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Sample records for quinolone antibacterial drug

  1. Drug interactions with quinolones.

    PubMed

    Davies, B I; Maesen, F P

    1989-01-01

    Numerous drug interactions with the new 4-quinolone antimicrobial agents have now been established. Many, but not all, quinolones are extensively metabolized and can have inhibitory effects on the liver cytochrome P450 enzyme system, leading to reduced metabolism and clearance of certain other drugs that are normally thus eliminated. Examples include the highly significant interaction between enoxacin and theophylline and the interaction between ciprofloxacin and theophylline, which may also be important clinically. The quinolone-caffeine interaction does not usually cause problems. Absorption of all quinolones from the stomach and small intestine is greatly reduced by antacids containing magnesium or aluminium salts, including sucralfate, probably as a result of the formation of nonabsorbable chelates. Cimetidine can reduce the clearance of pefloxacin (but not of ciprofloxacin) through its effects on liver metabolism, although newer H2-inhibitors appear not to have these effects. Probenecid reduces the renal elimination of some quinolones by inhibiting tubular secretion. New evidence is now coming to light of interactions between certain nonsteroid antiinflammatory drugs (e.g., fenbufen), quinolones, and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, producing increased cerebral excitation and, sometimes, epileptiform convulsions. PMID:2570456

  2. Drug interactions with quinolones.

    PubMed

    Janknegt, R

    1990-11-01

    The pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic drug interactions and pharmaceutical compatibilities of fluoroquinolones are reviewed. Incompatibilities are observed between quinolones and penicillins such as flucloxacillin and amoxicillin and with clindamycin when mixed in an administration set. Fluoroquinolones, especially enoxacin, and to a lesser extent ciprofloxacin and pefloxacin, inhibit the metabolic clearance of theophylline and caffeine. It is advisable to use non-interacting quinolones such as ofloxacin or norfloxacin or to measure theophylline levels and reduce caffeine intake where appropriate. A potential interaction with midazolam needs further study. The absorption of fluoroquinolones is markedly reduced by antacids, calcium carbonate, ferrous sulphate and sucralfate. Although quantitative differences between fluoroquinolones exist, these combinations should be avoided whenever possible. Cimetidine reduces the metabolic clearance of pefloxacin. More studies are needed on the possible reduction of absorption of fluoroquinolones by opiates. Several case reports of a pharmacodynamic interaction between fluoroquinolones and cyclosporin or oral anticoagulants exist. No pharmacokinetic interaction has been observed and more, controlled studies are needed to assess the significance of the pharmacodynamic interaction. A high incidence of convulsions has been observed in patients receiving the combination enoxacin and fenbufen, an NSAID. A synergistic inhibitory effect of fluoroquinolones and several NSAIDs has been observed on the binding of the neurotransmitter GABA. Although the relevance of this interaction is probably not great, except with fenbufen, a possible epileptogenic effect of the combination cannot be excluded.

  3. Type II topoisomerases as targets for quinolone antibacterials: turning Dr. Jekyll into Mr. Hyde.

    PubMed

    Anderson, V E; Osheroff, N

    2001-03-01

    Quinolones are a very important family of antibacterial agents that are widely prescribed for the treatment of infections in humans. Although the founding members of this drug class had little clinical impact, successive generations include the most active and broad spectrum oral antibacterials currently in use. In contrast to most other anti-infective drugs, quinolones do not kill bacteria by inhibiting a critical cellular process. Rather, they corrupt the activities of two essential enzymes, DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, and induce them to kill cells by generating high levels of double-stranded DNA breaks. A second unique aspect of quinolones is their differential ability to target these two enzymes in different bacteria. Depending upon the bacterial species and quinolone employed, either DNA gyrase or topoisomerase IV serves as the primary cytotoxic target of drug action. While this unusual feature initially stymied development of quinolones with high activity against Gram-positive bacteria, it ultimately opened new vistas for the clinical use of this drug class. In addition to the antibacterial quinolones, specific members of this drug family display high activity against eukaryotic type II topoisomerases, as well as cultured mammalian cells and in vivo tumor models. These antineoplastic quinolones represent a potentially important source of new anticancer agents and provide an opportunity to examine drug mechanism across divergent species. Because of the clinical importance of quinolones, this review will discuss the mechanistic basis for drug efficacy and interactions between these compounds and their topoisomerase targets. PMID:11254893

  4. [The history of the development and changes of quinolone antibacterial agents].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hisashi; Hayakawa, Isao; Akimoto, Takeshi

    2003-01-01

    The quinolones, especially the new quinolones (the 6-fluoroquinolones), are the synthetic antibacterial agents to rival the Beta-lactam and the macrolide antibacterials for impact in clinical usage in the antibacterial therapeutic field. They have a broad antibacterial spectrum of activity against Gram-positive, Gram-negative and mycobacterial pathogens as well as anaerobes. Further, they show good-to-moderate oral absorption and tissue penetration with favorable pharmacokinetics in humans resulting in high clinical efficacy in the treatment of many kinds of infections. They also exhibit excellent safety profiles as well as those of oral Beta-lactam antibiotics. The bacterial effects of quinolones inhibit the function of bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. The history of the development of the quinolones originated from nalidixic acid (NA), developed in 1962. In addition, the breakthrough in the drug design for the scaffold and the basic side chains have allowed improvements to be made to the first new quinolone, norfloxacin (NFLX), patented in 1978. Although currently more than 10,000 compounds have been already synthesized in the world, only two percent of them were developed and tested in clinical studies. Furthermore, out of all these compounds, only twenty have been successfully launched into the market. In this paper, the history of the development and changes of the quinolones are described from the first quinolone, NA, via, the first new quinolone (6-fluorinated quinolone) NFLX, to the latest extended-spectrum quinolone antibacterial agents against multi-drug resistant bacterial infections. NA has only modest activity against Gram-negative bacteria and low oral absorption, therefore a suitable candidate for treatment of systemic infections (UTIs) is required. Since the original discovery of NA, a series of quinolones, which are referred to as the old quinolones, have been developed leading to the first new quinolone, NFLX, with moderate improvements

  5. [The history of the development and changes of quinolone antibacterial agents].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hisashi; Hayakawa, Isao; Akimoto, Takeshi

    2003-01-01

    The quinolones, especially the new quinolones (the 6-fluoroquinolones), are the synthetic antibacterial agents to rival the Beta-lactam and the macrolide antibacterials for impact in clinical usage in the antibacterial therapeutic field. They have a broad antibacterial spectrum of activity against Gram-positive, Gram-negative and mycobacterial pathogens as well as anaerobes. Further, they show good-to-moderate oral absorption and tissue penetration with favorable pharmacokinetics in humans resulting in high clinical efficacy in the treatment of many kinds of infections. They also exhibit excellent safety profiles as well as those of oral Beta-lactam antibiotics. The bacterial effects of quinolones inhibit the function of bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV. The history of the development of the quinolones originated from nalidixic acid (NA), developed in 1962. In addition, the breakthrough in the drug design for the scaffold and the basic side chains have allowed improvements to be made to the first new quinolone, norfloxacin (NFLX), patented in 1978. Although currently more than 10,000 compounds have been already synthesized in the world, only two percent of them were developed and tested in clinical studies. Furthermore, out of all these compounds, only twenty have been successfully launched into the market. In this paper, the history of the development and changes of the quinolones are described from the first quinolone, NA, via, the first new quinolone (6-fluorinated quinolone) NFLX, to the latest extended-spectrum quinolone antibacterial agents against multi-drug resistant bacterial infections. NA has only modest activity against Gram-negative bacteria and low oral absorption, therefore a suitable candidate for treatment of systemic infections (UTIs) is required. Since the original discovery of NA, a series of quinolones, which are referred to as the old quinolones, have been developed leading to the first new quinolone, NFLX, with moderate improvements

  6. Mechanisms of drug resistance: quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, David C.; Jacoby, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Quinolone antimicrobials are synthetic and widely used in clinical medicine. Resistance emerged with clinical use and became common in some bacterial pathogens. Mechanisms of resistance include two categories of mutation and acquisition of resistance-conferring genes. Resistance mutations in one or both of the two drug target enzymes, DNA gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV, are commonly in a localized domain of the GyrA and ParE subunits of the respective enzymes and reduce drug binding to the enzyme-DNA complex. Other resistance mutations occur in regulatory genes that control the expression of native efflux pumps localized in the bacterial membrane(s). These pumps have broad substrate profiles that include quinolones as well as other antimicrobials, disinfectants, and dyes. Mutations of both types can accumulate with selection pressure and produce highly resistant strains. Resistance genes acquired on plasmids can confer low-level resistance that promotes the selection of mutational high-level resistance. Plasmid-encoded resistance is due to Qnr proteins that protect the target enzymes from quinolone action, one mutant aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme that also modifies certain quinolones, and mobile efflux pumps. Plasmids with these mechanisms often encode additional antimicrobial resistances and can transfer multidrug resistance that includes quinolones. Thus, the bacterial quinolone resistance armamentarium is large. PMID:26190223

  7. Origins of the Quinolone Class of Antibacterials: An Expanded "Discovery Story".

    PubMed

    Bisacchi, Gregory S

    2015-06-25

    Published descriptions of the specific lines of research leading to the discovery of therapeutically important medicines, especially major new class medicines, have long provided value to the biopharmaceutical community as models of success, often influencing the strategies and methods of subsequent drug research. Quinolone antibacterials represent one of medicine's most important classes of anti-infective agents; yet in contrast to many other classes of anti-infectives, astonishingly few details concerning the origin of the class or the rationale leading to the selection of the first clinical agent, nalidixic acid, were ever published by the discoverers. Moreover, earlier disclosures of an independent discovery of the quinolone class of antibacterials have been almost entirely overlooked by the scientific literature. This review brings together all the available information from primary literature sources relating to both discoveries and provides for the first time a much fuller, if still partially speculative, story of the earliest years of this important class of drugs.

  8. A “Double-Edged” Scaffold: Antitumor Power within the 
Antibacterial Quinolone

    PubMed Central

    Bisacchi, Gregory S.; Hale, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    In the late 1980s, reports emerged describing experimental antibacterial quinolones having significant potency against eukaryotic Type II topoisomerases (topo II) and showing cytotoxic activity against tumor cell lines. As a result, several pharmaceutical companies initiated quinolone anticancer programs to explore the potential of this class in comparison to conventional human topo II inhibiting antitumor drugs such as doxorubicin and etoposide. In this review, we present a modern re-evaluation of the anticancer potential of the quinolone class in the context of today’s predominantly pathway-based (rather than cytotoxicity-based) oncology drug R&D environment. The quinolone eukaryotic SAR is comprehensively discussed, contrasted with the corresponding prokaryotic data, and merged with recent structural biology information which is now beginning to help explain the basis for that SAR. Quinolone topo II inhibitors appear to be much less susceptible to efflux-mediated resistance, a current limitation of therapy with conventional agents. Recent advances in the biological understanding of human topo II isoforms suggest that significant progress might now be made in overcoming two other treatment-limiting disadvantages of conventional topo II inhibitors, namely cardiotoxicity and drug-induced secondary leukemias. We propose that quinolone class topo II inhibitors could have a useful future therapeutic role due to the continued need for effective topo II drugs in many cancer treatment settings, and due to the recent biological and structural advances which can now provide, for the first time, specific guidance for the design of a new class of inhibitors potentially superior to existing agents. PMID:26695512

  9. Looking for the new preparations for antibacterial therapy III. New antimicrobial agents from the quinolones group in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Karpiuk, Izabela; Tyski, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    There is an essential need for searching for the new compounds effective in the treatment of infections caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria. This paper is the third part of a series associated with the exploration of new antibacterial agents and it discusses the compounds belonging to the group of quinolones and substances possessing a hybrid structure composed of the quinolone molecule and other compounds. Eleven new substances at the stage of clinical trials are presented. Three of them belong to the group of non-fluorinated quinolone (nemonoxacin, ozenoxacin and KRP-AM 1977X), while six are the quinolones containing fluorine atom at 6 position of the carbon atom in the quinoline ring (zabofloxacin, finafloxacin, delafloxacin, JNJ-Q2, WCK771 and KPI-10). The remaining two compounds possess a hybrid construction composed of the quinolone structure and other molecules (cadazolid and CBR-2092). There is a chance in the near future, that the presented compounds can extend the range of existing antibacterial drugs and provide an alternative to currently available medicinal products.

  10. Microbial transformations of antimicrobial quinolones and related drugs.

    PubMed

    Parshikov, Igor A; Sutherland, John B

    2012-12-01

    The quinolones are an important group of synthetic antimicrobial drugs used for treating bacterial diseases of humans and animals. Microorganisms transform antimicrobial quinolones (including fluoroquinolones) and the pharmacologically related naphthyridones, pyranoacridones, and cinnolones to a variety of metabolites. The biotransformation processes involve hydroxylation of methyl groups; hydroxylation of aliphatic and aromatic rings; oxidation of alcohols and amines; reduction of carboxyl groups; removal of methyl, carboxyl, fluoro, and cyano groups; addition of formyl, acetyl, nitrosyl, and cyclopentenone groups; and cleavage of aliphatic and aromatic rings. Most of these reactions greatly reduce or eliminate the antimicrobial activity of the quinolones. PMID:23007957

  11. Design and biological evaluation of novel quinolone-based metronidazole derivatives as potent Cu(2+) mediated DNA-targeting antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Kumar, Kannekanti Vijaya; Geng, Rong-Xia; Zhou, Cheng-He

    2015-09-01

    A series of novel quinolone-based metronidazole derivatives as new type of antimicrobial agents were developed and characterized. Most of them gave good antibacterial activity towards the Gram-positive and negative bacteria. Noticeably, quinolone derivative 3i exhibited low MIC value of 0.25 μg/mL against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which was even superior to reference drugs Norfloxacin, Ciprofloxacin and Clinafloxacin. The further research revealed that compound 3i could intercalate into P. aeruginosa DNA through copper ion bridge to form a steady 3i-Cu(2+)-DNA ternary complex which might further block DNA replication to exert the powerful bioactivities.

  12. 4-Quinolone drugs affect cell cycle progression and function of human lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Forsgren, A; Schlossman, S F; Tedder, T F

    1987-01-01

    Most antibacterial agents do not affect human lymphocyte function, but a few are inhibitory. In contrast, a pronounced increase in the incorporation of [3H]thymidine in the presence of 4-quinolones was observed in these studies. The uptake of [3H]thymidine into DNA (trichloroacetic acid precipitable) was significantly increased in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human lymphocytes when they were exposed to eight new 4-quinolone derivatives, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, A-56619, A-56620, amifloxacin, enoxacin, and pefloxacin, at 1.6 to 6.25 micrograms/ml for 5 days. Four less antibacterially active 4-quinolones (nalidixic acid, cinoxacin, flumequine, and pipemidic acid) stimulated [3H]thymidine incorporation only at higher concentrations or not at all. Kinetic studies showed that incorporation of [3H]thymidine was not affected or slightly inhibited by ciprofloxacin 2 days after phytohemagglutinin stimulation but was increased on days 3 to 6. The total incorporation of [3H]thymidine from day 1 to day 6 after phytohemagglutinin stimulation was increased by 42 to 45% at 5 to 20 micrograms of ciprofloxacin per ml. Increased [3H]thymidine incorporation was also seen when human lymphocytes were stimulated with mitogens other than phytohemagglutinin. Ciprofloxacin added at the start of the culture had a more pronounced effect on [3H]thymidine incorporation than when added later. In spite of the apparent increase in DNA synthesis, lymphocyte growth was inhibited by 20 micrograms of ciprofloxacin per ml, and cell cycle analysis showed that ciprofloxacin inhibited progression through the cell cycle. In addition, immunoglobulin secretion by human lymphocytes stimulated by pokeweed mitogen for Epstein-Barr virus was inhibited by approximately 50% at 5 micrograms of ciprofloxacin per ml. These results suggest that the 4-quinolone drugs may also affect eucaryotic cell function in vitro, but additional studies are needed to establish an in vivo relevance. PMID:3606076

  13. [Bacterial type II topoisomerases as targets for antibacterial drugs].

    PubMed

    Pietrusiński, Michał; Staczek, Paweł

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial type II DNA topoisomerases are essential enzymes for correct genome functioning and cell growth. Gyrase is responsible for maintaining negative supercoiling of bacterial chromosome, whereas topoisomerase IV acts in disentangling daughter chromosomes following replication. Type II DNA topoisomerases possess an ATP binding site, which can be treated as a target for antibacterial drugs. Resolving crystal structures of protein fragments consisting of an ATP binding site complexed with ADPNP/antibiotics have proven to be valuable for the understanding of the mode of action of existing antibacterial agents and presented new possibilities for novel drug design. Coumarins, quinolones and cyclothialidines are diverse group of antibiotics that interfere with type II DNA topoisomerases, however their mode of action is different. Recently a new class of antibiotics, simociclinones, was characterized. Their mechanism of action towards gyrase is entirely distinct from already known modes of action, therefore demonstrating the potential for development of novel anti-bacterial agents.

  14. DNA Gyrase Is the Target for the Quinolone Drug Ciprofloxacin in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    PubMed Central

    Evans-Roberts, Katherine M.; Mitchenall, Lesley A.; Wall, Melisa K.; Leroux, Julie; Mylne, Joshua S.; Maxwell, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome contains four genes that were originally annotated as potentially encoding DNA gyrase: ATGYRA, ATGYRB1, ATGYRB2, and ATGYRB3. Although we subsequently showed that ATGYRB3 does not encode a gyrase subunit, the other three genes potentially encode subunits of a plant gyrase. We also showed evidence for the existence of supercoiling activity in A. thaliana and that the plant is sensitive to quinolone and aminocoumarin antibiotics, compounds that target DNA gyrase in bacteria. However, it was not possible at that time to show whether the A. thaliana genes encoded an active gyrase enzyme, nor whether that enzyme is indeed the target for the quinolone and aminocoumarin antibiotics. Here we show that an A. thaliana mutant resistant to the quinolone drug ciprofloxacin has a point mutation in ATGYRA. Moreover we show that, as in bacteria, the quinolone-sensitive (wild-type) allele is dominant to the resistant gene. Further we have heterologously expressed ATGYRA and ATGYRB2 in a baculovirus expression system and shown supercoiling activity of the partially purified enzyme. Expression/purification of the quinolone-resistant A. thaliana gyrase yields active enzyme that is resistant to ciprofloxacin. Taken together these experiments now show unequivocally that A. thaliana encodes an organelle-targeted DNA gyrase that is the target of the quinolone drug ciprofloxacin; this has important consequences for plant physiology and the development of herbicides. PMID:26663076

  15. DNA Gyrase Is the Target for the Quinolone Drug Ciprofloxacin in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Evans-Roberts, Katherine M; Mitchenall, Lesley A; Wall, Melisa K; Leroux, Julie; Mylne, Joshua S; Maxwell, Anthony

    2016-02-12

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome contains four genes that were originally annotated as potentially encoding DNA gyrase: ATGYRA, ATGYRB1, ATGYRB2, and ATGYRB3. Although we subsequently showed that ATGYRB3 does not encode a gyrase subunit, the other three genes potentially encode subunits of a plant gyrase. We also showed evidence for the existence of supercoiling activity in A. thaliana and that the plant is sensitive to quinolone and aminocoumarin antibiotics, compounds that target DNA gyrase in bacteria. However, it was not possible at that time to show whether the A. thaliana genes encoded an active gyrase enzyme, nor whether that enzyme is indeed the target for the quinolone and aminocoumarin antibiotics. Here we show that an A. thaliana mutant resistant to the quinolone drug ciprofloxacin has a point mutation in ATGYRA. Moreover we show that, as in bacteria, the quinolone-sensitive (wild-type) allele is dominant to the resistant gene. Further we have heterologously expressed ATGYRA and ATGYRB2 in a baculovirus expression system and shown supercoiling activity of the partially purified enzyme. Expression/purification of the quinolone-resistant A. thaliana gyrase yields active enzyme that is resistant to ciprofloxacin. Taken together these experiments now show unequivocally that A. thaliana encodes an organelle-targeted DNA gyrase that is the target of the quinolone drug ciprofloxacin; this has important consequences for plant physiology and the development of herbicides. PMID:26663076

  16. Recent advances in antibacterial drugs

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Jaswant; Randhawa, Gurpreet Kaur; Kaur, Mandeep

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of antimicrobial resistance is on continued rise with a threat to return to the “pre-antibiotic” era. This has led to emergence of such bacterial infections which are essentially untreatable by the current armamentarium of available treatment options. Various efforts have been made to develop the newer antimicrobials with novel modes of action which can act against these multi-drug resistant strains. This review aims to focus on these newly available and investigational antibacterials approved after year 2000, their mechanism of actions/resistance, and spectrum of activity and their phases of clinical trials. Newer unexploited targets and strategies for the next generation of antimicrobial drugs for combating the drug resistance and emerging pathogens in the 21st century have also been reviewed in the present article. PMID:23776832

  17. Synthesis and Antibacterial Evaluation of a New Series of N-Alkyl-2-alkynyl/(E)-alkenyl-4-(1H)-quinolones

    PubMed Central

    Wube, Abraham; Guzman, Juan-David; Hüfner, Antje; Hochfellner, Christina; Blunder, Martina; Bauer, Rudolf; Gibbons, Simon; Bhakta, Sanjib; Bucar, Franz

    2012-01-01

    To gain further insight into the structural requirements of the aliphatic group at position 2 for their antimycobacterial activity, some N-alkyl-4-(1H)-quinolones bearing position 2 alkynyls with various chain length and triple bond positions were prepared and tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against rapidly-growing strains of mycobacteria, the vaccine strain Mycobacterium bovis BCG, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains, EMRSA-15 and -16. The compounds were also evaluated for inhibition of ATP-dependent MurE ligase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The lowest MIC value of 0.5 mg/L (1.2-1.5 μM) was found against M. fortuitum and M. smegmatis. These compounds displayed no or only weak toxicity to the human lung fibroblast cell line MRC-5 at 100 μM concentration. The quinolone derivatives exhibited pronounced activity against the epidemic MRSA strains (EMRSA-15 and -16) with MIC values of 2-128 mg/L (5.3-364.7 μM), and M. bovis BCG with an MIC value of 25 mg/L (66.0-77.4 μM). In addition, the compounds inhibited the MurE ligase of M. tuberculosis with moderate to weak activity showing IC50 values of 200-774 μM. The increased selectivity towards mycobacterial bacilli with reference to MRC-5 cells observed for 2-alkynyl quinolones compared to their corresponding 2-alkenyl analogues serves to highlight the mycobacterial specific effect of the triple bond. Exploration of a terminal bromine atom at the side chain of N-alkyl-2-(E)-alkenyl-4-(1H)-quinolones showed improved antimycobacterial activity whereas a cyclopropyl residue at N-1 was suggested to be detrimental to antibacterial activity. PMID:22777190

  18. Quinolone-3-Diarylethers: A new class of drugs for a new era of malaria eradication

    PubMed Central

    White, Karen L.; Forquer, Isaac P.; Cross, Richard M.; Marfurt, Jutta; Mather, Michael W.; Delves, Michael J.; Shackleford, David M.; Saenz, Fabian E.; Morrisey, Joanne M.; Steuten, Jessica; Mutka, Tina; Li, Yuexin; Wirjanata, Grennady; Ryan, Eileen; Duffy, Sandra; Kelly, Jane Xu; Sebayang, Boni F.; Zeeman, Anne-Marie; Noviyanti, Rintis; Sinden, Robert E.; Kocken, Clemens H. M.; Price, Ric N.; Avery, Vicky M.; Angulo-Barturen, Iñigo; Jiménez-Díaz, María Belén; Ferrer, Santiago; Herreros, Esperanza; Sanz, Laura M.; Gamo, Francisco-Javier; Bathurst, Ian; Burrows, Jeremy N.; Siegl, Peter; Guy, R. Kiplin; Winter, Rolf W.; Vaidya, Akhil B.; Charman, Susan A.; Kyle, Dennis E.; Manetsch, Roman; Riscoe, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Ideally antimalarial drugs can be developed which target multiple life cycle stages, thus impacting prevention, treatment and transmission of disease. Here we introduce 4-(1H)-quinolone-3-diarylethers that are selectively potent inhibitors of the parasite’s mitochondrial cytochrome bc1 complex. These compounds are highly active against the primary human malarias (falciparum and vivax), targeting the parasite at both the liver and blood stages as well as the forms that are crucial to disease transmission: gametocytes ⇒ zygotes ⇒ ookinetes ⇒ oocysts. Chosen as the preclinical candidate, ELQ-300 has good oral bioavailability at efficacious dosages in mice, is metabolically stable, and is highly active in rodent malaria models. Given a low predicted dose in patients and a long predicted half-life, ELQ-300 offers the hope of a new molecule for the treatment, prevention and, ultimately, eradication of malaria. PMID:23515079

  19. Facilitating Antibacterial Drug Development in a Time of Great Need.

    PubMed

    Cox, Edward; Cavaleri, Marco; Eichler, Hans-Georg; Woodcock, Janet; Borio, Luciana

    2016-08-15

    The continued development of new antibacterial drugs is critical to meet patient and public health needs. In this editorial, authors from the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency reflect on the role of public-private partnerships and the development of clinical trials networks as agents to guide and perform quality studies of antibacterial drugs. PMID:27481949

  20. Antibacterial drug discovery in the resistance era.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric D; Wright, Gerard D

    2016-01-21

    The looming antibiotic-resistance crisis has penetrated the consciousness of clinicians, researchers, policymakers, politicians and the public at large. The evolution and widespread distribution of antibiotic-resistance elements in bacterial pathogens has made diseases that were once easily treatable deadly again. Unfortunately, accompanying the rise in global resistance is a failure in antibacterial drug discovery. Lessons from the history of antibiotic discovery and fresh understanding of antibiotic action and the cell biology of microorganisms have the potential to deliver twenty-first century medicines that are able to control infection in the resistance era. PMID:26791724

  1. Antibacterial drug discovery in the resistance era.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric D; Wright, Gerard D

    2016-01-21

    The looming antibiotic-resistance crisis has penetrated the consciousness of clinicians, researchers, policymakers, politicians and the public at large. The evolution and widespread distribution of antibiotic-resistance elements in bacterial pathogens has made diseases that were once easily treatable deadly again. Unfortunately, accompanying the rise in global resistance is a failure in antibacterial drug discovery. Lessons from the history of antibiotic discovery and fresh understanding of antibiotic action and the cell biology of microorganisms have the potential to deliver twenty-first century medicines that are able to control infection in the resistance era.

  2. UV-Vis Spectrophotometrical and Analytical Methodology for the Determination of Singlet Oxygen in New Antibacterials Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Zoltan, Tamara; Vargas, Franklin; Izzo, Carla

    2007-01-01

    We have determined and quantified spectrophotometrically the capacity of producing reactive oxygen species (ROS) as 1O2 during the photolysis with UV-A light of 5 new synthesized naphthyl ester derivates of well-known quinolone antibacterials (nalidixic acid (1), cinoxacin (2), norfloxacin (3), ciprofloxacin (4) and enoxacin (5)). The ability of the naphthyl ester derivatives (6–10) to generate singlet oxygen were detecting and for the first time quantified by the histidine assay, a sensitive, fast and inexpensive method. The following tendency of generation of singlet oxygen was observed: compounds 7 > 10 > 6 > 8 > 9 >> parent drugs 1–5. PMID:19662185

  3. Characterization of Campylobacter jejuni DNA gyrase as the target of quinolones.

    PubMed

    Changkwanyeun, Ruchirada; Usui, Masaru; Kongsoi, Siriporn; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Kim, Hyun; Suthienkul, Orasa; Changkaew, Kanjana; Nakajima, Chie; Tamura, Yutaka; Suzuki, Yasuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Quinolones have long been used as the first-line treatment for Campylobacter infections. However, an increased resistance to quinolones has raised public health concerns. The development of new quinolone-based antibiotics with high activity is critical for effective, as DNA gyrase, the target of quinolones, is an essential enzyme for bacterial growth in several mechanisms. The evaluation of antibiotic activity against Campylobacter jejuni largely relies on drug susceptibility tests, which require at least 2 days to produce results. Thus, an in vitro method for studying the activity of quinolones against the C. jejuni DNA gyrase is preferred. To identify potent quinolones, we investigated the interaction of C. jejuni DNA gyrase with a number of quinolones using recombinant subunits. The combination of purified subunits exhibited DNA supercoiling activity in an ATP dependent manner. Drug concentrations that inhibit DNA supercoiling by 50% (IC50s) of 10 different quinolones were estimated to range from 0.4 (sitafloxacin) to >100 μg/mL (nalidixic acid). Sitafloxacin showed the highest inhibitory activity, and the analysis of the quinolone structure-activity relationship demonstrated that a fluorine atom at R-6 might play the important role in the inhibitory activity against C. jejuni gyrase. Measured quinolone IC50s correlated well with minimum inhibitory concentrations (R = 0.9943). These suggest that the in vitro supercoiling inhibition assay on purified recombinant C. jejuni DNA gyrase is a useful and predictive technique to monitor the antibacterial potency of quinolones. And furthermore, these data suggested that sitafloxacin might be a good candidate for clinical trials on campylobacteriosis.

  4. Discovery of 4′′-Ether Linked Azithromycin-Quinolone Hybrid Series: Influence of the Central Linker on the Antibacterial Activity

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A series of novel C-4′′-substituted azithromycins was synthesized and evaluated for in vitro antibacterial activity against a panel of representative erythromycin-susceptible and macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin (MLS) resistant pathogens. In summary, azithromycin and quinolone substructures merged in a mutually SAR-compatible design gave rise to a new class of antimicrobials with an improved spectrum and potency over azithromycin. Prototypical analogues 7f and 8f display an improved potency versus azithromycin against Gram-positive and fastidious Gram-negative pathogens. In particular, these new leads maintain activity against MLS-resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus pyogenes. In addition, they represent an improvement over telithromycin (1) and cethromycin (2) against the fastidious Gram-negative pathogen Haemophilus influenzae. PMID:24900314

  5. Nanofibers based antibacterial drug design, delivery and applications.

    PubMed

    Ulubayram, Kezban; Calamak, Semih; Shahbazi, Reza; Eroglu, Ipek

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by microorganisms like bacteria, fungi, etc. are the main obstacle in healing processes. Conventional antibacterial administration routes can be listed as oral, intravenous/intramuscular, topical and inhalation. These kinds of drug administrations are faced with critical vital issues such as; more rapid delivery of the drug than intended which can result in bacterial resistance, dose related systemic toxicity, tissue irritation and finally delayed healing process that need to be tackled. Recently, studies have been focused on new drug delivery systems, overcoming resistance and toxicological problems and finally localizing the molecules at the site of action in a proper dose. In this regard, many nanotechnological approaches such as nanoparticulate therapeutic systems have been developed to address accompanying problems mentioned above. Among them, drug loaded electrospun nanofibers propose main advantages like controlled drug delivery, high drug loading capacity, high encapsulation efficiency, simultaneous delivery of multiple drugs, ease of production and cost effectiveness for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. Therefore, some particular attention has been devoted to the design of electrospun nanofibers as promising antibacterial drug carrier systems. A variety of antibacterials e.g., biocides, antibiotics, quaternary ammonium salts, triclosan, metallic nanoparticles (silver, titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide) and antibacterial polymers (chitosan, polyethyleneimine, etc.) have been impregnated by various techniques into nanofibers that exhibit strong antibacterial activity in standard assays. This review highlights the design and delivery of antibacterial drug loaded nanofibers with particular focus on their function in the fields of drug delivery, wound healing, tissue engineering, cosmetics and other biomedical applications.

  6. Nanofibers based antibacterial drug design, delivery and applications.

    PubMed

    Ulubayram, Kezban; Calamak, Semih; Shahbazi, Reza; Eroglu, Ipek

    2015-01-01

    Infections caused by microorganisms like bacteria, fungi, etc. are the main obstacle in healing processes. Conventional antibacterial administration routes can be listed as oral, intravenous/intramuscular, topical and inhalation. These kinds of drug administrations are faced with critical vital issues such as; more rapid delivery of the drug than intended which can result in bacterial resistance, dose related systemic toxicity, tissue irritation and finally delayed healing process that need to be tackled. Recently, studies have been focused on new drug delivery systems, overcoming resistance and toxicological problems and finally localizing the molecules at the site of action in a proper dose. In this regard, many nanotechnological approaches such as nanoparticulate therapeutic systems have been developed to address accompanying problems mentioned above. Among them, drug loaded electrospun nanofibers propose main advantages like controlled drug delivery, high drug loading capacity, high encapsulation efficiency, simultaneous delivery of multiple drugs, ease of production and cost effectiveness for pharmaceutical and biomedical applications. Therefore, some particular attention has been devoted to the design of electrospun nanofibers as promising antibacterial drug carrier systems. A variety of antibacterials e.g., biocides, antibiotics, quaternary ammonium salts, triclosan, metallic nanoparticles (silver, titanium dioxide, and zinc oxide) and antibacterial polymers (chitosan, polyethyleneimine, etc.) have been impregnated by various techniques into nanofibers that exhibit strong antibacterial activity in standard assays. This review highlights the design and delivery of antibacterial drug loaded nanofibers with particular focus on their function in the fields of drug delivery, wound healing, tissue engineering, cosmetics and other biomedical applications. PMID:25732666

  7. Possible interaction of quinolone antibiotics with peptide transporter 1 in oral absorption of peptide-mimetic drugs.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Kamioka, Hiroki; Kanagawa, Masahiko; Hatano, Yasuko; Idota, Yoko; Yano, Kentaro; Morimoto, Kaori; Ogihara, Takuo

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated whether quinolone antibiotics inhibit the PEPT1-mediated uptake of its substrates. Among the quinolones examined, lomefloxacin, moxifloxacin (MFLX) and purlifloxacin significantly inhibited the uptake of PEPT1 substrate phenylalanine-Ψ(CN-S)-alanine (Phe-Ψ-Ala) in HeLa/PEPT1 cells to 31.6 ± 1.3%, 27.6 ± 2.9%, 36.8 ± 2.2% and 32.6 ± 1.4%, respectively. Further examination showed that MFLX was an uncompetitive inhibitor, with an IC50 value of 4.29 ± 1.29 mm. In addition, MFLX significantly decreased the cephalexin and valacyclovir uptake in HeLa/PEPT1 cells. In an in vivo study in rats, the maximum plasma concentration (C(max)) of orally administered Phe-Ψ-Ala was significantly decreased in the presence of MFLX (171 ± 1 ng/ml) compared with that in its absence (244 ± 9 ng/ml). The area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of orally administered Phe-Ψ-Ala in the presence of MFLX (338 ± 50 ng/ml · h) tended to decrease compared with that in its absence (399 ± 75 ng/ml · h). The oral bioavailability of Phe-Ψ-Ala in the presence and absence of MFLX was 41.7 ± 6.2% and 49.2 ± 9.2%, respectively. The results indicate that administration of quinolone antibiotics concomitantly with PEPT1 substrate drugs may potentially result in drug-drug interaction. PMID:26590007

  8. The antibacterial paradox: essential drugs, effectiveness, and cost.

    PubMed Central

    Fasehun, F.

    1999-01-01

    The concept proposed by WHO of an essential drugs list that should comprise drugs corresponding to the health needs of the majority of the people has been embraced by countries, which have adapted it to their needs. In this study, the essential antibacterial drug lists of 16 countries chosen from the six WHO regions are reviewed. Most of these countries include 73% of WHO-recommended essential antibacterials on their lists. However, most are lacking reserve antibacterials, and even some main list antibacterials, which are essential when empirical therapy fails in cases of bacterial resistance. Many factors that may be responsible for the lack of selection of these drugs, not least cost considerations, are discussed. PMID:10212510

  9. 75 FR 33317 - Antibacterial Resistance and Diagnostic Device and Drug Development Research for Bacterial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... Development Research for Bacterial Diseases; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... Diseases Society of America (IDSA) regarding scientific and potential research issues in antibacterial drug resistance, rapid diagnostic device development for bacterial diseases, and antibacterial drug...

  10. Cost-effectiveness and Pricing of Antibacterial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Verhoef, Talitha I; Morris, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Growing resistance to antibacterial agents has increased the need for the development of new drugs to treat bacterial infections. Given increasing pressure on limited health budgets, it is important to study the cost-effectiveness of these drugs, as well as their safety and efficacy, to find out whether or not they provide value for money and should be reimbursed. In this article, we systematically reviewed 38 cost-effectiveness analyses of new antibacterial agents. Most studies showed the new antibacterial drugs were cost-effective compared to older generation drugs. Drug pricing is a complicated process, involving different stakeholders, and has a large influence on cost-effectiveness. Value-based pricing is a method to determine the price of a drug at which it can be cost-effective. It is currently unclear what the influence of value-based pricing will be on the prices of new antibacterial agents, but an important factor will be the definition of ‘value’, which as well as the impact of the drug on patient health might also include other factors such as wider social impact and the health impact of disease. PMID:25521641

  11. Electrospray tandem quadrupole fragmentation of quinolone drugs and related ions. On the reversibility of water loss from protonated molecules.

    PubMed

    Neta, Pedatsur; Godugu, Bhaskar; Liang, Yuxue; Simón-Manso, Yamil; Yang, Xiaoyu; Stein, Stephen E

    2010-11-30

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) of quinolone drugs showed different sensitivities in aqueous solution vs. biological extract. The authors suggested formation of two singly protonated molecules with different behavior, one undergoing loss of H(2)O and the other loss of CO(2), so that SRM transitions might depend on the ratios of these forms generated by the electrospray. These surprising results prompted us to re-examine several quinolone drugs and some simpler compounds to further elucidate the mechanisms. We find that the relative contributions of loss of H(2)O vs. loss of CO(2) in tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) experiments depend not only on molecular structure and collision energy, but also, in certain cases, on the cone voltage. We further find that many product ions formed by loss of H(2)O can reattach a water molecule in the collision cell, whereas ions formed by loss of CO(2) do not. Since reattachment of H(2)O can occur after water loss in the cone region and prior to selection of the precursor ion, this effect leads to the dependence of MS/MS spectra on the cone voltage used in creating the precursor ion, which explains the formerly observed effect on SRM ratios. Our results support the earlier conclusion that varying amounts of two ions of the same m/z value are responsible for problems in the analysis of these drugs, but the origin is in dehydration/rehydration reactions. Thus, SRM transitions for certain complex compounds may be comparable only when monitored under equivalent ion-forming conditions, including the voltage used in the production of the protonated molecules in the electrospray ionization (ESI) source.

  12. Discovery of WQ-3810: Design, synthesis, and evaluation of 7-(3-alkylaminoazetidin-1-yl)fluoro-quinolones as orally active antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Kenji; Kuramoto, Yasuhiro; Amano, Hirotaka; Kazamori, Daichi; Yazaki, Akira

    2015-10-20

    Novel 7-(3-alkylaminoazetidin-1-yl)fluoroquinolones were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their antibacterial activities and oral absorption rates. Against Gram-negative bacteria, 10a-e, which have various alkyl groups containing different numbers of carbon atoms (C0-C3) at the C-7 alkylaminoazetidine position, showed potent and similar antibacterial activities, whereas the activity of 10f (C4, t-Bu) was significantly lower than those of 10a-e. Conversely, the oral absorption rates of 10a-e in rats increased depending on the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl groups; 10d (C3, n-Pr) and 10e (C3, i-Pr) had high oral absorption rates (>90% at 10 mg/kg). These results demonstrated that the introduction of alkyl groups onto C-7 aminoazetidine is useful for the improvement of the oral absorption rates of these drugs while maintaining their antibacterial activities. As a conclusion, from this series of fluoroquinolones, WQ-3810 (10e), having 3-isopropylaminoazetidine as the C-7 substituent, was identified as an orally active antibacterial agent with a potent in vitro activity.

  13. DNA gyrase, topoisomerase IV, and the 4-quinolones.

    PubMed Central

    Drlica, K; Zhao, X

    1997-01-01

    For many years, DNA gyrase was thought to be responsible both for unlinking replicated daughter chromosomes and for controlling negative superhelical tension in bacterial DNA. However, in 1990 a homolog of gyrase, topoisomerase IV, that had a potent decatenating activity was discovered. It is now clear that topoisomerase IV, rather than gyrase, is responsible for decatenation of interlinked chromosomes. Moreover, topoisomerase IV is a target of the 4-quinolones, antibacterial agents that had previously been thought to target only gyrase. The key event in quinolone action is reversible trapping of gyrase-DNA and topoisomerase IV-DNA complexes. Complex formation with gyrase is followed by a rapid, reversible inhibition of DNA synthesis, cessation of growth, and induction of the SOS response. At higher drug concentrations, cell death occurs as double-strand DNA breaks are released from trapped gyrase and/or topoisomerase IV complexes. Repair of quinolone-induced DNA damage occurs largely via recombination pathways. In many gram-negative bacteria, resistance to moderate levels of quinolone arises from mutation of the gyrase A protein and resistance to high levels of quinolone arises from mutation of a second gyrase and/or topoisomerase IV site. For some gram-positive bacteria, the situation is reversed: primary resistance occurs through changes in topoisomerase IV while gyrase changes give additional resistance. Gyrase is also trapped on DNA by lethal gene products of certain large, low-copy-number plasmids. Thus, quinolone-topoisomerase biology is providing a model for understanding aspects of host-parasite interactions and providing ways to investigate manipulation of the bacterial chromosome by topoisomerases. PMID:9293187

  14. A Review for the Analysis of Antidepressant, Antiepileptic and Quinolone Type Drugs in Pharmaceuticals and Environmental Samples.

    PubMed

    Rani, Susheela; Malik, Ashok Kumar; Kaur, Ramandeep; Kaur, Ripneel

    2016-09-01

    The analysis of drugs in various biological fluids is an important criterion for the determination of the physiological performance of a drug. After sampling of the biological fluid, the next step in the analytical process is sample preparation. Sample preparation is essential for isolation of desired components from complex biological matrices and greatly influences their reliable and accurate determination. The complexity of biological fluids adds to the challenge of direct determination of the drug by chromatographic analysis, therefore demanding a sample preparation step that is often time consuming, tedious and frequently overlooked. However, direct online injection methods offer the advantage of reducing sample preparation steps and enabling effective pre-concentration and clean-up of biological fluids. These procedures can be automated and therefore reduce the requirements for handling potentially infectious biomaterial, improve reproducibility, and minimize sample manipulations and potential contamination. This review is focused on the discovery and development of high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas chromatography (GC) with different detectors. The drugs covered in this review are antiepileptics, antidepressant (AD), and quinolones. The application of these methods for determination of these drugs in biological, environmental and pharmaceutical samples has also been discussed.

  15. New natural products as new leads for antibacterial drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Brown, Dean G; Lister, Troy; May-Dracka, Tricia L

    2014-01-15

    Natural products have been a rich source of antibacterial drugs for many decades, but investments in this area have declined over the past two decades. The purpose of this review article is to provide a recent survey of new natural product classes and the mechanisms by which they work. PMID:24388805

  16. Preparation, structure and microbial evaluation of metal complexes of the second generation quinolone antibacterial drug lomefloxacin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeek, Sadeek A.; El-Shwiniy, Walaa H.

    2010-09-01

    Lomefloxacinate of Y(III), Zr(IV) and U(VI) were isolated as solids with the general formula; [Y(LFX) 2Cl 2]Cl·12H 2O, [ZrO(LFX) 2Cl]Cl·15H 2O and [UO 2(LFX) 3](NO 3) 2·4H 2O. The new synthesized complexes were characterized with physicochemical and diverse spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-Vis. and 1H NMR spectroscopies) as well as thermal analyses. In these complexes lomefloxacin act as bidentate ligand bound to the metal ions through the pyridone oxygen and one carboxylate oxygen. The kinetic parameters of thermogravimetric (TGA) and its differential (DTG), such as entropy of activation, activation energy, enthalpy of activation and Gibbs free energy evaluated by using Coats- Redfern and Horowitz- Metzger equations for free lomefloxacin and three complexes were carried out. The bond stretching force constant and length of the U dbnd O bond for the [UO 2(LFX) 3](NO 3) 2·4H 2O complex were calculated. The antimicrobial activity of lomefloxacin and its metal complexes was tested against different bacterial species, such as Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus), Escherichia coli ( E. coli) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( P. aeruginosa) as Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial species and also against two species of antifungal, penicillium ( P. rotatum) and trichoderma ( T. sp.). The three complexes are of a good action against three bacterial species but the Y(III) complex exhibit excellent activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( P. aeruginosa), when compared to the free lomefloxacin.

  17. Metal complexes of the fourth generation quinolone antimicrobial drug gatifloxacin: Synthesis, structure and biological evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeek, Sadeek A.; El-Shwiniy, Walaa H.

    2010-08-01

    Three metal complexes of the fourth generation quinolone antimicrobial agent gatifloxacin (GFLX) with Y(ΙΙΙ), Zr(ΙV) and U(VΙ) have been prepared and characterized with physicochemical and spectroscopic techniques. In these complexes, gatifloxacin acts as a bidentate deprotonated ligand bound to the metal through the ketone oxygen and a carboxylato oxygen. The complexes are six-coordinated with distorted octahedral geometry. The kinetic parameters for gatifloxacin and the three prepared complexes have been evaluated from TGA curves by using Coats-Redfern (CR) and Horowitz-Metzeger (HM) methods. The calculated bond length and force constant, F(U dbnd O), for the UO 2 bond in uranyl complex are 1.7522 Å and 639.46 N m -1. The antimicrobial activity of the complexes has been tested against microorganisms, three bacterial species, such as Staphylococcus aureus ( S. aureus), Escherichia coli ( E. coli) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( P. aeruginosa) and two fungi species, penicillium ( P. rotatum) and trichoderma ( T. sp.), showing that they exhibit higher activity than free ligand.

  18. [General pharmacology of T-3761, a new oral quinolone antibacterial agent (2). Effect on the respiratory and cardiovascular systems, autonomic nervous system and other functions].

    PubMed

    Furuhata, K; Hiraiwa, T; Terashima, N; Arai, H; Ono, S; Hashiba, K; Maekawa, M; Kitamura, K; Nakada, Y; Mori, Y

    1995-05-01

    General pharmacological effects of T-3761, a new oral quinolone antibacterial agent, on the respiratory and cardiovascular systems, autonomic nervous system and other functions were investigated in laboratory animals. The results obtained are summarized as follows. 1. Respiratory and cardiovascular systems: Oral administration of T-3761 at doses of 100-1,000 mg/kg did not affect in conscious rats. But intravenous administration of T-3761 at doses of 10-100 mg/kg caused an increase in respiratory rate, induced hypotension, caused increase or decrease in heart rate and altered ECG patterns (elevation of T waves and reduction of voltage of QRS complexes, etc.) in anesthetized dogs. Intravenous administration of T-3761 at doses of 10-100 mg/kg showed respiratory rate increase or decrease, hypertension, heart rate decrease and ECG patterns changes (T waves elevation and extrasystole) in anesthetized rabbits. 2. Autonomic nervous system and smooth muscle organs: T-3761 increased the epinephrine-induced contraction of the isolated guinea pig vas deferens at concentration of 10(-5)-10(-4) g/ml. T-3761 decreased the acetylcholine-induced contraction of the isolated guinea pig ileum and epinephrine-induced relaxation of the isolated guinea pig trachea-chain at concentration of 10(-4) g/ml. T-3761 increased the norepinephrine-induced contraction of the isolated rabbit thoracic aorta at concentration of 10(-4) g/ml. Oral administration of T-3761 at a dose of 1,000 mg/kg exerted slight mydriasis in mice. 3. Digestive system: T-3761 decreased the spontaneous motilities of isolated ileum and colon at concentration of 10(-4) g/ml. Oral administration of T-3761 at a dose of 1,000 mg/kg inhibited gastric output and intestinal transit time in rats or mice. 4. Renal functions: Oral administration of T-3761 at a dose of 300 mg/kg increased Na+ excretion but did not affect PSP excretion in rats. 5. Hematological examinations: T-3761 showed no effects on resistance to hemolysis, blood

  19. The evolving role of chemical synthesis in antibacterial drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Wright, Peter M; Seiple, Ian B; Myers, Andrew G

    2014-08-18

    The discovery and implementation of antibiotics in the early twentieth century transformed human health and wellbeing. Chemical synthesis enabled the development of the first antibacterial substances, organoarsenicals and sulfa drugs, but these were soon outshone by a host of more powerful and vastly more complex antibiotics from nature: penicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, and erythromycin, among others. These primary defences are now significantly less effective as an unavoidable consequence of rapid evolution of resistance within pathogenic bacteria, made worse by widespread misuse of antibiotics. For decades medicinal chemists replenished the arsenal of antibiotics by semisynthetic and to a lesser degree fully synthetic routes, but economic factors have led to a subsidence of this effort, which places society on the precipice of a disaster. We believe that the strategic application of modern chemical synthesis to antibacterial drug discovery must play a critical role if a crisis of global proportions is to be averted.

  20. The Evolving Role of Chemical Synthesis in Antibacterial Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Peter M.; Seiple, Ian B.; Myers, Andrew G.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery and implementation of antibiotics in the early twentieth century transformed human health and wellbeing. Chemical synthesis enabled the development of the first antibacterial substances, organoarsenicals and sulfa drugs, but these were soon outshone by a host of more powerful and vastly more complex antibiotics from nature: penicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, and erythromycin, among others. These primary defences are now significantly less effective as an unavoidable consequence of rapid evolution of resistance within pathogenic bacteria, made worse by widespread misuse of antibiotics. For decades medicinal chemists replenished the arsenal of antibiotics by semisynthetic and to a lesser degree fully synthetic routes, but economic factors have led to a subsidence of this effort, which places society on the precipice of a disaster. We believe that the strategic application of modern chemical synthesis to antibacterial drug discovery must play a critical role if a crisis of global proportions is to be averted. PMID:24990531

  1. Undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase inhibitors: antibacterial drug leads.

    PubMed

    Sinko, William; Wang, Yang; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Yonghui; Feixas, Ferran; Cox, Courtney L; Mitchell, Douglas A; Oldfield, Eric; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-07-10

    There is a significant need for new antibiotics due to the rise in drug resistance. Drugs such as methicillin and vancomycin target bacterial cell wall biosynthesis, but methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE) have now arisen and are of major concern. Inhibitors acting on new targets in cell wall biosynthesis are thus of particular interest since they might also restore sensitivity to existing drugs, and the cis-prenyl transferase undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS), essential for lipid I, lipid II, and thus, peptidoglycan biosynthesis, is one such target. We used 12 UPPS crystal structures to validate virtual screening models and then assayed 100 virtual hits (from 450,000 compounds) against UPPS from S. aureus and Escherichia coli. The most promising inhibitors (IC50 ∼2 μM, Ki ∼300 nM) had activity against MRSA, Listeria monocytogenes, Bacillus anthracis, and a vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus sp. with MIC or IC50 values in the 0.25-4 μg/mL range. Moreover, one compound (1), a rhodanine with close structural similarity to the commercial diabetes drug epalrestat, exhibited good activity as well as a fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) of 0.1 with methicillin against the community-acquired MRSA USA300 strain, indicating strong synergism. PMID:24827744

  2. Antibacterial studies, DNA oxidative cleavage, and crystal structures of Cu(II) and Co(II) complexes with two quinolone family members, ciprofloxacin and enoxacin.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Garrido, N; Perelló, L; Ortiz, R; Alzuet, G; González-Alvarez, M; Cantón, E; Liu-González, M; García-Granda, S; Pérez-Priede, M

    2005-03-01

    Nine coordination compounds of Cu(II) and Co(II) with Ciprofloxacin (HCp) and Enoxacin (HEx) as ligands have been prepared and characterized. Single crystal structural determinations of [Cu(HCp)2(ClO4)2].6H2O (1) and [Co(HEx)2(Ex)]Cl.2CH(3)OH.12H2O (4) are reported. The crystal of 1 is composed of [Cu(HCp)2(ClO4)2] units with the two perchlorate anions semicoordinated, and uncoordinated water molecules. The copper ion, at a crystallographic inversion centre, is in a tetragonally distorted octahedral environment. The structure of 4 consists of cationic monomeric [Co(HEx)2(Ex)]+ units, chloride anions, and uncoordinated methanol and water molecules. The complex is six-coordinate, with a slightly distorted octahedral environment around the metal centre. Some complexes of ciprofloxacin and enoxacin were screened for their activity against several bacteria, showing activity similar to that of the corresponding free ligands. All compounds tested were more active against Gram-negative bacteria than against Gram-positive bacteria. Ciprofloxacin hydrochloride and its complexes were more active than enoxacin and its complexes. In addition, the bactericidal studies against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 reveal that one complex exhibits the "paradoxical effect" (diminution in the number of bacteria killed at high drug concentration), which has been described and related to the mechanism of action of quinolones, but three other complexes do not, suggesting different mechanisms of bactericidal action. The ability of Cu(HCp)2(NO3)2.6H2O to cleave DNA has been determined. The results show that the complex behaves as an efficient chemical nuclease with ascorbate/hydrogen peroxide activation. Mechanistic studies using different inhibiting reagents reveal that hydroxyl radicals are involved in the DNA scission process mediated by this compound.

  3. Human therapeutic and agricultural uses of antibacterial drugs and resistance of the enteric flora of humans.

    PubMed

    Siegel, D; Huber, W G; Drysdale, S

    1975-11-01

    Fecal samples were collected from five groups of people differing in the manner of their exposure to antibacterial drugs. The groups included: (i) people working on farms who were continuously in contact with the predominantly resistant florae of farm animals receiving rations containing antibacterial drugs, (ii) people residing on the same farms with no direct exposure to the farm animals, (iii) people treated with antibacterial drugs, (iv) untreated people residing with treated individuals, and (v) untreated people with no exposure to farm animals or treated individuals. The samples were examined by quantitative plating for proportions of antibiotic-resistant, gram-negative enteric organisms. Individual isolates were also examined for their susceptibility to 11 different antibacterial drugs. The results indicate that enteric florae unexposed directly to the selective effects of antibacterial drugs may be affected by contact with predominantly resistant florae directly exposed to antibacterial drugs.

  4. Human Therapeutic and Agricultural Uses of Antibacterial Drugs and Resistance of the Enteric Flora of Humans

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, D.; Huber, W. G.; Drysdale, S.

    1975-01-01

    Fecal samples were collected from five groups of people differing in the manner of their exposure to antibacterial drugs. The groups included: (i) people working on farms who were continuously in contact with the predominantly resistant florae of farm animals receiving rations containing antibacterial drugs, (ii) people residing on the same farms with no direct exposure to the farm animals, (iii) people treated with antibacterial drugs, (iv) untreated people residing with treated individuals, and (v) untreated people with no exposure to farm animals or treated individuals. The samples were examined by quantitative plating for proportions of antibiotic-resistant, gram-negative enteric organisms. Individual isolates were also examined for their susceptibility to 11 different antibacterial drugs. The results indicate that enteric florae unexposed directly to the selective effects of antibacterial drugs may be affected by contact with predominantly resistant florae directly exposed to antibacterial drugs. PMID:1108775

  5. Bacterial Transcription as a Target for Antibacterial Drug Development.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cong; Yang, Xiao; Lewis, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    Transcription, the first step of gene expression, is carried out by the enzyme RNA polymerase (RNAP) and is regulated through interaction with a series of protein transcription factors. RNAP and its associated transcription factors are highly conserved across the bacterial domain and represent excellent targets for broad-spectrum antibacterial agent discovery. Despite the numerous antibiotics on the market, there are only two series currently approved that target transcription. The determination of the three-dimensional structures of RNAP and transcription complexes at high resolution over the last 15 years has led to renewed interest in targeting this essential process for antibiotic development by utilizing rational structure-based approaches. In this review, we describe the inhibition of the bacterial transcription process with respect to structural studies of RNAP, highlight recent progress toward the discovery of novel transcription inhibitors, and suggest additional potential antibacterial targets for rational drug design.

  6. Repurposing of gallium-based drugs for antibacterial therapy.

    PubMed

    Bonchi, Carlo; Imperi, Francesco; Minandri, Fabrizia; Visca, Paolo; Frangipani, Emanuela

    2014-01-01

    While the occurrence and spread of antibiotic resistance in bacterial pathogens is vanishing current anti-infective therapies, the antibiotic discovery pipeline is drying up. In the last years, the repurposing of existing drugs for new clinical applications has become a major research area in drug discovery, also in the field of anti-infectives. This review discusses the potential of repurposing previously approved gallium formulations in antibacterial chemotherapy. Gallium has no proven function in biological systems, but it can act as an iron-mimetic in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The activity of gallium mostly relies on its ability to replace iron in redox enzymes, thus impairing their function and ultimately hampering cell growth. Cancer cells and bacteria are preferential gallium targets due to their active metabolism and fast growth. The wealth of knowledge on the pharmacological properties of gallium has opened the door to the repurposing of gallium-based drugs for the treatment of infections sustained by antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens, such as Acinetobacter baumannii or Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and for suppression of Mycobacterium tuberculosis growth. The promising antibacterial activity of gallium both in vitro and in different animal models of infection raises the hope that gallium will confirm its efficacy in clinical trials, and will become a valuable therapeutic option to cure otherwise untreatable bacterial infections.

  7. Conjugation between quinolone-susceptible bacteria can generate mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region, inducing quinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Pitondo-Silva, André; Martins, Vinicius Vicente; Silva, Carolina Fávero da; Stehling, Eliana Guedes

    2015-02-01

    Quinolones are an important group of antibacterial agents that can inhibit DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV activity. DNA gyrase is responsible for maintaining bacteria in a negatively supercoiled state, being composed of subunits A and B. Topoisomerase IV is a homologue of DNA gyrase and consists of two subunits codified by the parC and parE genes. Mutations in gyrA and gyrB of DNA gyrase may confer resistance to quinolones, and the majority of resistant strains show mutations between positions 67 and 106 of gyrA, a region denoted the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR). The most frequent substitutions occur at positions 83 and 87, but little is known about the mechanisms promoting appearance of mutations in the QRDR. The present study proposes that some mutations in the QRDR could be generated as a result of the natural mechanism of conjugation between bacteria in their natural habitat. This event was observed following conjugation in vitro of two different isolates of quinolone-susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which transferred plasmids of different molecular weights to a recipient strain of Escherichia coli (HB101), also quinolone-susceptible, generating two different transconjugants that presented mutations in DNA gyrase and acquisition of resistance to all quinolones tested. PMID:25262036

  8. QSAR study on the antibacterial activity of some sulfa drugs: building blockers of Mannich bases.

    PubMed

    Mandloi, Dheeraj; Joshi, Sheela; Khadikar, Padmakar V; Khosla, Navita

    2005-01-17

    Sulfa drugs are building blockers of several types of Mannich bases. Consequently, the antibacterial activities of sulfa drugs are reported in this paper, which will help in explaining and understanding antibacterial activities of Mannich bases. Reported QSAR is carried out using distance-based topological indices and discussed critically on the basis of statistical parameters.

  9. The relationship between target-class and the physicochemical properties of antibacterial drugs

    PubMed Central

    Mugumbate, Grace; Overington, John P.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of novel mechanism of action (MOA) antibacterials has been associated with the concept that antibacterial drugs occupy a differentiated region of physicochemical space compared to human-targeted drugs. With, in broad terms, antibacterials having higher molecular weight, lower log P and higher polar surface area (PSA). By analysing the physicochemical properties of about 1700 approved drugs listed in the ChEMBL database, we show, that antibacterials for whose targets are riboproteins (i.e., composed of a complex of RNA and protein) fall outside the conventional human ‘drug-like’ chemical space; whereas antibacterials that modulate bacterial protein targets, generally comply with the ‘rule-of-five’ guidelines for classical oral human drugs. Our analysis suggests a strong target-class association for antibacterials—either protein-targeted or riboprotein-targeted. There is much discussion in the literature on the failure of screening approaches to deliver novel antibacterial lead series, and linkage of this poor success rate for antibacterials with the chemical space properties of screening collections. Our analysis suggests that consideration of target-class may be an underappreciated factor in antibacterial lead discovery, and that in fact bacterial protein-targets may well have similar binding site characteristics to human protein targets, and questions the assumption that larger, more polar compounds are a key part of successful future antibacterial discovery. PMID:25975639

  10. Newer Antibacterials in Therapy and Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Paknikar, Simi S; Narayana, Sarala

    2012-01-01

    In order to deal with the rising problem of antibiotic resistance, newer antibacterials are being discovered and added to existing pool. Since the year 2000, however, only four new classes of antibacterials have been discovered. These include the oxazolidinones, glycolipopeptides, glycolipodepepsipeptide and pleuromutilins. Newer drugs were added to existing classes of antibiotics, such as streptogramins, quinolones, beta-lactam antibiotics, and macrolide-, tetracycline- and trimethoprim-related drugs. Most of the antibacterials are directed against resistant S. aureus infections, with very few against resistant gram-negative infections. The following article reviews the antibacterials approved by the FDA after the year 2000 as well as some of those in clinical trials. Data was obtained through a literature search via Pubmed and google as well as a detailed search of our library database. PMID:23181224

  11. Simple assay for monitoring seven quinolone antibacterials in eggs: extraction with hot water and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Laboratory validation in line with the European Union Commission Decision 657/2002/EC.

    PubMed

    Bogialli, Sara; D'Ascenzo, Giuseppe; Di Corcia, Antonio; Laganà, Aldo; Tramontana, Giovanna

    2009-01-30

    A simple and rapid method able to determine residues of seven quinolone antibacterials in whole eggs is presented here. This method is based on the matrix solid-phase dispersion technique with hot water as extractant followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. After depositing 1.5 g of an egg sample containing the analytes and the analyte surrogate (norfloxacin) on sand (crystobalite), this material was packed into an extraction cell. Quinolones were extracted by flowing 6 mL of water acidified with 50 mmol/L formic acid through the cell heated at 100 degrees C. After pH adjustment and filtration of the extract, 100 microL of it was injected into the LC column. MS data acquisition was performed in the multiple reaction monitoring mode, selecting two precursor ion to product ion transitions for each target compound. Hot water appeared an efficient extracting medium, since absolute recoveries of the analyte in egg at the level of 20 ng/g were 89-103%. Estimated limits of quantification (S/N=10) were 0.2-0.6 ng/g. Based on the EU Commission Decision 2002/657/EC, the method was validated in terms of ruggedness, specificity, linearity, within-laboratory reproducibility, decision limit (CCalpha and detection capability (CCbeta). Depending on the particular analyte, CCalphas ranged between 0.41 and 2.6 ng/g, while CCbetas were 0.64-3.7 ng/g. The method was linear in the 3-30 ng/g range, with typical R(2) values higher than 0.97. The within-laboratory reproducibility (n=21) at 6 ng/g level was in the 9.0-12% range. After validation, a depletion study of enrofloxacin and one of its metabolites, i.e. ciprofloxacin, in eggs was conducted.

  12. Quinolones: from antibiotics to autoinducers

    PubMed Central

    Heeb, Stephan; Fletcher, Matthew P; Chhabra, Siri Ram; Diggle, Stephen P; Williams, Paul; Cámara, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    Since quinine was first isolated, animals, plants and microorganisms producing a wide variety of quinolone compounds have been discovered, several of which possess medicinally interesting properties ranging from antiallergenic and anticancer to antimicrobial activities. Over the years, these have served in the development of many synthetic drugs, including the successful fluoroquinolone antibiotics. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and related bacteria produce a number of 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolones, some of which exhibit antimicrobial activity. However, quinolones such as the Pseudomonas quinolone signal and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline act as quorum-sensing signal molecules, controlling the expression of many virulence genes as a function of cell population density. Here, we review selectively this extensive family of bicyclic compounds, from natural and synthetic antimicrobials to signalling molecules, with a special emphasis on the biology of P. aeruginosa. In particular, we review their nomenclature and biochemistry, their multiple properties as membrane-interacting compounds, inhibitors of the cytochrome bc1 complex and iron chelators, as well as the regulation of their biosynthesis and their integration into the intricate quorum-sensing regulatory networks governing virulence and secondary metabolite gene expression. PMID:20738404

  13. 75 FR 73109 - Guidance for Industry on Antibacterial Drug Products: Use of Noninferiority Trials to Support...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry on Antibacterial Drug Products: Use of Noninferiority Trials to Support Approval; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance for...

  14. Update on Quinolone Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Zenilman, Jonathan M.

    2002-04-01

    Quinolones are widely used for treating gonococcal infections, typically in single-dose, oral regimens. However, in the 1990s, quinolone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae emerged, potentially compromising the utility of this drug class. In the past year, these strains have widely disseminated, accounting for over half of isolates in parts of Southeast Asia. The molecular mechanism of resistance has been localized to multiple mutations in genes coding for the bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase enzymes. These mutations accumulate until the minimum inhibitory concentration is 4.0 g/mL or more, which in clinical studies appears to be the threshold for clinical treatment failure. Quinolone-resistant N. gonorrhoeae is independent from other plasmid- and chromosomally-mediated resistance determinants; nearly all isolates to date have been sensitive to cephalosporins and spectinomycin. Nevertheless, designing public health strategies to contain quinolone-resistant N. gonorrhoeae will be difficult. PMID:11927047

  15. 21 CFR 201.24 - Labeling for systemic antibacterial drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of (insert name of antibacterial drug... treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by bacteria. (b) In the “Indications and Usage” section, the labeling must state: To reduce the development of drug-resistant...

  16. 21 CFR 201.24 - Labeling for systemic antibacterial drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of (insert name of antibacterial drug... treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by bacteria. (b) In the “Indications and Usage” section, the labeling must state: To reduce the development of drug-resistant...

  17. 21 CFR 201.24 - Labeling for systemic antibacterial drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of (insert name of antibacterial drug... treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by bacteria. (b) In the “Indications and Usage” section, the labeling must state: To reduce the development of drug-resistant...

  18. 21 CFR 201.24 - Labeling for systemic antibacterial drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of (insert name of antibacterial drug... treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by bacteria. (b) In the “Indications and Usage” section, the labeling must state: To reduce the development of drug-resistant...

  19. 21 CFR 201.24 - Labeling for systemic antibacterial drug products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... development of drug-resistant bacteria and maintain the effectiveness of (insert name of antibacterial drug... treat or prevent infections that are proven or strongly suspected to be caused by bacteria. (b) In the “Indications and Usage” section, the labeling must state: To reduce the development of drug-resistant...

  20. Screening of Taiwanese crude drugs for antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Chen, C P; Lin, C C; Namba, T

    1989-12-01

    Preliminary antibacterial screening of local crude drugs was carried out using the cariogenic bacterium, Streptococcus mutans. Of 79 aqueous extracts tested, 6 crude drugs were shown to have significant antibacterial activity with minimal inhibitory concentration equal to or lower than 7.8 mg/ml (expressed in terms of dry starting material). Of these effective crude drugs, Morus australis, Ludwigia octovalvis and Thuja orientalis were very effective in inhibiting the growth of serotypes c and d of S. mutans (MIC less than or equal to 2.0-7.8 mg/ml). Elephantopus scaber, Artemisia vulgaris, Mosla chinensis and Orthosiphon aristatus also exhibited considerable antibacterial activity (MIC = 7.8-23.4 mg/ml) against both serotypes. In the presence of 5% sucrose, the antibacterial potency of the majority of the extracts did not change for type c, while the potency decreased about one-half for type d.

  1. Legionella pneumophila Carbonic Anhydrases: Underexplored Antibacterial Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) are metalloenzymes which catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Many pathogenic bacteria encode such enzymes belonging to the α-, β-, and/or γ-CA families. In the last decade, enzymes from some of these pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, have been cloned and characterized in detail. These enzymes were shown to be efficient catalysts for CO₂ hydration, with kcat values in the range of (3.4-8.3) × 10⁵ s(-1) and kcat/KM values of (4.7-8.5) × 10⁷ M(-1)·s(-1). In vitro inhibition studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates, were also reported for the two β-CAs from this pathogen, LpCA1 and LpCA2. Inorganic anions were millimolar inhibitors, whereas diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamate, sulfamide, phenylboronic acid, and phenylarsonic acid were micromolar ones. The best LpCA1 inhibitors were aminobenzolamide and structurally similar sulfonylated aromatic sulfonamides, as well as acetazolamide and ethoxzolamide (KIs in the range of 40.3-90.5 nM). The best LpCA2 inhibitors belonged to the same class of sulfonylated sulfonamides, together with acetazolamide, methazolamide, and dichlorophenamide (KIs in the range of 25.2-88.5 nM). Considering such preliminary results, the two bacterial CAs from this pathogen represent promising yet underexplored targets for obtaining antibacterials devoid of the resistance problems common to most of the clinically used antibiotics, but further studies are needed to validate them in vivo as drug targets. PMID:27322334

  2. Legionella pneumophila Carbonic Anhydrases: Underexplored Antibacterial Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Supuran, Claudiu T.

    2016-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1) are metalloenzymes which catalyze the hydration of carbon dioxide to bicarbonate and protons. Many pathogenic bacteria encode such enzymes belonging to the α-, β-, and/or γ-CA families. In the last decade, enzymes from some of these pathogens, including Legionella pneumophila, have been cloned and characterized in detail. These enzymes were shown to be efficient catalysts for CO2 hydration, with kcat values in the range of (3.4–8.3) × 105 s−1 and kcat/KM values of (4.7–8.5) × 107 M−1·s−1. In vitro inhibition studies with various classes of inhibitors, such as anions, sulfonamides and sulfamates, were also reported for the two β-CAs from this pathogen, LpCA1 and LpCA2. Inorganic anions were millimolar inhibitors, whereas diethyldithiocarbamate, sulfamate, sulfamide, phenylboronic acid, and phenylarsonic acid were micromolar ones. The best LpCA1 inhibitors were aminobenzolamide and structurally similar sulfonylated aromatic sulfonamides, as well as acetazolamide and ethoxzolamide (KIs in the range of 40.3–90.5 nM). The best LpCA2 inhibitors belonged to the same class of sulfonylated sulfonamides, together with acetazolamide, methazolamide, and dichlorophenamide (KIs in the range of 25.2–88.5 nM). Considering such preliminary results, the two bacterial CAs from this pathogen represent promising yet underexplored targets for obtaining antibacterials devoid of the resistance problems common to most of the clinically used antibiotics, but further studies are needed to validate them in vivo as drug targets. PMID:27322334

  3. 75 FR 37818 - Issues in the Design and Conduct of Clinical Trials for Antibacterial Drug Development; Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Issues in the Design and Conduct of Clinical Trials for... regarding scientific issues in the design and conduct of clinical trials for antibacterial drug development... clinical trials for antibacterial drugs. The workshop will focus on the design and conduct of...

  4. Electrospinning polyvinylidene fluoride fibrous membranes containing anti-bacterial drugs used as wound dressing.

    PubMed

    He, Ting; Wang, Jingnan; Huang, Peilin; Zeng, Baozhen; Li, Haihong; Cao, Qingyun; Zhang, Shiying; Luo, Zhuo; Deng, David Y B; Zhang, Hongwu; Zhou, Wuyi

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to synthesis drug-loaded fibrous membrane scaffolds for potential applications as wound dressing. Polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) fibrous membranes were loaded with enrofloxacin (Enro) drugs by using an electrospinning process, and their mechanical strength, drug release profile and anti-bacterial properties were evaluated. Enro drug-loaded PVDF membranes exhibited good elasticity, flexibility and excellent mechanical strength. The electrospinning Enro/PVDF membranes showed a burst drug release in the initial 12h, followed by sustained release for the next 3 days, which was an essential property for antibiotic drugs applied for wound healing. The drug-loaded PVDF fibrous membranes displayed excellent anti-bacterial activity toward Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The results suggest that electrospinning PVDF membrane scaffolds loaded with drugs can be used as wound dressing.

  5. Single-step extraction followed by LC for determination of (fluoro)quinolone drug residues in muscle, eggs, and milk.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee-Jung; Yi, Hee; Cho, Soo Min; Lee, Dong Goo; Cho, Kyul; Abd el-Aty, A M; Shim, Jae-Han; Lee, Soon-Ho; Jeong, Ji-Yoon; Shin, Ho-Chul

    2010-04-01

    In this study, a simplified method for the extraction and determination of seven fluoroquinolone residues (danofloxacin, difloxacin, enrofloxacin, marbofloxacin, orbifloxacin, ofloxacin, and sarafloxacin) and three quinolones (oxolinic acid, flumequine, and nalidixic acid), in porcine muscle, table eggs, and commercial whole milk, which required no cleanup step, was devised. This procedure involves the extraction of analytes from the samples via liquid-phase extraction, and the subsequent quantitative determination was accomplished via LC-fluorescence detection. Analyte separation was successfully conducted on an XBridge-C(18) column, with a linear gradient mobile phase composed of acetonitrile and 0.01 M oxalic acid buffer at pH=3.5. The one-step liquid-liquid extraction method evidenced good selectivity, precision (RSDs=0.26-15.07%), and recovery of the extractable analytes, ranging from 61.12 to 115.93% in matrices. The LOQs ranged from 0.3 to 25 microg/kg. A survey of ten samples purchased from local markets was conducted, and none of the samples harbored fluoroquinolone residues. This method is an improvement over existing methodologies, since no additional cleanup was necessary.

  6. Advances in the discovery of novel antibacterial agents during the year 2002.

    PubMed

    Harris, Christina R; Thorarensen, Atli

    2004-08-01

    The development of bacterial resistance is a significant problem in the treatment of infection, and the importance of research directed toward the discovery of novel agents to treat infections cannot be underestimated. In the past, discovery programs have focused on modification of natural products or existing classes of marketed antibacterial agents. A significant period of time lapsed between the introduction of the nalidixic acid-based quinolones and the next novel antibacterial agent (Zyvox). However, the advent of the "genomics era" has provided a wealth of new targets that afford the opportunity to discover novel antibacterial agents. This review reports on the state of antibacterial research directed toward the development of novel antibacterial agents with novel mechanisms of action for the calendar year, 2002. While variations on existing drug classes continue to appear, we have chosen to limit our discussion to novel classes of antibacterial agents which have not yet been marketed.

  7. Changes in antibacterial activity of triclosan and sulfa drugs due to photochemical transformations.

    PubMed

    Wammer, Kristine H; Lapara, Timothy M; McNeill, Kristopher; Arnold, William A; Swackhamer, Deborah L

    2006-06-01

    Sulfa drugs and triclosan represent two classes of antibacterials that have been found in natural waters and for which photodegradation is anticipated to be a significant loss process. Parent antibacterial compounds and the products of photolysis reactions were compared for three sulfa drugs and triclosan to determine the extent to which photolysis affects their antibacterial potency on Escherichia coli DH5alpha. Sulfathiazole (median effective concentration [EC50] = 20.0 microM), sulfamethoxazole (EC50 = 12.3 microM), and sulfachloropyridazine (EC50 = 6.9 microM) inhibited bacterial growth but did not affect respiratory activity. Photolysis products of these sulfa drugs did not retain any measurable ability to inhibit growth. Triclosan inhibited both the growth (EC50 = 0.24 microM) and respiratory activity of E. coli DH5alpha. Triclosan photolysis products also exhibited no measurable effect on growth or respiratory activity. These experiments indicate that the products of triclosan and sulfa drug photolysis are unlikely to possess antibacterial activity in natural waters. The rapid screening method used for these two classes of compounds will be useful for helping to identify photolabile antibacterial compounds, for which photoproducts could require further investigation.

  8. 76 FR 39883 - Design of Clinical Trials for Systemic Antibacterial Drugs for the Treatment of Acute Otitis...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Design of Clinical Trials for Systemic Antibacterial Drugs... workshop regarding the design of Clinical Trials for Systemic Antibacterial Agents for the Treatment of... various aspects of the design of clinical trials. The input from this public workshop will help...

  9. Synthesis, characterization, antibacterial activity, SOD mimic and interaction with DNA of drug based copper(II) complexes.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mohan N; Dosi, Promise A; Bhatt, Bhupesh S; Thakkar, Vasudev R

    2011-02-01

    Novel metal complexes of the second-generation quinolone antibacterial agent enrofloxacin with copper(II) and neutral bidentate ligands have been prepared and characterized with elemental analysis reflectance, IR and mass spectroscopy. Complexes have been screened for their in-vitro antibacterial activity against two Gram(+ve) Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and three Gram((-ve)) Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa organisms using the double dilution technique. The binding of this complex with CT-DNA has been investigated by absorption titration, salt effect and viscosity measurements. Binding constant is ranging from 1.3×10(4)-3.7×10(4). The cleavage ability of complexes has been assessed by gel electrophoresis using pUC19 DNA. The catalytic activity of the copper(II) complexes towards the superoxide anion (O2.-) dismutation was assayed by their ability to inhibit the reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT).

  10. Synthesis, characterization, antibacterial activity, SOD mimic and interaction with DNA of drug based copper(II) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Mohan N.; Dosi, Promise A.; Bhatt, Bhupesh S.; Thakkar, Vasudev R.

    2011-02-01

    Novel metal complexes of the second-generation quinolone antibacterial agent enrofloxacin with copper(II) and neutral bidentate ligands have been prepared and characterized with elemental analysis reflectance, IR and mass spectroscopy. Complexes have been screened for their in-vitro antibacterial activity against two Gram (+ve)Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and three Gram (-ve)Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa organisms using the double dilution technique. The binding of this complex with CT-DNA has been investigated by absorption titration, salt effect and viscosity measurements. Binding constant is ranging from 1.3 × 10 4-3.7 × 10 4. The cleavage ability of complexes has been assessed by gel electrophoresis using pUC19 DNA. The catalytic activity of the copper(II) complexes towards the superoxide anion (O 2rad -) dismutation was assayed by their ability to inhibit the reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT).

  11. 78 FR 32669 - New Approaches to Antibacterial Drug Development; Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... study designs, proposed priorities for CDER guidances, and strategies intended to slow the rate of emerging resistance to antibacterial drugs. The purpose of this notice is to request information and..., 5630 Fishers Lane, rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jonas...

