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Sample records for quince cydonia oblonga

  1. Improved microsatellite markers for quince (Cydonia oblonga) genetic analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    he USDA National Clonal Germplasm Repository maintains a diverse living collection of 149 European quince (Cydonia oblonga) genotypes with origins from 16 countries. The collection is represented by one tree per accession on a 0.5 hectare orchard in Corvallis, Oregon. We previously used nine apple-d...

  2. Quince (Cydonia oblonga) emerges from the ashes of fire blight

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The two-decade history of fire blight in Bulgaria revealed quince as one of the most frequently attacked hosts and its production on a large scale has almost been entirely eliminated. Nevertheless, this species will play an important epidemiological role as a permanent source of inoculum for other p...

  3. Quince (Cydonia oblonga Miller) peel polyphenols modulate LPS-induced inflammation in human THP-1-derived macrophages through NF-{kappa}B, p38MAPK and Akt inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Essafi-Benkhadir, Khadija; Refai, Amira; Riahi, Ichrak

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quince peel polyphenols inhibit LPS-induced secretion of TNF-{alpha} and IL-8. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quince peel polyphenols augment LPS-induced secretion of IL-10 and IL-6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quince peel polyphenols-mediated inhibition of LPS-induced secretion of TNF-{alpha} is partially mediated by IL-6. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The anti-inflammatory effects of quince polyphenols pass through NF-{kappa}B, p38MAPK and Akt inhibition. -- Abstract: Chronic inflammation is a hallmark of several pathologies, such as rheumatoid arthritis, gastritis, inflammatory bowel disease, atherosclerosis and cancer. A wide range of anti-inflammatory chemicals have been used to treat such diseases while presenting high toxicity and numerous side effects. Here, we report the anti-inflammatory effectmore » of a non-toxic, cost-effective natural agent, polyphenolic extract from the Tunisian quince Cydonia oblonga Miller. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment of human THP-1-derived macrophages induced the secretion of high levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-{alpha} and the chemokine IL-8, which was inhibited by quince peel polyphenolic extract in a dose-dependent manner. Concomitantly, quince polyphenols enhanced the level of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 secreted by LPS-treated macrophages. We further demonstrated that the unexpected increase in IL-6 secretion that occurred when quince polyphenols were associated with LPS treatment was partially responsible for the polyphenols-mediated inhibition of TNF-{alpha} secretion. Biochemical analysis showed that quince polyphenols extract inhibited the LPS-mediated activation of three major cellular pro-inflammatory effectors, nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B), p38MAPK and Akt. Overall, our data indicate that quince peel polyphenolic extract induces a potent anti-inflammatory effect that may prove useful for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and that a quince

  4. Antioxidant properties and cytotoxic effects on human cancer cell lines of aqueous fermented and lipophilic quince (Cydonia oblonga Mill.) preparations.

    PubMed

    Pacifico, Severina; Gallicchio, Marialuisa; Fiorentino, Antonio; Fischer, Anna; Meyer, Ulrich; Stintzing, Florian Conrad

    2012-11-01

    In the course of a screening program on quince phytochemicals, two complex preparations were in the focus of the present study, i.e., a lipophilic quince wax extract (QWE) and an aqueous fermented one (QAFE). While the phytochemical composition has been described earlier, the intention of the current investigation was to complement these data with an extensive antioxidant screening of these preparations including their radical scavenging and reductive power as well as their antilipoperoxidative properties. The Quince Aqueous Fermented Extract (QAFE) effectively scavenged the radical target species exhibiting ID(50) values equal to 68.8 μg/mL towards DPPH· and 73.7 μg/mL towards the anion superoxide radical. Quince wax extract (QWE) was more effective at preventing the formation of thiobarbituric reactive species than QAFE exhibiting an ID(50) value equal to 48.9 μg/mL. Moreover the cytotoxic effects towards human HepG2, A549, and HeLa cell lines were evaluated. The two preparations exerted a different effect on the proliferation of the three tested cell lines. Noteworthy, QAFE was almost always more active than QWE but, sometimes, its effects seemed to be strongly dependent on exposure time. Data obtained demonstrate clearly that both hydrophilic and lipophilic quince preparations are non-toxic and exert health-promoting properties. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of supercritical fluid extraction and ultrasound-assisted extraction of fatty acids from quince (Cydonia oblonga Miller) seed using response surface methodology and central composite design.

    PubMed

    Daneshvand, Behnaz; Ara, Katayoun Mahdavi; Raofie, Farhad

    2012-08-24

    Fatty acids of Cydonia oblonga Miller cultivated in Iran were obtained by supercritical (carbon dioxide) extraction and ultrasound-assisted extraction methods. The oils were analyzed by capillary gas chromatography using mass spectrometric detections. The compounds were identified according to their retention indices and mass spectra (EI, 70eV). The experimental parameters of SFE such as pressure, temperature, modifier volume, static and dynamic extraction time were optimized using a Central Composite Design (CCD) after a 2(5) factorial design. Pressure and dynamic extraction time had significant effect on the extraction yield, while the other factors (temperature, static extraction time and modifier volume) were not identified as significant factors under the selected conditions. The results of chemometrics analysis showed the highest yield for SFE (24.32%), which was obtained at a pressure of 353bar, temperature of 35°C, modifier (methanol) volume of 150μL, and static and dynamic extraction times of 10 and 60min, respectively. Ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) of Fatty acids from C. oblonga Miller was optimized, using a rotatable central composite design. The optimum conditions were as follows: solvent (n-hexane) volume, 22mL; extraction time, 30min; and extraction temperature, 55°C. This resulted in a maximum oil recovery of 19.5%. The extracts with higher yield from both methods were subjected to transesterification and GC-MS analysis. The results show that the oil obtained by SFE with the optimal operating conditions allowed a fatty acid composition similar to the oil obtained by UAE in optimum condition and no significant differences were found. The major components of oil extract were Linoleic, Palmitic, Oleic, Stearic and Eicosanoic acids. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Cydonia oblonga M., A Medicinal Plant Rich in Phytonutrients for Pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Muhammad U.; Muhammad, Gulzar; Hussain, Muhammad A.; Bukhari, Syed N. A.

    2016-01-01

    Cydonia oblonga M. is a medicinal plant of family Rosaceae which is used to prevent or treat several ailments such as cancer, diabetes, hepatitis, ulcer, respiratory, and urinary infections, etc. Cydonia oblonga commonly known as Quince is rich in useful secondary metabolites such as phenolics, steroids, flavonoids, terpenoids, tannins, sugars, organic acids, and glycosides. A wide range of pharmacological activities like antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal, anti-inflammatory, hepatoprotective, cardiovascular, antidepressant, antidiarrheal, hypolipidemic, diuretic, and hypoglycemic have been ascribed to various parts of C. oblonga. The polysaccharide mucilage, glucuronoxylan extruded from seeds of C. oblonga is used in dermal patches to heal wounds. This review focuses on detailed investigations of high-valued phytochemicals as well as pharmacological and phytomedicinal attributes of the plant. PMID:27445806

  7. Relative Susceptibility of Quince, Pear, and Apple Cultivars to Fire Blight Following Greenhouse Inoculation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fire blight caused by Erwinia amylovora (EA) is one of the most serious diseases of plants in the family Rosaceae, and Quince (Cydonia oblonga Mill.) is considered one of the most susceptible host genera. Apple (Malus sp.) and pear (Pyrus sp.) cultivars ranging from most susceptible to most resistan...

  8. Cydonia Landscape

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-19

    The Cydonia region on Mars, seen in this image from NASA Mars Odyssey spacecraft, straddles the boundary between the bright, dusty, cratered highlands to the southeast and the dark, relatively dust-free, lowland plains to the west.

  9. Cydonia Craters

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-03-22

    In this image from NASA Mars Odyssey, eroded mesas and secondary craters dot the landscape in an area of Cydonia Mensae. The single oval-shaped crater displays a butterfly ejecta pattern, indicating that the crater formed from a low-angle impact.

  10. Cydonia Craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Eroded mesas and secondary craters dot the landscape in this area of the Cydonia Mensae region. The single oval-shaped crater displays a 'butterfly' ejecta pattern, indicating that the crater formed from a low-angle impact.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 32.9, Longitude 343.8 East (16.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

  11. Cydonia Landscape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The Cydonia region on Mars straddles the boundary between the bright, dusty, cratered highlands to the southeast and the dark, relatively dust-free, lowland plains to the west. The countless mesas and buttes that cover the region are testament to the former presence of vast layers of material that have been stripped back over the eons leaving the isolated remnants seen in this THEMIS image. Evidence of larger masses of these remnants is visible to the south in the MOLA context image. Note the lobes of ejecta emanating from the large crater in the upper right of the THEMIS image. This style of ejecta is thought to arise when an impact occurs into water or ice-rich material, indicating that at least at the time of the impact such material was present.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  12. Crater in Cydonia

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-12-16

    This image shows the dissected interior of a crater in the Cydonia region of Mars. The flat-topped buttes and mesas in the northern portion of the image were once a continuous layer of material that filled the crater. Since deposition, the material has been disturbed and dissected. The process that causes such landforms is not well known, but likely involves frozen subsurface water that may have found its way to the surface. The surfaces on the mesas are not rough, suggesting that the whole scene is mantled with fine dust, masking the details that may give clues to whether surface water was involved at some point in the past. Small recent channels can be seen in the lower left. This is an indication of relatively recent small-scale surface activity, which has been could have been volcanic, fluvial, or some process involving subsurface volatiles (ice). http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA04030

  13. 21 CFR 182.40 - Natural extractives (solvent-free) used in conjunction with spices, seasonings, and flavorings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the Act, are as follows: Common name Botanical name of plant source Apricot kernel (persic oil) Prunus armeniaca L. Peach kernel (persic oil) Prunus persica Sieb. et Zucc. Peanut stearine Arachis hypogaea L. Persic oil (see apricot kernel and peach kernel) Quince seed Cydonia oblonga Miller. [42 FR 14640, Mar...

  14. Field Susceptibility of Quince Hybrids to Fire Blight in Bulgaria

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Spread of fire blight in Bulgaria during the last 20 years has nearly eliminated commercial production of pear and quince. Damage has increased in both nurseries and orchards, yet susceptible cultivars continue to be planted. Quince is the host most frequently attacked by Erwinia amylovora in Bulgar...

  15. Curvilinear ridges and related features in southwest Cydonia Mensae, Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Timothy J.; Schneeberger, Dale M.; Pieri, David C.; Saunders, R. Stephen

    1987-01-01

    Examined is a region on Mars in southwest Cydonia Mensae (32 deg lat., 17 deg long.) just northwest of the lowland/upland boundary escarpment. The dominant morphological features in this region are the clusters of large massifs and plateau outliers (PI), knobby material (K), and smooth lowland plains (Ps). Surrounding the clusters and linking many isolated knobs is a system of curvilinear ridges and arcuate terrain boundaries which tend to separate the massifs and knobs from the smooth plains. Curvilinear ridges are arcuate to nearly linear and smoother in plan than wrinkle ridges and show no apparent correlation with regional structural grain. They are typically 5 to 10 km long but can range from as little as 2 or 3 km to greater than 50 km long. The widths vary from about 100 m to as much as 2 km. Curvilinear ridges are most numerous within 100 km of the lowland/upland boundary escarpment and are associated with massifs and knobby terrain. Arcuate terrain boundaries appear between units of different apparent albedo or arcuate breaks in slope.

  16. Extract of Salacia oblonga lowers acute glycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jennifer A; Choe, Yong S; Noss, Michael J; Baumgartner, Carl J; Mustad, Vikkie A

    2007-07-01

    Two previous studies tested the efficacy of Salacia oblonga extract in healthy adults. This study evaluated the effect of an herbal extract of Salacia oblonga on postprandial glycemia and insulinemia in patients with type 2 diabetes after ingestion of a high-carbohydrate meal. Sixty-six patients with diabetes were studied in this randomized, double-blinded crossover study. In a fasted state, subjects consumed 1 of the following 3 meals: a standard liquid control meal, a control meal + 240 mg Salacia oblonga extract, and a control meal + 480 mg Salacia oblonga extract. Serum glucose and insulin samples were measured at baseline and at postprandial intervals up to 180 min. Both doses of the Salacia extract significantly lowered the postprandial positive area under the glucose curve (14% for the 240 mg extract and 22% for the 480 mg extract) and the adjusted peak glucose response (19% for the lower dose and 27% for the higher dose of extract) to the control meal. In addition, both doses of the herbal extract significantly decreased the postprandial insulin response, lowering both the positive area under the insulin curve and the adjusted peak insulin response (14% and 9%, respectively, for the 240 mg extract; 19% and 12%, respectively, for the 480 mg extract) in comparison with the control meal. The extract of Salacia oblonga lowers acute glycemia and insulinemia in persons with type 2 diabetes after a high-carbohydrate meal. The results from this study suggest that Salacia may be beneficial to this population for postprandial glucose control.

  17. Hydrovolcanic Landforms in Acidalia and Cydonia: Pan-Spectral Analysis with MGS MOC, MOLA, and TES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrand, W. H.; Gaddis, L. R.; Blundell, S.

    2002-01-01

    Landforms resembling tuyas and moberg hills and ridges in Acidalia and Cydonia are examined using MGS MOC, MOLA, and TES data. Using multiple datasets provides additional constraints on the question of whether these landforms are hydrovolcanic in origin. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. Antimicrobial flavonoids isolated from Indian medicinal plant Scutellaria oblonga inhibit biofilms formed by common food pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, Narendran; Subramaniam, Shankar; Christena, Lowrence Rene; Muthuraman, Meenakshi Sundaram; Subramanian, Nagarajan Sai; Pemiah, Brindha; Sivasubramanian, Aravind

    2016-09-01

    Scutellaria oblonga Benth., a hitherto phytochemically unexplored Indian medicinal folklore plant was extracted with acetone and subjected to chromatography to yield nine flavonoids, for the first time from this plant. Antimicrobial assays were performed against 11 foodborne pathogens, and three molecules (Techtochrysin, Negletein and Quercitin-3-glucoside) depicted significant activity. These molecules were assessed for their rate of antibacterial action using time-kill curves which depicted complete inhibition of most of the bacteria within 12-16 h. The significant biofilm-reducing capability exhibited by these three molecules formed a significant finding of the current study. In most of the experiments, a 90-95% reduction in biofilms was observed. Thus, flavonoids as natural molecules from S. oblonga could be further researched to be used as potent antimicrobial and antibiofilm agents.

  19. Beyond Parasitism: Hepatic Lesions in Stranded Harbor Porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) Without Trematode (Campula oblonga) Infections.

    PubMed

    Hiemstra, S; Harkema, L; Wiersma, L C M; Keesler, R I

    2015-11-01

    The liver can be an indicator of the health of an individual or of a group, which can be especially important to identify agents that can cause disease in multiple species. To better characterize hepatic lesions in stranded harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena), we analyzed the livers from 39 porpoises that stranded along the Dutch coast between December 2008 and December 2012. The animals were selected because they had either gross or histologic liver lesions with minimal autolysis and no evidence of trematode (Campula oblonga) infection. The most common finding was a chronic hepatitis (22/39, 56.4%) that was often associated with significant disease reported in another organ system (18/22, 81.8%), of which 14 had chronic systemic disease. One case of chronic hepatitis was so severe as to mimic lymphoma, which could only be differentiated with immunohistochemistry. The other common lesions were lipidosis (11/39, 28.2%) and acute hepatitis (6/39, 15.4%), often in combination with mild chronic changes. Overall, although there were no consistent trends in etiology for the hepatic lesions, lipidosis was associated with starvation (8/11, 72.7%) and acute disease, and acute hepatitis was associated with bacterial infections and sepsis (6/6, 100%). © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Structural characterization of Chinese quince fruit lignin pretreated with enzymatic hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhao; Wang, Xue-De; Liu, Hua-Min; Wang, Dong-Min; Qin, Guang-Yong

    2018-08-01

    Lignin is an increasingly valuable raw material for industrial, pharmaceutical and the food industries; natural antioxidants are also being used more and more widely. The Chinese quince fruits have an abundance of lignins with antioxidant properties; however, the lignins cannot be isolated by the methods conventionally used on other sources (e.g., wood, straw). In this investigation, multi-enzymatic hydrolytic pretreatments were used to isolate lignins from Chinese quince fruit, and the structures of these multi-enzyme mixture lignin (EML) fractions were then analyzed and compared with conventional cellulolytic enzyme lignin (CEL). EML fractions are structurally similar to CEL fractions except for an increased S/G ratio, greater number of β-O-4 linkages, higher average molecular weight and decreased thermal stability. The EML-2 fraction in particular seemed most representative of the lignins isolated, and it exhibited the highest antioxidant activity in comparison with CEL and other EML fractions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Structure characterization and antioxidant activity of polysaccharides from Chinese quince seed meal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Liu, Hua-Min; Qin, Guang-Yong

    2017-11-01

    In the present study, three polysaccharide fractions, QSMP-1, QSMP-2, and QSMP-3, were isolated and purified from the seed meal of Chinese quince. These fractions' structures were investigated by high performance anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC), gel permeation chromatography (GPC), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and their antioxidant activities were assessed. The results showed that QSMP-1 is a novel polysaccharide with a backbone mainly composed of →4)-Glcp-(1→, →6)-Glcp-(1→, →6)-Galp-(1→, →2, 3, 4)-Xylp-(1→. The side chains consist of →4)-Arap-(1→, →3, 4)-Arap-(1→, →2)-Galp-(1→, →4)-Manp-(1→, →3)-Galp-(1→, and →3, 6)-Glcp-(1→ with the non-reducing terminals Glcp and Galp. QSMP-1 exhibited effective antioxidant activities by ferrous ion chelation and superoxide anion-scavenging in a dose-dependent manner. These investigations of the polysaccharides from the seed meal of Chinese quince provide a scientific basis for the use of the by-products of quince seed oil processing, particularly as an ingredient in functional foods and medicines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Kinetics, biocompounds, antioxidant activity, and sensory attributes of quinces as affected by drying method.

    PubMed

    Szychowski, Przemysław J; Lech, Krzysztof; Sendra-Nadal, Esther; Hernández, Francisca; Figiel, Adam; Wojdyło, Aneta; Carbonell-Barrachina, Ángel A

    2018-07-30

    Quinces are attracting interest due to their health and nutritional benefits. Drying kinetics, bioactive compounds, antioxidant activity, and the main sensory parameters were determined in dried quinces, cultivar Leskovač, as affected by the drying method. The highest total polyphenols content was observed in dried samples obtained after freeze drying and convective drying at 50 °C. The best drying treatment, considering only sensory attributes, was vacuum-microwave drying at 480 W, because it led to intermediate dark color and high intensities of basic tastes and key flavor attributes. The studied parameters were finally used to recommend convective drying at 60 °C as the most appropriate drying method for quinces, because it had a high content of total phenolic compounds (2nd best treatment out of 10), a good sensory profile, was cheap, and caused no negative effects on nutritional or sensory parameters; the only disadvantage was its long drying time. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Antioxidant Bioactive Compounds Changes in Fruit of Quince Genotypes Over Cold Storage.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Samira; Koushesh Saba, Mahmoud; Mozafari, Ali Akbar; Abdollahi, Hamid

    2016-07-01

    Quince fruit has many benefits to human health and is excellent source of bioactive compounds. The fruit of 15 quince genotypes stored at 2 °C for 5 mo to study fruit quality changes during cold storage. Fruit were sampled monthly and stored at 20 °C for 24 h. Fruit ascorbic acid (AA), total phenol (TP), and total flavonoid (TF) concentrations, total antioxidant activity (TAA), flesh browning (FB) incidence, polyphenol oxidase (PPO), peroxidase (POX), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were measured during storage. A high variation in bioactive compounds was observed across genotypes. The range of 26.8 to 44.4 mg/100 g FW for AA, 86.7% to 98.2% for TAA, 157.7 to 380.7 mg GAE 100(-1) g FW for TP, and 5.3 to 10.7 mg/100 g FW for TF were observed across genotypes at harvest time. The overall AA, TAA, TP, TF, and SOD decreased while PPO and POX increased during storage. FB was first observed after 4 mo and increased thereafter while the FB index was different across genotypes. Higher bioactive content may prevent or reduce FB index so that a negative correlation was found between FB and AA, TAA, TP, TF, and SOD. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  4. Apron heights around stepped massifs in the Cydonia Mensae region: Do they record the local paleobathymetry of Oceanus Borealis?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, T. J.; Gorsline, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    The use of photoclinometry and shadow measurements to determine the basin volume without linking the measurements to a global datum is described. Since the boundary, or shoreline, of the basin cannot be tied to the datum and typically has no useful local relative height to measure, what is needed is a number of measurements of the height of the paleoshorelines distributed across the basin. Photoclinometric profiles are being compiled from Viking Orbiter images of the Cydonia Mensae region, which includes images with high sun elevations, necessary to avoid shadows, and images with low sun elevations, to enable the use of shadow measurements as an independent check, at high resolution (40 to 100 m/pixel). Both asymmetric and symmetric photoclinometric profile models are being used, and the results cross checked with one another to minimize errors. An apron-height map, potentially a paleobathymetric map of part of the margin of Oceanus Borealis, can be compiled from this data to determine whether variations in apron height are consistent with a lacustrine interpretation.

  5. Pitted cones and domes on Mars: Observations in Acidalia Planitia and Cydonia Mensae using MOC, THEMIS, and TES data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrand, W. H.; Gaddis, L.R.; Keszthelyi, L.

    2005-01-01

    Domes and cones with summit pits located in Acidalia Planitia and Cydonia Mensae were studied using MOC and THEMIS images and a TES-derived thermal inertia map. North of 40.5??N latitude, the features have a dome-like morphology, and south of that latitude, the morphology is more cone-like. Layering is apparent in the summit craters of fresher looking southern cones, and asymmetric aprons were observed in some instances. Some of the northern domes also display layering in their summit craters, but asymmetric aprons were not observed. The northern domes can also display multiple summit pits or no summit pits at all and can occur in association with higher-albedo "pancake" features. The northern domes are higher in albedo but have apparent thermal inertias that are lower than the surrounding plains. The apparent thermal inertia values of the southern cones range from values comparable to the surrounding plains to slightly lower. From the TES thermal inertia map, we infer that the thermal inertia values of the pitted cones are between those of basaltic fine dust and sand, while those of the surrounding plains are closer to that of basaltic sand. While a unique interpretation of the origin of the pitted cones is not possible with the available data, we do not find compelling evidence to suggest an origin related to either basaltic volcanism or ground-ice. Instead, an origin for these features through some combination of mud volcanism and evaporite deposition around geysers and/or springs is most consistent with the observations. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  6. Salacia oblonga root improves postprandial hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis in Zucker diabetic fatty rats: Activation of PPAR-{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Hsun-Wei Huang, Tom; Peng Gang; Qian Li, George

    Salacia oblonga (SO) root is an Ayurvedic medicine with anti-diabetic and anti-obese properties. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-{alpha}, a nuclear receptor, plays an important role in maintaining the homeostasis of lipid metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that chronic oral administration of the water extract from the root of SO to Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats, a genetic model of type 2 diabetes and obesity, lowered plasma triglyceride and total cholesterol (TC) levels, increased plasma high-density lipoprotein levels and reduced the liver contents of triglyceride, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and the ratio of fatty droplets to total tissue. By contrast, the extract hadmore » no effect on plasma triglyceride and TC levels in fasted ZDF rats. After olive oil administration to ZDF the extract also inhibited the increase in plasma triglyceride levels. These results suggest that SO extract improves postprandial hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis in ZDF rats. Additionally, SO treatment enhanced hepatic expression of PPAR-{alpha} mRNA and protein, and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 and acyl-CoA oxidase mRNAs in ZDF rats. In vitro, SO extract and its main component mangiferin activated PPAR-{alpha} luciferase activity in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and lipoprotein lipase mRNA expression and enzyme activity in THP-1 differentiated macrophages; these effects were completely suppressed by a selective PPAR-{alpha} antagonist MK-886. The findings from both in vivo and in vitro suggest that SO extract functions as a PPAR-{alpha} activator, providing a potential mechanism for improvement of postprandial hyperlipidemia and hepatic steatosis in diabetes and obesity.« less

  7. Content of bioactive compounds and antioxidant capacity of pumpkin puree enriched with japanese quince, cornelian cherry, strawberry and apples.

