Science.gov

Sample records for rabbit temporomandibular joint

  1. Temporomandibular Joint, Closed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oral Health > The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Main Content Title: The Temporomandibular Joint, Closed Description: The temporomandibular joint connects the lower ...

  2. Functional analysis of the rabbit temporomandibular joint using dynamic biplane imaging.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Sarah E; Desai, Riddhi; Tashman, Scott; Almarza, Alejandro J

    2014-04-11

    The dynamic function of the rabbit temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was analyzed through non-invasive, three-dimensional skeletal kinematics, providing essential knowledge for understanding normal joint motion. The objective of this study was to evaluate and determine repeatable measurements of rabbit TMJ kinematics. Maximal distances, as well as paths were traced and analyzed for the incisors and for the condyle-fossa relationship. From one rabbit to another, the rotations and translations of both the incisors and the condyle relative to the fossa contained multiple clear, repeatable patterns. The slope of the superior/inferior incisor distance with respect to the rotation about the transverse axis was repeatable to 0.14 mm/deg and the right/left incisor distance with respect to the rotation about the vertical axis was repeatable to 0.03 mm/deg. The slope of the superior/inferior condylar translation with respect to the rotational movement about the transverse axis showed a consistent relationship to within 0.05 mm/deg. The maximal translations of the incisors and condyles were also consistent within and between rabbits. With an understanding of the normal mechanics of the TMJ, kinematics can be used to compare and understand TMJ injury and degeneration models.

  3. Functional analysis of the rabbit temporomandibular joint using dynamic biplane imaging.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Sarah E; Desai, Riddhi; Tashman, Scott; Almarza, Alejandro J

    2014-04-11

    The dynamic function of the rabbit temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was analyzed through non-invasive, three-dimensional skeletal kinematics, providing essential knowledge for understanding normal joint motion. The objective of this study was to evaluate and determine repeatable measurements of rabbit TMJ kinematics. Maximal distances, as well as paths were traced and analyzed for the incisors and for the condyle-fossa relationship. From one rabbit to another, the rotations and translations of both the incisors and the condyle relative to the fossa contained multiple clear, repeatable patterns. The slope of the superior/inferior incisor distance with respect to the rotation about the transverse axis was repeatable to 0.14 mm/deg and the right/left incisor distance with respect to the rotation about the vertical axis was repeatable to 0.03 mm/deg. The slope of the superior/inferior condylar translation with respect to the rotational movement about the transverse axis showed a consistent relationship to within 0.05 mm/deg. The maximal translations of the incisors and condyles were also consistent within and between rabbits. With an understanding of the normal mechanics of the TMJ, kinematics can be used to compare and understand TMJ injury and degeneration models. PMID:24594064

  4. Functional Analysis of the Rabbit Temporomandibular Joint Using Dynamic Biplane Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Sarah E.; Desai, Riddhi; Tashman, Scott; Almarza, Alejandro J.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic function of the rabbit temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was analyzed through non-invasive three-dimensional skeletal kinematics, providing essential knowledge for understanding normal joint motion. The objective of this study was to evaluate and determine repeatable measurements of rabbit TMJ kinematics. Maximal distances, as well as paths were traced and analyzed for the incisors and for the condyle-fossa relationship. From one rabbit to another, the rotations and translations of both the incisors and the condyle relative to the fossa contained multiple clear, repeatable patterns. The slope of the superior/inferior incisor distance with respect to the rotation about the transverse axis was repeatable to 0.14 mm/degree and the right/left incisor distance with respect to the rotation about the vertical axis was repeatable to 0.03 mm/degree. The slope of the superior/inferior condylar translation with respect to the rotational movement about the transverse axis showed a consistent relationship to within 0.05 mm/degree. The maximal translations of the incisors and condyles were also consistent within and between rabbits. With an understanding of the normal mechanics of the TMJ, kinematics can be used to compare and understand TMJ injury and degeneration models. PMID:24594064

  5. A repetitive, steady mouth opening induced an osteoarthritis-like lesion in the rabbit temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, T; Kuboki, T; Kasai, T; Sonoyama, W; Kojima, S; Uehara, J; Komori, C; Yatani, H; Hattori, T; Takigawa, M

    2003-09-01

    Although excessive mechanical stress is assumed to be one of the factors contributing to pathogenesis of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis (OA), no pure mechanical-stress-induced OA model has been developed without surgical manipulation or puncture of the joint cavity. The purpose of this study was to establish a genuine mechanical-stress-induced OA model of the rabbit TMJ. In the experimental rabbits, repetitive, forced jaw-opening, 3 hrs/day for 5 days, was applied with the use of a general anesthesia protocol. By histological assessment of the TMJ articular tissues, partial eburnation of the articular cartilage, reactive marginal proliferation of the articular cartilage chondrocytes, and nested proliferation of chondrocytes in the subchondral bone area were observed at 7 days after the repetitive, forced-jaw-opening period. These results suggest that the repetitive, forced-jaw-opening protocol without surgical intervention can induce evident OA-like lesions in the rabbit TMJ, and this OA model may greatly contribute to the elucidation of the cartilage degradation mechanism in TMJ OA. PMID:12939359

  6. Decreased Temporomandibular Joint Range of Motion in a Model of Early Osteoarthritis in the Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Sarah E.; Tudares, Mauro A.; Tashman, Scott; Almarza, Alejandro J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Analysis of mandibular biomechanics could help with understanding the mechanisms of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders (TMJDs), such as osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA), by investigating the effects of injury or disease on TMJ movement. The objective of the present study was to determine the functional kinematic implications of mild TMJ-OA degeneration caused by altered occlusion from unilateral splints in the rabbit. Materials and Methods Altered occlusion of the TMJ was mechanically induced in rabbits by way of a unilateral molar dental splint (n = 3). TMJ motion was assessed using 3-dimensional (3D) skeletal kinematics twice, once before and once after 6 weeks of splint placement with the splints removed, after allowing 3 days of recovery. The relative motion of the condyle to the fossa and the distance between the incisors were tracked. Results An overall decrease in the range of joint movement was observed at the incisors and in the joint space between the condyle and fossa. The incisor movement decreased from 7.0 ± 0.5 mm to 6.2 ± 0.5 mm right to left, from 5.5 ± 2.2 mm to 4.6 ± 0.8 mm anterior to posterior, and from 13.3 ± 1.8 mm to 11.6 ± 1.4 mm superior to inferior (P < .05). The total magnitude of the maximum distance between the points on the condyle and fossa decreased from 3.6 ± 0.8 mm to 3.1 ± 0.6 mm for the working condyle and 2.8 ± 0.4 mm to 2.5 ± 0.4 mm for the balancing condyle (P < .05). The largest decreases were seen in the anteroposterior direction for both condyles. Conclusion Determining the changes in condylar movement might lead to a better understanding of the early predictors in the development of TMJ-OA and determining when the symptoms become a chronic, irreversible problem. PMID:25889371

  7. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  8. Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2008 Previous Next Related Articles: Temporomandibular Joint Disorder (TMD) Are You Biting Off More Than You Can Chew? Equilibration May Lessen TMD Pain Fender-benders: Source of TMD? First Comes ...

  9. Effect of unilateral mandibular distraction osteogenesis on mandibular morphology in rabbits with antigen-induced temporomandibular joint arthritis.

    PubMed

    Andersen, K; Pedersen, T K; Svendsen, P; Hauge, E M; Schou, S; Nørholt, S E

    2015-08-01

    Aim was to evaluate effect of unilateral distraction osteogenesis (DO) on mandibular morphology in rabbits with antigen-induced arthritis in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Forty 8-week-old rabbits were divided into four groups. In groups A,C, arthritis was induced in the right TMJ. Groups A,B underwent DO. Group D served as control group. Cephalometric analysis of mandibular angle, mandibular ramus height, mandibular collum height, and total posterior mandibular height was done on CT-scans preoperatively (T0), after distraction (T1), and at euthanasia (T2). Two-factor ANOVA evaluated the effect of DO and antigen-induced arthritis. No effect of DO or arthritis was observed on mandibular angle or mandibular collum height. For T0-T1, DO increased mandibular ramus height 12.3% (95% CI 5.2-19.4%) in group B (P=0.001) and total posterior mandibular height 6.2% (95% CI 0.3-12.1%) in group A (P=0.04) and 10.0% (95% CI 4.3-15.7%) in group B (P=0.001). For T1-T2, no significant changes occurred in arthritic rabbits (group A). In conclusion, DO increased total posterior mandibular height in rabbits with arthritis. Postoperatively, no significant effect of DO was observed in rabbits with arthritis. Mandibular DO could be a viable treatment modality in patients with TMJ-arthritis.

  10. [Total temporomandibular joint prostheses].

    PubMed

    Zwetyenga, N; Amroun, S; Wajszczak, B-L; Moris, V

    2016-09-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is probably the most complex human joint. As in all joints, its prosthetic replacement may be indicated in selected cases. Significant advances have been made in the design of TMJ prostheses during the last three decades and the indications have been clarified. The aim of our work was to make an update on the current total TMJ total joint replacement. Indications, contraindications, prosthetic components, advantages, disadvantages, reasons for failure or reoperation, virtual planning and surgical protocol have been exposed.

  11. Temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis and temporomandibular joint hypermobility.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, P U; de Bont, L G; de Leeuw, R; Stegenga, B; Boering, G

    1993-10-01

    For studying the relationship between condylar hypermobility of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and osteoarthrosis (OA), 13 patients with bilateral condylar hypermobility were evaluated clinically and radiographically, 30 years after non-surgical treatment. The evaluation included range of motion, joint and muscle tenderness to palpation, joint sounds and masticatory function. Radiographs of the TMJs were evaluated for the absence or presence of degenerative changes. The hypermobile group (HG) was compared with a control group (CG) (n = 13). The CG was evaluated in the same way as the HG. Statistics included t-tests (to compare ranges of motion in the HG over time and to compare ranges of motion in HG and CG), non-parametric tests (to compare tenderness of muscles and joints, joint sounds, masticatory function and radiographic changes over time in the HG). The tests were also used to compare the same variables between the HG and CG group. The groups' only difference was the presence of radiographic signs of OA. In the HG the number of joints with radiographic degenerative changes increased significantly over time and was significantly higher than the CG. Clinically and functionally, the HG and CG did not differ. Therefore, it is concluded that TMJ hypermobility is a subsidiary factor in the development of TMJ OA. PMID:8118897

  12. Histological fate of abdominal dermis-fat grafts implanted in the temporomandibular joint of the rabbit following condylectomy.

    PubMed

    Dimitroulis, G; Slavin, J; Morrison, W

    2011-02-01

    The histological fate of abdominal dermis-fat grafts implanted into the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) following condylectomy was studied. 21 rabbits underwent left TMJ discectomies and condylectomies; 6 were controls (Group A; no graft used); 15 (Group B) had autogenous abdominal grafts transplanted into the left TMJ. Animals were killed after 4, 12 and 20 weeks. Specimens of the TMJ were histologically and histomorphometrically evaluated. At 4 weeks, fat necrosis was clear in all specimens. The dermis component survived and formed cysts with no necrosis. By 12 weeks, viable fat deposits appeared with no evidence of necrotic fat. At 20 weeks, large amounts of viable fat were present in Group B specimens. Group A had no fat, although the missing condyles regenerated. In the presence of viable fat, Group B showed little condyle regeneration 20 weeks after condylectomy. Non-vascularised fat grafts do not survive transplantation, but stimulate neoadipogenesis. The fate of the dermis component of the graft is independent of the fat component. Fat in the joint space disrupts the regeneration of a new condylar head. Neoadipogensis inhibits growth of new bone and cartilage. This has clinical implications for TMJ ankylosis management and preventing heterotopic bone formation around prosthetic joints. PMID:21050720

  13. [Total temporomandibular joint prostheses].

    PubMed

    Zwetyenga, N; Amroun, S; Wajszczak, B-L; Moris, V

    2016-09-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is probably the most complex human joint. As in all joints, its prosthetic replacement may be indicated in selected cases. Significant advances have been made in the design of TMJ prostheses during the last three decades and the indications have been clarified. The aim of our work was to make an update on the current total TMJ total joint replacement. Indications, contraindications, prosthetic components, advantages, disadvantages, reasons for failure or reoperation, virtual planning and surgical protocol have been exposed. PMID:27554487

  14. Temporomandibular joint dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Naresh Kumar; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Pandey, Arun; Verma, Vishal; Singh, Shreya

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation is an uncommon but debilitating condition of the facial skeleton. The condition may be acute or chronic. Acute TMJ dislocation is common in clinical practice and can be managed easily with manual reduction. Chronic recurrent TMJ dislocation is a challenging situation to manage. In this article, we discuss the comprehensive review of the different treatment modalities in managing TMJ dislocation. PMID:26668447

  15. Human temporomandibular joint morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Carini, Francesco; Scardina, Giuseppe Alessandro; Caradonna, Carola; Messina, Pietro; Valenza, Vincenzo

    2007-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint morphogenesis was studied. Ranging in age of fetuses examined was from 6 to14 weeks' gestation. Our results showed the condyle so first element that appear between 6 degrees and 8 degrees week (condylar blastema). After a week appear temporal elements. Disk appear at the same time of glenoid blastema and it reaches an advanced differentation before of the condyle and temporal element, so these don't effect machanical compression on mesenchyma where we find the disk. So we think that the disk result of genetic expression and it isn't the result of mechanical compression. The inferior joint cavity appear to 12 week. The superior joint cavity appear to 13-14 week. In conclusion, the appearance of the condyle is the first event during TMJ morphogenesis, with its initial bud, in form of a mesenchymal thickening, becoming detectable between the sixth and eight week of development, when all the large joints of the limbs are already well defined. PMID:18333411

  16. Temporomandibular joint vibration in bruxers.

    PubMed

    Li, Xueling; Lin, Xuefeng; Wang, Yan

    2009-07-01

    Temporomandibular joint vibration is considered an important physical sign of joint dysfunction and/or joint pathology. The aim of this study was to compare the difference of joint vibration between bruxers and asymptomatic individuals, evaluate the effect of bruxism on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the association between bruxism and temporomandibular disorders. Twenty-four (24) bruxers and 16 asymptomatic subjects were included in the study. Bilateral joint vibrations with jaw tracking were recorded using a TMJ detecting instrument during rhythmic jaw opening and closing movement. The results showed that the vibratory energy and amplitude of the moderate to severe bruxers were significantly higher than that of the mild bruxers and asymptomatic subjects. The percentage of joint vibration occurrence in asymptomatic subjects, mild bruxers, and moderate to severe bruxers was 75.0%, 77.8%, and 100%, respectively. It was concluded that bruxism might induce abnormal joint vibrations, and that the energy of abnormal vibrations might increase with the degree of bruxism.

  17. [Gout in the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Deferm, J T; Barkhuysen, R; de Rooy, J; Coppen, C; Merkx, M Aw

    2016-06-01

    A 76-year-old woman, with a medical history of diabetes mellitus and hypertension, presented herself to an oral and maxillofacial surgeon with a sudden pre-auricular swelling of the right temporomandibular joint. As a result of the atypical clinical appearance and signs of local destruction in the initial panoramic x-ray, a malign process was first eliminated from consideration. With the aid of extensive diagnostics and an open biopsy, the diagnosis of gout was established. PMID:27275659

  18. Etiological factors of temporomandibular joint disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shalender; Gupta, D. S.; Pal, U. S.; Jurel, Sunit Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint receives its name from the two bones that enter into its formation, namely the temporal bone and the mandible. This complex synovial system is composed of two temporomandibular joints together with their articulating ligaments and masticatory muscles. This articulation affects other synovial joints that relate specifically to masticatory function. The causes of temporomandibular disorders are complex and multifactorial. There are numerous factors that can contribute to temporomandibular disorders. In some instances a single factor may serve one or all of these roles. Iatrogenic injuries can act as both initiating as well as predisposing factors. The term craniomandibular disorder is used synonymously with the term temporomandibular disorders and is considered a major cause of nondental pain in the orofacial pain region. The successful management of temporomandibular disorders is dependent on identifying and controlling the contributing factors. The temporomandibular disorders are more common in females, the reason is not clearly known. The following article provides detailed information regarding temporomandibular joint disorders. PMID:22639496

  19. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction: A Dental Overview

    PubMed Central

    Hillier, Clyde D.

    1985-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is common and often acutely painful. Because of the large and diverse symptom complex created by this disorder, patients frequently first seek relief from their physician rather than their dentist. In this article temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction is defined and the presenting signs and symptoms are discussed. Their etiology is described in relation to the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint. Examination techniques can help in the differential diagnosis. Current treatment ranges from heat, local anesthesia and ultrasound to anxiolytics, transcutaneous nerve stimulation and nutritional supplementation. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:21274225

  20. Condylar hyperplasia following unilateral temporomandibular joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Machon, V; Levorova, J; Hirjak, D; Foltan, R

    2015-06-01

    Total joint replacement of the temporomandibular joint (TJR) can be associated with intraoperative and postoperative complications. We report herein the occurrence of a postoperative open bite malocclusion, the result of condylar hyperplasia affecting the non-operated joint at 1 year after unilateral total joint replacement. PMID:25662429

  1. [Temporomandibular joint, occlusion and bruxism].

    PubMed

    Orthlieb, J D; Ré, J P; Jeany, M; Giraudeau, A

    2016-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint and dental occlusion are joined for better and worse. TMJ has its own weaknesses, sometimes indicated by bad functional habits and occlusal disorders. Occlusal analysis needs to be addressed simply and clearly. The term "malocclusion" is not reliable to build epidemiological studies, etiologic mechanisms or therapeutic advice on this "diagnosis". Understanding the impact of pathogenic malocclusion is not just about occlusal relationships that are more or less defective, it requires to locate them within the skeletal framework, the articular and behavioural context of the patient, and above all to assess their impact on the functions of the masticatory system. The TMJ-occlusion couple is often symbiotic, developing together in relation to its environment, compensating for its own shortcomings. However, a third partner may alter this relationship, such as bruxism, or more generally oral parafunctions, trauma or an interventionist practitioner. PMID:27523443

  2. Osteoma of temporomandibular joint: a rarity.

    PubMed

    Misra, Neeta; Srivastava, Saurabh; Bodade, Pankaj R; Rastogi, Vikalp

    2013-09-06

    Osteoma is a benign tumour consisting of mature bone tissue. It is an uncommon lesion that occurs in the bones of the craniofacial complex. Only a few cases involving the temporomandibular joint have been reported. An osteoma of the left temporomandibular joint causing limited mouth opening in a 22-year-old man with CT findings revealing the unusual possibility in differential diagnosis of trismus.

  3. Osteoma of temporomandibular joint: a rarity

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Neeta; Srivastava, Saurabh; Bodade, Pankaj R; Rastogi, Vikalp

    2013-01-01

    Osteoma is a benign tumour consisting of mature bone tissue. It is an uncommon lesion that occurs in the bones of the craniofacial complex. Only a few cases involving the temporomandibular joint have been reported. An osteoma of the left temporomandibular joint causing limited mouth opening in a 22-year-old man with CT findings revealing the unusual possibility in differential diagnosis of trismus. PMID:24014334

  4. Temporomandibular joint diagnostics using CBCT.

    PubMed

    Larheim, T A; Abrahamsson, A-K; Kristensen, M; Arvidsson, L Z

    2015-01-01

    The present review will give an update on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) imaging using CBCT. It will focus on diagnostic accuracy and the value of CBCT compared with other imaging modalities for the evaluation of TMJs in different categories of patients; osteoarthritis (OA), juvenile OA, rheumatoid arthritis and related joint diseases, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and other intra-articular conditions. Finally, sections on other aspects of CBCT research related to the TMJ, clinical decision-making and concluding remarks are added. CBCT has emerged as a cost- and dose-effective imaging modality for the diagnostic assessment of a variety of TMJ conditions. The imaging modality has been found to be superior to conventional radiographical examinations as well as MRI in assessment of the TMJ. However, it should be emphasized that the diagnostic information obtained is limited to the morphology of the osseous joint components, cortical bone integrity and subcortical bone destruction/production. For evaluation of soft-tissue abnormalities, MRI is mandatory. There is an obvious need for research on the impact of CBCT examinations on patient outcome.

  5. Temporomandibular joint diagnostics using CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamsson, A-K; Kristensen, M; Arvidsson, L Z

    2015-01-01

    The present review will give an update on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) imaging using CBCT. It will focus on diagnostic accuracy and the value of CBCT compared with other imaging modalities for the evaluation of TMJs in different categories of patients; osteoarthritis (OA), juvenile OA, rheumatoid arthritis and related joint diseases, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and other intra-articular conditions. Finally, sections on other aspects of CBCT research related to the TMJ, clinical decision-making and concluding remarks are added. CBCT has emerged as a cost- and dose-effective imaging modality for the diagnostic assessment of a variety of TMJ conditions. The imaging modality has been found to be superior to conventional radiographical examinations as well as MRI in assessment of the TMJ. However, it should be emphasized that the diagnostic information obtained is limited to the morphology of the osseous joint components, cortical bone integrity and subcortical bone destruction/production. For evaluation of soft-tissue abnormalities, MRI is mandatory. There is an obvious need for research on the impact of CBCT examinations on patient outcome. PMID:25369205

  6. [Temporomandibular joint disorders: Physiotherapy and postural approaches].

    PubMed

    Breton-Torres, I; Trichot, S; Yachouh, J; Jammet, P

    2016-09-01

    Rehabilitation of temporomandibular joint dysfunctions has for a long time tried to treat symptoms: pain relief, joint kinetics restoration, disk re-capture by manual maneuvers. The authors present their own therapeutic approach, which is no longer limited to symptoms, but addresses the causes and identifies risk factors to prevent relapse. PMID:27522242

  7. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to...

  8. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to...

  9. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to...

  10. Temporomandibular joint dislocation: experiences from Zaria, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Fomete, Benjamin; Obiadazie, Athanasius Chukwudi; Idehen, Kelvin; Okeke, Uche

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Dislocation of the temporomandibular joint may occur for various reasons. Although different invasive methods have been advocated for its treatment, this study highlights the value of non-invasive treatment options even in chronic cases in a resource-poor environment. Materials and Methods A seven-year retrospective analysis of all patients managed for temporomandibular joint dislocation in our department was undertaken. Patient demographics, risk factors associated with temporomandibular joint dislocation and treatment modalities were retrieved from patient records. Results In all, 26 patients were managed over a seven-year period. Males accounted for 62% of the patients, and yawning was the most frequent etiological factor. Conservative treatment methods were used successfully in 86.4% of the patients managed. Two (66.7%) of the three patients who needed surgical treatment developed complications, while only one (5.3%) patient who was managed conservatively developed complications. Conclusion Temporomandibular joint dislocation appears to be associated with male sex, middle age, yawning, and low socio-economic status, although these observed relationships were not statistically significant. Non-invasive methods remain an effective treatment option in this environment in view of the low socio-economic status of the patients affected. PMID:25045637

  11. Principles of treatment for temporomandibular joint ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Freedus, M S; Ziter, W D; Doyle, P K

    1975-10-01

    An understanding of the growth and development of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is necessary for successful treatment of TMJ ankylosis. The concept of a growth center in the condyle is probably misleading; instead, the soft tissues of the orofacial region seem to provide the primary growth forces. As a result of this concept, methods of treatment should be reexamined.

  12. Temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis. Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Nitzan, Dorrit; González-Garcia, Raul

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is still controversial. TMJ arthrocentesis represents a form of minimally invasive surgical treatment in patients suffering from internal derangement of the TMJ, especially closed lock. It consists of washing the joint with the possibility of depositing a drug or other therapeutic substance. Resolution of symptoms is due to the removal of chemical inflammatory mediators and changes in intra-articular pressure. Numerous clinical studies regarding this technique have been published. The goal of this paper is to review all clinical articles that have been published with regard to the critique of this technique. 19 articles with different designs fulfilling selection guidelines were chosen. A series of clinical and procedure variables were analyzed. Although the mean of improvement was higher that 80%, further research is needed to determine more homogeneous indications for TMJ athrocentesis. Key words:Temporomandibular joint, arthrocentesis, minimally invasive surgery. PMID:22322493

  13. Imaging of the temporomandibular joint: An update

    PubMed Central

    Bag, Asim K; Gaddikeri, Santhosh; Singhal, Aparna; Hardin, Simms; Tran, Benson D; Medina, Josue A; Curé, Joel K

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is continuously evolving with advancement of imaging technologies. Many different imaging modalities are currently used to evaluate the TMJ. Magnetic resonance imaging is commonly used for evaluation of the TMJ due to its superior contrast resolution and its ability to acquire dynamic imaging for demonstration of the functionality of the joint. Computed tomography and ultrasound imaging have specific indication in imaging of the TMJ. This article focuses on state of the art imaging of the temporomandibular joint. Relevant normal anatomy and biomechanics of movement of the TMJ are discussed for better understanding of many TMJ pathologies. Imaging of internal derangements is discussed in detail. Different arthropathies and common tumors are also discussed in this article. PMID:25170394

  14. Gnathological splint therapy in temporomandibular joint disorder.

    PubMed

    Gnanashanmugham, K; Saravanan, B; Sukumar, M R; Tajir, T Faisal

    2015-04-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) forms an integral functional part of stomatognathic system. Position, shape, structure and function of teeth have an influence on the proper functioning and health of TMJ. But a problem associated with TMJ is often neglected, and treatment for it is mostly restricted to palliative therapy. A proper understanding of the underlying cause of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) is necessary to device a proper treatment plan. Etiology of TMDs varies from idiopathic reasons to systemic disorders. The option of Gnathological splint is a conservative, safe and an effective mode of therapy for TMDs caused by occlusal discrepancies (fulcrum/interferences). This article presents a case report of a patient with TMD caused by occlusal discrepancy.

  15. Gnathological splint therapy in temporomandibular joint disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gnanashanmugham, K.; Saravanan, B.; Sukumar, M. R.; Tajir, T. Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) forms an integral functional part of stomatognathic system. Position, shape, structure and function of teeth have an influence on the proper functioning and health of TMJ. But a problem associated with TMJ is often neglected, and treatment for it is mostly restricted to palliative therapy. A proper understanding of the underlying cause of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) is necessary to device a proper treatment plan. Etiology of TMDs varies from idiopathic reasons to systemic disorders. The option of Gnathological splint is a conservative, safe and an effective mode of therapy for TMDs caused by occlusal discrepancies (fulcrum/interferences). This article presents a case report of a patient with TMD caused by occlusal discrepancy PMID:26015741

  16. [Temporo-mandibular joint. Morpho-functional considerations].

    PubMed

    Scutariu, M D; Indrei, Anca

    2004-01-01

    The temporo-mandibular joint is distinguished from most other synovial joints of the body by two features: 1. the two jointed components carry teeth whose position and occlusion introduce a very strong influence on the movements of the temporo-mandibular joint and 2. its articular surfaces are not covered by hyaline cartilage, but by a dense, fibrous tissue. This paper describes the parts of the temporo-mandibular joint: the articular surfaces (the condylar process of the mandible and the glenoid part of the temporal bone), the fibrocartilaginous disc which is interposed between the mandibular and the temporal surface, the fibrous capsule of the temporo-mandibular joint and the ligaments of this joint. All these parts present a very strong adaptation at the important functions of the temporo-mandibular joint.

  17. Temporomandibular joint involvement in ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pallak; Amarnath, Janardhan; Ravindra, Setru Veerabhadrappa; Rallan, Mandeep

    2013-01-01

    Frequency of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) has varied from 4% to 35%. It is more common in men and produces generalised stiffness in involved joints. Clinician should be suspicious of AS when a patient reports with painful restricted movements of joint, neck or back and with no trauma history. Conventional radiographic methods have allowed the demonstration of TMJ abnormalities in patients with AS, but CT is necessary to establish joint space relations and bony morphology. We describe a case of severe AS with TMJ involvement in a 40-year-old female patient and demonstrated TMJ changes on CT. A CT was able to demonstrate articular cartilage changes, disc- and joint abnormalities. Thus, if conventional radiographs in a symptomatic patient with rheumatic diseases are unable to demonstrate changes, CT can provide valuable additional information of the changes in the TMJ. PMID:23645650

  18. [Temporo-mandibular joints and orthognathic surgery].

    PubMed

    Bouletreau, P

    2016-09-01

    Temporo-Mandibular Joints (TMJ) and orthognathic surgery are closely linked. In the past, some authors have even described (with mixed results) the correction of some dysmorphosis through direct procedures on the TMJs. Nowadays, performing orthognathic surgery involves the TMJ in three different occasions: (1) TMJ disorders potentially responsible for dento-maxillary dysmorphosis, (2) effects of orthognathic surgery on TMJs, and (3) condylar positioning methods in orthognathic surgery. These three chapters are developed in order to focus on the close relationships between TMJ and orthognathic surgery. Some perspectives close this article.

  19. [Surgical treatment of temporomandibular joint ankylosis].

    PubMed

    Worsaae, N; Hjørting-Hansen, E; Jensen, B; Seidler, B; Praetorius, F

    1992-09-14

    Surgical treatment of temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis may be a particularly difficult procedure due to unfavourable anatomic configurations and the proximity of vital structures. Postoperatively, it is followed by an often long and painful period of physiotherapy. The results of treatment of eight patients with TMJ ankylosis are reported. Different methods were used according to age of the patient and the extent of the ankylotic changes. The importance of early treatment is emphasized. This results in less extensive surgery and reduces secondary growth anomalies of the jaws.

  20. Surgical Management of Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Felstead, Andrew M.; Revington, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Relatively few patients develop such severe degenerative temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disease that they require total joint replacement. Current indications include those conditions involving condylar bone loss such as degenerative (osteoarthritis) or inflammatory joint disease (ankylosing spondylitis, rheumatoid, and psoriatic). Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) secondary to ankylosing spondylitis remains an under investigated entity. We aim to provide an overview of treatment objectives, surgical procedures, and our experience with total TMJ replacement for this condition. PMID:21547039

  1. General joint hypermobility and temporomandibular joint derangement in adolescents.

    PubMed Central

    Westling, L; Mattiasson, A

    1992-01-01

    Joint mobility was assessed in each member of an epidemiological sample of 96 girls and 97 boys, 17 years old, and graded by means of the hypermobility score of Beighton et al. Twenty two per cent of the girls and 3% of the boys could perform five or more of the nine manoeuvres. The prevalence of symptoms and signs of internal derangement in the temporomandibular joint was higher in adolescents with hypermobility of joints (score greater than or equal to 5/9). In subjects with a high mobility score oral parafunctions (overuse) correlated more strongly with several signs and symptoms of craniomandibular disorder than in those with a low score. PMID:1540046

  2. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940 Section 872.3940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular...

  3. Septic Arthritis in the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khalisy, Hassan Mahdi; Nikiforov, Ivan; Mansoora, Qurat; Goldman, John; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare event that has only been reported a few dozen times worldwide. This case is remarkable for septic arthritis of the TMJ joint in an otherwise healthy male. Case Report: A 24-year-old male presented to the emergency department with periauricular swelling, erythema, fever, myalgia's and generalized joint pain. He had previously sought medical attention and was placed on ciprofloxacin. However, he developed facial swelling and a rash and had to discontinue the antibiotic. On physical exam the patient had a large swelling and tenderness in his left periauricular area, with erythema and deviation of the right mandible which limited his ability to open the mouth. A computed tomography showed mild asymmetric soft tissue swelling in the left pharyngeal region but did not show joint effusion. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging did show effusion of the joint space. The effusion was drained, and the synovial fluid was submitted for gram stain, culture, and sensitivity. The cultures grew menthicillin sensitive Staphyloccocus Aureus. The patient was discharged to complete a two week course of intravenous (IV) Ceftriaxone and IV Vancomycin via home infusion. Conclusion: Septic Arthritis of the TMJ is a rare event with very specific clinical symptoms. Due to the low sensitivity of the computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging should be considered when computed tomography scan is negative for TMJ effusion. PMID:26713295

  4. Temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis: long-term results.

    PubMed

    Spallaccia, F; Rivaroli, A; Cascone, P

    2000-01-01

    Arthrocentesis is a simple procedure, that may be performed under local anaesthesia and entails low risks of complications. It consists in the lavage of the upper joint compartment of the temporo-mandibular articulation through two transcutaneous needles of entrance and exit. The simplicity of execution, the low costs of the material employed and the excellent results published cause that this technique is beginning to be included in international protocols of treatment of temporomandibular dysfunctions. The clinical study involves 26 articulation in 25 patients. The age of the subjects at the time of the treatment ranged from 16 to 70 years. The follow-up of the patients treated ranges from a minimum of 12 to a maximum of 53 months. The most significant parameters to assess the effectiveness of the articular lavage, performed by the arthrocentesis technique, are the local pain intensity and the millimetre analytic comparison of the mouth opening and the mandibular movements in protrusion and laterality. A Student's "t" test was used to compare pre-treatment and post-treatment differences in level of TMJ pain and maximal mouth opening, in both cases section valve was less then 0.05 and so statistically significant.

  5. [Pharmacological therapy of temporomandibular joint pain].

