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Sample records for r4d investigations final

  1. Seasonal snow of arctic Alaska R4D investigations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.S.

    1993-02-01

    Seasonal snow is present on the Arctic Slope of Alaska for nine months each year. Its presence or absence determines whether 80% of the solar radiation is reflected or absorbed, respectively. Although life on the Arctic Slope is adapted to, and in some cases dependent upon seasonal snow, little is known about it from a scientific point of view. Its quantity has been grossly underestimated, and knowledge of its distribution and the extent of wind transport and redistribution is very limited. This research project dealt with the amount, regional distribution and physical properties of wind blown snow and its biological role in the R4D area of the Arctic Slope. Physical processes which operate within the snow that were studied included the flux of heat and vapor and the fractionation of stable isotopes through it during fall and winter, and the complex heat and mass transfer within the snow and between snow, its substrate and the overlying atmosphere during the melt period.

  2. Effects of disturbance on ecosystem dynamics of tundra and riparian vegetation: A project in the R4D program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.F.

    1995-12-31

    Models were proposed as research tools to test the basic understanding of the structure and function of arctic ecosystems, as a means for providing initial management assessments of potential response to energy-related development, and as a vehicle for extrapolation of research results to other arctic sites and landscapes. This final summary report reviews progress made on models at a variety of scales from nutrient uptake by individual roots to nutrient availability within arctic landscapes, and examines potentials and critical limitations of these models for providing insight on patch and landscape level function in tundra regions.

  3. Terrain, vegetation, and landscape evolution of the R4D research site, Brooks Range Foothills, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, D.A.; Binnian, Emily F.; Evans, B. M.; Lederer, N.D.; Nordstrand, E.A.; Webber, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    Maps of the vegetation and terrain of a 22 km2 area centered on the Department of Energy (DOE) R4D (Response, Resistance, Resilience to and Recovery from Disturbance in Arctic Ecosystems) study site in the Southern Foothills Physiographic Province of Alaska were made using integrated geobotanical mapping procedures and a geographic-information system. Typical land forms and surface f orms include hillslope water tracks, Sagavanirktok-age till deposits, nonsorted stone stripes, and colluvial-basin deposits. Thirty-two plant communities are described; the dominant vegetation (51% of the mapped area) is moist tussock-sedge, dwarf-shrub tundra dominated by Eriophorum vaginatum or Carex bigelowii. Much of the spatial variation in the mapped geobotanical characters reflects different-aged glaciated surfaces. Shannon-Wienerin dices indicate that the more mature landscapes, represented by retransported hillslope deposits and basin colluvium, are less heterogeneous than newer landscapes such as surficial till deposits and floodplains. A typical toposequence on a mid-Pleistocene-age surface is discussed with respect to evolution of the landscape. Thick Sphagnum moss layers occur on lower hillslopes, and the patterns of moss-layer development, heat flux, active layer thickness, and ground-ice are seen as keys to developing thermokarst-susceptibility maps.

  4. Cameron Station remedial investigation: Final asbestos survey report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1992-02-01

    Woodward-Clyde Federal Services (WCFS) conducted a comprehensive asbestos survey of the facilities at Cameron Station as part of its contract with the US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA) to perform a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) at the base. The purpose of the survey which was initiated August 23, 1990 in response to the Base Realignment And Closure Environmental Restoration Strategy (BRAC), was to identify friable and non-friable asbestos-containing material (ACM), provide options for abatement of asbestos, provide cost estimates for both abatement and operations and maintenance costs, and identifying actions requiring immediate action in Cameron Station`s 24 buildings. BRAC states that only friable asbestos which presents a threat to health and safety shall be removed; non-friable asbestos or friable asbestos which is encapsulated or in good repair shall be left in place and identified to the buyer per GSA agreement. The investigation followed protocols that met or exceeded the requirements of 40 CFR 763, the EPA regulations promulgated under the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA).

  5. Report Summary, Final Hells Canyon Environmental Investigation.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1985-01-01

    The Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 provided for the establishment of a Regional Power Planning Council (Regional Council) and mandated the development of a Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (F&W Program). The F&W Program was adopted by the Regional Council in November 1982. and is intended to mitigate fish and wildlife losses resulting from the development of hydroelectric dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. One element of the FLW Program is the Water Budget. It calls for additional flows in the Columbia and Snake Rivers between April 15 and June 15 to improve the survival of juvenile salmon and steelhead migrating downstream. The Snake River's contribution to the Water Budget is 20,000 cubic feet per second-months (A volume of water equal to a flow of 20.000 cubic feet per second, 24 hours per day, for a period of a month) over and above water that would normally flow for power production. The water for the Water Budget would come out of Idaho Power Company's (IPCo) Hells Canyon Complex and the Corps of Engineers' (Corps) Dvorshak Reservoir. IPCo's Hells Canyon Complex consists of three dams, Brownlee, Oxbow, and Hells Canyon. Brownlee, at the upstream end, contains a large reservoir and controls flow to the lower dams. IPCo's participation in the Water Budget could affect the level of the Brownlee Reservoir and flows downstream of the Hells Canyon Complex on the Snake River. In light of this, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and IPCo contracted with the consulting firm of CH2!4 Hill to study the potential changes that could occur to the environment. The Environmental Investigation (EI) takes into account concerns that were expressed by the public at a series of public meetings held in the Snake River area during June 1983 and again during September 1984. Existing information and consultations with agencies which have management responsibilities in the project area formed the basis for the data used in the EI

  6. Outstanding Junior Investigator Award. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, J.A.

    1995-04-17

    The OJI supported research of J. Ellison has been concentrated in two areas: study of W{gamma} and Z{gamma} production at the Tevatron, which probes the trilinear boson coupling; design, fabrication and testing of silicon microstrip detectors for the D0 upgrade silicon tracking system. The W{gamma} analysis using data from the first D0 run ({approximately}14 pb{sup {minus}1} integrated luminosity) has been completed - J. Ellison and a postdoctoral research working with him (B. Choudhary) were responsible for the muon channel analysis. This analysis is an important test of the Standard Model (SM), since it probes the nature of the WW{gamma} coupling, which is related to the W boson magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments. Any deviation from the SM value of the WW{gamma} coupling would be an indication of either composite structure of the W or higher order loop corrections involving physics beyond the SM. The analysis has resulted in the world`s most sensitive limits on the WW{gamma} coupling parameters. In addition the author has also worked on an analysis of Z{gamma} production which has yielded sensitive limits on the ZZ{gamma} and Z{gamma}{gamma} couplings. The work on the D0 Silicon Tracker has also made very good progress. The team led by J. Ellison includes two postdoctoral researchers (A. Bischoff and C. Boswell), one graduate student (M. Mason) and three undergraduate students. They have fully evaluated proptotype detectors which were designed at UCR and have completed a detailed simulation study of the detector performance for different strip geometries. The results were used to optimize the design of the final D0 detectors, for which UR has sole responsibility. The author has completed the mask design for the 3-chip barrel detectors and production of the final detectors as now begun.

  7. Highway Collision Investigation Training Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, John W.

    The report was prepared for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) of the U.S. Department of Transportation. The report briefly reviews the appropriate literature, then describes the one-year program which involved planning and organization of a Highway Collision Investigation Training Program, preparing a course syllabus, and…

  8. An Investigation of Harvard Dropouts. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholi, Armand M., II

    Approximately half of the 7,000,000 students currently enrolled in college will fail to complete their education. This study investigates the causes of this high attrition rate by examining the records of 1,454 undergraduates who dropped out of Harvard College for various reasons over a 5-year period. Sources of the data were: (1) Registrar's…

  9. Hells Canyon Environmental Investigation : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1985-01-01

    The Water Budget plan would provide additional flows in the Columbia and Snake Rivers between April 15 and June 15 to improve the survival of downstream migrating salmon and steelhead. The plan calls for 20,000 cubic feet per second-months (beyond the firm power flow) to be delivered to Lower Granite pool as the Snake River contribution to the Water Budget. This water would come from Idaho Power Company's (IPCo) Hells Canyon Complex (principally, Brownlee Reservoir) and the US Army Corps of Engineers' Dworshak Reservoir. This report contains the results of an environmental investigation of the nonpower impacts on the Hells Canyon Complex investigation. The environmental investigation evaluated three Water Budget scenarios, or levels of participation, developed by IPCo. These scenarios involve drawdowns of Brownlee Reservoir to three elevations, or floor levels (2036, 2050, and 2065), for Water Budget flows. A total of nine discipline areas were studied. These include natural features (geology); water use; water quality; fish, botanical, and wildlife resources; air quality; land use; historical and archeological resources; recreational resources; and aesthetic resources. Within each discipline, the report presents the existing conditions, the potential impacts associated with each scenario, information deficiencies and needed studies, and references.

  10. Investigation of coal structure. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nishioka, Masaharu

    1994-03-01

    A better understanding of coal structure is the first step toward more effective utilization of the most abundant hydrocarbon resource. Detailed characterization of coal structure is very difficult, even with today`s highly developed analytical techniques. This is primarily due to the amorphous nature of these high-molecular-weight mixtures. Coal has a polymeric character and has been popularly represented as a three-dimensional cross-linked network. There is, however, little or no information which positively verifies this model. The principal objective of this research was to further investigate the physical structure of coal and to determine the extent to which coal molecules may be covalently cross-linked and/or physically associated. Two common characterization methods, swellability and extractability, were used. A technique modifying the conventional swelling procedure was established to better determine network or associated model conformation. A new method for evaluating coal swelling involving laser scattering has also been developed. The charge-transfer interaction is relatively strong in high-volatile bituminous coal. Soaking in the presence of electron donors and acceptors proved effective for solubilizing the coal, but temperatures in excess of 200 C were required. More than 70 wt% of the coal was readily extracted with pyridine after soaking. Associative/dissociative equilibria of coal molecules were observed during soaking. From these results, the associated model has gained credibility over the network model as the representative structure of coal. Significant portions of coal molecules are unquestionably physically associated, but the overall extent is not known at this time.

  11. An Investigation of the Outward Bound Final Expedition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobilya, Andrew J.; Kalisch, Ken; Daniel, Brad

    2011-01-01

    Research of wilderness programs indicates a clear need for additional investigation of specific program components and their influence on participant outcomes. This study examines one component of the Outward Bound wilderness program--the Final Expedition. The Final Expedition is a student-led wilderness expedition and is also referred to as an…

  12. Investigation of the Spherical Stellarator Concept - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, P.E.

    2000-10-15

    This document is a final report of the U.S. DOE grant entitled ''Investigation of the Spherical Stellarator Concept'' which supported theoretical and numerical investigation of a novel fusion concept, the ultra-low-aspect-ratio stellarator system called Spherical Stellarator (SS). The research was concentrated on (a) search for principally different types of SS configurations, (b) optimization of SS configurations by varying the parameters of the coil systems, (c) finite beta and finite plasma current (including bootstrap current) equilibria in the SS, and (d) Monte Carlo particle transport simulations for the SS.

  13. Iowa Hill Pumped Storage Project Investigations - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, David

    2016-07-01

    This Final Technical Report is a summary of the activities and outcome of the Department of Energy (DOE) Assistance Agreement DE-EE0005414 with the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD). The Assistance Agreement was created in 2012 to support investigations into the Iowa Hill Pumped-storage Project (Project), a new development that would add an additional 400 MW of capacity to SMUD’s existing 688MW Upper American River Hydroelectric Project (UARP) in the Sierra Nevada mountains east of Sacramento, California.

  14. Investigations on detonation shock dynamics and related topics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D.S.

    1993-11-01

    This document is a final report that summarizes the research findings and research activities supported by the subcontract DOE-LANL-9-XG8-3931P-1 between the University of Illinois (D. S. Stewart Principal Investigator) and the University of California (Los Alamos National Laboratory, M-Division). The main focus of the work has been on investigations of Detonation Shock Dynamics. A second emphasis has been on modeling compaction of energetic materials and deflagration to detonation in those materials. The work has led to a number of extensions of the theory of Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) and its application as an engineering design method for high explosive systems. The work also enhanced the hydrocode capabilities of researchers in M-Division by modifications to CAVEAT, an existing Los Alamos hydrocode. Linear stability studies of detonation flows were carried out for the purpose of code verification. This work also broadened the existing theory for detonation. The work in this contract has led to the development of one-phase models for dynamic compaction of porous energetic materials and laid the groundwork for subsequent studies. Some work that modeled the discrete heterogeneous behavior of propellant beds was also performed. The contract supported the efforts of D. S. Stewart and a Postdoctoral student H. I. Lee at the University of Illinois.

  15. Final report for the network authentication investigation and pilot.

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, John M.; Dautenhahn, Nathan; Miller, Marc M.; Wiener, Dallas J; Witzke, Edward L.

    2006-11-01

    New network based authentication mechanisms are beginning to be implemented in industry. This project investigated different authentication technologies to see if and how Sandia might benefit from them. It also investigated how these mechanisms can integrate with the Sandia Two-Factor Authentication Project. The results of these investigations and a network authentication path forward strategy are documented in this report.

  16. Accident Investigation Technician Instructor Training Institute. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Ronald D.; And Others

    To assist States in implementing Highway Safety Program Standard 18, "Accident Investigation and Reporting", the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration funded an instructor training program for a new occupational field in highway safety, accident investigation technician. The Center for Vocational and Technical Education executed this…

  17. Final Work Plan: Targeted Investigation at York, Nebraska

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M.

    2016-08-01

    The targeted investigation at York will be implemented in phases, so that data collected and interpretations developed at each stage of the program can be evaluated to guide subsequent phases most effectively. Section 2 of this Work Plan presents a brief overview of the York site, its geologic and hydrologic setting, and the previous CCC/USDA investigations. Section 3, outlines the proposed technical program for the targeted investigation, and Section 4 describes the investigative methods to be employed. A community relations plan is in Section 5, and Section 6 includes health and safety information. In addition to this site-specific Work Plan, the Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) developed by Argonne for CCC/USDA investigations in Nebraska should be consulted for complete details of the methods and procedures to be used at York.

  18. Criminal investigations and the Superfund program. Fact sheet (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The fact sheet, directed toward any one who witnesses fraudulent activity in EPA programs, discusses areas in which fraud and abuse can occur and provides an understanding of the criminal investigation process that results from reports of suspicious activity.

  19. Final work plan for targeted investigation at Hilton, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-08-28

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of a targeted investigation to update the status of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater associated with grain storage operations at Hilton, Kansas. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility in Hilton during the 1950s and 1960s. At the time of the CCC/USDA operation in Hilton, grain storage facilities (CCC/USDA and private) were located along the both sides of the former Union Pacific railroad tracks (Figure 1.1). The main grain storage structures were on or near the railroad right-of-way. The proposed targeted investigation, to be conducted by Argonne National Laboratory on the behalf of CCC/USDA, will supplement Argonne's Phase I and Phase II investigations in 1996-1997. The earlier investigations erroneously focused on an area east of the railroad property where the CCC/USDA did not operate, specifically on a private grain storage facility. In addition, the investigation was limited in scope, because access to railroad property was denied (Argonne 1997a,b). The hydrogeologic system at Hilton is potentially complex.

  20. Geophysical investigation at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. Final report,

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, M.K.

    1992-03-01

    Results of a geophysical investigation at the incinerator site of Philadelphia Naval Shipyard are presented. Following the end of World War II, 50 to 60 pallets of gas cylinders were reportedly buried to the west of the old incinerator at Girard Point. The contents of the cylinders are unknown. Extensive filling operations occurred at Girard Point from 1940 to 1970, resulting in shallow groundwater surface in the area, 2 to 10 ft deep, which would indicate that the cylinders are probably in direct contact with the water surface. The geophysical investigation presented in this report was designed to help alleviate uncertainties produced from previous studies in the area. The geophysical program included electromagnetic induction and magnetic survey methods. The results of the various surveys were integrated, and numerous anomalous areas were interpreted. Anomalies warranting further investigation were presented along with a priority ranking.

  1. Final Work Plan: Phase I Investigation at Bladen, Nebraska

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M.; Yan, Eugene

    2014-07-01

    The village of Bladen is a town of population approximately 237 in the northwest part of Webster County, Nebraska, 30 mi southwest of Hastings and 140 mi southwest of Lincoln, Nebraska. In 2000, the fumigant-related compound carbon tetrachloride was detected in public water supply well PWS 68-1, at a trace level. Low-level contamination, below the maximum contamination level (MCL) of 5.0 μg/L, has been detected intermittently in well PWS 68-1 since 2000, including in the last sample taken in July 2013. In 2006, the village installed a new well, PWS 2006-1, that remains free of contamination. Because the carbon tetrachloride found in well PWS 68-1 might be linked to historical use of fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride at grain storage facilities, including its former facility in Bladen, the CCC/USDA is proposing an investigation to (1) delineate the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination potentially associated with its former facility, (2) characterize pathways and controlling factors for contaminant migration in the subsurface, and (3) establish a basis for estimating potential health and environmental risks. The work will be performed in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement established between the NDEQ and the Farm Service Agency of the USDA. The site investigation at Bladen will be implemented in phases, so that data collected and interpretations developed during each phase can be evaluated to determine if a subsequent phase of investigation is warranted and, if warranted, to provide effective guidance for the subsequent investigation activities. This Work Plan identifies the specific technical objectives and defines the scope of work proposed for the Phase I investigation by compiling and evaluating historical data. The proposed investigation activities will be performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research

  2. Geophysical investigation at Fort Detrick Maryland. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Llopis, J.L.; Simms, J.E.

    1993-07-01

    Results of a comprehensive, integrated geophysical investigation of 15 suspected disposal areas at Area B, Fort Detrick, Maryland, are presented. Between 1943 and 1969, Fort Detrick served as the nation's center for military offensive and defensive biological research. As a result of this activity, chemically and biologically contaminated materials were generated and disposed in burial pits at Site B. Based on historical and visual information, 15 sites suspected of containing burial pits were selected to be examined in greater detail using geophysical methods. The geophysical investigations were designed to detect anomalous conditions indicative of past disposal activities. The geophysical program included electromagnetic (EM), magnetic, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and seismic refraction methods. Anomalous conditions were found at several of the sites tested and noted. The anomalous conditions may have resulted from the presence of buried material or from physical and/or chemical soil changes caused by disposal activities.... Geophysics, Electromagnetics ground penetrating radar, Geophysical surveys, Magnetics, Seismic refraction.

  3. Final work plan for targeted investigation at Inman, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-05

    In 1997, low levels of carbon tetrachloride (below the maximum contaminant level [MCL] of 5 {micro}g/L) were detected in groundwater at Inman, Kansas, by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The 1997 KDHE sampling was conducted under the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) private well sampling program. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), a USDA agency, operated a grain storage facility in Inman from 1954 to 1965. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with former CCC/USDA grain storage operations. Inman is located in southwest McPherson County, approximately 10 mi southwest of the city of McPherson (Figure 1.1). To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Inman is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA has agreed to conduct an investigation at Inman, in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the USDA. For this work plan, Argonne compiled historical data related to the previous investigations and grain storage operations at Inman. Through a review of documents acquired from all available sources, other potential contaminant source areas (in addition to the former CCC/USDA facility) have been identified as (1) the commercial grain storage structures northwest of Inman, along the railroad right-of-way, and (2) small former private grain storage facilities west of Main Street and near the former CCC/USDA facility at the southern edge of Inman (Figure 1.2). Previous investigations and the potential source areas are discussed in Section 2.

  4. Final report : Phase III targeted investigation, Everest, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-01-31

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated grain storage facilities at two different locations at Everest, Kansas (Figure 1.1). One facility (referred to in this report as the Everest facility) was at the western edge of the city. The second facility (referred to in this report as Everest East) was about 0.5 mi northeast of the town. The CCC/USDA operated these facilities from the early 1950s until the early 1970s, at a time when commercial fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the CCC/USDA and private industry for the preservation of grain in storage. In 1997 the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) sampled several domestic drinking water and non-drinking water wells in the Everest area as part of the CCC/USDA Private Well Sampling Program. All of the sampled wells were outside the Everest city limits. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was identified at a single domestic drinking water well (the Nigh well, DW06; Figure 1.1) approximately 3/8 mi northwest of the former Everest CCC/USDA grain storage facility. Subsequent KDHE investigations suggested that the contamination in DW06 could be linked to the former use of grain fumigants at the CCC/USDA facility. For this reason, the CCC/USDA is conducting a phased environmental study to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination at Everest and to identify potential remedial options. The studies are being performed by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Two phases of investigation were completed previously; this report presents the findings of the targeted Phase III investigation at Everest.

  5. Investigation of the string effect using final state photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akers, R.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Altekamp, N.; Ametewee, K.; Anderson, K. J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A. H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Batley, J. R.; Beaudoin, G.; Bechtluft, J.; Beck, A.; Beck, G. A.; Beeston, C.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K. W.; Bella, G.; Bentvelsen, S.; Berlich, P.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I. J.; Bock, P.; Bosch, H. M.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brown, R. M.; Buijs, A.; Burckhart, H. J.; Burgard, C.; Bürgin, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R. K.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Chang, C. Y.; Charlesworth, C.; Charlton, D. G.; Chu, S. L.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clayton, J. C.; Clowes, S. G.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J. E.; Cooke, O. C.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Darling, C.; de Jong, S.; Del Pozo, L. A.; Deng, H.; Dixit, M. S.; Do Couto E Silva, E.; Duboscq, J. E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Dunwoody, U. C.; Edwards, J. E. G.; Estabrooks, P. G.; Evans, H. G.; Fabbri, F.; Fabbro, B.; Fanti, M.; Fath, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fischer, H. M.; Folman, R.; Fong, D. G.; Foucher, M.; Fukui, H.; Fürtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gaidot, A.; Gary, J. W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S. M.; Geddes, N. I.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Gensler, S. W.; Gentit, F. X.; Geralis, T.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W. R.; Gillies, J. D.; Gingrich, D. M.; Goldberg, J.; Goodrick, M. J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Gross, E.; Hanson, G. G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Hargrove, C. K.; Hart, P. A.; Hartmann, C.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R. J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R. D.; Hill, J. C.; Hillier, S. J.; Hilse, T.; Hobson, P. R.; Hochman, D.; Homer, R. J.; Honma, A. K.; Howard, R.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D. C.; Jawahery, A.; Jeffreys, P. W.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Joly, A.; Jones, M.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jovanovic, P.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R. K.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kennedy, B. W.; King, B. J.; King, J.; Kirk, J.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koetke, D. S.; Kokott, T. P.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, R.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lafoux, H.; Lahmann, R.; Lai, W. P.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Layter, J. G.; Lee, A. M.; Lefebvre, E.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lloyd, S. L.; Loebinger, F. K.; Long, G. D.; Lorazo, B.; Losty, M. J.; Ludwig, J.; Luig, A.; Malik, A.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markus, C.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, J. P.; Mashimo, T.; Matthews, W.; Mättig, P.; McKenna, J.; McKigney, E. A.; McMahon, T. J.; McNab, A. I.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F. S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D. J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Müller, U.; Nellen, B.; Nijjhar, B.; O'Neale, S. W.; Oakham, F. G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H. O.; Oldershaw, N. J.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Orito, S.; Palmonari, F.; Pansart, J. P.; Patrick, G. N.; Pearce, M. J.; Phillips, P. D.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D. E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Posthaus, A.; Pritchard, T. W.; Przysiezniak, H.; Redmond, M. W.; Rees, D. L.; Rigby, D.; Rison, M. G.; Robins, S. A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J. M.; Ros, E.; Rossi, A. M.; Rosvick, M.; Routenburg, P.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D. R.; Sasaki, M.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A. D.; Schaile, O.; Scharf, F.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schenk, P.; Schmitt, B.; Schröder, M.; Schultz-Coulon, H. C.; Schulz, M.; Schütz, P.; Schwiening, J.; Scott, W. G.; Settles, M.; Shears, T. G.; Shen, B. C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G. P.; Skillman, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A. M.; Smith, T. J.; Snow, G. A.; Sobie, R.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Springer, R. W.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Starks, M.; Stegmann, C.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stockhausen, B.; Strom, D.; Szymanski, P.; Tafirout, R.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Tecchio, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Tesch, N.; Thomson, M. A.; von Törne, E.; Towers, S.; Tscheulin, M.; Tsukamoto, T.; Turcot, A. S.; Turner-Watson, M. F.; Utzat, P.; van Kooten, R.; Vaseur, G.; Vikas, P.; Vincter, M.; Wäckerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Wagner, D. L.; Ward, C. P.; Ward, D. R.; Ward, J. J.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Weber, P.; Wells, P. S.; Wermes, N.; Wilkens, B.; Wilson, G. W.; Wilson, J. A.; Wlodek, T.; Wolf, G.; Wotton, S.; Wyatt, T. R.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zeuner, W.; Zorn, G. T.

    1995-12-01

    The string effect in QCD is investigated using data from the OPAL detector at LEP. By comparing the charged particle flow in three-jet multihadronic events with that in events with two jets and a hard isolated photon, the sensitivity to particular models is reduced. A comparison with various Monte Carlo models is presented. The difference in particle flows in the interquark region is found to be well reproduced by a leading order calculation of soft gluon emission, in the spirit of the Local Parton Hadron Duality hypothesis.

  6. Fundamental investigation of duct/ESP phenomena. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.A.; Durham, M.D.; Sowa, W.A.; Himes, R.M.; Mahaffey, W.A.

    1991-10-21

    Radian Corporation was contracted to investigate duct injection and ESP phenomena in a 1.7 MW pilot plant constructed for this test program. This study was an attempt to resolve problems found in previous studies and answer remaining questions for the technology using an approach which concentrates on the fundamental mechanisms of the process. The goal of the study was to obtain a better understanding of the basic physical and chemical phenomena that control: (1) the desulfurization of flue gas by calcium-based reagent, and (2) the coupling of an existing ESP particulate collection device to the duct injection process. Process economics are being studied by others. (VC)

  7. Field investigation of FGD system chemistry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Litherland, S.T.; Colley, J.D.; Glover, R.L.; Maller, G.; Behrens, G.P.

    1984-12-01

    Three full-scale wet limestone FGD systems were investigated to gain a better understanding of FGD system operation and chemistry. The three plants which participated in the program were South Mississippi Electric Power Association's R. D. Morrow Station, Colorado-Ute Electric Association's Craig Station, and Central Illinois Light Company's Duck Creek Station. Each FGD system was characterized with respect to SO/sub 2/ removal, liquid and solid phase chemistry, and calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate relative saturation. Mist eliminator chemistry and performance were documented at Morrow and Duck Creek. Solutions to severe mist eliminator scaling and pluggage were demonstrated at Duck Creek. A technical and econ

  8. Investigation of gigawatt millimeter wave source applications. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bruder, J.A.; Belcher, M.L.

    1991-09-01

    The Georgia Tech Research Institute (GTRI) investigated potential applications of millimeter wave (MMW) sources with peak powers on the order of a gigawatt. This power level is representative of MMW devices such as the free electron laser (FEL) and the cyclotron auto-resonance maser (CARM) that are under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). In addition to determining the technical requirements for these applications, the investigation considered potential users and how a high power MMW system would expand their current capabilities. Two of the more promising applications were examined in detail to include trade-off evaluations system parameters. The trade-off evaluations included overall system configuration, frequency and coherence, component availability, and performance estimates. Brainstorming sessions were held to try and uncover additional applications for a gigawatt MMW source. In setting up guidelines for the session, the need to attempt to predict applications for the years 2000 to 2030 was stressed. Also, possible non-DoD applications needed to be considered. While some of these applications could not in themselves justify the costs involved in the development of the radar system, they could be considered potential secondary applications of the system. As a result of the sessions, a number of interesting potential applications evolved including: space object identification; low angle tracking; illuminator for space-based radar; radio astronomy; space vehicle navigation; space debris location; atmospheric research; wind shear detection; electronic countermeasures; low observable detection; and long range detection via ducting.

  9. Final work plan : environmental site investigation at Sylvan Grove, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2012-07-15

    In 1998, carbon tetrachloride was found above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L in groundwater from one private livestock well at Sylvan Grove, Kansas, by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The 1998 KDHE sampling was conducted under the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) private well sampling program. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), a USDA agency, operated a grain storage facility in Sylvan Grove from 1954 to1966. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with former CCC/USDA grain storage operations. Sylvan Grove is located in western Lincoln County, approximately 60 mi west of Salina (Figure 1.1). To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Sylvan Grove is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA has agreed to conduct an investigation, in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency (FSA) of the USDA. This Work Plan presents historical data related to previous investigations, grain storage operations, local private wells and public water supply (PWS) wells, and local geologic and hydrogeologic conditions at Sylvan Grove. The findings from a review of all available documents are discussed in Section 2. On the basis of the analyses of historical data, the following specific technical objectives are proposed for the site investigation at Sylvan Grove: (1) Evaluate the potential source of carbon tetrachloride at the former CCC/USDA facility; (2) Determine the relationship of potential contamination (if present) at the former CCC/USDA facility to contamination identified in 1998 in groundwater samples from one private well to the west; and (3) Delineate the extent of potential contamination associated with the former CCC/USDA facility. The detailed scope of work is outlined in Section 3. The results of the proposed work will provide the basis for determining

  10. Final Report on Investigation of the Electron Interactions in Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Philip

    2015-02-14

    In graphene, combined with the real spin degree of freedom, which exhibits SU(2) symmetry, the total internal degrees of freedom of graphene carriers is thus described by a larger SU(4) symmetry, which produces a richer space for potential phenomena of emergent correlated electron phenomena. The major part of this proposal is exploring this unique multicomponent correlated system in the quantum limit. In the current period of DOE BES support we have made several key advances that will serve as a foundation for the new studies in this proposal. Employing the high-mobility encapsulated graphene heterostructures developed during the current phase of research, we have investigated spin and valley quantum Hall ferromagnetism in graphene and discovered a spin phase transition leading to a quantum spin Hall analogue. We have also observed the fractal quantum Hall effect arising from the Hofstadter’s butterfly energy spectrum. In addition, we have discovered multiband transport phenomena in bilayer graphene at high carrier densities.

  11. Final report for targeted investigations at Murdock, Nebraska, in 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2005-08-01

    On April 1, 2003, representatives of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) and Argonne National Laboratory met with representatives of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region VII (EPA); the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ); and Nebraska Health and Human Services (NHHS) to discuss the current regulatory and technical status of the environmental investigations at the former CCC/USDA grain bin site in Murdock, Nebraska. The investigations are being performed by Argonne (under the direction of the CCC/USDA) to characterize and evaluate the potential remedial needs associated with the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in groundwater and surface waters in the vicinity of the town. This contamination has been linked to former CCC/USDA grain storage activities at Murdock. Table 1.1 presents a brief summary of the regulatory, site characterization, and remedial assessment activities to date at Murdock. Figure 1.1 illustrates the extent of the groundwater carbon tetrachloride plume, estimated on the basis of sampling performed by Argonne in June 2002. Figure 1.2 presents the 2002 interpretation of the site hydrogeology in a cross section extending northwestward from the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility, along the approximate axis of the groundwater plume. In reviewing the available information for Murdock, the EPA identified two specific areas of technical concern regarding the distribution and potential fate of the carbon tetrachloride contamination at the site that might significantly affect the selection of an appropriate remedial strategy: (1) Periodic sampling (by Argonne) of surface water at the headwaters of the unnamed tributary to Pawnee Creek northwest of Murdock and sampling of the effluent from natural seepage points and agricultural drain tile lines that contribute to the creek (Figure 1.3) demonstrated discharge of contaminated groundwater from the aquifer to the

  12. Final report : Hanover environmental site investigation, 2009-2010.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2011-06-07

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility at the northeastern edge of the city of Hanover, Kansas, from 1950 until the early 1970s. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In February 1998, trace to low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected in two private lawn and garden wells near the former grain storage facility at Hanover, as part of a statewide USDA private well sampling program that was implemented by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) near former CCC/USDA facilities. In July 2007, the CCC/USDA sampled indoor air at nine residences on or adjacent to its former facility to address the residents concerns. Low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected at four of the nine homes. Consequently, the CCC/USDA has conducted investigations, under the direction of the KDHE, to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination that might be associated with the former facility. In July 2007, the CCC/USDA sampled indoor air at nine residences on or adjacent to its former facility to address the residents concerns regarding vapor intrusion (VI). Low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected at four of the nine homes. Because carbon tetrachloride found in private wells and indoor air at Hanover might be linked to historical use of fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA has conducted investigations to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination that may be associated with the former facility. The results of the comprehensive investigation at Hanover indicate that no unacceptable risk to human health currently exists from exposure to surface and subsurface soils by either ingestion, inhalation or dermal contact. No risk is

  13. Final STS-35 Columbia descent BET products and results for LaRC OEX investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakes, Kevin F.; Findlay, John T.; Jasinski, Rachel A.; Wood, James S.

    1991-01-01

    Final STS-35 'Columbia' descent Best Estimate Trajectory (BET) products have been developed for Langley Research Center (LaRC) Orbiter Experiments (OEX) investigations. Included are the reconstructed inertial trajectory profile; the Extended BET, which combines the inertial data and, in this instance, the National Weather Service atmospheric information obtained via Johnson Space Center; and the Aerodynamic BET. The inertial BET utilized Inertial Measurement Unit 1 (IMU1) dynamic measurements for deterministic propagation during the ENTREE estimation process. The final estimate was based on the considerable ground based C-band tracking coverage available as well as Tracking Data and Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) Doppler data, a unique use of the latter for endo-atmospheric flight determinations. The actual estimate required simultaneous solutions for the spacecraft position and velocity, spacecraft attitude, and six IMU parameters - three gyro biases and three accelerometer scale factor correction terms. The anchor epoch for this analysis was 19,200 Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) seconds which corresponds to an initial Shuttle altitude of approximately 513 kft. The atmospheric data incorporated were evaluated based on Shuttle derived considerations as well as comparisons with other models. The AEROBET was developed based on the Extended BET, the measured spacecraft configuration information, final mass properties, and the final Orbiter preoperation databook. The latter was updated based on aerodynamic consensus incrementals derived by the latest published FAD. The rectified predictions were compared versus the flight computed values and the resultant differences were correlated versus ensemble results for twenty-two previous STS entry flights.

  14. FINAL REPORT: An Investigation of the Microphysical, Radiative, and Dynamical Properties of Mixed-Phase Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Shupe, Matthew D

    2007-10-01

    This final report summarizes the major accomplishments and products resulting from a three-year grant funded by the DOE, Office of Science, Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program titled: An Investigation of the Microphysical, Radiative, and Dynamical Properties of Mixed-Phase Clouds. Accomplishments are listed under the following subcategories: Mixed-phase cloud retrieval method development; Mixed-phase cloud characterization; ARM mixed-phase cloud retrieval review; and New ARM MICROBASE product. In addition, lists are provided of service to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, data products provided to the broader research community, and publications resulting from this grant.

  15. Dynamics explorer interdisciplinary scientist investigations. Final report, 1 October 1990-30 January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kozyra, J.U.; Nagy, A.F.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a final report on research activities and accomplishments that occurred during the funding period of 10-1-90 through 1-30-94. The focus of this interdisciplinary investigation during the Dynamics Explorer Mission was on the complex coupling processes that tap the magnetic-storm energy, stored in the ring current particle reservoir, and transport this energy into the subauroral, midlatitude and even equatorial ionospheric regions. The transport of energy through the inner magnetosphere and into the underlying ionospheric regions is a critical element in the understanding of the impact of solar and magnetic disturbances on upper atmospheric and ionospheric regions equatorward of the auroral zone.

  16. Outer Continental Shelf environmental-assessment program: final reports of principal investigators. Volume 23

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    This compilation includes 9 final reports on the following subjects: ecological studies of benthos and sea ice fauna in the southwestern Beaufort Sea; geographical and biological reconnaissance of rock habitats in Eastern Camden Bay, Beaufort Sea; temperature preference of juvenile arctic cod in relation to salinity and temperature acclimation; an assessment of the Beaufort Sea stock of Arctic Cisco; modeling movements and distribution of Arctic Cisco near the Waterflood Causeway; shorebird littoral zone ecology of the Alaskan Beaufort Coast; pelagic and nearshore birds of the Beaufort Sea; prey selection by Oldsquaws; continuing investigations of Oldsquaws during the molt period.

  17. The value of auditing negative lower GI investigations preceding a final diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Somasekar, A; James, L; Stephenson, B M; Thompson, I W; Vellacott, K D; Allison, M C

    2009-09-01

    To review all preceding 'negative' large bowel investigations in patients with a final diagnosis of colorectal cancer, and to examine whether delayed diagnosis was associated with worse outcome. Details were gathered on all patients with a new diagnosis of colorectal adenocarcinoma presenting over 4.5 years. For each patient the hospital's clinical workstation and radiology and endoscopy databases were interrogated for all flexible sigmoidoscopies, colonoscopies and barium enemas during the 5 years prior to diagnosis. Among the 570 patients, 28 (5%) had undergone colonoscopy and/or flexible sigmoidoscopy that had not shown colorectal cancer during the 5 years preceding final diagnosis, and a further 28 (5%) had undergone 'negative' barium enemas. Polyp surveillance might have missed four lesions destined to become malignant. Correspondingly there were three patients undergoing IBD surveillance found to have CRC, having had a negative complete colonoscopy within the preceding 5 years. Among patients undergoing de novo colonoscopy for diagnosis the true miss rate was only one patient per year. At August 2007, 29 (58%) of those with delayed diagnosis were still alive, compared with 216 (42%) of those diagnosed during initial investigation (chi2 = 5.04, P < 0.05). Colonoscopic miss rates are in line with previous studies. The application of simple clinical ground rules will avoid most pitfalls. The methodology described herein may assist in auditing the quality assurance of lower gastrointestinal diagnostic services. Despite the delay, late diagnosis was found to be associated with improved survival and a lower likelihood of metastatic disease.

  18. 78 FR 13379 - Xanthan Gum from Austria and China; Scheduling of the Final Phase of an Antidumping Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Xanthan Gum from Austria and China; Scheduling of the Final Phase of an Antidumping Investigation... gives notice of the scheduling of the final phase of antidumping investigation Nos. 731-TA-1202-03...

  19. Final proposed plan, Army Materials Technology Laboratory, task order 1, remedial investigation/feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The U.S. Army is proposing a cleanup plan, referred to as a preferred alternative, to address outdoor contamination at the MTL Superfund site in Watertown, Massachusetts. The Proposed Plan recommends one of the cleanup options from among those that were evaluated during the Remedial Investigation (RI) and Feasibility Study (FS) performed for the site. The Army is publishing this Proposed Plan to provide opportunity for public review and comment on the cleanup alternatives, known as remedial alternatives, under consideration for the site. The Army is soliciting comments on the proposed level of cleanup and will consider public comments as part of the final decision-making process for selecting the cleanup remedy for the site.

  20. 29 CFR 101.24 - Final disposition of a charge which has been held pending investigation of the petition.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final disposition of a charge which has been held pending investigation of the petition. 101.24 Section 101.24 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor NATIONAL LABOR...)(7) and 9(c) of the Act § 101.24 Final disposition of a charge which has been held...

  1. Letter from Galo Jackson Final Comments on November 2012 Draft ofthe Remedial Investigation Report fpr Operable Unit 3-Upland Soils

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Letter from Galo Jackson contains the Final Comments on November 2012 Draft ofthe Remedial Investigation Report for Operable Unit 3-Upland Soils: LCP Chemical National Priorities List Site, Brunswick, Glynn County, GA.

  2. Final Report - Investigation of Intermittent Turbulence and Turbulent Structures in the Presence of Controlled Sheared Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Mark A.

    2013-06-27

    Final Report for grant DE-FG02-06ER54898. The dynamics and generation of intermittent plasma turbulent structures, widely known as "blobs" have been studied in the presence of sheared plasma flows in a controlled laboratory experiment.

  3. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 38

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-04-01

    This final report of a study of the environmental characterization of the North Aleutian Shelf nearshore region includes: characterization, processes, and vulnerability to development; and annotated bibliography and keyword index.

  4. Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study of the Defense Property Disposal Office, Fort George G. Meade, Maryland. Final Quality Control Plan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-05-01

    0)N Final Quality Control Plan Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study of the Defense Property Disposal Office Fort George G. Meade, Maryland...8 2.1.2 Remedial Investigation Project Manager ................. 8 2.1.3 Feasibility Study Project Manager ..................... 8...20 4.0 SAMPLE COLLECTION ................................. 21 4.1 Sampling for the Remedial Investigation at the DRMO Yard ....... 21 4.1.1

  5. Environmental assessment of the Alaskan Continental Shelf. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 10. Biological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    This volume of final reports includes the following: Forage Fish Spawning Surveys Southern Bering Sea; Effects of Oil Contamination in the Sea Otter; Reconnaissance of Intertidal Communities in the Eastern Bering Sea; Effects of Ice Scour on Community Structure; and Study of Microbial Activity and Crude Oil-Microbial Interactions in the Waters and Sediments of Cook Inlet and the Beaufort Sea.

  6. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 34

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    The report is a compilation of three final reports dealing with geologic processes and hazards of the Beaufort and Chukchi Sea Shelf and coastal regions: Beaufort and Chukchi, seacoast permafrost studies; and the environmental geology and geomorphology of the Barrier Island-lagoon system along the Beaufort Sea coastal plain from Prudhoe Bay to the Colville River. Fifteen oversized maps are included.

  7. An Investigation of Spoken Brazilian Portuguese: Part I, Technical Report. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, John A.

    This final report of a study which developed a working corpus of spoken and written Portuguese from which syntactical studies could be conducted includes computer-processed data on which the findings and analysis are based. A data base, obtained by taping some 487 conversations between Brazil and the United States, serves as the corpus from which…

  8. Outer Continental Shelf environmental-assessment program: final reports of principal investigators. Volume 25

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    This compilation of includes final reports on the following subjects: ice edge ecosystems, primary productivity, nutrient cycling and organic matter transfer; analysis of Harrison Bay zooplankton samples; Beaufort Sea plankton studies, winter-spring studies in Stefansson Sound and off Narwhal Island; foodweb and nutrient dynamics in nearshore Beaufort Sea waters.

  9. Investigation of Pre-School Children's Problem Solving Processes. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klahr, David

    Preschool children's problem solving processes are investigated in both direct and indirect ways. Direct investigations focus on substantive and methodological issues related to how children solve a few well defined puzzles, such as the Tower of Hanoi and the Tangram. Indirect investigations deal with related issues: U-shaped (or non-monotone)…

  10. Multi-agency radiation survey and site investigation manual (MARSIM). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    The MARSSIM provides information on planning, conducting, evaluating, and documenting building surface and surface soil final status radiological surveys for demonstrating compliance with dose or risk-based regulations or standards. The MARSSIM is a multi-agency consensus document that was developed collaboratively by four Federal agencies having authority and control over radioactive materials: Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The MARSSIM`s objective is to describe a consistent approach for planning, performing, and assessing building surface and surface soil final status surveys to meet established dose or risk-based release criteria, while at the same time encouraging an effective use of resources.

  11. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assesment program. Final reports of principal investigators. volume 37

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    A compilation of seven final reports dealing with seal/sea lion and walrus surveys of the Navarin Basin; potential impacts of man-made noise on ringed seals; modern populations, migrations, demography, trophics, and historical status of the Pacific Walrus; distribution of marine mammals in the coastal zone of the eastern Chukchi Sea during summer and autumn; and early spring distribution, density and abundance of the Pacific Walrus in 1976.

  12. Environmental assessment of the Alaskan Continental Shelf. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 11. Biological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    This volume of final reports includes the following: Toxicity of Oil-Well Drilling Muds to Alaska Larval Shrimp and Crabs; Trophic Relationships Among Ice-Inhabiting Phocid Seals and Functionally Related Marine Mammals in the Chukchi Sea; Trophic Relationships Among Ice-Inhabiting Phocid Seals and Functionally Related Marine Mammals in the Bering Sea; Ecological Studies in the Bering Strait Region; and The Relationships of Marine Mammal Distributions, Densities and Activities to Sea Ice Conditions.

  13. Amendment to examination and investigation sample requirements--FDA. Direct final rule.

    PubMed

    1998-09-25

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations regarding the collection of twice the quantity of food, drug, or cosmetic estimated to be sufficient for analysis. This action increases the dollar amount that FDA will consider to determine whether to routinely collect a reserve sample of a food, drug, or cosmetic product in addition to the quantity sufficient for analysis. Experience has demonstrated that the current dollar amount does not adequately cover the cost of most quantities sufficient for analysis plus reserve samples. This direct final rule is part of FDA's continuing effort to achieve the objectives of the President's "Reinventing Government" initiative, and is intended to reduce the burden of unnecessary regulations on food, drugs, and cosmetics without diminishing the protection of the public health. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is publishing a companion proposed rule under FDA's usual procedures for notice and comment to provide a procedural framework to finalize the rule in the event the agency receives any significant adverse comment and withdraws this direct final rule.

  14. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE TRAINING AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS OF INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY MAINTENANCE WORKERS. VOLUME II. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LYNN, FRANK

    THE APPENDIXES FOR "AN INVESTIGATION OF THE TRAINING AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS OF INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY MAINTENANCE WORKERS, FINAL REPORT, VOLUME I" (VT 004 006) INCLUDE (1) TWO LETTERS FROM PLANT ENGINEERS STRESSING THE IMPORTANCE OF TRAINING MACHINERY MAINTENANCE WORKERS, (2) A DESCRIPTION OF THE MAINTENANCE TRAINING SURVEY, A SAMPLE QUESTIONNAIRE,…

  15. An Investigation of the Compensatory Effectiveness of Assistive Technology on Postsecondary Students with Learning Disabilities. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Harry; Higgins, Eleanor

    This final report describes the activities and accomplishments of a 3-year study on the compensatory effectiveness of three assistive technologies, optical character recognition, speech synthesis, and speech recognition, on postsecondary students (N=140) with learning disabilities. These technologies were investigated relative to: (1) immediate…

  16. 77 FR 16559 - Large Power Transformers From Korea: Scheduling of the Final Phase of an Antidumping Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ... COMMISSION Large Power Transformers From Korea: Scheduling of the Final Phase of an Antidumping Investigation... imports from Korea of large power transformers, provided for in subheading 8504.23.00 of the Harmonized... Commerce that imports of large power transformers from Korea are being sold in the United States at...

  17. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 56

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Contents include: seal, sea lion, walrus and beluga whale surveys of the Bering Sea, 1979 and 1982-1983; investigations of belukha whales in coastal waters of western and northern Alaska. i. distribution, abundance, and movements; investigations of belukha whales in coastal waters of western and northern Alaska. ii. biology and ecology; investigations of belukha whales in coastal water of western and northern Alaska. iii. food habits; behavioral responses of gray whales to industrial noise: feeding observations and predictive modeling.

  18. Final report : results of the 2005 investigation of contaminant sources at Agra, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-08-24

    The 2005 investigation of contaminant sources at Agra, Kansas, was conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE; Gotto 2004). The Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory implemented the investigation on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The investigation was designed to (1) update the conceptual site model and (2) investigate sources of previously identified carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater. Six technical objectives were proposed in the ''Work Plan'' (Argonne 2005). The ''Work Plan'' was approved by the KDHE on March 28, 2005 (KDHE 2005). The six objectives were as follows: (1) Determine the current configuration of the carbon tetrachloride plume in the investigation area. (2) Delineate contamination detected in 1998-1999 at the former CCC/USDA facility. (3) Investigate the Pro-Ag Co-op property for evidence of releases of carbon tetrachloride. (4) Investigate the area adjacent to the site of the former retail store for evidence of releases of carbon tetrachloride to the subsurface. (5) Collect data to support the analysis of potential remedial alternatives. (6) Update the inventory of private wells to identify potential downgradient receptors. This report details and interprets the data collected during the 2005 investigation at Agra. The investigation met the objectives defined in the ''Work Plan''.

  19. Investigation of formation of nitrogen compounds in coal combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, D.W.; Crane, I.D.; Wendt, J.O.L.

    1983-10-01

    This is the final report on DOE contract number DE-AC21-80MC14061. It concerns the formation of nitrogen oxide from fuel-bound nitrogen during coal combustion. The work reported was divided into three tasks. They addressed problems of time-resolving pyrolysis rates of coal under simulated combustion conditions, the combustion of the tar that results from such pyrolysis, and theoretical modeling of the pyrolysis process. In all of these tasks, special attention was devoted to the fate of coal nitrogen. The first two tasks were performed by Exxon Research and Engineering Company. 49 references.

  20. Environmental assessment of the Alaskan continental shelf. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 19

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    This is a compilation of 7 final reports on the following subjects: selected annotated references on marine mammals of Alaska, trophic relationships among ice-inhabiting phocid seals in the Chukchi Sea, biology of the harbor seal in the Gulf of Alaska, natural history and ecology of the bearded seal, measurements and localization of underwater sounds from the Prudhoe Bay region, March 1981; population, assessment, ecology, and trophic relationships of Steller sea lions in the Gulf of Alaska; harvest of Pacific walruses by the pelagic whaling industry 1848-1914.

  1. Investigation of Alleged Scientific Misconduct on Grants MH-32206 and MH-37449. Final Report and Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    The report presents results of a Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) investigation into alleged scientific misconduct by Dr. Stephen Bruening in relation to two federally supported projects concerning tardive dyskinesia in retarded populations and stimulant drug use with mentally retarded children. The investigative panel of scientists…

  2. Site investigation of Cluster 3, Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, M.K.; Kean, T.B.

    1995-08-01

    The Waterways Experiment Station (WES) is currently involved in investigating several sites at the Edgewood Area (EA) of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland. These investigations consist of placing monitoring wells and periodically collecting samples for laboratory analysis. Additionally, several of the sites are to be investigated geophysically to determine if any anomalous areas exist. One of the sites, Cluster 3, a suspected landfill area is the focus of this report. Geophysical surveys were conducted to help delineate any anomalies indicative of buried waste, waste containers, boundaries of burial trenches, and the depth to water table. The geophysical methods utilized at the site were electromagnetic induction (EM), magnetics, and seismic refraction.