  12. Mechanisms of action of cephalosporin 3'-quinolone esters, carbamates, and tertiary amines in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Georgopapadakou, N H; Bertasso, A

    1993-01-01

    Cephalosporin 3'-quinolone esters, carbamates, and tertiary amines are potent antibiotics whose antibacterial activities reflect the action of both the beta-lactam and the quinolone components. The biological properties of representative compounds from each class were compared in Escherichia coli. All compounds bound to the essential PBP 3, inhibited DNA gyrase, and caused filamentation in growing cells. To distinguish between cephalosporin- and quinolone-induced filaments, nucleoid segregation was also examined, as quinolones disrupt nucleoid segregation while the beta-lactams do not (N. H. Georgopapadakou and A. Bertasso, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 35:2645-2648, 1991). The cephalosporin quinolone esters Ro 23-9424 and Ro 24-6392, at concentrations causing filamentation in E. coli ATCC 25922, did not affect nucleoid segregation after 1 h of incubation (cephalosporin response) but did not affect it after 2 h (quinolone response), indicating the release of free quinolone. Accordingly, only the quinolone response was produced in a strain possessing TEM-3, an expanded-spectrum beta-lactamase. The cephalosporin carbamate Ro 24-4383 and the tertiary amine Ro 24-8138 produced a quinolone response in E. coli ATCC 25922, though they produced a cephalosporin response in a quinolone-resistant strain. Carbamate and tertiary amine linkages are chemically more stable than the ester linkage, and both cephalosporin 3'-quinolone carbamates and tertiary amines are more potent inhibitors of DNA gyrase than are the corresponding esters. The results suggest that, while intact cephalosporin 3'-quinolone esters act as cephalosporins, carbamates and amines may possess both cephalosporin and quinolone activity in the intact molecule. Images PMID:8384817

  13. [Effect of antibacterial therapy on the epidemic threat of experimental pneumonic plague in monkeys].

    PubMed

    Romanov, V E; Vasil'ev, N T; Shabalin, B A; Mironin, A V

    2001-01-01

    High therapeutic efficacy of aminoglycosides, quinolones, cephalosporins and rifampicins was demonstrated in experiments performed on monkeys, infected aerogenically by Yersinia pestis 1300. Antibacterials inhibited Y. pestis cells reproduction in the infected animals organisms evaluated by dynamics of bacterial cells isolated from the blood and fauces of the animals. It was shown that antibacterial therapy prevented infection transmission from the infected animals. The time of respiratory tract sanitation was in the range from 12 to 48 hours after the treatment and depended on drug efficacy. PMID:11550501

  14. Antibacterial Activities and Antibacterial Mechanism of Polygonum cuspidatum Extracts against Nosocomial Drug-Resistant Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Su, Pai-Wei; Yang, Cheng-Hong; Yang, Jyh-Ferng; Su, Pei-Yu; Chuang, Li-Yeh

    2015-01-01

    Recently, drug resistance due to the extensive abuse and over-use of antibiotics has become an increasingly serious problem, making the development of alternative antibiotics a very urgent issue. In this study, the Chinese herbal medicine, Polygonum cuspidatum, was extracted with 95% ethanol and the crude extracts were further purified by partition based on solvent polarity. The antimicrobial activities of the extracts and fractions were determined by the disk diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) methods. The results showed that the ethyl ether fraction (EE) of the ethanol extracts possesses a broader antimicrobial spectrum and greater antimicrobial activity against all of the tested clinical drug-resistant isolates, with a range of MIC values between 0.1-3.5 mg/mL. The active extract showed complete inhibition of pathogen growth and did not induce resistance to the active components. In addition, according to scanning electron microscope observations, EE resulted in greater cell morphological changes by degrading and disrupting the cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane, whereby ultimately this cell membrane integrity damage led to cell death. In conclusion, the EE extracts from Polygonum cuspidatum may provide a promising antimicrobial agent for therapeutic applications against nosocomial drug-resistant bacteria. PMID:26087259

  15. Antibacterial drugs as corrosion inhibitors for bronze surfaces in acidic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotaru, Ileana; Varvara, Simona; Gaina, Luiza; Muresan, Liana Maria

    2014-12-01

    The present study is aiming to investigate the effect of four antibiotics (amoxicillin, ciprofloxacin, doxycycline and streptomycin,) belonging to different classes of antibacterial drugs on bronze corrosion in a solution simulating an acid rain (pH 4). Due to their ability to form protective films on the metal surface, the tested antibiotics act as corrosion inhibitors for bronze. The antibiotics were tested at various concentrations in order to determine the optimal concentration range for the best corrosion inhibiting effect. In evaluating the inhibition efficiency, polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, SEM and XPS measurements were used. Moreover, a correlation between the inhibition efficiency of some antibacterial drugs and certain molecular parameters was determined by quantum chemical computations. Parameters like energies EHOMO and ELUMO and HOMO-LUMO energy gap were used for correlation with the corrosion data.

  16. Machine-Learning Techniques Applied to Antibacterial Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Durrant, Jacob D.; Amaro, Rommie E.

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant bacteria threatens to catapult humanity back to the pre-antibiotic era. Even now, multi-drug-resistant bacterial infections annually result in millions of hospital days, billions in healthcare costs, and, most importantly, tens of thousands of lives lost. As many pharmaceutical companies have abandoned antibiotic development in search of more lucrative therapeutics, academic researchers are uniquely positioned to fill the resulting vacuum. Traditional high-throughput screens and lead-optimization efforts are expensive and labor intensive. Computer-aided drug discovery techniques, which are cheaper and faster, can accelerate the identification of novel antibiotics in an academic setting, leading to improved hit rates and faster transitions to pre-clinical and clinical testing. The current review describes two machine-learning techniques, neural networks and decision trees, that have been used to identify experimentally validated antibiotics. We conclude by describing the future directions of this exciting field. PMID:25521642

  17. Postmarketing surveillance of quinolones, 1990 to 1992.

    PubMed

    Davey, P; McDonald, T

    1993-01-01

    During the last 2 years, the major event in the postmarketing surveillance of quinolones has been the worldwide withdrawal of temafloxacin after only 15 weeks on the USA market. The Adverse Drug Reaction (ADR) reports that led to the withdrawal have been reviewed and show that the frequency and type of ADR and serious ADR were highly unusual in comparison with other quinolones marketed in the USA (ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and ofloxacin). The difficulty in establishing causality between drugs and ADRs is discussed. Prescription event monitoring and computerised databases are beginning to reach the size required to pick up rare ADRs but, even so, they can only establish association rather than causality. Perhaps a more important question is the issue of acceptable risk. This requires better definition in order to apply decision analysis to the options available for the treatment of bacterial infections. PMID:7689451

  18. Exploring simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug, as a potential topical antibacterial agent.

    PubMed

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F N; Hamed, Maha I; Sobreira, Tiago J P; Hedrick, Victoria E; Paul, Lake N; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics combined with the decline in discovery of novel antibacterial agents has created a global public health crisis. Repurposing existing drugs presents an alternative strategy to potentially expedite the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. The present study demonstrates that simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug exhibited broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against important Gram-positive (including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)) and Gram-negative pathogens (once the barrier imposed by the outer membrane was permeabilized). Proteomics and macromolecular synthesis analyses revealed that simvastatin inhibits multiple biosynthetic pathways and cellular processes in bacteria, including selective interference of bacterial protein synthesis. This property appears to assist in simvastatin's ability to suppress production of key MRSA toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leucocidin) that impair healing of infected skin wounds. A murine MRSA skin infection experiment confirmed that simvastatin significantly reduces the bacterial burden and inflammatory cytokines in the infected wounds. Additionally, simvastatin exhibits excellent anti-biofilm activity against established staphylococcal biofilms and demonstrates the ability to be combined with topical antimicrobials currently used to treat MRSA skin infections. Collectively the present study lays the foundation for further investigation of repurposing simvastatin as a topical antibacterial agent to treat skin infections. PMID:26553420

  19. Comparative Genomic Assessment of Novel Broad-Spectrum Targets for Antibacterial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    White, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    Single and multiple resistance to antibacterial drugs currently in use is spreading, since they act against only a very small number of molecular targets; finding novel targets for anti-infectives is therefore of great importance. All protein sequences from three pathogens (Staphylococcus aureus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Escherichia coli O157:H7 EDL993) were assessed via comparative genomics methods for their suitability as antibacterial targets according to a number of criteria, including the essentiality of the protein, its level of sequence conservation, and its distribution in pathogens, bacteria and eukaryotes (especially humans). Each protein was scored and ranked based on weighted variants of these criteria in order to prioritize proteins as potential novel broad-spectrum targets for antibacterial drugs. A number of proteins proved to score highly in all three species and were robust to variations in the scoring system used. Sensitivity analysis indicated the quantitative contribution of each metric to the overall score. After further analysis of these targets, tRNA methyltransferase (trmD) and translation initiation factor IF-1 (infA) emerged as potential and novel antimicrobial targets very worthy of further investigation. The scoring strategy used might be of value in other areas of post-genomic drug discovery. PMID:18629165

  20. Exploring simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug, as a potential topical antibacterial agent

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F. N.; Hamed, Maha I.; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Paul, Lake N.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    The rapid rise of bacterial resistance to traditional antibiotics combined with the decline in discovery of novel antibacterial agents has created a global public health crisis. Repurposing existing drugs presents an alternative strategy to potentially expedite the discovery of new antimicrobial drugs. The present study demonstrates that simvastatin, an antihyperlipidemic drug exhibited broad-spectrum antibacterial activity against important Gram-positive (including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)) and Gram-negative pathogens (once the barrier imposed by the outer membrane was permeabilized). Proteomics and macromolecular synthesis analyses revealed that simvastatin inhibits multiple biosynthetic pathways and cellular processes in bacteria, including selective interference of bacterial protein synthesis. This property appears to assist in simvastatin’s ability to suppress production of key MRSA toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leucocidin) that impair healing of infected skin wounds. A murine MRSA skin infection experiment confirmed that simvastatin significantly reduces the bacterial burden and inflammatory cytokines in the infected wounds. Additionally, simvastatin exhibits excellent anti-biofilm activity against established staphylococcal biofilms and demonstrates the ability to be combined with topical antimicrobials currently used to treat MRSA skin infections. Collectively the present study lays the foundation for further investigation of repurposing simvastatin as a topical antibacterial agent to treat skin infections. PMID:26553420

  1. Structural basis of DNA gyrase inhibition by antibacterial QPT-1, anticancer drug etoposide and moxifloxacin.

    PubMed

    Chan, Pan F; Srikannathasan, Velupillai; Huang, Jianzhong; Cui, Haifeng; Fosberry, Andrew P; Gu, Minghua; Hann, Michael M; Hibbs, Martin; Homes, Paul; Ingraham, Karen; Pizzollo, Jason; Shen, Carol; Shillings, Anthony J; Spitzfaden, Claus E; Tanner, Robert; Theobald, Andrew J; Stavenger, Robert A; Bax, Benjamin D; Gwynn, Michael N

    2015-01-01

    New antibacterials are needed to tackle antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Type IIA topoisomerases (topo2As), the targets of fluoroquinolones, regulate DNA topology by creating transient double-strand DNA breaks. Here we report the first co-crystal structures of the antibacterial QPT-1 and the anticancer drug etoposide with Staphylococcus aureus DNA gyrase, showing binding at the same sites in the cleaved DNA as the fluoroquinolone moxifloxacin. Unlike moxifloxacin, QPT-1 and etoposide interact with conserved GyrB TOPRIM residues rationalizing why QPT-1 can overcome fluoroquinolone resistance. Our data show etoposide's antibacterial activity is due to DNA gyrase inhibition and suggests other anticancer agents act similarly. Analysis of multiple DNA gyrase co-crystal structures, including asymmetric cleavage complexes, led to a 'pair of swing-doors' hypothesis in which the movement of one DNA segment regulates cleavage and religation of the second DNA duplex. This mechanism can explain QPT-1's bacterial specificity. Structure-based strategies for developing topo2A antibacterials are suggested. PMID:26640131

  2. Influence of Surface Chemistry on the Release of an Antibacterial Drug from Nanostructured Porous Silicon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mengjia; Hartman, Philip S; Loni, Armando; Canham, Leigh T; Bodiford, Nelli; Coffer, Jeffery L

    2015-06-01

    Nanostructured mesoporous silicon possesses important properties advantageous to drug loading and delivery. For controlled release of the antibacterial drug triclosan, and its associated activity versus Staphylococcus aureus, previous studies investigated the influence of porosity of the silicon matrix. In this work, we focus on the complementary issue of the influence of surface chemistry on such properties, with particular regard to drug loading and release kinetics that can be ideally adjusted by surface modification. Comparison between drug release from as-anodized, hydride-terminated hydrophobic porous silicon and the oxidized hydrophilic counterpart is complicated due to the rapid bioresorption of the former; hence, a hydrophobic interface with long-term biostability is desired, such as can be provided by a relatively long chain octyl moiety. To minimize possible thermal degradation of the surfaces or drug activity during loading of molten drug species, a solution loading method has been investigated. Such studies demonstrate that the ability of porous silicon to act as an effective carrier for sustained delivery of antibacterial agents can be sensitively altered by surface functionalization.

  3. Machine-learning techniques applied to antibacterial drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Durrant, Jacob D; Amaro, Rommie E

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant bacteria threatens to revert humanity back to the preantibiotic era. Even now, multidrug-resistant bacterial infections annually result in millions of hospital days, billions in healthcare costs, and, most importantly, tens of thousands of lives lost. As many pharmaceutical companies have abandoned antibiotic development in search of more lucrative therapeutics, academic researchers are uniquely positioned to fill the pipeline. Traditional high-throughput screens and lead-optimization efforts are expensive and labor intensive. Computer-aided drug-discovery techniques, which are cheaper and faster, can accelerate the identification of novel antibiotics, leading to improved hit rates and faster transitions to preclinical and clinical testing. The current review describes two machine-learning techniques, neural networks and decision trees, that have been used to identify experimentally validated antibiotics. We conclude by describing the future directions of this exciting field.

  4. Antibacterial activity and mechanism of action of auranofin against multi-drug resistant bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Thangamani, Shankar; Mohammad, Haroon; Abushahba, Mostafa F. N.; Sobreira, Tiago J. P.; Hedrick, Victoria E.; Paul, Lake N.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional methods employed to discover new antibiotics are both a time-consuming and financially-taxing venture. This has led researchers to mine existing libraries of clinical molecules in order to repurpose old drugs for new applications (as antimicrobials). Such an effort led to the discovery of auranofin, a drug initially approved as an anti-rheumatic agent, which also possesses potent antibacterial activity in a clinically achievable range. The present study demonstrates auranofin’s antibacterial activity is a complex process that involves inhibition of multiple biosynthetic pathways including cell wall, DNA, and bacterial protein synthesis. We also confirmed that the lack of activity of auranofin observed against Gram-negative bacteria is due to the permeability barrier conferred by the outer membrane. Auranofin’s ability to suppress bacterial protein synthesis leads to significant reduction in the production of key methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) toxins. Additionally, auranofin is capable of eradicating intracellular MRSA present inside infected macrophage cells. Furthermore, auranofin is efficacious in a mouse model of MRSA systemic infection and significantly reduces the bacterial load in murine organs including the spleen and liver. Collectively, this study provides valuable evidence that auranofin has significant promise to be repurposed as a novel antibacterial for treatment of invasive bacterial infections. PMID:26936660

  5. Analysis toward innovative herbal antibacterial and antifungal drugs.

    PubMed

    Dhankhar, Sandeep; Dhankhar, Seema; Kumar, Manish; Ruhil, Sonam; Balhara, Meenakshi; Chhillar, Anil K

    2012-12-01

    The antimicrobial activities of four medicinal plants Argemona mexicana, Achyranthes aspera, Catharanthus roseus, and Syzygium cumini were evaluated against Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus subtilis, Salmonella typhi and three Aspergillus species. Extracts from Achyranthes aspera and Catharanthus roseus showed the highest antimicrobial potential (MIC 0.375-0.750 mg/ml) while extract from Argemona mexicana and Syzygium cumini, showed less activity. In disc diffusion assay, only eight out of twenty extracts showed antimicrobial activity at a concentration of 25.0 μg/ disc. The GCMS investigation reveals the existence of 2-bornanone; 1, 2-benzenedicarboxylic acid, bis (2-methylpropyl) ester; hexadecanoic acid, methyl ester and hexatriacontane in water extract fraction of C. roseus. The present research article provides a review of some medicinal plants incorporating antimicrobial drugs, together with recent advances in emerging therapeutics in clinical development and related patents for exploitation of herbal medicine. PMID:23072646

  6. Veterinary use of new quinolones in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, S

    1995-01-01

    Five new quinolones are used as veterinary medicines in Japan. Benofloxacin and ofloxacin are orally given in feed or in drinking water for respiratory diseases due to Mycoplasma spp. and Escherichia coli in poultry. Enrofloxacin is subcutaneously, intramuscularly or orally administered to cattle and swine for pneumonia due to Pasteurella spp., Mycoplasma spp. and Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and diarrhoea due to E. coli, and is used orally for respiratory diseases in poultry. Danofloxacin is similar to enrofloxacin except that the former is not approved for diarrhoea in cattle and swine. Orbifloxacin is given intramuscularly for pneumonia and diarrhoea in cattle and swine but not for poultry diseases. They are effective and safe in animals, and disappear from edible tissues after appropriate drug withdrawal times. The quinolones are indicated only when first-choice drugs are ineffective, only under the direction of veterinarians and only for periods of less than 5 days. Under these conditions, it appears unlikely that quinolone use in veterinary practice will be detrimental to human chemotherapy.

  7. Investigation of an Immunoassay with Broad Specificity to Quinolone Drugs by Genetic Algorithm with Linear Assignment of Hypermolecular Alignment of Data Sets and Advanced Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiahong; Lu, Ning; Shen, Xing; Tang, Qiushi; Zhang, Chijian; Xu, Jun; Sun, Yuanming; Huang, Xin-An; Xu, Zhenlin; Lei, Hongtao

    2016-04-01

    A polyclonal antibody against the quinolone drug pazufloxacin (PAZ) but with surprisingly broad specificity was raised to simultaneously detect 24 quinolones (QNs). The developed competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ciELISA) exhibited limits of detection (LODs) for the 24 QNs ranging from 0.45 to 15.16 ng/mL, below the maximum residue levels (MRLs). To better understand the obtained broad specificity, a genetic algorithm with linear assignment of hypermolecular alignment of data sets (GALAHAD) was used to generate the desired pharmacophore model and superimpose the QNs, and then advanced comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and advanced comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) models were employed to study the three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR) between QNs and the antibody. It was found that the QNs could interact with the antibody with different binding poses, and cross-reactivity was mainly positively correlated with the bulky substructure containing electronegative atom at the 7-position, while it was negatively associated with the large bulky substructure at the 1-position of QNs.

  8. An analysis of FDA-approved drugs for infectious disease: antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Kinch, Michael S; Patridge, Eric; Plummer, Mark; Hoyer, Denton

    2014-09-01

    Drugs targeting infectious diseases have greatly improved public health. A study to evaluate all US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved new molecular entities (NMEs) reveals that the number of new agents targeting infectious disease peaked during the 1990s and declined rapidly thereafter. Molecules targeting bacterial pathogens represent the most common component of anti-infectives followed by antivirals and antifungals. Focusing on antibacterial agents, an increase in new NMEs predominated from the 1960s through to the 1990s, dropping sharply thereafter. Obsolescence and resistance has eliminated one-third of these drugs. Consequently, the arsenal of antibiotics peaked in 2000 and is declining. Likewise, the number of organizations awarded at least one NME for a bacterial indication has declined to a level not seen in more than a half century. PMID:25043770

  9. In vivo drug release and antibacterial properties of vancomycin loaded hydroxyapatite/chitosan composite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingzhe; Wang, Chenyu; Wang, Jincheng; Qu, Yang; Liu, Guangyao

    2012-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the in vivo drug release and antibacterial properties of a novel mesoporous hydroxyapatite/chitosan (mesoHA-CS) composite loaded with vancomycin (VCM). VCM-mesoHA/CS composite was prepared via a freeze-drying method. The successful loading of VCM in the composite scaffold was verified by FT IR analyses. SEM observation revealed the mesoporous structure of the VCM-mesoHA/CS composite with the pore size of 50-100 µm. Medicated composites were then implanted into the muscular pockets of extremity in rabbits. The results demonstrated that local VCM concentration in muscle tissue could maintain higher than the minimum inhibitory concentration at the site of implantation for long time (i.e. 4 weeks). As a result, the number of viable methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on mesoHA/CS could be significantly suppressed after the VCM-mesoHA/CS implantation. These results indicated that the mesoHA/CS composite may be promising scaffold as drug storage and release vehicle applied for local antibacterial drug release and bone repair.

  10. Ligand and Structure-Based Approaches for the Identification of Peptide Deformylase Inhibitors as Antibacterial Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jian; Liang, Li; Zhu, Yasheng; Qiu, Shengzhi; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) is a metalloprotease catalyzing the removal of a formyl group from newly synthesized proteins, which makes it an important antibacterial drug target. Given the importance of PDF inhibitors like actinonin in antibacterial drug discovery, several reported potent PDF inhibitors were used to develop pharmacophore models using the Galahad module of Sybyl 7.1 software. Generated pharmacophore models were composed of two donor atom centers, four acceptor atom centers and two hydrophobic groups. Model-1 was screened against the Zinc database and several compounds were retrieved as hits. Compounds with Qfit values of more than 60 were employed to perform a molecular docking study with the receptor Escherichia coli PDF, then compounds with docking score values of more than 6 were used to predict the in silico pharmacokinetic and toxicity risk via OSIRIS property explorer. Two known PDF inhibitors were also used to perform a molecular docking study with E. coli PDF as reference molecules. The results of the molecular docking study were validated by reproducing the crystal structure of actinonin. Molecular docking and in silico pharmacokinetic and toxicity prediction studies suggested that ZINC08740166 has a relatively high docking score of 7.44 and a drug score of 0.78. PMID:27428963

  11. Ligand and Structure-Based Approaches for the Identification of Peptide Deformylase Inhibitors as Antibacterial Drugs.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jian; Liang, Li; Zhu, Yasheng; Qiu, Shengzhi; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Peptide deformylase (PDF) is a metalloprotease catalyzing the removal of a formyl group from newly synthesized proteins, which makes it an important antibacterial drug target. Given the importance of PDF inhibitors like actinonin in antibacterial drug discovery, several reported potent PDF inhibitors were used to develop pharmacophore models using the Galahad module of Sybyl 7.1 software. Generated pharmacophore models were composed of two donor atom centers, four acceptor atom centers and two hydrophobic groups. Model-1 was screened against the Zinc database and several compounds were retrieved as hits. Compounds with Qfit values of more than 60 were employed to perform a molecular docking study with the receptor Escherichia coli PDF, then compounds with docking score values of more than 6 were used to predict the in silico pharmacokinetic and toxicity risk via OSIRIS property explorer. Two known PDF inhibitors were also used to perform a molecular docking study with E. coli PDF as reference molecules. The results of the molecular docking study were validated by reproducing the crystal structure of actinonin. Molecular docking and in silico pharmacokinetic and toxicity prediction studies suggested that ZINC08740166 has a relatively high docking score of 7.44 and a drug score of 0.78. PMID:27428963

  12. Improvement of antibacterial activity of some sulfa drugs through linkage to certain phthalazin-1(2H)-one scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Hany S; Eldehna, Wagdy M; Abdel-Aziz, Hatem A; Elaasser, Mahmoud M; Abdel-Aziz, Marwa M

    2014-10-01

    RAB1 5 is a lead antibacterial agent in which trimethoprim is linked to phthalazine moiety. Similarly, our strategy in this research depends on the interconnection between some sulfa drugs and certain phthalazin-1(2H)-one scaffolds in an attempt to enhance their antibacterial activity. This approach was achieved through the combination of 4-substituted phthalazin-1(2H)-ones 9a, b or 14a, b with sulfanilamide 1a, sulfathiazole 1b or sulfadiazine 1c through amide linkers 6a, b to produce the target compounds 10a-d and 15a-e, respectively. The antibacterial activity of the newly synthesized compounds showed that all tested compounds have antibacterial activity higher than that of their reference sulfa drugs 1a-c. Compound 10c represented the highest antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus pneumonia and Staphylococcus aureus with MIC = 0.39 μmol/mL. Moreover, compound 10d displayed excellent antibacterial activity against Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium with MIC = 0.39 and 0.78 μmol/mL, respectively.

  13. [New antibacterial agents on the market and in the pipeline].

    PubMed

    Kern, W V

    2015-11-01

    After some years of stagnation there have been several new successful developments in the field of antibacterial agents. Most of these new developments have been in conventional antibacterial classes. New drugs among the beta-lactam agents are methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) active cephalosporins (ceftaroline and ceftobiprole) and new combinations of beta-lactam with beta-lactamase inhibitors (ceftolozane/tazobactam, ceftazidime/avibactam, imipenem/relebactam and meropenem/RPX7009). New developments can also be observed among oxazolidinones (tedizolid, radezolid, cadazolid and MRX-I), macrolides/ketolides (modithromycin and solithromycin), aminoglycosides (plazomicin), quinolones (nemonoxacin, delafloxacin and avarofloxacin), tetracyclines (omadacycline and eravacycline) as well as among glycopeptides and lipopeptides (oritavancin, telavancin, dalbavancin and surotomycin). New agents in a very early developmental phase are FabI inhibitors, endolysines, peptidomimetics, lipid A inhibitors, methionyl-tRNA synthetase inhibitors and teixobactin.

  14. Inactivation of indispensable bacterial proteins by early proteins of bacteriophages: implication in antibacterial drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Sau, S; Chattoraj, P; Ganguly, T; Chanda, P K; Mandal, N C

    2008-06-01

    Bacteriophages utilize host bacterial cellular machineries for their own reproduction and completion of life cycles. The early proteins that phage synthesize immediately after the entry of their genomes into bacterial cells participate in inhibiting host macromolecular biosynthesis, initiating phage-specific replication and synthesizing late proteins. Inhibition of synthesis of host macromolecules that eventually leads to cell death is generally performed by the physical and/or chemical modification of indispensable host proteins by early proteins. Interestingly, most modified bacterial proteins were shown to take part actively in phage-specific transcription and replication. Research on phages in last nine decades has demonstrated such lethal early proteins that interact with or chemically modify indispensable host proteins. Among the host proteins inhibited by lethal phage proteins, several are not inhibited by any chemical inhibitor available today. Under the context of widespread dissemination of antibiotic-resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria in recent years, the information of lethal phage proteins and cognate host proteins could be extremely invaluable as they may lead to the identification of novel antibacterial compounds. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about some early phage proteins, their cognate host proteins and their mechanism of action and also describe how the above interacting proteins had been exploited in antibacterial drug discovery. PMID:18537683

  15. Antibacterial activity of natural spices on multiple drug resistant Escherichia coli isolated from drinking water, Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Spices traditionally have been used as coloring agents, flavoring agents, preservatives, food additives and medicine in Bangladesh. The present work aimed to find out the antimicrobial activity of natural spices on multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli isolates. Methods Anti-bacterial potentials of six crude plant extracts (Allium sativum, Zingiber officinale, Allium cepa, Coriandrum sativum, Piper nigrum and Citrus aurantifolia) were tested against five Escherichia coli isolated from potable water sources at kushtia, Bangladesh. Results All the bacterial isolates were susceptible to undiluted lime-juice. None of them were found to be susceptible against the aqueous extracts of garlic, onion, coriander, pepper and ginger alone. However, all the isolates were susceptible when subjected to 1:1:1 aqueous extract of lime, garlic and ginger. The highest inhibition zone was observed with lime (11 mm). Conclusion Natural spices might have anti-bacterial activity against enteric pathogens and could be used for prevention of diarrheal diseases. Further evaluation is necessary. PMID:21406097

  16. Advanced biopolymer-coated drug-releasing titania nanotubes (TNTs) implants with simultaneously enhanced osteoblast adhesion and antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Kumeria, Tushar; Mon, Htwe; Aw, Moom Sinn; Gulati, Karan; Santos, Abel; Griesser, Hans J; Losic, Dusan

    2015-06-01

    Here, we report on the development of advanced biopolymer-coated drug-releasing implants based on titanium (Ti) featuring titania nanotubes (TNTs) on its surface. These TNT arrays were fabricated on the Ti surface by electrochemical anodization, followed by the loading and release of a model antibiotic drug, gentamicin. The osteoblastic adhesion and antibacterial properties of these TNT-Ti samples are significantly improved by loading antibacterial payloads inside the nanotubes and modifying their surface with two biopolymer coatings (PLGA and chitosan). The improved osteoblast adhesion and antibacterial properties of these drug-releasing TNT-Ti samples are confirmed by the adhesion and proliferation studies of osteoblasts and model Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus epidermidis). The adhesion of these cells on TNT-Ti samples is monitored by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopies. Results reveal the ability of these biopolymer-coated drug-releasing TNT-Ti substrates to promote osteoblast adhesion and proliferation, while effectively preventing bacterial colonization by impeding their proliferation and biofilm formation. The proposed approach could overcome inherent problems associated with bacterial infections on Ti-based implants, simultaneously enabling the development of orthopedic implants with enhanced and synergistic antibacterial functionalities and bone cell promotion.

  17. Antibacterial effect of Allium sativum cloves and Zingiber officinale rhizomes against multiple-drug resistant clinical pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Karuppiah, Ponmurugan; Rajaram, Shyamkumar

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the antibacterial properties of Allium sativum (garlic) cloves and Zingiber officinale (ginger) rhizomes against multi-drug resistant clinical pathogens causing nosocomial infection. Methods The cloves of garlic and rhizomes of ginger were extracted with 95% (v/v) ethanol. The ethanolic extracts were subjected to antibacterial sensitivity test against clinical pathogens. Results Anti-bacterial potentials of the extracts of two crude garlic cloves and ginger rhizomes were tested against five gram negative and two gram positive multi-drug resistant bacteria isolates. All the bacterial isolates were susceptible to crude extracts of both plants extracts. Except Enterobacter sp. and Klebsiella sp., all other isolates were susceptible when subjected to ethanolic extracts of garlic and ginger. The highest inhibition zone was observed with garlic (19.45 mm) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). The minimal inhibitory concentration was as low as 67.00 µg/mL against P. aeruginosa. Conclusions Natural spices of garlic and ginger possess effective anti-bacterial activity against multi-drug clinical pathogens and can be used for prevention of drug resistant microbial diseases and further evaluation is necessary. PMID:23569978

  18. Advanced biopolymer-coated drug-releasing titania nanotubes (TNTs) implants with simultaneously enhanced osteoblast adhesion and antibacterial properties.

    PubMed

    Kumeria, Tushar; Mon, Htwe; Aw, Moom Sinn; Gulati, Karan; Santos, Abel; Griesser, Hans J; Losic, Dusan

    2015-06-01

    Here, we report on the development of advanced biopolymer-coated drug-releasing implants based on titanium (Ti) featuring titania nanotubes (TNTs) on its surface. These TNT arrays were fabricated on the Ti surface by electrochemical anodization, followed by the loading and release of a model antibiotic drug, gentamicin. The osteoblastic adhesion and antibacterial properties of these TNT-Ti samples are significantly improved by loading antibacterial payloads inside the nanotubes and modifying their surface with two biopolymer coatings (PLGA and chitosan). The improved osteoblast adhesion and antibacterial properties of these drug-releasing TNT-Ti samples are confirmed by the adhesion and proliferation studies of osteoblasts and model Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus epidermidis). The adhesion of these cells on TNT-Ti samples is monitored by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopies. Results reveal the ability of these biopolymer-coated drug-releasing TNT-Ti substrates to promote osteoblast adhesion and proliferation, while effectively preventing bacterial colonization by impeding their proliferation and biofilm formation. The proposed approach could overcome inherent problems associated with bacterial infections on Ti-based implants, simultaneously enabling the development of orthopedic implants with enhanced and synergistic antibacterial functionalities and bone cell promotion. PMID:25944564

  19. One-pot synthesis of antibacterial chitosan/silver bio-nanocomposite hydrogel beads as drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Yadollahi, Mehdi; Farhoudian, Sana; Namazi, Hassan

    2015-08-01

    Silver nanoparticles were synthesized in situ during the formation of physically crosslinked chitosan hydrogel beads using sodium tripolyphosphate as the crosslinker. The aim of the study was to investigate whether these nanocomposite beads have the potential to be used in drug delivery applications. The formation of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in the hydrogels was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy studies. Furthermore, the antibacterial and swelling properties of the beads were studied. The nanocomposite hydrogels demonstrated good antibacterial effects against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. AgNPs caused an increase in the swelling capacity of the beads. In vitro drug release test was carried out to prove the effectiveness of this novel type of nanocomposite beads as a controlled drug delivery system. Prolonged and more controlled drug releases were observed for AgNPs containing chitosan beads, which increased by the increase in AgNPs content.

  20. Novel N-2-(Furyl)-2-(chlorobenzyloxyimino) Ethyl Piperazinyl Quinolones: Synthesis, Cytotoxic Evaluation and Structure-Activity Relationship.

    PubMed

    Mohammadhosseini, Negar; Pordeli, Mahboobeh; Safavi, Maliheh; Firoozpour, Loghman; Amin, Fatame; Kabudanian Ardestani, Sussan; Edraki, Najmeh; Shafiee, Abbas; Foroumadi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Quinolone antibacterials are one of the most important classes of pharmacological agents known as potent inhibitors of bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV that efficiently inhibit DNA replication and transcription by generating several double-stranded DNA break. Some quinolone derivatives demonstrated inhibitory potential against eukaryote topoismarase II and substantial dose-dependent cytotoxic potential against some cancerous cells. In present study, synthesis and cytotoxic activity evaluation of new series of N-pipearzinyl quinolones containing N-2-(furyl-2 or 3-yl)-2-(chlorobenzyloxyimino) ethyl moiety 7a-i have been studied. Reaction of quinolone, with 2-bromo-1-(furan-2 or 3-yl)ethanone-O-substituted chlorobenzyloxime in DMF in presence of NaHCO3 at room temperature, gave the title compounds N-2-(furan-2 or 3-yl)-2-(chlorobenzyloxyiminoethyl) quinolone 7a-i. Synthesized compounds were further evaluated in-vitro against three human breast tumor cell lines. Preliminary screening indicated that compound 7 g demonstrated significant growth inhibitory potential against all evaluated cell lines. The results of structure-activity relationship study exhibited that quinolone derivatives are superior in cytotoxic potential compared to 1, 8-naphthyridone series. Furthermore, ethyl quinolone derivatives were more potent cytotoxic agents comparing with cyclopropyl quinolones.

  1. Nanotechnology approaches for antibacterial drug delivery: Preparation and microbiological evaluation of fusogenic liposomes carrying fusidic acid.

    PubMed

    Nicolosi, Daria; Cupri, Sarha; Genovese, Carlo; Tempera, Gianna; Mattina, Roberto; Pignatello, Rosario

    2015-06-01

    Many antibacterial drugs have some difficulty passing through the bacterial cell membrane, especially if they have a high molecular weight or large spatial structure. Consequently, intrinsic resistance is shown by some bacterial strains. Reduced cell membrane permeability is one of the mechanisms of resistance known for fusidic acid (FUS), a bacteriostatic steroidal compound with activity limited to Gram-positive bacteria. Moreover, the lipophilic character of FUS has been shown to cause drug retention inside the bilayers of cell membranes, preventing its diffusion towards target sites inside the cytoplasm. Targeting antimicrobial agents by means of liposomes may be a valid strategy in the treatment of infections refractory to conventional routes of antimicrobial treatment. On this basis, loading of FUS in fusogenic liposomes (FLs) was planned in this study. Fusogenic small unilamellar vesicles loaded with FUS were produced to evaluate their influence on improving the cell penetration and antibacterial activity of the antibiotic. The produced carriers were technologically characterised and were subjected to an in vitro microbiological assay against several strains of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. The experimental results showed that encapsulating FUS in a liposomal carrier can improve antimicrobial efficacy and reduce the effective concentration required, probably through putative mechanisms of increased diffusion through the bacterial cell membrane. In fact, whilst free FUS was active only on the tested Gram-positive strains, incubation of FUS-loaded FLs exhibited growth inhibitory activity both against Gram-positive and Gram-negative strains. The lowest MICs were obtained against Staphylococcus epidermidis (≤0.15 μg/mL) and Acinetobacter baumannii (37.5 μg/mL) clinical strains.

  2. Possible involvement of DEC1 on the adverse effects of quinolone antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaohong; Zheng, Yan; Ma, Wanshan; Wang, Yunshan

    2010-04-30

    Quinolone antibacterial agents are widely used in the clinic because of their high antibacterial activity, broad spectra and favorable pharmacokinetics. However, the adverse effects induced by quinolones, such as tendon/articular toxicity, central nervous system toxicity, phototoxicity and dysglycemia, have greatly restricted their therapeutic use. Differentiated embryo-chondrocyte expressed gene 1 (DEC1), an important transcription factor that has a basic helix-loop-helix domain and is ubiquitously expressed in both human embryonic and adult tissues, has a pivotal function in various biological phenomena, including neurogenesis, neuroregulation, chondrogenesis, cell growth, oncogenesis, immune balance and circandian rhythm. Recently, DEC1 has received increasing attention for its role in maintaining the homeostasis of metabolism and energy. Research has shown that DEC1 may play a vital role in metabolic disease. Although the mechanism of the adverse reactions caused by quinolones has not been clarified, the distribution of these serious adverse effects in tissues and organs is consistent with the expression of DEC1 in corresponding normal tissues. In the present paper, we review evidence showing that DEC1 may take part in the adverse effects induced by quinolone antibiotics. The investigation of the molecular details of the toxicity caused by quinolones may help overcome the shortcomings of the antibiotics and reveal new, useful therapeutic functions besides their antimicrobial effect.

  3. Taguchi design for optimization and development of antibacterial drug-loaded PLGA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sonam; Chaudhary, Hema; Kumar, Vikash

    2014-03-01

    This research report was to develop Cefixime loaded polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) nanoparticles using modified precipitation method. TEM analysis indicated formation of well-formed, smooth, spherical nanoparticles with no aggregates whereas XRD recommended dispersion of drug in PLGA carrier system in amorphous form. The polymer and stabilizer concentration and organic to aqueous ratio were found to be significant factors for nanoparticles and their optimization using Taguchi design (L9). The design formulations showed entrapment efficiency (EE), particle size and poly-dispersity index (PDI) ranging 68.31 ± 1.74%, 159.8-157.7 nm and 0.126-0.149, respectively indicated small and stable nanoparticles with good homogeneity and encapsulation. The design optimized formulation drug release and permeation studies demonstrated that it is four times sustained release behavior and 1.74 times better permeation than free drug. The result of microbiological assay also suggested that optimized formulation has significant antibacterial activity against intracellular multidrug resistance (MDR) of Salmonella typhi.

  4. Human-use antibacterial residues in the natural environment of China: implication for ecopharmacovigilance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; He, Bingshu; Hu, Xiamin

    2015-06-01

    Antibacterial residues in the natural environment have been of increasing concern due to their impact on bacteria resistance development and toxicity to natural communities and ultimately to public health. China is a large country with high production and consumption of antibacterials for its population growth and economic development in recent years. In this article, we summarized the current situation of human-use antibacterial pollution in Chinese water (wastewaters, natural and drinking waters) and solid matrices (sludge, sediment, and soil) reported in 33 peer-reviewed papers. We found that, although there are adequate wastewater treatment systems in China, human-use antibacterial residues in the natural environment were reported almost throughout the whole country. Three most frequently prescribed classes of antibacterials in China, including quinolones, macrolides, and β-lactam, were also the predominant classes of residues in Chinese environment, manifested as the high concentration and detection frequency. In view of this alarming situation, we have presented that ecopharmacovigilance (EPV) might be implemented in the antibacterial drug administration of China, as the active participation of the pharmaceutical industry and drug regulatory authorities from the diffuse source of antibacterial pollution. Considering EPV experience of developed countries together with the actual conditions of China, we have identified some approaches that can be taken, including:• Focus on education;• Further strengthening and persevering the antibacterial stewardship strategies and pharmaceutical take-back programs in China;• Designing greener antibacterials with better degradability in the environment;• Implementing environmental risk assessment prior to launch of new drugs;• Strengthening collaboration in EPV-related areas. PMID:25947893

  5. Human-use antibacterial residues in the natural environment of China: implication for ecopharmacovigilance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; He, Bingshu; Hu, Xiamin

    2015-06-01

    Antibacterial residues in the natural environment have been of increasing concern due to their impact on bacteria resistance development and toxicity to natural communities and ultimately to public health. China is a large country with high production and consumption of antibacterials for its population growth and economic development in recent years. In this article, we summarized the current situation of human-use antibacterial pollution in Chinese water (wastewaters, natural and drinking waters) and solid matrices (sludge, sediment, and soil) reported in 33 peer-reviewed papers. We found that, although there are adequate wastewater treatment systems in China, human-use antibacterial residues in the natural environment were reported almost throughout the whole country. Three most frequently prescribed classes of antibacterials in China, including quinolones, macrolides, and β-lactam, were also the predominant classes of residues in Chinese environment, manifested as the high concentration and detection frequency. In view of this alarming situation, we have presented that ecopharmacovigilance (EPV) might be implemented in the antibacterial drug administration of China, as the active participation of the pharmaceutical industry and drug regulatory authorities from the diffuse source of antibacterial pollution. Considering EPV experience of developed countries together with the actual conditions of China, we have identified some approaches that can be taken, including:• Focus on education;• Further strengthening and persevering the antibacterial stewardship strategies and pharmaceutical take-back programs in China;• Designing greener antibacterials with better degradability in the environment;• Implementing environmental risk assessment prior to launch of new drugs;• Strengthening collaboration in EPV-related areas.

  6. Study of fluorescence characteristics of the charge-transfer reaction of quinolone agents with bromanil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wen-Ying; Chen, Xiao-Fang; Xuan, Chun-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    A spectrofluorimetric method was discussed for the determination of three antibacterial quinolone derivatives, ofloxacin (OFL), norfloxacin (NOR) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) through charge-transfer complexation (CTC) with 2,3,5,6-tetrabromo-1,4-benzoquinone (bromanil, TBBQ). The method was based on the reaction of these drugs as n-electron donors with the π-acceptor TBBQ. TBBQ was found to react with these drugs to produce a kind of yellow complexes and the fluorescence intensities of the complexes were enhanced by 29-36 times more than those of the corresponding monomers. UV-vis, 1H NMR and XPS techniques were used to study the complexes formed. The various experimental parameters affecting the fluorescence intensity were studied and optimized. Under optimal reaction conditions, the rectilinear calibration graphs were obtained in the concentration range of 0.021-2.42 μg mL -1, 0.017-2.63 μg mL -1 and 0.019-2.14 μg mL -1 for OFL, NOR and CIP, respectively. The methods developed were applied successfully to the determination of the subject drugs in their pharmaceutical dosage forms with good precision and accuracy compared to official and reported methods as revealed by t- and F-tests.

  7. Two approaches to form antibacterial surface: Doping with bactericidal element and drug loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhorukova, I. V.; Sheveyko, A. N.; Kiryukhantsev-Korneev, Ph. V.; Anisimova, N. Y.; Gloushankova, N. A.; Zhitnyak, I. Y.; Benesova, J.; Amler, E.; Shtansky, D. V.

    2015-03-01

    Two approaches (surface doping with bactericidal element and loading of antibiotic into specially formed surface microcontainers) to the fabrication of antibacterial yet biocompatible and bioactive surfaces are described. A network structure with square-shaped blind pores of 2.6 ± 0.6 × 10-3 mm3 for drug loading was obtained by selective laser sintering (SLS). The SLS-fabricated samples were loaded with 0.03, 0.3, 2.4, and 4 mg/cm2 of co-amoxiclav (amoxicillin and clavulanic acid). Ag-doped TiCaPCON films with 0.4, 1.2, and 4.0 at.% of Ag were obtained by co-sputtering of composite TiC0.5-Ca3(PO4)2 and metallic Ag targets. The surface structure of SLS-prepared samples and cross-sectional morphology of TiCaPCON-Ag films were studied by scanning electron microscopy. The through-thickness of Ag distribution in the TiCaPCON-Ag films was obtained by glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy. The kinetics of Ag ion release in normal saline solution was studied using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Bacterial activity of the samples was evaluated against S. epidermidis, S. aureus, and K. pneum. ozaenae using the agar diffusion test and photometric method by controlling the variation of optical density of the bacterial suspension over time. Cytocompatibility of the Ag-doped TiCaPCON films was observed in vitro using chondrocytic and MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells. The viability and proliferation of chondrocytic cells were determined using the MTS assay and PicoGreen assay tests, respectively. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of the SLS-fabricated samples loaded with co-amoxiclav was also studied. The obtained results showed that the moderate bacteriostatic effect of the Ag-doped TiCaPCON films is mainly manifested in the change of bacterial colony morphology and optical densities of bacteria suspensions. In contrast, the SLS-prepared samples showed a very rapid initial drug release resulting in strong bactericidal effect just from the start of the

  8. Immobilisation of an antibacterial drug to Ti6Al4V components fabricated using selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaithilingam, Jayasheelan; Kilsby, Samuel; Goodridge, Ruth D.; Christie, Steven D. R.; Edmondson, Steve; Hague, Richard J. M.

    2014-09-01

    Bacterial infections from biomedical implants and surgical devices are a major problem in orthopaedic, dental and vascular surgery. Although the sources of contaminations that lead to bacterial infections are known, it is not possible to control or avoid such infections completely. In this study, an approach to immobilise Ciprofloxacin® (an antibacterial drug) to phosphonic acid based self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) adsorbed on a selectively laser melted (SLM) Ti6Al4V structure, has been presented. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and static water contact angle measurements confirmed the attachment of SAMs and the drug. Results showed that Ciprofloxacin® is highly stable under the oxidative conditions used in this study. In-vitro stability was estimated by immersing the Ciprofloxacin® immobilised substrates in 10 mM of Tris-HCl buffer (pH-7.4) for 42 days. The Tris-HCl buffer was analysed using UV-vis spectrophotometry at 7, 14, 28 and 42 day time intervals to determine the release of the immobilised drug. The drug was observed to release in a sustained manner. 50% of the drug was released after 4 weeks with approximately 40% of the drug remaining after 6 weeks. Antibacterial susceptibility tests revealed that the immobilised drug was therapeutically active upon its release. This study demonstrates the potential to use self-assembled monolayers to modify SLM fabricated surfaces with therapeutics.

  9. Proteomics Evidence for the Activity of the Putative Antibacterial Plant Alkaloid (-)-Roemerine: Mainstreaming Omics-Guided Drug Discovery.

    PubMed

    Gokgoz, Nilay Budeyri; Akbulut, Berna Sariyar

    2015-08-01

    Discovery of new antibacterials with novel mechanisms is important to counteract the ingenious resistance mechanisms of bacteria. In this connection, omics-guided drug discovery offers a rigorous method in the quest of new antibacterials. (-)-Roemerine is a plant alkaloid that has been reported to possess putative antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and Salmonella typhimurium. The aim of the present study was to characterize the activity of (-)-roemerine in Escherichia coli TB1 using proteomics tools. With (-)-roemerine treatment, we found limited permeability through the outer membrane and repression of transport proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism, resulting in poor carbon source availability. The shortfall of intracellular carbon sources in turn led to impaired cell growth. The reduction in the abundance of proteins related to translational machinery, amino acid biosynthesis, and metabolism was accompanied by a nutrient-limited state. The latter finding could suggest a metabolic shutdown in E. coli cells. High osmolarity was clearly not one of the reasons of bacterial death by (-)-roemerine. These observations collectively attest to the promise of plant omics and profiling of putative drug candidates using proteomics tools. Omics-guided drug discovery deserves greater attention in mainstream pharmacology so as to better understand the plants' medicinal potentials. PMID:26230533

  10. DNA gyrase-mediated wrapping of the DNA strand is required for the replication fork arrest by the DNA gyrase-quinolone-DNA ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Hiasa, H; Shea, M E

    2000-11-01

    The ability of DNA gyrase (Gyr) to wrap the DNA strand around itself allows Gyr to introduce negative supercoils into DNA molecules. It has been demonstrated that the deletion of the C-terminal DNA-binding domain of the GyrA subunit abolishes the ability of Gyr to wrap the DNA strand and catalyze the supercoiling reaction (Kampranis, S. C., and Maxwell, A. (1996) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 93, 14416-14421). By using this mutant Gyr, Gyr (A59), we have studied effects of Gyr-mediated wrapping of the DNA strand on its replicative function and its interaction with the quinolone antibacterial drugs. We find that Gyr (A59) can support oriC DNA replication in vitro. However, Gyr (A59)-catalyzed decatenation activity is not efficient enough to complete the decatenation of replicating daughter DNA molecules. As is the case with topoisomerase IV, the active cleavage and reunion activity of Gyr is required for the formation of the ternary complex that can arrest replication fork progression in vitro. Although the quinolone drugs stimulate the covalent Gyr (A59)-DNA complex formation, the Gyr (A59)-quinolone-DNA ternary complexes do not arrest the progression of replication forks. Thus, the quinolone-induced covalent topoisomerase-DNA complex formation is necessary but not sufficient to cause the inhibition of DNA replication. We also assess the stability of ternary complexes formed with Gyr (A59), the wild type Gyr, or topoisomerase IV. The ternary complexes formed with Gyr (A59) are more sensitive to salt than those formed with either the wild type Gyr or topoisomerase IV. Furthermore, a competition experiment demonstrates that the ternary complexes formed with Gyr (A59) readily disassociate from the DNA, whereas the ternary complexes formed with either the wild type Gyr or topoisomerase IV remain stably bound. Thus, Gyr-mediated wrapping of the DNA strand is required for the formation of the stable Gyr-quinolone-DNA ternary complex that can arrest replication fork

  11. Palladium-Catalyzed Thioetherification of Quinolone Derivatives via Decarboxylative C-S Cross-Couplings.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chengcai; Wei, Zhenjiang; Yang, Yong; Yu, Wenbo; Liao, Hanxiao; Shen, Chao; Zhang, Pengfei

    2016-02-01

    A highly efficient and practical procedure for palladium-catalyzed direct thioetherification of quinolone derivatives with diaryl disulfides through decarboxylative C-S coupling has been established. The reaction could proceed smoothly under air in the presence of Pd(OAc)2 and Ag2 CO3 in DMSO. This protocol provides an appealing alternative to existing approaches to construct aryl sulfides of quinolone derivatives, which may be used as key intermediates in the synthesis of drug candidates.

  12. Recurrent mania consequent to quinolones exposure: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Swapnajeet; Aneja, Jitender; Basu, Debasish

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotics are the one of the most commonly used group, of drugs, in general medical and surgical practice. The quinolone antibiotics can lead to a range of adverse neuropsychiatric effects with most of the reports due to ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin. Here, we report an interesting and rarely described psychiatric manifestation of recurrent mania following the use of quinolone antibiotics, and briefly review the available literature. PMID:27453864

  13. Alkaloids: an overview of their antibacterial, antibiotic-enhancing and antivirulence activities.

    PubMed

    Cushnie, T P Tim; Cushnie, Benjamart; Lamb, Andrew J

    2014-11-01

    With reports of pandrug-resistant bacteria causing untreatable infections, the need for new antibacterial therapies is more pressing than ever. Alkaloids are a large and structurally diverse group of compounds that have served as scaffolds for important antibacterial drugs such as metronidazole and the quinolones. In this review, we highlight other alkaloids with development potential. Natural, semisynthetic and synthetic alkaloids of all classes are considered, looking first at those with direct antibacterial activity and those with antibiotic-enhancing activity. Potent examples include CJ-13,136, a novel actinomycete-derived quinolone alkaloid with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.1 ng/mL against Helicobacter pylori, and squalamine, a polyamine alkaloid from the dogfish shark that renders Gram-negative pathogens 16- to >32-fold more susceptible to ciprofloxacin. Where available, information on toxicity, structure-activity relationships, mechanisms of action and in vivo activity is presented. The effects of alkaloids on virulence gene regulatory systems such as quorum sensing and virulence factors such as sortases, adhesins and secretion systems are also described. The synthetic isoquinoline alkaloid virstatin, for example, inhibits the transcriptional regulator ToxT in Vibrio cholerae, preventing expression of cholera toxin and fimbriae and conferring in vivo protection against intestinal colonisation. The review concludes with implications and limitations of the described research and directions for future research.

  14. Alkaloids: an overview of their antibacterial, antibiotic-enhancing and antivirulence activities.

    PubMed

    Cushnie, T P Tim; Cushnie, Benjamart; Lamb, Andrew J

    2014-11-01

    With reports of pandrug-resistant bacteria causing untreatable infections, the need for new antibacterial therapies is more pressing than ever. Alkaloids are a large and structurally diverse group of compounds that have served as scaffolds for important antibacterial drugs such as metronidazole and the quinolones. In this review, we highlight other alkaloids with development potential. Natural, semisynthetic and synthetic alkaloids of all classes are considered, looking first at those with direct antibacterial activity and those with antibiotic-enhancing activity. Potent examples include CJ-13,136, a novel actinomycete-derived quinolone alkaloid with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.1 ng/mL against Helicobacter pylori, and squalamine, a polyamine alkaloid from the dogfish shark that renders Gram-negative pathogens 16- to >32-fold more susceptible to ciprofloxacin. Where available, information on toxicity, structure-activity relationships, mechanisms of action and in vivo activity is presented. The effects of alkaloids on virulence gene regulatory systems such as quorum sensing and virulence factors such as sortases, adhesins and secretion systems are also described. The synthetic isoquinoline alkaloid virstatin, for example, inhibits the transcriptional regulator ToxT in Vibrio cholerae, preventing expression of cholera toxin and fimbriae and conferring in vivo protection against intestinal colonisation. The review concludes with implications and limitations of the described research and directions for future research. PMID:25130096

  15. Visible-Light-Triggered Drug Release from TiO2 Nanotube Arrays: A Controllable Antibacterial Platform.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingwen; Zhou, Xuemei; Gao, Zhida; Song, Yan-Yan; Schmuki, Patrik

    2016-01-11

    In this work, we use a double-layered stack of TiO2 nanotubes (TiNTs) to construct a visible-light-triggered drug delivery system. The key for visible light drug release is a hydrophobic cap on the nanotubes containing Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). The AuNPs allow for a photocatalytic scission of the hydrophobic chain under visible light. To demonstrate this principle, we loaded ampicillin (AMP) into the lower part of the TiO2 nanotube stack, triggered visible-light-induced release, and carried out antibacterial studies. The release from the platform becomes most controllable if the drug is silane-grafted in the hydrophilic bottom layer for drug storage. Thus, visible light photocatalysis can also determine the release kinetics of the active drug from the nanotube wall.

  16. New antibacterial, non-genotoxic materials, derived from the functionalization of the anti-thyroid drug methimazole with silver ions.

    PubMed

    Sainis, I; Banti, C N; Owczarzak, A M; Kyros, L; Kourkoumelis, N; Kubicki, M; Hadjikakou, S K

    2016-07-01

    The new silver(I) compound {[AgBr(μ2-S-MMI)(TPP))]2} (1) and the known one [AgCl(TPP)2(MMI)] (2) were obtained by refluxing toluene solutions of silver(I) halide with triphenylphosphine (TPP) and the anti-thyroid drug 2-mercapto-1-methyl-imidazole or methimazole (MMI). The complexes were characterized by m.p., vibrational spectroscopy (mid-FT-IR), (1)H, (31)P-NMR, UV-Vis spectroscopic techniques and X-ray crystallography. The antibacterial effect of 1 and 2 against the bacterial species Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO) and Escherichia coli was evaluated. Compound 1 exhibits comparable activity to the corresponding one of the silver nitrate which is an antibacterial drug in use. The in vivo genotoxicity of 1-2 by the mean of Allium cepa test shows no alterations in the mitotic index values due to the absence of chromosomal aberrations. The mechanism of action of the title compounds is evaluated. The DNA binding tests indicate the ability of the complexes 1-2 to modify the activity of the bacteria. The binding constants of 1-2 towards CT-DNA indicate interaction through opening of the hydrogen bonds of DNA. Docking studies on DNA-complexes interactions confirm the binding of both complexes 1-2 in the major groove of the CT-DNA. In conclusion the silver complex 1 is an anti-bacterial and non-genotoxic material, which can be applied to antibacterial drug in the future. PMID:26765999

  17. Advancing New Antibacterial Drug Development for Treatment of Hospital-Acquired and Ventilator-Associated Bacterial Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Toerner, Joseph G; Rubin, Daniel

    2016-08-15

    The Clinical Trials Transformation Initiative (CTTI), a public-private partnership comprised of representatives from academia, the pharmaceutical industry, and the federal government including the US Food and Drug Administration, formed a group working toward a common goal of intensified research to facilitate the development of new antibacterial drug therapies for treatment of hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia (HABP/VABP). The summary of the CTTI HABP/VABP project in this supplement of Clinical Infectious Diseases is a first step in this direction. PMID:27481951

  18. [Antibacterial activity for clinical isolates from pediatric patients of clavulanic acid/amoxicillin (1: 14) -outcomes of special drug use investigation on antibacterial activity (annual changes)].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Atsuko; Hasegawa, Naomi; Okano, Hideyuki; Hara, Terufumi; Yoshida, Pascal

    2013-06-01

    As a special drug use investigation, we monitored and assessed trends in antibacterial activity of clavulanic acid/amoxicillin (1:14) (hereafter, "CVA/AMPC (1:14)") and other antimicrobial agents for clinical isolates from pediatric patients with otitis media or respiratory, skin, and urinary tract infections. Against Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis isolated and identified from otorrhea, epipharynx and rhinorrhea of pediatric patients with otitis media, the MIC90s of CVA/AMPC (1:14) in five years between 2006-2010 were 1 microg/mL for S. pneumoniae and 8 microg/mL for H. influenzae and 0.25-0.5microg/mL for M catarrhalis. The changes of MIC90s of CVA/AMPC (1:14) for penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (PRSP) and beta-lactamase non-producing H. influenzae were two times, and no decrease in drug susceptibility was found in the period of the present investigation. In addition, the MIC changes of other antimicrobial agents for these three organisms were approximately two to four times as well. Against organisms isolated and identified from pus, sputum, pharynx, skin and urine of pediatric patients with respiratory, skin, and urinary tract infections, the MIC90s of CVA/AMPC (1:14) in four years between 2008-2011 were 1 microg/mL for S. pneumoniae, < or =0.06microg/mL for penicillin susceptible S. pneumoniae (PSSP) without any change, 0.5-1 microg/mL for penicillin intermediate resistant S. pneumoniae (PISP) with a twofold change and 1 microg/mL for PRSP with no change. The MIC90s of CVA/AMPC (1:14) were 2-8 microg/mL for S. aureus with a fourfold change, 2 microg/mL for methicillin-sensitive S. aureus without any change, 4-8 microg/mL for H. influenzae with a twofold change. Against beta-lactamase non-producing H. influenzae, MIC90s of CVA/AMPC (1:14) were 1 microg/mL for beta-lactamase negative ampicillin susceptible (BLNAS), 8 microg/mL for beta-lactamase negative ampicillin resistant (BLNAR), showing no change. Neither

  19. Quinolone resistance in the food chain.

    PubMed

    Fàbrega, Anna; Sánchez-Céspedes, Javier; Soto, Sara; Vila, Jordi

    2008-04-01

    Antimicrobials are used in pet animals and in animal husbandry for prophylactic and therapeutic reasons and also as growth promoters, causing selective pressure on bacteria of animal origin. The impact of quinolones or quinolone-resistant bacteria on the management of human infections may be associated with three different scenarios. (i) Quinolone-resistant zoonotic bacterial pathogens are selected and food is contaminated during slaughter and/or preparation. (ii) Quinolone-resistant bacteria non-pathogenic to humans are selected in the animal. When the contaminated food is ingested, the bacteria may transfer resistance determinants to other bacteria in the human gut (commensal and potential pathogens). And (iii) quinolones remain in residues of food products, which may allow the selection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria after the food is consumed. In this review, we analyse the abovementioned aspects, emphasising the molecular basis of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp.

  20. Quinolone resistance in the food chain.

    PubMed

    Fàbrega, Anna; Sánchez-Céspedes, Javier; Soto, Sara; Vila, Jordi

    2008-04-01

    Antimicrobials are used in pet animals and in animal husbandry for prophylactic and therapeutic reasons and also as growth promoters, causing selective pressure on bacteria of animal origin. The impact of quinolones or quinolone-resistant bacteria on the management of human infections may be associated with three different scenarios. (i) Quinolone-resistant zoonotic bacterial pathogens are selected and food is contaminated during slaughter and/or preparation. (ii) Quinolone-resistant bacteria non-pathogenic to humans are selected in the animal. When the contaminated food is ingested, the bacteria may transfer resistance determinants to other bacteria in the human gut (commensal and potential pathogens). And (iii) quinolones remain in residues of food products, which may allow the selection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria after the food is consumed. In this review, we analyse the abovementioned aspects, emphasising the molecular basis of quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp. PMID:18308515

  1. Antibacterial activity of herbal extracts against multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli recovered from retail chicken meat.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Arfat Yousaf; Sheikh, Ali Ahmad; Rabbani, Masood; Aslam, Asim; Bibi, Tasra; Liaqat, Fakhra; Muhammad, Javed; Rehmani, Shafqat Fatima

    2015-07-01

    Increasing incidence rate of multiple drug resistance in Escherichia coli (E. coli) due to extensive uses of antibiotics is a serious challenge to disease treatment. Contaminated retail chicken meat is one of the major sources of spread of multi drug resistant (MDR) E. coli. Current study has been conducted to study the prevalence of MDR E. coli in retail chicken meat samples from Lahore city of Pakistan and it was found that 73.86% of E. coli isolates have MDR pattern. In vitro evaluation of antibacterial activity of crude ethanolic extracts of six herbs against MDR E. coli phenotypes has revealed that clove and cinnamon have maximum zones of inhibition as compared to other herbal extracts. Mint and coriander gave the intermediate results while garlic and kalonji showed the least antibacterial activity against the MDR E. coli phenotypes using the agar well diffusion technique. Average Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) for clove, mint, cinnamon, coriander, kalonji and garlic extracts were 1.15, 1.38, 0.5, 1.99, 2.41, 8.60 mg/mL respectively using the broth micro dilution method. The results obtained in present study were revealed that crude ethanol extracts of selected herbs have had significant antibacterial activity. Hence they can be used as promising alternatives of antimicrobials against MDR E. coli species and can be used for cooked food preservation. PMID:26142503

  2. Antibacterial activity of herbal extracts against multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli recovered from retail chicken meat.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Arfat Yousaf; Sheikh, Ali Ahmad; Rabbani, Masood; Aslam, Asim; Bibi, Tasra; Liaqat, Fakhra; Muhammad, Javed; Rehmani, Shafqat Fatima

    2015-07-01

    Increasing incidence rate of multiple drug resistance in Escherichia coli (E. coli) due to extensive uses of antibiotics is a serious challenge to disease treatment. Contaminated retail chicken meat is one of the major sources of spread of multi drug resistant (MDR) E. coli. Current study has been conducted to study the prevalence of MDR E. coli in retail chicken meat samples from Lahore city of Pakistan and it was found that 73.86% of E. coli isolates have MDR pattern. In vitro evaluation of antibacterial activity of crude ethanolic extracts of six herbs against MDR E. coli phenotypes has revealed that clove and cinnamon have maximum zones of inhibition as compared to other herbal extracts. Mint and coriander gave the intermediate results while garlic and kalonji showed the least antibacterial activity against the MDR E. coli phenotypes using the agar well diffusion technique. Average Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations (MICs) for clove, mint, cinnamon, coriander, kalonji and garlic extracts were 1.15, 1.38, 0.5, 1.99, 2.41, 8.60 mg/mL respectively using the broth micro dilution method. The results obtained in present study were revealed that crude ethanol extracts of selected herbs have had significant antibacterial activity. Hence they can be used as promising alternatives of antimicrobials against MDR E. coli species and can be used for cooked food preservation.

  3. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jacoby, George A.; Strahilevitz, Jacob; Hooper, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Three mechanisms for plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) have been discovered since 1998. Plasmid genes qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, and qnrVC code for proteins of the pentapeptide repeat family that protects DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV from quinolone inhibition. The qnr genes appear to have been acquired from chromosomal genes in aquatic bacteria, are usually associated with mobilizing or transposable elements on plasmids, and are often incorporated into sul1-type integrons. The second plasmid-mediated mechanism involves acetylation of quinolones with an appropriate amino nitrogen target by a variant of the common aminoglycoside acetyltransferase AAC(6′)-Ib. The third mechanism is enhanced efflux produced by plasmid genes for pumps QepAB and OqxAB. PMQR has been found in clinical and environmental isolates around the world and appears to be spreading. The plasmid-mediated mechanisms provide only low-level resistance that by itself does not exceed the clinical breakpoint for susceptibility but nonetheless facilitates selection of higher-level resistance and makes infection by pathogens containing PMQR harder to treat. PMID:25584197

  4. Clinical Importance and Epidemiology of Quinolone Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eu Suk

    2014-01-01

    The quinolone class of antimicrobial agents is one of most widely used classes of antimicrobial agents in outpatient and inpatient treatment. However, quinolone resistance in gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria has emerged and increased globally. This resistance limits the usefulness of quinolones in clinical practice. The review summarizes mechanisms of quinolone resistance and its epidemiology and implications in the most common clinical settings, urinary tract infections, respiratory tract infections, intraabdominal infections, skin and skin structure infections, and sexually transmitted diseases. PMID:25566402

  5. In Vitro Activity of Ozenoxacin against Quinolone-Susceptible and Quinolone-Resistant Gram-Positive Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    López, Y.; Tato, M.; Espinal, P.; Garcia-Alonso, F.; Gargallo-Viola, D.; Cantón, R.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro activity of ozenoxacin, a novel nonfluorinated topical (L. D. Saravolatz and J. Leggett, Clin. Infect. Dis. 37:1210–1215, 2003) quinolone, was compared with the activities of other quinolones against well-characterized quinolone-susceptible and quinolone-resistant Gram-positive bacteria. Ozenoxacin was 3-fold to 321-fold more active than other quinolones. Ozenoxacin could represent a first-in-class nonfluorinated quinolone for the topical treatment of a broad range of dermatological infections. PMID:24080666

  6. Evaluating the impact of a novel restricted reimbursement policy for quinolone antibiotics: A time series analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Publicly-funded drug plans often use prior authorization policies to limit drug prescribing. To guide physician prescribing of a class of antibiotics with broad antimicrobial activity (quinolone antibiotics) in accordance with new prescribing guidelines, Alberta’s provincial health ministry implemented a new mechanism for formulary restriction entitled the optional special authorization (OSA) program. We conducted an observational study to determine the impact of this new formulary restriction policy on antimicrobial prescription rates as well as any clinical consequences. Methods Quinolone antibiotic use, and adherence with quinolone prescribing guidelines, was assessed before and after implementation of the OSA program in patients with common outpatient infections using an administrative data cohort and a chart review cohort, respectively. At the same time this policy was implemented to limit quinolone prescribing, two new quinolone antibiotics were added to the formulary. Using administrative data, we analysed a total of 397,534 unique index visits with regard to overall antibiotic utilization, and through chart review, we analysed 1681 charts of patients with infections of interest to determine the indications for quinolone usage. Results Using segmented regression models adjusting for age, sex and physician enrollment in the OSA program, there was no statistically significant change in the monthly rate of all quinolone use (−3.5 (95% CI −5.5, 1.4) prescriptions per 1000 index visits) following implementation of the OSA program (p = 0.74). There was a significant level change in the rate of quinolone antibiotic use for urinary tract infection (−33.6 (95% CI: -23.8, -43.4) prescriptions and upper respiratory tract infection (−16.1 (95%CI: -11.6, -20.6) prescriptions per 1000 index visits. Among quinolone prescriptions identified on chart review, 42.5% and 58.5% were consistent with formulary guidelines before and after the implementation

  7. Synergic Antibacterial Effect of Curcumin with Ampicillin; Free Drug Solutions in Comparison with SLN Dispersions

    PubMed Central

    Alihosseini, Faezeh; Azarmi, Shirzad; Ghaffari, Solmaz; Haghighat, Setareh; Rezayat Sorkhabadi, Seyed Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to investigate benefit of using nanotechnology on increasing of synergic antibacterial effect of natural and chemical antibacterial agents. Methods: At first the MIC and MBC of Curcumin and Ampicillin as selected antibacterial agents was determined, after that Solid Lipid Nanoparticles (SLNs) of each active ingredients as well as Curcumin-Ampicillin loaded SLNs were prepared using high pressure homogenization technique. Characterization of prepared SLNs was done, then MIC, MBC and contact killing time were investigated for Curcumin-Ampicillin loaded SLNs in comparison with free Curcumin and Ampicillin solutions as well as Ampicillin and Curcumin SLNs. Results: Based on results nanoparticles with the size of 150 nm show much more decreased MIC and MBC when Ampicillin and Curcumin were loaded together on SLNs than solutions in which free Ampicillin and Curcumin were mixed. Conclusion: It seems that using nanotechnology could cause decrease the dosage of antibiotics and risk of having antibiotic resistance bacteria strains. PMID:27766232

  8. 4-Quinolone-3-carboxylic acids as cell-permeable inhibitors of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Ying; Gao, Li-Xin; Jin, Yi; Tang, Chun-Lan; Li, Jing-Ya; Li, Jia; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2014-07-15

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B is a negative regulator in the insulin and leptin signaling pathways, and has emerged as an attractive target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and obesity. However, the essential pharmacophore of charged phosphotyrosine or its mimetic confer low selectivity and poor cell permeability. Starting from our previously reported aryl diketoacid-based PTP1B inhibitors, a drug-like scaffold of 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid was introduced for the first time as a novel surrogate of phosphotyrosine. An optimal combination of hydrophobic groups installed at C-6, N-1 and C-3 positions of the quinolone motif afforded potent PTP1B inhibitors with low micromolar IC50 values. These 4-quinolone-3-carboxylate based PTP1B inhibitors displayed a 2-10 fold selectivity over a panel of PTP's. Furthermore, the bidentate inhibitors of 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acids conjugated with aryl diketoacid or salicylic acid were cell permeable and enhanced insulin signaling in CHO/hIR cells. The kinetic studies and molecular modeling suggest that the 4-quinolone-3-carboxylates act as competitive inhibitors by binding to the PTP1B active site in the WPD loop closed conformation. Taken together, our study shows that the 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid derivatives exhibit improved pharmacological properties over previously described PTB1B inhibitors and warrant further preclinical studies.

  9. Putative histidine kinase inhibitors with antibacterial effect against multi-drug resistant clinical isolates identified by in vitro and in silico screens

    PubMed Central

    Velikova, Nadya; Fulle, Simone; Manso, Ana Sousa; Mechkarska, Milena; Finn, Paul; Conlon, J. Michael; Oggioni, Marco Rinaldo; Wells, Jerry M.; Marina, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Novel antibacterials are urgently needed to address the growing problem of bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics. Two-component systems (TCS) are widely used by bacteria to regulate gene expression in response to various environmental stimuli and physiological stress and have been previously proposed as promising antibacterial targets. TCS consist of a sensor histidine kinase (HK) and an effector response regulator. The HK component contains a highly conserved ATP-binding site that is considered to be a promising target for broad-spectrum antibacterial drugs. Here, we describe the identification of putative HK autophosphorylation inhibitors following two independent experimental approaches: in vitro fragment-based screen via differential scanning fluorimetry and in silico structure-based screening, each followed up by the exploration of analogue compounds as identified by ligand-based similarity searches. Nine of the tested compounds showed antibacterial effect against multi-drug resistant clinical isolates of bacterial pathogens and include three novel scaffolds, which have not been explored so far in other antibacterial compounds. Overall, putative HK autophosphorylation inhibitors were found that together provide a promising starting point for further optimization as antibacterials. PMID:27173778

  10. Proteomic response of methicillin-resistant S. aureus to a synergistic antibacterial drug combination: a novel erythromycin derivative and oxacillin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaofen; Pai, Pei-Jin; Zhang, Weipeng; Hu, Yingwei; Dong, Xiaojing; Qian, Pei-yuan; Chen, Daijie; Lam, Henry

    2016-01-01

    The use of antibacterial drug combinations with synergistic effects is increasingly seen as a critical strategy to combat multi-drug resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In this work, the proteome responses in MRSA under the stress of a sub-inhibitory dose of a synergistic drug combination of a novel erythromycin derivative, SIPI-8294, and oxacillin, were studied by label-free quantitative proteomics. Several control treatment groups were designed to isolate proteome responses potentially related to the synergy: (1) the non-synergistic drug combination of erythromycin and oxacillin, (2) SIPI-8294 only, (3) oxacillin only and (4) erythromycin only. Results showed that 200 proteins were differentially expressed in SIPI-8294/oxacillin-treated cells. Among these proteins, the level of penicillin binding protein 2a, the protein mainly responsible for oxacillin resistance in MRSA, was four times lower in the SIPI-8294/oxacillin group than in the erythromycin/oxacillin group, suggesting that SIPI-8294 may interfere with this known oxacillin resistance mechanism. Moreover, hierarchical clustering analysis of differentially expressed proteins under different treatments revealed that SIPI-8294/oxacillin elicits very different responses than the individual drugs or the non-synergistic erythromycin/oxacillin combination. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that the synergistic effect can be further traced to a disruption in oxidation-reduction homeostasis and cell wall biosynthesis. PMID:26806358

  11. In vitro anti-Mycobacterium avium activities of quinolones: predicted active structures and mechanistic considerations.

    PubMed

    Klopman, G; Li, J Y; Wang, S; Pearson, A J; Chang, K; Jacobs, M R; Bajaksouzian, S; Ellner, J J

    1994-08-01

    The relationship between the structures of quinolones and their anti-Mycobacterium avium activities has been previously derived by using the Multiple Computer-Automated Structure Evaluation program. A number of substructural constraints required to overcome the resistance of most of the strains have been identified. Nineteen new quinolones which qualify under these substructural requirements were identified by the program and subsequently tested. The results show that the substructural attributes identified by the program produced a successful a priori prediction of the anti-M. avium activities of the new quinolones. All 19 quinolones were found to be active, and 4 of them are as active or better than ciprofloxacin. With these new quinolones, the updated multiple computer-automated structure evaluation program structure-activity relationship analysis has helped to uncover additional information about the nature of the substituents at the C5 and C7 positions needed for optimal inhibitory activity. A possible explanation of drug resistance based on the observation of suicide inactivation of bacterial cytochrome P-450 by the cyclopropylamine moiety has also been proposed and is discussed in this report. Furthermore, we confirm the view that the amount of the uncharged form present in a neutral pH solution plays a crucial role in the drug's penetration ability.

