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  1. Quizzes | Smokefree.gov

    Cancer.gov

    The Smokefree quizzes can help you learn about what's important to you: Depression Quiz Depression is more than feeling sad or having a bad day. People with depression usually feel down‚ blue‚ or sad. Find out if you have some of the symptoms of depression.Take Quiz

  2. In Defense of Reading Quizzes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tropman, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Many students fail to read the assigned material before class. A failure to read is detrimental to both student learning and course engagement. This paper considers the often-neglected teaching technique of giving frequent quizzes on the reading. Drawing on the author's experiences assigning reading quizzes, together with student opinions…

  3. Weekly Quizzing Really Works!: Online Software Makes It Easy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waite, Jerry

    2007-01-01

    Frequent quizzing prods students to keep up with course work--and keeps them on their toes. The Internet offers a great tool for frequent quizzing. In this article, the author shares his experience quizzing his students weekly using his university's online learning system, WebCT, in the hope that this experience will prove useful to other…

  4. Student Performance in Online Quizzes as a Function of Time in Undergraduate Financial Management Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnusenberg, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    An interesting research question in light of recent technological developments is an investigation of the relationship between the time remaining to complete online quizzes and quiz scores. The data consist of over 4,000 individual quiz scores for six sections of Financial Management at The University of North Florida taught between the Summer of…

  5. Using Out-of-Class Quizzes to Promote Cognitive Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Danette Ifert

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a quizzing activity that aims to facilitate student cognitive engagement at a variety of Bloom's taxonomy levels and promote reading of course assignments. The quizzing activity described is potentially useful for any course. Because it is based on Bloom's cognitive taxonomy, which is itself designed to address the spectrum…

  6. Online Quizzes Promote Inconsistent Improvements on In-Class Test Performance in Introductory Anatomy and Physiology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Gregory A.; Bice, Matthew R.; Shaw, Brandon S.; Shaw, Ina

    2015-01-01

    Review quizzes can provide students with feedback and assist in the preparation for in-class tests, but students often do not voluntarily use self-testing resources. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate if taking a mandatory online review quiz alters performance on subsequent in-class tests. During two semesters of a single-semester…

  7. Online quizzes promote inconsistent improvements on in-class test performance in introductory anatomy and physiology.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gregory A; Bice, Matthew R; Shaw, Brandon S; Shaw, Ina

    2015-06-01

    Review quizzes can provide students with feedback and assist in the preparation for in-class tests, but students often do not voluntarily use self-testing resources. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate if taking a mandatory online review quiz alters performance on subsequent in-class tests. During two semesters of a single-semester introductory anatomy and physiology course, students were required to complete brief online quizzes after each textbook chapter had been covered during lecture as well as the day before an in-class test. During the next two semesters, students were not required to take the online review quizzes. Overall scores on chapter specific in-class tests were higher (P < 0.05) during the semesters in which students took online review quizzes (82.9 ± 14.3%) compared with when they did not (78.7 ± 15.5%), but all in-class tests were not improved. Scores on comprehensive midterm examinations were higher (83.0 ± 12.9% vs. 78.9 ± 13.7%, P < 0.05) but not on final examinations (72.4 ± 13.8% vs. 71.8 ± 14.0%) between those with online review quizzes and those without, respectively. Overall scores on in-class tests and comprehensive examinations were higher (P < 0.05) during the semesters in which students took online review quizzes (83.4 ± 16.8%) compared with when they did not (80.3 ± 17.6%). These data suggest that an online review quiz taken the day before an in-class test increases performance on some in-class tests. However, online review quizzes taken after completion of each chapter do not consistently enhance performance on comprehensive examinations.

  8. Lessons Learned in the Use of WIRIS Quizzes to Upgrade Moodle to Solve Electrical Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogarra Rodriguez, S.; Corbalan Fuertes, M.; Font Piera, A.; Plaza Garcia, I.; Solsona, F. J. A.

    2012-01-01

    WIRIS quizzes are an online mathematics tool for educational purposes that upgrade Moodle quizzes and allow the development of personalized quizzes using random data and conditional instructions. WIRIS quizzes can be used in any mathematics or science degree; their complex operators allow it to be used to solve electrical circuits. This tool…

  9. The Impact of Cooperative Quizzes in a Large Introductory Astronomy Course for Non Science Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeilik, Michael; Morris, Vicky J.

    In Astronomy 101 at the University of New Mexico, we carried out a repeated-items experiment on quizzes and tests to investigate the impact of cooperative testing. This trial was the only change in a reformed course format that had been refined over previous semesters. Our research questions were: Did cooperative quizzes result in gains for the class overall? Did these gains "stick" within the semester? In the spring and fall semesters of 2000, students took quizzes individually and in cooperative learning teams, and tests individually. Normalized gain, , on the quizzes averaged about 0.4, and effect size about 0.8 (approximately a 10% increase in class mean score). Repeating selected quiz items on a subsequent test demonstrated that the gain was sustained over a month in both semesters. In addition, we compared demographics of UNM students with those of the National Astronomy Diagnostic Test project. We found that UNM students are similar to the national sample, except in ethnicity (more Hispanic American, fewer White). Based on these results, we judge that our cooperative quiz strategy will likely succeed in other "Astro 101" classes.

  10. Interactive Learning Using Expert System Quizzes on the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byers, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a software system that allows teachers and students in practically any subject to make interactive expert systems of quizzes on the Internet. Discusses the design of the system, including building a database of questions and answers; integrating text files of questions and answers with JavaScript-HTML pages; and the JavaScript and HTML…

  11. Implementing Test Enhanced Learning: Swedish Teacher Students' Perception of Quizzing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyroos, Mikaela; Schéle, Ingrid; Wiklund-Hörnqvist, Carola

    2016-01-01

    Given previous findings on test enhanced learning, the present study examined the implementation of this practice in terms of quizzing, during the progress of a course. After completing the university course, 88 Swedish teacher students were asked to answer an adapted Retrieval Practice and Test Anxiety Survey. The results showed that students…

  12. Helping geoscience students improve their numeracy using online quizzes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuttall, Anne-Marie; Stott, Tim; Sparke, Shaun

    2010-05-01

    This project aims to help geoscience undergraduates improve their competence and confidence in numeracy using online quizzes delivered via the Blackboard virtual learning environment. Numeracy materials are being developed based on actual examples used in a range of modules in the geoscience degree programmes taught at Liverpool John Moores University. This is to ensure the subject relevance which is considered vital to maintaining student interest & motivation. These materials are delivered as a collection of Blackboard quizzes on specific numeracy topics which students can access at any point in their studies, either on or off campus. Feedback and guidance is provided immediately so that a student gains a confidence boost if they get it right or else they can learn where they have gone wrong. It is intended that positive feedback and repetition/reinforcement will help build the confidence in numeracy which so many students seem to lack. The anonymous nature of the delivery means that students avoid the common fear of ‘asking a stupid question' in class, which can hamper their progress. The fact that students can access the quizzes anytime and from anywhere means that they can use the materials flexibly to suit their individual learning needs. In preliminary research, 70% of the students asked felt that they were expected to have greater numeracy skills than they possessed and 65% said that they would use numeracy support materials on Blackboard. Once fully developed and evaluated, the Blackboard quizzes can be opened up to other departments who may wish to use them with their own students.

  13. Random learning units using WIRIS quizzes in Moodle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Ángel; Mérida, Enrique; Eixarch, Ramon

    2011-09-01

    Moodle is an extended learning management system for developing learning units, including mathematically-based subjects. A wide variety of material can be developed in Moodle which contains facilities for forums, questionnaires, lessons, tasks, wikis, glossaries and chats. Therefore, the Moodle platform provides a meeting point for those working in a mathematics course. Mathematics requires special materials and activities: The material must include mathematical objects and the activities included in the virtual course must be able to do mathematical computations. WIRIS is a powerful software for educational environments. It has libraries for calculus, algebra, geometry and much more. In this article, examples showing the use of WIRIS in numerical methods and examples of using a new tool, WIRIS quizzes, are illustrated. By enhancing Moodle with WIRIS, we can add random learning questions to modules. Moodle has a simpler version of this capability, but WIRIS extends the method in which the random material is presented to the students. Random objects can appear in a question, in a variable of a question, in a plot or in the definition of a mathematical object. This article illustrates material prepared for numerical methods using a WIRIS library integrated in WIRIS quizzes. As a result, WIRIS in Moodle can be considered as a global solution for mathematics education.

  14. Recurrent Online Quizzes: Ubiquitous Tools for Promoting Student Presence, Participation and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePaolo, Concetta A.; Wilkinson, Kelly

    2014-01-01

    We present the idea of recurrent, in-class online quizzes as an effective and efficient way to promote student attendance (presence), engagement (participation) and to provide formative assessment (to enhance performance) within a face-to-face course. Quizzes during each class meeting encourage students to attend class regularly and participate…

  15. The Effect of Short Formative Diagnostic Web Quizzes with Minimal Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balter, Olle; Enstrom, Emma; Klingenberg, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    To help students gauge their understanding of basic concepts and encourage good study habits, we administered short online quizzes that use generic questions in the crucial first few weeks of a course. The purpose of the study was to investigate whether the combination of these web quizzes with generic questions with only binary feedback (right or…

  16. Using Reading Quizzes in STEM Classes--The What, Why, and How

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Linda C.; Anderson, Eric C.; Carpenter, Tara S.; Cui, Lili; Gierasch, Tiffany Malinky; Leupen, Sarah; Nanes, Kalman M.; Wagner, Cynthia R.

    2015-01-01

    Many active learning pedagogies depend on students' preparing for class in advance. One common method for holding students accountable for this preparation is the use of reading quizzes. When used thoughtfully, reading quizzes can also actually promote student learning through the testing effect. In this article we describe why and how we use…

  17. The Impact of Cooperative Quizzes in a Large Introductory Astronomy Course for Non-Science Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeilik, Michael; Morris, Vicky J.

    2004-01-01

    In Astronomy 101 at the University of New Mexico, we carried out a repeated-items experiment on quizzes and tests to investigate the impact of cooperative testing. This trial was the only change in a reformed course format that had been refined over previous semesters. Our research questions were: (1) Did cooperative quizzes result in gains for…

  18. The Effect of Frequent Quizzes on Short- and Long-Term Academic Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geist, James R.; Soehren, Stephen E.

    1997-01-01

    This study examined effects of frequent quizzes on dental student performance in a course on introductory radiology. Results indicated the group (N=36) with frequent quizzes performed significantly better than the control group (n=35) on midterm and final examinations (but not post-tests), and assessed course content and instructor more…

  19. The Use of Formative Online Quizzes to Enhance Class Preparation and Scores on Summative Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, John L.

    2008-01-01

    Online quizzes were introduced into an undergraduate Exercise Physiology course to encourage students to read ahead and think critically about the course material before coming to class. The purpose of the study was to determine if the use of the online quizzes was associated with improvements in summative exam scores and if the online quizzes…

  20. Does Structured Quizzing with Process Specific Feedback Lead to Learning Gains in an Active Learning Geoscience Classroom?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palsole, S.; Serpa, L. F.

    2013-12-01

    There is a great realization that efficient teaching in the geosciences has the potential to have far reaching effects in outreach to decision and policy makers (Herbert, 2006; Manduca & Mogk, 2006). This research in turn informs educators that the geosciences by the virtue of their highly integrative nature play an important role in serving as an entry point into STEM disciplines and helping developing a new cadre of geoscientists, scientists and a general population with an understanding of science. Keeping these goals in mind we set to design introductory geoscience courses for non-majors and majors that move away from the traditional lecture models which don't necessarily contribute well to knowledge building and retention ((Handelsman et al., 2007; Hake, 1997) to a blended active learning classroom where basic concepts and didactic information is acquired online via webquests, lecturettes and virtual field trips and the face to face portions of the class are focused on problem solving exercises. The traditional way to ensure that students are prepared for the in-class activity is to have the students take a quiz online to demonstrate basic competency. In the process of redesign, we decided to leverage the technology to build quizzes that are highly structured and map to a process (formation of divergent boundaries for example) or sets of earth processes that we needed the students to know before in-class activities. The quizzes can be taken multiple times and provide process specific feedback, thus serving as a heuristic to the students to ensure they have acquired the necessary competency. The heuristic quizzes were developed and deployed over a year with the student data driving the redesign process to ensure synchronicity. Preliminary data analysis indicates a positive correlation between higher student scores on in-class application exercises and time spent on the process quizzes. An assessment of learning gains also indicate a higher degree of self

  1. Temporal Patterns of Behavior from the Scheduling of Psychology Quizzes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarmolowicz, David P.; Hayashi, Yusuke; St. Peter Pipkin, Claire

    2010-01-01

    Temporal patterns of behavior have been observed in real-life performances such as bill passing in the U.S. Congress, in-class studying, and quiz taking. However, the practical utility of understanding these patterns has not been evaluated. The current study demonstrated the presence of temporal patterns of quiz taking in a university-level…

  2. Test-Enhanced Learning in the Classroom: Long-Term Improvements from Quizzing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roediger, Henry L., III; Agarwal, Pooja K.; McDaniel, Mark A.; McDermott, Kathleen B.

    2011-01-01

    Three experiments examined whether quizzing promotes learning and retention of material from a social studies course with sixth grade students from a suburban middle school. The material used in the experiments was the course material students were to learn and some of the dependent measures were the actual tests on which students received grades.…

  3. A Variation on the Use of Interactive Anonymous Quizzes in the Chemistry Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an interesting variation on the use of interactive anonymous quizzes (IAQs) in the chemistry classroom. In this variation, IAQs are used to introduce new material or topics in a course, as opposed to their traditional use for reviewing previously covered material. Two examples of IAQs used to introduce new topics in a…

  4. Students' Performance and Satisfaction with Web vs. Paper-Based Practice Quizzes and Lecture Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macedo-Rouet, Monica; Ney, Muriel; Charles, Sandrine; Lallich-Boidin, Genevieve

    2009-01-01

    The use of computers to deliver course-related materials is rapidly expanding in most universities. Yet the effects of computer vs. printed delivery modes on students' performance and motivation are not yet fully known. We compared the impacts of Web vs. paper to deliver practice quizzes that require information search in lecture notes. Hundred…

  5. Giving Online Quizzes in Corporate Finance and Investments for a Better Use of Seat Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peng, Zhuoming

    2007-01-01

    The primary benefit of providing out-of-class online quizzes in a face-to-face class is to gain more in-class time. A study designed to investigate this issue was conducted during the Spring 2006 and Spring 2007 semesters. Thirty-one and 34 Corporate Finance undergraduate students from each semester, and 33 and 36 Investments undergraduate…

  6. The Impact of Various Quizzing Patterns on the Test Performance of High School Economics Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, William L.

    2010-01-01

    Presenting college students, in a wide variety of content areas, with frequent announced and unannounced quizzes appears to correlate positively with enhanced test performance. The purpose of this quantitative study was to examine if similar results can be achieved with high school students in a standard economics class. Based on a theoretical…

  7. Laying the Groundwork for NCLEX Success: An Exploration of Adaptive Quizzing as an Examination Preparation Method.

    PubMed

    Cox-Davenport, Rebecca A; Phelan, Julia C

    2015-05-01

    First-time NCLEX-RN pass rates are an important indicator of nursing school success and quality. Nursing schools use different methods to anticipate NCLEX outcomes and help prevent student failure and possible threat to accreditation. This study evaluated the impact of a shift in NCLEX preparation policy at a BSN program in the southeast United States. The policy shifted from the use of predictor score thresholds to determine graduation eligibility to a more proactive remediation strategy involving adaptive quizzing. A descriptive correlational design evaluated the impact of an adaptive quizzing system designed to give students ongoing active practice and feedback and explored the relationship between predictor examinations and NCLEX success. Data from student usage of the system as well as scores on predictor tests were collected for three student cohorts. Results revealed a positive correlation between adaptive quizzing system usage and content mastery. Two of the 69 students in the sample did not pass the NCLEX. With so few students failing the NCLEX, predictability of any course variables could not be determined. The power of predictor examinations to predict NCLEX failure could also not be supported. The most consistent factor among students, however, was their content mastery level within the adaptive quizzing system. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  8. Effect of Formative Quizzes on Teacher Candidates' Learning in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yalaki, Yalcin; Bayram, Zeki

    2015-01-01

    Formative assessment or assessment for learning is one of the most emphasized educational innovations around the world. Two of the common strategies that could be used in formative assessment are use of summative tests for formative purposes and comment only marking. We utilized these strategies in the form of formative quizzes in a general…

  9. Quiz Making Activities Using the Multi-Mouse Quiz System in an Elementary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Juan; Mori, Mikihiko; Ueda, Hiroshi; Kita, Hajime

    2013-01-01

    The Multi-Mouse Quiz System is an application used to treat quizzes in a classroom or other learning environment. The system comprises the Multi Mouse Quiz (MMQ) and MMQEditor. The MMQ is an application of Single Display Groupware (SDG), which enables multiple users to answer quizzes by connecting several mice to an ordinary computer. The…

  10. The Use of Group Quizzes in Developmental Mathematics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Ian

    2012-01-01

    For a period of four semesters, the possibility was explored of using a "group quiz" as a learning activity that provides a collaborative learning environment, a review of the previous week's material, and a formative assessment for both the student and the instructor. Using both quantitative (i.e., student surveys) and qualitative (i.e., student…

  11. Emotions Experienced by Students Taking Online and Classroom Quizzes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stowell, Jeffrey R.; Allan, Wesley D.; Teoro, Samantha M.

    2012-01-01

    Emotions experienced during online academic examinations may differ from emotions experienced in the traditional classroom testing situation. Students in a "Psychology of Learning" course (n = 61) completed assessments of emotions before and after a quiz in each of the following settings: online at their own choice of time and location; online in…

  12. Weekly quizzes in extended-matching format as a means of monitoring students' progress in gross anatomy.

    PubMed

    Lukić, I K; Gluncić, V; Katavić, V; Petanjek, Z; Jalsovec, D; Marusić, A

    2001-11-01

    We compared weekly quizzes in extended-matching format with multiple-choice questions and oral examinations as means of monitoring students' progress in gross anatomy. Students' performance on 19 weekly oral examinations or 10-question quizzes based on extended-matching or multiple-choice formats were correlated with their success on 3 interim examinations and the final comprehensive examination. The Kuder-Richardson formula 20, an estimate of precision of the test, was 0.64 for extended-matching quizzes. Students' performance on interim examinations did not differ significantly. There was a significant correlation between students' mean scores on weekly quizzes and mean scores on interim examinations in both the extended-matching (r = 0.516) and multiple-choice group (r = 0.823). The mean grades (ranging from 2 to 5) on the final exam, based on understanding of anatomical concepts and their application in clinical practice, were significantly higher in extended-matching group (4.8) than in the multiple-choice (4.1) and orally examined groups (3.9) (p < 0.05). We conclude that extended-matching quizzes were at least as effective as multiple-choice quizzes and oral examinations and may be better for acquiring synthetic understanding of anatomical concepts especially in combination with other means of knowledge assessment. We recommend them as a reliable and objective means of monitoring students' performance during a gross anatomy course.

  13. The effect of access time on online quiz performance in large biology lecture courses.

    PubMed

    Metz, Anneke M

    2008-05-01

    To better understand the dynamics of online student test taking, including the likelihood of cheating by large numbers of students, we examined test-taking patterns and outcomes of weekly online quizzes in two large undergraduate biology lecture courses. Students taking a quiz late in a 1-3-day quiz access period performed 10-15% worse on quizzes than the students who completed the quiz early. Quiz access time was also negatively correlated with performance in other course components and course grades. These patterns suggest that academic dishonesty was not a determinant in unsupervised online quiz performance. Students generally completed quizzes in late afternoon or evening hours, but students who completed quizzes between midnight and 8 a.m. had significantly lower quiz grades than their peers. In addition, upper-division students were more likely to characterize weekly online quizzes as more helpful for their learning than the lower-division students.

  14. 1. Progress toward the synthesis of vancosamine using a tandem [4+2]/[3+2] cycloaddition. 2. Discussion boards and pre-lecture quizzes in organic chemistry courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Tyson A.

    The sugar vancosamine is one of the two sugar residues found on the broad spectrum antibiotic vancomycin. A strategy using a tandem intermolecular [4+2]/intermolecular [3+2] cycloaddition with nitro olefins was employed in an effort to enantioselectively synthesize the target. The [4+2] cycloaddition proceeded well with tin tetrachloride in high yield. However, the products from the [3+2] cycloaddition afforded diastereomers with stereocenters that were inconsistent with the natural product. An online facilitated group work assignment was introduced to a first semester non-majors organic chemistry lecture courses with large enrollments (˜300--660 students). Student opinion surveys, performance scores, and a detailed account of time spent by the facilitator afforded insight on the value of such assignments with large class sizes. Format and number of attempts were varied in online pre-lecture quizzes administered to a first semester non-majors organic chemistry lecture course. Student quiz performance and post-quiz assessment shows significant differences in mastery of material and class preparedness with format and number of attempts. When combined with student survey data, recommendations are made as to how format selection and number of attempts can optimize the value of online pre-lecture quizzes as a learning tool and as an assessment tool.

  15. Supporting active learning in an undergraduate geotechnical engineering course using group-based audience response systems quizzes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohue, Shane

    2014-01-01

    The use of audience response systems (ARSs) or 'clickers' in higher education has increased over the recent years, predominantly owing to their ability to actively engage students, for promoting individual and group learning, and for providing instantaneous feedback to students and teachers. This paper describes how group-based ARS quizzes have been integrated into an undergraduate civil engineering course on foundation design. Overall, the ARS summary quizzes were very well received by the students. Feedback obtained from the students indicates that the majority believed the group-based quizzes were useful activities, which helped to improve their understanding of course materials, encouraged self-assessment, and assisted preparation for their summative examination. Providing students with clickers does not, however, necessarily guarantee the class will be engaged with the activity. If an ARS activity is to be successful, careful planning and design must be carried out and modifications adopted where necessary, which should be informed by the literature and relevant student feedback.

  16. Web-based Pre-Lab Quizzes for the Introductory E&M Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julian, Glenn

    2000-05-01

    A sequence of new experiments in electromagnetism (1) forms, at Miami University, part of an introductory laboratory course with one weekly two-hour meeting. This serves about 400 students annually, from both a 4-credit calculus-based lecture course for majors in physical sciences and engineering, and a 3-credit lecture course for majors in biological sciences. A guided-discovery Lab Manual and course Website (2) provide introduction to the physics. Pre-Lab Quizzes are intended to motivate students to prepare before coming to the lab. The entire test bank is posted in advance on the Web, and consists of multiple-choice questions which deal with fundamental concepts needed to appreciate lab observations. We have had students take the quizzes on-line with automatic scoring, but prefer having students justify in writing their answers to selected questions. Student reactions and evaluation by external referees are described. (1) Glenn M. Julian, Joseph Priest, and Peter Heller, Announcer 26 (2), 50 (1996). (2) http://www.muohio.edu/ lab184

  17. Student Responses to a Flipped Introductory Physics Class with built-in Post-Video Feedback Quizzes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, Roberto

    We present and analyze student responses to multiple Introductory physics classes in a university setting, taught in a ''flipped'' class format. The classes included algebra- and calculus-based introductory physics. Outside class, students viewed over 100 online video lectures on Classical Mechanics, Electricity and Magnetism, and Modern Physics prepared by this author and in some cases, by a third-party lecture package available over YouTube. Inside the class, students solved and discussed problems and conceptual issues in greater detail. A pre-class online quiz was deployed as an important source of feedback. I will report on the student reactions to the feedback mechanism, student responses using data based on anonymous surveys, as well as on learning gains from pre-/post- physics diagnostic tests. The results indicate a broad mixture of responses to different lecture video packages that depend on learning styles and perceptions. Students preferred the online quizzes as a mechanism to validate their understanding. The learning gains based on FCI and CSEM surveys were significant.

  18. Invertebrates [Student Guide with Pre-Test, Teacher's Guide, Quizzes 1-5 and Post-Test].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falana, Kenneth

    This programed text, designed for upper elementary and middle school students, is intended to give students a basic knowledge of invertebrates. Students are expected to be able to identify, name, describe, classify to phylum, and draw animals studied in the text when the unit is completed. A pretest, a series of quizzes and are provided. The…

  19. Using Errors to Teach through a Two-Staged, Structured Review: Peer-Reviewed Quizzes and "What's Wrong with Me?"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coppola, Brian P.; Pontrello, Jason K.

    2014-01-01

    Using errors as a method of learning has been made explicit through a two-staged peer review and discussion. During organic chemistry discussion sessions, quizzes are followed by a structured peer review designed to help students identify and discuss student errors. After the face-to-face discussion, a second stage of review involves analyzing and…

  20. Quiz Today: Should I Skip Class?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zizler, Peter

    2013-01-01

    How does selective assessment, wherein one counts only the best "k" out of "n" quizzes set, impact grade inflation? Based on our analysis, a specific quantitative answer can be given to a student who plans to skip a quiz, depending, of course, on the student's quiz writing consistency or inconsistency.

  1. Faculty Forum--Introductory Psychology Student Performance: Weekly Quizzes Followed by a Cumulative Final Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landrum, R. Eric

    2007-01-01

    Students in an introductory psychology course took a quiz a week over each textbook chapter, followed by a cumulative final exam. Students missing a quiz in class could make up a quiz at any time during the semester, and answers to quiz items were available to students prior to the cumulative final exam. The cumulative final exam consisted of half…

  2. Extra Credit Exercise: A Painless Pop Quiz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorne, B. Michael

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the extra credit exercise (ECE), a pop quiz variation that combines the benefits of frequent, unannounced testing with the features that make quizzes less aversive (the ECE are extra-credit and do not hurt the students' grades). Addresses the benefits of the ECE assignment and the students' reactions to it. (CMK)

  3. The Effect of Access Time on Online Quiz Performance in Large Biology Lecture Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Anneke M.

    2008-01-01

    To better understand the dynamics of online student test taking, including the likelihood of cheating by large numbers of students, we examined test-taking patterns and outcomes of weekly online quizzes in two large undergraduate biology lecture courses. Students taking a quiz late in a 1-3-day quiz access period performed 10-15% worse on quizzes…

  4. Healthy Heart Quizzes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  5. The endocrine quiz.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Sanjay; Baruah, Manash P; Nagesh, V Sri

    2014-05-01

    With the recent explosion in endocrine conferences, audience fatigue has set in and conference planners are now looking at newer pedagogic methods to revive the interest of audiences in these conferences. The endocrine quiz has finally come of vogue and is increasingly becoming one of the most popular attractions of any ranking endocrine conference. The endocrine quiz has a large and varied palette and draws questions from religious scriptures, history, literature, current affairs, sports, movies and basic and paramedical sciences. The more we delve into the quizzable aspects of endocrinology, the more we realize that endocrinology is ubiquitous and there is no sphere in human life untouched by endocrine disorders. Be it epic characters like Kumbhakarna and Bheema, fiction characters like Tintin or Orphan Annie, sportspersons like Gail Devers or heads of state like George Bush Sr and Boris Yeltsin, all have contributed to the melting pot of endocrine quizzing. Adding further grist to the endocrine mill are the Nobel prizes, with their attendant anecdotes and controversies. Step into this world of endocrine quizzing to have an up close and personal look at the diverse facets of this subject.

  6. The endocrine quiz

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Sanjay; Baruah, Manash P.; Nagesh, V. Sri

    2014-01-01

    With the recent explosion in endocrine conferences, audience fatigue has set in and conference planners are now looking at newer pedagogic methods to revive the interest of audiences in these conferences. The endocrine quiz has finally come of vogue and is increasingly becoming one of the most popular attractions of any ranking endocrine conference. The endocrine quiz has a large and varied palette and draws questions from religious scriptures, history, literature, current affairs, sports, movies and basic and paramedical sciences. The more we delve into the quizzable aspects of endocrinology, the more we realize that endocrinology is ubiquitous and there is no sphere in human life untouched by endocrine disorders. Be it epic characters like Kumbhakarna and Bheema, fiction characters like Tintin or Orphan Annie, sportspersons like Gail Devers or heads of state like George Bush Sr and Boris Yeltsin, all have contributed to the melting pot of endocrine quizzing. Adding further grist to the endocrine mill are the Nobel prizes, with their attendant anecdotes and controversies. Step into this world of endocrine quizzing to have an up close and personal look at the diverse facets of this subject. PMID:24944922

  7. "UML Quiz": Automatic Conversion of Web-Based E-Learning Content in Mobile Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Franqué, Alexander; Tellioglu, Hilda

    2014-01-01

    Many educational institutions use Learning Management Systems to provide e-learning content to their students. This often includes quizzes that can help students to prepare for exams. However, the content is usually web-optimized and not very usable on mobile devices. In this work a native mobile application ("UML Quiz") that imports…

  8. Relation of Early Testing and Incentive on Quiz Performance in Introductory Psychology: An Archival Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGuire, Michael J.; MacDonald, Pamelyn M.

    2009-01-01

    Students should learn best by repeating a cycle of studying, testing, and feedback, all of which are components of "mastery learning." We performed an archival analysis to determine the relation between taking quizzes early and quiz performance in a "mastery learning" context. Also investigated was whether extra credit resulted in early testing…

  9. Studying as Fun and Games: Effects on College Students' Quiz Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neef, Nancy A.; Perrin, Christopher J.; Haberlin, Alayna T.; Rodrigues, Lilian C.

    2011-01-01

    We examined college students' participation in a game activity for studying course material on their subsequent quiz performance. Game conditions were alternated with another activity counterbalanced across two groups of students in a multielement design. Overall, the mean percentage correct on quizzes was higher during the game condition than…

  10. Teaching baroreflex physiology to medical students: a comparison of quiz-based and conventional teaching strategies in a laboratory exercise.

    PubMed

    Berg, Ronan M G; Plovsing, Ronni R; Damgaard, Morten

    2012-06-01

    Quiz-based and collaborative teaching strategies have previously been found to be efficient for the improving meaningful learning of physiology during lectures. These approaches have, however, not been investigated during laboratory exercises. In the present study, we compared the impact of solving quizzes individually and in groups with conventional teaching on the immediate learning during a laboratory exercise. We implemented two quizzes in a mandatory 4-h laboratory exercise on baroreflex physiology. A total of 155 second-year medical students were randomized to solve quizzes individually (intervention group I, n = 57), in groups of three to four students (intervention group II, n = 56), or not to perform any quizzes (control; intervention group III, n = 42). After the laboratory exercise, all students completed an individual test, which encompassed two recall questions, two intermediate questions, and two integrated questions. The integrated questions were of moderate and advanced difficulty, respectively. Finally, students completed an evaluation form. Intervention group I reached the highest total test scores and proved best at answering the integrated question of advanced difficulty. Moreover, there was an overall difference between groups for student evaluations of the quality of the teaching, which was highest for intervention group II. In conclusion, solving quizzes individually during a laboratory exercise may enhance learning, whereas solving quizzes in groups is associated with higher student satisfaction.

  11. The Effects of Certain and Uncertain Reinforcement Procedures on the Quiz Submission and Performance of College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkovits, Shira Melody

    2011-01-01

    College instructors often provide homework so that their students can review class material; however some students do not take advantage of these review opportunities. This study compared the effects of a certain reward and a lottery reward on the quiz submission rates and accuracy of 112 college students. In Baseline, quizzes were for practice…

  12. Teaching Baroreflex Physiology to Medical Students: A Comparison of Quiz-Based and Conventional Teaching Strategies in a Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Ronan M. G.; Plovsing, Ronni R.; Damgaard, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Quiz-based and collaborative teaching strategies have previously been found to be efficient for the improving meaningful learning of physiology during lectures. These approaches have, however, not been investigated during laboratory exercises. In the present study, we compared the impact of solving quizzes individually and in groups with…

  13. Sherlock: A Semi-automatic Framework for Quiz Generation Using a Hybrid Semantic Similarity Measure.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chenghua; Liu, Dong; Pang, Wei; Wang, Zhe

    In this paper, we present a semi-automatic system (Sherlock) for quiz generation using linked data and textual descriptions of RDF resources. Sherlock is distinguished from existing quiz generation systems in its generic framework for domain-independent quiz generation as well as in the ability of controlling the difficulty level of the generated quizzes. Difficulty scaling is non-trivial, and it is fundamentally related to cognitive science. We approach the problem with a new angle by perceiving the level of knowledge difficulty as a similarity measure problem and propose a novel hybrid semantic similarity measure using linked data. Extensive experiments show that the proposed semantic similarity measure outperforms four strong baselines with more than 47 % gain in clustering accuracy. In addition, we discovered in the human quiz test that the model accuracy indeed shows a strong correlation with the pairwise quiz similarity.

  14. YouTube and Video Quizzes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yee, Kevin; Hargis, Jace

    2010-01-01

    The Internet sensation YouTube (http://www.youtube.com) has become such a force online that it was estimated in 2006 to account for a full tenth of the bandwidth by the entire Internet in the United States (WebProNews, 2007), and to use as much bandwidth in 2007 as the entire Internet had done in 2000 (Carter, 2008). Like many technological tools…

  15. Quizzing Promotes Deeper Acquisition in Middle School Science: Transfer of Quizzed Content to Summative Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwal, Pooja K.; McDaniel, Mark A.; Thomas, Ruthann C.; McDermott, Kathleen B.; Roediger, Henry L., III

    2011-01-01

    The use of summative testing to evaluate students' acquisition, retention, and transfer of instructed material is a fundamental aspect of educational practice and theory. However, a substantial basic literature has established that testing is not a neutral event--testing can also enhance and modify memory (Carpenter & DeLosh, 2006; Hogan &…

  16. A Usability Comparison of PDA-Based Quizzes and Paper-and-Pencil Quizzes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segall, Noa; Doolen, Toni L.; Porter, J. David

    2005-01-01

    In the last few years, schools and universities have incorporated personal digital assistants (PDAs) into their teaching curricula in an attempt to enhance students' learning experience and reduce instructors' workload. One of the most common uses of PDAs in the classroom is as a test administrator. This study compared the usability effectiveness,…

  17. The quiz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-12-01

    The flow field represented in the following figure was shown on the cover of the Symposium book of abstracts. Its interpretation was proposed to the participants as a quiz. The answer to the quiz is given here.

  18. Quiz: Nails

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Quiz: Nails KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Nails Print A A A How much do ... about your nails? Find out by taking this quiz! About KidsHealth Nemours.org Reading BrightStart! Contact Us ...

  19. The Enhancement of Student's Learning in Both Lower-Division and Upper-Division Classes by a Quiz-Based Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faraji, Sepideh

    2012-01-01

    In this study, an investigation into the proper use of weekly quizzes in chemical engineering program has been conducted. The traditional weekly homework assignments were replaced with weekly paper quizzes. Achievement levels of students were compared with those students who learn through traditional homework assignments only. The results show the…

  20. Quiz Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vail, Kathleen

    1999-01-01

    Many schools and other organizations use the quiz show format to showcase their students' academic talents. Except for national championships, most school-level competitions are held in classrooms. "It's Academic," a Washington, D.C., quiz show with 81 competing schools, allows bright kids to be on television--something athletes might…

  1. Sarcoidosis Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Sarcoidosis Quiz Sarcoidosis is a disease of unknown cause that leads ... various organs in the body. The outcome of sarcoidosis varies. The disease leads to organ damage in ...

  2. Random Learning Units Using WIRIS Quizzes in Moodle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mora, Angel; Merida, Enrique; Eixarch, Ramon

    2011-01-01

    Moodle is an extended learning management system for developing learning units, including mathematically-based subjects. A wide variety of material can be developed in Moodle which contains facilities for forums, questionnaires, lessons, tasks, wikis, glossaries and chats. Therefore, the Moodle platform provides a meeting point for those working…

  3. Using Group Quizzes to Engage Students in Learning Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xue, Fei; McGivney-Burelle, Jean

    2012-01-01

    As noted in "Beyond Crossroads" (AMATYC, 2006), for today's students, learning mathematics is participatory and depends on the active involvement of students (p. 53). The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics shares the point of view that the teaching and learning of mathematics should include giving students ample opportunity to think…

  4. Motivating Students to Read with Collaborative Reading Quizzes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Timothy; Eckerson, Todd

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important challenges a teacher faces is motivating his or her students to complete reading assignments and to complete them carefully. After all, if students bring to class a basic understanding of the text up for discussion, much deeper learning can occur than if the teacher is forced to spend time explaining the reading to…

  5. Immune System Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Immune System A A A How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! About KidsHealth ...

  6. Cholesterol IQ Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Cholesterol IQ Quiz Updated:Feb 2,2015 Begin the quiz Cholesterol • Home • About Cholesterol Introduction Good vs. Bad Cholesterol ...

  7. Television Quiz Show Simulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jonnie Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the simulation of four television quiz shows for students in China studying English as a foreign language (EFL). It discusses the adaptation and implementation of television quiz shows and how the students reacted to them.

  8. Quiz Corrections: Improving Learning by Encouraging Students to Reflect on Their Mistakes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Charles; Harper, Kathleen A.

    2009-01-01

    Most introductory physics instructors administer several quizzes and/or exams each term. Instructors are willing to invest the significant time it takes to develop, administer, and grade these assessments because they believe that regular assessments help students learn. However, instructors also believe that students do not make full use of the…

  9. Who Wants to Be a Biologist? An Excellent Quiz Tool for Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Ian J.

    2008-01-01

    Lectures tend to be a largely passive experience with respect to student learning and it has been shown that engaging students in their own learning can increase their understanding. Quizzes have been shown to be a mechanism that improves the student learning experience, and other key factors such as a competitive environment, enjoyment, and a…

  10. Immune System Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Immune System Print A A A How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! About KidsHealth ...

  11. A Quiz on Stereochemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghosh, Abhik

    1987-01-01

    Presents five problems on organic stereochemistry in the form of an open-book quiz meant for senior undergraduates and graduate students in chemistry. Provides some acceptable solutions to the problems. (TW)

  12. Sickle Cell Disease Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Sickle Cell Disease Quiz Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on ... True or False: Only African Americans get sickle cell disease. A True B False 2. True or ...

  13. Folic Acid Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Us Information For... Media Policy Makers Folic Acid Quiz Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ... button beside the question. Good Luck! 1. Folic acid is: A a B vitamin B a form ...

  14. Stay Teen: Games

    MedlinePlus

    ... by You are here Home » Games and Quizzes Games and Quizzes Facebook Twitter Tumblr Shares · 53 quiz ... Year’s Relationship Resolution Be? Shares · 6 Comments · 0 game Block Party Shares · 34 Comments · 0 quiz Should ...