  3. Final Report for LDRD Feasibility Study 11-FS-0015 Feasibility of Asteroid Deflection Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Paul L.

    2011-11-10

    This report is a compilation of material generated in the course of the LDRD feasibility study 11-FS-0015, Feasibility of Asteroid Deflection Investigations. The descriptive material is from the web-based proposal for the project.

  4. Imaging investigations before referral to a sarcoma center delay the final diagnosis of musculoskeletal sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Dyrop, Heidi Buvarp; Vedsted, Peter; Rædkjær, Mathias; Safwat, Akmal; Keller, Johnny

    2017-04-01

    Background and purpose - The use of point-of-care or local investigations before referral to specialist sarcoma centers as part of a fast-track diagnostic pathway varies, and may affect the time to diagnosis. We wanted to investigate differences in time intervals and proportion of malignancy in patients who were referred after initial diagnostic investigations were performed locally and in patients who were referred without these investigations. Patients and methods - We included 545 consecutive patients who were referred to Aarhus Sarcoma Center for suspected musculoskeletal sarcoma. Data on time intervals and investigations performed were collected from questionnaires and patient records. Patients who were referred from outside Aarhus uptake area after initial MRI/CT or histology performed locally were compared with patients who were referred from Aarhus uptake area without these investigations. Results - The median total interval from first symptom to diagnosis was 166 days for outside patients referred with MRI/CT or histology, which was 91 (95% CI: 76-106) days longer than for local patients who were referred without MRI/CT or histology. Comparing the same groups, the median diagnostic interval was 41 (95% CI: 30-51) days longer for outside patients including both primary care and hospital intervals. Both the proportion of malignancies (38% vs. 14%) and the proportion of sarcomas (24% vs. 7%) were higher in the outside group referred with MRI/CT or histology than in the local group without MRI/CT or histology. Interpretation - Pre-referral investigations at a local hospital increased the diagnostic interval by at least 1 month for 50% of the patients, and the proportion of malignancy was more than doubled-to almost 40%. If investigations are to be performed before referral to a sarcoma center, they should be part of the fast-track pathway in order to ensure timely diagnosis.

  5. Imaging investigations before referral to a sarcoma center delay the final diagnosis of musculoskeletal sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Dyrop, Heidi Buvarp; Vedsted, Peter; Rædkjær, Mathias; Safwat, Akmal; Keller, Johnny

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose The use of point-of-care or local investigations before referral to specialist sarcoma centers as part of a fast-track diagnostic pathway varies, and may affect the time to diagnosis. We wanted to investigate differences in time intervals and proportion of malignancy in patients who were referred after initial diagnostic investigations were performed locally and in patients who were referred without these investigations. Patients and methods We included 545 consecutive patients who were referred to Aarhus Sarcoma Center for suspected musculoskeletal sarcoma. Data on time intervals and investigations performed were collected from questionnaires and patient records. Patients who were referred from outside Aarhus uptake area after initial MRI/CT or histology performed locally were compared with patients who were referred from Aarhus uptake area without these investigations. Results The median total interval from first symptom to diagnosis was 166 days for outside patients referred with MRI/CT or histology, which was 91 (95% CI: 76–106) days longer than for local patients who were referred without MRI/CT or histology. Comparing the same groups, the median diagnostic interval was 41 (95% CI: 30–51) days longer for outside patients including both primary care and hospital intervals. Both the proportion of malignancies (38% vs. 14%) and the proportion of sarcomas (24% vs. 7%) were higher in the outside group referred with MRI/CT or histology than in the local group without MRI/CT or histology. Interpretation Pre-referral investigations at a local hospital increased the diagnostic interval by at least 1 month for 50% of the patients, and the proportion of malignancy was more than doubled—to almost 40%. If investigations are to be performed before referral to a sarcoma center, they should be part of the fast-track pathway in order to ensure timely diagnosis. PMID:28077058

  6. Final report : results of the 2007 targeted investigation at Hilton, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-04-29

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility in Hilton, Kansas, in 1954-1965. In 1992, carbon tetrachloride was first identified, at a concentration of 910 {micro}g/L, in groundwater from well GW01 at Hilton. This discovery occurred in association with the sale of the private grain storage facility on which well GW01 is located to the current owner, the Mid-Kansas Cooperative Association. The Kansas Department of Health and Environment conducted investigations at Hilton in 1992-1994. In 1996-1997, Argonne National Laboratory conducted Phase I and Phase II investigations on behalf of the CCC/USDA to characterize the distribution of the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in well GW01, the stratigraphic units potentially hosting contaminant migration, and local hydrogeology in the Hilton area. The 2007 targeted investigation reported here focused specifically on the former CCC/USDA property at Hilton, west of the railroad tracks. (Until a property record search in 2005, the location of the CCC/USDA's former facility at Hilton was not known with certainty.) The objectives of the investigation, as implemented, were to (1) investigate for carbon tetrachloride contamination in the shallower soil and shallow aquifer units below the former CCC/USDA property and (2) investigate groundwater flow patterns. The key results of the 2007 targeted investigation are as follows: (1) No carbon tetrachloride or chloroform contamination was found in soil or groundwater below the former CCC/USDA facility. (2) The 2007 groundwater level data support a southwesterly direction for groundwater flow in the main Hilton aquifer (Equus Beds), consistent with findings of previous investigations. Contaminated well GW01 was confirmed to be upgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility. (3) The contaminants carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, and 1,2-dibromoethane (ethylene dibromide) were found in

  7. Current good manufacturing practice and investigational new drugs intended for use in clinical trials. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2008-07-15

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) regulations for human drugs, including biological products, to exempt most phase 1 investigational drugs from complying with the regulatory CGMP requirements. FDA will continue to exercise oversight of the manufacture of these drugs under FDA's general statutory CGMP authority and through review of the investigational new drug applications (IND). In addition, elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing the availability of a guidance document entitled "Guidance for Industry: CGMP for Phase 1 Investigational Drugs" dated November 2007 (the companion guidance). This guidance document sets forth recommendations on approaches to compliance with statutory CGMP for the exempted phase 1 investigational drugs. FDA is taking this action to focus a manufacturer's effort on applying CGMP that is appropriate and meaningful for the manufacture of the earliest stage investigational drug products intended for use in phase 1 clinical trials while ensuring safety and quality. This action will also streamline and promote the drug development process.

  8. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report. Volume 1: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force`s Installation Restoration Program (IRP). As a part of the IRP program, field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions willneed to be carried out at each site. The island`s drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites during the 1992 field investigation included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. In addition, geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal to be avoided during drilling activities.

  9. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report. Volume 2, Appendix A: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force`s Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions will need to be carried out at each site. The island`s drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites during the 1992 field investigation included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. In addition, geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal to be avoided during drilling activities. This report, appendix A, contains the analytical results.

  10. Subsurface investigation of a liquefaction-induced lateral spread, Thousand Springs Valley, Idaho. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Andrus, R.D.; Youd, T.L.

    1987-05-01

    A subsurface investigation was made across a lateral spread that was induced by liquefaction during the 1983 Borah Peak Earthquake (MS=7.3). The lateral spread is at a site near Whiskey Springs in the Thousand Springs Valley, Idaho. The purpose of the investigation was to (a) determine whether previous liquefaction and lateral spreading had occurred; (b) measure and evaluate geologic and geotechnical properties susbsurface sediments many of which are gravels; and (c) analyze liquefaction and ground failure susceptibility. Because there are very few past case histories of liquefaction in gravel, this study provides an opportunity to further evaluate the behavior of this important matarial. The field investigations included trenching, SPT tests, CPT soundings, BDT (Becker Drill) tests, and SASW tests (Spectral-Analysis-of Surface-Waves). Radiocarbon dataing and grain-size analysis were conducted on samples collected in the field.

  11. FInal Report: Site Investigation Results, 2009-2011, at Inman, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M.

    2015-05-01

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at the southern edge of the city of Inman, Kansas, from 1954 to 1965. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In 1997, trace to low levels of carbon tetrachloride (below the maximum contamination level [MCL] of 5.0 μg/L) were detected in three private wells near the former grain storage facility at Inman, as part of a statewide USDA private well sampling program that was implemented by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) near former CCC/USDA facilities. No public water supply wells were identified in 1998 by the KDHE within 1 mi of the town. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with grain storage operations. To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Inman is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA agreed to conduct investigations at Inman. The investigations were performed by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the USDA. Argonne, on behalf of the CCC/USDA, developed a Work Plan (Argonne 2007) and subsequently a Summary of Investigation Results and Proposed Work Plan (Appendix A) for a phased site investigation. The proposed work was approved by the KDHE (2007, 2011). The investigations were conducted from November 2009 to September 2011, as proposed in the two work plans. This report presents the findings of the 2009-2011 investigations at Inman.

  12. Investigation of separation, treatment, and recycling options for hazardous paint blast media waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boy, J.H.; Race, T.D.; Reinbold, K.A.

    1996-02-01

    U.S. Army depot depaint operations generate over 4 million kg per year of contaminated paint blast media wastes. The objective of this work was to investigate technologies that might significantly mitigate this Army hazardous waste disposal problem. Most of the technologies investigated either failed to meet acceptable TCLP levels for hazardous metals content, or failed to meet Army disposal requirements. However, based on a review of several commercially available services, it is recommended that Army depot depaint operations consider processing hazardous blast media waste through properly regulated contractors that offer safe, effective, and economical stabilization, fixation, and recycling technologies.

  13. Investigation of the Feasibility of Establishing Health Technology Demonstration Centers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahler, Carol

    This investigation studied the feasibility of establishing a network of centers to demonstrate model programs in the health technologies. It was necessary to: 1)identify colleges with multiple health-related programs; 2) identify campus health-related programs which have recognizable strengths; 3)further define "recognizable strengths" through…

  14. Final work plan : investigation of potential contamination at the former USDA facility in Powhattan, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-02-02

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work to be conducted to investigate the subsurface contaminant conditions at the property formerly leased by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) in Powhattan, Kansas (Figure 1.1). Data obtained during this event will be used to (1) evaluate potential contaminant source areas on the property; (2) determine the vertical and horizontal extent of potential contamination; and (3) provide recommendations for future action, with the ultimate goal of assigning this site No Further Action status. The planned investigation includes groundwater monitoring requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with Section V of the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The work is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. A nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy, Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities. Argonne issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that has been approved by the KDHE. The Master Work Plan describes the general scope of all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and provides guidance for these investigations. It should be consulted for the complete details of plans for work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Powhattan.

  15. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report. Volume 4, Appendixes E and F: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force`s Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions will need to be carried out at each site. The island`s drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. In addition, geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal, to be avoided during drilling activities. This report contains appendices E and F with information on the following: soil boring logs, and data validation of samples analyzed.

  16. Inter-American Investigation of Mortality in Childhood: California Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Helen M.; Gabrielson, Ira W.

    Part of an international study of the nature and extent of childhood mortality in geographically, socioeconomically and culturally disparate populations, this report focuses on (1) an investigation into all deaths of children under 5 years of age, and (2) a probability sample of live children within the same northern California area during an…

  17. Investigating the Role of Technology in Widening Participation in Lifelong Learning. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorard, Stephen; Selwyn, Neil

    This small-grant funded project was intended to act as a pilot study looking at the use of information and communications technology (ICT) in adult education. In particular, the project aimed to investigate the use of ICT in extending patterns of participation in adult education to those social groups presently excluded from learning; one of the…

  18. Geologic and seismologic investigations for Rocky Flats Plant. Volume II. Appendices. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    This volume contains the results of a seismic refraction study of the Ralston Reservoir area, soil stratigraphic investigations, unit descriptions, an analysis of geodetic data, experimental models, seismological evaluation, a seismicity survey of the Northern Golden Fault, historical data for the November 7, 1882 earthquake, and a dendrochronology study. (ACR)

  19. Final Report: Results of Environmental Site Investigation at Sylvan Grove, Kansas

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M

    2014-09-01

    Sylvan Grove is located in western Lincoln County, approximately 60 mi west of Salina, Kansas (Figure 1.1). From 1954 to 1966, the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility at the northeastern edge of Sylvan Grove. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use to preserve grain in storage. In 1998, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) found carbon tetrachloride above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 μg/L in groundwater from one private well used for livestock and lawn and garden watering. The 1998 KDHE sampling at Sylvan Grove was conducted under the USDA private well sampling program. To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Sylvan Grove is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA proposed to conduct an environmental site investigation, in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency (FSA) of the USDA. Argonne National Laboratory, on behalf of the CCC/USDA, developed a work plan (Argonne 2012) for the site investigation and a supplemental work plan for indoor and ambient air sampling (Appendix A). The proposed work was approved by the KDHE (2012a, 2013). The investigations were performed by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory, on behalf of the CCC/USDA. The main activities for the site investigation were conducted in June 2012, and indoor and ambient air sampling was performed in February 2013. This report presents the findings of the investigations at Sylvan Grove.

  20. Final Report for grant entitled "Production of Astatine-211 for U.S. Investigators"

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbur, Daniel Scott

    2012-12-12

    Alpha-particle emitting radionuclides hold great promise in the therapy of cancer, but few alpha-emitters are available to investigators to evaluate. Of the alpha-emitters that have properties amenable for use in humans, 211At is of particular interest as it does not have alpha-emitting daughter radionuclides. Thus, there is a high interest in having a source of 211At for sale to investigators in the US. Production of 211At is accomplished on a cyclotron using an alpha-particle beam irradiation of bismuth metal. Unfortunately, there are few cyclotrons available that can produce an alpha particle beam for that production. The University of Washington has a cyclotron, one of three in the U.S., that is currently producing 211At. In the proposed studies, the things necessary for production and shipment of 211At to other investigators will be put into place at UW. Of major importance is the efficient production and isolation of 211At in a form that can be readily used by other investigators. In the studies, production of 211At on the UW cyclotron will be optimized by determining the best beam energy and the highest beam current to maximize 211At production. As it would be very difficult for most investigators to isolate the 211At from the irradiated target, the 211At-isolation process will be optimized and automated to more safely and efficiently obtain the 211At for shipment. Additional tasks to make the 211At available for distribution include obtaining appropriate shipping vials and containers, putting into place the requisite standard operating procedures for Radiation Safety compliance at the levels of 211At activity to be produced / shipped, and working with the Department of Energy, Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program, to take orders, make shipments and be reimbursed for costs of production and shipment.

  1. Final work plan : investigation of potential contamination at the former USDA facility in Ramona, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-01-27

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work that will be conducted to investigate the subsurface contaminant conditions at the property formerly leased by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) in Ramona, Kansas (Figure 1.1). Data obtained during this event will be used to (1) evaluate potential source areas on the property, (2) determine the vertical and horizontal extent of potential contamination, and (3) provide recommendations for future actions, with the ultimate goal of assigning this site No Further Action status. The planned investigation includes groundwater monitoring requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with Section V of the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The work is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. Under the Intergovernmental Agreement, Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities. Argonne has issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and provides guidance for these investigations. The Master Work Plan was approved by the KDHE. It contains materials common to investigations at locations in Kansas and should be consulted for the complete details of plans for work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Ramona.

  2. Final Phase II Report : QuickSite{reg_sign} investigation, Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L.

    2004-04-01

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated a grain storage facility approximately 1,100 ft north of Centralia from 1949 until 1971. Subsequently, a concrete mixing plant operated on the site (FSA 1997). None of the CCC/USDA structures remain, though belowgrade foundations related to structures associated with the concrete mixing operations are evident. Two additional grain storage facilities currently exist in and near Centralia: the Nemaha County Co-op, approximately 4,000 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, and a private grain storage facility near the Don Morris residence, 3,500 ft north of the former CCC/USDA facility (Figure 1.1). The property on which the former facility was located is currently owned by Jeanne Burdett Lacky of Seneca, Kansas. In August-September 1998 the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) conducted preliminary investigations at the former CCC/USDA facility, on the basis of the detection of carbon tetrachloride in the domestic well at the Don Morris residence (north of the former CCC/USDA facility). Prior to 1986, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the grain storage industry to preserve grain. The details of previous investigations in the area and a summary of the findings were reported previously (Argonne 2002a). Because the KDHE detected carbon tetrachloride in groundwater and soil at the former CCC/USDA facility at Centralia that might be related to historical use of carbon tetrachloride-based grain fumigants at the facility, the CCC/USDA is conducting an environmental site investigation to determine the source(s) and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination at the former facility near Centralia and to assess whether the contamination requires remedial action. The town of Centralia and all residents near the former CCC/USDA facility currently obtain their water from Rural Water

  3. Investigation of possible uses of surplus CFC/halon chemicals. Final report, September 1991-August 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Sherwell, J.

    1993-08-01

    The object of the project was to investigate the possibility of alternate uses for surplus CFC/halon chemicals as these are replaced in their traditional service roles. These uses may be beneficial new products or substances that are nonhazardous to the environment. The CFC/halons investigated in the study were: CFC-11; CFC-12; HCFC-22; CFC-113; CFC-114; CFC-115; R-500; R-502; Halon-1211; Halon-1301; Halon-2402. The emphasis of the study was on the U.S. market; however, where data were available, global estimates were sought. The study had three major components: (1) Identification of potential transformation technologies; (2) Identification of potential U.S. markets for transformation; (3) Engineering evaluation of the transformation technologies.

  4. Investigation into the feasibility of an air curtain for a solar central receiver. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, O.J.

    1984-06-01

    An experimental investigation into the feasibility of using an air curtain to decrease the convective losses from a solar central receiver cavity is described. The investigation makes use of a simplified small-scale model of a cavity, the side walls of which are electrically heated to simulate the effects of the sun. Although optimization of air-curtain performance was not within the scope of this work, a decrease in convective losses of approximately 35% was achieved. In this report, the apparatus, instrumentation, and test procedures used are described. The results achieved are presented and discussed. Some preliminary notions regarding extrapolating the model-scale results to full size are presented, and a research program to continue the development of the concept is briefly outlined.

  5. Feasibility Study for a Plasma Dynamo Facility to Investigate Fundamental Processes in Plasma Astrophysics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, Cary B.

    2013-09-19

    The scientific equipment purchased on this grant was used on the Plasma Dynamo Prototype Experiment as part of Professor Forest's feasibility study for determining if it would be worthwhile to propose building a larger plasma physics experiment to investigate various fundamental processes in plasma astrophysics. The initial research on the Plasma Dynamo Prototype Experiment was successful so Professor Forest and Professor Ellen Zweibel at UW-Madison submitted an NSF Major Research Instrumentation proposal titled "ARRA MRI: Development of a Plasma Dynamo Facility for Experimental Investigations of Fundamental Processes in Plasma Astrophysics." They received funding for this project and the Plasma Dynamo Facility also known as the "Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment" was constructed. This experiment achieved its first plasma in the fall of 2012 and U.S. Dept. of Energy Grant No. DE-SC0008709 "Experimental Studies of Plasma Dynamos," now supports the research.

  6. Experimental Investigation of Coolant Boiling in a Half-Heated Circular Tube - Final CRADA Report

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Wenhua; Singh, Dileep; France, David M.

    2016-11-01

    Coolant subcooled boiling in the cylinder head regions of heavy-duty vehicle engines is unavoidable at high thermal loads due to high metal temperatures. However, theoretical, numerical, and experimental studies of coolant subcooled flow boiling under these specific application conditions are generally lacking in the engineering literature. The objective of this project was to provide such much-needed information, including the coolant subcooled flow boiling characteristics and the corresponding heat transfer coefficients, through experimental investigations.

  7. Matrix Infrared Spectroscopic and Computational Investigations of Novel Small Uranium Containing Molecules - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Lester

    2014-10-17

    Direct reactions of f-element uranium, thorium and lanthanide metal atoms were investigated with small molecules. These metal atoms were generated by laser ablation and mixed with the reagent molecules then condensed with noble gases at 4K. The products were analyzed by absorption of infrared light to measure vibrational frequencies which were confirmed by quantum chemical calculations. We have learned more about the reactivity of uranium atoms with common molecules, which will aid in the develolpment of further applications of uranium.

  8. Investigation of a fossil geothermal system, Hamblin-Cleopatra Volcano, Clark County, Nevada. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, D.S.

    1986-07-28

    The Hamblin-Cleopatra volcano, selected for study because erosion and fault displacement have exposed the entire volcanic succession, the intrusive core, a radial dike systems, and sedimentary and volcanic rocks that predate and postdate the volcano, was investigated to estimate the proportions of igneous materials forming lava flows, pyroclastic deposits, intrusive bodies, and reworked debris. Chemical changes in the magma throughout the active period of the volcano were documented. The geothermal system active within the pile after activity ceased was reconstructed. (ACR)

  9. Investigation of electron attachment in polyatomic molecules. Final report 1 Apr 77-31 Mar 80

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, J.T.

    1980-05-30

    Electron attachment to polyatomic molecules was studied using molecular beams of variable temperature crossed with an electron of high energy resolution. Species investigated include sulfur hexafluoride, molybdenum hexafluoride, and tungsten oxide polymers. New results were obtained in sulfur hexafluoride demonstrating importance of internal energy for the dissociative attachment in molybdenum hexafluoride. Tungsten oxide vapor exhibits both monomer and dimer negative ion formation near zero energy, apparently from dissociative attachment to the trimer.

  10. Manual for investigation and correction of boiler tube failures. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lamping, G.A.; Arrowood, R.M. Jr.

    1985-04-01

    The manual is for use by electric utility power plant personnel during the investigation into the cause of a boiler tube failure and during the evaluation of corrective actions to prevent future boiler tube failures. It is intended to aid plant personnel in their understanding of the basic failure mechanisms that can produce a boiler tube failure. Information is provided on ways to identify the specific failure mechanisms, to determine the root cause of the failure, and to evaluate the corrective action that can be taken. The Manual contains information on the current methods to control the root causes of tube failures with the understanding that current and future research is necessary on many of these mechanisms to fully understand the factors which can prevent their recurrence. The Manual does not eliminate the need for a thorough metallurgical analysis during the failure investigation but is intended to enhance the investigative process by providing descriptive information for use during communications with technical specialists. The Manual encourages the comprehensive acquisition of failure data and pertinent records to document the failure for immediate and future reference. 80 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Investigation of the fundamentals of low-energy nanosecond pulse ignition: Final CRADA Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, Thomas; Scarcelli, Riccardo; Zhang, Anqi; Sevik, James; Biruduganti, Munidhar; Bihari, Bipin; Matusik, Katarzyna E.; Duke, Daniel J.; Powell, Christopher F.; Kastengren, Alan L.

    2017-01-01

    A detailed investigation of the fundamentals of low-energy nanosecond pulse ignition was performed with the objective to overcome the barrier presented by limited knowledge and characterization of nonequilibrium plasma ignition for realistic internal combustion engine applications (be it in the automotive or power generation field) and shed light on the mechanisms which improve the performance of the advanced TPS ignition system compared to conventional state-of-the-art hardware. Three main tasks of the research included experimental evaluation on a single-cylinder automotive gasoline engine, experimental evaluation on a single-cylinder stationary natural gas engine and energy quantification using x-ray diagnostics.

  12. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 40

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    Contents include: Interaction of oil with sea ice; Physical oceanographic investigations in the Bering Sea marginal ice zone; The movement and decay of ice edge bands in the winter Bering Sea; On some possible interactions between internal waves and sea ice in the marginal ice zone; The Bering Sea ice cover during March 1979: Comparison of surface and satellite data with the Nimbus-7, SMMR; Persistence of spilled oil along the Beaufort Sea coast; Potential oiled ice trajectories in the Beaufort Sea; Interaction of oil with artic sea ice; Activity-directed fractionation of petroleum samples.

  13. Geophysical investigation at US Army Materials Technology Laboratory, Massachusetts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Llopis, J.L.; Simms, J.E.

    1993-11-01

    Results of a comprehensive, integrated geophysical investigation at 5 sites at the U.S. Army Materials Technology Laboratory (MTL) located in Watertown, MA, are presented. In 1960, the Army's first materials research reactor was completed at MTL, which was used actively in molecular and atomic structure research activities until 1970, when it was deactivated. In addition to the research reactor were facilities that stored and handled depleted uranium (DU). In 1989, the Commission on Base Realignment and Closure recommended that MTL be closed. The MTL closure program is being supervised by the U.S. Army Environmental Center. As part of the MTL closure program, any previously contaminated sites must be identified. Based on historical information, 5 sites were selected at MTL to be examined in further detail using geophysical methods. The geophysical investigation was designed to detect and delineate anomalous conditions indicative of buried waste, waste containers, fuel storage tanks, and unmapped drain or sewer lines having the potential of carrying wastes off the site. Electromagnetics, Geophysics, Magnetics, Geophysical surveys, Ground penetrating, Radar.

  14. Investigation of dust associated with shell stars. Final report 1984-1985

    SciTech Connect

    Boehle, M.S.

    1985-05-09

    This project investigated the association of dust with shell stars. Shell stars are identified by emission lines in their spectra, which have been produced in a shell of hot gas surrounding the star. Additional observed properties have indicated the presence of dust, but the direct association of dust with individual shell stars has not been demonstrated conclusively. The first phase of this project was designed to show the presence of dust around the two shell stars, and the second phase investigated their variability. The technique used for both phases was photoelectric photometry. Two sets of filters, broad band and narrow band, were used, in two photometers. The color index obtained from the broad band filters can detect the effects of dust on the star's light and, when compared to neighboring stars, can show whether the dust is directly associated with the star. Variability was searched for, using both sets of filters. AB Aurigal was not found to have a significant amount of circumsteller dust, but FS Canis Major has a strong indication of circumsteller dust and its observed variability has been shown to be a result of its circumsteller dust shell and not any variation of its actual physical properties.

  15. Final Phase II report : QuickSite(R) investigation, Everest, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2003-11-01

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated grain storage facilities at two different locations at Everest, Kansas (Figure 1.1). One facility (referred to in this report as the Everest facility) was at the western edge of the city of Everest. The CCC/USDA operated this facility from 1950 until the early 1970s. The second facility (referred to in this report as Everest East) was about 0.5 mi northeast of the town. The CCC/USDA operated this facility from 1954 until the early 1970s. While these two former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities were in operation, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain. In 1997, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) sampled several domestic drinking water and nondrinking water wells in the Everest area. The KDHE sampling was part of the CCC/USDA Private Well Sampling Program, which was initiated to determine whether carbon tetrachloride was present in domestic wells near former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Kansas. All of the sampled domestic drinking water wells were located outside the Everest city boundaries. As a result of this sampling, carbon tetrachloride contamination was identified at a single domestic drinking water well (the Nigh well; DW06) approximately 3/8 mi northwest of the former Everest CCC/USDA grain storage facility. The CCC/USDA subsequently connected the Nigh residence to the Everest municipal water system. As a result of the detection of carbon tetrachloride in this well, the KDHE conducted preliminary investigations to further evaluate the existence of contamination and its potential effect on public health and the environment. The KDHE concluded that carbon tetrachloride in groundwater at Everest might, in part, be linked to historical use of carbon tetrachloride-based grain fumigants at the former CCC/USDA facilities. For

  16. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 43

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    Contents include: Assessment of gray whale feeding grounds and sea floor interaction in the northeastern Bering Sea; Feeding ecology of the gray whale in the northern Bering Sea; Feeding ecology of the gray whale in the Chirikof Basin, summer 1982; Project rationale, design, summary; Distribution, production, and ecology of gray whale prey species; Distribution and abundance of gray whales in the Chirikof Basin, summer 1982; Assessment of gray whale feeding grounds and sea floor interaction in the northeastern Bering Sea; Feeding ecology of gray whales in the Chirikof Basin; Investigations of belukha whales in coastal waters of western and northern Alaska, 1982-1983: marking and tracking of whales in Bristol Bay; Belukha whale responses to industrial noise in Nushagak Bay, Alaska.

  17. The effect of weld metal matching on girth weld performance. Volume 2, Experimental investigation: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Denys, R.M.

    1993-01-24

    This report provides an experimental study of the failure behavior of 11.6 mm (0.457 in) pipe segments taken from 36 inch diameter pipes containing defects in the girth weld using small scale and fatigue pre-cracked curved wide plate test specimens. The focal points of the evaluations were: to study the effect of the relative difference between pipe and weld metal yield strengths on girth weld performance; to verify the assumption that the CTOD (Crack Tip Opening Displacement) test is a reliable indicator of girth weld performance; and to evaluate the usefulness of the Charpy V notch test for predicting girth weld failure behavior. The investigations have demonstrated that it would be highly desirable to require weld metal yield strength overmatching for preventing the situation where a weak weld would have to take the applied deformations and to develop a reliable testing procedure for the determination of weld metal yield strength.

  18. Investigation of properties and performance of ceramic composite components. Final report on Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, W.A.; Reifsnider, K.L.; Oleksuk, L.L.S.; Stinchcomb, W.W.

    1994-10-31

    The purpose of Phase 2 of the Investigation of Properties and Performance of Ceramic Composite Components has been to build on and extend the work completed during Phase 1 to further advance the transition from properties of ceramic composite materials to performance of ceramic composite components used in fossil energy environments. The specific tasks of Phase 2 were: (1) develop and validate reliable and accurate high temperature, biaxial mechanical tests methods for structural ceramic composite components; (2) test and evaluate ceramic composite components, specifically tubes; (3) characterize long-term, mechanical performance of ceramic composite tubes at high temperatures; (4) develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanical degradation and performance limitations of ceramic composite components under service conditions; (5) develop predictive models for damage tolerance and reliability; and (6) relate component performance to microstructure and, thereby, provide feedback to the associated process-development effort, to improve performance. Accomplishments for each task are given.

  19. Results of boron, surfactant, and cyanide investigation, Beale AFB, California. Final report, Feb-Mar 91

    SciTech Connect

    Garland, J.G.

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this field survey was to investigate wastewater treatment plant effluent levels for boron, methylene blue active substances (MBAS-surfactants), and total cyanide. Historical sampling data were insufficient to clarify whether Beale AFB exceeded their National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit limitations. Up to 30 composite samples were taken of each contaminant. The results showed the base met boron permit limitations, exceeded the daily limit on one day for MBAS, and exceeded both the monthly average limitation and the daily limit for cyanide. Beale AFB has already taken numerous steps to eliminate contaminants from their discharges, e.g., increased sample data collection, product substitution, waste stream isolation and treatment, and split sampling. The report recommends the base systematically review past actions for areas that may have been overlooked or deemed too minor to address. Alternatively, the report recommends follow-up survey work by Armstrong Laboratory or an Armstrong Laboratory contactor.

  20. Investigation of particulate formation during diesel spray combustion: CARS for diesel spray combustion. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Boedeker, L.R.

    1991-09-01

    An experimental and analytical research program has been carried out whose objectives were to investigate strategies for using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) laser diagnostic techniques for detecting the vapor phase of liquid fuel sprays, determining fuel-air ratio and the degree of fuel pyrolysis. The extent to which CARS can provide valid vapor phase fuel measurements in the presence of droplets within the CARS resolution volume will determine its ultimate utility for engine measurements. Hence, the priority in this program was maintained toward investigating possible adverse droplet effects on CARS measurements. Droplets in a relevant size range (25-- 50 microns) were generated for convenience with a spray nozzle. Tests were conducted in a spray chamber at 1 atm pressure under near- saturated fuel vapor pressure conditions, with and without a toluene fuel spray turned on. For reasons of safety an inert gas, CO{sub 2}, was used to simulate O{sub 2}. It was necessary to provide reliable vapor phase CARS reference spectra for these spray studies in order to insure that spurious liquid effects were not present and known vapor phase spectra were attained. To provide these reference spectra the capability was developed of isolating, in a CARS test cell, the vapor phase of fuels that are normally liquids at room temperature and pressure. The cell could be evacuated with a vacuum pump and heated uniformly up to about 100 C. Hence, a capability was established to measure nonresonant and resonant vapor phase CARS features of normally liquid fuels over wide pressure and temperature range, needed for evaluating CARS fuel-air analysis strategies.

  1. Investigation of transport process involved in FGD. Final repot, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kadambi, J.R.; Tien, J.S.; Yurteri, C.; Kadaba, V.; Assar, M.

    1995-02-01

    The objectives of this five year plan of study are to experimentally obtain a basic understanding of (1) turbulent flow structure of the mixing zone and it influence on particle dispersion, (2) the effect of particle loading on turbulent properties and mixing, (3) the effect of jet entrainment, (4) water spray-sorbent interaction, sorbent wetting and mixing, (5) investigate the flow field where certain ratios of jet velocity to flu gas velocity result in regions of negative flow and define onset o negative flow, and (6) sorbent reactivity in immediate mixing zone. In the first two years of the project a sorbent injection facility which can simulate the conditions encountered in COOLSIDE set up was designed and built. Non-intrusive laser based diagnostic tools PDA/LDA were used for flow characterization of particle laden jet in cocurrent flows. In the third year a new technique called TTLDV which combines particle transit time in measurement volume of LDV and LDV velocity measurements to simultaneously obtain non-spherical lime particle size and velocity was developed. Better sorbent injection schemes were investigated spray occurrent flow tests were conducted. During the fourth year the spray cocurrent flow interaction data was analyzed. A criterion was developed for predicting the flow reversal which results in deposition of water droplets on the duct wall (Table 3). The flow reversal occurs when the spray has entrained all the cocurrent flowing stream. The criterion is based upon the mass flow rate of the two phases. The criterion successfully predicted the flow reversals encountered in the experiments and will be a very useful practical tool. Lime laden jet occurrent flow interactions tests were completed. Tests on the swirling nozzle have been conducted. The single phase data have been analyzed while the two phase glass particle laden jet data is being analyzed.

  2. Investigation of transport process involved in FGD. Final technical report, September 1994--February 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Kadambi, J.R.; Yurteri, C.; Assar, M.

    1996-03-01

    This report describes the work done in the fifth year of this project. The objectives of this five year plan of study were to experimentally obtain a basic understanding of (1) turbulent flow structure of the mixing zone and its influence on particle dispersion, (2) the effect of particle loading on turbulent properties and mixing, (3) the effect of jet entrainment, (4) water spray-sorbent interaction, sorbent wetting and mixing, (5) investigate the flow field where certain ratios of jet velocity to flue gas velocity result in regions of negative flow and define onset of negative flow, and (6) sorbent reactivity in immediate mixing zone. Some of the highlights for this period are: sorbent injection facility was modified by adding a heater so as to simulate the higher flue gas temperatures; spray cocurrent flow interaction tests were conducted at the higher temperatures; tests were conducted with particle laden jet to understand the cocurrent flow particle interactions and flow reversals; tests were conducted on two new swirl nozzles and the simple nozzle; test data indicated better mixing characteristics for the swirl nozzles; test results with simulated flue gas indicate substantial improvement, up to 140%, in sulfur capture by lime when swirl nozzle 1 is used over the results obtained for the simple nozzle.

  3. Investigation of a family of power conditioners integrated into a utility grid: final report Category I

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, P.; Putkovich, R.P.

    1981-07-01

    A study was conducted of the requirements for and technologies applicable to power conditioning equipment in residential solar photovoltaic systems. A survey of companies known or thought to manufacture power conditioning equipment was conducted to asses the technology. Technical issues regarding ac and dc interface requirements were studied. A baseline design was selected to be a good example of existing technology which would not need significant development effort for its implementation. Alternative technologies are evaluated to determine which meet the baseline specification, and their costs and losses are evaluated. Areas in which cost improvements can be obtained are studied, and the three best candidate technologies--the current-sourced converter, the HF front end converter, and the programmed wave converter--are compared. It is concluded that the designs investigated will meet, or with slight improvement could meet, short term efficiency goals. Long term efficiency goals could be met if an isolation transformer were not required in the power conditioning equipment. None of the technologies studied can meet cost goals unless further improvements are possible. (LEW)

  4. Investigation of land-use spectral signatures. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagewood, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    A technique was developed to obtain bidirectional reflectance data from natural surfaces by using a folding mirror to transfer the reflected energy from the test surface to a spectroradiometer. The folding mirror was a first surface reflector made by stretching Mylar vacuum coated with aluminum over a light weight frame. The optically folding mirror was positioned over the test surfaces with a moveable platform for both laboratory and field tests. Field tests were conducted using a tethered balloon system to position the folding mirror. A spectroradiometer was designed and built specifically for this investigation. The spectroradiometer had an angular field of view of twenty-four minutes in one axis and ten minutes in the other axis. The radiometer was capable of detecting energies in small bandwidths throughout the electromagnetic spectrum from 0.3 microns to 3.0 microns. Bidirectional reflectance data and variations in the data with source angles were obtained for Saint Augustine grass, Bermuda grass, and a black alluvium soil from the Mississippi River delta.

  5. Final Technical Report - Investigation into the Relationship between Heterogeneity and Heavy-Tailed Solute Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Weissmann, Gary S

    2013-12-06

    The objective of this project was to characterize the influence that naturally complex geologic media has on anomalous dispersion and to determine if the nature of dispersion can be estimated from the underlying heterogeneous media. The UNM portion of this project was to provide detailed representations of aquifer heterogeneity through producing highly-resolved models of outcrop analogs to aquifer materials. This project combined outcrop-scale heterogeneity characterization (conducted at the University of New Mexico), laboratory experiments (conducted at Sandia National Laboratory), and numerical simulations (conducted at Sandia National Laboratory and Colorado School of Mines). The study was designed to test whether established dispersion theory accurately predicts the behavior of solute transport through heterogeneous media and to investigate the relationship between heterogeneity and the parameters that populate these models. The dispersion theory tested by this work was based upon the fractional advection-dispersion equation (fADE) model. Unlike most dispersion studies that develop a solute transport model by fitting the solute transport breakthrough curve, this project explored the nature of the heterogeneous media to better understand the connection between the model parameters and the aquifer heterogeneity. We also evaluated methods for simulating the heterogeneity to see whether these approaches (e.g., geostatistical) could reasonably replicate realistic heterogeneity. The UNM portion of this study focused on capturing realistic geologic heterogeneity of aquifer analogs using advanced outcrop mapping methods.

  6. Investigation of sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate and water systems for saturated solar ponds. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-03-28

    The overall objective of this study was to gather relevant data primarily from the published literature to investigate the technical feasibility of using a Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-NaHCO/sub 3/ mixture for a saturated solar pond. This objective was accomplished by a literature search and review of existing chemical information and by performing simple chemistry experiments in the laboratory. Information on density, solubility, phase diagram, equilibrium compositions, reaction rate constant, equilibrium constant, diffusion coefficient, vapor pressure and potentially useful additives is compiled. It is concluded that even though both the saturation density and solubility increase with temperature for trona, it is not chemically stable either at room temperature or higher temperatures (80/sup 0/C). Therefore, as is, trona is not suitable for use in a saturated solar pond. From the literature it has been found that sugar and gum can retard the decomposition of bicarbonate to carbonate in the mixture. Nevertheless, trona is a very attractive solute for an unsaturated solar pond. A laboratory unsaturated pond with a stable density gradient has worked without any problems for about two months at InterTechnology/Solar Corporation.

  7. Remedial investigation of contaminant mobility at Naval Weapons Station, Concord, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.R.; O'Neil, L.J.; Clairain, E.J.; Brandon, D.L.; Rhett, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    A remedial investigation was conducted at Naval Weapons Station, Concord, California, to determine the nature and extent of of wetland and terrestrial environments. The evaluation considered major pathways of contaminant migration including soil, water, air and biota. Major testing was conducted on soil and the biological components of the pathways. Chemical analysis of soil samples indicated substantial elevation in arsenic, cadmium, lead, selenium, zinc and copper in certain contaminated areas. Field-conducted clam bioassays showed a moderate potential for lead, cadmium, and zinc to bioaccumulate in clams placed in surface waters of a limited number of sampling sites. Plant and earthworm bioassays indicated substantial movement of arsenic, cadmium, lead, selenium, zinc and copper into plants and soil-dwelling organisms in contaminated areas. A definite threat of these contaminants to impact wildlife, especially the endangered species that inhabit the contaminated sites, was strongly suggested by the toxicological effects of these metals on birds and mammals. A hydrological evaluation indicated substantial movement of hazardous substances into surface waters during storm events and high tides. A comprehensive evaluation of natural resources indicated that the wetland areas have moderate to high functional values for wildlife habitat, food chain support, flood storage, shoreline anchorage, sediment trapping, nutrient retention and passive recreation and heritage.

  8. Geophysical investigations of the Western Ohio-Indiana region: Final report, October 1981-September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, D.H.; Pollack, H.N.; Lay, T.; Schwartz, S.Y.

    1987-03-01

    Earthquake activity in the Western Ohio-Indiana region has been monitored with a precision seismograph network consisting of nine stations located in west-central Ohio and four stations located in Indiana. Five local and near-regional earthquakes have been recorded and located during the 1985-86 fiscal report period, ranging in magnitude from 0.5 to 5.0m/sub b/. The two largest of these events (January 31, 1986, near Cleveland, Ohio, magnitude = 5.0m/sub b/, and July 12, 1986, near St. Marys, Ohio, magnitude = 4.5m/sub b/) were felt with minor damage reported in each case. Focal mechanisms and isoseismal maps for these events are included in this report. These events are the largest to have occurred in Ohio since the events of March 2 and March 9, 1937 (magnitude = 4.5 and 4.9, respectively). The remaining three earthquakes of this report period all occurred in Ohio, north of the array. A total of 42 local and near-regional events, eleven of which have been felt, have now been recorded by the Ohio-Indiana array since its initiation in 1976. Teleseismic P-wave arrival and residual tables have been updated to include newly acquired data. The results are similar to those in previous years. The local velocity structure has been investigated using data acquired during a refraction experiment in the summer of 1984 and travel time data of local and near regional earthquakes.

  9. Geophysical investigations of the western Ohio-Indiana region. Technical report (final) Nov 75-Sep 81

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, P.L.; Christensen, D.H.; Mauk, F.H.

    1982-01-01

    The geophysical investigations of the Western Ohio and Indiana regions include the maintenance of a precision seismograph network to monitor earthquake activity. Data generated by this network, supplemented with other information, are used to analyze regional seismicity and to interpret the local geologic and seismotectonic structure. Four array stations in Indiana were added to the nine stations near Anna, Ohio, and the Ohio stations were upgraded by replacing seismometers and installing more stable electronic systems. A new digital computer with analog-to-digital convertors was obtained for direct digital recording and other digital analysis. Ten small earthquakes in the Anna region were recorded, six in a very tight cluster near the village of Anna. Only one of the earthquakes was felt. P-wave studies show an azimuthally dependent difference in residuals between stations within the Western Ohio array--a difference which can only be caused by significant variation in local structure. Aftershocks were recorded, public responses obtained and classified, and intensity contours drawn for the 5.1 magnitude earthquake on July 27, 1980, in Sharpsburg, Kentucky.

  10. Investigation of passive blade cyclic pitch variation using an automatic yaw control system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hohenemser, K.H.; Swift, A.H.P.

    1982-08-01

    The investigation of passive cyclic pitch variation using an automatic yaw control system made use of the test equipment and of the results of an earlier study. The atmospheric test equipment consisted of a horizontal axis wind turbine with vane controlled upwind two-bladed rotor of 7.6 m (25 ft) diameter having passive cyclic pitch variation. An automatically triggered electric furl actuator prevented over-speeds and over-torques by furling the rotor which means yawing the rotor out of the winds. The atmospheric test equipment was modified to accept two alternative fully automatic yaw or furl control systems. The first system was of the active type and included a hydraulic single acting constant speed governor as it is used for aircraft propeller controls. Upon reaching the rotor speed limit, the governor delivered pressurized oil to a hydraulic furl actuator which then overcame the unfurling spring force and furled the rotor. When the rotor speed fell below the set value, the governor admitted oil flow from the hydraulic actuator into the oil reservoir and the rotor was unfurled by the spring. The second automatic control system was of a purely mechanical passive type. The rotor thrust, which was laterally off-set from the yaw axis, in combination with a yawing component of the rotor torque due to uptilt of the rotor axis overcame at rated power the unfurling spring and furled the rotor. The analytically predicted and experimentally substantiated negative rotor yaw damping would cause excessive furling rates unless alleviated by a furl damper. The tests were supported by a specially developed dynamic yawing analysis. Both analysis and tests indicated that the two-bladed passive cyclic pitch wind rotor can be effectively torque or speed limited by rotor yaw control systems which are less costly and more reliable than the conventional blade feathering control systems.

  11. Final Scientific Report: Experimental Investigation of Reconnection in a Line-tied Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, Cary

    2016-10-25

    This grant used funding from the NSF/DoE Partnership on Plasma Science to investigate magnetic reconnection phenomena in a line-tied pinch experiment. The experiment was upgraded from a previous device intended to study fusion plasma-related instabilities to a new configuration capable of studying a number of new, previously unstudied configurations. A high spatial and time resolution array of magnetic probes was constructed to measure time evolving structures present as instability and turbulence developed. The most important new equilibrium made possible by this grant was a Zero-Net-Current equilibrium that models the footpoint twisting of solar flux tubes that occurs prior to solar eruptions (flares and coronal mass ejections). This new equilibrium was successfully created in the lab, and it exhibited a host of instabilities. In particular, at low current when the equilibrium was not overly stressed, a saturated internal kink mode oscillation was observed. At high current, 2 D magnetic turbulence developed which we attribute to the lack of a equilibrium brought about by a subcritical transition to turbulence. A second set of experiments involved the turbulent interactions of a collection of flux tubes all being twisted independently, a problem known as the Parker Problem. Current profiles consisting of 2, 3 and 4 guns were used to impose a fine scale drive, and resulted in a new experimental platform in which the injection scale of the magnetic turbulence could be controlled. First experiments in this configuration support the conclusion that an inverse cascade of magnetic energy occurred which self-organized the plasma into a nearly axisymmetric current distribution.

  12. Investigation of low-cost LNG vehicle fuel tank concepts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, J.E.; Siahpush, A.

    1998-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate development of a low-cost liquid natural gas (LNG) vehicle fuel storage tank with low fuel boil-off, low tank pressure, and high safety margin. One of the largest contributors to the cost of converting a vehicle to LNG is the cost of the LNG fuel tank. To minimize heat leak from the surroundings into the low-temperature fuel, these tanks are designed as cryogenic dewars with double walls separated by an evacuated insulation space containing multi-layer insulation. The cost of these fuel tanks is driven by this double-walled construction, both in terms of materials and labor. The primary focus of the analysis was to try to devise a fuel tank concept that would allow for the elimination of the double-wall requirement. Results of this study have validated the benefit of vacuum/MLI insulation for LNG fuel tanks and the difficulty in identifying viable alternatives. The thickness of a non-vacuum insulation layer would have to be unreasonably large to achieve an acceptable non-venting hold time. Reasonable hold times could be achieved by using an auxiliary tank to accept boil-off vapor from a non-vacuum insulated primary tank, if the vapor in the auxiliary tank can be stored at high pressure. The primary focus of the analysis was to try to devise a fuel tank concept that allowed for the elimination of the double-wall requirement. Thermodynamic relations were developed for analyzing the fuel tank transient response to heat transfer, venting of vapor, and out-flow of either vapor or liquid. One of the major costs associated with conversion of a vehicle to LNG fuel is the cost of the LNG fuel tank. The cost of these tanks is driven by the cryogenic nature of the fuel and by the fundamental design requirements of long non-venting hold times and low storage pressure.

  13. Final Report: Investigation of Polarization Spectroscopy and Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing for Quantitative Concentration Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Robert P. Lucht

    2005-03-09

    Laser-induced polarization spectroscopy (LIPS), degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM), and electronic-resonance-enhanced (ERE) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) are techniques that shows great promise for sensitive measurements of transient gas-phase species, and diagnostic applications of these techniques are being pursued actively at laboratories throughout the world. However, significant questions remain regarding strategies for quantitative concentration measurements using these techniques. The primary objective of this research program is to develop and test strategies for quantitative concentration measurements in flames and plasmas using these nonlinear optical techniques. Theoretically, we are investigating the physics of these processes by direct numerical integration (DNI) of the time-dependent density matrix equations that describe the wave-mixing interaction. Significantly fewer restrictive assumptions are required when the density matrix equations are solved using this DNI approach compared with the assumptions required to obtain analytical solutions. For example, for LIPS calculations, the Zeeman state structure and hyperfine structure of the resonance and effects such as Doppler broadening can be included. There is no restriction on the intensity of the pump and probe beams in these nonperturbative calculations, and both the pump and probe beam intensities can be high enough to saturate the resonance. As computer processing speeds have increased, we have incorporated more complicated physical models into our DNI codes. During the last project period we developed numerical methods for nonperturbative calculations of the two-photon absorption process. Experimentally, diagnostic techniques are developed and demonstrated in gas cells and/or well-characterized flames for ease of comparison with model results. The techniques of two-photon, two-color H-atom LIPS and three-laser ERE CARS for NO and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} were demonstrated during the

  14. Final master work plan : environmental investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas, 2002 revision.

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, J. C.; Environmental Research

    2003-01-23

    mistake sometimes made in the site characterization process is failure to use technically sound available data to form working hypotheses on hydrogeology, contaminant distribution, etc. for initial testing. (3) After assembling and interpreting existing data for the site, the entire technical team visits the site to identify as a group the site characteristics that might prohibit or enhance any particular technological approach. Logistic and community constraints are also identified at this point. (4) After the field visit, the team selects a suite of technologies appropriate to the problem and completes the design of the field program. No one technique works well at all sites, and a suite of techniques is necessary to delineate site features fully. In addition, multiple technologies are employed to increase confidence in conclusions about site features. Noninvasive and minimally invasive technologies are emphasized to minimize risk to the environment, the community, and the staff. In no case is the traditional approach of installing a massive number of monitoring wells followed. A dynamic work plan that outlines the program is produced for the sponsoring and regulatory agencies. The word ''dynamic'' is emphasized because the work plan is viewed as a guide, subject to modification, for the site characterization activity, rather than a document that is absolute and unchangeable. Therefore, the health and safety plan and the quality assurance/quality control plan must be broad and encompass all possible alterations to the plan. The cooperation of the regulating agency is essential in successful implementation of this process. The sponsoring and regulatory agencies are notified if significant changes to the site-specific work plan are necessary. (5) The entire team participates in the technical field program. Several technical activities are undertaken simultaneously. These may range from different surface geophysics investigations to vegetation sampling. Data from the

  15. Additional safeguards for children in clinical investigations of food and drug administration-regulated products. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-02-26

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations to provide additional safeguards for children enrolled in clinical investigations of FDA-regulated products. This rule finalizes the interim rule published in 2001 to bring FDA regulations into compliance with provisions of the Children's Health Act of 2000 (the Children's Health Act). The Children's Health Act requires that all research involving children that is conducted, supported, or regulated by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) be in compliance with HHS regulations providing additional protections for children involved as subjects in research. FDA is taking this action both to comply with the congressional mandate and because of increases in the enrollment of children in clinical investigations as a result of ongoing pediatric initiatives.