    PubMed

    Hugger, Alfons; Schindler, Hans J; Türp, Jens C; Hugger, Sybille

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological interventions in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain differ from corresponding therapeutic interventions of jaw muscle (myofascial) pain. An actual systematic literature search lists and evaluates available articles on randomised controlled trials for treatment of arthralgia of the TMJ. On the basis of the few available trial reports, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) seem to be effective, but side effects and drug interactions need to be considered. In relation to other therapeutic modalities, the rapidity of the onset of action of NSAIDs seems to be different, and the extension of side effects can be varied or reduced by changing the application route (oral versus topical). Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) as dietary supplement for special medical purposes can apparently evoke positive therapeutic effects in TMJ arthralgia which need to be analysed in further studies.

  6. Family Therapy in Complex Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Boll, Pamela G.; Mercuri, Louis G.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to offer the oral and maxillofacial surgeon a collaborative approach to the treatment of complex temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction. Through a positive relationship with a family therapist, the oral and maxillofacial surgeon in this case reports family therapy intervention as an additive solution to resolving apparent recurrent surgical failures. After three surgical procedures, the oral and maxillofacial surgeon noted continued muscle hyperactivity brought on by family environmental stress and arranged for family therapy treatment before a fourth surgical procedure. This paper presents a complicated TMJ case history, documentation for including the family in treatment of pain problems, collaborative efforts necessary for acceptance of referral for psychological intervention, and a family therapy approach to treatment in complex TMJ dysfunction. PMID:3166348

  7. An interspecies comparison of the temporomandibular joint disc.

    PubMed

    Kalpakci, K N; Willard, V P; Wong, M E; Athanasiou, K A

    2011-02-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc plays a critical role in normal function of the joint, and many disorders of the TMJ are a result of disc dysfunction. Previous quantitative TMJ characterization studies examined either the human or a specific animal model, but no single study has compared different species, in the belief that differences in joint morphology, function, and diet would be reflected in the material properties of the disc. In this study, we examined topographical biochemical (collagen, glycosaminoglycan, and DNA content) and biomechanical (tensile and compressive) properties of the human TMJ disc, and also discs from the cow, goat, pig, and rabbit. Regional and interspecies variations were identified in all parameters measured, and certain disc characteristics were observed across all species, such as a weak intermediate zone under mediolateral tension. While human discs possessed properties distinct from those of the other species, pig discs were most similar to the human, suggesting that the pig may be a suitable animal model for TMJ bioengineering efforts.

  8. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Reyes Macías, Juan Francisco; Sánchez Prieto, Martín

    2007-01-01

    Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) is a disease whose etiology is unknown, can be defined as a benign synovial process characterized by the formation of metaplastic cartilaginous nodes inside connective tissue of articular surfaces, is considered an active metaplastic phenomenon better than a neoplastic process; it presents a greater preference to affect women who constitute almost 70% of reported cases, the age range is wide and oscillates between 18-75 years (average 44.6 years). Between the main clinical findings are: pain, crackle, volume augmentation and a limited buccal opening. SC is an unusual state and the reports in the English literature are no more than 75 cases, only 66 of those where histologically verified, most of those were affecting great joints like hip, knee and shoulder, but if SC is not frequent in this sites, is even more infrequent on temporomandibular joint. The aim of this paper is to report a clinical case and at the same time to realize a brief review of the literature.

  9. Anatomical and physiological considerations regarding the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Boering, G

    1979-12-01

    The structure and function of the human temporomandibular joint has concerned several investigators but still fundamental questions exist and require further examination. A profound knowledge of the normal anatomy and histology of the temporomandibular joint is necessary to understand its function and functional disturbances. It is also necessary for a good understanding of clinical findings and the interpretation of radiographs. In this paper a clinically orientated description has been given of the anatomy and histology of the mandibular head, the articular fossa and eminence, the articular disc, the capsule and ligaments, the synovial membrane, the innervation of the joint and the normal relationship between the different components. About the physiology of the temporomandibular joint many controversial theories exist. A lot of research has still to be done, especially in the field of the co-ordination of the function of both joints, the muscles and the dentition.

  10. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis: the Egyptian experience.

    PubMed Central

    el-Sheikh, M. M.

    1999-01-01

    This is a review of 204 patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis treated according to a definitive protocol in the Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Department of the Alexandria University Hospital during the period 1990-1996 with a follow-up varying from 1.5 to 7 years. A history of trauma was confirmed in 98% of cases. Patients were grouped into: (1) Those with ankylosis not associated with facial deformities. The management involves release of the ankylosed joint(s) and reconstruction of the condyle ramus unit(s) (CRUs) using costochondral graft(s) (CCGs). (2) Those with mandibular ankylosis complicated by facial bone deformities, either asymmetric or bird face. The treatment consists of release of the ankylosis, reconstruction of the CRUs, and correction of jaw deformities--all performed simultaneously. Respiratory embarrassment was an important presenting symptom in the second group, all of whom complained of night snoring, eight of whom had obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). In this latter group, respiratory obstruction improved dramatically after surgical intervention. The degree of mouth opening, monitored as the interincisal distance (IID) improved from a range of 0-12 mm to over 30 mm in 62% of patients and to 20-30 mm in 29% of patients. However, reankylosis was still around 8% and was attributed to lack of patient compliance in 75% and to iatrogenic factors in 25% of patients. CCGs resorption, whether partial or complete, occurred in 27% of patients, resulting in retarded growth, relapse of deformities and night snoring. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10325678

  11. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis consequent to ear suppuration.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajeev; Hota, Ashutosh; Sikka, Kapil; Thakar, Alok

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the complication of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis consequent to otitis media. The method applied is prospective case series and data collection done in tertiary referral centre from April 2012 to April 2013. Case description of three adolescent male patients with unilateral TMJ ankylosis consequent to ipsilateral chronic suppurative otitis media. Further literature review of TMJ ankylosis in relation to otitis media for evaluation for predisposing conditions. Surgical treatment by ipsilateral canal wall down mastoidectomy and concurrent TMJ gap arthroplasty. Surgical exposure confirmed ipsilateral bony ankylosis in all three. Two cases with long standing trismus had developed contralateral disuse fibrous ankylosis and required bilateral gap arthroplasty. Relief of trismus achieved in all three cases. Literature review indicated three similar cases secondary to otitis media. A universal feature among all previous case reports and the current case series was the age at onset of trismus, being at 10 years or less in all. TMJ ankylosis is a rare but potential complication of paediatric ear suppuration. Dehiscence along the tympanosquamosal fissure, tympanic plate and the foraminae of Huschke and Santorini in the paediatric population may predispose to extension of tympanic suppuration to the TMJ.

  12. Inflammatory pseudotumour of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Ghavami, Y; Yau, A Y; Ziai, K; Maducdoc, M M; Djalilian, H R

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck inflammatory pseudotumors (IPs) are rare, idiopathic, non-neoplastic lesions that most commonly affect the orbit, but may involve other areas such as the larynx, oropharynx, paranasal sinuses, and meninges. We report the case of a 55-year-old man who presented with progressive left-sided hearing loss, aural fullness, and otalgia. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detected a soft-tissue mass in the left temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Histopathologic examination showed overlying squamous epithelium with hyperkeratosis, parakeratosis, subepithelial fibrosis, and chronic inflammatory infiltrate, which were consistent with an IP. Radiologic images and MRI indicated an ill-defined soft tissue involving the roof and posterior aspect of the TMJ, extending into the anterior external auditory canal. Our case was treated with a 2-week course of high dose prednisone (1 mg/kg) and a 2-week taper with resolution of symptoms. Two years after treatment, the patient shows no evidence of recurrence on MRI. PMID:26891541

  13. Mouse genetic models for temporomandibular joint development and disorders

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, A; Iwata, J

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a synovial joint essential for hinge and sliding movements of the mammalian jaw. Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are dysregulations of the muscles or the TMJ in structure, function, and physiology, and result in pain, limited mandibular mobility, and TMJ noise and clicking. Although approximately 40–70% adults in the USA have at least one sign of TMD, the etiology of TMD remains largely unknown. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of TMD in mouse models. PMID:26096083

  14. Osteochondritis dissecans affecting the temporo-mandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Olley, S F; Leopard, P J

    1978-07-01

    A case of a single loose body occurring in the temporo-mandibular joint is described. It is probable that this case represents the degenerative process of osteochondritis dissecans, a condition not previously described in this joint. The essential features of this condition are noted as a comparison to the condition of synovial chondromatosis.

  15. Dynamic stereometry of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Palla, S; Gallo, L M; Gössi, D

    2003-01-01

    Studies on jaw kinematics have provided a good understanding of the motion of the mandible in space, but are of little biomechanical relevance because they could not relate the movements to anatomic structures. This is possible by the combination of three-dimensional reconstructions of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) anatomy with jaw motion recordings. This technique allows us to analyze the variation of the relationship between the articular surfaces, providing indirect insight into disk deformation during function and parafunction as well as TMJ loading. As far as the variation of the condyle-fossa distance is concerned, data indicated that during chewing the distance was smaller 1) on closing than on opening; 2) on the balancing than on the working side; and 3) during chewing of hard than soft food. Moreover, during a forceful static biting, the condyle-fossa distance decreased more on the contralateral, i.e. on the balancing side than on the working side. The decrease was related to the degree of clenching force. These results support the content that both condyles are loaded during chewing and the balancing side joint more than the working one. Biomechanically, the development of osteoarthrosis is more likely related to the magnitude and frequency of stresses applied on the cartilage. Joint movements produce tractional forces that may cause shear stresses contributing to cartilage wear and fatigue. Tractional forces are the result of frictional forces caused by the cartilage surface rubbing and of plowing forces caused by the translation of a stress-field through the cartilage matrix, as the intra-articular space changes during motion. Translation of the stress-field in mediolateral direction seems to be particularly important for the integrity of the TMJ disk because of its anisotropic properties. Dynamic stereometry showed that stress-fields translate in mediolateral direction during opening/closing, protrusion and laterotrusion, and that their translatory

  16. Septic Arthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint in an Infant.

    PubMed

    Chuk, Raymond; Arvier, John; Laing, Barbara; Coman, David

    2015-04-24

    Infantile temporomandibular joint septic arthritis is an uncommon paediatric infection, but one which carries the potential for severe morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and aggressive medical and possibly surgical management is indicated for the best outcomes. The presenting clinical features are non-specific in a neonate and an infant; as such a high degree of clinical suspicion is required. We present the case of an eleven-month-old boy who has made a full recovery from an acute temporomandibular joint septic arthritis and review the relevant literature.

  17. Evaluation of aural manifestations in temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sobhy, O A; Koutb, A R; Abdel-Baki, F A; Ali, T M; El Raffa, I Z; Khater, A H

    2004-08-01

    Thirty patients with temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction were selected to investigate the changes in otoacoustic emissions before and after conservative treatment of their temporo-mandibular joints. Pure tone audiometry, transient-evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAE), distortion-product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) as well as a tinnitus questionnaire were administered to all patients before and after therapy. Therapy was conservative in the form of counselling, physiotherapy, anti-inflammatory agents, muscle relaxants, and occlusal splints. Results indicated insignificant changes in the TEOAEs, whereas there were significant increases in distortion product levels at most of the frequency bands. These results were paralleled to subjective improvement of tinnitus.

  18. [Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: report of one case].

    PubMed

    Pintor, Fernanda; Carrasco, Rolando; Verdugo-Avello, Francisco; Landaeta, Mirtha

    2015-06-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is an uncommon condition, caused by hematic bacterial migration or direct migration of other head and neck infections. We report a 41 year old female who presented a right temporomandibular joint involvement, with bone destruction of the mandibular condyle and an infectious process spreading to the temporal space, following a necrotizing medial and external otitis with associated mastoiditis. A septic arthritis of the TMJ by continuity was diagnosed and treated with antimicrobials, TMJ arthrocentesis and occlusal stabilization, with a positive evolution. However, the patient remains in control due a secondary TMJ osteoarthritis caused by the septic arthritis.

  19. Global Body Posture Evaluation in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Eliza Tiemi; Akashi, Paula Marie Hanai; de Camargo Neves Sacco, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To identify the relationship between anterior disc displacement and global posture (plantar arches, lower limbs, shoulder and pelvic girdle, vertebral spine, head and mandibles). Common signs and symptoms of anterior disc displacement were also identified. INTRODUCTION: Global posture deviations cause body adaptation and realignment, which may interfere with the organization and function of the temporomandibular joint. METHODS : Global posture evaluation was performed in a group of 10 female patients (20 to 30 years of age) with temporomandibular joint disc displacement and in a control group of 16 healthy female volunteers matched for age, weight and height. Anterior disc displacement signs, symptoms and the presence of parafunctional habits were also identified through interview. RESULTS: Patients with disc displacement showed a higher incidence of pain in the temporomandibular joint area, but there were no differences in parafunctional habits between the groups. In the disc displacement group, postural deviations were found in the pelvis (posterior rotation), lumbar spine (hyperlordosis), thoracic spine (rectification), head (deviation to the right) and mandibles (deviation to the left with open mouth). There were no differences in the longitudinal plantar arches between the groups. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest a close relationship between body posture and temporomandibular disorder, though it is not possible to determine whether postural deviations are the cause or the result of the disorder. Hence, postural evaluation could be an important component in the overall approach to providing accurate prevention and treatment in the management of patients with temporomandibular disorder. PMID:19142549

  20. Emotional factors in temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Glaros, A G

    The chronic pain of many temporomandibular disorders is associated with multiple changes in emotional function and activities of daily living. Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are similar to other chronic pain disorders in their impact on patients. Depression is probably the most common emotional state associated with chronic pain, although anxiety disorders also can be associated with TMD. The probability of emotional problems appears to be greatest in those individuals diagnosed with myofascial pain and least in those with disk displacement. Dental practitioners are encouraged to seek professional liaisons with mental health professionals who can assist them in managing chronic pain patients. PMID:11314076

  1. Temporo-mandibular joint changes in renal osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Cappelini, G; Pavlica, P; Stasi, G; Tonti, R; Viglietta, G

    1978-01-01

    The radiologic study of temporo-mandibular joints in patients undergoing long-term haemodialysis has led to documentation of osteodystrophic changes in 6 patients: 2 were asymptomatic and 4 had referred to pain. The roentgenologic picture of this unusual abnormally varies from a simple decrease of bone density to resorption of the condylar head.

  2. Computed tomography of the temporo-mandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Avrahami, E; Horowitz, I; Cohn, D F

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) has only been occasionally reported. As CT techniques improve, more detailed information is available. Though conventional radiography of the TMJ can supply sufficient diagnostic detail, it may well be replaced by CT as a preliminary examination, as it is able to offer more information with less radiation and minimal patient discomfort.

  3. Temporomandibular joint dislocation and deafness from a cricket ball injury.

    PubMed

    Murthy, P; Bandasson, C; Dhillon, R S

    1994-05-01

    Cricket is a national sport in some countries and can be potentially hazardous. We report an incident of a cricket ball impact to the chin, which resulted in posterior dislocation of both temporomandibular joints and bilateral mixed deafness. There appear to be no similar case reports in the literature.

  4. Temporomandibular joint vibration before and after exercises and occlusal splints.

    PubMed

    Turcio, Karina Helga Leal; Garcia, Alício Rosalino; Zuim, Paulo Renato Junqueira; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Sundefeld, Maria Lucia Marçal Mazza

    2011-11-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) sounds are frequent in patients. The aim of this study was to analyze patients with clicking at the end of opening and at the beginning of closing their mouths treated by muscular exercises through chewing and by occlusal splints. Fifteen patients with clinically verified clicking and TMJ and 15 patients without sounds were selected by the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders. They were submitted to electrovibratography at consultation and 60 and 120 days of treatment by occlusal splints and exercises. Patients demonstrated significant reduction of TMJ sounds after treatment, but vibration intensity was not similar with that of the control group after 120 days. PMID:22134308

  5. A truly endaural approach to the temporo-mandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Dias, A D

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents 12 cases of temporo-mandibular joint arthroplasty done through an endaural incision which lies strictly within the confines of the ear. No scar is seen in profile view. Adequate exposure of the joint is achieved and safe excision of the head and coronoid process is possible. There is no possibility of danger to the branches of the facial nerve. The post-operative results are satisfactory and are tabulated.

  6. Skeletal pattern in subjects with temporomandibular joint disorders

    PubMed Central

    Almăşan, Oana Cristina; Almăşan, Horea Artimoniu; Bran, Simion; Lascu, Liana; Iancu, Mihaela; Băciuţ, Grigore

    2013-01-01

    Introduction To establish the skeletal pattern in subjects with malocclusions and temporomandibular disorders (TMD); to assess the relationship between craniofacial skeletal structures and TMD in subjects with malocclusions. Material and methods Sixty-four subjects with malocclusions, over 18 years of age, were included in the study. Temporomandibular disorders were clinically assessed according to the Helkimo Anamnestic Index. Subjects underwent a lateral cephalogram. Subjects were grouped according to the sagittal skeletal pattern (ANB angle) into class I, II and III. Parametric Student tests with equal or unequal variations were used (variations were previously tested with Levene test). Results Twenty-four patients with TMD (experimental sample); 40 patients without TMD (control group); interincisal angle was higher in class I and II (p < 0.05) experimental subjects; overjet was larger in experimental subjects; midline shift and Wits appraisal were broader in the experimental group in all three classes. In class III subjects, the SNB angle was higher in the experimental group (p = 0.01). Joint noises followed by reduced mandible mobility, muscular pain and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain were the most frequent symptoms in subjects with TMD and malocclusions. Conclusions Temporomandibular joint status is an important factor to consider when planning orthodontic treatment in patients with severe malocclusions; midline shift, large overjet and deep overbite have been associated with signs and symptoms of TMD. PMID:23515361

  7. Therapy of the osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Machon, Vladimir; Hirjak, Dusan; Lukas, Jindrich

    2011-03-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common condition of the mandible. The treatment of osteoarthritis primarily consists of rest therapy (restricting jaw movements), the use of pharmaceuticals (analgesics, antiinflammatories), splint therapy, thermotherapy or mini-invasive therapy. Our study investigated the effectiveness of the various therapeutic options in the treatment of osteoarthritis. We compared the effectiveness of rest therapy (restricting mouth opening, analgesic therapy), splints, arthrocentesis of the upper joint space, and arthrocentesis in combination with splint therapy. We looked at 80 patients diagnosed with osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint. We only included patients with symptoms in one temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This 3 months long-term study shows that arthrocentesis combined with the use of a splint is an effective first-stage treatment method for patients with osteoarthritis of the TMJ (80% patients with good outcome 3 months after commencement of therapy).

  8. Tophaceous calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jennifer L; Matthew, Ian R; Chalmers, Andrew

    2008-04-01

    Tophaceous pseudogout is a rare manifestation of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) deposition disease that particularly affects the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). We describe a case of tophaceous pseudogout and review the literature. Thirty-four cases of chronic CPPD deposition disease affecting the TMJ are described. Symptoms usually included pain and swelling. Most patients required surgery because of extensive crystal deposits, usually localized to the joint and adjacent structures but occasionally invasive. For many patients, malignancy was the preoperative diagnosis. Although patients with acute pseudogout of the TMJ may have involvement of other joints, tophaceous pseudogout was predominantly isolated to the TMJ.

  9. Rationale of arthroscopic surgery of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Murakami, KenIchiro

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic surgery has been widely used for treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangements and diseases for the last 40 years. Although 626 articles have been hit by Pubmed search in terms of "TMJ arthroscopic surgery", this review article is described based on distinguished publishing works and on my experiences with TMJ arthroscopic surgery and related research with an aim to analyse the rationale of arthroscopic surgeries of the temporomandibular joint. With arthrocentesis emerging as an alternative, less invasive, treatment for internal derangement with closed lock, the primary indication of arthroscopic surgery seems to be somewhat limited. However, the value of endoscopic inspection and surgery has its position for both patient and physician with its long-term reliable results.

  10. Rationale of arthroscopic surgery of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, KenIchiro

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic surgery has been widely used for treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangements and diseases for the last 40 years. Although 626 articles have been hit by Pubmed search in terms of “TMJ arthroscopic surgery”, this review article is described based on distinguished publishing works and on my experiences with TMJ arthroscopic surgery and related research with an aim to analyse the rationale of arthroscopic surgeries of the temporomandibular joint. With arthrocentesis emerging as an alternative, less invasive, treatment for internal derangement with closed lock, the primary indication of arthroscopic surgery seems to be somewhat limited. However, the value of endoscopic inspection and surgery has its position for both patient and physician with its long-term reliable results. PMID:25737901

  11. Dislocation of the Temporomandibular Joint and Relocation Procedures.

    PubMed

    White, Thomas; Hedderick, Viki; Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation requires prompt medical attention due to the crucial impact of airway, nutrition acquisition, and communication. Recognition of this injury by the practitioner, based on clinical presentation and history, is paramount for identification of accurate diagnosis and prompt treatment of TMJ dislocation. Relocation or reduction methods vary on the basis of the severity of the injury and whether it is an acute or chronic dislocation. PMID:27482989

  12. Regional 3D superimposition to assess temporomandibular joint condylar morphology

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, J; Gomes, L C R; Benavides, E; Nguyen, T; Paniagua, B; Styner, M; Boen, V; Gonçalves, J R; Cevidanes, L H S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the reliability of regional three-dimensional registration and superimposition methods for assessment of temporomandibular joint condylar morphology across subjects and longitudinally. Methods: The sample consisted of cone beam CT scans of 36 patients. The across-subject comparisons included 12 controls, mean age 41.3 ± 12.0 years, and 12 patients with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis, mean age 41.3 ± 14.7 years. The individual longitudinal assessments included 12 patients with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis, mean age 37.8 ± 16.7 years, followed up at pre-operative jaw surgery, immediately after and one-year post-operative. Surface models of all condyles were constructed from the cone beam CT scans. Two previously calibrated observers independently performed all registration methods. A landmark-based approach was used for the registration of across-subject condylar models, and temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis vs control group differences were computed with shape analysis. A voxel-based approach was used for registration of longitudinal scans calculated x, y, z degrees of freedom for translation and rotation. Two-way random intraclass correlation coefficients tested the interobserver reliability. Results: Statistically significant differences between the control group and the osteoarthritis group were consistently located on the lateral and medial poles for both observers. The interobserver differences were ≤0.2 mm. For individual longitudinal comparisons, the mean interobserver differences were ≤0.6 mm in translation errors and 1.2° in rotation errors, with excellent reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient >0.75). Conclusions: Condylar registration for across-subjects and longitudinal assessments is reliable and can be used to quantify subtle bony differences in the three-dimensional condylar morphology. PMID:24170802

  13. Chitosan-Based Thermosensitive Hydrogel for Controlled Drug Delivery to the Temporomandibular Joint.

    PubMed

    Talaat, Wael M; Haider, Mohamed; Kawas, Sausan Al; Kandil, Nadia G; Harding, David R K

    2016-05-01

    Intra-articular injections of hyaluronic acid (HA) and corticosteroids have been extensively used in treating temporomandibular disorders. However, rapid clearance from the site of injection is a major concern that is commonly managed by frequent dosing, which is not without complications. This study aimed to determine the suitability of thermosensitive chitosan-based hydrogels for intra-articular controlled release of drugs in the rabbit temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A series of hydrogels were prepared using different chitosan (Ch) to β-glycerophosphate (β-GP) ratios. The gelation time, swelling ratio, the shape, and surface morphology of the prepared gels were investigated to select the formulation with optimum characteristics. The left TMJ in 13 adult male New Zealand white rabbits was injected with 0.2 mL of Chitosan/β-glycerophosphate/HA while the right TMJ was injected with 0.2 mL of control solution of HA. Hyaluronic acid concentrations in experimental and control groups were measured using Hyaluronan Quantikine Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay Kit. In vitro characterization showed that both the Ch:β-GP ratio and incorporation of HA had a significant effect on gelation time, degree of swelling, and surface morphology of the hydrogels. No morphological changes were observed in the joints in both groups. The mean concentration of HA in the experimental joints after 7 days (1339.79 ± 244.98 μg/g) was significantly higher than that in the control (474.52 ± 79.36 μg/g). In conclusion, the chitosan-based thermosensitive hydrogel can be considered as a promising controlled drug release system to the TMJ in a rabbit model that would potentially overcome many of the current limitations of intra-articular formulations. PMID:27100649

  14. Temporo-mandibular joint disease in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Davidson, C; Wojtulewski, J A; Bacon, P A; Winstock, D

    1975-02-01

    The occurrence of temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) disease in ankylosing spondylitis is not widely recognized and its incidence is disputed. Seventy-nine patients attending two routine rheumatology clinics were therefore examined by dental surgeon and nine (11-5 per cent) were considered to have specific TMJ involvement. These patients were older than the remainder, and had more extensive spinal and peripheral joint disease. Symptoms were mild and the predominant clinical feature was restricted mouth opening, which could present considerable difficulties during emergency anaesthesia. Bilateral condylectomy was undertaken in one patient with some benefit.

  15. [Comparative evolution surgical accesses to temporo-mandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Sysoliatin, P G; Novikov, A I; Sysoliatin, S P; Bobylev, N G; Brega, I N

    2007-01-01

    In experiment on 30 corpses of adult people criteria of an operational wound (depth of a wound, a corner of operational action, an axis of operational action, a corner of an inclination of operational action) were studied at preauricularis, intrauricularis, intrauriculo-temporalis and posterior mandibullaris access to temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ). New surgical intrauriculo-temporalis access to the joint is substantrated. On the basis of the analysis of 289 operations at 268 patients the indications to a choice of surgical access were developed at various diseases and damages of TMJ.

  16. Reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint autogenous compared with alloplastic.

    PubMed

    Saeed, N; Hensher, R; McLeod, N; Kent, J

    2002-08-01

    The aims of and indications for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) reconstruction are well-established but the method of reconstruction is controversial. We describe a retrospective, two-centre audit of 49 patients treated with costochondral grafting and 50 patients treated with alloplastic joints. The characteristics of the patients were similar in both centres and the minimum follow-up period was 2 years. For each patient a number of variables were recorded including both subjective scores (pain and interference with eating) and objective data (interincisal distance). Patients in both groups showed an improvement in symptoms but more patients required reoperation in the autogenous group. PMID:12175828

  17. Biomechanics of the human temporomandibular joint during chewing.

    PubMed

    Naeije, M; Hofman, N

    2003-07-01

    Experimental data on the loading of the human temporomandibular joint during chewing are scarce. Coincidence of the opening and closing chewing strokes of the condyles probably indicates compression in the joint during chewing. Using this indication, we studied the loading of the joint during chewing and chopping of a latex-packed food bolus on the left or right side of the mouth. Mandibular movements of ten healthy subjects were recorded. Distances traveled by the condylar kinematic centers were normalized with respect to the distances traveled during maximum opening. We judged coincidence of the opening and closing condylar movement traces without knowing their origin. When subjects chewed, the ipsilateral condyles traveled shorter distances than did the contralateral condyles. During chewing and chopping, all contralateral condyles showed a coincident movement pattern, while a significantly smaller number of ipsilateral condyles did. These results suggest that the ipsilateral joints were less heavily loaded during chewing and chopping than were the contralateral joints.

  18. Early magnetic resonance imaging control after temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis

    PubMed Central

    Ângelo, David Faustino; Sousa, Rita; Pinto, Isabel; Sanz, David; Gil, F. Monje; Salvado, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lysis and lavage arthrocentesis with viscosupplementation are an effective treatment for acute disc displacement (DD) without reduction. Clinical success seems to be related to multiple factors despite the lack of understanding of its mechanisms. The authors present a case report of 17-year-old women with acute open mouth limitation (12 mm), right TMJ pain-8/10 visual analog scale, right deviation when opening her mouth. The clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis was acute DD without reduction of right TMJ. Right TMJ arthrocentesis was purposed to the patient with lysis, lavage, and viscosupplementation of the upper joint space. After 5 days, a new MRI was performed to confirm upper joint space distension and disc position. Clinical improvement was obtained 5 days and 1 month after arthrocentesis. Upper joint space increased 6 mm and the disc remained displaced. We report the first early TMJ MRI image postoperative, with measurable upper joint space. PMID:26981483

  19. Early magnetic resonance imaging control after temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis.

    PubMed

    Ângelo, David Faustino; Sousa, Rita; Pinto, Isabel; Sanz, David; Gil, F Monje; Salvado, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lysis and lavage arthrocentesis with viscosupplementation are an effective treatment for acute disc displacement (DD) without reduction. Clinical success seems to be related to multiple factors despite the lack of understanding of its mechanisms. The authors present a case report of 17-year-old women with acute open mouth limitation (12 mm), right TMJ pain-8/10 visual analog scale, right deviation when opening her mouth. The clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis was acute DD without reduction of right TMJ. Right TMJ arthrocentesis was purposed to the patient with lysis, lavage, and viscosupplementation of the upper joint space. After 5 days, a new MRI was performed to confirm upper joint space distension and disc position. Clinical improvement was obtained 5 days and 1 month after arthrocentesis. Upper joint space increased 6 mm and the disc remained displaced. We report the first early TMJ MRI image postoperative, with measurable upper joint space. PMID:26981483

  20. Three-dimensional temporomandibular joint modeling and animation.

    PubMed

    Cascone, Piero; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Pagnoni, Mario; Marianetti, Tito Matteo; Tedaldi, Massimiliano

    2008-11-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) model derives from a study of the cranium by 3D virtual reality and mandibular function animation. The starting point of the project is high-fidelity digital acquisition of a human dry skull. The cooperation between the maxillofacial surgeon and the cartoonist enables the reconstruction of the fibroconnective components of the TMJ that are the keystone for comprehension of the anatomic and functional features of the mandible. The skeletal model is customized with the apposition of the temporomandibular ligament, the articular disk, the retrodiskal tissue, and the medial and the lateral ligament of the disk. The simulation of TMJ movement is the result of the integration of up-to-date data on the biomechanical restrictions. The 3D TMJ model is an easy-to-use application that may be run on a personal computer for the study of the TMJ and its biomechanics. PMID:19098544

  1. Genetic Influences on Temporomandibular Joint Development and Growth.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Robert J; Jing, Junjun; Feng, Jian Q

    2015-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a small synovial joint at which the mandible articulates with the skull during movements involved in speaking and mastication. However, the secondary cartilage lining its joint surfaces is indicative of a very different developmental history than limb cartilages. This review summarizes our current knowledge of genes that regulate the formation of primary components of the TMJ, as well as genes that regulate postnatal growth of the TMJ. Although the TMJ is regulated by some of the same genes that are important in limb joints, others appear unique to the TMJ or have different actions. Runx2, Sox9, and members of the TGF-β/BMP family are critical drivers of chondrogenesis during condylar cartilage morphogenesis, and Indian hedgehog (Ihh) is important for formation of the articular disc and cavitation. Osterix (Osx) is a critical regulator of endochondral bone formation during postnatal TMJ growth. PMID:26589922

  2. Gout of the Temporomandibular Joint: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Isaac Nilton Fernandes; Gomes, Renata Caroline Ferreira; dos Santos, Raiane Rodrigues; Oliveira, Thiago de Paula; Pereira, Larissa Loiuse Cândida; Mainenti, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Gout is an illness characterized by the deposition of monosodium urate crystals in the joints or in soft tissues. The clinical manifestation results from inflammation of limb joints and pain with a rare presentation in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Case Report This study describes a 66-year-old white man with a chief complaint of “occasional pain in the left temporal muscle region.” The case disclosed a gout manifestation in the TMJ after physical, radiographic, and ultrasonographic exams, and the patient was referred to proper treatment. Conclusion Gout manifestation in the TMJ is an unusual presentation, and few reports in the English literature address to the subject. Gout in the TMJ should be included as a differential diagnosis for joint disorders. PMID:25992112

  3. Automobilization intervention and exercise for temporomandibular joint open lock

    PubMed Central

    Hoglund, Lisa T; Scott, Brian W

    2012-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) are common and may cause temporomandibular joint (TMJ) locking, pain, and disability. Evidence supports use of manual therapy and exercise for treatment of TMDs including disk displacement limiting full mouth opening, TMJ ‘closed lock’. Only limited case studies describe management of TMJ ‘open lock’, a condition due to posterior disk displacement (PDD) or TMJ anterior dislocation (TMJ-AD). Reported treatment for open lock includes splinting and intraoral joint manipulation. This case report describes a novel extraoral automobilization using the mandibular elevator muscles to treat TMJ open lock in a 22-year-old male after intraoral joint mobilization failed. The exercise program used to restore neuromuscular control for post-reduction management is described. Short term results of automobilization were excellent with restored ability to swallow, speak normally, and achieve occlusion. Long term results at 14 months were good: the patient was pain-free, could swallow and speak normally, had no recurrence of TMJ locking, and minimal disability. Limited right lateral excursion range and left mandibular deviation during mouth opening indicated possible persistence of PDD. This case suggests that mandibular elevator automobilization and masticatory muscle exercise may be useful to treat TMJ open lock and should be considered to treat PDD and TMJ-AD. PMID:24179326