  12. The Emergence of Quinolone Resistant Shigella sonnei, Pondicherry, India.

    PubMed

    Das, Ankita; Natarajan, Mailan; Mandal, Jharna

    2016-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin resistant Shigella sonnei across the globe have been increasing alarmingly. In order to understand the emergence of S.sonnei with respect to ciprofloxacin resistance in our patient population, the following study was carried out. Of the 184 Shigella sp. Isolated from 2012 to 2015, 34 S.sonnei which were confirmed by standard methods and subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing were selected. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 16/34 quinolone resistant isolates tested ranged from 4micrograms/ml to 16micrograms/ml for ciprofloxacin, from 16 micrograms/ml to 64 micrograms/ml for ofloxacin and from 16micrograms/ml to 64micrograms/ml for levofloxacin. Sequence determination of the quinolone resistance determining regions of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes showed mutations in GyrA at Gln69/Trp, Phe71/Ser, Ser72/Pro, Met75/Leu, Ser90/Cys, Met94/Leu, His106/Pro, Asn161/His, Thr163/Ala and in ParC at Ala64/Asp. Among the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQRs) targets investigated,qnrB was the most (93.7%) prevalent followed by qnrC (18.7%). None hadqnrA, qnrS and qepA. Two (0.1%) of the isolates harboured theaac(6')-lb gene. Drug accumulation assay detected the presence of efflux pump activity in 9/15 (60%) among ciprofloxacin resistant isolates. All isolates harboured the ipaH gene followed by ial (17.6%), sen (11.7%), set1A&set1B (5.8%) genes. None had stx1 element. PCR for Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) sequences resulted in 4 unique clusters, of which Type III was the most (44%) dominant but there was no correlation between the ERIC types and the antibiotic resistance pattern or the virulence profile. A documented increase in S.sonnei harbouring the qnrgenes and some unusual genes like set1Aand indicate an ongoing process of horizontal gene transfer. The accumulation of novel mutations in GyrA and ParC in the presence of efflux pump and PMQR genes contributed to the raised MIC to quinolones. These

  13. The Emergence of Quinolone Resistant Shigella sonnei, Pondicherry, India

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ciprofloxacin resistant Shigella sonnei across the globe have been increasing alarmingly. In order to understand the emergence of S.sonnei with respect to ciprofloxacin resistance in our patient population, the following study was carried out. Of the 184 Shigella sp. Isolated from 2012 to 2015, 34 S.sonnei which were confirmed by standard methods and subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing were selected. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 16/34 quinolone resistant isolates tested ranged from 4micrograms/ml to 16micrograms/ml for ciprofloxacin, from 16 micrograms/ml to 64 micrograms/ml for ofloxacin and from 16micrograms/ml to 64micrograms/ml for levofloxacin. Sequence determination of the quinolone resistance determining regions of gyrA, gyrB, parC, and parE genes showed mutations in GyrA at Gln69/Trp, Phe71/Ser, Ser72/Pro, Met75/Leu, Ser90/Cys, Met94/Leu, His106/Pro, Asn161/His, Thr163/Ala and in ParC at Ala64/Asp. Among the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQRs) targets investigated,qnrB was the most (93.7%) prevalent followed by qnrC (18.7%). None hadqnrA, qnrS and qepA. Two (0.1%) of the isolates harboured theaac(6’)-lb gene. Drug accumulation assay detected the presence of efflux pump activity in 9/15 (60%) among ciprofloxacin resistant isolates. All isolates harboured the ipaH gene followed by ial (17.6%), sen (11.7%), set1A&set1B (5.8%) genes. None had stx1 element. PCR for Enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) sequences resulted in 4 unique clusters, of which Type III was the most (44%) dominant but there was no correlation between the ERIC types and the antibiotic resistance pattern or the virulence profile. A documented increase in S.sonnei harbouring the qnrgenes and some unusual genes like set1Aand indicate an ongoing process of horizontal gene transfer. The accumulation of novel mutations in GyrA and ParC in the presence of efflux pump and PMQR genes contributed to the raised MIC to quinolones. These

  14. MRJP1-containing glycoproteins isolated from honey, a novel antibacterial drug candidate with broad spectrum activity against multi-drug resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    Brudzynski, Katrina; Sjaarda, Calvin; Lannigan, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of extended- spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) is the underlying cause of growing antibiotic resistance among Gram-negative bacteria to β-lactam antibiotics. We recently reported the discovery of honey glycoproteins (glps) that exhibited a rapid, concentration-dependent antibacterial activity against both Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Escherichia coli that resembled action of cell wall-active β-lactam drugs. Glps showed sequence identity with the Major Royal Jelly Protein 1 (MRJP1) precursor that harbors three antimicrobial peptides: Jelleins 1, 2, and 4. Here, we used semi-quantitative radial diffusion assay and broth microdilution assay to evaluate susceptibility of a number of multi-drug resistant (MDR) clinical isolates to the MRJP1-contaning honey glycoproteins. The MDR bacterial strains comprised three methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), four Pseudomonas aeruginosa, two Klebsiella pneumoniae, two vancomycin-resistant Enterococci (VRE), and five ESBL identified as one Proteus mirabilis, three E. coli, and one E. coli NDM. Their resistance to different classes of antibiotics was confirmed using automated system Vitek 2. MDR isolates differed in their susceptibility to glps with MIC90 values ranging from 4.8 μg/ml against B. subtilis to 14.4 μg/ml against ESBL K. pneumoniae, Klebsiella spp. ESBL and E. coli and up to 33 μg/ml against highly resistant strains of P. aeruginosa. Glps isolated from different honeys showed a similar ability to overcome bacterial resistance to β-lactams suggesting that (a) their mode of action is distinct from other classes of β-lactams and that (b) the common glps structure was the lead structure responsible for the activity. The results of the current study together with our previous evidence of a rapid bactericidal activity of glps demonstrate that glps possess suitable characteristics to be considered a novel antibacterial drug candidate. PMID:26217333

  15. Antibiotic-loaded, silver core-embedded mesoporous silica nanovehicles as a synergistic antibacterial agent for the treatment of drug-resistant infections.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao; Ding, Xiali; Chen, Yuan; Guo, Mingquan; Zhang, Yan; Guo, Xiaokui; Gu, Hongchen

    2016-09-01

    Drug-resistant bacterial infections have become one of the most serious risks in public health as they make the conventional antibiotics less efficient. There is an urgent need for developing new generations of antibacterial agents in this field. In this work, a nanoplatform of LEVO-loaded and silver core-embedded mesoporous silica nanovehicles (Ag@MSNs@LEVO) is demonstrated as a synergistic antibacterial agent for the treatment of drug-resistant infections both in vitro and in vivo. The combination of the inner Ag core and the loaded antibiotic drug in mesopores endows the single-particle nanoplatform with a synergistic effect on killing the drug-resistant bacteria. The nanoplatform of Ag@MSNs@LEVO exhibits superior antibacterial activity to LEVO-loaded MSNs (MSNs@LEVO) and silver core-embedded MSNs (Ag@MSNs) in vitro. In the in vivo acute peritonitis model, the infected drug-resistant Escherichia coli GN102 in peritoneal cavity of the mice is reduced by nearly three orders of magnitude and the aberrant pathological feature of spleen and peritoneum disappears after treatment with Ag@MSNs@LEVO. Importantly, this nanopaltform renders no obvious toxic side effect to the mice during the tested time. There is no doubt that this study strongly indicates a promising potential of Ag@MSNs@LEVO as a synergistic and safety therapy tool for the clinical drug-resistant infections. PMID:27294538

  16. Gallium(iii) and iron(iii) complexes of quinolone antimicrobials.

    PubMed

    Mjos, Katja Dralle; Cawthray, Jacqueline F; Polishchuk, Elena; Abrams, Michael J; Orvig, Chris

    2016-08-16

    Iron is an essential nutrient for many microbes. According to the "Trojan Horse Hypothesis", biological systems have difficulties distinguishing between Fe(3+) and Ga(3+), which constitutes the antimicrobial efficacy of the gallium(iii) ion. Nine novel tris(quinolono)gallium(iii) complexes and their corresponding iron(iii) analogs have been synthesized and fully characterized. Quinolone antimicrobial agents from three drug generations were used in this study: ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, fleroxacin, levofloxacin, lomefloxacin, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, oxolinic acid, and pipemidic acid. The antimicrobial efficacy of the tris(quinolono)gallium(iii) complexes was studied against E. faecalis and S. aureus (both Gram-positive), as well as E. coli, K. pneumonia, and P. aeruginosa (all Gram-negative) in direct comparison to the tris(quinolono)iron(iii) complexes and the corresponding free quinolone ligands at various concentrations. For the tris(quinolono)gallium(iii) complexes, no combinational antimicrobial effects between Ga(3+) and the quinolone antimicrobial agents were observed. PMID:27315225

  17. Activity of quinolone CP-115,955 against bacterial and human type II topoisomerases is mediated by different interactions.

    PubMed

    Aldred, Katie J; Schwanz, Heidi A; Li, Gangqin; Williamson, Benjamin H; McPherson, Sylvia A; Turnbough, Charles L; Kerns, Robert J; Osheroff, Neil

    2015-02-10

    CP-115,955 is a quinolone with a 4-hydroxyphenyl at C7 that displays high activity against both bacterial and human type II topoisomerases. To determine the basis for quinolone cross-reactivity between bacterial and human enzymes, the activity of CP-115,955 and a series of related quinolones and quinazolinediones against Bacillus anthracis topoisomerase IV and human topoisomerase IIα was analyzed. Results indicate that the activity of CP-115,955 against the bacterial and human enzymes is mediated by different interactions. On the basis of the decreased activity of quinazolinediones against wild-type and resistant mutant topoisomerase IV and the low activity of quinolones against resistant mutant enzymes, it appears that the primary interaction of CP-115,955 with the bacterial system is mediated through the C3/C4 keto acid and the water-metal ion bridge. In contrast, the drug interacts with the human enzyme primarily through the C7 4-hydroxyphenyl ring and has no requirement for a substituent at C8 in order to attain high activity. Despite the fact that the human type II enzyme is unable to utilize the water-metal ion bridge, quinolones in the CP-115,955 series display higher activity against topoisomerase IIα in vitro and in cultured human cells than the corresponding quinazolinediones. Thus, quinolones may be a viable platform for the development of novel drugs with anticancer potential.

  18. Modeling the Overproduction of Ribosomes when Antibacterial Drugs Act on Cells.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Arijit; Dill, Ken A

    2016-02-01

    Bacteria that are subjected to ribosome-inhibiting antibiotic drugs show an interesting behavior: Although the drug slows down cell growth, it also paradoxically increases the cell's concentration of ribosomes. We combine our earlier nonlinear model of the energy-biomass balance in undrugged Escherichia coli cells with Michaelis-Menten binding of drugs that inactivate ribosomes. Predictions are in good agreement with experiments on ribosomal concentrations and synthesis rates versus drug concentrations and growth rates. The model indicates that the added drug drives the cell to overproduce ribosomes, keeping roughly constant the level of ribosomes producing ribosomal proteins, an important quantity for cell growth. The model also predicts that ribosomal production rates should increase and then decrease with added drug. This model gives insights into the driving forces in cells and suggests new experiments. PMID:26840738

  19. Antibacterial therapy of aspiration pneumonia in patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-positive sputum: identification of risk factors.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Y; Matsuoka, T; Mori, T; Yoshida, S; Ohashi, K; Yoshimura, T; Sugiyama, T

    2016-02-01

    Inappropriate antimicrobial treatment could adversely affect the recovery of patients with aspiration pneumonia. We attempted to identify inappropriate antibacterial treatment and to determine the standard use of anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) drugs in aspiration pneumonia patients with MRSA-positive in sputum. Aspiration pneumonia patients with MRSA-positive sputum treated between January 2013 and May 2013 were included in this study to determine the risk factors for death during hospitalization. The relationship between anti-MRSA medicine use and death during hospitalization was also investigated. More than 10⁷ MRSA colony-forming units in sputum culture, creatinine clearance of less than 30 mL/min, and quinolone use were found to be risk factors for death during hospitalization. The death rate during hospitalization was significantly lower in cases a Geckler classification of 4 or 5 when anti-MRSA treatment was initiated soon after the culture was obtained. Therefore, we concluded that the use of quinolones as antibacterial treatment in aspiration pneumonia patients with MRSA-positive sputum should be avoided and that anti-MRSA treatment should be started in cases with good quality sputum cultures.

  20. Coupling of radiofrequency with magnetic nanoparticles treatment as an alternative physical antibacterial strategy against multiple drug resistant bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaurasia, Akhilesh K.; Thorat, Nanasaheb D.; Tandon, Anshula; Kim, Jin-Hahn; Park, Sung Ha; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2016-09-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria not only affect human health and but also threatens the safety in hospitals and among communities. However, the emergence of drug resistant bacteria is inevitable due to evolutionary selection as a consequence of indiscriminate antibiotic usage. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a novel strategy by which pathogenic bacteria can be eliminated without triggering resistance. We propose a novel magnetic nanoparticle-based physical treatment against pathogenic bacteria, which blocks biofilm formation and kills bacteria. In this approach, multiple drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 and uropathogenic Escherichia coli CFT073 are trapped to the positively charged magnetic core-shell nanoparticles (MCSNPs) by electrostatic interaction. All the trapped bacteria can be completely killed within 30 min owing to the loss of membrane potential and dysfunction of membrane-associated complexes when exposed to the radiofrequency current. These results indicate that MCSNP-based physical treatment can be an alternative antibacterial strategy without leading to antibiotic resistance, and can be used for many purposes including environmental and therapeutic applications.

  1. Coupling of radiofrequency with magnetic nanoparticles treatment as an alternative physical antibacterial strategy against multiple drug resistant bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chaurasia, Akhilesh K.; Thorat, Nanasaheb D.; Tandon, Anshula; Kim, Jin-Hahn; Park, Sung Ha; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Antibiotic resistant bacteria not only affect human health and but also threatens the safety in hospitals and among communities. However, the emergence of drug resistant bacteria is inevitable due to evolutionary selection as a consequence of indiscriminate antibiotic usage. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a novel strategy by which pathogenic bacteria can be eliminated without triggering resistance. We propose a novel magnetic nanoparticle-based physical treatment against pathogenic bacteria, which blocks biofilm formation and kills bacteria. In this approach, multiple drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 and uropathogenic Escherichia coli CFT073 are trapped to the positively charged magnetic core-shell nanoparticles (MCSNPs) by electrostatic interaction. All the trapped bacteria can be completely killed within 30 min owing to the loss of membrane potential and dysfunction of membrane-associated complexes when exposed to the radiofrequency current. These results indicate that MCSNP-based physical treatment can be an alternative antibacterial strategy without leading to antibiotic resistance, and can be used for many purposes including environmental and therapeutic applications. PMID:27670157

  2. The Synthesis of Quinolone Natural Products from Pseudonocardia sp.

    PubMed Central

    Salvaggio, Flavia; Hodgkinson, James T.; Carro, Laura; Geddis, Stephen M.; Galloway, Warren R. J. D.; Welch, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The synthesis of four quinolone natural products from the actinomycete Pseudonocardia sp. is reported. The key step involved a sp2–sp3 Suzuki–Miyaura reaction between a common boronic ester lateral chain and various functionalised quinolone cores. The quinolones slowed growth of E. coli and S. aureus by inducing extended lag phases.

  3. White Paper: Recommendations on the Conduct of Superiority and Organism-Specific Clinical Trials of Antibacterial Agents for the Treatment of Infections Caused by Drug-Resistant Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    There is a critical need for new pathways to develop antibacterial agents to treat life-threatening infections caused by highly resistant bacteria. Traditionally, antibacterial agents have been studied in noninferiority clinical trials that focus on one site of infection (eg, pneumonia, intra-abdominal infection). Conduct of superiority trials for infections caused by highly antibiotic-resistant bacteria represents a new, and as yet, untested paradigm for antibacterial drug development. We sought to define feasible trial designs of antibacterial agents that could enable conduct of superiority and organism-specific clinical trials. These recommendations are the results of several years of active dialogue among the white paper's drafters as well as external collaborators and regulatory officials. Our goal is to facilitate conduct of new types of antibacterial clinical trials to enable development and ultimately approval of critically needed new antibacterial agents. PMID:22891041

  4. Investigation of β-lactam antibacterial drugs, β-lactamases, and penicillin-binding proteins with fluorescence polarization and anisotropy: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Adam B.

    2016-06-01

    This review covers the uses of fluorescence polarization and anisotropy for the investigation of bacterial penicillin binding proteins (PBPs), which are the targets of β-lactam antibacterial drugs (penicillins, cephalosporins, carbapenems, and monobactams), and of the β-lactamase enzymes that destroy these drugs and help to render bacterial pathogens resistant to them. Fluorescence polarization and anisotropy-based methods for quantitation of β-lactam drugs are also reviewed. A particular emphasis is on methods for quantitative measurement of the interactions of β-lactams and other inhibitors with PBPs and β-lactamases.

  5. Resistance pattern of enterobacteriaceae isolates from urinary tract infections to selected quinolones in Yaoundé

    PubMed Central

    Lyonga, Emilia Enjema; Toukam, Michel; Nkenfou, Celine; Gonsu, Hortense Kamga; Assoumou, Marie-Claire Okomo; Mesembe, Martha Tongo; Eyoh, Agnes Bedie; Ikomey, George Mondinde; Ndze, Valantine Ngum; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata

    2015-01-01

    Introduction It is estimated that 150 million urinary tract infections (UTIs) occur yearly worldwide, resulting in more than 6 billion dollar in direct healthcare cost. The etiology of UTIs is predictable, with Escherichia coli, an Enterobacteriaceae being the principal pathogen. Quinolones are usually the drug of choice. In this study, we report the resistance pattern of Enterobacteriaceae isolates from UTIs to quinolones among in-patients and out-patients at the Yaoundé Reference Hospital in Cameroon. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out for a ten-month period. Consecutive clean-catch mid-stream urine samples were collected from 207 in and out-patients. Identification was done using the Api 20E, and susceptibility testing using the Kirby Bauer's disc diffusion method and the MIC was done using the E-test. Results Out of the 207 isolates, 58(28.0%) were found to be resistant to all the quinolones used in the study. The resistances observed by species were in the order: Enterobacter 4(30.8%); Klebsiella 19(29.7%); Escherichia 25 (29.4%); Proteus 2(11.8%); Serratia 4(25.0%). Quinolone resistance for Escherichia was 42.9% for In-Patients (IP) and 16.3% for Out-Patient (OP) (P-value = 0.006); Klebsiella 35.9% for IP and 20% for OP; Proteus 11.1% for IP and 12.5% for OP; Serratia 18.2% for IP and 40% for OP; Enterobacter 22.2 for IP and 50% for OP. Conclusion High resistance rates to quinolones were observed not only for in-patients but also for out-patients with urinary tract enterobacterial infections. These findings demonstrate the importance of antibiotics susceptibility testing in improving quinolones prescription practices in Cameroon. PMID:26327943

  6. Generation and characterization of quinolone-specific DNA aptamers suitable for water monitoring.

    PubMed

    Reinemann, C; Freiin von Fritsch, U; Rudolph, S; Strehlitz, B

    2016-03-15

    Quinolones are antibiotics that are accredited in human and veterinary medicine but are regularly used in high quantities also in industrial livestock farming. Since these compounds are often only incompletely metabolized, significant amounts contaminate the aquatic environment and negatively impact on a variety of different ecosystems. Although there is increasing awareness of problems caused by pharmaceutical pollution, available methods for the detection and elimination of numerous pharmaceutical residues are currently inefficient or expensive. While this also applies to antibiotics that may lead to multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacteria, aptamer-based technologies potentially offer alternative approaches for sensitive and efficient monitoring of pharmaceutical micropollutants. Using the Capture-SELEX procedure, we here describe the selection of an aptamer pool with enhanced binding qualities for fluoroquinolones, a widely used group of antibiotics in both human and veterinary medicine. The selected aptamers were shown to detect various quinolones with high specificity, while specific binding activities to structurally unrelated drugs were not detectable. The quinolone-specific aptamers bound to ofloxacin, one of the most frequently prescribed fluoroquinolone, with high affinity (KD=0.1-56.9 nM). The functionality of quinolone-specific aptamers in real water samples was demonstrated in local tap water and in effluents of sewage plants. Together, our data suggest that these aptamers may be applicable as molecular receptors in biosensors or as catcher molecules in filter systems for improved monitoring and treatment of polluted water.

  7. Generation and characterization of quinolone-specific DNA aptamers suitable for water monitoring.

    PubMed

    Reinemann, C; Freiin von Fritsch, U; Rudolph, S; Strehlitz, B

    2016-03-15

    Quinolones are antibiotics that are accredited in human and veterinary medicine but are regularly used in high quantities also in industrial livestock farming. Since these compounds are often only incompletely metabolized, significant amounts contaminate the aquatic environment and negatively impact on a variety of different ecosystems. Although there is increasing awareness of problems caused by pharmaceutical pollution, available methods for the detection and elimination of numerous pharmaceutical residues are currently inefficient or expensive. While this also applies to antibiotics that may lead to multi-drug resistance in pathogenic bacteria, aptamer-based technologies potentially offer alternative approaches for sensitive and efficient monitoring of pharmaceutical micropollutants. Using the Capture-SELEX procedure, we here describe the selection of an aptamer pool with enhanced binding qualities for fluoroquinolones, a widely used group of antibiotics in both human and veterinary medicine. The selected aptamers were shown to detect various quinolones with high specificity, while specific binding activities to structurally unrelated drugs were not detectable. The quinolone-specific aptamers bound to ofloxacin, one of the most frequently prescribed fluoroquinolone, with high affinity (KD=0.1-56.9 nM). The functionality of quinolone-specific aptamers in real water samples was demonstrated in local tap water and in effluents of sewage plants. Together, our data suggest that these aptamers may be applicable as molecular receptors in biosensors or as catcher molecules in filter systems for improved monitoring and treatment of polluted water. PMID:26547431

  8. Quinolones and pregnancy: worrying animal findings, few clinical data.

    PubMed

    1999-02-01

    (1) Follow-up studies of approximately 1,000 women exposed to quinolones during pregnancy show no increase in the risk of malformations, miscarriage, prematurity, intrauterine growth retardation or postnatal disorders, but there are not enough data to draw firm conclusions. (2) Teratogenic effects have been observed in animals treated with the oldest quinolones (flumequine, nalidixic acid and pipemidic acid) and also with sparfloxacin, a fluoroquinolone. (3) Cartilage damage after postnatal exposure to quinolones in animals and humans has been reported. (4) Alternatives to quinolones can almost always be found for pregnant women. (5) Accidental exposure to quinolones during pregnancy does not warrant termination.

  9. Synthesis of novel selenium-containing sulfa drugs and their antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hafez, Sh H

    2010-01-01

    Synthesis of 3-[4-(N-substituted sulfamoyl)phenyl]-3,4-dihydro-4-oxo-7,9-dimethylpyrido[3',2':4,5]selenolo[3,2-d]pyrimidines, 7-[4-(N-substituted sulfamoyl)phenyl]-7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-3,4-diphenylpyrimido[4',5':4,5]selenolo [2,3-c]pyridazines and 1-[4-(N-substituted sulfamoyl)phenyl]-1,11-dihydro-11-oxo-4-methylpyrimido[4',5':4,5]selenolo[2,3-b]quinolines is reported. 4-Amino-N-pyrimidine-2-ylbenzene sulfonamide (a), 4-amino-N-(2,6-dimetnylpyrimidin-4-yl)benzene sulfonamide (b), N-[(4-aminophenyl)sulfonyl] acetamide (c) with N-ethoxymethyleneamino of selenolo pyridine, selenolo pyridazine and selenolo quinoline derivatives respectively were obtained starting from 1-amino-N-substituted sulfanilamides. Spectroscopic data (IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and Mass spectral) confirmed the structure of the newly synthesized compounds. Substituted pyrimidines, pyridazines and quinolines were screened for antibacterial activity against gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Selenolo derivative of N-[(4-aminophenyl)sulfonyl] acetamide (substitutent of sulfacetamide c) showed strong bactericidal effect against all the tested organisms. Selenolo[3,2-d]pyrimidin (substitutent a) showed a good bactericidal effect against Serratia marcescens, Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Compounds Selenolo[2,3-c]pyridazine (substitutent b), Selenolo[2,3-b]quinoline(substitutents c)) exhibited a moderate bactericidal effect against Serratia marcescens. None of the synthesized selenopyridazines has a considerable antimicrobial activity against the tested organisms. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the most active compound - 3-[4-(N-acetyl sulfamoyl)phenyl]-3,4-dihydro-4-oxo-7,9-dimethylpyrido[3',2':4,5]selenolo [3,2-d]pyrimidine was 10 mg mL(-1).

  10. Conversion of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal and Related Alkylhydroxyquinolines by Rhodococcus sp. Strain BG43

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S.; Niewerth, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    A bacterial strain, which based on the sequences of its 16S rRNA, gyrB, catA, and qsdA genes, was identified as a Rhodococcus sp. closely related to Rhodococcus erythropolis, was isolated from soil by enrichment on the Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone], a quorum sensing signal employed by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The isolate, termed Rhodococcus sp. strain BG43, cometabolically degraded PQS and its biosynthetic precursor 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone (HHQ) to anthranilic acid. HHQ degradation was accompanied by transient formation of PQS, and HHQ hydroxylation by cell extracts required NADH, indicating that strain BG43 has a HHQ monooxygenase isofunctional to the biosynthetic enzyme PqsH of P. aeruginosa. The enzymes catalyzing HHQ hydroxylation and PQS degradation were inducible by PQS, suggesting a specific pathway. Remarkably, Rhodococcus sp. BG43 is also capable of transforming 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide to PQS. It thus converts an antibacterial secondary metabolite of P. aeruginosa to a quorum sensing signal molecule. PMID:25239889

  11. Phytochemicals increase the antibacterial activity of antibiotics by acting on a drug efflux pump

    PubMed Central

    Ohene-Agyei, Thelma; Mowla, Rumana; Rahman, Taufiq; Venter, Henrietta

    2014-01-01

    Drug efflux pumps confer resistance upon bacteria to a wide range of antibiotics from various classes. The expression of efflux pumps are also implicated in virulence and biofilm formation. Moreover, organisms can only acquire resistance in the presence of active drug efflux pumps. Therefore, efflux pump inhibitors (EPIs) are attractive compounds to reverse multidrug resistance and to prevent the development of resistance in clinically relevant bacterial pathogens. We investigated the potential of pure compounds isolated from plants to act as EPIs. In silico screening was used to predict the bioactivity of plant compounds and to compare that with the known EPI, phe-arg-β-naphthylamide (PAβN). Subsequently, promising products have been tested for their ability to inhibit efflux. Plumbagin nordihydroguaretic acid (NDGA) and to a lesser degree shikonin, acted as sensitizers of drug-resistant bacteria to currently used antibiotics and were able to inhibit the efflux pump-mediated removal of substrate from cells. We demonstrated the feasibility of in silico screening to identify compounds that potentiate the action of antibiotics against drug-resistant strains and which might be potentially useful lead compounds for an EPI discovery program. PMID:25224951

  12. Thermosensitive hydrogel for periodontal application: in vitro drug release, antibacterial activity and toxicity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Pakzad, Yousef; Ganji, Fariba

    2016-02-01

    Injectable thermosensitive chitosan hydrogel is an attractive temperature-induced sol-gel solution that is widely used in drug delivery and biomedical applications. In this study, an injectable antimicrobial delivery system for periodontal treatment based on chitosan/gelatin/β-glycerolphosphate solution has been developed. The result of thermal and mechanical evaluations of chitosan/gelatin/β-glycerolphosphate hydrogel showed that adding gelatin to chitosan/β-glycerolphosphate solution significantly decreased gelling time and increased gel strength at 37℃. The antimicrobial agents chosen for release studies were metronidazole with a low molecular weight and vancomycin hydrochloride with a high molecular weight. The initial burst and total in vitro drug release for metronidazole was 13% and 67%, respectively. The initial burst and total drug release for vancomycin hydrochloride was relatively low at 3% and 23%, respectively. The momentary and total percentage of metronidazole accumulated in the phosphate buffer revealed that chitosan/gelatin/β-glycerolphosphate can develop and maintain sustained release of metronidazole in concentrations that are effective for eliminating pathogenic bacteria over time. Cytotoxicity evaluations show that chitosan/gelatin/β-glycerolphosphate thermosensitive hydrogel is a drug carrier with no cytotoxic effects. PMID:26686586

  13. In vitro and in vivo efficacy, toxicity, bio-distribution and resistance selection of a novel antibacterial drug candidate

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, Jlenia; Falciani, Chiara; Roscia, Giulia; Pollini, Simona; Bindi, Stefano; Scali, Silvia; Arrieta, Unai Cossio; Gómez-Vallejo, Vanessa; Quercini, Leila; Ibba, Elisa; Prato, Marco; Rossolini, Gian Maria; Llop, Jordi; Bracci, Luisa; Pini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    A synthetic antimicrobial peptide was identified as a possible candidate for the development of a new antibacterial drug. The peptide, SET-M33L, showed a MIC90 below 1.5 μM and 3 μM for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae, respectively. In in vivo models of P. aeruginosa infections, the peptide and its pegylated form (SET-M33L-PEG) enabled a survival percentage of 60–80% in sepsis and lung infections when injected twice i.v. at 5 mg/Kg, and completely healed skin infections when administered topically. Plasma clearance showed different kinetics for SET-M33L and SET-M33L-PEG, the latter having greater persistence two hours after injection. Bio-distribution in organs did not show significant differences in uptake of the two peptides. Unlike colistin, SET-M33L did not select resistant mutants in bacterial cultures and also proved non genotoxic and to have much lower in vivo toxicity than antimicrobial peptides already used in clinical practice. The characterizations reported here are part of a preclinical development plan that should bring the molecule to clinical trial in the next few years. PMID:27169671

  14. Antibacterial effect of mango (Mangifera indica Linn.) leaf extract against antibiotic sensitive and multi-drug resistant Salmonella typhi.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Abdul; Asghar, Samra; Naeem, Tahir; Ikram Ullah, Muhammad; Ahmed, Ijaz; Aneela, Syeda; Hussain, Shabbir

    2013-07-01

    Alternative herbal medicine has been used to treat various infections from centuries. Natural plants contain phytoconstituents having similar chemical properties as of synthetic antibiotics. Typhoid fever is a serious infection and failure of its treatment emerged multi-drug resistant (MDR) bugs of Salmonella typhi. Due to multiple and repeated issues with antibiotics efficacy, it became essential to evaluate biological properties of plants from different geographical origins. Mango leaves have been Reported for various medicinal effects like antioxidant, antimicrobial, antihelminthic, antidiabetic and antiallergic etc. Objective of present study was to investigate anti-typhoid properties of acetone mango leaf extract (AMLE) against antibiotic sensitive and MDR S. typhi isolates. A total of 50 isolates of S. typhi including MDR (n=30) and antibiotic sensitive (n=20) were investigated. Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25923) and Salmonella typhimurium (ATCC14028) were used as quality control strains. AMLE was prepared and its antibacterial activity was evaluated by agar well diffusion screening method and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), by agar dilution technique. Zone of inhibition (mm) of AMLE against MDR and antibiotic sensitive isolates was 18±1.5mm (Mean±S.D). Zone of S. aureus (ATCC 25923) and S. typhimurium (ATCC14028) was 20±1.5mm (Mean±S.D). MIC of AMLE was Reported in range from 10-50 mg/ml. The present study described the inhibitory effects of mango leaves against S. typhi.

  15. Simulating Serial-Target Antibacterial Drug Synergies Using Flux Balance Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Gautam; Church, George M.; Galagan, James; Lehár, Joseph; Sommer, Morten O. A.

    2016-01-01

    Flux balance analysis (FBA) is an increasingly useful approach for modeling the behavior of metabolic systems. However, standard FBA modeling of genetic knockouts cannot predict drug combination synergies observed between serial metabolic targets, even though such synergies give rise to some of the most widely used antibiotic treatments. Here we extend FBA modeling to simulate responses to chemical inhibitors at varying concentrations, by diverting enzymatic flux to a waste reaction. This flux diversion yields very similar qualitative predictions to prior methods for single target activity. However, we find very different predictions for combinations, where flux diversion, which mimics the kinetics of competitive metabolic inhibitors, can explain serial target synergies between metabolic enzyme inhibitors that we confirmed in Escherichia coli cultures. FBA flux diversion opens the possibility for more accurate genome-scale predictions of drug synergies, which can be used to suggest treatments for infections and other diseases. PMID:26821252

  16. Nitroimidazoles, Quinolones and Oxazolidinones as Fluorine Bearing Antitubercular Clinical Candidates.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rahul V; Keum, Young-Soo; Park, Se Won

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading killer of lives worldwide and the global curse of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis is attaining really dangerous levels. Synergistic interaction of HIV and TB is the twin epidemics in resource-limited countries as each potentiate progression of the other. The increasing emergence of MDR-TB and XDR-TB place an immense burden for the treatment of TB with currently available drugs. The situation urgently demands for the discovery of new drugs with novel mode of action and differs in structural features in order to overcome resistance appears in conventional TB therapeutics. The present report covers the discovery of three classes of antituberculosis drugs, Nitroimidazoles, Quinolones and Oxazolidinones, undergoing clinical development with fluorine atom in their structures. Highly electronegative fluorine atom plays a signature role in advancing medicinal innovations as it existence in the drug compounds critically influences metabolic stability and lipophilicity thereby delaying its elimination by the body which results into a long term in vivo efficiency of the drug. Presence of fluorine atom(s) in the drug structures described in this report, has been associated with the several fold increase in the overall potency of the compound as demonstrated since the early discoveries. 6 Fluorinated derivatives from these three classes as pretomanid, delamanid, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, linezolid and sutezolid have been discussed with their antituberculosis effects, mode of action, chemical synthetic routes and results of clinical studies.

  17. Optimization of endochin-like quinolones for antimalarial activity

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Rolf; Kelly, Jane X.; Smilkstein, Martin J.; Hinrichs, David; Koop, Dennis R.; Riscoe, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    Structural analogs of the antimalarial Endochin were synthesized and screened for antiplasmodial activity against drug sensitive and multidrug resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Structural features have been identified that are associated with improved potency while other features are associated with equipotency against an atovaquone-resistant clinical isolate. Relative to endochin the most active compound ELQ-121 shows ≈ 100-fold improvement in IC50 for inhibition of P. falciparum in vitro and it also exhibits enhanced metabolic stability. A polyethylene glycol carbonate ester prodrug of ELQ-121 demonstrated in vivo efficacy against P. yoelii in mice. This is the first report of an endochin-like quinolone that is efficacious in treating malaria in a mammalian host. PMID:21040724

  18. A novel cotton fabric with anti-bacterial and drug delivery properties using SBA-15-NH2/polysiloxane hybrid containing tetracycline.

    PubMed

    Hashemikia, Samaneh; Hemmatinejad, Nahid; Ahmadi, Ebrahim; Montazer, Majid

    2016-02-01

    Here, mesoporous silica particles containing tetracycline were loaded on cotton fabric for possible application on the infected human skin. Amino functionalized mesoporous silica, SBA-15-NH2, was chosen as a safe drug carrier loaded with tetracycline via post impregnation method. Diverse content of the drug loaded silica particles were then attached on the cotton fabric surface using polysiloxane reactive softener as a soft and safe fixing agent. UV-Vis spectroscopy was used to study the drug delivery properties of the mesoporous silica on the treated cotton fabrics. The treated fabric with long drug release properties was selected as the optimized sample. Further analysis was carried out on this sample including anti-bacterial, water contact angle, bending length, mineral content and washing durability. Also, SEM images, EDX patterns, X-Ray spectra and thermal behavior of the optimum sample were studied. The optimized treated sample indicated the gradual release profile of tetracycline in PBS buffer media within 48h along with excellent anti-bacterial efficiency as a good feature for biological application.

  19. A novel cotton fabric with anti-bacterial and drug delivery properties using SBA-15-NH2/polysiloxane hybrid containing tetracycline.

    PubMed

    Hashemikia, Samaneh; Hemmatinejad, Nahid; Ahmadi, Ebrahim; Montazer, Majid

    2016-02-01

    Here, mesoporous silica particles containing tetracycline were loaded on cotton fabric for possible application on the infected human skin. Amino functionalized mesoporous silica, SBA-15-NH2, was chosen as a safe drug carrier loaded with tetracycline via post impregnation method. Diverse content of the drug loaded silica particles were then attached on the cotton fabric surface using polysiloxane reactive softener as a soft and safe fixing agent. UV-Vis spectroscopy was used to study the drug delivery properties of the mesoporous silica on the treated cotton fabrics. The treated fabric with long drug release properties was selected as the optimized sample. Further analysis was carried out on this sample including anti-bacterial, water contact angle, bending length, mineral content and washing durability. Also, SEM images, EDX patterns, X-Ray spectra and thermal behavior of the optimum sample were studied. The optimized treated sample indicated the gradual release profile of tetracycline in PBS buffer media within 48h along with excellent anti-bacterial efficiency as a good feature for biological application. PMID:26652393

  20. Detection of quinolones in poultry meat obtained from retail centers in Santiago Province, the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Silfrany, R O; Caba, R E; Solís de Los Santos, F; Hanning, I

    2013-02-01

    In the Dominican Republic, poultry consumption per capita is greater than 34 kg of poultry meat per year. However, antibiotics, specifically the quinolone group, may be overused and can result in residues in the poultry meat. These residues are of concern because consumers may have allergies to antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant bacteria can develop from overuse of antibiotics in production. Little is known concerning this issue specifically for Santiago Province in the Dominican Republic. Thus, the main purpose of this research was to evaluate the incidence of residual quinolones in poultry meat and determine whether any residues detected were higher than the residue maximum limits (100 μg/kg) established by food industry authorities, including the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and European Food Safety Authority. A total of 135 samples of chicken breast were taken from different retail meat centers in the nine municipalities of Santiago Province (Santiago, Tamboril, Sabana Iglesia, Villa Bisonó, Puñal, Villa González, Licey, Jánico, and San José De Las Matas) and were analyzed using the Equinox test (Immunotec, Swanton, VT). Of the 135 samples analyzed, 50% from Sabana Iglesia, 20% from Licey, 20% from San Jose De Las Matas, and 6.25% from Santiago contained residues of quinolones higher than the residue maximum limits. No quinolone residues were detected in samples obtained from Janico, Punal, Tamboril, Villa Bisono, or Villa Gonzalez. The results of this investigation suggest that some poultry meat sold for human consumption in Santiago Province of the Dominican Republic contains quinolone residues and may represent a health risk to some consumers. PMID:23433388

  1. Quinolone and macrolide resistance in Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli: resistance mechanisms and trends in human isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Engberg, J.; Aarestrup, F. M.; Taylor, D. E.; Gerner-Smidt, P.; Nachamkin, I.

    2001-01-01

    The incidence of human Campylobacter jejuni and C. coli infections has increased markedly in many parts of the world in the last decade as has the number of quinolone-resistant and, to a lesser extent, macrolide-resistant Campylobacter strains causing infections. We review macrolide and quinolone resistance in Campylobacter and track resistance trends in human clinical isolates in relation to use of these agents in food animals. Susceptibility data suggest that erythromycin and other macrolides should remain the drugs of choice in most regions, with systematic surveillance and control measures maintained, but fluoroquinolones may now be of limited use in the empiric treatment of Campylobacter infections in many regions. PMID:11266291

  2. Loss of bactericidal activities of quinolones during the post-antibiotic effect induced by rifampicin.

    PubMed

    Meng, X; Nightingale, C H; Sweeney, K R; Quintiliani, R

    1994-04-01

    The post-antibiotic effect (PAE) is the phenomenon of persisting suppression of bacterial growth as a result of prior antimicrobial exposure. In antimicrobial therapy, multiple doses of either a single drug or a combination of drugs are common. Accordingly, the following question may arise: what impact might the PAE induced by the previous dose impose on the subsequent bactericidal action of a cycle-specific antibiotic. To answer the question, a study was conducted using pefloxacin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin as test drugs, rifampicin as the PAE inducer and Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 as the test organism. Bacterial kill kinetics were determined for each quinolone at 4 x MIC before rifampicin treatment and during the PAE period following rifampicin challenge. The relative bactericidal activity of the quinolones during the PAE period was calculated. During the PAE period, pefloxacin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin displayed only 6%, 8%, 7% and 33% of their normal activities, respectively. The results were compared to those obtained at low temperature (4 degrees C) and when the cells were challenged simultaneously with a quinolone and with rifampicin. The findings of this study suggest that prolonging the dosing interval by taking the PAE into account may not only lower the cost of antimicrobial therapy and the risk of toxicity, but also ensure the efficacy of subsequent doses. PMID:8056690

  3. Antibacterial modification of an injectable, biodegradable, non-cytotoxic block copolymer-based physical gel with body temperature-stimulated sol-gel transition and controlled drug release.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaowen; Hu, Huawen; Wang, Wenyi; Lee, Ka I; Gao, Chang; He, Liang; Wang, Yuanfeng; Lai, Chuilin; Fei, Bin; Xin, John H

    2016-07-01

    Biomaterials are being extensively used in various biomedical fields; however, they are readily infected with microorganisms, thus posing a serious threat to the public health care. We herein presented a facile route to the antibacterial modification of an important A-B-A type biomaterial using poly (ethylene glycol) methyl ether (mPEG)- poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)-mPEG as a typical model. Inexpensive, commercial bis(2-hydroxyethyl) methylammonium chloride (DMA) was adopted as an antibacterial unit. The effective synthesis of the antibacterial copolymer mPEG-PCL-∼∼∼-PCL-mPEG (where ∼∼∼ denotes the segment with DMA units) was well confirmed by FTIR and (1)H NMR spectra. At an appropriate modification extent, the DMA unit could render the copolymer mPEG-PCL-∼∼∼-PCL-mPEG highly antibacterial, but did not largely alter its fascinating intrinsic properties including the thermosensitivity (e.g., the body temperature-induced sol-gel transition), non-cytotoxicity, and controlled drug release. A detailed study on the sol-gel-sol transition behavior of different copolymers showed that an appropriate extent of modification with DMA retained a sol-gel-sol transition, despite the fact that a too high extent caused a loss of sol-gel-sol transition. The hydrophilic and hydrophobic balance between mPEG and PCL was most likely broken upon a high extent of quaternization due to a large disturbance effect of DMA units at a large quantity (as evidenced by the heavily depressed PCL segment crystallinity), and thus the micelle aggregation mechanism for the gel formation could not work anymore, along with the loss of the thermosensitivity. The work presented here is highly expected to be generalized for synthesis of various block copolymers with immunity to microorganisms. Light may also be shed on understanding the phase transition behavior of various multiblock copolymers.

  4. Antibacterial agents in the cinema.

    PubMed

    García Sánchez, J E; García Sánchez, E; Merino Marcos, M L

    2006-12-01

    Numerous procedures used as antibacterial therapy are present in many films and include strategies ranging from different antimicrobial drugs to surgery and supporting measures. Films also explore the correct use and misuse of antimicrobial agents. Side effects and other aspects related to antibacterial therapy have also been reflected in some films. This article refers to the presence of antibacterial agents in different popular movies. There are movies in which antibacterial agents form part of the central plot, while in others it is merely an important part of the plot. In still others, its presence is isolated, and in these it plays an ambient or anecdotal role.

  5. Fluoroquinolone-gyrase-DNA complexes: two modes of drug binding.

    PubMed

    Mustaev, Arkady; Malik, Muhammad; Zhao, Xilin; Kurepina, Natalia; Luan, Gan; Oppegard, Lisa M; Hiasa, Hiroshi; Marks, Kevin R; Kerns, Robert J; Berger, James M; Drlica, Karl

    2014-05-01

    DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV control bacterial DNA topology by breaking DNA, passing duplex DNA through the break, and then resealing the break. This process is subject to reversible corruption by fluoroquinolones, antibacterials that form drug-enzyme-DNA complexes in which the DNA is broken. The complexes, called cleaved complexes because of the presence of DNA breaks, have been crystallized and found to have the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring system facing the GyrB/ParE subunits. As expected from x-ray crystallography, a thiol-reactive, C-7-modified chloroacetyl derivative of ciprofloxacin (Cip-AcCl) formed cross-linked cleaved complexes with mutant GyrB-Cys(466) gyrase as evidenced by resistance to reversal by both EDTA and thermal treatments. Surprisingly, cross-linking was also readily seen with complexes formed by mutant GyrA-G81C gyrase, thereby revealing a novel drug-gyrase interaction not observed in crystal structures. The cross-link between fluoroquinolone and GyrA-G81C gyrase correlated with exceptional bacteriostatic activity for Cip-AcCl with a quinolone-resistant GyrA-G81C variant of Escherichia coli and its Mycobacterium smegmatis equivalent (GyrA-G89C). Cip-AcCl-mediated, irreversible inhibition of DNA replication provided further evidence for a GyrA-drug cross-link. Collectively these data establish the existence of interactions between the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring and both GyrA and GyrB. Because the GyrA-Gly(81) and GyrB-Glu(466) residues are far apart (17 Å) in the crystal structure of cleaved complexes, two modes of quinolone binding must exist. The presence of two binding modes raises the possibility that multiple quinolone-enzyme-DNA complexes can form, a discovery that opens new avenues for exploring and exploiting relationships between drug structure and activity with type II DNA topoisomerases. PMID:24497635

  6. Fluoroquinolone-gyrase-DNA complexes: two modes of drug binding.

    PubMed

    Mustaev, Arkady; Malik, Muhammad; Zhao, Xilin; Kurepina, Natalia; Luan, Gan; Oppegard, Lisa M; Hiasa, Hiroshi; Marks, Kevin R; Kerns, Robert J; Berger, James M; Drlica, Karl

    2014-05-01

    DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV control bacterial DNA topology by breaking DNA, passing duplex DNA through the break, and then resealing the break. This process is subject to reversible corruption by fluoroquinolones, antibacterials that form drug-enzyme-DNA complexes in which the DNA is broken. The complexes, called cleaved complexes because of the presence of DNA breaks, have been crystallized and found to have the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring system facing the GyrB/ParE subunits. As expected from x-ray crystallography, a thiol-reactive, C-7-modified chloroacetyl derivative of ciprofloxacin (Cip-AcCl) formed cross-linked cleaved complexes with mutant GyrB-Cys(466) gyrase as evidenced by resistance to reversal by both EDTA and thermal treatments. Surprisingly, cross-linking was also readily seen with complexes formed by mutant GyrA-G81C gyrase, thereby revealing a novel drug-gyrase interaction not observed in crystal structures. The cross-link between fluoroquinolone and GyrA-G81C gyrase correlated with exceptional bacteriostatic activity for Cip-AcCl with a quinolone-resistant GyrA-G81C variant of Escherichia coli and its Mycobacterium smegmatis equivalent (GyrA-G89C). Cip-AcCl-mediated, irreversible inhibition of DNA replication provided further evidence for a GyrA-drug cross-link. Collectively these data establish the existence of interactions between the fluoroquinolone C-7 ring and both GyrA and GyrB. Because the GyrA-Gly(81) and GyrB-Glu(466) residues are far apart (17 Å) in the crystal structure of cleaved complexes, two modes of quinolone binding must exist. The presence of two binding modes raises the possibility that multiple quinolone-enzyme-DNA complexes can form, a discovery that opens new avenues for exploring and exploiting relationships between drug structure and activity with type II DNA topoisomerases.

  7. Quinolone-Hydroxyquinoline Tautomerism in Quinolone 3-Esters. Preserving the 4-Oxoquinoline Structure To Retain Antimalarial Activity.

    PubMed

    Horta, Pedro; Kuş, Nihal; Henriques, Marta Sofia C; Paixão, José A; Coelho, Lis; Nogueira, Fátima; O'Neill, Paul M; Fausto, Rui; Cristiano, Maria Lurdes Santos

    2015-12-18

    Recent publications report in vitro activity of quinolone 3-esters against the bc1 protein complex of Plasmodium falciparum and the parasite. Docking studies performed in silico at the yeast Qo site established a key role for the 4-oxo and N-H groups in drug-target interactions. Thus, the possibility of 4-oxoquinoline/4-hydroxyquinoline tautomerism may impact in pharmacologic profiles and should be investigated. We describe the synthesis, structure, photochemistry, and activity against multidrug-resistant P. falciparum strain Dd2 of ethyl 4-oxo-7-methylquinoline-3-carboxylate (7Me-OQE) and ethyl 4-hydroxy-5-methylquinoline-3-carboxylate (5Me-HQE), obtained from diethyl 2-[((3-methylphenyl)amino)methylene]malonate. Theoretically (B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)), 5Me-HQE and 7Me-OQE show clear preference for the hydroxyquinoline form. The difference between the lowest energy hydroxyquinoline and quinolone forms is 27 and 38 kJ mol(-1), for 5Me-HQE and 7Me-OQE, respectively. Calculations of aromaticity indexes show that in 5Me-HQE both rings are aromatic, while in the corresponding oxo tautomers the nitrogen-containing ring is essentially non-aromatic. The structure of monomeric 5Me-HQE was studied using matrix isolation coupled to FTIR spectroscopy. No traces of 4-oxoquinoline tautomers were found in the experimental IR spectra, revealing that the species present in the crystal, 5Me-HQE·HCl, was lost HCl upon sublimation but did not tautomerize. Continuous broadband irradiation (λ > 220 nm; 130 min) of the matrix led to only partial photodecomposition of 5Me-HQE (ca. 1/3).

  8. Quinolone-Hydroxyquinoline Tautomerism in Quinolone 3-Esters. Preserving the 4-Oxoquinoline Structure To Retain Antimalarial Activity.

    PubMed

    Horta, Pedro; Kuş, Nihal; Henriques, Marta Sofia C; Paixão, José A; Coelho, Lis; Nogueira, Fátima; O'Neill, Paul M; Fausto, Rui; Cristiano, Maria Lurdes Santos

    2015-12-18

    Recent publications report in vitro activity of quinolone 3-esters against the bc1 protein complex of Plasmodium falciparum and the parasite. Docking studies performed in silico at the yeast Qo site established a key role for the 4-oxo and N-H groups in drug-target interactions. Thus, the possibility of 4-oxoquinoline/4-hydroxyquinoline tautomerism may impact in pharmacologic profiles and should be investigated. We describe the synthesis, structure, photochemistry, and activity against multidrug-resistant P. falciparum strain Dd2 of ethyl 4-oxo-7-methylquinoline-3-carboxylate (7Me-OQE) and ethyl 4-hydroxy-5-methylquinoline-3-carboxylate (5Me-HQE), obtained from diethyl 2-[((3-methylphenyl)amino)methylene]malonate. Theoretically (B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p)), 5Me-HQE and 7Me-OQE show clear preference for the hydroxyquinoline form. The difference between the lowest energy hydroxyquinoline and quinolone forms is 27 and 38 kJ mol(-1), for 5Me-HQE and 7Me-OQE, respectively. Calculations of aromaticity indexes show that in 5Me-HQE both rings are aromatic, while in the corresponding oxo tautomers the nitrogen-containing ring is essentially non-aromatic. The structure of monomeric 5Me-HQE was studied using matrix isolation coupled to FTIR spectroscopy. No traces of 4-oxoquinoline tautomers were found in the experimental IR spectra, revealing that the species present in the crystal, 5Me-HQE·HCl, was lost HCl upon sublimation but did not tautomerize. Continuous broadband irradiation (λ > 220 nm; 130 min) of the matrix led to only partial photodecomposition of 5Me-HQE (ca. 1/3). PMID:26551438

  9. Chemical conjugation of 2-hexadecynoic acid to C5-curcumin enhances its antibacterial activity against multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sanabria-Ríos, David J; Rivera-Torres, Yaritza; Rosario, Joshua; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Torres-García, Yeireliz; Montano, Nashbly; Ortíz-Soto, Gabriela; Ríos-Olivares, Eddy; Rodríguez, José W; Carballeira, Néstor M

    2015-11-15

    The first total synthesis of a C5-curcumin-2-hexadecynoic acid (C5-Curc-2-HDA, 6) conjugate was successfully performed. Through a three-step synthetic route, conjugate 6 was obtained in 13% overall yield and tested for antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. Our results revealed that 6 was active against eight MRSA strains at MICs that range between 31.3 and 62.5 μg/mL. It was found that the presence of 2-hexadecynoic acid (2-HDA, 4) in conjugate 6 increased 4-8-fold its antibacterial activity against MRSA strains supporting our hypothesis that the chemical connection of 4 to C5-curcumin (2) increases the antibacterial activity of 2 against Gram-positive bacteria. Combinational index (CIn) values that range between 1.6 and 2.3 were obtained when eight MRSA strains were treated with an equimolar mixture of 2 and 4. These results demonstrated that an antagonistic effect is taking place. Finally, it was investigated whether conjugate 6 can affect the replication process of S. aureus, since this compound inhibited the supercoiling activity of the S. aureus DNA gyrase at minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 250 μg/mL (IC50=100.2±13.9 μg/mL). Moreover, it was observed that the presence of 4 in conjugate 6 improves the anti-topoisomerase activity of 2 towards S. aureus DNA gyrase, which is in agreement with results obtained from antibacterial susceptibility tests involving MRSA strains. PMID:26483137

  10. Chemical conjugation of 2-hexadecynoic acid to C5-curcumin enhances its antibacterial activity against multi-drug resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sanabria-Ríos, David J; Rivera-Torres, Yaritza; Rosario, Joshua; Gutierrez, Ricardo; Torres-García, Yeireliz; Montano, Nashbly; Ortíz-Soto, Gabriela; Ríos-Olivares, Eddy; Rodríguez, José W; Carballeira, Néstor M

    2015-11-15

    The first total synthesis of a C5-curcumin-2-hexadecynoic acid (C5-Curc-2-HDA, 6) conjugate was successfully performed. Through a three-step synthetic route, conjugate 6 was obtained in 13% overall yield and tested for antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. Our results revealed that 6 was active against eight MRSA strains at MICs that range between 31.3 and 62.5 μg/mL. It was found that the presence of 2-hexadecynoic acid (2-HDA, 4) in conjugate 6 increased 4-8-fold its antibacterial activity against MRSA strains supporting our hypothesis that the chemical connection of 4 to C5-curcumin (2) increases the antibacterial activity of 2 against Gram-positive bacteria. Combinational index (CIn) values that range between 1.6 and 2.3 were obtained when eight MRSA strains were treated with an equimolar mixture of 2 and 4. These results demonstrated that an antagonistic effect is taking place. Finally, it was investigated whether conjugate 6 can affect the replication process of S. aureus, since this compound inhibited the supercoiling activity of the S. aureus DNA gyrase at minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 250 μg/mL (IC50=100.2±13.9 μg/mL). Moreover, it was observed that the presence of 4 in conjugate 6 improves the anti-topoisomerase activity of 2 towards S. aureus DNA gyrase, which is in agreement with results obtained from antibacterial susceptibility tests involving MRSA strains.

  11. Cytotoxic and antibacterial substances against multi-drug resistant pathogens from marine sponge symbiont: Citrinin, a secondary metabolite of Penicillium sp.

    PubMed Central

    Subramani, Ramesh; Kumar, Rohitesh; Prasad, Pritesh; Aalbersberg, William

    2013-01-01

    Objective To Isolate, purify, characterize, and evaluate the bioactive compounds from the sponge-derived fungus Penicillium sp. FF001 and to elucidate its structure. Methods The fungal strain FF001 with an interesting bioactivity profile was isolated from a marine Fijian sponge Melophlus sp. Based on conidiophores aggregation, conidia development and mycelia morphological characteristics, the isolate FF001 was classically identified as a Penicillium sp. The bioactive compound was identified using various spectral analysis of UV, high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectra, 1H and 13C NMR spectral data. Further minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) assay and brine shrimp cytotoxicity assay were also carried out to evaluate the biological properties of the purified compound. Results Bioassay guided fractionation of the EtOAc extract of a static culture of this Penicillium sp. by different chromatographic methods led the isolation of an antibacterial, anticryptococcal and cytotoxic active compound, which was identified as citrinin (1). Further, citrinin (1) is reported for its potent antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), rifampicin-resistant S. aureus, wild type S. aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium showed MICs of 3.90, 0.97, 1.95 and 7.81 µg/mL, respectively. Further citrinin (1) displayed significant activity against the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans (MIC 3.90 µg/mL), and exhibited cytotoxicity against brine shrimp larvae LD50 of 96 µg/mL. Conclusions Citrinin (1) is reported from sponge associated Penicillium sp. from this study and for its strong antibacterial activity against multi-drug resistant human pathogens including cytotoxicity against brine shrimp larvae, which indicated that sponge associated Penicillium spp. are promising sources of natural bioactive metabolites. PMID:23620853

  12. [Antibacterial treatment: perspectives].

    PubMed

    Mihalache, Doina

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to search new antibacterial molecules for an efficient therapy. Thus the researches look for new categories of antibacterial molecules that will solve the current and future therapy problems, some of them being already used, others are still evaluated. Among these there are the new antibiotics (streptogramine, oxazolidinone, fluorochinolone and lipopeptides), enzymatic inhibitors (PDF), tubular peptides--nanotubes, cytokines pro- and anti-inflammatory drugs and preparations obtained through genetic engineering (anti-stress molecules, medicines that inhibit the lipid metabolism of the macro-organisms persisting in macrophages or gene mutation pca A, that enables the immunologic recognition of'the tubercle bacillus).

  13. Design, Synthesis, Molecular Docking, and Antibacterial Evaluation of Some Novel Flouroquinolone Derivatives as Potent Antibacterial Agent

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mehul M.; Patel, Laxman J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Quinolone moiety is an important class of nitrogen containing heterocycles widely used as key building blocks for medicinal agents. It exhibits a wide spectrum of pharmacophores and has bactericidal, antiviral, antimalarial, and anticancer activities. In view of the reported antimicrobial activity of various fluoroquinolones, the importance of the C-7 substituents is that they exhibit potent antimicrobial activities. Our objective was to synthesize newer quinolone analogues with increasing bulk at C-7 position of the main 6-fluoroquinolone scaffold to produce the target compounds which have potent antimicrobial activity. Methods. A novel series of 1-ethyl-6-fluoro-4-oxo-7-{4-[2-(4-substituted phenyl)-2-(substituted)-ethyl]-1-piperazinyl}-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxylic acid derivatives were synthesized. To understand the interaction of binding sites with bacterial protein receptor, the docking study was performed using topoisomerase II DNA gyrase enzymes (PDB ID: 2XCT) by Schrodinger's Maestro program. In vitro antibacterial activity of the synthesized compounds was studied and the MIC value was calculated by the broth dilution method. Results. Among all the synthesized compounds, some compounds showed potent antimicrobial activity. The compound 8g exhibited good antibacterial activity. Conclusion. This investigation identified the potent antibacterial agents against certain infections. PMID:25574496

  14. Changes of the Quinolones Resistance to Gram-positive Cocci Isolated during the Past 8 Years in the First Bethune Hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jiancheng; Chen, Qihui; Yao, Hanxin; Zhou, Qi

    This study was to investigate the quinolones resistance to gram-positive cocci isolated in the First Bethune Hospital during the past 8 years. Disk diffusion test was used to study the antimicrobial resistance. The data were analyzed by WHONET 5 software according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). The rates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative Staphylococci (MRCNS) were 50.8%∼83.3% and 79.4%∼81.5%during the past 8 years, respectively. In recent 8 years, the quinolones resistance to gram-positive cocci had increased. Monitoring of the quinolones resistance to gram-positive cocci should be strengthened. The change of the antimicrobial resistance should be investigated in order to guide rational drug usage in the clinic and prevent bacterial strain of drug resistance from being transmitted.

  15. ANTIBACTERIAL PROPERTIES OF THE CFTR POTENTIATOR IVACAFTOR

    PubMed Central

    Reznikov, Leah R.; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Dohrn, Cassie L.; Gansemer, Nick D.; Diekema, Daniel J.; Stoltz, David A.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Ivacaftor increases CFTR channel activity and improves pulmonary function for individuals bearing a G551D mutation. Because ivacaftor structurally resembles quinolone antibiotics, we tested the hypothesis that ivacaftor possesses antibacterial properties. Methods Bioluminescence, colony forming unit, and minimal inhibitory concentration assays were used to assess viability of Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and multiple clinical microbial isolates. Results Ivacaftor induced a dose-dependent reduction in bioluminescence of S. aureus and decreased the number of colony forming units. We observed a similar but less robust effect in P. aeruginosa following outer membrane permeabilization. Ivacaftor inhibited the growth of respiratory isolates of S. aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae and exhibited positive interactions with antibiotics against lab and respiratory strains of S. aureus and S. pneumoniae. Conclusion These data indicate that ivacaftor exhibits antibacterial properties and raise the intriguing possibility that ivacaftor might have an antibiotic effect in people with CF. PMID:24618508

  16. Antibacterial and antibiotic-potentiation activities of the methanol extract of some cameroonian spices against Gram-negative multi-drug resistant phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The present work was designed to evaluate the antibacterial properties of the methanol extracts of eleven selected Cameroonian spices on multi-drug resistant bacteria (MDR), and their ability to potentiate the effect of some common antibiotics used in therapy. Results The extract of Cinnamomum zeylanicum against Escherichia coli ATCC 8739 and AG100 strains showed the best activities, with the lowest minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 64 μg/ml. The extract of Dorstenia psilurus was the most active when tested in the presence of an efflux pump inhibitor, phenylalanine Arginine-β- Naphtylamide (PAβN), a synergistic effect being observed in 56.25 % of the tested bacteria when it was combined with Erythromycin (ERY). Conclusion The present work evidently provides information on the role of some Cameroonian spices in the fight against multi-resistant bacteria. PMID:22709668

  17. Orally Bioavailable 6-Chloro-7-methoxy-4(1H)-quinolones Efficacious against Multiple Stages of Plasmodium

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The continued proliferation of malaria throughout temperate and tropical regions of the world has promoted a push for more efficacious treatments to combat the disease. Unfortunately, more recent remedies such as artemisinin combination therapies have been rendered less effective due to developing parasite resistance, and new drugs are required that target the parasite in the liver to support the disease elimination efforts. Research was initiated to revisit antimalarials developed in the 1940s and 1960s that were deemed unsuitable for use as therapeutic agents as a result of poor understanding of both physicochemical properties and parasitology. Structure–activity and structure–property relationship studies were conducted to generate a set of compounds with the general 6-chloro-7-methoxy-2-methyl-4(1H)-quinolone scaffold which were substituted at the 3-position with a variety of phenyl moieties possessing various properties. Extensive physicochemical evaluation of the quinolone series was carried out to downselect the most promising 4(1H)-quinolones, 7, 62, 66, and 67, which possessed low-nanomolar EC50 values against W2 and TM90-C2B as well as improved microsomal stability. Additionally, in vivo Thompson test results using Plasmodium berghei in mice showed that these 4(1H)-quinolones were efficacious for the reduction of parasitemia at >99% after 6 days. PMID:25148516

  18. 77 FR 49450 - Issues in the Design of Clinical Trials of Antibacterial Drugs for the Treatment of Non-Cystic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... Drugs for the Treatment of Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug... treatment of non-cystic fibrosis (non-CF) bronchiectasis. This public workshop is intended to...

  19. Antimicrobial activity of CS-940, a new trifluorinated quinolone.

    PubMed Central

    Biedenbach, D J; Sutton, L D; Jones, R N

    1995-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of CS-940, a new trifluorinated quinolone drug, was tested against 761 clinical isolates. CS-940 activity against members of the family Enterobacteriaceae was most similar to that of ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin, with a large range of MICs inhibiting 90% of isolates tested (MIC90S) of 0.015 to 16 micrograms/ml (median MIC90, 0.06 micrograms/ml). CS-940 had greater activity than ciprofloxacin or ofloxacin when they were tested against Acinetobacter spp. (MIC90S, 0.03 micrograms/ml) and Stenotrophomonas (Xanthomonas) maltophilia (MIC90S, 2 micrograms/ml). CS-940 demonstrated a high degree of potency against Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, and Neisseria spp. (MIC90S, < or = 0.06 micrograms/ml). CS-940 was two- to eightfold more active than ciprofloxacin or ofloxacin against oxacillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus haemolyticus, and coagulase-negative Staphylococcus spp. CS-940 was also very active against Streptococcus spp. and enterococci, for which MIC90S were < or = 2 micrograms/ml; for Enterococcus faecium, however, the MIC90 was 4 micrograms/ml. CS-940 was generally less active than a comparison investigational fluoroquinolone, clinafloxacin. This compound appears promising by in vitro test analysis and warrants further in vivo trials. PMID:8619590

  20. Non-competitive inhibition of GABAA responses by a new class of quinolones and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories in dissociated frog sensory neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Yakushiji, T.; Shirasaki, T.; Akaike, N.

    1992-01-01

    1. The interaction of a new class of quinolone antimicrobials (new quinolones) and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAIDs) with the GABAA receptor-Cl- channel complex was investigated in frog sensory neurones by use of the internal perfusion and 'concentration clamp' techniques. 2. The new quinolones and the NSAIDs (both 10(-6)-10(-5) M) had little effect on the GABA-induced chloride current (ICI) when applied separately. At a concentration of 10(-4) M the new quinolones, and to a lesser degree the NSAIDs, produced some suppression of the GABA response. 3. The co-administration of new quinolones and some NSAIDs (10(-6)-10(-14) M) resulted in a marked suppression of the GABA response. The size of this inhibition was dependent on the concentration of either the new quinolone or the NSAID tested. The inhibitory potency of new quinolones in combination with 4-biphenylacetic acid (BPAA) was in rank order norfloxacin (NFLX) much greater than enoxacin (ENX) greater than ciprofloxancin (CPFX) much greater than ofloxacin (OFLX), and that of NSAIDs in combination with ENX was BPAA much greater than indomethacin = ketoprofen greater than naproxen greater than ibuprofen greater than pranoprofen. Diclofenac, piroxicam and acetaminophen did not affect GABA responses in the presence of ENX. 4. In the presence of ENX or BPAA, there was a small shift to the right of the concentration-response curve for GABA without any effect on the maximum response. However, the co-administration of these drugs suppressed the maximum of the GABA concentration-response curve, indicating a non-competitive inhibition, for which no voltage-dependency was observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1317734

  1. Quinolone co-resistance in ESBL- or AmpC-producing Escherichia coli from an Indian urban aquatic environment and their public health implications.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Priyanka; Kanaujia, Pawan Kumar; Singh, Nambram Somendro; Sharma, Shalu; Kumar, Shakti; Virdi, Jugsharan Singh

    2016-01-01

    Quinolone and β-lactam antibiotics constitute major mainstay of treatment against infections caused by pathogenic Escherichia coli. Presence of E. coli strains expressing co-resistance to both these antibiotic classes in urban aquatic environments which are consistently being used for various anthropogenic activities represents a serious public health concern. From a heterogeneous collection of 61 E. coli strains isolated from the river Yamuna traversing through the National Capital Territory of Delhi (India), those harboring blaCTX-M-15 (n = 10) or blaCMY-42 (n = 2) were investigated for co-resistance to quinolones and the molecular mechanisms thereof. Resistance was primarily attributed to amino acid substitutions in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of GyrA (S83L ± D87N) and ParC (S80I ± E84K). One of the E. coli strains, viz., IPE, also carried substitutions in GyrB and ParE at positions Ser492→Asn and Ser458→Ala, respectively. The phenotypically susceptible strains nevertheless carried plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) gene, viz., qnrS, which showed co-transfer to the recipient quinolone-sensitive E. coli J53 along with the genes encoding β-lactamases and led to increase in minimal inhibitory concentrations of quinolone antibiotics. To the best of our knowledge, this represents first report of molecular characterization of quinolone co-resistance in E. coli harboring genes for ESBLs or AmpC β-lactamases from a natural aquatic environment of India. The study warrants true appreciation of the potential of urban aquatic environments in the emergence and spread of multi-drug resistance and underscores the need to characterize resistance genetic elements vis-à-vis their public health implications, irrespective of apparent phenotypic resistance. PMID:26498967

  2. Quinolone co-resistance in ESBL- or AmpC-producing Escherichia coli from an Indian urban aquatic environment and their public health implications.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Priyanka; Kanaujia, Pawan Kumar; Singh, Nambram Somendro; Sharma, Shalu; Kumar, Shakti; Virdi, Jugsharan Singh

    2016-01-01

    Quinolone and β-lactam antibiotics constitute major mainstay of treatment against infections caused by pathogenic Escherichia coli. Presence of E. coli strains expressing co-resistance to both these antibiotic classes in urban aquatic environments which are consistently being used for various anthropogenic activities represents a serious public health concern. From a heterogeneous collection of 61 E. coli strains isolated from the river Yamuna traversing through the National Capital Territory of Delhi (India), those harboring blaCTX-M-15 (n = 10) or blaCMY-42 (n = 2) were investigated for co-resistance to quinolones and the molecular mechanisms thereof. Resistance was primarily attributed to amino acid substitutions in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of GyrA (S83L ± D87N) and ParC (S80I ± E84K). One of the E. coli strains, viz., IPE, also carried substitutions in GyrB and ParE at positions Ser492→Asn and Ser458→Ala, respectively. The phenotypically susceptible strains nevertheless carried plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) gene, viz., qnrS, which showed co-transfer to the recipient quinolone-sensitive E. coli J53 along with the genes encoding β-lactamases and led to increase in minimal inhibitory concentrations of quinolone antibiotics. To the best of our knowledge, this represents first report of molecular characterization of quinolone co-resistance in E. coli harboring genes for ESBLs or AmpC β-lactamases from a natural aquatic environment of India. The study warrants true appreciation of the potential of urban aquatic environments in the emergence and spread of multi-drug resistance and underscores the need to characterize resistance genetic elements vis-à-vis their public health implications, irrespective of apparent phenotypic resistance.

  3. [Residues of tetracycline and quinolones in wild fish living around a salmon aquaculture center in Chile].

    PubMed

    Fortt Z, Antonia; Cabello C, Felipe; Buschmann R, Alejandro

    2007-02-01

    The presence of residues of tetracycline, quinolones and antiparasitic drugs was investigated in wild fish captured around salmon aquaculture pens in Cochamó, Region X, Chile. Residues of both antibiotics were found in the meta [corrected] of two species of wild fish that are consumed by humans, robalo (Elginops maclovinus) and cabrilla (Sebastes capensis) [corrected] These findings suggest that the antibiotic usage in salmon aquaculture in Chile has nvironmental implications that may affect human and animal health. More studies are needed in Chile to determine the relevance of these findings for human and animal health and the environment to regulate this use of antibiotics. PMID:17369965

  4. [Residues of tetracycline and quinolones in wild fish living around a salmon aquaculture center in Chile].

    PubMed

    Fortt Z, Antonia; Cabello C, Felipe; Buschmann R, Alejandro

    2007-02-01

    The presence of residues of tetracycline, quinolones and antiparasitic drugs was investigated in wild fish captured around salmon aquaculture pens in Cochamó, Region X, Chile. Residues of both antibiotics were found in the meta [corrected] of two species of wild fish that are consumed by humans, robalo (Elginops maclovinus) and cabrilla (Sebastes capensis) [corrected] These findings suggest that the antibiotic usage in salmon aquaculture in Chile has nvironmental implications that may affect human and animal health. More studies are needed in Chile to determine the relevance of these findings for human and animal health and the environment to regulate this use of antibiotics.

  5. Synthetic thioamide, benzimidazole, quinolone and derivatives with carboxylic acid and ester moieties: a strategy in the design of antituberculosis agents.

    PubMed

    Ashfaq, M; Shah, S S A; Najam, T; Ahmad, M M; Tabassum, R; Rivera, G

    2014-03-01

    Synthetic heterocyclic compounds have remarkable potential activity against diseases; thioamides, benzimidazoles, quinolones and derivatives with carboxylic acid and esters moieties have shown excellent activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We reviewed antituberculosis activities of above compounds with reference to half maximal inhibitory concentration, minimum inhibitory concentration and structural-activity relationship which clearly indicate that electron-withdrawing groups are the main inducers of antimycobacterium activity. Comparison between clinically used drugs and new synthetic derivatives showed recent advances made in the last decade.

  6. Chemoinformatics for rational discovery of safe antibacterial drugs: simultaneous predictions of biological activity against streptococci and toxicological profiles in laboratory animals.

    PubMed

    Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Kleandrova, Valeria V; Cordeiro, M N D S

    2013-05-15

    Streptococci are a group of Gram-positive bacteria which are responsible for causing many diverse diseases in humans and other animals worldwide. The high prevalence of resistance of these bacteria to current antibacterial drugs is an alarming problem for the scientific community. The battle against streptococci by using antimicrobial chemotherapies will depend on the design of new chemicals with high inhibitory activity, having also as low toxicity as possible. Multi-target approaches based on quantitative-structure activity relationships (mt-QSAR) have played a very important role, providing a better knowledge about the molecular patterns related with the appearance of different pharmacological profiles including antimicrobial activity. Until now, almost all mt-QSAR models have considered the study of biological activity or toxicity separately. In the present study, we develop by the first time, a unified multitasking (mtk) QSAR model for the simultaneous prediction of anti-streptococci activity and toxic effects against biological models like Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus. The mtk-QSAR model was created by using artificial neural networks (ANN) analysis for the classification of compounds as positive (high biological activity and/or low toxicity) or negative (otherwise) under diverse sets of experimental conditions. Our mtk-QSAR model, correctly classified more than 97% of the cases in the whole database (more than 11,500 cases), serving as a promising tool for the virtual screening of potent and safe anti-streptococci drugs.

  7. Three-dimensional structures of unligated uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis at 1.4 Å resolution and its complex with an antibacterial drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mironov, A. S.; Betzel, C.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2015-07-01

    Uridine phosphorylases play an essential role in the cellular metabolism of some antibacterial agents. Acute infectious diseases (bubonic plague, yersiniosis, pseudotuberculosis, etc., caused by bacteria of the genus Yersinia) are treated using both sulfanilamide medicines and antibiotics, including trimethoprim. The action of an antibiotic on a bacterial cell is determined primarily by the character of its interactions with cellular components, including those which are not targets (for example, with pyrimidine phosphorylases). This type of interaction should be taken into account in designing drugs. The three-dimensional structure of uridine phosphorylase from the bacterium Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ( YptUPh) with the free active site was determined for the first time by X-ray crystallography and refined at 1.40 Å resolution (DPI = 0.062 Å; ID PDB: 4OF4). The structure of the complex of YptUPh with the bacteriostatic drug trimethoprim was studied by molecular docking and molecular dynamics methods. The trimethoprim molecule was shown to be buffered by the enzyme YptUPh, resulting in a decrease in the efficiency of the treatment of infectious diseases caused by bacteria of the genus Yersinia with trimethoprim.

  8. Anti-inflammatory drugs interacting with Zn (II) metal ion based on thiocyanate and azide ligands: Synthesis, spectroscopic studies, DFT calculations and antibacterial assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiniforoshan, Hossein; Tabrizi, Leila; Hadizade, Morteza; Sabzalian, Mohammad R.; Chermahini, Alireza Najafi; Rezapour, Mehdi

    2014-07-01

    Zinc (II) complexes with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) naproxen (nap) and ibuprofen (ibu) were synthesized in the presence of nitrogen donor ligands (thiocyanate or azide). The complexes were characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, 1H NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopes. The binding modes of the ligands in complexes were established by means of molecular modeling of the complexes, and calculation of their IR, NMR and absorption spectra at DFT (TDDFT)/B3LYP level were studied. The experimental and calculated data verified monodentate binding through the carboxylic oxygen atoms of anti-inflammatory drugs in the zinc complexes. The calculated 1H, FT-IR and UV-Vis data are in better agreement with the experimental results, and confirm the predicted tetrahedral structures for the Zn (II) complexes. In addition to DFT calculations of complexes, natural bond orbital (NBO) was performed at B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of theory. Biological studies showed the antibacterial activity of zinc complexes against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains.

  9. Transport of gemifloxacin, a 4th generation quinolone antibiotic, in the Caco-2 and engineered MDCKII cells, and potential involvement of efflux transporters in the intestinal absorption of the drug.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hyo-Eon; Song, Boran; Kim, Sang-Bum; Shim, Won-Sik; Kim, Dae-Duk; Chong, Saeho; Chung, Suk-Jae; Shim, Chang-Koo

    2013-04-01

    The oral (po) bioavailability of gemifloxacin mesylate in rats and its possible association with efflux transporters was investigated. The apparent permeabilities (Papp) of gemifloxacin across the Caco-2 cell monolayer were 1.20 ± 0.09 × 10(-5) cm/s for apical to basal (absorptive) transport, and 2.13 ± 0.6 × 10(-5) cm/s for basal to apical (secretory) transport for a 5-500 μM concentration range, suggesting the involvement of a carrier-mediated efflux in the secretory transport. The secretory transport in Caco-2 cells was significantly decreased by MRP2 (MK571) and BCRP (Ko143) inhibitors. The secretory transport was distinct in MDCKII/P-gp, MDCKII/MRP2 and MDCKII/BCRP cells, and the affinity was highest for MRP2, followed by BCRP and P-gp. The efflux was significantly decreased by verapamil and Ko143, but not significantly by MK571. The comparative po bioavailability in rats was increased by the preadministration of Ko143 (four-fold), MK571 (two-fold) and verapamil (two-fold). Efflux transporters appeared to significantly limit the bioavailability of gemifloxacin in rats, suggesting their possible contribution to the low bioavailability of the drug in the human (70%).

  10. Antibacterials from the sea.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Chambers C; Fenical, William

    2010-11-01

    The ocean contains a host of macroscopic life in a great microbial soup. Unlike the terrestrial environment, an aqueous environment provides perpetual propinquity and blurs spatial distinctions. Marine organisms are under a persistent threat of infection by resident pathogenic microbes including bacteria, and in response they have engineered complex organic compounds with antibacterial activity from a diverse set of biological precursors. The diluting effect of the ocean drives the construction of potent molecules that are stable to harsh salty conditions. Members of each class of metabolite-ribosomal and non-ribosomal peptides, alkaloids, polyketides, and terpenes-have been shown to exhibit antibacterial activity. The sophistication and diversity of these metabolites points to the ingenuity and flexibility of biosynthetic processes in Nature. Compared with their terrestrial counterparts, antibacterial marine natural products have received much less attention. Thus, a concerted effort to discover new antibacterials from marine sources has the potential to contribute significantly to the treatment of the ever increasing drug-resistant infectious diseases.

  11. Synthesis of macrolones with central piperazine ring in the linker and its influence on antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Kapić, Samra; Cipčić Paljetak, Hana; Palej Jakopović, Ivana; Fajdetić, Andrea; Ilijaš, Marina; Stimac, Vlado; Brajša, Karmen; Holmes, David J; Berge, John; Alihodžić, Sulejman

    2011-12-01

    Three macrolides, clarithromycin, azithromycin and 11-O-Me-azithromycin have been selected for the construction of a series of new macrolone derivatives. Quinolone-linker intermediates are prepared by Sonogashira-type C(6)-alkynylation of 6-iodoquinolone precursors. The final macrolones, differing by macrolide moiety and substituents at the position N-1 of the quinolone or by the presence of an ethyl ester or free acid on the quinolone unit attached via a linker. The linker comprises of a central piperazine ring bonded to the 4″-O position of cladinose by 3-carbon ester or ether functionality. Modifications of the linker did not improve antibacterial properties compared to the previously reported macrolone compounds. Linker flexibility seems to play an important role for potency against macrolide resistant respiratory pathogens.

  12. [Development status of new antibacterials].

    PubMed

    Yamano, Yoshinori

    2012-02-01

    The increase of the infections caused by multi-drug-resistant bacteria is a serious problem worldwide. As for Gram-positive bacteria, the community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin- or linezolid-resistant strains have been increasing. As for Gram-negative bacteria, multi-drug-resistant strains of Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii have been increasing due to the carbapenemase production recently. During these 10 years, various types of novel antibacterials targeted for Gram-positive bacteria have been approved in US and EU, but not in Japan. On the other hand, the discovery of new antibacterials targeted for Gram-negative bacteria is still immature. In this review, the status of the discovery of new antibacterials targeted for these multi-drug-resistant bacteria will be reviewed.