  16. Investigation of the manifold sensitivities of a final repository model with two distinct peaks in the output distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiessl, Sabine M.; Becker, Dirk-Alexander

    2015-04-01

    The sensitivities of a performance assessment (PA) model for a final repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste in rock salt are examined. The output frequency distribution of this PA model shows two peaks, which become increasingly distinct with time. This is a result of the dissolution and nearly sudden failure of a seal in the near field, which happens at some point in time depending on certain parameters. When this barrier fails, the release of radionuclides increases considerably within a short time. The presented investigations of the various sensitivities are based upon separation of the output of a probabilistic set of model runs at selected points in time into "low" and "high" values. In this way, the sensitivities of the two distinct subsets of the model output can be studied separately. For evaluation, a variance-based and a non-parametric method are applied.

  17. Installation restoration program final remedial investigation report IRP sites 8 and 10. 151st air refueling group Utah Air National Guard, Salt Lake City, Utah. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the results from a Remedial Investigation (RI) for two sites at the Utah Air National Guard (UANG) Base located in Salt Lake City, Utah. The two sites investigated are identified as Installation Restoration Program (IRP) Site 8, a former underground storage tank (UST) location, and IRP Site 10, an existing petroleum, oil, and lubricants (POL) yard. The RI was conducted as outlined in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan prepared by Stone Webster and submitted to and approved by the ANG in May 1993. The field work associated with the RI was performed in June, July, and August 1995.

  18. Investigation of a rotary valving system with variable valve timing for internal combustion engines: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, P.C.; Hansen, C.N.

    1994-11-18

    The objective of the program was to provide a functional demonstration of the Hansen Rotary Valving System with Variable Valve timing (HRVS/VVT), capable of throttleless inlet charge control, as an alternative to conventional poppet-valves for use in spark ignited internal combustion engines. The goal of this new technology is to secure benefits in fuel economy, broadened torque band, vibration reduction, and overhaul accessibility. Additionally, use of the variable valve timing capability to vary the effective compression ratio is expected to improve multi-fuel tolerance and efficiency. Efforts directed at the design of HRVS components proved to be far more extensive than had been anticipated, ultimately requiring that proof-trial design/development work be performed. Although both time and funds were exhausted before optical or ion-probe types of in-cylinder investigation could be undertaken, a great deal of laboratory data was acquired during the course of the design/development work. This laboratory data is the basis for the information presented in this Final Report.

  19. Final report : phase I investigation at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-05

    Agency of the USDA and the MoDNR, to address carbon tetrachloride contamination potentially associated with a number of former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Missouri. The site characterization at Savannah is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. A phased approach is being employed by the CCC/USDA and Argonne, with the approval of the MoDNR, so that information obtained and interpretations developed during each incremental stage of the study can be used most effectively to guide subsequent aspects of the program. This report presents the technical findings of Phase I of Argonne's studies. The Phase I investigation was undertaken in accord with the final site-specific Phase I Work Plan for Savannah (Argonne 2007), as well as with the Master Work Plan (MWPK) for CCC/USDAArgonne operations in the state of Kansas (Argonne 2002), which the MoDNR reviewed and approved (with minor revisions) for temporary use in Missouri to facilitate the start-up of the CCC/USDA's activities at Savannah. (Argonne is developing a similar Master Work Plan for operations in Missouri that is based on the existing MWPK, with the approval of the MoDNR. The Missouri document has not been finalized, however, at this time.) The site-specific Savannah Work Plan (Argonne 2007; approved by the MoDNR [2007a]) (1) summarized the pre-existing knowledge base for the Savannah investigation site compiled by Argonne and (2) described the site-specific technical objectives and the intended scope of work developed for this phase of the investigation. Four primary technical objectives were identified for the Phase I studies, as follows: (1) Update the previous (MoDNR 2000a,b) inventory and status of private wells in the immediate vicinity of the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility, and sample the identified wells for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and geochemical constituents. (2) Investigate for possible evidence of

  20. Investigation of Strain Aging in the Ordered Intermetallic Compound beta-NiAl. Ph.D. Thesis Final Contractor Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Mark Lovell

    1995-01-01

    The phenomenon of strain aging has been investigated in polycrystalline and single crystal NiAl alloys at temperatures between 300 and 1200 K. Static strain aging studies revealed that after annealing at 1100 K for 7200 s (i.e., 2h) followed by furnace cooling, high purity, nitrogen-doped and titanium-doped polycrystalline alloys exhibited continuous yielding, while conventional-purity and carbon-doped alloys exhibited distinct yield points and Luders strains. Prestraining by hydrostatic pressurization removed the yield points, but they could be reintroduced by further annealing treatments. Yield points could be reintroduced more rapidly if the specimens were prestrained uniaxially rather than hydrostatically, owing to the arrangement of dislocations into cell structures during uniaxial deformation. The time dependence of the strain aging events followed at t(exp 2/3) relationship suggesting that the yield points observed in polycrystalline NiAl were the result of the pinning of mobile dislocations by interstitials, specifically carbon. Between 700 and 800 K, yield stress plateaus, yield stress transients upon a ten-fold increase in strain rate, work hardening peaks, and dips in the strain rate sensitivity (SRS) have been observed in conventional-purity and carbon-doped polycrystals. In single crystals, similar behavior was observed; in conventional-purity single crystals, however, the strain rate sensitivity became negative resulting in serrated yielding, whereas, the strain rate sensitivity stayed positive in high purity and in molybdenum-doped NiAl. These observations are indicative of dynamic strain aging (DSA) and are discussed in terms of conventional strain aging theories. The impact of these phenomena on the composition-structure-property relations are discerned. Finally, a good correlation has been demonstrated between the properties of NiAl alloys and a recently developed model for strain aging in metals and alloys developed by Reed-Hill et al.

  1. Source evaluation report phase 2 investigation: Limited field investigation. Final report: United States Air Force Environmental Restoration Program, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the limited field investigation work done to address issues and answer unresolved questions regarding a collection of potential contaminant sources at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB), near Fairbanks, Alaska. These sources were listed in the Eielson AFB Federal Facility Agreement supporting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup of the base. The limited field investigation began in 1993 to resolve all remaining technical issues and provide the data and analysis required to evaluate the environmental hazard associated with these sites. The objective of the limited field investigation was to allow the remedial project managers to sort each site into one of three categories: requiring remedial investigation/feasibility study, requiring interim removal action, or requiring no further remedial action.

  2. Investigating the Effects of Human Factors on the Outcomes of a Library Computer Literacy Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albritton, Rosie L.; Sievert, MaryEllen C.

    This study investigated the relationship of the effects of library staff attitudes toward computer technology on their level of participation in a library computer literacy program. A series of in-service computer workshops at the University of Missouri-Columbia Libraries provided the opportunity to investigate computer anxiety among library…

  3. Investigation of the Public Library as a Linking Agent to Major Scientific, Educational, Social, and Environmental Data Bases. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockheed Research Lab., Palo Alto, CA.

    The DIALIB Project was a 3-year experiment that investigated the potential of the public library as a "linking agent" between the public and the many machine-readable data bases currently accessible via the telephone using online terminals. The study investigated the following questions: (1) Is online search of use to the patrons of a…

  4. Final report : results of the 2007 investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA facility in Powhattan, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-08-15

    The 2007 investigation of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform contamination at Powhattan, Kansas, was conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2006a). The Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory implemented the investigation on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The primary purposes of the investigation were to evaluate potential contaminant source areas on the former CCC/USDA property, determine the horizontal and vertical extent of potential contamination, conduct groundwater monitoring, and provide recommendations for future action.

  5. Installation Restoration Program. Remedial investigation report. Site 1. Fire Training Area. Volk Field Air National Guard Base, Camp Douglas, Wi. Volume 1. Final remedial investigation report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Volume 1 of this report covers the Remedial Investigation conducted on Site 1, Fire Training Area at Volk Field Air National Guard Base. The remedial work is described and the testing conducted after remediation to insure all contamination has been removed. The study as conducted under the Air National Guard's Installation Restoration Program. Partial contents include: Meteorology; Hydrology; Soils; Water wells; Groundwater; Borings; Samplings; Chemical contamination; Migration; Decontamination.

  6. Investigation of organic nonlinear optical crystals for harmonic frequency conversion and electro-optics. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    The authors are conducting a detailed study of the crystal growth of different organic materials and their physical, optical and morphological properties. The crystals are grown by a novel solution crystal growth technique developed by the principal investigator at Alabama A and M University (AAMU). The studies included the measurement of solubility of organic NLO materials in different solvents, growth of crystals by solution growth technique, and the characterization of optical properties and damage threshold of crystals for high power laser applications. Two different NLO crystals of 4-Aminobenzophenone (ABP) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-benzaldehyde (MHBA) were investigated during the course of this investigation. A paper on ABP crystals was published in Journal of Crystal Growth in 1997.

  7. Foundation investigation of the upstream switchyard of Wilson Dam power plant: Microgravity survey. Final report, 1 August-31 December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Yule, D.E.; Butler, D.K.; Sharp, M.K.

    1990-09-01

    A microgravity survey consisting of 347 stations was conducted in the upstream switchyard of the Wilson Dam powerplant. The objective of the survey was the detection of subsurface cavities or other anomalous conditions that could threaten the integrity of the switchyard structures. Six anomalous areas were identified on the gravity anomaly map and ranked for their interpreted significance. From the results, nine boring locations were selected to investigate the cause of the anomalies. This report presents details of the field survey, data processing interpretations, and recommended drilling locations for subsurface investigation.

  8. A Pilot Investigation for Developing and Operating a State Occupational Information Service System for Vocational-Technical Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Richard A.; And Others

    To investigate and resolve some of the problems associated with developing a permanent state-wide occupational information service system for planning and programing vocational education, a small scale data bank was developed for six selected countries in Alabama. Inputs were collected from 38 high schools offering vocational education, two…

  9. AN INVESTIGATION OF NON-INDEPENDENCE OF COMPONENTS OF SCORES ON MULTIPLE-CHOICE TESTS. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ZIMMERMAN, DONALD W.; BURKHEIMER, GRAHAM J., JR.

    INVESTIGATION IS CONTINUED INTO VARIOUS EFFECTS OF NON-INDEPENDENT ERROR INTRODUCED INTO MULTIPLE-CHOICE TEST SCORES AS A RESULT OF CHANCE GUESSING SUCCESS. A MODEL IS DEVELOPED IN WHICH THE CONCEPT OF THEORETICAL COMPONENTS OF SCORES IS NOT INTRODUCED AND IN WHICH, THEREFORE, NO ASSUMPTIONS REGARDING ANY RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SUCH COMPONENTS NEED…

  10. 78 FR 45968 - Silica Bricks and Shapes From China: Scheduling of the Final Phase of an Antidumping Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ...) under section 735(b) of the Tariff Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1673d(b)) (the Act) to determine whether an...), and part 207, subparts A and C (19 CFR part 207). DATES: Effective Date: June 20, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Cynthia Trainor (202-205-3354), Office of Investigations, U.S. International...

  11. The Investigation of Demand for a Rapid Document Delivery Service for the University of Pittsburgh Library System. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, K. Leon; And Others

    A joint project of the University of Pittsburgh Library System and the School of Library and Information Science investigated the need for a rapid document delivery service within the University Library System (ULS). Two instruments were designed to answer questions about library patrons' uses of bibliographic citations retrieved in online…

  12. An Empirical Investigation Into the Intellectual, Physical, Psychological, and Social Consequences of Being Reared an Only Child. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doby, John T.; And Others

    Declining family size plus the widespread belief that only children experience adjustment difficulties provided the impetus for this investigation comparing the characteristics of only children with children raised in multiple-sibling families. Results indicated that being reared as an only child actually provided a slight developmental advantage…

  13. Investigation and Development of Competency Standards and Certification Requirements for Secondary-Level Vocational Foodservice Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usiewicz, Ronald A.

    An investigation ascertained, analyzed, and documented competency standards and certification requirements for secondary-level vocational food service programs. A literature review produced no instruments used in past studies to measure the attitudes of food service professionals toward task competencies. Six occupations were selected for the…

  14. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report. Volume 3, Appendixes B, C, and D: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force`s Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions will need to be carried out at each site. The island`s drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. Geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal to be avoided during drilling activities. This report, appendices B, C, and D contains information on the following: geophysical contour maps and profile plots; human health risk assessment; and ecological risk assessment.

  15. 78 FR 72641 - Request for Public Comments on Draft Final Report on the Technical Investigation of the May 22...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ...: The Director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), United States Department of... conducted by NIST into the tornado that impacted Joplin, Missouri on May 22, 2011. NIST will consider all... copy of the draft report may be found on the Joplin Investigation Web page http://www.nist.gov/el...

  16. Investigation of transport process involved in FGD. Final technical report for the third year, September 1992--August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kadambi, J.R.; Kadaba, V.; Yurteri, C.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes the work done in the third year of the project {open_quotes}Investigation of Transport Processes Involved in FGD{close_quotes}. The objectives of this five year plan of study is to experimentally obtain a basic understanding of (1) turbulent flow structure of the mixing zone and its influence on particle dispersion, (2) the effect of particle loading on turbulent properties and mixing, (3) the effect of jet entrainment, (4) water spray-sorbent interaction, sorbent wetting and mixing, (5) investigate the flow field where certain ratios of jet velocity to flue gas velocity result in regions of negative flow and define onset of negative flow (6) sorbent reactivity in mixing zone and (7) effect of particle agglomeration. In the first two years of the project a sorbent injection facility which can simulate the conditions encountered in COOLSIDE set up was designed and built. Non-intrusive laser based diagnostic tools PDA/LDA was used for flow characterization of particle laden jet in cocurrent flows. All tasks for third year were addressed. The accomplishments for the third year include the following. For the investigation of Lime Laden Jet Flow, since no existing technique was capable of providing the simultaneous measurement of irregular shaped particle size and velocity, a new technique, TTLDV which utilizes the transit time in LDV measurement volume and the LDV velocity measurements to obtain simultaneous particle size and velocity measurements was developed. Better Sorbent Injection Methods and Optimized Injection Schemse were investigated. Progress was made in the development of Technique to Study Particulate Droplet Interactions, the task was not completed because of difficulties encountered due to differences in the refractive index of glass beads and water droplets. The investigations of flow reversal resulting from spray jet cocurrent flow interactions was completed.

  17. Investigation of MAGMA chambers in the Western Great Basin. Final report, 9 June 1982-31 October 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Peppin, W.A.

    1986-02-10

    This report summarizes efforts made by the Seismological Laboratory toward the detection and delineation of shallow crustal zones in the western Great Basin, and toward the development of methods to accomplish such detection. The work centers around the recently-active volcanic center near Long Valley, California. The work effort is broken down into three tasks: (1) network operations, (2) data analysis and interpretation, and (3) the study of shallow crustal amomalies (magma bodies). Section (1) describes the efforts made to record thousand of earthquakes near the Long Valley caldera, and focusses on the results obtained for the November 1984 round Valley earthquake. Section (2) describes the major effort of this contract, which was to quantify the large volume of seismic data being recorded as it pertains to the goals of this contract. Efforts described herein include (1) analysis of earthquake focal mechanisms, and (2) the classification, categorization, and interpretation of unusual seismic phases in terms of reflections and refractions from shallow-crustal anomalous zones. Section (3) summarizes the status of our research to date on the locations of magma bodies, with particular emphasis on a location corresponding to the map location of the south end of Hilton Creek fault. Five lines of independent evidence suggest that magma might be associated with this spot. Finally, new evidence on the large magma bodies within the Long Valley caldera, of interest to the DOE deep drilling project, is presented.

  18. Investigation of the effects of pressure on the compaction and subsequent sintering of nanosize powders. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, E.J.; Piermarini, G.J.; Hockey, B.; Malghan, S.G.

    1996-02-26

    With current technology and available raw materials, one knows that it is very difficult, if not impossible, to produce a monolithic ceramic material with an average grain size of less than 100 nm. The grains of ceramic materials cannot be refined by cold working as is typically done in metals. Hence, the starting ceramic powder must be of a smaller or similar particle size as the desired grain size for the final product. The availability of nanosize (<100 nm) ceramic powders, however, is limited. In many cases, the powders consist of polymorphic mixtures, precursors, or amorphous phases of the desired material. Phase transformation during sintering is difficult to control, and when it does occur it usually is accompanied by significant microstructural changes and grain growth. An example of such a powder is Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. To the best of the authors` knowledge, high purity nanosize {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder is unavailable commercially. However, a variety of nanosize transitional forms of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, including the {gamma} and {delta} polymorphs, are commercially available in large quantities as mixtures. Results on the compaction and sintering of nanosize {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder are reported here.

  19. Investigation of mineral transformation and ash deposition during staged combustion. Final report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Harb, J.N.

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this report is to document a recently completed four-year study to examine the impact of low-NOx firing technologies on ash formation and deposition while firing pulverized coal. Low-NOx burners and staged combustion inhibit NOx formation by restricting the amount of oxygen available to form a fuel-rich zone in which nitrogen compounds are reduced to molecular nitrogen (N{sub 2}) rather than oxidized. Additional oxygen is provided downstream for complete combustion. Consequently, coal and mineral particles encounter different temperatures and oxygen concentrations when they are burned under low-NOx firing conditions than they do in conventionally-fired units. Two coals with distinctly different inorganic contents and ash characteristics were fired in a pilot-scale laboratory combustor under both conventional and staged combustion conditions. Ash and deposit samples were collected at various locations in the reactor and analyzed in order to assess the influence of staged combustion. This report is organized as follows. First, a background section provides the foundation needed in order to understand the motivation for and the results of the experimental program. The next section presents a description of the experimental apparatus and procedures, including the development the analytical methods critical to the study. Results of the analyses of coal, ash and deposit samples are then presented and discussed for each of the two coals. Finally, the report ends with a short summary and statement of conclusions.

  20. Investigation into avian mortality in the Playa Lakes region of southeastern New Mexico: Final Report - June 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dein, F. Joshua; Baeten, Laurie A.; Moore, Melody K.; Samuel, Michael D.; Miller, Paul D.; Murphy, Christopher; Sissler, Steven; Jeske, Clinton W.; Jehl, Joseph R.; Yaeger, J. S.; Bauer, B.; Mahoney, Shiela A.

    1997-01-01

    This Final Report is a review of work on a cooperative study undertaken by the USGS Biological Resources Division's National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC) and National Wetlands Research Center (NWRC; formerly the Southern Science Center) from 1994 through 1997. The study was initiated at the request of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), through a request to the former National Biological Service. The Southeastern New Mexico Playa Lakes Coordinating Committee (SENMPLCC) played an important role in outlining the research needs. The initial Study Plan document, which outlines the background, objectives and methods for the first two years is available as Appendix 1. A letter indicating modifications to the Study Plan was sent to the SENMPLCC chair on April 25,1995, and is Appendix 2. An Interim Report, covering this work was completed and submitted in September 1995. The Literature Review section of the study was completed and presented to SENMPLCC in August, 1995. Following SENMPLCC review, NWHC was asked to develop a series of questions that could be posed from information gained in the initial phase (Appendix 3). The NWHC and NWRC were then directed to begin work to answer the top three questions, within the available fiscal resources. NWRC could continue with work outlined under the original Study Plan (Appendix 1), however an additional Study Plan for experiments performed by NWHC and collaborators and is available as Appendix 4.

  1. Ionic solid hydrogen fuel: Experimental investigation of cluster-impact fusion. Final report 1 Jul-30 Sep 90

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Y.K.; Lorents, D.C.; Young, S.; Staider, K.

    1991-01-24

    This report discusses the investigation of a new novel fusion method: the use of deuterium-containing clusters for igniting fusion (cluster-impact fusion, CIF). If CIF becomes practical, the energy density that can be achieved with the DT fuel is 3.4 X 10 to the 14 power J/kg, which is eight orders of magnitude larger than the energy density of LO{sub X}/H{sub 2} (1,600,000 j/kg). For missions with specific impulse less than 100,000 s, the CIF rocket performance will be essentially identical to that of antimatter. Under the current project, we have successfully built and demonstrated a new cluster-impact fusion facility by extending the existing hydrogen cluster facility. We are confident that the new fusion method discovered at Brookhaven is very promising; thus, we are ready to investigate means of increasing the fusion yield to a practical level for rocket propulsion applications.

  2. Investigation of forced and isothermal chemical vapor infiltrated SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sankar, J.; Kelkar, A.D.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    1993-09-01

    Mechanical properties of two different layups for each of the forced CVI (41 specimens) and isothermal CVI (36 specimens) materials were investigated in air at room temperature (RT), 1000C, and at room temperature after thermal shock (RT/TS) and exposure to oxidation (RT/OX). The FCVI specimens had a nominal interfacial coating thickness of 0.3 {mu}m of pyrolytic carbon, while CVI specimens had a coating thickness of 0.1 {mu}m. Effect of reinforcement and interfacial bond on mechanical properties of composite were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to analyze the fiber-matrix interface and the toughening mechanisms in this ceramic composite system.

  3. Fundamental Investigations of C1O2 Delignification - Final Report - 07/10/1996 - 07/09/1999

    SciTech Connect

    Ragauskas, Arthur J.; McDonough, T. J.

    2001-05-18

    The overall objective of this project was to develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of chlorine dioxide delignification of low kappa kraft pulps and identify new methods of improving the efficiency and effectiveness of this bleaching agent. The approach adopted was to investigate the fundamental structural components of lignin that contribute to delignification reactions with chlorine dioxide. These results were then used to examine new bleaching technologies that will permit enhanced delignification while simultaneously reducing the generation of chlorinated organic compounds.

  4. Final phase I report and phase II work plan : QuickSite{reg_sign} investigation, Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2003-03-01

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated a grain storage facility approximately 1,100 ft north of Centralia (Figure 1.2). The CCC/USDA operated this facility from 1949 until 1971. None of the CCC/USDA structures remain. Two additional grain storage facilities currently exist in and near Centralia: the Nemaha County Co-op, approximately 4,000 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, and a private grain storage facility near the Don Morris residence, 3,500 ft north of the former CCC/USDA facility. Prior to 1986, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the grain storage industry to preserve grain. In April 1998, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) sampled the domestic well at the Don Morris residence near Centralia (Figure 1.2) as part of the CCC/USDA Private Well Sampling Program, which was initiated to determine whether carbon tetrachloride was present in domestic wells located near former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Kansas. Carbon tetrachloride was detected in the Morris well at 19.3 mg/L and confirmed at 25.4 mg/L, both concentrations above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 mg/L for carbon tetrachloride in drinking water. On the basis of the detection of carbon tetrachloride in the Morris well, the KDHE in August-September 1998 conducted preliminary investigations at the former CCC/USDA facility. For the details of previous investigations in the area and a summary of their findings, see the QuickSite{reg_sign} Phase I Work Plan for Centralia (Argonne 2002a). Because the KDHE found carbon tetrachloride at the former CCC/USDA facility at Centralia that might, in part, be linked to historical use of carbon tetrachloride-based grain fumigants at the facility, the CCC/USDA is conducting an environmental site investigation at Centralia. However, the KDHE established in 1998 that the probable groundwater

  5. Turbulence Investigation and Reproduction for Assisting Downstream Migrating Juvenile Salmonids, Part I of II, 2001-2002 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hotchkiss, Rollin H.

    2002-12-01

    Turbulence in gravel bed rivers plays a critical role in most stream processes including contaminant and nutrient transport, aquatic habitat selection, and natural channel design. While most hydraulic designs and fluid models are based on bulk velocity, migrating juvenile salmon experience and react to the temporally varied turbulent fluctuations. Without properly understanding and accounting for the continuous turbulent motions proper fishway design and guidance are impossible. Matching temporally varied flow to fish reactions is the key to guiding juvenile salmonids to safe passageways. While the ideal solution to fish guidance design would be to use specific fluid action-fish reaction mechanisms, such concrete cause and effect relations have not been established. One way to approach the problem of guidance is to hypothesize that in an environment lacking obvious bulk flow cues (like the reservoir environment), turbulent flow conditions similar to those experienced by juvenile salmonids in natural migration corridors will be attractive to juvenile salmonids. Proof of this hypothesis requires three steps: (1) gathering data on turbulence characteristics in natural migration corridors, (2) reproduction of the turbulence parameters in a controlled environment, and (3) testing the reproduced turbulence on actively migrating juvenile salmonids for increased passage efficiencies. The results from the third step have not been finalized, therefore this report will focus on understanding turbulent processes in gravel bed rivers and reproduction of turbulence in controlled environments for use in fish passage technologies. The purposes of this report are to (1) present data collected in natural gravel bed rivers, (2) present a simple method for reproduction of appropriate turbulence levels in a controlled environment, (3) compare these results to those from one prototype surface collector (PSC), and (4) discuss the implications on fish passage design.

  6. Final report : results of the 2006 investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA facility in Ramona, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-10-18

    The investigation reported here was conducted by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in 2006. The investigation addressed carbon tetrachloride contamination on the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility at Ramona, Kansas. The results clearly demonstrate that only minimal contamination is associated with the past use of carbon tetrachloride on the former CCC/USDA property. No soil contamination was detected at concentrations above Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) risk-based screening level (RBSL) Tier 2 standard of 200 {micro}g/kg for the soil-to-groundwater protection pathway. Carbon tetrachloride concentrations in groundwater above the RBSL and maximum contaminant level (MCL) value of 5.0 {micro}g/L were detected in only two samples, collected at adjacent locations on the southeast part of the property. The relatively low concentrations detected and the limited areal extent of the contamination demonstrate that no imminent threat exists on the former CCC/USDA property to warrant remediation. The soil and groundwater contamination detected on the former CCC/USDA property is clearly separate from contamination detected at off-site locations. The carbon tetrachloride and chloroform contamination in groundwater (at concentrations above the RBSL and MCL value) associated with past activities on the former CCC/USDA property is contained within the property boundaries. Data collected independently by the KDHE in 2006 validate these findings and, furthermore, provide additional evidence that the sources identified on the Co-op property (west of the former CCC/USDA property) are separate from the comparatively minor results of past activities on the former CCC/USDA property. The KDHE concluded in its 2006 report that the sources are separate and that the Co-op is the principally responsible party for the carbon tetrachloride contamination detected during its 2006 investigation.

  7. Investigation of the potential effects of underwater noise from petroleum-industry activities on feeding humpback whale behavior. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Malme, C.I.; Miles, P.R.; Tyack, P.; Clark, C.W.; Bird, J.E.

    1985-06-01

    An investigation was made of the potential effects of underwater noise from petroleum-industry activities on the behavior of feeding humpback whales in Frederick Sound and Stephens Passage, Alaska in August, 1984. Test sounds were a 100 cu. in. air gun and playbacks of recorded drillship, drilling platform, production platform, semi-submersible drill rig, and helicopter fly-over noise. Sound source levels and acoustic propagation losses were measured. The movement patterns of whales were determined by observations of whale-surfacing positions.

  8. Spectroscopic investigation of materials for frequency-agile laser systems. Final report, 15 January 1982-14 January 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    This research involves the use of laser-spectroscopy techniques such as four-wave mixing, multiphoton absorption, time-resolved site-selection spectroscopy, and holography to characterize dynamical optical processes such as energy transfer, exciton migration, radiation-less relaxation, and the photorefractive effect. In addition, a significant effort was spent in the synthesis and characterization of new types of materials for tunable laser applications. The materials investigated include alexandrite, titanium-doped sapphire, lithium niobate, neodymium pentaphosphate, rhodium-doped rubidium calcium fluoride, manganese silicate, and neodymium-doped garnet crystals and glasses.

  9. Hydrogen Compressor Reliability Investigation and Improvement. Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-13-514

    SciTech Connect

    Terlip, Danny

    2016-03-28

    Diaphragm compressors have become the primary source of on-site hydrogen compression for hydrogen fueling stations around the world. NREL and PDC have undertaken two studies aimed at improving hydrogen compressor operation and reducing the cost contribution to dispensed fuel. The first study identified the failure mechanisms associated with mechanical compression to reduce the maintenance and down-time. The second study will investigate novel station configurations to maximize hydrogen usage and compressor lifetime. This partnership will allow for the simulation of operations in the field and a thorough analysis of the component failure to improve the reliability of diaphragm compression.

  10. Final work plan : supplemental upward vapor intrusion investigation at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Hanover, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-12-15

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility at the northeastern edge of the city of Hanover, Kansas, from 1950 until the early 1970s. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In February 1998, trace to low levels of carbon tetrachloride (below the maximum contaminant level [MCL] of 5.0 {micro}g/L) were detected in two private wells near the former grain storage facility at Hanover, as part of a statewide USDA private well sampling program that was implemented by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) near former CCC/USDA facilities. In 2007, the CCC/USDA conducted near-surface soil sampling at 61 locations and also sampled indoor air at nine residences on or adjacent to its former Hanover facility to address the residents concerns regarding vapor intrusion. Low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected at four of the nine homes. The results were submitted to the KDHE in October 2007 (Argonne 2007). On the basis of the results, the KDHE requested sub-slab sampling and/or indoor air sampling (KDHE 2007). This Work Plan describes, in detail, the proposed additional scope of work requested by the KDHE and has been developed as a supplement to the comprehensive site investigation work plan that is pending (Argonne 2008). Indoor air samples collected previously from four homes at Hanover were shown to contain the carbon tetrachloride at low concentrations (Table 2.1). It cannot be concluded from these previous data that the source of the detected carbon tetrachloride is vapor intrusion attributable to former grain storage operations of the CCC/USDA at Hanover. The technical objective of the vapor intrusion investigation described here is to assess the risk to human health due to the potential for upward migration of carbon tetrachloride and

  11. Experimental investigation of PIC formation during the incineration of recovered CFC-11. Final report, July 1993-July 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Springsteen, B.; Ho, L.; Kryder, G.

    1994-09-01

    The report gives results of an investigation of the formation of products of incomplete combustion (PICs) during 'recovered' trichlorofluoromethane (CFC-11) incineration. Tests involved burning the recovered CFC-11 in a propane gas flame. Combustion gas samples were taken and analyzed for volatile organic compounds as well as polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/PCDF). Test results confirm that incineration can be used to effectively destroy recovered CFC-11; CFC destruction efficiencies of greater than 99.9999 (six nines) were consistently demonstrated for CFC-11-to-propane molar ratios of 0.66-0.6. Additionally, low levels were detected when sampling downstream of the flue gas scrubber. Results of a secondary goal of the study, to determine the fate of chlorine (Cl) and fluroine (F), were inconclusive.

  12. Solar flares and magnetospheric particles: Investigations based upon the ONR-602 and ONR-604 experiments. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wefel, J.P.

    1990-02-14

    The study of solar flares, and the interaction of solar flare radiations with the geospace environment, is one of the most fundamental investigations in space science. Involved are basic questions about the mechanism for energy generation in the flare region, the conversion of this energy into high energy charged particles, neutrons, x-rays and gamma rays, the interplanetary propagation of the particles to Earth, the access of these particles to the magnetosphere and the changes initiated in our local environment due to the solar flare. In the latter case, the solar particles are superposed upon an existing background of geomagnetically trapped and pseudo-trapped charged particles, which are themselves of fundamental importance in the dynamics of the geospace environment.

  13. Final work plan : investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Hanover, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-19

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility at the northeastern edge of the city of Hanover, Kansas, from 1950 until the early 1970s. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In February 1998, trace to low levels of carbon tetrachloride (below the maximum contaminant level [MCL] of 5.0 {micro}g/L) were detected in two private wells near the former grain storage facility at Hanover, as part of a statewide USDA private well sampling program that was implemented by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) near former CCC/USDA facilities. In April 2007, the CCC/USDA collected near-surface soil samples at 1.8-2 ft BGL (below ground level) at 61 locations across the former CCC/USDA facility. All soil samples were analyzed by the rigorous gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer analytical method (purge-and-trap method). No contamination was found in soil samples above the reporting limit of 10 {micro}g/kg. In July 2007, the CCC/USDA sampled indoor air at nine residences on or adjacent to its former facility to address the residents concerns regarding vapor intrusion. Low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected at four of the nine homes. Because carbon tetrachloride found in private wells and indoor air at the site might be linked to historical use of fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA is proposing to conduct an investigation to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination associated with the former facility. This investigation will be conducted in accordance with the intergovernmental agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency (FSA) of the USDA. The investigation at Hanover will be performed, on behalf of the CCC/USDA, by the Environmental Science

  14. Final Technical Report: Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Transport Control via Shaping of Radial Plasma Flow Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Eugenio

    2014-05-02

    The strong coupling between the different physical variables involved in the plasma transport phenomenon and the high complexity of its dynamics call for a model-based, multivariable approach to profile control where those predictive models could be exploited. The overall objective of this project has been to extend the existing body of work by investigating numerically and experimentally active control of unstable fluctuations, including fully developed turbulence and the associated cross-field particle transport, via manipulation of flow profiles in a magnetized laboratory plasma device. Fluctuations and particle transport can be monitored by an array of electrostatic probes, and Ex B flow profiles can be controlled via a set of biased concentric ring electrodes that terminate the plasma column. The goals of the proposed research have been threefold: i- to develop a predictive code to simulate plasma transport in the linear HELCAT (HELicon-CAThode) plasma device at the University of New Mexico (UNM), where the experimental component of the proposed research has been carried out; ii- to establish the feasibility of using advanced model-based control algorithms to control cross-field turbulence-driven particle transport through appropriate manipulation of radial plasma flow profiles, iii- to investigate the fundamental nonlinear dynamics of turbulence and transport physics. Lehigh University (LU), including Prof. Eugenio Schuster and one full-time graduate student, has been primarily responsible for control-oriented modeling and model-based control design. Undergraduate students have also participated in this project through the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) program. The main goal of the LU Plasma Control Group has been to study the feasibility of controlling turbulence-driven transport by shaping the radial poloidal flow profile (i.e., by controlling flow shear) via biased concentric ring electrodes.

  15. Investigation and development of alternative methods for shale oil processing and analysis. Final technical report, October 1979--April 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.A.

    1998-06-01

    Oil shale, a carbonaceous rock which occurs abundantly in the earth`s crust, has been investigated for many years as an alternate source of fuel oil. The insoluble organic matter contained in such shales is termed {open_quotes}Kerogen{close_quotes} from the Greek meaning oil or oil forming. The kerogen in oil shale breaks down into oil-like products when subjected to conditions simulating destructive distillation. These products have been the subject of extensive investigations by several researchers and many of the constituents of shale oil have been identified. (1) Forsman (2) estimates that the kerogen content of the earth is roughly 3 {times} 10{sup 15} tons as compared to total coal reserves of about 5 {times} 10{sup 12}. Although the current cost per barrel estimate for commercial production of shale oil is higher than that of fossil oil, as our oil reserves continue to dwindle, shale oil technology will become more and more important. When oil shale is heated, kerogen is said to undergo chemical transformation to usable oil in two steps (3): Kerogen (in oil shale) 300-500{degrees}C bitumen. Crude shale oil and other products. The crude shale oil so obtained differs from fossil oil in that: (1) kerogen is thought to have been produced from the aging of plant matter over many years; (2) shale oil has a higher nitrogen content than fossil oil; (3) non-hydrocarbons are present to a much greater extent in shale oil; and (4) the hydrocarbons in shale oil are much more unsaturated than those in fossil oil (petroleum).

  16. Characterize and explore potential sites and prepare research and development plan (site investigation study). Final draft. Task 2. Milestone report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-01

    A specific research and development plan to investigate the behavior and suitability of aquifers as compressed air energy storage (CAES) sites is presented. The proposed effort will evaluate present uncertainties in the performance of the underground energy storage subsystem and its impact on above ground plant design and cost. The project is planned to provide the utility industry with a quantitative basis for confidence that financial commitment to a demonstration plant and subsequent expansion is justified and poses acceptable risks. Activities in Phase II of a 5-phase overall CAES development program are reported. Information is included on the development of field testing specifications and schedules; selection of specific site for the conceptual design; development plan and schedule for the media site; development of analytical models of aquifer airflow; and well drilling requirements. As a result of these studies 14 sites in Illinois and Indiana were evaluated, 7 were ranked for suitability for CAES, and 4 were selected for possible use in the field testing program. Test procedures, the mathematical models and drilling requirments were developed. (LCL)

  17. Investigation of microscopic radiation damage in waste forms using ODNMR and AEM techniques. (EMSP Project Final Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.; Luo, J.; Beitz, J.; Li, S.; Williams, C.; Zhorin, V.

    2000-04-21

    This project seeks to understand the microscopic effects of radiation damage in nuclear waste forms. The authors' approach to this challenge encompasses studies of ceramics and glasses containing short-lived alpha- and beta-emitting actinides with electron microscopy, laser and X-ray spectroscopic techniques, and computational modeling and simulations. In order to obtain information on long-term radiation effects on waste forms, much of the effort is to investigate {alpha}-decay induced microscopic damage in 18-year old samples of crystalline yttrium and lutetium orthophosphates that initially contained {approximately} 1(wt)% of the alpha-emitting isotope {sup 244}Cm (18.1 y half life). Studies also are conducted on borosilicate glasses that contain {sup 244}Cm, {sup 241}Am, or {sup 249}Bk, respectively. The authors attempt to gain clear insights into the properties of radiation-induced structure defects and the consequences of collective defect-environment interactions, which are critical factors in assessing the long-term performance of high-level nuclear waste forms.

  18. INVESTIGATION ON DURABILITY AND REACTIVITY OF PROMISING METAL OXIDE SORBENTS DURING SULFIDATION AND REGENERATION. QUARTERLY AND FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. KWON

    1998-08-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at high pressures and high temperatures. Metal oxides such as zinc titanate oxides, zinc ferrite oxide, copper oxide, manganese oxide and calcium oxide, were found to be promising sorbents in comparison with other removal methods such as membrane separations and reactive membrane separations. Some metal oxide sorbents exhibited the quite favorable performance in terms of attrition resistance and sulfur capacity. Experiments on removal reaction of H{sub 2}S from coal gas mixtures with formulated metal oxide sorbents were conducted in a batch reactor or a differential reactor. The objectives of this research project are to formulate promising metal oxide sorbents for removal of sulfur from coal gas mixtures, to find initial reaction kinetics for the metal oxide-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to obtain effects of hydrogen, nitrogen and moisture on dynamic absorption and equilibrium absorption at various absorption temperatures. Promising durable metal oxide sorbents with high-sulfur-absorbing capacity were formulated by mixing active metal oxide powders with inert metal oxide powders, and calcining these powder mixtures. The Research Triangle Institute (RTI), a sub-contractor of this research project, will also prepare promising metal oxide sorbents for this research project, plan experiments on removal of sulfur compounds from coal gases with metal oxide, and review experimental results.

  19. Surface chemistry investigation of colloid transport in packed beds. Final report, August 1, 1989--July 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, T.M.

    1996-12-31

    The importance of colloids as co-transport agents for pollutants in subsurface systems hinges on the extent to which electrostatic or other sources of repulsive colloid-collector interactions inhibit their filtration. When electrostatic interactions are favorable, for example when the colloid and groundwater media have opposite charge, colloids may be expected to travel only a few centimeters in saturated porous media. Repulsive electrostatic interactions between colloids and aquifer media with the same charge sign are postulated to significantly mobilize particles. As it happens, however, theories describing particle filtration from first principles, i.e., DLVO (Derjagin and Landau, Verwey and Overbeek) theory, dramatically underestimate filtration rates when colloid-collector interactions are electrostatically repulsive. One of the primary objectives of the project was to experimentally investigate potential reasons for the historical lack of agreement between particle filtration models based on DLVO theory and observed particle deposition rates. An important hypothesis of the study was to test the validity of the assumption of surface homogeneity, as required by these models. The approach was to focus on collector surfaces that were commonly used as model systems, e.g., glass beads and quartz sand. Laboratory-scale column filtration experiments were conducted with colloidal polystyrene latex spheres. Collector surface preparation and cleaning approaches were examined, as well as the effects of solution chemistry.

  20. Experimental and theoretical investigation of operational and survivability issues in thermal radiators for thermionic space nuclear power systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Keddy, M.D.

    1994-03-15

    Heat pipes are a promising candidate for spacecraft radiators. This report describes a program designed to investigate the mass migration phenomenon in heat pipes. The program involved experiments to observe and measure the mass migration rates in both high and low operating temperature heat pipes. The low-temperature experiments were intended to simulate the operation of high-temperature, liquid metal heat pipes. Octadecane was the selected low-temperature working fluid. It is a paraffin and exhibits some of the characteristics of liquid metal working fluids. Sodium was the working fluid used in the high temperature experiment. A one-dimensional compressible flow model was developed for describing the hydrodynamics of rarefied vapor flow in heat pipe condensers. This model was compared with experimental data for the low-temperature octadecane heat pipes and the high-temperature sodium heat pipe. The model was found to satisfactorily predict the temperature profiles and location of freeze-fronts for the low-temperature heat pipes. Mass migration rate predictions using the model were satisfactory for the low-temperature heat pipes as well. However, the mass migration prediction for the high-temperature, sodium heat pipe was not in agreement with experimental data. An analytical model which accounts for property variations in the radial as well as longitudinal directions is recommended. A one-dimensional model was unsatisfactory for predicting mass migration rates in liquid metal heat pipes.

  1. Investigation of Advanced Processed Single-Crystal Turbine Blade Alloys. Final report, 16 December 1991-31 December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, B.J.; Biondo, C.M.; Deluca, D.P.

    1995-12-01

    This investigation studied the influence of thermal processing and microstructure on the mechanical properties of the single-crystal, nickel-based superalloys PWA 1482 and PWA 1484. The objective of the program was to develop an improved single-crystal turbine blade alloy that is specifically tailored for use in hydrogen fueled rocket engine turbopumps. High-gradient casting, hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and alternate heat treatment (HT) processing parameters were developed to produce pore-free, eutectic-free microstructures with different (gamma)` precipitate morphologies. Test materials were cast in high thermal gradient solidification (greater than 30 C/cm (137 F/in.)) casting furnaces for reduced dendrite arm spacing, improved chemical homogeneity, and reduced interdendritic pore size. The HIP processing was conducted in 40 cm (15.7 in. ) diameter production furnaces using a set of parameters selected from a trial matrix study. Metallography was conducted on test samples taken from each respective trial run to characterize the as-HIP microstructure. Post-HIP alternate HT processes were developed for each of the two alloys. The goal of the alternate HT processing was to fully solution the eutectic gamma/(gamma)` phase islands and to develop a series of modified (gamma)` morphologies for subsequent characterization testing. This was accomplished by slow cooling through the (gamma)` solvus at controlled rates to precipitate volume fractions of large (gamma)`. Post-solution alternate HT parameters were established for each alloy providing additional volume fractions of finer precipitates. Screening tests included tensile, high-cycle fatigue (HCF), smooth and notched low-cycle fatigue (LCF), creep, and fatigue crack growth evaluations performed in air and high pressure (34.5 MPa (5 ksi)) hydrogen at room and elevated temperature.

  2. Kinematically complete final state investigations of molecular photodissociation: two- and three-body decay of laser-prepared H 3 3 s 2 A 1 '

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galster, U.; Kaminski, P.; Beckert, M.; Helm, H.; Müller, U.

    2001-12-01

    We have performed kinematically complete investigations of molecular photodissociation of triatomic hydrogen in a fast beam translational spectrometer recently built in Freiburg. The apparatus allows us to investigate laser-induced dissociation of neutral molecules into two, three, or more neutral products. The fragments are detected in coincidence and their vectorial momenta in the center-of-mass frame are determined. We demonstrate the potential of the method at the fragmentation of the 3 s 2A1'(N = 1, K = 0) state of triatomic hydrogen. In this state, three-body decay into ground state hydrogen atoms H+H+H, two-body predissociation into H+H2(v, J), and photoemission to the H3 ground state surface with subsequent two-body decay are competing channels. In the case of two-body predissociation, we determine the rovibrational population in the H2(v, J) fragment. The vibrational distribution of H2 is compared with approximate theoretical predictions. For three-body decay, we measure the six-fold differential photodissociation cross-section. To determine accurate final state distributions, the geometric collection efficiency of the apparatus is calculated by a Monte Carlo simulation, and the raw data are corrected for apparatus efficiency. The final state momentum distribution shows pronounced correlation patterns which are characteristic for the dissociation mechanism. For a three-body decay process with a discrete kinetic energy release we have developed a novel data reduction procedure based on the detection of two fragments. The final state distribution determined by this independent method agrees extremely well with that observed in the triple-coincidence data. In addition, this method allows us to fully explore the phase space of the final state and to determine the branching ratios between the two- and three-body decay processes.

  3. Investigation of a sulfur reduction technique for mild gasification char. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, R.A.

    1993-12-31

    The objective of this program is to investigate the desulfurization of mild gasification char using H{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} mixtures. Mild gasification of coal produces char, liquids, and gases at 1000{degrees}--1500{degrees}F and near-ambient pressure. Char, comprising 60--70% of the product, can be used to make high-value form coke for steel making and foundries. A sulfur content below 1 wt% is desirable, and char from high-sulfur Illinois coals must be upgraded to meet this criterion. In the first year of the program, Illinois No. 6 chars were treated in a batch fluidized bed with H{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} blends containing 9--24 vol% CH{sub 4} at 1100{degrees}--1600{degrees}F and 50--200 psig. Sulfur removals up to 92.5 wt% were obtained, and the char desulfurization susceptibility was related to porosity, density, and carbon crystallite size. During the second year, the relationships among mild gasification parameters, char properties, char desulfurization susceptibility, and form coke properties were studied. Acid washing of coal to remove Ca and Fe was explored for its effect on subsequent sulfur removal, and secondary desulfurization of form coke produced from the desulfurized chars was studied. Desulfurization tests of entrained and fluidized-bed reactor chars from IBC-105 coal were completed. Acid-washing of the coal prior to mild gasification or the char prior to desulfurization increased its susceptibility to desulfurization, with sulfur content reduced to as low as 0.10 wt % dry char. Fluidized-bed chars were easier to desulfurize than entrained chars, with or without acid-washing. Form coke briquettes were prepared from selected chars and mild gasification pitch binder, and then carbonized under both N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} atmospheres. carbonization in H{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} removed additional sulfur from the form coke. Adequate tensile strength (837 psi) was achieved in briquettes with 1.2 wt% sulfur made from desulfurized char.

  4. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. Paul Drake

    2001-11-30

    This final report describes work involving 22 investigators from 11 institutions to explore the dynamics present in supernova explosions by means of experiments on the Omega laser. The specific experiments emphasized involved the unstable expansion of a spherical capsule and the coupling of perturbations at a first interface to a second interface by means of a strong shock. Both effects are present in supernovae. The experiments were performed at Omega and the computer simulations were undertaken at several institutions. B139

  5. Systematic investigation of drip stains on apparel fabrics: The effects of prior-laundering, fibre content and fabric structure on final stain appearance.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Therese C; Taylor, Michael C; Kieser, Jules A; Carr, Debra J; Duncan, W

    2015-05-01

    Bloodstain pattern analysis is the investigation of blood deposited at crime scenes and the interpretation of that pattern. The surface that the blood gets deposited onto could distort the appearance of the bloodstain. The interaction of blood and apparel fabrics is in its infancy, but the interaction of liquids and apparel fabrics has been well documented and investigated in the field of textile science (e.g. the processes of wetting and wicking of fluids on fibres, yarns and fabrics). A systematic study on the final appearance of drip stains on torso apparel fabrics (100% cotton plain woven, 100% polyester plain woven, blend of polyester and cotton plain woven and 100% cotton single jersey knit) that had been laundered for six, 26 and 52 cycles prior to testing was investigated in the paper. The relationship between drop velocity (1.66±0.50m/s, 4.07±0.03m/s, 5.34±0.18m/s) and the stain characteristics (parent stain area, axes 1 and 2 and number of satellite stains) for each fabric was examined using analysis of variance. The experimental design and effect of storing blood were investigated on a reference sample, which indicated that the day (up to five days) at which the drops were generated did not affect the bloodstain. The effect of prior-laundering (six, 26 and 52 laundering cycles), fibre content (cotton vs. polyester vs. blend) and fabric structure (plain woven vs. single jersey knit) on the final appearance of the bloodstain were investigated. Distortion in the bloodstains produced on non-laundered fabrics indicated the importance of laundering fabrics to remove finishing treatments before conducting bloodstain experiments. For laundered fabrics, both the cotton fabrics and the blend had a circular to oval stain appearance, while the polyester fabric had a circular appearance with evidence of spread along the warp and weft yarns, which resulted in square-like stains at the lowest drop velocity. A significant (p<0.001) increase in the stain size on

  6. Investigational new drug safety reporting requirements for human drug and biological products and safety reporting requirements for bioavailability and bioequivalence studies in humans. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2010-09-29

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations governing safety reporting requirements for human drug and biological products subject to an investigational new drug application (IND). The final rule codifies the agency's expectations for timely review, evaluation, and submission of relevant and useful safety information and implements internationally harmonized definitions and reporting standards. The revisions will improve the utility of IND safety reports, reduce the number of reports that do not contribute in a meaningful way to the developing safety profile of the drug, expedite FDA's review of critical safety information, better protect human subjects enrolled in clinical trials, subject bioavailability and bioequivalence studies to safety reporting requirements, promote a consistent approach to safety reporting internationally, and enable the agency to better protect and promote public health.