    PubMed

    Nawirska-Olszańska, Agnieszka; Biesiada, Anita; Sokół-Łętowska, Anna; Kucharska, Alicja Z

    2011-01-01

    When evaluated in terms of taste, smell or active ingredients, pumpkin in itself is not very attractive as a raw material. Hence, it is recommended to blend pumpkin with other fruits, which are aromatic, have a defined taste, and contain a large quantity of active ingredients and organic acids to improve its palatibility. The pumpkin chosen for the experiments was of the variety Karowita, of species Cucurbita maxima. Ten different of compositions were prepared for the purpose of the study: 10, 20 and 30% (w/w) of Japanese quince and cornelian cherry each, or 20 and 30% (w/w) of strawberry and apple each. The puree was then analysed for dry matter, extract, viscosity, colour, vitamin C, total polyphenols, carotenoids and DPPH. The highest content of vitamin C, which was in direct proportion to the quantity of the supplement added (17.88 to 23.43 mg·100 g(-1)), was detected in the quince-enriched puree. The lowest vitamin C content was determined in apple-enriched samples (1.36 to 1.6 mg·100 g(-1)). A similar pattern was observed with total polyphenols: the highest values were measured in quince-enriched puree, and the lowest in the puree supplemented with apple. Taking into account antioxidant properties of the samples, quince-enriched pumpkin puree was found to be the most attractive, and apple-enriched pumpkin puree the least attractive one. The results suggest a wide range of application for pumpkin puree enriched with various additives.

  8. Subcritical Fluid Extraction of Chinese Quince Seed: Optimization and Product Characterization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Wu, Min; Liu, Hua-Min; Ma, Yu-Xiang; Wang, Xue-De; Qin, Guang-Yong

    2017-03-25

    Chinese quince seed (CQS) is an underutilized oil source and a potential source of unsaturated fatty acids and α-tocopherol-rich oil. Subcritical fluid (SCF) extraction is executed at lower pressures and temperatures than the pressures and temperatures used in supercritical fluid extraction. However, no studies on the SCF extraction of CQS oil are reported. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the use of SCF for the extraction of CQS oil and to compare the use of SCF with the classical Soxhlet (CS) and supercritical CO₂ (SC-CO₂) extraction methods. Response surface methodology (RSM) was used to investigate the extraction conditions: temperature (45-65 °C), time (30-50 min), and solvent/solid ratio (5-15 mL/g). The optimization results showed that the highest yield (27.78%) was obtained at 56.18 °C, 40.20 min, and 12.57 mL/g. The oil extracted by SCF had a higher unsaturated fatty acid content (86.37%-86.75%), higher α-tocopherol content (576.0-847.6 mg/kg), lower acid value (3.97 mg/g), and lower peroxide value (0.02 meq O₂/kg) than extractions using CS and SC-CO 2 methods. The SCF-defatted meal of oilseed exhibited the highest nitrogen solubility index (49.64%) and protein dispersibility index (50.80%), demonstrating that SCF extraction was a promising and efficient technique as an alternative to CS and SC-CO 2 methods, as very mild operating conditions and an eco-friendly solvent can be used in the process with maximum preservation of the quality of the meal.

  9. Biological Activity of Japanese Quince Extract and Its Interactions with Lipids, Erythrocyte Membrane, and Human Albumin.

    PubMed

    Strugała, Paulina; Cyboran-Mikołajczyk, Sylwia; Dudra, Anna; Mizgier, Paulina; Kucharska, Alicja Z; Olejniczak, Teresa; Gabrielska, Janina

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine in vitro biological activity of fruit ethanol extract from Chaenomeles speciosa (Sweet) Nakai (Japanese quince, JQ) and its important constituents (-)-epicatechin (EC) and chlorogenic acid (CA). The study also investigated the structural changes in phosphatidylcholine (PC) liposomes, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine liposomes, and erythrocyte membranes (RBC) induced by the extract. It was found that the extract effectively inhibits oxidation of RBC, induced by 2,2'-azobis (2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH), and PC liposomes, induced by UVB radiation and AAPH. Furthermore, JQ extract to a significant degree inhibited the activity of the enzymes COX-1 and COX-2, involved in inflammatory reactions. The extract has more than 2 times greater activity in relation to COX-2 than COX-1 (selectivity ratio 0.48). JQ extract stimulated growth of the beneficial intestinal bacteria Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus plantarum. In the fluorimetric method by means of the probes Laurdan, DPH and TMA-DPH, and (1)H-NMR, we examined the structural changes induced by JQ and its EC and CA components. The results show that JQ and its components induce a considerable increase of the packing order of the polar heads of lipids with a slight decrease in mobility of the acyl chains. Lipid membrane rigidification could hinder the diffusion of free radicals, resulting in inhibition of oxidative damage induced by physicochemical agents. JQ extract has the ability to quench the intrinsic fluorescence of human serum albumin through static quenching. This report thus could be of huge significance in the food industry, pharmacology, and clinical medicine.

  10. Influence of rootstocks on growth, yield, fruit quality and leaf mineral element contents of pear cv. 'Santa Maria' in semi-arid conditions.

    PubMed

    Ikinci, Ali; Bolat, Ibrahim; Ercisli, Sezai; Kodad, Ossama

    2014-12-16

    Rootstocks play an essential role to determining orchard performance of fruit trees. Pyrus communis and Cydonia oblonga are widely used rootstocks for European pear cultivars. The lack of rootstocks adapted to different soil conditions and different grafted cultivars is widely acknowledged in pear culture. Cydonia rootstocks (clonal) and Pyrus rootstocks (seedling or clonal) have their advantages and disadvantages. In each case, site-specific environmental characteristics, specific cultivar response and production objectives must be considered before choosing the best rootstock. In this study, the influence of three Quince (BA 29, Quince A = MA, Quince C = MC) and a local European pear seedling rootstocks on the scion yield, some fruit quality characteristics and leaf macro (N, P, K, Ca and Mg) and micro element (Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn and B) content of 'Santa Maria' pear (Pyrus communis L.) were investigated. Trees on seedling rootstock had the highest annual yield, highest cumulative yield (kg tree(-1)), largest trunk cross-sectional area (TCSA), lowest yield efficiency and lowest cumulative yield (ton ha(-1)) in the 10(th) year after planting. The rootstocks had no significant effect on average fruit weight and fruit volume. Significantly higher fruit firmness was obtained on BA 29 and Quince A. The effect of rootstocks on the mineral element accumulation (N, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn and B) was significant. Leaf analysis showed that rootstocks used had different mineral uptake efficiencies throughout the early season. The results showed that the rootstocks strongly affected fruit yield, fruit quality and leaf mineral element uptake of 'Santa Maria' pear cultivar. Pear seedling and BA 29 rootstock found to be more prominent in terms of several characteristics for 'Santa Maria' pear cultivar that is grown in highly calcareous soil in semi-arid climate conditions. We determined the highest N, P (although insignificant), K, Ca, Mg, Fe and Cu mineral element concentrations

  11. The effect of water stress on some morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics and bud success on apple and quince rootstocks.

    PubMed

    Bolat, Ibrahim; Dikilitas, Murat; Ercisli, Sezai; Ikinci, Ali; Tonkaz, Tahsin

    2014-01-01

    The effects of different water stress (control, medium, and severe) on some morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics and bud success of M9 apple and MA quince rootstocks were determined. The results showed that water stress significantly affected most morphological, physiological, and biochemical characteristics as well as budding success on the both rootstocks. The increasing water stress decreased the relative shoot length, diameter, and plant total fresh and dry weights. Leaf relative water content and chlorophyll index decreased while electrolyte leakage increased with the increase of water stress in both rootstocks. An increase in water stress also resulted in reduction in budding success in Vista Bella/M9 (79.33% and 46.67%) and Santa Maria/MA (70.33% and 15.33%) combinations. However, the water stress in Santa Maria/MA was more prominent. The increase in water stress resulted in higher peroxidase activities as well as phenol contents in both rootstocks. Although catalase activity, anthocyanin, and proline contents increased with the impact of stress, this was not statistically significant. The results suggest that the impact of stress increased with the increase of water stress; therefore, growers should be careful when using M9 and MA rootstocks in both nursery and orchards where water scarcity is present.

  12. Flavanols from Japanese quince (Chaenomeles japonica) fruit suppress expression of cyclooxygenase-2, metalloproteinase-9, and nuclear factor-kappaB in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Owczarek, Katarzyna; Hrabec, Elżbieta; Fichna, Jakub; Sosnowska, Dorota; Koziołkiewicz, Maria; Szymański, Jacek; Lewandowska, Urszula

    2017-01-01

    Natural polyphenols and polyphenol-rich extracts have been found to possess preventive and therapeutic potential against several types of cancers, including colorectal cancer (CRC), which is an example of an inflammation-associated cancer. This study examines the chemopreventive effect of a Japanese quince (Chaenomeles japonica) fruit flavanol preparation (JQFFP) on colon cancer SW-480 cells. JQFFP, rich in procyanidin monomers and oligomers, was found to inhibit the SW-480 cell viability by 40% at 150 µM catechin equivalents (CE) after 72 h incubation when compared to control, but it was non-toxic to normal colon fibroblast CCD-18Co cells. Furthermore, 100 µM CE JQFFP suppressed COX-2 mRNA expression to 36.7% of control values and protein expression to 77%. In addition, JQFFP reduced the MMP-9 protein expression (to 24% vs. control at 100 µM CE) and caused inhibition of its enzymatic activity (to 35% vs. control at 100 µM CE). Not only did JQFFP inhibit the COX-2 and MMP-9 levels, but it also reduced the NF-κB protein expression (to 65% of control) and phosphorylation of its p65 subunit (to 51%) at 100 µM CE. These results provide the first evidence that JQFFP inhibits COX-2, MMP-9, and NF-κB expression, suggesting that it has cytotoxic, anti-inflammatory, and anti-metastatic activities towards the colon cancer SW-480 cells.

  13. Effect of quince seed mucilage edible films incorporated with oregano or thyme essential oil on shelf life extension of refrigerated rainbow trout fillets.

    PubMed

    Jouki, Mohammad; Yazdi, Farideh Tabatabaei; Mortazavi, Seyed Ali; Koocheki, Arash; Khazaei, Naimeh

    2014-03-17

    The effects of quince seed mucilage film (QSMF) containing oregano (O) or thyme (T) essential oil on shelf life extension of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fillets during refrigerated storage (4°C) were evaluated over a period of 18days. Films were prepared in four different concentrations of essential oils, including 0, 1, 1.5 and 2%. The control and the wrapped fillet samples were analyzed periodically for microbiological (aerobic and psychrotrophic count, Pseudomonas spp., H2S-producing bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, and Enterobacteriaceae), chemical (TBA, TVB-N, TMA-N), and sensory characteristics. Bacteria grew most quickly in trout fillets stored in air, followed by those wrapped with QSMF and the lowest counts were in wrapped samples with QSMF+2%T. Pseudomonas spp., Enterobacteriaceae and LAB counts were significantly lower in samples wrapped with QSMF+2%T. The lowest TBA value was obtained in fillets wrapped QSMF containing 2% oregano essential oil. The strong antioxidant activity of QSMF+2%O was related to the composition of oregano essential oil. The GC analysis of essential oil components revealed that carvacrol (81.85%) was the major component of oregano essential oil. TBA value varied for all treatments and remained lower than 2mg MDA/kg throughout storage. The formation of TVB-N, TMA-N increased with time of storage. TVB-N and TMA-N correlated well with the microbiological data, indicating that along with TVB-N, TMA-N may serve as a useful index for fillets spoilage. QSMF extended the microbial shelf life of rainbow trout fillets by 2days, whereas the QSMF+1%O, QSMF+1.5%O, QSMF+2%O, QSMF+1%T, QSMF+1.5%T and QSMF+2%T resulted in a significant shelf life extension of the trout fillets by 3, 5, 9, 6, 10 and 11days, respectively, as compared to the control samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Liquid crystal-type assembly of native cellulose-glucuronoxylans extracted from plant cell wall.

    PubMed

    Reis, D; Vian, B; Chanzy, H; Roland, J C

    1991-01-01

    In numerous plant cell walls, the cellulose microfibrils are arranged in a helicoidal pattern which has been considered as an analog to a cholesteric order. Here, we report on the spontaneous helicoidal organization which occurs in acellular conditions from aqueous suspensions of cellulose. The cellulosic mucilage of mature seeds of quince (Cydonia oblonga L) was studied both in situ (pre-release mucilage) and after water extraction and in in vitro re-assembly (prolonged high speed ultracentrifugation, further progressive dehydration and embedding in LR White methacrylate or hydrosoluble melamine resin). The cellulosic component was characterized by the use of cellobiohydrolase (CBH1) bound to colloidal gold, and the glucuronic acid residues of the xylan matrix were characterized by the use of cationised gold. Inside the seeds, the pre-release mucilage is mostly helicoidal, with the occurrence of more or less ordered domains, which indicate a fluid organization relevant to an actual liquid crystal state. Cytochemical tests revealed the tight association between cellulose and glucuronoxylans, the latter constituting a charged coat around each microfibril. Following the hydration of the seed, a cellulosic suspension was extracted in which microfibrils were totally dispersed. The progressive dehydration of the suspension gave rise to concentrated viscous drops. Ultrastructural observations revealed the occurrence of multidomain organization, from non-ordered to cholesteric-like regions, revealing that the mucilage is at the same time crystalline and liquid. This constitutes the first demonstration that liquid crystal type assemblies can arise from crystalline and biological cellulose in aqueous suspension. It strengthens the hypothesis that a transient liquid crystal state must occur during the cellulose ordering. The possible morphogenetic role of the glucuronoxylans in the cholesteric organization of the cellulose is discussed.

  15. A Youthful Crater in the Cydonia Colles Region

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-11-27

    The central portion of this image from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter is dominated by a sharp-rimmed crater that is roughly 5 kilometers in diameter. On its slopes, gullies show young (i.e., geologically recent) headward erosion, which is the lengthening of the gully in the upslope direction. This crater is also remarkable for another reason. This image is part of a stereo pair, and the anaglyph of these images shows that the bottom of the crater contains a small mound. This mound hints at a possible complex crater, with the mound being a central uplift. Complex craters as small as this one are uncommon and such examples may provide clues to the lithology of the rocks underground and possibly to the impact process itself. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA20158

  16. QUINCE System; State-of-the-Art Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-06-01

    linguistic data base in terms of semantic feature set, interlingual transfer component, contrastive lexical/syntactic studies and contextual analysis ...and Syntactical Studies 3.3.1 Contrastlve Lexical Studies 3.3.2 Contrastlve Syntactic Studies 3.4 Contextual Analysis 3.4.1 Elided Subjects...and English, combined with contextual analysis of language- specific characteristics of Chinese ^re offered as the most promising solutions In this

  17. [The in vitro action of plants on Vibrio cholerae].

    PubMed

    Guevara, J M; Chumpitaz, J; Valencia, E

    1994-01-01

    Natural products of several plants, according to the geographic location, are used by Peruvian people in the popular treatment of diarrhea, with good success. When cholerae cases appeared in Peru, we were interested to know the "in vitro" effect against Vibrio cholerae 01, of these useful plants to treat diarrhea. The following plants were tested: Cichorium intybus, Althaea officinalis, Psorela glandulosa, Geranium maculatum, Punica granatum, Malus sativa, Cydonia oblonga, Chenopodium ambrosoides, Krameria triandria, Tea chinensis, Daucus carota, Persea gratissima, Psidium guayaba and Lippia dulcis. Decoction or infusion of the plants were used in the "in vitro" experiments. The following plants showed no "in vitro" effect against V. cholerae: Cichorium intybus, Althaea officinalis, Psorela glandulosa, Geranium maculatum, Chenopodium ambrosoides, Krameria triandria, Psidium guayaba, Lippia dulcis and Daucus carota. Decoction of Malus sativa and Cydenia oblonga showed bactericidal effect for their acidity and stone avocado (Persea gratissima) a late bactericidal effect. Tea infusión and the decoction of Punica granatum peel, showed the best bactericidal effect and we suggest to use them as to stop cholera spreading.

  18. Medicinal Plants for Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Review of Animal and Human Studies.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Mehdi; Karegar-Borzi, Hossein; Karimi, Mehrdad; Rahimi, Roja

    2017-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a prevalent gastrointestinal disease that causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications. The major therapeutic strategy for GERD focuses mainly on symptom alleviation using proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which does not produce a perfect response in all patients. An approach with new therapeutic agents for GERD seems to be essential. The aim of this study was to review animal and human studies investigating the effect of medicinal plants in GERD as well as mechanisms underlying their therapeutic effects. Medline, Scopus, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for animal or human studies. The data collected covered January 1966-October 2015. A total of 22 studies were included in this review, of which nine were animal studies and 13 were human studies. Ceratonia siliqua as a medicinal plant and rikkunshito as a multicomponent herbal preparation were the most frequently studied herbal medicines in GERD. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities were the main mechanisms demonstrated in animal studies for ameliorating the effects of medicinal plants in GERD. Other mechanisms include downregulation of genes encoding inflammatory proteins, improvement of barrier function and gastric mucus, a decrease in gastric acid, and induction of tonic contractions of the lower esophageal sphincter. All herbal preparations used in human studies have led to the alleviation of symptoms related to GERD. Myrtus communis and Cydonia oblonga showed marked reduction in GERD symptoms comparable to omeprazole. The therapeutic effect of Cydonia oblonga persisted after discontinuation of the drug. Tongjlang and rikkunshito showed therapeutic effects for non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) where PPIs failed to show a promising effect. Studies on Ceratonia siliqua have been solely focused on regurgitation in infants, and a remarkable decrease in the number of regurgitations was demonstrated. The multiple mechanisms of action

  19. Activity, polypeptide and gene identification of thylakoid Ndh complex in trees: potential physiological relevance of fluorescence assays.

    PubMed

    Serrot, Patricia H; Sabater, Bartolomé; Martín, Mercedes

    2012-09-01

    Three evergreen (Laurus nobilis, Viburnum tinus and Thuja plicata) and two autumnal abscission deciduous trees (Cydonia oblonga and Prunus domestica) have been investigated for the presence (zymogram and immunodetection) and functionality (post-illumination chlorophyll fluorescence) of the thylakoid Ndh complex. The presence of encoding ndh genes has also been investigated in T. plicata. Western assays allowed tentative identification of zymogram NADH dehydrogenase bands corresponding to the Ndh complex after native electrophoresis of solubilized fractions from L. nobilis, V. tinus, C. oblonga and P. domestica leaves, but not in those of T. plicata. However, Ndh subunits were detected after SDS-PAGE of thylakoid solubilized proteins of T. plicata. The leaves of the five plants showed the post-illumination chlorophyll fluorescence increase dependent on the presence of active Ndh complex. The fluorescence increase was higher in autumn in deciduous, but not in evergreen trees, which suggests that the thylakoid Ndh complex could be involved in autumnal leaf senescence. Two ndhB genes were sequenced from T. plicata that differ at the 350 bp 3' end sequence. Comparison with the mRNA revealed that ndhB genes have a 707-bp type II intron between exons 1 (723 bp) and 2 (729 bp) and that the UCA 259th codon is edited to UUA in mRNA. Phylogenetically, the ndhB genes of T. plicata group close to those of Metasequoia, Cryptomeria, Taxodium, Juniperus and Widdringtonia in the cupresaceae branch and are 5' end shortened by 18 codons with respect to that of angiosperms. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  20. Activity, polypeptide and gene identification of thylakoid Ndh complex in trees: potential physiological relevance of fluorescence assays

    PubMed Central

    Serrot, Patricia H; Sabater, Bartolomé; Martín, Mercedes

    2012-01-01

    Three evergreen (Laurus nobilis, Viburnum tinus and Thuja plicata) and two autumnal abscission deciduous trees (Cydonia oblonga and Prunus domestica) have been investigated for the presence (zymogram and immunodetection) and functionality (post-illumination chlorophyll fluorescence) of the thylakoid Ndh complex. The presence of encoding ndh genes has also been investigated in T. plicata. Western assays allowed tentative identification of zymogram NADH dehydrogenase bands corresponding to the Ndh complex after native electrophoresis of solubilized fractions from L. nobilis, V. tinus, C. oblonga and P. domestica leaves, but not in those of T. plicata. However, Ndh subunits were detected after SDS-PAGE of thylakoid solubilized proteins of T. plicata. The leaves of the five plants showed the post-illumination chlorophyll fluorescence increase dependent on the presence of active Ndh complex. The fluorescence increase was higher in autumn in deciduous, but not in evergreen trees, which suggests that the thylakoid Ndh complex could be involved in autumnal leaf senescence. Two ndhB genes were sequenced from T. plicata that differ at the 350 bp 3′ end sequence. Comparison with the mRNA revealed that ndhB genes have a 707-bp type II intron between exons 1 (723 bp) and 2 (729 bp) and that the UCA 259th codon is edited to UUA in mRNA. Phylogenetically, the ndhB genes of T. plicata group close to those of Metasequoia, Cryptomeria, Taxodium, Juniperus and Widdringtonia in the cupresaceae branch and are 5′ end shortened by 18 codons with respect to that of angiosperms. PMID:22324908

  1. Use of atomic absorption spectrometry in assessment of biomonitor plants for lead, cadmium and copper pollution.

    PubMed

    Gokce, Kaya; Mehmet, Yaman

    2012-01-01

    Eleven plant species were collected from the vicinity of lead-battery plant in the city of Gaziantep, Turkey. Lead, cadmium and copper concentrations in the soil and leaves of plants were determined by atomic absorption spectrometry. Lead, Cd and Cu concentrations in the soil samples taken from battery area were found to be in the ranges of 304-602, 0.4-0.44 and 31-37 mg x kg(-1), respectively. Significantly increased lead concentration up to 2 750 mg x kg(-1) was found in the leaves of Eleagnus angustifolia L. plant. The lead concentrations in the other plant leaves taken from 50 m around battery factory followed the order Ailanthus altissima > Morus sp. > Juglans regia L. > Ficus carica L. > Cydonia oblonga Miller > Prunus x domestica L. The plants, Populus nigra L. , Eleagnus angustifolia L. and Salix sp. were found useful for Cd, and the plant, Eleagnus angusti folia L. for Pb, to be considered as potential biomonitor. Especially, leaves of trees and plants taken from the distance of 50 m from battery plant have relatively higher Pb concentrations. Therefore, people who and animals which live in this area and benefit from these soil and plants have vital risks.

  2. Scientific evaluation of medicinal plants used for the treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding by Avicenna.

    PubMed

    Mobli, Masumeh; Qaraaty, Marzieh; Amin, Gholamreza; Haririan, Ismaeil; Hajimahmoodi, Mannan; Rahimi, Roja

    2015-07-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is one of the prevalent gynecological disorders that cause considerable morbidity and management of that plays an important role in protecting women's health. This review focuses on medicinal plants mentioned by Avicenna, a great Iranian philosopher and physician (A.D. 980-1037), in his book Canon for treatment of AUB. Medicinal plants mentioned in Canon for treatment of AUB were elicited and searched in electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, Google Scholar and Cochrane library to find studies that confirmed their efficacy. Data were collected for the years 1980-2014. The findings included 23 plants belonging to 18 families. Scientific findings have revealed that these plants control AUB through four mechanisms of action including inhibition of inflammatory process, inhibition of prostaglandins production, antiproliferative activity on human cervical cancer cells (HeLa), and estrogenic activity. All of the plants exhibited anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and/or in vivo. Cuscuta chinensis and Portulaca oleracea exhibited estrogenic activity. Boswellia carteri, Lens culinaris, Myrtus communis, Polygonum aviculare, Pistacia lentiscus, and Punica granatum have revealed inhibitory activity on biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Some of the mentioned plants including: Ceratonia siliqua, Cuscuta chinensis, Cuscuta epithymum, Cydonia oblonga, Paeonia sp., Portulaca oleracea, Solanum nigrum, Rumex acetosa and Onopordum acanthium have shown antiproliferative activity on HeLa cells. Investigation of traditional Iranian medicine literatures can lead to the identification of effective natural medicines for the management of AUB; however, conclusive confirmation of the efficacy and safety of these treatments needs more evaluations.

