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Sample records for quorum sensing inhibitors

  1. Quorum sensing inhibitors: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Vipin Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Excessive and indiscriminate use of antibiotics to treat bacterial infections has lead to the emergence of multiple drug resistant strains. Most infectious diseases are caused by bacteria which proliferate within quorum sensing (QS) mediated biofilms. Efforts to disrupt biofilms have enabled the identification of bioactive molecules produced by prokaryotes and eukaryotes. These molecules act primarily by quenching the QS system. The phenomenon is also termed as quorum quenching (QQ). In addition, synthetic compounds have also been found to be effective in QQ. This review focuses primarily on natural and synthetic quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) with the potential for treating bacterial infections. It has been opined that the most versatile prokaryotes to produce QSI are likely to be those, which are generally regarded as safe. Among the eukaryotes, certain legumes and traditional medicinal plants are likely to act as QSIs. Such findings are likely to lead to efficient treatments with much lower doses of drugs especially antibiotics than required at present.

  2. Caffeine as a Potential Quorum Sensing Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Norizan, Siti Nur Maisarah; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-01-01

    Quorum sensing enables bacteria to control the gene expression in response to the cell density. It regulates a variety of bacterial physiological functions such as biofilm formation, bioluminescence, virulence factors and swarming which has been shown contribute to bacterial pathogenesis. The use of quorum sensing inhibitor would be of particular interest in treating bacterial pathogenicity and infections. In this work, we have tested caffeine as quorum sensing inhibitor by using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 as a biosensor. We verified that caffeine did not degrade the N-acyl homoserine lactones tested. In this work, it is shown that caffeine could inhibit N-acyl homoserine lactone production and swarming of a human opportunistic pathogen, namely Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation providing evidence on the presence of anti-quorum sensing activity in caffeine. Our work will allow caffeine to be explored as anti-infective drugs. PMID:23598500

  3. Evolution of resistance to quorum sensing inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Vipin C.; Wood, Thomas K.; Kumar, Prasun

    2013-01-01

    The major cause of mortality and morbidity in human beings is bacterial infection. Bacteria have developed resistance to most of the antibiotics primarily due to large scale and “indiscriminate” usage. The need is to develop novel mechanisms to treat bacterial infections. The expression of pathogenicity during bacterial infections is mediated by a cell density dependent phenomenon known as quorum sensing (QS). A wide array of QS systems (QSS) is operative in expressing the virulent behavior of bacterial pathogens. Each QSS may be mediated largely by a few major signals along with others produced in minuscule quantities. Efforts to target signal molecules and their receptors have proved effective in alleviating the virulent behavior of such pathogenic bacteria. These QS inhibitors (QSIs) have been reported to be effective in influencing the pathogenicity without affecting bacterial growth. However, evidence is accumulating that bacteria may develop resistance to QSIs. The big question is whether QSIs will meet the same fate as antibiotics? PMID:24194099

  4. Quorum sensing inhibitors: how strong is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Defoirdt, Tom; Brackman, Gilles; Coenye, Tom

    2013-12-01

    Because of its promising effect as an alternative to antibiotics, quorum sensing disruption is an intensively studied field, and there are many studies that describe the quorum sensing inhibitory activity of natural and synthetic compounds. In this opinion article, we present an overview of recent literature with respect to quorum sensing inhibitors. Most of this research is based on experiments with quorum sensing signal molecule reporter strains. However, these experiments are prone to bias due to other effects compounds may have on reporter strains. We argue that researchers should perform adequate control experiments and should carefully assess toxicity of the compounds in the bacterial species they are working with in order to confirm that what they observe really is quorum sensing inhibition.

  5. Recent progresses on AI-2 bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Peng; Li, Minyong

    2012-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a communication procedure that predominates gene expression in response to cell density and fluctuations in the neighboring environment as a result of discerning molecules termed autoinducers (AIs). It has been embroiled that QS can govern bacterial behaviors such as the secretion of virulence factors, biofilm formation, bioluminescence production, conjugation, sporulation and swarming motility. Autoinducer 2 (AI-2), a QS signaling molecule brought up to be involved in interspecies communication, exists in both gram-negative and -positive bacteria. Therefore, novel approaches to interrupt AI-2 quorum sensing are being recognized as next generation antimicrobials. In the present review article, we summarized recent progresses on AI-2 bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors and discussed their potential as the antibacterial agents.

  6. Lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid as potential quorum sensing inhibitor against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Gökalsın, Barış; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2016-09-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is a genetic disease and it affects the respiratory and digestive systems. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in Cystic Fibrosis are presented as the main cause for high mortality and morbidity rates. Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations can regulate their virulence gene expressions via the bacterial communication system: quorum sensing. Inhibition of quorum sensing by employing quorum sensing inhibitors can leave the bacteria vulnerable. Therefore, determining natural sources to obtain potential quorum sensing inhibitors is essential. Lichens have ethnobotanical value for their medicinal properties and it is possible that their secondary metabolites have quorum sensing inhibitor properties. This study aims to investigate an alternative treatment approach by utilizing lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid to reduce the expressions of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence factors by inhibiting quorum sensing. For this purpose, fluorescent monitor strains were utilized for quorum sensing inhibitor screens and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR analyses were conducted for comparison. Results indicate that evernic acid is capable of inhibiting Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems.

  7. Reducing Virulence and Biofilm of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Potential Quorum Sensing Inhibitor Carotenoid: Zeaxanthin.

    PubMed

    Gökalsın, Barış; Aksoydan, Busecan; Erman, Burak; Sesal, Nüzhet Cenk

    2017-03-02

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can regulate its virulence gene expressions by using a signal system called quorum sensing. It is known that inhibition of quorum sensing can block biofilm formation and leave the bacteria defenseless. Therefore, it is necessary to determine natural sources to obtain potential quorum sensing inhibitors. This study aims to investigate an alternative treatment approach by utilizing the carotenoid zeaxanthin to reduce the expressions of P. aeruginosa virulence factors through quorum sensing inhibition. The inhibition potential of zeaxanthin was determined by in silico screening from a library of 638 lichen metabolites. Fluorescent monitor strains were utilized for quorum sensing inhibitor screens, and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR assay was performed for evaluating gene expression. Results indicate that zeaxanthin is a better inhibitor than the lichen secondary metabolite evernic acid, which was previously shown to be capable of inhibiting P. aeruginosa quorum sensing systems.

  8. Computer-aided identification of recognized drugs as Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yang, Liang; Rybtke, Morten Theil; Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Hentzer, Morten; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Givskov, Michael; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2009-06-01

    Attenuation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence by the use of small-molecule quorum-sensing inhibitors (referred to as the antipathogenic drug principle) is likely to play a role in future treatment strategies for chronic infections. In this study, structure-based virtual screening was used in a search for putative quorum-sensing inhibitors from a database comprising approved drugs and natural compounds. The database was built from compounds which showed structural similarities to previously reported quorum-sensing inhibitors, the ligand of the P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing receptor LasR, and a quorum-sensing receptor agonist. Six top-ranking compounds, all recognized drugs, were identified and tested for quorum-sensing-inhibitory activity. Three compounds, salicylic acid, nifuroxazide, and chlorzoxazone, showed significant inhibition of quorum-sensing-regulated gene expression and related phenotypes in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that the identified compounds have the potential to be used as antipathogenic drugs. Furthermore, the results indicate that structure-based virtual screening is an efficient tool in the search for novel compounds to combat bacterial infections.

  9. Food as a Source for Quorum Sensing Inhibitors: Iberin from Horseradish Revealed as a Quorum Sensing Inhibitor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Bragason, Steinn Kristinn; Phipps, Richard Kerry; Christensen, Louise Dahl; van Gennip, Maria; Alhede, Morten; Skindersoe, Mette; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Høiby, Niels; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Foods with health-promoting effects beyond nutritional values have been gaining increasing research focus in recent years, although not much has been published on this subject in relation to bacterial infections. With respect to treatment, a novel antimicrobial strategy, which is expected to transcend problems with selective pressures for antibiotic resistance, is to interrupt bacterial communication, also known as quorum sensing (QS), by means of signal antagonists, the so-called QS inhibitors (QSIs). Furthermore, QSI agents offer a potential solution to the deficiencies associated with use of traditional antibiotics to treat infections caused by bacterial biofilms and multidrug-resistant bacteria. Several QSIs of natural origin have been identified, and in this study, several common food products and plants were extracted and screened for QSI activity in an attempt to isolate and characterize previously unknown QSI compounds active against the common opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Several extracts displayed activity, but horseradish exhibited the highest activity. Chromatographic separation led to the isolation of a potent QSI compound that was identified by liquid chromatography-diode array detector-mass spectrometry (LC-DAD-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy as iberin—an isothiocyanate produced by many members of the Brassicaceae family. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and DNA microarray studies showed that iberin specifically blocks expression of QS-regulated genes in P. aeruginosa. PMID:22286987

  10. Colostrum Hexasaccharide, a Novel Staphylococcus aureus Quorum-Sensing Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, A.; Deepak, D.; Singh, B. R.

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of quorum-sensing (QS) systems regulating antibiotic resistance and virulence factors (VFs) has afforded a novel opportunity to prevent bacterial pathogenicity. Dietary molecules have been demonstrated to attenuate QS circuits of bacteria. But, to our knowledge, no study exploring the potential of colostrum hexasaccharide (CHS) in regulating QS systems has been published. In this study, we analyzed CHS for inhibiting QS signaling in Staphylococcus aureus. We isolated and characterized CHS from mare colostrum by high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography evaporative light-scattering detection (RP-HPLC-ELSD), 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Antibiofilm activity of CHS against S. aureus and its possible interference with bacterial QS systems were determined. The inhibition and eradication potentials of the biofilms were studied by microscopic analyses and quantified by 96-well-microtiter-plate assays. Also, the ability of CHS to interfere in bacterial QS by degrading acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), one of the most studied signal molecules for Gram-negative bacteria, was evaluated. The results revealed that CHS exhibited promising inhibitory activities against QS-regulated secretion of VFs, including spreading ability, hemolysis, protease, and lipase activities, when applied at a rate of 5 mg/ml. The results of biofilm experiments indicated that CHS is a strong inhibitor of biofilm formation and also has the ability to eradicate it. The potential of CHS to interfere with bacterial QS systems was also examined by degradation of AHLs. Furthermore, it was documented that CHS decreased antibiotic resistance in S. aureus. The results thus give a lead that mare colostrum can be a promising source for isolating a next-generation antibacterial. PMID:25645850

  11. Maniwamycins: new quorum-sensing inhibitors against Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 were isolated from Streptomyces sp. TOHO-M025.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Atsushi; Murakami, Chikana; Anzai, Yojiro; Kato, Fumio

    2016-05-01

    Quorum sensing is an important microbial signaling system that controls the expression of many virulence genes. Maniwamycins C-F, new compounds and quorum-sensing inhibitors, were isolated from the culture broth of Streptomyces sp. TOHO-M025 using a silica gel column and preparative HPLC. The structures of maniwamycins were elucidated by spectroscopic analyses, including NMR. The compounds each have an azoxy moiety. All maniwamycins inhibited violacein synthesis, which is controlled by quorum sensing, in Chromobacterium violaceum CV026.

  12. Identification of poultry meat-derived fatty acids functioning as quorum sensing signal inhibitors of autoinducer-2 (AI-2)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) is a compound that plays a key role in bacterial cell-to-cell communication (quorum sensing). Previous research has shown certain food matrices inhibit this signaling compound. Using the reporter strain, Vibrio harveyi BB170, quorum sensing inhibitors contained in poultry meat...

  13. Quorum Sensing and Phytochemicals

    PubMed Central

    Nazzaro, Filomena; Fratianni, Florinda; Coppola, Raffaele

    2013-01-01

    Most infectious diseases are caused by bacteria, which proliferate within quorum sensing (QS)-mediated biofilms. Efforts to block QS in bacteria and disrupt biofilms have enabled the identification of bioactive molecules that are also produced by plants. This mini review primarily focuses on natural QS inhibitors, which display potential for treating bacterial infections and also enhance the safety of food supply. PMID:23774835

  14. Structure-based discovery and experimental verification of novel AI-2 quorum sensing inhibitors against Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Li, Minyong; Ni, Nanting; Chou, Han-Ting; Lu, Chung-Dar; Tai, Phang C; Wang, Binghe

    2008-08-01

    Quorum sensing has been implicated in the control of pathologically relevant bacterial behavior such as secretion of virulence factors, biofilm formation, sporulation, and swarming motility. The AI-2 quorum sensing pathway is found in both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Therefore, antagonizing AI-2 quorum sensing is a possible approach to modifying bacterial behaviour. However, efforts in developing inhibitors of AI-2-mediated quorum sensing are especially lacking. High-throughput virtual screening using the V. harveyi LuxP crystal structure identified two compounds that were found to antagonize AI-2-mediated quorum sensing in V. harveyi without cytotoxicity. The sulfone functionality of these inhibitors was identified as critical to their ability to mimic the natural ligand in their interactions with Arg 215 and Arg 310 of the active site.

  15. Synthesis of antimicrobial glucosamides as bacterial quorum sensing mechanism inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Nripendra N; Yu, Tsz Tin; Kimyon, Önder; Nizalapur, Shashidhar; Gardner, Christopher R; Manefield, Mike; Griffith, Renate; Black, David StC; Kumar, Naresh

    2017-02-01

    Bacteria communicate with one another and regulate their pathogenicity through a phenomenon known as quorum sensing (QS). When the bacterial colony reaches a threshold density, the QS system induces the production of virulence factors and the formation of biofilms, a powerful defence system against the host's immune responses. The glucosamine monomer has been shown to disrupt the bacterial QS system by inhibiting autoinducer (AI) signalling molecules such as the acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs). In this study, the synthesis of acetoxy-glucosamides 8, hydroxy-glucosamides 9 and 3-oxo-glucosamides 12 was performed via the 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC·HCl) and N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCC) coupling methods. All of the synthesized compounds were tested against two bacterial strains, P. aeruginosa MH602 (LasI/R-type QS) and E. coli MT102 (LuxI/R-type QS), for QS inhibitory activity. The most active compound 9b showed 79.1% QS inhibition against P. aeruginosa MH602 and 98.4% against E. coli MT102, while compound 12b showed 64.5% inhibition against P. aeruginosa MH602 and 88.1% against E. coli MT102 strain at 2mM concentration. The ability of the compounds to inhibit the production of the virulence factor pyocyanin and biofilm formation in the P. aeruginosa (PA14) strain was also examined. Finally, computational docking studies were performed with the LasR receptor protein.

  16. Bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors: attractive alternatives for control of infectious pathogens showing multiple drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Ashima K; Vinothkumar, Kittappa; Rajpara, Neha

    2013-04-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial communication process that depends on the bacterial population density. It involves small diffusible signaling molecules which activate the expression of myriad genes that control diverse array of functions like bioluminescence, virulence, biofilm formation, sporulation, to name a few. Since QS is responsible for virulence in the clinically relevant bacteria, inhibition of QS appears to be a promising strategy to control these pathogenic bacteria. With indiscriminate use of antibiotics, there has been an alarming increase in the number of antibiotic resistant pathogens. Antibiotics are no longer the magic bullets they were once thought to be and therefore there is a need for development of new antibiotics and/or other novel strategies to combat the infections caused by multidrug resistant organisms. Quorum sensing inhibition or quorum quenching has been pursued as one of such novel strategies. While antibiotics kill or slow down the growth of bacteria, quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) or quorum quenchers (QQs) attenuate bacterial virulence. A large body of work on QS has been carried out in deadly pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio fischeri, V. harveyi, Escherichia coli and V. cholerae etc to unravel the mechanisms of QS as well as identify and study QSIs. This review describes various aspects of QS, QSI, different model systems to study these phenomena and recent patents on various QSIs. It suggests QSIs as attractive alternatives for controlling human, animal and plant pathogens and their utility in agriculture and other industries.

  17. Quorum Sensing of Periodontal Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Plančak, Darije; Musić, Larisa; Puhar, Ivan

    2015-09-01

    The term 'quorum sensing' describes intercellular bacterial communication which regulates bacterial gene expression according to population cell density. Bacteria produce and secrete small molecules, named autoinducers, into the intercellular space. The concentration of these molecules increases as a function of population cell density. Once the concentration of the stimulatory threshold is reached, alteration in gene expression occurs. Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria possess different types of quorum sensing systems. Canonical LuxI/R-type/acyl homoserine lactone mediated quorum sensing system is the best studied quorum sensing circuit and is described in Gram-negative bacteria which employ it for inter-species communication mostly. Gram-positive bacteria possess a peptide-mediated quorum sensing system. Bacteria can communicate within their own species (intra-species) but also between species (inter-species), for which they employ an autoinducer-2 quorum sensing system which is called the universal language of the bacteria. Periodontal pathogenic bacteria possess AI-2 quorum sensing systems. It is known that they use it for regulation of biofilm formation, iron uptake, stress response and virulence factor expression. A better understanding of bacterial communication mechanisms will allow the targeting of quorum sensing with quorum sensing inhibitors to prevent and control disease.

  18. Effect of Quorum Quenching Lactonase in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Comparison with Quorum Sensing Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Guendouze, Assia; Plener, Laure; Bzdrenga, Janek; Jacquet, Pauline; Rémy, Benjamin; Elias, Mikael; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Daudé, David; Chabrière, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram negative pathogenic bacterium involved in many human infections including otitis, keratitis, pneumonia, and diabetic foot ulcers. P. aeruginosa uses a communication system, referred to as quorum sensing (QS), to adopt a group behavior by synchronizing the expression of certain genes. Among the regulated traits, secretion of proteases or siderophores, motility and biofilm formation are mainly involved in the pathogenicity. Many efforts have been dedicated to the development of quorum sensing inhibitors (QSI) and quorum quenching (QQ) agents to disrupt QS. QQ enzymes have been particularly considered as they may act in a catalytic way without entering the cell. Here we focus on the lactonase SsoPox which was previously investigated for its ability to degrade the signaling molecules, acyl-homoserine lactones, in particular on the engineered variant SsoPox-W263I. We highlight the potential of SsoPox-W263I to inhibit the virulence of 51 clinical P. aeruginosa isolates from diabetic foot ulcers by decreasing the secretion of two virulence factors, proteases and pyocyanin, as well as biofilm formation. We further compared the effect of SsoPox-W263I to the comprehensively described QSI, 5-fluorouracil and C-30. We found the lactonase SsoPox-W263I to be significantly more effective than the tested QSI at their respective concentration optimum and to retain its activity after immobilization steps, paving the way for future therapeutic applications.

  19. Effect of Quorum Quenching Lactonase in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Comparison with Quorum Sensing Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Guendouze, Assia; Plener, Laure; Bzdrenga, Janek; Jacquet, Pauline; Rémy, Benjamin; Elias, Mikael; Lavigne, Jean-Philippe; Daudé, David; Chabrière, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram negative pathogenic bacterium involved in many human infections including otitis, keratitis, pneumonia, and diabetic foot ulcers. P. aeruginosa uses a communication system, referred to as quorum sensing (QS), to adopt a group behavior by synchronizing the expression of certain genes. Among the regulated traits, secretion of proteases or siderophores, motility and biofilm formation are mainly involved in the pathogenicity. Many efforts have been dedicated to the development of quorum sensing inhibitors (QSI) and quorum quenching (QQ) agents to disrupt QS. QQ enzymes have been particularly considered as they may act in a catalytic way without entering the cell. Here we focus on the lactonase SsoPox which was previously investigated for its ability to degrade the signaling molecules, acyl-homoserine lactones, in particular on the engineered variant SsoPox-W263I. We highlight the potential of SsoPox-W263I to inhibit the virulence of 51 clinical P. aeruginosa isolates from diabetic foot ulcers by decreasing the secretion of two virulence factors, proteases and pyocyanin, as well as biofilm formation. We further compared the effect of SsoPox-W263I to the comprehensively described QSI, 5-fluorouracil and C-30. We found the lactonase SsoPox-W263I to be significantly more effective than the tested QSI at their respective concentration optimum and to retain its activity after immobilization steps, paving the way for future therapeutic applications. PMID:28261183

  20. Quorum Sensing of Periodontal Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Plančak, Darije; Musić, Larisa

    2015-01-01

    The term ‘quorum sensing’ describes intercellular bacterial communication which regulates bacterial gene expression according to population cell density. Bacteria produce and secrete small molecules, named autoinducers, into the intercellular space. The concentration of these molecules increases as a function of population cell density. Once the concentration of the stimulatory threshold is reached, alteration in gene expression occurs. Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria possess different types of quorum sensing systems. Canonical LuxI/R-type/acyl homoserine lactone mediated quorum sensing system is the best studied quorum sensing circuit and is described in Gram-negative bacteria which employ it for inter-species communication mostly. Gram-positive bacteria possess a peptide-mediated quorum sensing system. Bacteria can communicate within their own species (intra-species) but also between species (inter-species), for which they employ an autoinducer-2 quorum sensing system which is called the universal language of the bacteria. Periodontal pathogenic bacteria possess AI-2 quorum sensing systems. It is known that they use it for regulation of biofilm formation, iron uptake, stress response and virulence factor expression. A better understanding of bacterial communication mechanisms will allow the targeting of quorum sensing with quorum sensing inhibitors to prevent and control disease. PMID:27688408

  1. Inhibition of marine biofouling by bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Dobretsov, Sergey; Teplitski, Max; Bayer, Mirko; Gunasekera, Sarath; Proksch, Peter; Paul, Valerie J

    2012-01-01

    Seventy eight natural products from chemical libraries containing compounds from marine organisms (sponges, algae, fungi, tunicates and cyanobacteria) and terrestrial plants, were screened for the inhibition of bacterial quorum sensing (QS) using a reporter strain Chromobacterium violaceum CV017. About half of the natural products did not show any QS inhibition. Twenty four percent of the tested compounds inhibited QS of the reporter without causing toxicity. The QS inhibitory activities of the most potent and abundant compounds were further investigated using the LuxR-based reporter E. coli pSB401 and the LasR-based reporter E. coli pSB1075. Midpacamide and tenuazonic acid were toxic to the tested reporters. QS-dependent luminescence of the LasR-based reporter, which is normally induced by N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone, was reduced by demethoxy encecalin and hymenialdisin at concentrations 46.6 μM and 15μM, respectively. Hymenialdisin, demethoxy encecalin, microcolins A and B and kojic acid inhibited responses of the LuxR-based reporter induced by N-3-oxo-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone at concentrations 40.2 μM, 2.2 μM, 1.5 μM, 15 μM and 36 μM, respectively. The ability to prevent microfouling by one of the compounds screened in this study (kojic acid; final concentrations 330 μM and 1 mM) was tested in a controlled mesocosm experiment. Kojic acid inhibited formation of microbial communities on glass slides, decreasing the densities of bacteria and diatoms in comparison with the control lacking kojic acid. The study suggests that natural products with QS inhibitory properties can be used for controlling biofouling communities. PMID:21882898

  2. Environmental fate and effects of novel quorum sensing inhibitors that can control biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Lillicrap, Adam; Macken, Ailbhe; Wennberg, Aina Charlotte; Grung, Merete; Rundberget, Jan Thomas; Fredriksen, Lene; Scheie, Anne Aamdal; Benneche, Tore; d'Auriac, Marc Anglès

    2016-12-01

    The formation of bacterial biofilms can have negative impacts on industrial processes and are typically difficult to control. The increase of antibiotic resistance, in combination with the requirement for more environmentally focused approaches, has placed pressure on industry and the scientific community to reassess biofilm control strategies. The discovery of bacterial quorum sensing, as an important mechanism in biofilm formation, has led to the development of new substances (such as halogenated thiophenones) to inhibit the quorum sensing process. However, there are currently limited data regarding the biodegradability or ecotoxicity of these substances. To assess the environmental fate and effects of thiophenones capable of quorum sensing inhibition, candidate substances were first identified that have potentially high biodegradability and low ecotoxicity using quantitative structure activity relationships. Subsequent confirmatory hazard assessment of these substances, using a marine alga and a marine crustacean, indicated that these estimates were significantly under predicted with acute toxicity values more than three orders of magnitude lower than anticipated combined with limited biodegradability. Therefore, although these quorum sensing inhibitors appear a promising approach to control biofilms, they may also have environmental impacts on certain aquatic organisms.

  3. A high-throughput screen for quorum-sensing inhibitors that target acyl-homoserine lactone synthases.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Quin H; Grove, Tyler L; Booker, Squire J; Greenberg, E Peter

    2013-08-20

    Many Proteobacteria use N-acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) quorum sensing to control specific genes. Acyl-HSL synthesis requires unique enzymes that use S-adenosyl methionine as an acyl acceptor and amino acid donor. We developed and executed an enzyme-coupled high-throughput cell-free screen to discover acyl-HSL synthase inhibitors. The three strongest inhibitors were equally active against two different acyl-HSL synthases: Burkholderia mallei BmaI1 and Yersinia pestis YspI. Two of these inhibitors showed activity in whole cells. The most potent compound behaves as a noncompetitive inhibitor with a Ki of 0.7 µM and showed activity in a cell-based assay. Quorum-sensing signal synthesis inhibitors will be useful in attempts to understand acyl-HSL synthase catalysis and as a tool in studies of quorum-sensing control of gene expression. Because acyl-HSL quorum-sensing controls virulence of some bacterial pathogens, anti-quorum-sensing chemicals have been sought as potential therapeutic agents. Our screen and identification of acyl-HSL synthase inhibitors serve as a basis for efforts to target quorum-sensing signal synthesis as an antivirulence approach.

  4. Regulatory effects of macrolides on bacterial virulence: potential role as quorum-sensing inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tateda, Kazuhiro; Standiford, Theodore J; Pechere, Jean Claude; Yamaguchi, Keizo

    2004-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen, and this organism is a major cause of pulmonary damage and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) and other forms of bronchiectasis. A break-through in the treatment of DPB and associated chronic P. aeruginosa pulmonary infection was realized when a patient with DPB improved dramatically after treatment with erythromycin for years. Now, long-term macrolide therapy has become a first line of treatment in DPB patients, and the immunomodulatory properties have now been extended to other clinical settings, including CF. An important factor in the pathogenesis of chronic P. aeruginosa infection is a bacterial cell-to-cell signaling mechanism, referred to as "quorum sensing", which enables bacteria to coordinately turn on and off specific virulence genes through the production of autoinducer molecules. Interference or blocking of quorum-sensing systems has been considered an attractive therapeutic strategy. Clinical and basic science data suggests the potential of macrolides as relevant inhibitors of the Pseudomonas quorum-sensing system. In fact, certain macrolides strongly suppressed quorum-sensing associated genes and autoinducer production, in addition to inhibition of a variety of virulence factors. In this review, clinical efficacy of macrolides on DPB and CF patients will be briefly summarized. Additionally, the mechanisms of action of macrolides will be discussed from the standpoint of sub-MIC macrolide effects on P. aeruginosa, particularly the ability of this antibiotic to suppress quorum-sensing systems, which may be crucial in the pathogenesis of chronic P. aeruginosa infection.

  5. Fusaric acid and analogues as Gram-negative bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Tung, Truong Thanh; Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Dao, Trong Tuan; Fuglsang, Anja Thoe; Givskov, Michael; Christensen, Søren Brøgger; Nielsen, John

    2017-01-27

    Taking advantage of microwave-assisted synthesis, efficient and expedite procedures for preparation of a library of fusaric acid and 39 analogues are reported. The fusaric acid analogues were tested in cell-based screening assays for inhibition of the las and rhl quorum sensing system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the lux quorum sensing system in Vibrio fischeri. Eight of the 40 compounds in the library including fusaric acid inhibited lux quorum sensing and one compound inhibited activity of the las quorum sensing system. To our delight, none of the compounds showed growth inhibitory effects in the tested concentration ranges.

  6. Discovery of potent inhibitors of pseudomonal quorum sensing via pharmacophore modeling and in silico screening.

    PubMed

    Taha, Mutasem O; Al-Bakri, Amal G; Zalloum, Waleed A

    2006-11-15

    HipHop-Refine was employed to derive a binding hypothesis for pseudomonal quorum sensing (QS) antagonists. The model was employed as 3D search query to screen the National Cancer Institute (NCI) database. One of the hits illustrated nanomolar QS inhibitory activity. The fact that this compound contained tetravalent lead (Pb) prompted us to evaluate the activities of phenyl mercuric nitrate and thimerosal, both fit the binding pharmacophore. The two mercurials illustrated nanomolar to low micromolar IC50 inhibitory values against pseudomonal QS. The three compounds represent a new class of QS inhibitors.

  7. Mini Review of Phytochemicals and Plant Taxa with Activity as Microbial Biofilm and Quorum Sensing Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ta, Chieu Anh Kim; Arnason, John Thor

    2015-12-26

    Microbial biofilms readily form on many surfaces in nature including plant surfaces. In order to coordinate the formation of these biofilms, microorganisms use a cell-to-cell communication system called quorum sensing (QS). As formation of biofilms on vascular plants may not be advantageous to the hosts, plants have developed inhibitors to interfere with these processes. In this mini review, research papers published on plant-derived molecules that have microbial biofilm or quorum sensing inhibition are reviewed with the objectives of determining the biosynthetic classes of active compounds, their biological activity in assays, and their families of occurrence and range. The main findings are the identification of plant phenolics, including benzoates, phenyl propanoids, stilbenes, flavonoids, gallotannins, proanthocyanidins and coumarins as important inhibitors with both activities. Some terpenes including monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and triterpenes also have anti-QS and anti-biofilm activities. Relatively few alkaloids were reported. Quinones and organosulfur compounds, especially from garlic, were also active. A common feature is the polar nature of these compounds. Phytochemicals with these activities are widespread in Angiosperms in temperate and tropical regions, but gymnosperms, bryophytes and pteridophytes were not represented.

  8. Identification of Five Structurally Unrelated Quorum-Sensing Inhibitors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a Natural-Derivative Database

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Sean Yang-Yi; Chua, Song-Lin; Chen, Yicai; Rice, Scott A.; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Nielsen, Thomas E.; Givskov, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria communicate by means of small signal molecules in a process termed quorum sensing (QS). QS enables bacteria to organize their activities at the population level, including the coordinated secretion of virulence factors. Certain small-molecule compounds, known as quorum-sensing inhibitors (QSIs), have been shown to effectively block QS and subsequently attenuate the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as increasing its susceptibility to both antibiotics and the immune system. In this study, a structure-based virtual screening (SB-VS) approach was used for the discovery of novel QSI candidates. Three-dimensional structures of 3,040 natural compounds and their derivatives were obtained, after which molecular docking was performed using the QS receptor LasR as a target. Based on docking scores and molecular masses, 22 compounds were purchased to determine their efficacies as quorum-sensing inhibitors. Using a live reporter assay for quorum sensing, 5 compounds were found to be able to inhibit QS-regulated gene expression in P. aeruginosa in a dose-dependent manner. The most promising compound, G1, was evaluated by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analysis, and it was found to significantly affect the abundance of 46 proteins (19 were upregulated; 27 were downregulated) in P. aeruginosa PAO1. It specifically reduced the expression of several quorum-sensing-regulated virulence factors, such as protease IV, chitinase, and pyoverdine synthetases. G1 was also able to reduce extracellular DNA release and inhibited the secretion of the virulence factor, elastase, whose expression is regulated by LasR. These results demonstrate the utility of SB-VS for the discovery of target-specific QSIs. PMID:24002091

  9. Identification of five structurally unrelated quorum-sensing inhibitors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from a natural-derivative database.

    PubMed

    Tan, Sean Yang-Yi; Chua, Song-Lin; Chen, Yicai; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Nielsen, Thomas E; Yang, Liang; Givskov, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Bacteria communicate by means of small signal molecules in a process termed quorum sensing (QS). QS enables bacteria to organize their activities at the population level, including the coordinated secretion of virulence factors. Certain small-molecule compounds, known as quorum-sensing inhibitors (QSIs), have been shown to effectively block QS and subsequently attenuate the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as increasing its susceptibility to both antibiotics and the immune system. In this study, a structure-based virtual screening (SB-VS) approach was used for the discovery of novel QSI candidates. Three-dimensional structures of 3,040 natural compounds and their derivatives were obtained, after which molecular docking was performed using the QS receptor LasR as a target. Based on docking scores and molecular masses, 22 compounds were purchased to determine their efficacies as quorum-sensing inhibitors. Using a live reporter assay for quorum sensing, 5 compounds were found to be able to inhibit QS-regulated gene expression in P. aeruginosa in a dose-dependent manner. The most promising compound, G1, was evaluated by isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based proteomic analysis, and it was found to significantly affect the abundance of 46 proteins (19 were upregulated; 27 were downregulated) in P. aeruginosa PAO1. It specifically reduced the expression of several quorum-sensing-regulated virulence factors, such as protease IV, chitinase, and pyoverdine synthetases. G1 was also able to reduce extracellular DNA release and inhibited the secretion of the virulence factor, elastase, whose expression is regulated by LasR. These results demonstrate the utility of SB-VS for the discovery of target-specific QSIs.

  10. Virulence Inhibitors from Brazilian Peppertree Block Quorum Sensing and Abate Dermonecrosis in Skin Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    Muhs, Amelia; Lyles, James T.; Parlet, Corey P.; Nelson, Kate; Kavanaugh, Jeffery S.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Quave, Cassandra L.

    2017-01-01

    Widespread antibiotic resistance is on the rise and current therapies are becoming increasingly limited in both scope and efficacy. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) represents a major contributor to this trend. Quorum sensing controlled virulence factors include secreted toxins responsible for extensive damage to host tissues and evasion of the immune system response; they are major contributors to morbidity and mortality. Investigation of botanical folk medicines for wounds and infections led us to study Schinus terebinthifolia (Brazilian Peppertree) as a potential source of virulence inhibitors. Here, we report the inhibitory activity of a flavone rich extract “430D-F5” against all S. aureus accessory gene regulator (agr) alleles in the absence of growth inhibition. Evidence for this activity is supported by its agr-quenching activity (IC50 2–32 μg mL−1) in transcriptional reporters, direct protein outputs (α-hemolysin and δ-toxin), and an in vivo skin challenge model. Importantly, 430D-F5 was well tolerated by human keratinocytes in cell culture and mouse skin in vivo; it also demonstrated significant reduction in dermonecrosis following skin challenge with a virulent strain of MRSA. This study provides an explanation for the anti-infective activity of peppertree remedies and yields insight into the potential utility of non-biocide virulence inhibitors in treating skin infections. PMID:28186134

  11. Flavones as Quorum Sensing Inhibitors Identified by a Newly Optimized Screening Platform Using Chromobacterium violaceum as Reporter Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Skogman, Malena E; Kanerva, Sonja; Manner, Suvi; Vuorela, Pia M; Fallarero, Adyary

    2016-09-10

    Quorum sensing (QS) is the process by which bacteria produce and detect signal molecules to coordinate their collective behavior. This intercellular communication is a relevant target for anti-biofilm therapies. Here we have optimized a screening-applicable assay to search for new quorum sensing inhibitors from natural compound libraries. In this system, QS is correlated with the production of violacein, which is directly controlled by the LuxI/LuxR system in Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 31532. The parallel use of C. violaceum Tn5-mutant CV026, which depends on auto-inducer addition, allows simultaneous discrimination of compounds that act as quenchers of the AHL signal (quorum quenchers). The incorporation of a redox stain into the platform allowed further distinction between QS inhibitors, quorum quenchers and antibacterial compounds. A pilot screening was performed with 465 natural and synthetic flavonoids. All the most active compounds were flavones and they displayed potencies (IC50) in the range of 3.69 to 23.35 μM. These leads were particularly promising as they inhibited the transition from microcolonies into mature biofilms from Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. This approach can be very effective in identifying new antimicrobials posing lesser risks of resistance.

  12. Mechanistic analysis of a synthetic inhibitor of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa LasI quorum-sensing signal synthase

    PubMed Central

    Lidor, O.; Al-Quntar, A.; Pesci, E. C.; Steinberg, D.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen responsible for many human infections. LasI is an acyl-homoserine lactone synthase that produces a quorum-sensing (QS) signal that positively regulates numerous P. aeruginosa virulence determinants. The inhibition of the LasI protein is therefore an attractive drug target. In this study, a novel in silico to in vitro complementation was applied to screen thiazolidinedione-type compounds for their ability to inhibit biofilm formation at concentrations not affecting bacterial growth. The compound (z)-5-octylidenethiazolidine-2, 4-dione (TZD-C8) was a strong inhibitor of biofilm formation and chosen for further study. Structural exploration of in silico docking predicted that the compound had high affinity for the LasI activity pocket. The TZD-C8 compound was also predicted to create hydrogen bonds with residues Arg30 and Ile107. Site-directed mutagenesis (SDM) of these two sites demonstrated that TZD-C8 inhibition was abolished in the lasI double mutant PAO-R30D, I107S. In addition, in vitro swarming motility and quorum sensing signal production were affected by TZD-C 8, confirming this compound alters the cell to cell signalling circuitry. Overall, this novel inhibitor of P. aeruginosa quorum sensing shows great promise and validates our mechanistic approach to discovering inhibitors of LuxI-type acyl-homoserine lactone synthases. PMID:26593271

  13. A quorum-sensing inhibitor blocks Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    O'Loughlin, Colleen T; Miller, Laura C; Siryaporn, Albert; Drescher, Knut; Semmelhack, Martin F; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2013-10-29

    Quorum sensing is a chemical communication process that bacteria use to regulate collective behaviors. Disabling quorum-sensing circuits with small molecules has been proposed as a potential strategy to prevent bacterial pathogenicity. The human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses quorum sensing to control virulence and biofilm formation. Here, we analyze synthetic molecules for inhibition of the two P. aeruginosa quorum-sensing receptors, LasR and RhlR. Our most effective compound, meta-bromo-thiolactone (mBTL), inhibits both the production of the virulence factor pyocyanin and biofilm formation. mBTL also protects Caenorhabditis elegans and human lung epithelial cells from killing by P. aeruginosa. Both LasR and RhlR are partially inhibited by mBTL in vivo and in vitro; however, RhlR, not LasR, is the relevant in vivo target. More potent antagonists do not exhibit superior function in impeding virulence. Because LasR and RhlR reciprocally control crucial virulence factors, appropriately tuning rather than completely inhibiting their activities appears to hold the key to blocking pathogenesis in vivo.

  14. Screening of traditional Chinese medicinal plants for quorum-sensing inhibitors activity.

    PubMed

    Koh, Khee Hoon; Tham, Foong-Yee

    2011-04-01

    The misuse of antibiotics has contributed to widespread development of antimicrobial resistance among clinically significant bacterial species. Alternative approaches other than those using antibiotics are needed in the fight against infectious diseases. Quorum sensing (QS) is an intercellular signaling and gene regulatory mechanism, which is used by a number of opportunistic pathogenic bacteria in determining virulence gene expression. The study of QS may yield another strategy for disease control by interference with QS signals. Scientific research on complementary therapies such as traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has focused mainly on its antibacterial properties. To test for anti-QS activity, 10 TCM herbs were screened using two biomonitor strains, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01. Interference with violacein (purple pigment) production in CV026 (exogenously supplied with homoserine lactone signals), and swarming in PA01, both QS-regulated phenomena, was used as indication of anti-QS activity. Eight of the selected TCM (80%) yielded QS inhibitors: Prunus armeniaca, Prunella vulgaris, Nelumbo nucifera, Panax notoginseng (root and flower), Punica granatum, Areca catechu, and Imperata cylindrica. Compounds that interfere with QS are present in TCM herbs and these medicines may be a rich source of compounds to combat pathogenic bacteria and reduce the development of antibiotic resistance.

  15. Potential Emergence of Multi-quorum Sensing Inhibitor Resistant (MQSIR) Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Koul, Shikha; Prakash, Jyotsana; Mishra, Anjali; Kalia, Vipin Chandra

    2016-03-01

    Expression of certain bacterial genes only at a high bacterial cell density is termed as quorum-sensing (QS). Here bacteria use signaling molecules to communicate among themselves. QS mediated genes are generally involved in the expression of phenotypes such as bioluminescence, biofilm formation, competence, nodulation, and virulence. QS systems (QSS) vary from a single in Vibrio spp. to multiple in Pseudomonas and Sinorhizobium species. The complexity of QSS is further enhanced by the multiplicity of signals: (1) peptides, (2) acyl-homoserine lactones, (3) diketopiperazines. To counteract this pathogenic behaviour, a wide range of bioactive molecules acting as QS inhibitors (QSIs) have been elucidated. Unlike antibiotics, QSIs don't kill bacteria and act at much lower concentration than those of antibiotics. Bacterial ability to evolve resistance against multiple drugs has cautioned researchers to develop QSIs which may not generate undue pressure on bacteria to develop resistance against them. In this paper, we have discussed the implications of the diversity and multiplicity of QSS, in acting as an arsenal to withstand attack from QSIs and may use these as reservoirs to develop multi-QSI resistance.

  16. Deciphering the role of coumarin as a novel quorum sensing inhibitor suppressing virulence phenotypes in bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Barranquero, José A; Reen, F Jerry; McCarthy, Ronan R; O'Gara, Fergal

    2015-04-01

    The rapid unchecked rise in antibiotic resistance over the last few decades has led to an increased focus on the need for alternative therapeutic strategies for the treatment and clinical management of microbial infections. In particular, small molecules that can suppress microbial virulence systems independent of any impact on growth are receiving increased attention. Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-to-cell signalling communication system that controls the virulence behaviour of a broad spectrum of bacterial pathogens. QS systems have been proposed as an effective target, particularly as they control biofilm formation in pathogens, a key driver of antibiotic ineffectiveness. In this study, we identified coumarin, a natural plant phenolic compound, as a novel QS inhibitor, with potent anti-virulence activity in a broad spectrum of pathogens. Using a range of biosensor systems, coumarin was active against short, medium and long chain N-acyl-homoserine lactones, independent of any effect on growth. To determine if this suppression was linked to anti-virulence activity, key virulence systems were studied in the nosocomial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Consistent with suppression of QS, coumarin inhibited biofilm, the production of phenazines and swarming motility in this organism potentially linked to reduced expression of the rhlI and pqsA quorum sensing genes. Furthermore, coumarin significantly inhibited biofilm formation and protease activity in other bacterial pathogens and inhibited bioluminescence in Aliivibrio fischeri. In light of these findings, coumarin would appear to have potential as a novel quorum sensing inhibitor with a broad spectrum of action.

  17. Identification of poultry meat-derived fatty acids functioning as quorum sensing signal inhibitors to autoinducer-2 (AI-2).

    PubMed

    Widmer, K W; Soni, K A; Hume, M E; Beier, R C; Jesudhasan, P; Pillai, S D

    2007-11-01

    Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) is a compound that plays a key role in bacterial cell-to-cell communication (quorum sensing). Previous research has shown certain food matrices inhibit this signaling compound. Using the reporter strain, Vibrio harveyi BB170, quorum-sensing inhibitors contained in poultry meat wash (PMW) samples were characterized by molecular weight and hydrophobic properties using liquid chromatography systems. Most fractions that demonstrated AI-2 inhibition were 13.7 kDa or less, and had hydrophobic properties. Hexane was used to extract inhibitory compounds from a PMW preparation and the extract was further separated by gas chromatography (GC). Several fatty acids were identified and quantified. Linoleic acid, oleic acid, palmitic acid, and stearic acid were each tested for inhibition at 0.1, 1, and 10 mM concentrations. All samples expressed AI-2 inhibition (ranging from approximately 25% to 99%). Fatty acids, combined in concentrations equivalent to those determined by GC analysis, expressed inhibition at 59.5%, but higher combined concentrations (10- and 100-fold) had inhibition at 84.4% and 69.5%, respectively. The combined fatty acids (100-fold) did not demonstrate a substantial decrease in colony plate counts, despite presenting high AI-2 inhibition. These fatty acids, through modulating quorum sensing by inhibition, may offer a unique means to control foodborne pathogens and reduce microbial spoilage.

  18. Quorum sensing and microbial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Irie, Y; Parsek, M R

    2008-01-01

    Some bacterial species engage in two well-documented social behaviors: the formation of surface-associated communities known as biofilms, and intercellular signaling, or quorum sensing. Recent studies have begun to reveal how these two social behaviors are related in different species. This chapter will review the role quorum sensing plays in biofilm formation for different species. In addition, different aspects of quorum sensing in the context of multispecies biofilms will be discussed.

  19. At a supra-physiological concentration, human sexual hormones act as quorum-sensing inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Beury-Cirou, Amélie; Tannières, Mélanie; Minard, Corinne; Soulère, Laurent; Rasamiravaka, Tsiry; Dodd, Robert H; Queneau, Yves; Dessaux, Yves; Guillou, Catherine; Vandeputte, Olivier M; Faure, Denis

    2013-01-01

    N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum-sensing (QS) regulates virulence functions in plant and animal pathogens such as Agrobacterium tumefaciens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. A chemolibrary of more than 3500 compounds was screened using two bacterial AHL-biosensors to identify QS-inhibitors (QSIs). The purity and structure of 15 QSIs selected through this screening were verified using HPLC MS/MS tools and their activity tested on the A. tumefaciens and P. aeruginosa bacterial models. The IC50 value of the identified QSIs ranged from 2.5 to 90 µg/ml, values that are in the same range as those reported for the previously identified QSI 4-nitropyridine-N-oxide (IC50 24 µg/ml). Under the tested culture conditions, most of the identified QSIs did not exhibit bacteriostatic or bactericidal activities. One third of the tested QSIs, including the plant compound hordenine and the human sexual hormone estrone, decreased the frequency of the QS-regulated horizontal transfer of the tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid in A. tumefaciens. Hordenine, estrone as well as its structural relatives estriol and estradiol, also decreased AHL accumulation and the expression of six QS-regulated genes (lasI, lasR, lasB, rhlI, rhlR, and rhlA) in cultures of the opportunist pathogen P. aeruginosa. Moreover, the ectopic expression of the AHL-receptors RhlR and LasR of P. aeruginosa in E. coli showed that their gene-regulatory activity was affected by the QSIs. Finally, modeling of the structural interactions between the human hormones and AHL-receptors LasR of P. aeruginosa and TraR of A. tumefaciens confirmed the competitive binding capability of the human sexual hormones. This work indicates potential interferences between bacterial and eukaryotic hormonal communications.

  20. Bioactive proteins from Solanaceae as quorum sensing inhibitors against virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurpreet; Tamboli, Ekant; Acharya, Aurovind; Kumarasamy, Chellan; Mala, Kanchana; Raman, Pachaiappan

    2015-06-01

    Cell-to-cell communication or quorum sensing (QS) is a generic event in bacteria that is used to coordinate gene expression among local populations. The phenomenon of QS depends on the fact that presence of sufficient bacteria ascertains a threshold level of autoinducer concentration that allows bacteria to sense a critical cell mass and to activate or repress target genes. Thus, QS has been an attractive target for the development of anti-infective strategies that are not based on the use of antibiotics. Several anti-QS approaches have been demonstrated including natural products from plant-based secondary metabolites. However, the role of plant bioactive proteins as an anti-QS peptide is yet to be deciphered. Against a backdrop of ever-increasing antibiotic resistant pathogens, there is a strong need for development of alternative therapeutic strategies. Thus, our hypothesis is that bioactive proteins from the plant family Solanaceae are quorum quenching molecules that can be exploited to develop a therapeutic strategy against virulence. We presume that bioactive proteins will inactivate or inhibit or degrade QS signals from bacteria to prevent cell-to-cell communication and thus inhibit development of virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Further, the use of proteins as quorum quenchers will delay the bacteria to develop resistance against these quenching molecules.

  1. Quorum sensing: a quantum perspective.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sarangam; Pal, Sukla

    2016-09-01

    Quorum sensing is the efficient mode of communication in the bacterial world. After a lot of advancements in the classical theory of quorum sensing few basic questions of quorum sensing still remain unanswered. The sufficient progresses in quantum biology demands to explain these questions from the quantum perspective as non trivial quantum effects already have manifested in various biological processes like photosynthesis, magneto-reception etc. Therefore, it's the time to review the bacterial communications from the quantum view point. In this article we carefully accumulate the latest results and arguments to strengthen quantum biology through the addition of quorum sensing mechanism in the light of quantum mechanics.

  2. Nanoporous Superhydrophobic Coatings that Promote the Extended Release of Water-Labile Quorum Sensing Inhibitors and Enable Long-Term Modulation of Quorum Sensing in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Materials and coatings that inhibit bacterial colonization are of interest in a broad range of biomedical, environmental, and industrial applications. In view of the rapid increase in bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics, the development of new strategies that target nonessential pathways in bacterial pathogens—and that thereby limit growth and reduce virulence through nonbiocidal means—has attracted considerable attention. Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) represents one such target, and is intimately connected to virulence in many human pathogens. Here, we demonstrate that the properties of nanoporous, polymer-based superhydrophobic coatings can be exploited to host and subsequently sustain the extended release of potent and water-labile peptide-based inhibitors of QS (QSIs) in Staphylococcus aureus. Our results demonstrate that these peptidic QSIs can be released into surrounding media for periods of at least 8 months, and that they strongly inhibit agr-based QS in S. aureus for at least 40 days. These results also suggest that these extremely nonwetting coatings can confer protection against the rapid hydrolysis of these water-labile peptides, thereby extending their useful lifetimes. Finally, we demonstrate that these peptide-loaded superhydrophobic coatings can strongly modulate the QS-controlled formation of biofilm in wild-type S. aureus. These nanoporous superhydrophobic films provide a new, useful, and nonbiocidal approach to the design of coatings that attenuate bacterial virulence. This approach has the potential to be general, and could prove suitable for the encapsulation, protection, and release of other classes of water-sensitive agents. We anticipate that the materials, strategies, and concepts reported here will enable new approaches to the long-term attenuation of QS and associated bacterial phenotypes in a range of basic research and applied contexts. PMID:26501126

  3. Nanoporous Superhydrophobic Coatings that Promote the Extended Release of Water-Labile Quorum Sensing Inhibitors and Enable Long-Term Modulation of Quorum Sensing in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kratochvil, Michael J; Tal-Gan, Yftah; Yang, Tian; Blackwell, Helen E; Lynn, David M

    2015-10-12

    Materials and coatings that inhibit bacterial colonization are of interest in a broad range of biomedical, environmental, and industrial applications. In view of the rapid increase in bacterial resistance to conventional antibiotics, the development of new strategies that target nonessential pathways in bacterial pathogens-and that thereby limit growth and reduce virulence through nonbiocidal means-has attracted considerable attention. Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) represents one such target, and is intimately connected to virulence in many human pathogens. Here, we demonstrate that the properties of nanoporous, polymer-based superhydrophobic coatings can be exploited to host and subsequently sustain the extended release of potent and water-labile peptide-based inhibitors of QS (QSIs) in Staphylococcus aureus. Our results demonstrate that these peptidic QSIs can be released into surrounding media for periods of at least 8 months, and that they strongly inhibit agr-based QS in S. aureus for at least 40 days. These results also suggest that these extremely nonwetting coatings can confer protection against the rapid hydrolysis of these water-labile peptides, thereby extending their useful lifetimes. Finally, we demonstrate that these peptide-loaded superhydrophobic coatings can strongly modulate the QS-controlled formation of biofilm in wild-type S. aureus. These nanoporous superhydrophobic films provide a new, useful, and nonbiocidal approach to the design of coatings that attenuate bacterial virulence. This approach has the potential to be general, and could prove suitable for the encapsulation, protection, and release of other classes of water-sensitive agents. We anticipate that the materials, strategies, and concepts reported here will enable new approaches to the long-term attenuation of QS and associated bacterial phenotypes in a range of basic research and applied contexts.

  4. Simplified AIP-II Peptidomimetics Are Potent Inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus AgrC Quorum Sensing Receptors.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Joseph K; Tal-Gan, Yftah; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Tyler, Kimberly A; Blackwell, Helen E

    2017-02-16

    The bacterial pathogen Staphylococcus aureus controls many aspects of virulence by using the accessory gene regulator (agr) quorum sensing (QS) system. The agr system is activated by a macrocyclic peptide signal known as an autoinducing peptide (AIP). We sought to develop structurally simplified mimetics of AIPs for use as chemical tools to study QS in S. aureus. Herein, we report new peptidomimetic AgrC receptor inhibitors based on a tail-truncated AIP-II peptide that have almost analogous inhibitory activities to the parent peptide. Structural comparison of one of these peptidomimetics to the parent peptide and a highly potent, all-peptide-derived, S. aureus agr inhibitor (AIP-III D4A) revealed a conserved hydrophobic motif and overall amphipathic nature. Our results suggest that the AIP scaffold is amenable to structural mimicry and minimization for the development of synthetic agr inhibitors.

  5. Quorum sensing inhibition, relevance to periodontics.

    PubMed

    Yada, Sudheer; Kamalesh, B; Sonwane, Siddharth; Guptha, Indra; Swetha, R K

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing helps bacteria to communicate with each other and in coordinating their behavior. Many diseases of human beings, plants, and animals are mediated by quorum sensing. Various approaches are being tried to inhibit this communication to control the diseases caused by bacteria. Periodontal pathogens also communicate through quorum sensing and new approaches to treat periodontal disease using quorum sensing inhibition need to explored.

  6. (1)H NMR-Based Global Metabolic Studies of Pseudomonas aeruginosa upon Exposure of the Quorum Sensing Inhibitor Resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tongtong; Sheng, Jiyang; Fu, Yonghong; Li, Minghui; Wang, Junsong; Jia, Ai-Qun

    2017-02-03

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a process of bacterial communication that has been a novel target for drug discovery. Pyocyanin quantification assay confirmed that resveratrol was an effective quorum sensing inhibitor (QSI) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. In this study, the global metabolite changes of P. aeruginosa PAO1 exposed to QSI resveratrol were investigated by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. A total of 40 metabolites containing amino acids, organic acid, organic amine, and energy storage compounds were identified. The changed metabolic profile indicated that resveratrol influenced pathways including oxidative stress, protein synthesis, and energy metabolism. Oxidative stress could upregulate the expression of genes related to QS in P. aeruginosa. It suggested that resveratrol could inhibit the QS systems in P. aeruginosa PAO1 by relieving oxidative stress due to its antioxidant activity. On the other hand, resveratrol could attenuate the pathogenicity of P. aeruginosa PAO1 by disturbing the TCA cycle so that anaerobic respiration could suppress the virulence because anaerobiosis could induce the loss of cytotoxicity regulated by QS in P. aeruginosa. These findings deepened our comprehending of the metabolic responses of P. aeruginosa PAO1 to resveratrol and pinpointed the possible underlying mechanism of resveratrol's inhibition effect on QS in P. aeruginosa PAO1.

  7. Computational discovery of putative quorum sensing inhibitors against LasR and RhlR receptor proteins of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annapoorani, Angusamy; Umamageswaran, Venugopal; Parameswari, Radhakrishnan; Pandian, Shunmugiah Karutha; Ravi, Arumugam Veera

    2012-09-01

    Drugs have been discovered in the past mainly either by identification of active components from traditional remedies or by unpredicted discovery. A key motivation for the study of structure based virtual screening is the exploitation of such information to design targeted drugs. In this study, structure based virtual screening was used in search for putative quorum sensing inhibitors (QSI) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The virtual screening programme Glide version 5.5 was applied to screen 1,920 natural compounds/drugs against LasR and RhlR receptor proteins of P. aeruginosa. Based on the results of in silico docking analysis, five top ranking compounds namely rosmarinic acid, naringin, chlorogenic acid, morin and mangiferin were subjected to in vitro bioassays against laboratory strain PAO1 and two more antibiotic resistant clinical isolates, P. aeruginosa AS1 (GU447237) and P. aeruginosa AS2 (GU447238). Among the five compounds studied, except mangiferin other four compounds showed significant inhibition in the production of protease, elastase and hemolysin. Further, all the five compounds potentially inhibited the biofilm related behaviours. This interaction study provided promising ligands to inhibit the quorum sensing (QS) mediated virulence factors production in P. aeruginosa.

  8. Secondary metabolites produced by marine streptomyces as antibiofilm and quorum-sensing inhibitor of uropathogen Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Younis, Khansa Mohammed; Usup, Gires; Ahmad, Asmat

    2016-03-01

    Quorum-sensing regulates bacterial biofilm formation and virulence factors, thereby making it an interesting target for attenuating pathogens. In this study, we investigated anti-biofilm and anti-quorum-sensing compounds from secondary metabolites of halophiles marine streptomyces against urinary catheter biofilm forming Proteus mirabilis without effect on growth viability. A total of 40 actinomycetes were isolated from samples collected from different places in Iraq including marine sediments and soil samples. Fifteen isolates identified as streptomyces and their supernatant screened as anti-quorum-sensing by inhibiting quorum-sensing regulated prodigiosin biosynthesis of Serratia marcescens strain Smj-11 as a reporter strain. Isolate Sediment Lake Iraq (sdLi) showed potential anti-quorum-sensing activity. Out of 35 clinical isolates obtained from Urinary catheter used by patient at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, 22 isolates were characterized and identified as Proteus mirabilis. Isolate Urinary Catheter B4 (UCB4) showed the highest biofilm formation with highest resistance to used antibiotic and was chosen for further studies. Ethyl acetate secondary metabolites extract was produced from sdLi isolate. First, we determined the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of sdLi crude extract against UCB4 isolate, and all further experiments used concentrations below the MIC. Tests of subinhibitory concentrations of sdLi crude extract showed good inhibition against UCB4 isolate biofilm formation on urinary catheter and cover glass using Scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy respectively. The influence of sub-MIC of sdLi crude extract was also found to attenuate the quorum sensing (QS)-dependent factors such as hemolysin activity, urease activity, pH value, and motility of UCB4 isolate. Evidence is presented that these nontoxic secondary metabolites may act as antagonists of bacterial quorum sensing by competing with quorum-sensing signals

  9. Quorum Sensing Inhibitors from the Sea Discovered Using Bacterial N-acyl-homoserine Lactone-Based Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Saurav, Kumar; Costantino, Valeria; Venturi, Vittorio; Steindler, Laura

    2017-02-23

    Marine natural products with antibiotic activity have been a rich source of drug discovery; however, the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains has turned attention towards the discovery of alternative innovative strategies to combat pathogens. In many pathogenic bacteria, the expression of virulence factors is under the regulation of quorum sensing (QS). QS inhibitors (QSIs) present a promising alternative or potential synergistic treatment since they disrupt the signaling pathway used for intra- and interspecies coordination of expression of virulence factors. This review covers the set of molecules showing QSI activity that were isolated from marine organisms, including plants (algae), animals (sponges, cnidarians, and bryozoans), and microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, and cyanobacteria). The compounds found and the methods used for their isolation are the emphasis of this review.

  10. Quorum Sensing Inhibitors from the Sea Discovered Using Bacterial N-acyl-homoserine Lactone-Based Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Saurav, Kumar; Costantino, Valeria; Venturi, Vittorio; Steindler, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Marine natural products with antibiotic activity have been a rich source of drug discovery; however, the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains has turned attention towards the discovery of alternative innovative strategies to combat pathogens. In many pathogenic bacteria, the expression of virulence factors is under the regulation of quorum sensing (QS). QS inhibitors (QSIs) present a promising alternative or potential synergistic treatment since they disrupt the signaling pathway used for intra- and interspecies coordination of expression of virulence factors. This review covers the set of molecules showing QSI activity that were isolated from marine organisms, including plants (algae), animals (sponges, cnidarians, and bryozoans), and microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, and cyanobacteria). The compounds found and the methods used for their isolation are the emphasis of this review. PMID:28241461

  11. Bacterial quorum sensing and biofilm formation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quorum sensing is a cell density-dependent signaling system by which bacteria can regulate gene expression through the production, secretion, and subsequent detection of extracellular signaling molecules called autoinducers. Bacteria use quorum sensing to regulate various physiological activities, ...

  12. Quorum sensing by farnesol revisited.

    PubMed

    Polke, Melanie; Jacobsen, Ilse D

    2017-02-28

    Quorum sensing, a form of molecular communication in microbial communities, is relatively well studied in bacterial species, but poorly understood in fungi. Farnesol, a quorum sensing molecule secreted by the opportunistic human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans, was the first quorum sensing molecule described in a eukaryotic organism. However, despite considerable research efforts and advances in recent years, the mechanisms behind its action remain largely elusive. Only recently, we showed that deletion of the C. albicans gene EED1 (eed1Δ), which is essential for hyphal maintenance, resulted in both increased farnesol production and hypersensitivity to farnesol, providing a link between farnesol signaling and elongated hyphal growth. This finding raised several questions concerning farnesol signaling. In this short review we use the unique phenotype of the eed1Δ mutant to summarize current hypotheses and to speculate on possible mechanisms of quorum sensing in C. albicans and its implication in fungus-host interaction, by drawing comparisons to comparatively well-studied quorum sensing systems in bacteria.

  13. Quorum Sensing Inhibition, Relevance to Periodontics

    PubMed Central

    Yada, Sudheer; Kamalesh, B; Sonwane, Siddharth; Guptha, Indra; Swetha, R K

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing helps bacteria to communicate with each other and in coordinating their behavior. Many diseases of human beings, plants, and animals are mediated by quorum sensing. Various approaches are being tried to inhibit this communication to control the diseases caused by bacteria. Periodontal pathogens also communicate through quorum sensing and new approaches to treat periodontal disease using quorum sensing inhibition need to explored. PMID:25709373

  14. Optimal census by quorum sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillefumier, Thibaud

    Bacteria regulate their gene expression in response to changes in local cell density in a process called quorum sensing. To synchronize their gene-expression programs, these bacteria need to glean as much information as possible about local density. Our study is the first to physically model the flow of information in a quorum-sensing microbial community, wherein the internal regulator of the individual's response tracks the external cell density via an endogenously generated shared signal. Combining information theory and Lagrangian optimization, we find that quorum-sensing systems can improve their information capabilities by tuning circuit feedbacks. At the population level, external feedback adjusts the dynamic range of the shared input to individuals' detection channels. At the individual level, internal feedback adjusts the regulator's response time to dynamically balance output noise reduction and signal tracking ability. Our analysis suggests that achieving information benefit via feedback requires dedicated systems to control gene expression noise, such as sRNA-based regulation.

  15. Non-antibiotic quorum sensing inhibitors acting against N-acyl homoserine lactone synthase as druggable target

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chien-Yi; Krishnan, Thiba; Wang, Hao; Chen, Ye; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chong, Yee-Meng; Tan, Li Ying; Chong, Teik Min; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    N-acylhomoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing (QS) is important for the regulation of proteobacterial virulence determinants. Thus, the inhibition of AHL synthases offers non-antibiotics-based therapeutic potentials against QS-mediated bacterial infections. In this work, functional AHL synthases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa LasI and RhlI were heterologously expressed in an AHL-negative Escherichia coli followed by assessments on their AHLs production using AHL biosensors and high resolution liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LCMS). These AHL-producing E. coli served as tools for screening AHL synthase inhibitors. Based on a campaign of screening synthetic molecules and natural products using our approach, three strongest inhibitors namely are salicylic acid, tannic acid and trans-cinnamaldehyde have been identified. LCMS analysis further confirmed tannic acid and trans-cinnemaldehyde efficiently inhibited AHL production by RhlI. We further demonstrated the application of trans-cinnemaldehyde inhibiting Rhl QS system regulated pyocyanin production in P. aeruginosa up to 42.06%. Molecular docking analysis suggested that trans-cinnemaldehyde binds to the LasI and EsaI with known structures mainly interacting with their substrate binding sites. Our data suggested a new class of QS-inhibiting agents from natural products targeting AHL synthase and provided a potential approach for facilitating the discovery of anti-QS signal synthesis as basis of novel anti-infective approach. PMID:25430794

  16. Revisiting AI-2 quorum sensing inhibitors: direct comparison of alkyl-DPD analogues and a natural product fimbrolide.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Colin A; Abe, Takumi; Park, Junguk; Eubanks, Lisa M; Sawada, Daisuke; Kaufmann, Gunnar F; Janda, Kim D

    2009-11-04

    Quorum sensing (QS) systems have been discovered in a wide variety of bacteria, and mediate both intra- and interspecies communication. The AI-2-based QS system represents the most studied of these proposed interspecies systems and has been shown to regulate diverse functions such as bioluminescence, expression of virulence factors, and biofilm formation. As such, the development of modulatory compounds, both agonists and antagonists, is of great interest for the study of unknown AI-2-based QS systems and the potential treatment of bacterial infections. The fimbrolide class of natural products has exhibited excellent inhibitory activity against AI-2-based QS and as such may be considered the "gold standard" of AI-2 inhibitors. Thus, we sought to include a fimbrolide as a control compound for our recently developed alkyl-DPD panel of AI-2 modulators. Herein, we present a revised synthesis of a commonly studied fimbrolide as well as a direct comparison between the fimbrolide and alkyl-DPD analogues. We demonstrate that our alkyl-DPD analogues are more potent inhibitors of QS in both Vibrio harveyi and Salmonella typhimurium, the two organisms with defined AI-2 QS systems, and in doing so call into question the widely accepted use of fimbrolide-derived compounds as the "gold standard" of AI-2 inhibition.

  17. Competition studies confirm two major barriers that can preclude the spread of resistance to quorum-sensing inhibitors in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gerdt, Joseph P; Blackwell, Helen E

    2014-10-17

    The growing threat of antibiotic resistance necessitates the development of novel antimicrobial therapies. Antivirulence agents that target group-beneficial traits in microorganisms (i.e., phenotypes that help the cells surrounding the producer cell instead of selfishly benefiting only the producer cell) represent a new antimicrobial approach that may be robust against the spread of resistant mutants. One prominent group-beneficial antivirulence target in bacteria is quorum sensing (QS). While scientists are producing new QS inhibitors (QSIs) at an increasing pace for use as research tools and potential therapeutic leads, substantial work remains in empirically demonstrating a robustness against resistance. Herein we report the results of in vitro competition studies in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that explicitly confirm that two separate barriers can impede the spread of resistance to QSIs: (1) insufficient native QS signal levels prevent rare QSI-resistant bacteria from expressing their QS regulon, and (2) group-beneficial QS-regulated phenotypes produced by resistant bacteria are susceptible to cheating by QSI-sensitive neighbors, even when grown on a solid substrate with limited mixing to mimic infected tissue. These results underscore the promise of QSIs and other antivirulence molecules that target group beneficial traits as resistance-robust antimicrobial treatments and provide support for their further development.

  18. Star Anise (Illicium verum Hook. f.) as Quorum Sensing and Biofilm Formation Inhibitor on Foodborne Bacteria: Study in Milk.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Ramim Tanver; Lou, Zaixiang; Zhang, Jun; Yu, Fuhao; Timilsena, Yakindra Prasad; Zhang, Caili; Zhang, Yi; Bakry, Amr M

    2017-04-01

    Bacteria use quorum sensing (QS) systems to communicate with each other and regulate microbial group behavior, such as the secretion of virulence factors, including biofilm formation. In order to explore safe, edible agents, the potential of star anise (SA) as an anti-QS and antibiofilm agent and its possible application in milk safety were investigated. Staphylococcus aureus , Salmonella Typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa , and biosensor strain Chromobacterium violaceum were selected as test strains for QS, biofilm, and exopolysaccharide assays. The percent acidities and total plate counts were determined to evaluate the quality of biofilm-inoculated and noninoculated milk. The yield of SA extraction was 25.90% ± 0.2% (w/w). At sub-MIC, SA extract did not show any effect on bacterial growth. The production of violacein was inhibited by 89% by SA extract. The extract also inhibited the formation of biofilm by up to 87% in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition rates of 70.45%, 42.82%, and 35.66% were found for exopolysaccharide production. The swarming motility of S. aureus was reduced by about 95.9% by SA extract. Confocal laser scanning microscopy analysis confirmed that the development of biofilm architecture was hampered. It was found that SA extract could delay the spoilage of milk. In the endeavor to avoid drug resistance, pathogenesis, and resistance to biocides while improving food safety and avoiding health hazard issues arising from synthetic chemicals, SA extract could be used as a potential QS and biofilm inhibitor.

  19. Honaucins A–C, Potent Inhibitors of Eukaryotic Inflammation and Bacterial Quorum Sensing: Synthetic Derivatives and Structure-Activity Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyukjae; Mascuch, Samantha J.; Villa, Francisco A.; Byrum, Tara; Teasdale, Margaret E.; Smith, Jennifer E.; Preskitt, Linda B.; Rowley, David C.; Gerwick, Lena; Gerwick, William H.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Honaucins A–C were isolated from the cyanobacterium Leptolyngbya crossbyana which was found overgrowing corals on the Hawaiian coast. Honaucin A consists of (S)-3-hydroxy-γ-butyrolactone and 4-chlorocrotonic acid which are connected via an ester linkage. Honaucin A and its two natural analogs exhibit potent inhibition of bioluminescence, a quorum sensing-dependent phenotype, in Vibrio harveyi BB120 as well as of lipopolysaccharide-stimulated nitric oxide production in the murine macrophage cell line RAW264.7. The decrease in nitric oxide production was accompanied by a decrease in the transcripts of several pro-inflammatory cytokines, most dramatically interleukin-1β. Synthesis of honaucin A as well as a number of analogs and subsequent evaluation in anti-inflammation and quorum sensing inhibition bioassays revealed the essential structural features for activity in this chemical class, and provided analogs with greater potency in both assays. PMID:22633410

  20. Impairment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Biofilm Resistance to Antibiotics by Combining the Drugs with a New Quorum-Sensing Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Lajoie, Barbora; El Hage, Salome; Baziard, Genevieve; Roques, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an important role in chronic lung infections among patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) through its ability to form antibiotic-resistant biofilms. In P. aeruginosa, biofilm development and the production of several virulence factors are mainly regulated by the rhl and las quorum-sensing (QS) systems, which are controlled by two N-acyl-homoserine lactone signal molecules. In a previous study, we discovered an original QS inhibitor, N-(2-pyrimidyl)butanamide, called C11, based on the structure of C4-homoserine lactone, and found that it is able to significantly inhibit P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. However, recent data indicate that P. aeruginosa grows under anaerobic conditions and forms biofilms in the lungs of CF patients that are denser and more robust than those formed under aerobic conditions. Our confocal microscopy observations of P. aeruginosa biofilms developed under aerobic and anaerobic conditions confirmed that the biofilms formed under these two conditions have radically different architectures. C11 showed significant dose-dependent antibiofilm activity on biofilms grown under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, with a greater inhibitory effect being seen under conditions of anaerobiosis. Gene expression analyses performed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR showed that C11 led to the significant downregulation of rhl QS regulatory genes but also to the downregulation of both las QS regulatory genes and QS system-regulated virulence genes, rhlA and lasB. Furthermore, the activity of C11 in combination with antibiotics against P. aeruginosa biofilms was tested, and synergistic antibiofilm activity between C11 and ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, and colistin was obtained under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This study demonstrates that C11 may increase the efficacy of treatments for P. aeruginosa infections by increasing the susceptibility of biofilms to antibiotics and by attenuating the pathogenicity of the

  1. Isoprenyl caffeate, a major compound in manuka propolis, is a quorum-sensing inhibitor in Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Gemiarto, Adrian Tandhyka; Ninyio, Nathaniel Nyakaat; Lee, Siew Wei; Logis, Joko; Fatima, Ayesha; Chan, Eric Wei Chiang; Lim, Crystale Siew Ying

    2015-08-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacterial pathogens, especially Gram-negative bacteria, has driven investigations into suppressing bacterial virulence via quorum sensing (QS) inhibition strategies instead of bactericidal and bacteriostatic approaches. Here, we investigated several bee products for potential compound(s) that exhibit significant QS inhibitory (QSI) properties at the phenotypic and molecular levels in Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 as a model organism. Manuka propolis produced the strongest violacein inhibition on C. violaceum lawn agar, while bee pollen had no detectable QSI activity and honey had bactericidal activity. Fractionated manuka propolis (pooled fraction 5 or PF5) exhibited the largest violacein inhibition zone (24.5 ± 2.5 mm) at 1 mg dry weight per disc. In C. violaceum liquid cultures, at least 450 µg/ml of manuka propolis PF5 completely inhibited violacein production. Gene expression studies of the vioABCDE operon, involved in violacein biosynthesis, showed significant (≥two-fold) down-regulation of vioA, vioD and vioE in response to manuka propolis PF5. A potential QSI compound identified in manuka propolis PF5 is a hydroxycinnamic acid-derivative, isoprenyl caffeate, with a [M-H] of 247. Complete violacein inhibition in C. violaceum liquid cultures was achieved with at least 50 µg/ml of commercial isoprenyl caffeate. In silico docking experiments suggest that isoprenyl caffeate may act as an inhibitor of the violacein biosynthetic pathway by acting as a competitor for the FAD-binding pockets of VioD and VioA. Further studies on these compounds are warranted toward the development of anti-pathogenic drugs as adjuvants to conventional antibiotic treatments, especially in antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections.