  4. Temporomandibular Joint Hypermobility Manifestation Based on Clinical Observations

    PubMed Central

    Nosouhian, Saeid; Haghighat, Abbas; Mohammadi, Iman; Shadmehr, Elham; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Joint range of motion might affected by some factors like laxity and increase joint mobility. Generalized joint hypermobility and temporomandibular joint hypermobility (TMJH) are reported as risk factors for temporomandibular disorders. The aim of this study was to survey the etiological factors of TMJH and its relations to habitual status. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study, 69 patients with TMJH were involved. After profiling personal information and medical history, the patients were divided into three groups based on their maximum mouth opening (MMO) as follow: (Light) MMO of 50-55 mm, (moderate): MMO between 55 and 65 mm, (severe) MMO >65 mm. For subjective observations, patients were asked to fill the prepared questionnaire. The objective evaluations conducted by a specialist. Finally, all the data subjected Chi-Square test by using SPSS software version 22 at a significant level of 0.05. Results: TMJH was more common in women (74.2%). The light group had significant differences with other groups in the discomfort of TMJ and TMJ sound (P < 0.05). Furthermore, sever group manifested highest percentage of masticatory pains, significantly (P < 0.05). Conclusion: It can be concluded that pain in TMJ would have a correlation with MMO. PMID:26464530

  5. Imaging of Temporomandibular Joint: Approach by Direct Volume Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Carola; Bruschetta, Daniele; Vaccarino, Gianluigi; Milardi, Demetrio

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to conduct a morphological analysis of the temporomandibular joint, a highly specialized synovial joint that permits movement and function of the mandible. Materials and Methods: We have studied the temporom-andibular joint anatomy, directly on the living, from 3D images obtained by medical imaging Computed Tomography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance acquisition, and subsequent re-engineering techniques 3D Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering. Data were analysed with the goal of being able to isolate, identify and distinguish the anatomical structures of the joint, and get the largest possible number of information utilizing software for post-processing work. Results: It was possible to reproduce anatomy of the skeletal structures, as well as through acquisitions of Magnetic Resonance Imaging; it was also possible to visualize the vascular, muscular, ligamentous and tendinous components of the articular complex, and also the capsule and the fibrous cartilaginous disc. We managed the Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering, not only to obtain three-dimensional images for colour and for resolution comparable to the usual anatomical preparations, but also a considerable number of anatomical, minuter details, zooming, rotating and cutting the same images with linking, graduating the colour, transparency and opacity from time to time. Conclusion: These results are encouraging to stimulate further studies in other anatomical districts. PMID:25664280

  6. Bilateral Temporomandibular Joint Replacement Using Computer-Assisted Surgical Simulation and Three-Dimensional Printing.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jaeyoung; Cho, Jinyong; Kim, Hyeon Min

    2016-07-01

    The dental occlusion is the important reference for replacement of the temporomandibular joint. If a patient does not have normal occlusion, few considerations are needed for temporomandibular joint replacement. The custom-made prosthesis, typically fabricated with a stereolithographic model, is probably the optimized solution currently available. However the ready-made stock from Biomet Microfixation System (Jacksonville, FL) is the only available product, which is authorized by the government ministry in South Korea, for replacement of the temporomandibular joint. This report presents a patient with the problems that were retrognathic "bird face" profile subsequent to severe bilateral condylar resorption and temporomandibular joint ankylosis without enough natural teeth for occlusion. Bilateral temporomandibular joint replacement using the ready-made prosthesis was done by reestablishing the mandibular position with new occlusion and improved facial profile via the virtual surgical planning and stereolithographic model simulation. PMID:27315318

  7. Clinical findings in temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis.

    PubMed

    Kopp, S

    1977-09-01

    The clinical findings in 20 patients with TMJ-crepitation (E1-group) and 19 patients with TMJ palpatory tenderness (E2-group) have been compared with the findings in 29 other patients with mandibular dysfunction (R-group). The patients underwent a clinical examination of the masticatory system and of the second distal interphalangeal joints (DIP II joints). No statistically significant differences could be found between groups with respect to clinical signs, occlusal interferences, or dental attrition. Loss of molar support was found to be significantly more frequent in the E1-group than in the R-group. The frequency of tenderness to palpation or pain on movement of DIP II joints was significantly higher in the E2-group than in the R-group. Periarticular bony swelling of DIP II joints was significantly correlated with TMJ-crepitation. The patients with TMJ-crepitation were considered to have TMJ-osteoarthrosis. The results of the present study indicate that patients with TMJ-OZ have a similar clinical picture to other patients with mandibular dysfunction and that molar loss plays a role in the etiology of TMJ-OA. PMID:271341

  8. Component Approach to the Temporomandibular Joint and Coronoid Process

    PubMed Central

    Pfaff, Miles J.; Clune, James; Steinbacher, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region is challenging. The conventional direct preauricular incision permits only limited access to the TMJ and surrounding structures, therefore risking injury to the facial nerve during retraction. The ideal approach allows sufficient exposure, preservation of underlying neurovascular structures, and achieves an optimal aesthetic outcome. We describe a preauricular posttragal incision with a superficial musculoaponeurotic system flap to allow wide exposure of the zygomatic arch, TMJ, condyle, and coronoid process. We postulate that this approach improves access, lessens the amount of retraction required, and creates a more inconspicuous scar. PMID:25383157

  9. A study of the temporomandibular joint during bruxism.

    PubMed

    Commisso, María S; Martínez-Reina, Javier; Mayo, Juana

    2014-06-01

    A finite element model of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the human mandible was fabricated to study the effect of abnormal loading, such as awake and asleep bruxism, on the articular disc. A quasilinear viscoelastic model was used to simulate the behaviour of the disc. The viscoelastic nature of this tissue is shown to be an important factor when sustained (awake bruxism) or cyclic loading (sleep bruxism) is simulated. From the comparison of the two types of bruxism, it was seen that sustained clenching is the most detrimental activity for the TMJ disc, producing an overload that could lead to severe damage of this tissue.

  10. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature.

  11. The temporalis muscle flap in temporo-mandibular joint surgery.

    PubMed

    Brusati, R; Raffaini, M; Sesenna, E; Bozzetti, A

    1990-11-01

    In the treatment of the severely damaged TMJ structural components (ankylosis, arthrosis, tumour, perforation or degeneration of the disc), it is advisable to insert a biological interposition between bony articular surfaces. The temporal muscle, due to its anatomical, topographical, and functional properties, can be successfully employed for this purpose. Based on the experience of Tessier, Delaire and Rowe, a temporalis muscle flap, inferiorly based, is rotated downwards and medially to the zygomatic arch, interposed and then fixed to condyle and capsule. Using this surgical technique, 12 patients and 13 temporo-mandibular joints were treated with good functional results and without any complication.

  12. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Won; Cho, Jin-Yong; Kim, Hyeon-Min

    2016-08-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature. PMID:27595091

  13. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature. PMID:27595091

  14. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung-Won; Cho, Jin-Yong; Kim, Hyeon-Min

    2016-08-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature.

  15. Symptoms resembling temporomandibular joint disorder caused by a pleomorphic adenoma.

    PubMed

    Marchese, Nadia; Witterick, Ian; Freeman, Bruce V

    2013-01-01

    Pleomorphic adenoma is a benign neoplasm of the salivary glands. It is the most common type of salivary gland tumour and the tumour most commonly found in the parotid gland. Clinical diagnosis of a parotid gland neoplasm can be difficult, particularly when the lesion is located deep within the gland. Although usually asymptomatic, pleomorphic adenoma may exhibit symptoms mimicking those of conditions such as temporomandibular joint disorder. This case report highlights the difficulties of diagnosing this type of tumour and the importance of communication between physicians and dentists to ensure an accurate diagnosis.

  16. [The transverse movement of the temporo-mandibular joint (translation movement) of the dog, also with reference to dysplasia of this joint in the dachshund].

    PubMed

    Vollmerhaus, B; Roos, H

    1996-09-01

    Contrary to the accepted opinion, transverse movement is possible in the temporo-mandibular joint of the dog. This movement is arched and is important for mastication. Analysis of transverse movement of the temporo-mandibular joint was done in 20 dog breeds. Accidentally dysplasia of the temporo-mandibular joint was found in the dachshund, a phenomenon which has not been described before.

  17. Multidetector computed tomography of temporomandibular joint: A road less travelled

    PubMed Central

    Pahwa, Shivani; Bhalla, Ashu Seith; Roychaudhary, Ajoy; Bhutia, Ongkila

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the imaging anatomy of temporomandibular joint (TMJ), describes the technique of multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) of the TMJ, and describes in detail various osseous pathologic afflictions affecting the joint. Traumatic injuries affecting the mandibular condyle are most common, followed by joint ankylosis as a sequel to arthritis. The congenital anomalies are less frequent, hemifacial microsomia being the most commonly encountered anomaly involving the TMJ. Neoplastic afflictions of TMJ are distinctly uncommon, osteochondroma being one of the most common lesions. MDCT enables comprehensive evaluation of osseous afflictions of TMJ, and is a valuable tool for surgical planning. Sagittal, coronal and 3D reformatted images well depict osseous TMJ lesions, and their relationship to adjacent structures. PMID:25984518

  18. Attributes of tinnitus that may predict temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Vernon, J; Griest, S; Press, L

    1992-10-01

    A collection of 1002 patients with severe tinnitus, drawn from the Tinnitus Data Registry, were retrospectively surveyed to determine which traits or attributes of tinnitus could indicate the possibility of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD) as the cause of tinnitus. The patients were divided into two groups: (1) a TMD group, consisting of 69 patients for whom there was no known cause of tinnitus except for one or more temporomandibular joint (TMJ) indicators, and (2) a comparison group with mixed etiologies (n = 860). Seventy-three patients were eliminated due to excessive complications relating to cause. The two groups were compared seeking those attributes of tinnitus that significantly separated them. No single benchmark standard was discovered that exclusively indicated tinnitus from TMJ origins. However, a total of 10 "TMJ Indicators" were discovered. The data for each of these indicators is presented and discussed. In addition, the attributes that did not significantly separate the two groups are listed. The study concludes with a recommendation for TMJ referral for those tinnitus patients with unknown etiology who demonstrate any three or more of the TMJ indicators. PMID:1291101

  19. Congenital Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Ryan Chin Taw; Kassam, Karim; Eccles, Simon; Hensher, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Congenital temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is an uncommon condition that presents itself at or soon after birth in the absence of acquired factors that could have contributed to the ankylosis such as infection and trauma. The experience of managing one such case is reported in light of a review of the literature on this condition. Key management principles include adequate removal of the ankylotic mass, costochondral grafting, and post-op physiotherapy. Most patients reported in the literature with the condition experienced relapse. This echoes our own experience where there was recurrence of the ankylosis. However, after removal of the ankylotic mass, the patient maintains a satisfactory maximal incisal opening (MIO) till the present day. The additional challenges faced in the congenital form in addition to the already complex management of acquired paediatric temporomandibular joint ankylosis are (1) much earlier insult to the TMJ, (2) reduced opportunity for neuromuscular development of the muscles of mastication, and (3) reduced compliance with postoperative physiotherapy programmes due to the younger age of these patients. PMID:27190665

  20. Jacob's disease associated with temporomandibular joint dysfunction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Capote, Ana; Rodríguez, Francisco J; Blasco, Ana; Muñoz, Mario F

    2005-01-01

    Jacob's disease is regarded a rare condition in which a joint formation is established between an enlarged mandibular coronoid process and the inner aspect of the zygomatic body. Chronic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disk displacement has been proposed as etiological factor of coronoid process enlargement. We present a 23-year-old woman with long-standing TMJ dysfunction and restricted interincisal opening, who developed a progressive zygomatic asymmetry. The patient underwent treatment by intraoral coronoidectomy and homolateral TMJ arthroscopy in the same surgery. The histopathological diagnosis of the coronoid sample was cartilage-capped exostoses with presence of articular fibrous cartilage. Although the low prevalence of this entity, it should be considered as a possible diagnosis in patients with progressive limitation of mouth opening, although a TMJ syndrome may be present as a cause of this entity.

  1. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders’ Impact on Pain, Function, and Disability

    PubMed Central

    Chantaracherd, P.; John, M.T.; Hodges, J.S.; Schiffman, E.L.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between more advanced stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorders (“TMJ intra-articular status”), representing a transition from normal joint structure to TMJ disc displacement with and without reduction (DDwR and DDwoR) to degenerative joint disease (DJD), and patient-reported outcomes of jaw pain, function, and disability (“TMD impact”). This cross-sectional study included 614 cases from the RDC/TMD Validation Project with at least one temporomandibular disorder (TMD) diagnosis. TMJ intra-articular status was determined by 3 blinded, calibrated radiologists using magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography as one of normal joint structure, DDwR, DDwoR, or DJD, representing the subject’s most advanced TMJ diagnosis. TMD impact was conceptualized as a latent variable consisting of 1) pain intensity (Characteristic Pain Index from the Graded Chronic Pain Scale [GCPS]), 2) jaw function (Jaw Functional Limitation Scale), and 3) disability (Disability Points from GCPS). A structural equation model estimated the association of TMJ intra-articular status with the latent measure TMD impact as a correlation coefficient in all TMD cases (n = 614) and in cases with a TMD pain diagnosis (n = 500). The correlations between TMJ intra-articular status and TMD impact were 0.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], −0.04 to 0.13) for all TMD cases and 0.07 (95% CI, −0.04 to 0.17) for cases with a pain diagnosis, which are neither statistically significant nor clinically relevant. Conceptualizing worsening of TMJ intra-articular disorders as 4 stages and characterizing impact from TMD as a composite of jaw pain, function, and disability, this cross-sectional study found no clinically significant association. Models of TMJ intra-articular status other than ours (normal structure → DDwR → DDwoR → DJD) should be explored. PMID:25572112

  2. Temporomandibular joint disorders' impact on pain, function, and disability.

    PubMed

    Chantaracherd, P; John, M T; Hodges, J S; Schiffman, E L

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between more advanced stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorders ("TMJ intra-articular status"), representing a transition from normal joint structure to TMJ disc displacement with and without reduction (DDwR and DDwoR) to degenerative joint disease (DJD), and patient-reported outcomes of jaw pain, function, and disability ("TMD impact"). This cross-sectional study included 614 cases from the RDC/TMD Validation Project with at least one temporomandibular disorder (TMD) diagnosis. TMJ intra-articular status was determined by 3 blinded, calibrated radiologists using magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography as one of normal joint structure, DDwR, DDwoR, or DJD, representing the subject's most advanced TMJ diagnosis. TMD impact was conceptualized as a latent variable consisting of 1) pain intensity (Characteristic Pain Index from the Graded Chronic Pain Scale [GCPS]), 2) jaw function (Jaw Functional Limitation Scale), and 3) disability (Disability Points from GCPS). A structural equation model estimated the association of TMJ intra-articular status with the latent measure TMD impact as a correlation coefficient in all TMD cases (n = 614) and in cases with a TMD pain diagnosis (n = 500). The correlations between TMJ intra-articular status and TMD impact were 0.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.04 to 0.13) for all TMD cases and 0.07 (95% CI, -0.04 to 0.17) for cases with a pain diagnosis, which are neither statistically significant nor clinically relevant. Conceptualizing worsening of TMJ intra-articular disorders as 4 stages and characterizing impact from TMD as a composite of jaw pain, function, and disability, this cross-sectional study found no clinically significant association. Models of TMJ intra-articular status other than ours (normal structure → DDwR → DDwoR → DJD) should be explored.

  3. Coronal joint spaces of the Temporomandibular joint: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Joana-Cristina; Pires, Carlos A.; Ponces-Ramalhão, Maria-João-Feio; Lopes, Jorge-Dias

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The joint space measurements of the temporomandibular joint have been used to determine the condyle position variation. Therefore, the aim of this study is to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the coronal joint spaces measurements of the temporomandibular joint. Material and Methods An electronic database search was performed with the terms “condylar position”; “joint space”AND”TMJ”. Inclusionary criteria included: tomographic 3D imaging of the TMJ, presentation of at least two joint space measurements on the coronal plane. Exclusionary criteria were: mandibular fractures, animal studies, surgery, presence of genetic or chronic diseases, case reports, opinion or debate articles or unpublished material. The risk of bias of each study was judged as high, moderate or low according to the “Cochrane risk of bias tool”. The values used in the meta-analysis were the medial, superior and lateral joint space measurements and their differences between the right and left joint. Results From the initial search 2706 articles were retrieved. After excluding the duplicates and all the studies that did not match the eligibility criteria 4 articles classified for final review. All the retrieved articles were judged as low level of evidence. All of the reviewed studies were included in the meta-analysis concluding that the mean coronal joint space values were: medial joint space 2.94 mm, superior 2.55 mm and lateral 2.16 mm. Conclusions the analysis also showed high levels of heterogeneity. Right and left comparison did not show statistically significant differences. Key words:Temporomandibular joint, systematic review, meta-analysis. PMID:26330944

  4. Mandibulofacial adaptations in a juvenile animal model of temporomandibular joint arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tavakkoli-Jou, M; Miller, A J; Kapila, S

    1999-08-01

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) is a chronic systemic disease of childhood that affects synovial joints including the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Individuals with JRA of the TMJ frequently show aberrations in mandibulofacial development. Since the basis for these developmental perturbations is poorly understood, they remain a perplexing clinical problem to manage. To begin dissecting the mechanisms for altered craniofacial development in JRA of the TMJ, we characterized the gross morphologic adaptations in the facial skeleton in a juvenile animal model of TMJ arthritis. Arthritis was induced in ten 87-day-old male rabbits by intra-articular challenge with ovalbumin. Eight sham-challenged and 4 unchallenged rabbits were used as controls. Serial lateral head cephalograms, taken at 73 (T1), 87 (T2), 108 (T3), 129 (T4), and 150 (T5) days of age, were evaluated by linear measures of maxillary, mandibular, and posterior dental height dimensions. Differences in the absolute dimensions and relative percent incremental changes were compared by ANOVA and Fisher's test. The body weights, as well as the absolute measures and incremental changes in maxillary and posterior dental height dimensions, were not significantly different between the antigen-challenged and control groups. In contrast, absolute measures of posterior mandibular height, condylar neck height, and total mandibular length were significantly smaller (P < 0.05) in antigen-challenged rabbits than in both control groups at T5. Furthermore, the antigen-challenged rabbits demonstrated significantly smaller (P < 0.05) relative increases in all measures of mandibular length, and in total posterior mandibular and condylar neck heights. Cephalometric superimpositions on the cranial base and tantalum implants confirmed these quantitative observations. This investigation demonstrates mandibulofacial developmental aberrations in experimental JRA-like disease of the TMJ that are similar to those observed in humans

  5. The arterial blood supply of the temporomandibular joint: an anatomical study and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico; Anastasi, Giuseppe; Milardi, Demetrio; Favaloro, Angelo; De Pietro, Anita; Angileri, Tommaso Maurizio; Caradonna, Luigi; Cutroneo, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to analyze three-dimensional images of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. Materials and Methods Ten patients (five men and five women, mean age 36 years) without signs or symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, who underwent contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scanning with intravenous contrast, were studied. The direct volume rendering technique of CT images was used, and a data set of images to visualize the vasculature of the human temporomandibular joint in three dimensions was created. After elaboration of the data through post-processing, the arterial supply of the temporomandibular joint was studied. Results The analysis revealed the superficial temporal artery, the anterior tympanic artery, the deep temporal artery, the auricular posterior artery, the transverse facial artery, the middle meningeal artery, and the maxillary artery with their branches as the main arterial sources for the lateral and medial temporomandibular joint. Conclusion The direct volume rendering technique was found to be successful in the assessment of the arterial supply to the temporomandibular joint. The superficial temporal artery and maxillary artery ran along the lateral and medial sides of the condylar neck, suggesting that these arteries are at increased risk during soft-tissue procedures such as an elective arthroplasty of the temporomandibular joint. PMID:23525363

  6. Manual therapy of the mandibular accessory ligaments for the management of temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Cuccia, Antonino Marco; Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico

    2011-02-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders are characterized by chronic or acute musculoskeletal or myofascial pain with dysfunction of the masticatory system. Treatment modalities include occlusal splints, patient education, activity modification, muscle and joint exercises, myofascial therapy, acupuncture, and manipulative therapy. In the physiology of the temporomandibular joint, accessory ligaments limit the movement of the mandible. A thorough knowledge of the anatomy of accessory ligaments is necessary for good clinical management of temporomandibular joint disorders. Although general principles regarding the anatomy of the ligaments are relatively clear, very little substantiated information on the dimension, orientation, and function of the ligaments has been published, to the authors' knowledge. The authors review the literature concerning the accessory ligaments of the temporomandibular joint and describe treatment options, including manual techniques for mobilizing the accessory ligaments. PMID:21357496

  7. Pseudotumors and tumors of the temporomandibular joint. A review

    PubMed Central

    Bagán, José V.; Sanchis, José M.; Margaix, María

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To review the pseudotumors and tumors of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) published in journals included in Journal Citation Reports (JCR), and to evaluate whether there are clinical and radiological signs capable of differentiating between pseudotumors and tumors and between malignant and benign tumors. Material and Methods: A systematic Medline search was made of clinical cases of tumors and pseudotumors of the TMJ covering a 20-year period and published in journals included in JCR. Only cases with histological confirmation were included. A description is provided of the general characteristics of TMJ tumors, with comparison of the clinical, diagnostic, therapeutic and evolutive variables referred to pseudotumors, benign tumors and malignant tumors. Results: We identified 285 TMJ tumors published in 181 articles of 15 journals. The most frequent lesions were pseudotumors (synovial chondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, eosinophilic granuloma and osteochondroma). The mean age was 42 years and one month ± 16 years and two months. Tumors were more common in females. The mean time from symptoms onset to consultation was 30 months and 8 days ± 41 months and 9 days, and almost 19.6% of the cases initially had been diagnosed and treated as TMJ dysfunction. The most frequent clinical manifestations were pain, swelling and the limitation of joint movements. The most common radiological findings in the case of benign and malignant lesions were radiopacities and radiotransparencies, respectively. No panoramic X-ray alterations were observed in 14.6% of the benign tumors and in 7.7% of the malignant lesions. Surgery was the usual form of treatment. Sequelae were recorded in 18.2% of the cases, with tumor relapse in 9.1%. The four-year survival rate in the case of malignant tumors was 72.2%. Key words:Tumor, temporomandibular joint, metaplasia, pseudotumor, condyle. PMID:23385515

  8. [MRI of the temporomandibular joint--the gold standard].

    PubMed

    Barmeir, E; Teich, S; Gutmcher, Z

    2014-04-01

    MRI has been established as the imaging modality of choice for the evaluation of temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD), as it allows for a noninvasive detailed evaluation of the joint that is not otherwise available. During the last decade, the introduction of dynamic (cine-mode) MR imaging has made functional evaluation feasible in addition to the morphologic study of the joint. The major advantage of MRI is its ability to study the articular disc and its congruity as well as its location relative to the condyle in both closed- and open-mouth positions. Due to its high contrast resolution, MRI is unique in demonstrating joint effusion, bone edema and sclerosis, rupture of the retrodiscal layers and impairment of the lateral pterigoid muscle. In Mor-Mar Imaging Center we performed during the last two years MRI studies of the TMJ in 234 subjects, 172 (74%) female and 62 (26%) male patients. The average age of the patients was 29 years. In this article we present our experience in the evaluation of TMD and review the main indications and findings. In addition, our experience in optimizing the MRI sequence protocols in both static and dynamic modes are discussed. MRI examinations provide the clinician with anatomic and physiologic information that can guide treatment decisions. It has a special role in monitoring and evaluating treatment results, both conservative and surgical. PMID:25252468

  9. Reconstruction of the zygoma, temporo-mandibular joint and mandible using a compound pectoralis major osteo-muscular flap.

    PubMed

    Jones, N F; Sommerlad, B C

    1983-10-01

    A method of reconstruction of the zygoma, temporo-mandibular joint and hemi-mandible utilising a segment of the outer table of the sternum, sterno-costal joint and rib vascularised by an ipsilateral pectoralis major muscle flap is described. The mobility of an isolated sterno-coastal joint is compared with movements of the temporo-mandibular joint.

  10. Dynamic properties of bovine temporomandibular joint disks change with age.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, E; Aoyama, J; Tanaka, M; Murata, H; Hamada, T; Tanne, K

    2002-09-01

    The temporomandibular joint disk exhibits morphological and biochemical age-related changes. However, the possible age-related changes of the dynamic viscoelasticity in the disk are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the dynamic viscoelastic properties of the disk change with age. Thirty-six disks from young-adult, adult, and mature-adult cattle were used for dynamic tensile tests. In all disks, the magnitudes of the complex modulus, the storage modulus, and the loss modulus increased as the frequency increased. The mature-adult disks had higher values of these moduli than did the younger disks. The loss tangent ranged from 0.1 to 0.3, which means that the disk has relatively large elasticity and relatively small viscosity. It was concluded that both the elasticity and viscosity of the disk increase with age. This may reflect age-related changes in biochemical composition.

  11. Can orthodontic relapse be blamed on the temporomandibular joint?

    PubMed Central

    Wolford, Larry M

    2014-01-01

    There are many temporomandibular joint (TMJ) conditions that can cause orthodontic treatment instability and relapse. These conditions are often associated with dentofacial deformities, malocclusion, TMJ pain, headaches, myofascial pain, TMJ and jaw functional impairment, ear symptoms, etc., Many of these TMJ conditions can cause progressive and continuous changes in the occlusion and jaw relationships. Patients with these conditions may benefit from corrective orthodontic and surgical intervention. The difficulty for many clinicians may lie in identifying the presence of a TMJ condition, diagnosing the specific TMJ pathology, and selecting the proper treatment for that condition. This paper will discuss the most common TMJ pathologies that can adversely affect orthodontic stability and outcomes as well as present the treatment considerations to correct the specific TMJ conditions and associated jaw deformities to provide stable and predictable treatment results. PMID:25426452

  12. Treatment of temporomandibular joint ankylosis with temporalis superficial fascia flap.

    PubMed

    Karasu, Hakan Alpay; Okcu, Kemal Murat; Ortakoglu, Kerim; Bayar, Gurkan Rasit; Aydintug, Yavuz Sinan

    2005-02-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is characterized by the formation of bony or fibrous mass, which replaces the normal articulation and limitation of mouth opening. This study aims to determine the efficacy of arthroplasty and interpositional fascia flap in the treatment of unilateral and bilateral TMJ ankylosis in three young adult men. Our operative protocol for unilateral and bilateral TMJ ankylosis entailed resection of ankylotic mass, intraoral ipsilateral and bilateral arthroplasty, interpositional tissue transfer to the TMJ with temporalis superficial fascia flap, maxillomandibular fixation, and early mobilization and aggressive physiotherapy. Early postoperative initial exercise, physiotherapy, and strict follow-up play an important role in preventing postoperative adhesions. The temporalis superficial facia flap is an autogenous graft that has the advantages of close proximity to the TMJ minimal surgical morbidity, and successful clinical results. It was found to be a valuable option for TMJ ankylosis reconstruction. PMID:15782841

  13. Management of temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis in growing children.

    PubMed

    Shashikiran, N D; Reddy, S V V; Patil, R; Yavagal, C

    2005-03-01

    Although temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is one of the most common pathologies afflicting the facial skeleton, it is also the most overlooked and under-managed problem in children. The TMJ forms the very cornerstone of cranio-facial integrity and hence its ankylosis in growing children adversely affects the growth and development of the jaws and occlusion. Impairment of speech, difficulty in mastication, poor oral hygiene, rampant caries and acute compromise of the airway pose a severe psychologic burden on the tender minds of children. The aim of this article is to present an overview of efficient management strategies, based on a case report, so as to increase its awareness among all dental surgeons involved in the treatment of children.

  14. [Temporomandibular joint symptoms in orthognathic surgery: a retrospective study].

    PubMed

    Declercq, C; Neyt, L; Mommaerts, M; Abeloos, J; De Mot, B

    1993-06-01

    The records of 152 consecutive patients who underwent orthognathic surgery in the Division of Maxillofacial Surgery A.Z. St.-Jan, Brugge, between 1/10/90 and 1/10/91 were evaluated for pre- and postoperative temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) symptoms. Fewer TMJ symptoms were found postoperatively, than preoperatively (14.4% versus 19.7%). In the mandibular retrognathism group there were twice as much TMJ symptoms preoperatively in the low and normal mandibular angle patient group than in the high mandibular angle group (26% versus 13%). After surgery, there was a decrease of TMJ symptoms in the low and normal angle patient group (83% improvement). In the high angle absolute mandibular retrognathism group however, more new TMJ symptoms were seen postoperatively (21%). Bimaxillary surgical correction of a high angle absolute mandibular retrognathism case may provoke condylar resorption. Advice for follow-up and suggestions to reduce this annoying complication are given.

  15. Detection of degenerative disease of the temporomandibular joint by bone scintigraphy: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Bloom, C.Y.

    1980-10-01

    Nine patients with facial pain were evaluated with limited bone scans. The scintigrams correlated with microscopy in all patients, although radiographs correlated with microscopy in only five patients. The degenerative disease process in the temporomandibular joint was more extensive in the patients with radiographic and scintigraphic abnormalities than in those with scintigraphic abnormalities alone. The limited bone scan appears useful in detecting early degenerative changes in the temporomandibular joint.

  16. Lubricin Protects the Temporomandibular Joint Surfaces from Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a specialized synovial joint essential for the mobility and function of the mammalian jaw. The TMJ is composed of the mandibular condyle, the glenoid fossa of the temporal bone, and a fibrocartilagenous disc interposed between these bones. A fibrous capsule, lined on the luminal surface by the synovial membrane, links these bones and retains synovial fluid within the cavity. The major component of synovial fluid is lubricin, a glycoprotein encoded by the gene proteoglycan 4 (Prg4), which is synthesized by chondrocytes at the surface of the articular cartilage and by synovial lining cells. We previously showed that in the knee joint, Prg4 is crucial for maintenance of cartilage surfaces and for regulating proliferation of the intimal cells in the synovium. Consequently, the objective of this study was to determine the role of lubricin in the maintenance of the TMJ. We found that mice lacking lubricin have a normal TMJ at birth, but develop degeneration resembling TMJ osteoarthritis by 2 months, increasing in severity over time. Disease progression in Prg4−/− mice results in synovial hyperplasia, deterioration of cartilage in the condyle, disc and fossa with an increase in chondrocyte number and their redistribution in clusters with loss of superficial zone chondrocytes. All articular surfaces of the joint had a prominent layer of protein deposition. Compared to the knee joint, the osteoarthritis-like phenotype was more severe and manifested earlier in the TMJ. Taken together, the lack of lubricin in the TMJ causes osteoarthritis-like degeneration that affects the articular cartilage as well as the integrity of multiple joint tissues. Our results provide the first molecular evidence of the role of lubricin in the TMJ and suggest that Prg4−/− mice might provide a valuable new animal model for the study of the early events of TMJ osteoarthritis. PMID:25188282

  17. Lubricin protects the temporomandibular joint surfaces from degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hill, Adele; Duran, Juanita; Purcell, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a specialized synovial joint essential for the mobility and function of the mammalian jaw. The TMJ is composed of the mandibular condyle, the glenoid fossa of the temporal bone, and a fibrocartilagenous disc interposed between these bones. A fibrous capsule, lined on the luminal surface by the synovial membrane, links these bones and retains synovial fluid within the cavity. The major component of synovial fluid is lubricin, a glycoprotein encoded by the gene proteoglycan 4 (Prg4), which is synthesized by chondrocytes at the surface of the articular cartilage and by synovial lining cells. We previously showed that in the knee joint, Prg4 is crucial for maintenance of cartilage surfaces and for regulating proliferation of the intimal cells in the synovium. Consequently, the objective of this study was to determine the role of lubricin in the maintenance of the TMJ. We found that mice lacking lubricin have a normal TMJ at birth, but develop degeneration resembling TMJ osteoarthritis by 2 months, increasing in severity over time. Disease progression in Prg4-/- mice results in synovial hyperplasia, deterioration of cartilage in the condyle, disc and fossa with an increase in chondrocyte number and their redistribution in clusters with loss of superficial zone chondrocytes. All articular surfaces of the joint had a prominent layer of protein deposition. Compared to the knee joint, the osteoarthritis-like phenotype was more severe and manifested earlier in the TMJ. Taken together, the lack of lubricin in the TMJ causes osteoarthritis-like degeneration that affects the articular cartilage as well as the integrity of multiple joint tissues. Our results provide the first molecular evidence of the role of lubricin in the TMJ and suggest that Prg4-/- mice might provide a valuable new animal model for the study of the early events of TMJ osteoarthritis.

