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Sample records for r3327-h rat prostate

  1. Immunotherapy of prostate cancer in a murine model using a novel GnRH based vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Junco, Jesús A; Peschke, Peter; Zuna, Ivan; Ehemann, Volker; Fuentes, Franklin; Bover, Eddy; Pimentel, Eulogio; Basulto, Roberto; Reyes, Osvaldo; Calzada, Lesvia; Castro, María D; Arteaga, Niurka; López, Yovisleidis; Garay, Hilda; Hernández, Héctor; Bringas, Ricardo; Guillén, Gerardo E

    2007-12-05

    Previous studies with gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH/LHRH) vaccines have shown the usefulness of immunization against this hormone in prostate cancer. To this end, we have generated a completely synthetic peptide modified at position 6 and attached to the 830-844 tetanic toxoid (TT) helper T cell sequence. Through this work we have demonstrated that the GnRHm1-TT molecule was highly immunogenic when it is formulated as an oil-based emulsion adjuvated with Montanide ISA 51. That results correlated directly with testosterone reduction and tumor growth inhibition of the Dunning R3327-H androgen responsive prostate tumor model in rats. GnRHm1-TT, proved to be safe and useful for future clinical trials.

  2. Gonadotrophin releasing hormone-based vaccine, an effective candidate for prostate cancer and other hormone-sensitive neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Junco, Jesús A; Basalto, Roberto; Fuentes, Franklin; Bover, Eddy; Reyes, Osvaldo; Pimentel, Eulogio; Calzada, Lesvia; Castro, Maria D; Arteaga, Niurka; López, Yovisleidis; Hernández, Héctor; Bringas, Ricardo; Garay, Hilda; Peschke, Peter; Bertot, José; Guillén, Gerardo

    2008-01-01

    Prostate growth, development, functions, and neoplastic transformation is androgen dependent. Estrogens have similar effects in the ovary and breast. Previous studies using gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH/LHRH) vaccines have shown the usefulness of immunization against this hormone in prostate (PC) and breast cancer (BC). We have synthesized a peptide mutated at position 6 and attached to the 830-844 tetanic toxoid (TT) helper T cell sequence in the same synthesis process. After repeated pig immunizations, we have demonstrated a vaccine that significantly decreased testes size (p < 0.001), prostate (p < 0.01), seminal vesicles (p < 0.01), and testosterone (T) castration [0.05 nM ml(-1) (p < 0. 01)]. Similar results were obtained in adult male and female healthy dogs and Macaca fascicularis models. These data indicate that this GnRHm1-TT vaccine is safe and able to induce significant tumor growth inhibition in the Dunning R3327-H rat androgen responsive prostate tumor model. In these rats, the immunization induced high anti-GnRH titers concomitant with T castration reduction (p < 0.01) in 90% of the animals tested. In addition, 70% of the responders exhibited tumor growth inhibition (p = 0.02) and a survival rate approximately three times longer that those of untreated rats. These data indicate that GnRHm1-TT vaccine may be a potential candidate in the treatment of PC, BC, and other hormone-dependent cancers.

  3. Chronic prostatic infection and inflammation by Propionibacterium acnes in a rat prostate infection model.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Jan; Drott, Johanna Bergh; Laurantzon, Lovisa; Laurantzon, Oscar; Bergh, Anders; Elgh, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation in the prostate, seen as infiltration of inflammatory cells into the prostate gland in histological samples, affects approximately half the male population without indication of prostate disease, and is almost ubiquitous in patients diagnosed with benign prostate hyperplasia and cancer. Several studies have demonstrated the gram-positive bacterium Propionibacterium acnes to be frequently present in prostate tissue from men suffering from prostate disease. P. acnes has been shown to be associated with histological inflammation in human prostatectomy specimens, and also to induce strong inflammatory response in prostate-derived tissue culture models. The present paper describes a rat model for assessment of the pathogenic potential of P. acnes in prostate. Prostate glands of Sprague Dawley rats (n = 98) were exposed via an abdominal incision and live P. acnes or, in control rats, saline were injected into the ventral and dorso-lateral lobes. Rats were sacrificed 5 days, 3 weeks, 3 months and 6 months post infection, and prostate tissue was analyzed for bacterial content and histological inflammation. Rat sera were assessed for levels of CRP and anti-P. acnes IgG. Live P. acnes could be recovered from the dorso-lateral lobes up to 3 months post infection, while the ventral lobes were cleared from bacteria at that time. In samples up to 3 months post infection, the dorso-lateral lobes exhibited intense focal inflammation. CRP and IgG levels were elevated throughout the span of the experiment, and reached maximum levels 3 weeks and 3 months post infection, respectively. We show that P. acnes have the potential to cause chronic infection in previously healthy prostate, and that the infection has potential to cause chronic histological inflammation in the infected tissue. The high prevalence of P. acnes in human prostate tissue calls for resolution of pathogenic details. The present rat model suggests that complications such as chronic

  4. Testosterone uptake by prostatic tissue from young and old rats.

    PubMed

    Ghanadian, R; Fotherby, K

    1975-01-01

    The uptake of [3H]-testosterone in vitro by the ventral lobe of the prostate of rats more than 11 months old was significantly less than that of rats 4-5 weeks old. There were significant decreases between young and old rats in the RNA and DNA content of the prostate but not in the activity of acid or alkaline phosphatases. Alkaline phosphatase activity was higher than that of acid phosphatase. Testosterone uptake by the prostate was higher in culture medium TC199 than in Krebs-Ringer buffer solution.

  5. Red maca (Lepidium meyenii) reduced prostate size in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Miranda, Sara; Nieto, Jessica; Fernández, Gilma; Yucra, Sandra; Rubio, Julio; Yi, Pedro; Gasco, Manuel

    2005-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have found that consumption of cruciferous vegetables is associated with a reduced risk of prostate cancer. This effect seems to be due to aromatic glucosinolate content. Glucosinolates are known for have both antiproliferative and proapoptotic actions. Maca is a cruciferous cultivated in the highlands of Peru. The absolute content of glucosinolates in Maca hypocotyls is relatively higher than that reported in other cruciferous crops. Therefore, Maca may have proapoptotic and anti-proliferative effects in the prostate. Methods Male rats treated with or without aqueous extracts of three ecotypes of Maca (Yellow, Black and Red) were analyzed to determine the effect on ventral prostate weight, epithelial height and duct luminal area. Effects on serum testosterone (T) and estradiol (E2) levels were also assessed. Besides, the effect of Red Maca on prostate was analyzed in rats treated with testosterone enanthate (TE). Results Red Maca but neither Yellow nor Black Maca reduced significantly ventral prostate size in rats. Serum T or E2 levels were not affected by any of the ecotypes of Maca assessed. Red Maca also prevented the prostate weight increase induced by TE treatment. Red Maca administered for 42 days reduced ventral prostatic epithelial height. TE increased ventral prostatic epithelial height and duct luminal area. These increases by TE were reduced after treatment with Red Maca for 42 days. Histology pictures in rats treated with Red Maca plus TE were similar to controls. Phytochemical screening showed that aqueous extract of Red Maca has alkaloids, steroids, tannins, saponins, and cardiotonic glycosides. The IR spectra of the three ecotypes of Maca in 3800-650 cm (-1) region had 7 peaks representing 7 functional chemical groups. Highest peak values were observed for Red Maca, intermediate values for Yellow Maca and low values for Black Maca. These functional groups correspond among others to benzyl glucosinolate. Conclusions

  6. Ursolic acid reduces prostate size and dihydrotestosterone level in a rat model of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Shin, In-Sik; Lee, Mee-Young; Jung, Da-Young; Seo, Chang-Seob; Ha, Hye-Kyung; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2012-03-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is characterized by hyperplasia of prostatic stromal and epithelial cells, which can lead to lower urinary tract symptoms. The prevalence of BPH increases in an age-dependent manner. We investigated the protective effect of ursolic acid in BPH development using a testosterone-induced BPH rat model. BPH was induced in experimental groups by daily subcutaneous injections of testosterone propionate (TP), for a period of four weeks. Ursolic acid was administrated daily by oral gavage at a dose level of 5mg/kg during the four weeks of TP injections. Animals were sacrificed on the scheduled termination, before prostates were weighed and subjected to histopathological examination. TP and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels in the serum and prostate were also measured. BPH-induced animals displayed an increase in prostate weight with increased testosterone and DHT levels in both the serum and prostate. However, ursolic acid treatment resulted in significant reductions in prostate weight and testosterone and DHT levels in both the serum and prostate, compared with BPH-induced animals. Histopathological examination also showed that ursolic acid treatment suppressed TP-induced prostatic hyperplasia. These findings indicate that ursolic acid may effectively inhibit the development of BPH and it may be a useful agent in BPH treatment.

  7. Immunocytochemistry of epithelial markers in citral-induced prostate hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Massas, R; Servadio, C; Sandbank, U; Abramovici, A

    1991-04-01

    Immunocytochemical characterization of several epithelial markers using the PAP technique was analyzed during different stages of induced prostatic hyperplasia in rats. Intact adolescent rats (42 days old) were treated with citral (3,7 dimethyl-2,6 octadienal) for 10, 30 and 100 days and their ventral prostate compared to untreated, matched-age animals. Among the epithelial markers studied the prostatic specific acid phosphatase was present in hyperplastic prostates of rats. The immunoreaction showed a fair correlation with the severity of lesion and duration of treatment. The prostatic specific antigen showed equally immunoreactive in both control and treated rats. The hyperplastic and normal rat prostates did not show immunoreactivity towards the other epithelial cell markers such as epithelial membrane antigen, carcinoembrionic antingen and alpha-fetoprotein antisera. It is concluded that prostatic specific acid phosphatase, and to a lesser extent prostatic specific antigen, might represent valuable markers for comparative studies of prostatic hyperplasia in rodents.

  8. Extracellular Vesicles from Metastatic Rat Prostate Tumors Prime the Normal Prostate Tissue to Facilitate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Hägglöf, Christina; Thysell, Elin; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Lundholm, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are responsible for tumor-promoting effects. However, if tumor EVs also prepare the tumor-bearing organ for subsequent tumor growth, and if this effect is different in low and high malignant tumors is not thoroughly explored. Here we used orthotopic rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumors to compare the role of EVs from fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu (MLL) tumors with EVs from more indolent and non-metastatic Dunning G (G) tumors. Prostate tissue pre-conditioned with MLL-EVs in vivo facilitated G tumor establishment compared to G-EVs. MLL-EVs increased prostate epithelial proliferation and macrophage infiltration into the prostate compared to G-EVs. Both types of EVs increased macrophage endocytosis and the mRNA expression of genes associated with M2 polarization in vitro, with MLL-EVs giving the most pronounced effects. MLL-EVs also altered the mRNA expression of growth factors and cytokines in primary rat prostate fibroblasts compared to G-EVs, suggesting fibroblast activation. Our findings propose that EVs from metastatic tumors have the ability to prime the prostate tissue and enhance tumor growth to a higher extent than EVs from non-metastatic tumors. Identifying these differences could lead to novel therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers for prostate cancer. PMID:27550147

  9. Biosynthesis of putrescine in the prostate gland of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Pegg, A. E.; Williams-Ashman, H. G.

    1968-01-01

    In the rat ventral prostate gland the biosynthesis of putrescine, a precursor of spermidine and spermine, is shown to occur by the direct decarboxylation of l-ornithine. Some properties of a soluble pyridoxal phosphate-dependent l-ornithine decarboxylase are described. The findings are discussed in relation to other enzymic reactions involved in the biosynthesis of polyamines by the prostate gland. PMID:5667265

  10. Effect of red maca (Lepidium meyenii) on prostate zinc levels in rats with testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, C; Leiva-Revilla, J; Rubio, J; Gasco, M; Gonzales, G F

    2012-05-01

    Lepidium meyenii (maca) is a plant that grows exclusively above 4000 m in the Peruvian central Andes. Red maca (RM) extract significantly reduced prostate size in rats with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) induced by testosterone enanthate (TE). Zinc is an important regulator of prostate function. This study aimed to determine the effect of RM on prostate zinc levels in rats with BPH induced by TE. Also, the study attempted to determine the best marker for the effect of RM on sex accessory glands. Rats treated with RM extract from day 1 to day 14 reversed the effect of TE administration on prostate weight and zinc levels. However, RM administered from day 7 to day 14 did not reduce the effect of TE on all studied variables. Finasteride (FN) reduced prostate, seminal vesicle and preputial gland weights in rats treated with TE. Although RM and FN reduced prostate zinc levels, the greatest effect was observed in TE-treated rats with RM from day 1 to day 14. In addition, prostate weight and zinc levels showed the higher diagnosis values than preputial and seminal vesicle weights. In conclusion, RM administered from day 1 to day 14 reduced prostate size and zinc levels in rats where prostatic hyperplasia was induced with TE. Also, this experimental model could be used as accurately assay to determine the effect of maca obtained under different conditions and/or the effect of different products based on maca.

  11. Retinoic acid binding protein in normal and neopolastic rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Gesell, M S; Brandes, M J; Arnold, E A; Isaacs, J T; Ueda, H; Millan, J C; Brandes, D

    1982-01-01

    Sucrose density gradient analysis of cytosol from normal and neoplastic rat prostatic tissues exhibited a peak of (3H) retinoic acid binding in the 2S region, corresponding to the cytoplasmic retinoic acid binding protein (cRABP). In the Fisher-Copenhagen F1 rat, cRABP was present in the lateral lobe, but could not be detected in the ventral nor in the dorsal prostatic lobes. Four sublines of the R-3327 rat prostatic tumor contained similar levels of this binding protein. The absence of cRABP in the normal tissue of origin of the R-3327 tumor, the rat dorsal prostate, and reappearance in the neoplastic tissues follows a pattern described in other human and animal tumors. The occurrence of cRABP in the well-differentiated as well as in the anaplastic R-3327 tumors in which markers which reflect a state of differentiation and hormonal regulation, such as androgen receptor, 5 alpha reductase, and secretory acid phosphatase are either markedly reduced or absent, points to cRABP as a marker of malignant transformation.

  12. Tamsulosin alters levofloxacin pharmacokinetics in prostates derived from rats with acute bacterial prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Guo-Dong; Xiao, Ming-Zhao; Zhou, Yuan-Da; Yang, Jing; He, Hai-Xia; He, Yue; Zeng, Yang

    2013-03-01

    The combination of levofloxacin and α1 adrenergic antagonist treatment is the current preferred choice for both bacterial and non-bacterial prostatitis. The aim of this study is to explore the influence of α1 adrenergic antagonists on the pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin using rat models with acute bacterial prostatitis (ABP) induced by direct injection with Escherichia coli (ATCC25922). A total of 96 model rats were randomly assigned into two groups: the experimental group (treated with both tamsulosin and levofloxacin, n=48) and the control group (treated with levofloxacin and solvents, n=48). Six rats from each group were euthanized to collect blood, liver, kidney and prostate samples at the time points of 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8 and 12 h after drug administration. The levofloxacin concentrations were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using the 3p97 software program. There were no obvious differences (P>0.05) between the experimental and control groups in the major pharmacokinetic parameters of levofloxacin, including the halftime (t1/2), time to peak (tpeak), clearance rate (CL), maximum concentration (Cmax) and area under the curve (AUC0∼12), in the plasma or in the hepatic and kidney tissues of the model rats. However, in the prostatic tissues, tamsulosin increased the Cmax, prolonged the t1/2 and decreased the CL of levofloxacin (P<0.05). These results indicate that tamsulosin may enhance the effect of levofloxacin in the treatment of bacterial prostatitis without changing the drug concentration in the liver and kidney.

  13. Effects of an immunosuppressive treatment on the rat prostate

    PubMed Central

    Grabowska, Marta; Kędzierska, Karolina; Michałek, Katarzyna; Słuczanowska-Głąbowska, Sylwia; Grabowski, Maciej; Piasecka, Małgorzata; Kram, Andrzej; Rotter, Iwona; Rył, Aleksandra; Laszczyńska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of different combinations of immunosuppressive drugs on the morphology, ultrastructure, and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and cytoskeleton proteins in the rat dorsolateral prostate. The studies were conducted on 48 male Wistar rats. The animals were divided into eight groups: a control group and seven experimental groups. For 6 months, the animals in the experimental groups were administered a combination of drugs including rapamycin (Rapa), cyclosporin A, tacrolimus (Tac), mycophenolate mofetil, and prednisone (Pred), according to the standard three-drug regimens for immunosuppressive therapy used in clinical practice. An evaluation of the morphology and ultrastructure was conducted, and a quantitative evaluation of the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen and desmin- and cytokeratin-positive cells with weak, moderate, and strong expression was performed. The combination of Rapa, Tac, and Pred caused the smallest morphological and ultrastructural changes in the rat prostate cells. In the case of rats whose treatment was switched to Rapa monotherapy, a decreased percentage of proliferating cells of both the glandular epithelium and the stroma was found. Decreases in body weight and changes in the expression of cytokeratin and desmin were observed in all the experimental rats. The combination of Rapa, Tac, and Pred would seem to be the most beneficial for patients who do not suffer from prostate diseases. Our results justify the use of inhibitors of the mammalian target of Rapa in the treatment of patients with prostate cancer. The changes in the expression of cytoskeleton proteins may be the result of direct adverse effects of the immunosuppressive drugs, which are studied in this article, on the structure and organization of intermediate filament proteins. PMID:27672312

  14. Alteration of Loperamide-Induced Prostate Relaxation in High-Fat Diet-Fed Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Sheng-Lung; Chung, Hsien-Hui; Chen, I-Hung; Tong, Yat-Ching

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the change of loperamide-induced prostate relaxation in rats fed with high-fat diet (HFD). Materials and Methods. Adult male Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups: (1) control rats fed with normal chow and (2) rats fed with HFD for 6 months. The prostate was removed for histology study. Isolated prostate strips were hung in organ bath and precontracted with 1 μmol/L phenylephrine or 50 mmol/L KCl. The relaxation responses to loperamide 0.1 to 10 μmol/L were recorded. Western blotting analyses were performed for prostate μ-opioid receptors (MOR) and ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel proteins: sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) and inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir) 6.2 subunits. Results. Body weight, prostate weight, plasma levels of glucose, insulin, triglyceride, and cholesterol, as well as systolic blood pressure, were significantly increased in the HFD rats. Histology showed prostatic hyperplasia in the HFD rat prostate. Prostatic relaxation induced by loperamide was markedly reduced in HFD when compared to the control. Protein expressions of MOR, SUR, and Kir 6.2 were decreased in HFD-fed rats. Conclusion. Loperamide-induced prostate relaxation is decreased in HFD rats due to reduced MOR and KATP channel expressions. PMID:25506071

  15. Inhibitory effects of Tripterygium wilfordii multiglycoside on benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hai-Nan; Xu, Yuan; Jiang, Zhen-Zhou; Huang, Xin; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Wang, Tao

    2015-06-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the inhibitory effects of Tripterygium wilfordii multiglycoside (GTW) against testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in rats. A total of 45 rats were randomly divided into five groups: Group I, vehicle control group (sham-operated and treated with vehicle); Group II, BPH group; Group III, BPH rats treated with finasteride at a dose of 5 mg·kg(-1); and Groups IV and V, BPH rats treated with GTW at dose levels of 10 and 20 mg·kg(-1), respectively. The drugs were administered orally once a day for 14 days. Prostate weight, prostatic index, and the testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels in serum and prostate, and the serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels were measured; prostate tissues were taken for histopathological examination; and serum biochemical analysis was also performed. The BPH rats displayed an increase in prostate weight, prostatic index with increased testosterone and DHT levels in both the serum and prostate, and increased serum PSA levels. GTW treatment at both doses resulted in significant reductions in prostate weight, prostatic index, testosterone and DHT levels in both the serum and prostate, and serum PSA levels, compared with BPH group. Histopathological examination also indicated that GTW treatment at both doses inhibited testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia. Serum biochemical analysis showed that the liver and renal functions were normal. In conclusion, GTW inhibited testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in rats, without host toxicity, providing a basis for the development of GTW as a novel therapy for BPH.

  16. Protective effect of zinc on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea and testosterone-induced prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in the dorsolateral prostate of Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Banudevi, Sivanantham; Elumalai, Perumal; Sharmila, Govindaraj; Arunkumar, Ramachandran; Senthilkumar, Kalimuthu; Arunakaran, Jagadeesan

    2011-09-01

    Previous studies have suggested that zinc exerts anticarcinogenic and antiproliferative effects against prostate cancer both in vitro and in rat ventral prostate. Zinc accumulation diminishes early in the course of prostate malignancy and it inhibits the growth of several carcinoma cells through induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In this study, we have investigated the influence of zinc on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and testosterone (T)-induced prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia in the dorsolateral prostate of Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. The results indicate that zinc plays an important role in prostate carcinogenesis. Increased tumor incidence was accompanied by a decrease in prostatic acid phosphatase activity, citrate, zinc, glutathione-S-transferase, reduced glutathione, p53, B-cell lymphoma protein (Bcl-2)-associated X protein and caspase-3 levels in MNU + T-treated rats. On the contrary, significantly increased phase I drug metabolizing enzyme activities, lipid peroxide, hydrogen peroxide, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, Bcl-2 and Bcl-X(L) protein levels were observed in the dorsolateral prostate of MNU + T-treated rats. Simultaneous zinc supplementation significantly reversed these effects in MNU + T-treated rats. Signs of dysplasia, a characteristic of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, were evident in the dorsolateral prostatic tissue sections by MNU + T administration. However, zinc supplementation has reversed these effects in the dorsolateral prostatic histoarchitecture. These results suggest that zinc may act as an essential trace element against MNU and testosterone-induced prostatic preneoplastic progression in SD rats.

  17. Calcitonin releases acid phosphatase from rat ventral prostate explants.

    PubMed

    Latif, A; Nakhla, A M

    1994-01-01

    Inclusion of salmon calcitonin in the culture medium of rat ventral prostate explants diminished l-tartarate-sensitive acid phosphatase activity in the tissues with a concomitant increment of the enzyme activity in the medium. The effect of the hormone was dose-dependent for a dose range of 10(-12)-10(-6) M. Acid phosphatase activity in prostate explants decreased from 38.6 +/- 3.5 to 20.5 +/- 2.8, whereas it increased from 0.60 +/- 0.15 to 2.80 +/- 0.40 nmol p-nitrophenol liberated/mg protein/30 min in the culture medium. Tissues exposed to 10(-6) M salmon calcitonin had higher acetylcholinesterase activity (8.8 +/- 0.7) than non-exposed ones (6.2 +/- 0.5 mumol substrate hydrolyzed/g tissue/min). These results suggest that locally produced calcitonin causes a release for prostatic acid phosphatase from prostate tissues possibly through its interaction with the cholinergic system.

  18. Inhibitory effects by ayurvedic plants on prostate enlargement induced in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dumbre, Rahul K.; Kamble, Manisha B.; Patil, Vijay R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ayurveda recommends several plants and plant preparation for conditions of urogenital disorders as per its principles. Objectives: Ayurvedic plants Tamala (Cinnamomum tamala); Daruhalad (Berberis aristata); Ativish (Aconitum heterophyllum) were studied for mechanisms of prostatic hyperplasia induced in rats. Materials and Methods: Prostatic enlargement was induced in castrated rats by testosterone injection s.c. for 21 days and simultaneously plants were dosed orally daily. On day 22 rats were sacrificed and prostate was removed; weight and volume of prostate was measured; histopathology performed. Inflammation was induced by injecting carrageenan in rat hind paw and inhibition was studied by measuring rat paw oedema at different time points. Results: Tamala showed significant effect where it reduced prostatic enlargement and improved hyperplastic changes, while Daruhalad and Ativisha did not show any significant effect. All of them showed mild to moderate anti-inflammatory activity. Conclusion: Study concludes that Tamala may benefit in prostate disorder by virtue of inhibition of androgen mechanisms in prostate and modulating inflammatory mediators in prostate. Daruhalad and Ativisha did not show any effect in this model of prostate enlargement while the anti-inflammatory effect may propose one of the useful properties when included in various formulations. PMID:24761116

  19. Inflammation and Atrophy Precede Prostate Neoplasia in PhIP Induced Rat Model

    SciTech Connect

    Borowsky, A D; Dingley, K; Ubick, E; Turteltaub, K; Cardiff, R D; DeVere-White, R

    2006-06-01

    2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo(4,5-b)pyridine (PhIP) has been implicated as a major mutagenic heterocyclic amine in the human diet and is carcinogenic in the rat prostate. In order to validate PhIP induced rat prostate neoplasia as a model of human prostate cancer progression, we sought to study the earliest histologic and morphologic changes in the prostate and to follow the progressive changes over time. We fed 67 male Fischer F344 5 week old rats with PhIP (400 PPM) or control diets for 20 weeks, and then sacrificed animals for histomorphologic examination at age 25 weeks, 45 weeks, and 65 weeks. Animals treated with PhIP showed significantly more inflammation (P=.002 (25wk), >.001(45wk), .016(65wk)) and atrophy (P=.003(25wk), >.001(45wk), .006 (65wk)) in their prostate glands relative to controls. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) occurred only in PhIP treated rats. PIN lesions arose in areas of glandular atrophy, most often in the ventral prostate. Atypical cells in areas of atrophy show loss of glutathione S-transferase pi immunostaining preceding development of PIN. None of the animals in this study developed invasive carcinomas differing from previous reports. Overall, these findings suggest that the pathogenesis of prostatic neoplasia in the PhIP treated rat prostate proceeds from inflammation to post-inflammatory proliferative atrophy to PIN.

  20. Genistein alters growth but is not toxic to the rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Wayne A; Eltoum, Isam-Eldin; Cotroneo, Michelle S; Lamartiniere, Coral A

    2002-10-01

    The mortality of clinical prostate cancer is lower in Asian populations than in American or European men. Asian men typically consume more soy than their Western counterparts, leading to the investigation of individual components, particularly phytoestrogens, as protective factors against prostate cancer. Genistein, the predominant isoflavone in soy, has been reported to reduce the incidence of prostate cancer in animal models, but the underlying biological action remains to be elucidated. The purpose of this investigation was to identify the effects of the phytoestrogen, genistein and the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES), as a control, on development and function of the rat dorsolateral prostate (DLP) when given in the diet. The effects of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) injections were also tested. Analysis of individual lobes of the DLP revealed that 1000 mg/kg, but not 250 mg/kg, of a genistein AIN-76A diet slightly reduced lateral prostate type 1 (LP1) bud perimeter. However, expression of the secretory dorsal protein 1 (DP1) and 5alpha-reductase type II activity were not altered in the prostate. This suggested that prostate differentiation, and not toxicity, had occurred. DES in the diet reduced and testosterone injections elevated relative prostate weights and perimeters of the dorsal, LP1, lateral prostate type 2 and DP1 expression. DHT increased relative prostate weights but did not significantly increase individual lobe perimeter. Unlike DES, maximally tolerated doses of genistein in the diet were not toxic to the rat prostate.

  1. Laser immunotherapy in treatment of metastatic prostate tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Bartles, Kenneth E.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2002-07-01

    Laser immunotherapy is a special cancer treatment modality using an intratumor injection of a special formulation consisting of a novel immunoadjuvant and a laser-absorbing dye, followed by a non-invasive near-IR laser irradiation. Our early experiments using a metastatic mammary rat tumor model showed that laser immunotherapy could cause acute selective photothermal tumor destruction and induce a systemic, long-term specific anti-tumor immunity. In the current study, laser immunotherapy was used to treat metastatic prostate tumors in Copenhagen male rats. The transplantable tumors metastasize mainly to the lung and the lung cancer is usually the cause of death. Two experimental were performed in our study. The first was to study the effect of laser immunotherapy on the tumor burdens, both the primary and the metastasis in the lung. The second was to study the effect of laser immunotherapy on the long-term survival of the tumor-bearing rats. For comparison, some rat tumors were also treated by the laser-dye combination to study the photothermal effect. Tour results showed that both the photothermal effect and the laser immunotherapy could slow the growth of primary tumors and the metastatic tumors. The laser-dye-immunoadjuvant treatment resulted in more than 20 percent long-term survival rate in tumor-bearing rats. Our experimental results indicate that the laser immunotherapy has a great potential in treating metastatic tumors.

  2. Urinary bladder stone associated with seminal vesicle and prostate infection in a Copenhagen rat

    PubMed Central

    Senapati, Shantibhusan; Suklabaidya, Sujit; Mallik, Hrudananda; Panda, Sabyasachi; Hota, Datteswar; Baisakh, Manas R.

    2016-01-01

    We report a very rare case of urinary bladder stone in a laboratory rat, which was associated with severe prostatitis and seminal vesiculitis. Importantly, the histopathological analysis revealed the rare variety of keratinizing desquamative squamous metaplasia of bladder, prostate, and seminal vesicle epithelium. Immunohistochemistry for alpha smooth muscle actin protein and aniline blue staining for collagen clearly showed interstitial prostate fibrosis. The detail information about these findings and subsequent discussion are provided here. PMID:27433075

  3. Ornithine decarboxylase activity and: [125I]iododeoxyuridine incorporation in rat prostate.

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, D J; Donaldson, L J; Thomas, G H

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between ornithine decarboxylase activity and [125I]iododexyuridine incorporation was studied in prostates from castrated rats (aged 5, 26 and 80 weeks) injected daily with testosterone for up to 10 days. The results suggest that ornithine decarboxylase activity is a parameter of secretory activity, rather than growth, in the ventral prostate. In the dorsolateral prostate, ornithine decarboxylase activity tends to parallel [125I]iododeoxyuridine incorporation. PMID:1212206

  4. Methyl Jasmonate Ameliorates Testosterone Propionate-induced Prostatic Hyperplasia in Castrated Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Akanni, Olubukola Oyebimpe; Abiola, Olusoji John; Adaramoye, Oluwatosin Adekunle

    2017-04-01

    Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) is a progressive disease that is related to age. Known therapeutic agents used in the treatment of BPH are associated with toxicity. Therefore, chemoprevention could be an effective approach. We investigated the ameliorative effects of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) in testosterone propionate (TP)-induced BPH in castrated rats. Castration was performed by removing both testes through the scrotum sack under ketamine anesthesia. Rats were assigned into seven groups of seven animals each: non-castrated control, castrated control, castrated rats that received TP, castrated rats that received TP and MeJA, castrated rats that received TP and finasteride, castrated rats that received MeJA, and castrated rats that received finasteride. Results indicate that BPH rats had significantly (p < 0.05) elevated prostate weight and relative weight of prostate relative to control. Also, BPH rats had significantly (p < 0.05) increased activities of prostatic acid and alkaline phosphatases, levels of zinc, and malondialdehyde. Further, levels of enzymic and non-enzymic antioxidative indices were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in BPH. Histology of prostate revealed hyperplasia of transition lobe, increased expression of PSA, and Ki67 in BPH. Treatment with MeJA and finasteride attenuated the activities of the phosphatases and levels of antioxidants in BPH. Overall, MeJA ameliorates BPH via antioxidative mechanism. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Active principle of swine prostate extract: I. Isolation of active principle activating prostatic acid phosphatase and its effect on testosterone uptake of the prostate in castrated rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Y; Mori, H; Inami, K; Koda, A

    1991-07-01

    There have been several reports concerning the therapeutic effect of an extract from animal prostates on benign prostatic hypertrophy. Previously, we reported that the swine prostate extract (PE) had the activity to enhance human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAPase) activity in vitro, and to increase the muscular tonicity of the urinary bladder by directly acting upon vesical muscles, suggesting that PE have an activity to elevate the intravesical voiding pressure in vivo. In the present study, it was attempted to isolate such an active principle of PE as activates human prostatic acid phosphatase (PAPase). The finally purified PE (PPE) was assessed as to some physico-chemical and pharmacological properties. 1) PPE was found to be a peptide with a molecular weight of about 8,800, composed largely of neutral amino acids (approximately 70%) and few of aromatic amino acids. 2) PPE activated PAPase in a dose-dependent fashion, resulting in an increase of the enzyme activity approximately twice in a dose of 2 X 10(-5) g/ml of PPE. Furthermore, PPE recovered PAPase activity dose-dependently from the 50% inhibition by 2 X 10(-3) M L-tartaric acid. 3) In castrated rats, the 3H-testosterone uptake of the prostate was significantly suppressed by the oral administration of PPE. PPE might be one of active principles of PE for the therapeutic effect on prostatic hypertrophy.

  6. Chronic caffeine intake increases androgenic stimuli, epithelial cell proliferation and hyperplasia in rat ventral prostate

    PubMed Central

    Sarobo, Carolina; Lacorte, Lívia M; Martins, Marcela; Rinaldi, Jaqueline C; Moroz, Andrei; Scarano, Wellerson R; Delella, Flavia K; Felisbino, Sérgio L

    2012-01-01

    Coffee intake has been associated with a low risk of developing cancer, including prostate cancer, which is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancer in men. However, few studies have evaluated the chronic effects of caffeine, which is the most abundant methylxanthine in coffee, on prostate morphology and physiology. In the present study, we investigated the effects of chronic, low-dose caffeine intake on rat prostate morphology from puberty to adulthood. Five-week-old male Wistar rats were randomized into two experimental groups: caffeine-treated (20 ppm in drinking water, n = 12) and control (n = 12). The ventral and dorsolateral prostates were dissected, weighted and submitted to morphological, morphometrical and immunohistochemical analysis of cellular proliferation, apoptosis and androgen receptor (AR) tissue expression. The testosterone (T) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) concentrations were measured in the plasma. Our results show that caffeine intake increased the concentrations of T and DHT, organ weight, epithelial cell proliferation and AR tissue expression in the ventral prostatic lobe. All the ventral prostates from the caffeine-treated animals presented various degrees of epithelial and stromal hyperplasia. Our results suggest that chronic caffeine intake from puberty increases androgenic signalling and cell proliferation in the rat prostate gland and can be related to the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:23136995

  7. Pioglitazone, a Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Agonist, Suppresses Rat Prostate Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shugo; Mori, Yukiko; Nagano, Aya; Naiki-Ito, Aya; Kato, Hiroyuki; Nagayasu, Yuko; Kobayashi, Mizuho; Kuno, Toshiya; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Pioglitazone (PGZ), a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ agonist, which is known as a type 2 diabetes drug, inhibits cell proliferation in various cancer cell lines, including prostate carcinomas. This study focused on the effect of PGZ on prostate carcinogenesis using a transgenic rat for an adenocarcinoma of prostate (TRAP) model. Adenocarcinoma lesions as a percentage of overall lesions in the ventral prostate were significantly reduced by PGZ treatment in a dose-dependent manner. The number of adenocarcinomas per given area in the ventral prostate was also significantly reduced by PGZ treatment. The Ki67 labeling index in the ventral prostate was also significantly reduced by PGZ. Decreased cyclin D1 expression in addition to the inactivation of both p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor (NF)κB were detected in PGZ-treated TRAP rat groups. In LNCaP, a human androgen-dependent prostate cancer cell line, PGZ also inhibited cyclin D1 expression and the activation of both p38 MAPK and NFκB. The suppression of cultured cell growth was mainly regulated by the NFκB pathway as detected using specific inhibitors in both LNCaP and PC3, a human androgen-independent prostate cancer cell line. These data suggest that PGZ possesses a chemopreventive potential for prostate cancer. PMID:27973395

  8. Effects of Melandrium firmum methanolic extract on testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mee-Young; Shin, In-Sik; Seo, Chang-Seob; Lee, Nam-Hun; Ha, Hye-Kyung; Son, Jong-Keun; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2012-03-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is an age-related disease of unknown aetiology characterized by prostatic enlargement coincident with distinct alterations in tissue histomorphology. Instead of therapeutic agents that can cause severe side effects, plant extracts are frequently used to treat BPH. In this study, we investigated whether the Melandrium firmum methanolic extract (MFME) improves BPH, using the testosterone propionate (TP)-induced BPH rat model. Castration was performed via the scrotal route under sodium pentobarbital anaesthesia. BPH in castrated rats was generated via daily subcutaneous injections of TP (3 mg kg(-1)) dissolved in corn oil, for 4 weeks. MFME was administered daily by oral gavage at a dose of 200 mg kg(-1) for 4 weeks, along with the TP injections. The control group received injections of corn oil subcutaneously. At the scheduled termination of the experiment, all rats were killed and their prostates weighed; the relative prostate weight (prostate/body weight ratio) was calculated, and histomorphological changes in the prostate were examined. Additionally, we measured the levels of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in the serum and the prostate. Experimentally induced BPH led to marked decreases in the relative prostate weight and the DHT levels in the serum and the prostate. Histologically, BPH was evident in the ventral lobe of the prostate, and MFME treatment suppressed the severity of the lesions. These results indicate that MFME effectively inhibits the development of BPH induced by testosterone in a rat model. Further studies will be needed to identify the compound(s) responsibility for inducing the protective effect against BPH and determine its mechanism of action.

  9. Effects of Melandrium firmum methanolic extract on testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mee-Young; Shin, In-Sik; Seo, Chang-Seob; Lee, Nam-Hun; Ha, Hye-Kyung; Son, Jong-Keun; Shin, Hyeun-Kyoo

    2012-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is an age-related disease of unknown aetiology characterized by prostatic enlargement coincident with distinct alterations in tissue histomorphology. Instead of therapeutic agents that can cause severe side effects, plant extracts are frequently used to treat BPH. In this study, we investigated whether the Melandrium firmum methanolic extract (MFME) improves BPH, using the testosterone propionate (TP)-induced BPH rat model. Castration was performed via the scrotal route under sodium pentobarbital anaesthesia. BPH in castrated rats was generated via daily subcutaneous injections of TP (3 mg kg−1) dissolved in corn oil, for 4 weeks. MFME was administered daily by oral gavage at a dose of 200 mg kg−1 for 4 weeks, along with the TP injections. The control group received injections of corn oil subcutaneously. At the scheduled termination of the experiment, all rats were killed and their prostates weighed; the relative prostate weight (prostate/body weight ratio) was calculated, and histomorphological changes in the prostate were examined. Additionally, we measured the levels of testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in the serum and the prostate. Experimentally induced BPH led to marked decreases in the relative prostate weight and the DHT levels in the serum and the prostate. Histologically, BPH was evident in the ventral lobe of the prostate, and MFME treatment suppressed the severity of the lesions. These results indicate that MFME effectively inhibits the development of BPH induced by testosterone in a rat model. Further studies will be needed to identify the compound(s) responsibility for inducing the protective effect against BPH and determine its mechanism of action. PMID:22231294

  10. Establishment of a syngeneic orthotopic model of prostate cancer in immunocompetent rats

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shugo; Naiki-Ito, Aya; Kuno, Toshiya; Punfa, Wanisa; Long, Ne; Kato, Hiroyuki; Inaguma, Shingo; Komiya, Masami; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    We previously established 3 cell lines (PLS10, PLS20 and PLS30) from a chemically-induced prostate carcinoma in F344 rats, and demonstrated high potential for metastasis in nude mice. In the present study, we investigated the feasibility of establishing an orthotopic model using the 3 rat prostate cancer cell lines in immunocompetent rats with the aim of resolving species-mismatch problems and defects of immune systems. The PLS10, PLS20 and PLS30 cell lines were injected into the ventral prostates of 6-week-old rats, which were then sacrificed at experimental weeks 4 and 8. Tumor mass formation was found in rats with PLS10, but not in those with PLS20 or PLS30. Additionally, metastatic carcinomas could be detected in lymph nodes and lungs of PLS10-inoculated rats. Genetic analysis demonstrated K-ras gene mutations in PLS10 and PLS20, but not in PLS30 cells. There were no mutations in p53 and KLF6. In conclusion, we established a syngeneic orthotopic model for prostate cancer in immunocompetent rats simulating human castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), which should prove useful for development and validation of therapeutic agents, especially with immunotherapy. PMID:26023257

  11. Ethanol modulates the synthesis and catabolism of retinoic acid in the rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Fioruci-Fontanelli, Beatriz Aparecida; Chuffa, Luiz Gustavo A; Mendes, Leonardo O; Pinheiro, Patricia Fernanda F; Justulin, Luis Antônio; Felisbino, Sérgio Luis; Martinez, Francisco Eduardo

    2015-06-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (atRA) maintains physiological stability of the prostate, and we reported that ethanol intake increases atRA in the rat prostate; however the mechanisms underlying these changes are unknown. We evaluated the impact of a low- and high-dose ethanol intake (UChA and UChB strains) on atRA metabolism in the dorsal and lateral prostate. Aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) subtype 1A3 was increased in the dorsal prostate of UChA animals while ALDH1A1 and ALDH1A2 decreased in the lateral prostate. In UChB animals, ALDH1A1, ALDH1A2, and ALDH1A3 increased in the dorsal prostate, and ALDH1A3 decreased in the lateral prostate. atRA levels increased with the low activity of CYP2E1 and decreased with high CYP26 activity in the UChB dorsal prostate. Conversely, atRA was found to decrease when the activity of total CYP was increased in the UChA lateral prostate. Ethanol modulates the synthesis and catabolism of atRA in the prostate in a concentration-dependent manner.

  12. Prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Domingue, Gerald J.; Hellstrom, Wayne J. G.

    1998-01-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of acute bacterial prostatitis is straightforward and easily accomplished in clinical laboratories. Chronic bacterial prostatitis, and especially chronic idiopathic prostatitis (most often referred to as abacterial prostatitis), presents a real challenge to the clinician and clinical microbiologist. Clinically, the diagnosis of chronic idiopathic prostatitis is differentiated from that of acute prostatitis by a lack of prostatic inflammation and no “significant” (controversial) leukocytes or bacteria in the expressed prostatic secretions. Despite these diagnostic criteria, the etiology of chronic idiopathic prostatitis is unknown. While this review covers the entire spectrum of microbially caused acute prostatitis (including common and uncommon bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites) and microbially associated chronic prostatitis, a special focus has been given to chronic idiopathic prostatitis. The idiopathic syndrome is commonly diagnosed in men but is poorly treated. Recent data convincingly suggests a possible bacterial etiology for the condition. Provocative molecular studies have been published reporting the presence of 16S rRNA bacterial sequences in prostate biopsy tissue that is negative for ordinary bacteria by routine culture in men with chronic idiopathic prostatitis. Additionally, special culture methods have indicated that difficult-to-culture coryneforms and coagulase-negative staphylococci are present in expressed prostatic secretions found to be negative by routine culture techniques. Treatment failures are not uncommon in chronic prostatitis. Literature reports suggest that antimicrobial treatment failures in chronic idiopathic prostatitis caused by organisms producing extracellular slime might result from the virulent properties of coagulase-negative staphylococci or other bacteria. While it is difficult to definitively extrapolate from animal models, antibiotic pharmokinetic studies with a murine model have

  13. Regulation of 5alpha-reductase isoforms by oxytocin in the rat ventral prostate.

    PubMed

    Assinder, S J; Johnson, C; King, K; Nicholson, H D

    2004-12-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is present in the male reproductive tract, where it is known to modulate contractility, cell growth, and steroidogenesis. Little is known about how OT regulates these processes. This study describes the localization of OT receptor in the rat ventral prostate and investigates if OT regulates gene expression and/or activity of 5alpha-reductase isoforms I and II. The ventral prostates of adult male Wistar rats were collected following daily sc administration of saline (control), OT, a specific OT antagonist or both OT plus antagonist for 3 d. Expression of the OT receptor was identified in the ventral prostate by RT-PCR and Western blot, and confirmed to be a single active binding site by radioreceptor assay. Immunohistochemistry localized the receptor to the epithelium of prostatic acini and to the stromal tissue. Real-time RT-PCR determined that OT treatment significantly reduced expression of 5alpha-reductase I but significantly increased 5alpha-reductase II expression in the ventral prostate. Activity of both isoforms of 5alpha-reductase was significantly increased by OT, resulting in increased concentration of prostatic dihydrotestosterone. In conclusion, OT is involved in regulating conversion of testosterone to the biologically active dihydrotestosterone in the rat ventral prostate. It does so by differential regulation of 5alpha-reductase isoforms I and II.

  14. Effect of Tripterygium Wilfordii Polyglycoside on Experimental Prostatitis Caused by Ureaplasma Urealyticum in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Pingnan; Lu, Zhiyong; Ye, Lihong; Fang, Yaqin; Tan, Suhong; Xuan, Guohong; Ru, Jincheng; Mao, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Background Prostatitis is a common and refractory urological disease with complicated etiology. Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU) has a close relationship with human urinary tract infection that can induce nonbacterial prostatitis. Tripterygium wilfordii polyglycoside (TWP) is a non-steroidal immune inhibitor that causes significant immune suppression and anti-inflammatory effects. Its role in prostatitis caused by UU has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of TWP on UU-infected prostatitis in a rat model. Material/Methods UU-infected prostatitis SD model rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: the prostatitis group (model group) and the TWP treatment group (treatment group). At 7 days after treatment, prostate weight, leucocyte count, lecithin corpuscles, UU infection rate, and UU microbe count were compared between the 2 groups. Serum inflammatory cytokines TNF-α was determined by ELISA, and ICAM-1 and NF-κB expression were detected. Results UU infection rate was 80% after modeling. The rat prostate weight and leucocyte count in the model group increased significantly, while lecithin corpuscles decreased. Compared with controls, inflammatory factor TNF-α, ICAM-1, and NF-κB expression were obviously higher (P<0.05). TWP markedly reduced prostate weight and leucocyte count, increased lecithin corpuscles, and decreased UU microbe count and TNF-α, ICAM-1, and NF-κB expression (P<0.05). Conclusions TWP can inhibit expression of inflammatory factors and may be useful in treating UU-infected prostatitis through reducing UU infection rate. PMID:27743513

  15. Effect of Tripterygium Wilfordii Polyglycoside on Experimental Prostatitis Caused by Ureaplasma Urealyticum in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shan, Pingnan; Lu, Zhiyong; Ye, Lihong; Fang, Yaqin; Tan, Suhong; Xuan, Guohong; Ru, Jincheng; Mao, Liming

    2016-10-15

    BACKGROUND Prostatitis is a common and refractory urological disease with complicated etiology. Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU) has a close relationship with human urinary tract infection that can induce nonbacterial prostatitis. Tripterygium wilfordii polyglycoside (TWP) is a non-steroidal immune inhibitor that causes significant immune suppression and anti-inflammatory effects. Its role in prostatitis caused by UU has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of TWP on UU-infected prostatitis in a rat model. MATERIAL AND METHODS UU-infected prostatitis SD model rats were randomly divided into 2 groups: the prostatitis group (model group) and the TWP treatment group (treatment group). At 7 days after treatment, prostate weight, leucocyte count, lecithin corpuscles, UU infection rate, and UU microbe count were compared between the 2 groups. Serum inflammatory cytokines TNF-α was determined by ELISA, and ICAM-1 and NF-κB expression were detected. RESULTS UU infection rate was 80% after modeling. The rat prostate weight and leucocyte count in the model group increased significantly, while lecithin corpuscles decreased. Compared with controls, inflammatory factor TNF-α, ICAM-1, and NF-κB expression were obviously higher (P<0.05). TWP markedly reduced prostate weight and leucocyte count, increased lecithin corpuscles, and decreased UU microbe count and TNF-α, ICAM-1, and NF-κB expression (P<0.05). CONCLUSIONS TWP can inhibit expression of inflammatory factors and may be useful in treating UU-infected prostatitis through reducing UU infection rate.

  16. Chemopreventive effect of quercetin in MNU and testosterone induced prostate cancer of Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Sharmila, Govindaraj; Athirai, Thavadurainathan; Kiruthiga, Balakrishnan; Senthilkumar, Kalimuthu; Elumalai, Perumal; Arunkumar, Ramachandran; Arunakaran, Jagadeesan

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer becomes an ideal target for chemoprevention because of its high incidence and extended natural history. The consumption of quercetin (plant flavonoid) in diet is associated with decreased risk of disease and many cancers but then this was not elucidated in prostate malignancy. Hence, a study in which the male Sprague-Dawley rats were induced prostate cancer by hormone (testosterone) and carcinogen (MNU) and simultaneously supplemented with quercetin (200 mg/Kg body weight) thrice a week, was conducted. After the treatment period, rats were killed; ventral and dorsolateral lobes of the prostate were dissected. Histology and oxidative stress markers LPO, H2O2, and antioxidant GSH level were measured in both lobes. The lipid peroxidation, H2O2, in (MNU+T) treated rats were increased and GSH level was decreased, whereas simultaneous quercetin-treated rats reverted back to normal level in both ventral and dorsolateral regions. The different patterns of PIN were observed with associated hyperplasia and dysplasia; changes in these regions and the occurrence of this lesion were reduced in simultaneous quercetin-treated rats. The study concluded that dietary quercetin prevented MNU + T-induced prostate carcinogenesis on both ventral and dorsolateral lobes of Sprague-Dawley rats.

  17. Zinc-protein from rat prostate fluid binds epididymal spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Sansone, G; Abrescia, P

    1991-09-01

    The detection and the isolation of a zinc-protein from the secretion of the rat dorsolateral prostate is described. The purification procedure, based on gel filtration and cationic exchange chromatography, allowed to separate a minor protein (Mr approximately 66,000) from free zinc ions and other secretory components. Two zinc ions were estimated to be associated with one molecule of isolated protein. The zinc-protein was labelled with 125I and then incubated at 37 degrees C with spermatozoa from rat epididymal cauda. Time-dependent in vitro binding of the radioactive protein to sperm cells was demonstrated. This binding was not affected by the presence of proteins from the seminal vesicle during the incubation, while it was blocked in the presence of an excess of unlabelled zinc-protein. After binding, the labelled spermatozoa were treated with a buffer containing 0.5% sodium deoxycholate and 40 mM EDTA; only very small amounts of label were removed from the cells, thus suggesting that the zinc-proteins were kept on the plasma membrane by interactions which do not involve merely hydrophobic bonds.

  18. Preventive effect of Pueraria mirifica on testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in Sprague Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Masrudin, S S; Mohamad, J

    2015-12-01

    Pueraria mirifica (PM) extract contains phytoestrogen daidzein and genistein. In this study, we investigated the protective effect of PM extract, daidzein and genistein on a testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in rats. Testosterone was administered at 3 mg kg(-1) to rats followed by the PM extract, daidzein and genistein for a period of 30 days with finasteride as positive control. The testosterone level was increased, indicating inhibition of 5α-reductase converting testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. This was confirmed by prostate-specific antigen level that significantly decreased when treated with PM extract, daidzein and genistein. The PM extract, daidzein and genistein reduced the increase in the prostate/body weight ratio in testosterone-induced rats. This gives indication that PM extract, daidzein and genistein possessed protective activity for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. The analysis of histoarchitechture of the prostate has also shown that there was a significant improvement in prostatic cells of the testosterone-induced rats when treated with PM extract, daidzein and genistein.

  19. Preventive effects of ACTICOA powder, a cocoa polyphenolic extract, on experimentally induced prostate hyperplasia in Wistar-Unilever rats.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Jean-François; Hidalgo, Sophie; Rozan, Pascale; Messaoudi, Michaël

    2007-12-01

    Plant extracts are useful in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). This study investigates whether ACTICOA (Barry Callebaut France, Louviers, France) powder (AP), a cocoa polyphenolic extract, could prevent prostate hyperplasia induced by testosterone propionate (TP) in rats. Male Wistar-Unilever rats were randomly divided in four groups of 12 rats: one negative control group receiving subcutaneous injections of corn oil and treated with vehicle and three groups injected subcutaneously with TP and treated with the vehicle (positive control) or AP at 24 (AP24) and 48 (AP48) mg/kg/day. Treatments were given orally and started 2 weeks before the induction of prostate hyperplasia. The influence of TP and AP on body weights and food and water consumption of rats was examined. On day 36, rats were sacrificed, and the prostates were removed, cleaned, and weighed. The prostate size ratio (prostate weight/rat body weight) was then calculated. TP significantly influenced the body weight gain of the rats and their food and water consumption, while AP at both doses tested reduced significantly these differences. TP significantly increased prostate size ratio (P < .001), and this induced increase was significantly inhibited in AP-treated rats in comparison with positive controls (P < .001) in a dose-dependent manner. We conclude that AP can prevent TP-induced prostate hyperplasia and therefore may be beneficial in the management of BPH.

  20. Inhibitory effect of diosgenin on experimentally induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Huai-Fen; Xiong, Chao-Mei; Ruan, Jin-Lan

    2016-12-01

    This study investigated the effect of diosgenin, a natural sapogenin possessing various pharmacological activities, on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in rats and the possible mechanisms. BPH was established in the castrated rats by subcutaneous injection of testosterone propionate. Animals were randomly divided into four groups (n=10 each): model group (0.5% sodium carboxymethyl cellulose); positive control group (3 mg/kg finasteride); two diosgenin groups (50 and 100 mg/kg). The drugs were intragastricaly given in each group for consecutive 3 weeks. Another 10 rats with no testicles cut off served as negative controls and they were subcutaneously injected with 0.1 mL olive oil per day and then treated with 0.5% sodium carboxymethylcellulose. After 3-week administration, the prostate index and serum PSA level were determined, and histopathological examination was carried out. The levels of MDA, SOD and GPx in prostates were also measured. Additionally, the expression of Bcl-2, Bax and p53 was examined using Western blotting. The results showed that the prostate index and serum PSA level were significantly decreased, and the pathological changes of the prostate gland were greatly improved in diosgenin groups as compared with the model group. Elevated activities of SOD and GPx, and reduced MDA level were also observed in diosgenin-treated rats. In addition, the expression of Bcl-2 in prostates was down-regulated, whereas that of Bax and p53 was up-regulated in diosgenin-treated rats. These results indicated that diosgenin was effective in inhibiting testosterone propionate-induced prostate enlargement and may be a candidate agent for the treatment of BPH.

  1. Inhibition of testosterone-induced hyperplasia of the prostate of sprague-dawley rats by pumpkin seed oil.

    PubMed

    Gossell-Williams, M; Davis, A; O'Connor, N

    2006-01-01

    The oil from the pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo) seed is claimed to be useful in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia. This investigation seeks to examine the effect of pumpkin seed oil on testosterone-induced hyperplasia of the prostate of rats. Hyperplasia was induced by subcutaneous administration of testosterone (0.3 mg/100 g of body weight) for 20 days. Simultaneous oral administration of either pumpkin seed oil (2.0 and 4.0 mg/100 g of body weight) or corn oil (vehicle) was also given for 20 days. The weights of the rats were recorded weekly, and the influence of testosterone and pumpkin seed oil on the weight gain of the rats was examined. On day 21, rats were sacrificed, and the prostate was removed, cleaned, and weighed. The prostate size ratio (prostate weight/rat body weight) was then calculated. Neither testosterone nor pumpkin seed oil had any significant influence on the weight gain of the rats. Testosterone significantly increased prostate size ratio (P < .05), and this induced increase was inhibited in rats fed with pumpkin seed oil at 2.0 mg/100 g of body weight. The protective effect of pumpkin seed oil was significant at the higher pumpkin seed oil dose (P < .02). We conclude pumpkin seed oil can inhibit testosterone-induced hyperplasia of the prostate and therefore may be beneficial in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  2. Effect of Benincasa hispida fruits on testosterone-induced prostatic hypertrophy in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Nandecha, Chetan; Nahata, Alok; Dixit, Vinod Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Background: Benincasa hispida Cogn. has been used traditionally in India for the management of urinary disorders. The fruit of B hispida is used as a diuretic and the seeds have been reported to possess antiangiogenic effects in prostate cells. Objective: The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of petroleum ether extract, ethanolic extract, and B hispida seed oil on hyperplasia of the prostate induced by the subcutaneous administration of testosterone in rats. Methods: In vitro studies were performed to determine the 5α-reductase inhibitory potential of the extracts. The results of those studies paved the way for the pharmacologic screening of the extracts to assess their potential against testosterone-induced hyperplasia in rats. Nine groups containing 10 rats per group were created for this study. Hyperplasia was induced by administration of testosterone (3 mg/kg SC) for 14 days in all the groups except the vehicle-treated group. Simultaneous administration of petroleum ether extract (100 or 200 mg/kg PO), ethanolic extract (100 or 200 mg/kg PO), and B hispida seed oil (20 or 40 mg/kg PO) was conducted. A standard 5α-reductase inhibitor (ie, finasteride) was used as a positive control. The weight of the rats was recorded on day 0 (ie, day 1 of the study) and on day 14, and the influence of testosterone and test extracts on the weight of the rats was determined. On day 14, rats were euthanized; prostates were dissected out, and weighed. The rats' prostate/body weight (P/BW) ratio was then determined. Histologic examinations were performed on prostates from each group. Results: The petroleum ether extract as well as B hispida seed oil exhibited inhibition of 5α-reductase activity in in vitro studies. Ethanolic extract did not exhibit significant inhibitory potential in vitro. Further in vivo study found that testosterone treatment significantly increased the rats' P/BW ratio in all the groups except the vehicle-treated rats, and this increase in

  3. Comparison of Saw Palmetto (extract and whole berry) and Cernitin on prostate growth in rats.

    PubMed

    Talpur, Nadeem; Echard, Bobby; Bagchi, Debasis; Bagchi, Manashi; Preuss, Harry G

    2003-08-01

    Pharmaceuticals such as finasteride and alpha blockers are used to treat symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and are known to cause severe adverse reactions. Accordingly, a search for safer, natural products has been undertaken. Two natural agents (nutraceuticals) have come under recent scrutiny; because natural products, in general, often have evidence of long-term safety. The present study compares the in vivo effects on androgen-induced prostatic enlargement in rats of two nutraceuticals--the widely recognized Saw Palmetto (Serenoa repens) and the less well-known Cernitin (defined pollen extract). Non-castrated rats, had a mean prostate weight of 124 mg +/- 8.8 (S.E.M.) compared to the 24.5 mg +/- 1.9 (S.E.M.) of the castrated rat followed under the same regimen (p < 0.01). When castrated rats were given testosterone, the mass increased significantly to 250.0 mg +/- 31.7 (S.E.M.) (p < 0.01). In the five remaining groups, castrated rats receiving testosterone were given finasteride, an extract of Saw Palmetto, crushed whole berry derived from Saw Palmetto fruit, a water soluble and fat soluble extract of Cernitin or a combination of the Saw Palmetto extract and Cernitin. All treatments decreased the size of the prostate to roughly the same size as in the non-castrated rats, a size that was significantly smaller than castrated rats treated with testosterone in the same manner (p < 0.01). A second study examining non-castrated rats treated with very high doses of testosterone showed similar results. In both studies, the nutraceuticals generally decreased body weight. In conclusion, these studies show the ability of Saw Palmetto (whole berry and extract) and Cernitin to influence prostatic hyperplasia via effects on androgen metabolism.

  4. Arecoline augments cellular proliferation in the prostate gland of male Wistar rats

    SciTech Connect

    Saha, Indraneel; Chatterjee, Aniruddha; Mondal, Anushree; Maiti, Bishwa Ranjan; Chatterji, Urmi

    2011-09-01

    Areca nut chewing is the fourth most popular habit in the world due to its effects as a mild stimulant, causing a feeling of euphoria and slightly heightened alertness. Areca nuts contain several alkaloids and tannins, of which arecoline is the most abundant and known to have several adverse effects in humans, specially an increased risk of oral cancer. On evaluating the effects of arecoline on the male endocrine physiology in Wistar rats, it was found that arecoline treatment led to an overall enlargement and increase in the wet weight of the prostate gland, and a two-fold increase in serum gonadotropin and testosterone levels. Since the prostate is a major target for testosterone, the consequences of arecoline consumption were studied specifically in the prostate gland. Arecoline treatment led to an increase in the number of rough endoplasmic reticulum and reduction of secretory vesicles, signifying a hyperactive state of the prostate. Increased expression of androgen receptors in response to arecoline allowed for enhanced effect of testosterone in the prostate of treated animals, which augmented cell proliferation, subsequently confirmed by an increase in the expression of Ki-67 protein. Cellular proliferation was also the outcome of concomitant over expression of the G{sub 1}-to-S cell cycle regulatory proteins, cyclin D1 and CDK4, both at the transcriptional and translational levels. Taken together, the findings provide the first evidence that regular use of arecoline may lead to prostatic hyperplasia and hypertrophy, and eventually to disorders associated with prostate enlargement. - Highlights: > Effect of arecoline was investigated on the endocrine physiology of male Wistar rats. > Increase observed in prostate size, wet weight, serum testosterone and gonadotropins. > Arecoline increased RER, expression of androgen receptor and cellular proliferation. > Upregulation of cyclin D1 and CDK4 seen at transcriptional and translational levels. > It may cause

  5. Therapeutic effect of ACTICOA powder, a cocoa polyphenolic extract, on experimentally induced prostate hyperplasia in Wistar-Unilever rats.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Jean-François; Hidalgo, Sophie; Rozan, Pascale; Messaoudi, Michaël

    2007-12-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a non-malignant enlargement of the prostate that results in obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms. Plant extracts are frequently used to treat BPH rather than therapeutics that can cause severe side effects. ACTICOA() (Ba0rry Callebaut France, Louviers, France) powder (AP) is a cocoa polyphenolic extract, and we have shown in a previous study that oral treatment with AP prevented prostate hyperplasia. This study investigated whether AP could improve established prostate hyperplasia using the same testosterone propionate (TP)-induced prostate hyperplasia model in rats. Male Wistar-Unilever rats were randomly divided in four groups of 12 rats: one group injected with corn oil and orally treated with the vehicle (negative control) and three groups injected subcutaneously with TP and orally treated with the vehicle (positive control) or AP at 24 (AP24) and 48 (AP48) mg/kg/day. Treatments started 1 week after the start of the induction of prostate hyperplasia and lasted for 2 weeks. The influence of TP and AP on body weights, food and water consumptions, plasma polyphenolic concentration, and serum dihydrotestoterone (DHT) level of rats was examined. At completion of the study, rats were sacrificed, and the prostates were removed, cleaned, and weighed. The prostate size ratio (prostate weight/rat body weight) was then calculated. TP significantly influenced the body weight gain of the rats and their food and water consumptions, while AP reduced significantly these differences in a dose-dependent manner. AP significantly reduced serum DHT level and prostate size ratio in comparison with positive controls also dose-dependently. In conclusion, AP orally administered was effective for reducing established prostate hyperplasia, especially at the dose of 48 mg/kg/day.

  6. Effects of coconut oil on testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    de Lourdes Arruzazabala, María; Molina, Vivian; Más, Rosa; Carbajal, Daisy; Marrero, David; González, Víctor; Rodríguez, Eduardo

    2007-07-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the benign uncontrolled growth of the prostate gland, leading to difficulty with urination. Saw palmetto lipid extracts (SPLE), used to treat BPH, have been shown to inhibit prostate 5a-reductase, and some major components, such as lauric, myristic and oleic acids also inhibit this enzyme. Coconut oil (CO) is also rich in fatty acids, mainly lauric and myristic acids. We investigated whether CO prevents testosterone-induced prostate hyperplasia (PH) in Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were distributed into seven groups (10 rats each). A negative control group were injected with soya oil; six groups were injected with testosterone (3 mg kg(-1)) to induce PH: a positive control group, and five groups treated orally with SPLE (400 mg kg(-1)), CO or sunflower oil (SO) (400 and 800 mg kg(-1)). Treatments were given for 14 days. Rats were weighed before treatment and weekly thereafter. Rats were then killed and the prostates were removed and weighed. CO (400 and 800 mg kg(-1)), SPLE (400 mg kg(-1)) and SO at 800 mg kg(-1), but not at 400 mg kg(-1), significantly reduced the increase in prostate weight (PW) and PW:body weight (BW) ratio induced by testosterone (% inhibition 61.5%, 82.0%, 43.8% and 28.2%, respectively). Since CO and SPLE, but not SO, contain appreciable concentrations of lauric and myristic acids, these results could be attributed to this fact. In conclusion, this study shows that CO reduced the increase of both PW and PW:BW ratio, markers of testosterone-induced PH in rats.

  7. Metformin Attenuates Testosterone-Induced Prostatic Hyperplasia in Rats: A Pharmacological Perspective.

    PubMed

    Mosli, Hala H; Esmat, Ahmed; Atawia, Reem T; Shoieb, Sherif M; Mosli, Hisham A; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2015-10-23

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is uncontrolled proliferation of prostate tissue. Metformin, a widely prescribed anti-diabetic agent, possesses anticancer activity through induction of apoptotic signaling and cell cycle arrest. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of metformin against experimentally-induced BPH in rats. Treatment with 500 and 1000 mg/kg metformin orally for 14 days significantly inhibited testosterone-mediated increase in the prostate weight &prostate index (prostate weight/body weight [mg/g]) and attenuated the pathological alterations induced by testosterone. Mechanistically, metformin significantly protected against testosterone-induced elevation of estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) and decrease of estrogen receptor-β (ER-β) expression, with no significant effect of androgen receptor (AR) and 5α-reductase expression. It decreased mRNA expression of IGF-1 and IGF-1R and protein expression ratio of pAkt/total Akt induced by testosterone. Furthermore, it significantly ameliorated testosterone-induced reduction of mRNA expression Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, P21 and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and AMPK [PT-172] activity. In conclusion, these findings elucidate the effectiveness of metformin in preventing testosterone-induced BPH in rats. These results could be attributed, at least partly, to its ability to enhance expression ratio of ER-β/ER-α, decrease IGF-1, IGF-1R and pAkt expressions, increase P21, PTEN, Bax/Bcl-2 expressions and activate AMPK with a subsequent inhibition of prostate proliferation.