  2. Social cheating in Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Mitzimberg, Shelby M; Schuster, Martin

    2007-10-02

    In a process termed quorum sensing, bacteria use diffusible chemical signals to coordinate cell density-dependent gene expression. In the human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, quorum sensing controls hundreds of genes, many of which encode extracellular virulence factors. Quorum sensing is required for P. aeruginosa virulence in animal models. Curiously, quorum sensing-deficient variants, most of which carry a mutation in the gene encoding the central quorum sensing regulator lasR, are frequently isolated from acute and chronic infections. The mechanism for their emergence is not known. Here we provide experimental evidence suggesting that these lasR mutants are social cheaters that cease production of quorum-controlled factors and take advantage of their production by the group. We detected an emerging subpopulation of lasR mutants after approximately 100 generations of in vitro evolution of the P. aeruginosa wild-type strain under culture conditions that require quorum sensing for growth. Under such conditions, quorum sensing appears to impose a metabolic burden on the proliferating bacterial cell, because quorum-controlled genes not normally induced until cessation of growth were highly expressed early in growth, and a defined lasR mutant showed a growth advantage when cocultured with the parent strain. The emergence of quorum-sensing-deficient variants in certain environments is therefore an indicator of high quorum sensing activity of the bacterial population as a whole. It does not necessarily indicate that quorum sensing is insignificant, as has previously been suggested. Thus, novel antivirulence strategies aimed at disrupting bacterial communication may be particularly effective in such clinical settings.

  3. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of N-sulfonyl homoserine lactone derivatives as inhibitors of quorum sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingming; Yu, Yingying; Hua, Yuhui; Feng, Fan; Tong, Yigang; Yang, Xiaohong; Xiao, Junhai; Song, Hongrui

    2013-03-13

    A novel series of N-sulfonyl homoserine lactone derivatives 5a-l has been designed, synthesized and evaluated for quorum sensing inhibitory activities towards violacein production. Of the compounds synthesized, compound 5h was found to possess an excellent level of enantiopurity (99.2% e.e.). The results indicated that compounds bearing an ortho substituent on their phenyl ring exhibited excellent levels of inhibitory activity against violacein production. Compounds 5h and 5k in particular, with IC₅₀ values of 1.64 and 1.66 µM, respectively, were identified as promising lead compounds for further structural modification.

  4. Garlic as an inhibitor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing in cystic fibrosis--a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Smyth, Alan R; Cifelli, Paramita M; Ortori, Catharine A; Righetti, Karima; Lewis, Sarah; Erskine, Penny; Holland, Elaine D; Givskov, Michael; Williams, Paul; Cámara, Miguel; Barrett, David A; Knox, Alan

    2010-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa forms biofilms in the cystic fibrosis lung. Quorum sensing (QS) controls biofilm maturation, immune evasion, antibiotic tolerance and virulence factor production. Garlic shows QS inhibitory activity in vitro and in animal models. We report the first clinical trial in man of a QS inhibitor.We randomized 34 patients to garlic or olive oil capsules (both 656 mg daily). Clinical outcomes and safety bloods were measured at baseline and after 8 weeks treatment. In this exploratory study, analysis was per protocol.Eight patients withdrew, leaving 26 for analysis (13 garlic). With placebo, there was a greater decline in mean (SD) percentage change from baseline FEV(1) [-3.6% (11.3)] than with garlic [-2.0% (12.3)]. This was not significant (mean difference = 1.6, 95% CI -12.7 to 15.9, P = 0.8). The mean (SD) increase in weight was greater with garlic [1.0% (2.0)] than with placebo [0.6% (2.0)]--non-significant (mean difference = 0.4%, 95% CI -1.3 to 2.0, P = 0.6). The median (range) change in clinical score with garlic was -1 (-3 to 5) and 1 (-1 to 4) with placebo (negative score means improvement). This was non-significant [median difference = -1 (-3 to 0), P = 0.16]. In the garlic group, seven patients had IV antibiotics versus five placebo. There was a highly significant correlation between plasma and sputum measurements of the QS molecule 3-oxo-C12-HSL (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.914, P = 0.004). At the end of treatment five patients in each group had abnormal liver function or triglycerides and five garlic patients (one placebo) reported minor adverse effects.Garlic capsules were well tolerated. Although there was no significant effect of garlic compared to placebo in this pilot study, there was a suggestion of improvement with garlic which should be investigated in a larger trial.

  5. Quorum sensing and microbial drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Yufan, Chen; Shiyin, Liu; Zhibin, Liang; Mingfa, Lv; Jianuan, Zhou; Lianhui, Zhang

    2016-10-20

    Microbial drug resistance has become a serious problem of global concern, and the evolution and regulatory mechanisms of microbial drug resistance has become a hotspot of research in recent years. Recent studies showed that certain microbial resistance mechanisms are regulated by quorum sensing system. Quorum sensing is a ubiquitous cell-cell communication system in the microbial world, which associates with cell density. High-density microbial cells produce sufficient amount of small signal molecules, activating a range of downstream cellular processes including virulence and drug resistance mechanisms, which increases bacterial drug tolerance and causes infections on host organisms. In this review, the general mechanisms of microbial drug resistance and quorum-sensing systems are summarized with a focus on the association of quorum sensing and chemical signaling systems with microbial drug resistance mechanisms, including biofilm formation and drug efflux pump. The potential use of quorum quenching as a new strategy to control microbial resistance is also discussed.

  6. A genetic circuit system based on quorum sensing signaling for directed evolution of quorum-quenching enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Hyun; Lee, Sang-Chul; Kyeong, Hyun-Ho; Kim, Hak-Sung

    2010-08-16

    Quorum sensing is a cell-cell communication mechanism that is involved in the regulation of biological functions such as luminescence, virulence, and biofilm formation. Quorum-quenching enzymes, which interrupt quorum-sensing signaling through degradation of quorum-sensing molecules, have emerged as a new approach to controlling and preventing bacterial virulence and pathogenesis. In an effort to develop quorum-quenching enzymes with improved catalytic activities, a genetic circuit system based on acylhomoserine-lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum-sensing signaling was constructed. The genetic circuit system was composed of lux-R, lux-I promoter, beta-lactamase, and beta-lactamase inhibitor, and designed to confer antibiotic resistance on host cells expressing an AHL-degrading enzyme, thereby enabling rapid screening of quorum-quenching enzymes. To demonstrate the utility of the genetic circuit system, we attempted the directed evolution of the AHL hydrolase from Bacillus sp. The genetic circuit system was shown to be effective in screening of quorum-quenching enzymes with high catalytic efficiency. From these results it is expected that the genetic circuit system can be widely used for the isolation and directed evolution of quorum-quenching enzymes with greater potential.

  7. N,N'-alkylated Imidazolium-derivatives act as quorum-sensing inhibitors targeting the Pectobacterium atrosepticum-induced symptoms on potato tubers.

    PubMed

    des Essarts, Yannick Raoul; Sabbah, Mohamad; Comte, Arnaud; Soulère, Laurent; Queneau, Yves; Dessaux, Yves; Hélias, Valérie; Faure, Denis

    2013-10-08

    Bacteria belonging to the Pectobacterium genus are the causative agents of the blackleg and soft-rot diseases that affect potato plants and tubers worldwide. In Pectobacterium, the expression of the virulence genes is controlled by quorum-sensing (QS) and N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). In this work, we screened a chemical library of QS-inhibitors (QSIs) and AHL-analogs to find novel QSIs targeting the virulence of Pectobacterium. Four N,N'-bisalkylated imidazolium salts were identified as QSIs; they were active at the µM range. In potato tuber assays, two of them were able to decrease the severity of the symptoms provoked by P. atrosepticum. This work extends the range of the QSIs acting on the Pectobacterium-induced soft-rot disease.

  8. Development and validation of a UHPLC-MS/MS procedure for quantification of the Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal in bacterial culture after acetylation for characterization of new quorum sensing inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Christine K; Steinbach, Anke; Hartmann, Rolf W

    2013-12-01

    The appearance of antibiotic resistance requires novel therapeutic strategies. One approach is to selectively attenuate bacterial pathogenicity by interfering with bacterial cell-to-cell communication known as quorum sensing. The PQS quorum sensing system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs as signal molecule the Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal (PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-(1H)-quinolone), a key contributor to virulence and biofilm formation. Thus, interference with PQS production is considered as promising approach for the development of novel anti-infectives. Therefore, in this study, we developed and validated an ultra-high performance liquid chromatographic-tandem mass spectrometric approach for reliable quantification of PQS in P. aeruginosa cultures for activity determination of new quorum sensing inhibitors. The poor chromatographic properties of PQS reported by others could be overcome by fast microwave-assisted acetylation. The validation procedure including matrix effects, recovery, process efficiency, selectivity, carry-over, accuracy and precision, stability of the processed sample, and limit of quantification demonstrated that the method fulfilled all requirements of common validation guidelines. Its applicability was successfully proven in routine testing. In addition, two-point calibration was shown to be applicable for fast and reliable PQS quantification saving time and resources. In summary, the described method provides a powerful tool for the discovery of new quorum sensing inhibitors as potential anti-infectives and illustrated the usefulness of chemical derivatization, acetylation, in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

  9. Interfering with Bacterial Quorum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Kerstin; Steinbach, Anke; Helms, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) describes the exchange of chemical signals in bacterial populations to adjust the bacterial phenotypes according to the density of bacterial cells. This serves to express phenotypes that are advantageous for the group and ensure bacterial survival. To do so, bacterial cells synthesize autoinducer (AI) molecules, release them to the environment, and take them up. Thereby, the AI concentration reflects the cell density. When the AI concentration exceeds a critical threshold in the cells, the AI may activate the expression of virulence-associated genes or of luminescent proteins. It has been argued that targeting the QS system puts less selective pressure on these pathogens and should avoid the development of resistant bacteria. Therefore, the molecular components of QS systems have been suggested as promising targets for developing new anti-infective compounds. Here, we review the QS systems of selected gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria, namely, Vibrio fischeri, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus, and discuss various antivirulence strategies based on blocking different components of the QS machinery. PMID:26819549

  10. Molecular Docking, Molecular Dynamics Simulations, Computational Screening to Design Quorum Sensing Inhibitors Targeting LuxP of Vibrio harveyi and Its Biological Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rajamanikandan, Sundaraj; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Srinivasan, Pappu

    2017-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) plays an important role in the biofilm formation, production of virulence factors and stress responses in Vibrio harveyi. Therefore, interrupting QS is a possible approach to modulate bacterial behavior. In the present study, three docking protocols, such as Rigid Receptor Docking (RRD), Induced Fit Docking (IFD), and Quantum Polarized Ligand Docking (QPLD) were used to elucidate the binding mode of boronic acid derivatives into the binding pocket of LuxP protein in V. harveyi. Among the three docking protocols, IFD accurately predicted the correct binding mode of the studied inhibitors. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the protein-ligand complexes indicates that the inter-molecular hydrogen bonds formed between the protein and ligand complex remains stable during the simulation time. Pharmacophore and shape-based virtual screening were performed to find selective and potent compounds from ChemBridge database. Five hit compounds were selected and subjected to IFD and MD simulations to validate the binding mode. In addition, enrichment calculation was performed to discriminate and separate active compounds from the inactive compounds. Based on the computational studies, the potent Bicyclo [2.2.1] hept-5-ene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid-2,6-dimethylpyridine 1-oxide (ChemBridge_5144368) was selected for in vitro assays. The compound exhibited dose dependent inhibition in bioluminescence and also inhibits biofilm formation in V. harveyi to the level of 64.25 %. The result from the study suggests that ChemBridge_5144368 could serve as an anti-quorum sensing molecule for V. harveyi.

  11. Use of the quorum sensing inhibitor furanone C-30 to interfere with biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans and its luxS mutant strain.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiyan; Wang, Qian; Hu, Yuejian; Liang, Jingping; Jiang, Yuntao; Ma, Rui; Tang, Zisheng; Huang, Zhengwei

    2012-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans is recognised as a major aetiological agent of dental caries. One of its important virulence factors is its ability to form biofilms on tooth surfaces. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the quorum sensing inhibitor furanone C-30 on biofilm formation by S. mutans and its luxS mutant strain. The effects of furanone C-30 on biofilms of both strains formed on 96-well microtitre plates at 37 °C were determined by a colorimetric technique (MTT assay). Different concentrations of furanone C-30 (0.0, 2.0 and 4.0 μg/mL) and different time points of biofilm formation (4, 14 and 24 h) were investigated. The structures and thickness of the biofilms were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Quorum sensing-related gene expression (ftf, smu630, brpA, gbpB, gtfB, vicR, comDE and relA) was investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that synthetic furanone C-30 can inhibit biofilm formation by S. mutans and its luxS mutant strain, although it does not affect the bacterial growth rate itself. The quantities of biofilm formed by both strains significantly decreased (P<0.05) and the biofilms became thinner and looser as revealed by CLSM with increasing concentrations of furanone C-30. Expression of the genes tested was downregulated in the biofilms by the addition of furanone C-30. These results revealed that synthetic furanone C-30 can effectively inhibit biofilm formation by S. mutans and its luxS mutant strain.

  12. Societal Interactions in Ovarian Cancer Metastases: A Quorum Sensing Hypothesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    functions. Specific Aim 3. To test known quorum sensing signaling molecules for new functions in the induction of quorum sensing -like behavior...involves the production, release, and detection of chemical signaling molecules called autoinducers. As a population of quorum - sensing bacteria grows...that blocking quorum - sensing signaling molecules in drug resistant bacteria may restore susceptibility to antimicrobial therapy [20, 23, 29, 30]. If

  13. Quorum sensing control of Type VI secretion factors restricts the proliferation of quorum-sensing mutants.

    PubMed

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Schneider, Emily; Greenberg, E Peter

    2016-05-16

    Burkholderia thailandensis uses acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing systems to regulate hundreds of genes. Here we show that cell-cell contact-dependent type VI secretion (T6S) toxin-immunity systems are among those activated by quorum sensing in B. thailandensis. We also demonstrate that T6S is required to constrain proliferation of quorum sensing mutants in colony cocultures of a BtaR1 quorum-sensing signal receptor mutant and its parent. However, the BtaR1 mutant is not constrained by and outcompetes its parent in broth coculture, presumably because no cell contact occurs and there is a metabolic cost associated with quorum sensing gene activation. The increased fitness of the wild type over the BtaR1 mutant during agar surface growth is dependent on an intact T6SS-1 apparatus. Thus, quorum sensing activates B. thailandensis T6SS-1 growth inhibition and this control serves to police and constrain quorum-sensing mutants. This work defines a novel role for T6SSs in intraspecies mutant control.

  14. Quorum sensing control of Type VI secretion factors restricts the proliferation of quorum-sensing mutants

    PubMed Central

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Schneider, Emily; Greenberg, E Peter

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis uses acyl-homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing systems to regulate hundreds of genes. Here we show that cell-cell contact-dependent type VI secretion (T6S) toxin-immunity systems are among those activated by quorum sensing in B. thailandensis. We also demonstrate that T6S is required to constrain proliferation of quorum sensing mutants in colony cocultures of a BtaR1 quorum-sensing signal receptor mutant and its parent. However, the BtaR1 mutant is not constrained by and outcompetes its parent in broth coculture, presumably because no cell contact occurs and there is a metabolic cost associated with quorum sensing gene activation. The increased fitness of the wild type over the BtaR1 mutant during agar surface growth is dependent on an intact T6SS-1 apparatus. Thus, quorum sensing activates B. thailandensis T6SS-1 growth inhibition and this control serves to police and constrain quorum-sensing mutants. This work defines a novel role for T6SSs in intraspecies mutant control. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14712.001 PMID:27183270

  15. Quorum sensing in plant-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Loh, John; Pierson, Elizabeth A; Pierson, Leland S; Stacey, Gary; Chatterjee, Arun

    2002-08-01

    N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-mediated quorum sensing by bacteria regulates traits that are involved in symbiotic, pathogenic and surface-associated relationships between microbial populations and their plant hosts. Recent advances demonstrate deviations from the classic LuxR/LuxI paradigm, which was first developed in Vibrio. For example, LuxR homologs can repress as well as activate gene expression, and non-AHL signals and signal mimics can affect the expression of genes that are controlled by quorum sensing. Many bacteria utilize multiple quorum-sensing systems, and these may be modulated via post-transcriptional and other global regulatory mechanisms. Microbes inhabiting plant surfaces also produce and respond to a diverse mixture of AHL signals. The production of AHL mimics by plants and the identification of AHL degradative pathways suggest that bacteria and plants utilize this method of bacterial communication as a key control point for influencing the outcome of their interactions.

  16. Quorum Sensing in Nitrogen-Fixing Rhizobia

    PubMed Central

    González, Juan E.; Marketon, Melanie M.

    2003-01-01

    Members of the rhizobia are distinguished for their ability to establish a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with leguminous plants. While many details of this relationship remain a mystery, much effort has gone into elucidating the mechanisms governing bacterium-host recognition and the events leading to symbiosis. Several signal molecules, including plant-produced flavonoids and bacterially produced nodulation factors and exopolysaccharides, are known to function in the molecular conversation between the host and the symbiont. Work by several laboratories has shown that an additional mode of regulation, quorum sensing, intercedes in the signal exchange process and perhaps plays a major role in preparing and coordinating the nitrogen-fixing rhizobia during the establishment of the symbiosis. Rhizobium leguminosarum, for example, carries a multitiered quorum-sensing system that represents one of the most complex regulatory networks identified for this form of gene regulation. This review focuses on the recent stream of information regarding quorum sensing in the nitrogen-fixing rhizobia. Seminal work on the quorum-sensing systems of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae, R. etli, Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234, Sinorhizobium meliloti, and Bradyrhizobium japonicum is presented and discussed. The latest work shows that quorum sensing can be linked to various symbiotic phenomena including nodulation efficiency, symbiosome development, exopolysaccharide production, and nitrogen fixation, all of which are important for the establishment of a successful symbiosis. Many questions remain to be answered, but the knowledge obtained so far provides a firm foundation for future studies on the role of quorum-sensing mediated gene regulation in host-bacterium interactions. PMID:14665677

  17. Quorum sensing and swarming migration in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Ruth; Vanderleyden, Jos; Michiels, Jan

    2004-06-01

    Bacterial cells can produce and sense signal molecules, allowing the whole population to initiate a concerted action once a critical concentration (corresponding to a particular population density) of the signal has been reached, a phenomenon known as quorum sensing. One of the possible quorum sensing-regulated phenotypes is swarming, a flagella-driven movement of differentiated swarmer cells (hyperflagellated, elongated, multinucleated) by which bacteria can spread as a biofilm over a surface. The glycolipid or lipopeptide biosurfactants thereby produced function as wetting agent by reducing the surface tension. Quorum sensing systems are almost always integrated into other regulatory circuits. This effectively expands the range of environmental signals that influence target gene expression beyond population density. In this review, we first discuss the regulation of AHL-mediated surface migration and the involvement of other low-molecular-mass signal molecules (such as the furanosyl borate diester AI-2) in biosurfactant production of different bacteria. In addition, population density-dependent regulation of swarmer cell differentiation is reviewed. Also, several examples of interspecies signalling are reported. Different signal molecules either produced by bacteria (such as other AHLs and diketopiperazines) or excreted by plants (such as furanones, plant signal mimics) might influence the quorum sensing-regulated swarming behaviour in bacteria different from the producer. On the other hand, specific bacteria can reduce the local available concentration of signal molecules produced by others. In the last part, the role and regulation of a surface-associated movement in biofilm formation is discussed. Here we also describe how quorum sensing may disperse existing biofilms and control the interaction between bacteria and higher organisms (such as the Rhizobium-bean symbiosis).

  18. A strategy for antagonizing quorum sensing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guozhou; Swem, Lee R.; Swem, Danielle L.; Stauff, Devin L.; O’Loughlin, Colleen T.; Jeffrey, Philip D.; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Hughson, Frederick M.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Quorum-sensing bacteria communicate via small molecules called autoinducers to coordinate collective behaviors. Because quorum sensing controls virulence factor expression in many clinically relevant pathogens, membrane-permeable quorum sensing antagonists that prevent population-wide expression of virulence genes offer a potential route to novel antibacterial therapeutics. Here, we report a strategy for inhibiting quorum-sensing receptors of the widespread LuxR family. Structure-function studies with natural and synthetic ligands demonstrate that the dimeric LuxR-type transcription factor CviR from Chromobacterium violaceum is potently antagonized by molecules that bind in place of the native acylated homoserine lactone autoinducer, provided that they stabilize a closed conformation. In such conformations, each of the two DNA-binding domains interacts with the ligand-binding domain of the opposing monomer. Consequently, the DNA-binding helices are held apart by ~60 Å, twice the ~30 Å separation required for operator binding. This approach may represent a general strategy for the inhibition of multi-domain proteins. PMID:21504831

  19. A Strategy for Antagonizing Quorum Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    G Chen; L Swem; D Swem; D Stauff; C OLoughlin; P Jeffrey; B Bassler; F Hughson

    2011-12-31

    Quorum-sensing bacteria communicate via small molecules called autoinducers to coordinate collective behaviors. Because quorum sensing controls virulence factor expression in many clinically relevant pathogens, membrane-permeable quorum sensing antagonists that prevent population-wide expression of virulence genes offer a potential route to novel antibacterial therapeutics. Here, we report a strategy for inhibiting quorum-sensing receptors of the widespread LuxR family. Structure-function studies with natural and synthetic ligands demonstrate that the dimeric LuxR-type transcription factor CviR from Chromobacterium violaceum is potently antagonized by molecules that bind in place of the native acylated homoserine lactone autoinducer, provided that they stabilize a closed conformation. In such conformations, each of the two DNA-binding domains interacts with the ligand-binding domain of the opposing monomer. Consequently, the DNA-binding helices are held apart by {approx}60 {angstrom}, twice the {approx}30 {angstrom} separation required for operator binding. This approach may represent a general strategy for the inhibition of multidomain proteins.

  20. Time-dependent hormesis of chemical mixtures: A case study on sulfa antibiotics and a quorum-sensing inhibitor of Vibrio fischeri.

    PubMed

    You, Ruirong; Sun, Haoyu; Yu, Yan; Lin, Zhifen; Qin, Mengnan; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Sulfa antibiotics (SAs) and quorum-sensing inhibitor (QSI) may pose potential ecological risks because mixed using of them has been proposed to inhibit bacteria from generating antibiotic resistance. This study investigated the time-dependent hormesis of single and binary mixtures of QSI and SAs of Vibrio fischeri (V. fischeri) for 0-24 h. Although the low-dose SAs stimulated the expression of LuxR protein, the high-dose SAs could inhibit bacteria growth by competitively binding to dihydropteroate synthase. Moreover, AinR protein was bound to Benzofuran-3(2H)-one (B3O) with low concentration, thus the N-octanoyl homoserine lactone signal molecules (C8) has chance to bind to LuxR protein to promote light emission. The hormesis effect induced by the mixtures could be deduced that SAs promoted the expression of LuxR protein and B3O increases the chance of C8 binding to LuxR. Our findings facilitate new insight into the mechanistic study of hormesis and ecological risks of the chemical mixtures.

  1. Mechanisms of quorum sensing and strategies for quorum sensing disruption in aquaculture pathogens.

    PubMed

    Zhao, J; Chen, M; Quan, C S; Fan, S D

    2015-09-01

    In many countries, infectious diseases are a considerable threat to aquaculture. The pathogenicity of micro-organisms that infect aquaculture systems is closely related to the release of virulence factors and the formation of biofilms, both of which are regulated by quorum sensing (QS). Thus, QS disruption is a potential strategy for preventing disease in aquaculture systems. QS inhibitors (QSIs) not only inhibit the expression of virulence-associated genes but also attenuate the virulence of aquaculture pathogens. In this review, we discuss QS systems in important aquaculture pathogens and focus on the relationship between QS mechanisms and bacterial virulence in aquaculture. We further elucidate QS disruption strategies for targeting aquaculture pathogens. Four main types of QSIs that target aquaculture pathogens are discussed based on their mechanisms of action.

  2. Exploiting Quorum Sensing To Confuse Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    LaSarre, Breah

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell-cell communication, or quorum sensing, is a widespread phenomenon in bacteria that is used to coordinate gene expression among local populations. Its use by bacterial pathogens to regulate genes that promote invasion, defense, and spread has been particularly well documented. With the ongoing emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens, there is a current need for development of alternative therapeutic strategies. An antivirulence approach by which quorum sensing is impeded has caught on as a viable means to manipulate bacterial processes, especially pathogenic traits that are harmful to human and animal health and agricultural productivity. The identification and development of chemical compounds and enzymes that facilitate quorum-sensing inhibition (QSI) by targeting signaling molecules, signal biogenesis, or signal detection are reviewed here. Overall, the evidence suggests that QSI therapy may be efficacious against some, but not necessarily all, bacterial pathogens, and several failures and ongoing concerns that may steer future studies in productive directions are discussed. Nevertheless, various QSI successes have rightfully perpetuated excitement surrounding new potential therapies, and this review highlights promising QSI leads in disrupting pathogenesis in both plants and animals. PMID:23471618

  3. Quorum sensing: implications on rhamnolipid biosurfactant production.

    PubMed

    Dusane, Devendra H; Zinjarde, Smita S; Venugopalan, Vayalam P; McLean, Robert J C; Weber, Mary M; Rahman, Pattanathu K S M

    2010-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) has received significant attention in the past few decades. QS describes population density dependent cell to cell communication in bacteria using diffusible signal molecules. These signal molecules produced by bacterial cells, regulate various physiological processes important for social behavior and pathogenesis. One such process regulated by quorum sensing molecules is the production of a biosurfactant, rhamnolipid. Rhamnolipids are important microbially derived surface active agents produced by Pseudomonas spp. under the control of two interrelated quorum sensing systems; namely las and rhl. Rhamnolipids possess antibacterial, antifungal and antiviral properties. They are important in motility, cell to cell interactions, cellular differentiation and formation of water channels that are characteristics of Pseudomonas biofilms. Rhamnolipids have biotechnological applications in the uptake of hydrophobic substrates, bioremediation of contaminated soils and polluted waters. Rhamnolipid biosurfactants are biodegradable as compared to chemical surfactants and hence are more preferred in environmental applications. In this review, we examine the biochemical and genetic mechanism of rhamnolipid production by P. aeruginosa and propose the application of QS signal molecules in enhancing the rhamnolipid production.

  4. AI-2 quorum-sensing inhibitors affect the starvation response and reduce virulence in several Vibrio species, most likely by interfering with LuxPQ.

    PubMed

    Brackman, Gilles; Celen, Shari; Baruah, Kartik; Bossier, Peter; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Nelis, Hans J; Coenye, Tom

    2009-12-01

    The increase of disease outbreaks caused by Vibrio species in aquatic organisms as well as in humans, together with the emergence of antibiotic resistance in Vibrio species, has led to a growing interest in alternative disease control measures. Quorum sensing (QS) is a mechanism for regulating microbial gene expression in a cell density-dependent way. While there is good evidence for the involvement of auto-inducer 2 (AI-2)-based interspecies QS in the control of virulence in multiple Vibrio species, only few inhibitors of this system are known. From the screening of a small panel of nucleoside analogues for their ability to disturb AI-2-based QS, an adenosine derivative with a p-methoxyphenylpropionamide moiety at C-3' emerged as a promising hit. Its mechanism of inhibition was elucidated by measuring the effect on bioluminescence in a series of Vibrio harveyi AI-2 QS mutants. Our results indicate that this compound, as well as a truncated analogue lacking the adenine base, block AI-2-based QS without interfering with bacterial growth. The active compounds affected neither the bioluminescence system as such nor the production of AI-2, but most likely interfered with the signal transduction pathway at the level of LuxPQ in V. harveyi. The most active nucleoside analogue (designated LMC-21) was found to reduce the Vibrio species starvation response, to affect biofilm formation in Vibrio anguillarum, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio cholerae, to reduce pigment and protease production in V. anguillarum, and to protect gnotobiotic Artemia from V. harveyi-induced mortality.

  5. Surface coatings that promote rapid release of peptide-based AgrC inhibitors for attenuation of quorum sensing in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Adam H; Stacy, Danielle M; Tal-Gan, Yftah; Kratochvil, Michael J; Blackwell, Helen E; Lynn, David M

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen responsible for a variety of life-threatening infections. The pathogenicity of this organism is attributed to its ability to produce a range of virulence factors and toxins, including the superantigen toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1). While many S. aureus infections can be treated using conventional antibiotics, strains resistant to these bactericidal agents have emerged. Approaches that suppress pathogenicity through mechanisms that are nonbactericidal (i.e., antivirulence approaches) could provide new options for treating infections, including those caused by resistant strains. Here, we report a nonbactericidal approach to suppressing pathogenicity based on the release of macrocyclic peptides (1 and 2) that inhibit the agr quorum sensing (QS) circuit in group-III S. aureus. It is demonstrated that these peptides can be immobilized on planar and complex objects (on glass slides, nonwoven meshes, or within absorbent tampons) using the rapidly dissolving polymer carboxymethylcellulose (CMC). Peptide-loaded CMC films released peptide rapidly (<5 min) and promoted strong (>95%) inhibition of the agr QS circuit without inducing cell death when incubated in the presence of a group-III S. aureus gfp-reporter strain. Peptide 1 is among the most potent inhibitors of QS in S. aureus reported to date, and the group-III QS circuit regulates production of TSST-1, the primary cause of toxic shock syndrome (TSS). These results thus suggest approaches to treat the outer covers of tampons, wound dressings, or other objects to suppress toxin production and reduce the severity of TSS in clinical and personal care contexts. Because peptide 1 also inhibits QS in S. aureus groups-I, -II, and -IV, this approach could also provide a pathway for attenuation of QS and associated virulence phenotypes in a broader range of contexts.

  6. Noisy neighbourhoods: quorum sensing in fungal-polymicrobial infections.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Emily F; Hall, Rebecca A

    2015-10-01

    Quorum sensing was once considered a way in which a species was able to sense its cell density and regulate gene expression accordingly. However, it is now becoming apparent that multiple microbes can sense particular quorum-sensing molecules, enabling them to sense and respond to other microbes in their neighbourhood. Such interactions are significant within the context of polymicrobial disease, in which the competition or cooperation of microbes can alter disease progression. Fungi comprise a small but important component of the human microbiome and are in constant contact with bacteria and viruses. The discovery of quorum-sensing pathways in fungi has led to the characterization of a number of interkingdom quorum-sensing interactions. Here, we review the recent developments in quorum sensing in medically important fungi, and the implications these interactions have on the host's innate immune response.

  7. Global convergence of quorum-sensing networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Giovanni; Slotine, Jean Jacques E.

    2010-10-01

    In many natural synchronization phenomena, communication between individual elements occurs not directly but rather through the environment. One of these instances is bacterial quorum sensing, where bacteria release signaling molecules in the environment which in turn are sensed and used for population coordination. Extending this motivation to a general nonlinear dynamical system context, this paper analyzes synchronization phenomena in networks where communication and coupling between nodes are mediated by shared dynamical quantities, typically provided by the nodes’ environment. Our model includes the case when the dynamics of the shared variables themselves cannot be neglected or indeed play a central part. Applications to examples from system biology illustrate the approach.

  8. The impact of quorum sensing on the virulence of Aeromonas hydrophila and Aeromonas salmonicida towards burbot (Lota lota L.) larvae.

    PubMed

    Natrah, F M I; Alam, Md Iftakharul; Pawar, Sushant; Harzevili, A Shiri; Nevejan, Nancy; Boon, Nico; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2012-09-14

    In this study, the link between quorum sensing in Aeromonas spp. and its virulence towards burbot (Lota lota) was investigated. High mortality occurred in burbot juveniles challenged with Aeromonas salmonicida HN-00, but not in juveniles challenged with Aeromonas hydrophila AH-1N. Meanwhile, both A. hydrophila AH-1N and A. salmonicida HN-00 were virulent towards larvae. The effect of quorum sensing on the virulence of A. hydrophila AH-1N towards burbot larvae was further investigated using quorum sensing mutants (N-(butyryl)-L-homoserine lactone production and receptor mutants). Challenge with these mutants resulted in higher survival of burbot larvae when compared to challenge with the wild type, and the addition of the signal molecule N-butyryl-L-homoserine lactone restored the virulence of the quorum sensing production mutant. Moreover, quorum sensing inhibitors protected the burbot larvae from both Aeromonas strains. Finally, the freshwater micro-algae Chlorella saccharophila and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, which are able to interfere with quorum sensing, also protected burbot from the pathogens. However, QS interference was unlikely to be the only mechanism. This study revealed that the virulence of Aeromonas spp. towards burbot is regulated by quorum sensing and that quorum sensing inhibitors and micro-algae are promising biocontrol agents.

  9. Subtilosin Prevents Biofilm Formation by Inhibiting Bacterial Quorum Sensing.

    PubMed

    Algburi, Ammar; Zehm, Saskia; Netrebov, Victoria; Bren, Anzhelica B; Chistyakov, Vladimir; Chikindas, Michael L

    2017-03-01

    Subtilosin, the cyclic lantibiotic protein produced by Bacillus subtilis KATMIRA1933, targets the surface receptor and electrostatically binds to the bacterial cell membrane. In this study, subtilosin was purified using ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4) precipitation and purified via column chromatography. Subtilosin's antibacterial minimum and sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC and sub-MIC) and anti-biofilm activity (biofilm prevention) were established. Subtilosin was evaluated as a quorum sensing (QS) inhibitor in Gram-positive bacteria using Fe(III) reduction assay. In Gram-negative bacteria, subtilosin was evaluated as a QS inhibitor utilizing Chromobacterium voilaceum as a microbial reporter. The results showed that Gardnerella vaginalis was more sensitive to subtilosin with MIC of 6.25 μg/mL when compared to Listeria monocytogenes (125 μg/mL). The lowest concentration of subtilosin, at which more than 90% of G. vaginalis biofilm was inhibited without effecting the growth of planktonic cells, was 0.78 μg/mL. About 80% of L. monocytogenes and more than 60% of Escherichia coli biofilm was inhibited when 15.1 μg/mL of subtilosin was applied. Subtilosin with 7.8-125 μg/mL showed a significant reduction in violacein production without any inhibitory effect on the growth of C. violaceum. Subtilosin at 3 and 4 μg/mL reduced the level of Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) production in G. vaginalis. However, subtilosin did not influence AI-2 production by L. monocytogenes at sub-MICs of 0.95-15.1 μg/mL. To our knowledge, this is the first report exploring the relationship between biofilm prevention and quorum sensing inhibition in G. vaginalis using subtilosin as a quorum sensing inhibitor.

  10. Inhibition of quorum sensing and biofilm formation in Vibrio harveyi by 4-fluoro-DPD; a novel potent inhibitor of signalling.

    PubMed

    Kadirvel, Manikandan; Fanimarvasti, Fariba; Forbes, Sarah; McBain, Andrew; Gardiner, John M; Brown, Gavin D; Freeman, Sally

    2014-05-21

    (S)-4,5-Dihydroxypentane-2,3-dione [(S)-DPD, (1)] is a precursor for , a quorum sensing signalling molecule for inter- and intra-species bacterial communication. The synthesis of its fluoro-analogue, 4-fluoro-5-hydroxypentane-2,3-dione () is reported. An intermediate in this route also enables a new, shorter synthesis of the native (S)-DPD. 4-Fluoro-DPD (2) completely inhibited bioluminescence and bacterial growth of Vibrio harveyi BB170 strain at 12.5 μM and 100 μM, respectively.

  11. Ambroxol interferes with Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qi; Yu, Jialin; Yang, Xiqiang; Wang, Jiarong; Wang, Lijia; Lin, Yayin; Lin, Lihua

    2010-09-01

    The mucolytic agent ambroxol has been reported to interfere with the formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived biofilms in addition to reducing alginate production by undefined mechanisms. Since quorum sensing is a key regulator of virulence and biofilm formation, we examined the effects of ambroxol on P. aeruginosa PAO1 wild-type bacterial clearance rates, adhesion profiles and biofilm formation compared with the quorum sensing-deficient, double-mutant strains DeltalasR DeltarhlR and DeltalasI DeltarhlI. Data presented in this report demonstrated that ambroxol treatment reduced survival rates of the double-mutant strains compared with the wild-type strain in a dose-dependent manner even though the double-mutants had increased adhesion in the presence of ambroxol compared with the wild-type strain. The PAO1 wild-type strain produced a significantly thicker biofilm (21.64+/-0.57 microm) compared with the biofilms produced by the DeltalasR DeltarhlR (7.36+/-0.2 microm) and DeltalasI DeltarhlI (6.62+/-0.31 microm) isolates. Ambroxol treatment reduced biofilm thickness, increased areal porosity, and decreased the average diffusion distance and textual entropy of wild-type and double-mutant strains. However, compared with the double-mutant strains, the changes observed for the wild-type strain were more clearly defined. Finally, ambroxol exhibited significant antagonistic quorum-sensing properties, suggesting that it could be adapted for use clinically in the treatment of cystic fibrosis and to reduce biofilm formation and in the colonisation of indwelling devices.

  12. Metagenomic approaches to understanding phylogenetic diversity in quorum sensing

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Nobutada

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing, a form of cell–cell communication among bacteria, allows bacteria to synchronize their behaviors at the population level in order to control behaviors such as luminescence, biofilm formation, signal turnover, pigment production, antibiotics production, swarming, and virulence. A better understanding of quorum-sensing systems will provide us with greater insight into the complex interaction mechanisms used widely in the Bacteria and even the Archaea domain in the environment. Metagenomics, the use of culture-independent sequencing to study the genomic material of microorganisms, has the potential to provide direct information about the quorum-sensing systems in uncultured bacteria. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge of quorum sensing focused on phylogenetic diversity, and presents examples of studies that have used metagenomic techniques. Future technologies potentially related to quorum-sensing systems are also discussed. PMID:24429899

  13. Metagenomic approaches to understanding phylogenetic diversity in quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Nobutada

    2014-04-01

    Quorum sensing, a form of cell-cell communication among bacteria, allows bacteria to synchronize their behaviors at the population level in order to control behaviors such as luminescence, biofilm formation, signal turnover, pigment production, antibiotics production, swarming, and virulence. A better understanding of quorum-sensing systems will provide us with greater insight into the complex interaction mechanisms used widely in the Bacteria and even the Archaea domain in the environment. Metagenomics, the use of culture-independent sequencing to study the genomic material of microorganisms, has the potential to provide direct information about the quorum-sensing systems in uncultured bacteria. This article provides an overview of the current knowledge of quorum sensing focused on phylogenetic diversity, and presents examples of studies that have used metagenomic techniques. Future technologies potentially related to quorum-sensing systems are also discussed.

  14. Bacterial quorum sensing and metabolic incentives to cooperate.

    PubMed

    Dandekar, Ajai A; Chugani, Sudha; Greenberg, E Peter

    2012-10-12

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses a cell-cell communication system termed "quorum sensing" to control production of public goods, extracellular products that can be used by any community member. Not all individuals respond to quorum-sensing signals and synthesize public goods. Such social cheaters enjoy the benefits of the products secreted by cooperators. There are some P. aeruginosa cellular enzymes controlled by quorum sensing, and we show that quorum sensing-controlled expression of such private goods can put a metabolic constraint on social cheating and prevent a tragedy of the commons. Metabolic constraint of social cheating provides an explanation for private-goods regulation by a cooperative system and has general implications for population biology, infection control, and stabilization of quorum-sensing circuits in synthetic biology.

  15. Novel linear polymers able to inhibit bacterial quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Cavaleiro, Eliana; Duarte, Ana Sofia; Esteves, Ana Cristina; Correia, António; Whitcombe, Michael J; Piletska, Elena V; Piletsky, Sergey A; Chianella, Iva

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial phenotypes, such as biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance and virulence expression, are associated with quorum sensing. Quorum sensing is a density-dependent regulatory system of gene expression controlled by specific signal molecules, such as N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), produced and released by bacteria. This study reports the development of linear polymers capable to attenuate quorum sensing by adsorption of AHLs. Linear polymers were synthesized using MMA as backbone monomer and methacrylic acid and itaconic acid as functional monomers. Two different quorum sensing-controlled phenotypes, Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence and Aeromonas hydrophila biofilm formation, were evaluated to test the polymers' efficiency. Results showed that both phenotypes were significantly affected by the polymers, with the itaconic acid-containing material being more effective than the methacrylic acid one. The polymer inhibitory effects were reverted by the addition of lactones, confirming attenuation of quorum sensing through sequestration of signal molecules. The polymers also showed no cytotoxicity when tested using a mammalian cell line.

  16. [Quorum sensing in bacteria and yeast].

    PubMed

    March Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto; Eiros Bouza, José María

    2013-10-19

    Bacterial sets are complex dynamic systems, which interact with each other and through the interaction, bacteria coexist, collaborate, compete and share information in a coordinated manner. A way of bacterial communication is quorum sensing. Through this mechanism the bacteria can recognize its concentration in a given environment and they can decide the time at which the expression of a particular set of genes should be started for developing a specific and simultaneous response. The result of these interconnections raises properties that cannot be explained from a single isolated bacterial cell.

  17. Antibiotic-free nanotherapeutics: ultra-small, mucus-penetrating solid lipid nanoparticles enhance the pulmonary delivery and anti-virulence efficacy of novel quorum sensing inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nafee, Noha; Husari, Ayman; Maurer, Christine K; Lu, Cenbin; de Rossi, Chiara; Steinbach, Anke; Hartmann, Rolf W; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Schneider, Marc

    2014-10-28

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease mainly manifested in the respiratory tract. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) is the most common pathogen identified in cultures of the CF airways, however, its eradication with antibiotics remains challenging as it grows in biofilms that counterwork human immune response and dramatically decrease susceptibility to antibiotics. P. aeruginosa regulates pathogenicity via a cell-to-cell communication system known as quorum sensing (QS) involving the virulence factor (pyocyanin), thus representing an attractive target for coping with bacterial pathogenicity. The first in vivo potent QS inhibitor (QSI) was recently developed. Nevertheless, its lipophilic nature might hamper its penetration of non-cellular barriers such as mucus and bacterial biofilms, which limits its biomedical application. Successful anti-infective inhalation therapy necessitates proper design of a biodegradable nanocarrier allowing: 1) high loading and prolonged release, 2) mucus penetration, 3) effective pulmonary delivery, and 4) maintenance of the anti-virulence activity of the QSI. In this context, various pharmaceutical lipids were used to prepare ultra-small solid lipid nanoparticles (us-SLNs) by hot melt homogenization. Plain and QSI-loaded SLNs were characterized in terms of colloidal properties, drug loading, in vitro release and acute toxicity on Calu-3 cells. Mucus penetration was studied using a newly-developed confocal microscopy technique based on 3D-time-lapse imaging. For pulmonary application, nebulization efficiency of SLNs and lung deposition using next generation impactor (NGI) were performed. The anti-virulence efficacy was investigated by pyocyanin formation in P. aeruginosa cultures. Ultra-small SLNs (<100nm diameter) provided high encapsulation efficiency (68-95%) according to SLN composition, high burst in phosphate buffer saline compared to prolonged release of the payload over >8h in simulated lung fluid with minor burst. All

  18. Efficacies of quorum sensing inhibitors, piericidin A and glucopiericidin A, produced by Streptomyces xanthocidicus KPP01532 for the control of potato soft rot caused by Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ji Eun; Han, Jae Woo; Jeon, Byeong Jun; Kim, Beom Seok

    2016-03-01

    To discover potential inhibitors of the quorum sensing (QS) system, a library of microbial culture extracts was screened with Chromobacterium violaceumCV026 strain. The culture extract of Streptomyces xanthocidicus KPP01532 contained quorum-sensing inhibitors (QSIs) of the CV026 strain. The active constituents of the culture extract of strain KPP01532 were purified using a series of chromatographic procedures, and based on data from NMR and mass spectroscopy, piericidin A and glucopiericidin A were identified. Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica (Eca) is a plant pathogen that causes blackleg and soft rot diseases on potato stems and tubers. The virulence factors of Eca are regulated by QS. The expression of virulence genes (pelC, pehA, celV and nip) under the control of QS was monitored using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The transcription levels of the four genes were significantly lower when Eca was exposed to piericidin A or glucopiericidin A. These two compounds displayed similar control efficacies against soft rot caused by Eca in potato slices as furanone C-30. Therefore, piericidin A and glucopiericidin A are potential QSIs that suppress the expression of the virulence genes of Eca, suggesting that they could have potential use as control agents of soft rot disease on potato tubers.

  19. Engineered biological nanofactories trigger quorum sensing response in targeted bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Rohan; Roy, Varnika; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Bentley, William E.

    2010-03-01

    Biological nanofactories, which are engineered to contain modules that can target, sense and synthesize molecules, can trigger communication between different bacterial populations. These communications influence biofilm formation, virulence, bioluminescence and many other bacterial functions in a process called quorum sensing. Here, we show the assembly of a nanofactory that can trigger a bacterial quorum sensing response in the absence of native quorum molecules. The nanofactory comprises an antibody (for targeting) and a fusion protein that produces quorum molecules when bound to the targeted bacterium. Our nanofactory selectively targets the appropriate bacteria and triggers a quorum sensing response when added to two populations of bacteria. The nanofactories also trigger communication between two bacterial populations that are otherwise non-communicating. We envision the use of these nanofactories in generating new antimicrobial treatments that target the communication networks of bacteria rather than their viability.

  20. Quorum quenching enzymes and their application in degrading signal molecules to block quorum sensing-dependent infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fang; Gao, Yuxin; Chen, Xiaoyi; Yu, Zhimin; Li, Xianzhen

    2013-08-26

    With the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of bacteria, the available options for treating bacterial infections have become very limited, and the search for a novel general antibacterial therapy has received much greater attention. Quorum quenching can be used to control disease in a quorum sensing system by triggering the pathogenic phenotype. The interference with the quorum sensing system by the quorum quenching enzyme is a potential strategy for replacing traditional antibiotics because the quorum quenching strategy does not aim to kill the pathogen or limit cell growth but to shut down the expression of the pathogenic gene. Quorum quenching enzymes have been identified in quorum sensing and non-quorum sensing microbes, including lactonase, acylase, oxidoreductase and paraoxonase. Lactonase is widely conserved in a range of bacterial species and has variable substrate spectra. The existence of quorum quenching enzymes in the quorum sensing microbes can attenuate their quorum sensing, leading to blocking unnecessary gene expression and pathogenic phenotypes. In this review, we discuss the physiological function of quorum quenching enzymes in bacterial infection and elucidate the enzymatic protection in quorum sensing systems for host diseases and their application in resistance against microbial diseases.

  1. Applications of quorum sensing in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Swati; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia

    2010-05-01

    Many unicellular microorganisms use small signaling molecules to determine their local concentration. The processes involved in the production and recognition of these signals are collectively known as quorum sensing (QS). This form of cell-cell communication is used by unicellular microorganisms to co-ordinate their activities, which allows them to function as multi-cellular systems. Recently, several groups have demonstrated artificial intra-species and inter-species communication through synthetic circuits which incorporate components of bacterial QS systems. Engineered QS-based circuits have a wide range of applications such as production of biochemicals, tissue engineering, and mixed-species fermentations. They are also highly useful in designing microbial biosensors to identify bacterial species present in the environment and within living organisms. In this review, we first provide an overview of bacterial QS systems and the mechanisms developed by bacteria and higher organisms to obstruct QS communications. Next, we describe the different ways in which researchers have designed QS-based circuits and their applications in biotechnology. Finally, disruption of quorum sensing is discussed as a viable strategy for preventing the formation of harmful biofilms in membrane bioreactors and marine transportation.

  2. Transition state analogs of 5'-methylthioadenosine nucleosidase disrupt quorum sensing.

    SciTech Connect

    Gutierrez, J.; Crowder, T; Rinaldo-Matthis, A; Ho, M; Almo, S; Schramm, V

    2009-01-01

    5'-Methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine nucleosidase (MTAN) is a bacterial enzyme involved in S-adenosylmethionine-related quorum sensing pathways that induce bacterial pathogenesis factors. Transition state analogs MT-DADMe-Immucillin-A, EtT-DADMe-Immucillin-A and BuT-DADMe-Immucillin-A are slow-onset, tight-binding inhibitors of Vibrio cholerae MTAN (VcMTAN), with equilibrium dissociation constants of 73, 70 and 208 pM, respectively. Structural analysis of VcMTAN with BuT-DADMe-Immucillin-A revealed interactions contributing to the high affinity. We found that in V. cholerae cells, these compounds are potent MTAN inhibitors with IC50 values of 27, 31 and 6 nM for MT-, EtT- and BuT-DADMe-Immucillin-A, respectively; the compounds disrupt autoinducer production in a dose-dependent manner without affecting growth. MT- and BuT-DADMe-Immucillin-A also inhibited autoinducer-2 production in enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 with IC{sub 50} values of 600 and 125 nM, respectively. BuT-DADMe-Immucillin-A inhibition of autoinducer-2 production in both strains persisted for several generations and caused reduction in biofilm formation. These results support MTAN's role in quorum sensing and its potential as a target for bacterial anti-infective drug design.

  3. [Screening and identification of marine fungi against bacterial quorum sensing].

    PubMed

    Yin, Shouliang; Chang, Yajing; Deng, Suping; Wang, Qingchi; Yu, Wengong; Gong, Qianhong

    2011-09-01

    The discovery of quorum sensing (QS) system and its critical role in bacterial virulence have revealed a new way to attack pathogenic bacterium. The pathogenecity of QS deletion mutants decreases significantly. Targeting bacterial QS system is a promising therapeutic approach to control infections and anti-microbial resistance. To obtain natural QS inhibitors from marine organisms, marine fungi (69 strains) were isolated from marine mollusca, and their extracts were screened using improved QSIS2 (Quorum Sensing Inhibitor Selector 2) assay and Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. To improve the efficiency of QSIS2 screening, 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining method was used. Extract from strain QY013 was found to have QS inhibitory activity. Further experiment indicated that pyocyanin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAOI and violacein in C. violaceum CV026 were reduced by QY013 extract, without affecting bacterial growth. Morphological and 18S rDNA sequence analysis revealed that strain QY013 was most closely related to Penicillium species. The above results suggest that active constituents from QY013 may be used as novel antimicrobial agents against bacterial infection.

  4. Quorum sensing in metal tolerance of Acinetobacter junii BB1A is associated with biofilm production.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Suchitra; Chakraborty, Ranadhir

    2008-05-01

    Acinetobacter junii strain BB1A, a novel metal-tolerant bacterium, produced biofilm in the presence of added ions such as Ni(2+), AsO(2)(-), Cd(2+) and Hg(2+) on surfaces such as glass and polystyrene. Generation of a metal-sensitive and adhesion-deficient mutant by transposition of Tn5-mob in the A. junii genome has putatively confirmed the association of metal tolerance with the production of biofilm. The requirement of a critical cell density for biofilm formation and presence of acyl-homoserine lactone-like autoinducer molecules in the cell-free supernatant indicated the phenomenon of quorum sensing. Addition of a natural quorum-sensing inhibitor (garlic extract) or synthetic quorum-sensing inhibitor (4-nitro-pyridine oxide) significantly inhibited cell growth and biofilm formation in the presence of metal/metalloid ions.

  5. Social Evolution Selects for Redundancy in Bacterial Quorum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Valastyan, Julie; Ke, Xiaobo; Pollak, Shaul; Bareia, Tasneem; Ben-Zion, Ishay; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Eldar, Avigdor

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a process of chemical communication that bacteria use to monitor cell density and coordinate cooperative behaviors. Quorum sensing relies on extracellular signal molecules and cognate receptor pairs. While a single quorum-sensing system is sufficient to probe cell density, bacteria frequently use multiple quorum-sensing systems to regulate the same cooperative behaviors. The potential benefits of these redundant network structures are not clear. Here, we combine modeling and experimental analyses of the Bacillus subtilis and Vibrio harveyi quorum-sensing networks to show that accumulation of multiple quorum-sensing systems may be driven by a facultative cheating mechanism. We demonstrate that a strain that has acquired an additional quorum-sensing system can exploit its ancestor that possesses one fewer system, but nonetheless, resume full cooperation with its kin when it is fixed in the population. We identify the molecular network design criteria required for this advantage. Our results suggest that increased complexity in bacterial social signaling circuits can evolve without providing an adaptive advantage in a clonal population. PMID:26927849

  6. Quorum sensing and Bacterial Pathogenicity: From Molecules to Disease.

    PubMed

    Deep, Antariksh; Chaudhary, Uma; Gupta, Varsha

    2011-01-01

    Quorum sensing in prokaryotic biology refers to the ability of a bacterium to sense information from other cells in the population when they reach a critical concentration (i.e. a Quorum) and communicate with them. The "language" used for this intercellular communication is based on small, self-generated signal molecules called as autoinducers. Quorum sensing is thought to afford pathogenic bacteriaa mechanism to minimize host immune responses by delaying theproduction of tissue-damaging virulence factors until sufficientbacteria have amassed and are prepared to overwhelm host defensemechanisms and establish infection. Quorum sensing systems are studied in a large number of gram-negative bacterial species belonging to α, β, and γ subclasses of proteobacteria. Among the pathogenic bacteria, Pseudomonas aeruginosa is perhaps the best understood in terms of the virulence factors regulated and the role the Quorum sensing plays in pathogenicity. Presently, Quorum sensing is considered as a potential novel target for antimicrobial therapy to control multi/all drug-resistant infections. This paper reviews Quorum sensing in gram positive and gram negative bacteria and its role in biofilm formation.

  7. Social Evolution Selects for Redundancy in Bacterial Quorum Sensing.

    PubMed

    Even-Tov, Eran; Bendori, Shira Omer; Valastyan, Julie; Ke, Xiaobo; Pollak, Shaul; Bareia, Tasneem; Ben-Zion, Ishay; Bassler, Bonnie L; Eldar, Avigdor

    2016-02-01

    Quorum sensing is a process of chemical communication that bacteria use to monitor cell density and coordinate cooperative behaviors. Quorum sensing relies on extracellular signal molecules and cognate receptor pairs. While a single quorum-sensing system is sufficient to probe cell density, bacteria frequently use multiple quorum-sensing systems to regulate the same cooperative behaviors. The potential benefits of these redundant network structures are not clear. Here, we combine modeling and experimental analyses of the Bacillus subtilis and Vibrio harveyi quorum-sensing networks to show that accumulation of multiple quorum-sensing systems may be driven by a facultative cheating mechanism. We demonstrate that a strain that has acquired an additional quorum-sensing system can exploit its ancestor that possesses one fewer system, but nonetheless, resume full cooperation with its kin when it is fixed in the population. We identify the molecular network design criteria required for this advantage. Our results suggest that increased complexity in bacterial social signaling circuits can evolve without providing an adaptive advantage in a clonal population.

  8. Quorum sensing and policing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa social cheaters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meizhen; Schaefer, Amy L; Dandekar, Ajai A; Greenberg, E Peter

    2015-02-17

    The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that uses a quorum sensing signal cascade to activate expression of dozens of genes when sufficient population densities have been reached. Quorum sensing controls production of several key virulence factors, including secreted proteases such as elastase. Cooperating groups of bacteria growing on protein are susceptible to social cheating by quorum-sensing defective mutants. A possible way to restrict cheater emergence is by policing where cooperators produce costly goods to sanction or punish cheats. The P. aeruginosa LasR-LasI quorum sensing system controls genes including those encoding proteases and also those encoding a second quorum-sensing system, the RhlR-RhlI system, which controls numerous genes including those for cyanide production. By using RhlR quorum sensing mutants and cyanide synthesis mutants, we show that cyanide production is costly and cyanide-producing cooperators use cyanide to punish LasR-null social cheaters. Cooperators are less susceptible to cyanide than are LasR mutants. These experiments demonstrate policing in P. aeruginosa, provide a mechanistic understanding of policing, and show policing involves the cascade organization of the two quorum sensing systems in this bacterium.

  9. Quorum Sensing in Marine Microbial Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hmelo, Laura R.

    2017-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a form of chemical communication used by certain bacteria that regulates a wide range of biogeochemically important bacterial behaviors. Although QS was first observed in a marine bacterium nearly four decades ago, only in the past decade has there been a rise in interest in the role that QS plays in the ocean. It has become clear that QS, regulated by signals such as acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) or furanosyl-borate diesters [autoinducer-2 (AI-2) molecules], is involved in important processes within the marine carbon cycle, in the health of coral reef ecosystems, and in trophic interactions between a range of eukaryotes and their bacterial associates. The most well-studied QS systems in the ocean occur in surface-attached (biofilm) communities and rely on AHL signaling. AHL-QS is highly sensitive to the chemical and biological makeup of the environment and may respond to anthropogenic change, including ocean acidification and rising sea surface temperatures.

  10. ["Quorum sensing" or social behavior of bacteria].

    PubMed

    Gintsburg, A L; Il'ina, T S; Romanova, Iu M

    2003-01-01

    The review deals with the data of literature on the role of the "quorum sensing" (QS) system ensuring the social behavior of bacteria in the regulation of virulence genes. The mechanisms of the action of these systems in Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as the influence of acyl-homoserine lactones, one of the components of the QS system, on the immune response of the infected host are discussed. In addition, in this review the data of literature on the existence of bacteria in the form of biofilms are presented. The methods of the identification of biofilms, the methods of their experimental preparation and the role of the QS system in the process of their formation are considered.

  11. Quorum sensing positively regulates flagellar motility in pathogenic Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Vibrios belonging to the Harveyi clade are among the major pathogens of aquatic organisms. Quorum sensing (QS) is essential for virulence of V. harveyi towards different hosts. However, most virulence factors reported to be controlled by QS to date are negatively regulated by QS, therefore suggesting that their impact on virulence is limited. In this study, we report that QS positively regulates flagellar motility. We found that autoinducer synthase mutants showed significantly lower swimming motility than the wild type, and the swimming motility could be restored by adding synthetic signal molecules. Further, motility of a luxO mutant with inactive QS (LuxO D47E) was significantly lower than that of the wild type and of a luxO mutant with constitutively maximal QS activity (LuxO D47A). Furthermore, we found that the expression of flagellar genes (both early, middle and late genes) was significantly lower in the luxO mutant with inactive QS when compared with wild type and the luxO mutant with maximal QS activity. Motility assays and gene expression also revealed the involvement of the quorum-sensing master regulator LuxR in the QS regulation of motility. Finally, the motility inhibitor phenamil significantly decreased the virulence of V. harveyi towards gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae.

  12. Electronic Implementation of a Repressilator with Quorum Sensing Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Hellen, Edward H.; Dana, Syamal K.; Zhurov, Boris; Volkov, Evgeny

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a synthetic genetic repressilator with quorum sensing feedback. In a basic genetic ring oscillator network in which three genes inhibit each other in unidirectional manner, an additional quorum sensing feedback loop stimulates the activity of a chosen gene providing competition between inhibitory and stimulatory activities localized in that gene. Numerical simulations show several interesting dynamics, multi-stability of limit cycle with stable steady-state, multi-stability of different stable steady-states, limit cycle with period-doubling and reverse period-doubling, and infinite period bifurcation transitions for both increasing and decreasing strength of quorum sensing feedback. We design an electronic analog of the repressilator with quorum sensing feedback and reproduce, in experiment, the numerically predicted dynamical features of the system. Noise amplification near infinite period bifurcation is also observed. An important feature of the electronic design is the accessibility and control of the important system parameters. PMID:23658793

  13. A Mathematical Model of Quorum Sensing Induced Biofilm Detachment

    PubMed Central

    Emerenini, Blessing O.; Hense, Burkhard A.; Kuttler, Christina; Eberl, Hermann J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cell dispersal (or detachment) is part of the developmental cycle of microbial biofilms. It can be externally or internally induced, and manifests itself in discrete sloughing events, whereby many cells disperse in an instance, or in continuous slower dispersal of single cells. One suggested trigger of cell dispersal is quorum sensing, a cell-cell communication mechanism used to coordinate gene expression and behavior in groups based on population densities. Method To better understand the interplay of colony growth and cell dispersal, we develop a dynamic, spatially extended mathematical model that includes biofilm growth, production of quorum sensing molecules, cell dispersal triggered by quorum sensing molecules, and re-attachment of cells. This is a highly nonlinear system of diffusion-reaction equations that we study in computer simulations. Results Our results show that quorum sensing induced cell dispersal can be an efficient mechanism for bacteria to control the size of a biofilm colony, and at the same time enhance its downstream colonization potential. In fact we find that over the lifetime of a biofilm colony the majority of cells produced are lost into the aqueous phase, supporting the notion of biofilms as cell nurseries. We find that a single quorum sensing based mechanism can explain both, discrete dispersal events and continuous shedding of cells from a colony. Moreover, quorum sensing induced cell dispersal affects the structure and architecture of the biofilm, for example it might lead to the formation of hollow inner regions in a biofilm colony. PMID:26197231

  14. Zingerone silences quorum sensing and attenuates virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lokender; Chhibber, Sanjay; Kumar, Rajnish; Kumar, Manoj; Harjai, Kusum

    2015-04-01

    Quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays an imperative role in virulence factor, biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Blocking quorum sensing pathways are viewed as viable anti-virulent therapy in association with traditional antimicrobial therapy. Anti-quorum sensing dietary phytochemicals with may prove to be a safe and viable choice as anti-virulent drug candidates. Previously, our lab proved zingerone as potent anti-biofilm agent hence; further its anti-virulent and anti-quorum activities were evaluated. Zingerone, besides decreasing swimming, swarming and twitching phenotypes of P. aeruginosa PAO1, reduced biofilm forming capacity and production of virulence factors including rhamnolipid, elastase, protease, pyocyanin, cell free and cell bound hemolysin (p<0.001) indicating anti-virulent property attributing towards attenuation of virulence of P. aeruginosa. Further zingerone not only had marked effect on the production of quorum sensing signal molecules by clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa but also showed significant interference with the activation of QS reporter strains. To study the mechanism of blocking quorum sensing cascade, in silico analysis was carried out. Anti-QS activity was attributed to interference with the ligand receptor interaction of zingerone with QS receptors (TraR, LasR, RhlR and PqsR). Zingerone showed a good comparative docking score to respective autoinducer molecules which was even higher than that of vanillin, a proven anti-quorum sensing phytochemical. The results of the present study revealed the anti-quorum sensing activity of zingerone targeting ligand-receptor interaction, hence proposing zingerone as a suitable anti-virulent drug candidate against P. aeruginosa infections.

  15. The Quorum Sensing Inhibitor Hamamelitannin Increases Antibiotic Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms by Affecting Peptidoglycan Biosynthesis and eDNA Release

    PubMed Central

    Brackman, Gilles; Breyne, Koen; De Rycke, Riet; Vermote, Arno; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Meyer, Evelyne; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Coenye, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections has become increasingly challenging due to the rapid emergence and dissemination of methicillin-resistant strains. In addition, S. aureus reside within biofilms at the site of infection. Few novel antibacterial agents have been developed in recent years and their bacteriostatic or bactericidal activity results in selective pressure, inevitably inducing antimicrobial resistance. Consequently, innovative antimicrobials with other modes of action are urgently needed. One alternative approach is targeting the bacterial quorum sensing (QS) system. Hamamelitannin (2′,5-di-O-galloyl-d-hamamelose; HAM) was previously suggested to block QS through the TraP QS system and was shown to increase S. aureus biofilm susceptibility towards vancomycin (VAN) although mechanistic insights are still lacking. In the present study we provide evidence that HAM specifically affects S. aureus biofilm susceptibility through the TraP receptor by affecting cell wall synthesis and extracellular DNA release of S. aureus. We further provide evidence that HAM can increase the susceptibility of S. aureus biofilms towards different classes of antibiotics in vitro. Finally, we show that HAM increases the susceptibility of S. aureus to antibiotic treatment in in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans and mouse mammary gland infection models. PMID:26828772

  16. Structure-Activity Relationship of Cinnamaldehyde Analogs as Inhibitors of AI-2 Based Quorum Sensing and Their Effect on Virulence of Vibrio spp

    PubMed Central

    Brackman, Gilles; Celen, Shari; Hillaert, Ulrik; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Cos, Paul; Maes, Louis; Nelis, Hans J.; Coenye, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Background Many bacteria, including Vibrio spp., regulate virulence gene expression in a cell-density dependent way through a communication process termed quorum sensing (QS). Hence, interfering with QS could be a valuable novel antipathogenic strategy. Cinnamaldehyde has previously been shown to inhibit QS-regulated virulence by decreasing the DNA-binding ability of the QS response regulator LuxR. However, little is known about the structure-activity relationship of cinnamaldehyde analogs. Methodology/Principal Findings By evaluating the QS inhibitory activity of a series of cinnamaldehyde analogs, structural elements critical for autoinducer-2 QS inhibition were identified. These include an α,β unsaturated acyl group capable of reacting as Michael acceptor connected to a hydrophobic moiety and a partially negative charge. The most active cinnamaldehyde analogs were found to affect the starvation response, biofilm formation, pigment production and protease production in Vibrio spp in vitro, while exhibiting low cytotoxicity. In addition, these compounds significantly increased the survival of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans infected with Vibrio anguillarum, Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio vulnificus. Conclusions/Significance Several new and more active cinnamaldehyde analogs were discovered and they were shown to affect Vibrio spp. virulence factor production in vitro and in vivo. Although ligands for LuxR have not been identified so far, the nature of different cinnamaldehyde analogs and their effect on the DNA binding ability of LuxR suggest that these compounds act as LuxR-ligands. PMID:21249192

  17. Structure-based virtual screening and biological evaluation of LuxT inhibitors for targeting quorum sensing through an in vitro biofilm formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasikala, Dakshinamurthy; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman; Srinivasan, Pappu

    2017-01-01

    The LuxT regulator protein is a potential drug target for regulating quorum sensing (QS) in Vibrio alginolyticus. There is no substantiation of a 3D structure of LuxT in this particular species, thus the 3D model was constructed using molecular modeling and its stability was verified under solvation effect using molecular dynamics simulation. Further, exploration of the drug candidate against the LuxT binding site through structure-based approaches identified four Bitter compounds, viz., quercetin, cnicin, 5, 5‧ methylenedisalicyclic acid, and flufenamic acid with high docking score and optimum binding energy. Remarkably, these compounds established agreeable interactions with the amino acid residues Phe67, Asp63, Thr59, Gly64, Ile66, Phe99, Arg123, Asn119, and Gly120; which are found to play a vital role in the LuxT mechanistic inhibition. In addition to the scoring and energy parameters, MD simulation and ADME prediction suggested that the proposed compounds may be promising drug candidates against V. alginolyticus. Therefore, the lead candidate quercetin was scrutinized to validate its potential in biofilm inhibition of V. alginolyticus. The results revealed that the compound had better efficacy in biofilm destruction; as a consequence, there was a significant effect on motility and EPS synthesis at an effective concentration of 100 μM, which was further confirmed by microscopic studies. Hence, the present study will provide an insight into the design of high potent drug molecules to combat dreadful pathogenic diseases caused by V. alginolyticus.

  18. Quorum Sensing Peptides Selectively Penetrate the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Wynendaele, Evelien; Verbeke, Frederick; Stalmans, Sofie; Gevaert, Bert; Janssens, Yorick; Van De Wiele, Christophe; Peremans, Kathelijne; Burvenich, Christian; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria communicate with each other by the use of signaling molecules, a process called 'quorum sensing'. One group of quorum sensing molecules includes the oligopeptides, which are mainly produced by Gram-positive bacteria. Recently, these quorum sensing peptides were found to biologically influence mammalian cells, promoting i.a. metastasis of cancer cells. Moreover, it was found that bacteria can influence different central nervous system related disorders as well, e.g. anxiety, depression and autism. Research currently focuses on the role of bacterial metabolites in this bacteria-brain interaction, with the role of the quorum sensing peptides not yet known. Here, three chemically diverse quorum sensing peptides were investigated for their brain influx (multiple time regression technique) and efflux properties in an in vivo mouse model (ICR-CD-1) to determine blood-brain transfer properties: PhrCACET1 demonstrated comparatively a very high initial influx into the mouse brain (Kin = 20.87 μl/(g×min)), while brain penetrabilities of BIP-2 and PhrANTH2 were found to be low (Kin = 2.68 μl/(g×min)) and very low (Kin = 0.18 μl/(g×min)), respectively. All three quorum sensing peptides were metabolically stable in plasma (in vitro) during the experimental time frame and no significant brain efflux was observed. Initial tissue distribution data showed remarkably high liver accumulation of BIP-2 as well. Our results thus support the potential role of some quorum sensing peptides in different neurological disorders, thereby enlarging our knowledge about the microbiome-brain axis.

  19. Choosing an Appropriate Infection Model to Study Quorum Sensing Inhibition in Pseudomonas Infections

    PubMed Central

    Papaioannou, Evelina; Utari, Putri Dwi; Quax, Wim J.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria, although considered for decades to be antisocial organisms whose sole purpose is to find nutrients and multiply are, in fact, highly communicative organisms. Referred to as quorum sensing, cell-to-cell communication mechanisms have been adopted by bacteria in order to co-ordinate their gene expression. By behaving as a community rather than as individuals, bacteria can simultaneously switch on their virulence factor production and establish successful infections in eukaryotes. Understanding pathogen-host interactions requires the use of infection models. As the use of rodents is limited, for ethical considerations and the high costs associated with their use, alternative models based on invertebrates have been developed. Invertebrate models have the benefits of low handling costs, limited space requirements and rapid generation of results. This review presents examples of such models available for studying the pathogenicity of the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Quorum sensing interference, known as quorum quenching, suggests a promising disease-control strategy since quorum-quenching mechanisms appear to play important roles in microbe-microbe and host-pathogen interactions. Examples of natural and synthetic quorum sensing inhibitors and their potential as antimicrobials in Pseudomonas-related infections are discussed in the second part of this review. PMID:24065108

  20. Role of quorum sensing in bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Juárez, Israel; Maeda, Toshinari; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna Ayerim; Tomás, María; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; García-Contreras, Silvia Julieta; Wood, Thomas K; García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2015-07-16

    Quorum sensing (QS) is cell communication that is widely used by bacterial pathogens to coordinate the expression of several collective traits, including the production of multiple virulence factors, biofilm formation, and swarming motility once a population threshold is reached. Several lines of evidence indicate that QS enhances virulence of bacterial pathogens in animal models as well as in human infections; however, its relative importance for bacterial pathogenesis is still incomplete. In this review, we discuss the present evidence from in vitro and in vivo experiments in animal models, as well as from clinical studies, that link QS systems with human infections. We focus on two major QS bacterial models, the opportunistic Gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus, which are also two of the main agents responsible of nosocomial and wound infections. In addition, QS communication systems in other bacterial, eukaryotic pathogens, and even immune and cancer cells are also reviewed, and finally, the new approaches proposed to combat bacterial infections by the attenuation of their QS communication systems and virulence are also discussed.