  3. News from Tartary: an ethnopharmacological approach to drug and therapeutic discovery

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Nawel; Berke, Benedicte; Umar, Anwar

    2016-01-01

    Ethnopharmacology aims to identify new therapeutic agents based on their traditional use. It begins by the identification of disease states, and of the traditional therapies for these, most commonly herbals. Herbals of interest are selected from ethnopharmacological surveys, and tested on experimental models of the diseases of interest. Once the activity of the traditional remedy is demonstrated, including dose‐dependence, if possible comparatively to reference medications, the active ingredients can be explored, if possible using bioguided extraction. Identified molecules can then be further developed as medicinal products or pharmaceutical medicines (e.g., artemisine), or the herbal product can be developed as such (e.g. St John's wort). We provide examples of various study programmes, concerning the antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of Armagnac extracts from Southwest France; antithrombotic and antihypertensive effects of extracts of Ocimum basilicum L; antithrombotic, antihypertensive and antihyperlipidemic effects of Cydonia oblonga; Antiproliferative and antithrombotic effects of Abnorma Savda Munziq of traditional Uyghur medicine; and the antidiabetic and hepatoprotective effects of Centaurium erythraea Rafn, Artemisia herba‐alba Asso and Trigonella foenum‐graecum L., all in collaboration between University of Bordeaux, France, Xinjiang Medical University in Urumqi, China and University Mentouri in Constantine, Algeria. PMID:27297624

  4. A mixture of Salacia oblonga extract and IP-PA1 reduces fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels

    PubMed Central

    Nakata, Kazue; Taniguchi, Yoshie; Yoshioka, Noriko; Yoshida, Aya; Inagawa, Hiroyuki; Nakamoto, Takeru; Yoshimura, Hiroshi; Miyake, Shin-ichiro; Kohchi, Chie; Kuroki, Masahide

    2011-01-01

    At present, lifestyle-related diseases are one of the most critical health issues worldwide. It has been reported that lipopolysaccharide derived from a Gram-negative bacteria (IP-PA1) symbiotic with wheat exhibited several advantageous biological effects, such as the reduction of plasma glucose levels in NOD mice and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels in WHHL rabbits. In this study, the beneficial effects on plasma glucose and lipids of a tea (SI tea) consisting of IP-PA1 and Salacia (which contains an inhibitor of α-glucosidase) were investigated in the KK-Ay/TaJcl type 2 diabetic model mice and in human subjects with premetabolic syndrome in a double-blind, randomized study. SI tea significantly decreased plasma glucose levels in KK-Ay/TaJcl mice. A clinical trial of SI tea was performed with 41 subjects between the ages of 40 and 69, who belonged either to a high plasma glucose group (HG: FPG 100-125 mg/dl) or to a hyperlipidemia group (HL: TG ≥ 150 mg/dl, or LDL ≥ 120 mg/dl, or HDL < 40 mg/dl). These subjects ingested either Salacia without IP-PA1 (the control) or SI tea. Blood samples were collected at 0, 30, and 60 days after initiating SI tea treatment, and were measured for FPG, HbA1c, TG, LDL, and HDL. These results showed that SI tea reduced FPG and HbA1c more rapidly than the control in the HL group, and also significantly improved LDL and HDL levels in the HG group. Thus, SI tea may be helpful in preventing lifestyle-related diseases. PMID:22125681

  5. Chinese vegetative materia medica in a venereological treatise by Jean Astruc from 1740.

    PubMed

    Drobnik, Jacek

    2016-07-01

    Historical medical sources can be still queried for forgotten cures and remedies. Traditional Chinese medicine has dealt with lues venerea (syphilis) since the Five Dynasties period (10th century). Chinese indigenous materia medica and remedies recorded, studied or imported by the Europeans can reveal known or quite unknown medicinal plants. The studied Jean Astruc's work is a published ethnopharmacological survey carried out in Beijing in the 1730s and it deserves a modern interpretation. This is the first proposal to identify historical Chinese medicinal plants listed in a scarcely known medical treatise De Morbis venereis… ('On venereal diseases…') by Jean Astruc from 1740. I searched for the current uses and position of the taxonomically identified herbal stock in both traditional Chinese and official medical knowledge, with special attention to syphilis. Chinese names of drugs and their botanical identities (originally expressed by means of pre-Linnaean polynomials, and now interpreted as accepted binomials) were independently cross-checked with younger till most recent taxonomical and ethnopharmacological sources. Plants and drugs identified this way were queried for their modern applications in traditional Chinese and official medicine with special attention to sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and other uses which are similar to the 18th-century understanding of venereology. For 24 items of medicinal stock, 34 medicinal plants have been identified or suspected: Acacia catechu, Achyranthes bidentata, Akebia quinata, Angelica dahurica, A. sinensis, Aquilaria sinensis, Aralia cordata, Aristolochia fangchi, Chaenomeles sinensis, Ch. speciosa, Clematis vitalba, Coix lacryma-jobi, Commiphora myrrha, Cydonia oblonga, Daemonorops draco, D. jenkinsiana, Dictamnus dasycarpus, Dryobalanops sumatrensis, Forsythia suspensa, Glycyrrhiza uralensis, Lonicera confusa, L. hypoglauca, L. japonica, Ligusticum striatum (=L. chuanxiong), Piper kadsura, Pterocarpus

  6. Lectins in fruits having gastrointestinal activity: their participation in the hemagglutinating property of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Coutiño-Rodríguez, R; Hernández-Cruz, P; Giles-Ríos, H

    2001-01-01

    In fruits with therapeutic properties for antidiarrheal and laxative uses, the presence of lectins may be the bioactive properties that interfere with bacterial adhesion, thought to be competition for glycoside signal sites in the attachment. This study identifies lectins in crude extracts from fruits such as Tamarindus indica (tamarind), Spontia vulgaris (plum), Psidium guava (guava), Mangifera indica (mango), Cydonia vulgaris (quince), and Crataegus mexicanus (tejocote). To verify the procedures, extracts from Ricinus communis (castor bean), Glycine max (soybean), Phaseolus vulgaris (beans), Vicia fava (fava bean), and Solanum tuberosum (potato) were used as controls for lectin activity. Both sources of lectins were analyzed to determine their participation in the host-parasite interaction, using as a model the hemagglutinating properties of Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHA). All extracts showed hemagglutination to group O erythrocytes test (HA) with the exception of mango. Two new galactose-specific lectins were identified from tamarind and guava. When analyzed for participation in EHA, only guava lectins inhibited this, while soybean lectin induced hemolysis; as both lectins bind to galactose, it is probable that their recognition occurs in different domains. Sugars involved in the attachment between Escherichia coli O157:H7 and red cells were identified and again, galactose in addition to mannose was found to be related in EHA. On the other hand, guava lectins also agglutinated E. coli O157:H7, perhaps due to the same galactose-specific lectin or to another type of lectin. In summary, guava has a galactose-specific lectin that prevents adhesion of E. coli O157:H7 to red cells; this lectin is mediated by galactose. Prevention could also be due to their capacity of agglutinating E. coli by guava lectins. Soybean lectin induced hemolysis only when bacteria was present, but not with floating secretions. This finding showed that guava is a source of lectin that can be

  7. 21 CFR 182.40 - Natural extractives (solvent-free) used in conjunction with spices, seasonings, and flavorings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... source Apricot kernel (persic oil) Prunus armeniaca L. Peach kernel (persic oil) Prunus persica Sieb. et Zucc. Peanut stearine Arachis hypogaea L. Persic oil (see apricot kernel and peach kernel) Quince seed...

  8. 21 CFR 182.40 - Natural extractives (solvent-free) used in conjunction with spices, seasonings, and flavorings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... source Apricot kernel (persic oil) Prunus armeniaca L. Peach kernel (persic oil) Prunus persica Sieb. et Zucc. Peanut stearine Arachis hypogaea L. Persic oil (see apricot kernel and peach kernel) Quince seed...

  9. 7 CFR 1560.2 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., fresh or chilled. 07.02 Tomatoes, fresh or chilled. 07.03 Onions, shallots, garlic, leeks, and other... chilled. 08.06.10 Grapes, fresh. 08.08.20 Pears and quinces, fresh. 08.09 Apricots, cherries, peaches...

  10. 21 CFR 182.40 - Natural extractives (solvent-free) used in conjunction with spices, seasonings, and flavorings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... source Apricot kernel (persic oil) Prunus armeniaca L. Peach kernel (persic oil) Prunus persica Sieb. et Zucc. Peanut stearine Arachis hypogaea L. Persic oil (see apricot kernel and peach kernel) Quince seed...

  11. Search for the viking 2 landing site.

    PubMed

    Masursky, H; Crabill, N L

    1976-10-01

    The search for the landing site of Viking 2 was more extensive than the search for the Viking 1 site. Seven times as much area (4.5 million square kilometers) was examined as for Viking 1. Cydonia (B1) and Capri (C1) sites were examined with the Viking 1 orbiter. The B latitude band (40 degrees to 50 degrees N) was selected before the final midcourse maneuver of Viking 2 because of its high scientific interest (that is, high atmospheric water content, surface temperature, possible near-surface permafrost, and a different geological domain). The Viking 1 orbiter continued photographing the Cydonia (B1) site to search for an area large and smooth enough on which to land (three-sigma ellipse; 100 by 260 kilometers); such an area was not found. The second spacecraft photographed and made infrared measurements in large areas in Arcadia (B2) and Utopia Planitia (B3). Both areas are highly textured, mottled cratered plains with abundant impact craters like Cydonia (B1), but smaller sectors in each area are partially mantled by wind-formed deposits. The thermal inertia, from which the grain size of surface material can be computed, and atmospheric water content were determined from the infrared observations. A region in Utopia Planitia, west of the crater Mie, was selected: the landing took place successfully on 3 September 1976 at 3:58:20 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time, earth received time.

  12. Search for the Viking 2 landing site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masursky, H.; Crabill, N.L.

    1976-01-01

    The search for the landing site of Viking 2 was more extensive than the search for the Viking 1 site. Seven times as much area (4.5 million square kilometers) was examined as for Viking 1. Cydonia (B1) and Capri (C1) sites were examined with the Viking 1 orbiter. The B latitude band (40?? to 50??N) was selected before the final midcourse maneuver of Viking 2 because of its high scientific interest (that is, high atmospheric water content, surface temperature, possible near-surface permafrost, and a different geological domain). The Viking 1 orbiter continued photographing the Cydonia (B1) site to search for an area large and smooth enough on which to land (three-sigma ellipse; 100 by 260 kilometers); such an area was not found. The second spacecraft photographed and made infrared measurements in large areas in Arcadia (B2) and Utopia Planitia (B3). Both areas are highly textured, mottled cratered plains with abundant impact craters like Cydonia (B1), but smaller sectors in each area are partially mantled by wind-formed deposits. The thermal inertia, from which the grain size of surface material can be computed, and atmospheric water content were determined from the infrared observations. A region in Utopia Planitia, west of the crater Mie, was selected: the landing took place successfully on 3 September 1976 at 3:58:20 p.m. Pacific Daylight Time, earth received time.

  13. The effect of chitosan and whey proteins-chitosan films on the growth of Penicillium expansum in apples.

    PubMed

    Simonaitiene, Dovile; Brink, Ieva; Sipailiene, Ausra; Leskauskaite, Daiva

    2015-05-01

    Penicillium expansum causes a major post-harvest disease of apples. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibition effect of chitosan and whey proteins-chitosan films containing different amounts of quince and cranberry juice against P. expansum on the simulation medium and on apples. The mechanical properties of films were also evaluated. The presence of cranberry and quince juice in the composition of chitosan and whey proteins-chitosan films caused a significant (P ≤ 0.05) increase in elasticity and decrease in tensile strength of films. Chitosan and whey proteins-chitosan films with quince and cranberry juice demonstrated a significant (P ≤ 0.05) inhibition effect against P. expansum growth on the simulated medium and apples. The presence of cranberry juice in the composition of chitosan and whey proteins-chitosan films resulted in a longer lag phase and a lower P. expansum growth rate on the simulation medium in comparison with films made with the addition of quince juice. These differences were not evident when experiment was conducted with apples. Addition of quince and cranberry juice to the chitosan and whey proteins-chitosan films as natural antifungal agents has some potential for prolonging the shelf life of apples. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  14. Systematics of Juniperus section Juniperus based on leaf essential oils and random amplified polymorphic DNAs (RAPDs).

    PubMed

    Adams

    2000-07-01

    The composition of the leaf essential oils of all the species of Juniperus in sect. Juniperus (=sect. Oxycedrus) are reported and compared (J. brevifolia, J. cedrus, J. communis, J. c. var. saxatilis, J. c. var. oblonga, J. formosana, J. oxycedrus, J. o. subsp. badia, J. o. subsp. macrocarpa, J. o. subsp. transtagana, J. rigida, J. r. subsp. conferta, J. sibirica, J. taxifolia and J. t. var. lutchuensis). In addition, DNA fingerprinting by RAPDs was utilized. Based on these data, several taxa remained at the same taxonomic level: J. brevifolia, J. cedrus, J. communis, J. c. var. saxatilis, J. formosana, J. oxycedrus, J. rigida, J. r. var. conferta, and J. taxifolia. However, several taxa exhibited considerable differentiation that warranted their recognition at the specific level: J. oblonga M.-Bieb. (=J. communis var. oblonga), J. badia H. Gay (=J. oxycedrus subsp. badia), J. macrocarpa Sibth. and Sm. (=J. oxycedrus subsp. macrocarpa), J. navicularis Gand. (=J. oxycedrus subsp. transtagana), J. sibirica Brugsd. (=J. communis var. saxatilis in part), and J. lutchuensis Koidz. (= J. taxifolia var. lutchuensis).

  15. [Amino acid level in pastry with low caloric value].

    PubMed

    Barkhatov, V Iu; Vyskubova, N K; Felipas, T B; Pshemurzova, R M; Kamenetskaia, E V

    1988-01-01

    The effect of fruit paste additives on amino acid composition of farinaceous and decorative confectionery semifinished products was studied to decrease their fuel value. It was found that a partial replacement of sugar and fat for apple and quince pastes in apple biscuit and apple shortbread semiproducts led to an increase in the content of essential and sulfur-containing amino acids. Cream prepared from egg albumin and quince paste had reduced content of amino acids (except for glutamic acid) due to the diminished content of egg albumin, however, the balance of amino acid composition was improved.

  16. 21 CFR 150.110 - Fruit butter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., canned, and/or dried (evaporated) mature fruits, with or without added water, and screening out skins... Apricot 7.0 Grape 7.0 Peach 8.5 Pear 6.5 Plum (other than prune) 7.0 Prune 7.0 Quince 7.5 (2) The...

  17. 21 CFR 150.110 - Fruit butter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., canned, and/or dried (evaporated) mature fruits, with or without added water, and screening out skins... Apricot 7.0 Grape 7.0 Peach 8.5 Pear 6.5 Plum (other than prune) 7.0 Prune 7.0 Quince 7.5 (2) The...

  18. 21 CFR 150.110 - Fruit butter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., canned, and/or dried (evaporated) mature fruits, with or without added water, and screening out skins... Apricot 7.0 Grape 7.0 Peach 8.5 Pear 6.5 Plum (other than prune) 7.0 Prune 7.0 Quince 7.5 (2) The...

  19. Patrones de lluvia, transcolación y flujo de nutrientes en las cuencas de Bisley, Bosque Experimental de Luquillo, Puerto Rico

    Treesearch

    Tamara Heartsill; Carlos R. Estrada Ruiz; Samuel Moya

    2006-01-01

    Describimos la cantidad de lluvia y transcolación durante veinte años (1988-2008), incluyendo varios periodos de sequías, huracanes y lluvias intensas. La composición de nutrientes en la lluvia y transcolación fueron medidos semanalmente durante quince años (1988-2002), incluyendo los periodos de...

  20. Proceedings of the 1985 Annual DTIC (Defense Technical Information Center) Users Conference Held in Alexandria, Virginia on 23-25 October 1985

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    Donovan Space Communications Company 1300 Quince Orchard Boulevard Gaithersburg, MD 20878 Joyce H. Deegan Rockwell International Corporation 1200 N...J. P. Norton Engineered Air Systems 1270 N. Price Road St. Louis, MO 63132 Craig L. Pelz Naval Weapons Center Information Services Branch Code

  1. 23. A SECTION OF THE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT WHICH CONTAINS BURBANK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. A SECTION OF THE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT WHICH CONTAINS BURBANK ORIGINALS - QUINCES - ALONG ROAD. THE EUCALYPTUS TO THE RIGHT IS JUST OUTSIDE THE SOUTHEAST CORNER PROPERTY LINE AND WAS INDICATED ON THE 1912 BURBANK PLAN. LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Gold Ridge Farm, 7777 Bodega Avenue, Sebastopol, Sonoma County, CA

  2. Mineral and heavy metal contents of the outer and inner tissues of commonly used fruits.

    PubMed

    Özcan, Mehmet Musa; Harmankaya, Mustafa; Gezgin, Sait

    2012-01-01

    The rate of heavy metal pollution in some minor fruit samples growing at roadsides in Turkey were determined by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). The mineral contents of samples were found to be different depending on the several parts Citrus fruits. The highest minor and heavy metal levels for Citrus fruits were determined between 17.24 and 45.30 mg/kg boron, 2.08 and 15.05 mg/kg copper, 1.01 and 16.00 mg/kg iron and 2.35 and 9.87 mg/kg zinc. Boron content ranged from 16.54 mg/kg (Deveci pear inner pulp) to 89.89 mg/kg (Arjantin apple outer skin). The level of Fe ranged from 1.49 mg/kg (quince pulp) to 25.05 mg/kg (Ankara pear pulp). Cu content of fruits ranged between 2.52 mg/kg (Fuji apple skin) and 25.93 mg/kg quince skin). Zn content was found between 0.46 mg/kg (Golden apple pulp) and 14.34 mg/kg (quince skin). P contents ranged from 651 mg/kg (Golden apple pulp) to 1269 mg/kg (quince skin). Na was found between 500 mg/kg (Fuji apple skin) and 907 mg/kg (Arjantin apple skin).

  3. Chinese-English Machine Translation System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, William S-Y; And Others

    The report documents results of a two-year R&D effort directed at the completion of a prototype system for Chinese-English machine translation of S&T literature. The system, designated QUINCE, accepts Chinese input exactly as printed, with no pre-editing of any kind, and produces English output on experimental basis. Coding of Chinese text via…

  4. 40 CFR 180.116 - Ziram; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ....0 1 Blueberry 7.0 1 Cherry, sweet 7.0 1 Cherry, tart 7.0 1 Grape 7.0 Huckleberry 7.0 Peach 7.0 Pear 7.0 1 Pecan 0.1 Quince 7.0 1 Strawberry 7.0 Tomato 7.0 1 1 Some of these tolerances were established...

  5. 40 CFR 180.116 - Ziram; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....0 1 Blueberry 7.0 1 Cherry, sweet 7.0 1 Cherry, tart 7.0 1 Grape 7.0 Huckleberry 7.0 Peach 7.0 Pear 7.0 1 Pecan 0.1 Quince 7.0 1 Strawberry 7.0 Tomato 7.0 1 1 Some of these tolerances were established...

  6. Genome sequencing and analyses of the postharvest fungus Penicillium expansum R21

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Blue mold is the vernacular name of a common postharvest disease of stored apples, pears and quince that is caused by several common species of Penicillium. This study reports the draft genome sequence of Penicillium expansum strain R21, a strain isolated from a Red Delicious apple in 2011 in Pennsy...

  7. Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGill, George E.

    2004-01-01

    Geological mapping and topical studies, primarily in the southern Acidalia Planitia/Cydonia Mensae region of Mars is presented. The overall objective was to understand geologic processes and crustal history in the northern lowland in order to assess the probability that an ocean once existed in this region. The major deliverable is a block of 6 1:500,000 scale geologic maps that will be published in 2004 as a single map at 1:1,000,000 scale along with extensive descriptive and interpretive text. A major issue addressed by the mapping was the relative ages of the extensive plains of Acidalia Planitia and the knobs and mesas of Cydonia Mensae. The mapping results clearly favor a younger age for the plains. Topical studies included a preliminary analysis of the very abundant small domes and cones to assess the possibility that their origins could be determined by detailed mapping and remote-sensing analysis. We also tested the validity of putative shorelines by using GIs to co-register full-resolution MOLA altimetry data and Viking images with these shorelines plotted on them. Of the 3 proposed shorelines in this area, one is probably valid, one is definitely not valid, and the third is apparently 2 shorelines closely spaced in elevation. Publications supported entirely or in part by this grant are included.

  8. Molecular characterization and RAPD analysis of Juniperus species from Iran.

    PubMed

    Kasaian, J; Behravan, J; Hassany, M; Emami, S A; Shahriari, F; Khayyat, M H

    2011-06-07

    The genus Juniperus L. (Cupressaceae), an aromatic evergreen plant, consists of up to 68 species around the world. We classified five species of Juniperus found in Iran using molecular markers to provide a means for molecular identification of Iranian species. Plants were collected (three samples of each species) from two different provinces of Iran (Golestan and East Azarbayejan). The DNA was extracted from the leaves using a Qiagen Dneasy Plant Mini Kit. Amplification was performed using 18 ten-mer RAPD primers. Genetic distances were estimated based on 187 RAPD bands to construct a dendrogram by means of unweighted pair group method of arithmetic means. It was found that J. communis and J. oblonga were differentiated from the other species. Genetic distance values ranged from 0.19 (J. communis and J. oblonga) to 0.68 (J. communis and J. excelsa). Juniperus foetidissima was found to be most similar to J. sabina. Juniperus excelsa subspecies excelsa and J. excelsa subspecies polycarpos formed a distinct group.

  9. In Situ/On-Site Biodegradation of Refined Oils and Fuels (A Technology Review). Volume 2. Appendix A. Supplementary Text.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    Dobbs, 1980) g - (Ohneck and Gardner, 1982) h - (Quince and Gardner, 1982) i a (Pritchard, Van Veld, and Cooper, 1981) j (Ehrlich, Schroeder, and Martin...1964) h - (Cerniglia and Gibson, 1977) i - (Ahearn, Meyers, and Standard, 1971) j - (Jamison, Raymond, and Hudson, 1975) k - (Stetzenbach and Sinclair...and Crow 1981) g - (Gibson and Mahadevan, 1975) h - (Gibson, Koch, and Kallio, 1968) i - (Zajic, 1964) j - (Cerniglia, Hebert, Szaniszlo, and Gibson

  10. Electrochemistry and Spectroelectrochemistry of Polynuclear Zinc Phthalocyanines: Formation of Mixed Valence Cation Radical Species.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-02-25

    No. No. Copies Cpe Office of Naval Research 2 Dr. David You.)g Attn: Code 1113 Code 334 800 N. Quinc’ Street NORDA Arlington, Virginia 22217-5000 NSTL...Naval Surface Weapons Center Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 Silver Spring, Maryland 20910 Or. R. A. Marcus Dr. Michael J. Weaver Department of...Microprocessor model 340 spectrometer. Cyclic and dif, rential pulse voltammetry were performed with a Princeton Applied Research (PARC) model 174A

  11. Preliminary results from the Viking orbiter imaging experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.; Masursky, H.; Baum, W.A.; Blasius, K.R.; Briggs, G.A.; Cutts, J.A.; Duxbury, T.; Greeley, R.; Guest, J.E.; Smith, B.A.; Soderblom, L.A.; Veverka, J.; Wellman, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    During its first 30 orbits around Mars, the Viking orbiter took approximately 1000 photographic frames of the surface of Mars with resolutions that ranged from 100 meters to a little more than 1 kilometer. Most were of potential landing sites in Chryse Planitia and Cydonia and near Capri Chasma. Contiguous high-resolution coverage in these areas has led to an increased understanding of surface processes, particularly cratering, fluvial, and mass-wasting phenomena. Most of the surfaces examined appear relatively old, channel features abound, and a variety of features suggestive of permafrost have been identified. The ejecta patterns around large craters imply that fluid flow of ejecta occurred after ballistic deposition. Variable features in the photographed area appear to have changed little since observed 5 years ago from Mariner 9. A variety of atmospheric phenomena were observed, including diffuse morning hazes, both stationary and moving discrete white clouds, and wave clouds covering extensive areas.