  15. Face the Fats Quiz 2

    MedlinePlus

    Face the Fats Quiz II Do you know your fats by heart? Ready to make informed choices about the foods you eat? From ... some familiar foods. Welcome to Face the Fats Quiz II - and be sure to check out Face ...

  16. Cerebral Palsy (CP) Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Pop Quiz: Cerebral Palsy Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... Sandy is the parent of a child with cerebral palsy and the Board President of Gio’s Garden , a ...

  17. Increasing Student Engagement with Practical Classes through Online Pre-Lab Quizzes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cann, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory practicals classes are an essential component of all science degrees, but are a pinch point because of rising student numbers, rising student expectations and falling student exposure to laboratory work prior to entering higher education. Augmentation of physical laboratory work with online interventions is not new, but as virtual…

  18. An Automated Method to Generate e-Learning Quizzes from Online Language Learner Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Brendan; Yin, Chengjiu; Hirokawa, Sachio; Hashimoto, Kiyota; Tabata, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the entries of Lang-8, which is a Social Networking Site (SNS) site for learning and practicing foreign languages, were analyzed and found to contain similar rates of errors for most error categories reported in previous research. These similarly rated errors were then processed using an algorithm to determine corrections suggested…

  19. Quizzes--A Sin against the Sixth Commandment? In Defense of MReader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robb, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The "Ten Principles Teaching Extensive Reading" has appeared in a number of forms, initially as "The characteristics of an extensive reading approach" in Day and Bamford (1998) and later in an article in Reading in a Foreign Language (2002) but in a slightly different form and ordering. What was originally intended to be a…

  20. Promoting Active Learning through "Pub Quizzes"--A Case Study at the University of Kent

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klappa, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Several teaching approaches with a focus on active learning have been developed in the past, with the aim to encourage the learner to take responsibility for their own learning progress. Most of these approaches augment the learning of material after it was introduced in conventional lectures. The aim of this project was to develop a teaching…

  1. Ecological Validity of the Testing Effect: The Use of Daily Quizzes in Introductory Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batsell, W. Robert, Jr.; Perry, Jennifer L.; Hanley, Elizabeth; Hostetter, Autumn B.

    2017-01-01

    The testing effect is the enhanced retention of learned information by individuals who have studied and completed a test over the material relative to individuals who have only studied the material. Although numerous laboratory studies and simulated classroom studies have provided evidence of the testing effect, data from a natural class setting…

  2. Example of Good Practice of a Learning Environment with a Classroom Response System in a Mechanical Engineering Bachelor Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arteaga, Ines Lopez; Vinken, Esther

    2013-01-01

    Results of a successful pilot study are presented, in which quizzes are introduced in a second year bachelor course for mechanical engineering students. The pilot study course entailed the basic concepts of mechanical vibrations in complex, realistic structures. The quiz is held weekly using a SharePoint application. The purpose of the quizzes is…

  3. Gaps"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of daily quizzes on the performance of college students. Students in an introductory psychology course used their own wireless-enabled devices to take short Internet-based quizzes at the beginning of every class. The quiz items were drawn approximately equally from material covered in the readings and the…

  4. Online Self-testing Resources Prepared by Peer Tutors as a Formative Assessment Tool in Pharmacology Courses.

    PubMed

    Lull, Melinda E; Mathews, Jennifer L

    2016-09-25

    Objective. To assess the effectiveness of optional online quizzes written by peer tutors in a pharmacology course for doctor of pharmacy students. Methods. Online quizzes were written by peer tutors for second-year pharmacy students. Quizzes reflected the material taught during lecture and were in a format similar to that of the examinations. Data related to performance on each quiz and each examination were collected throughout the semester. At the end of the semester, students and peer tutors were surveyed to gather information on the utility and success of the quizzes. Results. Students taking online quizzes performed significantly better on examinations than those who did not take quizzes. In addition, students received higher scores on examinations than when practicing with the quizzes. Surveys suggest that students liked the quizzes and felt they increased their confidence and performance on examinations. Conclusion. The quizzes were beneficial to student performance on examinations as well as student perception of performance and confidence going into the examinations. Quizzes were also beneficial learning experiences for peer tutors.

  5. Online Self-testing Resources Prepared by Peer Tutors as a Formative Assessment Tool in Pharmacology Courses

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess the effectiveness of optional online quizzes written by peer tutors in a pharmacology course for doctor of pharmacy students. Methods. Online quizzes were written by peer tutors for second-year pharmacy students. Quizzes reflected the material taught during lecture and were in a format similar to that of the examinations. Data related to performance on each quiz and each examination were collected throughout the semester. At the end of the semester, students and peer tutors were surveyed to gather information on the utility and success of the quizzes. Results. Students taking online quizzes performed significantly better on examinations than those who did not take quizzes. In addition, students received higher scores on examinations than when practicing with the quizzes. Surveys suggest that students liked the quizzes and felt they increased their confidence and performance on examinations. Conclusion. The quizzes were beneficial to student performance on examinations as well as student perception of performance and confidence going into the examinations. Quizzes were also beneficial learning experiences for peer tutors. PMID:27756932

  6. Online feedback assessments in physiology: effects on students' learning experiences and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Marden, Nicole Y; Ulman, Lesley G; Wilson, Fiona S; Velan, Gary M

    2013-06-01

    Online formative assessments have become increasingly popular; however, formal evidence supporting their educational benefits is limited. This study investigated the impact of online feedback quizzes on the learning experiences and outcomes of undergraduate students enrolled in an introductory physiology course. Four quiz models were tested, which differed in the amount of credit available, the number of attempts permitted, and whether the quizzes were invigilated or unsupervised, timed or untimed, or open or closed book. All quizzes were composed of multiple-choice questions and provided immediate individualized feedback. Summative end-of-course examination marks were analyzed with respect to performance in quizzes and were also compared with examination performance in the year before the quizzes were introduced. Online surveys were conducted to gather students' perceptions regarding the quizzes. The vast majority of students perceived online quizzes as a valuable learning tool. For all quiz models tested, there was a significant relationship between performance in quizzes and end-of-course examination scores. Importantly, students who performed poorly in quizzes were more likely to fail the examination, suggesting that formative online quizzes may be a useful tool to identify students in need of assistance. Of the four quiz models, only one quiz model was associated with a significant increase in mean examination performance. This model had the strongest formative focus, allowing multiple unsupervised and untimed attempts. This study suggests that the format of online formative assessments is critical in achieving the desired impact on student learning. Specifically, such assessments are most effective when they are low stakes.

  7. MISR Where on Earth…?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-11-16

    ... Become a geographical detective and solve the latest mystery quiz from NASA’s MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer) instrument ... 23, at 4:00 p.m. PST. Happy sleuthing!   Take the quiz here:  http://climate.nasa.gov/quizzes/misr_quiz_28 Access MISR ...

  8. Supporting Active Learning in an Undergraduate Geotechnical Engineering Course Using Group-Based Audience Response Systems Quizzes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue, Shane

    2014-01-01

    The use of audience response systems (ARSs) or "clickers" in higher education has increased over the recent years, predominantly owing to their ability to actively engage students, for promoting individual and group learning, and for providing instantaneous feedback to students and teachers. This paper describes how group-based ARS…

  9. Improving Student Learning through the Use of Classroom Quizzes: Three Years of Evidence from the Columbia Middle School Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agarwal, Pooja K.; Roediger, Henry L., III; McDaniel, Mark A.; McDermott, Kathleen B.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined whether a test-enhanced learning program, integrated with daily classroom practices, is effective in a middle school setting. Specifically, they implemented and experimentally evaluated a test-enhanced learning program in 6th-8th grade Social Studies, English, Science, and Spanish classes. Although laboratory…

  10. Developing and Incorporating Instructional Videos and Quizzes as a Blended and Online Learning Component in an Undergraduate Optical Microscopy Curriculum.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tramontano, S.; Gualda, G. A. R.; Claiborne, L. L.; Brame, C.

    2015-12-01

    Optical mineralogy is not an easy skill to master as an undergraduate, but it is crucial for understanding what the Earth is made out of. It is a supplementary and specific skillset typically taught in a microscope lab supporting lessons on crystallography, chemistry and mineral analysis in the classroom. Mastering the basic skills is required for advancement in courses that utilize thin sections in teaching igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rocks. This project asks: Will exposing undergraduate Earth and environmental studies students to optical microscopy figures in videos prior to lab assist in the acquisition of skills required to describe and distinguish Earth materials? This project is conducted in conjunction with the Blended and Online Learning Design (BOLD) Fellowship offered through the Center for Teaching (CFT) at Vanderbilt University. Eight videos and accompanying pre-lab questions were hosted online weekly in a semester-long, undergraduate Earth materials course. The focus of the design of the videos and supporting questions is specifically on microscopy skills rather than on optics concepts, which is taught post-video. The videos were made available prior to a weekly lab with the intent of familiarizing the student with the types of images and information he/she should obtain with the microscope. Multiple choice, formative-style questions accompany the videos in an online-hosted assignment. These questions are graded on basis of completion and are intended to aid in student metacognition. Subjects include students in the Vanderbilt University Earth Materials course and students from the Hanover College Mineralogy course. The effectiveness of the videos is assessed in two parts: (1) Comparing the homework and lab final grades of the students this year with those of the students last year (2) Analysis of a weekly questionnaire. The answers after each week will be compiled and compared. Collecting data from Vanderbilt University students and Hanover College students diversifies the student population for this study, making it more comprehensive and applicable across different types of institutions. We will use our assessment of the effectiveness of the videos this year to modify and improve the videos and their use in future offerings of the courses.

  11. Quizzing and Feedback in Computer-Based and Book-Based Training for Workplace Safety and Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohlman, Diane S.; Eckerman, David A.; Ammerman, Tammara A.; Fercho, Heather L.; Lundeen, Christine A.; Blomquist, Carrie; Anger, W. Kent

    2005-01-01

    Participants received different amounts of information in either a cTRAIN computer-based instruction (CBI) program or in a booklet format, presented before or concurrently with interactive questions about the information. An interactive CBI presentation that required an overt response during training produced equivalent acquisition and retention…

  12. To quiz or not to quiz: Formative tests help detect students at risk of failing the clinical anatomy course.

    PubMed

    Azzi, Alain J; Ramnanan, Christopher J; Smith, Jennifer; Dionne, Éric; Jalali, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Through a modified team-based learning (TBL) in the anatomy pre-clerkship curriculum, formative evaluations are utilized in the University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine to assess and predict students' outcomes on summative examinations. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficiency of formative assessments to predict student's performance on summative examinations, during the first two semesters of medical school. Formative assessments included multiple-choice quizzes (MCQ) for each laboratory session and a practical midterm examination (MIDTERM), while the summative assessment corresponded to the final practical examination (FINAL). A moderate correlation between MCQs and FINAL (r = 0.353 and 0.301, respectively), and strong correlation between MIDTERM and FINAL assessments (r = 0.688 and 0.610, respectively) were found in the first two semesters. The MIDTERM-FINAL correlations were enhanced for students who scored under 61% in the MIDTERM (r = 0.887 and 0.717, respectively). Despite limitations, mostly related to particularities of the used tests, the analysis revealed an efficient method to identify students at risk of failing the FINAL in a TBL-based anatomy program. Future developments include the elaboration of strategies to predict and support those underperforming students.

  13. Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz | Alzheimer's disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease Quiz Past Issues / Fall 2010 Table of Contents How many people in the United States have Alzheimer's disease? as many as 5.1 million as many ...

  14. Nicotine Withdrawal; Measure Your Symptoms (Quiz)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quiz: How Bad is Secondhand Smoke? E-Cigs, Menthol, Dip, & More Know More About Menthol Cigarettes What We Know About E-Cigarettes Quitting ... Quiz: How Bad is Secondhand Smoke? E-Cigs, Menthol, Dip, & More Know More About Menthol Cigarettes What ...

  15. How's Your Self-Esteem? (Quiz)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness How's Your Self-Esteem? (Quiz) KidsHealth > For Teens > How's Your Self-Esteem? (Quiz) A A A We hear a lot about the importance of self-esteem. Self-esteem can influence our happiness and success. ...

  16. The Pedagogic Potential of the Pub Quiz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourner, Tom; Heath, Linda

    2014-01-01

    This article examines an innovative approach to the induction of students on an Education Doctorate programme by exploring the value of the pub quiz as a pedagogic device to support learning. The quiz took relatively little time out of a two-day induction programme and had the dual benefits of providing a stimulating and entertaining way of…

  17. Can You Recognize a Heart Attack? Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Attack? Updated:Sep 16,2016 Begin the quiz Heart Attack • Home • About Heart Attacks Acute Coronary ... in Women “Can you recognize a heart attack?” Quiz • Understand Your Risks to Prevent a Heart Attack ...

  18. How's Your Self-Esteem? (Quiz)

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness How's Your Self-Esteem? (Quiz) KidsHealth > For Teens > How's Your Self-Esteem? (Quiz) Print A A A We hear a lot about the importance of self-esteem. Self-esteem can influence our happiness and success. ...

  19. Measuring and reducing college students' procrastination.

    PubMed

    Perrin, Christopher J; Miller, Neal; Haberlin, Alayna T; Ivy, Jonathan W; Meindl, James N; Neef, Nancy A

    2011-01-01

    We examined college students' procrastination when studying for weekly in-class quizzes. Two schedules of online practice quiz delivery were compared using a multiple baseline design. When online study material was made available noncontingently, students usually procrastinated. When access to additional study material was contingent on completing previous study material, studying was more evenly distributed. Overall, the mean gain in percentage correct scores on weekly in-class quizzes relative to pretests was greater during contingent access than during noncontingent access conditions.

  20. Does Computer-Aided Formative Assessment Improve Learning Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannah, John; James, Alex; Williams, Phillipa

    2014-01-01

    Two first-year engineering mathematics courses used computer-aided assessment (CAA) to provide students with opportunities for formative assessment via a series of weekly quizzes. Most students used the assessment until they achieved very high (>90%) quiz scores. Although there is a positive correlation between these quiz marks and the final…

  1. Validation of the male osteoporosis knowledge quiz.

    PubMed

    Gaines, Jean M; Marx, Katherine A; Narrett, Matthew; Caudill, JoAnn; Landsman, Jeffrey; Parrish, John M

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the six-item Men's Osteoporosis Knowledge Quiz (MOKQ). The MOKQ asks questions about risk factors that are pertinent to men, such as the risk for developing low bone mass related to hormone treatment for prostate cancer and the importance of testosterone for bone mass. A survey was sent to 242 men with a mean age of 83.2 years. The mean number of questions answered correctly in response to the six-item MOKQ was 2.37. Convergent validity was examined by correlating the score achieved on the MOKQ with the score achieved on the total Facts on Osteoporosis Quiz. The Pearson correlation coefficient for the MOKQ and the Facts on Osteoporosis Quiz was r = .76. Reliability was demonstrated by computing a Cronbach's alpha for the MOKQ (r = .72). The MOKQ was found to have adequate reliability and validity in assessing older men's knowledge about osteoporosis.

  2. Smoking Quiz: Do You Need Help to Quit?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stay Healthy Stay Away from Tobacco Smoking Habits Quiz What kind of smoker are you? Answer the ... about your smoking habits. Then click the "Score Quiz" button for a profile of your nicotine dependence ...

  3. MISR Where on Earth…? Mystery Image Quiz #28

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-12-30

    ... title:  MISR Where on Earth…? Mystery Image Quiz #28     View Larger Image   ... Become a geographical detective and solve the latest mystery quiz from NASA’s MISR (Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer) instrument ...

  4. Biochemistry Games: "AZ-Quiz" and "Jeopardy!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rostejnska, Milada; Klimova, Helena

    2011-01-01

    "AZ-Quiz" and "Jeopardy!" are popular television shows and serve as the basis for in-class games designed to support and diversify chemistry instruction at the high school level. Both games were created in Microsoft PowerPoint, which is an easily accessible and controllable instrument that enables the creation of engaging animation. The use of…

  5. Facts on Aging: A Short Quiz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmore, Erdman

    1977-01-01

    A short, factual, and documented quiz is developed and tested which covers the basic facts and frequent misconceptions about aging. Its uses include stimulating discussion, measuring levels of information and anti-aged bias, identifying the most frequent misconceptions, measuring the effects of courses, and measuring changes in public information…

  6. Frequent Collaborative Quiz Taking and Conceptual Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rezaei, Ali R.

    2015-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study reports on the effectiveness of three assessment strategies for students' performance. The primary goal was to determine whether there are any improvements in students' conceptual learning when a frequent (weekly) quiz is used for grading purposes compared to using midterm and final examinations only. Another goal was…

  7. The Monte Carlo Quiz: Encouraging Punctual Completion and Deep Processing of Assigned Readings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernald, Peter S.

    2004-01-01

    The Monte Carlo Quiz (MCQ), a single-item quiz, is so named because chance, with the roll of a die, determines (a) whether the quiz is administered; (b) the specific article, chapter, or section of the assigned reading that the quiz covers; and (c) the particular question that makes up the quiz. The MCQ encourages both punctual completion and deep…

  8. Analytical Thinking, Analytical Action: Using Prelab Video Demonstrations and e-Quizzes to Improve Undergraduate Preparedness for Analytical Chemistry Practical Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolley, Dianne F.; Wilson, Stephen R.; Kelso, Celine; O'Brien, Glennys; Mason, Claire E.

    2016-01-01

    This project utilizes visual and critical thinking approaches to develop a higher-education synergistic prelab training program for a large second-year undergraduate analytical chemistry class, directing more of the cognitive learning to the prelab phase. This enabled students to engage in more analytical thinking prior to engaging in the…

  9. Uncontrolled Web-Based Administration of Surveys on Factual Health-Related Knowledge: A Randomized Study of Untimed Versus Timed Quizzing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Health knowledge and literacy are among the main determinants of health. Assessment of these issues via Web-based surveys is growing continuously. Research has suggested that approximately one-fifth of respondents submit cribbed answers, or cheat, on factual knowledge items, which may lead to measurement error. However, little is known about methods of discouraging cheating in Web-based surveys on health knowledge. Objective This study aimed at exploring the usefulness of imposing a survey time limit to prevent help-seeking and cheating. Methods On the basis of sample size estimation, 94 undergraduate students were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to complete a Web-based survey on nutrition knowledge, with or without a time limit of 15 minutes (30 seconds per item); the topic of nutrition was chosen because of its particular relevance to public health. The questionnaire consisted of two parts. The first was the validated consumer-oriented nutrition knowledge scale (CoNKS) consisting of 20 true/false items; the second was an ad hoc questionnaire (AHQ) containing 10 questions that would be very difficult for people without health care qualifications to answer correctly. It therefore aimed at measuring cribbing and not nutrition knowledge. AHQ items were somewhat encyclopedic and amenable to Web searching, while CoNKS items had more complex wording, so that simple copying/pasting of a question in a search string would not produce an immediate correct answer. Results A total of 72 of the 94 subjects started the survey. Dropout rates were similar in both groups (11%, 4/35 and 14%, 5/37 in the untimed and timed groups, respectively). Most participants completed the survey from portable devices, such as mobile phones and tablets. To complete the survey, participants in the untimed group took a median 2.3 minutes longer than those in the timed group; the effect size was small (Cohen’s r=.29). Subjects in the untimed group scored significantly higher on CoNKS (mean difference of 1.2 points, P=.008) and the effect size was medium (Cohen’s d=0.67). By contrast, no significant between-group difference in AHQ scores was documented. Unexpectedly high AHQ scores were recorded in 23% (7/31) and 19% (6/32) untimed and timed respondents, respectively, very probably owing to “e-cheating”. Conclusions Cribbing answers to health knowledge items in researcher-uncontrolled conditions is likely to lead to overestimation of people’s knowledge; this should be considered during the design and implementation of Web-based surveys. Setting a time limit alone may not completely prevent cheating, as some cheats may be very fast in Web searching. More complex and contextualized wording of items and checking for the “findability” properties of items before implementing a Web-based health knowledge survey may discourage help-seeking, thus reducing measurement error. Studies with larger sample sizes and diverse populations are needed to confirm our results. PMID:25872617

  10. Nurturing Your Newborn: Young Parents' Guide to Baby's First Month. [With Teacher's Guide (Workbook Responses, Quizzes, Answer Keys) and Independent Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Jeanne Warren; Brunelli, Jean

    A teen mother is likely to be out of school for several weeks following childbirth and will probably spend many hours caring for and bonding with her child. Schools may take this opportunity to allow her to earn elective school credit. This document is comprised of a textbook for use in such a course, a study guide, and a teacher's guide. The…

  11. Integrating an Information Literacy Quiz into the Learning Management System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, M. Sara; Booth, Char; Tagge, Natalie; Stone, Sean

    2014-01-01

    The Claremont Colleges Library Instruction Services Department developed a quiz that could be integrated into the consortial learning management software to accompany a local online, open-source information literacy tutorial. The quiz is integrated into individual course pages, allowing students to receive a grade for completion and improving…

  12. Student Achievement in Undergraduate Statistics: The Potential Value of Allowing Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrandino, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    This article details what resulted when I re-designed my undergraduate statistics course to allow failure as a learning strategy and focused on achievement rather than performance. A variety of within and between sample t-tests are utilized to determine the impact of unlimited test and quiz opportunities on student learning on both quizzes and…

  13. The Use of Clickers in Secondary Education Math with Students with High-Incidence Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Jeremy Ryan

    2012-01-01

    A single-subject withdrawal design paired with content quizzes was used to examine the effect of clickers on three dependent variables (student engagement, math quiz scores, and inappropriate behavior) with students diagnosed with high-incidence disabilities in a secondary grade level resource math class and a secondary grade level inclusive math…

  14. Experiences and Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marden, Nicole Y.; Ulman, Leslie G.; Wilson, Fiona S.; Velan, Gary M.

    2013-01-01

    Online formative assessments have become increasingly popular; however, formal evidence supporting their educational benefits is limited. This study investigated the impact of online feedback quizzes on the learning experiences and outcomes of undergraduate students enrolled in an introductory physiology course. Four quiz models were tested, which…

  15. Measuring and Reducing College Students' Procrastination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrin, Christopher J.; Miller, Neal; Haberlin, Alayna T.; Ivy, Jonathan W.; Meindl, James N.; Neef, Nancy A.

    2011-01-01

    We examined college students' procrastination when studying for weekly in-class quizzes. Two schedules of online practice quiz delivery were compared using a multiple baseline design. When online study material was made available noncontingently, students usually procrastinated. When access to additional study material was contingent on completing…

  16. Adding Test Generation to the Teaching Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce-Lockhart, Michael; Norvell, Theodore; Crescenzi, Pierluigi

    2009-01-01

    We propose an extension of the Teaching Machine project, called Quiz Generator, that allows instructors to produce assessment quizzes in the field of algorithm and data structures quite easily. This extension makes use of visualization techniques and is based on new features of the Teaching Machine that allow third-party visualizers to be added as…

  17. Orthopedic Health: Osteoarthritis— What You Should Know (quiz)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Orthopedic Health Osteoarthritis— What You Should Know Past Issues / Spring 2009 ... Javascript on. How much do you know about osteoarthritis, its causes, and its therapies? Take this quiz ...

  18. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASDs): Alcohol Use Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: About CDC.gov . FASD Homepage Facts Secondary Conditions Videos Alcohol Use in Pregnancy Questions & Answers Quiz Alcohol Screening & Brief Intervention Diagnosis Treatments Data & Statistics Alcohol Consumption Rates Research & Tracking Monitoring Alcohol ...

  19. Implementation and student perceptions of e-assessment in a Chemical Engineering module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorensen, Eva

    2013-05-01

    This paper describes work carried out at the Department of Chemical Engineering at UCL into the use of e-assessment in a second year module and, in particular, the student perceptions of this mode of assessment. Three quizzes were implemented in Moodle, the first two as formative assessment and the final quiz as summative assessment. The results were very encouraging and practically all students engaged with the process. An online survey was delivered to all students after the module, which showed that the students felt that e-assessment added value to their learning and they would like to see it implemented in other modules. The quizzes were intended to be mainly beneficial to the weaker students as it gave them an opportunity to go over key aspects of the material in their own time. Interestingly, the stronger students were even more in favour of e-learning than the weaker students, for whom the quizzes were originally designed.

  20. Interactive learning in oral and maxillofacial radiology

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Rumpa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The use of electronic tools in teaching is growing rapidly in all fields, and there are many options to choose from. We present one such platform, Learning Catalytics™ (LC) (Pearson, New York, NY, USA), which we utilized in our oral and maxillofacial radiology course for second-year dental students. Materials and Methods The aim of our study was to assess the correlation between students' performance on course exams and self-assessment LC quizzes. The performance of 354 predoctoral dental students from 2 consecutive classes on the course exams and LC quizzes was assessed to identify correlations using the Spearman rank correlation test. The first class was given in-class LC quizzes that were graded for accuracy. The second class was given out-of-class quizzes that were treated as online self-assessment exercises. The grading in the self-assessment exercises was for participation only and not accuracy. All quizzes were scheduled 1-2 weeks before the course examinations. Results A positive but weak correlation was found between the overall quiz scores and exam scores when the two classes were combined (P<0.0001). A positive but weak correlation was likewise found between students' performance on exams and on in-class LC quizzes (class of 2016) (P<0.0001) as well as on exams and online LC quizzes (class of 2017) (P<0.0001). Conclusion It is not just the introduction of technological tools that impacts learning, but also their use in enabling an interactive learning environment. The LC platform provides an excellent technological tool for enhancing learning by improving bidirectional communication in a learning environment. PMID:27672617

  1. Embedded Formative E-Assessment: Who Benefits, Who Falters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Glenberg, Mina C.

    2010-01-01

    This research examined the impact of formative quizzes on e-learning designed to teach volunteers how to tutor struggling readers. Three research questions were addressed: (1) Do embedded quizzes facilitate learning of e-content? (2) Does the announcement of upcoming quizzes affect learning? (3) Does prior knowledge interact with quizzing and…

  2. Captain Power and Power Quiz: Two New Energy Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niedermeyer, Fred C.; Roberson, Ernest J.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the development and the testing of two elementary school programs on energy education: "Captain Power" for Grades 2 or 3 and "Power Quiz" for Grades 5 or 6. The programs were tested in classrooms and revised to the point where they will reliably produce high levels of achievement of specified learning outcomes.…

  3. Stimulating Student Interest in Physiology: The Intermedical School Physiology Quiz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Hwee-Ming

    2010-01-01

    The Intermedical School Physiology Quiz (IMSPQ) was initiated in 2003 during the author's last sabbatical from the University of Malaya. At this inaugural event, there were just seven competing teams from Malaysian medical schools. The challenge trophy for the IMSPQ is named in honor of Prof. A. Raman, who was the first Malaysian Professor of…

  4. Recent Court Decisions: A Quiz for APGA Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbutt, Lou C.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a short quiz for American Personnel and Guidance members to test their current legal knowledge concerning abortions for minors, drug searches, and student conduct. Correct answers are given and discussed, and legal precedents are cited. Suggests ways for counselors to keep abreast of current laws. (Author/JAC)

  5. The Buddy Quiz: A Collaborative Assessment and a Representation of the Scientific Enterprise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Ian M.

    2012-01-01

    The form and function of a collaborative assessment known as a "Buddy Quiz" is presented. The assessment is conducted in three successive phases over a contiguous 45-60 min class period. A portion of each quiz is completed in collaboration with one or two peers and a portion is completed without collaboration. The quiz is primarily…

  6. Example of good practice of a learning environment with a classroom response system in a mechanical engineering bachelor course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Arteaga, Ines; Vinken, Esther

    2013-12-01

    Results of a successful pilot study are presented, in which quizzes are introduced in a second year bachelor course for mechanical engineering students. The pilot study course entailed the basic concepts of mechanical vibrations in complex, realistic structures. The quiz is held weekly using a SharePoint application. The purpose of the quizzes is to repeat important course material, give instantaneous feedback (i.e. formative assessment), stimulate peer instruction and, as a consequence, increase the students' comprehension of the basic concepts taught in the course so that their deeper understanding of the subject matter improves. Students can earn half a point bonus, on a scale from 0 to 10, on top of their exam mark if they correctly answer 55% of all the quiz questions. The efficacy of the pilot study is determined by investigating the percentage of students that pass the course on their first attempt, i.e. the first time pass rate, and asking students for feedback through questionnaires. The first time pass rate of the students in the pilot study groups has, on average, increased significantly in comparison to groups in which the quizzes are not performed. Students indicated that the feedback from the quizzes helps them to identify gaps in their knowledge. Therefore, the pilot study is considered effective.

  7. The Merits of Giving an Extra Credit Quiz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carroll, Ryall

    2014-01-01

    In the past, Ryall Carroll struggled to get students to arrive on time, read the material in advance of the class, and to start class on topic. In an attempt to address these issues, he started implementing an extra-credit two-question quiz at the beginning of every class, hoping it would provide a small incentive for students to at least come on…

  8. Collaborative quiz-based teaching strategy in histology.

    PubMed

    Li, Enzhong; Guo, Yuping

    2014-01-01

    In the present article we introduce a teaching strategy used in a histology course with first-year students in the first term of their studies at the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine at Huanghuai University, China. Forty students were randomly divided into two sections (n=20/section). Students in the first section were taught using a collaborative quiz-based strategy (the experimental section), and students in the second section were taught using a traditional teaching strategy (the control section). To assess achievement of learning, a final examination was carried out at the end of the course. To determine students' attitudes toward the teaching strategy used, a questionnaire was conducted at the end of the term. Results showed that students preferred the collaborative quiz-based teaching strategy. The final-examination scores of students in the experimental section were significantly higher than those of students in the control section (p<.05), which indicates that the collaborative quiz-based strategy results in better performance on examinations compared to the traditional histology course.

  9. American society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2014: transplantation.

    PubMed

    Josephson, Michelle A; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2015-05-07

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. Once again, the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories along with single best answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, program directors of United States nephrology training programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by experts. They compared their answers in real time using audience response devices with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the audience responses and the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for the readers of CJASN. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  10. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2015: Glomerular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Bomback, Andrew S; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2016-05-06

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the annual Kidney Week meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. Once again, the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and kidney transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories, along with single-best-answer questions, were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, training program directors of United States nephrology fellowship programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions through an Internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by the experts. They compared their answers in real time using their cell phones with a special app with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology readers. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  11. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2013: transplantation.

    PubMed

    Josephson, Michelle A; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2014-07-01

    The nephrology quiz and questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. As in past years, the conference hall was overflowing with interested audience members. Topics covered by expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories along with single best answer questions were prepared by a panel of experts. Before the meeting, program directors of United States nephrology training programs answered questions through an Internet-based questionnaire. A new addition to the nephrology quiz and questionnaire was participation in the questionnaire by nephrology fellows. To review the process, members of the audience test their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by experts. Their answers are compared in real time using audience response devices with the answers of nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers are then briefly discussed after the audience responds, and the results of the questionnaire are displayed. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for the readers of CJASN. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  12. American Society of Nephrology quiz and questionnaire 2014: glomerular diseases.

    PubMed

    Bomback, Andrew S; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2015-04-07

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. Once again, the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories along with single best answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, program directors of United States nephrology training programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions that were prepared and discussed by the experts. They compared their answers in real time using audience response devices with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the audience responses, and the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for the readers of CJASN. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  13. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2015: Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Josephson, Michelle A; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2016-06-06

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. Once again, the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and kidney transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories along with single best answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, training program directors of US nephrology fellowship programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by the experts. They compared their answers in real time using their cell phones with a special application with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this highly educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology readers. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  14. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2014: RRT.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, Rajnish; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2015-06-05

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire (NQ&Q) remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Once again, the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, end-stage renal disease/dialysis, and transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories along with single best answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Prior to the meeting, program directors of U.S. nephrology training programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by experts. They compared their answers in real time using audience response devices with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors (TPDs). The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the audience responses and the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for the readers of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  15. Examination of the Psychometric Properties of the Knowledge of Aging for Social Work Quiz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakao, Kayoko C.; Damron-Rodriguez, JoAnn; Lawrance, Frances P.; Volland, Patricia J.

    2013-01-01

    Using graduate social work students' data ("n" = 481) in the Hartford Partnership Program for Aging Education (HPPAE) in the United States, the study examined psychometric properties of the Knowledge of Aging for Social Work Quiz (KASW), a revision of the Facts on Aging Quiz, to evaluate biopsychosocial knowledge relevant to social work.…

  16. Effects of Guided Notes versus Completed Notes during Lectures on College Students' Quiz Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neef, Nancy A.; McCord, Brandon E.; Ferreri, Summer J.

    2006-01-01

    We compared the effects of guided lecture notes versus completed lecture notes on pre- to postlecture improvements in quiz performance across two sections of a college course. The results of a counterbalanced multielement design did not reveal consistent differences between the two note formats on students' mean quiz scores. However, fewer errors…

  17. Web-Based Quiz-Game-Like Formative Assessment: Development and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Tzu-Hua

    2008-01-01

    This research aims to develop a multiple-choice Web-based quiz-game-like formative assessment system, named GAM-WATA. The unique design of "Ask-Hint Strategy" turns the Web-based formative assessment into an online quiz game. "Ask-Hint Strategy" is composed of "Prune Strategy" and "Call-in Strategy".…

  18. Problem-Solving Learning of Physics through the Creation of Quiz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosoda, Hiroki

    The creation of homemade quiz on physical phenomena has been utilized for a subject in the general education of Ehime University in Japan from 2001. The quiz is made from not only questions but also the intuition answers of students, so it can mislead a person to the wrong choices by the misunderstanding and the misconception obtained through one's life. The method of learning through the creation of quiz excites the curiosity of student, and encourages him/her in learning of physics. By the purpose of making the wrong choices of quiz, the students can talk easily and consider carefully about their misunderstood things. Then, the teacher may play an audience in the class, so the creation of quiz is easy and important.

  19. How Effective are Your Mentoring Relationships? Mentoring Quiz for Residents.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Nagy, Paul; Chhabra, Avneesh; Lee, Cindy S

    Mentoring is an essential part of a resident's career development. It plays an important role in nurturing, and sustaining success along the career path of a young physician. Mentoring is a long-term goal that is development-driven rather than performance-driven. Although specific learning goals may be used as a basis, the focus of mentoring may also include self-confidence, self-perception, and work-life balance. A number of residency programs have implemented mentoring programs in their institutions. This article discusses the importance of mentoring, illustrates "do's and don'ts" for mentees and demonstrates how to choose the ideal mentor. Finally, a "mentoring quiz" is designed to evaluate your mentoring relationship.

  20. Does computer-aided formative assessment improve learning outcomes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, John; James, Alex; Williams, Phillipa

    2014-02-01

    Two first-year engineering mathematics courses used computer-aided assessment (CAA) to provide students with opportunities for formative assessment via a series of weekly quizzes. Most students used the assessment until they achieved very high (>90%) quiz scores. Although there is a positive correlation between these quiz marks and the final exam marks, spending time on the CAA component of the course was negatively correlated with final exam performance. Students across the ability spectrum reduced their time commitment to CAA in their second semester, with weaker students achieving lower quiz totals, but with more able students' quiz marks hardly affected. Despite this lower quiz performance, the weaker students still improved their final exam marks in the second semester.

  1. Quiz: What's the buzz about salt? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Too Much Salt Quiz: What's the buzz about salt? Past Issues / Spring - Summer 2010 Table of Contents The body needs how much salt per day: ¼ teaspoon ½ teaspoon 1 teaspoon ...

  2. Quiz: Does Your Blood Pressure Pass the Test? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Special Section: Healthy Blood Pressure Quiz: Does Your Blood Pressure Pass the Test? Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of Contents Blood pressure changes throughout the day. It is highest while ...

  3. Special Section: Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM):Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Special Section CAM Quiz on Complementary and Alternative Medicine Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... low back pain. True False Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) includes: Meditation Chiropractic Use of natural products, ...

  4. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2012: glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Fervenza, Fernando C; Glassock, Richard J; Bleyer, Anthony J

    2013-08-01

    Presentation of the Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire (NQQ) has become an annual tradition at the meetings of the American Society of Nephrology. It is a very popular session, judged by consistently large attendance. Members of the audience test their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by experts. They can also compare their answers in real time, using audience response devices, to those of program directors of nephrology training programs in the United States, acquired through an Internet-based questionnaire. The topic presented here is GN. Cases representing this category, along with single best answer questions, were prepared by a panel of experts (Drs. Fervenza, Glassock, and Bleyer). The correct and incorrect answers were then briefly discussed after the audience responses and the results of the questionnaire were displayed. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for a larger audience--that of the readers of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Have fun.

  5. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2012: Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Daniel C; Glassock, Richard J; Bleyer, Anthony J

    2013-07-01

    Presentation of the Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire has become an annual tradition at the meetings of the American Society of Nephrology. It is a very popular session, as judged by consistently large attendance. Members of the audience test their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by experts. They can also compare their answers in real time, using audience response devices, to those of program directors of nephrology training programs in the United States, acquired through an Internet-based questionnaire. Topics presented here include fluid and electrolyte disorders, transplantation, and ESRD and dialysis. Cases representing each of these categories, along with single-best-answer questions, were prepared by a panel of experts (Drs. Palmer, Fervenza, Brennan, and Mehrotra, respectively). The correct and incorrect answers were briefly discussed after the audience responses, and the results of the questionnaire were displayed. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for a larger audience--that of the readers of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Have fun.

  6. American Society of Nephrology quiz and questionnaire 2013: glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Fervenza, Fernando C; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire (NQ&Q) remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. As in past years, the conference hall of the 2013 meeting was overflowing with interested audience members. Topics covered by expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories, along with single best answer questions, were prepared by a panel of experts. Before the meeting, program directors of United States nephrology training programs answered questions through an Internet-based questionnaire. A new addition to the NQ&Q was participation in the questionnaire by nephrology fellows. To review the process, members of the audience test their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by experts. Their answers are compared in real time using audience response devices with the answers of nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers are then briefly discussed after the audience responses and the results of the questionnaire are displayed. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for CJASN readers. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  7. Perfusion scintigraphy in the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism: a self-assessment quiz

    SciTech Connect

    Egermayer, P.; Rutland, M.D.

    1982-07-01

    The authors present ten case reports with lung scintigrams in a format suitable for a self-assessment quiz. The first seven cases include perfusion scintigrams and the final diagnosis was established by postmortem examination. The last three studies include ventilation images (using nebulized /sup 99m/Tc tin colloid) and the final diagnosis established by nonradionuclide studies. The authors believe this quiz demonstrates the necessity for ventilation studies when using lung scintigraphy for a positive diagnosis.