  1. Quorum sensing in group A Streptococcus

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Juan Cristobal; Federle, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a widespread phenomenon in the microbial world that has important implications in the coordination of population-wide responses in several bacterial pathogens. In Group A Streptococcus (GAS), many questions surrounding QS systems remain to be solved pertaining to their function and their contribution to the GAS lifestyle in the host. The QS systems of GAS described to date can be categorized into four groups: regulator gene of glucosyltransferase (Rgg), Sil, lantibiotic systems, and LuxS/AI-2. The Rgg family of proteins, a conserved group of transcription factors that modify their activity in response to signaling peptides, has been shown to regulate genes involved in virulence, biofilm formation and competence. The sil locus, whose expression is regulated by the activity of signaling peptides and a putative two-component system (TCS), has been implicated on regulating genes involved with invasive disease in GAS isolates. Lantibiotic regulatory systems are involved in the production of bacteriocins and their autoregulation, and some of these genes have been shown to target both bacterial organisms as well as processes of survival inside the infected host. Finally AI-2 (dihydroxy pentanedione, DPD), synthesized by the LuxS enzyme in several bacteria including GAS, has been proposed to be a universal bacterial communication molecule. In this review we discuss the mechanisms of these four systems, the putative functions of their targets, and pose critical questions for future studies. PMID:25309879

  2. Role of quorum sensing in bacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Juárez, Israel; Maeda, Toshinari; Mandujano-Tinoco, Edna Ayerim; Tomás, María; Pérez-Eretza, Berenice; García-Contreras, Silvia Julieta; Wood, Thomas K; García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is cell communication that is widely used by bacterial pathogens to coordinate the expression of several collective traits, including the production of multiple virulence factors, biofilm formation, and swarming motility once a population threshold is reached. Several lines of evidence indicate that QS enhances virulence of bacterial pathogens in animal models as well as in human infections; however, its relative importance for bacterial pathogenesis is still incomplete. In this review, we discuss the present evidence from in vitro and in vivo experiments in animal models, as well as from clinical studies, that link QS systems with human infections. We focus on two major QS bacterial models, the opportunistic Gram negative bacteria Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Gram positive Staphylococcus aureus, which are also two of the main agents responsible of nosocomial and wound infections. In addition, QS communication systems in other bacterial, eukaryotic pathogens, and even immune and cancer cells are also reviewed, and finally, the new approaches proposed to combat bacterial infections by the attenuation of their QS communication systems and virulence are also discussed. PMID:26244150

  3. Quorum Sensing Peptides Selectively Penetrate the Blood-Brain Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Wynendaele, Evelien; Verbeke, Frederick; Stalmans, Sofie; Gevaert, Bert; Janssens, Yorick; Van De Wiele, Christophe; Peremans, Kathelijne; Burvenich, Christian; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria communicate with each other by the use of signaling molecules, a process called ‘quorum sensing’. One group of quorum sensing molecules includes the oligopeptides, which are mainly produced by Gram-positive bacteria. Recently, these quorum sensing peptides were found to biologically influence mammalian cells, promoting i.a. metastasis of cancer cells. Moreover, it was found that bacteria can influence different central nervous system related disorders as well, e.g. anxiety, depression and autism. Research currently focuses on the role of bacterial metabolites in this bacteria-brain interaction, with the role of the quorum sensing peptides not yet known. Here, three chemically diverse quorum sensing peptides were investigated for their brain influx (multiple time regression technique) and efflux properties in an in vivo mouse model (ICR-CD-1) to determine blood-brain transfer properties: PhrCACET1 demonstrated comparatively a very high initial influx into the mouse brain (Kin = 20.87 μl/(g×min)), while brain penetrabilities of BIP-2 and PhrANTH2 were found to be low (Kin = 2.68 μl/(g×min)) and very low (Kin = 0.18 μl/(g×min)), respectively. All three quorum sensing peptides were metabolically stable in plasma (in vitro) during the experimental time frame and no significant brain efflux was observed. Initial tissue distribution data showed remarkably high liver accumulation of BIP-2 as well. Our results thus support the potential role of some quorum sensing peptides in different neurological disorders, thereby enlarging our knowledge about the microbiome-brain axis. PMID:26536593

  4. Computational modeling of the quorum-sensing network in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenley, Andrew; Banik, Suman; Kulkarni, Rahul

    2007-03-01

    Certain species of bacteria are able produce and sense the concentration of small molecules called autodinducers in order to coordinate gene regulation in response to population density, a process known as ``quorum-sensing''. The resulting regulation of gene expression involves both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulators. In particular, the species of bacteria in the Vibrio genus use small RNAs to regulate the master protein controlling the quorum-sensing response (luminescence, biofilm formation, virulence...). We model the network of interactions using a modular approach which provides a quantitative understanding of how signal transduction occurs. The parameters of the input-module are fit to current experimental results allowing for testable predictions to be made for future experiments. The results of our analysis offer a revised perspective on quorum-sensing based regulation.

  5. Quorum sensing in the squid-Vibrio symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Subhash C; Miyashiro, Tim

    2013-08-07

    Quorum sensing is an intercellular form of communication that bacteria use to coordinate group behaviors such as biofilm formation and the production of antibiotics and virulence factors. The term quorum sensing was originally coined to describe the mechanism underlying the onset of luminescence production in cultures of the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Luminescence and, more generally, quorum sensing are important for V. fischeri to form a mutualistic symbiosis with the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes. The symbiosis is established when V. fischeri cells migrate via flagella-based motility from the surrounding seawater into a specialized structure injuvenile squid called the light organ. The cells grow to high cell densities within the light organ where the infection persists over the lifetime of the animal. A hallmark of a successful symbiosis is the luminescence produced by V. fischeri that camouflages the squid at night by eliminating its shadow within the water column. While the regulatory networks governing quorum sensing are critical for properly regulating V. fischeri luminescence within the squid light organ, they also regulate luminescence-independent processes during symbiosis. In this review, we discuss the quorum-sensing network of V. fischeri and highlight its impact at various stages during host colonization.

  6. Integrated analysis of bacterial quorum-sensing networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Rahul

    2005-11-01

    The regulation of gene expression is fundamental to most processes in cellular biology. At the transcriptional level, regulation occurs by the binding of specific proteins called transcription factors to DNA. Post-transcriptional regulation is often carried out by small RNAs which have become the focus of intense research activity recently. The talk will discuss the physics and biology of these two regulatory mechanisms by focusing on a specific biological system: quorum-sensing networks in bacteria. Quorum sensing is the process by which bacteria communicate to regulate gene expression in response to cell population density. Using an integrated approach which combines computational modeling, bioinformatics and experimental molecular biology, we are studying quorum-sensing pathways in bacteria. This approach led to the discovery of multiple regulatory small RNAs which are an integral part of the quorum-sensing pathway in Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio harveyi. Modeling of regulation of and by small RNAs in quorum sensing reveals the circuit characteristics controlling the transition from the low cell-density response to the high cell-density response.

  7. RND efflux pump and its interrelationship with quorum sensing system.

    PubMed

    Zhibin, Liang; Yumei, Chen; Yufan, Chen; Yingying, Cheng; Lianhui, Zhang

    2016-10-20

    Antibiotic resistance has become a serious concern in treatment of bacterial infections. Overexpression of efflux pump is one of the important mechanisms in antibiotic resistance. In Gram negative bacteria, RND (Resistance-nodulation-cell division) superfamily efflux pump plays a vital important role in antibiotics resistance. Recent research progress unveils an intriguing interrelationship between RND efflux pump and the bacterial quorum sensing system, whose regulation is dependent on small signal molecules. This article reviews the latest findings on the structure and transport mechanism of RND efflux pump, as well as the general features and regulatory mechanisms of quorum sensing, with a special focus on the role and mechanism of quorum sensing system in regulation of RND efflux pump, and the influence of efflux pump on quorum sensing signal transportation. Further investigation of the interrelationship between RND efflux pumps and the bacterial quorum sensing systems is critical for elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms that govern the expression of the RND efflux pumps genes, and may also provide useful clues to overcome the efflux pump mediated antibiotic resistance.

  8. Efficacy of the Quorum Sensing Inhibitor FS10 Alone and in Combination with Tigecycline in an Animal Model of Staphylococcal Infected Wound

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Ivana; Baldassarre, Leonardo; Orlando, Fiorenza; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Lucarini, Guendalina; Orsetti, Elena; Provinciali, Mauro; Fornasari, Erika; Di Stefano, Antonio; Giacometti, Andrea; Offidani, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    In staphylococci, quorum sensing regulates both biofilm formation and toxin production, moreover it has been demonstrated to be inhibited by RNAIII inhibiting peptide (RIP). Aim our study was to evaluate the in vitro activity and its in vivo efficacy of the combined administration of FS10, a novel RIP derivative, and tigecycline in an animal model of methicillin-resistant (MR) and methicillin-sensitive (MS) Staphylococcus aureus wound infection. Using a 1.x2 cm template, one full thickness wound was established through the panniculus carnosus on the back subcutaneous tissue of each animal. Infection was determined by inoculation of 5x107 CFU/ml of bacteria, that produced an abscess within 24 h, after this, treatment was initiated. The study included, for each strain, a control group without infection, a control infected group that did not receive any treatment and a control infected group with drug-free foam dressing, and three infected groups treated, respectively, with: FS10-soaked foam dressing (containing 20 μg FS10), daily intraperitoneal tigecycline (7 mg/Kg), FS10-soaked foam dressing (containing 20 μg FS10) and daily intraperitoneal injections of tigecycline (7 mg/Kg). The main outcome measures were quantitative culture and histological examination of tissue repair. The highest inhibition of infection was achieved in the group that received FS10-soaked and parenteral tigecycline reducing the bacterial load from 107 CFU/ml to about 103 CFU/g for MSSA and to about 104 CFU/g for MRSA. The group treated with FS10-soaked foam dressing associated with parenteral tigecycline showed, histologically, better overall healing with epithelialization and collagen scores significantly higher than those of the other groups in both strains. In conclusion, the combined use of topical FS10 with i.p. tigecycline induced positive interaction in vivo, resulting in an enhanced therapeutic benefit versus staphylococcal infections in murine wound models. PMID:27253706

  9. How Quorum Sensing Connects Sporulation to Necrotrophism in Bacillus thuringiensis

    PubMed Central

    Poncet, Sandrine; Lazar, Noureddine; Li de la Sierra-Gallay, Inès; Gohar, Michel; Lereclus, Didier; Nessler, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria use quorum sensing to coordinate adaptation properties, cell fate or commitment to sporulation. The infectious cycle of Bacillus thuringiensis in the insect host is a powerful model to investigate the role of quorum sensing in natural conditions. It is tuned by communication systems regulators belonging to the RNPP family and directly regulated by re-internalized signaling peptides. One such RNPP regulator, NprR, acts in the presence of its cognate signaling peptide NprX as a transcription factor, regulating a set of genes involved in the survival of these bacteria in the insect cadaver. Here, we demonstrate that, in the absence of NprX and independently of its transcriptional activator function, NprR negatively controls sporulation. NprR inhibits expression of Spo0A-regulated genes by preventing the KinA-dependent phosphorylation of the phosphotransferase Spo0F, thus delaying initiation of the sporulation process. This NprR function displays striking similarities with the Rap proteins, which also belong to the RNPP family, but are devoid of DNA-binding domain and indirectly control gene expression via protein-protein interactions in Bacilli. Conservation of the Rap residues directly interacting with Spo0F further suggests a common inhibition of the sporulation phosphorelay. The crystal structure of apo NprR confirms that NprR displays a highly flexible Rap-like structure. We propose a molecular regulatory mechanism in which key residues of the bifunctional regulator NprR are directly and alternatively involved in its two functions. NprX binding switches NprR from a dimeric inhibitor of sporulation to a tetrameric transcriptional activator involved in the necrotrophic lifestyle of B. thuringiensis. NprR thus tightly coordinates sporulation and necrotrophism, ensuring survival and dissemination of the bacteria during host infection. PMID:27483473

  10. Noisy neighbourhoods: quorum sensing in fungal–polymicrobial infections

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Emily F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Quorum sensing was once considered a way in which a species was able to sense its cell density and regulate gene expression accordingly. However, it is now becoming apparent that multiple microbes can sense particular quorum‐sensing molecules, enabling them to sense and respond to other microbes in their neighbourhood. Such interactions are significant within the context of polymicrobial disease, in which the competition or cooperation of microbes can alter disease progression. Fungi comprise a small but important component of the human microbiome and are in constant contact with bacteria and viruses. The discovery of quorum‐sensing pathways in fungi has led to the characterization of a number of interkingdom quorum‐sensing interactions. Here, we review the recent developments in quorum sensing in medically important fungi, and the implications these interactions have on the host's innate immune response. PMID:26243526

  11. The Evolution of Quorum Sensing as a Mechanism to Infer Kinship

    PubMed Central

    Schluter, Jonas; Schoech, Armin P.; Foster, Kevin R.; Mitri, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria regulate many phenotypes via quorum sensing systems. Quorum sensing is typically thought to evolve because the regulated cooperative phenotypes are only beneficial at certain cell densities. However, quorum sensing systems are also threatened by non-cooperative “cheaters” that may exploit quorum-sensing regulated cooperation, which begs the question of how quorum sensing systems are maintained in nature. Here we study the evolution of quorum sensing using an individual-based model that captures the natural ecology and population structuring of microbial communities. We first recapitulate the two existing observations on quorum sensing evolution: density-dependent benefits favor quorum sensing but competition and cheating will destabilize it. We then model quorum sensing in a dense community like a biofilm, which reveals a novel benefit to quorum sensing that is intrinsically evolutionarily stable. In these communities, competing microbial genotypes gradually segregate over time leading to positive correlation between density and genetic similarity between neighboring cells (relatedness). This enables quorum sensing to track genetic relatedness and ensures that costly cooperative traits are only activated once a cell is safely surrounded by clonemates. We hypothesize that under similar natural conditions, the benefits of quorum sensing will not result from an assessment of density but from the ability to infer kinship. PMID:27120081

  12. The Evolution of Quorum Sensing as a Mechanism to Infer Kinship.

    PubMed

    Schluter, Jonas; Schoech, Armin P; Foster, Kevin R; Mitri, Sara

    2016-04-01

    Bacteria regulate many phenotypes via quorum sensing systems. Quorum sensing is typically thought to evolve because the regulated cooperative phenotypes are only beneficial at certain cell densities. However, quorum sensing systems are also threatened by non-cooperative "cheaters" that may exploit quorum-sensing regulated cooperation, which begs the question of how quorum sensing systems are maintained in nature. Here we study the evolution of quorum sensing using an individual-based model that captures the natural ecology and population structuring of microbial communities. We first recapitulate the two existing observations on quorum sensing evolution: density-dependent benefits favor quorum sensing but competition and cheating will destabilize it. We then model quorum sensing in a dense community like a biofilm, which reveals a novel benefit to quorum sensing that is intrinsically evolutionarily stable. In these communities, competing microbial genotypes gradually segregate over time leading to positive correlation between density and genetic similarity between neighboring cells (relatedness). This enables quorum sensing to track genetic relatedness and ensures that costly cooperative traits are only activated once a cell is safely surrounded by clonemates. We hypothesize that under similar natural conditions, the benefits of quorum sensing will not result from an assessment of density but from the ability to infer kinship.

  13. Modeling of signal transduction in bacterial quorum-sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenley, Andrew; Banik, Suman; Kulkarni, Rahul

    2006-03-01

    Several species of bacteria are able to coordinate gene regulation in response to population density, a process known as ``quorum-sensing''. Quorum-sensing bacteria produce, secrete, and detect signal molecules called autoinducers. For several species of bacteria in the Vibrio genus, recent results have shown that the external autoinducer concentrations control the expression of regulatory small RNA(s) which are critical to the process of quorum-sensing. We present a theoretical analysis of the network which relates the rate of small RNA expression to the external autoinducer concentrations. We relate the results from our modeling to previous experimental observations and suggest new experiments based on testable predictions of the model.

  14. Quorum Sensing and Quorum Quenching in the Phycosphere of Phytoplankton: a Case of Chemical Interactions in Ecology.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Jean Luc; Stien, Didier; Sanchez-Ferandin, Sophie; Lami, Raphaël

    2016-12-01

    The interactions between bacteria and phytoplankton regulate many important biogeochemical reactions in the marine environment, including those in the global carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur cycles. At the microscopic level, it is now well established that important consortia of bacteria colonize the phycosphere, the immediate environment of phytoplankton cells. In this microscale environment, abundant bacterial cells are organized in a structured biofilm, and exchange information through the diffusion of small molecules called semiochemicals. Among these processes, quorum sensing plays a particular role as, when a sufficient abundance of cells is reached, it allows bacteria to coordinate their gene expression and physiology at the population level. In contrast, quorum quenching mechanisms are employed by many different types of microorganisms that limit the coordination of antagonistic bacteria. This review synthesizes quorum sensing and quorum quenching mechanisms evidenced to date in the phycosphere, emphasizing the implications that these signaling systems have for the regulation of bacterial communities and their activities. The diversity of chemical compounds involved in these processes is examined. We further review the bacterial functions regulated in the phycosphere by quorum sensing, which include biofilm formation, nutrient acquisition, and emission of algaecides. We also discuss quorum quenching compounds as antagonists of quorum sensing, their function in the phycosphere, and their potential biotechnological applications. Overall, the current state of the art demonstrates that quorum sensing and quorum quenching regulate a balance between a symbiotic and a parasitic way of life between bacteria and their phytoplankton host.

  15. The evolution of quorum sensing in bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nadell, Carey D; Xavier, Joao B; Levin, Simon A; Foster, Kevin R

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria have fascinating and diverse social lives. They display coordinated group behaviors regulated by quorum-sensing systems that detect the density of other bacteria around them. A key example of such group behavior is biofilm formation, in which communities of cells attach to a surface and envelope themselves in secreted polymers. Curiously, after reaching high cell density, some bacterial species activate polymer secretion, whereas others terminate polymer secretion. Here, we investigate this striking variation in the first evolutionary model of quorum sensing in biofilms. We use detailed individual-based simulations to investigate evolutionary competitions between strains that differ in their polymer production and quorum-sensing phenotypes. The benefit of activating polymer secretion at high cell density is relatively straightforward: secretion starts upon biofilm formation, allowing strains to push their lineages into nutrient-rich areas and suffocate neighboring cells. But why use quorum sensing to terminate polymer secretion at high cell density? We find that deactivating polymer production in biofilms can yield an advantage by redirecting resources into growth, but that this advantage occurs only in a limited time window. We predict, therefore, that down-regulation of polymer secretion at high cell density will evolve when it can coincide with dispersal events, but it will be disfavored in long-lived (chronic) biofilms with sustained competition among strains. Our model suggests that the observed variation in quorum-sensing behavior can be linked to the differing requirements of bacteria in chronic versus acute biofilm infections. This is well illustrated by the case of Vibrio cholerae, which competes within biofilms by polymer secretion, terminates polymer secretion at high cell density, and induces an acute disease course that ends with mass dispersal from the host. More generally, this work shows that the balance of competition within and among

  16. Information processing and signal integration in bacterial quorum sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Pankaj

    2009-03-01

    Bacteria communicate with each other using secreted chemical signaling molecules called autoinducers (AIs) in a process known as quorum sensing. Quorum sensing enables bacteria to collectively regulate their behavior depending on the number and/or species of bacteria present. The quorum-sensing network of the marine-bacteria Vibrio harveyi consists of three AIs encoding distinct ecological information, each detected by its own histidine-kinase sensor protein. The sensor proteins all phosphorylate a common response regulator and transmit sensory information through a shared phosphorelay that regulates expression of downstream quorum-sensing genes. Despite detailed knowledge of the Vibrio quorum-sensing circuit, it is still unclear how and why bacteria integrate information from multiple input signals to coordinate collective behaviors. Here we develop a mathematical framework for analyzing signal integration based on Information Theory and use it to show that bacteria must tune the kinase activities of sensor proteins in order to transmit information from multiple inputs. This is demonstrated within a quantitative model that allows us to quantify how much Vibrio's learn about individual inputs and explains experimentally measured input-output relations. Furthermore, we predicted and experimentally verified that bacteria manipulate the production rates of AIs in order to increase information transmission and argue that the quorum-sensing circuit is designed to coordinate a multi-cellular developmental program. Our results show that bacteria can successfully learn about multiple signals even when they are transmitted through a shared pathway and suggest that Information Theory may be a powerful tool for analyzing biological signaling networks.

  17. Effects of natural and chemically synthesized furanones on quorum sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Daniel; Grossmann, Gilles; Séquin, Urs; Brandl, Helmut; Bachofen, Reinhard

    2004-01-01

    R proteins. For further experiments it is important to be aware of the fact that quorum sensing active compounds have non-linear effects. Inducers can act as inhibitors and inhibitors might be able to activate or enhance the quorum sensing system depending on chemical structure and concentration levels. PMID:15233843

  18. A structural perspective on the mechanisms of quorum sensing activation in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Lixa, Carolina; Mujo, Amanda; Anobom, Cristiane D; Pinheiro, Anderson S

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are able to synchronize the population behavior in order to regulate gene expression through a cell-to-cell communication mechanism called quorum sensing. This phenomenon involves the production, detection and the response to extracellular signaling molecules named autoinducers, which directly or indirectly regulate gene expression in a cell density-dependent manner. Quorum sensing may control a wide range of biological processes in bacteria, such as bioluminescence, virulence factor production, biofilm formation and antibiotic resistance. The autoinducers are recognized by specific receptors that can either be membrane-bound histidine kinase receptors, which work by activating cognate cytoplasmic response regulators, or cytoplasmic receptors acting as transcription factors. In this review, we focused on the cytosolic quorum sensing regulators whose three-dimensional structures helped elucidate their mechanisms of action. Structural studies of quorum sensing receptors may enable the rational design of inhibitor molecules. Ultimately, this approach may represent an effective alternative to treat infections where classical antimicrobial therapy fails to overcome the microorganism virulence.

  19. Quorum Sensing Activity in Pandoraea pnomenusa RB38

    PubMed Central

    Ee, Robson; Lim, Yan-Lue; Kin, Lin-Xin; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    Strain RB38 was recovered from a former dumping area in Malaysia. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry and genomic analysis identified strain RB-38 as Pandoraea pnomenusa. Various biosensors confirmed its quorum sensing properties. High resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry analysis was subsequently used to characterize the N-acyl homoserine lactone production profile of P. pnomenusa strain RB38, which validated that this isolate produced N-octanoyl homoserine lactone as a quorum sensing molecule. This is the first report of the production of N-octanoyl homoserine lactone by P. pnomenusa strain RB38. PMID:24919016

  20. A direct pre-screen for marine bacteria producing compounds inhibiting quorum sensing reveals diverse planktonic bacteria that are bioactive.

    PubMed

    Linthorne, Jamie S; Chang, Barbara J; Flematti, Gavin R; Ghisalberti, Emilio L; Sutton, David C

    2015-02-01

    A promising new strategy in antibacterial research is inhibition of the bacterial communication system termed quorum sensing. In this study, a novel and rapid pre-screening method was developed to detect the production of chemical inhibitors of this system (quorum-quenching compounds) by bacteria isolated from marine and estuarine waters. This method involves direct screening of mixed populations on an agar plate, facilitating specific isolation of bioactive colonies. The assay showed that between 4 and 46 % of culturable bacteria from various samples were bioactive, and of the 95 selectively isolated bacteria, 93.7 % inhibited Vibrio harveyi bioluminescence without inhibiting growth, indicating potential production of quorum-quenching compounds. Of the active isolates, 21 % showed further activity against quorum-sensing-regulated pigment production by Serratia marcescens. The majority of bioactive isolates were identified by 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) amplification and sequencing as belonging to the genera Vibrio and Pseudoalteromonas. Extracts of two strongly bioactive Pseudoalteromonas isolates (K1 and B2) were quantitatively assessed for inhibition of growth and quorum-sensing-regulated processes in V. harveyi, S. marcescens and Chromobacterium violaceum. Extracts of the isolates reduced V. harveyi bioluminescence by as much as 98 % and C. violaceum pigment production by 36 % at concentrations which had no adverse effect on growth. The activity found in the extracts indicated that the isolates may produce quorum-quenching compounds. This study further supports the suggestion that quorum quenching may be a common attribute among culturable planktonic marine and estuarine bacteria.

  1. Structural Basis for Native Agonist and Synthetic Inhibitor Recognition by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing Regulator PqsR (MvfR)

    PubMed Central

    Ilangovan, Aravindan; Fletcher, Matthew; Rampioni, Giordano; Pustelny, Christian; Rumbaugh, Kendra; Heeb, Stephan; Cámara, Miguel; Truman, Alex; Chhabra, Siri Ram; Emsley, Jonas; Williams, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial populations co-ordinate gene expression collectively through quorum sensing (QS), a cell-to-cell communication mechanism employing diffusible signal molecules. The LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) protein PqsR (MvfR) is a key component of alkyl-quinolone (AQ)-dependent QS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PqsR is activated by 2-alkyl-4-quinolones including the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone), its precursor 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (HHQ) and their C9 congeners, 2-nonyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (C9-PQS) and 2-nonyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (NHQ). These drive the autoinduction of AQ biosynthesis and the up-regulation of key virulence determinants as a function of bacterial population density. Consequently, PqsR constitutes a potential target for novel antibacterial agents which attenuate infection through the blockade of virulence. Here we present the crystal structures of the PqsR co-inducer binding domain (CBD) and a complex with the native agonist NHQ. We show that the structure of the PqsR CBD has an unusually large ligand-binding pocket in which a native AQ agonist is stabilized entirely by hydrophobic interactions. Through a ligand-based design strategy we synthesized and evaluated a series of 50 AQ and novel quinazolinone (QZN) analogues and measured the impact on AQ biosynthesis, virulence gene expression and biofilm development. The simple exchange of two isosteres (OH for NH2) switches a QZN agonist to an antagonist with a concomitant impact on the induction of bacterial virulence factor production. We also determined the complex crystal structure of a QZN antagonist bound to PqsR revealing a similar orientation in the ligand binding pocket to the native agonist NHQ. This structure represents the first description of an LTTR-antagonist complex. Overall these studies present novel insights into LTTR ligand binding and ligand-based drug design and provide a chemical scaffold for further anti-P. aeruginosa

  2. Structural basis for native agonist and synthetic inhibitor recognition by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing regulator PqsR (MvfR).

    PubMed

    Ilangovan, Aravindan; Fletcher, Matthew; Rampioni, Giordano; Pustelny, Christian; Rumbaugh, Kendra; Heeb, Stephan; Cámara, Miguel; Truman, Alex; Chhabra, Siri Ram; Emsley, Jonas; Williams, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial populations co-ordinate gene expression collectively through quorum sensing (QS), a cell-to-cell communication mechanism employing diffusible signal molecules. The LysR-type transcriptional regulator (LTTR) protein PqsR (MvfR) is a key component of alkyl-quinolone (AQ)-dependent QS in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PqsR is activated by 2-alkyl-4-quinolones including the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS; 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone), its precursor 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (HHQ) and their C9 congeners, 2-nonyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (C9-PQS) and 2-nonyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (NHQ). These drive the autoinduction of AQ biosynthesis and the up-regulation of key virulence determinants as a function of bacterial population density. Consequently, PqsR constitutes a potential target for novel antibacterial agents which attenuate infection through the blockade of virulence. Here we present the crystal structures of the PqsR co-inducer binding domain (CBD) and a complex with the native agonist NHQ. We show that the structure of the PqsR CBD has an unusually large ligand-binding pocket in which a native AQ agonist is stabilized entirely by hydrophobic interactions. Through a ligand-based design strategy we synthesized and evaluated a series of 50 AQ and novel quinazolinone (QZN) analogues and measured the impact on AQ biosynthesis, virulence gene expression and biofilm development. The simple exchange of two isosteres (OH for NH₂) switches a QZN agonist to an antagonist with a concomitant impact on the induction of bacterial virulence factor production. We also determined the complex crystal structure of a QZN antagonist bound to PqsR revealing a similar orientation in the ligand binding pocket to the native agonist NHQ. This structure represents the first description of an LTTR-antagonist complex. Overall these studies present novel insights into LTTR ligand binding and ligand-based drug design and provide a chemical scaffold for further anti-P. aeruginosa

  3. [Research advance in the function of quorum sensing in the biological aggregates].

    PubMed

    Dai, Xin; Zhou, Jia-Heng; Zhu, Liang; Xu, Xiang-Yang

    2014-04-01

    Quorum sensing is a microbial phenomenon that microorganisms use signal molecules to perceive environmental conditions and regulate specific gene expressions. As the communication function of quorum sensing is increasingly highlighted in the microbial field, researches on quorum sensing in the formation process of biological aggregates (biofilm and granules) attract wide attentions. The paper reviewed autoinducers (AI) classification and the corresponding regulation methods in quorum sensing, and provided an up-to-date account on research progress of AIs regulating biological aggregates formation and structural stability. New territories and future of quorum sensing were also outlined.

  4. Exploring the chemical space of quorum sensing peptides.

    PubMed

    Wynendaele, Evelien; Gevaert, Bert; Stalmans, Sofie; Verbeke, Frederick; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2015-09-01

    Quorum sensing peptides are signalling molecules that are produced by mainly gram-positive bacteria. These peptides can exert different effects, ranging from intra- and interspecies bacterial virulence to bacterial-host interactions. To better comprehend these functional differences, we explored their chemical space, bacterial species distribution and receptor-binding properties using multivariate data analyses, with information obtained from the Quorumpeps database. The quorum sensing peptides can be categorized into three main clusters, which, in turn, can be divided into several subclusters: the classification is based on characteristic chemical properties, including peptide size/compactness, hydrophilicity/lipophilicity, cyclization and the presence of (unnatural) S-containing and aromatic amino acids. Most of the bacterial species synthesize peptides located into one cluster. However, some Streptococcus, Stapylococcus, Clostridium, Bacillus and Lactobacillus species produce peptides that are distributed over more than one cluster, with the quorum sensing peptides of Bacillus subtilis even occupying the total peptide space. The AgrC, FsrC and LamC receptors are only activated by cyclic (thio)lacton or lactam quorum sensing peptides, while the lipophilic isoprenyl-modified peptides solely bind the ComP receptor in Bacillus species.

  5. Detection of quorum-sensing-related molecules in Vibrio scophthalmi

    PubMed Central

    García-Aljaro, Cristina; Eberl, Leo; Riedel, Kathrin; Blanch, Anicet R

    2008-01-01

    Background Cell-to-cell communication (also referred to as quorum sensing) based on N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs) is a widespread response to environmental change in Gram-negative bacteria. AHLs seem to be highly variable, both in terms of the acyl chain length and in the chemical structure of the radicals. Another quorum sensing pathway, the autoinducer-2-based system, is present both in Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. In this study the presence of signal molecules belonging to both quorum sensing signalling pathways was analysed in the marine symbiotic species Vibrio scophthalmi. Results Three AHL-like signal molecules were detected in V. scophthalmi supernatants with the Agrobacterium tumefaciens sensor assay. This observation was further supported by the decrease in the presence of these signal molecules after cloning and expression of lactonase AiiA from Bacillus cereus in the V. scophthalmi strains. One of the signal molecules was identified as N-(3-hydroxy dodecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone. V. scophthalmi was also shown to carry a functional LuxS synthase. The coding sequence for a luxS-like gene was obtained showing a maximum similarity of 78% with Vibrio vulnificus. Analysis of the translated sequence revealed that the sequenced luxS gene carried the conserved domain, which is common to luxS sequences found in other species, and which is essential for LuxS enzymatic activity. Conclusion The data are consistent with the presence of quorum-sensing signal molecules from both AHL- and autoinducer 2-based quorum sensing systems in V. scophthalmi, which are homologous to others previously described in various Vibrio species. How this bacterium interacts with other bacteria and eukaryotic cells to compete ecologically with other intestinal bacteria present in the fish Scophthalmus maximus warrants further investigation. PMID:18700048

  6. Substituted Lactam and Cyclic Azahemiacetals Modulate Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Malladi, Venkata L. A.; Sobczak, Adam J.; Maricic, Natalie; Murugapiran, Senthil Kumar; Schneper, Lisa; Makemson, John; Mathee, Kalai; Wnuk, Stanislaw F.

    2011-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a population-dependent signaling process bacteria use to control multiple processes including virulence that is critical for establishing infection. The most common QS signaling molecule used by Gram-negative bacteria are acylhomoserine lactones. The development of non-native acylhomoserine lactone (AHL) ligands has emerged as a promising new strategy to inhibit QS in Gram-negative bacteria. In this work, we have synthesized a set of optically pure γ-lactams and their reduced cyclic azahemiacetal analogues, bearing the additional alkylthiomethyl substituent, and evaluated their effect on the AHL-dependent Pseudomonas aeruginosa las and rhl QS pathways. The concentration of these ligands and the simple structural modification such as the length of the alkylthio substituent has notable effect on activity. The γ-lactam derivatives with nonylthio or dodecylthio chains acted as inhibitors of las signaling with moderate potency. The cyclic azahemiacetal with shorter propylthio or hexylthio substituent was found to strongly inhibit both las and rhl signaling at higher concentrations while the propylthio analogue strongly stimulated the las QS system at lower concentrations. PMID:21855349

  7. Rule–based regulatory and metabolic model for Quorum sensing in P. aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the pathogen P. aeruginosa, the formation of virulence factors is regulated via Quorum sensing signaling pathways. Due to the increasing number of strains that are resistant to antibiotics, there is a high interest to develop novel antiinfectives. In the combat of resistant bacteria, selective blockade of the bacterial cell–to–cell communication (Quorum sensing) has gained special interest as anti–virulence strategy. Here, we modeled the las, rhl, and pqs Quorum sensing systems by a multi–level logical approach to analyze how enzyme inhibitors and receptor antagonists effect the formation of autoinducers and virulence factors. Results Our rule–based simulations fulfill the behavior expected from literature considering the external level of autoinducers. In the presence of PqsBCD inhibitors, the external HHQ and PQS levels are indeed clearly reduced. The magnitude of this effect strongly depends on the inhibition level. However, it seems that the pyocyanin pathway is incomplete. Conclusions To match experimental observations we suggest a modified network topology in which PqsE and PqsR acts as receptors and an autoinducer as ligand that up–regulate pyocyanin in a concerted manner. While the PQS biosynthesis is more appropriate as target to inhibit the HHQ and PQS formation, blocking the receptor PqsR that regulates the biosynthesis reduces the pyocyanin level stronger. PMID:23965312

  8. Quorum-sensing in yeast and its potential in wine making.

    PubMed

    Avbelj, Martina; Zupan, Jure; Raspor, Peter

    2016-09-01

    This mini-review synthesises the present knowledge of microbial quorum-sensing, with a specific focus on quorum-sensing in yeast, and especially in wine yeast. In vine and wine ecosystems, yeast co-interact with a large variety of microorganisms, thereby affecting the fermentation process and, consequently, the flavour of the wine. The precise connections between microbial interactions and quorum-sensing remain unclear, but we describe here how and when some species start to produce quorum-sensing molecules to synchronously adapt their collective behaviour to new conditions. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the quorum-sensing molecules were identified as 2-phenylethanol and tryptophol. However, it was recently shown that also a quorum-sensing molecule formerly identified only in Candida albicans, tyrosol, appears to be regulated in S. cerevisiae according to cell density. This review describes the methods for detection and quantification of those quorum-sensing molecules, their underlying mechanisms of action, and their genetic background. It also examines the external stimuli that evoke the quorum-sensing mechanism in the wine-processing environment. The review closes with insight into the biotechnological applications that are already making use of the advantages of quorum-sensing systems and indicates the important questions that still need to be addressed in future research into quorum-sensing.

  9. Effect of low Reynolds number flow on the quorum sensing behavior of sessile bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingremeau, Francois; Minyoung, Kevin Kim; Bassler, Bonnie; Stone, Howard; Mechanical; Aerospace Engineering, Complex fluids Group Team; Molecular Biology Lab Team

    2014-11-01

    Sessile and planktonic bacteria can be sensitive to the bacteria cell density around them through a chemical mediated communication called quorum sensing. When the quorum sensing molecules reach a certain value, the metabolism of the bacteria changes. Quorum sensing is usually studied in static conditions or in well mixed environments. However, bacteria biofilms can form in porous media or in the circulatory system of an infected body: quorum sensing in such flowing environment at low Reynolds number is not well studied. Using microfluidic devices, we observe how the flow of a pure media affects quorum sensing of bacteria attached to the wall. The biofilm formation is quantified by measuring the optical density in brightfield microscopy and the quorum sensing gene expression is observed through the fluorescence of a green fluorescent protein, which is a reporter for one of the quorum sensing genes. We measured without flow the amount of Staphylococcus aureus biofilm when the quorum sensing gene expression starts. In contrast, when the media is flowing in the microchannel, the quorum sensing expression is delayed. This effect can be understood and modelled by considering the diffusion of the quorum sensing molecules in the biofilm and their convection by the flowing media.

  10. Repellent and Anti-quorum Sensing Activity of Six Aromatic Plants Occurring in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Ceballos, Leonor; Caballero-Gallardo, Karina; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2015-10-01

    Essential oils (EOs) are widely used as biopesticides and to control bacterial infections. This study describes the ability of six EOs isolated from plants cultivated in Colombia to perform as repellents against Ulomoides dermestoides and as quorum sensing (QS) inhibitors. EOs from Aloysia triphylla, Cymbopogon nardus, Lippia origanoides, Hyptis suaveolens, Swinglea glutinosa and Eucalyptus globulus were repellents classified as Class IV, IV, IV, III, II, and II, respectively, whereas the commercial repellent IR3535 only reached Class II after 2 h exposure. All EOs presented small, but significant inhibitory properties against the QS system in Escherichia coli (pJBA132) at 25 μg/mL after 4 h exposure. These data suggest evaluated EOs from Colombia are sustainable, promising new sources of natural repellents and could be important as anti-quorum sensing molecules.

  11. Quorum Sensing and Bacterial Social Interactions in Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yung-Hua; Tian, Xiaolin

    2012-01-01

    Many bacteria are known to regulate their cooperative activities and physiological processes through a mechanism called quorum sensing (QS), in which bacterial cells communicate with each other by releasing, sensing and responding to small diffusible signal molecules. The ability of bacteria to communicate and behave as a group for social interactions like a multi-cellular organism has provided significant benefits to bacteria in host colonization, formation of biofilms, defense against competitors, and adaptation to changing environments. Importantly, many QS-controlled activities have been involved in the virulence and pathogenic potential of bacteria. Therefore, understanding the molecular details of quorum sensing mechanisms and their controlled social activities may open a new avenue for controlling bacterial infections. PMID:22736963

  12. Quorum sensing and bacterial social interactions in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Li, Yung-Hua; Tian, Xiaolin

    2012-01-01

    Many bacteria are known to regulate their cooperative activities and physiological processes through a mechanism called quorum sensing (QS), in which bacterial cells communicate with each other by releasing, sensing and responding to small diffusible signal molecules. The ability of bacteria to communicate and behave as a group for social interactions like a multi-cellular organism has provided significant benefits to bacteria in host colonization, formation of biofilms, defense against competitors, and adaptation to changing environments. Importantly, many QS-controlled activities have been involved in the virulence and pathogenic potential of bacteria. Therefore, understanding the molecular details of quorum sensing mechanisms and their controlled social activities may open a new avenue for controlling bacterial infections.

  13. RETRACTED ARTICLE: Quorum-sensing of bacteria and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Guoliang; Su, Mingxia

    2009-12-01

    Quorum sensing, or auto induction, as a cell density dependent signaling mechanism in many microorganisms, is triggered via auto inducers which passively diffuse across the bacterial envelope and therefore intracellulaly accumulate only at higher bacterial densities to regulate specialized processes such as genetic competence, bioluminescence, virulence and sporulation. N-acyl homoserine lactones are the most common type of signal molecules. Aquaculture is one of the fastest-growing food-producing industries, but disease outbreaks caused by pathogenic bacteria are a significant constraint on the development of the sector worldwide. Many of these pathogens have been found to be controlled by their quorum sensing systems. As there is relevance between the pathogenic bacteria's virulence factor expression and their auto inducers, quorum quenching is a new effective anti-infective strategy to control infections caused by bacterial pathogens in aquaculture. The techniques used to do this mainly include the following: (1) the inhibition of signal molecule biosynthesis, (2) blocking signal transduction, and (3) chemical inactivation and biodegradation of signal molecules. To provide a basis for finding alternative means of controlling aquatic diseases by quorum quenching instead of treatment by antibiotics and disinfectants, we will discuss the examination, purification and identification of auto inducers in this paper.

  14. Hybrid Quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometry for quantitative measurement of quorum sensing inhibition.

    PubMed

    Todd, Daniel A; Zich, David B; Ettefagh, Keivan A; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S; Horswill, Alexander R; Cech, Nadja B

    2016-08-01

    Drug resistant bacterial infections cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, and new strategies are needed for the treatment of these infections. The anti-virulence approach, which targets non-essential virulence factors in bacteria, has been proposed as one way to combat the problem of antibiotic resistance. Virulence in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and many other Gram-positive bacterial pathogens is controlled by the quorum sensing system. Thus, there is excellent therapeutic potential for compounds that target this system. With this project, we have developed and validated a novel approach for measuring quorum sensing inhibition in vitro. Ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) was employed to directly measure one of the important outputs of the quorum sensing system in MRSA, auto-inducing peptide I (AIP I) in bacterial cultures. The method for AIP detection was validated and demonstrated limits of detection and quantification of range of 0.0035μM and 0.10μM, respectively. It was shown that the known quorum sensing inhibitor ambuic acid inhibited AIP I production by a clinically relevant strain of MRSA, with an IC50 value of 2.6±0.2μM. The new method performed similarly to previously published methods using GFP reporter assays, but has the advantage of being applicable without the need for engineering of a reporter strain. Additionally, the mass spectrometry-based method could be applicable in situations where interference by the inhibitor prevents the application of fluorescence-based methods.

  15. Transcriptome analysis of acyl-homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing regulation in Yersinia pestis [corrected].

    PubMed

    LaRock, Christopher N; Yu, Jing; Horswill, Alexander R; Parsek, Matthew R; Minion, F Chris

    2013-01-01

    The etiologic agent of bubonic plague, Yersinia pestis, senses self-produced, secreted chemical signals in a process named quorum sensing. Though the closely related enteric pathogen Y. pseudotuberculosis uses quorum sensing system to regulate motility, the role of quorum sensing in Y. pestis has been unclear. In this study we performed transcriptional profiling experiments to identify Y. pestis quorum sensing regulated functions. Our analysis revealed that acyl-homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing controls the expression of several metabolic functions. Maltose fermentation and the glyoxylate bypass are induced by acyl-homoserine lactone signaling. This effect was observed at 30°C, indicating a potential role for quorum sensing regulation of metabolism at temperatures below the normal mammalian temperature. It is proposed that utilization of alternative carbon sources may enhance growth and/or survival during prolonged periods in natural habitats with limited nutrient sources, contributing to maintenance of plague in nature.

  16. Strain-dependent diversity in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing regulon.

    PubMed

    Chugani, Sudha; Kim, Byoung Sik; Phattarasukol, Somsak; Brittnacher, Mitchell J; Choi, Sang Ho; Harwood, Caroline S; Greenberg, E Peter

    2012-10-09

    Quorum sensing allows bacteria to sense and respond to changes in population density. Acyl-homoserine lactones serve as quorum-sensing signals for many Proteobacteria, and acyl-homoserine lactone signaling is known to control cooperative activities. Quorum-controlled activities vary from one species to another. Quorum-sensing controls a constellation of genes in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which thrives in a number of habitats ranging from soil and water to animal hosts. We hypothesized that there would be significant variation in quorum-sensing regulons among strains of P. aeruginosa isolated from different habitats and that differences in the quorum-sensing regulons might reveal insights about the ecology of P. aeruginosa. As a test of our hypothesis we used RNA-seq to identify quorum-controlled genes in seven P. aeruginosa isolates of diverse origins. Although our approach certainly overlooks some quorum-sensing-regulated genes we found a shared set of genes, i.e., a core quorum-controlled gene set, and we identified distinct, strain-variable sets of quorum-controlled genes, i.e., accessory genes. Some quorum-controlled genes in some strains were not present in the genomes of other strains. We detected a correlation between traits encoded by some genes in the strain-variable subsets of the quorum regulons and the ecology of the isolates. These findings indicate a role for quorum sensing in extension of the range of habitats in which a species can thrive. This study also provides a framework for understanding the molecular mechanisms by which quorum-sensing systems operate, the evolutionary pressures by which they are maintained, and their importance in disparate ecological contexts.

  17. The Vibrio campbellii quorum sensing signals have a different impact on virulence of the bacterium towards different crustacean hosts.

    PubMed

    Pande, Gde Sasmita Julyantoro; Natrah, Fatin Mohd Ikhsan; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2013-12-27

    Pathogenic bacteria communicate with small signal molecules in a process called quorum sensing, and they often use different signal molecules to regulate virulence gene expression. Vibrio campbellii, one of the major pathogens of aquatic organisms, regulates virulence gene expression by a three channel quorum sensing system. Here we show that although they use a common signal transduction cascade, the signal molecules have a different impact on the virulence of the bacterium towards different hosts, i.e. the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana and the commercially important giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii. These results suggest that the use of multiple types of signal molecules to regulate virulence gene expression is one of the features that allow bacteria to infect different hosts. Our findings emphasize that it is highly important to study the efficacy of quorum sensing inhibitors as novel biocontrol agents under conditions that are as close as possible to the clinical situation.

  18. Global analysis of the Burkholderia thailandensis quorum sensing-controlled regulon.

    PubMed

    Majerczyk, Charlotte; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Jacobs, Michael; Armour, Christopher D; Radey, Mathew; Schneider, Emily; Phattarasokul, Somsak; Bunt, Richard; Greenberg, E Peter

    2014-04-01

    Burkholderia thailandensis contains three acyl-homoserine lactone quorum sensing circuits and has two additional LuxR homologs. To identify B. thailandensis quorum sensing-controlled genes, we carried out transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses of quorum sensing mutants and their parent. The analyses were grounded in the fact that we identified genes coding for factors shown previously to be regulated by quorum sensing among a larger set of quorum-controlled genes. We also found that genes coding for contact-dependent inhibition were induced by quorum sensing and confirmed that specific quorum sensing mutants had a contact-dependent inhibition defect. Additional quorum-controlled genes included those for the production of numerous secondary metabolites, an uncharacterized exopolysaccharide, and a predicted chitin-binding protein. This study provides insights into the roles of the three quorum sensing circuits in the saprophytic lifestyle of B. thailandensis, and it provides a foundation on which to build an understanding of the roles of quorum sensing in the biology of B. thailandensis and the closely related pathogenic Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei.

  19. Quorum quenching is responsible for the underestimated quorum sensing effects in biological wastewater treatment reactors.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiang-Ning; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Wen-Wei; Li, Bing-Bing; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Fang, Cai-Yun; Wang, Yun-Kun; Li, Xiao-Yan; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-11-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) and quorum quenching (QQ) are two antagonistic processes coexisting in various bacterial communities in bioreactors, e.g., activated sludge for biological wastewater treatment. Although QS signal molecules are detected in activated sludge reactors and known to affect sludge properties and reactor performance, there has been no direct evidence to prove the endogenous existence of QQ effects in activated sludge. In this study, for the first time, acyl homoserine lactones-degrading enzymatic activity, a typical QQ effect, was discovered in activated sludge and found to considerably affect the QS detection results. The coexistence of QS and QQ bacteria in activated sludge was further confirmed by bacterial screening and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis. The method developed in this study could also be used to evaluate QQ activities in bioreactors, and a possible way is provided to tune bioreactor performance through balancing the QS and QQ processes.

  20. Sociomicrobiology: the connections between quorum sensing and biofilms.

    PubMed

    Parsek, Matthew R; Greenberg, E P

    2005-01-01

    In the past decade, significant debate has surrounded the relative contributions of genetic determinants versus environmental conditions to certain types of human behavior. While this debate goes on, it is with a certain degree of irony that microbiologists studying aspects of bacterial community behavior face the same questions. Information regarding two social phenomena exhibited by bacteria, quorum sensing and biofilm development, is reviewed here. These two topics have been inextricably linked, possibly because biofilms and quorum sensing represent two areas in which microbiologists focus on social aspects of bacteria. We will examine what is known about this linkage and discuss areas that might be developed. In addition, we believe that these two aspects of bacterial behavior represent a small part of the social repertoire of bacteria. Bacteria exhibit many social activities and they represent a model for dissecting social behavior at the genetic level. Therefore, we introduce the term 'sociomicrobiology'.

  1. Antisense RNA that Affects Rhodopseudomonas palustris Quorum-Sensing Signal Receptor Expression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    these molecules . Because asrpaR expression is quorum sensing dependent, we sought to characterize its production and function. We show that asrpaR is...but little is known about the function of these molecules . Because asrpaR expression is quorum sensing dependent, we sought to character- ize its...detection of N-acylhomoserine lactone-type quorum - sensing molecules : Detection of autoinducers in Mesorhizobium huakuii. Appl Environ Microbiol 69: 6949

  2. Quorum Sensing Inhibitory Activity of Giganteone A from Myristica cinnamomea King against Escherichia coli Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Sivasothy, Yasodha; Krishnan, Thiba; Chan, Kok-Gan; Abdul Wahab, Siti Mariam; Othman, Muhamad Aqmal; Litaudon, Marc; Awang, Khalijah

    2016-03-21

    Malabaricones A-C (1-3) and giganteone A (4) were isolated from the bark of Myristica cinnamomea King. Their structures were elucidated and characterized by means of NMR and MS spectral analyses. These isolates were evaluated for their anti-quorum sensing activity using quorum sensing biosensors, namely Escherichia coli [pSB401] and Escherichia coli [pSB1075], whereby the potential of giganteone A (4) as a suitable anti-quorum sensing agent was demonstrated.

  3. Simple models for quorum sensing: Nonlinear dynamical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Wei-Yin; Li, Yue-Xian; Lai, Pik-Yin

    2011-10-01

    Quorum sensing refers to the change in the cooperative behavior of a collection of elements in response to the change in their population size or density. This behavior can be observed in chemical and biological systems. These elements or cells are coupled via chemicals in the surrounding environment. Here we focus on the change of dynamical behavior, in particular from quiescent to oscillatory, as the cell population changes. For instance, the silent behavior of the elements can become oscillatory as the system concentration or population increases. In this work, two simple models are constructed that can produce the essential representative properties in quorum sensing. The first is an excitable or oscillatory phase model, which is probably the simplest model one can construct to describe quorum sensing. Using the mean-field approximation, the parameter regime for quorum sensing behavior can be identified, and analytical results for the detailed dynamical properties, including the phase diagrams, are obtained and verified numerically. The second model consists of FitzHugh-Nagumo elements coupled to the signaling chemicals in the environment. Nonlinear dynamical analysis of this mean-field model exhibits rich dynamical behaviors, such as infinite period bifurcation, supercritical Hopf, fold bifurcation, and subcritical Hopf bifurcations as the population parameter changes for different coupling strengths. Analytical result is obtained for the Hopf bifurcation phase boundary. Furthermore, two elements coupled via the environment and their synchronization behavior for these two models are also investigated. For both models, it is found that the onset of oscillations is accompanied by the synchronized dynamics of the two elements. Possible applications and extension of these models are also discussed.

  4. Quorum Sensing and Synchronization in Populations of Coupled Chemical Oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Annette F.; Tinsley, Mark R.; Showalter, Kenneth

    2013-12-01

    Experiments and simulations of populations of coupled chemical oscillators, consisting of catalytic particles suspended in solution, provide insights into density-dependent dynamics displayed by many cellular organisms. Gradual synchronization transitions, the "switching on" of activity above a threshold number of oscillators (quorum sensing) and the formation of synchronized groups (clusters) of oscillators have been characterized. Collective behavior is driven by the response of the oscillators to chemicals emitted into the surrounding solution.

  5. Dynorphin Activates Quorum Sensing Quinolone Signaling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Zaborina, Olga; Lepine, Francois; Xiao, Gaoping; Valuckaite, Vesta; Chen, Yimei; Li, Terry; Ciancio, Mae; Zaborin, Alex; Petroff, Elaine; Turner, Jerrold R; Rahme, Laurence G; Chang, Eugene; Alverdy, John C

    2007-01-01

    There is now substantial evidence that compounds released during host stress directly activate the virulence of certain opportunistic pathogens. Here, we considered that endogenous opioids might function as such compounds, given that they are among the first signals to be released at multiple tissue sites during host stress. We tested the ability of various opioid compounds to enhance the virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa using pyocyanin production as a biological readout, and demonstrated enhanced virulence when P. aeruginosa was exposed to synthetic (U-50,488) and endogenous (dynorphin) κ-agonists. Using various mutants and reporter strains of P. aeruginosa, we identified involvement of key elements of the quorum sensing circuitry such as the global transcriptional regulator MvfR and the quorum sensing-related quinolone signaling molecules PQS, HHQ, and HQNO that respond to κ-opioids. The in vivo significance of κ-opioid signaling of P. aeruginosa was demonstrated in mice by showing that dynorphin is released from the intestinal mucosa following ischemia/reperfusion injury, activates quinolone signaling in P. aeruginosa, and enhances the virulence of P. aeruginosa against Lactobacillus spp. and Caenorhabditis elegans. Taken together, these data demonstrate that P. aeruginosa can intercept opioid compounds released during host stress and integrate them into core elements of quorum sensing circuitry leading to enhanced virulence. PMID:17367209

  6. Control of the pollution of antibiotic resistance genes in soils by quorum sensing inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lai, Bai-Min; Zhang, Kun; Shen, Dong-Sheng; Wang, Mei-Zhen; Shentu, Jia-Li; Li, Na

    2017-02-01

    To investigate whether pollution from antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) could be affected by bacterial quorum sensing, the oxytetracycline (OTC)-containing manure was fertilized to establish the ARG-polluted soil environment. Under long-term OTC stress, substantial ARGs in the range from 10(-4) to 10(-3) RG/16S rRNA (resistance genes/16S rRNA) were detected in the antibiotics control (AC) group, in which OTC-containing manure was fertilized. Meanwhile, 10(-6) RG/16S rRNA was detected in biological control (BC) group, in which non-OTC-containing manure was fertilized. Subsequently, two typical quorum sensing inhibitors, 4-nitropyridine N-oxide (4-NPO) and 3,4-dibromo-2H-furan-5-one (DBF), were used to treat the ARG-polluted soils. These two groups called 4-NPO treatments (NT) and DBF treatments (FT), respectively. There were no significant differences in bacterial growth and OTC degradation in NT and FT groups, compared to AC group. However, acyl-homoserine lactones such as C4-HSL, C6-HSL, and C8-HSL decreased significantly in both NT and FT groups, compared to AC group. Meanwhile, the abundance of most ARGs decreased dramatically. In FT group, the concentrations of tet(L) and tet(Q) were below the detection limits. It was demonstrated that quorum sensing inhibition could be an effective way to prevent and control the pollution of ARGs in soil.

  7. Quorum sensing influences phage infection efficiency via affecting cell population and physiological state.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xuying; Sun, Qinghui; Yang, Baixue; Pan, Xuewei; He, Yang; Yang, Hongjiang

    2017-02-01

    Bacterial growth phase has been reported affecting phage infection. To underpin the related mechanism, infection efficiency of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage K5 is characterized. When infecting the logarithmic cells, phage K5 produced significantly more infection centers than the stationary cells, well concordant with the viable cell ratio in the different growth phases. Additionally, the burst size decreased dramatically in the stationary cells, implying that the physiological state of the viable cells contributed to the productivity of phage K5, and it was consistent with the expression variation of the phage RNA polymerase. Quorum sensing inhibitor penicillic acid was applied and could significantly improve the viable cell proportion and the infection center numbers, but had less effect on the corresponding burst sizes. Moreover, the effect of penicillic acid and the quorum sensing regulator mutants on the production of phage C11 was also analyzed. Taken together, our data suggest that quorum sensing is involved in the defense of phage K5 infection by influencing the viable cell population and their physiological state, and it is an efficient and intrinsic pathway allowing bacteria to resist phage attacks in natural environment.

  8. Specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity (A QSI) of thiophenones and their therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Scheie, Anne Aamdal; Benneche, Tore; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-12-09

    Disease caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens is becoming a serious problem, both in human and veterinary medicine. The inhibition of quorum sensing, bacterial cell-to-cell communication, is a promising alternative strategy to control disease. In this study, we determined the quorum sensing-disrupting activity of 20 thiophenones towards the quorum sensing model bacterium V. harveyi. In order to exclude false positives, we propose a new parameter (AQSI) to describe specific quorum sensing activity. AQSI is defined as the ratio between inhibition of quorum sensing-regulated activity in a reporter strain and inhibition of the same activity when it is independent of quorum sensing. Calculation of AQSI allowed to exclude five false positives, whereas the six most active thiophenones (TF203, TF307, TF319, TF339, TF342 and TF403) inhibited quorum sensing at 0.25 μM, with AQSI higher than 10. Further, we determined the protective effect and toxicity of the thiophenones in a highly controlled gnotobiotic model system with brine shrimp larvae. There was a strong positive correlation between the specific quorum sensing-disrupting activity of the thiophenones and the protection of brine shrimp larvae against pathogenic V. harveyi. Four of the most active quorum sensing-disrupting thiophenones (TF 203, TF319, TF339 and TF342) were considered to be promising since they have a therapeutic potential of at least 10.

  9. Quorum sensing in the context of food microbiology.

    PubMed

    Skandamis, Panagiotis N; Nychas, George-John E

    2012-08-01

    Food spoilage may be defined as a process that renders a product undesirable or unacceptable for consumption and is the outcome of the biochemical activity of a microbial community that eventually dominates according to the prevailing ecological determinants. Although limited information are reported, this activity has been attributed to quorum sensing (QS). Consequently, the potential role of cell-to-cell communication in food spoilage and food safety should be more extensively elucidated. Such information would be helpful in designing approaches for manipulating these communication systems, thereby reducing or preventing, for instance, spoilage reactions or even controlling the expression of virulence factors. Due to the many reports in the literature on the fundamental features of QS, e.g., chemistry and definitions of QS compounds, in this minireview, we only allude to the types and chemistry of QS signaling molecules per se and to the (bioassay-based) methods of their detection and quantification, avoiding extensive documentation. Conversely, we attempt to provide insights into (i) the role of QS in food spoilage, (ii) the factors that may quench the activity of QS in foods and review the potential QS inhibitors that might "mislead" the bacterial coordination of spoilage activities and thus may be used as biopreservatives, and (iii) the future experimental approaches that need to be undertaken in order to explore the "gray" or "black" areas of QS, increase our understanding of how QS affects microbial behavior in foods, and assist in finding answers as to how we can exploit QS for the benefit of food preservation and food safety.

  10. Quorum Sensing in the Context of Food Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Skandamis, Panagiotis N.

    2012-01-01

    Food spoilage may be defined as a process that renders a product undesirable or unacceptable for consumption and is the outcome of the biochemical activity of a microbial community that eventually dominates according to the prevailing ecological determinants. Although limited information are reported, this activity has been attributed to quorum sensing (QS). Consequently, the potential role of cell-to-cell communication in food spoilage and food safety should be more extensively elucidated. Such information would be helpful in designing approaches for manipulating these communication systems, thereby reducing or preventing, for instance, spoilage reactions or even controlling the expression of virulence factors. Due to the many reports in the literature on the fundamental features of QS, e.g., chemistry and definitions of QS compounds, in this minireview, we only allude to the types and chemistry of QS signaling molecules per se and to the (bioassay-based) methods of their detection and quantification, avoiding extensive documentation. Conversely, we attempt to provide insights into (i) the role of QS in food spoilage, (ii) the factors that may quench the activity of QS in foods and review the potential QS inhibitors that might “mislead” the bacterial coordination of spoilage activities and thus may be used as biopreservatives, and (iii) the future experimental approaches that need to be undertaken in order to explore the “gray” or “black” areas of QS, increase our understanding of how QS affects microbial behavior in foods, and assist in finding answers as to how we can exploit QS for the benefit of food preservation and food safety. PMID:22706047

  11. Multiplicity of Quorum Quenching Enzymes: A Potential Mechanism to Limit Quorum Sensing Bacterial Population.

    PubMed

    Koul, Shikha; Kalia, Vipin Chandra

    2017-03-01

    Bacteria express certain of their characteristics especially, pathogenicity factors at high cell densities. The process is termed as quorum sensing (QS). QS operates via signal molecules such as acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). Other bacteria inhibit QS through the inactivation of AHL signals by producing enzymes like AHL-lactonases and -acylases. Comparative genomic analysis has revealed the multiplicity of genes for AHL lactonases (up to 12 copies per genome) among Bacillus spp. and that of AHL-acylases (up to 5 copies per genome) among Pseudomonas spp. This genetic evolution can be envisaged to enable host to withstand the attacks from bacterial population, which regulates its functioning through QS.

  12. Quorum sensing via static coupling demonstrated by Chua's circuits.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harpartap; Parmananda, P

    2013-10-01

    Dynamical quorum sensing, the population based phenomenon, is believed to occur when the elements of a system interact via dynamic coupling. In the present work, we demonstrate an alternate scenario, involving static coupling, that could also lead to quorum sensing behavior. These static and dynamic coupling terms have already been employed by Konishi [Int. J. Bifurcation Chaos Appl. Sci. Eng. 17, 2781 (2007)]. In our context, the coupling is defined as static or dynamic, on the basis of the relative time scales at which the surrounding dynamics and the elements' dynamics evolve. According to this, if the variation in the surrounding dynamics happens on a much larger (fast) time scale than that at which the elements' dynamics are varying (such as seconds and μs), then the coupling is considered to be static, otherwise it is considered to be dynamic. A series of experiments have been performed starting from a system of three Chua's circuits to a system of 20 Chua's circuits to study two types of quorum transitions: the emergence and the extinction of global oscillations (period-1). The numerics involving up to 100 Chua's circuits validate the experimental observations.

  13. Quorum sensing via static coupling demonstrated by Chua's circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Harpartap; Parmananda, P.

    2013-10-01

    Dynamical quorum sensing, the population based phenomenon, is believed to occur when the elements of a system interact via dynamic coupling. In the present work, we demonstrate an alternate scenario, involving static coupling, that could also lead to quorum sensing behavior. These static and dynamic coupling terms have already been employed by Konishi [Int. J. Bifurcation Chaos Appl. Sci. Eng.IJBEE40218-127410.1142/S0218127407018750 17, 2781 (2007)]. In our context, the coupling is defined as static or dynamic, on the basis of the relative time scales at which the surrounding dynamics and the elements' dynamics evolve. According to this, if the variation in the surrounding dynamics happens on a much larger (fast) time scale than that at which the elements' dynamics are varying (such as seconds and μs), then the coupling is considered to be static, otherwise it is considered to be dynamic. A series of experiments have been performed starting from a system of three Chua's circuits to a system of 20 Chua's circuits to study two types of quorum transitions: the emergence and the extinction of global oscillations (period-1). The numerics involving up to 100 Chua's circuits validate the experimental observations.

  14. Biosynthesis of Glycomonoterpenes to Attenuate Quorum Sensing Associated Virulence in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Patil, Amrita; Joshi-Navre, Kasturi; Mukherji, Ruchira; Prabhune, Asmita

    2017-04-01

    The acquisition of multidrug resistance in bacteria has become a bigger threat of late, mainly due to the bacterial signaling phenomenon, quorum sensing (QS). QS, among a population of bacteria, initiates the formation of biofilms and offers myriad advantages to bacteria. Burgeoning antibiotic resistance in biofilm-producing bacteria has motivated efforts toward finding new alternatives to these traditional antimicrobials. In the present study, we report the increased solubility and additional quorum quenching as well as biofilm disruption activity of glyco-derivatives of monoterpenes (citral and citronellal). Glycomonoterpenes of citral and citronellal were synthesized via conjugation of the monoterpenes with glucose by the non-pathogenic yeast Candida bombicola (ATCC 22214). Structural elucidation of newly synthesized glycomonoterpenes showed that one synthesized using citronellal contains three major lactonic forms with molecular weight 492.43, 473.47, and 330.39 Da whereas the one produced using citral has an acidic form with molecular weight 389.33 and 346.23 Da. The glycomonoterpenes were able to individually inhibit QS, mediated through various medium-chain and long-chain N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). These new compounds are interesting additions to the known range of quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) and could be further explored for potential clinical applications.

  15. Can the natural diversity of quorum-sensing advance synthetic biology?

    PubMed

    Davis, René Michele; Muller, Ryan Yue; Haynes, Karmella Ann

    2015-01-01

    Quorum-sensing networks enable bacteria to sense and respond to chemical signals produced by neighboring bacteria. They are widespread: over 100 morphologically and genetically distinct species of eubacteria are known to use quorum sensing to control gene expression. This diversity suggests the potential to use natural protein variants to engineer parallel, input-specific, cell-cell communication pathways. However, only three distinct signaling pathways, Lux, Las, and Rhl, have been adapted for and broadly used in engineered systems. The paucity of unique quorum-sensing systems and their propensity for crosstalk limits the usefulness of our current quorum-sensing toolkit. This review discusses the need for more signaling pathways, roadblocks to using multiple pathways in parallel, and strategies for expanding the quorum-sensing toolbox for synthetic biology.

  16. Structure and Inhibition of Quorum Sensing Target from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Singh,V.; Shi, W.; Almo, S.; Evans, G.; Furneaux, R.; Tyler, P.; Painter, G.; Lenz, D.; Mee, S.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae 5'-methylthioadenosine/S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase (MTAN) catalyzes the hydrolytic deadenylation of its substrates to form adenine and 5-methylthioribose or S-ribosylhomocysteine (SRH). MTAN is not found in mammals but is involved in bacterial quorum sensing. MTAN gene disruption affects the growth and pathogenicity of bacteria, making it a target for antibiotic design. Kinetic isotope effects and computational studies have established a dissociative S{sub N}1 transition state for Escherichia coli MTAN, and transition state analogues resembling the transition state are powerful inhibitors of the enzyme [Singh, V., Lee, J. L., Nunez, S., Howell, P. L., and Schramm, V. L. (2005) Biochemistry 44, 11647-11659]. The sequence of MTAN from S. pneumoniae is 40% identical to that of E. coli MTAN, but S. pneumoniae MTAN exhibits remarkably distinct kinetic and inhibitory properties. 5'-Methylthio-Immucillin-A (MT-ImmA) is a transition state analogue resembling an early S{sub N}1 transition state. It is a weak inhibitor of S. pneumoniae MTAN with a K{sub i} of 1.0 {mu}M. The X-ray structure of S. pneumoniae MTAN with MT-ImmA indicates a dimer with the methylthio group in a flexible hydrophobic pocket. Replacing the methyl group with phenyl (PhT-ImmA), tolyl (p-TolT-ImmA), or ethyl (EtT-ImmA) groups increases the affinity to give K{sub i} values of 335, 60, and 40 nM, respectively. DADMe-Immucillins are geometric and electrostatic mimics of a fully dissociated transition state and bind more tightly than Immucillins. MT-DADMe-Immucillin-A inhibits with a K{sub i} value of 24 nM, and replacing the 5'-methyl group with p-Cl-phenyl (p-Cl-PhT-DADMe-ImmA) gave a K{sub i}* value of 0.36 nM. The inhibitory potential of DADMe-Immucillins relative to the Immucillins supports a fully dissociated transition state structure for S. pneumoniae MTAN. Comparison of active site contacts in the X-ray crystal structures of E. coli and S. pneumoniae MTAN with MT

  17. Monitoring of quorum-sensing molecules during minifermentation studies in wine yeast.

    PubMed

    Zupan, Jure; Avbelj, Martina; Butinar, Bojan; Kosel, Janez; Šergan, Matej; Raspor, Peter

    2013-03-13

    At high cell density or under low nutrient conditions, yeasts collectively adapt their metabolism by secreting aromatic alcohols in what is known as quorum sensing. However, the mechanisms and role of quorum sensing in yeast are poorly understood, and the methodology behind this process is not well established. This paper describes an effective approach to study quorum sensing in yeast fermentations. The separation, detection, and quantification of the putative quorum-sensing molecules 2-phenylethanol, tryptophol, and tyrosol have been optimized on a simple HPLC-based system. With the use of a phenyl HPLC column and a fluorescence detector, the sensitivity of the system was significantly increased. This allowed extraction and concentration procedures to be eliminated and the process to be scaled down to 2 mL minifermentations. Additionally, an innovative method for rapid viable-cell counting is presented. This study forms the basis for detailed studies in kinetics and regulation of quorum sensing in yeast fermentation.

  18. Interaction of a P. aeruginosa Quorum Sensing Signal with Lipid Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrison, Rebecca; Hall, Amelia; Hutchison, Ellen; Nguyen, Thuc; Cooley, Benjamin; Gordon, Vernita

    2011-03-01

    Bacteria use a signaling and regulatory system called ``quorum sensing'' to alter their gene expressions in response to the concentration of neighboring bacteria and to environmental conditions that make collective activity favorable for bacteria. P. aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that uses quorum sensing to govern processes such as virulence and biofilm formation. This organism's two main quorum sensing circuits use two different signaling molecules that are amphiphilic and differ primarily in the length of their hydrocarbon side chain and thus in their hydrophobic physical chemistry. How these physical chemistries govern the propagation and spatial localization of signals and thus of quorum sensing is not known. We present preliminary results showing that signals preferentially sequester to amphiphilic lipid membranes, which can act as reservoirs for signal. This is promising for future characterization of how the quorum sensing signals of many bacteria and yeast partition to spatially-differentiated amphiphilic environments, in a host or biofilm.

  19. Small Molecule Inhibitors of AI-2 Signaling in Bacteria: State-of-the-Art and Future Perspectives for Anti-Quorum Sensing Agents

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Min; Gamby, Sonja; Zheng, Yue; Sintim, Herman O.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria respond to different small molecules that are produced by other neighboring bacteria. These molecules, called autoinducers, are classified as intraspecies (i.e., molecules produced and perceived by the same bacterial species) or interspecies (molecules that are produced and sensed between different bacterial species). AI-2 has been proposed as an interspecies autoinducer and has been shown to regulate different bacterial physiology as well as affect virulence factor production and biofilm formation in some bacteria, including bacteria of clinical relevance. Several groups have embarked on the development of small molecules that could be used to perturb AI-2 signaling in bacteria, with the ultimate goal that these molecules could be used to inhibit bacterial virulence and biofilm formation. Additionally, these molecules have the potential to be used in synthetic biology applications whereby these small molecules are used as inputs to switch on and off AI-2 receptors. In this review, we highlight the state-of-the-art in the development of small molecules that perturb AI-2 signaling in bacteria and offer our perspective on the future development and applications of these classes of molecules. PMID:23994835

  20. Autocrine Signaling and Quorum Sensing: Extreme Ends of a Common Spectrum.

    PubMed

    Doğaner, Berkalp A; Yan, Lawrence K Q; Youk, Hyun

    2016-04-01

    'Secrete-and-sense cells' can communicate by secreting a signaling molecule while also producing a receptor that detects the molecule. The cell can potentially 'talk' to itself ('self-communication') or talk to neighboring cells with the same receptor ('neighbor communication'). The predominant forms of secrete-and-sense cells are self-communicating 'autocrine cells', which are largely found in animals, and neighbor-communicating 'quorum sensing cells', which are mostly associated with bacteria. While assumed to function independently of one another, recent studies have discovered quorum-sensing organs and autocrine-signaling microbes. Moreover, similar types of genetic circuit control many autocrine and quorum-sensing cells. Here, we outline these recent findings and explain how autocrine and quorum sensing are two sides of a many-sided 'dice' created by the versatile secrete-and-sense cell.

