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Sample records for r4d investigations final

  1. Seasonal snow of arctic Alaska R4D investigations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.S.

    1993-02-01

    Seasonal snow is present on the Arctic Slope of Alaska for nine months each year. Its presence or absence determines whether 80% of the solar radiation is reflected or absorbed, respectively. Although life on the Arctic Slope is adapted to, and in some cases dependent upon seasonal snow, little is known about it from a scientific point of view. Its quantity has been grossly underestimated, and knowledge of its distribution and the extent of wind transport and redistribution is very limited. This research project dealt with the amount, regional distribution and physical properties of wind blown snow and its biological role in the R4D area of the Arctic Slope. Physical processes which operate within the snow that were studied included the flux of heat and vapor and the fractionation of stable isotopes through it during fall and winter, and the complex heat and mass transfer within the snow and between snow, its substrate and the overlying atmosphere during the melt period.

  2. Effects of disturbance on ecosystem dynamics of tundra and riparian vegetation: A project in the R4D program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, J.F.

    1995-12-31

    Models were proposed as research tools to test the basic understanding of the structure and function of arctic ecosystems, as a means for providing initial management assessments of potential response to energy-related development, and as a vehicle for extrapolation of research results to other arctic sites and landscapes. This final summary report reviews progress made on models at a variety of scales from nutrient uptake by individual roots to nutrient availability within arctic landscapes, and examines potentials and critical limitations of these models for providing insight on patch and landscape level function in tundra regions.

  3. Terrain, vegetation, and landscape evolution of the R4D research site, Brooks Range Foothills, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, D. A.; Binnian, Emily F.; Evans, B. M.; Lederer, N. D.; Nordstrand, E.; Webber, P. J.

    1989-01-01

    Maps of the vegetation and terrain of a 22 km2 area centered on the Department of Energy (DOE) R4D (Response, Resistance, Resilience to and Recovery from Disturbance in Arctic Ecosystems) study site in the Southern Foothills Physiographic Province of Alaska were made using integrated geobotanical mapping procedures and a geographic-information system. Typical land forms and surface f orms include hillslope water tracks, Sagavanirktok-age till deposits, nonsorted stone stripes, and colluvial-basin deposits. Thirty-two plant communities are described; the dominant vegetation (51% of the mapped area) is moist tussock-sedge, dwarf-shrub tundra dominated by Eriophorum vaginatum or Carex bigelowii. Much of the spatial variation in the mapped geobotanical characters reflects different-aged glaciated surfaces. Shannon-Wienerin dices indicate that the more mature landscapes, represented by retransported hillslope deposits and basin colluvium, are less heterogeneous than newer landscapes such as surficial till deposits and floodplains. A typical toposequence on a mid-Pleistocene-age surface is discussed with respect to evolution of the landscape. Thick Sphagnum moss layers occur on lower hillslopes, and the patterns of moss-layer development, heat flux, active layer thickness, and ground-ice are seen as keys to developing thermokarst-susceptibility maps.

  4. Cameron Station remedial investigation: Final asbestos survey report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1992-02-01

    Woodward-Clyde Federal Services (WCFS) conducted a comprehensive asbestos survey of the facilities at Cameron Station as part of its contract with the US Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA) to perform a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) at the base. The purpose of the survey which was initiated August 23, 1990 in response to the Base Realignment And Closure Environmental Restoration Strategy (BRAC), was to identify friable and non-friable asbestos-containing material (ACM), provide options for abatement of asbestos, provide cost estimates for both abatement and operations and maintenance costs, and identifying actions requiring immediate action in Cameron Station`s 24 buildings. BRAC states that only friable asbestos which presents a threat to health and safety shall be removed; non-friable asbestos or friable asbestos which is encapsulated or in good repair shall be left in place and identified to the buyer per GSA agreement. The investigation followed protocols that met or exceeded the requirements of 40 CFR 763, the EPA regulations promulgated under the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA).

  5. Report Summary, Final Hells Canyon Environmental Investigation.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1985-01-01

    The Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 provided for the establishment of a Regional Power Planning Council (Regional Council) and mandated the development of a Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (F&W Program). The F&W Program was adopted by the Regional Council in November 1982. and is intended to mitigate fish and wildlife losses resulting from the development of hydroelectric dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. One element of the FLW Program is the Water Budget. It calls for additional flows in the Columbia and Snake Rivers between April 15 and June 15 to improve the survival of juvenile salmon and steelhead migrating downstream. The Snake River's contribution to the Water Budget is 20,000 cubic feet per second-months (A volume of water equal to a flow of 20.000 cubic feet per second, 24 hours per day, for a period of a month) over and above water that would normally flow for power production. The water for the Water Budget would come out of Idaho Power Company's (IPCo) Hells Canyon Complex and the Corps of Engineers' (Corps) Dvorshak Reservoir. IPCo's Hells Canyon Complex consists of three dams, Brownlee, Oxbow, and Hells Canyon. Brownlee, at the upstream end, contains a large reservoir and controls flow to the lower dams. IPCo's participation in the Water Budget could affect the level of the Brownlee Reservoir and flows downstream of the Hells Canyon Complex on the Snake River. In light of this, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and IPCo contracted with the consulting firm of CH2!4 Hill to study the potential changes that could occur to the environment. The Environmental Investigation (EI) takes into account concerns that were expressed by the public at a series of public meetings held in the Snake River area during June 1983 and again during September 1984. Existing information and consultations with agencies which have management responsibilities in the project area formed the basis for the data used in the EI

  6. Outstanding Junior Investigator Award. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, J.A.

    1995-04-17

    The OJI supported research of J. Ellison has been concentrated in two areas: study of W{gamma} and Z{gamma} production at the Tevatron, which probes the trilinear boson coupling; design, fabrication and testing of silicon microstrip detectors for the D0 upgrade silicon tracking system. The W{gamma} analysis using data from the first D0 run ({approximately}14 pb{sup {minus}1} integrated luminosity) has been completed - J. Ellison and a postdoctoral research working with him (B. Choudhary) were responsible for the muon channel analysis. This analysis is an important test of the Standard Model (SM), since it probes the nature of the WW{gamma} coupling, which is related to the W boson magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments. Any deviation from the SM value of the WW{gamma} coupling would be an indication of either composite structure of the W or higher order loop corrections involving physics beyond the SM. The analysis has resulted in the world`s most sensitive limits on the WW{gamma} coupling parameters. In addition the author has also worked on an analysis of Z{gamma} production which has yielded sensitive limits on the ZZ{gamma} and Z{gamma}{gamma} couplings. The work on the D0 Silicon Tracker has also made very good progress. The team led by J. Ellison includes two postdoctoral researchers (A. Bischoff and C. Boswell), one graduate student (M. Mason) and three undergraduate students. They have fully evaluated proptotype detectors which were designed at UCR and have completed a detailed simulation study of the detector performance for different strip geometries. The results were used to optimize the design of the final D0 detectors, for which UR has sole responsibility. The author has completed the mask design for the 3-chip barrel detectors and production of the final detectors as now begun.

  7. An Investigation of Harvard Dropouts. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholi, Armand M., II

    Approximately half of the 7,000,000 students currently enrolled in college will fail to complete their education. This study investigates the causes of this high attrition rate by examining the records of 1,454 undergraduates who dropped out of Harvard College for various reasons over a 5-year period. Sources of the data were: (1) Registrar's…

  8. 24 CFR 103.230 - Final investigative report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Final investigative report. 103.230 Section 103.230 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR EQUAL OPPORTUNITY, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT...

  9. Investigations on detonation shock dynamics and related topics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D.S.

    1993-11-01

    This document is a final report that summarizes the research findings and research activities supported by the subcontract DOE-LANL-9-XG8-3931P-1 between the University of Illinois (D. S. Stewart Principal Investigator) and the University of California (Los Alamos National Laboratory, M-Division). The main focus of the work has been on investigations of Detonation Shock Dynamics. A second emphasis has been on modeling compaction of energetic materials and deflagration to detonation in those materials. The work has led to a number of extensions of the theory of Detonation Shock Dynamics (DSD) and its application as an engineering design method for high explosive systems. The work also enhanced the hydrocode capabilities of researchers in M-Division by modifications to CAVEAT, an existing Los Alamos hydrocode. Linear stability studies of detonation flows were carried out for the purpose of code verification. This work also broadened the existing theory for detonation. The work in this contract has led to the development of one-phase models for dynamic compaction of porous energetic materials and laid the groundwork for subsequent studies. Some work that modeled the discrete heterogeneous behavior of propellant beds was also performed. The contract supported the efforts of D. S. Stewart and a Postdoctoral student H. I. Lee at the University of Illinois.

  10. Final report for the network authentication investigation and pilot.

    SciTech Connect

    Eldridge, John M.; Dautenhahn, Nathan; Miller, Marc M.; Wiener, Dallas J; Witzke, Edward L.

    2006-11-01

    New network based authentication mechanisms are beginning to be implemented in industry. This project investigated different authentication technologies to see if and how Sandia might benefit from them. It also investigated how these mechanisms can integrate with the Sandia Two-Factor Authentication Project. The results of these investigations and a network authentication path forward strategy are documented in this report.

  11. An Investigation of Personality and Music Teaching Success. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krueger, Reynold J.

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the relationships between personality and motivational variables and music teaching success criteria. The success criteria investigated were class mean residual gain scores of pupils and teacher ratings by pupils, building principals, supervisors, peers, and teachers themselves. The problems considered…

  12. Investigation of multiparticle final states in {sup 12}C photoreactions

    SciTech Connect

    Harty, P.D.; MacGregor, I.J.; Annand, J.R.; Anthony, I.; Cross, G.E.; Hall, S.J.; Kellie, J.D.; McGeorge, J.C.; Miller, G.J.; Owens, R.O.; Grabmayr, P.; Hehl, T.; Lamparter, T.; Sauer, M.; Schneider, R.; Spaeth, K.; Branford, D.; Davinson, T.; MacKenzie, J.A.; Ahrens, J.; Beck, R.

    1998-01-01

    The {sup 12}C({gamma},pn), {sup 12}C({gamma},pp), {sup 12}C({gamma},ppp), {sup 12}C({gamma},pp{pi}{sup {plus_minus}}), {sup 12}C({gamma},p{pi}{sup {plus_minus}}) reactions have been studied using tagged photons of energy E{sub {gamma}}=250{endash}600 MeV. A model which includes all major absorption mechanisms and final state interactions gives results that agree well with the shapes of missing energy spectra, but for some channels the predicted cross sections are too large. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Criminal investigations and the Superfund program. Fact sheet (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    The fact sheet, directed toward any one who witnesses fraudulent activity in EPA programs, discusses areas in which fraud and abuse can occur and provides an understanding of the criminal investigation process that results from reports of suspicious activity.

  14. Final work plan for targeted investigation at Hilton, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-08-28

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of a targeted investigation to update the status of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater associated with grain storage operations at Hilton, Kansas. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility in Hilton during the 1950s and 1960s. At the time of the CCC/USDA operation in Hilton, grain storage facilities (CCC/USDA and private) were located along the both sides of the former Union Pacific railroad tracks (Figure 1.1). The main grain storage structures were on or near the railroad right-of-way. The proposed targeted investigation, to be conducted by Argonne National Laboratory on the behalf of CCC/USDA, will supplement Argonne's Phase I and Phase II investigations in 1996-1997. The earlier investigations erroneously focused on an area east of the railroad property where the CCC/USDA did not operate, specifically on a private grain storage facility. In addition, the investigation was limited in scope, because access to railroad property was denied (Argonne 1997a,b). The hydrogeologic system at Hilton is potentially complex.

  15. Geophysical investigation at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. Final report,

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, M.K.

    1992-03-01

    Results of a geophysical investigation at the incinerator site of Philadelphia Naval Shipyard are presented. Following the end of World War II, 50 to 60 pallets of gas cylinders were reportedly buried to the west of the old incinerator at Girard Point. The contents of the cylinders are unknown. Extensive filling operations occurred at Girard Point from 1940 to 1970, resulting in shallow groundwater surface in the area, 2 to 10 ft deep, which would indicate that the cylinders are probably in direct contact with the water surface. The geophysical investigation presented in this report was designed to help alleviate uncertainties produced from previous studies in the area. The geophysical program included electromagnetic induction and magnetic survey methods. The results of the various surveys were integrated, and numerous anomalous areas were interpreted. Anomalies warranting further investigation were presented along with a priority ranking.

  16. Final work plan for targeted investigation at Inman, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-05

    In 1997, low levels of carbon tetrachloride (below the maximum contaminant level [MCL] of 5 {micro}g/L) were detected in groundwater at Inman, Kansas, by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The 1997 KDHE sampling was conducted under the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) private well sampling program. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), a USDA agency, operated a grain storage facility in Inman from 1954 to 1965. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with former CCC/USDA grain storage operations. Inman is located in southwest McPherson County, approximately 10 mi southwest of the city of McPherson (Figure 1.1). To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Inman is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA has agreed to conduct an investigation at Inman, in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the USDA. For this work plan, Argonne compiled historical data related to the previous investigations and grain storage operations at Inman. Through a review of documents acquired from all available sources, other potential contaminant source areas (in addition to the former CCC/USDA facility) have been identified as (1) the commercial grain storage structures northwest of Inman, along the railroad right-of-way, and (2) small former private grain storage facilities west of Main Street and near the former CCC/USDA facility at the southern edge of Inman (Figure 1.2). Previous investigations and the potential source areas are discussed in Section 2.

  17. Final report : Phase III targeted investigation, Everest, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-01-31

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated grain storage facilities at two different locations at Everest, Kansas (Figure 1.1). One facility (referred to in this report as the Everest facility) was at the western edge of the city. The second facility (referred to in this report as Everest East) was about 0.5 mi northeast of the town. The CCC/USDA operated these facilities from the early 1950s until the early 1970s, at a time when commercial fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the CCC/USDA and private industry for the preservation of grain in storage. In 1997 the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) sampled several domestic drinking water and non-drinking water wells in the Everest area as part of the CCC/USDA Private Well Sampling Program. All of the sampled wells were outside the Everest city limits. Carbon tetrachloride contamination was identified at a single domestic drinking water well (the Nigh well, DW06; Figure 1.1) approximately 3/8 mi northwest of the former Everest CCC/USDA grain storage facility. Subsequent KDHE investigations suggested that the contamination in DW06 could be linked to the former use of grain fumigants at the CCC/USDA facility. For this reason, the CCC/USDA is conducting a phased environmental study to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination at Everest and to identify potential remedial options. The studies are being performed by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Two phases of investigation were completed previously; this report presents the findings of the targeted Phase III investigation at Everest.

  18. Field investigation of FGD system chemistry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Litherland, S.T.; Colley, J.D.; Glover, R.L.; Maller, G.; Behrens, G.P.

    1984-12-01

    Three full-scale wet limestone FGD systems were investigated to gain a better understanding of FGD system operation and chemistry. The three plants which participated in the program were South Mississippi Electric Power Association's R. D. Morrow Station, Colorado-Ute Electric Association's Craig Station, and Central Illinois Light Company's Duck Creek Station. Each FGD system was characterized with respect to SO/sub 2/ removal, liquid and solid phase chemistry, and calcium sulfite and calcium sulfate relative saturation. Mist eliminator chemistry and performance were documented at Morrow and Duck Creek. Solutions to severe mist eliminator scaling and pluggage were demonstrated at Duck Creek. A technical and econ

  19. Fundamental investigation of duct/ESP phenomena. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, C.A.; Durham, M.D.; Sowa, W.A.; Himes, R.M.; Mahaffey, W.A.

    1991-10-21

    Radian Corporation was contracted to investigate duct injection and ESP phenomena in a 1.7 MW pilot plant constructed for this test program. This study was an attempt to resolve problems found in previous studies and answer remaining questions for the technology using an approach which concentrates on the fundamental mechanisms of the process. The goal of the study was to obtain a better understanding of the basic physical and chemical phenomena that control: (1) the desulfurization of flue gas by calcium-based reagent, and (2) the coupling of an existing ESP particulate collection device to the duct injection process. Process economics are being studied by others. (VC)

  20. Final work plan : environmental site investigation at Sylvan Grove, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2012-07-15

    In 1998, carbon tetrachloride was found above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L in groundwater from one private livestock well at Sylvan Grove, Kansas, by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The 1998 KDHE sampling was conducted under the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) private well sampling program. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), a USDA agency, operated a grain storage facility in Sylvan Grove from 1954 to1966. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with former CCC/USDA grain storage operations. Sylvan Grove is located in western Lincoln County, approximately 60 mi west of Salina (Figure 1.1). To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Sylvan Grove is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA has agreed to conduct an investigation, in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency (FSA) of the USDA. This Work Plan presents historical data related to previous investigations, grain storage operations, local private wells and public water supply (PWS) wells, and local geologic and hydrogeologic conditions at Sylvan Grove. The findings from a review of all available documents are discussed in Section 2. On the basis of the analyses of historical data, the following specific technical objectives are proposed for the site investigation at Sylvan Grove: (1) Evaluate the potential source of carbon tetrachloride at the former CCC/USDA facility; (2) Determine the relationship of potential contamination (if present) at the former CCC/USDA facility to contamination identified in 1998 in groundwater samples from one private well to the west; and (3) Delineate the extent of potential contamination associated with the former CCC/USDA facility. The detailed scope of work is outlined in Section 3. The results of the proposed work will provide the basis for determining

  1. Final Report on Investigation of the Electron Interactions in Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Philip

    2015-02-14

    In graphene, combined with the real spin degree of freedom, which exhibits SU(2) symmetry, the total internal degrees of freedom of graphene carriers is thus described by a larger SU(4) symmetry, which produces a richer space for potential phenomena of emergent correlated electron phenomena. The major part of this proposal is exploring this unique multicomponent correlated system in the quantum limit. In the current period of DOE BES support we have made several key advances that will serve as a foundation for the new studies in this proposal. Employing the high-mobility encapsulated graphene heterostructures developed during the current phase of research, we have investigated spin and valley quantum Hall ferromagnetism in graphene and discovered a spin phase transition leading to a quantum spin Hall analogue. We have also observed the fractal quantum Hall effect arising from the Hofstadter’s butterfly energy spectrum. In addition, we have discovered multiband transport phenomena in bilayer graphene at high carrier densities.

  2. Final report for targeted investigations at Murdock, Nebraska, in 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2005-08-01

    On April 1, 2003, representatives of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) and Argonne National Laboratory met with representatives of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region VII (EPA); the Nebraska Department of Environmental Quality (NDEQ); and Nebraska Health and Human Services (NHHS) to discuss the current regulatory and technical status of the environmental investigations at the former CCC/USDA grain bin site in Murdock, Nebraska. The investigations are being performed by Argonne (under the direction of the CCC/USDA) to characterize and evaluate the potential remedial needs associated with the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in groundwater and surface waters in the vicinity of the town. This contamination has been linked to former CCC/USDA grain storage activities at Murdock. Table 1.1 presents a brief summary of the regulatory, site characterization, and remedial assessment activities to date at Murdock. Figure 1.1 illustrates the extent of the groundwater carbon tetrachloride plume, estimated on the basis of sampling performed by Argonne in June 2002. Figure 1.2 presents the 2002 interpretation of the site hydrogeology in a cross section extending northwestward from the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility, along the approximate axis of the groundwater plume. In reviewing the available information for Murdock, the EPA identified two specific areas of technical concern regarding the distribution and potential fate of the carbon tetrachloride contamination at the site that might significantly affect the selection of an appropriate remedial strategy: (1) Periodic sampling (by Argonne) of surface water at the headwaters of the unnamed tributary to Pawnee Creek northwest of Murdock and sampling of the effluent from natural seepage points and agricultural drain tile lines that contribute to the creek (Figure 1.3) demonstrated discharge of contaminated groundwater from the aquifer to the

  3. Final report : Hanover environmental site investigation, 2009-2010.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2011-06-07

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility at the northeastern edge of the city of Hanover, Kansas, from 1950 until the early 1970s. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In February 1998, trace to low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected in two private lawn and garden wells near the former grain storage facility at Hanover, as part of a statewide USDA private well sampling program that was implemented by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) near former CCC/USDA facilities. In July 2007, the CCC/USDA sampled indoor air at nine residences on or adjacent to its former facility to address the residents concerns. Low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected at four of the nine homes. Consequently, the CCC/USDA has conducted investigations, under the direction of the KDHE, to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination that might be associated with the former facility. In July 2007, the CCC/USDA sampled indoor air at nine residences on or adjacent to its former facility to address the residents concerns regarding vapor intrusion (VI). Low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected at four of the nine homes. Because carbon tetrachloride found in private wells and indoor air at Hanover might be linked to historical use of fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA has conducted investigations to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination that may be associated with the former facility. The results of the comprehensive investigation at Hanover indicate that no unacceptable risk to human health currently exists from exposure to surface and subsurface soils by either ingestion, inhalation or dermal contact. No risk is

  4. Holland Roller Windmill: investigation and demonstration of principles. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, R. Jr.

    1981-06-01

    A horizontal axis wind power machine using a radially positioned spinning cylindrical roller was investigated and a demonstration machine was constructed and operated in the natural wind. Earlier wind machines using the Magnus rotor were reviewed, such as the Flettner Rotor Windmill and the Madaras Rotor Power Plant. Wind tunnel tests and analyses were made. Analyses were made of gyroscopic bending moments on the roller and centrifugal hinge moments acting on the freely hinged trailer. Analyses of applied structural air loads were made of the conventional torsionally restrained airfoil type blade compared to the unconventional blade consisting of roller and free trailer. Criteria for stress analysis of trailer blades were developed. Exploratory wind tunnel tests were made of the downwash patterns around Magnus rotors. The power required to spin them was measured. Combined spinning and whirling of a model horizontal axis roller machine was demonstrated. Tests of blade type models were run. Sections for roller mill blades, consisting of power driven spinning roller and a series of trailers of varying sizes and shapes, were tested. Reynolds number effects on section performance were studied, and broadly suitable types of roller trailer combinations were determined below the critical and above the critical Reynolds. A design was synthesized for a single bladed demonstrator machine, including stress analysis, detail design, construction and assembly. The demonstrator operated satisfactorily in the natural wind. Results indicate that major benefits of this type of machine are virtual elimination of stresses due to gusts and strong winds, and marked reduction of cost per unit of swept disk area.

  5. An Investigation of Preservation Service Needs and Options for Florida Libraries: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePew, John N.

    This final report presents the results of a survey conducted during 1989-90 which investigated the preservation needs of Florida's academic and public libraries. Data were collected via mail questionnaires sent to 516 libraries and a series of follow-up visits to 22 of the 374 libraries (72.5%) which responded to the survey. Information elicited…

  6. Final STS-35 Columbia descent BET products and results for LaRC OEX investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oakes, Kevin F.; Findlay, John T.; Jasinski, Rachel A.; Wood, James S.

    1991-01-01

    Final STS-35 'Columbia' descent Best Estimate Trajectory (BET) products have been developed for Langley Research Center (LaRC) Orbiter Experiments (OEX) investigations. Included are the reconstructed inertial trajectory profile; the Extended BET, which combines the inertial data and, in this instance, the National Weather Service atmospheric information obtained via Johnson Space Center; and the Aerodynamic BET. The inertial BET utilized Inertial Measurement Unit 1 (IMU1) dynamic measurements for deterministic propagation during the ENTREE estimation process. The final estimate was based on the considerable ground based C-band tracking coverage available as well as Tracking Data and Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) Doppler data, a unique use of the latter for endo-atmospheric flight determinations. The actual estimate required simultaneous solutions for the spacecraft position and velocity, spacecraft attitude, and six IMU parameters - three gyro biases and three accelerometer scale factor correction terms. The anchor epoch for this analysis was 19,200 Greenwich Mean Time (GMT) seconds which corresponds to an initial Shuttle altitude of approximately 513 kft. The atmospheric data incorporated were evaluated based on Shuttle derived considerations as well as comparisons with other models. The AEROBET was developed based on the Extended BET, the measured spacecraft configuration information, final mass properties, and the final Orbiter preoperation databook. The latter was updated based on aerodynamic consensus incrementals derived by the latest published FAD. The rectified predictions were compared versus the flight computed values and the resultant differences were correlated versus ensemble results for twenty-two previous STS entry flights.

  7. Offpost operable unit remedial investigation/endangerment assessment/feasibility study, draft final work plan

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-01

    This document presents the scope of work for additional data collection activities and interpretive reports to be performed in the off-post operable unit (OU) for preparation of: (1) Addendum to the final remedial investigation report; (2)` Revision of the draft final endangerment assessment/feasibility study. The plan is divided into the following sections: (1) Requirements for the RI addendum - technical approach and data collection program for the RI addendum - technical approach and data collection program for ground water, soil, sediment, biota, air; (2) Revision of the endagerment assessment - items that need to be reevaluated; (3) Revision of the feasibility study - evaluation of different media and ARAR`s development of remedial alternatives; (4) Schedule and description of deliverables. Appendix a contains a detailed approach for the 96th avenue risk assessment.

  8. FINAL REPORT: An Investigation of the Microphysical, Radiative, and Dynamical Properties of Mixed-Phase Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Shupe, Matthew D

    2007-10-01

    This final report summarizes the major accomplishments and products resulting from a three-year grant funded by the DOE, Office of Science, Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program titled: An Investigation of the Microphysical, Radiative, and Dynamical Properties of Mixed-Phase Clouds. Accomplishments are listed under the following subcategories: Mixed-phase cloud retrieval method development; Mixed-phase cloud characterization; ARM mixed-phase cloud retrieval review; and New ARM MICROBASE product. In addition, lists are provided of service to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, data products provided to the broader research community, and publications resulting from this grant.

  9. Final report of the independent counsel for Iran/Contra matters. Volume 1: Investigations and prosecutions

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, L.E.

    1993-08-04

    In October and November 1986, two secret U.S. Government operations were publicly exposed, potentially implicating Reagan Administration officials in illegal activities. These operations were the provision of assistance to the military activities of the Nicaraguan contra rebels during an October 1984 to October 1986 prohibition on such aid, and the sale of U.S. arms to Iran in contravention of stated U.S. policy and in possible violation of arms-export controls. In late November 1986, Reagan Administration officials announced that some of the proceeds from the sale of U.S. arms to Iran had been diverted to the contras. As a result of the exposure of these operations, Attorney General Edwin Meese III sought the appointment of an independent counsel to investigate and, if necessary, prosecute possible crimes arising from them. This is the final report of that investigation.

  10. Investigators' Experience With Expedited Safety Reports Prior to the FDA's Final IND Safety Reporting Rule.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Judith M; Vock, David; Greenberg, Howard E; Janning, Cheri; Szczech, Lynda; Salgo, Miklos; Gagnon, Suzanne; Ellenberg, Susan

    2014-07-01

    Prior to enactment of the final investigational new drug application (IND) safety reporting rule, an attempt was made to document the effort expended at investigative sites in processing IND safety reports from sponsors and to assess the effect of these expedited reports on trial conduct. Investigators were asked to (1) prospectively document time to process IND safety reports and (2) retrospectively review safety reports from a previous 3-month period, documenting resultant actions. In this limited sample, sites spent a median of 0.25 hours per report at a median cost of US$22. Few expedited safety reports were retrospectively said to have changed study conduct or informed consent. However, a low response rate and the concentration of clinical sites in a single therapeutic area preclude generalizing these results. The authors discuss the challenges in gaining investigators' cooperation to evaluate the impact of regulatory requirements. Better methods to facilitate this type of research will enrich the scientific basis of future clinical trial regulation and guidance.

  11. Final proposed plan, Army Materials Technology Laboratory, task order 1, remedial investigation/feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The U.S. Army is proposing a cleanup plan, referred to as a preferred alternative, to address outdoor contamination at the MTL Superfund site in Watertown, Massachusetts. The Proposed Plan recommends one of the cleanup options from among those that were evaluated during the Remedial Investigation (RI) and Feasibility Study (FS) performed for the site. The Army is publishing this Proposed Plan to provide opportunity for public review and comment on the cleanup alternatives, known as remedial alternatives, under consideration for the site. The Army is soliciting comments on the proposed level of cleanup and will consider public comments as part of the final decision-making process for selecting the cleanup remedy for the site.

  12. Experimental investigation of collisionless electron-electron microinstabilities. Final technical report for the period August 1, 1997-October 31, 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Scime, Earl E.

    2000-12-11

    This is the final report for the Office of Fusion Energy sponsored project entitled, "Experimental Investigation of Collisionless Electron-Electron Microinstabilities." The report summarizes the scientific and human resource development accomplishments supported through this project.

  13. Investigations in gauge theories, topological solitons and string theories. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    This is the Final Report on a supported research project on theoretical particle physics entitled ``Investigations in Gauge Theories, Topological Solitons and String Theories.`` The major theme of particle theory pursued has been within the rubric of the standard model, particularly on the interplay between symmetries and dynamics. Thus, the research has been carried out primarily in the context of gauge with or without chiral fermions and in effective chiral lagrangian field theories. The topics studied include the physical implications of abelian and non-abelian anomalies on the spectrum and possible dynamical symmetry breaking in a wide range of theories. A wide range of techniques of group theory, differential geometry and function theory have been applied to probe topological and conformal properties of quantum field theories in two and higher dimensions, the breaking of global chiral symmetries by vector-like gauge theories such as QCD,the phenomenology of a possibly strongly interacting Higgs sector within the minimal standard model, and the relevance of solitonic ideas to non-perturbative phenomena at SSC energies.

  14. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 38

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-04-01

    This final report of a study of the environmental characterization of the North Aleutian Shelf nearshore region includes: characterization, processes, and vulnerability to development; and annotated bibliography and keyword index.

  15. Final Report - Investigation of Intermittent Turbulence and Turbulent Structures in the Presence of Controlled Sheared Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Mark A.

    2013-06-27

    Final Report for grant DE-FG02-06ER54898. The dynamics and generation of intermittent plasma turbulent structures, widely known as "blobs" have been studied in the presence of sheared plasma flows in a controlled laboratory experiment.

  16. Outer Continental Shelf environmental-assessment program: final reports of principal investigators. Volume 25

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-10-01

    This compilation of includes final reports on the following subjects: ice edge ecosystems, primary productivity, nutrient cycling and organic matter transfer; analysis of Harrison Bay zooplankton samples; Beaufort Sea plankton studies, winter-spring studies in Stefansson Sound and off Narwhal Island; foodweb and nutrient dynamics in nearshore Beaufort Sea waters.

  17. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 34

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    The report is a compilation of three final reports dealing with geologic processes and hazards of the Beaufort and Chukchi Sea Shelf and coastal regions: Beaufort and Chukchi, seacoast permafrost studies; and the environmental geology and geomorphology of the Barrier Island-lagoon system along the Beaufort Sea coastal plain from Prudhoe Bay to the Colville River. Fifteen oversized maps are included.

  18. 78 FR 13379 - Xanthan Gum from Austria and China; Scheduling of the Final Phase of an Antidumping Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ... gives notice of the scheduling of the final phase of antidumping investigation Nos. 731-TA-1202-03... pentasaccharide monomer unit consists of a backbone of two P-1,4-D- Glucose monosaccharide units, the second with... monosaccharide units. The terminal mannose may be pyruvylated and the internal mannose unit may be...

  19. 77 FR 16559 - Large Power Transformers From Korea: Scheduling of the Final Phase of an Antidumping Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ... COMMISSION Large Power Transformers From Korea: Scheduling of the Final Phase of an Antidumping Investigation... imports from Korea of large power transformers, provided for in subheading 8504.23.00 of the Harmonized... Commerce has defined the subject merchandise as ``large liquid dielectric power transformers (LPTs)...

  20. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE TRAINING AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS OF INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY MAINTENANCE WORKERS. VOLUME II. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LYNN, FRANK

    THE APPENDIXES FOR "AN INVESTIGATION OF THE TRAINING AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS OF INDUSTRIAL MACHINERY MAINTENANCE WORKERS, FINAL REPORT, VOLUME I" (VT 004 006) INCLUDE (1) TWO LETTERS FROM PLANT ENGINEERS STRESSING THE IMPORTANCE OF TRAINING MACHINERY MAINTENANCE WORKERS, (2) A DESCRIPTION OF THE MAINTENANCE TRAINING SURVEY, A SAMPLE QUESTIONNAIRE,…

  1. Investigation of Pre-School Children's Problem Solving Processes. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klahr, David

    Preschool children's problem solving processes are investigated in both direct and indirect ways. Direct investigations focus on substantive and methodological issues related to how children solve a few well defined puzzles, such as the Tower of Hanoi and the Tangram. Indirect investigations deal with related issues: U-shaped (or non-monotone)…

  2. 78 FR 13019 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Investigation, Final Determination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks From the People's Republic of China: Antidumping Duty Investigation, 77 FR... Preliminary Determination, 77 FR at 60675. \\5\\ See Memorandum to the Record from Paul Piquado, Assistant... Amended, 70 FR 24533 (May 10, 2005). Period of Investigation The period of investigation (``POI'') is...

  3. Multi-agency radiation survey and site investigation manual (MARSIM). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    The MARSSIM provides information on planning, conducting, evaluating, and documenting building surface and surface soil final status radiological surveys for demonstrating compliance with dose or risk-based regulations or standards. The MARSSIM is a multi-agency consensus document that was developed collaboratively by four Federal agencies having authority and control over radioactive materials: Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The MARSSIM`s objective is to describe a consistent approach for planning, performing, and assessing building surface and surface soil final status surveys to meet established dose or risk-based release criteria, while at the same time encouraging an effective use of resources.

  4. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 33

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-07-01

    This ccompilation of five final reports deals with the distribution and dynamics of heavy metals in Alaskan Shelf environments; characterization of organic matter in sediments; distribution of trace elements in bottom sediment of the Northern Bering Sea; aspects of size distributions, clay mineralogy, and geochemistry of sediments of the Beaufort Sea and adjacent deltas; and the natural distribution and dynamics of hydrocarbons on the Alaskan continental shelf.

  5. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assesment program. Final reports of principal investigators. volume 37

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-03-01

    A compilation of seven final reports dealing with seal/sea lion and walrus surveys of the Navarin Basin; potential impacts of man-made noise on ringed seals; modern populations, migrations, demography, trophics, and historical status of the Pacific Walrus; distribution of marine mammals in the coastal zone of the eastern Chukchi Sea during summer and autumn; and early spring distribution, density and abundance of the Pacific Walrus in 1976.

  6. Environmental assessment of the Alaskan Continental Shelf. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 11. Biological studies

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    This volume of final reports includes the following: Toxicity of Oil-Well Drilling Muds to Alaska Larval Shrimp and Crabs; Trophic Relationships Among Ice-Inhabiting Phocid Seals and Functionally Related Marine Mammals in the Chukchi Sea; Trophic Relationships Among Ice-Inhabiting Phocid Seals and Functionally Related Marine Mammals in the Bering Sea; Ecological Studies in the Bering Strait Region; and The Relationships of Marine Mammal Distributions, Densities and Activities to Sea Ice Conditions.

  7. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 56

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Contents include: seal, sea lion, walrus and beluga whale surveys of the Bering Sea, 1979 and 1982-1983; investigations of belukha whales in coastal waters of western and northern Alaska. i. distribution, abundance, and movements; investigations of belukha whales in coastal waters of western and northern Alaska. ii. biology and ecology; investigations of belukha whales in coastal water of western and northern Alaska. iii. food habits; behavioral responses of gray whales to industrial noise: feeding observations and predictive modeling.

  8. Final report : results of the 2005 investigation of contaminant sources at Agra, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-08-24

    The 2005 investigation of contaminant sources at Agra, Kansas, was conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE; Gotto 2004). The Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory implemented the investigation on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The investigation was designed to (1) update the conceptual site model and (2) investigate sources of previously identified carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater. Six technical objectives were proposed in the ''Work Plan'' (Argonne 2005). The ''Work Plan'' was approved by the KDHE on March 28, 2005 (KDHE 2005). The six objectives were as follows: (1) Determine the current configuration of the carbon tetrachloride plume in the investigation area. (2) Delineate contamination detected in 1998-1999 at the former CCC/USDA facility. (3) Investigate the Pro-Ag Co-op property for evidence of releases of carbon tetrachloride. (4) Investigate the area adjacent to the site of the former retail store for evidence of releases of carbon tetrachloride to the subsurface. (5) Collect data to support the analysis of potential remedial alternatives. (6) Update the inventory of private wells to identify potential downgradient receptors. This report details and interprets the data collected during the 2005 investigation at Agra. The investigation met the objectives defined in the ''Work Plan''.

  9. Investigation of Alleged Scientific Misconduct on Grants MH-32206 and MH-37449. Final Report and Summary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Mental Health (DHHS), Rockville, MD.

    The report presents results of a Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) investigation into alleged scientific misconduct by Dr. Stephen Bruening in relation to two federally supported projects concerning tardive dyskinesia in retarded populations and stimulant drug use with mentally retarded children. The investigative panel of scientists…

  10. Environmental assessment of the Alaskan continental shelf. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 19

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    This is a compilation of 7 final reports on the following subjects: selected annotated references on marine mammals of Alaska, trophic relationships among ice-inhabiting phocid seals in the Chukchi Sea, biology of the harbor seal in the Gulf of Alaska, natural history and ecology of the bearded seal, measurements and localization of underwater sounds from the Prudhoe Bay region, March 1981; population, assessment, ecology, and trophic relationships of Steller sea lions in the Gulf of Alaska; harvest of Pacific walruses by the pelagic whaling industry 1848-1914.

  11. Investigation of formation of nitrogen compounds in coal combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, D.W.; Crane, I.D.; Wendt, J.O.L.

    1983-10-01

    This is the final report on DOE contract number DE-AC21-80MC14061. It concerns the formation of nitrogen oxide from fuel-bound nitrogen during coal combustion. The work reported was divided into three tasks. They addressed problems of time-resolving pyrolysis rates of coal under simulated combustion conditions, the combustion of the tar that results from such pyrolysis, and theoretical modeling of the pyrolysis process. In all of these tasks, special attention was devoted to the fate of coal nitrogen. The first two tasks were performed by Exxon Research and Engineering Company. 49 references.

  12. Site investigation of Cluster 3, Edgewood Area, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, M.K.; Kean, T.B.

    1995-08-01

    The Waterways Experiment Station (WES) is currently involved in investigating several sites at the Edgewood Area (EA) of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland. These investigations consist of placing monitoring wells and periodically collecting samples for laboratory analysis. Additionally, several of the sites are to be investigated geophysically to determine if any anomalous areas exist. One of the sites, Cluster 3, a suspected landfill area is the focus of this report. Geophysical surveys were conducted to help delineate any anomalies indicative of buried waste, waste containers, boundaries of burial trenches, and the depth to water table. The geophysical methods utilized at the site were electromagnetic induction (EM), magnetics, and seismic refraction.

  13. Final report : results of the 2007 targeted investigation at Hilton, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-04-29

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility in Hilton, Kansas, in 1954-1965. In 1992, carbon tetrachloride was first identified, at a concentration of 910 {micro}g/L, in groundwater from well GW01 at Hilton. This discovery occurred in association with the sale of the private grain storage facility on which well GW01 is located to the current owner, the Mid-Kansas Cooperative Association. The Kansas Department of Health and Environment conducted investigations at Hilton in 1992-1994. In 1996-1997, Argonne National Laboratory conducted Phase I and Phase II investigations on behalf of the CCC/USDA to characterize the distribution of the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in well GW01, the stratigraphic units potentially hosting contaminant migration, and local hydrogeology in the Hilton area. The 2007 targeted investigation reported here focused specifically on the former CCC/USDA property at Hilton, west of the railroad tracks. (Until a property record search in 2005, the location of the CCC/USDA's former facility at Hilton was not known with certainty.) The objectives of the investigation, as implemented, were to (1) investigate for carbon tetrachloride contamination in the shallower soil and shallow aquifer units below the former CCC/USDA property and (2) investigate groundwater flow patterns. The key results of the 2007 targeted investigation are as follows: (1) No carbon tetrachloride or chloroform contamination was found in soil or groundwater below the former CCC/USDA facility. (2) The 2007 groundwater level data support a southwesterly direction for groundwater flow in the main Hilton aquifer (Equus Beds), consistent with findings of previous investigations. Contaminated well GW01 was confirmed to be upgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility. (3) The contaminants carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, and 1,2-dibromoethane (ethylene dibromide) were found in

  14. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report. Volume 2, Appendix A: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force`s Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions will need to be carried out at each site. The island`s drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites during the 1992 field investigation included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. In addition, geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal to be avoided during drilling activities. This report, appendix A, contains the analytical results.

  15. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report. Volume 1: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force`s Installation Restoration Program (IRP). As a part of the IRP program, field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions willneed to be carried out at each site. The island`s drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites during the 1992 field investigation included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. In addition, geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal to be avoided during drilling activities.

  16. Subsurface investigation of a liquefaction-induced lateral spread, Thousand Springs Valley, Idaho. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Andrus, R.D.; Youd, T.L.

    1987-05-01

    A subsurface investigation was made across a lateral spread that was induced by liquefaction during the 1983 Borah Peak Earthquake (MS=7.3). The lateral spread is at a site near Whiskey Springs in the Thousand Springs Valley, Idaho. The purpose of the investigation was to (a) determine whether previous liquefaction and lateral spreading had occurred; (b) measure and evaluate geologic and geotechnical properties susbsurface sediments many of which are gravels; and (c) analyze liquefaction and ground failure susceptibility. Because there are very few past case histories of liquefaction in gravel, this study provides an opportunity to further evaluate the behavior of this important matarial. The field investigations included trenching, SPT tests, CPT soundings, BDT (Becker Drill) tests, and SASW tests (Spectral-Analysis-of Surface-Waves). Radiocarbon dataing and grain-size analysis were conducted on samples collected in the field.

  17. Geophysical investigation at Hazardous Waste Management Site 16, Radford Army Ammunition Plant Radford, Virginia. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Llopis, J.L.; Sjostrom, K.J.

    1989-09-01

    This report describes procedural details and test results of a geophysical investigation conducted at Hazardous Waste Management Site-16 (HWMS-16), Radford Army Ammunition Plant, Va. The geophysical investigation, part of a comprehensive ground-water assessment program, was conducted to obtain subsurface information regarding HWMS-16, thus aiding in determining the most optimal locations for future monitoring wells. The two geophysical methods used in this investigation were electromagnetic (EM) induction and seismic refraction. A number of anomalous areas including a suspected sinkhole were discerned at HWMS-16. Also, the EM method proved to be effective in delineating the boundaries of covered and leveled-off landfill cells and distinguishing landfill cells used for the disposal of household waste from those used for the disposal of hazardous waste.

  18. Investigation of separation, treatment, and recycling options for hazardous paint blast media waste. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Boy, J.H.; Race, T.D.; Reinbold, K.A.

    1996-02-01

    U.S. Army depot depaint operations generate over 4 million kg per year of contaminated paint blast media wastes. The objective of this work was to investigate technologies that might significantly mitigate this Army hazardous waste disposal problem. Most of the technologies investigated either failed to meet acceptable TCLP levels for hazardous metals content, or failed to meet Army disposal requirements. However, based on a review of several commercially available services, it is recommended that Army depot depaint operations consider processing hazardous blast media waste through properly regulated contractors that offer safe, effective, and economical stabilization, fixation, and recycling technologies.

  19. Investigation of 2D laterally dispersive photonic crystal structures : LDRD 33602 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania,Ganapathi Subramanian; Vawter, Gregory Allen; Wendt, Joel Robert; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Guo, Junpeng; Peters, David William; Hadley, G. Ronald

    2003-12-01

    Artificially structured photonic lattice materials are commonly investigated for their unique ability to block and guide light. However, an exciting aspect of photonic lattices which has received relatively little attention is the extremely high refractive index dispersion within the range of frequencies capable of propagating within the photonic lattice material. In fact, it has been proposed that a negative refractive index may be realized with the correct photonic lattice configuration. This report summarizes our investigation, both numerically and experimentally, into the design and performance of such photonic lattice materials intended to optimize the dispersion of refractive index in order to realize new classes of photonic devices.

  20. Investigation of Systematic Instructional Procedures to Facilitate Academic Achievement in Mentally Retarded Disadvantaged Children. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle. Child Development and Mental Retardation Center.

    Investigators applied the techniques of precision teaching (systematic arrangement of instructional cues, the technology of programed learning, careful management of reinforcement contingencies, and continuous measurement of performance) to improve the academic performance of disadvantaged children who had been labeled mentally retarded. The…

  1. Final technical report, Outstanding Junior Investigator Award for DE-FG02-94ER40869

    SciTech Connect

    Falk, Adam F.

    2002-05-16

    This report summarizes the research of the Principal Investigator, his postdoctoral research associates, and his students during the period of the award. The majority of the work concerns the behavior of hadrons containing strange, charm, bottom and top quarks, with a particular focus on the extraction of Cabibbo--Kobayashi--Maskawa matrix elements from experiments performed on such systems.

  2. Final work plan : investigation of potential contamination at the former USDA facility in Powhattan, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-02-02

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work to be conducted to investigate the subsurface contaminant conditions at the property formerly leased by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) in Powhattan, Kansas (Figure 1.1). Data obtained during this event will be used to (1) evaluate potential contaminant source areas on the property; (2) determine the vertical and horizontal extent of potential contamination; and (3) provide recommendations for future action, with the ultimate goal of assigning this site No Further Action status. The planned investigation includes groundwater monitoring requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with Section V of the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The work is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. A nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy, Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities. Argonne issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that has been approved by the KDHE. The Master Work Plan describes the general scope of all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and provides guidance for these investigations. It should be consulted for the complete details of plans for work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Powhattan.

  3. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report. Volume 4, Appendixes E and F: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force`s Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions will need to be carried out at each site. The island`s drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. In addition, geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal, to be avoided during drilling activities. This report contains appendices E and F with information on the following: soil boring logs, and data validation of samples analyzed.

  4. Geologic and seismologic investigations for Rocky Flats Plant. Volume II. Appendices. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    This volume contains the results of a seismic refraction study of the Ralston Reservoir area, soil stratigraphic investigations, unit descriptions, an analysis of geodetic data, experimental models, seismological evaluation, a seismicity survey of the Northern Golden Fault, historical data for the November 7, 1882 earthquake, and a dendrochronology study. (ACR)

  5. Final work plan : investigation of potential contamination at the former USDA facility in Ramona, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2006-01-27

    This Work Plan outlines the scope of work that will be conducted to investigate the subsurface contaminant conditions at the property formerly leased by the Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) in Ramona, Kansas (Figure 1.1). Data obtained during this event will be used to (1) evaluate potential source areas on the property, (2) determine the vertical and horizontal extent of potential contamination, and (3) provide recommendations for future actions, with the ultimate goal of assigning this site No Further Action status. The planned investigation includes groundwater monitoring requested by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in accordance with Section V of the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). The work is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Research Division of Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne is a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. Under the Intergovernmental Agreement, Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA with environmental site characterization and remediation at former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities. Argonne has issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that describes the general scope of all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and provides guidance for these investigations. The Master Work Plan was approved by the KDHE. It contains materials common to investigations at locations in Kansas and should be consulted for the complete details of plans for work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Ramona.

  6. Final Report for grant entitled "Production of Astatine-211 for U.S. Investigators"

    SciTech Connect

    Wilbur, Daniel Scott

    2012-12-12

    Alpha-particle emitting radionuclides hold great promise in the therapy of cancer, but few alpha-emitters are available to investigators to evaluate. Of the alpha-emitters that have properties amenable for use in humans, 211At is of particular interest as it does not have alpha-emitting daughter radionuclides. Thus, there is a high interest in having a source of 211At for sale to investigators in the US. Production of 211At is accomplished on a cyclotron using an alpha-particle beam irradiation of bismuth metal. Unfortunately, there are few cyclotrons available that can produce an alpha particle beam for that production. The University of Washington has a cyclotron, one of three in the U.S., that is currently producing 211At. In the proposed studies, the things necessary for production and shipment of 211At to other investigators will be put into place at UW. Of major importance is the efficient production and isolation of 211At in a form that can be readily used by other investigators. In the studies, production of 211At on the UW cyclotron will be optimized by determining the best beam energy and the highest beam current to maximize 211At production. As it would be very difficult for most investigators to isolate the 211At from the irradiated target, the 211At-isolation process will be optimized and automated to more safely and efficiently obtain the 211At for shipment. Additional tasks to make the 211At available for distribution include obtaining appropriate shipping vials and containers, putting into place the requisite standard operating procedures for Radiation Safety compliance at the levels of 211At activity to be produced / shipped, and working with the Department of Energy, Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications Program, to take orders, make shipments and be reimbursed for costs of production and shipment.

  7. Final Phase II Report : QuickSite{reg_sign} investigation, Centralia, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L.

    2004-04-01

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated a grain storage facility approximately 1,100 ft north of Centralia from 1949 until 1971. Subsequently, a concrete mixing plant operated on the site (FSA 1997). None of the CCC/USDA structures remain, though belowgrade foundations related to structures associated with the concrete mixing operations are evident. Two additional grain storage facilities currently exist in and near Centralia: the Nemaha County Co-op, approximately 4,000 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, and a private grain storage facility near the Don Morris residence, 3,500 ft north of the former CCC/USDA facility (Figure 1.1). The property on which the former facility was located is currently owned by Jeanne Burdett Lacky of Seneca, Kansas. In August-September 1998 the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) conducted preliminary investigations at the former CCC/USDA facility, on the basis of the detection of carbon tetrachloride in the domestic well at the Don Morris residence (north of the former CCC/USDA facility). Prior to 1986, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the grain storage industry to preserve grain. The details of previous investigations in the area and a summary of the findings were reported previously (Argonne 2002a). Because the KDHE detected carbon tetrachloride in groundwater and soil at the former CCC/USDA facility at Centralia that might be related to historical use of carbon tetrachloride-based grain fumigants at the facility, the CCC/USDA is conducting an environmental site investigation to determine the source(s) and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination at the former facility near Centralia and to assess whether the contamination requires remedial action. The town of Centralia and all residents near the former CCC/USDA facility currently obtain their water from Rural Water

  8. Feasibility Study for a Plasma Dynamo Facility to Investigate Fundamental Processes in Plasma Astrophysics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Forest, Cary B.