  7. Investigation of radon, thoron, and their progeny near the earth`s surface. Final report, 1 January 1994--31 December 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Schery, S.D.; Wasiolek, P.T.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report for DOE Grant DE-FG03-94ER6178, covering a performance period of 1 January 1994 through 31 December 1997. The DOE award amount for this period was $547,495. The objective of the project as stated in its proposal was {open_quotes}to improve our understanding of the physical processes controlling the concentration of radon, thoron, and their progeny in the atmospheric environment.{close_quotes} The original project was directed at developing underlying science that would help with evaluation of the health hazard from indoor radon in the United States and implementation of corrective measures that might be employed to reduce the health hazard. As priorities within the Office of Health and Environment (OHER) changed, and the radon research program was phased out, emphasis of the project was shifted somewhat to be also relevant to other interests of the OHER, namely global pollution and climate change and pollution resulting from energy production. This final report is brief, since by reference it can direct the reader to the comprehensive research publications that have been generated by the project. In section 2, we summarize the main accomplishments of the project and reference the primary publications. There were seven students who received support from the project and their names are listed in section 3. One of these students (Fred Yarger, Ph.D. candidate) continues to work on research initiated through this project. No post-docs received support from the project, although one of the co-principal investigators (Dr. Piotr Wasiolek) received the majority of his salary from the project. The project also provided part-time support for a laboratory manager (Dr. Maryla Wasiolek). Section 4 lists chronologically the reports and publications resulting from the project (references 1 through 12), and the Appendix provides abstracts of major publications and reports.

  8. The feasibility of epidemiologic investigations of the health effects of low-level ionizing radiation. Final report, 3 July 1979-30 October 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Dreyer, N.A.; Kohn, H.I.; Clapp, R.W.; Covino, S.J. Jr.; Fahey, F.H.

    1980-11-01

    This is the final report of 'A Study to Determine the Feasibility of Conducting Epidemiologic Investigations of the Health Effects of Low-Level Ionizing Radiation', begun July 3, 1979. The study defines low-level ionizing radiation as a single dose of 5 rem (whole-body) or less and chronic doses that accumulate at the rate of less than 5 rem per year. The objective of this project was to determine whether or not further epidemiologic research (either expansion of current projects or initiation of new ones) would be useful at this time for quantitating the health effects due to low-level ionizing radiation. No outstanding candidate population is recommended for study since, even if the largest available populations are studied, the chance of finding a definite positive result is very small. However, the decision to conduct a study must rest heavily on social and political considerations rather than on purely scientific ones. Therefore, four populations are tentatively proposed for prospective cohort studies, with nested case-control studies as needed. Overall, the most practical approach would be to conduct a study through a national worker registry, with cancer as the endpoint of interest.

  9. Investigation of a GaAlAs Mach-Zehnder electro-optic modulator. M.S. Thesis. Final Contractor Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Materna, David M.

    1987-01-01

    A GaAs modulator operating at 0.78 to 0.88 micron wavelength has the potential to be integrated with a GaAs/GaAlAs laser diode for an integrated fiber-optic transmitter. A travelling-wave Mach-Zehnder modulator using the electro-optic effect of GaAs and operating at a wavelength of 0.82 microns has been investigated for the first time. A four layer Strip-loaded ridge optical waveguide has been analyzed using the effective index method and single mode waveguides have been designed. The electro-optic effect of GaAs has also been analyzed and a modulator using the geometry producing the maximum phase shift has been designed. A coplanar transmission line structure is used in an effort to tap the potentially higher bandwidth of travelling-wave electrodes. The modulator bandwidth has been calculated at 11.95 GHz with a required drive power of 2.335 Watts for full intensity modulation. Finally, some preliminary experiments were performed to characterize a fabrication process for the modulator.

  10. Investigation of a GaAlAs Mach-Zehnder electro-optic modulator. M.S. Thesis. Final Contractor Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Materna, David M.

    1987-01-01

    A GaAs modulator operating at 0.78 to 0.88 micron wavelength has the potential to be integrated with a GaAs/GaAlAs laser diode for an integrated fiber-optic transmitter. A travelling-wave Mach-Zehnder modulator using the electro-optic effect of GaAs and operating at a wavelength of 0.82 microns has been investigated for the first time. A four layer Strip-loaded ridge optical waveguide has been analyzed using the effective index method and single mode waveguides have been designed. The electro-optic effect of GaAs has also been analyzed and a modulator using the geometry producing the maximum phase shift has been designed. A coplanar transmission line structure is used in an effort to tap the potentially higher bandwidth of travelling-wave electrodes. The modulator bandwidth has been calculated at 11.95 GHz with a required drive power of 2.335 Watts for full intensity modulation. Finally, some preliminary experiments were performed to characterize a fabrication process for the modulator.

  11. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schuur, Edward; Luo, Yiqi

    2016-12-01

    This final grant report is a continuation of the final grant report submitted for DE-SC0006982 as the Principle Investigator (Schuur) relocated from the University of Florida to Northern Arizona University. This report summarizes the original project goals, as well as includes new project activities that were completed in the final period of the project.

  12. What Should Make Up a Final Mark for a Course? An Investigation into the Academic Performance of First Year Bioscience Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, Colleen T.

    2006-01-01

    Performance of individual students in a tertiary level course is usually reflected in a final mark that determines their progress and transfer to higher courses. The contributions of different types of assessment to this final mark vary greatly within and between subjects in and between institutions. Performance of students in a first year course,…

  13. What Should Make Up a Final Mark for a Course? An Investigation into the Academic Performance of First Year Bioscience Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, Colleen T.

    2006-01-01

    Performance of individual students in a tertiary level course is usually reflected in a final mark that determines their progress and transfer to higher courses. The contributions of different types of assessment to this final mark vary greatly within and between subjects in and between institutions. Performance of students in a first year course,…

  14. Relationships between high oxygen extraction fraction in the acute stage and final infarction in reversible middle cerebral artery occlusion: an investigation in anesthetized baboons with positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Young, A R; Sette, G; Touzani, O; Rioux, P; Derlon, J M; MacKenzie, E T; Baron, J C

    1996-11-01

    Studies in humans suggest that regions that show maximal increases in brain oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) in the hours following an ischemic episode are those most vulnerable for infarction and are often, although not always, associated with the final site of infarction. To clarify this issue, we followed the hemodynamic and metabolic characteristics of regions with an initially maximally increased OEF and compared them with the ultimately infarcted region in an experimental stroke model. Positron emission tomography (PET) was used to obtain functional images of the brain prior to and following reversible unilateral middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in 11 anesthetized baboons. To model early reperfusion, the clips were removed 6 h after occlusion. Successive measurements of regional CBF (rCBF), regional CMRO2 (rCMRO2), regional cerebral blood volume, and regional OEF (rOEF) were performed during the acute (up to 2 days) and chronic (> 15 days) stage. Late magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans (co-registered with PET) were obtained to identify infarction. Reversible MCAO produced an MRI-measurable infarction in 6 of 11 baboons; the others had no evidence of ischemic damage. Histological analysis confirmed the results of the MRI investigation but failed to show any evidence of cortical ischemic damage. The lesion was restricted to the head of the caudate nucleus, internal capsule, and putamen. The infarct volume obtained was 0.58 +/- 0.31 cm3. The infarcts were situated in the deep MCA territory, while the area of initially maximally increased OEF was within the cortical mantle. The mean absolute rCBF value in the infarct region of interest (ROI) was not significantly lower than in the highest-OEF ROI until 1-2 days post-MCAO. Cerebral metabolism in the deep MCA territory was always significantly lower than that of the cortical mantle; decreases in CMRO2 in the former region were evident as early as 1 h post-MCAO. In the cortical mantle, the rOEF was

  15. An experimental investigation into the extent social evaluation anxiety impairs performance in simulation-based learning environments amongst final-year undergraduate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Mills, Brennen; Carter, Owen; Rudd, Cobie; Claxton, Louise; O'Brien, Robert

    2016-10-01

    While numerous theoretical and conceptual models suggest social evaluation anxiety would likely influence performance in simulation-based learning environments, there has been surprisingly little research to investigate the extent to which this is true. Final-year Bachelor of Science (Nursing) students (N=70) were randomly assigned to complete one of three clinically identical simulation-based scenarios designed to elicit varying levels of social evaluation anxiety by manipulating the number of other people present with the student during the simulation (1, 2 or 3 others). Rises in acute stress were measured via continuous heart-rate and salivary cortisol. Performance scores were derived from the average of two independent raters' using a structured clinical checklist (/16). Statistically different increases were found within the first minute of the simulation between those students with one versus three other people in the room (+4.13 vs. +14.01beats-per-minute respectively, p=0.01) and salivary cortisol measures suggested significantly different changes in anxiety between these groups (-0.05 vs. +0.11μg/dL respectively, p=0.02). Independent assessments suggested students with only one other person accompanying them in the simulation significantly outperformed those accompanied by three others (12.95 vs. 10.67 respectively, p=0.03). Students accompanied by greater numbers during simulations experienced measurably greater anxiety and measurably poorer performances. These results demonstrate the ability to manipulate social evaluation anxiety within high-fidelity simulation training of undergraduates in order to help students better acclimatise to stressful events prior to practising in real clinical settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Investigations of the dynamics and growth of insulator films by high resolution helium atom scattering. Final report, May 1, 1985--April 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Safron, S.A.; Skofronick, J.G.

    1997-07-01

    Over the twelve years of this grant from the U.S. Department of Energy, DE-FG05-85ER45208, the over-reaching aims of this work have been to explore and to attempt to understand the fundamental physics and chemistry of surfaces and interfaces. The instrument we have employed m in this work is high-resolution helium atom scattering (HAS) which we have become even more convinced is an exceptionally powerful and useful tool for surface science. One can follow the evolution of the development and progress of the experiments that we have carried out by the evolution of the proposal titles for each of the four three-year periods. At first, m in 1985-1988, the main objective of this grant was to construct the HAS instrument so that we could begin work on the surface vibrational dynamics of crystalline materials; the title was {open_quotes}Helium Atom-Surface Scattering Apparatus for Studies of Crystalline Surface Dynamics{close_quotes}. Then, as we became more interested m in the growth of films and interfaces the title m in 1988-1991 became {open_quotes}Helium Atom Surface Spectroscopy: Surface Lattice Dynamics of Insulators, Metal and Metal Overlayers{close_quotes}. In 1991-1994, we headed even more m in this direction, and also recognized that we should focus more on insulator materials as very few techniques other than helium atom scattering could be applied to insulators without causing surface damage. Thus, the proposal title became {open_quotes}Helium Atom-Surface Scattering: Surface Dynamics of Insulators, Overlayers and Crystal Growth{close_quotes}. M in the final period of this grant the title ended up {open_quotes}Investigations of the Dynamics and Growth of Insulator Films by High Resolution Helium Atom Scattering{close_quotes} m in 1994-1997. The list of accomplishments briefly discussed in this report are: tests of the shell model; multiphoton scattering; physisorbed monolayer films; other surface phase transitions; and surface magnetic effects.

  17. An Investigation of the Cost-Benefits and Consumer Outcomes Related to Competency Based Education In a Community College Nursing Program. Final Report, 1973-74.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mount Hood Community Coll., Gresham, OR.

    Three final reports on a competency-based computer-assisted nursing education program at Mt. Hood Community College include the following: (1) the examination and refinement of curricular outcomes; (2) cost analysis of the program relative to nursing education, learner benefits, and effectiveness; and (3) an examination of the relationship between…

  18. Construction of an Algorithm for Stem Recognition in the Hebrew Language. Application of Hebrew Morphology to Computer Techniques for Investigation of Word Roots. Final Report, Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazewnik, Grainom

    This document describes developments in the project since the first part of the final report (ED 019 668) was published. A noun reference dictionary was compiled in two sections: verbal derivatives (AL 002 269 and 270) and non-verbal derivatives (AL 002 267 and 268). There are a total of some 18,000 entries. All parts of speech except verbs were…

  19. Installation restoration program site investigation. Gulfport Field Training Site, Mississippi Air National Guard Gulfport-Biloxi Regional Airport Gulfport, Mississippi. Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-01

    Site Investigation Report, Volume: 1. A Site Investigation was performed at three sites at the Combat Readiness Training Center, Gulfport-Bolixi. The three sites investigated are the: Former Fire Training Area (Site 1), the Former JP-4 Bulk Storage Area, Mill Road (Site 2), and the Motor Pool Above-Ground Diesel Fuel Storage Tank Area (Site 3). The findings of this investigation recommended further investigation at the Fire Training Area and the JP-4 Bulk Storage Tank. At Site 3 the levels of contamination did not represent a risk to human health or the environment; therefore, no further action was recommended.

  20. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wessels, B. W.

    2002-08-02

    Final report for program on the study of structure and properties of epitaxial oxide films. The defect structure of epitaxial oxide thin films was investigated. Both binary and complex oxides were studied. Epitaxial oxides were synthesized by organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD). This technique has been found to be highly versatile for the synthesis of a wide range of epitaxial oxide including dielectrics, ferroelectrics and high T{sub c} superconductors. Systems investigated include the binary oxides ZnO and TiO{sub 2} and ferroelectric oxides BaTiO{sub 3}, BaSrTiO{sub 3} and KNbO{sub 3}. Techniques used to evaluate the defect structure included deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), photocapacitance spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. High purity, stoichiometric oxide films were deposited and their defect structure evaluated. Epitaxial ZnO was deposited at temperatures as low as 250 C. PL indicated only near band edge ultraviolet emission showing that both extrinsic and intrinsic point defects could be significantly lowered in OMCVD derived thin films compared to that of the bulk. This presumably was a result of low deposition temperatures and high purity starting materials. Ferroelectric oxides epitaxial thin films of BaTiO{sub 3} and the solid solution BaSrTiO{sub 3} were synthesized and the defect structure determined. Photocapacitance spectroscopy was developed to quantify electrically active defects in the oxides. Defects with concentrations as low as 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} were observed and their properties determined. A new model was developed for the electronic transport properties of intrinsic and extrinsic BaTiO{sub 3}. A transport model was proposed whereby conduction in La doped films occurs via hopping in localized states within a pseudogap formed between a lower Hubbard band and the conduction band edge. The influence of the size effect on the ferroelectric phase transition in the thin films was investigated. The

  1. FINAL PROJECT REPORT DOE Early Career Principal Investigator Program Project Title: Developing New Mathematical Models for Multiphase Flows Based on a Fundamental Probability Density Function Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar Subramaniam

    2009-04-01

    This final project report summarizes progress made towards the objectives described in the proposal entitled “Developing New Mathematical Models for Multiphase Flows Based on a Fundamental Probability Density Function Approach”. Substantial progress has been made in theory, modeling and numerical simulation of turbulent multiphase flows. The consistent mathematical framework based on probability density functions is described. New models are proposed for turbulent particle-laden flows and sprays.

  2. United States Air Force 611th air support group, 611th Civil Engineer Squadron, Tin City Long Range Radar Station, Alaska final remedial investigation/feasibility study. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-30

    This Final Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study describes the work performed; explains project objectives; and presents data collected during project activities, results, and conclusions for the Installation Restoration Program at Tin City Longe Range Radar Station, Alaska. The report describes the risks posed by the site and gives the basis for selecting remedies to mitigate the risks.

  3. Final report : results of the 2006-2007 investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA facility in Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-08-28

    The 2006-2007 investigation of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform contamination at Barnes, Kansas, was conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory implemented the investigation on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The overall goal of the investigation was to establish criteria for monitoring leading to potential site reclassification. The investigation objectives were to (1) determine the hydraulic gradient near the former CCC/USDA facility, (2) delineate the downgradient carbon tetrachloride plume, and (3) design and implement an expanded monitoring network at Barnes (Argonne 2006a).

  4. Remedial investigation and feasibility study Point Lonely Radar Installation, Alaska. Volume 1. Appendices a - c. Final report, January 1995-April 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report presents the findings of Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies at sites located at the Point Lonely radar installation in northern Alaska. The sites were characterized based on sampling and analyses conducted during Remedial Investigation activities performed during August and September 1993.

  5. Installation restoration program site investigation. Gulfport Field Training Site, Mississippi Air National Guard Gulfport-Biloxi Regional Airport Gulfport, Mississippi. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1992-12-01

    Site Investigation Report, Volume: 2. A Site Investigation was performed at 3 sites at the Combat Readiness Training Center, Gulfport-Bolixi. The 3 sites investigated are the: Former Fire Training Area (Site 1), the Former JP-4 Bulk Storage Area, Mill Road (Site 2), and the Motor Pool Above-Ground Diesel Fuel Storage Tank Area (Site 3). The findings of this investigation recommended further investigation at the Fire Training Area and the JP-4 Bulk Storage Tank. At Site 3 the levels of contamination did not represent a risk to human health or the environment; therefore, no further action was recommended. Volume two of this report consisted of the following Appendixes: Site Photographs (A), Well Inventory (B), Boring Logs (C), CSL Technical Memorandum (D), Data Review and Validation (E), GPS Memorandum (F), Level C Analytical Data Summary Tables (G), Slug Test (H), Special-Status Species (I), and Representative Species of Less Mobile Fish and Wildlife (J).

  6. Evaluation of the geologic relations and seismotectonic stability of the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada Nuclear Waste Site Investigation (NNWSI); Final report, January 1, 1987--June 30, 1988: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1988-10-01

    This report provides a summary of progress for the project ``Evaluation of the Geologic Relations and Seismotectonic Stability of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nevada Nuclear Waste Site Investigation (NNWSI)`` for the eighteen month period of January 1, 1987 to June 10, 1988. This final report was preceded by the final report for the initial six month period, July 1, 1986 to December 31, 1986 (submitted on January 25, 1987, and revised in June 1987.) Quaternary Tectonics, Geochemical, Mineral Deposits, Vulcanic Geology, Seismology, Tectonics, Neotectonics, Remote Sensing, Geotechnical Assessments, Geotechnical Rock Mass Assessments, Basinal Studies, and Strong Ground Motion.

  7. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gurney, Kevin R.

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  8. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    DeTar, Carleton

    2012-12-10

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  9. United States Air Force 611th Air Support Group Civil Engineering Squadron, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Remedial investigation and feasibility study Point Lay Radar Installation, Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karmi, S.

    1996-03-04

    The United States Air Force (Air Force) has prepared this Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) report to present the results of RI/FS activities at four sites located at the Point Lay radar installation. The remedial investigation (RI) field activities were conducted at the Point Lay radar installation during the summer of 1993. The four sites at Point Lay were investigated because they were suspected of being contaminated with hazardous substances. RI activities were conducted using methods and procedures specified in the RI/FS Work Plan, Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP), and Health and Safety Plan.

  10. Environmental investigations at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and surrounding area, McCracken County, Kentucky: Volume 1 -- Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-01

    This report details the results of four studies into environmental and cultural resources on and near the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) located in Western Kentucky in McCracken County, approximately 10 miles west of Paducah, KY. The area investigated includes the PGDP facility proper, additional area owned by DOE under use permit to the Western Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA), area owned by the Commonwealth of Kentucky that is administered by the WKWMA, area owned by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Metropolis Lake State Nature preserve and some privately held land. DOE requested the assistance and support of the US Army Engineer District, Nashville (CEORN) in conducting various environmental investigations of the area. The US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station (WES) provided technical support to the CEORN for environmental investigations of (1) wetland resources, (2) threatened or endangered species and habitats, and (3) cultural resources. A floodplain investigation was conducted by CEORN.

  11. United States Air Force 611th Air Support Group/Civil Engineering Squadron Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Remedial investigation and feasibility study. Bullen Point Radar Installation, Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karmi, S.

    1996-03-18

    The United States Air Force (Air Force) has prepared this Remedial investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) report as part of the Installation Restoration Program (IRP) to present results of RI/FS activities at five sites at the Bullen Point radar installation. The IRP provides for investigating, quantifying, and remediating environmental contamination from past waste management activities at Air Force installations throughout the United States.

  12. United States Air Force 611th Civil Engineer Squadron, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Final remedial investigation report, Galena Airport and Campion Air Station, Alaska. Volume 1. Text

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Air Force (USAF) has conducted a Remedial Investigation (RI) at the Galena Airport (formerly Galena Air Force Station) and Campion Air Station (AS), Alaska. The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities and findings of the investigation and, on the basis of this information, make recommendations on future activities at the Galena Airport and Campion AS sites. Information from the RI at these sites was also used to support a baseline risk assessment.

  13. Accident investigation board report on the May 14, 1997, chemical explosion at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility, Hanford Site,Richland, Washington - final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerton, R.E.

    1997-07-25

    On May 14, 1997, at 7:53 p.m. (PDT), a chemical explosion occur-red in Tank A- 109 in Room 40 of the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (Facility) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site, approximately 30 miles north of Richland, Washington. The inactive processing Facility is part of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). On May 16, 1997, Lloyd L. Piper, Deputy Manager, acting for John D. Wagoner, Manager, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), formally established an Accident Investigation Board (Board) to investigate the explosion in accordance with DOE Order 225. 1, Accident Investigations. The Board commenced its investigation on May 15, 1997, completed the investigation on July 2, 1997, and submitted its findings to the RL Manager on July 26, 1997. The scope of the Board`s investigation was to review and analyze the circumstances of the events that led to the explosion; to analyze facts and to determine the causes of the accident; and to develop conclusions and judgments of need that may help prevent a recurrence of the accident. The scope also included the application of lessons learned from similar accidents within DOE. In addition to this detailed report, a companion document has also been prepared that provides a concise summary of the facts and conclusions of this report, with an emphasis on management issues (DOE/RL-97-63).

  14. General administrative rulings and decisions; amendment to the examination and investigation sample requirements; companion document to direct final rule--FDA. Proposed rule.

    PubMed

    1998-09-25

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to amend its regulations regarding the collection of twice the quantity of food, drug, or cosmetic estimated to be sufficient for analysis. This action increases the dollar amount that FDA will consider to determine whether to routinely collect a reserve sample of a food, drug, or cosmetic product in addition to the quantity sufficient for analysis. Experience has demonstrated that the current dollar amount does not adequately cover the cost of most quantities sufficient for analysis plus reserve samples. This proposed rule is a companion to the direct final rule published elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register. This action is part of FDA's continuing effort to achieve the objectives of the President's "Reinventing Government" initiative, and it is intended to reduce the burden of unnecessary regulations on food, drugs, and cosmetics without diminishing the protection of the public health.

  15. The investigation of molecular mechanisms in photodynamic action and radiobiology with nanosecond flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis: Final report for period April 1, 1972-June 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Grossweiner, L.I.

    1987-07-01

    Laser flash was employed to investigate initial photolysis mechanisms in enzymes and constituent aromatic amino acids. The key role of photoionization and solvated electron generation was demonstrated. The photochemistry of furocoumarins employed for phototherapy of skin diseases was investigated, emphasizing the production and subsequent reactions of singlet molecular oxygen. The photochemistry of porphyrins employed for photodynamic therapy of malignant tumors was studied, emphasizing photosensitization of model membranes, liposomes and resealed red blood cell membranes. Photosensitization in light-scattering media was investigated in a tissue model, consisting of polystyrene microspheres in an aqueous dye solution and analyzed with the diffusion approximation to radiative transfer. The diffusion approximation was employed to develop a dosimetry model for photodynamic therapy.

  16. Final Report; Arsenic Fate, Transport and Stability Study; Groundwater, Surface Water, Soil And Sediment Investigation, Fort Devens Superfund Site, Devens, Massachusetts

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document presents results from the Fiscal Years 2006-2008 field investigation at the Fort Devens Superfund Site, Operable Unit 1 (Shepley's Hill Landfill) to fulfill the research objectives outlined in the proposal entitled, 'Fate and Transport of Arsenic in an Urban, Milita...

  17. Final Report; Arsenic Fate, Transport and Stability Study; Groundwater, Surface Water, Soil And Sediment Investigation, Fort Devens Superfund Site, Devens, Massachusetts

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document presents results from the Fiscal Years 2006-2008 field investigation at the Fort Devens Superfund Site, Operable Unit 1 (Shepley's Hill Landfill) to fulfill the research objectives outlined in the proposal entitled, 'Fate and Transport of Arsenic in an Urban, Milita...

  18. Individual Differences and Learner Control II: Investigation of Control Over Pictorial Mediators in Computer-Assisted Instruction. AFHRL-TR-74-30. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judd, Wilson A.; And Others

    The reported research was designed to investigate the impact of learner control on performance and anxiety in a computer assisted instruction task. This, the third phase of a project, substituted pictorial mediators for mnemonic devices as the facilitating variable in an instruction program on edible plants. Four experimental groups were formed…

  19. An Empirical Investigation of the Results of Two Different Test Development Strategies. Final Report for the Period March 15, 1981 - December 31, 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brzezinski, Evelyn; Demaline, Randy

    Item banks offer a different approach to test development than that of the more traditional item specification method. This study was designed as an initial comparative investigation in the Area. Fourth grade math and reading tests were developed using both items written from item specifications and items drawn from an existing item bank. Four…

  20. A GUIDANCE PROJECT TO INVESTIGATE CHARACTERISTICS, BACKGROUND, AND JOB EXPERIENCES OF SUCCESSFUL AND UNSUCCESSFUL ENTRY WORKERS IN THREE SELECTED INDUSTRIES. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GORMAN, ROBERT E.

    FIFTEEN CERTIFIED SECONDARY SCHOOL COUNSELORS PARTICIPATED IN AN ON-THE-JOB INVESTIGATION OF THREE SELECTED INDUSTRIES IN MONTANA--MINING, LUMBERING, AND CONSTRUCTION. THE PURPOSES WERE TO (1) PROVIDE THE PARTICIPATING COUNSELORS WITH ON-THE-JOB KNOWLEDGE ESSENTIAL FOR ENGAGING IN MORE EFFECTIVE VOCATIONAL COUNSELING OF SECONDARY SCHOOL STUDENTS…

  1. Installation-restoration program Stage 3. Remedial investigation/feasibility study, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Volume 2. Section 5 - bibliography text. Final report, March 1988-May 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    Contents of this volume consist, primarily of, alternative remedial measures and recommendations for restoration of each site studied. A feasibility study (FS) of alternative remedial measures is required for 7 of the 32 sites investigated at Elmendorf AFB. Alternative remedial measures for Sites D-16, IS-1, SP-5/5A, SP-7/10 and SP-15 are developed and evaluated.

  2. Remedial investigation report, site 2-Pesticide Pit Burial Area, Stewart Air National Guard Base, Newburgh, New York. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Site 2-Pesticide Pit Burial Area was investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. A removal action was conducted in 1988, when pesticide containers and contaminated soil were excavated from the pit. The pit covered an area of approximately 1000 square feet and was approximately 12 feet deep. The report recommends no further action based on study results.

  3. Remedial investigation report, site 2-Pesticide Pit Burial Area, Stewart Air National Guard Base, Newburgh, New York. Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Site 2-Pesticide Pit Burial Area was investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. A removal action was conducted in 1988, when pesticide containers and contaminated soil were excavated from the pit. The pit covered an area of approximately 1000 square feet and was approximately 12 feet deep. The report recommends no further action based on study results.

  4. Investigation of the electrode kinetics and electrochemistry of refractory-metal deposition. Final report, 26 April 1982-30 June 1985

    SciTech Connect

    White, S.H.; Twardoch, U.M.

    1986-07-01

    Electrochemical methods represent important ways in which the refractory-metal coatings can be applied to the more active metals and alloys to take advantage, at the new surface, of their superior properties to provide erosion and corrosion protection. Currently, of the refractory metals, only chromium can be plated from aqueous solution, albeit in a form that is not entirely free of cracks and pores. These aberrations in the coating can lead to protection failure under severe conditions. The remaining metals can be plated from molten fluoride electrolytes at temperatures in excess of 700 C. It is clear that less-severe operating conditions are required for the plating of these metals, to take advantage of their properties in coatings upon as wide a range of materials as possible. The plating process involves the transport of ionic species, established in an ionic medium, to the solution electrode interface at which these species undergo electron transfer reactions and ligand removal to form metal atoms at favored sites. The aggregation of these atoms into clusters of nuclei, their growth into crystallites, and the accumulation of crystallites into a coherent polycrystalline metal coating, represents the final stages of the complex process of metal plating. This program of work has explored some aspects of each of these contributing processes to develop a scientific basis for the design of new plating baths and techniques which can be operated for chromium and molybdenum at substantially lower temperatures.

  5. Final Report for Project DE-SC0006958: "An Investigation of the Effects of magnetic Fields and Collisionality on Shock Formation in Radiatively Cooled Plasma Flows"

    SciTech Connect

    Bott-Suzuki, Simon

    2014-11-05

    We have developed a new experimental platform to study bow-shock formation in plasma flows generated using an inverse wire array z-pinch. We have made significant progress on the analysis of both hydrodynamic and magnetized shocks using this system. The hydrodynamic experiments show formation of a well-defined Mach cone, and highly localized shock strong associated with radiative losses and rapidly cooling over the shock. Magnetized shocks show that the balance of magnetic and ram pressures dominate the evolution of the shock region, generating a low plasma beta void around the target. Manuscripts are in preparation for publication on both these topics. We have also published the development of a novel diagnostic method which allow recovery of interferometry and self-emission data along the same line of sight. Finally, we have carried out work to integrate a kinetic routine with the 3D MHD code Gorgon, however it remains to complete this process. Both undergraduate and graduate students have been involved in both the experimental work and publications.

  6. Investigation of proposed process sequence for the array automated assembly task. Phase I and II. Final report, October 1, 1977-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Mardesich, N.; Garcia, A.; Eskenas, K.

    1980-08-01

    A selected process sequence for the low cost fabrication of photovoltaic modules was defined during this contract. Each part of the process sequence was looked at regarding its contribution to the overall dollars per watt cost. During the course of the research done, some of the initially included processes were dropped due to technological deficiencies. The printed dielectric diffusion mask, codiffusion of the n+ and p+ regions, wraparound front contacts and retention of the diffusion oxide for use as an AR coating were all the processes that were removed for this reason. Other process steps were retained to achieve the desired overall cost and efficiency. Square wafers, a polymeric spin-on PX-10 diffusion source, a p+ back surface field and silver front contacts are all processes that have been recommended for use in this program. The printed silver solderable pad for making contact to the aluminum back was replaced by an ultrasonically applied tin-zinc pad. Also, the texturized front surface was dropped as inappropriate for the sheet silicon likely to be available in 1986. Progress has also been made on the process sequence for module fabrication. A shift from bonding with a conformal coating to laminating with ethylene vinyl acetate and a glass superstrate is recommended for further module fabrication. The finalized process sequence is described.

  7. An investigation of the applicability of the new ion exchange resin, Reillex{trademark}-HPQ, in ATW separations. Milestone 4, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, K.R.; Ball, J.; Grissom, M.; Williamson, M.; Cobb, S.; Young, D.; Wu, Yen-Yuan J.

    1993-09-07

    The investigations with the anion exchange resin Reillex{trademark}-HPQ is continuing along several different paths. The topics of current investigations that are reported here are: The sorption behavior of chromium(VI) on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ from nitric acid solutions and from sodium hydroxide/sodium nitrate solutions; sorption behavior of F{sup {minus}} on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resin in acidic sodium nitrate solution; sorption behavior of Cl{sup {minus}} on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resin in acidic sodium nitrate solution; sorption behavior of Br{sup {minus}} on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resin in acidic sodium nitrate solution; and the Honors thesis by one of the students is attached as Appendix II (on ion exchange properties of a new macroperous resin using bromide as the model ion in aqueous nitrate solutions).

  8. Pilot investigation of indoor-outdoor and personal PM10 (thoracic) and associated ionic compounds and mutagenic activity. Final report, February 1987-April 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Colome, S.D.; Kado, N.Y.; Kleinman, M.; Jaques, P.

    1989-04-27

    A major objective of the pilot study was to evaluate methods of measuring indoor and personal exposures to PM10. Other objectives were to examine the feasibility of measuring particle characteristics (other than mass) that may be useful in relating exposures to PM10 to health effects. The investigators tested several types of particle-sampling devices in the homes of eight asthmatic subjects who resided in Orange County. The investigators measured particle mass for levels of sulfate/nitrate ions and the mutagenicity of particle extracts. The pilot study demonstrated successfully the use of certain portable sampling devices to measure PM10 exposure and showed that it is feasible to measure levels of ionic species and mutagenic activity in particle samples obtained with these devices. The results of the study can be applied in the design of larger studies of similar nature.

  9. Investigation of Novel Electrode Materials for Electrochemically-Based Remediation of High- and Low-Level Mixed Wastes in the DOE Complex - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, N.S.; Anderson, M.

    2000-12-01

    New materials are investigated, based on degenerately-doped titanias, for use in the electrochemical degradation of organics and nitrogen-containing compounds in sites of concern to the DOE remediation effort. The data collected in this project appear to provide a rational approach for design of more efficient nanoporous electrodes. Also, osmium complexes appear to be promising candidates for further optimization in operating photo electrochemical cells for solar energy conversion applications.

  10. Installation restoration program: Closure investigation report. Site 1: Former base landfill; Stewart Air National Guard Base, Newburgh, New York. Volume I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    A Closure Investigation (Cl) of Site 1, the former Base Landfill at Stewart Air National Guard Base (the Base) located at the Stewart International Airport (lAP), was performed by Aneptek Corporation (ANEPTEK). Site 1 is located southeast of the airport complex. Site 1 and Site 2 (the former pesticide pit disposal area) have been the subject of several previous investigations by both the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) and the National Guard Bureau. Scope of Investigation. The CI field program included air monitoring and the sampling of subsurface soils, surface water and groundwater to provide data for an evaluation of site geology, hydrogeology, and potential environmental impacts from the Site 1 landfill. Ml groundwater and surface water samples submitted for off-site laboratory analysis were analyzed for the full list of Baseline Parameters provide in Chapter 6 of the New York Codes, Rules, and Regulations (6 NYCRR) Part 360-2.11. Physical characteristics of the fill and cover material were defined through the installation and monitoring of slope stability monuments and settlement pads. Test pits were excavated to determine the lateral extent of waste. Soil samples collected from the existing interim cover were submitted to an off-site laboratory for grain size analyses. Slug tests were performed on monitoring wells to provide estimates of formation hydraulic conductivity. In accordance with the requirements of 6 NYCRR Part 360-2.15, an explosive gas investigation was conducted using a slam-bar and monitoring gasses with a flame ionization detector (FID) and a meter capable of detecting percent oxygen, percent lower explosive limit (LEL), carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulfide. A complete site walkover of the landfill was made to locate any areas of leachate outbreak; and a vector survey was conducted by a field biologist.

  11. Installation-restoration program Stage 3. Remedial investigation/feasibility study, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Volume 1. Sections 1-4, text. Final report, March 1988-May 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    This report presents and discusses the results of a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) for 32 sites at Elmendorf AFB, AK. Several sites were combined during the field investigation program; therefore a total of 29 sites are discussed in this RI/FS report. In addition several other locations were sampled and five additional wells were installed to determine basewide hydrogeology and background levels. The main contaminants found at the Elmendorf AFB sites included total petroleum hydrocarbons and other fuel contaminants such as benzene, ethylbenzene, toluene, and xylenes; solvents such as trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons such as fluranthene and pyrene, and pesticides such as 4,4 -DDT and 4,4 -DDD. During the RI sites were prioritized according the level of contamination at each site. Of the new total of 29 sites, 5 were included in the FS and 7 of the sites were determined to need no further action. The remaining 17 require further investigation for better characterization and to ultimately complete either and FS or no further action documentation.

  12. Final work plan : phase II investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-16

    From approximately 1949 until 1970, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility on federally owned property approximately 0.25 mi northwest of Savannah, Missouri (Figure 1.1). During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In November 1998, carbon tetrachloride was detected in a private well (Morgan) roughly 50 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, as a result of statewide screening of private wells near former CCC/USDA facilities, conducted in Missouri by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1999). The 1998 and subsequent investigations by the EPA and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR) confirmed the presence of carbon tetrachloride in the Morgan well, as well as in a second well (on property currently occupied by the Missouri Department of Transportation [MoDOT]) described as being approximately 400 ft east of the former CCC/USDA facility. The identified concentrations in these two wells were above the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) and the Missouri risk-based corrective action default target level (MRBCA DTL) values of 5.0 {micro}g/L for carbon tetrachloride in water used for domestic purposes (EPA 1999; MoDNR 2000a,b, 2006). Because the observed contamination in the Morgan and MoDOT wells might be linked to the past use of carbon tetrachloride-based fumigants at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA is conducting an investigation to (1) characterize the source(s), extent, and factors controlling the subsurface distribution and movement of carbon tetrachloride at Savannah and (2) evaluate the potential risks to human health, public welfare, and the environment posed by the contamination. This work is being performed in accord with the Intergovernmental Agreement established between the Farm Service Agency

  13. Final Report - Novel investigation of iron cross sections via spherical shell transmission measurements and particle transport calculations for material embrittlement studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Steven M. Grimes; Thomas N. Massey; Allan D. Carlson; James M. Adams; Alireza Haghighat; Michael T. Wenner; Shane R. Gardner

    2003-04-25

    OAK B204 We have been pursuing a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, to study neutron scattering interactions in iron. The principal objective of this work is to investigate the well-known deficiency that exists for reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence determinations. Specifically, we are using the spherical-shell transmission method, employing iron shells with different thicknesses, and neutron time-of-flight (TOF) measurements of the scattered neutrons, in an effort to precisely determine specific energy regions over which deficiencies in the non-elastic scattering cross section for neutron scattering in iron appear to exist.

  14. Investigation of the application of gelled polymer systems for permeability modification in petroleum reservoirs: Final annual report for the period October 1985-September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Willhite, G.P.

    1987-11-01

    The research program is directed at improvement of volumetric sweep of fluid-displacement processes using gelled polymer systems. An integrated program is underway to develop a systematic procedure for the methods which can be used for design of gelled polymer applications. The program is organized into three parts: (1) physical and chemical description of gelling systems, (2) experiemental investigation of in situ gelation in porous media, and (3) correlation and mathematical modeling of in situ gelation. This report describes progress during the first year of a three-year program. 93 refs., 59 figs., 22 tabs.

  15. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.

    1995-12-01

    This research studied the oil recovery potential of flooding light oil reservoirs by combining interfacial tension reducing agent(s) with a mobility control agent. The specific objectives were: To define the mechanisms and limitations of co-injecting interfacial tension reduction agent(s) and a mobility control agent to recover incremental oil. Specifically, the study focused on the fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions. To evaluate the economics of the combination technology and investigate methods to make the process more profitable. Specific areas of study were to evaluate different chemical concentration tapers and the volume of chemical injection required to give optimal oil recovery.

  16. Experimental and theoretical investigation of three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers and turbulence characteristics inside an axial flow inducer passage. Final Report. Ph.D. Thesis, Jun. 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anand, A. K.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1977-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations of the characteristics of three dimensional turbulent boundary layers in a rotating helical passage of an inducer rotor are reported. Expressions are developed for the velocity profiles in the inner layer, where the viscous effects dominate, in the outer layer, where the viscous effects are small, and in the interference layer, where the end walls influence the flow. The prediction of boundary layer growth is based on the momentum integral technique. The equations derived are general enough to be valid for all turbomachinery rotors with arbitrary pressure gradients. The experimental investigations are carried out in a flat plate inducer 3 feet in diameter. The mean velocity profiles, turbulence intensities and shear stresses, wall shear stress, and limiting streamline angles are measured at various radial and chordwise locations by using rotating probes. The measurements are in general agreement with the predictions. The radial flows are well represented by an expression which includes the effect of stagger angle and radial pressure gradient. The radial flows in the rotor channel are higher than those on a single blade. The collateral region exists only very near the blade surface. The radial component of turbulence intensity is higher than the streamwise component because of the effect of rotation.

  17. An experimental investigation of high temperature superconducting microstrip antennas at K- and Ka-band frequencies. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Mark A.

    1993-01-01

    The recent discovery of high temperature superconductors (HTS) has generated a substantial amount of interest in microstrip antenna applications. However, the high permittivity of substrates compatible with HTS results in narrow bandwidths and high patch edge impedances of such antennas. To investigate the performance of superconducting microstrip antennas, three antenna architectures at K and Ka-band frequencies are examined. Superconducting microstrip antennas that are directly coupled, gap coupled, and electromagnetically coupled to a microstrip transmission line were designed and fabricated on lanthanum aluminate substrates using YBa2Cu3O7 superconducting thin films. For each architecture, a single patch antenna and a four element array were fabricated. Measurements from these antennas, including input impedance, bandwidth, patterns, efficiency, and gain are presented. The measured results show usable antennas can be constructed using any of the architectures. All architectures show excellent gain characteristics, with less than 2 dB of total loss in the four element arrays. Although the direct and gap coupled antennas are the simplest antennas to design and fabricate, they suffer from narrow bandwidths. The electromagnetically coupled antenna, on the other hand, allows the flexibility of using a low permittivity substrate for the patch radiator, while using HTS for the feed network, thus increasing the bandwidth while effectively utilizing the low loss properties of HTS. Each antenna investigated in this research is the first of its kind reported.

  18. Final work plan : phase I investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Montgomery City, Missouri.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-16

    From September 1949 until September 1966, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) leased property at the southeastern end of Montgomery City, Missouri, for the operation of a grain storage facility. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In January 2000, carbon tetrachloride was detected in a soil sample (220 {micro}g/kg) and two soil gas samples (58 {micro}g/m{sup 3} and 550 {micro}g/m{sup 3}) collected at the former CCC/USDA facility, as a result of a pre-CERCLIS site screening investigation (SSI) performed by TN & Associates, Inc., on behalf of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region VII (MoDNR 2001). In June 2001, the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR) conducted further sampling of the soils and groundwater at the former CCC/USDA facility as part of a preliminary assessment/site inspection (PA/SI). The MoDNR confirmed the presence of carbon tetrachloride (at a maximum identified concentration of 2,810 {micro}g/kg) and chloroform (maximum 82 {micro}g/kg) in the soils and also detected carbon tetrachloride and chloroform (42.2 {micro}g/L and 58.4 {micro}g/L, respectively) in a groundwater sample collected at the former facility (MoDNR 2001). The carbon tetrachloride levels identified in the soils and groundwater are above the default target level (DTL) values established by the MoDNR for this contaminant in soils of all types (79.6 {micro}g/kg) and in groundwater (5.0 {micro}g/L), as outlined in Missouri Risk-Based Corrective Action (MRBCA): Departmental Technical Guidance (MoDNR 2006a). The corresponding MRBCA DTL values for chloroform are 76.6 {micro}g/kg in soils of all types and 80 {micro}g/L in groundwater. Because the observed contamination at Montgomery City might be linked to the past use of carbon tetrachloride-based fumigants at its

  19. Final work plan : Phase I investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-10-12

    From approximately 1949 until 1970, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility on federally owned property approximately 0.25 mi northwest of Savannah, Missouri. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In November 1998, carbon tetrachloride was detected in a private well (Morgan) roughly 50 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, as a result of state-wide screening of private wells near former CCC/USDA facilities, conducted in Missouri by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1999). The 1998 and subsequent investigations by the EPA and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR) confirmed the presence of carbon tetrachloride in the Morgan well, as well as in a second well (on property currently occupied by the Missouri Department of Transportation [MoDOT]), approximately 400 ft east of the former CCC/USDA facility. Carbon tetrachloride concentrations in the Morgan well have ranged from the initial value of 29 {micro}g/L in 1998, up to a maximum of 61 {micro}g/L in 1999, and back down to 22 {micro}g/L in 2005. The carbon tetrachloride concentration in the MoDOT well in 2000 (the only time it was sampled) was 321 {micro}g/L. The concentrations for the two wells are above the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L for carbon tetrachloride (EPA 1999; MoDNR 2000a,b). Because the observed contamination in the Morgan and MoDOT wells might be linked to the past use of carbon tetrachloride-based grain fumigants at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA will conduct investigations to (1) characterize the source(s), extent, and factors controlling the subsurface distribution and movement of carbon tetrachloride at Savannah and (2) evaluate the health and environmental threats potentially posed by the contamination

  20. Investigation of Head Burns in Adult Salmonids : Phase 1, Examination of Fish at Lookingglass Hatchery in 1996 : Addendum to Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Groberg, Warren J.

    1996-11-01

    This information is an addendum to the report 'Investigation of Head Burns in Adult Salmonids, Phase 1: Examination of Fish at Lower Granite Dam, July 2, 1996' by Ralph Elston because there may be relevant observations included here. The author of this document participated in the examinations at Lower Granite Dam described in that report. Because of Endangered Species Act issues, the Rapid River stock of spring chinook salmon reared at Lookingglass Hatchery on the Grande Ronde River in northeastern Oregon are annually being captured as returning adults at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River and trucked to Lookingglass. During the peak migration period they are held in an adult holding facility at Lower Granite for as long as 72 hours and then transported by truck to Lookingglass for holding in an adult pond for spawning. In 1996 a total of 572 adults were transported from Lower Granite Dam between May 3 and August 6. Two-hundred eighty-one of these were later transported from Lookingglass to Wallowa Hatchery for artificial spawning and the remaining 291 were held for spawning at Lookingglass. On May 21, 24, 30 and June 2, 1996 hatchery personnel identified a total of 32 off-loaded fish with lesions on the dorsal area of the head they described as having the appearance of blisters (Robert Lund personal communication). By date these are shown in Table 1 (fish with similar lesions were also observed on May 27 but the number of these was not recorded). Such lesions were not observed on fish offloaded on any other dates. On May 24, 1996 hatchery personnel took photographs of fish with these lesions but do to light-meter problems the photographs did not turn out. On June 28, 1996 personnel of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Fish Pathology laboratory in La Grande were notified by James Lauman, ODFW Northeast Region supervisor, of discussions and concerns of head burn on returning adult chinook while he was on a visitation to Lower Granite Dam. That led

  1. Fermi Guest Investigator Program Cycle 2 Project Final Report Albedo Polarimetry of Gamma-Ray Bursts and Solar Flares with GBM

    SciTech Connect

    Kippen, Richard Marc

    2012-08-27

    Several key properties of GRBs remain poorly understood and are difficult or even impossible to infer with the information currently being collected. Polarization measurements will probe the precise nature of the central engine. For solar flares, high-energy polarization measurements are expected to be useful in determining the beaming (or directivity) of solar flare electrons - a quantity that may provide important clues about electron acceleration and transport. We propose to investigate the viability of using the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) to measure the polarization of GRBs and solar flares using the albedo photon flux. This approach was previously developed for use with BATSE data. We will conduct a careful study of this technique using a modified version of the GRESS simulation tools developed by the GBM team.

  2. An investigation of the effects of smoke suppressant fuel additives on engine and test cell exhaust gas opacities. Final report for 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Thornburg, D.W.; Darnell, T.R.; Netzer, D.W.

    1982-05-01

    Tests were conducted in a one-eighth scale turbojet test cell with a ramjet type combustor to investigate the effects of fuel additives on smoke reduction. Particle size and mass concentrations were determined at the engine and stack exhausts using three wavelength optical detector systems. Particulate samples were also collected at the engine exhaust and analyzed with a scanning electron microscope. Combustor temperature and fuel additives were found to significantly affect particulate mass concentrations emitted from the engine while particle size appeared to be unaffected. No significant changes in the particulate size or mass occurred from the engine exhaust to the stack exhaust. The optical determination of exhaust mean particulate size/mass concentration with three wavelength optical detector systems appears to be reasonably accurate technique for evaluating the effects of engine and test cell operating conditions and fuel composition changes on the emitted particulates.

  3. Interactive simulation of the fate of hazardous chemicals during land treatment of oily wastes: RITZ (Regulatory and Investigative Treatment Zone) user's guide. Final report, May 1986-November 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Nofziger, D.L.; Williams, J.R.; Short, T.E.

    1988-01-01

    An interactive software system was developed to enable decision makers to simulate the movement and fate of hazardous chemicals during land treatment of oily wastes. The mathematical model known as the Regulatory and Investigative Treatment Zone Model, or RITZ, was developed and published earlier by Short(1985). The model incorporates the influence of oil in the sludge, water movement, volatilization, and degradation upon the transport and fate of a hazardous chemical. The manual describes the conceptual framework and assumptions used by Short (1985) in developing the model. It then explains the microcomputer hardware and software requirements, the input parameters for the model, and the graphical and tabular outputs which can be selected. Illustrations of the use of the software are also included. The computational equations developed by Short (1985) are presented for completeness but are not derived.