  1. Chemical methods to interrogate bacterial quorum sensing pathways

    PubMed Central

    Praneenararat, Thanit; Palmer, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria frequently manifest distinct phenotypes as a function of cell density in a phenomenon known as quorum sensing (QS). This intercellular signalling process is mediated by “chemical languages comprised of low-molecular weight signals, known as” autoinducers, and their cognate receptor proteins. As many of the phenotypes regulated by QS can have a significant impact on the success of pathogenic or mutualistic prokaryotic–eukaryotic interactions, there is considerable interest in methods to probe and modulate QS pathways with temporal and spatial control. Such methods would be valuable for both basic research in bacterial ecology and in practical medicinal, agricultural, and industrial applications. Toward this goal, considerable recent research has been focused on the development of chemical approaches to study bacterial QS pathways. In this Perspective, we provide an overview of the use of chemical probes and techniques in QS research. Specifically, we focus on: (1) combinatorial approaches for the discovery of small molecule QS modulators, (2) affinity chromatography for the isolation of QS receptors, (3) reactive and fluorescent probes for QS receptors, (4) antibodies as quorum “quenchers,” (5) abiotic polymeric “sinks” and “pools” for QS signals, and (6) the electrochemical sensing of QS signals. The application of such chemical methods can offer unique advantages for both elucidating and manipulating QS pathways in culture and under native conditions. PMID:22948815

  2. Functional amyloids keep quorum-sensing molecules in check.

    PubMed

    Seviour, Thomas; Hansen, Susan Hove; Yang, Liang; Yau, Yin Hoe; Wang, Victor Bochuan; Stenvang, Marcel R; Christiansen, Gunna; Marsili, Enrico; Givskov, Michael; Chen, Yicai; Otzen, Daniel E; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Geifman-Shochat, Susana; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Dueholm, Morten S

    2015-03-06

    The mechanism by which extracellular metabolites, including redox mediators and quorum-sensing signaling molecules, traffic through the extracellular matrix of biofilms is poorly explored. We hypothesize that functional amyloids, abundant in natural biofilms and possessing hydrophobic domains, retain these metabolites. Using surface plasmon resonance, we demonstrate that the quorum-sensing (QS) molecules, 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone and N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone, and the redox mediator pyocyanin bind with transient affinity to functional amyloids from Pseudomonas (Fap). Their high hydrophobicity predisposes them to signal-amyloid interactions, but specific interactions also play a role. Transient interactions allow for rapid association and dissociation kinetics, which make the QS molecules bioavailable and at the same time secure within the extracellular matrix as a consequence of serial bindings. Retention of the QS molecules was confirmed using Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1-based 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone and N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone reporter assays, showing that Fap fibrils pretreated with the QS molecules activate the reporters even after sequential washes. Pyocyanin retention was validated by electrochemical analysis of pyocyanin-pretreated Fap fibrils subjected to the same washing process. Results suggest that QS molecule-amyloid interactions are probably important in the turbulent environments commonly encountered in natural habitats.

  3. Functional Amyloids Keep Quorum-sensing Molecules in Check*

    PubMed Central

    Seviour, Thomas; Hansen, Susan Hove; Yang, Liang; Yau, Yin Hoe; Wang, Victor Bochuan; Stenvang, Marcel R.; Christiansen, Gunna; Marsili, Enrico; Givskov, Michael; Chen, Yicai; Otzen, Daniel E.; Nielsen, Per Halkjær; Geifman-Shochat, Susana; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Dueholm, Morten S.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which extracellular metabolites, including redox mediators and quorum-sensing signaling molecules, traffic through the extracellular matrix of biofilms is poorly explored. We hypothesize that functional amyloids, abundant in natural biofilms and possessing hydrophobic domains, retain these metabolites. Using surface plasmon resonance, we demonstrate that the quorum-sensing (QS) molecules, 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone and N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone, and the redox mediator pyocyanin bind with transient affinity to functional amyloids from Pseudomonas (Fap). Their high hydrophobicity predisposes them to signal-amyloid interactions, but specific interactions also play a role. Transient interactions allow for rapid association and dissociation kinetics, which make the QS molecules bioavailable and at the same time secure within the extracellular matrix as a consequence of serial bindings. Retention of the QS molecules was confirmed using Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1-based 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone and N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone reporter assays, showing that Fap fibrils pretreated with the QS molecules activate the reporters even after sequential washes. Pyocyanin retention was validated by electrochemical analysis of pyocyanin-pretreated Fap fibrils subjected to the same washing process. Results suggest that QS molecule-amyloid interactions are probably important in the turbulent environments commonly encountered in natural habitats. PMID:25586180

  4. Novel insights from molecular docking of SdiA from Salmonella Enteritidis and Escherichia coli with quorum sensing and quorum quenching molecules.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Felipe Alves de; Pinto, Uelinton Manoel; Vanetti, Maria Cristina Dantas

    2016-10-01

    Quorum sensing is a cell-to-cell communication mechanism leading to differential gene expression in response to high population density. The autoinducer-1 (AI-1) type quorum sensing system is incomplete in Escherichia coli and Salmonella due to the lack of the AI-1 synthase (LuxI homolog) responsible for acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) synthesis. However, these bacteria encode the AHL receptor SdiA (a LuxR homolog) leading to gene regulation in response to AI-1 produced by other bacteria. This study aimed to model the SdiA protein of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis PT4 578 based on three crystallized SdiA structures from Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) with different ligands. Molecular docking of these predicted structures with AHLs, furanones and 1-octanoyl-rac-glycerol were also performed. The available EHEC SdiA structures provided good prototypes for modeling SdiA from Salmonella. The molecular docking of these proteins showed that residues Y63, W67, Y71, D80 and S134 are common binding sites for different quorum modulating signals, besides being conserved among other LuxR type proteins. We also show that AHLs with twelve carbons presented better binding affinity to SdiA than AHLs with smaller side chains in our docking analysis, regardless of the protein structures used. Interestingly, the conformational changes provided by AHL binding resulted in structural models with increased affinities to brominated furanones. These results suggest that the use of brominated furanones to inhibit phenotypes controlled by quorum sensing in Salmonella and EHEC may present a good strategy since these inhibitors seem to specifically compete with AHLs for binding to SdiA in both pathogens.

  5. Inhibition of Quorum Sensing in Staphylococcus spp.

    PubMed

    Brackman, Gilles; Coenye, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The Gram-positive, facultative anaerobic coccus-shaped bacteria of the genus Staphylococcus are among the most important causative agents of acute and chronic bacterial infections in humans as well as in animals. Treatment of Staphylococcus infections has become increasingly challenging due to the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. For this reason innovative antimicrobials with novel targets and modes of action are needed. Since the discovery that QS is used by Staphylococcus spp. to coordinate the expression of several genes involved in virulence, biofilm formation and pathogenicity, QS inhibition has gained increasing attention as an alternative anti-pathogenic strategy. A major advantage compared with antibiotic therapy is that QSIs are used in concentrations that do not affect bacterial growth. For this reason, it is expected that these compounds would exert less pressure towards the development of resistance. However, some important points still need to be addressed. Although several inhibitors have proven to be active antipathogenic agents in vitro and in several in vivo models, it is still unknown whether these compounds will also be useful in humans. Furthermore, several fundamental mechanisms by which the different QS systems in Staphylococcus spp. exert their regulatory functions and how they are inhibited by QSIs are still poorly understood. In order to achieve real-life applications with QSIs, these challenges should be addressed and more research will be needed. In this article, we will discuss the different QS systems present in Staphylococcus spp., how they are used to control virulence and biofilm formation and how they can be blocked.

  6. A quorum sensing-disrupting brominated thiophenone with a promising therapeutic potential to treat luminescent vibriosis.

    PubMed

    Defoirdt, Tom; Benneche, Tore; Brackman, Gilles; Coenye, Tom; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Scheie, Anne Aamdal

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio harveyi is amongst the most important bacterial pathogens in aquaculture. Novel methods to control this pathogen are needed since many strains have acquired resistance to antibiotics. We previously showed that quorum sensing-disrupting furanones are able to protect brine shrimp larvae against vibriosis. However, a major problem of these compounds is that they are toxic toward higher organisms and therefore, they are not safe to be used in aquaculture. The synthesis of brominated thiophenones, sulphur analogues of the quorum sensing-disrupting furanones, has recently been reported. In the present study, we report that these compounds block quorum sensing in V. harveyi at concentrations in the low micromolar range. Bioluminescence experiments with V. harveyi quorum sensing mutants and a fluorescence anisotropy assay indicated that the compounds disrupt quorum sensing in this bacterium by decreasing the ability of the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR to bind to its target promoter DNA. In vivo challenge tests with gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae showed that thiophenone compound TF310, (Z)-4-((5-(bromomethylene)-2-oxo-2,5-dihydrothiophen-3-yl)methoxy)-4-oxobutanoic acid, completely protected the larvae from V. harveyi BB120 when dosed to the culture water at 2.5 µM or more, whereas severe toxicity was only observed at 250 µM. This makes TF310 showing the highest therapeutic index of all quorum sensing-disrupting compounds tested thus far in our brine shrimp model system.

  7. Non-native acylated homoserine lactones reveal that LuxIR quorum sensing promotes symbiont stability.

    PubMed

    Studer, Sarah V; Schwartzman, Julia A; Ho, Jessica S; Geske, Grant D; Blackwell, Helen E; Ruby, Edward G

    2014-08-01

    Quorum sensing, a group behaviour coordinated by a diffusible pheromone signal and a cognate receptor, is typical of bacteria that form symbioses with plants and animals. LuxIR-type N-acyl L-homoserine (AHL) quorum sensing is common in Gram-negative Proteobacteria, and many members of this group have additional quorum-sensing networks. The bioluminescent symbiont Vibrio fischeri encodes two AHL signal synthases: AinS and LuxI. AinS-dependent quorum sensing converges with LuxI-dependent quorum sensing at the LuxR regulatory element. Both AinS- and LuxI-mediated signalling are required for efficient and persistent colonization of the squid host, Euprymna scolopes. The basis of the mutualism is symbiont bioluminescence, which is regulated by both LuxI- and AinS-dependent quorum sensing, and is essential for maintaining a colonization of the host. Here, we used chemical and genetic approaches to probe the dynamics of LuxI- and AinS-mediated regulation of bioluminescence during symbiosis. We demonstrate that both native AHLs and non-native AHL analogues can be used to non-invasively and specifically modulate induction of symbiotic bioluminescence via LuxI-dependent quorum sensing. Our data suggest that the first day of colonization, during which symbiont bioluminescence is induced by LuxIR, is a critical period that determines the stability of the V. fischeri population once symbiosis is established.

  8. Airway Epithelial Cell Integrity Protects from Cytotoxicity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Sensing Signals.

    PubMed

    Losa, Davide; Köhler, Thilo; Bacchetta, Marc; Saab, Joanna Bou; Frieden, Maud; van Delden, Christian; Chanson, Marc

    2015-08-01

    Cell-to-cell communication via gap junctions regulates airway epithelial cell homeostasis and maintains the epithelium host defense. Quorum-sensing molecules produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa coordinate the expression of virulence factors by this respiratory pathogen. These bacterial signals may also incidentally modulate mammalian airway epithelial cell responses to the pathogen, a process called interkingdom signaling. We investigated the interactions between the P. aeruginosa N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C12) quorum-sensing molecule and human airway epithelial cell gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). C12 degradation and its effects on cells were monitored in various airway epithelial cell models grown under nonpolarized and polarized conditions. Its concentration was further monitored in daily tracheal aspirates of colonized intubated patients. C12 rapidly altered epithelial integrity and decreased GJIC in nonpolarized airway epithelial cells, whereas other quorum-sensing molecules had no effect. The effects of C12 were dependent on [Ca(2+)]i and could be prevented by inhibitors of Src tyrosine family and Rho-associated protein kinases. In contrast, polarized airway cells grown on Transwell filters were protected from C12 except when undergoing repair after wounding. In vivo during colonization of intubated patients, C12 did not accumulate, but it paralleled bacterial densities. In vitro C12 degradation, a reaction catalyzed by intracellular paraoxonase 2 (PON2), was impaired in nonpolarized cells, whereas PON2 expression was increased during epithelial polarization. The cytotoxicity of C12 on nonpolarized epithelial cells, combined with its impaired degradation allowing its accumulation, provides an additional pathogenic mechanism for P. aeruginosa infections.

  9. Monitoring of Vibrio harveyi quorum sensing activity in real time during infection of brine shrimp larvae.

    PubMed

    Defoirdt, Tom; Sorgeloos, Patrick

    2012-12-01

    Quorum sensing, bacterial cell-to-cell communication, has been linked to the virulence of pathogenic bacteria. Indeed, in vitro experiments have shown that many bacterial pathogens regulate the expression of virulence genes by this cell-to-cell communication process. Moreover, signal molecules have been detected in samples retrieved from infected hosts and quorum sensing disruption has been reported to result in reduced virulence in different host-pathogen systems. However, data on in vivo quorum sensing activity of pathogens during infection of a host are currently lacking. We previously reported that quorum sensing regulates the virulence of Vibrio harveyi in a standardised model system with gnotobiotic brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) larvae. Here, we monitored quorum sensing activity in Vibrio harveyi during infection of the shrimp, using bioluminescence as a read-out. We found that wild-type Vibrio harveyi shows a strong increase in quorum sensing activity early during infection. In this respect, the bacteria behave remarkably similar in different larvae, despite the fact that only half of them survive the infection. Interestingly, when expressed per bacterial cell, Vibrio harveyi showed around 200-fold higher maximal quorum sensing-regulated bioluminescence when associated with larvae than in the culture water. Finally, the in vivo quorum sensing activity of mutants defective in the production of one of the three signal molecules is consistent with their virulence, with no detectable in vivo quorum sensing activity in AI-2- and CAI-1-deficient mutants. These results indicate that AI-2 and CAI-1 are the dominant signals during infection of brine shrimp.

  10. Effect of solid retention time on membrane fouling in membrane bioreactor: from the perspective of quorum sensing and quorum quenching.

    PubMed

    Yu, Huarong; Xu, Guoren; Qu, Fangshu; Li, Guibai; Liang, Heng

    2016-09-01

    Solid retention time (SRT) is one of the most important operational parameters in membrane bioreactor (MBR), which significantly influences membrane fouling. It is widely recognized that SRT mainly changes biomass characteristics, and then, influences membrane fouling. Effect of SRT on quorum sensing (QS) in MBR, which could also influence fouling by coordinating biofilm formation, has not been reported. In this study, fouling, QS, soluble microbial products (SMP), and extracellular polymer substances (EPS) in MBRs operated under SRTs of 4, 10, and 40 days were investigated. The results showed that as SRT increased, the abundance of quorum quenching (QQ) bacteria increased, the quorum signal degradation activity of activated sludge increased, the concentrations of signal molecules in MBR decreased, the excretion of SMP and EPS decreased, and thus membrane biofouling was alleviated. Therefore, besides altering the biomass physiochemical properties, SRT also changed the balance between QS and QQ in MBR, and in this way, influenced membrane biofouling.

  11. Quorum-quenching limits quorum-sensing exploitation by signal-negative invaders

    PubMed Central

    Tannières, Mélanie; Lang, Julien; Barnier, Claudie; Shykoff, Jacqui A.; Faure, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Some bacteria produce and perceive quorum-sensing (QS) signals that coordinate several behaviours, including the costly processes that are exoenzyme production and plasmid transfer. In the case of plasmid transfer, the emergence of QS signal-altered invaders and their policing are poorly documented. In Agrobacterium tumefaciens, the virulence Ti-plasmid encodes both synthesis and sensing of QS-signals, which promote its transfer from a donor to a recipient cell. Here, we reported that QS-altered A. tumefaciens mutants arose during experimental evolution. All showed improved growth compared to their ancestor. Genome sequencing revealed that, though some had lost the Ti-plasmid, most were defective for QS-signal synthesis and Ti-plasmid conjugation (traR mutations) and one exhibited a QS-signal exploitation behaviour, using signal produced by other cells to enhance its own Ti-plasmid transfer. We explored mechanisms that can limit this QS-hijacking. We showed that the A. tumefaciens capacity to inactivate QS-signals by expressing QS-degrading enzyme could attenuate dissemination of the QS signal-negative Ti-plasmids. This work shows that enzymatic QS-disruption whether encoded by the QS-producing Ti-plasmid itself, by a companion plasmid in the same donor cells, or by one in the recipient cells, in all cases can serve as a mechanism for controlling QS exploitation by QS signal-negative mutants. PMID:28054641

  12. Quorum-quenching limits quorum-sensing exploitation by signal-negative invaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannières, Mélanie; Lang, Julien; Barnier, Claudie; Shykoff, Jacqui A.; Faure, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Some bacteria produce and perceive quorum-sensing (QS) signals that coordinate several behaviours, including the costly processes that are exoenzyme production and plasmid transfer. In the case of plasmid transfer, the emergence of QS signal-altered invaders and their policing are poorly documented. In Agrobacterium tumefaciens, the virulence Ti-plasmid encodes both synthesis and sensing of QS-signals, which promote its transfer from a donor to a recipient cell. Here, we reported that QS-altered A. tumefaciens mutants arose during experimental evolution. All showed improved growth compared to their ancestor. Genome sequencing revealed that, though some had lost the Ti-plasmid, most were defective for QS-signal synthesis and Ti-plasmid conjugation (traR mutations) and one exhibited a QS-signal exploitation behaviour, using signal produced by other cells to enhance its own Ti-plasmid transfer. We explored mechanisms that can limit this QS-hijacking. We showed that the A. tumefaciens capacity to inactivate QS-signals by expressing QS-degrading enzyme could attenuate dissemination of the QS signal-negative Ti-plasmids. This work shows that enzymatic QS-disruption whether encoded by the QS-producing Ti-plasmid itself, by a companion plasmid in the same donor cells, or by one in the recipient cells, in all cases can serve as a mechanism for controlling QS exploitation by QS signal-negative mutants.

  13. Acyl-homoserine lactone quorum sensing: from evolution to application.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Martin; Sexton, D Joseph; Diggle, Stephen P; Greenberg, E Peter

    2013-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a widespread process in bacteria that employs autoinducing chemical signals to coordinate diverse, often cooperative activities such as bioluminescence, biofilm formation, and exoenzyme secretion. Signaling via acyl-homoserine lactones is the paradigm for QS in Proteobacteria and is particularly well understood in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Despite thirty years of mechanistic research, empirical studies have only recently addressed the benefits of QS and provided support for the traditional assumptions regarding its social nature and its role in optimizing cell-density-dependent group behaviors. QS-controlled public-goods production has served to investigate principles that explain the evolution and stability of cooperation, including kin selection, pleiotropic constraints, and metabolic prudence. With respect to medical application, appreciating social dynamics is pertinent to understanding the efficacy of QS-inhibiting drugs and the evolution of resistance. Future work will provide additional insight into the foundational assumptions of QS and relate laboratory discoveries to natural ecosystems.

  14. Quorum-sensing regulation in staphylococci—an overview

    PubMed Central

    Le, Katherine Y.; Otto, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococci are frequent human commensals and some species can cause disease. Staphylococcus aureus in particular is a dangerous human pathogen. In staphylococci, the ability to sense the bacterial cell density, or quorum, and to respond with genetic adaptations is due to one main system, which is called accessory gene regulator (Agr). The extracellular signal of Agr is a post-translationally modified peptide containing a thiolactone structure. Under conditions of high cell density, Agr is responsible for the increased expression of many toxins and degradative exoenzymes, and decreased expression of several colonization factors. This regulation is important for the timing of virulence factor expression during infection and the development of acute disease, while low activity of Agr is associated with chronic staphylococcal infections, such as those involving biofilm formation. Accordingly, drugs inhibiting Agr are being evaluated for their capacity to control acute forms of S. aureus infection. PMID:26579084

  15. Acyl-Homoserine Lactone Quorum Sensing in the Roseobacter Clade

    PubMed Central

    Zan, Jindong; Liu, Yue; Fuqua, Clay; Hill, Russell T.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the Roseobacter clade are ecologically important and numerically abundant in coastal environments and can associate with marine invertebrates and nutrient-rich marine snow or organic particles, on which quorum sensing (QS) may play an important role. In this review, we summarize current research progress on roseobacterial acyl-homoserine lactone-based QS, particularly focusing on three relatively well-studied representatives, Phaeobacter inhibens DSM17395, the marine sponge symbiont Ruegeria sp. KLH11 and the dinoflagellate symbiont Dinoroseobacter shibae. Bioinformatic survey of luxI homologues revealed that over 80% of available roseobacterial genomes encode at least one luxI homologue, reflecting the significance of QS controlled regulatory pathways in adapting to the relevant marine environments. We also discuss several areas that warrant further investigation, including studies on the ecological role of these diverse QS pathways in natural environments. PMID:24402124

  16. Bacterial quorum sensing: functional features and potential applications in biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Mangwani, Neelam; Dash, Hirak Ranjan; Chauhan, Ashvini; Das, Surajit

    2012-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) represents an exceptional pattern of cell-to-cell communication in bacteria using self-synthesized signalling molecules known as autoinducers. Various features regulated by QS in bacteria include virulence, biofilm formation, sporulation, genetic competence and bioluminescence, among others. Other than the diverse signalling properties of autoinducers, there are non-signalling properties also associated with these signalling molecules which make them potential antimicrobial agents and metal chelators. Additionally, QS signal antagonism has also been shown to be a promising alternative for blocking pathogenic diseases. Besides, QS has impressive design features useful in tissue engineering and biosensor technology. Although many aspects of QS are well understood, several other features remain largely unknown, especially in biotechnology applications. This review focuses on the functional features and potential applications of QS signalling molecules in biotechnology.

  17. Fungal quorum sensing molecules: Role in fungal morphogenesis and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Wongsuk, Thanwa; Pumeesat, Potjaman; Luplertlop, Natthanej

    2016-05-01

    When microorganisms live together in high numbers, they need to communicate with each other. To achieve cell-cell communication, microorganisms secrete molecules called quorum-sensing molecules (QSMs) that control their biological activities and behaviors. Fungi secrete QSMs such as farnesol, tyrosol, phenylethanol, and tryptophol. The role of QSMs in fungi has been widely studied in both yeasts and filamentous fungi, for example in Candida albicans, C. dubliniensis, Aspergillus niger, A. nidulans, and Fusarium graminearum. QSMs impact fungal morphogenesis (yeast-to-hypha formation) and also play a role in the germination of macroconidia. QSMs cause fungal cells to initiate programmed cell death, or apoptosis, and play a role in fungal pathogenicity. Several types of QSMs are produced during stages of biofilm development to control cell population or morphology in biofilm communities. This review article emphasizes the role of fungal QSMs, especially in fungal morphogenesis, biofilm formation, and pathogenicity. Information about QSMs may lead to improved measures for controlling fungal infection.

  18. Studying bacterial quorum-sensing at the single cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfino Perez, Pablo; Pelakh, Leslie; Young, Jonathan; Johnson, Elaine; Hagen, Stephen

    2010-03-01

    Like many bacterial species, Vibrio fischeri can detect its own population density through a quorum sensing (QS) mechanism. The bacterium releases a signal molecule (AI, autoinducer), which accumulates at high population density and triggers a genetic switch. In V.fischeri this leads to bioluminescence. Little is known about how stochastic gene expression affects QS at the level of single cells. We are imaging the luminescence of individual V.fischeri cells in a flow chamber and directly measuring the intercell variability in AI activation of the QS circuit. Our single-cell luminescence experiments allow us to track cells over time and characterize variations in their response to AI levels. We find heterogeneous response to the external signal: at a given AI concentration some cells may be strongly luminescent while others are virtually dark. The analysis of noise in the individual cell response can eventually lead to a better understanding of how cells use QS to gather information about their environment.

  19. Modeling a synthetic multicellular clock: Repressilators coupled by quorum sensing

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi; Elowitz, Michael B.; Strogatz, Steven H.

    2004-01-01

    Diverse biochemical rhythms are generated by thousands of cellular oscillators that somehow manage to operate synchronously. In fields ranging from circadian biology to endocrinology, it remains an exciting challenge to understand how collective rhythms emerge in multicellular structures. Using mathematical and computational modeling, we study the effect of coupling through intercell signaling in a population of Escherichia coli cells expressing a synthetic biological clock. Our results predict that a diverse and noisy community of such genetic oscillators interacting through a quorum-sensing mechanism should self-synchronize in a robust way, leading to a substantially improved global rhythmicity in the system. As such, the particular system of coupled genetic oscillators considered here might be a good candidate to provide the first quantitative example of a synchronization transition in a population of biological oscillators. PMID:15256602

  20. Functional marine metagenomic screening for anti-quorum sensing and anti-biofilm activity.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Karin; Golberg, Karina; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Marks, Robert; Pushkarev, Alina; Béjà, Oded; Kushmaro, Ariel

    2017-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS), a cell-to-cell communication process, entails the production of signaling molecules that enable synchronized gene expression in microbial communities to regulate myriad microbial functions, including biofilm formation. QS disruption may constitute an innovative approach to the design of novel antifouling and anti-biofilm agents. To identify novel quorum sensing inhibitors (QSI), 2,500 environmental bacterial artificial chromosomes (BAC) from uncultured marine planktonic bacteria were screened for QSI activity using soft agar overlaid with wild type Chromobacterium violaceum as an indicator. Of the BAC library clones, 7% showed high QSI activity (>40%) against the indicator bacterium, suggesting that QSI is common in the marine environment. The most active compound, eluted from BAC clone 14-A5, disrupted QS signaling pathways and reduced biofilm formation in both Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. The mass spectra of the active BAC clone (14-A5) that had been visualized by thin layer chromatography was dominated by a m/z peak of 362.1.

  1. Quorum Sensing Inhibition and Structure-Activity Relationships of β-Keto Esters.

    PubMed

    Forschner-Dancause, Stephanie; Poulin, Emily; Meschwitz, Susan

    2016-07-25

    Traditional therapeutics to treat bacterial infections have given rise to multi-drug resistant pathogens, which pose a major threat to human and animal health. In several pathogens, quorum sensing (QS)-a cell-cell communication system in bacteria-controls the expression of genes responsible for pathogenesis, thus representing a novel target in the fight against bacterial infections. Based on the structure of the autoinducers responsible for QS activity and other QS inhibitors, we hypothesize that β-keto esters with aryl functionality could possess anti-QS activity. A panel of nineteen β-keto ester analogs was tested for the inhibition of bioluminescence (a QS-controlled phenotype) in the marine pathogen Vibrio harveyi. Initial screening demonstrated the need of a phenyl ring at the C-3 position for antagonistic activity. Further additions to the phenyl ring with 4-substituted halo groups or a 3- or 4-substituted methoxy group resulted in the most active compounds with IC50 values ranging from 23 µM to 53 µM. The compounds additionally inhibit green fluorescent protein production by E. coli JB525. Evidence is presented that aryl β-keto esters may act as antagonists of bacterial quorum sensing by competing with N-acyl homoserine lactones for receptor binding. Expansion of the β-keto ester panel will enable us to obtain more insight into the structure-activity relationships needed to allow for the development of novel anti-virulence agents.

  2. Composition, anti-quorum sensing and antimicrobial activity of essential oils from Lippia alba

    PubMed Central

    Olivero-Verbel, Jesus; Barreto-Maya, Ana; Bertel-Sevilla, Angela; Stashenko, Elena E.

    2014-01-01

    Many Gram-negative pathogens have the ability to produce N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) as signal molecules for quorum sensing (QS). This cell-cell communication system allows them to coordinate gene expression and regulate virulence. Strategies to inhibit QS are promising for the control of infectious diseases or antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS) and antibacterial potential of five essential oils isolated from Lippia alba on the Tn-5 mutant of Chromobacterium violaceum CV026, and on the growth of the gram-positive bacteria S. aureus ATCC 25923. The anti-QS activity was detected through the inhibition of the QS-controlled violacein pigment production by the sensor bacteria. Results showed that two essential oils from L. alba, one containing the greatest geranial:neral and the other the highest limonene:carvone concentrations, were the most effective QS inhibitors. Both oils also had small effects on cell growth. Moreover, the geranial/neral chemotype oil also produced the maximum zone of growth inhibition against S. aureus ATCC 25923. These data suggest essential oils from L. alba have promising properties as QS modulators, and present antibacterial activity on S. aureus. PMID:25477905

  3. Composition, anti-quorum sensing and antimicrobial activity of essential oils from Lippia alba.

    PubMed

    Olivero-Verbel, Jesus; Barreto-Maya, Ana; Bertel-Sevilla, Angela; Stashenko, Elena E

    2014-01-01

    Many Gram-negative pathogens have the ability to produce N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) as signal molecules for quorum sensing (QS). This cell-cell communication system allows them to coordinate gene expression and regulate virulence. Strategies to inhibit QS are promising for the control of infectious diseases or antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS) and antibacterial potential of five essential oils isolated from Lippia alba on the Tn-5 mutant of Chromobacterium violaceum CV026, and on the growth of the gram-positive bacteria S. aureus ATCC 25923. The anti-QS activity was detected through the inhibition of the QS-controlled violacein pigment production by the sensor bacteria. Results showed that two essential oils from L. alba, one containing the greatest geranial:neral and the other the highest limonene:carvone concentrations, were the most effective QS inhibitors. Both oils also had small effects on cell growth. Moreover, the geranial/neral chemotype oil also produced the maximum zone of growth inhibition against S. aureus ATCC 25923. These data suggest essential oils from L. alba have promising properties as QS modulators, and present antibacterial activity on S. aureus.

  4. BACTERIAL ATTRACTION AND QUORUM SENSING INHIBITION IN CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS EXUDATES

    PubMed Central

    KAPLAN, FATMA; BADRI, DAYAKAR V.; ZACHARIAH, CHERIAN; AJREDINI, RAMADAN; SANDOVAL, FRANCISCO J; ROJE, SANJA; LEVINE, LANFANG H.; ZHANG, FENGLI; ROBINETTE, STEVEN L.; ALBORN, HANS T.; ZHAO, WEI; STADLER, MICHAEL; NIMALENDRAN, RATHIKA; DOSSEY, AARON T.; BRÜSCHWEILER, RAFAEL; VIVANCO, JORGE M.; EDISON, ARTHUR S.

    2014-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans, a bacterivorous nematode, lives in complex rotting fruit, soil, and compost environments, and chemical interactions are required for mating, monitoring population density, recognition of food, avoidance of pathogenic microbes, and other essential ecological functions. Despite being one of the best-studied model organisms in biology, relatively little is known about the signals that C. elegans uses to chemically interact with its environment or as defense. C. elegans exudates were analyzed using several analytical methods and found to contain 36 common metabolites including organic acids, amino acids and sugars, all in relatively high abundance. Furthermore, the concentrations of amino acids in the exudates were dependent on developmental stage. The C. elegans exudates were tested for bacterial chemotaxis using Pseudomonas putida (KT2440), a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1), a soil bacterium pathogenic to C. elegans, and E. coli (OP50), a non-motile bacterium tested as a control. The C. elegans exudates attracted the two Psuedomonas species, but had no detectable antibacterial activity against P. aeruginosa. To our surprise, the exudates of young adult and adult life stages of C. elegans exudates inhibited quorum sensing in the reporter system based on the LuxR bacterial quorum sensing (QS) system, which regulates bacterial virulence and other factors in Vibrio fischeri. We were able to fractionate the QS inhibition and bacterial chemotaxis activities, demonstrating that these activities are chemically distinct. Our results demonstrate that C. elegans can attract its bacterial food and has the potential of partially regulating the virulence of bacterial pathogens by inhibiting specific QS systems. PMID:19649780

  5. Influence of the hydrodynamic environment on quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms.

    PubMed

    Kirisits, Mary Jo; Margolis, Jeffrey J; Purevdorj-Gage, Boloroo L; Vaughan, Benjamin; Chopp, David L; Stoodley, Paul; Parsek, Matthew R

    2007-11-01

    We provide experimental and modeling evidence that the hydrodynamic environment can impact quorum sensing (QS) in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm. The amount of biofilm biomass required for full QS induction of the population increased as the flow rate increased.

  6. Antimicrobial and antibiofilm activity of quorum sensing peptides and Peptide analogues against oral biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed

    LoVetri, Karen; Madhyastha, Srinivasa

    2010-01-01

    Widespread antibiotic resistance is a major incentive for the investigation of novel ways to treat or prevent infections. Much effort has been put into the discovery of peptides in nature accompanied by manipulation of natural peptides to improve activity and decrease toxicity. The ever increasing knowledge about bacteria and the discovery of quorum sensing have presented itself as another mechanism to disrupt the infection process. We have shown that the natural quorum sensing (QS) peptide, competence-stimulating peptide (CSP), used by the caries causing bacteria Streptococcus mutans when used in higher than normally present concentrations can actually contribute to cell death in S. mutans. Using an analogue of this quorum sensing peptide (KBI-3221), we have shown it to be beneficial at decreasing biofilm of various Streptococcus species. This chapter looks at a number of assay methods to test the inhibitory effects of quorum sensing peptides and their analogues on the growth and biofilm formation of oral bacteria.

  7. Complex quorum-sensing regulatory systems regulate bacterial growth and symbiotic nodulation in Mesorhizobium tianshanense.

    PubMed

    Cao, Huijuan; Yang, Menghua; Zheng, Huiming; Zhang, Jiang; Zhong, Zengtao; Zhu, Jun

    2009-03-01

    LuxR/LuxI-type quorum-sensing systems have been shown to be important for symbiotic interactions between a number of rhizobium species and host legumes. In this study, we found that different isolates of Mesorhizobium tianshanense, a moderately-growing Rhizobium that forms nodules on a number of types of licorice plants, produces several different N-acyl homoserine lactone-like molecules. In M. tianshanense CCBAU060A, we performed a genetic screen and identified a network of regulatory components including a set of LuxI/LuxR-family regulators as well as a MarR-family regulator that is required for quorum-sensing regulation. Furthermore, compared with the wild-type strains, quorum-sensing deficient mutants showed a reduced growth rate and were defective in nodule formation on their host plant Glycyrrhiza uralensis. These data suggest that different M. tianshanense strains may use diverse quorum-sensing systems to regulate symbiotic process.

  8. More than a signal: non-signaling properties of quorum sensing molecules.

    PubMed

    Schertzer, Jeffrey W; Boulette, Megan L; Whiteley, Marvin

    2009-05-01

    Quorum sensing in bacteria serves as an example of the adaptation of single-celled organisms to engage in cooperative group behaviors. This phenomenon is much more widespread than originally thought, with many different species 'speaking' through various secreted small molecules. Despite some variation in signaling molecules, the principles of quorum sensing are conserved across a wide range of organisms. Small molecules, secreted into the environment, are detected by neighbors who respond by altering gene expression and, as a consequence, behavior. However, it is not known whether these systems evolved specifically for this purpose, or even if their role is exclusive to information trafficking. Rather, clues exist that many quorum sensing molecules function as more than just signals. Here, we discuss non-signaling roles for quorum sensing molecules in such important processes as nutrient scavenging, ultrastructure modification and competition.

  9. Bacteria clustering by polymers induces the expression of quorum sense controlled phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Leong T.; Xue, Xuan; Sui, Cheng; Brown, Alan; Pritchard, David I.; Halliday, Nigel; Winzer, Klaus; Howdle, Steven M.; Fernandez-Trillo, Francisco; Krasnogor, Natalio; Alexander, Cameron

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria deploy a range of chemistries to regulate their behaviour and respond to their environment. Quorum sensing is one mean by which bacteria use chemical reactions to modulate pre-infection behaviour such as surface attachment. Polymers that can interfere with bacterial adhesion or the chemical reactions used for quorum sensing are thus a potential means to control bacterial population responses. Here we report how polymeric “bacteria sequestrants”, designed to bind to bacteria through electrostatic interactions and thus inhibit bacterial adhesion to surfaces, induce the expression of quorum sensing controlled phenotypes as a consequence of cell clustering. A combination of polymer and analytical chemistry, biological assays and computational modelling has been used to characterise the feedback between bacteria clustering and quorum sensing signaling. We have also derived design principles and chemical strategies for controlling bacterial behaviour at the population level. PMID:24256871

  10. Modulating Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing-controlled communication using autoinducer-loaded nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hoang D; Spiegel, Alina C; Hurley, Amanda; Perez, Lark J; Maisel, Katharina; Ensign, Laura M; Hanes, Justin; Bassler, Bonnie L; Semmelhack, Martin F; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2015-04-08

    The rise of bacterial antibiotic resistance has created a demand for alternatives to traditional antibiotics. Attractive possibilities include pro- and anti-quorum sensing therapies that function by modulating bacterial chemical communication circuits. We report the use of Flash NanoPrecipitation to deliver the Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing signal CAI-1 ((S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one) in a water dispersible form as nanoparticles. The particles activate V. cholerae quorum-sensing responses 5 orders of magnitude higher than does the identically administered free CAI-1 and are diffusive across in vivo delivery barriers such as intestinal mucus. This work highlights the promise of combining quorum-sensing strategies with drug delivery approaches for the development of next-generation medicines.

  11. Quorum sensing inhibition in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms: new insights through network mining.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pérez, Martín; Jorge, Paula; Pérez Rodríguez, Gael; Pereira, Maria Olívia; Lourenço, Anália

    2017-02-01

    Quorum sensing plays a pivotal role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa's virulence. This paper reviews experimental results on antimicrobial strategies based on quorum sensing inhibition and discusses current targets in the regulatory network that determines P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and virulence. A bioinformatics framework combining literature mining with information from biomedical ontologies and curated databases was used to create a knowledge network of potential anti-quorum sensing agents for P. aeruginosa. A total of 110 scientific articles, corresponding to 1,004 annotations, were so far included in the network and are analysed in this work. Information on the most studied agents, QS targets and methods is detailed. This knowledge network offers a unique view of existing strategies for quorum sensing inhibition and their main regulatory targets and may be used to readily access otherwise scattered information and to help generate new testable hypotheses. This knowledge network is publicly available at http://pcquorum.org/ .

  12. Bacteria clustering by polymers induces the expression of quorum-sensing-controlled phenotypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lui, Leong T.; Xue, Xuan; Sui, Cheng; Brown, Alan; Pritchard, David I.; Halliday, Nigel; Winzer, Klaus; Howdle, Steven M.; Fernandez-Trillo, Francisco; Krasnogor, Natalio; Alexander, Cameron

    2013-12-01

    Bacteria deploy a range of chemistries to regulate their behaviour and respond to their environment. Quorum sensing is one method by which bacteria use chemical reactions to modulate pre-infection behaviour such as surface attachment. Polymers that can interfere with bacterial adhesion or the chemical reactions used for quorum sensing are therefore a potential means to control bacterial population responses. Here, we report how polymeric ‘bacteria sequestrants’, designed to bind to bacteria through electrostatic interactions and therefore inhibit bacterial adhesion to surfaces, induce the expression of quorum-sensing-controlled phenotypes as a consequence of cell clustering. A combination of polymer and analytical chemistry, biological assays and computational modelling has been used to characterize the feedback between bacteria clustering and quorum sensing signalling. We have also derived design principles and chemical strategies for controlling bacterial behaviour at the population level.

  13. Modulating Vibrio cholerae Quorum-Sensing-Controlled Communication Using Autoinducer-Loaded Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Hoang D.; Spiegel, Alina C.; Hurley, Amanda; Perez, Lark J.; Maisel, Katharina; Ensign, Laura M.; Hanes, Justin; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Semmelhack, Martin F.; Prud’homme, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    The rise of bacterial antibiotic resistance has created a demand for alternatives to traditional antibiotics. Attractive possibilities include pro- and anti-quorum sensing therapies that function by modulating bacterial chemical communication circuits. We report the use of Flash NanoPrecipitation to deliver the Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing signal CAI-1 ((S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one) in a water dispersible form as nanoparticles. The particles activate V. cholerae quorum-sensing responses five orders of magnitude higher than does the identically administered free CAI-1, and are diffusive across in vivo delivery barriers such as intestinal mucus. This work highlights the promise of combining quorum-sensing strategies with drug delivery approaches for the development of next-generation medicines. PMID:25651002

  14. 3-D Numerical Simulations of Biofilm Dynamics with Quorum Sensing in a Flow Cell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Especially, the phenomenon of quorum sensing regulating expopolysacharride production during biofilm formation has been reported widely in the...of, even if it is produced by other bacteria. However, how quorum sensing regulation affect the EPS production is not clearly resolved. Besides, in...some bacterial systems, like Vibrio cholerae, the EPS production is suppressed when the density of autoinducer reaches its threshold value [?]; whereas

  15. Dueling quorum sensing systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa control the production of the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS).

    PubMed

    McGrath, Stephen; Wade, Dana S; Pesci, Everett C

    2004-01-15

    The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa regulates the production of numerous virulence factors via the action of two separate but coordinated quorum sensing systems, las and rhl. These systems control the transcription of genes in response to population density through the intercellular signals N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C(12)-HSL) and N-(butanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (C(4)-HSL). A third P. aeruginosa signal, 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone [Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS)], also plays a significant role in the transcription of multiple P. aeruginosa virulence genes. PQS is intertwined in the P. aeruginosa quorum sensing hierarchy with its production and bioactivity requiring the las and rhl quorum sensing systems, respectively. This report presents a preliminary transcriptional analysis of pqsA, the first gene of the recently discovered PQS biosynthetic gene cluster. We show that pqsA transcription required pqsR, a transcriptional activator protein encoded within the PQS biosynthetic gene cluster. It was also found that the transcription of pqsA and subsequent production of PQS was induced by the las quorum sensing system and repressed by the rhl quorum sensing system. In addition, PQS production was dependent on the ratio of 3-oxo-C(12)-HSL to C(4)-HSL, suggesting a regulatory balance between quorum sensing systems. These data are an important early step toward understanding the regulation of PQS synthesis and the role of PQS in P. aeruginosa intercellular signaling.

  16. Plant-Derived Natural Products as Sources of Anti-Quorum Sensing Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Yin, Wai-Fong; Tan, Li Ying; Krishnan, Thiba; Chong, Yee Meng; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a system of stimuli and responses in relation to bacterial cell population density that regulates gene expression, including virulence determinants. Consequently, quorum sensing has been an attractive target for the development of novel anti-infective measures that do not rely on the use of antibiotics. Anti-quorum sensing has been a promising strategy to combat bacterial infections as it is unlikely to develop multidrug resistant pathogens since it does not impose any selection pressure. A number of anti-quorum sensing approaches have been documented and plant-based natural products have been extensively studied in this context. Plant matter is one of the major sources of chemicals in use today in various industries, ranging from the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food biotechnology to the textile industries. Just like animals and humans, plants are constantly exposed to bacterial infections, it is therefore logical to expect that plants have developed sophisticated of chemical mechanisms to combat pathogens. In this review, we have surveyed the various types of plant-based natural products that exhibit anti-quorum sensing properties and their anti-quorum sensing mechanisms. PMID:23669710

  17. Plant-derived natural products as sources of anti-quorum sensing compounds.

    PubMed

    Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Yin, Wai-Fong; Tan, Li Ying; Krishnan, Thiba; Chong, Yee Meng; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-05-13

    Quorum sensing is a system of stimuli and responses in relation to bacterial cell population density that regulates gene expression, including virulence determinants. Consequently, quorum sensing has been an attractive target for the development of novel anti-infective measures that do not rely on the use of antibiotics. Anti-quorum sensing has been a promising strategy to combat bacterial infections as it is unlikely to develop multidrug resistant pathogens since it does not impose any selection pressure. A number of anti-quorum sensing approaches have been documented and plant-based natural products have been extensively studied in this context. Plant matter is one of the major sources of chemicals in use today in various industries, ranging from the pharmaceutical, cosmetic, and food biotechnology to the textile industries. Just like animals and humans, plants are constantly exposed to bacterial infections, it is therefore logical to expect that plants have developed sophisticated of chemical mechanisms to combat pathogens. In this review, we have surveyed the various types of plant-based natural products that exhibit anti-quorum sensing properties and their anti-quorum sensing mechanisms.

  18. Flavonoids Suppress Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence through Allosteric Inhibition of Quorum-sensing Receptors.

    PubMed

    Paczkowski, Jon E; Mukherjee, Sampriti; McCready, Amelia R; Cong, Jian-Ping; Aquino, Christopher J; Kim, Hahn; Henke, Brad R; Smith, Chari D; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2017-03-10

    Quorum sensing is a process of cell-cell communication that bacteria use to regulate collective behaviors. Quorum sensing depends on the production, detection, and group-wide response to extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. In many bacterial species, quorum sensing controls virulence factor production. Thus, disrupting quorum sensing is considered a promising strategy to combat bacterial pathogenicity. Several members of a family of naturally produced plant metabolites called flavonoids inhibit Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation by an unknown mechanism. Here, we explore this family of molecules further, and we demonstrate that flavonoids specifically inhibit quorum sensing via antagonism of the autoinducer-binding receptors, LasR and RhlR. Structure-activity relationship analyses demonstrate that the presence of two hydroxyl moieties in the flavone A-ring backbone are essential for potent inhibition of LasR/RhlR. Biochemical analyses reveal that the flavonoids function non-competitively to prevent LasR/RhlR DNA binding. Administration of the flavonoids to P. aeruginosa alters transcription of quorum sensing-controlled target promoters and suppresses virulence factor production, confirming their potential as anti-infectives that do not function by traditional bacteriocidal or bacteriostatic mechanisms.

  19. [Quorum sensing involved in the regulation of secondary metabolism in streptomycetes--a review].

    PubMed

    Liu, Ming; Li, Aiying

    2011-05-01

    Quorum sensing as an extracellular signal transduction system is distributed widely among many bacteria to coordinate their behaviors or actions by mediating gene expression, and plays key roles in many physiological processes and pathogenicity. Quorum sensing was also observed among many streptomycetes, as an important regulatory mechanism of secondary metabolite biosynthesis and/or cell differentiation, and displayed certain diversity of the autoinducer structures and action mechanisms. The participation of A-factor-driven quorum sensing systems in the secondary metabolism has been extensively studied, and triggered the identification of a major signal class featured with gamma-butyrolactone core. Additionally, PI-factor, M-factor and certain small antibiotic molecules recently found in streptomycetes clearly could play important roles in the biosynthetic pathways of some antibiotics, and might represent extracellular autoinducer classes with novel structures. Meanwhile, some specific products of streptomycetes including cholesterol oxidase and glycerol have been identified to function as cell-signaling molecules which modulate the secondary metabolic activities in streptomycetes, probably by the mode of quorum sensing. Here, we reviewed research advances on quorum sensing systems involved in the accumulation of secondary metabolites in streptomycetes, mainly focusing on the clarification of their action modes and structural diversity of autoinducers. We also prospected the research trends in this field and application of autoinducers through quorum-sensing in metabolic engineering of natural products.

  20. Quorum Sensing: An Under-Explored Phenomenon in the Phylum Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Polkade, Ashish V.; Mantri, Shailesh S.; Patwekar, Umera J.; Jangid, Kamlesh

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is known to play a major role in the regulation of secondary metabolite production, especially, antibiotics, and morphogenesis in the phylum Actinobacteria. Although it is one of the largest bacterial phylum, only 25 of the 342 genera have been reported to use quorum sensing. Of these, only nine have accompanying experimental evidence; the rest are only known through bioinformatic analysis of gene/genome sequences. It is evident that this important communication mechanism is not extensively explored in Actinobacteria. In this review, we summarize the different quorum sensing systems while identifying the limitations of the existing screening strategies and addressing the improvements that have taken place in this field in recent years. The γ-butyrolactone system turned out to be almost exclusively limited to this phylum. In addition, methylenomycin furans, AI-2 and other putative AHL-like signaling molecules are also reported in Actinobacteria. The lack of existing screening systems in detecting minute quantities and of a wider range of signaling molecules was a major reason behind the limited information available on quorum sensing in this phylum. However, recent improvements in screening strategies hold a promising future and are likely to increase the discovery of new signaling molecules. Further, the quorum quenching ability in many Actinobacteria has a great potential in controlling the spread of plant and animal pathogens. A systematic and coordinated effort is required to screen and exploit the enormous potential that quorum sensing in the phylum Actinobacteria has to offer for human benefit. PMID:26904007

  1. Quorum Sensing: An Under-Explored Phenomenon in the Phylum Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Polkade, Ashish V; Mantri, Shailesh S; Patwekar, Umera J; Jangid, Kamlesh

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing is known to play a major role in the regulation of secondary metabolite production, especially, antibiotics, and morphogenesis in the phylum Actinobacteria. Although it is one of the largest bacterial phylum, only 25 of the 342 genera have been reported to use quorum sensing. Of these, only nine have accompanying experimental evidence; the rest are only known through bioinformatic analysis of gene/genome sequences. It is evident that this important communication mechanism is not extensively explored in Actinobacteria. In this review, we summarize the different quorum sensing systems while identifying the limitations of the existing screening strategies and addressing the improvements that have taken place in this field in recent years. The γ-butyrolactone system turned out to be almost exclusively limited to this phylum. In addition, methylenomycin furans, AI-2 and other putative AHL-like signaling molecules are also reported in Actinobacteria. The lack of existing screening systems in detecting minute quantities and of a wider range of signaling molecules was a major reason behind the limited information available on quorum sensing in this phylum. However, recent improvements in screening strategies hold a promising future and are likely to increase the discovery of new signaling molecules. Further, the quorum quenching ability in many Actinobacteria has a great potential in controlling the spread of plant and animal pathogens. A systematic and coordinated effort is required to screen and exploit the enormous potential that quorum sensing in the phylum Actinobacteria has to offer for human benefit.

  2. Quorum Sensing in Vibrio fischeri Cell Density-Dependent Activation of Symbiosis-Related Genes in a Marine Bacterium

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Washington, DC 20503. 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leave blank) 2. REPORT DATE August 3, 1998 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quorum Sensing in Vibrio fischeri Cell...of the proposed research is to fully elucidate the mechanism of quorum sensing and response in bacteria by continuing investigations of the most well...Regulation/Marine bacteria/Symbiosis Genes/ Transcriptional activation/ Quorum Sensing 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF REPORT u NSN 7540-01-280

  3. Mathematical Modelling of Bacterial Quorum Sensing: A Review.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Velázquez, Judith; Gölgeli, Meltem; García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2016-08-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) refers to the process of cell-to-cell bacterial communication enabled through the production and sensing of the local concentration of small molecules called autoinducers to regulate the production of gene products (e.g. enzymes or virulence factors). Through autoinducers, bacteria interact with individuals of the same species, other bacterial species, and with their host. Among QS-regulated processes mediated through autoinducers are aggregation, biofilm formation, bioluminescence, and sporulation. Autoinducers are therefore "master" regulators of bacterial lifestyles. For over 10 years, mathematical modelling of QS has sought, in parallel to experimental discoveries, to elucidate the mechanisms regulating this process. In this review, we present the progress in mathematical modelling of QS, highlighting the various theoretical approaches that have been used and discussing some of the insights that have emerged. Modelling of QS has benefited almost from the onset of the involvement of experimentalists, with many of the papers which we review, published in non-mathematical journals. This review therefore attempts to give a broad overview of the topic to the mathematical biology community, as well as the current modelling efforts and future challenges.

  4. Resilience of bacterial quorum sensing against fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emge, Philippe; Moeller, Jens; Jang, Hongchul; Rusconi, Roberto; Yawata, Yutaka; Stocker, Roman; Vogel, Viola

    2016-09-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a population-density dependent chemical process that enables bacteria to communicate based on the production, secretion and sensing of small inducer molecules. While recombinant constructs have been widely used to decipher the molecular details of QS, how those findings translate to natural QS systems has remained an open question. Here, we compare the activation of natural and synthetic Pseudomonas aeruginosa LasI/R QS systems in bacteria exposed to quiescent conditions and controlled flows. Quantification of QS-dependent GFP expression in suspended cultures and in surface-attached microcolonies revealed that QS onset in both systems was similar under quiescent conditions but markedly differed under flow. Moderate flow (Pe > 25) was sufficient to suppress LasI/R QS recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli, whereas only high flow (Pe > 102) suppressed QS in wild-type P. aeruginosa. We suggest that this difference stems from the differential production of extracellular matrix and that the matrix confers resilience against moderate flow to QS in wild-type organisms. These results suggest that the expression of a biofilm matrix extends the environmental conditions under which QS-based cell-cell communication is effective and that findings from synthetic QS circuits cannot be directly translated to natural systems.

  5. A crucial role for spatial distribution in bacterial quorum sensing

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Meng; Zheng, Huizhen; Ren, Ying; Lou, Ruyun; Wu, Fan; Yu, Weiting; Liu, Xiudong; Ma, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a process that enables bacteria to communicate using secreted signaling molecules, and then makes a population of bacteria to regulate gene expression collectively and control behavior on a community-wide scale. Theoretical studies of efficiency sensing have suggested that both mass-transfer performance in the local environment and the spatial distribution of cells are key factors affecting QS. Here, an experimental model based on hydrogel microcapsules with a three-dimensional structure was established to investigate the influence of the spatial distribution of cells on bacterial QS. Vibrio harveyi cells formed different spatial distributions in the microcapsules, i.e., they formed cell aggregates with different structures and sizes. The cell aggregates displayed stronger QS than did unaggregated cells even when equal numbers of cells were present. Large aggregates (LA) of cells, with a size of approximately 25 μm, restricted many more autoinducers (AIs) than did small aggregates (SA), with a size of approximately 10 μm, thus demonstrating that aggregate size significantly affects QS. These findings provide a powerful demonstration of the fact that the spatial distribution of cells plays a crucial role in bacterial QS. PMID:27698391

  6. Resilience of bacterial quorum sensing against fluid flow

    PubMed Central

    Emge, Philippe; Moeller, Jens; Jang, Hongchul; Rusconi, Roberto; Yawata, Yutaka; Stocker, Roman; Vogel, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a population-density dependent chemical process that enables bacteria to communicate based on the production, secretion and sensing of small inducer molecules. While recombinant constructs have been widely used to decipher the molecular details of QS, how those findings translate to natural QS systems has remained an open question. Here, we compare the activation of natural and synthetic Pseudomonas aeruginosa LasI/R QS systems in bacteria exposed to quiescent conditions and controlled flows. Quantification of QS-dependent GFP expression in suspended cultures and in surface-attached microcolonies revealed that QS onset in both systems was similar under quiescent conditions but markedly differed under flow. Moderate flow (Pe > 25) was sufficient to suppress LasI/R QS recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli, whereas only high flow (Pe > 102) suppressed QS in wild-type P. aeruginosa. We suggest that this difference stems from the differential production of extracellular matrix and that the matrix confers resilience against moderate flow to QS in wild-type organisms. These results suggest that the expression of a biofilm matrix extends the environmental conditions under which QS-based cell-cell communication is effective and that findings from synthetic QS circuits cannot be directly translated to natural systems. PMID:27650454

  7. Inhibition of quorum sensing-mediated biofilm formation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by a locally isolated Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Wahman, Shaimaa; Emara, Mohamed; Shawky, Riham M; El-Domany, Ramadan A; Aboulwafa, Mohammad Mabrouk

    2015-12-01

    Quorum sensing has been shown to play a crucial role in Pseudomonas aeruginosa pathogenesis where it activates expression of myriad genes that regulate the production of important virulence factors such as biofilm formation. Antagonism of quorum sensing is an excellent target for antimicrobial therapy and represents a novel approach to combat drug resistance. In this study, Chromobacterium violaceum biosensor strain was employed as a fast, sensitive, reliable, and easy to use tool for rapid screening of soil samples for Quorum Sensing Inhibitors (QSI) and the optimal conditions for maximal QSI production were scrutinized. Screening of 127 soil isolates showed that 43 isolates were able to breakdown the HHL signal. Out of the 43 isolates, 38 isolates were able to inhibit the violet color of the biosensor and to form easily detectable zones of color inhibition around their growth. A confirmatory bioassay was carried out after concentrating the putative positive cell-free lysates. Three different isolates that belonged to Bacillus cereus group were shown to have QSI activities and their QSI activities were optimized by changing their culture conditions. Further experiments revealed that the cell-free lysates of these isolates were able to inhibit biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa clinical isolates.

  8. Suppression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing systems by macrolides: a promising strategy or an oriental mystery?

    PubMed

    Tateda, Kazuhiro; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Kimura, Soichiro; Horikawa, Manabu; Miyairi, Shinichi; Yamaguchi, Keizo

    2007-12-01

    A breakthrough in antibiotic chemotherapy for patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pulmonary infections was brought about by findings in a patient with diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB), who had been treated with erythromycin over a period of years. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated that long-term macrolide therapy can be used not only for DPB patients but also for those with other chronic infections, including patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The pathogenesis of chronic P. aeruginosa infection is considered to arise from a bacterial cell-to-cell signaling mechanism, named "quorum-sensing", which enables the bacteria to coordinately turn on and off their virulence genes through the production of autoinducer molecules. Accumulating evidence from clinical and basic science fields suggests the potential of macrolides as Pseudomonas quorum-sensing inhibitors. In this review, we briefly summarize the data on the clinical efficacy of macrolides in DPB and CF patients. Then we discuss the mechanisms of action of macrolides from the viewpoint of sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC) macrolide effects on P. aeruginosa, particularly the potential activity of this antibiotic to suppress the bacterial quorum-sensing system.

  9. Quorum-sensing inhibition abrogates the deleterious impact of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on airway epithelial repair.

    PubMed

    Ruffin, Manon; Bilodeau, Claudia; Maillé, Émilie; LaFayette, Shantelle L; McKay, Geoffrey A; Trinh, Nguyen Thu Ngan; Beaudoin, Trevor; Desrosiers, Martin-Yvon; Rousseau, Simon; Nguyen, Dao; Brochiero, Emmanuelle

    2016-09-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections are associated with progressive epithelial damage and lung function decline. In addition to its role in tissue injury, the persistent presence of P. aeruginosa-secreted products may also affect epithelial repair ability, raising the need for new antivirulence therapies. The purpose of our study was to better understand the outcomes of P. aeruginosa exoproducts exposure on airway epithelial repair processes to identify a strategy to counteract their deleterious effect. We found that P. aeruginosa exoproducts significantly decreased wound healing, migration, and proliferation rates, and impaired the ability of directional migration of primary non-cystic fibrosis (CF) human airway epithelial cells. Impact of exoproducts was inhibited after mutations in P. aeruginosa genes that encoded for the quorum-sensing (QS) transcriptional regulator, LasR, and the elastase, LasB, whereas impact was restored by LasB induction in ΔlasR mutants. P. aeruginosa purified elastase also induced a significant decrease in non-CF epithelial repair, whereas protease inhibition with phosphoramidon prevented the effect of P. aeruginosa exoproducts. Furthermore, treatment of P. aeruginosa cultures with 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone, a QS inhibitor, abrogated the negative impact of P. aeruginosa exoproducts on airway epithelial repair. Finally, we confirmed our findings in human airway epithelial cells from patients with CF, a disease featuring P. aeruginosa chronic respiratory infection. These data demonstrate that secreted proteases under the control of the LasR QS system impair airway epithelial repair and that QS inhibitors could be of benefit to counteract the deleterious effect of P. aeruginosa in infected patients.-Ruffin, M., Bilodeau, C., Maillé, É., LaFayette, S. L., McKay, G. A., Trinh, N. T. N., Beaudoin, T., Desrosiers, M.-Y., Rousseau, S., Nguyen, D., Brochiero, E. Quorum-sensing inhibition abrogates the deleterious impact

  10. Quorum Sensing Inhibiting Activity of Streptomyces coelicoflavus Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ramadan; Shaaban, Mona I.; Abdel Bar, Fatma M.; El-Mahdy, Areej M.; Shokralla, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) systems communicate bacterial population and stimulate microbial pathogenesis through signaling molecules. Inhibition of QS signals potentially suppresses microbial infections. Antimicrobial properties of Streptomyces have been extensively studied, however, less is known about quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activities of Streptomyces. This study explored the QSI potential of Streptomyces isolated from soil. Sixty-five bacterial isolates were purified from soil samples with morphological characteristics of Streptomyces. The three isolates: S6, S12, and S17, exhibited QSI effect by screening with the reporter, Chromobacterium violaceum. Isolate S17 was identified as Streptomyces coelicoflavus by sequencing of the hypervariable regions (V1–V6) of 16S rRNA and was assigned gene bank number KJ855087. The QSI effect of the cell-free supernatant of isolate S17 was not abolished by proteinase K indicating the non-enzymatic activity of QSI components of S17. Three major compounds were isolated and identified, using spectroscopic techniques (1D, 2D NMR, and Mass spectrometry), as behenic acid (docosanoic acid), borrelidin, and 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid inhibited QS and related virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including; elastase, protease, and pyocyanin without affecting Pseudomonas viability. At the molecular level, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid suppressed the expression of QS genes (lasI, lasR, lasA, lasB, rhlI, rhlR, pqsA, and pqsR). Moreover, QSI activity of S17 was assessed under different growth conditions and ISP2 medium supplemented with glucose 0.4% w/v and adjusted at pH 7, showed the highest QSI action. In conclusion, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, one of the major metabolites of Streptomyces isolate S17, inhibited QS and virulence determinants of P. aeruginosa PAO1. The findings of the study open the scope to exploit the in vivo efficacy of this active molecule as anti-pathogenic and anti

  11. Inhibition of quorum sensing in the opportunistic pathogenic bacterium Chromobacterium violaceum by an extract from fruiting bodies of Lingzhi or Reishi medicinal mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum (W.Curt.:Fr.) P. Karst. (higher Basidiomycetes).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hu; Liu, Wei; Tian, Baozhen; Liu, Huijun; Ning, Shoujiao

    2011-01-01

    Extracts of Lingzhi or Reishi medicinal mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum, inhibited quorum sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. G. lucidum fruiting bodies were milled and extracted with ethyl acetate. The crude extract was dissolved in an appropriate concentration of methanol, sterilized by filtration through a 0.22-μm membrane filter, and added to Ch. Violaceum CV026 cultures, which were used as an indicator to monitor quorum sensing inhibition. Inhibitory activity was measured by quantifying violacein production using a microplate reader. Methanol-soluble compounds extracted from G. lucidum significantly inhibited quorum sensing-controlled behavior in Ch. Violaceum in a concentration-dependent manner. The results suggest that compounds in G. lucidum might be useful to control and handle detrimental infections caused by human, animal, and plant pathogens. Further studies are in progress in our lab to isolate the specific compounds from G. lucidum extract, evaluate them as quorum sensing inhibitors, and analyze their mechanism of action.

  12. Significant immunomodulatory effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing signal molecules: possible link in human sepsis.

    PubMed

    Boontham, Pisake; Robins, Adrian; Chandran, Palanichamy; Pritchard, David; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Chuthapisith, Suebwong; McKechnie, Alasdair; Rowlands, Brian J; Eremin, Oleg

    2008-12-01

    Pathogenic bacteria use quorum-sensing signal molecules to co-ordinate the expression of virulence genes. Animal-based studies have demonstrated the immunomodulatory effects of quorum-sensing signal molecules. In the present study, we have examined the impact of these molecules on normal human immune function in vitro and compared this with immune changes in patients with sepsis where quorum-sensing signal molecules were detected in the sera of patients. Quorum-sensing signal molecules inhibited normal dendritic cell and T-cell activation and proliferation, and down-regulated the expression of co-stimulatory molecules on dendritic cells; in MLDCRs (mixed lymphocyte dendritic cell reactions), secretion of IL (interleukin)-4 and IL-10 was enhanced, but TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha), IFN-gamma (interferon-gamma) and IL-6 was reduced. Quorum-sensing signal molecules induced apoptosis in dendritic cells and CD4(+) cells, but not CD8(+) cells. Dendritic cells from patients with sepsis were depleted and ex vivo showed defective expression of co-stimulatory molecules and dysfunctional stimulation of allogeneic T-lymphocytes. Enhanced apoptosis of dendritic cells and differential CD4(+) Th1/Th2 (T-helper 1/2) cell apoptotic rate, and modified Th1/Th2 cell cytokine profiles in MLDCRs were also demonstrated in patients with sepsis. The pattern of immunological changes in patients with sepsis mirrors the effects of quorum-sensing signal molecules on responses of immune cells from normal individuals in vitro, suggesting that quorum-sensing signal molecules should be investigated further as a cause of immune dysfunction in sepsis.

  13. Local and Global Consequences of Flow on Bacterial Quorum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minyoung Kevin; Ingremeau, Francois; Zhao, Aishan; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Stone, Howard A.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria use a chemical communication process called quorum sensing (QS) to control collective behaviours, such as pathogenesis and biofilm formation1,2. QS relies on the production, release, and group-wide detection of signal molecules called autoinducers. To date, studies of bacterial pathogenesis in well-mixed cultures have revealed virulence factors and the regulatory circuits controlling them, including the overarching role of QS3. Although flow is ubiquitous to nearly all living systems4, much less explored is how QS influences pathogenic traits in scenarios that mimic host environments, for example, under fluid flow and in complex geometries. Previous studies have showed that sufficiently strong flow represses QS5–7. Nonetheless, it is not known how QS functions under constant or intermittent flow, how it varies within biofilms or as a function of position along a confined flow, or how surface topography (grooves, crevices, pores) influence QS-mediated communication. We explore these questions using two common pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Vibrio cholerae. We identify conditions where flow represses QS and other conditions where QS is activated despite flow, including characterizing geometric and topographic features that influence the QS response. Our studies highlight that, under flow, genetically identical cells do not exhibit phenotypic uniformity with respect to QS in space and time, leading to complex patterns of pathogenesis and colonization. Understanding the ramifications of spatially and temporally non-uniform QS responses in realistic environments will be crucial for successful deployment of synthetic pro- and anti-QS strategies. PMID:27571752

  14. Mycofabricated biosilver nanoparticles interrupt Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Braj R.; Singh, Brahma N.; Singh, Akanksha; Khan, Wasi; Naqvi, Alim H.; Singh, Harikesh B.

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a chemical communication process that Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses to regulate virulence and biofilm formation. Disabling of QS is an emerging approach for combating its pathogenicity. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely applied as antimicrobial agents against human pathogenic bacteria and fungi, but not for the attenuation of bacterial QS. Here we mycofabricated AgNPs (mfAgNPs) using metabolites of soil fungus Rhizopus arrhizus BRS-07 and tested their effect on QS-regulated virulence and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa. Transcriptional studies demonstrated that mfAgNPs reduced the levels of LasIR-RhlIR. Treatment of mfAgNPs inhibited biofilm formation, production of several virulence factors (e.g. LasA protease, LasB elastrase, pyocyanin, pyoverdin, pyochelin, rhamnolipid, and alginate) and reduced AHLs production. Further genes quantification analyses revealed that mfAgNPs significantly down-regulated QS-regulated genes, specifically those encoded to the secretion of virulence factors. The results clearly indicated the anti-virulence property of mfAgNPs by inhibiting P. aeruginosa QS signaling. PMID:26347993

  15. Quorum sensing and social networking in the microbial world.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Steve; Williams, Paul

    2009-11-06

    For many years, bacterial cells were considered primarily as selfish individuals, but, in recent years, it has become evident that, far from operating in isolation, they coordinate collective behaviour in response to environmental challenges using sophisticated intercellular communication networks. Cell-to-cell communication between bacteria is mediated by small diffusible signal molecules that trigger changes in gene expression in response to fluctuations in population density. This process, generally referred to as quorum sensing (QS), controls diverse phenotypes in numerous Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Recent advances have revealed that bacteria are not limited to communication within their own species but are capable of 'listening in' and 'broadcasting to' unrelated species to intercept messages and coerce cohabitants into behavioural modifications, either for the good of the population or for the benefit of one species over another. It is also evident that QS is not limited to the bacterial kingdom. The study of two-way intercellular signalling networks between bacteria and both uni- and multicellular eukaryotes as well as between eukaryotes is just beginning to unveil a rich diversity of communication pathways.

  16. Where antibiotic resistance mutations meet quorum-sensing

    PubMed Central

    Krašovec, Rok; Belavkin, Roman V.; Aston, John A.; Channon, Alastair; Aston, Elizabeth; Rash, Bharat M.; Kadirvel, Manikandan; Forbes, Sarah; Knight, Christopher G.

    2014-01-01

    We do not need to rehearse the grim story of the global rise of antibiotic resistant microbes. But what if it were possible to control the rate with which antibiotic resistance evolves by de novo mutation? It seems that some bacteria may already do exactly that: they modify the rate at which they mutate to antibiotic resistance dependent on their biological environment. In our recent study [Krašovec, et al. Nat. Commun. (2014), 5, 3742] we find that this modification depends on the density of the bacterial population and cell-cell interactions (rather than, for instance, the level of stress). Specifically, the wild-type strains of Escherichia coli we used will, in minimal glucose media, modify their rate of mutation to rifampicin resistance according to the density of wild-type cells. Intriguingly, the higher the density, the lower the mutation rate (Figure 1). Why this novel density-dependent ‘mutation rate plasticity’ (DD-MRP) occurs is a question at several levels. Answers are currently fragmentary, but involve the quorum-sensing gene luxS and its role in the activated methyl cycle.

  17. Quorum Sensing Desynchronization Leads to Bimodality and Patterned Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Quan, David N.; Tsao, Chen-Yu; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Bentley, William E.

    2016-01-01

    Quorum Sensing (QS) drives coordinated phenotypic outcomes among bacterial populations. Its role in mediating infectious disease has led to the elucidation of numerous autoinducers and their corresponding QS signaling pathways. Among them, the Lsr (LuxS-regulated) QS system is conserved in scores of bacteria, and its signal molecule, autoinducer-2 (AI-2), is synthesized as a product of 1-carbon metabolism. Lsr signal transduction processes, therefore, may help organize population scale activities in numerous bacterial consortia. Conceptions of how Lsr QS organizes population scale behaviors remain limited, however. Using mathematical simulations, we examined how desynchronized Lsr QS activation, arising from cell-to-cell population heterogeneity, could lead to bimodal Lsr signaling and fractional activation. This has been previously observed experimentally. Governing these processes are an asynchronous AI-2 uptake, where positive intracellular feedback in Lsr expression is combined with negative feedback between cells. The resulting activation patterns differ from that of the more widely studied LuxIR system, the topology of which consists of only positive feedback. To elucidate differences, both QS systems were simulated in 2D, where cell populations grow and signal each other via traditional growth and diffusion equations. Our results demonstrate that the LuxIR QS system produces an ‘outward wave’ of autoinduction, and the Lsr QS system yields dispersed autoinduction from spatially-localized secretion and uptake profiles. In both cases, our simulations mirror previously demonstrated experimental results. As a whole, these models inform QS observations and synthetic biology designs. PMID:27071007

  18. Bacterial quorum sensing and nitrogen cycling in rhizosphere soil

    SciTech Connect

    DeAngelis, K.M.; Lindow, S.E.; Firestone, M.K.

    2008-10-01

    Plant photosynthate fuels carbon-limited microbial growth and activity, resulting in increased rhizosphere nitrogen (N)-mineralization. Most soil organic N is macromolecular (chitin, protein, nucleotides); enzymatic depolymerization is likely rate-limiting for plant N accumulation. Analyzing Avena (wild oat) planted in microcosms containing sieved field soil, we observed increased rhizosphere chitinase and protease specific activities, bacterial cell densities, and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) compared to bulk soil. Low-molecular weight DON (<3000 Da) was undetectable in bulk soil but comprised 15% of rhizosphere DON. Extracellular enzyme production in many bacteria requires quorum sensing (QS), cell-density dependent group behavior. Because proteobacteria are considered major rhizosphere colonizers, we assayed the proteobacterial QS signals acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs), which were significantly increased in the rhizosphere. To investigate the linkage between soil signaling and N cycling, we characterized 533 bacterial isolates from Avena rhizosphere: 24% had chitinase or protease activity and AHL production; disruption of QS in 7 of 8 eight isolates disrupted enzyme activity. Many {alpha}-Proteobacteria were newly found with QS-controlled extracellular enzyme activity. Enhanced specific activities of N-cycling enzymes accompanied by bacterial density-dependent behaviors in rhizosphere soil gives rise to the hypothesis that QS could be a control point in the complex process of rhizosphere N-mineralization.