  12. In-vitro Antimicrobial Activities of Some Iranian Conifers

    PubMed Central

    Afsharzadeh, Maryam; Naderinasab, Mahboobe; Tayarani Najaran, Zahra; Barzin, Mohammad; Emami, Seyed Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Male and female leaves and fruits of eleven different taxons of Iranian conifers (Cupressus sempervirens var. horizontalis, C. sempervirens var. sempervirens, C. sempervirens cv. Cereifeormis, Juniperus communis subsp. hemisphaerica, J. excelsa subsp. excelsa, J. excelsa subsp. polycarpos, J. foetidissima, J. oblonga, J. sabina, Platycladus orientalis and Taxus baccata) were collected from different localities of Iran, dried and extracted with methanol. The extracts were tested for their antimicrobial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Candida albicans. The extracts were screened qualitatively using four different methods, the disc diffusion, hole plate, cylinder agar diffusion and agar dilution methods, whereas the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of each extract were determined by the agar dilution method. The best result was obtained by means of hole plate method in qualitative determination of antimicrobial activities of extracts and the greatest activity was found against S. aureus in all tested methods. PMID:24250573

  13. Novel Genetic Resources in the Genus Vigna Unveiled from Gene Bank Accessions

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yu; Somta, Prakit; Muto, Chiaki; Iseki, Kohtaro; Naito, Ken; Pandiyan, Muthaiyan; Natesan, Senthil; Tomooka, Norihiko

    2016-01-01

    The genus Vigna (Fabaceae) consists of five subgenera, and includes more than 100 wild species. In Vigna, 10 crops have been domesticated from three subgenera, Vigna, Plectrotropis, and Ceratotropis. The habitats of wild Vigna species are so diverse that their genomes could harbor various genes responsible for environmental stress adaptation, which could lead to innovations in agriculture. Since some of the gene bank Vigna accessions were unidentified and they seemed to be novel genetic resources, these accessions were identified based on morphological traits. The phylogenetic positions were estimated based on the DNA sequences of nuclear rDNA-ITS and chloroplast atpB-rbcL spacer regions. Based on the results, the potential usefulness of the recently described species V. indica and V. sahyadriana, and some wild Vigna species, i.e., V. aconitifolia, V. dalzelliana, V. khandalensis, V. marina var. oblonga, and V. vexillata, was discussed. PMID:26800459

  14. Diversity of marine planktonic ostracods in South China Sea: a DNA taxonomy approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lei; Wang, Lianggen; Ning, Jiajia; Li, Hong; Ji, Yingying; Du, Feiyan

    2018-04-19

    Ostracods (Crustacea, Ostracoda) are small bivalved crustaceans, contributing over 200 described species to the marine zooplankton community. They are widely distributed and are relatively abundant components of the mesozooplankton, playing an important role in the transport of organic matter to deep layers. However, identification of ostracods based on micro-morphological characters is extremely difficult and time-consuming. Previous fragmentary taxonomic studies of ostracods in the South China Sea (SCA), were based solely on morphology. Here, by analysing the mitochondrial COI gene, we explore the taxa across the SCA using molecular tools for the first time. Our results show that sequence divergence among species varies within a large range, from 12.93% to 35.82%. Sixteen of the taxonomic units recovered by DNA taxonomy agree well with morphology, but Paraconchoecia oblonga, Conchoecia magna and Halocypris brevirostris split into two clades each, each of which contains cryptic species.

  15. A revision of the Neotropical tortoise beetle genus Eurypedus Gistel 1834 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Shin, Chulwoo

    2016-09-06

    The genus Eurypedus Gistel is revised based on detailed morphological study, including examination of the mouthparts and genitalia. Besides previously known diagnostic characters, such as an oblong and laterally parallel-sided body, narrow elytral lamella, narrow prosternal process between the procoxae, and angled pronotal base, new diagnostic characters are identified: antennal notches on the ventral surface of antennomeres V-XI, a stridulatory file on the vertex, and paired projections on the ventral surface of the pronotum. The distinct stridulatory file is found only in males. The number of ridges of the stridulatory file varies between 48 and 59. Eurypedus thoni Barber (= Cassida oblonga Sturm in Thon) syn. nov. is synonymized with E. peltoides (Boheman). The remaining two species E. peltoides and E. nigrosignatus (Boheman) show distinct distributions separated by the Amazon Basin.

  16. Demographic histories of adaptively diverged riparian and non-riparian species of Ainsliaea (Asteraceae) inferred from coalescent analyses using multiple nuclear loci.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Yuki; Setoguchi, Hiroaki

    2012-12-28

    Understanding demographic histories, such as divergence time, patterns of gene flow, and population size changes, in ecologically diverging lineages provide implications for the process and maintenance of population differentiation by ecological adaptation. This study addressed the demographic histories in two independently derived lineages of flood-resistant riparian plants and their non-riparian relatives [Ainsliaea linearis (riparian) and A. apiculata (non-riparian); A. oblonga (riparian) and A. macroclinidioides (non-riparian); Asteraceae] using an isolation-with-migration (IM) model based on variation at 10 nuclear DNA loci. The highest posterior probabilities of the divergence time parameters were estimated to be ca. 25,000 years ago for A. linearis and A. apiculata and ca. 9000 years ago for A. oblonga and A. macroclinidioides, although the confidence intervals of the parameters had broad ranges. The likelihood ratio tests detected evidence of historical gene flow between both riparian/non-riparian species pairs. The riparian populations showed lower levels of genetic diversity and a significant reduction in effective population sizes compared to the non-riparian populations and their ancestral populations. This study showed the recent origins of flood-resistant riparian plants, which are remarkable examples of plant ecological adaptation. The recent divergence and genetic signatures of historical gene flow among riparian/non-riparian species implied that they underwent morphological and ecological differentiation within short evolutionary timescales and have maintained their species boundaries in the face of gene flow. Comparative analyses of adaptive divergence in two sets of riparian/non-riparian lineages suggested that strong natural selection by flooding had frequently reduced the genetic diversity and size of riparian populations through genetic drift, possibly leading to fixation of adaptive traits in riparian populations. The two sets of riparian

  17. Immunological and molecular comparison of polyphenol oxidase in Rosaceae fruit trees.

    PubMed

    Haruta, M; Murata, M; Kadokura, H; Homma, S

    1999-03-01

    An antibody raised against apple polyphenol oxidase (PPO) cross-reacted with PPOs from Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia), pear (Pyrus communis), peach (Prunus persica), Chinese quince (Pseudocydonia sinensis) and Japanese loquat (Eriobotrya japonica). Core fragments (681 bp) of the corresponding PPO genes were amplified and characterized. The deduced protein sequences showed identities of 85.3 to 97.5%. Chlorogenic acid oxidase activity of these PPOs showed higher activities when assayed at pH 4 than at pH 6. These results indicate that PPOs in Rosaceae plants are structurally and enzymatically similar.

  18. The So-Called 'Face on Mars' in Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (Released 24 July 2002) This set of THEMIS infrared images shows the so-called 'face on Mars' landform located in the northern plains of Mars near 40o N, 10o W (350 o E). The 'face' is located near the center of the image approximately 1/6 of the way down from the top, and is one of a large number of knobs, mesas, hills, and buttes that are visible in this THEMIS image. The THEMIS infrared camera has ten different filters between 6.2 and 15 micrometers - nine view the surface and one views the CO2 atmosphere. The calibrated and geometrically projected data from all of the nine surface-viewing filters are shown in this figure. The major differences seen in this region are due to temperature effects -- sunlit slopes are warm (bright), whereas those in shadow are cold (dark), The temperature in this scene ranges from 50 oC (darkest) to 15 oC (brightest). The major differences between the different filters are due to the expected variation in the amount of energy emitted from the surface at different wavelengths. Minor spectral differences (infrared 'color') also exist between the different filters, but these differences are small in this region due to the uniform composition of the rocks and soils exposed at the surface. The THEMIS infrared camera provides an excellent regional view of Mars - this image covers an area 32 kilometers (20 miles) by approximately 200 kilometers (125 miles) at a resolution of 100 meters per picture element ('pixel'). This image provides a broad perspective of the landscape and geology of the Cydonia region, showing numerous knobs and hills that have been eroded into a remarkable array of different shapes. In this 'big picture' view the Cydonia region is seen to be covered with dozens of interesting knobs and mesas that are similar in many ways to the knob named the 'face' - so many in fact that it requires care to discover the 'face' among this jumble of knobs and hills. The 3-km

  19. Mars Orbiter Camera Views the 'Face on Mars' - Best View from Viking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Shortly after midnight Sunday morning (5 April 1998 12:39 AM PST), the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft successfully acquired a high resolution image of the 'Face on Mars' feature in the Cydonia region. The image was transmitted to Earth on Sunday, and retrieved from the mission computer data base Monday morning (6 April 1998). The image was processed at the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) facility 9:15 AM and the raw image immediately transferred to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for release to the Internet. The images shown here were subsequently processed at MSSS.

    The picture was acquired 375 seconds after the spacecraft's 220th close approach to Mars. At that time, the 'Face', located at approximately 40.8o N, 9.6o W, was 275 miles (444 km) from the spacecraft. The 'morning' sun was 25o above the horizon. The picture has a resolution of 14.1 feet (4.3 meters) per pixel, making it ten times higher resolution than the best previous image of the feature, which was taken by the Viking Mission in the mid-1970's. The full image covers an area 2.7 miles (4.4 km) wide and 25.7 miles (41.5 km) long.

    This Viking Orbiter image is one of the best Viking pictures of the area Cydonia where the 'Face' is located. Marked on the image are the 'footprint' of the high resolution (narrow angle) Mars Orbiter Camera image and the area seen in enlarged views (dashed box). See PIA01440-1442 for these images in raw and processed form.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  20. Topography of the Deuteronilus contact on Mars: Evidence for an ancient water/mud ocean and long-wavelength topographic readjustments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, M. A.; Erkeling, G.; Hiesinger, H.; Bernhardt, H.; Reiss, D.

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we present the results of our detailed study of morphology, topography, and age of the Deuteronilus contact that outlines Vastitas Borealis Formation (VBF) in the northern plains and the Isidis Planitia unit. The Deuteronilus contact represents a sharp and distinct geological boundary that can be traced continuously for many hundreds to thousands of kilometers. In the northern plains, segments of the Deuteronilus contact occur at two distinct topographic levels. In the northern plains, the long-wavelength topography of the Deuteronilus contact occur at two distinct topographic levels. In the Tempe, Chryse, Acidalia, and Cydonia-Deuteronilus regions (the total length is ∼14,000 km), the contact is at the mean elevation of about -3.92 km (the decile range is 180 m, from -4.01 km to -3.83 km). In the Pyramus-Astapus, Utopia, and Western Elysium regions (the total length is ∼7700 km), the mean elevation of the contact is about -3.58 km (the decile range is 270 m, from -3.73 km to -3.46 km). These levels to large extent (but not completely) correspond to the model geoids that may have been characterized the shape of Mars at the time of the VBF emplacement. Largest deviations of the actual topographic position of the contact from the model geoids occur in the Tantalus and Phlegra regions where the deviations are due to the post-VBF changes of the regional topography. The fact that the model geoids satisfactory describe the shape of the largest portion of the contact provides additional evidence for both the emplacement of the VBF edges near an equipotential surface and for relative stability of the shape of Mars during a long time interval of about 3.6 Ga. Within the northern plains in the Tempe Terra, Acidalia Planitia, Cydonia-Deuteronilus, Pyramus-Astapus, and the southern Utopia regions, the absolute model ages of the VBF surface near the Deuteronilus contact are tightly clustered around the age of ∼3.6 Ga, which we interpret as the age of the

  1. Sesamin and sesamolin as unexpected contaminants in various cold-pressed plant oils: NP-HPLC/FLD/DAD and RP-UPLC-ESI/MS(n) study.

    PubMed

    Górnaś, Paweł; Siger, Aleksander; Pugajeva, Iveta; Segliņa, Dalija

    2014-04-01

    Thirteen cold-pressed oils (Japanese quince seed, black caraway, flaxseed, rapeseed, hemp, peanut, sunflower, pumpkin, hazelnut, poppy, walnut, almond and sesame oil) manufactured by the same company over a 2-year period (2011-12) were assessed for lipophilic compounds. The presence of sesamin and sesamolin, two characteristic lignans of sesame oil, were detected in all tested plant oils. Both lignans were identified by NP-HPLC/FLD/DAD and confirmed by a RP-UPLC-ESI/MS(n) method. The lowest amount of sesamin and sesamolin was found for Japanese quince seed oil (0.10 and 0.27 mg/100 g), and the highest, excluding sesame oil, for almond oil (36.21 and 105.42 mg/100 g, respectively). The highly significant correlation between sesamolin and sesamin concentrations was found in all samples tested (r = 0.9999; p < 0.00001). These results indicate contamination of cold-pressed oils from the same source. This investigation highlights the fact that increasing the range of products manufactured by the same company can contribute to a lesser regard for the quality of the final product. Moreover, less attention paid to the quality of final product can be related to the health risks of consumers especially sensitive to allergens. Therefore, proper cleaning of processing equipment is needed to prevent cross-contact of cold-pressed oils.

  2. Glucose-sensitive silicone hydrogel contact lens toward tear glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Badugu, Ramachandram; Reece, Edward Albert; Lakowicz, Joseph R

    2018-05-01

    Accurate and reliable monitoring of blood glucose is needed for the treatment of diabetes, which has many challenges, including lack of patient compliance. Measuring tear glucose is an alternative to traditional finger-stick tests used to track blood sugar levels, but glucose sensing using tears has yet to be achieved. We report a methodology for possible tear glucose monitoring using glucose-sensitive silicone hydrogel (SiHG) contact lenses, the primary type of lenses available in today's market. Initially, we assessed the interpenetrating polymer network, with nearly pure silicone and water regions, existing in the SiHGs using a polarity-sensitive probe Prodan. We then synthesized a glucose-sensitive fluorophore Quin-C18 with a hydrophobic side chain for localization of probe at the interfacial region. Using our glucose-sensing contact lens, we were able to measure varying concentrations of glucose in an in-vitro system. The Quin-C18 strongly bound to the lenses with insignificant leaching even after multiple rinses. The lenses displayed a similar response to glucose after three months of storage in water. This study demonstrates that it may be possible to develop a contact lens for continuous glucose monitoring in the near term, using our concept of fluorophore binding at the silicone-water interface. (2018) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of PR genes in some pome fruit species with the emphasis on transcriptional analysis and ROS response under Erwinia amylovora inoculation in apple.

    PubMed

    Hassani, Maryam; Salami, Seyed Alireza; Nasiri, Jaber; Abdollahi, Hamid; Ghahremani, Zahra

    2016-02-01

    Attempts were made to identify eight pathogenesis related (PR) genes (i.e., PR-1a, PR3-ch1, PR3-Ch2, PR3-Ch3, PR3-Ch4, PR3-Ch5, PR-5 and PR-8) from 27 genotypes of apple, quince and pear, which are induced in response to inoculation with the pathogen Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight. Totally, 32 PR genes of different families were obtained, excepting PR3-Ch2 (amplified only in apple) and PR3-Ch4 (amplified only in apple and pear), the others were successfully amplified in all the genotypes of apple, quince and pear. Evolutionary, the genes of each family exhibited significant homology with each other, as the corresponded phylogenetic neighbor-joining-based dendrograms were taken into consideration. Meanwhile, according to the expression assay, it was deduced that the pathogen activity can significantly affect the expression levels of some selected PR genes of PR3-Ch2, PR3-Ch4, PR3-Ch5 and particularly Cat I in both resistant (MM-111) and semi-susceptible (MM-106) apple rootstocks. Lastly, it was concluded that the pathogen E. amylovora is able to stimulate ROS response, particularly using generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in both aforementioned apple rootstock.

  4. [Polyvalence of bacteriophages isolated from fruit trees, affected by bacterial fire blight].

    PubMed

    Tovkach, F I; Moroz, S N; Korol', N A; Faĭdiuk, Iu V; Kushkina, A I

    2013-01-01

    Phage populations appearing as a result of a pathogenic process caused by Erwinia amylovora have been discovered and described. They accompany bacterial fire blight development in the process of quince, pear and apple trees vegetation in Zakarpattya region of Ukraine. Phage isolates of the affected pear and quince include polyvalent virulent phages able to develop on bacterial strains associated with plants--E. amylovora. E. "horticola" and Pantoea agglomerans. E. amylovora isolated from the plant tissues affected by the fire blight and detected at the same time as phages proved to be resistant to the viral infection. It is hard to explain now this characteristic however it was noticed that resistance to phages can change drastically in case of dissociation, lysogenization and mutagenesis of erwinia in laboratory conditions. Phage population study shows that they are heterogeneous and can obviously include not only polyvalent but also specific viruses. Further studies of biology and molecular genetics of pure lines of isolated phages will help to get closer to understanding the place and role of bacteriophages in the complicated network of relations between bacterial pathogens and plants.

  5. Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor Outreach Compilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-09-01

    This videotape is a compilation of the best NASA JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) videos of the Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor missions. The mission is described using animation and narration as well as some actual footage of the entire sequence of mission events. Included within these animations are the spacecraft orbit insertion; descent to the Mars surface; deployment of the airbags and instruments; and exploration by Sojourner, the Mars rover. JPL activities at spacecraft control during significant mission events are also included at the end. The spacecraft cameras pan the surrounding Mars terrain and film Sojourner traversing the surface and inspecting rocks. A single, brief, processed image of the Cydonia region (Mars face) at an oblique angle from the Mars Global Surveyor is presented. A description of the Mars Pathfinder mission, instruments, landing and deployment process, Mars approach, spacecraft orbit insertion, rover operation are all described using computer animation. Actual color footage of Sojourner as well as a 360 deg pan of the Mars terrain surrounding the spacecraft is provided. Lower quality black and white photography depicting Sojourner traversing the Mars surface and inspecting Martian rocks also is included.

  6. Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor Outreach Compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This videotape is a compilation of the best NASA JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) videos of the Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor missions. The mission is described using animation and narration as well as some actual footage of the entire sequence of mission events. Included within these animations are the spacecraft orbit insertion; descent to the Mars surface; deployment of the airbags and instruments; and exploration by Sojourner, the Mars rover. JPL activities at spacecraft control during significant mission events are also included at the end. The spacecraft cameras pan the surrounding Mars terrain and film Sojourner traversing the surface and inspecting rocks. A single, brief, processed image of the Cydonia region (Mars face) at an oblique angle from the Mars Global Surveyor is presented. A description of the Mars Pathfinder mission, instruments, landing and deployment process, Mars approach, spacecraft orbit insertion, rover operation are all described using computer animation. Actual color footage of Sojourner as well as a 360 deg pan of the Mars terrain surrounding the spacecraft is provided. Lower quality black and white photography depicting Sojourner traversing the Mars surface and inspecting Martian rocks also is included.

  7. Lunar and Planetary Science XXXV: Mars Volcanology and Tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Reports from the session, "Mars Volcanology and Tectonics" include:Martian Shield Volcanoes; Estimating the Rheology of Basaltic Lava Flows; A Model for Variable Levee Formation Rates in an Active Lava Flow; Deflections in Lava Flow Directions Relative to Topography in the Tharsis Region: Indicators of Post-Flow Tectonic Motion; Fractal Variation with Changing Line Length: A Potential Problem for Planetary Lava Flow Identification; Burfellshraun:A Terrestrial Analogue to Recent Volcanism on Mars; Lava Domes of the Arcadia Region of Mars; Comparison of Plains Volcanism in the Tempe Terra Region of Mars to the Eastern Snake River Plains, Idaho with Implications for Geochemical Constraints; Vent Geology of Low-Shield Volcanoes from the Central Snake River Plain, Idaho: Lessons for Mars and the Moon; Field and Geochemical Study of Table Legs Butte and Quaking Aspen Butte, Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho: An Analog to the Morphology of Small Shield Volcanoes on Mars; Variability in Morphology and Thermophysical Properties of Pitted Cones in Acidalia Planitia and Cydonia Mensae; A Volcano Composed of Light-colored Layered Deposits on the Floor of Valles Marineris; Analysis of Alba Patera Flows: A Comparison of Similarities and Differences Geomorphologic Studies of a Very Long Lava Flow in Tharsis, Mars; Radar Backscatter Characteristics of Basaltic Flow Fields: Results for Mauna Ulu, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii;and Preliminary Lava Tube-fed Flow Abundance Mapping on Olympus Mons.

  8. Demographic histories of adaptively diverged riparian and non-riparian species of Ainsliaea (Asteraceae) inferred from coalescent analyses using multiple nuclear loci

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding demographic histories, such as divergence time, patterns of gene flow, and population size changes, in ecologically diverging lineages provide implications for the process and maintenance of population differentiation by ecological adaptation. This study addressed the demographic histories in two independently derived lineages of flood-resistant riparian plants and their non-riparian relatives [Ainsliaea linearis (riparian) and A. apiculata (non-riparian); A. oblonga (riparian) and A. macroclinidioides (non-riparian); Asteraceae] using an isolation-with-migration (IM) model based on variation at 10 nuclear DNA loci. Results The highest posterior probabilities of the divergence time parameters were estimated to be ca. 25,000 years ago for A. linearis and A. apiculata and ca. 9000 years ago for A. oblonga and A. macroclinidioides, although the confidence intervals of the parameters had broad ranges. The likelihood ratio tests detected evidence of historical gene flow between both riparian/non-riparian species pairs. The riparian populations showed lower levels of genetic diversity and a significant reduction in effective population sizes compared to the non-riparian populations and their ancestral populations. Conclusions This study showed the recent origins of flood-resistant riparian plants, which are remarkable examples of plant ecological adaptation. The recent divergence and genetic signatures of historical gene flow among riparian/non-riparian species implied that they underwent morphological and ecological differentiation within short evolutionary timescales and have maintained their species boundaries in the face of gene flow. Comparative analyses of adaptive divergence in two sets of riparian/non-riparian lineages suggested that strong natural selection by flooding had frequently reduced the genetic diversity and size of riparian populations through genetic drift, possibly leading to fixation of adaptive traits in riparian

  9. Antioxidant Activity of Leaves and Fruits of Iranian Conifers

    PubMed Central

    Emami, S. A.; Asili, J.; Mohagheghi, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Cupressus semipervirens var. horizontalis, Cupressus semipervirens var. semipervirens, Cupressus semipervirens cv. Cereifeormis, Juniperus communis subsp. hemisphaerica, Juniperus excelsa subsp. excelsa, Juniperus excelsa subsp. polycarpos, Juniperus foetidissima, Juniperus oblonga, Juniperus sabina, Platycladus orientalis and Taxus baccata are Iranian conifers. The antioxidant activity of leaves and fruits of these 11 different taxons were evaluated. The leaves of both male and female, and fruits of these plants were collected from different areas of the country. Methanol extract of leaves and fruits of these taxons were prepared. Antioxidant activity of each extracts was measured using two different tests of the ferric thiocyanate method and thiobarbituric acid. Results indicated that the methanol extracts of leaves, of male and female, and fruits of all these species (27 samples) possessed antioxidant activity when tested with both methods. The antioxidant activity was then compared with those of α-tocopherol (a natural antioxidant) and butylated hydroxytoluene (a synthetic antioxidant). Methanol extract of fruits of C. semipervirens cv. Cereifeormis showed the highest antioxidant activity while the methanol extract of leaves of C. semipervirens var. semipervirens possessed the lowest antioxidant activity. However, our finding showed that most of the tested extracts were showing strong antioxidant activity even higher than α-tocopherol. PMID:17965761

  10. [Systematics and genegeography of Juniperus communis inferred from isoenzyme data].