  8. To Tell the Tooth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oral Health Made Easy Sesame Street Activity Sheets + Games and Quizzes Visit the Dentist with Marty To ... Resources Smile Smarts Dental Health Curriculum MouthHealthy Kids > Games and Quizzes > To Tell the Tooth To Tell ...

  9. GeneQuiz: A workbench for sequence analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Scharf, M.; Schneider, R.; Casari, G.; Bork, P.

    1994-12-31

    We present the prototype of a software system, called GeneQuiz, for large-scale biological sequence analysis. The system was designed to meet the needs that arise in computational sequence analysis and our past experience with the analysis of 171 protein sequences of yeast chromosome III. We explain the cognitive challenges associated with this particular research activity and present our model of the sequence analysis process. The prototype system consists of two parts: (i) the database update and search system (driven by perl programs and rdb, a simple relational database engine also written in perl) and (ii) the visualization and browsing system (developed under C++/ET++). The principal design requirement for the first part was the complete automation of all repetitive actions: database up- dates, efficient sequence similarity searches and sampling of results in a uniform fashion. The user is then presented with {open_quotes}hit-lists{close_quotes} that summarize the results from heterogeneous database searches. The expert`s primary task now simply becomes the further analysis of the candidate entries, where the problem is to extract adequate information about functional characteristics of the query protein rapidly. This second task is tremendously accelerated by a simple combination of the heterogeneous output into uniform relational tables and the provision of browsing mechanisms that give access to database records, sequence entries and alignment views. Indexing of molecular sequence databases provides fast retrieval of individual entries with the use of unique identifiers as well as browsing through databases using pre-existing cross-references. The presentation here covers an overview of the architecture of the system prototype and our experiences on its applicability in sequence analysis.

  10. Effects of a test taking strategy on postsecondary computer assisted chemistry assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manco, Sharon Ann

    Metacognitive test taking strategies have proven advantageous in improving content-based test scores in a wide variety of disciplines and age/grade levels using traditional paper-and-pencil tests. However, despite the increase in computer assisted assessment (CAA), little research has examined whether these test taking strategies are effective for computer assisted tests. Research was conducted to determine if learning a proven test taking strategy would improve the online quiz scores of six university students in an introductory chemistry course intended for science, technology, engineering and math majors. Participants completed six to ten chemistry quizzes prior to intervention---learning the test taking strategy---and four to eight chemistry quizzes after intervention. Results indicated that, while students learned the strategy, it had little effect on their online chemistry quiz scores. Additionally, at the end of the semester, participants completed a satisfaction survey indicating general satisfaction with having learned the test taking strategy and generalization to other courses and types of tests. Furthermore, results suggest that adaptations to the on-line delivery method of the quizzes and to the test taking strategies may improve the robustness of the effect. Due to the increased use of computer assisted assessment, additional research is warranted to determine appropriate test taking strategies for online tests.

  11. DITEC User Priority Designation (UPD) Algorithm: An Approach to Prioritizing Technology Evaluations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    exams, a final exam, five quizzes, ten homework assignments, and attendance grades. It seems natural that the quizzes should have less impact on a...student’s overall grade than the exams, while homework may still have a different impact than the quizzes or the exams. For every UPD Profile P there

  12. Using Higher Order Thinking Questions to Foster Critical Thinking: A Classroom Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Jerrold E.; Francis, Alisha L.

    2012-01-01

    To determine if quizzes containing higher order thinking questions are related to critical thinking and test performance when utilised in conjunction with an immersion approach to instruction and effort-based grading, sections of an "Educational Psychology" course were assigned to one of three quizzing conditions. Quizzes contained…

  13. Where on Earth...? MISR Mystery Image Quiz #6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Here's another chance to play geographical detective! This Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) image covers an area of about 298 kilometers x 358 kilometers, and was captured by the instrument's vertical-viewing (nadir) camera on December 27, 2001. Use any reference materials you like and answer the following five questions: The large lagoon in the image is named for a particular type of bird. Name the bird. Note the sediment plume emanating from the southern end of the lagoon. Sailors in the 16th century imagined this outlet to be the mouth of a large river. What did they call the river? A series of wave-like points and curls form 'cusps' on the inner shores of the lagoon. Which ONE of the following is most responsible for the formation of these cusps? Violent storm impacts on erosion and accretion Wind and tide-driven sediment transport and circulation Tectonic folding associated with nearby mountain ridges Bathymetric effects of dredging operations True or false: Changes in regional precipitation associated with large scale atmospheric circulation patterns have no effect on the salinity of the lagoon's water. Which one of these is NOT distributed within the area covered by this image? Ruppia maritima Chelonia mydas Tapirus bairdii Microcystis aeruginosa E-mail your answers, name (initials are acceptable if you prefer), and your hometown by Tuesday, February 19, 2002 to suggestions@mail-misr.jpl.nasa.gov. Answers will be published on the MISR web site in conjunction with the next weekly image release. The names and home towns of respondents who answer all questions correctly by the deadline will also be published in the order responses were received. The first 3 people on this list who are not affiliated with NASA, JPL, or MISR and who did not win a prize in the last quiz will be sent a print of the image. A new 'Where on Earth...?' mystery appears as the MISR 'image of the week' approximately once per month. A new image of the week is released every

  14. Instrumented and interactive limb models for biomechanics education: An assessment of efficacy and engagement.

    PubMed

    Sulas, Romina; Liem, Nicholas; Kark, Lauren

    2015-08-01

    Custom anatomical and instrumented models of the human arm and leg were designed and manufactured to complement the teaching of introductory biomechanics subjects. The models were assessed for engagement and efficacy via questionnaires and unscheduled pop-quizzes, respectively. Questionnaire results demonstrated the ability of the models to provide assistance with understanding and visualising the fundamental principles of biomechanics. Additionally, the majority of students who participated also stated that the models enhanced their motivation to learn and stimulated their interest in biomechanics. Results from the pop-quizzes were ambiguous about the efficacy of the arm and leg models; only one group (out of five) showed significant improvements in pop-quiz scores following exposure to the models. Significance was not reached in the remaining groups. Further assessment is required to expose the true efficacy of the models.

  15. Interteach Preparation: A Comparison of the Effects of Answering versus Generating Study Guide Questions on Quiz Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannella-Malone, Helen I.; Axe, Judah B.; Parker, Edward D.

    2009-01-01

    Within an interteaching context, an alternating treatments design was used to compare the effects of answering versus writing study guide questions on quiz performance in a 10-week methods course in special education. Results indicated quiz performance was not substantially influenced by the type of preparation, but that writing questions led to…

  16. Students' Perception of Supplementary, Online Activities for Japanese Language Learning: Groupwork, Quiz and Discussion Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Keri; Iida, Sumiko

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the frequency of use and the reasons for non-use of the online component of a course developed in "Blackboard 9", one popular learning management system (LMS) in tertiary education. The study particularly focuses on the three tools in the LMS: Groupwork tool, Downloadable quiz and Discussion forum. These tools were…

  17. Misconceptions Highlighted among Medical Students in the Annual International Intermedical School Physiology Quiz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Hwee-Ming; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi

    2012-01-01

    The annual Intermedical School Physiology Quiz (IMSPQ), initiated in 2003, is now an event that attracts a unique, large gathering of selected medical students from medical schools across the globe. The 8th IMSPQ, in 2010, hosted by the Department of Physiology, University of Malaya, in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, had 200 students representing 41…

  18. The Effectiveness Evaluation among Different Player-Matching Mechanisms in a Multi-Player Quiz Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Fu-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate whether different player-matching mechanisms in educational multi-player online games (MOGs) can affect students' learning performance, enjoyment perception and gaming behaviors. Based on the multi-player quiz game, TRIS-Q, developed by Tsai, Tsai and Lin (2015) using a free player-matching (FPM) mechanism, the same…

  19. Older Adults' Level of Knowledge about Old Age Using the Facts of Aging Quiz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Arleen J.

    The Facts on Aging Quiz (FAQ) has been used in different studies to assess the level of knowledge about old age. It contains 25 factual statements concerning basic physical, mental, and social facts and the most common misconceptions about aging. One purpose of this study was to identify the most frequent misconceptions in a group of older adults…

  20. Enhancing Self-Directed Learning through a Content Quiz Group Learning Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warburton, Natalie; Volet, Simone

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the findings of an empirical study that examined the learning value of a novel group assessment activity aimed at promoting first-year students' development of basic self-directed learning skills required for university study. A content quiz group learning assignment was designed to enhance students' capacity to ask…

  1. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2015: Electrolytes and Acid-Base Disorders.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Mitchell H; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2016-04-07

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the annual Kidney Week meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. During the 2015 meeting the conference hall was once again overflowing with eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the experts included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, end-stage renal disease and dialysis, and kidney transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories together with single-best-answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, training program directors of nephrology fellowship programs and nephrology fellows in the United States answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on the same series of case-oriented questions in a quiz. The audience compared their answers in real time using a cell-phone app containing the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The results of the online questionnaire were displayed, and then the quiz answers were discussed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this highly educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces selected content of educational value for theClinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrologyreaders. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  2. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2015: ESRD/RRT.

    PubMed

    Lok, Charmaine E; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2016-07-07

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. During the 2015 meeting, the conference hall was once again overflowing with eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the experts included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD and dialysis, and kidney transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories together with single best answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, training program directors of nephrology fellowship programs and nephrology fellows in the United States answered the questions through an internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on the same series of case-oriented questions in a quiz. The audience compared their answers in real time using a cellphone application containing the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The results of the online questionnaire were displayed, and then, the quiz answers were discussed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this highly educational session. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces selected content of educational value for the readers of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  3. Formative Assessment: The One-Minute Paper vs. the Daily Quiz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwan, Felix

    2011-01-01

    Regular assessment is a vital part of effective teaching and learning. For this, the "one-minute paper" has been popular among faculty. While many teachers who have used it find huge benefits from it, there are also several weaknesses of this tool that are commonly reported by its users. This paper suggests the "daily quiz" as…

  4. The Use of a Daily Quiz "TOPday" as Supportive Learning Method for Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maessen, Martijn F. H.; Fluit, Cornelia R. M. G.; Holla, Micha; Drost, Gea; Vorstenbosch, Marc A. T. M.; de Waal Malefijt, Maarten C.; Kooloos, Jan G. M.; Tanck, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Medical students consider anatomy, neurology, and traumatology as difficult study topics. A recent study showed that the daily quiz "Two Opportunities to Practice per day (TOPday)" positively supported biomedical students in analyzing and solving biomechanical problems. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of…

  5. What Happened Next? Making and Using an Interactive DVD Quiz Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sluman, Jonny

    2013-01-01

    In this article Jonny Sluman describes how he adapted an interactive DVD quiz game at a Christmas family get-together into an exciting, creative science activity to teach his students. The rounds included: a "quick fire" question round, a "what happened next" round, a music round, and a "spot the difference" round.…

  6. Sustaining Learning through Assessment: An Evaluation of the Value of a Weekly Class Quiz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haigh, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Commencing each class session with a class quiz, which emphasizes the previous week's work and is supported by immediate feedback, encourages students to revise their notes ahead of the session, undertake more reading and keep pace with course progression. It reduces the necessity for any spoken review of the previous week's work, provides…

  7. Effects of the contingency for homework submission on homework submission and quiz performance in a college course.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Carolyn S; Hemmes, Nancy S

    2005-01-01

    Effects of the contingency for submission of homework assignments on the probability of assignment submission and on quiz grades were assessed in an undergraduate psychology course. Under an alternating treatments design, each student was assigned to a points condition for 5 of 10 quiz-related homework assignments corresponding to textbook chapters. Points were available for homework submission under this condition; points were not available under the no-points condition. The group-mean percentage of homework assignments submitted and quiz grades were higher for all chapters under the points condition than in the no-points condition. These findings, which were replicated in Experiment 2, demonstrate that homework submission was not maintained when the only consequences were instructor-provided feedback and expectation of improved quiz performance.

  8. Information literacy skills retention over the first professional year of pharmacy school.

    PubMed

    Chiarella, Deborah; Khadem, Tina M; Brown, Jack E; Wrobel, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    The authors aimed to determine if first-professional-year pharmacy students retain library literature search skills throughout the school year. Students (n = 61 consented) were given an identical seven-item quiz on basic library search skills prior to library instruction in the fall semester and at the end of the spring semester. There was no significant difference between median scores on the two quizzes, nor were any significant differences noted in subgroup analyses. Search competency may be retained to a higher degree if library instruction is moved later in the pharmacy curriculum when literature search skills are used more often.

  9. Teaching Is Learning--Maximum Incentive, Minimum Discipline in Student Groups Teaching General Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benvenuto, Mark

    2001-02-01

    A novel form of teaching and test scoring has been developed, in which student group work and test performance are linked to bonus points on weekly quizzes. A class of 71 students was divided into 12 groups of five or six students. The groups taught sections of a general chemistry class, and their test grades were adjusted upward on the basis of the scores achieved for each quiz or test. The scoring technique involves the possibility of only upward adjustments, to maximize positive reinforcement for good test performance. Work requirements resulting from this technique, for both the students and the faculty member, are discussed.

  10. Pregnancy Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... recommended that pregnant women only need to consume 300 extra calories per day. The extra nutrients needed ... a precious new life. While you only need 300 extra calories each day, the kind of food ...

  11. Sleep Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size Accessible Search Form Search the NHLBI, use radio buttons below to select whole site or Disease ... life. Opening the car window or turning the radio up will keep the drowsy driver awake. True ...

  12. Antibiotics Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... National Activities Get Smart: Know When Antibiotics Work Strategies and Plans Related CDC Education Programs Global Activities Measuring Outpatient Antibiotic Prescribing Tracking Antibiotic-Resistant ...

  13. COPD Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... COPD is: A. allergies B. cigarette smoke C. air pollution Question 4. Common signs and symptoms of COPD ... smoke B. avoid other lung irritants, such as air pollution, chemical fumes, and dust C. follow your treatment ...

  14. Sleep Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... 8. False is correct. The human body's biological clock programs each person to feel sleepy during the ... during the day are constantly fighting their biological clocks. This puts them at risk of error and ...

  15. Asthma Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... least likely to trigger asthma? Strenuous exercise A common cold Reading the newspaper Cat dander Tobacco smoke Reading ... individuals. Viral and bacterial infections, such as the common cold and sinusitis, and continuous exercise are also common ...

  16. American Society of Nephrology quiz and questionnaire 2014: acid-base and electrolyte disorders.

    PubMed

    Rosner, Mitchell H; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2015-03-06

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the Annual Kidney Week Meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. Once again, in 2014 the conference hall was overflowing with audience members and eager quiz participants. Topics covered by the expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and transplantation. Complex cases from each of these categories along with single-best-answer questions were prepared and submitted by the panel of experts. Before the meeting, program directors of United States nephrology training programs and nephrology fellows answered the questions using an Internet-based questionnaire. During the live session, members of the audience tested their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by the experts. They compared their answers in real time using audience response devices with the answers of the nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers were then discussed after the audience responses and the results of the questionnaire were displayed. As always, the audience, lecturers, and moderators enjoyed this educational session. This article recapitulates the acid-base and electrolyte disorders portion of the session and reproduces its educational value for the readers of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  17. Small-group learning in an upper-level university biology class enhances academic performance and student attitudes toward group work.

    PubMed

    Gaudet, Andrew D; Ramer, Leanne M; Nakonechny, Joanne; Cragg, Jacquelyn J; Ramer, Matt S

    2010-12-29

    To improve science learning, science educators' teaching tools need to address two major criteria: teaching practice should mirror our current understanding of the learning process; and science teaching should reflect scientific practice. We designed a small-group learning (SGL) model for a fourth year university neurobiology course using these criteria and studied student achievement and attitude in five course sections encompassing the transition from individual work-based to SGL course design. All students completed daily quizzes/assignments involving analysis of scientific data and the development of scientific models. Students in individual work-based (Individualistic) sections usually worked independently on these assignments, whereas SGL students completed assignments in permanent groups of six. SGL students had significantly higher final exam grades than Individualistic students. The transition to the SGL model was marked by a notable increase in 10th percentile exam grade (Individualistic: 47.5%; Initial SGL: 60%; Refined SGL: 65%), suggesting SGL enhanced achievement among the least prepared students. We also studied student achievement on paired quizzes: quizzes were first completed individually and submitted, and then completed as a group and submitted. The group quiz grade was higher than the individual quiz grade of the highest achiever in each group over the term. All students--even term high achievers--could benefit from the SGL environment. Additionally, entrance and exit surveys demonstrated student attitudes toward SGL were more positive at the end of the Refined SGL course. We assert that SGL is uniquely-positioned to promote effective learning in the science classroom.

  18. The Effect of Response Cards on Participation and Weekly Quiz Scores of University Students Enrolled in Introductory Psychology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clayton, Michael C.; Woodard, Camille

    2007-01-01

    Increasing student participation in college classrooms is an overlooked yet socially valid endeavor. The present study attempted to increase student participation, accuracy of responding, and weekly quiz scores, by incorporating student response-cards. Measures of social validity were also addressed. One hundred twenty university students in two…

  19. Medical student web-based formative assessment tool for renal pathology.

    PubMed

    Bijol, Vanesa; Byrne-Dugan, Cathryn J; Hoenig, Melanie P

    2015-01-01

    Background Web-based formative assessment tools have become widely recognized in medical education as valuable resources for self-directed learning. Objectives To explore the educational value of formative assessment using online quizzes for kidney pathology learning in our renal pathophysiology course. Methods Students were given unrestricted and optional access to quizzes. Performance on quizzed and non-quizzed materials of those who used ('quizzers') and did not use the tool ('non-quizzers') was compared. Frequency of tool usage was analyzed and satisfaction surveys were utilized at the end of the course. Results In total, 82.6% of the students used quizzes. The greatest usage was observed on the day before the final exam. Students repeated interactive and more challenging quizzes more often. Average means between final exam scores for quizzed and unrelated materials were almost equal for 'quizzers' and 'non-quizzers', but 'quizzers' performed statistically better than 'non-quizzers' on both, quizzed (p=0.001) and non-quizzed (p=0.024) topics. In total, 89% of surveyed students thought quizzes improved their learning experience in this course. Conclusions Our new computer-assisted learning tool is popular, and although its use can predict the final exam outcome, it does not provide strong evidence for direct improvement in academic performance. Students who chose to use quizzes did well on all aspects of the final exam and most commonly used quizzes to practice for final exam. Our efforts to revitalize the course material and promote learning by adding interactive online formative assessments improved students' learning experience overall.

  20. Effect of personal response systems on student perception and academic performance in courses in a health sciences curriculum.

    PubMed

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A; Finn, Kevin E; Campisi, Jay

    2011-09-01

    To increase student engagement, active participation, and performance, personal response systems (clickers) were incorporated into six lecture-based sections of four required courses within the Health Sciences Department major curriculum: freshman-level Anatomy and Physiology I and II, junior-level Exercise Physiology, and senior-level Human Pathophysiology. Clickers were used to gather anonymous student responses to questions posed within the class period after individual thought and peer discussion. Students (n = 293, 88% of students completing the courses) completed a perceptual survey on clicker effectiveness inserted into the Student Assessment of Learning Gains online instrument. Across courses and years, students uniformly rated several dimensions of clicker use as providing good to great gain in engaging them in active learning, increasing participation and involvement during class, maintaining attention, applying material immediately, providing feedback concerning their understanding, and offering an anonymous format for participation. Within these four sections, quiz grades were compared between clicker and nonclicker years. Significant increases in pre- and posttest scores were seen in Exercise Physiology in clicker years and on some, but not all material, in Anatomy and Physiology I and II based on content quizzes. Human Pathophysiology results were unexpected, with higher quiz scores in the nonclicker year. The results support the hypothesis of increased engagement with clicker use. The hypothesis of increased student performance was not consistently supported. Increased performance was seen in Exercise Physiology. In Anatomy and Physiology I and II, performance improved on some content quizzes. In Human Pathophysiology, performance did not improve with clickers.

  1. A comparison of Web page and slide/tape for instruction in periapical and panoramic radiographic anatomy.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, J B; Platin, E

    2000-04-01

    Self-guided slide/tape (ST) and web page (WP) instruction in normal radiographic anatomy of periapical and panoramic images is compared using objective test performance and subjective preference of freshman dental students. A class of seventy-four students was divided into a group studying anatomy in periapical images using WP and a group studying similar ST material. In a modified cross-over design the groups switched presentation technologies to learn anatomy in panoramic images. Students completed self-administered on-line quizzes covering WP materials and conventional quizzes for ST material. Students also completed a voluntary survey. Mean quiz performance identifying matched anatomic features in PA (n = 26) and panoramic images (n = 35) was excellent (96.9%) and not different between image types (p = 0.12) or presentation technologies (p = 0.81). Students preferred WP for accessibility, ease of use, freedom of navigation, and image quality (p < .01). Student comfort level with the quiz formats of the two technologies was not different (p = 0.11). Students experienced a higher rate of mechanical and logistical problems with ST than with WP technology. While 71 percent of the students preferred WP technology, this preference appears to be related to ease of use and facilitation of flexible learning styles rather than improved didactic performance.

  2. Engaging Non-science Students in Large Classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, S. E.

    2008-12-01

    Most students in introductory geoscience courses are not headed toward careers as scientists. One high- enrollment science course may be a student's only opportunity to engage with science from a scientific perspective. Given that earth systems science is immensely relevant to human society today, engaging students in these large enrollment courses is a crucial and golden opportunity. Two engagement techniques were used in a large class for non-science students called "Earth and the Solar System": (1) short on-line quizzes prior to each class, based on reading material (an aspect of Just-in-Time- Teaching), and (2) in-class activities that required students to address some important concept and submit a written response. On-line pre-class quizzes provided an incentive for students to grapple with course material on an ongoing basis, and prepare them for each class. Questions submitted by students during the quizzes revealed common confusions and common interests that could be addressed by the instructor in a timely way. Students who regularly kept up with the quizzes scored significantly higher on high stakes exams than those who did not (p-value <0.01). Students who participated in class activities more than 75% of the time scored on average 9-10% higher on high stakes exams than those who participated less frequently (p-value <0.001). On exam questions that addressed the same concept as was addressed in an activity, those who participated in that particular activity scored higher on the conceptually matching exam questions. There is some indication that completing the activities was more effective (produced a greater gain in exam score) for female than for male students. While this was not a controlled experiment (students self-selected their participation levels), surveys of students regarding the effectiveness of pre-class quizzes and in-class activities show that they regarded both as valuable learning experiences and favored keeping both aspects in the course

  3. Prototype of a Questionnaire and Quiz System for Supporting Increase of Health Awareness During Wait Time in Dispensing Pharmacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Takeshi; Chen, Poa-Min; Ozaki, Shinya; Ideguchi, Naoko; Miyaki, Tomoko; Nanbu, Keiko; Ikeda, Keiko

    For quit-smoking clinic and its campaign, there was a need for pharmacists to investigate pediatric patient's parent consciousness to tobacco harm utilizing wait time in a pediatric dispensing pharmacy. In this research, we developed the questionnaire and quiz total system using the tablet for user interface, in which people can easily answer the questionnaire/quiz and quickly see the total results on the spot in order to enhance their consciousness to the tobacco harm. The system also provides their tobacco dependence level based on the questionnaire results and some advice for their health and dietary habits due to the tobacco dependence level. From a field trial with one hundred four examinees in the pediatric dispensing pharmacy, the user interface was useful compared to conventional questionnaire form. The system could enhance their consciousness to tobacco harm and make their beneficial use of waiting time in dispensing pharmacy. Some interesting suggestions for improvement and new services were also obtained.

  4. American Society of Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire 2013: electrolyte and acid-base.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F; Perazella, Mark A; Choi, Michael J

    2014-06-06

    The Nephrology Quiz and Questionnaire (NQ&Q) remains an extremely popular session for attendees of the annual meeting of the American Society of Nephrology. As in past years, the conference hall was overflowing with interested audience members. Topics covered by expert discussants included electrolyte and acid-base disorders, glomerular disease, ESRD/dialysis, and transplantation. Complex cases representing each of these categories along with single-best-answer questions were prepared by a panel of experts. Prior to the meeting, program directors of United States nephrology training programs answered questions through an Internet-based questionnaire. A new addition to the NQ&Q was participation in the questionnaire by nephrology fellows. To review the process, members of the audience test their knowledge and judgment on a series of case-oriented questions prepared and discussed by experts. Their answers are compared in real time using audience response devices with the answers of nephrology fellows and training program directors. The correct and incorrect answers are then briefly discussed after the audience responses, and the results of the questionnaire are displayed. This article recapitulates the session and reproduces its educational value for the readers of CJASN. Enjoy the clinical cases and expert discussions.

  5. Evaluating Juvenile Detainees' Miranda Misconceptions: The Discriminant Validity of the Juvenile Miranda Quiz.

    PubMed

    Sharf, Allyson J; Rogers, Richard; Williams, Margot M; Drogin, Eric Y

    2016-08-08

    Most juvenile arrestees in custodial settings waive their Miranda rights almost immediately, and many then provide incriminating statements, if not outright confessions. Forensic practitioners are then asked to provide retrospective determinations regarding whether these waivers were effectuated knowingly, voluntarily, and intelligently. At present, the forensic assessment instrument for juvenile Miranda issues consists of the Miranda Rights Comprehension Instruments (MRCI)-which as its name implies-focuses mostly on Miranda comprehension with a de-emphasis of Miranda reasoning. In partially addressing this gap, the current study investigated the clinical utility of the Juvenile Miranda Quiz (JMQ) for evaluating key Miranda misconceptions, a critically important component of Miranda reasoning. Using data from 201 juvenile detainees, we evaluated the JMQ's discriminability with regards to cognitive variables and MRCI scales. Many moderate effect sizes in the predicted direction were found for the JMQ Primary Total and Juvenile Total scores. Finally, these detainees were tested using a mock crime scenario with a representative Miranda warning plus a brief interrogation to evaluate whether they would waive their rights, and if so, whether they would confess. Using Miranda measures to predict problematic outcomes (i.e., impaired waivers followed by confessions), the JMQ Juvenile Total proved the most successful. These findings are discussed within the context of the "intelligent" prong of Miranda waivers. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. E-Assessment Adaptation at a Military Vocational College: Student Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cigdem, Harun; Oncu, Semiral

    2015-01-01

    This survey study examines an assessment methodology through e-quizzes administered at a military vocational college and subsequent student perceptions in spring 2013 at the "Computer Networks" course. A total of 30 Computer Technologies and 261 Electronic and Communication Technologies students took three e-quizzes. Data were gathered…

  7. Psychology: Teacher Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stark, Rebecca

    This supplement provides teachers with tests, quizzes, answers to questions in the text, and general teaching information for using the student text, "Psychology," by Rebecca Stark. Quizzes included are on the topics of human development; the nervous system; the brain; cognitive development; sensation and perception; conditioning; learning;…

  8. Why Cramming Doesn't Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, David

    2007-01-01

    Most college instructors probably are not about to start giving the daily quizzes that some researchers recommend to improve learning, so students might want to try testing themselves when they study on their own. But there's a catch: When people study with flashcards, by far the most common method of self-quizzing, they're notoriously bad at…

  9. Increasing Reading Compliance and Metacognitive Strategies in Border Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culver, Tiffany F.

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to increase reading compliance and active reading strategies, quizzes and reading guides were given to 100 participants in four psychology courses. Each participant was given four weeks of reading quizzes and four weeks of reading guides. Participants consisted of students (freshman through senior level) from two colleges along the…

  10. Timed Online Tests: Do Students Perform Better with More Time?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portolese, Laura; Krause, Jackie; Bonner, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This article focuses on timed tests and specifically on whether increased time enhances test performance. Three courses during the Winter 2015 term (quizzes n = 573) and three courses over the Spring 2015 term (quizzes n = 600) comprised this sample. Students were given the same tests, but the experimental group (Spring 2015) was given 50% more…

  11. A Comparison of Concrete and Formal Science Instruction upon Science Achievement and Reasoning Ability of Sixth Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saunders, Walter L.; Shepardson, Daniel

    This study examined the effect of formal and concrete instruction upon science achievement and intellectual development of sixth grade students. Formal instruction, which emphasized oral and written language, included lecture, discussion, oral quizzes, written assignments, reading assignments, films, film strips, written tests, and quizzes.…

  12. Assessments That Promote Collaborative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watanabe, Maika; Evans, Laura

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses assessments that can be used to help encourage a collaborative classroom community, in which students help one another learn mathematics. The authors describe participation quizzes and explanation quizzes as assessment tools that encourage students to work together, share specific questions on challenging mathematics…

  13. Incorporating Active Learning Techniques into a Genetics Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, W. Theodore; Jabot, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    We revised a sophomore-level genetics class to more actively engage the students in their learning. The students worked in groups on quizzes using the Immediate Feedback Assessment Technique (IF-AT) and active-learning projects. The IF-AT quizzes allowed students to discuss key concepts in small groups and learn the correct answers in class. The…

  14. Effects of Primer Podcasts on Stimulating Learning from Lectures: How Do Students Engage?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popova, Anguelina; Kirschner, Paul A.; Joiner, Richard

    2014-01-01

    A number of factors can influence learning from lectures such as students' prior knowledge, their motivation, the instructional design, the lecturer and so forth. Instructional aid techniques such as preparing class notes, giving quizzes (either planned or spot quizzes) and the like can be used to maximize learning. This study uses two…

  15. Nitrogen Cycle Ninja, A Teaching Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raun, William R.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Assesses the effectiveness of using pop quizzes and rewards to improve student retention of the nitrogen cycle. Students able to diagram the N cycle on pop quizzes were rewarded with special cards that included the N cycle. These cards could then be used on subsequent tests in place of memory alone. Six of 11 students tested three months later…

  16. Use of the virtual ventilator, a screen-based computer simulation, to teach the principles of mechanical ventilation.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Robert; Henderson, Tom; Brown, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Examination scores from 109 students enrolled in the professional veterinary program at Washington State University were evaluated to determine the effectiveness and utility of the Virtual Ventilator computer simulation for teaching the principles of mechanical ventilation in an anesthesia course. Students were randomly assigned to either a live-animal mechanical ventilation laboratory (LIVE-1st) or a computer laboratory using the mechanical ventilation simulation (SIM-1st) in week 1. During week 2, students in the LIVE-1st group participated in the ventilation simulation while students in the SIM-1st group participated in the live-animal laboratory. Student knowledge was evaluated using two similar written quizzes administered following each laboratory. Student opinions concerning the value of the simulation were assessed using an online survey. Differences in quiz scores within and between groups were compared using t-tests while survey results were tabulated. A p value of less than 0.05 was considered significant. Within the LIVE-1st group, scores for the second quiz, which was taken after the students had completed the simulation exercise, were significantly higher than those obtained from the first quiz. Accordingly, the Virtual Ventilator simulation was at least equivalent to the live-animal laboratory in the ability to present information that was subsequently tested for on the quizzes. Students in the SIM-1st group reported that use of the simulation prior to a live-animal ventilation laboratory enhanced their understanding of and ability to provide mechanical ventilation to anesthetized patients. The Virtual Ventilator simulation appears to be a useful and well-received teaching tool.

  17. Assessing Health Practitioner Knowledge of Appropriate Psychotropic Medication Use in Nursing Homes: Validation of the Older Age Psychotropic Quiz.

    PubMed

    Brown, Donnamay Tegan; Westbury, Juanita Louise

    2016-07-05

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ARTICLE INSTRUCTIONS XX contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded once you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. To obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "Assessing Health Practitioner Knowledge of Appropriate Psychotropic Medication Use in Nursing Homes: Validation of the Older Age Psychotropic Quiz" found on pages XX-XX, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website listed above to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name; contact information; and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until MONTH XX, 20XX. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. ACTIVITY OBJECTIVES 1. XXX 2. XXX DISCLOSURE STATEMENT

  18. Flipped classroom model improves graduate student performance in cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal physiology.

    PubMed

    Tune, Johnathan D; Sturek, Michael; Basile, David P

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a traditional lecture-based curriculum versus a modified "flipped classroom" curriculum of cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal physiology delivered to first-year graduate students. Students in both courses were provided the same notes and recorded lectures. Students in the modified flipped classroom were required to watch the prerecorded lectures before class and then attend class, where they received a quiz or homework covering material in each lecture (valued at 25% of the final grade) followed by a question and answer/problem-solving period. In the traditional curriculum, attending lectures was optional and there were no quizzes. Evaluation of effectiveness and student performance was achieved by having students in both courses take the same multiple-choice exams. Within a comparable group of graduate students, participants in the flipped course scored significantly higher (P ≤ 0.05) on the cardiovascular, respiratory, and weighted cumulative sections by an average of >12 percentage points. Exam averages for students in the flipped course also tended to be higher on the renal section by ∼11 percentage points (P = 0.06). Based on our experience and responses obtained in blinded student surveys, we propose that the use of homework and in-class quizzes were critical motivating factors that likely contributed to the increase in student exam performance. Taken together, our findings support that the flipped classroom model is a highly effective means in which to disseminate key physiological concepts to graduate students.

  19. Evaluation of Web-Based Interactive Instruction in Intraoral and Panoramic Radiographic Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Farkhondeh, Alireza; Geist, James R

    2015-07-01

    The objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of Web-based interactive modules in the instruction of dental hygiene students on intraoral and panoramic radiographic landmarks. The experimental group studied these landmarks as presented on interactive Web-based modules instead of in classroom presentations. The control group (the previous year's class) received instruction in the traditional classroom format. The outcomes measures included quizzes, examinations and an in-class project. Independent samples t-tests compared the scores of the two groups. A survey was administered to the experimental group to determine their perceptions of instruction with the modules. There was no significant difference in scores between the two groups on the project (p = .926) or the intraoral quiz and exam scores (p = .1 22), but the experimental group scored significantly lower on the panoramic outcomes (p = .039). Only 26% of the students preferred computer-assisted instruction to classroom instruction. The narration and interactive quizzes in the intraoral module may have contributed to the similar performance of the experimental and control groups, while their absence may have adversely affected the effectiveness of the panoramic module.

  20. Increasing Active Student Responding in a University Applied Behavior Analysis Course: The Effect of Daily Assessment and Response Cards on End of Week Quiz Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malanga, Paul R.; Sweeney, William J.

    2008-01-01

    The study compared the effects of daily assessment and response cards on average weekly quiz scores in an introduction to applied behavior analysis course. An alternating treatments design (Kazdin 1982, "Single-case research designs." New York: Oxford University Press; Cooper et al. 2007, "Applied behavior analysis." Upper Saddle River:…

  1. What do students do when asked to diagnose their mistakes? Does it help them? I. An atypical quiz context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerushalmi, Edit; Cohen, Elisheva; Mason, Andrew; Singh, Chandralekha

    2012-12-01

    “Self-diagnosis tasks” are aimed at fostering diagnostic behavior by explicitly requiring students to present diagnosis as part of the activity of reviewing their problem solutions. Recitation groups in an introductory physics class of about 200 college students were distributed into a control group and three intervention groups in which different levels of guidance were provided for performing self-diagnosis activities. We investigated how well students self-diagnose their solutions in the different interventions and examined the effect of students’ self-diagnosis on subsequent problem solving in the different intervention groups. We found that in the context of an atypical quiz, while external support altered the self-diagnosis performance, the self-diagnosis score was not correlated with subsequent problem-solving performance on a transfer problem. We discuss possible explanations for our findings.

  2. Effects of reducing scaffolding in an undergraduate electronics lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halstead, Evan

    2016-07-01

    Design and scientific investigation are recognized as key components of undergraduate physics laboratory curricula. In light of this, many successful lab programs have been developed to train students to develop these abilities, and students in these programs have been shown to exhibit a higher transfer rate of scientific abilities to new situations. This paper describes data from students in an electronics class for physics majors, in which steps were removed from traditional "cookbook" lab guides in order to give students the opportunity to design circuits. Post-lab quizzes were given to investigate how this later affected the students' ability to determine the function of circuits they hadn't seen before. Results are compared with post-lab quiz results from students who were given complete explicit procedures, and no statistically significant difference between the two groups is found. Possible explanations for the null effect and recommended future research directions are provided.

  3. Learning the Constellations: From Junior High to Undergraduate Descriptive Astronomy Class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Denise C.; Hintz, Eric G.; Hintz, Maureen; Lawler, Jeannette; Jones, Michael; Bench, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    As part of two separate studies we have examined the ability of students to learn and remember a group of constellations, bright stars, and deep sky objects. For a group of junior high students we tested their knowledge of only the constellations by giving them a 'constellation quiz' without any instruction. We then provided the students with a lab session, and retested. We also tested a large number of undergraduate students in our descriptive astronomy classes, but in this case there were the same 30 constellations, 17 bright stars, and 3 deep sky objects. The undergraduate students were tested in a number of ways: 1) pre-testing without instruction, 2) self-reporting of knowledge, 3) normal constellation quizzes as part of the class, and 4) retesting students from previous semesters. This provided us with a set of baseline measurements, allowed us to track the learning curve, and test retention of the material. We will present our early analysis of the data.

  4. Integration of Video-Based Demonstrations to Prepare Students for the Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadelson, Louis S.; Scaggs, Jonathan; Sheffield, Colin; McDougal, Owen M.

    2015-08-01

    Consistent, high-quality introductions to organic chemistry laboratory techniques effectively and efficiently support student learning in the organic chemistry laboratory. In this work, we developed and deployed a series of instructional videos to communicate core laboratory techniques and concepts. Using a quasi-experimental design, we tested the videos in five traditional laboratory experiments by integrating them with the standard pre-laboratory student preparation presentations and instructor demonstrations. We assessed the influence of the videos on student laboratory knowledge and performance, using sections of students who did not view the videos as the control. Our analysis of pre-quizzes revealed the control group had equivalent scores to the treatment group, while the post-quiz results show consistently greater learning gains for the treatment group. Additionally, the students who watched the videos as part of their pre-laboratory instruction completed their experiments in less time.

  5. Transfer of Learning through Gender and Ethnicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calder, Austin M.; Ashbaugh, Emily L.

    2005-09-01

    This brief report compared the performance by gender and ethnicity of 6720 students in an introductory course for the life science majors: Physics 7A and 7B. We compared performance between ethnicities and genders using Z scores taken by quarter. We also performed a binary analysis with achievement of a high grade in 7B as the dependent variable. The results indicate that on average males score higher than females in every ethnic group, and that the only statistically significant ethnic differences in our binary analysis were White and African American, The model indicated that being female reduced odds of achieving a high grade in 7B by one half. Odds were reduced by more than half for African Americans and increased by three halves for White. We also compared gender equity over 18 quizzes. Equity favored quiz questions that are more open ended; this is consistent with some earlier findings in studies of gender equity in introductory physics courses.