  18. Absence of the articular disc in the tasmanian devil temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Sugisaki, M; Kino, K; Ishikawa, T; Sugisaki, M; Abe, S

    2013-12-01

    The articular disc of the temporomandibular joint is a constant structure in mammals. According to Parsons' report in 1900, however, it is absent in four animals: the armadillo, two kinds of monotremes and the Tasmanian devil. Thereafter, no research was performed to confirm this observation. The aim of this study was to determine by anatomical and histological examination whether the Tasmanian devil has an articular disc in its temporomandibular joint. Six fresh frozen corpses and one dry skull of Tasmanian devils were obtained from the School of Zoology, University of Tasmania. The corpses were dissected and the morphology of the temporomandibular joint was carefully observed by gross anatomical and histological examination. The structure of the temporomandibular joint of the dry skull was examined macroscopically and by micro-computed tomography. In all cases, absence of the articular disc in the Tasmanian devil temporomandibular joint was morphologically confirmed. The surface layer of both the condyle and the glenoid fossa comprised a thick fibrous tissue. Micro-computed tomography revealed dense and fine trabecular bone in the condyle. The thick fibrous tissue covering the condyle and high-density trabecular bone in the condyle might play a role in absorption against powerful mastication and heavy loading of the Tasmanian devil temporomandibular joint. PMID:23438215

  19. Change of Range of Motion of the Temporomandibular Joint after Correction of Mild Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yongnam; Bae, Youngsook

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to verify the change in range of motion of the temporomandibular joint on correction of scoliosis. [Subjects and Methods] This study examined 31 male and female participants in their 20s and 30s with a spinal curve degree of 10° or greater. The subjects performed therapeutic exercise based on the pilates exercise system, which is known to be effective in mitigating the spinal curve for patients with scoliosis. All participants completed an 8-week therapeutic exercise regimen to alleviate the scoliosis in which exercise was performed, the exercise was done three times a week for 8 weeks and each session lasted 60 minutes. Among them, 19 participants were selected as an experiment group, whose symptoms were mitigated significantly, and 12 participants who did not undergo the exercise were identified as a control group. All subject was assessed for spinal curve degree, apparent leg length discrepancy, and deviation and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint before and after the study. [Results] In the experimental group, the apparent leg length discrepancy and the deviation of the temporomandibular joint were significantly decreased after the exercise, and the ROM in the temporomandibular joint was significantly increased. In intergroup comparisons, all variables showed a significant difference. [Conclusion] The findings suggest that as the spinal curve degree decreases significantly, the range of motion and deviation in the temporomandibular joint showed a significant change, indicating that mild scoliosis may be a negative factor affecting the deviation and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint. PMID:25202172

  20. Change of range of motion of the temporomandibular joint after correction of mild scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Yongnam; Bae, Youngsook

    2014-08-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to verify the change in range of motion of the temporomandibular joint on correction of scoliosis. [Subjects and Methods] This study examined 31 male and female participants in their 20s and 30s with a spinal curve degree of 10° or greater. The subjects performed therapeutic exercise based on the pilates exercise system, which is known to be effective in mitigating the spinal curve for patients with scoliosis. All participants completed an 8-week therapeutic exercise regimen to alleviate the scoliosis in which exercise was performed, the exercise was done three times a week for 8 weeks and each session lasted 60 minutes. Among them, 19 participants were selected as an experiment group, whose symptoms were mitigated significantly, and 12 participants who did not undergo the exercise were identified as a control group. All subject was assessed for spinal curve degree, apparent leg length discrepancy, and deviation and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint before and after the study. [Results] In the experimental group, the apparent leg length discrepancy and the deviation of the temporomandibular joint were significantly decreased after the exercise, and the ROM in the temporomandibular joint was significantly increased. In intergroup comparisons, all variables showed a significant difference. [Conclusion] The findings suggest that as the spinal curve degree decreases significantly, the range of motion and deviation in the temporomandibular joint showed a significant change, indicating that mild scoliosis may be a negative factor affecting the deviation and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint. PMID:25202172

  1. [Aseptic necrosis of the temporomandibular joint in systemic lupus erythematosus].

    PubMed

    Grinin, V M; Maksimovskiĭ, Iu M; Nasonova, V A

    1999-01-01

    A total of 285 patients with verified systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were examined. They complained of painful temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) and/or limited mobility of the mandible. Eight patients with chronic arthritis of the TMJ and a shortened (by 3-4 mm) mandibular branch were detected. In 4 female patients aged 25-38 with SLE lasting for about 5.5 years, unilateral signs of myoarticular dysfunction of the TMJ, flattening and decrease of the articular head without erosion and destruction, subcortical round foci with uneven internal contours were found in the central or median part of the head, with the compact bone above the foci thinned and the articular surface flattened; this prompted us to regard these changes as avascular necrosis (AN) of the joint. Shortening of the mandibular branch was caused by deformation of the neck of the articular process and its declination backwards. The detected changes in the TMJ were not accompanied by involvement of other joints. All these 4 patients with SLE and TMJ AN suffered from cerebropathy with epileptic attacks (frequent in 2 patients), Raynaud's syndrome, and bright capillaries of the palms and soles; 2 patients developed clinical picture of the antiphospholipid syndrome. Computer tomography and magnetic resonance findings validating the development of TMJ AN in?

  2. Outcomes of temporomandibular joint arthroscopy in patients with painful but otherwise normal joints.

    PubMed

    Dimitroulis, George

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this retrospective clinical study was to assess the clinical outcomes of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthroscopy in patients who presented with category 1 normal joints. The null hypothesis being tested was that patients with normal joints do not respond to TMJ arthroscopy. The clinical records of 116 patients who had undergone TMJ arthroscopy by the author from 2010 to 2013 were retrieved and individually analysed for inclusion in this retrospective, cohort clinical study. The inclusion criteria used to select patients for this study were those who had arthroscopically proven category 1 normal joints, free of intra-articular pathology. Of the 14 patients who were found to have normal joints, only 10 could be contacted for a follow-up survey. Despite the fact that all patients were informed that no joint pathology was found, six out of the 10 patients reported improvement in their temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms that lasted for more than 6 months following TMJ arthroscopy. The results of this investigation indicate that we can reject the null hypothesis, and that patients with normal TMJs do indeed respond to TMJ arthroscopy. What this limited study has highlighted is the pervasive effects of the placebo that all surgeons need to keep in mind when formulating treatment plans for patients with TMD.

  3. Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis and crystal deposition diseases: a study of crystals in synovial fluid lavages in osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints.

    PubMed

    Dijkgraaf, L C; Liem, R S; de Bont, L G

    1998-08-01

    To study the presence of crystals in synovial fluid lavages of osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints (TMJs), in order to evaluate the possible role of these crystals in the osteoarthritic (OA) process, synovial fluid lavage samples of the upper joint compartment from 44 TMJs were obtained prior to arthroscopy. The OA group consisted of 32 TMJs. The control group consisted of 12 TMJs that had been diagnosed with other nonosteoarthritic conditions. The lavage samples were analysed as wet preparations, unstained and stained, with ordinary light, polarized light and compensated polarized light for the presence of crystals and white blood cells. One sample was prepared for subsequent electron microscopic (EM) examination. Synovial fluid lavage analysis of osteoarthritic TMJs did not show any monosodium urate monohydrate or calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals. However, in three lavages, particles which possibly contained calcium were identified with alizarin red S staining. White blood cells were occasionally seen. Synovial fluid analysis of the lavages of the control TMJs did not reveal any crystals. EM examination of synovial fluid lavage from an osteoarthritic TMJ failed to clearly show crystal formation. Concurrence of TMJ crystal deposition and OA appears less prominent than in other synovial joints. We conclude that crystals probably do not play an important role in TMJ OA. PMID:9698172

  4. Synovial fluid dynamics with small disc perforation in temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Zhan, J; Zheng, Y; Han, Y; Zhang, Z; Xi, Y; Zhu, P

    2012-10-01

    The articular disc plays an important role as a stress absorber in joint movement, resulting in stress reduction and redistribution in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The flow of synovial fluid in the TMJ may follow a regular pattern during movement of the jaw. We hypothesised that the regular pattern is disrupted when the TMJ disc is perforated. By computed tomography arthrography, we studied the upper TMJ compartment in patients with small disc perforation during jaw opening-closing at positions from 0 to 3 cm. Finite element fluid dynamic modelling was accomplished to analyse the pattern of fluid flow and pressure distribution during the movements. The results showed that the fluid flow in the upper compartment generally formed an anticlockwise circulation but with local vortexes with the jaw opening up to 2 cm. However, when the jaw opening-closing reached 3 cm, an abnormal flow field and the fluid pressure change associated with the perforation may increase the risk of perforation expansion or rupture and is unfavourable for self-repair of the perforated disc. PMID:22582815

  5. Calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Vasisht; Wensel, Andrew; Dutcher, Paul; Newlands, Shawn; Johnson, Mahlon; Vates, George Edward

    2012-10-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPDD, tophaceous pseudogout) is a rare crystal arthropathy characterized by calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition in joint spaces, episodes of synovitis, and radiological features of chondrocalcinosis. We present a case of 61-year-old woman who presented with left temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain, difficulty chewing, left facial numbness, left-sided hearing loss, and left TMJ swelling. Imaging of the temporal fossa revealed a large mass emanating from the temporal bone at the TMJ, extending into the greater wing of the sphenoid and involving the mastoid bone and air cells posteriorly. Fine needle aspiration demonstrated polarizable crystals with giant cells. Intraoperatively, the TMJ was completely eroded by the mass. Final pathology was consistent with tophaceous pseudogout. CPDD has rarely been reported involving the skull base. None of the cases originally described by McCarty had TMJ pseudogout. Symptoms are generally pain, swelling, and hearing loss. Management is nearly always surgical with many patients achieving symptomatic relief with resection. CPDD is associated with many medical problems (including renal failure, gout, and hyperparathyroidism), but our patient had none of these risk factors. This case demonstrates that CPDD can involve the skull base and is best treated with skull base surgical techniques.

  6. Gene Mutations Associated with Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sangani, Dhruvee; Suzuki, Akiko; VonVille, Helena; Hixson, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a bilateral synovial joint between the mandible and the temporal bone of the skull. TMJ disorders (TMDs) are a set of complicated and poorly understood clinical conditions, in which TMDs are associated with a number of symptoms including pain and limited jaw movement. The increasing scientific evidence suggests that genetic factors play a significant role in the pathology of TMDs. However, the underlying mechanism of TMDs remains largely unknown. Objective The study aimed to determine the associated genes to TMDs in humans and animals. Methods The literature search was conducted through databases including Medline (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), and PubMed (NLM) by using scientific terms for TMDs and genetics in March 2015. Additional studies were identified by searching bibliographies of highly relevant articles and Scopus (Elsevier). Results Our systematic analyses identified 31 articles through literature searches. A total of 112 genes were identified to be significantly and specifically associated with TMDs. Conclusion Our systematic review provides a list of accurate genes associated with TMDs and suggests a genetic contribution to the pathology of TMDs. PMID:27695703

  7. Effect of methotrexate on the temporomandibular joint and facial morphology in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Ince, D O; Ince, A; Moore, T L

    2000-07-01

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is a disease characterized by chronic inflammation in one or more joints; it affects children and adolescents up to 18 years of age. This disease may cause significant skeletal joint destruction, and the temporomandibular joint, like other joints, may become severely affected resulting in aberrant mandibular growth, abnormal dentofacial development, and/or altered orofacial muscle function. Methotrexate is the most common remittive agent used in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis to modify the course of inflammatory destruction of peripheral joints. The purpose of this study was: (1) to evaluate the effect of methotrexate therapy on the prevalence of temporomandibular joint lesions and aberration in craniofacial development in children afflicted with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis; (2) to further examine the relationship between the temporomandibular joint/cephalometric findings and rheumatologic data (ie, age at onset, duration of disease); and (3) to evaluate further pauciarticular- and polyarticular-onset disease in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and the prevalence of temporomandibular joint lesions and facial dysmorphology. The following information was obtained from 45 patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: (1) routine rheumatologic clinical examination data; (2) anamnestic temporomandibular joint evaluation data; (3) clinical temporomandibular joint examination data; (4) lateral cephalometric measurement data; (5) posteroanterior cephalometric measurement data; and (6) individually corrected axial tomographic data. The results demonstrated the following: (1) radiographic evidence of condylar degeneration was apparent in 63% of all patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis with pauciarticular patients showing less temporomandibular involvement than polyarticular patients; (2) polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients receiving methotrexate showed less severe temporomandibular joint involvement than the polyarticular

  8. Condylectomy for temporomandibular joint dysfunction. A survey of seventeen postoperative patients.

    PubMed

    Nelson, C L; Hutton, C E

    1981-04-01

    Seventeen patients were asked to make a subjective evaluation of their condition after having had a mandibular condylectomy performed. Fourteen of seventeen felt that the surgical procedure had cured their symptoms of pain and limitation of motion. Surgical procedures on the temporomandibular joint are valid when there is organic disease of the temporomandibular joint. However, care must be taken to differentiate between organic disease and the so-called myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome, since surgery is considered inappropriate for the myofascial pain dysfunction syndrome. Even in cases of organic joint disease, care must be taken to identify any existing emotional problems that the patient may have. In cases of organic joint disease with strong psychological overtones, surgical intervention alone may not be enough to relieve the patients of their temporomandibular joint symptoms. PMID:6940070

  9. Immunolocalization and expression of lubricin in the bilaminar zone of the human temporomandibular joint disc.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Rosalia; Rusu, Mugurel Constantin; Loreto, Federico; Loreto, Carla; Musumeci, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Lubricin, which is a boundary joint lubricant, was investigated immunohistochemically in the bilaminar zone (BZ) of the human temporomandibular joint (TMJ), without any degenerative changes. Immunohistochemistry for lubricin detection was carried out on 33 TMJ discs obtained from 17 cadavers. Sections were incubated with diluted rabbit polyclonal anti-lubricin antibody and scored according to the percentage of lubricin immunopositive cells. Three different TMJ disc tissue compartments were analyzed, namely: the upper lamina, the inferior lamina and the loose connective tissue in the space between the laminae. The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare protein expression (lubricin) among disc specimens' regions. Staining was noted within the TMJ disc cell populations in every disc tissue sample, with almost every cell immunolabeled by the lubricin antibody. The number of disc cells immunolabeled was almost the same in the 3 bilaminar zone regions. Positive extracellular matrix staining was also seen. The results of the present study suggest that lubricin is expressed in the TMJ disc bilaminar zone. Lubricin may have a role in normal disc posterior attachment physiology through the prevention of cellular adhesion as well as providing lubrication during normal bilaminar zone function.

  10. Personality disorders and regulative styles of patients with temporo-mandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Baggi, L; Rubino, I A; Zanna, V; Martignoni, M

    1995-02-01

    A sample of 42 women patients with Temporo-mandibular Joint Pain Dysfunction Syndrome was given the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II and the Serial Color-Word Test. Compared with sex- and age-matched nonclinical controls, temporo-mandibular patients had significantly (1) higher scores on the Obsessive-Compulsive scale, (2) lower scores of ITa (a pattern concerned with initial times of response), and (3) higher scores of R (linear increase in reading times during the trials). The latter intergroup difference concerned mainly the first subtest, i.e., temporo-mandibular patients were characterized by higher scores of R from the very beginning of the process of adaptation.

  11. Effects of enzymatic degradation after loading in temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Asakawa-Tanne, Y; Su, S; Kunimatsu, R; Hirose, N; Mitsuyoshi, T; Okamoto, Y; Tanaka, E; Tanne, K; Tanimoto, K

    2015-02-01

    Synovial fluid of the joint decreases friction between the cartilage surfaces and reduces cartilage wear during articulation. Characteristic changes of synovial fluid have been shown in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). OA is generally considered to be induced by excessive mechanical stress. However, whether the changes in synovial fluid precede the mechanical overloading or vice versa remains unclear. In the present study, our purpose was to examine if the breakdown of joint lubrication affects the frictional properties of mandibular condylar cartilage and leads to subsequent degenerative changes in TMJ. We measured the frictional coefficient in porcine TMJ by a pendulum device after digestion with hyaluronidase (HAase) or trypsin. Gene expressions of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), type II collagen, and histology were examined after prolonged cyclic loading by an active pendulum system. The results showed that the frictional coefficient increased significantly after HAase (35%) or trypsin (74%) treatment. Gene expression of IL-1β, COX-2, and MMPs-1, -3, and -9 increased significantly in enzyme-treated TMJs after cyclic loading. The increase in the trypsin-treated group was greater than that in the HAase-treated group. Type II collagen expression was reduced in both enzyme-treated groups. Histology revealed surface fibrillation and increased MMP-1 in the trypsin-treated group, as well as increased IL-1β in both enzyme-treated groups after cyclic loading. The findings demonstrated that the compromised lubrication in TMJ is associated with altered frictional properties and surface wear of condylar cartilage, accompanied by release of pro-inflammatory and matrix degradation mediators under mechanical loading.

  12. Effects of Enzymatic Degradation after Loading in Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Asakawa-Tanne, Y.; Su, S.; Kunimatsu, R.; Hirose, N.; Mitsuyoshi, T.; Okamoto, Y.; Tanaka, E.; Tanne, K.

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fluid of the joint decreases friction between the cartilage surfaces and reduces cartilage wear during articulation. Characteristic changes of synovial fluid have been shown in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). OA is generally considered to be induced by excessive mechanical stress. However, whether the changes in synovial fluid precede the mechanical overloading or vice versa remains unclear. In the present study, our purpose was to examine if the breakdown of joint lubrication affects the frictional properties of mandibular condylar cartilage and leads to subsequent degenerative changes in TMJ. We measured the frictional coefficient in porcine TMJ by a pendulum device after digestion with hyaluronidase (HAase) or trypsin. Gene expressions of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), type II collagen, and histology were examined after prolonged cyclic loading by an active pendulum system. The results showed that the frictional coefficient increased significantly after HAase (35%) or trypsin (74%) treatment. Gene expression of IL-1β, COX-2, and MMPs-1, -3, and -9 increased significantly in enzyme-treated TMJs after cyclic loading. The increase in the trypsin-treated group was greater than that in the HAase-treated group. Type II collagen expression was reduced in both enzyme-treated groups. Histology revealed surface fibrillation and increased MMP-1 in the trypsin-treated group, as well as increased IL-1β in both enzyme-treated groups after cyclic loading. The findings demonstrated that the compromised lubrication in TMJ is associated with altered frictional properties and surface wear of condylar cartilage, accompanied by release of pro-inflammatory and matrix degradation mediators under mechanical loading. PMID:25503611

  13. Preliminary optical coherence tomography investigation of the temporo-mandibular joint disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mărcăuteanu, Corina; Demjan, Enikö; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Motoc, Adrian; Lighezan, Rodica; Vasile, Liliana; Hughes, Mike; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2010-02-01

    Aim and objectives. The morphology and position of the temporo-mandibular disc are key issues in the diagnosis and treatment of arthrogenous temporo-mandibular disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy are used today to identify: flattening of the pars posterior of the disc, perforation and/or adhesions in the pars intermedia of the disc and disc displacements. The present study proposes the investigation of the temporo-mandibular joint disc by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Material and methods. 8 human temporo-mandibular joint discs were harvested from dead subjects, under 40 year of age, and conserved in formalin. They had a normal morphology, with a thicker pars posterior (2,6 mm on the average) and a thinner pars intermedia (1mm on the average). We investigated the disc samples using two different OCT systems: an en-face OCT (time domain (TD)-OCT) system, working at 1300 nm (C-scan and B-scan mode) and a spectral OCT system (a Fourier domain (FD)-OCT) system , working at 840 nm (B-scan mode). Results. The OCT investigation of the temporo-mandibular joint discs revealed a homogeneous microstructure. The longer wavelength of the TD-OCT offers a higher penetration depth (2,5 mm in air), which is important for the analysis of the pars posterior, while the FD-OCT is much faster. Conclusions: OCT is a promising imaging method for the microstructural characterization of the temporo-mandibular disc.

  14. Incidental findings on MRI of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Makdissi, J; Pawar, R R; Radon, M; Holmes, S B

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of incidental findings in MRI of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Methods: MRI reports of 730 patients were assessed. The reports were analysed by one consultant and one clinical lecturer in dental and maxillofacial radiology. The prevalence of intracranial and extracranial incidental findings was recorded and categorized. Results: There were 53 (7.3%) incidental findings, of which 11 (1.5%) were intracranial and 42 (5.7%) were extracranial (divided into paranasal sinuses, mastoid air cells, muscle hypertrophy, lymphadenopathy and salivary glands). A total number of eight intracranial findings needed further dedicated imaging and/or specialist clinical opinion. Only one tumour (a meningioma) was found and required surgical intervention. Conclusions: Incidental findings on TMJ MRI are rare but not unheard of. The clinical relevance of incidental findings can be significant, and it is therefore important to ensure that the full data set of images is inspected, including any scout slices. A close working relationship between the areas of dental and maxillofacial radiology and neuroradiology is essential in expediting a second opinion relating to intracranial findings. All incidental findings should be communicated to referring clinicians in a timely manner, based on their urgency and clinical significance. PMID:24005059

  15. Occlusal effects on longitudinal bone alterations of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Jiao, K; Zhang, M; Zhou, T; Liu, X-D; Yu, S-B; Lu, L; Jing, L; Yang, T; Zhang, Y; Chen, D; Wang, M-Q

    2013-03-01

    The pathological changes of subchondral bone during osteoarthritis (OA) development in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the longitudinal alterations of subchondral bone using a rat TMJ-OA model developed in our laboratory. Changes in bone mass were examined by micro-CT, and changes in osteoblast and osteoclast activities were analyzed by real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and TRAP staining. Subchondral bone loss was detected from 8 weeks after dental occlusion alteration and reached the maximum at 12 weeks, followed by a repair phase until 32 weeks. Although bone mass increased at late stages, poor mechanical structure and lower bone mineral density (BMD) were found in these rats. The numbers of TRAP-positive cells were increased at 12 weeks, while the numbers of osteocalcin-expressing cells were increased at both 12 and 32 weeks. Levels of mRNA expression of TRAP and cathepsin K were increased at 12 weeks, while levels of ALP and osteocalcin were increased at both 12 and 32 weeks. These findings demonstrated that there is an active bone remodeling in subchondral bone in TMJs in response to alteration in occlusion, although new bone was formed with lower BMD and poor mechanical properties. PMID:23340211

  16. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis contributing to coronoid process hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Wang, W H; Xu, B; Zhang, B J; Lou, H Q

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between coronoid process hyperplasia and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis and to analyze the pathological mechanism and clinical significance of coronoid process hyperplasia. Forty-four patients treated for TMJ ankylosis between January 2007 and December 2014 were studied retrospectively; 176 patients with normal TMJs served as controls. The original DICOM data were used to reconstruct the jaw, and a three-dimensional cephalometric analysis (SimPlant Pro software version 11.04) was performed to assess the association between the severity of TMJ ankylosis and the height of the coronoid process. The height of the coronoid process was 20.41±5.00mm in the case group and 14.86±2.67mm in the control group; there was a significant difference between the two groups (P<0.001). Long-standing TMJ ankylosis contributes to coronoid process hyperplasia. Therefore, attention should be drawn to the coronoid process in patients with TMJ ankylosis. A coronoidectomy together with arthroplasty is recommended in patients with TMJ ankylosis.

  17. [Kinetic radiography and functional analysis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ)].

    PubMed

    Bandai, Natsuko; Sanada, Shigeru; Ueki, Koichiro; Funabasama, Shintaro; Matsui, Takeshi; Tsuduki, Shinji

    2003-03-01

    To develop a method of kinetic radiography and a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system for quantitative evaluation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), dynamic images of the TMJ from one healthy volunteer were obtained by fluoroscopy in the lateral view on the right and left sides. The accumulated image subtraction technique extracted the condyle in each image. A sequential similarity detection algorithm (SSDA) was employed to trace the movement path and the velocity of the condyle. The shape of the path of the right condyle was smoother than that of the left condyle. The size of the maximum vertical and horizontal movements of the condyle were 4.6+/-0.1 mm and 15.0+/-0.2 mm, respectively. The velocity of the movement of the condyle was higher in the area close to the articular eminence than in any other area during the opening and closing of the mouth. This CAD system will contribute to the kinetic analysis of the TMJ for screening, follow-up study, and informed consent, providing speed, quantitation, and cost-effectiveness.

  18. Prevalence of different temporomandibular joint sounds, with emphasis on disc-displacement, in patients with temporomandibular disorders and controls.

    PubMed

    Elfving, Lars; Helkimo, Martti; Magnusson, Tomas

    2002-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) sounds are very common among patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD), but also in non-patient populations. A variety of different causes to TMJ-sounds have been suggested e.g. arthrotic changes in the TMJs, anatomical variations, muscular incoordination and disc displacement. In the present investigation, the prevalence and type of different joint sounds were registered in 125 consecutive patients with suspected TMD and in 125 matched controls. Some kind of joint sound was recorded in 56% of the TMD patients and in 36% of the controls. The awareness of joint sounds was higher among TMD patients as compared to controls (88% and 60% respectively). The most common sound recorded in both groups was reciprocal clickings indicative of a disc displacement, while not one single case fulfilling the criteria for clicking due to a muscular incoordination was found. In the TMD group women with disc displacement reported sleeping on the stomach significantly more often than women without disc displacement did. An increased general joint laxity was found in 39% of the TMD patients with disc displacement, while this was found in only 9% of the patients with disc displacement in the control group. To conclude, disc displacement is probably the most common cause to TMJ sounds, while the existence of TMJ sounds due to a muscular incoordination can be questioned. Furthermore, sleeping on the stomach might be associated with disc displacement, while general joint laxity is probably not a causative factor, but a seeking care factor in patients with disc displacement.

  19. Topical versus systemic diclofenac in the treatment of temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction symptoms.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo Businco, L; Di Rienzo Businco, A; D'Emilia, M; Lauriello, M; Coen Tirelli, G

    2004-10-01

    The most frequent symptom of craniomandibular dysfunction is pain in the preauricular area or in the temporo-mandibular joint, usually localized at the level of the masticatory musculature. Patients sometimes also complain of reflect otalgia, headaches and facial pain. Osteoarthrosis is a frequent degenerative debilitating chronic disorder that can affect the temporomandibular joint. It causes pain and articular rigidity, a reduction in mobility, and radiological alterations are visible in stratigraphy. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of a topically applied non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug that has recently become commercially available (diclofenac sodium in a patented carrier containing dimethyl sulfoxide, that favours transcutaneous absorption) which is commonly used to alleviate pain in knee or elbow joints, versus oral diclofenac, in the treatment of symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint was diagnosed in 36 adult patients. The patients were randomized in two age- and gender -matched groups. Group A (18 patients) received oral diclofenac sodium administered after a meal in 50-mg tablets twice a day for 14 days. Group B (18 patients) received 16 mg/ml topical diclofenac (diclofenac topical solution, 10 drops 4 times a day for 14 days). All patients completed a questionnaire at the start and end of therapy. Patients were asked to quantify on a graded visual analogue scale and to reply to questions about the pain and tenderness of the temporomandibular joint and the functional limitation of mouth opening. Patients were also requested to report side-effects of the treatment. All patients showed relief from pain after treatment: the difference between the two groups was not significant (p > 0.05). Post-treatment, 16 patients of group A had epigastralgic symptoms. Three patients treated with topical diclofenac showed a modest irritation of the temporomandibular joint region, and disappeared

  20. [Inferior hemiarthroplasty of the temporo-mandibular joint with articulated condylar prosthesis type Stryker].

    PubMed

    Bucur, A; Dincă, O; Totan, C; Ghită, V

    2007-01-01

    The optimal reconstruction of the mandible and of the temporo-mandibular joint after mandibular hemi-resection with disarticulation is still controversial in literature. This paperwork presents our experience on four cases in the reconstruction of the mandible together with the inferior arthroplasty of the temporo-mandibular joint, after the resection of extended benign tumors of the mandible, based on fibular free vascularized grafts having attached a Stryker titanium condylar prosthesis reconstructing the inferior segment of the temporo-mandibular joint. Our results for the this technique were excellent, with a functional rehabilitation very close to normal. After reviewing the various techniques and their arguments in literature, with accent on the TMJ reconstruction, we consider this method to be optimal for the reconstruction of mandibular defects in patients with neoplastic conditions.

  1. Static and dynamic mechanics of the temporomandibular joint: plowing forces, joint load and tissue stress.

    PubMed

    Nickel, J; Spilker, R; Iwasaki, L; Gonzalez, Y; McCall, W D; Ohrbach, R; Beatty, M W; Marx, D

    2009-08-01

    OBJECTIVES - To determine the combined effects 1) of stress-field aspect ratio and velocity and compressive strain and 2) joint load, on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc mechanics. SETTING AND SAMPLE POPULATION - Fifty-two subjects (30 female; 22 male) participated in the TMJ load experiments. MATERIAL AND METHODS - In the absence of human tissue, pig TMJ discs were used to determine the effects of variables 1) on surface plowing forces, and to build a biphasic finite element model (bFEM) to test the effect of human joint loads and 2) on tissue stresses. In the laboratory, discs received a 7.6 N static load via an acrylic indenter before cyclic movement. Data were recorded and analysed using anova. To determine human joint loads, Research Diagnostic Criteria calibrated investigators classified subjects based on signs of disc displacement (DD) and pain (+DD/+pain, n = 18; +DD/-pain, n = 17; -DD/-pain, n = 17). Three-dimensional geometries were produced for each subject and used in a computer model to calculate joint loads. RESULTS - The combined effects of compressive strain, and aspect ratio and velocity of stress-field translation correlated with plowing forces (R(2) = 0.85). +DD/-pain subjects produced 60% higher joint loads (ANOVA, p < 0.05), which increased bFEM-calculated compressive strain and peak total normal stress. CONCLUSIONS - Static and dynamic variables of the stress-field and subject-dependent joint load significantly affect disc mechanics.

  2. Neocartilage integration in temporomandibular joint discs: physical and enzymatic methods

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Meghan K.; Arzi, Boaz; Prouty, Shannon M.; Hu, Jerry C.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2015-01-01

    Integration of engineered musculoskeletal tissues with adjacent native tissues presents a significant challenge to the field. Specifically, the avascularity and low cellularity of cartilage elicit the need for additional efforts in improving integration of neocartilage within native cartilage. Self-assembled neocartilage holds significant potential in replacing degenerated cartilage, though its stabilization and integration in native cartilage require further efforts. Physical and enzymatic stabilization methods were investigated in an in vitro model for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc degeneration. First, in phase 1, suture, glue and press-fit constructs were compared in TMJ disc intermediate zone defects. In phase 1, suturing enhanced interfacial shear stiffness and strength immediately; after four weeks, a 15-fold increase in stiffness and a ninefold increase in strength persisted over press-fit. Neither suture nor glue significantly altered neocartilage properties. In phase 2, the effects of the enzymatic stabilization regimen composed of lysyl oxidase, CuSO4 and hydroxylysine were investigated. A full factorial design was employed, carrying forward the best physical method from phase 1, suturing. Enzymatic stabilization significantly increased interfacial shear stiffness after eight weeks. Combined enzymatic stabilization and suturing led to a fourfold increase in shear stiffness and threefold increase in strength over press-fit. Histological analysis confirmed the presence of a collagen-rich interface. Enzymatic treatment additionally enhanced neocartilage mechanical properties, yielding a tensile modulus over 6 MPa and compressive instantaneous modulus over 1200 kPa at eight weeks. Suturing enhances stabilization of neocartilage, and enzymatic treatment enhances functional properties and integration of neocartilage in the TMJ disc. Methods developed here are applicable to other orthopaedic soft tissues, including knee meniscus and hyaline articular

  3. Angioarchitecture and morphology of temporomandibular joint of Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Minucci, Matheus Silvestre; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; Yokoyama, Fernando Yukio; Dias, Fernando José; Iyomasa, Daniela Mizusaki; Guimarães, Elaine Aparecida Del-Bel Belluz; Watanabe, Ii-Sei; Iyomasa, Mamie Mizusaki

    2016-09-01

    The opossum Monodelphis domestica presents movement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) reflecting adaptation to eating habits similar to movement in humans, but the structure of the TMJ is not yet known. Thus, nine young M. domestica, of both sexes were weighed, anesthetized with xylazine (10 mg kg(-1) ), and ketamine (70 mg kg(-1) ) and processed for: 1. The analyses of the macroscopic angioarchitecture after latex injection, as well as the topography of the TMJ; 2. The analysis of microvascularization after injection of Mercox resin and corrosion of soft tissue with NaOH using scanning electron microscopy and; 3. The histological evaluation of the TMJ with an optical microscope. Macroscopic analysis of the latex injected vessels revealed the distribution of the arteries from the common carotid artery, receiving branches of the superficial temporal and maxillary arteries. The mandibular condyle has the long axis in the lateral-lateral direction, and is convex in the anterior-posterior direction. Its topography was determined in relation to the eye and external acoustic meatus. With scanning electron microscopy, microvascularization consists of arterioles of varying diameter (85-15 µm) of the meandering capillary network in the retrodiscal region, and a network of straight capillaries in the TMJ anterior region. Via light microscopy the TMJ has similar histological features to those of humans. These macroscopic, microscopic and ultrastructural data from TMJ of the M. domestica could be a suitable model for TMJ physiology and pathophysiology studies for then speculate on possible human studies. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:806-813, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27324400

  4. Effects of growth factors on temporomandibular joint disc cells.

    PubMed

    Detamore, Michael S; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2004-07-01

    The effects of growth factors on cartilaginous tissues are well documented. An exception is the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc, where data for growth factor effects on proliferation and biosynthesis are very limited. The purpose of this study was to quantify proliferation of and synthesis by TMJ disc cells cultured in monolayer with either platelet derived growth factor-AB (PDGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF), at either a low (10 ng/ml) or high (100 ng/ml) concentration. Proliferation was assessed with a DNA quantitation technique, collagen synthesis was measured via a hydroxyproline assay, and GAG synthesis was determined with a dimethylmethylene blue dye binding assay at 14 days. Overall, the most beneficial growth factor was bFGF, which was most potent in increasing proliferation and GAG synthesis, and also effective in promoting collagen synthesis. At the high concentration, bFGF resulted in 96% more cells than the control and 30 to 45% more cells than PDGF and IGF. PDGF and bFGF were the most potent upregulators of GAG synthesis, producing 2-3 times more GAG than the control. IGF had no significant effect on GAG production, although at its higher concentration it increased collagen production by 4.5 times over the control. Collagen synthesis was promoted by bFGF at its lower concentration, with levels 4.2 times higher than the control, whereas PDGF had no significant effect on collagen production. In general, higher concentrations increased proliferation, whereas lower concentrations favoured biosynthesis. PMID:15126139

  5. 3D superimposition and understanding temporomandibular joint arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, LHS; Gomes, LR; Jung, BT; Gomes, MR; Ruellas, ACO; Goncalves, JR; Schilling, J; Styner, M; Nguyen, T; Kapila, S; Paniagua, B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the 3D morphological variations in 169 Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) condyles, using novel imaging statistical modeling approaches. Setting and Sample Population The Department of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry at the University of Michigan. Cone beam CT scans were acquired from 69 subjects with long-term TMJ osteoarthritis (OA, mean age 39.1 ± 15.7 years), 15 subjects at initial consult diagnosis of OA (mean age 44.9 ± 14.8 years) and 7 healthy controls (mean age 43 ± 12.4 years). Material & Methods 3D surface models of the condyles were constructed and homologous correspondent points on each model were established. The statistical framework included Direction-Projection-Permutation (DiProPerm) for testing statistical significance of the differences between healthy controls and the OA groups determined by clinical and radiographic diagnoses. Results Condylar morphology in OA and healthy subjects varied widely with categorization from mild to severe bone degeneration or overgrowth. DiProPerm statistics supported a significant difference between the healthy control group and the initial diagnosis of OA group (t=6.6, empirical p-value = 0.006), and between healthy and long term-diagnosis of OA group (t = 7.2, empirical p-value = 0). Compared with healthy controls, the average condyle in OA subjects was significantly smaller in all dimensions, except its anterior surface, even in subjects with initial diagnosis of OA. Conclusion This new statistical modeling of condylar morphology allows the development of more targeted classifications of this condition than previously possible. PMID:25865530

  6. Current status of temporomandibular joint arthroscopy in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sangeetha M; Matthews, N Shaun

    2012-10-01

    In an era during which minimally invasive procedures are increasingly becoming the norm, arthroscopy of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) seems to be infrequently used for diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the TMJ. The reasons for this are not clear. The purpose of this study was to find out the current state of arthroscopy of the TMJ in the UK and, more specifically, how often it is used, the indications for its use, the level of experience of practising surgeons, and the reasons for not using it. Information was gathered between 2009 and 2010 from a postal and e-mail questionnaire to all oral and maxillofacial consultants in the UK. Of the 346 consultants, 215 (60%) responded to the questionnaire. Forty-two said that they currently used arthroscopy of the TMJ, and 33 of those (81%) have more than 5 years' experience. During the past year, a total of 8 consultants nationally have done 20 arthroscopies or more. Thirty-three of the procedures (81%) were done for both diagnosis and treatment. Lack of perceived need of patients and lack of interest in this specialty were the main reasons given for not doing arthroscopy, lack of training being a key secondary reason. The Storz and Olympus systems were the most commonly used within the UK. Results seem to support the opinion that arthroscopy of the TMJ is under-used, and consideration should be given to ensuring that trainees are instructed in its use, which is important in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the TMJ.