  13. Challenges of Antibacterial Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Lynn L.

    2011-01-01

    Summary: The discovery of novel small-molecule antibacterial drugs has been stalled for many years. The purpose of this review is to underscore and illustrate those scientific problems unique to the discovery and optimization of novel antibacterial agents that have adversely affected the output of the effort. The major challenges fall into two areas: (i) proper target selection, particularly the necessity of pursuing molecular targets that are not prone to rapid resistance development, and (ii) improvement of chemical libraries to overcome limitations of diversity, especially that which is necessary to overcome barriers to bacterial entry and proclivity to be effluxed, especially in Gram-negative organisms. Failure to address these problems has led to a great deal of misdirected effort. PMID:21233508

  14. Antibacterial Applications of Nanodiamonds

    PubMed Central

    Szunerits, Sabine; Barras, Alexandre; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial infectious diseases, sharing clinical characteristics such as chronic inflammation and tissue damage, pose a major threat to human health. The steady increase of multidrug-resistant bacteria infections adds up to the current problems modern healthcare is facing. The treatment of bacterial infections with multi-resistant germs is very difficult, as the development of new antimicrobial drugs is hardly catching up with the development of antibiotic resistant pathogens. These and other considerations have generated an increased interest in the development of viable alternatives to antibiotics. A promising strategy is the use of nanomaterials with antibacterial character and of nanostructures displaying anti-adhesive activity against biofilms. Glycan-modified nanodiamonds (NDs) revealed themselves to be of great promise as useful nanostructures for combating microbial infections. This review summarizes the current efforts in the synthesis of glycan-modified ND particles and evaluation of their antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities. PMID:27077871

  15. Antibacterial Applications of Nanodiamonds.

    PubMed

    Szunerits, Sabine; Barras, Alexandre; Boukherroub, Rabah

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial infectious diseases, sharing clinical characteristics such as chronic inflammation and tissue damage, pose a major threat to human health. The steady increase of multidrug-resistant bacteria infections adds up to the current problems modern healthcare is facing. The treatment of bacterial infections with multi-resistant germs is very difficult, as the development of new antimicrobial drugs is hardly catching up with the development of antibiotic resistant pathogens. These and other considerations have generated an increased interest in the development of viable alternatives to antibiotics. A promising strategy is the use of nanomaterials with antibacterial character and of nanostructures displaying anti-adhesive activity against biofilms. Glycan-modified nanodiamonds (NDs) revealed themselves to be of great promise as useful nanostructures for combating microbial infections. This review summarizes the current efforts in the synthesis of glycan-modified ND particles and evaluation of their antibacterial and anti-biofilm activities. PMID:27077871

  16. Importance of Confirming Data on the In Vivo Efficacy of Novel Antibacterial Drug Regimens against Various Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    De Groote, Mary A.; Gruppo, Veronica; Woolhiser, Lisa K.; Orme, Ian M.; Gilliland, Janet C.

    2012-01-01

    In preclinical testing of antituberculosis drugs, laboratory-adapted strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis are usually used both for in vitro and in vivo studies. However, it is unknown whether the heterogeneity of M. tuberculosis stocks used by various laboratories can result in different outcomes in tests of antituberculosis drug regimens in animal infection models. In head-to-head studies, we investigated whether bactericidal efficacy results in BALB/c mice infected by inhalation with the laboratory-adapted strains H37Rv and Erdman differ from each other and from those obtained with clinical tuberculosis strains. Treatment of mice consisted of dual and triple drug combinations of isoniazid (H), rifampin (R), and pyrazinamide (Z). The results showed that not all strains gave the same in vivo efficacy results for the drug combinations tested. Moreover, the ranking of HRZ and RZ efficacy results was not the same for the two H37Rv strains evaluated. The magnitude of this strain difference also varied between experiments, emphasizing the risk of drawing firm conclusions for human trials based on single animal studies. The results also confirmed that the antagonism seen within the standard HRZ regimen by some investigators appears to be an M. tuberculosis strain-specific phenomenon. In conclusion, the specific identity of M. tuberculosis strain used was found to be an important variable that can change the apparent outcome of in vivo efficacy studies in mice. We highly recommend confirmation of efficacy results in late preclinical testing against a different M. tuberculosis strain than the one used in the initial mouse efficacy study, thereby increasing confidence to advance potent drug regimens to clinical trials. PMID:22143517

  17. Antibacterial Activity of Novel Cationic Peptides against Clinical Isolates of Multi-Drug Resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius from Infected Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Mohamed F.; Hammac, G. Kenitra; Guptill, Lynn; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus pseudintermedius is a major cause of skin and soft tissue infections in companion animals and has zoonotic potential. Additionally, methicillin-resistant S. pseudintermedius (MRSP) has emerged with resistance to virtually all classes of antimicrobials. Thus, novel treatment options with new modes of action are required. Here, we investigated the antimicrobial activity of six synthetic short peptides against clinical isolates of methicillin-susceptible and MRSP isolated from infected dogs. All six peptides demonstrated potent anti-staphylococcal activity regardless of existing resistance phenotype. The most effective peptides were RRIKA (with modified C terminus to increase amphipathicity and hydrophobicity) and WR-12 (α-helical peptide consisting exclusively of arginine and tryptophan) with minimum inhibitory concentration50 (MIC50) of 1 µM and MIC90 of 2 µM. RR (short anti-inflammatory peptide) and IK8 “D isoform” demonstrated good antimicrobial activity with MIC50 of 4 µM and MIC90 of 8 µM. Penetratin and (KFF)3K (two cell penetrating peptides) were the least effective with MIC50 of 8 µM and MIC90 of 16 µM. Killing kinetics revealed a major advantage of peptides over conventional antibiotics, demonstrating potent bactericidal activity within minutes. Studies with propidium iodide and transmission electron microscopy revealed that peptides damaged the bacterial membrane leading to leakage of cytoplasmic contents and consequently, cell death. A potent synergistic increase in the antibacterial effect of the cell penetrating peptide (KFF)3K was noticed when combined with other peptides and with antibiotics. In addition, all peptides displayed synergistic interactions when combined together. Furthermore, peptides demonstrated good therapeutic indices with minimal toxicity toward mammalian cells. Resistance to peptides did not evolve after 10 passages of S. pseudintermedius at sub-inhibitory concentration. However, the MICs of amikacin and

  18. Electrochemical evaluation of antibacterial drugs as environment-friendly inhibitors for corrosion of carbon steel in HCl solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golestani, Gh.; Shahidi, M.; Ghazanfari, D.

    2014-07-01

    The effect of penicillin G, ampicillin and amoxicillin drugs on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel (ASTM 1015) in 1.0 mol L-1 hydrochloric acid solution was investigated using potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and electrochemical noise (EN) techniques. The inhibition efficiency was found to increase with increasing inhibitor concentration. The effect of temperature on the rate of corrosion in the absence and presence of these drugs was also studied. Some thermodynamic parameters were computed from the effect of temperature on corrosion and inhibition processes. Adsorption of these inhibitors was found to obey Langmuir adsorption isotherm. There was a case of mixed mode of adsorption here but while penicillin was adsorbed mainly through chemisorption, two other drugs were adsorbed mainly through physisorption. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements indicated that the inhibitors were of mixed type. In addition, this paper suggests that the electrochemical noise (EN) technique under open circuit conditions as the truly noninvasive electrochemical method can be employed for the quantitative evaluation of corrosion inhibition. This was done by using the standard deviation of partial signal (SDPS) for calculation of the amount of noise charges at the particular interval of frequency, thereby obtaining the inhibition efficiency (IE) of an inhibitor. These IE values showed a reasonable agreement with those obtained from potentiodynamic polarization and EIS measurements.

  19. The immune response and antibacterial therapy.

    PubMed

    Anuforom, Olachi; Wallace, Graham R; Piddock, Laura V

    2015-04-01

    The host's immune defence mechanisms are indispensable factors in surviving bacterial infections. However, in many circumstances, the immune system alone is inadequate. Since the 1940s, the use of antibacterial therapy has saved millions of lives, improving the span and quality of life of individuals. Unfortunately, we are now facing an era where antibacterial agents are threatened by resistance. In addition to targeting bacteria, some antibacterial agents affect various aspects of the immune response to infection. Since many antibacterial drugs are failing in efficacy due to resistance, it has been strongly suggested that any synergy between these drugs and the immune response be exploited in the treatment of bacterial infections. This review explores the influence of antibacterial therapy on the immune response and new approaches that could exploit this interaction for the treatment of bacterial infections.

  20. Antibacterial products of marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Bekhit, Adnan A; Bekhit, Alaa El-Din

    2015-05-01

    Marine organisms comprising microbes, plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates elaborate an impressive array of structurally diverse antimicrobial products ranging from small cyclic compounds to macromolecules such as proteins. Some of these biomolecules originate directly from marine animals while others arise from microbes associated with the animals. It is noteworthy that some of the biomolecules referred to above are structurally unique while others belong to known classes of compounds, peptides, and proteins. Some of the antibacterial agents are more active against Gram-positive bacteria while others have higher effectiveness on Gram-negative bacteria. Some are efficacious against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and against drug-resistant strains as well. The mechanism of antibacterial action of a large number of the chemically identified antibacterial agents, possible synergism with currently used antibiotics, and the issue of possible toxicity on mammalian cells and tissues await elucidation. The structural characteristics pivotal to antibacterial activity have been ascertained in only a few studies. Demonstration of efficacy of the antibacterial agents in animal models of bacterial infection is highly desirable. Structural characterization of the active principles present in aqueous and organic extracts of marine organisms with reportedly antibacterial activity would be desirable.

  1. Antibacterial Effects of Liposomes Containing Phospholipid Cardiolipin and Fluoroquinolone Levofloxacin on Mycobacterium tuberculosis with Extensive Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Gaidukevich, S K; Mikulovich, Yu L; Smirnova, T G; Andreevskaya, S N; Sorokoumova, G M; Chernousova, L N; Selishcheva, A A; Shvets, V I

    2016-03-01

    The effects of liposomes containing phospholipid cardiolipin without antibiotic and loaded with levofloxacin on the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with extensive drug resistance were studied in vitro. Liposomes consisting of cardiolipin alone in a concentration of 335 μM completely suppressed the growth of M. tuberculosis. In order to reduce the minimum inhibitory concentration of cardiolipin, complex liposome preparation consisting of phosphatidylcholin/cholesterol/cardiolipin and loaded with levofloxacin was prepared. Due to this, the cardiolipin concentration was reduced to 33.5 μM (50 μg/ml) and concentration of levofloxacin - to 2 μg/ml. PMID:27021087

  2. Antibacterials in Household Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... products such as soaps, detergents, health and skincare products and household cleaners. How do antibacterials work? ♦ Antibacterials may be ... contain triclosan or other biocide agents? Antibacterials in household products Are there any risks associated with triclosan-containing ...

  3. New poly(ester urea) derived from L-leucine: electrospun scaffolds loaded with antibacterial drugs and enzymes.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Angélica; del Valle, Luis J; Tugushi, David; Katsarava, Ramaz; Puiggalí, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun scaffolds from an amino acid containing poly(ester urea) (PEU) were developed as promising materials in the biomedical field and specifically in tissue engineering applications. The selected poly(ester urea) was obtained with a high yield and molecular weight by reaction of phosgene with a bis(α-aminoacyl)-α,ω-diol-diester monomer. The polymer having L-leucine, 1,6-hexanediol and carbonic acid units had a semicrystalline character and relatively high glass transition and melting temperatures. Furthermore it was highly soluble in most organic solvents, an interesting feature that facilitated the electrospinning process and the effective incorporation of drugs with bactericidal activity (e.g. biguanide derivatives such as clorhexidine and polyhexamethylenebiguanide) and enzymes (e.g. α-chymotrypsin) that accelerated the degradation process. Continuous micro/nanofibers were obtained under a wide range of processing conditions, being diameters of electrospun fibers dependent on the drug and solvent used. Poly(ester urea) samples were degradable in media containing lipases and proteinases but the degradation rate was highly dependent on the surface area, being specifically greater for scaffolds with respect to films. The high hydrophobicity of new scaffolds had repercussions on enzymatic degradability since different weight loss rates were found depending on how samples were exposed to the medium (e.g. forced or non-forced immersion). New scaffolds were biocompatible, as demonstrated by adhesion and proliferation assays performed with fibroblast and epithelial cells.

  4. Synthesis, activity and pharmacokinetics of novel antibacterial 15-membered ring macrolones.

    PubMed

    Fajdetić, Andrea; Vinter, Adrijana; Paljetak, Hana Čipčić; Padovan, Jasna; Jakopović, Ivana Palej; Kapić, Samra; Alihodžić, Sulejman; Filić, Darko; Modrić, Marina; Košutić-Hulita, Nada; Antolović, Roberto; Schoenfeld, Zrinka Ivezić; Mutak, Stjepan; Eraković Haber, Vesna; Spaventi, Radan

    2011-08-01

    Synthesis, antibacterial activity and pharmacokinetic properties of a novel class of macrolide antibiotics-macrolones-derived from azithromycin, comprising oxygen atom(s) in the linker and either free or esterified quinolone 3-carboxylic group, are reported. Selected compounds showed excellent antibacterial potency towards key erythromycin resistant respiratory pathogens. However, the majority of compounds lacked good bioavailability. The isopropyl ester, compound 35, and a macrolone derivative with an elongated linker 29 showed the best oral bioavailability in rats, both accompanied with an excellent overall microbiology profile addressing inducible and constitutive MLSb as well as efflux mediated macrolide resistance in streptococci, while compound 29 is more potent against staphylococci.

  5. Study of in vitro antibacterial activity of 19 antimicrobial agents against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wang, R; Sun, X D; Cai, Q M

    1989-04-01

    The in vitro antibacterial activity of 19 antimicrobial agents against 40 strains of P aeruginosa was studied. The 19 antimicrobial agents included 7 semisynthetic penicillins, 6 third generation cephalosporins, 5 aminoglycosides and 1 quinolone agent. The minimal inhibition concentrations (MIGs) were measured by the serial dilution on solid agar. Ceftazidime was the most active in 19 antimicrobial agents again P aeruginosa (MIC50: 1 microgram/ml, MIC90: 2 micrograms/ml) Amikacin and ofloxaxin followed it in activity. Acylureido-penicillins, such as azlocillin, furbenicillin and piperacillin were highly active against P aeruginosa, which could inhibit, 92.5%, 90% and 85% of these strains at a concentration of 8 micrograms/ml. Cefsulodine and cefoperazone were also active against the same strains, inhibiting 92.5% and 99% of the strains at a concentration of 8 micrograms/ml. The potency of the agents mentioned above against P. aeruginosa was similar to that of aminoglycosides. The drug susceptibility of 10 strains isolated in our hospital was compared with that of 29 strains of other hospitals in Beijing. The MICS of 5 penicillins and 3 cephalosporins against the isolates of our hospital was higher than that of other hospitals, suggesting that the susceptibility of beta-lactam antibiotics against isolates of our hospital was lower. The effects of combined use of azlocillin with oxacillin and piperacillin with ofloxacin against 4 strains of carbenicillin-resistant P aeruginosa was studied using check-board testing. The synergy and partial synergy were observed in both combinations.

  6. Sequence-motif Detection of NAD(P)-binding Proteins: Discovery of a Unique Antibacterial Drug Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Yun Hao; Wu, Chih Yuan; Sargsyan, Karen; Lim, Carmay

    2014-09-01

    Many enzymes use nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide or nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAD(P)) as essential coenzymes. These enzymes often do not share significant sequence identity and cannot be easily detected by sequence homology. Previously, we determined all distinct locally conserved pyrophosphate-binding structures (3d motifs) from NAD(P)-bound protein structures, from which 1d sequence motifs were derived. Here, we aim to establish the precision of these 3d and 1d motifs to annotate NAD(P)-binding proteins. We show that the pyrophosphate-binding 3d motifs are characteristic of NAD(P)-binding proteins, as they are rarely found in nonNAD(P)-binding proteins. Furthermore, several 1d motifs could distinguish between proteins that bind only NAD and those that bind only NADP. They could also distinguish between NAD(P)-binding proteins from nonNAD(P)-binding ones. Interestingly, one of the pyrophosphate-binding 3d and corresponding 1d motifs was found only in enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductases, which are enzymes essential for bacterial fatty acid biosynthesis. This unique 3d motif serves as an attractive novel drug target, as it is conserved across many bacterial species and is not found in human proteins.

  7. Electrochemistry of the antibacterial and antifungal drug nitroxoline and its determination in bulk form, pharmaceutical formulation and human blood.

    PubMed

    Ghoneim, Mohamed M; El-Desoky, Hanaa S; Abdel-Galeil, Mohamed M

    2011-02-01

    Nitroxoline has been reduced at the mercury electrode in buffered solutions (pH 2-11) in two irreversible cathodic steps. The first step was attributed to reduction of -NO(2) group to the hydroxylamine stage and the second one to reduction-saturation of the C=N double bond. DC-polarographic and various adsorptive stripping voltammetric methods were developed for determination of nitroxoline in bulk form. Limits of quantitation of 1.02×10(-6), 3.05×10(-8), 9.01×10(-9), and 9.12×10(-10)M nitroxoline were achieved by means of the developed DC-polarography, differential-pulse-, linear-sweep-, and square-wave-adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetric methods, respectively. All these electroanalytical methods were successfully applied for determination of nitroxoline in its Nibiol(®) tablets. While only the developed adsorptive stripping voltammetry methods were successfully applied for determination of the drug in spiked human serum and for pharmacokinetic studies in real human plasma. The analysis was carried out without interference from common excipients and without the necessity for prior extraction or interaction with any reagent during the analysis.

  8. In vitro antibacterial activity of some antihistaminics belonging to different groups against multi-drug resistant clinical isolates.

    PubMed

    El-Nakeeb, Moustafa A; Abou-Shleib, Hamida M; Khalil, Amal M; Omar, Hoda G; El-Halfawy, Omar M

    2011-07-01

    Antihistaminics are widely used for various indications during microbial infection. Hence, this paper investigates the antimicrobial activities of 10 antihistaminics belonging to both old and new generations using multiresistant Gram-positive and Gram-negative clinical isolates. The bacteriostatic activity of antihistaminics was investigated by determining their MIC both by broth and agar dilution techniques against 29 bacterial strains. Azelastine, cyproheptadine, mequitazine and promethazine were the most active among the tested drugs. Diphenhydramine and cetirizine possessed weaker activity whereas doxylamine, fexofenadine and loratadine were inactive even at the highest tested concentration (1 mg/ml). The MIC of meclozine could not be determined as it precipitated with the used culture media. The MBC values of antihistaminics were almost identical to the corresponding MIC values. The bactericidal activity of antihistaminics was also studied by the viable count technique in sterile saline solution. Evident killing effects were exerted by mequitazine, meclozine, azelastine and cyproheptadine. Moreover, the dynamics of bactericidal activity of azelastine were studied by the viable count technique in nutrient broth. This activity was found to be concentration-dependant. This effect was reduced on increasing the inoculum size while it was increased on raising the pH. The post-antimicrobial effect of 100 μg/ml azelastine was also determined and reached up to 3.36 h. PMID:24031715

  9. Novel cajaninstilbene acid derivatives as antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Geng, Zhi-Zhong; Zhang, Jian-Jun; Lin, Jing; Huang, Mei-Yan; An, Lin-Kun; Zhang, Hong-Bin; Sun, Ping-Hua; Ye, Wen-Cai; Chen, Wei-Min

    2015-07-15

    Discovery of novel antibacterial agents with new structural scaffolds that combat drug-resistant pathogens is an urgent task. Cajaninstilbene acid, which is isolated from pigeonpea leaves, has shown antibacterial activity. In this study, a series of cajaninstilbene acid derivatives were designed and synthesized. The antibacterial activities of these compounds against gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, as well as nine strains of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria are evaluated,and the related structure-activity relationships are discussed. Assays suggest that some of the synthetic cajaninstilbene acid derivatives exhibit potent antibacterial activity against gram-positive bacterial strains and MRSA. Among these compounds, 5b, 5c, 5j and 5k show better antibacterial activity than the positive control compounds. The results of MTT assays illustrate the low cytotoxicity of the active compounds.

  10. Quinolone and Cephalosporin Resistance in Enteric Fever

    PubMed Central

    Capoor, Malini Rajinder; Nair, Deepthi

    2010-01-01

    Enteric fever is a major public health problem in developing countries. Ciprofloxacin resistance has now become a norm in the Indian subcontinent. Novel molecular substitutions may become frequent in future owing to selective pressures exerted by the irrational use of ciprofloxacin in human and veterinary therapeutics, in a population endemic with nalidixic acid-resistant strains. The therapeutics of ciprofloxacin-resistant enteric fever narrows down to third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins, azithromycin, tigecycline and penems. The first-line antimicrobials ampicillin, chloramphenicol and co-trimoxazole need to be rolled back. Antimicrobial surveillance coupled with molecular analysis of fluoroquinolone resistance is warranted for reconfirming novel and established molecular patterns for therapeutic reappraisal and for novel-drug targets. This review explores the antimicrobial resistance and its molecular mechanisms, as well as novel drugs in the therapy of enteric fever. PMID:20927288

  11. Targeting Integrin-Dependent Adhesion and Signaling with 3-Arylquinoline and 3-Aryl-2-Quinolone Derivatives: A new Class of Integrin Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Fiorucci, Sandrine; Lin, Xiaochen; Sadoul, Karin; Fournet, Guy; Bouvard, Daniel; Vinogradova, Olga; Joseph, Benoît; Block, Marc R.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported the anti-migratory function of 3-aryl-2-quinolone derivatives, chemically close to flavonoids (Joseph et al., 2002). Herein we show that 3-arylquinoline or 3-aryl-2-quinolone derivatives disrupt cell adhesion in a dose dependent and reversible manner yet antagonized by artificial integrin activation such as manganese. Relying on this anti-adhesive activity, a Structure-Activity Relationship (SAR) study was established on 20 different compounds to throw the bases of future optimization strategies. Active drugs efficiently inhibit platelet spreading, aggregation, and clot retraction, processes that rely on αllbβ3 integrin activation and clustering. In vitro these derivatives interfere with β3 cytoplasmic tail interaction with kindlin-2 in pulldown assays albeit little effect was observed with pure proteins suggesting that the drugs may block an alternative integrin activation process that may not be directly related to kindlin recruitment. Ex vivo, these drugs blunt integrin signaling assayed using focal adhesion kinase auto-phosphorylation as a read-out. Hence, 3-arylquinoline and 3-aryl-2-quinolone series are a novel class of integrin activation and signaling antagonists. PMID:26509443

  12. Differential distribution of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in clinical enterobacteria with unusual phenotypes of quinolone susceptibility from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Andres, Patricia; Lucero, Celeste; Soler-Bistué, Alfonso; Guerriero, Leonor; Albornoz, Ezequiel; Tran, Tung; Zorreguieta, Angeles; Galas, Marcelo; Corso, Alejandra; Tolmasky, Marcelo E; Petroni, Alejandro

    2013-06-01

    We studied a collection of 105 clinical enterobacteria with unusual phenotypes of quinolone susceptibility to analyze the occurrence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) and oqx genes and their implications for quinolone susceptibility. The oqxA and oqxB genes were found in 31/34 (91%) Klebsiella pneumoniae and 1/3 Klebsiella oxytoca isolates. However, the oqxA- and oqxB-harboring isolates lacking other known quinolone resistance determinants showed wide ranges of susceptibility to nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin. Sixty of the 105 isolates (57%) harbored at least one PMQR gene [qnrB19, qnrB10, qnrB2, qnrB1, qnrS1, or aac(6')-Ib-cr)], belong to 8 enterobacterial species, and were disseminated throughout the country, and most of them were categorized as susceptible by the current clinical quinolone susceptibility breakpoints. We developed a disk diffusion-based method to improve the phenotypic detection of aac(6')-Ib-cr. The most common PMQR genes in our collection [qnrB19, qnrB10, and aac(6')-Ib-cr] were differentially distributed among enterobacterial species, and two different epidemiological settings were evident. First, the species associated with community-acquired infections (Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli) mainly harbored qnrB19 (a unique PMQR gene) located in small ColE1-type plasmids that might constitute its natural reservoirs. qnrB19 was not associated with an extended-spectrum β-lactamase phenotype. Second, the species associated with hospital-acquired infections (Enterobacter spp., Klebsiella spp., and Serratia marcescens) mainly harbored qnrB10 in ISCR1-containing class 1 integrons that may also have aac(6')-Ib-cr as a cassette within the variable region. These two PMQR genes were strongly associated with an extended-spectrum β-lactamase phenotype. Therefore, this differential distribution of PMQR genes is strongly influenced by their linkage or lack of linkage to integrons.

  13. Structure activity relationship of C-2 ether substituted 1,5-naphthyridine analogs of oxabicyclooctane-linked novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors as broad-spectrum antibacterial agents (Part-5).

    PubMed

    Singh, Sheo B; Kaelin, David E; Meinke, Peter T; Wu, Jin; Miesel, Lynn; Tan, Christopher M; Olsen, David B; Lagrutta, Armando; Fukuda, Hideyuki; Kishii, Ryuta; Takei, Masaya; Takeuchi, Tomoko; Takano, Hisashi; Ohata, Kohei; Kurasaki, Haruaki; Nishimura, Akinori; Shibata, Takeshi; Fukuda, Yasumichi

    2015-09-01

    Oxabicyclooctane linked novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors (NBTIs) are new class of recently reported broad-spectrum antibacterial agents. They target bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV and bind to a site different than quinolones. They show no cross-resistance to known antibiotics and provide opportunity to combat drug-resistant bacteria. A structure activity relationship of the C-2 substituted ether analogs of 1,5-naphthyridine oxabicyclooctane-linked NBTIs are described. Synthesis and antibacterial activities of a total of 63 analogs have been summarized representing alkyl, cyclo alkyl, fluoro alkyl, hydroxy alkyl, amino alkyl, and carboxyl alkyl ethers. All compounds were tested against three key strains each of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as for hERG binding activities. Many key compounds were also tested for the functional hERG activity. Six compounds were evaluated for efficacy in a murine bacteremia model of Staphylococcus aureus infection. Significant tolerance for the ether substitution (including polar groups such as amino and carboxyl) at C-2 was observed for S. aureus activity however the same was not true for Enterococcus faecium and Gram-negative strains. Reduced clogD generally showed reduced hERG activity and improved in vivo efficacy but was generally associated with decreased overall potency. One of the best compounds was hydroxy propyl ether (16), which mainly retained the potency, spectrum and in vivo efficacy of AM8085 associated with the decreased hERG activity and improved physical property.

  14. A New-Class Antibacterial-Almost. Lessons in Drug Discovery and Development: A Critical Analysis of More than 50 Years of Effort toward ATPase Inhibitors of DNA Gyrase and Topoisomerase IV.

    PubMed

    Bisacchi, Gregory S; Manchester, John I

    2015-01-01

    The introduction into clinical practice of an ATPase inhibitor of bacterial DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV (topo IV) would represent a new-class agent for the treatment of resistant bacterial infections. Novobiocin, the only historical member of this class, established the clinical proof of concept for this novel mechanism during the late 1950s, but its use declined rapidly and it was eventually withdrawn from the market. Despite significant and prolonged effort across the biopharmaceutical industry to develop other agents of this class, novobiocin remains the only ATPase inhibitor of gyrase and topo IV ever to progress beyond Phase I. In this review, we analyze the historical attempts to discover and develop agents within this class and highlight factors that might have hindered those efforts. Within the last 15 years, however, our technical understanding of the molecular details of the inhibition of the gyrase and topo IV ATPases, the factors governing resistance development to such inhibitors, and our knowledge of the physical properties required for robust clinical drug candidates have all matured to the point wherein the industry may now address this mechanism of action with greater confidence. The antibacterial spectrum within this class has recently been extended to begin to include serious Gram negative pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. In spite of this recent technical progress, adverse economics associated with antibacterial R&D over the last 20 years has diminished industry's ability to commit the resources and perseverance needed to bring new-class agents to launch. Consequently, a number of recent efforts in the ATPase class have been derailed by organizational rather than scientific factors. Nevertheless, within this context we discuss the unique opportunity for the development of ATPase inhibitors of gyrase and topo IV as new-class antibacterial agents with broad spectrum potential. PMID

  15. Iron(III) complexes: preparation, characterization, antibacterial activity and DNA-binding.

    PubMed

    Pansuriya, Pramod B; Patel, M N

    2008-04-01

    Iron(III) have been combined to well known quinolones (ciprofloxacin) and some Schiff bases with the help of coordination approach. Characterization of these compounds have been done using elemental analysis, magnetic measurements, thermogravimetric analysis, IR, UV-VIS, (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR spectral investigation. Analytical studies suggest that the iron(III)-quinolone complexes assume a six-coordinated dimeric distorted octahedral geometry. All the compounds show a good antibacterial activity against broad range of bacteria like Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, Salmonella typhi and Serratia marcescens, whereas no significant inhibition towards growth of fungal strains like Aspergillus Niger, Aspergillus flavus and Lasiodiplodia theobromae. Analyses of all these compounds show effective sperm herring DNA inhibition. PMID:18343909

  16. Identification, Design and Biological Evaluation of Bisaryl Quinolones Targeting Plasmodium falciparum Type II NADH:Quinone Oxidoreductase (PfNDH2)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A program was undertaken to identify hit compounds against NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (PfNDH2), a dehydrogenase of the mitochondrial electron transport chain of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. PfNDH2 has only one known inhibitor, hydroxy-2-dodecyl-4-(1H)-quinolone (HDQ), and this was used along with a range of chemoinformatics methods in the rational selection of 17 000 compounds for high-throughput screening. Twelve distinct chemotypes were identified and briefly examined leading to the selection of the quinolone core as the key target for structure–activity relationship (SAR) development. Extensive structural exploration led to the selection of 2-bisaryl 3-methyl quinolones as a series for further biological evaluation. The lead compound within this series 7-chloro-3-methyl-2-(4-(4-(trifluoromethoxy)benzyl)phenyl)quinolin-4(1H)-one (CK-2-68) has antimalarial activity against the 3D7 strain of P. falciparum of 36 nM, is selective for PfNDH2 over other respiratory enzymes (inhibitory IC50 against PfNDH2 of 16 nM), and demonstrates low cytotoxicity and high metabolic stability in the presence of human liver microsomes. This lead compound and its phosphate pro-drug have potent in vivo antimalarial activity after oral administration, consistent with the target product profile of a drug for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria. Other quinolones presented (e.g., 6d, 6f, 14e) have the capacity to inhibit both PfNDH2 and P. falciparum cytochrome bc1, and studies to determine the potential advantage of this dual-targeting effect are in progress. PMID:22364416

  17. Targeting virulence not viability in the search for future antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Heras, Begoña; Scanlon, Martin J; Martin, Jennifer L

    2015-01-01

    New antibacterials need new approaches to overcome the problem of rapid antibiotic resistance. Here we review the development of potential new antibacterial drugs that do not kill bacteria or inhibit their growth, but combat disease instead by targeting bacterial virulence. PMID:24552512

  18. Should quinolones come first in Helicobacter pylori therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Berning, Marco; Krasz, Susanne; Miehlke, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    New generations of fluoroquinolones, like levofloxacin and moxifloxacin, exhibit a broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and have been successfully introduced into the treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection. Based on a large body of evidence, current guidelines recommend the use of levofloxacin- or moxifloxacin-containing proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) triple therapies in second-line or rescue treatment of H. pylori infection. The efficacy of standard PPI triple therapies has substantially declined during the last decade, mainly due to increasing resistance against the key antibiotics clarithromycin and metronidazole. Therefore, alternative strategies for first-line therapy of H. pylori infection have been evaluated in a considerable number of clinical trials including sequential regimens, nonbismuth quadruple regimens, and quinolone-containing PPI triple therapy regimens. The aim of this paper is to summarize the current body of evidence of levofloxacin- and moxifloxacin-containing regimens in first-line treatment of H. pylori infection, and to discuss the risks and benefits of these strategies in the light of increasing resistance of H. pylori to quinolones. PMID:21694812

  19. Responses of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and bacterial taxa to (fluoro)quinolones-containing manure in arable soil.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wenguang; Sun, Yongxue; Ding, Xueyao; Zhang, Yiming; Zhong, Xiaoxia; Liang, Wenfei; Zeng, Zhenling

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the fate of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes and the disturbance of soil bacterial communities posed by (fluoro)quinolones (FQNs)-containing manure in arable soil. Representative FQNs (enrofloxacin (ENR), ciprofloxacin (CIP) and norfloxacin (NOR)), PMQR genes (qepA, oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrS) and bacterial communities in untreated soil, +manure and +manure+FQNs groups were analyzed using culture independent methods. The significantly higher abundance of oqxA, oqxB and aac(6')-Ib-cr, and significantly higher abundance of qnrS in +manure group than those in untreated soil disappeared at day 30 and day 60, respectively. All PMQR genes (oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrS) dissipated 1.5-1.7 times faster in +manure group than those in +manure+FQNs group. The disturbance of soil bacterial communities posed by FQNs-containing manure was also found. The results indicated that significant effects of PMQR genes (oqxA, oqxB, aac(6')-Ib and qnrS) on arable soils introduced by manure disappeared 2 month after manure application. FQNs introduced by manure slowed down the dissipation of PMQR genes. The presence of high FQNs provided a selective advantage for species affiliated to the phylum including Acidobacteria, Verrucomicrobia and Planctomycetes while suppressing Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria.

  20. Computational Study of Quinolone Derivatives to Improve their Therapeutic Index as Anti-malaria Agents: QSAR and QSTR

    PubMed Central

    Iman, Maryam; Davood, Asghar; Khamesipour, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a parasitic disease caused by five different species of Plasmodium. More than 40% of the world’s population is at risk and malaria annual incidence is estimated to be more than two hundred million, malaria is one of the most important public health problems especially in children of the poorest parts of the world, annual mortality is about 1 million. The epidemiological status of the disease justifies to search for control measures, new therapeutic options and development of an effective vaccine. Chemotherapy options in malaria are limited, moreover, drug resistant rate is high. In spite of global efforts to develop an effective vaccine yet there is no vaccine available. In the current study, a series of quinolone derivatives were subjected to quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) and quantitative structure toxicity relationship (QSTR) analyses to identify the ideal physicochemical characteristics of potential anti-malaria activity and less cytotoxicity. Quinolone with desirable properties was built using HyperChem program, and conformational studies were performed through the semi-empirical method followed by the PM3 force field. Multi linear regression (MLR) was used as a chemo metric tool for quantitative structure activity relationship modeling and the developed models were shown to be statistically significant according to the validation parameters. The obtained QSAR model reveals that the descriptors PJI2, Mv, PCR, nBM, and VAR mainly affect the anti-malaria activity and descriptors MSD, MAXDP, and X1sol affect the cytotoxicity of the series of ligands. PMID:26330866

  1. Synthesis and antibacterial evaluation of novel 4″-glycyl linked quinolyl-azithromycins with potent activity against macrolide-resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Dražen; Mutak, Stjepan

    2016-03-15

    A new azithromycin-based series of antibacterial macrolones is reported, which features the use of a 4″-ester linked glycin for tethering the quinolone side chain to the macrolide scaffold. Among the analogs prepared, compounds 9e and 22f with a quinolon-6-yl moiety were found to have potent and well-balanced activity against clinically important respiratory tract pathogens, including erythromycin-susceptible and MLSB resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Haemophilus influenzae. In addition, potential lead compounds 9e and 22f demonstrated outstanding levels of activity against Moraxella catarrhalis and inducibly MLSB resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The best member of this series 22f rivals or exceeds, in potency, some of the most active ketolide antibacterial agents known today, such as telithromycin and cethromycin. PMID:26860929

  2. Synthesis and antibacterial evaluation of novel 4″-glycyl linked quinolyl-azithromycins with potent activity against macrolide-resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Pavlović, Dražen; Mutak, Stjepan

    2016-03-15

    A new azithromycin-based series of antibacterial macrolones is reported, which features the use of a 4″-ester linked glycin for tethering the quinolone side chain to the macrolide scaffold. Among the analogs prepared, compounds 9e and 22f with a quinolon-6-yl moiety were found to have potent and well-balanced activity against clinically important respiratory tract pathogens, including erythromycin-susceptible and MLSB resistant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus pyogenes, and Haemophilus influenzae. In addition, potential lead compounds 9e and 22f demonstrated outstanding levels of activity against Moraxella catarrhalis and inducibly MLSB resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The best member of this series 22f rivals or exceeds, in potency, some of the most active ketolide antibacterial agents known today, such as telithromycin and cethromycin.

  3. A Theoretical-Experimental Study on the Structure and Activity of Certain Quinolones and the Interaction of Their Cu(II)-Complexes on a DNA Model

    PubMed Central

    Robles, J.; Martín-Polo, J.; Álvarez-Valtierra, L.; Hinojosa, L.

    2000-01-01

    Theoretical electronic Structure methods have been employed to study the structure and activity of certain (free) quinolones and the interaction of their Cu(II)-complexes on a DNA model (Rhodamine 6G (rhod)). As a manner of assessing the generated geometries, the nalidixic acid geometrical parameters obtained were tested against the crystallographic ones and it was found that the average error in the calculated geometries is small. The present study allows us to (1) Rationalize the observed differences in antibiotic activities through their electronic hardnesses. (2) Suggest a plausible mechanism of action for these drugs through formation of a reactive intermediate (or carrier) which would consist of a quinolone anion coordinated to an adequate metal center (Cu(II) in this study). (3) We find that, through this model of DNA (modeled with rhod) the interaction seems to be mediated by an effective π-π stacking. (4) Finally, an in vitro experiment was designed so that the intercalation process in DNA could be experimentally modeled as well. The quenching of the rhod fluorescence is proportional to the strength of the Cu(II)-complex-rhod interaction and therefore provides a quantitative measurement of the “intercalating” capacity of the quinolones and their copper complexes. These results agree well with the theoretical total adduct formation energies. PMID:18475962

  4. Synthesis, Characterization, and Antibacterial Activities of Novel Sulfonamides Derived through Condensation of Amino Group Containing Drugs, Amino Acids, and Their Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Abdul Qadir, Muhammad; Ahmed, Mahmood; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Novel sulfonamides were developed and structures of the new products were confirmed by elemental and spectral analysis (FT-IR, ESI-MS, 1HNMR, and 13CNMR). In vitro, developed compounds were screened for their antibacterial activities against medically important gram (+) and gram (−) bacterial strains, namely, S. aureus, B. subtilis, E. coli, and K. pneumoniae. The antibacterial activities have been determined by measuring MIC values (μg/mL) and zone of inhibitions (mm). Among the tested compounds, it was found that compounds 5a and 9a have most potent activity against E. coli with zone of inhibition: 31 ± 0.12 mm (MIC: 7.81 μg/mL) and 30 ± 0.12 mm (MIC: 7.81 μg/mL), respectively, nearly as active as ciprofloxacin (zone of inhibition: 32 ± 0.12 mm). In contrast, all the compounds were totally inactive against the gram (+) B. subtilis. PMID:25802872

  5. Efficient drug delivery to alveolar macrophages and lung epithelial lining fluid following pulmonary administration of liposomal ciprofloxacin in rats with pneumonia and estimation of its antibacterial effects.

    PubMed

    Chono, Sumio; Tanino, Tomoharu; Seki, Toshinobu; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2008-10-01

    The efficacy of pulmonary administration of liposomal ciprofloxacin (CPFX) in pneumonia was evaluated. In brief, the pharmacokinetics following pulmonary administration of liposomal CPFX (particle size, 1,000 nm; dose, 200 microg/kg) were examined in rats with lipopolysaccharide-induced pneumonia as an experimental pneumonia model. Furthermore, the antibacterial effects of liposomal CPFX against the pneumonic causative organisms were estimated by pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) analysis. The time-courses of the concentration of CPFX in alveolar macrophages (AMs) and lung epithelial lining fluid (ELF) following pulmonary administration of liposomal CPFX to rats with pneumonia were markedly higher than that following the administration of free CPFX (200 microg/kg). The time course of the concentrations of CPFX in plasma following pulmonary administration of liposomal CPFX was markedly lower than that in AMs and ELF. These results indicate that pulmonary administration of liposomal CPFX was more effective in delivering CPFX to AMs and ELF compared with free CPFX, and it avoids distribution of CPFX to the blood. According to PK/PD analysis, the liposomal CPFX exhibited potent antibacterial effects against the causative organisms of pneumonia. This study indicates that pulmonary administration of CPFX could be an effective technique for the treatment of pneumonia.

  6. Synthesis, characterization, and antibacterial activities of novel sulfonamides derived through condensation of amino group containing drugs, amino acids, and their analogs.

    PubMed

    Abdul Qadir, Muhammad; Ahmed, Mahmood; Iqbal, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Novel sulfonamides were developed and structures of the new products were confirmed by elemental and spectral analysis (FT-IR, ESI-MS, (1)HNMR, and (13)CNMR). In vitro, developed compounds were screened for their antibacterial activities against medically important gram (+) and gram (-) bacterial strains, namely, S. aureus, B. subtilis, E. coli, and K. pneumoniae. The antibacterial activities have been determined by measuring MIC values (μg/mL) and zone of inhibitions (mm). Among the tested compounds, it was found that compounds 5a and 9a have most potent activity against E. coli with zone of inhibition: 31 ± 0.12 mm (MIC: 7.81 μg/mL) and 30 ± 0.12 mm (MIC: 7.81 μg/mL), respectively, nearly as active as ciprofloxacin (zone of inhibition: 32 ± 0.12 mm). In contrast, all the compounds were totally inactive against the gram (+) B. subtilis.

  7. DNA topoisomerases from pathogenic fungi: targets for the discovery of antifungal drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Shen, L L; Baranowski, J; Fostel, J; Montgomery, D A; Lartey, P A

    1992-01-01

    DNA topoisomerases, a class of enzymes that change the topological structure of DNA, have been shown to be the target of many therapeutic agents, including antibacterial agents (quinolones) and anticancer agents. These drugs inhibit the enzyme in a unique way so that the enzyme is converted into a cellular poison. Candida albicans and Aspergillus niger are two major opportunistic fungal pathogens. Our results show that these fungi have high levels of both type I and type II topoisomerases (with a minimum of 5 x 10(5) ATP-independent relaxation units and 2 x 10(5) P-4 unknotting units per liter of wild-type C. albicans). The ATP-dependent type II topoisomerase (termed C. albicans topoisomerase II) was purified by approximately 2,000-fold from C. albicans cells by using a simple isolation scheme that consists of three column procedures: hydroxylapatite, phosphocellulose, and heparin-agarose chromatographies. The responses of the Candida and the calf thymus topoisomerase II to some known topoisomerase II inhibitors were measured. Etoposide and 4'-(9-acridinylamino)methanesulfon-m-anisidide, compounds known to inhibit catalysis and to enhance DNA breakage by mammalian topoisomerase II, and A-80198, an etoposide derivative, enhanced cleavage by both enzymes at similar concentrations of these compounds, with the response of the calf thymus topoisomerase II from slightly to fourfold higher in magnitude than the response of the Candida enzyme in the same concentration range. In contrast, A-75272 (a cytotoxic tricyclic quinolone) shows a slightly stronger DNA cleavage enhancement effect with the Candida enzyme than with the mammalian counterpart. The abundance of the enzyme in cells and the different drug responses of the host enzyme and the fungal enzyme suggest that the fungal topoisomerase may serve as a target for the discovery of effective and safe antifungal agents. Images PMID:1336349

  8. Quinolones for the Treatment of Neisseria Gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia Trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The most commonly sexually transmitted bacteria are Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis. The quinolones ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin have been shown to have activity against both of these bacteria in vitro and in vivo. Ofloxacin is particularly well suited for the treatment of N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis cervical infection, which can be considered the earliest manifestation of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). Not only can ofloxacin be effectively used as a single agent, it is also useful in treating urinary tract infections caused by Enterobacteriaceae. Although it has moderate activity against anaerobes in general, ofloxacin does have activity against the anaerobes commonly isolated from female patients with soft tissue pelvic infections. Thus, ofloxacin has the potential for being utilized to treat early salpingitis. PMID:18475328

  9. Topoisomerase II and IV quinolone resistance-determining regions in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia clinical isolates with different levels of quinolone susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Valdezate, Sylvia; Vindel, Ana; Echeita, Aurora; Baquero, Fernando; Cantó, Rafael

    2002-03-01

    The quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of topoisomerase II and IV genes from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ATCC 13637 were sequenced and compared with the corresponding regions of 32 unrelated S. maltophilia clinical strains for which ciprofloxacin MICs ranged from 0.1 to 64 microg/ml. GyrA (Leu-55 to Gln-155, Escherichia coli numbering), GyrB (Met-391 to Phe-513), ParC (Ile-34 to Arg-124), and ParE (Leu-396 to Leu-567) fragments from strain ATCC 13637 showed high degrees of identity to the corresponding regions from the phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa, with the degrees of identity ranging from 85.0 to 93.5%. Lower degrees of identity to the corresponding regions from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (70.9 to 88.6%) and E. coli (73.0 to 88.6%) were observed. Amino acid changes were present in GyrA fragments from 9 of the 32 strains at positions 70, 85, 90, 103, 112, 113, 119, and 124; but there was no consistent relation to higher ciprofloxacin MICs. The absence of changes at positions 83 and 87, commonly involved in quinolone resistance in gram-negative bacteria, was unexpected. The GyrB sequences were identical in all strains, and only one strain (ciprofloxacin MIC, 16 microg/ml) showed a ParC amino acid change (Ser-80-->Arg). In contrast, a high frequency (16 of 32 strains) of amino acid replacements was present in ParE. The frequencies of alterations at positions 437, 465, 477, and 485 were higher (P < 0.05) in strains from cystic fibrosis patients, but these changes were not linked with high ciprofloxacin MICs. An efflux phenotype, screened by the detection of decreases of at least twofold doubling dilutions of the ciprofloxacin MIC in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (0.5 microg/ml) or reserpine (10 microg/ml), was suspected in seven strains. These results suggest that topoisomerases II and IV may not be the primary targets involved in quinolone resistance in S. maltophilia.

  10. Topoisomerase II and IV Quinolone Resistance-Determining Regions in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Clinical Isolates with Different Levels of Quinolone Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Valdezate, Sylvia; Vindel, Ana; Echeita, Aurora; Baquero, Fernando; Cantó, Rafael

    2002-01-01

    The quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of topoisomerase II and IV genes from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ATCC 13637 were sequenced and compared with the corresponding regions of 32 unrelated S. maltophilia clinical strains for which ciprofloxacin MICs ranged from 0.1 to 64 μg/ml. GyrA (Leu-55 to Gln-155, Escherichia coli numbering), GyrB (Met-391 to Phe-513), ParC (Ile-34 to Arg-124), and ParE (Leu-396 to Leu-567) fragments from strain ATCC 13637 showed high degrees of identity to the corresponding regions from the phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa, with the degrees of identity ranging from 85.0 to 93.5%. Lower degrees of identity to the corresponding regions from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (70.9 to 88.6%) and E. coli (73.0 to 88.6%) were observed. Amino acid changes were present in GyrA fragments from 9 of the 32 strains at positions 70, 85, 90, 103, 112, 113, 119, and 124; but there was no consistent relation to higher ciprofloxacin MICs. The absence of changes at positions 83 and 87, commonly involved in quinolone resistance in gram-negative bacteria, was unexpected. The GyrB sequences were identical in all strains, and only one strain (ciprofloxacin MIC, 16 μg/ml) showed a ParC amino acid change (Ser-80→Arg). In contrast, a high frequency (16 of 32 strains) of amino acid replacements was present in ParE. The frequencies of alterations at positions 437, 465, 477, and 485 were higher (P < 0.05) in strains from cystic fibrosis patients, but these changes were not linked with high ciprofloxacin MICs. An efflux phenotype, screened by the detection of decreases of at least twofold doubling dilutions of the ciprofloxacin MIC in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (0.5 μg/ml) or reserpine (10 μg/ml), was suspected in seven strains. These results suggest that topoisomerases II and IV may not be the primary targets involved in quinolone resistance in S. maltophilia. PMID:11850246

  11. In vitro evaluation of antibacterial and immunomodulatory activities of Pelargonium reniforme, Pelargonium sidoides and the related herbal drug preparation EPs 7630.

    PubMed

    Kolodziej, Herbert; Kiderlen, Albrecht F

    2007-01-01

    The importance of Pelargonium species, most notably Pelargonium reniforme and Pelargonium sidoides, in traditional medicine in the Southern African region is well documented. Nowadays, a modern aqueous-ethanolic formulation of the roots of P. sidoides (EPs) 7630) is successfully employed for the treatment of ear, nose and throat disorders as well as respiratory tract infections. To provide a scientific basis of its present utilization in phytomedicine, EPs 7630, extracts and isolated constituents of the titled Pelargoniums with emphasis on P. sidoides were evaluated for antibacterial activity and for their effects on nonspecific immune functions. The samples exhibited merely moderate direct antibacterial capabilities against a spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Functional bioassays including an in vitro model for intracellular diseases, a fibroblast-lysis assay (tumour necrosis factor (TNF) activity), a fibroblast-virus protection assay (IFN activity) and a biochemical assay for nitric oxides revealed significant immunomodulatory properties. Gene expression experiments (iNOS, IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, Interleukin (IL)-1, IL-10, IL12, IL-18) not only confirmed functional data, they also clearly showed differences in the response of infected macrophages when compared to that of noninfected cells. ELISA confirmed the protein production of TNF-alpha, IL-1alpha and IL-12, while FACS analyses reaffirmed the cytokines IL-1alpha and IL-12 at the singular cell level. The current data provide convincing support for the improvement of immune functions at various levels, hence, validating the medicinal uses of EPs 7630. Despite considerable efforts, the remedial effects cannot yet be related to a chemically defined principle.

  12. Effective antibacterials: at what cost? The economics of antibacterial resistance and its control.

    PubMed

    White, Anthony R

    2011-09-01

    The original and successful business model of return on investment being sufficiently attractive to the pharmaceutical industry to encourage development of new antibacterial molecules and related diagnostics has been compromised by increasing development costs and regulatory hurdles, resulting in a decreasing chance of success and financial return. The supply of new effective agents is diminishing along with the number of companies engaged in antibacterial research and development. The BSAC Working Party on The Urgent Need:Regenerating Antibacterial Drug Discovery and Development identified the need to establish, communicate and apply the true health and economic value of antibacterials, along with the adoption of meaningful incentives, as part of the future model for antibacterial development. Robust data are needed on the cost of resistance and ineffective treatment of bacterial infection, along with national and local holistic analyses of the cost-benefit of antibacterials. An understanding of the true health and economic value of antibacterials and the cost of resistance across healthcare systems needs to be generated, communicated and used in order to set a pricing and reimbursement structure that is commensurate with value. The development and economic model of antibacterial use needs to be rebuilt based on this value through dialogue with the various stakeholders, including the pharmaceutical industry, and alternative incentives from 'push' to 'pull' and funding models, such as public/private partnerships, agreed. A research and development model that succeeds in developing and delivering new antibacterial agents that address the health needs of society from start to finish, 'from cradle to grave', must be established.

  13. Association of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance with extended-spectrum beta-lactamase VEB-1.

    PubMed

    Poirel, Laurent; Van De Loo, Marc; Mammeri, Hedi; Nordmann, Patrice

    2005-07-01

    Association of the plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinant QnrA and the bla(VEB-1) gene was identified in a single Enterobacter cloacae isolate from K.-Bicêtre, France, and in 11 out of 23 bla(VEB-1)-positive enterobacterial isolates from Bangkok, Thailand. This result may explain in part the association between quinolone and extended-spectrum beta-lactam resistance.

  14. Occurrence of (fluoro)quinolones and (fluoro)quinolone resistance in soil receiving swine manure for 11 years.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yonggang; Yu, Wantai; Ma, Qiang; Zhou, Hua

    2015-10-15

    Because of the widespread use of antibiotics in animal breeding, the agricultural application of animal manure can lead to the introduction of antibiotics, antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes to the soil and surrounding environment, which may pose a threat to public health. In this study, we investigated the status of (fluoro)quinolone (FQ) residues and FQ resistance levels in soil with and without receiving long-term swine manure. Six FQs (pipemidic acid, lomefloxacin, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin) were only detected in manured soil, with individual concentrations ranging from below the detection limit to 27.2 μg kg(-1) and increasing with the increase in swine manure application rates. Higher load rates of swine manure yielded a higher number of ciprofloxacin-resistant (CIPr) bacteria after spreading. A total of 24 CIPr bacterial isolates were obtained from the tested soil, which belonged to four phyla (Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Bacteroidetes) or were related to nine different genera. Only 18 isolates from manured soil were positive for five plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes (aac(6')-Ib-cr, qnrD, qepA, oqxA, and oqxB). To our knowledge, this study is the first to examine the occurrence of PMQR genes in FQ-resistant bacteria from the soil environment. A similar result was observed for the total DNA from soil, with the exception of aac(6')-Ib being detected in the control sample. The absolute and relative abundances of total PMQR genes also increased with fertilization quantity. Significant correlations were observed between FQ resistance levels and FQ concentrations. These results indicated that the agricultural application of swine manure led to FQ residues and enhanced FQ resistance. This investigation provides baseline data on FQ resistance profiles in soils receiving long-term swine manure.

  15. Quinolone arthropathy in immature rabbits treated with the fluoroquinolone, PD 117596.

    PubMed

    Gough, A; Johnson, R; Campbell, E; Hall, L; Tylor, J; Carpenter, A; Black, W; Basrur, P K; Baragi, V M; Sigler, R; Metz, A

    1996-06-01

    To study the potential of the fluorquinolone, PD 117596 to cause arthropathy in experimental animals, immature rabbits were orally administered the drug for five days at 0, 100, 350, 500 and 750 mg/kg. Characterization of changes induced in major synovial joints was based on: macroscopic and histopathologic observations, transmission electron microscopic examinations and magnetic resonance imaging. Preferentially targeting the knee, PD 117596 produced vesicles and erosions in articular cartilage which resembled, morphologically, those described in other laboratory species. Lesion incidence was not clearly dose-related. In the perivesicular region, degenerate chondrocytes were intermixed with hypertrophic cartilage cells and chondrocyte clusters. Ultrastructurally, hypertrophic chondrocytes were the consequence of karyomegaly and RER proliferation. Matrix density was reduced due to collagen and proteoglycan loss. Joint structures were readily visualized by magnetic resonance imaging which identified thickened articular cartilage, surface irregularities consistent with ruptured vesicles and separation of opposing articular surfaces secondary to synovival effusions. The immature rabbit, although less sensitive than the juvenile dog to the arthropathic effects of quinolones, was nonetheless a good model to study this experimental osteoarticular disease.

  16. Antigiardial activity of novel triazolyl-quinolone-based chalcone derivatives: when oxygen makes the difference

    PubMed Central

    Bahadur, Vijay; Mastronicola, Daniela; Singh, Amit K.; Tiwari, Hemandra K.; Pucillo, Leopoldo P.; Sarti, Paolo; Singh, Brajendra K.; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Giardiasis is a common diarrheal disease worldwide caused by the protozoan parasite Giardia intestinalis. It is urgent to develop novel drugs to treat giardiasis, due to increasing clinical resistance to the gold standard drug metronidazole (MTZ). New potential antiparasitic compounds are usually tested for their killing efficacy against G. intestinalis under anaerobic conditions, in which MTZ is maximally effective. On the other hand, though commonly regarded as an ‘anaerobic pathogen,’ G. intestinalis is exposed to relatively high O2 levels in vivo, living attached to the mucosa of the proximal small intestine. It is thus important to test the effect of O2 when searching for novel potential antigiardial agents, as outlined in a previous study [Bahadur et al. (2014) Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 58, 543]. Here, 45 novel chalcone derivatives with triazolyl-quinolone scaffold were synthesized, purified, and characterized by high resolution mass spectrometry, 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopy. Efficacy of the compounds against G. intestinalis trophozoites was tested under both anaerobic and microaerobic conditions, and selectivity was assessed in a counter-screen on human epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma cells. MTZ was used as a positive control in the assays. All the tested compounds proved to be more effective against the parasite in the presence of O2, with the exception of MTZ that was less effective. Under anaerobiosis eighteen compounds were found to be as effective as MTZ or more (up to three to fourfold); the same compounds proved to be up to >100-fold more effective than MTZ under microaerobic conditions. Four of them represent potential candidates for the design of novel antigiardial drugs, being highly selective against Giardia trophozoites. This study further underlines the importance of taking O2 into account when testing novel potential antigiardial compounds. PMID:25904901

  17. [EMPIRICAL ANTIBACTERIAL PROPHYLAXIS IN EMERGENCY SURGERY].

    PubMed

    Yarovoy, S K; Zhevelyuk, A G; Kareva, E N; Glukhova, N S

    2015-01-01

    The main principles of selecting antibacterial drugs for prophylactic therapy of patients prior to surgery of gastrointestinal tract, vessels, skin, and soft tissues are considered. Special attention is devoted to antibacterial prophylaxis in co-morbid patients, in particular those with chronic renal insufficiency, chronic liver disorder, decompensated diabetes mellitus, and allergy to beta-lactam antibiotics. All proposed schemes are optimized with respect to three criteria: clinical effectiveness, economic feasibility, and epidemiologic safety (stopping the selection of poly-resistant microbial families). PMID:26591581

  18. [Multiresidue determination of quinolones in animal and fishery products by HPLC].

    PubMed

    Chonan, Takao; Fujimoto, Toru; Inoue, Maki; Tazawa, Teijiro; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2008-06-01

    A simple and rapid multiresidue method was developed for the determination of twelve quinolones (ciprofloxacin, danofloxacin, difloxacin, enrofloxacin, flumequine, marbofloxacin, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, orbifloxacin, oxolinic acid and sarafloxacin) in muscle, liver, chicken eggs, milk, prawn and rainbow trout. The quinolones were extracted from a sample with acetonitrile-water (95 : 5). A fifth part of the filtered extract was diluted with water to keep the acetonitrile ratio at ca. 60%, and passed through a C18 mini-column. The eluate was evaporated to dryness, and the residues were dissolved in methanol-water (30 : 70) for HPLC analysis. The quinolones were separated on a Inertsil ODS-3V column (4.6 mm i.d.x250 mm) with a gradient system of 0.1% phosphoric acid-acetonitrile as the mobile phase, with fluorescence detection.No interfering peak was found on the chromatograms of animal and fishery products, except for milk. The recoveries of the quinolones were over 60% from the animal and fishery products fortified at 0.1 microg/g, and the quantification limits of the quinolones were 0.005 microg/g. This proposed method was found to be effective and suitable for the screening of the quinolones in animal and fishery products.

  19. Carrier-mediated mechanism for the biliary excretion of the quinolone antibiotic grepafloxacin and its glucuronide in rats.

    PubMed

    Sasabe, H; Tsuji, A; Sugiyama, Y

    1998-03-01

    Grepafloxacin (GPFX) has a comparatively greater hepatobiliary transport than other quinolone antibiotics. The biliary excretion mechanism of GPFX was investigated in a series of in vivo and in vitro studies with Sprague-Dawley rats and the mutant strain Eisai-hyperbilirubinemia rats (EHBR), which have a hereditary defect in their bile canalicular multispecific organic anion transport system (cMOAT). The biliary excretion of the parent drug in EHBR was 38% of that in normal rats, whereas the 3-glucuronide, a main metabolite of GPFX, was scarcely excreted into the bile in EHBR. To clarify the biliary excretion mechanism of GPFX, studies of uptake by bile canalicular membrane vesicle (CMV) were performed. ATP dependence was observed in the uptake of GPFX by CMV, although the extent was not very marked, whereas no ATP-dependent uptake was observed by CMV prepared from EHBR. An inhibition study of the ATP-dependent uptake of the glutathione conjugate, 2,4-dinitrophenyl-S-glutathione (DNP-SG), a typical substrate for cMOAT, was performed in order to differentiate among the affinities of six quinolone antibiotics for this transporter. All quinolone antibiotics inhibited the ATP-dependent uptake of DNP-SG with different half-inhibition concentrations (IC50), and GPFX had the lowest IC50 value. The uptake of GPFX-glucuronide by CMV from normal rats showed a marked ATP dependence, whereas there was little ATP-dependent uptake in EHBR. The K(m) value (7.2 microM) for the higher-affinity component of the glucuronide uptake was comparable to the Ki value (9.2 microM) of the glucuronide in terms of inhibition of the ATP-dependent uptake of DNP-SG, which indicates that DNP-SG and the glucuronide may share the same transporter, cMOAT. The Ki value of the glucuronide observed in this inhibition was less than 1/200 that of the parent, which suggests that the glucuronide had a much higher affinity than the parent drug. These results lead us to conclude that at least a part of the

  20. [Bacteriophages as antibacterial agents].

    PubMed

    Shasha, Shaul M; Sharon, Nehama; Inbar, Michael

    2004-02-01

    Bacteriophages are viruses that only infect bacteria. They have played an important role in the development of molecular biology and have been used as anti-bacterial agents. Since their independent discovery by Twort and d'Herelle, they have been extensively used to prevent and treat bacterial infections, mainly in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union. In western countries this method has been sporadically employed on humans and domesticated animals. However, the discovery and widespread use of antibiotics, coupled with doubts about the efficacy of phage therapy, led to an eclipse in the use of phage in medicine. The emergence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, especially strains that are multiply resistant, has resulted in a renewed interest in alternatives to conventional drugs. One of the possible replacements for antibiotics is the use of bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents. This brief review aims to describe the history of bacteriophage and early clinical studies on their use in bacterial disease prophylaxis and therapy, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of bacteriophage in this regard.

  1. Screening of quinolone antibiotic residues in chicken meat and beef sold in the markets of Ankara, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Er, Buket; Onurdag, Fatma Kaynak; Demirhan, Burak; Ozgacar, Selda Özgen; Oktem, Aysel Bayhan; Abbasoglu, Ufuk

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to find the effects of quinolone antibiotics in chicken and beef used in Ankara, Turkey. Total number of 127 chicken and 104 beef meat samples were collected randomly from local markets for analysis. Extraction and determination of quinolones were made by ELISA procedure. One hundred eighteen of 231 (51.1%) examined chicken meat and beef samples were found to contain quinolone antibiotic residue. Among the chicken meat and beef samples, 58 (45.7%) of chicken meat samples and 60 (57.7%) of beef meat samples were positive for quinolones, respectively. The mean levels (±SE) of quinolones were found to be 30.81 ± 0.45 µg/kg and 6.64 ± 1.11 µg/kg in chicken and beef samples, respectively. This study indicated that some chicken and beef meat sold in Ankara contains residues of quinolone antibiotics.

  2. Cell-Envelope Remodeling as a Determinant of Phenotypic Antibacterial Tolerance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms that lead to phenotypic antibacterial tolerance in bacteria remain poorly understood. We investigate whether changes in NaCl concentration toward physiologically higher values affect antibacterial efficacy against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causal agent of human tuberculosis. Indeed, multiclass phenotypic antibacterial tolerance is observed during Mtb growth in physiologic saline. This includes changes in sensitivity to ethionamide, ethambutol, d-cycloserine, several aminoglycosides, and quinolones. By employing organism-wide metabolomic and lipidomic approaches combined with phenotypic tests, we identified a time-dependent biphasic adaptive response after exposure of Mtb to physiological levels of NaCl. A first rapid, extensive, and reversible phase was associated with changes in core and amino acid metabolism. In a second phase, Mtb responded with a substantial remodelling of plasma membrane and outer lipid membrane composition. We demonstrate that phenotypic tolerance at physiological concentrations of NaCl is the result of changes in plasma and outer membrane lipid remodeling and not changes in core metabolism. Altogether, these results indicate that physiologic saline-induced antibacterial tolerance is kinetically coupled to cell envelope changes and demonstrate that metabolic changes and growth arrest are not the cause of phenotypic tolerance observed in Mtb exposed to physiologic concentrations of NaCl. Importantly, this work uncovers a role for bacterial cell envelope remodeling in antibacterial tolerance, alongside well-documented allterations in respiration, metabolism, and growth rate. PMID:27231718

  3. Antibacterial activities of multi drug resistant Myroides odoratimimus bacteria isolated from adult flesh flies (Diptera: sarcophagidae) are independent of metallo beta-lactamase gene

    PubMed Central

    Dharne, M.S.; Gupta, A.K.; Rangrez, A.Y.; Ghate, H.V.; Patole, M.S.; Shouche, Y.S.

    2008-01-01

    Flesh flies (Diptera: Sarcophagidae) are well known cause of myiasis and their gut bacteria have never been studied for antimicrobial activity against bacteria. Antimicrobial studies of Myroides spp. are restricted to nosocomial strains. A Gram-negative bacterium, Myroides sp., was isolated from the gut of adult flesh flies (Sarcophaga sp.) and submitted to evaluation of nutritional parameters using Biolog GN, 16S rRNA gene sequencing, susceptibility to various antimicrobials by disc diffusion method and detection of metallo β-lactamase genes (TUS/MUS). The antagonistic effects were tested on Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria isolated from human clinical specimens, environmental samples and insect mid gut. Bacterial species included were Aeromonas hydrophila, A. culicicola, Morganella morganii subsp. sibonii, Ochrobactrum anthropi, Weissella confusa, Escherichia coli, Ochrobactrum sp., Serratia sp., Kestersia sp., Ignatzschineria sp., Bacillus sp. The Myroides sp. strain was resistant to penicillin-G, erythromycin, streptomycin, amikacin, kanamycin, gentamycin, ampicillin, trimethoprim and tobramycin. These strain showed antibacterial action against all bacterial strains except W. confusa, Ignatzschineria sp., A. hydrophila and M. morganii subsp. sibonii. The multidrug resistance of the strain was similar to the resistance of clinical isolates, inhibiting growth of bacteria from clinical, environmental and insect gut samples. The metallo β-lactamase (TUS/MUS) genes were absent, and resistance due to these genes was ruled out, indicating involvement of other secretion machinery. PMID:24031236

  4. Antibacterial activities of the methanol extracts of Canarium schweinfurthii and four other Cameroonian dietary plants against multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dzotam, Joachim K; Touani, Francesco K; Kuete, Victor

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial infections are among the major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activities of the methanol extracts of five Cameroonian edible plants namely Colocasia esculenta, Triumfetta pentandra, Hibiscus esculentus, Canarium schweinfurthii and Annona muricata against a panel of 19 multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacterial strains. The liquid broth microdilution was used to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the extracts. The preliminary phytochemical screening of the extracts was conducted according to the standard phytochemical methods. Results showed that all extracts contained compounds belonging to the classes of polyphenols, triterpenes and steroids, other classes of chemicals being selectively distributed. Canarium schweinfurthii extract showed the best activity with MIC values ranging from 64 to 1024 μg/mL against 89.5% of the 19 tested bacteria strains. MIC values below or equal to 1024 μg/mL were also recorded with Triumfetta pentandra, Annona muricata, Colocasia esculenta and Hibiscus esculentus extracts respectively against 15/19 (78.9%), 11/19 (57.9%), 10/19 (52.6%) and 10/19 (52.6%) tested bacteria. Extract from C. schweinfurthii displayed the lowest MIC value (64 μg/mL) against Escherichia coli AG100ATet. Finally, the results of this work provide baseline information for the use of C. esculenta, T. pentandra, H. esculentus, C. schweinfurthii and A. muricata in the treatment of bacterial infections including multidrug resistant phenotypes.

  5. Antibacterial activities of the methanol extracts of Canarium schweinfurthii and four other Cameroonian dietary plants against multi-drug resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dzotam, Joachim K; Touani, Francesco K; Kuete, Victor

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial infections are among the major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activities of the methanol extracts of five Cameroonian edible plants namely Colocasia esculenta, Triumfetta pentandra, Hibiscus esculentus, Canarium schweinfurthii and Annona muricata against a panel of 19 multidrug resistant Gram-negative bacterial strains. The liquid broth microdilution was used to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) of the extracts. The preliminary phytochemical screening of the extracts was conducted according to the standard phytochemical methods. Results showed that all extracts contained compounds belonging to the classes of polyphenols, triterpenes and steroids, other classes of chemicals being selectively distributed. Canarium schweinfurthii extract showed the best activity with MIC values ranging from 64 to 1024 μg/mL against 89.5% of the 19 tested bacteria strains. MIC values below or equal to 1024 μg/mL were also recorded with Triumfetta pentandra, Annona muricata, Colocasia esculenta and Hibiscus esculentus extracts respectively against 15/19 (78.9%), 11/19 (57.9%), 10/19 (52.6%) and 10/19 (52.6%) tested bacteria. Extract from C. schweinfurthii displayed the lowest MIC value (64 μg/mL) against Escherichia coli AG100ATet. Finally, the results of this work provide baseline information for the use of C. esculenta, T. pentandra, H. esculentus, C. schweinfurthii and A. muricata in the treatment of bacterial infections including multidrug resistant phenotypes. PMID:27579004

  6. The Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) stimulates chemotaxis of polymorphonuclear neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Hänsch, Gertrud M; Prior, Birgit; Brenner-Weiss, Gerald; Obst, Ursula; Overhage, Joerg

    2014-06-12

    Cross-talk between bacteria and mammalian cells is increasingly recognized as an important factor, especially during chronic infections. In particular, the interaction of extracellular bacterial signaling molecules with cells of the innate immune response is of special interest. In this context, we investigated whether the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) which is a quorum sensing molecule produced by bacteria and participates in biofilm formation and virulence has any influence on polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), the cells of the "first line defense" against bacterial infections. We found that PQS did not enhance the bactericidal activity of PMN and did not induce apoptosis at concentrations up to 100 µM. However, PQS stimulated chemotaxis of PMN in doses of 10-100 µM. This PQS-dependent chemotaxis could be inhibited with SB203580 which blocks MAPkinase p38, suggesting a signaling pathway similar to AHL-12 induction. Using bacterial cell culture supernantants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa wild-type cells and a PQS-deficient mutant strain support the in vivo relevance of these findings. Since PQS is produced in the early phase of biofilm formation, PMN infiltration could be timely enough to eradicate bacteria before biofilm formation is completed, which confers the bacteria with a relative resistance to host defense mechanisms.

  7. Antibacterial kaolinite/urea/chlorhexidine nanocomposites: Experiment and molecular modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holešová, Sylva; Valášková, Marta; Hlaváč, Dominik; Madejová, Jana; Samlíková, Magda; Tokarský, Jonáš; Pazdziora, Erich

    2014-06-01

    Clay minerals are commonly used materials in pharmaceutical production both as inorganic carriers or active agents. The purpose of this study is the preparation and characterization of clay/antibacterial drug hybrids which can be further included in drug delivery systems for treatment oral infections. Novel nanocomposites with antibacterial properties were successfully prepared by ion exchange reaction from two types of kaolinite/urea intercalates and chlorhexidine diacetate. Intercalation compounds of kaolinite were prepared by reaction with solid urea in the absence of solvents (dry method) as well as with urea aqueous solution (wet method). The antibacterial activity of two prepared samples against Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was evaluated by finding the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Antibacterial studies of both samples showed the lowest MIC values (0.01%, w/v) after 1 day against E. faecalis, E. coli and S. aureus. A slightly worse antibacterial activity was observed against P. aeruginosa (MIC 0.12%, w/v) after 1 day. Since samples showed very good antibacterial activity, especially after 1 day of action, this means that these samples can be used as long-acting antibacterial materials. Prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The experimental data are supported by results of molecular modelling.

  8. Combination of hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction followed by HPLC-DAD and multivariate curve resolution to determine antibacterial residues in foods of animal origin.

    PubMed

    Tajabadi, Fateme; Ghambarian, Mahnaz; Yamini, Yadollah; Yazdanfar, Najmeh

    2016-11-01

    In the present research, a carrier mediated hollow fiber based liquid-phase microextraction approach (HF-LPME) prior to high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) was developed for the simultaneous determination of the antibacterial residues of four tetracyclines (TCs) and five quinolones (QNs), which are commonly used as veterinary medicines. In order to obtain high extraction efficiency, the parameters affecting HF-LPME were optimized using a three-factor and three-level Box-Behnken design under response surface methodology. This method was validated according to the recommendations of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and, for the first time, successfully applied to a wide range of animal source food samples such as fish, milk, and honey as well as the liver and muscles of lamb and chicken. Analytical performance was determined in terms of linearity, intra- and inter-assay precision, detection and quantification limits, matrix effect, accuracy, and drug stability in real samples. Detection and quantitation limits for the different antibiotics ranged between 0.5-20ngg(-1) and 1.25-40ngg(-1), respectively. Intra and inter-day repeatability, expressed as the relative standard deviation, were in the ranges of 3.4-10.7% and 5.0-11.5%, respectively. The procedure allows good preconcentration factors of 175-700. The results of the validation process proved that the method is suitable for determining TCs and QNs residues in surveillance programs. Finally, the applicability of the proposed method was successfully confirmed by the extraction and determination of nine antibiotics in various animal source food samples. The importance of this methodology relies on the combination of HF-LPME/HPLC-DAD second-order data with multivariate curve resolution-alternative least squares (MCR-ALS) algorithm, which improves the resolution of some overlapped chromatograms and, hence, increases the accuracy and repeatability of drug determination. PMID

  9. Combination of hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction followed by HPLC-DAD and multivariate curve resolution to determine antibacterial residues in foods of animal origin.

    PubMed

    Tajabadi, Fateme; Ghambarian, Mahnaz; Yamini, Yadollah; Yazdanfar, Najmeh

    2016-11-01

    In the present research, a carrier mediated hollow fiber based liquid-phase microextraction approach (HF-LPME) prior to high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) was developed for the simultaneous determination of the antibacterial residues of four tetracyclines (TCs) and five quinolones (QNs), which are commonly used as veterinary medicines. In order to obtain high extraction efficiency, the parameters affecting HF-LPME were optimized using a three-factor and three-level Box-Behnken design under response surface methodology. This method was validated according to the recommendations of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and, for the first time, successfully applied to a wide range of animal source food samples such as fish, milk, and honey as well as the liver and muscles of lamb and chicken. Analytical performance was determined in terms of linearity, intra- and inter-assay precision, detection and quantification limits, matrix effect, accuracy, and drug stability in real samples. Detection and quantitation limits for the different antibiotics ranged between 0.5-20ngg(-1) and 1.25-40ngg(-1), respectively. Intra and inter-day repeatability, expressed as the relative standard deviation, were in the ranges of 3.4-10.7% and 5.0-11.5%, respectively. The procedure allows good preconcentration factors of 175-700. The results of the validation process proved that the method is suitable for determining TCs and QNs residues in surveillance programs. Finally, the applicability of the proposed method was successfully confirmed by the extraction and determination of nine antibiotics in various animal source food samples. The importance of this methodology relies on the combination of HF-LPME/HPLC-DAD second-order data with multivariate curve resolution-alternative least squares (MCR-ALS) algorithm, which improves the resolution of some overlapped chromatograms and, hence, increases the accuracy and repeatability of drug determination.

  10. High levels of multiresistance in quinolone resistant urinary tract isolates of Escherichia coli from Norway; a non clonal phenomen?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The problem of emerging ciprofloxacin resistance is compounded by its frequent association with multiresistance, the reason for which is not fully understood. In this study we compare multiresistance, clonal similarities and phylogenetic group in urinary tract isolates of Escherichia coli sensitive and resistant to the quinolone antimicrobials nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin. Results Quinolone resistant isolates were more resistant to non-quinolone antibiotics than sensitive isolates, with resistance to ampicillin, mecillinam, sulphonamide, trimethoprim, tetracycline, kanamycin and chloramphenicol significantly increased. Fifty-one percent of quinolone-resistant isolates were multiresistant. Although multiresistance was most prevalent (63%) in isolates showing high-level ciprofloxacin resistance, it was still highly prevalent (41%) in nalidixic acid resistant isolates with low-level ciprofloxacin resistance. Multiresistance was more frequent among singleton isolates (61%) than clonal isolates (40%) of quinolone resistant Escherichia coli. Ciprofloxacin resistance was associated with certain specific clones, among them the globally distributed clonal Group A. However, there was no significant difference in the overall degree of clonality between quinolone sensitive and resistant isolates. Ciprofloxacin resistance was positively associated with phylogroup D and negatively associated with phylogroup B2. This correlation was not associated with clonal isolates. Conclusion This study supports earlier findings of association between ciprofloxacin resistance and resistance to other antibiotics. The prevalence of multiresistance in quinolone-resistant isolates that have not yet developed high-level ciprofloxacin resistance suggest that multiresistance arises early in the development of quinolone resistance. This is consistent with exposure to quinolones causing quinolone resistance by mutations and mobilization of multiresistance elements by induction of the

  11. Effect of various storage conditions on the stability of quinolones in raw milk.

    PubMed

    Chen, Meixia; Wen, Fang; Wang, Hui; Zheng, Nan; Wang, Jiaqi

    2016-07-01

    Research on the storage stability of antibiotic residues in milk is important for method development or validation, milk quality control and risk assessment during screening, confirmation, qualitative or quantitative analysis. This study was conducted using UPLC-MS/MS to determine the stability of six quinolones - ciprofloxacin (CIP), danofloxacin (DAN), enrofloxacin (ENR), sarafloxacin (SAR), difloxacin (DIF) and flumequine (FLU) - in raw milk stored under various conditions to investigate if quinolones degrade during storage of milk, and finally to determine optimal storage conditions for analysis and scientific risk assessment of quinolone residues in raw milk. The storage conditions included different temperatures and durations (4°C for 4, 8, 24 and 48 h; -20°C for 1, 7 and 30 days; -80°C for 1, 7 and 30 days), thawing temperatures (25, 40 and 60°C), freeze-thaw cycles (1-5), and the addition of different preservatives (sodium thiocyanate, sodium azide, potassium dichromate, bronopol and methanal). Most quinolones exhibited high stability at 4°C for up to 24 h, but began to degrade after 48 h. In addition, no degradation of quinolones was seen when milk samples were stored at -20°C for up to 7 days; however, 30 days of storage at -20°C resulted in a small amount of degradation (about 30%). Similar results were seen when samples were stored at -80°C. Moreover, no losses were observed when frozen milk samples were thawed at 25, 40 or 60°C. All the quinolones of interest, except sarafloxacin, were stable when milk samples were thawed at 40°C once and three times, but unstable after five freeze-thaw cycles. Preservatives affected the stability of quinolones, but the effects differed depending on the preservative and quinolone. The results of this study indicate optimum storage protocols for milk samples, so that residue levels reflect those at the time of initial sample analysis, and should improve surveillance programmes for quinolones in raw milk

  12. The evidence for clonal spreading of quinolone resistance with a particular clonal complex of Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Kovač, J; Cadež, N; Lušicky, M; Nielsen, E Møller; Ocepek, M; Raspor, P; Možina, S Smole

    2014-12-01

    Campylobacter is the most prevalent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide and it represents a significant public health risk of increasing severity due to its escalating resistance to clinically important quinolone and macrolide antibiotics. As a zoonotic pathogen Campylobacter is transmitted along the food chain and naturally cycles from environmental waters, feedstuff, animals and food to humans. We determined antibiotic resistance profiles, as well as multilocus sequence types and flaA-SVR types for 52 C. jejuni isolated in Slovenia from human, animal, raw and cured chicken meat and water samples. Twenty-eight different sequence types, arranged in ten clonal complexes, three new allele types and five new sequence types were identified, indicating the relatively high diversity in a small group of strains. The assignment of strains from different sources to the same clonal complexes indicates their transmission along the food supply chain. The most prevalent clonal complex was CC21, which was also the genetic group with 95% of quinolone-resistant strains. Based on the genetic relatedness of these quinolone-resistant strains identified by polymerase chain reaction with a mismatch amplification mutation assay and sequencing of the quinolone resistance-determining region of the gyrA gene, we conclude that the high resistance prevalence observed indicates the local clonal spread of quinolone resistance with CC21. PMID:24534165

  13. Molecular characterisation of quinolone-resistant Shigella strains isolated in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Reza; Behnood, Vahid; Memariani, Hamed; Najafi, Ali; Moghbeli, Majid; Mammina, Caterina

    2016-06-01

    Over the past few years, the number of Shigella strains resistant to nalidixic acid has increased and has made the selection of effective antimicrobial therapy more difficult. The purpose of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism of quinolone resistance in Shigella strains. Shigella strains isolated from 1100 diarrhoeal patients in Tehran, Iran, were assessed for their susceptibility to nalidixic acid prior to PCR-RFLP and sequence analysis of their quinolone resistance genes. Among 73 Shigella strains isolated, 23 (31.5%) were resistant to nalidixic acid. The most common Shigella spp. was Shigella sonnei (54; 74.0%). Of the 23 quinolone-resistant isolates, 4 (17.4%) (including 2 Shigella flexneri, 1 S. sonnei and 1 Shigella boydii) contained the qnrS gene. However, none of the isolates harboured qnrA or qnrB genes. PCR-RFLP analysis of gyrA showed a mutation profile in two nalidixic acid-resistant strains, including one S. sonnei and one S. flexneri. Sequencing of mutant gyrA genes revealed a point mutation at position 83, resulting in the replacement of serine by leucine. In conclusion, molecular mechanisms of resistance to quinolones were identified in 6 of 23 Shigella isolates. Other possible mechanisms of resistance should also be investigated for better characterisation of quinolone-resistant Shigella isolates. PMID:27436462

  14. [Common features of antibacterial compounds: an analysis of 104 compounds library].