  8. Effect of Serenoa repens extract (Permixon) on estradiol/testosterone-induced experimental prostate enlargement in the rat.

    PubMed

    Paubert-Braquet, M; Richardson, F O; Servent-Saez, N; Gordon, W C; Monge, M C; Bazan, N G; Authie, D; Braquet, P

    1996-01-01

    The effect of the lipidosterolic extract of Serenoa repens (LSESR) on experimental prostate enlargement was investigated in three groups of rats: shams treated with LSESR (sham rats), castrated animals treated with estradiol and testosterone (castrated rats), castrated animals treated with estradiol/testosterone and treated with LSESR (castrated and treated rats). Following three months of continuous hormonal treatment, the weight of prostates in estradiol/testosterone-treated castrated rats was significantly increased in comparison with sham-operated rats. Such an increase started rapidly, reached a maximum by 30 days and remained at a plateau or slightly declined thereafter. The increase of prostate total weight induced by the hormone treatment was inhibited by administration of LSESR. Indeed, the weight was significantly lower at day 60 and day 90 for the dorsal and lateral regions of the prostate. The weight of the ventral region of the prostate was significantly lower after 30 and 60 days treatment with LSESR. These results demonstrate that administering LSESR to hormone-treated castrated rats inhibits the increase in prostate wet weight. This effect of LSESR may explain the beneficial effect of this extract in human benign prostatic hypertrophy.

  9. Suppressive effects of dietary genistin and daidzin on rat prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kato, K; Takahashi, S; Cui, L; Toda, T; Suzuki, S; Futakuchi, M; Sugiura, S; Shirai, T

    2000-08-01

    High intake of phytoestrogens through soybeans and their products is thought to be associated with low incidences of prostate and / or breast cancer in Asian countries. Possible chemopreventive effects of genistin or daidzin on rat prostate carcinogenesis were therefore investigated. Male F344 rats were given 10 biweekly subcutaneous injections of 3,2'-dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl (DMAB) and then either genistin or daidzin in the diet at a concentration of 0.1% for 40 weeks. Other groups of rats given DMAB were treated with genistin or daidzin together with a high dose of testosterone propionate (TP). Both genistin and daidzin reduced the numbers of ventral prostate carcinomas (P < 0.05), with a tendency for decrease in incidence. Invasive carcinomas which developed in the anterior prostate and seminal vesicles with TP were, however, not influenced by the two isoflavones. Thus, the present data suggest that genistin and daidzin possess anti-cancer effects at relatively early stages of prostate cancer development, providing experimental support for epidemiological findings.

  10. Microarray analysis of diet-induced alterations in gene expression in the ACI rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Niradiz; Iatropoulos, Michael; Mittelman, Abraham; Geliebter, Jan

    2002-08-01

    The natural history of prostate cancer is a multistage process that involves the transition from normal tissue to subclinical cancer, with progression to carcinoma in situ and eventually metastatic disease. Evidence suggests that a high-fat diet plays a critical role in the biology and progression of the disease. ACI rats were maintained for two generations on high beef fat or control diets for 18 months. Affymetrix microarrays were used to analyze the mRNA expression levels in the dorsolateral prostates of rats on the different diets. Approximately 4752 genes and expressed sequence tag (EST) were expressed in the prostates of rats on either diet. Twenty-seven genes were upregulated and 28 genes downregulated in the high beef fat diet. Data analysis indicated that a high beef fat diet affects the expression of genes involved in inflammation, glucose and fatty acid metabolism, androgen metabolism, potential tumor suppression and protein kinase activity, as well as intracellular and extracellular matrix molecules, growth factors and androgen responsive genes. Results from these and future studies will lead to a better understanding of the effect of diet on gene expression in the prostate and facilitate the rational design and assessment of potential dietary programs for prostate cancer prevention.

  11. Testosterone regulates smooth muscle contractile pathways in the rat prostate: emphasis on PDE5 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinhua; Zang, Ning; Wei, Yu; Yin, Jin; Teng, Ruobing; Seftel, Allen

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone (T) plays a permissive role in the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5is) have been found to be effective for BPH and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in clinical trials. This study investigated the effect of T on smooth muscle (SM) contractile and regulatory signaling pathways, including PDE5 expression and functional activity in prostate in male rats (sham-operated, surgically castrated, and castrated with T supplementation). In vitro organ bath studies, real-time RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry were performed. Castration heavily attenuated contractility, including sensitivity to phenylephrine with SM myosin immunostaining revealing a disrupted SM cell arrangement in the stroma. PDE5 was immunolocalized exclusively in the prostate stroma, and orchiectomy signficantly reduced PDE5 immunopositivity, mRNA, and protein expression, along with nNOS and ROKβ mRNA, whereas it increased eNOS plus α1a and α1b adrenoreceptor expression in castrated animals. The PDE5i zaprinast significantly increased prostate strip relaxation to the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in control but not castrated rats. But SNP alone was more effective on castrated rats, comparable with sham treated with SNP plus zaprinast. T supplementation prevented or restored all above changes, including SNP and zaprinast in vitro responsiveness. In conclusion, our data show that T positively regulates PDE5 expression and functional activities in prostate, and T ablation not only suppresses prostate size but also reduces prostatic SM contractility, with several potential SM contraction/relaxation pathways implicated. Zaprinast findings strongly suggest a major role for PDE5/cGMP in this signaling cascade. PDE5 inhibition may represent a novel mechanism for treatment of BPH. PMID:22028410

  12. Cafeteria diet increases prostaglandin E2 levels in rat prostate, kidney and testis.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, L; Leone, S; Chiavaroli, A; Orlando, G; Recinella, L; Ferrante, C; Di Nisio, C; Verratti, V; Vacca, M

    2010-01-01

    Nutrient composition, particularly the omega-6/omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids ratio, may differently affect inflammatory mediators production in tissues, which could be causally related to increased cancer incidence in obesity. We evaluated prostaglandin E(2) levels in male Wistar rat prostate, kidney and testicle tissues after 15 days of either a high fat, cafeteria-style diet (5.50 Kcal/g, 30 percent calories from fat, omega-6/omega-3 ratio 2.33) or a standard laboratory chow diet (3.35 Kcal/g, 3 percent calories from fat, omega-6/omega-3 ratio 0.56). In the cafeteria diet compared to standard laboratory diet rats, we found both an increase in weight gain and increased prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) levels in prostate, kidney and testicle tissues. The increased levels of PGE(2) induced by the cafeteria diet could drive an inflammatory process leading to increased incidence of prostate, kidney and testicular cancer in overweight patients.

  13. Terazosin Treatment Induces Caspase-3 Expression in the Rat Ventral Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Georgios; Vlachodimitropoulos, Dimitrios; Kyroudi, Aspasia; Kouloukoussa, Mirsini; Perrea, Despina; Mitropoulos, Dionisios

    2013-01-01

    Background Quinazoline-based alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonists may not act solely on smooth muscle contractility. We evaluated the in vivo effect of terazosin on the expression of caspase-3 in the rat ventral prostate. Methods Fifteen Wistar rats were treated with terazosin (1.2 mg/kg body weight, given orally every second day) for 120 days. Another 15 control animals received the same amount of distilled water. The expression of caspase-3 was assessed immunohistochemically in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections. Results Terazosin treatment did not affect prostate weight and histomorphology. In controls caspase-3 was expressed weakly and sporadically. In contrast, strong and weak expression was evident in 67% and 33% of the terazosin-treated specimens, respectively. Conclusions These findings implicate the induction of caspase-3 expression by terazosin as a potential molecular mechanism of its apoptotic action on prostate cells. PMID:23518907

  14. Down regulation of the muscarinic cholinergic receptor of the rat prostate following castration

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, E.; Miller, A.R.; Lepor, H.

    1985-07-01

    Prostatic secretion is dependent upon the integrity of the endocrine and autonomic nervous systems and is dramatically influenced by muscarinic cholinergic analogs. In this study, the authors have used radioligand receptor binding methods on whole tissue homogenates and slide mounted tissue sections of rat prostate to determine whether androgens regulate the density of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the prostate. The muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding affinities (Kd) of (/sup 3/H) N-methylscopolamine in prostatic homogenates obtained from intact, castrate, and castrate rats receiving testosterone replacement (castrate + T) were similar (0.07 to 0.10 nM). The muscarinic cholinergic receptor binding capacity decreased 73 per cent following castration. Testosterone administration restored the density of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in castrate rats to intact levels. In order to ensure that the loss of receptor density was not due to a decrease in the epithelial: stromal cell ratio, the number of muscarinic cholinergic receptors per unit area of epithelium was determined in the 3 treatment groups using autoradiography on slide mounted tissue sections. The density of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in a unit area of epithelium was decreased 91 per cent following castration. Testosterone administration restored the density of muscarinic cholinergic receptors in the castrate rats to intact levels. The modulation of neurotransmitter receptors by steroid hormones may be a mechanism by which sex steroids regulate biological responsiveness of target tissues.

  15. PREPUBERTAL EXPOSURES TO COMPOUNDS THAT INCREASE PROLACTIN SECRETION IN THE MALE RAT: EFFECTS ON ADULT PROSTATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prepubertal exposure to compounds that increase prolactin secretion in the male rat: effects on the adult prostate.

    Stoker TE, Robinette CL, Britt BH, Laws SC, Cooper RL.

    Endocrinology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effec...

  16. GENE ARRAY ANALYSIS OF THE VENTRAL PROSTATE IN RATS EXPOSED TO EITHER VINCLOZOLIN OR PROCYMIDONE

    EPA Science Inventory

    GENE ARRAY ANALYSIS OF THE VENTRAL PROSTATE IN RATS EXPOSED TO EITHER VINCLOZOLIN OR PROCYMIDONE. MB Rosen, VS Wilson, JE Schmid, and LE Gray Jr. US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTP, NC.

    Vinclozolin (Vi) and procymidone (Pr) are antiandrogenic fungicides. While changes in gene expr...

  17. The therapeutic effects of docosahexaenoic acid on oestrogen/androgen-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Luo, Fei; Zhou, Ying; Du, Xiaoling; Shi, Jiandang; Zhao, Xiaoling; Xu, Yong; Zhu, Yan; Hong, Wei; Zhang, Ju

    2016-07-15

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the major disorders of the urinary system in elderly men. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is the main component of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) and has nerve protective, anti-inflammatory and tumour-growth inhibitory effects. Here, the therapeutic potential of DHA in treating BPH was investigated. Seal oil effectively prevented the development of prostatic hyperplasia induced by oestradiol/testosterone in a rat model by suppressing the increase of the prostatic index (PI), reducing the thickness of the peri-glandular smooth muscle layer, inhibiting the proliferation of both prostate epithelial and stromal cells, and downregulating the expression of androgen receptor (AR) and oestrogen receptor α (ERα). An in vitro study showed that DHA inhibited the growth of the human prostate stromal cell line WPMY-1 and the epithelial cell line RWPE-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In both cell lines, the DHA arrested the cell cycle in the G2/M phase. In addition, DHA also reduced the expression of ERα and AR in the WPMY-1 and RWPE-1 cells. These results indicate that DHA inhibits the multiplication of prostate stromal and epithelial cells through a mechanism that may involve cell cycle arrest and the downregulation of ERα and AR expression.

  18. The histological and histometrical effects of Urtica dioica extract on rat's prostate hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Hamid Reza; Erfani Majd, Naeem; Esmaeilzadeh, Saleh; Fatemi Tabatabaei, Sayed Reza

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common disease in human that gradual overgrowth of the prostate gland leads to impinge on the urethra with impairment in urinary function. Numerous plants improve uncontrolled growth of the prostate gland and improve urinary tract symptoms associated with BPH. In this study, 25 healthy adult male Wistar rats were divided randomly in five groups: G1 (Control group) received ordinary feed without any treatment, G2 received 10 mg kg(-1) testosterone subcutaneously, G3 received 50 mg kg(-1) nettle root extract orally, G4 received 50 mg kg(-1) nettle root extract orally and 10 mg kg(-1) testosterone, G5 received 10 mg kg(-1) almond oil (Almond oil was used as testosterone solvent) subcutaneously. After six weeks, volume and weight of each lobe were measured and samples were taken. The 5 to 6 µm thickness sections were made using paraffin embedding method and stained by hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid-Schiff. The results showed that prostate volume and ratio of prostate to body weight were increased significantly in the testosterone. Histological and histometrical results showed that dorsal and lateral type 1 and 2 lobes were not changed significantly but the ventral and anterior lobes have changed significantly. Over all, the nettle root could prevent from some of prostatic hyperplasia effects, so that percentage of folded alveoli in ventral lobe reduced insignificantly.

  19. Sleep Deprivation Alters Rat Ventral Prostate Morphology, Leading to Glandular Atrophy: A Microscopic Study Contrasted with the Hormonal Assays

    PubMed Central

    Venâncio, Daniel P.; Andersen, Monica L.; Vilamaior, Patricia S. L.; Santos, Fernanda C.; Zager, Adriano; Tufik, Sérgio; Taboga, Sebastião R.; De Mello, Marco T.

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effect of 96 h paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) and 21-day sleep restriction (SR) on prostate morphology using stereological assays in male rats. After euthanasia, the rat ventral prostate was removed, weighed, and prepared for conventional light microscopy. Microscopic analysis of the prostate reveals that morphology of this gland was altered after 96 h of PSD and 21 days of SR, with the most important alterations occurring in the epithelium and stroma in the course of both procedures compared with the control group. Both 96 h PSD and 21-day SR rats showed lower serum testosterone and higher corticosterone levels than control rats. The significance of our result referring to the sleep deprivation was responsible for deep morphological alterations in ventral prostate tissue, like to castration microscopic modifications. This result is due to the marked alterations in hormonal status caused by PSD and SR. PMID:22927719

  20. Hypothermia and rewarming induce gene expression and multiplication of cells in healthy rat prostate tissue.

    PubMed

    Kaija, Helena; Pakanen, Lasse; Kortelainen, Marja-Leena; Porvari, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer has been extensively studied, but cellular stress responses in healthy prostate tissue are rarely investigated. Hypothermia is known to cause alterations in mRNA and protein expressions and stability. The aim of this study was to use normal rat prostate as a model in order to find out consequences of cold exposure and rewarming on the expressions of genes which are either members or functionally/structurally related to erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene B (ErbB) signaling pathway. Relative mRNA expressions of amphiregulin (AMR), cyclin D1 (CyD1), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21), transmembrane form of the prostatic acid phosphatase (PAcP), thrombomodulin (TM) and heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) in rat ventral prostate were quantified in mild (2 or 4.5 h at room temperature) and severe (2 or 4.5 h at +10°C) hypothermia and in rewarming after cold exposure (2 h at +10°C followed by 2 h at room temperature or 3 h at +28°C). AMR protein level, apoptotic Bcl-2 associated X protein to B-cell CLL/lymphoma 2 (Bax/Bcl-2) mRNA ratio and proliferative index Ki-67 were determined. 4.5-h mild hypothermia, 2-h severe hypothermia and rewarming increased expression of all these genes. Elevated proliferation index Ki-67 could be seen in 2-h severe hypothermia, and the proliferation index had its highest value in longer rewarming with totally recovered normal body temperature. Pro-apoptotic tendency could be seen in 2-h mild hypothermia while anti-apoptosis was predominant in 4.5-h mild hypothermia and in shorter rewarming with only partly recovered body temperature. Hypothermia and following rewarming promote the proliferation of cells in healthy rat prostate tissue possibly via ErbB signaling pathway.

  1. Androgen metabolism and regulation of rat ventral prostate growth and acid phosphatase during sexual maturation.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, J; Bird, C E; Clark, A F

    1988-01-01

    Androgen metabolism and the regulation of rat ventral prostate cell proliferation and secretory function were examined during sexual maturation. Changes in acid phosphatase (AP) characteristics were measured as a marker of androgen-dependent prostatic secretory function. In immature (21-day-old) rats, total AP activity per cell was low (14.2 +/- 1.3 mol p-nitrophenol phosphate hydrolysed/h per mg DNA); it increased threefold as the weight, protein and DNA contents of the prostate increased to adult (65-day) levels. This corresponded with significant (P less than 0.001) increases in the staining intensities of three of the four bands of secretory AP on isoelectric focusing gels. The extent of inhibition of AP by tartrate decreased at the same time. Secretory AP is known to be relatively tartrate-resistant. The changes in AP activity occurred after prostatic 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (5 alpha-DHT) levels increased from 4.6 +/- 0.7 pmol/mg DNA (21 days) to reach a peak of 17.6 +/- 2.3 pmol/mg DNA at 58 days. Prostatic 5 alpha-DHT concentrations were always higher than testosterone levels. Prostatic 5 alpha-androstane-3 alpha,17 beta-diol (3 alpha-Adiol) levels were lower than 5 alpha-DHT levels except on day 58 when levels peaked dramatically at 26.2 +/- 5.5 pmol/mg DNA. Changes in prostatic 5 alpha-DHT and 3 alpha-Adiol levels corresponded with changes in 5 alpha-reductase and 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase (3 alpha-HSOR) activities. The oxidative reaction of 3 alpha-HSOR was approximately fourfold higher than the reductive reaction, indicating a preference for the formation of 5 alpha-DHT. The plasma levels of testosterone, 5 alpha-DHT and 3 alpha-Adiol cannot account for their respective prostatic levels, indicating the importance of the steroid-metabolizing enzymes in regulating intracellular androgen levels. Changes in the AP characteristics could be correlated with the androgen status of the prostate.

  2. Linkage and microarray analyses of susceptibility genes in ACI/Seg rats: a model for prostate cancers in the aged.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Satoshi; Suzuki, Shugo; Nomoto, Tomoko; Kondo, Yasushi; Wakazono, Kuniko; Tsujino, Yoshimi; Sugimura, Takashi; Shirai, Tomoyuki; Homma, Yukio; Ushijima, Toshikazu

    2005-04-01

    ACI/Seg (ACI) rats develop prostate cancers spontaneously with aging, similar to humans. Here, to identify genes involved in prostate cancer susceptibility, we did linkage analysis and oligonucleotide microarray analysis. Linkage analysis was done using 118 effective rats, and prostate cancer susceptibility 1 (Pcs1), whose ACI allele dominantly induced prostate cancers, was mapped on chromosome 19 [logarithm of odds (LOD) score of 5.0]. PC resistance 1 (Pcr1), whose ACI allele dominantly and paradoxically suppressed the size of prostate cancers, was mapped on chromosome 2 (LOD score of 5.0). When linkage analysis was done in 51 rats with single or no macroscopic testicular tumors, which had larger prostates and higher testosterone levels than those with bilateral testicular tumors, Pcs2 and Pcr2 were mapped on chromosomes 20 and 1, respectively. By oligonucleotide microarray analysis with 8,800 probe sets and confirmation by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, only two genes within these four loci were found to be differentially expressed >1.8-fold. Membrane metalloendopeptidase (Mme), known to inhibit androgen-independent growth of prostate cancers, on Pcr1 was expressed 2.0- to 5.5-fold higher in the ACI prostate, in accordance with its paradoxical effect. Cdkn1a on Pcs2 was expressed 1.5- to 4.5-fold lower in the ACI prostate. Additionally, genes responsible for testicular tumors and unilateral renal agenesis were mapped on chromosomes 11 and 14, respectively. These results showed that prostate cancer susceptibility of ACI rats involves at least four loci, and suggested Mme and Cdkn1a as candidates for Pcr1 and Pcs2.

  3. Metformin Attenuates Testosterone-Induced Prostatic Hyperplasia in Rats: A Pharmacological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mosli, Hala H.; Esmat, Ahmed; Atawia, Reem T.; Shoieb, Sherif M.; Mosli, Hisham A.; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B.

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is uncontrolled proliferation of prostate tissue. Metformin, a widely prescribed anti-diabetic agent, possesses anticancer activity through induction of apoptotic signaling and cell cycle arrest. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of metformin against experimentally-induced BPH in rats. Treatment with 500 and 1000 mg/kg metformin orally for 14 days significantly inhibited testosterone-mediated increase in the prostate weight & prostate index (prostate weight/body weight [mg/g]) and attenuated the pathological alterations induced by testosterone. Mechanistically, metformin significantly protected against testosterone-induced elevation of estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) and decrease of estrogen receptor-β (ER-β) expression, with no significant effect of androgen receptor (AR) and 5α-reductase expression. It decreased mRNA expression of IGF-1 and IGF-1R and protein expression ratio of pAkt/total Akt induced by testosterone. Furthermore, it significantly ameliorated testosterone–induced reduction of mRNA expression Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, P21 and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and AMPK [PT-172] activity. In conclusion, these findings elucidate the effectiveness of metformin in preventing testosterone-induced BPH in rats. These results could be attributed, at least partly, to its ability to enhance expression ratio of ER-β/ER-α, decrease IGF-1, IGF-1R and pAkt expressions, increase P21, PTEN, Bax/Bcl-2 expressions and activate AMPK with a subsequent inhibition of prostate proliferation. PMID:26492952

  4. Rat Prostate Tumor Cells Progress in the Bone Microenvironment to a Highly Aggressive Phenotype1

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Sofia Halin; Rudolfsson, Stina H; Bergh, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer generally metastasizes to bone, and most patients have tumor cells in their bone marrow already at diagnosis. Tumor cells at the metastatic site may therefore progress in parallel with those in the primary tumor. Androgen deprivation therapy is often the first-line treatment for clinically detectable prostate cancer bone metastases. Although the treatment is effective, most metastases progress to a castration-resistant and lethal state. To examine metastatic progression in the bone microenvironment, we implanted androgen-sensitive, androgen receptor–positive, and relatively slow-growing Dunning G (G) rat prostate tumor cells into the tibial bone marrow of fully immune-competent Copenhagen rats. We show that tumor establishment in the bone marrow was reduced compared with the prostate, and whereas androgen deprivation did not affect tumor establishment or growth in the bone, this was markedly reduced in the prostate. Moreover, we found that, with time, G tumor cells in the bone microenvironment progress to a more aggressive phenotype with increased growth rate, reduced androgen sensitivity, and increased metastatic capacity. Tumor cells in the bone marrow encounter lower androgen levels and a higher degree of hypoxia than at the primary site, which may cause high selective pressures and eventually contribute to the development of a new and highly aggressive tumor cell phenotype. It is therefore important to specifically study progression in bone metastases. This tumor model could be used to increase our understanding of how tumor cells adapt in the bone microenvironment and may subsequently improve therapy strategies for prostate metastases in bone. PMID:26992916

  5. Withania coagulans Extract Induces Cell Apoptosis and Inhibits COX-2 Expression in a Rat Model of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sarbishegi, Maryam; Khajavi, Ozra; Arab, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Phytotherapy is a popular treatment option in cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), with many different herbal products being used for the treatment of this condition. Withania coagulans (WC) is an herbal medicine that has shown anti-tumoral, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant effects. Objectives This study examined the effect of Withania coagulans extract (WCE) on prostatic cell apoptosis and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in rats. Methods Forty Wistar rats were equally divided into five groups: control, sham, BPH, BPH + WCE, and BPH + CLX (celecoxib) as a positive control group. The induction of BPH was achieved via the subcutaneous injection of 3 mg/kg of testosterone propionate (TP) daily for 28 days. The animals received WCE, celecoxib, or distilled water by oral gavage accompanied by the TP injection. After four weeks, the prostate glands of the rats were weighed to measure the prostatic index (PI). The ventral lobes of the prostates were dissected and processed with paraffin blocks in order to study the number of mast cells. A TUNEL analysis was performed to evaluate the cell apoptosis, while the expression of COX-2 was examined using immunohistochemistry. Results BPH was obvious in the ventral lobe of the prostate, and the administration of WCE markedly decreased the PI and the number of mast cells (P < 0.001) in the BPH rats. Additionally, the WCE treatment induced prostatic cell apoptosis when compared to the BPH group. Furthermore, following the WCE treatment, the expression of COX-2 in the prostatic tissues was significantly decreased when compared to the BPH groups. Conclusions According to the results of this study, WCE was effective in the treatment of BPH in rats. It may therefore have beneficial effects in the treatment of patients with BPH. PMID:27878112

  6. Temperature-controlled optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves.

    PubMed

    Tozburun, Serhat; Hutchens, Thomas C; McClain, Michael A; Lagoda, Gwen A; Burnett, Arthur L; Fried, Nathaniel M

    2013-06-01

    Optical nerve stimulation (ONS) may be useful as a diagnostic tool for intraoperative identification and preservation of the prostate cavernous nerves (CN), responsible for erectile function, during prostate cancer surgery. Successful ONS requires elevating the nerve temperature to within a narrow range (~42 to 47°C) for nerve activation without thermal damage to the nerve. This preliminary study explores a prototype temperature-controlled optical nerve stimulation (TC-ONS) system for maintaining a constant (±1°C) nerve temperature during short-term ONS of the rat prostate CNs. A 150-mW, 1455-nm diode laser was operated in continuous-wave mode, with and without temperature control, during stimulation of the rat CNs for 15 to 30 s through a fiber optic probe with a 1-mm-diameter spot. A microcontroller opened and closed an in-line mechanical shutter in response to an infrared sensor, with a predetermined temperature set point. With TC-ONS, higher laser power settings were used to rapidly and safely elevate the CNs to a temperature necessary for a fast intracavernous pressure response, while also preventing excessive temperatures that would otherwise cause thermal damage to the nerve. With further development, TC-ONS may provide a rapid, stable, and safe method for intraoperative identification and preservation of the prostate CNs.

  7. Protective potential of epigallocatechin-3-gallate against benign prostatic hyperplasia in metabolic syndrome rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jinglou; Song, Hongping

    2016-07-01

    Epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) is a major catechin in green tea with functions of antioxidant, anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory and attenuating metabolic syndrome. In this study, rat model of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) accompanied with metabolic syndrome was induced by fed on high-fat diet for 12 weeks combined with testosterone injection (10mg/kg/d) from 9th to 12th weeks. EGCG was orally given from 9th to 12th weeks. Finally, the levels of glucose, total cholesterol, triglyceride, prostate weight, insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), inflammatory cytokines, antioxidant enzymes, and prostatic expression of IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and peroxisome proliferator activated receptors (PPARs) were evaluated. It was found that EGCG significantly decreased the levels of glucose, total cholesterol, triglyceride, IGFs, and inflammatory cytokines, normalized the activities of antioxidant enzymes, as well as increased the prostatic expression of IGFBP-3 and PPARs. These results indicated that EGCG was able to exert anti-BPH activities in metabolic syndrome rats.

  8. Exendin-4 shows no effects on the prostatic index in high-fat-diet-fed rat with benign prostatic hyperplasia by improving insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J-X; Xiao, Y-C; Hu, Y-R; Hao, M; Kuang, H-Y

    2015-03-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a prevalent disease globally, and accumulating evidence has indicated an association between BPH, insulin resistance (IR) and diabetes. Exendin-4 is widely used in clinics, which could enhance the proliferation of pancreatic β cells. The ability of exendin-4 to promote tumorigenesis has been of concern, and whether exendin-4 would enhance the propagation of BPH is not fully understood. We aimed to determine whether glucagon-like peptide-1 receptors (GLP-1Rs) were expressed in rat prostate and to determine the effect of exendin-4 on prostate of BPH. Male Wistar rats were used and assigned to six groups: normal diet (ND), high-fat diet (HFD), HFD + exendin-4, HFD + BPH, HFD + BPH + exendin-4 and HFD + BPH + rosiglitazone group. After castration, steroids were injected subcutaneously for 4 weeks to induce BPH. Rats were kept on high-fat diet to induce IR. Treatment groups were treated with exendin-4 and rosiglitazone. Prostatic index and HOMA-IR index were used to evaluate the prostatic hyperplasia status and the degree of IR respectively. The expression of GLP-1R was indicated not only by immunohistochemistry, but also by Western blot analysis. The expression of GLP-1R was significantly higher, and HOMA-IR index and body weight significantly decreased after administration of exendin-4. However, no significant differences in the prostatic index were observed between exendin-4 treatment groups and non-exendin-4 treatment groups. Prostatic index was not influenced by exendin-4 maybe by improving IR and weight loss.

  9. Anti-Inflammatory and Antimicrobial Effects of a Novel Herbal Formulation (WSY-1075) in a Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Woo; Jeong, Hyun Cheol; Moon, Hyong Woo; Cho, Shin Jay; Yang, Jong Hyup; Kim, Woo Hyun; Bae, Woong Jin; Choi, Jin Bong; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Ha, U-Syn; Hong, Sung Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects of a multi-herbal formula known as WSY-1075 in the treatment of chronic bacterial prostatitis in a rat model. Materials and Methods Experimental chronic bacterial prostatitis was induced in 32 Wistar rats by instillation of a bacterial suspension (Escherichia coli, 108 colony-forming units [CFU]/mL) into the prostatic urethra. After the induction of prostatitis, the rats were randomly divided into one of 4 treatment groups: control (n=8), ciprofloxacin (n=8), WSY-1075 (400 mg/kg) (n=8), and WSY-1075 (400 mg/kg)+ciprofloxacin (n=8). After 4 weeks of treatment, microbiological data from prostate tissue cultures, level of prostatic pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α], interleukin [IL]-6, and IL-8), anti-oxidant effects (superoxide dismutase [SOD]), and histological findings were noted. Results The WSY-1075, ciprofloxacin, and WSY-1075+ciprofloxacin groups showed fewer CFUs in prostate tissue cultures than the control group. The WSY-1075, ciprofloxacin and WSY-1075+ciprofloxacin groups showed statistically significantly lower levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-8 than the control group. SOD levels in the WSY-1075, ciprofloxacin and WSY-1075+ciprofloxacin groups were significantly higher than in the control group. Conclusions This study found that WSY-1075 had anti-microbial effects, anti-inflammatory effects, and anti-oxidative effects in a chronic bacterial prostatitis rat model. We expect the WSY-1075 may be useful for the clinical treatment of chronic bacterial prostatitis. PMID:28053947

  10. NEONATAL LOW- AND HIGH-DOSE EXPOSURE TO ESTRADIOL BENZOATE IN THE MALE RAT: I. EFFECTS ON THE PROSTATE GLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    Neonatal Low- And High-Dose Exposure To Estradiol Benzoate In The Male Rat: 1. Effects On The Prostate Gland. Oliver Putz, Christian B. Schwartz, Steve Kim, Gerald A. LeBlanc Ralph L. Cooper, Gail S. Prins

    ABSTRACT
    Brief exposure of rats to high doses of natural estro...

  11. Therapeutic effect of D-004, a lipid extract from Roystonea regia fruits, on prostate hyperplasia induced in rats.

    PubMed

    Carbajal, D; Molina, V; Mas, R; Arruzazabala, M L

    2005-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a nonmalignant growth of prostate leading to difficulty in urinating. Drug therapy, phytotherapy included, is frequently used to treat BPH. D-004 is a lipid extract from Roystonea regia fruits, and previous studies have shown that oral treatment with D-004 for 14 days prevented prostate hyperplasia (PH) induced by testosterone in rats. No information is available, however; about the effects of D-004 in reverting already established PH. This study investigated whether D-004 could improve PH after oral dosing with testosterone in rats. Rats were distributed in five groups (10 rats/group). One group was injected with soy oil (negative control) and four groups were injected with testosterone: one was orally treated with the vehicle (positive control), two with D-004 (200 and 400 mg/kg) and the other with Saw palmetto (400 mg/kg). At study completion, the rats were sacrificed and the prostates were removed and weighed. D-004 (200 and 400 mg/kg) significantly and dose-dependently decreased prostate enlargement by 85% and 98%, respectively, versus the positive control. Likewise, Saw palmetto (400 mg/kg) significantly reduced prostate weight by 73% versus the positive control. D-004 (400 mg/kg) was more effective (p < 0.05) than Saw palmetto (400 mg/kg) in lowering prostate enlargement. D-004 and Saw palmetto also decreased the prostate weight to body weight ratio, but did not affect body weight. In conclusion, D-004 (200 and 400 mg/kg) orally administered was effective for reducing PH after testosterone dosing. D-004 (400 mg/kg) was more effective than Saw palmetto (400 mg/kg). Further studies, however, are needed to corroborate the present results.

  12. Development of a locally advanced orthotopic prostate tumor model in rats for assessment of combined modality therapy

    PubMed Central

    TUMATI, VASU; MATHUR, SANJEEV; SONG, KWANG; HSIEH, JER-TSONG; ZHAO, DAWEN; TAKAHASHI, MASAYA; DOBIN, TIMOTHY; GANDEE, LEAH; SOLBERG, TIMOTHY D.; HABIB, AMYN A.; SAHA, DEBABRATA

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an aggressive locally advanced orthotopic prostate cancer model for assessing high-dose image-guided radiation therapy combined with biological agents. For this study, we used a modified human prostate cancer (PCa) cell line, PC3, in which we knocked down a tumor suppressor protein, DAB2IP (PC3-KD). These prostate cancer cells were implanted into the prostate of nude or Copenhagen rats using either open surgical implantation or a minimally invasive procedure under ultrasound guidance. We report that: i) these DAB2IP-deficient PCa cells form a single focus of locally advanced aggressive tumors in both nude and Copenhagen rats; ii) the resulting tumors are highly aggressive and are poorly controlled after treatment with radiation alone; iii) ultrasound-guided tumor cell implantation can be used successfully for tumor development in the rat prostate; iv) precise measurement of the tumor volume and the treatment planning for radiation therapy can be obtained from ultrasound and MRI, respectively; and v) the use of a fiducial marker for enhanced radiotherapy localization in the rat orthotopic tumor. This model recapitulates radiation-resistant prostate cancers which can be used to demonstrate and quantify therapeutic response to combined modality treatments. PMID:23525451

  13. Development of a locally advanced orthotopic prostate tumor model in rats for assessment of combined modality therapy.

    PubMed

    Tumati, Vasu; Mathur, Sanjeev; Song, Kwang; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Zhao, Dawen; Takahashi, Masaya; Dobin, Timothy; Gandee, Leah; Solberg, Timothy D; Habib, Amyn A; Saha, Debabrata

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an aggressive locally advanced orthotopic prostate cancer model for assessing high-dose image-guided radiation therapy combined with biological agents. For this study, we used a modified human prostate cancer (PCa) cell line, PC3, in which we knocked down a tumor suppressor protein, DAB2IP (PC3‑KD). These prostate cancer cells were implanted into the prostate of nude or Copenhagen rats using either open surgical implantation or a minimally invasive procedure under ultrasound guidance. We report that: i) these DAB2IP-deficient PCa cells form a single focus of locally advanced aggressive tumors in both nude and Copenhagen rats; ii) the resulting tumors are highly aggressive and are poorly controlled after treatment with radiation alone; iii) ultrasound-guided tumor cell implantation can be used successfully for tumor development in the rat prostate; iv) precise measurement of the tumor volume and the treatment planning for radiation therapy can be obtained from ultrasound and MRI, respectively; and v) the use of a fiducial marker for enhanced radiotherapy localization in the rat orthotopic tumor. This model recapitulates radiation-resistant prostate cancers which can be used to demonstrate and quantify therapeutic response to combined modality treatments.

  14. Efficacy of various natural and synthetic androgens to induce ductal branching morphogenesis in the developing anterior rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Foster, B A; Cunha, G R

    1999-01-01

    The studies presented herein quantitated ductal branching morphogenesis in the anterior prostate (AP) of the newborn rat. Four parameters were measured: epithelial area, epithelial perimeter, node number, and form factor. Nine natural and synthetic androgens were tested for their effectiveness in inducing postnatal prostatic development using 808 newborn rat APs in 68 dose-response experiments. Based on these studies it was shown that testosterone (T) was slightly more effective than dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in supporting ductal branching morphogenesis in the developing rat AP. Furthermore, the activity of T could not be accounted for simply by conversion of T to DHT. Synthetic androgens, 7alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone and methyltrienolone (R1881), which cannot be 5alpha-reduced to DHT, also induced extensive ductal branching and elicited responses less than those to T and not statistically different from those to DHT. This suggests that although DHT is sufficient for prostatic development, it is not necessary for postnatal ductal branching morphogenesis and growth of the prostate. 5Alpha-androstan-3alpha,17beta-diol was particularly potent in inducing ductal branching, eliciting a response greater than or comparable to those of T and DHT. Androsterone, androstanedione, 5alpha-androstan-3beta,17beta-diol and 5beta-androstan-3alpha,17beta-diol induced ductal branching, but to a lesser extent than either T or DHT. These studies challenge the assumption that DHT is essential for prostatic development, specifically during ductal branching morphogenesis of the neonatal rat prostate.

  15. Microbubble-mediated ultrasound promotes accumulation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell to the prostate for treating chronic bacterial prostatitis in rats

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Shanhong; Han, Guangwei; Shang, Yonggang; Liu, Chengcheng; Cui, Dong; Yu, Shuangjiang; Liao, Bin; Ao, Xiang; Li, Guangzhi; Li, Longkun

    2016-01-01

    Chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) is an intractable disease. Although bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) are able to regulate inflammation in CBP, the effect of microbubble-mediated ultrasound- induced accumulation of BMMSCs on CBP remains unclear. To address this gap, a model of CBP was established in SD rats, which were then treated with BMMSCs alone (BMMSC group), BMMSCs with ultrasound (ultrasound group), BMMSCs with microbubble-mediated ultrasound (MMUS group) and compared with a healthy control group. A therapeutic-ultrasound apparatus was used to treat the prostate in the presence of circulating microbubbles and BMMSCs. The BMMSC distribution was assessed with in vivo imaging, and the prostate structure with light microscopy. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR, ELISA, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the expressions of TNF-α and IL-1β. More BMMSCs were found in the prostate in the MMUS group than in the CBP, ultrasound, and BMMSC groups. Inflammatory cell infiltration, fibrous tissue hyperplasia, and tumor-like epithelial proliferation were significantly reduced in the MMUS group, as were the mRNA and protein expressions of TNF-α and IL-1β. Microbubble-mediated ultrasound-induced accumulation of BMMSCs can inhibit inflammation and decrease TNF-α and IL-1β expressions in the prostate of CBP rats, suggesting that this method may be therapeutic for CPB. PMID:26797392

  16. Ameliorative effects of stinging nettle (Urtica dioica) on testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Nahata, A; Dixit, V K

    2012-05-01

    The present study investigated the effects of stinging nettle (Urtica dioica L.) (UD) on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) induced by testosterone. In vitro studies were conducted to assess the 5α-reductase inhibitory potential of UD. Two biochemical markers viz., β-sitosterol and scopoletin, were isolated and characterised in the extracts utilising High-performance thin layer chromatographic, FTIR, NMR and overlain UV spectral studies. Hyperplasia was induced in rats by subcutaneous administration of testosterone (3 mg kg(-1) s.c.) for 28 days in all the groups except the vehicle-treated group. Simultaneous administration of petroleum ether and ethanolic extracts (10, 20 and 50 mg kg(-1) p.o.) and isolated β-sitosterol (10 and 20 mg kg(-1) p.o.) was undertaken. Finasteride was used as a positive control (1 mg kg(-1) p.o.). Measurement of prostate/body weight ratio, weekly urine output and serum testosterone levels, prostate-specific antigen levels (on day 28) and histological examinations carried out on prostates from each group led us to conclude that UD can be used as an effective drug for the management of BPH.

  17. Stimulation of androgen-dependent gene expression by the adrenal precursors dehydroepiandrosterone and androstenedione in the rat ventral prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Labrie, C.; Simard, J.; Zhao, H.F.; Belanger, A.; Pelletier, G.; Labrie, F. )

    1989-06-01

    Androgens play a major role in the development, growth, and function of accessory sexual organs, especially the prostate. However, the testis is not the sole source of circulating androgens in man, since the adrenal gland secretes dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), DHEA sulfate, and androstenedione (delta 4-dione) in large quantities. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of plasma concentrations of DHEA and delta 4-dione similar to those found in adult man on sensitive and specific markers of androgen action in the rat ventral prostate. In addition to ventral prostate weight, we have measured the steady state levels of the mRNAs encoding the C1 component of rat prostatic binding protein (PBP-C1) and spermine-binding protein (SBP) using 35S-labeled cDNA probes for in situ hybridization. One week after castration, ventral prostate weight fell 84%, while prostatic 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and androgen-dependent mRNAs were undetectable. When administered via Silastic implants to castrated adult rats for 1 week, plasma concentrations of 1.37 +/- 0.06 ng/ml DHEA or 0.43 +/- 0.08 ng/ml delta 4-dione independently caused increases in ventral prostate weight to 33% and 65% of normal values, respectively. The same plasma levels of DHEA and delta 4-dione resulted in high intraprostatic levels of DHT to 1.19 +/- 0.34 and 3.66 +/- 0.89 ng/g tissue, respectively. Furthermore, DHEA caused an increase in the steady state levels of PBP-C1 and SBP mRNAs to 50% and 57% of the normal state, respectively, while delta 4-dione caused increases corresponding to 80% and 119% of control values, respectively. Castrated adult rats receiving testosterone at a concentration of 1.66 +/- 0.37 ng/ml plasma maintained normal ventral prostate weight and gene expression levels.

  18. Inhibitory effect of Yukmijihwang-tang, a traditional herbal formula against testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Yukmijihwang-tang, a traditional herbal formula, has been used for treating disorder, diabetic mellitus and neurosis in China (Liu-wei-di-huang-tang in Chinese), Japan (Lokumijio-to in Japanese) and Korea for many years. In this study, we investigated the effects of Yukmijihwang-tang water extract (YJT) on the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) using a rat model of testosterone propionate (TP)-induced BPH. Methods A total of 30 rats were divided into five groups. One group was used as a control and the other groups received subcutaneous injections of TP for 4 weeks to induce BPH. YJT (200 or 400 mg/kg) was administered daily for 4 weeks to two groups by oral gavage concurrently with the TP. The animals were euthanized, the prostate and body weights were recorded, and tissues were subjected to hormone assays and histomorphology. In addition, we investigated proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression in the prostate using immunoblotting. Results Animals with BPH showed significantly increased absolute and relative prostate weights, increased dihydrotestosterone levels in the serum or prostate and increased PCNA expression in the prostate; however, YJT-treated animals showed significant reductions compared with the animals with TP-induced BPH. Histomorphology also showed that YJT inhibited TP-induced prostatic hyperplasia. Conclusions These findings indicate that YJT effectively inhibited the development of BPH and might be a useful drug clinically. PMID:22520510

  19. Primary structure and androgen regulation of a 20-kilodalton protein specific to rat ventral prostate.

    PubMed

    Ho, K C; Snoek, R; Quarmby, V; Viskochil, D H; Rennie, P S; Wilson, E M; French, F S; Bruchovsky, N

    1989-07-25

    Nuclear and cytosolic forms of a 20-kdalton rat ventral prostate protein were purified and partially sequenced from their N-termini. Isolated nuclei were treated with micrococcal nuclease and extracted in 0.6 M NaCl, and proteins were separated by affinity chromatography on Matrex gel green A, ammonium sulfate fractionation, and fast protein liquid chromatography on Superose 12. The 43 amino acid N-terminal sequence of the nuclear 20-kdalton protein was identical with the cytosolic protein except it lacked 7 N-terminal amino acids present in the cytosolic form. The DNA sequence of a full-length complementary DNA clone isolated from a ventral prostate gt11 library extended the N-terminal sequence of the cytosolic form by an additional nine amino acids from the predicted initiation methionine. The cDNA included the nucleotide sequence for the 43 amino acid N-terminal sequence of the purified 20-kdalton protein and predicted molecular weights of 16,686, 17,521, and 18,650, respectively, for the nuclear, cytoplasmic, and nonprocessed proteins. Northern blot analyses of reproductive tract tissue RNAs using the 20-kdalton protein cDNA as probe revealed a single mRNA species of 0.92 kb detectable only in extracts of rat ventral prostate. Expression of the 0.92-kb mRNA was androgen dependent since the mRNA was undetectable in extracts obtained 4 days after castration and was restored 16 h after restimulation with androgen.

  20. Protective potential of the methanol extract of Macrothelypteris oligophlebia rhizomes for chronic non-bacterial prostatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Han, Pan; Lai, Yong Ji; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Xue Nong; Chen, Jing Lou; Yang, Xian; Xue, Ping Ping; Ruan, Jin Lan

    2016-07-01

    The protective potential of the methanol extract of Macrothelypteris oligophlebia rhizomes (MMO) for chronic non-bacterial prostatitis (CNP) in rats was investigated in the present study. Carrageenan-induced CNP in rats was established. Fifty rats were randomly divided into sham-operated (sham-ope) group, model group, positive control group (Cernilton at a dose of 148mg/kg body weight) and two MMO-treated groups (MMO at doses of 600mg/kg and 300 mg/kg body weight). The anti-prostatitis effect was evaluated by prostate index, the levels of interleukin-10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and histopathological examination. After 20 days of administration, MMO could significantly decrease prostate index and the levels of IL-10, TNF-α COX-2 and PGE2 in serum and could improve the prostate morphology in comparison with the model group. In summary, these results suggest that MMO possesses protective effects on prostate, which might be beneficial to further development for the treatment of CNP.

  1. Effect of s-triazine compounds on testosterone metabolism in the rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Kniewald, J; Osredecki, V; Gojmerac, T; Zechner, V; Kniewald, Z

    1995-01-01

    The influence of s-triazine compounds (atrazine, prometryne and deethylatrazine) on testosterone conversion and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone-receptor complex formation was studied in vitro and in vivo in the rat prostate. A marked in vitro influence of atrazine and prometryne (from 0.465 to 1.392 mumol) and their mixtures (in total concentration, 0.928 mumol) on 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone formation was detected. 5 alpha-Dihydrotestosterone-specific receptor complex formation was inhibited in vitro by ca. 0.5 mumol of atrazine or deethylatrazine and only in vivo by 6 mg of atrazine 100 g-1 body wt. daily during 7 days in the prostate cytosol. The inhibition of the enzymic activities responsible for testosterone conversion and steroid hormone-receptor complex formation was non-competitive and reversible, and s-triazine compounds act as antiandrogens.

  2. Effects of L-Glutamine oral supplementation on prostate of irradiated rats

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Flavia C. M.; Costa, Waldemar S.; Silva, Pamella C.; de Souza, Diogo B; Gregório, Bianca; Sampaio, Francisco J. B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To investigate the protective effect of L-Glutamine in animals undergone to ventral radiation when the target organ is not the prostate. Materials and Methods Wistar rats were divided into groups of 10 animals each: Controls (C), maintained under standard conditions and not exposed to radiation, Radiated group (R) undergone to abdominal radiation only and Radiated plus supplemented by L-glutamine group (R+G). The animals of group R+G were supplemented with L-glutamine at the beginning of the experiment until death in the 22nd day. The ventral prostate was dissected and processed for morphometrical analysis. The epithelial height, collagen density and acinar area were objectively assessed in histological sections. Results Epithelial height was significantly reduced in R group in comparison to C group (p= 0.005). However, there was no statistical difference between the C and R+G groups. Collagen surface density in the C and R groups were not statistically different, but a significant difference was observed when comparing groups R+G and R (p= 0.040). The R+G group values did not differ significantly from C group. The acinar prostate area of group R was similar to that of C (p= 0.971), but in R+G it was significantly reduced when compared with the C (p= 0.038) and R (p= 0.001) groups. Conclusions Pelvic radiation promotes structural modifications in ventral prostate of rats, which can be reduced by L-Glutamine. PMID:27286127

  3. Evaluation of the protective effect of pentoxifylline on carrageenan-induced chronic non-bacterial prostatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Hajighorbani, Mahboobeh; Ahmadi-Hamedani, Mahmood; Shahab, Elaheh; Hayati, Farzad; Kafshdoozan, Khatereh; Keramati, Keivan; Amini, Amin Hossein

    2017-03-09

    Chronic non-bacterial prostatitis (CNP) is the most common type of prostatitis and oxidative stress (OS) was shown to be highly elevated in prostatitis patients. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of pentoxifylline (PTX) on CNP induced by carrageenan in rats. Male adult Wistar rats (n = 30) were divided into control, CNP and three treatment groups (n = 6) including CNP + cernilton and CNP + PTX groups. CNP was induced by single intraprostatic injection of 1% carrageenan (100 µl). Rats in treatment groups received orally cernilton 100 mg/kg and PTX at 50 and 100 mg/kg 1 week after CNP induction for 21 days. Prostatic index (PI), prostatic specific antigen (PSA), tumor-necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), serum lipid peroxidation (MDA), blood urea nitrogen, creatinine and histopathological changes were compared between groups. There were significant increase of PI, serum levels of PSA, TNF-α and MDA in CNP group at 29 day. In treatment groups, significant reduction in PI, serum levels of PSA, TNF-α, MDA and creatinine was observed especially in rats treated with dose of 50 mg/kg of PTX. In CNP group, histopathological changes of the prostate such as leucocyte infiltration, large involutions and projection into the lumen and reducing the volume of the lumen were observed as well. Whereas PTX, especially at dose of 50 mg/kg, could improve the above-mentioned changes remarkably in CNP treated rats. For the first time, our findings indicated that PTX improved CNP induced by carrageenan in rats.

  4. Atypical fetal prostate development is associated with ipsilateral hypoplasia of the wolffian ducts in the ACI rat.

    PubMed

    Hofkamp, Luke E; Bradley, Sarahann; Geliebter, Jan; Timms, Barry G

    2010-05-01

    For over a half century, the ACI (August x Copenhagen) rat has been a primary model for studying renal agenesis and ipsilateral hypoplasia (IHP) of the Wolffian-derived structures (WDS). Because the ACI rat is also used as a model for prostate research, it is important to examine the relationship of IHP and urogenital sinus (UGS) development. The prostate is dependent on androgens for proper growth and differentiation. Alteration in androgen production and/or delivery to the UGS has the potential to perturbate normal development. In this study, we investigate whether the ipsilateral loss of the WDS is associated with altered prostate development. Digital images of serial-sectioned fetal ACI rat UGS were used to create three-dimensional (3-D) surface-rendered models of the developing prostate, seminal vesicle, vas deferens, and utricle on gestational day 21. The number and volume of prostate ducts developing from the UGS were calculated from the 3-D model data. Animals exhibiting IHP had a significant decrease in total fetal prostate volume (40%; P < 0.005) with significant regional specific differences when compared with normal male ACI rats. Anatomical and histological differences in the utricle, abnormal histology of the ipsilateral testes, and a truncation of the ipsilateral Wolffian ductal mesenchyme were also seen in the animals with IHP. Additional research is needed to further understand the mechanisms and consequences of IHP on prostate growth and development. Alterations to normal prenatal development of the male accessory sex organs can have important consequences for the growth and morphology of the adult gland.

  5. D-004 ameliorates phenylephrine-induced urodynamic changes and increased prostate and bladder oxidative stress in rats

    PubMed Central

    Oyarzábal, Ambar; Pérez, Yohani; Mas, Rosa; Ravelo, Yazmin; Jiménez, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Background Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) mainly depend on alpha1-adrenoreceptors (α1-ADR) stimulation, but a link with oxidative stress (OS) is also involved. D-004, a lipid extract of Roystonea regia fruits, antagonizes ADR-induced responses and produces antioxidant effects. The objective of this study was to investigate whether D-004 produce antioxidant effects in rats with phenylephrine (PHE)-induced urodynamic changes. Methods Rats were randomized into eight groups (ten rats/group): a negative vehicle control and seven groups injected with PHE: a positive control, three treated with D-004 (200, 400 and 800 mg/kg) and three others with tamsulosin (0.4 mg/kg), grape seed extract (GSE) (250 mg/kg) and vitamin E (VE) (250 mg/kg), respectively. Results Effects on urinary total volume (UTV), volume voided per micturition (VM), malondialdehyde (MDA) and carbonyl groups (CG) concentrations in prostate and bladder homogenates were study outcomes. While VM and UTV lowered significantly in the positive control as compared to the negative control group, the opposite occurred with prostate and bladder MDA and CG values. D-004 (200-800 mg/kg) increased significantly both VM and UTV, lowered significantly MDA in prostate and bladder homogenates, and reduced GC levels only in the prostate. Tamsulosin increased significantly VM and UTV, but unchanged oxidative variables. GSE and VE unchanged the UTV, whereas VE, not GSE, modestly but significantly attenuated the PHE-induced decrease of VM. Conclusions Single oral administration of D-004 (200-800 mg/kg) was the only treatment that ameliorated the urodynamic changes and reduced increased oxidative variables in the prostate of rats with PHE-induced prostate hyperplasia. PMID:26816837

  6. Investigation of the effect of traditional Chinese medicine on pain and inflammation in chronic nonbacterial prostatitis in rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y-J; Song, G-H; Liu, G T

    2016-08-01

    According to traditional Chinese medicine, the symptoms of chronic nonbacterial prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CNP/CPPS) may be treated using a cocktail of herbs that stimulate blood circulation ('activating blood circulation formula'). We investigated the effect of three doses of this formula on a rat model of CNP/CPPS. Male Wistar rats were injected with a saline extract of male sex accessory glands on days 0 and 30 to induce prostatitis and then treated daily by gavage between days 32 and 60. Treatment with low, medium and high doses of activating blood circulation formula resulted in an almost total rescue of paw withdrawal threshold at day 60, and treatment with the highest dose also significantly decreased prostate inflammation (assessed histopathologically). We further observed elevated serum prostaglandin E2 levels in the CNP/CPPS model which decreased upon high-dose treatment, and increased Cox-2 expression in the prostate and spinal cord dorsal horn which was rescued in both tissues in the high-dose group and in the prostate in the medium-dose group. These results shed light on a possible mechanism by which activating blood circulation therapy may alleviate pain in a rat model of CNP/CPPS by downregulating Cox-2 expression in the spinal cord, thereby raising the pain threshold. Further research will be needed to fully characterise the mechanism by which activating blood circulation therapy produces this therapeutic effect.

  7. Management of experimental benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats using a food-based therapy containing Telfairia occidentalis seeds.

    PubMed

    Ejike, Chukwunonso E C C; Ezeanyika, Lawrence U S

    2011-01-01

    The usefulness of diet containing Telfairia occidentalis seeds, in managing benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in rats was studied. Twenty male Wistar rats were divided into four equal groups. BPH was induced by sub-cutaneous injection of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and estradiol valerate (ratio, 10:1) every other day for 28 days. Rats in the test group were placed on the test diet for 7 days following disease induction. One control group (DC) was fed on a normal diet for 7 days following disease induction. Two other control groups, HC and HDC, were given sub-cutaneous olive oil (vehicle) for the same duration, and placed on the test diet and normal diet, respectively. Markers of BPH, and hormone profile were determined using standard methods. The results show that relative prostate weight and protein content of the prostates were lower [albeit not significantly (p>0.05)] in the test group, relative to the DC group. Serum prostatic acid phosphatase concentrations (U/L) decreased significantly (p<0.05) from 2.9 ± 0.2 in the DC group to 2.1 ± 0.7 in the test group. Histological findings corroborate these data. The testosterone: estradiol ratio (× 10(3)) was increased from 4.0 ± 0.2 in the DC group to 4.6 ± 0.2 in the test group. The test diet reduced the mass and secretory activity of the enlarged prostate and may act by increasing the testosterone: estradiol ratio.

  8. Onion and garlic extracts as potential antidotes for cadmium-induced biochemical alterations in prostate glands of rats.

    PubMed

    Ola-Mudathir, F K; Suru, S M

    2015-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) has been implicated in increased prostate gland malignancy risk in both wildlife and humans. This study examines the chemoprotective roles of onion and garlic extracts on Cd-induced biochemical alterations in the prostate glands of rats. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into nine groups: control group received double distilled water; Cd group received Cd alone (1.5 mg/100 g bwt per day); extract-treated groups were pre-treated with varied doses of onion and/or garlic extract (0.5 ml and 1.0 ml/100 g bwt per day) for 1 week and then co-treated with Cd (1.5 mg/100 g bwt per day) for additional 3 weeks. Oxidant/antioxidant status and acid phosphatase (ACPtotal and ACPprostatic ) activity were examined in prostate glands. Cd intoxication caused a marked (P < 0.001) increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) levels, whereas glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase and catalase levels were markedly (P < 0.001) decreased. We also observed significant (P < 0.001) decrease in ACPtotal and ACPprostatic activities in prostate glands and a concomitant significant (P < 0.001) increase in the plasma. However, treatment of Cd-intoxicated rats with onion and/or garlic extract significantly minimised these alterations. The onion extract offered a dose-dependent protection. Our findings suggest a chemoprotective capability for onion and garlic extracts against Cd-induced biochemical alteration in the prostate glands.

  9. Effect of Serenoa Repens on Oxidative Stress, Inflammatory and Growth Factors in Obese Wistar Rats with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Colado-Velázquez, Juventino; Mailloux-Salinas, Patrick; Medina-Contreras, Jml; Cruz-Robles, David; Bravo, Guadalupe

    2015-10-01

    Serenoa repens has been widely used to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia and lower urinary tract symptoms; however, most of the studies have been conducted in individuals with normal weight and not obese. In this study, the effects of a lipidic extract of S. repens, in markers of oxidative stress, inflammation, and growth factors, in obese rats with testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia, were investigated. Total nitrites, malondialdehyde, total glutathione, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase activity were measured; in addition, assays for inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and the growth factors basic fibroblast growth factor (FGFb) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were performed. The obese rats had a higher prostate weight compared with controls. S. repens significantly decreased prostate weight, total nitrites, and malondialdehyde; improved total glutathione, SOD, and catalase activity; and significantly reduced inflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6) and growth factors (VEGF and FGFb). S. repens showed high antioxidant and antiinflammatory activity in obese rats, suggesting that their use could be beneficial in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  10. Continuous-wave vs. pulsed infrared laser stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Cilip, Christopher M.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-03-01

    Optical nerve stimulation has recently been developed as an alternative to electrical nerve stimulation. However, recent studies have focused primarily on pulsed delivery of the laser radiation and at relatively low pulse rates. The objective of this study is to demonstrate faster optical stimulation of the prostate cavernous nerves using continuouswave (CW) infrared laser radiation, for potential diagnostic applications. A Thulium fiber laser (λ = 1870 nm) was used for non-contact optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves, in vivo. Optical nerve stimulation, as measured by an intracavernous pressure (ICP) response in the penis, was achieved with the laser operating in either CW mode, or with a 5-ms pulse duration at 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 100 Hz. Successful optical stimulation was observed to be primarily dependent on a threshold nerve temperature (42-45 °C), not an incident fluence, as previously reported. CW optical nerve stimulation provides a significantly faster ICP response time using a laser with lower power output than pulsed stimulation. CW optical nerve stimulation may therefore represent an alternative mode of stimulation for intra-operative diagnostic applications where a rapid response is critical, such as identification of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery.

  11. AZD3514: a small molecule that modulates androgen receptor signaling and function in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Loddick, Sarah A; Ross, Sarah J; Thomason, Andrew G; Robinson, David M; Walker, Graeme E; Dunkley, Tom P J; Brave, Sandra R; Broadbent, Nicola; Stratton, Natalie C; Trueman, Dawn; Mouchet, Elizabeth; Shaheen, Fadhel S; Jacobs, Vivien N; Cumberbatch, Marie; Wilson, Joanne; Jones, Rhys D O; Bradbury, Robert H; Rabow, Alfred; Gaughan, Luke; Womack, Chris; Barry, Simon T; Robson, Craig N; Critchlow, Susan E; Wedge, Stephen R; Brooks, A Nigel

    2013-09-01

    Continued androgen receptor (AR) expression and signaling is a key driver in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) after classical androgen ablation therapies have failed, and therefore remains a target for the treatment of progressive disease. Here, we describe the biological characterization of AZD3514, an orally bioavailable drug that inhibits androgen-dependent and -independent AR signaling. AZD3514 modulates AR signaling through two distinct mechanisms, an inhibition of ligand-driven nuclear translocation of AR and a downregulation of receptor levels, both of which were observed in vitro and in vivo. AZD3514 inhibited testosterone-driven seminal vesicle development in juvenile male rats and the growth of androgen-dependent Dunning R3327H prostate tumors in adult rats. Furthermore, this class of compound showed antitumor activity in the HID28 mouse model of CRPC in vivo. AZD3514 is currently in phase I clinical evaluation.

  12. AZD3514: a small molecule that modulates androgen receptor signaling and function in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Loddick, Sarah A; Ross, Sarah J; Thomason, Andrew G; Robinson, David M; Walker, Graeme E; Dunkley, Tom PJ; Brave, Sandra R; Broadbent, Nicola; Stratton, Natalie C; Trueman, Dawn; Mouchet, Elizabeth; Shaheen, Fadhel S; Jacobs, Vivien N; Cumberbatch, Marie; Wilson, Joanne; Jones, Rhys D O; Bradbury, Robert H; Rabow, Alfred; Gaughan, Luke; Womack, Chris; Barry, Simon T; Robson, Craig N; Critchlow, Susan E; Wedge, Stephen R; Brooks, Nigel A

    2013-01-01

    Continued androgen receptor (AR) expression and signaling is a key driver in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) after classical androgen ablation therapies have failed, and therefore remains a target for the treatment of progressive disease. Here we describe the biological characterization of AZD3514, an orally bioavailable drug that inhibits androgen-dependent and–independent AR signaling. AZD3514 modulates AR signaling through two distinct mechanisms, an inhibition of ligand driven nuclear translocation of AR and a down-regulation of receptor levels, both of which were observed in vitro and in vivo. AZD3514 inhibited testosterone-driven seminal vesicle development in juvenile male rats and the growth of androgen-dependent Dunning R3327H prostate tumors in adult rats. Furthermore, this class of compound demonstrated anti-tumor activity in the HID28 mouse model of CRPC in vivo. AZD3514 is currently in Phase I clinical evaluation. PMID:23861347

  13. Prolactin, EGFR, vimentin and α-actin profiles in elderly rat prostate subjected to steroid hormonal imbalance.

    PubMed

    Hetzl, Amanda Cia; Montico, Fabio; Kido, Larissa Akemi; Cagnon, Valéria Helena Alves

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize and relate the prolactin (PR), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), α-actin and vimentin immunoreactivity in the prostate of elderly rats subjected to steroid hormonal imbalance. Senile and young rats were divided into the young group (YNG), the senile group (SE), the castrated group (CAS), the estrogen-deficient group (ED), the castrated+estrogen group (CASE), and the estrogen-deficient+androgen group (EDTEST). PR and EGFR increased in the estrogen and androgen ablation groups. In addition, EGFR influenced the immunolocalization by changing it from the prostatic stroma to the epithelium in elderly rats. Hormone ablation in elderly rats, not only related to androgen but also estrogen, led to increased stromal EGFR immunolocalization. The α-actin pattern decreased in the groups with estrogenic imbalance. Moreover, vimentin increased in the senile and estrogen deficient group. To conclude, we can suggest that EGFR contributed towards the proliferative process in the prostate, by means however, of different mechanisms, considering the androgenic and estrogenic pathways. Also, our results indicated that prolactin could be activated not only in an androgen-independent pathway but also in an estrogen independent pathway. Finally, PR and vimentin immunolocalization increase, in the prostatic stroma in the group showing estrogenic ablation, could be one of the factors which contribute to the reactive stroma formation.

  14. Angiogenic and tissue remodeling factors in the prostate of elderly rats submitted to hormonal replacement.

    PubMed

    Montico, Fábio; Hetzl, Amanda Cia; Cândido, Eduardo Marcelo; Cagnon, Valéria Helena Alves

    2013-11-01

    The influence of senescence and hormone replacement on the onset of pathologic processes in the prostate is not yet fully understood. The aim was to identify the immunoreactivity and protein levels of molecules involved in cell proliferation, tissue remodeling and angiogenesis in the ventral prostate of elderly rodents following hormonal replacement. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were separated into one Young group (4-months old), treated with peanut oil (5 mL kg(-1) , s.c.), and six Senile groups. The senile rats (10-months old) were subdivided into: Senile group (SEN) (5 mL kg(-1) peanut oil, s.c.); Testosterone group (TEST) (5 mg kg(-1) testosterone cipionate, s.c.); Estrogen group (EST) (25 µg kg(-1) 17β-estradiol, s.c.); castrated group (CAS) (surgical castration); castrated-testosterone group (CT) (same treatment as CAS and TEST groups); and castrated-estrogen group (CE) (same treatment as CAS and EST groups). After 30 days, samples of the ventral prostate were harvested for analyses of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGFR-1), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and endostatin features. IGFR-1 and MMP-9 showed increased protein levels and epithelial immunolabeling both after hormonal replacement and castration. Increased VEGF levels and reduced endostatin were verified in the SEN group. Hormonal therapy and castration led to a higher increase of VEGF, especially in the EST, CAS, and CE groups. Endostatin increased mainly in the TEST and CT groups. Hormonal therapy in senescence generated a reactive microenvironment characterized by the increase of mitogenic and tissue remodeling factors and by the imbalance of angiogenesis, which possibly compromised organ function and predisposed toward glandular disorders.