  6. Using confidence-based marking in a laboratory setting: A tool for student self-assessment and learning

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Deborah A.; Burke, Jeanmarie R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Confidence-based marking (CBM), developed by A. R. Gardner-Medwin et al., has been used for many years in the medical school setting as an assessment tool. Our study evaluates the use of CBM in the neuroanatomy laboratory setting, and its effectiveness as a tool for student self-assessment and learning. Methods The subjects were 224 students enrolled in Neuroscience I over a period of four trimesters. Regional neuroanatomy multiple choice question (MCQ) quizzes were administered the week following topic presentation in the laboratory. A total of six quizzes was administered during the trimester and the MCQ was paired with a confidence question, and the paired questions were scored using a three-level CBM scoring scheme. Results Spearman's rho correlation coefficients indicated that the number of correct answers was correlated highly with the CBM score (high, medium, low) for each topic. The χ2 analysis within each neuroscience topic detected that the distribution of students into low, medium, and high confidence levels was a function of number of correct answers on the quiz (p < .05). Pairwise comparisons of quiz performance with CBM score as the covariate detected that the student's level of understanding of course content was greatest for information related to spinal cord and medulla, and least for information related to midbrain and cerebrum. Conclusion CBM is a reliable strategy for challenging students to think discriminately-based on their knowledge of material. The three-level CBM scoring scheme was a valid tool to assess student learning of core neuroanatomic topics regarding structure and function. PMID:23519005

  7. Digital assist: A comparison of two note-taking methods (traditional vs. digital pen) for students with emotional behavioral disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rody, Carlotta A.

    High school biology classes traditionally follow a lecture format to disseminate content and new terminology. With the inclusive practices of No Child Left Behind, the Common Core State Standards, and end-of-course exam requirement for high school diplomas, classes include a large range of achievement levels and abilities. Teachers assume, often incorrectly, that students come to class prepared to listen and take notes. In a standard diploma, high school biology class in a separate school for students with emotional and behavioral disorders, five students participated in a single-subject, alternating treatment design study that compared the use of regular pens and digital pens to take notes during 21 lecture sessions. Behavior measures were threefold between the two interventions: (a) quantity of notes taken per minute during lectures, (b) quantity of notes or notations taken during review pauses, and (c) percent of correct responses on the daily comprehension quizzes. The study's data indicated that two students were inclined to take more lecture notes when using the digital pen. Two students took more notes with the regular pen. One student demonstrated no difference in her performance with either pen type. Both female students took more notes per minute, on average, than the three males regardless of pen type. During the review pause, three of the five students only added notes or notations to their notes when using the regular pen. The remaining two students did not add to their notes. Quiz scores differed in favor of the regular pen. All five participants earned higher scores on quizzes given during regular pen sessions. However, the differences were minor, and recommendations are made for specific training in note-taking, the pause strategy, and digital pen fluency which may produce different results for both note-taking and quiz scores.

  8. What do students do when asked to diagnose their mistakes? Does it help them? II. A more typical quiz context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yerushalmi, Edit; Cohen, Elisheva; Mason, Andrew; Singh, Chandralekha

    2012-12-01

    “Self-diagnosis tasks” aim at fostering students’ learning in an examination context by requiring students to present diagnoses of their solutions to quiz problems. We examined the relationship between students’ learning from self-diagnosis and the typicality of the problem situation. Four recitation groups in an introductory physics class (˜200 students) were divided into a control group and three intervention groups in which different levels of guidance were provided to aid students in their performance of self-diagnosis activities. The self-diagnosis task was administered twice, first in an atypical problem situation and then in a typical one. In a companion paper we reported our findings in the context of an atypical problem situation. Here we report our findings in the context of a typical problem situation and discuss the effect of problem typicality on students’ self-diagnosis performance and subsequent success in solving transfer problems. We show that the self-diagnosis score was correlated with subsequent problem-solving performance only in the context of a typical problem situation, and only when textbooks and notebooks were the sole means of guidance available to the students for assisting them with diagnosis.

  9. Vygotskian-based grouping: Utilizing the zone of proximal development in a chemistry laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggle, Justin David

    A large portion of any science major's curriculum utilizes laboratories. Many of these laboratories now incorporate cooperative learning as a result of studies attesting to its beneficial effects. However, little attention has been given to the composition of those groups, specifically at post-secondary education institutes. We have therefore investigated the effectiveness of a grouping technique based on the theories of L. S. Vygotsky and his construct of the zone of proximal development (ZPD) in the context of an undergraduate general chemistry laboratory course at The University of Texas at Austin. All students were responsible for the completion of a short, 11 question, pre-quiz. Depending on their respective classes, students were grouped either according to the ZPD-scheme, based on pre-quiz scores, or randomly, regardless of pre-quiz score. Achievement of the students in each of the two groups was compared in order to determine grouping effectiveness. This study was carried out for 3 semesters (spring 2003, spring 2004, and fall 2004) under two different instructors. Overall, results indicate that grouping according to the ZPD-scheme revealed higher student achievement versus random grouping. Moreover, students scoring low and average on pre-quizzes benefited far more from this grouping method than higher scoring students. The protocol for implementing this grouping scheme is straightforward and is discussed in detail.

  10. [Psychometric properties of the spanish version of the "Barriers to Being Active Quiz" among university students in Colombia].

    PubMed

    Rubio-Henao, Rubén Fernando; Correa, Jorge Enrique; Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson

    2015-04-01

    Objetivo: El cuestionario Barriers to Being Active Quiz (BBAQ), indaga las barreras para ser físicamente activo. El cuestionario fue traducido al español por el mismo equipo que desarrolló la versión inglésa original, pero carece de estudios de validez en la versión española. El objetivo de esta investigación fue evaluar las propiedades psicométricas del BBAQ (en la versión completa de 21 ítems), centrándose en la fiabilidad y validez. Material y métodos: Un total de 2.634 (1.462 mujeres y 1.172 varones; 18-30 años de edad) estudiantes universitarios completaron el cuestionario BBAQ-21. El alfa de Crombach se estimó como indicador de consistencia interna. El coeficiente de correlación intra-clase (CCI) y el grado de acuerdo se calcularon para evaluar la estabilidad temporal con un periodo de 7 días entre ambas administraciones como estimadores de la reproducibilidad. Se aplicó un análisis factorial exploratorio (AFE) y confirmatorio (AFC) para analizar la validez del BBAQ-21 ítems. Resultados: El BBAQ-21 mostró valores de un alfa de Cronbach entre 0,812 y 0,844 y un CCI entre el 0,46 y 0,87. El porcentaje de acuerdo por todos los conceptos individuales varió de 45 a 80%. El AFE determinó cuatro factores que explicaron el 52,90% de la varianza y el AFC mostró moderadas cargas factoriales. Conclusiones: Los resultados obtenidos en este cuestionario avalan la utilización de este instrumento con este tipo de muestra, desde el punto de vista de la fiabilidad y validez. El BBAQ-21 está disponible para evaluar las barreras para la actividad física en América Latina.

  11. Allergic Rhinitis Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... The most common causes of allergic conjunctivitis (eye allergy) are seasonal allergens such as pollen and mold spores. Indoor ... may seem drastic, but it often helps ease seasonal symptoms. True False False. It's hard to escape allergy triggers. Many forms of pollen (especially grasses) and ...

  12. Pet Allergy Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... term treatment for pet allergies. True False False: Allergy shots therapy (immunotherapy) has a proven track record as an effective form of long term treatment. Talk to your allergist / immunologist about whether this treatment approach is right for you. ... Utility navigation Donate ...

  13. Teen Diabetes Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Teens with diabetes should not eat at fast food restaurants. True False Teens get type 2 diabetes because: They have certain genes They are overweight They have a family member who has diabetes They are American Indian, Alaska Native, African American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian American, ...

  14. Blood Pressure Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... high blood pressure can lead to… stroke. kidney failure. heart attack and heart failure. all of the above. ... high blood pressure can lead to stroke, kidney failure, heart attack and heart failure A is the correct ...

  15. Water Safety Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Espanol Local Red Cross ( ) Change Chapter Edit Zip Code Edit Zip Code Shop the Red Cross Store Toggle Navigation Menu ... Espanol Local Red Cross ( ) Change Chapter Edit Zip Code Edit Zip Code Shop the Red Cross Store ...

  16. Teen Diabetes Quiz Answers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the food you eat and is needed to fuel our bodies. Glucose is also stored in our liver and muscles. Your blood always has some glucose in it because your body needs glucose for energy. But having too much glucose in your blood ...

  17. Credit Card Quiz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marks, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students design credit cards and discover for themselves the mathematical realities of buying on credit. Employs multiple-intelligence theory to increase the chance that all students will be reached. (YDS)

  18. Skin Allergy Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... time. Some common medications that can cause skin allergy include penicillin, sulfa drugs, barbiturates and anticonvulsants just to mention a few. Some of the symptoms from drug allergies might be hives, skin rash, itchy skin or ...

  19. Teen Diabetes Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... energy. You don't have to play a sport or go to a gym. Ask your family members and friends to do something fun with you—take a walk after dinner instead of watching TV and playing video games, or put on a CD and dance. Answer: B You can eat at fast-food ...

  20. Secondhand Smoke Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... secondhand smoke? a) Exhaled toxic cloud b) Environmental tobacco smoke c) Passive smoke d) Involuntary smoking 6. Which of the following chemicals does secondhand smoke contain? a) Ammonia b) Arsenic c) Cyanide d) Formaldehyde e) All of the above f) ...

  1. Teaching and learning "on the run": ready-to-use toolkits in busy clinical settings.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Walter, Garry

    2010-06-01

    Clinicians should strongly consider using toolkits in their workplaces with students on clinical placement. These toolkits could include brief quizzes, crossword puzzles, vignettes, role-playing, storytelling, or reflective activities to engage students in context-specific, collaborative learning.

  2. Successful Application of Active Learning Techniques to Introductory Microbiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Elizabeth A.

    2001-01-01

    Points out the low student achievement in microbiology courses and presents an active learning method applied in an introductory microbiology course which features daily quizzes, cooperative learning activities, and group projects. (Contains 30 references.) (YDS)

  3. Fads versus Reality: Knowing Your Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, William G.

    2000-01-01

    Indicates the responsibilities of teachers in understanding the student learning process and focuses on some tools that identify student learning styles such as quizzes, the Myers Briggs Type Indicator, and Multiple Intelligences. (YDS)

  4. Back Problem: Kyphosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... People, Places & Things That Help Feelings Q&A Movies & More Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En ... in the Operating Room? How the Body Works: Movies Scoliosis Your Bones Contact Us Print Resources Send ...

  5. Teaching Is Learning--Maximum Incentive, Minimum Discipline in Student Groups Teaching General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benvenuto, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Presents a teaching approach that uses student group teaching wherein students teach, are rewarded for good performance and benefit from other students' academic achievement during quizzes. Discusses the scope and limitations of this approach. Includes 15 references. (YDS)

  6. E3 Sustainable Manufacturing Curriculum

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    A short E3 course containing three modules on Environmental Sustainability; Lean Manufacturing and Pollution Prevention; and Energy and Carbon. Each module includes slides, a facilitator's guide with handouts, activities, quizzes, and facilitator's notes.

  7. Welcome from Library Director Donald A.B. Lindberg, M.D. | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn Javascript on. Welcome to the NIH MedlinePlus Magazine. Past Issues / Spring 2013 Table of Contents Donald ... about their efforts to cure disease. Lastly, the magazine's lively graphics, fun quizzes and practical tips have ...

  8. What's Mad Cow Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Video: Am I Normal? ( ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? What's Mad Cow Disease? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Mad ...

  9. What Happens in the Operating Room? (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Video: Am I Normal? ( ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? KidsHealth > For Kids > ...

  10. What Is a Coma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Video: Am I Normal? ( ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? What Is a Coma? KidsHealth > For Kids > What Is ...

  11. Fine tuning the teaching methods used for second year university mathematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, L. L.; Thiel, D. V.; Searles, Debra J.

    2012-01-01

    Second year mathematics is a compulsory course for all students enrolled in engineering and mathematics programmes at the university, and it is taken by approximately 120 students each year. The pass rate of the course had been below expectations in the past years. In order to improve the predicament, quizzes which provided a mark incentive were introduced in 2009 as a pilot study. The pass rate was improved compared to the previous year. Hence, quizzes were added to the course assessment in 2010. This article compares and reports the outcome to the 2009 and 2010 quizzes based on the students' feedback and results at the end of the course. From the data of the surveys, students welcomed the regular quizzes, although the pass rate still did not meet the expectation.

  12. Types of Ulcerative Colitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... IBD Learn about IBD treatments, diet, complications, and quality of life through videos, interactive quizzes, and more on the I'll Be Determined disease management website. Find a Clinical Trial Be an active ...

  13. Histology on the World Wide Web: A Digest of Resources for Students and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cotter, John R.

    1997-01-01

    Provides a list of 37 World Wide Web sites that are devoted to instruction in histology and include electronic manuals, syllabi, atlases, image galleries, and quizzes. Reviews the topics, content, and highlights of these Web sites. (DDR)

  14. School of the Month: Northgate High School, Walnut Creek, California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, Art

    1983-01-01

    Describes solutions to burgeoning student interest in computers instituted at Northgate High School, including a computer club and independent study in computers. Purpose, membership, scheduling, meetings and activities, courseware, worksheets, and quizzes are discussed. (EJS)

  15. Pearly Penile Papules

    MedlinePlus

    Young Men's Health http://youngmenshealthsite.org/guides/pearly-penile-papules/ ≡ Menu Ask Us Health Guides Quizzes Parents About Us Donate General Health Sexual Health Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness ...

  16. Corticosteroids

    MedlinePlus

    ... IBD Learn about IBD treatments, diet, complications, and quality of life through videos, interactive quizzes, and more ... disease and ulcerative colitis, and to improve the quality of life of those affected. Get Involved Attend ...

  17. Retention of Information as a Function of Lesson Design for Middle School Studies of Wetlands in New Jersey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsekian, A.; Cimiluca, C.; Gates, A. E.; Calderon, I.

    2010-12-01

    Considering the breadth of innovative teaching strategies available, it is helpful to identify which will be best suited for a particular subject. With students that have a variety of interests, it is important to engage as many as possible in the lab activity, especially those who might not identify science as their preferred interest. Here we test the retention of information by middle school students after a problem-based learning (PBL) style lesson compared with an investigation where the students were given no role-playing problem. Both lessons were designed around wetlands in New Jersey: the first being a pond-edge ecosystem in a park near the middle school in Newark, NJ that the students are familiar with and the second being small, isolated peat bogs in the Pinelands of southern New Jersey that are the subject of ongoing scientific research. Days after both hands-on lessons, the students were given short, carefully designed multiple choice quizzes that tested the retention of knowledge about each of the learning objectives set forth. Results of the quizzes are nearly normally distributed, indicating a similar average performance. A higher number of students preformed better on the problem-based learning post-quiz suggesting the inclusion of a role playing scenario is useful for engaging the most students in hands-on wetlands laboratory experiments. Future work should test the retention of this type of information over time and explore other teaching strategies. We also present new ideas for an inexpensive hands-on lesson as implemented for the peat bog wetlands example that introduces basic soil science concepts to middle school and high school students.

  18. Distance Learning Materials for Elementary Astronomy with Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castle, K. G.

    2004-05-01

    I have developed a distance learning astronomy course with an integral lab. The materials for this course are available from the site below. Test and quiz contents can be obtained upon request In this distance-learning format, students take quizzes online, tests in person and meet with the instructor for assistance. Student activities include homework, laboratory exercises and observing projects using household and community resources. This course (Astro 128) has been approved to fulfill general education requirements for University of California and the California State University system. Materials include instructions and reference materials for measuring parallax, analyzing radial velocity and light curves, finding ages of star clusters, tracking planets, recording sunrise or sunset time, simulating lunar phases, assessing lunar feature ages, classifying stellar spectra from tracings, and classifying galaxy morphology. Students analyze actual astronomical data from the literature in many cases. A comparatively large number of observational examples allows each student to work with a unique assignment. Course management includes a calendar where students schedule meetings with the instructor and WebCT test, quiz and grade maintenance. Course materials are supplied with links to data sets in PDF. This class was developed with technical assistance from the Instructional Technology Department at Diablo Valley College.

  19. A Comparison of Interteaching and Lecture in the College Classroom

    PubMed Central

    Saville, Bryan K; Zinn, Tracy E; Neef, Nancy A; Van Norman, Renee; Ferreri, Summer J

    2006-01-01

    Interteaching is a new method of classroom instruction that is based on behavioral principles but offers more flexibility than other behaviorally based methods. We examined the effectiveness of interteaching relative to a traditional form of classroom instruction—the lecture. In Study 1, participants in a graduate course in special education took short quizzes after alternating conditions of interteaching and lecture. Quiz scores following interteaching were higher than quiz scores following lecture, although both methods improved performance relative to pretest measures. In Study 2, we also alternated interteaching and lecture but counterbalanced the conditions across two sections of an undergraduate research methods class. After each unit of information, participants from both sections took the same test. Again, test scores following interteaching were higher than test scores following lecture. In addition, students correctly answered more interteaching-based questions than lecture-based questions on a cumulative final test. In both studies, the majority of students reported a preference for interteaching relative to traditional lecture. In sum, the results suggest that interteaching may be an effective alternative to traditional lecture-based methods of instruction. PMID:16602385

  20. Computer-based, Jeopardy™-like game in general chemistry for engineering majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, S. S.; Saffre, F.; Kadadha, M.; Gater, D. L.; Isakovic, A. F.

    2013-03-01

    We report on the design of Jeopardy™-like computer game for enhancement of learning of general chemistry for engineering majors. While we examine several parameters of student achievement and attitude, our primary concern is addressing the motivation of students, which tends to be low in a traditionally run chemistry lectures. The effect of the game-playing is tested by comparing paper-based game quiz, which constitutes a control group, and computer-based game quiz, constituting a treatment group. Computer-based game quizzes are Java™-based applications that students run once a week in the second part of the last lecture of the week. Overall effectiveness of the semester-long program is measured through pretest-postest conceptual testing of general chemistry. The objective of this research is to determine to what extent this ``gamification'' of the course delivery and course evaluation processes may be beneficial to the undergraduates' learning of science in general, and chemistry in particular. We present data addressing gender-specific difference in performance, as well as background (pre-college) level of general science and chemistry preparation. We outline the plan how to extend such approach to general physics courses and to modern science driven electives, and we offer live, in-lectures examples of our computer gaming experience. We acknowledge support from Khalifa University, Abu Dhabi

  1. Effects of single sex lab groups on physics self-efficacy, behavior, and academic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Gary L.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between the gender composition of a laboratory group and student behaviors, self-efficacy, and quiz performance, within the college physics laboratory. A student population was chosen and subdivided into two groups, which were assigned either same-sex or coed laboratory teams while executing identical laboratory activities and instruction. Assessments were carried out prior to instruction, during the course, and at the end of one semester worth of instruction and laboratory activities. Students were assessed in three areas: behaviors exhibited during laboratory activities, self-efficacy, and scores on laboratory quizzes. Analyses considered the differences in outcomes after a single semester of physics laboratories that differed only in team gender organization. The results indicated that there were no statistically significant differences in behavior variable, self-efficacy or laboratory quiz scores between same sex teams and coed teams. There were also no statistically significant differences between genders, and no interaction effect present. In a post-hoc analysis of the individual behaviors data, it was noted that there is present a practical difference in the individual behaviors exhibited by males and females. This difference implies a difference in how males and females successfully engage in the laboratory activities.

  2. Simulation: a teaching tool for liver transplantation anesthesiology.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Shushma; Bane, Brian C; Boucek, Charles D; Planinsic, Raymond M; Lutz, John W; Metro, David G

    2012-01-01

    Anesthesia for liver transplantation (ALT) requires extensive preparation and rapid recognition of changing clinical conditions. Owing to the proliferation of transplant centers, greater number of anesthesia providers need training in specific skills required to treat these patients. These cases are no longer limited to few transplant centers; therefore, reduction of cases in individual centers has created a need for simulation training to prepare and supplement clinical experience. We have developed an ALT simulation course for senior anesthesia residents which combines didactic sessions with live-patient-based and mannequin-based simulation. Outcomes have been measured using pre- and post-simulation course quizzes as well as a survey given at the end of the month-long ALT rotation. Twenty-four senior anesthesiology residents (n = 24) have completed the ALT simulation course. Residents had an average score of 75% ± 10% on the pre-simulation quiz, which increased to 92% ± 6.5% on the post-simulation quiz (p < 0.001). Furthermore, survey scores indicated that residents noted that the course provided an improvement in their preparedness, confidence, anticipation, and understanding of the importance of communication skills in the care of this patient population. The ALT simulation course provided a standardized in-depth exposure to clinical issues involved in the perioperative care of liver transplant patients.

  3. Evaluation of Consumer Understanding of Different Front-of-Package Nutrition Labels, 2010–2011

    PubMed Central

    Bragg, Marie A.; Seamans, Marissa J.; Mechulan, Regine L.; Novak, Nicole; Brownell, Kelly D.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Governments throughout the world are using or considering various front-of-package (FOP) food labeling systems to provide nutrition information to consumers. Our web-based study tested consumer understanding of different FOP labeling systems. Methods Adult participants (N = 480) were randomized to 1 of 5 groups to evaluate FOP labels: 1) no label; 2) multiple traffic light (MTL); 3) MTL plus daily caloric requirement icon (MTL+caloric intake); 4) traffic light with specific nutrients to limit based on food category (TL+SNL); or 5) the Choices logo. Total percentage correct quiz scores were created reflecting participants’ ability to select the healthier of 2 foods and estimate amounts of saturated fat, sugar, and sodium in foods. Participants also rated products on taste, healthfulness, and how likely they were to purchase the product. Quiz scores and product perceptions were compared with 1-way analysis of variance followed by post-hoc Tukey tests. Results The MTL+caloric intake group (mean [standard deviation], 73.3% [6.9%]) and Choices group (72.5% [13.2%]) significantly outperformed the no label group (67.8% [10.3%]) and the TL+SNL group (65.8% [7.3%]) in selecting the more healthful product on the healthier product quiz. The MTL and MTL+caloric intake groups achieved average scores of more than 90% on the saturated fat, sugar, and sodium quizzes, which were significantly better than the no label and Choices group average scores, which were between 34% and 47%. Conclusion An MTL+caloric intake label and the Choices symbol hold promise as FOP labeling systems and require further testing in different environments and population subgroups. PMID:22995103

  4. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... have a viral infection, temperatures are low, or pollen and air pollution levels are high. Learn more ... navigation Donate Annual meeting Browse your conditions Check pollen counts Continuing education center Find an allergist / immunologist ...

  5. Be MedWise Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... What is the first information category on the new "Drug Facts" label? a) active ingredients b) inactive ingredients ... you find in the "Warning" category on the New "Drug Facts" label: a) when to ask a doctor ...

  6. Quiz: Water and Your Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Illness & disability Drugs, alcohol & smoking Your feelings Relationships Bullying Safety Your future Environmental health Skip section navigation ( ... February 15, 2017 top About this site Mission Statement Privacy Policy For the Media Contact Us Language ...

  7. The 30-Second Spot Quiz.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rank, Hugh

    Based on the pattern of "the pitch" (Hi/Trust Me/You Need/Hurry/Buy), this sequence of questions can be used to focus on the "skeleton" underneath the surface variations of radio and television commercials, and newspaper and magazine ads. The five questions, which include evaluation criteria, are as follows: (1) What attention-getting techniques…

  8. Effects of reinforcement on test-enhanced learning in a large, diverse introductory college psychology course.

    PubMed

    Trumbo, Michael C; Leiting, Kari A; McDaniel, Mark A; Hodge, Gordon K

    2016-06-01

    A robust finding within laboratory research is that structuring information as a test confers benefit on long-term retention-referred to as the testing effect. Although well characterized in laboratory environments, the testing effect has been explored infrequently within ecologically valid contexts. We conducted a series of 3 experiments within a very large introductory college-level course. Experiment 1 examined the impact of required versus optional frequent low-stakes testing (quizzes) on student grades, revealing students were much more likely to take advantage of quizzing if it was a required course component. Experiment 2 implemented a method of evaluating pedagogical intervention within a single course (thereby controlling for instructor bias and student self-selection), which revealed a testing effect. Experiment 3 ruled out additional exposure to information as an explanation for the findings of Experiment 2 and suggested that students at the college level, enrolled in very large sections, accept frequent quizzing well. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. Neural patterns underlying social comparisons of personal performance

    PubMed Central

    Birg, Robert; Falk, Armin; Weber, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Humans often evaluate their abilities by comparing their personal performance with that of others. For this process, it is critical whether the comparison turns out in one’s favor or against it. Here, we investigate how social comparisons of performance are encoded and integrated on the neural level. We collected functional magnetic resonance images while subjects answered questions in a knowledge quiz that was related to their profession. After each question, subjects received a feedback about their personal performance, followed by a feedback about the performance of a reference group who had been quizzed beforehand. Based on the subjects’ personal performance, we divided trials in downward and upward comparisons. We found that upward comparisons correlated with activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the anterior insula. Downward comparisons were associated with increased activation in the ventral striatum (VS), the medial orbitofrontal cortex and the ventral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). The extent to which subjects outperformed the reference group modulated the activity in the VS and in the dorsal ACC. We suggest that the co-activation of the VS and the dorsal ACC contributes to the integration of downward comparisons into the evaluation of personal performance. PMID:24948156

  10. Weather Forecaster Understanding of Climate Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bol, A.; Kiehl, J. T.; Abshire, W. E.

    2013-12-01

    Weather forecasters, particularly those in broadcasting, are the primary conduit to the public for information on climate and climate change. However, many weather forecasters remain skeptical of model-based climate projections. To address this issue, The COMET Program developed an hour-long online lesson of how climate models work, targeting an audience of weather forecasters. The module draws on forecasters' pre-existing knowledge of weather, climate, and numerical weather prediction (NWP) models. In order to measure learning outcomes, quizzes were given before and after the lesson. Preliminary results show large learning gains. For all people that took both pre and post-tests (n=238), scores improved from 48% to 80%. Similar pre/post improvement occurred for National Weather Service employees (51% to 87%, n=22 ) and college faculty (50% to 90%, n=7). We believe these results indicate a fundamental misunderstanding among many weather forecasters of (1) the difference between weather and climate models, (2) how researchers use climate models, and (3) how they interpret model results. The quiz results indicate that efforts to educate the public about climate change need to include weather forecasters, a vital link between the research community and the general public.

  11. Challenges and opportunities: using a science-based video game in secondary school settings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muehrer, Rachel; Jenson, Jennifer; Friedberg, Jeremy; Husain, Nicole

    2012-12-01

    Simulations and games are not new artifacts to the study of science in secondary school settings (Hug, Kriajcik and Marx 2005), however teachers remain skeptical as to their value, use and appropriateness (Rice 2006). The difficulty is not only the design and development of effective play environments that produce measurable changes in knowledge and/or understanding, but also in their on-the-ground use (Jaipal and Figg 2010). This paper reports on the use of a science-focused video game in five very different secondary school settings in Ontario, Canada. A mixed-methods approach was used in the study, and included data gathered on general gameplay habits and technology use, as well as informal interviews with teachers and students who played the game. In total, 161 participants played a series of games focused on the "life of a plant", and were given both a pre and post quiz to determine if the game helped them retain and/or change what they knew about scientific processes like plant cell anatomy and photosynthesis. Participants showed statistically significant improvement on quizzes that were taken after playing the game for approximately one-hour sessions, despite difficulties in some cases both accessing and playing the game for the full hour. Our findings also reveal the ongoing challenges in making use of technology in a variety of school sessions, even when using a browser-based game, that demanded very little other than a reliable internet connection.

  12. Using video games for volcanic hazard education and communication: an assessment of the method and preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Lara; Cole, Paul D.; Stewart, Iain

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the findings from a study aimed at understanding whether video games (or serious games) can be effective in enhancing volcanic hazard education and communication. Using the eastern Caribbean island of St. Vincent, we have developed a video game - St. Vincent's Volcano - for use in existing volcano education and outreach sessions. Its twin aims are to improve residents' knowledge of potential future eruptive hazards (ash fall, pyroclastic flows and lahars) and to integrate traditional methods of education in a more interactive manner. Here, we discuss the process of game development including concept design through to the final implementation on St. Vincent. Preliminary results obtained from the final implementation (through pre- and post-test knowledge quizzes) for both student and adult participants provide indications that a video game of this style may be effective in improving a learner's knowledge. Both groups of participants demonstrated a post-test increase in their knowledge quiz score of 9.3 % for adults and 8.3 % for students and, when plotted as learning gains (Hake, 1998), show similar overall improvements (0.11 for adults and 0.09 for students). These preliminary findings may provide a sound foundation for the increased integration of emerging technologies within traditional education sessions. This paper also shares some of the challenges and lessons learnt throughout the development and testing processes and provides recommendations for researchers looking to pursue a similar study.

  13. On the placement of practice questions during study.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Yana; Nunes, Ludmila D; Karpicke, Jeffrey D

    2016-03-01

    Retrieval practice improves retention of information on later tests. A question remains: When should retrieval occur during learning-interspersed throughout study or at the end of each study period? In a lab experiment, an online experiment, and a classroom study, we aimed to determine the ideal placement (interspersed vs. at-the-end) of retrieval practice questions. In the lab experiment, 64 subjects viewed slides about APA style and answered short-answer practice questions about the content or restudied the slides (restudy condition). The practice questions either appeared 1 every 1-2 slides (interspersed condition), or all at the end of the presentation (at-the-end condition). One week later, subjects returned and answered the same questions on a final test. In the online experiment, 175 subjects completed the same procedure. In the classroom study, 62 undergraduate students took quizzes as part of class lectures. Short-answer practice questions appeared either throughout the lectures (interspersed condition) or at the end of the lectures (at-the-end condition). Nineteen days after the last quiz, students were given a surprise final test. Results from the 3 experiments converge in demonstrating an advantage for interspersing practice questions on the initial tests, but an absence of this advantage on the final test.

  14. Learning clinical neurophysiology: gaming is better than lectures.

    PubMed

    Schuh, Lori; Burdette, David E; Schultz, Lonni; Silver, Brian

    2008-06-01

    We sought to find evidence for generalizability of a game and team oriented educational intervention in clinical neurophysiology in a neurology residency program. A prospective educational intervention was studied in a single neurology residency program and compared with a historical control. Seventeen PGY 2-4 residents studied neurophysiology in 2004-2005. The historical control was 20 PGY 2-4 residents from 1998 to 2002. The neurophysiology educational intervention consisted of weekly presentations, followed by a game show-type oral quiz which was team-based and required all residents to participate. The control group attended faculty-prepared didactic lectures. Outcome measures were percent correct subset neurophysiology Residency Inservice Training Examination scores. United States Medical Licensing Examination step 1 scores were also compared between the groups. Data were analyzed with analysis of variance methods accounting for multiple measurements. The mean+/-standard error neurophysiology subset percent correct Residency Inservice Training Examination score was 63.6+/-4.12 for the intervention group and 49.4+/-2.35 for the control (P=0.002). There was no difference in United States Medical Licensing Examination step 1 scores between the two groups (P=0.11). We found evidence for generalizability of the effectiveness of a team-oriented educational intervention in clinical neurophysiology with gaming and oral quizzing in improving subset Residency Inservice Training Examination performance compared with faculty prepared didactics.

  15. Utilization of blended learning to teach preclinical endodontics.

    PubMed

    Maresca, Cristina; Barrero, Carlos; Duggan, Dereck; Platin, Enrique; Rivera, Eric; Hannum, Wallace; Petrola, Frank

    2014-08-01

    Blended learning (BL) is the integration of classroom learning with an online environment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether dental students who experienced BL in a preclinical endodontic course demonstrated better manual skills, conceptual knowledge, and learning experience compared to those experiencing traditional learning. All eighty-one students (100 percent) in a preclinical endodontics course agreed to participate and were assigned to either the traditional or BL group. A root canal procedure was used to determine the level of manual skills gained by each group. Pre- and post-intervention quizzes were given to all students to evaluate conceptual knowledge gained, and the students' perspectives on the methods were evaluated with a survey. The BL group scored better than the traditional group on the manual skills exercise at a statistically significant level (p=0.0067). There were no differences in the post-intervention quiz scores between the two groups, and the students' opinions were positive regarding BL. With BL, the students were able to learn and demonstrate dental skills at a high level.

  16. Canine theriogenology for dog enthusiasts: teaching methodology and outcomes in a massive open online course (MOOC).

    PubMed

    Root Kustritz, Margaret V

    2014-01-01

    A massive open online course (MOOC) in canine theriogenology was offered for dog owners and breeders and for veterinary professionals as a partnership between the University of Minnesota and Coursera. The six-week course was composed of short video lectures, multiple-choice quizzes with instant feedback to assess understanding, weekly case studies with peer evaluation to promote integration of course materials, and discussion forums to promote participant interaction. Peak enrollment was 8,796 students. The grading policy for completion was strict and was upheld; completion rate for all participants was 7.5%. About 12% of participants achieved a grade of over 90% in the course, with those who had any deficiency mostly missing one quiz or assignment. Ninety-nine individuals were enrolled in a for-cost, credentialed pathway, and 50% of those individuals completed all required course components. Pre- and postcourse surveys were used to demonstrate that learning objectives were met by the participants and to identify that lack of time to commit to study was the biggest impediment to completion. Positive aspects of the course were active engagement by participants from all over the world and the ability of this university and instructor to reach those learners. Negative aspects concerned technical support and negative feedback from some participants who were unable to meet course requirements for reasons beyond the control of the instructor.

  17. Promoting Argumentative Discourse: A Design-Based Implementation and Refinement of an Astronomy Multimedia Curriculum, Assessment Model, and Learning Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Hickey, Daniel T.

    This study uses an existing astronomy software program to encourage inquiry-based learning and argumentation while also ensuring gains on conventional classroom assessments and high-stakes achievement tests. To supplement the software program, a curriculum and three levels of assessment--quizzes, exam, and test--were designed and administered to 11th- and 12th-grade students during a four-week implementation. Students worked in groups for the quizzes and exam to engage in argumentative discourse. Because of the difficulties in engaging students in quality argumentation, the curriculum, assessments, and overall learning environment were examined for ways to further support argumentative discourse.

  18. Promoting Argumentative Discourse: A Design-Based Implementation and Refinement of an Astronomy Multimedia Curriculum, Assessment Model, and Learning Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taasoobshirazi, Gita; Hickey, Daniel T.

    This study uses an existing astronomy software program to encourage inquiry- based learning and argumentation while also ensuring gains on conventional classroom assessments and high-stakes achievement tests. To supplement the software program, a curriculum and three levels of assessment-- quizzes, exam, and test--were designed and administered to 11th- and 12th- grade students during a four-week implementation. Students worked in groups for the quizzes and exam to engage in argumentative discourse. Because of the difficulties in engaging students in quality argumentation, the curriculum, assessments, and overall learning environment were examined for ways to further support argumentative discourse.

  19. A Receptor-Grounded Approach to Teaching Nonsteroidal Antiinflammatory Drug Chemistry and Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective To describe a receptor-based approach to promote learning about nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) chemistry, structure-activity relationships, and therapeutic decision-making. Design Three lessons on cyclooxygenase (COX) and NSAID chemistry, and NSAID therapeutic utility, were developed using text-based resources and primary medicinal chemistry and pharmacy practice literature. Learning tools were developed to assist students in content mastery. Assessment Student learning was evaluated via performance on quizzes and examinations that measured understanding of COX and NSAID chemistry, and the application of that knowledge to therapeutic problem solving. Conclusion Student performance on NSAID-focused quizzes and examinations documented the success of this approach. PMID:20221336

  20. Effects of Social Network Exposure on Nutritional Learning: Development of an Online Educational Platform

    PubMed Central

    Dagan, Noa; Beskin, Daniel; Brezis, Mayer

    2015-01-01

    Background Social networking sites (SNSs) such as Facebook have the potential to enhance online public health interventions, in part, as they provide social exposure and reinforcement. Objective The objective of the study was to evaluate whether social exposure provided by SNSs enhances the effects of online public health interventions. Methods As a sample intervention, we developed Food Hero, an online platform for nutritional education in which players feed a virtual character according to their own nutritional needs and complete a set of virtual sport challenges. The platform was developed in 2 versions: a "private version" in which a user can see only his or her own score, and a "social version" in which a user can see other players’ scores, including preexisting Facebook friends. We assessed changes in participants’ nutritional knowledge using 4 quiz scores and 3 menu-assembly scores. Monitoring feeding and exercising attempts assessed engagement with the platform. Results The 2 versions of the platform were randomly assigned between a study group (30 members receiving the social version) and a control group (33 members, private version). The study group's performance on the quizzes gradually increased over time, relative to that of the control group, becoming significantly higher by the fourth quiz (P=.02). Furthermore, the study group's menu-assembly scores improved over time compared to the first score, whereas the control group's performance deteriorated. Study group members spent an average of 3:40 minutes assembling each menu compared to 2:50 minutes in the control group, and performed an average of 1.58 daily sport challenges, compared to 1.21 in the control group (P=.03). Conclusions This work focused on isolating the SNSs' social effects in order to help guide future online interventions. Our results indicate that the social exposure provided by SNSs is associated with increased engagement and learning in an online nutritional educational platform

  1. Implementation of cooperative learning through collaboration with foreign lecturer to improve students' understanding and soft skills in the course of drug delivery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syukri, Yandi; Nugroho, Bambang Hernawan

    2017-03-01

    The course of Drug Delivery Systems is an elective that supports the development of new products in pharmaceutical industry. The existing learning process has been in the form of one-direction face-to-face lecturing. During the lecture, students find it difficult to follow or understand the materials, so they become passive. Also, class effectiveness is low because it cannot develop students' active participation during the learning process. To improve the learning outcomes and to achieve the desired competence, innovations in the learning process should be attempted. This learning model aimed to improve students' understanding of and soft skills in the course of Drug Delivery Systems through a cooperative learning method and collaboration with foreign lecturers. The order of cooperative learning included explaining the desired learning outcomes of each topic, providing reading materials for students to learn when preparing their papers, instructing students to work on group assignments and to help each other to master the lesson through question-answer sessions and discussions among group members, encouraging group presentations, and evaluating through quizzes. The foreign lecturers played a role in enriching teaching materials and providing an international class atmosphere. The students' hard skills assessed from the quiz, midterm exam, and final semester exam showed a minimum score of 70 > 80% in the quiz and final semester exam components, while the midterm exam value with a minimum of 70 > 80% was only 6%. The assessment of soft skills obtained from the students' independence in constructing knowledge to complete assignments and resolve problems indicated such outcomes as each group's better ability to access relevant journals, their active participation in group discussions, discipline to submit assignments, discipline to be punctual, and good communication skills. It can be concluded that cooperative learning method could improve the soft skills of students

  2. Ideas for Managing Large Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabel, Robert L.

    1983-01-01

    Describes management strategies used in a large kinetics/industrial chemistry course. Strategies are designed to make instruction in such classes more efficient and effective. Areas addressed include homework assignment, quizzes, final examination, grading and feedback, and rewards for conducting the class in the manner described. (JN)

  3. Review, Revise, and (re)Release: Updating an Information Literacy Tutorial to Embed a Science Information Life Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bussmann, Jeffra Diane; Plovnick, Caitlin E.