    PubMed

    Khantemirova, E V; Berkutenko, A N; Semerikov, V L

    2012-09-01

    Using isoenzyme analysis, 35 populations of Juniperus communis L. from various parts of the Russian species range and by one population from Sweden and Alaska were studied. The total sample size was 1200 plants. As a result, the existence ofJ. communis var. oblonga in North Caucasus and J. communis var. depressa in North America was confirmed, but genetic differences between J. communis var. communis and J. communis var. saxatilis were not detected in the main part of the Russian species range (European part of Russia, Ural, Siberia). These populations proved to be genetically uniform with the same predominant allelic frequencies, which may evidence recent settling of this species from one of Central or East European refugium. J. communis var. saxatilis from northeastern Russia inhabiting the region behind Verkhoyansk mountain and Russian Far East showed considerable differentiation in frequencies of alleles at three loci and geographical subdivision. These populations also exhibit high intrapopulation variation. This can be connected with the refugium in this territory. The origin of this group is probably connected with migrations from Central Asia (Tibet) in the direction to northeastern Russia along mountains connecting Central and North Asia. It is also assumed that migrations of this species previously proceeded across the Beringian land bridge.

  11. Indo-Pacific echinoids in the tropical eastern Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lessios, H. A.; Kessing, B. D.; Wellington, G. M.; Graybeal, A.

    1996-06-01

    The existing literature reports that only one species of Indo-Pacific echinoid ( Echinometra oblonga), occurs in the eastern Pacific. In this study we confirm the presence of this species at Islas Revillagigedo and also report the presence of two species of Echinothrix (a genus hitherto unknown outside the Indo-Pacific) at Isla del Coco and at Clipperton Island. We also present evidence from isozymes and from mitochondrial DNA sequences indicating that at least one individual of Diadema at Clipperton may belong to a maternal lineage characteristic of the west Pacific species D. savignyi. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the observed populations of Indo-Pacific echinoid species are recent arrivals to the eastern Pacific, as opposed to the view that they are relicts of Tethyan pan-tropical distributions. Echinothrix diadema, in particular, may have arrived at Isla del Coco during the 1982-1983 El Nifio. In addition to Indo-Pacific species, Clipperton, Isla del Coco and the Revillagigedos contain a complement of eastern Pacific echinoids. The echinoid faunas of these islands should, therefore, be regarded as mixtures of two biogeographic provinces. Though none of the Indo-Pacific species are known to have reached the coast of the American mainland, their presence at the offshore islands of the eastern Pacific suggests that, for some echinoids, the East Pacific Barrier is not as formidable an obstacle to migration as was previously thought.

  12. Underwater Hearing in Turtles.

    PubMed

    Willis, Katie L

    2016-01-01

    The hearing of turtles is poorly understood compared with the other reptiles. Although the mechanism of transduction of sound into a neural signal via hair cells has been described in detail, the rest of the auditory system is largely a black box. What is known is that turtles have higher hearing thresholds than other reptiles, with best frequencies around 500 Hz. They also have lower underwater hearing thresholds than those in air, owing to resonance of the middle ear cavity. Further studies demonstrated that all families of turtles and tortoises share a common middle ear cavity morphology, with scaling best suited to underwater hearing. This supports an aquatic origin of the group. Because turtles hear best under water, it is important to examine their vulnerability to anthropogenic noise. However, the lack of basic data makes such experiments difficult because only a few species of turtles have published audiograms. There are also almost no behavioral data available (understandable due to training difficulties). Finally, few studies show what kinds of sounds are behaviorally relevant. One notable paper revealed that the Australian snake-necked turtle (Chelodina oblonga) has a vocal repertoire in air, at the interface, and under water. Findings like these suggest that there is more to the turtle aquatic auditory scene than previously thought.

  13. Antihyperglycaemic effect of 'Ilogen-Excel', an ayurvedic herbal formulation in streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Umamaheswari, Selvaraj; Mainzen Prince, Ponnaian Stanely

    2007-01-01

    'Ilogen-Excel', an Ayurvedic herbal formulation is composed of eight medicinal plants (Curcuma longa, Strychnos potatorum, Salacia oblonga, Tinospora cordifolia, Vetivelia zizanioides, Coscinium fenestratum, Andrographis paniculata and Mimosa pudica). The present study evaluates the antihyperglycemic effect of 'Ilogen-Excel' in streptozotocin induced diabetic rats. Rats were rendered diabetic by streptozotocin (STZ) (45 mg/kg body weight). Oral administration of 'Ilogen-Excel' (50 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg) for 60 days resulted in significantly lowered levels of blood glucose and significantly increased levels of plasma insulin, hepatic glycogen and total hemoglobin. 'Ilogen-Excel' administration also decreased the levels of glycosylated hemoglobin, plasma thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, hydroperoxides, ceruloplasmin and vitamin E in diabetic rats. Plasma reduced glutathione and vitamin C were significantly elevated by oral administration of 'Ilogen-Excel'. Administration of insulin normalized all the biochemical parameters studied in diabetic rats. The effect at a dose of 100 mg/kg was more pronounced than 50 mg/kg and brought back all the parameters to near normal levels. Thus, our study shows the antihyperglycemic effects of 'Ilogen-Excel' in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Our study also shows that combined therapy is better than individual therapy.

  14. Biting midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) from Martín García Island, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Ronderos, María M; Marino, Pablo I; Díaz, Florentina; Estévez, Ana L

    2011-09-01

    Nearly 230 species of biting midges have been recorded or described from Argentina; 38 of them are known from the Buenos Aires province and only one is cited from Martín García Island. This paper presents the results raised from six collecting trips which took place on the island during spring 2005, summer 2006 and autumn 2009. Diverse sampling sites including permanent and temporary aquatic environments were chosen, most of the ten sampling sites were ponds of diverse origin, some of these environments were covered with floating vegetation as Lemna gibba, Lemna minuscule, Salvinia biloba, Salvinia minima, Azolla filiculoides, Limnobium laevigatum, Pistia stratiotes, Spirodela intermedia, Wolffiella oblonga and Wolffia columbiana. Other sites were placed in urban and suburban areas. Adults were collected with sweep nets at sunrise and sunset and with light traps at intervals of four to five hours at night, depending on electricity availability on the island. Larvae and pupae were collected with different implements depending on characteristics of each surveyed aquatic habitat. In free standing water, they were captured with small sieves or hand pipettes and micropipettes, flotation techniques were utilized for sampling vegetated areas, free and rooted floating hydrophytes were extracted for removing insects among them. Thirteen species of Ceratopogonidae were collected, three of Atrichopogon Kieffer, three of Forcipomyia Meigen, two of Dasyhelea Kieffer, four of Culicoides Latreille, and one of Bezzia Kieffer, all representing new records from the island.

  15. Distribution of glycogen phosphorylase and cytochrome oxidase in the central nervous system of the turtle Trachemys dorbigni.

    PubMed

    Partata, W A; Krepsky, A M; Xavier, L L; Marques, M; Achaval, M

    1999-10-01

    Glycogen phosphorylase (GP) and cytochrome oxidase (CO) activities were mapped histochemically in the brain of the turtle Trachemys dorbigni. In the telencephalon, both activities occurred in the olfactory bulb, in all cortical areas, in the dorsal ventricular ridge, striatum, primordium hippocampi and olfactory tubercle. In the diencephalon, they were identified in some areas of the hypothalamus, and in rotundus and geniculate nuclei. Both reactions were detected in the oculomotor, trochlear, mesencephalic trigeminal nuclei, the nucleus of the posterior commissure, torus semicircularis, substantia nigra and ruber and isthmic nuclei of the mesencephalon. In all layers of the optic tectum GP activity was found, but CO only labelled the stratum griseum centrale. In the medulla oblonga both enzymes appear in the reticular, raphe and vestibular nuclei, locus coeruleus and nuclei of cranial nerves. In the cerebellum, the granular and molecular layers, and the deep cerebellar nuclei were positive for both enzymes. The Purkinje cells were only reactive for CO. In the spinal cord, motor and commissural neurones exhibited a positive reaction for the two enzymes. However, CO also occurred in the marginal nucleus and in the lateral funiculus. These results may be useful as a basis for subsequent studies on turtle brain metabolism.

  16. Indigenous species barcode database improves the identification of zooplankton

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jianghua; Zhang, Wanwan; Sun, Jingying; Xie, Yuwei; Zhang, Yimin; Burton, G. Allen; Yu, Hongxia

    2017-01-01

    Incompleteness and inaccuracy of DNA barcode databases is considered an important hindrance to the use of metabarcoding in biodiversity analysis of zooplankton at the species-level. Species barcoding by Sanger sequencing is inefficient for organisms with small body sizes, such as zooplankton. Here mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) fragment barcodes from 910 freshwater zooplankton specimens (87 morphospecies) were recovered by a high-throughput sequencing platform, Ion Torrent PGM. Intraspecific divergence of most zooplanktons was < 5%, except Branchionus leydign (Rotifer, 14.3%), Trichocerca elongate (Rotifer, 11.5%), Lecane bulla (Rotifer, 15.9%), Synchaeta oblonga (Rotifer, 5.95%) and Schmackeria forbesi (Copepod, 6.5%). Metabarcoding data of 28 environmental samples from Lake Tai were annotated by both an indigenous database and NCBI Genbank database. The indigenous database improved the taxonomic assignment of metabarcoding of zooplankton. Most zooplankton (81%) with barcode sequences in the indigenous database were identified by metabarcoding monitoring. Furthermore, the frequency and distribution of zooplankton were also consistent between metabarcoding and morphology identification. Overall, the indigenous database improved the taxonomic assignment of zooplankton. PMID:28977035

  17. The Berriasian-Valanginian boundary interval based on calpionellids from the Taraises Formation, Cuencamé de Ceniceros, Durango, NW Mexico: Biostratigraphic, paleoecologic and paleobiogeographic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omaña, Lourdes; González-Arreola, Celestina; Núñez-Useche, Fernando

    2017-12-01

    A section from the lower part of the Taraises Formation located in the central-east part of Durango State, northern Mexico was studied. The succession consists of a grey and reddish limestone interstratified with marl levels. The calcareous strata provide a microfossil assemblage that consists of calpionellids, planktonic and benthonic foraminifera, and radiolarians. Based on the first appearance of Calpionellites darderi the Berriasian-Valanginian boundary was defined for the first time from the Taraises Formation. Also, the zones and subzones of this interval were described, the Calpionellopsis Zone, Oblonga Subzone and Praecalpionellites murgeanui Subzone for the late Berriasian and the Calpionellites Zone, Darderi and Major Subzones for the early Valanginian. The paleoenvironmental changes in the studied section are documented from the microfaunal association and mineralogical composition. The abundant occurrence of radiolarians in the early Valanginian might suggest an increase in nutrient input. In addition, the presence of tiny barite crystals, ankerite, siderite and dolomite rhombs confirms high fertility, implying oxygen-depleted conditions that could be considered a prelude of the mid-Valanginian Weissert Event. The predominant wackestone texture along with the occurrence of calpionellids and planktonic foraminifera indicate a pelagic basin environment. The microfaunal association is characteristic of the Tethys Realm.

  18. Recent speciation in the Indo-West Pacific: rapid evolution of gamete recognition and sperm morphology in cryptic species of sea urchin.

    PubMed Central

    Landry, C; Geyer, L B; Arakaki, Y; Uehara, T; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2003-01-01

    The rich species diversity of the marine Indo-West Pacific (IWP) has been explained largely on the basis of historical observation of large-scale diversity gradients. Careful study of divergence among closely related species can reveal important new information about the pace and mechanisms of their formation, and can illuminate the genesis of biogeographic patterns. Young species inhabiting the IWP include urchins of the genus Echinometra, which diverged over the past 1-5 Myr. Here, we report the most recent divergence of two cryptic species of Echinometra inhabiting this region. Mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase 1 (CO1) sequence data show that in Echinometra oblonga, species-level divergence in sperm morphology, gamete recognition proteins and gamete compatibility arose between central and western Pacific populations in the past 250 000 years. Divergence in sperm attachment proteins suggests rapid evolution of the fertilization system. Divergence of sperm morphology may be a common feature of free-spawning animals, and offers opportunities to simultaneously understand genetic divergence, changes in protein expression patterns and morphological evolution in traits directly related to reproductive isolation. PMID:12964987

  19. Zooplankton community resilience and aquatic environmental stability on aquaculture practices: a study using net cages.

    PubMed

    Dias, J D; Simões, N R; Bonecker, C C

    2012-02-01

    Fish farming in net cages causes changes in environmental conditions. We evaluated the resilience of zooplankton concerning this activity in Rosana Reservoir (Paranapanema River, PR-SP). Samples were taken near the net cages installed at distances upstream and downstream, before and after net cage installation. The resilience was estimated by the decrease in the groups' abundance after installing the net cages. The zooplankton community was represented by 106 species. The most abundant species were Synchaeta pectinata, S. oblonga, Conochilus coenobasis, Polyarthra dolichoptera and C. unicornis (Rotifera), Ceriodaphnia cornuta, Moina minuta, Bosmina hagmanni and C. silvestrii (Cladocera) and Notodiaptomus amazonicus (Copepoda). The resilience of microcrustaceans was affected in the growing points as this activity left the production environment for longer, delaying the natural ability of community responses. Microcrustaceans groups, mainly calanoid and cyclopoid copepods, had a different return rate. The net cage installation acted as a stress factor on the zooplankton community. Management strategies that cause fewer risks to the organisms and maximize energy flow may help in maintaining system stability.

  20. Structure and similarity of helminth communities of six species of Australian turtles.

    PubMed

    Zelmer, Derek A; Platt, Thomas R

    2008-08-01

    Patterns of infracommunity structure and infra- and component community similarity were examined for helminths of 6 species of turtles, each collected from a single locality in Australia in 1993 and 1994. Elseya latisternum (N = 11) and Emydura kreffti (N = 16) were collected from northern Queensland, Emydura macquarii macquarii (N = 11) from southern Queensland, Emydura macquarii dhara (N = 11) and Chelodina longicollis (N = 11) from northern New South Wales, and Chelodina oblonga (N = 5) from Western Australia. Local parasite species richness was not correlated with host geographical range. Differences in parasite diversity among host species were related primarily to differences in evenness, a pattern attributed to local habitat characteristics, rather than species-specific differences in colonization potential. Ordination and analysis of similarity demonstrated the patterns of infracommunity structure of Chelodina spp. to be distinct from those of the other host species sampled, which showed considerable overlap among patterns of infracommunity structure. Despite overlap with the component communities of Em. kreffti and El. latisternum, the component communities of Em. m. dhara and Em. m. macquarii were more distinct from one another than either was to the component communities of Em. kreffti or El. latisternum.

  1. Characterization and 1.57 Å resolution structure of the key fire blight phosphatase AmsI from Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Salomone-Stagni, Marco; Musiani, Francesco; Benini, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    AmsI is a low-molecular-weight protein tyrosine phosphatase that regulates the production of amylovoran in the Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora, a specific pathogen of rosaceous plants such as apple, pear and quince. Amylovoran is an exopolysaccharide that is necessary for successful infection. In order to shed light on AmsI, its structure was solved at 1.57 Å resolution at the same pH as its highest measured activity (pH 5.5). In the active site, a water molecule, bridging between the catalytic Arg15 and the reaction-product analogue sulfate, might be representative of the water molecule attacking the phospho-cysteine intermediate in the second step of the reaction mechanism.

  2. Sex pheromone monitoring as a versatile tool for determining presence and abundance of Cydia pomonella (Lep.: Tortricidae) in German apple orchards.

    PubMed

    Hummel, H E; Czyrt, T; Schmid, S; Leithold, G; Vilcinskas, A

    2012-01-01

    Cydia pomonella (Lep.: Tortricidae), the codling moth, is an apple, pear, quince and walnut pest with considerable impact on horticultural production systems in many parts of the world. In commercial apple production, it is responsible for a yearly damage level of 40 billion dollars. In response to the need of tight codling moth control there are several options for intervention by pest managers in commercially operated orchards. Spray and count methods have been used for decades with success, but at considerable external costs for the integrity of ecological cycles. Also, problems with pesticide residues and with resistant strains are an issue of concern. For environmental reasons, toxicological means are discounted here. Instead, flight curves based on sex pheromone trapping and monitoring are preferred means towards determining the optimal timing of interventions by biotechnical and biological control methods. Finally, ecological reasons are discussed for vastly different population levels of C. pomonella developing in closely neighboring field sections which operated under different environmental management.

  3. Drug release from nanoparticles embedded in four different nanofibrillar cellulose aerogels.

    PubMed

    Valo, Hanna; Arola, Suvi; Laaksonen, Päivi; Torkkeli, Mika; Peltonen, Leena; Linder, Markus B; Serimaa, Ritva; Kuga, Shigenori; Hirvonen, Jouni; Laaksonen, Timo

    2013-09-27

    Highly porous nanocellulose aerogels prepared by freeze-drying from various nanofibrillar cellulose (NFC) hydrogels are introduced as nanoparticle reservoirs for oral drug delivery systems. Here we show that beclomethasone dipropionate (BDP) nanoparticles coated with amphiphilic hydrophobin proteins can be well integrated into the NFC aerogels. NFCs from four different origins are introduced and compared to microcrystalline cellulose (MCC). The nanocellulose aerogel scaffolds made from red pepper (RC) and MCC release the drug immediately, while bacterial cellulose (BC), quince seed (QC) and TEMPO-oxidized birch cellulose-based (TC) aerogels show sustained drug release. Since the release of the drug is controlled by the structure and interactions between the nanoparticles and the cellulose matrix, modulation of the matrix formers enable a control of the drug release rate. These nanocomposite structures can be very useful in many pharmaceutical nanoparticle applications and open up new possibilities as carriers for controlled drug delivery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessment of Potential for Colloidal Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-06-01

    Scientific Officer U casfe ""DOffice of Naval ResearchS800O N, Quinc’y $truet -~~~~~_ ! A r i g o , V C1 ) V ; I - A S S I F I C A T J "O Nr D f J...of Colloidal Fuels .............. . . page 12 The BCL Colloidal Fuel Costing Rationale . . . . . . . Appendix A $ Alternative Assessment of the Cost...partievia ny as coal part icl siz(-s are reducud it’ss than 70 microns. Note in Table 11 that the impact of thev fine~r Coal Of Batch1 12 rc suIt’s in a moiC

  5. Genomics of pear and other Rosaceae fruit trees

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Toshiya; Terakami, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    The family Rosaceae includes many economically important fruit trees, such as pear, apple, peach, cherry, quince, apricot, plum, raspberry, and loquat. Over the past few years, whole-genome sequences have been released for Chinese pear, European pear, apple, peach, Japanese apricot, and strawberry. These sequences help us to conduct functional and comparative genomics studies and to develop new cultivars with desirable traits by marker-assisted selection in breeding programs. These genomics resources also allow identification of evolutionary relationships in Rosaceae, development of genome-wide SNP and SSR markers, and construction of reference genetic linkage maps, which are available through the Genome Database for the Rosaceae website. Here, we review the recent advances in genomics studies and their practical applications for Rosaceae fruit trees, particularly pear, apple, peach, and cherry. PMID:27069399

  6. Genomics of pear and other Rosaceae fruit trees.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshiya; Terakami, Shingo

    2016-01-01

    The family Rosaceae includes many economically important fruit trees, such as pear, apple, peach, cherry, quince, apricot, plum, raspberry, and loquat. Over the past few years, whole-genome sequences have been released for Chinese pear, European pear, apple, peach, Japanese apricot, and strawberry. These sequences help us to conduct functional and comparative genomics studies and to develop new cultivars with desirable traits by marker-assisted selection in breeding programs. These genomics resources also allow identification of evolutionary relationships in Rosaceae, development of genome-wide SNP and SSR markers, and construction of reference genetic linkage maps, which are available through the Genome Database for the Rosaceae website. Here, we review the recent advances in genomics studies and their practical applications for Rosaceae fruit trees, particularly pear, apple, peach, and cherry.

  7. The use of fruit extracts for production of apple chips with enhanced antioxidant activity

    PubMed

    Tarko, Tomasz; Duda-Chodak, Aleksandra; Semik-Szczurak, Dorota

    Style and pace of life make consumers more willing to reach for snack products. This group of processed food includes, among others, fruit chips. Due to the increasing incidence of diseases associated with the excessive exposure to free radicals foods enriched with antioxidant compounds, eg. polyphenols, can be introduced into the sale. The aim of the study was to use the fruit extracts for the production of apple chips with enhanced antioxidant activity. ‘Golden Delicious’ variety of apple fruit was used to produce chips. Apple chips were prepared by slicing, soaking in a sugar solution and pre-drying in a microwave oven. Chips were enriched with extracts prepared from fruits of chokeberry, five-flavor berry, Cornelian cherry, woodland hawthorn, goji berry, Japanese quince and cranberry microcarpa. For this purpose, pre-dried apple slices were soaked (5 min) in ethanolic extract of fruits and then dried to achieve a 5% moisture content. Chips were sensory evaluated and their antioxidant activity and total polyphenols content were determined. All enriched apple chips were characterized by high antioxidant activity and a relatively high value of total polyphenols content. Chips soaked in extracts of five-flavor berry, cranberry and goji berry were characterized by the highest antioxidant potential. Samples obtained by using chokeberry and Cornelian cherry extracts showed the highest content of polyphenols. High sensory attractiveness of enriched chips was also showed. The chips with the addition of fiveflavor berry extract were exceptions. Their taste was not acceptable. Fruit extracts are a valuable material for chips enrichment. Taking into account all the analyzed differentiators, extracts of Japanese quince, goji berry and woodland hawthorn were found to be the best enriching additives. The chips soaked in extract of five-flavor berry, despite their high antioxidant activity, were disqualified due to very low score of sensory evaluation.

  8. The So-called 'Face on Mars' at Night

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    inclined by 3o from the true north-south direction, and the spacecraft is flying from north-to-south on the day side and from south-to-north on the night side of the planet. These images provide a broad perspective of the landscape and geology of the Cydonia region, showing numerous knobs and hills that have been eroded into a remarkable array of different shapes. In these views the Cydonia region is seen to numerous interesting knobs and mesas that are similar in many ways to the knob named the 'face'. The 3-km long 'face' knob was first imaged by the Viking spacecraft in the 1970's and was seen by some to resemble a face carved into the rocks of Mars. Since that time the Mars Orbiter Camera on the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft and the THEMIS visible and infrared cameras on Mars Odyssey have provided detailed views of this hill that clearly show that it is a normal geologic feature with slopes and ridges carved by eons of wind and downslope motion due to gravity. Many of the knobs in Cydonia, including the 'face', have several flat ledges partway up the hill slopes. These ledges are made of more resistant layers of rock and are the last remnants of layers that once were continuous across this entire region. Erosion has completely removed these layers in most places, leaving behind only the small isolated hills and knobs seen today.

    Note: this THEMIS infrared image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS

  9. Differences in the response sensitivity of stomatal index to atmospheric CO2 among four genera of Cupressaceae conifers.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Matthew; Heath, James; McElwain, Jennifer C

    2010-03-01

    The inverse relationship between stomatal density (SD: number of stomata per mm(2) leaf area) and atmospheric concentration of CO2 ([CO2]) permits the use of plants as proxies of palaeo-atmospheric CO2. Many stomatal reconstructions of palaeo-[CO2] are based upon multiple fossil species. However, it is unclear how plants respond to [CO2] across genus, family or ecotype in terms of SD or stomatal index (SI: ratio of stomata to epidermal cells). This study analysed the stomatal numbers of conifers from the ancient family Cupressaceae, in order to examine the nature of the SI-[CO2] relationship, and potential implications for stomatal reconstructions of palaeo-[CO2]. Methods Stomatal frequency measurements were taken from historical herbarium specimens of Athrotaxis cupressoides, Tetraclinis articulata and four Callitris species, and live A. cupressoides grown under CO2-enrichment (370, 470, 570 and 670 p.p.m. CO2). T. articulata, C. columnaris and C. rhomboidea displayed significant reductions in SI with rising [CO2]; by contrast, A. cupressoides, C. preissii and C. oblonga show no response in SI. However, A. cupressoides does reduce SI to increases in [CO2] above current ambient (approx. 380 p.p.m. CO2). This dataset suggests that a shared consistent SI-[CO2] relationship is not apparent across the genus Callitris. Conclusions The present findings suggest that it is not possible to generalize how conifer species respond to fluctuations in [CO2] based upon taxonomic relatedness or habitat. This apparent lack of a consistent response, in conjunction with high variability in SI, indicates that reconstructions of absolute palaeo-[CO2] based at the genus level, or upon multiple species for discrete intervals of time are not as reliable as those based on a single or multiple temporally overlapping species.