  15. Fraction of macroporous resin from Smilax china L. inhibits testosterone propionate-induced prostatic hyperplasia in castrated rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Xiong, Chao-Mei; Song, Shan-Shan; Han, Pan; Ruan, Jin-Lan

    2012-07-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a fraction of macroporous resin (FMR), a bioactive component of Smilax china L., on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in castrated rats induced by testosterone propionate. Rats were randomly divided into five groups: the negative control group (sham-operated), the model group, two FMR-treated groups (at doses of 300 mg/kg and 600 mg/kg of body weight), and the positive control group (treated with finasteride at the dose of 3 mg/kg). Drugs were administered once a day for three consecutive weeks by gastric gavage. Prostates were weighed, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels in serum were determined, and histopathological examinations were carried out. FMR treatment inhibited prostatic hyperplasia, reducing the DHT level in serum and improving the prostate gland morphology compared with the model group. The overall results of this study suggest that FMR is effective at inhibiting experimentally induced prostate enlargement, and it presents a valuable resource for the treatment of human BPH.

  16. Fraction of Macroporous Resin from Smilax china L. Inhibits Testosterone Propionate–Induced Prostatic Hyperplasia in Castrated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Xiong, Chao-Mei; Song, Shan-Shan; Han, Pan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a fraction of macroporous resin (FMR), a bioactive component of Smilax china L., on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in castrated rats induced by testosterone propionate. Rats were randomly divided into five groups: the negative control group (sham-operated), the model group, two FMR-treated groups (at doses of 300 mg/kg and 600 mg/kg of body weight), and the positive control group (treated with finasteride at the dose of 3 mg/kg). Drugs were administered once a day for three consecutive weeks by gastric gavage. Prostates were weighed, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels in serum were determined, and histopathological examinations were carried out. FMR treatment inhibited prostatic hyperplasia, reducing the DHT level in serum and improving the prostate gland morphology compared with the model group. The overall results of this study suggest that FMR is effective at inhibiting experimentally induced prostate enlargement, and it presents a valuable resource for the treatment of human BPH. PMID:22510101

  17. Changes in optical properties of ex vivo rat prostate due to heating.

    PubMed

    Skinner, M G; Everts, S; Reid, A D; Vitkin, I A; Lilge, L; Sherar, M D

    2000-05-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of a single, first-order Arrhenius process in accurately modelling the thermally induced changes in the optical properties, particularly the reduced scattering coefficient, mu(s)', and the absorption coefficient, mu(a), of ex vivo rat prostate. Recent work has shown that mu(s)' can increase as much as five-fold due to thermal coagulation, and the observed change in mu(s)' has been modelled well according to a first-order rate process in albumen. Conversely, optical property measurements conducted using pig liver suggest that this change in mu(s)' cannot suitably be described using a single rate parameter. In canine prostate, measurements have indicated that while the absorption coefficient varies with temperature, it does not do so according to first-order kinetics. A double integrating sphere system was used to measure the reflectance and transmittance of light at 810 nm through a thin sample of prostate. Using prostate samples collected from Sprague Dawley rats, optical properties were measured at a constant elevated temperature. Tissue samples were measured over the range 54-83 degrees C. The optical properties of the sample were determined through comparison with reflectance and transmittance values predicted by a Monte Carlo simulation of light propagation in turbid media. A first order Arrhenius model was applied to the observed change in mu(s)' and mu(a) to determine the rate process parameters for thermal coagulation. The measured rate coefficients were Ea = (7.18 +/- 1.74) x 10(4) J mol(-1) and Afreq = 3.14 x 10(8) s(-1) for mu(s)'. It was determined that the change in mu(s)' is well described by a single first-order rate process. Similar analysis performed on the changes in mu(a) due to increased temperatures yielded Ea = (1.01 +/- 0.35) x 10(5) J mol(-1) and Afreq = 8.92 x 10(12) s(-1). The results for mu(a) suggest that the Arrhenius model may be applicable to the changes in absorption.

  18. Bisphenol A Disrupts HNF4α-Regulated Gene Networks Linking to Prostate Preneoplasia and Immune Disruption in Noble Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Hung-Ming; Chen, Jing; Medvedovic, Mario; Tam, Neville Ngai Chung

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of humans to bisphenol A (BPA) is widespread and continuous. The effects of protracted exposure to BPA on the adult prostate have not been studied. We subjected Noble rats to 32 weeks of BPA (low or high dose) or 17β-estradiol (E2) in conjunction with T replenishment. T treatment alone or untreated groups were used as controls. Circulating T levels were maintained within the physiological range in all treatment groups, whereas the levels of free BPA were elevated in the groups treated with T+low BPA (1.06 ± 0.05 ng/mL, P < .05) and T+high BPA (10.37 ± 0.43 ng/mL, P < .01) when compared with those in both controls (0.1 ± 0.05 ng/mL). Prostatic hyperplasia, low-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), and marked infiltration of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells into the PIN epithelium (P < .05) were observed in the lateral prostates (LPs) of T+low/high BPA-treated rats. In contrast, only hyperplasia and high-grade PIN, but no aberrant immune responses, were found in the T+E2-treated LPs. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis in LPs identified differential changes between T+BPA vs T+E2 treatment. Expression of multiple genes in the regulatory network controlled by hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α was perturbed by the T+BPA but not by the T+E2 exposure. Collectively these findings suggest that the adult rat prostate, under a physiologically relevant T environment, is susceptible to BPA-induced transcriptomic reprogramming, immune disruption, and aberrant growth dysregulation in a manner distinct from those caused by E2. They are more relevant to our recent report of higher urinary levels BPA found in patients with prostate cancer than those with benign disease. PMID:26496021

  19. Reversibility of the inhibitory effect of atrazine and lindane on cytosol 5. alpha. -dihydrotestosterone receptor complex formation in rat prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Simic, B.; Kniewald, Z.; Kniewald, J. ); Davies, J.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Once entering the bloodstream, most toxic substances, including pesticides, can reach organs involved in the reproductive system. They can cross the placenta, as well as the brain barrier, posing various risks to the reproductive processes. The organochlorine insecticide lindane and the s-triazine herbicide atrazine produce changes in hormone-dependent reactions in the rat hypothalamus, anterior pituitary, and prostate. Lindane also causes histological and biochemical alterations in the rat testis. In vivo treatment with atrazine produces a markedly inhibitory influence of 5{alpha}-dihydrotestosterone - receptor complex formation in rat prostate cytosol. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether such changes in the crucial step in the reproductive process are reversible. A parallel investigation using lindane was also undertaken.

  20. Pharmaceutical evaluation of naftopidil enantiomers: Rat functional assays in vitro and estrogen/androgen induced rat benign prostatic hyperplasia model in vivo.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun-Jun; Cai, Yi; Huang, Min-Yi; Zhu, Liu; He, Fei; Liu, Xia-Wen; Huang, Bi-Yun; Yi, Yan-Zhen; Yuan, Mu

    2016-11-15

    Naftopidil (NAF) is a α1D/1A adrenoceptor selective drug used for the treatment of both benign prostatic hyperplasia and lower urinary tract symptoms (BPH/LUTS). However, NAF is used as a racemate in clinic. To compare the differences and similarities among two enantiomers and racemate, pharmacological activities were evaluated through rat functional assays in vitro and estrogen/androgen (E/T) induced rat BPH model in vivo. NAF and the two enantiomers showed similar blocking activity on α1 receptor. S-NAF exhibited more α1D/1A adrenoceptor subtype selectivity than R-NAF and the racemate. The selectivity ratios pA2 (α1D)/pA2 (α1B) and pA2 (α1A)/pA2 (α1B) were 40.7- and 16.2-fold, respectively. NAF and its enantiomers effectively prevented the development of rat prostatic hyperplasia via suppressing the increase of the prostatic wet weight, visually. The quantitative analysis of the relative acinus volume, relative stroma volume, relative epithelial volume, epithelial height and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) were carried out. S-NAF showed an advantage on the effect of inhibiting prostate wet weight and stroma volume over R-NAF and racemate NAF (P<0.05). Nevertheless, no other significant difference was observed between these two enantiomers. In conclusion, both R-NAF and S-NAF not only relax prostate muscle but also inhibit the prostate growth, thus relieve BPH.

  1. Stromal-epithelial paracrine interactions in the neoplastic rat and human prostate.

    PubMed

    Djakiew, D; Pflug, B; Onoda, M

    1993-01-01

    Homotypic paracrine interactions in the rat and human prostate have been investigated using prostatic stromal cells and neoplastic epithelial cells (PA-III, rat; TSU-pr1, human). Secretory proteins prepared from each cell type were used to determine the dose dependent regulation of growth (DNA synthesis) of the corresponding homotypic responder cell, as determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation. PA-III secretory protein stimulated rat stromal cell proliferation by 1.8-fold. This stimulatory activity of PA-III protein on stromal cell proliferation was partially reduced (approximately 35%) by treatment with nerve growth factor (NGF) antibody, whereas neither acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) antibody nor basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) antibody immunoneutralized the stimulatory activity of PA-III cell protein. In the corresponding opposite interaction, rat stromal cell protein modulated PA-III growth in a biphasic manner. At lower concentrations of stromal cell protein (1.25 micrograms/ml) PA-III cell growth was stimulated by 1.6-fold, whereas at higher concentrations of protein (100 micrograms/ml) PA-III cell growth was inhibited to 60%. Treatment of the stromal cell protein (1.25 micrograms/ml and 100 micrograms/ml) with NGF antibody reduced PA-III cell relative growth to approximately 30% and 5%, respectively. bFGF antibody treatment of stromal cell protein at 1.25 micrograms/ml did not influence relative growth, whereas bFGF antibody treatment of 100 micrograms/ml stromal cell protein reduced relative growth by an additional 40%. Treatment of the stromal cell protein (1.25 micrograms/ml and 100 micrograms/ml) with aFGF antibodies reduced relative growth from that observed at these two protein concentrations by approximately 50% in both cases. Human epithelial TSU-pr1 protein stimulated human stromal cell proliferation approximately 1.7-fold. Treatment of TSU-pr1 protein with NGF antibody resulted in stimulation of human stromal cell proliferation (4

  2. Changes in erectile organ structure and function in a rat model of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, X-J; Xia, L-L; Xu, T-Y; Zhang, X-H; Zhu, Z-W; Zhang, M-G; Liu, Y; Xu, C; Zhong, S; Shen, Z-J

    2016-04-01

    There is a growing recognition of the association between chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) and erectile dysfunction (ED); however, most of the reports are based on questionnaires which cannot distinguish between organic and functional ED. The purpose of this study was to determine the exact relationship between CP/CPPS and ED, and to investigate the changes in erectile organ structure and function in a rat model of CP/CPPS. We established a rat model of experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP), which is a valid model for CP/CPPS. Erectile function in EAP and normal rats was comparable after cavernous nerve electrostimulation. The serum testosterone and oestradiol levels, ultrastructure of the corpus cavernosum and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase in the two groups were similar; however, there was a decrease in smooth muscle-to-collagen ratio and alpha-smooth muscle actin expression and an increase in transforming growth factor-beta 1 expression was observed in EAP rats. Thus, organic ED may not exist in EAP rats. We speculate that ED complained by patients with CP/CPPS may be psychological, which could be caused by impairment in the quality of life; however, further studies are needed to fully understand the potential mechanisms underlying the penile fibrosis in EAP rats.

  3. Serum Bisphenol A Pharmacokinetics and Prostate Neoplastic Responses following Oral and Subcutaneous Exposures in Neonatal Sprague-Dawley Rats

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Gail S.; Ye, Shu-Hua; Birch, Lynn; Ho, Shuk-mei; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines BPA pharmacokinetics in neonatal rats following s.c. injection or oral delivery of 10μg BPA/kg BW and compares susceptibility to estrogen-induced prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) following either exposure route. Serum BPA in PND3 rats was measured using HPLC-MS-MS. Free and total BPA at Cmax were 1.77 and 2.0 ng/ml, respectively following injection and 0.26 and 1.02 ng/ml, respectively following oral exposure. The AUC0-2 for free and total BPA was 4.1-fold and 1.8-fold greater, respectively, in s.c. versus oral delivery. While exposure route affected BPA metabolism, internal dosimetry following s.c. injection of 10μg BPA/kg BW is similar to BPA levels observed in humans. Prostates from aged rats given s.c. or oral BPA neonatally and T+E implants as adults exhibited nearly identical, heightened susceptibility to PIN incidence and score as compared to neonatal oil-controls. These findings on prostate health are directly relevant to humans at current BPA exposure levels. PMID:20887781

  4. Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling of the Unbound Levofloxacin Concentrations in Rat Plasma and Prostate Tissue Measured by Microdialysis

    PubMed Central

    Hurtado, Felipe K.; Weber, Benjamin; Derendorf, Hartmut; Hochhaus, Guenther

    2014-01-01

    Levofloxacin is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone used in the treatment of both acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis. Currently, the treatment of bacterial prostatitis is still difficult, especially due to the poor distribution of many antimicrobials into the prostate, thus preventing the drug to reach effective interstitial concentrations at the infection site. Newer fluoroquinolones show a greater penetration into the prostate. In the present study, we compared the unbound levofloxacin prostate concentrations measured by microdialysis to those in plasma after a 7-mg/kg intravenous bolus dose to Wistar rats. Plasma and dialysate samples were analyzed using a validated high-pressure liquid chromatography-fluorescence method. Both noncompartmental analysis (NCA) and population-based compartmental modeling (NONMEM 6) were performed. Unbound prostate tissue concentrations represented 78% of unbound plasma levels over a period of 12 h by comparing the extent of exposure (unbound AUC0–∞) of 6.4 and 4.8 h·μg/ml in plasma and tissue, respectively. A three-compartment model with simultaneous passive diffusion and saturable distribution kinetics from the prostate to the central compartment gave the best results in terms of curve fitting, precision of parameter estimates, and model stability. The following parameter values were estimated by the population model: V1 (0.38 liter; where V1 represents the volume of the central compartment), CL (0.22 liter/h), k12 (2.27 h−1), k21 (1.44 h−1), k13 (0.69 h−1), Vmax (7.19 μg/h), kM (0.35 μg/ml), V3/fuprostate (0.05 liter; where fuprostate represents the fraction unbound in the prostate), and k31 (3.67 h−1). The interindividual variability values for V1, CL, Vmax, and kM were 21, 37, 42, and 76%, respectively. Our results suggest that levofloxacin is likely to be substrate for efflux transporters in the prostate. PMID:24217697

  5. Population pharmacokinetic modeling of the unbound levofloxacin concentrations in rat plasma and prostate tissue measured by microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Hurtado, Felipe K; Weber, Benjamin; Derendorf, Hartmut; Hochhaus, Guenther; Dalla Costa, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Levofloxacin is a broad-spectrum fluoroquinolone used in the treatment of both acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis. Currently, the treatment of bacterial prostatitis is still difficult, especially due to the poor distribution of many antimicrobials into the prostate, thus preventing the drug to reach effective interstitial concentrations at the infection site. Newer fluoroquinolones show a greater penetration into the prostate. In the present study, we compared the unbound levofloxacin prostate concentrations measured by microdialysis to those in plasma after a 7-mg/kg intravenous bolus dose to Wistar rats. Plasma and dialysate samples were analyzed using a validated high-pressure liquid chromatography-fluorescence method. Both noncompartmental analysis (NCA) and population-based compartmental modeling (NONMEM 6) were performed. Unbound prostate tissue concentrations represented 78% of unbound plasma levels over a period of 12 h by comparing the extent of exposure (unbound AUC0-∞) of 6.4 and 4.8 h·μg/ml in plasma and tissue, respectively. A three-compartment model with simultaneous passive diffusion and saturable distribution kinetics from the prostate to the central compartment gave the best results in terms of curve fitting, precision of parameter estimates, and model stability. The following parameter values were estimated by the population model: V1 (0.38 liter; where V1 represents the volume of the central compartment), CL (0.22 liter/h), k12 (2.27 h(-1)), k21 (1.44 h(-1)), k13 (0.69 h(-1)), Vmax (7.19 μg/h), kM (0.35 μg/ml), V3/fuprostate (0.05 liter; where fuprostate represents the fraction unbound in the prostate), and k31 (3.67 h(-1)). The interindividual variability values for V1, CL, Vmax, and kM were 21, 37, 42, and 76%, respectively. Our results suggest that levofloxacin is likely to be substrate for efflux transporters in the prostate.

  6. Chronic toxic and carcinogenic effects of oral cadmium in the Noble (NBL/Cr) rat: induction of neoplastic and proliferative lesions of the adrenal, kidney, prostate, and testes.

    PubMed

    Waalkes, M P; Anver, M R; Diwan, B A

    1999-10-29

    Based on the occurrence of pulmonary cancers in exposed populations, cadmium is classified as a human carcinogen. More controversial target sites for cadmium in humans include the prostate and kidney, where some studies have shown a link between cadmium and cancer. In Wistar rats cadmium induces tumors in the ventral prostate. The relevance of such lesions to humans is debated since the rat ventral lobe, unlike the dorsolateral lobe, has no embryological homolog in the human prostate. Cadmium has not been linked with renal tumors in rodents but is a potent nephrotoxin. In this work we studied the effects of oral cadmium in the Noble (NBL/Cr) rat with particular attention to proliferative lesions of the prostate and kidneys. Cadmium (as CdCl2) was given ad libitum throughout the study in the drinking water at doses of 0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 ppm Cd to groups (initial n = 30) of male rats, which were observed for up to 102 wk. At the lower doses of cadmium (< or =50 ppm) a clear dose-related increase in total proliferative lesions of the prostate (ventral and dorsolateral lesions combined) occurred (0 ppm = 21% incidence, 25 ppm = 46%, 50 ppm = 50%; trend p < .03). These lesions were described as intraepithelial hyperplasia with occasional areas of atypical epithelial cells without stromal invasion. The lesions occurred primarily in the dorsolateral prostate with cadmium exposure and most frequently showed three or more foci within each specimen. At higher doses, prostatic proliferative lesions declined to control levels. The loss of prostatic response at the higher doses was likely due to diminished testicular function secondary to cadmium treatment. This was reflected in lesions indicative of testicular hypofunction at the highest cadmium dose, namely, interstitial cell hyperplasia, and a strong correlation between cadmium dose and total proliferative lesions of the testes (hyperplasias and tumors combined). Renal tumors (mainly mesenchymal and pelvic transitional

  7. Beef tallow, but not perilla or corn oil, promotion of rat prostate and intestinal carcinogenesis by 3,2'-dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl.

    PubMed

    Mori, T; Imaida, K; Tamano, S; Sano, M; Takahashi, S; Asamoto, M; Takeshita, M; Ueda, H; Shirai, T

    2001-10-01

    The modifying effects of three kinds of fat (corn oil, beef tallow or perilla oil, each at 20% in the diet) on F344 rat prostate carcinogenesis induced by 3,2'-dimethyl-4-aminobiphenyl (DMAB) were investigated. Non-invasive carcinomas of the ventral prostate were induced by DMAB alone and invasive carcinomas of the other prostate lobes and seminal vesicles by DMAB and testosterone propionate (TP). Eight groups of F344 rats were initiated with 50 mg / kg body weight of DMAB at 2-week intervals for the first 20 weeks, four also receiving TP, extended until week 60. The animals received basal chow powder diet or one of three high fat diets throughout the experiment (60 weeks). One further group served as a non-carcinogen-treated control maintained on basal chow powder diet. Beef tallow significantly increased the development of ventral prostate carcinomas with DMAB alone (from 15 to 45%, P < 0.05), while perilla oil reduced the incidence of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in the ventral lobe of rats given DMA + TP (from 70 to 10%, P < 0.01), but not in those given DMAB alone. No other effects of high fats were observed regarding PIN or invasive cancers of the dorsolateral and anterior prostate or seminal vesicles. A satellite experiment demonstrated that all high fat diets for 4 weeks increased the 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling index of prostate epithelial cells, suggesting that a high fat intake, irrespective of the fatty acid composition, may accelerate cell kinetics in the prostate. Of the three high fat diets, beef tallow was also found to increase intestinal carcinogenesis. Thus, the present data revealed carcinogenesis in the prostate and intestine to be promoted by beef tallow.

  8. High fat-induced obesity associated with insulin-resistance increases FGF-2 content and causes stromal hyperplasia in rat ventral prostate.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Daniele Lisboa; Pinto, Maria Etelvina; Maeda, Samantha Yuri; Taboga, Sebastião Roberto; Góes, Rejane Maira

    2012-08-01

    Obesity affects sex hormone secretion, which can negatively influence prostatic structure, homeostasis, and disease. This investigation aimed to evaluate the repercussions of obesity induced by a high-fat diet on the rat prostate, with or without treatment with the aromatase inhibitor, Letrozole. Adult Wistar rats were fed a high-fat diet (20% saturated fat, O) for 15 weeks to induce obesity or received a balanced diet (4% fat, C). Then, a group of C and O rats were daily treated with Letrozole (1 mg/kg b.w. per day) for 2 weeks (CL and OL, respectively). Subsequently, ventral prostate was processed for analysis by transmission electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and Western blotting. Obesity decreased 70% of the testosterone plasma level. The prostate showed epithelial atrophy and dilated acini in the intermediate portion and epithelial wrinkling in the distal tips. The relative frequency of smooth muscle α-actin in the O group increased by 67%. Ultrastructurally, epithelial cells in obese animals presented altered secretory organelles, lipid droplets, and thicker subjacent fibromuscular layer. Letrozole treatment caused a partial restoration of the prostatic changes caused by obesity. Obesity increased the prostatic content of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) by 150%, and Letrozole treatment increased this protein even more in the control and obese groups. This investigation shows that obesity provokes structural and ultrastructural changes in the epithelium of rat prostate; these changes might affect gland homeostasis and physiology. The epithelial and smooth muscle cell hyperplasia and increased FGF-2 expression observed in this experimental model of obesity/insulin-resistance might explain the high frequency of benign prostatic hyperplasia in insulin-resistant men.

  9. Immunomodulatory Effect of Red Onion (Allium cepa Linn) Scale Extract on Experimentally Induced Atypical Prostatic Hyperplasia in Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Elberry, Ahmed A.; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah; Abdel Sattar, Essam; Ghareib, Salah A.; Mosli, Hisham A.; Gabr, Salah A.

    2014-01-01

    Red onion scales (ROS) contain large amounts of flavonoids that are responsible for the reported antioxidant activity, immune enhancement, and anticancer property. Atypical prostatic hyperplasia (APH) was induced in adult castrated Wistar rats by both s.c. injection of testosterone (0.5 mg/rat/day) and by smearing citral on shaved skin once every 3 days for 30 days. Saw palmetto (100 mg/kg) as a positive control and ROS suspension at doses of 75, 150, and 300 mg/kg/day were given orally every day for 30 days. All medications were started 7 days after castration and along with testosterone and citral. The HPLC profile of ROS methanolic extract displayed two major peaks identified as quercetin and quercetin-4′-β-O-D-glucoside. Histopathological examination of APH-induced prostatic rats revealed evidence of hyperplasia and inflammation with cellular proliferation and reduced apoptosis Immunohistochemistry showed increased tissue expressions of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, IGF-1, and clusterin, while TGF-β1 was decreased, which correlates with the presence of inflammation. Both saw palmetto and RO scale treatment have ameliorated these changes. These ameliorative effects were more evident in RO scale groups and were dose dependent. In conclusion, methanolic extract of ROS showed a protective effect against APH induced rats that may be attributed to potential anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects. PMID:24829522

  10. Immunomodulatory effect of red onion (Allium cepa Linn) scale extract on experimentally induced atypical prostatic hyperplasia in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Elberry, Ahmed A; Mufti, Shagufta; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah; Abdel Sattar, Essam; Ghareib, Salah A; Mosli, Hisham A; Gabr, Salah A

    2014-01-01

    Red onion scales (ROS) contain large amounts of flavonoids that are responsible for the reported antioxidant activity, immune enhancement, and anticancer property. Atypical prostatic hyperplasia (APH) was induced in adult castrated Wistar rats by both s.c. injection of testosterone (0.5 mg/rat/day) and by smearing citral on shaved skin once every 3 days for 30 days. Saw palmetto (100 mg/kg) as a positive control and ROS suspension at doses of 75, 150, and 300 mg/kg/day were given orally every day for 30 days. All medications were started 7 days after castration and along with testosterone and citral. The HPLC profile of ROS methanolic extract displayed two major peaks identified as quercetin and quercetin-4'-β-O-D-glucoside. Histopathological examination of APH-induced prostatic rats revealed evidence of hyperplasia and inflammation with cellular proliferation and reduced apoptosis Immunohistochemistry showed increased tissue expressions of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, IGF-1, and clusterin, while TGF-β1 was decreased, which correlates with the presence of inflammation. Both saw palmetto and RO scale treatment have ameliorated these changes. These ameliorative effects were more evident in RO scale groups and were dose dependent. In conclusion, methanolic extract of ROS showed a protective effect against APH induced rats that may be attributed to potential anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects.

  11. The anti-hyperplasia, anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties of Qing Ye Dan and swertiamarin in testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinying; Gu, Ye; Li, Lun

    2017-01-04

    Qing Ye Dan (QYD) is the whole plant of Swertia mileensis and used in Chinese folk medicine for the treatment of prostatitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and so on. This study was to investigate the effects of QYD and its main component swertiamarin on BPH induced by testosterone in rats. The prostatic expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (βFGF) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were detected by immunohistochemistry assay. Prostatic levels of oxidative stress and inflammatory-related factors were also analyzed. Additionally, the prostatic expressions of androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor (ER)-α, ER-β, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, B-cell CLL/lymphoma (Bcl)-2 and Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) were measured by western blot. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated factors were evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR. It showed that QYD and swertiamarin ameliorated the testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia and collagen deposition, attenuated the over-expressions of HIF-1α, VEGF, EGF, βFGF, PCNA, AR and ER-α, reduced the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax, enhanced the expression of ER-β, inhibited the oxidative stress and local inflammation, as well as relieved prostatic EMT. It suggested that QYD and swertiamarin had prostatic protective potential against BPH.

  12. Influx of testosterone-binding globulin (TeBG) and TeBG-bound sex steroid hormones into rat testis and prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Sakiyama, R.; Pardridge, W.M.; Musto, N.A.

    1988-07-01

    The availability of testosterone and estradiol to Sertoli and prostate cells is dependent upon 1) the permeability properties of the blood-tubular barrier (BTB) of the testis or prostate cell membrane, and 2) sex steroid binding to plasma proteins, such as albumin or testosterone-binding globulin (TeBG). Sex steroid influx into these tissues was studied after in vivo arterial bolus injections of (/sup 3/H)testosterone or (/sup 3/H)estradiol in anesthetized rats. Both testosterone and estradiol were readily cleared across the BTB or prostate cell membrane in the absence of plasma proteins and in the presence of human pregnancy serum, in which testosterone or estradiol are 80-95% distributed to TeBG. The extravascular extraction of (/sup 3/H)TeBG across the BTB or prostate plasma membrane (73 +/- 2% (+/- SE) and 92 +/- 9%, respectively) was significantly greater than extraction of (/sup 3/H)albumin or other plasma space markers and indicative of a rapid first pass clearance of TeBG by Sertoli or prostate cells. In summary, these studies indicate that 1) testosterone and estradiol are readily cleared by Sertoli and prostate cells; 2) albumin- and TeBG-bound sex steroids represent the major circulating pool of bioavailable hormone for testis or prostate; and 3) the TeBG-sex steroid complex may be nearly completely available for influx through the BTB or prostate plasma membrane.

  13. Effects of Hedera helix L. extracts on rat prostate cancer cell proliferation and motility

    PubMed Central

    Gumushan-Aktas, Hatice; Altun, Seyhan

    2016-01-01

    Hedera helix L., a member of Araliaceae family, has antiproliferative, cytotoxic, antimicrobial, antifungal, antiprotozoal and anti-inflammatory effects, and is used in cosmetics. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of treatment with extracts of leaves and unripened fruits of H. helix on rat prostate cancer cell lines with markedly different metastatic potentials: Mat-LyLu cells (strongly metastatic) and AT-2 cells (weakly metastatic). The effects of the extracts on cell kinetics and migration were determined. Tetrodotoxin was used to block the voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) associated specifically with Mat-LyLu cells. Cell proliferation was detected spectrophotometrically using the 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide assay. The mitotic index was determined using the Feulgen staining method. Lateral motility was quantified by wound-healing assays. The results of the present study demonstrated that cell kinetics (proliferation and mitotic activity) and motility were inhibited by ethanolic leaf extract of H. helix. The ethanolic extract of H. helix fruit suppressed Mat-LyLu cell migration, with no effect on proliferation. The opposite effects were observed in AT-2 cells; migration was not affected but proliferation was inhibited. In conclusion, the ethanolic fruit extract of H. helix may inhibit the cell migration of Mat-LyLu cells by blocking VGSCs. However, the effect of ethanolic leaf extract of H. helix treatment on the lateral motility of the cancer cells is unclear. PMID:27698887

  14. Inhibitory Effect of Yongdamsagan-Tang Water Extract, a Traditional Herbal Formula, on Testosterone-Induced Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mee-Young; Lee, Nari

    2016-01-01

    Yongdamsagan-tang, a traditional herbal formula, is used widely for the treatment of inflammation and viral diseases. In this study, we investigated whether Yongdamsagan-tang water extract (YSTE) affects testosterone propionate- (TP-) induced benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in a rat model. To induce BPH, rats were injected subcutaneously with 10 mg/kg of TP every day. YSTE was administrated daily by oral gavage at doses of 200 and 500 mg/kg along with the TP injection. After 4 weeks, prostates were collected, weighed, and analyzed. The relative prostrate weight was significantly lower in both YSTE groups (200 and 500 mg/kg/day) compared with the TP-induced BPH group. YSTE administration reduced the expression of proliferation markers PCNA, cyclin D1, and Ki-67 and the histological abnormalities observed in the prostate in TP-induced BPH rats. YSTE attenuated the increase in the TP-induced androgen concentration in the prostate. The YSTE groups also showed decreased lipid peroxidation and increased glutathione reductase activity in the prostate. These findings suggest that YSTE effectively prevented the development of TP-induced BPH in rats through antiproliferative and antioxidative activities and might be useful in the clinical treatment of BPH. PMID:27504137

  15. Dietary prevention of hormone refractory prostate cancer in Lobund-Wistar rats: a review of studies in a relevant animal model.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Morris; Suckow, Mark A

    2006-12-01

    Lobund-Wistar (LW) rats, which have high testosterone levels, are predisposed to develop hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) spontaneously and by methylnitrosourea (MNU) induction, and the development of HRPC progresses through 2 stages. This paper reviews several studies in which LW rats were placed on soy-containing diets and were evaluated for development of either spontaneous or MNU-induced prostate cancer. The premalignant, testosterone-dependent stage is inhibited by testosterone deprivation. In the absence of testosterone deprivation, tumorigenesis progresses spontaneously to the testosterone-independent refractory stage. In LW rats: moderate caloric restriction prevented development of spontaneous prostate cancer; dietary 4-hydroxyphenylretinamide prevented MNU-induced prostate cancer; and dietary supplementation with soy protein isolate with high isoflavones prevented spontaneous and induced tumors and led to moderate reduction of serum testosterone. In rats 12 mo of age and younger, changing from the control diet to the soy+isoflavone diet significantly prevented progression of spontaneous tumors to the refractory stage of disease. Tumors that developed spontaneously and after MNU induction showed similar developmental stages and morphology, but MNU-induced tumors had shorter latency periods before development. The accumulated data indicate that soy-based diets are effective in the prevention of prostate cancer.

  16. Suppression of rat and human androgen biosynthetic enzymes by apigenin: Possible use for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiudi; Wang, Guimin; Li, Xiaoheng; Liu, Jianpeng; Hong, Tingting; Zhu, Qiqi; Huang, Ping; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2016-06-01

    Apigenin is a natural flavone. It has recently been used as a chemopreventive agent. It may also have some beneficial effects to treat prostate cancer by inhibiting androgen production. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of apigenin on the steroidogenesis of rat immature Leydig cells and some human testosterone biosynthetic enzyme activities. Rat immature Leydig cells were incubated for 3h with 100μM apigenin without (basal) or with 1ng/ml luteinizing hormone (LH), 10mM 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8BR), and 20μM of the following steroid substrates: 22R-hydroxychloesterol (22R), pregnenolone (P5), progesterone (P4), and androstenedione (D4). The medium levels of 5α-androstane-3α, 17β-diol (DIOL), the primary androgen produced by rat immature Leydig cells, were measured. Apigenin significantly inhibited basal, 8BR, 22R, PREG, P4, and D4 stimulated DIOL production in rat immature Leydig cells. Further study showed that apigenin inhibited rat 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17α-hydroxylase/17, 20-lyase, and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 with IC50 values of 11.41±0.7, 8.98±0.10, and 9.37±0.07μM, respectively. Apigenin inhibited human 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3 with IC50 values of 2.17±0.04 and 1.31±0.09μM, respectively. Apigenin is a potent inhibitor of rat and human steroidogenic enzymes, being possible use for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  17. Region-Specific Growth Effects in the Developing Rat Prostate Following Fetal Exposure to Estrogenic Ultraviolet Filters

    PubMed Central

    Hofkamp, Luke; Bradley, Sarahann; Tresguerres, Jesus; Lichtensteiger, Walter; Schlumpf, Margret; Timms, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives Exposure to environmental endocrine disruptors is a potential risk factor for humans. Many of these chemicals have been shown to exhibit disruption of normal cellular and developmental processes in animal models. Ultraviolet (UV) filters used as sunscreens in cosmetics have previously been shown to exhibit estrogenic activity in in vitro and in vivo assays. We examined the effects of two UV filters, 4-methylbenzylidene camphor (4-MBC) and 3-benzylidene camphor (3-BC), in the developing prostate of the fetal rat. Methods Pregnant Long Evans rats were fed diets containing doses of 4-MBC and 3-BC that resulted in average daily intakes of these chemicals corresponding to the lowest observed adverse effects level (LOAEL) and the no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL) doses in prior developmental toxicity studies. Using digital photographs of serial sections from postnatal day 1 animals, we identified, contoured, and aligned the epithelial ducts from specific regions of the developing prostate, plus the accessory sex glands and calculated the total volume for each region from three-dimensional, surface-rendered models. Results Fetal exposure to 4-MBC (7.0 mg/kg body weight/day) resulted in a significant increase (p < 0.05) in tissue volume in the prostate and accessory sex glands. Treated males exhibited a 62% increase in the number of ducts in the caudal dorsal prostate. Increased distal branching morphogenesis appears to be a consequence of exposure in the ventral region, resulting in a 106% increase in ductal volume. Conclusions 4-MBC exposure during development of the male reproductive accessory sex glands exhibited classical growth effects associated with estrogenic endocrine disruptors. The different regional responses suggest that the two developmental processes of ductal outgrowth and branching morphogenesis are affected independently by exposure to the environmental chemicals. PMID:18629307

  18. Inhibitory effect of rape pollen supercritical CO2 fluid extract against testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats

    PubMed Central

    YANG, BI-CHENG; JIN, LI-LI; YANG, YI-FANG; LI, KUN; PENG, DAN-MING

    2014-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) can lead to lower urinary tract symptoms. Rape pollen is an apicultural product that is composed of nutritionally valuable and biologically active substances. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of rape pollen supercritical CO2 fluid extract (SFE-CO2) in BPH development using a testosterone-induced BPH rat model. BPH was induced in the experimental groups by daily subcutaneous injections of testosterone for a period of 30 days. Rape pollen SFE-CO2 was administered daily by oral gavage concurrently with the testosterone injections. Animals were sacrificed at the scheduled termination and the prostates were weighed and subjected to histopathological examination. Testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), 5α-reductase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) levels were also measured. BPH-induced animals exhibited an increase in prostate weight with increased testosterone, DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 expression levels. However, rape pollen SFE-CO2 treatment resulted in significant reductions in the prostate index and testosterone, DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 levels compared with those in BPH-induced animals. Histopathological examination also demonstrated that rape pollen SFE-CO2 treatment suppressed testosterone-induced BPH. These observations indicate that rape pollen SFE-CO2 inhibits the development of BPH in rats and these effects are closely associated with reductions in DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 levels. Therefore, the results of the present study clearly indicate that rape pollen SFE-CO2 extract may be a useful agent in BPH treatment. PMID:24944593

  19. AB099. The anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial effects of the novel herbal formulation (WSY-1075) on chronic bacterial prostatitis rat model

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Woong Jin; Bashraheel, Fahad; Choi, Sae Woong; Kim, Su Jin; Kim, Sae Woong; Yoon, Byung Il

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory and anti-microbial effects of a new herbal formula (WSY-1075) in a chronic bacterial prostatitis rat model. Methods Thirty two male Wistar rats were used in the study. Experimental chronic bacterial prostatitis was induced by instillation of bacterial suspension (Escherichia coli 108 per mL) into the prostatic urethra. Animals were followed for 4 weeks. After the induction of prostatitis, the rats were randomly divided into one of four treatment groups: control (n=8), ciprofloxacin (n=8), WSY-1075 (400 mg/kg) (n=8), and WSY-1075 (400 mg/kg) + ciprofloxacin (n=8). After 4 weeks of treatment, the prostatic pro-inflammatory cytokine [tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-8] levels, anti-oxidant effects (superoxide dismutase) and histological findings were noted. Results The use of ciprofloxacin, WSY-1075, and WSY-1075 with ciprofloxacin showed statistically significant decreases in bacterial growth and improvements in the reduction of prostatic inflammation compared with the control group (P<0.05). The WSY-1075 with ciprofloxacin group showed a statistically significant decrease in bacterial growth and improvement in prostatic inflammation compared with the ciprofloxacin group (P<0.05). Conclusions These results suggest that WSY-1075 may have anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial effects, as well as a synergistic effect with ciprofloxacin. Therefore, we suggest that the combination of WSY-1075 and ciprofloxacin may be effective in treating chronic bacterial prostatitis to obtain a higher rate of treatment success.

  20. Induction of apoptosis in the LNCaP human prostate carcinoma cell line and prostate adenocarcinomas of SV40T antigen transgenic rats by the Bowman-Birk inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Tang, MingXi; Asamoto, Makoto; Ogawa, Kumiko; Naiki-Ito, Aya; Sato, Shinya; Takahashi, Satoru; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2009-11-01

    The soybean-derived serine protease inhibitor, Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI), has been reported as a potent chemoprevention agent against several types of tumors. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of BBI on androgen-sensitive/dependent prostate cancers using a human prostate cancer cell (LNCaP) and the transgenic rats developing adenocarcinoma of the prostate (TRAP) model. Treatment of LNCaP prostate cancer cells with 500 microg/mL BBI resulted in inhibition of viability measured on WST-1 assays, with induction of connexin 43 (Cx43) and cleaved caspase-3 protein expression. Feeding of 3% roughly prepared BBI (BBIC) to TRAP from the age 3 weeks to 13 weeks resulted in significant reduction of the relative epithelial areas within the acinus and multiplicity of the adenocarcinomas in the lateral prostate lobes. Cx43- and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP-biotin end labeling of fragmented DNA (TUNEL)-positive apoptotic cancer cells were more frequently observed in the lateral prostates treated with BBIC than in the controls. These in vivo and in vitro results suggest that BBI possesses chemopreventive activity associated with induction of Cx43 expression and apoptosis.

  1. Relationship of changing delta 4-steroid 5 alpha-reductase activity to (125I)iododeoxyuridine uptake during regeneration of involuted rat prostates

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahara, S.; Higashi, Y.; Takeuchi, S.; Oshima, H. )

    1989-04-01

    To elucidate the phenotypic expression of proliferating prostatic cells, rats were castrated, and the regenerating process of involuted ventral prostates during testosterone propionate (TP) administration was investigated by examining morphology, (5-{sup 125}I)iododeoxyuridine ({sup 125}I-UdR) uptake, DNA content, weight, acid phosphatase, and delta 4-steroid 5 alpha-reductase (5 alpha-reductase) activities. Morphologically, TP treatment initially increased the number of epithelial cells lining glandular lobules and subsequently restored the shape of epithelial cells. {sup 125}I-UdR uptake peaked on Day 3 of TP treatment and stayed at higher levels than for uncastrated controls until Day 14 of treatment. Prostatic weight, protein content, acid phosphatase, and DNA content returned to uncastrated control levels by Day 14 of TP treatment. TP administration markedly stimulated prostatic 5 alpha-reductase activity, which peaked on the Day 5 of treatment and decreased to uncastrated control levels by Day 14 of treatment. It is concluded that TP administration to castrated rats initially induced active mitotic division of the remaining stem cells, followed by formation of differentiated functional epithelial cells. Prostatic 5 alpha-reductase was highly active at the initial phase of active mitotic cell division. The major portion of the increased enzyme activity can be regarded as a phenotypic expression of stem or transient cells of prostatic epithelium.

  2. Mechanism of retention of estramustine in the rat prostate and results of a clinical trial of Estracyt in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanaka, H.; Imai, K.; Yuasa, H.; Shida, K.

    1981-01-01

    To clarify the mechanism of action of Estracyt, we performed experiments using /sup 3/H-estramustine of high specific activity. /sup 3/H-Radioactivity accumulated selectively in the ventral prostate of castrated male rats after the administration of /sup 3/H-estramustine. Estramustine and its metabolites were retained in the ventral prostate for long time periods. The uptake of /sup 3/H-radioactivity was almost totally localized in the cytosol fraction, but not in a purified receptor fraction. The apparent equilibrium dissociation constant of the estramustine binding protein was 18.9 nM, and the apparent equilibrium Bmax value was 0.76 nmoles/mg of cytosol protein. In addition, we wish to report in this paper the results of clinical trials of Estracyt studied by a cooperative research group in Japan from 1977 to 1979. It was concluded that Estracyt was effective in 89% of previously untreated prostatic cancer patients and in 38% of reactivated cancer patients.

  3. Ionically-crosslinked milk protein nanoparticles as flutamide carriers for effective anticancer activity in prostate cancer-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Elzoghby, Ahmed O; Saad, Noha I; Helmy, Maged W; Samy, Wael M; Elgindy, Nazik A

    2013-11-01

    In this study, casein (CAS) nanoparticles were used to encapsulate the hydrophobic anticancer drug, flutamide (FLT), aiming at controlling its release, enhancing its anti-tumor activity, and reducing its hepatotoxicity. The nanoparticles were prepared by emulsification of CAS, at pH below its isoelectric point, and stabilized via ionic-crosslinking with sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP). The nanoparticles were spherical and positively charged with a size below 100 nm and exhibited a sustained drug release up to 4 days. After intravenous administration into prostate cancer-bearing rats for 28 days, FLT-loaded CAS nanoparticles showed a higher anti-tumor efficacy as revealed by a significantly higher % reduction in PSA serum level (75%) compared to free FLT (55%). Moreover, the nanoparticles demonstrated a marked reduction in the relative weights of both prostate tumor and seminal vesicle (43% and 32%) compared to free FLT (12% and 18%), respectively. A significantly higher anti-proliferative, anti-angiogenic, and apoptotic effects was demonstrated by the nanoparticles compared to drug solution as evidenced by their ability to decrease the expression of the proliferative marker (Ki-67) and reduce the level of tumor angiogenic markers (VEGF and IGF-1) as well as their ability to activate caspase-3 with subsequent induction of apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. Conclusively, these novel ionically-crosslinked milk protein nanovehicles offer a promising carrier to allow controlled intravenous delivery of hydrophobic anticancer drugs.

  4. Anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative activities of date palm pollen (Phoenix dactylifera) on experimentally-induced atypical prostatic hyperplasia in rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Atypical prostatic hyperplasia (APH) is a pseudoneoplastic lesion that can mimic prostate adenocarcinoma because of its cytologic and architectural features. Suspension of date palm pollen (DPP) is an herbal mixture that is widely used in folk medicine for male infertility. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of DPP suspension and extract on APH-induced rats. Methods APH was induced in adult castrated Wistar rats by both s.c. injection of testosterone (0.5 mg/rat/day) and smearing citral on shaved skin once every 3 days for 30 days. Saw palmetto (100mg/kg), DPP suspension (250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg), and lyophilized DPP extract (150,300 and 600 mg/kg) were given orally daily for 30 days. All medications were started 7 days after castration and along with testosterone and citral. Results The histopathological feature in APH-induced prostate rats showed evidence of hyperplasia and inflammation. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that the expressions of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, IGF-1 and clusterin were increased, while the expression of TGF-β1 was decreased that correlates with presence of inflammation. Moreover, histopathological examination revealed increased cellular proliferation and reduced apoptosis in ventral prostate. Both saw palmetto and DPP treatment has ameliorated these histopathological and immunohistochemical changes in APH-induced rats. These improvements were not associated with reduction in the prostatic weight that may be attributed to the persistence of edema. Conclusion DPP may have a potential protective effect in APH-induced Wistar rats through modulation of cytokine expression and/or upregulation of their autocrine/paracrine receptors. PMID:22195697

  5. Voltage-dependent ion channel currents in putative neuroendocrine cells dissociated from the ventral prostate of rat.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Hee; Shin, Sun Young; Yun, Sang Soon; Kim, Tae Jin; Oh, Seung-June; Kim, Kwang Myung; Chung, Young-Shin; Hong, Eun-Kyoung; Uhm, Dae-Yong; Kim, Sung Joon

    2003-04-01

    Prostate neuroendocrine (NE) cells play important roles in the growth and differentiation of the prostate. Following enzymatic digestion of rat ventral prostate, the whole-cell patch-clamp technique was applied to dark, round cells that exhibited chromogranin-A immunoreactivity, a representative marker of NE cells. Under zero current-clamp conditions, putative NE cells showed hyperpolarized resting membrane potentials of some -70 mV, and spontaneous action potentials were induced by an increase in external [K+] or by the injection of current. Using a CsCl pipette solution, step-like depolarization activated high-voltage-activated Ca2+ current (HVA I(Ca)) and tetrodotoxin-resistant voltage-activated Na+ current. The HVA I(Ca) was blocked by nifedipine and omega-conotoxin GVIA, L-type and N-type Ca2+ channel blockers, respectively. Using a KCl pipette solution, the transient outward K+ current (I(to)), Ca2+ -activated K+ currents (I(K,Ca)), the non-inactivating outward current and an inwardly rectifying K+ current (I(Kir)) were identified. I(K,Ca) was suppressed by charybdotoxin (50 nM), iberiotoxin (10 nM) or clotrimazol (1 microM), but not by apamine (100 nM). I(to) was inhibited by 4-aminopyridine (5 mM). I(Kir) was identified as a Ba2+ -sensitive inwardly rectifying current in the presence of a high-K+ bath solution. The voltage- and Ca2+ -activated ion channels could play significant roles in the regulation of neurohormonal secretion in the prostate.

  6. The prevention and treatment effects of tanshinone IIA on oestrogen/androgen-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Du, Xiaoling; Yang, Rui; Liu, Jie; Xu, Da; Shi, Jiandang; Chen, Linfeng; Shao, Rui; Fan, Guanwei; Gao, Xiumei; Tian, Guo; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Ju

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the major diseases of the urinary system in elderly men. Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA) is the active ingredient extracted from the traditional Chinese medicine Salvia, and it has effects of anti-oxidation, anti-inflammation, vascular smooth muscle relaxation and tumour growth inhibition. The present study aimed to investigate the therapeutic potential of Tan IIA in the prevention and treatment of BPH. In a rat model of oestradiol/testosterone-induced BPH, Tan IIA inhibited the increase in the thickness of the peri-glandular smooth muscle layer, suppressed the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in both prostate epithelial cells and stromal cells, downregulated the expression of androgen receptor (AR), oestrogen receptor α (ERα), cyclin B1 (CCNB1) and cyclin D1 (CCND1), and effectively prevented the development of the disorder. In vitro, Tan IIA inhibited the proliferation of human prostate stromal cell line WPMY-1 and epithelial cell line RWPE-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In WPMY-1 cells, Tan IIA treatment arrested the cell cycle at the G2/M phase and downregulated the expression of CCNB1. However, in RWPE-1 cells, Tan IIA treatment arrested cell cycle at the G0/G1 phase and reduced the expression of CCND1. Tan IIA also reduced the expression of ERα and AR in WPMY-1 and RWPE-1 cells. These results suggest that Tan IIA can inhibit the growth of prostate stromal and epithelial cells both in vivo and in vitro by a mechanism that may involve arresting the cell cycle and downregulating ERα and AR expression.

  7. Increased chromogranin A and neuron-specific enolase in rats with chronic nonbacterial prostatitis induced by 17-beta estradiol combined with castration

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Song; Hao, Zong-Yao; Zhang, Li; Chen, Xian-Guo; Zhou, Jun; Zang, Yi-Fei; Tai, Sheng; Liang, Chao-Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Although chronic nonbacterial prostatitis (CNBP) is a common diagnosis in middle-aged men, the etiology of this disease remains poorly understood. Neuroendocrine cells play an important role in the neuroendocrine regulation of the prostate, and chromogranin A (CgA) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) are regarded as classic markers of neuroendocrine cells. This study aimed to determine CgA and NSE levels in a CNBP rat model to evaluate the role of neuroendocrine cells in the pathogenesis of CNBP. For developing a CNBP rat model, we examined the ability of 17-beta estradiol and surgical castration alone or in combination to induce CNBP. Histologic inflammation of the prostate was assessed in CNBP-induced rats by hematoxylin-eosin staining, whereas CgA and NSE protein levels were assessed by immunohistochemistry, Western blot analysis, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Our results showed that 17-beta estradiol combined with castration successfully induced CNBP and that CgA and NSE levels were increased in the prostate of CNBP rats as compared to those without CNBP. These findings indicate that the neuroendocrine regulation mediated by neuroendocrine cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of CNBP. PMID:25120776

  8. Effect of D-004, a lipid extract from Cuban royal palm fruit, on histological changes of prostate hyperplasia induced with testosterone in rats.

    PubMed

    Noa, M; Arruzazabala, M L; Carbajal, D; Más, R; Molina, V

    2005-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the nonmalignant, uncontrolled growth of prostate gland cells and stroma leading to difficulty in urinating. Lipid extracts from Saw palmetto (Arecaceae) fruits are used to treat BPH. The Cuban royal palm (Roystonea regia) is a member of this family and D-004, a lipid extract from its fruits, prevents prostate hyperplasia (PH) induced with testosterone, as opposed to dihydrotestosterone, in rodents. This study investigated whether D-004 could prevent the histological features of testosterone-induced PH in rats. Rats were distributed into six groups (10 rats per group): A negative control group receiving subcutaneous injections of soy oil and treated with vehicle, and five groups injected subcutaneously with testosterone and treated with the vehicle (positive control), D-004 (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg) or Saw palmetto (400 mg/kg). Treatments were given orally for 14 days. At sacrifice, prostates were removed and processed for light microscopy. The histopathological findings of PH were assessed according to a score-chart protocol. D-004 200 and 400 mg/kg, but not 100 mg/kg, significantly and moderately in a dose-dependent manner prevented prostate enlargement and the testosterone-induced histological changes. Compared with positive controls, D-004 200 and 400 mg/kg inhibited prostate size increases and the histological score up to 56.1% and 60.7%, respectively, while Saw palmetto 400 mg/kg reduced such variables by 45.8% and 49.0%, respectively. The effects of D-004 400 mg/kg on the histological changes, not on prostate size, were greater (p < 0.05) than those of Saw palmetto. D-004 and Saw palmetto did not affect body weight values. In conclusion, D-004 200 and 400 mg/kg administered orally for 14 days prevented the increase of prostate size and the testosterone-induced histological changes in rats, its effects being comparable or mildly better than those of Saw palmetto. These results extend previous data showing preventive

  9. AB036. Effects and its potential mechanisms of Cox-2 inhibitors on ejaculation latency of rat with experimental autoimmune prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Tao; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Tian-Biao; Jia, Dong-Hui; Wang, Chao-Liang; Sun, Yang; Zhang, Wei-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Background To investigate the effects and its potential mechanisms of Cox-2 inhibitors on ejaculation latency of rat with experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP). Methods Thirty six male Wistar rats with normal sexual function were screened by using the copulatory test, and were randomly divided into 3 groups: the model group (n=16), the normal control group (n=10) and the celecoxib treatment group (n=10). EAP rat model was established in the model group and the celecoxib treatment group by subcutaneous multiple point’s injection of male prostate gland extract emulsified in an equal volume of Freund’s adjuvant at the 0 and 21th day. Control animals received equal volume of saline. From the 0th day, the celecoxib treatment group was given a gavage of celecoxib (18 mg·kg-1·d-1), the model group and the normal control group were given a gavage of saline (0.1 mL·kg-1·d-1). Eight weeks later, the sexual behavior was investigated by the copulatory test, the morphological change of prostatic tissue was observed by light microscopy after HE staining, cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β) in serum were detected by ELISA, the levels of 5-HT, 5-HT1A receptor, 5-HT2C receptor and SERT in T13-L2 and L5-S2 spinal cord tissue were detected by immunohistochemical staining and Western Blot. Results In model group, prostatic inflammation was found in 12 rats, and not in another 4 rats. The 4 rats were not included in the statistical analysis. In normal control group, prostatic inflammation was not found. In the celecoxib treatment group, there was a small amount of interstitial infiltration of inflammatory cells in rat’s prostate. In the copulatory test, compared with normal control group, mount latency (ML) and intromission latency (IL) in the model group were significantly prolonged (P<0.05); ejaculation latency (EL) in the model group was significantly shortened (P<0.05). There was no significant difference in these sexual behavior parameters between the normal control group and

  10. Subsurface optical stimulation of the rat prostate nerves using continuous-wave near-infrared laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2012-02-01

    Successful identification and preservation of the cavernous nerves (CN), which are responsible for sexual function, during prostate cancer surgery, will require subsurface detection of the CN beneath a thin fascia layer. This study explores optical nerve stimulation (ONS) in the rat with a fascia layer placed over the CN. Two near-IR diode lasers (1455 nm and 1550 nm lasers) were used to stimulate the CN in CW mode with a 1-mm-diameter spot in 8 rats. The 1455 nm wavelength provides an optical penetration depth (OPD) of ~350 μm, while 1550 nm provides an OPD of ~1000 μm (~3 times deeper than 1455 nm and 1870 nm wavelengths previously tested). Fascia layers with thicknesses of 85 - 600 μm were placed over the CN. Successful ONS was confirmed by an intracavernous pressure (ICP) response in the rat penis at 1455 nm through fascia 110 μm thick and at 1550 nm through fascia 450 μm thick. Higher incident laser power was necessary and weaker and slower ICP responses were observed as fascia thickness was increased. Subsurface ONS of the rat CN at a depth of 450 μm using a 1550 nm laser is feasible.

  11. Possible protective effect of royal jelly against cyclophosphamide induced prostatic damage in male albino rats; a biochemical, histological and immuno-histo-chemical study.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hafez, Sara Mohammed Naguib; Rifaai, Rehab Ahmed; Abdelzaher, Walaa Yehia

    2017-03-21

    Almost all the chemotherapy treat many cancer types effectively, but it leads to severe side effects. Chemotherapy like cyclophosphamide (CP) not works only on the active cells, such as cancer cells, but also acts on the healthy cells. Royal jelly (RJ) was reported to have a lot of therapeutic effects besides being an anti-oxidant and anti-cancer agent. The purpose of this study was to assess the possible protective role of RJ in ameliorating the toxic effects of CP overdose in the rat prostatic tissue. The rats were separated into 4 groups; control group, RJ group, CP group and RJ with CP group. Prostatic specimens were processed for biochemical, histological and immune-histo-chemical studies. The mean area fractions of eNOS and Bax expression were measured in all groups, and statistical analysis was carried out. The results showed that in CP treated group, there were marked biological changes in the form of significant increase in prostatic malondialdehyde (MDA) and C - reactive protein (CRP). Additionally there was a significant decrease in glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in prostatic tissue if compared with the control group. Furthermore, the histological changes showed marked acinar and stromal prostatic degeneration. Most prostatic acini showed less PAS reaction and more (eNOS and Bax) expression if compared with the control group. Concomitant administration of RJ with CP revealed a noticeable amelioration of these biochemical and histological changes. In conclusion, RJ provided biochemical and histo-pathological improvement in CP induced prostatic tissue toxicity. These findings revealed that this improvement was associated with a decrease in the tissue oxidative damage and apoptosis.

  12. In vivo effect of the lipido-sterolic extract of Serenoa repens (Permixon) on mast cell accumulation and glandular epithelium trophism in the rat prostate.

    PubMed

    Mitropoulos, Dionisios; Kyroudi, Aspasia; Zervas, Anastasios; Papadoukakis, Stefanos; Giannopoulos, Aris; Kittas, Christos; Karayannacos, Panagiotis

    2002-04-01

    The Serenoa repens lipido-sterolic extract (SRLSE, Permixon, Pierre Fabre Medicament, Castres, France) is used to treat benign prostate hyperplasia. We studied the in vivo effect of SRLSE on mast cell accumulation and the histological characteristics of the rat ventral prostate. Adult Wistar rats received either tocopherol or SRLSE (50 and 100 mg/kg body weight, respectively) every second day for 90 days. Histological features were studied in hematoxylin-eosin stained tissue sections while mean mast cell numbers were determined in Giemsa-stained sections. The central region of the ventral prostate in treated animals showed significant changes with acinar epithelium becoming flat or low cuboidal. In the same region, mean mast cell number per optical field in the control, low-dose and high-dose groups were, respectively, 4.7+/-0.7, 3.4+/-1.0 and 2.4+/-0.6, showing a dose-dependent, statistically significant decrease. Administering SRLSE significantly reduces mast cell accumulation and provokes epithelium atrophy within the central area of the rat ventral prostate. These phenomena may participate in the clinical activity of the drug.

  13. Effects of a diet rich in sesame ( Sesamum indicum) pericarp on the expression of oestrogen receptor alpha and oestrogen receptor beta in rat prostate and uterus.

    PubMed

    Anagnostis, Aristotelis; Papadopoulos, Athanasios I

    2009-09-01

    The expression of oestrogen receptors (ERalpha and ERbeta) in the prostate and uterus tissues of Wistar rats supplied for 8 weeks with a diet rich in sesame (Sesamum indicum) pericarp (30 %) was monitored. Eight male rats, aged 6 weeks, were divided into a control group fed on a normal diet, and an experimental one, provided with the normal diet enriched with 30 % sesame pericarp. A similar experiment was performed with female rats. At the end of the experiment, the prostate and uterus tissues were surgically removed and kept at - 80 degrees C for up to 2 months. Western blotting and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) methods were used in order to investigate the levels of receptor proteins and mRNA. Significant increase in the expression of ERbeta in prostate and uterus was evident in both methods, while the magnitude of the observed alteration depended on the applied method. No statistically significant change was observed in the expression of ERalpha in uterus. In prostate, although the increase was more evident when investigated by means of qRT-PCR, the difference in expression of ERalpha was not statistically significant. In both tissues, a shift of the ratio of ERalpha:ERbeta in favour of ERbeta was evident, indicating, according to existing literature, a beneficial effect of the diet provided upon the health status of the organisms. It is suggested that this effect is attributed to the lignans present in the pericarp which exert phyto-oestrogenic activity.

  14. Rat dorsal prostate is necessary for vaginal adhesion of the seminal plug and sperm motility in the uterine horns.

    PubMed

    Tlachi-López, José L; López, Aurora; Hoffman, Kurt; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier; García-Lorenzana, Mario; Lucio, Rosa Angélica

    2011-01-01

    The rat prostate comprises dorsal, ventral and lateral lobes that are morphologically and biochemically distinct. Lesions to these structures are expected to affect the quality of the ejaculate and male fertility. In experiment 1, we analyzed ejaculate parameters of males that had chemical lesions of the dorsal or ventral lobes. At pre-lesion and at 5 and 20 days post-lesion males were mated, and after ejaculation, seminal fluid and seminal plug were obtained from the mated females. In experiment 2, the ventral lobes were ablated, and the ejaculate was analyzed. In experiment 3, the fertility of males with chemically-lesioned dorsal lobes or ablation of the ventral lobes was evaluated. Chemical lesion of the dorsal lobe prevented the adhesion of the seminal plug to vaginal walls. When these males were tested at 5-days postlesion, no sperm were found in uterus, and at 20-days post-lesion, the few sperm encountered showed slow progressive motility. None of the females that mated with dorsal lobe-lesioned males became pregnant. However, chemical lesion or ablation of the ventral lobes did not affect ejaculate or fertility. Our results indicate that the dorsal prostatic lobes are indispensable for reproductive success in males, and define parameters of ejaculate with which fertility can be estimated.

  15. High susceptibility of the ACI and spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) strains to 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Inaguma, Shingo; Takahashi, Satoru; Ohnishi, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Shugo; Cho, Young-Man; Shirai, Tomoyuki

    2003-11-01

    Carcinogenic responses in the prostate to 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) were compared among seven rat strains (F344, ACI, Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat (SHR), Sprague-Dawley (SD), Wistar, Lewis and Brown Norway (BN)). Ten-week-old animals of each strain were given PhIP at 400 ppm in the diet for 20 weeks then maintained until week 54. The final survival rates were 92, 92, 83, 75, 67, 42 and 42%, respectively, and the SHR strain showed the highest sensitivity with regard to development of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PINs) in the ventral prostate. With regard to the induction of adenocarcinomas of the ventral prostate, the ACI strain was most sensitive, whereas Lewis and F344 rats were relatively resistant. No adenocarcinomas were found in the dorsolateral or anterior prostate or seminal vesicles in any of the strains. The levels of serum testosterone and estrogen, PhIP-DNA adducts and cell kinetics did not correlate with the development of ventral prostatic lesions and thus other factors are presumably responsible for the variations in susceptibility. The present data indicate that ACI and SHR rats are appropriate strains for experimental investigation of PhIP-induced prostate carcinogenesis.

  16. Correlation of prolactin levels and PRL-receptor expression with Stat and Mapk cell signaling in the prostate of long-term sexually active rats.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Durán, Fausto; Pascual-Mathey, Luz I; Serrano, Karina; Aranda-Abreu, Gonzalo E; Manzo, Jorge; Soto-Cid, Abraham H; Hernandez, Ma Elena

    2015-01-01

    Prolactin (PRL) is a key hormone for prostate function, with a basal level in serum and associated with two characteristic circadian peaks. In the male rat, the execution of one bout of sexual behavior with consecutive ejaculations produces a significant transient increase in PRL. However, the impact of a constant sexual life on both PRL levels and prostate function is unknown. Thus, by using constantly copulating males we analyzed the levels of serum PRL, the effect on prostate PRL receptors, and activation of pStat3, pStat5 and Mapk signaling pathways. Sexually experienced Wistar male rats were used, which underwent periodic sessions of sexual behavior tests. Males were subjected to a session of sexual behavior to achieve at least one and up to four ejaculations. Of these, a blood sample was collected from randomly selected males and the ventral prostate was removed for analysis. Serum PRL was quantified, the mRNA for PRL receptors was determined, and signaling pathways were analyzed. Data show that a constant sexual life produced a constant elevation of PRL in serum during four consecutive ejaculations. The ventral prostate showed a different mRNA expression profile for the long and short isoform of the PRL receptor, and both mRNA levels increased. Although the gland did not show modification of the activation of the pStat5 signaling pathway, the levels of pStat3 increased, and the Mapk pathway showed one significant elevation after the third ejaculation. Thus, we showed that an active and constant sexual life produces a sustained increase in serum PRL, its receptors, and the pStat3 signaling pathway. These responses seem to underlie the required physiological need to produce the quantity and quality of prostatic semen to ensure the appropriate environment for sperm to reach and fertilize the ovum.

  17. Cyclic GMP signaling in rat urinary bladder, prostate, and epididymis: tissue-specific changes with aging and in response to Leydig cell depletion.