  7. Isometric exercises and a simple appliance for temporomandibular joint dysfunction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Santiesteban, A J

    1989-06-01

    This case report presents a treatment approach for a patient with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction signs and symptoms. Temporomandibular joint pain, jaw clicking and locking, and postural abnormalities were treated with gentle isometric (static) exercises, coordination exercises, and an easily fitted and readily available appliance. After treatment, the patient showed reduced TMJ pain, no jaw locking, and improved TMJ mobility. The patient also showed improved postural awareness. The results of treatment and the relatively minor cost of the appliance make the sharing of this case study potentially worthwhile for those clinicians treating patients with TMJ dysfunction. PMID:2727070

  8. The current role and the future of minimally invasive temporomandibular joint surgery.

    PubMed

    González-García, Raúl

    2015-02-01

    Several open surgeries have been proposed for the treatment of internal derangement (ID) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), although minimally invasive temporomandibular joint surgery (MITMJS) plays a major role in the treatment of ID and has been widely used for the treatment of ID of the TMJ. Arthrocentesis, arthroscopic lysis and lavage, and operative or advanced arthroscopy are the 3 most relevant techniques for MITMJS; clear indications for their application and a detailed description of each technique are presented. Also, clinical outcomes for each technique from the most relevant studies in the literature are reported.

  9. [The para-clinic investigation of temporo-mandibular joint changes in patients with acromegaly].

    PubMed

    Morăraşu, C; Burlui, V; Olaru, C; Boza, C; Bortă, C; Morăraşu, G; Brînză, M

    2001-01-01

    The Acromegaly is an endocrinological disease determined by the hypersecretion of STH in a certain period of the body evolution and it causes the hypertrophy of bones in general and of mandible and cranio-facial bones, determining a disorder due to this development of bones, associated with troubles in the activity of muscles and of the phospho-calcium metabolism. This study was made on a group of 33 acromegaly patients. Their temporo-mandibular joint was investigated by ortopantomography, tomography, computer tomography and scintigraphy. All of these exams shows the changes in temporo-mandibular joint due to the cells hyperactivity determined by the hypersecretion of STH. PMID:12092142

  10. [The para-clinic investigation of temporo-mandibular joint changes in patients with acromegaly].

    PubMed

    Morăraşu, C; Burlui, V; Olaru, C; Boza, C; Bortă, C; Morăraşu, G; Brînză, M

    2001-01-01

    The Acromegaly is an endocrinological disease determined by the hypersecretion of STH in a certain period of the body evolution and it causes the hypertrophy of bones in general and of mandible and cranio-facial bones, determining a disorder due to this development of bones, associated with troubles in the activity of muscles and of the phospho-calcium metabolism. This study was made on a group of 33 acromegaly patients. Their temporo-mandibular joint was investigated by ortopantomography, tomography, computer tomography and scintigraphy. All of these exams shows the changes in temporo-mandibular joint due to the cells hyperactivity determined by the hypersecretion of STH.

  11. Use of indomethacin as an adjuvant to surgery for recurrent temporomandibular joint ankylosis in adults

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Krushna; Pandey, Sandeep; Bhutia, Ongkila; Roychoudhury, Ajoy

    2014-01-01

    Two cases with multiple recurrences of temporomandibular joint ankylosis and multiple failed interposition/gap arthroplasty procedures are presented here. Heterotopic bone formation was thought to be the reason. Indomethacin prophylaxis for prevention of heterotopic new bone formation at the osteoarthrectomy site was used as an adjuvant to surgery, in dosages of 75 mg/day for six weeks. Indomethacin is used frequently in hip and elbow arthroplasties to prevent heterotopic ossification, but its use in temporomandibular joint is not routine. The presented cases did not develop further recurrence and attained stable mouth opening over two-year follow-up after osteoarthrectomy and oral indomethacin. PMID:25937735

  12. Psychoeducation Program on Strategies for Coping with Stress in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lack of educational projects in the available literature was an inspiration to develop a psychoeducational program. The objective was to provide patients with basic information on the contribution of stressors in the occurrence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and educate on methods for coping with stress most commonly used in psychology. In the course of three meetings, patients are familiarised with the issue of experienced stress as a potential source of psychosomatic illnesses (in particular, temporomandibular joint dysfunction). Preliminary patients' opinions, expressed through self-report methods, indicate significant usefulness of the developed psychoeducational program for the process of treatment and the quality of patients' lives. PMID:25610871

  13. Management of Temporomandibular Joint Reankylosis in Syndromic Patients Corrected with Joint Prostheses: Surgical and Rehabilitation Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Clauser, Luigi C.; Consorti, Giuseppe; Elia, Giovanni; Tieghi, Riccardo; Galiè, Manlio

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA) is a severe disorder described as an intracapsular union of the disc-condyle complex to the temporal articular surface with bony fusion. The management of this disability is challenging and rarely based on surgical and rehabilitation protocols. We describe the treatment in two young adults affected by Goldenhar syndrome and Pierre Robin sequence with reankylosis after previous surgical treatments. There are three main surgical procedures for the treatment of TMJA: gap arthroplasty, interpositional arthroplasty, and joint reconstruction. Various authors have described reankylosis as a frequent event after treatment. Treatment failure could be associated with surgical errors and/or inadequate intensive postoperative physiotherapy. Surgical treatment should be individually tailored and adequate postoperative physiotherapy protocol is mandatory for success. PMID:24624260

  14. Inferior joint space arthrography of normal temporomandibular joints: Reassessment of diagnostic criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, P.A.; Tu, H.K.; Sleder, P.R.; Lydiatt, D.D.; Laney, T.J.

    1986-06-01

    Inferior joint space arthrograms of the temporomandibular joints of 31 healthy volunteers (62 joints) were obtained to determine normal arthrographic findings. The superior margin of the anterior recess was smooth and flat in 68% of the joints and concave in 32% with the subjects' mouths closed. The concavity was the result of the anterior ridge of the meniscus impinging on the contrast material. The concave impression could be distinguished easily from an anteriorly displaced meniscus on videotaped studies, which demonstrated a smooth transition of contrast material from the anterior to the posterior recess during opening of a subject's mouth. With the mouth open, the anterior recess decreased in size, appearing as a small, crescent-shaped collection of contrast material anterior to the head of the condyle in 52 joints (84%); it remained large in ten joints (16%) at maximal mouth opening. The configuration of the posterior recess was identical to that described previously; however, with the subjects' mouths closed, it was larger than the anterior recess, contrary to most previously reported results.

  15. Protocol for concomitant temporomandibular joint custom-fitted total joint reconstruction and orthognathic surgery using computer-assisted surgical simulation.

    PubMed

    Movahed, Reza; Wolford, Larry M

    2015-02-01

    Combined orthognathic and total joint reconstruction cases can be predictably performed in 1 stage. Use of virtual surgical planning can eliminate a significant time requirement in preparation of concomitant orthognathic and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) prostheses cases. The concomitant TMJ and orthognathic surgery-computer-assisted surgical simulation technique increases the accuracy of combined cases. In order to have flexibility in positioning of the total joint prosthesis, recontouring of the lateral aspect of the rami is advantageous.

  16. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis overview and involvement of the temporomandibular joint: prevalence, systemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Ruy

    2015-02-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is one of the many joints involved in the inflammatory arthritides. As imaging of joints has developed, so have the data regarding extent and prevalence of TMJ involvement in these diseases. TMJ disease is especially prevalent in juvenile arthritis. The adult and pediatric inflammatory arthritides share common pathophysiology but are still markedly different. The preponderance of TMJ arthritis research exists in juvenile arthritis. This article discusses classification, treatment, and TMJ involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  17. A case of chronic calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal disease (tophaceous pseudogout) in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Meul, B; Ernestus, K; Neugebauer, J; Kuebler, A C

    2005-03-01

    Pseudogout is a rare joint disease which is characterized by the presence of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals in the intraarticular and periarticular tissue. The crystals tend to attach to fibrocartilage tissue. Pseudogout principally affects the knee and wrist joints. Involvement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very rare. There have been <20 cases reported world-wide. Both acute and chronic manifestations have been described. We present here an unusual case that necessitated a high condylectomy.

  18. Gait changes after using a temporomandibular joint exerciser in patients who underwent lower limb joint surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Gu-Young; Choi, Geun-Seok; Shin, Ki-Young; Park, Joon-Soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The improvements in gait of the patients with lower limb disease who used a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) exerciser were verified. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven subjects were included. Their mean age was 53.2 years. The lower limb joint angles before and after using the TMJ exerciser were measured using a gait analyzer. Before the gait experiment, the TMJ exerciser setting process and one-leg stance balance test (OLST) were repeated until the balance maintenance time improved. [Results] Because of the OLST, the mean change in the body center point after the subjects used the exerciser improved from 5.76 mm to 4.20 mm. When the TMJ exerciser was used, the joint angle range of the subjects approached that of the normal individuals. [Conclusion] According to the gait experiments, the angles of the subjects’ hips, knees, and ankle joints approached to those of the normal individuals after the subjects used the TMJ exerciser; however, the results did not completely match. The changes in the hip, knee, and ankle joint angles were statistically significant, which confirm the usefulness of the TMJ exerciser. PMID:27313377

  19. Dental and Temporomandibular Joint Pathology of the Walrus (Odobenus rosmarus).

    PubMed

    Winer, J N; Arzi, B; Leale, D M; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2016-01-01

    Maxillae and/or mandibles from 76 walruses (Odobenus rosmarus) were examined macroscopically according to predefined criteria. The museum specimens were acquired between 1932 and 2014. Forty-five specimens (59.2%) were from male animals, 29 (38.2%) from female animals and two (2.6%) from animals of unknown sex, with 58 adults (76.3%) and 18 young adults (23.7%) included in this study. The number of teeth available for examination was 830 (33.6%); 18.5% of teeth were absent artefactually, 3.3% were deemed to be absent due to acquired tooth loss and 44.5% were absent congenitally. The theoretical complete dental formula was confirmed to be I 3/3, C 1/1, P 4/3, M 2/2, while the most probable dental formula is I 1/0, C 1/1, P 3/3, M 0/0; none of the specimens in this study possessed a full complement of theoretically possible teeth. The majority of teeth were normal in morphology; only five teeth (0.6% of available teeth) were malformed. Only one tooth had an aberrant number of roots and only one supernumerary tooth was encountered. No persistent deciduous teeth were found in any of the young adult or adult specimens, nor were any specimens affected by enamel hypoplasia. The majority of teeth (85.5%) displayed attrition/abrasion. Of the adult and young adult specimens, 90.8% showed some degree of attrition/abrasion on at least one tooth. Tooth fractures were noted in eight walruses, affecting 10.5% of specimens and 1.3% of the total number of teeth, nearly three-quarters of which were maxillary canine teeth (tusks). Three specimens (3.9%), all adult males, displayed overt periapical disease. The majority (99.2%) of dental alveoli did not have bony changes indicative of periodontitis, with only five specimens (6.6%) affected by periodontitis. Lesions consistent with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) were found in 46 specimens (60.5%) and TMJ-OA was significantly more common in adults than young adults and males than females. Although the clinical

  20. Septic Arthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint--Unusual Presentations.

    PubMed

    Lohiya, Sapna; Dillon, Jasjit

    2016-01-01

    This report describes 2 patients whose septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (SATMJ) presented atypically, resulting in treatment delay and complications. A 49-year-old man developed left-side facial allodynia, which was first treated unsuccessfully as trigeminal neuralgia. On day 21, the patient sustained facial trauma from a fall and presented to the emergency department (ED). Maxillofacial contrast-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scan was suggestive of parotiditis, SATMJ, or hemarthrosis. His condition did not improve with empiric antibiotic treatment. On day 30, contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed SATMJ. Incision and drainage yielded 6 mL of pus and produced clinical improvement. Cultures grew methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, which was treated with amoxicillin plus clavulanate and sulfamethoxazole plus trimethoprim for 30 days. On day 59, the patient still had slight preauricular pain and CT-proved TMJ osteoarthritic changes. A 56-year-old woman developed right-side facial pain after a crown procedure on her right mandibular second molar. Oral prednisone (and clindamycin) produced partial relief. Her primary physician suspected temporal arteritis, but its biopsy result on day 11 was normal. Gradually, the patient developed trismus and malocclusion refractory to various medicines. On day 49, she presented to the ED. A contrast-enhanced maxillofacial CT scan suggested SATMJ. Incision and drainage yielded 30 mL of pus and produced clinical improvement. During days 50 to 57, the patient received intravenous ampicillin plus sulbactam and metronidazole. However, preauricular tenderness and drainage from the surgical incision persisted. On day 55, CT scan showed a residual abscess. Secondary debridement yielded 5 mL of pus. Culture grew coagulase-negative S aureus. On day 141, the patient still had slight preauricular pain and TMJ osteoarthritic changes on MRI. In these cases, the SATMJ diagnosis was delayed owing

  1. Dental and Temporomandibular Joint Pathology of the Walrus (Odobenus rosmarus).

    PubMed

    Winer, J N; Arzi, B; Leale, D M; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2016-01-01

    Maxillae and/or mandibles from 76 walruses (Odobenus rosmarus) were examined macroscopically according to predefined criteria. The museum specimens were acquired between 1932 and 2014. Forty-five specimens (59.2%) were from male animals, 29 (38.2%) from female animals and two (2.6%) from animals of unknown sex, with 58 adults (76.3%) and 18 young adults (23.7%) included in this study. The number of teeth available for examination was 830 (33.6%); 18.5% of teeth were absent artefactually, 3.3% were deemed to be absent due to acquired tooth loss and 44.5% were absent congenitally. The theoretical complete dental formula was confirmed to be I 3/3, C 1/1, P 4/3, M 2/2, while the most probable dental formula is I 1/0, C 1/1, P 3/3, M 0/0; none of the specimens in this study possessed a full complement of theoretically possible teeth. The majority of teeth were normal in morphology; only five teeth (0.6% of available teeth) were malformed. Only one tooth had an aberrant number of roots and only one supernumerary tooth was encountered. No persistent deciduous teeth were found in any of the young adult or adult specimens, nor were any specimens affected by enamel hypoplasia. The majority of teeth (85.5%) displayed attrition/abrasion. Of the adult and young adult specimens, 90.8% showed some degree of attrition/abrasion on at least one tooth. Tooth fractures were noted in eight walruses, affecting 10.5% of specimens and 1.3% of the total number of teeth, nearly three-quarters of which were maxillary canine teeth (tusks). Three specimens (3.9%), all adult males, displayed overt periapical disease. The majority (99.2%) of dental alveoli did not have bony changes indicative of periodontitis, with only five specimens (6.6%) affected by periodontitis. Lesions consistent with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) were found in 46 specimens (60.5%) and TMJ-OA was significantly more common in adults than young adults and males than females. Although the clinical

  2. Biofeedback and Relaxation Therapy for Chronic Temporomandibular Joint Pain: Predicting Successful Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funch, Donna P.; Gale, Elliot N.

    1984-01-01

    Randomly assigned 57 patients with chronic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain to receive either relaxation or biofeedback therapy. Successful patients in the relaxation condition tended to be younger and had experienced TMJ pain for a shorter period of time than the successful biofeedback patients. (BH)

  3. Conservative treatment of temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis: intra-articular injection of sodium hyaluronate.

    PubMed

    Guarda-Nardini, L; Masiero, S; Marioni, G

    2005-10-01

    Promising short-term results in the treatment of temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis with intra-articular injections of sodium hyaluronate (SH) have been reported in preliminary studies. The present prospective study compared long-term outcomes of temporomandibular joint SH injections with those of a conventional non-surgical treatment (bite-plane). Data from three groups of 20 patients with degenerative temporomandibular joint disease were considered. Group A underwent one cycle of five injections of 1 mL SH. Group B underwent a bite-plane treatment for at least 6 months. We considered a control group of 20 patients who refused any treatments. The description of the outcomes was based on objective and subjective parameters after a 6-month follow-up. Sodium hyaluronate and bite-plane treatments significantly improved patients conditions in all considered parameters. No significant differences in outcomes were confirmed by the statistical analysis. The tolerability of SH treatment resulted to be significantly higher. The analysis of results of serial controls in the SH treated group disclosed a significant worsening in pain at rest by comparing 1 and 6 months follow-up. Sodium hyaluronate infiltration resulted a valid non-surgical treatment for temporomandibular joint degenerative disease. Five well-tolerated intra-articular SH injections achieved equivalent results to those of a 6 months bite-plane treatment. We did not diagnose any complications of SH intra-articular injections. Longer time follow-up is necessary to determine the stability of SH properties.

  4. Dislocation of temporo-mandibular joint - an uncommon circumstance of occurrence: vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    El Bouazzaoui, Abderrahim; Labib, Smael; Derkaoui, Ali; Adnane Berdai, Mohammed; Bendadi, Azzeddine; Harandou, Mustapha

    2010-06-25

    Dislocation of temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) is an infrequent disease but still spectacular. This disease consists of a permanent, to some extent complete disruption of the temporo-mandibular joint. These dislocations often occur in a context of yawning, and less frequently after a burst of laughing or relatively mild facial trauma (slap, punch on the chin). We report a case of TMJ occurring in an uncommon circumstance: vaginal delivery. A woman aged 24-years with no special past medical history; primipara was admitted in the Department of Maternity of the University Hospital Hassan II of Fez for an imminent delivery of a twin pregnancy. Ten minutes after admission, the patient delivered vaginally with episiotomy. She gave birth to twins weighing 2800 g and 2400 g. During labour, and due to efforts of crying, the patient developed a sudden and immediate loss of function of the temporo-mandibular joint, with difficulty of speaking, the mouth permanently opened and with the chin lowered and thrown forward. The examination found an empty glenoid fossa of the temporo-mandibular joint in both sides. The diagnosis of dislocation of the TMJ was established. A CT scan of facial bones was done, objectifying a bilateral dislocation of TMJ. The reduction of this dislocation was performed in the operating room under sedation.

  5. [Trigeminal motor paralysis and dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joints].

    PubMed

    Ohkawa, S; Yoshida, T; Ohsumi, Y; Tabuchi, M

    1996-07-01

    A 64-year-old woman with diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital with left hemiparesis of sudden onset. A brain MRI demonstrated a cerebral infarction in the ventral part of the right lower pons. When left hemiparesis worsened, she had dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joints repeatedly. Then, her lower jaw deviated to the right when she opened her mouth. Also, there was decreased contraction of the right masseter when she clenched her teeth. These findings suggest that there was trigeminal motor paralysis on the right side resulting from involvement of the intrapontine trigeminal motor nerve. She has no history of dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joints. An X-ray film showed that the temporo-mandibular joints were intact. Thus, it is possible that deviation of the lower jaw was the cause of this dislocation. We suspect that dislocation of the temporo-mandibular joints may occur as a complication of unilateral trigeminal motor paralysis. This has not been reported to our knowledge.

  6. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis caused by chondroid hyperplasia from the callus of condylar neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soung Min; Park, Jung Min; Kim, Ji Hyuck; Kwon, Kwang Jun; Park, Young Wook; Lee, Jong Ho; Lee, Sang Shin; Lee, Suk Keun

    2009-01-01

    A patient who complained of difficulty in opening his mouth after condylar neck fracture 1 year ago presented typical features of temporomandibular joint ankylosis in clinical and radiologic examinations. To demonstrate a possible pathogenesis of temporomandibular joint ankylosis after condylar neck fracture, the fractured condylar portion removed was examined by histologic and immunohistochemical stainings. Interpositional gap arthroplasty was performed by removing the inferomesially displaced fractured condyle, and reconstruction with subcutaneous dermis to the previous vertical height was performed immediately. The fractured condylar portion was almost intact with slight erosion of the condylar cartilage. In the hematoxylin and eosin and Masson trichrome stainings, an extensive chondroid hyperplasia with abundant hyaline cartilage was shown in the removed condylar portion. There were also hyperplastic features of the synovial membrane, which were abnormally distributed throughout the chondroid tissues. In the immunohistochemical stainings of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and BMP-4, the chondroid tissues were conspicuously hyperplastic and strongly positive for BMP-4 but sparse for BMP-2. From these results, we think that the hyperplastic chondroid tissue was derived from the callus of the primary fractured site of the condylar neck and propose that the chondroid tissue could proliferate continuously because of synovial tissue support from around the temporomandibular joint, resulting in temporomandibular joint ankylosis. This pathogenesis is quite different from those of other diaphyseal fracture of long bones. PMID:19165036

  7. Temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis and oro-nasal fistula as complications of facial trauma.

    PubMed

    Summers, L; Pearce, R L

    1975-02-01

    Condylar fractures with or without disruption of the temporo-mandibular joint occur commonly with other facial injuries. The subsequent development of ankylosis presents surgical and anaesthetic problems in management and results in severe physical disability to the patient. Oro-nasal fistula is a rare complication of fractures involving the middle third of the facial skeleton, and two cases are reported.

  8. Squamous cell carcinoma invading the right temporomandibular joint in a Belgian mare

    PubMed Central

    Perrier, Melanie; Schwarz, Tobias; Gonzalez, Olga; Brounts, Sabrina

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a rare case of squamous cell carcinoma invading the right temporomandibular joint, right guttural pouch, and calvarium. Radiography, computed tomography, and histopathology were performed in the diagnostic workup. Computed tomography depicted more accurately than radiography the invasive nature, exact location, and extent of the lesion. PMID:21037891

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporo-mandibular joint and meniscus dislocation.

    PubMed

    Avrahami, E; Schreiber, R; Benmair, J; Paltiel, Z; Machtey, J; Horowitz, I

    1986-12-01

    A preliminary study of the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed. Ten asymptomatic volunteers with no clinical history of TMJ disorder and five patients with a recent history of trauma to the TMJ were examined using a special surface coil. The meniscus, which is only slightly brighter than the surrounding tissue, gave a high signal and was demonstrated very clearly in its normal position in the controls and shown to be dislocated in the post-trauma cases. Four criteria for identification of the temporo-mandibular meniscus were established in the normal cases and compared with the findings in the pathological cases.

  10. [The place of mandibular condylectomy in surgery of temporomandibular joint dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Gordeeff, A; Mercier, J; Delaire, J

    1990-01-01

    Mandibular condylectomy is one of the methods to which one must sometimes resort when treating temporomandibular joint dysfunction. As emphasized by Merville, this is the conventional method used whenever dealing with condylar hypertrophy , as well as in certain grade-III cases with deep bite. However, another interesting indication for it is the horizontal configuration of the occlusal plane, leading to pain and/or luxation. This type of surgical joint operation presents no risk whatsoever, provided the meniscus is respected. PMID:2309089

  11. Loose bodies of the temporo-mandibular joint, synovial chondromatosis or osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Blenkinsopp, P T

    1978-07-01

    A patient is presented with multiple intra-articular loose bodies of the temporo-mandibular joint, the aetiology and management is discussed. In the absence of histological proof of metaplasia within the synovium the mechanism of cartilage production is open to question. Attention is drawn to the diagnostic problem in long-standing cases when osteo-arthritis supervenes. The clinical picture presented may represent the late stages of synovial chondromatosis or degenerative joint disease from another cause.

  12. [The temporomandibular joint in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: what radiologists need to look for on magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    De La Hoz Polo, M; Navallas, M

    2014-01-01

    The term "juvenile idiopathic arthritis" (JIA) encompasses a group of arthritis of unknown cause with onset before the age of 16 years that last for at least 6 weeks. The prevalence of temporomandibular joint involvement in published series ranges from 17% to 87%. Temporomandibular joint involvement is difficult to detect clinically, so imaging plays a key role in diagnosis and monitoring treatment. MRI is the technique of choice for the study of arthritis of the temporomandibular joint because it is the most sensitive technique for detecting acute synovitis and bone edema. Power Doppler ultrasonography can also detect active synovitis by showing the hypervascularization of the inflamed synovial membrane, but it cannot identify bone edema. This article describes the MRI technique for evaluating the temporomandibular joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, defines the parameters to look for, and illustrates the main findings.

  13. [The temporomandibular joint in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: what radiologists need to look for on magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    De La Hoz Polo, M; Navallas, M

    2014-01-01

    The term "juvenile idiopathic arthritis" (JIA) encompasses a group of arthritis of unknown cause with onset before the age of 16 years that last for at least 6 weeks. The prevalence of temporomandibular joint involvement in published series ranges from 17% to 87%. Temporomandibular joint involvement is difficult to detect clinically, so imaging plays a key role in diagnosis and monitoring treatment. MRI is the technique of choice for the study of arthritis of the temporomandibular joint because it is the most sensitive technique for detecting acute synovitis and bone edema. Power Doppler ultrasonography can also detect active synovitis by showing the hypervascularization of the inflamed synovial membrane, but it cannot identify bone edema. This article describes the MRI technique for evaluating the temporomandibular joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, defines the parameters to look for, and illustrates the main findings. PMID:24792314

  14. Women with more severe degrees of temporomandibular disorder exhibit an increase in temperature over the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Costa, Ana Cláudia de Souza; Packer, Amanda Carine; de Castro, Ester Moreira; Rodrigues-Bigaton, Delaine

    2014-01-01

    Aim The purpose of the present study was to correlate the degree of temporomandibular disorder (TMD) severity and skin temperatures over the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and masseter and anterior temporalis muscles. Materials and methods This blind cross-sectional study involved 60 women aged 18–40 years. The volunteers were allocated to groups based on Fonseca anamnestic index (FAI) score: no TMD, mild TMD, moderate TMD, and severe TMD (n = 15 each). All volunteers underwent infrared thermography for the determination of skin temperatures over the TMJ, masseter and anterior temporalis muscles. The Shapiro–Wilk test was used to determine the normality of the data. The Kruskal–Wallis test, followed by Dunn’s test, was used for comparisons among groups according to TMD severity. Spearman’s correlation coefficients were calculated to determine the strength of associations among variables. Results Weak, positive, significant associations were found between FAI score and skin temperatures over the left TMJ (rs = 0.195, p = 0.009) and right TMJ (rs = 0.238, p = 0.001). Temperatures over the right and left TMJ were significantly higher in groups with more severe TMD (p < 0.05). Conclusion FAI score was associated with skin temperature over the TMJ, as determined by infrared thermography, in this sample. Women with more severe TMD demonstrated a bilateral increase in skin temperature. PMID:25544814

  15. Temporomandibular pain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, HR; Kalavathi, SD

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  16. Temporomandibular pain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, HR; Kalavathi, SD

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view.

  17. Temporomandibular pain.

    PubMed

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, H R; Kalavathi, S D

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  18. [Temporo-mandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome in children].

    PubMed

    Gagnon, P P

    1978-12-01

    Otalgia is a common symptom in children. Otological examination usually reveals a local pathology as the causative agent. However, it does occur that otoscopy reveals normal ear drums and canals. The otologist must then review the causes of referred otalgia. We know that the ear is a nervous crossroad: vagus, trigeminal and third cervical nerve. The most common causes of referred otalgia are the teeth, the sinus, the mouth, the pharynx, and the larynx. If none of these factors is involved, one must then think about the painful temporomandibular dysfunction syndrome.

  19. Clinical-surgical treatment of temporomandibular joint disorder in a psoriatic arthritis patient

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Condylotomy is a surgical procedure that has been used as an option to treat temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. This technique has the advantage of avoiding intra-capsular alterations that might be found involving other surgical procedures. Its use, even when unilateral, has positive effect on treatment of both joints. Methods In order to better evaluate the benefits of a clinical-surgical treatment for TMD, the present report describes the case of a psoriatic arthritis patient. The case was clinically characterized by dental malloclusion, and imaging exams showed joint degeneration of the right mandibular condyle. The patient was treated by condylotomy technique after a prosthetic oral rehabilitation. Results No clinical-radiological signs or symptoms of progression of articular disease were observed within a period of 16 months after surgery. Furthermore, there was functional stability of the temporomandibular joint, total absence of local pain and improvement of mouth opening. Conclusion The present study suggests that condylotomy can be considered as a valid option for the management of TMD, since it has low surgical morbidity and favorable clinical outcomes. In this case, the patient had a medical diagnosis of systemic disease presenting general pain and pain at the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), in addition of causal agent of TMD (dental malloclusion). The difficulty of finding a single etiology (malocclusion vs. systemic disease) did not exclude the indication of a clinical-surgical treatment to re-establish the balance of TMJ. PMID:23556553

  20. The human temporo-mandibular joint: current anatomic and physiologic status.

    PubMed

    Le Toux, G; Duval, J M; Darnault, P

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this study was to take stock of current anatomic and physiologic knowledge of the human temporo-mandibular joint. Though the lateral pterygoid m. plays an essential role in joint movements, we believe that the small deep portion of the masseter and temporalis have a supplementary action in guiding the articular disc forward. The embryologists have demonstrated joint movements in the two-month embryo and at this stage there already exists a triple attachment of the temporalis, pterygoid and masseter to the disc.

  1. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease (pseudogout)

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Y; Nomura, J; Nakanishi, K; Yanase, S; Kato, H; Tagawa, T

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a very rare case of synovial chondromatosis with deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals (pseudogout) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of a 46-year-old male patient. Synovial chondromatosis is a non-neoplastic disease characterized by metaplasia of the connective tissue leading to chondrogenesis in the synovial membrane. Pseudogout is an inflammatory disease of the joints caused by the deposition of CPPD, producing similar symptoms to those observed in gout but not hyperuricaemia. Both diseases commonly affect the knee, hip and elbow joints, but rarely affect the TMJ. PMID:23166363

  2. [Postankylosis condylectomy of the temporomandibular joint in a 5-year old girl. Report of a case].