    2013-01-01

    In 2008, University of California, Irvine (UCI) Libraries launched their first Find Science Information online tutorial. It was an innovative web-based tool, containing not only informative content but also interactive activities, embedded hyperlinked resources, and reflective quizzes, all designed primarily to educate undergraduate science…

  4. Healthy Games and Teasers. An INMED Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ripley, David; And Others

    Indians into Medicine (INMED) provides academic, financial, and personal support for Indian college and professional students training for health careers, and supports summer enrichment sessions beginning in junior high school. This INMED activity book contains puzzles, coloring pages, quizzes, and facts about health and the human body. Topics…

  5. Interactive Videodisc as a Component in a Multi-Method Approach to Anatomy and Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Donald A.; Wheeler, Mary Jane

    At Cuyahoga Community College (Ohio), computer-controlled interactive videodisc technology is being used as one of several instructional methods to teach anatomy and physiology. The system has the following features: audio-visual instruction, interaction with immediate feedback, self-pacing, fill-in-the-blank quizzes for testing total recall,…

  6. How the Initial Thinking Period Affects Student Argumentation during Peer Instruction: Students' Experiences versus Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Kjetil L.; Hansen, Gabrielle; Stav, John B.

    2016-01-01

    The authors have compared students discussing multiple-choice quizzes during peer instruction with and without the initial thinking period before discussion. Video clips of students engaged in peer discussion in groups of three of varying group combinations, a total of 140 different students in all, were compared to students' own experiences…

  7. Comparative Analysis of the Effectiveness of Oral vs. Podcasting Reviewing Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoads, Misty L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the use of podcasts to traditional delivery of information in classrooms. Four podcasts were created on the topics of asthma, diabetes, seizure disorders, and acute infections to aid students in reviewing for quizzes. Knowledge retained of students using podcasts was compared to the knowledge retained of…

  8. A Case Study In the Use of Computers To Personalize Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towle, Nelson J.; And Others

    A developmental project in a college psychology course has shown that the computer can be a useful instrument for individualizing student learning and testing by freeing instructors from clerical and test generation tasks. In successive stages, the computer was used for the batch generation of quizzes on each unit of the course, for on-line…

  9. Knowledge of Aging and Life Satisfaction among Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Neil C.; Friedrich, Douglas

    2004-01-01

    Four hundred young-, middle-, and old-old adults responded to a battery of quizzes dealing with life satisfaction and objective aging knowledge in the physical, psychological, and social domains. Analyses incorporated domains of aging knowledge, life satisfaction, age, gender, and demographic variables. Both means difference and regression…

  10. Preservice Teachers' Acceptance of Learning Management Software: An Application of the UTAUT2 Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raman, Arumugam; Don, Yahya

    2013-01-01

    "Moodle" also known as Learning Management System is freely available to educators. Universiti Utara Malaysia (UUM) encourages students and instructors to utilize the teaching and learning process. Moodle enables lecturer to create sequences and facilitate activities for their students, auto-marked online quizzes and exams, navigation…

  11. Evaluating Preference for Graphic Feedback on Correct versus Incorrect Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigurdsson, Sigurdur O.; Ring, Brandon M.

    2013-01-01

    The current study evaluated preferences of undergraduate students for graphic feedback on percentage of incorrect performance versus feedback on percentage of correct performance. A total of 108 participants were enrolled in the study and received graphic feedback on performance on 12 online quizzes. One half of participants received graphic…

  12. Teaching a New Method of Partial Fraction Decomposition to Senior Secondary Students: Results and Analysis from a Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Man, Yiu-Kwong; Leung, Allen

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a new approach to compute the partial fraction decompositions of rational functions and describe the results of its trials at three secondary schools in Hong Kong. The data were collected via quizzes, questionnaire and interviews. In general, according to the responses from the teachers and students concerned, this new…

  13. Supporting Student Learning: The Use of Computer-Based Formative Assessment Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peat, Mary; Franklin, Sue

    2002-01-01

    Describes the development of a variety of computer-based assessment opportunities, both formative and summative, that are available to a large first-year biology class at the University of Sydney (Australia). Discusses online access to weekly quizzes, a mock exam, and special self-assessment modules that are beneficial to student learning.…

  14. Case study evaluating Just-In-Time Teaching and Peer Instruction using clickers in a quantum mechanics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayer, Ryan; Marshman, Emily; Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-12-01

    Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) is an instructional strategy involving feedback from students on prelecture activities in order to design in-class activities to build on the continuing feedback from students. We investigate the effectiveness of a JiTT approach, which included in-class concept tests using clickers in an upper-division quantum mechanics course. We analyze student performance on prelecture reading quizzes, in-class clicker questions answered individually, and clicker questions answered after group discussion, and compare those performances with open-ended retention quizzes administered after all instructional activities on the same concepts. In general, compared to the reading quizzes, student performance improved when individual clicker questions were posed after lectures that focused on student difficulties found via electronic feedback. The performance on the clicker questions after group discussion following individual clicker question responses also showed improvement. We discuss some possible reasons for the improved performance at various stages, e.g., from prelecture reading quizzes to postlecture clicker questions, and from individual to group clicker questions.

  15. Society for College Science Teachers: Putting Inquiry Teaching to the Test--Enhancing Learning in College Botany

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lord, Thomas; Shelly, Chad; Zimmerman, Rachel

    2007-01-01

    Can you imagine a class where students cover the content with each other rather than simply listening to the professor's lecture? Can you envision students developing their own laboratory investigations and quizzing each other weekly to check for understanding? Well, that's pretty much how the major science organizations across the nation are…

  16. Economics and Entrepreneurship: Student Activities. Master Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Economic Education, New York, NY.

    Correlated to the Economics and Entrepreneurship Teaching Strategies Master Curriculum Guide, this book features 66 student activities, case studies, comprehension quizzes, and lessons related to economic concepts. Designed for high school students of economics, social studies, and business education, this curriculum guide combines study of basic…

  17. Effects of Writing-Related Contingencies on Both Quality of Writing and Multiple-Choice Exam Performance in Large College Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krohn, Katherine R.; Parker, Megan R.; Foster, Lisa N.; Aspiranti, Kathleen B.; McCleary, Daniel F.; Williams, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Students (N = 158) in three sections of an undergraduate educational psychology course equivalent in content and assessment procedures completed five-min writing quizzes over assigned subject matter at the beginning of most class sessions. The study compared the effects of three separate writing contingencies on writing scores and multiple-choice…

  18. Geocaching Is Catching Students' Attention in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lisenbee, Peggy; Hallman, Christine; Landry, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Geocaching is an inquiry-based activity encouraging creativity, active learning, and real-world problem solving. As such, it is an educational opportunity for students in all grade levels. Educators benefit by observing students using higher-order thinking instead of rote learning offered by using traditional worksheets, tests, or quizzes. Also,…

  19. A Rubric for Assessing a Student's Ability to Use the Light Microscope

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Greg K.

    2007-01-01

    All teachers do assessments. Biology teachers, by grading exams, quizzes, papers, and lab reports, assess mostly "knowledge." An important part of being a modern biologist, however, is the ability to perform certain technical or manual skills (known in the trade as "techniques") such as running gels, pipetting, recording from excitable cells with…

  20. Retrieval Practice Is an Efficient Method of Enhancing the Retention of Anatomy and Physiology Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobson, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Although a great deal of empirical evidence has indicated that retrieval practice is an effective means of promoting learning and memory, very few studies have investigated the strategy in the context of an actual class. The primary purpose of this study was to determine if a series of very brief retrieval quizzes could significantly improve the…

  1. Cutting Class Harms Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Lewis A., III

    2012-01-01

    An accessible business school population of undergraduate students was investigated in three independent, but related studies to determine effects on grades due to cutting class and failing to take advantage of optional reviews and study quizzes. It was hypothesized that cutting classes harms exam scores, attending preexam reviews helps exam…

  2. Retrieval practice is an efficient method of enhancing the retention of anatomy and physiology information.

    PubMed

    Dobson, John L

    2013-06-01

    Although a great deal of empirical evidence has indicated that retrieval practice is an effective means of promoting learning and memory, very few studies have investigated the strategy in the context of an actual class. The primary purpose of this study was to determine if a series of very brief retrieval quizzes could significantly improve the retention of previously tested information throughout an anatomy and physiology course. A second purpose was to determine if there were any significant differences between expanding and uniform patterns of retrieval that followed a standardized initial retrieval delay. Anatomy and physiology students were assigned to either a control group or groups that were repeatedly prompted to retrieve a subset of previously tested course information via a series of quizzes that were administered on either an expanding or a uniform schedule. Each retrieval group completed a total of 10 retrieval quizzes, and the series of quizzes required (only) a total of 2 h to complete. Final retention of the exam subset material was assessed during the last week of the semester. There were no significant differences between the expanding and uniform retrieval groups, but both retained an average of 41% more of the subset material than did the control group (ANOVA, F = 129.8, P = 0.00, ηp(2) = 0.36). In conclusion, retrieval practice is a highly efficient and effective strategy for enhancing the retention of anatomy and physiology material.

  3. Approach to Learning and Assessment in Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickie, Leslie

    The objectives of this exploratory study were to determine: (1) the approach to learning of physics students (N=142) at John Abbott College (Quebec, Canada) as determined by the Study Process Questionnaire; (2) the intellectual demands of quizzes, tests, and final exams in physics using a scheme derived from Bloom's taxonomy; and (3) the…

  4. The Sentence Fairy: A Natural-Language Generation System to Support Children's Essay Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbusch, Karin; Itsova, Gergana; Koch, Ulrich; Kuhner, Christine

    2008-01-01

    We built an NLP system implementing a "virtual writing conference" for elementary-school children, with German as the target language. Currently, state-of-the-art computer support for writing tasks is restricted to multiple-choice questions or quizzes because automatic parsing of the often ambiguous and fragmentary texts produced by pupils…

  5. Your Menstrual Cycle

    MedlinePlus

    ... your best Fighting germs Your sexuality What are STDs and STIs? Seeing the doctor Quizzes Links to more information on girls' ... What happens during your menstrual cycle The menstrual cycle includes not just your period, but the rise and fall of hormones and other body changes ...

  6. Active Learning by Play Dough Modeling in the Medical Profession

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herur, Anita; Kolagi, Sanjeev; Chinagudi, Surekharani; Manjula, R.; Patil, Shailaja

    2011-01-01

    Active learning produces meaningful learning, improves attitudes toward learning, and increases knowledge and retention, but is still not fully institutionalized in the undergraduate sciences. A few studies have compared the effectiveness of PowerPoint presentations, student seminars, quizzes, and use of CD-ROMs with blackboard teaching and…

  7. Training of Pharmacy Assistants in Bulgaria.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borke, Mitchell L.

    1982-01-01

    Pharmacy assistant training in Bulgaria involves going to a special institute for a two-year program with five components: general, biomedical, professional, practical experience, and electives. Evaluation is based on quizzes and examinations, followed by successful passing of state examination for practice. There are more assistants than…

  8. The Adoption of Mobile Learning in a Traditional Training Environment: The C95-Challenge Project Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catenazzi, Nadia; Sommaruga, Lorenzo; De Angelis, Kylene; Gabbianelli, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Within the C95-Challenge Erasmus+ project, mobile learning technologies are adopted and tested for bus and truck drivers training according to the EU 2003/59/EC Directive. Different kinds of training contents are developed in the form of interactive slides, hyper-videos, interactive quizzes and delivered on mobile devices. Existing apps and games…

  9. Leading Learning in Our Times

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trilling, Bernie

    2010-01-01

    Important tools that schools need to support a 21st century approach to teaching and learning include the usual suspects: the Internet, pen and paper, cell phones, educational games, tests and quizzes, good teachers, caring communities, educational funding, and loving parents. All of these items and more contribute to a 21st century education, but…

  10. Brief Daily Writing Activities and Performance on Major Multiple-Choice Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Haley C.; Bliss, Stacy L.; Hautau, Briana; Carroll, Erin; Jaspers, Kathryn E.; Williams, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    Although past research indicates that giving brief quizzes, administered either regularly or randomly, may lead to improvement in students' performance on major exams, negligible research has targeted daily writing activities that require the processing of course information at a deeper level than might result from simply reading course materials…

  11. Radiological Defense Officer. Student Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Civil Preparedness Agency (DOD), Washington, DC.

    This student workbook includes the necessary administrative materials, briefs, exercises and answer sheets for the quizzes and final course examination as needed by the students during the conduct of the Radiological Defense Officer course. Among the briefs included are the following: (1) Reporting Forms; (2) Forecasting Dose Rates; (3) Dose…

  12. Collaborative Team Testing to Support Individual Learning: Can Teamwork Motivate Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stelzer, Leigh; Coll-Reilly, Joan

    2010-01-01

    A challenge in the contemporary classroom is that many students do not prepare for class. While technology is a boon in the classroom it can often be an apathy-fostering distraction. To encourage greater student preparation a course was designed with 4 quizzes to be taken first as individuals and then as members of predetermined teams. We reasoned…

  13. Combination of Formative and Summative Assessment Instruments in Elementary Algebra Classes: A Prescription for Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Euguenia; Siadat, M. Vali

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of the implementation of formative assessment on student achievement in elementary algebra classes at Richard J. Daley College in Chicago, IL. The formative assessment is defined in this case as frequent, cumulative, time-restricted, multiple-choice quizzes with immediate constructive feedback.…

  14. Solving Differential Equations Analytically. Elementary Differential Equations. Modules and Monographs in Undergraduate Mathematics and Its Applications Project. UMAP Unit 335.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldston, J. W.

    This unit introduces analytic solutions of ordinary differential equations. The objective is to enable the student to decide whether a given function solves a given differential equation. Examples of problems from biology and chemistry are covered. Problem sets, quizzes, and a model exam are included, and answers to all items are provided. The…

  15. A Learning Management System Developed at the Eastern Mediterranean University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aybay, Isik; Dag, O. Oguz

    2003-01-01

    Discusses distance education programs in higher education and describes the Eastern Mediterranean University (Cyprus) Learning Management System which was developed while the online program was offered to on-campus students. Explains functions of the system, including user enrollment, course management, lectures, quizzes, announcements,…

  16. Taking on Multitasking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rekart, Jerome L.

    2011-01-01

    Multitasking impedes learning and performance in the short-term and may affect long-term memory and retention. The implications of these findings make it critical that educators and parents impress upon students the need to focus and reduce extraneous stimuli while studying or reading. Course-based quizzes and tests can be used for more than…

  17. Some Techniques for the Mathematics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfeld, Alan H.

    1977-01-01

    Eight suggestions for surmounting barriers between the student and the class teacher are given and briefly discussed: class evaluations, alternate class structure, student-written notes, in-class "experiments," quizzes without trauma, the class dummy, "programmed" spontaneity, and "treats." (DT)

  18. Developing the Sixth Sense: Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baines, Lawrence A.; Slutsky, Ruslan

    2009-01-01

    Traditional ways of teaching--working from a textbook, designing quizzes, and assigning seat work--are predicated on the idea of students' ability and desire to self-regulate. However, these sedentary techniques are ineffective with unmotivated students and poor readers. Teachers commonly invoke fear of failure in an attempt to engage students in…

  19. Pedagogical Techniques: Student Performance and Preferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beets, S. Douglas; Lobingier, Patricia G.

    2001-01-01

    Students in financial accounting were exposed to three teaching methods for one-third semester each (chalkboard, overhead projector, presentation software). No overall student learning differences were found, but students performed better on quizzes and exams when their preferred method was used. (SK)

  20. Students' Use of E-Mail in an Undergraduate Public Relations Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelleher, Tom; Dodd, Julie E.

    A study examined the use of e-mail between the students in an introductory public relations class and their instructor. E-mail use was parallel to the use of face-to-face communication, with students reporting that they used office time and e-mail primarily to ask questions about quizzes, tests, and assignments. Older students and students further…

  1. Information Gap Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cicekdag, Mehmet Ali

    1995-01-01

    Focuses on a real world technique used to teach language proficiency in the classroom. This method involves creating deliberate information and opinion gaps by administering pop quizzes and other communicative games and filling those gaps through cooperative action. Use of this technique generated heated discussion among students. (nine…

  2. JavaScript: Convenient Interactivity for the Class Web Page.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Patricia

    This paper shows how JavaScript can be used within HTML pages to add interactive review sessions and quizzes incorporating graphics and sound files. JavaScript has the advantage of providing basic interactive functions without the use of separate software applications and players. Because it can be part of a standard HTML page, it is…

  3. Progressive Inquiry Learning Object Templates (PILOT)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poldoja, Hans; Leinonen, Teemu; Valjataga, Terje; Ellonen, Antti; Priha, Marjo

    2006-01-01

    In most cases digital learning objects are used for individual learning (reading, looking, playing, quizzes) or by teachers in their class-room or online teaching (presentations). In PILOT project we argue that learning objects should be designed and presented in a special way in order to promote truly social constructivist learning. The project…

  4. Design Patterns for Digital Item Types in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draaijer, S.; Hartog, R. J. M.

    2007-01-01

    A set of design patterns for digital item types has been developed in response to challenges identified in various projects by teachers in higher education. The goal of the projects in question was to design and develop formative and summative tests, and to develop interactive learning material in the form of quizzes. The subject domains involved…

  5. Note-Taking in the College Classroom as Evidence of Generative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefanou, Candice; Hoffman, Lynn; Vielee, Nicolette

    2008-01-01

    College student notes were analysed with respect to the amount of words copied directly, omitted and added to the teacher's overheads or PowerPoint slides in order to understand the effect of teacher scaffolds on student generative learning during initial encoding. Scores on quizzes taken at the end of classes from which notes were collected were…

  6. The Impact of Supplementary On-Line Resources on Academic Performance: A Study of First-Year University Students Studying Economics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birch, Elisa; Williams, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of supplementary web-based materials on students' academic performance in a first-year economics unit at university. In particular, the paper considers the impact of students' usage of the unit's webpage, voluntary on-line discussion board, voluntary on-line quizzes and voluntary on-line homework questions on their…

  7. Learning to Teach Young People How to Think Historically: A Case Study of One Student Teacher's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Robert H.

    2006-01-01

    Twenty years ago, John Goodlad (1984) produced a troubling image of the social studies classroom. The primary activities for students in those classes included "listening, reading textbooks, completing workbooks and worksheets, and taking quizzes" (213). Despite many endeavors over the years to uplift the teaching of history, including the writing…

  8. Comparing Assessment Methods as Predictors of Student Learning in an Undergraduate Mathematics Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shorter, Nichole A.; Young, Cynthia Y.

    2011-01-01

    This experiment was designed to determine which assessment method: continuous assessment (in the form of daily in-class quizzes), cumulative assessment (in the form of online homework), or project-based learning, best predicted student learning (dependent upon post-test grades) in an undergraduate mathematics course. Participants included 117…

  9. Flippin' Fluid Mechanics--Comparison Using Two Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webster, Donald R.; Majerich, David M.; Madden, Amanda G.

    2016-01-01

    A flipped classroom approach was implemented in an undergraduate fluid mechanics course. Students watched short, online video lectures before class, participated in active in-class problem solving sessions (in pairs), and completed individualized online quizzes weekly. In-class activities were designed to develop problem-solving skills and teach…

  10. Clicking in the Community College Classroom: Assessing the Effectiveness of Clickers on Student Learning in a General Psychology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Symister, Petra; VanOra, Jason; Griffin, Kenneth W.; Troy, David

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the efficacy of clickers in a community college classroom. Specifically we sought to compare the effects of clicker technology on perceived knowledge and exam scores with the effectiveness of essays and pop quizzes. One hundred students completed surveys measuring presemester motivation to take psychology and baseline…

  11. Interteaching and the Testing Effect: A Preliminary Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Tonya; Saville, Bryan K.

    2012-01-01

    In a number of studies, interteaching has produced better student-learning outcomes than traditional teaching methods. Little research, however, has examined ways to make interteaching more effective. Research on the testing effect suggests that frequent testing may improve performance. Thus, including postdiscussion quizzes as a part of…

  12. ONCE UPON A TIME IN AMERICA: INTERACTIVE NUTRITION EVALUATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Once Upon a Time in America (OUTIA) is an evaluation tool in which fourth and fifth grades can have fun while demonstrating personal nutrition knowledge and behavior and participating in game quizzes on food history and other social science concepts. The impact of nutrition education lessons can be ...

  13. Increased Course Structure Improves Performance in Introductory Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Scott; Haak, David; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2011-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that highly structured course designs, which implement reading quizzes and/or extensive in-class active-learning activities and weekly practice exams, can lower failure rates in an introductory biology course for majors, compared with low-structure course designs that are based on lecturing and a few high-risk assessments.…

  14. An Investigation of the Impact of an Intervention to Reduce Academic Procrastination Using Short Message Service (SMS) Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Darrel R.; Abbitt, Jason T.

    2013-01-01

    This mixed-method pilot study investigated the impact of a custom Short Message Service (SMS) reminder system developed to help students reduce procrastination and increase performance on weekly content-related quizzes in a high-enrollment hybrid online course. Text message reminders were sent to three students with high procrastination and low…

  15. Formative Assessment Probes: With a Purpose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeley, Page

    2011-01-01

    The first thing that comes to mind for many teachers when they think of assessment is testing, quizzes, performance tasks, and other summative forms used for grading purposes. Such assessment practices represent only a fraction of the kinds of assessment that occur on an ongoing basis in an effective science classroom. Formative assessment is a…

  16. Everglades National Park Including Biscayne National Park. Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruehrwein, Dick

    Intended to help elementary school children learn about the resources of the Everglades and Biscayne National Parks, this activity book includes information, puzzles, games, and quizzes. The booklet deals with concepts related to: (1) the seasons; (2) fire ecology; (3) water; (4) fish; (5) mammals; (6) mosquitos; (7) birds; (8) venomous snakes;…

  17. Teaching Techniques: Give or Take? Test Review in the ESL/EFL Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mermelstein, Aaron David

    2016-01-01

    This article describes "Give or Take?", a fun game that teachers can use to review vocabulary in the English as a second language or foreign language (ESL/EFL) classroom. This game is easy to prepare, and it is a fun and efficient way to review for quizzes or larger midterm or final exams. It can be adapted to almost any grade level or…

  18. Forgetting to Remember Important Course Information: Instructors' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lei, Simon; Donoso, Denise; Foutz, Kara; Lasorsa, Meghann; Oliver, Sherry

    2011-01-01

    The notion of forgetting implies that important information once learned and accessible can no longer be retrieved and remembered. Although college students do not need to recall everything, they frequently have some trouble remembering what they need to know when taking quizzes and examinations (exams), and when giving oral presentations. This…

  19. Affective, Cognitive, and Behavioral Differences Between High and Low Procrastinators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothblum, Esther D.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Examined the relation between procrastination and academically related trait measures. Self-reported procrastination was positively correlated with delay in taking self-paced quizzes and negatively correlated with grade point average. High procrastinators, particularly women, were significantly more likely to report more test anxiety and to…

  20. Fiscal Officer Training, 1999-2000. Participant's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This guide is intended for use by participants (college fiscal officers, business officers, bursars, loan managers, etc.) in a two-day workshop on Title IV of the reauthorized Higher Education Act. The guide includes copies of the visual displays used in the workshop, space for individual notes, sample forms, sample computer screens, quizzes, and…

  1. HI-TIE: The University, the High School, and Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Robert C.; Maxwell, Lee M.

    1975-01-01

    Describes four years experience at Colorado State University with courses introducing high school students to engineering, including a Fortran IV computer programming course in which tapings of actual campus classroom sessions, supplemented with homework assignments, class roles, quizzes, and examinations were used. Benefits of the transitional…

  2. Improved Student Achievement Using Personalized Online Homework for a Course in Material and Energy Balances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liberatore, Matthew W.

    2011-01-01

    Personalized, online homework was used to supplement textbook homework, quizzes, and exams for one section of a course in material and energy balances. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that students using personalized, online homework earned better grades in the course. The online homework system asks the same questions of…

  3. The Tutor-Web: An Educational System for Classroom Presentation, Evaluation and Self-Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefansson, Gunnar

    2004-01-01

    A general Web-based system for use in education, the tutor-web, has been developed for storage and presentation of electronic slides for classroom use, along with reference material, examples and quizzes. The primary novelty of the system is the structured linkage between the various pieces of information, to maintain coherence and focus on the…

  4. Fun and Creative Unit Assessment Ideas for All Students in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fencl, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Although traditional methods of assessment--such as rubrics, checklists, skill tests, and quizzes--have long been viable methods of evaluation in physical education, they may at times seem boring or overwhelming. Yet, assessment can be as fun and interesting as the activities that are taught in physical education, and can help to increase…

  5. newSLATE: Building a Web-Based Infrastructure for Learning Non-Roman Script Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopp, Marsha A.; Hopp, Theodore H.

    2004-01-01

    The "newSLATE" environment provides a Web-based infrastructure for language learning. Its design and implementation were driven by the difficulties of non-Roman-script text handling. The software features a cross-platform approach to non-Roman text input and handling and a novel method for automatically generating online quizzes from study…

  6. Reading Questions in Large-Lecture Courses: Limitations and Unexpected Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offerdahl, Erika; Baldwin, Thomas; Elfring, Lisa; Vierling, Elizabeth; Ziegler, Miriam

    2008-01-01

    As an alternative to reading quizzes, a team of biochemistry instructors implemented student reading questions (Henderson and Rosenthal 2006) as a new instructional strategy within their large-enrollment biochemistry courses. Unexpected positive outcomes of this instructional method were realized, as well as limitations of the method within this…

  7. Evaluating the Usability and Accessibility of LMS "Blackboard" at King Saud University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alturki, Uthman T.; Aldraiweesh, Ahmed; Kinshuck

    2016-01-01

    King Saud University is in the process of adopting and implementing the interactive Blackboard Learning Management Systems (LMSs) with features that allow members of staff and teachers from different faculties to access, upload assignments, send quizzes, download content, and evaluate the academic progress of the members of faculty. However, many…

  8. Good For Me! All about Food in 32 Bites. A Brown Paper School Book. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Marilyn

    This book, designed to introduce elementary school students to nutrition, contains 32 chapters dealing with various issues of nutrition, dietetics, eating, and food. Information is conveyed through readings, student quizzes, statistics, student activities and experiments, and illustrations. The chapters, generally two to four pages in length,…

  9. Dancing with Words: Helping Students Love Language through Authentic Vocabulary Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaels, Judith Rowe

    This book argues for a deeper, richer view of vocabulary than the standard images conjured up by that word--worksheets, weekly quizzes, and anxieties about standardized test scores. The book invites teachers and students to experience "the music of words," words in isolation and in juxtapositions, and urges them to bring their own life…

  10. Fine Tuning the Teaching Methods Used for Second Year University Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, L. L.; Thiel, D. V.; Searles, Debra J.

    2012-01-01

    Second year mathematics is a compulsory course for all students enrolled in engineering and mathematics programmes at the university, and it is taken by approximately 120 students each year. The pass rate of the course had been below expectations in the past years. In order to improve the predicament, quizzes which provided a mark incentive were…

  11. Gladwell and Group Communication: Using "The Tipping Point" as a Supplemental Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browning, Blair W.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an activity using Malcolm Gladwell's "The Tipping Point" as a supplemental text in an undergraduate group communication course. This book will help stimulate conversation and promote easy avenues for classroom discussion. In addition to weekly quizzes over each chapter to help facilitate rich classroom discussions, the…

  12. Asynchronous Assessment in a Large Lecture Marketing Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downey, W. Scott; Schetzsle, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    Asynchronous assessment, which includes quizzes or exams online or outside class, offers marketing educators an opportunity to make more efficient use of class time and to enhance students' learning experiences by giving them more flexibility and choice in their assessment environment. In this paper, we examine the performance difference between…

  13. Virtual Learning Environment for Interactive Engagement with Advanced Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedersen, Mads Kock; Skyum, Birk; Heck, Robert; Müller, Romain; Bason, Mark; Lieberoth, Andreas; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2016-01-01

    A virtual learning environment can engage university students in the learning process in ways that the traditional lectures and lab formats cannot. We present our virtual learning environment "StudentResearcher," which incorporates simulations, multiple-choice quizzes, video lectures, and gamification into a learning path for quantum…

  14. Computing Accurate Grammatical Feedback in a Virtual Writing Conference for German-Speaking Elementary-School Children: An Approach Based on Natural Language Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harbusch, Karin; Itsova, Gergana; Koch, Ulrich; Kuhner, Christine

    2009-01-01

    We built a natural language processing (NLP) system implementing a "virtual writing conference" for elementary-school children, with German as the target language. Currently, state-of-the-art computer support for writing tasks is restricted to multiple-choice questions or quizzes because automatic parsing of the often ambiguous and fragmentary…

  15. Design and Evaluation of an Integrated Online Motion Control Training Package

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buiu, C.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to present an integrated Internet-based package for teaching the fundamentals of motion control by using a wide range of resources: theory, videos, simulators, games, quizzes, and a remote lab. The package is aimed at automation technicians, pupils at vocational schools and students taking an introductory course in…

  16. ON TEACHING LITERATURE, ESSAYS FOR SECONDARY SCHOOL TEACHERS. INDIANA UNIVERSITY ENGLISH CURRICULUM STUDY SERIES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HAWLEY, JANE STOUDER; JENKINSON, EDWARD B.

    SIX PROFESSORS OF ENGLISH PRESENT ESSAYS ON THE TEACHING OF EACH OF THE MAJOR LITERARY GENRES. ALL OF THE ESSAYS STRESS THE NECESSITY FOR AN INTELLIGENT CLOSE READING OF A LITERARY WORK, AND FOR AN AWARENESS OF THE VARIETY OF APPROACHES TO TEACHING LITERATURE. DISCOURAGING THE COMMON PRACTICE OF QUIZZING STUDENTS ON FACTUAL INFORMATION, THE ESSAYS…

  17. Teaching to the Test…or Testing to Teach: Exams Requiring Higher Order Thinking Skills Encourage Greater Conceptual Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jamie L.; McDaniel, Mark A.; Woodard, Steven M.; Kummer, Tyler A.

    2014-01-01

    In order to test the effect of exam-question level on fostering student conceptual understanding, low-level and high-level quizzes and exams were administered in two sections of an introductory biology course. Each section was taught in a high-level inquiry based style but was assigned either low-level questions (memory oriented) on the quizzes…

  18. Pork Puzzlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Pork Producers Council, Des Moines, IA.

    Pork Puzzlers is a nutrition education activity booklet for elementary-level students. It includes word scrambles; quizzes with pictures that describe the Food Guide Pyramid; a nutrition word search; a mathematics problem that includes questions on pork; a maze that uses food clues; a letter decoding activity that focuses on a pork dinner; a meal…

  19. Construction and Evaluation of Animated Teachable Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodenheimer, Bobby; Williams, Betsy; Kramer, Mattie Ruth; Viswanath, Karun; Balachandran, Ramya; Belynne, Kadira; Biswas, Gautam

    2009-01-01

    This article describes the design decisions, technical approach, and evaluation of the animation and interface components for an agent-based system that allows learners to learn by teaching. Students learn by teaching an animated agent using a visual representation. The agent can answer questions about what she has been taught and take quizzes.…

  20. An Integrated Approach to Preempt Cheating on Asynchronous, Objective, Online Assessments in Graduate Business Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Daniel P.

    2016-01-01

    Cheating, left untended, erodes the validity of evaluation and, ultimately, corrupts the legitimacy of a course. We profile an approach to manage, with an eye toward preempting, cheating on asynchronous, objective, online quizzes. This approach taps various technological and social solutions to academic dishonesty, integrating them into a…

  1. Challenges and Opportunities for Testing Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: Information for Educators on Creating Test Equity. Test Equity Considerations: Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PEPNet-West, 2010

    2010-01-01

    For most students, test taking is a challenge. For students who are deaf or hard of hearing, classroom quizzes, tests, and exams are even more challenging. Standardized tests--The SAT, ACT, state proficiency tests, No Child Left Behind annual tests, and psychoeducational evaluations--present additional challenges for students who are deaf or hard…

  2. The Impact of Online Video Lecture Recordings and Automated Feedback on Student Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wieling, M. B.; Hofman, W. H. A.

    2010-01-01

    To what extent a blended learning configuration of face-to-face lectures, online on-demand video recordings of the face-to-face lectures and the offering of online quizzes with appropriate feedback has an additional positive impact on the performance of these students compared to the traditional face-to-face course approach? In a between-subjects…

  3. Why Do Eyes Water?

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Movies & More Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Taking Care of Your Ears Taking Care of Your Skin Taking Care of Your Teeth El cuidado de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Why Do Eyes Water? KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Do Eyes Water? Print ...

  4. From Cloud to Mobile: Drawing down Big Info into Little Apps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herther, Nancy K.

    2011-01-01

    With the release of Google's App Inventor for Android, though still officially in beta, the company sought to make app development "simple but powerful" so that teachers could create study tips and quizzes, anyone could create geographic information systems (GIS) to help people find their way to some destination, and people could communicate over…

  5. Improving Oral Communication Skills of Students in Food Science Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reitmeier, C. A.; Svendsen, L. K.; Vrchota, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Communication activities about food evaluation were incorporated into food preparation courses. Oral reports replaced quizzes and an oral presentation replaced the final exam. A rubric was developed to help students evaluate ingredient functions, procedures, techniques, temperatures, and sensory evaluation. Oral report scores, self-evaluations,…

  6. A PROJECT TO IMPROVE LEARNING IN CHEMISTRY AT EL CAMINO COLLEGE BY INTRODUCING CHEM STUDY FILMS IN THE EIGHT MILLIMETER CARTRIDGE FORM FOR OUT-OF-CLASS USE BY STUDENTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KALLAN, LEO E.; MOONEY, WILLIAM T., JR.

    THE USE OF SIX 16-MILLIMETER FILMS IN CHEMISTRY CLASSES WAS SUPPLEMENTED BY PURCHASE OF THEIR 8-MILLIMETER CARTRIDGE VERSIONS AND PROJECTION EQUIPMENT TO ENABLE STUDENTS TO VIEW THE FILMS AS AN INDEPENDENT STUDY PROCEDURE. STUDY GUIDES, QUIZZES AND EVALUATION FORMS WERE PREPARED FOR USE BY INDIVIDUAL STUDENTS. TOTAL COST FOR THE PROJECT WAS…

  7. SAR Aircrew--HH-3F Avionics and HH-3F Flight Preparation. ACH3AV-0442. Second Edition, Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coast Guard Inst., Oklahoma City, OK.

    This document contains two U.S. Coast Guard self-study pamphlets that provide training in helicopter flight preparation and avionics duties. Each pamphlet consists of a number of lessons that include objectives, information illustrated with line drawings and/or photographs, and self-quizzes with answers. The avionics course covers the following…

  8. The Influence of Attitudes about Weight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance (JOPERD), 2005

    2005-01-01

    Obesity stereotypes and anti fat attitudes influence the social behavior of middle school students according to a study presented last June at the annual meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). Using a series of questionnaires and fat and thin silhouette figures, the researchers quizzed 176 boys and 141 girls between the ages of…

  9. Team-Based Learning in a Statistical Literacy Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Clair, Katherine; Chihara, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL) is a pedagogical strategy that uses groups of students working together in teams to learn course material. The main learning objective in TBL is to provide students the opportunity to "practice" course concepts during class-time. A key feature is multiple-choice quizzes that students take individually and then re-take as…

  10. Adventures in Exercise Physiology: Enhancing Problem Solving and Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FitzPatrick, Kathleen A.

    2004-01-01

    I altered the format of an exercise physiology course from traditional lecture to emphasizing daily reading quizzes and group problem-solving activities. I used the SALGains evaluation to compare the two approaches and saw significant improvements in the evaluation ratings of students who were taught using the new format. Narrative responses…

  11. Evaluating Students' Learning Gains and Experiences from Using Nomenclature101.com

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodé, Nicholas E.; Caron, Jeanette; Flynn, Alison B.

    2016-01-01

    Skill in organic chemistry nomenclature is fundamental for communicating more complex concepts. Interpreting and using functional group names is particularly important. With nomenclature101.com, students can create tailored interactive quizzes according to their learning needs; the tool is free and available in English and French. The present…

  12. Getting to Know Your Baby and Yourself: Prenatal to Birth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Grace C.

    This illustrated booklet on prenatal care and birth is part of a related curriculum on parenting and child development designed for school-age mothers. Conception, embryonic and fetal development, the birth process, nutrition during pregnancy, and emotional and physical characteristics of pregnant women are explained. Short quizzes and answers are…

  13. An Evaluation of Computer-Managed Education Technology at New York City Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chitayat, Linda

    The Computer-Managed Education Technology (COMET) program was designed to improve group instruction through the use of technological aids in the classroom. Specific objectives included: (1) improving feedback on student comprehension during a class period; (2) facilitating the administration and grading of homework and quizzes; (3) providing for…

  14. Determinants of Student Attitudes toward Team Exams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinig, Bruce A.; Horowitz, Ira; Whittenburg, Gene

    2014-01-01

    We examine how student attitudes toward their group, learning method, and perceived development of professional skills are initially shaped and subsequently evolve through multiple uses of team exams. Using a Tobit regression model to analyse a sequence of 10 team quizzes given in a graduate-level tax accounting course, we show that there is an…

  15. Assessing Student Attitudes toward Graded Readers, MReader and the MReader Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheetham, Catherine; Harper, Alan; Elliott, Melody; Ito, Mika

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a pilot study conducted with English as a foreign language (EFL) students at a private university in Japan who used graded readers and the MReader website in class or independently to enhance their English reading skills. Each semester students who read 100,000 words with MReader quizzes passed enter into the "MReader…

  16. Money in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, James R.

    1990-01-01

    A suggested college classroom technique for motivating and rewarding student learning is the payment of play dollars to students for correct answers, attendance, and success in pop quizzes. The method is designed to encourage, not discourage, class participation, and provides students with immediate feedback on performance. (MSE)

  17. A Context-Based Strategy for Teaching Vocabulary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Deanna L.

    2008-01-01

    Students in Deanna L. Nelson's high school classroom study vocabulary gradually over a period of time. Students begin by collecting words from readings and listing them on a designated whiteboard. They prepare practice quizzes to exchange with peers and engage in frequent vocabulary discussions that emphasize recognition of context clues and other…

  18. Designing Human-Centered Systems: Circa 2039 Scenario

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    Leonardo de Vinci on the design team?" quipped the captain. "No Sir, AIRT, the Automation Impacts Research Testbed. Actually its real name is something...least it was almost lunchtime when there are fewer shuttle flights ." -- I II I I I I 1 "How did that happen, Sir?" quizzed the lieutenant. "They, the

  19. Development and Evaluation of Computerized Problem-based Learning Cases Emphasizing Basic Sciences Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abate, Marie A.; Meyer-Stout, Paula J.; Stamatakis, Mary K.; Gannett, Peter M.; Dunsworth, Teresa S.; Nardi, Anne H.