  19. Quorum Sensing in Some Representative Species of Halomonadaceae

    PubMed Central

    Tahrioui, Ali; Schwab, Melanie; Quesada, Emilia; Llamas, Inmaculada

    2013-01-01

    Cell-to-cell communication, or quorum-sensing (QS), systems are employed by bacteria for promoting collective behaviour within a population. An analysis to detect QS signal molecules in 43 species of the Halomonadaceae family revealed that they produced N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs), which suggests that the QS system is widespread throughout this group of bacteria. Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) analysis of crude AHL extracts, using Agrobacterium tumefaciens NTL4 (pZLR4) as biosensor strain, resulted in different profiles, which were not related to the various habitats of the species in question. To confirm AHL production in the Halomonadaceae species, PCR and DNA sequencing approaches were used to study the distribution of the luxI-type synthase gene. Phylogenetic analysis using sequence data revealed that 29 of the species studied contained a LuxI homolog. Phylogenetic analysis showed that sequences from Halomonadaceae species grouped together and were distinct from other members of the Gammaproteobacteria and also from species belonging to the Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. PMID:25371343

  20. The fitness burden imposed by synthesising quorum sensing signals

    PubMed Central

    Ruparell, A.; Dubern, J. F.; Ortori, C. A.; Harrison, F.; Halliday, N. M.; Emtage, A.; Ashawesh, M. M.; Laughton, C. A.; Diggle, S. P.; Williams, P.; Barrett, D. A.; Hardie, K. R.

    2016-01-01

    It is now well established that bacterial populations utilize cell-to-cell signaling (quorum-sensing, QS) to control the production of public goods and other co-operative behaviours. Evolutionary theory predicts that both the cost of signal production and the response to signals should incur fitness costs for producing cells. Although costs imposed by the downstream consequences of QS have been shown, the cost of QS signal molecule (QSSM) production and its impact on fitness has not been examined. We measured the fitness cost to cells of synthesising QSSMs by quantifying metabolite levels in the presence of QSSM synthases. We found that: (i) bacteria making certain QSSMs have a growth defect that exerts an evolutionary cost, (ii) production of QSSMs negatively correlates with intracellular concentrations of QSSM precursors, (iii) the production of heterologous QSSMs negatively impacts the production of a native QSSM that shares common substrates, and (iv) supplementation with exogenously added metabolites partially rescued growth defects imposed by QSSM synthesis. These data identify the sources of the fitness costs incurred by QSSM producer cells, and indicate that there may be metabolic trade-offs associated with QS signaling that could exert selection on how signaling evolves. PMID:27616328

  1. Quorum sensing in water and wastewater treatment biofilms.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lin; Wu, Zhuoying; Yu, Xin

    2013-04-01

    Fixed film processes and activated sludge processes are two main families of wastewater treatment systems which all refer to the heterogeneous microbial communities. Meanwhile, biofilms in drinking water distribution systems (DWDS) and biofouling in membrane systems are significant problems in the water and wastewater treatment which reduce the microbial quality of drinking water and limit the development of membrane system respectively. Since biofilms and quorum sensing (QS) as two microbial social behaviors have been inextricably linked, a number of studies have focused on the role of QS signaling and QS inhibition in the processes of water and wastewater treatment, which will help us engineer these biological treatment processes successfully and develop promising approaches for control of microbial adhesion, colonization and biofilm formation. This review gives a summary of recent known QS mechanisms and their role in biofilm formation for different species. Particular attentions are dedicated to the signaling molecules involved in some microbial granulation processes and the potential applications by some of their natural and synthetic analogues in the treatment of membrane biofouling.

  2. Simulation of the Dynamics of Bacterial Quorum Sensing.

    PubMed

    Psarras, Anastasios; Karafyllidis, Ioannis

    2015-01-13

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a signaling mechanism that pathogenic bacteria use to communicate and synchronize the production of exofactors to attack their hosts. Understanding and controlling QS is an important step towards a possible solution to the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. QS is a cooperative effort of a bacterial population in which some of the bacteria do not participate. This phenomenon is usually studied using game theory and the non-participating bacteria are modeled as cheaters that exploit the production of common goods (exofactors) by other bacteria. Here, we take a different approach to study the QS dynamics of a growing bacterial population. We model the bacterial population as a growing graph and use spectral graph theory to compute the evolution of its synchronizability. We also treat each bacterium as a source of signaling molecules and use the diffusion equation to compute the signaling molecule distribution. We formulate a cost function based on Lagrangian dynamics that combines the time-like synchronization with the space-like diffusion of signaling molecules. Our results show that the presence of non-participating bacteria improves the homogeneity of the signaling molecule distribution preventing thus an early onset of exofactor production and has a positive effect on the optimization of QS signaling and on attack synchronization.

  3. Specificity and complexity in bacterial quorum-sensing systems

    PubMed Central

    Hawver, Lisa A.; Jung, Sarah A.; Ng, Wai-Leung

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a microbial cell-to-cell communication process that relies on the production and detection of chemical signals called autoinducers (AIs) to monitor cell density and species complexity in the population. QS allows bacteria to behave as a cohesive group and coordinate collective behaviors. While most QS receptors display high specificity to their AI ligands, others are quite promiscuous in signal detection. How do specific QS receptors respond to their cognate signals with high fidelity? Why do some receptors maintain low signal recognition specificity? In addition, many QS systems are composed of multiple intersecting signaling pathways: what are the benefits of preserving such a complex signaling network when a simple linear ‘one-to-one’ regulatory pathway seems sufficient to monitor cell density? Here, we will discuss different molecular mechanisms employed by various QS systems that ensure productive and specific QS responses. Moreover, the network architectures of some well-characterized QS circuits will be reviewed to understand how the wiring of different regulatory components achieves different biological goals. PMID:27354348

  4. Mycofabricated biosilver nanoparticles interrupt Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing systems.

    PubMed

    Singh, Braj R; Singh, Brahma N; Singh, Akanksha; Khan, Wasi; Naqvi, Alim H; Singh, Harikesh B

    2015-09-08

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a chemical communication process that Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses to regulate virulence and biofilm formation. Disabling of QS is an emerging approach for combating its pathogenicity. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely applied as antimicrobial agents against human pathogenic bacteria and fungi, but not for the attenuation of bacterial QS. Here we mycofabricated AgNPs (mfAgNPs) using metabolites of soil fungus Rhizopus arrhizus BRS-07 and tested their effect on QS-regulated virulence and biofilm formation of P. aeruginosa. Transcriptional studies demonstrated that mfAgNPs reduced the levels of LasIR-RhlIR. Treatment of mfAgNPs inhibited biofilm formation, production of several virulence factors (e.g. LasA protease, LasB elastrase, pyocyanin, pyoverdin, pyochelin, rhamnolipid, and alginate) and reduced AHLs production. Further genes quantification analyses revealed that mfAgNPs significantly down-regulated QS-regulated genes, specifically those encoded to the secretion of virulence factors. The results clearly indicated the anti-virulence property of mfAgNPs by inhibiting P. aeruginosa QS signaling.

  5. Early activation of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa reveals the architecture of a complex regulon

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Martin; Greenberg, E Peter

    2007-01-01

    Background Quorum-sensing regulation of gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa is complex. Two interconnected acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) signal-receptor pairs, 3-oxo-dodecanoyl-HSL-LasR and butanoyl-HSL-RhlR, regulate more than 300 genes. The induction of most of the genes is delayed during growth of P. aeruginosa in complex medium, cannot be advanced by addition of exogenous signal, and requires additional regulatory components. Many of these late genes can be induced by addition of signals early by using specific media conditions. While several factors super-regulate the quorum receptors, others may co-regulate target promoters or may affect expression posttranscriptionally. Results To better understand the contributions of super-regulation and co-regulation to quorum-sensing gene expression, and to better understand the general structure of the quorum sensing network, we ectopically expressed the two receptors (in the presence of their cognate signals) and another component that affects quorum sensing, the stationary phase sigma factor RpoS, early in growth. We determined the effect on target gene expression by microarray and real-time PCR analysis. Our results show that many target genes (e.g. lasB and hcnABC) are directly responsive to receptor protein levels. Most genes (e.g. lasA, lecA, and phnAB), however, are not significantly affected, although at least some of these genes are directly regulated by quorum sensing. The majority of promoters advanced by RhlR appeared to be regulated directly, which allowed us to build a RhlR consensus sequence. Conclusion The direct responsiveness of many quorum sensing target genes to receptor protein levels early in growth confirms the role of super-regulation in quorum sensing gene expression. The observation that the induction of most target genes is not affected by signal or receptor protein levels indicates that either target promoters are co-regulated by other transcription factors, or that expression is

  6. Quorum Sensing and the Use of Quorum Quenchers as Natural Biocides to Inhibit Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Scarascia, Giantommaso; Wang, Tiannyu; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are one of the main protagonist groups of biocorrosion in the seawater environment. Given their principal role in biocorrosion, it remains a crucial task to develop strategies to reduce the abundance of SRBs. Conventional approaches include the use of biocides and antibiotics, which can impose health, safety, and environmental concerns. This review examines an alternative approach to this problem. This is achieved by reviewing the role of quorum sensing (QS) in SRB populations and its impact on the biofilm formation process. Genome databases of SRBs are mined to look for putative QS systems and homologous protein sequences representative of autoinducer receptors or synthases. Subsequently, this review puts forward the potential use of quorum quenchers as natural biocides against SRBs and outlines the potential strategies for the implementation of this approach. PMID:27983678

  7. Influence of glucose concentrations on biofilm formation, motility, exoprotease production, and quorum sensing in Aeromonas hydrophila.

    PubMed

    Jahid, Iqbal Kabir; Lee, Na-Young; Kim, Anna; Ha, Sang-Do

    2013-02-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila recently has received increased attention because it is opportunistic and a primary human pathogen. A. hydrophila biofilm formation and its control are a major concern for food safety because biofilms are related to virulence. Therefore, we investigated biofilm formation, motility inhibition, quorum sensing, and exoprotease production of this opportunistic pathogen in response to various glucose concentrations from 0.05 to 2.5% (wt/vol). More than 0.05% glucose significantly impaired (P < 0.05) quorum sensing, biofilm formation, protease production, and swarming and swimming motility, whereas bacteria treated with 0.05% glucose had activity similar to that of the control (0% glucose). A stage shift biofilm assay revealed that the addition of glucose (2.5%) inhibited initial biofilm formation but not later stages. However, addition of quorum sensing molecules N-3-butanoyl-DL-homoserine lactone and N-3-hexanoyl homoserine lactone partially restored protease production, indicating that quorum sensing is controlled by glucose concentrations. Thus, glucose present in food or added as a preservative could regulate acyl-homoserine lactone quorum sensing molecules, which mediate biofilm formation and virulence in A. hydrophila.

  8. Quorum-Sensing Kinetics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A Symphony of ARO Genes and Aromatic Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Avbelj, Martina; Zupan, Jure; Kranjc, Luka; Raspor, Peter

    2015-09-30

    The kinetics of quorum sensing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were studied using a mini-fermentation platform. The quorum-sensing molecules were monitored using our previous HPLC approach that is here supported by quantitative real-time PCR analysis of the quorum-sensing genes. We thus initially confirm correlations between peak production rates of the monitored quorum-sensing molecules 2-phenylethanol, tryptophol, and tyrosol and peak expression of the genes responsible for their synthesis: ARO8, ARO9, and ARO10. This confirms the accuracy of our previously implemented kinetic model, thus favoring its use in further studies in this field. We also show that the quorum-sensing kinetics are precisely dependent on the population growth phase and that tyrosol production is also regulated by cell concentration, which has not been reported previously. Additionally, we show that during wine fermentation, ethanol stress reduces the production of 2-phenylethanol, tryptophol, and tyrosol, which opens new challenges in the control of wine fermentation.

  9. A Model of Rapid Radicalization Behavior Using Agent-Based Modeling and Quorum Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwartz, Noah; Drucker, Nick; Campbell, Kenyth

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of radicalization, especially rapid radicalization, has become increasingly important to US policy in the past several years. Traditionally, radicalization is considered a slow process, but recent social and political events demonstrate that the process can occur quickly. Examining this rapid process, in real time, is impossible. However, recreating an event using modeling and simulation (M&S) allows researchers to study some of the complex dynamics associated with rapid radicalization. We propose to adapt the biological mechanism of quorum sensing as a tool to explore, or possibly explain, rapid radicalization. Due to the complex nature of quorum sensing, M&S allows us to examine events that we could not otherwise examine in real time. For this study, we employ Agent Based Modeling (ABM), an M&S paradigm suited to modeling group behavior. The result of this study was the successful creation of rapid radicalization using quorum sensing. The Battle of Mogadishu was the inspiration for this model and provided the testing conditions used to explore quorum sensing and the ideas behind rapid radicalization. The final product has wider applicability however, using quorum sensing as a possible tool for examining other catalytic rapid radicalization events.

  10. The Role of the QseC Sensor Kinase in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium Quorum Sensing and Swine Colonization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    At least two quorum sensing molecules, autoinducer-3 (AI-3) and norepinephrine (NE), are present in the gastrointestinal tract and activate the E. coli QseBC quorum sensing system. AI-3 is produced by enteric bacteria, whereas NE is produced by the animal host, often during stress. Both 10% pre-co...

  11. Identification of quorum sensing signal molecules and oligolignols associated with watermark disease in willow (Salix sp.).

    PubMed

    Huvenne, Hanneke; Goeminne, Geert; Maes, Martine; Messens, Eric

    2008-09-01

    The bacterium Brenneria salicis is the causal agent of watermark disease in willow. This work shows the importance of in situ studies and high-resolution separation of biological samples with ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography combined with ion trap mass spectrometry to unambiguously identify molecular compounds associated with this disease. Approximately 40 oligolignols accumulated in wood sap of watermark diseased willow, and are indicative for degradation of the xylem cell wall, of which 15 were structurally assigned based on an earlier study. Many bacteria are known to produce and release quorum sensing signal molecules that switch on the expression of specific, sometimes pathogenic functions. Two quorum sensing signal molecules, N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone and N-(hexanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone, were present in 4/1 ratios in diseased wood and in high-density in vitro cultures of B. salicis at 0.13-1.2 microM concentrations, and absent in healthy wood and in low-density in vitro cultures of B. salicis. Although it is not a proof, it can be an indication for involvement of quorum sensing in B. salicis pathogenesis. Cyclic dipeptides were present at high concentrations in high-density in vitro cultures of B. salicis, but not in situ, and were found not to be involved in quorum sensing signaling, therefore, the attribution of quorum signal properties to cyclic dipeptides isolated from in vitro cultures of pathogenic bacteria should be reconsidered.

  12. The Effect of Magnetic Fields on the Quorum Sensing-Regulated Luminescence of Vibrio fischeri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barron, Addie; Hagen, Steve; Son, Minjun

    2015-03-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a mechanism by which bacteria communicate through the secretion and detection of extracellular signaling molecules known as autoinducers. This research focuses on the quorum sensing regulated bioluminescence of Vibrio fischeri, a marine bacterium that lives in symbiosis with certain fish and squid species. Previous studies of V. harveyi, a close relative of V. fisheri, indicate that a strong magnetic field has a positive effect on V.harveyi bioluminescence. However the effect of magnetic fields on quorum sensing-regulated luminescence is in general poorly understood. We grew V. fischeri in solid and liquid growth media, subject to strong static magnetic fields, and imaged the bioluminescence over a period of forty-eight hours. Luminescence patterns were analyzed in both the spatial and time dimensions. We find no indication that a magnetic field influences Vibrio fischeri luminescence either positively or negatively. This research was funded by the Grant Number NSF DMR-1156737.

  13. Facultative cheating supports the coexistence of diverse quorum-sensing alleles.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Shaul; Omer-Bendori, Shira; Even-Tov, Eran; Lipsman, Valeria; Bareia, Tasneem; Ben-Zion, Ishay; Eldar, Avigdor

    2016-02-23

    Bacterial quorum sensing enables bacteria to cooperate in a density-dependent manner via the group-wide secretion and detection of specific autoinducer molecules. Many bacterial species show high intraspecific diversity of autoinducer-receptor alleles, called pherotypes. The autoinducer produced by one pherotype activates its coencoded receptor, but not the receptor of another pherotype. It is unclear what selection forces drive the maintenance of pherotype diversity. Here, we use the ComQXPA system of Bacillus subtilis as a model system, to show that pherotype diversity can be maintained by facultative cheating--a minority pherotype exploits the majority, but resumes cooperation when its frequency increases. We find that the maintenance of multiple pherotypes by facultative cheating can persist under kin-selection conditions that select against "obligate cheaters" quorum-sensing response null mutants. Our results therefore support a role for facultative cheating and kin selection in the evolution of quorum-sensing diversity.

  14. Ultrasensitivity and noise amplification in a model of V. harveyi quorum sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.

    2016-06-01

    We analyze ultrasensitivity in a model of Vibrio harveyi quorum sensing. We consider a feedforward model consisting of two biochemical networks per cell. The first represents the interchange of a signaling molecule (autoinducer) between the cell cytoplasm and an extracellular domain and the binding of intracellular autoinducer to cognate receptors. The unbound and bound receptors within each cell act as kinases and phosphotases, respectively, which then drive a second biochemical network consisting of a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle. We ignore subsequent signaling pathways associated with gene regulation and the possible modification in the production rate of an autoinducer (positive feedback). We show how the resulting quorum sensing system exhibits ultrasensitivity with respect to changes in cell density. We also demonstrate how quorum sensing can protect against the noise amplification of fast environmental fluctuations in comparison to a single isolated cell.

  15. Facultative cheating supports the coexistence of diverse quorum-sensing alleles

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, Shaul; Omer-Bendori, Shira; Even-Tov, Eran; Lipsman, Valeria; Bareia, Tasneem; Ben-Zion, Ishay; Eldar, Avigdor

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing enables bacteria to cooperate in a density-dependent manner via the group-wide secretion and detection of specific autoinducer molecules. Many bacterial species show high intraspecific diversity of autoinducer–receptor alleles, called pherotypes. The autoinducer produced by one pherotype activates its coencoded receptor, but not the receptor of another pherotype. It is unclear what selection forces drive the maintenance of pherotype diversity. Here, we use the ComQXPA system of Bacillus subtilis as a model system, to show that pherotype diversity can be maintained by facultative cheating—a minority pherotype exploits the majority, but resumes cooperation when its frequency increases. We find that the maintenance of multiple pherotypes by facultative cheating can persist under kin-selection conditions that select against “obligate cheaters” quorum-sensing response null mutants. Our results therefore support a role for facultative cheating and kin selection in the evolution of quorum-sensing diversity. PMID:26787913

  16. Quorum-Sensing Signal-Response Systems in Gram-Negative Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Papenfort, Kai; Bassler, Bonnie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract / Preface Bacteria use quorum sensing to orchestrate gene expression programmes that underlie collective behaviours. Quorum sensing relies on the production, release, detection and group-level response to extracellular signalling molecules, which are called autoinducers. Recent work has discovered new autoinducers in Gram-negative bacteria, shown how these molecules are recognized by cognate receptors, revealed new regulatory components that are embedded in canonical signalling circuits and identified novel regulatory network designs. In this Review we examine how, together, these features of quorum sensing signal–response systems combine to control collective behaviours in Gram-negative bacteria and we discuss the implications for host–microbial associations and antibacterial therapy. PMID:27510864

  17. Flexible dynamics of two quorum-sensing coupled repressilators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellen, Edward H.; Volkov, Evgeny

    2017-02-01

    Genetic oscillators play important roles in cell life regulation. The regulatory efficiency usually depends strongly on the emergence of stable collective dynamic modes, which requires designing the interactions between genetic networks. We investigate the dynamics of two identical synthetic genetic repressilators coupled by an additional plasmid which implements quorum sensing (QS) in each network thereby supporting global coupling. In a basic genetic ring oscillator network in which three genes inhibit each other in unidirectional manner, QS stimulates the transcriptional activity of chosen genes providing for competition between inhibitory and stimulatory activities localized in those genes. The "promoter strength", the Hill cooperativity coefficient of transcription repression, and the coupling strength, i.e., parameters controlling the basic rates of genetic reactions, were chosen for extensive bifurcation analysis. The results are presented as a map of dynamic regimes. We found that the remarkable multistability of the antiphase limit cycle and stable homogeneous and inhomogeneous steady states exists over broad ranges of control parameters. We studied the antiphase limit cycle stability and the evolution of irregular oscillatory regimes in the parameter areas where the antiphase cycle loses stability. In these regions we observed developing complex oscillations, collective chaos, and multistability between regular limit cycles and complex oscillations over uncommonly large intervals of coupling strength. QS coupling stimulates the appearance of intrachaotic periodic windows with spatially symmetric and asymmetric partial limit cycles which, in turn, change the type of chaos from a simple antiphase character into chaos composed of pieces of the trajectories having alternating polarity. The very rich dynamics discovered in the system of two identical simple ring oscillators may serve as a possible background for biological phenotypic diversification, as well

  18. Bacterial quorum sensing and interference by naturally occurring biomimics.

    PubMed

    McDougald, Diane; Rice, Scott A; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria are able to coordinate gene expression as a community through the secretion and detection of signalling molecules so that the members of the community can simultaneously express specific behaviours. This mechanism of regulation of behaviour appears to be a key trait for adaptation to specific environments and has been shown to regulate a variety of important phenotypes, from virulence factor production to biofilm formation to symbiosis related behaviours such as bioluminescence. The ability to communicate and communally regulate gene expression is hypothesised to have evolved as a way for organisms to delay expression of phenotypes until numerical supremacy is reached. For example, in the case of infection, if an invading microorganism were to express virulence factors too early, the host may be able to mount a successful defence and repel the invaders. There is growing evidence that bacterial quorum sensing (QS) systems are involved in cross-kingdom signalling with eukaryotic organisms and that eukaryotes are capable of actively responding to bacteria in their environment by detecting and acting upon the presence of these signalling molecules. Likewise, eukaryotes produce compounds that can interfere with QS systems in bacteria by acting as agonists or antagonists. An exciting new field of study, biomimetics, takes inspiration from nature's models and attempts to design solutions to human problems, and biomimics of QS systems may be one such solution. This article presents the acylated homoserine lactone and autoinducer 2 QS systems in bacteria, the means of intercepting or interfering with bacterial QS systems evolved by eukaryotes, and the rational design of synthetic antagonists.

  19. Anti-quorum sensing potential of Adenanthera pavonina

    PubMed Central

    Vasavi, Halkare Suryanarayana; Arun, Ananthapadmanabha Bhagwath; Rekha, Punchappady-Devasya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Quorum sensing (QS) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a key role in virulence factor production, biofilm formation and antimicrobial resistance. Because of emerging antimicrobial resistance in P. aeruginosa, there is a need to find an alternate nonantibiotic agent for the control of infections caused by this organism. Objective: To evaluate anti-QS activity of Adenanthera pavonina L., a medicinal plant used in traditional medicine. Materials and Methods: Preliminary screening for anti-QS activity of ethanol extract of A. pavonina was carried out using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 biosensor strain and inhibition of QS-regulated violacein production was quantified using C. violaceum ATCC12472. Bioassay guided fractionation of ethanol extract resulted in ethyl acetate fraction (AEF) with strong anti-QS activity and AEF was evaluated for inhibition of QS-regulated pyocyanin production, proteolytic, elastolytic activity, swarming motility and biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa PAO1. Results: AEF, at 0.5 mg/ml, inhibited pyocyanin production completely and at 1 mg/ml of AEF, complete inhibition of proteolytic and elastolytic activities were observed. However, viability of P. aeruginosa PAO1 was not affected at the tested concentrations of AEF as observed by cell count. Swarming motility was inhibited at the concentration of 0.1 mg/ml of AEF. Thin layer chromatography and biosensor overlay of AEF showed violacein inhibition zone at Rf value 0.63. Conclusion: From the results of this study, it can be concluded that A. pavonina extracts can be used as effective anti-QS agents. PMID:25598643

  20. Quorum sensing inhibitory potential and molecular docking studies of sesquiterpene lactones from Vernonia blumeoides.

    PubMed

    Aliyu, Abubakar Babando; Koorbanally, Neil Anthony; Moodley, Brenda; Singh, Parvesh; Chenia, Hafizah Yousuf

    2016-06-01

    The increasing incidence of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial pathogens has focused research on the suppression of bacterial virulence via quorum sensing inhibition strategies, rather than the conventional antimicrobial approach. The anti-virulence potential of eudesmanolide sesquiterpene lactones previously isolated from Vernonia blumeoides was assessed by inhibition of quorum sensing and in silico molecular docking. Inhibition of quorum sensing-controlled violacein production in Chromobacterium violaceum was quantified using violacein inhibition assays. Qualitative modulation of quorum sensing activity and signal synthesis was investigated using agar diffusion double ring assays and C. violaceum and Agrobacterium tumefaciens biosensor systems. Inhibition of violacein production was concentration-dependent, with ⩾90% inhibition being obtained with ⩾2.4 mg ml(-1) of crude extracts. Violacein inhibition was significant for the ethyl acetate extract with decreasing inhibition being observed with dichloromethane, hexane and methanol extracts. Violacein inhibition ⩾80% was obtained with 0.071 mg ml(-1) of blumeoidolide B in comparison with ⩾3.6 mg ml(-1) of blumeoidolide A. Agar diffusion double ring assays indicated that only the activity of the LuxI synthase homologue, CviI, was modulated by blumeoidolides A and B, and V. blumeoides crude extracts, suggesting that quorum sensing signal synthesis was down-regulated or competitively inhibited. Finally, molecular docking was conducted to explore the binding conformations of sesquiterpene lactones into the binding sites of quorum sensing regulator proteins, CviR and CviR'. The computed binding energy data suggested that the blumeoidolides have a tendency to inhibit both CviR and CviR' with varying binding affinities. Vernonia eudesmanolide sesquiterpene lactones have the potential to be novel therapeutic agents, which might be important in reducing virulence and pathogenicity of drug-resistant bacteria

  1. N-Acyl Homoserine Lactone-Mediated Quorum Sensing with Special Reference to Use of Quorum Quenching Bacteria in Membrane Biofouling Control

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Diby

    2014-01-01

    Membrane biofouling remains a severe problem to be addressed in wastewater treatment systems affecting reactor performance and economy. The finding that many wastewater bacteria rely on N-acyl homoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing to synchronize their activities essential for biofilm formations; the quenching bacterial quorum sensing suggests a promising approach for control of membrane biofouling. A variety of quorum quenching compounds of both synthetic and natural origin have been identified and found effective in inhibition of membrane biofouling with much less environmental impact than traditional antimicrobials. Work over the past few years has demonstrated that enzymatic quorum quenching mechanisms are widely conserved in several prokaryotic organisms and can be utilized as a potent tool for inhibition of membrane biofouling. Such naturally occurring bacterial quorum quenching mechanisms also play important roles in microbe-microbe interactions and have been used to develop sustainable nonantibiotic antifouling strategies. Advances in membrane fabrication and bacteria entrapment techniques have allowed the implication of such quorum quenching bacteria for better design of membrane bioreactor with improved antibiofouling efficacies. In view of this, the present paper is designed to review and discuss the recent developments in control of membrane biofouling with special emphasis on quorum quenching bacteria that are applied in membrane bioreactors. PMID:25147787

  2. Assessment of Anti-Quorum Sensing Activity for Some Ornamental and Medicinal Plants Native to Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Ahmed A.; Shaaban, Mona I.; Hashish, Nadia E.; Amer, Mohamed A.; Lahloub, Mohamed-Farid

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of some plant extracts on the bacterial communication system, expressed as quorum sensing (QS) activity. Quorum sensing has a directly proportional effect on the amount of certain compounds, such as pigments, produced by the bacteria. Alcohol extracts of 23 ornamental and medicinal plants were tested for anti-QS activity by the Chromobacterium violaceum assay using the agar cup diffusion method. The screening revealed the anti-QS activity of six plants; namely the leaves of Adhatoda vasica Nees, Bauhinia purpurea L., Lantana camara L., Myoporum laetum G. Forst.; the fruits of Piper longum L.; and the aerial parts of Taraxacum officinale F.H. Wigg. PMID:23641343

  3. A model for signal transduction during quorum sensing in Vibrio harveyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banik, Suman K.; Fenley, Andrew T.; Kulkarni, Rahul V.

    2009-12-01

    We present a framework for analyzing luminescence regulation during quorum sensing in the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi. Using a simplified model for signal transduction in the quorum sensing pathway, we identify key dimensionless parameters that control the system's response. These parameters are estimated using experimental data on luminescence phenotypes for different mutant strains. The corresponding model predictions are consistent with results from other experiments which did not serve as input for determining model parameters. Furthermore, the proposed framework leads to novel testable predictions for luminescence phenotypes and for responses of the network to different perturbations.

  4. Dynamical quorum sensing and clustering dynamics in a population of spatially distributed active rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Maeyama, Satomi

    2013-02-01

    A model of clustering dynamics is proposed for a population of spatially distributed active rotators. A transition from excitable to oscillatory dynamics is induced by the increase of the local density of active rotators. It is interpreted as dynamical quorum sensing. In the oscillation regime, phase waves propagate without decay, which generates an effectively long-range interaction in the clustering dynamics. The clustering process becomes facilitated and only one dominant cluster appears rapidly as a result of the dynamical quorum sensing. An exact localized solution is found to a simplified model equation, and the competitive dynamics between two localized states is studied numerically.

  5. Quorum Sensing Influences Vibrio harveyi Growth Rates in a Manner Not Fully Accounted For by the Marker Effect of Bioluminescence

    PubMed Central

    Nackerdien, Zeena E.; Keynan, Alexander; Bassler, Bonnie L.; Lederberg, Joshua; Thaler, David S.

    2008-01-01

    Background The light-emitting Vibrios provide excellent material for studying the interaction of cellular communication with growth rate because bioluminescence is a convenient marker for quorum sensing. However, the use of bioluminescence as a marker is complicated because bioluminescence itself may affect growth rate, e.g. by diverting energy. Methodology/Principal Findings The marker effect was explored via growth rate studies in isogenic Vibrio harveyi (Vh) strains altered in quorum sensing on the one hand, and bioluminescence on the other. By hypothesis, growth rate is energy limited: mutants deficient in quorum sensing grow faster because wild type quorum sensing unleashes bioluminescence and bioluminescence diverts energy. Findings reported here confirm a role for bioluminescence in limiting Vh growth rate, at least under the conditions tested. However, the results argue that the bioluminescence is insufficient to explain the relationship of growth rate and quorum sensing in Vh. A Vh mutant null for all genes encoding the bioluminescence pathway grew faster than wild type but not as fast as null mutants in quorum sensing. Vh quorum sensing mutants showed altered growth rates that do not always rank with their relative increase or decrease in bioluminescence. In addition, the cell-free culture fluids of a rapidly growing Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) strain increased the growth rate of wild type Vh without significantly altering Vh's bioluminescence. The same cell-free culture fluid increased the bioluminescence of Vh quorum mutants. Conclusions/Significance The effect of quorum sensing on Vh growth rate can be either positive or negative and includes both bioluminescence-dependent and independent components. Bioluminescence tends to slow growth rate but not enough to account for the effects of quorum sensing on growth rate. PMID:18301749

  6. Whole-Cell Biosensors as Tools for the Detection of Quorum-Sensing Molecules: Uses in Diagnostics and the Investigation of the Quorum-Sensing Mechanism.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Gregory; Knecht, Leslie D; Salgado, Nelson; Strobel, Sebastian; Pasini, Patrizia; Daunert, Sylvia

    2015-10-17

    Genetically engineered bacterial whole-cell biosensors are powerful tools that take advantage of bacterial proteins and pathways to allow for detection of a specific analyte. These biosensors have been employed for a broad range of applications, including the detection of bacterial quorum-sensing molecules (QSMs). Bacterial QSMs are the small molecules bacteria use for population density-dependent communication, a process referred to as quorum sensing (QS). Various research groups have investigated the presence of QSMs, including N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) and autoinducer-2 (AI-2), in physiological samples in attempts to enhance our knowledge of the role of bacteria and QS in disease states. Continued studies in these fields may allow for improved patient care and therapeutics based upon QSMs. Furthermore, bacterial whole-cell biosensors have elucidated the roles of some antibiotics as QS agonists and antagonists. Graphical Abstract.

  7. Discovery of new diketopiperazines inhibiting Burkholderia cenocepacia quorum sensing in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Scoffone, Viola C.; Chiarelli, Laurent R.; Makarov, Vadim; Brackman, Gilles; Israyilova, Aygun; Azzalin, Alberto; Forneris, Federico; Riabova, Olga; Savina, Svetlana; Coenye, Tom; Riccardi, Giovanna; Buroni, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia, an opportunistic respiratory pathogen particularly relevant for cystic fibrosis patients, is difficult to eradicate due to its high level of resistance to most clinically relevant antimicrobials. Consequently, the discovery of new antimicrobials as well as molecules capable of inhibiting its virulence is mandatory. In this regard quorum sensing (QS) represents a good target for anti-virulence therapies, as it has been linked to biofilm formation and is important for the production of several virulence factors, including proteases and siderophores. Here, we report the discovery of new diketopiperazine inhibitors of the B. cenocepacia acyl homoserine lactone synthase CepI, and report their anti-virulence properties. Out of ten different compounds assayed against recombinant CepI, four were effective inhibitors, with IC50 values in the micromolar range. The best compounds interfered with protease and siderophore production, as well as with biofilm formation, and showed good in vivo activity in a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. These molecules were also tested in human cells and showed very low toxicity. Therefore, they could be considered for in vivo combined treatments with established or novel antimicrobials, to improve the current therapeutic strategies against B. cenocepacia. PMID:27580679

  8. Synthesis, quorum sensing inhibition and docking studies of 1,5-dihydropyrrol-2-ones.

    PubMed

    Goh, Wai-Kean; Gardner, Christopher R; Chandra Sekhar, Kondapalli V G; Biswas, Nripendra N; Nizalapur, Shashidhar; Rice, Scott A; Willcox, Mark; Black, David StC; Kumar, Naresh

    2015-12-01

    Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli use N-acylated l-homoserine lactones (AHLs) as autoinducers (AIs) for quorum sensing (QS), a chief regulatory and cell-to-cell communication system. QS is responsible for social adaptation, virulence factor production, biofilm production and antibiotic resistance in bacteria. Fimbrolides, a class of halogenated furanones isolated from the red marine alga Delisea pulchra, have been shown to exhibit promising QS inhibitory activity against various Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains. In this work, various lactam analogues of fimbrolides viz., 1,5-dihydropyrrol-2-ones, were designed and synthesized via an efficient lactamization protocol. All the synthesized analogues were tested for QS inhibition against the E. coli AHL-monitor strain JB357 gfp (ASV). Compound 17a emerged as the most potent compound, followed by 9c, with AIC40 values (the ratio of synthetic inhibitor to natural AHL signaling molecule that is required to lower GFP expression to 40%) of 1.95 and 19.00, respectively. Finally, the potential binding interactions between the synthesized molecules and the LasR QS receptor were studied by molecular docking. Our results indicate that 1,5-dihydropyrrol-2-ones have the ability to serve as potential leads for the further development of novel QS inhibitors as antimicrobial therapeutics.

  9. Quercetin Influences Quorum Sensing in Food Borne Bacteria: In-Vitro and In-Silico Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Gopu, Venkadesaperumal; Meena, Chetan Kumar; Shetty, Prathapkumar Halady

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) plays a vital role in regulating the virulence factor of many food borne pathogens, which causes severe public health risk. Therefore, interrupting the QS signaling pathway may be an attractive strategy to combat microbial infections. In the current study QS inhibitory activity of quercetin and its anti-biofilm property was assessed against food-borne pathogens using a bio-sensor strain. In addition in-silico techniques like molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies were applied to screen the quercetin’s potentiality as QS inhibitor. Quercetin (80μg/ml) showed the significant reduction in QS-dependent phenotypes like violacein production, biofilm formation, exopolysaccharide (EPS) production, motility and alginate production in a concentration-dependent manner. Synergistic activity of conventional antibiotics with quercetin enhanced the susceptibility of all tested pathogens. Furthermore, Molecular docking analysis revealed that quercetin binds more rigidly with LasR receptor protein than the signaling compound with docking score of -9.17Kcal/mol. Molecular dynamics simulation predicted that QS inhibitory activity of quercetin occurs through the conformational changes between the receptor and quercetin complex. Above findings suggest that quercetin can act as a competitive inhibitor for signaling compound towards LasR receptor pathway and can serve as a novel QS-based antibacterial/anti-biofilm drug to manage food-borne pathogens. PMID:26248208

  10. Chemical probes for competitive profiling of the quorum sensing signal synthase PqsD of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Prothiwa, Michaela; Szamosvári, Dávid; Glasmacher, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    The human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa uses the pqs quorum sensing system to coordinate the production of its broad spectrum of virulence factors to facilitate colonization and infection of its host. Hereby, the enzyme PqsD is a virulence related quorum sensing signal synthase that catalyzes the central step in the biosynthesis of the Pseudomonas quinolone signals HHQ and PQS. We developed a library of cysteine reactive chemical probes with an alkyne handle for fluorescence tagging and report the selective and highly sensitive in vitro labelling of the active site cysteine of this important enzyme. Interestingly, only one type of probe, with a reactive α-chloroacetamide was capable of covalently reacting with the active site. We demonstrated the potential of our probes in a competitive labelling platform where we screened a library of synthetic HHQ and PQS analogues with heteroatom replacements and found several inhibitors of probe binding that may represent promising scaffolds for the development of customized PqsD inhibitors as well as a chemical toolbox to investigate the activity and active site specificity of the enzyme. PMID:28144351

  11. Rosmarinic acid is a homoserine lactone mimic produced by plants that activates a bacterial quorum-sensing regulator.

    PubMed

    Corral-Lugo, Andrés; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Ortega, Alvaro; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel; Krell, Tino

    2016-01-05

    Quorum sensing is a bacterial communication mechanism that controls genes, enabling bacteria to live as communities, such as biofilms. Homoserine lactone (HSL) molecules function as quorum-sensing signals for Gram-negative bacteria. Plants also produce previously unidentified compounds that affect quorum sensing. We identified rosmarinic acid as a plant-derived compound that functioned as an HSL mimic. In vitro assays showed that rosmarinic acid bound to the quorum-sensing regulator RhlR of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 and competed with the bacterial ligand N-butanoyl-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL). Furthermore, rosmarinic acid stimulated a greater increase in RhlR-mediated transcription in vitro than that of C4-HSL. In P. aeruginosa, rosmarinic acid induced quorum sensing-dependent gene expression and increased biofilm formation and the production of the virulence factors pyocyanin and elastase. Because P. aeruginosa PAO1 infection induces rosmarinic acid secretion from plant roots, our results indicate that rosmarinic acid secretion is a plant defense mechanism to stimulate a premature quorum-sensing response. P. aeruginosa is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects plants and animals; therefore, identification of rosmarinic acid as an inducer of premature quorum-sensing responses may be useful in agriculture and inform human therapeutic strategies.

  12. Novel Glycolipids Synthesized Using Plant Essential Oils and Their Application in Quorum Sensing Inhibition and as Antibiofilm Agents

    PubMed Central

    Prabhune, Asmita

    2014-01-01

    Essential oils (EOs) form an important part of traditional medicine so their anti-microbial and, in the recent past, antiquorum sensing activity has been well studied. However it is likely that due to their hydrophobic nature and reduced solubility in aqueous environments full potential of their activity cannot be realized. hence it is only rational to formulate a process to make these molecules more polar in nature. The present paper reports synthesis of sophorolipids using 12 different essential oils as substrates, thus providing surfactant-like properties to these EOs. The synthesis protocol makes the use of Candida bombicola ATCC 22214 as producer organism. The production process required 7 days of incubation at 28°C and 180 rpm. Preliminary characterization of the synthesized essential oil sophorolipids (EOSLs) was performed using thin layer chromatography (TLC) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Additionally, essential oils that were incapable of mediating quorum sensing inhibition (QSI) on their own became potent quorum sensing inhibitors upon conversion into their corresponding EOSLs. Antibiofilm potential of these EOSLs was also demonstrated using V. cholerae as test organism. Use of essential oils as substrates for glycolipid synthesis has not been attempted previously, and hence this is the first report. PMID:24558341

  13. Going beyond the Control of Quorum-Sensing to Combat Biofilm Infections

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Wolf-Rainer

    2016-01-01

    Most bacteria attach to surfaces where they form a biofilm, cells embedded in a complex matrix of polymers. Cells in biofilms are much better protected against noxious agents than free-living cells. As a consequence it is very difficult to control pathogens with antibiotics in biofilm infections and novel targets are urgently needed. One approach aims at the communication between cells to form and to maintain a biofilm, a process called quorum-sensing. Water soluble small-sized molecules mediate this process and a number of antagonists of these compounds have been found. In this review natural compounds and synthetic drugs which do not interfere with the classical quorum-sensing compounds are discussed. For some of these compounds the targets are still not known, but others interfere with the formation of exopolysaccharides, virulence factors, or cell wall synthesis or they start an internal program of biofilm dispersal. Some of their targets are more conserved among pathogens than the receptors for quorum sensing autoinducers mediating quorum-sensing, enabling a broader application of the drug. The broad spectrum of mechanisms, the diversity of bioactive compounds, their activity against several targets, and the conservation of some targets among bacterial pathogens are promising aspects for several clinical applications of this type of biofilm-controlling compound in the future. PMID:27025518

  14. A new class of bacterial quorum sensing antagonists: glycomonoterpenols synthesized using linalool and alpha terpineol.

    PubMed

    Mukherji, Ruchira; Prabhune, Asmita

    2015-06-01

    With increasing burden of antibiotic resistant microorganism search for newer drug targets and potent drug molecules is a never ending scenario. Quorum sensing (QS), the phenomenon of bacterial cross-talk, is one such target that has captured the attention of many and has been touted as the future of new age antimicrobials. Quorum sensing has the potential to regulate a plethora of bacterial virulence phenotypes and search of molecules with powerful quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) capacity are underway. Monoterpene alcohols like linalool and alpha terpineol have been shown to possess antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activity. However in this article we attempt to bring forth a new class of compounds, glycomonoterpenols, derived from monoterpenoids alcohols. These glycomonoterpenols have been synthesized using Candida bombicola ATCC 22214 by feeding the cells with linalool and alpha terpineol respectively as substrates in 10% glucose, production medium. The advantage of these molecules over their parent compound is their additional surfactant like property, increased solubility and enhanced QSI potential. A variety of gram-negative bacteria capable of elaborating quorum sensing mediated phenotypes have been selected and both these glycoterpenoid derivatives have been shown to possess strong anti-QS activity.

  15. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing molecules correlate with clinical status in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Barr, Helen L; Halliday, Nigel; Cámara, Miguel; Barrett, David A; Williams, Paul; Forrester, Douglas L; Simms, Rebecca; Smyth, Alan R; Honeybourne, David; Whitehouse, Joanna L; Nash, Edward F; Dewar, Jane; Clayton, Andrew; Knox, Alan J; Fogarty, Andrew W

    2015-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces quorum sensing signal molecules that are potential biomarkers for infection.A prospective study of 60 cystic fibrosis patients with chronic P. aeruginosa, who required intravenous antibiotics for pulmonary exacerbations, was undertaken. Clinical measurements and biological samples were obtained at the start and end of the treatment period. Additional data were available for 29 of these patients when they were clinically stable.Cross-sectionally, quorum sensing signal molecules were detectable in the sputum, plasma and urine of 86%, 75% and 83% patients, respectively. They were positively correlated between the three biofluids. Positive correlations were observed for most quorum sensing signal molecules in sputum, plasma and urine, with quantitative measures of pulmonary P. aeruginosa load at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation. Plasma concentrations of 2-nonyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline (NHQ) were significantly higher at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation compared to clinical stability (p<0.01). Following the administration of systemic antibiotics, plasma 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (p=0.02) and NHQ concentrations (p<0.01) decreased significantly.In conclusion, quorum sensing signal molecules are detectable in cystic fibrosis patients with pulmonary P. aeruginosa infection and are positively correlated with quantitative measures of P. aeruginosa. NHQ correlates with clinical status and has potential as a novel biomarker for P. aeruginosa infection.

  16. SigMol: repertoire of quorum sensing signaling molecules in prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Akanksha; Kaur, Karambir; Kumar, Manoj

    2016-01-04

    Quorum sensing is a widespread phenomenon in prokaryotes that helps them to communicate among themselves and with eukaryotes. It is driven through quorum sensing signaling molecules (QSSMs) in a density dependent manner that assists in numerous biological functions like biofilm formation, virulence factors secretion, swarming motility, bioluminescence, etc. Despite immense implications, dedicated resources of QSSMs are lacking. Therefore, we have developed SigMol (http://bioinfo.imtech.res.in/manojk/sigmol), a specialized repository of these molecules in prokaryotes. SigMol harbors information on QSSMs pertaining to different quorum sensing signaling systems namely acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs), diketopiperazines (DKPs), 4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines (HAQs), diffusible signal factors (DSFs), autoinducer-2 (AI-2) and others. Database contains 1382: entries of 182: unique signaling molecules from 215: organisms. It encompasses biological as well as chemical aspects of signaling molecules. Biological information includes genes, preliminary bioassays, identification assays and applications, while chemical detail comprises of IUPAC name, SMILES and structure. We have provided user-friendly browsing and searching facilities for easy data retrieval and comparison. We have gleaned information of diverse QSSMs reported in literature at a single platform 'SigMol'. This comprehensive resource will assist the scientific community in understanding intraspecies, interspecies or interkingdom networking and further help to unfold different facets of quorum sensing and related therapeutics.

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing molecules correlate with clinical status in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Halliday, Nigel; Cámara, Miguel; Barrett, David A.; Williams, Paul; Forrester, Douglas L.; Simms, Rebecca; Smyth, Alan R.; Honeybourne, David; Whitehouse, Joanna L.; Nash, Edward F.; Dewar, Jane; Clayton, Andrew; Knox, Alan J.; Fogarty, Andrew W.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces quorum sensing signal molecules that are potential biomarkers for infection. A prospective study of 60 cystic fibrosis patients with chronic P. aeruginosa, who required intravenous antibiotics for pulmonary exacerbations, was undertaken. Clinical measurements and biological samples were obtained at the start and end of the treatment period. Additional data were available for 29 of these patients when they were clinically stable. Cross-sectionally, quorum sensing signal molecules were detectable in the sputum, plasma and urine of 86%, 75% and 83% patients, respectively. They were positively correlated between the three biofluids. Positive correlations were observed for most quorum sensing signal molecules in sputum, plasma and urine, with quantitative measures of pulmonary P. aeruginosa load at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation. Plasma concentrations of 2-nonyl-4-hydroxy-quinoline (NHQ) were significantly higher at the start of a pulmonary exacerbation compared to clinical stability (p<0.01). Following the administration of systemic antibiotics, plasma 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline (p=0.02) and NHQ concentrations (p<0.01) decreased significantly. In conclusion, quorum sensing signal molecules are detectable in cystic fibrosis patients with pulmonary P. aeruginosa infection and are positively correlated with quantitative measures of P. aeruginosa. NHQ correlates with clinical status and has potential as a novel biomarker for P. aeruginosa infection. PMID:26022946

  18. A Mathematical model to investigate quorum sensing regulation and its heterogenecity in pseudomonas syringae on leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bacterium Pseudomonas syringae is a plant-pathogen, which through quorum sensing (QS), controls virulence. In this paper, by means of mathematical modeling, we investigate QS of this bacterium when living on leaf surfaces. We extend an existing stochastic model for the formation of Pseudomonas s...

  19. The response of Serratia marcescens JG to environmental changes by quorum sensing system.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shu-Jing; Liu, Hui-Jun; Weng, Cai-Hong; Lai, Chun-Fen; Ai, Liu-Ying; Liu, Yu-Chen; Zhu, Hu

    2016-08-01

    Many bacterial cells are known to regulate their cooperative behaviors and physiological processes through a molecular mechanism called quorum sensing. Quorum sensing in Serratia marcescens JG is mediated by the synthesis of autoinducer 2 (AI-2) which is a furanosyl borate diester. In this study, the response of quorum sensing in S. marcescens JG to environment changes such as the initial pH, carbon sources and boracic acid was investigated by a bioreporter and real-time PCR analysis. The results show that glucose can affect AI-2 synthesis to the greatest extent, and 2.0 % glucose can stimulate S. marcescens JG to produce more AI-2, with a 3.5-fold increase in activity compared with control culture. Furthermore, the response of quorum sensing to changes in glucose concentration was performed by changing the amount of luxS RNA transcripts. A maximum of luxS transcription appeared during the exponential growth phase when the glucose concentration was 20.0 g/L. AI-2 production was also slightly impacted by the low initial pH. It is significant for us that the addition of boracic acid at microdosage (0.1-0.2 g/L) can also induce AI-2 synthesis, which probably demonstrated the feasible fact that the 4,5-dihydroxy-2, 3-pentanedione cyclizes by the addition of borate and the loss of water, is hydrated and is converted to the final AI-2 in S. marcescens JG.

  20. Antioxidant and Anti-quorum Sensing Potential of Acer monspessulanum subsp. monspessulanum Extracts.

    PubMed

    Ceylan, Ozgur; Sahin, Mehtap Donmez; Akdamar, Gultekin

    2016-10-01

    In this study, anti-quorum sensing, and antioxidant activities, and chemical composition of Acer monspessulanum subsp. monspessulanum extracts were evaluated. Determination of the antioxidant activity was revealed by DPPH radical scavenging activity, the total phenolic content assay, and the β-carotene/linoleic acid assay. The detection of phenolic compounds was determined using RP-HPLC. Anti-quorum sensing activity and violacein inhibition activity were determined using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and C. violaceum ATCC 112 472, respectively. The determination of anti-swarming activity was carried out with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01. In DPPH and total phenolic content assays, the water extract exhibited good antioxidant activity. In the β-carotene-linoleic acid assay, ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts exhibited good lipid peroxidation inhibition activity, demonstrating 96.95 ± 0.03 % and 95.35 ± 0.00 % at 2.5 mg/mL concentrations, respectively. The predominant phenolic compounds of the extracts were determined as rutin, naringin, catechin hydrate, quercetin, and protocatechuic acid. Ethyl acetate and ethanol extracts were found to contain a high level of violacein inhibition and anti-quorum sensing activity. The ethanol extract also showed weak anti-swarming activity. In this first study that used Acer monspessulanum subsp. monspessulanum extracts, it was revealed that the water extract has antioxidant activity and the ethanol and ethyl acetate extracts have anti-quorum sensing activity depending on the phenolic compounds that it contained.

  1. MicroBQs: a centralized database for use in studying bacterial biofilms and quorum sensing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biofilm formation in many bacterial species may be negatively or positively regulated by cell-to-cell signaling systems referred to as quorum sensing (QS). To assist in understanding research related to biofilms, QS, and the role of QS in biofilm formation, a comprehensive, centralized database, kn...

  2. Impact of Environmental Cues on Staphylococcal Quorum Sensing and Biofilm Development.

    PubMed

    Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S; Horswill, Alexander R

    2016-06-10

    Staphylococci are commensal bacteria that colonize the epithelial surfaces of humans and many other mammals. These bacteria can also attach to implanted medical devices and develop surface-associated biofilm communities that resist clearance by host defenses and available chemotherapies. These communities are often associated with persistent staphylococcal infections that place a tremendous burden on the healthcare system. Understanding the regulatory program that controls staphylococcal biofilm development, as well as the environmental conditions that modulate this program, has been a focal point of research in recent years. A central regulator controlling biofilm development is a peptide quorum-sensing system, also called the accessory gene regulator or agr system. In the opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, the agr system controls production of exo-toxins and exo-enzymes essential for causing infections, and simultaneously, it modulates the ability of this pathogen to attach to surfaces and develop a biofilm, or to disperse from the biofilm state. In this review, we explore advances on the interconnections between the agr quorum-sensing system and biofilm mechanisms, and topics covered include recent findings on how different environmental conditions influence quorum sensing, the impact on biofilm development, and ongoing questions and challenges in the field. As our understanding of the quorum sensing and biofilm interconnection advances, there are growing opportunities to take advantage of this knowledge and develop therapeutic approaches to control staphylococcal infections.

  3. Going beyond the Control of Quorum-Sensing to Combat Biofilm Infections.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Wolf-Rainer

    2016-01-09

    Most bacteria attach to surfaces where they form a biofilm, cells embedded in a complex matrix of polymers. Cells in biofilms are much better protected against noxious agents than free-living cells. As a consequence it is very difficult to control pathogens with antibiotics in biofilm infections and novel targets are urgently needed. One approach aims at the communication between cells to form and to maintain a biofilm, a process called quorum-sensing. Water soluble small-sized molecules mediate this process and a number of antagonists of these compounds have been found. In this review natural compounds and synthetic drugs which do not interfere with the classical quorum-sensing compounds are discussed. For some of these compounds the targets are still not known, but others interfere with the formation of exopolysaccharides, virulence factors, or cell wall synthesis or they start an internal program of biofilm dispersal. Some of their targets are more conserved among pathogens than the receptors for quorum sensing autoinducers mediating quorum-sensing, enabling a broader application of the drug. The broad spectrum of mechanisms, the diversity of bioactive compounds, their activity against several targets, and the conservation of some targets among bacterial pathogens are promising aspects for several clinical applications of this type of biofilm-controlling compound in the future.

  4. Whole-Genome Analysis of Quorum-Sensing Burkholderia sp. Strain A9

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian Woon; Tee, Kok Keng; Chang, Chien-Yi; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Xin-Yue

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia spp. rely on N-acyl homoserine lactone as quorum-sensing signal molecules which coordinate their phenotype at the population level. In this work, we present the whole genome of Burkholderia sp. strain A9, which enables the discovery of its N-acyl homoserine lactone synthase gene. PMID:25745000

  5. Arthroamide, a Cyclic Depsipeptide with Quorum Sensing Inhibitory Activity from Arthrobacter sp.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuki; Fukuda, Takao; Shojima, Akane; Nakayama, Jiro; Carro, Lorena; Trujillo, Martha E

    2015-11-25

    Nonfilamentous actinobacteria have been less studied as secondary metabolite producers than their filamentous counterparts such as Streptomyces. From our collection of nonfilamentous actinobacteria isolated from sandstone, an Arthrobacter strain was found to produce a new cyclic peptide arthroamide (1) together with the known compound turnagainolide A (2). These compounds inhibited the quorum sensing signaling of Staphylococcus aureus in the submicromolar to micromolar range.

  6. Quorum Quenching of Nitrobacter winogradskyi Suggests that Quorum Sensing Regulates Fluxes of Nitrogen Oxide(s) during Nitrification

    PubMed Central

    Giguere, Andrew T.; Bottomley, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Quorum sensing (QS) is a widespread process in bacteria used to coordinate gene expression with cell density, diffusion dynamics, and spatial distribution through the production of diffusible chemical signals. To date, most studies on QS have focused on model bacteria that are amenable to genetic manipulation and capable of high growth rates, but many environmentally important bacteria have been overlooked. For example, representatives of proteobacteria that participate in nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, produce QS signals called acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs). Nitrification emits nitrogen oxide gases (NO, NO2, and N2O), which are potentially hazardous compounds that contribute to global warming. Despite considerable interest in nitrification, the purpose of QS in the physiology/ecology of nitrifying bacteria is poorly understood. Through a quorum quenching approach, we investigated the role of QS in a well-studied AHL-producing nitrite oxidizer, Nitrobacter winogradskyi. We added a recombinant AiiA lactonase to N. winogradskyi cultures to degrade AHLs to prevent their accumulation and to induce a QS-negative phenotype and then used mRNA sequencing (mRNA-Seq) to identify putative QS-controlled genes. Our transcriptome analysis showed that expression of nirK and nirK cluster genes (ncgABC) increased up to 19.9-fold under QS-proficient conditions (minus active lactonase). These data led to us to query if QS influenced nitrogen oxide gas fluxes in N. winogradskyi. Production and consumption of NOx increased and production of N2O decreased under QS-proficient conditions. Quorum quenching transcriptome approaches have broad potential to identify QS-controlled genes and phenotypes in organisms that are not genetically tractable. PMID:27795404

  7. Quorum Quenching of Nitrobacter winogradskyi Suggests that Quorum Sensing Regulates Fluxes of Nitrogen Oxide(s) during Nitrification.

    PubMed

    Mellbye, Brett L; Giguere, Andrew T; Bottomley, Peter J; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A

    2016-10-25

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a widespread process in bacteria used to coordinate gene expression with cell density, diffusion dynamics, and spatial distribution through the production of diffusible chemical signals. To date, most studies on QS have focused on model bacteria that are amenable to genetic manipulation and capable of high growth rates, but many environmentally important bacteria have been overlooked. For example, representatives of proteobacteria that participate in nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, produce QS signals called acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs). Nitrification emits nitrogen oxide gases (NO, NO2, and N2O), which are potentially hazardous compounds that contribute to global warming. Despite considerable interest in nitrification, the purpose of QS in the physiology/ecology of nitrifying bacteria is poorly understood. Through a quorum quenching approach, we investigated the role of QS in a well-studied AHL-producing nitrite oxidizer, Nitrobacter winogradskyi We added a recombinant AiiA lactonase to N. winogradskyi cultures to degrade AHLs to prevent their accumulation and to induce a QS-negative phenotype and then used mRNA sequencing (mRNA-Seq) to identify putative QS-controlled genes. Our transcriptome analysis showed that expression of nirK and nirK cluster genes (ncgABC) increased up to 19.9-fold under QS-proficient conditions (minus active lactonase). These data led to us to query if QS influenced nitrogen oxide gas fluxes in N. winogradskyi Production and consumption of NOx increased and production of N2O decreased under QS-proficient conditions. Quorum quenching transcriptome approaches have broad potential to identify QS-controlled genes and phenotypes in organisms that are not genetically tractable.

  8. Quorum Sensing Determines the Choice of Antiphage Defense Strategy in Vibrio anguillarum

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Demeng; Svenningsen, Sine Lo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Selection for phage resistance is a key driver of bacterial diversity and evolution, and phage-host interactions may therefore have strong influence on the genetic and functional dynamics of bacterial communities. In this study, we found that an important, but so far largely overlooked, determinant of the outcome of phage-bacterial encounters in the fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum is bacterial cell-cell communication, known as quorum sensing. Specifically, V. anguillarum PF430-3 cells locked in the low-cell-density state (ΔvanT mutant) express high levels of the phage receptor OmpK, resulting in a high susceptibility to phage KVP40, but achieve protection from infection by enhanced biofilm formation. By contrast, cells locked in the high-cell-density state (ΔvanΟ mutant) are almost completely unsusceptible due to quorum-sensing-mediated downregulation of OmpK expression. The phenotypes of the two quorum-sensing mutant strains are accurately reflected in the behavior of wild-type V. anguillarum, which (i) displays increased OmpK expression in aggregated cells compared to free-living variants in the same culture, (ii) displays a clear inverse correlation between ompK mRNA levels and the concentration of N-acylhomoserine lactone quorum-sensing signals in the culture medium, and (iii) survives mainly by one of these two defense mechanisms, rather than by genetic mutation to phage resistance. Taken together, our results demonstrate that V. anguillarum employs quorum-sensing information to choose between two complementary antiphage defense strategies. Further, the prevalence of nonmutational defense mechanisms in strain PF430-3 suggests highly flexible adaptations to KVP40 phage infection pressure, possibly allowing the long-term coexistence of phage and host. PMID:26081633

  9. Synthetic organic compounds with potential for bacterial biofilm inhibition, a path for the identification of compounds interfering with quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    de Lima Pimenta, Andréa; Chiaradia-Delatorre, Louise Domeneghini; Mascarello, Alessandra; de Oliveira, Karen Andrinéia; Leal, Paulo César; Yunes, Rosendo Augusto; de Aguiar, Cláudia Beatriz Nedel Mendes; Tasca, Carla Inês; Nunes, Ricado José; Smânia, Artur

    2013-12-01

    New unconventional approaches to the development of antimicrobial drugs must target inhibition of infection stages leading to host colonisation or virulence itself, rather than bacterial viability. Amongst the most promising unconventional targets for the development of new antimicrobial drugs is bacterial adherence and biofilm formation as well as their control system, the quorum-sensing (QS) system, a mechanism of communication used to co-ordinate bacterial activities. Here we describe the evaluation of synthetic organic compounds as bacterial biofilm inhibitors against a panel of clinically relevant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains. This approach has successfully allowed the identification of five compounds (GEt, GHex, GOctad, G19 and C33) active not only against bacterial biofilms but also displaying potential to be used as antagonists and/or inhibitors of bacterial QS.

  10. A chemical biology approach to interrogate quorum-sensing regulated behaviors at the molecular and cellular level.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Colin A; Matamouros, Susana; Niessen, Sherry; Zhu, Jie; Scolnick, Jonathan; Lively, Jenny M; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Miller, Samuel I; Kaufmann, Gunnar F; Janda, Kim D

    2013-07-25

    Small molecule probes have been used extensively to explore biologic systems and elucidate cellular signaling pathways. In this study, we use an inhibitor of bacterial communication to monitor changes in the proteome of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium with the aim of discovering unrecognized processes regulated by AI-2-based quorum-sensing (QS), a mechanism of bacterial intercellular communication that allows for the coordination of gene expression in a cell density-dependent manner. In S. typhimurium, this system regulates the uptake and catabolism of intercellular signals and has been implicated in pathogenesis, including the invasion of host epithelial cells. We demonstrate that our QS antagonist is capable of selectively inhibiting the expression of known QS-regulated proteins in S. typhimurium, thus attesting that QS inhibitors may be used to confirm proposed and elucidate previously unidentified QS pathways without relying on genetic manipulation.

  11. How ants use quorum sensing to estimate the average quality of a fluctuating resource.

    PubMed

    Franks, Nigel R; Stuttard, Jonathan P; Doran, Carolina; Esposito, Julian C; Master, Maximillian C; Sendova-Franks, Ana B; Masuda, Naoki; Britton, Nicholas F

    2015-07-08

    We show that one of the advantages of quorum-based decision-making is an ability to estimate the average value of a resource that fluctuates in quality. By using a quorum threshold, namely the number of ants within a new nest site, to determine their choice, the ants are in effect voting with their feet. Our results show that such quorum sensing is compatible with homogenization theory such that the average value of a new nest site is determined by ants accumulating within it when the nest site is of high quality and leaving when it is poor. Hence, the ants can estimate a surprisingly accurate running average quality of a complex resource through the use of extraordinarily simple procedures.

  12. Interaction of Pseudostellaria heterophylla with Quorum Sensing and Quorum Quenching Bacteria Mediated by Root Exudates in a Consecutive Monoculture System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liaoyuan; Guo, Zewang; Gao, Huifang; Peng, Xiaoqian; Li, Yongyu; Sun, Shujing; Lee, Jung-Kul; Lin, Wenxiong

    2016-12-28

    Many plant-pathogenic bacteria are dependent on quorum sensing (QS) to evoke disease. In this study, the population of QS and quorum quenching (QQ) bacteria was analyzed in a consecutive monoculture system of Pseudostellaria heterophylla. The isolated QS strains were identified as Serratia marcescens with SwrIR-type QS system and exhibited a significant increase over the years of monoculture. Only one QQ strain was isolated from newly planted soil sample and was identified as Bacillus thuringiensis, which secreted lactonase to degrade QS signal molecules. Inoculation of S. marcescens to P. heterophylla root could rapidly cause wilt disease, which was alleviated by B. thuringiensis. Furthermore, the expression of lactonase encoded by the aiiA gene in S. marcescens resulted in reduction of its pathogenicity, implying that the toxic effect of S. marcescens on the seedlings was QS-regulated. Meanwhile, excess lactonase in S. marcescens led to reduction in antibacterial substances, exoenzymes, and swarming motility, which might contribute to pathogensis on the seedlings. Root exudates and root tuber extracts of P. heterophylla significantly promoted the growth of S. marcescens, whereas a slight increase of B. thuringiensis was observed in both samples. These results demonstrated that QS-regulated behaviors in S. marcescens mediated by root exudates played an important role in replanting diseases of P. heterophylla.

  13. Quorum sensing network in clinical strains of A. baumannii: AidA is a new quorum quenching enzyme

    PubMed Central

    López, María; Mayer, Celia; Fernández-García, Laura; Blasco, Lucía; Muras, Andrea; Ruiz, Federico Martín; Bou, German; Otero, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important pathogen that causes nosocomial infections generally associated with high mortality and morbidity in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Currently, little is known about the Quorum Sensing (QS)/Quorum Quenching (QQ) systems of this pathogen. We analyzed these mechanisms in seven clinical isolates of A. baumannii. Microarray analysis of one of these clinical isolates, Ab1 (A. baumannii ST-2_clon_2010), previously cultured in the presence of 3-oxo-C12-HSL (a QS signalling molecule) revealed a putative QQ enzyme (α/ß hydrolase gene, AidA). This QQ enzyme was present in all non-motile clinical isolates (67% of which were isolated from the respiratory tract) cultured in nutrient depleted LB medium. Interestingly, this gene was not located in the genome of the only motile clinical strain growing in this medium (A. baumannii strain Ab421_GEIH-2010 [Ab7], isolated from a blood sample). The AidA protein expressed in E. coli showed QQ activity. Finally, we observed downregulation of the AidA protein (QQ system attenuation) in the presence of H2O2 (ROS stress). In conclusion, most of the A. baumannii clinical strains were not surface motile (84%) and were of respiratory origin (67%). Only the pilT gene was involved in surface motility and related to the QS system. Finally, a new QQ enzyme (α/ß hydrolase gene, AidA protein) was detected in these strains. PMID:28328989

  14. Selective chemical inhibition of agr quorum sensing in Staphylococcus aureus promotes host defense with minimal impact on resistance.

    PubMed

    Sully, Erin K; Malachowa, Natalia; Elmore, Bradley O; Alexander, Susan M; Femling, Jon K; Gray, Brian M; DeLeo, Frank R; Otto, Michael; Cheung, Ambrose L; Edwards, Bruce S; Sklar, Larry A; Horswill, Alexander R; Hall, Pamela R; Gresham, Hattie D

    2014-06-01

    Bacterial signaling systems are prime drug targets for combating the global health threat of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections including those caused by Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus is the primary cause of acute bacterial skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and the quorum sensing operon agr is causally associated with these. Whether efficacious chemical inhibitors of agr signaling can be developed that promote host defense against SSTIs while sparing the normal microbiota of the skin is unknown. In a high throughput screen, we identified a small molecule inhibitor (SMI), savirin (S. aureus virulence inhibitor) that disrupted agr-mediated quorum sensing in this pathogen but not in the important skin commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mechanistic studies employing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and a novel AgrA activation reporter strain revealed the transcriptional regulator AgrA as the target of inhibition within the pathogen, preventing virulence gene upregulation. Consistent with its minimal impact on exponential phase growth, including skin microbiota members, savirin did not provoke stress responses or membrane dysfunction induced by conventional antibiotics as determined by transcriptional profiling and membrane potential and integrity studies. Importantly, savirin was efficacious in two murine skin infection models, abating tissue injury and selectively promoting clearance of agr+ but not Δagr bacteria when administered at the time of infection or delayed until maximal abscess development. The mechanism of enhanced host defense involved in part enhanced intracellular killing of agr+ but not Δagr in macrophages and by low pH. Notably, resistance or tolerance to savirin inhibition of agr was not observed after multiple passages either in vivo or in vitro where under the same conditions resistance to growth inhibition was induced after passage with conventional antibiotics. Therefore, chemical inhibitors can selectively target AgrA in

  15. Selective Chemical Inhibition of agr Quorum Sensing in Staphylococcus aureus Promotes Host Defense with Minimal Impact on Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Sully, Erin K.; Malachowa, Natalia; Elmore, Bradley O.; Alexander, Susan M.; Femling, Jon K.; Gray, Brian M.; DeLeo, Frank R.; Otto, Michael; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Edwards, Bruce S.; Sklar, Larry A.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Hall, Pamela R.; Gresham, Hattie D.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial signaling systems are prime drug targets for combating the global health threat of antibiotic resistant bacterial infections including those caused by Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus is the primary cause of acute bacterial skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) and the quorum sensing operon agr is causally associated with these. Whether efficacious chemical inhibitors of agr signaling can be developed that promote host defense against SSTIs while sparing the normal microbiota of the skin is unknown. In a high throughput screen, we identified a small molecule inhibitor (SMI), savirin (S. aureus virulence inhibitor) that disrupted agr-mediated quorum sensing in this pathogen but not in the important skin commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis. Mechanistic studies employing electrophoretic mobility shift assays and a novel AgrA activation reporter strain revealed the transcriptional regulator AgrA as the target of inhibition within the pathogen, preventing virulence gene upregulation. Consistent with its minimal impact on exponential phase growth, including skin microbiota members, savirin did not provoke stress responses or membrane dysfunction induced by conventional antibiotics as determined by transcriptional profiling and membrane potential and integrity studies. Importantly, savirin was efficacious in two murine skin infection models, abating tissue injury and selectively promoting clearance of agr+ but not Δagr bacteria when administered at the time of infection or delayed until maximal abscess development. The mechanism of enhanced host defense involved in part enhanced intracellular killing of agr+ but not Δagr in macrophages and by low pH. Notably, resistance or tolerance to savirin inhibition of agr was not observed after multiple passages either in vivo or in vitro where under the same conditions resistance to growth inhibition was induced after passage with conventional antibiotics. Therefore, chemical inhibitors can selectively target AgrA in

  16. Endemic malagasy Dalbergia species inhibit quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Rasamiravaka, Tsiry; Jedrzejowski, Anaïs; Kiendrebeogo, Martin; Rajaonson, Sanda; Randriamampionona, Denis; Rabemanantsoa, Christian; Andriantsimahavandy, Abel; Rasamindrakotroka, Andry; Duez, Pierre; El Jaziri, Mondher; Vandeputte, Olivier M

    2013-05-01

    Various species of the plant genus Dalbergia are traditionally used as medicine for sundry ailments and some of them have been shown recently to quench the virulence of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Cell-to-cell communication mechanisms, quorum sensing (QS) in particular, are key regulators of virulence in many pathogenic bacteria. Screening n-hexane extracts of leaves, roots and bark of endemic Malagasy Dalbergia species for their capacity to antagonize QS mechanisms in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 showed that many reduced the expression of the QS-regulated genes lasB and rhlA. However, only the extract of Dalbergia trichocarpa bark (DTB) showed a significant reduction of QS gene expression without any effect on the aceA gene encoding a QS-independent isocitrate lyase. Further characterization of DTB impact on QS revealed that the QS systems las and rhl are inhibited and that swarming, twitching, biofilm formation and the production of pyocyanin, elastase and proteases are also hampered in the presence of the DTB extract. Importantly, compared with the known QS inhibitor naringenin, the DTB extract showed a stronger negative effect on twitching, biofilm formation and tobramycin resistance. Preliminary structural characterization of these potent biofilm disrupters suggests that they belong to the phytosterols. The strong inhibition of motility and biofilm formation suggests that the DTB extract contains agents disrupting biofilm architecture, which is an important observation in the context of the design of new drugs targeting biofilm-encapsulated pathogens.