  4. An Investigation of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Sonochemistry for Destruction of Hazardous Waste - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 09/14/2000

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Inez

    2000-09-14

    During the last 20 years, various legislative acts have mandated the reduction and elimination of water and land pollution. In order to fulfill these mandates, effective control and remediation methods must be developed and implemented. The drawbacks of current hazardous waste control methods motivate the development of new technology, and the need for new technology is further driven by the large number of polluted sites across the country. This research explores the application and optimization of ultrasonic waves as a novel method by which aqueous contaminants are degraded. The primary objective of the investigation is to acquire a deeper fundamental knowledge of acoustic cavitation and cavitation chemistry, and in doing so, to ascertain how ultrasonic irradiation can be more effectively applied to environmental problems. Special consideration is given to the types of problems and hazardous chemical substrates found specifically at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The experimental work is divided into five broad tasks, to be completed over a period of three years. The first task is to explore the significance of physical variables during sonolysis, such as ultrasonic frequency. The second aim is an understanding of sonochemical degradation kinetics and by-products, complemented by information from the detection of reactive intermediates with electron paramagnetic resonance. The sonolytic decomposition studies will focus on polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Investigation of activated carbon regeneration during ultrasonic irradiation extends sonochemical applications in homogeneous systems to heterogeneous systems of environmental interest. Lastly, the physics and hydrodynamics of cavitation bubbles and bubble clouds will be correlated with sonochemical effects by performing high-speed photographic studies of acoustically cavitating aqueous solutions. The most important benefit will be fundamental information which will allow a more optimal application of

  5. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stinis, Panos

    2016-08-07

    This is the final report for the work conducted at the University of Minnesota (during the period 12/01/12-09/18/14) by PI Panos Stinis as part of the "Collaboratory on Mathematics for Mesoscopic Modeling of Materials" (CM4). CM4 is a multi-institution DOE-funded project whose aim is to conduct basic and applied research in the emerging field of mesoscopic modeling of materials.

  6. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Marchant, Gary E.

    2013-04-23

    This is the final report of a two year project entitled "Governing Nanotechnology Risks and Benefits in the Transition to Regulation: Innovative Public and Private Approaches." This project examined the role of new governance or "soft law" mechanisms such as codes of conduct, voluntary programs and partnership agreements to manage the risks of emerging technologies such as nanotechnology. A series of published or in publication papers and book chapters are attached.

  7. Investigation of an integrated switchgrass gasification/fuel cell power plant. Final report for Phase 1 of the Chariton Valley Biomass Power Project

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.C.; Smeenk, J.; Steinfeld, G.

    1998-09-30

    The Chariton Valley Biomass Power Project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy Biomass Power Program, has the goal of converting switchgrass grown on marginal farmland in southern Iowa into electric power. Two energy conversion options are under evaluation: co-firing switchgrass with coal in an existing utility boiler and gasification of switchgrass for use in a carbonate fuel cell. This paper describes the second option under investigation. The gasification study includes both experimental testing in a pilot-scale gasifier and computer simulation of carbonate fuel cell performance when operated on gas derived from switchgrass. Options for comprehensive system integration between a carbonate fuel cell and the gasification system are being evaluated. Use of waste heat from the carbonate fuel cell to maximize overall integrated plant efficiency is being examined. Existing fuel cell power plant design elements will be used, as appropriate, in the integration of the gasifier and fuel cell power plant to minimize cost complexity and risk. The gasification experiments are being performed by Iowa State University and the fuel cell evaluations are being performed by Energy Research Corporation.

  8. Fracture mechanics investigation of oil shale to aid in understanding the explosive fragmentation process. Final technical report, January 1983-July 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Chong, K.P.

    1984-09-01

    This report summarizes goals and findings achieved in developing technologies to improve the overall efficiency of oil shale recovery processes. The objectives are to (a) develop theoretical fracture mechanics tools that are applicable to transversely isotropic materials such as sedimentary rock, more particularly oil shale; and (b) develop a fracture mechanics test procedure that can be conveniently used for rock specimens. Such a test procedure would: utilize the geometry of a typical rock core for the test; require a minimum amount of specimen machining; and provide meaningful, reproducible data that corresponds well to test data obtained from conventional fracture mechanics tests. Critical review of the state-of-the-art of fracture mechanics on layered rocks has been completed. Recommendations are made for innovative and promising methods for oil shale fracture mechanics. Numerical and analytical studies of mixed mode fracture mechanics are investigated. Transversely isotropic properties of oil shale are input using isoparametric finite elements with singular elements at the crack tip. The model is a plate with an edge crack whose angle with the edge varies to study the effect of mixed mode fracture under various conditions. The three-dimensional plate is in tension, and stress, energy methods are used in the fracture analysis. Precracked disks of oil shale cored perpendicular to bedding planes are analyzed numerically. Stress intensity factors are determined by (i) strain energy method, and (ii) elliptic simulation method. 47 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Experimental Investigation of Magnetic, Superconducting, and other Phase Transitions in novel F-Electron Materials at Ultra-high Pressures - Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Maple, Brian; Jeffires, Jason

    2006-07-28

    This grant, entitled “Experimental investigation of magnetic, superconducting and other phase transitions in novel f-electron materials at ultrahigh pressures,” spanned the funding period from May 1st, 2003 until April 30th, 2006. The major goal of this grant was to develop and utilize an ultrahigh pressure facility—capable of achieving very low temperatures, high magnetic fields, and extreme pressures as well as providing electrical resistivity, ac susceptibility, and magnetization measurement capabilities under pressure—for the exploration of magnetic, electronic, and structural phases and any corresponding interactions between these states in novel f-electron materials. Realizing this goal required the acquisition, development, fabrication, and implementation of essential equipment, apparatuses, and techniques. The following sections of this report detail the establishment of an ultrahigh pressure facility (Section 1) and measurements performed during the funding period (Section 2), as well as summarize the research project (Section 3), project participants and their levels of support (Section 4), and publications and presentations (Section 5).

  10. Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 1 -- Base program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, V.E.

    1994-05-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

  11. Investigation of poling processor, charge trapping and preservation - some ferroelectric and polymeric material. Final report, July 1, 1984--June 20, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    A single crystalline (Yttrium stabilized) Zirconia was extensively studied in order to get insight into the charge transport process in Zirconia as compared to other crystalline samples. One thing examined was the effect of crystalline-orientation charge retention on the electret formation discs. The authors did not find any significant difference in the electret formation or retention on cutting the crystal in different orientations. They did, however, notice and collect data on the increase of the charge density and the half life when the sample thickness was increased. They are trying to correlate this with their theory developed for the charge retention and relaxation for the two different mechanisms of monocharge and bipolar charge retention. They also examined the increase in the relaxation time by storage at colder temperature and drier atmosphere. The result was an exponential increase of the half life with the fall of temperature as expected. They began investigating different new materials, all obtained from single crystalline structure. Some new materials like deuterated triglycine fluoroberyliate, (TGA) etc., were found to have much lower insulation property to be able to retain the charges. On the other hand the single crystalline samples of Lithium Niobate and lead zirconium titanate were found to be much better than the single crystal-zironia.

  12. A coupled approach to spatially derived parameters necessary for ecosystem modeling on the North Slope of Alaska: Appendix A. Final report, March 1, 1989--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, G.W.; Day, R.L.; Pollack, J.

    1993-12-01

    This study concerned an investigation of ecosystem dynamics in several small study sites in the North Slope region of Alaska. The scope of the proposed research is to quantitatively determine spatial interrelationships between landform geometry within these study areas and such ecologically important factors as vegetation type, depth-to-permafrost, hydraulic conductivity and incoming solar radiation. Extrapolation techniques developed and terrain-related data generated as a result of this research will augment R4D Phase II goals which relate to running the General Arctic Simulac (GAS) model (and associated ecosystem models) at different locations on the North Slope. In particular, Penn State has contributed significantly to extrapolation efforts by developing techniques which can be used to initialize conditions for model input either through direct measurement (e.g., slope and aspect) and GIS-based simulation models (e.g., drainage basin characterization). As stated in the R4D Phase II Research Plan, the long-term objectives of this program are: (1) to determine effects and to develop models based on ecosystem disturbances commonly created by energy development so that appropriate, cost-effective measures can be utilized to minimize deleterious disturbances; and (2) to extend the results to other arctic and alpine areas which are important because of likely impact from energy development. It is this second long-term objective which relates most directly to Penn State`s work.

  13. Establishment of vaccination clinics; user fees for investigational new drug (IND) influenza vaccine services and vaccines. Interim final rule and request for comments.

    PubMed

    2005-01-25

    We are amending 42 CFR part 70 to establish vaccination clinics and a user fee in connection with the administration of vaccination services and vaccine. On December 7, 2004, HHS Secretary Tommy G. Thompson announced the purchase of 1.2 million doses of GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) influenza vaccine, Fluarix, for distribution to areas most in need as determined by State public health authorities. The Fluarix vaccine has been approved in seventy-eight foreign countries, and FDA has recently reviewed extensive manufacturing and summary clinical information and conducted an inspection of the GSK manufacturing facility in Germany to determine that this vaccine, although not licensed in the United States, is suitable for use under an Investigational New Drug application (IND). The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reviewed GSK's IND application as well as the clinical protocol and manufacturing data. CDC and CDC's Institutional Review Board approved the GSK flu vaccine response protocol including the informed consent document. To ensure that the vaccine is properly administered to individuals identified to be most at risk and facilitate compliance with IND requirements, CDC is establishing vaccination clinics. CDC is proceeding without delay because of the unprecedented nature of this season's influenza vaccine shortage caused by contamination problems with Chiron Corporation's production facility in the United Kingdom, which effectively cut in half the expected United States supply of inactivated influenza vaccine. A user fee is being established in order to recoup the costs associated with administering the vaccine and for the vaccine itself. All individuals, other than those who are enrolled in Medicare Part B, will be required to pay the user fee.

  14. Investigation into environmentally friendly alternative cleaning processes for hybrid microcircuits to replace vapor degreasing with 1,1,1-trichloroethane. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.E.

    1997-02-01

    Two cleaning processes, one aqueous and one nonaqueous, were investigated as potential replacements for the vapor degreasing process using 1,1,1 trichloroethane (TCA) for hybrid microcircuit assemblies. The aqueous process was based upon saponification chemistry. A 10% solution of either Kester 5768 or Armakleen 2001, heated to 140 F, was sprayed on the hybrid at 450 psig and a flow rate of 5 gpm through a specially designed nozzle which created microdroplets. The nonaqueous process was based upon dissolution chemistry and used d-limonene as the solvent in an immersion and spray process. The d-limonene solvent was followed by an isopropyl alcohol spray rinse to remove the excess d-limonene. The aqueous microdroplet process was found to be successful only for solder reflow profiles that did not exceed 210 C. Furthermore, removal of component marking was a problem and the spray pressure had to be reduced to 130 psig to eliminate damage to capacitor end caps. The d-limonene cleaning was found to be successful for solder reflow temperature up to 250 C when using a four-step cleaning process. The four steps included refluxing the hybrid at 80 C, followed by soaking the hybrid in d-limonene which is heated to 80 C, followed by spray cleaning at 80 psig with room temperature d-limonene, followed by spray cleaning at 80 psig with room temperature IPA was developed to remove residual flux from the hybrid microcircuits. This process was the most robust and most closely matched the cleaning ability of TCA.

  15. DOE/SC0001389 Final technical report: Investigation of uranium attenuation and release at column and pore scales in response to advective geochemical gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, Kaye S.; Zhu, Wenyi; Barnett, Mark O.

    2013-05-13

    Experimental approach Column experiments were devised to investigate the role of changing fluid composition on mobility of uranium through a sequence of geologic media. Fluids and media were chosen to be relevant to the ground water plume emanating from the former S-3 ponds at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFC) site. Synthetic ground waters were pumped upwards at 0.05 mL/minute for 21 days through layers of quartz sand alternating with layers of uncontaminated soil, quartz sand mixed with illite, quartz sand coated with iron oxides, and another soil layer. Increases in pH or concentration of phosphate, bicarbonate, or acetate were imposed on the influent solutions after each 7 pore volumes while uranium (as uranyl) remained constant at 0.1mM. A control column maintained the original synthetic groundwater composition with 0.1mM U. Pore water solutions were extracted to assess U retention and release in relation to the advective ligand or pH gradients. Following the column experiments, subsamples from each layer were characterized using microbeam X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with X-ray fluorescence mapping and compared to sediment core samples from the ORIFC, at SSRL Beam Line 2-3. Results U retention of 55-67mg occurred in phosphate >pH >control >acetate >carbonate columns. The mass of U retained in the first-encountered quartz layer in all columns was highest and increased throughout the experiment. The rate of increase in acetate- and bicarbonate-bearing columns declined after ligand concentrations were raised. U also accumulated in the first soil layer; the pH-varied column retained most, followed by the increasing-bicarbonate column. The mass of U retained in the upper layers was far lower. Speciation of U, interpreted from microbeam XANES spectra and XRF maps, varied within and among the columns. Evidence of minor reduction to U(IV) was observed in the first-encountered quartz layer in the phosphate, bicarbonate

  16. Safety and effectiveness of bevacizumab treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer: final results from the Avastin(®) Registry - Investigation of Effectiveness and Safety (ARIES) observational cohort study.

    PubMed

    Hurwitz, H I; Bekaii-Saab, T S; Bendell, J C; Cohn, A L; Kozloff, M; Roach, N; Mun, Y; Fish, S; Flick, E D; Grothey, A

    2014-06-01

    The Avastin(®) Registry - Investigation of Effectiveness and Safety (ARIES) observational cohort study (OCS) was designed to prospectively examine outcomes associated with bevacizumab-containing treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) in a community-based setting, where patient populations are less restricted than those in randomised trials. Patients with mCRC who were eligible for bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy in first- or second-line treatment were enrolled from November 2006 to September 2008. There were no protocol-specified treatment regimens; the dose and schedule of bevacizumab and chemotherapy were at the treating physician's discretion. The objectives in the ARIES OCS included analyses of progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival, treatment patterns and safety in each of the first- and second-line treatment cohorts. ARIES enrolled 1550 patients with mCRC receiving first-line therapy with bevacizumab. The median follow-up time was 20.6 months. The median PFS in this cohort was 10.2 months (95% confidence interval 9.8-10.6) and the median overall survival was 23.2 months (95% confidence interval 21.2-24.8). In a separate cohort of 482 patients with second-line mCRC, the median follow-up time was 16.9 months, the median PFS and overall survival from the start of second-line treatment to the end of follow-up was 7.9 months (95% confidence interval 7.2-8.3) and 17.8 months (95% confidence interval 16.5-20.7), respectively. Incidences of known bevacizumab-associated adverse events in ARIES were generally consistent with those previously reported in OCSs and randomised trials. Results from the prospective ARIES OCS add further evidence to support the effectiveness and safety of bevacizumab when added to first- and second-line treatment regimens for patients with mCRC in community treatment settings. Copyright © 2014 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R Paul Drake

    2004-01-12

    OAK-B135 This is the final report from the project Hydrodynamics by High-Energy-Density Plasma Flow and Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications. This project supported a group at the University of Michigan in the invention, design, performance, and analysis of experiments using high-energy-density research facilities. The experiments explored compressible nonlinear hydrodynamics, in particular at decelerating interfaces, and the radiation hydrodynamics of strong shock waves. It has application to supernovae, astrophysical jets, shock-cloud interactions, and radiative shock waves.

  18. Final Technical Report for 'Investigations of the Role of Protozoa in Transformations of Marine Biopolymers using Phaeocytis Polymer Gels as a Model'

    SciTech Connect

    Lessard, Evelyn

    2003-04-01

    protists are able to use the polymer for nutrition and growth. This is the first demonstration of the ingestion and utilization of a natural marine biopolymer by protists. We also isolated three bacterial strains from our Phaeocystis cultures. All three bacterial strains were capable of growing solely on the polymer gels produced by Phaeocystis without added inorganic nitrogen sources. We used the bacterial and protist strains to investigate degradation and alterations (size, chemical composition) of Phaeocystis polymer gels by bacteria alone and in the presence of protists. In a typical experiment, bacterial abundance in the presence of protists was reduced to one third of that in the control due to grazing, but the degradation rate was about the same. This indicates either that grazing by the protist somehow enhanced the per cell rate of bacterial degradation and/or the protist was ingesting polymer directly. Residual polymer remained after weeks, but the mean the mean diameter of the polymers were shortened considerably to ca. 200 nm. These results, along with other lines of evidence, suggest that it may be the length of polymer that limits degradation, which has important implications for the large pool of refractory DOM in the oceans. Chemical analyses indicated that the polymers are carbohydrate-rich and that the nitrogen is not proteinaceous, but most likely in the form of low molecular weight compounds such as amino sugars or sialic acid, and that they had a surprisingly low C:N ratios (<9). Extracellular polymers may therefore provide a nutritional substrate for bacteria and protists without the need for other sources of nitrogen in nature.

  19. Investigation of Nuclear Partonic Structure. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Henry J.; Engelage, J. M.

    2016-08-30

    Our research program had two primary goals during the period of this grant, to search for new and rare particles produced in high-energy nuclear collisions and to understand the internal structure of nuclear matter. We have developed electronics to pursue these goals at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC (STAR) experiment and the AnDY experiment. Our results include discovery of the anti-hyper-triton, anti- 3Λ-barH, which opened a new branch on the chart of the nuclides, and the anti-alpha, anti- 4He, the heaviest form of anti-matter yet seen, as well as uncovering hints of gluon saturation in cold nuclear matter and observation of jets in polarized proton-proton collisions that will be used to probe orbital motion inside protons.

  20. PEM Degradation Investigation Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Stevenson; Lee H Spangler

    2010-10-18

    This project conducted fundamental studies of PEM MEA degradation. Insights gained from these studies were disseminated to assist MEA manufacturers in understanding degradation mechanisms and work towards DOE 2010 fuel cell durability targets.

  1. FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai S. Shah

    2003-08-07

    Current and next generation experiments in nuclear and particle physics require detectors with high spatial resolution, fast response, and accurate energy information. In many nuclear physics experiments, existing detector technology is the limiting factor. The proposed project aims to investigate a promising detector concept that will have wide applicability in particle physics and many other applications.

  2. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Robert C.; Kamon, Teruki; Toback, David; Safonov, Alexei; Dutta, Bhaskar; Dimitri, Nanopoulos; Pope, Christopher; White, James

    2013-11-18

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  3. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, Fred C.

    2003-01-15

    species of flagellates, Spumella sp. and Bodo sp. (identifications are tentative) were isolated from South Oyster sediments by repetitive serial dilution/extinction method. Protistan cells were cultured with Cereal leaf Prescott medium and pelleted by centrifugation. Protistan DNAs were extracted with a DNA extraction kit (Sigma Co.) and the sequencing of their SSrDNA is underway. Finally, to follow up on our collaboration of Dr. Bill Johnson (Univ. of Utah), one of the co-PIs under the same NABIR umbrella, we are pleased to report we have successfully tested antibody-ferrographic capture of protists (See previous year's report for more background). Polyclonal FITC-conjugated antibody specific for a flagellate, Spumella sp., was produced by Rockland Inc., and we now are able to enumerate that species using ferrographic capture. There are, however, some issues of non-specific staining that remain to be resolved.

  4. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph H. Simmons; Tracie J. Bukowski

    2002-08-07

    This grant was a continuation of research conducted at the University of Florida under Grant No. DE-FG05-91ER45462 in which we investigated the energy bandgap shifts produced in semiconductor quantum dots of sizes between 1.5 and 40 nm. The investigated semiconductors consisted of a series of Column 2-6 compounds (CdS, CdSe, CdTe) and pure Column IV elements (Si and Ge). It is well-known of course that the 2-6 semiconductors possess a direct-gap electronic structure, while the Column IV elements possess an indirect-gap structure. The investigation showed a major difference in quantum confinement behavior between the two sets of semiconductors. This difference is essentially associated with the change in bandgap energy resulting from size confinement. In the direct-gap semiconductors, the change in energy (blue shift) saturates when the crystals approach 2-3 nm in diameter. This limits the observed shift in energy to less than 1 eV above the bulk value. In the indirect-gap semiconductors, the energy shift does not show any sign of saturation and in fact, we produced Si and Ge nanocrystals with absorption edges in the UV. The reason for this difference has not been determined and will require additional experimental and theoretical studies. In our work, we suggest, but do not prove that mixing of conduction band side valleys with the central valley under conditions of size confinement may be responsible for the saturation in the blue-shift of direct-gap semiconductors. The discovery of large bandgap energy shifts with crystal size prompted us to suggest that these materials may be used to form photovoltaic cells with multi-gap layers for high efficiency in a U.S. Patent issued in 1998. However, this possibility depends strongly on the ability to collect photoexcited carriers from energy-confined crystals. The research conducted at the University of Arizona under the subject grant had a major goal of testing an indirect gap semiconductor in size-confined structures to

  5. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Michael C. Weinberg; Lori L. Burgner; Joseph H. Simmons

    2003-05-23

    OAK B135 The formation of metastable crystalline phases in lithium disilicate glass has been a subject of controversy for decades. Here, one aspect of this problem relating to the stability of these non-equilibrium phases when glasses are heated for extended time periods in the nucleation regime is addressed. The results of a systematic experimental investigation on the persistence of metastable phases and the factors that may influence the appearance of such phases, e.g., water content, impurities, glass composition, and glass preparation procedure are presented. Growth rates of lithium disilicate crystals in lithium disilicate glass are measured as a function water concentration in the glass and of temperature in the deeply undercooled regime. The growth rate data obtained in this work are combined with data reported in the literature and used to assess the applicability of standard models of crystal growth for the description of experimental results over a very broad temperature range. The reduced growth rate versus undercooling graph is found to consist of three regimes. For undercoolings less than 140°C, the reduced growth rate curve is suggestive of either 2-D surface nucleation or screw dislocation growth. For undercoolings greater than 400°C, the reduced growth rate plot suggests the operative crystal growth mechanism is 2-D surface nucleation, but detailed calculations cast doubt upon this conclusion. In the intermediate undercooling range, there appears to be some sort of transitional behavior for which none of the standard models appear to be applicable. Further, it is observed that small differences in the viscosity data employed can produce enormous differences in the predicted growth rates at larger undercoolings. Results of the kinetic analyses conducted herein seem to indicate that the nature of the kinetic rate coefficient used in the standard growth models may be incorrect. Nucleation rates of sodium metasilicate crystals in a sodium silicate

  6. FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, Mark W; McDaniel, Anthony; Schweighardt, Frank K

    2003-05-23

    In this program the teams at Penn State University (PSU), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), DCH Technology (DCHT), and Air Products and Chemicals Inc. (APCI), have aggressively pursued engineering solutions to eliminate barriers to solid-state chemiresistor hydrogen sensor technology. The metallurgical effects of alloying palladium with nickel have been shown to prevent phase transitions in the thin films at high H2 overpressures, making the devices more suitable for IOF process conditions. We investigated the use of thin, semi-permeable membranes that protect the catalytic surface from poisoning or other undesirable surface reactions that would otherwise reduce sensitivity or operability in harsh IOF process environments. The results of this project have provided new insight into the effects of metallurgy and protective coatings on device behavior, and open new avenues for research in this field. Commercialization of this sensor technology could be easily achieved, although not yet realized. The benefits to society, once this technology is commercialized, is a dramatic cost and energy savings to the industry, which employs these sensors. In addition, the fundamental understandings gained in this program could have an impact on both cost and safety in the future hydrogen economy utilizing hydrogen fuel cells and hydrogen storage.

  7. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Benson

    2012-09-24

    This project combines outcrop-scale heterogeneity characterization, laboratory experiments, and numerical simulations. The study is designed to test whether established dispersion theory accurately predicts the behavior of solute transport through heterogeneous media and to investigate the relationship between heterogeneity and the parameters that populate these models. The dispersion theory tested by this work is based upon the fractional advection-dispersion equation (fADE) model. Unlike most dispersion studies that develop a solute transport model by fitting the solute transport breakthrough curve, this project will explore the nature of the heterogeneous media to better understand the connection between the model parameters and the aquifer heterogeneity. Our work at the Colorado School of Mines was focused on the following questions: 1) What are the effects of multi-scale geologic variability on transport of conservative and reactive solutes? 2) Can those transport effects be accounted for by classical methods, and if not, can the nonlocal fractional-order equations provide better predictions? 3) Can the fractional-order equations be parameterized through a link to some simple observable geologic features? 4) Are the classical equations of transport and reaction sufficient? 5) What is the effect of anomalous transport on chemical reaction in groundwater systems? The work is predicated on the observation that upscaled transport is defined by loss of information, or spatio-temporal averaging. This averaging tends to make the transport laws such as Fick's 2nd-order diffusion equation similar to central limit theory. The fractional-order advection-dispersion equations rely on limit theory for heavy-tailed random motion that has some diverging moments. The equations predict larger tails of a plume in space and/or time than those predicted by the classical 2nd-order advection-dispersion equation. The heavy tails are often seen in plumes at field sites.

  8. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, Jeff

    2014-07-31

    The purpose of this project was to develop tools and techniques to improve the ability of computational scientists to investigate and correct problems (bugs) in their programs. Specifically, the University of Maryland component of this project focused on the problems associated with the finite number of bits available in a computer to represent numeric values. In large scale scientific computation, numbers are frequently added to and multiplied with each other billions of times. Thus even small errors due to the representation of numbers can accumulate into big errors. However, using too many bits to represent a number results in additional computation, memory, and energy costs. Thus it is critical to find the right size for numbers. This project focused on several aspects of this general problem. First, we developed a tool to look for cancelations, the catastrophic loss of precision in numbers due to the addition of two numbers whose actual values are close to each other, but whose representation in a computer is identical or nearly so. Second, we developed a suite of tools to allow programmers to identify exactly how much precision is required for each operation in their program. This tool allows programmers to both verify that enough precision is available, but more importantly find cases where extra precision could be eliminated to allow the program to use less memory, computer time, or energy. These tools use advanced binary modification techniques to allow the analysis of actual optimized code. The system, called Craft, has been applied to a number of benchmarks and real applications.

  9. FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Juergen Eckert; Anthony K. Cheetham

    2011-03-11

    Hydrogen storage systems based on the readily reversible adsorption of H{sub 2} in porous materials have a number of very attractive properties with the potential to provide superior performance among candidate materials currently being investigated were it not for the fact that the interaction of H{sub 2} with the host material is too weak to permit viable operation at room temperature. Our study has delineated in quantitative detail the structural elements which we believe to be the essential ingredients for the future synthesis of porous materials, where guest-host interactions are intermediate between those found in the carbons and the metal hydrides, i.e. between physisorption and chemisorption, which will result in H{sub 2} binding energies required for room temperature operation. The ability to produce porous materials with much improved hydrogen binding energies depends critically on detailed molecular level analysis of hydrogen binding in such materials. However, characterization of H{sub 2} sorption is almost exclusively carried by thermodynamic measurements, which give average properties for all the sites occupied by H{sub 2} molecules at a particular loading. We have therefore extensively utilized the most powerful of the few molecular level experimental probes available to probe the interactions of hydrogen with porous materials, namely inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy of the hindered rotations of the hydrogen molecules adsorbed at various sites, which in turn can be interpreted in a very direct way in by computational studies. This technique can relate spectral signatures of various H{sub 2} molecules adsorbed at binding sites with different degrees of interaction. In the course of this project we have synthesized a rather large number of entirely new hybrid materials, which include structural modifications for improved interactions with adsorbed hydrogen. The results of our systematic studies on many porous materials provide detailed

  10. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hameed A. Naseem, Husam H. Abu-Safe

    2007-02-09

    The purpose of this project was to investigate metal-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon at low temperatures using excitation sources such as laser and rapid thermal annealing, as well as, electric field. Deposition of high quality crystalline silicon at low temperatures allows the use of low cost soda-lime glass and polymeric films for economically viable photovoltaic solar cells and low cost large area flat panel displays. In light of current and expected demands on Si supply due to expanding use of consumer electronic products throughout the world and the incessant demand for electric power the need for developing high grade Si thin films on low cost substrate becomes even more important. We used hydrogenated and un-hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and sputtering techniques (both of which are extensively used in electronic and solar cell industries) to fabricate nano-crystalline, poly-crystalline (small as well as large grain), and single-crystalline (epitaxial) films at low temperatures. We demonstrated Si nanowires on flat surfaces that can be used for fabricating nanometer scale transistors. We also demonstrated lateral crystallization using Al with and without an applied electric field. These results are critical for high mobility thin film transistors (TFT) for large area display applications. Large grain silicon (~30-50 µm grain size for < 0.5 µm thick films) was demonstrated on glass substrates at low temperatures. We also demonstrated epitaxial growth of silicon on (100) Si substrates at temperatures as low as 450°C. Thin film Si solar cells are being projected as the material of choice for low cost high efficiency solar cells when properly coupled with excellent light-trapping schemes. Ar ion laser (CW) was shown to produce dendritic nanowire structures at low power whereas at higher powers yielded continuous polycrystalline films. The power density required for films in contact with Al

  11. Final Results from A Pilot Project to Investigate Wake Vortex Patterns and Weather Patterns at the Atlantic City Airport by the Richard Stockton College of NJ and the FAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trout, Joseph; Manson, J. Russell; King, David; Decicco, Nicolas; Prince, Alyssa; di Mercurio, Alexis; Rios, Manual

    2017-01-01

    Wake Vortex Turbulence is the turbulence generated by an aircraft in flight. This turbulence is created by vortices at the tips of the wing that may decay slowly and persist for several minutes after creation. These vortices and turbulence are hazardous to other aircraft in the vicinity. The strength, formation and lifetime of the turbulence and vortices are effected by many things including the weather. Here we present the final results of the pilot project to investigation of low level wind fields generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting Model and an analysis of historical data. The findings from the historical data and the data simulations were used as inputs for the computational fluid dynamics model (OpenFoam) to show that the vortices could be simulated using OpenFoam. Presented here are the updated results from a research grant, ``A Pilot Project to Investigate Wake Vortex Patterns and Weather Patterns at the Atlantic City Airport by the Stockton University and the FAA''.

  12. B280 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ulmer, J.; Loomis, G.; Sampson, M.

    2011-09-29

    Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS) has commissioned this independent Structural Condition Assessment as part of its Functional Management Review of the decommissioned Livermore Pool-Type Reactor (LPTR) located in Building 280 at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) for the purpose of addressing a potential management concern regarding the nature and impact of observed cracks in the LPTR shielding structure discovered approximately 8 months earlier. This assessment represents the final report from an initial investigation performed between July 11th and July 15th, 2011. The Exit Briefing presented by the review team at the conclusion of the on-site investigation phase is included as Attachment A.

  13. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sobecky, Patricia A; Taillefert, Martial

    2013-03-29

    This final technical report describes results and findings from a research project to examine the role of microbial phosphohydrolase enzymes in naturally occurring subsurface microorganisms for the purpose of promoting the immobilization of the radionuclide uranium through the production of insoluble uranium phosphate minerals. The research project investigated the microbial mechanisms and the physical and chemical processes promoting uranium biomineralization and sequestration in oxygenated subsurface soils. Uranium biomineralization under aerobic conditions can provide a secondary biobarrier strategy to immobilize radionuclides should the metal precipitates formed by microbial dissimilatory mechanisms remobilize due to a change in redox state.

  14. Final focus system for TLC

    SciTech Connect

    Oide, K.

    1988-11-01

    A limit of the chromaticity correction for the final focus system of a TeV Linear Collider (TLC) is investigated. As the result, it becomes possible to increase the aperture of the final doublet with a small increase of the horizontal US function. The new optics design uses a final doublet of 0.5 mm half-aperture and 1.4 T pole-tip field. The length of the system is reduced from 400 m to 200 m by several optics changes. Tolerances for various machine errors with this optics are also studied. 5 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Investigation of polycrystalline thin-film CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells based on ZnSe and ZnO buffer layers. Final report, February 16, 1992--November 15, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, L C

    1996-06-01

    The major objective of this program was to determine the potential of ZnSe and ZnO buffer layers in solar cells based on CuInSe{sub 2} and related alloys. Experimental studies were carried out with CIS and CIGSS substrates. ZnSe films were deposited by a CVD process which involved the reaction of a zinc adduct and H{sub 2}Se. Al/ZnSe/CIS test cells were used for process development. Test cell performance aided in determining the optimum thickness for ZnSe buffer layers to be in the range of 150 {angstrom} to 200 {angstrom} for Siemens CIS material, and between 80 {angstrom} and 120 {angstrom} for the graded absorber material. If the buffer layers exceeded these values significantly, the short-circuit current would be reduced to zero. The best efficiency achieved for a ZnSe/CIS cell was an active area value of 9.2%. In general, deposition of a conductive ZnO film on top of a ZnSe/CIS structure resulted in either shunted or inflected I-V characteristics. Two approaches were investigated for depositing ZnO buffer layers, namely, chemical bath deposition and CVD. CVD ZnO buffer layers are grown by reacting a zinc adduct with tetrahydrofuran. Best results were obtained for ZnO buffer layers grown with a substrate temperature ca. 225--250 C. These studies concentrated on Siemens graded absorber material (CIGSS). ZnO/CIS solar cells have been fabricated by first depositing a ZnO buffer layer, followed by deposition of a low resistivity ZnO top contact layer and an Al/Ag collector grid. Several cells were fabricated with an area of 0.44 cm{sup 2} that have total area efficiencies greater than 11%. To date, the best performing ZnO/CIS cell had a total area efficiency of 11.3%. In general, the authors find that ZnO buffer layers should have a resistivity > 1,000 ohm-cm and have a thickness from 200 {angstrom} to 600 {angstrom}. CIS cells studies with ZnO buffer layers grown by CBD also show promise. Finally, simulation studies were carried out using the 1-D code, PC-1D.

  16. Verb-Final Typology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogihara, Saeko

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is a typological study of verb-final languages, the purpose of which is to examine various grammatical phenomena in verb-final languages to discover whether there are correlations between the final position of the verb and other aspects of grammar. It examines how finality of the verb interacts with argument coding in simple…

  17. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    John Tanis

    2005-11-25

    This document comprises the final technical report for atomic collisions research supported by DOE grant No. DE-FG02-87ER13778 from September 1, 2001 through August 31, 2004. The research involved the experimental investigation of excitation and charge-changing processes occurring in ion-atom and ion-molecule collisions. Major emphases of the study were: (1) interference effects resulting from coherent electron emission in H2, (2) production of doubly vacant K-shell (hollow ion) states due to electron correlation, and (3) formation of long-lived metastable states in electron transfer processes. During the period of the grant, this research resulted in 23 publications, 12 invited presentations, and 39 contributed presentations at national and international meetings and other institutions. Brief summaries of the completed research are presented below.

  18. Fire investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomberg, A.

    There was considerable progress made on several fronts of fire investigation in the United States in recent years. Progress was made in increasing the quantity of fire investigation and reporting, through efforts to develop the National Fire Incident Reporting System. Improving overall quality of fire investigation is the objective of efforts such as the Fire Investigation Handbook, which was developed and published by the National Bureau of Standards, and the upgrading and expanding of the ""dictionary'' of fire investigation and reporting, the NFPA 901, Uniform Coding for Fire Protection, system. The science of fire investigation as furthered also by new approaches to post fire interviews being developed at the University of Washington, and by in-depth research into factors involved in several large loss fires, including the MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas. Finally, the use of special study fire investigations - in-depth investigations concentrating on specific fire problems - is producing new glimpses into the nature of the national fire problem. A brief description of the status of efforts in each of these areas is discussed.

  19. Investigation Organizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panontin, Tina; Carvalho, Robert; Keller, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the folloving:Overview of the Application; Input Data; Analytical Process; Tool's Output; and Application of the Results of the Analysis.The tool enables the first element through a Web-based application that can be accessed by distributed teams to store and retrieve any type of digital investigation material in a secure environment. The second is accomplished by making the relationships between information explicit through the use of a semantic network-a structure that literally allows an investigator or team to "connect -the-dots." The third element, the significance of the correlated information, is established through causality and consistency tests using a number of different methods embedded within the tool, including fault trees, event sequences, and other accident models. And finally, the evidence gathered and structured within the tool can be directly, electronically archived to preserve the evidence and investigative reasoning.

  20. From the utilization point of view, the two approaches seem to United States Air Force 611th Air Support Group/Civil Engineering Squadron, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Remedial investigation and feasibility study Point Barrow Radar Installation, Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karmi, S.

    1996-02-19

    This report presents the findings of Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies at sites located at the Point Barrow radar installation in northern Alaska. The sites were characterized based on sampling and analyses conducted during Remedial Investigation activities performed during August and September 1993.

  1. United States Air Force 611th air support group 611th Civil Engineer Squadron, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Eareckson Air Station, Alaska. Remedial investigation/feasibility study report, final. Volume 1. Report for July 1994-September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-25

    The Report, has been prepared to present the findings of the environmental investigation activities conducted at Eareckson Air Station. The RI/FS report has been divided into four primary volumes. This volume, Volume I, provides general information about environmental activities conducted at Eareckson AS to date (Section 1.0), summarizes 1993 and 1994 investigation activities (Section 2.0), outlines the decision process (Section 3.0), and presents basewide findings (Section 4.0).

  2. Tiger LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steich, D J; Brugger, S T; Kallman, J S; White, D A

    2000-02-01

    This final report describes our efforts on the Three-Dimensional Massively Parallel CEM Technologies LDRD project (97-ERD-009). Significant need exists for more advanced time domain computational electromagnetics modeling. Bookkeeping details and modifying inflexible software constitute a vast majority of the effort required to address such needs. The required effort escalates rapidly as problem complexity increases. For example, hybrid meshes requiring hybrid numerics on massively parallel platforms (MPPs). This project attempts to alleviate the above limitations by investigating flexible abstractions for these numerical algorithms on MPPs using object-oriented methods, providing a programming environment insulating physics from bookkeeping. The three major design iterations during the project, known as TIGER-I to TIGER-III, are discussed. Each version of TIGER is briefly discussed along with lessons learned during the development and implementation. An Application Programming Interface (API) of the object-oriented interface for Tiger-III is included in three appendices. The three appendices contain the Utilities, Entity-Attribute, and Mesh libraries developed during the project. The API libraries represent a snapshot of our latest attempt at insulated the physics from the bookkeeping.

  3. MESSENGER Final Image

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-30

    Today, the MESSENGER spacecraft sent its final image. Originally planned to orbit Mercury for one year, the mission exceeded all expectations, lasting for over four years and acquiring extensive datasets with its seven scientific instruments and radio science investigation. This afternoon, the spacecraft succumbed to the pull of solar gravity and impacted Mercury's surface. The image shown here is the last one acquired and transmitted back to Earth by the mission. The image is located within the floor of the 93-kilometer-diameter crater Jokai. The spacecraft struck the planet just north of Shakespeare basin. Date acquired: April 30, 2015 Image Mission Elapsed Time (MET): 72716050 Image ID: 8422953 Instrument: Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) of the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) Center Latitude: 72.0° Center Longitude: 223.8° E Resolution: 2.1 meters/pixel Scale: This image is about 1 kilometers (0.6 miles) across Incidence Angle: 57.9° Emission Angle: 56.5° Phase Angle: 40.7° http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19448

  4. Vet Centers. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-03-02

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopts as final an interim final rule that amends its medical regulation that governs Vet Center services. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (the 2013 Act) requires Vet Centers to provide readjustment counseling services to broader groups of veterans, members of the Armed Forces, including a member of a reserve component of the Armed Forces, and family members of such veterans and members. This final rule adopts as final the regulatory criteria to conform to the 2013 Act, to include new and revised definitions.

  5. Cassini's Grand Finale: The Final Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Linda; Edgington, Scott

    2016-04-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission, a joint collaboration between NASA, ESA and the Italian Space Agency, is approaching its last year of operations after nearly 12 years in orbit around Saturn. Cassini will send back its final bits of unique data on September 15th, 2017 as it plunges into Saturn's atmosphere, vaporizing and satisfying planetary protection requirements. Before that time Cassini will continue its legacy of exploration and discovery with 12 close flybys of Titan in 2016 and 2017 that will return new science data as well as sculpt the inclinations and periods of the final orbits. Even though all of our close icy satellite flybys, including those of Enceladus, are now completed, numerous Voyager-class flybys (<100,000 km) of Mimas and Enceladus remain as well as some of our best flybys of the tiny ring moons. Cassini will also continue to study seasonal and temporal changes in the system as northern summer solstice approaches. In November 2016 Cassini will transition to a series of orbits with peripases just outside Saturn's F ring. These 20 orbits will include close flybys of some tiny ring moons and excellent views of the F ring and outer A ring. The 126th and final close flyby of Titan will propel Cassini across Saturn's main rings and into its final orbits. Cassini's Grand Finale, starting in April 2017, is comprised of 22 orbits at an inclination of 63 degrees. Cassini will repeatedly dive between the innermost rings and the upper atmosphere of the planet providing insights into fundamental questions unattainable during the rest of the mission. Cassini will be the first spacecraft to explore this region. These close orbits provide the highest resolution observations of both the rings and Saturn, and direct in situ sampling of the ring particles, composition, plasma, Saturn's exosphere and the innermost radiation belts. Saturn's gravitational field will be measured to unprecedented accuracy, providing information on the interior structure of the planet

  6. Investigation of blown boundary layers with an improved wall jet system. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Technical Report, 1 Jul. 1978 - Dec. 1979; [to prevent turbulent boundary layer separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saripalli, K. R.; Simpson, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior of two dimensional incompressible turbulent wall jets submerged in a boundary layer when they are used to prevent boundary layer separation on plane surfaces is investigated. The experimental set-up and instrumentation are described. Experimental results of zero pressure gradient flow and adverse pressure gradient flow are presented. Conclusions are given and discussed.

  7. A Report of the Special Committee on Investigations of the Select Committee on Indian Affairs. Final Report and Legislative Recommendations. Senate, 101st Congress, 1st Session (November 6, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs.

    In 1987, the United States Senate established the Special Committee to investigate American Indian affairs. Fraud, corruption, and mismanagement were found pervading the institutions serving American Indians. Corruption was also discovered in Indian tribal governments. The Committee faulted Congress for failing to adequately oversee and reform…

  8. United States Air Force 611th air support group 611th Civil Engineer Squadron, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Eareckson Air Station, Alaska Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Report, final. Volume 2. Report for July 1994-September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1995-08-30

    The Volume II has been prepared to present the findings of the environmental investigation activities conducted at Eareckson Air Station. The RI/FS report has been divided into four primary volumes. This volume, Volume II, discusses 13 source areas that are recommended to be proposed for no further action.

  9. 32 CFR 536.64 - Final offers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Final offers. 536.64 Section 536.64 National... UNITED STATES Investigation and Processing of Claims § 536.64 Final offers. (a) When claims personnel... timely. Note to § 536.64: For further discussion see DA Pam 27-162, paragraph 2-74. ...

  10. 32 CFR 536.64 - Final offers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Final offers. 536.64 Section 536.64 National... UNITED STATES Investigation and Processing of Claims § 536.64 Final offers. (a) When claims personnel... timely. Note to § 536.64: For further discussion see DA Pam 27-162, paragraph 2-74. ...

  11. 32 CFR 536.64 - Final offers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Final offers. 536.64 Section 536.64 National... UNITED STATES Investigation and Processing of Claims § 536.64 Final offers. (a) When claims personnel... timely. Note to § 536.64: For further discussion see DA Pam 27-162, paragraph 2-74. ...

  12. 32 CFR 536.64 - Final offers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Final offers. 536.64 Section 536.64 National... UNITED STATES Investigation and Processing of Claims § 536.64 Final offers. (a) When claims personnel... timely. Note to § 536.64: For further discussion see DA Pam 27-162, paragraph 2-74. ...

  13. 32 CFR 536.64 - Final offers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Final offers. 536.64 Section 536.64 National... UNITED STATES Investigation and Processing of Claims § 536.64 Final offers. (a) When claims personnel... timely. Note to § 536.64: For further discussion see DA Pam 27-162, paragraph 2-74. ...

  14. Type A Accident Investigation Board report on the January 17, 1996, electrical accident with injury in Technical Area 21 Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    An electrical accident was investigated in which a crafts person received serious injuries as a result of coming into contact with a 13.2 kilovolt (kV) electrical cable in the basement of Building 209 in Technical Area 21 (TA-21-209) in the Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility (TSFF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In conducting its investigation, the Accident Investigation Board used various analytical techniques, including events and causal factor analysis, barrier analysis, change analysis, fault tree analysis, materials analysis, and root cause analysis. The board inspected the accident site, reviewed events surrounding the accident, conducted extensive interviews and document reviews, and performed causation analyses to determine the factors that contributed to the accident, including any management system deficiencies. Relevant management systems and factors that could have contributed to the accident were evaluated in accordance with the guiding principles of safety management identified by the Secretary of Energy in an October 1994 letter to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board and subsequently to Congress.

  15. Report on surface geology and groundwater investigations of Mortons and Green Valley Well Fields. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas Project, Converse County, Wyoming; site evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    The general region of investigation of this report is in the southern part of the Powder River Basin near the Town of Douglas, Wyoming. Two specific areas within this region were investigated to determine the groundwater potential with drilling and testing programs during the years 1973 to 1975. One area of investigation is located approximately 12 miles west of Douglas in T32 and 33N, R73 and 74W, and is known as the Green Valley Well Field. This area is situated in the foothills of the north end of the Laramie Range and encompasses approximately 25 square miles. In this area the Madison Formation limestone and the Flathead Formation sandstone are the aquifers of interest for groundwater production. The second area is located approximately 13 miles north of Douglas in T34 and 35N, R70 and 71W, and is known as the Mortons Well Field. This area encompasses about 30 square miles. In this area, the Lance Formation and Fox Hills Formation sandstones are the aquifers of interest. Contained within the body of this report are two geologic studies prepared by consulting geologists, Dr. Peter Huntoon and Henry Richter. These studies define the pertinent structural and groundwater geologic features in and in the vicinities of the Mortons and Green Valley Well Fields. A relatively complex structural geology was encountered in the Green Valley area. The study of the Mortons area suggests that the geology of this area is relatively uniform. Inventories of the water users in the vicinities of the two study areas are included at the back of this report in Appendix B. These inventories are comprised of water appropriations as recognized by the Wyoming State Engineer's Office. Both groundwater and surface water appropriations are inventoried within the Green Valley study area. Only groundwater appropriations are inventoried within the Mortons study area.

  16. Infrared and Raman investigation of rare-earth phosphate glasses for potential use as radioactive waste forms. Historically Black Colleges and Universities Radioactive Waste Management Research Program: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, S.

    1986-11-10

    This project was designed to investigate the properties of the rare-earth phosphate glasses CeO{sub 2}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} and Pr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-P{sub 2}O{sub 5} for potential use as radioactive waste glasses. The research involved determination of the glass-forming region, loading capacity, and optimum processing parameters of the glasses. Structural studies of the unloaded host glasses and glasses loaded with simulated waste elements were to be done using Raman, infrared and infrared reflection spectroscopy. Leach testing and spectroscopic studies of the corroded surfaces were also to be performed.

  17. Acute results, complications, and effect of lesion characteristics on outcome with the solid-state, pulsed-wave, mid-infrared laser angioplasty system: final multicenter registry report. Holmium:YAG Laser Multicenter Investigators.

    PubMed

    Topaz, O; McIvor, M; Stone, G W; Krucoff, M W; Perin, E C; Foschi, A E; Sutton, J; Nair, R; deMarchena, E

    1998-01-01

    -month angiographic restenosis was documented in 54% of patients, and clinical restenosis occurred in 34% of patients. Mid-infrared laser has a safety profile similar to that of other debulking devices. This laser may be useful in select patients presenting with acute ischemic syndromes associated with intracoronary thrombus; however, like other coronary lasers, it is limited by the need for adjunctive balloon angioplasty and/or stenting to achieve adequate final luminal diameter. No beneficial effects on reducing 6-month restenosis rates were observed.

  18. LDRD Final Report - Investigations of the impact of the process integration of deposited magnetic films for magnetic memory technologies on radiation-hardened CMOS devices and circuits - LDRD Project (FY99)

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS,DAVID R.; JESSING,JEFFREY R.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; SHANEYFELT,MARTY R.

    2000-01-01

    This project represented a coordinated LLNL-SNL collaboration to investigate the feasibility of developing radiation-hardened magnetic non-volatile memories using giant magnetoresistance (GMR) materials. The intent of this limited-duration study was to investigate whether giant magnetoresistance (GMR) materials similar to those used for magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) were process compatible with functioning CMOS circuits. Sandia's work on this project demonstrated that deposition of GMR materials did not affect the operation nor the radiation hardness of Sandia's rad-hard CMOS technology, nor did the integration of GMR materials and exposure to ionizing radiation affect the magnetic properties of the GMR films. Thus, following deposition of GMR films on rad-hard integrated circuits, both the circuits and the films survived ionizing radiation levels consistent with DOE mission requirements. Furthermore, Sandia developed techniques to pattern deposited GMR films without degrading the completed integrated circuits upon which they were deposited. The present feasibility study demonstrated all the necessary processing elements to allow fabrication of the non-volatile memory elements onto an existing CMOS chip, and even allow the use of embedded (on-chip) non-volatile memories for system-on-a-chip applications, even in demanding radiation environments. However, funding agencies DTRA, AIM, and DARPA did not have any funds available to support the required follow-on technology development projects that would have been required to develop functioning prototype circuits, nor were such funds available from LDRD nor from other DOE program funds.