    PubMed

    Veselov, M S; Sergiev, P V; Osterman, I A; Skvortsov, D A; Golovina, A Ya; Andreyanova, E S; Laptev, I G; Pletnev, P I; Evfratov, S A; Marusich, E I; Leonov, S V; Ivanenkov, Ya A; Bogdanov, A A; Dontsova, O A

    2015-01-01

    Antibacterial compounds are one of the essential classes of clinically important drugs. High throughput screening allowed revealing potential antibiotics active towards any molecular target in bacterial cell. We used a library of 9820 organic compounds with highly diversified structures to screen for antibacterial activity. As the result of automated screening, 103 compounds were found to possess antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli. The properties of these compounds were compared with those of initial library. Non-linear Kohonen mapping was used to analyze the differences between non-active molecules from initial library, identified antibacterial hits and compounds with reported antibacterial activity. It was found that identified antibacterial compounds are located in the separated area of chemical space. It can be therefore suggested that these molecules belong to novel classes of antibacterial compounds and could be studied further.

  15. [Investigation of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes in quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates from bloodstream infections].

    PubMed

    Buruk, Celal Kurtuluş; Öztel Ocak, Hikmet; Bayramoğlu, Gülçin; Aydın, Faruk

    2016-04-01

    One of the treatment options of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. infections which are the most common opportunistic pathogens of gram-negative sepsis is quinolones. Resistance to quinolones which act by disrupting DNA synthesis has been increasing. Horizontal transfer of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes play an important role in the spread of resistance. The data about the prevalence of PMQR genes in our country is quite limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of known PMQR genes namely qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrS, qnrD, aac(6')-Ib-cr, qepA and oqxAB amongst quinolone-resistant E. coli and Klebsiella spp. strains isolated from blood cultures. One hundred twenty seven E.coli and 66 Klebsiella isolates detected as nalidixic acid- and/or ciprofloxacin-resistant by phenotypical methods, from 193 blood samples of 187 patients admitted to Karadeniz Technical University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Medical Microbiology, Bacteriology Unit of Patient Service Laboratory between January 2012 to August 2013 were included in the study. The presence of PMQR genes were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and for the detection of aac(6')-Ib-cr variants PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method was used. The positive bands were sequenced using the same primers, and aligned with formerly defined resistance gene sequences, and confirmed. In the study, 56.7% (72/127) of E.coli and 19.7% (13/66) of Klebsiella spp. isolates, with a total of 44% (85/193) of all the isolates were found to be phenotypically resistant to quinolones. Of the 13 resistant Klebsiella isolates, 11 were K.pneumoniae, and two were K.oxytoca. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing isolates showed higher resistance (50/80, 62.5%) to quinolones than the negative ones (35/113, 30.9%). The prevalence of quinolone resistance genes among resistant E. coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates was determined as qnrA, 1.4% and 15.4%; qnrB, 4

  16. Structural requirements of 3-carboxyl-4(1H)-quinolones as potential antimalarials from 2D and 3D QSAR analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiazhong; Li, Shuyan; Bai, Chongliang; Liu, Huanxiang; Gramatica, Paola

    2013-07-01

    Malaria is a fatal tropical and subtropical disease caused by the protozoal species Plasmodium. Many commonly available antimalarial drugs and therapies are becoming ineffective because of the emergence of multidrug resistant Plasmodium falciparum, which drives the need for the development of new antimalarial drugs. Recently, a series of 3-carboxyl-4(1H)-quinolone analogs, derived from the famous compound endochin, were reported as promising candidates for orally efficacious antimalarials. In this study, to analyze the structure-activity relationships (SAR) of these quinolones and investigate the structural requirements for antimalarial activity, the 2D multiple linear regressions (MLR) method and 3D comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) methods are employed to evolve different QSAR models. All these models give satisfactory results with highly accurate fitting and strong external predictive abilities for chemicals not used in model development. Furthermore, the contour maps from 3D models can provide an intuitive understanding of the key structure features responsible for the antimalarial activities. In conclusion, we summarize the detailed position-specific structural requirements of these derivatives accordingly. All these results are helpful for the rational design of new compounds with higher antimalarial bioactivities.

  17. Discovery, Synthesis, and Optimization of Antimalarial 4(1H)-Quinolone-3-Diarylethers

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The historical antimalarial compound endochin served as a structural lead for optimization. Endochin-like quinolones (ELQ) were prepared by a novel chemical route and assessed for in vitro activity against multidrug resistant strains of Plasmodium falciparum and against malaria infections in mice. Here we describe the pathway to discovery of a potent class of orally active antimalarial 4(1H)-quinolone-3-diarylethers. The initial prototype, ELQ-233, exhibited low nanomolar IC50 values against all tested strains including clinical isolates harboring resistance to atovaquone. ELQ-271 represented the next critical step in the iterative optimization process, as it was stable to metabolism and highly effective in vivo. Continued analoging revealed that the substitution pattern on the benzenoid ring of the quinolone core significantly influenced reactivity with the host enzyme. This finding led to the rational design of highly selective ELQs with outstanding oral efficacy against murine malaria that is superior to established antimalarials chloroquine and atovaquone. PMID:24720377

  18. PqsBC, a Condensing Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal

    PubMed Central

    Drees, Steffen Lorenz; Li, Chan; Prasetya, Fajar; Saleem, Muhammad; Dreveny, Ingrid; Williams, Paul; Hennecke, Ulrich; Emsley, Jonas; Fetzner, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a number of alkylquinolone-type secondary metabolites best known for their antimicrobial effects and involvement in cell-cell communication. In the alkylquinolone biosynthetic pathway, the β-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthase III (FabH)-like enzyme PqsBC catalyzes the condensation of octanoyl-coenzyme A and 2-aminobenzoylacetate (2-ABA) to form the signal molecule 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone. PqsBC, a potential drug target, is unique for its heterodimeric arrangement and an active site different from that of canonical FabH-like enzymes. Considering the sequence dissimilarity between the subunits, a key question was how the two subunits are organized with respect to the active site. In this study, the PqsBC structure was determined to a 2 Å resolution, revealing that PqsB and PqsC have a pseudo-2-fold symmetry that unexpectedly mimics the FabH homodimer. PqsC has an active site composed of Cys-129 and His-269, and the surrounding active site cleft is hydrophobic in character and approximately twice the volume of related FabH enzymes that may be a requirement to accommodate the aromatic substrate 2-ABA. From physiological and kinetic studies, we identified 2-aminoacetophenone as a pathway-inherent competitive inhibitor of PqsBC, whose fluorescence properties could be used for in vitro binding studies. In a time-resolved setup, we demonstrated that the catalytic histidine is not involved in acyl-enzyme formation, but contributes to an acylation-dependent increase in affinity for the second substrate 2-ABA. Introduction of Asn into the PqsC active site led to significant activity toward the desamino substrate analog benzoylacetate, suggesting that the substrate 2-ABA itself supplies the asparagine-equivalent amino function that assists in catalysis. PMID:26811339

  19. Development and in vitro characterization of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres loaded with an antibacterial natural drug for the treatment of long-term bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Reinbold, Jochen; Hierlemann, Teresa; Hinkel, Helena; Müller, Ingrid; Maier, Martin E; Weindl, Tobias; Schlensak, Christian; Wendel, Hans Peter; Krajewski, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable polymers, especially poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), have good biocompatibility and toxicological properties. In combination with active ingredients, a specialized drug delivery system can be generated. The aim of the present study was to develop a drug delivery system consisting of PLGA microspheres loaded with the natural active ingredient totarol, which has several antimicrobial mechanisms. Totarol, isolated from the Podocarpus totara tree, was purified using column chromatography, and the eluate was checked for purity using thin layer chromatography. The spherically shaped microspheres with mean diameters of 147.21±3.45 µm and 131.14±3.69 µm (totarol-loaded and -unloaded microspheres, respectively) were created using the single emulsion evaporation method. Furthermore, the encapsulation efficiency, in a range of 84.72%±6.68% to 92.36%±0.99%, was measured via UV/vis spectroscopy. In a 90-day in vitro drug release study, the release of totarol was investigated by UV/vis spectroscopy as well, showing a release of 53.76%. The toxicity on cells was determined using BJ fibroblasts or Human Embryonic Kidney cells and an 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, which showed no influence on the cell growth. The minimal inhibitory concentration was ascertained. A totarol concentration between 64 µg/mL and 128 µg/mL was necessary to inhibit the bacterial growth over a period of 24 hours. Biofilm formation on the surface of totarol-loaded microspheres was determined using transmission electron microscopy. No biofilm formation could be detected, even if the totarol concentration was below the minimal inhibitory concentration. The hemocompatibility investigations on various markers with fresh heparinized blood (1.5 IU/mL) showed that totarol and totarol-loaded microspheres have no influence on different blood parameters. The PLGA microspheres characterized by slow release of totarol and great entrapment efficiency represent

  20. The association of DNA damage response and nucleotide level modulation with the antibacterial mechanism of the anti-folate drug Trimethoprim

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Trimethoprim is a widely prescribed antibiotic for a variety of bacterial infections. It belongs to a class of anti-metabolites - antifolates - which includes drugs used against malarial parasites and in cancer therapy. However, spread of bacterial resistance to the drug has severely hampered its clinical use and has necessitated further investigations into its mechanism of action and treatment regimen. Trimethoprim selectively starves bacterial cells for tetrahydrofolate, a vital cofactor necessary for the synthesis of several metabolites. The outcome (bacteriostatic or bactericidal) of such starvation, however, depends on the availability of folate-dependent metabolites in the growth medium. To characterize this dependency, we investigated in detail the regulatory and structural components of Escherichia coli cellular response to trimethoprim in controlled growth and supplementation conditions. Results We surveyed transcriptional responses to trimethoprim treatment during bacteriostatic and bactericidal conditions and analyzed associated gene sets/pathways. Concurrent starvation of all folate dependent metabolites caused growth arrest, and this was accompanied by induction of general stress and stringent responses. Three gene sets were significantly associated with the bactericidal effect of TMP in different media including LB: genes of the SOS regulon, genes of the pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway and members of the multiple antibiotic resistance (mar) regulon controlled by the MarR repressor. However, the SOS response was identified as the only universal transcriptional signature associated with the loss of viability by direct thymine starvation or by folate stress. We also used genome-wide gene knock-out screen to uncover means of sensitization of bacteria to the drug. We observed that among a number of candidate genes and pathways, the effect of knock-outs in the deoxyribose nucleotide salvage pathway, encoded by the deoCABD operon and

  1. Development and in vitro characterization of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres loaded with an antibacterial natural drug for the treatment of long-term bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Reinbold, Jochen; Hierlemann, Teresa; Hinkel, Helena; Müller, Ingrid; Maier, Martin E; Weindl, Tobias; Schlensak, Christian; Wendel, Hans Peter; Krajewski, Stefanie

    2016-01-01

    Biodegradable polymers, especially poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), have good biocompatibility and toxicological properties. In combination with active ingredients, a specialized drug delivery system can be generated. The aim of the present study was to develop a drug delivery system consisting of PLGA microspheres loaded with the natural active ingredient totarol, which has several antimicrobial mechanisms. Totarol, isolated from the Podocarpus totara tree, was purified using column chromatography, and the eluate was checked for purity using thin layer chromatography. The spherically shaped microspheres with mean diameters of 147.21±3.45 µm and 131.14±3.69 µm (totarol-loaded and -unloaded microspheres, respectively) were created using the single emulsion evaporation method. Furthermore, the encapsulation efficiency, in a range of 84.72%±6.68% to 92.36%±0.99%, was measured via UV/vis spectroscopy. In a 90-day in vitro drug release study, the release of totarol was investigated by UV/vis spectroscopy as well, showing a release of 53.76%. The toxicity on cells was determined using BJ fibroblasts or Human Embryonic Kidney cells and an 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, which showed no influence on the cell growth. The minimal inhibitory concentration was ascertained. A totarol concentration between 64 µg/mL and 128 µg/mL was necessary to inhibit the bacterial growth over a period of 24 hours. Biofilm formation on the surface of totarol-loaded microspheres was determined using transmission electron microscopy. No biofilm formation could be detected, even if the totarol concentration was below the minimal inhibitory concentration. The hemocompatibility investigations on various markers with fresh heparinized blood (1.5 IU/mL) showed that totarol and totarol-loaded microspheres have no influence on different blood parameters. The PLGA microspheres characterized by slow release of totarol and great entrapment efficiency represent

  2. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of quinolone resistance in Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii recovered from postsurgical infections.

    PubMed

    de Moura, Vinicius Calado Nogueira; da Silva, Marlei Gomes; Gomes, Karen Machado; Coelho, Fábrice Santana; Sampaio, Jorge Luiz Mello; Mello, Fernanda Carvalho de Queiroz; Lourenço, Maria Cristina da Silva; Amorim, Efigênia de Lourdes Teixeira; Duarte, Rafael Silva

    2012-01-01

    Several outbreaks of infections caused by rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) were reported in many Brazilian states (2032 notified cases) from 2004 to 2010. Most of the confirmed cases were mainly associated with Mycobacterium massiliense (recently renamed as Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii) BRA100 clone, recovered from patients who had undergone invasive procedures in which medical instruments had not been properly sterilized and/or disinfected. Since quinolones have been an option for the treatment of general RGM infections and have been suggested for therapeutic schemes for these outbreaks, we evaluated the in vitro activities of all generations of quinolones for clinical and reference RGM by broth microdilution, and analysed the peptide sequences of the quinolone resistance determining regions (QRDRs) of GyrA and GyrB after DNA sequencing followed by amino acid translation. Fifty-four isolates of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii, including clone BRA100, recovered in different states of Brazil, and 19 reference strains of RGM species were characterized. All 54 M. abscessus subsp. bolletii isolates were resistant to all generations of quinolones and showed the same amino acids in the QRDRs, including the Ala-83 in GyrA, and Arg-447 and Asp-464 in GyrB, described as being responsible for an intrinsic low level of resistance to quinolones in mycobacteria. However, other RGM species showed distinct susceptibilities to this class of antimicrobials and patterns of mutations contrary to what has been traditionally defined, suggesting that other mechanisms of resistance, different from gyrA or gyrB mutations, may also be involved in resistance to high levels of quinolones. PMID:21903825

  3. Drugs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurst, Hunter, Ed.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This document contains the third volume of "Today's Delinquent," an annual publication of the National Center for Juvenile Justice. This volume deals with the issue of drugs and includes articles by leading authorities in delinquency and substance abuse who share their views on causes and cures for the drug problem among youth in this country.…

  4. Prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants among oxyiminocephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Giovanna Rincon; Radice, Marcela; Sennati, Samantha; Pallecchi, Lucia; Rossolini, Gian María; Gutkind, Gabriel; Conza, Jose Alejandro Di

    2013-01-01

    High quinolone resistance rates were observed among oxyiminocephalosporin-resistant enterobacteria. In the present study, we searched for the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes within the 55 oxyiminocephalosporin-resistant enterobacteria collected in a previous survey. The main PMQR determinants were aac(6')-Ib-cr and qnrB, which had prevalence rates of 42.4% and 33.3%, respectively. The aac(6')-Ib-cr gene was more frequently found in CTX-M-15-producing isolates, while qnrB was homogeneously distributed among all CTX-M producers. PMID:24037111

  5. Developing Outcomes Assessments as Endpoints for Registrational Clinical Trials of Antibacterial Drugs: 2015 Update From the Biomarkers Consortium of the Foundation for the National Institutes of Health.

    PubMed

    Talbot, George H; Powers, John H; Hoffmann, Steven C

    2016-03-01

    One important component in determining the benefits and harms of medical interventions is the use of well-defined and reliable outcome assessments as endpoints in clinical trials. Improving endpoints can better define patient benefits, allowing more accurate assessment of drug efficacy and more informed benefit-vs-risk decisions; another potential plus is facilitating efficient trial design. Since our first report in 2012, 2 Foundation for the National Institutes of Health Biomarkers Consortium Project Teams have continued to develop outcome assessments for potential uses as endpoints in registrational clinical trials of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections. In addition, the teams have initiated similar work in the indications of hospital-acquired bacterial pneumonia and ventilator-associated bacterial pneumonia. This report provides an update on progress to date in these 4 diseases.

  6. New insights toward the discovery of antibacterial agents: multi-tasking QSBER model for the simultaneous prediction of anti-tuberculosis activity and toxicological profiles of drugs.

    PubMed

    Speck-Planche, Alejandro; Kleandrova, Valeria V; Cordeiro, M Natália D S

    2013-03-12

    Tuberculosis (TB) constitutes one of the most dangerous and serious health problems around the world. It is a very lethal disease caused by microorganisms of the genus mycobacterium, principally Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) which affects humans. A very active field for the search of more efficient anti-TB chemotherapies is the use in silico methodologies for the discovery of potent anti-TB agents. The battle against MTB by using antimicrobial chemotherapies will depend on the design of new chemicals with high anti-TB activity and low toxicity as possible. Multi-target methodologies focused on quantitative-structure activity relationships (mt-QSAR) have played a very important role for the rationalization of drug design, providing a better understanding about the molecular patterns related with diverse pharmacological profiles including antimicrobial activity. Nowadays, almost all mt-QSAR models have considered the study of biological activity or toxicity separately. In the present study, we develop by the first time, a unified multitasking model based on quantitative-structure biological effect relationships (mtk-QSBER) for the simultaneous prediction of anti-TB activity and toxicity against Mus musculus and Rattus norvegicus. The mtk-QSBER model was created by using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) for the classification of compounds as positive (high biological activity and/or low toxicity) or negative (otherwise) under many experimental conditions. Our mtk-QSBER model, correctly classified more than 90% of the case in the whole database (more than 12,000 cases), serving as a powerful tool for the computer-assisted screening of potent and safe anti-TB drugs.

  7. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desirable. Here we report a responsive, broad-spectrum, antibacterial agent that can be temporally activated with light, whereupon it auto-inactivates on the scale of hours. The use of such a ‘smart’ antibiotic might prevent the build-up of active antimicrobial material in the environment. Reversible optical control over active drug concentration enables us to obtain pharmacodynamic information. Precisely localized control of activity is achieved, allowing the growth of bacteria to be confined to defined patterns, which has potential for the development of treatments that avoid interference with the endogenous microbial population in other parts of the organism.

  8. [Susceptibility of clinically-isolated bacteria strains to respiratory quinolones and evaluation of antimicrobial agent efficacy by Monte Carlo simulation].

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Tadashi; Yamada, Yukiji; Kimura, Takeshi; Kodama, Mai; Fujitomo, Yumiko; Masaki, Nakanishi; Toshiaki, Komori; Keisuke, Shikata; Fujita, Naohisa

    2016-02-01

    Respiratory quinolones (RQs) are broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents used for the treatment of a wide variety of community-acquired and nosocomial infections. However, bacterial resistance to quinolones has been on the increase. In this study, we investigated the predicted efficacy of RQs for various strains of 9 bacterial species clinically isolated at our university hospital using the Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) method based on pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics modeling. In addition, the influence of the patients' renal function on the efficacy of RQs was evaluated. We surveyed antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 9 bacterial species (n = number of strains) [Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 15), Streptococcus pyogenes (n = 14), Streptococcus agalactiae (n = 19), methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) (n = 24), Escherichia coli (n = 35), Haemophilus influenzae (n = 17), Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 14), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (n = 31), and Moraxella catarrhalis (n = 11)] to 4 RQs [garenoxacin (GRNX), levofloxacin (LVFX), sitafloxacin (STFX), and moxifloxacin (MFLX)]. We found that compared with the other RQs, Gram-positive cocci was most resistant to LVFX, and that the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC₉₀) values for S. pneumoniae, S. pyogenes, S. agalactiae, and MSSA were high (2, 16, > 16, and 8 µg/mL, respectively). In regard to Gram-negative rods, the susceptibility of E. coli to RQs was found to be decreased, with the MIC₉₀ values of GRNX, LVFX, STFX, and MFLX being > 16, 16, 1, and 16 µg/mL, respectively. MCS revealed that the target attainment rate of the area under the unbound concentration-time curve divided by the MIC₉₀ (ƒ · AUC/MIC ratio), against S. pneumoniae was 86.9-100%, but against E. coli was low (52.1-66.2%). The ƒ · AUC/MIC target attainment rate of LVFX against S. pneumoniae, S. pyogenes, and S. agalactiae tended to decrease due to increased creatinine clearance, and that of LVFX and STFX against MSSA also

  9. Antibacterial natural products in medicinal chemistry--exodus or revival?

    PubMed

    von Nussbaum, Franz; Brands, Michael; Hinzen, Berthold; Weigand, Stefan; Häbich, Dieter

    2006-08-01

    To create a drug, nature's blueprints often have to be improved through semisynthesis or total synthesis (chemical postevolution). Selected contributions from industrial and academic groups highlight the arduous but rewarding path from natural products to drugs. Principle modification types for natural products are discussed herein, such as decoration, substitution, and degradation. The biological, chemical, and socioeconomic environments of antibacterial research are dealt with in context. Natural products, many from soil organisms, have provided the majority of lead structures for marketed anti-infectives. Surprisingly, numerous "old" classes of antibacterial natural products have never been intensively explored by medicinal chemists. Nevertheless, research on antibacterial natural products is flagging. Apparently, the "old fashioned" natural products no longer fit into modern drug discovery. The handling of natural products is cumbersome, requiring nonstandardized workflows and extended timelines. Revisiting natural products with modern chemistry and target-finding tools from biology (reversed genomics) is one option for their revival.

  10. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Bernhard; Lecker, Laura S. M.; Zoltner, Martin; Jaenicke, Elmar; Schnell, Robert; Hunter, William N.; Brenk, Ruth

    2015-07-28

    Three crystal structures of recombinant P. aeruginosa FabF are reported: the apoenzyme, an active-site mutant and a complex with a fragment of a natural product inhibitor. The characterization provides reagents and new information to support antibacterial drug discovery. Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials.

  11. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A.; Gabdoulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2015-03-01

    Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis ( YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability ( R work = 16.2, R free = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh.

  12. Structure of a complex of uridine phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis with the modified bacteriostatic antibacterial drug determined by X-ray crystallography and computer analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Balaev, V. V.; Lashkov, A. A. Gabdoulkhakov, A. G.; Seregina, T. A.; Dontsova, M. V.; Mikhailov, A. M.

    2015-03-15

    Pseudotuberculosis and bubonic plague are acute infectious diseases caused by the bacteria Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Yersinia pestis. These diseases are treated, in particular, with trimethoprim and its modified analogues. However, uridine phosphorylases (pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylases) that are present in bacterial cells neutralize the action of trimethoprim and its modified analogues on the cells. In order to reveal the character of the interaction of the drug with bacterial uridine phosphorylase, the atomic structure of the unligated molecule of uridine-specific pyrimidine nucleoside phosphorylase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (YptUPh) was determined by X-ray diffraction at 1.7 Å resolution with high reliability (R{sub work} = 16.2, R{sub free} = 19.4%; r.m.s.d. of bond lengths and bond angles are 0.006 Å and 1.005°, respectively; DPI = 0.107 Å). The atoms of the amino acid residues of the functionally important secondary-structure elements—the loop L9 and the helix H8—of the enzyme YptUPh were located. The three-dimensional structure of the complex of YptUPh with modified trimethoprim—referred to as 53I—was determined by the computer simulation. It was shown that 53I is a pseudosubstrate of uridine phosphorylases, and its pyrimidine-2,4-diamine group is located in the phosphate-binding site of the enzyme YptUPh.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of quinolone resistance in clinical isolates of Aeromonas caviae and Aeromonas veronii bv. sobria.

    PubMed

    Arias, Antonina; Seral, Cristina; Gude, M José; Castillo, F Javier

    2010-09-01

    Mutations in quinolone targets were studied together with quinolone efflux pump activation and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants in nalidixic-acid-resistant isolates of Aeromonas caviae and Aeromonas veronii. Among 135 clinical Aeromonas spp. isolated from stools of patients with gastrointestinal symptoms, 40 nalidixic acid-resistant strains belonging to A. caviae and A. veronii were selected and their susceptibility to different quinolones (ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin) further evaluated. Susceptibility to nalidixic acid and ciprofloxacin in the presence/absence of Phe- Arg-β-naphthylamide was also determined. The 16 nalidixic-acid-resistant strains identified as A. caviae were more resistant than the 24 A. veronii bv. sobria strains to ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, and ofloxacin. All strains showed a mutation (single or double) at position 83 of the QRDR sequence of gyrA, with Ser-83 → Ile as the most frequent substitution. By contrast, no mutations were found at position 87 of gyrA. Double substitutions (GyrA-ParC) were detected in 50% of A. veronii bv. sobria isolates and in 43.75% of A. caviae strains. Both species showed decreases in the MICs of ciprofloxacin. A qnrS gene was found in an A. caviae strain. Thus, in the two species of nalidixic-acid-resistant Aeromonas isolates examined, resistance mediated by efflux pumps contributed only slightly to ciprofloxacin resistance. While two isolates were positive for the aac(6')-Ib gene, no -cr variants were detected.

  14. [Preliminary study on occurrence and health risk assessment of quinolone antibiotics in vegetables from Guangzhou, China].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Wen; Zhang, Yan; Mo, Ce-Hui; Tai, Yi-Ping; Wu, Xiao-Lian; Wang, Ji-Yang; Su, Qing-Yun

    2010-10-01

    Quinolone antibiotics (QNs) including norfloxacin (NOR), enrofolxacin (ENR), ciprofloxacin (CIP) and lomefloxacin (LOM) in vegetable samples collected from Guangzhou were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with fluorescent detector (FLD). The detected frequency of QNs was 96% in vegetables. The total concentration of quinolones (sigma QNs) detected in vegetable ranged from 1.0 microg/kg to 1 683.1 microg/kg (F.W.). Leafy vegetable topped the content of quinolones among the three types of vegetables, followed by the melon-fruit vegetable and rhizome vegetable. The detected frequency of the four quinolone antibiotics ranked as NOR > CIP > LOM > ENR. Except ENR, concentrations of CIP, NOR, LOM and sigma QNs in pollution-free vegetable, green vegetable and organic vegetable were higher than those in routine cultivated vegetables. The maximum contribution to ADI value (caculated by the sum of CIP and ENR) is estimated up to 41.5% and 83% for adults and children respectively via consumption of vegetables.

  15. Antimicrobial susceptibility and mechanisms of resistance to quinolones and beta-lactams in Acinetobacter genospecies 3.

    PubMed

    Ribera, A; Fernández-Cuenca, F; Beceiro, A; Bou, G; Martínez-Martínez, L; Pascual, A; Cisneros, J M; Rodríguez-Baño, J; Pachón, J; Vila, J

    2004-04-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined in 15 epidemiologically unrelated clinical isolates of Acinetobacter genospecies 3. Moreover, the mechanisms of resistance to some beta-lactam antibiotics may be associated with the presence of a chromosomal cephalosporinase, AmpC, and the resistance to quinolones related to mutations in the gyrA and parC genes.

  16. Antimicrobial Susceptibility and Mechanisms of Resistance to Quinolones and β-Lactams in Acinetobacter Genospecies 3

    PubMed Central

    Ribera, A.; Fernández-Cuenca, F.; Beceiro, A.; Bou, G.; Martínez-Martínez, L.; Pascual, A.; Cisneros, J. M.; Rodríguez-Baño, J.; Pachón, J.; Vila, J.

    2004-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined in 15 epidemiologically unrelated clinical isolates of Acinetobacter genospecies 3. Moreover, the mechanisms of resistance to some β-lactam antibiotics may be associated with the presence of a chromosomal cephalosporinase, AmpC, and the resistance to quinolones related to mutations in the gyrA and parC genes. PMID:15047561

  17. [Determination of 25 quinolones in cosmetics by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Zhang, Yi; Tu, Xiaoke; Xie, Liqi; Yue, Zhenfeng; Kang, Haining; Wu, Weidong; Luo, Yao

    2015-03-01

    An analytical method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 25 quinolones, including danofloxacin mesylate, enrofloxacin, flumequine, oxloinic acid, ciprofloxacin, sarafloxacin, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, and ofloxacin etc in cosmetics using direct extraction and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Cosmetic sample was extracted by acidified acetonitrile, defatted by n-hexane and separated on Poroshell EC-C18 column with gradient elution program using acetonitrile and water (both containing 0. 1% formic acid) as the mobile phases and analyzed by LC-ESI-MS/MS under the positive mode using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The interference of matrix was reduced by the matrix-matched calibration standard curve. The method showed good linearities over the range of 1-200 mg/kg for the 25 quinolones with good linear correlation coefficients (r ≥ 0.999). The method detection limit of the 25 quinolones was 1.0 mg/kg, and the recoveries of all analytes in lotion, milky and cream cosmetics matrices ranged from 87.4% to 105% at the spiked levels of 1, 5 and 10 mg/kg with the relative standard deviations (RSD) of 4.54%-19.7% (n = 6). The results indicated that this method is simple, fast and credible, and suitable for the simultaneous determination of the quinolones in the above three types of cosmetics.

  18. Quinolone therapy of Klebsiella pneumoniae sepsis following irradiation: Comparison of pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin

    SciTech Connect

    Brook, I.; Elliott, T.B.; Ledney, G.D. )

    1990-05-01

    Exposure to whole-body irradiation is associated with fatal gram-negative sepsis. The effect of oral therapy with three quinolones, pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin, for orally acquired Klebsiella pneumoniae infection was tested in B6D2F1 mice exposed to 8.0 Gy whole-body irradiation from bilaterally positioned 60Co sources. A dose of 10(8) organisms was given orally 2 days after irradiation, and therapy was started 1 day later. Quinolones reduced colonization of the ileum with K. pneumoniae: 16 of 28 (57%) untreated mice harbored the organisms, compared to only 12 of 90 (13%) mice treated with quinolones (P less than 0.005). K. pneumoniae was isolated from the livers of 6 of 28 untreated mice, compared to only 1 of 90 treated mice (P less than 0.001). Only 5 of 20 (25%) untreated mice survived for at least 30 days compared with 17 of 20 (85%) mice treated with ofloxacin, 15 of 20 (75%) mice treated with pefloxacin, and 14 of 20 (70%) treated with ciprofloxacin (P less than 0.05). These data illustrate the efficacy of quinolones for oral therapy of orally acquired K. pneumoniae infection in irradiated hosts.

  19. [Determination of 25 quinolones in cosmetics by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Lin, Li; Zhang, Yi; Tu, Xiaoke; Xie, Liqi; Yue, Zhenfeng; Kang, Haining; Wu, Weidong; Luo, Yao

    2015-03-01

    An analytical method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 25 quinolones, including danofloxacin mesylate, enrofloxacin, flumequine, oxloinic acid, ciprofloxacin, sarafloxacin, nalidixic acid, norfloxacin, and ofloxacin etc in cosmetics using direct extraction and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). Cosmetic sample was extracted by acidified acetonitrile, defatted by n-hexane and separated on Poroshell EC-C18 column with gradient elution program using acetonitrile and water (both containing 0. 1% formic acid) as the mobile phases and analyzed by LC-ESI-MS/MS under the positive mode using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The interference of matrix was reduced by the matrix-matched calibration standard curve. The method showed good linearities over the range of 1-200 mg/kg for the 25 quinolones with good linear correlation coefficients (r ≥ 0.999). The method detection limit of the 25 quinolones was 1.0 mg/kg, and the recoveries of all analytes in lotion, milky and cream cosmetics matrices ranged from 87.4% to 105% at the spiked levels of 1, 5 and 10 mg/kg with the relative standard deviations (RSD) of 4.54%-19.7% (n = 6). The results indicated that this method is simple, fast and credible, and suitable for the simultaneous determination of the quinolones in the above three types of cosmetics. PMID:26182469

  20. Characterization of quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovar Indiana from chickens in China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to characterize the quinolone resistance of Salmonella Indiana isolated from chickens in China. A total of 130 Salmonella isolates were obtained from chicken farms and slaughterhouses in the Shandong Province of China. All isolate serotypes were tested according to the Kauf...

  1. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance among non-typhi Salmonella enterica isolates, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We determined the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance mechanisms among non-Typhi Salmonella (NTS) spp. isolates from humans, food animals, and retail meat in the United States in 2007. Fifty-one (2.4%) of human isolates (n=2165), 5 (1.6%) of isolates from animal isolates (n=1915) an...

  2. Quinolone signaling in the cell-to-cell communication system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pesci, E C; Milbank, J B; Pearson, J P; McKnight, S; Kende, A S; Greenberg, E P; Iglewski, B H

    1999-09-28

    Numerous species of bacteria use an elegant regulatory mechanism known as quorum sensing to control the expression of specific genes in a cell-density dependent manner. In Gram-negative bacteria, quorum sensing systems function through a cell-to-cell signal molecule (autoinducer) that consists of a homoserine lactone with a fatty acid side chain. Such is the case in the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which contains two quorum sensing systems (las and rhl) that operate via the autoinducers, N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone and N-butyryl-L-homoserine lactone. The study of these signal molecules has shown that they bind to and activate transcriptional activator proteins that specifically induce numerous P. aeruginosa virulence genes. We report here that P. aeruginosa produces another signal molecule, 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone, which has been designated as the Pseudomonas quinolone signal. It was found that this unique cell-to-cell signal controlled the expression of lasB, which encodes for the major virulence factor, LasB elastase. We also show that the synthesis and bioactivity of Pseudomonas quinolone signal were mediated by the P. aeruginosa las and rhl quorum sensing systems, respectively. The demonstration that 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone can function as an intercellular signal sheds light on the role of secondary metabolites and shows that P. aeruginosa cell-to-cell signaling is not restricted to acyl-homoserine lactones.

  3. The inactivation of RNase G reduces the Stenotrophomonas maltophilia susceptibility to quinolones by triggering the heat shock response.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, Alejandra; Corona, Fernando; Dias, Ricardo; Sánchez, Maria B; Martínez, Jose L

    2015-01-01

    Quinolone resistance is usually due to mutations in the genes encoding bacterial topoisomerases. However, different reports have shown that neither clinical quinolone resistant isolates nor in vitro obtained Stenotrophomonas maltophilia mutants present mutations in such genes. The mechanisms so far described consist on efflux pumps' overexpression. Our objective is to get information on novel mechanisms of S. maltophilia quinolone resistance. For this purpose, a transposon-insertion mutant library was obtained in S. maltophilia D457. One mutant presenting reduced susceptibility to nalidixic acid was selected. Inverse PCR showed that the inactivated gene encodes RNase G. Complementation of the mutant with wild-type RNase G allele restored the susceptibility to quinolones. Transcriptomic and real-time RT-PCR analyses showed that several genes encoding heat-shock response proteins were expressed at higher levels in the RNase defective mutant than in the wild-type strain. In agreement with this situation, heat-shock reduces the S. maltophilia susceptibility to quinolone. We can then conclude that the inactivation of the RNase G reduces the susceptibility of S. maltophilia to quinolones, most likely by regulating the expression of heat-shock response genes. Heat-shock induces a transient phenotype of quinolone resistance in S. maltophilia.

  4. The inactivation of RNase G reduces the Stenotrophomonas maltophilia susceptibility to quinolones by triggering the heat shock response

    PubMed Central

    Bernardini, Alejandra; Corona, Fernando; Dias, Ricardo; Sánchez, Maria B.; Martínez, Jose L.

    2015-01-01

    Quinolone resistance is usually due to mutations in the genes encoding bacterial topoisomerases. However, different reports have shown that neither clinical quinolone resistant isolates nor in vitro obtained Stenotrophomonas maltophilia mutants present mutations in such genes. The mechanisms so far described consist on efflux pumps’ overexpression. Our objective is to get information on novel mechanisms of S. maltophilia quinolone resistance. For this purpose, a transposon-insertion mutant library was obtained in S. maltophilia D457. One mutant presenting reduced susceptibility to nalidixic acid was selected. Inverse PCR showed that the inactivated gene encodes RNase G. Complementation of the mutant with wild-type RNase G allele restored the susceptibility to quinolones. Transcriptomic and real-time RT-PCR analyses showed that several genes encoding heat-shock response proteins were expressed at higher levels in the RNase defective mutant than in the wild-type strain. In agreement with this situation, heat-shock reduces the S. maltophilia susceptibility to quinolone. We can then conclude that the inactivation of the RNase G reduces the susceptibility of S. maltophilia to quinolones, most likely by regulating the expression of heat-shock response genes. Heat-shock induces a transient phenotype of quinolone resistance in S. maltophilia. PMID:26539164

  5. A series of 2D metal-quinolone complexes: Syntheses, structures, and physical properties

    SciTech Connect

    He, Jiang-Hong; Xiao, Dong-Rong; Chen, Hai-Yan; Sun, Dian-Zhen; Yan, Shi-Wei; Wang, Xin; Ye, Zhong-Li; Luo, Qun-Li; Wang, En-Bo

    2013-02-15

    Six novel 2D metal-quinolone complexes, namely [Cd(cfH)(bpdc)]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (1), [M(norfH)(bpdc)]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (M=Cd (2) and Mn (3)), [Mn{sub 2}(cfH)(odpa)(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}]{center_dot}0.5H{sub 2}O (4), [Co{sub 2}(norfH)(bpta)({mu}{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{center_dot}H{sub 2}O (5) and [Co{sub 3}(saraH){sub 2}(Hbpta){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]{center_dot}9H{sub 2}O (6) (cfH=ciprofloxacin, norfH=norfloxacin, saraH=sarafloxacin, bpdc=4,4 Prime -biphenyldicarboxylate, odpa=4,4 Prime -oxydiphthalate, bpta=3,3 Prime ,4,4 Prime -biphenyltetracarboxylate) have been synthesized and characterized. Compounds 1-3 consist of 2D arm-shaped layers based on the 1D {l_brace}M(COO){r_brace}{sub n}{sup n+} chains. Compounds 4 and 5 display 2D structures based on tetranuclear manganese or cobalt clusters with (3,6)-connected kgd topology. Compound 6 exhibits a 2D bilayer structure, which represents the first example of metal-quinolone complexes with 2D bilayer structure. By inspection of the structures of 1-6, it is believed that the long aromatic polycarboxylate ligands are important for the formation of 2D metal-quinolone complexes. The magnetic properties of compounds 3-6 was studied, indicating the existence of antiferromagnetic interactions. Furthermore, the luminescent properties of compounds 1-2 are discussed. - Graphical abstract: Six novel 2D metal-quinolone complexes have been prepared by self-assemblies of the quinolones and metal salts in the presence of long aromatic polycarboxylates. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds 1-3 consist of novel 2D arm-shaped layers based on the 1D {l_brace}M(COO){r_brace}{sub n}{sup n+} chains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds 4 and 5 are two novel 2D layers based on tetranuclear Mn or Co clusters with kgd topology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound 6 is the first example of metal-quinolone complexes with 2D bilayer structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compounds 1-6 represent six unusual

  6. Microbial screening for quinolones residues in cow milk by bio-optical method.

    PubMed

    Appicciafuoco, Brunella; Dragone, Roberto; Frazzoli, Chiara; Bolzoni, Giuseppe; Mantovani, Alberto; Ferrini, Anna Maria

    2015-03-15

    The use of antibiotics on lactating cows should be monitored for the possible risk of milk contamination with residues. Accordingly, Maximum Residue Levels (MRLs) are established by the European Commission to guarantee consumers safety. As pointed out by Dec 2002/657/EC, screening is the first step in the strategy for antibiotic residue control, thus playing a key role in the whole control procedure. However, current routine screening methods applied in milk chain still fail to detect residues of quinolones at concentrations of interest. This paper reports the findings of a new bio-optical method for the screening of quinolones residues in bovine milk, based on E. coli ATCC 11303 growth inhibition. The effect of blank and spiked cow milk samples (aliquots equivalents to 0.8%, v/v) is evaluated in Mueller Hinton Broth (MHb) and MHb enriched with MgSO4 2% (MHb-Mg) inoculated with the test strain at the concentration of 10(4)CFU/mL. The presence of quinolones inhibits the cellular growth in MHb, while this effect is neutralized in MHb-Mg allowing both detection and presumptive identification of quinolones. Growth of the test strain is monitored at 37 °C in a Bioscreen C automated system, and Optical Density (OD) at 600 nm is recorded every 10 min after shaking for 10s. Growth curves (OD vs. time) of E. coli ATCC 11303 are assessed in milk samples, with and without quinolones, and their differences in terms of ΔOD (ΔOD600nm=ODMHb-Mg-ODMHb) are calculated. The presence of quinolones is detected by the cellular growth inhibition (OD vs time, none increase in the value OD) and presumptively identified through the increase of the slope of ΔOD600nm curve (ΔOD vs. time), after about 3h of incubation. The detection limit for ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin is at the level of MRL, for marbofloxacin is at 2-fold the MRL whereas for danofloxacin is at 4-fold the MRL. Although the sensitivity of the method could be further improved and the procedure automated, it is a

  7. Identification of Additional Anti-Persister Activity against Borrelia burgdorferi from an FDA Drug Library

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jie; Weitner, Megan; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Sullivan, David; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is a leading vector-borne disease in the United States. Although the majority of Lyme patients can be cured with standard 2–4 week antibiotic treatment, 10%–20% of patients continue to suffer from prolonged post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). While the cause for this is unclear, persisting organisms not killed by current Lyme antibiotics may be involved. In our previous study, we screened an FDA drug library and reported 27 top hits that showed high activity against Borrelia persisters. In this study, we present the results of an additional 113 active hits that have higher activity against the stationary phase B. burgdorferi than the currently used Lyme antibiotics. Many antimicrobial agents (antibiotics, antivirals, antifungals, anthelmintics or antiparasitics) used for treating other infections were found to have better activity than the current Lyme antibiotics. These include antibacterials such as rifamycins (3-formal-rifamycin, rifaximin, rifamycin SV), thiostrepton, quinolone drugs (sarafloxacin, clinafloxacin, tosufloxacin), and cell wall inhibitors carbenicillin, tazobactam, aztreonam; antifungal agents such as fluconazole, mepartricin, bifonazole, climbazole, oxiconazole, nystatin; antiviral agents zanamivir, nevirapine, tilorone; antimalarial agents artemisinin, methylene blue, and quidaldine blue; antihelmintic and antiparasitic agents toltrazuril, tartar emetic, potassium antimonyl tartrate trihydrate, oxantel, closantel, hycanthone, pyrimethamine, and tetramisole. Interestingly, drugs used for treating other non-infectious conditions including verteporfin, oltipraz, pyroglutamic acid, pidolic acid, and dextrorphan tartrate, that act on the glutathione/γ-glutamyl pathway involved in protection against free radical damage, and also the antidepressant drug indatraline, were found to have high activity against stationary phase B. burgdorferi. Among the active hits, agents that affect cell membranes, energy production, and

  8. Identification of Additional Anti-Persister Activity against Borrelia burgdorferi from an FDA Drug Library.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Weitner, Megan; Shi, Wanliang; Zhang, Shuo; Sullivan, David; Zhang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Lyme disease is a leading vector-borne disease in the United States. Although the majority of Lyme patients can be cured with standard 2-4 week antibiotic treatment, 10%-20% of patients continue to suffer from prolonged post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome (PTLDS). While the cause for this is unclear, persisting organisms not killed by current Lyme antibiotics may be involved. In our previous study, we screened an FDA drug library and reported 27 top hits that showed high activity against Borrelia persisters. In this study, we present the results of an additional 113 active hits that have higher activity against the stationary phase B. burgdorferi than the currently used Lyme antibiotics. Many antimicrobial agents (antibiotics, antivirals, antifungals, anthelmintics or antiparasitics) used for treating other infections were found to have better activity than the current Lyme antibiotics. These include antibacterials such as rifamycins (3-formal-rifamycin, rifaximin, rifamycin SV), thiostrepton, quinolone drugs (sarafloxacin, clinafloxacin, tosufloxacin), and cell wall inhibitors carbenicillin, tazobactam, aztreonam; antifungal agents such as fluconazole, mepartricin, bifonazole, climbazole, oxiconazole, nystatin; antiviral agents zanamivir, nevirapine, tilorone; antimalarial agents artemisinin, methylene blue, and quidaldine blue; antihelmintic and antiparasitic agents toltrazuril, tartar emetic, potassium antimonyl tartrate trihydrate, oxantel, closantel, hycanthone, pyrimethamine, and tetramisole. Interestingly, drugs used for treating other non-infectious conditions including verteporfin, oltipraz, pyroglutamic acid, pidolic acid, and dextrorphan tartrate, that act on the glutathione/γ-glutamyl pathway involved in protection against free radical damage, and also the antidepressant drug indatraline, were found to have high activity against stationary phase B. burgdorferi. Among the active hits, agents that affect cell membranes, energy production, and reactive

  9. Dual mode antibacterial activity of ion substituted calcium phosphate nanocarriers for bone infections.

    PubMed

    Sampath Kumar, T S; Madhumathi, K; Rubaiya, Y; Doble, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential for the management of infectious diseases caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria, through the development of newer antibacterial materials and efficient modes of antibiotic delivery. Calcium phosphate (CaP) bioceramics are commonly used as bone substitutes due to their similarity to bone mineral and are widely researched upon for the treatment of bone infections associated with bone loss. CaPs can be used as local antibiotic delivery agents for bone infections and can be substituted with antibacterial ions in their crystal structure to have a wide spectrum, sustained antibacterial activity even against drug resistant bacteria. In the present work, a dual mode antibiotic delivery system with antibacterial ion substituted calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) nanoparticles has been developed. Antibacterial ions such as zinc, silver, and strontium have been incorporated into CDHA at concentrations of 6, 0.25-0.75, and 2.5-7.5 at. %, respectively. The samples were found to be phase pure, acicular nanoparticles of length 40-50 nm and width 5-6 nm approximately. The loading and release profile of doxycycline, a commonly used antibiotic, was studied from the nanocarriers. The drug release was studied for 5 days and the release profile was influenced by the ion concentrations. The release of antibacterial ions was studied over a period of 21 days. The ion substituted CDHA samples were tested for antibacterial efficacy on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by MIC/MBC studies and time-kill assay. AgCDHA and ZnCDHA showed high antibacterial activity against both bacteria, while SrCDHA was weakly active against S. aureus. Present study shows that the antibiotic release can provide the initial high antibacterial activity, and the sustained ion release can provide a long-term antibacterial activity. Such dual mode antibiotic and antibacterial ion release offers an efficient and potent way to treat an incumbent drug

  10. In-vitro susceptibility of staphylococci to fleroxacin in comparison with six other quinolones.

    PubMed

    Pohlod, D J; Saravolatz, L D; Somerville, M M

    1988-10-01

    Susceptibilities of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, n = 32), methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA, n = 32), and S. epidermidis (SE, n = 24) were determined to fleroxacin, amifloxacin, ciprofloxacin, difloxacin, enoxacin, norfloxacin, and ofloxacin. All organisms were isolated from the blood of patients with infective endocarditis. MRSA and MSSA MIC90s were less than 1.0 mg/l of fleroxacin, ciprofloxacin, difloxacin, and ofloxacin while amifloxacin and norfloxacin produced MIC90s of less than 2.0 mg/l and enoxacin MIC90s of less than 4.0 mg/l. For S. epidermidis MIC90s were less than 1.0 mg/l of all quinolones except amifloxacin whose MIC90 was less than 2.0 mg/l. Two strains from each staphylococcal group were used in time-kill trials performed with all seven quinolones. Within 8 h, all quinolones colony counts were decreased by one log. At 24 h, most quinolones decreased MRSA, MSSA, and SE colony counts by two to four logs; however, exceptions were found with (1) difloxacin, enoxacin, and norfloxacin against MRSA, (2) ciprofloxacin and enoxacin against MSSA, and (3) ciprofloxacin against SE in which all colony counts increased one to three logs in 24 h. When quinolone time-kill trials did not show a decrease in colony counts at 24 h, the MIC's for the 24 h growth showed a four- to 250-fold increase when compared with pre-trial MICs. No selection or emergence of resistant organisms was found with fleroxacin, amifloxacin or ofloxacin.

  11. Structures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) and a C164Q mutant provide templates for antibacterial drug discovery and identify a buried potassium ion and a ligand-binding site that is an artefact of the crystal form.

    PubMed

    Baum, Bernhard; Lecker, Laura S M; Zoltner, Martin; Jaenicke, Elmar; Schnell, Robert; Hunter, William N; Brenk, Ruth

    2015-08-01

    Bacterial infections remain a serious health concern, in particular causing life-threatening infections of hospitalized and immunocompromised patients. The situation is exacerbated by the rise in antibacterial drug resistance, and new treatments are urgently sought. In this endeavour, accurate structures of molecular targets can support early-stage drug discovery. Here, crystal structures, in three distinct forms, of recombinant Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-ketoacyl-(acyl-carrier-protein) synthase II (FabF) are presented. This enzyme, which is involved in fatty-acid biosynthesis, has been validated by genetic and chemical means as an antibiotic target in Gram-positive bacteria and represents a potential target in Gram-negative bacteria. The structures of apo FabF, of a C164Q mutant in which the binding site is altered to resemble the substrate-bound state and of a complex with 3-(benzoylamino)-2-hydroxybenzoic acid are reported. This compound mimics aspects of a known natural product inhibitor, platensimycin, and surprisingly was observed binding outside the active site, interacting with a symmetry-related molecule. An unusual feature is a completely buried potassium-binding site that was identified in all three structures. Comparisons suggest that this may represent a conserved structural feature of FabF relevant to fold stability. The new structures provide templates for structure-based ligand design and, together with the protocols and reagents, may underpin a target-based drug-discovery project for urgently needed antibacterials.

  12. The Anti-Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Quinolone WCK 771 Has Potent Activity against Sequentially Selected Mutants, Has a Narrow Mutant Selection Window against Quinolone-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and Preferentially Targets DNA Gyrase▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Sachin S.; Mundkur, Lakshmi A.; Gupte, Shrikant V.; Patel, Mahesh V.; Khorakiwala, Habil F.

    2006-01-01

    WCK 771 is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone with enhanced activity against quinolone-resistant staphylococci. To understand the impact of the target-level interactions of WCK 771 on its antistaphylococcal pharmacodynamic properties, we determined the MICs for genetically defined mutants and studied the mutant prevention concentrations (MPCs), the frequency of mutation, and the cidality against the wild type and double mutants. There was a twofold increase in the MICs of WCK 771 for single gyrA mutants, indicating that DNA gyrase is its primary target. All first- and second-step mutants selected by WCK 771 revealed gyrA and grlA mutations, respectively. The MICs of WCK 771 and clinafloxacin were found to be superior to those of other quinolones against strains with double and triple mutations. WCK 771 was also cidal for high-density double mutants at low concentrations. WCK 771 and clinafloxacin showed narrow mutant selection windows compared to those of the other quinolones. Against a panel of 50 high-level quinolone-resistant clinical isolates of staphylococci (ciprofloxacin MIC ≥ 16 μg/ml), the WCK 771 MPCs were ≤2 μg/ml for 68% of the strains and ≤4 μg/ml for 28% of the strains. Our results demonstrate that gyrA is the primary target of WCK 771 and that it has pharmacodynamic properties remarkably different from those of quinolones with dual targets (garenoxacin and moxifloxacin) and topoisomerase IV-specific quinolones (trovafloxacin). WCK 771 displayed an activity profile comparable to that of clinafloxacin, a dual-acting quinolone with a high affinity to DNA gyrase. Overall, the findings signify the key role of DNA gyrase in determining the optimal antistaphylococcal features of quinolones. PMID:16940059

  13. Antibacterial activity of clarithromycin loaded PLGA nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Valizadeh, H; Mohammadi, G; Ehyaei, R; Milani, M; Azhdarzadeh, M; Zakeri-Milani, P; Lotfipour, F

    2012-01-01

    Novel drug delivery systems such as nanoparticles (NPs) have been proved to enhance the effectiveness of many drugs. Clarithromycin is a broad spectrum macrolide antibiotic, used in many infectious conditions like upper and lower respiratory tract infections, and skin and other soft tissue infections. This paper describes the preparation and enhanced in vitro antibacterial activities of clarithromycin loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. A modified quasi-emulsion solvent diffusion (MQESD) method was used to prepare clarithromycin (CLR) NPs. The antibacterial activity of the NPs was evaluated using the agar well diffusion method against Escherichia coli (PTCC 1330), Haemophilus influenzae (PTCC 1623), Salmonella typhi (PTCC 1609), Staphylococcus aureus (PTCC 1112) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (PTCC 1240). The inhibition zone diameters related to each nano formulation were compared with those for untreated CLR at the same concentrations. The results indicated that the mean inhibition zone diameters of NPs against all the bacteria tested were significantly higher than those of untreated CLR, particularly in the case of S. aureus. The increased potency of CLR NPs may be related to some physicochemical properties of NPs like modified surface characteristics, lower drug degradation, and increased drug adsorption and uptake.

  14. Antibacterial properties and mechanisms of gold-silver nanocages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yulan; Wan, Jiangshan; Miron, Richard J.; Zhao, Yanbin; Zhang, Yufeng

    2016-05-01

    Despite the number of antibiotics used in routine clinical practice, bacterial infections continue to be one of the most important challenges faced in humans. The main concerns arise from the continuing emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the difficulties faced with the pharmaceutical development of new antibiotics. Thus, advancements in the avenue of novel antibacterial agents are essential. In this study, gold (Au) was combined with silver (Ag), a well-known antibacterial material, to form silver nanoparticles producing a gold-silver alloy structure with hollow interiors and porous walls (gold-silver nanocage). This novel material was promising in antibacterial applications due to its better biocompatibility than Ag nanoparticles, potential in photothermal effects and drug delivery ability. The gold-silver nanocage was then tested for its antibacterial properties and the mechanism involved leading to its antibacterial properties. This study confirms that this novel gold-silver nanocage has broad-spectrum antibacterial properties exerting its effects through the destruction of the cell membrane, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of cell apoptosis. Therefore, we introduce a novel gold-silver nanocage that serves as a potential nanocarrier for the future delivery of antibiotics.

  15. Structure of PqsD, a Pseudomonas quinolone signal biosynthetic enzyme, in complex with anthranilate.

    PubMed

    Bera, Asim K; Atanasova, Vesna; Robinson, Howard; Eisenstein, Edward; Coleman, James P; Pesci, Everett C; Parsons, James F

    2009-09-15

    Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone, is an intercellular alkyl quinolone signaling molecule produced by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Alkyl quinolone signaling is an atypical system that, in P. aeruginosa, controls the expression of numerous virulence factors. PQS is synthesized from the tryptophan pathway intermediate, anthranilate, which is derived either from the kynurenine pathway or from an alkyl quinolone specific anthranilate synthase encoded by phnAB. Anthranilate is converted to PQS by the enzymes encoded by the pqsABCDE operon and pqsH. PqsA forms an activated anthraniloyl-CoA thioester that shuttles anthranilate to the PqsD active site where it is transferred to Cys112 of PqsD. In the only biochemically characterized reaction, a condensation then occurs between anthraniloyl-PqsD and malonyl-CoA or malonyl-ACP, a second PqsD substrate, forming 2,4-dihydroxyquinoline (DHQ). The role PqsD plays in the biosynthesis of other alkyl quinolones, such as PQS, is unclear, though it has been reported to be required for their production. No evidence exists that DHQ is a PQS precursor, however. Here we present a structural and biophysical characterization of PqsD that includes several crystal structures of the enzyme, including that of the PqsD-anthranilate covalent intermediate and the inactive Cys112Ala active site mutant in complex with anthranilate. The structure reveals that PqsD is structurally similar to the FabH and chalcone synthase families of fatty acid and polyketide synthases. The crystallographic asymmetric unit contains a PqsD dimer. The PqsD monomer is composed of two nearly identical approximately 170-residue alphabetaalphabetaalpha domains. The structures show anthranilate-liganded Cys112 is positioned deep in the protein interior at the bottom of an approximately 15 A long channel while a second anthraniloyl-CoA molecule is waiting in the cleft leading to the protein surface. Cys112, His257, and

  16. Structure of PqsD, a Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal Biosynthetic Enzyme, in Complex with Anthranilate†

    PubMed Central

    Bera, Asim K.; Atanasova, Vesna; Robinson, Howard; Eisenstein, Edward; Coleman, James P.; Pesci, Everett C.; Parsons, James F.

    2009-01-01

    Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone, is an intercellular alkyl quinolone signaling molecule produced by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Alkyl quinolone signaling is an atypical system that, in P. aeruginosa, controls the expression of numerous virulence factors. PQS is synthesized from the tryptophan pathway intermediate, anthranilate, which is either derived from the kynurenine pathway or from an alkyl quinolone specific anthranilate synthase encoded by phnAB. Anthranilate is converted to PQS by the enzymes encoded by the pqsABCDE operon and pqsH. PqsA forms an activated anthraniloyl-CoA thioester that shuttles anthranilate to the PqsD active site where it is transferred to Cys112 of PqsD. In the only biochemically characterized reaction, a condensation then occurs between anthraniloyl-PqsD and malonyl-CoA or malonyl-ACP, a second PqsD substrate, forming 2,4-dihydroxyquinoline (DHQ). The role PqsD plays in the biosynthesis of other alkyl quinolones, such as PQS, is unclear though it has been reported to be required for their production. No evidence however, exists that DHQ is a PQS precursor. Here we present a structural and biophysical characterization of PqsD that includes several crystal structures of the enzyme including that of the PqsD-anthranilate covalent intermediate and the inactive Cys112Ala active site mutant in complex with anthranilate. The structure reveals that PqsD is structurally similar to the FabH and chalcone synthase families of fatty acid and polyketide synthases. The crystallographic asymmetric unit contains a PqsD dimer. The PqsD monomer is composed of two nearly identical ~170 residue αβαβα domains. The structures show anthranilate-liganded Cys112 is positioned deep in the protein interior at the bottom of a ~15 Å long channel while a second anthraniloyl-CoA molecule is waiting in the cleft leading to the protein surface. Cys112, His257, and Asn287 form the FabH-like catalytic triad

  17. Comparative in vitro activities of newer quinolones against Pseudomonas species and Xanthomonas maltophilia isolated from patients with cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Rolston, K V; Messer, M; Ho, D H

    1990-01-01

    The in vitro susceptibilities of three Pseudomonas species (Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas putida, and Pseudomonas fluorescens) and Xanthomonas maltophilia to quinolone antimicrobial agents were determined. Several newer agents, particularly PD117558, PD117596, PD127391, sparfloxacin (AT-4140), A-56620, and temafloxacin, were active against Pseudomonas species. X. maltophilia isolates were generally less susceptible than were Pseudomonas isolates but were inhibited by some of the newer quinolones. PMID:2285297

  18. Antibacterial drug leads: DNA and enzyme multitargeting.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Yang; Li, Kai; Gao, Jian; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Chen, Chun-Chi; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Zhang, Yonghui; Guo, Rey-Ting; Oldfield, Eric

    2015-02-12

    We report the results of an investigation of the activity of a series of amidine and bisamidine compounds against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The most active compounds bound to an AT-rich DNA dodecamer (CGCGAATTCGCG)2 and using DSC were found to increase the melting transition by up to 24 °C. Several compounds also inhibited undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS) with IC50 values of 100-500 nM, and we found good correlations (R(2) = 0.89, S. aureus; R(2) = 0.79, E. coli) between experimental and predicted cell growth inhibition by using DNA ΔTm and UPPS IC50 experimental results together with one computed descriptor. We also solved the structures of three bisamidines binding to DNA as well as three UPPS structures. Overall, the results are of general interest in the context of the development of resistance-resistant antibiotics that involve multitargeting. PMID:25574764

  19. Designing Nanogel Carriers for Antibacterial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, M. Carme Coll; Dastgheyb, Sana; Hickok, Noreen J.; Eckmann, David M.; Composto, Russell J.

    2014-01-01

    Recently, we developed a novel and simple synthesis route to create nanosized (~ 5 nm) silver nanoparticles (NP) embedded in a biocompatible nanogel (NG) comprised of degradable, natural polymers, namely, dextran and lysozyme. In this study, we prepare hybrid nanogels with varying lysozyme content, evaluate their potential to reduce Ag NPs in situ (UV-Vis, cryo-TEM, TGA and FTIR) and determine their antibacterial properties against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Lysozyme enhances nucleation and stabilization of Ag NPs while limiting their growth. As lysozyme concentration increases, larger nanogels with greater loading of smaller Ag NPs are obtained. The antibacterial properties of hybrid NGs depend upon nanogel type and bacterial conditions. Hybrid nanogels with the largest Ag NPs show the lowest minimum inhibition concentration (MIC). However, the greatest bacterial killing efficiency (up to 100%) occurs within one hour if the bacteria are exposed to hybrid nanogels with smaller Ag NPs while agitating the medium. These results suggest that nanogel properties as well as antibacterial activity can be tuned by varying lysozyme content. By targeting drug delivery (e.g., ligand grafted surface), these nanogels can be used to prevent biofilm formation and control infection without the complications (i.e., over exposure) associated with classical antibiotic delivery platforms. PMID:24434534

  20. Plasmid-related quinolone resistance determinants in epidemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus, uropathogenic Escherichia coli, and marine bacteria from an aquaculture area in Chile.

    PubMed

    Aedo, Sandra; Ivanova, Larisa; Tomova, Alexandra; Cabello, Felipe C

    2014-08-01

    Marine bacteria from aquaculture areas with industrial use of quinolones have the potential to pass quinolone resistance genes to animal and human pathogens. The VPA0095 gene, related to the quinolone resistance determinant qnrA, from clinical isolates of epidemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus conferred reduced susceptibility to quinolone after cloning into Escherichia coli K-12 either when acting alone or synergistically with DNA gyrase mutations. In addition, a plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance gene from marine bacteria, aac(6')-Ib-cr, was identical to aac(6')-Ib-cr from urinary tract isolates of E. coli, suggesting a recent flow of this gene between these bacteria isolated from different environments. aac(6')-Ib-cr from E. coli also conferred reduced susceptibility to quinolone and kanamycin when cloned into E. coli K-12.

  1. Pharmacokinetics and serum bactericidal activities of quinolones in combination with clindamycin, metronidazole, and ornidazole.

    PubMed Central

    Boeckh, M; Lode, H; Deppermann, K M; Grineisen, S; Shokry, F; Held, R; Wernicke, K; Koeppe, P; Wagner, J; Krasemann, C

    1990-01-01

    To enhance the antimicrobial spectrum of the quinolones against anaerobic organisms and gram-positive bacteria, we investigated in two studies the parenteral combinations of ciprofloxacin (200 mg) and ofloxacin (200 mg) with metronidazole (500 mg) or clindamycin (600 mg) and the oral combinations of enoxacin (400 mg) and fleroxacin (400 mg) with metronidazole (400 mg), clindamycin (300 mg), or ornidazole (500 mg) (only with fleroxacin). The pharmacokinetics and serum bactericidal activities (SBAs) against 5 aerobic and 2 anaerobic species (total, 58 strains) were determined in two groups of 10 healthy volunteers by using a randomized crossover study design. The additions of metronidazole, clindamycin, and ornidazole did not affect the pharmacokinetics of the quinolones. The combination of clindamycin with ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, and, to a lesser extent, fleroxacin resulted in an increase of the SBA against gram-positive strains (mean peak titers): Staphylococcus aureus, ciprofloxacin alone, 1:5.5; ciprofloxacin-clindamycin, 1:19.9; ofloxacin alone, 1:3.6; ofloxacin-clindamycin, 1:17.5; fleroxacin alone, 1:4.3; fleroxacin-clindamycin, 1:8.1; Streptococcus pneumoniae (fleroxacin and enoxacin were not tested), ciprofloxacin alone, 1:2.0; ciprofloxacin-clindamycin, 1:53; ofloxacin alone, 1:2.6; and ofloxacin-clindamycin, 1:49.2. The high SBA of quinolones against gram-negative bacteria was not affected by the combinations; however, relatively low activities against Pseudomonas aeruginosa were detected. In general, against anaerobic bacteria, low bactericidal activities were determined in both studies (mean peak titers ranged from 1:2.1 to 1:3.1; mean trough titers range from 1:2.0 to 1:2.9). In clinical settings with severe mixed infections, a parenteral therapy consisting of modern quinolones together with clindamycin or imidazole derivatives seems to be active and offers no obvious interactions. PMID:2088195

  2. Zabofloxacin (DW-224a) activity against Neisseria gonorrhoeae including quinolone-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ronald N; Biedenbach, Douglas J; Ambrose, Paul G; Wikler, Matthew A

    2008-09-01

    Zabofloxacin, a new fluoroquinolone compound (DW-224a), was tested by reference agar dilution methods against 35 strains of multiresistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The potency of zabofloxacin (MIC(50), 0.016 microg/mL) was generally comparable with azithromycin but 8-fold superior to ciprofloxacin. This novel naphthyridine should be explored as an alternative therapy for quinolone-nonsusceptible gonorrhea and Chlamydia trachomatis infections. PMID:18620833

  3. Potent antibacterial nanoparticles for pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hong-Zheng; Chen, Wei-Yu; Wu, Ching-Yi; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2015-01-28

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria have emerged because of the prevalent use of antibacterial agents. Thus, new antibacterial agents and therapeutics that can treat bacterial infections are necessary. Vancomycin is a potent antibiotic. Unfortunately, some bacterial strains have developed their resistance toward vancomycin. Nevertheless, it has been demonstrated that vancomycin-immobilized nanoparticles (NPs) are capable to be used in inhibition of the cell growth of vancomycin-resistant bacterial strains through multivalent interactions. However, multistep syntheses are usually necessary to generate vancomycin-immobilized NPs. Thus, maintaining the antibiotic activity of vancomycin when the drug is immobilized on the surface of NPs is challenging. In this study, a facile approach to generate vancomycin immobilized gold (Van-Au) NPs through one-pot stirring of vancomycin with aqueous tetrachloroauric acid at pH 12 and 25 °C for 24 h was demonstrated. Van-Au NPs (8.4 ± 1.3 nm in size) were readily generated. The generated Van-Au NPs maintained their antibiotic activities and inhibited the cell growth of pathogens, which included Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. Furthermore, the minimum inhibitory concentration of the Van-Au NPs against bacteria was lower than that of free-form vancomycin. Staphylococcus aureus-infected macrophages were used as the model samples to examine the antibacterial activity of the Van-Au NPs. Macrophages have the tendency to engulf Van-Au NPs through endocytosis. The results showed that the cell growth of S. aureus in the macrophages was effectively inhibited, suggesting the potential of using the generated Van-Au NPs as antibacterial agents for bacterial infectious diseases.

  4. Simple and sensitive determination of five quinolones in food by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Macarena; Aranda, Angela; Garcia, Elena; Reuvers, Thea; Hooghuis, Henny

    2003-06-15

    A simple and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method has been developed for the determination of five different quinolones: enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, sarafloxacin, oxolinic acid and flumequine in pork and salmon muscle. The method includes one extraction and clean-up step for the five quinolones together which are detected in two separated HPLC runs by means of their fluorescence. The proposed analytical method involves homogenizing of the tissue sample with 0.05 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 and clean-up by Discovery DS-18 cartridges. For chromatographic separation a Symmetry C(18) column is used in two different runs: (1) ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and sarafloxacin with acetonitrile-0.02 M phosphate buffer pH 3.0 (18:82) as mobile phase and the detector at excitation wavelength: 280 nm and emission wavelength 450 nm; and (2) oxolinic acid and flumequine with acetonitrile-0.02 M phosphate buffer pH 3.0 (34:66) as mobile phase and excitation wavelength: 312 nm and emission wavelength: 366 nm. Detection limit was as low as 5 ng g(-1), except for sarafloxacin which had a limit of 10 ng g(-1). Standard curves using blank muscle tissues spiked at different levels showed a good linear correlation coefficient, r(2) higher than 0.999 for all quinolones. PMID:12742128

  5. Characterization of quinolone resistance in Salmonella spp. isolates from food products and human samples in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pribul, Bruno Rocha; Festivo, Marcia Lima; de Souza, Miliane Moreira Soares; dos Prazeres Rodrigues, Dalia

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal salmonellosis is an important zoonotic disease caused by Salmonella enterica. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella spp. and its association with fluoroquinolone susceptibility in Brazil. A total of 129 NTS isolates (samples from human origin, food from animal origin, environmental, and animal) grouped as from animal (n = 62) and human (n = 67) food were evaluated between 2009 and 2013. These isolates were investigated through serotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and the presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes (qnr, aac(6′)-Ib) and associated integron genes (integrase, and conserved integron region). Resistance to quinolones and/or fluoroquinolones, from first to third generations, was observed. Fifteen isolates were positive for the presence of qnr genes (8 qnrS, 6 qnrB, and 1 qnrD) and twenty three of aac(6′)-Ib. The conserved integron region was detected in 67 isolates as variable regions, from ±600 to >1000 pb. The spread of NTS involving PMQR carriers is of serious concern and should be carefully monitored. PMID:26887245

  6. Characterization of quinolone resistance in Salmonella spp. isolates from food products and human samples in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pribul, Bruno Rocha; Festivo, Marcia Lima; de Souza, Miliane Moreira Soares; Rodrigues, Dalia dos Prazeres

    2016-01-01

    Non-typhoidal salmonellosis is an important zoonotic disease caused by Salmonella enterica. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella spp. and its association with fluoroquinolone susceptibility in Brazil. A total of 129 NTS isolates (samples from human origin, food from animal origin, environmental, and animal) grouped as from animal (n=62) and human (n=67) food were evaluated between 2009 and 2013. These isolates were investigated through serotyping, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and the presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes (qnr, aac(6')-Ib) and associated integron genes (integrase, and conserved integron region). Resistance to quinolones and/or fluoroquinolones, from first to third generations, was observed. Fifteen isolates were positive for the presence of qnr genes (8 qnrS, 6 qnrB, and 1 qnrD) and twenty three of aac(6')-Ib. The conserved integron region was detected in 67 isolates as variable regions, from ±600 to >1000pb. The spread of NTS involving PMQR carriers is of serious concern and should be carefully monitored.

  7. Molecular characterization of tetracycline- and quinolone-resistant Aeromonas salmonicida isolated in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Hyung; Hwang, Sun Young; Son, Jee Soo; Han, Jee Eun; Jun, Jin Woo; Shin, Sang Phil; Choresca, Casiano; Choi, Yun Jaie; Park, Yong Ho

    2011-01-01

    The antibiotic resistance of 16 Aeromonas (A.) salmonicida strains isolated from diseased fish and environmental samples in Korea from 2006 to 2009 were investigated in this study. Tetracycline or quinolone resistance was observed in eight and 16 of the isolates, respectively, based on the measured minimal inhibitory concentrations. Among the tetracycline-resistant strains, seven of the isolates harbored tetA gene and one isolate harbored tetE gene. Additionally, quinolone-resistance determining regions (QRDRs) consisting of the gyrA and parC genes were amplified and sequenced. Among the quinolone-resistant A. salmonicida strains, 15 harbored point mutations in the gyrA codon 83 which were responsible for the corresponding amino acid substitutions of Ser83→Arg83 or Ser83→Asn83. We detected no point mutations in other QRDRs, such as gyrA codons 87 and 92, and parC codons 80 and 84. Genetic similarity was assessed via pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and the results indicated high clonality among the Korean antibiotic-resistant strains of A. salmonicida. PMID:21368562

  8. Simple and sensitive determination of five quinolones in food by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Macarena; Aranda, Angela; Garcia, Elena; Reuvers, Thea; Hooghuis, Henny

    2003-06-15

    A simple and sensitive high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method has been developed for the determination of five different quinolones: enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, sarafloxacin, oxolinic acid and flumequine in pork and salmon muscle. The method includes one extraction and clean-up step for the five quinolones together which are detected in two separated HPLC runs by means of their fluorescence. The proposed analytical method involves homogenizing of the tissue sample with 0.05 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 and clean-up by Discovery DS-18 cartridges. For chromatographic separation a Symmetry C(18) column is used in two different runs: (1) ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin and sarafloxacin with acetonitrile-0.02 M phosphate buffer pH 3.0 (18:82) as mobile phase and the detector at excitation wavelength: 280 nm and emission wavelength 450 nm; and (2) oxolinic acid and flumequine with acetonitrile-0.02 M phosphate buffer pH 3.0 (34:66) as mobile phase and excitation wavelength: 312 nm and emission wavelength: 366 nm. Detection limit was as low as 5 ng g(-1), except for sarafloxacin which had a limit of 10 ng g(-1). Standard curves using blank muscle tissues spiked at different levels showed a good linear correlation coefficient, r(2) higher than 0.999 for all quinolones.

  9. Prospects for new antibacterials: can we do better?

    PubMed

    Georgopapadakou, Nafsika H

    2014-02-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibacterial drugs has been increasing relentlessly over the past two decades. This includes common residents of the human body: Staphylococcus aureus (methicillin resistant or MRSA) Enteroccus faecalis and E. faecium (vancomycin resistant or VRE): Enterobacteriaceae (multiresistant, carbapenems included or CRE). It also includes environmental, opportunistic, but intrinsically multiresistant species: Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. Financial considerations have curtailed R&D activity in the antibacterial field in all, but a couple of large pharmaceutical companies and small biotech companies have largely been unable to fill the drug discovery gap. Antibacterials currently under development have targeted, almost exclusively, Gram-positive bacteria; hence, greater effort must be directed against Gram-negative bacteria, particularly enterobacteria. There also has to be more transparency and care in clinical development. To get ahead of the problem of resistance, we must look for first-in-class antibacterials and new targets. The need to innovate is best addressed through partnerships between drug-makers and public institutions. Such partnerships would provide a long-term view and stability to projects, but also balance the interests of corporate and public stakeholders.

  10. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was <1% of that from flat and rough reference surfaces. Our micro/nanofabrication process is a scalable approach based on cost-efficient self-organization and provides potential for further developing functional surfaces to study the behavior of microbes on nanoscale topographies.We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It

  11. Characterization of ESBLs and associated quinolone resistance in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from an urban wastewater treatment plant in Algeria.

    PubMed

    Alouache, Souhila; Estepa, Vanesa; Messai, Yamina; Ruiz, Elena; Torres, Carmen; Bakour, Rabah

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was the characterization of extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) and quinolone resistance in cefotaxime-resistant coliform isolates from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). ESBLs were detected in 19 out of 24 isolates (79%) from raw water and in 21 out of 24 isolates (87.5%) from treated water, identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Molecular characterization of ESBLs and quinolone resistance showed allele profiles CTX-M-15 (3), CTX-M-3 (5), CTX-M-15+qnrB1 (1), CTX-M-3+qnrB1 (1), CTX-M-15+aac-(6')-Ib-cr (4), and CTX-M-15+qnrB1+aac-(6')-Ib-cr (7). A double mutation S83L and D87N (GyrA) and a single mutation S80I (ParC) were detected in ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli isolates. In K. pneumoniae, mutations S83I (GyrA)+S80I (ParC) or single S80I mutation were detected in ciprofloxacin-resistant isolates, and no mutation was observed in ciprofloxacin-susceptible isolates. bla(CTX-M), qnrB1, and aac-(6')-Ib-cr were found, respectively, in these genetic environments: ISEcp1-bla(CTX-M)-orf477, orf1005-orf1-qnrB1, and Tn1721-IS26-aac-(6')-Ib-cr-bla(OXA-1)-catB4. bla(CTX-M-15) was located on IncF plasmid in E. coli and bla(CTX-M-3) on IncL/M plasmid in both species (E. coli and K. pneumoniae). E. coli isolates were affiliated to the phylogroups/MLST: D/ST405 (CC405), A/ST10 (CC10), A/ST617 (CC10), and B1/ST1431. K. pneumoniae isolates belonged to phylogroup KpI and to sequence types ST15, ST17, ST36, ST48, ST54, and ST147. The study showed a multi-drug resistance at the inflow and outflow of the WWTP, with ESBL production, plasmid-mediated quinolones resistance, and mutations in topoisomerases. The findings highlight the similarity of antibiotic resistance mechanisms in the clinical setting and the environment, and the role of the latter as a source of dissemination of resistance genes.