  17. Ajoene, a Sulfur-Rich Molecule from Garlic, Inhibits Genes Controlled by Quorum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; van Gennip, Maria; Phipps, Richard Kerry; Shanmugham, Meenakshi Sundaram; Christensen, Louise Dahl; Alhede, Morten; Skindersoe, Mette Eline; Rasmussen, Thomas Bovbjerg; Friedrich, Karlheinz; Uthe, Friedrich; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Moser, Claus; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Eberl, Leo; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Tanner, David; Høiby, Niels; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In relation to emerging multiresistant bacteria, development of antimicrobials and new treatment strategies of infections should be expected to become a high-priority research area. Quorum sensing (QS), a communication system used by pathogenic bacteria like Pseudomonas aeruginosa to synchronize the expression of specific genes involved in pathogenicity, is a possible drug target. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies revealed a significant inhibition of P. aeruginosa QS by crude garlic extract. By bioassay-guided fractionation of garlic extracts, we determined the primary QS inhibitor present in garlic to be ajoene, a sulfur-containing compound with potential as an antipathogenic drug. By comprehensive in vitro and in vivo studies, the effect of synthetic ajoene toward P. aeruginosa was elucidated. DNA microarray studies of ajoene-treated P. aeruginosa cultures revealed a concentration-dependent attenuation of a few but central QS-controlled virulence factors, including rhamnolipid. Furthermore, ajoene treatment of in vitro biofilms demonstrated a clear synergistic, antimicrobial effect with tobramycin on biofilm killing and a cease in lytic necrosis of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Furthermore, in a mouse model of pulmonary infection, a significant clearing of infecting P. aeruginosa was detected in ajoene-treated mice compared to a nontreated control group. This study adds to the list of examples demonstrating the potential of QS-interfering compounds in the treatment of bacterial infections. PMID:22314537

  18. Inhibition of quorum sensing, biofilm, and spoilage potential in Shewanella baltica by green tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junli; Huang, Xuzheng; Zhang, Fang; Feng, Lifang; Li, Jianrong

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the quorum sensing (QS) system of Shewanella baltica and the anti-QS related activities of green tea polyphenols (TP) against spoilage bacteria in refrigerated large yellow croaker. Autoinducer-2 (AI-2) and the diketopiperazines (DKPs) cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Leu) and cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Phe) were detected in the culture extract of S. baltica XH2, however, no N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) activity was observed. Green TP at sub-inhibitory concentrations interfered with AI-2 and DKPs activities of S. baltica without inhibiting cell growth and promoted degradation of AI-2. The green TP treatment inhibited biofilm development, exopolysaccharide production and swimming motility of S. baltica in a concentration- dependent manner. In addition, green TP decreased extracellular protease activities and trimethylamine production in S. baltica. A transcriptional analysis showed that green TP repressed the luxS and torA genes in S. baltica, which agreed with the observed reductions in QS activity and the spoilage phenotype. Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)-enriched in green TP significantly inhibited AI-2 activity of S. baltica. These findings strongly suggest that green TP could be developed as a new QS inhibitor for seafood preservation to enhance shelf life.

  19. An age-dependent model to analyse the evolutionary stability of bacterial quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Mund, A; Kuttler, C; Pérez-Velázquez, J; Hense, B A

    2016-09-21

    Bacterial communication is enabled through the collective release and sensing of signalling molecules in a process called quorum sensing. Cooperative processes can easily be destabilized by the appearance of cheaters, who contribute little or nothing at all to the production of common goods. This especially applies for planktonic cultures. In this study, we analyse the dynamics of bacterial quorum sensing and its evolutionary stability under two levels of cooperation, namely signal and enzyme production. The model accounts for mutation rates and switches between planktonic and biofilm state of growth. We present a mathematical approach to model these dynamics using age-dependent colony models. We explore the conditions under which cooperation is stable and find that spatial structuring can lead to long-term scenarios such as coexistence or bistability, depending on the non-linear combination of different parameters like death rates and production costs.

  20. Ligand-Induced Asymmetry in Histidine Sensor Kinase Complex Regulates Quorum Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Neiditch,M.; Federle, M.; Pompeani, A.; Kelly, R.; Swem, D.; Jeffrey, P.; Bassler, B.; Hughson, F.

    2006-01-01

    Bacteria sense their environment using receptors of the histidine sensor kinase family, but how kinase activity is regulated by ligand binding is not well understood. Autoinducer-2 (AI-2), a secreted signaling molecule originally identified in studies of the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi, regulates quorum-sensing responses and allows communication between different bacterial species. AI-2 signal transduction in V. harveyi requires the integral membrane receptor LuxPQ, comprised of periplasmic binding protein (LuxP) and histidine sensor kinase (LuxQ) subunits. Combined X-ray crystallographic and functional studies show that AI-2 binding causes a major conformational change within LuxP, which in turn stabilizes a quaternary arrangement in which two LuxPQ monomers are asymmetrically associated. We propose that formation of this asymmetric quaternary structure is responsible for repressing the kinase activity of both LuxQ subunits and triggering the transition of V. harveyi into quorum-sensing mode.

  1. Quorum-Sensing in CD4+ T Cell Homeostasis: A Hypothesis and a Model

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Afonso R. M.; Amado, Inês F.; Reynolds, Joseph; Berges, Julien; Lythe, Grant; Molina-París, Carmen; Freitas, Antonio A.

    2012-01-01

    Homeostasis of lymphocyte numbers is believed to be due to competition between cellular populations for a common niche of restricted size, defined by the combination of interactions and trophic factors required for cell survival. Here we propose a new mechanism: homeostasis of lymphocyte numbers could also be achieved by the ability of lymphocytes to perceive the density of their own populations. Such a mechanism would be reminiscent of the primordial quorum-sensing systems used by bacteria, in which some bacteria sense the accumulation of bacterial metabolites secreted by other elements of the population, allowing them to “count” the number of cells present and adapt their growth accordingly. We propose that homeostasis of CD4+ T cell numbers may occur via a quorum-sensing-like mechanism, where IL-2 is produced by activated CD4+ T cells and sensed by a population of CD4+ Treg cells that expresses the high-affinity IL-2Rα-chain and can regulate the number of activated IL-2-producing CD4+ T cells and the total CD4+ T cell population. In other words, CD4+ T cell populations can restrain their growth by monitoring the number of activated cells, thus preventing uncontrolled lymphocyte proliferation during immune responses. We hypothesize that malfunction of this quorum-sensing mechanism may lead to uncontrolled T cell activation and autoimmunity. Finally, we present a mathematical model that describes the key role of IL-2 and quorum-sensing mechanisms in CD4+ T cell homeostasis during an immune response. PMID:22654881

  2. Drosophila Host Model Reveals New Enterococcus faecalis Quorum-Sensing Associated Virulence Factors

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Neuza; Varahan, Sriram; Gorman, Matthew J.; Palmer, Kelli L.; Zaidman-Remy, Anna; Yokohata, Ryoji; Nakayama, Jiro; Hancock, Lynn E.; Jacinto, António; Gilmore, Michael S.; de Fátima Silva Lopes, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Enterococcus faecalis V583 is a vancomycin-resistant clinical isolate which belongs to the hospital-adapted clade, CC2. This strain harbours several factors that have been associated with virulence, including the fsr quorum-sensing regulatory system that is known to control the expression of GelE and SprE proteases. To discriminate between genes directly regulated by Fsr, and those indirectly regulated as the result of protease expression or activity, we compared gene expression in isogenic mutants of V583 variously defective in either Fsr quorum sensing or protease expression. Quorum sensing was artificially induced by addition of the quorum signal, GBAP, exogenously in a controlled manner. The Fsr regulon was found to be restricted to five genes, gelE, sprE, ef1097, ef1351 and ef1352. Twelve additional genes were found to be dependent on the presence of GBAP-induced proteases. Induction of GelE and SprE by GBAP via Fsr resulted in accumulation of mRNA encoding lrgAB, and this induction was found to be lytRS dependent. Drosophila infection was used to discern varying levels of toxicity stemming from mutations in the fsr quorum regulatory system and the genes that it regulates, highlighting the contribution of LrgAB and bacteriocin EF1097 to infection toxicity. A contribution of SprE to infection toxicity was also detected. This work brought to light new players in E. faecalis success as a pathogen and paves the way for future studies on host tolerance mechanisms to infections caused by this important nosocomial pathogen. PMID:23734216

  3. Chemical Inhibition of Kynureninase Reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing and Virulence Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Stephen H; Bonocora, Richard P; Wade, Joseph T; Musah, Rabi Ann; Cady, Nathaniel C

    2016-04-15

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa utilizes multiple quorum sensing (QS) pathways to coordinate an arsenal of virulence factors. We previously identified several cysteine-based compounds inspired by natural products from the plant Petiveria alliacea which are capable of antagonizing multiple QS circuits as well as reducing P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. To understand the global effects of such compounds on virulence factor production and elucidate their mechanism of action, RNA-seq transcriptomic analysis was performed on P. aeruginosa PAO1 exposed to S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide, the most potent inhibitor from the prior study. Exposure to this inhibitor down-regulated expression of several QS-regulated virulence operons (e.g., phenazine biosynthesis, type VI secretion systems). Interestingly, many genes that were differentially regulated pertain to the related metabolic pathways that yield precursors of pyochelin, tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, phenazines, and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS). Activation of the MexT-regulon was also indicated, including the multidrug efflux pump encoded by mexEF-oprN, which has previously been shown to inhibit QS and pathogenicity. Deeper investigation of the metabolites involved in these systems revealed that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide has structural similarity to kynurenine, a precursor of anthranilate, which is critical for P. aeruginosa virulence. By supplementing exogenous anthranilate, the QS-inhibitory effect was reversed. Finally, it was shown that S-phenyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide competitively inhibits P. aeruginosa kynureninase (KynU) activity in vitro and reduces PQS production in vivo. The kynurenine pathway has been implicated in P. aeruginosa QS and virulence factor expression; however, this is the first study to show that targeted inhibition of KynU affects P. aeruginosa gene expression and QS, suggesting a potential antivirulence strategy.

  4. Arachis hypogaea L. produces mimic and inhibitory quorum sensing like molecules.

    PubMed

    Nievas, F; Vilchez, L; Giordano, W; Bogino, P

    2017-03-29

    A wide variety of plant-associated soil bacteria (rhizobacteria) communicate with each other by quorum sensing (QS). Plants are able to detect and produce mimics and inhibitor molecules of the QS bacterial communicative process. Arachis hypogaea L. (peanut) establishes a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with rhizobia belonging to the genus Bradyrhizobium. These bacteria use a QS mechanism dependent on the synthesis of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). Given the relevance that plant-rhizobacteria interactions have at the ecological level, this work addresses the involvement of peanut in taking part in the QS mechanism. By using biosensor bacterial strains capable of detecting AHLs, a series of standard and original bioassays were performed in order to determine both (i) the production of QS-like molecules in vegetal materials and (ii) the expression of the QS mechanism throughout plant-bacteria interaction. Mimic QS-like molecules (mQS) linked to AHLs with long acyl chains (lac-AHL), and inhibitor QS-like molecules (iQS) linked to AHLs with short acyl chains (sac-AHL) were detected in seed and root exudates. The results revealed that synthesis of specific signaling molecules by the plant (such as mQS and iQS) probably modulates the function and composition of the bacterial community established in its rhizosphere. Novel bioassays of QS detection during peanut-Bradyrhizobium interaction showed an intense production of QS signals in the contact zone between root and bacteria. It is demonstrated that root exudates stimulate the root colonization and synthesis of lac-AHL by Bradyrhizobium strains in the plant rhizosphere, which leads to the early stages of the development of beneficial plant-bacteria interactions.

  5. The art of antibacterial warfare: Deception through interference with quorum sensing-mediated communication.

    PubMed

    Rampioni, Giordano; Leoni, Livia; Williams, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Almost a century on from the discovery of penicillin, the war against bacterial infection still rages compounded by the emergence of strains resistant to virtually every clinically approved antibiotic and the dearth of new antibacterial agents entering the clinic. Consequently there is renewed interest in drugs which attenuate virulence rather than bacterial growth. Since the metaphors of warfare are often used to describe the battle between pathogen and host, we will describe in such a context, the molecular communication (quorum sensing) mechanisms used by bacteria to co-ordinate virulence at the population level. Recent progress in exploiting this information through the design of anti-virulence deception strategies that disrupt quorum sensing through signal molecule inactivation, inhibition of signal molecule biosynthesis or the blockade of signal transduction and their advantages and disadvantages are considered.

  6. Lack of AHL-based quorum sensing in Pseudomonas fluorescens isolated from milk.

    PubMed

    Martins, Maurilio L; Pinto, Uelinton M; Riedel, Kathrin; Vanetti, Maria C D; Mantovani, Hilário C; de Araújo, Elza F

    2014-01-01

    Numerous bacteria coordinate gene expression in response to small signalling molecules in many cases known as acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs), which accumulate as a function of cell density in a process known as quorum sensing. This work aimed to determine if phenotypes that are important to define microbial activity in foods such as biofilm formation, swarming motility and proteolytic activity of two Pseudomonas fluorescens strains, isolated from refrigerated raw milk, are influenced by AHL molecules. The tested P. fluorescens strains did not produce AHL molecules in none of the evaluated media. We found that biofilm formation was dependent on the culture media, but it was not influenced by AHLs. Our results indicate that biofilm formation, swarming motility and proteolytic activity of the tested P. fluorescens strains are not regulated by acyl-homoserine lactones. It is likely that AHL-dependent quorum sensing system is absent from these strains.

  7. [The effect of topology of quorum sensing-related genes in Pectobacterium atrosepticumon their expression].

    PubMed

    Gogoleva, N E; Shlykova, L V; Gorshkov, V Iu; Daminova, A G; Gogolev, Iu V

    2014-01-01

    In prokaryotic genomes, the neighboring genes are often located on the complementary DNA strands and adjoin each other by their 5'- or 3'-ends or even overlap by their open reading frames. It was suggested that such gene topology hasfunctional purpose providing the regulation of their expression. For those genes that overlap by their coding 3'-termini this assumption has not been confirmed experimentally. In a broad group of bacteria that belong to proteobacteria such a convergent gene arrangement is typical for functionally connected quorum sensing-related genes "P" and "R" that encode synthases of N-acyl homoserine lactones and their sensors, respectively. In the present study on the example of overlapping quorum sensing-related genes of plant pathogenic bacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043--expI and expR it was shown that the topology of these genes determines the regula- tion of their expression.

  8. The Social Life of Aeromonas through Biofilm and Quorum Sensing Systems

    PubMed Central

    Talagrand-Reboul, Emilie; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle; Lamy, Brigitte

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Aeromonas display multicellular behaviors herein referred to as “social life”. Since the 1990s, interest has grown in cell-to-cell communication through quorum sensing signals and biofilm formation. As they are interconnected, these two self-organizing systems deserve to be considered together for a fresh perspective on the natural history and lifestyles of aeromonads. In this review, we focus on the multicellular behaviors of Aeromonas, i.e., its social life. First, we review and discuss the available knowledge at the molecular and cellular levels for biofilm and quorum sensing. We then discuss the complex, subtle, and nested interconnections between the two systems. Finally, we focus on the aeromonad multicellular coordinated behaviors involved in heterotrophy and virulence that represent technological opportunities and applied research challenges. PMID:28163702

  9. Triazole-containing N-acyl homoserine lactones targeting the quorum sensing system in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Mette R; Jakobsen, Tim H; Bang, Claus G; Cohrt, Anders Emil; Hansen, Casper L; Clausen, Janie W; Le Quement, Sebastian T; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael; Nielsen, Thomas E

    2015-04-01

    In an attempt to devise new antimicrobial treatments for biofilm infections, the bacterial cell-cell communication system termed quorum sensing has emerged as an attractive target. It has proven possible to intercept the communication system by synthetic non-native ligands and thereby lower the pathogenesis and antibiotic tolerance of a bacterial biofilm. To identify the structural elements important for antagonistic or agonistic activity against the Pseudomonas aeruginosa LasR protein, we report the synthesis and screening of new triazole-containing mimics of natural N-acyl homoserine lactones. A series of azide- and alkyne-containing homoserine lactone building blocks was used to prepare an expanded set of 123 homoserine lactone analogues through a combination of solution- and solid-phase synthesis methods. The resulting compounds were subjected to cell-based quorum sensing screening assays, thereby revealing several bioactive compounds, including 13 compounds with antagonistic activity and 9 compounds with agonistic activity.

  10. Inhibiting N-acyl-homoserine lactone synthesis and quenching Pseudomonas quinolone quorum sensing to attenuate virulence

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kok-Gan; Liu, Yi-Chia; Chang, Chien-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria sense their own population size, tune the expression of responding genes, and behave accordingly to environmental stimuli by secreting signaling molecules. This phenomenon is termed as quorum sensing (QS). By exogenously manipulating the signal transduction bacterial population behaviors could be controlled, which may be done through quorum quenching (QQ). QS related regulatory networks have been proven their involvement in regulating many virulence determinants in pathogenic bacteria in the course of infections. Interfering with QS signaling system could be a novel strategy against bacterial infections and therefore requires more understanding of their fundamental mechanisms. Here we review the development of studies specifically on the inhibition of production of N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL), a common proteobacterial QS signal. The opportunistic pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, equips the alkylquinolone (AQ)-mediated QS which also plays crucial roles in its pathogenicity. The studies in QQ targeting on AQ are also discussed. PMID:26539190

  11. Quorum-Sensing Dysbiotic Shifts in the HIV-Infected Oral Metabiome

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Robert E.; Ghannoum, Mahmoud A.; Mukherjee, Pranab K.; Gillevet, Patrick M.; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    We implemented a Systems Biology approach using Correlation Difference Probability Network (CDPN) analysis to provide insights into the statistically significant functional differences between HIV-infected patients and uninfected individuals. The analysis correlates bacterial microbiome (“bacteriome”), fungal microbiome (“mycobiome”), and metabolome data to model the underlying biological processes comprising the Human Oral Metabiome. CDPN highlights the taxa-metabolite-taxa differences between the cohorts that frequently capture quorum-sensing modifications that reflect communication disruptions in the dysbiotic HIV cohort. The results also highlight the significant role of cyclic mono and dipeptides as quorum-sensing (QS) mediators between oral bacteria and fungal genus. The developed CDPN approach allowed us to model the interactions of taxa and key metabolites, and hypothesize their possible contribution to the etiology of Oral Candidiasis (OC). PMID:25886290

  12. Quorum Sensing Primes the Oxidative Stress Response in the Insect Endosymbiont, Sodalis glossinidius

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Mauricio H.; Babst, Markus; Lochhead, Robert; Oakeson, Kelly; Smith, Kari; Dale, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Background Sodalis glossinidius, a maternally transmitted bacterial endosymbiont of tsetse flies (Glossina spp.), uses an acylated homoserine lactone (AHL)-based quorum sensing system to modulate gene expression in accordance with bacterial cell density. The S. glossinidius quorum sensing system relies on the function of two regulatory proteins; SogI (a LuxI homolog) synthesizes a signaling molecule, characterized as N-(3-oxohexanoyl) homoserine lactone (OHHL), and SogR1 (a LuxR homolog) interacts with OHHL to modulate transcription of specific target genes. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a tiling microarray to analyze the S. glossinidius transcriptome in the presence and absence of exogenous OHHL. The major finding is that OHHL increases transcription of a large number of genes that are known to be involved in the oxidative stress response. We also show that the obligate symbiont of the rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (SOPE), maintains copies of the quorum sensing regulatory genes that are found in S. glossinidius. Molecular evolutionary analyses indicate that these sequences are evolving under stabilizing selection, consistent with the maintenance of their functions in the SOPE symbiosis. Finally, the expression studies in S. glossinidius also reveal that quorum sensing regulates the expression of a cryptic, degenerate gene (carA) that arose from an ancient deletion in the last common ancestor of S. glossinidius and SOPE. Conclusions/Significance This oxidative stress response is likely mandated under conditions of dense intracellular symbiont infection, when intense metabolic activity is expected to generate a heavy oxidative burden. Such conditions are known to arise in the bacteriocytes of grain weevils, which harbor dense intracellular infections of symbiotic bacteria that are closely related to S. glossinidius. The presence of a degenerate carA sequence in S. glossinidius and SOPE indicates the potential for neofunctionalization to occur during the

  13. A cell-based model for quorum sensing in heterogeneous bacterial colonies.

    PubMed

    Melke, Pontus; Sahlin, Patrik; Levchenko, Andre; Jönsson, Henrik

    2010-06-17

    Although bacteria are unicellular organisms, they have the ability to act in concert by synthesizing and detecting small diffusing autoinducer molecules. The phenomenon, known as quorum sensing, has mainly been proposed to serve as a means for cell-density measurement. Here, we use a cell-based model of growing bacterial microcolonies to investigate a quorum-sensing mechanism at a single cell level. We show that the model indeed predicts a density-dependent behavior, highly dependent on local cell-clustering and the geometry of the space where the colony is evolving. We analyze the molecular network with two positive feedback loops to find the multistability regions and show how the quorum-sensing mechanism depends on different model parameters. Specifically, we show that the switching capability of the network leads to more constraints on parameters in a natural environment where the bacteria themselves produce autoinducer than compared to situations where autoinducer is introduced externally. The cell-based model also allows us to investigate mixed populations, where non-producing cheater cells are shown to have a fitness advantage, but still cannot completely outcompete producer cells. Simulations, therefore, are able to predict the relative fitness of cheater cells from experiments and can also display and account for the paradoxical phenomenon seen in experiments; even though the cheater cells have a fitness advantage in each of the investigated groups, the overall effect is an increase in the fraction of producer cells. The cell-based type of model presented here together with high-resolution experiments will play an integral role in a more explicit and precise comparison of models and experiments, addressing quorum sensing at a cellular resolution.

  14. Quorum-Sensing Mechanisms and Bacterial Response to Antibiotics in P. aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Rasamiravaka, Tsiry; El Jaziri, Mondher

    2016-11-01

    Emergence and worldwide spreading of resistant bacteria to antibiotic have raised the importance for finding therapeutic alternative to compensate antibiotic drawbacks. Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-to-cell communication involved in the development of various common bacterial behaviors including virulence factors expression, and targeting QS seems to be relevant to the struggle against bacterial infection. In this report, relevant literature on intrication of QS system and antimicrobial sensitivity mechanisms in P. aeruginosa PAO1 are reviewed.

  15. Broad Spectrum Anti-Quorum Sensing Activity of Tannin-Rich Crude Extracts of Indian Medicinal Plants

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Varsha; Bhathena, Zarine

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms have been demonstrated to have significance in expression of pathogenicity in infectious bacteria. In Gram negative bacteria the autoinducer molecules that mediate QS are acyl homoserine lactones (AHL) and in Gram positive bacteria they are peptides called autoinducing peptides (AIP). A screening of tannin-rich medicinal plants was attempted to identify extracts that could interrupt the QS mechanisms in both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria over a wide range of concentrations and therefore potentially be potent agents that could act as broad spectrum QS inhibitors. Six out of the twelve Indian medicinal plant extracts that were analyzed exhibited anti-QS activity in Chromobacterium violaceum 12472 and in S. aureus strain with agr:blaZ fusion over a broad range of subinhibitory concentrations, indicating that the extracts contain high concentration of molecules that can interfere with the QS mechanisms mediated by AHL as well as AIP. PMID:27190686

  16. From deep-sea volcanoes to human pathogens: a conserved quorum-sensing signal in Epsilonproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Ileana; Bolognini, Marie; Ricci, Jessica; Bini, Elisabetta; Vetriani, Costantino

    2015-01-01

    Chemosynthetic Epsilonproteobacteria from deep-sea hydrothermal vents colonize substrates exposed to steep thermal and redox gradients. In many bacteria, substrate attachment, biofilm formation, expression of virulence genes and host colonization are partly controlled via a cell density-dependent mechanism involving signal molecules, known as quorum sensing. Within the Epsilonproteobacteria, quorum sensing has been investigated only in human pathogens that use the luxS/autoinducer-2 (AI-2) mechanism to control the expression of some of these functions. In this study we showed that luxS is conserved in Epsilonproteobacteria and that pathogenic and mesophilic members of this class inherited this gene from a thermophilic ancestor. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the luxS gene is expressed—and a quorum-sensing signal is produced—during growth of Sulfurovum lithotrophicum and Caminibacter mediatlanticus, two Epsilonproteobacteria from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Finally, we detected luxS transcripts in Epsilonproteobacteria-dominated biofilm communities collected from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Taken together, our findings indicate that the epsiloproteobacterial lineage of the LuxS enzyme originated in high-temperature geothermal environments and that, in vent Epsilonproteobacteria, luxS expression is linked to the production of AI-2 signals, which are likely produced in situ at deep-sea vents. We conclude that the luxS gene is part of the ancestral epsilonproteobacterial genome and represents an evolutionary link that connects thermophiles to human pathogens. PMID:25397946

  17. Coprinopsis cinerea intracellular lactonases hydrolyze quorum sensing molecules of Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Stöckli, Martina; Lin, Chia-Wei; Sieber, Ramon; Plaza, David F; Ohm, Robin A; Künzler, Markus

    2016-07-27

    Biofilm formation on fungal hyphae and production of antifungal molecules are strategies of bacteria in their competition with fungi for nutrients. Since these strategies are often coordinated and under control of quorum sensing by the bacteria, interference with this bacterial communication system can be used as a counter-strategy by the fungi in this competition. Hydrolysis of N-acyl-homoserine lactones (HSL), a quorum sensing molecule used by Gram-negative bacteria, by fungal cultures has been demonstrated. However, the enzymes that are responsible for this activity, have not been identified. In this study, we identified and characterized two paralogous HSL hydrolyzing enzymes from the coprophilous fungus Coprinopsis cinerea. The C. cinerea HSL lactonases belong to the metallo-β-lactamase family and show sequence homology to and a similar biochemical activity as the well characterized lactonase AiiA from Bacillus thuringiensis. We show that the fungal lactonases, similar to the bacterial enzymes, are kept intracellularly and act as a sink for the bacterial quorum sensing signals both in C. cinerea and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing C. cinerea lactonases, due to the ability of these signal molecules to diffuse over the fungal cell wall and plasma membrane. The two isogenes coding for the C. cinerea HSL lactonases are arranged in the genome as a tandem repeat and expressed preferentially in vegetative mycelium. The occurrence of orthologous genes in genomes of other basidiomycetes appears to correlate with a saprotrophic lifestyle.

  18. Three Parallel Quorum-Sensing Systems Regulate Gene Expression in Vibrio harveyi†

    PubMed Central

    Henke, Jennifer M.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2004-01-01

    In a process called quorum sensing, bacteria communicate using extracellular signal molecules termed autoinducers. Two parallel quorum-sensing systems have been identified in the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi. System 1 consists of the LuxM-dependent autoinducer HAI-1 and the HAI-1 sensor, LuxN. System 2 consists of the LuxS-dependent autoinducer AI-2 and the AI-2 detector, LuxPQ. The related bacterium, Vibrio cholerae, a human pathogen, possesses System 2 (LuxS, AI-2, and LuxPQ) but does not have obvious homologues of V. harveyi System 1. Rather, System 1 of V. cholerae is made up of the CqsA-dependent autoinducer CAI-1 and a sensor called CqsS. Using a V. cholerae CAI-1 reporter strain we show that many other marine bacteria, including V. harveyi, produce CAI-1 activity. Genetic analysis of V. harveyi reveals cqsA and cqsS, and phenotypic analysis of V. harveyi cqsA and cqsS mutants shows that these functions comprise a third V. harveyi quorum-sensing system that acts in parallel to Systems 1 and 2. Together these communication systems act as a three-way coincidence detector in the regulation of a variety of genes, including those responsible for bioluminescence, type III secretion, and metalloprotease production. PMID:15466044

  19. Spatial dispersal of bacterial colonies induces a dynamical transition from local to global quorum sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusufaly, Tahir I.; Boedicker, James Q.

    2016-12-01

    Bacteria communicate using external chemical signals called autoinducers (AI) in a process known as quorum sensing (QS). QS efficiency is reduced by both limitations of AI diffusion and potential interference from neighboring strains. There is thus a need for predictive theories of how spatial community structure shapes information processing in complex microbial ecosystems. As a step in this direction, we apply a reaction-diffusion model to study autoinducer signaling dynamics in a single-species community as a function of the spatial distribution of colonies in the system. We predict a dynamical transition between a local quorum sensing (LQS) regime, with the AI signaling dynamics primarily controlled by the local population densities of individual colonies, and a global quorum sensing (GQS) regime, with the dynamics being dependent on collective intercolony diffusive interactions. The crossover between LQS to GQS is intimately connected to a trade-off between the signaling network's latency, or speed of activation, and its throughput, or the total spatial range over which all the components of the system communicate.

  20. Quorum Sensing Activity of Aeromonas Caviae Strain YL12, A Bacterium Isolated from Compost

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yan-Lue; Ee, Robson; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a well-studied cell-to-cell communication method that involves a cell-density dependent regulation of genes expression mediated by signalling molecules. In this study, a bacterium isolated from a plant material compost pile was found to possess quorum sensing activity based on bioassay screening. Isolate YL12 was identified using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry and molecular typing using rpoD gene which identified the isolate as Aeromonas caviae. High resolution tandem mass spectrometry was subsequently employed to identify the N-acyl homoserine lactone profile of Aeromonas caviae YL12 and confirmed that this isolate produced two short chain N-acyl homoserine lactones, namely C4-HSL and C6, and the production was observed to be cell density-dependent. Using the thin layer chromatography (TLC) bioassay, both AHLs were found to activate C. violaceum CV026, whereas only C6-HSL was revealed to induce bioluminescence expression of E. coli [pSB401]. The data presented in this study will be the leading steps in understanding the role of quorum sensing in Aeromonas caviae strain YL12. PMID:24759107

  1. From deep-sea volcanoes to human pathogens: a conserved quorum-sensing signal in Epsilonproteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Ileana; Bolognini, Marie; Ricci, Jessica; Bini, Elisabetta; Vetriani, Costantino

    2015-05-01

    Chemosynthetic Epsilonproteobacteria from deep-sea hydrothermal vents colonize substrates exposed to steep thermal and redox gradients. In many bacteria, substrate attachment, biofilm formation, expression of virulence genes and host colonization are partly controlled via a cell density-dependent mechanism involving signal molecules, known as quorum sensing. Within the Epsilonproteobacteria, quorum sensing has been investigated only in human pathogens that use the luxS/autoinducer-2 (AI-2) mechanism to control the expression of some of these functions. In this study we showed that luxS is conserved in Epsilonproteobacteria and that pathogenic and mesophilic members of this class inherited this gene from a thermophilic ancestor. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the luxS gene is expressed--and a quorum-sensing signal is produced--during growth of Sulfurovum lithotrophicum and Caminibacter mediatlanticus, two Epsilonproteobacteria from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Finally, we detected luxS transcripts in Epsilonproteobacteria-dominated biofilm communities collected from deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Taken together, our findings indicate that the epsiloproteobacterial lineage of the LuxS enzyme originated in high-temperature geothermal environments and that, in vent Epsilonproteobacteria, luxS expression is linked to the production of AI-2 signals, which are likely produced in situ at deep-sea vents. We conclude that the luxS gene is part of the ancestral epsilonproteobacterial genome and represents an evolutionary link that connects thermophiles to human pathogens.

  2. Quorum sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum: DNA recognition and gene regulation by the CviR receptor.

    PubMed

    Stauff, Devin L; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2011-08-01

    The bacterial pathogen Chromobacterium violaceum uses a LuxIR-type quorum-sensing system to detect and respond to changes in cell population density. CviI synthesizes the autoinducer C(10)-homoserine lactone (C(10)-HSL), and CviR is a cytoplasmic DNA binding transcription factor that activates gene expression following binding to C(10)-HSL. A number of behaviors are controlled by quorum sensing in C. violaceum. However, few genes have been shown to be directly controlled by CviR, in part because the DNA motif bound by CviR is not well characterized. Here, we define the DNA sequence required for promoter recognition by CviR. Using in vivo data generated from a library of point mutations in a CviR-regulated promoter, we find that CviR binds to a palindrome with the ideal sequence CTGNCCNNNNGGNCAG. We constructed a position weight matrix using these in vivo data and scanned the C. violaceum genome to predict CviR binding sites. We measured direct activation of the identified promoters by CviR and found that CviR controls the expression of the promoter for a chitinase, a type VI secretion-related gene, a transcriptional regulator gene, a guanine deaminase gene, and cviI. Indeed, regulation of cviI expression by CviR generates a canonical quorum-sensing positive-feedback loop.

  3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing signaling molecule N-3-oxododecanoyl homoserine lactone induces matrix metalloproteinase 9 expression via the AP1 pathway in rat fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Gojiro; Minematsu, Takeo; Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Yamane, Takumi; Kanazawa, Toshiki; Huang, Lijuan; Asada, Mayumi; Nagase, Takashi; Ikeda, Shin-ichi; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Sanada, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Quorum sensing is a cell-to-cell communication mechanism, which is responsible for regulating a number of bacterial virulence factors and biofilm maturation and therefore plays an important role for establishing wound infection. Quorum-sensing signals may induce inflammation and predispose wounds to infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa; however, the interaction has not been well investigated. We examined the effects of the P. aeruginosa las quorum-sensing signal, N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL), on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 9 expression in Rat-1 fibroblasts. 3OC12-HSL upregulated the expression of the MMP9 gene bearing an activator protein-1 (AP-1) binding site in the promoter region. We further investigated the mechanism underlying this effect. c-Fos gene expression increased rapidly after exposure to 3OC12-HSL, and nuclear translocation of c-Fos protein was observed; both effects were reduced by pretreatment with an AP-1 inhibitor. These results suggest that 3OC12-HSL can alter MMP9 gene expression in fibroblasts via the AP-1 signaling pathway.

  4. Antibacterial and Anti-Quorum Sensing Molecular Composition Derived from Quercus cortex (Oak bark) Extract.

    PubMed

    Deryabin, Dmitry G; Tolmacheva, Anna A

    2015-09-17

    Quercus cortex (Oak bark) has been used in European folk medicine since medieval times for treatment of diarrhea, stomatitis, pharyngitis and skin inflammations. Its antimicrobial activity is a well-known therapeutic property of oak bark, and its novel anti-quorum sensing (QS) ability has also been described recently. In this study, we examined the bioactive compounds of Quercus cortex extract and compared their direct antibacterial and regulatory anti-QS effects against Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 in a biotest. Evaluation of the original Quercus cortex extract showed weak antibacterial and prominent anti-QS activities that were retained and completely restored when the samples were dried and re-hydrated. The one-step liquid chromatography result indicated that the anti-QS activity might be determined by hydrophobic compounds; however, the subsequent reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography led to dissipation and loss of the activity. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry gave excellent resolution between a majority of the compounds. Based on this result, 10 of the 35 identified small molecules were selected for further screening. The subsequent investigation indicated several compounds determined both the antibacterial and anti-QS activities of the Quercus cortex extract. Direct antibacterial activity was shown for 1,2,3-benzenetriol and 4-propyl-1,3-benzenediol, while sub-inhibitory concentrations of these compounds led to anti-QS effects. Five compounds: 4-(3-hydroxy-1-propenyl)-2-methoxy-phenol; 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenol; 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde; 7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one and 2H-1-benzopyran-2-one were characterized as QS inhibitors independent of any effect on bacterial growth. Biologically relevant concentrations of each single component showed weak activity only while reconstruction of the small molecule composition derived from the Quercus cortex extract provided comparable complementary activity against C. violaceum

  5. Strain identification and quorum sensing inhibition characterization of marine-derived Rhizobium sp. NAO1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hong; Zhu, Xiaoshan; Yu, Shenchen; Chen, Lu; Jin, Hui; Cai, Zhonghua

    2017-01-01

    A novel strategy for combating pathogens is through the ongoing development and use of anti-quorum sensing (QS) treatments such as therapeutic bacteria or their anti-QS substances. Relatively little is known about the bacteria that inhabit the open ocean and of their potential anti-pathogenic attributes; thus, in an initiative to identify these types of therapeutic bacteria, planktonic microbes from the North Atlantic Ocean were collected, isolated, cultured and screened for anti-QS activity. Screening analysis identified one such strain, Rhizobium sp. NAO1. Extracts of Rhizobium sp. NAO1 were identified via ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) analysis. They were shown to contain N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based QS analogues (in particular, the N-butyryl homoserine lactone (C4-AHL) analogue) and could disrupt biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1. QS inhibition was confirmed using confocal scanning laser microscopy and growth curves, and it was shown to occur in a dose-dependent manner without affecting bacterial growth. Secondary metabolites of Rhizobium sp. NAO1 inhibited PAO1 pathogenicity by downregulating AHL-mediated virulence factors such as elastase activity and siderophore production. Furthermore, as a result of biofilm structure damage, the secondary metabolite products of Rhizobium sp. NAO1 significantly increased the sensitivity of PAO1 to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Our results demonstrated that Rhizobium sp. strain NAO1 has the ability to disrupt P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm architecture, in addition to attenuating P. aeruginosa PAO1 virulence factor production and pathogenicity. Therefore, the newly identified ocean-derived Rhizobium sp. NAO1 has the potential to serve as a QS inhibitor and may be a new microbial resource for drug development.

  6. Attenuation of quorum sensing-regulated behaviour by Tinospora cordifolia extract & identification of its active constituents

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Viraj C.; John, Nithya R.; Bhagwat, Ashok M.; Datar, Ajit G.; Kharkar, Prashant S.; Desai, Krutika B.

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: The pathogenicity of the nosocomial pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii is regulated by their quorum sensing (QS) systems. The objective of the present study was to examine the effect of the cold ethyl acetate extract of Tinospora cordifolia stem on virulence and biofilm development in the wild type and clinical strains of P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii. The study was further aimed to identify the probable active constituents in the plant extract. Methods: P. aeruginosa virulence factors viz., LasA protease, LasB elastase and pyocyanin production were analyzed spectrophotometrically. Biofilm formation was studied using crystal violet staining-microtitre plate assay. The plant extract was fractionated using silica gel column chromatography and the most active fraction was derivatized using silylation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In silico testing of the molecules identified in GC-MS was performed, for binding to the P. aeruginosa LasI and LasR proteins, to predict the QS inhibitory molecules. Results: The plant extract inhibited three major virulence factors in P. aeruginosa; it exhibited enhanced biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa while decreased biofilm development in A. baumannii. The most active fraction obtained from column chromatography, exhibited suppression of virulence as well as biofilm in both the organisms. Docking scores were calculated for all the molecules identified in GC-MS, and high docking scores were obtained for 2,3,4-triacetyloxybutyl acetate, methyl 16-methyl heptadecanoate, 2-(5-ethenyl-5-methyloxolan-2-yl)propan-2-ol, methyl hexadecanoate and 2-methoxy-4-vinyl phenol. Interpretation & conclusions: The compounds showing high docking scores could probably be the QS inhibitors. These molecules can be screened further for the development of new anti-infective drugs. PMID:27834332

  7. A diketopiperazine factor from Rheinheimera aquimaris QSI02 exhibits anti-quorum sensing activity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shiwei; Dai, Xiaoyun; Sun, Jiao; Bu, Xiangguo; Weng, Caihong; Li, Hui; Zhu, Hu

    2016-01-01

    An ethyl acetate (EtOAc) extract isolated from the marine bacterium, Rheinheimera aquimaris QSI02, was found to exhibit anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS) activity. A subsequent bioassay-guided isolation protocol led to the detection of an active diketopiperazine factor, cyclo(Trp-Ser). Biosensor assay data showed that the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of cyclo(Trp-Ser) ranged from 3.2 mg/ml to 6.4 mg/m for several microorganisms, including Escherichia coli, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026, Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans. Additionally, sub-MICs of cyclo(Trp-Ser) decreased the QS-regulated violacein production in C. violaceum CV026 by 67%. Furthermore, cyclo(Trp-Ser) can decrease QS-regulated pyocyanin production, elastase activity and biofilm formation in P. aeruginosa PA01 by 65%, 40% and 59.9%, respectively. Molecular docking results revealed that cyclo(Trp-Ser) binds to CviR receptor more rigidly than C6HSL with lower docking energy −8.68 kcal/mol, while with higher binding energy of −8.40 kcal/mol than 3-oxo-C12HSL in LasR receptor. Molecular dynamics simulation suggested that cyclo(Trp-Ser) is more easy to bind to CviR receptor than natural signaling molecule, but opposite in LasR receptor. These results suggest that cyclo(Trp-Ser) can be used as a potential inhibitor to control QS systems of C. violaceum and P. aeruginosa and provide increased the understanding of molecular mechanism that influences QS-regulated behaviors. PMID:28000767

  8. Modulation of Host Biology by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules: Messengers or Traitors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Chia; Chan, Kok-Gan; Chang, Chien-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cells sense their population density and respond accordingly by producing various signal molecules to the surrounding environments thereby trigger a plethora of gene expression. This regulatory pathway is termed quorum sensing (QS). Plenty of bacterial virulence factors are controlled by QS or QS-mediated regulatory systems and QS signal molecules (QSSMs) play crucial roles in bacterial signaling transduction. Moreover, bacterial QSSMs were shown to interfere with host cell signaling and modulate host immune responses. QSSMs not only regulate the expression of bacterial virulence factors but themselves act in the modulation of host biology that can be potential therapeutic targets.

  9. Modulation of Host Biology by Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum Sensing Signal Molecules: Messengers or Traitors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi-Chia; Chan, Kok-Gan; Chang, Chien-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial cells sense their population density and respond accordingly by producing various signal molecules to the surrounding environments thereby trigger a plethora of gene expression. This regulatory pathway is termed quorum sensing (QS). Plenty of bacterial virulence factors are controlled by QS or QS-mediated regulatory systems and QS signal molecules (QSSMs) play crucial roles in bacterial signaling transduction. Moreover, bacterial QSSMs were shown to interfere with host cell signaling and modulate host immune responses. QSSMs not only regulate the expression of bacterial virulence factors but themselves act in the modulation of host biology that can be potential therapeutic targets. PMID:26617576

  10. Natural Guided Genome Engineering Reveals Transcriptional Regulators Controlling Quorum-Sensing Signal Degradation.

    PubMed

    El Sahili, Abbas; Kwasiborski, Anthony; Mothe, Nicolas; Velours, Christophe; Legrand, Pierre; Moréra, Solange; Faure, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Quorum-quenching (QQ) are natural or engineered processes disrupting the quorum-sensing (QS) signalling which controls virulence and persistence (e.g. biofilm) in numerous bacteria. QQ involves different enzymes including lactonases, amidases, oxidases and reductases which degrade the QS molecules such as N-acylhomoserine lactones (NAHL). Rhodococcus erythropolis known to efficiently degrade NAHL is proposed as a biocontrol agent and a reservoir of QQ-enzymes for biotechnology. In R. erythropolis, regulation of QQ-enzymes remains unclear. In this work, we performed genome engineering on R. erythropolis, which is recalcitrant to reverse genetics, in order to investigate regulation of QQ-enzymes at a molecular and structural level with the aim to improve the QQ activity. Deep-sequencing of the R. erythropolis enhanced variants allowed identification of a punctual mutation in a key-transcriptional factor QsdR (Quorum sensing degradation Regulation) which regulates the sole QQ-lactonase QsdA identified so far. Using biophysical and structural studies on QsdR, we demonstrate that QQ activity can be improved by modifying the regulation of QQ-enzymes degrading QS signal. This modification requiring the change of only one amino-acid in a transcriptional factor leads to an enhanced R. erythropolis in which the QS-signal degradation pathway is strongly activated.

  11. Natural Guided Genome Engineering Reveals Transcriptional Regulators Controlling Quorum-Sensing Signal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Mothe, Nicolas; Velours, Christophe; Legrand, Pierre; Moréra, Solange; Faure, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Quorum-quenching (QQ) are natural or engineered processes disrupting the quorum-sensing (QS) signalling which controls virulence and persistence (e.g. biofilm) in numerous bacteria. QQ involves different enzymes including lactonases, amidases, oxidases and reductases which degrade the QS molecules such as N-acylhomoserine lactones (NAHL). Rhodococcus erythropolis known to efficiently degrade NAHL is proposed as a biocontrol agent and a reservoir of QQ-enzymes for biotechnology. In R. erythropolis, regulation of QQ-enzymes remains unclear. In this work, we performed genome engineering on R. erythropolis, which is recalcitrant to reverse genetics, in order to investigate regulation of QQ-enzymes at a molecular and structural level with the aim to improve the QQ activity. Deep-sequencing of the R. erythropolis enhanced variants allowed identification of a punctual mutation in a key-transcriptional factor QsdR (Quorum sensing degradation Regulation) which regulates the sole QQ-lactonase QsdA identified so far. Using biophysical and structural studies on QsdR, we demonstrate that QQ activity can be improved by modifying the regulation of QQ-enzymes degrading QS signal. This modification requiring the change of only one amino-acid in a transcriptional factor leads to an enhanced R. erythropolis in which the QS-signal degradation pathway is strongly activated. PMID:26554837

  12. The role of quorum sensing in Escherichia coli (ETEC) virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Sturbelle, Régis Tuchtenhagen; de Avila, Luciana Farias da Costa; Roos, Talita Bandeira; Borchardt, Jéssica Lopes; da Conceição, Rita de Cássia dos Santos; Dellagostin, Odir Antonio; Leite, Fábio Pereira Leivas

    2015-11-18

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a signaling system among bacteria mediated by auto-inducer substances (AI). Whenever the concentration of these molecules reaches a threshold corresponding to a high cell density or quorum, the whole population starts a coordinated expression of specific genes. Studies have shown that epinephrine is also responsible for activating specific bacterial genes. This work aimed to investigate the role of conditioned medium (containing AI), epinephrine and their association on growth, motility, F4 fimbriae and heat-labile toxin (LT) expression on enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC, E68). A significant increase in motility, F4 and LT expression, was observed in the ETEC culture supplemented with conditioned medium and epinephrine. These findings suggest that ETEC uses some components of conditioned medium (e.g., AI molecules), host molecules (epinephrine), and their association to modulate the expression of important virulence genes.

  13. Dynamical quorum-sensing in oscillators coupled through an external medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwab, David J.; Baetica, Ania; Mehta, Pankaj

    2012-11-01

    Many biological and physical systems exhibit population-density-dependent transitions to synchronized oscillations in a process often termed “dynamical quorum sensing”. Synchronization frequently arises through chemical communication via signaling molecules distributed through an external medium. We study a simple theoretical model for dynamical quorum sensing: a heterogenous population of limit-cycle oscillators diffusively coupled through a common medium. We show that this model exhibits a rich phase diagram with four qualitatively distinct physical mechanisms that can lead to a loss of coherent population-level oscillations, including a novel mechanism arising from effective time-delays introduced by the external medium. We derive a single pair of analytic equations that allow us to calculate phase boundaries as a function of population density and show that the model reproduces many of the qualitative features of recent experiments on Belousov-Zhabotinsky catalytic particles as well as synthetically engineered bacteria.

  14. Allele-Dependent Differences in Quorum-Sensing Dynamics Result in Variant Expression of Virulence Genes in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Geisinger, Edward; Chen, John

    2012-01-01

    Agr is an autoinducing, quorum-sensing system that functions in many Gram-positive species and is best characterized in the pathogen Staphylococcus aureus, in which it is a global regulator of virulence gene expression. Allelic variations in the agr genes have resulted in the emergence of four quorum-sensing specificity groups in S. aureus, which correlate with different strain pathotypes. The basis for these predilections is unclear but is hypothesized to involve the phenomenon of quorum-sensing interference between strains of different agr groups, which may drive S. aureus strain isolation and divergence. Whether properties intrinsic to each agr allele directly influence virulence phenotypes within S. aureus is unknown. In this study, we examined group-specific differences in agr autoinduction and virulence gene regulation by utilizing congenic strains, each harboring a unique S. aureus agr allele, enabling a dissection of agr locus-dependent versus genotype-dependent effects on quorum-sensing dynamics and virulence factor production. Employing a reporter fusion to the principal agr promoter, P3, we observed allele-dependent differences in the timing and magnitude of agr activation. These differences were mediated by polymorphisms within the agrBDCA genes and translated to significant variations in the expression of a key transcriptional regulator, Rot, and of several important exoproteins and surface factors involved in pathogenesis. This work uncovers the contribution of divergent quorum-sensing alleles to variant expression of virulence determinants within a bacterial species. PMID:22467783

  15. RpoN Regulates Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa via Modulating the PqsR Quorum Sensing Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhao; Liu, Yang; Chen, Yicai; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Chew, Su Chuen; Chua, Song Lin; Wang, Ke; Givskov, Michael; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    The alternative sigma factor RpoN regulates many cell functions, such as motility, quorum sensing, and virulence in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). P. aeruginosa often evolves rpoN-negative variants during the chronic infection in cystic fibrosis patients. It is unclear how RpoN interacts with other regulatory mechanisms to control virulence of P. aeruginosa. In this study, we show that RpoN modulates the function of PqsR, a quorum sensing receptor regulating production of virulence factors including the phenazine pyocyanin. The ∆rpoN mutant is able to synthesize 4-quinolone signal molecule HHQ but unable to activate PqsR and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (pqs) quorum sensing. The ∆rpoN mutant produces minimal level of pyocyanin and is unable to produce the anti-staphylococcal agents. Providing pqsR in trans in the ∆rpoN mutant restores its pqs quorum sensing and virulence factor production to the wild-type level. Our study provides evidence that RpoN has a regulatory effect on P. aeruginosa virulence through modulating the function of the PqsR quorum sensing regulator. PMID:26633362

  16. RpoN Regulates Virulence Factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa via Modulating the PqsR Quorum Sensing Regulator.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhao; Liu, Yang; Chen, Yicai; Yam, Joey Kuok Hoong; Chew, Su Chuen; Chua, Song Lin; Wang, Ke; Givskov, Michael; Yang, Liang

    2015-11-30

    The alternative sigma factor RpoN regulates many cell functions, such as motility, quorum sensing, and virulence in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa). P. aeruginosa often evolves rpoN-negative variants during the chronic infection in cystic fibrosis patients. It is unclear how RpoN interacts with other regulatory mechanisms to control virulence of P. aeruginosa. In this study, we show that RpoN modulates the function of PqsR, a quorum sensing receptor regulating production of virulence factors including the phenazine pyocyanin. The ∆rpoN mutant is able to synthesize 4-quinolone signal molecule HHQ but unable to activate PqsR and Pseudomonas quinolone signal (pqs) quorum sensing. The ∆rpoN mutant produces minimal level of pyocyanin and is unable to produce the anti-staphylococcal agents. Providing pqsR in trans in the ∆rpoN mutant restores its pqs quorum sensing and virulence factor production to the wild-type level. Our study provides evidence that RpoN has a regulatory effect on P. aeruginosa virulence through modulating the function of the PqsR quorum sensing regulator.

  17. Expression and Quorum Sensing Regulation of Type III Secretion System Genes of Vibrio harveyi during Infection of Gnotobiotic Brine Shrimp.

    PubMed

    Ruwandeepika, H A Darshanee; Karunasagar, Indrani; Bossier, Peter; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Type III secretion systems enable pathogens to inject their virulence factors directly into the cytoplasm of the host cells. The type III secretion system of Vibrio harveyi, a major pathogen of aquatic organisms and a model species in quorum sensing studies, is repressed by the quorum sensing master regulator LuxR. In this study, we found that during infection of gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae, the expression levels of three type III secretion operons in V. harveyi increased within the first 12h after challenge and decreased again thereafter. The in vivo expression levels were highest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in low cell density configuration (minimal LuxR levels) and lowest in a mutant with a quorum sensing system that is locked in the high cell density configuration (maximal LuxR levels), which is consistent with repression of type III secretion by LuxR. Remarkably, in vivo expression levels of the type III secretion system genes were much (> 1000 fold) higher than the in vitro expression levels, indicating that (currently unknown) host factors significantly induce the type III secretion system. Given the fact that type III secretion is energy-consuming, repression by the quorum sensing master regulators might be a mechanism to save energy under conditions where it does not provide an advantage to the cells.

  18. Inhibition of Biofilm Formation, Quorum Sensing and Infection in Pseudomonas aeruginosa by Natural Products-Inspired Organosulfur Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Cady, Nathaniel C.; McKean, Kurt A.; Behnke, Jason; Kubec, Roman; Mosier, Aaron P.; Kasper, Stephen H.; Burz, David S.; Musah, Rabi A.

    2012-01-01

    Using a microplate-based screening assay, the effects on Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 biofilm formation of several S-substituted cysteine sulfoxides and their corresponding disulfide derivatives were evaluated. From our library of compounds, S-phenyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide and its breakdown product, diphenyl disulfide, significantly reduced the amount of biofilm formation by P. aeruginosa at levels equivalent to the active concentration of 4-nitropyridine-N-oxide (NPO) (1 mM). Unlike NPO, which is an established inhibitor of bacterial biofilms, our active compounds did not reduce planktonic cell growth and only affected biofilm formation. When used in a Drosophila-based infection model, both S-phenyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide and diphenyl disulfide significantly reduced the P. aeruginosa recovered 18 h post infection (relative to the control), and were non-lethal to the fly hosts. The possibility that the observed biofilm inhibitory effects were related to quorum sensing inhibition (QSI) was investigated using Escherichia coli-based reporters expressing P. aeruginosa lasR or rhIR response proteins, as well as an endogenous P. aeruginosa reporter from the lasI/lasR QS system. Inhibition of quorum sensing by S-phenyl-L-cysteine sulfoxide was observed in all of the reporter systems tested, whereas diphenyl disulfide did not exhibit QSI in either of the E. coli reporters, and showed very limited inhibition in the P. aeruginosa reporter. Since both compounds inhibit biofilm formation but do not show similar QSI activity, it is concluded that they may be functioning by different pathways. The hypothesis that biofilm inhibition by the two active compounds discovered in this work occurs through QSI is discussed. PMID:22715388

  19. Prevention of bacterial quorum sensing in aquifer materials and effect on bioclogging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baveye, P.; Superak, C.; Farris, K.

    2012-12-01

    In aquifer materials that are clogged as a result of the growth and metabolism of bacteria, microscopic observations usually show the bacterial cells to be present in aggregates that tend to be strategically located at constrictions in the pore space, either strained there, or accumulating at these spots for metabolic advantages. Aggregation appears to be fostered by exopolymer production, but can also occur purely as a result of electrostatic interactions. On membranes, research has shown that if bacteria are discouraged from aggregating, for example by eliminating the biochemical means (e.g., "quorum sensing") by which they communicate in order to do so, biofouling of the membranes is significantly delayed and in some cases even largely alleviated. In this context, the goal of the research described in this presentation was to determine if a similar situation might arise when quorum quenchers are added to the liquid injected in columns of fine sand inoculated with various bacterial strains. Traditional saturated hydraulic conductivity and piezometer measurements asre complemented with detailed microscopic observations in the pore space. Perspectives on the possible use of quorum quenchers in practical situations is discussed.

  20. Quorum Sensing Inhibition by Asparagopsis taxiformis, a Marine Macro Alga: Separation of the Compound that Interrupts Bacterial Communication

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Bhavanath; Kavita, Kumari; Westphal, Jenny; Hartmann, Anton; Schmitt-Kopplin, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    The majority of the marine algal species, though completing their life cycle in seawater, are rarely susceptible to fouling, making them an important source of quorum sensing (QS) inhibitory substances. The separation and characterization of QS inhibitors are crucial for any potential application. Thirty marine macroalgae were tested for QS inhibition activity by using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 as the reporter strain, and among them, Asparagopsis taxiformis showed antibacterial, as well as antiquorum, sensing activities. Cinnamaldehyde (75 mM) and methanol were used as positive and negative controls, respectively. The antiquorum sensing activity of A. taxiformis was further confirmed using the sensor strain, Serratia liquefaciens MG44, having green fluorescent protein (gfp). Methanolic extract of the alga was fractionated by solid phase extraction (SPE), and each fraction was tested for QS inhibition. Two types of activities were observed—zone of clearance (antibacterial activity) and zone of inhibition with or without finger-like projections (QS inhibition). Out of five SPE cartridges, Bond Elut PH showed clear separation of these two fractions. The Ion Cyclotron Resonance Fourier Transformation Mass Spectrometer (ICR-FT/MS) analysis of the fractions further supported the bioassay results. The presence of strong QS inhibitory compound in A. taxiformis indicates its potential use in antifouling preparations. PMID:23344114

  1. Quorum quenching analysis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli: network topology and inhibition mechanism effect on the optimized inhibitor dose.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Andrés Fernando González; Covo, Virginia; Medina, Luis Miguel; Vives-Florez, Martha; Achenie, Luke

    2009-06-01

    The discovery of quorum sensing as a mechanism for regulating specific phenotypes in bacteria based on population density has conveyed attention to find molecules capable of interfering quorum sensing networks (QSN) in a process coined quorum quenching. Here, we examined the dynamics of Escherichia coli AI-2 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa QSN exposed to signal degraders or competitors for binding transcriptional regulators. Stability analysis was performed for E. coli and P. aeruginosa finding no multistability in E. coli. However, our model allowed to discern that quenchers influence P. aeruginosa QSN multistability by reducing the interval of the amount of molecules of the extracellular signal that originate several steady states. We proposed a simulated annealing algorithm to optimize the quencher dose based on stochastic kinetics. E. coli QSN requires around 640 while P. aeruginosa QSN needs 253 quencher molecules per microorganism. This dose was found to be negatively influenced by the quencher-signal affinity.

  2. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Secretes Compounds That Mimic Bacterial Signals and Interfere with Quorum Sensing Regulation in Bacteria1

    PubMed Central

    Teplitski, Max; Chen, Hancai; Rajamani, Sathish; Gao, Mengsheng; Merighi, Massimo; Sayre, Richard T.; Robinson, Jayne B.; Rolfe, Barry G.; Bauer, Wolfgang D.

    2004-01-01

    The unicellular soil-freshwater alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was found to secrete substances that mimic the activity of the N-acyl-l-homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules used by many bacteria for quorum sensing regulation of gene expression. More than a dozen chemically separable but unidentified substances capable of specifically stimulating the LasR or CepR but not the LuxR, AhyR, or CviR AHL bacterial quorum sensing reporter strains were detected in ethyl acetate extracts of C. reinhardtii culture filtrates. Colonies of C. reinhardtii and Chlorella spp. stimulated quorum sensing-dependent luminescence in Vibrio harveyi, indicating that these algae may produce compounds that affect the AI-2 furanosyl borate diester-mediated quorum sensing system of Vibrio spp. Treatment of the soil bacterium Sinorhizobium meliloti with a partially purified LasR mimic from C. reinhardtii affected the accumulation of 16 of the 25 proteins that were altered in response to the bacterium's own AHL signals, providing evidence that the algal mimic affected quorum sensing-regulated functions in this wild-type bacterium. Peptide mass fingerprinting identified 32 proteins affected by the bacterium's AHLs or the purified algal mimic, including GroEL chaperonins, the nitrogen regulatory protein PII, and a GTP-binding protein. The algal mimic was able to cancel the stimulatory effects of bacterial AHLs on the accumulation of seven of these proteins, providing evidence that the secretion of AHL mimics by the alga could be effective in disruption of quorum sensing in naturally encountered bacteria. PMID:14671013

  3. Attenuation of adhesion, quorum sensing and biofilm mediated virulence of carbapenem resistant Escherichia coli by selected natural plant products.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Pallavi; Chawla, Raman; Tanwar, Ankit; Chakotiya, Ankita Singh; Narula, Alka; Goel, Rajeev; Arora, Rajesh; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2016-03-01

    The multi-drug resistance offered by Carbapenem Resistant Escherichia coli (Family: Enterobacteriaceae; Class: Gammaproteobacteria) against third line antibiotics can be attributed towards its ability to develop biofilm. Such process involves adhesion and quorum-sensing induced colonization leading to biomass development. The present study explored the anti-adhesion, anti-quorum sensing and anti-biofilm potential of 05 pre-standardized potent herbals. Berberis aristata (PTRC-2111-A) exhibited maximum potential in all these activities i.e. 91.3% ± 0.05% (Anti-adhesion), 96.06% ± 0.05% (Anti-Quorum sensing) and 51.3% ± 0.07% (Anti-Biofilm formation) respectively. Camellia sinensis (PTRC-31911-A) showed both anti-adhesion (84.1% ± 0.03%) and anti-quorum sensing (90.0%) potential while Holarrhena antidysenterica (PTRC-8111-A) showed only anti-quorum sensing potential as compared to standards/antibiotics. These findings were in line with the molecular docking analysis of phytoligands against Lux S and Pilin receptors. Furthermore, the pairwise correlation analysis of the tested activities with qualitative, quantitative and bioactivity functional descriptors revealed that an increased content of alkaloid, moderate content of flavonoids and decreased content of tannins supported all the three activities. In addition, nitric oxide and superoxide scavenging activity were found to be correlated with anti-quorum sensing activity. The findings indicated clearly that B. aristata (Family: Berberidaceae) and C. sinensis (Family: Theaceae) were potent herbal leads with significant therapeutic potential which further needs to be explored at pre-clinical level in the future.

  4. Analysis of a bacteria-immunity model with delay quorum sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhonghua; Peng, Jigen; Zhang, Juan

    2008-04-01

    A bacteria-immunity model with bacterial quorum sensing is formulated, which describes the competition between bacteria and immune cells. A distributed delay is introduced to characterize the time in which bacteria receive signal molecules and then combat with immune cells. In this paper, we focus on a subsystem of the bacteria-immunity model, analyze the stability of the equilibrium points, discuss the existence and stability of periodic solutions bifurcated from the positive equilibrium point, and finally investigate the stability of the nonhyperbolic equilibrium point by the center manifold theorem.

  5. Engineering quorum sensing signaling of Pseudomonas for enhanced wastewater treatment and electricity harvest: A review.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yang-Chun; Wu, Xiang-Yang; Sun, Jian-Zhong; Cao, Ying-Xiu; Song, Hao

    2015-12-01

    Cell-cell communication that enables synchronized population behaviors in microbial communities dictates various biological processes. It is of great interest to unveil the underlying mechanisms of fine-tuning cell-cell communication to achieve environmental and energy applications. Pseudomonas is a ubiquitous microbe in environments that had wide applications in bioremediation and bioenergy generation. The quorum sensing (QS, a generic cell-cell communication mechanism) systems of Pseudomonas underlie the aromatics biodegradation, denitrification and electricity harvest. Here, we reviewed the recent progresses of the genetic strategies in engineering QS circuits to improve efficiency of wastewater treatment and the performance of microbial fuel cells.

  6. Collective Behavior of Quorum-Sensing Run-and-Tumble Particles under Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rein, Markus; Heinß, Nike; Schmid, Friederike; Speck, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    We study a generic model for quorum-sensing bacteria in circular confinement. Every bacterium produces signaling molecules, the local concentration of which triggers a response when a certain threshold is reached. If this response lowers the motility, then an aggregation of bacteria occurs which differs fundamentally from standard motility-induced phase separation due to the long-ranged nature of the concentration of signal molecules. We analyze this phenomenon analytically and by numerical simulations employing two different protocols leading to stationary cluster and ring morphologies, respectively.

  7. Realization of morphing logic gates in a repressilator with quorum sensing feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Vidit; Kang, Shivpal Singh; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate how a genetic ring oscillator network with quorum sensing feedback can operate as a robust logic gate. Specifically we show how a range of logic functions, namely AND/NAND, OR/NOR and XOR/XNOR, can be realized by the system, thus yielding a versatile unit that can morph between different logic operations. We further demonstrate the capacity of this system to yield complementary logic operations in parallel. Our results then indicate the computing potential of this biological system, and may lead to bio-inspired computing devices.

  8. Macrolides and community-acquired pneumonia: is quorum sensing the key?

    PubMed

    Wise, Matt P; Williams, David W; Lewis, Michael A O; Frost, Paul J

    2010-01-01

    Combination therapy with two antimicrobial agents is superior to monotherapy in severe community-acquired pneumonia, and recent data suggest that addition of a macrolide as the second antibiotic might be superior to other combinations. This observation requires confirmation in a randomised control trial, but this group of antibiotics have pleiotropic effects that extend beyond bacterial killing. Macrolides inhibit bacterial cell-to-cell communication or quorum sensing, which not only might be an important mechanism of action for these drugs in severe infections but may also provide a novel target for the development of new anti-infective drugs.

  9. Social interactions in the Burkholderia cepacia complex: biofilms and quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Coenye, Tom

    2010-07-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria are opportunistic pathogens that cause respiratory tract infections in susceptible patients, mainly people with cystic fibrosis. There is convincing evidence that B. cepacia complex bacteria can form biofilms, not only on abiotic surfaces (e.g., glass and plastics), but also on biotic surfaces such as epithelial cells, leading to the suggestion that biofilm formation plays a key role in persistent infection of cystic fibrosis lungs. This article presents an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in B. cepacia complex biofilm formation, the increased resistance of sessile B. cepacia complex cells and the role of quorum sensing in B. cepacia complex biofilm formation.

  10. Mathematical analysis of a quorum sensing induced biofilm dispersal model and numerical simulation of hollowing effects.

    PubMed

    Emerenini, Blessing O; Sonner, Stefanie; Eberl, Hermann J

    2017-06-01

    We analyze a mathematical model of quorum sensing induced biofilm dispersal. It is formulated as a system of non-linear, density-dependent, diffusion-reaction equations. The governing equation for the sessile biomass comprises two non-linear diffusion effects, a degeneracy as in the porous medium equation and fast diffusion. This equation is coupled with three semi-linear diffusion-reaction equations for the concentrations of growth limiting nutrients, autoinducers, and dispersed cells. We prove the existence and uniqueness of bounded non-negative solutions of this system and study the behavior of the model in numerical simulations, where we focus on hollowing effects in established biofilms.

  11. Detection, purification and characterisation of quorum-sensing signal molecules in plant-associated bacteria.

    PubMed

    Brelles-Mariño, G; Bedmar, E J

    2001-10-04

    Quorum sensing (also called autoinduction) is a term that describes an environmental sensing system that allows bacteria to monitor their own population density. Autoinduction relies upon the interaction of a small diffusible signal molecule (the autoinducer) with a transcriptional activator protein to couple gene expression with cell population density. These signal molecules diffuse from bacterial cells and accumulate in the environment as a function of cell growth. Once a threshold concentration is reached, these signals serve as co-inducers to regulate the transcription of (a) set(s) of target genes. In Gram-negative bacteria, most autoinducers belong to the family of N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). The detection of AHLs (or AHL-like activities) has been greatly facilitated by the development of sensitive bioassays that allow fast screening of microorganisms for diffusible signal molecules. AHL or diketopiperazine-mediated cell-cell signalling play roles in regulating different bacterial functions, such as antibiotic biosynthesis, production of virulence factors, exopolysaccharide biosynthesis, bacterial swarming, plasmid conjugal transfer and transition into the stationary phase. Several bacterial species that interact with plants produce AHL-like compounds. In this review, we will summarise the current knowledge about the detection, characterisation and purification of quorum-sensing molecules from plant-associated bacteria. We will also discuss some of the future prospects and biotechnological applications of autoinducers.

  12. Acyl-homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing and quorum quenching hold promise to determine the performance of biological wastewater treatments: An overview.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinhui; Shi, Yahui; Zeng, Guangming; Gu, Yanling; Chen, Guiqiu; Shi, Lixiu; Hu, Yi; Tang, Bi; Zhou, Jianxin

    2016-08-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a communication process between cells, in which bacteria secrete and sense the specific chemicals, and regulate gene expression in response to population density. Quorum quenching (QQ) blocks QS system, and inhibits gene expression mediating bacterial behaviors. Given the extensive research of acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signals, existences and effects of AHL-based QS and QQ in biological wastewater treatments are being subject to high concern. This review summarizes AHL structure, synthesis mode, degradation mechanisms, analytical methods, environmental factors, AHL-based QS and QQ mechanisms. The existences and roles of AHL-based QS and QQ in biomembrane processes, activated sludge processes and membrane bioreactors are summarized and discussed, and corresponding exogenous regulation strategy by selective enhancement of AHL-based QS or QQ coexisting in biological wastewater treatments is suggested. Such strategies including the addition of AHL signals, AHL-producing bacteria as well as quorum quenching enzyme or bacteria can effectively improve wastewater treatment performance without killing or limiting bacterial survival and growth. This review will present the theoretical and practical cognition for bacterial AHL-based QS and QQ, suggest the feasibility of exogenous regulation strategies in biological wastewater treatments, and provide useful information to scientists and engineers who work in this field.

  13. The Burkholderia pseudomallei BpeAB-OprB Efflux Pump: Expression and Impact on Quorum Sensing and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Ying Ying; Chua, Kim Lee

    2005-01-01

    BpeAB-OprB is a multidrug efflux pump of the bacterial pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei and is responsible for conferring antimicrobial resistance to aminoglycosides and macrolides. Expression of bpeAB-oprB is inducible by its substrate erythromycin and upon entry into stationary phase. BpeR, a member of the TetR family, functions as a repressor of the bpeAB-oprB operon. bpeR expression was similarly induced at stationary phase but lagged behind the induction of bpeAB-oprB expression. The induction of bpeAB-oprB expression could be advanced to the early exponential phase by exogenous addition of the B. pseudomallei autoinducers N-octanoyl-homoserine lactone (C8HSL) and N-decanoyl-homoserine lactone (C10HSL), suggesting that the bpeAB-oprB operon may be quorum regulated. On the other hand, acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) production was undetectable in the bpeAB-null mutant and strains which overexpress bpeR. The failure of these strains to produce acyl-HSLs seemed to be at the level of synthesis of acyl-HSLs, as growth-phase-dependent expression of the autoinducer synthase BpsI was abolished in the bpeAB-null mutant. bpsI expression remained growth phase dependent in the bpeR mutant which had functional BpeAB-OprB. BpeAB-OprB function is likewise necessary for optimal production of quorum-sensing-controlled virulence factors such as siderophore and phospholipase C and for biofilm formation. Cell invasion and cytotoxicity towards human lung epithelial (A549) and human macrophage (THP-1) cells were also significantly attenuated in both the bpeAB mutant and bpeR-overexpressing strains, thus suggesting the possibility of attenuating B. pseudomallei virulence using inhibitors of the BpeAB-OprB efflux pump. PMID:15995185

  14. The Burkholderia pseudomallei BpeAB-OprB efflux pump: expression and impact on quorum sensing and virulence.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ying Ying; Chua, Kim Lee

    2005-07-01

    BpeAB-OprB is a multidrug efflux pump of the bacterial pathogen Burkholderia pseudomallei and is responsible for conferring antimicrobial resistance to aminoglycosides and macrolides. Expression of bpeAB-oprB is inducible by its substrate erythromycin and upon entry into stationary phase. BpeR, a member of the TetR family, functions as a repressor of the bpeAB-oprB operon. bpeR expression was similarly induced at stationary phase but lagged behind the induction of bpeAB-oprB expression. The induction of bpeAB-oprB expression could be advanced to the early exponential phase by exogenous addition of the B. pseudomallei autoinducers N-octanoyl-homoserine lactone (C8HSL) and N-decanoyl-homoserine lactone (C10HSL), suggesting that the bpeAB-oprB operon may be quorum regulated. On the other hand, acyl-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL) production was undetectable in the bpeAB-null mutant and strains which overexpress bpeR. The failure of these strains to produce acyl-HSLs seemed to be at the level of synthesis of acyl-HSLs, as growth-phase-dependent expression of the autoinducer synthase BpsI was abolished in the bpeAB-null mutant. bpsI expression remained growth phase dependent in the bpeR mutant which had functional BpeAB-OprB. BpeAB-OprB function is likewise necessary for optimal production of quorum-sensing-controlled virulence factors such as siderophore and phospholipase C and for biofilm formation. Cell invasion and cytotoxicity towards human lung epithelial (A549) and human macrophage (THP-1) cells were also significantly attenuated in both the bpeAB mutant and bpeR-overexpressing strains, thus suggesting the possibility of attenuating B. pseudomallei virulence using inhibitors of the BpeAB-OprB efflux pump.