    PubMed

    Müller, Dieter; Mukhopadhyay, Amal K; Davidoff, Michail S; Middendorff, Ralf

    2011-08-01

    Aging of the male reproductive system leads to changes in endocrine signaling and is frequently associated with the emergence of prostate hyperplasia and bladder dysfunctions. Recent reports highlight prostate and bladder as promising targets for therapeutic interventions with inhibitors of the cyclic GMP (cGMP)-degrading phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5). However, the cGMP signaling system in these organs is as yet poorly characterized, and the possibility of age-related alterations has not been addressed. This study investigates key proteins of cGMP pathways in bladder, prostate, and epididymis of young (3 months) and old (23-24 months) Wistar rats. Local differences in the abundance of PDE5, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) and particulate guanylyl cyclases (GC-A, GC-B), endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and cGMP-dependent protein kinase I (PRKG1 (cGKI)) revealed pronounced tissue-specific peculiarities. Although cGMP-generating enzymes were not affected by age in all organs, we recognized age-related decreases of PDE5 expression in bladder and a selective diminishment of membrane-associated PRKG1 in epididymis. In disagreement with published data, all cGMP pathway proteins including PDE5 are poorly expressed in prostate. However, prostatic PRKG1 expression increases with aging. Androgen withdrawal during temporary Leydig cell elimination induced a massive (>12-fold) upregulation of PRKG1 in prostate but not in other (penis and epididymis) androgen-dependent organs. These findings identify PRKG1 as a key androgen-sensitive signaling protein in prostate of possible importance for growth regulation. The elucidated effects may have significance for age-associated pathologies in the male lower-urinary tract.

  18. Validation of a sensitive HPLC/fluorescence method for assessment of ciprofloxacin levels in plasma and prostate microdialysate samples from rats.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Estevan Sonego; Torres, Bruna Gaelzer Silva; Dalla Costa, Teresa

    2016-03-01

    Chronic bacterial prostatitis treatment consists of broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy for long periods of time. Drug penetration into the prostate makes the treatment a challenged. Ciprofloxacin is one of the most prescribed drugs for this treatment. A liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection method was developed and validated for determining ciprofloxacin concentrations in two different matrices: plasma and prostate microdialysate. Ciprofloxacin was separated on a C18 column eluted with a mobile phase constituted of a mixture of 0.4% aqueous triethylamine:methanol:acetonitrile (75:15:10, v/v/v) and 0.4% aqueous triethylamine:acetonitrile (88:12, v/v) for microdialysate and plasma samples, respectively. Linearity was obtained over a concentration range of 5-1000 ng/mL (microdialysate) and 10-2000 ng/mL (plasma), with coefficients of determination ≥0.9956. Precision was determined from the analysis of six quality control samples and showed RSD values <11.1 and 7.4% for intra and inter-assay precision, respectively. The accuracy ranged from 85.6 to 114.3%. The method was applied to a preliminary pharmacokinetic study to investigate ciprofloxacin concentrations in prostate, sampled by microdialysis, and plasma after a 7 mg/kg intravenous dose to Wistar rats. The method showed high sensitivity using only protein precipitation as plasma sample clean-up and was successfully applied to investigate ciprofloxacin prostate penetration.

  19. Role of the phytoestrogenic, pro-apoptotic and anti-oxidative properties of silymarin in inhibiting experimental benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats.

    PubMed

    Atawia, Reem T; Tadros, Mariane G; Khalifa, Amani E; Mosli, Hisham A; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B

    2013-05-23

    Androgen and estrogen play an important role in the pathogenesis of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Estrogen exerts its action through two distinct estrogen receptors (ERs) either ER-α or ER-β. The phytoestrogenic property of silymarin (SIL) has been previously characterized. Thus, this study examined the protective effect of SIL against testosterone-induced BPH in rats. In an initial dose-response study, SIL in a dose of 50mg/kg was the most effective in preventing the rise in prostate weight, prostate weight/body weight ratio and histopathologic changes induced by testosterone. Testosterone significantly decreased ER-β and increased ER-α and AR expressions as compared to the control group and these effects were significantly ameliorated by SIL. Furthermore, SIL significantly protected against testosterone-provoked decline in mRNA expression of P21(WAF1/Cip1) and Bax/Bcl-xl ratio as well as caspase-3 activity. SIL minimized the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) positive cells as compared to testosterone-treated group. Moreover, SIL significantly blunted the inducible NF-κB expression and restored the oxidative status to within normal values in the prostatic tissues. Collectively these findings elucidate the effectiveness of SIL in preventing testosterone-induced BPH in rats. This could be attributed, at least partly, to its phytoestrogenic, pro-apoptotic and anti-oxidative properties.

  20. Effect of hyperprolactinemia on PRL-receptor expression and activation of Stat and Mapk cell signaling in the prostate of long-term sexually-active rats.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Mathey, Luz I; Rojas-Duran, Fausto; Aranda-Abreu, Gonzalo E; Manzo, Jorge; Herrera-Covarrubias, Deissy; Muñoz-Zavaleta, David A; Garcia, Luis I; Hernandez, Ma Elena

    2016-04-01

    The abnormal elevation of serum PRL, referred to as hyperprolactinemia (HyperPRL), produces alterations in several reproductive parameters of male rats such as penile erection or decreased tendency to reach ejaculation. Additionally, this situation produces a significant modification of prostate histology, as observed in the epithelial structure and alveolar area, which could reach a level of hyperplasia in the long-term. In this tissue, HyperPRL produces an increase in expression of PRL receptors and activation of the Stat3 signaling pathway that is correlated with the evolution of prostate pathologies. However, the impact of HyperPRL in long-term sexually active male rats is unknown. In this work, using constantly copulating Wistar male rats with induced HyperPRL, we analyzed the level of serum PRL, the effect on prostate PRL receptors, and activation of pStat3, pStat5 and Mapk signaling pathways. Two procedures to induce HyperPRL were employed, comprising daily IP administration or adenohypophysis transplant, and although neither affected the execution of sexual behavior, the serum PRL profile following successive ejaculations was affected. Messenger RNA expression of the short and long isoforms of the PRL receptor at the ventral prostate was affected in different ways depending on the procedure to induce HyperPRL. The ventral prostate did not show any modification in terms of activation of the pStat5 signaling pathway in subjects with daily administration of PRL, although this was significantly increased in ADH transplanted subjects in the second and fourth consecutive ejaculation. A similar profile was found for the pStat3 pathway which additionally showed a significant increase in the third and fourth ejaculation of daily-injected subjects. The Mapk signaling pathway did not show any modifications in subjects with daily administration of PRL, but showed a significant increase in the second and third ejaculations of subjects with ADH transplants. Thus

  1. Effects of prenatal exposure to a low dose atrazine metabolite mixture on pubertal timing and prostate development of male Long-Evans rats

    SciTech Connect

    Stanko, Jason; Enoch, Rolondo; Rayner, Jennifer L; Davis, Christine; Wolf, Douglas; Malarkey, David; Fenton, Suzanne

    2010-12-01

    The present study examines the postnatal reproductive development of male rats following prenatal exposure to an atrazine metabolite mixture (AMM) consisting of the herbicide atrazine and its environmental metabolites diaminochlorotriazine, hydroxyatrazine, deethylatrazine, and deisopropylatrazine. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were treated by gavage with 0.09, 0.87, or 8.73 mg AMM/kg body weight (BW), vehicle, or 100 mg ATR/kg BW positive control, on gestation days 15 19. Preputial separation was significantly delayed in 0.87 mg and 8.73 mg AMM-exposed males. AMM-exposed males demonstrated a significant treatment-related increase in incidence and severity of inflammation in the prostate on postnatal day (PND) 120. A dose-dependent increase in epididymal fat masses and prostate foci were grossly visible in AMM-exposed offspring. These results indicate that a short, late prenatal exposure to mixture of chlorotriazine metabolites can cause chronic prostatitis in male LE rats. The mode of action for these effects is presently unclear.

  2. Effects of prenatal exposure to a low dose atrazine metabolite mixture on pubertal timing and prostate development of male Long-Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Stanko, Jason P; Enoch, Rolondo R; Rayner, Jennifer L; Davis, Christine C; Wolf, Douglas C; Malarkey, David E; Fenton, Suzanne E

    2010-12-01

    The present study examines the postnatal reproductive development of male rats following prenatal exposure to an atrazine metabolite mixture (AMM) consisting of the herbicide atrazine and its environmental metabolites diaminochlorotriazine, hydroxyatrazine, deethylatrazine, and deisopropylatrazine. Pregnant Long-Evans rats were treated by gavage with 0.09, 0.87, or 8.73mg AMM/kg body weight (BW), vehicle, or 100mg ATR/kg BW positive control, on gestation days 15-19. Preputial separation was significantly delayed in 0.87 mg and 8.73mg AMM-exposed males. AMM-exposed males demonstrated a significant treatment-related increase in incidence and severity of inflammation in the prostate on postnatal day (PND) 120. A dose-dependent increase in epididymal fat masses and prostate foci were grossly visible in AMM-exposed offspring. These results indicate that a short, late prenatal exposure to mixture of chlorotriazine metabolites can cause chronic prostatitis in male LE rats. The mode of action for these effects is presently unclear.

  3. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Prostate Cancer What is Prostate Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... the Escape (Esc) button on your keyboard.) How Prostate Cancer Occurs Prostate cancer occurs when a tumor forms ...

  4. Protective effect of γ-tocopherol-enriched diet on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea-induced epithelial dysplasia in rat ventral prostate

    PubMed Central

    Sanches, Lucas D; Santos, Sergio A A; Carvalho, Jaqueline R; Jeronimo, Gabriela D M; Favaro, Wagner J; Reis, Maria D G; Felisbino, Sérgio L; Justulin, Luis A

    2013-01-01

    Despite recent advances in understanding the biological basis of prostate cancer (PCa), the management of this disease remains a challenge. Chemoprotective agents have been used to protect against or eradicate prostate malignancies. Here, we investigated the protective effect of γ-tocopherol on N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced epithelial dysplasia in the rat ventral prostate (VP). Thirty-two male Wistar rats were divided into four groups (n = 8): control (CT): healthy control animals fed a standard diet; control+γ-tocopherol (CT+γT): healthy control animals without intervention fed a γ-tocopherol-enriched diet (20 mg/kg); N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU): rats that received a single dose of MNU (30 mg/kg) plus testosterone propionate (100 mg/kg) and were fed a standard diet; and MNU+γ-tocopherol (MNU+γT): rats that received the same treatment of MNU plus testosterone and were fed with a γ-tocopherol-enriched diet (20 mg/kg). After 4 months, the VPs were excised to evaluate morphology, cell proliferation and apoptosis, as well as cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), glutathione-S-transferase-pi (GST-pi) and androgen receptor (AR) protein expression, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activity. An increase in the incidence of epithelial dysplasias, such as stratified epithelial hyperplasia and squamous metaplasia, in the MNU group was accompanied by augmented cell proliferation, GST-pi and Cox-2 immunoexpression and pro-MMP-9 activity. Stromal thickening and inflammatory foci were also observed. The administration of a γ-tocopherol-enriched diet significantly attenuated the adverse effects of MNU in the VP. The incidence of epithelial dysplasia decreased, along with the cell proliferation index, GST-pi and Cox-2 immunoexpression. The gelatinolytic activity of pro-MMP-9 returned to the levels observed for the CT group. These results suggest that γ-tocopherol acts as a protective agent against MNU-induced prostatic disorders in the rat ventral prostate. PMID:24205794

  5. The effect of androgen and estrogen on secretory epithelial cells and basal cells of the rat ventral prostate after long-term castration.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, H; Kimura, M; Ichihara, I

    1993-12-01

    After long-term castration, rats were injected with cotton seed oil, testosterone- and estradiol-17 beta-cypionate (CS, TC and EC). The height of the epithelial cells of the ventral prostates from the castrated rats increased after TC and EC-injection. The secretory and basal cells formed two layers of epithelium, an inner layer near the lumen with pale nuclei and another layer with dark nuclei. These two layers could result from a reduction of secretory epithelial cells. Castration decreased the ratio of secretory cells to basal cells (S/B). TC-injection increased the ratio of S/B because of the secretory epithelial cell growth. Longer dark cells may be transient cells, appearing during the differentiation of basal cells into secretory epithelial cells. A sheet branching off from the basal lamina was observed. Androgen may stimulate the synthesis of the lamina, but whether it induces the synthesis or turnover of the basal lamina has not been established. EC increased the ventral prostatic weight and secretory epithelial cell height and induced the appearance of crystalline granules. Increase in S/B ratio may result from an increase in the secretory epithelial cells, but not from basal cell multiplication due to squamous metaplasia. The ratio is significantly correlated to the weight of the ventral prostate, but not to the secretory epithelial cell height. Its value could indicate the multiplication of secretory epithelial cells, differentiation of basal cells into epithelial cells, or both. It is probable that basal cells do not change in number, but control the size of the rat ventral prostate in response to the hormone level.

  6. 17β-Hydroxyestra-4,9,11-trien-3-one (Trenbolone) preserves bone mineral density in skeletally mature orchiectomized rats without prostate enlargement.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Sean C; Yarrow, Joshua F; Conover, Christine F; Borsa, Paul A; Tillman, Mark D; Conrad, Bryan P; Pingel, Jennifer E; Wronski, Thomas J; Johnson, Sally E; Kristinsson, Hordur G; Ye, Fan; Borst, Stephen E

    2012-10-01

    Testosterone enanthate (TE) administration attenuates bone loss in orchiectomized (ORX) rats. However, testosterone administration may increase risk for prostate/lower urinary tract related adverse events and polycythemia in humans. Trenbolone enanthate (TREN) is a synthetic testosterone analogue that preserves bone mineral density (BMD) and results in less prostate enlargement than testosterone in young ORX rodents. The purpose of this experiment was to determine if intramuscular TREN administration attenuates bone loss and maintains bone strength, without increasing prostate mass or hemoglobin concentrations in skeletally mature ORX rodents. Forty, 10 month old male F344/Brown Norway rats were randomized into SHAM, ORX, ORX+TE (7.0mg/week), and ORX+TREN (1.0mg/week) groups. Following surgery, animals recovered for 1 week and then received weekly: vehicle, TE, or TREN intramuscularly for 5 weeks. ORX reduced total and trabecular (t) BMD at the distal femoral metaphysis compared with SHAMs, while both TREN and TE completely prevented these reductions. TREN treatment also increased femoral neck strength by 28% compared with ORX animals (p<0.05), while TE did not alter femoral neck strength. In addition, TE nearly doubled prostate mass, compared with SHAMs (p<0.05). Conversely, TREN induced a non-significant 20% reduction in prostate mass compared with SHAMs, ultimately producing a prostate mass that was 64% below that found in ORX+TE animals (p<0.01). Hemoglobin concentrations and levator ani/bulbocavernosus (LABC) muscle mass were elevated in ORX+TE and ORX+TREN animals to a similar degree above both SHAM and ORX conditions (p<0.01). In skeletally mature rodents, both high-dose TE and low-dose TREN completely prevented the ORX-induced loss of tBMD at the distal femoral metaphysis and increased LABC mass. TREN also augmented femoral neck strength and maintained prostate mass at SHAM levels. These findings indicate that TREN may be an advantageous agent for future

  7. Immunolocalization of androgen and oestrogen receptors in the ventral lobe of rat (Rattus norvegicus) prostate after long-term treatment with ethanol and nicotine.

    PubMed

    Fávaro, W J; Cagnon, V H A

    2008-12-01

    Nicotine and alcohol adversely affect prostate gland function. In this work, immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the immunoreactivity and distribution of androgen and alpha, beta-oestrogen receptors following chronic treatment with alcohol, nicotine or a combination of both substances, as well as to relate these results to the development of possible prostatic pathologies. Forty male rats were divided into four groups: the Control group received tap water; the Alcoholic group received diluted 10% Gay Lussac ethanol; the Nicotine group received a 0.125 mg/100 g body weight dose of nicotine injected subcutaneously on a daily basis (Sigma Chemical Company, St. Louis, MO, USA); the Nicotine-Alcohol group received simultaneous alcohol and nicotine treatment. After 90 days of treatment, samples of the ventral lobe of the prostate were collected and processed for immunohistochemistry, light microscopy and the quantification of serum hormonal concentrations. The results showed significantly decreased serum testosterone levels and increased serum oestrogen levels in the animals from the nicotine-alcohol, the alcoholic and the nicotine groups, as well as their hormonal receptor levels. Then, it was concluded that ethanol and nicotine compromised the prostatic hormonal balance, which is a crucial factor to maintain the morphological and physiological features of this organ.

  8. Activity-dependent regulation of voltage-gated Na+ channel expression in Mat-LyLu rat prostate cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Brackenbury, William J; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2006-06-01

    We have shown previously that voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) are up-regulated in human metastatic disease (prostate, breast and small-cell lung cancers), and that VGSC activity potentiates metastatic cell behaviours. However, the mechanism(s) regulating functional VGSC expression in cancer cells remains unknown. We investigated the possibility of activity-dependent (auto)regulation of VGSC functional expression in the strongly metastatic Mat-LyLu model of rat prostate cancer. Pretreatment with tetrodotoxin (TTX) for 24-72 h subsequently suppressed peak VGSC current density without affecting voltage dependence. The hypothesis was tested that the VGSC auto-regulation occurred via VGSC-mediated Na(+) influx and subsequent activation of protein kinase A (PKA). Indeed, TTX pretreatment reduced the level of phosphorylated PKA, and the PKA inhibitor KT5720 decreased, whilst the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin and the Na(+) ionophore monensin both increased the peak VGSC current density. TTX reduced the mRNA level of Nav1.7, predominant in these cells, and VGSC protein expression at the plasma membrane, although the total VGSC protein level remained unchanged. TTX pretreatment eliminated the VGSC-dependent component of the cells' migration in Transwell assays. We concluded that the VGSC activity in Mat-LyLu rat prostate cancer cells was up-regulated in steady-state via a positive feedback mechanism involving PKA, and this enhanced the cells' migratory potential.

  9. Protein profiling of rat ventral prostate following chronic finasteride administration: identification and localization of a novel putative androgen-regulated protein.

    PubMed

    Cayatte, Corinne; Pons, Catherine; Guigonis, Jean-Marie; Pizzol, Jérôme; Elies, Laetitia; Kennel, Philippe; Rouquié, David; Bars, Rémi; Rossi, Bernard; Samson, Michel

    2006-11-01

    To better understand the effects of antiandrogens on the prostate, we investigated the changes in the proteome of rat ventral prostate (VP) following treatment with a well characterized 5alpha-reductase inhibitor, finasteride. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated daily by gavage with finasteride at 0, 1, 5, 25, and 125 mg/kg/day. Changes in plasma hormone levels as well as the weight and histology of sex accessory tissues were determined after 28 days of treatment and showed a dose-related decrease of VP weights together with a marked atrophy of the tissue visible at the macroscopic and microscopic levels. In addition, significant reductions in seminal vesicle and epididymis weights were noted. VP proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis: 37 proteins, mainly involved in protein synthesis, processing, and cellular trafficking and in metabolism, detoxification, and oxidative stress, were identified as modulated by finasteride. The prominent feature of this study is the demonstration of finasteride dose-dependent up-regulation of a protein similar to l-amino-acid oxidase 1 (Lao1). An up-regulation of this protein was also observed with the antiandrogen flutamide. Lao1 expression occurred as early as 48 h after antiandrogen administration and persisted throughout the treatment duration. Immunohistochemistry showed that this protein was only detectable in epithelial cells and secretory vesicles. Altogether these data point to a potential use of Lao1 to reveal antiandrogen-induced prostate injury.

  10. Safety and efficacy of a novel Prunus domestica extract (Sitoprin, CR002) on testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Swaroop, Anand; Bagchi, Manashi; Kumar, Pawan; Preuss, Harry G; Bagchi, Debasis

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of a novel Prunus domestica bark extract (Sitoprin, CR002) was investigated on testosterone propionate (TP)-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in male Wistar rats. BPH was induced by daily subcutaneous administration of TP (3.0 mg/kg) over a period of 15 days (interim sacrifice group) and for an additional 21 days (terminal sacrifice group). We evaluated the dose-dependent efficacy (0, 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight/day) of CR002 and a control group against BPH, and compared with a reference standard Prunus africana extract (CR001). Extensive clinical examinations were carried out on days 1, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 of treatment period to determine the onset, duration and severity of clinical signs. Clinical pathology, hematology, biochemistry and histopathology were performed on days 15 and 35, prior to necropsy. Animals were fasted overnight prior to blood collection. Prostate glands and tissues were examined. On day 36, histopathology of ventral prostrate of control rats demonstrates single layer of columnar mucin secreting epithelial cells along with a lumen occupied with eosinophilic secretion. In contrast, CR002 and CR001 groups (100 and 200 mg/kg/day) exhibited no hyperplasia and proliferation of epithelial cells. Prostate histopathology of these treated groups was comparable with control rats. The hyperplasia and hypertrophy of prostrate was reduced to single-layered cell indicating the efficacy of CR002 and CR001. Overall, results demonstrate that CR002 exhibits therapeutic efficacy/activity in TP-induced BPH in rats, which is comparable to CR001.

  11. Electrical stimulation vs. pulsed and continuous-wave optical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves, in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, William C.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-07-01

    Identification and preservation of the cavernous nerves (CNs) during prostate cancer surgery is critical for post-operative sexual function. Electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) mapping has previously been tested as an intraoperative tool for CN identification, but was found to be unreliable. ENS is limited by the need for electrode-tissue contact, poor spatial precision from electrical current spreading, and stimulation artifacts interfering with detection. Alternatively, optical nerve stimulation (ONS) provides noncontact stimulation, improved spatial selectivity, and elimination of stimulation artifacts. This study compares ENS to pulsed/CW ONS to explore the ONS mechanism. A total of eighty stimulations were performed in 5 rats, in vivo. ENS (4 V, 5 ms, 10 Hz) was compared to ONS using a pulsed diode laser nerve stimulator (1873 nm, 5 ms, 10 Hz) or CW diode laser nerve stimulator (1455 nm). Intracavernous pressure (ICP) response and nerve compound action potentials (nCAPs) were measured. All three stimulation modes (ENS, ONS-CW, ONS-P) produced comparable ICP magnitudes. However, ENS demonstrated more rapid ICP response times and well defined nCAPs compared to unmeasurable nCAPs for ONS. Further experiments measuring single action potentials during ENS and ONS are warranted to further understand differences in the ENS and ONS mechanisms.

  12. In vivo fluorescence imaging of the transport of charged chlorine6 conjugates in a rat orthotopic prostate tumour

    PubMed Central

    Hamblin, M R; Rajadhyaksha, M; Momma, T; Soukos, N S; Hasan, T

    1999-01-01

    Polymeric drug conjugates are used in cancer therapy and, varying their molecular size and charge, will affect their in vivo transport and extravasation in tumours. Partitioning between tumour vasculature and tumour tissue will be of particular significance in the case of photosensitizer conjugates used in photodynamic therapy, where this partitioning can lead to different therapeutic effects. Poly-l-lysine chlorine6 conjugates (derived from polymers of averageMr 5000 and 25 000) were prepared both in a cationic state and by poly-succinylation in an anionic state. A fluorescence scanning laser microscope was used to follow the pharmacokinetics of these conjugates in vivo in an orthotopic rat prostate cancer model obtained with MatLyLu cells. Fluorescence was excited with the 454–528 nm group of lines of an argon laser and a 570 nm long pass filter used to isolate the emission. Results showed that the conjugates initially bound to the walls of the vasculature, before extravasating into the tissue, and eventually increasing in fluorescence. The anionic conjugates produced tissue fluorescence faster than the cationic ones, and surprisingly, the largerMr conjugates produced tissue fluorescence faster than the smaller ones with the same charge. These results are consistent with differences in aggregation state between conjugates. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10496351

  13. Relative Biological Effectiveness of Carbon Ions for Local Tumor Control of a Radioresistant Prostate Carcinoma in the Rat

    SciTech Connect

    Peschke, Peter; Karger, Christian P.; Scholz, Michael; Debus, Juergen; Huber, Peter E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To study the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon ion beams relative to X-rays for local tumor control in a syngeneic rat prostate tumor (Dunning subline R3327-AT1). Methods and Materials: A total of 198 animals with tumors in the distal thigh were treated with increasing single and split doses of either {sup 12}C ions or photons using a 20-mm spread-out Bragg peak. Endpoints of the study were local control (no tumor recurrence within 300 days) and volumetric changes after irradiation. The resulting values for D{sub 50} (dose at 50% tumor control probability) were used to determine RBE values. Results: The D{sub 50} values for single doses were 32.9 {+-} 0.9 Gy for {sup 12}C ions and 75.7 {+-} 1.6 Gy for photons. The respective values for split doses were 38.0 {+-} 2.3 Gy and 90.6 {+-} 2.3 Gy. The corresponding RBE values were 2.30 {+-} 0.08 for single and 2.38 {+-} 0.16 for split doses. The most prominent side effects were dry and moist desquamation of the skin, which disappeared within weeks. Conclusion: The study confirmed the effectiveness of carbon ion therapy for severely radioresistant tumors. For 1- and 2-fraction photon and {sup 12}C ion radiation, we have established individual D{sub 50} values for local tumor control as well as related RBE values.

  14. A MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR THE ANDROGENIC REGULATION OF THE PROSTATE IN INTACT AND CASTRATE ADULT MALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An abstract that provides understanding for a mathematical model by Barton and Anderson, for the dynamics of androgenic synthesis, transport, metabolism, and regulation of the rodent ventral prostate.

  15. Effects of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid on the ventral prostate of rats during the peri-pubertal, pubertal and adult stage.

    PubMed

    Pochettino, Arístides A; Hapon, María Belén; Biolatto, Silvana M; Madariaga, María José; Jahn, Graciela A; Konjuh, Cintia N

    2016-10-01

    The herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is used on a wide variety of terrestrial and aquatic broadleaf weeds. 2,4-D has been shown to produce a wide range of adverse effects on animal and human health. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effects of pre- and postnatal exposure to 2,4-D on rat ventral prostate (VP). Pregnant rats were exposed daily to oral doses of 70 mg/kg/day of 2,4-D from 16 days of gestation up to 23 days after delivery. Then, the treated groups (n = 8) were fed with a 2,4-D added diet until sacrificed by decapitation on postnatal day (PND) 45, 60, or 90. Morphometric studies were performed and androgen receptor (AR) protein levels in the VP were determined. AR, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-1R) mRNA expression in the VP along with testosterone (T), dihydroxytestosterone (DHT), growth hormone (GH) and IGF-1 serum levels were also determined to ascertain whether these parameters were differentially affected. Results of this study showed that 2,4-D exposure during gestation and until adulthood altered development of the prostate gland in male rats, delaying it at early ages while increasing its size in adults, indicate that 2,4-D could behave as endocrine disruptors (EDs).

  16. The Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Prostate Cancer This booklet is about prostate cancer. Learning about medical care for your cancer ... ePub This booklet covers: The anatomy of the prostate and basics about prostate cancer Treatments for prostate ...

  17. Bone and muscle protective potential of the prostate-sparing synthetic androgen 7alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone: evidence from the aged orchidectomized male rat model.

    PubMed

    Venken, Katrien; Boonen, Steven; Van Herck, Erik; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Kumar, Narender; Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Sundaram, Kalyan; Bouillon, Roger; Vanderschueren, Dirk

    2005-04-01

    This study reports the preclinical evaluation of the bone and muscle protective potential of the synthetic androgen 7alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENTtrade mark), as assessed in the aged orchidectomized rat model. Aged (13-month-old) orchidectomized Wistar rats were treated with different doses of MENT (4, 12 or 36 microg/day) subcutaneously for 16 weeks via mini-osmotic pumps. Analysis of the effects of androgen deficiency versus MENT replacement was performed using quantitative computed tomography (pQCT), dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and biochemical markers of bone turnover. At the end of the study period, prostate weight in orchidectomized rats treated with low- (4 microg/day) or mid-dose (12 mug/day) MENT remained significantly lower compared to the sham-operated animals (-47% and -25%, respectively). High-dose MENT (36 microg/day), on the other hand, induced prostate hypertrophy (+21% versus sham). Low-, mid- and high-dose MENT were found to be effective in suppressing the acceleration of bone remodeling following orchidectomy, as assessed by osteocalcin and deoxypyridinoline. In addition, low-, mid- and high-dose were able to prevent the orchidectomy-induced bone loss, as evaluated by DEXA at the femur and total-body and by pQCT at the femur. Compared to sham-operated animals, the low- and mid-dose MENT groups showed no decline in lean body mass and no muscle atrophy (as measured by m. quadriceps weight) at 16 weeks, whereas high-dose MENT was associated with a significant decline in lean body mass (-8.5% versus sham) and quadriceps weight (-10.6%). We conclude that, in the aged orchidectomized rat model, low- and mid-doses of the synthetic androgen MENT have bone and muscle protective effects and do not induce prostate hypertrophy. The bone protective action of high-dose MENT, however, occurs at the expense of muscle wasting and prostate hypertrophy. Our findings support the need for human studies to explore the potential of MENT as an option

  18. Identification of an androgen-repressed mRNA in rat ventral prostate as coding for sulphated glycoprotein 2 by cDNA cloning and sequence analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Bettuzzi, S; Hiipakka, R A; Gilna, P; Liao, S T

    1989-01-01

    The concentrations of a small number of mRNAs in the rat ventral prostate increase after castration and then decrease upon androgen treatment. Since the repression of specific gene expression may be important in the regulation of organ growth, we have cloned a cDNA for an androgen-repressed mRNA, the concentration of which increased 17-fold 4 days after castration, and this increase was reversed rapidly by androgen treatment. By sequence analysis the androgen-repressed mRNA was identified as that coding for sulphated glycoprotein 2. Images Fig. 1. PMID:2920020

  19. Endocrine Disruption and Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    described in Task 1, was to expose pregnant female rats to vinclozolin and test if the inductive and instructive properties of the prostate stroma is...ethane dimethane sulphonate ) during sexual differentiation produces diverse profiles of reproductive malformations in the male rat. Toxicol Ind Health...BPH Benign prostate hyperplasia cDNA Complementary deoxyribonucleic acid DP Dorsal prostate EDC Endocrine disruptor E Estrogen FgF10

  20. Enlarged prostate

    MedlinePlus

    BPH; Benign prostatic hyperplasia (hypertrophy); Prostate - enlarged ... The actual cause of prostate enlargement is unknown. Factors linked to aging and changes in the cells of the testicles may have a role in the growth ...

  1. Relative Biological Effectiveness of Carbon Ions in a Rat Prostate Carcinoma In Vivo: Comparison of 1, 2, and 6 Fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Karger, Christian P.; Peschke, Peter; Scholz, Michael; Huber, Peter E.; Debus, Jürgen

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: To determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and the effective α/β ratio for local tumor control of a radioresistant rat prostate tumor (Dunning subline R3327-AT1) after 6 fractions of carbon ions and photons. Methods and Materials: A total of 82 animals with tumors in the distal thigh were treated with 6 fractions of either photons or carbon ions, by use of increasing dose levels and a 2-cm spread-out Bragg peak. Endpoints of the study were local control (no tumor recurrence within 300 days) and volumetric changes after irradiation. The resulting values for dose at 50% tumor control probability were used to determine RBE values. Including data for 1 and 2 fractions from a previous study, we estimated α/β ratios. Results: For 6 fractions, the values for dose at 50% tumor control probability were 116.6 ± 3.0 Gy for photons and 43.7 ± 2.3 Gy for carbon ions and the resulting RBE was 2.67 ± 0.15. The α/β ratio was 84.7 ± 13.8 Gy for photons and 66.0 ± 21.0 Gy for carbon ions. Using these data together with the linear-quadratic model, we estimated the maximum RBE to be 2.88 ± 0.27. Conclusions: The study confirmed the increased effectiveness of carbon ions relative to photons over the whole dose range for a highly radioresistant tumor. The maximum RBE below 3 is in line with other published in vivo data. The RBE values may be used to benchmark RBE models. Hypoxia seems to have a major impact on the radiation response, although this still has to be confirmed by dedicated experiments.

  2. Prostatitis: Inflammation of the Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... walnut-shaped gland that is part of the male reproductive system. The main function of the prostate is to ... walnut-shaped gland that is part of the male reproductive system. What causes prostatitis? The causes of prostatitis differ ...

  3. Optical and electrical stimulation of the rat prostate cavernous nerves: priming and fatigue studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaouk, Ghallia S.; Perkins, William C.; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2015-02-01

    Optical nerve stimulation (ONS) is being explored as an alternative to electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) for use as an intra-operative diagnostic method for identification and preservation of prostate cavernous nerves (CNs) during radical prostatectomy. Nerve priming and fatigue studies were performed to further characterize CNs and provide insight into the different ONS and ENS mechanisms. ONS studies were conducted using a 1455-nm diode laser, coupled to fiber optic probe, and delivering a collimated, 1-mm-diameter laser spot on CNs. For nerve priming studies, laser power was escalated in 5 mW increments (15 - 60 mW) with each stimulation lasting 15 s, until a strong ICP response was observed, and then power was similarly de-escalated. For ONS fatigue studies, a constant laser power was delivered for a period of 10 min. ENS studies were conducted for comparison, with standard parameters (4 V, 5 ms, 16 Hz) for fatigue studies (10 min. duration), but incrementally increasing/decreasing voltage (0.1 - 4.0 V) for priming studies with 15 s stimulations. ONS threshold was approximately 20% higher during initial escalating laser power steps (6.4 W/cm2) than in subsequently de-escalating laser power steps (5.1 W/cm2), demonstrating a nerve priming effect. Evidence of nerve priming during ENS was not observed. For nerve fatigue studies, ONS of CNs showed a peak ICP response at about 60 s, followed by a gradual decay in ICP, while ENS maintained a strong, but cyclical ICP. Nerve priming may allow repetitive ONS of CNs at lower and hence safer laser power settings. Both nerve priming and fatigue studies revealed different mechanisms for ONS and ENS.

  4. Combination of /sup 60/Co. gamma. -radiation, misonidazole, and maltose tetrapalmitate in the treatment of Dunning prostatic tumor in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Pageau, R.; Nigam, V.N.; Fisher, G.J.; Brailovsky, C.A.; Fathi, M.A.; Corcos, J.; Tahan, T.W.; Elhilali, M.M.

    1985-08-01

    Maltose tetrapalmitate (MTP), a synthetic nontoxic immunoadjuvant, the radiosensitizer misonidazole (MISO), and /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-radiation, alone or in combination, were used in the management of Dunning prostatic tumor in the rat. Nine groups of 10 rats each were used to assess the efficacy of various therapeutic modalities. Tumor growth rates and animal survival times were determined for each group. Radiation was more effective when combined with MTP, but the adjuvant must be present when radiation is given for synergism to occur. MISO was as effective as MTP when used with radiation, but combining them cancels out their individual effects. In a clinical situation it would be advantageous to use separately the synergisms existing between MISO and radiation on the one hand and MTP and radiation on the other hand.

  5. COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTS OF TWO AR ANTAGONISTS ON ANDROGEN DEPENDENT TISSUES WEIGHTS AND HORMONE LEVELS IN MALE RATS AND ON EXPRESSION OF THREE ANDROGEN DEPENDENT GENES IN THE VENTRAL PROSTATE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comparison of the effects of two AR antagonists on tissue weights and hormone levels in male rats and on expression of three androgen dependent genes in the ventral prostate
    VS Wilson, CR Wood, GA Held, CS Lambright, JS Ostby, JR Furr, LE Gray Jr. US EPA, ORD, NHEERL, RTD, ...

  6. Quantification of Arachidonic Acid and Its Metabolites in Rat Tissues by UHPLC-MS/MS: Application for the Identification of Potential Biomarkers of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Qiaoxia; Wang, Weihui; Wang, Nannan; Peng, Yan; Ma, Wen; Dai, Ronghua

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the potential relationship between benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and the arachidonic acid (AA) metabolome, a UHPLC—MS/MS method has been developed and validated for simultaneous determination of AA and its cyclooxygenase(COX) and lipoxygenase(LOX) pathway metabolites (15-HETE, 12-HETE, TXA2, 5-HETE, AA, PGI2, PGF2α, 8-HETE, PGD2, PGE2 and LTB4) in rat tissues. The analytes were extracted from tissue samples with a protein precipitation procedure and then separated on a Shim-pack XR-ODSC18 column with 0.05% formic acid in water (pH adjusted with dilute ammonia) and methanol:acetonitrile (20:80, v/v). Detection was performed on a UHPLC—MS/MS system with electrospray negative ionization (ESI) and a multiple reaction-monitoring mode. The lower limits of quantification (LLOQ) were 0.25–50 ng/mL for all of the analytes in the prostate, seminal, bladder, liver and kidney tissues. The absolute recoveries of the analytes from all of the tissues were more than 50%. By means of the method developed, the AA metabolites in tissue samples from Sham and BPH group rats were determined. The eleven biomarkers in the BPH group prostate, seminal, bladder, liver and kidney tissues were significantly higher than those of the sham group, indicating that BPH fortified the inducible expression of COX and LOX, as well as increased the production of AA and eicosanoids. The method described here offers a useful tool for the evaluation of complex regulatory eicosanoids responses in vivo. PMID:27893755

  7. Influence of hormonal replacement on the ventral lobe of the prostate of rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus) submitted to chronic ethanol treatment.

    PubMed

    Sáttolo, S; Carvalho, C A F; Cagnon, V H A

    2004-12-01

    The harmful influence of the chronic alcohol ingestion on the male reproductive system leads to important alterations including hypogonadism and feminization, besides the morphological and functional disorganization of the different sexual glands. So, the aim of this study was to analyse the structural changes on the ventral lobe of the prostate of rats with hormonal replacement associated to chronic alcohol ingestion. A total of 30 rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus) was divided into three groups: control-received water; alcoholic-received ethanol diluted to 20% and hormone-treated alcoholic-received ethanol diluted to 20% associated with the administering of testosterone (5mg/kg of weight) during the last 30 days of treatment. After 150 days of treatment, the animals were sacrificed, the prostate removed and submitted to transmission and scanning electron microscopies, histochemical analysis for acid phosphatase, testosterone level and stereologic analysis. In the alcoholic group the results demonstrated reduction of the total cellular volume and disorganization of the organelles involved in the secretory process. It was characterized a partial recovery of the cellular volume after treatment with testosterone. It was concluded that the ethanol impaired the cellular morphology and the hormonal replacement by itself did not bring about efficient remodeling of the organelles responsible for the secretory process.

  8. Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome impairs erectile function through increased endothelial dysfunction, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and corporal fibrosis in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Y; Niu, X; Wang, G; Huang, J; Liu, M; Peng, B

    2016-11-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is an independent risk factor for the development of erectile dysfunction (ED). But the molecular mechanisms underlying the relationship between CP/CPPS and ED are still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of CP/CPPS on erectile function in a rat model and the possible mechanisms. A rat model of experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) was established to mimic human CP⁄CPPS. Then twenty 2-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into EAP group and control group. Intracavernosal pressure (ICP) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were measured during cavernous nerve electrostimulation, the ratio of max ICP/MAP was calculated. Blood was collected to measure the levels of serum C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and testosterone, respectively. The expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in corpus cavernosum were detected. We also evaluated the smooth muscle/collagen ratio and apoptotic index (AI). The ratio of max ICP/MAP in EAP group were significantly lower than that in control group. The levels of serum CRP, TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in EAP group were all significantly higher than these in control group. The expression of eNOS and cGMP levels in corpus cavernosum of EAP rats were significantly downregulated. Furthermore, decreased SOD activity and smooth muscle/collagen ratio, increased MDA levels and AI were found in corpus cavernosum of EAP rats. In conclusion, CP/CPPS impaired penile erectile function in a rat model. The declines of eNOS expression and cGMP levels in corpus cavernosum may be an important mechanism of CP/CPPS-induced ED. CP/CPPS also increased oxidative stress, cell apoptosis and decreased smooth muscle/collagen ratio in corpus cavernosum of rats, which were

  9. Prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  10. What is Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research? Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer What Is Prostate Cancer? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... through the center of the prostate. Types of prostate cancer Almost all prostate cancers are adenocarcinomas . These cancers ...

  11. Testosterone-mediated increase in 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone content, nuclear androgen receptor levels, and cell division in an androgen-independent prostate carcinoma of Noble rats.

    PubMed

    Ho, S M; Leav, I; Damassa, D; Kwan, P W; Merk, F B; Seto, H S

    1988-02-01

    An androgen-independent, transplantable prostate carcinoma line (AIT), originally derived from the dorsolateral prostate (DLP) of Noble rat, was implanted into orchiectomized Noble rats and its response to androgen stimulation was studied and compared to that of the regenerating DLP tissue in sexually ablated rats. AIT tumors carried in castrated hosts displayed a high basal level of proliferative activity (mitotic index (MI), 15.0 +/- 0.5) while DLP tissue in untreated castrates exhibited no proliferative activity. Following androgen stimulation by testosterone capsule implantation into host rats, the AIT responded with a marked increase in cell proliferation; MI values doubled to 30.0 +/- 2.9 on Day 5 following androgen stimulation. This androgen-induced increase in MI values was coincident with elevations in nuclear androgen receptor (20-fold increase) and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone content (3-fold increase) in the tumor. However, by Day 10 following androgen treatment, indices of cell proliferation in the AIT declined to pre-androgen-stimulated levels (MI, 14.8 +/- 1.9) despite the continued elevations in nuclear androgen receptor and tissue 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone contents. Parallel changes in MI were also observed in the normal regenerating DLP following androgen stimulation. MI values in this tissue increased from nondetectable levels to 38.1 +/- 4.7 on Day 5 but declined to relatively low levels (4.5 +/- 0.9) by Day 10 following androgen replacement. Taken together these findings led us to conclude that the AIT carried in castrates is capable of responding to testosterone in a manner similar to that observed for androgen-stimulated DLP of sexually ablated rats. Thus, in both the neoplastic and regenerating tissues, the initial response to androgen is characterized by a marked enhancement of cell proliferation which was correlated with an increase in androgen receptor and 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone content. However, like its tissue of origin, the AIT

  12. Effects of D-004, a lipid extract from Cuban royal palm fruit, on inhibiting prostatic hypertrophy induced with testosterone or dihydrotestosterone in a rat model: A randomized, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Carbajal, Daisy; Arruzazabala, Maria de Lourdes; Rosa, Más; Molina, Vivian; Rodríguez, Eduardo; González, Victor

    2004-01-01

    Background: Benign prostatic hypertrophy is the nonmalignant, uncontrolled growth of prostatic epithelial cells and stroma that, left untreated, may lead to difficult urination and other complications. A common treatment of BPH is lipid extract from saw palmetto fruit, and lipid extract from Cuban Royal palm (a palm of the same family) fruit is being studied for this use. One study found that the latter, D-004, at 100 to 400 mg/kg daily prevented prostatic hypertrophy (PH) induced with testosterone (T) in a rat model. Objectives: This study comprised 2 experiments in a rat model. The first assessed the effects of different doses of D-004 on T-induced PH; the second investigated the effects of D-004 on PH induced with dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Methods: In experiment 1, rats were distributed in 6 groups of 10 rats each. One group received an SC injection of soy oil and oral treatment with Tween 65/water vehicle (negative control). The other 5 groups received an SC injection of T 3 mg/kg daily and oral treatment with vehicle (positive control) or D-004 at 50, 200, 400, or 800 mg/kg daily suspended in vehicle. In experiment 2, rats were distributed in 3 groups of 10 rats each. A negative control group received treatment as in experiment 1. Positive controls received an SC injection of DHT 1.5 mg/kg and vehicle orally. The third group received an SC injection of DHT and oral treatment with D-004 at 800 mg/kg suspended in vehicle. All treatments were given for 14 days. At sacrifice, prostates were removed and weighed. Mean prostatic weights and prostatic/body weight ratios were calculated. Results: In experiment 1, in the groups receiving D-004 at 200, 400, or 800 mg/kg daily, prostatic weight was significantly lower compared with the positive control group (P < 0.05, P < 0.01, and P < 0.001, respectively); this effect was not seen in the group receiving 50 mg/kg daily. In the groups receiving D-004 at 400 and 800 mg/kg daily, prostatic/body weight ratio was

  13. Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  14. Prostatitis - acute

    MedlinePlus

    ... through sexual contact can cause prostatitis. These include chlamydia and gonorrhea . Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are more ... 2012:chap 11. Read More Bladder outlet obstruction Chlamydia Enlarged prostate Epididymitis Urethritis Urinary tract infection - adults ...

  15. Prostate brachytherapy

    MedlinePlus

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer; Radioactive seed placement; Internal radiation therapy - prostate; High dose radiation (HDR) ... minutes or more, depending on the type of therapy you have. Before the procedure, you will be ...

  16. SYSTEMS MODELING OF PROSTATE REGULATION AND ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The prostate is an androgen-dependent tissue that is an important site of disease in human males as well as an important indicator of androgen status in animals. The rat prostate is used for studying antiandrogenic drugs as well as for evaluation of endocrine disruption (e.g., Hershberger Assay). Pubertal changes in the prostate have been observed to be as sensitive to environmental antiandrogens as in utero effects. The goal of this research is to model the biology of prostate androgen function on a systems level to determine the factors responsible for the dose-response observable with androgens and antiandrogens in the male rat. This includes investigation of the roles of positive and negative feedback loops in prostatic response following castration and dosing with testosterone and/or antiandrogens. A biologically-based, systems-level model will be developed describing the regulation of the prostate by androgens. The model will extend an existing model for the male rat central axis, which describes feedback between luteinizing hormone and testosterone production in the testes, to include the prostate and conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The prostate model will describe binding of androgens to the androgen receptor, 5α-reductase catalyzed production of DHT, and gene regulation affecting cell proliferation, apoptosis, and prostatic fluid production. The model will combine pharmacokinetic models for endogenous hormones (i.e., testost

  17. Prostate Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine away from ... and out of the body. A young man's prostate is about the size of a walnut. It ...

  18. Peripubertal aromatase inhibition in male rats has adverse long-term effects on bone strength and growth and induces prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bajpai, Anurag; Simm, Peter J; McPherson, Stephen J; Russo, Vincenzo C; Azar, Walid J; Wark, John D; Risbridger, Gail P; Werther, George A

    2010-10-01

    Aromatase inhibitors have been increasingly used in boys with growth retardation to prolong the duration of growth and increase final height. Multiple important roles of oestrogen in males point to potential adverse effects of this strategy. Although the deleterious effects of aromatase deficiency in early childhood and adulthood are well documented, there is limited information about the potential long-term adverse effects of peripubertal aromatase inhibition. To address this issue, we evaluated short-term and long-term effects of peripubertal aromatase inhibition in an animal model. Peripubertal male Wistar rats were treated with aromatase inhibitor letrozole or placebo and followed until adulthood. Letrozole treatment caused sustained reduction in bone strength and alteration in skeletal geometry, lowering of IGF1 levels, inhibition of growth resulting in significantly lower weight and length of treated animals and development of focal prostatic hyperplasia. Our observation of adverse long-term effects after peripubertal male rats were exposed to aromatase inhibitors highlights the need for further characterisation of long-term adverse effects of aromatase inhibitors in peripubertal boys before further widespread use is accepted. Furthermore, this suggests the need to develop more selective oestrogen inhibition strategies in order to inhibit oestrogen action on the growth plate, while beneficial effects in other tissues are preserved.

  19. [Prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Bey, P; Beckendorf, V; Stinès, J

    2001-10-01

    Radiation therapy of prostate carcinoma with a curative intent implies to treat the whole prostate at high dose (at least 66 Gy). According to clinical stage, PSA level, Gleason's score, the clinical target volume may include seminal vesicles and less often pelvic lymph nodes. Microscopic extracapsular extension is found in 15 to 60% of T1-T2 operated on, specially in apex tumors. On contrary, cancers developing from the transitional zone may stay limited to the prostate even with a big volume and with a high PSA level. Zonal anatomy of the prostate identifies internal prostate, including the transitional zone (5% of the prostate in young people). External prostate includes central and peripheral zones. The inferior limit of the prostate is not lower than the inferior border of the pubic symphysis. Clinical and radiological examination: ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), CT-scan identify prognostic factors as tumor volume, capsule effraction, seminal vesicles invasion and lymph node extension. The identification of the clinical target volume is now done mainly by CT-Scan which identifies prostate and seminal vesicles. NMR could be helpful to identify more precisely prostate apex. The definition of margins around the clinical target volume has to take in account daily reproducibility and organ motion and of course the maximum tolerable dose for organs at risk.

  20. Induction of heme oxygenase-1 with hemin alleviates cisplatin-induced reproductive toxicity in male rats and enhances its cytotoxicity in prostate cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Heeba, Gehan Hussein; Hamza, Alaaeldin Ahmed; Hassanin, Soha Osama

    2016-12-15

    Cisplatin-induced testicular damage is a major obstacle in the application of cisplatin as chemotherapeutic agent. However, it remains as one of the most widely employed anticancer agents in treating various solid tumors including prostate cancer. Since heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is a cytoprotective enzyme with anti-oxidative stress, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities, we investigated the effects of up-regulation of HO-1 by hemin and its inhibition by zinc protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPP) on cisplatin-induced testicular toxicity in adult rats. Furthermore, the anticancer effect of hemin and ZnPP, with and without cisplatin, was evaluated on human prostate cancer cell line, PC3. Results of the animal study showed that hemin reversed cisplatin-induced perturbations in sperm characteristics, normalized serum testosterone level, and ameliorated cisplatin-induced alterations in testicular and epididymal weights, and restored normal testicular architecture. Moreover, hemin increased the expression and activity of HO-1 protein and prevented cisplatin-induced testicular toxicity by virtue of its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. This effect was evidenced by amelioration of testicular oxidative stress markers (malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, reduced glutathione contents, and catalase activity) and inflammatory mediators (tumor necrosis factor-α and nitric oxide synthase expressions). In contrast, administration of ZnPP (HO-1 inhibitor) did not show significant improvement against cisplatin-induced testicular toxicity. Finally, in vitro analyses showed that, hemin augmented the anticancer efficacy of cisplatin, while ZnPP inhibited its apoptotic effect in PC3 cells. In conclusion, the induction of HO-1 represents a potential therapeutic approach to protect the testicular tissue from the detrimental effects of cisplatin without repressing, but rather augmenting, its cytotoxic effects on PC3 cells.

  1. Cryptococcal prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Hinchey, W W; Someren, A

    1981-02-01

    A case of granulomatous prostatitis due to Cryptococcus neoformans is reported. The patient, who had a history of diabetes mellitus and chronic active hepatitis, had symptoms of prostatic hypertrophy. Tissue obtained from surgery showed granulomatous prostatitis, and a cryptococcal organism was identified by special stains. Postoperative cultures grew Cryptococcus neoformans, and the patient was treated successfully with surgery and a short course of amphotericin B. After nine months of follow-up, there is no evidence of systemic infection.

  2. Prostatic aspergillosis.

    PubMed

    Abbas, F; Kamal, M K; Talati, J

    1995-03-01

    Prostatic aspergillosis is rare with only 3 cases reported previously. We report a case of localized invasive aspergillosis of the prostate in a nonimmunocompromised patient with chronic urinary retention and recurrent urinary tract infections. Transurethral resection followed by open prostatectomy was performed for massive prostatomegaly. No systemic antifungal therapy was required for cure. The literature is reviewed, and diagnostic and management options are discussed.

  3. Resveratrol: inhibitory effects on metastatic cell behaviors and voltage-gated Na⁺ channel activity in rat prostate cancer in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Scott Paton; Peters, Alex; Fleming-Jones, Sian; Mukhey, Dev; Djamgoz, Mustafa Bilgin Ali

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol, a natural plant phenolic found at high concentration in red grapes, has been suggested to have a range of health benefits. Here, we tested its effects on metastatic cell behaviors. The strongly metastatic rat prostate MAT-LyLu cells were used as a model. At 20 μM, resveratrol had no effect on cellular proliferation or viability. However, it suppressed significantly 1) lateral motility by up to 25%; 2) transverse motility by 31%; and invasion by 37%. It also increased the cells' adhesion to substrate by 55%. Electrophysiologically, resveratrol inhibited voltage-gated Na(+) channel (VGSC) activity that has been shown previously to promote metastatic cell behaviors. This effect was dose-dependent with an IC50 of ∼50 μM. Voltage dependencies of current activation and peak were not affected but steady-state inactivation was shifted to more hyperpolarized potentials and recovery from inactivation was slowed. Coapplication of resveratrol with the highly specific VGSC blocker tetrodotoxin did not result in any additive effect on inhibition of both 1) VGSC activity and 2) metastatic cell behaviors. These results suggest 1) that a significant mode of action of resveratrol is VGSC blockage and 2) that resveratrol has promise as a natural antimetastatic agent.

  4. Nerve growth factor enhances voltage-gated Na+ channel activity and Transwell migration in Mat-LyLu rat prostate cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Brackenbury, William J; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2007-03-01

    The highly dynamic nature of voltage-gated Na+ channel (VGSC) expression and its controlling mechanism(s) are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of nerve growth factor (NGF) in regulating VGSC activity in the strongly metastatic Mat-LyLu cell model of rat prostate cancer (PCa). NGF increased peak VGSC current density in a time- and dose-dependent manner. NGF also shifted voltage to peak and the half-activation voltage to more positive potentials, and produced currents with faster kinetics of activation; sensitivity to the VGSC blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX) was not affected. The NGF-induced increase in peak VGSC current density was suppressed by both the pan-trk antagonist K252a, and the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT5720. NGF did not affect the Nav1.7 mRNA level, but the total VGSC alpha-subunit protein level was upregulated. NGF potentiated the cells' migration in Transwell assays, and this was not affected by TTX. We concluded that NGF upregulated functional VGSC expression in Mat-LyLu cells, with PKA as a signaling intermediate, but enhancement of migration by NGF was independent of VGSC activity.

  5. Prostate cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate cancer screening - PSA; Prostate cancer screening - digital rectal exam; Prostate cancer screening - DRE ... level of PSA could mean you have prostate cancer. But other conditions can also cause a high ...

  6. Prostate Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . The prostate is just below the bladder (the ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  7. Gestational and lactational exposition to Di-N-butyl-phthalate (DBP) increases inflammation and preneoplastic lesions in prostate of wistar rats after carcinogenic N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) plus testosterone protocol.

    PubMed

    Peixoto, André R; Santos, Talita M; Brandt, Joyce Z; Delella, Flávia K; Gonçalves, Bianca F; Campos, Silvana G P; Taboga, Sebastião R; Favaro, Wagner J; Domeniconi, Raquel F; Scarano, Wellerson R

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, it was evaluated the susceptibility of prostatic lesions in male adult rats exposed to Di-N-butyl-phthalate during fetal and lactational periods and submitted to MNU plus testosterone carcinogenesis protocol. Pregnant females were distributed into four experimental groups: CN (negative control); CMNU (MNU control); TDBP100 (100 mg/kg of DBP); TDBP500 (500 mg/kg of DBP). Females from the TDBP groups received DBP, by gavage, from gestation day 15 (GD15) to postnatal day 21 (DPN21), while C animals received the vehicle (corn oil). CMNU, TDBP100, and TDBP500 groups received a single intraperitoneal injection of MNU (50 mg/kg) on the sixth postnatal week. After that, testosterone cypionate was administered subcutaneously two times a week (2 mg/kg) for 24 weeks. The animals were euthanized on PND220. Distal segment fragments of the ventral (VP) and dorsolateral prostate (DLP) were fixed and processed for histopathological analysis. Protein extracts from ventral prostate were obtained, and western blotting was performed to AR, ERα, MAPK (ERK1/2), and pan-AKT. Stereological analysis showed an increase in the epithelial compartment in TDBP100 and TDBP500 compared to CN. In general, there was increase in the incidence of inflammation and metaplasia/dysplasia in the DBP-treated groups, mainly in DLP, compared to CN and CMNU. Proliferation index was significant higher in TDBP500 and PIN (prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia) was more frequent in this group compared to CMNU. Western blot assays showed an increase in the expressions of AR and MAPK (ERK1/2) in the TDBP100 compared to CN, and ERα and AKT expressions were higher in the TDBP500 group compared do CN. These results showed that different doses of DBP during prostate organogenesis in Wistar rats could increase the incidence of premalignant lesions in initiated rats inducing distinct biological responses in the adulthood. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 1185-1195, 2016.

  8. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); Prostate enlargement resources; BPH resources ... organizations provide information on benign prostatic hyperplasia ( prostate enlargement ): National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse -- www. ...

  9. Xanthogranulomatous Prostatitis, a Rare Prostatic Entity.

    PubMed

    Noyola, Alejandro; Gil, José Fernando; Lujano, Heriberto; Piñon, Omar; Muñoz, Gabriel; Michel, José Manuel; Garcia, Jorge; Valdez, Jorge; Morales, Omar

    2017-01-01

    There are several benign prostatic pathologies that can clinically mimic a prostate adenocarcinoma. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis is a benign inflammatory condition of the prostate and a rare entity. A 47-year old male, with 3 years of lower urinary tract symptoms, with a palpable hypogastric tumor, digital rectal examination: solid prostate, of approximately 60 g. Initial PSA was 0.90 ng/mL. He underwent surgical excision of the lower abdominal nodule and prostatectomy. Histopathology showed xanthogranulomatous prostatitis, without malignancy. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis is an extremely rare entity that can simulate prostate adenocarcinoma, therefore having a correct histopathological diagnosis is essential.

  10. Chronic prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Chronic prostatitis can cause pain and urinary symptoms, and usually occurs without positive bacterial cultures from prostatic secretions (known as chronic abacterial prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome [CP/CPPS]). Bacterial infection can result from urinary tract instrumentation, but the cause and natural history of CP/CPPS are unknown. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for chronic bacterial prostatitis? What are the effects of treatments for chronic abacterial prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 33 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors, allopurinol, alpha-blockers, biofeedback, local injections of antimicrobial drugs, mepartricin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), oral antimicrobial drugs, pentosan polysulfate, prostatic massage, quercetin, radical prostatectomy, sitz baths, transurethral microwave thermotherapy, and transurethral resection. PMID:21736764

  11. Screening spectroscopy of prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolenko, S. B.; Voloshynskyy, D. I.; Fedoruk, O. S.

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to establish objective parameters of the field of laser and incoherent radiation of different spectral ranges (UV, visible, IR) as a non-invasive optical method of interaction with different samples of biological tissues and fluids of patients to determine the state of prostate cancer and choosing the best personal treatment. The objects of study were selected venous blood plasma of patient with prostate cancer, histological sections of rat prostate gland in the postoperative period. As diagnostic methods have been used ultraviolet spectrometry samples of blood plasma in the liquid state, infrared spectroscopy middle range (2,5-25 microns) dry residue of plasma by spectral diagnostic technique of thin histological sections of biological tissues.

  12. The Effect of Zinc and Selenium Supplementation Mode on Their Bioavailability in the Rat Prostate. Should Administration Be Joint or Separate?

    PubMed Central

    Daragó, Adam; Sapota, Andrzej; Nasiadek, Marzenna; Klimczak, Michał; Kilanowicz, Anna

    2016-01-01

    It is thought that zinc and selenium deficiency may play a significant role in the etiology of prostate cancer. Although joint zinc and selenium supplementation is frequently applied in the prevention of prostate diseases, the bioavailability of these elements in the prostate after co-administration is still unknown. The study examines the effect of subchronic supplementation of zinc gluconate and selenium compounds (sodium selenite or selenomethionine), administered together or separately, on their bioavailability in the prostate, as well as the induction of metallothionein-like proteins (MTs) bound to zinc in the prostate and liver. Zinc concentration in the dorso-lateral lobe of the prostate was significantly elevated already after the first month of supplementation of zinc alone. In the supplementation period, the MTs level increased together with zinc concentration. In contrast, the ventral lobe of the prostate did not demonstrate significantly higher levels of zinc until after three months of supplementation, despite the MTs induction noted after one-month supplementation. Increased selenium levels in the dorsolateral lobe were observed throughout the administration and post-administration periods, regardless of the selenium compound used or whether zinc was co-administered. The results of our studies suggested for the first time that these elements should not be administered jointly in supplementation. PMID:27782038

  13. AUTOIMMUNITY AS A POSSIBLE MECHANISM OF PROTACTIN-INDUCED PROSTATITIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    AUTOIMMUNITY AS A POSSIBLE MECHANISM OF PROLACTIN-INDUCED PROSTATITIS. RW Luebke, CB Copeland, and LR Bishop. US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC

    Stoker et al. reported inflammation of the lateral prostate (LP) lobes in 120 day old Wistar rats after manipulation of prolac...

  14. Stem Cells in Prostate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    disease upon aging, specifically prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia . In order to study the cell differentiation lineage associated with...specifically prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia . In order to study the cell differentiation lineage associated with normal and diseased prostate

  15. A PHARMACOKINETIC-PHARMACODYNAMIC MODEL FOR GENE-REGULATED PROSTATE MAINTENANCE: COMPARING THE EFFECTS OF CASTRATION WITH ANTIANDROGEN EXPOSURE IN THE RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Antiandrogens affect prostate maintenance in two ways. Androgen antagonists, such as the fungicide vinclozolin, act as competitive ligands for the androgen receptor (AR). Enzyme inhibitors, such as the therapeutic drug Finasteride, inhibit the enzyme 5 -reductase (5 R) from metab...

  16. A phytosterol enriched refined extract of Brassica campestris L. pollen significantly improves benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in a rat model as compared to the classical TCM pollen preparation Qianlie Kang Pule'an Tablets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruwei; Kobayashi, Yuta; Lin, Yu; Rauwald, Hans Wilhelm; Fang, Ling; Qiao, Hongxiang; Kuchta, Kenny

    2015-01-15

    In Qinghai Province, the Brassica campestris L. pollen preparation Qianlie Kang Pule'an Tablet (QKPT) is traditionally used for BPH therapy. However, in QKPT the content of supposedly active phytosterols is relatively low at 2.59%, necessitating high doses for successful therapy. Therefore, a phytosterol enriched (4.54%) refined extract of B. campestris pollen (PE) was developed and compared with QKPT in a BPH rat model. Six groups of rats (n=8 each), namely sham-operated distilled water control, castrated distilled water control, castrated QKPT 2.0g/kg, castrated PE 0.1g/kg, castrated PE 0.2g/kg, and castrated PE 0.4g/kg, were intragastrically treated with the respective daily doses. Testosterone propionate (0.3mg/day) was administered to all castrated rats, while the sham-operated group received placebo injections. After 30 days, the animals were sacrificed and prostates as well as seminal vesicles excised and weighted in order to calculate prostate volume index (PVI) as well as prostate index (PI) and seminal vesicle index (SVI), defined as organ weight in g per 100g body weight. Compared with sham-operated controls, PI (p<0.01), PVI (p<0.01), and SVI (p<0.01) were all significantly increased in all castrated, testosterone treated rats. After treatment with PE at 0.4 and 0.2g/kg or QKPT at 2.0g/kg per day, both indices were significantly reduced (p<0.01) as compared to the castrated distilled water control. For PE at 0.1g/kg per day only PI was significantly reduced (p<0.05). At the highest PE concentration of 0.4g/kg per day both PI and SVI were also significantly reduced when compared to the QKPT group (p<0.05). Both PE and QKPT demonstrated curative effects against BPH in the applied animal model. In its highest dose at 0.4g/kg per day, PE was clearly superior to QKPT.

  17. Prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mazhar, D; Waxman, J

    2002-01-01

    It is a paradigm in cancer treatment that early detection and treatment improves survival. However, although screening measures lead to a higher rate of detection, for small bulk localised prostate cancer it remains unclear whether early detection and early treatment will lead to an overall decrease in mortality. The management options include surveillance, radiotherapy, and radical prostatectomy but there is no evidence base to evaluate the benefits of each approach. Advanced prostate cancer is managed by hormonal therapy. There have been major changes in treatment over the last two decades with the use of more humane treatment and developments in both chemotherapy and radiation. In this article we review the natural history and management of prostate cancer. PMID:12415080

  18. Prostate Cancer Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... PCF? Featured Blue Jacket Fashion Show Contact Us Prostate Cancer Symptoms The conversation about PSA screening really applies ... That’s why screening is such an important topic. Prostate Cancer Basics About the Prostate Risk Factors Prevention Symptoms ...

  19. Localized Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... a decision aid for men with clinically localized prostate cancer (available at http://effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/prostate_da) ... A Decision Aid for Men With Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer Page 1 of 24 Introduction Men with clinically ...