    PubMed

    Ortega Alejandre, J J; Avila Parrao, J; Piña Velazco, G

    1990-04-01

    A case of post-traumatic temporomandibular joint ankylosis is described, and the technique of the treatment is detailed. Previous review of the literature was made in order to know the advantages of the treatment. There are several reports of children who have suffered facial injuries and fractures of the facial bones that became into ankylosis, characterized by the formation of new temporomandibular joint surfaces. The patient was a five years old girl who presented ankylosis of TMJ due to a car accident six months before. The symptom were: Limitation of motion, persistent close lock of mouth (2 mm) muscle pain that causes the patient to avoid eating foods, and the gradual loose of phonetic function. Condylectomy of the left mandibular condyle was performed to correct the mechanical problems associated to ankylosis. The patient had an uncomplicated postoperative course, and now are waiting the outcome of the treatment by a follow up study. PMID:2132265

  3. Bone structure of the temporo-mandibular joint in the individuals aged 18-25.

    PubMed

    Parafiniuk, M; Gutsch-Trepka, A; Trepka, S; Sycz, K; Wolski, S; Parafiniuk, W

    1998-01-01

    Osteohistometric studies were performed in 15 female and 15 male cadavers aged 18-25. Condyloid process and right and left acetabulum of the temporo-mandibular joint have been studied. Density has been investigated using monitor screen linked with microscope (magnification 80x). Density in the spongy part of the condyloid process was 26.67-26.77%; in the subchondrial layer--72.13-72.72%, and in the acetabular wall 75.03-75.91%. Microscopic structure of the bones of the temporo-mandibular joint revealed no differences when compared with images of compact and cancellous bone shown in the histology textbooks. Sex and the side of the body had no influence on microscopic image and proportional bone density. Isles of chondrocytes in the trabeculae of the spongy structure of the condyloid process were found in 4 cases and isles of the condensed bone resembling the compact pattern in 7 cases.

  4. [Diagnosis of the temporomandibular joint dysfunction by graphic reconstruction of mandibular movements].

    PubMed

    Arutiunov, S D; Khvatov, I L; Arutiunov, D S; Nabiev, N V; Tuturov, N S

    2003-01-01

    A total of 974 patients with suspected abnormalities of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) were examined; diseases were detected in 371 patients. The test group consisted of 40 patients, control group of 18 patients. Analysis of the results of graphic recording of mandibular movements and clinical x-ray data in patients of the main and control groups helped develop the strategy for the diagnosis of TMJ dysfunction, based on the functional methods of examination (oral functionography and non-oral axiography).

  5. Reconstruction of Temporomandibular Joint With a Fibula Free Flap: A Case Report With a Histological Study.

    PubMed

    Fariña, Rodrigo; Campos, Pía; Beytía, Javiera; Martínez, Benjamín

    2015-12-01

    Reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) for congenital or acquired deformities is a major challenge for maxillofacial surgeons. The alternatives for reconstructing the TMJ include free grafts (costochondral, iliac crest, clavicle, or metatarsus), free flaps (fibula), osteogenic distraction, and alloplastic grafts. The lack of biological knowledge of cartilaginous grafts and their reaction to the environment of the TMJ is largely responsible for the inability to predict growth. This report describes the use of a free flap for TMJ reconstruction. PMID:26342950

  6. Condylar resorption following temporomandibular joint arthroscopy in a patient with essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Balasubramaniam, Ramesh; Van Sickels, Joseph; Falace, Donald

    2006-05-01

    Condylar resorption of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a poorly understood phenomenon that is the subject of much controversy. The following case report depicts a unique case of condylar resorption (CR) in a 49-year-old female patient with essential thrombocythemia who underwent arthrocentesis of the TMJ. The exact cause of the CR is unclear but it is speculated that it was likely due to hemorrhagic and thrombotic complications during surgery secondary to an elevated platelet count. PMID:16632268

  7. Temporo-mandibular joint dislocation: an unusual complication of transoesophageal echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Anantharam, Brijesh; Chahal, Navtej; Stephens, Nigel; Senior, Roxy

    2010-03-01

    Temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation is an unusual complication of transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE). We report a rare case of bilateral TMJ dislocation in an 84-year-old man prior to DC cardioversion (DCCV) for atrial flutter. Shortly after TEE and DCCV, the patient complained of bilateral facial pain. An orthopantomogram revealed bilateral TMJ dislocation. A closed reduction was performed by maxillo-facial surgeons under intravenous anaesthesia. Although very uncommon, the physician should be aware of the complication and its management.

  8. Unilateral condylar hyperplasia combined with synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    de Bont, L G; Blankestijn, J; Panders, A K; Vermey, A

    1985-02-01

    A case of unilateral condylar hyperplasia combined with synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is presented. Clinical and radiographic findings were consistent with an active unilateral hyperplasia. A high condylectomy was performed. During the operation numerous cartilaginous particles discharged from the TMJ and so it became clear that the patient was also suffering from chondromatosis. Both conditions were confirmed by histological examination. PMID:3856622

  9. The temporomandibular joint in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: frequently used and frequently arthritic

    PubMed Central

    Ringold, Sarah; Cron, Randy Q

    2009-01-01

    Recent recognition of the markedly high prevalence of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthritis in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) coupled with the significant morbidity associated with TMJ damage has prompted increased interest in both the clinical and pathological aspects of TMJ arthritis. This review focuses on the prevalence of TMJ arthritis in JIA, the imaging modalities used to detect TMJ arthritis, and the treatment of TMJ arthritis in children with JIA. PMID:19480670

  10. [Chondrosarcoma of the temporomandibular joint. Apropos of a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Giraud, O; Lockhart, R; Dichamp, J; Capelle, L; Kujas, M; Dupuis, H J; Bertrand, J C

    1997-01-01

    Chondrosarcomas of the temporo-mandibular joint are exceptional and have been previously reported in the literature in only seven cases. A case located in the temporal bone with extension in the infratemporal fossa and the cranial base is presented. Treatment consisted in a wide surgical resection combined with postoperative radiotherapy. The patient is alive with a follow-up of more than two years.

  11. The wrist pivot method, a novel technique for temporomandibular joint reduction.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Lori E; Beeson, Michael S; Lum, Kevin K

    2004-08-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation is an infrequent dislocation of the mandible. The usual technique of reduction, recommended by most Emergency Medicine textbooks, consists of downward forces applied to the mandible. In the authors' experience this is often painful and requires significant sedation. We present a patient in whom the usual manner of TMJ dislocation reduction was difficult. We describe a novel technique for TMJ dislocation reduction that uses the intrinsic biomechanical properties of the mandible.

  12. Tinnitus in patients with temporo-mandibular joint disorder: Proposal for a new treatment protocol.

    PubMed

    Attanasio, Giuseppe; Leonardi, Alessandra; Arangio, Paolo; Minni, Antonio; Covelli, Edoardo; Pucci, Resi; Russo, Francesca Yoshie; De Seta, Elio; Di Paolo, Carlo; Cascone, Piero

    2015-06-01

    The present study was designed to verify the correlation between tinnitus and temporomandibular joint dysfunction.86 consecutive patients were enrolled in the study, all affected by subjective tinnitus without hearing impairment, from both genders, age between 18 and 60 years old. The final number of patients included in the study was 55. All patients received a temporo-mandibular joint examination. All the patients were asked to rate the severity of their symptoms before and after treatment using a VAS scale and the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) and they followed a standardized protocol for the investigation of tinnitus. All the subjects were monitored by the same researcher and they underwent the same splint treatment. The comparison between pre- and posttreatment phase scores showed in patients with predisposition of TMD and with TMD a statistically significant decrease of THI and VAS values. The characteristics of tinnitus and the degree of response to treatment confirmed the relationship between tinnitus and TMD. The authors believe that, when the most common causes of tinnitus, such as otologic disorders and neurological diseases are excluded, it is correct to evaluate the functionality of the temporo-mandibular joint and eventually treat its pathology to obtain tinnitus improvement or even resolution.

  13. Upregulation of lncRNA HOTAIR contributes to IL-1β-induced MMP overexpression and chondrocytes apoptosis in temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunping; Wang, Peng; Jiang, Pengfei; Lv, Yongbin; Dong, Changxia; Dai, Xiuyu; Tan, Lixia; Wang, Zhenlin

    2016-07-25

    Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ OA) is a common and heterogeneous disease that causes painful and progressive joint degeneration, which restricts daily activities, including talking and chewing. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are an important class of genes involved in various physiological and pathological functions, including osteoarthritis (OA).The present study aimed to identify the lncRNAs that are important in TMJ OA and their potential functions. Here, we found that HOTAIR was significantly upregulated in the synovial fluid of TMJ OA patients compared with that of normal controls. Increased HOTAIR was similarly observed in the synovial fluid of TMJ OA rabbits as compared to control rabbits. Furthermore, in interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced TMJ OA in vitro model (primary rabbit condylar chondrocytes), the expressions of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP3, MMP9 and HOTAIR were all dramatically increased. Most importantly, knockdown of HOTAIR in IL-1β-induced TMJ OA in vitro model could not only reverse the IL-1β-stimulated expressions of MMP1, MMP3 and MMP9, but also significantly decrease the apoptosis rate induced by IL-1β in primary rabbit condylar chondrocytes. Our data provides new insight into the mechanisms of chondrocytes destruction in TMJ OA. PMID:27063559

  14. [The temporomandibular joint of the domestic cat (Felis silvestris catus)].

    PubMed

    Knospe, C; Roos, H

    1994-06-01

    The mandibular joint of the cat is an incongruent cylindrical joint, which works as a hinge or screw joint. The course of motion is unilateral in the plane of the cutting edge of the molar/premolar border [symbol: see text]. The articular disc is a connective tissue membrane; its new function is decreasing the friction. PMID:7978349

  15. Do costochondral grafts have any growth potential in temporomandibular joint surgery? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Praveen; Rattan, Vidya; Rai, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the study To assess the growth potential of costochondral graft in temporomandibular joint reconstruction in patients with temporomandibular ankylosis and hemifacial microsomia. Method Systematic review after inclusion of articles fulfilling the following criteria: (1) only human studies; (2) patients of temporomandibular joint ankylosis and hemifacial microsomia; and (3) studies with minimum of five cases and with a minimum follow-up for a period of 5 years. The primary outcome measure was the percentage of patients with optimum growth of costochondral graft. Secondary outcomes were any abnormal growth and restoration of function. Delphi's criteria were used for assessing the quality of the included studies. Result Only three studies satisfied all the inclusion criteria. A total of 96 costochondral grafts were placed in the included studies. Optimum growth was reported in 54 grafts, undergrowth in 1 graft, overgrowth in 7 grafts, lateral overgrowth in 1 graft and no growth in 1 graft. Graft resorption, reankylosis and sequestration were seen in 21, 8 and 3 cases, respectively. When the Delphi's criteria were applied to the case series for the assessment of quality, majority of the studies could be considered as satisfying at least 50% of the criteria. Conclusion There are no randomised clinical trials and the only evidence is in the form of case series that is considered as the lowest level of evidence for any study. No inference can be interpreted regarding growth potential of costochondral graft. Thus, on the basis of available evidence, it can be concluded that use of costochondral graft for temporomandibular joint reconstruction lacks scientific evidence. PMID:26605146

  16. Arthroscopy of the temporomandibular joint. Examination of 2 patients with suspected disk derangement.

    PubMed

    Hellsing, G; Holmlund, A; Nordenram, A; Wredmark, T

    1984-02-01

    2 patients with a history of reciprocal temporomandibular joint (TMJ) clicking were visually examined with arthroscopy of their right side TMJs. Clinical and radiographic examination revealed no signs of arthrosis deformans. One patient with significantly reduced opening ability combined with occasional disappearance of TMJ clicks showed advanced arthrotic changes of cartilage which were not visible radiographically. The other patient with unimpaired function also had a severe arthrotic lesion in the clicking joint. In neither case did the disk appear to be displaced. It is concluded that arthroscopy yields additional information for TMJ diagnosis which cannot be achieved by clinical and radiographic examination alone.

  17. Post-traumatic changes of the temporo-mandibular joint by bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Harris, S A; Rood, J P; Testa, H J

    1988-06-01

    13 patients who sustained mandibular trauma were investigated with radiographs and scintiscans. The scintiscans showed abnormal uptake of radiopharmaceutical in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In patients with a long history of traumatic arthrosis, there was more positive correlation between the scintiscans, and clinical symptoms and histology than between radiographs, and symptoms and histology. In patients with mandibular body fractures and no TMJ symptoms, the scans showed abnormal uptake in the TMJ in 7/8 joints, in the absence of radiographic abnormality. The significance of the abnormal uptake and the value of scintigraphy is discussed.

  18. Giant Solitary Synovial Chondromatosis of the Temporomandibular Joint with Intracranial Extension

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Salú, José L.; Lázaro, Rafael; Aldasoro, José; Gonzalez-Darder, José M.

    1998-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis are rare entities but are well-described lesions in the literature that can affect many joint areas of the body. A case of tumoral synovial chondromatosis involving the temporomandibular joint with intracranial extension through mandibular fossa is reported. As long as there was significant infratemporal and extradural invasion of the middle and posterior fossa, a transtemporal and infratemporal approach was performed and total removal of the lesions was achieved. A brief review of skull base synovial chondromatosis is presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11 PMID:17171059

  19. Development of Synovial Membrane in the Temporomandibular Joint of the Human Fetus

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, R.C.; Arraéz-Aybar, L.A.; Klein, O.; Mérida-Velasco, J.R.; Alonso, L.G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of the synovial membrane was analyzed in serial sections of 21 temporomandibular joints of human fetuses at 9 to 13 weeks of gestation. Sections of two fetuses at 12 weeks of development were used to perform immunohistochemical expression of the markers CD68 and Hsp27 on the synovial lining. Macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells, which express CD68 and Hsp27, respectively, were observed at the twelfth week of development. Our results suggest that the development of the synovial membrane is related to the vascularization of the joint and the formation of the articular cavities. PMID:26708184

  20. Pleomorphic adenoma in an atypical location near the temporomandibular joint: a case report.

    PubMed

    Smolka, Wenko; Eggensperger, Nicole; Stauffer-Brauch, Edouard Jean; von Bredow, Ferdinand; Lizuka, Tateyuki

    2007-05-01

    Pleomorphic adenomas primarily arise in the major salivary glands, especially in the parotid. The most common area is the lower pole superficial to the plane of the facial nerve. In this report, a pleomorphic adenoma in an atypical location--the region of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ)--is presented. The tumor was solitary, closely attached to the capsule of the TMJ and superior to the parotid gland, with clear demarcation. Clinically, the tumor resembled TMJ pathology, but MRI examination led to diagnosis of a benign tumor attached to the TMJ. This report shows that pleomorphic adenoma can be a possible diagnosis for lesions at the joint capsule.

  1. Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint. Follow-up of thirteen patients.

    PubMed

    Schobel, G; Millesi, W; Watzke, I M; Hollmann, K

    1992-07-01

    We undertook a postoperative clinical study of 13 patients with ankylosis of the temporomandibular joints. The study consisted of an evaluation of the surgical concepts of resection and subsequent surgical reconstruction by osteotomy in previous height of the joint space and lining of the glenoid fossa with lyophilized dura. Early mobilization and aggressive physiotherapy are mandatory postoperative measures. According to the theory of mandibular growth as a result of functional matrix, early surgical intervention to correct ankylosis should be performed, regardless of the age of the patient, to prevent recurrence and later asymmetry or distoclusion.

  2. Costochondral grafts in reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint after condylectomy: an experimental study in sheep.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, H; Miyamoto, H; Ishimaru, J I; Kurita, K; Goss, A N

    2001-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of costochondral grafts in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in sheep. Five pure-bred adult Merino sheep were used. The condyle alone was resected and replaced with a costochondral graft from the 13th rib. The sheep were killed 3 months after operation. The range of jaw movements before and after operation and at death were recorded. The joints were examined radiologically, macroscopically, and histologically. A new condylar head with normal configuration and function developed. Histologically, the chondrocytes were arranged in a fashion similar to that of a normal joint. All inferior joint spaces showed fibrous adhesions between the condylar head and disc. This study showed that, when such grafts are used to replace the condyle in an otherwise normal sheep TMJ, they fused to the ramus and reconstituted a nearly normal, fully functional joint. PMID:11384115

  3. Internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: A review of the anatomy, diagnosis, and management

    PubMed Central

    Young, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    Internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint are conditions in which the articular disc has become displaced from its original position the condylar head. Relevant anatomic structures and their functional relationships are briefly discussed. The displacement of the disc can result in numerous presentations, with the most common being disc displacement with reduction (with or without intermittent locking), and disc displacement without reduction (with or without limited opening). These are described in this article according to the standardized Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, as well as the less common posterior disc displacement. Appropriate management usually ranges from patient education and monitoring to splints, physical therapy, and medications. In rare and select cases, surgery may be necessary. However, in for the majority of internal derangements, the prognosis is good, particularly with conservative care. PMID:26929478

  4. Origin of sympathetic and sensory innervation of the temporo-mandibular joint. A retrograde axonal tracing study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Widenfalk, B; Wiberg, M

    1990-02-01

    The cells of origin of sensory and sympathetic innervation of the temporo-mandibular joint were studied by the intraaxonal transport method. Horseradish peroxidase or lectin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase was injected into the temporo-mandibular joint unilaterally in adult rats. Labelled cells were observed ipsilaterally in the superior cervical and stellate sympathetic ganglia, in the sensory trigeminal ganglion and in the second to fifth dorsal root ganglia; none were found contralaterally. The results are discussed in relation to the hypothesis that a nervous mechanism might be involved in the pathogenesis of joint inflammation.

  5. 'Costen's syndrome'--correlation or coincidence: a review of 45 patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction, otalgia and other aural symptoms.

    PubMed

    Brookes, G B; Maw, A R; Coleman, M J

    1980-02-01

    Forty-five patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction, and otalgia together with other aural symptoms (deafness, tinnitus, pressure/blockage and vertigo) were evaluated clinically and audiometrically. The theoretical mechanisms by which aural symptoms may be produced as a result of temporomandibular joint dysfunction are outlined and discussed in the light of the patients under review. The wide diversity in the incidence of additional aural symptoms apart from otalgia reported in the literature is noted, together with the general lack of full objective audiometric assessment. In 37 patients the aural symptoms were directly attributable to other coincidental otolaryngological pathology. Details of the remaining 8 cases are presented. The other aural symptoms of 4 of these patients were also probably accounted for by other coincidental otalaryngological pathology. It may be significant that 2 of the other patients were suffering from concurrent psychiatric disorders. Thus in this series at least 9% of the patients were considered to have other aural symptoms coincidental to temporomandibular joint dysfunction. This is compatible with the relatively common occurrence of both temporomandibular joint dysfunction and aural symptoms in the general population. This study leads us to believe that there is no direct aetiological basis to link temporomandibular joint dysfunction and other aural symptoms apart from otalgia. PMID:7363490

  6. Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis: cone beam computed tomography findings, clinical features, and correlations.

    PubMed

    Cömert Kiliç, S; Kiliç, N; Sümbüllü, M A

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of and associations between clinical signs and symptoms and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) findings of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA). Seventy-six patients (total 117 TMJ) with osteoarthritis were included in this study. Clinical signs and symptoms and CBCT findings were reviewed retrospectively. A considerable decrease in mandibular motions and mastication efficiency, and considerable increase in joint sounds and general pain complaints were observed. The most frequent condylar bony changes were erosion (110 joints, 94.0%), followed by flattening (108 joints, 92.3%), osteophytes (93 joints, 79.5%), hypoplasia (22 joints, 18.8%), sclerosis (14 joints, 12.0%), and subchondral cyst (four joints, 3.4%). Flattening of the articular eminence and pneumatization were each observed in five joints. Forty-one patients had bilateral degeneration and 35 had unilateral degeneration. Hypermobility was detected in 47 degenerative joints. Masticatory efficiency was negatively correlated with both condylar flattening and sclerosis, and general pain complaints was positively correlated with condylar flattening. Condylar erosion, flattening, osteophytes, pain, joint sounds, reduced jaw movements, and worsened mastication were common findings in TMJ-OA in the present study. Poor correlations were found between osseous changes and clinical signs and symptoms of TMJ-OA. CBCT is a powerful diagnostic tool for the diagnosis of TMJ-OA. PMID:26194774

  7. A radiographic tracing technique for the comparative assessment of transcranial views of the temporo-mandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Wood, G D

    1980-09-01

    A simple radiographic technique for studying the temporo-mandibular joint is presented. From the radiographs obtained, tracings of the joint can be made which are of value for any research project apart from the clinical value of the radiographs themselves.

  8. Effect of unilateral condylectomy on the sheep temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Vickers, R; Ishimaru, J I; Ogi, N; Kurita, K; Goss, A N

    1999-10-01

    Unilateral condylectomy was performed on five young adult sheep. The animals were killed at three months and both joints and the excised condyles were examined macroscopically and histologically. All five showed pronounced regeneration of the condylar head on the operated side. The articular surface was fibrous and fused to the disc. Four of the five opposite joints showed medial remodelling. Young sheep have a higher regenerative capability than human adults of equivalent age, and similar reactions to those of children. PMID:10577756

  9. Innovative Surgical Management of the Synovial Chondromatosis of Temporo-Mandibular Joints: Highly Conservative Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Ionna, Franco; Amantea, Massimiliano; Mastrangelo, Filiberto; Ballini, Andrea; Maglione, Maria Grazia; Aversa, Corrado; De Cecio, Rossella; Russo, Daniela; Marrelli, Massimo; Tatullo, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) is an uncommon disease characterized by a benign nodular cartilaginous proliferation arising from the joint synovium, bursae, or tendon sheaths. Although the temporomandibular joint is rarely affected by neoplastic lesions, SC is the most common neoplastic lesion of this joint. The treatment of this disease consists in the extraoral surgery with a wide removal of the lesion; in this study, the authors described a more conservative intraoral surgical approach. Patient with SC of temporomandibular joint typically refer a limitation in the mouth opening, together with a persistent not physiological mandibular protrusion and an appearance of a neoformation located at the right preauricular region: the authors reported 1 scholar patient. After biopsy of the neoformation, confirming the synovial chondromatosis, the patient underwent thus to the surgical excision of the tumor, via authors' conservative transoral approach, to facilitate the enucleation of the neoformation. The mass fully involved the pterygo-maxillary fossa with involvement of the parotid lodge and of the right TMJ: this multifocal extension suggested for a trans-oral surgical procedure, in the light of the suspicion of a possible malignant nature of the neoplasm. Our intraoral conservative approach to surgery is aimed to reduce the presence of unaesthetic scars in preauricular and facial regions, with surgical results undoubtedly comparable to the traditional surgical techniques much more aggressive. Our technique could be a valid, alternative, and safe approach to treat this rare and complex kind of oncological disease.

  10. Use of Theraflex-TMJ topical cream for the treatment of temporomandibular joint and muscle pain.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Silvia Lobo; Mehta, Noshir; Forgione, Albert G; Melis, Marcello; Al-Badawi, Emad; Ceneviz, Caroline; Zawawi, Khalid H

    2004-04-01

    This randomized, double-blind study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the topical cream Theraflex-TMJ (NaBob/Rx, San Mateo, CA) in patients with masseter muscle pain and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain. Fifty-two subjects (5 males and 47 females) were instructed to apply a cream over the afflicted masseter muscle(s) or over the jaw joint(s) twice daily for two weeks. Theraflex-TMJ cream was used by the experimental group, while a placebo cream was used by the control group. The means of pain ratings were calculated prior to the application of the cream (baseline), after ten days of tx (period 1), and 15 days of tx (period 2) days of treatment and five days after stopping the treatment (follow-up). There was a significant decrease in reported pain levels from baseline in the experimental group for period 1 (p < 0.01), period 2 (p < 0.001), and follow-up (p < 0.01). For the control group, no significant differences were found between the different time periods (p > 0.05). There was evidence of minor side effects such as skin irritation and/or burning on the site of the application in two subjects in the experimental as well as two subjects in the control groups. The data strongly suggest that Theraflex-TMJ topical cream is safe and effective for reducing pain in the masseter muscle and the temporomandibular joint. PMID:15134414

  11. [An experimental study on change on the contralateral temporomandibular joint after unilateral condylectomy on one of the bilateral joints].

    PubMed

    Shimoda, T

    1989-01-01

    In this study I examined the macroscopic, radiological and histopathological changes on the contralateral temporomandibular joint following condylectomy on one of the bilateral temporomandibular joints on adult female Macaca fuscatas. I made a standardized radiographic apparatus for the temporomandibular joint and head for the Macaca fuscata on an experimental basis for radiological observation through the whole passage of time before making the experiment. The results were as follows: 1) In macroscopic observation, I noticed the entire mandible directed toward the operated side at opening the mandible and the anterior and molar (unoperated side) open bite after the operation. Besides the masticatory side altered and the degree of tooth attrition made progress with the passage of time. 2) According to radiographic investigation with an anteroposterior radiograph, complicated shift and rotation of the mandible were observed since the operation. According to the radiograph of condyle, distal displacement of the temporomandibular joint, widening of joint space and clockwise rotation of the mandible were confirmed. A shadow of bone was found in the articular surface of the mandibular head on the 123rd day. 3) The following findings were obtained in histopathology. (1) Heterotopic calcification appeared in an articular disk of one Macaca fuscata in control group and two in the 83rd-day-passaged Macaca fuscatas. (2) In the articular disk and the tissue around them, a tiny projection of connective tissue appeared in the posterior synovial portion of the superior articular cavity on the 10th day. And the intermediate zone of the articular disk showed itself to be fibrous small bundle daily as days passed on and cartilaginoid cells were found. (3) In the front edge of mandibular corpus and attachment region of the lateral pterygoid muscle, absorption of bone was observed by the 40th day from the operation, and additions of bone were observed during the period between the 40

  12. Association between estrogen receptor polymorphism and pain susceptibility in female temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Kang, S-C; Lee, D-G; Choi, J-H; Kim, S T; Kim, Y-K; Ahn, H-J

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possible association between estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) polymorphism and pain susceptibility in female symptomatic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis (OA) patients. A patient group of 100 women, diagnosed as TMJ OA according to the research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders, were selected, and 74 women with no signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorder were assigned to a control group. Pvu II and Xba I restriction fragment length polymorphisms were analyzed by direct haplotyping. The patient group was divided into three subgroups according to a visual analog scale (VAS): mild pain (0.05). TMJ OA patients carrying the PX haplotype were found to have a significantly higher risk of moderate or severe pain compared to those without the PX haplotype, suggesting that ERalpha polymorphism may be associated with pain susceptibility in female TMJ OA patients. PMID:17391927

  13. Generalized joint laxity and its relation with oral habits and temporomandibular disorders in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Winocur, E; Gavish, A; Halachmi, M; Bloom, A; Gazit, E

    2000-07-01

    A group of 248 girls, aged 15-16 years, were randomly selected and examined both clinically and by questionnaire with regard to the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), generalized joint laxity (GJL), range of mandibular opening, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) hypermobility and presence of oral parafunctions. The prevalence of GJL was 43% and that of TMJ hypermobility (TMJH) was 27.3%. A significant, albeit weak, correlation was found between the two. In the presence of joint click, both active and passive opening were significantly larger. When either muscle or joint sensitivity to palpation was present, the difference between the active and passive range of mouth opening increased significantly. The presence of reported clicks was negatively associated with GJL. This association was not valid in the presence of parafunction. Some of the signs and symptoms of TMD affected the range of mouth opening. In the presence of joint clicks, the mean active and passive mandibular opening were significantly larger. In the presence of joint and muscle sensitivity to palpation, the difference between passive and active mouth opening was larger. This was possibly because of the effect of pain on the full active range of opening, which was invalid in the registration of the passive mandibular opening. GJL, when present, did not seem to jeopardize the health of the stomatognathic system as expressed in the signs and symptoms of TMD. There was a negative association between GJL and the presence of reported joint clicks and catch. When a parafunction was present in addition to GJL, this association was invalid but not reversed, as has been previously reported.

  14. Alterations of the Temporomandibular Joint on Magnetic Resonance Imaging according to Growth and Development in Schoolchildren

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Tatsurou; Konoo, Tetsuro; Habu, Manabu; Oda, Masafumi; Kito, Shinji; Kodama, Masaaki; Kokuryo, Shinya; Wakasugi-Sato, Nao; Matsumoto-Takeda, Shinobu; Nishida, Ikuko; Morikawa, Kazumasa; Saeki, Katsura; Maki, Kenshi; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Masumi, Shin-ichi; Terashita, Masamichi; Morimoto, Yasuhiro

    2012-01-01

    The paper explains the alterations of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) visualized by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) according to the growth and development of schoolchildren. Appearance and disappearance of a “double contour-like structure” (DCLS) of the mandibular condyle on MRI according to the growth and development of schoolchildren were demonstrated. In addition, possible constituents of DCLS and the significance of detection of DCLS on MRI were also speculated. The relationship between red marrow and yellow marrow in the articular eminence of temporal bone, the disappearance of DCLS, and alterations of the mandibular condyle have been elucidated. PMID:23316233

  15. Comparison of Silastic and Proplast implants in the temporomandibular joint after condylectomy for osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, D M; Wolford, L M

    1982-10-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the long-term stability of Silastic and proplast when used as alloplastic implants following high condylectomy. Twelve patients with osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) were treated either unilaterally or bilaterally. The follow-up period ranged from one to four years. In all ten TMJs that received Silastic implants and in ten that received Proplast implants, there were no discernible differences relative to comfort, masticatory function, or TMJ mobility. Although Silastic and Proplast had similar functional characteristics, Proplast implants had better long-term stability than the Silastic implants. PMID:6956683

  16. Midline mandibulotomy for reduction of long-standing temporomandibular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Vidya; Rai, Sachin; Sethi, Amit

    2013-06-01

    Long-standing temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation is an uncommon condition, and due to its rarity, no definitive guidelines have been developed for its management. Various reduction techniques ranging from indirect traction techniques to direct exposure of the TMJ have been used. Indirect traction techniques for reduction may fail in long-standing dislocation. Management of two cases of long-standing TMJ dislocation with midline mandibulotomy is discussed in which other indirect reduction techniques had failed. Midline osteotomy of the mandible can be used for reduction in difficult TMJ dislocations. An algorithm for the management of long-standing TMJ dislocation is proposed and related literature is reviewed.

  17. One-stage reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint in hemifacial microsomia.

    PubMed

    Munro, I R

    1980-11-01

    In some patients with hemifacial microsomia, the mandibular ascending ramus and condyle are absent. Sometimes the zygomatic arch and glenoid fossa are also absent, and the zygoma and lateral orbital wall are deficient and misplaced. Complete alignment of the facial skeleton with construction of all components of the temporomandibular joint has been performed as a one-stage procedure on 14 patients, aged 6 to 23 years. The principle "first the bone, rarely the soft tissue" has evolved because when the skeleton is correct, the soft tissues assume a normal contour. The dangers of major skeletal surgery in children can be minimized if patients are referred to major craniofacial centers. PMID:7001516

  18. Improvement of pain and function after arthroscopy and arthrocentesis of the temporomandibular joint: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Goudot, P; Jaquinet, A R; Hugonnet, S; Haefliger, W; Richter, M

    2000-02-01

    In 1993 and 1994, 720 patients with pain in the temporo-mandibular joint area were examined and treated. The authors describe their therapeutic protocol. Sixty-two patients were not relieved by conservative nonsurgical therapy and were treated by arthroscopy or arthrocentesis. In both groups the differences in functional result and in pain control were analysed. Results show that both arthroscopy and lavage are useful in improving function and diminishing pain. Arthroscopy shows better results for functional treatment whereas arthrocentesis and arthroscopy show similar results in pain control.

  19. Tumoral calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease of the temporomandibular joint: identification on crystallography.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Toshinari; Takeda, Yasunori; Ohira, Akinori; Hoshi, Hideki; Sugiyama, Yoshiki; Yoshida, Yasuo; Ambo, Junichi

    2008-11-01

    This paper reports a case of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal deposition in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of a 59-year-old man with the chief complaint of severe pain in the left TMJ. On CT a radiopaque area was seen around the condylar process of the left TMJ with irregular destructive bony changes. A provisional diagnosis of crystalline-induced arthritis was made on histopathology of a biopsy specimen. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction showed both CPPD and hydroxyapatite (HA) in the crystalline materials. Identification of these two types of crystal in crystal deposition disease of TMJ, using crystallography, is discussed.

  20. [Proposal for a dynamic study of the temporo-mandibular joint, using a computerized image analyzer].

    PubMed

    Tedde, G; Mazzanti, V; Devilla, L; Chessa, G

    1990-04-01

    With the aim to go deep into the knowledge of the morpho-functional anatomical characteristics of the temporo-mandibular joint in humans, a dynamic method of study by means of a computerized analyzer of images is suggested. The acquired advantages are the following: a) the accuracy of evaluation of the chosen morphometric parameters; b) the working speed, from which results: c) the possibility to increase adequately the number of cases and d) the possibility to easily investigate many parameters with a very high accuracy of the quantitative results. Both right and left temporo-mandibular joints of adult individuals aged from 18 to 53 have been studied utilizing lateral tomographies focused at 3.3 mm to the lateral surface of the condylar head. The evaluations were done both in the position of completely closed mouth and in extreme opening. From the barycentre of the condyle several straight lines were drawn according to the figure 2. The length of the segment a-b (distance of profiles of the condyle and mandibular fossa) were evaluated in all the lines counter-clockwise and the results submitted to a statistical analysis. The results furnish very good information on the normal or pathological anatomical characteristics, of the joint.

  1. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis as part of the clinical spectrum of Carey-Fineman-Ziter syndrome?