    2013-09-19

    The scientific equipment purchased on this grant was used on the Plasma Dynamo Prototype Experiment as part of Professor Forest's feasibility study for determining if it would be worthwhile to propose building a larger plasma physics experiment to investigate various fundamental processes in plasma astrophysics. The initial research on the Plasma Dynamo Prototype Experiment was successful so Professor Forest and Professor Ellen Zweibel at UW-Madison submitted an NSF Major Research Instrumentation proposal titled "ARRA MRI: Development of a Plasma Dynamo Facility for Experimental Investigations of Fundamental Processes in Plasma Astrophysics." They received funding for this project and the Plasma Dynamo Facility also known as the "Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment" was constructed. This experiment achieved its first plasma in the fall of 2012 and U.S. Dept. of Energy Grant No. DE-SC0008709 "Experimental Studies of Plasma Dynamos," now supports the research.

  9. Investigation of high purity beryllium for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), Task 002. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vagin, S.P.

    1995-05-01

    The report includes a description of experimental abilities of Solid Structure Research Laboratory of IAE NNC RK, a results of microstructural characterization of A-4 grade polycrystal Beryllium produced at the Ulba metal plant and a technical project-for irradiation experiments. Technical project contains a detailed description of five proposed experiments, clearing behavior of Beryllium materials under the influence of irradiation, temperature, helium and hydrogen accumulation. Complex irradiation jobs, microstructural investigations and mechanical tests are planned in the framework of these experiments.

  10. Investigation of a fossil geothermal system, Hamblin-Cleopatra Volcano, Clark County, Nevada. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Barker, D.S.

    1986-07-28

    The Hamblin-Cleopatra volcano, selected for study because erosion and fault displacement have exposed the entire volcanic succession, the intrusive core, a radial dike systems, and sedimentary and volcanic rocks that predate and postdate the volcano, was investigated to estimate the proportions of igneous materials forming lava flows, pyroclastic deposits, intrusive bodies, and reworked debris. Chemical changes in the magma throughout the active period of the volcano were documented. The geothermal system active within the pile after activity ceased was reconstructed. (ACR)

  11. Biological investigations of marine farms. Final report, July 1, 1976-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Activities of the marine farm project from 1976 to 1979 are described. The group was concerned with biomass production. Problems such as species selection, optimal plant nutrition, and maintaining a crop at sea under simulated oceanic conditions were addressed. Overall objective of the project was to investigate feasibility of biomass production in the oceanic environment, as an alternative energy source. Project support from the gas industry caused our primary focus to be directed towards methane production.

  12. Matrix Infrared Spectroscopic and Computational Investigations of Novel Small Uranium Containing Molecules - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Lester

    2014-10-17

    Direct reactions of f-element uranium, thorium and lanthanide metal atoms were investigated with small molecules. These metal atoms were generated by laser ablation and mixed with the reagent molecules then condensed with noble gases at 4K. The products were analyzed by absorption of infrared light to measure vibrational frequencies which were confirmed by quantum chemical calculations. We have learned more about the reactivity of uranium atoms with common molecules, which will aid in the develolpment of further applications of uranium.

  13. Shallow groundwater investigations at Weldon Spring, Missouri. Final report for fiscal years 1988-1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    The Missouri Department of Natural Resources, Division of Geology and Land Survey (MDNR-DGLS) conducted investigations of the upper aquifer in the vicinity of the abandoned Weldon Spring Chemical Plant in southwest St. Charles County, Missouri. The study began October 1, 1987, and concluded September 30, 1990. The study area included most of the original Weldon Springs Ordinance Works property plus a smaller area to the northeast between U.S. Highway 40-61 and Dardenne Creek. The investigations included a literature review, classification of stream segments as gaining (effluent) or losing (influent), location of springs, water tracing tests, testing of the spontaneous potential geophysical technique, continuous gaging of selected streams and continuous water-level monitoring in selected monitoring wells. The objective of the investigation was to better define the relationships between precipitation, surface runoff, groundwater recharge and shallow groundwater discharge within the study area, thereby assisting the Department of Energy in designing an appropriate groundwater monitoring plan for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project. A review of literature revealed that a number of reports had been written pertaining to shallow groundwater hydrology near the Weldon Spring site; five by the U.S. Geological Survey and several short ones by the MDNR-DGLS. These reports noted various aspects about the hydrology of the area including the locations of some springs and losing streams, the presence of some subsurface hydrologic connections and some piezometric data. Using these data as a base, eleven surface water drainages around the site were examined during various climatic conditions to locate springs and identify losing stream stretches. Seventy-five springs were located and losing stream stretches were identified in nine of the eleven surface-water drainages.

  14. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 40

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    Contents include: Interaction of oil with sea ice; Physical oceanographic investigations in the Bering Sea marginal ice zone; The movement and decay of ice edge bands in the winter Bering Sea; On some possible interactions between internal waves and sea ice in the marginal ice zone; The Bering Sea ice cover during March 1979: Comparison of surface and satellite data with the Nimbus-7, SMMR; Persistence of spilled oil along the Beaufort Sea coast; Potential oiled ice trajectories in the Beaufort Sea; Interaction of oil with artic sea ice; Activity-directed fractionation of petroleum samples.

  15. Final Phase II report : QuickSite(R) investigation, Everest, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.

    2003-11-01

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated grain storage facilities at two different locations at Everest, Kansas (Figure 1.1). One facility (referred to in this report as the Everest facility) was at the western edge of the city of Everest. The CCC/USDA operated this facility from 1950 until the early 1970s. The second facility (referred to in this report as Everest East) was about 0.5 mi northeast of the town. The CCC/USDA operated this facility from 1954 until the early 1970s. While these two former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities were in operation, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain. In 1997, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) sampled several domestic drinking water and nondrinking water wells in the Everest area. The KDHE sampling was part of the CCC/USDA Private Well Sampling Program, which was initiated to determine whether carbon tetrachloride was present in domestic wells near former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Kansas. All of the sampled domestic drinking water wells were located outside the Everest city boundaries. As a result of this sampling, carbon tetrachloride contamination was identified at a single domestic drinking water well (the Nigh well; DW06) approximately 3/8 mi northwest of the former Everest CCC/USDA grain storage facility. The CCC/USDA subsequently connected the Nigh residence to the Everest municipal water system. As a result of the detection of carbon tetrachloride in this well, the KDHE conducted preliminary investigations to further evaluate the existence of contamination and its potential effect on public health and the environment. The KDHE concluded that carbon tetrachloride in groundwater at Everest might, in part, be linked to historical use of carbon tetrachloride-based grain fumigants at the former CCC/USDA facilities. For

  16. Remedial investigation report cold regions research and engineering laboratory, Hanover, New Hampshire. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    On 1 August 1991 the United States Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA) assigned Delivery Order No. 0002 to Ecology and Environment, Inc., (E and E). This delivery order tasked E and E to plan for and conduct a Remedial Investigation (RI) at the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL), located in Hanover, New Hampshire. The purpose of RI is to characterize the extent to contamination at 16 areas of potential concern at the CRREL site. To achieve the goal, E and E completed various field activities including a passive soil gas survey, soil borings, monitoring well installation, and the collection of soil, sediment, surfaces water, and ground water samples. The samples were then submitted for laboratory analysis to determine the type and amount of contamination.

  17. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 43

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-06-01

    Contents include: Assessment of gray whale feeding grounds and sea floor interaction in the northeastern Bering Sea; Feeding ecology of the gray whale in the northern Bering Sea; Feeding ecology of the gray whale in the Chirikof Basin, summer 1982; Project rationale, design, summary; Distribution, production, and ecology of gray whale prey species; Distribution and abundance of gray whales in the Chirikof Basin, summer 1982; Assessment of gray whale feeding grounds and sea floor interaction in the northeastern Bering Sea; Feeding ecology of gray whales in the Chirikof Basin; Investigations of belukha whales in coastal waters of western and northern Alaska, 1982-1983: marking and tracking of whales in Bristol Bay; Belukha whale responses to industrial noise in Nushagak Bay, Alaska.

  18. Investigation of properties and performance of ceramic composite components. Final report on Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, W.A.; Reifsnider, K.L.; Oleksuk, L.L.S.; Stinchcomb, W.W.

    1994-10-31

    The purpose of Phase 2 of the Investigation of Properties and Performance of Ceramic Composite Components has been to build on and extend the work completed during Phase 1 to further advance the transition from properties of ceramic composite materials to performance of ceramic composite components used in fossil energy environments. The specific tasks of Phase 2 were: (1) develop and validate reliable and accurate high temperature, biaxial mechanical tests methods for structural ceramic composite components; (2) test and evaluate ceramic composite components, specifically tubes; (3) characterize long-term, mechanical performance of ceramic composite tubes at high temperatures; (4) develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanical degradation and performance limitations of ceramic composite components under service conditions; (5) develop predictive models for damage tolerance and reliability; and (6) relate component performance to microstructure and, thereby, provide feedback to the associated process-development effort, to improve performance. Accomplishments for each task are given.

  19. Investigation of transport process involved in FGD. Final repot, September 1, 1993--August 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Kadambi, J.R.; Tien, J.S.; Yurteri, C.; Kadaba, V.; Assar, M.

    1995-02-01

    The objectives of this five year plan of study are to experimentally obtain a basic understanding of (1) turbulent flow structure of the mixing zone and it influence on particle dispersion, (2) the effect of particle loading on turbulent properties and mixing, (3) the effect of jet entrainment, (4) water spray-sorbent interaction, sorbent wetting and mixing, (5) investigate the flow field where certain ratios of jet velocity to flu gas velocity result in regions of negative flow and define onset o negative flow, and (6) sorbent reactivity in immediate mixing zone. In the first two years of the project a sorbent injection facility which can simulate the conditions encountered in COOLSIDE set up was designed and built. Non-intrusive laser based diagnostic tools PDA/LDA were used for flow characterization of particle laden jet in cocurrent flows. In the third year a new technique called TTLDV which combines particle transit time in measurement volume of LDV and LDV velocity measurements to simultaneously obtain non-spherical lime particle size and velocity was developed. Better sorbent injection schemes were investigated spray occurrent flow tests were conducted. During the fourth year the spray cocurrent flow interaction data was analyzed. A criterion was developed for predicting the flow reversal which results in deposition of water droplets on the duct wall (Table 3). The flow reversal occurs when the spray has entrained all the cocurrent flowing stream. The criterion is based upon the mass flow rate of the two phases. The criterion successfully predicted the flow reversals encountered in the experiments and will be a very useful practical tool. Lime laden jet occurrent flow interactions tests were completed. Tests on the swirling nozzle have been conducted. The single phase data have been analyzed while the two phase glass particle laden jet data is being analyzed.

  20. Remedial investigation of contaminant mobility at Naval Weapons Station, Concord, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.R.; O'Neil, L.J.; Clairain, E.J.; Brandon, D.L.; Rhett, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    A remedial investigation was conducted at Naval Weapons Station, Concord, California, to determine the nature and extent of of wetland and terrestrial environments. The evaluation considered major pathways of contaminant migration including soil, water, air and biota. Major testing was conducted on soil and the biological components of the pathways. Chemical analysis of soil samples indicated substantial elevation in arsenic, cadmium, lead, selenium, zinc and copper in certain contaminated areas. Field-conducted clam bioassays showed a moderate potential for lead, cadmium, and zinc to bioaccumulate in clams placed in surface waters of a limited number of sampling sites. Plant and earthworm bioassays indicated substantial movement of arsenic, cadmium, lead, selenium, zinc and copper into plants and soil-dwelling organisms in contaminated areas. A definite threat of these contaminants to impact wildlife, especially the endangered species that inhabit the contaminated sites, was strongly suggested by the toxicological effects of these metals on birds and mammals. A hydrological evaluation indicated substantial movement of hazardous substances into surface waters during storm events and high tides. A comprehensive evaluation of natural resources indicated that the wetland areas have moderate to high functional values for wildlife habitat, food chain support, flood storage, shoreline anchorage, sediment trapping, nutrient retention and passive recreation and heritage.

  1. An investigation of drag reduction for tractor trailer vehicles with air deflector and boattail. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Muirhead, V.U.

    1981-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the influence of several physical variables on the aerodynamic drag of a trailer model. The physical variables included: a cab mounted wind deflector, boattail on trailer, flow vanes on trailer front, forced transition on trailer, and decreased gap between tractor and trailer. Tests were conducted at yaw angles (relative wind angles) of 0, 5, 10, 20, and 30 degrees and Reynolds numbers of 3.58 x 10 to the 5th power 6.12 x 10 to the 5th power based upon the equivalent diameter of the vehicles. The wind deflector on top of the cab produced a calculated reduction in fuel consumption of about 5 percent of the aerodynamic portion of the fuel budget for a wind speed of 15.3 km/hr (9.5 mph) over a wind angle range of 0 deg to 180 deg and for a vehicle speed of 88.5 km/hr (55 mph). The boattail produced a calculated 7 percent to 8 percent reduction in fuel consumption under the same conditions. The decrease in gap reduced the calculated fuel consumption by about 5 percent of the aerodynamic portion of the fuel budget.

  2. Investigation of uranium potential of Precambrian metasedimentary rocks, central Laramie Range, Wyoming. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Graff, P.J.; Sears, J.W.; Holden, G.S.

    1981-01-01

    This study is directed toward evaluation of potential uraniferous quartz-pebble conglomerate occurrences or strata-bound uranium occurrences in the Laramie Range. Geologic investigations pursuant to that evaluation provide that metasediments in the central Laramie Range constitute an Archean greenstone belt which overlies remobilized granite-gneiss basement terrane of the Archean Wyoming Province. This greenstone belt is formed of branching arcuate, synformal keels of supracrustal rocks infolded and enveloped by granitic domes. The stratigraphic succession of the belt is a triad formed of lower mafic-ultramafic rocks including komatiites, middle mafic volcanics including pillow basalts, and an upper metasedimentary sequence composed of boulder paraconglomerates, graywackes, marbles, quartzites, pelites, thin quartz-pebble conglomerates and thin, banded iron formation. Because the metasedimentary sequence does not contain a thick, mature clastic wedge, a thick fluvial section, basal quartz-pebble conglomerates, or significant geochemical or radiometric anomalies and because the sequence is structurally complex and regionally of amphibolite facies metamorphic rank, the potential for uraniferous fossil placers is considered nil. Occurrences of other types may be indicated by radiometric and geochemical anomalies discovered over sheared zones within the granite-gneiss terrane and small radiometric anomalies over a coarse-grained phase of granite located north of the greenstone belt.

  3. Reconnaissance investigation of the March 2, 1987, New Zealand earthquake: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yanev, P.I.; Vallenas, P.; Williams, D.; Murray, R.C.

    1988-08-01

    On March 2, 1987 at 1:43 P.M. a magnitude (M/sub L/)6.3 (M6.3) earthquake struck the Bay of Plenty region of North Island, New Zealand. Propagating along a previously unmapped fault, the earthquake caused surface ruptures near the town of Edgecumbe. The adjacent towns of Kawerau, Te Teko, and Whakatane were also affected. Soil failures, liquefaction, settlement, and landslides occurred throughout the region. A peak horizontal ground acceleration of 0.26g was recorded approximately 6 miles from the fault rupture, and accelerations of 0.30g to 1.0g were estimated in the most severely damaged area. From March 9 to 13 a four member reconnaissance team visited the damaged area to investigate the earthquake's effects on power and industrial facilities. Collected data will be added to the seismic experience data base that is used in analyzing the safety of structures and equipment in nuclear power plants in the United States.

  4. Final Technical Report - Investigation into the Relationship between Heterogeneity and Heavy-Tailed Solute Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Weissmann, Gary S

    2013-12-06

    The objective of this project was to characterize the influence that naturally complex geologic media has on anomalous dispersion and to determine if the nature of dispersion can be estimated from the underlying heterogeneous media. The UNM portion of this project was to provide detailed representations of aquifer heterogeneity through producing highly-resolved models of outcrop analogs to aquifer materials. This project combined outcrop-scale heterogeneity characterization (conducted at the University of New Mexico), laboratory experiments (conducted at Sandia National Laboratory), and numerical simulations (conducted at Sandia National Laboratory and Colorado School of Mines). The study was designed to test whether established dispersion theory accurately predicts the behavior of solute transport through heterogeneous media and to investigate the relationship between heterogeneity and the parameters that populate these models. The dispersion theory tested by this work was based upon the fractional advection-dispersion equation (fADE) model. Unlike most dispersion studies that develop a solute transport model by fitting the solute transport breakthrough curve, this project explored the nature of the heterogeneous media to better understand the connection between the model parameters and the aquifer heterogeneity. We also evaluated methods for simulating the heterogeneity to see whether these approaches (e.g., geostatistical) could reasonably replicate realistic heterogeneity. The UNM portion of this study focused on capturing realistic geologic heterogeneity of aquifer analogs using advanced outcrop mapping methods.

  5. Investigation of the effects of acid deposition on materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vijayakuma, R.; Mansfeld, F.; Henry, R.

    1989-10-01

    The objective of the project was to determine damage functions which relate the atmospheric corrosion losses to the concentration of the pollutants which are routinely monitored. The materials investigated in the study were chosen based on the economic importance and included galvanized steel, nickel, aluminum, two types of flat latex exterior housepaint, nylon fabric, polyethylene and concrete. Atmospheric data were provided by ARB's air monitoring network at the three test sites in Southern California. The results from the field sites have been supported by laboratory tests in which corrosion damage was determined. The samples were exposed to SO2, NO2, or O3 and the combinations and to HNO3 aerosol of two different concentrations and flow rates. Corrosion rates determined by weight loss for galvanized steel, nickel, aluminum and latex paint containing some carbonate extender were higher in the summer than in the winter despite the fact that moisture and primary pollutant levels are higher in the winter. The corrosion rates for galvanized steel which has served as a benchmark material in most atmospheric exposure tests were very low and similar to rates which are usually observed at clean, rural areas. Damage functions were determined by regression of the corrosion rates against the explanatory variables which in the study were O3, NO2, T60, O3xT60, NO2xT60 and O3xNO2 averaged over the exposure T60 is the time for which the RH exceeded 60%.

  6. Investigation of transport process involved in FGD. Final technical report, September 1994--February 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Kadambi, J.R.; Yurteri, C.; Assar, M.

    1996-03-01

    This report describes the work done in the fifth year of this project. The objectives of this five year plan of study were to experimentally obtain a basic understanding of (1) turbulent flow structure of the mixing zone and its influence on particle dispersion, (2) the effect of particle loading on turbulent properties and mixing, (3) the effect of jet entrainment, (4) water spray-sorbent interaction, sorbent wetting and mixing, (5) investigate the flow field where certain ratios of jet velocity to flue gas velocity result in regions of negative flow and define onset of negative flow, and (6) sorbent reactivity in immediate mixing zone. Some of the highlights for this period are: sorbent injection facility was modified by adding a heater so as to simulate the higher flue gas temperatures; spray cocurrent flow interaction tests were conducted at the higher temperatures; tests were conducted with particle laden jet to understand the cocurrent flow particle interactions and flow reversals; tests were conducted on two new swirl nozzles and the simple nozzle; test data indicated better mixing characteristics for the swirl nozzles; test results with simulated flue gas indicate substantial improvement, up to 140%, in sulfur capture by lime when swirl nozzle 1 is used over the results obtained for the simple nozzle.

  7. Investigation of sodium carbonate, sodium bicarbonate and water systems for saturated solar ponds. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-03-28

    The overall objective of this study was to gather relevant data primarily from the published literature to investigate the technical feasibility of using a Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-NaHCO/sub 3/ mixture for a saturated solar pond. This objective was accomplished by a literature search and review of existing chemical information and by performing simple chemistry experiments in the laboratory. Information on density, solubility, phase diagram, equilibrium compositions, reaction rate constant, equilibrium constant, diffusion coefficient, vapor pressure and potentially useful additives is compiled. It is concluded that even though both the saturation density and solubility increase with temperature for trona, it is not chemically stable either at room temperature or higher temperatures (80/sup 0/C). Therefore, as is, trona is not suitable for use in a saturated solar pond. From the literature it has been found that sugar and gum can retard the decomposition of bicarbonate to carbonate in the mixture. Nevertheless, trona is a very attractive solute for an unsaturated solar pond. A laboratory unsaturated pond with a stable density gradient has worked without any problems for about two months at InterTechnology/Solar Corporation.

  8. Investigation of land-use spectral signatures. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagewood, J. F.

    1975-01-01

    A technique was developed to obtain bidirectional reflectance data from natural surfaces by using a folding mirror to transfer the reflected energy from the test surface to a spectroradiometer. The folding mirror was a first surface reflector made by stretching Mylar vacuum coated with aluminum over a light weight frame. The optically folding mirror was positioned over the test surfaces with a moveable platform for both laboratory and field tests. Field tests were conducted using a tethered balloon system to position the folding mirror. A spectroradiometer was designed and built specifically for this investigation. The spectroradiometer had an angular field of view of twenty-four minutes in one axis and ten minutes in the other axis. The radiometer was capable of detecting energies in small bandwidths throughout the electromagnetic spectrum from 0.3 microns to 3.0 microns. Bidirectional reflectance data and variations in the data with source angles were obtained for Saint Augustine grass, Bermuda grass, and a black alluvium soil from the Mississippi River delta.

  9. Analytical and experimental investigation of ringless-piston concept. Final report, September 1986-November 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Dickey, D.W.; Wood, C.D.

    1988-03-01

    The purpose of this project was to analytically and experimentally investigate the concept of a ringless-piston internal combustion engine. A joint objective was to design, build, and test a ringless piston to improve ringless piston engine performance. A computer model was developed to predict ringed and ringless piston engine performance. Experimental performance data were then collected by operating a small, liquid-cooled, two-stroke gasoline engine with and without the piston ring on the stock aluminum and Southwest Research Institute prototype steel piston. The experimental performance data were then compared with the results of the computer model. The results showed that a piston engine can operate without piston rings. Ringless-piston engine power and efficiency were found to be defined by the expression C/NBS, where C = piston-to-bore diametrical clearance, N = engine speed in rpm, B = engine bore, and S = engine stroke. There was good agreement between predicted and measured performance reperformance can be improved by using piston and liner materials that have similar coefficients of thermal expansion.

  10. Investigation of techniques for bulk stress measurement on exposed pipelines -- Phases 1 and 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kwun, H.

    1993-10-01

    Subsidence, frost heave, fault slippage, landslides, and other forms of soil movement can cause localized areas of high stress on a pipeline. The areas of high stress can compromise the integrity of the pipeline, despite the fact that the highly stressed areas may not be readily detectable. This report describes two phases of development by Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) of a nonintrusive technique to quantify the local, throughwall average axial stress in an exposed pipe. The technique selected for evaluation and development is a low-frequency, electromagnetic technique, called multiparameter magnetic measurement (MPMM). MPMM is a combination of existing magnetic techniques including magnetic hysteresis measurement, nonlinear harmonic analysis, and multiparameter correlation. The work included both a proof-of-principle demonstration of the technique using samples of grade X-42, X-46, and X-52 pipe (Phase 1), and further determination of practical applicability of the MPMM technique (Phase 2). Phase 2 focused on evaluating the variability of magnetic response to stress among five samples of grade X-42 pipe. The results of the investigations include the following; the technique can measure the throughwall average stress-difference between the axial and hoop stresses with approximately {+-} 5 ksi (35 Mpa) accuracy within the range up to about 50--75% of the yield strength; and at the present state of development, the practical applicability of the technique for measurements of absolute stress values is low.

  11. Investigation of low-cost LNG vehicle fuel tank concepts. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O`Brien, J.E.; Siahpush, A.

    1998-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate development of a low-cost liquid natural gas (LNG) vehicle fuel storage tank with low fuel boil-off, low tank pressure, and high safety margin. One of the largest contributors to the cost of converting a vehicle to LNG is the cost of the LNG fuel tank. To minimize heat leak from the surroundings into the low-temperature fuel, these tanks are designed as cryogenic dewars with double walls separated by an evacuated insulation space containing multi-layer insulation. The cost of these fuel tanks is driven by this double-walled construction, both in terms of materials and labor. The primary focus of the analysis was to try to devise a fuel tank concept that would allow for the elimination of the double-wall requirement. Results of this study have validated the benefit of vacuum/MLI insulation for LNG fuel tanks and the difficulty in identifying viable alternatives. The thickness of a non-vacuum insulation layer would have to be unreasonably large to achieve an acceptable non-venting hold time. Reasonable hold times could be achieved by using an auxiliary tank to accept boil-off vapor from a non-vacuum insulated primary tank, if the vapor in the auxiliary tank can be stored at high pressure. The primary focus of the analysis was to try to devise a fuel tank concept that allowed for the elimination of the double-wall requirement. Thermodynamic relations were developed for analyzing the fuel tank transient response to heat transfer, venting of vapor, and out-flow of either vapor or liquid. One of the major costs associated with conversion of a vehicle to LNG fuel is the cost of the LNG fuel tank. The cost of these tanks is driven by the cryogenic nature of the fuel and by the fundamental design requirements of long non-venting hold times and low storage pressure.

  12. Investigation of passive blade cyclic pitch variation using an automatic yaw control system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hohenemser, K.H.; Swift, A.H.P.

    1982-08-01

    The investigation of passive cyclic pitch variation using an automatic yaw control system made use of the test equipment and of the results of an earlier study. The atmospheric test equipment consisted of a horizontal axis wind turbine with vane controlled upwind two-bladed rotor of 7.6 m (25 ft) diameter having passive cyclic pitch variation. An automatically triggered electric furl actuator prevented over-speeds and over-torques by furling the rotor which means yawing the rotor out of the winds. The atmospheric test equipment was modified to accept two alternative fully automatic yaw or furl control systems. The first system was of the active type and included a hydraulic single acting constant speed governor as it is used for aircraft propeller controls. Upon reaching the rotor speed limit, the governor delivered pressurized oil to a hydraulic furl actuator which then overcame the unfurling spring force and furled the rotor. When the rotor speed fell below the set value, the governor admitted oil flow from the hydraulic actuator into the oil reservoir and the rotor was unfurled by the spring. The second automatic control system was of a purely mechanical passive type. The rotor thrust, which was laterally off-set from the yaw axis, in combination with a yawing component of the rotor torque due to uptilt of the rotor axis overcame at rated power the unfurling spring and furled the rotor. The analytically predicted and experimentally substantiated negative rotor yaw damping would cause excessive furling rates unless alleviated by a furl damper. The tests were supported by a specially developed dynamic yawing analysis. Both analysis and tests indicated that the two-bladed passive cyclic pitch wind rotor can be effectively torque or speed limited by rotor yaw control systems which are less costly and more reliable than the conventional blade feathering control systems.

  13. Final Report: Investigation of Polarization Spectroscopy and Degenerate Four-Wave Mixing for Quantitative Concentration Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Robert P. Lucht

    2005-03-09

    Laser-induced polarization spectroscopy (LIPS), degenerate four-wave mixing (DFWM), and electronic-resonance-enhanced (ERE) coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) are techniques that shows great promise for sensitive measurements of transient gas-phase species, and diagnostic applications of these techniques are being pursued actively at laboratories throughout the world. However, significant questions remain regarding strategies for quantitative concentration measurements using these techniques. The primary objective of this research program is to develop and test strategies for quantitative concentration measurements in flames and plasmas using these nonlinear optical techniques. Theoretically, we are investigating the physics of these processes by direct numerical integration (DNI) of the time-dependent density matrix equations that describe the wave-mixing interaction. Significantly fewer restrictive assumptions are required when the density matrix equations are solved using this DNI approach compared with the assumptions required to obtain analytical solutions. For example, for LIPS calculations, the Zeeman state structure and hyperfine structure of the resonance and effects such as Doppler broadening can be included. There is no restriction on the intensity of the pump and probe beams in these nonperturbative calculations, and both the pump and probe beam intensities can be high enough to saturate the resonance. As computer processing speeds have increased, we have incorporated more complicated physical models into our DNI codes. During the last project period we developed numerical methods for nonperturbative calculations of the two-photon absorption process. Experimentally, diagnostic techniques are developed and demonstrated in gas cells and/or well-characterized flames for ease of comparison with model results. The techniques of two-photon, two-color H-atom LIPS and three-laser ERE CARS for NO and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} were demonstrated during the

  14. Final master work plan : environmental investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas, 2002 revision.

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, J. C.; Environmental Research

    2003-01-23

    mistake sometimes made in the site characterization process is failure to use technically sound available data to form working hypotheses on hydrogeology, contaminant distribution, etc. for initial testing. (3) After assembling and interpreting existing data for the site, the entire technical team visits the site to identify as a group the site characteristics that might prohibit or enhance any particular technological approach. Logistic and community constraints are also identified at this point. (4) After the field visit, the team selects a suite of technologies appropriate to the problem and completes the design of the field program. No one technique works well at all sites, and a suite of techniques is necessary to delineate site features fully. In addition, multiple technologies are employed to increase confidence in conclusions about site features. Noninvasive and minimally invasive technologies are emphasized to minimize risk to the environment, the community, and the staff. In no case is the traditional approach of installing a massive number of monitoring wells followed. A dynamic work plan that outlines the program is produced for the sponsoring and regulatory agencies. The word ''dynamic'' is emphasized because the work plan is viewed as a guide, subject to modification, for the site characterization activity, rather than a document that is absolute and unchangeable. Therefore, the health and safety plan and the quality assurance/quality control plan must be broad and encompass all possible alterations to the plan. The cooperation of the regulating agency is essential in successful implementation of this process. The sponsoring and regulatory agencies are notified if significant changes to the site-specific work plan are necessary. (5) The entire team participates in the technical field program. Several technical activities are undertaken simultaneously. These may range from different surface geophysics investigations to vegetation sampling. Data from the

  15. Investigation of a rotary valving system with variable valve timing for internal combustion engines: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, P.C.; Hansen, C.N.

    1994-11-18

    The objective of the program was to provide a functional demonstration of the Hansen Rotary Valving System with Variable Valve timing (HRVS/VVT), capable of throttleless inlet charge control, as an alternative to conventional poppet-valves for use in spark ignited internal combustion engines. The goal of this new technology is to secure benefits in fuel economy, broadened torque band, vibration reduction, and overhaul accessibility. Additionally, use of the variable valve timing capability to vary the effective compression ratio is expected to improve multi-fuel tolerance and efficiency. Efforts directed at the design of HRVS components proved to be far more extensive than had been anticipated, ultimately requiring that proof-trial design/development work be performed. Although both time and funds were exhausted before optical or ion-probe types of in-cylinder investigation could be undertaken, a great deal of laboratory data was acquired during the course of the design/development work. This laboratory data is the basis for the information presented in this Final Report.

  16. Installation restoration program final remedial investigation report IRP sites 8 and 10. 151st air refueling group Utah Air National Guard, Salt Lake City, Utah. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-06-01

    This report presents the results from a Remedial Investigation (RI) for two sites at the Utah Air National Guard (UANG) Base located in Salt Lake City, Utah. The two sites investigated are identified as Installation Restoration Program (IRP) Site 8, a former underground storage tank (UST) location, and IRP Site 10, an existing petroleum, oil, and lubricants (POL) yard. The RI was conducted as outlined in the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan prepared by Stone Webster and submitted to and approved by the ANG in May 1993. The field work associated with the RI was performed in June, July, and August 1995.

  17. Final report : phase I investigation at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-05

    Agency of the USDA and the MoDNR, to address carbon tetrachloride contamination potentially associated with a number of former CCC/USDA grain storage facilities in Missouri. The site characterization at Savannah is being conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory. A phased approach is being employed by the CCC/USDA and Argonne, with the approval of the MoDNR, so that information obtained and interpretations developed during each incremental stage of the study can be used most effectively to guide subsequent aspects of the program. This report presents the technical findings of Phase I of Argonne's studies. The Phase I investigation was undertaken in accord with the final site-specific Phase I Work Plan for Savannah (Argonne 2007), as well as with the Master Work Plan (MWPK) for CCC/USDAArgonne operations in the state of Kansas (Argonne 2002), which the MoDNR reviewed and approved (with minor revisions) for temporary use in Missouri to facilitate the start-up of the CCC/USDA's activities at Savannah. (Argonne is developing a similar Master Work Plan for operations in Missouri that is based on the existing MWPK, with the approval of the MoDNR. The Missouri document has not been finalized, however, at this time.) The site-specific Savannah Work Plan (Argonne 2007; approved by the MoDNR [2007a]) (1) summarized the pre-existing knowledge base for the Savannah investigation site compiled by Argonne and (2) described the site-specific technical objectives and the intended scope of work developed for this phase of the investigation. Four primary technical objectives were identified for the Phase I studies, as follows: (1) Update the previous (MoDNR 2000a,b) inventory and status of private wells in the immediate vicinity of the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility, and sample the identified wells for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and geochemical constituents. (2) Investigate for possible evidence of

  18. Investigation of the particle selectivity of a traveling potential wave; neon isotope separation with the Solitron process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lowder, R.S.

    1994-07-26

    The specific goal of this three year effort was to investigate this novel isotope separation process itself: to determine whether isotopes could indeed be separated and, if so, with what limitations--space charge effects, instabilities, and, in particular, with what throughput limitations. Termed the Solitron process, the concept is based on the strong isotopic variation in wave/ion interaction for a potential wave passing through an ion beam when the wave speed is near the ion speed. The ion`s charge-to-mass ratio determines not only which ions are picked up by the wave but also the final energy of those ions that are picked up (accelerated to a higher energy); thus, this method can be used for isotope separation. Much progress was made regarding separation and throughput, concluding that separation works well in conjunction with electrostatic focusing used to obtain enough throughput (enough beam current) to make a practical device. The next step would likely be a production device, although development of an appropriate metal ion source would be useful. Funding is an issue; development cost estimates run around two million dollars for a market only several times that cost. Although there is much concern about the future supply of isotopes such as could be produced by the Solitron process, as well as costs, at present the supply from Oak Ridge and Russian sources is adequate for US needs. Should demand grow, these LDRD studies would strongly support proposals for further development of this Solitron process and help assure its likely success. For example, a point design for a magnesium mission was formulated to obtain a consistent set of design numbers that would optimize performance without pushing any constraints seen in these studies. A similar design could be formulated for other missions (magnesium was just a convenient target).

  19. Remedial investigation/feasibility study badger army ammunition plant Baraboo, Wisconsin. Volume 3. Feasibility study report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-01

    This Feasibility Study (FS) report for the Badger Army Ammunition Plant (BAAP) in Baraboo, Wisconsin, was prepared by ABB Environmental Services, Inc. (ABB-ES) as a component of Task Order 1 of Contract DAAAl5-91-D-OOO8 with the U.S. Army Environmental Center (USAEC). This report uses the results presented in the Final Remedial Investigation (RI) report (ABB-ES, 1993a) to develop and screen alternatives for remediation of contaminated media at BAAP. The purpose of this FS report is to develop, screen, and evaluate site-specific remedial alternatives to mitigate the impact of site-derived chemicals and ultimately provide protection of human health and the environment. Preferred alternatives for each site are included in this report. Based on previous environmental studies at BAAP, 11 potential hazardous waste sites were ranked according to potential contributions of hazardous chemicals to the environment. These sites were designated as Waste Management Areas because some of the sites contain multiple Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs). The sites selected to undergo facility assessment and corrective actions are: the Propellant Burning Ground (including Landfill), Deterrent Burning Ground, existing Landfill, Settling Ponds and Spoils Disposal Area, Rocket Paste Area, Oleum Plant and Oleum Plant Pond, Nitroglycerine Pond, old Acid Area, new Acid Area, and Ballistics Pond. The USAEC added an 11th site, the Old Fuel Oil Tank, to the list in October 1989 after discovery of fuel-contaminated soils during excavation of a water line in the vicinity of the old fuel oil tank foundation.

  20. Investigation of Strain Aging in the Ordered Intermetallic Compound beta-NiAl. Ph.D. Thesis Final Contractor Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, Mark Lovell

    1995-01-01

    The phenomenon of strain aging has been investigated in polycrystalline and single crystal NiAl alloys at temperatures between 300 and 1200 K. Static strain aging studies revealed that after annealing at 1100 K for 7200 s (i.e., 2h) followed by furnace cooling, high purity, nitrogen-doped and titanium-doped polycrystalline alloys exhibited continuous yielding, while conventional-purity and carbon-doped alloys exhibited distinct yield points and Luders strains. Prestraining by hydrostatic pressurization removed the yield points, but they could be reintroduced by further annealing treatments. Yield points could be reintroduced more rapidly if the specimens were prestrained uniaxially rather than hydrostatically, owing to the arrangement of dislocations into cell structures during uniaxial deformation. The time dependence of the strain aging events followed at t(exp 2/3) relationship suggesting that the yield points observed in polycrystalline NiAl were the result of the pinning of mobile dislocations by interstitials, specifically carbon. Between 700 and 800 K, yield stress plateaus, yield stress transients upon a ten-fold increase in strain rate, work hardening peaks, and dips in the strain rate sensitivity (SRS) have been observed in conventional-purity and carbon-doped polycrystals. In single crystals, similar behavior was observed; in conventional-purity single crystals, however, the strain rate sensitivity became negative resulting in serrated yielding, whereas, the strain rate sensitivity stayed positive in high purity and in molybdenum-doped NiAl. These observations are indicative of dynamic strain aging (DSA) and are discussed in terms of conventional strain aging theories. The impact of these phenomena on the composition-structure-property relations are discerned. Finally, a good correlation has been demonstrated between the properties of NiAl alloys and a recently developed model for strain aging in metals and alloys developed by Reed-Hill et al.

  1. PRELIMINARY ANALYSIS OF THE FINAL MULTICENTER INVESTIGATION OF RHEOPHERESIS FOR AGE RELATED MACULAR DEGENERATION (AMD) TRIAL (MIRA-1) RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Jose S.; Winters, Jeffrey L.; Boyer, David

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To present an initial evaluation of the final data from the Multicenter Investigation of Rheopheresis for age-related macular degeneration (AMD) (MIRA-1) trial. This was a 12-month randomized, prospective, multicenter, double-masked, placebo-controlled, Food and Drug Administration approved clinical trial designed to compare rheopheresis treatment with placebo-control treatment. Methods Patients that had nonexudative age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and certain hemorheologic abnormalities were randomized to either rheopheresis or sham treatment in a 2:1 fashion. Best-corrected visual acuity was determined before and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months following treatment. Adverse events were also recorded. Results A total of 216 patients were randomized. Of these, 18 were not included in the vision or adverse events evaluation because they did not complete one treatment. This decreased the number of patients that were evaluated for adverse events to 198 patients. In this group, there were 27 serious adverse events, but only 1.8 % of treatments were suspended because of adverse events. At 12 months, there were 104 treated patients and 63 placebo patients that had follow-up. The treated patients had a logMAR vision improvement of 0.02 ± 0.213, and the placebo patients had a vision improvement of 0.02 ± 0.20. This was not statistically significant (P = .977). The repeated measure P value for the entire time interval was not significant (P = .69). There appeared to be patients entered into the study that did not meet inclusion criteria. Excluding 37% of the treated patients and 29% of the placebo data from the analysis, there appeared to be statistically significant improvement in the treated patients compared to the control patients at 1 year with a P value of .001 (repeated measures P value = .01). Conclusions At best this was a flawed study in that 37% of the treated cases did not meet inclusion criteria, and at worst there was no evidence of effect. Even

  2. Source evaluation report phase 2 investigation: Limited field investigation. Final report: United States Air Force Environmental Restoration Program, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the limited field investigation work done to address issues and answer unresolved questions regarding a collection of potential contaminant sources at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB), near Fairbanks, Alaska. These sources were listed in the Eielson AFB Federal Facility Agreement supporting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup of the base. The limited field investigation began in 1993 to resolve all remaining technical issues and provide the data and analysis required to evaluate the environmental hazard associated with these sites. The objective of the limited field investigation was to allow the remedial project managers to sort each site into one of three categories: requiring remedial investigation/feasibility study, requiring interim removal action, or requiring no further remedial action.

  3. 78 FR 72641 - Request for Public Comments on Draft Final Report on the Technical Investigation of the May 22...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-03

    ... investigation. The establishment of the NCST Team was announced in the Federal Register on July 19, 2011 (76 FR... Technical Investigation of the May 22, 2011 Tornado in Joplin, Missouri AGENCY: National Institute of... conducted by NIST into the tornado that impacted Joplin, Missouri on May 22, 2011. NIST will consider...

  4. Final report : results of the 2007 investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA facility in Powhattan, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-08-15

    The 2007 investigation of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform contamination at Powhattan, Kansas, was conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE 2006a). The Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory implemented the investigation on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The primary purposes of the investigation were to evaluate potential contaminant source areas on the former CCC/USDA property, determine the horizontal and vertical extent of potential contamination, conduct groundwater monitoring, and provide recommendations for future action.

  5. Investigation of organic nonlinear optical crystals for harmonic frequency conversion and electro-optics. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    The authors are conducting a detailed study of the crystal growth of different organic materials and their physical, optical and morphological properties. The crystals are grown by a novel solution crystal growth technique developed by the principal investigator at Alabama A and M University (AAMU). The studies included the measurement of solubility of organic NLO materials in different solvents, growth of crystals by solution growth technique, and the characterization of optical properties and damage threshold of crystals for high power laser applications. Two different NLO crystals of 4-Aminobenzophenone (ABP) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-benzaldehyde (MHBA) were investigated during the course of this investigation. A paper on ABP crystals was published in Journal of Crystal Growth in 1997.

  6. Foundation investigation of the upstream switchyard of Wilson Dam power plant: Microgravity survey. Final report, 1 August-31 December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Yule, D.E.; Butler, D.K.; Sharp, M.K.

    1990-09-01

    A microgravity survey consisting of 347 stations was conducted in the upstream switchyard of the Wilson Dam powerplant. The objective of the survey was the detection of subsurface cavities or other anomalous conditions that could threaten the integrity of the switchyard structures. Six anomalous areas were identified on the gravity anomaly map and ranked for their interpreted significance. From the results, nine boring locations were selected to investigate the cause of the anomalies. This report presents details of the field survey, data processing interpretations, and recommended drilling locations for subsurface investigation.

  7. Shemya AFB, Alaska 1992 IRP field investigation report. Volume 3, Appendixes B, C, and D: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-02-01

    The US Air Force is currently investigating 22 sites on Shemya Air Force Base (AFB) to determine if past spill and disposal activities have caused environmental damage. These investigations are being carried out under the Air Force`s Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Field investigations were performed in 1992 to obtain the information needed to assess what future actions will need to be carried out at each site. The island`s drinking water supply was also investigated. Activities completed at 10 selected sites included surface sampling to determine the lateral extent of contamination, subsurface sampling to determine the vertical extent of contamination, and the installation of well points and monitoring wells to determine the direction of groundwater flow and if the groundwater has been affected by a site. Geophysical surveys were performed at most sites to identify site boundaries and check for the presence of buried metal to be avoided during drilling activities. This report, appendices B, C, and D contains information on the following: geophysical contour maps and profile plots; human health risk assessment; and ecological risk assessment.

  8. Investigation and Development of Competency Standards and Certification Requirements for Secondary-Level Vocational Foodservice Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Usiewicz, Ronald A.

    An investigation ascertained, analyzed, and documented competency standards and certification requirements for secondary-level vocational food service programs. A literature review produced no instruments used in past studies to measure the attitudes of food service professionals toward task competencies. Six occupations were selected for the…

  9. 78 FR 45968 - Silica Bricks and Shapes From China: Scheduling of the Final Phase of an Antidumping Investigation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... 7, 2011. See 76 FR 61937 (Oct. 6, 2011) and the newly revised Commission's Handbook on E-Filing... investigation as parties must file an entry of appearance with the Secretary to the Commission, as provided in... this notice. A party that filed a notice of appearance during the preliminary phase of...

  10. An Investigation, Analysis, and Evaluation of Activities Connected with the Operation of Educational Information Service Centers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, C. Neil; and Others

    This one-year project produced several publications and an evaluative investigation, all having to do with the rapidly growing community of educational information centers. Over 1500 such centers were surveyed by questionnaire to determine their locations, sizes, activities, and holdings. A directory which lists and describes some four hundred…

  11. Investigation of transport process involved in FGD. Final technical report for the third year, September 1992--August 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kadambi, J.R.; Kadaba, V.; Yurteri, C.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes the work done in the third year of the project {open_quotes}Investigation of Transport Processes Involved in FGD{close_quotes}. The objectives of this five year plan of study is to experimentally obtain a basic understanding of (1) turbulent flow structure of the mixing zone and its influence on particle dispersion, (2) the effect of particle loading on turbulent properties and mixing, (3) the effect of jet entrainment, (4) water spray-sorbent interaction, sorbent wetting and mixing, (5) investigate the flow field where certain ratios of jet velocity to flue gas velocity result in regions of negative flow and define onset of negative flow (6) sorbent reactivity in mixing zone and (7) effect of particle agglomeration. In the first two years of the project a sorbent injection facility which can simulate the conditions encountered in COOLSIDE set up was designed and built. Non-intrusive laser based diagnostic tools PDA/LDA was used for flow characterization of particle laden jet in cocurrent flows. All tasks for third year were addressed. The accomplishments for the third year include the following. For the investigation of Lime Laden Jet Flow, since no existing technique was capable of providing the simultaneous measurement of irregular shaped particle size and velocity, a new technique, TTLDV which utilizes the transit time in LDV measurement volume and the LDV velocity measurements to obtain simultaneous particle size and velocity measurements was developed. Better Sorbent Injection Methods and Optimized Injection Schemse were investigated. Progress was made in the development of Technique to Study Particulate Droplet Interactions, the task was not completed because of difficulties encountered due to differences in the refractive index of glass beads and water droplets. The investigations of flow reversal resulting from spray jet cocurrent flow interactions was completed.

  12. Investigation of MAGMA chambers in the Western Great Basin. Final report, 9 June 1982-31 October 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Peppin, W.A.

    1986-02-10

    This report summarizes efforts made by the Seismological Laboratory toward the detection and delineation of shallow crustal zones in the western Great Basin, and toward the development of methods to accomplish such detection. The work centers around the recently-active volcanic center near Long Valley, California. The work effort is broken down into three tasks: (1) network operations, (2) data analysis and interpretation, and (3) the study of shallow crustal amomalies (magma bodies). Section (1) describes the efforts made to record thousand of earthquakes near the Long Valley caldera, and focusses on the results obtained for the November 1984 round Valley earthquake. Section (2) describes the major effort of this contract, which was to quantify the large volume of seismic data being recorded as it pertains to the goals of this contract. Efforts described herein include (1) analysis of earthquake focal mechanisms, and (2) the classification, categorization, and interpretation of unusual seismic phases in terms of reflections and refractions from shallow-crustal anomalous zones. Section (3) summarizes the status of our research to date on the locations of magma bodies, with particular emphasis on a location corresponding to the map location of the south end of Hilton Creek fault. Five lines of independent evidence suggest that magma might be associated with this spot. Finally, new evidence on the large magma bodies within the Long Valley caldera, of interest to the DOE deep drilling project, is presented.

  13. Investigation of the effects of pressure on the compaction and subsequent sintering of nanosize powders. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, E.J.; Piermarini, G.J.; Hockey, B.; Malghan, S.G.

    1996-02-26

    With current technology and available raw materials, one knows that it is very difficult, if not impossible, to produce a monolithic ceramic material with an average grain size of less than 100 nm. The grains of ceramic materials cannot be refined by cold working as is typically done in metals. Hence, the starting ceramic powder must be of a smaller or similar particle size as the desired grain size for the final product. The availability of nanosize (<100 nm) ceramic powders, however, is limited. In many cases, the powders consist of polymorphic mixtures, precursors, or amorphous phases of the desired material. Phase transformation during sintering is difficult to control, and when it does occur it usually is accompanied by significant microstructural changes and grain growth. An example of such a powder is Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. To the best of the authors` knowledge, high purity nanosize {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder is unavailable commercially. However, a variety of nanosize transitional forms of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, including the {gamma} and {delta} polymorphs, are commercially available in large quantities as mixtures. Results on the compaction and sintering of nanosize {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder are reported here.

  14. Investigation into avian mortality in the Playa Lakes region of southeastern New Mexico: Final Report - June 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dein, F. Joshua; Baeten, Laurie A.; Moore, Melody K.; Samuel, Michael D.; Miller, Paul D.; Murphy, Christopher; Sissler, Steven; Jeske, Clinton W.; Jehl, Joseph R.; Yaeger, J. S.; Bauer, B.; Mahoney, Shiela A.

    1997-01-01

    This Final Report is a review of work on a cooperative study undertaken by the USGS Biological Resources Division's National Wildlife Health Center (NWHC) and National Wetlands Research Center (NWRC; formerly the Southern Science Center) from 1994 through 1997. The study was initiated at the request of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), through a request to the former National Biological Service. The Southeastern New Mexico Playa Lakes Coordinating Committee (SENMPLCC) played an important role in outlining the research needs. The initial Study Plan document, which outlines the background, objectives and methods for the first two years is available as Appendix 1. A letter indicating modifications to the Study Plan was sent to the SENMPLCC chair on April 25,1995, and is Appendix 2. An Interim Report, covering this work was completed and submitted in September 1995. The Literature Review section of the study was completed and presented to SENMPLCC in August, 1995. Following SENMPLCC review, NWHC was asked to develop a series of questions that could be posed from information gained in the initial phase (Appendix 3). The NWHC and NWRC were then directed to begin work to answer the top three questions, within the available fiscal resources. NWRC could continue with work outlined under the original Study Plan (Appendix 1), however an additional Study Plan for experiments performed by NWHC and collaborators and is available as Appendix 4.

  15. Investigation of forced and isothermal chemical vapor infiltrated SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sankar, J.; Kelkar, A.D.; Vaidyanathan, R.

    1993-09-01

    Mechanical properties of two different layups for each of the forced CVI (41 specimens) and isothermal CVI (36 specimens) materials were investigated in air at room temperature (RT), 1000C, and at room temperature after thermal shock (RT/TS) and exposure to oxidation (RT/OX). The FCVI specimens had a nominal interfacial coating thickness of 0.3 {mu}m of pyrolytic carbon, while CVI specimens had a coating thickness of 0.1 {mu}m. Effect of reinforcement and interfacial bond on mechanical properties of composite were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to analyze the fiber-matrix interface and the toughening mechanisms in this ceramic composite system.

  16. Fundamental Investigations of C1O2 Delignification - Final Report - 07/10/1996 - 07/09/1999

    SciTech Connect

    Ragauskas, Arthur J.; McDonough, T. J.

    2001-05-18

    The overall objective of this project was to develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of chlorine dioxide delignification of low kappa kraft pulps and identify new methods of improving the efficiency and effectiveness of this bleaching agent. The approach adopted was to investigate the fundamental structural components of lignin that contribute to delignification reactions with chlorine dioxide. These results were then used to examine new bleaching technologies that will permit enhanced delignification while simultaneously reducing the generation of chlorinated organic compounds.