  20. About the Prostate

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer growth or as a result of treatments. Prostate Cancer Basics About the Prostate Risk Factors Prevention Symptoms Early Detection & Screening Living with Prostate Cancer Newly Diagnosed Treatment Options Side Effects Recurrence Advanced ...

  1. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  2. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system located just below the bladder (the organ that ... up part of semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  3. Sustained in vivo regression of Dunning H rat prostate cancers treated with combinations of androgen ablation and Trk tyrosine kinase inhibitors, CEP-751 (KT-6587) or CEP-701 (KT-5555).

    PubMed

    George, D J; Dionne, C A; Jani, J; Angeles, T; Murakata, C; Lamb, J; Isaacs, J T

    1999-05-15

    The indolocarbazole analogue CEP-751 is a potent and selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor of the neurotrophin-specific trk receptors that has demonstrated antitumor activity in nine different models of prostate cancer growth in vivo. In the slow-growing, androgen-sensitive Dunning H prostate cancers, which express trk receptors, CEP-751 induced transient regressions independent of effects on cell cycle. Because androgen ablation is the most commonly used treatment for prostate cancer, we examined whether the combination treatment of CEP-751 with castration would lead to better antitumor efficacy than either treatment alone. For a 60-day period, H tumor-bearing rats received treatment with either castration, CEP-751 (10 mg/kg once a day s.c. for 5 days every 2 weeks), a combination of both, or vehicle. Castration caused tumor regression, followed by tumor regrowth in 4-6 weeks, whereas intermittent CEP-751 treatments resulted in tumor regressions during each treatment, which were followed by a period of regrowth between intermittent drug treatment cycles. Overall, both monotherapies significantly inhibited tumor growth compared with the vehicle-treated control group. However, the combination of castration and concomitant CEP-751 produced the most dramatic results: sigificantly greater tumor regression than either therapy alone, with no signs of regrowth. A related experiment using an orally administered CEP-751 analogue (CEP-701), as the trk inhibitor, and a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist, Leuprolide, to induce androgen ablation demonstrated similar results, indicating that these effects could be generalized to other forms of androgen ablation and other trk inhibitors within this class. In addition, when CEP-701 was given sequentially to rats bearing H tumors, which were progressing in the presence of continuous androgen ablation induced by Leuprolide, regression of the androgen-independent tumors occurred. In summary, these data demonstrate that CEP-751 or

  4. Prostatic ischemia induces ventral prostatic hyperplasia in the SHR; possible mechanism of development of BPH.

    PubMed

    Saito, Motoaki; Tsounapi, Panagiota; Oikawa, Ryo; Shimizu, Shogo; Honda, Masashi; Sejima, Takehiro; Kinoshita, Yukako; Tomita, Shuhei

    2014-01-22

    In the light of increasing evidence that benign prostatic hyperplasia is associated with cardiovascular disease, we have investigated the relationship between prostatic blood flow and prostatic hyperplasia in the spontaneously-hypertensive-rat (SHR). Twelve-week-old male SHRs were treated with nicorandil for six weeks. Wistar-Kyoto rats were used as controls. Six weeks after nicorandil treatment, blood pressure and the prostatic blood flow were estimated, and tissue levels of malondialdehyde, HIF-1α, TGF-β1, bFGF, dihydrotestosterone, and α-SMA were measured. SHRs showed significant increases in blood pressure, tissue levels of malondialdehyde, HIF-1α, TGF-β1, bFGF, α-SMA and a significant decrease in the prostatic blood flow. Although treatment with nicorandil failed to alter the blood-pressure and α-SMA, it significantly ameliorated the increased levels of malondialdehyde, HIF-1α, TGF-β1, and bFGF. There were no significant differences in tissue levels of dihydrotestosterone among any groups. These data indicate that development of prostatic hyperplasia may be associated with prostatic hypoxia, which nicorandil prevents via its effect to increase the blood flow.

  5. Prostate Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Making Your Wishes Known Home & Community Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Prostate Diseases Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Tools & Tips ...

  6. Prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... If the cancer has not spread outside the prostate gland, common treatments include: Surgery ( radical prostatectomy ) Radiation therapy , including brachytherapy and proton therapy If you are older, your doctor may recommend simply monitoring the cancer with PSA tests and biopsies. Hormone therapy is ...

  7. Prostate Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor’s office or a medical facility. A health care professional tests your urine sample at your doctor’s office or ... your doctor’s office or a medical facility. A health care professional sends ... may want to test your blood sample for prostate-specific antigen (PSA). ...

  8. Prostate brachytherapy - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer - discharge; Radioactive seed placement - discharge ... You had a procedure called brachytherapy to treat prostate cancer. Your treatment lasted 30 minutes or more, depending ...

  9. Conformational restraints revealing bioactive β-bend structures for hα CGRP8–37 at the CGRP2 receptor of the rat prostatic vas deferens

    PubMed Central

    Wisskirchen, F M; Doyle, P M; Gough, S L; Harris, C J; Marshall, I

    1999-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to identify putative β-bends and the role of the N- and C-terminus in the CGRP receptor antagonist hα CGRP8–37, which was measured against hα CGRP inhibition of twitch responses in the rat prostatic vas deferens. With a bend-biasing residue (proline) at position 16 in hα CGRP8–37 (10−5 M) an inactive compound was produced, while alanine at the same position retained antagonist activity (apparent pKB 5.6±0.1 at 10−5 M). Proline at position 19 within hα CGRP8–37 (10−5 M) was an antagonist (apparent pKB 5.8±0.1). Incorporation of a bend-forcing structure (beta-turn dipeptide or BTD) at either positions 19,20 or 33,34 in hα CGRP8–37 (10−5 M) antagonized hα CGRP responses (apparent pKB 6.0±0.1 and 6.1±0.1, respectively). Replacement by BTD at both positions 19,20 and 33,34 within hα CGRP8–37 competitively antagonized responses to hα CGRP (pA2 6.2; Schild plot slope 1.0±0.1). Hα CGRP8–37 analogues (10−5 M), substituted at the N-terminus by either glycine8, or des-NH2 valine8 or proline8 were all antagonists against hα CGRP (apparent pKB 6.1±0.1, 6.5±0.1 and 6.1±0.1, respectively), while hα CGRP8–37 (10−5 M) substituted in three places by proline8 and glutamic acid10,14 was inactive. Replacement of the C-terminus by alanine amide37 in hα CGRP8–37 (10−5 M) failed to antagonize hα CGRP responses. Peptidase inhibitors did not alter either the agonist potency of hα CGRP or the antagonist affinities of hα CGRP8–37 BTD19,20 and 33,34 and hα CGRP8–37 Gly8 (against hα CGRP responses). In conclusion, two β-bends at positions 18–21 and 32–35 are compatible with high affinity by BTD and is the first approach of modelling the bioactive structure of hα CGRP8–37. Further, the N-terminus of hα CGRP8–37 is not essential for antagonism, while the C-terminus interacts directly with CGRP receptor binding sites of the rat vas deferens. PMID:10205004

  10. Prostate Enlargement: Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur as a result of alcohol consumption, cold temperatures, or a long period of inactivity. What are ... to heat selected portions of the prostate. The temperature becomes high enough inside the prostate to destroy ...

  11. Extra-prostatic transgene-associated neoplastic lesions in transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice.

    PubMed

    Berman-Booty, Lisa D; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Bolon, Brad; Oglesbee, Michael J; Clinton, Steven K; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih; La Perle, Krista M D

    2015-02-01

    Male transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice are frequently used in prostate cancer research because their prostates consistently develop a series of preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions. Disease progression in TRAMP mouse prostates culminates in metastatic, poorly differentiated carcinomas with neuroendocrine features. The androgen dependence of the rat probasin promoter largely limits transgene expression to the prostatic epithelium. However, extra-prostatic transgene-positive lesions have been described in TRAMP mice, including renal tubuloacinar carcinomas, neuroendocrine carcinomas of the urethra, and phyllodes-like tumors of the seminal vesicle. Here, we describe the histologic and immunohistochemical features of 2 novel extra-prostatic lesions in TRAMP mice: primary anaplastic tumors of uncertain cell origin in the midbrain and poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas of the submandibular salivary gland. These newly characterized tumors apparently result from transgene expression in extra-prostatic locations rather than representing metastatic prostate neoplasms because lesions were identified in both male and female mice and in male TRAMP mice without histologically apparent prostate tumors. In this article, we also calculate the incidences of the urethral carcinomas and renal tubuloacinar carcinomas, further elucidate the biological behavior of the urethral carcinomas, and demonstrate the critical importance of complete necropsies even when evaluating presumably well characterized phenotypes in genetically engineered mice.

  12. Knockout AR in Prostate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    enlarged ventral prostates, we evaluated fertility. We found that there were no significant differences in litter-size when either WT or pes-ARKO males...prostate (DLP), ventral prostate (VP) all lobes of prostate (Pr), testes (T), glans penis (Pe); *Pɘ.05, ***Pɘ.001. PI: Chang, Chawnshang 7

  13. Autoimmune prostatitis: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Motrich, R D; Maccioni, M; Riera, C M; Rivero, V E

    2007-01-01

    The prostate is one of the main male sex accessory glands and the target of many pathological conditions affecting men of all ages. Pathological conditions of the prostate gland range from infections, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) of a still unknown aetiology to benign hyperplasia and cancer. CP/CPPS is one of the most prevalent diseases in the urologic clinic and affects men younger than 50 years old. A significant advance in the understanding of CP/CPPS was made when an autoimmune response against prostate antigens was revealed in a considerable number of patients. During the last 30 years, extensive work has been done regarding the development and characterization of different rodent models of experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP). It has been demonstrated that tolerance to prostate antigens can be disrupted in some strains of rats and mice and cellular and humoral responses to prostate antigens are elicited. A Th1 pattern has been described and the cellular response seems to be the major pathogenic mechanism involved. Immune cells infiltrate the gland and induce prostate lesions. The genetic background and hormonal imbalance are factors that could contribute to the onset of the disease in susceptible young males. Moreover, spontaneous autoimmune prostatitis could also occur with advanced age in susceptible strains. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge regarding rodent models of EAP and the immunological alterations present in CP/CPPS patients. We also discuss the reliability of these experimental approaches as genuine tools for the study of human disease.

  14. Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Back After Treatment Prostate Cancer Treating Prostate Cancer Vaccine Treatment for Prostate Cancer Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is ... less advanced prostate cancer. Possible side effects of vaccine treatment Side effects from the vaccine tend to ...

  15. Medical Tests for Prostate Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... than age 50 is inflammation, called prostatitis. Prostate enlargement, or benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), is another common ... cannot distinguish between cancerous tumors and noncancerous prostate enlargement. Once a biopsy has confirmed cancer, these imaging ...

  16. Transurethral resection of the prostate

    MedlinePlus

    TURP; Prostate resection - transurethral ... used to remove the inside part of your prostate gland using electricity. ... if you have benign prostatic hyperplasia ( BPH ). The prostate gland often grows larger as men get older. ...

  17. Effect of Phellius linteus water extract on benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Sun; Chun, Sung-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common diseases among elderly men. As the old-age population is increasing recently, it is to our interest to observe the growing BPH within them. In BPH, the dihydrotestosterone (DHT) acts as promotes prostate growth. It inhibits enzyme 5α-reductase that is involved in the conversion of testosterone to the DHT activity which reduces the excessive prostate growth. Through experiments, the effects of Phellius linteus water extract performed on the BPH rats were induced by testosterone treatments. For 12 weeks, Sprague-Dawley rats were treated with testosterone for the induction of BPH. Rats were divided into four experimental groups: the not treated group (N), the testosterone injection and D.W treatment group (TN), the testosterone injection and Phellinus linteus treatment group (TP) and testosterone injection and finasteride treatment group (TF). Prostate weight, volume and weight ratio in the TP group and the TF group were significantly lower than the TN group. Testosterone and DHT levels in the TN group were significantly higher than that of the N group. And the TP group was significantly decreased than that of the TN group. While prostates of control rats revealed severe acinar gland atrophy and stromal proliferation; the TP and TF groups showed trophic symptoms and were lined by flattened epithelial cells, thus, the stromal proliferation is relatively low as compared to the TN group. These suggest that Phellinus linteus water extracts may be an useful remedy for treating the benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:23766877

  18. Chrysophanic acid reduces testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats by suppressing 5α-reductase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase.

    PubMed

    Youn, Dong-Hyun; Park, Jinbong; Kim, Hye-Lin; Jung, Yunu; Kang, JongWook; Jeong, Mi-Young; Sethi, Gautam; Seok Ahn, Kwang; Um, Jae-Young

    2017-02-07

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common chronic diseases in male population, of which incidence increases gradually with age. In this study, we investigated the effect of chrysophanic acid (CA) on BPH. BPH was induced by a 4-week injection of testosterone propionate (TP). Four weeks of further injection with vehicle, TP, TP + CA, TP + finasteride was carried on. In the CA treatment group, the prostate weight was reduced and the TP-induced histological changes were restored as the normal control group. CA treatment suppressed the TP-elevated prostate specific antigen (PSA) expression. In addition, 5α-reductase, a crucial factor in BPH development, was suppressed to the normal level close to the control group by CA treatment. The elevated expressions of androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptor α and steroid receptor coactivator 1 by TP administration were also inhibited in the CA group when compared to the TP-induced BPH group. Then we evaluated the changes in three major factors of the mitogen-activated protein kinase chain during prostatic hyperplasia; extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38). While ERK was elevated in the process of BPH, JNK and p38 was not changed. This up-regulated ERK was also reduced as normal by CA treatment. Further in vitro studies with RWPE-1 cells confirmed TP-induced proliferation and elevated AR, PSA and p-ERK were all reduced by CA treatment. Overall, these results suggest a potential pharmaceutical feature of CA in the treatment of BPH.

  19. Differential effect of alpha-difluoromethylornithine on the in vivo uptake of 14C-labeled polyamines and methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) by a rat prostate-derived tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Heston, W.D.; Kadmon, D.; Covey, D.F.; Fair, W.R.

    1984-03-01

    The uptake of exogenously administered radiolabeled polyamines by a rat prostate-derived tumor line, the Dunning R3327 MAT-Lu, and various normal tissues was studied. Pretreatment of tumor cells in vitro with alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), a polyamine synthesis inhibitor, resulted in a markedly enhanced uptake of both (/sup 14/C)putrescine and (14 C)spermidine. The in vitro uptake of (/sup 14/C)putrescine by these cells was effectively inhibited by unlabeled spermine, spermidine, 1,8-diaminooctane, 1,7-diaminoheptane, 1,6-diaminohexane, 1,5-diaminopentane, 1,4-diaminopentane, and 1,4-diaminobutane, but less effectively by 1,4-diamino-2,3-butene and 1,4-diamino-2,3-butyne. The diamines, 1,3-diaminopropane and 1,2-diaminoethane, were ineffective in inhibiting (/sup 14/C)putrescine uptake in vitro into the R3327 MAT-Lu cell line. When tumor-bearing animals were pretreated with DFMO or with DFMO and 5-alpha-dihydrotestosterone propionate, the tumor and prostate uptake of (/sup 14/C)putrescine and (/sup 14/C)-cadaverine was enhanced but not substantially increased in other tissues. In contrast to the in vitro results, spermidine and spermine were not enhanced substantially by DFMO pretreatment into any tissue, and their uptake into the tumor actually decreased. Ethylenediamine, which does not utilize the polyamine transport system, did not have its uptake increased into any tissue following DFMO pretreatment. The chemotherapeutic agent, methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), which utilizes the polyamine transport system for uptake into cells, exhibited uptake behavior different from that of the polyamines.

  20. Prediction of alpha1-adrenoceptor occupancy in the human prostate from plasma concentrations of silodosin, tamsulosin and terazosin to treat urinary obstruction in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shizuo; Kato, Yasuhiro; Okura, Takashi; Kagawa, Yoshiyuki; Kawabe, Kazuki

    2007-07-01

    Alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists are clinically useful for the improvement of urinary obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and their therapeutic effects are mediated through the blockade of prostatic alpha(1)-adrenoceptors. The present study was undertaken to predict the magnitude and duration of alpha(1)-adrenoceptor occupancy in the human prostate after oral alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists. Prostatic alpha(1)-adrenoceptor-binding parameters of silodosin were estimated by measuring specific [(3)H]prazosin binding in rat prostate after oral administration of this drug. The plasma concentration of silodosin after oral administration in rats and healthy volunteers was measured using a high-performance liquid chromatographic method. The alpha(1)-adrenoceptor-binding affinities (K(i)) of silodosin, tamsulosin, and terazosin in the human prostate and plasma concentrations of tamsulosin and terazosin were obtained from the literature. Using the alpha(1)-adrenoceptor binding parameters of silodosin in rat prostate, alpha(1)-adrenoceptor occupancy in the human prostate was estimated to be around 60-70% at 1-6 h after oral administration of silodosin at doses of 3.0, 8.1, and 16.1 micromol. Thereafter, the receptor occupancy was periodically decreased, to 24% (8.1 micromol) and 54% (16.1 micromol) 24 h later. A similar magnitude and time course of alpha(1)-adrenoceptor occupancy by silodosin in the human prostate were estimated using alpha(1)-adrenoceptor-binding affinities (K(i)) in the human prostate. Despite about two orders of differences in the plasma unbound concentrations after clinically effective oral dosages of silodosin, tamsulosin, and terazosin, there was a comparable magnitude of prostatic alpha(1)-adrenoceptor occupancy by these drugs. In conclusion, the prediction of alpha(1)-adrenoceptor occupancy in the human prostate by alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists may provide the rationale for the optimum dosage regimen of these drugs in the

  1. Combined image-processing algorithms for improved optical coherence tomography of prostate nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitchian, Shahab; Weldon, Thomas P.; Fiddy, Michael A.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-07-01

    Cavernous nerves course along the surface of the prostate gland and are responsible for erectile function. These nerves are at risk of injury during surgical removal of a cancerous prostate gland. In this work, a combination of segmentation, denoising, and edge detection algorithms are applied to time-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of rat prostate to improve identification of cavernous nerves. First, OCT images of the prostate are segmented to differentiate the cavernous nerves from the prostate gland. Then, a locally adaptive denoising algorithm using a dual-tree complex wavelet transform is applied to reduce speckle noise. Finally, edge detection is used to provide deeper imaging of the prostate gland. Combined application of these three algorithms results in improved signal-to-noise ratio, imaging depth, and automatic identification of the cavernous nerves, which may be of direct benefit for use in laparoscopic and robotic nerve-sparing prostate cancer surgery.

  2. Prostate cancer - treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... well. Proton therapy is another kind of radiation therapy used to treat prostate cancer. Proton beams target the tumor precisely, so there is less damage to the surrounding tissue. This therapy is not widely accepted or used. Prostate Brachytherapy ...

  3. Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... treat. There is no standard screening test for prostate cancer. Researchers are studying different tests to find those ... PSA level may be high if you have prostate cancer. It can also be high if you have ...

  4. Enlarged prostate - after care

    MedlinePlus

    BPH - self-care; Benign prostatic hypertrophy - self-care; Benign prostatic hyperplasia - self-care ... Your health care provider may have you take a medicine called alpha-1- blocker. Most people find that these drugs help ...

  5. Cryotherapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000907.htm Cryotherapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing features ... first treatment for prostate cancer. What Happens During Cryotherapy Before the procedure, you will be given medicine ...

  6. PROSTATE REGULATION: MODELING ENDOGENOUS ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ALTERATIONS IN PROSTATE WEIGHT AND HISTOPATHOLOGY ARE OBSERVED FOLLOWING IN UTERO, PUBERTAL AND ADULT EXPOSURES TO ANTIANDROGENS. ALTERATIONS IN PROSTATE WEIGHT AND HISTOPATHOLOGY ARE OBSERVED FOLLOWING IN UTERO, PUBERTAL AND ADULT EXPOSURES TO ANTIANDROGENS.

  7. Prostate cancer - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - prostate cancer ... The following organizations are good resources for information on prostate cancer : American Cancer Society -- www.cancer.org/cancer/prostatecancer/index National Cancer Institute -- www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ ...

  8. Enlarged Prostate (BPH)

    MedlinePlus

    The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine out of the body. As men age, their prostate grows bigger. If it gets too large, it ...

  9. Linking Estrogens, Prostatitis and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    provide the first direct evidence linking phy siologic estr ogen up- regulation an d pr ostate ma lignancy via inflammation. Ellem, Stuart J...inflammation and malignancy in the prostate. The identification of estr ogen as a cause of prostatitis, as well as a fac tor in the development of

  10. Can Prostate Cancer Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Prostate Cancer Be Found Early? Screening is testing to find ... Health Care Team About Prostate Cancer? More In Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  11. Effects of oral exposure to bisphenol A on gene expression and global genomic DNA methylation in the prostate, female mammary gland, and uterus of NCTR Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Luísa; Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S.; Chang, Ching-Wei; Han, Tao; Kobets, Tetyana; Koturbash, Igor; Surratt, Gordon; Lewis, Sherry M.; Vanlandingham, Michelle M.; Fuscoe, James C.; da Costa, Gonçalo Gamboa; Pogribny, Igor P.; Delclos, K. Barry

    2015-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an industrial chemical used in the manufacture of polycarbonate and epoxy resins, binds to the nuclear estrogen receptor with an affinity 4–5 orders of magnitude lower than that of estradiol. We reported previously that “high BPA” (100,000 and 300,000 μg/kg body weight (bw)/day), but not “low BPA” [2.5–2700 μg/kg bw/day], induced clear adverse effects in NCTR Sprague-Dawley rats gavaged daily from gestation day 6 through postnatal day 90. The “high BPA” effects partially overlapped those of ethinyl estradiol (EE2, 0.5 and 5.0 μg/kg bw/day). To evaluate further the potential of “low BPA” to induce biological effects, here we assessed the global genomic DNA methylation and gene expression in the prostate and female mammary glands, tissues identified previously as potential targets of BPA, and uterus, a sensitive estrogen-responsive tissue. Both doses of EE2 modulated gene expression, including of known estrogen-responsive genes, and PND 4 global gene expression data showed a partial overlap of the “high BPA” effects with those of EE2. The “low BPA” doses modulated the expression of several genes; however, the absence of a dose response reduces the likelihood that these changes were causally linked to the treatment. These results are consistent with the toxicity outcomes. PMID:25862956

  12. Increase in prostate stem cell antigen expression in prostatic hyperplasia induced by testosterone and 17β-estradiol in C57BL mice.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Nariaki; Kanno, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Estradiol (E2) is known to act synergistically with testosterone (T) for the development of prostatic hyperplasia in rats and dogs, but murine prostate is less responsive to hormonal stimulation. However, a recent study revealed that the combined administration of E2 and T induced prostatic hyperplasia with bladder outlet obstruction in C57BL mice. To understand the mechanisms underlying the hormonal induction of prostatic hyperplasia, the expression of growth factors and their receptors, androgen receptor, estrogen receptor (ER), and prostatic secretory proteins was investigated. Ten-week-old male C57BL mice were treated with T (30mg) or T+E2 (0.5mg) for 10 weeks, and prostatic lobes were dissected and subjected to quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting analysis. T administration appeared to induce glandular prostatic growth, while with T+E2 administration this growth was greater and accompanied by extreme bladder enlargement. The expression of prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) mRNA and protein was increased in prostate tissue in the T group. The combined administration of E2 with T prominently enhanced PSCA expression, along with increased insulin growth factor 1 mRNA levels and decreased estrogen receptor β mRNA expression. The synergistic effect of E2 on the expression of PSCA suggests that this protein may play an important role in the hormone-induced development of prostatic hyperplasia.

  13. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  14. Risks of Prostate Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system located just below the bladder (the organ that ... up part of semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Prostate Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  16. General Information about Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  17. Anti-proliferation effects of Cistanches salsa on the progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyo-Jin An; Chung, Kyung-Sook; An, Hyo-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Cistanche salsa has been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of kidney deficiency, neurasthenia, sexual dysfunction diseases, and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism by which C. salsa extract (CSE) elicits an anti-proliferative effect on the prostate tissue of BPH-induced rats. The effects of CSE on BPH were evaluated in terms of prostate weight, production of serum dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and the mRNA expression of 5α-reductase type 1 and type 2 in the prostate tissue of BPH-induced rats. In addition, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining was performed for histological examination of prostate gland morphology, and protein expression levels in prostate tissue were investigated by western blot analysis. CSE treatment decreased prostate weight, serum DHT concentration, and the mRNA expression of 5α-reductase type 1 and type 2 in prostate tissue of BPH-induced rats. In addition, CSE treatment suppressed cell proliferation by regulating the expression levels of inflammatory-related proteins (inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2) and apoptosis-associated proteins (caspase-3 and Bcl-2 family proteins). CSE may be a potential therapeutic candidate for BPH owing to its ability to regulate the expression of inflammatory and apoptosis-related proteins.

  18. Effects of prenatal exposure to a low dose atrazine metabolite mixture onpubertal timing and prostate development of male Long-Evans rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atrazine (ATR) is a chlorotriazine herbicide extensively used in the US and other countries. Studies examining the effects of adult or developmental ATR exposure on the mammary gland (MG) have used either the Sprague Dawley (SD) or Long-Evans (LE) rat, but no strain comparisons h...

  19. Differential expression of androgen, estrogen, and progesterone receptors in benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lingmin; Shen, Wenhao; Zhang, Heng; Wang, Qiwu; Wang, Yongquan; Zhou, Zhansong

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the differential expression levels of androgen receptor (AR), estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ), and progesterone receptor (PGR) between normal prostate and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The combination of immunohistochemistry, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and Western blotting assay was used to identify the distribution and differential expression of these receptors at the immunoactive biomarker, transcriptional, and protein levels between 5 normal human prostate tissues and 40 BPH tissues. The results were then validated in a rat model of BPH induced by testosterone propionate and estradiol benzoate. In both human and rat prostate tissues, AR was localized mainly to epithelial and stromal cell nuclei; ERα was distributed mainly to stromal cells, but not exclusively; ERβ was interspersed in the basal layer of epithelium, but sporadically in epithelial and stromal cells; PGR was expressed abundantly in cytoplasm of epithelial and stromal cells. There were decreased expression of ERα and increased expression of PGR, but no difference in the expression of ERβ in the BPH compared to the normal prostate of both human and rat. Increased expression of AR in the BPH compared to the normal prostate of human was observed, however, the expression of AR in the rat prostate tissue was decreased. This study identified the activation of AR and PGR and repression of ERα in BPH, which indicate a promoting role of AR and PGR and an inhibitory role of ERα in the pathogenesis of BPH. PMID:27294569

  20. Cancer Targeting Potential of (99m)Tc-Finasteride in Experimental Model of Prostate Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jan, Gowsia; Passi, Neelima D; Dhawan, Devinder Kumar; Chadha, Vijayta Dani

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to radiolabel finasteride, a novel 5α-reductase inhibitor, to evaluate its cancer targeting potential in experimental model of prostate carcinogenesis. Finasteride was effectively radiolabeled with (99m)Tc and showed >90% labeling efficiency. The radiopharmaceutical was found to be stable up to 6 hours in rat serum at 37°C. The blood kinetics of the (99m)Tc-finasteride followed a biphasic release pattern, whereby fast-release phase was observed at 15 seconds and a slow-release phase was observed after 30 minutes of administration. The plasma protein binding of the radio complex observed was 83.89%. For biodistribution studies, the rats were divided into two groups. Group I served as normal controls, while group II was subjected to carcinogen N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) and hormone testosterone propionate (T) for induction of prostate carcinogenesis, which was confirmed histopathologically. The biodistribution studies on control and carcinogen-treated rats revealed a significant percent-specific uptake in prostate, which was found to be increased significantly as a function of time. The most significant finding of the study was an increase in the percent-specific uptake in prostate of carcinogen-treated animals when compared to the percent-specific uptake in prostate of normal rats after 2 and 4 hours postinjection. The study concludes that (99m)Tc-finasteride possesses selectively toward prostate cancer tissue and can be explored further for its role in detection of prostate cancer.

  1. [Tuberculosis of the prostate].

    PubMed

    Streltsova, O S; Krupin, V N; Yunusova, K E; Mamonov, M V

    2016-12-01

    Genitourinary tract is the second most common site where extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) occurs. Genitourinary TB is notable for a latent clinical course and difficult diagnosis. The paper presents clinical observations of two patients treated in a urology department of a general public hospital. One of them was diagnosed with tuberculosis of the prostate, MTB+. In the other, TB of the prostate was suspected based on pathologic assessment of the surgical specimen after surgery for prostate cancer.

  2. Screening for prostate cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weirich, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    Despite recent advances in both the survival and cure rates for many forms of cancer, unfortunately the same has not been true for prostate cancer. In fact, the age-adjusted death rate from prostate cancer has not significantly improved since 1949, and prostate cancer remains the most common cancer in American men, causing the second highest cancer mortality rate. Topics discussed include the following: serum testosterone levels; diagnosis; mortality statistics; prostate-sppecific antigen (PSA) tests; and the Occupational Medicine Services policy at LeRC.

  3. Living with Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer treatment and can improve many aspects of health, including muscle strength, balance, fatigue, cardiovascular fitness, and depression. Physical activity after a prostate cancer diagnosis is linked to ...

  4. Androgens and prostate disease

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lori A; Page, Stephanie T

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of literature has established the anabolic benefits of testosterone (T) therapy in hypogonadal men. However, there remains a paucity of data regarding the risks of exogenous androgen use in older men and the potential for adverse effects on the prostate gland. Whether T therapy in older, hypogonadal men might worsen lower urinary tract symptoms or exacerbate, unmask, or even incite prostate cancer development has tempered enthusiasm for T therapy, while known prostatic disease has served as a relative contraindication to T therapy. Androgens are necessary for the development and maintenance of the prostate gland. However, epidemiologic studies do not consistently find a positive relationship between endogenous serum androgen concentrations and the risk of prostate disease. Recent data demonstrate that 5α-reductase inhibitors decrease the risk of low-grade prostate cancer, suggesting that modifying androgen metabolism may have beneficial effects on prostate health, yet similar reductions in high-grade disease have not been observed, thereby questioning the true clinical benefits of these agents for chemoprevention. Knowing how to best investigate the relationship between androgens and the development of prostate disease given the lack of large, randomized trials is difficult. Accumulating data challenges the assumption that alterations in serum androgens have parallel effects within the prostate hormonal environment or change androgen-regulated processes within the gland. Long-term intervention studies are needed to truly ascertain the effects of androgen manipulation on prostate tissue and disease risk. However, available data do not support the notion that restoring serum androgens to normal physiologic ranges drives prostate disease. PMID:24407178

  5. Antioxidant Prophylaxis in the Prevention of Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia (PIN)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    Antioxidant supplementation prevents development of PIN: Noble rats were purchased from Charles River Laboratories (Wilmington, MA). Animal experiments were...supplementation and prostate cancer prevention in the SU.VI.MAX trial. Int J Cancer. 116: 182-186 3. Hennekens, CH, Buring JE, Manson , JE et al. 1996 Lack

  6. Exploration of Prostate Cancer Treatment Induced Neurotoxicity with Neuroimaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    Androgen deprived rats and humans show increased levels of brain beta-amyloid, a significant risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease , and low...testosterone is a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease in men. Behavioral studies from our group recently showed that men with prostate cancer on ADT had

  7. Primary malignant melanoma of prostate.

    PubMed

    Doublali, M; Chouaib, A; Khallouk, A; Tazi, M F; El Fassi, M J; Farih, My H; Elfatmi, H; Bendahou, M; Benlemlih, A; Lamarti, O

    2010-05-01

    Primary genitourinary melanoma accounts for less than one per cent of all cases of melanoma. Most cases attributed to the prostate actually originate from the prostatic urethra. Due to its infrequency, primary malignant melanoma of the genitourinary tract presents a difficult diagnostic and management challenge. We report a case of primary malignant melanoma of the prostate found during transurethral resection of the prostate.

  8. Experimental autoimmune prostatitis induces microglial activation in the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Larry; Done, Joseph D.; Schaeffer, Anthony J.; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2014-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome is unknown and factors including the host’s immune response and the nervous system have been attributed to the development of CP/CPPS. We previously demonstrated that mast cells and chemokines such as CCL2 and CCL3 play an important role in mediating prostatitis. Here, we examined the role of neuroinflammation and microglia in the CNS in the development of chronic pelvic pain. Methods Experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) was induced using a subcutaneous injection of rat prostate antigen. Sacral spinal cord tissue (segments S4–S5) was isolated and utilized for immunofluorescence or QRT-PCR analysis. Tactile allodynia was measured at baseline and at various points during EAP using Von Frey fibers as a function for pelvic pain. EAP mice were treated with minocycline after 30 days of prostatitis to test the efficacy of microglial inhibition on pelvic pain. Results Prostatitis induced the expansion and activation of microglia and the development of inflammation in the spinal cord as determined by increased expression levels of CCL3, IL-1β, Iba1, and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Microglial activation in mice with prostatitis resulted in increased expression of P2X4R and elevated levels of BDNF, two molecular markers associated with chronic pain. Pharmacological inhibition of microglia alleviated pain in mice with prostatitis and resulted in decreased expression of IL-1β, P2X4R, and BDNF. Conclusion Our data shows that prostatitis leads to inflammation in the spinal cord and the activation and expansion of microglia, mechanisms that may contribute to the development and maintenance of chronic pelvic pain. PMID:25263093

  9. Optical coherence tomography of the prostate nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitchian, Shahab

    Preservation of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery is critical in preserving a man's ability to have spontaneous erections following surgery. These microscopic nerves course along the surface of the prostate within a few millimeters of the prostate capsule, and they vary in size and location from one patient to another, making preservation of the nerves difficult during dissection and removal of a cancerous prostate gland. These observations may explain in part the wide variability in reported sexual potency rates (9--86%) following prostate cancer surgery. Any technology capable of providing improved identification, imaging, and visualization of the cavernous nerves during prostate cancer surgery would be of great assistance in improving sexual function after surgery, and result in direct patient benefit. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive optical imaging technique capable of performing high-resolution cross-sectional in vivo and in situ imaging of microstructures in biological tissues. OCT imaging of the cavernous nerves in the rat and human prostate has recently been demonstrated. However, improvements in the OCT system and the quality of the images for identification of the cavernous nerves is necessary before clinical use. The following chapters describe complementary approaches to improving identification and imaging of the cavernous nerves during OCT of the prostate gland. After the introduction to OCT imaging of the prostate gland, the optimal wavelength for deep imaging of the prostate is studied in Chapter 2. An oblique-incidence single point measurement technique using a normal-detector scanning system was implemented to determine the absorption and reduced scattering coefficients, mua and m's , of fresh canine prostate tissue, ex vivo, from the diffuse reflectance profile of near-IR light as a function of source-detector distance. The effective attenuation coefficient, mueff, and the Optical Penetration Depth (OPD) were

  10. Tuberculous prostatitis: mimicking a cancer.

    PubMed

    Aziz, El Majdoub; Abdelhak, Khallouk; Hassan, Farih Moulay

    2016-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common type of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis . The kidneys, ureter, bladder or genital organs are usually involved. Tuberculosis of the prostate has mainly been described in immune-compromised patients. However, it can exceptionally be found as an isolated lesion in immune-competent patients. Tuberculosis of the prostate may be difficult to differentiate from carcinoma of the prostate and the chronic prostatitis when the prostate is hard and nodular on digital rectal examination and the urine is negative for tuberculosis bacilli. In many cases, a diagnosis of tuberculous prostatitis is made by the pathologist, or the disease is found incidentally after transurethral resection. Therefore, suspicion of tuberculous prostatitis requires a confirmatory biopsy of the prostate. We report the case of 60-year-old man who presented a low urinary tract syndrome. After clinical and biological examination, and imaging, prostate cancer was highly suspected. Transrectal needle biopsy of the prostate was performed and histological examination showed tuberculosis lesions.

  11. Zinc and prostatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Ho, Emily

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Aim to understand the connection between zinc and prostatic cancer, and to summarize the recent findings about the functions of zinc in the maintenance of prostate health. Recent findings Contradictory findings have been reported by epidemiologic studies examining the association between zinc intake and the risk of prostate cancer. However, a growing body of experimental evidence support that high zinc levels are essential for prostate health. The possible mechanisms include the effects of zinc on the inhibition of terminal oxidation, induction of mitochondrial apoptogenesis, and suppression of NFκB activity. The most recent finding is the effects of zinc in the maintenance of DNA integrity in normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) by modulating the expression and activity of DNA repair and damage response proteins, especially p53. Zinc depletion in PrEC increased p53 expression but compromised p53 DNA binding activity resulting an impaired DNA repair function. Moreover, recent findings support the role of zinc transporters as tumor suppressors in the prostate. Summary Future studies need to discover sensitive and specific zinc biomarkers and perform more in vivo studies on the effects of zinc on prostate functions in normal animals or prostate cancer models. PMID:19684515

  12. The Prostate Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Frederico R.; Romero, Antonio W.; Filho, Thadeu Brenny; Kulysz, David; Oliveira, Fernando C., Jr.; Filho, Renato Tambara

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To help students, residents, and general practitioners to improve the technique, skills, and reproducibility of their prostate examination. Methods: We developed a comprehensive guideline outlining prostate anatomy, indications, patient preparation, positioning, technique, findings, and limitations of this ancient art of urological…

  13. PROSTATE REGULATION: MODELING ENDOGENOUS ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Prostate function is an important indicator of androgen status in toxicological studies making predictive modeling of the relevant pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics desirable. Prostate function is an important indicator of androgen status in toxicological studies making predictive modeling of the relevant pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics desirable.

  14. Expression of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin receptors claudin-3 and claudin-4 in prostate cancer epithelium.

    PubMed

    Long, H; Crean, C D; Lee, W H; Cummings, O W; Gabig, T G

    2001-11-01

    The mRNA for Rvp.1 (rat ventral prostate) increases in abundance before gland involution after androgen deprivation. Rvp.1 is homologous to CPE-R, the high-affinity intestinal epithelial receptor for Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (CPE), and is sufficient to mediate CPE binding and trigger subsequent toxin-mediated cytolysis. Rvp.1 (claudin-3) and CPE-R (claudin-4) are members of a larger family of transmembrane tissue-specific claudin proteins that are essential components of intercellular tight junction structures regulating paracellular ion flux. However, claudin-3 and claudin-4 are the only family members capable of mediating CPE binding and cytolysis. The present study was designed to study the expression of claudin-3 and claudin-4 in human prostate tissue as potential targets for CPE toxin-mediated therapy for prostate cancer. On human multiple-tissue Northern blot analysis, mRNAs for both claudin-3 and claudin-4 were expressed at high levels in prostate tissue. In normal prostate tissue, expression of claudin-3 was localized exclusively within acinar epithelial cells by in situ mRNA hybridization. Compared with expression within prostate epithelial cells in surrounding normal glandular tissue, expression of claudin-3 mRNA remained high in the epithelium of prostate adenocarcinoma (10 of 10) and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (five of five). Prostate adenocarcinoma cells metastatic to bone were obtained from a patient with disease progression during antiandrogen therapy. These metastatic cells were prostate-specific antigen-positive by immunohistochemical staining and also expressed functional CPE receptors as measured by sensitivity to CPE-induced cell lysis. The persistent high level of claudin-3 expression in prostate adenocarcinoma and functional cytotoxicity of CPE in metastatic androgen-independent prostate adenocarcinoma suggests a new potential therapeutic strategy for prostate cancer.

  15. Complications of prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Zapała, Lukasz; Cordeiro, Ernesto; Antoniewicz, Artur; Dimitriadis, Georgios; De Reijke, Theo

    2013-07-01

    Biopsy of the prostate is a common procedure with minor complications that are usually self-limited. However, if one considers that millions of men undergo biopsy worldwide, one realizes that although complication rate is low, the number of patients suffering from biopsy complications should not be underestimated and can be a clinically relevant problem for healthcare professionals. In this review, the authors present diagnosis and management of postbiopsy of prostate complications. Bleeding is the most common complication observed after prostate biopsy, but the use of aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is not an absolute contraindication to prostate biopsy. Emerging resistance to ciprofloxacin is the most probable cause of the increasing risk of infectious complications after prostate biopsy. Even though extremely rare, fatal complications are possible and were described in case reports.

  16. Cryosurgery for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Fahmy, W E; Bissada, N K

    2003-01-01

    Choice of management for patients with prostate cancer is influenced by patient and disease characteristics and life expectancy. Management options include expectance (watchful waiting), radical prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and cryosurgical ablation of the prostate (CSAP). The role of cryotherapy in the management of prostate cancer is still evolving. Continued research has allowed the introduction of efficient and safe cryosurgical equipment exemplified by the current third-generation cryosurgical machines. CSAP can be performed in an ambulatory surgery setting or as inpatient surgery with overnight stay. The procedure is performed under continuous ultrasonic monitoring. Mature data from the use of second-generation cryosurgical equipment indicate that CSAP is an effective therapeutic modality for managing patients with prostate cancer. Current data with the third-generation cryosurgical equipment are not mature. However, the favorable side effect profile and the good early responses seem to indicate that this modality will have a prominent role in the management of patients with prostate cancer.

  17. Lipids and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suburu, Janel; Chen, Yong Q.

    2012-01-01

    The role of lipid metabolism has gained particular interest in prostate cancer research. A large body of literature has outlined the unique upregulation of de novo lipid synthesis in prostate cancer. Concordant with this lipogenic phenotype is a metabolic shift, in which cancer cells use alternative enzymes and pathways to facilitate the production of fatty acids. These newly synthesized lipids may support a number of cellular processes to promote cancer cell proliferation and survival. Hence, de novo lipogenesis is under intense investigation as a therapeutic target. Epidemiologic studies suggest dietary fat may also contribute to prostate cancer; however, whether dietary lipids and de novo synthesized lipids are differentially metabolized remains unclear. Here, we highlight the lipogenic nature of prostate cancer, especially the promotion of de novo lipid synthesis, and the significance of various dietary lipids in prostate cancer development and progression. PMID:22503963

  18. [Prostate localization systems for prostate radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Lagrange, J-L; Messai, T; M'Barek, B; Lefkopoulos, D

    2006-11-01

    The development of sophisticated conformal radiation therapy techniques for prostate cancer, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy, implies precise and accurate targeting. Inter- and intrafraction prostate motion can be significant and should be characterized, unless the target volume may occasionally be missed. Indeed, bony landmark-based portal imaging does not provide the positional information for soft-tissue targets (prostate and seminal vesicles) or critical organs (rectum and bladder). In this article, we describe various prostate localization systems used before or during the fraction: rectal balloon, intraprostatic fiducials, ultrasound-based localization, integrated CT/linear accelerator system, megavoltage or kilovoltage cone-beam CT, Calypso 4D localization system tomotherapy, Cyberknife and Exactrac X-Ray 6D. The clinical benefit in using such prostate localization tools is not proven by randomized studies and the feasibility has just been established for some of these techniques. Nevertheless, these systems should improve local control by a more accurate delivery of an increased prescribed dose in a reduced planning target volume.

  19. Measurement of hypoxia-related parameters in three sublines of a rat prostate carcinoma using dynamic 18F-FMISO-Pet-Ct and quantitative histology

    PubMed Central

    Mena-Romano, Pamela; Cheng, Caixia; Glowa, Christin; Peschke, Peter; Pan, Leyun; Haberkorn, Uwe; Dimitrakopoulou-Strauss, Antonia; Karger, Christian P

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important resistance factor in radiotherapy and measuring its spatial distribution in tumors non-invasively is therefore of major importance. This study characterizes the hypoxic conditions of three tumor sublines (AT1, HI and H) of the Dunning R3327 prostate tumor model, which differ in histology, differentiation degree, volume doubling time and androgenic sensitivity, using dynamic Fluoromisonidazole (18F-FMISO)-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET-CT) and histology. Measurements were performed for two tumor volumes (average 0.8±0.5 cm3 vs 4.4±2.8 cm3). Data were analyzed according to tumor subline as well as to the shape of the time activity curves (TACs), based on standardized uptake values (SUVs) and a two-tissue compartment model. Quantitative immunohistochemical studies of the hypoxic fraction, vessel density and vessel size were performed using pimonidazole, Hoechst 33342 and CD31 dyes. No significant FMISO uptake was found in small tumors, which had a mean SUV of 0.64±0.36, 0.55±0.10 and 0.45±0.08, for AT1, HI and H sublines respectively. In large tumors, the SUVs were 1.33±0.52, 1.12±0.83 and 0.63±0.16 for AT1, HI and H sublines and the corresponding hypoxic fractions obtained with pimonidazole staining were 0.62±0.23, 0.54±0.24 and 0.07±0.10, respectively. The AT1- was the most and H-tumor was the least hypoxic for both methods (P<0.05). All measurements were able to discriminate different hypoxic conditions, however despite SUV and kinetic parameters correlated with the three identified TAC shapes, most of the histological results did not. These results demonstrate impact and limitations of static and dynamic PET-CT measurements to assess hypoxia non-invasively. PMID:26269773

  20. Regulation of the proapoptotic functions of prostate apoptosis response-4 (Par-4) by casein kinase 2 in prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    de Thonel, A; Hazoumé, A; Kochin, V; Isoniemi, K; Jego, G; Fourmaux, E; Hammann, A; Mjahed, H; Filhol, O; Micheau, O; Rocchi, P; Mezger, V; Eriksson, J E; Rangnekar, V M; Garrido, C

    2014-01-23

    The proapoptotic protein, prostate apoptosis response-4 (Par-4), acts as a tumor suppressor in prostate cancer cells. The serine/threonine kinase casein kinase 2 (CK2) has a well-reported role in prostate cancer resistance to apoptotic agents or anticancer drugs. However, the mechanistic understanding on how CK2 supports survival is far from complete. In this work, we demonstrate both in rat and humans that (i) Par-4 is a new substrate of the survival kinase CK2 and (ii) phosphorylation by CK2 impairs Par-4 proapoptotic functions. We also unravel different levels of CK2-dependent regulation of Par-4 between species. In rats, the phosphorylation by CK2 at the major site, S124, prevents caspase-mediated Par-4 cleavage (D123) and consequently impairs the proapoptotic function of Par-4. In humans, CK2 strongly impairs the apoptotic properties of Par-4, independently of the caspase-mediated cleavage of Par-4 (D131), by triggering the phosphorylation at residue S231. Furthermore, we show that human Par-4 residue S231 is highly phosphorylated in prostate cancer cells as compared with their normal counterparts. Finally, the sensitivity of prostate cancer cells to apoptosis by CK2 knockdown is significantly reversed by parallel knockdown of Par-4. Thus, Par-4 seems a critical target of CK2 that could be exploited for the development of new anticancer drugs.

  1. Optimization of prostate biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Weir, James; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Connelly, Roger R.; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

    1999-05-01

    Urologists routinely use the systematic sextant needle biopsy technique to detect prostate cancer. However, recent evidence suggests that this technique has a significant sampling error. We have developed a novel 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator based upon 201 whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens to compare the diagnostic accuracy of various prostate needle biopsy protocols. Computerized prostate models have been developed to accurately depict the anatomy of the prostate and all individual tumor foci. We obtained 18-biopsies of each prostate model to determine the detection rates of various biopsy protocols. As a result, the 10- and 12- pattern biopsy protocols had a 99.0 percent detection rate, while the traditional sextant biopsy protocol rate was only 72.6 percent. The 5-region biopsy protocol had a 90.5 percent detection rate. the lateral sextant pattern revealed a detection rate of 95.5 percent, whereas the 4-pattern lateral biopsy protocol had a 93.5 percent detection rate. Our results suggest that all the biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon the five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern. Lateral biopsies in the mid and apical zones of the gland are the most important.

  2. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Vemana, Goutham; Hamilton, Robert J; Andriole, Gerald L; Freedland, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Large prospective randomized trials, such as the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial (PCPT), Reduction by Dutasteride of Prostate Cancer Events (REDUCE) trial, and Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT), have provided practitioners with considerable data regarding methods of treatment and prevention of prostate cancer. The best-studied medications for prevention are 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors. Their efficacy and side effects are well characterized. Other medications, dietary nutrients, and supplements have not been as well studied and generally do not demonstrate efficacy for disease prevention with an acceptable level of evidence.

  3. Learning about Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gene Mapped To X Chromosome 1998 Researchers Link Gene to Hereditary Form of Prostate Cancer 2002 Get Email Updates Advancing human health through genomics research Privacy Copyright Contact Accessibility Plug-ins Site Map Staff Search FOIA Share Top

  4. Cholesterol and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Pelton, Kristine; Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2012-12-01

    Prostate cancer risk can be modified by environmental factors, however the molecular mechanisms affecting susceptibility to this disease are not well understood. As a result of a series of recently published studies, the steroidal lipid, cholesterol, has emerged as a clinically relevant therapeutic target in prostate cancer. This review summarizes the findings from human studies as well as animal and cell biology models, which suggest that high circulating cholesterol increases risk of aggressive prostate cancer, while cholesterol lowering strategies may confer protective benefit. Relevant molecular processes that have been experimentally tested and might explain these associations are described. We suggest that these promising results now could be applied prospectively to attempt to lower risk of prostate cancer in select populations.

  5. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... for prostate cancer. It concluded that the expected harms of PSA screening are greater than the potential ... exam or other screening tests. Potential Benefits and Harms The main goal of a cancer screening test ...

  6. Prostate Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ali

    2017-03-30

    Prostate ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a rare subtype of prostate adenocarcinoma that shows more aggressive behavior than conventional prostatic acinar adenocarcinoma. PDA demonstrates similar clinical and paraclinical features such as prostatic acinar adenocarcinoma; therefore, clinical distinction of the 2 entities is very difficult (if not impossible) and histopathology plays an important role in the diagnosis of the disease. This review discusses all the necessary information needed for the diagnosis and prognosis of PDA including the morphologic features of PDA, an introduction about the known variants of PDA with helpful hints in grading of each variant, tips on differential diagnosis of PDA from the common morphologic mimickers, a detailed discussion on the value of immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of PDA, and pathologic features that are helpful in determining the outcome.

  7. Prostate cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... test. A faster increase could show a more aggressive tumor. A prostate biopsy is done in your ... suggest the cancer is slow growing and not aggressive. Higher numbers indicate a faster growing cancer that ...

  8. Prostate resection - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... invasive - discharge Transurethral resection of the prostate - discharge Review Date 6/29/2015 Updated by: Jennifer Sobol, ... the Michigan Institute of Urology, West Bloomfield, MI. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by ...

  9. Chemoprevention of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Brand, Timothy C; Canby-Hagino, Edith D; Pratap Kumar, A; Ghosh, Rita; Leach, Robin J; Thompson, Ian M

    2006-08-01

    Prostate cancer is a common malignancy with multiple potential opportunities for cancer prevention. As the genetic basis of this malignancy is further understood, prevention strategies will be developed for individual patients based on specific risk factors and pathways of carcinogenesis. The PCPT has conclusively proven that prostate cancer prevention is possible. The results of the SELECT should be available within several years. An enormous challenge for the medical community will be the development of an efficient strategy to evaluate the substantial number of dietary, behavioral, and pharmacologic prevention opportunities. Ultimately, the goal of prostate can-cer prevention is to (1) identify men who are destined to develop clinically significant prostate cancer, and (2) provide individualized agents to prevent disease development.

  10. Advanced Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... if it has spread to: • Bones • Lungs • Liver • Brain • Lymph nodes outside the pelvis • Other organs You may be diagnosed with metastatic prostate cancer when you are first diagnosed, after having completed ...

  11. Enlarged prostate gland

    MedlinePlus

    ... enlarges in size in a process called benign hypertrophy, which means that the gland got larger without ... in several of the symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy, or BPH. Symptoms may include a slowed or ...

  12. Presence of PSA auto-antibodies in men with prostate abnormalities (prostate cancer/benign prostatic hyperplasia/prostatitis).

    PubMed

    Lokant, M T; Naz, R K

    2015-04-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), produced by the prostate, liquefies post-ejaculate semen. PSA is detected in semen and blood. Increased circulating PSA levels indicate prostate abnormality [prostate cancer (PC), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostatitis (PTIS)], with variance among individuals. As the prostate has been proposed as an immune organ, we hypothesise that variation in PSA levels among men may be due to presence of auto-antibodies against PSA. Sera from healthy men (n = 28) and men having prostatitis (n = 25), BPH (n = 30) or PC (n = 29) were tested for PSA antibody presence using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) values converted to standard deviation (SD) units, and Western blotting. Taking ≥2 SD units as cut-off for positive immunoreactivity, 0% of normal men, 0% with prostatitis, 33% with BPH and 3.45% with PC demonstrated PSA antibodies. One-way analysis of variance (anova) performed on the mean absorbance values and SD units of each group showed BPH as significantly different (P < 0.01) compared with PC and prostatitis. All others were nonsignificant (P < 0.05). Men (33%) with BPH had PSA antibodies by ELISA and Western blot. These discoveries may find clinical application in differential diagnosis among prostate abnormalities, especially differentiating BPH from prostate cancer and prostatitis.

  13. Knockout AR in Prostate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    significance. By week 24 and thereafter, this difference was significant. To determine if pes-ARKO mice contain abnormalities other than enlarged ventral...earlier studies by Donjacour and colleagues (15). To determine whether pes-ARKO mice contain abnormalities other than enlarged VPs, we evaluated...Kid, kidney; U, ureter; AP, anterior prostate; Pr, all lobes of prostate; T, testes; Pe, glans penis . *, P 0.05; ***, P 0.001. Fig. 1

  14. Vatuximab(Trademark): Optimizing Therapeutic Strategies for Prostate Cancer Based on Dynamic MR Tumor Oximetry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    being developed by Peregrine Pharmaceuticals for clinical trials. Investigations of tumor hypoxia indicated that non-invasive oxygen sensitive 1H MRI ...waiting versus aggressive therapy. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Vascular targeting; MRI ; bioluminescent imaging 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...prostate tumor growth delay. MRI was used to assess the onset and distribution of tumor vascular damage in a series of Dunning prostate rat tumors (R3327

  15. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Prostate Cancer Abiraterone Acetate Bicalutamide Cabazitaxel Casodex (Bicalutamide) Degarelix Docetaxel ...

  16. Understanding your prostate cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000931.htm Understanding your prostate cancer risk To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. Are you at risk for developing prostate cancer in your lifetime? Learn about the risk factors ...

  17. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  18. Parental High-Fat Diet Promotes Inflammatory and Senescence-Related Changes in Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Shweta; Jena, Gopabandhu; Shah, Heta; Chhabra, Richa

    2017-01-01

    Background. Obesity and dietary habits are associated with increased incidences of aging-related prostatic diseases. The present study was aimed to investigate transgenerational effects of chronic high-fat diet (HFD) feeding on inflammation and senescence-related changes in prostate. Methods. Sprague-Dawley rats were kept on either normal or HFD one. Senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-gal) activity, inflammation, and cellular proliferation were determined in the prostate. Results. Increased SA β-gal activity, expression of p53, and cell proliferation marker PCNA were observed in ventral prostate of HFD-fed rats. Immunostaining for p53 and PCNA revealed that the p53 immunopositive cells were primarily in stroma while PCNA immunopositive cells were epithelial cells. An increase in expression of cycloxygenase-2 (COX-2) and phosphorylation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kB) was observed in prostate of weaning pups HFD-fed parents. However, in adult pups, irrespective of dietary habit, a significant increase in the expression of COX-2, PCNA, phosphorylation of NF-kB, infiltration of inflammatory cells, and SA β-gal activity was observed. Conclusions. Present investigation reports that HFD feeding promotes accumulation of p53 expressing cells, proliferation of epithelial cells, and senescence-related changes in prostate. Further, parental HFD-feeding upholds inflammatory, proliferative, and senescence-related changes in prostate of pups. PMID:28261375

  19. Prostate Cancer Skeletal Metastases: Pathobiology and Interventions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-02-01

    in higher levels in prostate carcinoma than in benign prostatic hyperplasia [35, 36], and is found in human metastatic lesions in bone [37]. However...compared to normal controls, benign prostatic hyperplasia , prostatitis, and localized or recurrent disease. In an animal model, prostate tumor cells...Malakouti S, Antar S, Kukreja S. Enhanced expression of parathyroid hormone-related protein in prostate cancer as compared with benign prostatic hyperplasia . Hum

  20. Primary malignant melanoma of prostate

    PubMed Central

    Doublali, M.; Chouaib, A.; Khallouk, A.; Tazi, M. F.; El Fassi, M. J.; Farih, My. H.; Elfatmi, H.; Bendahou, M.; Benlemlih, A.; Lamarti, O.

    2010-01-01

    Primary genitourinary melanoma accounts for less than one per cent of all cases of melanoma. Most cases attributed to the prostate actually originate from the prostatic urethra. Due to its infrequency, primary malignant melanoma of the genitourinary tract presents a difficult diagnostic and management challenge. We report a case of primary malignant melanoma of the prostate found during transurethral resection of the prostate. PMID:20882159

  1. Prostatic microenvironment in senescence: fibroblastic growth factors × hormonal imbalance.

    PubMed

    Hetzl, A C; Montico, F; Lorencini, R M; Kido, L A; Cândido, E M; Cagnon, V H A

    2014-05-01

    The aim was to characterize and correlate steroid hormone receptors with the FGF2, FGF7 and FGF8 reactivities in the prostatic epithelium and stroma in senile rats. Fifty male senile rats and 10 young male rats were divided into the young (YNG), the senile groups (SE), the castrated group (CAS), the estrogen-deficient group (ED), the castrated + estrogen group (CASE), and the estrogen-deficient + androgen group (EDTEST). The ventral prostate was submitted to immunohistochemical and Western blotting analyses. The results showed decreased AR and ERβ levels and increased ERα in the senile animals in relation to YNG group. Increased ERα and ERβ reactivities presenting differential localization were characterized in the CASE group compared to the CAS group. Increased FGF2 level was observed in the stroma of the CAS and ED groups in relation to the SE group and in the epithelium of the ED group in relation to the other groups. Increased and differential immunolocalization of FGF7 levels were observed in the CAS, ED and CASE groups. The FGF8 levels showed differential localization in the CAS and ED groups compared to the senile group. The intense hormone ablation was favorable to the autocrine signaling of FGF2 and FGF8. FGF7 could be activated in the androgen-independent via considering the increased FGF7 in the castrated rats. We concluded that hormone ablation in senescence was favorable to activation or/and to fibroblast signaling in the prostatic microenvironment.

  2. Cholesterol and benign prostate disease.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2011-01-01

    The origins of benign prostatic diseases, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), are poorly understood. Patients suffering from benign prostatic symptoms report a substantially reduced quality of life, and the relationship between benign prostate conditions and prostate cancer is uncertain. Epidemiologic data for BPH and CP/CPPS are limited, however an apparent association between BPH symptoms and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been consistently reported. The prostate synthesizes and stores large amounts of cholesterol and prostate tissues may be particularly sensitive to perturbations in cholesterol metabolism. Hypercholesterolemia, a major risk factor for CVD, is also a risk factor for BPH. Animal model and clinical trial findings suggest that agents that inhibit cholesterol absorption from the intestine, such as the class of compounds known as polyene macrolides, can reduce prostate gland size and improve lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Observational studies indicate that cholesterol-lowering drugs reduce the risk of aggressive prostate cancer, while prostate cancer cell growth and survival pathways depend in part on cholesterol-sensitive biochemical mechanisms. Here we review the evidence that cholesterol metabolism plays a role in the incidence of benign prostate disease and we highlight possible therapeutic approaches based on this concept.

  3. Cholesterol and Benign Prostate Disease

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Michael R.; Solomon, Keith R.

    2014-01-01

    The origins of benign prostatic diseases, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), are poorly understood. Patients suffering from benign prostatic symptoms report a substantially reduced quality of life, and the relationship between benign prostate conditions and prostate cancer is uncertain. Epidemiologic data for BPH and CP/CPPS are limited, however an apparent association bet ween BPH symptoms and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been consistently reported. The prostate synthesizes and stores large amounts of cholesterol and prostate tissues may be particularly sensitive to perturbations in cholesterol metabolism. Hypercholesterolemi, a major risk factor for CVD, is also a risk factor for BPH. Animal model and clinical trial findings suggest that agents that inhibit cholesterol absorption from the intestine, such as the class of compounds known as polyene macrolides, can reduce prostate gland size and improve lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Observational studies indicate that cholesterol-lowering drugs reduce the risk of aggressive prostate cancer, while prostate cancer cell growth and survival pathways depend in part on cholesterol-sensitive biochemical mechanisms. Here we review the evidence that cholesterol metabolism plays a role in the incidence of benign prostate disease and we highlight possible therapeutic approaches based on this concept. PMID:21862201

  4. Utility of ADC measurement on diffusion-weighted MRI in differentiation of prostate cancer, normal prostate and prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Esen, Meltem; Onur, Mehmet Ruhi; Akpolat, Nusret; Orhan, Irfan; Kocakoc, Ercan

    2013-08-01

    To determine the utility of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in differentiation of prostate cancer from normal prostate parenchyma and prostatitis we obtained ADC values of 50 patients at b 100, 600 and 1,000 s/mm(2) diffusion gradients. The ADC values of prostate cancer group were significantly lower than normal prostate and prostatitis group at b 600 and 1,000 s/mm(2) gradients. The ADC values at high diffusion gradients may be used in differentiation prostate cancer from normal prostate and prostatitis.

  5. MYC and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Cheryl M.; Bieberich, Charles J.; Dang, Chi V.; Nelson, William G.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; De Marzo, Angelo M.

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer, the majority of which is adenocarcinoma, is the most common epithelial cancer affecting a majority of elderly men in Western nations. Its manifestation, however, varies from clinically asymptomatic insidious neoplasms that progress slowly and do not threaten life to one that is highly aggressive with a propensity for metastatic spread and lethality if not treated in time. A number of somatic genetic and epigenetic alterations occur in prostate cancer cells. Some of these changes, such as loss of the tumor suppressors PTEN and p53, are linked to disease progression. Others, such as ETS gene fusions, appear to be linked more with early phases of the disease, such as invasion. Alterations in chromosome 8q24 in the region of MYC have also been linked to disease aggressiveness for many years. However, a number of recent studies in human tissues have indicated that MYC appears to be activated at the earliest phases of prostate cancer (e.g., in tumor-initiating cells) in prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, a key precursor lesion to invasive prostatic adenocarcinoma. The initiation and early progression of prostate cancer can be recapitulated in genetically engineered mouse models, permitting a richer understanding of the cause and effects of loss of tumor suppressors and activation of MYC. The combination of studies using human tissues and mouse models paints an emerging molecular picture of prostate cancer development and early progression. This picture reveals that MYC contributes to disease initiation and progression by stimulating an embryonic stem cell–like signature characterized by an enrichment of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and by repressing differentiation. These insights pave the way to potential novel therapeutic concepts based on MYC biology. PMID:21779461

  6. Bisphenol A Promotes Human Prostate Stem-Progenitor Cell Self-Renewal and Increases In Vivo Carcinogenesis in Human Prostate Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wen-Yang; Shi, Guang-Bin; Hu, Dan-Ping; Majumdar, Shyama; Li, Guannan; Huang, Ke; Nelles, Jason L.; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Walker, Cheryl Lyn; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; van Breemen, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies in rodent models have shown that early-life exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) reprograms the prostate and enhances its susceptibility to hormonal carcinogenesis with aging. To determine whether the human prostate is similarly sensitive to BPA, the current study used human prostate epithelial stem-like cells cultured from prostates of young, disease-free donors. Similar to estradiol-17β (E2), BPA increased stem-progenitor cell self-renewal and expression of stem-related genes in a dose-dependent manner. Further, 10 nM BPA and E2 possessed equimolar membrane-initiated signaling with robust induction of p-Akt and p-Erk at 15 minutes. To assess in vivo carcinogenicity, human prostate stem-progenitor cells combined with rat mesenchyme were grown as renal grafts in nude mice, forming normal human prostate epithelium at 1 month. Developmental BPA exposure was achieved through oral administration of 100 or 250 μg BPA/kg body weight to hosts for 2 weeks after grafting, producing free BPA levels of 0.39 and 1.35 ng/mL serum, respectively. Carcinogenesis was driven by testosterone plus E2 treatment for 2 to 4 months to model rising E2 levels in aging men. The incidence of high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia and adenocarcinoma markedly increased from 13% in oil-fed controls to 33% to 36% in grafts exposed in vivo to BPA (P < .05). Continuous developmental BPA exposure through in vitro (200 nM) plus in vivo (250 μg/kg body weight) treatments increased high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia/cancer incidence to 45% (P < .01). Together, the present findings demonstrate that human prostate stem-progenitor cells are direct BPA targets and that developmental exposure to BPA at low doses increases hormone-dependent cancer risk in the human prostate epithelium. PMID:24424067

  7. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical immunotherapy mimicking prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Białek, Waldemar; Rudzki, Sławomir; Iberszer, Paweł; Wronecki, Lech

    2016-12-01

    Intravesical immunotherapy with attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis is a widely used therapeutic option in patients with non-muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. A rare complication of intravesical therapy with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is granulomatous prostatitis, which due to increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen and abnormalities found in transrectal examination of the prostate may suggest concomitant prostate cancer. A case of extensive granulomatous prostatitis in a 61-year-old patient which occurred after the first course of a well-tolerated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy is presented. Due to abnormalities found in rectal examination and an abnormal transrectal ultrasound image of the prostate with extensive infiltration mimicking neoplastic hyperplasia a core biopsy of the prostate was performed. Histopathological examination revealed inflammatory infiltration sites of tuberculosis origin.