  19. World Cup Final

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-07-05

    On July 9, hundreds of millions of fans worldwide were glued to their television sets watching the final match of the 2006 FIFA World Cup, played in Berlin Olympic stadium Olympiastadion. This image was acquired by NASA Terra spacecraft.

  20. Cassini's Grand Finale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgington, Scott G.; Spilker, Linda J.

    2016-07-01

    After more than a decade exploring Saturn and its moons, the Cassini mission is in its closing act. Cassini's last year is an encore performance stuffed with science, including a final plunge into Saturn's atmosphere.

  1. Endeavour's Final Voyage

    NASA Image and Video Library

    After nearly two decades of achievements in space, Endeavour makes one last reach for the stars on its 25th and final mission, STS-134. This webcast examines the mission to come and explores the st...

  2. Final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration.

  3. Expedition 34 Final Training

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The Expedition 34 crew members conduct final training at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center before their Dec. 19 launch to the International Space Station. Flight Engineers Chris Hadfield, Roman...

  4. Final focus nomenclature

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.

    1986-08-08

    The formal names and common names for all devices in the final focus system of the SLC are listed. The formal names consist of a device type designator, microprocessor designator, and a four-digit unit number. (LEW)

  5. New NLC Final Focus

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.

    2004-10-11

    A novel design of the Final Focus has recently been proposed [1] and has been adopted now for the Next Linear Collider [2]. This new design has fewer optical elements and is much shorter, nonetheless achieving better chromatic properties. In this paper, the new final focus system is briefly discussed stressing one particular characteristic of the new design--its multi TeV energy reach.

  6. Data breaches. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2008-04-11

    This document adopts, without change, the interim final rule that was published in the Federal Register on June 22, 2007, addressing data breaches of sensitive personal information that is processed or maintained by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). This final rule implements certain provisions of the Veterans Benefits, Health Care, and Information Technology Act of 2006. The regulations prescribe the mechanisms for taking action in response to a data breach of sensitive personal information.

  7. Investigation of carbon dioxide in the South Atlantic and northern Weddell Sea areas (WOCE Sections A-12 and A-21) during the METEOR expedition 11/5, January--March 1990. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Chipman, D.W.; Takahashi, Taro; Breger, D.; Sutherland, S.C.

    1991-12-01

    This report summarizes the results of investigation the oceanographic expedition aboard the F/S METEOR in South Atlantic Ocean including the Drake Passage, the northern Weddell Sea and the eastern South Atlantic during the austral summer of January through March 1990. The total CO{sub 2} concentration in about 1300 seawater samples and CO{sub 2} partial pressure (pCO{sub 2}) in about 870 seawater samples collected at 77 stations were determined aboard the ship using a coulometer and equilibrator/gas chromatograph system. The temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and nutrient salt data presented in this report were determined by other participants of the expedition including the members of the Oceanographic Data Facility of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Argentine Hydrographic Office and German institutions.

  8. Explosive washout lagoons soils operable unit supplemental investigation technical and environmental management support of installation restoration technology development program, Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston. Oregon. Phase 2. Final Draft report, May 1991-May 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Raymondi, R.

    1992-04-15

    As part of an ongoing Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study at the Umatilla Army Depot, the soils of the Explosives Washout Lagoons at that installation were assigned as an operable unit for a possible expedited remedial action. Additional sampling was conducted to determine the explosives concentrations at depth beneath the lagoons, and to verify the absence of other contaminants. Explosives contamination was found from the ground surface to the groundwater at 47 feet. Concentrations were much higher in the top 3 feet than in the soil beneath that. Other organic contamination was not present; some metals were elevated slightly above background. The results of the study are being used in a feasibility study of remedial action alternatives.

  9. Explosives Washout Lagoons Soils Operable Unit supplemental investigation technical and environmental management support of installation-restoration technology development program, Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon. Final report, May 91-May 92

    SciTech Connect

    Raymondi, R.

    1992-04-15

    As part of an ongoing Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study at the Umatilla Army Depot, the soils of the Explosives Washout Lagoons at that installation were assigned as an operable unit for a possible expedited remedial action. Additional sampling was conducted to determine the explosives concentrations at depth beneath the lagoons, and to verify the absence of other contaminants. Explosives contamination was found from the ground surface to the groundwater at 47 feet. Concentrations were much higher in the top 3 feet than in the soil beneath that. Other organic contamination was not present; some metals were elevated slightly above background. The results of the study are being used in a feasibility study of remedial action alternatives.

  10. Final Scientific/Technical Report – DE-EE0002960 Recovery Act. Detachment faulting and Geothermal Resources - An Innovative Integrated Geological and Geophysical Investigation of Pearl Hot Spring, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Daniel F.

    2015-11-30

    The Pearl Host Spring Geothermal Project funded by the DoE Geothermal Program was a joint academic (KU/UT & OU) and industry collaboration (Sierra and Ram Power) to investigate structural controls and the importance of low-angle normal faults on geothermal fluid flow through a multifaceted geological, geophysical, and geochemical investigation in west-central Nevada. The study clearly showed that the geothermal resources in Clayton Valley are controlled by the interplay between low-angle normal faults and active deformation related to the Walker Lane. The study not only identified potentially feasible blind geothermal resource plays in eastern Clayton Valley, but also provide a transportable template for exploration in the area of west-central Nevada and other regional and actively-deforming releasing fault bends. The study showed that deep-seated low-angle normal faults likely act as crustal scale permeability boundaries and could play an important role in geothermal circulation and funneling geothermal fluid into active fault zones. Not unique to this study, active deformation is viewed as an important gradient to rejuvenated fracture permeability aiding the long-term viability of blind geothermal resources. The technical approach for Phase I included the following components, (1) Structural and geological analysis of Pearl Hot Spring Resource, (2) (U-Th)/He thermochronometry and geothermometry, (3) detailed gravity data and modeling (plus some magnetic and resistivity), (4) Reflection and Refraction Seismic (Active Source), (5) Integration with existing and new geological/geophysical data, and (6) 3-D Earth Model, combining all data in an innovative approach combining classic work with new geochemical and geophysical methodology to detect blind geothermal resources in a cost-effective fashion.

  11. Simulations of neutralized final focus

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Genoni, T.C.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.

    2005-01-18

    In order to drive an inertial fusion target or study high energy density physics with heavy ion beams, the beam radius must be focused to < 3 mm and the pulse length must be compressed to < 10 ns. The conventional scheme for temporal pulse compression makes use of an increasing ion velocity to compress the beam as it drifts and beam space charge to stagnate the compression before final focus. Beam compression in a neutralizing plasma does not require stagnation of the compression, enabling a more robust method. The final pulse shape at the target can be programmed by an applied velocity tilt. In this paper, neutralized drift compression is investigated. The sensitivity of the compression and focusing to beam momentum spread, plasma, and magnetic field conditions is studied with realistic driver examples. Using the 3D particle-in-cell code, we examine issues associated with self-field generation, stability, and vacuum-neutralized transport transition and focusing.

  12. Cassini's Grand Finale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, L. J.; Edgington, S. G.; Altobelli, N.

    2016-12-01

    After more than 12 years in Saturn orbit, the Cassini-Huygens mission has entered its final year of data collection. Cassini will return its final bits of unique data on 15 September 2017 as it plunges into Saturn's atmosphere, vaporizing and satisfying planetary protection requirements. Since early 2016 Cassini's orbital inclination was slowly increased towards its final inclination. In November Cassini transitioned to a series of 20 orbits with peripases just outside Saturn's F ring that include some of the closest flybys of the tiny ring moons and excellent views of the F ring and outer A ring. Cassini's final close flyby of Titan will propel it across Saturn's main rings and into its final orbits. Cassini's Grand Finale begins in April 2017 and is comprised of 22 orbits at an inclination of 63 degrees. Cassini will repeatedly dive between the innermost ring and Saturn's upper atmosphere providing insights into fundamental questions unattainable during the rest of the mission. It will be the first spacecraft to explore this region. These close orbits provide the highest resolution observations of both the rings and Saturn, and direct in situ sampling of the ring particles' composition, plasma, Saturn's exosphere and the innermost radiation belts. Saturn's gravitational field will be measured to unprecedented accuracy, providing information on Saturn's interior structure and mass distribution in the rings. Probing the magnetic field will give insight into the nature of the magnetic dynamo and the true rotation rate of Saturn's interior. The ion and neutral mass spectrometer will sniff the exosphere and upper atmosphere and examine water-based molecules originating from the rings. The cosmic dust analyzer will sample particle composition from different parts of the main rings. Recent science highlights and science objectives from Cassini's final orbits will be discussed. This work was carried out in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of

  13. Low cloud investigations for project FIRE: Island studies of cloud properties, surface radiation, and boundary layer dynamics. A simulation of the reflectivity over a stratocumulus cloud deck by the Monte Carlo method. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, Thomas P.; Lin, Ruei-Fong

    1993-01-01

    The radiation field over a broken stratocumulus cloud deck is simulated by the Monte Carlo method. We conducted four experiments to investigate the main factor for the observed shortwave reflectively over the FIRE flight 2 leg 5, in which reflectivity decreases almost linearly from the cloud center to cloud edge while the cloud top height and the brightness temperature remain almost constant through out the clouds. From our results, the geometry effect, however, did not contribute significantly to what has been observed. We found that the variation of the volume extinction coefficient as a function of its relative position in the cloud affects the reflectivity efficiently. Additional check of the brightness temperature of each experiment also confirms this conclusion. The cloud microphysical data showed some interesting features. We found that the cloud droplet spectrum is nearly log-normal distributed when the clouds were solid. However, whether the shift of cloud droplet spectrum toward the larger end is not certain. The decrease of number density from cloud center to cloud edges seems to have more significant effects on the optical properties.

  14. Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 2 -- Jointly sponsored research program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, V.E.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

  15. Identifying technology barriers in adapting a state-of-the-art gas turbine for IGCC applications and an experimental investigation of air extraction schemes for IGCC operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tah-teh; Agrawal, A.K.; Kapat, J.S.

    1993-06-01

    Under contracted work with Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Clemson University, the prime contractor, and General Electric (GE) and CRSS, the subcontractors, made a comprehensive study in the first phase of research to investigate the technology barriers of integrating a coal gasification process with a hot gas cleanup scheme and the state-of-the-art industrial gas turbine, the GE MS-7001F. This effort focused on (1) establishing analytical tools necessary for modeling combustion phenomenon and emissions in gas turbine combustors operating on multiple species coal gas, (2) estimates the overall performance of the GE MS-7001F combined cycle plant, (3) evaluating material issues in the hot gas path, (4) examining the flow and temperature fields when air extraction takes place at both the compressor exit and at the manhole adjacent to the combustor, and (5) examining the combustion/cooling limitations of such a gas turbine by using 3-D numerical simulation of a MS-7001F combustor operated with gasified coal. In the second phase of this contract, a 35% cool flow model was built similar to GE`s MS-7001F gas turbine for mapping the flow region between the compressor exit and the expander inlet. The model included sufficient details, such as the combustor`s transition pieces, the fuel nozzles, and the supporting struts. Four cases were studied: the first with a base line flow field of a GE 7001F without air extraction; the second with a GE 7001F with air extraction; and the third and fourth with a GE 7001F using a Griffith diffuser to replace the straight wall diffuser and operating without air extraction and with extraction, respectively.

  16. 10 CFR 950.37 - Final agreement or final decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Final agreement or final decision. 950.37 Section 950.37 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STANDBY SUPPORT FOR CERTAIN NUCLEAR PLANT DELAYS Dispute Resolution Process § 950.37 Final agreement or final decision. (a) If the parties reach a Final Agreement on a contract...

  17. 10 CFR 950.37 - Final agreement or final decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final agreement or final decision. 950.37 Section 950.37 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY STANDBY SUPPORT FOR CERTAIN NUCLEAR PLANT DELAYS Dispute Resolution Process § 950.37 Final agreement or final decision. (a) If the parties reach a Final Agreement on a contract...

  18. RASSP Final Technical Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-21

    AD-A258 56211t Ul!Il Hili11111 IMIl Uli GE Aerospace Advanced Technology Laboratories RASSP Final Technical Report DTIC CLIN 0002AB S /= 2 C U...2. REPORT DATE 4 REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED October 21, 1992 - Technical Report 5/18/92 - 10/21/92 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Rapid...Prototyping of Application Specific Signal CMDA972-92-R-O017 Processors (RASSP) Program - Stuay Phase Final Technical Report 6. AUTHOR(S) John 6delsh

  19. Final report for DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64404 - Field Investigations of Microbially Facilitated Calcite Precipitation for Immobilization of Strontium-90 and Other Trace Metals in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert W; Fujita, Yoshiko; Ginn, Timothy R; Hubbard, Susan S

    2012-10-12

    Subsurface radionuclide and metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE's greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide 90Sr, is co-precipitation in calcite. We have previously found that that nutrient addition can stimulate microbial ureolytic activity that this activity accelerates calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of Sr, and that higher calcite precipitation rates can result in increased Sr partitioning. We have conducted integrated field, laboratory, and computational research to evaluate the relationships between ureolysis and calcite precipitation rates and trace metal partitioning under environmentally relevant conditions, and investigated the coupling between flow/flux manipulations and precipitate distribution. A field experimental campaign conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site located at Rifle, CO was based on a continuous recirculation design; water extracted from a down-gradient well was amended with urea and molasses (a carbon and electron donor) and re-injected into an up-gradient well. The goal of the recirculation design and simultaneous injection of urea and molasses was to uniformly accelerate the hydrolysis of urea and calcite precipitation over the entire inter-wellbore zone. The urea-molasses recirculation phase lasted, with brief interruptions for geophysical surveys, for 12 days followed by long-term monitoring which continued for 13 months. Following the recirculation phase we found persistent increases in urease activity (as determined from 14C labeled laboratory urea hydrolysis rates) in the upper portion of the inter-wellbore zone. We also observed an initial increase (approximately 2 weeks) in urea concentration associated with injection activities followed by decreasing urea concentration and associated increases in ammonium and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC

  20. Project Adobe. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Curen, Sallie A.

    This final report describes activities and accomplishments of Project Adobe, the New Mexico Parent Training and Information Center, which provides information, support, education and training to families with school-aged children with disabilities in their local communities. Achievements include: (1) completion and printing of a booklet on the…

  1. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Chris

    2014-11-13

    The project, Capital Investment to Fund Equipment Purchases and Facility Modifications to Create a Sustainable Future for EnergyXchange served to replace landfill gas energy with alternative energy resources, primarily solar and wood waste. This is the final project closeout report.

  2. Final FDA inspection manual.

    PubMed

    Donawa, M

    2001-04-01

    For some time now, the only publicly available compliance programme guidance manual on medical device inspections and administrative and enforcement activities has been a draft document. On 7 February 2001, a final guidance document was issued. This article discusses this document and its importance to non-US medical device manufacturers preparing for FDA facility inspections.

  3. Final Prep on SSME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Alvin Pittman Sr., lead electronics technician with Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne, and Janine Cuevas, a mechanical technician with PWR, perform final preparations on the space shuttle main engine tested Oct. 25, 2005, at NASA's Stennis Space Center. It was the first main engine test since Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast on Aug. 29.

  4. GENIE final state interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dytman, Steven

    2015-10-15

    Final state interactions are an important component of any neutrino-nucleus Monte Carlo program. GENIE has 2 FSI programs which serve different purposes. Each has fair-good agreement with a wide range of hadron-nucleus data. Recent improvements and planned advancements are described.

  5. Rosetta: The Final Furlong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, I. P.; Andrews, D. J.; Barber, S. J.; Sheridan, S.; Morgan, G. H.; Morse, A. D.

    2014-09-01

    By the time of the meeting, the Rosetta spacecraft will have formally arrived at its target comet, and final landing site selection will be in progress. One of the instruments that will be sent down to the surface of the comet is Ptolemy (a GC-MS).

  6. Final Prep on SSME

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2005-10-25

    Alvin Pittman Sr., lead electronics technician with Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne, and Janine Cuevas, a mechanical technician with PWR, perform final preparations on the space shuttle main engine tested Oct. 25, 2005, at NASA's Stennis Space Center. It was the first main engine test since Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast on Aug. 29.

  7. Progressive utterance-final lengthening in syllables with final fricatives.

    PubMed

    Berkovits, R

    1993-01-01

    The generality of the pattern of progressively greater lengthening within the utterance-final syllable, previously found with respect to final stops, is shown to extend to syllables in Hebrew with final fricatives. Seven native speakers of Hebrew read matched sentence pairs in which bisyllabic key words appeared in non-final and sentence-final position. Final fricatives showed almost four times as much utterance-final lengthening as the preceding stressed vowel. Final lengthening affected the duration of each segment of the final syllable, and also extended to the initial unstressed syllable of the final word. Though final fricatives showed more lengthening in sentence-final position than final-stop closures, no difference was found in the lengthening of the vowels preceding these consonants. The greater lengthening of the final fricative relative to the preceding vowel resulted in C/V ratios which failed to distinguish between the voiceless fricative in non-final position and the voiced fricative in utterance-final position. These results suggest that sentence position is taken into account in the perception of voicing, such that the C/V ratio applicable in non-final position is increased by a factor of two in final position.

  8. Investigation of cold nuclear fusion in condensed matter. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.E.; Berrondo, M.; Czirr, J.B.; Decker, D.L.; Harrison, K.; Jensen, G.L.; Palmer, E.P.; Rees, L.B.; Shelton, D.S.; Taylor, S.; Vanfleet, H.B.; Wang, J.C.; Bennion, D.N.; Harb, J.N.; Pitt, W.G.; Thorne, J.M.; Anderson, A.N.; McMurtry, G.; Murphy, N.; Goff, F.E.

    1992-12-29

    Recent research has been directed towards finding means to produce neutron emissions at will, to demonstrate reproducibility, and to permit in-depth studies of the origin of neutron emissions. this goal has been pursued in the Kamiokande detector in Japan and has led to the development of a deep underground laboratory in a tunnel in the Wasatch mountains near Brigham Young University. New counters for low-level neutron emissions are being utilized. Calorimetric tools have also been developed.

  9. Final report : site reclassification investigation for Courtland, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Dennis, C. B.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-01-31

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated a grain storage facility in Courtland, Kansas. Prior to 1986, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the grain industry to preserve stored grain. In 1999, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) identified the former CCC/USDA operation as the likely source of carbon tetrachloride found in groundwater east of the former CCC/USDA facility in Courtland. Sampling by the KDHE in April 1998 had found carbon tetrachloride in the Garman residence lawn and garden well at a concentration of 2.1 {micro}g/L and in the Hoard residence lawn and garden well at a concentration of 0.5 {micro}g/L. Subsequent soil and groundwater sampling by the KDHE at the former CCC/USDA facility found no indication of a continuing source, and subsequent sampling of the affected wells showed generally declining contaminant levels. At the request of the KDHE and the CCC/USDA, Argonne National Laboratory prepared a Work Plan for Groundwater Sampling for Potential Site Reclassification, Courtland, Kansas (Argonne 2004). The objective of the proposed work was to conduct a single groundwater monitoring event and collect information necessary to update the status of the previously detected groundwater contamination, in support of an evaluation of appropriate actions for reclassification of the status of this site from active to resolved, under the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the USDA's Farm Service Agency (FSA). The reclassification would be in accordance with the KDHE's Reclassification Plan (Policy No. BERRS-024, online at http://www.kdhe.state.ks.us/pdf/ber/scp/reclass.pdf). The KDHE approved the Work Plan on August 8, 2005. Sampling was conducted on September 7, 2005.

  10. Offpost Operable Unit Remedial Investigation. Final Addendum. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-30

    0115022992 7 Comment No. 8. oaee 28. paragraph I EPA agrees with the Army’s conclusion that the data from three wells do not permit a defintive ...addresses the last paragraph on page It1. The text has been revised to indicate that although onpost RMA sources may impact some animal species found in the

  11. Final Work Plan: Phase I investigation at Eustis, Nebraska

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, Lorraine M.

    2013-05-01

    The village of Eustis is located in the northeast corner of Frontier County, Nebraska (Figure 1.1), near Interstate 80 and approximately 190 mi west of Lincoln. From 1950 to 1964, the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility at the southeastern edge of Eustis. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use to preserve grain in storage. In July 2011, the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services (NDHHS) calculated a running annual average concentration of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater from one of the Eustis public water supply wells (PWS 70-1) at 5.24 μg/L, exceeding the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5.0 μg/L. The running average value was calculated on the basis of results (4.01-6.87 μg/L) from four groundwater sampling events in 2011 for well PWS 70-1 (NDHHS 2011). On January 16, 2012, the village placed well PWS 70-1 on backup/standby status for emergency use only (Village of Eustis 2012). This results of this groundwater sampling are presented here.

  12. Cameron Station Remedial Investigation, Final Asbestos Survey Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-02-01

    CELLULOSE 2_5,tr FIBROUS GLASS 10-15 NONASBESTOS, FIBEROUS 1-2 NONASBESTOS, NONFIBROUS 75-80 COMMENTS: APPENDIX 6-F SAMPLE CHAIN-OF-CUSTODY FORMS...houses the installation’s clinic, is a wood frame structure built on pilings. The roof consists of asphalt shingles over roofing felt; the exterior...7 SH)26+-/ (GB)260- ( ROOF ) LEGEND © FLOOR TILE MAj MASTIC SHJ SHINGLES GBJ GYPSUM BOARD + DENOTES POSmVE RESULTS USATHAMA

  13. Investigation of electrical breakdown in vacuum. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Elizondo, J.M.; Moeny, W.M.

    1991-07-11

    The program objectives are focused on increasing the voltage applied across an electron beam diode. Two objectives were pursued during the program. The first was to increase the total voltage applied to anelectron gun anode--cathode (A-K) structure by suppressing electron emission from regions other than the electron source. The second objective was to prevent surface flashover from the cathode surface due to fiber contamination from the carbon felt used to enhance electron emission from the source. The primary approach consisted of using a dielectric coating (or a surface treatment), to suppress undesired electron emission from non-emission areas of the cathode. In addition to the dielectric coating, the electrode surfaces were profiled to eliminate field enhancements in the transition areas. The program objectives were met by demonstrating 300 kv/cm fields across the gap during current conduction with no breakdown or surface flashover. This field value was obtained with electrodes coated with a dielectric polymer on the surfaces around the electron source (carbon felt) and with electrodes without the coating. Total pulse width duration was 300 nsec for electrodes with no emitter (carbon felt) and 100 nsec for electrodes with the emitter.

  14. INVESTIGATION INTO THE RETRIEVAL INDEXING AND SEARCHING SYSTEM. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BERNINGER, DOUGLAS E.; AND OTHERS

    A STUDY WAS MADE OF THE FEDERAL AVIATION INFORMATION RETRIEVAL SYSTEM (FAIRS), WHICH SERVES DIVERSE INFORMATION NEEDS OF THE AGENCY'S TECHNICAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PERSONNEL. FAIRS WAS DEVELOPED TO OPERATIONAL CAPACITY BY (1) ASSIGNING DESCRIPTORS AND IDENTIFIERS TO REPORTS TO PREPARE THEM FOR SUBSEQUENT RETRIEVAL, (2) EXPANDING, DEVELOPING, AND…

  15. Offpost Operable Unit Remedial Investigation. Final Addendum. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-03-30

    8 2.1.2 Water -Level Monitoring and Groundwater Sampling ................. 9 2.1.3 Field Sampling Methodology ................................. 10...2.1.4 Analytical Program ......................................... 10 2.2 SURFACE- WATER MONITORING PROGRAM ........................ I 1 2.2.1 Surface... Water Sampling Network and Rationale ................... I11 2.2.2 Field Sampling M ethodology .................................. 12 2.2.3 Analytical

  16. Situations and Language: A Sociolinguistic Investigation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donofrio, Rosalie Maggio

    The purpose of this research was to begin to refute the deficit approach to the verbal abilities of poor children. The contention was that data collected on poor children's verbal abilities had been done in incorrect social situations. Prior research had indicated that language development is innate and that disadvantaged children will be…

  17. Using Literacy Outside of School: An Ethnographic Investigation. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David M.; And Others

    A 2-year study examined the leisure reading of 60 and other language arts instruction in elementary school classrooms in west Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, led to the conclusion that many school practices were based upon assumptions of the out-of-school lives of students that were of questionable accuracy. Consequently, the researchers were asked to…

  18. Investigating the physical basis of biomineralization. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dove, Patricia M.

    2001-01-01

    During the three years of this project, Professor Dove's laboratory made tremendous progress in understanding fundamental controls on crystal growth in simple model systems for the complex phenomenon of biological mineralization. Our collaboration with J.J. DeYoreo was productive and we surpassed the goals set forth in the original proposal to establish a new quantitative understanding of carbonate mineral crystallization. The findings from this project have been widely recognized across the scientific community by the award of the Mineralogical Society of America best paper award in 1998 and the Best University Research Award of 1999 at the Basic Energy sciences, Division of Geosciences ''Interfacial Processes Symposium''. In addition, two students working on this project received six different awards for their research findings.

  19. Lead acid battery pulse discharge investigation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dowgiallo, E

    1980-04-01

    The effects of high current pulses caused by electric vehicle silicon-controlled rectifier and transistor chopper controllers on battery energy, lifetime, and microstructure were studied. Test equipment and results are described. It was found that the energy of improved golf cart-type batteries deteriorated under pulsed conditions by about 10% with respect to dc conditions for pulses between 16 and 333 Hz - no difference was noted above 333 Hz. Frequencies and duty cycles characteristic of electric vehicle controllers produce ampere-hour capacities similar in magnitude to dc discharges of the same average currents. The amount of positive plate corrosion under pulsed conditions was about twice that ot the unpulsed. Unusually large lead sulfate crystals were found in isolated colonies in pulsed plates, whereas a battery that had been discharged each cycle at an equivalent steady state did not show these large crystals. 5 figures, 3 tables. (RWR)

  20. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Mike, J., P.E.

    2012-08-30

    The STI product is the Final Technical Report from ReliOn, Inc. for contract award DE-EE0000487: Recovery Act PEM Fuel Cell Systems Providing Emergency Reserve and Backup Power. The program covered the turnkey deployment of 431 ReliOn fuel cell systems at 189 individual sites for AT&T and PG&E with ReliOn functioning as the primary equipment supplier and the project manager. The Final Technical Report provides an executive level summary, a comparison of the actual accomplishments vs. the goals and objectives of the project, as well as a summary of the project activity from the contract award date of August 1, 2009 through the contract expiration date of December 31, 2011. Two photos are included in the body of the report which show hydrogen storage and bulk hydrogen refueling technologies developed as a result of this program.

  1. Geolocation Technologies Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Magnoli, D E

    2003-06-02

    This paper is the final report for LL998 In Situ Sensing Subtask 7 (Geo-location) undertaken for NNSA NA-22 enabling technologies R&D for Counterproliferation Detection. A few state-of-the-art resolution parameters are presented for accelerometers, indoor and outdoor GPS (Global Positioning Satellite) systems, and INSs (Inertial Navigation Systems). New technologies are described, including one which has demonstrated the ability to track within a building to a resolution of under a foot.

  2. Investigative negotiation.

    PubMed

    Malhotra, Deepak; Bazerman, Max H

    2007-09-01

    Negotiators often fail to achieve results because they channel too much effort into selling their own position and too little into understanding the other party's perspective. To get the best deal -or, sometimes, any deal at al--egotiators need to think like detectives, digging for information about why the other side wants what it does. This investigative approach entails a mind-set and a methodology, say Harvard Business School professors Malhotra and Bazerman. Inaccurate assumptions about the other side's motivations can lead negotiators to propose solutions to the wrong problems, needlessly give away value, or derail deals altogether. Consider, for example, the pharmaceutical company that deadlocked with a supplier over the issue of exclusivity in an ingredient purchase. Believing it was a ploy to raise the price, the drugmaker upped its offer--unsuccessfully. In fact, the supplier was balking because a relative's company needed a small amount of the ingredient to make a local product. Once the real motivation surfaced, a compromise quickly followed. Understanding the other side's motives and goals is the first principle of investigative negotiation. The second is to figure out what constraints the other party faces. Often when your counterpart's behavior appears unreasonable, his hands are tied somehow, and you can reach agreement by helping overcome those limitations. The third is to view onerous demands as a window into what the other party prizes most--and use that information to create opportunities. The fourth is to look for common ground; even fierce competitors may have complementary interests that lead to creative agreements. Finally, if a deal appears lost, stay at the table and keep trying to learn more. Even if you don't win, you can gain insights into a customer's future needs, the interests of similar customers, or the strategies of competitors.

  3. Dental conditions. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-01-30

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopts as a final rule the proposal to amend its adjudication regulations regarding service connection of dental conditions for treatment purposes. This amendment clarifies that principles governing determinations by VA's Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) for service connection of dental conditions for the purpose of establishing eligibility for dental treatment by VA's Veterans Health Administration (VHA), apply only when VHA requests information or a rating from VBA for those purposes. This amendment also clarifies existing regulatory provisions and reflects the respective responsibilities of VHA and VBA in determinations concerning eligibility for dental treatment.

  4. STS 65 Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, James E.

    1996-01-01

    The report is organized into sections representing the phases of work performed in analyzing the STS 65 results and preparing the instrument for STS 73. Section 1 briefly outlines the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) system features, coordinates, and measurement parameters. Section 2 describes the results from STS 65. The mission description, data calibration, and representative data obtained on STS 65 are presented. Also, the anomalous performance of OARE on STS 65 is discussed. Finally, Section 3 presents a discussion of accuracy achieved and achievable with OARE.

  5. Prometheus Project final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Randall

    2005-01-01

    This Final Report serves as an executive summary of the Prometheus Project's activities and deliverables from November 2002 through September 2005. It focuses on the challenges from a technical and management perspective, what was different and innovative about this project, and identifies the major options, decisions, and accomplishments of the Project team as a whole. However, the details of the activities performed by DOE NR and its contractors will be documented separately in accordance with closeout requirements of the DOE NR and consistent with agreements between NASA and NR.

  6. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: FINAL ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    During the period of July 8 - July 12, 1985, the Shirco Infrared Systems Portable Pilot Test Unit was in operation at the Times Beach Dioxin Research Facility to demonstrate the capability of Shirco's infrared technology to decontaminate silty soil laden with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) at a concentration range of 156 to 306 ppb. Emissions sampling and final analysis was performed by Environmental Research & Technology, Inc. (ERT), while laboratory analysis of the emissions and soil samples was performed by Roy F. Weston Inc. Shirco Infrared Systems prepared the testing procedure protocol and operated the furnace system. publish information

  7. Prometheus Project final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Randall

    2005-01-01

    This Final Report serves as an executive summary of the Prometheus Project's activities and deliverables from November 2002 through September 2005. It focuses on the challenges from a technical and management perspective, what was different and innovative about this project, and identifies the major options, decisions, and accomplishments of the Project team as a whole. However, the details of the activities performed by DOE NR and its contractors will be documented separately in accordance with closeout requirements of the DOE NR and consistent with agreements between NASA and NR.

  8. Service dogs. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-09-05

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its regulations concerning veterans in need of service dogs. Under this final rule, VA will provide to veterans with visual, hearing, or mobility impairments benefits to support the use of a service dog as part of the management of such impairments. The benefits include assistance with veterinary care, travel benefits associated with obtaining and training a dog, and the provision, maintenance, and replacement of hardware required for the dog to perform the tasks necessary to assist such veterans.

  9. 40 CFR 1620.9 - Final denial of claim.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final denial of claim. 1620.9 Section 1620.9 Protection of Environment CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD INVESTIGATION BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS ARISING UNDER THE FEDERAL TORT CLAIMS ACT § 1620.9 Final denial of claim. Final denial of...

  10. Cosmology Without Finality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahootian, F.

    2009-12-01

    The rapid convergence of advancing sensor technology, computational power, and knowledge discovery techniques over the past decade has brought unprecedented volumes of astronomical data together with unprecedented capabilities of data assimilation and analysis. A key result is that a new, data-driven "observational-inductive'' framework for scientific inquiry is taking shape and proving viable. The anticipated rise in data flow and processing power will have profound effects, e.g., confirmations and disconfirmations of existing theoretical claims both for and against the big bang model. But beyond enabling new discoveries can new data-driven frameworks of scientific inquiry reshape the epistemic ideals of science? The history of physics offers a comparison. The Bohr-Einstein debate over the "completeness'' of quantum mechanics centered on a question of ideals: what counts as science? We briefly examine lessons from that episode and pose questions about their applicability to cosmology. If the history of 20th century physics is any indication, the abandonment of absolutes (e.g., space, time, simultaneity, continuity, determinacy) can produce fundamental changes in understanding. The classical ideal of science, operative in both physics and cosmology, descends from the European Enlightenment. This ideal has for over 200 years guided science to seek the ultimate order of nature, to pursue the absolute theory, the "theory of everything.'' But now that we have new models of scientific inquiry powered by new technologies and driven more by data than by theory, it is time, finally, to relinquish dreams of a "final'' theory.

  11. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, Douglas C.; Restani, Marco, Ph.D

    2009-12-28

    The Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management award was used to establish the organization and initiate investigations of hazardous waste issues along the U.S.-Mexico border. Scientific investigations conducted during the execution of this grant contributed significant data and established new sampling protocols to the dimension, frequency and severity of hazardous materials (e.g., heavy metals) along the U.S.-Mexico border. Additionally, new protocols and assessments with distinct Homeland Security implications were embedded thus establishing a baseline that will be significant for related investigations in the future.

  12. DEWPOINT. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Riddle, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    The DEWPOINT (Directed Energy POwer INTegration) program was aimed at providing the large amounts of electric power required for a laser or accelerator based in space, or on an aircraft or satellite platform. This is our final report on our efforts as a part of this program which was cancelled before completion. This report summarizes the entire scope of effort funded by this program. It also includes some related information on cryogenically cooled microchannel heatsinks which was funded internally by LLNL. Specifically, the DEWPOINT program was to provide the electrical power for the proposed Neutral Particle Beam weapon system of the Strategic Defense Initiative. The Neutral Particle Beam called for a space-based accelerator driven by radio frequency power sources. The radio frequency solid-state power amplifiers generate waste heat which must be dissipated.

  13. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  14. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  15. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Stephen A.

    2003-06-23

    In this final technical report, a summary of work is provided. Concepts were developed for a new statistical cloud parameterization suitable for inclusion into global climate models. These concepts were evaluated by comparison to ARM data and data from cloud resolving models driven by ARM data. The purpose of this grant was to develop a new cloud parameterization for the global climate model of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Note that uncertainties in cloud parameterizations are a key reason why prediction of climate change from climate models remain unacceptably uncertain. To develop the parameterizations, the observations and models provided by the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program were analyzed and used.

  16. Final reduction gear apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Yasui, Y.; Hori, H.

    1987-04-21

    A final reduction gear apparatus is described comprising: a differential carrier which houses a gear assembly; an oil seal attached to a side gear shaft opening in the differential carrier, the oil seal having a main lip which may contact a periphery of a side gear shaft; and a guide member located outside of the oil seal at the side gear shaft opening, the guide member being formed as a member separate from the oil seal, the guide member having a slightly larger inner diameter than that of the main lip of the oil seal, and having guide surface concentric to the main lip, wherein 1/2 of the difference between the inner diameter of the guide member and the inner diameter of the main lip of the oil seal is within the limit of the elastic deformability of the main lip.

  17. FINAL/ SCIENTIFIC TECHNICAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Henry; Singh, Suminderpal

    2006-08-28

    The overall objective of the Chattanooga fuel cell demonstrations project was to develop and demonstrate a prototype 5-kW grid-parallel, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system that co-produces hydrogen, based on Ion America’s technology. The commercial viability of the 5kW SOFC system was tested by transporting, installing and commissioning the SOFC system at the Alternative Energy Laboratory at the University of Tennessee – Chattanooga. The system also demonstrated the efficiency and the reliability of the system running on natural gas. This project successfully contributed to the achievement of DOE technology validation milestones from the Technology Validation section of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan. Results of the project can be found in the final technical report.

  18. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Josef Michl

    2011-10-31

    In this project we have established guidelines for the design on organic chromophores suitable for producing high triplet yields via singlet fission. We have proven their utility by identifying a chromophore of a structural class that had never been examined for singlet fission before, 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran, and demonstrating in two independent ways that a thin layer of this material produces a triplet yield of 200% within experimental error. We have also designed a second chromophore of a very different type, again of a structural class that had not been examined for singlet fission before, and found that in a thin layer it produces a 70% triplet yield. Finally, we have enhanced the theoretical understanding of the quantum mechanical nature of the singlet fission process.

  19. AIPM Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    John Mookken

    2006-06-30

    The final AIPM project report consists of six sections. Each section includes information on the original AIPM project and extension work on the high temperature design. The first section (1) provides an overview of the program and highlights the significant targets to meet at the end of the program. The next section (2) summarizes the significant technical accomplishments by the SEMIKRON AIPM team during the course of the project. Greater technical details are provided in a collection of all the quarterly reports which can be found in the appendix. Section three (3) presents some the more significant technical data collected from technology demonstrators. Section four (4) analyzes the manufacturing cost or economic aspects of producing 100,000 units/yr. Section five (5) describes the commercialization efforts of the AIPM technology into the automotive market. The last section (6) recommends follow on work that will build on the efforts and achievements of the AIPM program.

  20. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    2010-11-09

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  1. Final cook temperature monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, John; Matthews, Michael; Glasco, Marc

    2006-04-01

    Fully cooked, ready-to-eat products represent one of the fastest growing markets in the meat and poultry industries. Modern meat cooking facilities typically cook chicken strips and nuggets at rates of 6000 lbs per hour, and it is a critical food safety issue to ensure the products on these lines are indeed fully cooked. Common practice now employs oven technicians to constantly measure final cook temperature with insertion-type thermocouple probes. Prior research has demonstrated that thermal imagery of chicken breasts and other products can be used to predict core temperature of products leaving an oven. In practice, implementation of a system to monitor core temperature can be difficult for several reasons. First, a wide variety of products are typically produced on the same production line and the system must adapt to all products. Second, the products can be often hard to find because they often leave the process in random order and may be touching or even overlapping. Another issue is finite measurement time which is typically only a few seconds. Finally, the system is subjected to a rigorous sanitation cycle and must hold up under wash down conditions. To address these problems, a calibrated 320x240 micro-bolometer camera was used to monitor the temperature of formed, breaded poultry products on a fully cooked production line for a period of one year. The study addressed the installation and operation of the system as well as the development of algorithms used to identify the product on a cluttered conveyor belt. It also compared the oven tech insertion probe measurements to the non-contact monitoring system performance.

  2. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Aristos Aristidou Natureworks); Robert Kean; Tom Schechinger; Stuart Birrell; Jill Euken

    2007-10-01

    The two main objectives of this project were: 1) to develop and test technologies to harvest, transport, store, and separate corn stover to supply a clean raw material to the bioproducts industry, and 2) engineer fermentation systems to meet performance targets for lactic acid and ethanol manufacturers. Significant progress was made in testing methods to harvest corn stover in a “single pass” harvest mode (collect corn grain and stover at the same time). This is technically feasible on small scale, but additional equipment refinements will be needed to facilitate cost effective harvest on a larger scale. Transportation models were developed, which indicate that at a corn stover yield of 2.8 tons/acre and purchase price of $35/ton stover, it would be unprofitable to transport stover more than about 25 miles; thus suggesting the development of many regional collection centers. Therefore, collection centers should be located within about 30 miles of the farm, to keep transportation costs to an acceptable level. These collection centers could then potentially do some preprocessing (to fractionate or increase bulk density) and/or ship the biomass by rail or barge to the final customers. Wet storage of stover via ensilage was tested, but no clear economic advantages were evident. Wet storage eliminates fire risk, but increases the complexity of component separation and may result in a small loss of carbohydrate content (fermentation potential). A study of possible supplier-producer relationships, concluded that a “quasi-vertical” integration model would be best suited for new bioproducts industries based on stover. In this model, the relationship would involve a multiyear supply contract (processor with purchase guarantees, producer group with supply guarantees). Price will likely be fixed or calculated based on some formula (possibly a cost plus). Initial quality requirements will be specified (but subject to refinement).Producers would invest in harvest

  3. Tunability of the NLC Final Focus System

    SciTech Connect

    Seryi, Andrei

    2001-07-23

    The performance of the new NLC Final Focus system has been investigated as a function of the incoming beam characteristics, such as energy, emittances, energy spread. A preliminary study of the tolerances and the tunability of the system is presented in this paper.

  4. California Prison Gang Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, Eric

    A project investigated the cultural life, ideology, and education systems of particular prison gangs. It focused on recent changes in the gang system regarding gang education, organizational structure, and the balance of power in prisons and in relations with street gangs. Finally, the project assessed California's response to its prison gangs, in…

  5. Final state interactions and inclusive nuclear collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Dubey, Rajendra R.

    1993-01-01

    A scattering formalism is developed in a multiple scattering model to describe inclusive momentum distributions for high-energy projectiles. The effects of final state interactions on response functions and momentum distributions are investigated. Calculations for high-energy protons that include shell model response functions are compared with experiments.

  6. Final Hazard Search

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-08

    This single frame from a four-frame movie shows New Horizons' final deep search for hazardous material around Pluto, obtained on July 1, 2015. These data allow a highly sensitive search for any new moons. The images were taken with the spacecraft's Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) over a 100-minute period, and were the final observations in the series of dedicated searches for hazards in the Pluto system which began on May 11. The images show all five known satellites of Pluto moving in their orbits around the dwarf planet, but analysis of these data has so far not revealed the existence of any additional moons. This means that any undiscovered Plutonian moons further than a few thousand miles from Pluto must be smaller than about 1 mile (1.6 kilometers) in diameter, if their surfaces have similar brightness to Pluto's big moon Charon. For comparison, Pluto's faintest known moon, Styx, which is conspicuous in the lower left quadrant of these images, is about 4 miles (7 kilometers) across, assuming the same surface brightness. The absence of additional moons, and also the absence of detectable rings in the hazard search data, imply that the spacecraft is very unlikely to be damaged by collisions with rings, or dust particles ejected from moons, during its high-speed passage through the Pluto system. The four movie frames were taken at 16:28, 16:38, 17:52, and 18:04 UTC on July 1, from a range of 9.4 million miles (15.2 million kilometers). Each frame is a mosaic of four sets of overlapping images, with a total exposure time of 120 seconds. The images have been heavily processed to remove the glare of Pluto and Charon, and the dense background of stars, though blemishes remain at the locations of many of the brighter stars. The "tails" extending to the right or downward from Pluto and Charon are camera artifacts caused by the extreme overexposure of both objects. Pluto and its five moons Charon, Styx, Nix, Kerberos and Hydra are identified by their initials

  7. Partner Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona Univ., Tucson. Dept. of Special Education.

    The study investigated the effectiveness of the Partner Project, a participation strategy on the participation of learning disabled high school students and their parents during the annual individualized education program (IEP) conference. Eleven students and their parents received the IEP participation strategy training which focused on…

  8. Cooperative Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stauber, Dick T.

    In order to investigate the feasibility of adding a cooperative education option to the curricular offerings of Moraine Park Technical Institute (MPTI), interviews were conducted with randomly selected representatives of 12 industries and 17 employers in the marketing and merchandising businesses located in the MPTI service area. In addition,…

  9. Cooperative Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stauber, Dick T.

    In order to investigate the feasibility of adding a cooperative education option to the curricular offerings of Moraine Park Technical Institute (MPTI), interviews were conducted with randomly selected representatives of 12 industries and 17 employers in the marketing and merchandising businesses located in the MPTI service area. In addition,…

  10. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Held, Isaac; V. Balaji; Fueglistaler, Stephan

    2016-09-19

    We have constructed and analyzed a series of idealized models of tropical convection interacting with large-scale circulations, with 25-50km resolution and with 1-2km cloud resolving resolution to set the stage for rigorous tests of convection closure schemes in high resolution global climate models. Much of the focus has been on the climatology of tropical cyclogenesis in rotating systems and the related problem of the spontaneous aggregation of convection in non-rotating systems. The PI (Held) will be delivering the honorary Bjerknes lecture at the Fall 2016 AGU meeting in December on this work. We have also provided new analyses of long-standing issues related to the interaction between convection and the large-scale circulation: Kelvin waves in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, water vapor transport into the stratosphere, and upper tropospheric temperature trends. The results of these analyses help to improve our understanding of processes, and provide tests for future high resolution global modeling. Our final goal of testing new convections schemes in next-generation global atmospheric models at GFDL has been left for future work due to the complexity of the idealized model results meant as tests for these models uncovered in this work and to computational resource limitations. 11 papers have been published with support from this grant, 2 are in review, and another major summary paper is in preparation.

  11. Final technical report.

    SciTech Connect

    Emmanuel J. Candes

    2007-11-06

    In the last two dcades or so, many multiscale algorthms have been proposed to enable large scale computations which were thought as nearly intractable. For example, the fast multipole algorithm and other similar ideas have allowed to considerably speed up fundamental computations in electromagnetism, and many other fields. The thesis underlying this proposal is that traditional multiscale methods have been well-developed and it is clear that we now need new ideas in areas where traditional spatial multiscaling is ill-suited. In this context, the proposal argues that clever phase-space computations is bound to plan a crucial role in advancing algorithms and high-performance scientific computing. Our research past accomplishments have shown the existence of ideas beyond the traditional scale-space viewpoint such as new multiscale geometric representations of phase-space. We have shown that these clever representations lead to enhanced sparsity. We have shown that enhanced sparsity has significant important implications both for analysis, and for numerical applications, where sparsity allows for faster algorithms. We have implemented these ideas and built computational tools to be used as new building blocks of a new generation of wave propagation solvers. Finally, we have deployed these ideas into novel algorithms. In this last year, we assembled all these techniques and made significant progress in solving a variety of computational problems, which we then applied in selected areas of considerable scientific interest.

  12. Omega, the final multiplier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, T. N.

    2008-12-01

    The application of optimisation theory to vegetation processes has rarely extended beyond the context of diurnal to intra-annual gas exchange of individual leaves and crowns. One reason is that the Lagrange multipliers in the leaf-scale solutions, which are marginal products for allocatable photosynthetic resource inputs (water and nitrogen), are mysterious in origin, and their numerical values are difficult to measure -- let alone to predict or interpret in concrete physiological or ecological terms. These difficulties disappear, however, when the optimisation paradigm itself is extended to encompass carbon allocation and growth at the lifespan scale. The trajectories of leaf (and canopy) level marginal products are then implicit in the trajectory of plant and stand structure predicted by optimal carbon allocation. Furthermore, because the input and product are the same resource -- carbon -- in the whole plant optimisation, the product in one time step defines the input constraint, and hence implicitly the marginal product for carbon, in the next time step. This effectively converts the problem from a constrained optimisation of a definite integral, in which the multipliers are undetermined, to an unconstrained maximisation of a state, in which the multipliers are all implicit. This talk will explore how the marginal products for photosynthetic inputs as well as the marginal product for carbon -- i.e., the 'final multiplier,' omega -- are predicted to vary over time and in relation to environmental change during tree growth.

  13. Voyager Approaches Final Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    An artist's concept illustrates the positions of the Voyager spacecraft in relation to structures formed around our Sun by the solar wind. Also illustrated is the termination shock, a violent region the spacecraft must pass through before reaching the outer limits of the solar system. At the termination shock, the supersonic solar wind abruptly slows from an average speed of 400 kilometers per second to less than 100 kilometer per second (900,000 to less than 225,000 miles per hour). Beyond the termination shock is the solar system's final frontier, the heliosheath, a vast region where the turbulent and hot solar wind is compressed as it presses outward against the interstellar wind that is beyond the heliopause. A bow shock likely forms as the interstellar wind approaches and is deflected around the heliosphere, forcing it into a teardrop-shaped structure with a long, comet-like tail.

    The exact location of the termination shock is unknown, and it originally was thought to be closer to the Sun than Voyager 1 currently is. As Voyager 1 cruised ever farther from the Sun, it confirmed that all the planets are inside an immense bubble blown by the solar wind and the termination shock was much more distant.

  14. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Pigarov

    2012-06-05

    This is the final report for the Research Grant DE-FG02-08ER54989 'Edge Plasma Simulations in NSTX and CTF: Synergy of Lithium Coating, Non-Diffusive Anomalous Transport and Drifts'. The UCSD group including: A.Yu. Pigarov (PI), S.I. Krasheninnikov and R.D. Smirnov, was working on modeling of the impact of lithium coatings on edge plasma parameters in NSTX with the multi-species multi-fluid code UEDGE. The work was conducted in the following main areas: (i) improvements of UEDGE model for plasma-lithium interactions, (ii) understanding the physics of low-recycling divertor regime in NSTX caused by lithium pumping, (iii) study of synergistic effects with lithium coatings and non-diffusive ballooning-like cross-field transport, (iv) simulation of experimental multi-diagnostic data on edge plasma with lithium pumping in NSTX via self-consistent modeling of D-Li-C plasma with UEDGE, and (v) working-gas balance analysis. The accomplishments in these areas are given in the corresponding subsections in Section 2. Publications and presentations made under the Grant are listed in Section 3.