  12. Novel Antibacterial Nanofibrous PLLA Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Kai; Sun, Hongli; Bradley, Mark A.; Dupler, Ellen J.; Giannobile, William V.; Ma, Peter X.

    2010-01-01

    In order to achieve high local bioactivity and low systemic side effects of antibiotics in the treatment of dental, periodontal and bone infections, a localized and temporally controlled delivery system is crucial. In this study, a three-dimensional (3D) porous tissue engineering scaffold was developed with the ability to release antibiotics in a controlled fashion for long-term inhibition of bacterial growth. The highly soluble antibiotic drug, Doxycycline (DOXY), was successfully incorporated into PLGA nanospheres using a modified water-in-oil-in-oil (w/o/o) emulsion method. The PLGA nanospheres (NS) were then incorporated into prefabricated nanofibrous PLLA scaffolds with a well interconnected macroporous structure. The release kinetics of DOXY from four different PLGA NS formulations on a PLLA scaffold was investigated. DOXY could be released from the NS-scaffolds in a locally and temporally controlled manner. The DOXY release is controlled by DOXY diffusion out of the NS and is strongly dependent upon the physical and chemical properties of the PLGA. While PLGA50-6.5K, PLGA50-64K, and PLGA75-113K NS-scaffolds discharge DOXY rapidly with a high initial burst release, PLGA85-142K NS-scaffold can extend the release of DOXY to longer than 6 weeks with a low initial burst release. Compared to NS alone, the NS incorporated on a 3-D scaffold had significantly reduced the initial burst release. In vitro antibacterial tests of PLGA85 NS-scaffold demonstrated its ability to inhibit common bacterial growth (S.aureus and E.coli) for a prolonged duration. The successful incorporation of DOXY onto 3-D scaffolds and its controlled release from scaffolds extends the usage of nano-fibrous scaffolds from the delivery of large molecules such as growth factors to the delivery of small hydrophilic drugs, allowing for a broader application and a more complex tissue engineering strategy. PMID:20570700

  13. An outpatient antibacterial stewardship intervention during the journey to JCI accreditation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Antibacterial overuse, misuse and resistance have become a major global threat. The Joint Commission International (JCI) accreditation standards include quality improvement and patient safety, which is exemplified by antimicrobial stewardship. There are currently few reports on interventions to improve the quality of outpatient antibacterial prescribing. Methods A before-after intervention study, aiming at antibacterial use in outpatients, was performed in a university-affiliated hospital with 2.8 million outpatient visits annually during the journey to JCI accreditation (March of 2012 - March of 2013). Comprehensive intervention measures included formulary adjustment, classification management, motivational, information technological, educational and organizational measures. A defined daily dose (DDD) methodology was applied. Pharmacoeconomic data and drug-related problems (DRPs) were statistically compared between the two phases. Results The variety of antibacterials available in outpatient pharmacy decreased from 38 to 16. The proportion of antibacterial prescriptions significantly decreased (12.7% versus 9.9%, P < 0.01). The proportion of prescriptions containing the restricted antibacterials was 30.4% in the second phase, significantly lower than the value of 44.7% in the first phase (P < 0.01). The overall proportion of oral versus all antibacterial prescriptions increased (94.0% to 100%, P < 0.01) when measured as defined daily doses. Statistically significant increases in relative percentage of DDDs of oral antibacterials (i.e., DDDs of individual oral antibacterial divided by the sum of DDDs of all antibacterials) were observed with moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, cefuroxime axetil, ornidazole, clindamycin palmitate, cefaclor, amoxicillin and clarithromycin. Occurrence rate of DRPs decreased from 13.6% to 4.0% (P < 0.01), with a larger decrease seen in surgical clinics (surgical: 19.5% versus 5.6%; internal medicine: 8.4% versus 2

  14. Acylated flavonol glycosides from Tagetes minuta with antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Shahzadi, Irum; Shah, Mohammad M

    2015-01-01

    Wild marigold (Tagetes minuta), a flowering plant of the family Asteraceae contains compounds of pharmaceutical and nutritional importance especially essential oils and flavonols. Identification, characterization of flavonols and determination of their antibacterial activity were major objectives of the current study. The isolation and purification of flavonols was accomplished using chromatographic techniques while structural elucidation was completed by LC-MS and NMR spectroscopy. The extracts and purified compounds were tested against various bacterial strains for antibacterial activity. A total of 19 flavonols were isolated from this species. Of these, 17 were of butanol and two of ethyl acetate extracts. Based on the concentration and purity, eight potential flavonols were selected and structurally elucidated. Four flavonols, 6-hydroxyquercetin 7-O-β-(6''-galloylglucopyranoside; 2), 6-hydroxykaempferol 7-O-β-glucopyranoside (5), 6-hydroxykaempferol 7-O-β-(6''-galloylglucopyranoside; 7), 6-hydroxyquercetin 7-O-β-(6''-caffeoylglucopyranoside; 9), were identified for the first time from T. minuta. Butanol and ethyl acetate extracts of flowers and seeds showed significant antibacterial activity against Micrococcus leteus, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Pseudomonas pikettii. Among the isolated flavonols only 1, 2, and 18 were found to possess significant antibacterial activity against M. luteus. The extracts and purified flavonols from T. minuta can be potential candidates for antibacterial drug discovery and support to ethnopharmacological use. PMID:26441652

  15. Cationic polymers and their self-assembly for antibacterial applications.

    PubMed

    Deka, Smriti Rekha; Sharma, Ashwani Kumar; Kumar, Pradee

    2015-01-01

    The present article focuses on the amphiphilic cationic polymers as antibacterial agents. These polymers undergo self-assembly in aqueous conditions and impart biological activity by efficiently interacting with the bacterial cell wall, hence, used in preparing chemical disinfectants and biocides. Both cationic charge as well as hydrophobic segments facilitate interactions with the bacterial cell surface and initiate its disruption. The perturbation in transmembrane potential causes leakage of cytosolic contents followed by cell death. Out of two categories of macromolecules, peptide oligomers and cationic polymers, which have extensively been used as antibacterials, we have elaborated on the current advances made in the area of cationic polymer-based (naturally occurring and commonly employed synthetic polymers and their modified analogs) antibacterial agents. The development of polymer-based antibacterials has helped in addressing challenges posed by the drug-resistant bacterial infections. These polymers provide a new platform to combat such infections in the most efficient manner. This review presents concise discussion on the amphiphilic cationic polymers and their modified analogs having low hemolytic activity and excellent antibacterial activity against array of fungi, bacteria and other microorganisms.

  16. Structure pre-requisites for isoflavones as effective antibacterial agents

    PubMed Central

    Mukne, Alka P.; Viswanathan, Vivek; Phadatare, Avinash G.

    2011-01-01

    Recent reports reveal that there is increasing incidence of infections of multidrug-resistant bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). Flavonoids and related compounds have been shown to possess potent antimicrobial activities. Most of the flavonoids are considered as constitutive antimicrobial substances recently termed as “Phytoanticipins,” especially those belonging to prenylated flavonoids and isoflavones. The current review highlights the structure prerequisites for isoflavones as antibacterial agents. Structure–activity relationship (SAR) conclusions have been drawn by comparing the reported minimum inhibitory concentration values for the various isoflavones against S. aureus and MRSA. There exists a significant co-relationship between the presence of certain functional groups (prenyl group, phenolic hydroxyl) at particular positions and antibacterial activity of the compounds. These trends have been postulated with a view of assisting better drug designing of future next-generation antiinfectives, particularly against the bothersome multidrug-resistant microbes. The SAR of these isoflavones has also proved to be a basis to explore the mechanism of antibacterial action. Thus, the study would prove extremely useful to synthesize antibacterial isoflavones in future, which would eventually be beneficial for optimizing the lead molecule for the antibacterial action PMID:22096314

  17. Antibacterial polyelectrolyte-coated Mg alloys for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seraz, Md. S.; Asmatulu, R.; Chen, Z.; Ceylan, M.; Mahapatro, A.; Yang, S. Y.

    2014-04-01

    This study deals with two biomedical subjects: corrosion rates of polyelectrolyte-coated magnesium (Mg) alloys, mainly used for biomedical purposes, and antibacterial properties of these alloys. Thin sheets of Mg alloys were coated with cationic polyelectrolyte chitosan (CHI) and anionic polyelectrolyte carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) using a layer-by-layer coating method and then embedded with antibacterial agents under vacuum. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was employed to analyze these samples in order to detect their corrosion properties at different conditions. In the electrochemical analysis section, a corrosion rate of 72 mille inches per year was found in a salt solution for the sample coated with a 12 phosphonic acid self-assembled monolayer and 9 CHI/CMC multilayers. In the antibacterial tests, gentamicin was used to investigate the effects of the drug embedded with the coated surfaces against the Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria. Antibacterial studies were tested using the disk diffusion method. Based on the standard diameter of the zone of inhibition chart, the antibacterial diffusion from the surface strongly inhibited bacterial growth in the regions. The largest recorded diameter of the zone of inhibition was 50 mm for the pre-UV treated and gentamicin-loaded sample, which is more than three times the standard diameter.

  18. Acylated flavonol glycosides from Tagetes minuta with antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Shahzadi, Irum; Shah, Mohammad M.

    2015-01-01

    Wild marigold (Tagetes minuta), a flowering plant of the family Asteraceae contains compounds of pharmaceutical and nutritional importance especially essential oils and flavonols. Identification, characterization of flavonols and determination of their antibacterial activity were major objectives of the current study. The isolation and purification of flavonols was accomplished using chromatographic techniques while structural elucidation was completed by LC–MS and NMR spectroscopy. The extracts and purified compounds were tested against various bacterial strains for antibacterial activity. A total of 19 flavonols were isolated from this species. Of these, 17 were of butanol and two of ethyl acetate extracts. Based on the concentration and purity, eight potential flavonols were selected and structurally elucidated. Four flavonols, 6-hydroxyquercetin 7-O-β-(6′′-galloylglucopyranoside; 2), 6-hydroxykaempferol 7-O-β-glucopyranoside (5), 6-hydroxykaempferol 7-O-β-(6′′-galloylglucopyranoside; 7), 6-hydroxyquercetin 7-O-β-(6′′-caffeoylglucopyranoside; 9), were identified for the first time from T. minuta. Butanol and ethyl acetate extracts of flowers and seeds showed significant antibacterial activity against Micrococcus leteus, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Pseudomonas pikettii. Among the isolated flavonols only 1, 2, and 18 were found to possess significant antibacterial activity against M. luteus. The extracts and purified flavonols from T. minuta can be potential candidates for antibacterial drug discovery and support to ethnopharmacological use. PMID:26441652

  19. [Occurrence of quinolone and sulfonamide antibiotics in swine and cattle manures from large-scale feeding operations of Guangdong Province].

    PubMed

    Tai, Yi-Ping; Luo, Xiao-Dong; Mo, Ce-Hui; Li, Yan-Wen; Wu, Xiao-Lian; Liu, Xing-Yue

    2011-04-01

    The occurrence and distribution of four quinolones and four sulfonamides in swine and cattle feces sampled from twenty large-scale feeding operations in different areas of Guangdong province were detected using solid phase extraction (SPE) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Quinolone and sulfonamide compounds were observed in all pig dung samples. Their total concentrations ranged from 24.5 microg/kg to 1516.2 microg/kg (F. W.) with an average of 581.0 microg/kg and ranged from 1925.9-13399.5 microg/kg with an average of 4403.9 microg/kg respectively. The dominant compounds in pig feces were ciprofloxacin and enrofloxacin for quinolones and sulfamerazine and sulfamethoxazole for sulfonamides. Quinolone compounds which dominated with norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin were also observed in all cattle dung samples, its total concentrations ranged from 73.2 microg/kg to 1328.0 microg/kg which averaged 572.9 microg/kg. While the positive rates of sulfonamide compounds detected in cattle dung samples were above 90%, predominated by sulfamethoxazole and sulfamerazine. Concentration and distribution of both quinolone and sulfonamide compounds in swine and cattle dungs of different feeding operations varied greatly. Relatively high concentrations of the two kinds of antibiotics were found in both swine and cattle dungs from Guangzhou area, while sulfameter and sulfamethazine in cattle dungs from Foshan and Shenzhen areas were below the limit of detection. PMID:21717768

  20. Incidence of quinolone resistance in strains of Salmonella isolated from poultry, cattle and pigs in Germany between 1998 and 2001.

    PubMed

    Malorny, B; Schroeter, A; Guerra, B; Helmuth, R

    2003-11-22

    This paper reports the susceptibility to the quinolone nalidixic acid and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin of 14,514 strains of Salmonella isolated in Germany from poultry, cattle and pigs between 1998 and 2001. Quinolone-resistant salmonellae were most frequently isolated from poultry, with a prevalence of 10.2 to 16.8 per cent. Poultry-associated serotypes, such as Salmonella Paratyphi B (d-tartrate positive), Salmonella Hadar and Salmonella Virchow, had the highest prevalence of quinolone resistance, ranging between 35 and 74 per cent. All the nalidixic acid-resistant strains also had a reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICS) of 0.125 to 2 microg/ml. A comparison of the MICS for ciprofloxacin of the strains of these poultry-associated serotypes and Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 4 isolated in 1998/99 and 2000/01 indicated that there had been a shift towards higher MIC values of up to 2 microg/ml. The quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of the gyrA gene and the homologue region of the parC gene of 31 selected strains were sequenced. Several different amino acid changes were observed in gyrA of the quinolone-resistant isolates at positions 83 and 87, but no substitutions were observed in parC.

  1. Molecular mechanisms of quinolone, macrolide, and tetracycline resistance among Campylobacter isolates from initial stages of broiler production.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Boto, D; Herrera-León, S; García-Peña, F J; Abad-Moreno, J C; Echeita, M A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the resistance mechanisms of quinolones, macrolides and tetracycline in campylobacter isolates from grandparent and parent broiler breeders in Spain. Twenty-six isolates were investigated for quinolone resistance, three isolates for macrolide resistance and 39 for tetracycline resistance. All of the quinolone-resistant isolates possessed the mutation Thr86Ile in the quinolone resistance-determining region of gyrA and one isolate possessed the mutation Pro104Ser. Only one Campylobacter coli population (defined by restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction of flaA and pulsed field gel electrophoresis) was resistant to erythromycin, and the mutation A2075G (23S rDNA) was responsible for macrolide resistance. The tetO gene was found in all of the tetracycline-resistant isolates. Twenty-two out of the 39 isolates investigated by Southern blot possessed chromosomic location of tetO and 17 were located on plasmids. Most of the plasmids with tetO were of around 60 kb and conjugation was demonstrated in a selection of them. In conclusion, we showed that Thr86Ile is highly prevalent in quinolone-resistant isolates as well as mutation A2075G in macrolide-resistant isolates of poultry origin. More variability was found for tetO. The possibility of horizontal transmission of tetO among campylobacter isolates is also an issue of concern in public health. PMID:24689432

  2. Molecular mechanisms of quinolone, macrolide, and tetracycline resistance among Campylobacter isolates from initial stages of broiler production.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Boto, D; Herrera-León, S; García-Peña, F J; Abad-Moreno, J C; Echeita, M A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the resistance mechanisms of quinolones, macrolides and tetracycline in campylobacter isolates from grandparent and parent broiler breeders in Spain. Twenty-six isolates were investigated for quinolone resistance, three isolates for macrolide resistance and 39 for tetracycline resistance. All of the quinolone-resistant isolates possessed the mutation Thr86Ile in the quinolone resistance-determining region of gyrA and one isolate possessed the mutation Pro104Ser. Only one Campylobacter coli population (defined by restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction of flaA and pulsed field gel electrophoresis) was resistant to erythromycin, and the mutation A2075G (23S rDNA) was responsible for macrolide resistance. The tetO gene was found in all of the tetracycline-resistant isolates. Twenty-two out of the 39 isolates investigated by Southern blot possessed chromosomic location of tetO and 17 were located on plasmids. Most of the plasmids with tetO were of around 60 kb and conjugation was demonstrated in a selection of them. In conclusion, we showed that Thr86Ile is highly prevalent in quinolone-resistant isolates as well as mutation A2075G in macrolide-resistant isolates of poultry origin. More variability was found for tetO. The possibility of horizontal transmission of tetO among campylobacter isolates is also an issue of concern in public health.

  3. Synthesis, evaluation and molecular docking studies of amino acid derived N-glycoconjugates as antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Baig, Noorullah; Singh, Rajnish Prakash; Chander, Subhash; Jha, Prabhat Nath; Murugesan, Sankaranarayanan; Sah, Ajay K

    2015-12-01

    Six amino acid derived N-glycoconjugates of d-glucose were synthesized, characterized and tested for antibacterial activity against G(+)ve (Bacillus cereus) as well as G(-)ve (Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae) bacterial strains. All the tested compounds exhibited moderate to good antibacterial activity against these bacterial strains. The results were compared with the antibacterial activity of standard drug Chloramphenicol, where results of A5 (Tryptophan derived glycoconjugates) against E. coli and A4 (Isoleucine derived glycoconjugates) against K. pneumoniae bacterial strains are comparable with the standard drug molecule. In silico docking studies were also performed in order to understand the mode of action and binding interactions of these molecules. The docking studies revealed that, occupation of compound A5 at the ATP binding site of subunit GyrB (DNA gyrase, PDB ID: 3TTZ) via hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions may be the reason for its significant in vitro antibacterial activity.

  4. Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 Genes Mediating Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal Degradation and Virulence Factor Attenuation

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S.; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2015-01-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 is able to degrade the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecules PQS (Pseudomonas quinolone signal) [2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and HHQ [2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone] to anthranilic acid. Based on the hypothesis that degradation of HHQ might involve hydroxylation to PQS followed by dioxygenolytic cleavage of the heterocyclic ring and hydrolysis of the resulting N-octanoylanthranilate, the genome was searched for corresponding candidate genes. Two gene clusters, aqdA1B1C1 and aqdA2B2C2, each predicted to code for a hydrolase, a flavin monooxygenase, and a dioxygenase related to 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase, were identified on circular plasmid pRLCBG43 of strain BG43. Transcription of all genes was upregulated by PQS, suggesting that both gene clusters code for alkylquinolone-specific catabolic enzymes. An aqdR gene encoding a putative transcriptional regulator, which was also inducible by PQS, is located adjacent to the aqdA2B2C2 cluster. Expression of aqdA2B2C2 in Escherichia coli conferred the ability to degrade HHQ and PQS to anthranilic acid; however, for E. coli transformed with aqdA1B1C1, only PQS degradation was observed. Purification of the recombinant AqdC1 protein verified that it catalyzes the cleavage of PQS to form N-octanoylanthranilic acid and carbon monoxide and revealed apparent Km and kcat values for PQS of ∼27 μM and 21 s−1, respectively. Heterologous expression of the PQS dioxygenase gene aqdC1 or aqdC2 in P. aeruginosa PAO1 quenched the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and rhamnolipid and reduced the synthesis of the siderophore pyoverdine. Thus, the toolbox of quorum-quenching enzymes is expanded by new PQS dioxygenases. PMID:26319870

  5. Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 Genes Mediating Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal Degradation and Virulence Factor Attenuation.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christine; Birmes, Franziska S; Rückert, Christian; Kalinowski, Jörn; Fetzner, Susanne

    2015-11-01

    Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 is able to degrade the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecules PQS (Pseudomonas quinolone signal) [2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone] and HHQ [2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone] to anthranilic acid. Based on the hypothesis that degradation of HHQ might involve hydroxylation to PQS followed by dioxygenolytic cleavage of the heterocyclic ring and hydrolysis of the resulting N-octanoylanthranilate, the genome was searched for corresponding candidate genes. Two gene clusters, aqdA1B1C1 and aqdA2B2C2, each predicted to code for a hydrolase, a flavin monooxygenase, and a dioxygenase related to 1H-3-hydroxy-4-oxoquinaldine 2,4-dioxygenase, were identified on circular plasmid pRLCBG43 of strain BG43. Transcription of all genes was upregulated by PQS, suggesting that both gene clusters code for alkylquinolone-specific catabolic enzymes. An aqdR gene encoding a putative transcriptional regulator, which was also inducible by PQS, is located adjacent to the aqdA2B2C2 cluster. Expression of aqdA2B2C2 in Escherichia coli conferred the ability to degrade HHQ and PQS to anthranilic acid; however, for E. coli transformed with aqdA1B1C1, only PQS degradation was observed. Purification of the recombinant AqdC1 protein verified that it catalyzes the cleavage of PQS to form N-octanoylanthranilic acid and carbon monoxide and revealed apparent Km and kcat values for PQS of ∼27 μM and 21 s(-1), respectively. Heterologous expression of the PQS dioxygenase gene aqdC1 or aqdC2 in P. aeruginosa PAO1 quenched the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and rhamnolipid and reduced the synthesis of the siderophore pyoverdine. Thus, the toolbox of quorum-quenching enzymes is expanded by new PQS dioxygenases. PMID:26319870

  6. Synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation of (99m)Tc/Re-tricarbonyl quinolone complexes.

    PubMed

    Kydonaki, Theocharis E; Tsoukas, Evangelos; Mendes, Filipa; Hatzidimitriou, Antonios G; Paulo, António; Papadopoulou, Lefkothea C; Papagiannopoulou, Dionysia; Psomas, George

    2016-07-01

    New rhenium(I) tricarbonyl complexes with the quinolone antimicrobial agents oxolinic acid (Hoxo) and enrofloxacin (Herx) and containing methanol, triphenylphosphine (PPh3) or imidazole (im) as unidentate co-ligands, were synthesized and characterized. The crystal structure of complex [Re(CO)3(oxo)(PPh3)]∙0.5MeOH was determined by X-ray crystallography. The deprotonated quinolone ligands are bound bidentately to rhenium(I) ion through the pyridone oxygen and a carboxylate oxygen. The binding of the rhenium complexes to calf-thymus DNA (CT DNA) was monitored by UV spectroscopy, viscosity measurements and competitive studies with ethidium bromide; intercalation was suggested as the most possible mode and the DNA-binding constants of the complexes were calculated. The rhenium complex [Re(CO)3(erx)(im)] was assayed for its topoisomerase IIα inhibition activity and was found to be active at 100μM concentration. The interaction of the rhenium complexes with human or bovine serum albumin was investigated by fluorescence emission spectroscopy (through the tryptophan quenching) and the corresponding binding constants were determined. The tracer complex [(99m)Tc(CO)3(erx)(im)] was synthesized and identified by comparative HPLC analysis with the rhenium analog. The (99m)Tc complex was found to be stable in solution. Upon injection in healthy mice, fast tissue clearance of the (99m)Tc complex was observed, while both renal and hepatobiliary excretion took place. Preliminary studies in human K-562 erythroleukemia cells showed cellular uptake of the (99m)Tc tracer with distribution primarily in the cytoplasm and the mitochondria and less in the nucleus. These preliminary results indicate that the quinolone (99m)Tc/Re complexes show promise to be further evaluated as imaging or therapeutic agents. PMID:26795497

  7. Molecular epidemiological survey on quinolone resistance genotype and phenotype of Escherichia coli in septicemic broilers in Hebei, China.

    PubMed

    Xie, Rong; Huo, Shuying; Li, Yurong; Chen, Ligong; Zhang, Feiyan; Wu, Xianjun

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the quinolone-resistant determining region (QRDR) of gyrA of Escherichia coli and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes, qnr(qnrA, qnrB, and qnrS), and aac(6 ')-Ib-cr were detected, sequenced, and analyzed. In addition, antimicrobial susceptibility tests (using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method) were performed for all 111 E. coli isolates from septicemic broilers in Hebei, China. The results show that the resistance rates were as follows: ofloxacin 99.10%, ciprofloxacin 93.69%, levofloxacin 91.89%, norfloxacin 90.09%, and gatifloxacin 76.58%. Of the PMQR genes examined, aac(6 ')-Ib-cr (36.04%) was the most frequently identified gene in all isolates, followed by qnrS (8.11%), qnrB (0.90%), and qnrA (0%). Of the QRDR examined in the 40 phenotypic quinolone-resistant isolates, compared with the gyrA(+) gene of E. coli K-12, 4 amino acid exchanges were found, namely Ser-83→Asp, Asp-87→Asn, Asp-87→Tyr, and Asp-87→Ala, and all 40 isolates had 1 or 2 exchanges in QRDR. It was concluded that quinolone-resistance in E. coli remains a serious problem in Hebei, China. Therefore, there is considerable local surveillance of quinolone resistance. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance of the qnr type remains rare in Hebei, China, and mutation in QRDR may be the main problem.

  8. What are we looking for in new antibacterials and how do we design it?

    PubMed

    Barrett, John F; Motyl, Mary

    2006-02-01

    The need for new antibacterial agents is a pressing, unmet medical need, but success has been limited, resulting in decreased business interest. Part of the problem is the lack of clarity regarding what would make a new-generation 'blockbuster' antibacterial and how this agent could be designed. To this end, the authors outline a few ideas regarding the changes in approach in order to accomplish these needs, including a fundamental change in the drug discovery process. PMID:16433588

  9. Quinolone Amides as Antitrypanosomal Lead Compounds with In Vivo Activity.

    PubMed

    Hiltensperger, Georg; Hecht, Nina; Kaiser, Marcel; Rybak, Jens-Christoph; Hoerst, Alexander; Dannenbauer, Nicole; Müller-Buschbaum, Klaus; Bruhn, Heike; Esch, Harald; Lehmann, Leane; Meinel, Lorenz; Holzgrabe, Ulrike

    2016-08-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a major tropical disease for which few drugs for treatment are available, driving the need for novel active compounds. Recently, morpholino-substituted benzyl amides of the fluoroquinolone-type antibiotics were identified to be compounds highly active against Trypanosoma brucei brucei Since the lead compound GHQ168 was challenged by poor water solubility in previous trials, the aim of this study was to introduce structural variations to GHQ168 as well as to formulate GHQ168 with the ultimate goal to increase its aqueous solubility while maintaining its in vitro antitrypanosomal activity. The pharmacokinetic parameters of spray-dried GHQ168 and the newly synthesized compounds GHQ242 and GHQ243 in mice were characterized by elimination half-lives ranging from 1.5 to 3.5 h after intraperitoneal administration (4 mice/compound), moderate to strong human serum albumin binding for GHQ168 (80%) and GHQ243 (45%), and very high human serum albumin binding (>99%) for GHQ242. For the lead compound, GHQ168, the apparent clearance was 112 ml/h and the apparent volume of distribution was 14 liters/kg of body weight (BW). Mice infected with T. b. rhodesiense (STIB900) were treated in a stringent study scheme (2 daily applications between days 3 and 6 postinfection). Exposure to spray-dried GHQ168 in contrast to the control treatment resulted in mean survival durations of 17 versus 9 days, respectively, a difference that was statistically significant. Results that were statistically insignificantly different were obtained between the control and the GHQ242 and GHQ243 treatments. Therefore, GHQ168 was further profiled in an early-treatment scheme (2 daily applications at days 1 to 4 postinfection), and the results were compared with those obtained with a control treatment. The result was statistically significant mean survival times exceeding 32 days (end of the observation period) versus 7 days for the GHQ168 and control treatments

  10. Transition-Metal-Free Cascade Synthesis of 4-Quinolones: Umpolung of Michael Acceptors via Ene Reaction with Arynes.

    PubMed

    Santhosh Reddy, R; Lagishetti, Chandraiah; Kiran, I N Chaithanya; You, Hengyao; He, Yun

    2016-08-01

    A novel "one-pot" aryne transformation is described that affords various 4-quinolone derivatives without recourse to transition-metal catalysis. Arynes react with aza-Morita-Baylis-Hillman (AMBH) adducts through a cascade sequence involving an insertion/cyclization/ene reaction process to afford 4-quinolones in high yields with a broad substrate scope under mild reaction conditions. Essentially, an umpolung of reactivity at the β carbon of α,β-unsaturated ketone has been achieved by an inverse electron demand aryne-ene reaction to provide a C-arylated product. PMID:27434217

  11. A combined CoMFA and CoMSIA 3D-QSAR study of benzamide type antibacterial inhibitors of the FtsZ protein in drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Andrades, J; Campanini, J; Vásquez, D; Silvestri, C; Morales, C; Romero, J; Mella, J

    2015-01-01

    A major problem today is bacterial resistance to antibiotics and the small number of new therapeutic agents approved in recent years. The development of new antibiotics capable of acting on new targets is urgently required. The filamenting temperature-sensitive Z (FtsZ) bacterial protein is a key biomolecule for bacterial division and survival. This makes FtsZ an attractive new pharmacological target for the development of antibacterial agents. There have been several attempts to develop ligands able to inhibit FtsZ. Despite the large number of synthesized compounds that inhibit the FtsZ protein, there are no quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) that allow for the rational design and synthesis of promising new molecules. We present the first 3D-QSAR study of a large and diverse set of molecules that are able to inhibit the FtsZ bacterial protein. We summarize a set of chemical changes that can be made in the steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic and donor/acceptor hydrogen-bonding properties of the pharmacophore, to generate new bioactive molecules against FtsZ. These results provide a rational guide for the design and synthesis of promising new antibacterial agents, supported by the strong statistical parameters obtained from CoMFA (r(2)(pred) = 0.974) and CoMSIA (r(2)(pred) = 0.980) analyses. PMID:26505124

  12. Assessment of the effectiveness of silver-coated dressing, chlorhexidine acetate (0.5%), citric acid (3%), and silver sulfadiazine (1%) for topical antibacterial effects against the multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infecting full-skin thickness burn wounds on rats.

    PubMed

    Yabanoglu, Hakan; Basaran, Ozgur; Aydogan, Cem; Azap, Ozlem Kurt; Karakayali, Feza; Moray, Gokhan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of four different topical antimicrobial dressings on a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa contaminated full-thickness burn wound rat model. A total of 40 adult male Wistar albino rats were used. The control group (group 1), silver sulfadiazine (1%) group 2, chlorhexidine acetate (0.5%) group 3, citric acid (3%) group 4, and silver-coated dressing group 5 were compared to assess the antibacterial effects of a daily application to a 30% full-skin thickness burn wound seeded 10 minutes earlier with 10(8) CFU (colony forming unit)/0.5 mL of a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain. Five groups (1 control group and 4 treatment groups) were compared. The administration of third-degree burns to all rats was confirmed based on histopathologic data. The tissue cultures from groups 2 and 5 exhibited significant differences compared to those of the other 3 groups, whereas no significant differences were observed between groups 1, 3, and 4. The effectiveness of the treatments was as follows: 1% silver sulfadiazine > silver-coated dressing > 3% citric acid > 0.5% chlorhexidine acetate > control group. Our results supported the efficacy of topical therapy by silver sulfadiazine and silver-coated dressing on infections caused by multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas spp.

  13. Role of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) in sensitising Pseudomonas aeruginosa to UVA radiation.

    PubMed

    Pezzoni, Magdalena; Meichtry, Martín; Pizarro, Ramón A; Costa, Cristina S

    2015-01-01

    One of the main stress factors that bacteria face in the environment is solar ultraviolet-A (UVA) radiation, which leads to lethal effects through oxidative damage. The aim of this work was to investigate the role of 2-heptyl-3-hydroxi-4-quinolone (the Pseudomonas quinolone signal or PQS) in the response of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to UVA radiation. PQS is an intercellular quorum sensing signal associated to membrane vesicles which, among other functions, regulates genes related to iron acquisition, forms stable complexes with iron and participates in oxidative phenomena. UVA exposure of the wild-type PAO1 strain and a pqsA mutant unable to produce PQS revealed a sensitising role for this signal. Research into the mechanism involved in this phenomenon revealed that catalase, an essential factor in the UVA defence, is not related to PQS-mediated UVA sensitivity. Absorption of UVA by PQS produced its own photo-degradation, oxidation of the probe 2',7'- dichlorodihydrofluorescein and generation of singlet oxygen and superoxide anion, suggesting that this signal could be acting as an endogenous photosensitiser. The results presented in this study could explain the high sensitivity to UVA of P. aeruginosa when compared to enteric bacteria. PMID:25535873

  14. Lack of efflux mediated quinolone resistance in Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A.

    PubMed

    Baucheron, Sylvie; Monchaux, Isabelle; Le Hello, Simon; Weill, François-Xavier; Cloeckaert, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi A isolates from human patients in France displaying different levels of resistance to quinolones or fluoroquinolones were studied for resistance mechanisms to these antimicrobial agents. All resistant isolates carried either single or multiple target gene mutations (i.e., in gyrA, gyrB, or parC) correlating with the resistance levels observed. Active efflux, through upregulation of multipartite efflux systems, has also been previously reported as contributing mechanism for other serovars. Therefore, we investigated also the occurrence of non-target gene mutations in regulatory regions affecting efflux pump expression. However, no mutation was detected in these regions in both Typhi and Paratyphi isolates of this study. Besides, no overexpression of the major efflux systems was observed for these isolates. Nevertheless, a large deletion of 2334 bp was identified in the acrS-acrE region of all S. Typhi strains but which did not affect the resistance phenotype. As being specific to S. Typhi, this deletion could be used for specific molecular detection purposes. In conclusion, the different levels of quinolone or FQ resistance in both S. Typhi and S. Paratyphi A seem to rely only on target modifications.

  15. Ornamental fish as a source of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes and antibiotic resistance plasmids.

    PubMed

    Dobiasova, Hana; Kutilova, Iva; Piackova, Veronika; Vesely, Tomas; Cizek, Alois; Dolejska, Monika

    2014-07-16

    Growing ornamental fish industry is associated with public health concerns including extensive antibiotic use accompanied by increasing antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to analyze Aeromonas isolates from imported tropical ornamental fish and coldwater koi carps bred in the Czech Republic to assess the potential risk of ornamental fish as a source of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes (PMQR) and antibiotic resistance plasmids. A collection of Aeromonas spp. with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (MIC ≥ 0.05 mg/L) was selected for the detection of PMQR genes. Isolates harbouring PMQR genes were further analyzed for the additional antibiotic resistance, integron content, clonality, biofilm production and transferability of PMQR genes by conjugation and transformation. Comparative analysis of plasmids carrying PMQR genes was performed. Fifteen (19%, n=80) isolates from koi carps and 18 (24%, n=76) isolates from imported ornamental fish were positive for qnrS2, aac(6')-Ib-cr or qnrB17 genes. PMQR-positive isolates from imported ornamental fish showed higher MIC levels to quinolones, multiresistance and diverse content of antibiotic resistance genes and integrons compared to the isolates from the carps. Related IncU plasmids harbouring qnrS2 and aac(6')-Ib-cr genes were found in Aeromonas spp. from imported ornamental fish and koi carps from various geographical areas. Ornamental fish may represent a potential source of multiresistant bacteria and mobile genetic elements for the environment and for humans.

  16. [The sensitivity of Salmonella strains in diarrheal disease to new quinolones compared with other antimicrobial substances].

    PubMed

    David, E; Andronescu, D; Serban, D; Cocean, S

    1996-01-01

    The sensitivity of 59 Salmonella strains isolated in children with acute diarrhoea was tested against the new quinolones like: Ciproflaxicin (CIP), Norfloxacin (NOR) and Ofloxacin (OFX), as compared to the sensitivity against same aminosides: Gentamicin (GM), Amikacin (AN) against cephalosporins: Ceftazidime (CAZ), Cefalotine (CF) and other currently used antimicrobial agents: Tetraciclin (T), Ampicilin (A), Cloramfenicol (C), Furazolidon (FU). The majority of the studied Salmonella strains, 43 out of 59 strains, belonged to the serotype typhimurium, the most frequently serotype isolated in our geographical area. A very high percentage of Salmonella strains were sensitive against the three quinolones: 98,30% sensitive against NOR, 91,5% sensitive against OFX, 91,50% sensitive against CIP and 96,6% sensitive against AN. In contrast, the Salmonella strains sensitivity was lower in the other tested antimicrobial substances: C (32,2% sensitive strains), GM (8,5%), A (16,9%), CF (11,9%), T (3,4%), FU (1,7%). Out of 59 strains, 45 where resistant to more than four antibiotics, the most often observed pattern was: A, CAZ, CF, GM, T, C, FU.

  17. Antibiotics Threaten Wildlife: Circulating Quinolone Residues and Disease in Avian Scavengers

    PubMed Central

    Lemus, Jesús Á.; Blanco, Guillermo; Grande, Javier; Arroyo, Bernardo; García-Montijano, Marino; Martínez, Felíx

    2008-01-01

    Antibiotic residues that may be present in carcasses of medicated livestock could pass to and greatly reduce scavenger wildlife populations. We surveyed residues of the quinolones enrofloxacin and its metabolite ciprofloxacin and other antibiotics (amoxicillin and oxytetracycline) in nestling griffon Gyps fulvus, cinereous Aegypius monachus and Egyptian Neophron percnopterus vultures in central Spain. We found high concentrations of antibiotics in the plasma of many nestling cinereous (57%) and Egyptian (40%) vultures. Enrofloxacin and ciprofloxacin were also found in liver samples of all dead cinereous vultures. This is the first report of antibiotic residues in wildlife. We also provide evidence of a direct association between antibiotic residues, primarily quinolones, and severe disease due to bacterial and fungal pathogens. Our results indicate that, by damaging the liver and kidney and through the acquisition and proliferation of pathogens associated with the depletion of lymphoid organs, continuous exposure to antibiotics could increase mortality rates, at least in cinereous vultures. If antibiotics ingested with livestock carrion are clearly implicated in the decline of the vultures in central Spain then it should be considered a primary concern for conservation of their populations. PMID:18197254

  18. Structure Based In Silico Analysis of Quinolone Resistance in Clinical Isolates of Salmonella Typhi from India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Priyanka; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P.; Kapil, Arti; Kaur, Punit

    2015-01-01

    Enteric fever is a major cause of morbidity in several parts of the Indian subcontinent. The treatment for typhoid fever majorly includes the fluoroquinolone group of antibiotics. Excessive and indiscriminate use of these antibiotics has led to development of acquired resistance in the causative organism Salmonella Typhi. The resistance towards fluoroquinolones is associated with mutations in the target gene of DNA Gyrase. We have estimated the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of commonly used fluoroquinolone representatives from three generations, ciprofloxacin, ofloxacin, levofloxacin and moxifloxacin, for 100 clinical isolates of Salmonella Typhi from patients in the Indian subcontinent. The MICs have been found to be in the range of 0.032 to 8 μg/ml. The gene encoding DNA Gyrase was subsequently sequenced and point mutations were observed in DNA Gyrase in the quinolone resistance determining region comprising Ser83Phe/Tyr and Asp87Tyr/Gly. The binding ability of these four fluoroquinolones in the quinolone binding pocket of wild type as well as mutant DNA Gyrase was computationally analyzed by molecular docking to assess their differential binding behaviour. This study has revealed that mutations in DNA Gyrase alter the characteristics of the binding pocket resulting in the loss of crucial molecular interactions and consequently decrease the binding affinity of fluoroquinolones with the target protein. The present study assists in understanding the underlying molecular and structural mechanism for decreased fluoroquinolone susceptibility in clinical isolates as a consequence of mutations in DNA Gyrase. PMID:25962113

  19. Dual Mode Antibacterial Activity of Ion Substituted Calcium Phosphate Nanocarriers for Bone Infections

    PubMed Central

    Sampath Kumar, T. S.; Madhumathi, K.; Rubaiya, Y.; Doble, Mukesh

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential for the management of infectious diseases caused by multi-drug resistant bacteria, through the development of newer antibacterial materials and efficient modes of antibiotic delivery. Calcium phosphate (CaP) bioceramics are commonly used as bone substitutes due to their similarity to bone mineral and are widely researched upon for the treatment of bone infections associated with bone loss. CaPs can be used as local antibiotic delivery agents for bone infections and can be substituted with antibacterial ions in their crystal structure to have a wide spectrum, sustained antibacterial activity even against drug resistant bacteria. In the present work, a dual mode antibiotic delivery system with antibacterial ion substituted calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) nanoparticles has been developed. Antibacterial ions such as zinc, silver, and strontium have been incorporated into CDHA at concentrations of 6, 0.25–0.75, and 2.5–7.5 at. %, respectively. The samples were found to be phase pure, acicular nanoparticles of length 40–50 nm and width 5–6 nm approximately. The loading and release profile of doxycycline, a commonly used antibiotic, was studied from the nanocarriers. The drug release was studied for 5 days and the release profile was influenced by the ion concentrations. The release of antibacterial ions was studied over a period of 21 days. The ion substituted CDHA samples were tested for antibacterial efficacy on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli by MIC/MBC studies and time-kill assay. AgCDHA and ZnCDHA showed high antibacterial activity against both bacteria, while SrCDHA was weakly active against S. aureus. Present study shows that the antibiotic release can provide the initial high antibacterial activity, and the sustained ion release can provide a long-term antibacterial activity. Such dual mode antibiotic and antibacterial ion release offers an efficient and potent way to treat an incumbent

  20. Shifts in the Antibiotic Susceptibility, Serogroups, and Clonal Complexes of Neisseria meningitidis in Shanghai, China: A Time Trend Analysis of the Pre-Quinolone and Quinolone Eras

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Zou, Ying; Wang, Gangyi; Zhang, Xi; Xu, Xiaogang; Zhao, Miao; Hu, Fupin; Qu, Di; Chen, Min; Wang, Minggui

    2015-01-01

    Background Fluoroquinolones have been used broadly since the end of the 1980s and have been recommended for Neisseria meningitidis prophylaxis since 2005 in China. The aim of this study was to determine whether and how N. meningitidis antimicrobial susceptibility, serogroup prevalence, and clonal complex (CC) prevalence shifted in association with the introduction and expanding use of quinolones in Shanghai, a region with a traditionally high incidence of invasive disease due to N. meningitidis. Methods and Findings A total of 374 N. meningitidis isolates collected by the Shanghai Municipal Center for Disease Control and Prevention between 1965 and 2013 were studied. Shifts in the serogroups and CCs were observed, from predominantly serogroup A CC5 (84%) in 1965–1973 to serogroup A CC1 (58%) in 1974–1985, then to serogroup C or B CC4821 (62%) in 2005–2013. The rates of ciprofloxacin nonsusceptibility in N. meningitidis disease isolates increased from 0% in 1965–1985 to 84% (31/37) in 2005–2013 (p < 0.001). Among the ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible isolates, 87% (27/31) were assigned to either CC4821 (n = 20) or CC5 (n = 7). The two predominant ciprofloxacin-resistant clones were designated ChinaCC4821-R1-C/B and ChinaCC5-R14-A. The ChinaCC4821-R1-C/B clone acquired ciprofloxacin resistance by a point mutation, and was present in 52% (16/31) of the ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible disease isolates. The ChinaCC5-R14-A clone acquired ciprofloxacin resistance by horizontal gene transfer, and was found in 23% (7/31) of the ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible disease isolates. The ciprofloxacin nonsusceptibility rate was 47% (7/15) among isolates from asymptomatic carriers, and nonsusceptibility was associated with diverse multi-locus sequence typing profiles and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns. As detected after 2005, ciprofloxacin-nonsusceptible strains were shared between some of the patients and their close contacts. A limitation of this study is that isolates

  1. Biotin Protein Ligase Is a Target for New Antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jiage; Paparella, Ashleigh S.; Booker, Grant W.; Polyak, Steven W.; Abell, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    There is a desperate need for novel antibiotic classes to combat the rise of drug resistant pathogenic bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus. Inhibitors of the essential metabolic enzyme biotin protein ligase (BPL) represent a promising drug target for new antibacterials. Structural and biochemical studies on the BPL from S. aureus have paved the way for the design and development of new antibacterial chemotherapeutics. BPL employs an ordered ligand binding mechanism for the synthesis of the reaction intermediate biotinyl-5′-AMP from substrates biotin and ATP. Here we review the structure and catalytic mechanism of the target enzyme, along with an overview of chemical analogues of biotin and biotinyl-5′-AMP as BPL inhibitors reported to date. Of particular promise are studies to replace the labile phosphoroanhydride linker present in biotinyl-5′-AMP with alternative bioisosteres. A novel in situ click approach using a mutant of S. aureus BPL as a template for the synthesis of triazole-based inhibitors is also presented. These approaches can be widely applied to BPLs from other bacteria, as well as other closely related metabolic enzymes and antibacterial drug targets. PMID:27463729

  2. Biotin Protein Ligase Is a Target for New Antibacterials.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jiage; Paparella, Ashleigh S; Booker, Grant W; Polyak, Steven W; Abell, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    There is a desperate need for novel antibiotic classes to combat the rise of drug resistant pathogenic bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus. Inhibitors of the essential metabolic enzyme biotin protein ligase (BPL) represent a promising drug target for new antibacterials. Structural and biochemical studies on the BPL from S. aureus have paved the way for the design and development of new antibacterial chemotherapeutics. BPL employs an ordered ligand binding mechanism for the synthesis of the reaction intermediate biotinyl-5'-AMP from substrates biotin and ATP. Here we review the structure and catalytic mechanism of the target enzyme, along with an overview of chemical analogues of biotin and biotinyl-5'-AMP as BPL inhibitors reported to date. Of particular promise are studies to replace the labile phosphoroanhydride linker present in biotinyl-5'-AMP with alternative bioisosteres. A novel in situ click approach using a mutant of S. aureus BPL as a template for the synthesis of triazole-based inhibitors is also presented. These approaches can be widely applied to BPLs from other bacteria, as well as other closely related metabolic enzymes and antibacterial drug targets. PMID:27463729

  3. Analysis of the gyrA Gene of Clinical Yersinia ruckeri Isolates with Reduced Susceptibility to Quinolones

    PubMed Central

    Gibello, Alicia; Porrero, M. Concepción; Blanco, M. Mar; Vela, Ana I.; Liébana, Pilar; Moreno, Miguel A.; Fernández-Garayzábal, José F.; Domínguez, Lucas

    2004-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility of seven clinical strains of Yersinia ruckeri representative of those isolated between 1994 and 2002 from a fish farm with endemic enteric redmouth disease was studied. All isolates displayed indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis restriction patterns, indicating that they represented a single strain. However, considering both inhibition zone diameters (IZD) and MICs, the isolates recovered in 2001-2002 formed a separate cluster with lower levels of susceptibility to all the quinolones tested, especially nalidixic acid (NA) and oxolinic acid (OA), compared with the isolates recovered between 1994 and 1998. Analysis of the PCR product of the quinolone resistance-determining region of the gyrA gene from clinical isolates of Y. ruckeri with reduced susceptibility to OA and NA revealed a single amino acid substitution, Ser-83 to Arg-83 (Escherichia coli numbering). Identical substitution was observed in induced OA-resistant mutant strains, which displayed IZD and MICs of quinolones similar to those of the clinical isolates of Y. ruckeri with reduced susceptibility to these antimicrobial agents. These data indicate in that for Y. ruckeri, the substitution of Ser by Arg at position 83 of the gyrA gene is associated with reduced susceptibility to quinolones. PMID:14711693

  4. Analysis of the gyrA gene of clinical Yersinia ruckeri isolates with reduced susceptibility to quinolones.

    PubMed

    Gibello, Alicia; Porrero, M Concepción; Blanco, M Mar; Vela, Ana I; Liébana, Pilar; Moreno, Miguel A; Fernández-Garayzábal, José F; Domínguez, Lucas

    2004-01-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility of seven clinical strains of Yersinia ruckeri representative of those isolated between 1994 and 2002 from a fish farm with endemic enteric redmouth disease was studied. All isolates displayed indistinguishable pulsed-field gel electrophoresis restriction patterns, indicating that they represented a single strain. However, considering both inhibition zone diameters (IZD) and MICs, the isolates recovered in 2001-2002 formed a separate cluster with lower levels of susceptibility to all the quinolones tested, especially nalidixic acid (NA) and oxolinic acid (OA), compared with the isolates recovered between 1994 and 1998. Analysis of the PCR product of the quinolone resistance-determining region of the gyrA gene from clinical isolates of Y. ruckeri with reduced susceptibility to OA and NA revealed a single amino acid substitution, Ser-83 to Arg-83 (Escherichia coli numbering). Identical substitution was observed in induced OA-resistant mutant strains, which displayed IZD and MICs of quinolones similar to those of the clinical isolates of Y. ruckeri with reduced susceptibility to these antimicrobial agents. These data indicate in that for Y. ruckeri, the substitution of Ser by Arg at position 83 of the gyrA gene is associated with reduced susceptibility to quinolones.

  5. [Simultaneous determination of 19 quinolone residues in honey using high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Ding, Tao; Shen, Dongxu; Xu, Jinzhong; Wu, Bin; Chen, Huilan; Shen, Chongyu; Shen, Weijian; Zhao, Zengyun; Lian, Hongzhen

    2009-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous analysis of 19 quinolone residues, enrofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin, difloxacin, oxolinic acid, flumequine, sarafloxacin, sparfloxacin, danofloxacin, fleroxacin, marbofloxacin, enofloxacin, orbifloxacin, pipemidic acid, pefloxacin, lomefloxacin, cinofloxacin, and nalidixic acid in honey was developed by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). In comparison of the three different extraction methods, i.e. acid solution coupled with cation-exchange solid-phase extraction cartridge (PCX), neutral buffer solution coupled with a reversed-phase extraction cartridge (HLB) and alkali solution coupled with a strong anion-exchange solid-phase extraction cartridge (PAX), the third method was finally used. The cartridge was then applied to accumulate and purify the target analytes from the sample matrices in one step. The HPLC separation was performed on a C18 column with a linear gradient elution program of methanol and 0.1% formic acid solution as the mobile phase. Selective reaction monitoring (SRM) was used for the selective detection of 19 quinolones. The linearity of all the 19 quinolones in the range from 1 microg/L to 100 microg/L had correlation coefficient greater than 0.991. In the detection of spiked samples, the detection limit of the method was 1.0 microg/kg for all the 19 quinolones, and the recoveries were 71% - 118% with the relative standard deviations of 4.2% - 6.7%. Internal standard calibration was used for the quantitative analysis.

  6. Risk factors for quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli in feces from preweaned dairy calves and postpartum dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Duse, Anna; Waller, Karin Persson; Emanuelson, Ulf; Unnerstad, Helle Ericsson; Persson, Ylva; Bengtsson, Björn

    2015-09-01

    Quinolone resistance may emerge in gut bacteria (e.g., in Escherichia coli) of animals. Such bacteria could cause infections in the animal itself or be transmitted to humans via the food chain. Quinolone resistance is also observed in fecal E. coli of healthy dairy cattle, but the prevalence varies between farms, not solely as a result of varying degree of fluoroquinolone exposure. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors for the fecal shedding of quinolone-resistant E. coli (QREC) from dairy calves and postpartum cows. Rectal swabs from 15 preweaned calves and 5 postpartum cows per farm were collected on 23 Swedish dairy farms to determine the prevalence of QREC. Risk factors for the shedding of QREC were investigated using multivariable statistical models. Quinolone-resistant E. coli were found on all but one farm. Factors associated with QREC shedding by calves were being younger than 18 d, being fed milk from cows treated with antimicrobials, recent use of fluoroquinolones in the herd, carriage of QREC by postpartum cows, and using the calving area never or rarely as a sick pen compared with often. Factors associated with QREC shedding by cows were calving in group pens or freestalls compared with single pens or tiestalls, purchasing cattle, sharing animal transports with other farmers, and poor farm hygiene. Proper biosecurity and improved hygiene, as well as minimizing fluoroquinolone exposure and waste milk feeding, may be important factors to reduce the burden of QREC on dairy farms. PMID:26188574

  7. Antibacterial activity of Leonurus sibiricus aerial parts.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Firoj; Islam, M Amirul; Rahman, M Mustafizur

    2006-06-01

    Different solvent extracts (carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, acetone and methanol) of Leonurus sibiricus were studied for their antibacterial activity. Carbon tetrachloride and chloroform extracts showed a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity.

  8. Crystallization and preliminary crystal structure analysis of the ligand-binding domain of PqsR (MvfR), the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS) responsive quorum-sensing transcription factor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ningna; Yu, Shen; Moniot, Sébastien; Weyand, Michael; Blankenfeldt, Wulf

    2012-01-01

    The opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs three transcriptional regulators, LasR, RhlR and PqsR, to control the transcription of a large subset of its genes in a cell-density-dependent process known as quorum sensing. Here, the recombinant production, crystallization and structure solution of the ligand-binding domain of PqsR (MvfR), the LysR-type transcription factor that responds to the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), a quinolone-based quorum-sensing signal that is unique to P. aeruginosa and possibly a small number of other bacteria, is reported. PqsR regulates the expression of many virulence genes and may therefore be an interesting drug target. The ligand-binding domain (residues 91–319) was produced as a fusion with SUMO, and hexagonal-shaped crystals of purified PqsR_91–319 were obtained using the vapour-diffusion method. Crystallization in the presence of a PQS precursor allowed data collection to 3.25 Å resolution on a synchrotron beamline, and initial phases have been obtained using single-wavelength anomalous diffraction data from seleno-l-methionine-labelled crystals, revealing the space group to be P6522, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 116–120, c = 115–117 Å. PMID:22949189

  9. Substituted Hydroxyapatites with Antibacterial Properties

    PubMed Central

    Kolmas, Joanna; Groszyk, Ewa; Kwiatkowska-Różycka, Dagmara

    2014-01-01

    Reconstructive surgery is presently struggling with the problem of infections located within implantation biomaterials. Of course, the best antibacterial protection is antibiotic therapy. However, oral antibiotic therapy is sometimes ineffective, while administering an antibiotic at the location of infection is often associated with an unfavourable ratio of dosage efficiency and toxic effect. Thus, the present study aims to find a new factor which may improve antibacterial activity while also presenting low toxicity to the human cells. Such factors are usually implemented along with the implant itself and may be an integral part of it. Many recent studies have focused on inorganic factors, such as metal nanoparticles, salts, and metal oxides. The advantages of inorganic factors include the ease with which they can be combined with ceramic and polymeric biomaterials. The following review focuses on hydroxyapatites substituted with ions with antibacterial properties. It considers materials that have already been applied in regenerative medicine (e.g., hydroxyapatites with silver ions) and those that are only at the preliminary stage of research and which could potentially be used in implantology or dentistry. We present methods for the synthesis of modified apatites and the antibacterial mechanisms of various ions as well as their antibacterial efficiency. PMID:24949423

  10. Antibacterial activity of amphiphilic tobramycin.

    PubMed

    Dhondikubeer, Ramesh; Bera, Smritilekha; Zhanel, George G; Schweizer, Frank

    2012-10-01

    Amphiphilic aminoglycoside antimicrobials are an emerging class of new antibacterial agents with novel modes of action. Previous studies have shown that amphiphilic neomycin-B and kanamycin-A analogs restore potent antibacterial activity against Gram-positive neomycin-B- and kanamycin-A-resistant organisms. In this paper, we investigated the antibacterial properties of a series of amphiphilic tobramycin analogs. We prepared tobramycin-lipid conjugates, as well as tobramycin-peptide triazole conjugates, and studied their antibacterial activities against a panel of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains, including isolates obtained from Canadian hospitals. Our results demonstrate that the antibacterial activity of amphiphilic tobramycin is greatly affected by the length and nature of the hydrophobic lipid tail, whereas the nature of the polycationic headgroup or the number of cationic charges appear to be less important. Replacement of the hydrophobic tail by a fluorinated lipid confers good activity against two Pseudomonas strains and reduces hemolytic activity. However, susceptibility studies in the presence of bovine serum albumin indicate that all amphiphilic tobramycin analogs are strongly protein-bound, leading to a typical four- to eight-fold increase in MIC.

  11. Detection of quinolones in commercial eggs obtained from farms in the Espaíllat Province in the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Moscoso, S; de los Santos, F Solís; Andino, A G; Diaz-Sanchez, Sandra; Hanning, I

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported the use of quinolones in broiler chickens resulted in residues in retail poultry meat obtained from nine districts in the Santiago Province of the Dominican Republic. Residues in poultry products are a concern due to consumer allergies and the potential to develop antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Given the use of quinolones in poultry production and our previous findings in poultry meat, the objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of quinolone residues in eggs. Samples were collected from 48 different farms located in three of the four municipalities (Moca, Cayetano Germosén, and Jamao) of the Espaíllat Province. Each farm was sampled three times between July and September for a total of 144 samples. Samples were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively for quinolone residues using the Equinox test. Operation systems (cage or floor), seasonality, and location were considered along with egg-producer sizes that were defined as small scale, <30,000 eggs per day; medium scale, 30,000 to 60,000 eggs per day; or large scale, >60,000 eggs per day. From small-, medium-, and large-scale producers, 69, 50, and 40% of samples were positive for quinolone residues, respectively. A greater number of samples were positive (61%) in floor-laying hen producers compared with those using cages (40%). In the Jamao municipality, 67% of the samples were positive compared with Moca and Cayetano Germosén, where 56 and 25% of samples were positive, respectively. Sampling time had an effect on percent positives: samples collected in July, August, and September were 71, 19, and 63% positive, respectively. Overall, 51% of the samples obtained from eggs produced in the province of Espaíllat were positive for quinolone residues at levels higher than the maximum limits for edible tissue established by the regulatory agencies, including the European Union and U.S. Department of Agriculture. The results obtained from this research confirmed the presence of

  12. Detection of quinolones in commercial eggs obtained from farms in the Espaíllat Province in the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Moscoso, S; de los Santos, F Solís; Andino, A G; Diaz-Sanchez, Sandra; Hanning, I

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we reported the use of quinolones in broiler chickens resulted in residues in retail poultry meat obtained from nine districts in the Santiago Province of the Dominican Republic. Residues in poultry products are a concern due to consumer allergies and the potential to develop antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Given the use of quinolones in poultry production and our previous findings in poultry meat, the objective of this study was to evaluate the presence of quinolone residues in eggs. Samples were collected from 48 different farms located in three of the four municipalities (Moca, Cayetano Germosén, and Jamao) of the Espaíllat Province. Each farm was sampled three times between July and September for a total of 144 samples. Samples were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively for quinolone residues using the Equinox test. Operation systems (cage or floor), seasonality, and location were considered along with egg-producer sizes that were defined as small scale, <30,000 eggs per day; medium scale, 30,000 to 60,000 eggs per day; or large scale, >60,000 eggs per day. From small-, medium-, and large-scale producers, 69, 50, and 40% of samples were positive for quinolone residues, respectively. A greater number of samples were positive (61%) in floor-laying hen producers compared with those using cages (40%). In the Jamao municipality, 67% of the samples were positive compared with Moca and Cayetano Germosén, where 56 and 25% of samples were positive, respectively. Sampling time had an effect on percent positives: samples collected in July, August, and September were 71, 19, and 63% positive, respectively. Overall, 51% of the samples obtained from eggs produced in the province of Espaíllat were positive for quinolone residues at levels higher than the maximum limits for edible tissue established by the regulatory agencies, including the European Union and U.S. Department of Agriculture. The results obtained from this research confirmed the presence of

  13. Evaluation of the Antibacterial Activity of Patchouli Oil

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xian; Zhang, Xue; Yang, Shui-Ping; Liu, Wei-Qi

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the antimicrobial tests of patchouli oil were studied by using molecular docking technology and antimicrobial test in vitro. Five biological macromolecule enzymes, required by the bacteria in the process of biosynthesis were selected as target molecules. Five antibiotics benzylpenicillin, sulfadiazine, trimethoprim, rifampicin and ciprofloxacin, which are generally acknowledged as antibacterial drugs, were selected as reference compounds. The 3 three-dimensional (3D) structures of the 5 reference compounds and 26 compounds from patchouli oil were established by using surflex-dock software (8.1). And the 3D structures of five biological macromolecule enzymes derived from Protein Data Bank (PDB). Molecular docking was carried out between the 31 chemical compounds (ligands) and the 5 enzymes (receptors) by using surflex-dock function. Furthermore, the antibacterial effects of 31 chemical compounds were investigated by the scoring function after molecular docking was completed. By comparing the scoring result of 26 compounds in patchouli oil with 5 compared components, we inferred antibacterial activity in about 26 compounds in patchouli oil. On the other hand, six frequently-used pathogenic bacteria were selected for antimicrobial test in vitro, patchouli oil and its two major compounds: (-)-patchouli alcohol and pogostone, which their contents exceeded 60% in patchouli oil samples, were selected antibacterial agents. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and Minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were also determined. Molecular docking technology and antimicrobial test in vitro proved that patchouli oil had strong antimicrobial effects. Particularly, pogostone and (-)-patchouli alcohol have potent antimicrobial activity. PMID:24250637

  14. Screening of antibacterial activities of twenty-one oxygenated monoterpenes.

    PubMed

    Kotan, Recep; Kordali, Saban; Cakir, Ahmet

    2007-01-01

    Plant essential oils are widely used as fragrances and flavours in the cosmetic, perfume, drug and food industries. Oxygenated monoterpenes are widespread components of the essential oils, usually occurring in high amount. In this paper, the antibacterial activities of twenty-one oxygenated monoterpenes (borneol, borneol acetate, camphor, carvone, 1,8-cineole, citronellal, beta-citronellol, dihydrocarvone, fenchol, fenchone, geraniol acetate, isomenthol, limonene oxide, linalool, linalool acetate, nerol, nerol acetate, terpinen-4-ol, alpha-terpineol, menthol and menthone) and penicillin (standard antibiotic) were determined using a disc diffusion method (in vitro) against 63 bacterial strains, belonging to 37 different genera and 54 species (plant, food and clinic origins). The results showed that the oxygenated monoterpenes exhibited a variable degree of antibacterial activities. These compounds also inhibited the growth of bacterial strains by producing a weak zone of inhibition from 7 to 11 mm in diameter, depending on the susceptibility of the tested bacteria. Among the tested compounds, nerol, linalool alpha-terpineol, fenchol and terpinen-4-ol showed antibacterial activity at a broad spectrum. However, their antibacterial activities were lower than those of penicillin. In contrast to these compounds, camphor and 1,8-cineole exhibited no inhibition effects on the growth of all tested bacteria.

  15. Protein interactions in genome maintenance as novel antibacterial targets.

    PubMed

    Marceau, Aimee H; Bernstein, Douglas A; Walsh, Brian W; Shapiro, Walker; Simmons, Lyle A; Keck, James L

    2013-01-01

    Antibacterial compounds typically act by directly inhibiting essential bacterial enzyme activities. Although this general mechanism of action has fueled traditional antibiotic discovery efforts for decades, new antibiotic development has not kept pace with the emergence of drug resistant bacterial strains. These limitations have severely restricted the therapeutic tools available for treating bacterial infections. Here we test an alternative antibacterial lead-compound identification strategy in which essential protein-protein interactions are targeted rather than enzymatic activities. Bacterial single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) form conserved protein interaction "hubs" that are essential for recruiting many DNA replication, recombination, and repair proteins to SSB/DNA nucleoprotein substrates. Three small molecules that block SSB/protein interactions are shown to have antibacterial activity against diverse bacterial species. Consistent with a model in which the compounds target multiple SSB/protein interactions, treatment of Bacillus subtilis cultures with the compounds leads to rapid inhibition of DNA replication and recombination, and ultimately to cell death. The compounds also have unanticipated effects on protein synthesis that could be due to a previously unknown role for SSB/protein interactions in translation or to off-target effects. Our results highlight the potential of targeting protein-protein interactions, particularly those that mediate genome maintenance, as a powerful approach for identifying new antibacterial compounds.

  16. Time for a change: addressing R&D and commercialization challenges for antibacterials.

    PubMed

    Payne, David J; Miller, Linda Federici; Findlay, David; Anderson, James; Marks, Lynn

    2015-06-01

    The antibacterial therapeutic area has been described as the perfect storm. Resistance is increasing to the point that our hospitals encounter patients infected with untreatable pathogens, the overall industry pipeline is described as dry and most multinational pharmaceutical companies have withdrawn from the area. Major contributing factors to the declining antibacterial industry pipeline include scientific challenges, clinical/regulatory hurdles and low return on investment. This paper examines these challenges and proposes approaches to address them. There is a need for a broader scientific agenda to explore new approaches to discover and develop antibacterial agents. Additionally, ideas of how industry and academia could be better integrated will be presented. While promising progress in the regulatory environment has been made, more streamlined regulatory paths are still required and the solutions will lie in global harmonization and clearly defined guidance. Creating the right incentives for antibacterial research and development is critical and a new commercial model for antibacterial agents will be proposed. One key solution to help resolve both the problem of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and lack of new drug development are rapid, cost-effective, accurate point of care diagnostics that will transform antibacterial prescribing and enable more cost-effective and efficient antibacterial clinical trials. The challenges of AMR are too great for any one group to resolve and success will require leadership and partnerships among academia, industry and governments globally.

  17. Time for a change: addressing R&D and commercialization challenges for antibacterials.

    PubMed

    Payne, David J; Miller, Linda Federici; Findlay, David; Anderson, James; Marks, Lynn

    2015-06-01

    The antibacterial therapeutic area has been described as the perfect storm. Resistance is increasing to the point that our hospitals encounter patients infected with untreatable pathogens, the overall industry pipeline is described as dry and most multinational pharmaceutical companies have withdrawn from the area. Major contributing factors to the declining antibacterial industry pipeline include scientific challenges, clinical/regulatory hurdles and low return on investment. This paper examines these challenges and proposes approaches to address them. There is a need for a broader scientific agenda to explore new approaches to discover and develop antibacterial agents. Additionally, ideas of how industry and academia could be better integrated will be presented. While promising progress in the regulatory environment has been made, more streamlined regulatory paths are still required and the solutions will lie in global harmonization and clearly defined guidance. Creating the right incentives for antibacterial research and development is critical and a new commercial model for antibacterial agents will be proposed. One key solution to help resolve both the problem of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and lack of new drug development are rapid, cost-effective, accurate point of care diagnostics that will transform antibacterial prescribing and enable more cost-effective and efficient antibacterial clinical trials. The challenges of AMR are too great for any one group to resolve and success will require leadership and partnerships among academia, industry and governments globally. PMID:25918443

  18. Time for a change: addressing R&D and commercialization challenges for antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Payne, David J.; Miller, Linda Federici; Findlay, David; Anderson, James; Marks, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    The antibacterial therapeutic area has been described as the perfect storm. Resistance is increasing to the point that our hospitals encounter patients infected with untreatable pathogens, the overall industry pipeline is described as dry and most multinational pharmaceutical companies have withdrawn from the area. Major contributing factors to the declining antibacterial industry pipeline include scientific challenges, clinical/regulatory hurdles and low return on investment. This paper examines these challenges and proposes approaches to address them. There is a need for a broader scientific agenda to explore new approaches to discover and develop antibacterial agents. Additionally, ideas of how industry and academia could be better integrated will be presented. While promising progress in the regulatory environment has been made, more streamlined regulatory paths are still required and the solutions will lie in global harmonization and clearly defined guidance. Creating the right incentives for antibacterial research and development is critical and a new commercial model for antibacterial agents will be proposed. One key solution to help resolve both the problem of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and lack of new drug development are rapid, cost-effective, accurate point of care diagnostics that will transform antibacterial prescribing and enable more cost-effective and efficient antibacterial clinical trials. The challenges of AMR are too great for any one group to resolve and success will require leadership and partnerships among academia, industry and governments globally. PMID:25918443

  19. Characterization of Vibrio fluvialis qnrVC5 Gene in Native and Heterologous Hosts: Synergy of qnrVC5 with other Determinants in Conferring Quinolone Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Vinothkumar, Kittappa; Kumar, G. N.; Bhardwaj, Ashima K.

    2016-01-01

    Resistance of various pathogens toward quinolones has emerged as a serious threat to combat infections. Analysis of plethora of genes and resistance mechanisms associated with quinolone resistance reveals chromosome-borne and transferable determinants. qnr genes have been found to be responsible for transferable quinolone resistance. In the present work, a new allele qnrVC5 earlier reported in Vibrio fluvialis from this laboratory was characterized in detail for its sequence, genetic context and propensity to decrease the susceptibility for quinolones. The study has revealed persistence of qnrVC5 in clinical isolates of V. fluvialis from Kolkata region through the years 2002–2006. qnrVC5 existed in the form of a gene cassette with the open reading frame being flanked by an upstream promoter and a downstream V. cholerae repeat region suggestive of its superintegron origin. Sequence analysis of different qnrVC alleles showed that qnrVC5 was closely related to qnrVC2 and qnrVC4 and these alleles were associated with V. cholerae repeats. In contrast, qnrVC1, qnrVC3, and qnrVC6 belonging to another group were associated with V. parahaemolyticus repeats. The gene manifested its activity in native V. fluvialis host as well as in Escherichia coli transformants harboring it by elevating the MIC toward various quinolones by twofold to eightfold. In combination with other quinolone resistance factors such as topoisomerase mutations and aac(6’)-Ib-cr gene, qnrVC5 gene product contributed toward higher quinolone resistance displayed by V. fluvialis isolates. Silencing of the gene using antisense peptide nucleic acid sensitized the V. fluvialis parent isolates toward ciprofloxacin. Recombinant QnrVC5 vividly demonstrated its role in conferring quinolone resistance. qnrVC5 gene, its synergistic effect and global dissemination should be perceived as a menace for quinolone-based therapies. PMID:26913027

  20. Investigations on the 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid motif. 6. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of 7-substituted quinolone-3-carboxamide derivatives as high affinity ligands for cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, Serena; De Rosa, Maria; Ligresti, Alessia; Mugnaini, Claudia; Brizzi, Antonella; Caradonna, Nicola P; Cascio, Maria Grazia; Bolognini, Daniele; Pertwee, Roger G; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Corelli, Federico

    2012-12-01

    Within our studies on structure-activity relationships of 4-quinolone-3-carboxamides as cannabinoid ligands, a new series of compounds characterized by a fluoro or phenylthio group at 7-position and different substituents at N1 and carboxamide nitrogen were synthesized and evaluated for their binding ability to cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and type 2 (CB2) receptors. Most of the compounds showed affinity for one or both cannabinoid receptors at nanomolar concentration, with K(i)(CB1) and K(i)(CB2) values ranging from 2.45 to >10,000 nM and from 0.09 to 957 nM, respectively. The N-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)amide derivatives 27 and 40 displayed relatively low affinity, but high selectivity towards the CB1 receptor. Compounds 4 and 40, a CB2 and a CB1 ligand, respectively, behaved as partial agonists in the [(35)S]GTPγS assay. They showed very low permeability through (MDCK-MDR1) cells and might, therefore, represent possible lead structures for further optimization in the search for cannabinoid ligands unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. PMID:23085772

  1. A function of SmeDEF, the major quinolone resistance determinant of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, is the colonization of plant roots.

    PubMed

    García-León, Guillermo; Hernández, Alvaro; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Alavi, Peyman; Berg, Gabriele; Martínez, José Luis

    2014-08-01

    Quinolones are synthetic antibiotics, and the main cause of resistance to these antimicrobials is mutation of the genes encoding their targets. However, in contrast to the case for other organisms, such mutations have not been found in quinolone-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates, in which overproduction of the SmeDEF efflux pump is a major cause of quinolone resistance. SmeDEF is chromosomally encoded and highly conserved in all studied S. maltophilia strains; it is an ancient element that evolved over millions of years in this species. It thus seems unlikely that its main function would be resistance to quinolones, a family of synthetic antibiotics not present in natural environments until the last few decades. Expression of SmeDEF is tightly controlled by the transcriptional repressor SmeT. Our work shows that plant-produced flavonoids can bind to SmeT, releasing it from smeDEF and smeT operators. Antibiotics extruded by SmeDEF do not impede the binding of SmeT to DNA. The fact that plant-produced flavonoids specifically induce smeDEF expression indicates that they are bona fide effectors regulating expression of this resistance determinant. Expression of efflux pumps is usually downregulated unless their activity is needed. Since smeDEF expression is triggered by plant-produced flavonoids, we reasoned that this efflux pump may have a role in the colonization of plants by S. maltophilia. Our results showed that, indeed, deletion of smeE impairs S. maltophilia colonization of plant roots. Altogether, our results indicate that quinolone resistance is a recent function of SmeDEF and that colonization of plant roots is likely one original function of this efflux pump.

  2. A Function of SmeDEF, the Major Quinolone Resistance Determinant of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Is the Colonization of Plant Roots

    PubMed Central

    García-León, Guillermo; Hernández, Alvaro; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Alavi, Peyman; Berg, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Quinolones are synthetic antibiotics, and the main cause of resistance to these antimicrobials is mutation of the genes encoding their targets. However, in contrast to the case for other organisms, such mutations have not been found in quinolone-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates, in which overproduction of the SmeDEF efflux pump is a major cause of quinolone resistance. SmeDEF is chromosomally encoded and highly conserved in all studied S. maltophilia strains; it is an ancient element that evolved over millions of years in this species. It thus seems unlikely that its main function would be resistance to quinolones, a family of synthetic antibiotics not present in natural environments until the last few decades. Expression of SmeDEF is tightly controlled by the transcriptional repressor SmeT. Our work shows that plant-produced flavonoids can bind to SmeT, releasing it from smeDEF and smeT operators. Antibiotics extruded by SmeDEF do not impede the binding of SmeT to DNA. The fact that plant-produced flavonoids specifically induce smeDEF expression indicates that they are bona fide effectors regulating expression of this resistance determinant. Expression of efflux pumps is usually downregulated unless their activity is needed. Since smeDEF expression is triggered by plant-produced flavonoids, we reasoned that this efflux pump may have a role in the colonization of plants by S. maltophilia. Our results showed that, indeed, deletion of smeE impairs S. maltophilia colonization of plant roots. Altogether, our results indicate that quinolone resistance is a recent function of SmeDEF and that colonization of plant roots is likely one original function of this efflux pump. PMID:24837376

  3. A function of SmeDEF, the major quinolone resistance determinant of Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, is the colonization of plant roots.

    PubMed

    García-León, Guillermo; Hernández, Alvaro; Hernando-Amado, Sara; Alavi, Peyman; Berg, Gabriele; Martínez, José Luis

    2014-08-01

    Quinolones are synthetic antibiotics, and the main cause of resistance to these antimicrobials is mutation of the genes encoding their targets. However, in contrast to the case for other organisms, such mutations have not been found in quinolone-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates, in which overproduction of the SmeDEF efflux pump is a major cause of quinolone resistance. SmeDEF is chromosomally encoded and highly conserved in all studied S. maltophilia strains; it is an ancient element that evolved over millions of years in this species. It thus seems unlikely that its main function would be resistance to quinolones, a family of synthetic antibiotics not present in natural environments until the last few decades. Expression of SmeDEF is tightly controlled by the transcriptional repressor SmeT. Our work shows that plant-produced flavonoids can bind to SmeT, releasing it from smeDEF and smeT operators. Antibiotics extruded by SmeDEF do not impede the binding of SmeT to DNA. The fact that plant-produced flavonoids specifically induce smeDEF expression indicates that they are bona fide effectors regulating expression of this resistance determinant. Expression of efflux pumps is usually downregulated unless their activity is needed. Since smeDEF expression is triggered by plant-produced flavonoids, we reasoned that this efflux pump may have a role in the colonization of plants by S. maltophilia. Our results showed that, indeed, deletion of smeE impairs S. maltophilia colonization of plant roots. Altogether, our results indicate that quinolone resistance is a recent function of SmeDEF and that colonization of plant roots is likely one original function of this efflux pump. PMID:24837376

  4. An expert panel report of a proposed scientific model demonstrating the effectiveness of antibacterial handwash products.

    PubMed

    Boyce, John M; Dupont, Herbert L; Massaro, Joseph; Sack, David; Schaffner, Donald W

    2012-10-01

    In 2005, a US Food and Drug Administration Nonprescription Drug Advisory Committee (NDAC) review of consumer antiseptic handwash product studies concluded that the data regarding existing products failed to demonstrate any association between specific log reductions of bacteria achieved by antiseptic handwashing and reduction of infection. The NDAC recommended that consumer antibacterial handwashing products should demonstrate a reduction in infection compared with non-antibacterial handwash products. In response to the NDAC review, a consumer product industry-sponsored expert panel meeting was held in October 2007 to review new methods for assessing the efficacy of antibacterial handwashes. The expert panel reviewed a newly proposed model for linking the effectiveness of antibacterial handwashing to infection reduction and made recommendations for conducting future studies designed to demonstrate the efficacy of antibacterial handwash formulations. The panel concluded that using the surrogate infection model to demonstrate efficacy has a sound scientific basis, that the use of Shigella flexneri as a test organism coupled with a modified hand contamination procedure is supported by published data, and that the model represents a realistic test for the efficacy of consumer antibacterial handwash products. This article summarizes the expert panel's deliberations, conclusions, and recommendations.

  5. An expert panel report of a proposed scientific model demonstrating the effectiveness of antibacterial handwash products.