  10. Short-term effect of G-400, polyherbal formulation in the management of hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia conditions in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Gino A; Manjusha, V; Nair, Sunitha S; Varghese, Thomas; Padikkala, Jose

    2014-10-01

    Salacia oblonga, Tinospora cordifolia, Emblica offinalis Gaertn, Curcuma longa and Gymnema sylvestre are Ayurvedic medicinal plants reported to lower plasma glucose levels in animal models. To our knowledge, however, no clinical validations of those extracts for efficacy have been. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of polyherbal combination in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. We screened 250 patients enrolled in a diabetes mellitus screening camp held at District Ayurvedic Hospital, Kottayam, Kerala, India. Of these, 89 patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 50 healthy volunteers of similar age group were included in the study. Patients were treated with a polyherbal combination drug namely G-400 (1000 mg/d) for 8 wk with a follow-up of 2wk interval. Fasting and postprandial blood glucose levels measured after 8 wk of G-400 treatment in patients were significantly lower. Indeed diabetic rats showed similar protection with G-400 administration. Furthermore, glycosylated hemoglobin, serum total cholesterol, both high- and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides showed a significant improvement in G-400-administered patients. Toxicologic profile of the drug was assessed by analyzing the enzyme activities of alkaline phosphatase and alanine aminotransferase along with the concentration of blood urea nitrogen and creatinine in blood and found insignificant change compared with control. Short-term supplementation of G-400 not only attenuates the hyperglycemia, but also acts as hypolipidemic agent in patients with diabetes. Further study should be done for the long-term effect of the drug in larger populations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Anti‐diabetic and Anti‐hyperlipidemic Effects and Safety of Salacia reticulata and Related Species

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Sidhartha

    2015-01-01

    Extracts of Salacia reticulata Wight (Hypocrataceae) roots, stems, and leaves have been used in Asia for hundreds of years for the folkloric treatment of diabetes and other health problems. Constituents that have been identified as exhibiting anti‐diabetic effects include salacinol, kotalanol, ponkorinol, salaprinol, and their corresponding de‐0‐sulfonated compounds. Mangiferin, kotalagenin 16‐acetate and various proanthocyanidin oligomers have also been isolated. Studies indicate that Salacia extracts modulate multiple targets that influence carbohydrate and lipid metabolism including α‐glucosidase, aldose reductase, pancreatic lipase, peroxisomal proliferator‐activated receptor‐α, glucose transporter‐4 mediated glucose uptake, and angiotensin II type 1 receptor. Furthermore, Salacia extracts exhibit free radical scavenging, antioxidant and hepatoprotectant activities. In human studies, Salacia extracts have been shown to decrease plasma glucose and insulin levels, decrease HbA1c, and modulate serum lipid levels with no adverse effects being reported. Similar results have been demonstrated in rat and mouse models as well as in vitro systems. Safety of S. reticulata and other Salacia species as S. oblonga and S. chinensis in rats and mice indicate that extracts are exceedingly safe. No clinical studies have examined the effects of Salacia extracts on human weight loss, although weight loss and decreases in weight gain have been demonstrated in animal models. Because of the large number of pharmacologically active compounds, it is difficult to establish standards for extracts. © 2015 The Authors. Phytotheraphy Research published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26031882

  12. Effects of delayed metamorphosis on larval survival, metamorphosis, and juvenile performance of four closely related species of tropical sea urchins (genus Echinometra).

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Aminur; Yusoff, Fatimah Md; Arshad, A; Uehara, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    We report here, the effects of extended competency on larval survival, metamorphosis, and postlarval juvenile growth of four closely related species of tropical sea urchins, Echinometra sp. A (Ea), E. mathaei (Em), Echinometra sp. C (Ec), and E. oblonga (Eo). Planktotrophic larvae of all four species fed on cultured phytoplankton (Chaetoceros gracilis) attained metamorphic competence within 22-24 days after fertilization. Competent larvae were forced to delay metamorphosis for up to 5 months by preventing them from settling in culture bottles with continuous stirring on a set of 10 rpm rotating rollers and larval survival per monthly intervals was recorded. Larval survival was highest at 24 days, when competence was attained (0 delayed period), and there were no significant differences among the four species. Larvae that had experienced a prolonged delay had reduced survival rate, metamorphosis success, and juvenile survival, but among older larvae, Em had the highest success followed by Ea, Eo, and Ec. Juveniles from larvae of all four species that metamorphosed soon after becoming competent tended to have higher growth rates (test diameter and length of spines) than juveniles from larvae that metamorphosed after a prolonged period of competence with progressively slower growth the longer the prolonged period. Despite the adverse effects of delaying metamorphosis on growth parameters, competent larvae of all four species were able to survive up to 5 months and after metamorphosis grew into 1-month-old juveniles in lab condition. Overall, delayed larvae of Em showed significantly higher larval survival, metamorphosis, and juvenile survival than Ea and Eo, while Ec showed the lowest values in these performances. Em has the most widespread distribution of these species ranging from Africa to Hawaii, while Ec probably has the most restricted distribution. Consequently, differences in distribution may be related to differences in the ability to delay metamorphosis.

  13. Effects of Delayed Metamorphosis on Larval Survival, Metamorphosis, and Juvenile Performance of Four Closely Related Species of Tropical Sea Urchins (Genus Echinometra)

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. Aminur; Yusoff, Fatimah Md.; Arshad, A.; Uehara, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    We report here, the effects of extended competency on larval survival, metamorphosis, and postlarval juvenile growth of four closely related species of tropical sea urchins, Echinometra sp. A (Ea), E. mathaei (Em), Echinometra sp. C (Ec), and E. oblonga (Eo). Planktotrophic larvae of all four species fed on cultured phytoplankton (Chaetoceros gracilis) attained metamorphic competence within 22–24 days after fertilization. Competent larvae were forced to delay metamorphosis for up to 5 months by preventing them from settling in culture bottles with continuous stirring on a set of 10 rpm rotating rollers and larval survival per monthly intervals was recorded. Larval survival was highest at 24 days, when competence was attained (0 delayed period), and there were no significant differences among the four species. Larvae that had experienced a prolonged delay had reduced survival rate, metamorphosis success, and juvenile survival, but among older larvae, Em had the highest success followed by Ea, Eo, and Ec. Juveniles from larvae of all four species that metamorphosed soon after becoming competent tended to have higher growth rates (test diameter and length of spines) than juveniles from larvae that metamorphosed after a prolonged period of competence with progressively slower growth the longer the prolonged period. Despite the adverse effects of delaying metamorphosis on growth parameters, competent larvae of all four species were able to survive up to 5 months and after metamorphosis grew into 1-month-old juveniles in lab condition. Overall, delayed larvae of Em showed significantly higher larval survival, metamorphosis, and juvenile survival than Ea and Eo, while Ec showed the lowest values in these performances. Em has the most widespread distribution of these species ranging from Africa to Hawaii, while Ec probably has the most restricted distribution. Consequently, differences in distribution may be related to differences in the ability to delay metamorphosis

  14. Stratigraphic and microfossil evidence for hydroclimate changes over the middle to late Holocene in the northern Bahamas from an inland saline lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Hengstum, P. J.; Maale, G. E.; Donnelly, J. P.; Onac, B. P.; Sullivan, R.; Winkler, T. S.; Albury, N. A.

    2016-12-01

    No Man's Land is one of the largest inland lakes on the Little Bahama Bank in the northern Bahamas, so its paleoenvironmental history may provide insight into how the regional hydroclimate developed over the Holocene. In its modern state, the site is shallow (<3 m), brackish (20.6 psu), 170 m in diameter, and located 700 m from the coastline. Prior to 6400 Cal yrs BP, the accumulation of peat deposits and no aquatic invertebrates (e.g., ostracodes, foraminifera, aquatic mollusks) indicate that the site was a terrestrial ecosystem. However, the site transitioned into a subaqueous freshwater environment at 6400 Cal yrs BP, and the site became a palustrine-lacustrine setting thereafter until 4200 Cal yrs BP. During this time, widespread palustrine-lacustrine carbonate deposition and the appearance of freshwater to low mesohaline microfossils indicates that the lake's salinity was likely oligohaline (charophytes, ostracodes: Candona annae, Cypridopsis vidua, foraminifera: Helenina davescottensis, mollusks: Planorbis, Hydrobia). A salinity increase at 4200 Cal yrs BP is inferred from the appearance of the ostracode Cyprideis americana that typically prefers salinities exceeding 10 psu, and deposition of laminated microbial mats. Thereafter, an organic- rich, algal sapropel unit accumulated that was devoid of any microfossils or mollusks. This unit suggests that the lake hosted a stratified water column, where surface waters supported phytoplankton primary productivity and corrosive or anoxic bottom water conditions either hampered microfossil growth or precluded their preservation. The transition to the modern environment ( 20 psu) at 2600 cal yrs BP is characterized by diversification of brackish ostracodes (Aurila floridana, Dolerocypria inopinata, and Hemicyprideis setipunctata), foraminifera (Elphidium spp., Ammonia beccarii, Triloculina oblonga) and mollusks (Anomalocardia, Cerithidea). Over the middle to late Holocene, it appears that the stratigraphic development

  15. Differences in the response sensitivity of stomatal index to atmospheric CO2 among four genera of Cupressaceae conifers

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Matthew; Heath, James; McElwain, Jennifer C.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims The inverse relationship between stomatal density (SD: number of stomata per mm2 leaf area) and atmospheric concentration of CO2 ([CO2]) permits the use of plants as proxies of palaeo-atmospheric CO2. Many stomatal reconstructions of palaeo-[CO2] are based upon multiple fossil species. However, it is unclear how plants respond to [CO2] across genus, family or ecotype in terms of SD or stomatal index (SI: ratio of stomata to epidermal cells). This study analysed the stomatal numbers of conifers from the ancient family Cupressaceae, in order to examine the nature of the SI–[CO2] relationship, and potential implications for stomatal reconstructions of palaeo-[CO2]. Methods Stomatal frequency measurements were taken from historical herbarium specimens of Athrotaxis cupressoides, Tetraclinis articulata and four Callitris species, and live A. cupressoides grown under CO2-enrichment (370, 470, 570 and 670 p.p.m. CO2). Key Results T. articulata, C. columnaris and C. rhomboidea displayed significant reductions in SI with rising [CO2]; by contrast, A. cupressoides, C. preissii and C. oblonga show no response in SI. However, A. cupressoides does reduce SI to increases in [CO2] above current ambient (approx. 380 p.p.m. CO2). This dataset suggests that a shared consistent SI–[CO2] relationship is not apparent across the genus Callitris. Conclusions The present findings suggest that it is not possible to generalize how conifer species respond to fluctuations in [CO2] based upon taxonomic relatedness or habitat. This apparent lack of a consistent response, in conjunction with high variability in SI, indicates that reconstructions of absolute palaeo-[CO2] based at the genus level, or upon multiple species for discrete intervals of time are not as reliable as those based on a single or multiple temporally overlapping species. PMID:20089556

  16. Highest-Resolution View of 'Face on Mars'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    A key aspect of the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Extended Mission is the opportunity to turn the spacecraft and point the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) at specific features of interest. A chance to point the spacecraft comes about ten times a week. Throughout the Primary Mission (March 1999 - January 2001), nearly all MGS operations were conducted with the spacecraft pointing 'nadir'--that is, straight down. In this orientation, opportunities to hit a specific small feature of interest were in some cases rare, and in other cases non-existent. In April 1998, nearly a year before MGS reached its Primary Mission mapping orbit, several tests of the spacecraft's ability to be pointed at specific features was conducted with great success (e.g., Mars Pathfinder landing site, Viking 1 site, and Cydonia landforms). When the Mars Polar Lander was lost in December 1999, this capability was again employed to search for the missing lander. Following the lander search activities, a plan to conduct similar off-nadir observations during the MGS Extended Mission was put into place. The Extended Mission began February 1, 2001. On April 8, 2001, the first opportunity since April 1998 arose to turn the spacecraft and point the MOC at the popular 'Face on Mars' feature.

    Viking orbiter images acquired in 1976 showed that one of thousands of buttes, mesas, ridges, and knobs in the transition zone between the cratered uplands of western Arabia Terra and the low, northern plains of Mars looked somewhat like a human face. The feature was subsequently popularized as a potential 'alien artifact' in books, tabloids, radio talk shows, television, and even a major motion picture. Given the popularity of this landform, a new high-resolution view was targeted by pointing the spacecraft off-nadir on April 8, 2001. On that date at 20:54 UTC (8:54 p.m., Greenwich time zone), the MGS was rolled 24.8o to the left so that it was looking at the 'face' 165 km to the side from a distance of about 450 km

  17. Development and validation of an LC-MS/MS method for the determination of biogenic amines in wines and beers.

    PubMed

    Nalazek-Rudnicka, Katarzyna; Wasik, Andrzej

    2017-01-01

    Biogenic amines are group of organic, basic, nitrogenous compounds that naturally occur in plant, microorganism, and animal organisms. Biogenic amines are mainly produced through decarboxylation of amino acids. They are formed during manufacturing of some kind of food and beverages such as cheese, wine, or beer. Histamine, cadaverine, agmatine, tyramine, putrescine, and β -phenylethylamine are the most common biogenic amines found in wines and beers. This group of compounds can be toxic at high concentrations; therefore, their control is very important. Analysis of biogenic amines in alcoholic drinks (beers and wines) was carried out by HPLC-MS/MS after their derivatization with p -toluenesulfonyl chloride (tosyl chloride). The developed method has been applied for analysis of seventeen biogenic amines in twenty-eight samples of lager beers and in twelve samples of different homemade wines (white grape, red grape, strawberry, chokeberry, black currant, plum, apple, raspberry, and quince). The developed method is sensitive and repeatable for majority of the analytes. It is versatile and can be used for the determination of biogenic amines in various alcoholic beverages.

  18. RNA isolation from loquat and other recalcitrant woody plants with high quality and yield.

    PubMed

    Morante-Carriel, Jaime; Sellés-Marchart, Susana; Martínez-Márquez, Ascensión; Martínez-Esteso, María José; Luque, Ignacio; Bru-Martínez, Roque

    2014-05-01

    RNA isolation is difficult in plants that contain large amounts of polysaccharides and polyphenol compounds. To date, no commercial kit has been developed for the isolation of high-quality RNA from tissues with these characteristics, especially for fruit. The common protocols for RNA isolation are tedious and usually result in poor yields when applied to recalcitrant plant tissues. Here an efficient RNA isolation protocol based on cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and two successive precipitations with 10 M lithium chloride (LiCl) was developed specifically for loquat fruits, but it was proved to work efficiently in other tissues of loquat and woody plants. The RNA isolated by this improved protocol was not only of high purity and integrity (A260/A280 ratios ranged from 1.90 to 2.04 and A260/A230 ratios were>2.0) but also of high yield (up to 720 μg on average [coefficient of variation=21%] total RNA per gram fresh tissue). The protocol was tested on loquat fruit (different stages of development, postharvest, ripening, and bruising), leaf, root, flower, stem, and bud; quince fruit and root; grapevine cells in liquid culture; and rose petals. The RNA obtained with this method is amenable to enzymatic treatments and can be efficiently applied for research on gene characterization, expression, and function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Antioxidant capacity of fruits and vegetables cultivated in Chile].

    PubMed

    Araya, Héctor; Clavijo, Carolina; Herrera, Claudia

    2006-12-01

    The high prevalence of non transmissible chronic diseases (NCD) related to food consumption had increased the studies conducted to investigate the relationship between diet and health. A smaller incidence of NCD, with food patterns with high consumption of fruits and vegetables has been observed and chemical compounds of these foods have been one of the main subjects of the actual research in the reaqltion between food consumption and health. The effect of vegetable foods has been attributed to various nutrients and bioactive compounds with antioxidant activity. In order to determine the antioxidant capacity of vegetable foods cultivated in Chile, natural fruits and vegetables were analyzed according to the FRAP (ferric reducing activity power) method, reading to the 4 minutes. In vegetables, the values were between 0.002 and 1.91 milimoles of Fe/l00 g for cooked carrot and red pepper respectively. The values of the fruits ranged between 0.02 milimoles of Fe/100 g for the cucumber and 12.32 for maqui, the berries studies showed values between 3.10 for strawberry and 3.55 for wild blackberry. Lemmon and quince with 0.25 and 0.23 respectively are located in the intermediate level and the lowest values within the fruits corresponded to apple (fuji variety) and peaches.

  20. Influence of some technological parameters on the formation of dimethyl sulfide, 2-mercaptoethanol, methionol, and dimethyl sulfone in port wines.

    PubMed

    Silva Ferreira, António César; Rodrigues, Paula; Hogg, Timothy; Guedes De Pinho, Paula

    2003-01-29

    Volatile sulfur compounds of 15 young port wines and 12 old port wines were determined. As there is a great difference in the pool of sulfur compounds between the two groups of wines, an experimental protocol was performed to determine which technological parameter (dissolved O(2), free SO(2) levels, pH, and time/temperature) was related with the formation/consumption of these compounds. Four sulfur compounds were selected for this purpose: dimethyl sulfide, 2-mercaptoethanol, dimethyl sulfone, and methionol. The synergistic effects of increasing temperature and O(2) at lower pH had the largest impact. Dimethyl sulfide was formed during the experimental period in the presence of O(2). Dimethyl sulfone had the same behavior. Methionol decreased significantly in the presence of O(2), but no methional was formed. 2-Mercaptoethanol, considered to be an important "off-flavor" in dry wines, also decreased during the experimental period (54 days) in the presence of O(2), and the respective disulfide was formed. These results corroborate the fact that old port wine (barrel aged) never develops "off-flavors" associated with the presence of methionol (cauliflower), 2-mercaptoethanol (rubber/burnt), or methional (cooked potato). In fact, temperature and oxygen are the major factors in the consumption of these molecules. However, some notes of "quince" and "metallic" can appear during port wine aging, and these can be associated with the presence of dimethyl sulfide.

  1. Nutrient-rich versus nutrient-poor foods for depressed patients based on Iranian Traditional Medicine resources.

    PubMed

    Tavakkoli-Kakhki, Mandana; Eslami, Saeid; Motavasselian, Malihe

    2015-01-01

    Considering the positive effects of certain nutrients on depression, increasingly prevalent in the contemporary societies, we investigated the nutritional content of prescribed and prohibited foodstuffs for depressed patients in Iranian Traditional Medicine resources. In order to conduct the study, credible sources of Iranian Traditional Medicine were primarily reviewed for the prescribed and prohibited foodstuffs for depressed patients. USDA database, as a well-known and valuable source, was then visited to determine the amount of effective nutrients in each foodstuff. Finally, the obtained amounts were compared with each other in three food groups, namely vegetables, fruits and nuts and also high protein products. In Iranian Traditional Medicine texts, the following are prescribed for depression management: basil, coriander, spinach, lettuce, squash, peppermint, dill, chicory, celery, chard, quince, cucumber, watermelon, grape, peach, pomegranate, banana, apple, currant, pistachio, dried fig, almond, egg, chicken, lamb, and trout; cabbage, eggplant, onion, garlic, broad beans, lentils, and beef, meanwhile, are prohibited. In this regard, the effective nutritional content of these foodstuffs was obtained and then compared in the three food groups. This study revealed that spinach, lettuce, chicory, and squash (vegetables), pomegranate and almond (fruits and nuts) and ultimately trout (high protein products) are the best effective foodstuffs on depressed patients from nutritional content aspect.

  2. Molecular genetics of Erwinia amylovora involved in the development of fire blight.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang-Sik; Beer, Steven V

    2005-12-15

    The bacterial plant pathogen, Erwinia amylovora, causes the devastating disease known as fire blight in some Rosaceous plants like apple, pear, quince, raspberry and several ornamentals. Knowledge of the factors affecting the development of fire blight has mushroomed in the last quarter century. On the molecular level, genes encoding a Hrp type III secretion system, genes encoding enzymes involved in synthesis of extracellular polysaccharides and genes facilitating the growth of E. amylovora in its host plants have been characterized. The Hrp pathogenicity island, delimited by genes suggesting horizontal gene transfer, is composed of four distinct regions, the hrp/hrc region, the HEE (Hrp effectors and elicitors) region, the HAE (Hrp-associated enzymes) region, and the IT (Island transfer) region. The Hrp pathogenicity island encodes a Hrp type III secretion system (TTSS), which delivers several proteins from bacteria to plant apoplasts or cytoplasm. E. amylovora produces two exopolysaccharides, amylovoran and levan, which cause the characteristic fire blight wilting symptom in host plants. In addition, other genes, and their encoded proteins, have been characterized as virulence factors of E. amylovora that encode enzymes facilitating sorbitol metabolism, proteolytic activity and iron harvesting. This review summarizes our understanding of the genes and gene products of E. amylovora that are involved in the development of the fire blight disease.

  3. Two-strain competition in quasineutral stochastic disease dynamics.

    PubMed

    Kogan, Oleg; Khasin, Michael; Meerson, Baruch; Schneider, David; Myers, Christopher R

    2014-10-01

    We develop a perturbation method for studying quasineutral competition in a broad class of stochastic competition models and apply it to the analysis of fixation of competing strains in two epidemic models. The first model is a two-strain generalization of the stochastic susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) model. Here we extend previous results due to Parsons and Quince [Theor. Popul. Biol. 72, 468 (2007)], Parsons et al. [Theor. Popul. Biol. 74, 302 (2008)], and Lin, Kim, and Doering [J. Stat. Phys. 148, 646 (2012)]. The second model, a two-strain generalization of the stochastic susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model with population turnover, has not been studied previously. In each of the two models, when the basic reproduction numbers of the two strains are identical, a system with an infinite population size approaches a point on the deterministic coexistence line (CL): a straight line of fixed points in the phase space of subpopulation sizes. Shot noise drives one of the strain populations to fixation, and the other to extinction, on a time scale proportional to the total population size. Our perturbation method explicitly tracks the dynamics of the probability distribution of the subpopulations in the vicinity of the CL. We argue that, whereas the slow strain has a competitive advantage for mathematically "typical" initial conditions, it is the fast strain that is more likely to win in the important situation when a few infectives of both strains are introduced into a susceptible population.

  4. Bactericidal and anti-adhesive properties of culinary and medicinal plants against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, Rachel; Al-Khtheeri, Huda; Weerasekera, Deepaka; Fernando, Neluka; Vaira, Dino; Holton, John; Basset, Christelle

    2005-12-21

    To investigate the bactericidal and anti-adhesive properties of 25 plants against Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). Twenty-five plants were boiled in water to produce aqueous extracts that simulate the effect of cooking. The bactericidal activity of the extracts was assessed by a standard kill-curve with seven strains of H. pylori. The anti-adhesive property was assessed by the inhibition of binding of four strains of FITC-labeled H. pylori to stomach sections. Of all the plants tested, eight plants, including Bengal quince, nightshade, garlic, dill, black pepper, coriander, fenugreek and black tea, were found to have no bactericidal effect on any of the isolates. Columbo weed, long pepper, parsley, tarragon, nutmeg, yellow-berried nightshade, threadstem carpetweed, sage and cinnamon had bactericidal activities against H. pylori, but total inhibition of growth was not achieved in this study. Among the plants that killed H. pylori, turmeric was the most efficient, followed by cumin, ginger, chilli, borage, black caraway, oregano and liquorice. Moreover, extracts of turmeric, borage and parsley were able to inhibit the adhesion of H. pylori strains to the stomach sections. Several plants that were tested in our study had bactericidal and/or anti-adhesive effects on H. pylori. Ingestion of the plants with anti-adhesive properties could therefore provide a potent alternative therapy for H. pylori infection, which overcomes the problem of resistance associated with current antibiotic treatment.