  15. Coral-associated bacteria, quorum sensing disrupters, and the regulation of biofouling.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Karina; Pavlov, Valentina; Marks, Robert S; Kushmaro, Ariel

    2013-01-01

    Marine biofouling, the settlement of microorganisms and macroorganisms on structures submerged in seawater, although economically detrimental, is a successful strategy for survival in hostile environments, where coordinated bacterial communities establish biofilms via the regulation of quorum sensing (QS) communication systems. The inhibition of QS activity among bacteria isolated from different coral species was investigated to gain further insight into its potency in the attenuation, or even the prevention, of undesirable biofouling on marine organisms. It is hypothesized that coral mucus/microorganism interactions are competitive, suggesting that the dominant communities secrete QS disruptive compounds. One hundred and twenty bacterial isolates were collected from healthy coral species and screened for their ability to inhibit QS using three bioreporter strains. Approximately 12, 11, and 24% of the isolates exhibited anti-QS activity against Escherichia coli pSB1075, Chromobacterium violaceum CV026, and Agrobacterium tumefaciens KYC55 indicator strains, respectively. Isolates with positive activity against the bioluminescent monitor strains were scanned via a cytotoxic/genotoxic, E. coli TV1061 and DPD2794 antimicrobial panel. Isolates detected by C. violaceum CV026 and A. tumefaciens KYC55 reporter strains were tested for their ability to inhibit the growth of these reporter strains, which were found to be unaffected. Tests of the Favia sp. coral isolate Fav 2-50-7 (>98% similarity to Vibrio harveyi) for its ability to attenuate the formation of biofilm showed extensive inhibitory activity against biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. To ascertain the stability and general structure of the active compound, cell-free culture supernatants exposed to an increasing temperature gradient or to digestion by proteinase K, were shown to maintain potent QS attenuation and the ability to inhibit the growth of biofilms. Mass spectrometry confirmed

  16. Oregano essential oil-pectin edible films as anti-quorum sensing and food antimicrobial agents

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Maria V.; Ortega-Ramirez, Luis A.; Gutierrez-Pacheco, M. Melissa; Bernal-Mercado, A. Thalia; Rodriguez-Garcia, Isela; Gonzalez-Aguilar, Gustavo A.; Ponce, Alejandra; Moreira, Maria del R.; Roura, Sara I.; Ayala-Zavala, J. Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Edible films can be used as carriers for antimicrobial compounds to assure food safety and quality; in addition, pathogenesis of food bacteria is related to a cell to cell communication mechanism called quorum sensing (QS). Oregano essential oil (OEO) has proved to be useful as food antimicrobial; however, its food applications can be compromised by the volatile character of its active constituents. Therefore, formulation of edible films containing OEO can be an alternative to improve its food usages. QS inhibitory activity of OEO and pectin-OEO films was evaluated using Chromobacterium violaceum as bacterial model. Additionally, antibacterial activity was tested against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella Choleraesuis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Listeria monocytogenes. OEO was effective to inhibit bacterial growth at MIC of 0.24 mg/mL for all tested bacteria and MBC of 0.24, 0.24, 0.48, and 0.24 mg/mL against E. coli O157:H7, S. Choleraesuis, S. aureus, and L. monocytogenes, respectively. Pectin-films incorporated with 36.1 and 25.9 mg/mL of OEO showed inhibition diameters of 16.3 and 15.2 mm for E. coli O157:H7; 18.1 and 24.2 mm for S. Choleraesuis; 20.8 and 20.3 mm for S. aureus; 21.3 and 19.3 mm for L. monocytogenes, respectively. Pectin-OEO film (15.7 mg/mL) was effective against E. coli O157:H7 (9.3 mm), S. aureus (9.7 mm), and L. monocytogenes (9.2 mm), but not for S. Choleraesuis. All concentrations of OEO (0.0156, 0.0312, 0.0625 and 0.125 mg/mL) and pectin-OEO films (15.7, 25.9 and 36.1 mg/mL) showed a significant anti-QS activity expressed as inhibition of violacein production by C. violaceum. Additionally, the application of pectin-OEO films was effective reducing total coliforms, yeast, and molds of shrimp and cucumber slices stored at 4°C during 15 d. These results demonstrated the potential of pectin films enriched with OEO as food related microorganisms and QS inhibitors. PMID:25566215

  17. Metabolomics analysis of fungal biofilm development and of arachidonic acid-based quorum sensing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ząbek, Adam; Junka, Adam; Szymczyk, Patrycja; Wojtowicz, Wojciech; Klimek-Ochab, Magdalena; Młynarz, Piotr

    2017-04-03

    The infections caused by filamentous fungi are becoming worldwide problem of healthcare systems due to increasing drug-resistance of this microorganism and increasing number of immunocompromised nosocomial patients. These infections are related with Aspergillus ability to form sessile communities referred to as the biofilms. The small compounds known as quorum sensing (QS) molecules allow this microorganism to coordinate all processes taking place during biofilm formation and maturation. In the study presented, the HRMAS (1) H NMR metabolomic approach was applied to define composition of extra and intracellular metabolites produced by biofilmic and planktonic (aka free-swimming) cultures of this microorganism and to evaluate impact of quorum sensing molecule, arachidonic acid (AA) on biofilm formation. The Scanning Electron Microscopy was used to confirm Aspergillus ability to form biofilm in vitro, while multivariate and univariate data analysis was applied to analyze data obtained. The Aspergillus strain was able to form strong biofilm structures in vitro. The statistical analysis revealed significant changes of metabolite production depending on Aspergillus culture type (biofilm vs. plankton), time and presence of QS molecules. The data obtained, if developed, might be used in future NMR diagnostics as markers of Aspergillus biofilm-related infections and lead to shorten time between pathogen identification and introduction of treatment.

  18. Study of Signal Detection, Integration, and Propagation in Quorum Sensing at the Single Cell Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Tao; Bassler, Bonnie; Wingreen, Ned

    2007-03-01

    Bacteria respond to their environment and to each other and accordingly adjust their gene-expression levels. Accurate signal detection, appropriate signal integration, and faithful signal propagation are essential for a cell to make correct adjustments in response to various extracellular cues. To better understand this information processing by living cells, we studied a model system -- the quorum-sensing circuit in Vibrio harveyi. Quorum sensing is a process in which bacteria communicate with each other by diffusible chemical molecules, termed ``autoinducers'', to commit to coordinated developmental decisions. Three types of autoinducers are detected coincidently by three parallel receptors. The signals are then integrated into the same signaling pathway and propagated by phosphorylation or dephosphorylation of the pathway components. To quantitatively measure the intracellular response, we applied a fluorescent protein reporter, whose production is regulated by a phosphorylated protein in the pathway. By single-cell microscopy, we can explore features of this information-processing circuit such as coincidence detection, signal integration, noise reduction or filtering, and especially the fidelity in signal processing achieved in the presence of inevitable fluctuations.

  19. Cyclodepsipeptides produced by actinomycetes inhibit cyclic-peptide-mediated quorum sensing in Gram-positive bacteria.

    PubMed

    Desouky, Said E; Shojima, Akane; Singh, Ravindra Pal; Matsufuji, Takahisa; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Takashi; Yamagaki, Tohru; Okubo, Ken-Ichi; Ohtani, Kaori; Sonomoto, Kenji; Nakayama, Jiro

    2015-07-01

    Cyclic peptides are commonly used as quorum-sensing autoinducers in Gram-positive Firmicutes bacteria. Well-studied examples of such molecules are thiolactone and lactone, used to regulate the expression of a series of virulence genes in the agr system of Staphylococcus aureus and the fsr system of Enterococcus faecalis, respectively. Three cyclodepsipeptides WS9326A, WS9326B and cochinmicin II/III were identified as a result of screening actinomycetes culture extracts for activity against the agr/fsr system. These molecules are already known as receptor antagonists, the first two for tachykinin and the last one for endothelin. WS9326A also inhibited the transcription of pfoA regulated by the VirSR two-component system in Clostridium perfringens. Receptor-binding assays using a fluorescence-labeled autoinducer (FITC-GBAP) showed that WS9326A and WS9326B act as receptor antagonists in this system. In addition, an ex vivo assay showed that WS9326B substantially attenuated the toxicity of S. aureus for human corneal epithelial cells. These results suggest that these three natural cyclodepsipeptides have therapeutic potential for targeting the cyclic peptide-mediated quorum sensing of Gram-positive pathogens.

  20. Anti-quorum sensing activity of essential oils from Colombian plants.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo-Colorado, Beatriz; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus; Stashenko, Elena E; Wagner-Döbler, Irene; Kunze, Brigitte

    2012-01-01

    Essential oils from Colombian plants were characterised by GC-MS, and assayed for anti-quorum sensing activity in bacteria sensor strains. Two major chemotypes were found for Lippia alba, the limonene-carvone and the citral (geranial-neral). For other species, the main components included α-pinene (Ocotea sp.), β-pinene (Swinglea glutinosa), cineol (Elettaria cardamomun), α-zingiberene (Zingiber officinale) and pulegone (Minthostachys mollis). Several essential oils presented promising inhibitory properties for the short chain AHL quorum sensing (QS) system, in Escherichia coli containing the biosensor plasmid pJBA132, in particular Lippia alba. Moderate activity as anti-QS using the same plasmid, were also found for selected constituents of essential oils studied here, such as citral, carvone and α-pinene, although solely at the highest tested concentration (250 µg mL(-1)). Only citral presented some activity for the long chain AHL QS system, in Pseudomonas putida containing the plasmid pRK-C12. In short, essential oils from Colombian flora have promising properties as QS modulators.

  1. ``Quorum sensing'' generated multistability and chaos in a synthetic genetic oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potapov, I.; Zhurov, B.; Volkov, E.

    2012-06-01

    We model the dynamics of the synthetic genetic oscillator Repressilator equipped with quorum sensing. In addition to a circuit of 3 genes repressing each other in a unidirectional manner, the model includes a phase-repulsive type of the coupling module implemented as the production of a small diffusive molecule—autoinducer (AI). We show that the autoinducer (which stimulates the transcription of a target gene) is responsible for the disappearance of the limit cycle (LC) through the infinite period bifurcation and the formation of a stable steady state (SSS) for sufficiently large values of the transcription rate. We found conditions for hysteresis between the limit cycle and the stable steady state. The parameters' region of the hysteresis is determined by the mRNA to protein lifetime ratio and by the level of transcription-stimulating activity of the AI. In addition to hysteresis, increasing AI-dependent stimulation of transcription may lead to the complex dynamic behavior which is characterized by the appearance of several branches on the bifurcation continuation, containing different regular limit cycles, as well as a chaotic regime. The multistability which is manifested as the coexistence between the stable steady state, limit cycles, and chaos seems to be a novel type of the dynamics for the ring oscillator with the added quorum sensing positive feedback.

  2. Towards Predictive Modeling of Information Processing in Microbial Ecosystems With Quorum-Sensing Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusufaly, Tahir; Boedicker, James

    Bacteria communicate using external chemical signals in a process known as quorum sensing. However, the efficiency of this communication is reduced by both limitations on the rate of diffusion over long distances and potential interference from neighboring strains. Therefore, having a framework to quantitatively predict how spatial structure and biodiversity shape information processing in bacterial colonies is important, both for understanding the evolutionary dynamics of natural microbial ecosystems, and for the rational design of synthetic ecosystems with desired computational properties. As a first step towards these goals, we implement a reaction-diffusion model to study the dynamics of a LuxI/LuxR quorum sensing circuit in a growing bacterial population. The spatiotemporal concentration profile of acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signaling molecules is analyzed, and used to define a measure of physical and functional signaling network connectivity. From this, we systematically investigate how different initial distributions of bacterial populations influence the subsequent efficiency of collective long-range signal propagation in the population. We compare our results with known experimental data, and discuss limitations and extensions to our modeling framework.-/abstract-

  3. Synchronization and quorum sensing in an ensemble of indirectly coupled chaotic oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing-Wei; Fu, Chenbo; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Xingang

    2012-10-01

    The fact that the elements in some realistic systems are influenced by each other indirectly through a common environment has stimulated a new surge of studies on the collective behavior of coupled oscillators. Most of the previous studies, however, consider only the case of coupled periodic oscillators, and it remains unknown whether and to what extent the findings can be applied to the case of coupled chaotic oscillators. Here, using the population density and coupling strength as the tuning parameters, we explore the synchronization and quorum sensing behaviors in an ensemble of chaotic oscillators coupled through a common medium, in which some interesting phenomena are observed, including the appearance of the phase synchronization in the process of progressive synchronization, the various periodic oscillations close to the quorum sensing transition, and the crossover of the critical population density at the transition. These phenomena, which have not been reported for indirectly coupled periodic oscillators, reveal a corner of the rich dynamics inherent in indirectly coupled chaotic oscillators, and are believed to have important implications to the performance and functionality of some realistic systems.

  4. A Quorum-Sensing Factor in Vegetative Dictyostelium Discoideum Cells Revealed by Quantitative Migration Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Golé, Laurent; Rivière, Charlotte; Hayakawa, Yoshinori; Rieu, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background Many cells communicate through the production of diffusible signaling molecules that accumulate and once a critical concentration has been reached, can activate or repress a number of target genes in a process termed quorum sensing (QS). In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, QS plays an important role during development. However little is known about its effect on cell migration especially in the growth phase. Methods and Findings To investigate the role of cell density on cell migration in the growth phase, we use multisite timelapse microscopy and automated cell tracking. This analysis reveals a high heterogeneity within a given cell population, and the necessity to use large data sets to draw reliable conclusions on cell motion. In average, motion is persistent for short periods of time (), but normal diffusive behavior is recovered over longer time periods. The persistence times are positively correlated with the migrated distances. Interestingly, the migrated distance decreases as well with cell density. The adaptation of cell migration to cell density highlights the role of a secreted quorum sensing factor (QSF) on cell migration. Using a simple model describing the balance between the rate of QSF generation and the rate of QSF dilution, we were able to gather all experimental results into a single master curve, showing a sharp cell transition between high and low motile behaviors with increasing QSF. Conclusion This study unambiguously demonstrates the central role played by QSF on amoeboid motion in the growth phase. PMID:22073217

  5. Is Quorum Sensing Interference a Viable Alternative to Treat Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections?

    PubMed Central

    García-Contreras, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) coordinates the expression of multiple virulence factors in Pseudomonas aeruginosa; hence its inhibition has been postulated as a new alternative to treat its infections. In particular, QS interference approaches claim that they attenuate bacterial virulence without directly decreasing bacterial growth and suggest that in vivo the immune system would control the infections. Moreover, since in vitro experiments performed in rich medium demonstrate that interfering with QS decreases the production of virulence factors without affecting bacterial growth it was assumed than in vivo therapies will minimize the selection of resistant strains. Therefore, the underlying assumptions toward an effective implementation of a successful Quorum sensing interference (QSI) therapy for treating P. aeruginosa infections are that (i) QS only exerts important effects in the regulation of virulence genes but it does not affect metabolic processes linked to growth, (ii) the expression of virulence factors is only positively regulated by QS, (iii) inhibition of virulence factors in vivo do not affect bacterial growth, (iv) the immune system of the infected patients will be able to get rid of the infections, and (v) the therapy will be effective in the strains that are actively producing the infections. Nevertheless, for QSI in P. aeruginosa, substantial experimental evidence against the validity of most of these assumptions has accumulated during the past years, suggesting that a far better understanding of its virulence and its behavior during infections is needed in order to design truly solid QSI therapeutic alternatives to combat this remarkable pathogen. PMID:27683577

  6. Quorum sensing and biofilm formation investigated using laser-trapped bacterial arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Vernita; Butler, John; Smalyukh, Ivan; Parsek, Matthew; Wong, Gerard

    2008-03-01

    Studies of individual, free-swimming (planktonic) bacteria have yielded much information about their genetic and phenotypic characteristics and about ``quorum sensing,'' the autoinducing process by which bacteria detect high concentrations of other bacteria. However, in most environments the majority of bacteria are not in the planktonic form but are rather in biofilms, which are highly-structured, dynamic communities of multiple bacteria that adhere to a surface and to each other using an extracellular polysaccharide matrix. Bacteria in biofilms are phenotypically very different from their genetically-identical planktonic counterparts. Among other characteristics, they are much more antibiotic-resistant and virulent. Such biofilms form persistent infections on medical implants and in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients, where Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms are the leading cause of lung damage and, ultimately, death. To understand the importance of different extracellular materials, motility mechanisms, and quorum sensing for biofilm formation and stability, we use single-gene knockout mutants and an infrared laser trap to create a bacterial aggregate that serves as a model biofilm and allows us to measure the importance of these factors as a function of trapping time, surface, and nutritional environment.

  7. Quorum sensing activity of Serratia fonticola strain RB-25 isolated from an ex-landfill site.

    PubMed

    Ee, Robson; Lim, Yan-Lue; Tee, Kok-Keng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-03-12

    Quorum sensing is a unique bacterial communication system which permits bacteria to synchronize their behaviour in accordance with the population density. The operation of this communication network involves the use of diffusible autoinducer molecules, termed N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs). Serratia spp. are well known for their use of quorum sensing to regulate the expression of various genes. In this study, we aimed to characterized the AHL production of a bacterium designated as strain RB-25 isolated from a former domestic waste landfill site. It was identified as Serratia fonticola using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry analysis and this was confirmed by 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing. High resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of S. fonticola strain RB-25 spent culture supernatant indicated the existence of three AHLs namely: N-butyryl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL) and N-(3-oxohexanoyl) homoserine-lactone (3-oxo-C6 HSL). This is the first report of the production of these AHLs in S. fonticola.

  8. Novel Sinorhizobium meliloti quorum sensing positive and negative regulatory feedback mechanisms respond to phosphate availability.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Matthew; Meyer, Stefan; Becker, Anke

    2009-12-01

    The Sin quorum sensing system of Sinorhizobium meliloti depends upon at least three genes, sinR, sinI and expR, and N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) as signals to regulate multiple processes in its free-living state in the rhizosphere and in the development towards symbiosis with its plant host. In this study, we have characterized novel mechanisms of transcription control through which the system regulates itself. At low AHL levels a positive feedback loop activates expression of sinI (AHL synthase), resulting in amplification of AHL levels. At high AHL levels, expression of sinI is reduced by a negative feedback loop. These feedback mechanisms are mediated by the LuxR-type regulators ExpR and SinR. Expression of sinR and expR is regulated by ExpR in the presence of AHLs. A novel ExpR binding site in the promoter of sinR is responsible for the reduction of expression of this gene. In addition, expression of sinR, upon which sinI expression is dependent, is induced by phoB during growth under phosphate-limiting conditions. This indicates that this response ensures quorum sensing in phosphate-restricted growth.

  9. PepO, a CovRS-controlled endopeptidase, disrupts Streptococcus pyogenes quorum sensing

    PubMed Central

    Wilkening, Reid V.; Chang, Jennifer C.; Federle, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Group A Streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes) is a human-restricted pathogen with a capacity to both colonize asymptomatically and cause illnesses ranging from pharyngitis to necrotizing fasciitis. An understanding of how and when GAS switches between genetic programs governing these different lifestyles has remained an enduring mystery and likely requires carefully tuned environmental sensors to activate and silence genetic schemes when appropriate. Herein, we describe the relationship between the Control of Virulence (CovRS, CsrRS) two-component system and the Rgg2/3 quorum-sensing pathway. We demonstrate that responses of CovRS to the stress signals Mg2+ and a fragment of the antimicrobial peptide LL-37 result in modulated activity of pheromone signaling of the Rgg2/3 pathway through a means of proteolysis of SHP peptide pheromones. This degradation is mediated by the cytoplasmic endopeptidase PepO, which is the first identified enzymatic silencer of an RRNPP-type quorum-sensing pathway. These results suggest that under conditions in which the virulence potential of GAS is elevated (i.e. enhanced virulence gene expression), cellular responses mediated by the Rgg2/3 pathway are abrogated and allow individuals to escape from group behavior. These results also indicate that Rgg2/3 signaling is instead functional during non-virulent GAS lifestyles. PMID:26418177

  10. Evidence for quorum sensing and differential metabolite production by a marine bacterium in response to DMSP

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Winifred M; Kido Soule, Melissa C; Kujawinski, Elizabeth B

    2016-01-01

    Microbes, the foundation of the marine foodweb, do not function in isolation, but rather rely on molecular level interactions among species to thrive. Although certain types of interactions between autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms have been well documented, the role of specific organic molecules in regulating inter-species relationships and supporting growth are only beginning to be understood. Here, we examine one such interaction by characterizing the metabolic response of a heterotrophic marine bacterium, Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3, to growth on dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), an abundant organosulfur metabolite produced by phytoplankton. When cultivated on DMSP, R. pomeroyi synthesized a quorum-sensing molecule, N-(3-oxotetradecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone, at significantly higher levels than during growth on propionate. Concomitant with the production of a quorum-sensing molecule, we observed differential production of intra- and extracellular metabolites including glutamine, vitamin B2 and biosynthetic intermediates of cyclic amino acids. Our metabolomics data indicate that R. pomeroyi changes regulation of its biochemical pathways in a manner that is adaptive for a cooperative lifestyle in the presence of DMSP, in anticipation of phytoplankton-derived nutrients and higher microbial density. This behavior is likely to occur on sinking marine particles, indicating that this response may impact the fate of organic matter. PMID:26882264

  11. Regulation of Yersina pestis Virulence by AI-2 Mediated Quorum Sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Segelke, B; Hok, S; Lao, V; Corzett, M; Garcia, E

    2010-03-29

    The proposed research was motivated by an interest in understanding Y. pestis virulence mechanisms and bacteria cell-cell communication. It is expected that a greater understanding of virulence mechanisms will ultimately lead to biothreat countermeasures and novel therapeutics. Y. pestis is the etiological agent of plague, the most devastating disease in human history. Y. pestis infection has a high mortality rate and a short incubation before mortality. There is no widely available and effective vaccine for Y. pestis and multi-drug resistant strains are emerging. Y. pestis is a recognized biothreat agent based on the wide distribution of the bacteria in research laboratories around the world and on the knowledge that methods exist to produce and aerosolize large amounts of bacteria. We hypothesized that cell-cell communication via signaling molecules, or quorum sensing, by Y. pestis is important for the regulation of virulence factor gene expression during host invasion, though a causative link had never been established. Quorum sensing is a mode of intercellular communication which enables orchestration of gene expression for many bacteria as a function of population density and available evidence suggests there may be a link between quorum sensing and regulation of Y. pesits virulence. Several pathogenic bacteria have been shown to regulate expression of virulence factor genes, including genes encoding type III secretion, via quorum sensing. The Y. pestis genome encodes several cell-cell signaling pathways and the interaction of at least three of these are thought to be involved in one or more modes of host invasion. Furthermore, Y. pestis gene expression array studies carried out at LLNL have established a correlation between expression of known virulence factors and genes involved in processing of the AI-2 quorum sensing signal. This was a basic research project that was intended to provide new insights into bacterial intercellular communication and how it is

  12. Modeling quorum sensing trade-offs between bacterial cell density and system extension from open boundaries.

    PubMed

    Marenda, Mattia; Zanardo, Marina; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio; Squartini, Andrea

    2016-12-14

    Bacterial communities undergo collective behavioural switches upon producing and sensing diffusible signal molecules; a mechanism referred to as Quorum Sensing (QS). Exemplarily, biofilm organic matrices are built concertedly by bacteria in several environments. QS scope in bacterial ecology has been debated for over 20 years. Different perspectives counterpose the role of density reporter for populations to that of local environment diffusivity probe for individual cells. Here we devise a model system where tubes of different heights contain matrix-embedded producers and sensors. These tubes allow non-limiting signal diffusion from one open end, thereby showing that population spatial extension away from an open boundary can be a main critical factor in QS. Experimental data, successfully recapitulated by a comprehensive mathematical model, demonstrate how tube height can overtake the role of producer density in triggering sensor activation. The biotic degradation of the signal is found to play a major role and to be species-specific and entirely feedback-independent.

  13. Modeling quorum sensing trade-offs between bacterial cell density and system extension from open boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marenda, Mattia; Zanardo, Marina; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio; Squartini, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    Bacterial communities undergo collective behavioural switches upon producing and sensing diffusible signal molecules; a mechanism referred to as Quorum Sensing (QS). Exemplarily, biofilm organic matrices are built concertedly by bacteria in several environments. QS scope in bacterial ecology has been debated for over 20 years. Different perspectives counterpose the role of density reporter for populations to that of local environment diffusivity probe for individual cells. Here we devise a model system where tubes of different heights contain matrix-embedded producers and sensors. These tubes allow non-limiting signal diffusion from one open end, thereby showing that population spatial extension away from an open boundary can be a main critical factor in QS. Experimental data, successfully recapitulated by a comprehensive mathematical model, demonstrate how tube height can overtake the role of producer density in triggering sensor activation. The biotic degradation of the signal is found to play a major role and to be species-specific and entirely feedback-independent.

  14. Thermoregulation of N-acyl homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing in the soft rot bacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    PubMed

    Latour, Xavier; Diallo, Stéphanie; Chevalier, Sylvie; Morin, Danièle; Smadja, Bruno; Burini, Jean-François; Haras, Dominique; Orange, Nicole

    2007-06-01

    The psychrotolerant bacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum produces four N-acyl homoserine lactones under a wide range of temperatures. Their thermoregulation differs from that of the exoenzyme production, described as being under quorum-sensing control. A mechanism involved in this thermoregulation consists of controlling N-acyl homoserine lactones synthase production at a transcriptional level.

  15. Programming the quorum sensing-based AND gate in Shewanella oneidensis for logic gated-microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yidan; Yang, Yun; Katz, Evgeny; Song, Hao

    2015-03-11

    An AND logic gate based on a synthetic quorum-sensing (QS) module was constructed in a Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 mtrA knockout mutant. The presence of two input signals activated the expression of a periplasmic decaheme cytochrome MtrA to regenerate the extracellular electron transfer conduit, enabling the construction of AND-gated microbial fuel cells.

  16. Integration of Metabolic and Quorum Sensing Signals Governing the Decision to Cooperate in a Bacterial Social Trait.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Kerry E; Monaco, Hilary; van Ditmarsch, Dave; Deforet, Maxime; Xavier, Joao B

    2015-05-01

    Many unicellular organisms live in multicellular communities that rely on cooperation between cells. However, cooperative traits are vulnerable to exploitation by non-cooperators (cheaters). We expand our understanding of the molecular mechanisms that allow multicellular systems to remain robust in the face of cheating by dissecting the dynamic regulation of cooperative rhamnolipids required for swarming in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We combine mathematical modeling and experiments to quantitatively characterize the integration of metabolic and population density signals (quorum sensing) governing expression of the rhamnolipid synthesis operon rhlAB. The combined computational/experimental analysis reveals that when nutrients are abundant, rhlAB promoter activity increases gradually in a density dependent way. When growth slows down due to nutrient limitation, rhlAB promoter activity can stop abruptly, decrease gradually or even increase depending on whether the growth-limiting nutrient is the carbon source, nitrogen source or iron. Starvation by specific nutrients drives growth on intracellular nutrient pools as well as the qualitative rhlAB promoter response, which itself is modulated by quorum sensing. Our quantitative analysis suggests a supply-driven activation that integrates metabolic prudence with quorum sensing in a non-digital manner and allows P. aeruginosa cells to invest in cooperation only when the population size is large enough (quorum sensing) and individual cells have enough metabolic resources to do so (metabolic prudence). Thus, the quantitative description of rhlAB regulatory dynamics brings a greater understating to the regulation required to make swarming cooperation stable.

  17. DNA Microarray-Based Identification of Genes Controlled by Autoinducer 2-Stimulated Quorum Sensing in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    DeLisa, Matthew P.; Wu, Chi-Fang; Wang, Liang; Valdes, James J.; Bentley, William E.

    2001-01-01

    Bacterial cell-to-cell communication facilitates coordinated expression of specific genes in a growth rate-II and cell density-dependent manner, a process known as quorum sensing. While the discovery of a diffusible Escherichia coli signaling pheromone, termed autoinducer 2 (AI-2), has been made along with several quorum sensing genes, the overall number and coordination of genes controlled by quorum sensing through the AI-2 signal has not been studied systematically. We investigated global changes in mRNA abundance elicited by the AI-2 signaling molecule through the use of a luxS mutant that was unable to synthesize AI-2. Remarkably, 242 genes, comprising ca. 5.6% of the E. coli genome, exhibited significant transcriptional changes (either induction or repression) in response to a 300-fold AI-2 signaling differential, with many of the identified genes displaying high induction levels (more than fivefold). Significant induction of ygeV, a putative ς54-dependent transcriptional activator, and yhbH, a ς54 modulating protein, suggests ς54 may be involved in E. coli quorum sensing. PMID:11514505

  18. Effect of a BlpC-based quorum-sensing induction peptide on bacteriocin production in Streptococcus thermophiles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacteriocin synthesis in Streptococcus thermophilus is controlled by a complex blp locus. High levels of bacteriocin are produced only if the quorum-sensing regulatory mechanism is activated by the 30mer induction peptide (QSIP) which is embedded in the BlpC protein product of the blpC component. T...

  19. The involvement of bacterial quorum sensing in the spoilage of refrigerated Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Suqin; Wu, Haohao; Zeng, Mingyong; Liu, Zunying; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-02

    Quorum-sensing signals in refrigerated shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) undergoing spoilage were examined using bioreporter assays, thin-layer chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and the results revealed the presence of three types of autoinducers including acetylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) (i.e., N-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone, N-oxohexanoyl-homoserine lactone and N-octanoyl-homoserine lactone), autoinducer-2, and cyclic dipeptides (i.e., cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Leu), cyclo-(L-Leu-L-Leu) and cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Phe)). Autoinducer-2, rather than any AHL, was detected in extracts from pure cultures of the specific spoilage organisms (SSO), i.e., Shewanella putrefaciens (SS01) and Shewanella baltica (SA02). As for the cyclic peptides, only SA02 was determined to produce cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Leu). According to the transcription levels of LuxR (the master quorum-sensing regulator) in the SSO in response to exogenous autoinducers, the SSO could sense AHLs and cyclo-(L-Leu-L-Leu), rather than autoinducer-2, cyclo-(L-Leu-L-Leu) and cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Phe). In accordance with the results of LuxR expression, the production of biofilm matrixes and extracellular proteases in the SSO was regulated by exogenous AHLs and cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Leu), rather than 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (the autoinducer-2 precursor), cyclo-(L-Leu-L-Leu) and cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Phe). Exogenous N-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone and cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Leu) increased the growth rates and population percentages of the SSO in shrimp samples under refrigerated storage, and interestingly, exogenous 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione also increased the population percentages of the SSO in vivo by inhibiting the growth of the competing bacteria. However, according to the levels of TVB-N and the volatile organic components in the shrimp samples, exogenous 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione did not accelerate the shrimp spoilage process as N-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone and cyclo-(L-Pro-L-Leu) did. In summary, our results suggest that

  20. Complete genome sequence of Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 (DSM 46869), a degrader of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing signal molecules.

    PubMed

    Rückert, Christian; Birmes, Franziska S; Müller, Christine; Niewerth, Heiko; Winkler, Anika; Fetzner, Susanne; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2015-10-10

    Rhodococcus erythropolis BG43 was isolated from soil and characterized as a degrader of the quorum sensing signal molecules 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (the Pseudomonas quinolone signal, PQS) and 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone, produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The complete genome of R. erythropolis BG43 consists of a circular chromosome and three plasmids, one of them circular and two linear ones. In total, 6158 protein-coding regions were identified. With this genome sequence, the genetic basis of its quorum-quenching ability and possible biotechnological applications can be explored further.

  1. Quorum sensing of bacteria and trans-kingdom interactions of N-acyl homoserine lactones with eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Anton; Schikora, Adam

    2012-06-01

    Many environmental and interactive important traits of bacteria, such as antibiotic, siderophore or exoenzyme (like cellulose, pectinase) production, virulence factors of pathogens, as well as symbiotic interactions, are regulated in a population density-dependent manner by using small signaling molecules. This phenomenon, called quorum sensing (QS), is widespread among bacteria. Many different bacterial species are communicating or "speaking" through diffusible small molecules. The production often is sophisticatedly regulated via an autoinducing mechanism. A good example is the production of N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHL), which occur in many variations of molecular structure in a wide variety of Gram-negative bacteria. In Gram-positive bacteria, other compounds, such as peptides, regulate cellular activity and behavior by sensing the cell density. The degradation of the signaling molecule--called quorum quenching--is probably another important integral part in the complex quorum sensing circuit. Most interestingly, bacterial quorum sensing molecules also are recognized by eukaryotes that are colonized by QS-active bacteria. In this case, the cross-kingdom interaction can lead to specific adjustment and physiological adaptations in the colonized eukaryote. The responses are manifold, such as modifications of the defense system, modulation of the immune response, or changes in the hormonal status and growth responses. Thus, the interaction with the quorum sensing signaling molecules of bacteria can profoundly change the physiology of higher organisms too. Higher organisms are obligatorily associated with microbial communities, and these truly multi-organismic consortia, which are also called holobionts, can actually be steered via multiple interlinked signaling substances that originate not only from the host but also from the associated bacteria.

  2. The quorum-sensing molecules farnesol/homoserine lactone and dodecanol operate via distinct modes of action in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hall, Rebecca A; Turner, Kara J; Chaloupka, James; Cottier, Fabien; De Sordi, Luisa; Sanglard, Dominique; Levin, Lonny R; Buck, Jochen; Mühlschlegel, Fritz A

    2011-08-01

    Living as a commensal, Candida albicans must adapt and respond to environmental cues generated by the mammalian host and by microbes comprising the natural flora. These signals have opposing effects on C. albicans, with host cues promoting the yeast-to-hyphal transition and bacteria-derived quorum-sensing molecules inhibiting hyphal development. Hyphal development is regulated through modulation of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway, and it has been postulated that quorum-sensing molecules can affect filamentation by inhibiting the cAMP pathway. Here, we show that both farnesol and 3-oxo-C(12)-homoserine lactone, a quorum-sensing molecule secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, block hyphal development by affecting cAMP signaling; they both directly inhibited the activity of the Candida adenylyl cyclase, Cyr1p. In contrast, the 12-carbon alcohol dodecanol appeared to modulate hyphal development and the cAMP signaling pathway without directly affecting the activity of Cyr1p. Instead, we show that dodecanol exerted its effects through a mechanism involving the C. albicans hyphal repressor, Sfl1p. Deletion of SFL1 did not affect the response to farnesol but did interfere with the response to dodecanol. Therefore, quorum sensing in C. albicans is mediated via multiple mechanisms of action. Interestingly, our experiments raise the possibility that the Burkholderia cenocepacia diffusible signal factor, BDSF, also mediates its effects via Sfl1p, suggesting that dodecanol's mode of action, but not farnesol or 3-oxo-C(12)-homoserine lactone, may be used by other quorum-sensing molecules.

  3. Exposure to Static Magnetic Field Stimulates Quorum Sensing Circuit in Luminescent Vibrio Strains of the Harveyi Clade

    PubMed Central

    Talà, Adelfia; Delle Side, Domenico; Buccolieri, Giovanni; Tredici, Salvatore Maurizio; Velardi, Luciano; Paladini, Fabio; De Stefano, Mario; Nassisi, Vincenzo; Alifano, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the evidence of electron-dense magnetic inclusions with polyhedral shape in the cytoplasm of Harveyi clade Vibrio strain PS1, a bioluminescent bacterium living in symbiosis with marine organisms, led us to investigate the behavior of this bacterium under exposure to static magnetic fields ranging between 20 and 2000 Gauss. When compared to sham-exposed, the light emission of magnetic field-exposed bacteria growing on solid medium at 18°C ±0.1°C was increased up to two-fold as a function of dose and growth phase. Stimulation of bioluminescence by magnetic field was more pronounced during the post-exponential growth and stationary phase, and was lost when bacteria were grown in the presence of the iron chelator deferoxamine, which caused disassembly of the magnetic inclusions suggesting their involvement in magnetic response. As in luminescent Vibrio spp. bioluminescence is regulated by quorum sensing, possible effects of magnetic field exposure on quorum sensing were investigated. Measurement of mRNA levels by reverse transcriptase real time-PCR demonstrated that luxR regulatory gene and luxCDABE operon coding for luciferase and fatty acid reductase complex were significantly up-regulated in magnetic field-exposed bacteria. In contrast, genes coding for a type III secretion system, whose expression was negatively affected by LuxR, were down-regulated. Up-regulation of luxR paralleled with down-regulation of small RNAs that mediate destabilization of luxR mRNA in quorum sensing signaling pathways. The results of experiments with the well-studied Vibrio campbellii strain BB120 (originally classified as Vibrio harveyi) and derivative mutants unable to synthesize autoinducers suggest that the effects of magnetic fields on quorum sensing may be mediated by AI-2, the interspecies quorum sensing signal molecule. PMID:24960170

  4. Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PAL5 possesses an active quorum sensing regulatory system.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Elisa V; Nieto Peñalver, Carlos G; Leguina, Ana C; Irazusta, Verónica P; de Figueroa, Lucía I C

    2014-09-01

    The endophytic bacterium Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus colonizes a broad range of host plants. Its plant growth-promoting capability is related to the capacity to perform biological nitrogen fixation, the biosynthesis of siderophores, antimicrobial substances and the solubilization of mineral nutrients. Colonization of and survival in these endophytic niche requires a complex regulatory network. Among these, quorum sensing systems (QS) are signaling mechanisms involved in the control of several genes related to microbial interactions, host colonization and stress survival. G. diazotrophicus PAL5 possesses a QS composed of a luxR and a luxI homolog, and produces eight molecules from the AHL family as QS signals. In this report data are provided showing that glucose concentration modifies the relative levels of these signal molecules. The activity of G. diazotrophicus PAL5 QS is also altered in presence of other carbon sources and under saline stress conditions. Inactivation of the QS system of G. diazotrophicus PAL5 by means of a quorum quenching strategy allowed the identification of extracellular and intracellular proteins under the control of this regulatory mechanism.

  5. Programmed Lab Experiments for Biochemical Investigation of Quorum-Sensing Signal Molecules in Rhizospheric Soil Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Nievas, Fiorela L; Bogino, Pablo C; Giordano, Walter

    2016-05-06

    Biochemistry courses in the Department of Molecular Biology at the National University of Río Cuarto, Argentina, are designed for undergraduate students in biology, microbiology, chemistry, agronomy, and veterinary medicine. Microbiology students typically have previous coursework in general, analytical, and organic chemistry. Programmed sequences of lab experiments allow these students to investigate biochemical problems whose solution is feasible within the context of their knowledge and experience. We previously designed and reported a programmed lab experiment that familiarizes microbiology students with techniques for detection and characterization of quorum-sensing (QS) and quorum-quenching (QQ) signal molecules. Here, we describe a sequence of experiments designed to expand the understanding and capabilities of biochemistry students using techniques for extraction and identification of QS and QQ signal molecules from peanut rhizospheric soil bacteria, including culturing and manipulation of bacteria under sterile conditions. The program provides students with an opportunity to perform useful assays, draw conclusions from their results, and discuss possible extensions of the study. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44:256-262, 2016.

  6. Dioxygenase-mediated quenching of quinolone-dependent quorum sensing in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Pustelny, Christian; Albers, Alexander; Büldt-Karentzopoulos, Klaudia; Parschat, Katja; Chhabra, Siri Ram; Cámara, Miguel; Williams, Paul; Fetzner, Susanne

    2009-12-24

    2-Heptyl-3-hydroxy-4(1H)-quinolone (PQS) is a quorum-sensing signal molecule used by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The structural similarity between 3-hydroxy-2-methyl-4(1H)-quinolone, the natural substrate for the 2,4-dioxygenase, Hod, and PQS prompted us to investigate whether Hod quenched PQS signaling. Hod is capable of catalyzing the conversion of PQS to N-octanoylanthranilic acid and carbon monoxide. In P. aeruginosa PAO1 cultures, exogenously supplied Hod protein reduced expression of the PQS biosynthetic gene pqsA, expression of the PQS-regulated virulence determinants lectin A, pyocyanin, and rhamnolipids, and virulence in planta. However, the proteolytic cleavage of Hod by extracellular proteases, competitive inhibition by the PQS precursor 2-heptyl-4(1H)-quinolone, and PQS binding to rhamnolipids reduced the efficiency of Hod as a quorum-quenching agent. Nevertheless, these data indicate that enzyme-mediated PQS inactivation has potential as an antivirulence strategy against P. aeruginosa.

  7. Novel Reporter for Identification of Interference with Acyl Homoserine Lactone and Autoinducer-2 Quorum Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Weiland-Bräuer, Nancy; Pinnow, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    Two reporter strains were established to identify novel biomolecules interfering with bacterial communication (quorum sensing [QS]). The basic design of these Escherichia coli-based systems comprises a gene encoding a lethal protein fused to promoters induced in the presence of QS signal molecules. Consequently, these E. coli strains are unable to grow in the presence of the respective QS signal molecules unless a nontoxic QS-interfering compound is present. The first reporter strain designed to detect autoinducer-2 (AI-2)-interfering activities (AI2-QQ.1) contained the E. coli ccdB lethal gene under the control of the E. coli lsrA promoter. The second reporter strain (AI1-QQ.1) contained the Vibrio fischeri luxI promoter fused to the ccdB gene to detect interference with acyl-homoserine lactones. Bacteria isolated from the surfaces of several marine eukarya were screened for quorum-quenching (QQ) activities using the established reporter systems AI1-QQ.1 and AI2-QQ.1. Out of 34 isolates, two interfered with acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) signaling, five interfered with AI-2 QS signaling, and 10 were demonstrated to interfere with both signal molecules. Open reading frames (ORFs) conferring QQ activity were identified for three selected isolates (Photobacterium sp., Pseudoalteromonas sp., and Vibrio parahaemolyticus). Evaluation of the respective heterologously expressed and purified QQ proteins confirmed their ability to interfere with the AHL and AI-2 signaling processes. PMID:25527543

  8. Evolution of Microbial Quorum Sensing to Human Global Quorum Sensing: An Insight into How Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication Might Be Linked to the Global Metabolic Disease Crisis.

    PubMed

    Trosko, James E

    2016-06-15

    The first anaerobic organism extracted energy for survival and reproduction from its source of nutrients, with the genetic means to ensure protection of its individual genome but also its species survival. While it had a means to communicate with its community via simple secreted molecules ("quorum sensing"), the eventual shift to an aerobic environment led to multi-cellular metazoan organisms, with evolutionary-selected genes to form extracellular matrices, stem cells, stem cell niches, and a family of gap junction or "connexin" genes. These germinal and somatic stem cells responded to extracellular signals that triggered intra-cellular signaling to regulate specific genes out of the total genome. These extra-cellular induced intra-cellular signals also modulated gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in order to regulate the new cellular functions of symmetrical and asymmetrical cell division, cell differentiation, modes of cell death, and senescence. Within the hierarchical and cybernetic concepts, differentiated by neurons organized in the brain of the Homo sapiens, the conscious mind led to language, abstract ideas, technology, myth-making, scientific reasoning, and moral decision-making, i.e., the creation of culture. Over thousands of years, this has created the current collision between biological and cultural evolution, leading to the global "metabolic disease" crisis.

  9. Conformational change-induced repeat domain expansion regulates Rap phosphatase quorum-sensing signal receptors.

    PubMed

    Parashar, Vijay; Jeffrey, Philip D; Neiditch, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    The large family of Gram-positive quorum-sensing receptors known as the RNPP proteins consists of receptors homologous to the Rap, NprR, PlcR, and PrgX proteins that are regulated by imported oligopeptide autoinducers. Rap proteins are phosphatases and transcriptional anti-activators, and NprR, PlcR, and PrgX proteins are DNA binding transcription factors. Despite their obvious importance, the mechanistic basis of oligopeptide receptor regulation is largely unknown. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the Bacillus subtilis quorum-sensing receptor RapJ in complex with the centrally important oligopeptide autoinducer competence and sporulation factor (CSF, also termed PhrC), a member of the Phr family of quorum-sensing signals. Furthermore, we present the crystal structure of RapI. Comparison of the RapJ-PhrC, RapI, RapH-Spo0F, and RapF-ComA(C) crystal structures reveals the mechanistic basis of Phr activity. More specifically, when complexed with target proteins, Rap proteins consist of a C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain connected by a flexible helix-containing linker to an N-terminal 3-helix bundle. In the absence of a target protein or regulatory peptide, the Rap protein 3-helix bundle adopts different conformations. However, in the peptide-bound conformation, the Rap protein N-terminal 3-helix bundle and linker undergo a radical conformational change, form TPR-like folds, and merge with the existing C-terminal TPR domain. To our knowledge, this is the first example of conformational change-induced repeat domain expansion. Furthermore, upon Phr binding, the entire Rap protein is compressed along the TPR superhelical axis, generating new intramolecular contacts that lock the Rap protein in an inactive state. The fact that Rap proteins are conformationally flexible is surprising considering that it is accepted dogma that TPR proteins do not undergo large conformational changes. Repeat proteins are widely used as scaffolds for the

  10. Anti-Quorum Sensing Activity of Substances Isolated from Wild Berry Associated Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Abudoleh, Suha M.; Mahasneh, Adel M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Quorum Sensing (QS) is a mechanism used by bacteria to determine their physiological activities and coordinate gene expression based on cell to cell signaling. Many bacterial physiological functions are under the regulation of quorum sensing such as virulence, luminescence, motility, sporulation and biofilm formation. The aim of the present study was to isolate and characterize Quorum Sensing Inhibitory (QSI) substances from epiphytic bacteria residing on wild berries surfaces. Methods: Fifty nine bacterial isolates out of 600 screened bacteria were successfully isolated. These bacteria were obtained from berry surfaces of different plants in the wild forests of Ajloun-Jordan. Screening for QSI activity using Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 monitor strain, resulted in isolating 6 isolates exhibiting QSI activity only, 11 isolates with QSI and antibacterial activity, and 42 isolates with antibacterial activity only. Three potential isolates S 130, S 153, and S 664, were gram positive rods and spore formers, catalase positive and oxidase negative. These were chosen for further testing and characterization. Results: Different solvent extraction of the QSI substances based on polarity indicated that the activity of S 130 was in the butanol extract, S 153 activity in both chloroform and butanol; and for S 664, the activity was detected in the hexane extract. The chloroform extract of S 153 and hexane extract of S 664 were proteinaceous in nature while QSI substances of the butanol extract of S 130 and S 153 were non-proteinaceous. All the tested QSI substances showed a marked thermal stability when subjected at several time intervals to 70°C, with the highest stability observed for the butanol extract of S 153. Assessing the QSI substances using violacein quantification assay revealed varying degrees of activity depending upon the extracting solvent, type of the producer bacteria and the concentration of the substances. Conclusion: This study

  11. Plausible Drug Targets in the Streptococcus mutans Quorum Sensing Pathways to Combat Dental Biofilms and Associated Risks.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurmeet; Rajesh, Shrinidhi; Princy, S Adline

    2015-12-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a Gram positive facultative anaerobe, is one among the approximately seven hundred bacterial species to exist in human buccal cavity and cause dental caries. Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell-density dependent communication process that respond to the inter/intra-species signals and elicit responses to show behavioral changes in the bacteria to an aggressive forms. In accordance to this phenomenon, the S. mutans also harbors a Competing Stimulating Peptide (CSP)-mediated quorum sensing, ComCDE (Two-component regulatory system) to regulate several virulence-associated traits that includes the formation of the oral biofilm (dental plaque), genetic competence and acidogenicity. The QS-mediated response of S. mutans adherence on tooth surface (dental plaque) imparts antibiotic resistance to the bacterium and further progresses to lead a chronic state, known as periodontitis. In recent years, the oral streptococci, S. mutans are not only recognized for its cariogenic potential but also well known to worsen the infective endocarditis due to its inherent ability to colonize and form biofilm on heart valves. The review significantly appreciate the increasing complexity of the CSP-mediated quorum-sensing pathway with a special emphasis to identify the plausible drug targets within the system for the development of anti-quorum drugs to control biofilm formation and associated risks.

  12. Deinococcus radiodurans can interfere with quorum sensing by producing an AHL-acylase and an AHL-lactonase.

    PubMed

    Koch, Gudrun; Nadal-Jimenez, Pol; Cool, Robbert H; Quax, Wim J

    2014-07-01

    Bacterial communication via the secretion of small diffusible compounds allows microorganisms to regulate gene expression in a coordinated manner. As many virulence traits are regulated in this fashion, disruption of chemical communication has been proposed as novel antimicrobial therapy. Quorum-quenching enzymes have been a promising discovery in this field as they interfere with the communication of Gram-negative bacteria. AHL-lactonases and AHL-acylases have been described in a variety of bacterial strains; however, usually only one of these two groups of enzymes has been described in a single species. We report here the presence of a member of each group of enzymes in the extremophile bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. Co-occurrence of both enzymes in a single species increases the chance of inactivating foreign AHL signals under different conditions. We demonstrate that both enzymes are able to degrade the quorum-sensing molecules of various pathogens subsequently affecting virulence gene expression. These studies add the quorum-quenching enzymes of D. radiodurans to the list of potent quorum-quenchers and highlight the idea that quorum quenching could have evolved in some bacteria as a strategy to gain a competitive advantage by altering gene expression in other species.

  13. In Silico Evaluation of the Impacts of Quorum Sensing Inhibition (QSI) on Strain Competition and Development of QSI Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guopeng; Lo, Chieh; Walsh, Connor; Hiller, N. Luisa; Marculescu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    As understanding of bacterial regulatory systems and pathogenesis continues to increase, QSI has been a major focus of research. However, recent studies have shown that mechanisms of resistance to quorum sensing (QS) inhibitors (QSIs) exist, calling into question their clinical value. We propose a computational framework that considers bacteria genotypes relative to QS genes and QS-regulated products including private, quasi-public, and public goods according to their impacts on bacterial fitness. Our results show (1) QSI resistance spreads when QS positively regulates the expression of private or quasi-public goods. (2) Resistance to drugs targeting secreted compounds downstream of QS for a mix of private, public, and quasi-public goods also spreads. (3) Changing the micro-environment during treatment with QSIs may decrease the spread of resistance. At fundamental-level, our simulation framework allows us to directly quantify cell-cell interactions and biofilm dynamics. Practically, the model provides a valuable tool for the study of QSI-based therapies, and the simulations reveal experimental paths that may guide QSI-based therapies in a manner that avoids or decreases the spread of QSI resistance. PMID:27734907

  14. In Silico Evaluation of the Impacts of Quorum Sensing Inhibition (QSI) on Strain Competition and Development of QSI Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Guopeng; Lo, Chieh; Walsh, Connor; Hiller, N. Luisa; Marculescu, Radu

    2016-10-01

    As understanding of bacterial regulatory systems and pathogenesis continues to increase, QSI has been a major focus of research. However, recent studies have shown that mechanisms of resistance to quorum sensing (QS) inhibitors (QSIs) exist, calling into question their clinical value. We propose a computational framework that considers bacteria genotypes relative to QS genes and QS-regulated products including private, quasi-public, and public goods according to their impacts on bacterial fitness. Our results show (1) QSI resistance spreads when QS positively regulates the expression of private or quasi-public goods. (2) Resistance to drugs targeting secreted compounds downstream of QS for a mix of private, public, and quasi-public goods also spreads. (3) Changing the micro-environment during treatment with QSIs may decrease the spread of resistance. At fundamental-level, our simulation framework allows us to directly quantify cell-cell interactions and biofilm dynamics. Practically, the model provides a valuable tool for the study of QSI-based therapies, and the simulations reveal experimental paths that may guide QSI-based therapies in a manner that avoids or decreases the spread of QSI resistance.

  15. Growth-related changes in intracellular spermidine and its effect on efflux pump expression and quorum sensing in Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ying Ying; Chua, Kim Lee

    2010-04-01

    The Burkholderia pseudomallei BpeAB-OprB resistance-nodulation-division (RND) family pump effluxes aminoglycoside and macrolide antibiotics as well as acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) involved in quorum sensing. Expression of bpeA-lacZ was cell density-dependent and was inducible in the presence of these compounds. Intracellular levels of spermidine and N-acetylspermidine increased with cell density in wild-type B. pseudomallei KHW, but were always lower in the bpeAB pump mutant at all growth phases. The significance of changes in intracellular spermidine on efflux pump expression was demonstrated by the disruption of the binding of the BpeR repressor protein to the bpeABoprB regulatory region in vitro in the presence of increasing spermidine concentrations. This was supported by dose-dependent activation of bpeA-lacZ transcription in vivo in the presence of exogenous spermidine and N-acetylspermidine, thus implicating the involvement of the BpeAB-OprB pump in spermidine homeostasis in B. pseudomallei. Consequently, inhibition of intracellular spermidine synthesis reduced the efflux of AHLs by BpeAB-OprB. Other potential therapeutic applications of spermidine synthase inhibitors include the reduction of swimming motility and biofilm formation by B. pseudomallei.

  16. Piper betle leaf extract affects the quorum sensing and hence virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1.

    PubMed

    Datta, Siraj; Jana, Debanjan; Maity, Tilak Raj; Samanta, Aveek; Banerjee, Rajarshi

    2016-06-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) plays an important role in virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, blocking of QS ability are viewed as viable antimicrobial chemotherapy and which may prove to be a safe anti-virulent drug. Bioactive components from Piper betle have been reported to possess antimicrobial ability. This study envisages on the anti-QS properties of ethanolic extract of P. betle leaf (PbLE) using P. aeruginosa PAO1 as a model organism. A marked reduction in swarming, swimming, and twitching ability of the bacteria is demonstrated in presence of PbLE. The biofilm and pyocyanin production also shows a marked reduction in presence of PbLE, though it does not affect the bacterial growth. Thus, the studies hint on the possible effect of the bioactive components of PbLE on reducing the virulent ability of the bacteria; identification of bioactive compounds should be investigated further.

  17. [THE ROLE OF SYSTEM QUORUM SENSING UNDER CHRONIC UROGENITAL CHLAMYDIA INFECTION].

    PubMed

    2015-10-01

    It is established that system quorum sensing (QS) assure social behavior of bacteria in regulation of genes of virulence and generalization of inflectional inflammatory process under chronic urogenital chlamydia infection. The techniques of gas chromatography and mass-spectrometry were applied to detect molecular markers of generalization of infectious process under urogenital chlamydiasis--activators of QS microbes (lactones, quinolones, furan ethers). The developed diagnostic gas chromatography and mass-spectrometry criteria of indexation of molecular markers under chronic urogenital chlamydia infection have high level of diagnostic sensitivity, specificity and prognostic value of positive and negative result. The application of techniques of gas chromatography and mass-spectrometry permits enhancing effectiveness of diagnostic of chronic inflectional inflammatory diseases of urogenital system of chlamydia etiology with identification of prognostic criteria of generalization of infectious process and subsequent prescription of timely and appropriate therapy

  18. Reverse engineering gene regulatory networks related to quorum sensing in the plant pathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuang; Husmeier, Dirk; Dondelinger, Frank; Mayer, Claus D; Liu, Hui; Prichard, Leighton; Salmond, George P C; Toth, Ian K; Birch, Paul R J

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the project reported in the present chapter was the reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks related to quorum sensing in the plant pathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum from micorarray gene expression profiles, obtained from the wild-type and eight knockout strains. To this end, we have applied various recent methods from multivariate statistics and machine learning: graphical Gaussian models, sparse Bayesian regression, LASSO (least absolute shrinkage and selection operator), Bayesian networks, and nested effects models. We have investigated the degree of similarity between the predictions obtained with the different approaches, and we have assessed the consistency of the reconstructed networks in terms of global topological network properties, based on the node degree distribution. The chapter concludes with a biological evaluation of the predicted network structures.

  19. 6-Gingerol reduces Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation and virulence via quorum sensing inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han-Shin; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Byun, Youngjoo; Park, Hee-Deung

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a well-known pathogenic bacterium that forms biofilms and produces virulence factors via quorum sensing (QS). Interfering with normal QS interactions between signal molecules and their cognate receptors is a developing strategy for attenuating its virulence. Here we tested the hypothesis that 6-gingerol, a pungent oil of fresh ginger, reduces biofilm formation and virulence by antagonistically binding to P. aeruginosa QS receptors. In silico studies demonstrated molecular binding occurs between 6-gingerol and the QS receptor LasR through hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. Experimentally 6-gingerol reduced biofilm formation, several virulence factors (e.g., exoprotease, rhamnolipid, and pyocyanin), and mice mortality. Further transcriptome analyses demonstrated that 6-gingerol successfully repressed QS-induced genes, specifically those related to the production of virulence factors. These results strongly support our hypothesis and offer insight into the molecular mechanism that caused QS gene repression. PMID:25728862

  20. Bacterial behaviors associated with the quorum-sensing peptide pheromone ('alarmone') in streptococci.

    PubMed

    Dufour, Delphine; Lévesque, Céline M

    2013-05-01

    Streptococci are among the predominant bacterial species living in the human body. They are normally harmless bacteria, but have the ability to cause diverse infections, ranging from mild (e.g., tooth decay and sore throat) to life-threatening (e.g., endocarditis and meningitis). Streptococci have evolved various means of coping with the deleterious effects of environmental stressors and avoiding the host immune system. Recently, several studies have shown that streptococci colonizing the mouth and upper respiratory tract are able to mount complex stress responses in order to persist and successfully survive competition in their ecological niche. Using a small quorum-sensing peptide pheromone acting as a stress-inducible 'alarmone', oral streptococci synchronize the gene expression of a specific group of cells to coordinate important biological activities.

  1. Pseudomonas cremoricolorata Strain ND07 Produces N-acyl Homoserine Lactones as Quorum Sensing Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Yunos, Nina Yusrina Muhamad; Tan, Wen-Si; Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Mohamad, Nur Izzati; Tan, Pui-Wan; Adrian, Tan-Guan-Sheng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial cell-to-cell communication system controlling QS-mediated genes which is synchronized with the population density. The regulation of specific gene activity is dependent on the signaling molecules produced, namely N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs). We report here the identification and characterization of AHLs produced by bacterial strain ND07 isolated from a Malaysian fresh water sample. Molecular identification showed that strain ND07 is clustered closely to Pseudomonas cremoricolorata. Spent culture supernatant extract of P. cremoricolorata strain ND07 activated the AHL biosensor Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. Using high resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, it was confirmed that P. cremoricolorata strain ND07 produced N-octanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C8-HSL) and N-decanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (C10-HSL). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation on the production of C10-HSL in P. cremoricolorata strain ND07. PMID:24984061

  2. Dynamics and Mechanism of A Quorum Sensing Network Regulated by Small RNAs in Vibrio Harveyi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jian-Wei

    2011-03-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) has attracted much interests and it is an important process of cell communication. Recently, Bassler et al. studied the phenomena of QS regulated by small RNAs and the experimental data showed that small RNAs played important role in the QS of Vibrio harveyi and it can permit the fine-tuning of gene regulation and maintenance of homeostasis. According to Michaelis—Menten kinetics and mass action law in this paper, we construct a mathematical model to investigate the mechanism induced QS by coexist of small RNA and signal molecular (AI) and show that there are periodic oscillation when the time delay and Hill coefficient exceed a critical value and the periodic oscillation produces the change of concentration and induces QS. These results are fit to the experimental results. In the meanwhile, we also get some theoretical value of Hopf Bifurcation on time deday. In addition, we also find this network is robust against noise.

  3. Serotonin Activates Bacterial Quorum Sensing and Enhances the Virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the Host.

    PubMed

    Knecht, Leslie D; O'Connor, Gregory; Mittal, Rahul; Liu, Xue Z; Daftarian, Pirouz; Deo, Sapna K; Daunert, Sylvia

    2016-07-01

    Bacteria in humans play an important role in health and disease. Considerable emphasis has been placed in understanding the role of bacteria in host-microbiome interkingdom communication. Here we show that serotonin, responsible for mood in the brain and motility in the gut, can also act as a bacterial signaling molecule for pathogenic bacteria. Specifically, we found that serotonin acts as an interkingdom signaling molecule via quorum sensing and that it stimulates the production of bacterial virulence factors and increases biofilm formation in vitro and in vivo in a novel mouse infection model. This discovery points out at roles of serotonin both in bacteria and humans, and at phenotypic implications not only manifested in mood behavior but also in infection processes in the host. Thus, regulating serotonin concentrations in the gut may provide with paradigm shifting therapeutic approaches.

  4. Quorum sensing triggers the stochastic escape of individual cells from Pseudomonas putida biofilms.

    PubMed

    Cárcamo-Oyarce, Gerardo; Lumjiaktase, Putthapoom; Kümmerli, Rolf; Eberl, Leo

    2015-01-16

    The term 'quorum sensing' (QS) is generally used to describe the phenomenon that bacteria release and perceive signal molecules to coordinate cooperative behaviour in response to their population size. QS-based communication has therefore been considered a social trait. Here we show that QS signals (N-acyl-homoserine lactones, AHLs) are stochastically produced in young biofilms of Pseudomonas putida and act mainly as self-regulatory signals rather than inducing neighbouring cells. We demonstrate that QS induces the expression of putisolvin biosurfactants that are not public goods, thereby triggering asocial motility of induced cells out of microcolonies. Phenotypic heterogeneity is most prominent in the early stages of biofilm development, whereas at later stages behaviour patterns across cells become more synchronized. Our findings broaden our perspective on QS by showing that AHLs can control the expression of asocial (self-directed) traits, and that heterogeneity in QS can serve as a mechanism to drive phenotypic heterogeneity in self-directed behaviour.

  5. Piper nigrum, Piper betle and Gnetum gnemon- Natural Food Sources with Anti-Quorum Sensing Properties

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Li Ying; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-01-01

    Various parts of Piper nigrum, Piper betle and Gnetum gnemon are used as food sources by Malaysians. The purpose of this study is to examine the anti-quorum sensing (anti-QS) properties of P. nigrum, P. betle and G. gnemon extracts. The hexane, chloroform and methanol extracts of these plants were assessed in bioassays involving Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01, Escherichia coli [pSB401], E. coli [pSB1075] and Chromobacterium violaceum CV026. It was found that the extracts of these three plants have anti-QS ability. Interestingly, the hexane, chloroform and methanol extracts from P. betle showed the most potent anti-QS activity as judged by the bioassays. Since there is a variety of plants that serve as food sources in Malaysia that have yet to be tested for anti-QS activity, future work should focus on identification of these plants and isolation of the anti-QS compounds. PMID:23519352

  6. Differential Immune Modulatory Activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Sensing Signal Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Hooi, Doreen S. W.; Bycroft, Barrie W.; Chhabra, Siri Ram; Williams, Paul; Pritchard, David I.

    2004-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa releases a spectrum of well-regulated virulence factors, controlled by intercellular communication (quorum sensing) and mediated through the production of small diffusible quorum-sensing signal molecules (QSSM). We hypothesize that QSSM may in fact serve a dual purpose, also allowing bacterial colonization via their intrinsic immune-modulatory capacity. One class of signal molecule, the N-acylhomoserine lactones, has pleiotropic effects on eukaryotic cells, particularly those involved in host immunity. In the present study, we have determined the comparative effects of two chemically distinct and endobronchially detectable QSSM, N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL) and 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4 (1H)-quinolone or the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), on human leukocytes exposed to a series of stimuli designed to detect differential immunological activity in vitro. 3-Oxo-C12-HSL and PQS displayed differential effects on the release of interleukin-2 (IL-2) when human T cells were activated via the T-cell receptor and CD28 (a costimulatory molecule). 3-Oxo-C12-HSL inhibited cell proliferation and IL-2 release; PQS inhibited cell proliferation without affecting IL-2 release. Both molecules inhibited cell proliferation and the release of IL-2 following mitogen stimulation. Furthermore, in the presence of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide, 3-oxo-C12-HSL inhibited tumor necrosis factor alpha release from human monocytes, as reported previously (K. Tateda et al., Infect. Immun. 64:37-43, 1996), whereas PQS did not inhibit in this assay. These data highlight the presence of two differentially active immune modulatory QSSM from P. aeruginosa, which are detectable endobronchially and may be active at the host/pathogen interface during infection with P. aeruginosa, should the bronchial airway lymphoid tissues prove to be accessible to QSSM. PMID:15501777

  7. Differential immune modulatory activity of Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum-sensing signal molecules.

    PubMed

    Hooi, Doreen S W; Bycroft, Barrie W; Chhabra, Siri Ram; Williams, Paul; Pritchard, David I

    2004-11-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa releases a spectrum of well-regulated virulence factors, controlled by intercellular communication (quorum sensing) and mediated through the production of small diffusible quorum-sensing signal molecules (QSSM). We hypothesize that QSSM may in fact serve a dual purpose, also allowing bacterial colonization via their intrinsic immune-modulatory capacity. One class of signal molecule, the N-acylhomoserine lactones, has pleiotropic effects on eukaryotic cells, particularly those involved in host immunity. In the present study, we have determined the comparative effects of two chemically distinct and endobronchially detectable QSSM, N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL) and 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4 (1H)-quinolone or the Pseudomonas quinolone signal (PQS), on human leukocytes exposed to a series of stimuli designed to detect differential immunological activity in vitro. 3-Oxo-C12-HSL and PQS displayed differential effects on the release of interleukin-2 (IL-2) when human T cells were activated via the T-cell receptor and CD28 (a costimulatory molecule). 3-Oxo-C12-HSL inhibited cell proliferation and IL-2 release; PQS inhibited cell proliferation without affecting IL-2 release. Both molecules inhibited cell proliferation and the release of IL-2 following mitogen stimulation. Furthermore, in the presence of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide, 3-oxo-C12-HSL inhibited tumor necrosis factor alpha release from human monocytes, as reported previously (K. Tateda et al., Infect. Immun. 64:37-43, 1996), whereas PQS did not inhibit in this assay. These data highlight the presence of two differentially active immune modulatory QSSM from P. aeruginosa, which are detectable endobronchially and may be active at the host/pathogen interface during infection with P. aeruginosa, should the bronchial airway lymphoid tissues prove to be accessible to QSSM.

  8. Acyl homoserine lactone-based quorum sensing stimulates biofilm formation by Salmonella Enteritidis in anaerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Felipe Alves de; Pimentel-Filho, Natan de Jesus; Pinto, Uelinton Manoel; Mantovani, Hilário Cuquetto; Oliveira, Leandro Licursi de; Vanetti, Maria Cristina Dantas

    2017-04-01

    Quorum sensing regulates a variety of phenotypes in bacteria including the production of virulence factors. Salmonella spp. have quorum sensing systems mediated by three autoinducers (AI-1, AI-2, and AI-3). The AI-1-mediated system is incomplete in that the bacterium relies on the synthesis of signaling molecules by other microorganisms. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of the AI-1 N-dodecanoyl-DL-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL) on the growth, motility, adhesion, and biofilm formation of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis PT4 578 on a polystyrene surface. Experiments were conducted at 37 °C in anaerobic tryptone soy broth supplemented with C12-HSL and/or a mixture of four synthetic furanones, at the concentration of 50 nM each. The planktonic growth, adhesion, swarming, and twitching motility were not altered in the presence of C12-HSL and/or furanones under anaerobic conditions. However, C12-HSL induced biofilm formation after 36 h of cultivation as determined by quantification of biofilm formation, by enumeration of adhered cells to polystyrene coupons, and finally by imaging the presence of multilayered cells on an epifluorescence microscope. When furanones were present in the medium, an antagonistic effect against C12-HSL on the biofilm development was observed. The results demonstrate an induction of biofilm formation in Salmonella Enteritidis by AI-1 under anaerobic conditions. Considering that Salmonella does not produce AI-1 but respond to it, C12-HSL synthesized by other bacterial species could trigger biofilm formation by this pathogen in conditions that are relevant for its pathogenesis.

  9. Involvement of Bacterial Quorum-Sensing Signals in Spoilage of Bean Sprouts

    PubMed Central

    Rasch, Maria; Andersen, Jens Bo; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Flodgaard, Lars Ravn; Christensen, Henrik; Givskov, Michael; Gram, Lone

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial communication signals, acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs), were extracted from samples of commercial bean sprouts undergoing soft-rot spoilage. Bean sprouts produced in the laboratory did not undergo soft-rot spoilage and did not contain AHLs or AHL-producing bacteria, although the bacterial population reached levels similar to those in the commercial sprouts, 108 to 109 CFU/g. AHL-producing bacteria (Enterobacteriaceae and pseudomonads) were isolated from commercial sprouts, and strains that were both proteolytic and pectinolytic were capable of causing soft-rot spoilage in bean sprouts. Thin-layer chromatography and liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry revealed the presence of N-3-oxo-hexanoyl-l-homoserine lactone in spoiled bean sprouts and in extracts from pure cultures of bacteria. During normal spoilage, the pH of the sprouts increased due to proteolytic activity, and the higher pH probably facilitated the activity of pectate lyase. The AHL synthetase gene (I gene) from a spoilage Pectobacterium was cloned, sequenced, and inactivated in the parent strain. The predicted amino acid sequence showed 97% homology to HslI and CarI in Erwinia carotovora. Spoilage of laboratory bean sprouts inoculated with the AHL-negative mutant was delayed compared to sprouts inoculated with the wild type, and the AHL-negative mutant did not cause the pH to rise. Compared to the wild-type strain, the AHL-negative mutant had significantly reduced protease and pectinase activities and was negative in an iron chelation (siderophore) assay. This is the first study demonstrating AHL regulation of iron chelation in Enterobacteriaceae. The present study clearly demonstrates that the bacterial spoilage of some food products is influenced by quorum-sensing-regulated phenotypes, and understanding these processes may be useful in the development of novel food preservation additives that specifically block the quorum-sensing systems. PMID:15933035

  10. Baicalein Inhibits Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation and the Quorum Sensing System In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Liu, Tangjuan; Wang, Ke; Hou, Changchun; Cai, Shuangqi; Huang, Yingying; Du, Zhongye; Huang, Hong; Kong, Jinliang; Chen, Yiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formed by Staphylococcus aureus significantly enhances antibiotic resistance by inhibiting the penetration of antibiotics, resulting in an increasingly serious situation. This study aimed to assess whether baicalein can prevent Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation and whether it may have synergistic bactericidal effects with antibiotics in vitro. To do this, we used a clinically isolated strain of Staphylococcus aureus 17546 (t037) for biofilm formation. Virulence factors were detected following treatment with baicalein, and the molecular mechanism of its antibiofilm activity was studied. Plate counting, crystal violet staining, and fluorescence microscopy revealed that 32 μg/mL and 64 μg/mL baicalein clearly inhibited 3- and 7-day biofilm formation in vitro. Moreover, colony forming unit count, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy showed that vancomycin (VCM) and baicalein generally enhanced destruction of biofilms, while VCM alone did not. Western blotting and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses (RTQ-PCR) confirmed that baicalein treatment reduced staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) and α-hemolysin (hla) levels. Most strikingly, real-time qualitative polymerase chain reaction data demonstrated that 32 μg/mL and 64 μg/mL baicalein downregulated the quorum-sensing system regulators agrA, RNAIII, and sarA, and gene expression of ica, but 16 μg/mL baicalein had no effect. In summary, baicalein inhibited Staphylococcus aureus biofilm formation, destroyed biofilms, increased the permeability of vancomycin, reduced the production of staphylococcal enterotoxin A and α-hemolysin, and inhibited the quorum sensing system. These results support baicalein as a novel drug candidate and an effective treatment strategy for Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-associated infections.