    PubMed

    Boyce, John M; Dupont, Herbert L; Massaro, Joseph; Sack, David; Schaffner, Donald W

    2012-10-01

    In 2005, a US Food and Drug Administration Nonprescription Drug Advisory Committee (NDAC) review of consumer antiseptic handwash product studies concluded that the data regarding existing products failed to demonstrate any association between specific log reductions of bacteria achieved by antiseptic handwashing and reduction of infection. The NDAC recommended that consumer antibacterial handwashing products should demonstrate a reduction in infection compared with non-antibacterial handwash products. In response to the NDAC review, a consumer product industry-sponsored expert panel meeting was held in October 2007 to review new methods for assessing the efficacy of antibacterial handwashes. The expert panel reviewed a newly proposed model for linking the effectiveness of antibacterial handwashing to infection reduction and made recommendations for conducting future studies designed to demonstrate the efficacy of antibacterial handwash formulations. The panel concluded that using the surrogate infection model to demonstrate efficacy has a sound scientific basis, that the use of Shigella flexneri as a test organism coupled with a modified hand contamination procedure is supported by published data, and that the model represents a realistic test for the efficacy of consumer antibacterial handwash products. This article summarizes the expert panel's deliberations, conclusions, and recommendations. PMID:22300895

  6. Synthesis, molecular docking and biological evaluation of coumarin derivatives containing piperazine skeleton as potential antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Wang, She-Feng; Yin, Yong; Wu, Xun; Qiao, Fang; Sha, Shao; Lv, Peng-Cheng; Zhao, Jing; Zhu, Hai-Liang

    2014-11-01

    A series of 4-hydroxycoumarin derivatives were designed and synthesized in order to find some more potent antibacterial drugs. Their antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis and Staphylococcus aureus were tested. These compounds showed good antibacterial activities against Gram-positive strains. Compound 4 g represented the most potent antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis and S. aureus with MIC of 0.236, 0.355 μg/mL, respectively. What's more, it showed the most potent activity against SaFabI with IC50 of 0.57 μM. Molecular docking of 4 g into S. aureus Enoyl-ACP-reductase active site were performed to determine the probable binding mode, while the QSAR model was built to check the previous work as well as to introduce new directions.

  7. Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers: Structure Determination and Trends in Antibacterial Activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongbing; Lohith, Katheryn; Rosario, Margaret; Pulliam, Thomas H; O'Connor, Robert D; Bell, Lori J; Bewley, Carole A

    2016-07-22

    Antibacterial-guided fractionation of the Dictyoceratid sponges Lamellodysidea sp. and two samples of Dysidea granulosa yielded 14 polybrominated, diphenyl ethers including one new methoxy-containing compound (8). Their structures were elucidated by interpretation of spectroscopic data of the natural product and their methoxy derivatives. Most of the compounds showed strong antimicrobial activity with low- to sub-microgram mL(-1) minimum inhibitory concentrations against drug-susceptible and drug-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecium, and two compounds inhibited Escherichia coli in a structure-dependent manner. PMID:27399938

  8. Resistance patterns to beta-lactams and quinolones in clinical isolates of bacteria from Cuban hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gonzáles, I; Niebla, A; Vallin, C

    1995-01-01

    The resistance patterns to 26 beta-lactams and 8 quinolones of clinical isolates from Cuban hospitals were evaluated using the disk susceptibility test, according to the NCCLS guidelines (1992). The genera studied were Escherichia sp (320), Enterobacter sp (10), Klebsiella sp (90), Proteus sp (10), Pseudomonas sp (90), Serratia sp (20), and Staphylococcus sp (80). Higher resistance to beta-lactams was observed in the genera Pseudomonas, Escherichia and Klebsiella. For fluoroquinolones we found no significant resistance, with the exception of the genus Klebsiella. The most effective antibiotics were cephalosporins of the second and third generations, fluoroquinolones, and non-classical beta-lactams (cephamycins, moxalactam and monobactams). On the contrary, a pronounced resistance was found to penicillin, oxacillin, ticarcillin, ampicillin, methicillin, nalidixic acid and cinoxacin. These resistance patterns correspond to the high consumption of these antibiotics throughout the country.

  9. [Impact on public health of quinolone resistance in animal-origin bacteria].

    PubMed

    Orden Gutiérrez, J A; de la Fuente López, R

    2001-01-01

    Fluoroquinolones are one of the most useful classes of antimicrobial agents used in human and animal medicine today, both because of their spectrum and their physicochemical properties. The use of quinolones in animals is a matter of special concern because it could contribute to the acquisition of resistance in foodborn bacteria (such as Salmonella spp., Campylobacter spp. and Escherichia coli) and this, in turn, could lead to a reduction in the efficacy of such compounds in treating infections in humans. However, the causal relationship between the use of fluoroquinolones in veterinary medicine and the isolation of fluoroquinolone-resistant bacteria in humans has not been generally proven and, moreover, the use of fluoroquinolones in animals is only one of the many factors implicated in the resistance to these antimicrobials. Even so, the surveillance of fluoroquinolone resistance in bacteria isolated from animals and foods and the prudent use of these antimicrobials in animals should have the highest priority.

  10. Controlled Antibiotics Release System through Simple Blended Electrospun Fibers for Sustained Antibacterial Effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zixin; Tang, Jianxiong; Wang, Heran; Xia, Qinghua; Xu, Shanshan; Han, Charles C

    2015-12-01

    Implantation of sustained antibacterial system after abdominal surgery could effectively prevent complicated intra-abdominal infection. In this study, a simple blended electrospun membrane made of poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolide) (PLGA)/poly(dioxanone) (PDO)/Ciprofloxacin hydrochloride (CiH) could easily result in approximately linear drug release profile and sustained antibacterial activity against both Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Escherichia coli (E. coli). The addition of PDO changed the stack structure of PLGA, which in turn influenced the fiber swelling and created drug diffusion channels. It could be a good candidate for reducing postoperative infection or be associated with other implant to resist biofilm formation. PMID:26596498

  11. A conserved suppressor mutation in a tryptophan auxotroph results in dysregulation of Pseudomonas quinolone signal synthesis.

    PubMed

    Knoten, Claire A; Wells, Greg; Coleman, James P; Pesci, Everett C

    2014-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common nosocomial pathogen that relies on three cell-to-cell signals to regulate multiple virulence factors. The Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone) is one of these signals, and it is known to be important for P. aeruginosa pathogenesis. PQS is synthesized in a multistep reaction that condenses anthranilate and a fatty acid. In P. aeruginosa, anthranilate is produced via the kynurenine pathway and two separate anthranilate synthases, TrpEG and PhnAB, the latter of which is important for PQS synthesis. Others have previously shown that a P. aeruginosa tryptophan auxotroph could grow on tryptophan-depleted medium with a frequency of 10(-5) to 10(-6). These revertants produced more pyocyanin and had increased levels of phnA transcript. In this study, we constructed similar tryptophan auxotroph revertants and found that the reversion resulted from a synonymous G-to-A nucleotide mutation within pqsC. This change resulted in increased pyocyanin and decreased PQS, along with an increase in the level of the pqsD, pqsE, and phnAB transcripts. Reporter fusion and reverse transcriptase PCR studies indicated that a novel transcript containing pqsD, pqsE, and phnAB occurs in these revertants, and quantitative real-time PCR experiments suggested that the same transcript appears in the wild-type strain under nutrient-limiting conditions. These results imply that the PQS biosynthetic operon can produce an internal transcript that increases anthranilate production and greatly elevates the expression of the PQS signal response protein PqsE. This suggests a novel mechanism to ensure the production of both anthranilate and PQS-controlled virulence factors. PMID:24748618

  12. Quinolone-1-(2H)-ones as hedgehog signalling pathway inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Trieu N; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Abdel-Hamid, Mohammed K; Gordon, Christopher P; Bernstein, Ilana R; Pye, Victoria; Cossar, Peter; Sakoff, Jennette A; McCluskey, Adam

    2016-07-14

    A series of quinolone-2-(1H)-ones derived from the Ugi-Knoevenagel three- and four-component reaction were prepared exhibiting low micromolar cytotoxicity against a panel of eight human cancer cell lines known to possess the Hedgehog Signalling Pathway (HSP) components, as well as the seminoma TCAM-2 cell line. A focused SAR study was conducted and revealed core characteristics of the quinolone-2-(1H)-ones required for cytotoxicity. These requirements included a C3-tethered indole moiety, an indole C5-methyl moiety, an aliphatic tail or an ester, as well as an additional aromatic moiety. Further investigation in the SAG-activated Shh-LIGHT2 cell line with the most active analogues: 2-(3-cyano-2-oxo-4-phenylquinolin-1(2H)-yl)-2-(1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-N-(pentan-2-yl)acetamide (5), 2-(3-cyano-2-oxo-4-phenylquinolin-1(2H)-yl)-2-(5-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-N-(pentan-2-yl)acetamide (23) and ethyl (2-(3-cyano-2-oxo-4-phenylquinolin-1(2H)-yl)-2-(5-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)acetyl)glycinate (24) demonstrated a down regulation of the HSP via a reduction in Gli expression, and in the mRNA levels of Ptch1 and Gli2. Analogues 5, 23 and 24 returned in cell inhibition values of 11.6, 2.9 and 3.1 μM, respectively, making this new HSP-inhibitor pharmacophore amongst the most potent non-Smo targeted inhibitors thus far reported. PMID:27272335

  13. Complete Proteome of a Quinolone-Resistant Salmonella Typhimurium Phage Type DT104B Clinical Strain

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Susana; Nunes-Miranda, Júlio D.; Pinto, Luís; Santos, Hugo M.; de Toro, María; Sáenz, Yolanda; Torres, Carmen; Capelo, José Luis; Poeta, Patrícia; Igrejas, Gilberto

    2014-01-01

    Salmonellosis is one of the most common and widely distributed foodborne diseases. The emergence of Salmonella strains that are resistant to a variety of antimicrobials is a serious global public health concern. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium definitive phage type 104 (DT104) is one of these emerging epidemic multidrug resistant strains. Here we collate information from the diverse and comprehensive range of experiments on Salmonella proteomes that have been published. We then present a new study of the proteome of the quinolone-resistant Se20 strain (phage type DT104B), recovered after ciprofloxacin treatment and compared it to the proteome of reference strain SL1344. A total of 186 and 219 protein spots were recovered from Se20 and SL1344 protein extracts, respectively, after two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. The signatures of 94% of the protein spots were successfully identified through matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Three antimicrobial resistance related proteins, whose genes were previously detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), were identified in the clinical strain. The presence of these proteins, dihydropteroate synthase type-2 (sul2 gene), aminoglycoside resistance protein A (strA gene) and aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase type Ib-cr4 (aac(6')-Ib-cr4 gene), was confirmed in the DT104B clinical strain. The aac(6')-Ib-cr4 gene is responsible for plasmid-mediated aminoglycoside and quinolone resistance. This is a preliminary analysis of the proteome of these two S. Typhimurium strains and further work is being developed to better understand how antimicrobial resistance is developing in this pathogen. PMID:25196519

  14. Antimycobacterial and Antibacterial Activity of Allium sativum Bulbs.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, V; Phadatare, A G; Mukne, Alka

    2014-05-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the major public health problems faced globally. Resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to antitubercular agents has called for an urgent need to investigate newer drugs to combat tuberculosis. Garlic (Allium sativum) is an edible plant which has generated a lot of curiosity throughout human history as a medicinal plant. Garlic contains sulfur compounds like allicin, ajoene, allylmethyltrisulfide, diallyltrisulfide, diallyldisulphide and others which exhibit various biological properties like antimicrobial, anticancer, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, antiinflammatory, hypoglycemic, and cardiovascular effects. According to various traditional systems of medicine, garlic is one of the established remedies for tuberculosis. The objective of the current study was to investigate in vitro antimycobacterial activity as well as anti-bacterial activity of various extracts rich in specific phytoconstituents from garlic. Preparation of garlic extracts was done based on the chemistry of the constituents and their stability. The estimation of in vitro antimycobacterial activity of different garlic extracts was done using Resazurin microtire plate assay technique whereas activity of garlic oil was evaluated by colony count method. The antibacterial activity of extracts and oil was estimated by zone of inhibition method. Extracts of garlic rich in allicin and ajoene showed appreciable antimycobacterial activity as compared to standard drugs. Garlic oil demonstrated significant antibacterial activity, particularly against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

  15. Antimycobacterial and Antibacterial Activity of Allium sativum Bulbs

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, V.; Phadatare, A. G.; Mukne, Alka

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the major public health problems faced globally. Resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis to antitubercular agents has called for an urgent need to investigate newer drugs to combat tuberculosis. Garlic (Allium sativum) is an edible plant which has generated a lot of curiosity throughout human history as a medicinal plant. Garlic contains sulfur compounds like allicin, ajoene, allylmethyltrisulfide, diallyltrisulfide, diallyldisulphide and others which exhibit various biological properties like antimicrobial, anticancer, antioxidant, immunomodulatory, antiinflammatory, hypoglycemic, and cardiovascular effects. According to various traditional systems of medicine, garlic is one of the established remedies for tuberculosis. The objective of the current study was to investigate in vitro antimycobacterial activity as well as anti-bacterial activity of various extracts rich in specific phytoconstituents from garlic. Preparation of garlic extracts was done based on the chemistry of the constituents and their stability. The estimation of in vitro antimycobacterial activity of different garlic extracts was done using Resazurin microtire plate assay technique whereas activity of garlic oil was evaluated by colony count method. The antibacterial activity of extracts and oil was estimated by zone of inhibition method. Extracts of garlic rich in allicin and ajoene showed appreciable antimycobacterial activity as compared to standard drugs. Garlic oil demonstrated significant antibacterial activity, particularly against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:25035540

  16. Pyrazinamide drug interacting with Co(III) and Zn(II) metal ions based on 2,2‧-bipyridine and 1,10-phenanthroline ligands: Synthesis, studies and crystal structure, DFT calculations and antibacterial assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiniforoshan, Hossein; Radani, Zahra Sadeghian; Tabrizi, Leila; Tavakol, Hossein; Sabzalian, Mohammad R.; Mohammadnezhad, Gholamhossein; Görls, Helmar; Plass, Winfried

    2015-02-01

    Three novel compounds, [Co(PZAH)(bipy)2](ClO4)2 (1), [Zn(PZAH)(bipy)2]ClO4 (2), [Zn(PZAH)(phen)2]ClO4 (3), which PZAH2 = pyrazinamide, bipy = 2,2‧-bipyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR and electronic absorption spectroscopies. The crystal structure of 1 has been determined in an orthorhombic Pbca space group. The binding modes of the ligands in complex 1 were established by means of molecular modeling of the complex, and calculation of their IR and absorption spectra DFT calculations. The calculated FT-IR and UV-Vis data are in good agreement with the experimental results, and confirmed the experimental one. In addition to DFT calculations of the complex 1, natural bond orbital (NBO) was performed to obtain atomic charges. Biological studies also showed the antibacterial activity of complexes 1-3 against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains.

  17. Interaction of vanadium (IV) solvates (L) with second-generation fluoroquinolone antibacterial drug ciprofloxacin: spectroscopic, structure, thermal analyses, kinetics and biological evaluation (L=An, DMF, Py and Et3N).

    PubMed

    Zordok, Wael A

    2014-08-14

    The preparation and characterization of the new solid complexes [VO(CIP)2L]SO4⋅nH2O, where L=aniline (An), dimethylformamide (DMF), pyridine (Py) and triethylamine (Et3N) in the reaction of ciprofloxacin (CIP) with VO(SO4)2·2H2O in ethanol. The isolated complexes have been characterized with their melting points, elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, magnetic properties, conductance measurements, UV-Vis. and (1)H NMR spectroscopic methods and thermal analyses. The results supported the formation of the complexes and indicated that ciprofloxacin reacts as a bidentate ligand bound to the vanadium ion through the pyridone oxygen and one carboxylato oxygen. The activation energies, E(*); entropies, ΔS(*); enthalpies, ΔH(*); Gibbs free energies, ΔG(*), of the thermal decomposition reactions have been derived from thermo gravimetric (TGA) and differential thermo gravimetric (DTG) curves, using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzeger methods. The lowest energy model structure of each complex has been proposed by using the density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/CEP-31G level of theory. The ligand and their metal complexes were also evaluated for their antibacterial activity against several bacterial species, such as Bacillus Subtilis (B. Subtilis), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Nesseria Gonorrhoeae (N. Gonorrhoeae), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and Escherichia coli (E. coli).

  18. Interaction of vanadium (IV) solvates (L) with second-generation fluoroquinolone antibacterial drug ciprofloxacin: Spectroscopic, structure, thermal analyses, kinetics and biological evaluation (L = An, DMF, Py and Et3N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zordok, Wael A.

    2014-08-01

    The preparation and characterization of the new solid complexes [VO(CIP)2L]SO4ṡnH2O, where L = aniline (An), dimethylformamide (DMF), pyridine (Py) and triethylamine (Et3N) in the reaction of ciprofloxacin (CIP) with VO(SO4)2·2H2O in ethanol. The isolated complexes have been characterized with their melting points, elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, magnetic properties, conductance measurements, UV-Vis. and 1H NMR spectroscopic methods and thermal analyses. The results supported the formation of the complexes and indicated that ciprofloxacin reacts as a bidentate ligand bound to the vanadium ion through the pyridone oxygen and one carboxylato oxygen. The activation energies, E*; entropies, ΔS*; enthalpies, ΔH*; Gibbs free energies, ΔG*, of the thermal decomposition reactions have been derived from thermo gravimetric (TGA) and differential thermo gravimetric (DTG) curves, using Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzeger methods. The lowest energy model structure of each complex has been proposed by using the density functional theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/CEP-31G level of theory. The ligand and their metal complexes were also evaluated for their antibacterial activity against several bacterial species, such as Bacillus Subtilis (B. Subtilis), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), Nesseria Gonorrhoeae (N. Gonorrhoeae), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) and Escherichia coli (E. coli).

  19. Extraction of quinolones from milk samples using bentonite/magnetite nanoparticles before determination by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorimetric detection.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tao; Wu, Hao; Gao, Nannan; Chen, Xiaodan; Lai, Huajie; Zheng, Jinfeng; Du, Liming

    2016-02-01

    In this work, bentonite magnetic nanoparticles synthesized by a typical coprecipitation method were used as the adsorbent for the magnetic solid-phase extraction of six quinolones (ciprofloxacin, difloxacin, enrofloxacin, norfloxacin, sarafloxacin, and lomefloxacin) from milk samples followed by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorimetric detection. Under the optimized conditions, the linear quantitation range for the six quinolones was 0.3-200 ng/mL, and the correlation coefficients of the calibration curves ranged from 0.9994 to 0.9999. The detection limit of the method was 0.1 ng/mL. Recoveries of quinolones from pure and low-fat spiked milk samples varied from 80.4 to 92.7% and from 81.3 to 93.5%, respectively. These results demonstrated that the proposed method for the determination of six quinolones in milk samples was rapid, reliable, and efficient.

  20. An insight into the drug resistance profile & mechanism of drug resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Patel, Achchhe Lal; Chaudhry, Uma; Sachdev, Divya; Sachdeva, Poonam Nagpal; Bala, Manju; Saluja, Daman

    2011-10-01

    Among the aetiological agents of treatable sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), Neissseria gonorrhoeae is considered to be most important because of emerging antibiotic resistant strains that compromise the effectiveness of treatment of the disease - gonorrhoea. In most of the developing countries, treatment of gonorrhoea relies mainly on syndromic management rather than the aetiological based therapy. Gonococcal infections are usually treated with single-dose therapy with an agent found to cure > 95 per cent of cases. Unfortunately during the last few decades, N. gonorrhoeae has developed resistance not only to less expensive antimicrobials such as sulphonamides, penicillin and tetracyclines but also to fluoroquinolones. The resistance trend of N. gonorrhoeae towards these antimicrobials can be categorised into pre-quinolone, quinolone and post-quinolone era. Among the antimicrobials available so far, only the third-generation cephalosporins could be safely recommended as first-line therapy for gonorrhoea globally. However, resistance to oral third-generation cephalosporins has also started emerging in some countries. Therefore, it has become imperative to initiate sustained national and international efforts to reduce infection and misuse of antibiotics so as to prevent further emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance. It is necessary not only to monitor drug resistance and optimise treatment regimens, but also to gain insight into how gonococcus develops drug resistance. Knowledge of mechanism of resistance would help us to devise methods to prevent the occurrence of drug resistance against existing and new drugs. Such studies could also help in finding out new drug targets in N. gonorrhoeae and also a possibility of identification of new drugs for treating gonorrhoea. PMID:22089602

  1. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants in quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from patients with bacteremia in a university hospital in Taiwan, 2001-2015.

    PubMed

    Kao, Cheng-Yen; Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Lin, Wei-Hung; Tseng, Chin-Chung; Yan, Jing-Jou; Wang, Ming-Cheng; Teng, Ching-Hao; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from bacteremia in Taiwan in 2001-2015. During the study period, 248 (21.2%) of 1171 isolates were identified as levofloxacin-resistant. The results of phylogenetic group analysis showed that 38.7% of the FQ-resistant isolates belonged to phylogenetic group B2, 23.4% to group B1, 22.6% to groupA, 14.9% to group D, and 0.4% belonged to group F. FQ-resistant isolates were highly susceptible to cefepime (91.5%), imipenem (96.0%), meropenem (98.8%), amikacin (98.0%), and fosfomycin (99.6%), as determined by the agar dilution method. β-lactamases, including blaTEM (66.1%), blaCMY-2 (16.5%), blaCTX-M (5.2%), blaDHA-1 (1.6%), and blaSHV-12 (1.6%), were found in FQ-resistant isolates. The results of PCR and direct sequencing showed that 37 isolates (14.9%) harbored plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes. qnrB2, qnrB4, qnrS1, coexistence of qnrB4 and qnrS1, oqxAB, and aac(6')-Ib-cr were found in 1, 4, 4, 1, 15, and 14 isolates, respectively. PMQR genes were successfully transfered for 11 (29.7%) of the 37 PMQR-harboring isolates by conjugation to E. coli C600. These findings indicate that qnr genes remained rare in E. coli but demonstrate the potential spread of oqxAB and aac(6')-Ib-c in Taiwan. PMID:27573927

  2. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants in quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from patients with bacteremia in a university hospital in Taiwan, 2001–2015

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Cheng-Yen; Wu, Hsiu-Mei; Lin, Wei-Hung; Tseng, Chin-Chung; Yan, Jing-Jou; Wang, Ming-Cheng; Teng, Ching-Hao; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize fluoroquinolone (FQ)-resistant Escherichia coli isolates from bacteremia in Taiwan in 2001–2015. During the study period, 248 (21.2%) of 1171 isolates were identified as levofloxacin-resistant. The results of phylogenetic group analysis showed that 38.7% of the FQ-resistant isolates belonged to phylogenetic group B2, 23.4% to group B1, 22.6% to groupA, 14.9% to group D, and 0.4% belonged to group F. FQ-resistant isolates were highly susceptible to cefepime (91.5%), imipenem (96.0%), meropenem (98.8%), amikacin (98.0%), and fosfomycin (99.6%), as determined by the agar dilution method. β-lactamases, including blaTEM (66.1%), blaCMY-2 (16.5%), blaCTX-M (5.2%), blaDHA-1 (1.6%), and blaSHV-12 (1.6%), were found in FQ-resistant isolates. The results of PCR and direct sequencing showed that 37 isolates (14.9%) harbored plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes. qnrB2, qnrB4, qnrS1, coexistence of qnrB4 and qnrS1, oqxAB, and aac(6′)-Ib-cr were found in 1, 4, 4, 1, 15, and 14 isolates, respectively. PMQR genes were successfully transfered for 11 (29.7%) of the 37 PMQR-harboring isolates by conjugation to E. coli C600. These findings indicate that qnr genes remained rare in E. coli but demonstrate the potential spread of oqxAB and aac(6′)-Ib-c in Taiwan. PMID:27573927

  3. Iron metabolism: a promising target for antibacterial strategies.

    PubMed

    Ballouche, Mathieu; Cornelis, Pierre; Baysse, Christine

    2009-11-01

    In the fight against pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria, development and spreading of resistance to antibiotics is an increasing public health problem. The available antibacterial treatments are becoming less and less effective, making urgent the discovery of new active molecules. One strategy that has been explored to bypass the bacterial adaptation to drugs is to target the iron metabolism of bacteria, since iron is critical for all bacteria to grow. To date, three major ways have been assessed to exploit weaknesses in the bacterial iron metabolism: the "Trojan Horse strategy" which takes advantages of natural iron-uptake systems to deliver antimicrobial compounds inside the cells; the use of iron-antagonists and iron-chelators in order to reduce iron availability and the inhibition of enzymatic steps of iron metabolism via chemical compounds. This review discusses these antibacterial strategies interfering with several levels of the bacterial iron metabolism, with a special emphasis on recently published and/or patented discoveries.

  4. Sensitivities of major causative organisms isolated from patients with acute uncomplicated cystitis against various antibacterial agents: results of subanalysis based on the presence of menopause.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Hamasuna, Ryoichi; Ishikawa, Kiyohito; Takahashi, Satoshi; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Hayami, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kazushi; Muratani, Tetsuro; Monden, Koichi; Arakawa, Soichi; Yamamoto, Shingo

    2012-08-01

    We investigated whether the presence of menopause influenced the species and distribution of causative bacteria isolated from patients with acute uncomplicated cystitis (the most common urinary tract infection), and we also investigated the sensitivity of the isolated species to antibacterial agents. Using multivariate analysis, we also investigated risk factors for infection with quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli, because its frequency has increased and it is now a clinical problem in Japan. Six hundred and thirty-four strains were isolated from 489 premenopausal patients (mean age 32.3 ± 10.1 years). Major causative bacteria detected were Escherichia coli (65.0 %), Enterococcus faecalis (12.0 %), Streptococcus agalactiae (5.5 %), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (1.6 %). From 501 postmenopausal patients (mean age 68.7 ± 10.29 years), 657 strains were isolated, and the major causative bacteria detected were E. coli (61.5 %), E. faecalis (13.7 %), K. pneumoniae (5.2 %), and S. agalactiae (4.0 %). The sensitivities to fluoroquinolones (FQs) and cephems of E. coli isolated from premenopausal patients were both ≥90 %, while the sensitivities to FQs of E. coli isolated from postmenopausal patients were about 5 % lower. In regard to infection with quinolone-resistant E. coli (minimal inhibitory concentration of levofloxacin [LVFX] ≥4 μg/mL), significant risk factors were observed in patients with more than two episodes of cystitis within a year (p = 0.0002), patients to whom antibacterial agents were used previously for this episode of cystitis (p = 0.0175), and patients who had a history of FQ administration within 1 month. Although the species and distribution of causative bacteria of acute uncomplicated cystitis were the same regardless of the presence of menopause, the sensitivities to FQs of E. coli detected in postmenopausal patients were significantly lower than those in the premenopausal women. The major risk factors for infection with quinolone-resistant E

  5. Quinolones Induce Partial or Total Loss of Pathogenicity Islands in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli by SOS-Dependent or -Independent Pathways, Respectively

    PubMed Central

    Soto, S. M.; Jimenez de Anta, M. T.; Vila, J.

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli is the most common microorganism causing urinary tract infections. Quinolone-resistant E. coli strains have fewer virulence factors than quinolone-susceptible strains. Several urovirulence genes are located in pathogenicity islands (PAIs). We investigated the capacity of quinolones to induce loss of virulence factors such as hemolysin, cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1, P fimbriae, and autotransporter Sat included in PAIs in three uropathogenic E. coli strains. In a multistep selection, all strains lost hemolytic capacity at between 1 and 4 passages when they were incubated with subinhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin, showing a partial or total loss of the PAI containing the hly (hemolysin) and cnf-1 (cytotoxic necrotizing factor 1) genes. RecA− mutants were obtained from the two E. coli strains with partial or total loss of the PAI. The inactivation of the RecA protein affected only the partial loss of the PAI induced by quinolones. No spontaneous loss of PAIs was observed on incubation in the absence of quinolones in either the wild-type or mutant E. coli strains. Quinolones induce partial or total loss of PAIs in vitro in uropathogenic E. coli by SOS-dependent or -independent pathways, respectively. PMID:16436722

  6. Structural Simplification of Bioactive Natural Products with Multicomponent Synthesis. 2. Antiproliferative and Antitubulin Activities of Pyrano[3,2-c]pyridones and Pyrano[3,2-c]quinolones

    PubMed Central

    Magedov, Igor V.; Manpadi, Madhuri; Ogasawara, Marcia A.; Dhawan, Adriana S.; Rogelj, Snezna; Van slambrouck, Severine; Steelant, Wim F. A.; Evdokimov, Nikolai M.; Uglinskii, Pavel Y.; Elias, Eerik M.; Knee, Erica J.; Tongwa, Paul; Antipin, Mikhail Yu.; Kornienko, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Pyrano[3,2-c]pyridone and pyrano[3,2-c]quinolone structural motifs are commonly found in alkaloids manifesting diverse biological activities. As part of a program aimed at structural simplification of bioactive natural products utilizing multicomponent synthetic processes, we developed compound libraries based on these privileged heterocyclic scaffolds. The selected library members display low nanomolar antiproliferative activity and induce apoptosis in human cancer cell lines. Mechanistic studies reveal that these compounds induce cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase and block in vitro tubulin polymerization. Because of the successful clinical use of microtubule-targeting agents, these heterocyclic libraries are expected to provide promising new leads in anticancer drug design. PMID:18361483

  7. Role of gyrB Mutations in Pre-extensively and Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Thai Clinical Isolates.

    PubMed

    Disratthakit, Areeya; Prammananan, Therdsak; Tribuddharat, Chanwit; Thaipisuttikul, Iyarit; Doi, Norio; Leechawengwongs, Manoon; Chaiprasert, Angkana

    2016-09-01

    DNA gyrase mutations are a major cause of quinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis We therefore conducted the first comprehensive study to determine the diversity of gyrase mutations in pre-extensively drug-resistant (pre-XDR) (n = 71) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) (n = 30) Thai clinical tuberculosis (TB) isolates. All pre-XDR-TB and XDR-TB isolates carried at least one mutation within the quinolone resistance-determining region of GyrA (G88A [1.1%], A90V [17.4%], S91P [1.1%], or D94A/G/H/N/V/Y [72.7%]) or GyrB (D533A [1.1%], N538D [1.1%], or E540D [2.2%]). MIC and DNA gyrase supercoiling inhibition assays were performed to determine the role of gyrase mutations in quinolone resistance. Compared to the MICs against M. tuberculosis H37Rv, the levels of resistance to all quinolones tested in the isolates that carried GyrA-D94G or GyrB-N538D (8- to 32-fold increase) were significantly higher than those in isolates bearing GyrA-D94A or GyrA-A90V (2- to 8-fold increase) (P < 0.01). Intriguingly, GyrB-E540D led to a dramatic resistance to later-generation quinolones, including moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, and sparfloxacin (8- to 16-fold increases in MICs and 8.3- to 11.2-fold increases in 50% inhibitory concentrations [IC50s]). However, GyrB-E540D caused low-level resistance to early-generation quinolones, including ofloxacin, levofloxacin, and ciprofloxacin (2- to 4-fold increases in MICs and 1.5- to 2.0-fold increases in IC50s). In the present study, DC-159a was the most active antituberculosis agent and was little affected by the gyrase mutations described above. Our findings suggest that although they are rare, gyrB mutations have a notable role in quinolone resistance, which may provide clues to the molecular basis of estimating quinolone resistance levels for drug and dose selection. PMID:27297489

  8. Luminescent determination of quinolones in milk samples by liquid chromatography/post-column derivatization with terbium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yánez-Jácome, G S; Aguilar-Caballos, M P; Gómez-Hens, A

    2015-07-31

    The usefulness of terbium oxide nanoparticles (Tb4O7NPs) as post-column derivatizing reagent for the liquid chromatographic determination of residues of quinolone antibiotics in milk samples has been studied. Seven quinolones of veterinary use have been chosen as model analytes to develop this method. The derivatization step is based on the formation of luminescent chelates of quinolones with Tb4O7NPs, which are monitored at λex=340nm and λem=545nm. Another relevant feature of the method is that the use of a 10-cm column and a ternary mixture of methanol, acetonitrile and acetic acid as mobile phase in gradient elution mode allow the chromatographic separation of the quinolones in about 13min, whereas previously described chromatographic methods require about 20min. The dynamic ranges of the calibration graphs and limits of detection are, respectively: 65-900ngmL(-1) and 35ngmL(-1) for marbofloxacin, 7.2-900ngmL(-1) and 2.5ngmL(-1) for ciprofloxacin, 6-900ngmL(-1) and 2ngmL(-1) for danofloxacin, 50-900ngmL(-1) and 20ngmL(-1) for enrofloxacin, 35-900ngmL(-1) and 12ngmL(-1) for sarafloxacin, 5-900ngmL(-1) and 2ngmL(-1) for oxolinic acid, and 7-900ngmL(-1) and 2.5ngmL(-1) for flumequine. The precision, established at two concentration levels of each analyte and expressed as the percentage of the relative standard deviation is in the range of 1.9-8.1% using standards, and of 3.4-10.7% in the presence of milk samples. The method has been satisfactorily applied to the analysis of skimmed, semi-skimmed and whole milk samples, with recoveries ranging from 89.0 to 106.5%.

  9. Novel derivatives of benzo[b]thieno[2,3-c]quinolones: synthesis, photochemical synthesis, and antitumor evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dogan Koruznjak, Jasna; Grdisa, Mira; Slade, Neda; Zamola, Branimir; Pavelić, Kresimir; Karminski-Zamola, Grace

    2003-10-01

    Novel derivatives of benzo[b]thieno[2,3-c]quinolones 3a-j were synthesized in a multistep synthesis starting from substituted benzo[b]thiophene-2-carbonyl chlorides, to their corresponding benzo[b]thiophene-2-carboxamides, which were photochemically dehydrohalogenated to their corresponding substituted benzo[b]thieno[2,3-c]quinolones. Compound 4 was prepared from 3i by alkylation with 3-dimethylaminopropyl chloride in the presence of NaH. Compounds 7a,b were prepared from 3g in the multistep synthesis from compounds 5 and 6. Compounds 3b, 3c-f, 3h, 7a, and 7b were found to exert cytostatic activity against malignant cell lines: pancreatic carcinoma (MiaPaCa2), breast carcinoma (MCF7), cervical carcinoma (HeLa), laryngeal carcinoma (Hep2), colon carcinoma (CaCo-2), melanoma (HBL), human fibroblast cell lines (WI-38). The compounds that bear a 3-dimethylaminopropyl substituent on the quinolone nitrogen (3b, 3c-f, 3h) showed higher antitumor activity than compounds bearing the same substituent on the amidic nitrogen (7a and 7b). The compound 3h, which has a 3-dimethylaminopropyl substituent on the quinolone nitrogen and a methoxycarbonyl substituent at position 9, had marked antitumor activity. Because of strong cytotoxic effect of compound 4 on melanoma cells (HBL, ME 67.3, and ME 67.1), a potential mechanism of action was examined. Analysis of DNA and Annexin-V-FLUOS staining indicated that compound 4 causes cell death by apoptosis.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of Sparfloxacin in the Serum and Vitreous Humor of Rabbits: Physicochemical Properties That Regulate Penetration of Quinolone Antimicrobials

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weiguo; Liu, Qing Feng; Perkins, Ruth; Drusano, George; Louie, Arnold; Madu, Assumpta; Mian, Umar; Mayers, Martin; Miller, Michael H.

    1998-01-01

    We have used a recently described animal model to characterize the ocular pharmacokinetics of sparfloxacin in vitreous humor of uninfected albino rabbits following systemic administration and direct intraocular injection. The relationships of lipophilicity, protein binding, and molecular weight to the penetration and elimination of sparfloxacin were compared to those of ciprofloxacin, fleroxacin, and ofloxacin. To determine whether elimination was active, elimination rates following direct injection with and without probenecid or heat-killed bacteria were compared. Sparfloxacin concentrations were measured in the serum and vitreous humor by a biological assay. Protein binding and lipophilicity were determined, respectively, by ultrafiltration and oil-water partitioning. Pharmacokinetic parameters were characterized with RSTRIP, an iterative, nonlinear, weighted, least-squares-regression program. The relationship between each independent variable and mean quinolone concentration or elimination rate in the vitreous humor was determined by multiple linear regression. The mean concentration of sparfloxacin in the vitreous humor was 59.4% ± 12.2% of that in serum. Penetration of sparfloxacin, ciprofloxacin, fleroxacin, and ofloxacin into, and elimination from, the vitreous humor correlated with lipophilicity (r2 > 0.999). The linear-regression equation describing this relationship was not improved by including the inverse of the square root of the molecular weight and/or the degree of protein binding. Elimination rates for each quinolone were decreased by the intraocular administration of probenecid. Heat-killed Staphylococcus epidermidis decreased the rate of elimination of fleroxacin. Penetration of sparfloxacin into the noninflamed vitreous humor was greater than that of any quinolone previously examined. There was an excellent correlation between lipophilicity and vitreous entry or elimination for sparfloxacin as well as ciprofloxacin, fleroxacin, and ofloxacin

  11. Prevalence and characterization of quinolone resistance mechanisms in commensal Escherichia coli isolated from slaughter animals in Poland, 2009-2012.

    PubMed

    Wasyl, Dariusz

    2014-12-01

    The background of quinolone resistance was characterized in ciprofloxacin-resistant commensal Escherichia coli selected out of 3,551 isolates from slaughtered animals in Poland between 2009 and 2012. Plasmid-mediated determinants were suspected in 6.2% of the study group, ranging from 1.1% in cattle to 9.7% in turkeys. Polymerase chain reaction and sequencing identified up to four quinolone resistance-determining substitutions in gyrA (Ser83, Asp87) and parC (Ala56, Ser80). Plasmid-mediated mechanisms were identified as qnrS1 (or qnrS3, n=70, including six isolates with chromosomal mutations), qnrB19 (or qnrB10, n=19), and qnrB17 (n=1). All tested isolates were negative for qnrA, qnrC, qnrD, qepA, and aac(6')-Ib-cr. Still, there were several E. coli suspected for both plasmid- and chromosome-mediated resistance with unrevealed genetic background of the phenomenon. Since all tested isolates showed diverse XbaI-PFGE profiles, chromosome-encoded quinolone resistance does not result from the spread of a single resistant clone, however, it is rather due to antimicrobial pressure leading to the selection of random gyr and par mutants. It also favors the selection and spread of plasmids carrying predominant qnr genes, since the same determinants were found in Salmonella, isolated from similar sources. The identification of carrier plasmids and mitigation of their spread might be essential for sustainable quinolone usage in animal husbandry and efficient protection of human health. PMID:25051094

  12. Enterobacteriaceae resistant to third-generation cephalosporins and quinolones in fresh culinary herbs imported from Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Veldman, Kees; Kant, Arie; Dierikx, Cindy; van Essen-Zandbergen, Alieda; Wit, Ben; Mevius, Dik

    2014-05-01

    Since multidrug resistant bacteria are frequently reported from Southeast Asia, our study focused on the occurrence of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in fresh imported herbs from Thailand, Vietnam and Malaysia. Samples were collected from fresh culinary herbs imported from Southeast Asia in which ESBL-suspected isolates were obtained by selective culturing. Analysis included identification by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, susceptibility testing, XbaI-PFGE, microarray, PCR and sequencing of specific ESBL genes, PCR based replicon typing (PBRT) of plasmids and Southern blot hybridization. In addition, the quinolone resistance genotype was characterized by screening for plasmid mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes and mutations in the quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR) of gyrA and parC. The study encompassed fifty samples of ten batches of culinary herbs (5 samples per batch) comprising nine different herb variants. The herbs originated from Thailand (Water morning glory, Acacia and Betel leaf), Vietnam (Parsley, Asian pennywort, Houttuynia leaf and Mint) and Malaysia (Holy basil and Parsley). By selective culturing 21 cefotaxime resistant Enterobacteriaceae were retrieved. Array analysis revealed 18 isolates with ESBL genes and one isolate with solely non-ESBL beta-lactamase genes. Mutations in the ampC promoter region were determined in two isolates with PCR and sequencing. The isolates were identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae (n=9), Escherichia coli (n=6), Enterobacter cloacae complex (n=5) and Enterobacter spp. (n=1). All isolates tested were multidrug resistant. Variants of CTX-M enzymes were predominantly found followed by SHV enzymes. PMQR genes (including aac(6')-1b-cr, qnrB and qnrS) were also frequently detected. In almost all cases ESBL and quinolone resistance genes were located on the same plasmid. Imported fresh culinary herbs from Southeast Asia are a potential source for contamination of food with multidrug resistant bacteria

  13. Quinolone-resistance in Salmonella is associated with decreased mRNA expression of virulence genes invA and avrA, growth and intracellular invasion and survival.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Ping; Li, Lin; Shen, Jian-Zhong; Yang, Fu-Jiang; Wu, Yong-Ning

    2009-02-01

    A variety of environmental factors, such as oxygen, pH, osmolarity and antimicrobial agents, modulate the expression of Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI) genes. This study investigated SPI-1 gene expression and the pathogenicity of quinolone-resistant Salmonella. mRNA expression levels of the invA and avrA genes, located in SPI-1, in quinolone-susceptible and quinolone-resistant Salmonella strains were determined using real-time fluorescent quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Twenty-five quinolone-resistant Salmonella mutants were derived from quinolone-susceptible strains by multiple-passage selection through increasing concentrations of ciprofloxacin in vitro, while an additional 15 strains were quinolone-resistant Salmonella clinical isolates. Sequence analysis showed no gene deletion or point mutations of nine SPI-1 genes (including invA and avrA) occurred in either the selected or clinical quinolone-resistant strains, while a single gyrA point mutation (S83F) was observed in all 40 quinolone-resistant strains. The mRNA expression levels of invA and avrA were significantly decreased (P<0.005) in quinolone-resistant strains (clinically acquired or experimentally selected in vitro), compared to the quinolone-susceptible strains. The resistant strains also had a slower growth rate combined with decreased epithelial cell invasion and intracellular replication in epithelial cells and macrophages. The results suggest that quinolone-resistance may be associated with lower virulence and pathogenicity than in quinolone-susceptible strains.

  14. In Vitro Resistance Development to Nemonoxacin in Streptococcus pneumoniae: A Unique Profile for a Novel Nonfluorinated Quinolone

    PubMed Central

    Roychoudhury, Siddhartha; Makin, Kelly; Twinem, Tracy; Leunk, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Selection of resistant strains in Streptococcus pneumoniae was studied in vitro with nemonoxacin, a novel nonfluorinated quinolone (NFQ), in comparison with quinolone benchmarks, ciprofloxacin, garenoxacin, and gatifloxacin. In stepwise resistance selection studies, a 256-fold loss of potency was observed after three to four steps of exposure to ciprofloxacin or garenoxacin. In contrast, the loss of potency was limited to eightfold after three steps of exposure to nemonoxacin and repeated attempts to isolate highly resistant organisms after four steps of exposure yielded isolates that could not be subcultured in liquid medium. The quinolone resistance-determining regions of the target genes, parC, parE, gyrA, and gyrB, were analyzed through DNA sequencing. Known mutations, especially in the hotspots of parC and gyrA, were selected with exposure to garenoxacin, ciprofloxacin, and gatifloxacin. In contrast, mutations selected with nemonoxacin were limited to GyrA, GyrB, and ParE, sparing ParC, which is known as a key driver of resistance in clinical isolates of S. pneumoniae. This observation is consistent with previous data using other NFQs, which showed no loss of potency due to ParC mutations in clinical isolates. This apparently unique feature of nemonoxacin is potentially attributable to the structural uniqueness of the NFQs, distinguishing them from the fluoroquinolones that are commonly prescribed for infections by S. pneumoniae. PMID:27267788

  15. Recombinant bacteriophage lysins as antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, Mark; Ross, Paul; McAuliffe, Olivia; O'Mahony, Jim

    2010-01-01

    With the increasing worldwide prevalence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, bacteriophage endolysins (lysins) represent a very promising novel alternative class of antibacterial in the fight against infectious disease. Lysins are phage-encoded peptidoglycan hydrolases which, when applied exogenously (as purified recombinant proteins) to Gram-positive bacteria, bring about rapid lysis and death of the bacterial cell. A number of studies have recently demonstrated the strong potential of these enzymes in human and veterinary medicine to control and treat pathogens on mucosal surfaces and in systemic infections. They also have potential in diagnostics and detection, bio-defence, elimination of food pathogens and control of phytopathogens. This review discusses the extensive research on recombinant bacteriophage lysins in the context of antibacterials, and looks forward to future development and potential. PMID:21327123

  16. [Resistance to antituberculous drugs].

    PubMed

    Veziris, N; Cambau, E; Sougakoff, W; Robert, J; Jarlier, V

    2005-08-01

    Mycobacteria responsible for tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis, M. bovis, M. africanum) are susceptible to a very small number of antibiotics. As soon as these drugs were used in humans all gave rise to the selection of resistant mycobacteria. Study of the mechanisms of acquired resistance, with the help of the genetics of mycobacteria, led to a more accurate understanding of the mode of action of antituberculous drugs. The antibiotics isoniazid, pyrazinamide, ethionamide and ethambutol are mycobacteria-specific because they inhibit the synthesis of mycolic acids, which are specific constituants of the bacterial wall. Mutations responsible for resistance to these drugs affect genes coding for activator enzymes (katg for isoniazid, pncA for pyrazinamide) or genes coding for their target (inhA for isoniazid/ethionamide, embB for ethambutol). With rifamycins, aminosides and quinolones, mechanisms of action and resistance are the same for mycobacteria as for non-mycobacterial organisms. No plasmid or resistance transposon has been described in M. tuberculosis. Currently a test for the quick detection of resistance to rifampicin is widely available but in the future DNA chips may allow the simultaneous detection of multiple resistances. Monitoring of antituberculous drugs shows that in France the prevalence of multiresistance ( resistance to both isoniazid and rifampicin) is 0.5%, primary resistance (before treatment) is 9%, and secondary resistance (after treatment) is 16%.

  17. Antibacterial activity of Artocarpus heterophyllus.

    PubMed

    Khan, M R; Omoloso, A D; Kihara, M

    2003-07-01

    The crude methanolic extracts of the stem and root barks, stem and root heart-wood, leaves, fruits and seeds of Artocarpus heterophyllus and their subsequent partitioning with petrol, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate and butanol gave fractions that exhibited a broad spectrum of antibacterial activity. The butanol fractions of the root bark and fruits were found to be the most active. None of the fractions were active against the fungi tested.

  18. Antibacterial and Antifungal Compounds from Marine Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lijian; Meng, Wei; Cao, Cong; Wang, Jian; Shan, Wenjun; Wang, Qinggui

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews 116 new compounds with antifungal or antibacterial activities as well as 169 other known antimicrobial compounds, with a specific focus on January 2010 through March 2015. Furthermore, the phylogeny of the fungi producing these antibacterial or antifungal compounds was analyzed. The new methods used to isolate marine fungi that possess antibacterial or antifungal activities as well as the relationship between structure and activity are shown in this review. PMID:26042616

  19. Antibacterial activity on Citrullus colocynthis Leaf extract

    PubMed Central

    gowri, S. Shyamala; Priyavardhini, S.; Vasantha, K.; Umadevi, M.

    2009-01-01

    Studies on the antibacterial activities of the leaf extract of Citrullus colocynthis (Cucurbitaceae), a medicinal plant used for the treatment of various ailments was carried out using agar disc diffusion technique. The results revealed that the crude acetone extract exhibited antibacterial activities against Pseudomonas aeruginosa with zones of inhibition measuring 14.0mm. The chloroform leaf extract exhibited no antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. The minimum inhibitory concentration for the chloroform extract was 4.0mm for Escherichia coli. PMID:22557336

  20. Synthesis, antifungal and antibacterial activity of novel 1,2,4-triazole derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Deepa; Jain, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    A large number of 1,2,4-triazole-containing ring system have been incorporated into a wide variety of therapeutically interesting drug candidates including anti-inflammatory, central nervous system stimulants, antianxiety, and antimicrobial agents. To overcome the rapid development of drug resistance, new agents should preferably have chemical characteristics that clearly differ from those of existing agents. Thus led to the design and synthesize the new antimicrobial agents. A novel series of Schiff bases based on of 4-(benzylideneamino)-5-phenyl-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol scaffold was prepared by heating thiocarbohydrazide and substituted benzoic acid and subsequently, treating with substituted benzaldehydes. Seventeen derivatives were synthesized and were biologically screened for antifungal and antibacterial activity. The newly synthesized derivatives of triazole showed antifungal activity against fungal species, Microsporum gypseum; and antibacterial activity against bacterial species, Staphylococcus aureus. It was observed that none of the compounds tested showed positive results for fungi Candida albicans fungi Aspergillus niger, nor against bacterial strain Escherichia coli. Strong antifungal effects were obtained for the synthesized compounds against M. gypseum and were superior or comparable to standard drug ketoconazole. Similarly, all of the synthesized compounds exhibit strong antibacterial activity against S. aureus and were superior or comparable to standard drug streptomycin. It was found that among the triazole derivatives so synthesized, six of them, showed antifungal activity superior to ketoconazole while one of them, showed antibacterial activity superior to streptomycin. Thus, these can be the potential new molecule as an antimicrobial agent. PMID:26317080

  1. Multifunctional upconverting nanoparticles for near-infrared triggered and synergistic antibacterial resistance therapy.

    PubMed

    Yin, Meili; Li, Zhenhua; Ju, Enguo; Wang, Zhenzhen; Dong, Kai; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-09-18

    To integrate photodynamic therapy with photothermal therapy for improved multidrug-resistant bacteria therapy, we have constructed a novel multifunctional core/satellite nanostructure by decorating CuS nanoparticles onto the surface of NaYF4:Mn/Yb/Er@photosensitizer doped SiO2. This system exhibited a superior antibacterial activity towards drug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli.

  2. Antibacterial Surgical Silk Sutures Using a High-Performance Slow-Release Carrier Coating System.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojie; Hou, Dandan; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Qian; Zou, Jiahan; Sun, Gang

    2015-10-14

    Sutures are a vital part for surgical operation, and suture-associated surgical site infections are an important issue of postoperative care. Antibacterial sutures have been proved to reduce challenging complications caused by bacterial infections. In recent decades, triclosan-free sutures have been on their way to commercialization. Alternative antibacterial substances are becoming relevant to processing surgical suture materials. Most of the antibacterial substances are loaded directly on sutures by dipping or coating methods. The aim of this study was to optimize novel antibacterial braided silk sutures based on levofloxacin hydrochloride and poly(ε-caprolactone) by two different processing sequences, to achieve suture materials with slow-release antibacterial efficacy and ideal physical and handling properties. Silk strands were processed into sutures on a circular braiding machine, and antibacterial treatment was introduced alternatively before or after braiding by two-dipping-two-rolling method (M1 group and M2 group). The antibacterial activity and durability against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were tested. Drug release profiles were measured in phosphate buffer with different pH values, and release kinetics model was built to analyze the sustained drug release mechanism between the interface of biomaterials and the in vitro aqueous environment. Knot-pull tensile strength, thread-to-thread friction, and bending stiffness were determined to evaluate physical and handling properties of sutures. All coated sutures showed continuous antibacterial efficacy and slow drug release features for more than 5 days. Besides, treated sutures fulfilled U.S. Pharmacopoeia required knot-pull tensile strength. The thread-to-thread friction and bending stiffness for the M1 group changed slightly when compared with those of uncoated ones. However, physical and handling characteristics of the M2 group tend to approach those of monofilament ones. The novel suture

  3. Antibacterial Surgical Silk Sutures Using a High-Performance Slow-Release Carrier Coating System.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojie; Hou, Dandan; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Qian; Zou, Jiahan; Sun, Gang

    2015-10-14

    Sutures are a vital part for surgical operation, and suture-associated surgical site infections are an important issue of postoperative care. Antibacterial sutures have been proved to reduce challenging complications caused by bacterial infections. In recent decades, triclosan-free sutures have been on their way to commercialization. Alternative antibacterial substances are becoming relevant to processing surgical suture materials. Most of the antibacterial substances are loaded directly on sutures by dipping or coating methods. The aim of this study was to optimize novel antibacterial braided silk sutures based on levofloxacin hydrochloride and poly(ε-caprolactone) by two different processing sequences, to achieve suture materials with slow-release antibacterial efficacy and ideal physical and handling properties. Silk strands were processed into sutures on a circular braiding machine, and antibacterial treatment was introduced alternatively before or after braiding by two-dipping-two-rolling method (M1 group and M2 group). The antibacterial activity and durability against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli were tested. Drug release profiles were measured in phosphate buffer with different pH values, and release kinetics model was built to analyze the sustained drug release mechanism between the interface of biomaterials and the in vitro aqueous environment. Knot-pull tensile strength, thread-to-thread friction, and bending stiffness were determined to evaluate physical and handling properties of sutures. All coated sutures showed continuous antibacterial efficacy and slow drug release features for more than 5 days. Besides, treated sutures fulfilled U.S. Pharmacopoeia required knot-pull tensile strength. The thread-to-thread friction and bending stiffness for the M1 group changed slightly when compared with those of uncoated ones. However, physical and handling characteristics of the M2 group tend to approach those of monofilament ones. The novel suture

  4. Application of Sigmoidal Transformation Functions in Optimization of Micellar Liquid Chromatographic Separation of Six Quinolone Antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Hadjmohammadi, Mohammadreza; Salary, Mina

    2016-03-01

    A chemometrics approach has been used to optimize the separation of six quinolone compounds by micellar liquid chromatography (MLC). A Derringer's desirability function, a multicriteria decision-making (MCDM) method, was tested for evaluation of two different measures of chromatographic performance (resolution and analysis time). The effect of three experimental parameters on a chromatographic response function (CRF) expressed as a product of two sigmoidal desirability functions was investigated. The sigmoidal functions were used to transform the optimization criteria, resolution and analysis time into the desirability values. The factors studied were the concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate, butanol content and pH of the mobile phase. The experiments were done according to the face-centered cube central composite design, and the calculated CRF values were fitted to a polynomial model to correlate the CRF values with the variables and their interactions. The developed regression model showed good descriptive and predictive ability (R(2) = 0.815, F = 6.919, SE = 0.038, [Formula: see text]) and used, by a grid search algorithm, to optimize the chromatographic conditions for the separation of the mixture. The efficiency of prediction of polynomial model was confirmed by performing the experiment under the optimal conditions.

  5. Identification of an integron containing the quinolone resistance gene qnrA1 in Shewanella xiamenensis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-yi; Mu, Xiao-dong; Zhu, Yuan-qi; Xi, Lijun; Xiao, Zijun

    2015-09-01

    This study investigated multidrug resistance in Shewanella xiamenensis isolated from an estuarine water sample in China during 2014. This strain displayed resistance or decreased susceptibility to ampicillin, aztreonam, cefepime, cefotaxime, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, kanamycin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. The antimicrobial resistance genes aacA3, blaOXA-199, qnrA1 and sul1 were identified by PCR amplification and by sequencing. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and DNA hybridization experiments showed that the quinolone resistance gene qnrA1 was chromosomally located. qnrA1 was located in a complex class 1 integron, downstream from an ISCR1, and bracketed by two copies of qacEΔ1-sul1 genes. This integron is similar to In825 with four gene cassettes aacA3, catB11c, dfrA1z and aadA2az. An IS26-mel-mph2-IS26 structure was also detected in the flanking sequences, conferring resistance to macrolides. This is the first identification of the class 1 integron in S. xiamenensis. This is also the first identification of the qnrA1 gene and IS26-mediated macrolide resistance genes in S. xiamenensis. Presence of a variety of resistance genetic determinants in environmental S. xiamenensis suggests the possibility that this species may serve as a potential vehicle of antimicrobial resistance genes in aquatic environments.

  6. Urinary Tract Physiological Conditions Promote Ciprofloxacin Resistance in Low-Level-Quinolone-Resistant Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Martín-Gutiérrez, Guillermo; Rodríguez-Beltrán, Jerónimo; Rodríguez-Martínez, José Manuel; Costas, Coloma; Aznar, Javier; Pascual, Álvaro; Blázquez, Jesús

    2016-07-01

    Escherichia coli isolates carrying chromosomally encoded low-level-quinolone-resistant (LLQR) determinants are frequently found in urinary tract infections (UTIs). LLQR mutations are considered the first step in the evolutionary pathway producing high-level fluoroquinolone resistance. Therefore, their evolution and dissemination might influence the outcome of fluoroquinolone treatments of UTI. Previous studies support the notion that low urine pH decreases susceptibility to ciprofloxacin (CIP) in E. coli However, the effect of the urinary tract physiological parameters on the activity of ciprofloxacin against LLQR E. coli strains has received little attention. We have studied the activity of ciprofloxacin under physiological urinary tract conditions against a set of well-characterized isogenic E. coli derivatives carrying the most prevalent chromosomal mutations (ΔmarR, gyrA-S83L, gyrA-D87N, and parC-S80R and some combinations). The results presented here demonstrate that all the LLQR strains studied became resistant to ciprofloxacin (according to CLSI guidelines) under physiological conditions whereas the control strain lacking LLQR mutations did not. Moreover, the survival of some LLQR E. coli variants increased up to 100-fold after challenge with a high concentration of ciprofloxacin under UTI conditions compared to the results seen with Mueller-Hinton broth. These selective conditions could explain the high prevalence of LLQR mutations in E. coli Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that recommended methods for MIC determination produce poor estimations of CIP activity against LLQR E. coli in UTIs. PMID:27139482

  7. Tandem prenyltransferases catalyze isoprenoid elongation and complexity generation in biosynthesis of quinolone alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yi; Zhan, Zhajun; Li, Dehai; Tang, Mancheng; Cacho, Ralph A; Watanabe, Kenji; Tang, Yi

    2015-04-22

    Modification of natural products with prenyl groups and the ensuing oxidative transformations are important for introducing structural complexity and biological activities. Penigequinolones (1) are potent insecticidal alkaloids that contain a highly modified 10-carbon prenyl group. Here we reveal an iterative prenylation mechanism for installing the 10-carbon unit using two aromatic prenyltransferases (PenI and PenG) present in the gene cluster of 1 from Penicillium thymicola. The initial Friedel-Crafts alkylation is catalyzed by PenI to yield dimethylallyl quinolone 6. The five-carbon side chain is then dehydrogenated by a flavin-dependent monooxygenase to give aryl diene 9, which serves as the electron-rich substrate for a second alkylation with dimethylallyl diphosphate to yield stryrenyl product 10. The completed, oxidized 10-carbon prenyl group then undergoes further structural morphing to yield yaequinolone C (12), the immediate precursor of 1. Our studies have therefore uncovered an unprecedented prenyl chain extension mechanism in natural product biosynthesis.

  8. Tandem Prenyltransferases Catalyze Isoprenoid Elongation and Complexity Generation in Biosynthesis of Quinolone Alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yi; Zhan, Zhajun; Li, Dehai; Tang, Mancheng; Watanabe, Kenji; Tang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Modification of natural products with prenyl groups and the ensuing oxidative transformations are important for introducing structural complexity and biological activities. Understanding the different mechanisms Nature performs prenylation can lead to new enzymatic tools. Penigequinolones (1) are potent insecticidal alkaloids that contain a highly modified ten-carbon prenyl group. Here we reveal an iterative prenylation mechanism for installing the ten-carbon unit using two aromatic prenyltransferases (PenI and PenG) present in the gene cluster of 1 from Penicillium thymicola. The initial Friedel-Crafts alkylation is catalyzed by PenI to yield the dimethylallyl quinolone 6. The five-carbon side chain is then dehydrogenated by a Flavin-dependent monooxygenase to an aryldiene 9, which serves as the electron-rich substrate for a second alkylation with dimethylallyl diphosphate to yield a stryrenyl product 10. The completed, oxidized ten-carbon prenyl group is then shown to undergo further structural morphing to yield yaequinolone C 12, the immediate precursor of 1. Our studies therefore uncover an unprecedented prenyl chain extension mechanism in natural product biosynthesis. PMID:25859931

  9. Tandem prenyltransferases catalyze isoprenoid elongation and complexity generation in biosynthesis of quinolone alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yi; Zhan, Zhajun; Li, Dehai; Tang, Mancheng; Cacho, Ralph A; Watanabe, Kenji; Tang, Yi

    2015-04-22

    Modification of natural products with prenyl groups and the ensuing oxidative transformations are important for introducing structural complexity and biological activities. Penigequinolones (1) are potent insecticidal alkaloids that contain a highly modified 10-carbon prenyl group. Here we reveal an iterative prenylation mechanism for installing the 10-carbon unit using two aromatic prenyltransferases (PenI and PenG) present in the gene cluster of 1 from Penicillium thymicola. The initial Friedel-Crafts alkylation is catalyzed by PenI to yield dimethylallyl quinolone 6. The five-carbon side chain is then dehydrogenated by a flavin-dependent monooxygenase to give aryl diene 9, which serves as the electron-rich substrate for a second alkylation with dimethylallyl diphosphate to yield stryrenyl product 10. The completed, oxidized 10-carbon prenyl group then undergoes further structural morphing to yield yaequinolone C (12), the immediate precursor of 1. Our studies have therefore uncovered an unprecedented prenyl chain extension mechanism in natural product biosynthesis. PMID:25859931

  10. beta-Lactamase hydrolysis of cephalosporin 3'-quinolone esters, carbamates, and tertiary amines.

    PubMed Central

    Georgopapadakou, N H; McCaffrey, C

    1994-01-01

    The beta-lactam hydrolysis of five cephalosporin 3'-quinolones (dual-action cephalosporins) by three gram-negative beta-lactamases was examined. The dual-action cephalosporins tested were the ester Ro 23-9424; the carbamates Ro 25-2016, Ro 25-4095, and Ro 25-4835; and the tertiary amine Ro 25-0534. Also tested were cephalosporins with similar side chains (cefotaxime, desacetylcefotaxime, cephalothin, cephacetrile, and Ro 09-1227 [SR 0124]) and standard beta-lactams (penicillin G, cephaloridine). The beta-lactamases used were the plasmid-mediated TEM-1 and TEM-3 enzymes and the chromosomal AmpC. The cephacetrile-related compounds Ro 25-4095 and Ro 25-4835 were hydrolyzed by all three beta-lactamases with catalytic efficiencies (relative to penicillin G) ranging from approximately 5 (TEM-1, AmpC) to approximately 25 (TEM-3). The cephalothin-related Ro 25-2016 was also hydrolyzed by all three beta-lactamases, particularly the AmpC enzyme (relative catalytic efficiency, 110). The cefotaxime-related compounds Ro 25-0534 and Ro 23-9424 were hydrolyzed to any significant extent only by the TEM-3 enzyme (relative catalytic efficiencies, 1.2 and 4.7, respectively. PMID:8067776

  11. Conformational analysis of a quinolonic ribonucleoside with anti-HSV-1 activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, Julliane D.; Velloso, Marcia Helena R.; Leal, Kátia Z.; Azeredo, Rodrigo B. de V.; Sugiura, Makiko; Albuquerque, Magaly G.; Santos, Fernanda da C.; Souza, Maria Cecília B. V. de; Cunha, Anna Claudia; Seidl, Peter R.; Alencastro, Ricardo B. de; Ferreira, Vitor F.

    2011-01-01

    The infections caused by the Herpes Simplex Virus are one of the most common sources of diseases in adults and several natural nucleoside analogues are currently used in the treatment of these infections. In vitro tests of a series of quinolonic ribonucleosides derivatives synthesized by part of our group indicated that some of them have antiviral activity against HSV-1. The conformational analysis of bioactive compounds is extremely important in order to better understand their chemical structures and biological activity. In this work, we have carried out a nuclear relaxation NMR study of 6-Me ribonucleoside derivative in order to determine if the syn or anti conformation is preferential. The NMR analysis permits the determination of inter-atomic distances by using techniques which are based on nuclear relaxation and related phenomena. Those techniques are non-selective longitudinal or spin-lattice relaxation rates and NULL pulse sequence, which allow the determination of distances between pairs of hydrogen atoms. The results of NMR studies were compared with those obtained by molecular modeling.

  12. Drugs against superbugs: private lessons from bacteriophages.

    PubMed

    Brown, Eric D

    2004-09-01

    Bacterial genomics has provided a plethora of potential targets for antibacterial drug discovery, however, success in the hunt for new antibiotics will hinge on selecting targets with the highest potential. A recent paper by Liu and coworkers describes a new approach to target selection that uncovers strategies used by bacteriophage to disable bacteria. The method uses key phage proteins to identify and validate vulnerable targets and exploits them further in the identification of new antibacterial leads.

  13. [Two chapters from the medical history of this century: antibacterial therapy].

    PubMed

    Bol, P

    1999-02-13

    The antibiotic era brought adequate therapies for bacterial infections and began with the introduction of sulphonamides (discovered earlier by Domagk) in 1935 and penicillins (discovered earlier by Fleming) in the course of World War II. Notwithstanding the usual description as 'discoveries', they were the fruits of systematic investigations for chemicals with antibacterial properties and little or no toxicity for the host. Despite the role of serendipity in the discovery of penicillin, the bactericidal moulds that Fleming observed had fallen on fertile soil: a laboratory where the search for antibacterial drugs had been going on for years. PMID:10221100

  14. Fabrication of silver-coated cobalt ferrite nanocomposite and the study of its antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooti, M.; Saiahi, S.; Motamedi, H.

    2013-05-01

    A new silver coated cobalt ferrite nanocomposite, Ag@CoFe2O4, was prepared by a two-step procedure. In the first step, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by a combustion method using glycine as a fuel. This ferrite was then coated with nanosilver via chemical reduction of Ag+ solution. The as-synthesized Ag@CoFe2O4 was characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The antibacterial activity of this composite was investigated against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and compared with those of silver nanoparticles and some standard antibacterial drugs.

  15. Antibacterial peptide nisin: a potential role in the inhibition of oral pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhongchun; Ni, Longxing; Ling, Junqi

    2014-10-01

    Although the antimicrobial peptide nisin has been extensively studied in the food industry for decades, its application in the oral cavity remains to develop and evaluate its feasibility in treating oral common diseases. Nisin is an odorless, colorless, tasteless substance with low toxicity and with antibacterial activities against Gram-positive bacteria. These biologic properties may establish its use in promising products for oral diseases. This article summarizes the antibacterial efficiency of nisin against pathogenic bacteria related to dental caries and root canal infection and discusses the combination of nisin and common oral drugs.

  16. Antibacterial peptide nisin: a potential role in the inhibition of oral pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhongchun; Ni, Longxing; Ling, Junqi

    2014-10-01

    Although the antimicrobial peptide nisin has been extensively studied in the food industry for decades, its application in the oral cavity remains to develop and evaluate its feasibility in treating oral common diseases. Nisin is an odorless, colorless, tasteless substance with low toxicity and with antibacterial activities against Gram-positive bacteria. These biologic properties may establish its use in promising products for oral diseases. This article summarizes the antibacterial efficiency of nisin against pathogenic bacteria related to dental caries and root canal infection and discusses the combination of nisin and common oral drugs. PMID:25088158

  17. [Antibiotheraphy in the 21st century, antibacterials for the second decade. Posibilities or realities in the future?].

    PubMed

    García-Sánchez, José Elías; García-Merino, Enrique; Martín-del-Rey, Angel; García-Sánchez, Enrique

    2012-06-01

    A review of some antibacterial products is done motivated by the serious situation arisen by the antimicrobial resistance in bacteria. The attention is focus on those drugs with suitable antimicrobial properties that have prospects to be commercialized in the next years because of they are undergoing a clinical development phase (I, II, III). The search for these antibacterial products has been done by an exhaustive study of conference proceedings and web pages of international congresses on chemotherapy, infectious diseases and new antimicrobial drugs. Some of the new antibacterial products acts on known targets, and they belong to already used families. Furthermore, the great majority acts against the gram-positive bacterium. There is also some limited-spectrum antimicrobial drug whose use would minimize the adverse biological effects. PMID:22707099

  18. Structure-based optimization and derivatization of 2-substituted quinolone-based non-nucleoside HCV NS5B inhibitors with submicromolar cellular replicon potency.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Shen, Jian; Peng, Run-Ze; Wang, Gui-Feng; Zuo, Jian-Ping; Long, Ya-Qiu

    2016-06-15

    HCV NS5B polymerase is an attractive and validated target for anti-HCV therapy. Starting from our previously identified 2-aryl quinolones as novel non-nucleoside NS5B polymerase inhibitors, structure-based optimization furnished 2-alkyl-N-benzyl quinolones with improved antiviral potency by employing privileged fragment hybridization strategy. The N-(4-chlorobenzyl)-2-(methoxymethyl)quinolone derivative 5f proved to be the best compound of this series, exhibiting a selective sub-micromolar antiviral effect (EC50=0.4μM, SI=10.8) in Huh7.5.1 cells carrying a HCV genotype 2a. Considering the undesirable pharmacokinetic property of the highly substituted quinolones, a novel chemotype of 1,6-naphthyridine-4,5-diones were evolved via scaffold hopping, affording brand new structure HCV inhibitors with compound 6h (EC50 (gt2a)=2.5μM, SI=7.2) as a promising hit. Molecular modeling studies suggest that both of 2-alkyl quinolones and 1,6-naphthyridine-4,5-diones function as HCV NS5B thumb pocket II inhibitors. PMID:27133482

  19. Impacts of coexisting antibiotics, antibacterial residues, and heavy metals on the occurrence of erythromycin resistance genes in urban wastewater.

    PubMed

    Gao, Pin; He, Shi; Huang, Shenglin; Li, Kanzhu; Liu, Zhenhong; Xue, Gang; Sun, Weimin

    2015-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a global challenge and represents a growing threat on human health worldwide. Wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) are generally considered as hotspots for control and/or dissemination of antibiotic resistance. The role of antibiotics, antibacterial residues, and heavy metals played on the evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance is still not well understood. Here, the occurrence of antibiotics (i.e., macrolides, tetracyclines, sulfonamides, and quinolones), antibacterial residues (i.e., triclosan), as well as heavy metals (i.e., cadmium, chromium, copper, zinc, lead, and nickel) in urban wastewater was investigated. Also, the abundances of erythromycin resistance genes (ERY-ARGs) including ere(A), ere(B), mef(A)/mef(E), erm(A), erm(B), erm(C), and msr(A)/msr(B) genes were screened. A relationship between certain antibiotics, antibacterial residues, and heavy metals and ERY-ARGs was demonstrated. ERY presented significant correlations (0.883 < r < 0.929, P < 0.05) with ere(A), ere(B), and mef(A)/mef(E) genes, while tetracycline exhibited a significant correlation (r = 0.829, P < 0.05) with erm(B) genes. It is noteworthy that triclosan correlated significantly (0.859 < r < 0.956, P < 0.05) with ere(A), ere(B), mef(A)/mef(E), and erm(B) genes. In addition, significantly positive correlations (0.823 < r < 0.871, P < 0.05) were observed between zinc and lead and certain ERY-ARGs (i.e., ere(B), mef(A)/mef(E), erm(B), etc.). Further investigations should be involved to elucidate the co-selection and/or cross-selection mechanisms due to co-existence of these selective factors in urban wastewater.

  20. Antibacterial peptides isolated from insects.

    PubMed

    Otvos, L

    2000-10-01

    Insects are amazingly resistant to bacterial infections. To combat pathogens, insects rely on cellular and humoral mechanisms, innate immunity being dominant in the latter category. Upon detection of bacteria, a complex genetic cascade is activated, which ultimately results in the synthesis of a battery of antibacterial peptides and their release into the haemolymph. The peptides are usually basic in character and are composed of 20-40 amino acid residues, although some smaller proteins are also included in the antimicrobial repertoire. While the proline-rich peptides and the glycine-rich peptides are predominantly active against Gram-negative strains, the defensins selectively kill Gram-positive bacteria and the cecropins are active against both types. The insect antibacterial peptides are very potent: their IC50 (50% of the bacterial growth inhibition) hovers in the submicromolar or low micromolar range. The majority of the peptides act through disintegrating the bacterial membrane or interfering with membrane assembly, with the exception of drosocin, apidaecin and pyrrhocoricin which appear to deactivate a bacterial protein in a stereospecific manner. In accordance with their biological function, the membrane-active peptides form ordered structures, e.g. alpha-helices or beta-pleated sheets and often cast permeable ion-pores. Their cytotoxic properties were exploited in in vivo studies targeting tumour progression. Although the native peptides degrade quickly in biological fluids other than insect haemolymph, structural modifications render the peptides resistant against proteases without sacrificing biological activity. Indeed, a pyrrhocoricin analogue shows lack of toxicity in vitro and in vivo and protects mice against experimental Escherichia coli infection. Careful selection of lead molecules based on the insect antibacterial peptides may extend their utility and produce viable alternatives to the conventional antimicrobial compounds for mammalian therapy.

  1. Antibacterial activity of baking soda.

    PubMed

    Drake, D

    1996-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) was assessed using three different experimental approaches. Standard minimum inhibitory concentration analyses revealed substantial inhibitory activity against Streptococcus mutans that was not due to ionic strength or high osmolarity. Short-term exposure assays showed significant killing of bacterial suspensions when baking soda was combined with the detergent sodium dodecylsulfate. Multiple, brief exposures of sucrose-colonized S mutans to baking soda and sodium dodecylsulfate caused statistically significant decreases in numbers of viable cells. Use of oral health care products with high concentrations of baking soda could conceivably result in decreased levels of cariogenic S mutans in saliva and plaque. PMID:11524862

  2. Antibacterial activity of baking soda.

    PubMed

    Drake, D

    1997-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) was assessed using three different experimental approaches. Standard minimum inhibitory concentration analyses revealed substantial inhibitory activity against Streptococcus mutans that was not due to ionic strength or high osmolarity. Short-term exposure assays showed significant killing of bacterial suspensions when baking soda was combined with the detergent sodium dodecylsulfate. Multiple, brief exposures of sucrose-colonized S mutans to baking soda and sodium dodecylsulfate caused statistically significant decreases in numbers of viable cells. Use of oral health care products with high concentrations of baking soda could conceivably result in decreased levels of cariogenic S mutans in saliva and plaque. PMID:12017929

  3. Antibacterial activity of baking soda.

    PubMed

    Drake, D

    1997-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) was assessed using three different experimental approaches. Standard minimum inhibitory concentration analyses revealed substantial inhibitory activity against Streptococcus mutans that was not due to ionic strength or high osmolarity. Short-term exposure assays showed significant killing of bacterial suspensions when baking soda was combined with the detergent sodium dodecylsulfate. Multiple, brief exposures of sucrose-colonized S mutans to baking soda and sodium dodecylsulfate caused statistically significant decreases in numbers of viable cells. Use of oral health care products with high concentrations of baking soda could conceivably result in decreased levels of cariogenic S mutans in saliva and plaque.

  4. Antibacterial activity of baking soda.

    PubMed

    Drake, D

    1996-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) was assessed using three different experimental approaches. Standard minimum inhibitory concentration analyses revealed substantial inhibitory activity against Streptococcus mutans that was not due to ionic strength or high osmolarity. Short-term exposure assays showed significant killing of bacterial suspensions when baking soda was combined with the detergent sodium dodecylsulfate. Multiple, brief exposures of sucrose-colonized S mutans to baking soda and sodium dodecylsulfate caused statistically significant decreases in numbers of viable cells. Use of oral health care products with high concentrations of baking soda could conceivably result in decreased levels of cariogenic S mutans in saliva and plaque.

  5. Vancomycin loaded superparamagnetic MnFe2O4 nanoparticles coated with PEGylated chitosan to enhance antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Akbar; Ghobadianpour, Sepideh

    2016-03-30

    Increasing prevalence of antibiotic-resistant and failed-treatment make more investigations to deal with these problems. Hence new therapeutic approaches for effective treatment are necessary. Ferrite superparamagnetic nanoparticles have potentially antibacterial activity. In this study we prepared MnFe2O4 superparamagnetic nanoparticles as core by precipitation method and used chitosan crosslinked by glutaraldehyde as shell, then modified with PEG to increase stability of particles against RES. Chitosan coating not only improves the properties of ferrit nanoparticles but also has antibacterial activity. FT-IR confirmed this surface modification; XRD and SEM were developed to demonstrate particle size approximately 25 nm and characteristics of crystal structure of these nanoparticles. Magnetic properties of nanoparticles were evaluated by VSM. Actual drug loading and releasing were examined by UV-vis spectroscopy method. We employed liquid broth dilution method to assessment antibacterial activity of nanoparticles against microorganisms. Significant antibacterial effect against gram negative bacteria was developed.