    2000-01-01

    Describes development and evaluation of eight computerized problem-based learning (PBL) cases in medicinal chemistry and pharmaceutics concepts. Case versions either incorporated concept maps emphasizing key ideas or did not. Student performance on quizzes did not differ between the different case versions and was similar to that of students who…

  20. Using Wireless Response Systems to Replicate Behavioral Research Findings in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleary, Anne M.

    2008-01-01

    College instructors are increasingly relying on wireless clicker systems as instructional tools in the classroom. Instructors commonly use clicker systems for such classroom activities as taking attendance, giving quizzes, and taking opinion polls. However, these systems are uniquely well suited for the teaching of psychology and other courses…

  1. Fiction and Non-Fiction Reading and Comprehension in Preferred Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Topping, Keith J.

    2015-01-01

    Are the books preferred and most enjoyed by children harder than other books they read? Are non-fiction books read and understood at the same level of difficulty as fiction books? The Accelerated Reader software offers computerized comprehension quizzes of real books individually chosen by children, giving children (and teachers, librarians, and…

  2. Aviation. Fifth Grade. Anchorage School District Elementary Science Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defendorf, Jean, Ed.

    This unit of study is designed to teach the science of flight to students in the intermediate grades. Included are a list of materials for the unit, a discussion of the use of process skills, a list of unit objectives, vocabulary, teacher background information, 12 lessons, 5 quizzes, math problems, and a unit test. Lessons are oriented toward…

  3. Teaching of Psychiatry by PSP: Impact on NBME-Examination Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gregory, Ian; And Others

    1977-01-01

    A Personalized Study Program (PSP) was implemented in 1974 at Ohio State for all students on the psychiatry clerkship. PSP included an assigned textbook and syllabus of reading assignments, private meetings with tutors, standardized practice quizzes, optional use of other opportunities, and a written final exam. Its success is noted. (LBH)

  4. Accelerated Reader[TM]. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2010

    2010-01-01

    "Accelerated Reader"[TM] is a guided reading intervention used to supplement regular reading instruction in K-12 classrooms. Its aim is to improve students' reading skills through reading practice and quizzes on the books students read. The "Accelerated Reader"[TM] program calls for students to select and read a book and then…

  5. Testing to Enhance Retention in Human Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logan, Jessica M.; Thompson, Andrew J.; Marshak, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Recent work in cognitive psychology has shown that repeatedly testing one's knowledge is a powerful learning aid and provides substantial benefits for retention of the material. To apply this in a human anatomy course for medical students, 39 fill-in-the-blank quizzes of about 50 questions each, one for each region of the body, and four about the…

  6. A Comparative Evaluation of E-Learning and Traditional Pedagogical Process Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vavpotic, Damjan; Zvanut, Bostjan; Trobec, Irena

    2013-01-01

    In modern pedagogical processes various teaching methods and approaches (elements of the pedagogical process -- EPPs) are used ranging from traditional ones (e.g., lectures, books) to more recent ones (e.g., e-discussion boards, e-quizzes). Different models for evaluation of the appropriateness of EPPs have been proposed in the past. However, the…

  7. Literacy 2.0: Teaching Students the Skills Needed to Succeed in Our Information Economy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linik, Joyce Riha

    2012-01-01

    At a middle school, English language learners "beg" to take quizzes via iPod, engaging in interactive language arts exercises that seem more game than test. In a high school classroom, students write, videotape, and edit public service announcements, documentaries, and films. Students from the Seattle metropolitan area create stories via…

  8. Web-Based Computer-Aided Personalized System of Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pear, Joseph J.; Schnerch, Gabriel J.; Silva, Kathleen M.; Svenningsen, Louis; Lambert, Jody

    2011-01-01

    In the last two decades, there has been a proliferation of Web-based course-management systems designed to facilitate postsecondary teaching (for example, WebCT, Blackboard, Desire2Learn, Moodle). In general, these systems provide analogs for delivering lectures, holding class discussions, giving quizzes and examinations (typically multiple…

  9. Experiences with Use of Various Pedagogical Methods Utilizing a Student Response System -- Motivation and Learning Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnesen, Ketil; Korpas, Guri Sivertsen; Hennissen, Jon Eirik; Stav, John Birger

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes use of an online Student Response System (SRS) in a pre-qualification course for engineering studies in Norway. The SRS in use, where students answer quizzes using handheld mobile devices like Smartphones, PADs, iPods etc., has been developed at Sor-Trondelag University College. The development of the SRS was co-funded by the …

  10. E-Mail as an Effective Teaching Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Don J.

    1994-01-01

    The use of electronic mail (e-mail) to facilitate communications between professors and students is presented. Examples of uses include announcements, students' questions, counseling, distribution of class assignments, quizzes, grade posting, homework hints, and attendance issues. Advantages and disadvantages are discussed. (SLW)

  11. Using Formative Assessment and Self-Regulated Learning to Help Developmental Mathematics Students Achieve: A Multi-Campus Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudesman, John; Crosby, Sara; Ziehmke, Niesha; Everson, Howard; Issac, Sharlene; Flugman, Bert; Zimmerman, Barry; Moylan, Adam

    2014-01-01

    The authors describe an Enhanced Formative Assessment and Self-Regulated Learning (EFA-SRL) program designed to improve the achievement of community college students enrolled in developmental mathematics courses. Their model includes the use of specially formatted quizzes designed to assess both the students' mathematics and metacognitive skill…

  12. Online Homework, Help or Hindrance? What Students Think and How They Perform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards-Babb, Michelle; Drelick, Janice; Henry, Zachary; Robertson-Honecker, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    To improve students' retention rates in general chemistry, online homework was introduced into our curriculum. Replacing quizzes directly by online homework significantly improved (p less than 0.0005) success rates in second-term general chemistry. Attitudinal Likert survey results indicate that the majority of students completed the online…

  13. Gendered Responses to Online Homework Use in General Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards-Babb, Michelle; Jackson, Jennifer Kasi

    2011-01-01

    Online homework assignments have been shown to enhance student performance. Our research on gendered responses to these assignments adds new and useful information. We investigated differences between male and female students' responses to online homework in large-enrollment general chemistry courses. Replacing in class quizzes with online…

  14. Development and Implementation of a First-Semester Hybrid Organic Chemistry Course: Yielding Advantages for Educators and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ealy, Julie B.

    2013-01-01

    A first-semester organic chemistry course was developed as a hybrid course. The students met face-to-face for one class each week (50 minutes) and the lectures were accessible online via Adobe Connect. Quizzes were scheduled for almost every lecture with access online through ANGEL. In addition, the students had three in-class tests and one final…

  15. Analyzing Breadth and Depth of a Virtual Charter School's Science Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    This case study analyzes five science courses of a United States virtual charter school. Online quizzes and exams are provided by the corporate partner, while local teachers have selected report topics, virtual labs and at-home labs for students to complete. These assessments were coded for their correlation to the cognitive levels of the revised…

  16. Self-Directed Learning in Gross Human Anatomy: Assessment Outcomes and Student Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smythe, Gayle; Hughes, Diane

    2008-01-01

    Speech pathology students enrolled in a lecture-based gross human anatomy program completed two out of nine topics in self-directed mode. Student performance in quizzes was compared for the two modes, and the students completed questionnaires on their perceptions of the self-directed mode of delivery. Students performed as well in the first…

  17. An Empirical Study of Personal Response Technology for Improving Attendance and Learning in a Large Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Student evaluations of a large General Psychology course indicate that students enjoy the class a great deal, yet attendance is low. An experiment was conducted to evaluate a personal response system as a solution. Attendance rose by 30% as compared to extra credit as an inducement, but was equivalent to offering pop quizzes. Performance on test…

  18. Navigating the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woestman, Kelly A.

    1996-01-01

    Briefly notes, literally, hundreds of Web sites concerning the 1996 presidential election and politics in general. Includes candidate and party home pages, media outlets, partisan and nonpartisan sites, and a list of parody pages. Lists interactive programs involving quizzes and simulations, as well as dozens of discussion groups. (MJP)

  19. Who Lives on the Other Side of that Boundary: A Model of Geographic Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Sandra J.

    2011-01-01

    As a geography educator, it is hard to miss geography's bad rap. There is no shortage of stories and quizzes that show just how bad Americans are at geography and, by implication, how bad geography teachers are. What the public means when they say Americans don't know geography is that people cannot pinpoint countries/states on a map, cannot name…

  20. Evaluation of an Interactive Tutorial for Teaching the Central Limit Theorem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aberson, Christopher L.; Berger, Dale E.; Healy, Michael R.; Kyle, Diana J.; Romero, Victoria L.

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates an interactive, Web-based tutorial that helps students learn about sampling distribution. 111 students enrolled in statistics or research methods courses used either the tutorial or attended a lecture/demonstration. Indicates through pre- and post-test quizzes both groups learned comparable amounts and reveals students' ratings of both…

  1. Bats.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Presents information about bats, including definitions and descriptions of the characteristics of bats. Provides teaching activities such as "Bat and Math,""A Bat Like That,""Bat Party,""Ears in the Dark," and "The Big Bat Mystery." Contains reproducible handouts and quizzes. (TW)

  2. Does the mind map learning strategy facilitate information retrieval and critical thinking in medical students?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A learning strategy underutilized in medical education is mind mapping. Mind maps are multi-sensory tools that may help medical students organize, integrate, and retain information. Recent work suggests that using mind mapping as a note-taking strategy facilitates critical thinking. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a relationship existed between mind mapping and critical thinking, as measured by the Health Sciences Reasoning Test (HSRT), and whether a relationship existed between mind mapping and recall of domain-based information. Methods In this quasi-experimental study, 131 first-year medical students were randomly assigned to a standard note-taking (SNT) group or mind map (MM) group during orientation. Subjects were given a demographic survey and pre-HSRT. They were then given an unfamiliar text passage, a pre-quiz based upon the passage, and a 30-minute break, during which time subjects in the MM group were given a presentation on mind mapping. After the break, subjects were given the same passage and wrote notes based on their group (SNT or MM) assignment. A post-quiz based upon the passage was administered, followed by a post-HSRT. Differences in mean pre- and post-quiz scores between groups were analyzed using independent samples t-tests, whereas differences in mean pre- and post-HSRT total scores and subscores between groups were analyzed using ANOVA. Mind map depth was assessed using the Mind Map Assessment Rubric (MMAR). Results There were no significant differences in mean scores on both the pre- and post-quizzes between note-taking groups. And, no significant differences were found between pre- and post-HSRT mean total scores and subscores. Conclusions Although mind mapping was not found to increase short-term recall of domain-based information or critical thinking compared to SNT, a brief introduction to mind mapping allowed novice MM subjects to perform similarly to SNT subjects. This demonstrates that medical students

  3. What Was His Name? A Historical Quiz

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Michael

    1980-01-01

    In this paper, the reader is given a number of clues as to the identity of a country doctor who made unique contributions to medicine and science which still affect our daily practice and living. The paper also hints at our current responsibility to provide some foundation to the presently termed specialty of family practice. PMID:21293707

  4. Quiz: Test Your Skin Cancer IQ

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccines might be used to prevent melanoma prevent polio treat melanoma A is the correct answer. Skin ... similar to traditional vaccines, like those that prevent polio, but cancer vaccines are given as treatment to ...

  5. Headaches and Migraines: Migraine 101 Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... for migraine headaches. Dietary triggers for migraines include: Chocolate Cheese Food additives such as MSG Alcohol A, B, and C A, B, C, and D True/False: Migraines sometimes run in families. True/False: A bad headache is usually a sign of a brain tumor. Answer Key False. In most cases of ...

  6. Collaborative Quiz Game Developed with Epik

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampaio, Bruno; Morgado, Carmen; Barbosa, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    Games are currently being used by an increasing number of people, of different ages and in different contexts. Usually, they provide fun ways of interaction, collaboration, and competition among players. These aspects may be very important in an educational context, since many research studies confirm that games have many positive effects on…

  7. One Quiz File, Several Modes of Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, John C.

    2012-01-01

    This report offers online course designers, particularly those keen on using Moodle CMSs, a means of diversifying accessibility to their educational materials via multiple modes of delivery that do not require the creation of numerous files and formats for just one activity. The author has made contributions to the development of an open source…

  8. Web-based Homework and Quiz Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, David

    2005-05-01

    Mastering Physics is a Socratic tutor designed to help students learn introductory physics. The tutor poses problems and then comments specifically on about 1/2 of all wrong answers, even though most responses demanded are analytic expressions. Students can request hints (some of which are sub-problems), and work through the list of hint titles at random. In a typical problem there are 10 round trip interactions between tutor and student, raising the percentage of students who get the answer from ˜60% on the first try to over 90% after tutoring. This is Mastery Learning where student time and effort are increased to achieve learning rather than the grade decreased to indicate that the learning is incomplete. Mastering Physics is also a homework administration system that aids the instructor in preparing an assignment by indicating (in the problem library) the difficulty and duration of each problem and of the overall assignment. At MIT doing Mastering Physics has been shown to correlate much better than written homework or going to recitation with scoring better on the final exam in May than that student did on the final in December (which is why the student was repeating the course in the spring). At Arizona State, Mastering Physics increased the class' normalized gain on the Force Concept Inventory from 21% to 40% the year it was introduced.

  9. Approved Instructional Resources Series: A National Initiative to Identify Quality Emergency Medicine Blog and Podcast Content for Resident Education.

    PubMed

    Lin, Michelle; Joshi, Nikita; Grock, Andrew; Swaminathan, Anand; Morley, Eric J; Branzetti, Jeremy; Taira, Taku; Ankel, Felix; Yarris, Lalena M

    2016-05-01

    Background Emergency medicine (EM) residency programs can provide up to 20% of their planned didactic experiences asynchronously through the Individualized Interactive Instruction (III) initiative. Although blogs and podcasts provide potential material for III content, programs often struggle with identifying quality online content. Objective To develop and implement a process to curate quality EM content on blogs and podcasts for resident education and III credit. Methods We developed the Approved Instructional Resources (AIR) Series on the Academic Life in Emergency Medicine website. Monthly, an editorial board identifies, peer reviews, and writes assessment questions for high-quality blog/podcast content. Eight educators rate each post using a standardized scoring instrument. Posts scoring ≥ 30 of 35 points are awarded an AIR badge and featured in the series. Enrolled residents can complete an assessment quiz for III credit. After 12 months of implementation, we report on program feasibility, enrollment rate, web analytics, and resident satisfaction scores. Results As of June 2015, 65 EM residency programs are enrolled in the AIR Series, and 2140 AIR quizzes have been completed. A total of 96% (2064 of 2140) of participants agree or strongly agree that the activity would improve their clinical competency, 98% (2098 of 2140) plan to use the AIR Series for III credit, and 97% (2077 of 2140) plan to use it again in the future. Conclusions The AIR Series is a national asynchronous EM curriculum featuring quality blogs and podcasts. It uses a national expert panel and novel scoring instrument to peer review web-based educational resources.

  10. Achieving New Levels of Recall in Consent to Research by Combining Remedial and Motivational Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Festinger, David S.; Dugosh, Karen L.; Marlowe, Douglas B.; Clements, Nicolle

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Research supports the efficacy of both a remedial consent procedure (corrected feedback) and a motivational consent procedure (incentives) for improving recall of informed consent to research. Although these strategies were statistically superior to standard consent, effects were modest and not clinically significant. This study examines a combined incentivized consent and corrected feedback that simplifies the cognitive task and increases motivation to learn consent information. Methods We randomly assigned 104 individuals consenting to an unrelated host study to a consent as usual (CAU) condition (n = 52) or an incentivized corrected feedback (ICF) condition (n = 52). All participants were told they would be quizzed on their consent recall following their baseline assessment and at 4 monthly follow-ups. ICF participants were also informed that they would earn $5.00 for each correct answer and receive corrected feedback as needed. Results Quiz scores in the two conditions did not differ at the first administration (p = 0.39, d = 0.2), however ICF scores were significantly higher at each subsequent administration (second : p = 0.003, Cohen’s d = 0.6; third: p < 0.0001, d = 1.4; fourth: p < 0.0001, d = 1.6; fifth: p < 0.0001, d = 1.8.) Conclusions The ICF procedure increased consent recall from 72% to 83%, compared to the CAU condition in which recall decreased from 69% to 59%. This supports the statistical and clinical utility of a combined remedial and motivational consent procedure for enhancing recall of study information and human research protections. PMID:23557912

  11. Small Acute Benefits of 4 Weeks Processing Speed Training Games on Processing Speed and Inhibition Performance and Depressive Mood in the Healthy Elderly People: Evidence from a Randomized Control Trial.

    PubMed

    Nouchi, Rui; Saito, Toshiki; Nouchi, Haruka; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Processing speed training using a 1-year intervention period improves cognitive functions and emotional states of elderly people. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether short-term processing speed training such as 4 weeks can benefit elderly people. This study was designed to investigate effects of 4 weeks of processing speed training on cognitive functions and emotional states of elderly people. Methods: We used a single-blinded randomized control trial (RCT). Seventy-two older adults were assigned randomly to two groups: a processing speed training game (PSTG) group and knowledge quiz training game (KQTG) group, an active control group. In PSTG, participants were asked to play PSTG (12 processing speed games) for 15 min, during five sessions per week, for 4 weeks. In the KQTG group, participants were asked to play KQTG (four knowledge quizzes) for 15 min, during five sessions per week, for 4 weeks. We measured several cognitive functions and emotional states before and after the 4 week intervention period. Results: Our results revealed that PSTG improved performances in processing speed and inhibition compared to KQTG, but did not improve performance in reasoning, shifting, short term/working memory, and episodic memory. Moreover, PSTG reduced the depressive mood score as measured by the Profile of Mood State compared to KQTG during the 4 week intervention period, but did not change other emotional measures. Discussion: This RCT first provided scientific evidence related to small acute benefits of 4 week PSTG on processing speed, inhibition, and depressive mood in healthy elderly people. We discuss possible mechanisms for improvements in processing speed and inhibition and reduction of the depressive mood. Trial registration: This trial was registered in The University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN000022250).

  12. An assessment of student experiences and learning based on a novel undergraduate e-learning resource.

    PubMed

    Mehta, S; Clarke, F; Fleming, P S

    2016-08-12

    Purpose/objectives The aims of this study were to describe the development of a novel e-learning resource and to assess its impact on student learning experiences and orthodontic knowledge.Methods Thirty-two 4th year dental undergraduate students at Queen Mary University of London were randomly allocated to receive electronic access to e-learning material covering various undergraduate orthodontic topics over a 6-week period. Thirty-one control students were not given access during the study period. All students were asked to complete electronic quizzes both before (T0) and after (T1) the study period and a general questionnaire concerning familiarity with e-learning. The test group also completed a user satisfaction questionnaire at T1. Two focus groups were also undertaken to explore learners' experiences and suggestions in relation to the resource.Results The mean quiz result improved by 3.9% and 4.5% in the control and test groups, respectively. An independent t-test, however, demonstrated a lack of statistical significance in knowledge gain between control and test groups (P = 0.941). The qualitative feedback indicated that students believed that use of the resource enhanced knowledge and basic understanding with students expressing a wish to ingrain similar resources in other areas of undergraduate teaching.Conclusions Use of the novel orthodontic e-resource by 4th year undergraduate students over a 6-week period did not result in a significant improvement in subject knowledge. However, the e-learning has proven popular among undergraduates and the resources will continue to be refined.

  13. Effect of a Cognitive Aid on Adherence to Perioperative Assessment and Management Guidelines for the Cardiac Evaluation of Non-Cardiac Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Kathryn H; Stiegler, Marjorie P; Schell, Randall M; DiLorenzo, Amy N; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Nietert, Paul J; McEvoy, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND The 2007 American College of Cardiologists/American Heart Association Guidelines on Perioperative Cardiac Evaluation and Care for Noncardiac Surgery is the standard for perioperative cardiac evaluation. Recent work has shown residents and anesthesiologists do not apply these guidelines when tested. This research hypothesized that a decision support tool would improve adherence to this consensus guideline. METHODS Anesthesiology residents at 4 training programs participated in an unblinded prospective randomized cross-over trial in which they completed two tests covering clinical scenarios. One quiz was completed from memory and one with the aid of an electronic decision support tool. Performance was evaluated by overall score (% correct), number of incorrect answers with possibly increased cost or risk of care, and the amount of time required to complete the quizzes both with and without the cognitive aid. The primary outcome was the proportion of correct responses attributable to the use of the decision support tool. RESULTS All anesthesiology residents at four institutions were recruited and 111 residents participated. Use of the decision support tool resulted in a 25% improvement in adherence to guidelines compared to memory alone (p<0.0001), and participants made 77% fewer incorrect responses that would have resulted in increased costs. Use of the tool was associated with a 3.4-minute increase in time to complete the test (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS Use of an electronic decision support tool significantly improved adherence to the guidelines as compared to memory alone. The decision support tool also prevented inappropriate management steps possibly associated with increased healthcare costs. PMID:24705442

  14. Small Acute Benefits of 4 Weeks Processing Speed Training Games on Processing Speed and Inhibition Performance and Depressive Mood in the Healthy Elderly People: Evidence from a Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Nouchi, Rui; Saito, Toshiki; Nouchi, Haruka; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2016-01-01

    Background: Processing speed training using a 1-year intervention period improves cognitive functions and emotional states of elderly people. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether short-term processing speed training such as 4 weeks can benefit elderly people. This study was designed to investigate effects of 4 weeks of processing speed training on cognitive functions and emotional states of elderly people. Methods: We used a single-blinded randomized control trial (RCT). Seventy-two older adults were assigned randomly to two groups: a processing speed training game (PSTG) group and knowledge quiz training game (KQTG) group, an active control group. In PSTG, participants were asked to play PSTG (12 processing speed games) for 15 min, during five sessions per week, for 4 weeks. In the KQTG group, participants were asked to play KQTG (four knowledge quizzes) for 15 min, during five sessions per week, for 4 weeks. We measured several cognitive functions and emotional states before and after the 4 week intervention period. Results: Our results revealed that PSTG improved performances in processing speed and inhibition compared to KQTG, but did not improve performance in reasoning, shifting, short term/working memory, and episodic memory. Moreover, PSTG reduced the depressive mood score as measured by the Profile of Mood State compared to KQTG during the 4 week intervention period, but did not change other emotional measures. Discussion: This RCT first provided scientific evidence related to small acute benefits of 4 week PSTG on processing speed, inhibition, and depressive mood in healthy elderly people. We discuss possible mechanisms for improvements in processing speed and inhibition and reduction of the depressive mood. Trial registration: This trial was registered in The University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN000022250). PMID:28066229

  15. Quiz. Correct answer to the quiz. Check your diagnosis. Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Keva; Liu, Kai-Wen; Chang, I-Wei

    2015-06-01

    We incidentally observed a case of clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma of an 81-year-old woman, presenting with intermittent left flank pain. It is a recently described rare renal parenchymal tumor.

  16. An Electrifying Quiz! Constructing a Printed-Circuit Board Quiz Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calhoun, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Laptop computers, cell phones and the Apple iPod all contain transistors, IC chips, capacitors, and other electronic components. To the general public--and especially students in upper elementary and middle school grades--these components are most often very mysterious items. Yet, it is at elementary and middle school levels that scientists and…

  17. The Future of Web Maps in Next Generation Textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiBiase, D.; Prasad, S.

    2014-12-01

    The reformation of the "Object Formerly Known as Textbook" (coined by the Chronicle of Higher Education) toward a digital future is underway. Emerging nextgen texts look less like electronic books ("ebooks") and more like online courseware. In addition to text and illustrations, nextgen textbooks for STEM subjects are likely to combine quizzes, grade management tools, support for social learning, and interactive media including web maps. Web maps are interactive, multi-scale, online maps that enable teachers and learners to explore, interrogate, and mash up the wide variety of map layers available in the cloud. This presentation will show how web maps coupled with interactive quizzes enable students' purposeful explorations and interpretations of spatial patterns related to humankind's interactions with the earth. Attendees will also learn about Esri's offer to donate ArcGIS Online web mapping subscriptions to every U.S. school as part of the President Obama's ConnectED initiative.

  18. Integration of Problem-based Learning and Innovative Technology Into a Self-Care Course

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assess the integration of problem-based learning and technology into a self-care course. Design. Problem-based learning (PBL) activities were developed and implemented in place of lectures in a self-care course. Students used technology, such as computer-generated virtual patients and iPads, during the PBL sessions. Assessments. Students’ scores on post-case quizzes were higher than on pre-case quizzes used to assess baseline knowledge. Student satisfaction with problem-based learning and the use of technology in the course remained consistent throughout the semester. Conclusion. Integrating problem-based learning and technology into a self-care course enabled students to become active learners. PMID:23966730

  19. Using Web-Based Key Character and Classification Instruction for Teaching Undergraduate Students Insect Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golick, Douglas A.; Heng-Moss, Tiffany M.; Steckelberg, Allen L.; Brooks, David. W.; Higley, Leon G.; Fowler, David

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine whether undergraduate students receiving web-based instruction based on traditional, key character, or classification instruction differed in their performance of insect identification tasks. All groups showed a significant improvement in insect identifications on pre- and post-two-dimensional picture specimen quizzes. The study also determined student performance on insect identification tasks was not as good as for family-level identification as compared to broader insect orders and arthropod classification identification tasks. Finally, students erred significantly more by misidentification than misspelling specimen names on prepared specimen quizzes. Results of this study support that short web-based insect identification exercises can improve insect identification performance. Also included is a discussion of how these results can be used in teaching and future research on biological identification.

  20. Using PRS in Large Introductory Astronomy Courses: Engaging the Audience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutel, R.

    2004-12-01

    The use of electronic voting systems in large lecture-based courses is rapidly increasing in popularity. An obvious advantage of these systems are that they allow individual students to provide immediate anonymous feedback of their understanding (or misunderstanding) of a concept before the instructor continues to another topic. The instructor can also use the system for evaluation in place of written quizzes or even homework. I will review my experience with the Personal Response System (PRS) which I have used for two years in several large introductory astronomy courses. I will describe both the successes and problems encountered, both pedagogically and technically. In particular,I will discuss the art of writing non-trivial multiple choice questions suitable for PRS quizzes, capturing student interest by varying the question format (e.g. using a 'Who Wants to be a Millionaire Astronomer?' theme), and enhanced software that replaces the software originally provided.

  1. Is Latency to Test Deadline a Predictor of Student Test Performance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landrum, R. Eric; Gurung, Regan A. R.

    2013-01-01

    When students are given a period or window of time to take an exam, is taking an exam earlier in the window (high latency to deadline) related to test scores? In Study 1, students (n = 236) were given windows of time to take online each of 13 quizzes and 4 exams. In Study 2, students (n = 251) similarly took 4 exams online within a test window. In…

  2. Student Attitudes, Satisfaction, and Learning in a Collaborative Testing Environment*

    PubMed Central

    Meseke, Christopher A.; Nafziger, Rita; Meseke, Jamie K.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: This study examined the effect of collaborative testing on student learning, attitude toward testing, and course satisfaction at a chiropractic college. Methods: The study compared testing performance between two cohorts of students taking an advanced neuroanatomy course: a control group (n = 78) and an experimental group (n = 80). Scores examined for each cohort included sums of quizzes, examination scores, and a comprehensive final examination. The control cohort completed weekly quizzes as individuals, while the experimental cohort completed the quizzes collaboratively in small groups. Both cohorts completed three unit examinations and the comprehensive final examination as individuals. Additionally, pretest–posttest and delayed posttest scores were examined. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA) (including repeated measures MANCOVA) were used for statistical analysis. Results: The experimental cohort scored significantly higher compared to the control cohort on all quizzes (F = 217.761; df = 1,156; p < .05) and overall course grades (F = 16.099; df = 1,156; p < .05). There were no significant differences in either the comprehensive final (posttest) (F = 3.138; df = 1,122; p > .05) or the delayed posttest (taken 5 weeks after the end of the course) (F = 0.431; df = 1,122; p > .05) between the two cohorts. The overall scores for both cohorts on the delayed posttest were significantly lower than the posttest scores (F = 4.660; df = 1,122; p < .05). Conclusions: This project extends previous findings that students using collaborative testing have significantly increased short-term course performance compared with those students using traditional testing. No differences in learning or retention were noted. PMID:20480011

  3. PhysicsFun4K24

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-31

    they are and what they do. The process starts with a concrete curriculum plan, a standard of learning or a classroom lesson plan. Typically, the...measuring? 3. Games that act too much like a classroom , with quizzes interrupt a player’s experience. In order for the PhysicsFun to be a...successful tool that augments classroom learning it needs to incorporate learning assessment, and evaluation capabilities into Game Play. 4.1 Physics Fun

  4. The Hubble Exoplanet Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Laura; Carson, J.; Ruwadi, D.; Low, K.; Jordan, S.; Schneider, G.

    2013-01-01

    We present a status report on the Hubble Exoplanet Classroom, an interactive website designed to engage 8-12th grade students in physical science concepts using the exciting field of exoplanet studies. Addressing national teaching standards, the webpage allows educators to enhance their physical science, physics, and astronomy curriculum with student-driven lessons. The webpage records students' performance on lessons and quizzes and compiles the results, which can be accessed by the instructor using a secure website.

  5. Motivating students to read the textbook before class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepper, Rachel E.

    2016-11-01

    Many faculty in STEM courses assign textbook reading in advance of lecture, yet evidence shows few students actually read the textbook. Those students that do read often do so only after the material has been presented in class. Preparing for class by reading the textbook beforehand improves student learning and is particularly critical for classes that employ active engagement strategies. Here I present strategies I have used to successfully motivate my students to read the textbook before class in physics classes ranging from introductory algebra-based physics to advanced courses for physics majors. In the introductory course, I used pre-class reading quizzes, a common strategy that has been shown effective in previous studies, but one that is somewhat time-consuming to implement. In my more advanced courses I used reading reflections, which required considerably less time. While it was typical for less than 25% of students to read the textbook before I implemented reading quizzes or reflections, after implementing these strategies 70-90% of students reported reading the textbook before class most of the time. Students also report finding both the readings themselves and the quizzes and reflections valuable for their learning.

  6. Social media and the classroom?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-02-01

    Many years ago, I learned (through eavesdropping on a conversation during lab) that my students had set up their own Facebook group. They told me they were using it to help each other with homework assignments. This year, my daughter took physics at a university. She and her friends were struggling a bit with the online quizzes. I suggested that she set up a Facebook community and add me as a member. I would answer questions and help the group study. My daughter's group used Facebook to get answers to specific questions from the quizzes. They often ended up helping each other because the questions were posed quite late in the evening. Questions ranged from exact copies of the original queries to "Does anyone know what equation to use for this?" I began to think that, although their grades were improving on the quizzes, they were not gaining any content knowledge. To combat this, I made and posted a few short video clips reteaching the content.

  7. Gamification: using elements of video games to improve engagement in an undergraduate physics class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, J. A.; O'Meara, J. M.; Gerhardt, T. C.; Williams, M.

    2016-09-01

    Gamification has been extensively implemented and studied in corporate settings and has proven to be more effective than traditional employee-training programs, however, few classroom studies of gamification have been reported in the literature. Our study explored the potential of gamified on-line undergraduate physics content as a mechanism to enhance student learning and motivation. Specifically, the main objective of this work was to determine whether extrinsic motivation indicators commonly used in video games could increase student engagement with course content outside of the classroom. Life Science students taking an introductory physics course were provided access to gamified multiple choice quizzes as part of their course assessment. The quizzes incorporated common gaming elements such as points, streaks, leaderboards and achievements, as well as some gamified graphical enhancements and feedback. Student attitudes and performance among those using the gamified quizzes were examined and compared to non-gamified control groups within the same course. Student engagement was quantified through examining student participation above and beyond the minimum course requirements. The results showed that gaming techniques are significantly correlated with increased engagement with course material outside of the classroom. These results may assist instructors in engaging and motivating students outside the classroom through carefully designed online and distance-delivered undergraduate physics content. Furthermore, the gaming elements incorporated in this study were not specifically tied to the physics content and can be easily translated to any educational setting.

  8. Multimodal representation contributes to the complex development of science literacy in a college biology class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, William Drew

    educators are communicating ideas and concepts to their audience with more than simple text. A focused holistic rubric was designed in this study to score how well students in this class were able to incorporate aspects of multimodality into their writing assignments. Using these scores and factors within the rubric (ex. Number of original modes created) they were correlated with classroom performance scores to determine the strength and direction of the relationship. Classroom observations of lectures and discussion sections along with personal interviews with students and teaching assistants aided the interpretation of the results. The results from the study were surprisingly complex to interpret given the background of literature which suggested a strong relationship between multimodal representations and science learning (Lemke, 2000). There were significant positive correlations between student multimodal representations and quiz scores but not exam scores. This study was also confounded by significant differences between sections at the beginning of the study which may have led to learning effects later. The dissimilarity between the tasks of writing during their homework and working on exams may be the reason for no significant correlations with exams. The power to interpret these results was limited by the number of the participants, the number of modal experiences by the students, and the operationalization of multimodal knowledge through the holistic rubric. These results do show that a relationship does exist between the similar tasks within science writing and quizzes. Students may also gain derived science literacy benefits from modal experiences on distal tasks in exams as well. This study shows that there is still much more research to be known about the interconnectedness of multimodal representational knowledge and use to the development of science literacy.

  9. Differences between Lab Completion and Non-Completion on Student Performance in an Online Undergraduate Environmental Science Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsi, Gianluca

    2011-12-01

    Web-based technology has revolutionized the way education is delivered. Although the advantages of online learning appeal to large numbers of students, some concerns arise. One major concern in online science education is the value that participation in labs has on student performance. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationships between lab completion and student academic success as measured by test grades, scientific self-confidence, scientific skills, and concept mastery. A random sample of 114 volunteer undergraduate students, from an online Environmental Science program at the American Public University System, was tested. The study followed a quantitative, non-experimental research design. Paired sample t-tests were used for statistical comparison between pre-lab and post-lab test grades, two scientific skills quizzes, and two scientific self-confidence surveys administered at the beginning and at the end of the course. The results of the paired sample t-tests revealed statistically significant improvements on all post-lab test scores: Air Pollution lab, t(112) = 6.759, p < .001; Home Chemicals lab t(114) = 8.585, p < .001; Water Use lab, t(116) = 6.657, p < .001; Trees and Carbon lab, t(113) = 9.921, p < .001; Stratospheric Ozone lab, t(112) =12.974, p < .001; Renewable Energy lab, t(115) = 7.369, p < .001. The end of the course Scientific Skills quiz revealed statistically significant improvements, t(112) = 8.221, p < .001. The results of the two surveys showed a statistically significant improvement on student Scientific Self-Confidence because of lab completion, t(114) = 3.015, p < .05. Because age and gender were available, regression models were developed. The results indicated weak multiple correlation coefficients and were not statistically significant at alpha = .05. Evidence suggests that labs play a positive role in a student's academic success. It is recommended that lab experiences be included in all online Environmental Science

  10. The effect of matching learning styles and instructional strategies on academic achievement and student enjoyment of science lessons in a high school general chemistry course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fundi, Shaaban Kitindi

    This study explored the matching hypothesis by examining the effect of matching students' learning style preferences with teachers' instructional strategies on students' academic performance and lesson enjoyment in a high school general chemistry course. To achieve the study aims, the researcher utilized a single-participant study design with a baseline phase and four treatment phases. Determination of students' learning style preferences involved using the Visual, Audial, Read/Write, and Kinesthetic (VARK) Learning Style Inventory. During the one-week baseline phase, students received instruction using regular instructional strategies, followed by four treatment phases: visual intervention, audial intervention, read/write intervention, and a kinesthetic intervention. Each intervention phase lasted one week. During each phase, the researcher measured academic achievement using three teacher-created quiz scores. Student enjoyment was measured using the Test of Science-Related Attitudes (TOSRA). A total of 14 students completed the VARK Questionnaire. Of these, eight students (2 boys and 6 girls) exhibited a multimodal learning style were subsequently excluded from study participation. An additional student was excluded due to excessive absenteeism, leaving five students who completed all phases of the study. Results indicated that matching students' learning style preferences with teachers' instructional strategies did not improve students' academic performance as measured by teacher-created quizzes. However, weekly switching of the instructional strategies did improve student enjoyment of chemistry lessons. Student enjoyment increased for all participants in all intervention phases regardless of whether or not instruction matched students' learning style preferences compared to baseline phase. The results of this study do not support the matching hypothesis. The students in this study, preferred to learn with multiple teaching strategies. Alternating instructional

  11. Sleeping and Driving Don't Mix: Sleep Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs of sleepiness. If you're getting a AAA or CAA Triptik, ask the travel counselor to ... of Top Deadly Mistakes Made by Teen Drivers -- AAA AAA: Road debris causes avoidable crashes, deaths Save ...

  12. Quiz: Alzheimer's Disease | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... with mild Alzheimer's disease may be helped in day-to-day living by a list of daily plans notes ... help some people with mild Alzheimer's disease with day-to-day living. A big calendar, a list ...

  13. COPD Quiz | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... irritant that causes COPD is: allergies cigarette smoke air pollution Question 4. Common signs and symptoms of COPD ... secondhand smoke avoid other lung irritants, such as air pollution, chemical fumes, and dust follow your treatment plan ...

  14. WITHDRAWN: Cas radiologique du mois Radiological quiz of the month.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, D; Soldaini, A; Lehmann, C; Leflot, L

    2009-03-10

    This article has been withdrawn at the request of the author(s) and/or editor. The Publisher apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause. The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/withdrawalpolicy.