  17. Turbulence Investigation and Reproduction for Assisting Downstream Migrating Juvenile Salmonids, Part I of II, 2001-2002 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Hotchkiss, Rollin H.

    2002-12-01

    Turbulence in gravel bed rivers plays a critical role in most stream processes including contaminant and nutrient transport, aquatic habitat selection, and natural channel design. While most hydraulic designs and fluid models are based on bulk velocity, migrating juvenile salmon experience and react to the temporally varied turbulent fluctuations. Without properly understanding and accounting for the continuous turbulent motions proper fishway design and guidance are impossible. Matching temporally varied flow to fish reactions is the key to guiding juvenile salmonids to safe passageways. While the ideal solution to fish guidance design would be to use specific fluid action-fish reaction mechanisms, such concrete cause and effect relations have not been established. One way to approach the problem of guidance is to hypothesize that in an environment lacking obvious bulk flow cues (like the reservoir environment), turbulent flow conditions similar to those experienced by juvenile salmonids in natural migration corridors will be attractive to juvenile salmonids. Proof of this hypothesis requires three steps: (1) gathering data on turbulence characteristics in natural migration corridors, (2) reproduction of the turbulence parameters in a controlled environment, and (3) testing the reproduced turbulence on actively migrating juvenile salmonids for increased passage efficiencies. The results from the third step have not been finalized, therefore this report will focus on understanding turbulent processes in gravel bed rivers and reproduction of turbulence in controlled environments for use in fish passage technologies. The purposes of this report are to (1) present data collected in natural gravel bed rivers, (2) present a simple method for reproduction of appropriate turbulence levels in a controlled environment, (3) compare these results to those from one prototype surface collector (PSC), and (4) discuss the implications on fish passage design.

  18. Final report : results of the 2006 investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA facility in Ramona, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-10-18

    The investigation reported here was conducted by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in 2006. The investigation addressed carbon tetrachloride contamination on the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility at Ramona, Kansas. The results clearly demonstrate that only minimal contamination is associated with the past use of carbon tetrachloride on the former CCC/USDA property. No soil contamination was detected at concentrations above Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) risk-based screening level (RBSL) Tier 2 standard of 200 {micro}g/kg for the soil-to-groundwater protection pathway. Carbon tetrachloride concentrations in groundwater above the RBSL and maximum contaminant level (MCL) value of 5.0 {micro}g/L were detected in only two samples, collected at adjacent locations on the southeast part of the property. The relatively low concentrations detected and the limited areal extent of the contamination demonstrate that no imminent threat exists on the former CCC/USDA property to warrant remediation. The soil and groundwater contamination detected on the former CCC/USDA property is clearly separate from contamination detected at off-site locations. The carbon tetrachloride and chloroform contamination in groundwater (at concentrations above the RBSL and MCL value) associated with past activities on the former CCC/USDA property is contained within the property boundaries. Data collected independently by the KDHE in 2006 validate these findings and, furthermore, provide additional evidence that the sources identified on the Co-op property (west of the former CCC/USDA property) are separate from the comparatively minor results of past activities on the former CCC/USDA property. The KDHE concluded in its 2006 report that the sources are separate and that the Co-op is the principally responsible party for the carbon tetrachloride contamination detected during its 2006 investigation.

  19. Spectroscopic investigation of materials for frequency-agile laser systems. Final report, 15 January 1982-14 January 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    This research involves the use of laser-spectroscopy techniques such as four-wave mixing, multiphoton absorption, time-resolved site-selection spectroscopy, and holography to characterize dynamical optical processes such as energy transfer, exciton migration, radiation-less relaxation, and the photorefractive effect. In addition, a significant effort was spent in the synthesis and characterization of new types of materials for tunable laser applications. The materials investigated include alexandrite, titanium-doped sapphire, lithium niobate, neodymium pentaphosphate, rhodium-doped rubidium calcium fluoride, manganese silicate, and neodymium-doped garnet crystals and glasses.

  20. Investigation of welding and brazing of molybdenum and TZM alloy tubes. Final report, November 1990-February 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Lundblad, W.E.

    1991-02-01

    This effort involved investigating the welding and brazing techniques of molybdenum tubes to be used as cartridges in the crystal growth cartridge. Information is given in the form of charts and photomicrographs. It was found that the recrystallization temperature of molybdenum can be increased by alloying it with 0.5 percent titanium and 0.1 percent zirconium. Recrystallization temperatures for this alloy, known as TZM, become significant around 2500 F. A series of microhardness tests were run on samples of virgin and heat soaked TZM. The test results are given in tabular form. It was concluded that powder metallurgy TZM may be an acceptable cartridge material.

  1. Investigation of the potential effects of underwater noise from petroleum-industry activities on feeding humpback whale behavior. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Malme, C.I.; Miles, P.R.; Tyack, P.; Clark, C.W.; Bird, J.E.

    1985-06-01

    An investigation was made of the potential effects of underwater noise from petroleum-industry activities on the behavior of feeding humpback whales in Frederick Sound and Stephens Passage, Alaska in August, 1984. Test sounds were a 100 cu. in. air gun and playbacks of recorded drillship, drilling platform, production platform, semi-submersible drill rig, and helicopter fly-over noise. Sound source levels and acoustic propagation losses were measured. The movement patterns of whales were determined by observations of whale-surfacing positions.

  2. Investigations into the properties, conditions, and effects of the ionosphere. Final report 4 Dec 86-31 Dec 89

    SciTech Connect

    Fremouw, E.J.; Reinisch, B.W.; Szuszczewica, E.P.

    1990-01-15

    The contractor and its subcontractors supported GL/AFSC research in ionospheric physics and its systems effects. Support was provided in the following six categories; laboratory measurements; field measurements, aircraft measurements; rocket, satellite, and Shuttle measurements; analytical and theoretical investigations; and engineering analysis. This report summarizes results on 15 specific topics. These topics included ionospheric characteristics central to operation of HF systems, such as OTH radars; engineering studies of meteor/scatter communication links; effects on transionospheric radio propagation controlled by the total electron content (path integral of electron density) of the ionosphere and its fine structure (which produces radiowave scintillation); optical and ultraviolet effects of the aurora and airglow, as well as laboratory uv studies; and feasibility studies on modifying radio blackout and measuring electron density in the D region..

  3. Final work plan : investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Hanover, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-11-19

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility at the northeastern edge of the city of Hanover, Kansas, from 1950 until the early 1970s. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In February 1998, trace to low levels of carbon tetrachloride (below the maximum contaminant level [MCL] of 5.0 {micro}g/L) were detected in two private wells near the former grain storage facility at Hanover, as part of a statewide USDA private well sampling program that was implemented by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) near former CCC/USDA facilities. In April 2007, the CCC/USDA collected near-surface soil samples at 1.8-2 ft BGL (below ground level) at 61 locations across the former CCC/USDA facility. All soil samples were analyzed by the rigorous gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer analytical method (purge-and-trap method). No contamination was found in soil samples above the reporting limit of 10 {micro}g/kg. In July 2007, the CCC/USDA sampled indoor air at nine residences on or adjacent to its former facility to address the residents concerns regarding vapor intrusion. Low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected at four of the nine homes. Because carbon tetrachloride found in private wells and indoor air at the site might be linked to historical use of fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA is proposing to conduct an investigation to determine the source and extent of the carbon tetrachloride contamination associated with the former facility. This investigation will be conducted in accordance with the intergovernmental agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency (FSA) of the USDA. The investigation at Hanover will be performed, on behalf of the CCC/USDA, by the Environmental Science

  4. Final field-sampling plan for surface and ground-water investigation at the Milwaukee Army Reserve Center (MIARC)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-24

    This Field Sampling Plan has been prepared by OHM Remediation Services Corp. (OHM), a wholly owned subsidiary of OHM Corporation, to support Task order No. 004 of Contract No. DAAA15-90-D-0019 for the Surface and Ground Water Investigation at the Milwaukee Army Reserve Center (MIARC). MIARC is located in eastern Wisconsin, approximately 5 miles from the western shore of Lake Michigan between North 48th and North 55th streets in the City of Milwaukee as shown in Figure 1-1. This property lies adjacent to, and directly north of, West Silver Spring Drive. The reserve center is comprised of several administrative/maintenance buildings located on approximately 60 acres with additional Adjacent training areas. The complex includes military reserve buildings, a motor repair shop, paved roadways, parking areas, and sidewalks. The entire facility is fenced, however, public access is unrestricted in the northwest corner of the site.

  5. Final work plan : supplemental upward vapor intrusion investigation at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Hanover, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-12-15

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), operated a grain storage facility at the northeastern edge of the city of Hanover, Kansas, from 1950 until the early 1970s. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were in common use by the grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In February 1998, trace to low levels of carbon tetrachloride (below the maximum contaminant level [MCL] of 5.0 {micro}g/L) were detected in two private wells near the former grain storage facility at Hanover, as part of a statewide USDA private well sampling program that was implemented by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) near former CCC/USDA facilities. In 2007, the CCC/USDA conducted near-surface soil sampling at 61 locations and also sampled indoor air at nine residences on or adjacent to its former Hanover facility to address the residents concerns regarding vapor intrusion. Low levels of carbon tetrachloride were detected at four of the nine homes. The results were submitted to the KDHE in October 2007 (Argonne 2007). On the basis of the results, the KDHE requested sub-slab sampling and/or indoor air sampling (KDHE 2007). This Work Plan describes, in detail, the proposed additional scope of work requested by the KDHE and has been developed as a supplement to the comprehensive site investigation work plan that is pending (Argonne 2008). Indoor air samples collected previously from four homes at Hanover were shown to contain the carbon tetrachloride at low concentrations (Table 2.1). It cannot be concluded from these previous data that the source of the detected carbon tetrachloride is vapor intrusion attributable to former grain storage operations of the CCC/USDA at Hanover. The technical objective of the vapor intrusion investigation described here is to assess the risk to human health due to the potential for upward migration of carbon tetrachloride and

  6. Investigation and development of alternative methods for shale oil processing and analysis. Final technical report, October 1979--April 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, R.A.

    1998-06-01

    Oil shale, a carbonaceous rock which occurs abundantly in the earth`s crust, has been investigated for many years as an alternate source of fuel oil. The insoluble organic matter contained in such shales is termed {open_quotes}Kerogen{close_quotes} from the Greek meaning oil or oil forming. The kerogen in oil shale breaks down into oil-like products when subjected to conditions simulating destructive distillation. These products have been the subject of extensive investigations by several researchers and many of the constituents of shale oil have been identified. (1) Forsman (2) estimates that the kerogen content of the earth is roughly 3 {times} 10{sup 15} tons as compared to total coal reserves of about 5 {times} 10{sup 12}. Although the current cost per barrel estimate for commercial production of shale oil is higher than that of fossil oil, as our oil reserves continue to dwindle, shale oil technology will become more and more important. When oil shale is heated, kerogen is said to undergo chemical transformation to usable oil in two steps (3): Kerogen (in oil shale) 300-500{degrees}C bitumen. Crude shale oil and other products. The crude shale oil so obtained differs from fossil oil in that: (1) kerogen is thought to have been produced from the aging of plant matter over many years; (2) shale oil has a higher nitrogen content than fossil oil; (3) non-hydrocarbons are present to a much greater extent in shale oil; and (4) the hydrocarbons in shale oil are much more unsaturated than those in fossil oil (petroleum).

  7. Final Technical Report: Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Transport Control via Shaping of Radial Plasma Flow Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Eugenio

    2014-05-02

    The strong coupling between the different physical variables involved in the plasma transport phenomenon and the high complexity of its dynamics call for a model-based, multivariable approach to profile control where those predictive models could be exploited. The overall objective of this project has been to extend the existing body of work by investigating numerically and experimentally active control of unstable fluctuations, including fully developed turbulence and the associated cross-field particle transport, via manipulation of flow profiles in a magnetized laboratory plasma device. Fluctuations and particle transport can be monitored by an array of electrostatic probes, and Ex B flow profiles can be controlled via a set of biased concentric ring electrodes that terminate the plasma column. The goals of the proposed research have been threefold: i- to develop a predictive code to simulate plasma transport in the linear HELCAT (HELicon-CAThode) plasma device at the University of New Mexico (UNM), where the experimental component of the proposed research has been carried out; ii- to establish the feasibility of using advanced model-based control algorithms to control cross-field turbulence-driven particle transport through appropriate manipulation of radial plasma flow profiles, iii- to investigate the fundamental nonlinear dynamics of turbulence and transport physics. Lehigh University (LU), including Prof. Eugenio Schuster and one full-time graduate student, has been primarily responsible for control-oriented modeling and model-based control design. Undergraduate students have also participated in this project through the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) program. The main goal of the LU Plasma Control Group has been to study the feasibility of controlling turbulence-driven transport by shaping the radial poloidal flow profile (i.e., by controlling flow shear) via biased concentric ring electrodes.

  8. Characterize and explore potential sites and prepare research and development plan (site investigation study). Final draft. Task 2. Milestone report

    SciTech Connect

    1980-12-01

    A specific research and development plan to investigate the behavior and suitability of aquifers as compressed air energy storage (CAES) sites is presented. The proposed effort will evaluate present uncertainties in the performance of the underground energy storage subsystem and its impact on above ground plant design and cost. The project is planned to provide the utility industry with a quantitative basis for confidence that financial commitment to a demonstration plant and subsequent expansion is justified and poses acceptable risks. Activities in Phase II of a 5-phase overall CAES development program are reported. Information is included on the development of field testing specifications and schedules; selection of specific site for the conceptual design; development plan and schedule for the media site; development of analytical models of aquifer airflow; and well drilling requirements. As a result of these studies 14 sites in Illinois and Indiana were evaluated, 7 were ranked for suitability for CAES, and 4 were selected for possible use in the field testing program. Test procedures, the mathematical models and drilling requirments were developed. (LCL)

  9. INVESTIGATION ON DURABILITY AND REACTIVITY OF PROMISING METAL OXIDE SORBENTS DURING SULFIDATION AND REGENERATION. QUARTERLY AND FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    K.C. KWON

    1998-08-01

    Hot-gas desulfurization for the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) process has been investigated by many researchers to remove effectively hydrogen sulfide with various metal oxide sorbents at high pressures and high temperatures. Metal oxides such as zinc titanate oxides, zinc ferrite oxide, copper oxide, manganese oxide and calcium oxide, were found to be promising sorbents in comparison with other removal methods such as membrane separations and reactive membrane separations. Some metal oxide sorbents exhibited the quite favorable performance in terms of attrition resistance and sulfur capacity. Experiments on removal reaction of H{sub 2}S from coal gas mixtures with formulated metal oxide sorbents were conducted in a batch reactor or a differential reactor. The objectives of this research project are to formulate promising metal oxide sorbents for removal of sulfur from coal gas mixtures, to find initial reaction kinetics for the metal oxide-hydrogen sulfide heterogeneous reaction system, to obtain effects of hydrogen, nitrogen and moisture on dynamic absorption and equilibrium absorption at various absorption temperatures. Promising durable metal oxide sorbents with high-sulfur-absorbing capacity were formulated by mixing active metal oxide powders with inert metal oxide powders, and calcining these powder mixtures. The Research Triangle Institute (RTI), a sub-contractor of this research project, will also prepare promising metal oxide sorbents for this research project, plan experiments on removal of sulfur compounds from coal gases with metal oxide, and review experimental results.

  10. Experimental and theoretical investigation of operational and survivability issues in thermal radiators for thermionic space nuclear power systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Keddy, M.D.

    1994-03-15

    Heat pipes are a promising candidate for spacecraft radiators. This report describes a program designed to investigate the mass migration phenomenon in heat pipes. The program involved experiments to observe and measure the mass migration rates in both high and low operating temperature heat pipes. The low-temperature experiments were intended to simulate the operation of high-temperature, liquid metal heat pipes. Octadecane was the selected low-temperature working fluid. It is a paraffin and exhibits some of the characteristics of liquid metal working fluids. Sodium was the working fluid used in the high temperature experiment. A one-dimensional compressible flow model was developed for describing the hydrodynamics of rarefied vapor flow in heat pipe condensers. This model was compared with experimental data for the low-temperature octadecane heat pipes and the high-temperature sodium heat pipe. The model was found to satisfactorily predict the temperature profiles and location of freeze-fronts for the low-temperature heat pipes. Mass migration rate predictions using the model were satisfactory for the low-temperature heat pipes as well. However, the mass migration prediction for the high-temperature, sodium heat pipe was not in agreement with experimental data. An analytical model which accounts for property variations in the radial as well as longitudinal directions is recommended. A one-dimensional model was unsatisfactory for predicting mass migration rates in liquid metal heat pipes.

  11. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R. Paul Drake

    2001-11-30

    This final report describes work involving 22 investigators from 11 institutions to explore the dynamics present in supernova explosions by means of experiments on the Omega laser. The specific experiments emphasized involved the unstable expansion of a spherical capsule and the coupling of perturbations at a first interface to a second interface by means of a strong shock. Both effects are present in supernovae. The experiments were performed at Omega and the computer simulations were undertaken at several institutions. B139

  12. Investigations of the dynamics and growth of insulator films by high resolution helium atom scattering. Final report, May 1, 1985--April 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Safron, S.A.; Skofronick, J.G.

    1997-07-01

    Over the twelve years of this grant from the U.S. Department of Energy, DE-FG05-85ER45208, the over-reaching aims of this work have been to explore and to attempt to understand the fundamental physics and chemistry of surfaces and interfaces. The instrument we have employed m in this work is high-resolution helium atom scattering (HAS) which we have become even more convinced is an exceptionally powerful and useful tool for surface science. One can follow the evolution of the development and progress of the experiments that we have carried out by the evolution of the proposal titles for each of the four three-year periods. At first, m in 1985-1988, the main objective of this grant was to construct the HAS instrument so that we could begin work on the surface vibrational dynamics of crystalline materials; the title was {open_quotes}Helium Atom-Surface Scattering Apparatus for Studies of Crystalline Surface Dynamics{close_quotes}. Then, as we became more interested m in the growth of films and interfaces the title m in 1988-1991 became {open_quotes}Helium Atom Surface Spectroscopy: Surface Lattice Dynamics of Insulators, Metal and Metal Overlayers{close_quotes}. In 1991-1994, we headed even more m in this direction, and also recognized that we should focus more on insulator materials as very few techniques other than helium atom scattering could be applied to insulators without causing surface damage. Thus, the proposal title became {open_quotes}Helium Atom-Surface Scattering: Surface Dynamics of Insulators, Overlayers and Crystal Growth{close_quotes}. M in the final period of this grant the title ended up {open_quotes}Investigations of the Dynamics and Growth of Insulator Films by High Resolution Helium Atom Scattering{close_quotes} m in 1994-1997. The list of accomplishments briefly discussed in this report are: tests of the shell model; multiphoton scattering; physisorbed monolayer films; other surface phase transitions; and surface magnetic effects.

  13. A coupled approach to spatially derived parameters necessary for ecosystem modeling on the North Slope of Alaska: Appendix A. Final report, March 1, 1989--February 28, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Petersen, G.W.; Day, R.L.; Pollack, J.

    1993-12-01

    This study concerned an investigation of ecosystem dynamics in several small study sites in the North Slope region of Alaska. The scope of the proposed research is to quantitatively determine spatial interrelationships between landform geometry within these study areas and such ecologically important factors as vegetation type, depth-to-permafrost, hydraulic conductivity and incoming solar radiation. Extrapolation techniques developed and terrain-related data generated as a result of this research will augment R4D Phase II goals which relate to running the General Arctic Simulac (GAS) model (and associated ecosystem models) at different locations on the North Slope. In particular, Penn State has contributed significantly to extrapolation efforts by developing techniques which can be used to initialize conditions for model input either through direct measurement (e.g., slope and aspect) and GIS-based simulation models (e.g., drainage basin characterization). As stated in the R4D Phase II Research Plan, the long-term objectives of this program are: (1) to determine effects and to develop models based on ecosystem disturbances commonly created by energy development so that appropriate, cost-effective measures can be utilized to minimize deleterious disturbances; and (2) to extend the results to other arctic and alpine areas which are important because of likely impact from energy development. It is this second long-term objective which relates most directly to Penn State`s work.

  14. Experimental and numerical investigation of ADP square crystal with large aperture in the new Final Optics Assembly under the non-critical phase matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Fuzhong; Zhang, Peng; Bai, Qingshun; Lu, Lihua; Xiang, Yong

    2016-04-01

    This paper presented a new Final Optics Assembly (FOA) of ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) square crystal with large aperture under the non-critical phase matching (NCPM), which controlled by the constant temperature water, and the temperature distribution was analyzed by simulation and experiment. Firstly, thermal analysis was carried out, as well as the temperature distribution of the cavity only heated under different velocities was analyzed. Then, the temperature distributions of ADP square crystal in the cavity were achieved using the Finite Volume Method (FVM), and this prediction was validated by the experiment results when the velocity is 0.1 m/s and 0.5 m/s. Finally, the optimal FHG conversion efficiency was obtained and the comparison of different heating methods was also highlighted.

  15. FINAL PROJECT REPORT DOE Early Career Principal Investigator Program Project Title: Developing New Mathematical Models for Multiphase Flows Based on a Fundamental Probability Density Function Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Shankar Subramaniam

    2009-04-01

    This final project report summarizes progress made towards the objectives described in the proposal entitled “Developing New Mathematical Models for Multiphase Flows Based on a Fundamental Probability Density Function Approach”. Substantial progress has been made in theory, modeling and numerical simulation of turbulent multiphase flows. The consistent mathematical framework based on probability density functions is described. New models are proposed for turbulent particle-laden flows and sprays.

  16. Evaluation of the geologic relations and seismotectonic stability of the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada Nuclear Waste Site Investigation (NNWSI); Final report, January 1, 1987--June 30, 1988: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    1988-10-01

    This report provides a summary of progress for the project ``Evaluation of the Geologic Relations and Seismotectonic Stability of the Yucca Mountain Area, Nevada Nuclear Waste Site Investigation (NNWSI)`` for the eighteen month period of January 1, 1987 to June 10, 1988. This final report was preceded by the final report for the initial six month period, July 1, 1986 to December 31, 1986 (submitted on January 25, 1987, and revised in June 1987.) Quaternary Tectonics, Geochemical, Mineral Deposits, Vulcanic Geology, Seismology, Tectonics, Neotectonics, Remote Sensing, Geotechnical Assessments, Geotechnical Rock Mass Assessments, Basinal Studies, and Strong Ground Motion.

  17. Final report : results of the 2006-2007 investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA facility in Barnes, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-08-28

    The 2006-2007 investigation of carbon tetrachloride and chloroform contamination at Barnes, Kansas, was conducted at the request of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory implemented the investigation on behalf of the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA). The overall goal of the investigation was to establish criteria for monitoring leading to potential site reclassification. The investigation objectives were to (1) determine the hydraulic gradient near the former CCC/USDA facility, (2) delineate the downgradient carbon tetrachloride plume, and (3) design and implement an expanded monitoring network at Barnes (Argonne 2006a).

  18. Remedial investigation and feasibility study Point Lonely Radar Installation, Alaska. Volume 1. Appendices a - c. Final report, January 1995-April 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    This report presents the findings of Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies at sites located at the Point Lonely radar installation in northern Alaska. The sites were characterized based on sampling and analyses conducted during Remedial Investigation activities performed during August and September 1993.

  19. United States Air Force 611th Air Support Group Civil Engineering Squadron, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Remedial investigation and feasibility study Point Lay Radar Installation, Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karmi, S.

    1996-03-04

    The United States Air Force (Air Force) has prepared this Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) report to present the results of RI/FS activities at four sites located at the Point Lay radar installation. The remedial investigation (RI) field activities were conducted at the Point Lay radar installation during the summer of 1993. The four sites at Point Lay were investigated because they were suspected of being contaminated with hazardous substances. RI activities were conducted using methods and procedures specified in the RI/FS Work Plan, Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP), and Health and Safety Plan.

  20. United States Air Force 611th Air Support Group/Civil Engineering Squadron Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Remedial investigation and feasibility study. Bullen Point Radar Installation, Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karmi, S.

    1996-03-18

    The United States Air Force (Air Force) has prepared this Remedial investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) report as part of the Installation Restoration Program (IRP) to present results of RI/FS activities at five sites at the Bullen Point radar installation. The IRP provides for investigating, quantifying, and remediating environmental contamination from past waste management activities at Air Force installations throughout the United States.

  1. Accident investigation board report on the May 14, 1997, chemical explosion at the Plutonium Reclamation Facility, Hanford Site,Richland, Washington - final report

    SciTech Connect

    Gerton, R.E.

    1997-07-25

    On May 14, 1997, at 7:53 p.m. (PDT), a chemical explosion occur-red in Tank A- 109 in Room 40 of the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (Facility) located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site, approximately 30 miles north of Richland, Washington. The inactive processing Facility is part of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). On May 16, 1997, Lloyd L. Piper, Deputy Manager, acting for John D. Wagoner, Manager, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL), formally established an Accident Investigation Board (Board) to investigate the explosion in accordance with DOE Order 225. 1, Accident Investigations. The Board commenced its investigation on May 15, 1997, completed the investigation on July 2, 1997, and submitted its findings to the RL Manager on July 26, 1997. The scope of the Board`s investigation was to review and analyze the circumstances of the events that led to the explosion; to analyze facts and to determine the causes of the accident; and to develop conclusions and judgments of need that may help prevent a recurrence of the accident. The scope also included the application of lessons learned from similar accidents within DOE. In addition to this detailed report, a companion document has also been prepared that provides a concise summary of the facts and conclusions of this report, with an emphasis on management issues (DOE/RL-97-63).

  2. The investigation of molecular mechanisms in photodynamic action and radiobiology with nanosecond flash photolysis and pulse radiolysis: Final report for period April 1, 1972-June 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Grossweiner, L.I.

    1987-07-01

    Laser flash was employed to investigate initial photolysis mechanisms in enzymes and constituent aromatic amino acids. The key role of photoionization and solvated electron generation was demonstrated. The photochemistry of furocoumarins employed for phototherapy of skin diseases was investigated, emphasizing the production and subsequent reactions of singlet molecular oxygen. The photochemistry of porphyrins employed for photodynamic therapy of malignant tumors was studied, emphasizing photosensitization of model membranes, liposomes and resealed red blood cell membranes. Photosensitization in light-scattering media was investigated in a tissue model, consisting of polystyrene microspheres in an aqueous dye solution and analyzed with the diffusion approximation to radiative transfer. The diffusion approximation was employed to develop a dosimetry model for photodynamic therapy.

  3. Final technical report on investigation of selective non-catalytic processes for in-situ reduction of NOx and CO emissions from marine gas turbines and diesel engines. Final technical report, 1 April 1994-31 March 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, C.T.; Hanson, R.K.

    1997-05-15

    The effectiveness of selective non-catalytic (SNCR) gas-phase reaction processes for NO(x) removal from combustion products at elevated pressures was investigated in a combined experimental and modeling research program. Calculations using existing chemical models for SNCR indicate that the temperature window for NO(x) removal by SNCR widens as pressure increases, resulting in NO(x) removal at higher temperatures than at ambient pressure. The calculations also show a significant reduction in the reaction time scale with increasing pressure. These observations suggest the possibility of utilizing SNCR for reducing NO(x) emissions from marine gas turbines and Diesel engines by direct injection of a reductant species into the combustion chamber, possibly as a fuel additive. Initial experiments were carried out at atmospheric pressure to allow comparison with previous measurements in order to verify the experimental approach. Following these validation tests, experiments were conducted at elevated pressures. Results from these tests, confirm the model predictions that the SNCR window for NO(x) removal widens as the pressure increases. In addition, a project was initiated, to develop compact, robust, solid-state microsensors for pollutant species for use in control systems for reduction of pollutant emissions. The sensor concept is based on integrated circuit fabrication technology that allows the integration of a metal-oxide sensor with associated electronic circuitry on a single chip. Initial efforts focused on development of a sensor for NO(x).

  4. Individual Differences and Learner Control II: Investigation of Control Over Pictorial Mediators in Computer-Assisted Instruction. AFHRL-TR-74-30. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Judd, Wilson A.; And Others

    The reported research was designed to investigate the impact of learner control on performance and anxiety in a computer assisted instruction task. This, the third phase of a project, substituted pictorial mediators for mnemonic devices as the facilitating variable in an instruction program on edible plants. Four experimental groups were formed…

  5. Remedial investigation report, site 2-Pesticide Pit Burial Area, Stewart Air National Guard Base, Newburgh, New York. Volume 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Site 2-Pesticide Pit Burial Area was investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. A removal action was conducted in 1988, when pesticide containers and contaminated soil were excavated from the pit. The pit covered an area of approximately 1000 square feet and was approximately 12 feet deep. The report recommends no further action based on study results.

  6. Remedial investigation report, site 2-Pesticide Pit Burial Area, Stewart Air National Guard Base, Newburgh, New York. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    Site 2-Pesticide Pit Burial Area was investigated under the Installation Restoration Program. A removal action was conducted in 1988, when pesticide containers and contaminated soil were excavated from the pit. The pit covered an area of approximately 1000 square feet and was approximately 12 feet deep. The report recommends no further action based on study results.

  7. An Empirical Investigation of the Results of Two Different Test Development Strategies. Final Report for the Period March 15, 1981 - December 31, 1981.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brzezinski, Evelyn; Demaline, Randy

    Item banks offer a different approach to test development than that of the more traditional item specification method. This study was designed as an initial comparative investigation in the Area. Fourth grade math and reading tests were developed using both items written from item specifications and items drawn from an existing item bank. Four…

  8. Final Report; Arsenic Fate, Transport and Stability Study; Groundwater, Surface Water, Soil And Sediment Investigation, Fort Devens Superfund Site, Devens, Massachusetts

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document presents results from the Fiscal Years 2006-2008 field investigation at the Fort Devens Superfund Site, Operable Unit 1 (Shepley's Hill Landfill) to fulfill the research objectives outlined in the proposal entitled, 'Fate and Transport of Arsenic in an Urban, Milita...

  9. Investigation of proposed process sequence for the array automated assembly task. Phase I and II. Final report, October 1, 1977-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Mardesich, N.; Garcia, A.; Eskenas, K.

    1980-08-01

    A selected process sequence for the low cost fabrication of photovoltaic modules was defined during this contract. Each part of the process sequence was looked at regarding its contribution to the overall dollars per watt cost. During the course of the research done, some of the initially included processes were dropped due to technological deficiencies. The printed dielectric diffusion mask, codiffusion of the n+ and p+ regions, wraparound front contacts and retention of the diffusion oxide for use as an AR coating were all the processes that were removed for this reason. Other process steps were retained to achieve the desired overall cost and efficiency. Square wafers, a polymeric spin-on PX-10 diffusion source, a p+ back surface field and silver front contacts are all processes that have been recommended for use in this program. The printed silver solderable pad for making contact to the aluminum back was replaced by an ultrasonically applied tin-zinc pad. Also, the texturized front surface was dropped as inappropriate for the sheet silicon likely to be available in 1986. Progress has also been made on the process sequence for module fabrication. A shift from bonding with a conformal coating to laminating with ethylene vinyl acetate and a glass superstrate is recommended for further module fabrication. The finalized process sequence is described.

  10. Final Report for Project DE-SC0006958: "An Investigation of the Effects of magnetic Fields and Collisionality on Shock Formation in Radiatively Cooled Plasma Flows"

    SciTech Connect

    Bott-Suzuki, Simon

    2014-11-05

    We have developed a new experimental platform to study bow-shock formation in plasma flows generated using an inverse wire array z-pinch. We have made significant progress on the analysis of both hydrodynamic and magnetized shocks using this system. The hydrodynamic experiments show formation of a well-defined Mach cone, and highly localized shock strong associated with radiative losses and rapidly cooling over the shock. Magnetized shocks show that the balance of magnetic and ram pressures dominate the evolution of the shock region, generating a low plasma beta void around the target. Manuscripts are in preparation for publication on both these topics. We have also published the development of a novel diagnostic method which allow recovery of interferometry and self-emission data along the same line of sight. Finally, we have carried out work to integrate a kinetic routine with the 3D MHD code Gorgon, however it remains to complete this process. Both undergraduate and graduate students have been involved in both the experimental work and publications.

  11. Investigations of the origins of metastable light-induced changes in hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Final subcontract report, April 1, 1988--March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, J.D.

    1991-12-01

    The work performed for this contract continued investigations of the origins of metastable effectS in a-Si:H through three kinds of studies: (1) the effect of carbon impurities in a-Si:H samples at low concentrations using drive-level capacitance profiling measurements on samples whose carbon content was intentionally modulated spatially during growth, (2) the characterization of metastable states in n-type doped a Si:H samples caused by quench cooling and by light-soaking with partial annealing, and (3) the use of depletion-width-modulated ESR spectroscopy together with junction capacitance spectroscopy to investigate deep defect states for various metastable states of a 10- and an 80-Vppm PH{sub 3}-doped a-Si:H sample.

  12. Pilot investigation of indoor-outdoor and personal PM10 (thoracic) and associated ionic compounds and mutagenic activity. Final report, February 1987-April 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Colome, S.D.; Kado, N.Y.; Kleinman, M.; Jaques, P.

    1989-04-27

    A major objective of the pilot study was to evaluate methods of measuring indoor and personal exposures to PM10. Other objectives were to examine the feasibility of measuring particle characteristics (other than mass) that may be useful in relating exposures to PM10 to health effects. The investigators tested several types of particle-sampling devices in the homes of eight asthmatic subjects who resided in Orange County. The investigators measured particle mass for levels of sulfate/nitrate ions and the mutagenicity of particle extracts. The pilot study demonstrated successfully the use of certain portable sampling devices to measure PM10 exposure and showed that it is feasible to measure levels of ionic species and mutagenic activity in particle samples obtained with these devices. The results of the study can be applied in the design of larger studies of similar nature.

  13. An investigation of the applicability of the new ion exchange resin, Reillex{trademark}-HPQ, in ATW separations. Milestone 4, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, K.R.; Ball, J.; Grissom, M.; Williamson, M.; Cobb, S.; Young, D.; Wu, Yen-Yuan J.

    1993-09-07

    The investigations with the anion exchange resin Reillex{trademark}-HPQ is continuing along several different paths. The topics of current investigations that are reported here are: The sorption behavior of chromium(VI) on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ from nitric acid solutions and from sodium hydroxide/sodium nitrate solutions; sorption behavior of F{sup {minus}} on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resin in acidic sodium nitrate solution; sorption behavior of Cl{sup {minus}} on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resin in acidic sodium nitrate solution; sorption behavior of Br{sup {minus}} on Reillex{trademark}-HPQ resin in acidic sodium nitrate solution; and the Honors thesis by one of the students is attached as Appendix II (on ion exchange properties of a new macroperous resin using bromide as the model ion in aqueous nitrate solutions).

  14. Investigation of Novel Electrode Materials for Electrochemically-Based Remediation of High- and Low-Level Mixed Wastes in the DOE Complex - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, N.S.; Anderson, M.

    2000-12-01

    New materials are investigated, based on degenerately-doped titanias, for use in the electrochemical degradation of organics and nitrogen-containing compounds in sites of concern to the DOE remediation effort. The data collected in this project appear to provide a rational approach for design of more efficient nanoporous electrodes. Also, osmium complexes appear to be promising candidates for further optimization in operating photo electrochemical cells for solar energy conversion applications.

  15. Final work plan : phase II investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-16

    From approximately 1949 until 1970, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility on federally owned property approximately 0.25 mi northwest of Savannah, Missouri (Figure 1.1). During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In November 1998, carbon tetrachloride was detected in a private well (Morgan) roughly 50 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, as a result of statewide screening of private wells near former CCC/USDA facilities, conducted in Missouri by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1999). The 1998 and subsequent investigations by the EPA and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR) confirmed the presence of carbon tetrachloride in the Morgan well, as well as in a second well (on property currently occupied by the Missouri Department of Transportation [MoDOT]) described as being approximately 400 ft east of the former CCC/USDA facility. The identified concentrations in these two wells were above the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) and the Missouri risk-based corrective action default target level (MRBCA DTL) values of 5.0 {micro}g/L for carbon tetrachloride in water used for domestic purposes (EPA 1999; MoDNR 2000a,b, 2006). Because the observed contamination in the Morgan and MoDOT wells might be linked to the past use of carbon tetrachloride-based fumigants at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA is conducting an investigation to (1) characterize the source(s), extent, and factors controlling the subsurface distribution and movement of carbon tetrachloride at Savannah and (2) evaluate the potential risks to human health, public welfare, and the environment posed by the contamination. This work is being performed in accord with the Intergovernmental Agreement established between the Farm Service Agency

  16. Step-scan Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer for investigating chemical reactions of energy-related materials. Final report, April 1, 1995--March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Eyring, E.M.

    1997-11-04

    Two step-scan Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers were purchased with URI-DOE funds by the University of Utah. These infrared spectrometers have been used to carry out the following investigations: the determination of strength of adsorption of organic molecules at the liquid-solid interface of coated attenuated total reflectance (ATR) elements, the kinetic study of the photoinitiated polymerization of a dental resin, the exploration of the kinetics of photochemical reactions of organic molecules in solution, and the development of a stopped-flow FTIR interface for measuring rates and mechanisms of reactions in solution that are not photoinitiated and do not have convenient ultraviolet-visible spectral features.

  17. Final Report - Novel investigation of iron cross sections via spherical shell transmission measurements and particle transport calculations for material embrittlement studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Steven M. Grimes; Thomas N. Massey; Allan D. Carlson; James M. Adams; Alireza Haghighat; Michael T. Wenner; Shane R. Gardner

    2003-04-25

    OAK B204 We have been pursuing a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, to study neutron scattering interactions in iron. The principal objective of this work is to investigate the well-known deficiency that exists for reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence determinations. Specifically, we are using the spherical-shell transmission method, employing iron shells with different thicknesses, and neutron time-of-flight (TOF) measurements of the scattered neutrons, in an effort to precisely determine specific energy regions over which deficiencies in the non-elastic scattering cross section for neutron scattering in iron appear to exist.

  18. Investigation of oil recovery improvement by coupling an interfacial tension agent and a mobility control agent in light oil reservoirs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, M.

    1995-12-01

    This research studied the oil recovery potential of flooding light oil reservoirs by combining interfacial tension reducing agent(s) with a mobility control agent. The specific objectives were: To define the mechanisms and limitations of co-injecting interfacial tension reduction agent(s) and a mobility control agent to recover incremental oil. Specifically, the study focused on the fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions. To evaluate the economics of the combination technology and investigate methods to make the process more profitable. Specific areas of study were to evaluate different chemical concentration tapers and the volume of chemical injection required to give optimal oil recovery.

  19. Experimental and theoretical investigation of three-dimensional turbulent boundary layers and turbulence characteristics inside an axial flow inducer passage. Final Report. Ph.D. Thesis, Jun. 1971

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anand, A. K.; Lakshminarayana, B.

    1977-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations of the characteristics of three dimensional turbulent boundary layers in a rotating helical passage of an inducer rotor are reported. Expressions are developed for the velocity profiles in the inner layer, where the viscous effects dominate, in the outer layer, where the viscous effects are small, and in the interference layer, where the end walls influence the flow. The prediction of boundary layer growth is based on the momentum integral technique. The equations derived are general enough to be valid for all turbomachinery rotors with arbitrary pressure gradients. The experimental investigations are carried out in a flat plate inducer 3 feet in diameter. The mean velocity profiles, turbulence intensities and shear stresses, wall shear stress, and limiting streamline angles are measured at various radial and chordwise locations by using rotating probes. The measurements are in general agreement with the predictions. The radial flows are well represented by an expression which includes the effect of stagger angle and radial pressure gradient. The radial flows in the rotor channel are higher than those on a single blade. The collateral region exists only very near the blade surface. The radial component of turbulence intensity is higher than the streamwise component because of the effect of rotation.

  20. An experimental investigation of high temperature superconducting microstrip antennas at K- and Ka-band frequencies. Ph.D. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, Mark A.

    1993-01-01

    The recent discovery of high temperature superconductors (HTS) has generated a substantial amount of interest in microstrip antenna applications. However, the high permittivity of substrates compatible with HTS results in narrow bandwidths and high patch edge impedances of such antennas. To investigate the performance of superconducting microstrip antennas, three antenna architectures at K and Ka-band frequencies are examined. Superconducting microstrip antennas that are directly coupled, gap coupled, and electromagnetically coupled to a microstrip transmission line were designed and fabricated on lanthanum aluminate substrates using YBa2Cu3O7 superconducting thin films. For each architecture, a single patch antenna and a four element array were fabricated. Measurements from these antennas, including input impedance, bandwidth, patterns, efficiency, and gain are presented. The measured results show usable antennas can be constructed using any of the architectures. All architectures show excellent gain characteristics, with less than 2 dB of total loss in the four element arrays. Although the direct and gap coupled antennas are the simplest antennas to design and fabricate, they suffer from narrow bandwidths. The electromagnetically coupled antenna, on the other hand, allows the flexibility of using a low permittivity substrate for the patch radiator, while using HTS for the feed network, thus increasing the bandwidth while effectively utilizing the low loss properties of HTS. Each antenna investigated in this research is the first of its kind reported.

  1. X-ray-absorption spectroscopic investigation of alkali and alkaline earth catalysts in coal gasification. Final report, January 1987-September 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Huggins, F.E.; Shah, N.; Huffman, G.P.

    1990-04-01

    The structures of alkali and alkaline-earth metal catalyst species in lignite and polymer chars and during pyrolysis pretreatment and char gasification have been investigated using ambient and newly-developed, in situ XAFS spectroscopic techniques. The XAFS data, which were obtained at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, were supplemented by char characterization and reactivity measurements made at the Pennsylvania State University. The findings of the investigation are as follows: (i) the catalytic species, as introduced to the char or lignite, is an atomically-dispersed, metal-ion-oxygen-anion complex, and remains a metal-oxygen complex throughout pyrolysis and gasification; (ii) the catalyst species transforms to a bulk oxide species during pyrolysis pretreatment; (iii) during gasification, the catalyst species rapidly transforms to bulk alkali carbonate in the case of the alkali-metal species and slowly to calcium oxide in the case of the calcium species; (iv) higher catalyst loadings results in an increased number of catalytic sites, rather than any structural variation of the catalyst site due to concentration effects; and (v) reaction of alkali with aluminosilicates (from clays) or silica is the major catalyst poisoning reaction, unless the coal is demineralized in which case the alkali may react with residual halide from HCl or HF used to clean the coal. Such poisoning reactions were not demonstrated for calcium-oxygen species.

  2. Final work plan : phase I investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Montgomery City, Missouri.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-08-16

    From September 1949 until September 1966, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) leased property at the southeastern end of Montgomery City, Missouri, for the operation of a grain storage facility. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In January 2000, carbon tetrachloride was detected in a soil sample (220 {micro}g/kg) and two soil gas samples (58 {micro}g/m{sup 3} and 550 {micro}g/m{sup 3}) collected at the former CCC/USDA facility, as a result of a pre-CERCLIS site screening investigation (SSI) performed by TN & Associates, Inc., on behalf of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region VII (MoDNR 2001). In June 2001, the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR) conducted further sampling of the soils and groundwater at the former CCC/USDA facility as part of a preliminary assessment/site inspection (PA/SI). The MoDNR confirmed the presence of carbon tetrachloride (at a maximum identified concentration of 2,810 {micro}g/kg) and chloroform (maximum 82 {micro}g/kg) in the soils and also detected carbon tetrachloride and chloroform (42.2 {micro}g/L and 58.4 {micro}g/L, respectively) in a groundwater sample collected at the former facility (MoDNR 2001). The carbon tetrachloride levels identified in the soils and groundwater are above the default target level (DTL) values established by the MoDNR for this contaminant in soils of all types (79.6 {micro}g/kg) and in groundwater (5.0 {micro}g/L), as outlined in Missouri Risk-Based Corrective Action (MRBCA): Departmental Technical Guidance (MoDNR 2006a). The corresponding MRBCA DTL values for chloroform are 76.6 {micro}g/kg in soils of all types and 80 {micro}g/L in groundwater. Because the observed contamination at Montgomery City might be linked to the past use of carbon tetrachloride-based fumigants at its

  3. Final work plan : Phase I investigation of potential contamination at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Savannah, Missouri.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-10-12

    From approximately 1949 until 1970, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility on federally owned property approximately 0.25 mi northwest of Savannah, Missouri. During this time, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the private grain storage industry to preserve grain in their facilities. In November 1998, carbon tetrachloride was detected in a private well (Morgan) roughly 50 ft south of the former CCC/USDA facility, as a result of state-wide screening of private wells near former CCC/USDA facilities, conducted in Missouri by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1999). The 1998 and subsequent investigations by the EPA and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MoDNR) confirmed the presence of carbon tetrachloride in the Morgan well, as well as in a second well (on property currently occupied by the Missouri Department of Transportation [MoDOT]), approximately 400 ft east of the former CCC/USDA facility. Carbon tetrachloride concentrations in the Morgan well have ranged from the initial value of 29 {micro}g/L in 1998, up to a maximum of 61 {micro}g/L in 1999, and back down to 22 {micro}g/L in 2005. The carbon tetrachloride concentration in the MoDOT well in 2000 (the only time it was sampled) was 321 {micro}g/L. The concentrations for the two wells are above the EPA maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L for carbon tetrachloride (EPA 1999; MoDNR 2000a,b). Because the observed contamination in the Morgan and MoDOT wells might be linked to the past use of carbon tetrachloride-based grain fumigants at its former grain storage facility, the CCC/USDA will conduct investigations to (1) characterize the source(s), extent, and factors controlling the subsurface distribution and movement of carbon tetrachloride at Savannah and (2) evaluate the health and environmental threats potentially posed by the contamination

  4. Investigation of Head Burns in Adult Salmonids : Phase 1, Examination of Fish at Lookingglass Hatchery in 1996 : Addendum to Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Groberg, Warren J.

    1996-11-01

    This information is an addendum to the report 'Investigation of Head Burns in Adult Salmonids, Phase 1: Examination of Fish at Lower Granite Dam, July 2, 1996' by Ralph Elston because there may be relevant observations included here. The author of this document participated in the examinations at Lower Granite Dam described in that report. Because of Endangered Species Act issues, the Rapid River stock of spring chinook salmon reared at Lookingglass Hatchery on the Grande Ronde River in northeastern Oregon are annually being captured as returning adults at Lower Granite Dam on the Snake River and trucked to Lookingglass. During the peak migration period they are held in an adult holding facility at Lower Granite for as long as 72 hours and then transported by truck to Lookingglass for holding in an adult pond for spawning. In 1996 a total of 572 adults were transported from Lower Granite Dam between May 3 and August 6. Two-hundred eighty-one of these were later transported from Lookingglass to Wallowa Hatchery for artificial spawning and the remaining 291 were held for spawning at Lookingglass. On May 21, 24, 30 and June 2, 1996 hatchery personnel identified a total of 32 off-loaded fish with lesions on the dorsal area of the head they described as having the appearance of blisters (Robert Lund personal communication). By date these are shown in Table 1 (fish with similar lesions were also observed on May 27 but the number of these was not recorded). Such lesions were not observed on fish offloaded on any other dates. On May 24, 1996 hatchery personnel took photographs of fish with these lesions but do to light-meter problems the photographs did not turn out. On June 28, 1996 personnel of the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) Fish Pathology laboratory in La Grande were notified by James Lauman, ODFW Northeast Region supervisor, of discussions and concerns of head burn on returning adult chinook while he was on a visitation to Lower Granite Dam. That led

  5. An investigation of the effects of smoke suppressant fuel additives on engine and test cell exhaust gas opacities. Final report for 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Thornburg, D.W.; Darnell, T.R.; Netzer, D.W.

    1982-05-01

    Tests were conducted in a one-eighth scale turbojet test cell with a ramjet type combustor to investigate the effects of fuel additives on smoke reduction. Particle size and mass concentrations were determined at the engine and stack exhausts using three wavelength optical detector systems. Particulate samples were also collected at the engine exhaust and analyzed with a scanning electron microscope. Combustor temperature and fuel additives were found to significantly affect particulate mass concentrations emitted from the engine while particle size appeared to be unaffected. No significant changes in the particulate size or mass occurred from the engine exhaust to the stack exhaust. The optical determination of exhaust mean particulate size/mass concentration with three wavelength optical detector systems appears to be reasonably accurate technique for evaluating the effects of engine and test cell operating conditions and fuel composition changes on the emitted particulates.

  6. Laboratory investigations of cascade crossflow packed towers for air stripping of volatile organics from ground-water. Final report, 21 Apr 86-24 Aug 89

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, D.P.; Valsaraj, K.T.; Thibodeaus, L.J.

    1990-12-01

    This report evaluates the effectiveness of a cascade crossflow air stripper for the removal of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) from simulated groundwater. Experimental tests were conducted on four VOCs-methylene chloride, chloroform, 1,2-dichloroethane and carbon tetrachloride - on both a 6-inch internal diameter laboratory scale column and a 12-inch internal diameter pilot-scale column. The additional variable, alpha, which is the ratio of gas to liquid flow areas was investigated. Experimental data on stripping efficiencies were used to obtain mass transfer coefficients in crossflow operation. These mass transfer coefficients were compared with literature correlations obtained for conventional countercurrent operation, but modified appropriately for crossflow. For liquid phase controlled chemicals, the modified Onda's correlation satisfactorily predicted the crossflow mass transfer coefficient.

  7. Fermi Guest Investigator Program Cycle 2 Project Final Report Albedo Polarimetry of Gamma-Ray Bursts and Solar Flares with GBM

    SciTech Connect

    Kippen, Richard Marc

    2012-08-27

    Several key properties of GRBs remain poorly understood and are difficult or even impossible to infer with the information currently being collected. Polarization measurements will probe the precise nature of the central engine. For solar flares, high-energy polarization measurements are expected to be useful in determining the beaming (or directivity) of solar flare electrons - a quantity that may provide important clues about electron acceleration and transport. We propose to investigate the viability of using the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) to measure the polarization of GRBs and solar flares using the albedo photon flux. This approach was previously developed for use with BATSE data. We will conduct a careful study of this technique using a modified version of the GRESS simulation tools developed by the GBM team.