  15. Final Report to DOE

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail Gultepe

    2012-05-15

    This final report summarizes the accomplished goals and provide a list of the publications and presentations made during the project. The goals of the project were accomplished through the various publications submitted to Journals and presentations done at the DOE and international meetings and conferences. The 8 journal articles related to the goals of this project were accepted or submitted. The 23 presentations related to goals of the project were presented at the meetings. There were some minor changes regarding to project goals because of issues encountered during the analysis of the data. For example, a total water probe sensor mounted on the Convair-580 that can be used for defining mixed phase conditions and parameterization, had some problems to estimate magnitude of total water mass, and this resulted in issues providing an accurate parameterization for cloud fraction. Variability related aerosol number concentrations and their composition for direct and indirect effects were studied and published. Results were given to explain aerosol and ice microphysical effects on climate change studies. It is suggested that developed parameterizations should consider the variability in aerosol and ice parameters over the Arctic regions.

  16. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco, Mayda

    2013-11-01

    This work is focused on the design and construction of novel beam diagnostic and instrumentation for charged particle accelerators required for the next generation of linear colliders. Our main interest is in non-invasive techniques. The Northwestern group of Velasco has been a member of the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) collaboration since 2003, and the beam instrumentation work is developed mostly at this facility1. This 4 kW electron beam facility has a 25-170 MeV electron LINAC. CTF3 performed a set of dedicated measurements to finalize the development of our RF-Pickup bunch length detectors. The RF-pickup based on mixers was fully commissioned in 2009 and the RF-pickup based on diodes was finished in time for the 2010-11 data taking. The analysis of all the data taken in by the summer of 2010 was finish in time and presented at the main conference of the year, LINAC 2010 in Japan.

  17. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriy Y. Anistratov; Marvin L. Adams; Todd S. Palmer; Kord S. Smith; Kevin Clarno; Hikaru Hiruta; Razvan Nes

    2003-08-04

    OAK B202 Final Technical Report. The present generation of reactor analysis methods uses few-group nodal diffusion approximations to calculate full-core eigenvalues and power distributions. The cross sections, diffusion coefficients, and discontinuity factors (collectively called ''group constants'') in the nodal diffusion equations are parameterized as functions of many variables, ranging from the obvious (temperature, boron concentration, etc.) to the more obscure (spectral index, moderator temperature history, etc.). These group constants, and their variations as functions of the many variables, are calculated by assembly-level transport codes. The current methodology has two main weaknesses that this project addressed. The first weakness is the diffusion approximation in the full-core calculation; this can be significantly inaccurate at interfaces between different assemblies. This project used the nodal diffusion framework to implement nodal quasidiffusion equations, which can capture transport effects to an arbitrary degree of accuracy. The second weakness is in the parameterization of the group constants; current models do not always perform well, especially at interfaces between unlike assemblies. The project developed a theoretical foundation for parameterization and homogenization models and used that theory to devise improved models. The new models were extended to tabulate information that the nodal quasidiffusion equations can use to capture transport effects in full-core calculations.

  18. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Fridman

    2005-06-01

    This DOE project DE-FC36-04GO14052 ''Plasma Pilot Plant Test for Treating VOC Emissions from Wood Products Plants'' was conducted by Drexel University in cooperation with Georgia-Pacific (G-P) and Kurchatov Institute (KI). The objective of this project was to test the Plasma Pilot Plant capabilities in wood industry. The final goal of the project was to replace the current state-of-the-art, regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO) technology by Low-Temperature Plasma Technology (LTPT) in paper and wood industry for Volatile Organic Components (VOC) destruction in High Volume Low Concentration (HVLC) vent emissions. MetPro Corporation joined the team as an industrial partner from the environmental control business and a potential leader for commercialization. Concurrent Technology Corporation (CTC) has a separate contract with DOE for this technology evaluation. They prepared questionnaires for comparison of this technology and RTO, and made this comparison. These data are presented in this report along with the description of the technology itself. Experiments with the pilot plant were performed with average plasma power up to 3.6 kW. Different design of the laboratory and pilot plant pulsed coronas, as well as different analytical methods revealed many new peculiarities of the VOC abatement process. The work reported herein describes the experimental results for the VOCs removal efficiency with respect to energy consumption, residence time, water effect and initial concentration.

  19. Electrocatalytic hydrocracking. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vaart, D.R. van der

    1992-06-01

    This report describes an electrocatalytic method for the chemical addition of hydrogen to a model hydrocarbon compound. In the method, hydrogen formed by water electrolysis at the counter electrode of an electrochemical cell is delivered via conduction through a proton-conducting solid electrolyte. The working electrode of the cell is, at the same time, a hydrocracking catalyst and therefore promotes the reaction of the hydrogen with the hydrocarbon. This process would have clear and distinct advantages over conventional hydroprocessing technologies in that the hydrogen concentration at the catalyst surface could be controlled and maintained by the applied electromotive force. This control would allow operation of the electrocatalytic reactor at ambient pressures instead of the extremely high hydrogen partial pressures required of conventional reactors. In addition, the direct delivery of hydrogen to the catalyst surface should inhibit coke formation and thus prolong the life of the catalyst. Finally, hydrogen utilization efficiencies should be greatly improved since the hydrogen is delivered directly to the reaction site thereby eliminating hydrogen solubility loss in the effluent stream. This report details the demonstration of (a) the ability of a solid electrolyte to perform as a catalyst, (b) the conduction of hydrogen through a solid electrolyte and (c) the simultaneous exploitation of these two properties. Hence, the essential concept of electrocatalytic hydrocracking has been demonstrated. An objective of future work in this area should be to determine whether the hydrocracking or hydrogenation reactions are actually enhanced during the electrocatalytic process when compared to the conventional catalytic process.

  20. DOE46168 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    McCartney, Martha R.

    2015-03-15

    The research objectives of this grant were to observe and to quantify nanoscale electrostatic and magnetic fields using the technique of off-axis electron holography. There have been two major areas of activity during the current reporting period, which spans September 2011 through December 2015; i) measurement of the 2D electrostatic potential distributions across complex semiconductor heterojunctions and devices; and ii) investigation of the remanent states and magnetization reversal mechanisms in magnetic thin films and nanostructures.

  1. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    drucker, jeff

    2014-08-18

    This project investigated the fundamental science of nanowire epitaxy using vapor-liquid-solid growth in the silicon-germanium material system. Ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHV CVD) was the primary deposition method. Nanowires grown using UHV CVD were characterized ex situ using scanning electron microscopy and a variety of transmission electron microscopy techniques. In situ transmission electron microscopy was also employed to monitor growth in real time and was instrumental in elucidating growth mechanisms.

  2. Project Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciolkosz, Daniel; Albright, Louis

    1999-01-01

    The initial focus of this GSRP project was to model and develop systems for optimized use of the Microwave lamp for use in bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS). The microwave lamp, which has been developed for use in BLSS as part of a NASA small business innovation research (SBIR) grant, exhibits a number of characteristics that make it an excellent candidate for use in BLSS. However, we decided to shift the focus of the project, after discussions with scientists at KSC, to a broader question. Specifically, we decided to investigate the possibility of developing a decision tool for characterizing overall fighting system effectiveness in a plant growth system. It seemed pointless to optimize a microwave lamp for BLSS when there was no good way to decide what exactly an optimized system would look like. The problem is a complex one, involving multiple, conflicting objectives with irreconcilable units, significant constraints, and a wide range of relative importance among the objectives. The project would involve not only characterizing this complex decision process, but also would require some investigations into the physical properties of the lighting systems being considered. Thus, we turned to the field of Decision Modeling as a means of meeting this objective. After a thorough investigation of the literature, a technique was chosen and carefully developed. Implementation and analysis of the system are still in progress, and should be completed during the summer of 1999. Ancillary studies, which were conducted in the course of the project, have also been conducted, and are summarized below.

  3. World Cup Final

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    On July 9, hundreds of millions of fans worldwide will be glued to their television sets watching the final match of the 2006 FIFA World Cup, played in Berlin's Olympic stadium (Olympiastadion). The stadium was originally built for the 1936 Summer Olympics. The Olympic Stadium seats 76,000,; its roof rises 68 meters over the seats and is made up of transparent panels that allow sunlight to stream in during the day.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 12.1 by 15.9 kilometers (7.5 by 9.5 miles) Location: 52.5 degrees North latitude, 13.3 degrees East longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49.2 feet) Dates Acquired: October 15, 2005

  4. The Final Days

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-04-28

    Though NASA MESSENGER days are numbered, the spacecraft will continue to acquire new data sets and transmit them back to Earth during its final days. Shown here is a high-resolution view snapped near Heemskerck Rupes, named for the Dutch ship that explored Australia and New Zealand in 1642-1643. The total number of images that MDIS has acquired and returned to Earth since entering Mercury orbit in March 2011 is currently 277,447, which is many more than originally planned for MESSENGER's one-year primary mission! In the next few days, approximately 500 additional images are planned to be received back at Earth, though the spacecraft is expected to impact the planet on April 30 with more than a thousand images still on its recorder, never to be seen. This is by design, as it is better to collect more data than can be transmitted than end the mission having been able to possibly have done more! Check out some highlights from the MESSENGER mission by visiting this image collection, or watch MESSENGER team members discuss the mission in these recently posted videos. Date acquired: April 26, 2015 Image Mission Elapsed Time (MET): 72384761 Image ID: 8400449 Instrument: Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) of the Mercury Dual Imaging System (MDIS) Center Latitude: 25.1° Center Longitude: 234.4° E Resolution: 6.7 meters/pixel Scale: The bottom of this image is about 7 kilometers (4.3 miles) across Incidence Angle: 57.9° Emission Angle: 56.5° Phase Angle: 40.7° http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA19438

  5. World Cup Final

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    On July 9, hundreds of millions of fans worldwide will be glued to their television sets watching the final match of the 2006 FIFA World Cup, played in Berlin's Olympic stadium (Olympiastadion). The stadium was originally built for the 1936 Summer Olympics. The Olympic Stadium seats 76,000,; its roof rises 68 meters over the seats and is made up of transparent panels that allow sunlight to stream in during the day.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 12.1 by 15.9 kilometers (7.5 by 9.5 miles) Location: 52.5 degrees North latitude, 13.3 degrees East longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49.2 feet) Dates Acquired: October 15, 2005

  6. MTX final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, E.B.; Allen, S.L.; Brown, M.D.; Byers, J.A.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Foote, J.H.; Hoshino, K.

    1994-01-01

    The MTX experiment was proposed in 1986 to apply high frequency microwaves generated by a free-electron laser (FEL) to electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in a high field, high density tokamak. As the absorption of microwaves at the electron cyclotron resonance requires high frequencies, the opportunity of applying a free-electron laser has appeal as the device is not limited to frequencies in the microwave or long millimeter wavelength regions, in contrast to many other sources. In addition, the FEL is inherently a high power source of microwaves, which would permit single units of 10 MW or more, optimum for reactors. Finally, it was recognized early in the study of the application of the FEL based on the induction linear accelerator, that the nonlinear effects associated with the intense pulses of microwaves naturally generated would offer several unique opportunities to apply ECRH to current drive, MHD control, and other plasma effects. It was consequently decided to adapt the induction accelerator based FEL to heating and controlling the tokamak, and to conduct experiments on the associated physics. To this end, the Alcator C tokamak was moved from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where it was installed in Building 431 and operated from March, 1989, until the conclusion of the experiment in October, 1992. The FEL, based on the ETA-11 accelerator and IMP wiggler was brought into operation by the LLNL Electron Beam Group and power injected into the tokamak during an experimental run in the Fall, 1989. Following an upgrade by the MTX group, a second experimental run was made lasting from the Winter, 1992 through the end of the experiment. Significant contributions to the ECRH experiments were made by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI).

  7. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    An investigation was made to determine if corn stalks could be economically collected for use in the production of either structural or insulation board. An assessment of the research shows that a pressed corn board suitable for some building application can be manufactured from ground corn stalks at very low cost; that an inexhaustible supply of corn stalks are readily available; and that the energy savings of corn board can only be estimated by assessing fuel savings to agriculture, freight savings, increased insulating qualities, manufacturing energy saved, and the potential use of acoustical insulation structural panels used in the prefab industry and/or the mobile home industry.

  8. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Eugene Clothiaux, Johannes Verlinde, Jerry Harrington

    2010-02-22

    The research project focuses on the following topics: a) removal of artifacts in the Doppler spectra from the ARM cloud radars, b) development of the second generation Active Remote Sensing of Cloud Layers (ARSCL) cloud data products, and c) evaluation of ARM cloud property retrievals within the framework of the EarthCARE simulator. We continue to pursue research on areas related to radiative transfer, atmospheric heating rates and related dynamics (topics of interest to the ARM science community at this time) and to contribute on an ad-hoc basis to the science of other ARM-supported principal investigators.

  9. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Ives

    2005-12-01

    The Phase I program met or exceeded all the program goals. During the Phase I program, CCR personnel communicated directly with Dr. Al Moretti at Fermilab concerning the design and specifications. Results of the Phase I program were also presented at the MUON Accelerator Conference in Berkeley, California in February 2005. This review of the design by accelerator scientists provided additional verification of the approach and predicted performance. Results for specific program tasks are described below. In addition, CCR performed a preliminary investigation for a 10 MW device at the request of personnel at Fermi National Laboratory. Results of that task are also provided.

  10. Watershed Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodzin, Alec; Shive, Louise

    2004-01-01

    Investigating local watersheds presents middle school students with authentic opportunities to engage in inquiry and address questions about their immediate environment. Investigation activities promote learning in an investigations interdisciplinary context as students explore relationships among chemical, biological, physical, geological, and…

  11. Watershed Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodzin, Alec; Shive, Louise

    2004-01-01

    Investigating local watersheds presents middle school students with authentic opportunities to engage in inquiry and address questions about their immediate environment. Investigation activities promote learning in an investigations interdisciplinary context as students explore relationships among chemical, biological, physical, geological, and…

  12. 78 FR 44592 - Final General Management Plan, Final Wilderness Study, and Final Environmental Impact Statement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... National Park Service Final General Management Plan, Final Wilderness Study, and Final Environmental Impact Statement, Fort Pulaski National Monument, Georgia AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice... 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4332(2)(C), the National Park Service (NPS) announces the availability of a...

  13. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bohdan W. Oppenheim; Rudolf Marloth

    2007-10-26

    Executive Summary The document contains Final Technical Report on the Industrial Assessment Center Program at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, covering the contract period of 9/1/2002 to 11/30/2006, under the contract DE-FC36-02GO 12073. The Report describes six required program tasks, as follows: TASK 1 is a summary of the assessments performed over the life of the award: 77 assessments were performed, 595 AR were recommended, covering a very broad range of manufacturing plants. TASK 2 is a description of the efforts to promote and increase the adoption of assessment recommendations and employ innovative methods to assist in accomplishing these goals. The LMU IAC has been very successful in accomplishing the program goals, including implemented savings of $5,141,895 in energy, $10,045,411 in productivity and $30,719 in waste, for a total of $15,218,025. This represents 44% of the recommended savings of $34,896,392. TASK 3 is a description of the efforts promoting the IAC Program and enhancing recruitment efforts for new clients and expanded geographic coverage. LMU IAC has been very successful recruiting new clients covering Southern California. Every year, the intended number of clients was recruited. TASK 4 describes the educational opportunities, training, and other related activities for IAC students. A total of 38 students graduated from the program, including 2-3 graduate students every semester, and the remainder undergraduate students, mostly from the Mechanical Engineering Department. The students received formal weekly training in energy (75%) and productivity (25). All students underwent extensive safety training. All students praised the IAC experience very highly. TASK 5 describes the coordination and integration of the Center activities with other Center and IAC Program activities, and DOE programs. LMU IAC worked closely with MIT, and SDSU IAC and SFSU IAC, and enthusiastically supported the SEN activities. TASK 6 describes other tasks

  14. ASEDRA Evaluation Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Dean J; Detwiler, Dr. Rebecca; Sjoden, Dr, Glenn E.

    2008-09-01

    The performance of the Advanced Synthetically Enhanced Detector Resolution Algorithm (ASEDRA) was evaluated by performing a blind test of 29 sets of gamma-ray spectra that were provided by DNDO. ASEDRA is a post-processing algorithm developed at the Florida Institute of Nuclear Detection and Security at the University of Florida (UF/FINDS) that extracts char-acteristic peaks in gamma-ray spectra. The QuickID algorithm, also developed at UF/FINDS, was then used to identify nuclides based on the characteristic peaks generated by ASEDRA that are inferred from the spectra. The ASEDRA/QuickID analysis results were evaluated with respect to the performance of the DHSIsotopeID algorithm, which is a mature analysis tool that is part of the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS). Data that were used for the blind test were intended to be challenging, and the radiation sources included thick shields around the radioactive materials as well as cargo containing naturally occurring radio-active materials, which masked emission from special nuclear materials and industrial isotopes. Evaluation of the analysis results with respect to the ground truth information (which was provided after the analyses were finalized) showed that neither ASEDRA/QuickID nor GADRAS could identify all of the radiation sources correctly. Overall, the purpose of this effort was primarily to evaluate ASEDRA, and GADRAS was used as a standard against which ASEDRA was compared. Although GADRAS was somewhat more accurate on average, the performance of ASEDRA exceeded that of GADRAS for some of the unknowns. The fact that GADRAS also failed to identify many of the radiation sources attests to the difficulty of analyzing the blind-test data that were used as a basis for the evaluation. This evaluation identified strengths and weaknesses of the two analysis approaches. The importance of good calibration data was also clear because the performance of both analysis methods was impeded by the

  15. [Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D.C.

    1998-11-01

    This is a final report on the research activities carried out under the above grant at Dartmouth. During the period considered, the grant was identified as being for nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics, considered as the most tractable theoretical framework in which the plasma problems associated with magnetic confinement of fusion plasmas could be studied. During the first part of the grant`s lifetime, the author was associated with Los Alamos National Laboratory as a consultant and the work was motivated by the reversed-field pinch. Later, when that program was killed at Los Alamos, the problems became ones that could be motivated by their relation to tokamaks. Throughout the work, the interest was always on questions that were as fundamental as possible, compatible with those motivations. The intent was always to contribute to plasma physics as a science, as well as to the understanding of mission-oriented confined fusion plasmas. Twelve Ph.D. theses were supervised during this period and a comparable number of postdoctoral research associates were temporarily supported. Many of these have gone on to distinguished careers, though few have done so in the context of the controlled fusion program. Their work was a combination of theory and numerical computation, in gradually less and less idealized settings, moving from rectangular periodic boundary conditions in two dimensions, through periodic straight cylinders and eventually, before the grant was withdrawn, to toroids, with a gradually more prominent role for electrical and mechanical boundary conditions. The author never had access to a situation where he could initiate experiments and relate directly to the laboratory data he wanted. Computers were the laboratory. Most of the work was reported in referred publications in the open literature, copies of which were transmitted one by one to DOE at the time they appeared. The Appendix to this report is a bibliography of published work which was carried out under the

  16. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brizard, Alain J

    2009-12-31

    Final Technical Report for U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-09ER55005 Nonlinear FLR Effects in Reduced Fluid Models Alain J. Brizard, Saint Michael's College The above-mentioned DoE grant was used to support research activities by the PI during a sabbatical leave from Saint Michael's College in 2009. The major focus of the work was the role played by guiding-center and gyrocenter (linear and nonlinear) polarization and magnetization effects in understanding transport processes in turbulent magnetized plasmas. The theoretical tools used for this work include Lie-transform perturbation methods and Lagrangian (variational) methods developed by the PI in previous work. The present final technical report lists (I) the peer-reviewed publications that were written based on work funded by the Grant; (II) invited and contributed conference presentations during the period funded by the Grant; and (III) seminars presented during the period funded by the Grant. I. Peer-reviewed Publications A.J. Brizard and N. Tronko, 2011, Exact momentum conservation for the gyrokinetic Vlasov- Poisson equations, Physics of Plasmas 18 , 082307:1-14 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3625554 ]. J. Decker, Y. Peysson, A.J. Brizard, and F.-X. Duthoit, 2010, Orbit-averaged guiding-center Fokker-Planck operator for numerical applications, Physics of Plasmas 17, 112513:1-12 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3519514]. A.J. Brizard, 2010, Noether derivation of exact conservation laws for dissipationless reduced fluid models, Physics of Plasmas 17, 112503:1-8 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3515303]. F.-X. Duthoit, A.J. Brizard, Y. Peysson, and J. Decker, 2010, Perturbation analysis of trapped particle dynamics in axisymmetric dipole geometry, Physics of Plasmas 17, 102903:1-9 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3486554]. A.J. Brizard, 2010, Exact energy conservation laws for full and truncated nonlinear gyrokinetic equations, Physics of Plasmas 17, 042303:1-11 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3374428]. A

  17. 75 FR 57441 - Aluminum Extrusions From the People's Republic of China: Alignment of Final Countervailing Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... International Trade Administration Aluminum Extrusions From the People's Republic of China: Alignment of Final...) is aligning the final determination in the countervailing duty investigation of aluminum extrusions... 20, 2010, the Department initiated the countervailing and antidumping duty investigations on aluminum...

  18. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimios Kaxiras

    2009-02-02

    This research consisted of a theoretical investigation of the properties of surface-based nanostructures, having as a main goal the deeper understanding of the atomic-scale mechanisms responsible for the formation and stability of such structures. This understanding will lead to the design of improved systems for applications in diverse areas such as novel electronic devices, sensors, field-effect transistors, substrates with enhanced hydro-phobic (water repelling) or hydro-philic (water absorbing) behavior for coatings of various surfaces used in bioengineering, flexible displays, organic photovoltaics, etc. The research consisted of developing new theoretical methodologies and applying them to a wide range of interesting physical systems. Highlights of the new methodologies include techniques for bridging different scales, from the quantum-mechanical electronic level to the meso-scopic level of large molecular structures such as DNA, carbon nanotubes and two-dimensional assemblies of organic molecules. These methodologies were successfully applied to investigate interactions between systems that are large on the atomic scale (reaching the scale of microns in length or milliseconds in time), but still incorporating all the essential elements of the atomic-scale structure. While the research performed here did not address applications directly, the implications of its finding are important in guiding experimental searches and in coming up with novel solutions to important problems. In this sense, the results of this work can be incorporated in the design of many useful applications. Specifically, in addition to elucidating important physical principles on how nano-structures are stabilized on surfaces, we have used our theoretical investigations to make predictions for useful applications in the following fields: a) we proposed new types of nanotubes that can overcome the limitations of the carbon nanotubes whose properties depend sensitively on the structure which

  19. Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, K. D.

    2006-01-31

    This project investigated the feasibility of developing a remote temperature measurement instrument for energy-intensive industries. Existing remote temperature measurement techniques based on infrared radiation fail when excessive amounts of dust, smoke, or other particulates are present. We found that a remote temperature measurement instrument using microwaves demonstrated performance superior to infrared instrumentation in laboratory and field trials when dust or steam was present. Since improved temperature measurement helps improve energy efficiency and quality in a wide variety of industrial processes, making the new microwave instrument commercially available should lead to reduced energy usage, improved quality, and better competitiveness in a number of energy-intensive industries such as food processing and cement manufacturing. These improvements can lead to lower-priced products of improved quality for the consumer, and can contribute to the nation's energy independence.

  20. Triton - Voyager's finale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The investigation of the Neptunian satellite Triton by the Voyager 2 is described with interpretations of the object's nature and composition. The orbit, seasonal cycle, and southern-hemisphere solstice are described, and the composition of the satellite is discussed. Triton's mass and radius are known, and the objects is made up of about 70 percent rock and organics and 30 percent ice by mass. Triton's interior is warm and geologically active considering its distance from the sun, and large amounts of frozen methane and nitrogen are theorized to contribute to the object's high reflectivity. Also noted in the Voyager color images are creeping ice, cryogenic lava, and dark streaks on the south polar cap from nitrogen gas leaks driven by a type of greenhouse effect. Triton represents a class of satellite that has not been observed previously: a moon-sized body in a retrograde inclined orbit from the class of objects that coalesced to form Neptune.

  1. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Sterling

    2007-05-29

    This project is conducted under the leadership and guidance of Sandia National Laboratory as part of the DOE Office of Science FAST-OS Program. It was initiated at the California Institute of Technology February 1, 2005. The Principal Investigator (PI), Dr. Thomas Sterling, accepted a position of Full Professor at the Department of Computer Science at Louisiana State University (LSU) on August 15, 2005, while retaining his position of Faculty Associate at California Institute of Technology’s Center for Advanced Computing Research. To take better advantage of the resources, research staff, and students at LSU, the award was transferred by DOE to LSU where research on the FAST-OS Config-OS project continues in accord with the original proposal. This brief report summarizes the accomplishments of this project during its initial phase at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  2. Nested Narratives Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Andrew T.; Pattengale, Nicholas D.; Forsythe, James C.; Carvey, Bradley John

    2015-02-01

    In cybersecurity forensics and incident response, the story of what has happened is the most important artifact yet the one least supported by tools and techniques. Existing tools focus on gathering and manipulating low-level data to allow an analyst to investigate exactly what happened on a host system or a network. Higher-level analysis is usually left to whatever ad hoc tools and techniques an individual may have developed. We discuss visual representations of narrative in the context of cybersecurity incidents with an eye toward multi-scale illustration of actions and actors. We envision that this representation could smoothly encompass individual packets on a wire at the lowest level and nation-state-level actors at the highest. We present progress to date, discuss the impact of technical risk on this project and highlight opportunities for future work.

  3. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquelyn Yanch

    2006-05-22

    This project involved the development of a method for in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for the investigation of Boron-10 distribution in a rabbit knee. The overall objective of this work was a robust approach for rapid screening of new {sup 10}B-labelled compounds to determine their suitability for use in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis via Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS). For BNCS it is essential to obtain a compound showing high uptake levels in the synovium and long residence time in the joints. Previously the in vivo uptake behavior of potential compounds was evaluated in the arthritic knee joints of rabbits via extensive dissection studies. These studies are very labor-intensive and involve sacrificing large numbers of animals. An in vivo {sup 10}B screening approach was developed to provide initial evaluation of potential compounds. Only those compounds showing positive uptake and retention characteristics will be evaluated further via dissection studies. No further studies will be performed with compounds showing rapid clearance and/or low synovial uptake. Two approaches to in vivo screening were investigated using both simulation methods and experimentation. Both make use of neutron beams generated at the MIT Research Reactor. The first, Transmission Computed Tomography (TCT) was developed and tested but was eventually rejected due to very limited spatial resolution using existing reactor beams. The second, in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (IVPGNAA) was much more promising. IVPGNAA was developed using computer simulation and physical measurement coupled with image reconstruction techniques. The method was tested in arthritic New Zealand rabbits previously injected intra-articularly with three boron labeled compounds and shown to be effective in providing information regarding uptake level and residence time of {sup 10}B in the joint.

  4. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Podzorov, Vitaly

    2012-10-28

    The scope of this project is to investigate fundamental aspects of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) grown at the surface of organic semiconductors and other electronic materials, recently discovered in our group (Fig. 1) [1]. Understanding the growth mechanism and structure of these SAMs, as well as investigating the effect of SAM-induced high surface conductivity, are the main thrusts of the project. An additional thrust of the project is to find new ways of surface doping or surface gating of novel semiconductors, in which electronic traps at the interface would be passivated. Molecular self assembly is an exciting research area of modern materials science, playing an important role in a variety of emerging applications, such as organic and molecular electronics, bioengineering, sensors and actuators. The current effort in this field has been focused on two experimental platforms: SAMs on metals (e.g., Au) and SAMs on inorganic oxides (e.g., SiO2). We have recently discovered the third platform, molecular self-assembly at the surface of carbon-based electronic materials (organic semiconductors, graphene and CNTs), which opens new opportunities for fundamental research and applications (Fig. 1) [1, 2, 3]. One of the most intriguing aspects of the new discovery is that formation of an FTS self-assembled monolayer on these materials induces a high-density mobile charges, with n up to 1014 cm-2, resulting in a large surface conductivity, σ ≈ 10-5 S·square-1 [1]. The effect is due to an interfacial electron transfer from the semiconductor to the SAM, resulting in a 0.54 V potential drop across the 1.3 nm-thick SAM, as recently revealed by Kelvin probe microscopy in rubrene [4].

  5. Magellan Final Science Reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Thomas W.

    1993-01-01

    This volume is a brief summary of the scientific results of the Magellan Venus mapping mission as reported by the Magellan science investigators. Magellan has exceeded all of its mission objectives by obtaining high resolution radar images, surface elevation, and radiometry for more than 98% of the planet. The amount of stereo data gathered on Venus is more than that available for any other planet. Magellan's fourth cycle collected gravity data from an elliptical orbit to provide information on the relationships between surface features and the interior of the planet. With the successful completion of the aerobraking experiment, the spacecraft, in its lower orbit around Venus, has captured high resolution gravity near the poles from the nearly circular orbit. Every attempt has been made to provide useful documentation for the complete Magellan data set. Magellan data have been released to the public through the Planetary Data System (PDS) and the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) in photographs, lithos, brochures, digital form, and compact discs. With the release of Magellan data on the compact disc read-only-memory (CD-ROM) a revolutionary new way of doing science has resulted. This technology provides a way to store, distribute and access large volumes of data. The Magellan science investigators have utilized this wealth of data to provide answers to questions we have been asking for a long time. I would like to personally thank everyone on the Magellan team for the success of this important mission, a mission that has revealed information that will help us to better understand our own Planet Earth.

  6. Final Performance Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Houldin, Joseph; Saboor, Veronica

    2016-03-30

    about assessing a company’s technical assets, broadening our view of the business to go beyond what they make or what NAICS code they have…to better understand their capacity, capability, and expertise, and to learn more about THEIR customers. Knowing more about the markets they serve can often provide insight into their level of technical knowledge and sophistication. Finally, in the spirit of realizing the intent of the Accelerator we strove to align and integrate the work and activities supported by the five funding agencies to leverage each effort. To that end, we include in the Integrated Work Plan a graphic that illustrates that integration. What follows is our summary report of the project, aggregated from prior reports.

  7. Inverse Cerenkov experiment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, W.D.

    1993-09-30

    The final report describes work performed to investigate inverse Cherenkov acceleration (ICA) as a promising method for laser particle acceleration. In particular, an improved configuration of ICA is being tested in a experiment presently underway on the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). In the experiment, the high peak power ({approximately} 10 GW) linearly polarized ATF CO{sub 2} laser beam is converted to a radially polarized beam. This is beam is focused with an axicon at the Cherenkov angle onto the ATF 50-MeV e-beam inside a hydrogen gas cell, where the gas acts as the phase matching medium of the interaction. An energy gain of {approximately}12 MeV is predicted assuming a delivered laser peak power of 5 GW. The experiment is divided into two phases. The Phase I experiments, which were completed in the spring of 1992, were conducted before the ATF e-beam was available and involved several successful tests of the optical systems. Phase II experiments are with the e-beam and laser beam, and are still in progress. The ATF demonstrated delivery of the e-beam to the experiment in Dec. 1992. A preliminary ``debugging`` run with the e-beam and laser beam occurred in May 1993. This revealed the need for some experimental modifications, which have been implemented. The second run is tentatively scheduled for October or November 1993. In parallel to the experimental efforts has been ongoing theoretical work to support the experiment and investigate improvement and/or offshoots. One exciting offshoot has been theoretical work showing that free-space laser acceleration of electrons is possible using a radially-polarized, axicon-focused laser beam, but without any phase-matching gas. The Monte Carlo code used to model the ICA process has been upgraded and expanded to handle different types of laser beam input profiles.

  8. Oklahoma seismic network. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. |

    1993-07-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established rigorous guidelines that must be adhered to before a permit to construct a nuclear-power plant is granted to an applicant. Local as well as regional seismicity and structural relationships play an integral role in the final design criteria for nuclear power plants. The existing historical record of seismicity is inadequate in a number of areas of the Midcontinent region because of the lack of instrumentation and (or) the sensitivity of the instruments deployed to monitor earthquake events. The Nemaha Uplift/Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly is one of five principal areas east of the Rocky Mountain front that has a moderately high seismic-risk classification. The Nemaha uplift, which is common to the states of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska, is approximately 415 miles long and 12-14 miles wide. The Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly extends southward from Minnesota across Iowa and the southeastern corner of Nebraska and probably terminates in central Kansas. A number of moderate-sized earthquakes--magnitude 5 or greater--have occurred along or west of the Nemaha uplift. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, in cooperation with the geological surveys of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, conducted a 5-year investigation of the seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha uplift and associated geologic features in the Midcontinent. This investigation was intended to provide data to be used to design nuclear-power plants. However, the information is also being used to design better large-scale structures, such as dams and high-use buildings, and to provide the necessary data to evaluate earthquake-insurance rates in the Midcontinent.

  9. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Laub

    2008-12-29

    Our team of investigators from MIT (Michael Laub) and Stanford (Harley McAdams and Lucy Shapiro) conducted a multi-faceted, systematic experimental analysis of the 106 Caulobacter two-component signal transduction system proteins (62 histidine kinases and 44 response regulators) to understand how they coordinate cell cycle progression, metabolism, and response to environmental changes. These two-component signaling proteins were characterized at the genetic, biochemical, and genomic levels. The results generated by our laboratories have provided numerous insights into how Caulobacter cells sense and respond to a myriad of signals. As nearly all bacteria use two-component signaling for cell regulation, the results from this project help to deepen our general understanding of bacterial signal transduction. The tools and approaches developed can be applied to other bacteria. In particular, work from the Laub laboratory now enables the systematic, rational rewiring of two-component signaling proteins, a major advance that stands to impact synthetic biology and the development of biosensors and other designer molecular circuits. Results are summarized from our work. Each section lists publications and publicly-available resources which result from the work described.

  10. Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jin; Zhao, Yiping

    2014-12-05

    In this entire project period from 2005-2014, we have made significant progress in developing novel nanostructures of metal oxides (MOs) for solar hydrogen generation based on photoelectrochemical (PEC). Materials investigated are focused on 1D and 0D MO nanostructures of TiO2, WO3, ZnO, and Fe2O3 in conjunction with quantum dot (QD) sensitization and chemical doping (N or H) to alter their electronic band structures for both visible light absorption and for facilitating interfacial charge transport. In addition, we have used plasmonic metal nanostructures to enhance the PEC performance by improving light absorption of QDs via enhanced scattering of the plamonic metal. Most importantly, we have discovered a multipronged strategy for improving PEC performance: using plasmonic metal nanostructure to enhance light absorption, QDs to improve charge transfer, and chemical doping to increase charge transport in metal oxides for PEC. The combination is critical for overall high efficiency of PEC. This strategy is developed and demonstrated for the first time to our best knowledge.

  11. Final LDRD report :

    SciTech Connect

    Kronawitter, Coleman X.; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Mao, Samuel S.

    2012-01-01

    The distinction between electricity and fuel use in analyses of global power consumption statistics highlights the critical importance of establishing efficient synthesis techniques for solar fuelsthose chemicals whose bond energies are obtained through conversion processes driven by solar energy. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) processes show potential for the production of solar fuels because of their demonstrated versatility in facilitating optoelectronic and chemical conversion processes. Tandem PEC-photovoltaic modular configurations for the generation of hydrogen from water and sunlight (solar water splitting) provide an opportunity to develop a low-cost and efficient energy conversion scheme. The critical component in devices of this type is the PEC photoelectrode, which must be optically absorptive, chemically stable, and possess the required electronic band alignment with the electrochemical scale for its charge carriers to have sufficient potential to drive the hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions. After many decades of investigation, the primary technological obstacle remains the development of photoelectrode structures capable of efficient conversion of light with visible frequencies, which is abundant in the solar spectrum. Metal oxides represent one of the few material classes that can be made photoactive and remain stable to perform the required functions.

  12. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Judy D. Wall

    2009-02-27

    Bioremediation of radionuclides and metals in the subsurface necessitate an understanding of the metabolic capacities and interactions of the anaerobic microorganisms that are found there, including members of the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Genetic investigation into the pathway of reductant flow to U(VI) in the SRB belonging to the genus Desulfovibrio has been the focus of this project. In Dv. desulfuricans strain G20, we confirmed the importance of the tetraheme cytochrome c3 by disruption of the gene encoding that cytochrome, cycA, and demonstrated a decrease in the ability of the mutant (I2) to reduce U(VI). We found that the cytochrome c3 was necessary for electrons from pyruvate to reach sulfate or fumarate as terminal electron acceptors. It was not needed for electrons from lactate to reach sulfate, from which we infer that a different pathway is used for the electrons from these two substrates. Cyrstal structure of the tetraheme cytochrome c3 was obtained and site-directed mutations of the protein indicated a binding site for metals at heme 4 of the structure. Kinetic studies for oxidation of reduced cytochrome c3 with U(VI) or molybdate revealed a preference for U(VI) as a substrate. Evidence for a role for sodium gradients in the energetic scheme for this soil organism was obtained.

  13. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kotov, Valeri

    2016-05-29

    The research in this program involves theoretical investigations of electronic, optical and mechanical properties of graphene and its derivatives, such as bi-layer graphene, graphene-based van der Waals heterostructures, strained graphene, as well as graphene on various surfaces. One line of research has been development of theoretical models that support graphene’s large array of possible technological applications. For example one of our goals has been the understanding of surface plasmons and spin relaxation mechanisms in graphene, related to novel optoelectronics and spintronics applications. Our current research focus is on understanding the role of correlations in graphene under mechanical deformations, such as strain. The main goal is to describe the mutual interplay between strain and electron-electron interactions which could lead to the formation of novel elec- tronic phases with strongly modified electronic, magnetic and optical properties. This direction of research contributes to deeper understanding of interactions in graphene and related atomically-thin materials - a subject at the forefront of research on graphene and its derivatives.

  14. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, members of the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG) inspect some of the debris. Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey, former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford (fourth from left), Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, members of the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG) inspect some of the debris. Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey, former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford (fourth from left), Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

  15. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, members of the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG) look at tiles recovered. Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey, former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford (center), Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, members of the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG) look at tiles recovered. Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey, former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford (center), Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

  16. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG) visits the Columbia Debris Hangar . Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey (third from right), former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford (fourth from right), Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - The Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG) visits the Columbia Debris Hangar . Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey (third from right), former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford (fourth from right), Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

  17. KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach answers questions from the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG). Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey (fifth from left), former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford, Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-08-05

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - In the Columbia Debris Hangar, Shuttle Launch Director Mike Leinbach answers questions from the Stafford-Covey Return to Flight Task Group (SCTG). Chairing the task group are Richard O. Covey (fifth from left), former Space Shuttle commander, and Thomas P. Stafford, Apollo commander. Chartered by NASA Administrator Sean O’Keefe, the task group will perform an independent assessment of NASA’s implementation of the final recommendations by the Columbia Accident Investigation Board.

  18. [Biomedical investigation in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Pérez-Tamayo, Ruy

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research as a professional specialty developed in the Western World in the following four stages: 1) primitive medicine based on magico-religious concepts; 2) hippocratic medicine (500 AD), which renounced supernatural ideas on disease; 3) scientific medicine (1543), which eschewed tradition and authority, and 4) finally in 1813, the first full-time professional biomedical investigator Claude Bernard was appointed in France. Notheless, the first full-time professional biomedical investigator in Mexico did not appear until 1939, and the number is still growing despite present restrictions to investigator growth and development.

  19. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, Reiner; Urrutia, J. Manuel

    2009-09-08

    emissions are only observed in whistler spheromaks and FRCs but not in mirrors or asymmetric configurations lacking magnetic null lines. The collisionless electron energization in a toroidal null line usually produces non-Maxwellian distributions. Off the null axis electrons gain more perpendicular than parallel energy. Distributions with T{sub {perpendicular}} > T{sub {parallel}} lead to whistler instabilities which have been observed. A whistler spheromak is a source of high-frequency whistler emissions. These are usually small amplitude whistlers propagating in a complicated background magnetic field. The waves are emitted from a moving source. High frequency whistlers propagate faster than the spheromak, thus partly move ahead of it and partly in the reverse direction. In test wave experiments wave growth opposite to the direction of the hot electron flow has been observed, confirming that Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance instabilities account for the emission process. Propagating whistler mirrors produce no significant instabilities except when they interact with other fields which exhibit null lines. For example, a whistler mirror has been launched against a stationary FRC, resulting in strong FRC heating and whistler instabilities. In the whistler mirror configuration the antenna near-zone field produces a toroidal null line outside the coil which can also become a source for whistler emissions. Finally, nonlinear EMHD research has been extended to initially unmagnetized plasmas where a new nonlinear skin depth has been discovered. When a small-amplitude oscillating magnetic field is applied to a plasma the field penetration is governed by the skin depth, collisional or collisionless depending on frequency, collision frequency and plasma frequency. However, when the magnetic field increases the electrons become magnetized and the field penetration occurs in the whistler mode if the cyclotron frequency exceeds the oscillating frequency. This phenomenon has been

  20. Sierra Army Depot, Phase 1, Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study, Lassen County, California. Final Remedial Investigation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    Health Risks .................. 7-106 7.6.4.1 Cancer Risks ........................ 7-106 7.6.4.2 Noncancer Risk ....................... 7-107 7.6.5 Risk...Calculated cancer risks exceeded the IE-06 benchmark for the casual visitor, construction worker, and future residents exposed to contaminated soil...and groundwater at the Abandoned Landfill and TNT Leaching Beds Site. * Calculated cancer risks exceeded the IE-06 benchmark for the future resident

  1. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Juan Camilo Serrano

    2011-12-16

    New and novel material and process technologies applied in wind blade designs and production are critical to increasing the competitiveness of wind power generation against traditional sources of energy. In this project, through collaboration between PPG Industries and MAG Industrial Automation Systems, the potential of using automated manufacturing for the production of fiber glass composite wind blades was evaluated from both technical and economic points of view. Further, it was demonstrated that by modifying the standard blade raw material forms through the use of cost effective pre-impregnated rovings coupled with using an automated fiber placement machine to lay up the parts, it is possible to produce state of the art composite laminates with significantly improved mechanical performance and with higher processing rates than standard blade production technology allows for today, thereby lowering the cost of energy over turbine blades made using traditional processes and materials. In conformity with the scope of work of the submitted proposal, the project team completed each task and documented and reported its findings on the appropriate quarterly report submitted to the DOE project team. The activities and this report are divided into 5 subtasks: (1) Material Investigation - Reviews traditional materials and key specifications and testing methods; (2) Manufacturing and Automation - Identifies new candidate material forms and automated layup processes; (3) Process Development - Performs trials of candidate materials and processes; (4) Predictive Analysis - Assesses impact of new material forms and automated processes on a model blade design; and (5) Feasibility Assessment - Compares traditional manufacturing processes and materials to new candidate material forms and automated processes.

  2. Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Caine Finnerty

    2008-01-14

    NanoDynamics Inc. has undertaken a study to develop and demonstrate an anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell capable of generating a minimum of 20 W per cell on hydrogen. The cell technology will also be assed for operation on renewable hydrocarbon-based fuels such as biomass gas, as well its applicability for larger-scale power production. The project was divided into five sub-tasks, the first of which was the development and refinement of the cell manufacturing processes of gel-casting and paste extrusion for the fabrication of planar and tubular anode supports. These methods exhibited high production yields with excellent reproducibility. Using a conventional YSZ-based cell as a performance benchmark, new materials-sets and cell configurations were developed. Three prototype configurations were implemented, the best generating an average of 10 W per cell, and exhibiting excellent potential for further development and scale-up. Using a variety of techniques such as modifying the materials-set, microstructure, and cell configuration, cells with an average power output of 22.7 W were demonstrated, 13.5% in excess of the 20 W project goal. Thermal cycling was performed on such cells, and it was found that over a regime of 150 cycles (approximately 300 h), the cell power increased by 1.8%. So-called “short-stacks” comprised of up to 6 cells were fabricated to study the feasibility of further stack scale-up. Such a 6-cell short-stacks operated on dry hydrogen exhibited power outputs of 80 W, a 6.4% power increase from their constituent cells, showing that the cells had excellent potential for further scale-up. Optimized Rev A cells were built into a 3-cell stack, and found to produce 63.42 W operating on hydrogen, and 58.18 W on methane. The feasibility of a biogas-fed SOFC was also investigated. Utilizing in-house developed catalysts, methane conversion and hydrogen yield was found to be 98 and 42%, respectively. By incorporating this catalyst material into

  3. ICCK Conference Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Green, William H.

    2013-05-28

    The 7th International Conference on Chemical Kinetics (ICCK) was held July 10-14, 2011, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in Cambridge, MA, hosted by Prof. William H. Green of MIT's Chemical Engineering department. This cross-disciplinary meeting highlighted the importance of fundamental understanding of elementary reactions to the full range of chemical investigations. The specific conference focus was on elementary-step kinetics in both the gas phase and in condensed phase. The meeting provided a unique opportunity to discuss how the same reactive species and reaction motifs manifest under very different reaction conditions (e.g. atmospheric, aqueous, combustion, plasma, in nonaqueous solvents, on surfaces.). The conference featured special sessions on new/improved experimental techniques, improved models and data analysis for interpreting complicated kinetics, computational kinetics (especially rate estimates for large kinetic models), and a panel discussion on how the community should document/archive kinetic data. In the past, this conference had been limited to homogeneous gas-phase and liquid-phase systems. This conference included studies of heterogeneous kinetics which provide rate constants for, or insight into, elementary reaction steps. This Grant from DOE BES covered about half of the subsidies we provided to students and postdocs who attended the conference, by charging them reduced-rate registration fees. The complete list of subsidies provided are listed in Table 1 below. This DOE funding was essential to making the conference affordable to graduate students, and indeed the attendance at this conference was higher than at previous conferences in this series. Donations made by companies provided additional subsidies, leveraging the DOE funding. The conference was very effective in educating graduate students and important in fostering scientific interactions, particularly between scientists studying gas phase and liquid phase kinetics

  4. IRIS Final Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    M. D. Carelli

    2003-11-03

    OAK-B135 This NERI project, originally started as the Secure Transportable Autonomous Light Water Reactor (STAR-LW) and currently known as the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) project, had the objective of investigating a novel type of water-cooled reactor to satisfy the Generation IV goals: fuel cycle sustainability, enhanced reliability and safety, and improved economics. The research objectives over the three-year (1999-2002) program were as follows: First year: Assess various design alternatives and establish main characteristics of a point design; Second year: Perform feasibility and engineering assessment of the selected design solutions; Third year: Complete reactor design and performance evaluation, including cost assessment These objectives were fully attained and actually they served to launch IRIS as a full fledged project for eventual commercial deployment. The program did not terminate in 2002 at the end of the NERI program, and has just entered in its fifth year. This has been made possible by the IRIS project participants which have grown from the original four member, two-countries team to the current twenty members, nine countries consortium. All the consortium members work under their own funding and it is estimated that the value of their in-kind contributions over the life of the project has been of the order of $30M. Currently, approximately 100 people worldwide are involved in the project. A very important constituency of the IRIS project is the academia: 7 universities from four countries are members of the consortium and five more US universities are associated via parallel NERI programs. To date, 97 students have worked or are working on IRIS; 59 IRIS-related graduate theses have been prepared or are in preparation, and 41 of these students have already graduated with M.S. (33) or Ph.D. (8) degrees. This ''final'' report (final only as far as the NERI program is concerned) summarizes the work performed in the first four

  5. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Loren F. Goodrich

    2011-05-31

    NIST has played a key role in many of the one-on-one, domestic, and international interlaboratory comparisons of measurements on superconductors. The history of interlaboratory comparisons of measurements on superconductors tells us that careful measurement methods are needed to obtain consistent results. Inconsistent results can lead to many problems including: a mistrust of the results of others, unfair advantages in commerce, and erroneous feedback in the optimization of conductor performance. NIST has experience in many interlaboratory comparisons; a long-term commitment to measurement accuracy; and independent, third-party laboratory status. The principal investigator's direct involvement in the measurements and daily supervision of sample mounting is the unique situation that has allowed important discoveries and evolution of our capabilities over the last 30 years. The principal investigator's research and metrology has helped to improve the accuracy of critical-current (I{sub c}) measurements in laboratories throughout the world. As conductors continue to improve and design limits are tested, the continuation of the long-term commitment to measurement accuracy could be vitally important to the success of new conductor development programs. It is extremely important to the U.S. wire manufacturers to get accurate (high certainty) I{sub c} measurements in order to optimize conductor performance. The optimization requires the adjustment of several fabrication parameters (such as reaction time, reaction temperature, conductor design, doping, diffusion barrier, Cu to non-Cu ratio, and twist pitch) based on the I{sub c} measurement of the conductor. If the I{sub c} measurements are made with high variability, it may be unclear whether or not the parameters are being adjusted in the optimal direction or whether or not the conductor meets the target specification. Our metrology is vital to the U.S. wire manufacturers in the highly competitive international arena and

  6. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Shayya, Walid

    2007-03-20

    interconnect with the power grid was approved by NYSEG (the electrical power provider) and the combined heat and power generation (CHP) system was authorized to start on February 27, 2007. The system has been in operation since February 28, 2007, and is generating 45 to 50 kW of electrical power on continuous basis. The completed project will ultimately allow for investigating the facility of utilizing organic waste from a dairy operation in a hard-top plug-flow methane digester with the ultimate goal of reducing environmental risk, increasing economic benefits, and demonstrating the viability of an anaerobic methane digestion system. Many benefits are expected as a result of the completed project including our better understanding of the anaerobic digestion process and its management as well as the facility to utilize the methane digester as a demonstration site for dairy producers, farmers, and organic waste producers in New York State and the Northeast. Additional benefits include helping current and future students in dairy science and technology, agricultural business, environmental sciences, agricultural engineering, and other disciplines develop better understanding of underutilized biomass alternative energy technologies, environmental conservation, environmental stewardship, and sustainable agriculture.