    PubMed

    Pasetti, Martina; Mazzoleni, Fabio; Novelli, Giorgio; Iascone, Maria; Bozzetti, Alberto; Selicorni, Angelo

    2016-08-01

    The Carey-Finema-Ziter syndrome (CFZS, MIM 254940) is an apparently autosomal recessively inherited disorder consisting of the combination of non-progressive congenital myopathy with Moebius and Pierre Robin sequence, facial anomalies and growth delay. Mental development has been described as normal or delayed. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is the immobility of the joint caused by ankylotic fusion of the mandible to the cranial base or zygoma. It is a serious and disabling condition that may cause problems in mastication, digestion, speech, appearance, and oral hygiene. Most often is a true ankylosis of the TMJ but other pathological mechanisms are described (i.e., the fusion of the coronoid process to temporal bone or with the zygoma, or a variety of soft tissues disorders like Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva). Here we report a 2-year-old girl fitting with a clinical diagnosis of CFZS associated with a limited mouth opening in which temporomandibular joint ankylosis was suspected. Because it has been postulated that many clinical features in CFZS may only be secondary effects of brainstem anomalies and muscle weakness during development, the limited opening of the mouth observed in our patient could represent a rare clinical feature of CFZS itself. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Stress Analysis of Anterior-Disc-Displaced Temporomandibular Joint Using Individual Finite Element Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masao; Tanaka, Eiji; Todoh, Masahiro; Asai, Daisuke; Kuroda, Yukiko

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder relates to the biomechanical irregularity of the structual joint components, and the behavior of soft tissue components is considered as a key to understand the biomechanical condition in the TMJ. The configuration of joint components, however, closely depends on individual patients. In this study, attention has been focused on the stress and displacement of irregular TMJs with anterior disc displacement. Using biplane magnetic resonance (MR) images, typical anterior-disc-displaced (ADD) TMJ of a patient with temporomandibular disorder has been modeled individually. The stress distribution in ADD TMJs has been compared with that in normal TMJs. Parameter studies with the elastic modulus have been carried out and it revealed that the stress distribution in the TMJ is highly dependent on the connective tissue modulus as well as disc modulus in the case of ADD TMJ, and that the disc displacement due to mouth opening movement depends on disc modulus in normal TMJ but depends on retrodiscal connective tissue in ADD TMJ.

  3. Clinical and MRI investigation of temporomandibular joint in major depressed patients

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, SLPC; Costa, ALF; Cruz, AD; Li, LM; de Almeida, SM

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to describe the clinical and MRI findings of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in patients with major depressive disorders (MDDs) of the non-psychotic type. Methods 40 patients (80 TMJs) who were diagnosed as having MDDs were selected for this study. The clinical examination of the TMJs was conducted according to the research diagnostic criteria and temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). The MRIs were obtained bilaterally in each patient with axial, parasagittal and paracoronal sections within a real-time dynamic sequence. Two trained oral radiologists assessed all images. For statistical analyses, Fisher's exact test and χ2 test were applied (α = 0.05). Results Migraine was reported in 52.5% of subjects. Considering disc position, statistically significant differences between opening patterns with and without alteration (p = 0.00) and between present and absent joint noises (p = 0.00) were found. Regarding muscular pain, patients with and without abnormalities in disc function and patients with and without abnormalities in disc position were not statistically significant (p = 0.42 and p = 0.40, respectively). Significant differences between mandibular pathway with and without abnormalities (p = 0.00) and between present and absent joint noises (p = 0.00) were observed. Conclusion Based on the preliminary results observed by clinical and MRI examination of the TMJ, no direct relationship could be determined between MDDs and TMDs. PMID:22517997

  4. Biglycan and Fibromodulin Have Essential Roles in Regulating Chondrogenesis and Extracellular Matrix Turnover in Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Embree, Mildred C.; Kilts, Tina M.; Ono, Mitsuaki; Inkson, Colette A.; Syed-Picard, Fatima; Karsdal, Morten A.; Oldberg, Åke; Bi, Yanming; Young, Marian F.

    2010-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint is critical for jaw movements and allows for mastication, digestion of food, and speech. Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease that is marked by permanent cartilage destruction and loss of extracellular matrix (ECM). To understand how the ECM regulates mandibular condylar chondrocyte (MCC) differentiation and function, we used a genetic mouse model of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis that is deficient in two ECM proteins, biglycan and fibromodulin (Bgn−/0Fmod−/−). Given the unavailability of cell lines, we first isolated primary MCCs and found that they were phenotypically unique from hyaline articular chondrocytes isolated from the knee joint. Using Bgn−/0 Fmod−/− MCCs, we discovered the early basis for temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis arises from abnormal and accelerated chondrogenesis. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 is a growth factor that is critical for chondrogenesis and binds to both biglycan and fibromodulin. Our studies revealed the sequestration of TGF-β1 was decreased within the ECM of Bgn−/0 Fmod−/− MCCs, leading to overactive TGF-β1 signal transduction. Using an explant culture system, we found that overactive TGF-β1 signals induced chondrogenesis and ECM turnover in this model. We demonstrated for the first time a comprehensive study revealing the importance of the ECM in maintaining the mandibular condylar cartilage integrity and identified biglycan and fibromodulin as novel key players in regulating chondrogenesis and ECM turnover during temoporomandibular joint osteoarthritis pathology. PMID:20035055

  5. Fracture of the articular disc in the temporomandibular joint: two case reports

    PubMed Central

    An, S-Y

    2015-01-01

    Disc fracture of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a little-known pathological condition owing to its extreme rarity. We report two cases of elderly patients who were diagnosed with disc fracture of the TMJ based on MRI, and we review related reports. On physical examination, an incomplete bite and mild joint pain were observed on the affected side in both patients. An MRI showed a complete fracture in the intermediate zone of the articular disc in the TMJ; the posterior fragment was displaced posteriorly, causing occlusal change in the closed position of the condyle and an incomplete bite. Conservative treatment including manual manipulation, physical therapy and oral appliance had no effect on the occlusal abnormality. Although the inciting cause of the disc fracture remained unclear, the degenerative changes in the joint may have been a factor by increasing the brittleness and reducing the elasticity of the disc. PMID:25308829

  6. Condylar hyperplasia associated to synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gay-Escoda, C; Valmaseda-Castellón, E; Alaejos-Algarra, C; Vázquez-Rodriguez, E

    2001-04-01

    Condylar hyperplasia is a slowly developing malformation of the mandible, with elongation of the mandibular neck, that generally results in facial asymmetry. Synovial chondromatosis is a benign chronic disorder characterized by the formation of multiple small nodules of hyaline cartilage as a result of metaplasia of the synovial connective tissue. It affects mostly the large joints, particularly the knee, hip, elbow and ankle. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is rarely affected. The case of a 42-year-old male with a history of left preauricular pain and swelling and deviation of the mandible to the left upon opening the mouth is presented. Computed tomography disclosed hyperplasia of the left condyle with loose radiopaque bodies within the joint cavity. The left TMJ was subject to open surgery, which included resection of four loose bodies and a remodeling condylectomy. The histopathological study confirmed the diagnosis of condylar hyperplasia and chondromatosis of the left TMJ. PMID:11842870

  7. Functional anatomy of the temporo-mandibular joint (II).

    PubMed

    Sava, Anca; Scutariu, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Jaw movement is analyzed as an action between two rigid components jointed together in a particular way, the movable mandible against the stabilized cranium. Opening and closing movements are symmetrical; that is, both sides of the cranio-mandibular articulation are making the same movements. Protrusive and retrusive movements may also be symmetrical. The mandibular muscles determine all the complicated postures and-movements of the jaw. Their behavior can be greatly clarified by restating certain fundamentals crucial to purposive muscular activity. The joint derives its arterial supply from the superficial temporal artery and the maxillary artery. Branches of the auriculo-temporal and masseteric nerves and postganglionic sympathetic nerves supply the tissues associated with the capsular ligament and the looser posterior bilaminar extension of the disc.

  8. Cancer risk among patients with finger and hand joint and temporo-mandibular joint prostheses in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Fryzek, J P; Mellemkjaer, L; McLaughlin, J K; Blot, W J; Olsen, J H

    1999-05-31

    The use of artificial joint implants has risen greatly over the past years. However, few investigations of the cancer risk associated with implants have been performed. We investigated cancer risk in patients with finger and hand joint and temporo-mandibular (TMJ) joint implants. A nationwide cohort in Denmark of patients with finger and hand joint prostheses (n = 858) or TMJ implants (n = 389) was followed from January 1, 1977, to December 31, 1995, to evaluate any potential cancer risks subsequent to receiving these implants. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for all cancers were 1.0 (95% CI = 0.8-1.2) for the finger and hand joint cohort and 1.1 (95% CI = 0.8-1.7) for the TMJ cohort. A significant risk for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was found in the finger and hand joint cohort (SIR = 3.8, 95% CI = 1.5-7.8). When the finger and hand joint cohort was stratified by diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, the excess risk was seen only in the group with rheumatoid arthritis. This is consistent with past studies, which have found an association between rheumatoid arthritis and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Our results provide evidence that the cancer risk for patients with finger and hand joint prostheses and TMJ implants is similar to that for the general population.

  9. Proteomic signature of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders (TMD): Toward diagnostically predictive biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Demerjian, Garabed Gary; Sims, Anothony Benjamin; Stack, Brendan Curran

    2011-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) articulates the mandible with the maxilla. Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) are dysfunctions of this joint, which range from acute to chronic inflammation, trauma and dislocations, developmental anomalies and neoplasia. TMD manifest as signs and symptoms that involve the surrounding muscles, ligaments, bones, synovial capsule, connective tissue, teeth and innervations proximal and distal to this joint. TMD induce proximal and distal, chronic and acute, dull or intense pain and discomfort, muscle spasm, clicking/popping sounds upon opening and closing of the mouth, and chewing or speaking difficulties. The trigeminal cranial nerve V, and its branches provide the primary sensory innervation to the TMJ. Our clinical work suggests that the auriculotemporal (AT) nerve, a branch of the mandibular nerve, the largest of the three divisions of the trigeminal nerve, plays a critical role in TMD sequelae. The AT nerve provides the somatosensory fibers that supply the joint, the middle ear, and the temporal region. By projecting fibers toward the otic ganglion, the AT nerve establishes an important bridge to the sympathetic system. As it courses posteriorly to the condylar head of the TMJ, compression, injury or irritation of the AT nerve can lead to significant neurologic and neuro-muscular disorders, including Tourette's syndrome,Torticolli, gait or balance disorders and Parkinson’s disease. Here, we propose that a proteomic signature of TMD can be obtained by assessing certain biomarkers in local (e.g., synovial fluid at the joint) and distal body fluids (e.g., saliva, cerebrospinal fluid), which can aid TMD diagnosis and prognosis. PMID:21364835

  10. [Dental aspects of the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders].

    PubMed

    De Boever, J A; De Boever, A M

    1997-01-01

    Over the last years, aetiological concepts have changed drastically. The role of occlusal factors in the aetiology has been overestimated in the past. The role of occlusal therapy should be aimed at restoring function. In the initial phase of treatment an occlusal splint, counseling, physiotherapy and occasionally NSAID's, leads to relieve pain and reduction of dysfunction in most patients. A repositioning splint in cases of anterior disc dislocation is not longer recommended. Selective grinding can be done in "occlusally sensitive" patients with pain or dysfunction of muscular origin. The adjustment should have a limited character, and is not indicated as preventive measure. Occlusal prosthetic reconstruction is in most patients not indicated for reasons linked to TMD because the aetiologic relationships between TMD and loss of molars has not been established. In cases of rheumatoid arthritis, osteo-arthrosis and spondylitis ankylosans, occlusal changes can occur due to the degeneration of the joint components. After the initial phase of treatment replacing the lost molars by prostheses in these particular patients, results in unloading of the joints and in decreasing recurrence of symptoms.

  11. Alloplastic total temporomandibular joint replacements: do they perform like natural joints? Prospective cohort study with a historical control.

    PubMed

    Wojczyńska, A; Leiggener, C S; Bredell, M; Ettlin, D A; Erni, S; Gallo, L M; Colombo, V

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the biomechanics of existing total alloplastic reconstructions of temporomandibular joints (TMJ). Fifteen patients with unilateral or bilateral TMJ total joint replacements and 15 healthy controls were evaluated via dynamic stereometry technology. This non-invasive method combines three-dimensional imaging of the subject's anatomy with jaw tracking. It provides an insight into the patient's jaw joint movements in real time and provides a quantitative evaluation. The patients were also evaluated clinically for jaw opening, protrusive and laterotrusive movements, pain, interference with eating, and satisfaction with the joint replacements. The qualitative assessment revealed that condyles of bilateral total joint replacements displayed similar basic motion patterns to those of unilateral prostheses. Quantitatively, mandibular movements of artificial joints during opening, protrusion, and laterotrusion were all significantly shorter than those of controls. A significantly restricted mandibular range of motion in replaced joints was also observed clinically. Fifty-three percent of patients suffered from chronic pain at rest and 67% reported reduced chewing function. Nonetheless, patients declared a high level of satisfaction with the replacement. This study shows that in order to gain a comprehensive understanding of complex therapeutic measures, a multidisciplinary approach is needed.

  12. Long-term stability of conservative orthodontic treatment in a patient with temporomandibular joint disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mitsui, Silvia Naomi; Yasue, Akihiro; Kuroda, Shingo; Tanaka, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the orthodontic treatment of a 20-year-old patient with dental crowding and temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs). The patient presented moderate anterior crowding with a Class I molar relationship and masticatory disturbance in the mandibular position induced by previous splint therapy. Orthodontic treatment with multi-bracket appliance was initiated to correct the anterior crowding in both dental arches, after the extraction of first premolars and third molars, and also to maintain the splint-induced position of the condyles. After 26 months of treatment, an acceptable occlusion was achieved without any TMD symptoms. After 18-month retention, flattening on the right condyle was observed, possibly as an adaptative remodeling. After 16-year retention period, the occlusion was maintained without recurrence of any TMD symptoms, indicating a long-term stability of occlusion and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) components. Our results suggest the possibility of compromised treatment in patients with TMD to achieve a long-term stability in occlusion and TMJ function. PMID:27556023

  13. Dexmedetomidine premedication for fiberoptic intubation in patients of temporomandibular joint ankylosis: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kumkum; Jain, Manish; Gupta, Prashant K.; Rastogi, Bhawna; Saxena, Sanjeev K.; Manngo, Aman

    2012-01-01

    Background: Fiberoptic intubation is the gold standard technique for difficult airway management in patients of temporomandibular joint. This study was aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of dexmedetomidine as premedication with propofol infusion for fiberoptic intubation. Methods: Consent was obtained from 46 adult patients of temporomandibular joint ankylosis, scheduled for gap arthroplasty. They were enrolled for thisdouble-blind, randomized, prospective clinical trial with two treatment groups – Group D and Group P, of 23 patients each. Group D patients had received premedication of dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg infused over 10 min followed by sedative propofol infusion and the control Group P patients were given only propofol infusion to achieve sedation. Condition achieved at endoscopy, intubating conditions, hemodynamic changes and postoperative events were evaluated as primary outcome. Results: The fiberoptic intubation was successful with satisfactory endoscopic and intubating condition in all patients. Dexmedetomidine premedication has provided satisfactory conditions for fiberoptic intubation and attenuated the hemodynamic response of fiberoptic intubation than the propofol group. Conclusion: Fiberoptic intubation was found to be easier with dexmedetomidine premedication along with sedative infusion of propofol with complete amnesia of the procedure, hemodynamic stability and preservation of patent airway. PMID:23162393

  14. Clinical evaluation of the temporomandibular joint following orthognathic surgery--multiple logistic regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Shigeru; Kino, Koji; Kobayashi, Jyunji; Yoshimasu, Hidemi; Amagasa, Teruo

    2005-06-01

    This study compares temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD) symptoms before and after bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy, and identifies predictive factors for the postoperative TMD symptoms by assessing the adjusted odds ratio using multiple logistic regression analysis. A consecutive series of 37 cases treated only with bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy were evaluated. New postoperative TMD symptoms appeared in 9 cases, preoperative TMD symptoms disappeared in 6 cases, and TMD symptoms were unchanged in 5 cases. The median period until the interincisal opening range attained 40 mm was 5 months (range, from 2 to 15 months). Age was a positive factor in patients with postoperative TMD symptoms, with an odds ratio of 1.43 (95 percent confidence interval, from 1.05 to 1.93). In addition, the maximum value of the bilateral setback distance of more than 9 mm was a positive factor of 6.95 (95 percent confidence interval, from 1.06 to 45.42). We concluded that surgical correction in skeletal malocclusion may affect temporomandibular joint dysfunction symptoms. PMID:16187616

  15. Is there a niche for arthroscopic laser surgery of the temporomandibular joint?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuebler-Moritz, Michael; Hering, Peter; Bachmaier, Uli; Schiessl, Robert; Rueschoff, Josef; Meister, Joerg

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to investigate and compare effects of currently available laser systems at different wavelengths (XeCl excimer laser, Holmium:YAG laser, Erbium:YAG laser) on porcine articulating facets, capsule and meniscus of the temporomandibular joint via photomacroscopy, light and scanning electron microscopy. From a critical review of the relevant literature and the preliminary observations of this investigation, it appears that the Neodymium:YAG laser is inappropriate for TMJ arthroscopic surgery with regard to the huge thermal injury caused to the remaining tissue. The Holmium:YAG laser suffers from remarkable photomechanical and photothermal side effects, whereas the Erbium:YAG laser ablates temporomandibular joint tissue efficiently with minimal adjacent damage--similar to the XeCl excimer laser, without entailing the risk of potential mutagenity. To sum up, it can be concluded that there is a clinical need for laser- assisted arthroscopic surgery of the craniomandibular articulation. Nevertheless, at present none of the available laser systems meet the medical demands completely. Currently, the Erbium:YAG laser seems to be the most suitable for TMJ arthroscopic surgery.

  16. Activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 in overloaded temporomandibular joint, and induction of osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shirakura, Maya; Tanimoto, Keiji; Eguchi, Hidetaka; Miyauchi, Mutsumi; Nakamura, Hideaki; Hiyama, Keiko; Tanimoto, Kotaro; Tanaka, Eiji; Takata, Takashi; Tanne, Kazuo

    2010-03-19

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf) was previously shown to be expressed specifically in the condylar cartilage of temporomandibular joint-osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) model rats. Here we demonstrate for the first time that hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (Hif-1alpha) is activated in mature chondrocytes of temporomandibular joint-osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) model rat by mechanical overload, and that activated Hif-1 in chondrocytes can induce osteoclastogenesis via repression of osteoprotegerin (Opg) expression. In rat TMJs, degeneration of the condylar cartilage became prominent in proportion to the duration of overloading. Hif-1alpha expression was observed specifically in mature and hypertrophic chondrocytes, and Hif-1alpha-positivity, level of Vegf expression, and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cell numbers all increased in the same manner. When ATDC5 cells induced differentiation by insulin were cultured under hypoxia, Hif-1alpha induction was observed in mature stage, but not in immature stage. Inductions of Hif-1-target genes showed a similar expression pattern. In addition, expression of Opg decreased in hypoxia, and Hif-1alpha played a role, in part, in its regulation. PMID:20171183

  17. Long-term stability of conservative orthodontic treatment in a patient with temporomandibular joint disorder.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Silvia Naomi; Yasue, Akihiro; Kuroda, Shingo; Tanaka, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the orthodontic treatment of a 20-year-old patient with dental crowding and temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs). The patient presented moderate anterior crowding with a Class I molar relationship and masticatory disturbance in the mandibular position induced by previous splint therapy. Orthodontic treatment with multi-bracket appliance was initiated to correct the anterior crowding in both dental arches, after the extraction of first premolars and third molars, and also to maintain the splint-induced position of the condyles. After 26 months of treatment, an acceptable occlusion was achieved without any TMD symptoms. After 18-month retention, flattening on the right condyle was observed, possibly as an adaptative remodeling. After 16-year retention period, the occlusion was maintained without recurrence of any TMD symptoms, indicating a long-term stability of occlusion and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) components. Our results suggest the possibility of compromised treatment in patients with TMD to achieve a long-term stability in occlusion and TMJ function. PMID:27556023

  18. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: Case reports and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Gayle, Eryka A.; Young, Sean M.; McKenna, Samuel J.; McNaughton, Candace D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular (TM) joint is rare, but it is associated with high risk for significant morbidity. Objective We reviewed the available literature regarding the presentation, evaluation, treatment, and clinical course of TM joint septic arthritis, focusing on elements relevant to emergency medicine physicians. Case Reports In the first case, a healthy 6-year-old boy presented with fever and trismus; computed tomography with contrast revealed a TM joint effusion. After empiric intravenous antibiotics, intraoperative arthrocentesis of the TM joint returned one milliliter of flocculent fluid, which was cultured and grew pan-sensitive Streptococcus pyogenes. He was discharge home with amoxicillin/clavulanate and experienced complete resolution of his symptoms. In the second case, more than three weeks after extraction of her third molars, an 18-year-old woman presented with facial pain, swelling, and trismus and was found to have a loculated abscess involving the left masseteric and pterygomandibular spaces with extension to the left deep temporal region and the skull base. She experienced a complicated postoperative course and required multiple procedures and intravenous antibiotics for growth of multiple bacteria. More than a month later underwent TM joint arthrotomy for TM joint septic arthritis, and she was found to have acute osteomyelitis. She continued to require multiple treatment modalities; twenty months after her initial presentation, she underwent left total TM joint arthroplasty for fibrous ankylosis of the TM joint. Conclusion Septic arthritis of the TM joint may be caused by hematogenous spread of distant infection or local spread of deep masticator space infections. Patients may present with TM joint septic arthritis acutely or sub-acutely. Septic arthritis of the TM joint should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients who present with trismus and pain or fever. PMID:23896057

  19. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders and radiologically observed abnormalities in the condyles of the temporomandibular joints of professional violin and viola players.

    PubMed

    Kovero, O; Könönen, M

    1995-04-01

    The frequency of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and radiologically observed abnormalities in the condyles of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of professional violin and viola players was investigated in 26 orchestra violinists/violists (VP group) and in their sex-, age-, and dentition-matched controls (C group). A routine clinical stomatognathic examination, a standardized interview, and radiography of the condyles were carried out for all subjects. The VP group showed a higher frequency of subjective symptoms and clinical signs of TMD, such as palpatory tenderness of masticatory muscles, TMJ clicking, painful mandibular movements, and deviation on opening or closing. There was no difference between the groups in terms of radiologic findings in the condyles. Weekly playing hours correlated positively with some signs of TMD. It is concluded that professional violin or viola playing might be a predisposing factor for TMD. PMID:7610780

  20. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders and radiologically observed abnormalities in the condyles of the temporomandibular joints of professional violin and viola players.

    PubMed

    Kovero, O; Könönen, M

    1995-04-01

    The frequency of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and radiologically observed abnormalities in the condyles of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of professional violin and viola players was investigated in 26 orchestra violinists/violists (VP group) and in their sex-, age-, and dentition-matched controls (C group). A routine clinical stomatognathic examination, a standardized interview, and radiography of the condyles were carried out for all subjects. The VP group showed a higher frequency of subjective symptoms and clinical signs of TMD, such as palpatory tenderness of masticatory muscles, TMJ clicking, painful mandibular movements, and deviation on opening or closing. There was no difference between the groups in terms of radiologic findings in the condyles. Weekly playing hours correlated positively with some signs of TMD. It is concluded that professional violin or viola playing might be a predisposing factor for TMD.

  1. Protocol for concomitant temporomandibular joint custom-fitted total joint reconstruction and orthognathic surgery utilizing computer-assisted surgical simulation.

    PubMed

    Movahed, Reza; Teschke, Marcus; Wolford, Larry M

    2013-12-01

    Clinicians who address temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pathology and dentofacial deformities surgically can perform the surgery in 1 stage or 2 separate stages. The 2-stage approach requires the patient to undergo 2 separate operations and anesthesia, significantly prolonging the overall treatment. However, performing concomitant TMJ and orthognathic surgery (CTOS) in these cases requires careful treatment planning and surgical proficiency in the 2 surgical areas. This article presents a new treatment protocol for the application of computer-assisted surgical simulation in CTOS cases requiring reconstruction with patient-fitted total joint prostheses. The traditional and new CTOS protocols are described and compared. The new CTOS protocol helps decrease the preoperative workup time and increase the accuracy of model surgery.

  2. Temporomandibular joint sounds: a critique of techniques for recording and analysis.

    PubMed

    Widmer, C G

    1989-01-01

    Sonography, or the graphic recording of sounds, has been proposed as an objective measure of various pathological conditions in the temporomandibular joint. Various electronic devices have been developed to enhance our ability to auscultate the joint, monitor the timing of the sounds with jaw movement, and analyze the characteristics of the sound; the intent of these devices is to diagnose the intracapsular condition "objectively." This review paper critically evaluates the advantages and limitations of this technique. Based on the existing literature, these instruments can record sounds; however, the origin of these sounds is uncertain, since room noise, skin and hair sounds, respiration, arterial blood flow, and cross-over noises from the opposite TMJ have not been excluded as possible artifacts of the recording. More important, the diagnostic specificity, as an indicator of each type of TMJ disease, has not been clearly and consistently demonstrated with the sonographic technique.

  3. Estrogen receptors in the temporomandibular joint of the baboon (Papio cynocephalus): an autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Aufdemorte, T.B.; Van Sickels, J.E.; Dolwick, M.F.; Sheridan, P.J.; Holt, G.R.; Aragon, S.B.; Gates, G.A.

    1986-04-01

    Using an autoradiographic method, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) complex of five aged female baboons was studied for the presence of receptors for estradiol-17 beta. The study was performed in an effort to learn more of the pathophysiology of this joint and in an attempt to provide a scientific basis to explain the reported preponderance of women who seek and undergo treatment for signs and symptoms referable to the TMJ. This experiment revealed that the TMJ complex contains numerous cells with receptors for estrogen, particularly the articular surface of the condyle, articular disk, and capsule. Muscles of mastication contained relatively fewer receptors. As a result, one may postulate a role for the sex steroid hormones in the maintenance, repair, and/or pathogenesis of the TMJ. Additional studies are necessary to fully determine the significance of hormone receptors in this site and any correlation between diseases of the TMJ and the endocrine status of affected patients.

  4. Custom Anatomical 3D Spacer for Temporomandibular Joint Resection and Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Green, John Marshall; Lawson, Sarah T; Liacouras, Peter C; Wise, Edward M; Gentile, Michael A; Grant, Gerald Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Two cases are presented using a two-stage approach and a custom antibiotic spacer placement. Temporomandibular reconstruction can be very demanding and accomplished with a variety of methods in preparation of a total joint and ramus reconstruction with total joint prostheses (TMJ Concepts, Ventura, CA). Three-dimensional reconstructions from diagnostic computed tomography were used to establish a virtually planned resection which included the entire condyle-ramus complex. From these data, digital designs were used to manufacture molds to facilitate intraoperative fabrication of precise custom anatomic spacers from rapidly setting antibiotic-impregnated polymethyl methacrylate. Molds were manufactured using vat polymerization (stereolithography) with a photopolymer in the first case and powder bed fusion (electron beam melting) with Ti6AL4V for the second. Surgical methodology and the use of molds for intraoperative spacer fabrication for each case are discussed. PMID:26889353

  5. Alterations of the rat temporomandibular joint in functional posterior displacement of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Cholasueksa, Purisa; Warita, Hiroyuki; Soma, Kunimichi

    2004-10-01

    Functional malocclusion that induces posterior condylar displacement may affect the remodeling processes of the temporomandibular joint structures. We tested the hypothesis that intermittent posterior condylar displacement due to functional malocclusion traumatizes condylar cartilage and joint innervated nerve fibers. Thirty-nine eight-week-old Wistar rats were used. To induce functional posterior condylar displacement, guiding appliances were attached to maxillary incisors of 24 rats for four, seven, and 14 days. Fifteen normal rats served as controls. Sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin or processed for immunohistochemistry of protein gene product 9.5 and growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43). Functional posterior condylar displacement led to a diminution in proliferative cells, reduction in cartilage width, and re-expression of GAP-43-immunoreactive nerve fibers. These results indicate that intermittent posterior condylar displacement due to functional malocclusion causes dysfunctional remodeling of condylar cartilage and nerve injury.

  6. A model to simulate the mastication motion at the temporomandibular joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villamil, Marta B.; Nedel, Luciana P.; Freitas, Carla M. D. S.; Maciel, Anderson

    2005-04-01

    The understanding of the mastication system motion is essential to maxillofacial surgeons and dentists in the procedures concerning jaw and teeth corrections. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ), despite its complexity, is one of the most frequently used joints of the human body. The incidence of a great number of injuries in this joint is influenced not only by its regular use during the mastication, but also by the strong forces applied by the muscles and the wide range of movements it is capable to perform. In this work, we propose the development of a jaw simulator capable of reproducing the complete mastication movement. Our jaw simulator is basically composed by three triangle meshes representing the 3D model of the cranium, mandible and teeth; and an anatomically-based joint model conceived to represent the TMJ motion. The polygonal meshes describing the bones and teeth are obtained from CT images and the jaw motion is simulated using the joint model guided by a 3D motion curve obtained from the composition of the standard 2D curves available in the medical literature. The scale, height and width of these original curves are modified to simulate different kind and size of food and to represent the movements" variability depending on patient morphology (teeth, bones, joints and muscles). The evaluation of preliminary results involved the comparison of a dynamic MRI of a healthy person with the respective simulation.