  8. An Investigation of Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Sonochemistry for Destruction of Hazardous Waste - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 09/14/2000

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Inez

    2000-09-14

    During the last 20 years, various legislative acts have mandated the reduction and elimination of water and land pollution. In order to fulfill these mandates, effective control and remediation methods must be developed and implemented. The drawbacks of current hazardous waste control methods motivate the development of new technology, and the need for new technology is further driven by the large number of polluted sites across the country. This research explores the application and optimization of ultrasonic waves as a novel method by which aqueous contaminants are degraded. The primary objective of the investigation is to acquire a deeper fundamental knowledge of acoustic cavitation and cavitation chemistry, and in doing so, to ascertain how ultrasonic irradiation can be more effectively applied to environmental problems. Special consideration is given to the types of problems and hazardous chemical substrates found specifically at Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The experimental work is divided into five broad tasks, to be completed over a period of three years. The first task is to explore the significance of physical variables during sonolysis, such as ultrasonic frequency. The second aim is an understanding of sonochemical degradation kinetics and by-products, complemented by information from the detection of reactive intermediates with electron paramagnetic resonance. The sonolytic decomposition studies will focus on polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Investigation of activated carbon regeneration during ultrasonic irradiation extends sonochemical applications in homogeneous systems to heterogeneous systems of environmental interest. Lastly, the physics and hydrodynamics of cavitation bubbles and bubble clouds will be correlated with sonochemical effects by performing high-speed photographic studies of acoustically cavitating aqueous solutions. The most important benefit will be fundamental information which will allow a more optimal application of

  9. Investigation of methods for updating ionospheric scintillation models using topside in situ plasma density measurements. Final report, 1 May 1990-30 April 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Secan, J.A.

    1993-05-01

    Modern military communication, navigation, and surveillance systems depend on reliable, noise free transionospheric radio-frequency channels and can be severely impacted by small-scale electron-density irregularities in the ionosphere. This report summarizes the results of a three year investigation into the methods for updating ionospheric scintillation models using observations of ionospheric plasma-density irregularities measured by the DMSP Scintillation Meter (SM) sensor. Results are reported from the analysis of data from a campaign conducted in January 1990 near Tromso, Norway, in which near coincident in-situ plasma-density and transionospheric scintillation measurements were made. Estimates for the level of intensity and phase scintillation on a transionospheric UBF radio link in the early-evening auroral zone were calculated from DMSP SM data and compared to the levels actually observed. Results are also presented from a comparison with scintillation observations made with a coincident DNA Polar BEAR satellite pass. Ionosphere, Ionospheric Scintillation, Radiowave Scintillation, Defense Meteorology Satellite Program (DMSP).

  10. Investigation of the irradiation-swelling mechanisms in refractory metals at high temperatures. Final scientific report, 1 March 1985-31 July 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Bajaj, R.; Hall, B.O.; Fenske, G.R.; Greggi, J.C.; Taylor, A.T.

    1989-06-01

    This report presents the results of an investigation of elevated-temperature irradiation swelling in refractory metals with an objective of understanding swelling mechanisms in these materials and demonstrating practicality of swelling-resistant materials. The study was divided into three phases. During the first phase, a theoretical model was developed for the swelling in body-centered cubic (bcc) metals. The model was based on chemical reaction rate formalism. Calculations were carried out on on a model material, niobium, which was selected for the study. Experimental and theoretical work was conducted to determine the swelling mechanism. Niobium was irradiated with Nb(++) ions to a dose of 50 dpa and swelling was determined by transmission electron microscopy. A peak swelling at 900C of 7% was observed. No swelling was observed above 1300C. The experimental data were compared to those predicted by the theoretical model. Reasonable agreements were obtained between the experimental and theoretical swelling curve when niobium-oxygen interaction was included. Sink-strength ratios were also calculated from the data. The theoretical model was extended during the second phase to include loop growth/shrinkage in bcc metals. During the third phase of the program, two alloys, Nb-5Hf and Nb-5W, were irradiated with Nb(++) alone and with Nb(++) + He(+) over a temperature range of 800 - 1350C. (AW)

  11. Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 1 -- Base program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, V.E.

    1994-05-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

  12. Investigation of Great Basin big sagebrush and black greasewood as biogeochemical indicators of uranium mineralization. Final report. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Diebold, F.E.; McGrath, S.

    1982-11-01

    The effects of varying phosphate concentrations in natural aqueous systems upon the uptake of uranium by big sagebrush (Artemesia tridentata subsp. tridentata) and black greasewood (Sarcobatus vermiculatus (Hook) Torr.) were investigated. Two separate growth experiments with five drip-flow hyroponic units were used and plant seedlings were grown for 60 days in solutions of varying phosphate and uranium concentrations. Successful growth experiments were obtained only for big sagebrush; black greasewood did not sustain sufficient growth. The phosphate concentration of the water did affect the uptake of uranium by the big sagebrush, and this effect is most pronounced in the region of higher concentrations of uranium in the water. The ratio of the concentration of uranium in the plant to that in the water was observed to decrease with increasing uranium concentration in solution. This is indicative of an absorption barrier in the plants. The field data shows that big sagebrush responds to uranium concentrations in the soil water and not the groundwater. The manifestation of these results is that the use of big sagebrush as a biogeochemical indicator of uranium is not recommended. Since the concentration of phosphate must also be knwon in the water supplying the uranium to the plant, one should analyze this natural aqueous phase as a hydrochemical indicator rather than the big sagebrush.

  13. Experimental Investigation of Magnetic, Superconducting, and other Phase Transitions in novel F-Electron Materials at Ultra-high Pressures - Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Maple, Brian; Jeffires, Jason

    2006-07-28

    This grant, entitled “Experimental investigation of magnetic, superconducting and other phase transitions in novel f-electron materials at ultrahigh pressures,” spanned the funding period from May 1st, 2003 until April 30th, 2006. The major goal of this grant was to develop and utilize an ultrahigh pressure facility—capable of achieving very low temperatures, high magnetic fields, and extreme pressures as well as providing electrical resistivity, ac susceptibility, and magnetization measurement capabilities under pressure—for the exploration of magnetic, electronic, and structural phases and any corresponding interactions between these states in novel f-electron materials. Realizing this goal required the acquisition, development, fabrication, and implementation of essential equipment, apparatuses, and techniques. The following sections of this report detail the establishment of an ultrahigh pressure facility (Section 1) and measurements performed during the funding period (Section 2), as well as summarize the research project (Section 3), project participants and their levels of support (Section 4), and publications and presentations (Section 5).

  14. Investigation into environmentally friendly alternative cleaning processes for hybrid microcircuits to replace vapor degreasing with 1,1,1-trichloroethane. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, B.E.

    1997-02-01

    Two cleaning processes, one aqueous and one nonaqueous, were investigated as potential replacements for the vapor degreasing process using 1,1,1 trichloroethane (TCA) for hybrid microcircuit assemblies. The aqueous process was based upon saponification chemistry. A 10% solution of either Kester 5768 or Armakleen 2001, heated to 140 F, was sprayed on the hybrid at 450 psig and a flow rate of 5 gpm through a specially designed nozzle which created microdroplets. The nonaqueous process was based upon dissolution chemistry and used d-limonene as the solvent in an immersion and spray process. The d-limonene solvent was followed by an isopropyl alcohol spray rinse to remove the excess d-limonene. The aqueous microdroplet process was found to be successful only for solder reflow profiles that did not exceed 210 C. Furthermore, removal of component marking was a problem and the spray pressure had to be reduced to 130 psig to eliminate damage to capacitor end caps. The d-limonene cleaning was found to be successful for solder reflow temperature up to 250 C when using a four-step cleaning process. The four steps included refluxing the hybrid at 80 C, followed by soaking the hybrid in d-limonene which is heated to 80 C, followed by spray cleaning at 80 psig with room temperature d-limonene, followed by spray cleaning at 80 psig with room temperature IPA was developed to remove residual flux from the hybrid microcircuits. This process was the most robust and most closely matched the cleaning ability of TCA.

  15. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    DeTar, Carleton

    2012-12-10

    This document constitutes the Final Report for award DE-FC02-06ER41446 as required by the Office of Science. It summarizes accomplishments and provides copies of scientific publications with significant contribution from this award.

  16. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gurney, Kevin R.

    2015-01-12

    This document constitutes the final report under DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649. The organization of this document is as follows: first, I will review the original scope of the proposed research. Second, I will present the current draft of a paper nearing submission to Nature Climate Change on the initial results of this funded effort. Finally, I will present the last phase of the research under this grant which has supported a Ph.D. student. To that end, I will present the graduate student’s proposed research, a portion of which is completed and reflected in the paper nearing submission. This final work phase will be completed in the next 12 months. This final workphase will likely result in 1-2 additional publications and we consider the results (as exemplified by the current paper) high quality. The continuing results will acknowledge the funding provided by DOE grant DE-FG-08ER64649.

  17. Assessment of carbon dioxide sink/source in the oceanic areas: the results of 1982-84 investigation. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, T.; Chipman, D.W.; Smethie, W. Jr.; Goddard, J.; Trumbore, S.; Mathieu, G.G.; Sutherland, S.

    1985-07-01

    The oceanic CO/sub 2/ sink/source relationships over the tropical Atlantic Ocean, the eastern North and South Pacific Ocean, and the Ross Sea were investigated. The net CO/sub 2/ flux across the air-sea interface over these areas was estimated. Measurements of the Kr-85 in atmospheric samples collected over the central Pacific along the 155/sup 0/W meridian were initiated. Based on the measurements of the difference between the pCO/sub 2/ values in the surface ocean water and the atmosphere and of the radon-222 distribution in the upper water column, we have found that the average net flux for the Atlantic equatorial belt, 10/sup 0/N-10/sup 0/S, is 1.3 moles CO/sub 2//m/sup 2/.y out of the ocean, when our measurements were made in November 1982 through February 1983. The surface water pCO/sub 2/ data obtained over the eastern North and South Pacific during the period, October 1983 through January 1984, show that the equatorial zone between 2/sup 0/N and 8/sup 0/S is an intense CO/sub 2/ source area, whereas a 10/sup 0/ wide belt coinciding with the area between the Subtropical and Antarctic Convergence Zones is a strong CO/sub 2/ sink area. The temperate gyre area located north of about 5/sup 0/N and that located between 8/sup 0/S and 35/sup 0/S are nearly in equilibrium with atmospheric CO/sub 2/. The surface water pCO/sub 2/ data obtained in the Southern Ocean during the past ten or more years suggest strongly the existence of an intense CO/sub 2/ sink zone, the Circumpolar Low pCO/sub 2/ Zone, which is about 10/sup 0/ wide in latitude and centered at about 50/sup 0/S surrounding the Antarctica Continent. The surface water of the Ross Sea is found to be a strong CO/sub 2/ sink during the period January 23 through February 12, 1984. Because of contamination problems, no reliable data for atmospheric krypton-85 have been obtained. 23 refs., 22 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. DOE/SC0001389 Final technical report: Investigation of uranium attenuation and release at column and pore scales in response to advective geochemical gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Savage, Kaye S.; Zhu, Wenyi; Barnett, Mark O.

    2013-05-13

    Experimental approach Column experiments were devised to investigate the role of changing fluid composition on mobility of uranium through a sequence of geologic media. Fluids and media were chosen to be relevant to the ground water plume emanating from the former S-3 ponds at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFC) site. Synthetic ground waters were pumped upwards at 0.05 mL/minute for 21 days through layers of quartz sand alternating with layers of uncontaminated soil, quartz sand mixed with illite, quartz sand coated with iron oxides, and another soil layer. Increases in pH or concentration of phosphate, bicarbonate, or acetate were imposed on the influent solutions after each 7 pore volumes while uranium (as uranyl) remained constant at 0.1mM. A control column maintained the original synthetic groundwater composition with 0.1mM U. Pore water solutions were extracted to assess U retention and release in relation to the advective ligand or pH gradients. Following the column experiments, subsamples from each layer were characterized using microbeam X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with X-ray fluorescence mapping and compared to sediment core samples from the ORIFC, at SSRL Beam Line 2-3. Results U retention of 55-67mg occurred in phosphate >pH >control >acetate >carbonate columns. The mass of U retained in the first-encountered quartz layer in all columns was highest and increased throughout the experiment. The rate of increase in acetate- and bicarbonate-bearing columns declined after ligand concentrations were raised. U also accumulated in the first soil layer; the pH-varied column retained most, followed by the increasing-bicarbonate column. The mass of U retained in the upper layers was far lower. Speciation of U, interpreted from microbeam XANES spectra and XRF maps, varied within and among the columns. Evidence of minor reduction to U(IV) was observed in the first-encountered quartz layer in the phosphate, bicarbonate

  19. Final Technical Report for 'Investigations of the Role of Protozoa in Transformations of Marine Biopolymers using Phaeocytis Polymer Gels as a Model'

    SciTech Connect

    Lessard, Evelyn

    2003-04-01

    protists are able to use the polymer for nutrition and growth. This is the first demonstration of the ingestion and utilization of a natural marine biopolymer by protists. We also isolated three bacterial strains from our Phaeocystis cultures. All three bacterial strains were capable of growing solely on the polymer gels produced by Phaeocystis without added inorganic nitrogen sources. We used the bacterial and protist strains to investigate degradation and alterations (size, chemical composition) of Phaeocystis polymer gels by bacteria alone and in the presence of protists. In a typical experiment, bacterial abundance in the presence of protists was reduced to one third of that in the control due to grazing, but the degradation rate was about the same. This indicates either that grazing by the protist somehow enhanced the per cell rate of bacterial degradation and/or the protist was ingesting polymer directly. Residual polymer remained after weeks, but the mean the mean diameter of the polymers were shortened considerably to ca. 200 nm. These results, along with other lines of evidence, suggest that it may be the length of polymer that limits degradation, which has important implications for the large pool of refractory DOM in the oceans. Chemical analyses indicated that the polymers are carbohydrate-rich and that the nitrogen is not proteinaceous, but most likely in the form of low molecular weight compounds such as amino sugars or sialic acid, and that they had a surprisingly low C:N ratios (<9). Extracellular polymers may therefore provide a nutritional substrate for bacteria and protists without the need for other sources of nitrogen in nature.

  20. PEM Degradation Investigation Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Stevenson; Lee H Spangler

    2007-11-02

    The objectives of this paper are: (1) Develop a system capable of measuring current and voltage performance for each membrane in a Polymer Electrolyte Membranes (PEM) fuel cell stack and record the performance of each individual cell; (2) Develop a single cell PEM FC to allow in situ synchrotron x-ray measurements of the cell in operation and to perform spatially resolved x-ray measurements on fuel cell elements before and after degradation; and (3) Perform initial magnetic resonance microimaging experiments on membrane materials. The Montana State University PEM Membrane Degradation program is geared towards determining how and why membranes in fuel cells degrade and fail. By monitoring every individual membrane in a fuel cell 2000 times/sec while the cell is subjected to real-world type use, we hope to: (1) cause the types of degradation users see, but in a controlled environment; (2) determine an electrical signature that will identify what causes failure, or at least warns of impending failure; (3) allows us to perform advanced x-ray and MRI characterization of the degraded membranes to provide information that may result in improvements of the membrane material; and (4) perhaps allow design of electronic control systems that will prevent fuel cells from operating under conditions where damage is likely to occur.

  1. PEM Degradation Investigation Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Stevenson; Lee H Spangler

    2010-10-18

    This project conducted fundamental studies of PEM MEA degradation. Insights gained from these studies were disseminated to assist MEA manufacturers in understanding degradation mechanisms and work towards DOE 2010 fuel cell durability targets.

  2. Final Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bers, Trudy

    2012-01-01

    This final chapter provides observations about institutional research in community colleges derived from the preceding chapters and the issue editors' own experiences. Taken as a whole, the chapters in this issue, as well as the editors' experiences, suggest several observations about institutional research in community colleges. These include the…

  3. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Marchant, Gary E.

    2013-04-23

    This is the final report of a two year project entitled "Governing Nanotechnology Risks and Benefits in the Transition to Regulation: Innovative Public and Private Approaches." This project examined the role of new governance or "soft law" mechanisms such as codes of conduct, voluntary programs and partnership agreements to manage the risks of emerging technologies such as nanotechnology. A series of published or in publication papers and book chapters are attached.

  4. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    R Paul Drake

    2004-01-12

    OAK-B135 This is the final report from the project Hydrodynamics by High-Energy-Density Plasma Flow and Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications. This project supported a group at the University of Michigan in the invention, design, performance, and analysis of experiments using high-energy-density research facilities. The experiments explored compressible nonlinear hydrodynamics, in particular at decelerating interfaces, and the radiation hydrodynamics of strong shock waves. It has application to supernovae, astrophysical jets, shock-cloud interactions, and radiative shock waves.

  5. FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Kanai S. Shah

    2003-08-07

    Current and next generation experiments in nuclear and particle physics require detectors with high spatial resolution, fast response, and accurate energy information. In many nuclear physics experiments, existing detector technology is the limiting factor. The proposed project aims to investigate a promising detector concept that will have wide applicability in particle physics and many other applications.

  6. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, Robert C.; Kamon, Teruki; Toback, David; Safonov, Alexei; Dutta, Bhaskar; Dimitri, Nanopoulos; Pope, Christopher; White, James

    2013-11-18

    Overview The High Energy Physics Group at Texas A&M University is submitting this final report for our grant number DE-FG02-95ER40917. This grant has supported our wide range of research activities for over a decade. The reports contained here summarize the latest work done by our research team. Task A (Collider Physics Program): CMS & CDF Profs. T. Kamon, A. Safonov, and D. Toback co-lead the Texas A&M (TAMU) collider program focusing on CDF and CMS experiments. Task D: Particle Physics Theory Our particle physics theory task is the combined effort of Profs. B. Dutta, D. Nanopoulos, and C. Pope. Task E (Underground Physics): LUX & NEXT Profs. R. Webb and J. White(deceased) lead the Xenon-based underground research program consisting of two main thrusts: the first, participation in the LUX two-phase xenon dark matter search experiment and the second, detector R&D primarily aimed at developing future detectors for underground physics (e.g. NEXT and LZ).

  7. Fire investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomberg, A.

    There was considerable progress made on several fronts of fire investigation in the United States in recent years. Progress was made in increasing the quantity of fire investigation and reporting, through efforts to develop the National Fire Incident Reporting System. Improving overall quality of fire investigation is the objective of efforts such as the Fire Investigation Handbook, which was developed and published by the National Bureau of Standards, and the upgrading and expanding of the ""dictionary'' of fire investigation and reporting, the NFPA 901, Uniform Coding for Fire Protection, system. The science of fire investigation as furthered also by new approaches to post fire interviews being developed at the University of Washington, and by in-depth research into factors involved in several large loss fires, including the MGM Grand Hotel in Las Vegas. Finally, the use of special study fire investigations - in-depth investigations concentrating on specific fire problems - is producing new glimpses into the nature of the national fire problem. A brief description of the status of efforts in each of these areas is discussed.

  8. Investigation Organizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panontin, Tina; Carvalho, Robert; Keller, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Contents include the folloving:Overview of the Application; Input Data; Analytical Process; Tool's Output; and Application of the Results of the Analysis.The tool enables the first element through a Web-based application that can be accessed by distributed teams to store and retrieve any type of digital investigation material in a secure environment. The second is accomplished by making the relationships between information explicit through the use of a semantic network-a structure that literally allows an investigator or team to "connect -the-dots." The third element, the significance of the correlated information, is established through causality and consistency tests using a number of different methods embedded within the tool, including fault trees, event sequences, and other accident models. And finally, the evidence gathered and structured within the tool can be directly, electronically archived to preserve the evidence and investigative reasoning.

  9. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, Fred C.

    2003-01-15

    species of flagellates, Spumella sp. and Bodo sp. (identifications are tentative) were isolated from South Oyster sediments by repetitive serial dilution/extinction method. Protistan cells were cultured with Cereal leaf Prescott medium and pelleted by centrifugation. Protistan DNAs were extracted with a DNA extraction kit (Sigma Co.) and the sequencing of their SSrDNA is underway. Finally, to follow up on our collaboration of Dr. Bill Johnson (Univ. of Utah), one of the co-PIs under the same NABIR umbrella, we are pleased to report we have successfully tested antibody-ferrographic capture of protists (See previous year's report for more background). Polyclonal FITC-conjugated antibody specific for a flagellate, Spumella sp., was produced by Rockland Inc., and we now are able to enumerate that species using ferrographic capture. There are, however, some issues of non-specific staining that remain to be resolved.

  10. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph H. Simmons; Tracie J. Bukowski

    2002-08-07

    This grant was a continuation of research conducted at the University of Florida under Grant No. DE-FG05-91ER45462 in which we investigated the energy bandgap shifts produced in semiconductor quantum dots of sizes between 1.5 and 40 nm. The investigated semiconductors consisted of a series of Column 2-6 compounds (CdS, CdSe, CdTe) and pure Column IV elements (Si and Ge). It is well-known of course that the 2-6 semiconductors possess a direct-gap electronic structure, while the Column IV elements possess an indirect-gap structure. The investigation showed a major difference in quantum confinement behavior between the two sets of semiconductors. This difference is essentially associated with the change in bandgap energy resulting from size confinement. In the direct-gap semiconductors, the change in energy (blue shift) saturates when the crystals approach 2-3 nm in diameter. This limits the observed shift in energy to less than 1 eV above the bulk value. In the indirect-gap semiconductors, the energy shift does not show any sign of saturation and in fact, we produced Si and Ge nanocrystals with absorption edges in the UV. The reason for this difference has not been determined and will require additional experimental and theoretical studies. In our work, we suggest, but do not prove that mixing of conduction band side valleys with the central valley under conditions of size confinement may be responsible for the saturation in the blue-shift of direct-gap semiconductors. The discovery of large bandgap energy shifts with crystal size prompted us to suggest that these materials may be used to form photovoltaic cells with multi-gap layers for high efficiency in a U.S. Patent issued in 1998. However, this possibility depends strongly on the ability to collect photoexcited carriers from energy-confined crystals. The research conducted at the University of Arizona under the subject grant had a major goal of testing an indirect gap semiconductor in size-confined structures to

  11. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Michael C. Weinberg; Lori L. Burgner; Joseph H. Simmons

    2003-05-23

    OAK B135 The formation of metastable crystalline phases in lithium disilicate glass has been a subject of controversy for decades. Here, one aspect of this problem relating to the stability of these non-equilibrium phases when glasses are heated for extended time periods in the nucleation regime is addressed. The results of a systematic experimental investigation on the persistence of metastable phases and the factors that may influence the appearance of such phases, e.g., water content, impurities, glass composition, and glass preparation procedure are presented. Growth rates of lithium disilicate crystals in lithium disilicate glass are measured as a function water concentration in the glass and of temperature in the deeply undercooled regime. The growth rate data obtained in this work are combined with data reported in the literature and used to assess the applicability of standard models of crystal growth for the description of experimental results over a very broad temperature range. The reduced growth rate versus undercooling graph is found to consist of three regimes. For undercoolings less than 140°C, the reduced growth rate curve is suggestive of either 2-D surface nucleation or screw dislocation growth. For undercoolings greater than 400°C, the reduced growth rate plot suggests the operative crystal growth mechanism is 2-D surface nucleation, but detailed calculations cast doubt upon this conclusion. In the intermediate undercooling range, there appears to be some sort of transitional behavior for which none of the standard models appear to be applicable. Further, it is observed that small differences in the viscosity data employed can produce enormous differences in the predicted growth rates at larger undercoolings. Results of the kinetic analyses conducted herein seem to indicate that the nature of the kinetic rate coefficient used in the standard growth models may be incorrect. Nucleation rates of sodium metasilicate crystals in a sodium silicate

  12. FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Horn, Mark W; McDaniel, Anthony; Schweighardt, Frank K

    2003-05-23

    In this program the teams at Penn State University (PSU), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), DCH Technology (DCHT), and Air Products and Chemicals Inc. (APCI), have aggressively pursued engineering solutions to eliminate barriers to solid-state chemiresistor hydrogen sensor technology. The metallurgical effects of alloying palladium with nickel have been shown to prevent phase transitions in the thin films at high H2 overpressures, making the devices more suitable for IOF process conditions. We investigated the use of thin, semi-permeable membranes that protect the catalytic surface from poisoning or other undesirable surface reactions that would otherwise reduce sensitivity or operability in harsh IOF process environments. The results of this project have provided new insight into the effects of metallurgy and protective coatings on device behavior, and open new avenues for research in this field. Commercialization of this sensor technology could be easily achieved, although not yet realized. The benefits to society, once this technology is commercialized, is a dramatic cost and energy savings to the industry, which employs these sensors. In addition, the fundamental understandings gained in this program could have an impact on both cost and safety in the future hydrogen economy utilizing hydrogen fuel cells and hydrogen storage.

  13. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Benson

    2012-09-24

    This project combines outcrop-scale heterogeneity characterization, laboratory experiments, and numerical simulations. The study is designed to test whether established dispersion theory accurately predicts the behavior of solute transport through heterogeneous media and to investigate the relationship between heterogeneity and the parameters that populate these models. The dispersion theory tested by this work is based upon the fractional advection-dispersion equation (fADE) model. Unlike most dispersion studies that develop a solute transport model by fitting the solute transport breakthrough curve, this project will explore the nature of the heterogeneous media to better understand the connection between the model parameters and the aquifer heterogeneity. Our work at the Colorado School of Mines was focused on the following questions: 1) What are the effects of multi-scale geologic variability on transport of conservative and reactive solutes? 2) Can those transport effects be accounted for by classical methods, and if not, can the nonlocal fractional-order equations provide better predictions? 3) Can the fractional-order equations be parameterized through a link to some simple observable geologic features? 4) Are the classical equations of transport and reaction sufficient? 5) What is the effect of anomalous transport on chemical reaction in groundwater systems? The work is predicated on the observation that upscaled transport is defined by loss of information, or spatio-temporal averaging. This averaging tends to make the transport laws such as Fick's 2nd-order diffusion equation similar to central limit theory. The fractional-order advection-dispersion equations rely on limit theory for heavy-tailed random motion that has some diverging moments. The equations predict larger tails of a plume in space and/or time than those predicted by the classical 2nd-order advection-dispersion equation. The heavy tails are often seen in plumes at field sites.

  14. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hollingsworth, Jeff

    2014-07-31

    The purpose of this project was to develop tools and techniques to improve the ability of computational scientists to investigate and correct problems (bugs) in their programs. Specifically, the University of Maryland component of this project focused on the problems associated with the finite number of bits available in a computer to represent numeric values. In large scale scientific computation, numbers are frequently added to and multiplied with each other billions of times. Thus even small errors due to the representation of numbers can accumulate into big errors. However, using too many bits to represent a number results in additional computation, memory, and energy costs. Thus it is critical to find the right size for numbers. This project focused on several aspects of this general problem. First, we developed a tool to look for cancelations, the catastrophic loss of precision in numbers due to the addition of two numbers whose actual values are close to each other, but whose representation in a computer is identical or nearly so. Second, we developed a suite of tools to allow programmers to identify exactly how much precision is required for each operation in their program. This tool allows programmers to both verify that enough precision is available, but more importantly find cases where extra precision could be eliminated to allow the program to use less memory, computer time, or energy. These tools use advanced binary modification techniques to allow the analysis of actual optimized code. The system, called Craft, has been applied to a number of benchmarks and real applications.

  15. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hameed A. Naseem, Husam H. Abu-Safe

    2007-02-09

    The purpose of this project was to investigate metal-induced crystallization of amorphous silicon at low temperatures using excitation sources such as laser and rapid thermal annealing, as well as, electric field. Deposition of high quality crystalline silicon at low temperatures allows the use of low cost soda-lime glass and polymeric films for economically viable photovoltaic solar cells and low cost large area flat panel displays. In light of current and expected demands on Si supply due to expanding use of consumer electronic products throughout the world and the incessant demand for electric power the need for developing high grade Si thin films on low cost substrate becomes even more important. We used hydrogenated and un-hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and sputtering techniques (both of which are extensively used in electronic and solar cell industries) to fabricate nano-crystalline, poly-crystalline (small as well as large grain), and single-crystalline (epitaxial) films at low temperatures. We demonstrated Si nanowires on flat surfaces that can be used for fabricating nanometer scale transistors. We also demonstrated lateral crystallization using Al with and without an applied electric field. These results are critical for high mobility thin film transistors (TFT) for large area display applications. Large grain silicon (~30-50 µm grain size for < 0.5 µm thick films) was demonstrated on glass substrates at low temperatures. We also demonstrated epitaxial growth of silicon on (100) Si substrates at temperatures as low as 450°C. Thin film Si solar cells are being projected as the material of choice for low cost high efficiency solar cells when properly coupled with excellent light-trapping schemes. Ar ion laser (CW) was shown to produce dendritic nanowire structures at low power whereas at higher powers yielded continuous polycrystalline films. The power density required for films in contact with Al

  16. FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Juergen Eckert; Anthony K. Cheetham

    2011-03-11

    Hydrogen storage systems based on the readily reversible adsorption of H{sub 2} in porous materials have a number of very attractive properties with the potential to provide superior performance among candidate materials currently being investigated were it not for the fact that the interaction of H{sub 2} with the host material is too weak to permit viable operation at room temperature. Our study has delineated in quantitative detail the structural elements which we believe to be the essential ingredients for the future synthesis of porous materials, where guest-host interactions are intermediate between those found in the carbons and the metal hydrides, i.e. between physisorption and chemisorption, which will result in H{sub 2} binding energies required for room temperature operation. The ability to produce porous materials with much improved hydrogen binding energies depends critically on detailed molecular level analysis of hydrogen binding in such materials. However, characterization of H{sub 2} sorption is almost exclusively carried by thermodynamic measurements, which give average properties for all the sites occupied by H{sub 2} molecules at a particular loading. We have therefore extensively utilized the most powerful of the few molecular level experimental probes available to probe the interactions of hydrogen with porous materials, namely inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy of the hindered rotations of the hydrogen molecules adsorbed at various sites, which in turn can be interpreted in a very direct way in by computational studies. This technique can relate spectral signatures of various H{sub 2} molecules adsorbed at binding sites with different degrees of interaction. In the course of this project we have synthesized a rather large number of entirely new hybrid materials, which include structural modifications for improved interactions with adsorbed hydrogen. The results of our systematic studies on many porous materials provide detailed

  17. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sobecky, Patricia A; Taillefert, Martial

    2013-03-29

    This final technical report describes results and findings from a research project to examine the role of microbial phosphohydrolase enzymes in naturally occurring subsurface microorganisms for the purpose of promoting the immobilization of the radionuclide uranium through the production of insoluble uranium phosphate minerals. The research project investigated the microbial mechanisms and the physical and chemical processes promoting uranium biomineralization and sequestration in oxygenated subsurface soils. Uranium biomineralization under aerobic conditions can provide a secondary biobarrier strategy to immobilize radionuclides should the metal precipitates formed by microbial dissimilatory mechanisms remobilize due to a change in redox state.

  18. Final focus system for TLC

    SciTech Connect

    Oide, K.

    1988-11-01

    A limit of the chromaticity correction for the final focus system of a TeV Linear Collider (TLC) is investigated. As the result, it becomes possible to increase the aperture of the final doublet with a small increase of the horizontal US function. The new optics design uses a final doublet of 0.5 mm half-aperture and 1.4 T pole-tip field. The length of the system is reduced from 400 m to 200 m by several optics changes. Tolerances for various machine errors with this optics are also studied. 5 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. 20 CFR 636.11 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Final action. 636.11 Section 636.11 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COMPLAINTS, INVESTIGATIONS AND HEARINGS § 636.11 Final action. The final decision of the Secretary pursuant to section 166(b) of the...

  20. From the utilization point of view, the two approaches seem to United States Air Force 611th Air Support Group/Civil Engineering Squadron, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Remedial investigation and feasibility study Point Barrow Radar Installation, Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karmi, S.

    1996-02-19

    This report presents the findings of Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies at sites located at the Point Barrow radar installation in northern Alaska. The sites were characterized based on sampling and analyses conducted during Remedial Investigation activities performed during August and September 1993.

  1. Verb-Final Typology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogihara, Saeko

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation is a typological study of verb-final languages, the purpose of which is to examine various grammatical phenomena in verb-final languages to discover whether there are correlations between the final position of the verb and other aspects of grammar. It examines how finality of the verb interacts with argument coding in simple…

  2. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    John Tanis

    2005-11-25

    This document comprises the final technical report for atomic collisions research supported by DOE grant No. DE-FG02-87ER13778 from September 1, 2001 through August 31, 2004. The research involved the experimental investigation of excitation and charge-changing processes occurring in ion-atom and ion-molecule collisions. Major emphases of the study were: (1) interference effects resulting from coherent electron emission in H2, (2) production of doubly vacant K-shell (hollow ion) states due to electron correlation, and (3) formation of long-lived metastable states in electron transfer processes. During the period of the grant, this research resulted in 23 publications, 12 invited presentations, and 39 contributed presentations at national and international meetings and other institutions. Brief summaries of the completed research are presented below.

  3. An Investigation of the Effects of Vocational, Supportive, and Directive Counseling on the Academic Recovery and Recidivist and Attrition Rates of Male College Students Referred for Disciplinary Offenses. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeMay, Morris Lee

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of specialized individual counseling as a practical method of assisting male college students referred to the Dean of Students for official disciplinary action and to discern what type of technique of counseling offered the best hope for rehabilitation. The major objectives were to see…

  4. A Report of the Special Committee on Investigations of the Select Committee on Indian Affairs. Final Report and Legislative Recommendations. Senate, 101st Congress, 1st Session (November 6, 1989).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs.

    In 1987, the United States Senate established the Special Committee to investigate American Indian affairs. Fraud, corruption, and mismanagement were found pervading the institutions serving American Indians. Corruption was also discovered in Indian tribal governments. The Committee faulted Congress for failing to adequately oversee and reform…

  5. Investigation of blown boundary layers with an improved wall jet system. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Technical Report, 1 Jul. 1978 - Dec. 1979; [to prevent turbulent boundary layer separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saripalli, K. R.; Simpson, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    The behavior of two dimensional incompressible turbulent wall jets submerged in a boundary layer when they are used to prevent boundary layer separation on plane surfaces is investigated. The experimental set-up and instrumentation are described. Experimental results of zero pressure gradient flow and adverse pressure gradient flow are presented. Conclusions are given and discussed.

  6. Type A Accident Investigation Board report on the January 17, 1996, electrical accident with injury in Technical Area 21 Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    An electrical accident was investigated in which a crafts person received serious injuries as a result of coming into contact with a 13.2 kilovolt (kV) electrical cable in the basement of Building 209 in Technical Area 21 (TA-21-209) in the Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility (TSFF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In conducting its investigation, the Accident Investigation Board used various analytical techniques, including events and causal factor analysis, barrier analysis, change analysis, fault tree analysis, materials analysis, and root cause analysis. The board inspected the accident site, reviewed events surrounding the accident, conducted extensive interviews and document reviews, and performed causation analyses to determine the factors that contributed to the accident, including any management system deficiencies. Relevant management systems and factors that could have contributed to the accident were evaluated in accordance with the guiding principles of safety management identified by the Secretary of Energy in an October 1994 letter to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board and subsequently to Congress.

  7. Report on surface geology and groundwater investigations of Mortons and Green Valley Well Fields. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas Project, Converse County, Wyoming; site evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    1982-01-01

    The general region of investigation of this report is in the southern part of the Powder River Basin near the Town of Douglas, Wyoming. Two specific areas within this region were investigated to determine the groundwater potential with drilling and testing programs during the years 1973 to 1975. One area of investigation is located approximately 12 miles west of Douglas in T32 and 33N, R73 and 74W, and is known as the Green Valley Well Field. This area is situated in the foothills of the north end of the Laramie Range and encompasses approximately 25 square miles. In this area the Madison Formation limestone and the Flathead Formation sandstone are the aquifers of interest for groundwater production. The second area is located approximately 13 miles north of Douglas in T34 and 35N, R70 and 71W, and is known as the Mortons Well Field. This area encompasses about 30 square miles. In this area, the Lance Formation and Fox Hills Formation sandstones are the aquifers of interest. Contained within the body of this report are two geologic studies prepared by consulting geologists, Dr. Peter Huntoon and Henry Richter. These studies define the pertinent structural and groundwater geologic features in and in the vicinities of the Mortons and Green Valley Well Fields. A relatively complex structural geology was encountered in the Green Valley area. The study of the Mortons area suggests that the geology of this area is relatively uniform. Inventories of the water users in the vicinities of the two study areas are included at the back of this report in Appendix B. These inventories are comprised of water appropriations as recognized by the Wyoming State Engineer's Office. Both groundwater and surface water appropriations are inventoried within the Green Valley study area. Only groundwater appropriations are inventoried within the Mortons study area.

  8. LDRD Final Report - Investigations of the impact of the process integration of deposited magnetic films for magnetic memory technologies on radiation-hardened CMOS devices and circuits - LDRD Project (FY99)

    SciTech Connect

    MYERS,DAVID R.; JESSING,JEFFREY R.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; SHANEYFELT,MARTY R.

    2000-01-01

    This project represented a coordinated LLNL-SNL collaboration to investigate the feasibility of developing radiation-hardened magnetic non-volatile memories using giant magnetoresistance (GMR) materials. The intent of this limited-duration study was to investigate whether giant magnetoresistance (GMR) materials similar to those used for magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) were process compatible with functioning CMOS circuits. Sandia's work on this project demonstrated that deposition of GMR materials did not affect the operation nor the radiation hardness of Sandia's rad-hard CMOS technology, nor did the integration of GMR materials and exposure to ionizing radiation affect the magnetic properties of the GMR films. Thus, following deposition of GMR films on rad-hard integrated circuits, both the circuits and the films survived ionizing radiation levels consistent with DOE mission requirements. Furthermore, Sandia developed techniques to pattern deposited GMR films without degrading the completed integrated circuits upon which they were deposited. The present feasibility study demonstrated all the necessary processing elements to allow fabrication of the non-volatile memory elements onto an existing CMOS chip, and even allow the use of embedded (on-chip) non-volatile memories for system-on-a-chip applications, even in demanding radiation environments. However, funding agencies DTRA, AIM, and DARPA did not have any funds available to support the required follow-on technology development projects that would have been required to develop functioning prototype circuits, nor were such funds available from LDRD nor from other DOE program funds.

  9. Investigation of the computer modeling of the direct coupling of high explosive energy to the ground for surface tangent--above TNT spheres (100-500 tons). Final report 29 May 79-31 Mar 80

    SciTech Connect

    Thomsen, J.M.

    1980-04-07

    The calculational modeling of the initial coupling of impulse and energy to the ground for large yield (100-500 tons) surface tangent-above spherical TNT cratering calculations was investigated. A pressure-time surface boundary condition was found to be an accurate way of modeling this initial coupling, if the styrofoam/plywood structure supporting the TNT charge is neglected. The specific boundary conditions used in its current baseline Middle Gust III calculation was examined, and compared favorably with ones previously used. No cratering calculations were found which adequately modeled the TNT charge support structure. One-dimensional calculations were performed to assess its effect on the initial coupling. Results showed that inclusion of a reasonable model for the support structure in a two-dimensional cratering calculation would cause higher close-in peak pressures in the soil, while probably not changing the total directly coupled energy or impulse significantly. Two-dimensional effects would predominate in such a calculation, however, and these were not addressed in the present investigation.

  10. Effect of crude oil contamination on some archaeological sites in the Gulf of Alaska, 1991 investigations. Archaeology study number 1. Exxon Valdez oil spill state/federal natural resource damage assessment final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reger, D.R.; McMahan, J.D.; Holmes, C.E.

    1992-08-01

    The 1991 field study investigated the presence of crude oil in 13 intertidal archaeological sites. The study assessed the effect of oiling at those sites on the ability to obtain radiocarbon dates for the archaeological remains. Ages of sites were estimated based on the types of artifacts recovered from subsurface deposits and compared with results of radiocarbon tests at those deposits. The four archaeological sites from which adequate collections and radiocarbon samples were obtained were also sampled for sediments to test for presence of oil. None of the sites yielded radiocarbon dates which appear to be significantly skewed from the expected age range. However, caution must be used in projecting those conclusions to other sites in the oil spill area in scientific studies because of the many factors which control such findings.

  11. Explosive washout lagoons soils operable unit supplemental investigation technical and environmental management support of installation restoration technology development program, Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston. Oregon. Phase 2. Final Draft report, May 1991-May 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Raymondi, R.

    1992-04-15

    As part of an ongoing Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study at the Umatilla Army Depot, the soils of the Explosives Washout Lagoons at that installation were assigned as an operable unit for a possible expedited remedial action. Additional sampling was conducted to determine the explosives concentrations at depth beneath the lagoons, and to verify the absence of other contaminants. Explosives contamination was found from the ground surface to the groundwater at 47 feet. Concentrations were much higher in the top 3 feet than in the soil beneath that. Other organic contamination was not present; some metals were elevated slightly above background. The results of the study are being used in a feasibility study of remedial action alternatives.

  12. Explosives Washout Lagoons Soils Operable Unit supplemental investigation technical and environmental management support of installation-restoration technology development program, Umatilla Depot Activity, Hermiston, Oregon. Final report, May 91-May 92

    SciTech Connect

    Raymondi, R.

    1992-04-15

    As part of an ongoing Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study at the Umatilla Army Depot, the soils of the Explosives Washout Lagoons at that installation were assigned as an operable unit for a possible expedited remedial action. Additional sampling was conducted to determine the explosives concentrations at depth beneath the lagoons, and to verify the absence of other contaminants. Explosives contamination was found from the ground surface to the groundwater at 47 feet. Concentrations were much higher in the top 3 feet than in the soil beneath that. Other organic contamination was not present; some metals were elevated slightly above background. The results of the study are being used in a feasibility study of remedial action alternatives.

  13. Investigation of carbon dioxide in the South Atlantic and northern Weddell Sea areas (WOCE Sections A-12 and A-21) during the METEOR expedition 11/5, January--March 1990. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Chipman, D.W.; Takahashi, Taro; Breger, D.; Sutherland, S.C.

    1991-12-01

    This report summarizes the results of investigation the oceanographic expedition aboard the F/S METEOR in South Atlantic Ocean including the Drake Passage, the northern Weddell Sea and the eastern South Atlantic during the austral summer of January through March 1990. The total CO{sub 2} concentration in about 1300 seawater samples and CO{sub 2} partial pressure (pCO{sub 2}) in about 870 seawater samples collected at 77 stations were determined aboard the ship using a coulometer and equilibrator/gas chromatograph system. The temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and nutrient salt data presented in this report were determined by other participants of the expedition including the members of the Oceanographic Data Facility of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Argentine Hydrographic Office and German institutions.

  14. Final Scientific/Technical Report – DE-EE0002960 Recovery Act. Detachment faulting and Geothermal Resources - An Innovative Integrated Geological and Geophysical Investigation of Pearl Hot Spring, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Stockli, Daniel F.

    2015-11-30

    The Pearl Host Spring Geothermal Project funded by the DoE Geothermal Program was a joint academic (KU/UT & OU) and industry collaboration (Sierra and Ram Power) to investigate structural controls and the importance of low-angle normal faults on geothermal fluid flow through a multifaceted geological, geophysical, and geochemical investigation in west-central Nevada. The study clearly showed that the geothermal resources in Clayton Valley are controlled by the interplay between low-angle normal faults and active deformation related to the Walker Lane. The study not only identified potentially feasible blind geothermal resource plays in eastern Clayton Valley, but also provide a transportable template for exploration in the area of west-central Nevada and other regional and actively-deforming releasing fault bends. The study showed that deep-seated low-angle normal faults likely act as crustal scale permeability boundaries and could play an important role in geothermal circulation and funneling geothermal fluid into active fault zones. Not unique to this study, active deformation is viewed as an important gradient to rejuvenated fracture permeability aiding the long-term viability of blind geothermal resources. The technical approach for Phase I included the following components, (1) Structural and geological analysis of Pearl Hot Spring Resource, (2) (U-Th)/He thermochronometry and geothermometry, (3) detailed gravity data and modeling (plus some magnetic and resistivity), (4) Reflection and Refraction Seismic (Active Source), (5) Integration with existing and new geological/geophysical data, and (6) 3-D Earth Model, combining all data in an innovative approach combining classic work with new geochemical and geophysical methodology to detect blind geothermal resources in a cost-effective fashion.

  15. Tiger LDRD final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steich, D J; Brugger, S T; Kallman, J S; White, D A

    2000-02-01

    This final report describes our efforts on the Three-Dimensional Massively Parallel CEM Technologies LDRD project (97-ERD-009). Significant need exists for more advanced time domain computational electromagnetics modeling. Bookkeeping details and modifying inflexible software constitute a vast majority of the effort required to address such needs. The required effort escalates rapidly as problem complexity increases. For example, hybrid meshes requiring hybrid numerics on massively parallel platforms (MPPs). This project attempts to alleviate the above limitations by investigating flexible abstractions for these numerical algorithms on MPPs using object-oriented methods, providing a programming environment insulating physics from bookkeeping. The three major design iterations during the project, known as TIGER-I to TIGER-III, are discussed. Each version of TIGER is briefly discussed along with lessons learned during the development and implementation. An Application Programming Interface (API) of the object-oriented interface for Tiger-III is included in three appendices. The three appendices contain the Utilities, Entity-Attribute, and Mesh libraries developed during the project. The API libraries represent a snapshot of our latest attempt at insulated the physics from the bookkeeping.

  16. Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 2 -- Jointly sponsored research program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, V.E.

    1994-09-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

  17. Vet Centers. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopts as final an interim final rule that amends its medical regulation that governs Vet Center services. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2013 (the 2013 Act) requires Vet Centers to provide readjustment counseling services to broader groups of veterans, members of the Armed Forces, including a member of a reserve component of the Armed Forces, and family members of such veterans and members. This final rule adopts as final the regulatory criteria to conform to the 2013 Act, to include new and revised definitions. PMID:26934755

  18. Identifying technology barriers in adapting a state-of-the-art gas turbine for IGCC applications and an experimental investigation of air extraction schemes for IGCC operations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Tah-teh; Agrawal, A.K.; Kapat, J.S.

    1993-06-01

    Under contracted work with Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Clemson University, the prime contractor, and General Electric (GE) and CRSS, the subcontractors, made a comprehensive study in the first phase of research to investigate the technology barriers of integrating a coal gasification process with a hot gas cleanup scheme and the state-of-the-art industrial gas turbine, the GE MS-7001F. This effort focused on (1) establishing analytical tools necessary for modeling combustion phenomenon and emissions in gas turbine combustors operating on multiple species coal gas, (2) estimates the overall performance of the GE MS-7001F combined cycle plant, (3) evaluating material issues in the hot gas path, (4) examining the flow and temperature fields when air extraction takes place at both the compressor exit and at the manhole adjacent to the combustor, and (5) examining the combustion/cooling limitations of such a gas turbine by using 3-D numerical simulation of a MS-7001F combustor operated with gasified coal. In the second phase of this contract, a 35% cool flow model was built similar to GE`s MS-7001F gas turbine for mapping the flow region between the compressor exit and the expander inlet. The model included sufficient details, such as the combustor`s transition pieces, the fuel nozzles, and the supporting struts. Four cases were studied: the first with a base line flow field of a GE 7001F without air extraction; the second with a GE 7001F with air extraction; and the third and fourth with a GE 7001F using a Griffith diffuser to replace the straight wall diffuser and operating without air extraction and with extraction, respectively.

  19. Final report for DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64404 - Field Investigations of Microbially Facilitated Calcite Precipitation for Immobilization of Strontium-90 and Other Trace Metals in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Robert W; Fujita, Yoshiko; Ginn, Timothy R; Hubbard, Susan S

    2012-10-12

    Subsurface radionuclide and metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE's greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide 90Sr, is co-precipitation in calcite. We have previously found that that nutrient addition can stimulate microbial ureolytic activity that this activity accelerates calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of Sr, and that higher calcite precipitation rates can result in increased Sr partitioning. We have conducted integrated field, laboratory, and computational research to evaluate the relationships between ureolysis and calcite precipitation rates and trace metal partitioning under environmentally relevant conditions, and investigated the coupling between flow/flux manipulations and precipitate distribution. A field experimental campaign conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site located at Rifle, CO was based on a continuous recirculation design; water extracted from a down-gradient well was amended with urea and molasses (a carbon and electron donor) and re-injected into an up-gradient well. The goal of the recirculation design and simultaneous injection of urea and molasses was to uniformly accelerate the hydrolysis of urea and calcite precipitation over the entire inter-wellbore zone. The urea-molasses recirculation phase lasted, with brief interruptions for geophysical surveys, for 12 days followed by long-term monitoring which continued for 13 months. Following the recirculation phase we found persistent increases in urease activity (as determined from 14C labeled laboratory urea hydrolysis rates) in the upper portion of the inter-wellbore zone. We also observed an initial increase (approximately 2 weeks) in urea concentration associated with injection activities followed by decreasing urea concentration and associated increases in ammonium and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC

  20. Cassini's Grand Finale: The Final Orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spilker, Linda; Edgington, Scott

    2016-04-01

    The Cassini-Huygens mission, a joint collaboration between NASA, ESA and the Italian Space Agency, is approaching its last year of operations after nearly 12 years in orbit around Saturn. Cassini will send back its final bits of unique data on September 15th, 2017 as it plunges into Saturn's atmosphere, vaporizing and satisfying planetary protection requirements. Before that time Cassini will continue its legacy of exploration and discovery with 12 close flybys of Titan in 2016 and 2017 that will return new science data as well as sculpt the inclinations and periods of the final orbits. Even though all of our close icy satellite flybys, including those of Enceladus, are now completed, numerous Voyager-class flybys (<100,000 km) of Mimas and Enceladus remain as well as some of our best flybys of the tiny ring moons. Cassini will also continue to study seasonal and temporal changes in the system as northern summer solstice approaches. In November 2016 Cassini will transition to a series of orbits with peripases just outside Saturn's F ring. These 20 orbits will include close flybys of some tiny ring moons and excellent views of the F ring and outer A ring. The 126th and final close flyby of Titan will propel Cassini across Saturn's main rings and into its final orbits. Cassini's Grand Finale, starting in April 2017, is comprised of 22 orbits at an inclination of 63 degrees. Cassini will repeatedly dive between the innermost rings and the upper atmosphere of the planet providing insights into fundamental questions unattainable during the rest of the mission. Cassini will be the first spacecraft to explore this region. These close orbits provide the highest resolution observations of both the rings and Saturn, and direct in situ sampling of the ring particles, composition, plasma, Saturn's exosphere and the innermost radiation belts. Saturn's gravitational field will be measured to unprecedented accuracy, providing information on the interior structure of the planet

  1. Watershed Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodzin, Alec; Shive, Louise

    2004-01-01

    Investigating local watersheds presents middle school students with authentic opportunities to engage in inquiry and address questions about their immediate environment. Investigation activities promote learning in an investigations interdisciplinary context as students explore relationships among chemical, biological, physical, geological, and…

  2. Forensics Investigator

    MedlinePlus

    ... Careers Career Profiles Forensics Investigator Overview Description Forensic science technicians investigate crimes by collecting and analyzing physical evidence. Often, they specialize in areas such as ...