  8. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical immunotherapy mimicking prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rudzki, Sławomir; Iberszer, Paweł; Wronecki, Lech

    2016-01-01

    Intravesical immunotherapy with attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis is a widely used therapeutic option in patients with non-muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. A rare complication of intravesical therapy with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is granulomatous prostatitis, which due to increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen and abnormalities found in transrectal examination of the prostate may suggest concomitant prostate cancer. A case of extensive granulomatous prostatitis in a 61-year-old patient which occurred after the first course of a well-tolerated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy is presented. Due to abnormalities found in rectal examination and an abnormal transrectal ultrasound image of the prostate with extensive infiltration mimicking neoplastic hyperplasia a core biopsy of the prostate was performed. Histopathological examination revealed inflammatory infiltration sites of tuberculosis origin. PMID:28138411

  9. [Sexuality and prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Colson, M-H; Lechevallier, E; Rambeaud, J-J; Alimi, J-C; Faix, A; Gravis, G; Hannoun-Levi, J-M; Quintens, H; Rébillard, X; Droupy, S

    2012-09-01

    All treatments of prostate cancer have a negative effect on both sexuality and male fertility. There is a specific profile of changes in the fields of quality of life, sexual, urinary, bowel and vitality according to the treatment modalities chosen. Maintain a satisfying sex is the main concern of a majority of men facing prostate cancer and its treatment. It is essential to assess the couple's sexuality before diagnosis of prostate cancer in order to deliver complete information and to consider early and appropriate treatment options at the request of the couple. Forms of sexuality sexual preference settings stored (orgasm) may, when the erection is not yet recovered, be an alternative to the couple to maintain intimacy and complicity. In all cases, a specific management and networking will in many cases to find a satisfactory sexuality. Consequences of the treatment on male fertility should be part of the information of patients with prostate cancer and their partners. The choice of treatment must take into account the desire of paternity of the couple. A semen analysis with sperm cryopreservation before any therapy should be routinely offered in men with prostate cancer, particularly among men under 55, with a partner under 43 years old or without children. If the desire for parenthood among couples, sperm cryopreservation before treatment and medical assisted reproduction are recommended.

  10. The Prostate Health Index Selectively Identifies Clinically Significant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, Stacy; Sanda, Martin G.; Broyles, Dennis L.; Shin, Sanghyuk S.; Bangma, Chris H.; Wei, John T.; Partin, Alan W.; Klee, George G.; Slawin, Kevin M.; Marks, Leonard S.; van Schaik, Ron H. N.; Chan, Daniel W.; Sokoll, Lori J.; Cruz, Amabelle B.; Mizrahi, Isaac A.; Catalona, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The Prostate Health Index (phi) is a new test combining total, free and [-2]proPSA into a single score. It was recently approved by the FDA and is now commercially available in the U.S., Europe and Australia. We investigate whether phi improves specificity for detecting clinically significant prostate cancer and can help reduce prostate cancer over diagnosis. Materials and Methods From a multicenter prospective trial we identified 658 men age 50 years or older with prostate specific antigen 4 to 10 ng/ml and normal digital rectal examination who underwent prostate biopsy. In this population we compared the performance of prostate specific antigen, % free prostate specific antigen, [-2]proPSA and phi to predict biopsy results and, specifically, the presence of clinically significant prostate cancer using multiple criteria. Results The Prostate Health Index was significantly higher in men with Gleason 7 or greater and “Epstein significant” cancer. On receiver operating characteristic analysis phi had the highest AUC for overall cancer (AUCs phi 0.708, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.648, [-2]proPSA 0.550 and prostate specific antigen 0.516), Gleason 7 or greater (AUCs phi 0.707, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.661, [-2]proPSA 0.558, prostate specific antigen 0.551) and significant cancer (AUCs phi 0.698, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.654, [-2]proPSA 0.550, prostate specific antigen 0.549). At the 90% sensitivity cut point for phi (a score less than 28.6) 30.1% of patients could have been spared an unnecessary biopsy for benign disease or insignificant prostate cancer compared to 21.7% using percent free prostate specific antigen. Conclusions The new phi test outperforms its individual components of total, free and [-2]proPSA for the identification of clinically significant prostate cancer. Phi may be useful as part of a multivariable approach to reduce prostate biopsies and over diagnosis. PMID:25463993

  11. Expectant Management (Watchful Waiting) and Active Surveillance for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Watchful Waiting or Active Surveillance for Prostate Cancer Because prostate cancer often grows very slowly, some ... Away or Comes Back After Treatment More In Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  12. What Are the Key Statistics for Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Research? Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer Key Statistics for Prostate Cancer How common is prostate cancer? ... at some point are still alive today. For statistics related to survival, see Survival Rates for Prostate ...

  13. Sirolimus, Docetaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-10

    Castration Levels of Testosterone; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; PSA Progression; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  14. Pharmacotherapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, P; Indudhara, R

    1994-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia is a benign neoplasm of the prostate seen in men of advancing age. Microscopic evidence of the disorder is seen in about 70% of men by 70 years of age, whereas symptoms requiring some form of surgical intervention occur in 30% of men during their lifetime. Although the exact cause of benign prostatic hyperplasia is not clear, it is well recognized that high levels of intraprostatic androgens are required for the maintenance of prostatic growth. In recent years, extensive surveys of patients undergoing transurethral resection of the prostate reveal an 18% incidence of morbidity that has essentially not changed in the past 30 years. This procedure is also the second highest reimbursed surgical therapy under Medicare. These findings have resulted in an intensive search for alternative therapies for prostatic hyperplasia. An alternative that has now been well defined is the use of alpha-adrenergic blockers to relax the prostatic urethra. This is based on findings that a major component of benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms is spasm of the prostatic urethra and bladder neck, which is mediated by the alpha-adrenergic nerves. A second approach is to block androgens involved in maintaining prostate growth. Several such drugs are now available for clinical use, and we discuss their side effects and use. We also include the newer recommendations on evaluating benign prostatic hyperplasia that are cost-effective yet comprehensive. Images PMID:7528957

  15. Promoter Hypermethylation in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Y.

    2011-01-01

    Background The prostate gland is the most common site of cancer and the second leading cause of cancer mortality in American men. It is well known that epigenetic alterations such as DNA methylation within the regulatory (promoter) regions of genes are associated with transcriptional silencing in cancer. Promoter hypermethylation of critical pathway genes could be potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for prostate cancer. Methods This review discusses current information on methylated genes associated with prostate cancer development and progression. Results Over 30 genes have been investigated for promoter methylation in prostate cancer. These methylated genes are involved in critical pathways, such as DNA repair, metabolism, and invasion/metastasis. The role of hypermethylated genes in regulation of critical pathways in prostate cancer is reviewed. Conclusions These findings may provide new information of the pathogenesis of prostate cancer. Certain epigenetic alterations in prostate tumors are being translated into clinical practice for therapeutic use. PMID:20861812

  16. Prostate PDT dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Timothy C.; Finlay, Jarod C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary We provide a review of the current state of dosimetry in prostate photodynamic therapy (PDT). PDT of the human prostate has been performed with a number of different photosensitizers and with a variety of dosimetry schemes. The simplest clinical light dose prescription is to quantify the total light energy emitted per length (J/cm) of cylindrical diffusing fibers (CDF) for patients treated with a defined photosensitizer injection per body weight. However, this approach does not take into account the light scattering by tissue and usually underestimates the local light fluence rate, and consequently the fluence. Techniques have been developed to characterize tissue optical properties and light fluence rates in vivo using interstitial measurements during prostate PDT. Optical methods have been developed to characterize tissue absorption and scattering spectra, which in turn provide information about tissue oxygenation and drug concentration. Fluorescence techniques can be used to quantify drug concentrations and photobleaching rates of photosensitizers. PMID:25046988

  17. Benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, R J

    1997-01-01

    The clinical syndrome of benign prostatic hyperplasia reflects a complex interplay between benign prostatic enlargement, which will affect almost all men by the age of 80, and the resulting outlet obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms. The disease is now known to adversely affect the quality of life of around one man in three over the age of 50. New medical treatments and new surgical interventions are challenging the previous standard treatment of transurethral resection of prostate, which continues to have a morbidity of 17% and some mortality. Primary care will be increasingly involved in shared care with particular emphasis on monitoring of patients on watchful waiting medical therapy- and following operative intervention. PMID:9196969

  18. Olaparib With or Without Cediranib in Treating Patients With Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Castration-Resistant Prostate Carcinoma; Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma With Focal Neuroendocrine Differentiation; Prostate Carcinoma Metastatic in the Bone; Prostate Small Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Adenocarcinoma

  19. Association of Diet With Prostate Specific Antigen and Prostate Volume

    PubMed Central

    Shirazi, Mehdi; Ariafar, Ali; Zeyghami, Shahryar; Hosseini, Mohammad Mehdi; Khezri, Abdol Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prostate is an important male reproductive system gland and its disorders can affect men's quality of life and health. Prostatitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate adenocarcinoma are major disorders that can be found in all men in different ages. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the association of diet with serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) level as well as prostate volume. Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 950 men older than 40 years of age who had attended our clinic for a screening program for prostate cancer were enrolled. Data was extracted from the program database. The eligible cases included all noncancerous subjects with available data concerning serum PSA level and prostate volume; the patients had completed a 50-item self-administered food frequency questionnaire about their diet during the preceding two year. Results: No overall association was found between the consumption of foods and prostate volume as well as serum PSA level. There was a significant correlations between age and serum PSA level (r = 0.24) as well as with prostate volume (r = 0.22) (P < 0.001). In addition, there was a significant correlation between serum PSA level and prostate volume (r = 0.41 and P < 0.001). Conclusions: The results of this study confirmed the previous reports regarding the serum PSA level correlation with prostate volume. There was no evidence that dietary patterns might have any important effect on prostate volume and serum PSA in this Iranian population. PMID:25695023

  20. Survival in prostate cancer prevention trial detailed

    Cancer.gov

    In the NCI-sponsored Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial, initial findings from a decade ago showed that the drug finasteride significantly reduced the risk of prostate cancer, but among those who did develop prostate cancer, paradoxically, the drug was asso

  1. Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... HPV-Associated Lung Ovarian Skin Uterine Cancer Home Prostate Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity Language: English Español ( ... Tweet Share Compartir The rate of men getting prostate cancer or dying from prostate cancer varies by race ...

  2. Transurethral resection of the prostate - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    TURP - discharge; Prostate resection - transurethral - discharge ... You had transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) surgery to treat an enlarged prostate. Your surgeon inserted a tube-like tool called a cystoscope (or endoscope) through your urethra ( ...

  3. Enlarged prostate - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... as men get older. This is called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). An enlarged prostate may cause you problems ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23234640 . Roehrborn CG. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: Etiology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, and natural history. In: Wein ...

  4. Treatment Options by Stage (Prostate Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system . It lies just below the bladder (the organ ... part of the semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  5. Simultaneous haploinsufficiency of Pten and Trp53 tumor suppressor genes accelerates tumorigenesis in a mouse model of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Suzana S.; Cao, Mei; Duarte, Paulo C.; Banach-Petrosky, Whitney; Wang, Shunyou; Romanienko, Peter; Wu, Hong; Cardiff, Robert D.; Abate-Shen, Cory; Cunha, Gerald R.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor suppressor gene PTEN is important in the initiation and progression of human prostate carcinoma, whereas the role of TP53 remains controversial. Since Pten/Trp53 double conditional knockout mice show earlier onset and fast progression of prostate cancer when compared to Pten knockout mice, we asked whether heterozygosity of these two tumor suppressor genes was sufficient to accelerate prostatic tumorigenesis. To answer this question we examined prostatic lesion progression of Pten/Trp53 double heterozygous mice and a series of controls such as Pten heterozygous, Pten conditional knockout, Trp53 heterozygous and Trp53 knockout mice. Tissue recombination of adult prostatic epithelium coupled with embryonic rat seminal vesicle mesenchyme was used as a tool to stimulate prostatic epithelial proliferation. In our study, high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) was found with high frequency at 8 weeks post-tissue recombination transplantation. PIN lesions in Pten/Trp53 double heterozygous mice were more severe than those seen in Pten heterozygous alone. Furthermore, morphologic features attributable to Pten or Trp53 loss appeared to be enhanced in double heterozygous tissues. LOH analysis of Pten and Trp53 in genomic DNA collected from high-grade PIN lesions in Pten heterozygous and Pten/Trp53 double heterozygous mice showed an intact wild-type allele for both genes in all samples examined. In conclusion, simultaneous heterozygosity of Pten and Trp53 accelerates prostatic tumorigenesis in this mouse model of prostate cancer independently of loss of heterozygosity of either gene. PMID:19281769

  6. Origin and Properties of Prostatic Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    treating prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia . prostate 6 integrin Bcl-2 S tem cell biology and tumorigenesis may be closely linked...In addition to being a source of carcinomas, stem cells may also give rise to benign prostatic hyperplasia (7). The isolation and characterization of...expression may contribute to the etiology of prostatic diseases such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (48), proliferative inflam- matory atrophy, which

  7. Tuberculous prostatitis: mimicking a cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, El Majdoub; Abdelhak, Khallouk; Hassan, Farih Moulay

    2016-01-01

    Genitourinary tuberculosis is a common type of extra-pulmonary tuberculosis . The kidneys, ureter, bladder or genital organs are usually involved. Tuberculosis of the prostate has mainly been described in immune-compromised patients. However, it can exceptionally be found as an isolated lesion in immune-competent patients. Tuberculosis of the prostate may be difficult to differentiate from carcinoma of the prostate and the chronic prostatitis when the prostate is hard and nodular on digital rectal examination and the urine is negative for tuberculosis bacilli. In many cases, a diagnosis of tuberculous prostatitis is made by the pathologist, or the disease is found incidentally after transurethral resection. Therefore, suspicion of tuberculous prostatitis requires a confirmatory biopsy of the prostate. We report the case of 60-year-old man who presented a low urinary tract syndrome. After clinical and biological examination, and imaging, prostate cancer was highly suspected. Transrectal needle biopsy of the prostate was performed and histological examination showed tuberculosis lesions. PMID:28292092

  8. Common Questions About Chronic Prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Holt, James D; Garrett, W Allan; McCurry, Tyler K; Teichman, Joel M H

    2016-02-15

    Chronic prostatitis is relatively common, with a lifetime prevalence of 1.8% to 8.2%. Risk factors include conditions that facilitate introduction of bacteria into the urethra and prostate (which also predispose the patient to urinary tract infections) and conditions that can lead to chronic neuropathic pain. Chronic prostatitis must be differentiated from other causes of chronic pelvic pain, such as interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and pelvic floor dysfunction; prostate and bladder cancers; benign prostatic hyperplasia; urolithiasis; and other causes of dysuria, urinary frequency, and nocturia. The National Institutes of Health divides prostatitis into four syndromes: acute bacterial prostatitis, chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP), chronic nonbacterial prostatitis (CNP)/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS), and asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis. CBP and CNP/CPPS both lead to pelvic pain and lower urinary tract symptoms. CBP presents as recurrent urinary tract infections with the same organism identified on repeated cultures; it responds to a prolonged course of an antibiotic that adequately penetrates the prostate, if the urine culture suggests sensitivity. If four to six weeks of antibiotic therapy is effective but symptoms recur, another course may be prescribed, perhaps in combination with alpha blockers or nonopioid analgesics. CNP/CPPS, accounting for more than 90% of chronic prostatitis cases, presents as prostatic pain lasting at least three months without consistent culture results. Weak evidence supports the use of alpha blockers, pain medications, and a four- to six-week course of antibiotics for the treatment of CNP/CPPS. Patients may also be referred to a psychologist experienced in managing chronic pain. Experts on this condition recommend a combination of treatments tailored to the patient's phenotypic presentation. Urology referral should be considered when appropriate treatment is ineffective. Additional treatments include pelvic

  9. Cholesterol and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael R; Solomon, Keith R

    2004-01-01

    Cholesterol is a neutral lipid that accumulates in liquid-ordered, detergent-resistant membrane domains called lipid rafts. Lipid rafts serve as membrane platforms for signal transduction mechanisms that mediate cell growth, survival, and a variety of other processes relevant to cancer. A number of studies, going back many years, demonstrate that cholesterol accumulates in solid tumors and that cholesterol homeostasis breaks down in the prostate with aging and with the transition to the malignant state. This review summarizes the established links between cholesterol and prostate cancer (PCa), with a focus on how accumulation of cholesterol within the lipid raft component of the plasma membrane may stimulate signaling pathways that promote progression to hormone refractory disease. We propose that increases in cholesterol in prostate tumor cell membranes, resulting from increases in circulating levels or from dysregulation of endogenous synthesis, results in the coalescence of raft domains. This would have the effect of sequestering positive regulators of oncogenic signaling within rafts, while maintaining negative regulators in the liquid-disordered membrane fraction. This approach toward examining the function of lipid rafts in prostate cancer cells may provide insight into the role of circulating cholesterol in malignant growth and on the potential relationship between diet and aggressive disease. Large-scale characterization of proteins that localize to cholesterol-rich domains may help unveil signaling networks and pathways that will lead to identification of new biomarkers for disease progression and potentially to novel targets for therapeutic intervention.

  10. [Grading of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Kristiansen, G; Roth, W; Helpap, B

    2016-07-01

    The current grading of prostate cancer is based on the classification system of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) following a consensus conference in Chicago in 2014. The foundations are based on the frequently modified grading system of Gleason. This article presents a brief description of the development to the current ISUP grading system.

  11. [Prostate cancer brachytherapy].

    PubMed

    Pommier, P; Guérif, S; Peiffert, D; Créhange, G; Hannoun-Lévi, J-M; de Crevoisier, R

    2016-09-01

    Prostate brachytherapy techniques are described, concerning both Iodine 125 high dose rate brachytherapy. The following parts are presented: brachytherapy indications, technical description, immediate postoperative management and post-treatment evaluation, and 4 to 6 weeks as well as long-term follow-up.

  12. Intraprostatic injection of neutralized zinc in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Fahim, M.S.; Wang, M.; Sutcu, M.F.; Fahim, Z.; Safron, J.A.; Ganjam, V.K. Xian Medical University )

    1991-03-11

    Zinc has been implicated in steroid endocrinology of the prostate gland. The conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) by 5{alpha}-reductase enzyme is believed to express androgenic responses in the prostate. To note the effect of neutralized zinc on the prostate, 50 sexually mature rats, weighing 325 {plus minus} 20 grams, were divided into 5 groups as follows: (1) control, (2) sham, (3) castrated, (4) injected intraprostatically with 10 mg. neutralized zinc, and (5) injected intraprostatically with 20 mg. neutralized zinc. Results in the treated groups indicated significant reduction of prostate weights, 12% and 53% and histologically normal prostate; no significant change in weight and histological structure of testes, epididymides, and seminal vesicles; significant reduction in 5{alpha}-reductase activity and total protein and DNA concentrations in prostate tissue; and no significant effect on progeny of treated animals. These results suggest that direct application of neutralized zinc to the prostate offers a new modality for treatment of prostatitis without affecting spermatogenesis and testosterone production.

  13. Intercellular communication and human prostate carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Carruba, Giuseppe; Stefano, Rosalba; Cocciadiferro, Letizia; Saladino, Francesca; Di Cristina, Antonietta; Tokar, Erik; Quader, Salmann T A; Webber, Mukta M; Castagnetta, Luigi

    2002-06-01

    Gap-junction-mediated intercellular communication (GJIC) is required for completion of embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, and regulation of cell proliferation and death. Although, as emphasized in several reports, defects or disruption of GJIC may be important in carcinogenesis, the potential role of GJIC in the onset and progression of human prostate cancer remains ill-defined. The gap junction channel-forming connexins (Cx) comprise a multigene family of highly conserved proteins that are differentially expressed in a tissue- and development-specific manner; changes in connexin expression are also commonly seen during cellular differentiation. However, when multiple connexins are concurrently expressed, gap junction channels may consist of more than one connexin species. This is important, because only certain pairings give rise to functional channels. In our studies, we investigated GJIC in a panel of both nontumorigenic (RWPE-1) and malignant (RWPE-2, LNCaP, DU-145) human prostate epithelial cells, compared to a normal rat liver epithelial F344 (WB-1) cell line, as it was found to be junctionally proficient. In addition, expression and regulation of Cx43 and Cx32 were also inspected using western blot analysis. The ability of hormones, antihormones, and the antihypertensive drug forskolin to restore GJIC in nontumorigenic and malignant human prostate epithelial cells was examined by the scrape-loading/dye transfer (SL/DT) or fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) methods using an Ultima laser cytometer. Results from both assays showed that neither nontumorigenic nor malignant prostate cells have functional GJIC. However, both estrone (E1) and forskolin (FK) induced a significant increase (4.4- and 2.8-fold, respectively) in cell-cell communication only in the RWPE-1 cells. Interestingly, the use of Matrigel, a solubilized basement membrane, as substrate for cell attachment and growth resulted in the rescue of GJIC activity in RWPE-1 cells, as

  14. The androgen receptor: a biologically relevant vaccine target for the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Olson, Brian M; Johnson, Laura E; McNeel, Douglas G

    2013-03-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays an essential role in the development and progression of prostate cancer. However, while it has long been the primary molecular target of metastatic prostate cancer therapies, it has not been explored as an immunotherapeutic target. In particular, the AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is a potentially attractive target, as it has an identical sequence among humans as well as among multiple species, providing a logical candidate for preclinical evaluation. In this report, we evaluated the immune and anti-tumor efficacy of a DNA vaccine targeting the AR LBD (pTVG-AR) in relevant rodent preclinical models. We found immunization of HHDII-DR1 mice, which express human HLA-A2 and HLA-DR1, with pTVG-AR augmented AR LBD HLA-A2-restricted peptide-specific, cytotoxic immune responses in vivo that could lyse human prostate cancer cells. Using an HLA-A2-expressing autochthonous model of prostate cancer, immunization with pTVG-AR augmented HLA-A2-restricted immune responses that could lyse syngeneic prostate tumor cells and led to a decrease in tumor burden and an increase in overall survival of tumor-bearing animals. Finally, immunization decreased prostate tumor growth in Copenhagen rats that was associated with a Th1-type immune response. These data show that the AR is as a prostate cancer immunological target antigen and that a DNA vaccine targeting the AR LBD is an attractive candidate for clinical evaluation.

  15. Phenylbutyrate induces apoptosis in human prostate cancer and is more potent than phenylacetate.

    PubMed

    Carducci, M A; Nelson, J B; Chan-Tack, K M; Ayyagari, S R; Sweatt, W H; Campbell, P A; Nelson, W G; Simons, J W

    1996-02-01

    Phenylbutyrate (PB), a novel lead compound for prostate cancer therapy, has molecular activities distinct from its metabolite, phenylacetate (PA). Both PB and PA promote differentiation in human prostate cancer cell lines, yet little data exist comparing the cytotoxic effects of each drug. We found that PB is more potent than PA in vitro; PB is 1.5-2.5 times more active at inhibiting growth and inducing programmed cell death than PA at clinically achievable doses against each human prostate cancer line studied. PB is equipotent to sodium butyrate, which induces apoptosis and differentiation through multiple mechanisms. Exposure of prostate cancer cell lines to PB reduces their DNA synthesis, leads to fragmentation of genomic DNA, and causes 50-60% of cells to undergo apoptosis. These PB-induced effects are 2-10 times greater than those of the control or PA. The stereotypical changes of apoptosis can be seen with sodium butyrate at similar concentrations, but not with PA. Prostate cancer cell lines overexpressing P-glycoprotein or possessing heterogeneous molecular alterations, including p53 mutations, are also sensitive to the effects of PB. In vivo, Copenhagen rats treated with oral PB had delayed growth of the androgen refractory Dunning R-3327 MAT-LyLu prostate cancer subline by 30-45% in a dose-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that PB induces cytotoxicity via apoptosis in human prostate cancer, in addition to its differentiating properties.

  16. Metagenomic sequencing of expressed prostate secretions.

    PubMed

    Smelov, Vitaly; Arroyo Mühr, L Sara; Bzhalava, Davit; Brown, Lyndon J; Komyakov, Boris; Dillner, Joakim

    2014-12-01

    To investigate which microorganisms may be present in expressed prostate secretions (EPS) metagenomic sequencing (MGS) was applied to prostate secretion samples from five men with prostatitis and five matched control men as well as to combined expressed prostate secretion and urine from six patients with prostate cancer and six matched control men. The prostate secretion samples contained a variety of bacterial sequences, mostly belonging to the Proteobacteria phylum. The combined prostate secretion and urine samples were dominated by abundant presence of the JC polyomavirus, representing >20% of all detected metagenomic sequence reads. There were also other viruses detected, for example, human papillomavirus type 81. All combined prostate secretion and urine samples were also positive for Proteobacteria. In summary, MGS of expressed prostate secretion is informative for detecting a variety of bacteria and viruses, suggesting that a more large-scale use of MGS of prostate secretions may be useful in medical and epidemiological studies of prostate infections.

  17. Testosterone Therapy and Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Emily; Morgentaler, Abraham

    2016-05-01

    Changes in understanding regarding the relationship of androgens and prostate cancer have led to changes in the use of testosterone therapy. The evidence supports a finite ability of androgens to stimulate prostate cancer growth, with a maximum achieved at low testosterone concentrations, called the saturation model. The saturation point corresponds with maximal androgenic stimulation at 250 ng/dL. Evidence is reviewed herein regarding the relationship of testosterone to prostate cancer and the relatively new practice of offering testosterone therapy to men with a history of prostate cancer. Although no prospective controlled trials have been performed, results have been reassuring.

  18. Prostatic Leiomyoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mellas, Soufiane; Bouchikhi, Ahmed Amine; Tazi, Mohammed-Fadl; Khallouk, Abdelhak; Elammari, Jalal-Eddin; El Fassi, Mohammed-Jamal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Prostatic enlargement due to benign adenomatous hyperplasia is very common in elderly males. However, benign mesenchymal tumors especially true leiomyoma of the prostate are rare. We describe a 68-year-old male presenting a urinary obstruction lasting more than two years. The patient was referred for an acute urinary retention. The clinical examination was normal. The perrectal examination revealed an enlarged prostate without abnormalities. An endoscopic resection was performed. The histopathological examination revealed a benign smooth muscle tumor with absence of glandular hyperplasia; the result was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Accordingly, the diagnosis of true leiomyoma of the prostate was made. PMID:23198266

  19. Prostatic leiomyoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mellas, Soufiane; Bouchikhi, Ahmed Amine; Tazi, Mohammed-Fadl; Khallouk, Abdelhak; Elammari, Jalal-Eddin; El Fassi, Mohammed-Jamal; Farih, Moulay Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Prostatic enlargement due to benign adenomatous hyperplasia is very common in elderly males. However, benign mesenchymal tumors especially true leiomyoma of the prostate are rare. We describe a 68-year-old male presenting a urinary obstruction lasting more than two years. The patient was referred for an acute urinary retention. The clinical examination was normal. The perrectal examination revealed an enlarged prostate without abnormalities. An endoscopic resection was performed. The histopathological examination revealed a benign smooth muscle tumor with absence of glandular hyperplasia; the result was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Accordingly, the diagnosis of true leiomyoma of the prostate was made.

  20. Urinary Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tosoian, Jeffrey J; Ross, Ashley E; Sokoll, Lori J; Partin, Alan W; Pavlovich, Christian P

    2016-02-01

    In light of the overdiagnosis and overtreatment associated with widespread prostate-specific antigen-based screening, controversy persists surrounding the detection and diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa). Given its anatomic proximity to the prostate, urine has been proposed as a noninvasive substrate for prostatic biomarkers. With greater understanding of the molecular pathways of carcinogenesis and significant technological advances, the breadth of potential biomarkers is substantial. In this review, the authors aim to provide an evidence-based assessment of current and emerging urinary biomarkers used in the detection and prognostication of PCa and high-grade PCa, with particular attention on clinically relevant findings.

  1. Influence of aqueous extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. petal on cadmium toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Asagba, S O; Adaikpoh, M A; Kadiri, H; Obi, F O

    2007-01-01

    The effects of chronic exposure to cadmium (Cd) on some selected biochemical parameters, as well as the possible protective role of aqueous extracts of Hibiscus sabdariffa L petal were studied in 12-wk-old male Wistar albino rats. Exposure to Cd caused a significant increase in plasma Lalanine aminotransferases (ALT) only but with a corresponding decrease in liver L-alanine and L-aspartate aminotransferases (L-ALT, L-AST) when compared to the Cd-free control. Total superoxide dismutase activity was decreased in the liver, testis, and prostate of Cd-exposed rats, whereas malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations were increased relative to the Cd-free control. The metal significantly increased prostatic acid phosphatase activity in the prostate, but decreased the body weight gain of the rats and organ/body weight ratio for prostate and testis compared to the Cd-free control. Pretreatment of rats with aqueous extract of H. sabdariffa resulted in significantly less hepatotoxicity than with Cd alone as measured by plasma ALT and liver ALT and AST activities. The extract also protected the rats against Cd-induced liver, prostate, and testis lipoperoxidation as evidenced by significantly reduced MDA values in these organs, as well as reduced prostatic acid phosphatase activity in the prostate, when compared to the Cd-only exposed rats. Also, when compared to the organ/body weight ratios obtained from rats exposed to Cd alone the prostate and testis were protected by the extract as shown by enhanced prostate/body weight and testis/body weight ratios of Cd- and extract-treated rats. These data suggest that H. sabdarrifa L might be protective in Cd toxicity.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of Prostatic Fluids for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    most widely used marker of prostate cancer - and prostate cancer risk. Moreover, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which is also strongly associated...Vigneron, D.B., Konety, B., Nelson, S.J., Narayan, P., and Hricak, H. Citrate as in vivo marker to discriminate prostate cancer from benign prostatic hyperplasia and

  3. Effects of maternal diabetes on male offspring: high cell proliferation and increased activity of MMP-2 in the ventral prostate.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, A A; Carvalho, C P; Santos, E M B; Botelho, F V; Araújo, F A; Deconte, S R; Tomiosso, T C; Balbi, A P C; Zanon, R G; Taboga, S R; Góes, R M; Ribeiro, D L

    2014-10-01

    This study presents a comprehensive view of the histological and functional status of the prostate of adult rat offspring of mothers subjected to gestational diabetes induced by alloxan. The ventral prostate of male adult offspring of diabetic (DP) or normal (CP) mothers was evaluated for collagen fibres, cell death, fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, cell proliferation, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), androgen receptors (AR), transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ-1), catalase and total antioxidant activity. The prostates of DP animals were lower in weight than those of the CP group. The DP group also exhibited hyperglycaemia and hypotestosteronemia, higher cell proliferation and AR expression, a reduction in α-actin (possibly interfering with the reproductive function of the prostate), and enhanced activity of MMP-2, although the absolute content of MMP-2 was lower in this group. These findings were associated with increased TGFβ-1 and decreased collagen distribution. The prostates of DP rats additionally exhibited reductions in catalase and total antioxidant activity. Thus, rats developing in a diabetic intrauterine environment have glycaemic and hormonal changes that impact on the structure and physiology of the prostate in adulthood. The increased AR expression possibly leads to elevated cell proliferation. Stromal remodelling was characterized by enhanced activity of MMP-2 and collagen degradation, even with increased TGFβ-1 activation. These changes associated with increased oxidative stress might interfere with tissue architecture and glandular homeostasis.

  4. Nonspecific Presentation of a Multiloculated Prostatic Abscess After Transurethral Prostatic Biopsy for Elevated Prostate-specific Antigen Level

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Nilay M.; Lin, Joseph; Schaeffer, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Prostate postbiopsy infectious complications typically present in the form of prostatitis and uncommonly urosepsis. Prostatic abscesses are generally found after multiple bouts of prostatitis and are associated with a clinically septic picture requiring intensive care unit admission and resuscitation. We report the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with prostatic abscess in the setting of nonspecific urinary symptoms after transrectal ultrasonography–guided prostate biopsy. At 4-month follow-up, he is currently free of disease with undetectable prostate-specific antigen level and negative imaging. PMID:26958487

  5. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    FAS activity in prostatectomy samples, intraprostatic lipid as measured by MRSI and prostate tumor aggressiveness. 3) To quantify key metabolic ...intermediates involved in lipid metabolism , mitochondrial function, inflammation, and apoptosis in the prostatectomy samples. 15. SUBJECT TERMS : none...vivo intraprostatic fat as measured by 1H MRSI, metabolic signatures of lipid oxidation and metabolism , and prostate cancer aggressiveness, our

  6. Simulated prostate biopsy: prostate cancer distribution and clinical correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, John J.; Zeng, Jianchao; Zhang, Wei; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Dean, Robert; Moul, Judd W.; Mun, Seong K.

    2000-04-01

    Our group has recently obtained data based upon whole- mounted step-sectioned radical prostatectomy specimens using a 3D computer assisted prostate biopsy simulator that suggests an increased detection rate is possible using laterally placed biopsies. A new 10-core biopsy pattern was demonstrated to be superior to the traditional sextant biopsy. This patter includes the traditional sextant biopsy cores and four laterally placed biopsies in the right and left apex and mid portion of the prostate gland. The objective of this study is to confirm the higher prostate cancer defection rate obtained using our simulated 10-core biopsy pattern in a small clinical trial. We retrospectively reviewed 35 consecutive patients with a pathologic diagnosis of prostate cancer biopsied by a single urologist using the 10-core prostate biopsy patterns were compared with respect to prostate cancer detection rate. Of the 35 patients diagnosed with prostate cancer, 54.3 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent were diagnosed when reviewing the sextant biopsy data only. Review of the 10-core pattern revealed that an additional 45.7 percent of patients were diagnosed solely with the laterally placed biopsies. Our results suggest that biopsy protocols that use laterally placed biopsies based upon a five region anatomical model are superior to the routinely used sextant prostate biopsy pattern.

  7. Prostate Cancer MR Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fütterer, Jurgen J.

    With a total of 192,280 new cases predicted for 2009, prostate cancer (PC) now accounts for 25% of all new male cancers diagnosed in the United States [1]. Furthermore, in their lifetime, one in six men will be clinically diagnosed with having PC, although many more men are found to have histological evidence of PC at autopsy [2,3,4]. Presently, approximately 1 in 10 men will die of PC [5,6]. The ever-aging population and wider spread use of the blood prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test [7,8], as well as the tendency to apply lower cut-off levels for this test [9], will further increase the diagnosis of this disease [10].

  8. Transperineal Prostate Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Muntener, Michael; Patriciu, Alexandru; Petrisor, Doru; Schär, Michael; Ursu, Daniel; Song, Danny Y.; Stoianovici, Dan

    2011-01-01

    The study was approved by the animal care and use committee. The purpose of the study was to prospectively establish proof of principle in vivo in canines for a magnetic resonance (MR) imaging–compatible robotic system designed for image-guided prostatic needle intervention. The entire robot is built with nonmagnetic and dielectric materials and in its current configuration is designed to perform fully automated brachytherapy seed placement within a closed MR imager. With a 3.0-T imager, in four dogs the median error for MR imaging–guided needle positioning and seed positioning was 2.02 mm (range, 0.86–3.18 mm) and 2.50 mm (range, 1.45–10.54 mm), respectively. The robotic system is capable of accurate MR imaging–guided prostatic needle intervention within a standard MR imager in vivo in a canine model. PMID:18430882

  9. A signaling network in phenylephrine-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jayoung; Yanagihara, Yutaka; Kikugawa, Tadahiko; Ji, Mihee; Tanji, Nozomu; Masayoshi, Yokoyama; Freeman, Michael R

    2009-08-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is an age-related disease of unknown etiology characterized by prostatic enlargement and coinciding with distinctive alterations in tissue histomorphology. To identify the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of BPH, we conducted a DNA microarray study using a previously described animal model in which chronic alpha(1)-adrenergic stimulation by repeated administration of phenylephrine evokes histomorphological changes in the rat prostate that resemble human BPH. Bioinformatic tools were applied to microarray data obtained from prostate tissue to construct a network model of potentially relevant signal transduction pathways. Significant involvement of inflammatory pathways was demonstrable, including evidence for activation of a TGF-beta signaling cascade. The heterodimeric protein clusterin (apolipoprotein J) was also identified as a prominent node in the network. Responsiveness of TGF-beta signaling and clusterin gene and protein expression were confirmed independently of the microarray data, verifying some components of the model. This is the first attempt to develop a comprehensive molecular network for histological BPH induced by adrenergic activation. The study also implicated clusterin as a novel biochemical target for therapy.

  10. Incidental fleurodeoxyglucose uptake in the prostate.

    PubMed

    Wong, W L; Moule, R N; Nunan, T

    2010-11-01

    This commentary confirms the rarity of prostatic cancer associated with incidental prostatic fleurodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake. The study adds to the literature by showing that even if a prostate lesion is FDG avid it is unlikely to be due to cancer. The commentary considers the management of incidental prostate FDG uptake on the basis of the available evidence.

  11. Incidental fleurodeoxyglucose uptake in the prostate

    PubMed Central

    Wong, W L; Moule, R N; Nunan, T

    2010-01-01

    This commentary confirms the rarity of prostatic cancer associated with incidental prostatic fleurodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake. The study adds to the literature by showing that even if a prostate lesion is FDG avid it is unlikely to be due to cancer. The commentary considers the management of incidental prostate FDG uptake on the basis of the available evidence. PMID:20965899

  12. Clinicopathological Overview of Granulomatous Prostatitis: An Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Dravid, Nandkumar; Nikumbh, Dhiraj; Patil, Ashish; Nagappa, Karibasappa Gundabaktha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Granulomatous prostatitis is a rare inflammatory condition of the prostate. Granulomatous prostatitis is important because, it mimics prostatic carcinoma clinically and hence the diagnosis can be made only by histopathological examination. Aim To study the histomorphological features and to know the prevalence of granulomatous prostatitis. Materials and Methods Histopathological records of 1,203 prostatic specimens received in the Department of the Pathology over a period of five years (June 2009 – June 2014). Seventeen cases of histopathologically, diagnosed granulomatous prostatitis were retrieved and reterospective data was collected from the patient’s records. Results Out of 17 cases of granulomatous prostatitis, we encountered 9 cases of non-specific granulomatous prostatitis, 5 cases of xanthogranulomatous prostatitis and 3 cases of specific tubercular prostatitis. The common age ranged from 51-75 years (mean 63 years) with mean PSA level of 15.8ng/ml. Six patients showed focal hypoechoic areas on TRUS and 11 cases revealed hard and fixed nodule on DRE. Conclusion Non-specific granulomatous prostatitis is the most common type of granulomatous prostatitis. There is no specific pattern of clinical, biochemical and ultrasound findings that allows the diagnosis of granulomatous prostatitis or differentiates it from prostatic carcinoma. Hence, histomorphological diagnosis is the gold standard in differentiating various prostatic lesions. PMID:27014642

  13. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    Prostate-specific antigen; Prostate cancer screening test; PSA ... special steps are needed to prepare for this test. ... Reasons for a PSA test: This test may be done to screen for prostate cancer. It is also used to follow people after prostate cancer ...

  14. High-dose dietary zinc promotes prostate intraepithelial neoplasia in a murine tumor induction model.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young Hwii; Woo, Yu Jeong; Kim, Jin Wook; Choi, Hoon; Kang, Seok Ho; Lee, Jeong Gu; Kim, Je Jong; Park, Hong Seok; Cheon, Jun

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the role of high-dose dietary zinc in the process of prostate malignancy, 60 Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: tumor induction with carcinogen and hormone (group 1), oral zinc administration without tumor induction (group 2), oral zinc administration with tumor induction (group 3) and a control without zinc administration or tumor induction (group 4). Zinc was supplied orally in the form of zinc sulfate heptahydrate dissolved in drinking water to groups 2 and 3 for 20 weeks. Although the serum level of zinc measured at 20 weeks was maintained similarly in each group (P = 0.082), intraprostatic zinc concentrations were statistically different. Group 1 prostates contained the least amount of zinc in both the dorsolateral and ventral lobes at levels of 36.3 and 4.8 microg g(-1), respectively. However, in group 3, zinc levels increased in both lobes to 59.3 and 12.1 microg g(-1), respectively, comparable with that of group 4 (54.5 +/- 14.6 and 14.1 +/- 2.4 microg g(-1)). In spite of these increases in zinc concentration, the prevalence of prostate intraepithelial neoplasm was rather increased in group 3 (53.3% and 46.7%) compared with group 1 (33.3% and 33.3%) in both dorsolateral and ventral prostate lobes. Although prostate intraepithelial neoplasm did not develop in any prostate in group 4, zinc administration did induce prostate intraepithelial neoplasm in group 2 (46.7% and 40.0%). Thus, although high dietary zinc increased intraprostatic zinc concentrations, it promoted, instead of preventing, prostate intraepithelial neoplasm in a murine prostate malignancy induction model.

  15. Prostate Focused Ultrasound Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier; Crouzet, Sébastien; Gelet, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The tremendous progress in engineering and computing power coupled with ultrasound transducer technology and imaging modalities over the past 20 years have encouraged a revival of clinical interest in ultrasound therapy, mainly in High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). So far, the most extensive results from HIFU obtained in urology involve transrectal prostate ablation, which appears to be an effective therapeutic alternative for patients with malignant prostate tumors. Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in men. Several treatment options with different therapeutic approaches exist, including HIFU for localized PCa that has been in use for over 15 years. Since the early 2000s, two systems have been marketed for this application, and other devices are currently in clinical trials. HIFU treatment can be used either alone or in combination with (before- or after-) external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (before or after HIFU) and can be repeated multiple times. HIFU treatment is performed under real-time monitoring with ultrasound or guided by MRI. Two indications are validated today: Primary care treatment and EBRT failure. The results of HIFU for primary care treatment are similar to standard conformal EBRT, even though no randomized comparative studies have been performed and no 10-year follow up data is yet available for HIFU. Salvage HIFU after EBRT failure is increasing with oncological outcomes, similar to those achieved with surgery but with the advantage of fewer adverse effects. HIFU is an evolving technology perfectly adapted for focal treatment. Thus, HIFU focal therapy is another pathway that must be explored when considering the accuracy and reliability for PCa mapping techniques. HIFU would be particularly suited for such a therapy since it is clear that HIFU outcomes and toxicity are relative to the volume of prostate treated.

  16. Tocotrienols and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    factors [1-3]. Some evidence supports the protective effects of tomato products ( lycopene ), soy products (isoflavonoids) and fruits. Secondary...tocopherols and tocotrienols, have variable growth inhibitory effects on both types of prostate cancer cell line models. The gamma isoforms are more... effective than the alpha isoforms and the tocotrienols are more effective than the tocopherols. This study further showed that the vitamin E-mediated

  17. Detection of DNA viruses in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Smelov, Vitaly; Bzhalava, Davit; Arroyo Mühr, Laila Sara; Eklund, Carina; Komyakov, Boris; Gorelov, Andrey; Dillner, Joakim; Hultin, Emilie

    2016-04-28

    We tested prostatic secretions from men with and without prostate cancer (13 cases and 13 matched controls) or prostatitis (18 cases and 18 matched controls) with metagenomic sequencing. A large number (>200) of viral reads was only detected among four prostate cancer cases (1 patient each positive for Merkel cell polyomavirus, JC polyomavirus and Human Papillomavirus types 89 or 40, respectively). Lower numbers of reads from a large variety of viruses were detected in all patient groups. Our knowledge of the biology of the prostate may be furthered by the fact that DNA viruses are commonly shed from the prostate and can be readily detected by metagenomic sequencing of expressed prostate secretions.

  18. Polyphenols and Prostate Cancer Chemoprevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    prostate chemoprevention are the soy isoflavone, genistein, and the tea catechin , (-)- epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG). Another polyphenol that has...diet high in soy products have reduced incidence of clinically manifested prostate cancers. Likewise, Asians have a long history of drinking tea

  19. Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map.

    PubMed

    Datta, Dipamoy; Aftabuddin, Md; Gupta, Dinesh Kumar; Raha, Sanghamitra; Sen, Prosenjit

    2016-08-01

    Human prostate cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease that mainly affects elder male population of the western world with a high rate of mortality. Acquisitions of diverse sets of hallmark capabilities along with an aberrant functioning of androgen receptor signaling are the central driving forces behind prostatic tumorigenesis and its transition into metastatic castration resistant disease. These hallmark capabilities arise due to an intense orchestration of several crucial factors, including deregulation of vital cell physiological processes, inactivation of tumor suppressive activity and disruption of prostate gland specific cellular homeostasis. The molecular complexity and redundancy of oncoproteins signaling in prostate cancer demands for concurrent inhibition of multiple hallmark associated pathways. By an extensive manual curation of the published biomedical literature, we have developed Human Prostate Cancer Hallmarks Map (HPCHM), an onco-functional atlas of human prostate cancer associated signaling and events. It explores molecular architecture of prostate cancer signaling at various levels, namely key protein components, molecular connectivity map, oncogenic signaling pathway map, pathway based functional connectivity map etc. Here, we briefly represent the systems level understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with prostate tumorigenesis by considering each and individual molecular and cell biological events of this disease process.

  20. Vitamin E and Prostate Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin E, its metabolites or its analogs, might help prevent prostate cancer initiation or progression. Prostate cancer is the most common non-skin malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the United States, exceeded only by lung cancer. About 218,890 new cases of prost...

  1. Prostate resection - minimally invasive - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23234640 . Roehrborn CG. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: Etiology, pathophysiology, epidemiology, and natural history. In: Wein ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Enlarged Prostate (BPH) Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  2. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy.

  3. HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER RISK FACTORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prostate cancer has the highest prevalence of any non-skin cancer in the human body, with similar likelihood of neoplastic foci found within the prostates of men around the world regardless of diet, occupation, lifestyle, or other factors. Essentially all men with circulating an...

  4. Genomic Rearrangements in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Christopher E.; Rubin, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Genomic instability is a fundamental feature of human cancer, leading to the activation of oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressors. In prostate cancer, structural genomic rearrangements, resulting in gene fusions, amplifications and deletions, are a critical mechanism effecting these alterations. Here we review recent literature regarding the importance of genomic rearrangements in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer and the potential impact on patient care. Recent findings Next generation sequencing has revealed a striking abundance, complexity, and heterogeneity of genomic rearrangements in prostate cancer. These recent studies have nominated a number of processes in predisposing prostate cancer to genomic rearrangements, including androgen-induced transcription. Summary Structural rearrangements are the critical mechanism resulting in the characteristic genomic changes associated with prostate cancer pathogenesis and progression. Future studies will determine if the impact of these events on tumor phenotypes can be translated to clinical utility for patient prognosis and choices of management strategies. PMID:25393273

  5. [Optimized standards for prostate biopsy].

    PubMed

    Wullich, B; Füssel, S; Grobholz, R

    2007-06-01

    As individual risk assessment mainly depends on the correct prediction of the tumor's biological behavior, primary diagnosis plays a key role in the clinical management of prostate cancer patients. Prostate core needle biopsy, as a primary diagnostic tool, should not only confirm clinical suspicion but also supply the urologist with information which is necessary for risk-adapted therapy. The experience and competence of both the urologist and the pathologist are crucial for the quality of prostate core needle biopsy diagnosis. Optimized handling and submission of prostate core needle biopsy specimens by the urologist to the pathologist are of outstanding importance for improving the number of cancer cases detected. Increasing availability of molecular markers leads to the necessity of developing new tissue sampling procedures which allow prostate core needle biopsy specimens to be simultaneously studied histologically and by molecular approaches.

  6. Biomarkers in localized prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferro, Matteo; Buonerba, Carlo; Terracciano, Daniela; Lucarelli, Giuseppe; Cosimato, Vincenzo; Bottero, Danilo; Deliu, Victor M; Ditonno, Pasquale; Perdonà, Sisto; Autorino, Riccardo; Coman, Ioman; De Placido, Sabino; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe; De Cobelli, Ottavio

    2016-02-01

    Biomarkers can improve prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment. Accuracy of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) for early diagnosis of prostate cancer is not satisfactory, as it is an organ- but not cancer-specific biomarker, and it can be improved by using models that incorporate PSA along with other test results, such as prostate cancer antigen 3, the molecular forms of PSA (proPSA, benign PSA and intact PSA), as well as kallikreins. Recent reports suggest that new tools may be provided by metabolomic studies as shown by preliminary data on sarcosine. Additional molecular biomarkers have been identified by the use of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics. We review the most relevant biomarkers for early diagnosis and management of localized prostate cancer.

  7. Characterization of alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes in tension response of human prostate to electrical field stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Guh, J. H.; Chueh, S. C.; Ko, F. N.; Teng, C. M.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of various alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists and nifedipine on tension responses of human prostate to electrical field stimulation were evaluated in this study. 2. Prazosin (3 x 10(-10) to 10(-8) M) and 5-methyl-urapidil (10(-9) to 3 x 10(-8) M) blocked concentration-dependently the tension responses to electrical field stimulation and completely abolished them in the maximal concentrations (10(-8) M and 3 x 10(-8) M, respectively); in contrast, chloroethylclonidine (CEC), in the maximal concentration of 100 microM, blocked these effects by only 50%. 3. The contractile responses of rat vas deferens and spleen to exogenously-applied alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonists were competitively inhibited by prazosin and 5-methyl-urapidil; in addition, the pA2 values were calculated and the relative potencies with reference to prazosin were obtained. The relative potency of 5-methyl-urapidil in human prostate (0.105) was close to that in rat vas deferens (0.257), which contains primarily putative alpha 1A-adrenoceptors. However, it was much more than that in rat spleen (0.011), which contains primarily putative alpha 1B-adrenoceptors. 4. Nifedipine (10(-8) to 10(-6) M) inhibited concentration-dependently the contractile responses to electrical field stimulation in human prostate; in addition, the inhibition percentages were similar to those to exogenously-applied noradrenaline in rat vas deferens. In contrast, CEC (10 microM), which almost flattened the concentration-response curve of the rat spleen to phenylephrine, only partially inhibited (by 33.1%) the nerve-mediated contraction of human prostate. 5. The involvement of prejunctional alpha 2-adrenoceptors situated on the sympathetic nerve terminals of human prostate was also examined.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7647968

  8. What's New in Prostate Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Research? Prostate Cancer About Prostate Cancer What’s New in Prostate Cancer Research? Research into the causes, ... in many medical centers throughout the world. Genetics New research on gene changes linked to prostate cancer ...

  9. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) - Series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The prostate gland is an organ that surrounds the urinary urethra in men. It secretes fluid that mixes with ... An enlarged prostate gland compresses the urethra, causing problems with ... is caused by prostate gland overgrowth (benign prostatic ...

  10. A Prospective Randomized Trial of Two Different Prostate Biopsy Schemes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-03

    Prostate Cancer; Local Anesthesia; Prostate-Specific Antigen/Blood; Biopsy/Methods; Image-guided Biopsy/Methods; Prostatic Neoplasms/Diagnosis; Prostate/Pathology; Prospective Studies; Humans; Male; Ultrasonography, Interventional/Methods

  11. Treating Enlarged Prostate (BPH): Which Drugs Work Best

    MedlinePlus

    ... the prostate gets larger. This is called prostate enlargement, or BPH (benign prostatic hyperplasia). Why should I ... alpha-blocker doxazosin for a first treatment. Prostate enlargement affects millions of men, including about half of ...

  12. Diabetes causes multiple genetic alterations and downregulates expression of DNA repair genes in the prostate.

    PubMed

    Ye, Chunwei; Li, Xiaojuan; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Yuying; Cai, Mengyin; Zhu, Baoyi; Mu, Panwei; Xia, Xuan; Zhao, Yi; Weng, Jianping; Gao, Xin; Wen, Xingqiao

    2011-09-01

    The molecular impact of diabetes mellitus on prostate gland has not been elucidated. In this study, we performed a whole-genome cDNA microarray analysis using a streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model to identify the effects of diabetes on the gene expression profiles in prostate. Our study shows that diabetes causes changes in the expression of multiple genes, particularly those related to cell proliferation and differentiation, oxidative stress, DNA damage repair, cell cycle checkpoints, angiogenesis and apoptosis. These findings were confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemical staining using rat and human prostate tissue. We also used a cell culture model (human normal prostatic RWPE-1 cell line) to study the direct effect of high glucose. We found that high glucose caused increased intracellular oxidative stress and DNA damage, as well as downregulation of anti-oxidative enzymes and DNA damage repair genes MRE11 and XRCC3. Our findings provide important insights into understanding the pathogenesis of the diabetes-induced changes in prostate as well as identifying potential therapeutic targets for future studies.

  13. Qianliening capsule treats benign prostatic hyperplasia via suppression of the EGF/STAT3 signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    LIN, JIUMAO; ZHOU, JIANHENG; XU, WEI; ZHONG, XIAOYONG; HONG, ZHENFENG; PENG, JUN

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a pathological overgrowth of the human prostate. It may cause increased resistance to urine flow through the urethra and occasionally kidney damage, bladder stones and urinary tract infections, and therefore affect the quality of life. Qianliening capsule (QC) is a traditional Chinese formula that has been used clinically in China to treat BPH for a number of years. However, the mechanism of its anti-BPH effect remains largely unknown. We evaluated the therapeutic effect of QC in a rat model of BPH, established by the injection of testosterone following castration, and investigated the underlying molecular mechanism of action. We observed that QC treatment significantly and dose-dependently decreased the prostatic volume (PV) and prostatic index (PI; P<0.05 or P<0.01), and ameliorated the histological damage of the prostate tissue in the BPH rats. In addition, treatment with QC inhibited the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), as well as the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), cyclin D1 and Bcl-2. Our results suggest that suppression of the EGF/STAT3 pathway may be one of the mechanisms by which QC treats BPH. PMID:23737867

  14. QUANTITATIVE STUDIES OF PROSTATIC SECRETION

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, Charles; Sommer, John Lambert

    1953-01-01

    The prostate of the dog was relocated permanently in the perineum where its size could be measured and correlated with the output of prostatic secretion during many months. The secretion of a submaxillary gland obtained through a fistula was utilized as an internal biologic standard of the effects of pilocarpine, the secretory stimulus employed, because the amount and route of administration of the alkaloid are critical factors in inducing secretion. Prostatic secretion was found to be profoundly affected by androgenic and estrogenic compounds, in contrast to salivation. The curves of the secretory response of the prostate and submaxillary glands to pilocarpine proved to be similar and a mathematical formula has been constructed to represent them. When testosterone propionate was administered in increasing quantities for periods of weeks at each level, the volume of the prostate increased in a series of flattened curves. This volume, under the conditions mentioned, was found to stand in a simple arithmetic relationship to the amount of testosterone propionate administered. Moderate quantities of testosterone propionate masked the effects of small amounts of stilbestrol on the prostate. The reverse was also true and the critical amounts of these compounds were defined. The amounts of stilbestrol were determined which lowered the quantity of prostatic secretion resulting from the simultaneous administration of moderate amounts of testosterone propionate in castrate dogs, the result being a level and flat secretory curve which was maintained for many weeks. We designate this effect the plateau phenomenon. When this amount of estrogen was continued, and the dosage of testosterone propionate greatly augmented, the prostatic secretion did not increase in volume. Very slight increases above the critical amount of stilbestrol, however, caused the secretory curve to fall to new and still lower levels though the secretion was never completely suppressed. The acid phosphatase

  15. Prostate Artery Embolization for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: Current Status.

    PubMed

    Mirakhur, Anirudh; McWilliams, Justin P

    2017-02-01

    Prostate artery embolization has garnered much attention as a promising treatment for lower urinary tract symptoms secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia. We aim to provide an up-to-date review of this minimally invasive technique, including discussion of potential benefits and technical challenges. Current evidence suggests it is a safe and effective option for patients with medication-refractory urinary obstructive symptoms who are poor surgical candidates or refuse surgical therapy. Larger, randomized studies with long-term follow-up data are needed for this technique to be formally established in the treatment paradigm for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  16. Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Dialyzable Leukocyte Extract in Autoimmune Prostatitis: Evaluation in Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Alvarado, Carlos; Gómez, Consuelo; Reyes, Miguel; García, Mario; Pérez, Elizabeth; Pérez de la Mora, Carlos; Sanchez, Virginia

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the anti-inflammatory properties of Dialyzable Leukocyte Extract (DLE) in a murine model of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS). Methods. Histopathological characterization, prostatein Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, and immunohistochemical analysis for CD45, TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-17, and IL-4 molecules were done in prostatic Wistar rats treated with DLE, placebo, or Dexamethasone. Results. Histopathological analysis of animals induced to prostatitis showed inflammatory infiltrate, mainly constituted by leucocytes and mast cells as well as Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. Serum prostatein concentrations were 14 times higher than those displayed by healthy animals. After DLE and Dexamethasone treatments, the inflammatory infiltrate decreased; the tissue morphology was similar to that of a normal prostate, and the prostatein decreased to the basal levels of healthy animals. DLE treatment produced a decreased expression of the cell surface marker CD45 and the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-17. On the other hand, the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 increased in both the Dexamethasone and DLE groups. Conclusion. DLE is able to modulate the inflammatory response in Experimental Autoimmune Prostatitis (EAP). PMID:28386549

  17. The histological and histometrical effects of Urtica dioica extract on rat’s prostate hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Hamid Reza; Erfani Majd, Naeem; Esmaeilzadeh, Saleh; Fatemi Tabatabaei, Sayed Reza

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common disease in human that gradual overgrowth of the prostate gland leads to impinge on the urethra with impairment in urinary function. Numerous plants improve uncontrolled growth of the prostate gland and improve urinary tract symptoms associated with BPH. In this study, 25 healthy adult male Wistar rats were divided randomly in five groups: G1 (Control group) received ordinary feed without any treatment, G2 received 10 mg kg-1 testosterone subcutaneously, G3 received 50 mg kg-1 nettle root extract orally, G4 received 50 mg kg-1 nettle root extract orally and 10 mg kg-1 testosterone, G5 received 10 mg kg-1 almond oil (Almond oil was used as testosterone solvent) subcutaneously. After six weeks, volume and weight of each lobe were measured and samples were taken. The 5 to 6 µm thickness sections were made using paraffin embedding method and stained by hematoxylin and eosin and periodic acid-Schiff. The results showed that prostate volume and ratio of prostate to body weight were increased significantly in the testosterone. Histological and histometrical results showed that dorsal and lateral type 1 and 2 lobes were not changed significantly but the ventral and anterior lobes have changed significantly. Over all, the nettle root could prevent from some of prostatic hyperplasia effects, so that percentage of folded alveoli in ventral lobe reduced insignificantly. PMID:25992248

  18. Multiplexed Analysis of Circulating Prostate Tumor and Host Response Markers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia , organ-confined prostate cancer, "metastatic prostate cancer, and no disease. Further development of high...organ-confined prostate cancer, non-organ-confined prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia , and no disease. These experiments were performed on

  19. Infections and inflammation in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Sfanos, Karen S; Isaacs, William B; De Marzo, Angelo M

    2013-12-25

    The frequent observation of both acute and chronic inflammation of unknown stimulus in the adult prostate has motivated a large body of research aimed at identifying potential infectious agents that may elicit prostatic inflammation. The overarching hypothesis is that infection-induced inflammation may be associated with prostate cancer development or progression, as inflammation is known to serve as an "enabling characteristic" of cancer. With recent advances in molecular techniques for microorganism identification, a panoply of microorganisms has been scrutinized in prostate tissues and in relation to prostate carcinogenesis. The aim of this review is to summarize the current literature on the evidence for infectious agents as a contributing factor to prostatic inflammation and prostate cancer, and to highlight recent literature suggesting an infectious etiology to the biogenesis of prostatic corpora amylacea and on the development of mouse models of prostatic infections.

  20. Infections and inflammation in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sfanos, Karen S; Isaacs, William B; Marzo, Angelo M De

    2013-01-01

    The frequent observation of both acute and chronic inflammation of unknown stimulus in the adult prostate has motivated a large body of research aimed at identifying potential infectious agents that may elicit prostatic inflammation. The overarching hypothesis is that infection-induced inflammation may be associated with prostate cancer development or progression, as inflammation is known to serve as an “enabling characteristic” of cancer. With recent advances in molecular techniques for microorganism identification, a panoply of microorganisms has been scrutinized in prostate tissues and in relation to prostate carcinogenesis. The aim of this review is to summarize the current literature on the evidence for infectious agents as a contributing factor to prostatic inflammation and prostate cancer, and to highlight recent literature suggesting an infectious etiology to the biogenesis of prostatic corpora amylacea and on the development of mouse models of prostatic infections. PMID:25110720

  1. Dose-response effect of Red Maca (Lepidium meyenii) on benign prostatic hyperplasia induced by testosterone enanthate.

    PubMed

    Gasco, M; Villegas, L; Yucra, S; Rubio, J; Gonzales, G F

    2007-08-01

    The main goal of this study was to determine the effect of a freeze-dried aqueous extract of the red variety of Lepidium meyenii (Red Maca) on testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in adult rats of the Holtzman strain. Rats were treated with freeze-dried aqueous extract of Red Maca at doses of 0, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.5 g/kg body wt. A positive control group received Finasteride (0.6 mg/kg body wt.). After treatment, the animals were sacrificed, and the ventral prostate was extracted, and weighed. HPLC was used to determine the presence of glucosinolates in Red Maca. The prostate weight diminished in a dose-dependent fashion in rats treated with Red Maca. The effect of Red Maca was better than that observed with Finasteride. Finasteride, but not Red Maca, reduced seminal vesicles weight. Analysis of the HPLC indicated the presence of benzyl glucosinolate (Glucotropaeolin) with a content of 0.639%. Serum testosterone levels were not affected by Red Maca. Moreover, serum testosterone levels were not related to prostate or seminal vesicles weight in rats treated with vehicle and Red Maca. In conclusion, Red Maca administered orally in rats seems to exert an inhibitory effect at a level post DHT conversion, on the BPH-induced experimentally, although a direct measure of reductase action would still be required.

  2. Prostate MR Imaging: An Update.

    PubMed

    Shaish, Hiram; Taneja, Samir S; Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2017-03-01

    Improvements in prostate MR imaging techniques and the introduction of MR imaging-targeted biopsies have had central roles in prostate cancer (PCa) management. The role of MR imaging has progressed from largely staging patients with biopsy-proven PCa to detecting, characterizing, and guiding the biopsy of suspected PCa. These diagnostic advances, combined with improved therapeutic interventions, have led to a more sophisticated and individually tailored approach to patients' unique PCa profile. This review discusses the MR imaging, a standardized reporting scheme, and the role of fusion-targeted prostate biopsy.