  7. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stavropoulos, Pericles

    2004-03-04

    Our research has as its primary objective the development and mechanistic investigation of suitable photocatalytic surfaces, as mediators of energy-efficient heterogeneous oxidation of aliphatic hydrocarbons. Particular emphasis is placed on mixed iron(III)/titanium(IV) oxide semiconductor particulates, featuring low %Fe content, for which a novel synthetic protocol has been developed in this laboratory, relying on sol-gel hydrolysis of high purity iron and titanium isopropoxide precursors, followed by thermal treatment to develop the active anatase phase. This methodology leads to replacement of Ti(IV) ions by Fe(III) sites in the TiO{sub 2} (anatase) lattice, and is contrasted to samples prepared by physical mixing of nanometer-sized a-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (gift from MACH I, Inc.) and TiO{sub 2} (Degussa P-25). Mechanistic understanding of these systems involves multifaceted approaches. Our unique ability to evaluate charge-carrier separation distances, as measured by time-resolved photocharge experiments (TRPC) on instrumentation pioneered by Dr. Levy, permits correlation of this important photophysical property to photocatalytic efficiency and reaction mechanism. A major redesign of our benchmark TRPC apparatus was recently undertaken, which provides for controlled environments during measurement, i.e., vacuum; controlled atmosphere (inert or reactive); and temperature control (-100 to +150 C). Operation of this new TRPC cell necessitated insulation from RF noise, which was achieved by employing a walk-in Faraday enclosure to house the apparatus and supporting instrumentation. Previous work has shown that charge-carrier separation distances (CCSD) for Pt dopped TiO{sub 2} pass through a maximum at very low %Pt content. A similar region of maximum CCSD has now been tentatively identified with samples of a-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} (0-0.02 %Fe) under ambient conditions. Interestingly, the decay portion of the TRPC waveform (charge recombination) exhibits

  8. Accident investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brunstein, A. I.

    1979-01-01

    Aircraft accident investigations are discussed with emphasis on those accidents that involved weather as a contributing factor. The organization of the accident investigation board for air carrier accidents is described along with the hearings, and formal report preparation. Statistical summaries of the investigations of general aviation accidents are provided.

  9. Cassini Grand Finale Dive Illustration

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-04

    This illustration shows NASA's Cassini spacecraft about to make one of its dives between Saturn and its innermost rings as part of the mission's Grand Finale. Cassini will make 22 orbits that swoop between the rings and the planet before ending its mission on Sept. 15, 2017, with a final plunge into Saturn. https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21439

  10. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sara Bergan, Executive Director; Brendan Jordan, Program Manager; Subcontractors as listed on the report.

    2007-06-06

    The following report contributes to our knowledge of how to economically produce wildlife-friendly grass mixtures for future fuel feedstocks in the northern plains. It investigates northern-adapted cultivars; management and harvest regimes that are good for yields, soils and wildlife; comparative analysis of monocultures and simple mixtures of native grasses; economic implications of growing grasses for fuel feedstocks in specific locations in the northern plains; and conversion options for turning the grasses into useful chemicals and fuels. The core results of this study suggest the following; Native grasses, even simple grass mixtures, can be produced profitably in the northern plains as far west as the 100th meridian with yields ranging from 2 to 6 tons per acre; Northern adapted cultivars may yield less in good years, but have much greater long-term sustainable yield potential than higher-yielding southern varieties; Grasses require very little inputs and stop economically responding to N applications above 56kg/hectare; Harvesting after a killing frost may reduce the yield available in that given year but will increase overall yields averaged throughout multiple years; Harvesting after a killing frost or even in early spring reduces the level of ash and undesirable molecules like K which cause adverse reactions in pyrolysis processing. Grasses can be managed for biomass harvest and maintain or improve overall soil-health and carbon sequestration benefits of idled grassland; The carbon sequestration activity of the grasses seems to follow the above ground health of the biomass. In other words plots where the above ground biomass is regularly removed can continue to sequester carbon at the rate of 2 tons/acre/year if the stand health is strong and yielding significant amounts of biomass; Managing grasses for feedstock quality in a biomass system requires some of the same management strategies as managing for wildlife benefit. We believe that biomass development

  11. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mattes, M. Jules

    2005-06-10

    possible to kill single cells with Abs conjugated to LEE emitters, and that the level of Ab binding, with high-density antigens, should be sufficient to achieve this effect. But we were the first to put this idea into practice. Therefore, we feel that we have essentially opened up a new area of research, and that future investigators will be able to build on the solid foundation than we have laid.

  12. 19 CFR 207.22 - Prehearing and final staff reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Prehearing and final staff reports. 207.22 Section... INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR FROM... and final staff reports. (a) Prehearing staff report. The Director shall prepare and place in the...

  13. X-43A Final Flight Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindle, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    The presentation will provide an overview of the final flight of the NASA X-43A project. The project consisted of three flights, two planned for Mach 7 and one for Mach 10. The first flight, conducted on June 2, 2001, was unsuccessful and resulted in a nine-month mishap investigation. A two-year return to flight effort ensued and concluded when the second Mach 7 flight was successfully conducted on March 27, 2004. The third and final flight, which occurred on November 16, 2004, was the first Mach 10 flight demonstration of an airframe-integrated, scramjet-powered, hypersonic vehicle. As such, the final flight presented first time technical challenges in addition to final flight project closeout concerns. The goals and objectives for the third flight as well as those for the project will be presented. The configuration of the Hyper-X stack including the X-43A, Hyper-X launch vehicle, and Hyper-X research vehicle adapter wil also be presented. Mission differences, vehicle modifications and lessons learned from the first and second flights as they applied to the third flight will also be discussed. Although X-43A flight 3 was always planned to be the final flight of the X-43A project, the X-43 program had two other vehicles and corresponding flight phases in X-43C and X-43B. Those other projects never manifested under the X-43 banner and X-43A flight 3 also became the final flight of X-43 program.

  14. Final height in elite male artistic gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Georgopoulos, Neoklis A; Theodoropoulou, Anastasia; Roupas, Nikolaos D; Armeni, Anastasia K; Koukkou, Eftychia; Leglise, Michel; Markou, Kostas B

    2012-01-01

    Elite male artistic gymnasts (AG) are exposed to high levels of physical and psychological stress during adolescence and experience a significant late maturation in both linear growth and pubertal development. The aim of the present study was to determine the impact of intensive physical training on the adult final height in elite male AG. This study is unique in character, as all variables were measured on the field of competition. The study was prospective and longitudinal; however, the current analysis of data is cross-sectional. Data from 86 elite male AG were obtained during the gymnastics competitions of European and World Championships. Clinical evaluation included height and weight measurements, as well as assessment of pubic hair and genital development according to Tanner's stages of pubertal development. The laboratory investigation included determination of skeletal maturation. All athletes completed a questionnaire that included questions on personal (onset and intensity of training, number of competitions per year) and family data (paternal and maternal heights). Male AG were below the 50th percentile for both final height and weight. Elite male AG had final height standard deviation score (SDS) lower than their genetic predisposition. Final height SDS was correlated positively with target height SDS (r = 0.430, p < 0.001) and weight SDS (r = 0.477, p < 0.001) and negatively to the intensity of training (r = -0.252, p = 0.022). The main factors influencing final height, by multiple regression analysis were weight SDS (p < 0.001) and target height SDS (p = 0.003). In elite maleAG, final height falls short of genetic predisposition, still well within normal limits. Considering medical and psychological risks in general, and based on the results of this research project, the International Federation of Gymnastics has increased the age limit for participants in international gymnastics competitions by 1 year.

  15. Final Environmental Planning Technical Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    AD-A267 225e i Department of the Air Force FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL JUL 1993 PLANNINGU• TECHNICAL REPORT _____________-_--_ AIR QUALITY P+prpoT d kr ptu...2922 JUL 16 󈨡 9:31 703 614 -1572 PAGE. 002’ FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING TECHNICAL REPORT AIR QUALITY January 1984 PREFACE The President has directed...Matrix 3-33 vi 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1.0 INTRODUCTION This final environmental planning technical report (EPTR) is a companion document to the air quality

  16. Emissions Inventory Final Rule TSD

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This technical support document (TSD) provides the details of emissions data processing done in support of EPA's final rulemaking effort for the Federal Transport Rule, now known as the Cross-State Air Pollution Rule.

  17. 2-Mercaptobenzothiazole; Final Test Rule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is issuing a final test rule, under section 4 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) requiring manufacturers and processors of 2-mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT, CAS No. 149—30-4) to perform testing.

  18. The Student Teacher's Final Exam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scahill, Jeannette

    1976-01-01

    The student teaching segment of the university curriculum frequently receives no review or evaluation--a discussion during the final seminar of students' personal experiences during student teaching would help to correct this situation. (MB)

  19. HINTS Puerto Rico: Final Report

    Cancer.gov

    This final report describes HINTS implementation in Puerto Rico. The report addresses sampling; staffing, training and management of data collection; calling protocol; findings from the CATI Operations, and sample weights.

  20. 2-Ethylhexanol; Final Test Rule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is issuing a final test rule, under section 4 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), requiring manufacturers and processors of 2-ethylhexanol (EH: CAS No. 104-76-7) to conduct a 2-year oncogenicity bioassay.

  1. Final Vowel-Consonant-e.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burmeister, Lou E.

    The utility value of the final vowel-consonant-e phonic generalization was examined using 2,715 common English words. When the vowel was defined as a single-vowel, the consonant as a single-consonant, and the final e as a single-e the generalization was found to be highly useful, contrary to other recent findings. Using the total sample of 2,715…

  2. RF Chain Final Technical Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    UNCLASSIFIED ~SECR1 AFWAL-TR-82-1160 RF CHAIN FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT (U) NORTHROP CORPORATION DEFENSE SYSTEMS DIVISION 600 HICKS ROAD * ROLLING MEADOWS...ILLINOIS 60008 JANUARY 1983 TECHNICAL REPORT AFWAL-TR-82-1160 Final Report for Period October 1979 - October 1982 Distribution Limited to U. S. Government...This technical report has been reviewed and is approved for publication. RICHARD A. HIEBER, Elec. Engr. fiNNETH W. HEL. A chnical Mgr Deception

  3. Final Vowel-Consonant-e.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burmeister, Lou E.

    The utility value of the final vowel-consonant-e phonic generalization was examined using 2,715 common English words. When the vowel was defined as a single-vowel, the consonant as a single-consonant, and the final e as a single-e the generalization was found to be highly useful, contrary to other recent findings. Using the total sample of 2,715…

  4. AXKT Phase 3 Final Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-06

    AD-A275 236 - July 6 1993 AXKT PHASE 3 FINAL REPORT CONTRACT N00014-88-C-6027 CDRL A013 I NE * ,~ 9M SUBMITSED BY W80co 02 SIPPICAN, INC.I...Funding Numbers. AXKT Phase 3 Final Report Contract NOOQI 4-88-C-6027 PrOgram Elemeni No. 0603704N 6. Auw~) Project No. R01i180 Task fo. 300 Accession No

  5. MPO B593110 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brooksby, C

    2011-07-25

    National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) shall provide one (1) Mechanical Engineer to support the Linear Collider Subsystem Development Program at Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS). The NSTec Mechanical Engineer's efforts will include engineering, design, and drawing support for the Vacuum Seal Test. NSTec will also provide a final report of the setup and input to LLNL's project management on project status. The NSTec Mechanical Engineer's efforts will also include engineering, design, and drawing support to the conceptual design for manufacturing of the Flux Concentrator Magnet. NSTec will also contribute to LLNS's final report on the Flux Concentrator Magnet. The deliverables are drawings, sketches, engineering documents, and final reports delivered to the LLNS Technical Representative.

  6. Medical Qualification Determinations. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2017-01-18

    The U.S. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is issuing a final rule to revise its regulations for medical qualification determinations. The revised regulations update references and language; add and modify definitions; clarify coverage and applicability; address the need for medical documentation and medical examination and/or testing for an applicant or employee whose position may or may not have medical standards and/or physical requirements; and recommend the establishment of agency medical review boards. The final rule provides agencies guidance regarding medical evaluation procedures.

  7. Karlson ozone sterilizer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karlson, E.

    1984-05-07

    The authors have a functional sterilization system employing ozone as a sterilization agent. This final report covers the work that led to the first medical sterilizer using ozone as the sterilizing agent. The specifications and the final design were set by hospital operating room personnel and public safety standards. Work on kill tests using bacteria, viruses and fungi determined the necessary time and concentration of ozone necessary for sterilization. These data were used in the Karlson Ozone Sterilizer to determine the length of the steps of the operating cycle and the concentration of ozone to be used. 27 references.

  8. A New Comprehensive Final Exam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavsar, Suketu P.

    2015-01-01

    Instructors aspire for students to master all the material covered. The final exam should assess the breadth and depth of their learning and be a significant basis for the final grade. I insist on a comprehensive final because I want students to review early material in light of later topics. I believe that this helps students create connections, integrate understanding, and retain knowledge for the long term. For non-science majors, reviewing and retaining the large amount of astronomy material is daunting. I experimented with a final exam format that calmed their fears and encouraged thorough review. It is only practical for a class of about twenty students or less. I provided a number of challenging conceptual and problem solving questions (at least as many as there were students), crafted to interconnect and span the entire range of topics. The order of the questions reflected the sequence in which the topics had been discussed. Students received these questions in ample time to prepare prior to the final. A student could bring up to 5 standard sheets of notes to the final. At the final, each student picked a number out of a hat. This was the question they had to answer in a 5-minute presentation. They were allowed 15 minutes for a final preparation during which they could use their 5 pages of notes. The presentations were given in order, 1- 20. Written comments on at least 10 other talks, explaining what was missed or correcting a mistake were required. They were graded both on their talk and on their comments. This format required students to be prepared for any question and encouraged interaction and communication while studying. Knowing the questions beforehand provided a guide to their studying as well as allayed their fears about what could be asked. The students also received guidance to what constituted a good answer, namely accuracy (correct scientific argument, appropriate facts, no irrelevant material), thoroughness (answered the complete questions

  9. Final disposal of radioactive waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiesleben, H.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper the origin and properties of radioactive waste as well as its classification scheme (low-level waste - LLW, intermediate-level waste - ILW, high-level waste - HLW) are presented. The various options for conditioning of waste of different levels of radioactivity are reviewed. The composition, radiotoxicity and reprocessing of spent fuel and their effect on storage and options for final disposal are discussed. The current situation of final waste disposal in a selected number of countries is mentioned. Also, the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency with regard to the development and monitoring of international safety standards for both spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management is described.

  10. Laboratory Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The primary objectives were to examine the site-specific physical, chemical, and biological factors that impact construction, durability and performance of the proposed 5-MW (sub e) solar pond system at the Salton Sea. The interactions of the water, salt, and soil of the site and on material compatibility were examined. Potential interactions of the water/brine and soil are particularly important because the pond will utilize the naturally occurring clays as a bottom seal. Although there is a considerable and growing solar pond literature, little written information deals with the important site-specific investigations of water, salt, and soil. Therefore, technical effort was directed toward identifying the factors that should be investigated and determining methods of investigation. As a result, a by-product was the development of an approach for site-specific investigations and some specific methodologies. This development should continue in order to establish a generic approach for evaluating the suitability of any site for the construction of large-scale solar ponds.

  11. Investigating Drama.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickering, Kenneth; And Others

    The purpose of this book is to provide an opportunity for investigating drama by a series of units, each of which examines an aspect of drama or theater. The 20 units discuss such topics as the definition of drama, dialogue in a poem by W. H. Auden, various aspects of the stage, improvisation, the visual impact of plays, "The Death of Grass" by…

  12. Environmental Education Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Joan; Batty, Sara O.

    This final report deals with the efforts of the Environmental Action Coalition of New York City to change its network of recycling centers from collection points to educational centers for learning about solid waste and related environmental problems. This change was accomplished by first increasing the efficiency and the stability of the centers…

  13. Environmental Education Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Joan; Batty, Sara O.

    This final report deals with the efforts of the Environmental Action Coalition of New York City to change its network of recycling centers from collection points to educational centers for learning about solid waste and related environmental problems. This change was accomplished by first increasing the efficiency and the stability of the centers…

  14. Deaths: Final Data for 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Sherry L.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents final 1998 data on U.S. deaths and death rates according to demographic and medical characteristics such as age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, marital status, educational attainment, injury at work, state of residence, and cause of death. Trends and patterns in general mortality, life expectancy, and infant and maternal…

  15. Tetrabromobisphenol A; Final Test Rule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is issuing a final test rule, under section 4 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), requiring manufacturers and processors of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA. CAS No. 79—94—7) to perform testing for chemical fate and environmental effects.

  16. MINIMARS conceptual design: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1986-09-01

    This volume contains the following sections: (1) fueling systems; (2) blanket; (3) alternative blanket concepts; (4) halo scraper/direct converter system study and final conceptual design; (5) heat-transport and power-conversion systems; (6) tritium systems; (7) minimars air detritiation system; (8) appropriate radiological safety design criteria; and (9) cost estimate. (MOW)

  17. Russian Cargo Craft Final Undocking

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The ISS Progress 47 resupply vehicle, loaded with trash, undocked from the International Space Station’s Pirs docking compartment for the final time July 30 at 5:19 p.m. EDT. The cargo ship undo...

  18. The Thy Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billimoria, Roshan R., Ed.

    Inspiried by a United Nations effort to establish a worldwide university, the four and one-half year project carried out in Thy (Denmark) is explained in this final report, from its historical beginnings in 1973 to its official completion in 1978. Dedicated to the solution of problems which could be considered universal, the project goals are…

  19. Bisphenol A; Final Test Rule

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is issuing a final rule, under section 4 of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) requiring manufacturers and processors of bisphenol A, hereinafter BPA, (4.4’-isopropylidenediphenol, CAS No. 80-05—7) to conduct a 90-day inhalation study.

  20. Data breaches. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2007-06-22

    This document establishes regulations to address data breaches regarding sensitive personal information that is processed or maintained by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The regulations implement certain provisions of Title IX of the Veterans Benefits, Health Care, and Information Technology Act of 2006, which require promulgation of these regulations as an interim final rule.

  1. LSCA Final Reports: Third Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Collin, Ed.

    This document includes final summary reports from 16 recent federally funded Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA) projects in California. This volume covers generally the period 1984-85, and reports are presented in six subject areas: programs for children, information and referral projects, institutional services, literacy, local history,…

  2. TRICARE reimbursement revisions. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-06-27

    This final rule provides several necessary revisions to the regulation in order for TRICARE to be consistent with Medicare. These revisions affect: Hospice periods of care; reimbursement of physician assistants and assistant-at-surgery claims; and diagnosis-related group values, removing references to specific numeric diagnosis-related group values and replacing them with their narrative description.

  3. The Trine Project Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunderson, Jon R.; And Others

    The final report describes the Trine Project which addressed three needs in the education of handicapped children: the need for an alternate writing system, the need for communication, and the need for access to general purpose computers used in the schools. The project had three major objectives: (1) to design a low-cost portable writing and…

  4. Reengineering Elementary Accounting. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Univ., Chico.

    This final report describes activities and accomplishments of a 3-year project at California State University Chico (CSUC) to reengineer the 2-semester elementary accounting course. The new model emphasized, first, shifting from the traditional view of the preparer of accounting information to that of the user; second, forcing the student to adopt…

  5. Curriculum of Attainments. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Gary W.

    The final report describes a project at the Florida State University at the end of its third year and an assessment of the degree to which project goals were attained. The project goals were to: (1) establish mastery standards for degree programs; (2) create open, time-variable educational programs; (3) verify that the program product can serve as…

  6. The hadronic final state at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Paul R.; Wing, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The hadronic final state in electron-proton collisions at HERA has provided a rich testing ground for development of the theory of the strong force, QCD. In this review, over 200 publications from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations are summarized. Short distance physics, the measurement of processes at high-energy scales, has provided rigorous tests of perturbative QCD and constrained the structure of the proton as well as allowing precise determinations of the strong coupling constant to be made. Nonperturbative or low-energy processes have also been investigated and results on hadronization interpreted together with those from other experiments. Searches for exotic QCD objects, such as pentaquarks, glueballs, and instantons, have been performed. The subject of diffraction has been reinvigorated through its precise measurement, such that it can now be described by perturbative QCD. After discussion of HERA, the H1 and ZEUS detectors, and the techniques used to reconstruct differing hadronic final states, the above subject areas are elaborated on. The major achievements are then condensed further in a final section summarizing what has been learned.

  7. Lossless compression of instrumentation data. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stearns, S.D.

    1995-11-01

    This is our final report on Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory- Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project 3517.070. Its purpose has been to investigate lossless compression of digital waveform and image data, particularly the types of instrumentation data generated and processed at Sandia Labs. The three-year project period ran from October 1992 through September 1995. This report begins with a descriptive overview of data compression, with and without loss, followed by a summary of the activities on the Sandia project, including research at several universities and the development of waveform compression software. Persons who participated in the project are also listed. The next part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles of lossless compression. Two basic compression stages, decorrelation and entropy coding, are described and discussed. An example of seismic data compression is included. Finally, there is a bibliography of published research. Taken together, the published papers contain the details of most of the work and accomplishments on the project. This final report is primarily an overview, without the technical details and results found in the publications listed in the bibliography.

  8. Investigator Perspectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mendillo, Michael

    1991-01-01

    A detailed presentation is given in the form of viewgraphs on principal investigator requirements ranging from simple to complex payloads. It is stated that the program was very important to the US science community, and that there was already concern that its funding was under stress, impacting the number of missions flown, down from around 44 to 25 or so. It is also stated that the program needs more help at NASA HQ.

  9. Expedited technology demonstration project final report: final forms

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, R W

    1999-05-01

    ETDP Final Forms was an attempt to demonstrate the fabrication and performance of a ceramic waste form immobilizing the hazardous and radioactive elements of the MSO/SR mineral residues. The ceramic material had been developed previously. The fabrication system was constructed and functioned as designed except for the granulator. Fabrication of our particular ceramic, however, proved unsatisfactory. The ceramic material design was therefore changed toward the end of the project, replacing nepheline with zircon as the sink for silica. Preliminary results were encouraging, but more development is needed. Fabrication of the new ceramic requires major changes in the processing: Calcination and granulation would be replaced by spray drying; and sintering would be at higher temperature. The main goal of the project--demonstrating the fabrication and performance of the waste form--was not achieved. This report summarizes Final Forms' activities. The problem of immobilizing the MSO/SR mineral residues is discussed.

  10. 19 CFR 207.21 - Final phase notice of scheduling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Final phase notice of scheduling. 207.21 Section 207.21 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR...

  11. 19 CFR 207.22 - Prehearing and final staff reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Prehearing and final staff reports. 207.22 Section 207.22 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR...

  12. 19 CFR 207.22 - Prehearing and final staff reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Prehearing and final staff reports. 207.22 Section 207.22 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR...

  13. 19 CFR 207.21 - Final phase notice of scheduling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Final phase notice of scheduling. 207.21 Section 207.21 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR...

  14. 19 CFR 207.21 - Final phase notice of scheduling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Final phase notice of scheduling. 207.21 Section 207.21 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR...

  15. 19 CFR 207.22 - Prehearing and final staff reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Prehearing and final staff reports. 207.22 Section 207.22 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR...

  16. 19 CFR 207.22 - Prehearing and final staff reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prehearing and final staff reports. 207.22 Section 207.22 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR FROM...

  17. Metallacumulenes and carbide complexes. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect

    Selegue, J.P.

    1992-12-31

    We investigated many aspects of transition metal complexes of carbon-rich ligands, including cumulated transition metal carbene complexes of the types vinylidene (M=C=CR{sub 2})(M = Fe, Ru, Os, Mo, W), allenylidene (M=C=C=CR{sub 2}), and butatrienylidene (M=C=C=CR{sub 2}), as well as ``naked`` carbon ligands C{sub 1}, C{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}. In the last 3 years, we began to put some effort into studying the fullerenes. Finally, we investigated initial aspects of the coordination chemistry of thiophenes, from the perspectives of (1) modeling the transition- metal-catalyzed hydrodesulfurization of fossil fuels and (2) development of metal-doped, polythiophene-based polymers.

  18. MR 201424 Final Report Addendum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    favoring by the Department of Defense. Page Intentionally Left Blank 2 1.0 INTRODUCTION This is a summary report on additional data collected...for MR-201424 after the final report was submitted. In addition to two new munitions items measured at Spring Valley, most of the data collected were...support. Because part of the deliverable for MR-201424 were self-contained HDF5 data files that can be imported into UX-Analyze to create the single

  19. NONLINEAR DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS - Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Philip Holmes

    2005-12-31

    This document is the final report on the work completed on DE-FG02-95ER25238 since the start of the second renewal period: Jan 1, 2001. It supplements the annual reports submitted in 2001 and 2002. In the renewal proposal I envisaged work in three main areas: Analytical and topological tools for studying flows and maps Low dimensional models of fluid flow Models of animal locomotion and I describe the progess made on each project.

  20. Inelastic final-state interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2008-03-01

    The final-state interaction in multichannel decay processes is systematically studied in the hadronic picture with application to B decay in mind. Since the final-state interaction is intrinsically interwoven with the decay interaction in this case, no simple phase theorem like ''Watson's theorem'' holds for experimentally observed final states. We first solve exactly the two-channel problem as a toy model in order to clarify the issues. The constraints of the two-channel approximation turns out to be too stringent for most B decay modes, but realistic multichannel problems are too complex for useful quantitative analysis at present. To alleviate the stringent constraints of the two-body problem and to cope with complexity beyond it, we introduce a method of approximation that is applicable to the case where one prominent inelastic channel dominates over all others. We illustrate this approximation method with the amplitude of the decay B{yields}K{pi} fed by the intermediate states of a charmed-meson pair. Even with our approximation we need more accurate information of strong interactions than we have now. Nonetheless we are able to obtain some insight in the issue and draw useful conclusions on general features on the strong phases.

  1. Inelastic final-state interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2008-03-01

    The final-state interaction in multichannel decay processes is systematically studied in the hadronic picture with application to B decay in mind. Since the final-state interaction is intrinsically interwoven with the decay interaction in this case, no simple phase theorem like “Watson’s theorem” holds for experimentally observed final states. We first solve exactly the two-channel problem as a toy model in order to clarify the issues. The constraints of the two-channel approximation turns out to be too stringent for most B decay modes, but realistic multichannel problems are too complex for useful quantitative analysis at present. To alleviate the stringent constraints of the two-body problem and to cope with complexity beyond it, we introduce a method of approximation that is applicable to the case where one prominent inelastic channel dominates over all others. We illustrate this approximation method with the amplitude of the decay B→Kπ fed by the intermediate states of a charmed-meson pair. Even with our approximation we need more accurate information of strong interactions than we have now. Nonetheless we are able to obtain some insight in the issue and draw useful conclusions on general features on the strong phases.

  2. Inelastic final-state interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko; Suzuki, Mahiko

    2007-10-29

    The final-state interaction in multichannel decay processes is systematically studied with application to B decay in mind. Since the final-state interaction is intrinsically interwoven with the decay interaction in this case, no simple phase theorem like"Watson's theorem" holds for experimentally observed final states. We first examine in detail the two-channel problem as a toy-model to clarify the issues and to remedy common mistakes made in earlier literature. Realistic multichannel problems are too challenging for quantitative analysis. To cope with mathematical complexity, we introduce a method of approximation that is applicable to the case where one prominent inelastic channel dominates over all others. We illustrate this approximation method in the amplitude of the decay B to pi K fed by the intermediate states of a charmed meson pair. Even with our approximation we need more accurate information of strong interactions than we have now. Nonetheless we are able to obtain some insight in the issue and draw useful conclusions on general features on the strong phases.

  3. Final Revisions Rule Significant Contribution Assessment TSD

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This Technical Support Document (TSD) presents quantitative assessments of the relationship between final revisions to the Transport Rule and the original analysis conducted for the final Transport Rule.

  4. Disposition and Metabolism of Investigational New Drugs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    UNCLASSIFIED N EL MDISPOSITION AND METABOLISM OF INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUGS rN4 MRI PROJECT NO. 4266-B FINAL REPORT By Thomas E. Shellenberger September 1982...documents. Ii I DISPOSITION AND METABOLISM OF INVESTIGATIONAL NEW DRUGS [RI PROJECT NO. 4266-B [FINAL REPORT BY Thomas E. Shellenberger September 1982...the Army, Contract No. DAMD-17-76-C-6059, MRI Project No. 4266-B, "Disposition and Metabolism of Investigational New Drugs ." The work was supported by

  5. Virtualized Network Control. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ghani, Nasir

    2013-02-01

    This document is the final report for the Virtualized Network Control (VNC) project, which was funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. This project was also informally referred to as Advanced Resource Computation for Hybrid Service and TOpology NEtworks (ARCHSTONE). This report provides a summary of the project's activities, tasks, deliverable, and accomplishments. It also provides a summary of the documents, software, and presentations generated as part of this projects activities. Namely, the Appendix contains an archive of the deliverables, documents, and presentations generated a part of this project.

  6. It Finally Happened to Me

    PubMed Central

    Kannai, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    It finally happened to me: I was sued for malpractice by the family of a patient who had died suddenly. My inner turmoil in the aftermath of this traumatic event affected me deeply. While I was an experienced family doctor dedicated to patient-centered medicine, the event challenged my customary approach to my patients. I share three vignettes from my practice that describe my inner dialogue both “preprosecution” and “postprosecution” and explain how I acted in each case. PMID:25201743

  7. Vet Centers. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-08-04

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is amending its medical regulation that governs Vet Center services. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (the 2013 Act) requires Vet Centers to provide readjustment counseling services to broader groups of veterans, members of the Armed Forces, including a member of a reserve component of the Armed Forces, and family members of such veterans and members. This interim final rule amends regulatory criteria to conform to the 2013 Act, to include new and revised definitions.

  8. SPIRIT 1 Final Flight Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-05-15

    If _ PL-TR-91-2226 Environmental Research Papers, No.1094 AD-A257 088" S PI R IT I llll l ii l li l IilI FINAL FLIGHT REPORT Donald R. Smith Michael...24213• :_• ./1111111111 II/ ll/ I111ll /i l ! 1111 I~lll’ "This technical report has been reviewed and is approved for publication" ,’TP" D. PRICE...the 500- to 2000-cm-1 (5- to 20-jim) region. This report provides a detailed overview of the SPIRIT 1 flight and mission and the analysis of the flight

  9. Field practice internship final report

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, T.

    1994-05-01

    This field practice internship final report gives an overview of the field practice, which was completed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Management Department, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field practice focused on the completion of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) Title III, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act Section 312, Tier II Report. The field practice internship was conducted on a full-time basis between December 13, 1993 through February 18, 1994. Sheila Poligone, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Coordinator served as the field practice preceptor.

  10. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-04-01

    This is the final report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington on work supported in part by US Department of Energy contract DE-AC06-81ER40048. It contains chapters on giant dipole resonances in excited nuclei, nucleus-nucleus reactions, astrophysics, polarization in nuclear reactions, fundamental symmetries and interactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), ultra-relativistic heavy ions, medium energy reactions, work by external users, instrumentation, accelerators and ion sources, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, a Ph. D. degree granted in the 1990-1991 academic year, and publications. Refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. New Approaches to Final Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David

    2014-11-10

    A high-energy muon collider scenario require a “final cooling” system that reduces transverse emittances by a factor of ~10 while allowing longitudinal emittance increase. The baseline approach has low-energy transverse cooling within high-field solenoids, with strong longitudinal heating. This approach and its recent simulation are discussed. Alternative approaches which more explicitly include emittance exchange are also presented. Round-to-flat beam transform, transverse slicing, and longitudinal bunch coalescence are possible components of the alternative approach. A more explicit understanding of solenoidal cooling beam dynamics is introduced.

  12. 49 CFR 1503.417 - Final Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty and Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Final Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty and Order... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.417 Final Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty and Order. (a) Issuance. TSA may issue a Final Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty...

  13. The Final Stages of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winget, D.

    2014-04-01

    The overwhelming majority of all stars end their lives as white dwarf stars. These stars and their environs have a deep personal significance for humanity: this is the expected fate of our own sun. Once a star becomes a white dwarf, its remaining evolution is best described as an exponential cooling. In the final throws of post-main sequence mass-loss the former stellar core becomes a white dwarf, emerging phoenix-like from amongst the ashes. Some planets may survive and others may form as a sort of second generation from the cast-off material. Life may survive or may be reborn on any planets that remain; life may also arise on newly formed planets. The prospects will depend in a significant way on the timescales of the central white dwarf star's cooling evolution and how its radiation shapes the environment. We will discuss white dwarf evolutionary timescales with an eye towards the potential habitability of planets, both new and old. We will consider the uncertainties in these timescales from both an empirical and a theoretical perspective. We will critique the existing evidence for planets and summarize what we have learned so far through direct imaging and stellar pulsations. We will close with the very bright prospects for the future of planets and life in the final stages.

  14. Space tug applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This article is the final report of the conceptual design efforts for a `space tug`. It includes preliminary efforts, mission analysis, configuration analysis, impact analysis, and conclusions. Of the several concepts evaluated, the nuclear bimodal tug was one of the top candidates, with the two options being the NEBA-1 and NEBA-3 systems. Several potential tug benefits were identified during the mission analysis. The tug enables delivery of large (>3,500 kg) payloads to the outer planets and it increases the GSO delivery capability by 20% relative to current systems. By providing end of life disposal, the tug can be used to extend the life of existing space assets. It can also be used to reboost satellites which were not delivered to their final orbit by the launch system. A specific mission model is the key to validating the tug concept. Once a mission model can be established, mission analysis can be used to determine more precise propellant quantities and burn times. In addition, the specific payloads can be evaluated for mass and volume capability with the launch systems. Results of the economic analysis will be dependent on the total years of operations and the number of missions in the mission model. The mission applications evaluated during this phase drove the need for large propellant quantities and thus did not allow the payloads to step down to smaller and less expensive launch systems.

  15. United States Air Force 611th Air Support Group/Civil Engineering Squadron Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Remedial investigation and feasibility study. Barter Island Radar Installation, Alaska. Volume 1 (includes appendices a through c). Revision 1. Final report, January 1995-January 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Karmi, S.; Madden, J.; Borsetti, R.

    1996-01-05

    This report presents the findings of Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies at sites located at the Barter Island radar installation in northern Alaska. The sites were characterized based on sampling and analyses conducted during Remedial Investigation activities performed during August and September 1993.

  16. Summer 1994 Computational Science Workshop. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This report documents the work performed by the University of New Mexico Principal Investigators and Research Assistants while hosting the highly successful Summer 1994 Computational Sciences Workshop in Albuquerque on August 6--11, 1994. Included in this report is a final budget for the workshop, along with a summary of the participants` evaluation of the workshop. The workshop proceeding have been delivered under separate cover. In order to assist in the organization of future workshops, we have also included in this report detailed documentation of the pre- and post-workshop activities associated with this contract. Specifically, we have included a section that documents the advertising performed, along with the manner in which applications were handled. A complete list of the workshop participants in this section. Sample letters that were generated while dealing with various commercial entities and departments at the University are also included in a section dealing with workshop logistics. Finally, we have included a section in this report that deals with suggestions for future workshops.

  17. Animal model validation studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Frazer, D.G.

    1989-01-01

    The project objectives were the development of a system to be used for exposing small laboratory animals to the respirable fraction of cotton dust found in a cotton mill, and testing an animal model of byssinosis which could be used to study the development of the disease in humans. This final report contains 10 published papers of the research at various stages of completion. A description of the cotton dust exposure system optimization techniques and measurements of the resulting improvements are noted in these articles. The final system developed used a large, modified, Pitt-3 cotton generator to expose up to 10 animals simultaneously to cotton dust in a Wahman stainless steel chamber. The acoustical powered generator, which was developed for the project to resuspend cotton dust has been very useful in resuspending other agricultural dusts. The development of an animal model for byssinosis involved verifying results of other investigators, developing and testing several new methods to evaluate pulmonary function in guinea pigs following acute cotton dust exposures, and modification of the cotton dust response using drug mediators.

  18. Hydrothermal reaction of fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.W.

    1994-12-31

    The reactions which occur when fly ash is treated under hydrothermal conditions were investigated. This was done for the following primary reasons. The first of these is to determine the nature of the phases that form to assess the stabilities of these phases in the ambient environment and, finally, to assess whether these phases are capable of sequestering hazardous species. The second reason for undertaking this study was whether, depending on the composition of the ash and the presence of selected additives, it would be possible under hydrothermal conditions to form compounds which have cementitious properties. Formation of four classes of compounds, which bracket likely fly ash compositional ranges, were selected for study. The classes are calcium silicate hydrates, calcium selenates, and calcium aluminosulfates, and silicate-based glasses. Specific compounds synthesized were determined and their stability regions assessed. As part of stability assessment, the extent to which selected hazardous species are sequestered was determined. Finally, the cementing properties of these compounds were established. The results obtained in this program have demonstrated that mild hydrothermal conditions can be employed to improve the reactivity of fly ash. Such improvements in reactivity can result in the formation of monolithic forms which may exhibit suitable mechanical properties for selected applications as building materials. If the ashes involved are considered hazardous, the mechanical properties exhibited indicated the forms could be handled in a manner which facilitates their disposal.

  19. The Remote Security Station (RSS) final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pletta, J.B.; Amai, W.A.; Klarer, P.; Frank, D.; Carlson, J.; Byrne, R.

    1992-10-01

    The Remote Security Station (RSS) was developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the Defense Nuclear Agency to investigate issues pertaining to robotics and sensor fusion in physical security systems. This final report documents the status of the RSS program at its completion in April 1992. The RSS system consists of the Man Portable Security Station (MaPSS) and the Telemanaged Mobile Security Station (TMSS), which are integrated by the Operator's Control Unit (OCU) into a flexible exterior perimeter security system. The RSS system uses optical, infrared, microwave, and acoustic intrusion detection sensors in conjunction with sensor fusion techniques to increase the probability of detection and to decrease the nuisance alarm rate of the system. Major improvements to the system developed during the final year are an autonomous patrol capability, which allows TMSS to execute security patrols with limited operator interaction, and a neural network approach to sensor fusion, which significantly improves the system's ability to filter out nuisance alarms due to adverse weather conditions.

  20. The Remote Security Station (RSS) final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pletta, J.B.; Amai, W.A.; Klarer, P.; Frank, D.; Carlson, J.; Byrne, R.

    1992-10-01

    The Remote Security Station (RSS) was developed by Sandia National Laboratories for the Defense Nuclear Agency to investigate issues pertaining to robotics and sensor fusion in physical security systems. This final report documents the status of the RSS program at its completion in April 1992. The RSS system consists of the Man Portable Security Station (MaPSS) and the Telemanaged Mobile Security Station (TMSS), which are integrated by the Operator`s Control Unit (OCU) into a flexible exterior perimeter security system. The RSS system uses optical, infrared, microwave, and acoustic intrusion detection sensors in conjunction with sensor fusion techniques to increase the probability of detection and to decrease the nuisance alarm rate of the system. Major improvements to the system developed during the final year are an autonomous patrol capability, which allows TMSS to execute security patrols with limited operator interaction, and a neural network approach to sensor fusion, which significantly improves the system`s ability to filter out nuisance alarms due to adverse weather conditions.

  1. Coaxial cable connector swaging technique. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.M.

    1986-03-01

    This project was established to investigate swaging small copper tubes onto the ends of the braided shield and twisted center conductor of a coaxial cable. The physical size, electrical characteristics, and mechanical strength of the swaged connection are the important parameters. A market search revealed that the swaging should be done in-house. The necessary tooling was purchased, and a formula was derived for designing the tubes. Subsequently, tubes were swaged onto appropriate wire, cut to specific lengths, and the electrical and mechanical characteristics tested. The testing done was insufficient to optimize the final connection versus assembly parameters. However, an approach was determined for any further work in developing and improving the connection as well as providing a connection that satisfies the preliminary drawing requirements.

  2. Soft color exchanges and the hadronic final state

    SciTech Connect

    Rathsman, J.

    2000-01-20

    The models for soft color interactions and color string re-interactions, implemented in the Monte Carlo program LEPTO, are investigated regarding hadronic final states in inclusive and diffractive deep inelastic scattering. The hadronic final state in inclusive and diffractive deep inelastic scattering (DIS) can give a better understanding of the interplay between soft and hard processes in QCD. Whereas hard interactions are well described by perturbative QCD, soft interactions are not calculable within perturbation theory. Instead more phenomenological models are used to transform the perturbative partonic final state into an observable hadronic final state. It is normally assumed that the color topology of an event is given by the planar approximation in perturbation theory, so that terms of order 1/N{sub c}{sup 2} are neglected, and that this topology is not altered by soft interactions.

  3. Gravimelt Process development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    This final report contains the results of a bench-scale program to continue the development of the TRW proprietary Gravimelt Process for chemically cleaning coal. This project consisted of two major efforts, a laboratory study aimed at identifying parameters which would influence the operation of a bench unit for desulfurization and demineralization of coal and the design, construction and operation of two types of continuous plug-flow type bench-scale fused caustic leachers. This present bench scale project has demonstrated modes for the continuous operation of fused caustic leaching of coal at coal throughputs of 1 to 5 pounds per hour. The remaining process unit operations of leach solutions regeneration and coal washing and filtration should be tested at bench scale together with fused caustic leaching of coal to demonstrate the complete Gravimelt Process. 22 figures, 11 tables.

  4. Strategic Asia 2002 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Ellings; Aaron Friedberg; Michael Wills

    2002-09-01

    The Strategic Asia Program made considerable progress over the course of 2002--the program's first year with support from the Department of Energy--and completed all its tasks on schedule and within budget. Following a planning meeting in Washington in February 2002, a team of leading specialists wrote a series of original assessments regarding the impact of September 11 on the strategic environment in Asia, examining how perceptions and strategies of countries in the region changed following the terrorist attacks. The final products, Strategic Asia 2002-03: Asian Aftershocks and its accompanying executive summary, were published in September 2002. The program's research findings (some of which are summarized) were presented to policymakers in Washington and elsewhere throughout the year, and almost 2,000 copies of the book had been distributed by mid-2003.

  5. Fort Polk EEAP. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, R.D.; Scheuch, K.E.; Shishman, T.T.

    1986-07-17

    This Final Presentation provides a summary of the work done under Increments A, B, E, and G of the Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP) for Fort Polk Louisiana. The work was accomplished under Contract DACA63-80-C-0166 plus modifications with the Fort Worth District, Corps of Engineers. The vast majority of consumed energy at Fort Polk consists of electricity and natural gas. In FY75, Fort Polk used 48,399,000 kWh of electricity at a cost of $600,000. During that same period, 782,637 MCF of natural gas was purchased for $484,000. The total FY75 energy use was 1,368,327 MBtu.

  6. Dairy methane generator. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, T.B.

    1981-09-30

    Details of the work completed under this contract are presented. During the winter of 1979-80 three students enrolled, in the Mechanical Design Engineering Technology program at the Pennsylvania State University's Capitol Campus (Middletown, PA), undertook a feasibility study for the utilization of the manure generated by the dairy cows located on Mr. Thomas B. Williams farm for the generation and use of methane gas. The results of their effort was the design of an Anaerobic Digester/Electric Generation System. This preliminary designed system was later changed and improved by another group of P.S.U. MDET students in the spring of 1980. The final design included working drawings and an economic analysis of the estimated investment necessary to complete the Methane Generator/Electric Power Generation System.

  7. The final portrait of Christ.

    PubMed

    Fauteux, K

    1989-09-01

    Artistic presentations of Jesus are as numerous and varied as the artists who created them. Whether on canvas or in music, Jesus has been portrayed as a redeemer, revolutionary, teacher, and clown. While some people are inspired by a particular presentation of Jesus, others are angered and incensed at what they perceive to be blasphemous. An example of the latter is Martin Scorsese's film, "The Last Temptation of Christ." This article examines why people responded so negatively to this and other artistic presentations of Jesus. It suggests they have failed to recognize how the portrayal reflects a personal experience of the artist and is not meant to be a final portrait of Christ. And on a more unconscious level, these works of art evoke feelings within people which they fear to acknowledge and which they escape by condemning the work.

  8. Shape memory metals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dworak, T.D.

    1993-09-01

    The ability to define a manufacturing process to form, heat-treat, and join parts made of nickel-titanium and/or copper-zinc-aluminum shape memory alloys was investigated. The specific emphasis was to define a process that would produce shape memory alloy parts in the configuration of helical coils emulating the appearance of compression springs. In addition, the mechanical strength of the finished parts along with the development of a electrical lead attachment method using shape memory alloy wire was investigated.

  9. Numerical Investigation of Boiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagan, Michael; Tanguy, Sebastien; Colin, Catherine

    2012-11-01

    In this work, boiling is numerically investigated, using two phase flow direct numerical simulation based on a level set / Ghost Fluid method. Nucleate boiling implies both thermal issue and multiphase dynamics issues at different scales and at different stages of bubble growth. As a result, the different phenomena are investigated separately, considering their nature and the scale at which they occur. First, boiling of a static bubble immersed in an overheated liquid is analysed. Numerical simulations have been performed at different Jakob numbers in the case of strong density discontinuity through the interface. The results show a good agreement on bubble radius evolution between the theoretical evolution and numerical simulation. After the validation of the code for the Scriven test case, interaction of a bubble with a wall is studied. A numerical method taking into account contact angle is evaluated by comparing simulations of the spreading of a liquid droplet impacting on a plate, with experimental data. Then the heat transfer near the contact line is investigated, and simulations of nucleate boiling are performed considering different contact angles values. Finally, the relevance of including a model to take into account the evaporation of the micro layer is discussed.

  10. Collaborative Investigations of Shallow Water Optics Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    contrast attenuation is also greatest. These results suggest several fruitful avenues Although the range of water types commonly inhabited for future...Collaborative Investigations of Shallow Water Optics Problems FINAL REPORT On Work Performed by Curtis D. Mobley Sequoia Scientific, Inc. 2700...To) 21-12-2004 Final Report Dec 2002 - Dec 2004 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Collaborative Investigations of Shallow Water Optics

  11. 75 FR 34974 - Drill Pipe From the People's Republic of China: Alignment of Final Countervailing Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... International Trade Administration Drill Pipe From the People's Republic of China: Alignment of Final...) is aligning the final determination in the countervailing duty investigation of drill pipe from the... investigations on drill pipe from the PRC. See Drill Pipe From the People's Republic of China: Initiation...

  12. Digital-Computer Processing of Graphical Data. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Herbert

    The final report of a two-year study concerned with the digital-computer processing of graphical data. Five separate investigations carried out under this study are described briefly, and a detailed bibliography, complete with abstracts, is included in which are listed the technical papers and reports published during the period of this program.…

  13. Leading Curriculum Innovation in Primary Schools Project: A Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brundrett, Mark; Duncan, Diane

    2015-01-01

    This article provides the final report on a research project that investigated the ways in which curriculum innovation can be led successfully in primary schools. Data gathering included 40 semi-structured interviews in 10 successful primary schools in England of varying sizes and types and in a range of geographical and social locations. Findings…

  14. Final Evaluation for the Neighborhood Educational Cultural Centerette.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frost, Patricia

    Contained in this report is the final evaluation for the Neighborhood Educational Cultural Centerette Project. Objectives of the research project were to: (1) investigate, experiment with, create, and evaluate methods of instruction curriculum, and materials; analyze pupil learning styles and teacher-teaching styles; and to provide staff growth…

  15. Psycholinguistic Evidence for a Hierarchy of Syllable Structure. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schane, Sanford A.; Pisoni, David B.

    An experiment was conducted to investigate the linguistic concept of a hierarchy of syllable structures. Subjects were asked to identify different types of consonant clusters in initial, medial, and final positions in words. Little psycholinguistic evidence was discovered to support the hierarchical ordering described in the linguistic literature.…

  16. Turn-Final or in English: A Conversation Analytic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Anna Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Or is commonly understood to be a conjunction linking two or more constituents. Ending a sentence with "or" is considered non-canonical in written interaction, but ending a turn with "or" occurs regularly in spoken interaction. This dissertation investigates the interactional work of turn-final or as in "Did his oxygen get…

  17. Influence of Gender and Other Factors to Final Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domeova, Ludmila; Jindrova, Andrea; Fejfar, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    The study focused on the relations between the partial evaluation and the final grade. The investigation has been done on a group of 269 students of the Czech University of Life Sciences in Prague, in the course of Mathematical Methods, who have to go through a strictly defined evaluation scheme. The results of statistical analysis confirmed that…

  18. Learning in Science Project (Form 1-4). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waikato Univ., Hamilton (New Zealand).

    The Learning in Science Project investigated teaching and learning in science at the Form 1 to 4 level to identify some of the key difficulties in this subject area and to find ways of overcoming such difficulties. Included in this final report are: (1) brief accounts of the three major phases of the research; (2) a list of papers derived from the…

  19. Leading Curriculum Innovation in Primary Schools Project: A Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brundrett, Mark; Duncan, Diane

    2015-01-01

    This article provides the final report on a research project that investigated the ways in which curriculum innovation can be led successfully in primary schools. Data gathering included 40 semi-structured interviews in 10 successful primary schools in England of varying sizes and types and in a range of geographical and social locations. Findings…

  20. Turn-Final or in English: A Conversation Analytic Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, Anna Veronika

    2013-01-01

    Or is commonly understood to be a conjunction linking two or more constituents. Ending a sentence with "or" is considered non-canonical in written interaction, but ending a turn with "or" occurs regularly in spoken interaction. This dissertation investigates the interactional work of turn-final or as in "Did his oxygen get…