  3. Final focus nomenclature

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.

    1986-08-08

    The formal names and common names for all devices in the final focus system of the SLC are listed. The formal names consist of a device type designator, microprocessor designator, and a four-digit unit number. (LEW)

  4. NARSTO Texas Final Report

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-03-06

    Final Report for the Texas PM2.5 Sampling and Analysis Study (March 11, 1997, through March 12, 1998) ... files: Section 1: Introduction and Section 2: Sampling Network (PDF) Section 3: Data Base Structure (PDF) ...

  5. Cassini's Grand Finale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgington, Scott G.; Spilker, Linda J.

    2016-07-01

    After more than a decade exploring Saturn and its moons, the Cassini mission is in its closing act. Cassini's last year is an encore performance stuffed with science, including a final plunge into Saturn's atmosphere.

  6. Endeavour's Final Voyage

    NASA Video Gallery

    After nearly two decades of achievements in space, Endeavour makes one last reach for the stars on its 25th and final mission, STS-134. This webcast examines the mission to come and explores the st...

  7. Expedition 34 Final Training

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Expedition 34 crew members conduct final training at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center before their Dec. 19 launch to the International Space Station. Flight Engineers Chris Hadfield, Roman...

  8. Final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration.

  9. Investigation of lunar crustal structure and isostasy. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Thurber, C.H.

    1987-07-01

    The lunar mascon basins have strongly free air gravity anomalies, generally exceeding 100 milligals at an elevation of 100 km. The source of the anomalies is a combination of mantle uplift beneath the impact basins and subsequent infilling by high-density mare basalts. The relative contribution of these two components is still somewhat uncertain, although it is generally accepted that the amount of mantle uplift greatly exceeds the thickness of the basalts. Extensive studies have been carried out of the crustal structure of mare basins, based on gravity data, and their tectonic evolution, based on compressive and extensional tectonic features. The present study endeavored to develop a unified, self-consistent model of the lunar crust and lithosphere incorporating both gravity and tectonic constraints.

  10. Cadmium electrode investigation. Final report, 16 July-4 December 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, E.

    1980-03-01

    Methods for improving the loading and utilization of active material in electrochemically impregnated cadmium electrodes were studied using sweep voltametry and galvanostatic pulse impregnation. Loading levels and utilization were found to decrease with cycling when the potentiostatic pulse method was used and impregnation times beyond one hour resulted in unacceptable surface loading. The use of galvanostatic pulse impregnation appeared to offer greater promise; however, solution composition, temperature and the pulse regime remain to be optimized. Several areas are recommended for further study including understanding of the cathodic processes, the economics of the counter electrode, solution pH control, definition of the process parameters and the effect of plaque pore morphology on loading efficiency.

  11. Investigating the physical basis of biomineralization. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dove, Patricia M.

    2001-01-01

    During the three years of this project, Professor Dove's laboratory made tremendous progress in understanding fundamental controls on crystal growth in simple model systems for the complex phenomenon of biological mineralization. Our collaboration with J.J. DeYoreo was productive and we surpassed the goals set forth in the original proposal to establish a new quantitative understanding of carbonate mineral crystallization. The findings from this project have been widely recognized across the scientific community by the award of the Mineralogical Society of America best paper award in 1998 and the Best University Research Award of 1999 at the Basic Energy sciences, Division of Geosciences ''Interfacial Processes Symposium''. In addition, two students working on this project received six different awards for their research findings.

  12. Theoretical investigation of superconductivity in doped fullerenes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jishi, R.A.

    1995-03-01

    The aim of the research the authors are conducting is to understand the phenomenon of superconductivity in the fullerene system. Towards achieving this goal they have conducted a series of studies and have published several papers quite recently. They have developed a force-constant model for the C60 molecule which accounts for all measured frequencies in C60. The model employs four bond-stretching and four angle-bending force constants that were doped to reproduce the correct values of the frequencies of the Raman-active vibrational modes. The model was successfully applied to higher fullerenes, such as C70 and the effect of doping by alkali metal atoms on the phonon modes in C60 and in C70 was considered. The study of the phonon spectrum in doped C60 and doped C70 is an important step in view of the fact that while doped C60 is superconducting, doped C70 is not. The studies the authors have carried out, combined with studies on the electronic states in doped C70, could elucidate the difference in the electrical properties between these two materials.

  13. Investigation of cold nuclear fusion in condensed matter. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, S.E.; Berrondo, M.; Czirr, J.B.; Decker, D.L.; Harrison, K.; Jensen, G.L.; Palmer, E.P.; Rees, L.B.; Shelton, D.S.; Taylor, S.; Vanfleet, H.B.; Wang, J.C.; Bennion, D.N.; Harb, J.N.; Pitt, W.G.; Thorne, J.M.; Anderson, A.N.; McMurtry, G.; Murphy, N.; Goff, F.E.

    1992-12-29

    Recent research has been directed towards finding means to produce neutron emissions at will, to demonstrate reproducibility, and to permit in-depth studies of the origin of neutron emissions. this goal has been pursued in the Kamiokande detector in Japan and has led to the development of a deep underground laboratory in a tunnel in the Wasatch mountains near Brigham Young University. New counters for low-level neutron emissions are being utilized. Calorimetric tools have also been developed.

  14. Final report : site reclassification investigation for Courtland, Kansas.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Dennis, C. B.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-01-31

    The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), formerly operated a grain storage facility in Courtland, Kansas. Prior to 1986, commercial grain fumigants containing carbon tetrachloride were commonly used by the CCC/USDA and the grain industry to preserve stored grain. In 1999, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) identified the former CCC/USDA operation as the likely source of carbon tetrachloride found in groundwater east of the former CCC/USDA facility in Courtland. Sampling by the KDHE in April 1998 had found carbon tetrachloride in the Garman residence lawn and garden well at a concentration of 2.1 {micro}g/L and in the Hoard residence lawn and garden well at a concentration of 0.5 {micro}g/L. Subsequent soil and groundwater sampling by the KDHE at the former CCC/USDA facility found no indication of a continuing source, and subsequent sampling of the affected wells showed generally declining contaminant levels. At the request of the KDHE and the CCC/USDA, Argonne National Laboratory prepared a Work Plan for Groundwater Sampling for Potential Site Reclassification, Courtland, Kansas (Argonne 2004). The objective of the proposed work was to conduct a single groundwater monitoring event and collect information necessary to update the status of the previously detected groundwater contamination, in support of an evaluation of appropriate actions for reclassification of the status of this site from active to resolved, under the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the USDA's Farm Service Agency (FSA). The reclassification would be in accordance with the KDHE's Reclassification Plan (Policy No. BERRS-024, online at http://www.kdhe.state.ks.us/pdf/ber/scp/reclass.pdf). The KDHE approved the Work Plan on August 8, 2005. Sampling was conducted on September 7, 2005.

  15. Final Report: Experimental Investigation of Nonlinear Plasma Wake-Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.

    1997-10-31

    We discuss the exploration of the newly proposed blowout regime of the plasma wakefield accelerator and advanced photoinjector technology for linear collider applications. The plasma wakefield experiment at ANL produced several ground-breaking results in the physics of the blowout regime. The photoinjector R and D effort produced breakthroughs in theoretical, computational, and experimental methods in high brightness beam physics. Results have been published.

  16. Coping with investigators and investigations.

    PubMed

    Stewart, D O; Fee, M K

    1991-09-01

    Most businesses in highly regulated industries like health care are likely to face an investigation at some point. By knowing ahead of time how to properly respond to investigators' requests and by exercising caution during the investigation, health care agencies can minimize the potential damage.

  17. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Chris

    2014-11-13

    The project, Capital Investment to Fund Equipment Purchases and Facility Modifications to Create a Sustainable Future for EnergyXchange served to replace landfill gas energy with alternative energy resources, primarily solar and wood waste. This is the final project closeout report.

  18. Rosetta: The Final Furlong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, I. P.; Andrews, D. J.; Barber, S. J.; Sheridan, S.; Morgan, G. H.; Morse, A. D.

    2014-09-01

    By the time of the meeting, the Rosetta spacecraft will have formally arrived at its target comet, and final landing site selection will be in progress. One of the instruments that will be sent down to the surface of the comet is Ptolemy (a GC-MS).

  19. GENIE final state interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dytman, Steven

    2015-10-15

    Final state interactions are an important component of any neutrino-nucleus Monte Carlo program. GENIE has 2 FSI programs which serve different purposes. Each has fair-good agreement with a wide range of hadron-nucleus data. Recent improvements and planned advancements are described.

  20. Space Station Final Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    An artist's conception of what the final configuration of the International Space Station (ISS) will look like when it is fully built and deployed. The ISS is a multidisciplinary laboratory, technology test bed, and observatory that will provide an unprecedented undertaking in scientific, technological, and international experimentation.

  1. Project CHILD: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    Presented is the final report of Project CHILD, a research effort to develop and validate screening procedures for the identification of language disabled (LD) children, three intervention models for LD children, and a competency based teacher education model. In the two phases of the first study, a battery of screening tests was evaluated with a…

  2. Final Prep on SSME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Alvin Pittman Sr., lead electronics technician with Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne, and Janine Cuevas, a mechanical technician with PWR, perform final preparations on the space shuttle main engine tested Oct. 25, 2005, at NASA's Stennis Space Center. It was the first main engine test since Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast on Aug. 29.

  3. Perception of Final Lengthening.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Jan; Beckman, Mary

    A series of phonetic production and perception experiments were designed to describe the phonological or phonetic domains of two effects in spoken English: final lengthening, generally interpreted as a mark for the edge of some linguistically-defined unit of speech production, and stress-timed shortening, generally interpreted as evidence for…

  4. SCIS Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eakin, James R.; Karplus, Robert

    Presented is the final report of the Science Curriculum Improvement Study (SCIS). Included is the background and a brief history of the SCIS project, an outline of the project development processes, evaluation made of SCIS during development, a summary of financial support for the project, names of advisory and staff members, a historical chart of…

  5. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Mike, J., P.E.

    2012-08-30

    The STI product is the Final Technical Report from ReliOn, Inc. for contract award DE-EE0000487: Recovery Act PEM Fuel Cell Systems Providing Emergency Reserve and Backup Power. The program covered the turnkey deployment of 431 ReliOn fuel cell systems at 189 individual sites for AT&T and PG&E with ReliOn functioning as the primary equipment supplier and the project manager. The Final Technical Report provides an executive level summary, a comparison of the actual accomplishments vs. the goals and objectives of the project, as well as a summary of the project activity from the contract award date of August 1, 2009 through the contract expiration date of December 31, 2011. Two photos are included in the body of the report which show hydrogen storage and bulk hydrogen refueling technologies developed as a result of this program.

  6. Caregivers program. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) adopts, with changes, the interim final rule concerning VA's Program of Comprehensive Assistance for Family Caregivers. VA administers this program to provide certain medical, travel, training, and financial benefits to caregivers of certain veterans and servicemembers who were seriously injured during service on or after September 11, 2001. Also addressed in this rulemaking is the Program of General Caregiver Support Services that provides support services to caregivers of veterans from all eras who are enrolled in the VA health care system. Specifically, changes in this final rule include a requirement that Veterans be notified in writing should a Family Caregiver request revocation (to no longer be a Family Caregiver), an extension of the application timeframe from 30 days to 45 days for a Family Caregiver, and a change in the stipend calculation to ensure that Primary Family Caregivers do not experience unexpected decreases in stipend amounts from year to year. PMID:25581943

  7. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Stephen A.

    2005-10-27

    In this final technical report, a summary of work is provided. Work toward an improved representation of frontal clouds in global climate models occurred. This involved analysis of cloud variability in ARM observations and the careful contrast of single column model solutions with ARM data. In addition, high resolution simulations of frontal clouds were employed to diagnosis processes that are important for the development of frontal clouds.

  8. Geolocation Technologies Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Magnoli, D E

    2003-06-02

    This paper is the final report for LL998 In Situ Sensing Subtask 7 (Geo-location) undertaken for NNSA NA-22 enabling technologies R&D for Counterproliferation Detection. A few state-of-the-art resolution parameters are presented for accelerometers, indoor and outdoor GPS (Global Positioning Satellite) systems, and INSs (Inertial Navigation Systems). New technologies are described, including one which has demonstrated the ability to track within a building to a resolution of under a foot.

  9. Quaternary investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Stieve, A.

    1991-05-15

    The primary purpose of the Quaternary investigation is to provide information on the location and age of Quaternary deposits for use in evaluating the presence or absence of neotectonic deformation or paleoliquefaction features within the Savannah River Site (SRS) region. The investigation will provide a basis for evaluating the potential for capable faults and associated deformation in the SRS vicinity. Particular attention will be paid to the Pen Branch fault.

  10. California Prison Gang Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummins, Eric

    A project investigated the cultural life, ideology, and education systems of particular prison gangs. It focused on recent changes in the gang system regarding gang education, organizational structure, and the balance of power in prisons and in relations with street gangs. Finally, the project assessed California's response to its prison gangs, in…

  11. Consortium on Inclusive Schooling Practices. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Christine; Roach, Virginia; Strieker, Toni; McGregor, Gail

    This final report describes the activities and accomplishments of the Consortium on Inclusive Schooling Practices, a federally-funded 5-year project to investigate the utility of a systemic approach for building the capacity of state and local education agencies to provide inclusive educational services. The project focused on four states…

  12. Viatical investigation.

    PubMed

    1995-10-01

    Viatical Benefits, a viatical settlement company in Fort Lauderdale, FL, is reportedly under investigation by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) for using high-pressure sales tactics to sell policies to investors. The SEC has declined comment, and Egbert Jaeger, the president of Viatical Benefits, has denied any investigation. This investigation follows a preliminary injunction filed by a Federal judge against Life Partners Inc. of Waco, TX, in August. The SEC claimed that Life Partners repackaged life insurance contracts as securities for investors, in violation of Federal securities laws. Viatical settlements enable persons with HIV to sell their life insurance policies at a discount, providing clients with sixty to eighty percent of the face value in cash to use for living expenses. Viatical settlement companies usually act as brokers in the sale of the policies. PMID:11362822

  13. 78 FR 44592 - Final General Management Plan, Final Wilderness Study, and Final Environmental Impact Statement...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... Environmental Impact Statement for the General Management Plan and Wilderness Study (Final EIS/GMP/WS) for Fort... policies and the purpose of the national monument, the Final EIS/GMP/WS will guide the management of the... the Final EIS/GMP/WS in the Federal Register. ADDRESSES: Electronic copies of the Final...

  14. Prometheus Project final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Randall

    2005-01-01

    This Final Report serves as an executive summary of the Prometheus Project's activities and deliverables from November 2002 through September 2005. It focuses on the challenges from a technical and management perspective, what was different and innovative about this project, and identifies the major options, decisions, and accomplishments of the Project team as a whole. However, the details of the activities performed by DOE NR and its contractors will be documented separately in accordance with closeout requirements of the DOE NR and consistent with agreements between NASA and NR.

  15. Laboratory investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-09-01

    The primary objectives were to examine the site-specific physical, chemical, and biological factors that impact construction, durability and performance of the proposed 5-MW (sub e) solar pond system at the Salton Sea. The interactions of the water, salt, and soil of the site and on material compatibility were examined. Potential interactions of the water/brine and soil are particularly important because the pond will utilize the naturally occurring clays as a bottom seal. Although there is a considerable and growing solar pond literature, little written information deals with the important site-specific investigations of water, salt, and soil. Therefore, technical effort was directed toward identifying the factors that should be investigated and determining methods of investigation. As a result, a by-product was the development of an approach for site-specific investigations and some specific methodologies. This development should continue in order to establish a generic approach for evaluating the suitability of any site for the construction of large-scale solar ponds.

  16. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, Douglas C.; Restani, Marco, Ph.D

    2009-12-28

    The Center of Excellence for Hazardous Materials Management award was used to establish the organization and initiate investigations of hazardous waste issues along the U.S.-Mexico border. Scientific investigations conducted during the execution of this grant contributed significant data and established new sampling protocols to the dimension, frequency and severity of hazardous materials (e.g., heavy metals) along the U.S.-Mexico border. Additionally, new protocols and assessments with distinct Homeland Security implications were embedded thus establishing a baseline that will be significant for related investigations in the future.

  17. FINAL/ SCIENTIFIC TECHNICAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Henry; Singh, Suminderpal

    2006-08-28

    The overall objective of the Chattanooga fuel cell demonstrations project was to develop and demonstrate a prototype 5-kW grid-parallel, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system that co-produces hydrogen, based on Ion America’s technology. The commercial viability of the 5kW SOFC system was tested by transporting, installing and commissioning the SOFC system at the Alternative Energy Laboratory at the University of Tennessee – Chattanooga. The system also demonstrated the efficiency and the reliability of the system running on natural gas. This project successfully contributed to the achievement of DOE technology validation milestones from the Technology Validation section of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan. Results of the project can be found in the final technical report.

  18. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  19. AIPM Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    John Mookken

    2006-06-30

    The final AIPM project report consists of six sections. Each section includes information on the original AIPM project and extension work on the high temperature design. The first section (1) provides an overview of the program and highlights the significant targets to meet at the end of the program. The next section (2) summarizes the significant technical accomplishments by the SEMIKRON AIPM team during the course of the project. Greater technical details are provided in a collection of all the quarterly reports which can be found in the appendix. Section three (3) presents some the more significant technical data collected from technology demonstrators. Section four (4) analyzes the manufacturing cost or economic aspects of producing 100,000 units/yr. Section five (5) describes the commercialization efforts of the AIPM technology into the automotive market. The last section (6) recommends follow on work that will build on the efforts and achievements of the AIPM program.

  20. Final Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Josef Michl

    2011-10-31

    In this project we have established guidelines for the design on organic chromophores suitable for producing high triplet yields via singlet fission. We have proven their utility by identifying a chromophore of a structural class that had never been examined for singlet fission before, 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran, and demonstrating in two independent ways that a thin layer of this material produces a triplet yield of 200% within experimental error. We have also designed a second chromophore of a very different type, again of a structural class that had not been examined for singlet fission before, and found that in a thin layer it produces a 70% triplet yield. Finally, we have enhanced the theoretical understanding of the quantum mechanical nature of the singlet fission process.

  1. Conference Summary Final Remarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Walter

    2007-05-01

    Finally we come to the last talk. The end of the Conference is near! I try to reflect on an interesting Conference, with many different - diverse - topics and 5 parallel afternoon sessions. How to solve this difficulty? I do it my way and present a selection of what I personally found interesting. I illustrate these topics with the help of slides which are borrowed from various speakers at the conference. There are outstanding problems, which will also find attention and interest if explained to non-nuclear physicists, common people. I will address four such topics which were were discussed at this conference: Heavy-Ion Cancer Therapy Extension of the Periodic Table - Superheavy Elements Nuclear Astrophysics Hot compressed elementary matter - Production - Phases

  2. Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop

    SciTech Connect

    2010-11-09

    The Final Scientific EFNUDAT Workshop - organized by the CERN/EN-STI group on behalf of n_TOF Collaboration - will be held at CERN, Geneva (Switzerland) from 30 August to 2 September 2010 inclusive.EFNUDAT website: http://www.efnudat.euTopics of interest include: Data evaluationCross section measurementsExperimental techniquesUncertainties and covariancesFission propertiesCurrent and future facilities  International Advisory Committee: C. Barreau (CENBG, France)T. Belgya (IKI KFKI, Hungary)E. Gonzalez (CIEMAT, Spain)F. Gunsing (CEA, France)F.-J. Hambsch (IRMM, Belgium)A. Junghans (FZD, Germany)R. Nolte (PTB, Germany)S. Pomp (TSL UU, Sweden) Workshop Organizing Committee: Enrico Chiaveri (Chairman)Marco CalvianiSamuel AndriamonjeEric BerthoumieuxCarlos GuerreroRoberto LositoVasilis Vlachoudis Workshop Assistant: Géraldine Jean

  3. Final cook temperature monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, John; Matthews, Michael; Glasco, Marc

    2006-04-01

    Fully cooked, ready-to-eat products represent one of the fastest growing markets in the meat and poultry industries. Modern meat cooking facilities typically cook chicken strips and nuggets at rates of 6000 lbs per hour, and it is a critical food safety issue to ensure the products on these lines are indeed fully cooked. Common practice now employs oven technicians to constantly measure final cook temperature with insertion-type thermocouple probes. Prior research has demonstrated that thermal imagery of chicken breasts and other products can be used to predict core temperature of products leaving an oven. In practice, implementation of a system to monitor core temperature can be difficult for several reasons. First, a wide variety of products are typically produced on the same production line and the system must adapt to all products. Second, the products can be often hard to find because they often leave the process in random order and may be touching or even overlapping. Another issue is finite measurement time which is typically only a few seconds. Finally, the system is subjected to a rigorous sanitation cycle and must hold up under wash down conditions. To address these problems, a calibrated 320x240 micro-bolometer camera was used to monitor the temperature of formed, breaded poultry products on a fully cooked production line for a period of one year. The study addressed the installation and operation of the system as well as the development of algorithms used to identify the product on a cluttered conveyor belt. It also compared the oven tech insertion probe measurements to the non-contact monitoring system performance.

  4. Cooperative Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stauber, Dick T.

    In order to investigate the feasibility of adding a cooperative education option to the curricular offerings of Moraine Park Technical Institute (MPTI), interviews were conducted with randomly selected representatives of 12 industries and 17 employers in the marketing and merchandising businesses located in the MPTI service area. In addition,…

  5. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Aristos Aristidou Natureworks); Robert Kean; Tom Schechinger; Stuart Birrell; Jill Euken

    2007-10-01

    The two main objectives of this project were: 1) to develop and test technologies to harvest, transport, store, and separate corn stover to supply a clean raw material to the bioproducts industry, and 2) engineer fermentation systems to meet performance targets for lactic acid and ethanol manufacturers. Significant progress was made in testing methods to harvest corn stover in a “single pass” harvest mode (collect corn grain and stover at the same time). This is technically feasible on small scale, but additional equipment refinements will be needed to facilitate cost effective harvest on a larger scale. Transportation models were developed, which indicate that at a corn stover yield of 2.8 tons/acre and purchase price of $35/ton stover, it would be unprofitable to transport stover more than about 25 miles; thus suggesting the development of many regional collection centers. Therefore, collection centers should be located within about 30 miles of the farm, to keep transportation costs to an acceptable level. These collection centers could then potentially do some preprocessing (to fractionate or increase bulk density) and/or ship the biomass by rail or barge to the final customers. Wet storage of stover via ensilage was tested, but no clear economic advantages were evident. Wet storage eliminates fire risk, but increases the complexity of component separation and may result in a small loss of carbohydrate content (fermentation potential). A study of possible supplier-producer relationships, concluded that a “quasi-vertical” integration model would be best suited for new bioproducts industries based on stover. In this model, the relationship would involve a multiyear supply contract (processor with purchase guarantees, producer group with supply guarantees). Price will likely be fixed or calculated based on some formula (possibly a cost plus). Initial quality requirements will be specified (but subject to refinement).Producers would invest in harvest

  6. Voyager Approaches Final Frontier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    An artist's concept illustrates the positions of the Voyager spacecraft in relation to structures formed around our Sun by the solar wind. Also illustrated is the termination shock, a violent region the spacecraft must pass through before reaching the outer limits of the solar system. At the termination shock, the supersonic solar wind abruptly slows from an average speed of 400 kilometers per second to less than 100 kilometer per second (900,000 to less than 225,000 miles per hour). Beyond the termination shock is the solar system's final frontier, the heliosheath, a vast region where the turbulent and hot solar wind is compressed as it presses outward against the interstellar wind that is beyond the heliopause. A bow shock likely forms as the interstellar wind approaches and is deflected around the heliosphere, forcing it into a teardrop-shaped structure with a long, comet-like tail.

    The exact location of the termination shock is unknown, and it originally was thought to be closer to the Sun than Voyager 1 currently is. As Voyager 1 cruised ever farther from the Sun, it confirmed that all the planets are inside an immense bubble blown by the solar wind and the termination shock was much more distant.

  7. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Velasco, Mayda

    2013-11-01

    This work is focused on the design and construction of novel beam diagnostic and instrumentation for charged particle accelerators required for the next generation of linear colliders. Our main interest is in non-invasive techniques. The Northwestern group of Velasco has been a member of the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) collaboration since 2003, and the beam instrumentation work is developed mostly at this facility1. This 4 kW electron beam facility has a 25-170 MeV electron LINAC. CTF3 performed a set of dedicated measurements to finalize the development of our RF-Pickup bunch length detectors. The RF-pickup based on mixers was fully commissioned in 2009 and the RF-pickup based on diodes was finished in time for the 2010-11 data taking. The analysis of all the data taken in by the summer of 2010 was finish in time and presented at the main conference of the year, LINAC 2010 in Japan.

  8. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriy Y. Anistratov; Marvin L. Adams; Todd S. Palmer; Kord S. Smith; Kevin Clarno; Hikaru Hiruta; Razvan Nes

    2003-08-04

    OAK B202 Final Technical Report. The present generation of reactor analysis methods uses few-group nodal diffusion approximations to calculate full-core eigenvalues and power distributions. The cross sections, diffusion coefficients, and discontinuity factors (collectively called ''group constants'') in the nodal diffusion equations are parameterized as functions of many variables, ranging from the obvious (temperature, boron concentration, etc.) to the more obscure (spectral index, moderator temperature history, etc.). These group constants, and their variations as functions of the many variables, are calculated by assembly-level transport codes. The current methodology has two main weaknesses that this project addressed. The first weakness is the diffusion approximation in the full-core calculation; this can be significantly inaccurate at interfaces between different assemblies. This project used the nodal diffusion framework to implement nodal quasidiffusion equations, which can capture transport effects to an arbitrary degree of accuracy. The second weakness is in the parameterization of the group constants; current models do not always perform well, especially at interfaces between unlike assemblies. The project developed a theoretical foundation for parameterization and homogenization models and used that theory to devise improved models. The new models were extended to tabulate information that the nodal quasidiffusion equations can use to capture transport effects in full-core calculations.

  9. Electrocatalytic hydrocracking. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vaart, D.R. van der

    1992-06-01

    This report describes an electrocatalytic method for the chemical addition of hydrogen to a model hydrocarbon compound. In the method, hydrogen formed by water electrolysis at the counter electrode of an electrochemical cell is delivered via conduction through a proton-conducting solid electrolyte. The working electrode of the cell is, at the same time, a hydrocracking catalyst and therefore promotes the reaction of the hydrogen with the hydrocarbon. This process would have clear and distinct advantages over conventional hydroprocessing technologies in that the hydrogen concentration at the catalyst surface could be controlled and maintained by the applied electromotive force. This control would allow operation of the electrocatalytic reactor at ambient pressures instead of the extremely high hydrogen partial pressures required of conventional reactors. In addition, the direct delivery of hydrogen to the catalyst surface should inhibit coke formation and thus prolong the life of the catalyst. Finally, hydrogen utilization efficiencies should be greatly improved since the hydrogen is delivered directly to the reaction site thereby eliminating hydrogen solubility loss in the effluent stream. This report details the demonstration of (a) the ability of a solid electrolyte to perform as a catalyst, (b) the conduction of hydrogen through a solid electrolyte and (c) the simultaneous exploitation of these two properties. Hence, the essential concept of electrocatalytic hydrocracking has been demonstrated. An objective of future work in this area should be to determine whether the hydrocracking or hydrogenation reactions are actually enhanced during the electrocatalytic process when compared to the conventional catalytic process.

  10. Final technical report.

    SciTech Connect

    Emmanuel J. Candes

    2007-11-06

    In the last two dcades or so, many multiscale algorthms have been proposed to enable large scale computations which were thought as nearly intractable. For example, the fast multipole algorithm and other similar ideas have allowed to considerably speed up fundamental computations in electromagnetism, and many other fields. The thesis underlying this proposal is that traditional multiscale methods have been well-developed and it is clear that we now need new ideas in areas where traditional spatial multiscaling is ill-suited. In this context, the proposal argues that clever phase-space computations is bound to plan a crucial role in advancing algorithms and high-performance scientific computing. Our research past accomplishments have shown the existence of ideas beyond the traditional scale-space viewpoint such as new multiscale geometric representations of phase-space. We have shown that these clever representations lead to enhanced sparsity. We have shown that enhanced sparsity has significant important implications both for analysis, and for numerical applications, where sparsity allows for faster algorithms. We have implemented these ideas and built computational tools to be used as new building blocks of a new generation of wave propagation solvers. Finally, we have deployed these ideas into novel algorithms. In this last year, we assembled all these techniques and made significant progress in solving a variety of computational problems, which we then applied in selected areas of considerable scientific interest.

  11. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Fridman

    2005-06-01

    This DOE project DE-FC36-04GO14052 ''Plasma Pilot Plant Test for Treating VOC Emissions from Wood Products Plants'' was conducted by Drexel University in cooperation with Georgia-Pacific (G-P) and Kurchatov Institute (KI). The objective of this project was to test the Plasma Pilot Plant capabilities in wood industry. The final goal of the project was to replace the current state-of-the-art, regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO) technology by Low-Temperature Plasma Technology (LTPT) in paper and wood industry for Volatile Organic Components (VOC) destruction in High Volume Low Concentration (HVLC) vent emissions. MetPro Corporation joined the team as an industrial partner from the environmental control business and a potential leader for commercialization. Concurrent Technology Corporation (CTC) has a separate contract with DOE for this technology evaluation. They prepared questionnaires for comparison of this technology and RTO, and made this comparison. These data are presented in this report along with the description of the technology itself. Experiments with the pilot plant were performed with average plasma power up to 3.6 kW. Different design of the laboratory and pilot plant pulsed coronas, as well as different analytical methods revealed many new peculiarities of the VOC abatement process. The work reported herein describes the experimental results for the VOCs removal efficiency with respect to energy consumption, residence time, water effect and initial concentration.

  12. Final Report to DOE

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail Gultepe

    2012-05-15

    This final report summarizes the accomplished goals and provide a list of the publications and presentations made during the project. The goals of the project were accomplished through the various publications submitted to Journals and presentations done at the DOE and international meetings and conferences. The 8 journal articles related to the goals of this project were accepted or submitted. The 23 presentations related to goals of the project were presented at the meetings. There were some minor changes regarding to project goals because of issues encountered during the analysis of the data. For example, a total water probe sensor mounted on the Convair-580 that can be used for defining mixed phase conditions and parameterization, had some problems to estimate magnitude of total water mass, and this resulted in issues providing an accurate parameterization for cloud fraction. Variability related aerosol number concentrations and their composition for direct and indirect effects were studied and published. Results were given to explain aerosol and ice microphysical effects on climate change studies. It is suggested that developed parameterizations should consider the variability in aerosol and ice parameters over the Arctic regions.

  13. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Pigarov

    2012-06-05

    This is the final report for the Research Grant DE-FG02-08ER54989 'Edge Plasma Simulations in NSTX and CTF: Synergy of Lithium Coating, Non-Diffusive Anomalous Transport and Drifts'. The UCSD group including: A.Yu. Pigarov (PI), S.I. Krasheninnikov and R.D. Smirnov, was working on modeling of the impact of lithium coatings on edge plasma parameters in NSTX with the multi-species multi-fluid code UEDGE. The work was conducted in the following main areas: (i) improvements of UEDGE model for plasma-lithium interactions, (ii) understanding the physics of low-recycling divertor regime in NSTX caused by lithium pumping, (iii) study of synergistic effects with lithium coatings and non-diffusive ballooning-like cross-field transport, (iv) simulation of experimental multi-diagnostic data on edge plasma with lithium pumping in NSTX via self-consistent modeling of D-Li-C plasma with UEDGE, and (v) working-gas balance analysis. The accomplishments in these areas are given in the corresponding subsections in Section 2. Publications and presentations made under the Grant are listed in Section 3.

  14. DOE46168 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    McCartney, Martha R.

    2015-03-15

    The research objectives of this grant were to observe and to quantify nanoscale electrostatic and magnetic fields using the technique of off-axis electron holography. There have been two major areas of activity during the current reporting period, which spans September 2011 through December 2015; i) measurement of the 2D electrostatic potential distributions across complex semiconductor heterojunctions and devices; and ii) investigation of the remanent states and magnetization reversal mechanisms in magnetic thin films and nanostructures.

  15. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    drucker, jeff

    2014-08-18

    This project investigated the fundamental science of nanowire epitaxy using vapor-liquid-solid growth in the silicon-germanium material system. Ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition (UHV CVD) was the primary deposition method. Nanowires grown using UHV CVD were characterized ex situ using scanning electron microscopy and a variety of transmission electron microscopy techniques. In situ transmission electron microscopy was also employed to monitor growth in real time and was instrumental in elucidating growth mechanisms.

  16. Project Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciolkosz, Daniel; Albright, Louis

    1999-01-01

    The initial focus of this GSRP project was to model and develop systems for optimized use of the Microwave lamp for use in bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS). The microwave lamp, which has been developed for use in BLSS as part of a NASA small business innovation research (SBIR) grant, exhibits a number of characteristics that make it an excellent candidate for use in BLSS. However, we decided to shift the focus of the project, after discussions with scientists at KSC, to a broader question. Specifically, we decided to investigate the possibility of developing a decision tool for characterizing overall fighting system effectiveness in a plant growth system. It seemed pointless to optimize a microwave lamp for BLSS when there was no good way to decide what exactly an optimized system would look like. The problem is a complex one, involving multiple, conflicting objectives with irreconcilable units, significant constraints, and a wide range of relative importance among the objectives. The project would involve not only characterizing this complex decision process, but also would require some investigations into the physical properties of the lighting systems being considered. Thus, we turned to the field of Decision Modeling as a means of meeting this objective. After a thorough investigation of the literature, a technique was chosen and carefully developed. Implementation and analysis of the system are still in progress, and should be completed during the summer of 1999. Ancillary studies, which were conducted in the course of the project, have also been conducted, and are summarized below.

  17. 32 CFR 536.72 - Finality of settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Finality of settlement. 536.72 Section 536.72 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY CLAIMS AND ACCOUNTS CLAIMS AGAINST THE UNITED STATES Investigation and Processing of Claims § 536.72 Finality of settlement....

  18. World Cup Final

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    On July 9, hundreds of millions of fans worldwide will be glued to their television sets watching the final match of the 2006 FIFA World Cup, played in Berlin's Olympic stadium (Olympiastadion). The stadium was originally built for the 1936 Summer Olympics. The Olympic Stadium seats 76,000,; its roof rises 68 meters over the seats and is made up of transparent panels that allow sunlight to stream in during the day.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 12.1 by 15.9 kilometers (7.5 by 9.5 miles) Location: 52.5 degrees North latitude, 13.3 degrees East longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49.2 feet) Dates Acquired: October 15, 2005

  19. MTX final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hooper, E.B.; Allen, S.L.; Brown, M.D.; Byers, J.A.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Foote, J.H.; Hoshino, K.

    1994-01-01

    The MTX experiment was proposed in 1986 to apply high frequency microwaves generated by a free-electron laser (FEL) to electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in a high field, high density tokamak. As the absorption of microwaves at the electron cyclotron resonance requires high frequencies, the opportunity of applying a free-electron laser has appeal as the device is not limited to frequencies in the microwave or long millimeter wavelength regions, in contrast to many other sources. In addition, the FEL is inherently a high power source of microwaves, which would permit single units of 10 MW or more, optimum for reactors. Finally, it was recognized early in the study of the application of the FEL based on the induction linear accelerator, that the nonlinear effects associated with the intense pulses of microwaves naturally generated would offer several unique opportunities to apply ECRH to current drive, MHD control, and other plasma effects. It was consequently decided to adapt the induction accelerator based FEL to heating and controlling the tokamak, and to conduct experiments on the associated physics. To this end, the Alcator C tokamak was moved from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where it was installed in Building 431 and operated from March, 1989, until the conclusion of the experiment in October, 1992. The FEL, based on the ETA-11 accelerator and IMP wiggler was brought into operation by the LLNL Electron Beam Group and power injected into the tokamak during an experimental run in the Fall, 1989. Following an upgrade by the MTX group, a second experimental run was made lasting from the Winter, 1992 through the end of the experiment. Significant contributions to the ECRH experiments were made by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI).

  20. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    An investigation was made to determine if corn stalks could be economically collected for use in the production of either structural or insulation board. An assessment of the research shows that a pressed corn board suitable for some building application can be manufactured from ground corn stalks at very low cost; that an inexhaustible supply of corn stalks are readily available; and that the energy savings of corn board can only be estimated by assessing fuel savings to agriculture, freight savings, increased insulating qualities, manufacturing energy saved, and the potential use of acoustical insulation structural panels used in the prefab industry and/or the mobile home industry.

  1. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Eugene Clothiaux, Johannes Verlinde, Jerry Harrington

    2010-02-22

    The research project focuses on the following topics: a) removal of artifacts in the Doppler spectra from the ARM cloud radars, b) development of the second generation Active Remote Sensing of Cloud Layers (ARSCL) cloud data products, and c) evaluation of ARM cloud property retrievals within the framework of the EarthCARE simulator. We continue to pursue research on areas related to radiative transfer, atmospheric heating rates and related dynamics (topics of interest to the ARM science community at this time) and to contribute on an ad-hoc basis to the science of other ARM-supported principal investigators.

  2. 19 CFR 207.22 - Prehearing and final staff reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SUBSIDIZED EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES Final Determinations, Short Life Cycle Products § 207.22 Prehearing... matter of the investigation. A version of the staff report containing business proprietary...

  3. 19 CFR 207.22 - Prehearing and final staff reports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SUBSIDIZED EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES Final Determinations, Short Life Cycle Products § 207.22 Prehearing... matter of the investigation. A version of the staff report containing business proprietary...

  4. Oklahoma seismic network. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. |

    1993-07-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established rigorous guidelines that must be adhered to before a permit to construct a nuclear-power plant is granted to an applicant. Local as well as regional seismicity and structural relationships play an integral role in the final design criteria for nuclear power plants. The existing historical record of seismicity is inadequate in a number of areas of the Midcontinent region because of the lack of instrumentation and (or) the sensitivity of the instruments deployed to monitor earthquake events. The Nemaha Uplift/Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly is one of five principal areas east of the Rocky Mountain front that has a moderately high seismic-risk classification. The Nemaha uplift, which is common to the states of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska, is approximately 415 miles long and 12-14 miles wide. The Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly extends southward from Minnesota across Iowa and the southeastern corner of Nebraska and probably terminates in central Kansas. A number of moderate-sized earthquakes--magnitude 5 or greater--have occurred along or west of the Nemaha uplift. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, in cooperation with the geological surveys of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, conducted a 5-year investigation of the seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha uplift and associated geologic features in the Midcontinent. This investigation was intended to provide data to be used to design nuclear-power plants. However, the information is also being used to design better large-scale structures, such as dams and high-use buildings, and to provide the necessary data to evaluate earthquake-insurance rates in the Midcontinent.

  5. ASEDRA Evaluation Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Dean J; Detwiler, Dr. Rebecca; Sjoden, Dr, Glenn E.

    2008-09-01

    The performance of the Advanced Synthetically Enhanced Detector Resolution Algorithm (ASEDRA) was evaluated by performing a blind test of 29 sets of gamma-ray spectra that were provided by DNDO. ASEDRA is a post-processing algorithm developed at the Florida Institute of Nuclear Detection and Security at the University of Florida (UF/FINDS) that extracts char-acteristic peaks in gamma-ray spectra. The QuickID algorithm, also developed at UF/FINDS, was then used to identify nuclides based on the characteristic peaks generated by ASEDRA that are inferred from the spectra. The ASEDRA/QuickID analysis results were evaluated with respect to the performance of the DHSIsotopeID algorithm, which is a mature analysis tool that is part of the Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS). Data that were used for the blind test were intended to be challenging, and the radiation sources included thick shields around the radioactive materials as well as cargo containing naturally occurring radio-active materials, which masked emission from special nuclear materials and industrial isotopes. Evaluation of the analysis results with respect to the ground truth information (which was provided after the analyses were finalized) showed that neither ASEDRA/QuickID nor GADRAS could identify all of the radiation sources correctly. Overall, the purpose of this effort was primarily to evaluate ASEDRA, and GADRAS was used as a standard against which ASEDRA was compared. Although GADRAS was somewhat more accurate on average, the performance of ASEDRA exceeded that of GADRAS for some of the unknowns. The fact that GADRAS also failed to identify many of the radiation sources attests to the difficulty of analyzing the blind-test data that were used as a basis for the evaluation. This evaluation identified strengths and weaknesses of the two analysis approaches. The importance of good calibration data was also clear because the performance of both analysis methods was impeded by the

  6. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bohdan W. Oppenheim; Rudolf Marloth

    2007-10-26

    Executive Summary The document contains Final Technical Report on the Industrial Assessment Center Program at Loyola Marymount University in Los Angeles, covering the contract period of 9/1/2002 to 11/30/2006, under the contract DE-FC36-02GO 12073. The Report describes six required program tasks, as follows: TASK 1 is a summary of the assessments performed over the life of the award: 77 assessments were performed, 595 AR were recommended, covering a very broad range of manufacturing plants. TASK 2 is a description of the efforts to promote and increase the adoption of assessment recommendations and employ innovative methods to assist in accomplishing these goals. The LMU IAC has been very successful in accomplishing the program goals, including implemented savings of $5,141,895 in energy, $10,045,411 in productivity and $30,719 in waste, for a total of $15,218,025. This represents 44% of the recommended savings of $34,896,392. TASK 3 is a description of the efforts promoting the IAC Program and enhancing recruitment efforts for new clients and expanded geographic coverage. LMU IAC has been very successful recruiting new clients covering Southern California. Every year, the intended number of clients was recruited. TASK 4 describes the educational opportunities, training, and other related activities for IAC students. A total of 38 students graduated from the program, including 2-3 graduate students every semester, and the remainder undergraduate students, mostly from the Mechanical Engineering Department. The students received formal weekly training in energy (75%) and productivity (25). All students underwent extensive safety training. All students praised the IAC experience very highly. TASK 5 describes the coordination and integration of the Center activities with other Center and IAC Program activities, and DOE programs. LMU IAC worked closely with MIT, and SDSU IAC and SFSU IAC, and enthusiastically supported the SEN activities. TASK 6 describes other tasks

  7. [Nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D.C.

    1998-11-01

    This is a final report on the research activities carried out under the above grant at Dartmouth. During the period considered, the grant was identified as being for nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics, considered as the most tractable theoretical framework in which the plasma problems associated with magnetic confinement of fusion plasmas could be studied. During the first part of the grant`s lifetime, the author was associated with Los Alamos National Laboratory as a consultant and the work was motivated by the reversed-field pinch. Later, when that program was killed at Los Alamos, the problems became ones that could be motivated by their relation to tokamaks. Throughout the work, the interest was always on questions that were as fundamental as possible, compatible with those motivations. The intent was always to contribute to plasma physics as a science, as well as to the understanding of mission-oriented confined fusion plasmas. Twelve Ph.D. theses were supervised during this period and a comparable number of postdoctoral research associates were temporarily supported. Many of these have gone on to distinguished careers, though few have done so in the context of the controlled fusion program. Their work was a combination of theory and numerical computation, in gradually less and less idealized settings, moving from rectangular periodic boundary conditions in two dimensions, through periodic straight cylinders and eventually, before the grant was withdrawn, to toroids, with a gradually more prominent role for electrical and mechanical boundary conditions. The author never had access to a situation where he could initiate experiments and relate directly to the laboratory data he wanted. Computers were the laboratory. Most of the work was reported in referred publications in the open literature, copies of which were transmitted one by one to DOE at the time they appeared. The Appendix to this report is a bibliography of published work which was carried out under the

  8. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Efthimios Kaxiras

    2009-02-02

    This research consisted of a theoretical investigation of the properties of surface-based nanostructures, having as a main goal the deeper understanding of the atomic-scale mechanisms responsible for the formation and stability of such structures. This understanding will lead to the design of improved systems for applications in diverse areas such as novel electronic devices, sensors, field-effect transistors, substrates with enhanced hydro-phobic (water repelling) or hydro-philic (water absorbing) behavior for coatings of various surfaces used in bioengineering, flexible displays, organic photovoltaics, etc. The research consisted of developing new theoretical methodologies and applying them to a wide range of interesting physical systems. Highlights of the new methodologies include techniques for bridging different scales, from the quantum-mechanical electronic level to the meso-scopic level of large molecular structures such as DNA, carbon nanotubes and two-dimensional assemblies of organic molecules. These methodologies were successfully applied to investigate interactions between systems that are large on the atomic scale (reaching the scale of microns in length or milliseconds in time), but still incorporating all the essential elements of the atomic-scale structure. While the research performed here did not address applications directly, the implications of its finding are important in guiding experimental searches and in coming up with novel solutions to important problems. In this sense, the results of this work can be incorporated in the design of many useful applications. Specifically, in addition to elucidating important physical principles on how nano-structures are stabilized on surfaces, we have used our theoretical investigations to make predictions for useful applications in the following fields: a) we proposed new types of nanotubes that can overcome the limitations of the carbon nanotubes whose properties depend sensitively on the structure which

  9. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brizard, Alain J

    2009-12-31

    Final Technical Report for U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-09ER55005 Nonlinear FLR Effects in Reduced Fluid Models Alain J. Brizard, Saint Michael's College The above-mentioned DoE grant was used to support research activities by the PI during a sabbatical leave from Saint Michael's College in 2009. The major focus of the work was the role played by guiding-center and gyrocenter (linear and nonlinear) polarization and magnetization effects in understanding transport processes in turbulent magnetized plasmas. The theoretical tools used for this work include Lie-transform perturbation methods and Lagrangian (variational) methods developed by the PI in previous work. The present final technical report lists (I) the peer-reviewed publications that were written based on work funded by the Grant; (II) invited and contributed conference presentations during the period funded by the Grant; and (III) seminars presented during the period funded by the Grant. I. Peer-reviewed Publications A.J. Brizard and N. Tronko, 2011, Exact momentum conservation for the gyrokinetic Vlasov- Poisson equations, Physics of Plasmas 18 , 082307:1-14 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3625554 ]. J. Decker, Y. Peysson, A.J. Brizard, and F.-X. Duthoit, 2010, Orbit-averaged guiding-center Fokker-Planck operator for numerical applications, Physics of Plasmas 17, 112513:1-12 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3519514]. A.J. Brizard, 2010, Noether derivation of exact conservation laws for dissipationless reduced fluid models, Physics of Plasmas 17, 112503:1-8 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3515303]. F.-X. Duthoit, A.J. Brizard, Y. Peysson, and J. Decker, 2010, Perturbation analysis of trapped particle dynamics in axisymmetric dipole geometry, Physics of Plasmas 17, 102903:1-9 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3486554]. A.J. Brizard, 2010, Exact energy conservation laws for full and truncated nonlinear gyrokinetic equations, Physics of Plasmas 17, 042303:1-11 [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.3374428]. A

  10. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Sterling

    2007-05-29

    This project is conducted under the leadership and guidance of Sandia National Laboratory as part of the DOE Office of Science FAST-OS Program. It was initiated at the California Institute of Technology February 1, 2005. The Principal Investigator (PI), Dr. Thomas Sterling, accepted a position of Full Professor at the Department of Computer Science at Louisiana State University (LSU) on August 15, 2005, while retaining his position of Faculty Associate at California Institute of Technology’s Center for Advanced Computing Research. To take better advantage of the resources, research staff, and students at LSU, the award was transferred by DOE to LSU where research on the FAST-OS Config-OS project continues in accord with the original proposal. This brief report summarizes the accomplishments of this project during its initial phase at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  11. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis L. Eggleston

    2005-03-28

    The purpose of this grant was to experimentally investigate asymmetry-induced radial transport in a non-neutral (Penning-Malmberg) plasma trap. These traps provide an excellent platform for transport studies since the plasmas are generally well confined. One can then study transport in a controlled manner: the plasma is perturbed and the resulting transport measured. The focus of this research is the transport produced by applied asymmetric electric fields. The main results of our research concern (1) the theory of asymmetry-induced transport, (2) an absolute comparison of theory predictions with experimental results, (3) the amplitude scaling of the transport, (4) the frequency dependence of the transport, (5) the development of techniques to determine the relative contribution of mobility and diffusion to the transport, and (6) measuring the effect of small axial magnetic variations on the transport.

  12. Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan, K. D.

    2006-01-31

    This project investigated the feasibility of developing a remote temperature measurement instrument for energy-intensive industries. Existing remote temperature measurement techniques based on infrared radiation fail when excessive amounts of dust, smoke, or other particulates are present. We found that a remote temperature measurement instrument using microwaves demonstrated performance superior to infrared instrumentation in laboratory and field trials when dust or steam was present. Since improved temperature measurement helps improve energy efficiency and quality in a wide variety of industrial processes, making the new microwave instrument commercially available should lead to reduced energy usage, improved quality, and better competitiveness in a number of energy-intensive industries such as food processing and cement manufacturing. These improvements can lead to lower-priced products of improved quality for the consumer, and can contribute to the nation's energy independence.

  13. Triton - Voyager's finale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The investigation of the Neptunian satellite Triton by the Voyager 2 is described with interpretations of the object's nature and composition. The orbit, seasonal cycle, and southern-hemisphere solstice are described, and the composition of the satellite is discussed. Triton's mass and radius are known, and the objects is made up of about 70 percent rock and organics and 30 percent ice by mass. Triton's interior is warm and geologically active considering its distance from the sun, and large amounts of frozen methane and nitrogen are theorized to contribute to the object's high reflectivity. Also noted in the Voyager color images are creeping ice, cryogenic lava, and dark streaks on the south polar cap from nitrogen gas leaks driven by a type of greenhouse effect. Triton represents a class of satellite that has not been observed previously: a moon-sized body in a retrograde inclined orbit from the class of objects that coalesced to form Neptune.