  15. Label Review Training: Module 5: Course Final Quiz

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Pesticide labels translate results of our extensive evaluations of pesticide products into conditions, directions and precautions that define parameters for use of a pesticide with the goal of ensuring protection of human health and the environment.

  16. Sleeping and Driving Don't Mix: Sleep Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Online Roadwise RX FAQ Research Driven Useful Links Traffic Safety News Cars are getting smarter: Here's why ... says states with medical marijuana laws have lower traffic fatality rates - Commerce Journal Drowsy driving: The other ...

  17. ECG Quiz: A Murmur in an Asymptomatic Athlete.

    PubMed

    Butcher, J D

    1997-08-01

    A 35-year-old, active duty Army officer presented for a screening physical exam before entering special training for HALO (High Altitude Low Opening) parachute qualification. This training involves jumping from aircraft at extreme altitudes with deployment of the parachute at relatively low altitudes (free fall). At the time of this evaluation he was assigned to a special operations airborne unit on active jump status. Careful review of his recent exercise history revealed a gradual decrease in endurance over the past several years, which he felt was due to decreased training intensity. His exercise consisted of running 3 to 4 miles four times a week and physical fitness training with his military unit three times a week. He continued to achieve high scores on the Army Physical Readiness Test.

  18. A quiz on "the ethics of accepting gifts from industry".

    PubMed

    Holm, Richard P

    2007-03-01

    (1) Cash payments should not be accepted from any health-related industry, which might create a conflict of interest, unless it is payment for legitimate research purposes, and the cash is not for purposes of marketing. (2) Marketing gifts, which benefit the patient, are acceptable as long as they are not of substantial value...like equal or less than $100. (3) Conferences (including a "mo dest" meal) sponsored by industry are acceptable when they serve a genuine educational function, and promote objective and scientific activity. (4) Professional people should understand and appreciate the marketing forces, which are endeavoring to influence our behavior. To interact with marketing people is appropriate, not unethical. However we must not be influenced in any way that would disadvantage our patients.

  19. To Quiz or Not to Quiz: Formative Tests Help Detect Students at Risk of Failing the Clinical Anatomy Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azzi, Alain J.; Ramnanan, Christopher J.; Smith, Jennifer; Dionne, Éric; Jalali, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Through a modified team-based learning (TBL) in the anatomy pre-clerkship curriculum, formative evaluations are utilized in the University of Ottawa Faculty of Medicine to assess and predict students' outcomes on summative examinations. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficiency of formative assessments to predict student's…

  20. Study Behavior and Performance: Effect of Practice and Test Question Similarity.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-01

    Inserted question s Te~t developmen t 20. ABSTRACT (Cones... on ‘cc. ~ .SU. SI onc. ..V ond IU..,H& by bS..b ~~~b.r) The st udy was conducted to test...that of a real-world classroom situation. Purpose The purpose of this research and development was to evaluate the effect of practice questions in a...The same prescription applies to classroom instruction where the teacher provides practice by oral quizzing or in workbooks, and to other situations in

  1. Half Lives for ``Irradiated'' Nonscience Majors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geise, Kathleen; Hallam, Peter; Rattray, Rebecca; Stencel, Robert; Wolfe, Tristan

    2014-03-01

    We launched new hands-on radiation labs to supplement lecture material for undergraduate, non-science majors at the University of Denver to reinforce learning objectives during winter quarter 2014 and in order to help educate the public about nuclear energy decisions. Our learning objectives included: 1. differentiate between particle radiation and electro-magnetic radiation, 2. understand that particle radiation comes in alpha, beta and gamma types, 3. atomic and nuclear structure, 4. decay and half-life, 5. understand safe vs. unsafe doses and issues surrounding nuclear waste disposal. We used prelab surveys, prelab assessments, laboratory write-ups and quizzes to measure success with the learning objectives.

  2. PubMed

    1994-11-23

    Team nursing: Nursing students from the University of Greenwich have been presented with the Duke of Edinburgh's Award after competing against 40 other teams in The Great Escape activity day at Eastnor Castle in Hertfordshire. The six, who met for the first time on the day, had to complete a range of activities, including orienteering, assault boat racing, abseiling, clay pigeon shooting, quizzes and an egg race. They are, left to right, back: Emma Starmer-Smith, Sheila Cousins, Julie McKenzie. Front: Greg Watson, Mark Bottomley and Tony Convery.

  3. Comparing assessment methods as predictors of student learning in an undergraduate mathematics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorter, Nichole A.; Young, Cynthia Y.

    2011-12-01

    This experiment was designed to determine which assessment method: continuous assessment (in the form of daily in-class quizzes), cumulative assessment (in the form of online homework), or project-based learning, best predicted student learning (dependent upon post-test grades) in an undergraduate mathematics course. Participants included 117 university-level undergraduate freshmen enrolled in a course titled 'Mathematics for Calculus'. A stepwise regression model was formulated to model the relationship between the predictor variables (the continuous assessment, cumulative assessment, and project scores) versus the outcome variable (the post-test scores). Results indicated that ultimately the continuous assessment scores best predicted students' post-test scores.

  4. Multiple-Choice Answers: To Change or Not to Change? Perhaps Not Such a Simple Question

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wainscott, Heidi

    2016-11-01

    When grading students' quizzes and exams, I find that students are seemingly always changing their answers from the right answer to the wrong answer. In fact, I have cautioned students against changing their answer. Colleagues have made similar observations and some books on test-taking strategies advise against answer-changing. In an effort to find out how pervasive the answer-changing problem was, I collected some data and dug a little deeper into the research. My hypothesis was that students most frequently changed their answers from right to wrong. Have you made similar observations? If yes, then the results of this study may surprise you.

  5. The LiverAnatomyExplorer: a WebGL-based surgical teaching tool.

    PubMed

    Birr, Steven; Mönch, Jeanette; Sommerfeld, Dirk; Preim, Uta; Preim, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    The LiverAnatomyExplorer is a real-time surgical teaching tool based on state-of-the-art Web technologies such as SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics), X3D (Extensible3D), and WebGL (Web Graphics Library). Unlike other medical e-learning systems, the LiverAnatomyExplorer combines traditional clinical 2D imagery with interactive Web-based 3D models derived from patient-specific image data. The tool is enhanced by surgical videos, a self-assessment tool, and an online authoring tool with which instructors can manage the presented case studies and create multiple-choice quizzes.

  6. A pilot training manual for the terminal configured vehicle electronic horizontal situation indicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houck, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    The initial phase of a training program for the Terminal Configured Vehicle Electronic Situation indicator (EHSI) is presented. The EHSI and its symbology is introduced and interpretation of the symbols is explained. Basic symbols shown on the display at all times are first presented. Additional optional symbols to be used as appropriate during different portions of a flight are then introduced and various display configurations interpreted. The upper half of each page is a reproduction of the EHSI display or other pertinent instructional material and the bottom half contains explanatory text, simplifying production of an audiovisual package for use with large training classes. Two quizzes on the course material are included.

  7. Everyone's answering: using technology to increase classroom participation.

    PubMed

    Filer, Debra

    2010-01-01

    A study was designed to assess the impact of a wireless technology known as an audience response system (ARS), commonly known clickers, on learning and student engagement in a nursing classroom. Students in the control group responded verbally to questions posed during lectures, while students in the intervention groups responded anonymously using the ARS. Although no significant improvement in postlecture quizzes was noted, students in ARS-enhanced lectures reported significantly higher satisfaction scores. The use of ARS promoted a sense of comfort, encouraged participation, and motivated students to answer questions and interact with the subject matter.

  8. Students' perceptions of academic dishonesty in the chemistry classroom laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Carlo, Dawn I.; Bodner, George M.

    2004-01-01

    Although the literature on both academic dishonesty and scientific misconduct is extensive, research on academic dishonesty has focused on quizzes, exams, and papers, with the virtual exclusion of the classroom laboratory. This study examined the distinctions undergraduate chemistry majors made between academic dishonesty in the classroom laboratory and scientific misconduct in the research laboratory. Across the spectrum of undergraduate chemistry courses, from the introductory course for first-semester chemistry majors to the capstone course in instrumental analysis, we noted that students believe the classroom lab is fundamentally different from a research or industrial lab. This difference is so significant that it carries over into students' perceptions of dishonesty in these two environments.

  9. Increased Course Structure Improves Performance in Introductory Biology

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Scott; Haak, David; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2011-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that highly structured course designs, which implement reading quizzes and/or extensive in-class active-learning activities and weekly practice exams, can lower failure rates in an introductory biology course for majors, compared with low-structure course designs that are based on lecturing and a few high-risk assessments. We controlled for 1) instructor effects by analyzing data from quarters when the same instructor taught the course, 2) exam equivalence with new assessments called the Weighted Bloom's Index and Predicted Exam Score, and 3) student equivalence using a regression-based Predicted Grade. We also tested the hypothesis that points from reading quizzes, clicker questions, and other “practice” assessments in highly structured courses inflate grades and confound comparisons with low-structure course designs. We found no evidence that points from active-learning exercises inflate grades or reduce the impact of exams on final grades. When we controlled for variation in student ability, failure rates were lower in a moderately structured course design and were dramatically lower in a highly structured course design. This result supports the hypothesis that active-learning exercises can make students more skilled learners and help bridge the gap between poorly prepared students and their better-prepared peers. PMID:21633066

  10. Using Attendance Worksheets to Improve Student Attendance, Participation, and Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, Edward

    2013-06-01

    As science instructors we are faced with two main barriers with respect to student learning. The first is motivating our students to attend class and the second is to make them active participants in the learning process once we have gotten them to class. As we head further into the internet age this problem only gets exacerbated as students have replaced newspapers with cell phones which can surf the web, check their emails, and play games. Quizzes can motivated the students to attend class but do not necessarily motivate them to pay attention. Active learning techniques work but we as instructors have been bombarded by the active learning message to the point that we either do it already or refuse to. I present another option which in my classroom has doubled the rate at which students learn my material. By using attendance worksheets instead of end of class quizzes I hold students accountable for not just their attendance but for when they show up and when they leave the class. In addition it makes the students an active participant in the class even without using active learning techniques as they are writing notes and answering the questions you have posed while the class is in progress. Therefore using attendance worksheets is an effective tool to use in order to guide student learning.

  11. Pedagogy for teaching and learning cooperatively on the Web: a Web-based pharmacology course.

    PubMed

    Tse, Mimi M Y; Pun, Sandra P Y; Chan, Moon Fai

    2007-02-01

    The Internet is becoming a preferred place to find information. Millions of people go online in the search of health and medical information. Likewise, the demand for Web-based courses grows. This article presents the development, utilization and evaluation of a web-based pharmacology course for nursing students. The course was developed based on 150 commonly used drugs. There were 110 year 1 nursing students took part in the course. After attending six hours face to face lecture of pharmacology over three weeks, students were invited to complete a questionnaire (pre-test) about learning pharmacology. The course materials were then uploaded to a WebCT for student's self-directed learning and attempts to pass two scheduled online quizzes. At the end of the semester, students were given the same questionnaire (post-test). There were a significant increase in the understanding compared with memorizing the subject content, the development of problem solving ability in learning pharmacology and becoming an independent learner (p ,0.05). Online quizzes yielded satisfactory results. In the focused group interview, students appreciated the time flexibility and convenience associated with web-based learning, also, they had made good suggestions in enhancing web-based learning. Web-based approach is promising for teaching and learning pharmacology for nurses and other health-care professionals.

  12. A Web-based e-learning course: integration of pathophysiology into pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Tse, Mimi M Y; Lo, Lisa W L

    2008-11-01

    The Internet is becoming the preferred place to find information. Millions of people go online in search of health and medical information. Likewise, the demand for Web-based courses is growing. This paper presents the development, utilization, and evaluation of a Web-based e-learning course for nursing students, entitled Integration of Pathophysiology into Pharmacology. The pathophysiology component included cardiovascular, respiratory, central nervous and immune system diseases, while the pharmacology component was developed based on 150 commonly used drugs. One hundred and nineteen Year 1 nursing students took part in the course. The Web-based e-learning course materials were uploaded to a WebCT for students' self-directed learning and attempts to pass two scheduled online quizzes. At the end of the semester, students were given a questionnaire to measure the e-learning experience. Their experience in the e-learning course was a positive one. Students stated that they were able to understand rather than memorize the subject content, and develop their problem solving and critical thinking abilities. Online quizzes yielded satisfactory results. In the focus group interview, students indicated that they appreciated the time flexibility and convenience associated with Web-based learning, and also made good suggestions for enhancing Web-based learning. The Web-based approach is promising for teaching and learning pathophysiology and pharmacology for nurses and other healthcare professionals.

  13. [Development and evaluation of an internet-based educational system about herbs and dietary supplements through periodical distribution of information to health professionals].

    PubMed

    Asahina, Yasuko; Hori, Satoko; Ohtani, Hisakazu; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2009-06-01

    Herbs and dietary supplements (HDS) are widely used, and health professionals are in an ideal position to educate patients about them. However, it is sometimes difficult to evaluate their risks and benefits with limited information and what is worse, many health professionals in Japan are unconcerned with HDS. Therefore, we aimed to develop an internet-based educational system to periodically provide information about HDS to medical doctors and pharmacists in order to increase their awareness. Monographs about selected HDS, accompanied with educational quizzes, were prepared to meet pharmacists' needs. Examples of clinical Q&A cases about drug interactions involving HDS were prepared. The material was distributed weekly to registered health professionals by e-mail and via WWW pages. Two hundred and forty-four health professionals evaluated the system by questionnaire. The questionnaire results revealed that 1) more than 75% of responders evaluated the system as useful, 2) compilation of information into educational quizzes and cases encouraged health professionals to learn about HDS with less difficulty, and 3) e-mails led them to learn periodically and to be more concerned about the safety of HDS. In conclusion, the developed information system for HDS was proved to be useful and should serve to improve the understanding of health professionals about this issue.

  14. Daily online testing in large classes: boosting college performance while reducing achievement gaps.

    PubMed

    Pennebaker, James W; Gosling, Samuel D; Ferrell, Jason D

    2013-01-01

    An in-class computer-based system, that included daily online testing, was introduced to two large university classes. We examined subsequent improvements in academic performance and reductions in the achievement gaps between lower- and upper-middle class students in academic performance. Students (N = 901) brought laptop computers to classes and took daily quizzes that provided immediate and personalized feedback. Student performance was compared with the same data for traditional classes taught previously by the same instructors (N = 935). Exam performance was approximately half a letter grade above previous semesters, based on comparisons of identical questions asked from earlier years. Students in the experimental classes performed better in other classes, both in the semester they took the course and in subsequent semester classes. The new system resulted in a 50% reduction in the achievement gap as measured by grades among students of different social classes. These findings suggest that frequent consequential quizzing should be used routinely in large lecture courses to improve performance in class and in other concurrent and subsequent courses.

  15. An Elective Course in Cardiovascular Electrophysiology for Pharmacy Learners

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To implement an integrated, comprehensive, and learner-centered elective course focused at exposing learners to the interpretation of electrocardiograms and highlighting the mechanisms underlining the abnormal electrophysiological events. Design. Learners were presented with foundational information on the mechanisms underlying electrophysiological changes associated with the development of arrhythmias. They then discussed the interpretation of electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings and diagnosis of cardiovascular events. Teaching formats included “chalk-talk” and didactic sessions, case-based exercises providing hands-on evaluation of ECG recordings, and high-fidelity simulation presenting cases of arrhythmias. The course design emphasized critical thinking, learner engagement, and development of problem-solving skills. Learners were assessed by formal assignments, examinations, and in-class quizzes. Assessment. Learner comprehension of the material was assessed using cumulative examinations, in-class quizzes, assignments, and in-class presentations. Learner evaluations showed that the case-based discussions, practice ECGs, review tables, and illustrations enhanced course performance and retention of complex material. Conclusion. The elective course provided in-depth exposure to the mechanisms underlying electrophysiological aberrations resulting in arrhythmias. It gave learners an opportunity to learn the art of ECG interpretation and to apply their knowledge in simulated scenarios. As clinical teams adopt a multidisciplinary team approach to patient care, acquiring these skills enriches learner experiences and allows them to expand their role and professional opportunities as pharmacists. PMID:27899826

  16. Taking "The Math You Need When You Need It" Modules Beyond Introductory Geology Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baer, E. M.; Wenner, J. M.; Burn, H. E.

    2012-12-01

    classroom (either in lab exercises or a lecture period). Almost all instructors employed pre- and posttests to gauge learning. More than ¾ of survey respondents introduced the modules within the first week of class. In all but one instance, students were instructed to complete an online quiz immediately after working through the online modules and most (77%) designed these post-module quizzes as formative assessments allowing at least 3 attempts. The grades on these modules contributed to students' grades but were relatively low stakes with 88% reporting that the modules contributed to less than 10% of a student's course grade. Given the use beyond the introductory geology classroom and the similarity of the use of these modules in a wide variety of courses, it appears that the design of the modules is sound. However, previous studies have indicated that mathematical skills are not easily transferred (e.g. Bassok. and Holyoak, 1989) suggesting the adaptation of the modules for use outside the geosciences.

  17. Developing Online Oceanography at UCSB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prothero, W. A.; Dodson, H.

    2001-12-01

    Oceanography at UCSB is an introductory general education science course taken by up to 200 students per quarter. The emphasis is on learning science process by engaging in authentic science activities that use real earth data. Recently, to increase student motivation, the course has been modified to include an Earth Summit framework. The online support being developed for this course is the first step in the creation of a completely online oceanography class. Foundation software was first tested in the class during Spring 2001. Online activities that are supported are writing and instructor feedback, online threaded discussion with live chat and graphics, automatically graded homeworks and games, auto graded quizzes with questions randomly selected from a database, and thought problems graded by the instructor(s). Future plans include integration with commercial course management software. To allow choice of assignments, all course activities totaled110%. Since grades were based on A=90-100, B=80-90, C= 70-80, etc, it was possible to get a better than A grade. Students see the effect (on their grade) of each assignment by calculating their current course grade. Course activities included (most of which are automatically graded): weekly lab homeworks, weekly mini-quizzes (10 multiple choice questions selected at random from a topic database), weekly thought questions (graded by the TA), 3 written assignments, and "Question of the Day" from lecture (credit given for handing it in), The online writing software allowed students to enter their writing, edit and link to graphic images, print the paper, and electronically hand it in. This has the enormous advantage of allowing the instructor and TA's convenient access to all student papers. At the end of the course, students were asked how effective each of the course activities were in learning the course material. On a five point scale, ranging from highest contribution to lowest, the percentage of students giving

  18. A Student-Designed Grammar Quiz on the Web: A Constructive Mode of Grammar Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukushima, Tatsuya

    2006-01-01

    The World Wide Web has frequently been incorporated into second/foreign language (L2 hereafter) course instruction during the past decade. However, many teaching methods essentially employed it as a reactive mode of L2 instruction. Many other methods have been designed to facilitate constructive L2 production. They are, however, limited in their…

  19. Not Another Quiz: An Approach to Engage Today's Students in Meaningful Current Events Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Leigh L.; Shemberger, Melony; Price, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Journalism professors are concerned with how effectively students understand current news events and engage with mainstream news sources. This essay is based on a survey administered to students in a newswriting course and analyzed the kinds of current news that students followed in weekly assignments designed with a digital, interactive approach.…

  20. Take this Quick Quiz: Alcohol and Medications | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... three alcoholic drinks each day, totaling 21 per week. True False 4) Drinking alcohol and/or mixing ... exceed a total of seven drinks in a week. Drinking more than these amounts puts people at ...

  1. Snapshot quiz - recurrent right iliac fossa pain in the patient with a previous history of appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Aris Chandran, Johan; Cobb, Will A; Keeler, Barrie D; Soin, Bob

    2015-06-01

    A low threshold for computed tomography (CT) scanning in patients with previous appendicectomy and right iliac fossa pain helps facilitate timely diagnosis and exclusion of other differential diagnoses. Here, we present a rare cause which has significant medicolegal ramifications and is accurately diagnosed with CT.

  2. The Ultimate Spelling Quiz Book: Over 100 Tests, Super Tests, and Killer Spelling Bees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grambs, David

    Not aimed at beginning or elementary spellers, this book contains more than 100 tests interspersed with various informative items, pertinent quotations, amusing anecdotes, and lightly historical discourses relating to the orthography of English. The tests in the book represent a rather extensive vocabulary (a person who takes all of the tests is…

  3. Interaction of a Vocabulary Quiz with Cognitive Instructional Strategies in First Language Learning among Japanese Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomita, Kei

    2016-01-01

    In response to concerns regarding effects of hyperlinked annotation on reading comprehension, this study was undertaken to compare hyperlinked annotation with student highlighting of unknown/difficult words. An online highlighting tool was used to help students reflect their prior vocabulary in a hyperlink-based annotated passage. Highlighting…

  4. Leveraging Quiz-Based Multiple-Prize Web Tournaments for Reinforcing Routine Mathematical Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Tablas, Ana I.; de Fuentes, Jose M.; Hernandez-Ardieta, Jorge L.; Ramos, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    In Higher Education Engineering studies, there exists the need of engaging students in performing drill and practice activities with the goal of reinforcing routine mathematical skills. The usual optionality of these tasks entails the risk of students not fulfilling them in an effective way. Although competitive approaches are not a trend in…

  5. WhoKnows? Evaluating Linked Data Heuristics with a Quiz that Cleans up DBpedia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waitelonis, Jorg; Ludwig, Nadine; Knuth, Magnus; Sack, Harald

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Linking Open Data (LOD) provides a vast amount of well structured semantic information, but many inconsistencies may occur, especially if the data are generated with the help of automated methods. Data cleansing approaches enable detection of inconsistencies and overhauling of affected data sets, but they are difficult to apply…

  6. Quiz: How much do you know about breast cancer? | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain, it is called metastatic breast cancer, not brain cancer. Doctors sometimes call this "distant" disease. D is ... body, most often the bones, lungs, liver, or brain. A is the correct answer. Surgery only treats the cancer at the site on the body where the ...

  7. The "It's Not Totally Dreamland" Quiz: Public Library Teen Area Self-Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Cathy; Mitchell, Sylvia

    1995-01-01

    Contains 18 questions for librarians to ask that relate to the young adult sections in public libraries. Addresses issues such as signs, types of materials, local information, seating, paperbacks, types of shelving, displays, free handouts, and weeding the collection. (LRW)

  8. Interprofessional Online Global Health Course

    PubMed Central

    Devraj, Radhika; Blankson, Faustina; Xin, Huaibo

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The design and evaluation of an online global health course targeted for pharmacy and other undergraduates is presented. Design. Enrolled students represented nursing, health education, pharmacy and a variety of other disciplines. The course was designed as an entirely online one with no class meetings. The course consisted of eight modules addressing global health competencies and interprofessional education competencies. Readings, quizzes, study question and team projects were tailored to the goals of each module. Students worked in interprofessional teams for their team projects. Assessment. Assessments consisted of pre and post course perceptions and course evaluation. Rubrics were designed to evaluate team assignments and peer assessment of team participation. Conclusion. Course was successful in enhancing perceptions of global health knowledge and understanding of roles and responsibilities of various health disciplines in addressing challenges of global health. No changes in teamwork perceptions were documented after completing the course. The overall course structure was successful in meeting course goals. PMID:28090104

  9. Interprofessional Online Global Health Course.

    PubMed

    Poirier, Therese I; Devraj, Radhika; Blankson, Faustina; Xin, Huaibo

    2016-11-25

    Objective. The design and evaluation of an online global health course targeted for pharmacy and other undergraduates is presented. Design. Enrolled students represented nursing, health education, pharmacy and a variety of other disciplines. The course was designed as an entirely online one with no class meetings. The course consisted of eight modules addressing global health competencies and interprofessional education competencies. Readings, quizzes, study question and team projects were tailored to the goals of each module. Students worked in interprofessional teams for their team projects. Assessment. Assessments consisted of pre and post course perceptions and course evaluation. Rubrics were designed to evaluate team assignments and peer assessment of team participation. Conclusion. Course was successful in enhancing perceptions of global health knowledge and understanding of roles and responsibilities of various health disciplines in addressing challenges of global health. No changes in teamwork perceptions were documented after completing the course. The overall course structure was successful in meeting course goals.

  10. A Module for Adaptive Course Configuration and Assessment in Moodle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limongelli, Carla; Sciarrone, Filippo; Temperini, Marco; Vaste, Giulia

    Personalization and Adaptation are among the main challenges in the field of e-learning, where currently just few Learning Management Systems, mostly experimental ones, support such features. In this work we present an architecture that allows Moodle to interact with the Lecomps system, an adaptive learning system developed earlier by our research group, that has been working in a stand-alone modality so far. In particular, the Lecomps responsibilities are circumscribed to the sole production of personalized learning objects sequences and to the management of the student model, leaving to Moodle all the rest of the activities for course delivery. The Lecomps system supports the "dynamic" adaptation of learning objects sequences, basing on the student model, i.e., learner's Cognitive State and Learning Style. Basically, this work integrates two main Lecomps tasks into Moodle, to be directly managed by it: Authentication and Quizzes.

  11. Web-Delivered Conceptual Physical Science Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turley, R. Steven; Hatch, Dorian; Boerio-Goates, Juliana; Griffen, Dana; Mason, Grant; Hendrix, Suzanne

    1999-10-01

    We present the results of our efforts to incorporate the latest developments in Web technology and pedagogical techniques into an introductory conceptual physical science course. The course is a freshman general education course which teaches principles of physics, chemistry, and geology. The work combines the efforts from faculty in each of these departments. Web presentation of the material uses email, FLASH, Java applets, Director animations, electronic quizzes with remedial correction, and digital video. The frustrations and the thrills that go with developing such a course are discussed and examples of lessons which incorporate the philosophy of the course and our pedagogical approach are shown. We have tested a sample of these lessons in two sections of the class alternating between web-based and paper-based assignments in each section. We present student reactions to using these resources and a statistical assessment of how they influenced student learning.

  12. Software tools for developing an acoustics multimedia CD-ROM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigelow, Todd W.; Wheeler, Paul A.

    2003-10-01

    A multimedia CD-ROM was developed to accompany the textbook, Science of Sound, by Tom Rossing. This paper discusses the multimedia elements included in the CD-ROM and the various software packages used to create them. PowerPoint presentations with an audio-track background were converted to web pages using Impatica. Animations of acoustic examples and quizzes were developed using Flash by Macromedia. Vegas Video and Sound Forge by Sonic Foundry were used for editing video and audio clips while Cleaner by Discreet was used to compress the clips for use over the internet. Math tutorials were presented as whiteboard presentations using Hitachis Starboard to create the graphics and TechSmiths Camtasia Studio to record the presentations. The CD-ROM is in a web-page format created with Macromedias Dreamweaver. All of these elements are integrated into a single course supplement that can be viewed by any computer with a web browser.

  13. Self- and other-diagnosis in user-led mental health online communities.

    PubMed

    Giles, David C; Newbold, Julie

    2011-03-01

    This article consists of a qualitative analysis of discussion forums in online mental health communities whose members routinely write about diagnosis. The analysis concerns the function of diagnosis from the perspective of personal identity, with particular focus on the status of official diagnosis, as well as community members' discussions of symptoms and psychiatric syndromes that amount to informal diagnosis or consultation. Self-diagnosis sometimes takes the form of recommended "quizzes" and other online quasi-diagnostic tools. Other-diagnosis, in which a third party is discussed by community members, is also considered. We discuss the implications of such online discourse for Internet users themselves as well the challenges for the health and medical professions.

  14. Virtual Learning Environment for Interactive Engagement with Advanced Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Mads Kock; Skyum, Birk; Heck, Robert; Müller, Romain; Bason, Mark; Lieberoth, Andreas; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2016-06-01

    A virtual learning environment can engage university students in the learning process in ways that the traditional lectures and lab formats cannot. We present our virtual learning environment StudentResearcher, which incorporates simulations, multiple-choice quizzes, video lectures, and gamification into a learning path for quantum mechanics at the advanced university level. StudentResearcher is built upon the experiences gathered from workshops with the citizen science game Quantum Moves at the high-school and university level, where the games were used extensively to illustrate the basic concepts of quantum mechanics. The first test of this new virtual learning environment was a 2014 course in advanced quantum mechanics at Aarhus University with 47 enrolled students. We found increased learning for the students who were more active on the platform independent of their previous performances.

  15. Using research to enhance student learning in intermediate mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrose, Bradley

    2011-03-01

    For many undergraduate physics majors the sophomore/junior level course in intermediate mechanics represents their first step beyond the introductory sequence. Over the past several years research has shown that intermediate mechanics students often encounter conceptual and reasoning difficulties similar to those that arise at the introductory level. Many difficulties suggest deeply-seated alternate conceptions, while others suggest loosely or spontaneously connected intuitions. Furthermore, students often do not connect the physics to the more sophisticated mathematics they are expected to use. This presentation will highlight results from research conducted at Grand Valley State University, the University of Maine (by co-PI Michael Wittmann) and pilot sites in the Intermediate Mechanics Tutorials project. These results, taken from the analysis of pretests (ungraded quizzes), written exams, and classroom observations, will illustrate specific student difficulties as well as examples of guided-inquiry teaching strategies that appear to address these difficulties. (Supported by NSF grants DUE-0441426 and DUE-0442388.)

  16. Meeting Review: 2002 O'Reilly Bioinformatics Technology Conference

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    At the end of January I travelled to the States to speak at and attend the first O’Reilly Bioinformatics Technology Conference [14]. It was a large, well-organized and diverse meeting with an interesting history. Although the meeting was not a typical academic conference, its style will, I am sure, become more typical of meetings in both biological and computational sciences. Speakers at the event included prominent bioinformatics researchers such as Ewan Birney, Terry Gaasterland and Lincoln Stein; authors and leaders in the open source programming community like Damian Conway and Nat Torkington; and representatives from several publishing companies including the Nature Publishing Group, Current Science Group and the President of O’Reilly himself, Tim O’Reilly. There were presentations, tutorials, debates, quizzes and even a ‘jam session’ for musical bioinformaticists. PMID:18628852

  17. "Spanish for Medical Professionals" an interactive videodisc program.

    PubMed

    Shmarak, A D

    1991-01-01

    "Spanish for Medical Professionals" is an application authored using the IBM InfoWindow Presentation System (IWPS). It consists of a double-sided videodisc featuring four doctor/patient dialogues interrupted by comprehension quizzes, plus a large visual and audio data base for drill and practice of Spanish words and phrases in the following classifications: Medical History, Review of Systems, Anatomy Vocabulary, General Vocabulary and Pronunciation Guide. These five broad headings yield easy access to more than seventy sub-groups of material available for practice. The entire application stresses communication, not diagnostic skill or interview techniques. This is not a course in basic Spanish, but rather a needs-based language course designed to teach Spanish for a medical environment. Basic knowledge of Spanish is strongly recommended as a prerequisite.

  18. Analysis of Soft Drinks: UV Spectrophotometry, Liquid Chromatography, and Capillary Electrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDevitt, Valerie L.; Rodriguez, Alejandra; Williams, Kathryn R.

    1998-05-01

    Instrumental analysis students analyze commercial soft drinks in three successive laboratory experiments. First, UV multicomponent analysis is used to determine caffeine and benzoic acid in Mello YelloTM using the spectrophotometer's software and manually by the simultaneous equations method. The following week, caffeine, benzoic acid and aspartame are determined in a variety of soft drinks by reversed-phase liquid chromatography using 45% methanol/55% aqueous phosphate, pH 3.0, as the mobile phase. In the third experiment, the same samples are analyzed by capillary electrophoresis using a pH 9.4 borate buffer. Students also determine the minimum detection limits for all three compounds by both LC and CE. The experiments demonstrate the analytical use and limitations of the three instruments. The reports and prelab quizzes also stress the importance of the chemistry of the three compounds, especially the relationships of acid/base behavior and polarity to the LC and CE separations.

  19. Physics of Health Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baublitz, Millard; Goldberg, Bennett

    A one-semester algebra-based physics course is being offered to Boston University students whose major fields of study are in allied health sciences: physical therapy, athletic training, and speech, language, and hearing sciences. The classroom instruction incorporates high-engagement learning techniques including worksheets, student response devices, small group discussions, and physics demonstrations instead of traditional lectures. The use of pre-session exercises and quizzes has been implemented. The course also requires weekly laboratory experiments in mechanics or electricity. We are using standard pre- and post-course concept inventories to compare this one-semester introductory physics course to ten years of pre- and post-course data collected on students in the same majors but who completed a two-semester course.

  20. An introductory course to biomedical microsystems for undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Papautsky, Ian; Peterson, Erik T K

    2008-06-01

    At the University of Cincinnati the state-of-the-art BioMEMS and Biomedical Microsystems research was successfully integrated within the undergraduate electrical engineering curricula through the development of a course Introduction to Biomedical Microsystems. In the first three course offerings, enrollment has spread beyond the initial target audience of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and now includes students from mechanical engineering, environmental engineering, computer engineering, and biomedical engineering. The use of research articles to supplement lecture materials worked effectively, providing undergraduate students with a real world perspective. Reading assignments, discussions of research papers, and short quizzes at the beginning of lectures were used to test understanding of concepts. This was also done to ensure that students were not overwhelmed by the multidisciplinary material or the pace of the course. This paper provides an overview of the course, summarizes results of student assessment, and discusses future improvements.

  1. Successful Application of Active Learning Techniques to Introductory Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    HOFFMAN, ELIZABETH A.

    2001-01-01

    While the traditional lecture format may be a successful way to teach microbiology to both medical and nursing students, it was not an effective means of learning for many prenursing and preprofessional students enrolled in either of the introductory microbiology courses at Ashland Community College, an open enrollment institution. The structure of both Medical Microbiology and Principles of Microbiology was redesigned to allow students to address the material in an active manner. Daily quizzes, student group discussions, scrapbooks, lab project presentations and papers, and extra credit projects were all added in order to allow students maximum exposure to the course material in a manner compatible with various methods of learning. Student knowledge, course evaluations, and student success rates have all improved with the active learning format. PMID:23653538

  2. Can New Digital Technologies Support Parasitology Teaching and Learning?

    PubMed

    Jabbar, Abdul; Gasser, Robin B; Lodge, Jason

    2016-07-01

    Traditionally, parasitology courses have mostly been taught face-to-face on campus, but now digital technologies offer opportunities for teaching and learning. Here, we give a perspective on how new technologies might be used through student-centred teaching approaches. First, a snapshot of recent trends in the higher education is provided; then, a brief account is given of how digital technologies [e.g., massive open online courses (MOOCs), flipped classroom (FC), games, quizzes, dedicated Facebook, and digital badges] might promote parasitology teaching and learning in digital learning environments. In our opinion, some of these digital technologies might be useful for competency-based, self-regulated, learner-centred teaching and learning in an online or blended teaching environment.

  3. An Evidence-based Elective on Dietary Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Whitney; Zeolla, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Objective To implement and evaluate the effectiveness of a pharmacy elective on dietary supplements that emphasized evidence-based care. Design A 3-credit elective that employed both traditional lectures and a variety of active-learning exercises was implemented. The course introduction provided a background in dietary supplement use and evidence-based medicine principles before addressing dietary supplements by primary indication. Assessment Student learning was assessed through quizzes, case assignments, discussion board participation, and completion of a longitudinal group project. Precourse and postcourse surveys were conducted to assess students' opinions, knowledge, and skills related to course objectives. Conclusion The course was an effective way to increase students' knowledge of dietary supplements and skills and confidence in providing patient care in this area. PMID:19777095

  4. Teaching undergraduate nursing research: a comparison of traditional and innovative approaches for success with millennial learners.

    PubMed

    McCurry, Mary K; Martins, Diane C

    2010-05-01

    Historically, nursing students have questioned the value of a nursing research course and have not appreciated the research-practice link. These are important concerns in light of the increasing emphasis on evidence-based nursing practice. The purpose of this study was to develop innovative strategies for teaching undergraduate nursing research that engage millennial learners and emphasize the relationship between evidence-based practice and clinical outcomes. Innovative assignments were developed that included interactive learning, group work, and practical applications preferred by these learners. Using a Likert scale, students' perceived effectiveness of innovative assignments and more traditional assignments were compared. Results indicated a preference for active learning assignments, reading quizzes, clinical nurse researcher presentations, and collaboration with clinical course assignments. By combining traditional assignments with innovative strategies and nursing practice applications, millennial learners were engaged and able to clearly articulate the value of the research-practice link vital to evidence-based nursing practice.

  5. Highly interactive multimedia in chemical education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver-Hoyo, Maria Teresa

    This dissertation explores the use of multimedia as a tool to introduce history into the chemistry curriculum. Steele's book, "Fourteen Weeks in Chemistry", written in the 1860's is the framework for this highly interactive multimedia project. Five features were developed that provided opportunities for interaction through connections of the past with the present, video clips, timelines, quizzes and interactive questions. Out of this project grew the development of interactive modules that could accompany any chemistry course. The exchange of information between computer and user is based on text and numerical recognition operations. Extensive surveying of student responses to questions and problems led to lesson scripts. Programming in Lingo, Director's authoring language, transformed lesson scripts into interactive software. Students' evaluations showed a strong preference for programs in which user inputs received a specific response. Stronger authoring systems would make the creation and editability of materials easier because of improved text recognition capabilities.

  6. Student Performance in a Pharmacotherapy Oncology Module Before and After Flipping the Classroom

    PubMed Central

    Panus, Peter; Stewart, David W.; Hagemeier, Nick E; George, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine if a flipped classroom improved student examination performance in a pharmacotherapy oncology module. Design. Third-year pharmacy students in 2012 experienced the oncology module as interactive lectures with optional case studies as supplemental homework. In 2013, students experienced the same content in a primarily flipped classroom. Students were instructed to watch vodcasts (video podcasts) before in-class case studies but were not held accountable (ie, quizzed) for preclass preparation. Examination questions were identical in both cohorts. Performance on examination questions was compared between the two cohorts using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA), with prior academic performance variables (grade point average [GPA]) as covariates. Assessment. The students who experienced the flipped classroom approach performed poorer on examination questions than the cohort who experienced interactive lecture, with previous GPA used as a covariate. Conclusion. A flipped classroom does not necessarily improve student performance. Further research is needed to determine optimal classroom flipping techniques. PMID:27073284

  7. Making Laboratories Count -- Better Integration of Laboratories in Physics Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizemore, Jim

    2011-10-01

    The quality of K-12 education leaves something to be desired and presents higher education faculty with the challenge of instructing under-prepared students. However, by their own admission, students from many institutions inform us that laboratory sections in science classes, including physics, consist mostly of showing up, going through the motions, and getting grades that boost their overall grade. This work presents laboratories that challenge students to take their laboratory work more seriously including specific rubrics enforcing SOLVE and Bloom's Taxonomy, pre-lab preparation work, and quizzes on pre-lab preparation. Early results are encouraging revealing greater student progress with better integration of laboratory with the rest of a complete physics course.