  3. Therapeutic Effects of Oligonol, Acupuncture, and Quantum Light Therapy in Chronic Nonbacterial Prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Öztekin, İlhan; Akdere, Hakan; Can, Nuray; Aktoz, Tevfik; Turan, Fatma Nesrin

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to compare anti-inflammatory effects of oligonol, acupuncture, and quantum light therapy in rat models of estrogen-induced prostatitis. Adult male Wistar albino rats were grouped as follows: Group I, control (n = 10); Group II, chronic prostatitis (n = 10); Group III, oligonol (n = 10); Group IV, acupuncture (n = 10); Group V, quantum (n = 10); Group VI, oligonol plus quantum (n = 10); Group VII, acupuncture plus oligonol (n = 10); Group VIII, quantum plus acupuncture (n = 10); and Group IX, acupuncture plus quantum plus oligonol (n = 10). Chronic prostatitis (CP) was induced by the administration of 17-beta-estradiol (E2) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Oligonol was given for 6 weeks at a dose of 60 mg/day. Acupuncture needles were inserted at CV 3/4 and bilaterally B 32/35 points with 1-hour manual stimulation. Quantum therapy was administered in 5-minute sessions three times weekly for 6 weeks. Lateral lobes of prostates were dissected for histopathologic evaluation. Although all of the treatment modalities tested in this study showed anti-inflammatory effects in the treatment of CP in male rats, a synergistic effect was observed for oligonol plus quantum light combination. Monotherapy with oligonol showed a superior anti-inflammatory efficacy as compared to quantum light and acupuncture monotherapies. PMID:26064171

  4. Down-regulation of the large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ channel, K(Ca)1.1 in the prostatic stromal cells of benign prostate hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Satomi; Ohya, Susumu; Kojima, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Shoichi; Yamamura, Hisao; Sakuragi, Motomu; Kohri, Kenjiro; Imaizumi, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK(Ca)) channel encoded by K(Ca)1.1 plays an important role in the control of smooth muscle tone by modulating membrane potential and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. BK(Ca) channel is functionally expressed in prostatic smooth muscle cells, and is activated by α(1)-adrenoceptor agonists. The main objective of this study was to elucidate the pathophysiological significance of changes in prostatic K(Ca)1.1 expressions in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Our previous study has shown that K(Ca)3.1 encoding intermediate-conductance K(Ca) (IK(Ca)) channel is up-regulated in stromal cells of implanted urogenital sinuses (UGSs) of stromal hyperplasia BPH model rats and in those of prostatic tissues from BPH patients. In the present study, the results from real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Western blot, and immunohistochemical analyses showed significant down-regulation of K(Ca)1.1 transcripts and proteins and negative correlation between K(Ca)1.1 and K(Ca)3.1 transcript expressions in prostatic stromal cells of both BPH model rats and BPH patients. Corresponding to down-regulation of K(Ca)1.1 expression in stromal cells of implanted UGSs, membrane depolarization by application of the BK(Ca) channel blocker was disappeared. Down-regulation of K(Ca)1.1 may be involved in the phenotype switch from contractile profile to proliferative one in prostatic stromal cells of BPH patients.

  5. N-acetylcysteine Ameliorates Prostatitis via miR-141 Regulating Keap1/Nrf2 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang-Liang; Huang, Yu-Hua; Yan, Chun-Yin; Wei, Xue-Dong; Hou, Jian-Quan; Pu, Jin-Xian; Lv, Jin-Xing

    2016-04-01

    Chronic prostatitis was the most common type of prostatitis and oxidative stress was reported to be highly elevated in prostatitis patients. In this study, we determined the effect of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on prostatitis and the molecular mechanism involved in it. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: control group (group A, n = 20), carrageenan-induced chronic nonbacterial prostatitis (CNP) model group (group B, n = 20), and carrageenan-induced CNP model group with NAC injection (group C, n = 20). Eye score, locomotion score, inflammatory cell count, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) expression, and Evans blue were compared in these three groups. The expression of miR-141 was determined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Moreover, protein expressions of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 (Keap1) and nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) and its target genes were examined by Western blot. Luciferase reporter assay was performed in RWPE-1 cells transfected miR-141 mimic or inhibitor and the plasmid carrying 3'-UTR of Keap1. The value of eye score, locomotion score, inflammatory cell count, and Evans blue were significantly decreased in group C, as well as the expression of COX2, when comparing to that of group B. These results indicated that NAC relieved the carrageenan-induced CNP. Further, we found that NAC increased the expression of miR-141 and activated the Keap1/Nrf2 signaling. Luciferase reporter assay revealed that miR-141 mimic could suppress the activity of Keap1 and stimulate the downstream target genes of Nrf2. In addition, miR-141 inhibitor could reduce the effect of NAC on prostatitis. NAC ameliorates the carrageenan-induced prostatitis and prostate inflammation pain through miR-141 regulating Keap1/Nrf2 signaling.

  6. Identifying Molecular Targets for Chemoprevention in a Rat Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    parametric t-test was applied to each data set for each of the quantitated characteristics. The resulting p values are recorded above each pair of...and the development of PIN was difficult to estimate. The prostate samples did not show the two populations in continuity, nor was there a continuous... lycopene and curcumin on experimental rat prostate carcinogenesis. Carcinogenesis 2001;22:467-72. [19] Nelson CP, Kidd LC, Sauvageot J, Isaacs WB, De

  7. Disruption of Prostate Epithelial Differentiation Pathways and Prostate Cancer Development

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Sander B.; Miranti, Cindy K.

    2013-01-01

    One of the foremost problems in the prostate cancer (PCa) field is the inability to distinguish aggressive from indolent disease, which leads to difficult prognoses and thousands of unnecessary surgeries. This limitation stems from the fact that the mechanisms of tumorigenesis in the prostate are poorly understood. Some genetic alterations are commonly reported in prostate tumors, including upregulation of Myc, fusion of Ets genes to androgen-regulated promoters, and loss of Pten. However, the specific roles of these aberrations in tumor initiation and progression are poorly understood. Likewise, the cell of origin for PCa remains controversial and may be linked to the aggressive potential of the tumor. One important clue is that prostate tumors co-express basal and luminal protein markers that are restricted to their distinct cell types in normal tissue. Prostate epithelium contains layer-specific stem cells as well as rare bipotent cells, which can differentiate into basal or luminal cells. We hypothesize that the primary oncogenic cell of origin is a transient-differentiating bipotent cell. Such a cell must maintain tight temporal and spatial control of differentiation pathways, thus increasing its susceptibility for oncogenic disruption. In support of this hypothesis, many of the pathways known to be involved in prostate differentiation can be linked to genes commonly altered in PCa. In this article, we review what is known about important differentiation pathways (Myc, p38MAPK, Notch, PI3K/Pten) in the prostate and how their misregulation could lead to oncogenesis. Better understanding of normal differentiation will offer new insights into tumor initiation and may help explain the functional significance of common genetic alterations seen in PCa. Additionally, this understanding could lead to new methods for classifying prostate tumors based on their differentiation status and may aid in identifying more aggressive tumors. PMID:24199173

  8. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    saturation bands (six for fat and two for water) were used to minimize lipid/water contamination to the VOI. The 2D MRSI sequence details are: TR/TE... fat as measured by in-vivo imaging using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging in the prediction of prostate disease aggressiveness...histology, in-vivo intraprostatic fat as measured by 1H MRSI, metabolic signatures of lipid oxidation and metabolism, and prostate cancer

  9. Morpho-physiological heterogeneity of cells within two rat prostate carcinoma cell lines AT-2 and MAT-LyLu differing in the degree of malignancy observed by cell cloning and the effects of caffeine, theophylline and papaverine upon a proportion of the clones.

    PubMed

    Musialik, Ewa; Ryszawy, Damian; Madeja, Zbigniew; Korohoda, Wlodzimierz

    2013-05-01

    Analysis of the heterogeneity of clones of single cells from two established lines of the Dunning series of rat prostate carcinoma differing in the degree of malignancy, AT-2 (moderately malignant) and MAT-LyLu (highly malignant), was conducted. The results showed that not only the original tumors and primary cell cultures were heterogeneous but also the established cell lines of tumor origin. In the MAT-LyLu cell line, the clones of cells with morpho-physiological features characteristic of malignant cells dominated, whereas diverse types of clones were present in the AT-2 cell line. Differences in cell morphology (EMT), multi-layering and release from contact inhibition followed by active migration were observed and found to be correlated with increased expression of proteins involved in cancer cell invasiveness: connexin 43 and transcription factor Snail. Caffeine, theophylline and papaverine, reported to show anticancer activity in vivo, were found to decrease the proportion of clones displaying malignant cell features in the AT-2 cell line. At the tested concentrations, these compounds reversibly retarded cell growth but did not inhibit it. The results showed that the heterogeneity of cell populations within the cell lines should be taken into account in experiments carried out in vitro on established model cancer cell lines.

  10. Qianliening capsule inhibits benign prostatic hyperplasia angiogenesis via the HIF-1α signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    LIN, JIUMAO; ZHOU, JIANHENG; XU, WEI; HONG, ZHENFENG; PENG, JUN

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in the progression and development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and has become a promising target for BPH treatment. The hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) signaling pathway promotes the process of angiogenesis, contributing to the growth and progression of a number of hyperplasia diseases, including BPH. Qianliening capsule (QC) is a traditional Chinese formula that has been used clinically in China to treat BPH for a number of years. Recently, QC was demonstrated to inhibit prostatic cell growth and induce apoptosis in vivo and in vitro via regulating the epidermal growth factor/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling pathway and mitochondrion-dependent apoptosis pathway. However, the mechanisms underlying the anti-BPH effect remain largely unknown. To further elucidate the mechanism of QC activity in BPH treatment, a rat BPH model established by injecting testosterone following castration was established and the effect of QC on prostatic tissue angiogenesis was evaluated, as well as the underlying molecular mechanisms. QC was shown to reduce the prostatic index in BPH rats, but without affecting the body weight, demonstrating that QC is effective in the treatment of BPH and without apparent toxicity. In addition, QC treatment significantly reduced the intraprostatic microvessel density, indicating antiangiogenesis activity in vivo. In addition, treatment with QC inhibited the expression of HIF-1α in BPH rats, as well as the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor. Therefore, for the first time, the present study hypothesized that QC inhibits angiogenesis in prostatic tissue of BPH rats via the inhibition of the HIF-1α signaling pathway, which may be one of the mechanisms in which QC treats BPH. PMID:24944609

  11. Genetics Home Reference: prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genes. Others act as tumor suppressors through different pathways. Changes in these genes probably make only a small contribution to overall prostate cancer risk. However, researchers suspect that the combined influence ...

  12. Minority issues in prostate disease.

    PubMed

    French, Dan B; Jones, LeRoy A

    2005-07-01

    This article has discussed the increased incidence and disproportionately increased mortality of prostate cancer among African American men.Although the exact reasons are unknown, genetics may play a role, in addition to health care practices. Morbidity from other disease states, such as diabetes, obesity, or hypertension, may influence the overall survival of patients with prostate cancer. Current research tools will continue to explore biologic differences between the races; however, socioeconomic status and access to health care must not be overlooked. Several studies have demonstrated that similar disease stages and equal access to health care will result in similar outcomes. It is recognized that screening for prostate cancer will remain a controversial topic. Several influential professional societies recommend against screening and other professional societies endorse screening. Large-scale trials are currently underway hoping to answer this critical question. Since the advent of current screening tools, however, it seems that the overall mortality for prostate cancer has decreased and this cannot be ignored. Certainly, screening programs and clinical trials have traditionally had difficulty in recruiting minority participants, although more recent trials seem to be finding success. A primary care physician who is viewed as competent by their patients can certainly have a positive impact on their African American patients' willingness to participate in studies and screening programs. Most importantly, on the individual level, primary care physicians can provide a great service to their minority patients by offering educational materials on prostate cancer and by offering screening to qualified patients. The current American Urologic Association and National Cancer Institute guidelines recommend offering screening to all men age 50 and above. African American men or men with a first-degree relative with prostate cancer should be offered screening beginning at

  13. Center for Prostate Disease Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Careers CPDR Celebrates 25 Years of innovative basic science and clinical research to develop promising detection techniques and treatments for prostate cancer Basic Science Research Program Two of the major activities of ...

  14. [The magnetotherapy of chronic prostatitis].

    PubMed

    Mokhort, V A; Voshchula, V I

    1998-01-01

    Low-frequency magnetic field generated by the unit ProSPOK was found more efficient than that of the unit Polyus-1 in physiotherapy of chronic prostatitis. The ProSPOK magnetotherapy stimulates ganglia, improves regeneration and circulation.

  15. Identification of Androgen Receptor and Beta-Catenin Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Transdisciplinary Research in Epigenetics and Cancer Journal Clubs and Transdisciplinary Science Meetings, biweekly and monthly 3. To gain expertise...Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Laura Lamb CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Washington University...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Identification of Androgen Receptor and Beta-Catenin Target Genes in Prostate and Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Genes in

  16. Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Prostate Which Was Initially Misdiagnosed as Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Osamu, Soma; Murasawa, Hiromi; Yoneyama, Takahiro; Koie, Takuya; Ohyama, Chikara

    2017-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) of the prostate is a very rare tumor. We report a case of 65-year-old man with SFT of the prostate which was initially misdiagnosed as prostate cancer. Finally, we performed total prostatectomy and the tumor was histologically diagnosed as SFT of the prostate. The patient's clinical course has progressed favorably with no obvious recurrence 18 months postoperatively.

  17. Antiandrogenic activities of Glycyrrhiza glabra in male rats.

    PubMed

    Zamansoltani, Farzaneh; Nassiri-Asl, Marjan; Sarookhani, Mohammad-Reza; Jahani-Hashemi, Hassan; Zangivand, Amir-Abdollah

    2009-08-01

    Abnormal levels of androgens cause many diseases like benign prostatic hyperplasia and hormone dependent cancers. Although the reduction in serum testosterone (T) by Glycyrrhiza glabra has been reported, its effects on seminal vesicle (SV) and prostate tissues have never been reported. This study was carried out to investigate different aspects of antiandrogenic properties of this plant. Immature male rats were divided into five groups (n = 7): castrated rats without any treatment received only vehicle; castrated rats plus T replacement; three castrated groups with T replacement plus various doses of G. glabra extract (75, 150 and 300 mg/kg). All of the injections were carried out once daily in subcutaneous manner for 7 days. On the eighth day, blood samples were collected for total T measurement. Ventral prostate (VP), SV and levator ani muscle were dissected and weighed. Slides prepared from prostate were assessed histologically. The variation in the relative and absolute volume of the prostate tissue compartments was determined. Those receiving the doses of 150 and 300 mg/kg showed a significant reduction (p < 0.05) in prostate weight, total T and VP epithelium/stroma ratio (V/V). These results in SV and levator ani were shown in response to 300 mg/kg of extract. Increasing in T metabolism, down-regulation of androgen receptors or activation of oestrogen receptors could be involved mechanisms. This study showed that alcoholic extract of G. glabra has antiandrogenic properties.

  18. Stimulation of cannabinoid receptors by using Rubus coreanus extracts to control osteoporosis in aged male rats.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hae-Kyoung; Lee, Hye-Rim; Do, Sun Hee

    2015-06-01

    A substantial proportion of men with prostatic disease have an increased risk of bone loss. In the present study, we investigated the effects of Rubus coreanus Miquel (RCM) extracts on osteoporosis that occurs with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-induced prostatic hyperplasia. The rats used in this study were categorized into groups of healthy controls, rats treated with MNU, and rats treated with MNU and RCM. The rats were sacrificed after 10 weeks of RCM treatment, after which ultrasonography, serum biochemical tests, histopathological examinations, immunohistochemical analysis, and semi-quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis were performed. There were no marked differences in body weight gain and the size and weight of the prostate gland between the MNU group and the MNU and RCM group. However, treatment with RCM inhibited osteoclastic osteolysis and reduced dysplastic progress in the prostate gland, as observed by histopathological evaluation and by analyzing changes in the levels of bone regulatory factors. In addition, the group treated with MNU and RCM had higher expression levels of cannabinoid receptors-1, -2, and osteoprotegerin. These results indicate that the anti-osteoporotic effect of RCM in prostatic hyperplasia is attributable to the cannabinoid receptor-related upregulation of osteoblastogenesis and inhibition of prostatic hyperplasia. The results of the present study suggest that treatment with RCM may benefit osteoporotic patients with prostatic disease by simultaneously altering the activation of osteoblasts and osteoclasts.

  19. Emerging Roles of Human Prostatic Acid Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Hoon Young; Byun, Jonghoe

    2013-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent non-skin related cancers. It is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among males in most Western countries. If prostate cancer is diagnosed in its early stages, there is a higher probability that it will be completely cured. Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) is a non-specific phosphomonoesterase synthesized in prostate epithelial cells and its level proportionally increases with prostate cancer progression. PAP was the biochemical diagnostic mainstay for prostate cancer until the introduction of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) which improved the detection of early-stage prostate cancer and largely displaced PAP. Recently, however, there is a renewed interest in PAP because of its usefulness in prognosticating intermediate to high-risk prostate cancers and its success in the immunotherapy of prostate cancer. Although PAP is believed to be a key regulator of prostate cell growth, its exact role in normal prostate as well as detailed molecular mechanism of PAP regulation is still unclear. Here, many different aspects of PAP in prostate cancer are revisited and its emerging roles in other environment are discussed. PMID:24009853

  20. Hyaluronan Biosynthesis in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT: Despite advances in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in the last several years, metastasis represents the... metastasis to lymph nodes and bone. Metastasis to bone is especially noteworthy, not only because it reflects more advanced tumors, but also because of the...the growth and metastasis of androgen-independent tumors, it may be possible to better diagnose and treat prostate cancers by inhibiting growth of

  1. Review of Prostate Anatomy and Embryology and the Etiology of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Aaron, LaTayia; Franco, Omar E; Hayward, Simon W

    2016-08-01

    Prostate development follows a common pattern between species and depends on the actions of androgens to induce and support ductal branching morphogenesis of buds emerging from the urogenital sinus. The human prostate has a compact zonal anatomy immediately surrounding the urethra and below the urinary bladder. Rodents have a lobular prostate with lobes radiating away from the urethra. The human prostate is the site of benign hyperplasia, prostate cancer, and prostatitis. The rodent prostate has little naturally occurring disease. Rodents can be used to model aspects of human benign hyperplasia, but care should be taken in data interpretation and extrapolation to the human condition.

  2. Serum Autoantibodies in Chronic Prostate Inflammation in Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schlick, Bettina; Massoner, Petra; Lueking, Angelika; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Blattner, Mirjam; Schaefer, Georg; Marquart, Klaus; Theek, Carmen; Amersdorfer, Peter; Zielinski, Dirk; Kirchner, Matthias; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Rubin, Mark A.; Müllner, Stefan; Schulz-Knappe, Peter; Klocker, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is frequently observed on histological analysis of malignant and non-malignant prostate specimens. It is a suspected supporting factor for prostate diseases and their progression and a main cause of false positive PSA tests in cancer screening. We hypothesized that inflammation induces autoantibodies, which may be useful biomarkers. We aimed to identify and validate prostate inflammation associated serum autoantibodies in prostate cancer patients and evaluate the expression of corresponding autoantigens. Methods Radical prostatectomy specimens of prostate cancer patients (N = 70) were classified into high and low inflammation groups according to the amount of tissue infiltrating lymphocytes. The corresponding pre-surgery blood serum samples were scrutinized for autoantibodies using a low-density protein array. Selected autoantigens were identified in prostate tissue and their expression pattern analyzed by immunohistochemistry and qPCR. The identified autoantibody profile was cross-checked in an independent sample set (N = 63) using the Luminex-bead protein array technology. Results Protein array screening identified 165 autoantibodies differentially abundant in the serum of high compared to low inflammation patients. The expression pattern of three corresponding antigens were established in benign and cancer tissue by immunohistochemistry and qPCR: SPAST (Spastin), STX18 (Syntaxin 18) and SPOP (speckle-type POZ protein). Of these, SPAST was significantly increased in prostate tissue with high inflammation. All three autoantigens were differentially expressed in primary and/or castration resistant prostate tumors when analyzed in an inflammation-independent tissue microarray. Cross-validation of the inflammation autoantibody profile on an independent sample set using a Luminex-bead protein array, retrieved 51 of the significantly discriminating autoantibodies. Three autoantibodies were significantly upregulated in both screens, MUT

  3. Immunotherapy in metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Slovin, Susan F.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Prostate cancer remains a challenge as a target for immunological approaches. The approval of the first cell-based immune therapy, Sipuleucel-T for prostate cancer introduced prostate cancer as a solid tumor with the potential to be influenced by the immune system. Methods: We reviewed articles on immunological management of prostate cancer and challenges that lie ahead for such strategies. Results: Treatments have focused on the identification of novel cell surface antigens thought to be unique to prostate cancer. These include vaccines against carbohydrate and blood group antigens, xenogeneic and naked DNA vaccines, and pox viruses used as prime-boost or checkpoint inhibitors. No single vaccine construct to date has resulted in a dramatic antitumor effect. The checkpoint inhibitor, anti-CTLA-4 has resulted in several long-term remissions, but phase III trials have not demonstrated an antitumor effect or survival benefit. Conclusions: Multiple clinical trials suggest that prostate cancer may not be optimally treated by single agent immune therapies and that combination with biologic agents, chemotherapies, or radiation may offer some enhancement of benefit. PMID:27843208

  4. A Phase I/II Study of Combination Neoadjuvant Hormone Therapy and Weekly OGX-011 Prior to Radical to Prostatectomy in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    pathologic conditions including Alzheimer’s [7] and nephrotoxic injury [8]. Clusterin levels increase dramatically during castration- induced ...CHATELAIN G, NORTH S, BRUN G: Stress- induced transcription of the clusterin/apoJ gene. Biochemical Journal. (1997) 328(1): 45-50. 17. HUMPHREYS DT...apoptosis in rat prostate epithelial cells [9], in androgen dependent Shionogi tumors [10], and human prostate cancer CRW22 [11] and PC82 [12] xenografts. In

  5. Phase I/II Study of Combination Neoadjuvant Hormone Therapy and Weekly OGX-011 (Clusterin Antisense Oligonulceotide) Prior to Radical Prostatectomy in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    castration- induced apoptosis in rat prostate epithelial cells [9], in androgen dependent Shionogi tumors [10], and human prostate cancer CRW22 [11... Biochemical Sciences. (2000) 25(3): 95-8. 16. MICHEL D, CHATELAIN G, NORTH S, BRUN G: Stress- induced transcription of the clusterin/apoJ gene...carcinoma [6], and with various pathologic conditions including Alzheimer’s [7] and nephrotoxic injury [8]. Clusterin levels increase dramatically during

  6. Study of Combination Neoadjuvant Hormone Therapy and Weekly OGX-011 (Clusterin Antisense Oligonulceotide) Prior to Radical Prostatectomy in Patients with Localized Prostate Cancer. Phase 1 and 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    castration- induced apoptosis in rat prostate epithelial cells [9], in androgen dependent Shionogi tumors [10], and human prostate cancer CRW22 [11... Biochemical Sciences. (2000) 25(3): 95-8. 16. MICHEL D, CHATELAIN G, NORTH S, BRUN G: Stress- induced transcription of the clusterin/apoJ gene...carcinoma [6], and with various pathologic conditions including Alzheimer’s [7] and nephrotoxic injury [8]. Clusterin levels increase dramatically during

  7. Prostatic Artery Embolization for Enlarged Prostates Due to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. How I Do It

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, Francisco C.; Antunes, Alberto A.

    2013-12-15

    Prostatic artery embolization (PAE) has emerged as an alternative to surgical treatments for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Patient selection and refined technique are essential for good results. Urodynamic evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging are very important and technical limitations are related to elderly patients with tortuous and atherosclerotic vessels, anatomical variations, difficulty visualizing and catheterizing small diameter arteries feeding the prostate, and the potential risk of bladder and rectum ischemia. The use of small-diameter hydrophilic microcatheters is mandatory. Patients can be treated safely by PAE with low rates of side effects, reducing prostate volume with clinical symptoms and quality of life improvement without urinary incontinence, ejaculatory disorders, or erectile dysfunction. A multidisciplinary approach with urologists and interventional radiologists is essential to achieve better results.

  8. What Tests Can Detect Prostate Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention and Early Detection What Tests Can Detect Prostate Cancer Early? The tests discussed below are used to ... also found in the blood. Most men without prostate cancer have PSA levels under 4 nanograms per milliliter ( ...

  9. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of Prostatic Fluids for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    in part - to it’s strong positive association with age.6,7 Benign prostatic hyperplasia , which is also highly associated with age, contributes to...prostate cancer risk. Moreover, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which is also strongly associated with age, can raise PSA levels and further muddy...contemporary referral series of men with prostate cancer. 60(4 Suppl 1):47-52, 2002 8. Fitzpatrick JM. The natural history of benign prostatic hyperplasia . BJU

  10. Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) of Prostatic Fluids for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    strong positive association with age.6,7 Benign prostatic hyperplasia , which is also highly associated with age, contributes to increased PSA levels and...prostate cancer risk. Moreover, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), which is also strongly associated with age, can raise PSA levels and further muddy...contemporary referral series of men with prostate cancer. 60(4 Suppl 1):47-52, 2002 8. Fitzpatrick JM. The natural history of benign prostatic hyperplasia . BJU

  11. The Relationship between Statins and Prostate Cancer Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    In 2011, it is estimated that 240,890 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer and 33,720 men will die from prostate cancer. Few prevention ...strategies for prostate cancer exist. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, statins, may prevent prostate cancer incidence and progression. We previously...prostate cancer in the Physicians’ Health Study and Early Stage Prostate Cancer Cohort study. Prostate cancer is commonly diagnosed and prevention

  12. Endometase in Androgen-Repressed Human Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    intraepithelial neoplasia from multiple patients were significantly higher than those in prostatitis, benign prostate hyperplasia, and normal prostate glandular...prostate cancer cell invasion. 3. We showed that the levels of MMP-26 protein in human prostate carcinomas from multiple patients were significantly...inhibitors of MMP-26 block prostate cancer invasion. We have showed that the levels of MMP-26 protein in human prostate carcinomas from multiple patients were

  13. Targeting Prostate Cancer with Multifunctional Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    4 Fig 1. Characterization of three prostate cancer cell lines by western blot. COXIV is used as a loading control...characterize our three prostate cancer cell lines , LNCaP, DU145 and PC3, which are being used in this project. We showed that prostate specific antigen...PSA) is expressed in the LNCaP cells, but absent in the DU145 cells whereas AMACR (P504S) is expressed in all prostate cancer cell lines (Fig 1

  14. Regulation of the Prostate Cancer Tumor Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    epithelium , stroma, as well as immune system, and the fixed nature of the prostate model with expression of the large T antigen, which may have...prostate cancer glandular architecture formed (Figure 10). Figure 10. Subcutanous TRAMP Model to Recapitulate Prostate Cancer. TRAMP C2 cells...specifically modulate the TLR signaling pathway in prostate epithelium , stroma, and immune system. To parse out the role of TLR signaling in

  15. Functional Angiogenic Mediators in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    FUNDING NUMBERS Functional Angiogenic Mediators in Prostate Cancer DAMD17-99- 1 -9521 6. AUTHOR(S) Jennifer A. Doll, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME...transition in the prostate by 1 ) identifying the key angiogenic mediators , 2) investigating the clinical significance of mediator levels in prostatic fluid...our proposal, we set out to 1 ) identify such mediators in the prostate, 2) assess the clinical usefulness of measuring angiogenic mediator levels in

  16. Holmium laser applications of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Lerner, Lori B; Tyson, Mark D

    2009-11-01

    The high-powered holmium laser is an excellent tool for the surgical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. This article discusses the background of holmium use in the prostate and describes the surgical techniques of holmium laser ablation of the prostate and holmium laser enucleation of the prostate. Operative challenges are reviewed with suggestions as to how to avoid these problems or deal with them when they arise. Surgical outcomes and a thorough literature review are both presented.

  17. Novel Optical Methods for Identification, Imaging, and Preservation of the Cavernous Nerves Responsible for Penile Erections during Prostate Cancer Surgery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    precise mapping of the CNs during adical prostatectomy. Ideally, OCT could be used to mage the topographic landscape of the entire postero- ateral aspect...recommendations of the Panel of Euthanasia of the American Veterinary Medical Association. After euthanization, the CN was removed and fixed with a...However, a major limitation of this study is that the rat prostate model represents an idealized version of the human anatomy . In the rat, the CN

  18. QUANTITATIVE STUDIES OF PROSTATIC SECRETION

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, Charles; Masina, M. H.; Eichelberger, Lillian; Wharton, James D.

    1939-01-01

    A simple isolation of the prostate enabled quantitative collection of prostatic secretion in dogs over periods of months. The secretory stimulant was pilocarpine and 2 similar amounts injected with a 6 hour interval gave smaller amounts at the second testing, suggesting a fatigue effect. The prostate was not absolutely refractory since doubling the amount of alkaloid injected at the second test increased the volume to equal or exceed the preliminary secretion. The depression effect had disappeared at 24 hours. In normal dogs the secretory curves were essentially regular, with occasional prolonged rises or depressions. The amount of secretion did not bear a direct relationship to the weight of the gland in adult dogs. The germinal epithelium of the testis underwent atrophy during the first few weeks of cage life while the prostatic secretion was maintained, showing that the atrophy was differential and did not involve the cells producing the androgenic hormone. The atrophy was reversible and all dogs kept for more than 4 months showed restoration of the germ cells. A few dogs developed atrophy of the germinal cells with cessation of prostatic secretion for many weeks but with final recovery. Removal of the suprarenal glands with suprarenal insufficiency did not produce sterility. The distribution of electrolytes in the prostatic secretion differed from that in the serum-transudate system, although the concentration of osmotically active substances was the same, being made up almost entirely of sodium and chloride. The distribution was not affected by the different physiological procedures used in this study. Protein concentrations were less than 1 per cent. The rate of prostatic atrophy following castration was determined, and cessation of secretion occurred in 7 to 23 days. The restoration of prostatic fluid in castrate dogs following daily injections of testosterone propionate followed a smooth curve to form a plateau which was interrupted occasionally by

  19. Characterization of Notch Signalling Pathway Members in Normal Prostate, Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia (PIN) and Prostatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Soylu, Hakan; Acar, Nuray; Ozbey, Ozlem; Unal, Betul; Koksal, Ismail Turker; Bassorgun, Ibrahim; Ciftcioglu, Akif; Ustunel, Ismail

    2016-01-01

    Prostate Cancer (PCa) holds the second place in terms of cancer-related mortality rate among men. The Notch signalling pathway regulates the proliferation and differentiation in embryonic and adult tissues and determines the cell fate. The body of knowledge in the present literature is currently controversial about the effect of the Notch pathway on prostatic cancer. Therefore, the present study aimed to examine the immunolocalization and expression levels of Notch1-4, Jagged1-2, Delta, HES1 and HES5 from among the members of the Notch signalling pathway in tissues of normal, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) and malignant prostate. The current study included a sample of 20 patients with localised prostatic adenocarcinoma, 18 patients with high grade PIN (H-PIN) and 18 normal prostatic tissue. Immunolocalisations of Notch1, 2, 3, 4, Jagged1, 2, Delta, HES1 and HES5 were identified through the immunohistochemical method. The findings of the present study showed that all in-scope members of the Notch signalling pathway were localised in PIN structures to a greater extent than in other tissues and from amongst these members, specifically Notch1, Notch4, Jagged1 and HES1 were at more significant levels. Consequently, the findings of the present study may indicate that the Notch signalling pathway can play a role especially in the formation of PIN structures.

  20. Suppression of benign prostate hyperplasia by Kaempferia parviflora rhizome

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Kazuya; Hayashi, Hirotaka; Matsumura, Shinichi; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2013-01-01

    Background: Kaempferia parviflora rhizome is used as a folk medicine in Thailand for the treatment of various symptoms. In the present study, the inhibitory activities of extract from K. parviflora rhizome against 5α-reductase (5αR) were subjected. Furthermore, the effects of the extract from K. parviflorar hizome in benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) were studied using the model mice. Materials and Methods: Preparations of extracts from the rhizomes of K. parviflora, Curcuma zedoaria and Zingiber officinale, and methoxyflavones isolated from K. parviflora was used for 5αR inhibition assay. The effects of K. parviflora extract on growth suppression for the prostates and seminal vesicles were performed based on the Hershberger's method. The K. parviflora extract was administered to castrated mice for 14 days. Results: K. parviflora extract showed more potent inhibitory activity on 5αR than C. zedoaria and Z. officinale extracts. The active principles were identified as 3,5,7,3’,4’-pentamethoxyflavone and 5,7,3’,4’-tetramethoxyflavone by activity guided fractionation. Furthermore, K. parviflora extract suppressed the weights of prostates and seminal vesicles in BPH model rats by daily administration for 14 days. Conclusion: These results indicate that K. parviflora extract can be a promising agent for the treatment of BPH. PMID:24174827

  1. Metabolic action of prolactin in regressing prostate: independent of androgen action

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.; Assimos, D.; Lee, C.; Grayhack, J.T.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism of the observed synergistic effect of prolactin and androgen on the lateral lobe of the rat prostate is not established. The observation that prolactin alone delayed the rate of loss of weight, protein, and DNA of the lateral lobe in castrated rats has led us to question the assumption that the effect of prolactin is produced by a modification of recognized androgen-induced intracellular changes. The present study was conducted to explore whether or not the sites of prolactin action in the rat prostate coincided with those recognized as the androgen effect. Two anterior pituitaries from female donors were grafted under the right renal capsule of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Seven days later, bilateral orchiectomy and unilateral nephrectomy were performed in these rats. In one half of the animals, the kidney bearing the pituitary grafts was removed. In the other half, the contralateral kidney was removed. Seven days following the orchiectomy-nephrectomy, animals bearing the pituitary grafts had a higher level of serum prolactin (93 +/- 7 ng/ml, mean +/- SE) than in those without the graft (26 +/- 3 ng/ml). This condition of hyperprolactinemia was associated with the delay of castration-induced regression in the lateral prostate. The rate of protein degradation, as judged by the amount of radioactivity remaining in the tissue following a single i.v. pulse of /sup 3/H-leucine 24 hr before orchiectomy-nephrectomy, was significantly slower in the lateral prostate in graft-bearing animals than in those without grafts.

  2. Cadmium exposure inhibits MMP2 and MMP9 activities in the prostate and testis

    SciTech Connect

    Lacorte, Livia M.; Rinaldi, Jaqueline C.; Justulin, Luis A.; Delella, Flávia K.; Moroz, Andrei; Felisbino, Sérgio L.

    2015-02-20

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc (Zn{sup 2+}) and calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) dependant endopeptidases, capable of degradation of numerous components of the extracellular matrix. Cadmium (Cd{sup 2+}) is a well known environmental contaminant which could impair the activity of MMPs. In this sense, this study was conducted to evaluate if Cd{sup 2+} intake inhibits these endopeptidases activities at the rat prostate and testicles and if it directly inhibits the activity of MMP2 and MMP9 at gelatinolytic assays when present in the incubation buffer. To investigate this hypothesis, Wistar rats (5 weeks old), were given tap water (untreated, n = 9), or 15 ppm CdCl{sub 2} diluted in drinking water, during 10 weeks (n = 9) and 20 weeks (n = 9). The animals were euthanized and their ventral prostate, dorsal prostate, and testicles were removed. These tissue samples were processed for protein extraction and subjected to gelatin zymography evaluation. Additionally, we performed an experiment of gelatin zymography in which 5 μM or 2 mM cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2}) was directly dissolved at the incubation buffer, using the prostatic tissue samples from untreated animals that exhibited the highest MMP2 and MMP9 activities in the previous experiment. We have found that CdCl{sub 2} intake in the drinking water led to the inhibition of 35% and 30% of MMP2 and MMP9 (p < 0.05) at the ventral prostate and testis, respectively, in Cd{sup 2+} treated animals when compared to controls. Moreover, the activities of the referred enzymes were 80% and 100% inhibited by 5 μM and 2 mM of CdCl{sub 2}, respectively, even in the presence of 10 mM of CaCl{sub 2} within the incubation buffer solution. These important findings demonstrate that environmental cadmium contamination may deregulate the natural balance in the extracellular matrix turnover, through MMPs downregulation, which could contribute to the toxic effects observed in prostatic and testicular tissue after its

  3. The Infectious Pathogenesis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    progression; 2-) To characterize the role of the infectious protozoa T. vaginalis in prostate carcinogenesis and progression. The current study is...understanding of the infectious pathogenesis of prostate cancer. Aim II. To characterize the role of the infectious protozoa T. vaginalis in prostate

  4. Counseling the Client with Prostate Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Russell C.; Juhnke, Gerald A.

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is prevalent in the United States and has a far-reaching effect on men and their relationships. Being diagnosed with and treated for prostate cancer often causes men to experience side effects that induce physical, emotional, and social change. Counselors need to be aware of prostate cancer's impact on men and their families.…

  5. Microtubule Control of Metabolism in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lynne Cassimeris CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...Microtubule Control of Metabolism in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0071 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The current standard chemotherapy treatment for metastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer is the microtubule

  6. Microtubule Control of Metabolism in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Lynne Cassimeris CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Lehigh University Bethlehem, PA 18015-3008 REPORT...Control of Metabolism in Prostate Cancer Dr. Lynne Cassimeris lc07@lehigh.edu Lehigh University 526 Brodhead Avenue Bethlehem, PA 18015-3008 U.S...tested whether metabolic inhibitors, metformin or 2-deoxy-glucose, function synergistically with docetaxel to block prostate cancer cell proliferation

  7. Reduction of Racial Disparities in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    JF, Levine AC. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 suppresses angiogenesis and the growth of prostate cancer in vivo. J Urol 2000:164:820-5 10. Mahmud...Tzivony Y, Flescher E. Contrasting effects of aspirin on prostate cancer cells: suppression of proliferation and induction of drug resistance...TITLE: Reduction of Racial Disparities in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nicholas Daniels, MD MPH, Principal Investigator

  8. Genistein chemoprevention: timing and mechanisms of action in murine mammary and prostate.

    PubMed

    Lamartiniere, Coral A; Cotroneo, Michelle S; Fritz, Wayne A; Wang, Jun; Mentor-Marcel, Roycelynn; Elgavish, Ada

    2002-03-01

    We investigated the potential of genistein, the primary isoflavone of soy, to protect against breast and prostate cancers in animal models. For mammary cancer studies, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed AIN-76A diet plus minus 250 mg genistein/kg diet. Dimethylbenz[a]anthracene was administered by gavage at d 50 postpartum to induce mammary tumors. Mammary cancer chemoprevention was demonstrated after prepubertal and combined prepubertal and adult genistein treatments but not after prenatal- or adult-only treatments, demonstrating that the timing of exposure to genistein is important for mammary cancer chemoprevention. The cellular mechanism of action was found to be mammary gland and cell differentiation, as shown by whole-mount analysis and beta-casein expression. An imprinting effect was shown for epidermal growth factor receptor expression in mammary terminal end buds. For prostate cancer studies, we used two models. The first was a chemically (N-methylnitrosourea) induced prostate cancer rat model. Genistein in the diet inhibited the development of invasive adenocarcinomas in a dose-dependent manner. The second model was a transgenic mouse model that resulted in spontaneously developing adenocarcinoma tumor of the prostate. Genistein in the diet reduced the incidence of poorly differentiated prostatic adenocarcinomas in a dose-dependent manner and down-regulated androgen receptor, estrogen receptor-alpha, progesterone receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, insulin-like growth factor-I, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1 but not estrogen receptor-beta and transforming growth factor-alpha mRNA expressions. We conclude that dietary genistein protects against mammary and prostate cancers by regulating specific sex steroid receptors and growth factor signaling pathways.

  9. The Danish Prostate Cancer Database

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Nielsen, Mary; Høyer, Søren; Friis, Søren; Hansen, Steinbjørn; Brasso, Klaus; Jakobsen, Erik Breth; Moe, Mette; Larsson, Heidi; Søgaard, Mette; Nakano, Anne; Borre, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Aim of database The Danish Prostate Cancer Database (DAPROCAdata) is a nationwide clinical cancer database that has prospectively collected data on patients with incident prostate cancer in Denmark since February 2010. The overall aim of the DAPROCAdata is to improve the quality of prostate cancer care in Denmark by systematically collecting key clinical variables for the purposes of health care monitoring, quality improvement, and research. Study population All Danish patients with histologically verified prostate cancer are included in the DAPROCAdata. Main variables The DAPROCAdata registers clinical data and selected characteristics for patients with prostate cancer at diagnosis. Data are collected from the linkage of nationwide health registries and supplemented with online registration of key clinical variables by treating physicians at urological and oncological departments. Main variables include Gleason scores, cancer staging, prostate-specific antigen values, and therapeutic measures (active surveillance, surgery, radiotherapy, endocrine therapy, and chemotherapy). Descriptive data In total, 22,332 patients with prostate cancer were registered in DAPROCAdata as of April 2015. A key feature of DAPROCAdata is the routine collection of patient-reported outcome measures (PROM), including data on quality-of-life (pain levels, physical activity, sexual function, depression, urine and fecal incontinence) and lifestyle factors (smoking, alcohol consumption, and body mass index). PROM data are derived from questionnaires distributed at diagnosis and at 1-year and 3-year follow-up. Hitherto, the PROM data have been limited by low completeness (26% among newly diagnosed patients in 2014). Conclusion DAPROCAdata is a comprehensive, yet still young clinical database. Efforts to improve data collection, data validity, and completeness are ongoing and of high priority. PMID:27843346

  10. WITHDRAWN: Can the conventional sextant prostate biopsy reliably diagnose unilateral prostate cancer in low-risk, localized, prostate cancer?

    PubMed

    Mayes, J M; Mouraviev, V; Sun, L; Madden, J F; Polascik, T J

    2008-05-13

    The authors hereby retract the e-publication dated 13 May 2008 and entitled, 'Can the conventional sextant prostate biopsy reliably diagnose unilateral prostate cancer in low-risk, localized, prostate cancer?' The authors are submitting a revised version with the same title. This article's statistics were performed for predicting bilateral prostate cancer outcomes. The article was written to help predict unilateral prostate cancer. Although the statistical numbers are correct, they are backwards. We apologize that the statistics indicate a contrary outcome (eg predicting bilateral cancer instead of unilateral disease).

  11. Equol an isoflavonoid: potential for improved prostate health, in vitro and in vivo evidence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To determine: in vitro binding affinity of equol for 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (5alpha-DHT), in vitro effects of equol treatment in human prostate cancer (LNCap) cells, and in vivo effects of equol on rat prostate weight and circulating levels of sex steroid hormones. Methods First, in vitro equol binding affinity for 5alpha-DHT was determined using 14C5alpha-DHT combined with cold 5alpha-DHT (3.0 nM in all samples). These steroids were incubated with increasing concentrations of equol (0-2,000 nM) and analyzed by Sephadex LH-20 column chromatography. 14C5alpha-DHT peak/profiles were determined by scintillation counting of column fractions. Using the 14C5alpha-DHT peak (0 nM equol) as a reference standard, a binding curve was generated by quantifying shifts in the 14C5alpha-DHT peaks as equol concentrations increased. Second, equol's in vitro effects on LNCap cells were determined by culturing cells (48 hours) in the presence of increasing concentrations of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) (vehicle-control), 5alpha-DHT, equol or 5alpha-DHT+equol. Following culture, prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels were quantified via ELISA. Finally, the in vivo effects of equol were tested in sixteen male Long-Evans rats fed a low isoflavone diet. From 190-215 days, animals received 0.1cc s.c. injections of either DMSO-control vehicle (n = 8) or 1.0 mg/kg (body weight) of equol (in DMSO) (n = 8). At 215 days, body and prostate weights were recorded, trunk blood was collected and serum assayed for luteinizing hormone (LH), 5alpha-DHT, testosterone and 17beta-estradiol levels. Results Maximum and half maximal equol binding to 5alpha-DHT occurred at approximately 100 nM and 4.8 nM respectively. LNCap cells cultured in the presence of 5alpha-DHT significantly increased PSA levels. However, in the presence of 5alpha-DHT+equol, equol blocked the significant increases in PSA levels from LNCap cells. In vivo equol treatment significantly decreased rat prostate weights and serum

  12. Preventive effects of lignan extract from flax hulls on experimentally induced benign prostate hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bisson, Jean-François; Hidalgo, Sophie; Simons, Rudy; Verbruggen, Marian

    2014-06-01

    Consumption of diet rich in lignans may decrease the risk of some chronic hormonal conditions such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). This study investigated whether a lignan-rich extract from flaxseed hulls, LinumLife EXTRA (LLE), could prevent BPH using the testosterone propionate (TP)-induced BPH rat model. Male Wistar-Unilever rats were randomly divided into four groups of 12 rats each: a negative control group fed with control diet and receiving daily subcutaneous injections of corn oil without TP, and three groups fed with control diet (positive control), diet containing 0.5% LLE (LLE 0.5) or 1.0% LLE (LLE 1.0) and receiving daily subcutaneous injections of TP in corn oil. Treatments with diets started 2 weeks before the induction of BPH and were carried out for 5 consecutive weeks. The influence of TP and LLE on body weight (BW), food and water consumptions, and enterolactone (ENL) levels in serum and urine of rats was examined at the end of the 5-week treatment period. TP significantly diminished the mean body weight gain (MBWG) of positive control rats and their food and water consumptions while LLE reduced significantly this MBWG reduction in a dose-dependent manner. The lignan-rich extract significantly inhibited TP-induced prostate size ratio (prostate weight/rat BW) increase in comparison with positive controls (P<.001). This effect was dose dependent. Higher serum and urine levels of ENL correlated well with the dose of extract provided to rats. It was concluded that the lignan-rich flaxseed hull extract prevented the TP-induced BPH indicating it might be beneficial in the prevention of BPH.

  13. Prostate cancer incidence in men with self-reported prostatitis after 15 years of follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Vaarala, Markku H.; Mehik, Aare; Ohtonen, Pasi; Hellström, Pekka A.

    2016-01-01

    Controversy exists regarding a possible association between prostatitis and prostate cancer. To further evaluate the incidence of prostate cancer following prostatitis, a study of prostate cancer incidence in a cohort of Finnish men was performed. The original survey evaluating self-reported prostatitis was conducted in 1996–1997. A database review was conducted focusing on prostate cancer diagnoses in the cohort. In 2012, there were 13 (5.2%) and 27 (1.8%) prostate cancer cases among men with (n=251) and without (n=1,521) prostatitis symptoms, respectively. There were no significant differences in age, primary therapy distribution, prostate-specific antigen levels, Gleason score, clinical T-class at the time of prostate cancer diagnosis, or time lag between the original survey and prostate cancer diagnosis. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of prostate cancer was 1.16 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.62–1.99] and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.29–0.64) among men with and without prostatitis symptoms, respectively. After 15 years of follow-up subsequent to self-reported prostatitis, no evident increase in incidence of prostate cancer was detected among Finnish men with prostatitis symptoms. The higher percentage of prostate cancer among men with prostatitis symptoms appears to be due to coincidentally low SIR of prostate cancer among men without prostatitis symptoms, and may additionally be due to increased diagnostic examinations. Further research is required to confirm this speculation. PMID:27446410

  14. Prostate cancer incidence in men with self-reported prostatitis after 15 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Vaarala, Markku H; Mehik, Aare; Ohtonen, Pasi; Hellström, Pekka A

    2016-08-01

    Controversy exists regarding a possible association between prostatitis and prostate cancer. To further evaluate the incidence of prostate cancer following prostatitis, a study of prostate cancer incidence in a cohort of Finnish men was performed. The original survey evaluating self-reported prostatitis was conducted in 1996-1997. A database review was conducted focusing on prostate cancer diagnoses in the cohort. In 2012, there were 13 (5.2%) and 27 (1.8%) prostate cancer cases among men with (n=251) and without (n=1,521) prostatitis symptoms, respectively. There were no significant differences in age, primary therapy distribution, prostate-specific antigen levels, Gleason score, clinical T-class at the time of prostate cancer diagnosis, or time lag between the original survey and prostate cancer diagnosis. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) of prostate cancer was 1.16 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.62-1.99] and 0.44 (95% CI, 0.29-0.64) among men with and without prostatitis symptoms, respectively. After 15 years of follow-up subsequent to self-reported prostatitis, no evident increase in incidence of prostate cancer was detected among Finnish men with prostatitis symptoms. The higher percentage of prostate cancer among men with prostatitis symptoms appears to be due to coincidentally low SIR of prostate cancer among men without prostatitis symptoms, and may additionally be due to increased diagnostic examinations. Further research is required to confirm this speculation.

  15. Chronic Prostatitis: A Possible Cause of Hematospermia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose While hematospermia is mainly caused by genitourinary inflammatory disorders, very few studies have been published on prostatitis-associated hematospermia (PAH) diagnosed using robust prostatitis evaluation methods. Therefore, we have evaluated the incidence of PAH by using systematic methods for evaluating prostatitis. Materials and Methods We evaluated 37 hematospermia patients from a single hospital over the last five years. We classified the patients into PAH versus hematospermia without any evidence of prostatitis (HWP) by using a NIH-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index questionnaire and expressed prostatic secretion studies. Results The mean age was 55.89±14.87 years, and the patients were grouped into two groups: one group had 12 HWP patients and the other 25 PAH patients. PAH patients were further sub-classified: chronic bacterial prostatitis (3 patients), chronic nonbacterial prostatitis (10 patients), prostadynia (7 patients), and asymptomatic prostatitis (5 patients). We found Enterococcus faecalis in the three chronic bacterial prostatitis patients. We could not find any statistically significant difference between the PAH and the HWP groups in terms of the age interval, serum prostate-specific antigen level, and prostate volume. Even though there was no statistically significant difference in the items about urination between the two groups, we found a statistically significant difference in the quality of life (QoL) impact for the patients in this study. Conclusions Two-thirds of the hematospermia patients were associated with some evidence of prostatitis. Further, the patients with PAH revealed poor QoL compared with the patients with HWP. Therefore, we must evaluate the presence of prostatitis in hematospermia patients and alleviate the prostatitis-associated symptoms to improve their QoL. PMID:26331127

  16. Prostate cancer immunotherapy: beyond immunity to curability.

    PubMed

    Simons, Jonathan W

    2014-11-01

    Metastatic prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer in the United States. It is the first prevalent cancer in which overall survival in advanced disease is modestly, but objectively, improved with outpatient delivered dendritic cell-based immunotherapy. More prostate cancer patients have enrolled through Facebook and trusted-site Internet searches in clinical trials for prostate cancer vaccine-based immunotherapy than in immunotherapy trials for lung, breast, colon, pancreas, ovarian, and bladder cancer combined in the past 7 years. Exceptional responses to anti-CTLA-4 treatment have been documented in clinics, and prostate cancer neoantigen characterization and T-cell clonotyping are in their research ascendancy. The prostate is an accessory organ; it is not required for fertility, erectile function, or urinary continence. The true evolutionary advantage of having a prostate for male mammalian physiology is a topic of speculation in seminar rooms and on bar stools, but it remains unknown. Hundreds of prostate lineage-unique proteins (PLUP) exist among the >37,000 normal human prostate lineage-unique open reading frames that can be targeted for immunologic ablation of PLUP(+) prostate cancer cells by prostate-specific autoimmunity. This bioengineered graft-versus-prostate disease is a powerful strategy that can eliminate deaths from prostate cancer. Immunologic tolerance to prostate cancer can be overcome at every clinical stage of presentation. This Cancer Immunology at the Crossroads article aims to present advances in the past two decades of basic, translational, and clinical research in prostate cancer, including bioengineering B-cell and T-cell responses, and ongoing prostate cancer immunotherapy trials.

  17. Comparison between prostate volume and intravesical prostatic protrusion in detecting bladder outlet obstruction due to benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Hossain, A K M S; Alam, A K M K; Habib, A K M K; Rashid, M M; Rahman, H; Islam, A K M A; Jahan, M U

    2012-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine and compare the correlation of intravesical prostatic protrusion (IPP) and prostate volume (PV) with bladder outlet obstruction (BOO). This study was conducted in the department of urology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU), Dhaka, Bangladesh, between July 2009 to September 2010. Fifty benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) patients were included in the study. Their evaluation consisted of history along with International Prostate Symptoms Score (IPSS), digital rectal examination (DRE), transabdominal ultrasonography to measure prostate volume, intravesical prostatic protrusion & post voidal residual (PVR) urine and pressure-flow studies to detect bladder outflow obstruction (BOO). Statistical analysis included Unpaired 't' test, Chi-square test and Spearman's Rank correlation test. Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves were used to compare the correlation of PV and IPP with BOO. Mean prostate volume was significantly larger in bladder outlet obstructed patients (P<0.05). Mean IPP was significantly greater in obstructed patients (P<0.001). Area under ROC curve was 0.700 for PV and 0.821 for IPP. Prostate volume & intravesical prostatic protrusion measured through transabdominal ultrasonography are noninvasive and accessible method that significantly correlates with bladder outlet obstruction in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and the correlation of IPP is much more stronger than that of prostate volume.

  18. [Markers of prostate cancer stem cells: research advances].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shun-Qi; Huang, Sheng-Song

    2013-12-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most seriously malignant diseases threatening men's health, and the mechanisms of its initiation and progression are not yet completely understood. Recent years have witnessed distinct advances in researches on prostate cancer stem cells in many aspects using different sources of materials, such as human prostate cancer tissues, human prostate cancer cell lines, and mouse models of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer stem cell study offers a new insight into the mechanisms of the initiation and progression of prostate cancer and contributes positively to its treatment. This article presents an overview on the prostate cancer stem cell markers utilized in the isolation and identification of prostate cancer stem cells.

  19. Updates of prostate cancer staging: Prostate-specific membrane antigen

    PubMed Central

    Lamb, Alastair; Nair, Rajesh; Geurts, Nicolas; Mitchell, Catherine; Lawrentschuk, Nathan L; Moon, Daniel A; Murphy, Declan G

    2016-01-01

    The ability to accurately stage prostate cancer in both the primary and secondary staging setting can have a major impact on management. Until recently radiological staging has relied on computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and nuclear bone scans to evaluate the extent of disease. However, the utility of these imaging technologies has been limited by their sensitivity and specificity especially in detecting early recurrence. Functional imaging using positron-emission tomography with a radiolabeled ligand targeted to prostate-specific membrane antigen has transformed the prostate cancer imaging landscape. Initial results suggest that it is a substantial improvement over conventional imaging in the setting of recurrence following primary therapy by having a superior ability to detect disease and to do so at an earlier stage. Additionally, it appears that the benefits seen in the secondary staging setting may also exist in the primary staging setting. PMID:27995218

  20. Clinical value of prostate segmentation and volume determination on MRI in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Brian; Türkbey, Barış; Truong, Hong; Bernardo, Marcelino; Periaswamy, Senthil; Choyke, Peter L

    2014-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a nonmalignant pathological enlargement of the prostate, which occurs primarily in the transitional zone. BPH is highly prevalent and is a major cause of lower urinary tract symptoms in aging males, although there is no direct relationship between prostate volume and symptom severity. The progression of BPH can be quantified by measuring the volumes of the whole prostate and its zones, based on image segmentation on magnetic resonance imaging. Prostate volume determination via segmentation is a useful measure for patients undergoing therapy for BPH. However, prostate segmentation is not widely used due to the excessive time required for even experts to manually map the margins of the prostate. Here, we review and compare new methods of prostate volume segmentation using both manual and automated methods, including the ellipsoid formula, manual planimetry, and semiautomated and fully automated segmentation approaches. We highlight the utility of prostate segmentation in the clinical context of assessing BPH.

  1. [Studies on hormone-polymer composites in urological field--their application in prostatic cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, H

    1983-12-01

    Our studies on the application of hormone-polymer composites in urological field are discussed in this review. We first studied the modes of in vivo and in vitro release of testosterone from vinyl polymer-testosterone composites prepared by radiation-induced polymerization. It was ascertained by our group that in vivo and in vitro release of testosterone from biodegradable copolypeptide -testosterone composites as well as vinyl polymer composites was well controlled. Using this system, we were successful in preparing a testicular prosthesis, which was made of vinyl polymer-testosterone composites and was ascertained to release testosterone constantly for a long period in the dose range of clinical usage. We also applied this sustained release drug delivery system to the method of administration of an LH x RH agonist, which was one of the best therapeutic drugs for androgen dependent prostatic cancer. Sustained release of the LH x RH agonist in the dose range of clinical usage over a period of several months from copolymer-LH x RH agonist composites was confirmed in both male rats and in prostatic cancer patients. Prostatic cancer cells contain a major secretion protein (alpha-protein or estramustine-binding protein) and estramustine has a high affinity for alpha-protein. Therefore, we examined the effect of an estramustine-microsphere containing anticancer drugs, namely, the missile therapy for prostatic cancer. The missile therapy should open the way to specific and selective chemotherapy for prostatic cancer.

  2. Lycopene: redress for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Pisipati, Sai Venkata Vedavyas; Pathapati, Harshavardhan; Bhukya, Ganesh; Nuthakki, Suresh; Chandu, Baburao; Nama, SreeKanth; Adeps, RajDev

    2012-03-01

    Lycopene, a carotenoid is what that gives red colour to some fruits like pomegranate, tomato, papaya etc... People with a sound diet of lycopene may have a less risk of cancers especially prostate cancer which is most impedent for the males of age 40-50 years. So, in countries of north America and Europe food contains much of the lycopene supplements. In accordance with the American journal of epidemiology 2002 studies implies that men with crushed serum lycopene levels are more divulged to prostate cancer and those with sound diet of lycopene have a less risk of prostate cancer. In a care study conveyed by The British journal of urology, men with prostate cancer are subjected to surgery and the tumour is detonated. Amongst the men half a set were supplemented with lycopene supplements and half were not. Those subjected with lycopene supplements have less bone pains and live longer than those not supplemented. This paints a picture about importance of lycopene in treatment of prostate cancer. This article evokes the importance of lycopene and its way of destroying the cancer. Lycopene reduces the risk of cancer by diverging its effect on the plasma Insulin like growth factor, on Connexins , and the most acceptable one, by quench of free radicals.

  3. Proton therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoppe, Bradford; Henderson, Randal; Mendenhall, William M; Nichols, Romaine C; Li, Zuofeng; Mendenhall, Nancy P

    2011-06-01

    Proton therapy has been used in the treatment of cancer for over 50 years. Due to its unique dose distribution with its spread-out Bragg peak, proton therapy can deliver highly conformal radiation to cancers located adjacent to critical normal structures. One of the important applications of its use is in prostate cancer, since the prostate is located adjacent to the rectum and bladder. Over 30 years of data have been published on the use of proton therapy in prostate cancer; these data have demonstrated high rates of local and biochemical control as well as low rates of urinary and rectal toxicity. Although before 2000 proton therapy was available at only a couple of centers in the United States, several new proton centers have been built in the last decade. With the increased availability of proton therapy, research on its use for prostate cancer has accelerated rapidly. Current research includes explorations of dose escalation, hypofractionation, and patient-reported quality-of-life outcomes. Early results from these studies are promising and will likely help make proton therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer more cost-effective.

  4. Active surveillance for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Romero-Otero, Javier; García-Gómez, Borja; Duarte-Ojeda, José M; Rodríguez-Antolín, Alfredo; Vilaseca, Antoni; Carlsson, Sigrid V; Touijer, Karim A

    2016-03-01

    It is worth distinguishing between the two strategies of expectant management for prostate cancer. Watchful waiting entails administering non-curative androgen deprivation therapy to patients on development of symptomatic progression, whereas active surveillance entails delivering curative treatment on signs of disease progression. The objectives of the two management strategies and the patients enrolled in either are different: (i) to review the role of active surveillance as a management strategy for patients with low-risk prostate cancer; and (ii) review the benefits and pitfalls of active surveillance. We carried out a systematic review of active surveillance for prostate cancer in the literature using the National Center for Biotechnology Information's electronic database, PubMed. We carried out a search in English using the terms: active surveillance, prostate cancer, watchful waiting and conservative management. Selected studies were required to have a comprehensive description of the demographic and disease characteristics of the patients at the time of diagnosis, inclusion criteria for surveillance, and a protocol for the patients' follow up. Review articles were included, but not multiple papers from the same datasets. Active surveillance appears to reduce overtreatment in patients with low-risk prostate cancer without compromising cancer-specific survival at 10 years. Therefore, active surveillance is an option for select patients who want to avoid the side-effects inherent to the different types of immediate treatment. However, inclusion criteria for active surveillance and the most appropriate method of monitoring patients on active surveillance have not yet been standardized.

  5. Lycopene: Redress for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pisipati, Sai Venkata Vedavyas; Pathapati, Harshavardhan; Bhukya, Ganesh; Nuthakki, Suresh; Chandu, Baburao; Nama, SreeKanth; Adeps, RajDev

    2012-01-01

    Lycopene, a carotenoid is what that gives red colour to some fruits like pomegranate, tomato, papaya etc... People with a sound diet of lycopene may have a less risk of cancers especially prostate cancer which is most impedent for the males of age 40-50 years. So, in countries of north America and Europe food contains much of the lycopene supplements. In accordance with the American journal of epidemiology 2002 studies implies that men with crushed serum lycopene levels are more divulged to prostate cancer and those with sound diet of lycopene have a less risk of prostate cancer. In a care study conveyed by The British journal of urology, men with prostate cancer are subjected to surgery and the tumour is detonated. Amongst the men half a set were supplemented with lycopene supplements and half were not. Those subjected with lycopene supplements have less bone pains and live longer than those not supplemented. This paints a picture about importance of lycopene in treatment of prostate cancer. This article evokes the importance of lycopene and its way of destroying the cancer. Lycopene reduces the risk of cancer by diverging its effect on the plasma Insulin like growth factor, on Connexins , and the most acceptable one, by quench of free radicals. PMID:24826034

  6. Prostate-specific targeting of the aqueous root extract of Croton membranaceus in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Afriyie, D K; Asare, G A; Bugyei, K; Asiedu-Gyekye, I J; Tackie, R; Adjei, S

    2014-09-01

    Croton membranaceus Müll.Arg. (Euphorbiaceae) is used for benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) treatment. The study aimed at investigating organs that the aqueous root extracts of C. membranaceus (CMARE) target, which is absent in literature. Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats (100-140 g) were randomly divided into 4 groups. Group 1, the control group received distilled water. Groups 2, 3 and 4 received 30, 150 and 300 mg kg(-1) b.wt CMARE respectively (oral gavage). Rats fed 90 days the standard chow diet ad libitum. Upon sacrifice, major organs were histologically examined and serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) biochemically determined. Only the prostate was abnormal. Histologically, H&E staining revealed thickness and infoldings of the epithelial cells shrinking with increasing dose. The 30 mg kg(-1) group showed low columnar or flattened epithelium cells, whereas the columnar epithelium infoldings of the 150 mg kg(-1) b.wt and 300 mg kg(-1) b.wt groups were virtually nonexistent. The acini of the control, 30 mg kg(-1) b.wt group and the 150 mg kg(-1) b.wt groups showed clear pinkish secretion. However, secretion of the high-dose group appeared light pink in colour and the stroma cells appeared much darker than all the treated and control group. C. membranaceus targets the prostate with significant PSA reduction (P < 0.01).

  7. Phosphoinositide-Driven Epithelial Proliferation in Prostatic Inflammation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    androgen -sensitive prostate cancer cells); and P (PC-3, androgen -insensitive prostate cancer cells). All three responded to IL-1 simulation (concentrations...Background: Among the variety of genetic and environmental factors involved in the development of prostate cancer , chronic prostatic inflammation is...implicated as growth promoters in prostate cancer . In addition, proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA), a histologic lesion characterized by

  8. Phosphoinositide-Driven Epithelial Proliferation in Prostatic Inflammation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    LNCaP androgen -sensitive prostate cancer cells); and P (PC-3, androgen -insensitive prostate cancer cells). All three responded to IL-1 simulation...INTRODUCTION Background: Among the variety of genetic and environmental factors involved in the development of prostate cancer , chronic prostatic ...been implicated as growth promoters in prostate cancer . In addition, proliferative inflammatory atrophy (PIA), a histologic lesion characterized by

  9. Vaccine Therapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Hormone-Resistant, Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-23

    Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Bone; Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Soft Tissues; Metastatic Prostate Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  10. Mycobacterium abscessus complex bacteremia due to prostatitis after prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chung-Hua; Lin, Jesun; Lin, Jen-Shiou; Chen, Yu-Min

    2016-10-01

    We present the case of a 49-year-old man, who developed Mycobacterium abscessus complex (M. abscessus complex) bacteremia and prostatitis after prostate biopsy. The patient was successfully treated with amikacin with imipenem-cilastatin with clarithromycin. Infections caused by M. abscessus complex have been increasingly described as a complication associated with many invasive procedures. Invasive procedures might have contributed to the occurrence of the M. abscessus complex. Although M. abscessus complex infection is difficult to diagnose and treat, we should pay more attention to this kind of infection, and the correct treatment strategy will be achieved by physicians.