  14. Nested Narratives Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Andrew T.; Pattengale, Nicholas D.; Forsythe, James C.; Carvey, Bradley John

    2015-02-01

    In cybersecurity forensics and incident response, the story of what has happened is the most impor- tant artifact yet the one least supported by tools and techniques. Existing tools focus on gathering and manipulating low-level data to allow an analyst to investigate exactly what happened on a host system or a network. Higher-level analysis is usually left to whatever ad hoc tools and techniques an individual may have developed. We discuss visual representations of narrative in the context of cybersecurity incidents with an eye toward multi-scale illustration of actions and actors. We envision that this representation could smoothly encompass individual packets on a wire at the lowest level and nation-state-level actors at the highest. We present progress to date, discuss the impact of technical risk on this project and highlight opportunities for future work.

  15. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Jacquelyn Yanch

    2006-05-22

    This project involved the development of a method for in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis for the investigation of Boron-10 distribution in a rabbit knee. The overall objective of this work was a robust approach for rapid screening of new {sup 10}B-labelled compounds to determine their suitability for use in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis via Boron Neutron Capture Synovectomy (BNCS). For BNCS it is essential to obtain a compound showing high uptake levels in the synovium and long residence time in the joints. Previously the in vivo uptake behavior of potential compounds was evaluated in the arthritic knee joints of rabbits via extensive dissection studies. These studies are very labor-intensive and involve sacrificing large numbers of animals. An in vivo {sup 10}B screening approach was developed to provide initial evaluation of potential compounds. Only those compounds showing positive uptake and retention characteristics will be evaluated further via dissection studies. No further studies will be performed with compounds showing rapid clearance and/or low synovial uptake. Two approaches to in vivo screening were investigated using both simulation methods and experimentation. Both make use of neutron beams generated at the MIT Research Reactor. The first, Transmission Computed Tomography (TCT) was developed and tested but was eventually rejected due to very limited spatial resolution using existing reactor beams. The second, in vivo prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (IVPGNAA) was much more promising. IVPGNAA was developed using computer simulation and physical measurement coupled with image reconstruction techniques. The method was tested in arthritic New Zealand rabbits previously injected intra-articularly with three boron labeled compounds and shown to be effective in providing information regarding uptake level and residence time of {sup 10}B in the joint.

  16. Final project report

    SciTech Connect

    Podzorov, Vitaly

    2012-10-28

    The scope of this project is to investigate fundamental aspects of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) grown at the surface of organic semiconductors and other electronic materials, recently discovered in our group (Fig. 1) [1]. Understanding the growth mechanism and structure of these SAMs, as well as investigating the effect of SAM-induced high surface conductivity, are the main thrusts of the project. An additional thrust of the project is to find new ways of surface doping or surface gating of novel semiconductors, in which electronic traps at the interface would be passivated. Molecular self assembly is an exciting research area of modern materials science, playing an important role in a variety of emerging applications, such as organic and molecular electronics, bioengineering, sensors and actuators. The current effort in this field has been focused on two experimental platforms: SAMs on metals (e.g., Au) and SAMs on inorganic oxides (e.g., SiO2). We have recently discovered the third platform, molecular self-assembly at the surface of carbon-based electronic materials (organic semiconductors, graphene and CNTs), which opens new opportunities for fundamental research and applications (Fig. 1) [1, 2, 3]. One of the most intriguing aspects of the new discovery is that formation of an FTS self-assembled monolayer on these materials induces a high-density mobile charges, with n up to 1014 cm-2, resulting in a large surface conductivity, σ ≈ 10-5 S·square-1 [1]. The effect is due to an interfacial electron transfer from the semiconductor to the SAM, resulting in a 0.54 V potential drop across the 1.3 nm-thick SAM, as recently revealed by Kelvin probe microscopy in rubrene [4].

  17. IRIS Final Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    M. D. Carelli

    2003-11-03

    OAK-B135 This NERI project, originally started as the Secure Transportable Autonomous Light Water Reactor (STAR-LW) and currently known as the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) project, had the objective of investigating a novel type of water-cooled reactor to satisfy the Generation IV goals: fuel cycle sustainability, enhanced reliability and safety, and improved economics. The research objectives over the three-year (1999-2002) program were as follows: First year: Assess various design alternatives and establish main characteristics of a point design; Second year: Perform feasibility and engineering assessment of the selected design solutions; Third year: Complete reactor design and performance evaluation, including cost assessment These objectives were fully attained and actually they served to launch IRIS as a full fledged project for eventual commercial deployment. The program did not terminate in 2002 at the end of the NERI program, and has just entered in its fifth year. This has been made possible by the IRIS project participants which have grown from the original four member, two-countries team to the current twenty members, nine countries consortium. All the consortium members work under their own funding and it is estimated that the value of their in-kind contributions over the life of the project has been of the order of $30M. Currently, approximately 100 people worldwide are involved in the project. A very important constituency of the IRIS project is the academia: 7 universities from four countries are members of the consortium and five more US universities are associated via parallel NERI programs. To date, 97 students have worked or are working on IRIS; 59 IRIS-related graduate theses have been prepared or are in preparation, and 41 of these students have already graduated with M.S. (33) or Ph.D. (8) degrees. This ''final'' report (final only as far as the NERI program is concerned) summarizes the work performed in the first four

  18. 78 FR 21592 - Drawn Stainless Steel Sinks from the People's Republic of China: Amended Final Determination of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ... Republic of China: Investigation, Final Determination, 78 FR 13019 (February 26, 2013) (``Final... Investigation, 77 FR 60673 (October 4, 2012) (``Preliminary Determination''). Continuation of Suspension of... CONTACT: Brooke Kennedy or Eve Wang, AD/CVD Operations, Office 8, Import Administration,...

  19. Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jin; Zhao, Yiping

    2014-12-05

    In this entire project period from 2005-2014, we have made significant progress in developing novel nanostructures of metal oxides (MOs) for solar hydrogen generation based on photoelectrochemical (PEC). Materials investigated are focused on 1D and 0D MO nanostructures of TiO2, WO3, ZnO, and Fe2O3 in conjunction with quantum dot (QD) sensitization and chemical doping (N or H) to alter their electronic band structures for both visible light absorption and for facilitating interfacial charge transport. In addition, we have used plasmonic metal nanostructures to enhance the PEC performance by improving light absorption of QDs via enhanced scattering of the plamonic metal. Most importantly, we have discovered a multipronged strategy for improving PEC performance: using plasmonic metal nanostructure to enhance light absorption, QDs to improve charge transfer, and chemical doping to increase charge transport in metal oxides for PEC. The combination is critical for overall high efficiency of PEC. This strategy is developed and demonstrated for the first time to our best knowledge.

  20. Final LDRD report :

    SciTech Connect

    Kronawitter, Coleman X.; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Mao, Samuel S.

    2012-01-01

    The distinction between electricity and fuel use in analyses of global power consumption statistics highlights the critical importance of establishing efficient synthesis techniques for solar fuelsthose chemicals whose bond energies are obtained through conversion processes driven by solar energy. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) processes show potential for the production of solar fuels because of their demonstrated versatility in facilitating optoelectronic and chemical conversion processes. Tandem PEC-photovoltaic modular configurations for the generation of hydrogen from water and sunlight (solar water splitting) provide an opportunity to develop a low-cost and efficient energy conversion scheme. The critical component in devices of this type is the PEC photoelectrode, which must be optically absorptive, chemically stable, and possess the required electronic band alignment with the electrochemical scale for its charge carriers to have sufficient potential to drive the hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions. After many decades of investigation, the primary technological obstacle remains the development of photoelectrode structures capable of efficient conversion of light with visible frequencies, which is abundant in the solar spectrum. Metal oxides represent one of the few material classes that can be made photoactive and remain stable to perform the required functions.

  1. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Laub

    2008-12-29

    Our team of investigators from MIT (Michael Laub) and Stanford (Harley McAdams and Lucy Shapiro) conducted a multi-faceted, systematic experimental analysis of the 106 Caulobacter two-component signal transduction system proteins (62 histidine kinases and 44 response regulators) to understand how they coordinate cell cycle progression, metabolism, and response to environmental changes. These two-component signaling proteins were characterized at the genetic, biochemical, and genomic levels. The results generated by our laboratories have provided numerous insights into how Caulobacter cells sense and respond to a myriad of signals. As nearly all bacteria use two-component signaling for cell regulation, the results from this project help to deepen our general understanding of bacterial signal transduction. The tools and approaches developed can be applied to other bacteria. In particular, work from the Laub laboratory now enables the systematic, rational rewiring of two-component signaling proteins, a major advance that stands to impact synthetic biology and the development of biosensors and other designer molecular circuits. Results are summarized from our work. Each section lists publications and publicly-available resources which result from the work described.

  2. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Judy D. Wall

    2009-02-27

    Bioremediation of radionuclides and metals in the subsurface necessitate an understanding of the metabolic capacities and interactions of the anaerobic microorganisms that are found there, including members of the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Genetic investigation into the pathway of reductant flow to U(VI) in the SRB belonging to the genus Desulfovibrio has been the focus of this project. In Dv. desulfuricans strain G20, we confirmed the importance of the tetraheme cytochrome c3 by disruption of the gene encoding that cytochrome, cycA, and demonstrated a decrease in the ability of the mutant (I2) to reduce U(VI). We found that the cytochrome c3 was necessary for electrons from pyruvate to reach sulfate or fumarate as terminal electron acceptors. It was not needed for electrons from lactate to reach sulfate, from which we infer that a different pathway is used for the electrons from these two substrates. Cyrstal structure of the tetraheme cytochrome c3 was obtained and site-directed mutations of the protein indicated a binding site for metals at heme 4 of the structure. Kinetic studies for oxidation of reduced cytochrome c3 with U(VI) or molybdate revealed a preference for U(VI) as a substrate. Evidence for a role for sodium gradients in the energetic scheme for this soil organism was obtained.

  3. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, Reiner; Urrutia, J. Manuel

    2009-09-08

    emissions are only observed in whistler spheromaks and FRCs but not in mirrors or asymmetric configurations lacking magnetic null lines. The collisionless electron energization in a toroidal null line usually produces non-Maxwellian distributions. Off the null axis electrons gain more perpendicular than parallel energy. Distributions with T{sub {perpendicular}} > T{sub {parallel}} lead to whistler instabilities which have been observed. A whistler spheromak is a source of high-frequency whistler emissions. These are usually small amplitude whistlers propagating in a complicated background magnetic field. The waves are emitted from a moving source. High frequency whistlers propagate faster than the spheromak, thus partly move ahead of it and partly in the reverse direction. In test wave experiments wave growth opposite to the direction of the hot electron flow has been observed, confirming that Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance instabilities account for the emission process. Propagating whistler mirrors produce no significant instabilities except when they interact with other fields which exhibit null lines. For example, a whistler mirror has been launched against a stationary FRC, resulting in strong FRC heating and whistler instabilities. In the whistler mirror configuration the antenna near-zone field produces a toroidal null line outside the coil which can also become a source for whistler emissions. Finally, nonlinear EMHD research has been extended to initially unmagnetized plasmas where a new nonlinear skin depth has been discovered. When a small-amplitude oscillating magnetic field is applied to a plasma the field penetration is governed by the skin depth, collisional or collisionless depending on frequency, collision frequency and plasma frequency. However, when the magnetic field increases the electrons become magnetized and the field penetration occurs in the whistler mode if the cyclotron frequency exceeds the oscillating frequency. This phenomenon has been

  4. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Juan Camilo Serrano

    2011-12-16

    New and novel material and process technologies applied in wind blade designs and production are critical to increasing the competitiveness of wind power generation against traditional sources of energy. In this project, through collaboration between PPG Industries and MAG Industrial Automation Systems, the potential of using automated manufacturing for the production of fiber glass composite wind blades was evaluated from both technical and economic points of view. Further, it was demonstrated that by modifying the standard blade raw material forms through the use of cost effective pre-impregnated rovings coupled with using an automated fiber placement machine to lay up the parts, it is possible to produce state of the art composite laminates with significantly improved mechanical performance and with higher processing rates than standard blade production technology allows for today, thereby lowering the cost of energy over turbine blades made using traditional processes and materials. In conformity with the scope of work of the submitted proposal, the project team completed each task and documented and reported its findings on the appropriate quarterly report submitted to the DOE project team. The activities and this report are divided into 5 subtasks: (1) Material Investigation - Reviews traditional materials and key specifications and testing methods; (2) Manufacturing and Automation - Identifies new candidate material forms and automated layup processes; (3) Process Development - Performs trials of candidate materials and processes; (4) Predictive Analysis - Assesses impact of new material forms and automated processes on a model blade design; and (5) Feasibility Assessment - Compares traditional manufacturing processes and materials to new candidate material forms and automated processes.

  5. Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Caine Finnerty

    2008-01-14

    NanoDynamics Inc. has undertaken a study to develop and demonstrate an anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell capable of generating a minimum of 20 W per cell on hydrogen. The cell technology will also be assed for operation on renewable hydrocarbon-based fuels such as biomass gas, as well its applicability for larger-scale power production. The project was divided into five sub-tasks, the first of which was the development and refinement of the cell manufacturing processes of gel-casting and paste extrusion for the fabrication of planar and tubular anode supports. These methods exhibited high production yields with excellent reproducibility. Using a conventional YSZ-based cell as a performance benchmark, new materials-sets and cell configurations were developed. Three prototype configurations were implemented, the best generating an average of 10 W per cell, and exhibiting excellent potential for further development and scale-up. Using a variety of techniques such as modifying the materials-set, microstructure, and cell configuration, cells with an average power output of 22.7 W were demonstrated, 13.5% in excess of the 20 W project goal. Thermal cycling was performed on such cells, and it was found that over a regime of 150 cycles (approximately 300 h), the cell power increased by 1.8%. So-called “short-stacks” comprised of up to 6 cells were fabricated to study the feasibility of further stack scale-up. Such a 6-cell short-stacks operated on dry hydrogen exhibited power outputs of 80 W, a 6.4% power increase from their constituent cells, showing that the cells had excellent potential for further scale-up. Optimized Rev A cells were built into a 3-cell stack, and found to produce 63.42 W operating on hydrogen, and 58.18 W on methane. The feasibility of a biogas-fed SOFC was also investigated. Utilizing in-house developed catalysts, methane conversion and hydrogen yield was found to be 98 and 42%, respectively. By incorporating this catalyst material into

  6. ICCK Conference Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Green, William H.

    2013-05-28

    The 7th International Conference on Chemical Kinetics (ICCK) was held July 10-14, 2011, at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in Cambridge, MA, hosted by Prof. William H. Green of MIT's Chemical Engineering department. This cross-disciplinary meeting highlighted the importance of fundamental understanding of elementary reactions to the full range of chemical investigations. The specific conference focus was on elementary-step kinetics in both the gas phase and in condensed phase. The meeting provided a unique opportunity to discuss how the same reactive species and reaction motifs manifest under very different reaction conditions (e.g. atmospheric, aqueous, combustion, plasma, in nonaqueous solvents, on surfaces.). The conference featured special sessions on new/improved experimental techniques, improved models and data analysis for interpreting complicated kinetics, computational kinetics (especially rate estimates for large kinetic models), and a panel discussion on how the community should document/archive kinetic data. In the past, this conference had been limited to homogeneous gas-phase and liquid-phase systems. This conference included studies of heterogeneous kinetics which provide rate constants for, or insight into, elementary reaction steps. This Grant from DOE BES covered about half of the subsidies we provided to students and postdocs who attended the conference, by charging them reduced-rate registration fees. The complete list of subsidies provided are listed in Table 1 below. This DOE funding was essential to making the conference affordable to graduate students, and indeed the attendance at this conference was higher than at previous conferences in this series. Donations made by companies provided additional subsidies, leveraging the DOE funding. The conference was very effective in educating graduate students and important in fostering scientific interactions, particularly between scientists studying gas phase and liquid phase kinetics

  7. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Loren F. Goodrich

    2011-05-31

    NIST has played a key role in many of the one-on-one, domestic, and international interlaboratory comparisons of measurements on superconductors. The history of interlaboratory comparisons of measurements on superconductors tells us that careful measurement methods are needed to obtain consistent results. Inconsistent results can lead to many problems including: a mistrust of the results of others, unfair advantages in commerce, and erroneous feedback in the optimization of conductor performance. NIST has experience in many interlaboratory comparisons; a long-term commitment to measurement accuracy; and independent, third-party laboratory status. The principal investigator's direct involvement in the measurements and daily supervision of sample mounting is the unique situation that has allowed important discoveries and evolution of our capabilities over the last 30 years. The principal investigator's research and metrology has helped to improve the accuracy of critical-current (I{sub c}) measurements in laboratories throughout the world. As conductors continue to improve and design limits are tested, the continuation of the long-term commitment to measurement accuracy could be vitally important to the success of new conductor development programs. It is extremely important to the U.S. wire manufacturers to get accurate (high certainty) I{sub c} measurements in order to optimize conductor performance. The optimization requires the adjustment of several fabrication parameters (such as reaction time, reaction temperature, conductor design, doping, diffusion barrier, Cu to non-Cu ratio, and twist pitch) based on the I{sub c} measurement of the conductor. If the I{sub c} measurements are made with high variability, it may be unclear whether or not the parameters are being adjusted in the optimal direction or whether or not the conductor meets the target specification. Our metrology is vital to the U.S. wire manufacturers in the highly competitive international arena and

  8. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Shayya, Walid

    2007-03-20

    interconnect with the power grid was approved by NYSEG (the electrical power provider) and the combined heat and power generation (CHP) system was authorized to start on February 27, 2007. The system has been in operation since February 28, 2007, and is generating 45 to 50 kW of electrical power on continuous basis. The completed project will ultimately allow for investigating the facility of utilizing organic waste from a dairy operation in a hard-top plug-flow methane digester with the ultimate goal of reducing environmental risk, increasing economic benefits, and demonstrating the viability of an anaerobic methane digestion system. Many benefits are expected as a result of the completed project including our better understanding of the anaerobic digestion process and its management as well as the facility to utilize the methane digester as a demonstration site for dairy producers, farmers, and organic waste producers in New York State and the Northeast. Additional benefits include helping current and future students in dairy science and technology, agricultural business, environmental sciences, agricultural engineering, and other disciplines develop better understanding of underutilized biomass alternative energy technologies, environmental conservation, environmental stewardship, and sustainable agriculture.

  9. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Stavropoulos, Pericles

    2004-03-04

    Our research has as its primary objective the development and mechanistic investigation of suitable photocatalytic surfaces, as mediators of energy-efficient heterogeneous oxidation of aliphatic hydrocarbons. Particular emphasis is placed on mixed iron(III)/titanium(IV) oxide semiconductor particulates, featuring low %Fe content, for which a novel synthetic protocol has been developed in this laboratory, relying on sol-gel hydrolysis of high purity iron and titanium isopropoxide precursors, followed by thermal treatment to develop the active anatase phase. This methodology leads to replacement of Ti(IV) ions by Fe(III) sites in the TiO{sub 2} (anatase) lattice, and is contrasted to samples prepared by physical mixing of nanometer-sized a-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} (gift from MACH I, Inc.) and TiO{sub 2} (Degussa P-25). Mechanistic understanding of these systems involves multifaceted approaches. Our unique ability to evaluate charge-carrier separation distances, as measured by time-resolved photocharge experiments (TRPC) on instrumentation pioneered by Dr. Levy, permits correlation of this important photophysical property to photocatalytic efficiency and reaction mechanism. A major redesign of our benchmark TRPC apparatus was recently undertaken, which provides for controlled environments during measurement, i.e., vacuum; controlled atmosphere (inert or reactive); and temperature control (-100 to +150 C). Operation of this new TRPC cell necessitated insulation from RF noise, which was achieved by employing a walk-in Faraday enclosure to house the apparatus and supporting instrumentation. Previous work has shown that charge-carrier separation distances (CCSD) for Pt dopped TiO{sub 2} pass through a maximum at very low %Pt content. A similar region of maximum CCSD has now been tentatively identified with samples of a-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} (0-0.02 %Fe) under ambient conditions. Interestingly, the decay portion of the TRPC waveform (charge recombination) exhibits

  10. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Sara Bergan, Executive Director; Brendan Jordan, Program Manager; Subcontractors as listed on the report.

    2007-06-06

    The following report contributes to our knowledge of how to economically produce wildlife-friendly grass mixtures for future fuel feedstocks in the northern plains. It investigates northern-adapted cultivars; management and harvest regimes that are good for yields, soils and wildlife; comparative analysis of monocultures and simple mixtures of native grasses; economic implications of growing grasses for fuel feedstocks in specific locations in the northern plains; and conversion options for turning the grasses into useful chemicals and fuels. The core results of this study suggest the following; Native grasses, even simple grass mixtures, can be produced profitably in the northern plains as far west as the 100th meridian with yields ranging from 2 to 6 tons per acre; Northern adapted cultivars may yield less in good years, but have much greater long-term sustainable yield potential than higher-yielding southern varieties; Grasses require very little inputs and stop economically responding to N applications above 56kg/hectare; Harvesting after a killing frost may reduce the yield available in that given year but will increase overall yields averaged throughout multiple years; Harvesting after a killing frost or even in early spring reduces the level of ash and undesirable molecules like K which cause adverse reactions in pyrolysis processing. Grasses can be managed for biomass harvest and maintain or improve overall soil-health and carbon sequestration benefits of idled grassland; The carbon sequestration activity of the grasses seems to follow the above ground health of the biomass. In other words plots where the above ground biomass is regularly removed can continue to sequester carbon at the rate of 2 tons/acre/year if the stand health is strong and yielding significant amounts of biomass; Managing grasses for feedstock quality in a biomass system requires some of the same management strategies as managing for wildlife benefit. We believe that biomass development

  11. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mattes, M. Jules

    2005-06-10

    possible to kill single cells with Abs conjugated to LEE emitters, and that the level of Ab binding, with high-density antigens, should be sufficient to achieve this effect. But we were the first to put this idea into practice. Therefore, we feel that we have essentially opened up a new area of research, and that future investigators will be able to build on the solid foundation than we have laid.

  12. HINTS Puerto Rico: Final Report

    Cancer.gov

    This final report describes HINTS implementation in Puerto Rico. The report addresses sampling; staffing, training and management of data collection; calling protocol; findings from the CATI Operations, and sample weights.

  13. [Ethics in nursing research and investigation].

    PubMed

    Busquets Alibés, Ester

    2009-12-01

    Investigation is indispensable for the nursing profession because it contributes to the development of the overall set of knowledge the profession has and thereby improves the practical, clinical care given to patients. However if we look into the history of research and investigation, we realize that investigators have not always respected persons' fundamental rights. This article starts with a short introduction which highlights the role played by investigation for the nursing profession. Then the author presents a historical overview on investigation in order to provide insights into the ethical problems related to investigation, and finally the author comments on the main ethical criteria which should be followed during investigation by nurses.

  14. 19 CFR 207.21 - Final phase notice of scheduling.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Final phase notice of scheduling. 207.21 Section 207.21 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR FROM SUBSIDIZED EXPORTS TO THE UNITED...

  15. Final Vowel-Consonant-e.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burmeister, Lou E.

    The utility value of the final vowel-consonant-e phonic generalization was examined using 2,715 common English words. When the vowel was defined as a single-vowel, the consonant as a single-consonant, and the final e as a single-e the generalization was found to be highly useful, contrary to other recent findings. Using the total sample of 2,715…

  16. Investigating photonic quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Casey Robert

    The use of photons as qubits is a promising implementation for quantum computation. The inability of photons to interact, especially with the environment, makes them an ideal physical candidate. However, this also makes them a difficult system to perform two qubit gates on. Recent breakthroughs in photonic quantum computing have shown methods around the requirement of direct photon-photon interaction. In this thesis we study three recently discovered schemes for optical quantum computation. We first investigate the so called linear optical quantum computing (LOQC) scheme, exploring a method to improve the original proposal by constructing a photon-number QND detector that succeeds with a high probability. In doing this we present a new type of LOQC teleporter, one that can detect the presence of a single photon in an arbitrary polarisation state when the input state is a sum of vacuum and multi-photon terms. This new type of teleporter is an improvement on the original scheme in that the entangled states required can be made offline with fewer entangling operations. We next investigate the so called quantum bus (qubus) scheme for photonic quantum computing. We show a scheme to measure the party of n qubit states by using a single qubus mode, controlled rotations and displacements. This allows for the syndrome measurements of any stabilizer quantum error correcting code. We extend these results to a fault tolerant scheme to measure an arbitrary Pauli operator of weight n, incorporating so called single bit teleportations. We investigate the construction of a Toffoli gate by using a single qubus mode, controlled rotations and displacements that works with a success probability of at least 25%. We also investigate the use of single bit teleportations to construct a universal set of gates on coherent state type logic and in the construction of cluster states. We finally investigate the optical Zeno gate, a gate that uses the Zeno effect in the form of two photon

  17. 49 CFR 1503.417 - Final Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty and Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Final Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty and Order... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Assessment of Civil Penalties by TSA § 1503.417 Final Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty and Order. (a) Issuance. TSA may issue a Final Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty...

  18. MPO B593110 - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Brooksby, C

    2011-07-25

    National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) shall provide one (1) Mechanical Engineer to support the Linear Collider Subsystem Development Program at Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS). The NSTec Mechanical Engineer's efforts will include engineering, design, and drawing support for the Vacuum Seal Test. NSTec will also provide a final report of the setup and input to LLNL's project management on project status. The NSTec Mechanical Engineer's efforts will also include engineering, design, and drawing support to the conceptual design for manufacturing of the Flux Concentrator Magnet. NSTec will also contribute to LLNS's final report on the Flux Concentrator Magnet. The deliverables are drawings, sketches, engineering documents, and final reports delivered to the LLNS Technical Representative.

  19. United States Air Force 611th Air Support Group/Civil Engineering Squadron Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Remedial investigation and feasibility study. Barter Island Radar Installation, Alaska. Volume 1 (includes appendices a through c). Revision 1. Final report, January 1995-January 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Karmi, S.; Madden, J.; Borsetti, R.

    1996-01-05

    This report presents the findings of Remedial Investigations and Feasibility Studies at sites located at the Barter Island radar installation in northern Alaska. The sites were characterized based on sampling and analyses conducted during Remedial Investigation activities performed during August and September 1993.

  20. A New Comprehensive Final Exam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhavsar, Suketu P.

    2015-01-01

    Instructors aspire for students to master all the material covered. The final exam should assess the breadth and depth of their learning and be a significant basis for the final grade. I insist on a comprehensive final because I want students to review early material in light of later topics. I believe that this helps students create connections, integrate understanding, and retain knowledge for the long term. For non-science majors, reviewing and retaining the large amount of astronomy material is daunting. I experimented with a final exam format that calmed their fears and encouraged thorough review. It is only practical for a class of about twenty students or less. I provided a number of challenging conceptual and problem solving questions (at least as many as there were students), crafted to interconnect and span the entire range of topics. The order of the questions reflected the sequence in which the topics had been discussed. Students received these questions in ample time to prepare prior to the final. A student could bring up to 5 standard sheets of notes to the final. At the final, each student picked a number out of a hat. This was the question they had to answer in a 5-minute presentation. They were allowed 15 minutes for a final preparation during which they could use their 5 pages of notes. The presentations were given in order, 1- 20. Written comments on at least 10 other talks, explaining what was missed or correcting a mistake were required. They were graded both on their talk and on their comments. This format required students to be prepared for any question and encouraged interaction and communication while studying. Knowing the questions beforehand provided a guide to their studying as well as allayed their fears about what could be asked. The students also received guidance to what constituted a good answer, namely accuracy (correct scientific argument, appropriate facts, no irrelevant material), thoroughness (answered the complete questions

  1. Final disposal of radioactive waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freiesleben, H.

    2013-06-01

    In this paper the origin and properties of radioactive waste as well as its classification scheme (low-level waste - LLW, intermediate-level waste - ILW, high-level waste - HLW) are presented. The various options for conditioning of waste of different levels of radioactivity are reviewed. The composition, radiotoxicity and reprocessing of spent fuel and their effect on storage and options for final disposal are discussed. The current situation of final waste disposal in a selected number of countries is mentioned. Also, the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency with regard to the development and monitoring of international safety standards for both spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste management is described.

  2. Karlson ozone sterilizer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Karlson, E.

    1984-05-07

    The authors have a functional sterilization system employing ozone as a sterilization agent. This final report covers the work that led to the first medical sterilizer using ozone as the sterilizing agent. The specifications and the final design were set by hospital operating room personnel and public safety standards. Work on kill tests using bacteria, viruses and fungi determined the necessary time and concentration of ozone necessary for sterilization. These data were used in the Karlson Ozone Sterilizer to determine the length of the steps of the operating cycle and the concentration of ozone to be used. 27 references.

  3. The Thy Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billimoria, Roshan R., Ed.

    Inspiried by a United Nations effort to establish a worldwide university, the four and one-half year project carried out in Thy (Denmark) is explained in this final report, from its historical beginnings in 1973 to its official completion in 1978. Dedicated to the solution of problems which could be considered universal, the project goals are…

  4. Stable Black Families. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gary, Lawrence E.; And Others

    This document is the final report of a study conducted to determine what factors contribute to strong Black family life and how these strong families solve problems, in order to add to the knowledge base on stable families so as to enhance practical intervention with families in need, and to identify models of self-help strategies used by stable…

  5. The Trine Project Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunderson, Jon R.; And Others

    The final report describes the Trine Project which addressed three needs in the education of handicapped children: the need for an alternate writing system, the need for communication, and the need for access to general purpose computers used in the schools. The project had three major objectives: (1) to design a low-cost portable writing and…

  6. Project Dakota Outreach: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjerland, Linda

    This final report describes the activities of Project Dakota Outreach, an early education program for children with disabilities designed to assist families living in Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Empowerment and Enterprise Zones in Texas, New York, and Minnesota. The major feature of the model is power-balancing, a concept…

  7. Deaths: Final Data for 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Sherry L.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents final 1998 data on U.S. deaths and death rates according to demographic and medical characteristics such as age, sex, race, Hispanic origin, marital status, educational attainment, injury at work, state of residence, and cause of death. Trends and patterns in general mortality, life expectancy, and infant and maternal…

  8. MINIMARS conceptual design: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.D.

    1986-09-01

    This volume contains the following sections: (1) fueling systems; (2) blanket; (3) alternative blanket concepts; (4) halo scraper/direct converter system study and final conceptual design; (5) heat-transport and power-conversion systems; (6) tritium systems; (7) minimars air detritiation system; (8) appropriate radiological safety design criteria; and (9) cost estimate. (MOW)

  9. SLC Final Performance and Lessons

    SciTech Connect

    Phinney, Nan

    2000-10-25

    The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) was the first prototype of a new type of accelerator, the electron-positron linear collider. Many years of dedicated effort were required to understand the physics of this new technology and to develop the techniques for maximizing performance. Key issues were emittance dilution, stability, final beam optimization and background control. Precision, non-invasive diagnostics were required to measure and monitor the beams throughout the machine. Beam-based feedback systems were needed to stabilize energy, trajectory, intensity and the final beam size at the interaction point. variety of new tuning techniques were developed to correct for residual optical or alignment errors. The final focus system underwent a series of refinements in order to deliver sub-micron size beams. It also took many iterations to understand the sources of backgrounds and develop the methods to control them. The benefit from this accumulated experience was seen in the performance of the SLC during its final run in 1997-98. The luminosity increased by a factor of three to 3*10 30 and the 350,000 Z data sample delivered was nearly double that from all previous runs combined.

  10. Multihandicapped Blind. Final Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lloyd

    The final report of the Garden Grove unified school district project for 1969 through 1972 (funded through Title III) involving six multiply handicapped, legally blind children, 7- to 10-years-old, who were previously excluded from special education (SE) classes is presented. Described as the main procedural objective is development of a…

  11. Environmental Education Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Joan; Batty, Sara O.

    This final report deals with the efforts of the Environmental Action Coalition of New York City to change its network of recycling centers from collection points to educational centers for learning about solid waste and related environmental problems. This change was accomplished by first increasing the efficiency and the stability of the centers…

  12. Russian Cargo Craft Final Undocking

    NASA Video Gallery

    The ISS Progress 47 resupply vehicle, loaded with trash, undocked from the International Space Station’s Pirs docking compartment for the final time July 30 at 5:19 p.m. EDT. The cargo ship undo...

  13. LSCA Final Reports: Third Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Collin, Ed.

    This document includes final summary reports from 16 recent federally funded Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA) projects in California. This volume covers generally the period 1984-85, and reports are presented in six subject areas: programs for children, information and referral projects, institutional services, literacy, local history,…

  14. Expedited technology demonstration project final report: final forms

    SciTech Connect

    Hopper, R W

    1999-05-01

    ETDP Final Forms was an attempt to demonstrate the fabrication and performance of a ceramic waste form immobilizing the hazardous and radioactive elements of the MSO/SR mineral residues. The ceramic material had been developed previously. The fabrication system was constructed and functioned as designed except for the granulator. Fabrication of our particular ceramic, however, proved unsatisfactory. The ceramic material design was therefore changed toward the end of the project, replacing nepheline with zircon as the sink for silica. Preliminary results were encouraging, but more development is needed. Fabrication of the new ceramic requires major changes in the processing: Calcination and granulation would be replaced by spray drying; and sintering would be at higher temperature. The main goal of the project--demonstrating the fabrication and performance of the waste form--was not achieved. This report summarizes Final Forms' activities. The problem of immobilizing the MSO/SR mineral residues is discussed.

  15. Luminosities for Final Flash Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Kenneth; Joyce, Richard; Lebzelter, Thomas

    2010-08-01

    A brief yet common evolutionary process is a post-AGB final episode of helium shell burning. This occurs after a low mass star has ejected a planetary nebula and has started on the white dwarf track. Seven stars are now classified with varying degrees of certainty as one of these ``final flash'' objects. Two of these have actually been observed to eject a shell of gas first as a pseudo-photosphere and then as a thick dust envelope. The dust envelopes are expanding at ~100 km s^-1. We propose AO imaging of the circumstellar shells to measure changes from images recorded a decade or more ago. From these changes we will determine geometric parallaxes and hence luminosities. The luminosity will be compared to stellar evolution models. In an additional challenge to models we will calibrate the He I emission line flux and through this the mass loss rate from the fast stellar wind.

  16. NONLINEAR DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS - Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Philip Holmes

    2005-12-31

    This document is the final report on the work completed on DE-FG02-95ER25238 since the start of the second renewal period: Jan 1, 2001. It supplements the annual reports submitted in 2001 and 2002. In the renewal proposal I envisaged work in three main areas: Analytical and topological tools for studying flows and maps Low dimensional models of fluid flow Models of animal locomotion and I describe the progess made on each project.

  17. Inelastic final-state interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko; Suzuki, Mahiko

    2007-10-29

    The final-state interaction in multichannel decay processes is systematically studied with application to B decay in mind. Since the final-state interaction is intrinsically interwoven with the decay interaction in this case, no simple phase theorem like"Watson's theorem" holds for experimentally observed final states. We first examine in detail the two-channel problem as a toy-model to clarify the issues and to remedy common mistakes made in earlier literature. Realistic multichannel problems are too challenging for quantitative analysis. To cope with mathematical complexity, we introduce a method of approximation that is applicable to the case where one prominent inelastic channel dominates over all others. We illustrate this approximation method in the amplitude of the decay B to pi K fed by the intermediate states of a charmed meson pair. Even with our approximation we need more accurate information of strong interactions than we have now. Nonetheless we are able to obtain some insight in the issue and draw useful conclusions on general features on the strong phases.

  18. Inelastic final-state interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2008-03-01

    The final-state interaction in multichannel decay processes is systematically studied in the hadronic picture with application to B decay in mind. Since the final-state interaction is intrinsically interwoven with the decay interaction in this case, no simple phase theorem like ''Watson's theorem'' holds for experimentally observed final states. We first solve exactly the two-channel problem as a toy model in order to clarify the issues. The constraints of the two-channel approximation turns out to be too stringent for most B decay modes, but realistic multichannel problems are too complex for useful quantitative analysis at present. To alleviate the stringent constraints of the two-body problem and to cope with complexity beyond it, we introduce a method of approximation that is applicable to the case where one prominent inelastic channel dominates over all others. We illustrate this approximation method with the amplitude of the decay B{yields}K{pi} fed by the intermediate states of a charmed-meson pair. Even with our approximation we need more accurate information of strong interactions than we have now. Nonetheless we are able to obtain some insight in the issue and draw useful conclusions on general features on the strong phases.

  19. 75 FR 29915 - Direct Final Rulemaking Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... Transportation published a final rule adopting direct final rule procedures (69 FR 4455) and the Federal Railroad Administration published a final rule adopting direct final rule ] procedures on March 7, 2007 (72 FR 10086... Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19476) or you may visit http://dms.dot.gov ....

  20. Dynamics explorer interdisciplinary scientist investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozyra, Janet U.; Nagy, A. F.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a final report on research activities and accomplishments that occurred during the funding period of 10-1-90 through 1-30-94. The focus of our interdisciplinary investigation during the Dynamics Explorer Mission was on the complex coupling processes that tap the magnetic-storm energy, stored in the ring current particle reservoir, and transport this energy into the subauroral, midlatitude and even equatorial ionospheric regions. The transport of energy through the inner magnetosphere and into the underlying ionospheric regions is a critical element in our understanding of the impact of solar and magnetic disturbances on upper atmospheric and ionospheric regions equatorward of the auroral zone.

  1. Hydrothermal reaction of fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, P.W.

    1994-12-31

    The reactions which occur when fly ash is treated under hydrothermal conditions were investigated. This was done for the following primary reasons. The first of these is to determine the nature of the phases that form to assess the stabilities of these phases in the ambient environment and, finally, to assess whether these phases are capable of sequestering hazardous species. The second reason for undertaking this study was whether, depending on the composition of the ash and the presence of selected additives, it would be possible under hydrothermal conditions to form compounds which have cementitious properties. Formation of four classes of compounds, which bracket likely fly ash compositional ranges, were selected for study. The classes are calcium silicate hydrates, calcium selenates, and calcium aluminosulfates, and silicate-based glasses. Specific compounds synthesized were determined and their stability regions assessed. As part of stability assessment, the extent to which selected hazardous species are sequestered was determined. Finally, the cementing properties of these compounds were established. The results obtained in this program have demonstrated that mild hydrothermal conditions can be employed to improve the reactivity of fly ash. Such improvements in reactivity can result in the formation of monolithic forms which may exhibit suitable mechanical properties for selected applications as building materials. If the ashes involved are considered hazardous, the mechanical properties exhibited indicated the forms could be handled in a manner which facilitates their disposal.

  2. Summer 1994 Computational Science Workshop. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This report documents the work performed by the University of New Mexico Principal Investigators and Research Assistants while hosting the highly successful Summer 1994 Computational Sciences Workshop in Albuquerque on August 6--11, 1994. Included in this report is a final budget for the workshop, along with a summary of the participants` evaluation of the workshop. The workshop proceeding have been delivered under separate cover. In order to assist in the organization of future workshops, we have also included in this report detailed documentation of the pre- and post-workshop activities associated with this contract. Specifically, we have included a section that documents the advertising performed, along with the manner in which applications were handled. A complete list of the workshop participants in this section. Sample letters that were generated while dealing with various commercial entities and departments at the University are also included in a section dealing with workshop logistics. Finally, we have included a section in this report that deals with suggestions for future workshops.

  3. Learning in Science Project (Form 1-4). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waikato Univ., Hamilton (New Zealand).

    The Learning in Science Project investigated teaching and learning in science at the Form 1 to 4 level to identify some of the key difficulties in this subject area and to find ways of overcoming such difficulties. Included in this final report are: (1) brief accounts of the three major phases of the research; (2) a list of papers derived from the…

  4. Influence of Gender and Other Factors to Final Grade

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domeova, Ludmila; Jindrova, Andrea; Fejfar, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    The study focused on the relations between the partial evaluation and the final grade. The investigation has been done on a group of 269 students of the Czech University of Life Sciences in Prague, in the course of Mathematical Methods, who have to go through a strictly defined evaluation scheme. The results of statistical analysis confirmed that…

  5. Kansas Early Childhood Research Institute on Transitions. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Mabel L.; O'Brien, Marion

    This final report describes research projects and other activities of the Kansas Early Childhood Research Institute (KECRI), a multi-investigator, cross-disciplinary Institute focusing on successful transitions for young (birth to age 8) children with disabilities or developmental delays. Interventions were developed, evaluated, and disseminated…

  6. Leading Curriculum Innovation in Primary Schools Project: A Final Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brundrett, Mark; Duncan, Diane

    2015-01-01

    This article provides the final report on a research project that investigated the ways in which curriculum innovation can be led successfully in primary schools. Data gathering included 40 semi-structured interviews in 10 successful primary schools in England of varying sizes and types and in a range of geographical and social locations. Findings…

  7. Final report: Compiled MPI. Cost-Effective Exascale Application Development

    SciTech Connect

    Gropp, William Douglas

    2015-12-21

    This is the final report on Compiled MPI: Cost-Effective Exascale Application Development, and summarizes the results under this project. The project investigated runtime enviroments that improve the performance of MPI (Message-Passing Interface) programs; work at Illinois in the last period of this project looked at optimizing data access optimizations expressed with MPI datatypes.

  8. Digital-Computer Processing of Graphical Data. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Herbert

    The final report of a two-year study concerned with the digital-computer processing of graphical data. Five separate investigations carried out under this study are described briefly, and a detailed bibliography, complete with abstracts, is included in which are listed the technical papers and reports published during the period of this program.…

  9. Future Aeronautical Communication Infrastructure Technology Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Tricia; Jin, Jenny; Bergerm Jason; Henriksen, Steven

    2008-01-01

    This National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Contractor Report summarizes and documents the work performed to investigate technologies that could support long-term aeronautical mobile communications operating concepts for air traffic management (ATM) in the timeframe of 2020 and beyond, and includes the associated findings and recommendations made by ITT Corporation and NASA Glenn Research Center to the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The work was completed as the final phase of a multiyear NASA contract in support of the Future Communication Study (FCS), a cooperative research and development program of the United States FAA, NASA, and EUROCONTROL. This final report focuses on an assessment of final five candidate technologies, and also provides an overview of the entire technology assessment process, including final recommendations.

  10. New Approaches to Final Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Neuffer, David

    2014-11-10

    A high-energy muon collider scenario require a “final cooling” system that reduces transverse emittances by a factor of ~10 while allowing longitudinal emittance increase. The baseline approach has low-energy transverse cooling within high-field solenoids, with strong longitudinal heating. This approach and its recent simulation are discussed. Alternative approaches which more explicitly include emittance exchange are also presented. Round-to-flat beam transform, transverse slicing, and longitudinal bunch coalescence are possible components of the alternative approach. A more explicit understanding of solenoidal cooling beam dynamics is introduced.

  11. Field practice internship final report

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, T.

    1994-05-01

    This field practice internship final report gives an overview of the field practice, which was completed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Management Department, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field practice focused on the completion of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) Title III, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act Section 312, Tier II Report. The field practice internship was conducted on a full-time basis between December 13, 1993 through February 18, 1994. Sheila Poligone, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Coordinator served as the field practice preceptor.

  12. [Experimental nuclear physics]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-04-01

    This is the final report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Washington on work supported in part by US Department of Energy contract DE-AC06-81ER40048. It contains chapters on giant dipole resonances in excited nuclei, nucleus-nucleus reactions, astrophysics, polarization in nuclear reactions, fundamental symmetries and interactions, accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS), ultra-relativistic heavy ions, medium energy reactions, work by external users, instrumentation, accelerators and ion sources, and computer systems. An appendix lists Laboratory personnel, a Ph. D. degree granted in the 1990-1991 academic year, and publications. Refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Virtualized Network Control. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ghani, Nasir

    2013-02-01

    This document is the final report for the Virtualized Network Control (VNC) project, which was funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. This project was also informally referred to as Advanced Resource Computation for Hybrid Service and TOpology NEtworks (ARCHSTONE). This report provides a summary of the project's activities, tasks, deliverable, and accomplishments. It also provides a summary of the documents, software, and presentations generated as part of this projects activities. Namely, the Appendix contains an archive of the deliverables, documents, and presentations generated a part of this project.

  14. The Final Stages of Life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winget, D.

    2014-04-01

    The overwhelming majority of all stars end their lives as white dwarf stars. These stars and their environs have a deep personal significance for humanity: this is the expected fate of our own sun. Once a star becomes a white dwarf, its remaining evolution is best described as an exponential cooling. In the final throws of post-main sequence mass-loss the former stellar core becomes a white dwarf, emerging phoenix-like from amongst the ashes. Some planets may survive and others may form as a sort of second generation from the cast-off material. Life may survive or may be reborn on any planets that remain; life may also arise on newly formed planets. The prospects will depend in a significant way on the timescales of the central white dwarf star's cooling evolution and how its radiation shapes the environment. We will discuss white dwarf evolutionary timescales with an eye towards the potential habitability of planets, both new and old. We will consider the uncertainties in these timescales from both an empirical and a theoretical perspective. We will critique the existing evidence for planets and summarize what we have learned so far through direct imaging and stellar pulsations. We will close with the very bright prospects for the future of planets and life in the final stages.

  15. Space tug applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-01-01

    This article is the final report of the conceptual design efforts for a `space tug`. It includes preliminary efforts, mission analysis, configuration analysis, impact analysis, and conclusions. Of the several concepts evaluated, the nuclear bimodal tug was one of the top candidates, with the two options being the NEBA-1 and NEBA-3 systems. Several potential tug benefits were identified during the mission analysis. The tug enables delivery of large (>3,500 kg) payloads to the outer planets and it increases the GSO delivery capability by 20% relative to current systems. By providing end of life disposal, the tug can be used to extend the life of existing space assets. It can also be used to reboost satellites which were not delivered to their final orbit by the launch system. A specific mission model is the key to validating the tug concept. Once a mission model can be established, mission analysis can be used to determine more precise propellant quantities and burn times. In addition, the specific payloads can be evaluated for mass and volume capability with the launch systems. Results of the economic analysis will be dependent on the total years of operations and the number of missions in the mission model. The mission applications evaluated during this phase drove the need for large propellant quantities and thus did not allow the payloads to step down to smaller and less expensive launch systems.

  16. Do listeners recover "deleted" final /t/ in German?

    PubMed

    Zimmerer, Frank; Reetz, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Reduction and deletion processes occur regularly in conversational speech. A segment that is affected by such reduction and deletion processes in many Germanic languages (e.g., Dutch, English, German) is /t/. There are similarities concerning the factors that influence the likelihood of final /t/ to get deleted, such as segmental context. However, speakers of different languages differ with respect to the acoustic cues they leave in the speech signal when they delete final /t/. German speakers usually lengthen a preceding /s/ when they delete final /t/. This article investigates to what extent German listeners are able to reconstruct /t/ when they are presented with fragments of words where final /t/ has been deleted. It aims also at investigating whether the strategies that are used by German depend on the length of /s/, and therefore whether listeners are using language-specific cues. Results of a forced-choice segment detection task suggest that listeners are able to reconstruct deleted final /t/ in about 45% of the times. The length of /s/ plays some role in the reconstruction, however, it does not explain the behavior of German listeners completely.

  17. Do listeners recover “deleted” final /t/ in German?

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerer, Frank; Reetz, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Reduction and deletion processes occur regularly in conversational speech. A segment that is affected by such reduction and deletion processes in many Germanic languages (e.g., Dutch, English, German) is /t/. There are similarities concerning the factors that influence the likelihood of final /t/ to get deleted, such as segmental context. However, speakers of different languages differ with respect to the acoustic cues they leave in the speech signal when they delete final /t/. German speakers usually lengthen a preceding /s/ when they delete final /t/. This article investigates to what extent German listeners are able to reconstruct /t/ when they are presented with fragments of words where final /t/ has been deleted. It aims also at investigating whether the strategies that are used by German depend on the length of /s/, and therefore whether listeners are using language-specific cues. Results of a forced-choice segment detection task suggest that listeners are able to reconstruct deleted final /t/ in about 45% of the times. The length of /s/ plays some role in the reconstruction, however, it does not explain the behavior of German listeners completely. PMID:25101016

  18. The FDA's Final Rule on Expedited Safety Reporting: Statistical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Wittes, Janet; Crowe, Brenda; Chuang-Stein, Christy; Guettner, Achim; Hall, David; Jiang, Qi; Odenheimer, Daniel; Xia, H. Amy; Kramer, Judith

    2015-01-01

    In March 2011, a Final Rule for expedited reporting of serious adverse events took effect in the United States for studies conducted under an Investigational New Drug (IND) application. In December 2012, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) promulgated a final Guidance describing the operationalization of this Final Rule. The Rule and Guidance clarified that a clinical trial sponsor should have evidence suggesting causality before defining an unexpected serious adverse event as a suspected adverse reaction that would require expedited reporting to the FDA. The Rule's emphasis on the need for evidence suggestive of a causal relation should lead to fewer events being reported but, among those reported, a higher percentage actually being caused by the product being tested. This article reviews the practices that were common before the Final Rule was issued and the approach the New Rule specifies. It then discusses methods for operationalizing the Final Rule with particular focus on relevant statistical considerations. It concludes with a set of recommendations addressed to Sponsors and to the FDA in implementing the Final Rule. PMID:26550466

  19. 40 CFR 61.134 - Standard: Naphthalene processing, final coolers, and final-cooler cooling towers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Standard: Naphthalene processing, final... Standard: Naphthalene processing, final coolers, and final-cooler cooling towers. (a) No (“zero”) emissions are allowed from naphthalene processing, final coolers and final-cooler cooling towers at coke...

  20. 40 CFR 61.134 - Standard: Naphthalene processing, final coolers, and final-cooler cooling towers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Standard: Naphthalene processing, final... Standard: Naphthalene processing, final coolers, and final-cooler cooling towers. (a) No (“zero”) emissions are allowed from naphthalene processing, final coolers and final-cooler cooling towers at coke...

  1. 40 CFR 61.134 - Standard: Naphthalene processing, final coolers, and final-cooler cooling towers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Standard: Naphthalene processing, final... Standard: Naphthalene processing, final coolers, and final-cooler cooling towers. (a) No (“zero”) emissions are allowed from naphthalene processing, final coolers and final-cooler cooling towers at coke...

  2. 40 CFR 61.134 - Standard: Naphthalene processing, final coolers, and final-cooler cooling towers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard: Naphthalene processing, final... Standard: Naphthalene processing, final coolers, and final-cooler cooling towers. (a) No (“zero”) emissions are allowed from naphthalene processing, final coolers and final-cooler cooling towers at coke...

  3. 40 CFR 61.134 - Standard: Naphthalene processing, final coolers, and final-cooler cooling towers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Standard: Naphthalene processing, final... Standard: Naphthalene processing, final coolers, and final-cooler cooling towers. (a) No (“zero”) emissions are allowed from naphthalene processing, final coolers and final-cooler cooling towers at coke...