  5. Malformations of calpionellid loricas recorded in Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous pelagic carbonates of the Western Carpathians, Western Balcan, Mexico and Cuba - a tool for paleoenvironmental interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reháková, Daniela; Michalík, Jozef; Lakova, Iskra; Petrova, Silviya; López-Martínez, Rafael

    2017-04-01

    Characteristic morphology and assemblage composition of of ancient planktonic ciliate protozoan loricas made of them a favourable tool for interregional correlation. They are playing a key role in the biostratigraphy of Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous sequences not only in areas lacking in ammonites. Detailed comparative analysis of calpionellid associations along all the Tethys shows variations in relative species abundance, variability, diversity changes and also in variability of their lorica structure. As oligotrophic organisms, they were sensitive to environmental perturbations such a change of the water temperature, chemistry, salinity and the nutrient supply. Mass occurrence of these microfossils was associated with shallow basins and with intrashelf elevations. These enviroments were characterized by a permanent current regime positively influencing the nutrient input. It is worth to mention, that the abundance and size of calpionellid loricas decrease towards the open sea - they are less frequent in deep basins, being very rare or seldom in reefal and lagoonal settings or in proximal settings with permanent river-influenced elevated nutrient level and with changes in surface water chemistry. Two diversity maxima were recorded within the Intermedia and the Oblonga subzones and two crisis were observed at the end of the Colomi Subzone and at the beginning of the Murgeanui Subzone. During the last mentioned events, deformations (aberrant morphology) were documented in Crassicollaria, Tintinnopsella and Praecalpionellites loricas (Reháková, 2000; Lakova and Petrova, 2013; López-Martínez et al., 2015). Teratological (malformed) tests may coincide either with metal poisoning or with salinity changes. Global climate changes could have been evoked by active volcanoes noted at this time (Casellato and Erba, 2015). Oxygen isotope data signalized late Tithonian cooling followed by a warming at the beginning of the Berriasian (Weissert and Erba, 2004). Huge

  6. Mars Shoreline Tests: Contact between Lycus Sulci and Amazonis Planitia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    site]

    The first picture above shows the regional context of a Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) high-resolution image that was targeted in August 1998 with the intent to test the hypothesis that the northern plains of Mars were once the site of a vast ocean of liquid water. The second picture shows the resulting MOC image, numbered SPO2-515/05 and located at 40.0oN, 6.0oW in the transition zone between the Cydonia region and Acidalia Planitia, Mars.

    The context image (first picture) includes several dark lines, some of which are labeled I and some are labeled G. These dark lines were proposed in previous, peer-reviewed scientific papers to be possible ocean shorelines located along the margins of the martian northern plains. Line I was called the Interior Plains Boundary, and line G was called the Gradational Boundary. The MGS MOC high resolution image was targeted such that it would examine the nature of line I, the Interior Plains Boundary.

    The second figure shows the MOC high resolution view. The picture on the left side of the figure (second image) is the full MOC image and the white box indicates the location of the expanded view to the right. In the expanded view (the center of the figure), the location of line I--the proposed shoreline--is shown by a dashed curve. The dashed curve follows a subtle, shallow trough. None of the types of coastal landforms common on Earth--such as a beach, wave-cut cliff or terrace, or coastal dune fields, are seen at this location. If an ocean had once been present, then the water would have covered the top 2/3 of the expanded view--i.e., water would have lapped up against the rounded mounds in the lower 1/3 of this picture. Instead of coastal landforms, the MOC image exhibits a dark surface in its upper 1/3. The dark surface covers older, rounded hills and has a low, lobate escarpment along its southern margin. This escarpment faces south--that is, it faces toward the once-proposed coastline. In other

  7. The study and analysis of the mating behavior and sound production of male cicada Psalmocharias alhageos (Kol.) (Homoptera:Cicadidae) to make disruption in mating.

    PubMed

    Zamanian, H; Mehdipour, M; Ghaemi, N

    2008-09-01

    Psalmocharias alhageos is an important pest of vine in most parts of Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, southern areas of Russia, Turkey and Iraq. This cicada is spread in most provinces in Iran such as Esfahan, Hamedan, Qazvin, Markazi, Lorestan, Qom, Kerman, Tehran and Kordestan. In addition to vine, this insect damages some other fruit trees, such as apple, sour cherry, quince, peach, pomegranate and pear trees and some non-fruit trees, namely white poplar, ash, elm, eglantine, silk and black poplar trees. The nymphs of cicada damage the trees by feeding on root, adult insects on young bud and by oviposition under branch barks. Nourishing root by nymph leads to the weakness of the tree and hinder its growth. The high density oviposition of adult insects inside young barks causes withering of branches. The resulted damage on vine products is 40% which is one of the most important factors in product reduction in vineyard. This research was conducted in Takestan in Qazvin. It was conducted for the first time to study the behaviors of the mates of this vine cicada in order to manage it. Two systems were used to record the sound of male cicada called analog voice-recorder and digital voice recorder. To analyze the recorded sound of the male cicada we used of spectrum analyzer, digital storage oscilloscope and protens 7 computer softwares. We could call the attention of natural enemies an disturb the male insect's attracting sound by producing natural and artificial sound in the range of 1-6 kHz in two different ripeness status of the fruits and could prevent mating and oviposition of female cicadas.

  8. NorM, an Erwinia amylovora Multidrug Efflux Pump Involved in In Vitro Competition with Other Epiphytic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Burse, Antje; Weingart, Helge; Ullrich, Matthias S.

    2004-01-01

    Blossoms are important sites of infection for Erwinia amylovora, the causal agent of fire blight of rosaceous plants. Before entering the tissue, the pathogen colonizes the stigmatic surface and has to compete for space and nutrient resources within the epiphytic community. Several epiphytes are capable of synthesizing antibiotics with which they antagonize phytopathogenic bacteria. Here, we report that a multidrug efflux transporter, designated NorM, of E. amylovora confers tolerance to the toxin(s) produced by epiphytic bacteria cocolonizing plant blossoms. According to sequence comparisons, the single-component efflux pump NorM is a member of the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion protein family. The corresponding gene is widely distributed among E. amylovora strains and related plant-associated bacteria. NorM mediated resistance to the hydrophobic cationic compounds norfloxacin, ethidium bromide, and berberine. A norM mutant was constructed and exhibited full virulence on apple rootstock MM 106. However, it was susceptible to antibiotics produced by epiphytes isolated from apple and quince blossoms. The epiphytes were identified as Pantoea agglomerans by 16S rRNA analysis and were isolated from one-third of all trees examined. The promoter activity of norM was twofold greater at 18°C than at 28°C. The lower temperature seems to be beneficial for host infection because of the availability of moisture necessary for movement of the pathogen to the infection sites. Thus, E. amylovora might employ NorM for successful competition with other epiphytic microbes to reach high population densities, particularly at a lower temperature. PMID:14766544

  9. Desarrollo de un instrumento para medir percepciones sobre el contexto de construccion del conocimiento cientifico de estudiantes universitarios de nuevo ingreso

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Ramirez, Jaime Antonio

    En esta investigacion, se desarrollo un instrumento que permite medir percepciones relacionadas al contexto de constriccion del conocimiento cientifico. Se examinaron instrumentos existentes y se encontro que el VOSTS (Views on science, technology, and society), instrumento desarrollado empiricamente en Canada por Aikenhead, Ryan y Fleming, podia traducirse y validarse en el contexto cultural puertorriqueno. El instrumento es extenso, consta de 113 reactivos, cada uno con una premisa basica relacionada a la tematica ciencia, tecnologia y sociedad y un numero de alternativas relacionadas a la premisa que oscila entre siete y trece. Se delimito su utilizacion a los quince reactivos identificados por los autores como relacionados a la construccion social del conocimiento cientifico. Metodologicamente, se procedio a utilizar el modelo de adaptacion intercultural, que permite que el instrumento desarrollado satisfaga las dimensiones de equivalencia semantica, de contenido, tecnica, de criterio y conceptual, atemperado asi al instrumento original. Se cumplio con este proposito mediante la traduccion de la version original en ingles al espanol y viceversa. Se utilizaron comites para examinar la traduccion y la retro-traduccion del instrumento. Se realizo una prueba piloto con estudiantes universitarios de nuevo ingreso, utilizando el instrumento traducido para asegurar su intelegibilidad. La confiabilidad del instrumento se determino mediante la intervencion de un panel de expertos quienes clasificaron las distintas posiciones dentro de cada reactivo en: realista, con merito e ingenua; se transformaron estas opciones en valores numericos lo que permitio establecer una escala Likert para cada una. Se suministro el instrumento a una muestra de estudiantes universitarios de nuevo ingreso con caracteristicas similares a las de la poblacion puertorriquena en cuanto a ejecucion en las pruebas de aptitud verbal y matematica del College Board. Los resultados de sus contestaciones

  10. Total number of planetary nebulae in different galaxies and the PN distance scale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peimbert, M.

    1990-12-01

    RESUMEN A partir de una muestra de quince galaxias se encuentra que la tasa de natalidad de nebulosas planetarias por unidad de luminosidad, , disminuye al aumentar la luminosidad y al aumentar (B - V)0. Se discuten posibles explicaciones para estos resultados. Se estima el valor de para la Galaxia y a partir de el se encuentra que el numero total de nebulosas planetarias en nuestra galaxia con R < 0.64 pc- es de 7200 j 1800. El valor galactico de implica que la mayorfa de las estrellas de masa intermedia pasa por la etapa de nebulosa planetaria. El valor galactico de , la tasa de mortalidad estelar por unidad de luminosidad y la tasa de natalidad de enanas blancas favorecen escalas de distancias largas para nebulosas planetarias, como la de Cudworth (1974) y la de Mallik y Peimbert (1988). ABSTRACT From a sample of fifteen galaxies it is found that the birth rate of PN per unit luminosity, , decreases with increasing luminosity and with increasing (B - V)0 possible reasons for these relationships are discussed. The value for the Galaxy is estimated and, from it, a total number of PN of 7200 # 1800 wid R < 0.64 pc is obtained. The galactic value implies that most of the intermediate mass stars go through the PN stage. The galactic value, the stellar death rate per unit luminosity and the white dwarf birth rate are in favor of long distance scales to PN like those of Cudworth (1974) and Mallik and (1988). Key wonis: NEBULAE.PLANETARY - STARS-EVOLUTION - STARS-SThLIAR STA. S

  11. Determining the Diversity and Species Abundance Patterns in Arctic Soils using Rational Methods for Exploring Microbial Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovreas, L.; Quince, C.; Sloan, W.; Lanzen, A.; Davenport, R.; Green, J.; Coulson, S.; Curtis, T.

    2012-12-01

    Arctic microbial soil communities are intrinsically interesting and poorly characterised. We have inferred the diversity and species abundance distribution of 6 Arctic soils: new and mature soil at the foot of a receding glacier, Arctic Semi Desert, the foot of bird cliffs and soil underlying Arctic Tundra Heath: all near Ny-Ålesund, Spitsbergen. Diversity, distribution and sample sizes were estimated using the rational method of Quince et al., (Isme Journal 2 2008:997-1006) to determine the most plausible underlying species abundance distribution. A log-normal species abundance curve was found to give a slightly better fit than an inverse Gaussian curve if, and only if, sequencing error was removed. The median estimates of diversity of operational taxonomic units (at the 3% level) were 3600-5600 (lognormal assumed) and 2825-4100 (inverse Gaussian assumed). The nature and origins of species abundance distributions are poorly understood but may yet be grasped by observing and analysing such distributions in the microbial world. The sample size required to observe the distribution (by sequencing 90% of the taxa) varied between ~ 106 and ~105 for the lognormal and inverse Gaussian respectively. We infer that between 5 and 50 GB of sequencing would be required to capture 90% or the metagenome. Though a principle components analysis clearly divided the sites into three groups there was a high (20-45%) degree of overlap in between locations irrespective of geographical proximity. Interestingly, the nearest relatives of the most abundant taxa at a number of most sites were of alpine or polar origin. Samples plotted on first two principal components together with arbitrary discriminatory OTUs

  12. Mars Orbiter Camera Views the 'Face on Mars' - Comparison with Viking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Shortly after midnight Sunday morning (5 April 1998 12:39 AM PST), the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft successfully acquired a high resolution image of the 'Face on Mars' feature in the Cydonia region. The image was transmitted to Earth on Sunday, and retrieved from the mission computer data base Monday morning (6 April 1998). The image was processed at the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) facility 9:15 AM and the raw image immediately transferred to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for release to the Internet. The images shown here were subsequently processed at MSSS.

    The picture was acquired 375 seconds after the spacecraft's 220th close approach to Mars. At that time, the 'Face', located at approximately 40.8o N, 9.6o W, was 275 miles (444 km) from the spacecraft. The 'morning' sun was 25o above the horizon. The picture has a resolution of 14.1 feet (4.3 meters) per pixel, making it ten times higher resolution than the best previous image of the feature, which was taken by the Viking Mission in the mid-1970's. The full image covers an area 2.7 miles (4.4 km) wide and 25.7 miles (41.5 km) long.

    In this comparison, the best Viking image has been enlarged to 3.3 times its original resolution, and the MOC image has been decreased by a similar 3.3 times, creating images of roughly the same size. In addition, the MOC images have been geometrically transformed to a more overhead projection (different from the mercator map projection of PIA01440 & 1441) for ease of comparison with the Viking image. The left image is a portion of Viking Orbiter 1 frame 070A13, the middle image is a portion of MOC frame shown normally, and the right image is the same MOC frame but with the brightness inverted to simulate the approximate lighting conditions of the Viking image.

    Processing Image processing has been applied to the images in order to improve the visibility of features. This processing included the following steps:

    The

  13. Mars Orbiter Camera Views the 'Face on Mars' - Calibrated, contrast enhanced, filtered,

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Shortly after midnight Sunday morning (5 April 1998 12:39 AM PST), the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft successfully acquired a high resolution image of the 'Face on Mars' feature in the Cydonia region. The image was transmitted to Earth on Sunday, and retrieved from the mission computer data base Monday morning (6 April 1998). The image was processed at the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) facility 9:15 AM and the raw image immediately transferred to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for release to the Internet. The images shown here were subsequently processed at MSSS.

    The picture was acquired 375 seconds after the spacecraft's 220th close approach to Mars. At that time, the 'Face', located at approximately 40.8o N, 9.6o W, was 275 miles (444 km) from the spacecraft. The 'morning' sun was 25o above the horizon. The picture has a resolution of 14.1 feet (4.3 meters) per pixel, making it ten times higher resolution than the best previous image of the feature, which was taken by the Viking Mission in the mid-1970's. The full image covers an area 2.7 miles (4.4 km) wide and 25.7 miles (41.5 km) long. Processing Image processing has been applied to the images in order to improve the visibility of features. This processing included the following steps:

    The image was processed to remove the sensitivity differences between adjacent picture elements (calibrated). This removes the vertical streaking.

    The contrast and brightness of the image was adjusted, and 'filters' were applied to enhance detail at several scales.

    The image was then geometrically warped to meet the computed position information for a mercator-type map. This corrected for the left-right flip, and the non-vertical viewing angle (about 45o from vertical), but also introduced some vertical 'elongation' of the image for the same reason Greenland looks larger than Africa on a mercator map of the Earth.

    A section of the image, containing the 'Face

  14. Mars Orbiter Camera Views the 'Face on Mars' - Calibrated, contrast enhanced, filtered

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Shortly after midnight Sunday morning (5 April 1998 12:39 AM PST), the Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) on the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) spacecraft successfully acquired a high resolution image of the 'Face on Mars' feature in the Cydonia region. The image was transmitted to Earth on Sunday, and retrieved from the mission computer data base Monday morning (6 April 1998). The image was processed at the Malin Space Science Systems (MSSS) facility 9:15 AM and the raw image immediately transferred to the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for release to the Internet. The images shown here were subsequently processed at MSSS.

    The picture was acquired 375 seconds after the spacecraft's 220th close approach to Mars. At that time, the 'Face', located at approximately 40.8o N, 9.6o W, was 275 miles (444 km) from the spacecraft. The 'morning' sun was 25o above the horizon. The picture has a resolution of 14.1 feet (4.3 meters) per pixel, making it ten times higher resolution than the best previous image of the feature, which was taken by the Viking Mission in the mid-1970's. The full image covers an area 2.7 miles (4.4 km) wide and 25.7 miles (41.5 km) long. Processing Image processing has been applied to the images in order to improve the visibility of features. This processing included the following steps:

    The image was processed to remove the sensitivity differences between adjacent picture elements (calibrated). This removes the vertical streaking.

    The contrast and brightness of the image was adjusted, and 'filters' were applied to enhance detail at several scales.

    The image was then geometrically warped to meet the computed position information for a mercator-type map. This corrected for the left-right flip, and the non-vertical viewing angle (about 45o from vertical), but also introduced some vertical 'elongation' of the image for the same reason Greenland looks larger than Africa on a mercator map of the Earth.

    A section of the image, containing the 'Face

  15. Catalogue of Tenebrionidae (Coleoptera) of North America

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, Yves; Thomas, Donald B.; Bouchard, Patrice; Smith, Aaron D.; Aalbu, Rolf L.; Johnston, M. Andrew; Jr., Warren E. Steiner

    2018-01-01

    , 1894)]; Asida angustula Casey, 1890, Stethasida stricta Casey, 1912, Stethasida muricatula languida Casey, 1912, Stethasida pertinax Casey, 1912, Stethasida socors Casey, 1912, Stethasida angustula inepta Casey, 1912, Stethasida tenax Casey, 1912, and Stethasida vegrandis Casey, 1912 [= Stenomorpha muricatula (LeConte, 1851)]; Stethasida obsoleta expansa Casey, 1912, Stethasida obsoleta opacella Casey, 1912, Stethasida brevipes Casey, 1912, Stethasida torpida Casey, 1912, Stethasida convergens Casey, 1912, Stethasida discreta Casey, 1912, Stethasida longula Casey, 1912, Stethasida adumbrata Casey, 1912, Stethasida occulta Casey, 1912, Stethasida tarsalis Casey, 1912, Stethasida unica Casey, 1912, and Pelecyphorus laevigatus Papp, 1961 [= Stenomorpha obsoleta (LeConte, 1851)]; Trichiasida eremica Wilke, 1922 [= Stenomorpha difficilis (Champion, 1884)]; Trichiasida lineatopilosa Casey, 1912 [= Stenomorpha hirsuta (LeConte, 1851)]; Trichiasida tenella Casey, 1912 [= Stenomorpha hispidula (LeConte, 1851)]; Trichiasida duplex Casey, 1912 [= Stenomorpha villosa (Champion, 1884)]; Alaudes squamosa Blaisdell, 1919, Alaudes testacea Blaisdell, 1919, and Alaudes fallax Fall, 1928 [= Alaudes singularis Horn, 1870]; Edrotes barrowsi Dajoz, 1999 [=Edrotes ventricosus LeConte, 1851]; Nyctoporis tetrica Casey, 1907 and Nyctoporis maura Casey, 1907 [= Nyctoporis aequicollis Eschscholtz, 1831]; Nyctoporis pullata Casey, 1907 [= Nyctoporis sponsa Casey, 1907]; Eleodes tibialis forma oblonga Blaisdell, 1909 [= Eleodes tibialis Blaisdell, 1909]; Eleodes (manni var.) variolosa Blaisdell, 1917 [= Eleodes constrictus LeConte, 1858]; Eleodes cordata forma sublaevis Blaisdell, 1909, Eleodes cordata forma intermedia Blaisdell, 1909, Eleodes cordata forma oblonga Blaisdell, 1909, Eleodes cordata forma elongata Blaisdell, 1909, and Eleodes (cordata var.) adulterina Blaisdell, 1917 [= Eleodes cordata Eschscholtz, 1829]; Eleodes hornii var. monticula Blaisdell, 1918 and Eleodes manni sierra

  16. Catalogue of Tenebrionidae (Coleoptera) of North America.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Yves; Thomas, Donald B; Bouchard, Patrice; Smith, Aaron D; Aalbu, Rolf L; Johnston, M Andrew; Steiner, Warren E

    2017-01-01

    )]; Asida angustula Casey, 1890, Stethasida stricta Casey, 1912, Stethasida muricatula languida Casey, 1912, Stethasida pertinax Casey, 1912, Stethasida socors Casey, 1912, Stethasida angustula inepta Casey, 1912, Stethasida tenax Casey, 1912, and Stethasida vegrandis Casey, 1912 [= Stenomorpha muricatula (LeConte, 1851)]; Stethasida obsoleta expansa Casey, 1912, Stethasida obsoleta opacella Casey, 1912, Stethasida brevipes Casey, 1912, Stethasida torpida Casey, 1912, Stethasida convergens Casey, 1912, Stethasida discreta Casey, 1912, Stethasida longula Casey, 1912, Stethasida adumbrata Casey, 1912, Stethasida occulta Casey, 1912, Stethasida tarsalis Casey, 1912, Stethasida unica Casey, 1912, and Pelecyphorus laevigatus Papp, 1961 [= Stenomorpha obsoleta (LeConte, 1851)]; Trichiasida eremica Wilke, 1922 [= Stenomorpha difficilis (Champion, 1884)]; Trichiasida lineatopilosa Casey, 1912 [= Stenomorpha hirsuta (LeConte, 1851)]; Trichiasida tenella Casey, 1912 [= Stenomorpha hispidula (LeConte, 1851)]; Trichiasida duplex Casey, 1912 [= Stenomorpha villosa (Champion, 1884)]; Alaudes squamosa Blaisdell, 1919, Alaudes testacea Blaisdell, 1919, and Alaudes fallax Fall, 1928 [= Alaudes singularis Horn, 1870]; Edrotes barrowsi Dajoz, 1999 [= Edrotes ventricosus LeConte, 1851]; Nyctoporis tetrica Casey, 1907 and Nyctoporis maura Casey, 1907 [= Nyctoporis aequicollis Eschscholtz, 1831]; Nyctoporis pullata Casey, 1907 [= Nyctoporis sponsa Casey, 1907]; Eleodes tibialis forma oblonga Blaisdell, 1909 [= Eleodes tibialis Blaisdell, 1909]; Eleodes ( manni var.) variolosa Blaisdell, 1917 [= Eleodes constrictus LeConte, 1858]; Eleodes cordata forma sublaevis Blaisdell, 1909, Eleodes cordata forma intermedia Blaisdell, 1909, Eleodes cordata forma oblonga Blaisdell, 1909, Eleodes cordata forma elongata Blaisdell, 1909, and Eleodes ( cordata var.) adulterina Blaisdell, 1917 [= Eleodes cordata Eschscholtz, 1829]; Eleodes hornii var. monticula Blaisdell, 1918 and Eleodes manni sierra Blaisdell

  17. Composite biostratigraphy and microfacies analysis of the Upper Jurassic - Lower Cretaceous carbonate platform to slope successions in Sivrihisar (Eskişehir) region (NW Turkey, Pontides): Remarks on the palaeogeographic evolution of the Western Sakarya Zo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atasoy, Serdar G.; Altıner, Demir; Okay, Aral I.