  6. A detailed study of antibacterial 3-acyltetramic acids and 3-acylpiperidine-2,4-diones.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Yong-Chul; Bikadi, Zsolt; Hazai, Eszter; Moloney, Mark G

    2014-08-01

    Inspired by the core fragment of antibacterial natural products such as streptolydigin, 3-acyltetramic acids and 3-acylpiperidine-2,4-diones have been synthesised from the core heterocycle by direct acylation with the substituted carboxylic acids using a strategy which permits ready access to a structurally diverse compound library. The antibacterial activity of these systems has been established against a panel of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, with activity mostly against the former, which in some cases is very potent. Data consistent with modes of action against undecaprenylpyrophosphate synthase (UPPS) and/or RNA polymerase (RNAP) for a small subset of the library has been obtained. The most active compounds have been shown to exhibit binding at known binding sites of streptolydigin and myxopyronin at UPPS and RNAP. These systems offer potential for their antibacterial activity, and further demonstrate the use of natural products as biologically validated starting points for drug discovery. PMID:24838989

  7. The Effect of Ultrafine Process on the Dissolution, Antibacterial Activity, and Cytotoxicity of Coptidis rhizoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Zhen-Yu; Deng, Hai-Ying; Yu, Zhi-Jun; Ni, Jun-Yan; Kang, Si-He

    2016-01-01

    Background: The dosage of herb ultrafine particle (UFP) depended on the increased level of its dissolution, toxicity, and efficacy. Objective: The dissolution, antibacterial activity, and cytotoxicity of Coptidis rhizoma (CR) UFP were compared with those of traditional decoction (TD). Materials and Methods: The dissolution of berberine (BBR) of CR TD and UFP was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. The antibacterial activity of CR extract was assayed by plate-hole diffusion and broth dilution method; the inhibitory effect of rat serums against bacteria growth was evaluated after orally given CR UFP or TD extract. The cytotoxicity of CR extract was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Results: The dissolution amount of BBR from CR UFP increased 6–8-folds in comparison to TD at 2 min, the accumulative amount of BBR in both UFP and TD group increased in a time-dependent manner. The minimal inhibitory concentrations and minimal bactericidal concentrations of CR UFP extract decreased to 1/2~1/4 of those of TD extract. The inhibitory effect of rat serums against bacteria growth decreased time-dependently, and no statistical difference was observed between two groups at each time point. The 50% cytotoxic concentrations of UFP extract increased 1.66~1.97 fold than those of TD. Conclusions: The antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity of CR UFP increased in a dissolution-effect manner in vitro, the increased level of cytotoxicity was lower than that of antibacterial activity, and the inhibitory effect of rat serums containing drugs of UFP group did not improve. SUMMARY Ultrafine grinding process caused a rapid increase of BBR dissolution from CR.The antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity of UFP extract in vitro increased in a dissolution-effect manner, but the cytotoxicity increased lower than the antibacterial activity.The antibacterial activity of rat serums of UFP group did not improve in comparison to that

  8. Molecular characterization of quinolone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from Brazil.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Aline A; Amorin, Efigênia L T; Ferreira, Maria de Fátima; Andrade, Claudia F; Clementino, Maysa B M; de Filippis, Ivano; Neves, Felipe P G; Pinto, Tatiana de C A; Teixeira, Lúcia M; Giambiagi-Demarval, Marcia; Fracalanzza, Sérgio E L

    2011-12-01

    Despite the rapid spread of antibiotic resistance among gonococci worldwide, limited reports are available from Brazilian locations. In the present study, 25 quinolone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae (QRNG) strains isolated in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were characterized by phenotypic and molecular methods, including analysis of mutations in the gyrA and parC genes. They represented 16.5% of the N. gonorrhoeae isolates obtained during a survey performed from 2006 to 2010. A trend for increasing resistance to ciprofloxacin was observed in the period investigated. The most prevalent pattern of mutation observed among QRNG isolates, Ser-91 to Phe and Asp-95 to Gly in gyrA and Ser-87 to Arg in parC, was detected in 40% of the isolates exhibiting MICs ranging from 4 to >32 μg/ml. Rare types of mutations were found in the gyrA gene (Gln-102 to His [12%] and Asp-95 to Tyr [4%]) and in the parC gene (Ser-88 to Thr [4%]). The genetic relationship of the QRNG isolates, evaluated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, suggested that the increase in the frequencies of the QRNG isolates in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, may have arisen as a result of simultaneous spread of two clonal groups. The results also indicate that fluoroquinolones may no longer be used as first line antibiotics for the treatment of gonorrhea in Rio de Janeiro, and that programs for antimicrobial susceptibility surveillance of N. gonorrhoeae should also be implemented in other regions of Brazil. PMID:21976763

  9. Susceptibility to β-lactams and quinolones of Enterobacteriaceae isolated from urinary tract infections in outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Marchisio, Martín; Porto, Ayelén; Joris, Romina; Rico, Marina; Baroni, María R.; Di Conza, José

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The antibiotic susceptibility profile was evaluated in 71 Enterobacteriaceae isolates obtained from outpatient urine cultures in July 2010 from two health institutions in Santa Fe, Argentina. The highest rates of antibiotic resistance were observed for ampicillin (AMP) (69%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMS) (33%), and ciprofloxacin (CIP) (25%). Meanwhile, 21% of the isolates were resistant to three or more tested antibiotics families. Thirty integron-containing bacteria (42.3%) were detected, and a strong association with TMS resistance was found. Third generation cephalosporin resistance was detected in only one Escherichia coli isolate, and it was characterized as a bla CMY-2 carrier. No plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) was found. Resistance to fluoroquinolone in the isolates was due to alterations in QRDR regions. Two mutations in GyrA (S83L, D87N) and one in ParC (S80I) were observed in all CIP-resistant E. coli. It was determined to be the main phylogenetic groups in E. coli isolates. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values against nalidixic acid (NAL), levofloxacin (LEV), and CIP were determined for 63 uropathogenic E. coli isolates as MIC50 of 4 μg/mL, 0.03125 μg/mL, and 0.03125 μg/mL, respectively, while the MIC90 values of the antibiotics were determined as 1024 μg/mL, 64 μg/mL, and 16 μg/mL, respectively. An association between the phylogenetic groups, A and B1 with fluoroquinolone resistance was observed. These results point to the importance of awareness of the potential risk associated with empirical treatment with both the families of antibiotics. PMID:26691475

  10. Characterisation of quinolone-resistant Escherichia coli of 1997 and 2005 isolates from poultry in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Del Rio-Avila, C; Rosario, C; Arroyo-Escalante, S; Carrillo-Casas, E M; Díaz-Aparicio, E; Suarez-Güemes, F; Silva-Sanchez, J; Xicohtencatl-Cortes, J; Maravilla, P; Hernández-Castro, R

    2016-08-01

    Forty-two enrofloxacin-resistant Escherichia coli strains isolated from eggs and first-week mortality associated with yolk sac infection of two vertically integrated poultry companies of Central Mexico in 1997 and 2005 were characterised. E. coli resistance to 19 antibiotics was determined, as well as the minimum inhibitory concentrations (broth dilution) for ciprofloxacin. The presence of gyrA,B, parC,E chromosomal point mutations, qnrA,B,S plasmid genes and the aminoglycoside acetyltransferase aac(6')-Ib-cr were determined by PCR and sequencing. Resistance to ampicillin (95%), piperacillin (95%), gatifloxacin (95%), levofloxacin (95%), ampicillin/sulbactam (90%), cefazolin (85%), trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (80%), amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (80%), aztreonam (80%), cefepime (80%), cefotaxime (80%), ceftazidime (80%), ceftriaxone (80%) and cefoxitin (75%) was high in the 2005 strains and 19 (95%) strains were resistant to 7 or more antimicrobials. The strains from 1997 expressed high rates of resistance only to the fluoroquinolones and 4 strains (18%) expressed resistance to 7 or more antimicrobials. All strains had a gyrA mutation (Ser83Leu) and a parC mutation (Ser80Ile or Ser80Arg) and 41 (97.6%) strains had a second gyrA mutation (Asp87Asn, Asp87Tyr or Asp87Gly). Only two (4.7%) strains had a parE mutation (Ser458Ala). A total of 10 strains were positive for the aac(6')-Ib wild-type gene, 6 strains for the aac(6')-Ib-cr variant and 6 strains possessed both the wild type and the variant. No gyrB mutations or qnrA,B,S genes were detected. This is the first report in Latin America of chromosomal and plasmid quinolone resistance genes in E. coli strains recovered from poultry.

  11. Susceptibilities of bacterial isolates from patients with cancer to levofloxacin and other quinolones.

    PubMed Central

    Dholakia, N; Rolston, K V; Ho, D H; LeBlanc, B; Bodey, G P

    1994-01-01

    The antibacterial activity of levofloxacin was compared with those of ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin against bacterial isolates from patients with cancer. In general, levofloxacin was as active or was twofold more active than ofloxacin and was two- to fourfold less active than ciprofloxacin against most gram-negative pathogens. Against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, ciprofloxacin was the most active agent tested (MIC for 90% of isolates tested, 1.0 microgram/ml). Overall, all three agents had similar activities against gram-positive organisms and were moderately active against methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci, Streptococcus species, and Enterococcus species. PMID:8031057

  12. Coastal seawater bacteria harbor a large reservoir of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants in Jiaozhou Bay, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-yi; Dang, Hongyue

    2012-07-01

    Diversity and prevalence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants were investigated in environmental bacteria isolated from surface seawater of Jiaozhou Bay, China. Five qnr gene alleles were identified in 34 isolates by PCR amplification, including qnrA3 gene in a Shewanella algae isolate, qnrB9 gene in a Citrobacter freundii isolate, qnrD gene in 22 Proteus vulgaris isolates, qnrS1 gene in 1 Enterobacter sp. and 4 Klebsiella spp. isolates, and qnrS2 gene in 1 Pseudomonas sp. and 4 Pseudoalteromonas sp. isolates. The qnrC, aac(6')-Ib-cr, and qepA genes could not be detected in this study. The 22 qnrD-positive Proteus vulgaris isolates could be differentiated into four genotypes based on ERIC-PCR assay. The qnrS1 and qnrD genes could be transferred to Escherichia coli J53 Azi(R) or E. coli TOP10 recipient strains using conjugation or transformation methods. Among the 34 qnr-positive isolates, 30 had a single point mutation in the QRDRs of GyrA protein (Ala67Ser, Ser83Ile, or Ser83Thr), indicating that cooperation of chromosome- and plasmid-mediated resistance contributed to the spread and evolution of quinolone resistance in this coastal bay. Eighty-five percent of the isolates were also found to be resistant to ampicillin, and bla(CMY), bla(OXY), bla(SHV), and bla(TEM) genes were detected in five isolates that also harbored the qnrB9 or qnrS1 gene. Our current study is the first identification of qnrS2 gene in Pseudoalteromonas and Pseudomonas strains, and qnrD gene in Proteus vulgaris strains. High prevalence of diverse qnr genes in Jiaozhou Bay indicates that coastal seawater may serve as an important reservoir, natural source, and dissemination vehicle of quinolone resistance determinants. PMID:22252223

  13. Cloning and nucleotide sequence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis gyrA and gyrB genes and detection of quinolone resistance mutations.

    PubMed

    Takiff, H E; Salazar, L; Guerrero, C; Philipp, W; Huang, W M; Kreiswirth, B; Cole, S T; Jacobs, W R; Telenti, A

    1994-04-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has resulted in increased interest in the fluoroquinolones (FQs) as antituberculosis agents. To investigate the frequency and mechanisms of FQ resistance in M. tuberculosis, we cloned and sequenced the wild-type gyrA and gyrB genes, which encode the A and B subunits of the DNA gyrase, respectively; DNA gyrase is the main target of the FQs. On the basis of the sequence information, we performed DNA amplification for sequencing and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis to examine the presumed quinolone resistance regions of gyrA and gyrB from reference strains (n = 4) and clinical isolates (n = 55). Mutations in codons of gyrA analogous to those described in other FQ-resistant bacteria were identified in all isolates (n = 14) for which the ciprofloxacin MIC was > 2 micrograms/ml. In addition, we selected ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants of Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis Erdman and H37ra. Spontaneously resistant mutants developed at a frequency of 1 in 10(7) to 10(8) at ciprofloxacin concentrations of 2 micrograms/ml, but no primary resistant colonies were selected at higher ciprofloxacin concentrations. Replating of those first-step mutants selected for mutants with high levels of resistance which harbored gyrA mutations similar to those found among clinical FQ-resistant isolates. The gyrA and gyrB sequence information will facilitate analysis of the mechanisms of resistance to drugs which target the gyrase and the implementation of rapid strategies for the estimation of FQ susceptibility in clinical M. tuberculosis isolates.

  14. Emergence of quinolone resistance and cephalosporin MIC creep in Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates from a cohort of young men in Kisumu, Kenya, 2002 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Supriya D; Maclean, Ian; Ndinya-Achola, Jeckoniah O; Moses, Stephen; Martin, Irene; Ronald, Allan; Agunda, Lawrence; Murugu, Ruth; Bailey, Robert C; Melendez, Johan; Zenilman, Jonathan M

    2011-08-01

    We evaluated antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolated from men enrolled in a randomized trial of male circumcision to prevent HIV. Urethral specimens from men with discharge were cultured for N. gonorrhoeae. MICs were determined by agar dilution. Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) criteria defined resistance: penicillin, tetracycline, and azithromycin MICs of ≥2.0 μg/ml; a ciprofloxacin MIC of ≥1.0 μg/ml; and a spectinomycin MIC of ≥128.0 μg/ml. Susceptibility to ceftriaxone and cefixime was shown by an MIC of ≤0.25 μg/ml. Additionally, PCR amplification identified mutations in parC and gyrA genes in selected isolates. From 2002 to 2009, 168 N. gonorrhoeae isolates were obtained from 142 men. Plasmid-mediated penicillin resistance was found in 65%, plasmid-mediated tetracycline resistance in 97%, and 11% were ciprofloxacin resistant (quinolone-resistant N. gonorrhoeae [QRNG]). QRNG appeared in November 2007, increasing from 9.5% in 2007 to 50% in 2009. Resistance was not detected for spectinomycin, cefixime, ceftriaxone, or azithromycin, but MICs of cefixime (P = 0.018), ceftriaxone (P < 0.001), and azithromycin (P = 0.097) increased over time. In a random sample of 51 men, gentamicin MICs were as follows: 4 μg/ml (n = 1), 8 μg/ml (n = 49), and 16 μg/ml (n = 1). QRNG increased rapidly and alternative regimens are required for N. gonorrhoeae treatment in this area. Amid emerging multidrug-resistant N. gonorrhoeae, antimicrobial resistance surveillance is essential for effective drug choice. High levels of plasmid-mediated resistance and increasing MICs for cephalosporins suggest that selective pressure from antibiotic use is a strong driver of resistance emergence. PMID:21606224

  15. PqsBC, a Condensing Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quinolone Signal: CRYSTAL STRUCTURE, INHIBITION, AND REACTION MECHANISM.

    PubMed

    Drees, Steffen Lorenz; Li, Chan; Prasetya, Fajar; Saleem, Muhammad; Dreveny, Ingrid; Williams, Paul; Hennecke, Ulrich; Emsley, Jonas; Fetzner, Susanne

    2016-03-25

    Pseudomonas aeruginosaproduces a number of alkylquinolone-type secondary metabolites best known for their antimicrobial effects and involvement in cell-cell communication. In the alkylquinolone biosynthetic pathway, the β-ketoacyl-(acyl carrier protein) synthase III (FabH)-like enzyme PqsBC catalyzes the condensation of octanoyl-coenzyme A and 2-aminobenzoylacetate (2-ABA) to form the signal molecule 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone. PqsBC, a potential drug target, is unique for its heterodimeric arrangement and an active site different from that of canonical FabH-like enzymes. Considering the sequence dissimilarity between the subunits, a key question was how the two subunits are organized with respect to the active site. In this study, the PqsBC structure was determined to a 2 Å resolution, revealing that PqsB and PqsC have a pseudo-2-fold symmetry that unexpectedly mimics the FabH homodimer. PqsC has an active site composed of Cys-129 and His-269, and the surrounding active site cleft is hydrophobic in character and approximately twice the volume of related FabH enzymes that may be a requirement to accommodate the aromatic substrate 2-ABA. From physiological and kinetic studies, we identified 2-aminoacetophenone as a pathway-inherent competitive inhibitor of PqsBC, whose fluorescence properties could be used forin vitrobinding studies. In a time-resolved setup, we demonstrated that the catalytic histidine is not involved in acyl-enzyme formation, but contributes to an acylation-dependent increase in affinity for the second substrate 2-ABA. Introduction of Asn into the PqsC active site led to significant activity toward the desamino substrate analog benzoylacetate, suggesting that the substrate 2-ABA itself supplies the asparagine-equivalent amino function that assists in catalysis.

  16. Small and lethal: searching for new antibacterial compounds with novel modes of action.

    PubMed

    Pathania, Ranjana; Brown, Eric D

    2008-04-01

    The discovery of drugs used to combat infectious diseases is in the process of constant change to address the ever-worsening problem of antibiotic resistance in pathogens and a lack of recent success in discovering new antibacterial drugs. In the past 2 decades, research in both academia and industry has made use of molecular biology, genetics, and comparative genomics, which has led to the development of key technologies for the discovery of novel antibacterial agents. Genome-scale efforts have led to the identification of numerous molecular targets. Chemical diversity from synthetic combinatorial libraries and natural products is being used to screen for new molecules. A wide variety of approaches are being used in the search for novel antibiotics, and these can be categorized as being either biochemically focused or cell based. The over-riding goal of all methods in use today is to discover new chemical matter with novel mechanisms of action against drug-resistant pathogens.

  17. Facile biofunctionalization of silver nanoparticles for enhanced antibacterial properties, endotoxin removal, and biofilm control.

    PubMed

    Lambadi, Paramesh Ramulu; Sharma, Tarun Kumar; Kumar, Piyush; Vasnani, Priyanka; Thalluri, Sitaramanjaneya Mouli; Bisht, Neha; Pathania, Ranjana; Navani, Naveen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases cause a huge burden on healthcare systems worldwide. Pathogenic bacteria establish infection by developing antibiotic resistance and modulating the host's immune system, whereas opportunistic pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa adapt to adverse conditions owing to their ability to form biofilms. In the present study, silver nanoparticles were biofunctionalized with polymyxin B, an antibacterial peptide using a facile method. The biofunctionalized nanoparticles (polymyxin B-capped silver nanoparticles, PBSNPs) were assessed for antibacterial activity against multiple drug-resistant clinical strain Vibrio fluvialis and nosocomial pathogen P. aeruginosa. The results of antibacterial assay revealed that PBSNPs had an approximately 3-fold higher effect than the citrate-capped nanoparticles (CSNPs). Morphological damage to the cell membrane was followed by scanning electron microscopy, testifying PBSNPs to be more potent in controlling the bacterial growth as compared with CSNPs. The bactericidal effect of PBSNPs was further confirmed by Live/Dead staining assays. Apart from the antibacterial activity, the biofunctionalized nanoparticles were found to resist biofilm formation. Electroplating of PBSNPs onto stainless steel surgical blades retained the antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa. Further, the affinity of polymyxin for endotoxin was exploited for its removal using PBSNPs. It was found that the prepared nanoparticles removed 97% of the endotoxin from the solution. Such multifarious uses of metal nanoparticles are an attractive means of enhancing the potency of antimicrobial agents to control infections.

  18. Polymeric micellar nanoplatforms for Fenton reaction as a new class of antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Park, Seong-Cheol; Kim, Nam-Hong; Yang, Wonseok; Nah, Jae-Woon; Jang, Mi-Kyeong; Lee, Dongwon

    2016-01-10

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by host phagocytes exert antibacterial action against a variety of pathogens and ROS-induced oxidative stress is the governing mechanism for the antibacterial activity of major bactericidal antibiotics. In particular, hydroxyl radical is a strong and nonselective oxidant which can damage biomolecules such as DNA, proteins and lipids. Ferrous ion is known to convert mild oxidant hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) into highly reactive and toxic hydroxyl radicals, referred to as Fenton reaction. Herein, we report a new class of antibacterial agents based on Fenton reaction-performing nanostructures, composed of H2O2-generating polymer (PCAE) and iron-containing ferrocene. Amphiphilic PCAE was designed to incorporate H2O2-generating cinnamaldehyde through acid-cleavable linkages and self-assemble to form thermodynamically stable micelles which could encapsulate ferrocene in their hydrophobic core. All the experiments in vitro display that ferrocene-loaded PCAE micelles produce hydroxyl radicals to kill Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa through membrane damages. Intraperitoneally injected ferrocene-loaded PCAE micelles significantly reduced the lung damages and therefore increased the survival rate of mice infected with drug resistant P. aeruginosa. Given their potent antibacterial activity, ferrocene-loaded PCAE micelles hold great potential as a new class of ROS-manipulating antibacterial agents.

  19. Design, synthesis, nitric oxide release and antibacterial evaluation of novel nitrated ocotillol-type derivatives.

    PubMed

    Bi, Yi; Yang, Xiao; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Zeyun; Zhang, Xiaochen; Lu, Jing; Cheng, Keguang; Xu, Jinyi; Wang, Hongbo; Lv, Guangyao; Lewis, Peter John; Meng, Qingguo; Ma, Cong

    2015-08-28

    Nitric oxide (NO) and its auto-oxidation products are known to disrupt normal bacterial function and NO releasing molecules have the potential to be developed as antibacterial leads in drug discovery. We have designed and synthesized a series of novel nitrated compounds by combining NO releasing groups with ocotillol-type triterpenoids, which have previously demonstrated activity only against Gram-positive bacteria. The in vitro NO release capacity and antibacterial activity were sequentially evaluated and the data showed that most of the synthesized compounds could release nitric oxide. Compound 16a, 17a and 17c, with nitrated aliphatic esters at C-3 position, displayed higher NO release than other analogues, correlating to their good antibacterial activity, in which 17c demonstrated broad-spectrum activity against both Gram positive and -negative bacteria, as well as excellent synergism at sub-minimum inhibitory concentration when using with kanamycin and chloramphenicol. Furthermore, the epifluorescent microscopic study indicated that the ocotillol-type triterpenoid core may induce NO release on the bacterial membrane. Our results demonstrate that nitrated substitutions at C-3 of ocotillol-type derivatives could provide an approach to expand their antibacterial spectrum, and that ocotillol-type triterpenoids may also be developed as appropriate carriers for NO donors in antibacterial agent discovery with low cytotoxicity.

  20. Facile biofunctionalization of silver nanoparticles for enhanced antibacterial properties, endotoxin removal, and biofilm control

    PubMed Central

    Lambadi, Paramesh Ramulu; Sharma, Tarun Kumar; Kumar, Piyush; Vasnani, Priyanka; Thalluri, Sitaramanjaneya Mouli; Bisht, Neha; Pathania, Ranjana; Navani, Naveen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Infectious diseases cause a huge burden on healthcare systems worldwide. Pathogenic bacteria establish infection by developing antibiotic resistance and modulating the host’s immune system, whereas opportunistic pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa adapt to adverse conditions owing to their ability to form biofilms. In the present study, silver nanoparticles were biofunctionalized with polymyxin B, an antibacterial peptide using a facile method. The biofunctionalized nanoparticles (polymyxin B-capped silver nanoparticles, PBSNPs) were assessed for antibacterial activity against multiple drug-resistant clinical strain Vibrio fluvialis and nosocomial pathogen P. aeruginosa. The results of antibacterial assay revealed that PBSNPs had an approximately 3-fold higher effect than the citrate-capped nanoparticles (CSNPs). Morphological damage to the cell membrane was followed by scanning electron microscopy, testifying PBSNPs to be more potent in controlling the bacterial growth as compared with CSNPs. The bactericidal effect of PBSNPs was further confirmed by Live/Dead staining assays. Apart from the antibacterial activity, the biofunctionalized nanoparticles were found to resist biofilm formation. Electroplating of PBSNPs onto stainless steel surgical blades retained the antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa. Further, the affinity of polymyxin for endotoxin was exploited for its removal using PBSNPs. It was found that the prepared nanoparticles removed 97% of the endotoxin from the solution. Such multifarious uses of metal nanoparticles are an attractive means of enhancing the potency of antimicrobial agents to control infections. PMID:25834431

  1. K2CO3-catalyzed synthesis of chromones and 4-quinolones through the cleavage of aromatic C-O bonds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Zhao, Yufen; Fu, Hua

    2012-06-01

    Phenol-derived electrophiles are favorable substrates because phenols are naturally abundant or can be readily prepared from other aromatic compounds. However, the cleavage of aromatic C-O bonds is a great challenge because of their high energy. K(2)CO(3)-catalyzed intramolecular cyclization of 1-(2-alkoxyphenyl)-3-akylpropane-1,3-dione and 3-(alkylimino)-1-(2-methoxyphenyl)-2-methylpropan-1-one derivatives via the selective cleavage of aromatic C-O bonds is reported. The corresponding chromone and 4-quinolone derivatives were obtained in reasonable yields. PMID:22587645

  2. Enantioselective Intermolecular [2 + 2] Photocycloaddition Reactions of 2(1H)-Quinolones Induced by Visible Light Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In the presence of a chiral thioxanthone catalyst (10 mol %) the title compounds underwent a clean intermolecular [2 + 2] photocycloaddition with electron-deficient olefins at λ = 419 nm. The reactions not only proceeded with excellent regio- and diastereoselectivity but also delivered the respective cyclobutane products with significant enantiomeric excess (up to 95% ee). Key to the success of the reactions is a two-point hydrogen bonding between quinolone and catalyst enabling efficient energy transfer and high enantioface differentiation. Preliminary work indicated that solar irradiation can be used for this process and that the substrate scope can be further expanded to isoquinolones. PMID:27268908

  3. Enantioselective Intermolecular [2 + 2] Photocycloaddition Reactions of 2(1H)-Quinolones Induced by Visible Light Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Tröster, Andreas; Alonso, Rafael; Bauer, Andreas; Bach, Thorsten

    2016-06-29

    In the presence of a chiral thioxanthone catalyst (10 mol %) the title compounds underwent a clean intermolecular [2 + 2] photocycloaddition with electron-deficient olefins at λ = 419 nm. The reactions not only proceeded with excellent regio- and diastereoselectivity but also delivered the respective cyclobutane products with significant enantiomeric excess (up to 95% ee). Key to the success of the reactions is a two-point hydrogen bonding between quinolone and catalyst enabling efficient energy transfer and high enantioface differentiation. Preliminary work indicated that solar irradiation can be used for this process and that the substrate scope can be further expanded to isoquinolones. PMID:27268908

  4. Overcoming scientific and structural bottlenecks in antibacterial discovery and development.

    PubMed

    Zorzet, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Antibiotic resistance is becoming an increasing threat, with too few novel antibiotics coming to market to replace those lost due to resistance development. Efforts by the pharmaceutical industry to screen for and design novel antibacterials have not been successful, with several companies minimizing or closing down their antibacterial research units, leading to a loss of skills and know-how. At the same time, antibiotic innovation in academia is not filling the void due to misaligned incentive structures and lack of vital knowledge of drug discovery. The scientific and structural difficulties in discovering new antibiotics have only begun to be appreciated in the latest years. Part of the problem has been a paradigm shift within both industry and academia to focus on 'rational' drug development with an emphasis on single targets and high-throughput screening of large chemical libraries, which may not be suited to target bacteria. The very particular aspects of 'targeting an organism inside another organism' have not been given enough attention. In this paper, researcher interviews have complemented literature studies to delve deeper into the specifics of the different scientific and structural barriers, and some potential solutions are offered.

  5. Overcoming scientific and structural bottlenecks in antibacterial discovery and development

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is becoming an increasing threat, with too few novel antibiotics coming to market to replace those lost due to resistance development. Efforts by the pharmaceutical industry to screen for and design novel antibacterials have not been successful, with several companies minimizing or closing down their antibacterial research units, leading to a loss of skills and know-how. At the same time, antibiotic innovation in academia is not filling the void due to misaligned incentive structures and lack of vital knowledge of drug discovery. The scientific and structural difficulties in discovering new antibiotics have only begun to be appreciated in the latest years. Part of the problem has been a paradigm shift within both industry and academia to focus on ‘rational’ drug development with an emphasis on single targets and high-throughput screening of large chemical libraries, which may not be suited to target bacteria. The very particular aspects of ‘targeting an organism inside another organism’ have not been given enough attention. In this paper, researcher interviews have complemented literature studies to delve deeper into the specifics of the different scientific and structural barriers, and some potential solutions are offered. PMID:24646118

  6. Drug-induced nail disorders.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    Nail disorders are defined according to their appearance and the part of the nail affected: the nail plate, the tissues that support or hold the nail plate in place, or the lunula. The consequences of most nail disorders are purely cosmetic. Other disorders, such as ingrown nails, inflammation, erythema, abscesses or tumours, cause functional impairment or pain. The appearance of the lesions is rarely indicative of their cause. Possible causes include physiological changes, local disorders or trauma, systemic conditions, toxic substances and drugs. Most drug-induced nail disorders resolve after discontinuation of the drug, although complete resolution sometimes takes several years. Drugs appear to induce nail disorders through a variety of mechanisms. Some drugs affect the nail matrix epithelium, the nail bed or the nail folds. Some alter nail colour. Other drugs induce photosensitivity. Yet others affect the blood supply to the nail unit. Nail abnormalities are common during treatment with certain cytotoxic drugs: taxanes, anthracyclines, fluorouracil, EGFR, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, etc. Some drugs are associated with a risk of serious and painful lesions, such as abscesses. When these disorders affect quality of life, the benefits of withdrawing the drug must be weighed against the severity of the condition being treated and the drug's efficacy, taking into account the harm-benefit balance of other options. Various anti-infective drugs, including tetracyclines, quinolones, clofazimine and zidovudine, cause the nail plate to detach from the nail bed after exposure to light, or cause nail discoloration. Psoralens and retinoids can also have the same effects. PMID:25162091

  7. Antibacterial Activity of Polyphenols of Garcinia Indica

    PubMed Central

    Lakshmi, C.; Kumar, K. Akshaya; Dennis, T. J.; Kumar, T. S. S. P. N. S. Sanath

    2011-01-01

    The aim of present work is to study the antibacterial activity of polyphenols isolated from the ethyl acetate soluble of methanol extract of stem bark of Garcinia indica against Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhi and Escherichia coli by paper disc method. The results showed good antibacterial activity against S. aureus at higher concentrations, moderate at lower concentrations, against S. typhi moderate at higher concentrations but no activity against E. coli even at higher concentration for flavononylflavone. With proauthocyanin S. Aureus, S. Typhi and E. coli showed good antibacterial activity at higher concentration only. PMID:22707838

  8. Toward bioactive yet antibacterial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sukhorukova, I V; Sheveyko, A N; Kiryukhantsev-Korneev, Ph V; Zhitnyak, I Y; Gloushankova, N A; Denisenko, E A; Filippovich, S Yu; Ignatov, S G; Shtansky, D V

    2015-11-01

    The fabrication of antibacterial yet biocompatible and bioactive surfaces is a challenge that biological and biomedical community has faced for many years, while no "dream material" has been developed so far. The primary goal of this study was to establish an optimal range of Ag concentration and its state of agglomeration in bioactive nanocomposite TiCaPCON films which would provide a strong bactericidal effect without compromising the material biocompatibility and bioactivity. To obtain samples with different Ag content and redistribution, two different methods were employed: (i) TiCaPCON films deposition by magnetron sputtering of composite TiС0.5-Ca3(РО4)2 target followed by Ag(+) ion implantation and (ii) Ag-doped TiCaPCON films obtained by co-sputtering of composite TiС0.5-Ca3(РО4)2 and Ag targets. In order to reveal the antibacterial role of Ag nanoparticles and Ag(+) ions, both separate and in synergy, part of the samples from the first and second groups was subjected to additional ion etching to remove an Ag rich surface layer heavily populated with Ag nanoparticles. All resultant films were characterized with respect to surface morphology, chemical composition, surface roughness, wettability, and Ag(+) ion release. The antibacterial and antifungal effects of the Ag-doped TiCaPCON films were evaluated against clinically isolated Escherichia coli O78 (E. coli) and Neurospora crassa wt-987 spores. The influence of the surface chemistry on spreading, proliferation, and early stages of MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cell differentiation was also studied. Our data demonstrated that under optimal conditions in terms of Ag content and agglomeration, the Ag-doped TiCaPCON films are highly efficient against E. coli bacteria and, at the same time, provide good adhesion, spreading, proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic cells which reflect high level of biocompatibility and bioactivity of the films. The influence of Ag(+) ions and nanoparticles on the MC3T3-E

  9. Toward bioactive yet antibacterial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sukhorukova, I V; Sheveyko, A N; Kiryukhantsev-Korneev, Ph V; Zhitnyak, I Y; Gloushankova, N A; Denisenko, E A; Filippovich, S Yu; Ignatov, S G; Shtansky, D V

    2015-11-01

    The fabrication of antibacterial yet biocompatible and bioactive surfaces is a challenge that biological and biomedical community has faced for many years, while no "dream material" has been developed so far. The primary goal of this study was to establish an optimal range of Ag concentration and its state of agglomeration in bioactive nanocomposite TiCaPCON films which would provide a strong bactericidal effect without compromising the material biocompatibility and bioactivity. To obtain samples with different Ag content and redistribution, two different methods were employed: (i) TiCaPCON films deposition by magnetron sputtering of composite TiС0.5-Ca3(РО4)2 target followed by Ag(+) ion implantation and (ii) Ag-doped TiCaPCON films obtained by co-sputtering of composite TiС0.5-Ca3(РО4)2 and Ag targets. In order to reveal the antibacterial role of Ag nanoparticles and Ag(+) ions, both separate and in synergy, part of the samples from the first and second groups was subjected to additional ion etching to remove an Ag rich surface layer heavily populated with Ag nanoparticles. All resultant films were characterized with respect to surface morphology, chemical composition, surface roughness, wettability, and Ag(+) ion release. The antibacterial and antifungal effects of the Ag-doped TiCaPCON films were evaluated against clinically isolated Escherichia coli O78 (E. coli) and Neurospora crassa wt-987 spores. The influence of the surface chemistry on spreading, proliferation, and early stages of MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cell differentiation was also studied. Our data demonstrated that under optimal conditions in terms of Ag content and agglomeration, the Ag-doped TiCaPCON films are highly efficient against E. coli bacteria and, at the same time, provide good adhesion, spreading, proliferation and differentiation of osteoblastic cells which reflect high level of biocompatibility and bioactivity of the films. The influence of Ag(+) ions and nanoparticles on the MC3T3-E

  10. Antibacterial Effects and Biocompatibility of Titania Nanotubes with Octenidine Dihydrochloride/Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid).

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhiqiang; Lai, Yingzhen; Wu, Dong; Huang, Wenxiu; Huang, Sijia; Zhou, Lin; Chen, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) implants with long-term antibacterial ability and good biocompatibility are highly desirable materials that can be used to prevent implant-associated infections. In this study, titania nanotubes (TNTs) were synthesized on Ti surfaces through electrochemical anodization. Octenidine dihydrochloride (OCT)/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) was infiltrated into TNTs using a simple solvent-casting technique. OCT/PLGA-TNTs demonstrated sustained drug release and maintained the characteristic hollow structures of TNTs. TNTs (200 nm in diameter) alone exhibited slight antibacterial effect and good osteogenic activity but also evidently impaired adhesion and proliferation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). OCT/PLGA-TNTs (100 nm in diameter) supported BMSC adhesion and proliferation and showed good osteogenesis-inducing ability. OCT/PLGA-TNTs also exhibited good long-term antibacterial ability within the observation period of 7 d. The synthesized drug carrier with relatively long-term antibacterial ability and enhanced excellent biocompatibility demonstrated significant potential in bone implant applications. PMID:26090449

  11. Gallic acid conjugated with gold nanoparticles: antibacterial activity and mechanism of action on foodborne pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Rattanata, Narintorn; Klaynongsruang, Sompong; Leelayuwat, Chanvit; Limpaiboon, Temduang; Lulitanond, Aroonlug; Boonsiri, Patcharee; Chio-Srichan, Sirinart; Soontaranon, Siriwat; Rugmai, Supagorn; Daduang, Jureerut

    2016-01-01

    Foodborne pathogens, including Plesiomonas shigelloides and Shigella flexneri B, are the major cause of diarrheal endemics worldwide. Antibiotic drug resistance is increasing. Therefore, bioactive compounds with antibacterial activity, such as gallic acid (GA), are needed. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are used as drug delivery agents. This study aimed to conjugate and characterize AuNP–GA and to evaluate the antibacterial activity. AuNP was conjugated with GA, and the core–shell structures were characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Antibacterial activity of AuNP–GA against P. shigelloides and S. flexneri B was evaluated by well diffusion method. AuNP–GA bactericidal mechanism was elucidated by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopic analysis. The results of small-angle X-ray scattering showed that AuNP–GA conjugation was successful. Antibacterial activity of GA against both bacteria was improved by conjugation with AuNP because the minimum inhibitory concentration value of AuNP–GA was significantly decreased (P<0.0001) compared to that of GA. Fourier transform infrared analysis revealed that AuNP–GA resulted in alterations of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids at the bacterial cell membrane. Our findings show that AuNP–GA has potential for further application in biomedical sciences. PMID:27555764

  12. Gallic acid conjugated with gold nanoparticles: antibacterial activity and mechanism of action on foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rattanata, Narintorn; Klaynongsruang, Sompong; Leelayuwat, Chanvit; Limpaiboon, Temduang; Lulitanond, Aroonlug; Boonsiri, Patcharee; Chio-Srichan, Sirinart; Soontaranon, Siriwat; Rugmai, Supagorn; Daduang, Jureerut

    2016-01-01

    Foodborne pathogens, including Plesiomonas shigelloides and Shigella flexneri B, are the major cause of diarrheal endemics worldwide. Antibiotic drug resistance is increasing. Therefore, bioactive compounds with antibacterial activity, such as gallic acid (GA), are needed. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are used as drug delivery agents. This study aimed to conjugate and characterize AuNP-GA and to evaluate the antibacterial activity. AuNP was conjugated with GA, and the core-shell structures were characterized by small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Antibacterial activity of AuNP-GA against P. shigelloides and S. flexneri B was evaluated by well diffusion method. AuNP-GA bactericidal mechanism was elucidated by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopic analysis. The results of small-angle X-ray scattering showed that AuNP-GA conjugation was successful. Antibacterial activity of GA against both bacteria was improved by conjugation with AuNP because the minimum inhibitory concentration value of AuNP-GA was significantly decreased (P<0.0001) compared to that of GA. Fourier transform infrared analysis revealed that AuNP-GA resulted in alterations of lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids at the bacterial cell membrane. Our findings show that AuNP-GA has potential for further application in biomedical sciences. PMID:27555764

  13. Antibacterial Effects and Biocompatibility of Titania Nanotubes with Octenidine Dihydrochloride/Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhiqiang; Lai, Yingzhen; Wu, Dong; Huang, Wenxiu; Huang, Sijia; Zhou, Lin; Chen, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) implants with long-term antibacterial ability and good biocompatibility are highly desirable materials that can be used to prevent implant-associated infections. In this study, titania nanotubes (TNTs) were synthesized on Ti surfaces through electrochemical anodization. Octenidine dihydrochloride (OCT)/poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) was infiltrated into TNTs using a simple solvent-casting technique. OCT/PLGA-TNTs demonstrated sustained drug release and maintained the characteristic hollow structures of TNTs. TNTs (200 nm in diameter) alone exhibited slight antibacterial effect and good osteogenic activity but also evidently impaired adhesion and proliferation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). OCT/PLGA-TNTs (100 nm in diameter) supported BMSC adhesion and proliferation and showed good osteogenesis-inducing ability. OCT/PLGA-TNTs also exhibited good long-term antibacterial ability within the observation period of 7 d. The synthesized drug carrier with relatively long-term antibacterial ability and enhanced excellent biocompatibility demonstrated significant potential in bone implant applications. PMID:26090449

  14. Apidaecins: antibacterial peptides from honeybees.

    PubMed Central

    Casteels, P; Ampe, C; Jacobs, F; Vaeck, M; Tempst, P

    1989-01-01

    Although insects lack the basic entities of the vertebrate immune system, such as lymphocytes and immunoglobulins, they have developed alternative defence mechanisms against infections. Different types of peptide factors, exhibiting bactericidal activity, have been detected in some insect species. These humoral factors are induced upon infection. The present report describes the discovery of the apidaecins, isolated from lymph fluid of the honeybee (Apis mellifera). The apidaecins represent a new family of inducible peptide antibiotics with the following basic structure: GNNRP(V/I)YIPQPRPPHPR(L/I). These heat-stable, non-helical peptides are active against a wide range of plant-associated bacteria and some human pathogens, through a bacteriostatic rather than a lytic process. Chemically synthesized apidaecins display the same bactericidal activity as their natural counterparts. While only active antibacterial peptides are detectable in adult honeybee lymph, bee larvae contain considerable amounts of inactive precursor molecules. PMID:2676519

  15. Environment-sensitive quinolone demonstrating long-lived fluorescence and unusually slow excited-state intramolecular proton transfer kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamotaiev, O. M.; Shvadchak, V.; Sych, T. P.; Melnychuk, N. A.; Yushchenko, D.; Mely, Y.; Pivovarenko, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    A new small fluorescent dye based on 3-hydroxybenzo[g]quinolone, a benzo-analogue of Pseudomonas quinolone signal species, has been synthesized. The dye demonstrates interesting optical properties, with absorption in the visible region, two band emission due to an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction and high fluorescence quantum yield in both protic and aprotic media. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy shows that the ESIPT reaction time is unusually long (up to 8 ns), indicating that both forward and backward ESIPT reactions are very slow in comparison to other 3-hydroxyquinolones. In spite of these slow rate constants, the ESIPT reaction was found to show a reversible character as a result of the very long lifetimes of both N* and T* forms (up to 16 ns). The ESIPT reaction rate is mainly controlled by the hydrogen bond donor ability in protic solvents and the polarity in aprotic solvents. Using large unilamellar vesicles and giant unilamellar vesicles of different lipid compositions, the probe was shown to preferentially label liquid disordered phases.

  16. Synthesis of chromone, quinolone, and benzoxazinone sulfonamide nucleosides as conformationally constrained inhibitors of adenylating enzymes required for siderophore biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Engelhart, Curtis A; Aldrich, Courtney C

    2013-08-01

    MbtA catalyzes the first committed step of mycobactin biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and is responsible for the incorporation of salicylic acid into the mycobactin siderophores. 5'-O-[N-(Salicyl)sulfamoyl]adenosine (Sal-AMS) is an extremely potent nucleoside inhibitor of MbtA that possesses excellent activity against whole-cell Mtb but suffers from poor bioavailability. In an effort to improve the bioavailability, we have designed four conformationally constrained analogues of Sal-AMS that remove two rotatable bonds and the ionized sulfamate group on the basis of computational and structural studies. Herein we describe the synthesis, biochemical, and microbiological evaluation of chromone-, quinolone-, and benzoxazinone-3-sulfonamide derivatives of Sal-AMS. We developed new chemistry to assemble these three heterocycles from common β-ketosulfonamide intermediates. The synthesis of the chromone- and quinolone-3-sulfonamide intermediates features formylation of a β-ketosulfonamide employing dimethylformamide dimethyl acetal to afford an enaminone that can react intramolecularly with a phenol or intermolecularly with a primary amine via addition-elimination reaction(s). The benzoxazinone-3-sulfonamide was prepared by nitrosation of a β-ketosulfonamide followed by intramolecular nucleophilic aromatic substitution. Mitsunobu coupling of these bicyclic sulfonamides with a protected adenosine derivative followed by global deprotection provides a concise synthesis of the respective inhibitors.

  17. Identification of the main quinolone resistance determinant in Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli by MAMA-DEG PCR.

    PubMed

    Hormeño, Lorena; Palomo, Gonzalo; Ugarte-Ruiz, María; Porrero, M Concepción; Borge, Carmen; Vadillo, Santiago; Píriz, Segundo; Domínguez, Lucas; Campos, Maria J; Quesada, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    Among zoonotic diseases, campylobacteriosis stands out as the major bacterial infection producing human gastroenteritis. Antimicrobial therapy, only recommended in critical cases, is challenged by resistance mechanisms that should be unambiguously detected for achievement of effective treatments. Quinolone (ciprofloxacin) resistance of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli, the 2 main Campylobacter detected in humans, is conferred by the mutation gyrA C-257-T, which can be genotyped by several methods that require a previous identification of the pathogen species to circumvent the sequence polymorphism of the gene. A multiplex PCR, based on degenerated oligonucleotides, has been designed for unambiguous identification of the quinolone resistance determinant in Campylobacter spp. isolates. The method was verified with 249 Campylobacter strains isolated from humans (141 isolates) and from the 3 most important animal sources for this zoonosis: poultry (34 isolates), swine (38 isolates), and cattle (36 isolates). High resistance to ciprofloxacin, MIC above 4μg/mL, linked to the mutated genotype predicted by MAMA-DEG PCR (mismatch amplification mutation assay PCR with degenerated primers) was found frequently among isolates from the different hosts.

  18. Molecular characterization of quinolone resistance mechanisms and extended-spectrum β-lactamase production in Escherichia coli isolated from dogs.

    PubMed

    Meireles, D; Leite-Martins, L; Bessa, L J; Cunha, S; Fernandes, R; de Matos, A; Manaia, C M; Martins da Costa, P

    2015-08-01

    The increasing prevalence of antimicrobial resistances is now a worldwide problem. Investigating the mechanisms by which pets harboring resistant strains may receive and/or transfer resistance determinants is essential to better understanding how owners and pets can interact safely. Here, we characterized the genetic determinants conferring resistance to β-lactams and quinolones in 38 multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from fecal samples of dogs, through PCR and sequencing. The most frequent genotype included the β-lactamase groups TEM (n=5), and both TEM+CTX-M-1 (n=5). Within the CTX-M group, we identified the genes CTX-M-32, CTX-M-1, CTX-M-15, CTX-M-55/79, CTX-M-14 and CTX-M-2/44. Thirty isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin presented two mutations in the gyrA gene and one or two mutations in the parC gene. A mutation in gyrA (reported here for the first time), due to a transversion and transition (TCG→GTG) originating a substitution of a serine by a valine in position 83 was also detected. The plasmid-encoded quinolone resistance gene, qnrs1, was detected in three isolates. Dogs can be a reservoir of genetic determinants conferring antimicrobial resistance and thus may play an important role in the spread of antimicrobial resistance to humans and other co-habitant animals.

  19. [Determination of 16 quinolone residues in animal tissues using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Yue, Zhenfeng; Lin, Xiuyun; Tang, Shaobing; Chen, Xiaoxia; Ji, Caini; Hua, Honghui; Liu, Yu

    2007-07-01

    A confirmative method was developed with high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) to simultaneously detect 16 quinolone residues in animal tissues, which included nalidixinic acid, oxolinic acid, flumequine, norfloxacin, enoxacin, ciprofloxacin, lomefloxacin, danofloxacin, enrofloxacin, ofloxacin, sarafloxacin, difloxacin, marbofloxacin, pefloxacin, sparfloxacin and orbifloxacin. In the method, the 16 residues were extracted with acidified acetonitrile, cleaned-up with hexane, and concentrated with a rotary evaporator. Then the reconstituted sample solution was analyzed using HPLC-MS/MS in positive mode, with a Inertsil C8-3 column as the analytical column. The method was validated at 10, 50 and 100 microg/kg. The validation results were as follows: the linear ranges were from 10 to 100 microg/kg; the overall recoveries were from 62.4% to 102% with the relative standard deviations of 1.4%-11.9%. The method is simple, rapid, and accurate, and its performance could meet the requirements of the domestic and international legislation. The method is applicable to simultaneously confirm multi-residues of quinolones in animal tissues such as chicken muscle, chicken liver and fish muscle.

  20. Synthesis of Chromone, Quinolone, and Benzoxazinone Sulfonamide Nucleosides as Conformationally Constrained Inhibitors of Adenylating Enzymes Required for Siderophore Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Engelhart, Curtis A.; Aldrich, Courtney C.

    2013-01-01

    MbtA catalyzes the first committed step of mycobactin biosynthesis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and is responsible for the incorporation of salicylic acid into the mycobactin siderophores. 5′-O-[N-(Salicyl)sulfamoyl]adenosine (Sal-AMS) is an extremely potent nucleoside inhibitor of MbtA that possesses excellent activity against whole-cell Mtb, but suffers from poor bioavailability. In an effort to improve the bioavailability, we have designed four conformationally constrained analogues of Sal-AMS that remove two rotatable bonds and the ionized sulfamate group based on computational and structural studies. Herein we describe the synthesis, biochemical, and microbiological evaluation of chromone-, quinolone-, and benzoxazinone-3-sulfonamide derivatives of Sal-AMS. We developed new chemistry to assemble these three heterocycles from common β-ketosulfonamide intermediates. The synthesis of the chromone- and quinolone-3-sulfonamide intermediates features formylation of a β-ketosulfonamide employing dimethylformamide dimethyl acetal to afford an enaminone that can react intramolecularly with a phenol or intermolecularly with a primary amine via addition-elimination reaction(s). The benzoxazinone-3-sulfonamide was prepared by nitrosation of a β-ketosulfonamide followed by intramolecular nucleophilic aromatic substitution. Mitsunobu coupling of these bicyclic sulfonamides with a protected adenosine derivative followed by global deprotection provides a concise synthesis of the respective inhibitors. PMID:23805993

  1. In vitro activity of sparfloxacin (AT-4140), a new quinolone agent, against invasive isolates from pediatric patients.

    PubMed Central

    Akaniro, J C; Stutman, H R; Arguedas, A G; Vargas, O M

    1992-01-01

    Sparfloxacin is a new oral fluoroquinolone agent with putative activity against common pediatric pathogens. Using the broth microdilution method, we evaluated sparfloxacin activity in comparison with those of other antimicrobial agents against 383 pediatric isolates derived from cultures of blood and other normally sterile body fluids. MICs were assessed in Mueller-Hinton broth, serum, and urine, as well as at inoculum sizes of 10(4) to 10(8) CFU/ml. The emergence and stability of resistance and cross-resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (mucoid and nonmucoid) and Staphylococcus aureus to sparfloxacin and ciprofloxacin were evaluated. Inhibitory activity of sparfloxacin against most test organisms was within achievable serum levels. Sparfloxacin was greater than or equal to 2- to 4-fold more active than other quinolones against gram-positive pathogens and 2- to 4-fold less active than ciprofloxacin against P. aeruginosa. Sparfloxacin activity was unaffected by urine and was enhanced by two- to eightfold in human serum. Its potency was not affected by inocula of less than or equal to 10(7) CFU/ml. The frequency of development of spontaneous resistance was similar to that found for other new quinolone agents, and stable resistance emerged only in P. aeruginosa. Sparfloxacin merits additional study against invasive pediatric pathogens. PMID:1318674

  2. Predictive analysis of transmissible quinolone resistance indicates Stenotrophomonas maltophilia as a potential source of a novel family of Qnr determinants

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, María B; Hernández, Alvaro; Rodríguez-Martínez, José M; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Martínez, José L

    2008-01-01

    Background Predicting antibiotic resistance before it emerges at clinical settings constitutes a novel approach for preventing and fighting resistance of bacterial pathogens. To analyse the possibility that novel plasmid-encoded quinolone resistance determinants (Qnr) can emerge and disseminate among bacterial pathogens, we searched the presence of those elements in nearly 1000 bacterial genomes and metagenomes. Results We have found a number of novel potential qnr genes in the chromosomes of aquatic bacteria and in metagenomes from marine organisms. Functional studies of the Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Smqnr gene show that plasmid-encoded SmQnr confers quinolone resistance upon its expression in a heterologous host. Conclusion Altogether, the data presented in our work support the notion that predictive studies on antibiotic resistance are feasible, using currently available information on bacterial genomes and with the aid of bioinformatic and functional tools. Our results confirm that aquatic bacteria can be the origin of plasmid-encoded Qnr, and highlight the potential role of S. maltophilia as a source of novel Qnr determinants. PMID:18793450

  3. A Supramolecular Antibiotic Switch for Antibacterial Regulation.

    PubMed

    Bai, Haotian; Yuan, Huanxiang; Nie, Chenyao; Wang, Bing; Lv, Fengting; Liu, Libing; Wang, Shu

    2015-11-01

    A supramolecular antibiotic switch is described that can reversibly "turn-on" and "turn-off" its antibacterial activity on demand, providing a proof-of-concept for a way to regulate antibacterial activity of biotics. The switch relies on supramolecular assembly and disassembly of cationic poly(phenylene vinylene) derivative (PPV) with cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) to regulate their different interactions with bacteria. This simple but efficient strategy does not require any chemical modification on the active sites of the antibacterial agent, and could also regulate the antibacterial activity of classical antibiotics or photosensitizers in photodynamic therapy. This supramolecular antibiotic switch may be a successful strategy to fight bacterial infections and decrease the emergence of bacterial resistance to antibiotics from a long-term point of view.

  4. FDA Cracks Down on Antibacterial Soaps

    MedlinePlus

    ... The ban covers soaps and body washes containing triclosan and triclocarban, the two most common antibacterial ingredients, ... ingredients. For example, recent studies have shown that triclosan can affect the thyroid, estrogen and testosterone systems ...

  5. Antibacterial Activity of Geminized Amphiphilic Cationic Homopolymers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Xuefeng; Yu, Danfeng; Zhang, Jian; Yang, Guang; Cui, Yingxian; Sun, Keji; Wang, Jinben; Yan, Haike

    2015-12-22

    The current study is aimed at investigating the effect of cationic charge density and hydrophobicity on the antibacterial and hemolytic activities. Two kinds of cationic surfmers, containing single or double hydrophobic tails (octyl chains or benzyl groups), and the corresponding homopolymers were synthesized. The antimicrobial activity of these candidate antibacterials was studied by microbial growth inhibition assays against Escherichia coli, and hemolysis activity was carried out using human red blood cells. It was interestingly found that the homopolymers were much more effective in antibacterial property than their corresponding monomers. Furthermore, the geminized homopolymers had significantly higher antibacterial activity than that of their counterparts but with single amphiphilic side chains in each repeated unit. Geminized homopolymers, with high positive charge density and moderate hydrophobicity (such as benzyl groups), combine both advantages of efficient antibacterial property and prominently high selectivity. To further explain the antibacterial performance of the novel polymer series, the molecular interaction mechanism is proposed according to experimental data which shows that these specimens are likely to kill microbes by disrupting bacterial membranes, leading them unlikely to induce resistance.

  6. Antibacterial, Antifungal and antioxidant activities of some medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Wazir, Asma; Mehjabeen, -; Jahan, Noor; Sherwani, Sikander Khan; Ahmad, Mansoor

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial, antifungal and antioxidant activities of medicinal plants. The antibacterial activity of methanolic extracts of three medicinal plants (Swertia chirata, Terminalia bellerica and Zanthoxylum armatum) were tested against Gentamicin (standard drug) on eleven gram positive and seventeen gram negative bacteria by agar well method. It was revealed that seven-gram negative and six gram positive bacterial species were inhibited by these plant extracts. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of the extracts were determined by broth micro-dilution method. The significant MIC value of Swertia chirata was 20mg/ml against Serratia marcesens, Zanthoxylum armatum was 10 mg/ml against Aeromonas hydrophila and Terminali bellerica was 20mg/ml against Acinetobacter baumanii as well as Serratia marcesens. Antifungal screening was done for methanolic extracts of these plants by agar well method with the 6 saprophytic, 5 dermatophytic and 6 yeasts. In this case Griseofulvin was used as a standard. All saprophytes and dermatophytes were showed resistance by these plants extracts except Microsporum canis, which was inhibited by Z. armatum and S. chirata extracts. The significant MIC value of Zanthoxylum armatum was 10mg/ml against Microsporum canis and Swertia chirata was 10mg/ml against Candida tropicalis. The anti-oxidant study was performed by DPPH free radical scavenging assay using ascorbic acid as a reference standard. Significant antioxidant activities were observed by Swertia chirata and Zanthoxylum armatum at concentration 200μg/ml was 70% DPPH scavenging activity (EC50=937.5μg/ml) while Terminalia bellerica showed 55.6% DPPH scavenging activity (EC50=100μg/ml). This study has shown that these plants could provide potent antibacterial compounds and may possible preventive agents in ROS related ailments.

  7. Investigations to the Antibacterial Mechanism of Action of Kendomycin

    PubMed Central

    A. Elnakady, Yasser; Chatterjee, Indranil; Bischoff, Markus; Rohde, Manfred; Josten, Michaele; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Herrmann, Mathias; Müller, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The emergence of bacteria that are resistant to many currently used drugs emphasizes the need to discover and develop new antibiotics that are effective against such multi-resistant strains. Kendomycin is a novel polyketide that has a unique quinone methide ansa structure and various biological properties. This compound exhibits strong antibacterial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Despite the promise of kendomycinin in several therapeutic areas, its mode of action has yet to be identified. Methods In this study, we used a multidisciplinary approach to gain insight into the antibacterial mechanism of this compound. Results The antibacterial activity of kendomycin appears to be bacteriostatic rather than bactericidal. Kendomycin inhibited the growth of the MRSA strain COL at a low concentration (MIC of 5 μg/mL). Proteomic analysis and gene transcription profiling of kendomycin-treated cells indicated that this compound affected the regulation of numerous proteins and genes involved in central metabolic pathways, such as the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (SdhA) and gluconeogenesis (PckA and GapB), cell wall biosynthesis and cell division (FtsA, FtsZ, and MurAA), capsule production (Cap5A and Cap5C), bacterial programmed cell death (LrgA and CidA), the cellular stress response (ClpB, ClpC, ClpP, GroEL, DnaK, and GrpE), and oxidative stress (AhpC and KatA). Electron microscopy revealed that kendomycin strongly affected septum formation during cell division. Most kendomycin-treated cells displayed incomplete septa with abnormal morphology. Conclusions Kendomycin might directly or indirectly affect the cell division machinery, protein stability, and programmed cell death in S. aureus. Additional studies are still needed to obtain deeper insight into the mode of action of kendomycin. PMID:26795276

  8. Novel substituted benzothiophene and thienothiophene carboxanilides and quinolones: synthesis, photochemical synthesis, DNA-binding properties, antitumor evaluation and 3D-derived QSAR analysis.

    PubMed

    Aleksić, Maja; Bertoša, Branimir; Nhili, Raja; Uzelac, Lidija; Jarak, Ivana; Depauw, Sabine; David-Cordonnier, Marie-Hélène; Kralj, Marijeta; Tomić, Sanja; Karminski-Zamola, Grace

    2012-06-14

    A series of new N,N-dimethylaminopropyl- and 2-imidazolinyl-substituted derivatives of benzo[b]thienyl- and thieno[2,3-b]thienylcarboxanilides and benzo[b]thieno[2,3-c]- and thieno[3',2':4,5]thieno[2,3-c]quinolones were prepared. Quinolones were prepared by the reaction of photochemical dehydrohalogenation of corresponding anilides. Carboxanilides and quinolones were tested for the antiproliferative activity. 2-Imidazolinyl-substituted derivatives showed very prominent activity. By use of the experimentally obtained antitumor measurements, 3D-derived QSAR analysis was performed for the set of compounds. Highly predictive 3D-derived QSAR models were obtained, and molecular properties that have the highest impact on antitumor activity were identified. Carboxanilides 6a-c and quinolones 9a-c and 11a were evaluated for DNA binding propensities and topoisomerases I and II inhibition as part of their mechanism of action assessment. The evaluated differences in the mode of action nicely correlate with the results of the 3D-QSAR analysis. Taken together, the results indicate which modifications of the compounds from the series should further improve their anticancer properties.

  9. Synthesis and Mechanism Insight of a Peptide-Grafted Hyperbranched Polymer Nanosheet with Weak Positive Charges but Excellent Intrinsically Antibacterial Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jingyi; Wang, Mingzhi; Wang, Fangyingkai; Du, Jianzhong

    2016-06-13

    Antimicrobial resistance is an increasingly problematic issue in the world and there is a present and urgent need to develop new antimicrobial therapies without drug resistance. Antibacterial polymers are less susceptible to drug resistance but they are prone to inducing serious side effects due to high positive charge. Herein we report a peptide-grafted hyperbranched polymer which can self-assemble into unusual nanosheets with highly effective intrinsically antibacterial activity but weak positive charges (+ 6.1 mV). The hyperbranched polymer was synthesized by sequential Michael addition-based thiol-ene and free radical mediated thiol-ene reactions, and followed by ring-opening polymerization of N-carboxyanhydrides (NCAs). The nanosheet structure was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies. Furthermore, a novel "wrapping and penetrating" antibacterial mechanism of the nanosheets was revealed by TEM and it is the key to significantly decrease the positive charges but have a very low minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 16 μg mL(-1) against typical Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Overall, our synthetic strategy demonstrates a new insight for synthesizing antibacterial nanomaterials with weak positive charges. Moreover, the unique antibacterial mechanism of our nanosheets may be extended for designing next-generation antibacterial agents without drug resistance.

  10. Single Plant Derived Nanotechnology for Synergistic Antibacterial Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kalluri, Jhansi R.; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Roberto; Hartman, Phil S.; Loni, Armando; Canham, Leigh T.; Coffer, Jeffery L.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple new approaches to tackle multidrug resistant infections are urgently needed and under evaluation. One nanotechnology-based approach to delivering new relevant therapeutics involves silicon accumulator plants serving as a viable silicon source in green routes for the fabrication of the nanoscale drug delivery carrier porous silicon (pSi). If the selected plant leaf components contain medicinally-active species as well, then a single substance can provide not only the nanoscale high surface area drug delivery carrier, but the drug itself. With this idea in mind, porous silicon was fabricated from joints of the silicon accumulator plant Bambuseae (Tabasheer) and loaded with an antibacterial extract originating from leaves of the same type of plant (Bambuseae arundinacea). Preparation of porous silicon from Tabasheer includes extraction of biogenic silica from the ground plant by calcination, followed by reduction with magnesium in the presence of sodium chloride, thereby acting as a thermal moderator that helps to retain the mesoporous structure of the feedstock. The purified product was characterized by a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and low temperature nitrogen gas adsorption measurements. Antimicrobial activity and minimum inhibitory concentration of a leaf extract of Bambuseae arundinacea was tested against the bacteria Escherichia Coli (E. Coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. Aureus), along with the fungus Candida albicans (C. Albicans). A S. aureus active ethanolic leaf extract was loaded into the above Tabasheer-derived porous silicon. Initial studies indicate sustained in vitro antibacterial activity of the extract-loaded plant derived pSi (25 wt %, TGA), as measured by disk diffusion inhibitory zone assays. Subsequent chromatographic separation of this extract revealed that the active antimicrobial species

  11. A class of selective antibacterials derived from a protein kinase inhibitor pharmacophore

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. Richard; Dunham, Steve; Mochalkin, Igor; Banotai, Craig; Bowman, Matthew; Buist, Susan; Dunkle, Bill; Hanna, Debra; Harwood, H. James; Huband, Michael D.; Karnovsky, Alla; Kuhn, Michael; Limberakis, Chris; Liu, Jia Y.; Mehrens, Shawn; Mueller, W. Thomas; Narasimhan, Lakshmi; Ogden, Adam; Ohren, Jeff; Prasad, J.V.N. Vara; Shelly, John A.; Skerlos, Laura; Sulavik, Mark; Thomas, V. Hayden; VanderRoest, Steve; Wang, LiAnn; Wang, Zhigang; Whitton, Amy; Zhu, Tong; Stover, C. Kendall

    2009-06-25

    As the need for novel antibiotic classes to combat bacterial drug resistance increases, the paucity of leads resulting from target-based antibacterial screening of pharmaceutical compound libraries is of major concern. One explanation for this lack of success is that antibacterial screening efforts have not leveraged the eukaryotic bias resulting from more extensive chemistry efforts targeting eukaryotic gene families such as G protein-coupled receptors and protein kinases. Consistent with a focus on antibacterial target space resembling these eukaryotic targets, we used whole-cell screening to identify a series of antibacterial pyridopyrimidines derived from a protein kinase inhibitor pharmacophore. In bacteria, the pyridopyrimidines target the ATP-binding site of biotin carboxylase (BC), which catalyzes the first enzymatic step of fatty acid biosynthesis. These inhibitors are effective in vitro and in vivo against fastidious Gram-negative pathogens including Haemophilus influenzae. Although the BC active site has architectural similarity to those of eukaryotic protein kinases, inhibitor binding to the BC ATP-binding site is distinct from the protein kinase-binding mode, such that the inhibitors are selective for bacterial BC. In summary, we have discovered a promising class of potent antibacterials with a previously undescribed mechanism of action. In consideration of the eukaryotic bias of pharmaceutical libraries, our findings also suggest that pursuit of a novel inhibitor leads for antibacterial targets with active-site structural similarity to known human targets will likely be more fruitful than the traditional focus on unique bacterial target space, particularly when structure-based and computational methodologies are applied to ensure bacterial selectivity.

  12. Antibacterial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis and biological characteristics of antibacterial stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Ren, Ling; Zhang, Yang; Xue, Nan; Yang, Ke; Zhong, Ming

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate the possibility of an alternative to the traditional orthodontic stainless steel implants, the antibacterial activity against Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and the related cytotoxicity of a type 304 Cu bearing antibacterial stainless steel were studied. The results indicated that the antibacterial stainless steel showed excellent antibacterial property against P. gingivalis, compared with the control steel (a purchased medical grade 304 stainless steel). Compared to the control steel, there were fewer bacteria on the surface of the antibacterial stainless steel, with significant difference in morphology. The cytotoxicities of the antibacterial stainless steel to both MG-63 and KB cells were all grade 1, the same as those of the control steel. There were no significant differences in the apoptosis rates on MG-63 and KB cells between the antibacterial stainless steel and the control steel. This study demonstrates that the antibacterial stainless steel is possible to reduce the incidence of implant-related infections and can be a more suitable material for the micro-implant than the conventional stainless steel in orthodontic treatment.

  13. Superhydrophobic PVDF and PVDF-HFP nanofibrous mats with antibacterial and anti-biofouling properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spasova, M.; Manolova, N.; Markova, N.; Rashkov, I.

    2016-02-01

    Superhydrophobic nanofibrous materials of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) and poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) were prepared by one-pot electrospinning technique. The mats were decorated with ZnO nanoparticles with silanized surface and a model drug - 5-chloro-8-hydroxyquinolinol (5Cl8HQ). The obtained hybrid nanofibrous materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), contact angle measurements, mechanical and microbiological tests. The results showed that the incorporation of ZnO nanoparticles into PVDF and PVDF-HFP nanofibers increased the hydrophobicity (contact angle 152°), improved the thermal stability and imparted to the nanofibrous materials anti-adhesive and antimicrobial properties. The mats containing the model drug possessed antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The results suggested that the obtained hybrid mats could find potential biomedical applications requiring antibacterial and anti-biofouling properties.

  14. Nanotechnology Formulations for Antibacterial Free Fatty Acids and Monoglycerides.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Joshua A; Yoon, Bo Kyeong; Li, Danlin; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-03-03

    Free fatty acids and monoglycerides have long been known to possess broad-spectrum antibacterial activity that is based on lytic behavior against bacterial cell membranes. Considering the growing challenges of drug-resistant bacteria and the need for new classes of antibiotics, the wide prevalence, affordable cost, and broad spectrum of fatty acids and monoglycerides make them attractive agents to develop for healthcare and biotechnology applications. The aim of this review is to provide a brief introduction to the history of antimicrobial lipids and their current status and challenges, and to present a detailed discussion of ongoing research efforts to develop nanotechnology formulations of fatty acids and monoglycerides that enable superior in vitro and in vivo performance. Examples of nano-emulsions, liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, and controlled release hydrogels are presented in order to highlight the potential that lies ahead for fatty acids and monoglycerides as next-generation antibacterial solutions. Possible application routes and future directions in research and development are also discussed.

  15. Synthesis and activities of naphthalimide azoles as a new type of antibacterial and antifungal agents.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Yi; Zhou, Cheng-He

    2011-07-15

    Naphthalimide-derived azoles as a new type of antimicrobial agents were synthesized and evaluated for their efficiency in vitro against eight bacteria and two fungi by two fold serial dilution technique. Most title compounds exhibited good antimicrobial potency with low MIC values ranging from 1 to 16μg/mL. Notably, some synthesized compounds displayed comparable or even better antibacterial and antifungal activities against some tested strains than the reference drugs Orbifloxacin, Chloromycin and Fluconazole, respectively.

  16. Phenazine antibiotic inspired discovery of potent bromophenazine antibacterial agents against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Borrero, Nicholas V; Bai, Fang; Perez, Cristian; Duong, Benjamin Q; Rocca, James R; Jin, Shouguang; Huigens, Robert W

    2014-02-14

    Nearly all clinically used antibiotics have been (1) discovered from microorganisms (2) using phenotype screens to identify inhibitors of bacterial growth. The effectiveness of these antibiotics is attributed to their endogenous roles as bacterial warfare agents against competing microorganisms. Unfortunately, every class of clinically used antibiotic has been met with drug resistant bacteria. In fact, the emergence of resistant bacterial infections coupled to the dismal pipeline of new antibacterial agents has resulted in a global health care crisis. There is an urgent need for innovative antibacterial strategies and treatment options to effectively combat drug resistant bacterial pathogens. Here, we describe the implementation of a Pseudomonas competition strategy, using redox-active phenazines, to identify novel antibacterial leads against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. In this report, we describe the chemical synthesis and evaluation of a diverse 27-membered phenazine library. Using this microbial warfare inspired approach, we have identified several bromophenazines with potent antibacterial activities against S. aureus and S. epidermidis. The most potent bromophenazine analogue from this focused library demonstrated a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 0.78-1.56 μM, or 0.31-0.62 μg mL(-1), against S. aureus and S. epidermidis and proved to be 32- to 64-fold more potent than the phenazine antibiotic pyocyanin in head-to-head MIC experiments. In addition to the discovery of potent antibacterial agents against S. aureus and S. epidermidis, we also report a detailed structure-activity relationship for this class of bromophenazine small molecules.

  17. Drug forecast – the peptide deformylase inhibitors as antibacterial agents

    PubMed Central

    Guay, David R P

    2007-01-01

    The relatively rapid development of microbial resistance after the entry of every new antimicrobial into the marketplace necessitates a constant supply of new agents to maintain effective pharmacotherapy. Despite extensive efforts to identify novel lead compounds from molecular targets, only the peptide deformylase inhibitors (PDIs) have shown any real promise, with some advancing to phase I human trials. Bacterial peptide deformylase, which catalyzes the removal of the N-formyl group from N-terminal methionine following translation, is essential for bacterial protein synthesis, growth, and survival. The majority of PDIs are pseudopeptide hydroxamic acids and two of these (IV BB-83698 and oral NVP LBM-415) entered phase I human trials. However, agents to the present have suffered from major potential liabilities. Their in vitro activity has been limited to gram-positive aerobes and some anaerobes and has been quite modest against the majority of such species (MIC90 values ranging from 1–8 mg/L). They have exerted bacteriostatic, not bacteriocidal, activity, thus reducing their potential usefulness in the management of serious infections in the immunocompromised. The relative ease with which microorganisms have been able to develop resistance and the multiple available mechanisms of resistance (mutations in fmt, defB, folD genes; AcrAB/TolC efflux pump; overexpression of peptide deformylase) are worrisome. These could portend a short timespan of efficacy after marketing. Despite these current liabilities, further pursuit of more potent and broader spectrum PDIs which are less susceptible to bacterial mechanisms of resistance is still warranted. PMID:18472972

  18. Antibacterial Drug Leads: DNA and Enzyme Multi-Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Yang; Li, Kai; Gao, Jian; Huang, Chun-Hsiang; Chen, Chun-Chi; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Zhang, Yonghui; Guo, Rey-Ting; Oldfield, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of an investigation of the activity of a series of amidine and bisamidine compounds against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. The most active compounds bound to an AT-rich DNA dodecamer (CGCGAATTCGCG)2, and using DSC were found to increase the melting transition by up to 24 °C. Several compounds also inhibited undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS) with IC50 values of 100–500 nM and we found good correlations (R2 = 0.89, S. aureus; R2 = 0.79, E. coli)) between experimental and predicted cell growth inhibition by using DNA ΔTm and UPPS IC50 experimental results together with 1 computed descriptor. We also solved the structures of three bisamidines binding to DNA as well as three UPPS structures. Overall, the results are of general interest in the context of the development of resistance-resistant antibiotics that involve multi-targeting. PMID:25574764

  19. A general ANN-based multitasking model for the discovery of potent and safer antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Speck-Planche, A; Cordeiro, M N D S

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria have been one of the world's most dangerous and deadliest pathogens for mankind, nowadays giving rise to significant public health concerns. Given the prevalence of these microbial pathogens and their increasing resistance to existing antibiotics, there is a pressing need for new antibacterial drugs. However, development of a successful drug is a complex, costly, and time-consuming process. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR)-based approaches are valuable tools for shortening the time of lead compound identification but also for focusing and limiting time-costly synthetic activities and in vitro/vivo evaluations. QSAR-based approaches, supported by powerful statistical techniques such as artificial neural networks (ANNs), have evolved to the point of integrating dissimilar types of chemical and biological data. This chapter reports an overview of the current research and potential applications of QSAR modeling tools toward the rational design of more efficient antibacterial agents. Particular emphasis is given to the setup of multitasking models along with ANNs aimed at jointly predicting different antibacterial activities and safety profiles of drugs/chemicals under diverse experimental conditions.

  20. Antibacterial Effects of Cissus welwitschii and Triumfetta welwitschii Extracts against Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance has increased sharply, while the pace for the development of new antimicrobials has slowed down. Plants provide an alternative source for new drugs. This study aimed to screen extracts from Cissus welwitschii and Triumfetta welwitschii for antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Bacillus cereus. The tests conducted included a susceptibility determination test, analysis of the effect of T. welwitschii on cell wall integrity, and transport across the membrane. It was found that the T. welwitschii methanol extracts were more effective than the water extracts and had the lowest minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration at 0.125 mg/mL and 0.5 mg/mL, respectively, against E. coli and B. cereus. The C. welwitschii extract caused the most drug accumulation in E. coli. In B. cereus, no significant drug accumulation was observed. Nucleic acid leakage in B. cereus and E. coli and protein leakage in E. coli were observed after exposure to the T. welwitschii extract. The extracts from T. welwitschii had greater antibacterial activity than the extracts from C. welwitschii. T. welwitschii may be a potential source of lead compounds for that could be developed into antibacterial agents. PMID:26904744

  1. Current challenges in the discovery of novel antibacterials from microbial natural products.

    PubMed

    Genilloud, Olga

    2012-12-01

    Microbial natural products have been for decades one of the most successful sources of drugs to treat infectious diseases. The high occurrence of resistances to all major classes of known antibiotics represents today a new challenge and new classes of antibacterial compounds are urgently needed to respond to this unmet clinical need. While natural products discovery programs have been gradually abandoned by big pharma, smaller biotechnology companies and other research organizations are taking the lead in the discovery of novel antibacterials. A survey of recent patents has shown that in spite of the efforts, few novel compounds are being developed that can overcome most of the emerging multi-resistant and pan-resistant pathogens. In order to respond to the current challenges of discovering novel antibiotics, new approaches are required to be developed to further exploit the microbial resources and their biosynthetic potential as an untapped source of novel metabolites. Strategies to mine microbial collections for orphan biosynthetic pathways and novel species thought to be uncultivable, are emerging as a need within antibacterial drug discovery programs, in combination with high throughput screening and chemical dereplication of novel compounds. Different innovative methods that are being developed to respond to the new challenges that are faced today by drug discovery programs will ensure the evolution of these strategies into a completely new framework that will address the renovated interest in the discovery of novel classes of antibiotics. PMID:22963258

  2. PEGylated ofloxacin nanoparticles render strong antibacterial activity against many clinically important human pathogens.

    PubMed

    Marslin, Gregory; Revina, Ann Mary; Khandelwal, Vinoth Kumar Megraj; Balakumar, Krishnamoorthy; Sheeba, Caroline J; Franklin, Gregory

    2015-08-01

    The rise of bacterial resistance against important drugs threatens their clinical utility. Fluoroquinones, one of the most important classes of contemporary antibiotics has also reported to suffer bacterial resistance. Since the general mechanism of bacterial resistance against fluoroquinone antibiotics (e.g. ofloxacin) consists of target mutations resulting in reduced membrane permeability and increased efflux by the bacteria, strategies that could increase bacterial uptake and reduce efflux of the drug would provide effective treatment. In the present study, we have compared the efficiencies of ofloxacin delivered in the form of free drug (OFX) and as nanoparticles on bacterial uptake and antibacterial activity. Although both poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (OFX-PLGA) and methoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (OFX-mPEG-PLGA) nanoformulations presented improved bacterial uptake and antibacterial activity against all the tested human bacterial pathogens, namely, Escherichia coli, Proteus vulgaris, Salmonella typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus, OFX-mPEG-PLGA showed significantly higher bacterial uptake and antibacterial activity compared to OFX-PLGA. We have also found that mPEG-PLGA nanoencapsulation could significantly inhibit Bacillus subtilis resistance development against OFX.

  3. A general ANN-based multitasking model for the discovery of potent and safer antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Speck-Planche, A; Cordeiro, M N D S

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria have been one of the world's most dangerous and deadliest pathogens for mankind, nowadays giving rise to significant public health concerns. Given the prevalence of these microbial pathogens and their increasing resistance to existing antibiotics, there is a pressing need for new antibacterial drugs. However, development of a successful drug is a complex, costly, and time-consuming process. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR)-based approaches are valuable tools for shortening the time of lead compound identification but also for focusing and limiting time-costly synthetic activities and in vitro/vivo evaluations. QSAR-based approaches, supported by powerful statistical techniques such as artificial neural networks (ANNs), have evolved to the point of integrating dissimilar types of chemical and biological data. This chapter reports an overview of the current research and potential applications of QSAR modeling tools toward the rational design of more efficient antibacterial agents. Particular emphasis is given to the setup of multitasking models along with ANNs aimed at jointly predicting different antibacterial activities and safety profiles of drugs/chemicals under diverse experimental conditions. PMID:25502375

  4. Therapy with newer oral beta-lactam and quinolone agents for infections of the skin and skin structures: a review.

    PubMed

    Gentry, L O

    1992-01-01

    Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, cefuroxime axetil, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin are each effective against many bacteria that cause infections in the skin and skin structures. Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid is potent against staphylococci, streptococci (including enterococci), and anaerobes, although adverse gastrointestinal reactions are common. Cefuroxime axetil is similarly effective yet is used only rarely because of its more common use in infections of the respiratory tract and the prevalent use of second-generation cephalosporins in surgical prophylaxis. The newer quinolones ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin are effective against staphylococci, Enterobacteriaceae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and exhibit only low toxicity; these agents have been used in many difficult tissue infections--notably, chronic infected ulcers in diabetic patients. Oral antimicrobial therapy, when chosen on the basis of culture and susceptibility results and combined with surgical debridement and local management, may be effective for many problematic infections of the skin and skin structures heretofore treated with parenteral antibiotics.

  5. Antibacterial activity of human natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    The in vitro effects of human NK cells on viability of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria was investigated. PBLs depleted of glass- adherent cells showed a significant antibacterial activity that was increased as the concentration of NK cells became higher. Leu-11- enric