  4. Gravimelt Process development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-06-01

    This final report contains the results of a bench-scale program to continue the development of the TRW proprietary Gravimelt Process for chemically cleaning coal. This project consisted of two major efforts, a laboratory study aimed at identifying parameters which would influence the operation of a bench unit for desulfurization and demineralization of coal and the design, construction and operation of two types of continuous plug-flow type bench-scale fused caustic leachers. This present bench scale project has demonstrated modes for the continuous operation of fused caustic leaching of coal at coal throughputs of 1 to 5 pounds per hour. The remaining process unit operations of leach solutions regeneration and coal washing and filtration should be tested at bench scale together with fused caustic leaching of coal to demonstrate the complete Gravimelt Process. 22 figures, 11 tables.

  5. Beverages: bottled water. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2005-06-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its bottled water quality standard regulations by revising the existing allowable level for the contaminant arsenic. As a consequence, bottled water manufacturers are required to monitor their finished bottled water products for arsenic at least once each year under the current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) regulations for bottled water. Bottled water manufacturers are also required to monitor their source water for arsenic as often as necessary, but at least once every year unless they meet the criteria for the source water monitoring exemptions under the CGMP regulations. This final rule will ensure that the minimum quality of bottled water, as affected by arsenic, remains comparable with the quality of public drinking water that meets the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) standards.

  6. The final portrait of Christ.

    PubMed

    Fauteux, K

    1989-09-01

    Artistic presentations of Jesus are as numerous and varied as the artists who created them. Whether on canvas or in music, Jesus has been portrayed as a redeemer, revolutionary, teacher, and clown. While some people are inspired by a particular presentation of Jesus, others are angered and incensed at what they perceive to be blasphemous. An example of the latter is Martin Scorsese's film, "The Last Temptation of Christ." This article examines why people responded so negatively to this and other artistic presentations of Jesus. It suggests they have failed to recognize how the portrayal reflects a personal experience of the artist and is not meant to be a final portrait of Christ. And on a more unconscious level, these works of art evoke feelings within people which they fear to acknowledge and which they escape by condemning the work. PMID:24276910

  7. Strategic Asia 2002 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Ellings; Aaron Friedberg; Michael Wills

    2002-09-01

    The Strategic Asia Program made considerable progress over the course of 2002--the program's first year with support from the Department of Energy--and completed all its tasks on schedule and within budget. Following a planning meeting in Washington in February 2002, a team of leading specialists wrote a series of original assessments regarding the impact of September 11 on the strategic environment in Asia, examining how perceptions and strategies of countries in the region changed following the terrorist attacks. The final products, Strategic Asia 2002-03: Asian Aftershocks and its accompanying executive summary, were published in September 2002. The program's research findings (some of which are summarized) were presented to policymakers in Washington and elsewhere throughout the year, and almost 2,000 copies of the book had been distributed by mid-2003.

  8. The final portrait of Christ.

    PubMed

    Fauteux, K

    1989-09-01

    Artistic presentations of Jesus are as numerous and varied as the artists who created them. Whether on canvas or in music, Jesus has been portrayed as a redeemer, revolutionary, teacher, and clown. While some people are inspired by a particular presentation of Jesus, others are angered and incensed at what they perceive to be blasphemous. An example of the latter is Martin Scorsese's film, "The Last Temptation of Christ." This article examines why people responded so negatively to this and other artistic presentations of Jesus. It suggests they have failed to recognize how the portrayal reflects a personal experience of the artist and is not meant to be a final portrait of Christ. And on a more unconscious level, these works of art evoke feelings within people which they fear to acknowledge and which they escape by condemning the work.

  9. HIP densification project. Final CRADA report

    SciTech Connect

    Franco-Ferreira, E.A.; Finkelstein, W.

    1997-08-29

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the use of HIPed aluminum castings as near-net-shape blanks for large electrostatic focusing electrodes in ion lithography machines. The electrodes must have very smooth finishes which are free of pores and other defects. This has heretofore been achieved by rough-machining the blanks out of large forged aluminum billets and final diamond-turning. The use of a near-net-shape casting for the blank was expected to save a significant amount of money and time. The test was conducted on a single cast blank which was supplied by the Partner in the HIPed and stress relieved condition. Rough machining and diamond turning operations conducted by LMES/ER revealed that the casting contained unacceptably large defects. The conclusion was reached that HIPed aluminum castings in the large sizes and of the quality levels required would probably be unobtainable in a cost-effective manner. An alternative approach, using ring forgings assembled by electron beam welding was proposed and investigated by LMES/ER. Although an electrode blank was not obtained, the study indicated that this approach would be successful and cost-effective.

  10. 78 FR 52954 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  11. 78 FR 52953 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  12. 78 FR 5820 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  13. 78 FR 5821 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final Notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  14. 78 FR 21143 - Final Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Final Flood Hazard Determinations AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Final notice. SUMMARY: Flood hazard determinations, which may include additions or modifications of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard...

  15. Final state interactions in hadronic B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, H.-Y.; Chua, C.-K.; Soni, Amarjit

    2005-01-01

    There exist many experimental indications that final-state interactions (FSIs) may play a prominent role not only in charmful B decays but also in charmless B ones. We examine the final-state rescattering effects on the hadronic B decay rates and their impact on direct CP violation. The color-suppressed neutral modes such as B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0},{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0},{rho}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0},K{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} can be substantially enhanced by long-distance rescattering effects. The direct CP-violating partial rate asymmetries in charmless B decays to {pi}{pi}/{pi}K and {rho}{pi} are significantly affected by final-state rescattering, and their signs are generally different from that predicted by the short-distance (SD) approach. For example, direct CP asymmetry in B{sup 0}{yields}{rho}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0} is increased to around 60% due to final-state rescattering effects whereas the short-distance picture gives about 1%. Evidence of direct CP violation in the decay B{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} is now established, while the combined BABAR and Belle measurements of B{sup 0}{yields}{rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}} imply a 3.6{sigma} direct CP asymmetry in the {rho}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} mode. Our predictions for CP violation agree with experiment in both magnitude and sign, whereas the QCD factorization predictions (especially for {rho}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) seem to have some difficulty with the data. Direct CP violation in the decay B{sup -}{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} is very small ((less-or-similar sign)1%) in the standard model even after the inclusion of FSIs. Its measurement will provide a nice way to search for new physics as in the standard model QCD penguins cannot contribute (except by isospin violation). Current data on {pi}K modes seem to violate the isospin sum-rule relation, suggesting the presence of electroweak penguin contributions. We have also investigated whether a large transverse polarization in B{yields}{phi}K* can arise from the

  16. Shape memory metals. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Dworak, T.D.

    1993-09-01

    The ability to define a manufacturing process to form, heat-treat, and join parts made of nickel-titanium and/or copper-zinc-aluminum shape memory alloys was investigated. The specific emphasis was to define a process that would produce shape memory alloy parts in the configuration of helical coils emulating the appearance of compression springs. In addition, the mechanical strength of the finished parts along with the development of a electrical lead attachment method using shape memory alloy wire was investigated.

  17. 16 CFR 1.12 - Final notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Final notice. 1.12 Section 1.12 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Rules and Rulemaking Under Section 18(a)(1)(B) of the FTC Act § 1.12 Final notice. A final notice...

  18. 18 CFR 1301.56 - Final determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Final determination. 1301.56 Section 1301.56 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY PROCEDURES... Proceedings § 1301.56 Final determination. The General Counsel makes the final determination whether a...

  19. 10 CFR 820.42 - Final order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final order. 820.42 Section 820.42 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR DOE NUCLEAR ACTIVITIES Compliance Orders § 820.42 Final order. A Compliance Order is a Final Order that constitutes a DOE Nuclear Safety Requirement that is effective...

  20. 10 CFR 820.42 - Final order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Final order. 820.42 Section 820.42 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR DOE NUCLEAR ACTIVITIES Compliance Orders § 820.42 Final order. A Compliance Order is a Final Order that constitutes a DOE Nuclear Safety Requirement that is effective immediately unless the Order specifies a...

  1. 31 CFR 50.95 - Final amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final amount. 50.95 Section 50.95... on Annual Liability § 50.95 Final amount. (a) Treasury shall determine if, as a final proration... that in the aggregate bring the insurer's total insured loss payments up to an amount equal to...

  2. 31 CFR 50.95 - Final amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Final amount. 50.95 Section 50.95... on Annual Liability § 50.95 Final amount. (a) Treasury shall determine if, as a final proration... that in the aggregate bring the insurer's total insured loss payments up to an amount equal to...

  3. 25 CFR 575.9 - Final assessment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Final assessment. 575.9 Section 575.9 Indians NATIONAL... § 575.9 Final assessment. (a) If the respondent fails to request a hearing as provided in part 577 of this chapter, the proposed civil fine assessment shall become a final order of the Commission....

  4. 31 CFR 92.17 - Final action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Final action. 92.17 Section 92.17 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND... States Mint § 92.17 Final action. (a) In making a final determination whether to impose a penalty,...

  5. 18 CFR 1301.56 - Final determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Final determination. 1301.56 Section 1301.56 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY PROCEDURES... Proceedings § 1301.56 Final determination. The General Counsel makes the final determination whether a...

  6. 18 CFR 1301.56 - Final determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Final determination. 1301.56 Section 1301.56 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY PROCEDURES... Proceedings § 1301.56 Final determination. The General Counsel makes the final determination whether a...

  7. 18 CFR 1301.56 - Final determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Final determination. 1301.56 Section 1301.56 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY PROCEDURES... Proceedings § 1301.56 Final determination. The General Counsel makes the final determination whether a...

  8. 14 CFR 1214.1105 - Final ranking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Final ranking. 1214.1105 Section 1214.1105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT NASA Astronaut Candidate Recruitment and Selection Program § 1214.1105 Final ranking. Final rankings will be based on a combination...

  9. 14 CFR 1214.1105 - Final ranking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Final ranking. 1214.1105 Section 1214.1105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT NASA Astronaut Candidate Recruitment and Selection Program § 1214.1105 Final ranking. Final rankings will be based on a combination...

  10. 14 CFR 1214.1105 - Final ranking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Final ranking. 1214.1105 Section 1214.1105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT NASA Astronaut Candidate Recruitment and Selection Program § 1214.1105 Final ranking. Final rankings will be based on a combination...

  11. 14 CFR 1214.1105 - Final ranking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Final ranking. 1214.1105 Section 1214.1105 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT NASA Astronaut Candidate Recruitment and Selection Program § 1214.1105 Final ranking. Final rankings will be based on a combination...

  12. 25 CFR 11.709 - Final account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Final account. 11.709 Section 11.709 Indians BUREAU OF... Probate Proceedings § 11.709 Final account. (a) When the affairs of an estate have been fully administered, the executor or administrator shall file a final account with the court, verified by his or her...

  13. 25 CFR 11.709 - Final account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Final account. 11.709 Section 11.709 Indians BUREAU OF... Probate Proceedings § 11.709 Final account. (a) When the affairs of an estate have been fully administered, the executor or administrator shall file a final account with the court, verified by his or her...

  14. 25 CFR 11.709 - Final account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Final account. 11.709 Section 11.709 Indians BUREAU OF... Probate Proceedings § 11.709 Final account. (a) When the affairs of an estate have been fully administered, the executor or administrator shall file a final account with the court, verified by his or her...

  15. 25 CFR 11.709 - Final account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Final account. 11.709 Section 11.709 Indians BUREAU OF... Probate Proceedings § 11.709 Final account. (a) When the affairs of an estate have been fully administered, the executor or administrator shall file a final account with the court, verified by his or her...

  16. 25 CFR 11.709 - Final account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Final account. 11.709 Section 11.709 Indians BUREAU OF... Probate Proceedings § 11.709 Final account. (a) When the affairs of an estate have been fully administered, the executor or administrator shall file a final account with the court, verified by his or her...

  17. 31 CFR 50.95 - Final amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Final amount. 50.95 Section 50.95 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM Cap on Annual Liability § 50.95 Final amount. (a) Treasury shall determine if, as a final...

  18. 31 CFR 50.95 - Final amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Final amount. 50.95 Section 50.95 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM Cap on Annual Liability § 50.95 Final amount. (a) Treasury shall determine if, as a final...

  19. 31 CFR 50.95 - Final amount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Final amount. 50.95 Section 50.95 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury TERRORISM RISK INSURANCE PROGRAM Cap on Annual Liability § 50.95 Final amount. (a) Treasury shall determine if, as a final...

  20. Experimental Neutrino Physics: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, Charles E.; Maricic, Jelena

    2012-09-05

    Experimental studies of neutrino properties, with particular emphasis on neutrino oscillation, mass and mixing parameters. This research was pursued by means of underground detectors for reactor anti-neutrinos, measuring the flux and energy spectra of the neutrinos. More recent investigations have been aimed and developing detector technologies for a long-baseline neutrino experiment (LBNE) using a neutrino beam from Fermilab.

  1. Students at Risk. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingstedt, Joe Lars

    Part of a national research project, this study of students at risk involved elementary and high school pupils in the El Paso (Texas) area. Investigators sought answers to questions concerning the identity and characteristics of at-risk students, and school intervention programs and their effectiveness. Data were gathered on 296 students in three…

  2. Teleteaching Distance Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansfield Univ., PA. Rural Services Inst.

    This study investigated the need for distance learning in Pennsylvania's rural schools, examined types of distance learning programs and technology currently being used, and identified factors that could enhance or inhibit the use of distance learning in rural schools. Data collection included (1) a literature search, (2) surveys administered to…

  3. TEACHING MACHINE STUDY. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EVCO, Albuquerque, NM.

    IN AN INVESTIGATION OF THE POTENTIAL OF TEACHING MACHINES IN THE JOB CORPS MATHEMATICS PROGRAM, EXISTING JOB CORPS ARITHMETIC MATERIAL WAS PREPARED FOR INSTRUCTION BY MACHINE AND PROGRAMED TEXT, AND THEN FIELD TESTED. REVISIONS WERE MADE, AND A PROGRAMED MANUAL FOR INSTRUCTORS WRITTEN, AFTER WHICH A NEW FIELD TEST WAS RUN. IN THE INITIAL FIELD…

  4. Advanced Design Studies. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steiner, Don

    2012-12-01

    The ARIES-CS project was a multi-year multi-institutional project to assess the feasibility of a compact stellarator as a fusion power plant. The work herein describes efforts to help design one aspect of the device, the divertor, which is responsible for the removal of particle and heat flux from the system, acting as the first point of contact between the magnetically confined hot plasma and the outside world. Specifically, its location and topology are explored, extending previous work on the sub ject. An optimized design is determined for the thermal particle flux using a suite of 3D stellarator design codes which trace magnetic field lines from just inside the confined plasma edge to their strike points on divertor plates. These divertor plates are specified with a newly developed plate design code. It is found that a satisfactory thermal design exists which maintains the plate temperature and heat load distribution below tolerable engineering limits. The design is unique, including a toroidal taper on the outboard plates which was found to be important to our results. The maximum thermal heat flux for the final design was 3.61 M W/m2 and the maximum peaking factor was 10.3, below prescribed limits of 10 M W/m2 and 15.6, respectively. The median length of field lines reaching the plates is about 250 m and their average angle of inclination to the surface is 2 deg. Finally, an analysis of the fast alphas, resulting from fusion in the core, which escape the plasma was performed. A method is developed for obtaining the mapping from magnetic coordinates to real-space coordinates for the ARIES-CS. This allows the alpha exit locations to be identified in real space for the first time. These were then traced using the field line algorithm as well as a guiding center routine accounting for their mass, charge, and specific direction and energy. Results show that the current design is inadequate for accommodating the alpha heat flux, capturing at most 1/3 of lost alphas

  5. Final shape of a drying thin film.

    PubMed

    Okuzono, Tohru; Kobayashi, Masaru; Doi, Masao

    2009-08-01

    Drying processes of polymer solutions on a solid substrate enclosed by bank are studied in the slow limit of the solvent evaporation. A simple model is proposed to examine the final shape of the film after drying. Analytical expressions of the final shape in terms of the initial parameters are obtained. It is shown that the craterlike and basinlike shapes appear as final shapes of the film depending on the initial parameters. The "shape diagrams" which show parameter dependence of the final shape are presented in the absence/presence of diffusion. The final shape of the film in the geometry without bank is also discussed.

  6. Demand Side Bidding. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Spahn, Andrew

    2003-12-31

    This document sets forth the final report for a financial assistance award for the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) to enhance coordination between the building operators and power system operators in terms of demand-side responses to Location Based Marginal Pricing (LBMP). Potential benefits of this project include improved power system reliability, enhanced environmental quality, mitigation of high locational prices within congested areas, and the reduction of market barriers for demand-side market participants. NARUC, led by its Committee on Energy Resources and the Environment (ERE), actively works to promote the development and use of energy efficiency and clean distributive energy policies within the framework of a dynamic regulatory environment. Electric industry restructuring, energy shortages in California, and energy market transformation intensifies the need for reliable information and strategies regarding electric reliability policy and practice. NARUC promotes clean distributive generation and increased energy efficiency in the context of the energy sector restructuring process. NARUC, through ERE's Subcommittee on Energy Efficiency, strives to improve energy efficiency by creating working markets. Market transformation seeks opportunities where small amounts of investment can create sustainable markets for more efficient products, services, and design practices.

  7. FINAL SCIENTIFIC/TECHNICAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Satish Mohapatra

    2011-12-21

    Dynalene Inc has developed and patented a fuel cell coolant with the help of DOE SBIR Phase I and Phase II funding (Project DE-FG02-04ER83884). However, this coolant could only be produced in lab scale (500 ml to 2 L) due to problems in the optimization and scale-up of a nanoparticle ingredient. This project optimized the nanoparticle production process in 10 L and 100 L reactors (which translates to about 5000 gallons of coolant), optimized the filtration process for the nanoparticles, and develop a high throughput production as well as quality control method for the final coolant formulation. Scale-up of nanoparticle synthesis (using emulsion polymerization) is an extremely challenging task. Dynalene researchers, in collaboration with a university partner, identified all the parameters affecting the size, charge density and coagulation characteristics of the nanoparticles and then optimized these parameters to achieve the goals and the objectives of this project. Nanoparticle synthesis was demonstrated to be reproducible in the 10 L and 100 L scales.

  8. Geopressured energy availability. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    Near- and long-term prospects that geopressured/geothermal energy sources could become a viable alternative fuel for electric power generation were investigated. Technical questions of producibility and power generation were included, as well as economic and environmental considerations. The investigators relied heavily on the existing body of information, particularly in geotechnical areas. Statistical methods were used where possible to establish probable production values. Potentially productive geopressured sediments have been identified in twenty specific on-shore fairways in Louisiana and Texas. A total of 232 trillion cubic feet (TCF) of dissolved methane and 367 x 10/sup 15/ Btu (367 quads) of thermal energy may be contained in the water within the sandstone in these formations. Reasonable predictions of the significant reservoir parameters indicate that a maximum of 7.6 TCF methane and 12.6 quads of thermal energy may be producible from these potential reservoirs.

  9. Characterize and Model Final Waste Formulations and Offgas Solids from Thermal Treatment Processes - FY-98 Final Report for LDRD 2349

    SciTech Connect

    Kessinger, Glen Frank; Nelson, Lee Orville; Grandy, Jon Drue; Zuck, Larry Douglas; Kong, Peter Chuen Sun; Anderson, Gail

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of LDRD #2349, Characterize and Model Final Waste Formulations and Offgas Solids from Thermal Treatment Processes, was to develop a set of tools that would allow the user to, based on the chemical composition of a waste stream to be immobilized, predict the durability (leach behavior) of the final waste form and the phase assemblages present in the final waste form. The objectives of the project were: • investigation, testing and selection of thermochemical code • development of auxiliary thermochemical database • synthesis of materials for leach testing • collection of leach data • using leach data for leach model development • thermochemical modeling The progress toward completion of these objectives and a discussion of work that needs to be completed to arrive at a logical finishing point for this project will be presented.

  10. 76 FR 50456 - Notice of Final Results of Antidumping Duty Changed Circumstances Review: Polyethylene...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... Film, Sheet, and Strip From the Republic of Korea, 56 FR 25669 (June 5, 1991). On September 26, 1997...; Notice of Final Court Decision and Amended Final Determination of Antidumping Duty Investigation, 62 FR... Notice of Revocation in Part, 61 FR 35177 (July 5, 1996). Subsequently, prior to the first sunset...

  11. Effective Classroom Management and Instruction: An Exploration of Models. Executive Summary of Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evertson, Carolyn M.; And Others

    A summary is presented of the final report, "Effective Classroom Management and Instruction: An Exploration of Models." The final report presents a set of linked investigations of the effects of training teachers in effective classroom management practices in a series of school-based workshops. Four purposes were addressed by the study: (1) to…

  12. 76 FR 76941 - Polyethylene Terephthalate Film, Sheet, and Strip From Taiwan: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-09

    ... Terephthalate Film, Sheet, and Strip (PET Film) from Taiwan, 67 FR 44174 (July 1, 2002) (Investigation Final... International Trade Administration Polyethylene Terephthalate Film, Sheet, and Strip From Taiwan: Final Results... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on polyethylene terephthalate film, sheet and strip (PET...

  13. Magnetospheric space plasma investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comfort, Richard H.; Horwitz, James L.

    1996-01-01

    The discussion in this final report is limited to a summary of important accomplishments. These accomplishments include the generalized semikinetic (GSK) model, O(+) outflows in the F-region ionosphere, field-aligned flows and trapped ion distributions, ULF wave ray-tracing, and plasmasphere-ionosphere coupling.

  14. Metabolomics techniques for nanotoxicity investigations.

    PubMed

    Lv, Mengying; Huang, Wanqiu; Chen, Zhipeng; Jiang, Hulin; Chen, Jiaqing; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Zunjian; Xu, Fengguo

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are commonly defined as engineered structures with at least one dimension of 100 nm or less. Investigations of their potential toxicological impact on biological systems and the environment have yet to catch up with the rapid development of nanotechnology and extensive production of nanoparticles. High-throughput methods are necessary to assess the potential toxicity of nanoparticles. The omics techniques are well suited to evaluate toxicity in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Besides genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic profiling, metabolomics holds great promises for globally evaluating and understanding the molecular mechanism of nanoparticle-organism interaction. This manuscript presents a general overview of metabolomics techniques, summarizes its early application in nanotoxicology and finally discusses opportunities and challenges faced in nanotoxicology. PMID:26168257

  15. International Ultraviolet Explorer Final Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    CSC processed IUE images through the Final Archive Data Processing System. Raw images were obtained from both NDADS and the IUEGTC optical disk platters for processing on the Alpha cluster, and from the IUEGTC optical disk platters for DECstation processing. Input parameters were obtained from the IUE database. Backup tapes of data to send to VILSPA were routinely made on the Alpha cluster. IPC handled more than 263 requests for priority NEWSIPS processing during the contract. Staff members also answered various questions and requests for information and sent copies of IUE documents to requesters. CSC implemented new processing capabilities into the NEWSIPS processing systems as they became available. In addition, steps were taken to improve efficiency and throughput whenever possible. The node TORTE was reconfigured as the I/O server for Alpha processing in May. The number of Alpha nodes used for the NEWSIPS processing queue was increased to a maximum of six in measured fashion in order to understand the dependence of throughput on the number of nodes and to be able to recognize when a point of diminishing returns was reached. With Project approval, generation of the VD FITS files was dropped in July. This action not only saved processing time but, even more significantly, also reduced the archive storage media requirements, and the time required to perform the archiving, drastically. The throughput of images verified through CDIVS and processed through NEWSIPS for the contract period is summarized below. The number of images of a given dispersion type and camera that were processed in any given month reflects several factors, including the availability of the required NEWSIPS software system, the availability of the corresponding required calibrations (e.g., the LWR high-dispersion ripple correction and absolute calibration), and the occurrence of reprocessing efforts such as that conducted to incorporate the updated SWP sensitivity-degradation correction in May.

  16. Beverages: bottled water. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2009-05-29

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its bottled water regulations to require that bottled water manufacturers test source water for total coliform, as is required for finished bottled water products, and to require, if any coliform organisms are detected in source water, that bottled water manufacturers determine whether any of the coliform organisms are Escherichia coli (E. coli), an indicator of fecal contamination. FDA also is amending its bottled water regulations to require, if any coliform organisms are detected in finished bottled water products, that bottled water manufacturers determine whether any of the coliform organisms are E. coli. FDA also is amending the adulteration provision of the bottled water standard to reflect the possibility of adulteration caused by the presence of filth. Bottled water containing E. coli will be considered adulterated, and source water containing E. coli will not be considered to be of a safe, sanitary quality and will be prohibited from use in the production of bottled water. FDA is also amending its bottled water regulations to require that, before a bottler can use source water from a source that has tested positive for E. coli, the bottler must take appropriate measures to rectify or eliminate the cause of E. coli contamination of that source, and that the bottler must keep records of such actions. Existing regulatory provisions require bottled water manufacturers to keep records of new testing required by this rule. This final rule will ensure that FDA's standards for the minimum quality of bottled water, as affected by fecal contamination, will be no less protective of the public health than those set by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for public drinking water.

  17. Purposeful Statistical Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    Lorraine Day provides us with a great range of statistical investigations using various resources such as maths300 and TinkerPlots. Each of the investigations link mathematics to students' lives and provide engaging and meaningful contexts for mathematical inquiry.

  18. Investigations with Protease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents two simple and reliable ways for measuring protease activity that can be used for a variety of investigations in a range of biology class levels. The investigations use protease from a variety of sources. (DDR)

  19. Preliminary site characterization - final report

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.; Smith, L.B.

    1993-12-01

    This report summarizes the ecological unit reconnaissance conducted at the F-Area Burning/Rubble Pit(s) RCRA/CERCLA Unit (F-Area BRP) on August 30 and 31, 1993 as part of the RFI/RI baseline risk assessment for the waste unit The baseline risk assessment will assess the potential endangerment to human health and the environment associated with the unit and will be used to evaluate remediation criteria, if needed. The information presented in this report will be used in subsequent stages of the ecological risk assessment to refine the conceptual site model, assist in the selection of contaminants of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and evaluate trophic relationships and other exposure pathways. The unit reconnaissance survey was conducted in accordance with Specification No. E-18272, Rev. 1 dated August 5, 1993, and the Draft {open_quotes}Ecological Risk Assessment Program Plan for Evaluation of Waste Sites on the Savannah River Site{close_quotes}. The objectives of the site reconnaissance were to: Assess the general characteristics of on-unit biological communities including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and any aquatic communities present. Determine the location, extent, and characteristics of on-unit ecological resources, such as forested areas and wetlands, that could serve as important wildlife habitat or provide other ecological functions. Identify any overt effects of contamination on biological communities. The field investigations included mapping and describing all wetland and terrestrial habitats; recording wildlife observations of birds, mammals, and reptiles; and investigating ecological resources in nearby downgradient and downstream areas which could be affected by mobile contaminants or future remedial actions. In preparation for the field investigation, existing unit information including aerial photographs and reports were reviewed to help identify and describe ecological resources at the waste unit.

  20. Repowering options study: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    Results of a scoping study in which natural-gas-fueled combustion turbines are utilized to repower existing oil-fired/gas-fired steam turbine generating units are presented. A representative range of unit sizes, 80 to 800 MW, was investigated. Depending on the unit and repowering configuration, repowering resulted in calculated heat rate reductions of 7% to 18% and calculated increased unit outputs of 28% to 165%. The estimated installed costs per kW of added new generating capacity ranged from $363/kW to $589/kW, again depending on the unit and repowering configuration. Design considerations for various repowering configurations are also presented. 23 figs., 21 tabs.

  1. Success with Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Christine

    2003-01-01

    Describes strategies for facilitating student science investigations and alleviating common weaknesses associated with student performance. Includes checklist criteria for performance on investigative tasks and an example of an assessment rubric for the investigation of the effect of temperature on enzyme activity. (Author/KHR)

  2. FINAL REPORT FOR TRITIUM WATER MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Sigg, R.; Ferguson, B.; DiPrete, D.

    2011-04-25

    The objective of this Plant Directed Research and Demonstration (PDRD) task was to develop a system to safetly analyze tritium in moisture collected from glovebox atmospheres in the Savannah River Site (SRS) Tritium Facility. In order to minimize potential radiation exposures that could occur in handling and diluting high-tritium-content water, SRS sought alternatives to liquid-scintillation counting. The proposed system determines tritium concentrations by measuring Bremsstrahlung radiation induced by low-energy beta interactions in liquid samples. Results show that, after a short counting period (30 seconds), detection limits are three orders of magnitude below the described concentration of tritiated water in the zeolite beds. Additionally, this report covers the analysis of process samples and the investigation of several cell window materials including beryllium, aluminum, and copper. Final tests reveal that alternate window materials and thicknesses can be used to obtain useful results. In particular, a window of stainless steel of moderate thickness (0.3 cm) can be used for counting relatively high levels of tritium.

  3. Biodenitrification in Sequencing Batch Reactors. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, J.

    1996-01-23

    One plan for stabilization of the Solar Pond waters and sludges at Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), is evaporation and cement solidification of the salts to stabilize heavy metals and radionuclides for land disposal as low-level mixed waste. It has been reported that nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sub {minus}}) salts may interfere with cement stabilization of heavy metals and radionuclides. Therefore, biological nitrate removal (denitrification) may be an important pretreatment for the Solar Pond wastewaters at RFP, improving the stability of the cement final waste form, reducing the requirement for cement (or pozzolan) additives and reducing the volume of cemented low-level mixed waste requiring ultimate disposal. A laboratory investigation of the performance of the Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) activated sludge process developed for nitrate removal from a synthetic brine typical of the high-nitrate and high-salinity wastewaters in the Solar Ponds at Rocky Flats Plant was carried out at the Environmental Engineering labs at the University of Colorado, Boulder, between May 1, 1994 and October 1, 1995.

  4. Fundamental Processes in Plasmas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    O'Neil, Thomas M.; Driscoll, C. Fred

    2009-11-30

    This research focuses on fundamental processes in plasmas, and emphasizes problems for which precise experimental tests of theory can be obtained. Experiments are performed on non-neutral plasmas, utilizing three electron traps and one ion trap with a broad range of operating regimes and diagnostics. Theory is focused on fundamental plasma and fluid processes underlying collisional transport and fluid turbulence, using both analytic techniques and medium-scale numerical simulations. The simplicity of these systems allows a depth of understanding and a precision of comparison between theory and experiment which is rarely possible for neutral plasmas in complex geometry. The recent work has focused on three areas in basic plasma physics. First, experiments and theory have probed fundamental characteristics of plasma waves: from the low-amplitude thermal regime, to inviscid damping and fluid echoes, to cold fluid waves in cryogenic ion plasmas. Second, the wide-ranging effects of dissipative separatrices have been studied experimentally and theoretically, finding novel wave damping and coupling effects and important plasma transport effects. Finally, correlated systems have been investigated experimentally and theoretically: UCSD experients have now measured the Salpeter correlation enhancement, and theory work has characterized the 'guiding center atoms of antihydrogen created at CERN.

  5. Cyclone reduction of taconite. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, P.R.; Bartlett, R.W.; Abdel-latif, M.A.; Hou, X.; Kumar, P.

    1995-05-01

    A cyclone reactor system for the partial reduction and melting of taconite concentrate fines has been engineered, designed and operated. A non-transferred arc plasma torch was employed as a heat source. Taconite fines, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide were fed axially into the reactor, while the plasma gas was introduced tangentially into the cyclone. The average reactor temperature was maintained at above 1400{degrees}C, and reduction experiments were performed under various conditions. The influence of the following parameters on the reduction of taconite was investigated experimentally; carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide inlet feed ratio, carbon monoxide inlet partial pressure, and average reactor temperature. The interactions of the graphite lining with carbon dioxide and taconite were also studied. An attempt was made to characterize the flow behavior of the molten product within the cyclone. The results suggest that the system may approach a plug flow reactor, with little back mixing. Finally, a fundamental mathematical model was developed. The model describes the flow dynamics of gases and solid particles in a cyclone reactor, energy exchange, mass transfer, and the chemical kinetics associated with cyclone smelting of taconite concentrate fines. The influence of the various parameters on the reduction and melting of taconite particles was evaluated theoretically.

  6. New laser materials: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-10-01

    In the Interim Report No. 1, it was reported that the fluorescence lifetime (greater than or equal to 750..mu..s) in Nd doped Y(PO/sub 3/)/sub 3/ was longer by a factor of three as compared to YAG. This means potentially three times as much energy storage and consequently more efficient for flashlamp pumping. It also makes diode pumping easier. In addition, since the Y site is octahedrally coordinated, there is a possibility of energy transfer using Cr as the sensitizing element. As suggested by W. Krupke, we decided to explore the trivalent cation metaphosphates systematically. The compounds investigated can be represented by the general formula A(PO/sub 3/)/sub 3/ where A = Y, Lu, In, Sc, GA and Al. The object is to study the fluorescence characteristics of Nd and Cr as well as the effectiveness of energy transfer from Cr to Nd. In addition, we also investigated other possible laser host crystals, notably CaMgSi/sub 2/O/sub 6/ (diopside), LaBO/sub 3/ and La(BO/sub 2/)/sub 3/. Results on these materials will also be discussed.

  7. Large Block Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W

    2001-12-01

    . Sections 5 through 9 report the measurements made on the block during the preheating, heating, and cooling phases. These measurements include temperature, thermal conductivity and diffusivity, hydrological measurements (electrical resistivity, neutron logging, gas pressure, and relative humidity), geomechanics, selected chemical analyses, and microbial activity. These sections also include analyses and simulations of the block behavior. Finally, conclusions are presented in Section 10. Complete data sets were submitted during the time the test was conducted. The data tracking numbers (DTNs) of all of the data are presented in Table 1-1.

  8. Final report on SNAC 11

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Patrick

    2013-06-26

    This report details how the $5,000 DOE grant to support the workshop titled “Sterile Neutrinos at the Crossroads” (or SNAC11) was allocated and spent. The SNAC11 workshop covered three days during which there were 28 talks, multiple discussion sessions, a poster session with 9 posters delivered, and an impromptu public lecture on the OPERA superluminal neutrino result by the former project manager of OPERA (this was the first official OPERA talk on the subject in North America). The workshop scientific agenda can be viewed at http://www.cpe.vt.edu/snac/program.html. Emerging out of the workshop discussions, was the idea to write a comprehensive white paper describing the current state of the light sterile neutrino. This effort soon became an international collaboration. The final document, titled “Light Sterile Neutrinos: A White Paper” has nearly 200 authors, is 267 pages long, and cites 730 unique references. It has been posted the preprint archive as arXiv:1204.5379 [hep-ph]. Workshop local organizing committee co-chairs, Patrick Huber and Jonathan Link, are the white paper’s head editors. The white paper’s sections and section editors are as follows: 1. Theory and Motivation (Gabriela Barenboim, Valencia and Werner Rodejohann, MPI Heidelberg) 2. Astrophysical Evidence (Kev Abazajian, UC Irvine and Yvonne Wong, Aachen) 3. Evidence from Oscillation Experiments (Joachim Kopp, FNAL and Bill Louis, LANL) 4. Global Picture (Thierry Lasserre, CEA Saclay and Thomas Schwetz, MPI Heidelberg) 5. Requirements for Future Measurements (Bonnie Fleming, Yale and Joe Formaggio, MIT) 6. Appendix: Possible Future Experiments (Patrick Huber, Virginia Tech and Jon Link, Virginia Tech) In all 56 people participated in the workshop, of these 11 were young scientists. The workshop was covered in a feature article in Science (Science, 334, (2011), 304-306.). The DOE award was spent, as budgeted, as contractual services to VT CPE, which is the unit within the University

  9. Santa Barbara Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, Angela; Hansen, Sherman; Watkins, Ashley

    2013-11-30

    This report serves as the Final Report for Santa Barbara County’s Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP) award from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). This report explains how DOE BBNP funding was invested to develop robust program infrastructure designed to help property owners complete energy improvements, thereby generating substantial outcomes for the local environment and economy. It provides an overview of program development and design within the grant period, program accomplishments and challenges to date, and a plan for the future sustainability of emPower, the County’s innovative clean energy and building efficiency program. During the grant period, Santa Barbara County’s emPower program primarily targeted 32,000 owner occupied, single family, detached residential homes over 25 years old within the County. In order to help these homeowners and their contractors overcome market barriers to completing residential energy improvements, the program developed and promoted six voluntary, market-based service areas: 1) low cost residential financing (loan loss reserve with two local credit unions), 2) residential rebates, 3) local customer service, 4) expert energy advising, 5) workforce development and training, and 6) marketing, education and outreach. The main goals of the program were to lower building energy use, create jobs and develop a lasting regional building performance market. These services have generated important early outcomes and lessons after the program’s first two years in service. The DOE BBNP funding was extended through October 2014 to enable Santa Barbara County to generate continued outcomes. In fact, funding related to residential financing remains wholly available for the foreseeable future to continue offering Home Upgrade Loans to approximately 1,300 homeowners. The County’s investment of DOE BBNP funding was used to build a lasting, effective, and innovative

  10. Final Report Package_Winnebago

    SciTech Connect

    Carolyn Stewart, Director, Red Mountain Energy Partners

    2006-10-31

    The Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska energy options study results will be used to advance the Tribe’s near term energy management objectives. The array of energy options identified allows the Tribe to select those activities that best fit its energy strategies, goals and objectives. During the course of the study, Red Mountain analyzed both energy options and energy organizational alternatives suitable for the Tribe, presented findings to the Tribal Council, and made recommendations regarding each. Work products delivered to the Tribe, and provided in the Final Report included: • A matrix of energy management options applicable to the Tribe, which provided descriptions of particular conservation, efficiency, weatherization, and demand management alternatives. The matrix also provided insight about relative costs of the alternatives, cost/benefit efficacy, ease of implementation, resources for implementing, and observations about each. • A matrix of utility service options applicable to the Tribe, describing each of the four alternatives described above. The matrix also provided insight about key benefits of each option, required resources, costs and timeframe for implementation, funding sources and analysis, and key issues for consideration. • Discussion guides prepared for each meeting between the Energy Committee and Council, and the Tribe’s contractor, Red Mountain Energy Partners, which included preliminary analysis and findings. • A Position Description for the Energy Manager position, which was reviewed by the Tribal HR Department, and used by the Tribe to develop a position posting. • A Utility Code designed for Winnebago to use in establishing its Utility Board, and, ultimately, to provide guidance for the Board’s further development. • A project summary book developed to include all key information, deliverables and utility provider data for the project. Winnebago’s growth trends and expansion plans require the Tribe to play a more active

  11. Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian sandstone reservoirs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kelkar, M.

    1995-02-01

    This final report summarizes the progress during the three years of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description; (ii) scale-up procedures; (iii) outcrop investigation. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be described in three dimensions. The next step in reservoir description is to scale up reservoir properties for flow simulation. The second section addresses the issue of scale-up of reservoir properties once the spatial descriptions of properties are created. The last section describes the investigation of an outcrop.

  12. 45 CFR 150.219 - Final determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ENFORCEMENT IN GROUP AND INDIVIDUAL INSURANCE MARKETS CMS Enforcement Processes for Determining Whether States... the State a written notice of its final determination. The notice includes the following:...

  13. Dickinson geothermal study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fossum, G.O.; Harris, K.L.; Hassett, D.J.; Mathsen, D.V.; Owens, T.C.

    1982-06-01

    The Inyan Kara Formation provides an abundant source of warm (54 to 71/sup 0/C) but salty (7400 mg/l combined Na and Cl ions) water for much of southwestern North Dakota. The city of Dickinson, ND, overlies this aquifer at 1676 to 1768 meters. This study investigates the potential of usng this hydrothermal resource as an energy source for a district heating system in a new undeveloped addition to Dickinson. In addition, the use of a reverse osmosis system to desalinate the water is considered along with other water treatment processes necessary to allow use of this water in the existing city water supply. The results of the study indicate the economic requirements to make this concept feasible and outline the consideration to carry the project into the design phase.

  14. 78 FR 70918 - Final Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair Value: Silica Bricks and Shapes From the People's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... Antidumping Duty Investigation and Postponement of Final Determination, 78 FR 37203 (June 20, 2013... International Trade Administration Final Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair Value: Silica Bricks and... determination of sales at less than fair value (``LTFV'') in the antidumping duty investigation of silica...

  15. Synthetic and Thermodynamic Investigations of Ancillary Ligand Influence on Catalytic Organometallic Systems. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, Steven

    2003-03-20

    During the grant period we have been involved in synthesizing and experimentally determining solution enthalpy values associated with partially fluorinated ligands. This has lead to the publication of manuscripts dealing with synthetic, calorimetric and catalytic behavior of partially fluorinated ligands. The collaboration with Los Alamos researchers has lead to the publication of catalytic results in sc CO{sub 2} which have proven very interesting. Furthermore, we have also examined ligands that behave as phosphine mimics. The N-heterocyclic carbenes have been explored as alternatives for tertiary phosphines and have resulted in the design and construction of efficient palladium and nickel system capable of performing C-C and C-N cross coupling reactions. The initial studies in this areas were made possible by exploratory work conducted under the DOE/EPSCoR grant.

  16. Investigation of parasites in sludges and disinfection techniques. Final report, August 1979-May 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Reimers, R.S.; Little, M.D.; Englande, A.J.; McDonell, D.B.; Bowman, D.D.

    1985-11-01

    The objectives of the research grant were to: assess the presence and densities of resistant stages of parasites in municipal wastewater sludges (sewage) in northern United States; compare the results of the study with the results of a previous study of sludges in southern United States; to evaluate several decontamination techniques for their effectiveness in inactivating parasites in waste sludges; and develop a standard method for the parasitologic examination of waste sludges. Sludge samples from all phases of treatment (i.e., primary, etc.) were collected during the fall, winter and summer from 48 municipal wastewater treatment plants located in New York, Ohio, Minnesota, and Washington.

  17. Investigation into the fractionation of refrigerant blends. Final technical report, March 1994--December 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Biancardi, F.R.; Michels, H.; Sienel, T.; Pandy, D.

    1996-01-01

    As a means of complying with current and impending national and international environmental regulations restricting the use and disposal of conventional CFC and HCFC refrigerants which contribute to the global ozone depletion effects, the HVAC industry is vigorously evaluating and testing BFC refrigerant blends. While analyses and system performance tools have shown that BFC refrigerant blends offer certain performance, capacity and operational advantages, there are significant possible service and operational issues that are raised by the use of blends. Many of these issues occur due to the fractionation of the blends. Therefore, the objective of this program is to conduct analyses and experimental tests aimed at understanding these issues, develop approaches or techniques to predict these effects and convey to the industry safe and reliable approaches. As a result, analytical models, verified by laboratory data, have been developed that predict the fractionation effects of HFC refrigerant blends when (1) exposed to selected POE lubricants, (2) during the system charging process from large liquid containers, and (3) during system startup, operation and shutdown within various system components (where two-phase refrigerant exists), and during selected system and component leakage scenarios. Model predictions and experimental results are presented for HFC refrigerant blends containing HFC-32, HFC-134a, and HFC-125 and the data are generalized for various operating conditions and scenarios.

  18. Investigation of the geothermal potential of the UK. A preliminary assessment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Geologically, Britain is an extremely stable area without active volcanism. In this situation the development of geothermal resources depends upon the occurrence of permeable rocks in deep sedimentary basins or the successful development of the hot dry rock concept. The average geothermal gradient is about 25C/km, but two belts of above average heat flow extend across northern and south-western England. In these areas the gradient can be 30C/km or more. The principal aquifers occur in the Mesozoic and the greatest geothermal potential is in sandstones of the Permo-Triassic where their occurrence at depth coincides with the high heat flow belts.

  19. Ceramic fiber burner cost reduction investigation and implementation. Final report, January 1994-October 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.D.; Schweizer, S.E.

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this project was to reduce the manufacturing cost of the Pyrocore ceramic fiber burner in order to make the product more competitive in a broad range of applications. The Pyrocore burner has been available commercially since the early 1980`s, and has been sold into applications including deep fat fryers, firetube boilers, and most recently volatile organic compound (VOC) thermal oxidizers, specifically in applications that require destruction of halogenated compounds. Although a number of attempts have been made by competitors to improve on the pyrocore product, most notably with reticulated ceramic foams, to date no product has been developed that provides a better combination of thermal performance, burner life, and relatively low cost to the end user. A significant cost reduction relative to the current baseline product cost was achieved. The combination of cost reduction and product improvement demonstrated in this project has allowed the authors to target several new OEM customers within the last 6 months, with test burner fabrication now in progress for one of these customers. In addition the authors believe that they have extended the product life of the Pyrocore burner with several existing customers.

  20. Hydrogen-fueled scramjet investigation. Final report, Feb 87-Apr 90

    SciTech Connect

    Peschke, W.T.; Barber, T.J.; Chiappetta, L.; Anderson, T.J.; Eckerle, W.J.

    1991-02-01

    This report documents an experimental and analytical study of the supersonic mixing and combustion processes associated with a free-shear layer. A specific objective comprised quantifying the effects on the mixing and combustion processes of pressure gradients associated with the production of shock waves in the flowfield. An experiment was conducted in a generic supersonic combustion configuration that incorporated the essential characteristics of scramjet combustors currently being considered for flight application. The objective of the analytical effort was to evaluate mixing and combustion models in state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. The experiments provided accurate data used to formulate code input conditions and to evaluate codes that were formulated for application in current high-speed propulsion design activities. Species concentration, total and static temperature, and pitot pressure profiles were measured in a shear layer experiment in which gaseous hydrogen was injected tangentially into a Mach 3 (nominal) vitiated air stream. In this experiment, hydrogen was injected adjacent to the upperwall of the test section. A nonintrusive optical diagnostic technique was used in conjunction with intrusive probing to define the flowfield initial conditions and to characterize the detailed features of the flowfield subsequent to hydrogen injection and combustion.

  1. Investigation of the transient fuel preburner manifold and combustor. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tensee; Chen, Yensen; Farmer, R.C.

    1989-06-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model with finite rate reactions, FDNS, was developed to study the start transient of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) fuel preburner (FPB). FDNS is a time accurate, pressure based CFD code. An upwind scheme was employed for spatial discretization. The upwind scheme was based on second and fourth order central differencing with adaptive artificial dissipation. A state of the art two-equation k-epsilon (T) turbulence model was employed for the turbulence calculation. A Pade' Rational Solution (PARASOL) chemistry algorithm was coupled with the point implicit procedure. FDNS was benchmarked with three well documented experiments: a confined swirling coaxial jet, a non-reactive ramjet dump combustor, and a reactive ramjet dump combustor. Excellent comparisons were obtained for the benchmark cases. The code was then used to study the start transient of an axisymmetric SSME fuel preburner. Predicted transient operation of the preburner agrees well with experiment. Furthermore, it was also found that an appreciable amount of unburned oxygen entered the turbine stages.

  2. Investigating a Chemoselective Grignard Reaction in an Undergraduate Discovery Lab to Predict Reactivity and Final Products

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Michael J.; Hayes, Colin O.; Vaccaro, Francesca A.; Flynn, Cailyn B.; Thedford, R. Paxton; Stephenson, Clifton J.

    2016-01-01

    A discovery-based Grignard experiment that emphasizes several important concepts in organic chemistry is reported. The Grignard reagent from 1- bromo-4-chlorobenzene was prepared and reacted with dimethylformamide (DMF) to synthesize 4-chlorobenzaldehyde. Students were tasked with predicting halogen reactivity in the formation of the Grignard…

  3. Final report on shipping-cask sabotage source-term investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, E W; Walters, M A; Trott, B D; Gieseke, J A

    1982-10-01

    A need existed to estimate the source term resulting from a sabotage attack on a spent nuclear fuel shipping cask. An experimental program sponsored by the US NRC and conducted at Battelle's Columbus Laboratories was designed to meet that need. In the program a precision shaped charge was fired through a subscale model cask loaded with segments of spent PWR fuel rods and the radioactive material released was analyzed. This report describes these experiments and presents their results.

  4. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 69

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This article includes the following: trace contaminants in surface sediment of the northern Bering Sea: a statistical review; trace contaminants in the greater St. George Basin: a statistical review; mercury in Alaska marine surface sediments: a review of the regional data; and natural distribution and environmental background of trace heavy metals in Alaskan shelf and estuarine areas.

  5. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 73

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    The volume contains information on the following: Subsea permafrost: probing, thermal regime, and data analyses, 1975-81 and a geographic based information management system for permafrost prediction in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas. Part I contains: Submarine permafrost on the Alaskan shelf and a geographic based information management system for permafrost prediction in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas. Part II contains: Submarine permafrost on the Arctic shelf of Eurasia and the development of the Arctic in the Pleistocene. Each paper is in reference to offshore drilling of oil and gas.

  6. An investigation of the internal and external aerodynamics of cattle trucks. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Muirhead, V.U.

    1983-05-01

    Wind tunnel tests were conducted on a one-tenth scale model of a conventional tractor trailer livestock hauler to determine the air flow through the trailer and the drag of the vehicle. These tests were conducted with the trailer empty and with a full load of simulated cattle. Additionally, the drag was determined for six configurations, of which details for three are documented herein. These are: (1) conventional livestock trailer empty, (2) conventional trailer with smooth sides (i.e., without ventilation openings), and (3) a stream line tractor with modified livestock trailer (cab streamlining and gap fairing). The internal flow of the streamlined modification with simulated cattle was determined with two different ducting systems: a ram air inlet over the cab and NACA submerged inlets between the cab and trailer. The air flow within the conventional trailer was random and variable. The streamline vehicle with ram air inlet provided a nearly uniform air flow which could be controlled. The streamline vehicle with NACA submerged inlets provided better flow conditions than the conventional livestock trailer but not as uniform or controllable as the ram inlet configuration.