    2017-04-01

    Two stratigraphical sections were measured along the Upper Jurassic - Lower Cretaceous carbonate successions exposed in a tectonic klippe of the Sakarya Zone (Pontides), north of Sivrihisar. According to the biozonation and microfacies types, two coeval but dissimiliar rock successions, separated by a thrust fault, have been detected. These successions belong to different depositional belts of the Edremit-Bursa-Bilecik Carbonate Platform (EBBCP), western Sakarya Zone. The lower succession displays a slope to basin facies and consists of the Kimmeridgian - Berriasian Yosunlukbayırı Formation and the overlying Valanginian Soǧukçam Limestone. Within these deposits the following biozones were defined: Globuligerina oxfordiana - Mohlerina basiliensis Zone (Kimmeridgian), Saccocoma Zone (Lower Tithonian), Protopeneroplis ultragranulata Zone (Upper Tithonian), Crassicollaria (massutiana subzone) Zone (uppermost Tithonian), Calpionella (alpina, Remaniella, elliptica subzones) Zone (Lower Berriasian), Calpionellopsis (simplex, oblonga subzones) Zone (Upper Berriasian) and Calpionellites (darderi subzone) Zone (Lower Valanginian). This succession is overthrusted from north to south by another distinct succession characterized by the shallow marine carbonate facies of the Kimmeridgian Günören Formation. Within this unit Labyrinthina mirabilis - Protopeneroplis striata (Kimmeridgian) Zone is recognized. A facies model is proposed for the Sivrihisar transect of the EBBCP for Kimmeridgian - Valanginian interval, based on the distribution of microfacies types. The toe-of-slope facies are characterized by peloidal-bioclastic packstone, mudstone-wackestone and calpionellid/ radiolarian wackestone-packstone comprising pelagic taxa (calpionellids, radiolaria, Globochaete sp., Pithonella sp., Saccocoma sp., calcareous dinocysts, aptychi, very rare planktonic foraminifera and nannoconids) and rare fossil groups transported from the carbonate platform (benthic foraminifera

  18. Characterization and regulation of the resistance-nodulation-cell division-type multidrug efflux pumps MdtABC and MdtUVW from the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Pletzer, Daniel; Weingart, Helge

    2014-07-11

    The Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora is the causal agent of the devastating disease fire blight in rosaceous plants such as apple, pear, quince, raspberry, and cotoneaster. In order to survive and multiply in a host, microbes must be able to circumvent the toxic effects of antimicrobial plant compounds, such as flavonoids and tannins. E. amylovora uses multidrug efflux transporters that recognize and actively export toxic compounds out of the cells. Here, two heterotrimeric resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type multidrug efflux pumps, MdtABC and MdtUVW, from E. amylovora were identified. These RND systems are unusual in that they contain two different RND proteins forming a functional pump. To find the substrate specificities of the two efflux systems, we overexpressed the transporters in a hypersensitive mutant lacking the major RND pump AcrB. Both transporters mediated resistance to several flavonoids, fusidic acid and novobiocin. Additionally, MdtABC mediated resistance towards josamycin, bile salts and silver nitrate, and MdtUVW towards clotrimazole. The ability of the mdtABC- and mdtUVW-deficient mutants to multiply in apple rootstock was reduced. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that the expression of the transporter genes was induced during infection of apple rootstock. The polyphenolic plant compound tannin, as well as the heavy metal salt tungstate was found to induce the expression of mdtABC. Finally, the expression of the mdtABC genes was shown to be regulated by BaeR, the response regulator of the two-component system BaeSR, a cell envelope stress response system that controls the adaptive responses to changes in the environment. The expression of MdtABC and MdtUVW is induced during growth of E. amylovora in planta. We identified the plant polyphenol tannin as inducer of mdtABC expression. The reduced ability of the mdtABC- and mdtUVW-deficient mutants to multiply in apple rootstock suggests that the efflux pumps are involved in

  19. Characterization and regulation of the Resistance-Nodulation-Cell Division-type multidrug efflux pumps MdtABC and MdtUVW from the fire blight pathogen Erwinia amylovora

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora is the causal agent of the devastating disease fire blight in rosaceous plants such as apple, pear, quince, raspberry, and cotoneaster. In order to survive and multiply in a host, microbes must be able to circumvent the toxic effects of antimicrobial plant compounds, such as flavonoids and tannins. E. amylovora uses multidrug efflux transporters that recognize and actively export toxic compounds out of the cells. Here, two heterotrimeric resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND)-type multidrug efflux pumps, MdtABC and MdtUVW, from E. amylovora were identified. These RND systems are unusual in that they contain two different RND proteins forming a functional pump. Results To find the substrate specificities of the two efflux systems, we overexpressed the transporters in a hypersensitive mutant lacking the major RND pump AcrB. Both transporters mediated resistance to several flavonoids, fusidic acid and novobiocin. Additionally, MdtABC mediated resistance towards josamycin, bile salts and silver nitrate, and MdtUVW towards clotrimazole. The ability of the mdtABC- and mdtUVW-deficient mutants to multiply in apple rootstock was reduced. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses revealed that the expression of the transporter genes was induced during infection of apple rootstock. The polyphenolic plant compound tannin, as well as the heavy metal salt tungstate was found to induce the expression of mdtABC. Finally, the expression of the mdtABC genes was shown to be regulated by BaeR, the response regulator of the two-component system BaeSR, a cell envelope stress response system that controls the adaptive responses to changes in the environment. Conclusions The expression of MdtABC and MdtUVW is induced during growth of E. amylovora in planta. We identified the plant polyphenol tannin as inducer of mdtABC expression. The reduced ability of the mdtABC- and mdtUVW-deficient mutants to multiply in apple rootstock suggests that the

  20. Alliteration in medicine: a puzzling profusion of p's

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Gregory F

    1999-01-01

    Problem Puzzling, progressive profusion of alliterative “p's” in published papers. Purpose To depict this particular “p” predominance with pinpoint precision. Plan Periodic, painstaking perusal of periodicals by a professor of paediatrics. Proposal The “p” plethora is positively perplexing and potentially perturbing. Alliteration is a literary device consisting of repetition of the same starting sound in several words in a sentence.1 Consider, for example, Shakespeare's playful parody of alliteration in Peter Quince's prologue in A Midsummer Night's Dream: “Whereat with blade, with bloody blameful blade, He bravely broach'd his boiling bloody breast.” Alliteration has appeared frequently in the medical literature—for example: “Respiratory syncytial virus—from chimps with colds to conundrums and cures;”2 “The choreas: of faints, fevers, and families;”3 “Coronary artery stents—gauging, gorging, and gouging;”4 “Moschcowitz, multimers, and metalloprotease;”5 “Alagille syndrome: a nutritional niche for Notch;”6 “Theodor Billroth: success with sutures and strings.”7 Perusing the medical literature with alliteration in mind, I have become perplexed by a peculiar propensity for the letter “p” to be placed in prominent positions. Consider for a moment the alliterative content of the BMJ, a prestigious periodical also published in Pakistani, Polish, and Portuguese. Perhaps the prime example is a piece entitled “A potpourri of parasites in poetry and proverb,”8 but the journal has presented articles addressing such topics as paracetamol poisoning,9 practitioners' pressure to prescribe,10 physicians' partnerships with patients,11 partnerships for prevention in public playgrounds,12 and pregnancy outcomes which have been persistently poor.13 Other topics have included patients' priorities,14 the political process of puzzling out private versus public priorities,15 and the ponderous problem of whether the priorities in

  1. Análisis de costo de la enfermedad, del tratamiento, las complicaciones e intervenciones de la hipercolesterolemia en México en 2016.

    PubMed

    Baeza-Cruz, German; Peniche-Otero, Gustavo; Alva-Esqueda, Mónica E; Naranjo-Muedano, Mariana; Soria-Suárez, Noé; Morales-Flores, Héctor J

    2018-04-20

    Describir los costos y el impacto económico de la atención de pacientes diagnosticados con hipercolesterolemia en México en el año 2016. METODOLOGíA: Se desarrolla una evaluación económica del tipo análisis de costo de la enfermedad donde se cuantifican los recursos médicos utilizados para el tratamiento de la hipercolesterolemia así como para sus complicaciones. Los costos de los recursos médicos utilizados son obtenidos de los costos unitarios por nivel de atención del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social (IMSS) así como de las licitaciones publicadas en el portal de compras del IMSS. El uso de recursos se obtiene mediante un panel de expertos y para el porcentaje de presencia de las complicaciones se efectúa una revisión de literatura. Los costos médicos directos son estimados multiplicando la frecuencia de uso por el costo unitario, agrupándolos y obteniendo así los costos individuales de cada recurso médico. Los casos de hipercolesterolemia en prevención secundaria con enfermedad coronaria y enfermedad cardiovascular representan un mayor costo promedio anual ($111,835.19, D.E. $84,276.37), seguido de la hipercolesterolemia en prevención secundaria con enfermedad coronaria sin enfermedad cardiovascular ($56,352.13, D.E. $29,004.04), los cuales no incluyen los costos generados por las complicaciones. El resto de los grupos de hipercolesterolemia representan una carga económica menor. La carga económica de la hipercolesterolemia representa en promedio por caso al año $258,761.37, esto traducido a los aproximadamente 445,075 de casos diagnosticados y tratados al año representaría un impacto económico en el sistema de salud de más de ciento quince mil millones ($115,168,331,355.11). Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. A systematic revision of Baconia Lewis (Coleoptera, Histeridae, Exosternini)

    PubMed Central

    Caterino, Michael S.; Tishechkin, Alexey K.

    2013-01-01

    ), Baconia turgifrons sp. n., Baconia crassa sp. n., Baconia anthracina sp. n., Baconia emarginata sp. n., Baconia obsoleta sp. n.], Baconia ruficauda group [Baconia ruficauda sp. n., Baconia repens sp. n.], Baconia angusta group [Baconia angusta Schmidt, 1893a, Baconia incognita sp. n., Baconia guartela sp. n., Baconia bullifrons sp. n., Baconia cavei sp. n., Baconia subtilis sp. n., Baconia dentipes sp. n., Baconia rubripennis sp. n., Baconia lunatifrons sp. n.], Baconia aeneomicans group [Baconia aeneomicans (Horn, 1873), Baconia pulchella sp. n., Baconia quercea sp. n., Baconia stephani sp. n., Baconia irinae sp. n., Baconia fornix sp. n., Baconia slipinskii Mazur, 1981, Baconia submetallica sp. n., Baconia diminua sp. n., Baconia rufescens sp. n., Baconia punctiventer sp. n., Baconia aulaea sp. n., Baconia mustax sp. n., Baconia plebeia sp. n., Baconia castanea sp. n., Baconia lescheni sp. n., Baconia oblonga sp. n., Baconia animata sp. n., Baconia teredina sp. n., Baconia chujoi (Cooman, 1941), Baconia barbarus (Cooman, 1934), Baconia reposita sp. n., Baconia kubani sp. n., Baconia wallacea sp. n., Baconia bigemina sp. n., Baconia adebratti sp. n., Baconia silvestris sp. n.], Baconia cylindrica group [Baconia cylindrica sp. n., Baconia chatzimanolisi sp. n.], Baconia gibbifer group [Baconia gibbifer sp. n., B. piluliformis sp. n., Baconia maquipucunae sp. n., Baconia tenuipes sp. n., Baconia tuberculifer sp. n., Baconia globosa sp. n.], Baconia insolita group [Baconia insolita (Schmidt, 1893a), comb. n., Baconia burmeisteri (Marseul, 1870), Baconia tricolor sp. n., Baconia pilicauda sp. n.], Baconia riouka group [Baconia riouka (Marseul, 1861), Baconia azuripennis sp. n.], Baconia famelica group [Baconia famelica sp. n., Baconia grossii sp. n., Baconia redemptor sp. n., Baconia fortis sp. n., Baconia longipes sp. n., Baconia katieae sp. n., Baconia cavifrons (Lewis, 1893), comb. n., Baconia haeterioides sp. n.], Baconia micans group [Baconia micans (Schmidt, 1889a

  3. A systematic revision of Baconia Lewis (Coleoptera, Histeridae, Exosternini).

    PubMed

    Caterino, Michael S; Tishechkin, Alexey K

    2013-01-01

    turgifrons sp. n., Baconia crassa sp. n., Baconia anthracina sp. n., Baconia emarginata sp. n., Baconia obsoleta sp. n.], Baconia ruficauda group [Baconia ruficauda sp. n., Baconia repens sp. n.], Baconia angusta group [Baconia angusta Schmidt, 1893a, Baconia incognita sp. n., Baconia guartela sp. n., Baconia bullifrons sp. n., Baconia cavei sp. n., Baconia subtilis sp. n., Baconia dentipes sp. n., Baconia rubripennis sp. n., Baconia lunatifrons sp. n.], Baconia aeneomicans group [Baconia aeneomicans (Horn, 1873), Baconia pulchella sp. n., Baconia quercea sp. n., Baconia stephani sp. n., Baconia irinae sp. n., Baconia fornix sp. n., Baconia slipinskii Mazur, 1981, Baconia submetallica sp. n., Baconia diminua sp. n., Baconia rufescens sp. n., Baconia punctiventer sp. n., Baconia aulaea sp. n., Baconia mustax sp. n., Baconia plebeia sp. n., Baconia castanea sp. n., Baconia lescheni sp. n., Baconia oblonga sp. n., Baconia animata sp. n., Baconia teredina sp. n., Baconia chujoi (Cooman, 1941), Baconia barbarus (Cooman, 1934), Baconia reposita sp. n., Baconia kubani sp. n., Baconia wallacea sp. n., Baconia bigemina sp. n., Baconia adebratti sp. n., Baconia silvestris sp. n.], Baconia cylindrica group [Baconia cylindrica sp. n., Baconia chatzimanolisi sp. n.], Baconia gibbifer group [Baconia gibbifer sp. n., B. piluliformis sp. n., Baconia maquipucunae sp. n., Baconia tenuipes sp. n., Baconia tuberculifer sp. n., Baconia globosa sp. n.], Baconia insolita group [Baconia insolita (Schmidt, 1893a), comb. n., Baconia burmeisteri (Marseul, 1870), Baconia tricolor sp. n., Baconia pilicauda sp. n.], Baconia riouka group [Baconia riouka (Marseul, 1861), Baconia azuripennis sp. n.], Baconia famelica group [Baconia famelica sp. n., Baconia grossii sp. n., Baconia redemptor sp. n., Baconia fortis sp. n., Baconia longipes sp. n., Baconia katieae sp. n., Baconia cavifrons (Lewis, 1893), comb. n., Baconia haeterioides sp. n.], Baconia micans group [Baconia micans (Schmidt, 1889a), Baconia

  4. Lekking behavior of Anastrepha Fraterculus (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    SciTech Connect

    Segura, D.; Petit-Marty, N.; Cladera, J.

    quimicas) para atraer a las hembras con el proposito de aparearse. Las hembras visitan el lek y eligen entre los machos para copular. La informacion acerca de los principales factores involucrados en la eleccion de la hembra y de la influencia del comportamiento de los machos en los leks en esta eleccion es escasa para A. fraterculus . Esta informacion es importante en el contexto de programas de control que incluyen la Tecnica del Insecto Esteril. En el presente estudio se evaluo el comportamiento sexual de machos de A. fraterculus dentro de los leks, y la asociacion de su comportamiento y de rasgos morfometricos con el exito copulatorio. El lugar preferido de agrupamiento de los machos fue evaluado en jaulas de campo con arboles en su interior y dividiendo el arbol en sectores de acuerdo a un sistema de tres dimensiones. Los machos fueron individualmente pesados, marcados y observados cada quince minutos. Luego de finalizado el ensayo se midieron los rasgos morfometricos. El mayor exito correspondio a machos agrupados en una region del arbol caracterizada por tener la mayor intensidad de luz en las dos primeras horas de la manana. Los resultados mostraron que la actividad de llamado con feromonas esta asociada con el exito copulatorio. Las copulas fueron mas frecuentes para machos que llamaron dentro del lek, indicando que la actividad de llamado con feromonas y la presencia dentro del lek son factores importantes en la obtencion de la copula. Los analisis morfometricos revelaron una asociacion positiva entre el exito copulatorio y el largo del ojo, y que algunas caracteristicas de la cara estan asociadas ademas con la duracion de la copula y la latencia. (author)« less

  5. Morphology of cone-fields in SW Elysium Planitia - Traces of hydrothermal venting on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanz, J. K.; Saric, M. B.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction Small cone-shaped features with summit pits can be found in several regions on Mars; mainly in Isidis Planitia; Elysium Planitia; Amazonis Planitia; Acidalia Planitia; in the Cydonia Region; in Cerberus Planum; the Phlegra Montes and on several volcanic flanks. They vary greatly in size and morphology and have been compared to terrestrial features of various origins; namely (1) cinder cones (e.g. [1]), (2) tuff cones or tuff rings (e.g. [2]), (3) rootless cones (pseudocraters) (e.g. [3], [4]), (4) pingos (e.g. [5], [6]) and (5) mud volcanoes (e.g. [7]). They are often found near volcanic centers and large lava fields or cluster in regions where the volatile content of the Martian regolith was/is supposedly high. This has led to the assumption that (ground-) water or ground ice was a trigger or driving force of cone formation. They could therefore, be an important indicator of the history of water on the planet. We have studied an area in western Elysium Planitia, bordering the Aeolis Planum plateau, which exhibits a large number of pitted cones, ridges and dome-like structures. Their distribution and morphology differs strongly from pitted cones elsewhere in Elysium Planitia, which have mainly been interpreted as hydrovolcanic rootless cones, and from other regions on Mars. Based on our observations, we present an alternative model for cone formation in the study area that might hint towards hydrothermal processes in the Aeolis Planum region and possibly young igneous activity. Aeolis Planum Cones The Aeolis Planum pitted cones (referred to as APCs from now on) cluster along the southern edges of the broad shallow valley that borders the Aeolis Planum Formation (APF) to the north. Cones along the northern edges of the valley are rare and can only be found in association with APF remnants where they strongly resemble the cones in the south. Along the southern border the cone coverage is almost continuous, describing a narrow band approximately 2 to 3 km

  6. Synopsis of the pelidnotine scarabs (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Rutelinae, Rutelini) and annotated catalog of the species and subspecies

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Matthew R.; Jameson, Mary L.; Garner, Beulah H.; Audibert, Cédric; Smith, Andrew B. T.; Seidel, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    (Ganonota) yungana Ohaus, 1934 is transferred to Sorocha (Sorocha yungana (Ohaus, 1934), comb. rev.); Pelidnota malyi Soula, 2010: 58, revised status; Xenopelidnota anomala porioni Chalumeau, 1985, revised subspecies status. To stabilize the classification of the group, a neotype is designated for the following species: Pelidnota thiliezi Soula, 2009. Lectotypes are designated for the following names (given in their original combinations): Pelidnota brevicollis Casey, 1915, Pelidnota brevis Casey, 1915, Pelidnota debiliceps Casey, 1915, Pelidnota hudsonica Casey, 1915, Pelidnota oblonga Casey, 1915, Pelidnota pallidipes Casey, 1915, Pelidnota ponderella Casey, 1915, Pelidnota strenua Casey, 1915, Pelidnota tarsalis Casey, 1915, Pelidnota texensis Casey, 1915, and Scarabaeus punctatus Linnaeus, 1758. The following published infrasubspecific names are unavailable per ICZN Article 45.6.1: Pelidnota (Odontognathus) cuprea var. coerulea Ohaus, 1913; Pelidnota (Odontognathus) cuprea var. rufoviolacea Ohaus, 1913; Pelidnota (Odontognathus) cuprea var. nigrocoerulea Ohaus, 1913; Pelidnota pulchella var. fulvopunctata Ohaus, 1913; Pelidnota pulchella var. sellata Ohaus, 1913; Pelidnota pulchella var. reducta Ohaus, 1913; Pelidnota unicolor var. infuscata Ohaus, 1913. The following published species name is unavailable per ICZN Article 11.5: Neopatatra synonyma Moore & Jameson, 2013. The following published species name is unavailable per application of ICZN Article 16.1: Parhoplognathus rubripennis Soula, 2008. The following published species name is unavailable per application of ICZN Article 16.4.1: Strigidia testaceovirens argentinica Soula, 2006, Pelidnota (Strigidia) testaceovirens argentinica (Soula, 2006), and Pelidnota testaceovirens argentinica (Soula, 2006). The following published species names are unavailable per application of ICZN Article 16.4.2: Homonyx digennaroi Soula, 2010; Homonyx lecourti Soula, 2010; Homonyx mulliei Soula, 2010; Homonyx simoensi Soula, 2010

  7. The story of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory -- A remarkable first 100 years of tracking eruptions and earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Babb, Janet L.; Kauahikaua, James P.; Tilling, Robert I.

    2011-01-01

    part of the USGS, the Nation’s premier Earth science agency. It currently operates under the direction of the USGS Volcano Science Center, which now supports five volcano observatories covering six U.S. areas—Hawaiʻi (HVO), Alaska and the Northern Mariana Islands (Alaska Volcano Observatory), Washington and Oregon (Cascades Volcano Observatory), California (California Volcano Observatory), and the Yellowstone region (Yellowstone Volcano Observatory). Although the National Park Service (NPS) managed HVO for only 12 years, HVO has enjoyed a close working relationship with Hawaiʻi Volcanoes National Park (named Hawaii National Park until 1961) since the park’s founding in 1916. Today, as in past years, the USGS and NPS work together to ensure the safety and education of park visitors. We are grateful to all park employees, particularly Superintendent Cindy Orlando and Chief Ranger Talmadge Magno and their predecessors, for their continuing support of HVO’s mission. HVO also works closely with the Hawaiʻi County Civil Defense. During volcanic and earthquake crises, we have appreciated the support of civil defense staff, especially that of Harry Kim and Quince Mento, who administered the agency during highly stressful episodes of Kīlauea's ongoing eruption. Our work in remote areas on Hawaiʻi’s active volcanoes is possible only with the able assistance of Hawaiʻi County and private pilots who have safely flown HVO staff to eruption sites through the decades. A special mahalo goes to David Okita, who has been HVO’s principal helicopter pilot for more than two decades. Many commercial and Civil Air Patrol pilots have also assisted HVO by reporting their observations during various eruptive events. Hawaiʻi’s news media—print, television, radio, and online sources—do an excellent job of distributing volcano and earthquake information to the public. Their assistance is invaluable to HVO, especially during times of crisis. HVO’s efforts to provide

  8. Measurement and evaluation of national family planning programs.

    PubMed

    Mauldin, W P

    1967-03-01

    RESUMEN: En los últimos quince años diez paises han inaugurado programas nacionales de planeamiento familiar: India, Pakistán, Corea del Sur, Taiwan, Turquía, Malasia, Ceilán, Túez, la República Arabe Unida, y Marruecos. Otros paises, incluyendo Tailandia, Hong Kong, Singapur, Kenya, Barbados, Trinidad y los Estados Unidos, apoyan y/o estimulan actividades de planeamiento familiar. En la mayor parte de los casos la razón fundamental del programa ha sido que si la tasa de crecimiento poblacional disminuyera, aumentaría la tasa de crecimiento económico.Las metas de largo alcance, expresadas típicamente en términos de reducir las tasa.de de natalidad o de crecimiento, tienen su ejemplo en el propósito de Pakistán de reducir su tasa de crecimiento a 26 para 1970; el de Corea de reducir su tasa de natalidad a 20 para 1971; y el de India de reducir su tasa de natalidad a 25 para 1973.Los objectivos intermedios, que cubren diversos aspectos del pro grama, incluyen metas específicas para un determinado mes a año, considerando personal, la adquisición de anticonceptivos, y el número de usarios por método. Las metas específicas anuales de aceptantes de dispositivos intrauterinos (IUD), para Taiwán, Corea, Túnez, Pakistán e India, son comunes, tanto por la naturaleza del artefacto, como por la facilidad de medición de los que continúan utilizándolos. El programa de evaluación en Taiwán, que trata de medir por diversos medios los efectos inmediatos, mediatos y de largo plazo del programa de planeamiento familiar sirve de modelo. El propósito de la evaiuación de un programa de planeamiento familiar es contribuir a la efectividad y eficiencia del programa, midiendo y analizando su progreso. Las áreas a medir pueden ser clasificadas como- (1) conocimiento acerca de; (2) actitudes hacia; (3) práctica de control de natalidad; y (4) nivel de fecundidad.Un buen sistema de evaluación debería incluir: A. Un buen conjunto de estadísticas de servicio