  11. Interference of quorum sensing in Pseudomonas syringae by bacterial epiphytes that limit iron availability.

    PubMed

    Dulla, Glenn F J; Krasileva, Ksenia V; Lindow, Steven E

    2010-06-01

    Leaf surfaces harbour bacterial epiphytes that are capable of influencing the quorum sensing (QS) system, density determination through detection of diffusible signal molecules, of the plant-pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae (Pss) which controls expression of extracellular polysaccharide production, motility and other factors contributing to virulence to plants. Approximately 11% of the bacterial epiphytes recovered from a variety of plants produced a diffusible factor capable of inhibiting the QS system of Pss as indicated by suppression of ahlI. Blockage of QS by these interfering strains correlated strongly with their ability to limit iron availability to Pss. A direct relationship between the ability of isogenic Escherichia coli strains to sequester iron via their production of different siderophores and their ability to suppress QS in Pss was also observed. Quorum sensing induction was inversely related to iron availability in culture media supplemented with iron chelators or with FeCl(3). Co-inoculation of interfering strains with Pss onto leaves increased the number of resultant disease lesions over twofold compared with that on plants inoculated with Pss alone. Transposon-generated mutants of interfering strains in which QS inhibition was blocked did not increase disease when co-inoculated with Pss. Increased disease incidence was also not observed when a non-motile mutant of Pss was co-inoculated onto plants with QS interfering bacteria suggesting that these strains enhanced the motility of Pss in an iron-dependent manner, leading to an apparent increase in virulence of this pathogen. Considerable cross-talk mediated by iron scavenging apparently occurs on plants, thereby altering the behaviour of bacteria such as Pss that exhibit important QS-dependent traits in this habitat.

  12. Production of tyrosol by Candida albicans biofilms and its role in quorum sensing and biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Alem, Mohammed A S; Oteef, Mohammed D Y; Flowers, T Hugh; Douglas, L Julia

    2006-10-01

    Tyrosol and farnesol are quorum-sensing molecules produced by Candida albicans which accelerate and block, respectively, the morphological transition from yeasts to hyphae. In this study, we have investigated the secretion of tyrosol by C. albicans and explored its likely role in biofilm development. Both planktonic (suspended) cells and biofilms of four C. albicans strains, including three mutants with defined defects in the Efg 1 and Cph 1 morphogenetic signaling pathways, synthesized extracellular tyrosol during growth at 37 degrees C. There was a correlation between tyrosol production and biomass for both cell types. However, biofilm cells secreted at least 50% more tyrosol than did planktonic cells when tyrosol production was related to cell dry weight. The addition of exogenous farnesol to a wild-type strain inhibited biofilm formation by up to 33% after 48 h. Exogenous tyrosol appeared to have no effect, but scanning electron microscopy revealed that tyrosol stimulated hypha production during the early stages (1 to 6 h) of biofilm development. Experiments involving the simultaneous addition of tyrosol and farnesol at different concentrations suggested that the action of farnesol was dominant, and 48-h biofilms formed in the presence of both compounds consisted almost entirely of yeast cells. When biofilm supernatants were tested for their abilities to inhibit or enhance germ tube formation by planktonic cells, the results indicated that tyrosol activity exceeds that of farnesol after 14 h, but not after 24 h, and that farnesol activity increases significantly during the later stages (48 to 72 h) of biofilm development. Overall, our results support the conclusion that tyrosol acts as a quorum-sensing molecule for biofilms as well as for planktonic cells and that its action is most significant during the early and intermediate stages of biofilm formation.

  13. Inhibition of quorum sensing-controlled virulence factor production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 by Ayurveda spice clove (Syzygium aromaticum) bud extract.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Thiba; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2012-01-01

    Quorum sensing controls the virulence determinants in most proteobacteria. In this work, the hexane, chloroform and methanol extracts of an Ayurveda spice, namely clove (Syzygium aromaticum), shown anti-quorum sensing activity. Hexane and methanol extracts of clove inhibited the response of C. violaceum CV026 to exogenously supplied N-hexanoylhomoserine lactone, in turn preventing violacein production. Chloroform and methanol extracts of clove significantly reduced bioluminescence production by E. coli [pSB1075] grown in the presence of N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone. We demonstrated that clove extract inhibited quorum sensing-regulated phenotypes in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01, including expression of lecA::lux (by hexane extract), swarming (maximum inhibition by methanol extract), pyocyanin (maximum inhibition by hexane extract). This study shows that the presence of natural compounds that exhibit anti-quorum sensing activity in the clove extracts may be useful as the lead of anti-infective drugs.

  14. Insights into the Quorum Sensing Regulon of the Acidophilic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Revealed by Transcriptomic in the Presence of an Acyl Homoserine Lactone Superagonist Analog.

    PubMed

    Mamani, Sigde; Moinier, Danielle; Denis, Yann; Soulère, Laurent; Queneau, Yves; Talla, Emmanuel; Bonnefoy, Violaine; Guiliani, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    While a functional quorum sensing system has been identified in the acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270(T) and shown to modulate cell adhesion to solid substrates, nothing is known about the genes it regulates. To address the question of how quorum sensing controls biofilm formation in A. ferrooxidans (T), the transcriptome of this organism in conditions in which quorum sensing response is stimulated by a synthetic superagonist AHL (N-acyl homoserine lactones) analog has been studied. First, the effect on biofilm formation of a synthetic AHL tetrazolic analog, tetrazole 9c, known for its agonistic QS activity, was assessed by fluorescence and electron microscopy. A fast adherence of A. ferrooxidans (T) cells on sulfur coupons was observed. Then, tetrazole 9c was used in DNA microarray experiments that allowed the identification of genes regulated by quorum sensing signaling, and more particularly, those involved in early biofilm formation. Interestingly, afeI gene, encoding the AHL synthase, but not the A. ferrooxidans quorum sensing transcriptional regulator AfeR encoding gene, was shown to be regulated by quorum sensing. Data indicated that quorum sensing network represents at least 4.5% (141 genes) of the ATCC 23270(T) genome of which 42.5% (60 genes) are related to biofilm formation. Finally, AfeR was shown to bind specifically to the regulatory region of the afeI gene at the level of the palindromic sequence predicted to be the AfeR binding site. Our results give new insights on the response of A. ferrooxidans to quorum sensing and on biofilm biogenesis.

  15. Insights into the Quorum Sensing Regulon of the Acidophilic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans Revealed by Transcriptomic in the Presence of an Acyl Homoserine Lactone Superagonist Analog

    PubMed Central

    Mamani, Sigde; Moinier, Danielle; Denis, Yann; Soulère, Laurent; Queneau, Yves; Talla, Emmanuel; Bonnefoy, Violaine; Guiliani, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    While a functional quorum sensing system has been identified in the acidophilic chemolithoautotrophic Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270T and shown to modulate cell adhesion to solid substrates, nothing is known about the genes it regulates. To address the question of how quorum sensing controls biofilm formation in A. ferrooxidansT, the transcriptome of this organism in conditions in which quorum sensing response is stimulated by a synthetic superagonist AHL (N-acyl homoserine lactones) analog has been studied. First, the effect on biofilm formation of a synthetic AHL tetrazolic analog, tetrazole 9c, known for its agonistic QS activity, was assessed by fluorescence and electron microscopy. A fast adherence of A. ferrooxidansT cells on sulfur coupons was observed. Then, tetrazole 9c was used in DNA microarray experiments that allowed the identification of genes regulated by quorum sensing signaling, and more particularly, those involved in early biofilm formation. Interestingly, afeI gene, encoding the AHL synthase, but not the A. ferrooxidans quorum sensing transcriptional regulator AfeR encoding gene, was shown to be regulated by quorum sensing. Data indicated that quorum sensing network represents at least 4.5% (141 genes) of the ATCC 23270T genome of which 42.5% (60 genes) are related to biofilm formation. Finally, AfeR was shown to bind specifically to the regulatory region of the afeI gene at the level of the palindromic sequence predicted to be the AfeR binding site. Our results give new insights on the response of A. ferrooxidans to quorum sensing and on biofilm biogenesis. PMID:27683573

  16. Microbial growth and quorum sensing antagonist activities of herbal plants extracts.

    PubMed

    Al-Hussaini, Reema; Mahasneh, Adel M

    2009-09-03

    Antimicrobial and antiquorum sensing (AQS) activities of fourteen ethanolic extracts of different parts of eight plants were screened against four Gram-positive, five Gram-negative bacteria and four fungi. Depending on the plant part extract used and the test microorganism, variable activities were recorded at 3 mg per disc. Among the Grampositive bacteria tested, for example, activities of Laurus nobilis bark extract ranged between a 9.5 mm inhibition zone against Bacillus subtilis up to a 25 mm one against methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Staphylococcus aureus and Aspergillus fumigatus were the most susceptible among bacteria and fungi tested towards other plant parts. Of interest is the tangible antifungal activity of a Tecoma capensis flower extract, which is reported for the first time. However, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC's) for both bacteria and fungi were relatively high (0.5-3.0 mg). As for antiquorum sensing activity against Chromobacterium violaceum, superior activity (>17 mm QS inhibition) was associated with Sonchus oleraceus and Laurus nobilis extracts and weak to good activity (8-17 mm) was recorded for other plants. In conclusion, results indicate the potential of these plant extracts in treating microbial infections through cell growth inhibition or quorum sensing antagonism, which is reported for the first time, thus validating their medicinal use.

  17. The role of quorum sensing system in antimicrobial induced ampC expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jingming; Jiang, Handong; Cheng, Wei; Wu, Jinxiang; Zhao, Jiping; Wang, Junfei; Dong, Liang

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of quorum sensing (QS) systems in Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) on the expression of ampC gene induced by antibiotics. An in vitro dynamic model of P. aeruginosa biofilms was established in a silicon tube in once-flowthrough system at 37 °C. Biofilm generation was identified by argentation. Biofilm morphology of standard P. aeruginosa strain (PAO-1) and QS systems deficient strains (PDO100, rhlI deficient strain; PAO-JP1, lasI deficient strain; and PAO-MW1, rhlI and lasI deficient strain) were observed by optical microscope. The expression of ampC in PAO1, PAO1 with QS inhibitor (furanone C-30) and the QS deficient strains before and after induced by antibiotics were quantified by real-time quantitative PCR. The biofilms of PAO-1 and PDO100 were much thicker and denser than that of PAO-JP1 and PAO-MW1. Being induced by antibiotics, the expression of ampC in PAO1 and PDO100 was significantly higher than that in PAO-MW1 and PAO-JP1. With the effect of furanone C-30, the expression of ampC in PAO1 induced by antibiotics was reduced in a dose-dependent manner. QS system, especially the las system, plays an important role in both biofilm formation and antimicrobials induced ampC expression and furanone C-30 is a potent inhibitor for P. aeruginosa QS system.

  18. Microbial communication, cooperation and cheating: quorum sensing drives the evolution of cooperation in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Czárán, Tamás; Hoekstra, Rolf F

    2009-08-17

    An increasing body of empirical evidence suggests that cooperation among clone-mates is common in bacteria. Bacterial cooperation may take the form of the excretion of "public goods": exoproducts such as virulence factors, exoenzymes or components of the matrix in biofilms, to yield significant benefit for individuals joining in the common effort of producing them. Supposedly in order to spare unnecessary costs when the population is too sparse to supply the sufficient exoproduct level, many bacteria have evolved a simple chemical communication system called quorum sensing (QS), to "measure" the population density of clone-mates in their close neighborhood. Cooperation genes are expressed only above a threshold rate of QS signal molecule re-capture, i.e., above the local quorum of cooperators. The cooperative population is exposed to exploitation by cheaters, i.e., mutants who contribute less or nil to the effort but fully enjoy the benefits of cooperation. The communication system is also vulnerable to a different type of cheaters ("Liars") who may produce the QS signal but not the exoproduct, thus ruining the reliability of the signal. Since there is no reason to assume that such cheaters cannot evolve and invade the populations of honestly signaling cooperators, the empirical fact of the existence of both bacterial cooperation and the associated QS communication system seems puzzling. Using a stochastic cellular automaton approach and allowing mutations in an initially non-cooperating, non-communicating strain we show that both cooperation and the associated communication system can evolve, spread and remain persistent. The QS genes help cooperative behavior to invade the population, and vice versa; cooperation and communication might have evolved synergistically in bacteria. Moreover, in good agreement with the empirical data recently available, this synergism opens up a remarkably rich repertoire of social interactions in which cheating and exploitation are

  19. A Method for Structure–Activity Analysis of Quorum-Sensing Signaling Peptides from Naturally Transformable Streptococci

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Many species of streptococci secrete and use a competence-stimulating peptide (CSP) to initiate quorum sensing for induction of genetic competence, bacteriocin production, and other activities. These signaling molecules are small, unmodified peptides that induce powerful strain-specific activity at nano-molar concentrations. This feature has provided an excellent opportunity to explore their structure–function relationships. However, CSP variants have also been identified in many species, and each specifically activates its cognate receptor. How such minor changes dramatically affect the specificity of these peptides remains unclear. Structure–activity analysis of these peptides may provide clues for understanding the specificity of signaling peptide–receptor interactions. Here, we use the Streptococcus mutans CSP as an example to describe methods of analyzing its structure–activity relationship. The methods described here may provide a platform for studying quorum-sensing signaling peptides of other naturally transformable streptococci. PMID:19517207

  20. Quorum sensing signals affect spoilage of refrigerated large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea) by Shewanella baltica.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junli; Zhao, Aifei; Feng, Lifang; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-18

    In this work we investigated the specific spoilage organism (SSO) of large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea) stored at 4°C and role of quorum sensing (QS) system of SSO isolated from the spoiled fish. According to microbial count and 16S rRNA gene of the isolated pure strains, Shewanella, mainly Shewanella baltica and Shewanella putrefaciens, was predominant genera at the end of shelf-life of P. crocea. Among Shewanella isolates, S.baltica02 was demonstrated as SSO in spoilage potential characteristics by inoculation into sterile fish juice using sensory and chemical analyses. Autoinducer 2 and two cyclic dipeptides (DKPs) including cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Leu) and cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Phe), no any AHLs, were detected in cell-free S. baltica culture. Interestingly, S.baltica02 had the highest QS activity among three spoilers of S. baltica. The production of biofilm, trimethylamines (TMA) and putrescine in these spoilers significantly increased in the presence of cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Leu), rather than cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Phe) and 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (the AI-2 precursor, DPD). In accordance with the effect of signal molecules on the spoilage phenotype, exposure to exogenous cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Leu) was also showed to up-regulate the transcription levels of luxR, torA and ODC, and no effect of luxS indicated that S. baltica could sense cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Leu). In the fish homogenate, exogenous cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Leu) shortened lag phase durations and enhanced growth rates of the dominant bacteria, H2S producing bacteria, under refrigerated storage, while exogenous DPD retarded growth of competing bacteria, such as Enterobacteriaceae. Meanwhile, cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Leu) also promoted the accumulation of metabolites on the spoilage process of homogenate. S.baltica02 luxS mutant preliminarily proved that AI-2 might not play a signaling role in the spoilage. The present study suggested that the spoilage potential of S. baltica in P. crocea might be regulated by DKP-based quorum sensing.

  1. Iron- and Quorum-sensing Signals Converge on Small Quorum-regulatory RNAs for Coordinated Regulation of Virulence Factors in Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yancheng; Kim, In Hwang; Kim, Kun-Soo

    2016-07-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a marine bacterium that causes human infections resulting in high mortality. This pathogen harbors five quorum-regulatory RNAs (Qrr1-5) that affect the expression of pathogenicity genes by modulating the expression of the master regulator SmcR. The qrr genes are activated by phosphorylated LuxO to different degrees; qrr2 is strongly activated; qrr3 and qrr5 are moderately activated, and qrr1 and qrr4 are marginally activated and are the only two that do not respond to cell density-dependent regulation. Qrrs function redundantly to inhibit SmcR at low cell density and fully repress when all five are activated. In this study, we found that iron inhibits qrr expression in three distinct ways. First, the iron-ferric uptake regulator (Fur) complex directly binds to qrr promoter regions, inhibiting LuxO activation by competing with LuxO for cis-acting DNA elements. Second, qrr transcription is repressed by iron independently of Fur. Third, LuxO expression is repressed by iron independently of Fur. We also found that, under iron-limiting conditions, the five Qrrs functioned additively, not redundantly, to repress SmcR, suggesting that cells lacking iron enter a high cell density mode earlier and could thereby modulate expression of virulence factors sooner. This study suggests that iron and quorum sensing, along with their cognate regulatory circuits, are linked together in the coordinated expression of virulence factors.

  2. The Stringent Response Modulates 4-Hydroxy-2-Alkylquinoline Biosynthesis and Quorum-Sensing Hierarchy in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Schafhauser, James; Lepine, Francois; McKay, Geoffrey; Ahlgren, Heather G.; Khakimova, Malika

    2014-01-01

    As a ubiquitous environmental organism and an important human pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa readily adapts and responds to a wide range of conditions and habitats. The intricate regulatory networks that link quorum sensing and other global regulators allow P. aeruginosa to coordinate its gene expression and cell signaling in response to different growth conditions and stressors. Upon nutrient transitions and starvation, as well as other environmental stresses, the stringent response is activated, mediated by the signal (p)ppGpp. P. aeruginosa produces a family of molecules called HAQ (4-hydroxy-2-alkylquinolines), some of which exhibit antibacterial and quorum-sensing signaling functions and regulate virulence genes. In this study, we report that (p)ppGpp negatively regulates HAQ biosynthesis: in a (p)ppGpp-null (ΔSR) mutant, HHQ (4-hydroxyl-2-heptylquinoline) and PQS (3,4-dihydroxy-2-heptylquinoline) levels are increased due to upregulated pqsA and pqsR expression and reduced repression by the rhl system. We also found that (p)ppGpp is required for full expression of both rhl and las AHL (acyl-homoserine lactone) quorum-sensing systems, since the ΔSR mutant has reduced rhlI, rhlR, lasI, and lasR expression, butanoyl-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL) and 3-oxo-dodecanoyl-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C12-HSL) levels, and rhamnolipid and elastase production. Furthermore, (p)ppGpp significantly modulates the AHL and PQS quorum-sensing hierarchy, as the las system no longer has a dominant effect on HAQ biosynthesis when the stringent response is inactivated. PMID:24509318

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of Pseudoalteromonas tetraodonis Strain MQS005, a Bacterium with Potential Quorum-Sensing Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yonglong; Wang, Yanbo; Yan, Xiaoqing; Mazumder, Asit

    2016-01-01

    We present here the draft genome sequence of Pseudoalteromonas tetraodonis strain MQS005, a bacterium possessing potential quorum-sensing regulatory activity. This strain was isolated from water from the South China Sea, People’s Republic of China. The assembly consists of 4,252,538 bp and contains 144 contigs, with a G+C content of 41.85%. PMID:27491986

  4. Regulation of the violacein biosynthetic gene cluster by acylhomoserine lactone-mediated quorum sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472.

    PubMed

    Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Fukamachi, Katsumasa; Kato, Masashi; Kato, Norihiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2010-01-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum produces the purple pigment violacein by quorum-sensing regulation. 20-bp of the lux box-like sequence was found upstream of vioA in C. violaceum ATCC 12472. CviR received C10-HSL and C6-HSL and activated the transcription of vioA in Escherichia coli. However, in strain ATCC 12472, C6-HSL inhibited both C10-HSL-mediated violacein production and the transcription of vioA.

  5. The natural antimicrobial carvacrol inhibits quorum sensing in Chromobacterium violaceum and reduces bacterial biofilm formation at sub-lethal concentrations.

    PubMed

    Burt, Sara A; Ojo-Fakunle, Victoria T A; Woertman, Jenifer; Veldhuizen, Edwin J A

    2014-01-01

    The formation of biofilm by bacteria confers resistance to biocides and presents problems in medical and veterinary clinical settings. Here we report the effect of carvacrol, one of the major antimicrobial components of oregano oil, on the formation of biofilms and its activity on existing biofilms. Assays were carried out in polystyrene microplates to observe (a) the effect of 0-0.8 mM carvacrol on the formation of biofilms by selected bacterial pathogens over 24 h and (b) the effect of 0-8 mM carvacrol on the stability of pre-formed biofilms. Carvacrol was able to inhibit the formation of biofilms of Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472, Salmonella enterica subsp. Typhimurium DT104, and Staphylococcus aureus 0074, while it showed no effect on formation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (field isolate) biofilms. This inhibitory effect of carvacrol was observed at sub-lethal concentrations (<0.5 mM) where no effect was seen on total bacterial numbers, indicating that carvacrol's bactericidal effect was not causing the observed inhibition of biofilm formation. In contrast, carvacrol had (up to 8 mM) very little or no activity against existing biofilms of the bacteria described, showing that formation of the biofilm also confers protection against this compound. Since quorum sensing is an essential part of biofilm formation, the effect of carvacrol on quorum sensing of C. violaceum was also studied. Sub-MIC concentrations of carvacrol reduced expression of cviI (a gene coding for the N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone synthase), production of violacein (pigmentation) and chitinase activity (both regulated by quorum sensing) at concentrations coinciding with carvacrol's inhibiting effect on biofilm formation. These results indicate that carvacrol's activity in inhibition of biofilm formation may be related to the disruption of quorum sensing.

  6. Silencing the mob: disrupting quorum sensing as a means to fight plant disease.

    PubMed

    Helman, Yael; Chernin, Leonid

    2015-04-01

    Bacteria are able to sense their population's density through a cell-cell communication system, termed 'quorum sensing' (QS). This system regulates gene expression in response to cell density through the constant production and detection of signalling molecules. These molecules commonly act as auto-inducers through the up-regulation of their own synthesis. Many pathogenic bacteria, including those of plants, rely on this communication system for infection of their hosts. The finding that the countering of QS-disrupting mechanisms exists in many prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms offers a promising novel method to fight disease. During the last decade, several approaches have been proposed to disrupt QS pathways of phytopathogens, and hence to reduce their virulence. Such studies have had varied success in vivo, but most lend promising support to the idea that QS manipulation could be a potentially effective method to reduce bacterial-mediated plant disease. This review discusses the various QS-disrupting mechanisms found in both bacteria and plants, as well as the different approaches applied artificially to interfere with QS pathways and thus protect plant health.

  7. Synthetic Quorum Sensing and Cell-Cell Communication in Gram-Positive Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Nicholas; Collins, Cynthia H

    2016-07-15

    The components of natural quorum-sensing (QS) systems can be used to engineer synthetic communication systems that regulate gene expression in response to chemical signals. We have used the machinery from the peptide-based agr QS system from Staphylococcus aureus to engineer a synthetic QS system in Bacillus megaterium to enable autoinduction of a target gene at high cell densities. Growth and gene expression from these synthetic QS cells were characterized in both complex and minimal media. We also split the signal production and sensing components between two strains of B. megaterium to produce sender and receiver cells and characterized the resulting communication in liquid media and on semisolid agar. The system described in this work represents the first synthetic QS and cell-cell communication system that has been engineered to function in a Gram-positive host, and it has the potential to enable the generation of dynamic gene regulatory networks in B. megaterium and other Gram-positive organisms.

  8. Bacterial Secretant from Pseudomonas aeruginosa Dampens Inflammasome Activation in a Quorum Sensing-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jungmin; Lee, Kang-Mu; Park, Sangjun; Cho, Yoeseph; Lee, Eunju; Park, Jong-Hwan; Shin, Ok Sarah; Son, Junghyun; Yoon, Sang Sun; Yu, Je-Wook

    2017-01-01

    Inflammasome signaling can contribute to host innate immune defense against bacterial pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. However, bacterial evasion of host inflammasome activation is still poorly elucidated. Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial communication mechanism that promotes coordinated adaptation by triggering expression of a wide range of genes. QS is thought to strongly contribute to the virulence of P. aeruginosa, but the molecular impact of bacterial QS on host inflammasome defense is completely unknown. Here, we present evidence that QS-related factors of the bacterial secretant (BS) from P. aeruginosa can dampen host inflammasome signaling in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. We found that BS from QS-defective ΔlasR/rhlR mutant, but not from wild-type (WT) P. aeruginosa, induces robust activation of the NLRC4 inflammasome. P. aeruginosa-released flagellin mediates this inflammasome activation by ΔlasR/rhlR secretant, but QS-regulated bacterial proteases in the WT BS impair extracellular flagellin to attenuate NLRC4 inflammasome activation. P. aeruginosa-secreted proteases also degrade inflammasome components in the extracellular space to inhibit the propagation of inflammasome-mediated responses. Furthermore, QS-regulated virulence factor pyocyanin and QS autoinducer 3-oxo-C12-homoserine lactone directly suppressed NLRC4- and even NLRP3-mediated inflammasome assembly and activation. Taken together, our data indicate that QS system of P. aeruginosa facilitates bacteria to evade host inflammasome-dependent sensing machinery.

  9. Methyl 3-Hydroxymyristate, a Diffusible Signal Mediating phc Quorum Sensing in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Kai, Kenji; Ohnishi, Hideyuki; Shimatani, Mika; Ishikawa, Shiho; Mori, Yuka; Kiba, Akinori; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Tabuchi, Mitsuaki; Hikichi, Yasufumi

    2015-11-02

    Ralstonia solanacearum, a plant pathogenic bacterium causing "bacterial wilt" on crops, uses a quorum sensing (QS) system consisting of phc regulatory elements to control its virulence. Methyl 3-hydroxypalmitate (3-OH PAME) was previously identified as the QS signal in strain AW1. However, 3-OH PAME has not been reportedly detected from any other strains, and this suggests that they produce another unknown QS signal. Here we identify (R)-methyl 3-hydroxymyristate [(R)-3-OH MAME] as a new QS signal that regulates the production of virulence factors and secondary metabolites. (R)-3-OH MAME was synthesized by the methyltransferase PhcB and sensed by the histidine kinase PhcS. The phylogenetic trees of these proteins from R. solanacearum strains were divided into two groups, according to their QS signal types--(R)-3-OH MAME or (R)-3-OH PAME. These results demonstrate that (R)-3-OH MAME is another crucial QS signal and highlight the unique evolution of QS systems in R. solanacearum.

  10. Modeling quorum sensing trade-offs between bacterial cell density and system extension from open boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Marenda, Mattia; Zanardo, Marina; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio; Squartini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial communities undergo collective behavioural switches upon producing and sensing diffusible signal molecules; a mechanism referred to as Quorum Sensing (QS). Exemplarily, biofilm organic matrices are built concertedly by bacteria in several environments. QS scope in bacterial ecology has been debated for over 20 years. Different perspectives counterpose the role of density reporter for populations to that of local environment diffusivity probe for individual cells. Here we devise a model system where tubes of different heights contain matrix-embedded producers and sensors. These tubes allow non-limiting signal diffusion from one open end, thereby showing that population spatial extension away from an open boundary can be a main critical factor in QS. Experimental data, successfully recapitulated by a comprehensive mathematical model, demonstrate how tube height can overtake the role of producer density in triggering sensor activation. The biotic degradation of the signal is found to play a major role and to be species-specific and entirely feedback-independent. PMID:27966657

  11. Furvina inhibits the 3-oxo-C12-HSL-based quorum sensing system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and QS-dependent phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Borges, Anabela; Sousa, Pedro; Gaspar, Alexandra; Vilar, Santiago; Borges, Fernanda; Simões, Manuel

    2017-02-01

    Disruption of cell-cell communication or quorum sensing (QS) is considered a stimulating approach for reducing bacterial pathogenicity and resistance. Although several QS inhibitors (QSIs) have been discovered so far their clinical use remains distant. This problem can be circumvented by searching for QSI among drugs already approved for the treatment of different diseases. In this context, antibiotics have earned special attention. Whereas at high concentrations antibiotics exert a killing effect, at lower concentrations they may act as signaling molecules and as such can modulate gene expression. In this study, the antibiotic furvina was shown to be able to cause inhibition of the 3-oxo-C12-HSL-dependent QS system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Furvina interacts with the LasI/LasR system. The data were validated by modeling studies. Furvina can also reduce biofilm formation and decrease the production of QS-controlled virulence factors.

  12. Response of Salmonella Typhi to bile-generated oxidative stress: implication of quorum sensing and persister cell populations.

    PubMed

    Walawalkar, Yogesh D; Vaidya, Yatindra; Nayak, Vijayashree

    2016-11-01

    Salmonella Typhi can chronically persist within the gallbladder of patients suffering from gallbladder diseases. This study, intended to improve our understanding of bacterial mechanisms underlying bile adaptation, revealed that bile, which is a bactericidal agent, led to the generation of reactive oxygen species in S Typhi. Salmonella Typhi in response showed a significant increase in the production of anti-oxidative enzymes, namely superoxide dismutase and catalase. The work reports that the quorum-sensing (QS) system of S Typhi regulates the level of these enzymes during oxidative stress. In support of these observations, the quorum-sensing mutant of S Typhi was found to be sensitive to bile with significantly lower levels of anti-oxidant enzymes compared to other clinical isolates. Furthermore the addition of exogenous cell-free extracts (CFEs) of S Typhi containing the quorum-sensing signalling molecule significantly increased the levels of these enzymes within the mutant. Interestingly the CFE addition did not significantly restore the biofilm-forming ability of the mutant strain when compared with the wild-type. In the presence of ciprofloxacin and ampicillin, S Typhi formed persister cells which increased >3-fold in the presence of bile. Thus the QS-system of S Typhi aids in oxidative stress management, and enhanced persister cell populations could assist chronic bacterial persistence within the gallbladder.

  13. Bench-to-bedside review: Quorum sensing and the role of cell-to-cell communication during invasive bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Asad, Shadaba; Opal, Steven M

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria communicate extensively with each other and employ a communal approach to facilitate survival in hostile environments. A hierarchy of cell-to-cell signaling pathways regulates bacterial growth, metabolism, biofilm formation, virulence expression, and a myriad of other essential functions in bacterial populations. The notion that bacteria can signal each other and coordinate their assault patterns against susceptible hosts is now well established. These signaling networks represent a previously unrecognized survival strategy by which bacterial pathogens evade antimicrobial defenses and overwhelm the host. These quorum sensing communication signals can transgress species barriers and even kingdom barriers. Quorum sensing molecules can regulate human transcriptional programs to the advantage of the pathogen. Human stress hormones and cytokines can be detected by bacterial quorum sensing systems. By this mechanism, the pathogen can detect the physiologically stressed host, providing an opportunity to invade when the patient is most vulnerable. These rather sophisticated, microbial communication systems may prove to be a liability to pathogens as they make convenient targets for therapeutic intervention in our continuing struggle to control microbial pathogens. PMID:19040778

  14. Degradation of bacterial quorum sensing signaling molecules by the microscopic yeast Trichosporon loubieri isolated from tropical wetland waters.

    PubMed

    Wong, Cheng-Siang; Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Chen, Jian Woon; Chong, Yee Meng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-09-25

    Proteobacteria produce N-acylhomoserine lactones as signaling molecules, which will bind to their cognate receptor and activate quorum sensing-mediated phenotypes in a population-dependent manner. Although quorum sensing signaling molecules can be degraded by bacteria or fungi, there is no reported work on the degradation of such molecules by basidiomycetous yeast. By using a minimal growth medium containing N-3-oxohexanoylhomoserine lactone as the sole source of carbon, a wetland water sample from Malaysia was enriched for microbial strains that can degrade N-acylhomoserine lactones, and consequently, a basidiomycetous yeast strain WW1C was isolated. Morphological phenotype and molecular analyses confirmed that WW1C was a strain of Trichosporon loubieri. We showed that WW1C degraded AHLs with N-acyl side chains ranging from 4 to 10 carbons in length, with or without oxo group substitutions at the C3 position. Re-lactonisation bioassays revealed that WW1C degraded AHLs via a lactonase activity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of degradation of N-acyl-homoserine lactones and utilization of N-3-oxohexanoylhomoserine as carbon and nitrogen source for growth by basidiomycetous yeast from tropical wetland water; and the degradation of bacterial quorum sensing molecules by an eukaryotic yeast.

  15. Bacillus sp. QSI-1 Modulate Quorum Sensing Signals Reduce Aeromonas hydrophila Level and Alter Gut Microbial Community Structure in Fish.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuxin; Zhang, An; Yin, Hongping; Chu, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell density dependent process that enables bacteria to communicate with each other based on the production, secretion and sensing of the auto-inducer molecules and then subsequently regulate virulence associated gene expression. Interrupting quorum sensing may represent a novel alternative approach to combat bacterial pathogen. Several bacteria can produce quorum quenching (QQ) enzymes. However, the role of QQ bacteria in shaping the microbiota and the level of N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs, a prevalent type of QS molecules) producing bacteria remains largely unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the presence of AHLs in the fish intestine and investigate the modulation of gut microbiota and its effect on Aeromonas hydrophila level by a QQ enzyme producing probiotic Bacillus sp. QSI-1. AHLs were found in fish gut content and were confirmed in Aeromonas species using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens AT 136 (pZLR4) as reporter strains. We demonstrated that the composition of fish gut microbiota was affected by quenching bacteria QSI-1, and the percentage of A. hydrophila was decreased significantly. Taken together, these results provide valuable insights into QQ enzyme producing probiotics can modulate the microbiota structure and decrease the percentage of AHL-producing pathogenic bacteria in the gut. These data strongly suggest that QQ probiotics may serve as non-antibiotic feed additive in aquaculture to control bacterial diseases.

  16. Degradation of Bacterial Quorum Sensing Signaling Molecules by the Microscopic Yeast Trichosporon loubieri Isolated from Tropical Wetland Waters

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Cheng-Siang; Koh, Chong-Lek; Sam, Choon-Kook; Chen, Jian Woon; Chong, Yee Meng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2013-01-01

    Proteobacteria produce N-acylhomoserine lactones as signaling molecules, which will bind to their cognate receptor and activate quorum sensing-mediated phenotypes in a population-dependent manner. Although quorum sensing signaling molecules can be degraded by bacteria or fungi, there is no reported work on the degradation of such molecules by basidiomycetous yeast. By using a minimal growth medium containing N-3-oxohexanoylhomoserine lactone as the sole source of carbon, a wetland water sample from Malaysia was enriched for microbial strains that can degrade N-acylhomoserine lactones, and consequently, a basidiomycetous yeast strain WW1C was isolated. Morphological phenotype and molecular analyses confirmed that WW1C was a strain of Trichosporon loubieri. We showed that WW1C degraded AHLs with N-acyl side chains ranging from 4 to 10 carbons in length, with or without oxo group substitutions at the C3 position. Re-lactonisation bioassays revealed that WW1C degraded AHLs via a lactonase activity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of degradation of N-acyl-homoserine lactones and utilization of N-3-oxohexanoylhomoserine as carbon and nitrogen source for growth by basidiomycetous yeast from tropical wetland water; and the degradation of bacterial quorum sensing molecules by an eukaryotic yeast. PMID:24072030

  17. Beneficial effects of bacteria-plant communication based on quorum sensing molecules of the N-acyl homoserine lactone group.

    PubMed

    Schikora, Adam; Schenk, Sebastian T; Hartmann, Anton

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial quorum sensing (QS) mechanisms play a crucial role in the proper performance and ecological fitness of bacterial populations. Many key physiological processes are regulated in a QS-dependent manner by auto-inducers, like the N-acyl homoserine lactones (AHLs) in numerous Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, also the interaction between bacteria and eukaryotic hosts can be regulated by AHLs. Those mechanisms gained much attention, because of the positive effects of different AHL molecules on plants. This positive impact ranges from growth promotion to induced resistance and is quite contrasting to the rather negative effects observed in the interactions between bacterial AHL molecules and animals. Only very recently, we began to understand the molecular mechanisms underpinning plant responses to AHL molecules. In this review, we gathered the latest information in this research field. The first part gives an overview of the bacterial aspects of quorum sensing. Later we focus on the impact of AHLs on plant growth and AHL-priming, as one of the most understood phenomena in respect to the inter-kingdom interactions based on AHL-quorum sensing molecules. Finally, we discuss the potential benefits of the understanding of bacteria-plant interaction for the future agricultural applications.

  18. Surface polysaccharides and quorum sensing are involved in the attachment and survival of Xanthomonas albilineans on sugarcane leaves.

    PubMed

    Mensi, Imene; Daugrois, Jean-Heinrich; Pieretti, Isabelle; Gargani, Daniel; Fleites, Laura A; Noell, Julie; Bonnot, Francois; Gabriel, Dean W; Rott, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Xanthomonas albilineans, the causal agent of sugarcane leaf scald, is a bacterial plant pathogen that is mainly spread by infected cuttings and contaminated harvesting tools. However, some strains of this pathogen are known to be spread by aerial means and are able to colonize the phyllosphere of sugarcane before entering the host plant and causing disease. The objective of this study was to identify the molecular factors involved in the survival or growth of X. albilineans on sugarcane leaves. We developed a bioassay to test for the attachment of X. albilineans on sugarcane leaves using tissue-cultured plantlets grown in vitro. Six mutants of strain XaFL07-1 affected in surface polysaccharide production completely lost their capacity to survive on the sugarcane leaf surface. These mutants produced more biofilm in vitro and accumulated more cellular poly-β-hydroxybutyrate than the wild-type strain. A mutant affected in the production of small molecules (including potential biosurfactants) synthesized by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs) attached to the sugarcane leaves as well as the wild-type strain. Surprisingly, the attachment of bacteria on sugarcane leaves varied among mutants of the rpf gene cluster involved in bacterial quorum sensing. Therefore, quorum sensing may affect polysaccharide production, or both polysaccharides and quorum sensing may be involved in the survival or growth of X. albilineans on sugarcane leaves.

  19. Modeling of Cell-to-Cell Communication Processes with Petri Nets Using the Example of Quorum Sensing.

    PubMed

    Janowski, Sebastian; Kormeier, Benjamin; Töpel, Thoralf; Hippe, Klaus; Hofestädt, Ralf; Willassen, Nils; Friesen, Rafael; Rubert, Sebastian; Borck, Daniela; Haugen, Peik; Chen, Ming

    2011-01-01

    The understanding of the molecular mechanism of cell-to-cell communication is fundamental for system biology. Up to now, the main objectives of bioinformatics have been reconstruction, modeling and analysis of metabolic, regulatory and signaling processes, based on data generated from high-throughput technologies. Cell-to-cell communication or quorum sensing (QS), the use of small molecule signals to coordinate complex patterns of behavior in bacteria, has been the focus of many reports over the past decade. Based on the quorum sensing process of the organism Aliivibrio salmonicida, we aim at developing a functional Petri net, which will allow modeling and simulating cell-to-cell communication processes. Using a new editor-controlled information system called VANESA (http://vanesa.sf.net), we present how to combine different fields of studies such as life-science, database consulting, modeling, visualization and simulation for a semi-automatic reconstruction of the complex signaling quorum sensing network. We show how cell-to-cell communication processes and information-flow within a cell and across cell colonies can be modeled using VANESA and how those models can be simulated with Petri net network structures in a sophisticated way.

  20. Modeling of cell-to-cell communication processes with Petri nets using the example of quorum sensing.

    PubMed

    Janowski, Sebastian; Kormeier, Benjamin; Töpel, Thoralf; Hippe, Klaus; Hofestädt, Ralf; Willassen, Nils; Friesen, Rafael; Rubert, Sebastian; Borck, Daniela; Haugen, Peik; Chen, Ming

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of the molecular mechanism of cell-to-cell communication is fundamental for system biology. Up to now, the main objectives of bioinformatics have been reconstruction, modeling and analysis of metabolic, regulatory and signaling processes, based on data generated from high-throughput technologies. Cell-to-cell communication or quorum sensing (QS), the use of small molecule signals to coordinate complex patterns of behavior in bacteria, has been the focus of many reports over the past decade. Based on the quorum sensing process of the organism Aliivibrio salmonicida, we aim at developing a functional Petri net, which will allow modeling and simulating cell-to-cell communication processes. Using a new editor-controlled information system called VANESA (http://vanesa.sf.net), we present how to combine different fields of studies such as life-science, database consulting, modeling, visualization and simulation for a semi-automatic reconstruction of the complex signaling quorum sensing network. We show how cell-to-cell communication processes and information-flow within a cell and across cell colonies can be modeled using VANESA and how those models can be simulated with Petri net network structures in a sophisticated way.

  1. Bacillus sp. QSI-1 Modulate Quorum Sensing Signals Reduce Aeromonas hydrophila Level and Alter Gut Microbial Community Structure in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuxin; Zhang, An; Yin, Hongping; Chu, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a cell density dependent process that enables bacteria to communicate with each other based on the production, secretion and sensing of the auto-inducer molecules and then subsequently regulate virulence associated gene expression. Interrupting quorum sensing may represent a novel alternative approach to combat bacterial pathogen. Several bacteria can produce quorum quenching (QQ) enzymes. However, the role of QQ bacteria in shaping the microbiota and the level of N-acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs, a prevalent type of QS molecules) producing bacteria remains largely unknown. The objective of this study was to examine the presence of AHLs in the fish intestine and investigate the modulation of gut microbiota and its effect on Aeromonas hydrophila level by a QQ enzyme producing probiotic Bacillus sp. QSI-1. AHLs were found in fish gut content and were confirmed in Aeromonas species using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens AT 136 (pZLR4) as reporter strains. We demonstrated that the composition of fish gut microbiota was affected by quenching bacteria QSI-1, and the percentage of A. hydrophila was decreased significantly. Taken together, these results provide valuable insights into QQ enzyme producing probiotics can modulate the microbiota structure and decrease the percentage of AHL-producing pathogenic bacteria in the gut. These data strongly suggest that QQ probiotics may serve as non-antibiotic feed additive in aquaculture to control bacterial diseases. PMID:28018866

  2. Quorum-Sensing-Negative (lasR) Mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Avoid Cell Lysis and Death

    PubMed Central

    Heurlier, Karin; Dénervaud, Valérie; Haenni, Marisa; Guy, Lionel; Krishnapillai, Viji; Haas, Dieter

    2005-01-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, N-acylhomoserine lactone signals regulate the expression of several hundreds of genes, via the transcriptional regulator LasR and, in part, also via the subordinate regulator RhlR. This regulatory network termed quorum sensing contributes to the virulence of P. aeruginosa as a pathogen. The fact that two supposed PAO1 wild-type strains from strain collections were found to be defective for LasR function because of independent point mutations in the lasR gene led to the hypothesis that loss of quorum sensing might confer a selective advantage on P. aeruginosa under certain environmental conditions. A convenient plate assay for LasR function was devised, based on the observation that lasR mutants did not grow on adenosine as the sole carbon source because a key degradative enzyme, nucleoside hydrolase (Nuh), is positively controlled by LasR. The wild-type PAO1 and lasR mutants showed similar growth rates when incubated in nutrient yeast broth at pH 6.8 and 37°C with good aeration. However, after termination of growth during 30 to 54 h of incubation, when the pH rose to ≥ 9, the lasR mutants were significantly more resistant to cell lysis and death than was the wild type. As a consequence, the lasR mutant-to-wild-type ratio increased about 10-fold in mixed cultures incubated for 54 h. In a PAO1 culture, five consecutive cycles of 48 h of incubation sufficed to enrich for about 10% of spontaneous mutants with a Nuh− phenotype, and five of these mutants, which were functionally complemented by lasR+, had mutations in lasR. The observation that, in buffered nutrient yeast broth, the wild type and lasR mutants exhibited similar low tendencies to undergo cell lysis and death suggests that alkaline stress may be a critical factor providing a selective survival advantage to lasR mutants. PMID:15995202

  3. Quorum quenching enzymes.

    PubMed

    Fetzner, Susanne

    2015-05-10

    Bacteria use cell-to-cell communication systems based on chemical signal molecules to coordinate their behavior within the population. These quorum sensing systems are potential targets for antivirulence therapies, because many bacterial pathogens control the expression of virulence factors via quorum sensing networks. Since biofilm maturation is also usually influenced by quorum sensing, quenching these systems may contribute to combat biofouling. One possibility to interfere with quorum sensing is signal inactivation by enzymatic degradation or modification. Such quorum quenching enzymes are wide-spread in the bacterial world and have also been found in eukaryotes. Lactonases and acylases that hydrolyze N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) signaling molecules have been investigated most intensively, however, different oxidoreductases active toward AHLs or 2-alkyl-4(1H)-quinolone signals as well as other signal-converting enzymes have been described. Several approaches have been assessed which aim at alleviating virulence, or biofilm formation, by reducing the signal concentration in the bacterial environment. These involve the application or stimulation of signal-degrading bacteria as biocontrol agents in the protection of crop plants against soft-rot disease, the use of signal-degrading bacteria as probiotics in aquaculture, and the immobilization or entrapment of quorum quenching enzymes or bacteria to control biofouling in membrane bioreactors. While most approaches to use quorum quenching as antivirulence strategy are still in the research phase, the growing number of organisms and enzymes known to interfere with quorum sensing opens up new perspectives for the development of innovative antibacterial strategies.

  4. Antioxidant and anti-quorum sensing activities of green pod of Acacia nilotica L.

    PubMed

    Singh, Brahma N; Singh, B R; Singh, R L; Prakash, D; Sarma, B K; Singh, H B

    2009-04-01

    The antioxidant and anti-quorum sensing activities of eight extracts were studied in green pods of Acacia nilotica. The specific phenolic compositions and their quantifications were performed by HPLC and MS/MS, which showed that the HEF (pH 4) was higher in gallic acid, ellagic acid, epicatechin, rutin, and GTs. In order to find antioxidant potential of various extracts, their activities were studied for TPC, AOA, FRSA, RP, inhibition of LPO, FIC activity, HO* and O(2)(-) scavenging activities. Among them HEF (pH 4) has shown potent antioxidant activity. HEF (pH 4) was also found effective in protecting plasmid DNA and HAS protein oxidation induced by HO*. Pre-treatment of HEF (pH 4) at 75 and 150 mg/kg body weight for 6 days caused a significant increase in the levels of CAT and SOD and decrease in the level of MDA content in liver, lungs, kidneys and blood when compared to CCl(4)-intoxicated rats. Eventually, the extracts were also screened for anti-QS activity. Of these extracts two showed QS inhibition: HEF (pH 4) and HCE. The results obtained strongly indicate that green pod of A. nilotica are important source of natural antioxidants.

  5. Death and survival in Streptococcus mutans: differing outcomes of a quorum-sensing signaling peptide.

    PubMed

    Leung, Vincent; Dufour, Delphine; Lévesque, Céline M

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are considered "social" organisms able to communicate with one another using small hormone-like molecules (pheromones) in a process called quorum-sensing (QS). These signaling molecules increase in concentration as a function of bacterial cell density. For most human pathogens, QS is critical for virulence and biofilm formation, and the opportunity to interfere with bacterial QS could provide a sophisticated means for manipulating the composition of pathogenic biofilms, and possibly eradicating the infection. Streptococcus mutans is a well-characterized resident of the dental plaque biofilm, and is the major pathogen of dental caries (cavities). In S. mutans, its CSP QS signaling peptide does not act as a classical QS signal by accumulating passively in proportion to cell density. In fact, particular stresses such as those encountered in the oral cavity, induce the production of the CSP pheromone, suggesting that the pheromone most probably functions as a stress-inducible alarmone by triggering the signaling to the bacterial population to initiate an adaptive response that results in different phenotypic outcomes. This mini-review discusses two different CSP-induced phenotypes, bacterial "suicide" and dormancy, and the underlying mechanisms by which S. mutans utilizes the same QS signaling peptide to regulate two opposite phenotypes.

  6. Regulated proteolysis of Candida albicans Ras1 is involved in morphogenesis and quorum sensing regulation

    PubMed Central

    Piispanen, Amy; Grahl, Nora; Hollomon, Jeffrey M.; Hogan, Deborah A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In Candida albicans, a fungal pathogen, the small G-protein Ras1 regulates many important behaviors including white-opaque switching, biofilm formation, and the induction and maintenance of hyphal growth. Like other Ras proteins, Ras1 is activated upon guanine triphosphate binding, and its activity is further modulated by post-translational lipid modifications. Here, we report that the levels of membrane-associated, full-length Ras1 were higher in hyphae than in yeast, and that yeast contained a shorter, soluble Ras1 species that resulted from cleavage. Deletion of the putative cleavage site led to more rapid induction of hyphal growth and delayed hypha-to-yeast transitions. The cleaved Ras1 species was less able to activate its effector, adenylate cyclase (Cyr1), unless tethered to the membrane by a heterologous membrane-targeting domain. Ras1 cleavage was repressed by cAMP-signaling, indicating the presence of a positive feedback loop in which Cyr1 and cAMP influence Ras1. The C. albicans quorum sensing molecule farnesol, which inhibits Cyr1 and represses filamentation, caused an increase in the fraction of Ras1 in the cleaved form, particularly in nascent yeast formed from hyphae. This newly recognized mode of Ras regulation may control C. albicans Ras1 activity in important ways. PMID:23692372

  7. The presence and role of bacterial quorum sensing in activated sludge

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Grace; Kimyon, Onder; Rice, Scott A.; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Manefield, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Summary Activated sludge used for wastewater treatment globally is composed of a high‐density microbial community of great biotechnological significance. In this study the presence and purpose of quorum sensing via N‐acylated‐l‐homoserine lactones (AHLs) in activated sludge was explored. The presence of N‐heptanoyl‐l‐homoserine lactone in organic extracts of sludge was demonstrated along with activation of a LuxR‐based AHL monitor strain deployed in sludge, indicating AHL‐mediated gene expression is active in sludge flocculates but not in the bulk aqueous phase. Bacterial isolates from activated sludge were screened for AHL production and expression of phenotypes commonly but not exclusively regulated by AHL‐mediated gene transcription. N‐acylated‐l‐homoserine lactone and exoenzyme production were frequently observed among the isolates. N‐acylated‐l‐homoserine lactone addition to sludge upregulated chitinase activity and an AHL‐ and chitinase‐producing isolate closely related to Aeromonas hydrophila was shown to respond to AHL addition with upregulation of chitinase activity. N‐acylated‐l‐homoserine lactones produced by this strain were identified and genes ahyI/R and chiA, encoding AHL production and response and chitinase activity respectively, were sequenced. These experiments provide insight into the relationship between AHL‐mediated gene expression and exoenzyme activity in activated sludge and may ultimately create opportunities to improve sludge performance. PMID:22583685

  8. Quorum Sensing Regulation of Competence and Bacteriocins in Streptococcus pneumoniae and mutans

    PubMed Central

    Shanker, Erin; Federle, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    The human pathogens Streptococcus pneumoniae and Streptococcus mutans have both evolved complex quorum sensing (QS) systems that regulate the production of bacteriocins and the entry into the competent state, a requirement for natural transformation. Natural transformation provides bacteria with a mechanism to repair damaged genes or as a source of new advantageous traits. In S. pneumoniae, the competence pathway is controlled by the two-component signal transduction pathway ComCDE, which directly regulates SigX, the alternative sigma factor required for the initiation into competence. Over the past two decades, effectors of cellular killing (i.e., fratricides) have been recognized as important targets of the pneumococcal competence QS pathway. Recently, direct interactions between the ComCDE and the paralogous BlpRH pathway, regulating bacteriocin production, were identified, further strengthening the interconnections between these two QS systems. Interestingly, a similar theme is being revealed in S. mutans, the primary etiological agent of dental caries. This review compares the relationship between the bacteriocin and the competence QS pathways in both S. pneumoniae and S. mutans, and hopes to provide clues to regulatory pathways across the genus Streptococcus as a potential tool to efficiently investigate putative competence pathways in nontransformable streptococci. PMID:28067778

  9. Bacterial quorum sensing: signals, circuits, and implications for biofilms and disease.

    PubMed

    Jayaraman, Arul; Wood, Thomas K

    2008-01-01

    Communication between bacteria, belonging to the same species or to different species, is mediated through different chemical signals that are synthesized and secreted by bacteria. These signals can either be cell-density related (autoinducers) or be produced by bacteria at different stages of growth, and they allow bacteria to monitor their environment and alter gene expression to derive a competitive advantage. The properties of these signals and the response elicited by them are important in ensuring bacterial survival and propagation in natural environments (e.g., human oral cavity) where hundreds of bacterial species coexist. First, the interaction between a signal and its receptor is very specific, which underlies intraspecies communication and quorum sensing. Second, when multiple signals are synthesized by the same bacterium, the signaling circuits utilized by the different signals are coordinately regulated with distinct overall circuit architecture so as to maximize the overall response. Third, the recognition of a universal communication signal synthesized by different bacterial species (interspecies communication), as well that of signals produced by eukaryotic cells (interkingdom communication), is also integral to the formation of multispecies biofilm communities that are important in infection and disease. The focus of this review is on the principles underlying signal-mediated bacterial communication, with specific emphasis on the potential for using them in two applications-development of synthetic biology modules and circuits, and the control of biofilm formation and infection.

  10. Clinical and environmental genotypes of Vibrio vulnificus display distinct, quorum-sensing-mediated, chitin detachment dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Phippen, Britney L.; Oliver, James D.

    2015-01-01

    The ability for bacteria to attach to and detach from various substrata is important for colonization, survival and transitioning to new environments. An opportunistic human pathogen, Vibrio vulnificus, can cause potentially fatal septicemia after ingestion of undercooked seafood. Based on genetic polymorphisms, strains of this species are subtyped into clinical (C) and environmental (E) genotypes. Vibrio vulnificus readily associates with chitin, thus we investigated chitin detachment dynamics in these disparate genotypes. We found that C-genotypes detach significantly more than E-genotypes after 24 hours in aerobic as well as anaerobic conditions. Furthermore, expression of genes involved in type IV pilin production was significantly downregulated in C-genotypes compared to E-genotypes, suggesting an importance in detachment. Interestingly, gbpA, a gene that has been shown to be important in host colonization in V. cholerae, was upregulated in the C-genotypes during detachment. Additionally, we found that C-genotypes detached to a greater extent, and produced more quorum-sensing (QS) autoinducer-2 molecules relative to E-genotypes, which suggests a role for QS in detachment. These findings suggest that for V. vulnificus, QS-mediated detachment may be a potential mechanism for transitioning into a human host for C-genotypes, while facilitating E-genotype maintenance in the estuarine environment. PMID:26377182

  11. Quorum sensing contributes to natural transformation of Vibrio cholerae in a species-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Suckow, Gaia; Seitz, Patrick; Blokesch, Melanie

    2011-09-01

    Although it is a human pathogen, Vibrio cholerae is a regular member of aquatic habitats, such as coastal regions and estuaries. Within these environments, V. cholerae often takes advantage of the abundance of zooplankton and their chitinous molts as a nutritious surface on which the bacteria can form biofilms. Chitin also induces the developmental program of natural competence for transformation in several species of the genus Vibrio. In this study, we show that V. cholerae does not distinguish between species-specific and non-species-specific DNA at the level of DNA uptake. This is in contrast to what has been shown for other Gram-negative bacteria, such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae. However, species specificity with respect to natural transformation still occurs in V. cholerae. This is based on a positive correlation between quorum sensing and natural transformation. Using mutant-strain analysis, cross-feeding experiments, and synthetic cholera autoinducer-1 (CAI-1), we provide strong evidence that the species-specific signaling molecule CAI-1 plays a major role in natural competence for transformation. We suggest that CAI-1 can be considered a competence pheromone.

  12. Quorum sensing activity of Citrobacter amalonaticus L8A, a bacterium isolated from dental plaque.

    PubMed

    Goh, Share-Yuan; Khan, Saad Ahmed; Tee, Kok Keng; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2016-02-10

    Cell-cell communication is also known as quorum sensing (QS) that happens in the bacterial cells with the aim to regulate their genes expression in response to increased cell density. In this study, a bacterium (L8A) isolated from dental plaque biofilm was identified as Citrobacter amalonaticus by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). Its N-acylhomoserine-lactone (AHL) production was screened by using two types of AHL biosensors namely Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Escherichia coli [pSB401]. Citrobacter amalonaticus strain L8A was identified and confirmed producing numerous types of AHL namely N-butyryl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C8-HSL) and N-hexadecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C16-HSL). We performed the whole genome sequence analysis of this oral isolate where its genome sequence reveals the presence of QS signal synthase gene and our work will pave the ways to study the function of the related QS genes in this bacterium.

  13. Screening of certain medicinal plants from India for their anti-quorum sensing activity.

    PubMed

    Zahin, Maryam; Hasan, Sameena; Aqil, Farrukh; Khan, Mohd Sajjad Ahmad; Husain, Fohad Mabood; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2010-12-01

    Discovery of quorum sensing (QS) system to coordinate virulence and biofilm formation in bacterial pathogens has triggered search for safe, stable and non-toxic anti-QS compounds from natural products. Ethanolic extracts of 24 Indian medicinal plants were tested by agar well and disc diffusion assay for anti-QS activity using Chromobacterium violaceum (CV12472 and CVO26) reporter strains. AHL from C. violaceum CV31532 was isolated and partially purified for its use in CVO26 based bioassay. Effect on swarming-motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) was also recorded at sub-MIC concentrations of extracts. Of the 24 medicinal plants screened Hemidesmus indicus (L.) Schult (root), Holarrhena antidysenterica (Roth) A.DC. (bark), Mangifera indica L. (seed) Punica granatum L. (pericarp) and Psoralea corylifolia L. (seed) demonstrated varying level of inhibition of violacein production in the reporter strains. Moreover, a significant reduction in swarms was recorded over control. The inhibition of violacein production and swarming motility may be due to direct or indirect interference on QS by active constituents or the interactive effect of different phytocompounds present in the extracts. These plant extracts may be selected for activity guided fractionation to identify and characterize the active principle.

  14. Nutrient reduction induced stringent responses promote bacterial quorum-sensing divergence for population fitness

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kelei; Zhou, Xikun; Li, Wujiao; Zhang, Xiuyue; Yue, Bisong

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria use a cell-cell communication system termed quorum-sensing (QS) to adjust population size by coordinating the costly but beneficial cooperative behaviors. It has long been suggested that bacterial social conflict for expensive extracellular products may drive QS divergence and cause the “tragedy of the commons”. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of social divergence and its evolutionary consequences for the bacterial ecology still remain largely unknown. By using the model bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, here we show that nutrient reduction can promote QS divergence for population fitness during evolution but requiring adequate cell density. Mechanically, decreased nutrient supplies can induce RpoS-directed stringent response and enhance the selection pressure on lasR gene, and lasR mutants are evolved in association with the DNA mismatch repair “switch-off”. The lasR mutants have higher relative fitness than QS-intact individuals due to their energy-saving characteristic under nutrient decreased condition. Furthermore an optimal incorporation of lasR mutants is capable of maximizing the fitness of entire population during in vitro culture and the colonization in mouse lung. Consequently, rather than worsen the population health, QS-coordinated social divergence is an elaborate evolutionary strategy that renders the entire bacterial population more fit in tough times. PMID:27713502

  15. Microbial inhibition of oral epithelial wound recovery: potential role for quorum sensing molecules?

    PubMed

    De Ryck, Tine; Vanlancker, Eline; Grootaert, Charlotte; Roman, Bart I; De Coen, Laurens M; Vandenberghe, Isabel; Stevens, Christian V; Bracke, Marc; Van de Wiele, Tom; Vanhoecke, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Awareness of the impact of microbiota in both health and disease is growing. Using a new in vitro oral mucosa co-culture model, we recently showed a clear inhibition of epithelial wound healing in the presence of an oral microbial community. In this paper, we have used the same model in combination with specific oral microbial species to obtain a better insight into the role of the oral microbiota in wound healing. Monocultures of Klebsiella oxytoca and Lactobacillus salivarius significantly inhibited wound healing with ~20%, whereas Streptococcus mitis and S. oralis enhanced the healing process with ~15% in 24 h. Yet, neither S. oralis or S. mitis were able to counteract the inhibitory effects from K. oxytoca on wound healing. Other tested microbial species had no effect on wound healing. Apart from this species-dependency, the inhibitory effect on wound healing depended on a microbial threshold concentration. Further mechanistic experiments with K. oxytoca excluded different microbial factors and hypothesized that quorum sensing molecules might play a role in the inter-kingdom signalling during wound healing. These results are important for the development of new strategies for the management of (infected) wounds and ulcerations.

  16. Detection of Quorum Sensing Molecules and Biofilm Formation in Ralstonia solanacearum.

    PubMed

    Kumar, J Shiva; Umesha, S; Prasad, K Shiva; Niranjana, P

    2016-03-01

    Many bacteria use small diffusible signaling molecules to communicate each other termed as quorum sensing (QS). Most Gram-negative bacteria use acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) as QS signal molecules. Using these signaling molecules, bacteria are able to express specific genes in response to population density. This work aimed to detect the production of QS signal molecules and biofilm formation in Ralstonia solanacearum isolated from various diseased tomato plants with symptoms of bacterial wilt. A total of 30 R. solanacearum strains were investigated for the production of QS signal molecules using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Agrobacterium tumefaciens NT1 (pZLR4) biosensor systems. All 30 bacterial isolates from various bacterial wilt-affected tomato plants produced AHL molecules that induced the biosensor. The microtiter plate assay demonstrated that of the 30 bacterial isolates, 60 % formed biofilm, among which four isolates exhibited a higher degree of biofilm formation. The biofilm-inducing factor was purified from these four culture supernatants. The structure of the responsible molecule was solved using nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy and was determined to be 2-hydroxy-4-((methylamino)(phenyl)methyl) cyclopentanone (HMCP), which was confirmed by chemical synthesis and NMR. The Confocal laser scanning microscopic analysis showed well-developed biofilm architecture of bacteria when treated with HMCP. The knowledge we obtained from this study will be useful for further researcher on the role of HMCP molecule in biofilm formation.

  17. Presence of quorum sensing signal molecules in minced beef stored under various temperature and packaging conditions.

    PubMed

    Blana, Vasiliki A; Nychas, George-John E

    2014-03-03

    The presence of acylated homoserine lactones (AHLs) and autoinducer-2 (AI-2)-like activity was observed in meat stored under various temperatures (0, 5, 10 and 15°C) and packaging (air, modified atmospheres and modified atmospheres with oregano essential oil) conditions, and correlated with the ephemeral spoilage organisms that comprise the microbial community generally associated with this product. Quorum sensing signal molecules were found to be affected by the packaging conditions e.g. temperature and atmosphere used for meat preservation as a consequence of the development of a distinct microbial community. AHL signal molecules were detected at all incubation temperatures in minced beef samples, both stored aerobically and under modified atmospheres, when both pseudomonads and Enterobacteriaceae populations ranged from 10(7) to 10(9)CFU/g, but no signal molecules were detected in minced beef stored under modified atmospheres in the presence of volatile compounds of oregano essential oil, where both these groups failed to grow in high numbers. Additionally, no significant AI-2 activity was observed in the tested cell-free meat extracts (CFME), regardless of the indigenous bacterial populations. The presence of N-(β-ketocaproyl)-homoserine lactone was confirmed with TLC analysis of CFME.

  18. Individuals in the crowd: studying bacterial quorum-sensing at the single-cell level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delfino Perez, Pablo; Young, Jonathan; Johnson, Elaine L.; Hagen, Stephen J.

    2009-03-01

    Like many bacterial species, the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri can detect its own population density through a quorum sensing (QS) mechanism. The bacterium releases a small molecule signal -- the autoinducer (AI) -- into its environment: high AI concentration indicates high population density and triggers a genetic switch that, in V.fischeri, leads to bioluminescence. Although the QS behavior of bulk cultures of V.fischeri has been extensively studied, little is known about either the response of individual cells to AI signal levels or the role of noise and local diffusion in QS signaling. We have used a photon-counting camera to record the luminescence of individual V.fischeri cells immobilized in a flow cell and subject to varying concentrations of AI. We observe that light output by individual cells varies not only with bulk AI concentration, but also over time, between cells, with local (micron-scale) population density, and even with the flow rate of the medium. Most of these variations would not be evident in a bulk culture. We will present an analysis of this heterogeneity at the cell level and its implications for the role of noise in QS signaling.

  19. A metabolic regulator modulates virulence and quorum sensing signal production in Pectobacterium atrosepticum.

    PubMed

    Cubitt, Marion F; Hedley, Peter E; Williamson, Neil R; Morris, Jenny A; Campbell, Emma; Toth, Ian K; Salmond, George P C

    2013-03-01

    Plant cell wall-degrading enzymes (PCWDE) are key virulence determinants in the pathogenesis of the potato pathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum. In this study, we report the impact on virulence of a transposon insertion mutation in the metJ gene that codes for the repressor of the methionine biosynthesis regulon. In a mutant strain defective for the small regulatory RNA rsmB, PCWDE are not produced and virulence in potato tubers is almost totally abolished. However, when the metJ gene is disrupted in this background, the rsmB(-) phenotype is suppressed and virulence and PCWDE production are restored. Additionally, when metJ is disrupted, production of the quorum-sensing signal, N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-homoserine lactone, is increased. The metJ mutant strains showed pleiotropic transcriptional impacts affecting approximately a quarter of the genome. Genes involved in methionine biosynthesis were most highly upregulated but many virulence-associated transcripts were also upregulated. This is the first report of the impact of the MetJ repressor on virulence in bacteria.

  20. Caenorhabditis elegans Recognizes a Bacterial Quorum-sensing Signal Molecule through the AWCON Neuron*

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Kristen M.; Perez, Lark J.; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Semmelhack, Martin F.; Bassler, Bonnie L.

    2014-01-01

    In a process known as quorum sensing, bacteria use chemicals called autoinducers for cell-cell communication. Population-wide detection of autoinducers enables bacteria to orchestrate collective behaviors. In the animal kingdom detection of chemicals is vital for success in locating food, finding hosts, and avoiding predators. This behavior, termed chemotaxis, is especially well studied in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Here we demonstrate that the Vibrio cholerae autoinducer (S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one, termed CAI-1, influences chemotaxis in C. elegans. C. elegans prefers V. cholerae that produces CAI-1 over a V. cholerae mutant defective for CAI-1 production. The position of the CAI-1 ketone moiety is the key feature driving CAI-1-directed nematode behavior. CAI-1 is detected by the C. elegans amphid sensory neuron AWCON. Laser ablation of the AWCON cell, but not other amphid sensory neurons, abolished chemoattraction to CAI-1. These analyses define the structural features of a bacterial-produced signal and the nematode chemosensory neuron that permit cross-kingdom interaction. PMID:25092291

  1. Quorum sensing activity of Citrobacter amalonaticus L8A, a bacterium isolated from dental plaque

    PubMed Central

    Goh, Share-Yuan; Khan, Saad Ahmed; Tee, Kok Keng; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2016-01-01

    Cell-cell communication is also known as quorum sensing (QS) that happens in the bacterial cells with the aim to regulate their genes expression in response to increased cell density. In this study, a bacterium (L8A) isolated from dental plaque biofilm was identified as Citrobacter amalonaticus by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS). Its N-acylhomoserine-lactone (AHL) production was screened by using two types of AHL biosensors namely Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Escherichia coli [pSB401]. Citrobacter amalonaticus strain L8A was identified and confirmed producing numerous types of AHL namely N-butyryl-L-homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), N-hexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C6-HSL), N-octanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C8-HSL) and N-hexadecanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (C16-HSL). We performed the whole genome sequence analysis of this oral isolate where its genome sequence reveals the presence of QS signal synthase gene and our work will pave the ways to study the function of the related QS genes in this bacterium. PMID:26860259

  2. Chemical Composition and Disruption of Quorum Sensing Signaling in Geographically Diverse United States Propolis

    PubMed Central

    Savka, Michael A.; Dailey, Lucas; Popova, Milena; Mihaylova, Ralitsa; Merritt, Benjamin; Masek, Marissa; Le, Phuong; Nor, Sharifah Radziah Mat; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hudson, André O.; Bankova, Vassya

    2015-01-01

    Propolis or bee glue has been used for centuries for various purposes and is especially important in human health due to many of its biological and pharmacological properties. In this work we showed quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activity of ten geographically distinct propolis samples from the United States using the acyl-homoserine lactone- (AHL-) dependent Chromobacterium violaceum strain CV026. Based on GC-MS chemical profiling the propolis samples can be classified into several groups that are as follows: (1) rich in cinnamic acid derivatives, (2) rich in flavonoids, and (3) rich in triterpenes. An in-depth analysis of the propolis from North Carolina led to the isolation and identification of a triterpenic acid that was recently isolated from Hondurian propolis (Central America) and ethyl ether of p-coumaric alcohol not previously identified in bee propolis. QSI activity was also observed in the second group US propolis samples which contained the flavonoid pinocembrin in addition to other flavonoid compounds. The discovery of compounds that are involved in QSI activity has the potential to facilitate studies that may lead to the development of antivirulence therapies that can be complementary and/or alternative treatments against antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens and/or emerging pathogens that have yet to be identified. PMID:25960752

  3. Quorum sensing activity of a Kluyvera sp. isolated from a Malaysian waterfall.

    PubMed

    Yunos, Nina Yusrina Muhamad; Tan, Wen-Si; Mohamad, Nur Izzati; Tan, Pui-Wan; Adrian, Tan-Guan-Sheng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-05-08

    In many species of bacteria, the quorum sensing mechanism is used as a unique communication system which allows them to regulate gene expression and behavior in accordance with their population density. N-Acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs) are known as diffusible autoinducer molecules involved in this communication network. This finding aimed to characterize the production of AHL of a bacterial strain ND04 isolated from a Malaysian waterfall. Strain ND04 was identified as Kluyvera sp. as confirmed by molecular analysis of its 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequence. Kluyvera sp. is closely related to the Enterobacteriaceae family. Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 was used as a biosensor to detect the production of AHL by strain ND04. High resolution triple quadrupole liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of strain ND04 showed our isolate produced two AHLs which are N-(3-oxohexanoyl)homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6 HSL) and N-3-oxo-octanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C8 HSL).

  4. Freshwater-borne bacteria isolated from a Malaysian rainforest waterfall exhibiting quorum sensing properties.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wen-Si; Yunos, Nina Yusrina Muhamad; Tan, Pui-Wan; Mohamad, Nur Izzati; Adrian, Tan-Guan-Sheng; Yin, Wai-Fong; Chan, Kok-Gan

    2014-06-13

    One obvious requirement for concerted action by a bacterial population is for an individual to be aware of and respond to the other individuals of the same species in order to form a response in unison. The term "quorum sensing" (QS) was coined to describe bacterial communication that is able to stimulate expression of a series of genes when the concentration of the signaling molecules has reached a threshold level. Here we report the isolation from aquatic environment of a bacterium that was later identified as Enterobacter sp.. Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 and Escherichia coli [pSB401] were used for preliminary screening of N-acyl homoserine lactone (AHL) production. The Enterobacter sp. isolated was shown to produce two types of AHLs as confirmed by analysis using high resolution tandem mass spectrometry. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation of an Enterobacter sp. that produced both 3-oxo-C6-HSL and 3-oxo-C8-HSL as QS signaling molecules.

  5. Chemical probes of quorum sensing: from compound development to biological discovery.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Michael A; Blackwell, Helen E

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria can utilize chemical signals to coordinate the expression of group-beneficial behaviors in a method of cell-cell communication called quorum sensing (QS). The discovery that QS controls the production of virulence factors and biofilm formation in many common pathogens has driven an explosion of research aimed at both deepening our fundamental understanding of these regulatory networks and developing chemical agents that can attenuate QS signaling. The inherently chemical nature of QS makes studying these pathways with small molecule tools a complementary approach to traditional microbiology techniques. Indeed, chemical tools are beginning to yield new insights into QS regulation and provide novel strategies to inhibit QS. Here, we review the most recent advances in the development of chemical probes of QS systems in Gram-negative bacteria, with an emphasis on the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa We first describe reports of novel small molecule modulators of QS receptors and QS signal synthases. Next, in