  7. [Investigation of high pore fluid pressure in the Uinta Basin, Utah]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-11-01

    High pore fluid pressures, approaching lithostatic, are observed in the deepest sections of the Uinta basin, Utah. The authors analyzed the cause of the anomalous overpressures with a 3-dimensional, numerical model of the evolution of the basin, including compaction disequilibrium and hydrocarbon generation as possible mechanisms. The numerical model builds the basin through time, coupling the structural, thermal and hydrodynamic evolution, and includes in situ hydrocarbon generation and migration. They used the evolution model to evaluate overpressure mechanisms and oil migration patterns for different possible conceptual models of the geologic history. Model results suggest that observed overpressures in the Uinta basin are probably caused by ongoing oil generation in strata with specific conditions of permeability, relative permeability, TOC content, and oil viscosity. They conducted a sensitivity analysis that suggests for oil generation to cause overpressures, the necessary conditions are: oil viscosity is {approximately}0.05 cP or higher, intrinsic permeability is {approximately}5 {times} 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2} or lower, and source rock TOC values are {approximately}0.5% or higher. The authors also analyzed hydrocarbon migration patterns in the basin and how they are affected by the basin`s structural history. Oil migration patterns produced by the model are consistent with published oil production maps: oil moves from the deep Altamont source rocks toward Redwash, the eastern Douglas Creek Arch area, and southward towards the Sunnyside tar-sands and Book Cliffs. Peak oil generation occurs from the time of maximum burial in the mid-Tertiary ({approximately}35 to {approximately}30 Ma). Most differential uplift of the basin`s flanks probably occurs well after this time, and most oil migration to the basin`s southern and eastern flanks occurs prior to uplift of these flanks. Model results show that if the basin`s flanks are uplifted too soon, reduced temperatures increase viscosity enough to inhibit migration of oil to the southern and eastern flanks.

  8. Investigation of the mechanism in Rijke pulse combustors with tangential air and fuel injection. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zinn, B.T.; Jagoda, J.I.; Daniel, B.R.; Bai, T.

    1993-03-01

    To study the mechanisms that control the operation of this combustor, an experimental setup is developed with access for detailed optical measurements. Propane is employed as fuel because the absence of liquid drops and combustion generated particulates in the combustion region significantly simplifies the optical diagnostics. The experimental techniques utilized include acoustic pressure measurements, space and time resolved radiation measurements, steady temperature measurements, exhaust flow chemical analysis, high speed video and intensified images of the reacting flow field by a computer based CCD camera imaging system. Flow visualization by the imaging system and the results from radiation intensity distribution measurements suggest that the periodic combustion processes caused by periodic vortex shedding and impingement provide the energy required to sustain the pressure oscillations. High radiation intensity occurs during a relatively short period of time and is in phase with the pressure oscillations, indicating that Rayleigh`s criterion is satisfied. Periodic variations of the air and fuel flow rates and, consequently, the air/fuel ratio of the reacting mixture inside the combustor appear to be another mechanism that contributes to the occurrence of periodic combustion and heat release processes. The presence of this mechanism has been uncovered by acoustic pressure measurements that revealed the presence of traveling pressure waves inside the air and fuel feed lines. These traveling waves produce periodic fuel and air feed rates which, in turn, result in periodic combustion and heat release processes within the combustor.

  9. Spectroscopic investigations of a field emission generated radiative zone: Mass spectroscopic measurements. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mitterauer, J.

    1981-10-01

    In view of the application of liquid metal field ion sources as electric thrustors for space propulsion, the basic physical features of the field ionization mechanism were analyzed experimentally. An ultrahigh vacuum test chamber and a liquid metal ion source were built. Diagnostic methods, e.g., basic measurements of the emission characteristics, probe measurements of the ion current distribution, mass spectroscopic measurements of the particles emitted from the ion source, and spectroscopic measurements of the visible radiation accompanying field ionization, were developed. Experimental data which can be transferred to prototype field ion thrusters are presented, but experimental facilities limit conclusions regarding theoretical aspects of field ionization.

  10. Woodbridge research facility remedial investigation/feasibility study. Health and safety plan. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, P.; McKown, G.; Waugh, J.; Houser, W.; Joy, G.

    1995-09-01

    The requirements set forth in 29 CFR 1910.120(f), shall be met for all employees performing or supervising hazardous waste operations. Medical exams shall be conducted as soon as possible upon notification by an employee that he/she has developed signs or symptoms indicating possible health hazards or overexposure to hazardous substances. Subcontractor personnel shall provide documentation of current status of participation in a medical surveillance program as required by 29 CFR 1910.120(f). Subcontractors unable to provide such documentation shall have successfully completed a medical examination as described in the above referenced OSHA standard prior to beginning work in a contaminated zone. Specific protocols for medical examinations are designed by an occupational physician. Common components include: (a) medical history and physical examination; (b) dipstick urinalysis, vision screen and vital signs; (c) spirometry ;(d) audiometry; (e) blood chemistry (complete blood count, liver function, kidney function, lipid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism); (f) resting EkG (with approval); (g) chest radiograph (P/A). No project-specific medical examinations, or biological monitoring is required for this project.

  11. Investigation of moisture-induced embrittlement of iron aluminides. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Alven, D.A.; Stoloff, N.S.

    1997-06-05

    Iron-aluminum alloys with 28 at.% Al and 5 at.% Cr were shown to be susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement by exposure to both gaseous hydrogen and water vapor. This study examined the effect of the addition of zirconium and carbon on the moisture-induced hydrogen embrittlement of an Fe{sub 3}Al,Cr alloy through the evaluation of tensile properties and fatigue crack growth resistance in hydrogen gas and moisture-bearing air. Susceptibility to embrittlement was found to vary with the zirconium content while the carbon addition was found to only affect the fracture toughness. Inherent fatigue crack growth resistance and fracture toughness, as measured in an inert environment, was found to increase with the addition of 0.5 at.% Zr. The combined addition of 0.5 at.% Zr and carbon only increased the fracture toughness. The addition of 1 at.% Zr and carbon was found to have no effect on the crack growth rate when compared to the base alloy. Susceptibility to embrittlement in moisture-bearing environments was found to decrease with the addition of 0.5 at.% Zr. In gaseous hydrogen, the threshold value of the Zr-containing alloys was found to increase above that found in the inert environment while the crack growth resistance was much lower. By varying the frequency of fatigue loading, it was shown that the corrosion fatigue component of the fatigue crack growth rate in an embrittling environment displays a frequency dependence. Hydrogen transport in iron aluminides was shown to occur primarily by a dislocation-assisted transport mechanism. This mechanism, in conjunction with fractography, indicates that the zirconium-containing precipitates act as traps for the hydrogen that is carried along by the dislocations through the lattice.

  12. An Investigation of the Factors Affecting Moral Judgment of Marital Status and Family Size. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drucker, Eugene H.

    This report describes a study of how certain factors influence peoples' attitudes about other peoples' marital status and family size. For the study, stories were prepared describing single or married persons and families with different numbers of children. The stories contained information believed likely to affect the readers' attitudes or moral…

  13. A REPLICATIVE INVESTIGATION OF THE BUCKINGHAM-DOLCH FREE-ASSOCIATION WORD STUDY. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JACOBS, HUGH DONALD

    PUBLISHED CHILDREN'S VOCABULARY LISTS BASED ON ACTUAL USAGE ARE ALL DRAWN FROM RESEARCH DONE PRIOR TO 1930. THE PRESENT STUDY REPLICATED THE 1926 BUCKINGHAM-DOLCH STUDY TO DETERMINE ANY VOCABULARY CHANGES. THE 2 HYPOTHESES TESTED WERE (1) THERE IS NO SIGNIFICANT VOCABULARY SHIFT, AND (2) COMMON WORDS DID NOT DIFFER IN GRADE-PLACEMENT (THE EARLIEST…

  14. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 53

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    Contents include: Baffin Island experimental oil spill and dispersant studies. Hydrocarbon bioaccumulation and histopathological and biochemical responses in marine bivalve molluscs; Feeding ecology of juvenile king and Tanner crab in the southeastern Bering Sea; Distribution of larval and juvenile red king crabs (Paralithodes camtschatica) in Bristol Bay; Distribution and abundance of decapod crustacean larvae in the southeastern Bering Sea with emphasis on commercial species.

  15. Minimum Pool and Bull Trout Prey Base Investigations at Beulah Reservoir - Final Report for 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, Brien P.; Mesa, Matthew G.

    2009-01-01

    Beulah Reservoir in southeastern Oregon provides irrigation water to nearby farms and supports an adfluvial population of threatened bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus). Summer drawdowns in the reservoir could affect forage fish production and overwintering bull trout. To assess the impacts of drawdown, we sampled fish, invertebrates, and water-quality variables seasonally during 2006-08. In 2006, the summer drawdown was about 68 percent of full pool, which was less than a typical drawdown of 85 percent. We detected few changes in pelagic invertebrate densities, and catch rates, abundance, and sizes of fish when comparing values from spring to values from fall. We did note that densities of benthic insects in areas that were dewatered annually were lower than those from areas that were not dewatered annually. In 2007, the drawdown was 100 percent (to run-of-river level) and resulted in decreases in abundance of invertebrates as much as 96 percent, decreases in catch rates of fish as much as 80 percent, decreases in abundance of redside shiners (Richardsonius balteatus) and northern pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) as much as 93 percent, and decreased numbers of small fish in catches. In the fall 2007, we estimated the total biomass of forage fish to be 76 kilograms, or about one-quarter of total biomass of forage fish in 2006. Bioenergetics modeling suggested that ample forage for about 1,000 bull trout would exist after a moderate drawdown, but that forage remaining after a complete dewatering would not be sufficient for a population one-fifth the size. Our results indicate that drawdowns in Beulah Reservoir affect the aquatic community and perhaps the health and well-being of bull trout. The severity of effects depends on the extent of drawdown, population size of bull trout, and perhaps other factors.

  16. Investigation of the Appropriateness of the Anchor Test Study Equating Results for Selected Subgroups. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bianchini, John C.; Vale, Carol A.

    The Anchor Test Study (ATS) yielded equating tables for vocabulary, reading comprehension, and total reading scores for eight commonly used reading tests at the 4th, 5th, and 6th grade levels. Because of the original ATS sampling design which resulted in a nationally representative sample of school children at those grades, the equating tables…

  17. Geophysical investigation at an existing landfill, Badger Army Ammunition Plant, Baraboo, Wisconsin. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, C.B.; Sjostrom, K.J.

    1991-04-01

    Ground-water contaminants were found in ground-water monitoring wells at the existing landfill. More wells to define the horizontal and vertical extent of the contaminant plume are to be installed. Geophysical techniques (electro-magnetic induction, vertical electrical resistivity, and horizontal resistivity profiling) were used to map the extent of the contaminant plume. Using the geophysical, ground-water elevation, and geologic data, five anomalous areas south and east of the landfill were identified as locations for additional ground-water monitoring wells.

  18. Final Technical Report EMSP 70045 Investigation of Pore Scale Processes That Affect Soil Vapor Extraction

    SciTech Connect

    Valocchi, Albert J.; Werth, Charles W.; Webb, Andrew W.

    2004-12-10

    Dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) contamination in the vadose zone is a significant problem at Department of Energy sites. Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is commonly used to remediate DNAPLs from the vadose zone. In most cases, a period of high recovery has been followed by a sustained period of low recovery. This behavior has been attributed to multiple processes including slow interphase mass transfer, retarded vapor phase transport, and diffusion from unswept zones of low permeability. This research project used a combination of laboratory experimentation and mathematical modeling to determine how these various processes interact to limit the removal of DNAPL components in heterogeneous porous media during SVE. Our results were applied to scenarios typical of the carbon tetrachloride spill zone at the Hanford Site. Our results indicate that: (a) the initial distribution of the spilled DNAPL (i.e., the spill-zone architecture) has a major influence upon the performance of any subsequent SVE operations; (b) while the pattern of higher and lower conductivity soil zones has an important impact upon spill zone architecture, soil moisture distribution plays an even larger role when there are large quantities of co-disposed waste-water (as in the Hanford scenario); (c) depending upon soil moisture dynamics, liquid DNAPL that is trapped by surrounding water is extremely difficult to remove by SVE; (d) natural barometric pumping can remove a large amount of the initial DNAPL mass for spills occurring close to the land surface, and hence the initial spilled inventory will be over-estimated if this process is neglected.

  19. Investigation of the Process for Registration of Squoxin for Squawfish Control, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rulifson, Robert L.

    1984-12-01

    Squawfish are a predator on downstream migrant salmon and steelhead. Squoxin, 1,1'-methylenedi-2-naphthol, is a specific toxin for squawfish. This report addresses the requirements and deficiencies in data necessary for squoxin registration as a pesticide. It includes an annotated bibliography, keyword index from published and unpublished sources covering information on squawfish, squoxin, state and federal regulations for pesticide registration. Squoxin is 100% lethal to squawfish at concentrations as low as 10 ppB for at least 2 hours. The recommended rate for field application is 100 ppB for 12 hours. At 100 ppB, the maximum LC/sub 0/ for the least squoxin tolerant salmonids is 7 to 17 times greater than the minimum LC/sub 100/ for northern squawfish. Squoxin is excreted in aquatic biota and mammals primarily via the bile. Squoxin shows little tendency to accumulate in animal tissues. A petition to register squoxin was submitted to EPA in 1977. EPA noted deficiencies in data including testing for residues in meat, milk, poultry, eggs, potable water, and irrigated crops; aquatic metabolism; mutagenicity; avian oral LC/sub 50/; acute LD/sub 50/ for freshwater invertebrates; freshwater fish LC/sub 50/; and acute LC/sub 50/ for marine organisms. Cost estimates for conducting the squoxin data research range from $436,600 to $2,070,000. Squawfish control with squoxin would represent an annual savings to the commercial and sports fishing industry of $20 to 25 million based on the value of the Columbia River salmon and steelhead lost to predation. The cost for registration of squoxin and initial treatment of the Columbia is far less than the value of returning adults from the smolts lost to predation in one year. 7 figs., 13 tabs.

  20. Outer continental shelf environmental-assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 68

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    The contents of this study include the following: biological reconnaissance of Boulder Island Shoal in western Camden Bay, Beaufort Sea, Alaska; the Chukchi Sea continental shelf: benthos-environmental interactions; ecological assessment of sublittoral plant communities in the northern Gulf of Alaska; and ecology of unconsolidated beaches in Lower Cook Inlet.

  1. Investigation of Antarctic sea ice concentration by means of selected algorithms. Final report, 1991-1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lomax, A.S.

    1992-05-08

    Changes in areal extent and concentration of sea ice around Antarctica may serve as sensitive indicators of global warming. A comparison study was conducted between the outputs of the three main algorithms currently in use (NASA Team, Comisco, and NORSEX) and a sea-ice model (Fine Resolution Antarctic Model). Data from the DMSP Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) were used as input algorithms for the time frame July, 1987 to June, 1990. Large disparities are apparent when comparing the NASA algorithm with the Comisco and NORSEX algorithms. Very large differences, some higher than 30 per cent, exist in the marginal ice zones, along the coast, and in the Weddell and Ross Seas Heat fluxes through recurring polynyas were calculated to quantify further differences in the algorithms; however, no conclusive patterns were apparent. No significant change in the extent or area of the ice pack occurred from July, 1987 through June, 1990. Antarctic Ocean, Antarctic regions, Global warming, Sea ice-Antarctic regions.

  2. Experimental investigation of natural convection heat transfer in volumetrically heated spherical segments. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Asfia, F.; Dhir, V.

    1998-03-01

    One strategy for preventing the failure of lower head of a nuclear reactor vessel is to flood the concrete cavity with subcooled water in accidents in which relocation of core material into the vessel lower head occurs. After the core material relocates into the vessel, a crust of solid material forms on the inner wall of the vessel, however, most of the pool remains molten and natural convection exists in the pool. At present, uncertainty exists with respect to natural convection heat transfer coefficients between the pool of molten core material and the reactor vessel wall. In the present work, experiments were conducted to examine natural convection heat transfer in internally heated partially filled spherical pools with external cooling. In the experiments, Freon-113 contained in a Pyrex bell jar was used as a test liquid. The pool was bounded with a spherical segment at the bottom, and was heated with magnetrons taken from a conventional microwave oven. The vessel was cooled from the outside with natural convection of water or with nucleate boiling of liquid nitrogen.

  3. Geotechnical investigation of the potential use of shredded scrap tires in soil stabilization. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shakoor, A.; Chu, C.J.

    1998-11-01

    Silt-tire and clay-tire mixtures, containing 0% to 100% shredded tire material by weight, with tire chips ranging in size from 7mm--13mm, 13mm--25mm, and 25mm--38mm, were tested for a series of engineering properties including compaction characteristics, permeability, unconfined compressive strength, friction angle, cohesion, and compression index. In addition, the leachate samples from shredded tire material, soil-tire mixtures, and a test embankment, containing 70% clay and 30% shredded tire material by weight, were analyzed for chemical composition. The results show that density and unconfined compressive strength decrease, and permeability increases, with increasing shredded tire content for both soil types and all three tire sizes used in the study. In general, the addition of shredded tire material improves the friction angle for both silt and clay by a few degrees but also increases their compression index values. The results of leachate analyses show that concentrations of trace elements from soil-tire mixtures are less than the maximum allowed contaminant levels specified in United States Environmental Protection Agency`s regulations.

  4. Investigation of properties and performance of ceramic composite components: Final report on Phases 3 and 4

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, W.A.; Halverson, H.; Carter, R.H.; Miraj, N.; Reifsnider, K.L.

    1998-01-15

    The objective of the Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development (AR and TD) Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for longer-term fossil energy applications as well as for generic needs of various fossil fuel technologies. The research program of the Materials Response Group at Virginia Tech addresses the need for reliable and durable structural ceramic composites to perform in high temperature environments. The research effort provides an experimental and analytical basis for the transition from properties of materials to performance of actual component structures. Phases 1 and 2 of the present program focused on the development of test capabilities, initial studies of component mechanical response under various conditions and the development of a life prediction methodology. These efforts have been described in previous reports. This report summarizes the major tasks completed under Phases 3 and 4 of the project. Overall, the authors have made significant progress in a broad spectrum of tasks in this program. Their efforts have encompassed component evaluation, assessment of new SiC-based composites with improved high-temperature potential, development of oxide coating materials for SiC, and the extension and development of new models for predicting the durability of composite components under specific operating conditions for various CMC applications. Each of these areas of work is an important area for achieving the ultimate goal of usable SiC-based composites in high-temperature corrosive environments typical of fossil energy applications.

  5. Flathead River Instream Flow Investigation Project : Final Report 1996-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, William J.; Ptacek, Jonathan A.

    2003-09-01

    A modified Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) approach was used on the mainstem Flathead River from the South Fork Flathead River downstream to Flathead Lake. The objective of this study was to quantify changes in habitat for the target fish species, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and west slope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi), as a function of discharge in the river. This approach used a combination of georeferenced field data for each study site combined with a two-dimensional hydraulic simulation of river hydraulic characteristics. The hydraulic simulations were combined with habitat suitability criteria in a GIS analysis format to determine habitat area as a function of discharge. Results of the analysis showed that habitat area is more available at lower discharges than higher discharges and that in comparison of the pre-dam hydrology with post-dam hydrology, the stable pre-dam baseflows provided more stable habitat than the highly variable flow regime during both summer and winter baseflow post-dam periods. The variability week to week and day to day under post-dam conditions waters and dewaters stream margins. This forces sub-adult fish, in particular bull trout, to use less productive habitat during the night. There is a distinct difference between daytime and nighttime habitat use for bull trout sub-adults. The marginal areas that are constantly wet and then dried provide little in productivity for lower trophic levels and consequently become unproductive for higher trophic levels, especially bull trout sub-adults that use those areas as flows increase. A stable flow regime would be more productive than flow regimes with high variability week to week. The highly variable flows likely put stress on a bull trout subadult and west slope cutthroat trout, due to the additional movement required to find suitable habitat. The GIS approach presented here provides both a visual characterization of habitat as well as Arcview project data in the distribution cassette disk that can be used for additional analysis of flow regimes and spatial variability of habitat within the three reaches of the river. The habitat time series can be used to compare habitat changes over time.

  6. Preliminary design and economic investigations of diffuser-augmented wind turbines (DAWT). Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Foreman, K.M.

    1981-12-01

    A preferred design and configuration approach for the DAWT innovative wind energy conversion system is suggested. A preliminary economic assessment is made for limited production rates of units between 5 and 150 kW rated output. Nine point designs are used to arrive at the conclusions regarding best construction material for the diffuser and busbar cost of electricity (COE). It is estimated that for farm and REA cooperative end users, the COE can range between 2 and 3.5 cents/kWh for sites with annual average wind speeds of 16 and 12 mph (25.7 and 19.3 km/h) respectively, and 150 kW rated units. No tax credits are included in these COE figures. For commercial end users of these 150 kW units, the COE ranges between 4.0 and 6.5 cents/kWh for 16 and 12 mph sites. These estimates in 1971 dollars are lower than DOE goals set in 1978 for the rating size and end applications. Recommendations are made for future activities to maintain steady, systematic progress toward mature development of the DAWT.

  7. Final Report: Investigation of Catalytic Pathways for Lignin Breakdown into Monomers and Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Gluckstein, Jeffrey A; Hu, Michael Z.; Kidder, Michelle; McFarlane, Joanna; Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Sturgeon, Matthew R

    2010-12-01

    Lignin is a biopolymer that comprises up to 35% of woody biomass by dry weight. It is currently underutilized compared to cellulose and hemicellulose, the other two primary components of woody biomass. Lignin has an irregular structure of methoxylated aromatic groups linked by a suite of ether and alkyl bonds which makes it difficult to degrade selectively. However, the aromatic components of lignin also make it promising as a base material for the production of aromatic fuel additives and cyclic chemical feed stocks such as styrene, benzene, and cyclohexanol. Our laboratory research focused on three methods to selectively cleave and deoxygenate purified lignin under mild conditions: acidolysis, hydrogenation and electrocatalysis. (1) Acidolysis was undertaken in CH2Cl2 at room temperature. (2) Hydrogenation was carried out by dissolving lignin and a rhodium catalyst in 1:1 water:methoxyethanol under a 1 atm H2 environment. (3) Electrocatalysis of lignin involved reacting electrically generated hydrogen atoms at a catalytic palladium cathode with lignin dissolved in a solution of aqueous methanol. In all of the experiments, the lignin degradation products were identified and quantified by gas chromatography mass spectroscopy and flame ionization detection. Yields were low, but this may have reflected the difficulty in recovering the various fractions after conversion. The homogeneous hydrogenation of lignin showed fragmentation into monomers, while the electrocatalytic hydrogenation showed production of polyaromatic hydrocarbons and substituted benzenes. In addition to the experiments, promising pathways for the conversion of lignin were assessed. Three conversion methods were compared based on their material and energy inputs and proposed improvements using better catalyst and process technology. A variety of areas were noted as needing further experimental and theoretical effort to increase the feasibility of lignin conversion to fuels.

  8. Investigations of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling relevant to operational systems. Final scientific report, 1984-1987

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, C.I.; Newell, P.T.

    1988-02-01

    Important advances were made in understanding the dynamics of the magnetosphere and its coupling to the ionosphere. Significant progress was made in the areas of polar cusp precipitation and dynamics; dayside auroral morphology and auroral boundary dynamics; polar rain; the quiescent polar cap; the physics of impulsive injection phenomena; and problems of global magnetospheric plasma transport.

  9. Investigations of ultrasonic wave interactions at boundaries separating anisotropic media. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, L.

    1984-03-31

    The analytical problem of elastic wave propagation through an interface separating two simi-infinite anisotropic solids has been formulated. Solutions have been obtained for 3 cases typical of weld and cast structures such as isotropic-cubic, isotropic-hexagonal, and cubic-cubic symmetrics. Reflection and transmission coefficients are calculated for the various types of wave modes. Special effects such as mode conversion, deviation between energy transport and phase velocity surface waves are addressed. Pure nickel (fcc) is selected as an anisotropic material suitable for modeling the various structural variables such as grain boundaries, columnar structure interior interfaces, etc. A crystal pulley has been added to the levitation zone refiner to produce cylindrical crystals with controlled orientation. All crystal samples had their orientation determined using Laue back reflection technique. Several single crystals with different orientation as well as a bicrystal with rough boindaries ahs been produced. In addition, bonding of nickel samples have been prepared using both diffusion bonding as well as fusion welding processes. A new computer-controlled ultrasonic experimental system has been developed for measurement of ultrasonic parameters in single crystals as well as in the bonded region between two crystals. The system has an angular resolution of 1/60/sup 0/ and linear resolution of 40 ..mu... The ultrasonic transit time and amplitude signals are recorded in digital form. Ultrasonic spectroscopic information (e.g. reflection coefficient as function of frequency from the interface) as well as two dimensional image displays from various regions may be produced. Ultrasonic measurements of various wave mode types, mode conversion effects and energy transport across boundaries are considered.

  10. Final Report, Research Program to Investigate the Fundamental Chemistry of Technetium

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens Jr., Wayne W.; Fickes, Michael J.; Bucher, Jerome J.; Burns, Carol J.; Edelstein, Norman M.; Shuh, David K.

    2000-12-23

    The purpose is to increase the basic scientific understanding of technetium chemistry to better understand the behavior of technetium in chemical environments relevant to DOE. Two important areas in need of study are the behavior of technetium in highly alkaline solutions similar to high-level nuclear waste, and its behavior in different waste forms. This research program addressed these two needs. Two separate approaches were used in this program. The first focus was to understand the basic solution chemistry of technetium, which underlies its behavior in the highly alkaline environment of the nuclear waste tanks located at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites. The specific problems at these sites are related to the anomalous oxidation state of technetium (Schroeder 1995). Although, at high pH, technetium should exist in its highest oxidation state as TcO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, soluble, lower-valent technetium species have been observed in certain wastes. The specific unknowns that this program sought to answer are the nature of lower valent technetium species that can be formed in highly alkaline solution and whether pertechnetate undergoes radiolytic reduction in highly alkaline solution when nitrate is present in excess. The second focus area is the behavior of technetium immobilized in various waste forms. The behavior of technetium in cement wastes was examined to gain information about its long-term stability. Specifically, this research examined the oxidation of reduced technetium species by components present in high-level waste that are incorporated into cement waste along with technetium.

  11. Investigation of Nitro-Organic Compounds in Diesel Engine Exhaust: Final Report, February 2007 - April 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Dane, J.; Voorhees, K. J.

    2010-06-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory upgraded its ReFUEL engine and vehicle testing facility to speciate unregulated gas-phase emissions. To complement this capability, the laboratory contracted with the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) to study the effects of soy biodiesel fuel and a diesel particle filter (DPF) on emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAH). CSM developed procedures to sample diesel particulate matter (PM) emissions from raw and diluted exhaust, with and without a DPF. They also developed improved procedures for extracting PAH and NPAH from the PM and quantifying them with a gas chromatograph-electron monochromator mass spectrometer. The study found the DPF generally reduced PAH emissions by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude. PAH conversion was lowest for B100, suggesting that PAHs were forming in the DPF. Orders of magnitude reductions were also found for NPAH emissions exiting the DPF.

  12. Experimental investigation of vortices shed by various wing fin configurations. M.S. Thesis. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iversen, J.; Moghadam, M.

    1981-01-01

    Forty-six different fins, which were members of twelve plan-form families, were tested. A two dimensional Boeing single element airfoil at an angle of attack of eight degrees and a sweepback angle of thirty-two was used to simulate a portion of the wing of a generator aircraft. Various free stream velocities were used to test any individual fin at its particular angle of attack. While the fin itself was mounted on the upper surface of the generator model, the angle of attack of each fin was varied until stall was reached and/or passed. The relative fin vortex strengths were measured in two ways. First, the maximum angular velocity of a four blade rotor placed in the fin vortex center was measured with the use of a stroboscope. Second, the maximum rolling moment on a following wing model placed in the fin vortex center was measured by a force balance.

  13. Final report on isotope tracer investigations in the Forebay of the Orange County groundwater basin.

    SciTech Connect

    Davisson, M; Woodside, G

    2003-12-13

    California is currently faced with some critical decisions about water resource infrastructure development in highly urbanized regions, whose outcome will dictate the future long-term viability of plentiful water. Among these is developing and safely implementing the reuse of advanced treated waste water. One of the most reliable strategies for this water resource is its indirect reuse via groundwater recharge and storage, with particular emphasis on supplementing annual water demand or during drought relief. The Orange County Water District (District) is currently implementing the first phase of a large-scale water reuse project that will advance-treat up to 60 million gallons per day of waste water and recharge it into existing percolation basins in the Forebay region of the Orange County groundwater basin. In order for the District to protect public health, the fate and potability of this recharged waste water needs to be understood. In particular, the direction and rates of flow into underlying aquifers need to be characterized so that changes in water quality can be quantified between the recharge basins and points of production. Furthermore, to ensure compliance to California Department of Health Services (DHS) draft regulations, the direction and rate of recharged waste water from these basins need to be understood to sufficient detail that small mixtures can be delineated in monitoring and production wells. Under proposed DHS guidelines, consumptive use of recycled water is permissive only if its residence time in an aquifer exceeds a specified six-month time-frame. DHS guidelines also limit the percentage of recycled water at production wells. However, attaining such detail using current hydrogeological and computer-assisted modeling tools is either cost-prohibitive or results in uncertainties too large to achieve regulatory confidence. To overcome this technical barrier, the District funded Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) from 1995-2001 to directly measure groundwater ages and perform two artificial tracer studies using isotope methods to quantify flowpath directions, groundwater residence times, and the rate and extent of recharge water and groundwater mixing. In addition, Jordan Clark at University of California, Santa Barbara also performed an artificial tracer experiment using sulfur-hexafluoride, whose results have been integrated into the LLNL findings.

  14. Training Assistance Technology Investigation. Final Report July 1977 to December 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammell, Thomas J.; And Others

    This report addresses the initial phase of a multiphase effort to install Training Assistance Technology (TAT) capabilities on a submarine combat system trainer (SCST), and evaluate their effectiveness during a formal training course. This phase addresses the (1) selection of the trainer and course with which to conduct the evaluation, (2)…

  15. The Development of Environmental Education Materials for Investigating Fire-Environment-Man Relationships: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanselman, David L.; Reider, David A.

    This publication details the development and use of environmental education materials based on the United States Forest Service "Process Approach." This publication focuses on materials that teach the ecology and management of natural and man-made forest and brush fires. The main body of the contents develop and document a rationale for…

  16. An Investigation of Wavelet Bases for Grid-Based Multi-Scale Simulations Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, R.S.; Burns, S.P.; Christon, M.A.; Roach, D.W.; Trucano, T.G.; Voth, T.E.; Weatherby, J.R.; Womble, D.E.

    1998-11-01

    The research summarized in this report is the result of a two-year effort that has focused on evaluating the viability of wavelet bases for the solution of partial differential equations. The primary objective for this work has been to establish a foundation for hierarchical/wavelet simulation methods based upon numerical performance, computational efficiency, and the ability to exploit the hierarchical adaptive nature of wavelets. This work has demonstrated that hierarchical bases can be effective for problems with a dominant elliptic character. However, the strict enforcement of orthogonality was found to be less desirable than weaker semi-orthogonality or bi-orthogonality for solving partial differential equations. This conclusion has led to the development of a multi-scale linear finite element based on a hierarchical change of basis. The reproducing kernel particle method has been found to yield extremely accurate phase characteristics for hyperbolic problems while providing a convenient framework for multi-scale analyses.

  17. Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 67

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    The contents of this study include the following: distribution, abundance, and biology of blue king and Korean hair crabs around the Pribilof Islands; distribution, abundance, and diversity of the epifaunal benthic organisms in Alitak and Ugak bays, Kodiak Island, Alaska; distribution and abundance of some epibenthic invertebrates of the northeastern Gulf of Alaska with notes on the feeding biology of selected species; reproductive success in Dungeness crab (Cancer magister) during long-term exposures to oil-contaminated sediments; and distribution and abundance of decapod larvae of the Kodiak shelf.

  18. Outstanding junior investigator program. [Final technical report, 8/1/92-10/31/97

    SciTech Connect

    Randall, Lisa; Rosenberg, Leslie

    1999-12-18

    Much of the authors work over the past five years has been aimed at bridging the gap between the exactly supersymmetric world of string theories and the world that is actually observed. Her report discusses the following subjects: (1) supersymmetry breaking; related work on the mass hierarchy and the relation between supersymmetry and grand unified theories; distinguishing between supersymmetric models; and the fundamental question of how gauge theories arise from D-branes.

  19. High power laser and materials investigation. Final report, 31 July 1978-28 October 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Chicklis, E.P.; Folweiler, R.C.; Pollak, T.M.; Baer, J.

    1980-06-01

    This is a combined study of resonant pumped solid state lasers as fusion drivers, and the development of crystalline optical materials suitable for propagation of the high peak powers associated with laser fusion research. During this period of study the concept of rare gas halide lasers was first demonstrated by the lasing of Tm:YLF at 453 nm pumped by the 353 nm energy of XeF. Excited stata densities of 5 x 10/sup 18/ cm/sup -3/ have been attained and spectroscopic measurements show that up to 60% of the pump energy can be converted into useful stored energy. Alternative lasers and pumping schemes are also discussed. In all cases the potential RGH/SS systems are evaluated in respect to internal efficiency and heat loading.

  20. A numerical and experimental investigation of electrochemical aircraft deicing. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leffel, K. L.

    1986-01-01

    This study was composed of three parts. The first part involved the extension of an existing transient two dimensional numerical code for an electrothermal deicer so that it would simulate the situation where a variable thickness ice layer existed at the outer surface. The Enthalpy Method was used to simulate the phase change, and Gauss-Seidel iteration was used to solve the resulting system of finite difference equations. A set of criteria were developed for determining when a variable thickness ice layer had an effect on deicer performance. The second part was the acquisition and analysis of experimental data. The test model was a section of a Bell UH-1H helicopter blade equipped with an electrothermal deicer. A total of fifty-two thermocouples were utilized to document the thermal response of the blade and decier assembly. In the deicing runs, the experimental temperature response data clearly showed when melting, shedding or refreezing occurred. The tests illustrated that the criterion for shedding in the three cases where it did occur was that the abrasion shield interface temperature was 32 to 34 F. The third part concerned the validation of a one dimensional transient thermal model of an electrothermal deicer by comparison of the predictions with the experimental data. The Enthalpy Method was found to effectively model the phase change which occurred, and the ice shedding algorithm employed in the simulation was also evaluated.

  1. Investigation of plasma density bulge in front of Venus bow shock. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Significant ion and electron flux enhancements immediately upstream of the Venus bow shock were observed by the Electron Temperature Probe on the Pioneer Venus Orbiter. Mass loading of the solar wind by oxygen ions accounts for only about 10 percent of the observed effect.

  2. Krakow clean fossil fuels and energy efficiency program. Final report: Initial site investigation

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-15

    Original objective of this project was to retrofit the Balice Boilerhouse with a TCS Coal Micronization system and Amerex baghouses to achieve higher combustion efficiencies and lower air emission, including SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, CO and particulate matter. The Balice Boilerhouse is located adjacent to the Krakow Airport and provides heating steam for the Polish Military Unit No. 1616. In May 1995 the Polish Military announced it had decided to convert its boiler house to gas; thus cancelling the TCS Project. The balance of 1995 was spent considering alternative Project sites in Krakow for the application of the TCS coal Micronization technology.

  3. Setting a Neglected Variable in Science Education: Investigations Into Outdoor Field Trips. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, John H.; Balling, John D.

    Reported are three studies of attitudes towards and effects of science education field trips. In the first study, 425 fifth and sixth graders participated in outdoor science activities in one of three types of settings. Results indicated that more learning took place when the number of available examples of concepts to be learned and setting…

  4. Development of the residential case-specular epidemiologic investigation method. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zaffanella, L.E.; Savitz, D.A.

    1995-11-01

    The residential case-specular method is an innovative approach to epidemiologic studies of the association between wire codes and childhood cancer. This project was designed to further the development of the residential case-specular method, which seeks to help resolve the ``wire code paradox``. For years, wire codes have been used as surrogate measures of past electric and magnetic field (EMF) exposure. There is a magnetic field hypothesis that suggests childhood cancer is associated with exposure to magnetic fields, with wire codes as a proxy for these fields. The neighborhood hypothesis suggests that childhood cancer is associated with neighborhood characteristics and exposures other than magnetic fields, with wire codes as a proxy for these characteristics and exposures. The residential case-specular method was designed to discriminate between the magnetic field and the neighborhood hypothesis. Two methods were developed for determining the specular of a residence. These methods were tested with 400 randomly selected residences. The main advantage of the residential case-specular method is that it may efficiently confirm or eliminate the suspicion that control selection bias or confounding by neighborhood factors affected the results of case-control studies of childhood cancer and magnetic fields. The method may be applicable to both past and ongoing studies. The main disadvantage is that the method is untried. Consequently, further work is required to verify its validity and to ensure that sufficient statistical power can be obtained in a cost-effective manner.

  5. Investigation of spontaneous abortion among video-display-terminal users. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Schnorr, T.M.; Grajewski, B.A.; Hornung, R.W.; Thun, M.J.; Egeland, G.M.

    1991-03-01

    NIOSH conducted a study of 2,430 female telephone operators to determine if exposure to electromagnetic fields emitted by video display terminals (VDT's) were associated with increased risk of spontaneous abortion. Exposure levels were determined using company records of weekly hours of VDT use and measurements of electromagnetic fields at VDT workstations. Operators who used VDT's had higher abdominal exposure to very low frequency (VLF) (15 kHz) electromagnetic. Workstations without VDT's did not emit VLF energy. Abdominal exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) (45 to 60Hz) was similar for operators who used VDT's and those who did not. The authors found no excess risk of spontaneous abortion for VDT use in the first trimester of pregnancy and no dose-response relationship resulting from weekly hours of VDT use. Significant associations were found for other risk factors e.g. cigarette smoking, thyroid disorder, alcohol consumption. The potential association of spontaneous abortion and physical or psychological stress could not be addressed in the study design. The authors conclude that VDT use and exposure to the accompanying electromagnetic fields were not associated with an increased risk of spontaneous abortion in the study.

  6. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE APPLICABILITY OF MOTION PICTURES TO EDUCATIONAL TESTING. FINAL REPORT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VAN HORN, CHARLES

    EIGHT ITEMS THE "GUILFORD-ZIMMERMAN TEMPERAMENT SURVEY" (E.G. , "YOU MAKE DECISIONS ON THE SPUR OF THE MOMENT") WERE DRAMATIZED AND FILMED IN TWO POLARIZED SITUATIONS, ONE DEPICTING A SPECIFIC SET OF BEHAVIOR TO SUPPORT AN AFFIRMATIVE RESPONSE TO THE TEST ITEM AND THE OTHER DEPICTING A NEGATIVE SPECIFIC. TWO ADDITIONAL VARIABLES INTENDED TO…

  7. Investigation of radiofrequency/microwave effects upon the central nervous system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, W.W.

    1980-06-26

    A study to determine the effect of pulsed electromagnetic energy upon brain calcium behavior was undertaken. An innovative approach for loading the cerebral tissues with radiocalcium was introduced. Intraventricular injections through the skull placed Ca-45 solution directly into the right lateral ventricle. Two hours later, companion frontal lobe samples were placed in separate glass breakers containing physiologic solution for a 20-min exposure to pulsed electromagnetic energy. An efflux value was calculated for each sample. A second experimental procedure involved whole-body irradiation of the animals two hours following the intraventricular injections. Animals were then irradiated with pulsed electromagnetic energy at a power density of 10 mW/cm squared, a pulse repetition frequency of 16 Hz, and carrier frequency of 2.45 GHz. Following exposure, frontal lobe and parieto-occipital tissue samples were taken and analysed for radioactivity. Statistical treatment of the first sets of experiments failed to reveal any perturbation in calcium efflux behavior. Data from the second set are still being evaluated.

  8. Outer Continental shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 51

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-01

    The following are repoted: research to determine the accumulation of organic constituents and heavy metals from petroleum-impacted sediments by marine detritivores of the Alaskan outer continental shelf; Suspended particulate matter distribution, transport, and physical characteristics in the north Aleutian Shelf and St. George Basin lease areas; The production and dispersion of dissolved methane in southeastern Bering Sea; Oil spill vulnerability, coastal morphology, and sedimentation of outer Kenai Peninsula and Montague Island; Circulation and water masses in the Gulf of Alaska; Coastal oceanography of the northeastern Gulf of Alaska.

  9. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 46

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-07-01

    Contents include: Source, composition, and flux of organic detritus in lower Cook Inlet; Lower Cook Inlet meroplankton; Seasonal population density distribution of copepods, euphausiids, amphipods, and other holoplankton on the Kodiak Shelf.

  10. Investigation of international experience with pulverized coal fires and explosions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, J.N.; Hamilton, T.B.; McNaughton, W.P.

    1993-06-01

    In the early 1980s there were indications that not only were pulverized coal (p.c.) mill fires and explosions a major cause of electric utility down time, but that the incidence of foreign p.c. mill explosions was lower than in the US. This study was established to survey foreign utility experience with p.c. fires and explosions and to relate this to US experience. Sources of foreign p.c. technology were located and visits made to Japan, Australia, England, France, Germany, and Switzerland. Pulverized coal mill manufacturers, operators, researchers and regulators were visited. The results indicate that (1) the conditions necessary for p.c. explosions are known, (2) all p.c. mill systems have the potential to be exploded, (3) there are no p.c. mill design or operating secrets held by foreign sources not known in the US, (4) p.c. mill fires and explosions in foreign countries have the same scenarios as in the US, (5) undiscovered fires in p.c. mill systems are the major cause of p.c. mill explosions, (6) p.c. mill fire and explosion rates tend to correlate with coal type fed to the mill (as described by the fuel ratio) and operator familiarity and caution in operating p.c. mill systems, (7) for a number of reasons, it was not possible to calculate explosion rates in foreign countries that could be compared directly to US experience; however, it was possible to note aspects of foreign operating experience, mill modifications, and pulverizer research that could provide guidance for US and Canadian utilities seeking to continue improving their pulverizer operations. Research on p.c. explosions is reviewed along with implications of the research into operating procedures. Operator experience, training and vigilance can be a significant factor in reducing the risk. Recommendations are made to increase operator efforts to identify and fight fires that would traditionally be undiscovered.

  11. Participation in the Creede Scientific Drilling Project as on-site Principal Investigator. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hulen, J.B.

    1992-06-01

    Scientific questions addressed by the Creede Scientific Drilling Project were as follows (Bethke et al., 1992): (1) Did the lacustrine sedimentary sequence filling the moat of Creede caldera serve as reservoir for the moderately-saline aqueous fluids which scavenged and then transported silver and base metals to ore-depositional sites for the rich epithermal deposits of the Creede mining district (Fig. 1)?; (2) what were the chemical and isotopic compositions of these fluids prior to their entry into the Creede fracture (later vein) system; (3) how did these chemical and isotopic compositions evolve in transit to the ore-depositional site?; (4) how did the Creede caldera form and evolve?; (5) what is the present thermal regime in Creede caldera moat? {hor_ellipsis}the, paleothermal regime?; (5) what are the hydrologic transport properties of the moat sedimentary rocks?; (6) what diagenetic or hydrothermal veins disrupt the moat sedimentary sequence, and what do their paragenetic relationships, mineralogic compositions, fluid-inclusion characteristics, and stable-isotope systematics reveal about evolution of the Creede hydrothermal system? Two Creede caldera moat drill holes were completed for this project.

  12. Final report for CAFDA project entitled, Experimental and numerical investigation of accelerated fluid interface

    SciTech Connect

    Greenough, J.A.; Jacobs, J.W.; Marcus, D.L.

    1997-03-26

    The main thrust of this collaborative effort can be summarized as an attempt to use the strengths of physical experiments and numerical simulations in understanding the dynamics of accelerated interfaces. Laboratory experiments represent the true nature of the physical processes and the simulations represent a model of these processes. We have taken the first steps toward this goal through development and calibration of new experimental techniques as well as validation and direct, systematic, and quantitative comparison with computational results. This report summarizes accomplishments made towards these goals. More detailed information is provided in reprints appended to this document.

  13. Investigations on deflagration to detonation transition in porous energetic materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, D.S.

    1999-07-01

    The research carried out by this contract was part of a larger effort funded by LANL in the areas of deflagration to detonation in porous energetic materials (DDT) and detonation shock dynamics in high explosives (DSD). In the first three years of the contract the major focus was on DDT. However, some researchers were carried out on DSD theory and numerical implementation. In the last two years the principal focus of the contract was on DSD theory and numerical implementation. However, during the second period some work was also carried out on DDT. The paper discusses DDT modeling and DSD modeling. Abstracts are included on the following topics: modeling deflagration to detonation; DSD theory; DSD wave front tracking; and DSD program burn implementation.

  14. Investigating Encrypted Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, Niall; Gladyshev, Pavel; Kechadi, Tahar; Carthy, Joe

    When encrypted material is discovered during a digital investigation and the investigator cannot decrypt the material then s/he is faced with the problem of how to determine the evidential value of the material. This research is proposing a methodology of extracting probative value from the encrypted file of a hybrid cryptosystem. The methodology also incorporates a technique for locating the original plaintext file. Since child pornography (KP) images and terrorist related information (TI) are transmitted in encrypted format the digital investigator must ask the question Cui Bono? - who benefits or who is the recipient? By doing this the scope of the digital investigation can be extended to reveal the intended recipient.

  15. FLECHT SEASET program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hochreiter, L E

    1985-11-01

    This report presents the highlights and main findings of the USNRC, EPRI, and Westinghouse cooperative FLECHT SEASET program. The report indicates areas in which the results of the program can contribute to revising the current licensing requirements for Loss of Coolant (LOCA) safety analysis for PWRs. Also identified are several technical areas in which the new FLECHT SEASET data and analysis can lead to improved safety analysis modeling, and thereby to predicted PWR response for postulated accident scenarios. Significant progress has been made in the modeling areas of nonequilibrium dispersed two-phase flow during reflood. Improved models and understanding of this rod bundle cooling regime are summarized in this report. Another important result of the FLECHT SEASET program arises from the natural circulation test series, which investigated single-phase, two-phase, and reflux condensation cooling modes of a scaled PWR under small-break LOCA conditions. The tests and subsequent analysis constitute one of few complete sets of data for these cooling modes in which full-height, multitube steam generators with sufficient instrumentation were used to examine primary-to-secondary heat transfer in the generators. It is believed that the natural circulation test data will be extremely useful to benchmark the improved post-TMI small-break LOCA computer codes. 170 figs., 13 tabs.

  16. Expedient antibiotics production: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bienkowski, P.R.; Byers, C.H.; Lee, D.D.

    1988-05-01

    The literature on the manufacture, separation and purification, and clinical uses of antibiotics was reviewed, and a bibliography of the pertinent material was completed. Five antimicrobial drugs, penicillin V and G, (and amoxicillin with clavulanic acid), Cephalexin (a cephalosporin), tetracycline and oxytetracycline, Bacitracin (topical), and sulfonamide (chemically produced) were identified for emergency production. Plants that manufacture antibiotics in the continental United States, Mexico, and Puerto Rico have been identified along with potential alternate sites such as those where SCP, enzyme, and fermentation ethanol are produced. Detailed process flow sheets and process descriptions have been derived from the literature and documented. This investigation revealed that a typical antibiotic-manufacturing facility is composed of two main sections: (1) a highly specialized, but generic, fermentation unit and (2) a multistep, complex separation and purification unit which is specific to a particular antibiotic product. The fermentation section requires specialized equipment for operation in a sterile environment which is not usually available in other industries. The emergency production of antibiotics under austere conditions will be feasible only if a substantial reduction in the complexity and degree of separation and purity normally required can be realized. Detailed instructions were developed to assist state and federal officials who would be directing the resumption of antibiotic production after a nuclear attack. 182 refs., 54 figs., 26 tabs.

  17. Environmental Prosperity Game. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, M.; Boyack, K.; VanDevender, J.P.

    1995-12-01

    Prosperity Games are an outgrowth and adaptation of move/countermove and seminar War Games. Prosperity Games are simulations that explore complex issues in a variety of areas including economics, politics, sociology, environment, education and research. These issues can be examined from a variety of perspectives ranging from a global, macroeconomic and geopolitical viewpoint down to the details of customer/supplier/market interactions in specific industries. All Prosperity Games are unique in that both the game format and the player contributions vary from game to game. This report documents the Environmental Prosperity Game conducted under the sponsorship of the Silicon Valley Environmental Partnership. Players were drawn from all stakeholders involved in environmental technologies including small and large companies, government, national laboratories, universities, environmentalists, the legal profession, finance, and the media. The primary objectives of this game were to: investigate strategies for developing a multi-agency (national/state/regional), one-step regulatory approval process for certifying and implementing environmental technologies and evaluating the simulated results; identify the regulatory hurdles and requirements, and the best approaches for surmounting them; identify technical problems and potential resources (environmental consultants, labs, universities) for solving them. The deliberations and recommendations of these players provided valuable insights as to the views of this diverse group of decision makers concerning environmental issues, including the development, licensing, and commercialization of new technologies.

  18. Biomass wood. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, A.H.

    1983-12-31

    This project supported an on going investigation to develop the commercial application of a multiple-use wood fired heater. As a result of the project, a production model heater has been designed and several units are undergoing performance testing: residental (three), hog parlor (one), community recreation center (one), and Pee Dee Experiment Station (two for tobacco curing tests). The present heater design uses a two-stage air-to-air heat exchanger with a total heating area of approximately 48 square feet and a furnace volume of approximately 18 cubic feet. The heater is rated at 100,000 Btu/hr, and heated air output is thermostatically controlled by the combination of on/off action of a fan moving air across the heated surface and open/closed action of a damper controlling combustion airflow into the furnace. At this time developmental work is directed toward overcoming the remaining obstacle to the immediate commercialization of the heater: controlled removal of excess furnace heat during relatively long no-heat demand periods or in the event of fan outage.

  19. Theoretical nuclear physics. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    As the three-year period FY93-FY96 ended, there were six senior investigators on the grant full-time: Bulgac, Henley, Miller, Savage, van Kolck and Wilets. This represents an increase of two members from the previous three-year period, achieved with only a two percent increase over the budget for FY90-FY93. In addition, the permanent staff of the Institute for Nuclear Theory (George Bertsch, Wick Haxton, and David Kaplan) continued to be intimately associated with our physics research efforts. Aurel Bulgac joined the Group in September, 1993 as an assistant professor, with promotion requested by the Department and College of Arts and Sciences by September, 1997. Martin Savage, who was at Carnegie-Mellon University, jointed the Physics Department in September, 1996. U. van Kolck continued as research assistant professor, and we were supporting one postdoctoral research associate, Vesteinn Thorssen, who joined us in September, 1995. Seven graduate students were being supported by the Grant (Chuan-Tsung Chan, Michael Fosmire, William Hazelton, Jon Karakowski, Jeffrey Thompson, James Walden and Mitchell Watrous).

  20. 50 CFR 296.11 - Final determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Final determination. 296.11 Section 296.11 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CONTINENTAL SHELF FISHERMEN'S CONTINGENCY FUND § 296.11 Final determination. (a) If...