  8. A Bioinformatics Practicum to Develop Student Understanding of Immunological Rejection of Protein Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Andrick, Benjamin J.; Borello, Alexa M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To design and implement a bioinformatics exercise that applies immunological principles to predicting rejection of protein drugs based upon patient genotype. Design. Doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students used the Immune Epitope Database, a freely available bioinformatics tool. Over a 2-week laboratory, students interrogated whether a protein drug would be predicted to induce an immune response based upon patient genotype. Results were presented at the last laboratory session, and students completed reports discussing their findings. Assessment. Pre-lab quizzes and a final report were graded. Students answered questionnaires assessing perceived learning gains. To determine the impact on student understanding of immunity against protein drugs, the quality of student data analysis and comparisons to class data were graded. Independent measures of student learning demonstrated that students developed a greater understanding of how patient genotype could contribute to treatment failure with protein drugs. Conclusions. This study indicates that questions related to clinical immunology can be posed using bioinformatics tools. PMID:28090096

  9. Teaching methods for systematic inventive problem-solving: evaluation of a course for teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barak, Moshe

    2006-11-01

    Systematic inventive problem-solving is an approach for finding original and useful ideas by systematically examining alterations in existing components within a system, their attributes, functions or internal relationships. This method, which aims at complementing divergent thinking in problem-solving and design, is gaining increased attention in industrial and academic frameworks. The current study examined how science and technology teachers learn, internalize and use the method within an academic course. Data were collected through pre-course and post-course quizzes and questionnaires, documentation of students’ activities, and interviews. The results showed that individuals can improve their problem-solving abilities by combining methods based on ‘ordered thinking’ and ‘disordered thinking,’ and that none of these approaches has preference over the other. Considerable additional work is required, however, to investigate how the proposed approach could be used to foster creative thinking in science and technology studies at school.

  10. Assessment and training of clinical interviewing skills: analogue analysis and field replication.

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, B A; Wong, S E; Riordan, M M; Dorsey, M F; Lau, M M

    1982-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to assess the train clinical interviewing skills. In Experiment 1, eight university practicum students ("therapists") and either role played or volunteer "clients" were audiotaped during simulated interviews. Following the collection of baseline data on both therapist and client responses, training was provided by way of written materials, classroom instruction and practice, and quizzes. Results of a multiple baseline design across subjects showed improvements in therapists' interviewing skills and subsequent increases in client responding. Experiment 2 replicated and extended the research to a hospital outpatient clinic, in which therapists interviewed the parents of children with behavior problems. In addition, four months following the completion of Experiment 2, follow-up data collected during a maintenance condition showed continued high levels of therapist and client behavior. Finally, a panel of expert peers indicated that each response category was judged highly relevant to the behavioral assessment process. PMID:7118753

  11. Using a cross section to train veterinary students to visualize anatomical structures in three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Provo, Judy; Lamar, Carlton; Newby, Timothy

    2002-01-01

    A cross section was used to enhance three-dimensional knowledge of anatomy of the canine head. All veterinary students in two successive classes (n = 124) dissected the head; experimental groups also identified structures on a cross section of the head. A test assessing spatial knowledge of the head generated 10 dependent variables from two administrations. The test had content validity and statistically significant interrater and test-retest reliability. A live-dog examination generated one additional dependent variable. Analysis of covariance controlling for performance on course examinations and quizzes revealed no treatment effect. Including spatial skill as a third covariate revealed a statistically significant effect of spatial skill on three dependent variables. Men initially had greater spatial skill than women, but spatial skills were equal after 8 months. A qualitative analysis showed the positive impact of this experience on participants. Suggestions for improvement and future research are discussed.

  12. An Online Health Informatics Elective Course for Doctor of Pharmacy Students

    PubMed Central

    Galt, Kimberly A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To describe the development and assessment of an online elective health informatics course and determine its potential for universal integration into doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) curricula. Design. A 2-credit hour online elective course was developed and offered to all PharmD students; voiced-over Powerpoint lectures were used to deliver content. Assessment. Assessment of student performance was measured using quantitative metrics via discussion questions, quizzes, written papers, and examinations. Qualitative findings were measured through discussion questions, a goal-setting classroom assessment technique, and an end-of-course reflection. Students report finding value in the course and recognizing how the knowledge gained could impact their future practice as pharmacists. Conclusion. An online course in health informatics can be an effective way to deliver content and provide a blueprint for continued integration of the content into curricula. PMID:25995516

  13. A Model for Small-Group Problem-Based Learning in a Large Class Facilitated by One Instructor

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Kelvin

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To implement and evaluate a model for small-group problem-based learning (PBL) in a large class facilitated by 1 instructor. Design. A PBL model that included weekly assignments, quizzes, peer feedback, and case wrap-up sessions was developed and implemented in the final year of the pharmacy program to allow 1 instructor to facilitate PBL for up to 16 student teams in a large classroom. Assessment. Student and team scores on multiple-choice examinations confirmed achievement of learning objectives. Students reported on course evaluation surveys that they were able to engage in the learning process and were satisfied with the new PBL model. This model achieved a cost savings of $42,000 per term. Conclusions. A revised PBL model without individual group tutors allowed students to achieve the required learning outcomes in an interactive and engaging atmosphere, avoided classroom-scheduling conflicts, and produced a large cost savings for the university. PMID:22919093

  14. Classroom Activities: Simple Strategies to Incorporate Student-Centered Activities within Undergraduate Science Lectures.

    PubMed

    Lom, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The traditional science lecture, where an instructor delivers a carefully crafted monolog to a large audience of students who passively receive the information, has been a popular mode of instruction for centuries. Recent evidence on the science of teaching and learning indicates that learner-centered, active teaching strategies can be more effective learning tools than traditional lectures. Yet most colleges and universities retain lectures as their central instructional method. This article highlights several simple collaborative teaching techniques that can be readily deployed within traditional lecture frameworks to promote active learning. Specifically, this article briefly introduces the techniques of: reader's theatre, think-pair-share, roundtable, jigsaw, in-class quizzes, and minute papers. Each technique is broadly applicable well beyond neuroscience courses and easily modifiable to serve an instructor's specific pedagogical goals. The benefits of each technique are described along with specific examples of how each technique might be deployed within a traditional lecture to create more active learning experiences.

  15. Students' proofs of one-to-one and onto properties in introductory abstract algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Ann; Champion, Joe

    2013-12-01

    Learning to write formal mathematical proofs presents a major challenge to undergraduates. Students who have succeeded in algorithm-intensive courses such as calculus often find the abstract logic and nonprocedural nature of proof writing to be technically difficult, ambiguous and filled with potential errors and misconceptions. This mixed-methods study examines 23 undergraduate students' attempts to write one-to-one and onto proofs in an introductory abstract algebra course. Data collected consisted of six rounds of assessments on one-to-one and onto proofs, including homework, quizzes and exams. Using an existing framework of undergraduate proof writing, the researchers found that students' misconceptions and errors varied substantially by student and task, with one-to-one proofs presenting unique challenges. Implications for teaching and research include emphasis on the logic of proof approaches and providing structured proof frameworks to assist undergraduates with the procedural and conceptual challenges in learning to write proofs.

  16. Sharing Web-Based Resources Using LON-CAPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Mark

    2001-10-01

    It is often cumbersome to reuse or share web-based materials developed for a particular course. The LON-CAPA project based at Michigan State University is being supported by an Information Technology Research grant from the National Science Foundation (as well as other means) to investigate means of improving resource sharing and reuseability. The LON-CAPA (Learning Online Network with Computer-Assisted Personalized Approach) combines the CAPA assessment engine (homework, quizzes, exams) with a full course delivery system. The system is being piloted at Michigan State and several other institutions. The Ohio University Department of Physics and Astronomy will begin using the system beginning Winter 2002. I will discuss the basic concepts and capabilities of the LON-CAPA system. Background information on the system can be found at the URL: http://www.lon-capa.org.

  17. Just the facts? Introductory undergraduate biology courses focus on low-level cognitive skills.

    PubMed

    Momsen, Jennifer L; Long, Tammy M; Wyse, Sara A; Ebert-May, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Introductory biology courses are widely criticized for overemphasizing details and rote memorization of facts. Data to support such claims, however, are surprisingly scarce. We sought to determine whether this claim was evidence-based. To do so we quantified the cognitive level of learning targeted by faculty in introductory-level biology courses. We used Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives to assign cognitive learning levels to course goals as articulated on syllabi and individual items on high-stakes assessments (i.e., exams and quizzes). Our investigation revealed the following: 1) assessment items overwhelmingly targeted lower cognitive levels, 2) the cognitive level of articulated course goals was not predictive of the cognitive level of assessment items, and 3) there was no influence of course size or institution type on the cognitive levels of assessments. These results support the claim that introductory biology courses emphasize facts more than higher-order thinking.

  18. Mindfulness, anxiety, and high-stakes mathematics performance in the laboratory and classroom.

    PubMed

    Bellinger, David B; DeCaro, Marci S; Ralston, Patricia A S

    2015-12-01

    Mindfulness enhances emotion regulation and cognitive performance. A mindful approach may be especially beneficial in high-stakes academic testing environments, in which anxious thoughts disrupt cognitive control. The current studies examined whether mindfulness improves the emotional response to anxiety-producing testing situations, freeing working memory resources, and improving performance. In Study 1, we examined performance in a high-pressure laboratory setting. Mindfulness indirectly benefited math performance by reducing the experience of state anxiety. This benefit occurred selectively for problems that required greater working memory resources. Study 2 extended these findings to a calculus course taken by undergraduate engineering majors. Mindfulness indirectly benefited students' performance on high-stakes quizzes and exams by reducing their cognitive test anxiety. Mindfulness did not impact performance on lower-stakes homework assignments. These findings reveal an important mechanism by which mindfulness benefits academic performance, and suggest that mindfulness may help attenuate the negative effects of test anxiety.

  19. A Comparison of Online and On-Ground Student Performance in Calculus-based Physics I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwortz, Andria C.

    2011-05-01

    The validity and rigor of online courses is an open question in higher education, with each institution applying different interpretations of grades received and making different decisions about whether online courses should be accepted in the transfer process. These discrepancies in institutional opinion are at times based upon the realities of variety in instructional methods or student self-selection into a course they view as an "easy A", but at times they do a disservice to online classes and students. Quinsigamond Community College, located in Worcester, Massachusetts, is now offering an online section of freshman calculus-based mechanics (General Physics I, PHY 105). During Spring 2011, the author teaches both the online and on-ground sections of the course. Content in the online section is communicated by videos recorded during class sessions in Spring 2010, and both sections perform on-ground labs and take quizzes and exams on-ground. The author is currently studying student outcomes in the two sections to determine the effectiveness of instruction in the different modalities. Preliminary findings will be presented, including analysis of grades in quizzes, online homework (MasteringPhysics), and labs, and comparisons of student problem solving methods and visual representations of problems (such as Free Body Diagrams). The effect of self-selection will also be investigated using open-ended surveys and pretests. Sample size of the two courses consisted of approximately 20 students online and 25 on-ground, with the students commingled into two lab sections of approximately equal size. Support for this project was provided by Quinsigamond Community College. This project received approval by QCC's Institutional Review Board; data presented are either in aggregate form, or are used with informed consent of the participants.

  20. The Perils of Space: An Introduction to Space Weather for freshman non-science majors at UCLA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldwin, M. B.

    2005-05-01

    A new course was taught Fall 2004 at UCLA on Space Weather for freshman non-science majors. The course fulfilled one of UCLA's General Education Science course requirements. Enrollment was 85 students (the size of the lecture room) and the course was very well received (8.57 out of 9 for "Overall Course Rating"). The course used two books - Carlowicz and Lopez's Storms from the Sun and Suess and Tsurutani's From the Sun. Students self-reported that they read the entire Storms from the Sun and took on-line quizzes each week based on the reading. The course was mostly traditional lecture, though at least weekly we broke into small group discussions or used peer-instruction techniques in the classroom. I also assigned two dorm laboratories. The first required the students to map a dipole magnetic field. They were given a compass and magnet. The second "dorm room lab" was from Space Science Institute's Solarscapes. It required them to estimate the rotation rate of the Sun. On quizzes before the "labs" were given, but after the concept of the labs were discussed, just slightly more than a majority of students were able to answer the following two questions: (1) Draw a dipole magnetic field and (2) How do we know the sun has an average rotation rate of 27 days? These were asked again on the final exam after the labs and essentially 100% of the students were able to answer correctly. I am currently developing additional "dorm room" labs and "Lecture-Tutorials" based on the University of Arizona's Conceptual Astronomy and Physics Education Research Team's efforts in Introductory Astronomy.

  1. A learning tool for optical and microwave satellite image processing and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashondhi, Gaurav K.; Mohanty, Jyotirmoy; Eeti, Laxmi N.; Bhattacharya, Avik; De, Shaunak; Buddhiraju, Krishna M.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a self-learning tool, which contains a number of virtual experiments for processing and analysis of Optical/Infrared and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images. The tool is named Virtual Satellite Image Processing and Analysis Lab (v-SIPLAB) Experiments that are included in Learning Tool are related to: Optical/Infrared - Image and Edge enhancement, smoothing, PCT, vegetation indices, Mathematical Morphology, Accuracy Assessment, Supervised/Unsupervised classification etc.; Basic SAR - Parameter extraction and range spectrum estimation, Range compression, Doppler centroid estimation, Azimuth reference function generation and compression, Multilooking, image enhancement, texture analysis, edge and detection. etc.; SAR Interferometry - BaseLine Calculation, Extraction of single look SAR images, Registration, Resampling, and Interferogram generation; SAR Polarimetry - Conversion of AirSAR or Radarsat data to S2/C3/T3 matrix, Speckle Filtering, Power/Intensity image generation, Decomposition of S2/C3/T3, Classification of S2/C3/T3 using Wishart Classifier [3]. A professional quality polarimetric SAR software can be found at [8], a part of whose functionality can be found in our system. The learning tool also contains other modules, besides executable software experiments, such as aim, theory, procedure, interpretation, quizzes, link to additional reading material and user feedback. Students can have understanding of Optical and SAR remotely sensed images through discussion of basic principles and supported by structured procedure for running and interpreting the experiments. Quizzes for self-assessment and a provision for online feedback are also being provided to make this Learning tool self-contained. One can download results after performing experiments.

  2. Impact of online learning modules on medical student microbiology examination scores.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mary T

    2008-01-01

    Medical students have a limited amount of time in which to acquire working knowledge of an enormous amount of information, and this is especially relevant for microbiology. One large midwestern medical school is unique in having medical microbiology taught at nine regional campuses using a single core curriculum. A committee of statewide course directors writes a licensure board-style final examination that is referenced to the core and used at all campuses. To prepare for the final examination, students traditionally utilize print-based board examination review books. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether students who train using web-based quizzes score differently as a group on this statewide examination than students who do not utilize the materials online for exam preparation. The study included 71 learners from two different campuses who were taught by the same instructor and were admitted to medical school with similar exemplary credentials. Results were aggregated for three consecutive years. A standard medical microbiology textbook was used to assign the same suggested readings for all students and similar laboratory sessions were provided for all learners. The independent variable was use of the web-based quizzes to prepare before examinations, as indicated by student web usage logs. The dependent variable was score on the statewide final examination. Results support the hypothesis that students who use preparation modules online score higher on the final examination than students who do not. Moreover, students who prepared online scored higher on questions designed to test synthesis of knowledge and analysis of data. The significant difference in final examination outcome (P < 0.002 using a two-tailed unpaired t test) indicates that online preparation for high-stakes examinations could improve student performance in medical microbiology.

  3. A teaching intervention for reading laboratory experiments in college-level introductory chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Maria Kristine

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects that a pre-laboratory guide, conceptualized as a "scientific story grammar," has on college chemistry students' learning when they read an introductory chemistry laboratory manual and perform the experiments in the chemistry laboratory. The participants (N = 56) were students enrolled in four existing general chemistry laboratory sections taught by two instructors at a women's liberal arts college. The pre-laboratory guide consisted of eight questions about the experiment, including the purpose, chemical species, variables, chemical method, procedure, and hypothesis. The effects of the intervention were compared with those of the traditional pre-laboratory assignment for the eight chemistry experiments. Measures included quizzes, tests, chemistry achievement test, science process skills test, laboratory reports, laboratory average, and semester grade. The covariates were mathematical aptitude and prior knowledge of chemistry and science processes, on which the groups differed significantly. The study captured students' perceptions of their experience in general chemistry through a survey and interviews with eight students. The only significant differences in the treatment group's performance were in some subscores on lecture items and laboratory items on the quizzes. An apparent induction period was noted, in that significant measures occurred in mid-semester. Voluntary study with the pre-laboratory guide by control students precluded significant differences on measures given later in the semester. The groups' responses to the survey were similar. Significant instructor effects on three survey items were corroborated by the interviews. The researcher's students were more positive about their pre-laboratory tasks, enjoyed the laboratory sessions more, and were more confident about doing chemistry experiments than the laboratory instructor's groups due to differences in scaffolding by the instructors.

  4. Using 3D modeling techniques to enhance teaching of difficult anatomical concepts

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, Sonia; Baldwin, Michael; Nassiri, Joshua; Kikinis, Ron; Shaffer, Kitt

    2016-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives Anatomy is an essential component of medical education as it is critical for the accurate diagnosis in organs and human systems. The mental representation of the shape and organization of different anatomical structures is a crucial step in the learning process. The purpose of this pilot study is to demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of developing innovative teaching modules for anatomy education of first-year medical students based on 3D reconstructions from actual patient data. Materials and Methods A total of 196 models of anatomical structures from 16 anonymized CT datasets were generated using the 3D Slicer open-source software platform. The models focused on three anatomical areas: the mediastinum, the upper abdomen and the pelvis. Online optional quizzes were offered to first-year medical students to assess their comprehension in the areas of interest. Specific tasks were designed for students to complete using the 3D models. Results Scores of the quizzes confirmed a lack of understanding of 3D spatial relationships of anatomical structures despite standard instruction including dissection. Written task material and qualitative review by students suggested that interaction with 3D models led to a better understanding of the shape and spatial relationships among structures, and helped illustrate anatomical variations from one body to another. Conclusion The study demonstrates the feasibility of one possible approach to the generation of 3D models of the anatomy from actual patient data. The educational materials developed have the potential to supplement the teaching of complex anatomical regions and help demonstrate the anatomic variation among patients. PMID:26897601

  5. Peer-assisted learning: filling the gaps in basic science education for preclinical medical students.

    PubMed

    Sammaraiee, Yezen; Mistry, Ravi D; Lim, Julian; Wittner, Liora; Deepak, Shantal; Lim, Gareth

    2016-09-01

    In contrast to peer-assisted learning (PAL) in clinical training, there is scant literature on the efficacy of PAL during basic medical sciences teaching for preclinical students. A group of senior medical students aimed to design and deliver clinically oriented small-group tutorials after every module in the preclinical curriculum at a United Kingdom medical school. Twenty tutorials were delivered by senior students throughout the year to first- and second-year students. A baseline questionnaire was delivered to inform the development of the program followed by an end-point questionnaire the next year (n = 122). Quizzes were administered before and after five separate tutorials to assess changes in mean student scores. Additionally, each tutorial was evaluated via a questionnaire for participants (n = 949). All five posttutorial quizzes showed a significant improvement in mean student score (P < 0.05). Questionnaires showed students found the program to be relevant and useful for revision purposes and appreciated how tutorials contextualized basic science to clinical medicine. Students appreciated the interactive nature of the sessions and found receiving personalized feedback about their learning and consolidating information with someone familiar with the material to be useful. With the inclusion of the program, students felt there were now an adequate number of tutorials during the year. In conclusion, this study shows that senior medical students can design and deliver a program that adds value to the mostly lecture-based formal preclinical curriculum. We hope that our study can prompt further work to explore the effect of PAL on the teaching of basic sciences during preclinical studies.

  6. Controversies in the Hydrosphere: an iBook exploring current global water issues for middle school classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufoe, A.; Guertin, L. A.

    2012-12-01

    This project looks to help teachers utilize iPad technology in their classrooms as an instructional tool for Earth system science and connections to the Big Ideas in Earth Science. The project is part of Penn State University's National Science Foundation (NSF) Targeted Math Science Partnership grant, with one goal of the grant to help current middle school teachers across Pennsylvania engage students with significant and complex questions of Earth science. The free Apple software iBooks Author was used to create an electronic book for the iPad, focusing on a variety of controversial issues impacting the hydrosphere. The iBook includes image slideshows, embedded videos, interactive images and quizzes, and critical thinking questions along Bloom's Taxonomic Scale of Learning Objectives. Outlined in the introductory iBook chapters are the Big Ideas of Earth System Science and an overview of Earth's spheres. Since the book targets the hydrosphere, each subsequent chapter focuses on specific water issues, including glacial melts, aquifer depletion, coastal oil pollution, marine debris, and fresh-water chemical contamination. Each chapter is presented in a case study format that highlights the history of the issue, the development and current status of the issue, and some solutions that have been generated. The next section includes critical thinking questions in an open-ended discussion format that focus on the Big Ideas, proposing solutions for rectifying the situation, and/or assignments specifically targeting an idea presented in the case study chapter. Short, comprehensive multiple-choice quizzes are also in each chapter. Throughout the iBook, students are free to watch videos, explore the content and form their own opinions. As a result, this iBook fulfills the grant objective by engaging teachers and students with an innovative technological presentation that incorporates Earth system science with current case studies regarding global water issues.

  7. Weaving together peer assessment, audios and medical vignettes in teaching medical terms

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Lateef M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The current study aims at exploring the possibility of aligning peer assessment, audiovisuals, and medical case-report extracts (vignettes) in medical terminology teaching. In addition, the study wishes to highlight the effectiveness of audio materials and medical history vignettes in preventing medical students' comprehension, listening, writing, and pronunciation errors. The study also aims at reflecting the medical students' attitudes towards the teaching and learning process. Methods The study involved 161 medical students who received an intensive medical terminology course through audio and medical history extracts. Peer assessment and formative assessment platforms were applied through fake quizzes in a pre- and post-test manner. An 18-item survey was distributed amongst students to investigate their attitudes and feedback towards the teaching and learning process. Quantitative and qualitative data were analysed using the SPSS software. Results The students did better in the posttests than on the pretests for both the quizzes of audios and medical vignettes showing a t-test of -12.09 and -13.60 respectively. Moreover, out of the 133 students, 120 students (90.22%) responded to the survey questions. The students gave positive attitudes towards the application of audios and vignettes in the teaching and learning of medical terminology and towards the learning process. Conclusions The current study revealed that the teaching and learning of medical terminology have more room for the application of advanced technologies, effective assessment platforms, and active learning strategies in higher education. It also highlights that students are capable of carrying more responsibilities of assessment, feedback, and e-learning. PMID:26637986

  8. Teaching Astronomy using a Flipped Classroom Model of Instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenger, Matthew; Impey, Chris D.; Rivera Chavez, Wendy

    2014-11-01

    Astronomy: State of the Art is a MOOC specifically developed to study student participation in an online learning environment. The project aims to serve multiple audiences of learners. For this project we focused on college students who use the online environment for lectures and quizzes but whose classroom time is devoted to hands-on activities and group work; this is the “flipped classroom” model.In spring 2014, Astronomy: State of the Art was co-convened with “The Physical Universe,” a Natural Sciences course taught at the University of Arizona that satisfies a General Education requirement for non-science majors. Using the same core material as Astronomy - State of the Art (with additional modules on the physics of radiation, atomic structure, energy, and gravity that are not necessary for the informal learners), the local course employed a “flipped” model where the students access lectures and podcasts online but are in a face-to-face classroom two times a week for labs and hands-on activities, lecture tutorials, group discussions, and other research-validated tools for enhancing learning. A flipped or hybrid model gives students flexibility, uses the online medium for the aspects of instruction where interaction with an instructor isn’t required, and optimizes the scarce resource of time in a large classroom.Final student grades were closely related to their attendance, however, performance in this class was not correlated with completion of the online video lectures, even though the quizzes were closely tied to the content of these videos. The course will next be taught using Coursera which allow instructors to more closely examine the relationship between students use of course materials and understanding of course topics. The eventual goal is to recruit undergraduates from anywhere in the United States and award them transferrable credit for completing the class.

  9. Evaluating dissection in the gross anatomy course: Correlation between quality of laboratory dissection and students outcomes.

    PubMed

    Nwachukwu, Chika; Lachman, Nirusha; Pawlina, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Anatomy learned by active exploration through dissection has many proven benefits including improvement of anatomic knowledge. Decreased laboratory time may affect the quality of dissection and ultimately lower student performance in anatomy translating to lower knowledge acquisition. The aim of this study was to determine whether the quality of students' dissection in teams correlates with their performance in the gross anatomy course. Quality of dissections for each team enrolled in a gross anatomy course at Mayo Medical School was evaluated biweekly using a five-point rubric based on course learning objectives. Assessment of anatomic knowledge was based on sequential laboratory practice practical examination scores, achievements on daily audience response system (ARS) quizzes, and final practical, written, and National Board of Medical Examiners(®) (NBME(®) ) Gross Anatomy and Embryology Subject Examinations. Twelve teams comprising 48 students were included in the study. There was a positive correlation between dissection quality and practice practical examination score (R = 0.83) and a negative correlation between dissection quality and ARS quizzes (R = -0.985). Dissection teams with a passing score on their dissection evaluations (>70%) performed better on their final examinations. Based on an end of course survey, students agreed that dissection evaluations should continue to be a part of the course. This study showed that better quality of dissection was associated with higher scores on practice practical examinations, final practical, written, and NBME examinations. The study demonstrated a positive correlation between dissection evaluations, accompanied by formative feedback during the course, and higher scores on final course assessments.

  10. The effect of a daily quiz (TOPday) on self-confidence, enthusiasm, and test results for biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Tanck, Esther; Maessen, Martijn F H; Hannink, Gerjon; van Kuppeveld, Sascha M H F; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Kooloos, Jan G M

    2014-01-01

    Many students in Biomedical Sciences have difficulty understanding biomechanics. In a second-year course, biomechanics is taught in the first week and examined at the end of the fourth week. Knowledge is retained longer if the subject material is repeated. However, how does one encourage students to repeat the subject matter? For this study, we developed 'two opportunities to practice per day (TOPday)', consisting of multiple-choice questions on biomechanics with immediate feedback, which were sent via e-mail. We investigated the effect of TOPday on self-confidence, enthusiasm, and test results for biomechanics. All second-year students (n = 95) received a TOPday of biomechanics on every regular course day with increasing difficulty during the course. At the end of the course, a non-anonymous questionnaire was conducted. The students were asked how many TOPday questions they completed (0-6 questions [group A]; 7-18 questions [group B]; 19-24 questions [group C]). Other questions included the appreciation for TOPday, and increase (no/yes) in self-confidence and enthusiasm for biomechanics. Seventy-eight students participated in the examination and completed the questionnaire. The appreciation for TOPday in group A (n = 14), B (n = 23) and C (n = 41) was 7.0 (95 % CI 6.5-7.5), 7.4 (95 % CI 7.0-7.8), and 7.9 (95 % CI 7.6-8.1), respectively (p < 0.01 between A and C). Of the students who actively participated (B and C), 91 and 80 % reported an increase in their self-confidence and enthusiasm, respectively, for biomechanics due to TOPday. In addition, they had a higher test result for biomechanics (p < 0.01) compared with those who did not actively participate (A). In conclusion, the teaching method 'TOPday' seems an effective way to encourage students to repeat the subject material, with the extra advantage that students are stimulated to keep on practising for the examination. The appreciation was high and there was a positive association between active participation, on the one hand, and self-confidence, enthusiasm, and test results for biomechanics on the other.

  11. Correct answer to the quiz. Check your diagnosis Mycosis fungoides - case report and short overview of the literature.

    PubMed

    Marszałek, Andrzej; Grzanka, Aleksandra; Grzanka, Dariusz; Placek, Waldemar

    2010-01-01

    Here we present a case report of a patient with mycosis fungoides (MF). A short overview of the currently used clinical algorithm and diagnostic methods is presented. The authors also provide a comparison of other T-cell skin lymphomas. The currently recommended disease staging is given.

  12. How Much Do You Know about Teen Sexual Behavior? A True-False Quiz. Fact Sheet. Publication 2008-31

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcombe, Emily; Peterson, Kristen; Manlove, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Despite media attention to teen sexual behavior and public concern about its consequences, the public is surprisingly ill-informed or misinformed on the subject. Yet without the facts, it is difficult to develop effective approaches to curb risky sexual behaviors and prevent teen pregnancy and STI transmission. This paper presents a true or false…

  13. Live Webcasts from CERN and ESO for European Science and Technology Week

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-10-01

    people's daily lives by showing in an entertaining way how the behaviour of electrons in silicon was essential to the development of transistors and thus to computers, for example. How new medicines are developed by looking at the genome of malaria-carrying mosquitoes, and how cancer can be diagnosed and treated with particle beams. People will be amazed to discover how everyday products such as cosmetics are developed using advanced scientific instruments like synchrotron radiation sources. And how fashion and design will be soon revolutionised by a new fabric made of the same optical fibre used for advanced computer networks. The excitement of the Internet audience will be maintained thanks to live quiz shows for 15 to 19 year-old Europeans in the studio and online, with top-tech prizes to win. Sci-tech... couldn't be without it! will show the next generation of technology users how fundamental research is relevant to everyday life, and draw attention to the fascinating opportunities that lie ahead in the world of research and development. WATCH THE LIVE WEBCASTS and take part in the Online quizzes: * Thursday 7 November at 10:00 hrs CET in Italian * Thursday 7 November at 15:00 hrs CET in French * Friday 8 November at 15:00 hrs CET in English on http://www.cern.ch/sci-tech For more information on the webcasts and the Sci-tech... couldn't be without it! project, contact: paola.catapano@cern.ch Catch A Star! Go to the Catch a Star! educational programme Another interesting webcast can be followed on Friday, November 8, 2002, from 13:00 hrs CET (in English) at: http://www.eso.org/public/outreach/eduoff/cas/cas2002/cas-webcast.html Earlier this year, the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and the European Association for Astronomy Education (EAAE) invited all students in Europe's schools to the exciting Catch A Star! web-based educational programme with a competition. It takes place within the context of the EC-sponsored European Week of Science and Technology (EWST

  14. Regulating social interactions: Developing a functional theory of collaboration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borge, Marcela

    A role-playing intervention was developed and implemented in a fifth grade classroom. The goal of the intervention was to address serious problems that researchers have connected to dysfunctional collaborative interactions. These problems include an inability to: engage in important aspects of argumentation and communication, monitor and regulate group processes, and ensure equity in participation. To this end, a comprehensive theory of collaboration was presented to students through the use of four sociocognitive roles: mediation manager, collaboration manager, communication manager, and productivity manager. Each role came with a written guide that included specific goals and strategies related to the role. Metacognitive activities, including planning and reflection, were also used during class sessions to support students' understanding and role-use. Each of the students in the class was assigned one of the roles to manage during a two part collaborative science project. Students took quizzes on the roles and provided verbal and written feedback about their role-use and metacognitive activities. Students from one of the video-recorded groups were also interviewed after the intervention. Analyses of data from video sessions, quizzes, and interviews supported three important findings: (1) students were able to learn goals, and strategies for all of the roles, even though they only managed a single role, (2) students demonstrated the ability to take the information they learned and put it into practice, and (3) when students employed the roles while their group was working, members of the group accepted the role-use. These findings related to the learning and utilization of the roles are important because they: (1) imply that the intervention was successful at developing students' knowledge of the theory of collaboration that the roles represented, (2) indicate that students used this knowledge to monitor and regulate behaviors in an authentic context, and (3

  15. Development of a transferable student engagement and knowledge retention framework for the earth sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palsole, Sunay Vasant

    The earth sciences play an important role in engaging students in science and in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines, because of the integrative nature of the disciplines. It then becomes important for us to provide an engaging experience for students taking earth science courses, because it serves a dual purpose of possibly increasing new majors in the discipline and helping to create a science literate population. Given that a majority of students in the larger introductory courses are non-majors, it behooves us to explore alternative engagement techniques and measure their efficacy in student engagement, which in turn can help inform instructional design for advanced geoscience courses. This study focused on creating a highly engaging course using inquiry based learning scenarios inter-spread throughout the semester along with heuristic quizzes (a series of questions in a specific sequence that map to a process) with very specific feedback that help students understand the development of the earth processes. Along with the heuristic quizzes, the course was transformed into an active learning based hybrid course, where the didactic content was uploaded and made available to the students using a learning management system and class time was spent working on application exercises that were developed by me. I chose specific scenarios and processes that the students could possibly encounter in the greater El Paso region to provide a local and situational aspect to the exercises. The course and instructional design process followed a period of 18 months with each semester providing data to jigsaw into the final design. Student performance data, both qualitative (self efficacy, self reported engagement ) as well as quantitative scales (performance on assessments, course grades) was collected over the entire development period. Comparative data of the hybrid course and a traditional course indicate improved student performance in the

  16. An investigation of student understanding in the undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grutsch, John Leo, Jr.

    Laboratory activities in organic chemistry involve a mixture of sophisticated logic and empirical observation that requires the integration of mechanistic thought, laboratory technique, and problem-solving skills. In an effort to understand how students develop the thought processes and problem-solving skills necessary for laboratory work in organic chemistry, student understanding of how the interaction between a reaction system (reactants or starting material(s), reagent(s), and/or solvent), experimental variables (pH, temperature, concentrations, etc), provides a result of interest (yield, selectivity, purity, etc.) for an experiment performed in the organic chemistry laboratory was investigated through the collection of responses to questions posed on pre-laboratory quizzes followed by in-depth interviews during which student volunteers discussed their responses along with their experiences in the laboratory. The conceptual change theory of learning which assumes new conceptions are understood, judged, acquired, or rejected in a conceptual context was used as a theoretical paradigm to examine students responses to questions posed on pre-laboratory quizzes and transcripts of the interviews with student volunteers. Students were found to not have developed a mechanistic understanding of how the interaction between a reaction system (reactants or starting material(s), reagent(s), and/or solvent), experimental variables (pH, temperature, concentrations, etc), provides a result of interest (yield, selectivity, purity, etc.) for an experiment performed in the organic chemistry laboratory. However, students' prior exposure to and understanding of chemical concepts was found to simultaneously assist and hinder in their development of a partial mechanistic understanding of how a reaction system (reactants or starting material(s), reagent(s), and/or solvent), experimental variables (pH, temperature, concentrations, etc), interact to provide a result of interest (yield

  17. 10 years of Terra Outreach over the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuen, K.; Riebeek, H.; Chambers, L. H.

    2009-12-01

    hurricane. All the images, including the Blue Marble, were made free and available to the public through the Earth Observatory, Visible Earth, the NASA Photojournal, and MODIS Rapid Response. Another distinctly unique web project was the MISR Mystery Image quizzes or more popularly known as "Where on Earth?..." These quizzes allowed a loyal audience base to embark upon a geographical adventure with MISR. The puzzles were designed to inspire understanding of the physical, biological and human processes that influence our home planet and cover topics from Archaeology to Zoology.

  18. Health Promotion at the Ballpark.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Bonni C

    2017-03-01

    The arrival of a new summer collegiate baseball league franchise to a small central New York city was seen as an opportunity for health promotion. The initiative was set up to explore two overarching questions: (1) Are summer collegiate baseball events acceptable to local public health organizations as viable places for health promotion activities addressing local health issues? (2) Are summer collegiate baseball organizations amenable to health promotion activities built in to their fan and/or player experiences? Planning and implementation were guided by precede-proceed, social cognitive theory, social marketing, and diffusion of innovations constructs. Environmental changes were implemented to support healthy eating and nontobacco use by players and fans; four health awareness nights were implemented at home games corresponding to local public health priorities and included public service announcements, between inning quizzes, information dissemination at concession and team market locations, and special guests. Sales and fan feedback support mostly healthy concession offerings and a tobacco-free ballpark; postseason evaluations from team staff and public health partners support continuing the trials of this sports event as a venue for health promotion.

  19. Predicting student success using analytics in course learning management systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olama, Mohammed M.; Thakur, Gautam; McNair, Allen W.; Sukumar, Sreenivas R.

    2014-05-01

    Educational data analytics is an emerging discipline, concerned with developing methods for exploring the unique types of data that come from the educational context. For example, predicting college student performance is crucial for both the student and educational institutions. It can support timely intervention to prevent students from failing a course, increasing efficacy of advising functions, and improving course completion rate. In this paper, we present the efforts carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) toward conducting predictive analytics to academic data collected from 2009 through 2013 and available in one of the most commonly used learning management systems, called Moodle. First, we have identified the data features useful for predicting student outcomes such as students' scores in homework assignments, quizzes, exams, in addition to their activities in discussion forums and their total GPA at the same term they enrolled in the course. Then, Logistic Regression and Neural Network predictive models are used to identify students as early as possible that are in danger of failing the course they are currently enrolled in. These models compute the likelihood of any given student failing (or passing) the current course. Numerical results are presented to evaluate and compare the performance of the developed models and their predictive accuracy.

  20. USRC: a new strategy for adding digital images to the medical school curriculum.

    PubMed

    Pinelle, David; Burbridge, Brent; Kalra, Neil

    2012-10-01

    Many medical schools use learning management systems (LMSs) to give students access to online lecture notes, assignments, quizzes, and other learning resources. LMSs can also be used to provide access to digital radiology images, potentially improving preclinical teaching in anatomy, physiology, and pathology while also allowing students to develop interpretation skills that are important in clinical practice. However, it is unclear how radiology images can best be stored, imported, and displayed in an LMS. We developed University of Saskatchewan Radiology Courseware (USRC), a new web application that allows course designers to import images into pages linked to BlackBoard Learn, a popular LMS. Page content, including images, annotations, captions, and supporting text, are stored as teaching cases on a MIRC (Medical Imaging Resource Center) server. Course designers create cases in MIRC, and then create a corresponding page in BlackBoard by modifying an HTML template so that it holds the URL of a MIRC case. When a user visits the page in BlackBoard, the page requests content from the MIRC case, reformats the text for display in BlackBoard, and loads an image viewer plug-in that allows students to view and interact with the images stored in the case. The USRC technology can be used to reformat MIRC cases for presentation in any website or in any learning management system that supports custom pages written in HTML with embedded JavaScript.