  11. Detection of DNA viruses in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smelov, Vitaly; Bzhalava, Davit; Arroyo Mühr, Laila Sara; Eklund, Carina; Komyakov, Boris; Gorelov, Andrey; Dillner, Joakim; Hultin, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    We tested prostatic secretions from men with and without prostate cancer (13 cases and 13 matched controls) or prostatitis (18 cases and 18 matched controls) with metagenomic sequencing. A large number (>200) of viral reads was only detected among four prostate cancer cases (1 patient each positive for Merkel cell polyomavirus, JC polyomavirus and Human Papillomavirus types 89 or 40, respectively). Lower numbers of reads from a large variety of viruses were detected in all patient groups. Our knowledge of the biology of the prostate may be furthered by the fact that DNA viruses are commonly shed from the prostate and can be readily detected by metagenomic sequencing of expressed prostate secretions. PMID:27121729

  12. Prostate cancer brachytherapy: guidelines overview

    PubMed Central

    Białas, Brygida

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer, due to wide availability of PSA tests, is very often diagnosed in early stage, nowadays. This makes management of this disease even harder in every day oncology care. There is a wide range of treatment options including surgery, radiotherapy and active surveillance, but essential question is which treatment patient and oncologist should decide for. Due to recent publication of Prostate Cancer Results Study Group, in which brachytherapy is one of supreme curative options for prostate cancer, we decided to overview most present european and north american recommendations. National Comprehensive Cancer Network, American Society for Radiation Oncology, American Brachytherapy Society, European Association of Urology and Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie of European Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology guidelines are overviewed, particularly focusing on HDR and LDR brachytherapy. PMID:23349655

  13. Metastatic Prostate Cancer of Hand

    PubMed Central

    Oshima, Koji; Ishimaru, Daichi; Nishimoto, Yutaka; Ohno, Yoshiyuki; Hirakawa, Akihiro; Miyazaki, Tatsuhiko; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Soft tissue metastases of prostate cancer to other sites are extremely rare, and, to our best knowledge, there have been no reports of metastasis to soft tissue of the hand. A 63-year-old man was diagnosed with prostatic cancer. During treatment, bone and soft tissue metastases to the right hand, appearing in the first web space, were observed. The tumor was resected, along with both the first and second metacarpal bones. The thumb was reconstructed by pollicization of the remaining index finger, enabling the patient to use the pollicized thumb for activities of daily living. This is the first case report of prostate cancer metastasizing to the soft tissue in hand. After wide resection, pollicization was able to reconstruct a functional hand and thumb. PMID:27843661

  14. Saw palmetto for prostate disorders.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Andrea E; Shaughnessy, Allen F

    2003-03-15

    Saw palmetto is an herbal product used in the treatment of symptoms related to benign prostatic hyperplasia. The active component is found in the fruit of the American dwarf palm tree. Studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of saw palmetto in reducing symptoms associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Saw palmetto appears to have efficacy similar to that of medications like finasteride, but it is better tolerated and less expensive. There are no known drug interactions with saw palmetto, and reported side effects are minor and rare. No data on its long-term usage are available. The herbal product also has been used to treat chronic prostatitis, but currently there is no evidence of its efficacy.

  15. Prostate cancer brachytherapy: guidelines overview.

    PubMed

    Wojcieszek, Piotr; Białas, Brygida

    2012-06-01

    Prostate cancer, due to wide availability of PSA tests, is very often diagnosed in early stage, nowadays. This makes management of this disease even harder in every day oncology care. There is a wide range of treatment options including surgery, radiotherapy and active surveillance, but essential question is which treatment patient and oncologist should decide for. Due to recent publication of Prostate Cancer Results Study Group, in which brachytherapy is one of supreme curative options for prostate cancer, we decided to overview most present european and north american recommendations. National Comprehensive Cancer Network, American Society for Radiation Oncology, American Brachytherapy Society, European Association of Urology and Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie of European Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology guidelines are overviewed, particularly focusing on HDR and LDR brachytherapy.

  16. Influence of Melatonin on the Proliferative and Apoptotic Responses of the Prostate under Normal and Hyperglycemic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gobbo, Marina G.; Dizeyi, Nishtman; Abrahamsson, Per-Anders; Bertilsson, Per-Anders; Masitéli, Viviane Sanches; Pytlowanciv, Eloisa Zanin; Taboga, Sebastião R.; Góes, Rejane M.

    2015-01-01

    The antitumor properties of melatonin (MLT) are known for prostate cancer cells. This study investigated whether MLT affects prostate maturation and interferes with tissue injuries induced by diabetes. MLT was administered to Wistar rats from 5 weeks of age in the drinking water (10 μg/kg b.w.), and diabetes was induced at the 13th week by streptozotocin (4.5 mg/100g b.w., i.p.). The animals were euthanized in the 14th and 21st weeks. MLT reduced the immunostained cells for androgen receptor (AR) by 10% in younger rats. Diabetes decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. MLT treatment impeded apoptosis (p = 0.02) and augmented proliferation (p = 0.0008) and PCNA content in prostate following long-term diabetes due to restoration of testosterone levels and expression of melatonin receptor type 1B. The effect of MLT (500 µM, 5 mM, and 10 mM) on androgen-dependent (22Rv1) and androgen-independent (PC3) cancer cells and human prostate epithelial cells (PNTA1) under normal and hyperglycemic conditions (HG, 450 mg/dL) was analyzed. Contrary to PNTA1 and 22Rv1 cells, MLT improved the proliferation of PC3 cells in hyperglycemic medium. The combined data indicated that MLT had proliferative and antiapoptotic effects in prostate cells subjected to HG levels and it seems to involve specific MLT pathways rather than AR. PMID:26295055

  17. Obesity decreases serum selenium levels in DMBA-induced mammary tumor using Obese Zucker Rat Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently, we reported that obese Zucker rats had increased susceptibility to DMBA-induced mammary tumors compared to lean Zucker rats. Several studies suggest that lower serum selenium may play an important role in increasing the risk of several types of cancers (e.g, colon, breast and prostate canc...

  18. Epigenetics of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    McKee, Tawnya C; Tricoli, James V

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of novel technologies that can be applied to the investigation of the molecular underpinnings of human cancer has allowed for new insights into the mechanisms associated with tumor development and progression. They have also advanced the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of cancer. These technologies include microarray and other analysis methods for the generation of large-scale gene expression data on both mRNA and miRNA, next-generation DNA sequencing technologies utilizing a number of platforms to perform whole genome, whole exome, or targeted DNA sequencing to determine somatic mutational differences and gene rearrangements, and a variety of proteomic analysis platforms including liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis to survey alterations in protein profiles in tumors. One other important advancement has been our current ability to survey the methylome of human tumors in a comprehensive fashion through the use of sequence-based and array-based methylation analysis (Bock et al., Nat Biotechnol 28:1106-1114, 2010; Harris et al., Nat Biotechnol 28:1097-1105, 2010). The focus of this chapter is to present and discuss the evidence for key genes involved in prostate tumor development, progression, or resistance to therapy that are regulated by methylation-induced silencing.

  19. Benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) may affect up to 30% of men in their early 70s, causing urinary symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction. Symptoms can improve without treatment, but the usual course is a slow progression of symptoms, with acute urinary retention occurring in 1-2% of men with BPH per year. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of medical, surgical, and herbal treatments? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to May 2005 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 43 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors, alpha-blockers, beta-sitosterol plant extract, less-invasive surgical techniques, pygeum africanum, rye grass pollen extract, saw palmetto plant extracts, transurethral microwave thermotherapy, transurethral needle ablation, and transurethral resection.

  20. Hormonal therapy of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Labrie, Fernand

    2010-01-01

    Of all cancers, prostate cancer is the most sensitive to hormones: it is thus very important to take advantage of this unique property and to always use optimal androgen blockade when hormone therapy is the appropriate treatment. A fundamental observation is that the serum testosterone concentration only reflects the amount of testosterone of testicular origin which is released in the blood from which it reaches all tissues. Recent data show, however, that an approximately equal amount of testosterone is made from dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) directly in the peripheral tissues, including the prostate, and does not appear in the blood. Consequently, after castration, the 95-97% fall in serum testosterone does not reflect the 40-50% testosterone (testo) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) made locally in the prostate from DHEA of adrenal origin. In fact, while elimination of testicular androgens by castration alone has never been shown to prolong life in metastatic prostate cancer, combination of castration (surgical or medical with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist) with a pure anti-androgen has been the first treatment shown to prolong life. Most importantly, when applied at the localized stage, the same combined androgen blockade (CAB) can provide long-term control or cure of the disease in more than 90% of cases. Obviously, since prostate cancer usually grows and metastasizes without signs or symptoms, screening with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is absolutely needed to diagnose prostate cancer at an 'early' stage before metastasis occurs and the cancer becomes non-curable. While the role of androgens was believed to have become non-significant in cancer progressing under any form of androgen blockade, recent data have shown increased expression of the androgen receptor (AR) in treatment-resistant disease with a benefit of further androgen blockade. Since the available anti-androgens have low affinity for AR and cannot block androgen action completely

  1. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Roehrborn, Claus G

    2005-01-01

    Despite the deceptively simple description of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), the actual relationship between BPH, lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), benign prostatic enlargement, and bladder outlet obstruction is complex and requires a solid understanding of the definitional issues involved. The etiology of BPH and LUTS is still poorly understood, but the hormonal hypothesis has many arguments in its favor. There are many medical and minimally invasive treatment options available for affected patients. In the intermediate and long term, minimally invasive treatment options are superior to medical therapy in terms of symptom and flow rate improvement; tissue ablative surgical treatment options are superior to both minimally invasive and medical therapy. PMID:16985902

  2. Enhancement of Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer by DNA-PKcs Inhibitor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    delayed the tumor growth compare to control animals . However, irradiation (10Gy X 2) has a significant impact on tumor growth , and combination...implanted into the right prostate lobe of athymic nude rats and the tumor growth was monitored by Ultrasound and BL imaging. Animals were radiated...without drug NU7441 (25mg/kg 1 hour before radiation). Control and irradiated tumors were observed for growth and after 3 weeks, animals were sacrificed

  3. Comprehensive Development Program of Hunter-Killer Peptides for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-05-01

    mnay Flectroplioresis of proteins "sas carlied Oiit using eilher S ot 121",. SDS polbacrtlaitide ges, Fquiial atiounts of total protein isere loaded...Rat iser iicioidriu xxerc prepacit as described aboe. Ile pep- liihood ofb helteitx in tile presence of negatisely charged unenibranes, tide...APPENDIX 3 Targeting the prostate for destruction through a vascular address Wadih Arap*t*, Wolfgang Haedicke* t§, Michele Bemasconi*, Renate Kain൓

  4. Daytime Blue Light Enhances the Nighttime Circadian Melatonin Inhibition of Human Prostate Cancer Growth.

    PubMed

    Dauchy, Robert T; Hoffman, Aaron E; Wren-Dail, Melissa A; Hanifin, John P; Warfield, Benjamin; Brainard, George C; Xiang, Shulin; Yuan, Lin; Hill, Steven M; Belancio, Victoria P; Dauchy, Erin M; Smith, Kara; Blask, David E

    2015-12-01

    Light controls pineal melatonin production and temporally coordinates circadian rhythms of metabolism and physiology in normal and neoplastic tissues. We previously showed that peak circulating nocturnal melatonin levels were 7-fold higher after daytime spectral transmittance of white light through blue-tinted (compared with clear) rodent cages. Here, we tested the hypothesis that daytime blue-light amplification of nocturnal melatonin enhances the inhibition of metabolism, signaling activity, and growth of prostate cancer xenografts. Compared with male nude rats housed in clear cages under a 12:12-h light:dark cycle, rats in blue-tinted cages (with increased transmittance of 462-484 nm and decreased red light greater than 640 nm) evinced over 6-fold higher peak plasma melatonin levels at middark phase (time, 2400), whereas midlight-phase levels (1200) were low (less than 3 pg/mL) in both groups. Circadian rhythms of arterial plasma levels of linoleic acid, glucose, lactic acid, pO2, pCO2, insulin, leptin, and corticosterone were disrupted in rats in blue cages as compared with the corresponding entrained rhythms in clear-caged rats. After implantation with tissue-isolated PC3 human prostate cancer xenografts, tumor latency-to-onset of growth and growth rates were markedly delayed, and tumor cAMP levels, uptake-metabolism of linoleic acid, aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect), and growth signaling activities were reduced in rats in blue compared with clear cages. These data show that the amplification of nighttime melatonin levels by exposing nude rats to blue light during the daytime significantly reduces human prostate cancer metabolic, signaling, and proliferative activities.

  5. Recurrent Prostate Infection: What Are the Treatment Options?

    MedlinePlus

    ... recurring prostate infection, also known as chronic bacterial prostatitis, is typically treated with antibiotics. This type of ... P. Castle, M.D. References Pontari M. Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. http://www.uptodate.com/ ...

  6. Progress Against Prostate Cancer | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Progress Against Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Winter 2010 Table of Contents Click ... This can narrow the urethra, decreasing urine flow. Prostate cancer is made up of cells the body does ...

  7. Repeat Prostate-Specific Antigen Tests Before Prostate Biopsy Decisions.

    PubMed

    Nordström, Tobias; Adolfsson, Jan; Grönberg, Henrik; Eklund, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Despite limited scientific support, a repeat prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test before prostate biopsy decisions is common. We analyzed biopsy outcomes in 1686 men from the STHLM3 study with PSA 3-10 ng/mL and two PSA tests taken within eight weeks and before prostate biopsy using percentages and multinomial logistic regression. We found that omitting prostate biopsy for men with PSA values decreasing to PSAs of 3 ng/mL or less would save 16.8% of biopsy procedures, while missing 5.4% of the cancers with Gleason scores (GSs) of 7 or higher. The proportion of cancers with GSs of 6 or lower was independent of the first PSA value, as well as of PSA change. Also, the risk of tumors with GSs of 7 or higher decreased with both decreasing and increasing PSA levels: It was 18.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 16.3% to 20.9%) for men with PSA changes of less than 20%, 12.1% (95% CI = 8.0% to 16.2%) for men with PSA levels increasing at least 20%, and 6.6% (95% CI = 3.8% to 9.3%) for men with PSA levels decreasing at least 20%.

  8. Prostate cancer vaccines in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Lubaroff, David M

    2012-07-01

    This review presents important information about the current state of the art for vaccine immunotherapy of prostate cancer. It includes important preclinical research for each of the important prostate cancer vaccines to have reached clinical trials. To date, the only prostate cancer vaccine that has completed Phase III trials and has been approved and licensed by the US FDA is Sipuleucel-T, which immunizes patients against the prostate-associated antigen prostatic acid phosphatase. The benefits and concerns associated with the vaccine are presented. A current Phase III trial is currently underway using the vaccinia-based prostate-specific antigen vaccine Prostvac-TRICOM. Other immunotherapeutic vaccines in trials include the Ad/prostate-specific antigen vaccine Ad5-prostate-specific antigen and the DNA/prostatic acid phosphatase vaccine. A cellular vaccine, GVAX, has been in clinical trials but has not seen continuous study. This review also delves into the multiple immune regulatory elements that must be overcome in order to obtain strong antitumor-associated antigen immune responses capable of effectively destroying prostate tumor cells.

  9. Stokes polarimetry imaging of dog prostate tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihoon; Johnston, William K., III; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    2010-02-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States in 2009. Radical prostatectomy (complete removal of the prostate) is the most common treatment for prostate cancer, however, differentiating prostate tissue from adjacent bladder, nerves, and muscle is difficult. Improved visualization could improve oncologic outcomes and decrease damage to adjacent nerves and muscle important for preservation of potency and continence. A novel Stokes polarimetry imaging (SPI) system was developed and evaluated using a dog prostate specimen in order to examine the feasibility of the system to differentiate prostate from bladder. The degree of linear polarization (DOLP) image maps from linearly polarized light illumination at different visible wavelengths (475, 510, and 650 nm) were constructed. The SPI system used the polarization property of the prostate tissue. The DOLP images allowed advanced differentiation by distinguishing glandular tissue of prostate from the muscular-stromal tissue in the bladder. The DOLP image at 650 nm effectively differentiated prostate and bladder by strong DOLP in bladder. SPI system has the potential to improve surgical outcomes in open or robotic-assisted laparoscopic removal of the prostate. Further in vivo testing is warranted.

  10. Difference in the rate of rectal complications following prostate brachytherapy based on the prostate-rectum distance and the prostate longitudinal length among early prostate cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Moon Hyung; Yu, Young Dong; Shin, Hyun Soo; Oh, Jong Jin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the difference in rectal complications rate following prostate low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy based on prostate-rectum distance and prostate longitudinal length among early prostate cancer patients. Materials and Methods From March 2008 to February 2013, 245 prostate cancer patients with a Gleason score ≤7 were treated with 125-I LDR brachytherapy. Among them, 178 patients with prostate volume 20-35 mL and a follow-up period ≥6 months were evaluated for radiation proctitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed for a prebrachytherapy evaluation, and prostate-rectum distance and prostate longitudinal length were measured. The radiation proctitis was confirmed and graded via colonoscopy based on the radiation therapy oncology group (RTOG) toxicity criteria. Results Twenty-three patients received a colonoscopy for proctitis evaluation, and 12 were identified as grade 1 on the RTOG scale. Nine patients were diagnosed as grade 2 and 2 patients were grade 3. No patient developed grade 4 proctitis. The rectal-complication group had a mean prostate-rectum distance of 2.51±0.16 mm, while non-rectal-complication control group had 3.32±0.31 mm. The grade 1 proctitis patients had a mean prostate-rectum distance of 2.80±0.15 mm, which was significantly longer than 2.12±0.31 mm of grades 2 and 3 patient groups (p=0.045). All 11 patients of grades 2 and 3 had a prostate longitudinal length of 35.22±2.50 mm, which was longer than group 1, but the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.214). Conclusions As the prostate-rectum distance increased, fewer postimplantation rectal symptoms were observed. Patients with a shorter prostate-rectum distance in MRI should receive modified implantation techniques or radical prostatectomy. PMID:26366276

  11. Biomarkers of Prostatic Cancer: An Attempt to Categorize Patients into Prostatic Carcinoma, Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, or Prostatitis Based on Serum Prostate Specific Antigen, Prostatic Acid Phosphatase, Calcium, and Phosphorus

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, Shahana; Nyamath, Parveen; Ishaq, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Prostatitis, BPH, and P.Ca are the most frequent pathologies of the prostate gland that are responsible for morbidity in men. Raised levels of PSA are seen in different pathological conditions involving the prostate. PAP levels are altered in inflammatory or infectious or abnormal growth of the prostate tissue. Serum calcium and phosphorus levels were also found to be altered in prostate cancer and BPH. The present study was carried out to study the levels of PSA, PAP, calcium, and phosphorus in serum of patients with Prostatitis, BPH, or P.Ca and also to evaluate the relationship between them. Males in the age group of 50–85 years with LUTS disease symptoms and with PSA levels more than 4 ng/mL were included. A total of 114 patients were analyzed including 30 controls. Prostatitis in 35.7% of cases, BPH in 35.7% of the cases, and P.Ca in 28.57% of the cases were observed. Thus, the nonmalignant cases constitute a majority. PSA, a marker specific for prostatic conditions, was significantly high in all the diseases compared to controls. A rise in serum PSA and PAP indicates prostatitis or, in combination with these two tests, decreased serum calcium shows advanced disease. PMID:28168057

  12. Biomarkers of Prostatic Cancer: An Attempt to Categorize Patients into Prostatic Carcinoma, Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, or Prostatitis Based on Serum Prostate Specific Antigen, Prostatic Acid Phosphatase, Calcium, and Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Sarwar, Shahana; Adil, Mohammed Abdul Majid; Nyamath, Parveen; Ishaq, Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Prostatitis, BPH, and P.Ca are the most frequent pathologies of the prostate gland that are responsible for morbidity in men. Raised levels of PSA are seen in different pathological conditions involving the prostate. PAP levels are altered in inflammatory or infectious or abnormal growth of the prostate tissue. Serum calcium and phosphorus levels were also found to be altered in prostate cancer and BPH. The present study was carried out to study the levels of PSA, PAP, calcium, and phosphorus in serum of patients with Prostatitis, BPH, or P.Ca and also to evaluate the relationship between them. Males in the age group of 50-85 years with LUTS disease symptoms and with PSA levels more than 4 ng/mL were included. A total of 114 patients were analyzed including 30 controls. Prostatitis in 35.7% of cases, BPH in 35.7% of the cases, and P.Ca in 28.57% of the cases were observed. Thus, the nonmalignant cases constitute a majority. PSA, a marker specific for prostatic conditions, was significantly high in all the diseases compared to controls. A rise in serum PSA and PAP indicates prostatitis or, in combination with these two tests, decreased serum calcium shows advanced disease.

  13. Prostate Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing prostate cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  14. Particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Suefuji, Hiroaki; Sinoto, Makoto; Matsunobu, Akira; Toyama, Shingo; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Kudo, Sho

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in external beam radiotherapy have allowed us to deliver higher doses to the tumors while decreasing doses to the surrounding tissues. Dose escalation using high-precision radiotherapy has improved the treatment outcomes of prostate cancer. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy has been widely used throughout the world as the most advanced form of photon radiotherapy. In contrast, particle radiotherapy has also been under development, and has been used as an effective and non-invasive radiation modality for prostate and other cancers. Among the particles used in such treatments, protons and carbon ions have the physical advantage that the dose can be focused on the tumor with only minimal exposure of the surrounding normal tissues. Furthermore, carbon ions also have radiobiological advantages that include higher killing effects on intrinsic radio-resistant tumors, hypoxic tumor cells and tumor cells in the G0 or S phase. However, the degree of clinical benefit derived from these theoretical advantages in the treatment of prostate cancer has not been adequately determined. The present article reviews the available literature on the use of particle radiotherapy for prostate cancer as well as the literature on the physical and radiobiological properties of this treatment, and discusses the role and the relative merits of particle radiotherapy compared with current photon-based radiotherapy, with a focus on proton beam therapy and carbon ion radiotherapy.

  15. Sarcomatoid Carcinoma of the Prostate

    PubMed Central

    Açıkgöz, Onur; Gazel, Eymen; Zengin, Neslihan İnci; Kasap, Yusuf; Çamtosun, Ahmet; Yazıcıoğlu, Ahmet Hamdi

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the prostate is among the rarest malignant neoplasm types and has been well known for its aggressive clinical course. Patient was admitted with the symptoms of lower urinary tract. Transurethral resection of prostate (TUR-P) was carried out. Revealing Gleason 5 + 3 = 8 prostate adenocarcinoma in TUR-P material. Thereby, a Radical Prostatectomy procedure was planned. In operation, frozen examination revealed adenocarcinoma metastasis to the obturator lymph node. The operation was terminated. In the postoperative 3rd month, the patient was re-admitted with acute urinary system symptoms. A cystoscopy performed and complete resection of the mass was performed. The pathological examination reported that the tumor was compatible with undifferentiated adenocarcinoma owing to presence of poorly differentiated tumoral cells and detection of adenocarcinoma in a relatively small (<1%) focus. 4 month after the operation, the patient underwent another cyctoscopic examination which revealed the prostatic lounge and most of the bladder lumen to be filled with tumoral tissue. The tumoral tissues was resected incompletely. This material was diagnosed to be “Sarcomatoid Malignant Tumor” upon the new evidences of progressive dedifferentiation and predominant sarcomatoid appearance, compared with the former TUR-P materials. Subsequent PET-CT scan depicted multiple metastasis. The patient was referred to oncology department. In conclusion, sarcomatoid carcinoma is a malignant variant that brings along diagnostic and treatment difficulties. PMID:23691427

  16. Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Açıkgöz, Onur; Gazel, Eymen; Zengin, Neslihan İnci; Kasap, Yusuf; Camtosun, Ahmet; Yazıcıoğlu, Ahmet Hamdi

    2013-01-01

    Sarcomatoid carcinoma of the prostate is among the rarest malignant neoplasm types and has been well known for its aggressive clinical course. Patient was admitted with the symptoms of lower urinary tract. Transurethral resection of prostate (TUR-P) was carried out. Revealing Gleason 5 + 3 = 8 prostate adenocarcinoma in TUR-P material. Thereby, a Radical Prostatectomy procedure was planned. In operation, frozen examination revealed adenocarcinoma metastasis to the obturator lymph node. The operation was terminated. In the postoperative 3rd month, the patient was re-admitted with acute urinary system symptoms. A cystoscopy performed and complete resection of the mass was performed. The pathological examination reported that the tumor was compatible with undifferentiated adenocarcinoma owing to presence of poorly differentiated tumoral cells and detection of adenocarcinoma in a relatively small (<1%) focus. 4 month after the operation, the patient underwent another cyctoscopic examination which revealed the prostatic lounge and most of the bladder lumen to be filled with tumoral tissue. The tumoral tissues was resected incompletely. This material was diagnosed to be "Sarcomatoid Malignant Tumor" upon the new evidences of progressive dedifferentiation and predominant sarcomatoid appearance, compared with the former TUR-P materials. Subsequent PET-CT scan depicted multiple metastasis. The patient was referred to oncology department. In conclusion, sarcomatoid carcinoma is a malignant variant that brings along diagnostic and treatment difficulties.

  17. Vaccine Immunotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    Center IRB, and the I owa City VA Medical Center Research and Development Committee. During the second and t hird years we have been recruiting pa...American Urologic Association (AUA). (3) Talks to prostate cancer survivor support groups in at the University of I owa , Mercy Medical Center in Cedar

  18. American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prostate Cancer Prevention and Early Detection American Cancer Society Recommendations for Prostate Cancer Early Detection The American Cancer Society (ACS) recommends that men have a chance to ...

  19. Prostate Specific or Enriched Genes as Composite Biomarkers for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    research: To evaluate prostate specific genes such as WDR19, NDRG1 , TAGLN2 as diagnosis and prognosis markers for prostate cancers. Major findings: (1) We...have determined that WDR19, NDRG1 are not as good a marker as PSA for prostate cancer stratification. (2) We developed a mouse antibody for a...optimize sandwich ELISA assays for WDR19, NDRG1 , or other novel prostate-specific biomarker candidates. During the past two years, we have evaluated the

  20. Optical stimulation of the prostate nerves: A potential diagnostic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat

    There is wide variability in sexual potency rates (9--86%) after nerve-sparing prostate cancer surgery due to limited knowledge of the location of the cavernous nerves (CN's) on the prostate surface, which are responsible for erectile function. Thus, preservation of the CN's is critical in preserving a man's ability to have spontaneous erections following surgery. Nerve-mapping devices, utilizing conventional Electrical Nerve Stimulation (ENS) techniques, have been used as intra-operative diagnostic tools to assist in preservation of the CN. However, these technologies have proven inconsistent and unreliable in identifying the CN's due to the need for physical contact, the lack of spatial selectivity, and the presence of electrical artifacts in measurements. Optical Nerve Stimulation (ONS), using pulsed infrared laser radiation, is studied as an alternative to ENS. The objective of this study is sevenfold: (1) to develop a laparoscopic laser probe for ONS of the CN's in a rat model, in vivo; (2) to demonstrate faster ONS using continuous-wave infrared laser radiation; (3) to describe and characterize the mechanism of successful ONS using alternative laser wavelengths; (4) to test a compact, inexpensive all-single-mode fiber configuration for optical stimulation of the rat CN studies; (5) to implement fiber optic beam shaping methods for comparison of Gaussian and flat-top spatial beam profiles during ONS; (6) to demonstrate successful ONS of CN's through a thin layer of fascia placed over the nerve and prostate gland; and (7) to verify the experimentally determined therapeutic window for safe and reliable ONS without thermal damage to the CN's by comparison with a computational model for thermal damage. A 5.5-Watt Thulium fiber laser operated at 1870 nm and two pigtailed, single mode, near-IR diode lasers (150-mW, 1455-nm laser and 500-mW, 1550-nm laser) were used for non-contact stimulation of the rat CN's. Successful laser stimulation, as measured by an

  1. Co-expression and impact of prostate specific membrane antigen and prostate specific antigen in prostatic pathologies

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The present study was undertaken to relate the co-expression of prostate-associated antigens, PSMA and PSA, with the degree of vascularization in normal and pathologic (hyperplasia and cancer) prostate tissues to elucidate their possible role in tumor progression. Methods The study was carried out in 6 normal, 44 benign prostatic hyperplastic and 39 cancerous human prostates. Immunohistochemical analysis were performed using the monoclonal antibody CD34 to determine the angiogenic activity, and the monoclonal antibodies 3E6 and ER-PR8 to assess PSMA and PSA expression, respectively. Results In our study we found that in normal prostate tissue, PSMA and PSA were equally expressed (3.7 ± 0.18 and 3.07 ± 0.11). A significant difference in their expression was see in hyperplastic and neoplastic prostates tissues (16.14 ± 0.17 and 30.72 ± 0.85, respectively) for PSMA and (34.39 ± 0.53 and 17.85 ± 1.21, respectively) for PSA. Study of prostate tumor profiles showed that the profile (PSA+, PSMA-) expression levels decreased between normal prostate, benign prostatic tissue and primary prostate cancer. In the other hand, the profile (PSA-, PSMA+) expression levels increased from normal to prostate tumor tissues. PSMA overexpression was associated with high intratumoral angiogenesis activity. By contrast, high PSA expression was associated with low angiogenesis activity. Conclusion These data suggest that these markers are regulated differentially and the difference in their expression showed a correlation with malignant transformation. With regard to the duality PSMA-PSA, this implies the significance of their investigation together in normal and pathologic prostate tissues. PMID:21189143

  2. Elevated Prostate Health Index (phi) and Biopsy Reclassification During Active Surveillance of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Darian; Tosoian, Jeffrey J; Landis, Patricia; Wolf, Sacha; Glavaris, Stephanie; Lotan, Tamara L; Schaeffer, Edward M; Sokoll, Lori J; Ross, Ashley E

    2016-07-01

    The Prostate Health Index (phi) has been FDA approved for decision-making regarding prostate biopsy. Phi has additionally been shown to positively correlate with tumor volume, extraprostatic disease and higher Gleason grade tumors. Here we describe a case in which an elevated phi encouraged biopsy of a gentleman undergoing active surveillance leading to reclassification of his disease as high risk prostate cancer.

  3. Early detection of prostate cancer. Role of prostate-specific antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakaran, V. M.

    1996-01-01

    Pressure to request prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests for early detection of prostate cancer in middle-aged and older men is increasing. However, current scientific data suggest that such testing does more harm than good. Most professional groups do not advise routine screening for prostate cancer. This paper reviews the current status of PSA testing. PMID:8653039

  4. [Bacterial prostatitis and prostatic fibrosis: modern view on the treatment and prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Zaitsev, A V; Pushkar, D Yu; Khodyreva, L A; Dudareva, A A

    2016-08-01

    Treatments of chronic bacterial prostatitis (CP) remain difficult problem. Bacterial prostatitis is a disease entity diagnosed clinically and by evidence of inflammation and infection localized to the prostate. Risk factors for UTI in men include urological interventions, such as transrectal prostate biopsy. Ensuing infections after prostate biopsy, such as UTI and bacterial prostatitis, are increasing due to increasing rates of fluoroquinolone resistance. The increasing global antibiotic resistance also significantly affects management of UTI in men, and therefore calls for alternative strategies. Prostatic inflammation has been suggested to contribute to the etiology of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) by inducing fibrosis. Several studies have shown that prostatic fibrosis is strongly associated with impaired urethral function and LUTS severity. Fibrosis resulting from excessive deposition of collagen is traditionally recognized as a progressive irreversible condition and an end stage of inflammatory diseases; however, there is compelling evidence in both animal and human studies to support that the development of fibrosis could potentially be a reversible process. Prostate inflammation may induce fibrotic changes in periurethral prostatic tissues, promote urethral stiffness and LUTS. Patients experiencing CP and prostate-related LUTS could benefit from anti-inflammatory therapies, especially used in combination with the currently prescribed enzyme treatment with Longidase. Treatment results showed that longidase is highly effective in bacterial and abacterial CP. Longidase addition to standard therapeutic methods significantly reduced the disease symptoms and regression of inflammatory-proliferative alterations in the prostate.

  5. African Americans' Perceptions of Prostate-Specific Antigen Prostate Cancer Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Jaimie C.; Vines, Anissa I.; Carlisle, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Background: In 2012, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force released a hotly debated recommendation against prostate-specific antigen testing for all men. The present research examines African Americans' beliefs about their susceptibility to prostate cancer (PCa) and the effectiveness of prostate-specific antigen testing in the context of the…

  6. Association between prostatic resistive index and cardiovascular risk factors in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Baykam, Mehmet Murat; Aktas, Binhan Kagan; Bulut, Suleyman; Ozden, Cuneyt; Deren, Tagmac; Tagci, Suleyman; Gokkaya, Cevdet Serkan; Memis, Ali

    2015-04-01

    We evaluated the relationship between prostatic resistive index (RI) and cardiovascular system (CVS) risk factors in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. The study included 120 patients who were attending our outpatient clinic with lower urinary tract symptoms related to benign prostatic hyperplasia. The clinical, laboratory, anthropometric data, and CVS risk factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, history of CVS events, and smoking) of the patients were evaluated regarding the association between prostate RI level by regression analyses. The prostatic RI levels of the patients were measured using power Doppler imaging. In univariate regression analysis, there were statistically significant relationships between prostatic RI levels and the patients' age, International Prostate Symptom Score, hip circumference, fasting blood glucose, prostate specific antigen, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total prostate volume, uroflowmetric maximal flow rate, and all investigated CVS risk factors (p < 0.05). The prostatic RI levels were found to be associated with fasting blood glucose and total prostate volume, and also with CVS risk factors including only metabolic syndrome and cigarette smoking in the multivariate regression analysis. Our results showed that prostatic RI level is significantly related to metabolic syndrome and smoking among the investigated CVS risk factors.

  7. Basic study on pulse-intensity-domain depth-controlled photodynamic therapy for transurethral prostate cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Sayaka; Masuda, Kensuke; Yamakawa, Yuko; Arai, Tsunenori

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is promising modality for cancer. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in USA. We proposed transurethral prostate cancer treatment using the pulse-intensity-domain depth-controlled PDT to preserve urethra wall. We have found that photocytotoxicity has been suppressed under high-intensity pulsed excitation with the second generation photosensitizers. We aim to apply this effect to form intact portion on the surface of the irradiated field. Irradiation condition dependence of photocytotoxicity of rat prostate cancer cell line R3327-AT-1 was investigated with two clinical photosensitizers, Porfimer sodium and Talaporfin sodium. A pulsed laser was irradiated with the power energy density ranging from 1.25 to 10 mJ/cm2. Near-infrared luminescence from singlet oxygen in the solution of those two photosensitizers was measured transiently. We performed PDT against a rat subcutaneous prostate tumor mode with Talaporfin sodium (2mg/kg) injected intravenously 1 h prior to the irradiation. The laser was irradiated with the power energy density 2.5 or 10 mW/cm2, with the total fluence of 50 J/cm2. Photocytotoxicity in vitro and the singlet oxygen generation were both suppressed with the 10mJ/cm2 irradiation with Talaporfin sodium, while these with Porfimer sodium were kept relatively constant. The surface of the irradiated field of 1mm in thickness remained intact, while the tumor damaged layer of 1.3 mm in thickness was obtained in the case of 10mJ/cm2 irradiation. We think Talaporfin sodium has high sensitivity to the pulse energy density, which might be useful to realize urethra preserved PDT for prostate cancer.

  8. Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins in experimental benign prostatic hyperplasia: effects of serenoa repens, selenium and lycopene

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The apoptosis machinery is a promising target against benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) modulate apoptosis by direct inhibition of caspases. Serenoa Repens (SeR) may be combined with other natural compounds such as Lycopene (Ly) and Selenium (Se) to maximize its therapeutic activity in BPH. We investigated the effects of SeR, Se and Ly, alone or in association, on the expression of four IAPs, cIAP-1, cIAP-2, NAIP and survivin in rats with experimental testosterone-dependent BPH. Moreover, caspase-3, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) have been evaluated. Rats were administered, daily, with testosterone propionate (3 mg/kg/sc) or its vehicle for 14 days. Testosterone injected animals (BPH) were randomized to receive vehicle, SeR (25 mg/kg/sc), Se (3 mg/kg/sc), Ly (1 mg/kg/sc) or the SeR-Se-Ly association for 14 days. Animals were sacrificed and prostate removed for analysis. Results BPH animals treated with vehicle showed unchanged expression of cIAP-1 and cIAP-2 and increased expression of NAIP, survivin, caspase-3, IL-6 and PSMA levels when compared with sham animals. Immunofluorescence studies confirmed the enhanced expression of NAIP and survivin with a characteristic pattern of cellular localization. SeR-Se-Ly association showed the highest efficacy in reawakening apoptosis; additionally, this therapeutic cocktail significantly reduced IL-6 and PSMA levels. The administration of SeR, Se and Ly significantly blunted prostate overweight and growth; moreover, the SeR-Se-Ly association was most effective in reducing prostate enlargement and growth by 43.3% in treated animals. Conclusions The results indicate that IAPs may represent interesting targets for drug therapy of BPH. PMID:24606563

  9. Dystrophic Calcification of the Prostate after Cryotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We present a previously undocumented complication of dystrophic calcification of the prostate after cryotherapy. An 87-year-old male presented with recurrent lower urinary tract infections and was found to have an obstructing large calcified mass in the right lobe of the prostate. Subsequently, he underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and bladder neck with laser lithotripsy to remove the calculus. We propose that chronic inflammation and necrosis of the prostate from cryotherapy resulted in dystrophic calcification of the prostate. As the use of cryotherapy for the treatment of localized prostate cancer continues to increase, it is important that clinicians be aware of this scenario and the technical challenges it poses. PMID:25548712

  10. Testosterone replacement therapy and prostate health.

    PubMed

    Polackwich, A Scott; Ostrowski, Kevin A; Hedges, Jason C

    2012-12-01

    There is an emerging evolution in the understanding of the relationship between the prostate and testosterone. It has long been generally believed that with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT), increasing serum testosterone levels led to prostatic growth and worsening of voiding dysfunction and associated complications. A new theory, the Saturation Model of Testosterone and its effect on the Prostate has gained attention. This theory suggests that the prostate's response to increasing levels of serum testosterone reaches a limit beyond which there is minimal effect. This model predicts that testosterone replacement therapy occurs above this saturation point, and replacing testosterone to eugonadal levels should not worsen prostate related benign disease. We evaluated the recent published data, with an emphasis on clinical studies done within the last 3 years, for the effects of testosterone supplementation on benign prostatic disease.

  11. Caveolin-1 and prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Michael R; Yang, Wei; Di Vizio, Dolores

    2012-01-01

    Caveolin-1 was identified in the 1990s as a marker of aggressive prostate cancer. The caveolin-1 protein localizes to vesicular structures called caveolae and has been shown to bind and regulate many signaling proteins involved in oncogenesis. Caveolin-1 also has lipid binding properties and mediates aspects of cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism and can elicit biological responses in a paracrine manner when secreted. Caveolin-1 is also present in the serum of prostate cancer patients and circulating levels correlate with extent of disease. Current evidence indicates that increased expression of caveolin-1 in prostate adenocarcinoma cells and commensurate downregulation of the protein in prostate stroma, mediate progression to the castration-resistant phase of prostate cancer through diverse pathways. This chapter summarizes the current state of our understanding of the cellular and physiologic mechanisms in which caveolin-1 participates in the evolution of prostate cancer cell phenotypes.

  12. Mitochondria, prostate cancer, and biopsy sampling error.

    PubMed

    Parr, Ryan L; Mills, John; Harbottle, Andrew; Creed, Jennifer M; Crewdson, Gregory; Reguly, Brian; Guimont, François S

    2013-04-01

    Mitochondria and their associated genome are emerging as sophisticated indicators of prostate cancer biology. Alterations in the mitochondrial genome (mtgenome) have been implicated in cell proliferation, metastatic behavior, androgen independence, as a signal for apoptosis, and as a predictor of biochemical recurrence. Somatic mutation patterns in complete mtgenomes are associated with prostate specific antigen levels (PSA) in prostate cancer patients and a large-scale mtgenome deletion (3.4 kb) is consistent with a prostate "cancerization" field effect. This review will focus on the biological characteristics of mitochondria and their direct clinical application to prostate cancer. Mitochondrial science is currently influencing clinical prostate cancer diagnostics and the rapid progress in this area indicates future, break-through contributions in the general field of oncology.

  13. Development of New Treatments for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    DiPaola, R. S.; Abate-Shen, C.; Hait, W. N.

    2005-02-01

    The Dean and Betty Gallo Prostate Cancer Center (GPCC) was established with the goal of eradicating prostate cancer and improving the lives of men at risk for the disease through research, treatment, education and prevention. GPCC was founded in the memory of Dean Gallo, a beloved New Jersey Congressman who died tragically of prostate cancer diagnosed at an advanced stage. GPCC unites a team of outstanding researchers and clinicians who are committed to high-quality basic research, translation of innovative research to the clinic, exceptional patient care, and improving public education and awareness of prostate cancer. GPCC is a center of excellence of The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, which is the only NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center in the state. GPCC efforts are now integrated well as part of our Prostate Program at CINJ, in which Dr. Robert DiPaola and Dr. Cory Abate-Shen are co-leaders. The Prostate Program unites 19 investigators from 10 academic departments who have broad and complementary expertise in prostate cancer research. The overall goal and unifying theme is to elucidate basic mechanisms of prostate growth and oncogenesis, with the ultimate goal of promoting new and effective strategies for the eradication of prostate cancer. Members' wide range of research interests collectively optimize the chances of providing new insights into normal prostate biology and unraveling the molecular pathophysiology of prostate cancer. Cell culture and powerful animal models developed by program members recapitulate the various stages of prostate cancer progression, including prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, adenocarcinoma, androgen-independence, invasion and metastases. These models promise to further strengthen an already robust program of investigator-initiated therapeutic clinical trials, including studies adopted by national cooperative groups. Efforts to translate laboratory results into clinical studies of early detection and chemoprevention

  14. Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0226 TITLE: Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Rafael Fridman...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0226 Targeting Discoidin Domain Receptors in Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15...DDRs in prostate cancer . During the first funding period, we conducted immunohistochemical studies by staining a 200 case Grade/Stage tissue

  15. Primary and salvage cryotherapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Finley, David S; Pouliot, Frederic; Miller, David C; Belldegrun, Arie S

    2010-02-01

    Cryotherapy is a technique to ablate tissue by local induction of extremely cold temperatures. Recently, the American Urological Association Best Practice Statement recognized cryoablation of the prostate as an established treatment option for men with newly diagnosed or radiorecurrent organ-confined prostate cancer. Emerging data suggest that, in select cases, cryoablation may have a role in focal ablation of prostate. The current state of the art of cryoablation in these applications is reviewed.

  16. Infrared Spectroscopic Imaging for Prostate Pathology Practice

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    status of biopsied tissue forms the definitive diagnosis for prostate cancer and constitutes an important cornerstone of therapy and prognosis.4...106-130 (2006). 2 SM Gilbert, CB Cavallo, H Kahane, FC Lowe Evidence suggesting PSA cutpoint of 2.5 ng/mL for prompting prostate biopsy: Review of...provides critical input for therapy . In particular, prostate cancer accounts for one third of noncutaneous cancers diagnosed in US men. Hence, it is

  17. Intra-Operative Dosimetry in Prostate Brachytherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    phantoms and pre-recorded patient data. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prostate Brachytherapy, X-ray reconstruction, C-arm, TRUS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...prostate brachytherapy system that provides dosimetry analysis (Aim-2), and evaluate the system experimentally on phantoms and pre-recorded patient data...prostate brachytherapy system to enable dosimetry calculation Aim-3: Experimental Validation: Evaluate the performance of the RUF system on phantoms and

  18. Imaging Prostate Cancer with Positron Emission Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-13-1-0125 TITLE: Imaging Prostate Cancer with Positron Emission Tomography...ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 2014 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 01 Sept 2013-31 Aug 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Imaging Prostate Cancer ...proposal is to develop peptide based radiopharmaceuticals and evaluate them as PET imaging agents in preclinical animal models of prostate cancer

  19. Multifunctional Nanotherapeutic System for Advanced Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    therapy for drug resistant prostate cancer cells. In addition the findings from this study can be extended to the combinatorial therapy involving...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0571 TITLE: “Multifunctional Nanotherapeutic System for Advanced Prostate Cancer ...29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Multifunctional Nanotherapeutic System for Advanced Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0571 5b

  20. Pittsburgh-Tuskegee Prostate Training Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    the Role of PSMA and Folate in Prostate Cancer and the Novel Localization of PSMA to the Mitochondria Denise O’Keefe Myers, Kimberly ERK MAPK...Meeting Datiri, Yeipyeng (2012) Exploring the Role of PSMA and Folate in Prostate Cancer and the Novel Localization of PSMA to the Mitochondria...Yeipyeng (2012) Exploring the Role of PSMA and Folate in Prostate Cancer and the Novel Localization of PSMA to the Mitochondria The National

  1. Prostate Cancer Presenting with Parietal Bone Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Pare, Abdoul Karim; Abubakar, Babagana Mustapha; Kabore, Moussa

    2017-01-01

    Bone metastases from prostate cancer are very common. They are usually located on the axial skeleton. However, cranial bone metastases especially to the parietal bone are rare. We report a case of metastatic prostate cancer presenting with left parietal bone metastasis in a patient with no urological symptoms or signs. We should consider prostate cancer in any man above 60 years presenting unusual bone lesions.

  2. Regulation of the Prostate Cancer Tumor Microenvironment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    epithelium , stroma, as well as immune system, and the fixed nature of the prostate model with expression of the large T antigen, which may have limited...cancer glandular architecture formed (Figure 8). Figure 8. Subcutanous TRAMP Model to Recapitulate Prostate Cancer. TRAMP C2 cells with and...model to be able to alter the aggressiveness of the tumor and specifically modulate the TLR signaling pathway in prostate epithelium , stroma, and immune

  3. Prostate Cancer Disparities in an Incarcerated Community

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Florida Department of Corrections (FDOC) as a model for elucidating the genetic, epigenetic , and socio-environmental etiologies of prostate cancer . 9 | P...TITLE: Prostate Cancer Disparities in an Incarcerated Community PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Meghan E. Borysova, Ph.D...1 Sep 2011 - 31 Aug 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Prostate Cancer Disparities in an Incarcerated Community 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  4. The Infectious Pathogenesis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    al. Plasma antibodies against Trichomonas vaginalis and subsequent risk of prostate cancer. Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention 2006;15...infectious agents with respect to prostate cancer: T vaginalis , the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infection, and the recently identified...To characterize the role of the infectious protozoa T. vaginalis in prostate carcinogenesis and progression. The current study is nested within the

  5. Sanguinarine: A Novel Agent Against Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    surgical approaches have not been successful in the management of prostate cancer (CaP). Natural plant - based products have shown promise as anticancer...or treatment of prostate cancer . Several studies have shown that plant -derived alkaloids possess remarkable anticancer effects. Sanguinarine, an...Preclinical evaluation of plant alkaloid sanguinarine against prostate cancer development in a nude mice xenograft model. Proc Amer Assoc Cancer

  6. ROPE Registry Project to Determine the Safety and Efficacy of Prostate Artery Embolisation (PAE) for Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Secondary to Benign Prostatic Enlargement (LUTS BPE).

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-03

    Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms Caused by Benign Prostatic Enlargement (LUTS BPE); Prostate Artery Embolisation (PAE); Transurethral Resection of the Prostate (TURP); Open Prostatectomy; Laser Enucleation or Ablation of the Prostate

  7. Plant-derived SAC domain of PAR-4 (Prostate Apoptosis Response 4) exhibits growth inhibitory effects in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Shayan; Jain, Sumeet; Rai, Vineeta; Sahoo, Dipak K.; Raha, Sumita; Suklabaidya, Sujit; Senapati, Shantibhusan; Rangnekar, Vivek M.; Maiti, Indu B.; Dey, Nrisingha

    2015-01-01

    The gene Par-4 (Prostate Apoptosis Response 4) was originally identified in prostate cancer cells undergoing apoptosis and its product Par-4 showed cancer specific pro-apoptotic activity. Particularly, the SAC domain of Par-4 (SAC-Par-4) selectively kills cancer cells leaving normal cells unaffected. The therapeutic significance of bioactive SAC-Par-4 is enormous in cancer biology; however, its large scale production is still a matter of concern. Here we report the production of SAC-Par-4-GFP fusion protein coupled to translational enhancer sequence (5′ AMV) and apoplast signal peptide (aTP) in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun NN plants under the control of a unique recombinant promoter M24. Transgene integration was confirmed by genomic DNA PCR, Southern and Northern blotting, Real-time PCR, and Nuclear run-on assays. Results of Western blot analysis and ELISA confirmed expression of recombinant SAC-Par-4-GFP protein and it was as high as 0.15% of total soluble protein. In addition, we found that targeting of plant recombinant SAC-Par-4-GFP to the apoplast and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was essential for the stability of plant recombinant protein in comparison to the bacterial derived SAC-Par-4. Deglycosylation analysis demonstrated that ER-targeted SAC-Par-4-GFP-SEKDEL undergoes O-linked glycosylation unlike apoplast-targeted SAC-Par-4-GFP. Furthermore, various in vitro studies like mammalian cells proliferation assay (MTT), apoptosis induction assays, and NF-κB suppression suggested the cytotoxic and apoptotic properties of plant-derived SAC-Par-4-GFP against multiple prostate cancer cell lines. Additionally, pre-treatment of MAT-LyLu prostate cancer cells with purified SAC-Par-4-GFP significantly delayed the onset of tumor in a syngeneic rat prostate cancer model. Taken altogether, we proclaim that plant made SAC-Par-4 may become a useful alternate therapy for effectively alleviating cancer in the new era. PMID:26500666

  8. Radioimmunoassay of carbonic anhydrase III in rat tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Shiels, A; Jeffery, S; Wilson, C; Carter, N

    1984-01-01

    A specific and sensitive radioimmunoassay for the rat carbonic anhydrase III isoenzyme was developed. High concentrations of carbonic anhydrase III were detected in soleus muscle and male liver. Female liver and other skeletal muscles contained significantly lower concentrations, and only trace amounts were found in heart, prostate, kidney, brain, plasma, urine and, possibly, erythrocytes. PMID:6424658

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of urinary prostate protein glycosylation profiling in prostatitis diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Vermassen, Tijl; Van Praet, Charles; Poelaert, Filip; Lumen, Nicolaas; Decaestecker, Karel; Hoebeke, Piet; Van Belle, Simon; Rottey, Sylvie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although prostatitis is a common male urinary tract infection, clinical diagnosis of prostatitis is difficult. The developmental mechanism of prostatitis is not yet unraveled which led to the elaboration of various biomarkers. As changes in asparagine-linked-(N-)-glycosylation were observed between healthy volunteers (HV), patients with benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer patients, a difference could exist in biochemical parameters and urinary N-glycosylation between HV and prostatitis patients. We therefore investigated if prostatic protein glycosylation could improve the diagnosis of prostatitis. Materials and methods Differences in serum and urine biochemical markers and in total urine N-glycosylation profile of prostatic proteins were determined between HV (N = 66) and prostatitis patients (N = 36). Additionally, diagnostic accuracy of significant biochemical markers and changes in N-glycosylation was assessed. Results Urinary white blood cell (WBC) count enabled discrimination of HV from prostatitis patients (P < 0.001). Urinary bacteria count allowed for discriminating prostatitis patients from HV (P < 0.001). Total amount of biantennary structures (urinary 2A/MA marker) was significantly lower in prostatitis patients compared to HV (P < 0.001). Combining the urinary 2A/MA marker and urinary WBC count resulted in an AUC of 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) = (0.70–0.89) which was significantly better than urinary WBC count (AUC = 0.70, 95% CI = [0.59–0.82], P = 0.042) as isolated test. Conclusions We have demonstrated the diagnostic value of urinary N-glycosylation profiling, which shows great potential as biomarker for prostatitis. Further research is required to unravel the developmental course of prostatic inflammation. PMID:26526330

  10. Effects of verbenalin on prostatitis mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Mingsan; Guo, Lin; Yan, Xiaoli; Wang, Tan; Li, Zuming

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the treatment characteristics of verbenalin on a prostatitis mouse model. Give Xiaozhiling injection in the prostate locally to make a prostatitis mouse model. High, medium and low doses of verbenalin were each given to different mouse groups. The amount of water was determined in 14th, 28th. The number of white cells and lecithin corpuscle density in prostatic fluid were determined. Morphological changes in the prostate, testis, epididymis and kidney were detected. Compared with the model control group, the mice treated with high, medium and low doses of verbenalin had significantly increased amounts of water, and prostate white blood cell count and prostate volume density (Vv) were decreased significantly, the density of lecithin corpuscle score increased, and pathologic prostatitis changes were significantly reduced. Pathological change in the testis was significantly reduced and the change in the epididymis was obviously reduced. The thymic cortex thickness and the number of lymphocytes increased significantly and could reduce the renal pathological changes in potential. Verbenalin has a good therapeutic effect on the prostatitis mouse model. PMID:26858560

  11. Arachidonic acid metabolism in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    YANG, PEIYING; CARTWRIGHT, CARRIE A.; LI, JIN; WEN, SIJIN; PROKHOROVA, INA N.; SHUREIQI, IMAD; TRONCOSO, PATRICIA; NAVONE, NORA M.; NEWMAN, ROBERT A.; KIM, JERI

    2012-01-01

    The arachidonic acid pathway is important in the development and progression of numerous malignant diseases, including prostate cancer. To more fully evaluate the role of individual cyclooxygenases (COXs), lipoxygenases (LOXs) and their metabolites in prostate cancer, we measured mRNA and protein levels of COXs and LOXs and their arachidonate metabolites in androgen-dependent (LNCaP) and androgen-independent (PC-3 and DU145) prostate cancer cell lines, bone metastasis-derived MDA PCa 2a and MDA PCa 2b cell lines and their corresponding xenograft models, as well as core biopsy specimens of primary prostate cancer and nonneoplastic prostate tissue taken ex vivo after prostatectomy. Relatively high levels of COX-2 mRNA and its product PGE2 were observed only in PC-3 cells and their xenografts. By contrast, levels of the exogenous 12-LOX product 12-HETE were consistently higher in MDA PCa 2b and PC-3 cells and their corresponding xenograft tissues than were those in LNCaP cells. More strikingly, the mean endogenous level of 12-HETE was significantly higher in the primary prostate cancers than in the nonneoplastic prostate tissue (0.094 vs. 0.010 ng/mg protein, respectively; p=0.019). Our results suggest that LOX metabolites such as 12-HETE are critical in prostate cancer progression and that the LOX pathway may be a target for treating and preventing prostate cancer. PMID:22895552

  12. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia: from Bench to Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hee Ju

    2012-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a prevalent disease, especially in old men, and often results in lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). This chronic disease has important care implications and financial risks to the health care system. LUTS are caused not only by mechanical prostatic obstruction but also by the dynamic component of obstruction. The exact etiology of BPH and its consequences, benign prostatic enlargement and benign prostatic obstruction, are not identified. Various theories concerning the causes of benign prostate enlargement and LUTS, such as metabolic syndrome, inflammation, growth factors, androgen receptor, epithelial-stromal interaction, and lifestyle, are discussed. Incomplete overlap of prostatic enlargement with symptoms and obstruction encourages focus on symptoms rather than prostate enlargement and the shifting from surgery to medicine as the treatment of BPH. Several alpha antagonists, including alfuzosin, doxazosin, tamsulosin, and terazosin, have shown excellent efficacy without severe adverse effects. In addition, new alpha antagonists, silodosin and naftopidil, and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors are emerging as BPH treatments. In surgical treatment, laser surgery such as photoselective vaporization of the prostate and holmium laser prostatectomy have been introduced to reduce complications and are used as alternatives to transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and open prostatectomy. The status of TURP as the gold standard treatment of BPH is still evolving. We review several preclinical and clinical studies about the etiology of BPH and treatment options. PMID:22468207

  13. Preventive effects of D-004, a lipid extract from Cuban royal palm (Roystonea regia) fruits, on testosterone-induced prostate hyperplasia in intact and castrated rodents.

    PubMed

    Arruzazabala, M L; Carbajal, D; Más, R; Molina, V; Rodríguez, E; González, V

    2004-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the noncancerous, uncontrolled growth of prostate gland cells and stroma that can cause difficulty urinating. Fruit lipid extracts from saw palmetto, a palm from the Arecaceae family, are used for BPH management. The Cuban royal palm, Roystonea regia, is also a member of the Arecaceae family and therefore it was appropriate to investigate the protective effects of Roystonea regia fruit lipid extracts on prostatic hyperplasia. The aim of this study was to investigate whether D-004, a lipid extract from Roystonea regia fruits, prevented testosterone-induced PH in castrated and intact rodents. Two series of experiments were performed. The first one was conducted in castrated and intact rats, distributed into five groups of 10 rats per group. The negative control group was injected with soy oil and treated orally with vehicle, while the four testosterone-injected groups were treated with vehicle (positive control), D-004 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg, respectively. The other experiment was conducted in castrated and intact mice. These were distributed into four groups of 10 mice per group: a negative control group and three testosterone-injected groups, of which one was a positive control, while two received D-004 200 and 400 mg/kg, respectively. At study completion, the rodents were sacrificed and prostates removed and weighed. D-004 at doses of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg significantly and dose-dependently prevented prostate enlargement in intact and castrated rats and mice. The percentage inhibitions obtained in mice were greater: 77% and 84% for intact and castrated mice, respectively. D-004 therapy did not affect body weight. It is concluded that D-004 administered orally significantly prevented testosterone-induced prostate enlargement in both intact and castrated rodents, indicating that an endogenous supply of testosterone is not necessary to observe such an effect The results of the present investigation support further studies of D

  14. Anti-proliferative effects of qianliening capsules on prostatic hyperplasia in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    ZHONG, XIAOYONG; LIN, JIUMAO; ZHOU, JIANHENG; XU, WEI; HONG, ZHENFENG

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies by our group showed that Qianliening capsules (QC), a clinically proven effective traditional Chinese formulation that has long been used in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), is capable of inhibiting BPH in vivo and in vitro via the promotion of apoptosis, suppression of the EGFR/STAT3 signaling pathway and regulating the expression of sex hormones as well as their receptors. However, the mechanism of its anti-BPH activity has remained to be fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the mechanism underlying the anti-proliferative effect of QC in vivo and in vitro. Castrated male Sprage-Dawley (SD) rats where subcutaneously injected with testosterone propionate and the WPMY-1 cell line was stimulated with basic fibroblast growth factor in order to generate BPH in vivo and in vitro separately, both of which were then subjected to QC treatment. Finasteride was used as a positive control drug for the in vivo study. In the present study, it was found that treatment with QC or finasteride significantly reduced the prostatic index (PI=prostate wet weight/body weight × 100) in a rat model of BPH (P<0.05). In addition, reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analyses showed that QC or finasteride treatment significantly inhibited model construction-induced upregulation of expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 in prostatic tissues of rats with BPH (P<0.05). The in vitro study further proved that QC exhibited anti-proliferative properties via G1/S cell cycle arrest in the WPMY-1 cell line, as evidenced by colony formation, flow cytometric cell cycle, immunoblot and RT-PCR analyses. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that inhibition of cell proliferation via G1/S cell cycle arrest may be one of the underlying mechanisms of the effect of QC on BPH. PMID:25825141

  15. Efficacy of Compound Therapy by Ginseng and Ciprofloxacin on Bacterial Prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Miri, Maryam; Shokri, Saeid; Darabi, Shahram; Alipour Heidari, Mahmood; Ghalyanchi, Akhgar; Karimfar, Mohammad Hassan; Shirazi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Objective Genitourinary tract infections play a significant role in male infertility. Infections of reproductive sex glands, such as the prostate, impair function and indirectly affect male fertility. The general aim of this study is to investigate the protective effect of Korean red ginseng (KRG) on prostatitis in male rats treated with ciprofloxacin (CIPX). Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we randomly divided 72 two male Wistar rats into 9 groups. The groups were treated as follows for 10 days: i. Control (no medication), ii. Sham [(normal saline injection into the vas deferens and oral administration of phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)], iii. Ginseng, iv. CPIX, v. CIPX+ginseng, vi. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) (UPEC), vii. UPEC+ginseng, viii. UPEC+CIPX, and ix. UPEC+ginseng+CIPX. The rats were killed 14 days after the last injection and the prostate glands were removed. After sample preparation, routine histology was performed using hematoxylin and eosin staining. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) method was used to determine the presence of apoptotic cells. Results The severity score for acinar changes and inflammatory cell infiltration in the UPEC+CIPX group did not significantly different from the UPEC group. However this score significantly decreased in the UPEC+CIPX+ginseng group compared to the UPEC group. Apoptotic index of all ginseng treated groups significantly decreased compared to the UPEC and CPIX groups. Conclusion These results suggested that ginseng might be an effective adjunct in CIPX treatment of prostatitis. The combined use ginseng and CIPX was more effective than ginseng or CIPX alone. PMID:27054125

  16. Optimization of Radiation Therapy Techniques for Prostate Cancer With Prostate-Rectum Spacers: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, Gary; Benz, Eileen; Vallee, Jean-Paul; Miralbell, Raymond; Zilli, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Dose-escalated radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer improves disease control but is also associated with worse rectal toxicity. A spacer placed between the prostate and rectum can be used to displace the anterior rectal wall outside of the high-dose radiation regions and potentially minimize radiation-induced rectal toxicity. This systematic review focuses on the published data regarding the different types of commercially available prostate-rectum spacers. Dosimetric results and preliminary clinical data using prostate-rectum spacers in patients with localized prostate cancer treated by curative radiation therapy are compared and discussed.

  17. Prostate development and growth in benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Timms, Barry G; Hofkamp, Luke E

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of benign prostatic hyperplasia [BPH] in elderly men has intrigued anatomists, pathologists and scientists for centuries. Studies of morbid anatomy, clinical observations and contemporary cellular biology have contributed to an evolving interpretation of the causality of the disease. Insights into the detailed microanatomy and ductal architecture of the prostate during stages of fetal and early postnatal development suggest that mechanisms involved in the early growth period become aberrantly expressed in elderly men. Age, hormones and epithelial-mesenchymal interactions are all contributing factors to the pathogenesis of BPH. Control of the microenvironment in normal and abnormal growth is a multifactorial process. Susceptibility to the disease may include clinical comorbid diseases, region-specific changes in cell-cell interactions and a variety of signaling pathways including a novel hypothesis regarding the role of the primary cilium as a regulator of signal transduction mechanisms. Recent work in animal models has shown that there are region-specific differences within the prostate that may be significant because of the dynamic and intricate interplay between the epithelium and mesenchyme. Because of the focal nature of BPH a closer examination of normal morphogenesis patterns, which defines the gland's architecture, may facilitate a detailed understanding of the atypical growth patterns.

  18. Defining the radiobiology of prostate cancer progression: An important question in translational prostate cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Vourganti, Srinivas; Donaldson, Jeffrey; Johnson, Linda; Turkbey, Baris; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Kotula, Leszek

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignancies affecting men worldwide. High mortality rates from advanced and metastatic prostate cancer in the United States are contrasted by a relatively indolent course in the majority of cases. This gives hope for finding methods that could direct personalized diagnostic, preventative, and treatment approaches to patients with prostate cancer. Recent advances in multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MP-MRI) offer a noninvasive diagnostic intervention which allows correlation of prostate tumor image characteristics with underlying biologic evidence of tumor progression. The power of MP-MRI includes examination of both local invasion and nodal disease and might overcome the challenges of analyzing the multifocal nature of prostate cancer. Future directions include a careful analysis of the genomic signature of individual prostatic lesions utilizing image-guided biopsies. This review examines the diagnostic potential of MRI in prostate cancer. PMID:24879423

  19. Radiologic presentation of chronic granulomatous prostatitis mimicking locally advanced prostate adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Su-Min; Joshi, Jay; Wolfe, Konrad; Acher, Peter; Liyanage, Sidath H

    2016-06-01

    We present a case of nonspecific granulomatous prostatitis (GP), a clinical mimic of prostate adenocarcinoma. A 54-year-old man presented with lower urinary tract symptoms and raised prostate-specific antigen. Magnetic resonance imaging showed features consistent with prostate cancer, including low T2-signal intensity in the peripheral and transition zones with signs of extracapsular extension. Diffusion-weighted imaging showed high-signal intensity, with low apparent diffusion coefficient values, whereas dynamic contrast enhancement demonstrated a type 3 washout curve, similar to that found in prostate cancer. Transperineal sector-guided prostate biopsy confirmed nonspecific GP, and the patient was treated conservatively. We discuss and compare nonspecific, chronic GP as a radiologic mimic of prostate adenocarcinoma patient.

  20. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia-like ductal prostatic adenocarcinoma: A case suitable for active surveillance?

    PubMed Central

    Rais-Bahrami, Soroush; Dillard, Melissa R.; Zhu, Grace G.; Gordetsky, Jennifer B.

    2017-01-01

    In contrast to typical prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN)-like ductal adenocarcinoma is a rare variant of prostate cancer with low-grade clinical behavior. We report a case of a 66-year-old African-American male with an elevated serum prostate-specific antigen who underwent multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MRI/ultrasound fusion-guided biopsies. Pathology demonstrated low-volume Gleason score 3 + 3 = 6 (Grade Group 1), acinar adenocarcinoma involving one core and PIN-like ductal adenocarcinoma on a separate core. Herein, we discuss the potential role of active surveillance for patients with this rare variant of prostate cancer found in the era of advanced imaging with multiparametric MRI for prostate cancer. PMID:28216939