  7. TNF Accelerates Death of Mandibular Condyle Chondrocytes in Rats with Biomechanical Stimulation-Induced Temporomandibular Joint Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyun; Zhang, Jing; Jing, Lei; Liao, Lifan; Wang, Meiqing

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if temporomandibular joint chondrocyte apoptosis is induced in rats with dental biomechanical stimulation and what a role TNF takes. Methods Thirty-two rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 8/group) and exposed to incisor mal-occlusion induced by unilateral anterior crossbite biomechanical stimulation. Two groups were sampled at 2 or 4 weeks. The other two groups were treated with local injections of a TNF inhibitor or PBS into the temporomandibular joints area at 2 weeks and then sampled at 4 weeks. Twenty-four rats either served as unilateral anterior crossbite mock operation controls (n = 8/group) with sampling at 2 or 4 weeks or received a local injection of the TNF inhibitor at 2 weeks with sampling at 4 weeks. Chondrocytes were isolated from the temporomandibular joints of 6 additional rats and treated with TNF in vitro. Joint samples were assessed using Hematoxylin&eosin, Safranin O, TUNEL and immunohistochemistry staining, real-time PCR, fluorogenic activity assays and Western blot analyses. The isolated chondrocytes were also analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Unilateral anterior crossbite stimulation led to temporomandibular joint cartilage degradation, associated with an increase in TUNEL-positive chondrocytes number, caspase-9 expression levels, and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria at 2 weeks without changes in TNF and caspase-8 levels until after 4 weeks. TNF stimulated apoptosis of the isolated chondrocytes and up-regulated caspase-8 expression, but did not change caspase-9 expression levels. Local injection of TNF inhibitor down-regulated caspase-8 expression and reduced TUNEL-positive cell number, but did not reverse cartilage thickness reduction, caspase-9 up-regulation or cytochrome c release. Conclusions Unilateral anterior crossbite stimulation induces mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis of articular chondrocytes. TNF accelerated the unilateral anterior crossbite induced chondrocytes apoptosis via death

  8. Osteochondroma of the Temporomandibular Joint Treated by Means of Condylectomy and Immediate Reconstruction with a Total Stock Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Caubet-Biayna, Jorge; Iriarte-Ortabe, José-Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background Osteochondromas are one of the most common benign tumours of bone, but they are rare in the craniofacial region. These condylar tumours have been variably treated, including resection through local excision or condylectomy with or without reconstruction. Methods A case of osteochondroma of the mandibular condyle and cranial base arising concurrently in the 76 years old patient was presented. The surgical excision of the skull base lesion and condylectomy with immediate reconstruction of temporomandibular joint was applied. Results Based on the history, clinical examination and radiographic findings, osteochondroma of the skull base was diagnosed, with a concurrent lesion of the condylar process. Treatment methods for this patient included excision of the skull base tumour and condylectomy with immediate temporomandibular joint reconstruction using appropriately sized stock total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. At the 24 month follow-up, patient was free of pain and her maximal incisal opening was maintained, with no radiographic evidence of tumour recurrence or failure of the device. Conclusions Temporomandibular joint stock total replacement prosthesis became a good option to reconstruct both the fossa and the condyle in a one-stage surgery, due to the fact that both the condylar/mandibular and the fossa implants were stable in situ from the moment of fixation, with a good outcome at 24 month follow-up, with no loosening of the screws nor failure of the device. PMID:24421981

  9. The efficacy of acupuncture and decompression splints in the treatment of temporomandibular joint pain-dysfunction syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Yu-Lu, Si-Lei; Zhang, Bingxin; Bocanegra-Pérez, Sacramento; Durán-Moreno, David; López-Márquez, Adriana; Knezevic, Milan; Castellano-Navarro, José-María; Limiñana-Cañal, José-María

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The goal of the present study was to evaluate the results of applying acupuncture or occlusal decompression splints in the treatment of patients diagnosed with the temporomandibular joint pain-dysfunction syndrome. Design of the study: We conducted a randomized clinical trial including 20 patients to whom the mentioned treatments were applied. Results were evaluated through an analogue pain scale, measurements of mouth opening and jaw lateral deviation in millimetres, and assessment of sensitivity to pressure on different points: preauricular, masseter muscle, temporal muscle and trapezius. Parameters were evaluated before and 30 days after the treatment. For standardized pressure, we used a pressure algometer. Results: Patients treated with decompression splints showed reductions in subjective pain and pain upon pressure on temporal, masseter and trapezius muscles, as well as increased mouth opening after the treatment. Patients treated with acupuncture showed pain reduction in the short term and improvements in all of the evaluated para-meters (stronger pressure was required to produce pain; mouth opening was improved). Conclusion: Acupuncture was an effective complement and/or an acceptable alternative to decompression splints in the treatment of myofascial pain and temporomandibular joint pain-dysfunction syndrome. Key words:Temporomandibular joint, temporomandibular dysfunction, acupuncture, decompression splint, arthralgia, myofascial pain, joint palpation. PMID:22549668

  10. CLINICAL APPLICATION OF SPHARM-PDM TO QUANTIFY TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT OSTEOARTHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Paniagua, Beatriz; Cevidanes, Lucia; Walker, David; Zhu, Hongtu; Guo, Ruixin; Styner, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The severe bone destruction and resorption that can occur in Osteoarthritis of the Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) is associated with significant pain and limited joint mobility. However, there is no validated method for the quantification of discrete changes in joint morphology in early diagnosis or assessment of disease progression or treatment effects. To achieve this, the objective of this cross-sectional study was to use simulated bone resorption on cone-beam CT (CBCT) to study condylar morphological variation in subjects with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis (OA). The first part of this study assessed the hypothesis that the agreement between the simulated defects and the shape analysis measurements made of these defects would be within 0.5mm (the image’s spatial resolution). One hundred seventy-nine discrete bony defects measuring 3mm and 6mm were simulated on the surfaces of 3D models derived from CBCT images of asymptomatic patients using ITK-Snap software. SPHARM shape correspondence was used to localize and quantify morphological differences of each resorption model with the original asymptomatic control. The size of each simulated defect was analyzed and the values obtained compared to the true defect size. The statistical analysis revealed very high probabilities that mean shape correspondence measured defects within 0.5mm of the true defect size. 95% confidence intervals (CI) were (2.67,2.92) and (5.99,6.36) and 95% prediction intervals (PI) were (2.22,3.37) and (5.54, 6.82), respectively for 3mm and 6mm simulated defects. The second part of this study applied shape correspondence methods to a longitudinal sample of TMJ OA patients. The mapped longitudinal stages of TMJ OA progression identified morphological variants or subtypes, which may explain the heterogeneity of the clinical presentation. This study validated shape correspondence as a method to precisely and predictably quantify 3D condylar resorption. PMID:21185694

  11. Clinical application of SPHARM-PDM to quantify temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, Beatriz; Cevidanes, Lucia; Walker, David; Zhu, Hongtu; Guo, Ruixin; Styner, Martin

    2011-07-01

    The severe bone destruction and resorption that can occur in osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is associated with significant pain and limited joint mobility. However, there is no validated method for the quantification of discrete changes in joint morphology in early diagnosis or assessment of disease progression or treatment effects. To achieve this, the objective of this cross-sectional study was to use simulated bone resorption on cone-beam CT (CBCT) to study condylar morphological variation in subjects with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis (OA). The first part of this study assessed the hypothesis that the agreement between the simulated defects and the shape analysis measurements made of these defects would be within 0.5mm (the image's spatial resolution). One hundred seventy-nine discrete bony defects measuring 3mm and 6mm were simulated on the surfaces of 3D models derived from CBCT images of asymptomatic patients using ITK-Snap software. SPHARM shape correspondence was used to localize and quantify morphological differences of each resorption model with the original asymptomatic control. The size of each simulated defect was analyzed and the values obtained compared to the true defect size. The statistical analysis revealed very high probabilities that mean shape correspondence measured defects within 0.5mm of the true defect size. 95% confidence intervals (CI) were (2.67, 2.92) and (5.99, 6.36) and 95% prediction intervals (PI) were (2.22, 3.37) and (5.54, 6.82), respectively for 3mm and 6mm simulated defects. The second part of this study applied shape correspondence methods to a longitudinal sample of TMJ OA patients. The mapped longitudinal stages of TMJ OA progression identified morphological variants or subtypes, which may explain the heterogeneity of the clinical presentation. This study validated shape correspondence as a method to precisely and predictably quantify 3D condylar resorption. PMID:21185694

  12. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction and orthognathic surgery: a retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Relations between maxillo-mandibular deformities and TMJ disorders have been the object of different studies in medical literature and there are various opinions concerning the alteration of TMJ dysfunction after orthognathic surgery. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate TMJ disorders changes before and after orthognathic surgery, and to assess the risk of creating new TMJ symptoms on asymptomatic patients. Methods A questionnaire was sent to 176 patients operated at the Maxillo-Facial Service of the Lille's 2 Universitary Hospital Center (Chairman Pr Joël Ferri) from 01.01.2006 to 01.01.2008. 57 patients (35 females and 22 males), age range from 16 to 65 years old, filled the questionnaire. The prevalence and the results on pain, sounds, clicking, joint locking, limited mouth opening, and tenseness were evaluated comparing different subgroups of patients. Results TMJ symptoms were significantly reduced after treatment for patients with pre-operative symptoms. The overall subjective treatment outcome was: improvement for 80.0% of patients, no change for 16.4% of patients, and an increase of symptoms for 3.6% of them. Thus, most patients were very satisfied with the results. However the appearance of new onset of TMJ symptoms is common. There was no statistical difference in the prevalence of preoperative TMJ symptoms and on postoperative results in class II compared to class III patients. Conclusions These observations demonstrate that: there is a high prevalence of TMJ disorders in dysgnathic patients; most of patients with preoperative TMJ signs and symptoms can improve TMJ dysfunction and pain levels can be reduced by orthognathic treatment; a percentage of dysgnathic patients who were preoperatively asymptomatic can develop TMJ disorders after surgery but this risk is low. PMID:21083902

  13. Effect of orthognathic surgery on the temporomandibular joint in patients with anterior open bite.

    PubMed

    Aghabeigi, B; Hiranaka, D; Keith, D A; Kelly, J P; Crean, S J

    2001-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) signs and symptoms in patients with anterior open bite. The influence of orthognathic surgery on the TMJ in these patients and the interaction of occlusal and psychologic variables on the presence and/or persistence of pain was studied. A retrospective survey of 83 patients with an anterior open bite who underwent orthognathic surgery was carried out. Records were examined for the prevalence of abnormal TMJ signs and symptoms, including pain. A survey was mailed to these patients that consisted of: (1) the TMJ Scale, (2) the Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL90), (3) the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), and (4) a visual analog scale on which patients indicated their degree of satisfaction with the procedure. Thirty-seven (42%) patients responded to the survey, and 13 (15%) also attended a clinical and radiographic examination. Multiple regression analysis was used for statistical analysis of the factors contributing to the presence and/or persistence of pain. In the preoperative group, the prevalence of pain was 32%, dysfunction 40%, and limitation of opening 7%. Age and gender were significantly associated with the presence of pain. The overall prevalence of abnormal TMJ signs and symptoms was not significantly different after orthognathic surgery. An abnormal psychologic profile was the most significant factor associated with the presence and/or persistence of pain. It is concluded that that the prevalence of temporomandibular disorders in anterior open bite patients increases with age, is significantly higher in females, and is not influenced by other occlusal variables. Furthermore, orthognathic surgery does not significantly influence temporomandibular disorders in patients with anterior open bite. Female patients, particularly those with an abnormal psychologic profile, are at a higher risk of persistent postoperative TMJ pain. PMID:11482294

  14. Histological study of the human temporo-mandibular joint and its surrounding muscles.

    PubMed

    Bravetti, P; Membre, H; El Haddioui, A; Gérard, H; Fyard, J P; Mahler, P; Gaudy, J F

    2004-10-01

    This is a histological study of the human temporo-mandibular joint and its surrounding muscles. Using a microscopic study of serial sections from anatomical specimens from six subjects, the detailed anatomy of the joint is presented with particular regard to the histology. This study has allowed, in particular, the description of the ligaments and capsule as well as the insertions of the masticatory muscles (temporalis, masseter, lateral pterygoid) on this joint. These observations are then compared with the anatomical and histological data already reported on this subject. This study shows that the bulk of the muscular fibres of the lateral pterygoid passes under the foot of the disc is attached over the whole height of the condylar, unite and extend as far as the medial pole of the joint under the insertion of the articular disc. An insertion of the temporo-masseter musculo-tendinous complex on the anterior and lateral capsulo-discal structures was observed. The lateral pterygoid is composed of a succession of tendinous and fleshy fibres. This study confirms the thickening of the lateral capsule that corresponds to a lateral collateral ligament, and the absence of a medial collateral ligament. Medial stability is conferred by the lateral ligament of the contralateral joint.

  15. Therapeutic effect of hyaluronic acid on experimental osteoarthrosis of ovine temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Kim, C H; Lee, B J; Yoon, J; Seo, K M; Park, J H; Lee, J W; Cho, E S; Hong, J J; Lee, Y S; Park, J H

    2001-10-01

    A symptomatic relief by hyaluronic acid (HA, MW: 3.5 x 10(6)), which is synthesized by Streptococcus spp, was investigated in experimental ovine osteoarthrosis. Bilateral osteoarthrosis (OA) of the temporo-mandibular joints (TMJs) was induced by perforating discs and by scrapping subchondral condylar surface. HA was intra-articularly injected into the left joints of 6 sheep on 7, 10, 14, 17 and 21 days after the operation and physiological saline as the control was injected into the contralateral (right) joints on the same day. Three sheep were killed at I month post-operation (MPO) and the remaining three sheep were killed at 3 MPO. Various responses such as proliferation of fibrous tissue, denudation, erosion, osteophyte formation, subcortical cyst formation and ankylosis were observed radiographically and histopathologically. The treatment of HA ameliorated the degenerative changes and lowered the osteoarthrotic score in the left joints at I MPO (9.96 vs 5.81) and 3 MPO (10.86 vs 5.29) compared to the right joints. These results indicate that a repeated intra-articular injection of HA inhibits the progression of OA in ovine TMJs by inducing the development of articular cartilage and by reducing the proliferation of fibrotic tissue.

  16. Radiologic Techniques Used to Evaluate the Temporomandibular Joint; I. Conventional Methods

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, David; Pettigrew, James; Ram, Carol; Joseph, Peter M.

    1984-01-01

    Symptoms of temporomandibular joint pathology are present in a relatively high proportion of the population. Conventional radiographic techniques used to evaluate the morphology of the joint provide data which may be difficult to interpret. These techniques are reviewed briefly and their interpretational shortcomings are noted. Computed tomography is currently being used by some clinicians to evaluate the joint. This technique may also yield data which are difficult to interpret. Extended processing of CT data to provide three-dimensional images of the joint enhances the technique as a means of diagnosing hard tissue pathology, but despite reports in the literature detailing its use in diagnosing soft tissue pathology, CT is not optimal for this purpose. The introduction of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging provides a means of examining the soft tissues of the joint in either two- or three-dimensional images and has the advantage over all previous techniques in that the patient is not subjected to ionizing radiation during the scan process. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9 PMID:6594954

  17. Identification of prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4 in the synovial fluid of painful, dysfunctional temporomandibular joints.

    PubMed

    Quinn, J H; Bazan, N G

    1990-09-01

    It has been hypothesized that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) should be present in the synovial fluid of inflamed, dysfunctional temporomandibular joints. An assay to identify PGE2 and LTB4 and platelet-activating factor (PAF) was used, and a strong correlation between the levels of these lipid mediators of pain and inflammation and an index of clinical joint pathology was found. PMID:2168477

  18. Using interactive multi-media to teach the anatomy and pathology of the temporo-mandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Demirjian, A; David, B

    1995-01-01

    An interactive multi-media courseware on the Temporo-mandibular Joint is presented. All the latest technological innovations are integrated into this document to make the learning process more enjoyable for the user. We believe that the complex anatomy and physiology of this joint, and mostly its various disorders will be better understood with this interactive multi-media approach. The courseware is intended for continuing education in dentistry and medicine.

  19. Using interactive multi-media to teach the anatomy and pathology of the temporo-mandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Demirjian, A; David, B

    1995-01-01

    An interactive multi-media courseware on the Temporo-mandibular Joint is presented. All the latest technological innovations are integrated into this document to make the learning process more enjoyable for the user. We believe that the complex anatomy and physiology of this joint, and mostly its various disorders will be better understood with this interactive multi-media approach. The courseware is intended for continuing education in dentistry and medicine. PMID:8591428

  20. Impact of functional mandibular advancement appliances on the temporomandibular joint - a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ivorra-Carbonell, Laura; Montiel-Company, José-María; Almerich-Silla, José-Manuel; Paredes-Gallardo, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Background Although many orthodontists have no doubts about the effectiveness of functional appliances for mandibular advancement, the impact on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is still in dispute. The objective of this systematic review is to examine the main effects on the TMJ of using functional appliances, both in healthy patients and in patients with a pre-existing disorder. Material and Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. Only systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), case-control studies and cohort studies were included. A detailed language-independent electronic search was conducted in the Pubmed, Scopus, Cochrane Library and Embase databases. All studies published between 2000 and 2015 were included. Results A total of 401 articles were identified. Of these, 159 were duplicates and were excluded. On reading the title and abstract, 213 articles were excluded because they did not answer the research question, leaving a total of 29 articles. These articles were read and assessed. Following critical reading of the full text, eight articles were excluded: seven because they were considered of low quality and one because it published redundant data. As a result, 21 articles were included. Conclusions After treatment with functional appliances, the condyle was found to be in a more advanced position, with remodelling of the condyle and adaptation of the morphology of the glenoid fossa. No significant adverse effects on the TMJ were observed in healthy patients and the appliances could improve joints that initially presented forward dislocation of the disk. Key words:Temporomandibular joint, TMJ, orthodontic appliances, functional, mandibular advancement, herbst appliance, bionator. PMID:27475694

  1. Engineered Microporosity: Enhancing the Early Regenerative Potential of Decellularized Temporomandibular Joint Discs

    PubMed Central

    Juran, Cassandra M.; Dolwick, M. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc is susceptible to numerous pathologies that may lead to structural degradation and jaw dysfunction. The limited treatment options and debilitating nature of severe temporomandibular disorders has been the primary driving force for the introduction and development of TMJ disc tissue engineering as an approach to alleviate this important clinical issue. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of laser micropatterning (LMP) ex vivo-derived TMJ disc scaffolds to enhance cellular integration, a major limitation to the development of whole tissue implant technology. LMP was incorporated into the decellularized extracellular matrix scaffold structure using a 40 W CO2 laser ablation system to drill an 8×16 pattern with a bore diameter of 120 μm through the scaffold thickness. Disc scaffolds were seeded with human neonatal-derived umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into chondrocytes at a density of 900 cells per mm2 and then assessed on days 1, 7, 14, and 21 of culture. Results derived from histology, PicoGreen DNA quantification, and cellular metabolism assays indicate that the LMP scaffolds improve cellular remodeling compared to the unworked scaffold over the 21-day culture period. Mechanical analysis further supports the use of the LMP showing the compressive properties of the LMP constructs closely represent native disc mechanics. The addition of an artificial path of infiltration by LMP culminated in improved chondrocyte adhesion, dispersion, and migration after extended culture aiding in recapitulating the native TMJ disc characteristics. PMID:25319941

  2. Size and form of the human temporomandibular joint in African-Americans and Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Cecilia; Magnusson, Tomas

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine contemporary human skull material for possible differences between Caucasians and African-Americans in respect to size and form of the temporomandibular condyles. The material consisted of a total of 129 Caucasian skulls (94 males and 35 females) and 76 African-American skulls (40 males and 36 females). Their mean age at death was 46 years for the Caucasians (range: 19-89 years) and 37 years for the African-Americans (range: 18-70 years). The mediolateral and anteroposterior dimensions of the 410 condyles were measured, and the condylar form was estimated using both anterior and superior views. No statistically significant differences could be found between Caucasians and African-Americans for any of the recorded variables. In conclusion, the present results lend no support for the existence of ethnic differences between the two groups examined in respect of temporomandibular joint size and form. It is likely that other factors such as evolution, overall cranial size, dietary differences, and genetic factors, irrespective of ethnicity, can explain the differences found in different skull samples.

  3. [Selective tomography in the study of the temporo-mandibular joint. (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Tréheux, A; Martin, G

    1975-10-01

    The majority of temporo-mandibular pains and dysfunction can be related directly or indirectly to the occlusal relationship of the teeth. The first manifestation is a slight reduction of the interarticular space, that must be early diagnosed, to prevent organic changes. Tomography is the one technique able to give a exact information of temporo-mandibular joint. But if we ask to that examination to detect very slight change of the interarticular space, the technique must be accurate and established in function of morphology of the patient; we have observed great variations in direction of the axis of condyles from one person to the other, and even from one side to the other for the same subject. So that, the first stage of the roentgen examination will be a radiograph taken in submentovertical (Hirtz) position. We measure the angle formed by the axis of each condyle and the sagittal median plane. The maim beam wil be directed in the axis of the condyle for sagittal tomography and perpendicularly for frontal tomography. It is important to state precisely that for tomography "closed mouth", the patient must be in terminal occlusion during the whole examination. For tomography "open mouth" we place a wedge between dental arches.

  4. Engineered microporosity: enhancing the early regenerative potential of decellularized temporomandibular joint discs.

    PubMed

    Juran, Cassandra M; Dolwick, M Franklin; McFetridge, Peter S

    2015-02-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc is susceptible to numerous pathologies that may lead to structural degradation and jaw dysfunction. The limited treatment options and debilitating nature of severe temporomandibular disorders has been the primary driving force for the introduction and development of TMJ disc tissue engineering as an approach to alleviate this important clinical issue. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of laser micropatterning (LMP) ex vivo-derived TMJ disc scaffolds to enhance cellular integration, a major limitation to the development of whole tissue implant technology. LMP was incorporated into the decellularized extracellular matrix scaffold structure using a 40 W CO2 laser ablation system to drill an 8×16 pattern with a bore diameter of 120 μm through the scaffold thickness. Disc scaffolds were seeded with human neonatal-derived umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into chondrocytes at a density of 900 cells per mm(2) and then assessed on days 1, 7, 14, and 21 of culture. Results derived from histology, PicoGreen DNA quantification, and cellular metabolism assays indicate that the LMP scaffolds improve cellular remodeling compared to the unworked scaffold over the 21-day culture period. Mechanical analysis further supports the use of the LMP showing the compressive properties of the LMP constructs closely represent native disc mechanics. The addition of an artificial path of infiltration by LMP culminated in improved chondrocyte adhesion, dispersion, and migration after extended culture aiding in recapitulating the native TMJ disc characteristics.

  5. Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Assessment of Mandibular Condylar Position in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction and in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Paknahad, Maryam; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Iranpour, Shiva; Mirhadi, Sabah; Paknahad, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem. The clinical significance of condyle-fossa relationships in the temporomandibular joint is a matter of controversy. Different studies have evaluated whether the position of the condyle is a predictor of the presence of temporomandibular disorder. Purpose. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the condylar position according to gender in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and healthy controls using cone-beam computed tomography. Materials and Methods. CBCT of sixty temporomandibular joints in thirty patients with TMD and sixty joints of thirty subjects without TMJ disorder was evaluated in this study. The condylar position was assessed on the CBCT images. The data were analyzed using Pearson chi-square test. Results. No statistically significant differences were found regarding the condylar position between symptomatic and asymptomatic groups. Posterior condylar position was more frequently observed in women and anterior condylar position was more prevalent in men in the symptomatic group. However, no significant differences in condylar position were found in asymptomatic subjects according to gender. Conclusion. This study showed no apparent association between condylar positioning and clinical findings in TMD patients. PMID:26681944

  6. On the development, morphology and function of the temporomandibular joint in the light of the orofacial system.

    PubMed

    Fanghänel, Jochen; Gedrange, Tomasz

    2007-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint has a key role in the biocybernetic functional cycle of the orofacial system. It has developed as a "secondary joint" and displays a number of features relating to the articular tubercle, the mandibular condyle, the articular disc, the joint cartilage and the retroarticular pad. The joint cartilage of the mandibular condyle is a primary compensatory growth centre also comprising distant effects. The coordinate course of the mandibular movements is controlled by a complex reflex mechanism and neuronal controller cycles. Morphology, function and clinical aspects are of equal interest to both physicians and dentists.

  7. Local application of Aqua Titan improves symptoms of temporomandibular joint muscle disorder: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, K; Tsukimura, N; Ishizuka, T; Kohinata, K; Yonehara, Y; Honda, K

    2015-04-01

    Aqua Titan (AT), comprising microscopic titanium particles dispersed in water, has been reported to have beneficial effects on muscle tissue. This study investigated the effects of local application of AT on symptoms in patients with muscle disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) compared to patients with joint disorders of the TMJ. Sixteen patients with unilateral masseter muscle pain during motion (muscle disorder group) and six patients with unilateral TMJ pain during motion (joint disorder group) applied an AT-permeated patch over the painful area every night for 2 weeks. Symptoms were evaluated clinically at the initial visit and 1 and 2 weeks later. Clinical symptoms in the joint disorder group showed no tendency towards improvement after 2 weeks. In contrast, mouth opening range with/without pain, visual analogue scale (VAS) scores for pain during mouth opening and eating, and activities of daily living (ADL) scores in the muscle disorder group were improved significantly after 2 weeks. Multiple comparison tests in the muscle disorder group showed significant improvements in the VAS for eating and ADL score after 1 week. These results suggest that the AT patch has a potential supplementary role in the treatment of patients with muscle disorders of the TMJ.

  8. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A Review of Etiology, Clinical Management, and Tissue Engineering Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Meghan K.; MacBarb, Regina F.; Wong, Mark E.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiology reports state temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) affect up to 25% of the population, yet their etiology and progression are poorly understood. As a result, treatment options are limited and fail to meet the long-term demands of the relatively young patient population. TMD are a class of degenerative musculoskeletal conditions associated with morphological and functional deformities. In up to 70% of cases, TMD are accompanied by malpositioning of the TMJ disc, termed “internal derangement.” Though onset is not well characterized, correlations between internal derangement and osteoarthritic change have been identified. Due to the complex and unique nature of each TMD case, diagnosis requires patient-specific analysis accompanied by various diagnostic modalities. Likewise, treatment requires customized plans to address the specific characteristics of each patient’s disease. In the mechanically demanding and biochemically active environment of the TMJ, therapeutic approaches capable of restoring joint functionality while responding to changes in the joint have become a necessity. Capable of integration and adaptation in the TMJ, one such approach, tissue engineering, carries significant potential in the development of repair and replacement tissues. The following review presents a synopsis of etiology, current treatment methods, and the future of tissue engineering for repairing and/or replacing diseased joint components, specifically the mandibular condyle and TMJ disc. Preceding the current trends in tissue engineering is an analysis of native tissue characterization, toward identifying tissue engineering objectives and validation metrics for restoring healthy and functional structures of the TMJ. PMID:24278954

  9. Iatrogenic arteriovenous fistula of the superficial temporal artery after manual reduction of temporomandibular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Satoru; Takasato, Yoshio

    2011-09-01

    A 33-year-old man fell from a height and was referred to our hospital. Physical examination showed a swelling in the left preauricular region without laceration. No thrill or bruit was detected at this time. A face x-ray and a computed tomographic scan showed a left temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation, Le Fort I fractures, and a mandibular body fracture. Left TMJ dislocation was treated by manual reduction. Two days after admission, a swelling in the left preauricular region progressed, with thrill and bruit. Left external carotid artery angiograms showed an arteriovenous fistula with a dilated pouch near the left TMJ. The fistula was fed by the left superficial temporal artery and drained into the left superficial temporal vein. The fistula was successfully embolized using Tornado coils. This is the first case of an arteriovenous fistula of the superficial temporal artery after manual reduction of TMJ dislocation. PMID:21959481

  10. Successful Function-Preserving Therapy for Chondroblastoma of the Temporal Bone Involving the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Junkichi; Yoshimoto, Hitoshi; Ito, Shin; Ohba, Shinichi; Fujimaki, Mitsuhisa; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Yazawa, Masaki; Fujimiya, Nozomi; Hanaguri, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    We present a case involving a late diagnosis of chondroblastoma of the temporal skull base involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Following an initial misdiagnosis and unsuccessful treatment over a period of 5 years, the patient was referred to our department for further evaluation and possible surgical intervention for occlusal abnormalities, trismus, clicking of the TMJ, and hearing impairment. Based on preoperative immunochemical studies showing positive reaction of multinucleated giant cells for S-100 protein, the final diagnosis was chondroblastoma. The surgical approach – postauricular incision and total parotidectomy, with complete removal of the temporal bone, including the TMJ via the extended middle fossa – was successful in preserving facial nerves and diminishing clinical manifestations. This study highlights a misdiagnosed case in an effort to underline the importance of medical examinations and accurate differential diagnosis in cases involving any tumor mass in the temporal bone. PMID:21475594

  11. Successful function-preserving therapy for chondroblastoma of the temporal bone involving the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Junkichi; Yoshimoto, Hitoshi; Ito, Shin; Ohba, Shinichi; Fujimaki, Mitsuhisa; Ikeda, Katsuhisa; Yazawa, Masaki; Fujimiya, Nozomi; Hanaguri, Makoto

    2011-02-14

    We present a case involving a late diagnosis of chondroblastoma of the temporal skull base involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Following an initial misdiagnosis and unsuccessful treatment over a period of 5 years, the patient was referred to our department for further evaluation and possible surgical intervention for occlusal abnormalities, trismus, clicking of the TMJ, and hearing impairment. Based on preoperative immunochemical studies showing positive reaction of multinucleated giant cells for S-100 protein, the final diagnosis was chondroblastoma. The surgical approach - postauricular incision and total parotidectomy, with complete removal of the temporal bone, including the TMJ via the extended middle fossa - was successful in preserving facial nerves and diminishing clinical manifestations. This study highlights a misdiagnosed case in an effort to underline the importance of medical examinations and accurate differential diagnosis in cases involving any tumor mass in the temporal bone.

  12. Severe bony ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint on one side and contralateral adhesion: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Gon; Choi, Hang-Moon; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2015-01-01

    Bony fusion between the mandibular condyle and skull base involves temporomandibular joint (TMJ) bony ankylosis. This condition might originate from trauma, infection, or systemic disease. TMJ adhesion can develop after synovial damage. Both TMJ ankylosis and adhesion lead to functional impairment and pain. Here, we present a case of a 50-year-old female who had bony ankylosis of the right TMJ and adhesion of the left TMJ. She had otitis media in the right ear. A large mass in the right TMJ was observed on computed tomograph. Magnetic resonance image showed a large fused bone mass with normal bone marrow in the right TMJ and flattening of the condyle with a thin disk in the left TMJ. Gap arthroplasty with temporal fascia was performed on the right TMJ, and discectomy, high condylectomy, and coronoidectomy were performed on the left TMJ. During a 2-year follow-up after surgery, the patient had no recurrence. PMID:26125005

  13. Ganglion and Synovial Cyst of the Temporomandibular Joint: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Steen, M Willemijn; Hofstede, Diederik J

    2015-09-01

    Ganglion and synovial cysts of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are rare. Although histopathological findings differ, clinical presentation is comparable. This study adds a case report of a ganglion of the TMJ to existing literature and a review of all available case reports on ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. Including our own case report, we reviewed 49 cases of ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. They occurred in a female:male ratio of 3:1, at an median age of 46 years (range, 11-64 years). Patients mainly presented with preauricular swelling and pain. After imaging, the ganglion or synovial cyst was most commonly excised under general anesthesia. No recurrences were described. PMID:26495237

  14. [Analysis of the changes of temporomandibular joint under repeated +Gz stress].

    PubMed

    Sun, Z Y; Hu, M; Yin, Y

    2001-12-01

    Changes of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) under repeated +Gz stress were discussed. From the etiological point of view in TMJ, many papers in the fields of aviation medicine, microcirculation, maxillofacial surgery and bone surgery were reviewed. +Gz forces can cause inadequacy of blood of oxygen supply to TMJ area. This situation can be worsened by release of free radical agent and cellular factors, ischemia/reperfusion injury, and/or hemorrheologic changes. Furthermore, G-induced injury of cervical muscles and spine may break the maxillofacial muscle chain balance. In addition to the above factors, mental stress may do harm to TMJ. This paper introduced the researches on this area in an attempt to enlighten the concern about TMJ responses to increased +Gz acceleration forces. PMID:11887899

  15. Ganglion and Synovial Cyst of the Temporomandibular Joint: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Diederik J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Ganglion and synovial cysts of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are rare. Although histopathological findings differ, clinical presentation is comparable. This study adds a case report of a ganglion of the TMJ to existing literature and a review of all available case reports on ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. Including our own case report, we reviewed 49 cases of ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. They occurred in a female:male ratio of 3:1, at an median age of 46 years (range, 11–64 years). Patients mainly presented with preauricular swelling and pain. After imaging, the ganglion or synovial cyst was most commonly excised under general anesthesia. No recurrences were described. PMID:26495237

  16. [Congenital malformations of the temporo-mandibular joint and the mandibular ramus: Grafting vs distraction osteogenesis].

    PubMed

    Gallucci, A; Graillon, N; Foletti, J M; Chossegros, C; Cheynet, F

    2016-09-01

    Congenital deformities of the mandibular ramus and of the temporo-mandibular joint are treated by surgery since the early 20th century. However, morphological and functional results are often disappointing, accounting for iterative operations. Today, a clear consensus concerning the type of intervention to be proposed, and at what age it should be carried out does not yet exist. For mild cases, "conventional" orthognathic or osteogenic distraction procedures seem to work well, especially if they are carried out at the end of growth. In severe cases, it is often necessary to proceed in several surgical steps, usually starting with a chondrocostal graft, especially when interceptive surgery, performed before the end of growth, is preferred in order to improve the patient's quality of life.

  17. Transparotid Approach for the Treatment of Condylar Osteochondroma and Ankylosis of the Temporomandibular Joint.

    PubMed

    Makiguchi, Takaya; Yokoo, Satoshi; Kosugi, Kensuke

    2015-10-01

    Among the methods to treat temporomandibular joint (TMJ), preauricular, submandibular, retromandibular, and intraoral approaches have been described. These approaches, however, occasionally offer inadequate access, owing to the oblique course of the facial nerve, and access can be limited, especially to the medial and anterior part of the infratemporal fossa. The use of the transparotid approach can offer direct visualization of the facial nerves to prevent severe damage, and a wide work field can be achieved from the medial-anterior part of the infratemporal fossa to subcondylar region by retracting the mobilized facial nerves in either the superior or inferior direction. The 2 patients reported herein illustrate the addition of a transparotid approach to the standard procedures for the removal of an osteochondroma and condylectomy with displaced bone fragment for ankyloses of TMJ from the infratemporal fossa. PMID:26468828

  18. Internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: findings in the pediatric age group

    SciTech Connect

    Katzberg, R.W.; Tallents, R.H.; Hayakawa, K.; Miller, T.L.; Goske, M.J.; Wood, B.P.

    1985-01-01

    Findings in 31 pediatric patients with pain and dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are reported. The average age was 14 years and the average duration of symptoms was 21.4 months. Internal derangements were found in 29 patients (94%) and degenerative arthritis in 13 (42%). In 12 patients (39%), the problem could be traced to an injury to the jaw. Secondary condylar hypoplasia was associated with the meniscal abnormality in 3 patients (10%). Further awareness of internal derangements of the TMJ in the pediatric population should permit greater recognition of their etiology. It is important that threatment be initiated as soon as possible, not only to minimize the development of osseous disease in young adults but also to prevent facial growth deformities.

  19. Observation of three cases of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis and mandibular morphology during adolescence using helical CT.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K; Saito, I; Hanada, K; Hayashi, T

    2004-04-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis (OA) is a potential cause of craniofacial deformity. If TMJ OA appears during orthodontic treatment, the mandible usually rotates posteriorly, resulting in an unsatisfactory profile, especially in patients with pre-treatment mandibular retrusion. Although it is important to confirm the kind of TMJ pathosis at the start of orthodontic treatment, the relationship between TMJ OA, condylar remodelling and changes in craniofacial morphology remains unclear because of a lack of longitudinal studies. Elucidating this relationship might allow better prediction of post-treatment craniofacial morphology. In the present case reports, helical computed tomography and cephalometry were used to analyse relationships between the pattern and location of condylar remodelling and the changes in craniofacial morphology in three patients with TMJ OA. PMID:15089933

  20. Sleep Disorders and their Association with Laboratory Pain Sensitivity in Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael T.; Wickwire, Emerson M.; Grace, Edward G.; Edwards, Robert R.; Buenaver, Luis F.; Peterson, Stephen; Klick, Brendan; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: We characterized sleep disorder rates in temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) and evaluated possible associations between sleep disorders and laboratory measures of pain sensitivity. Design: Research diagnostic examinations were conducted, followed by two consecutive overnight polysomnographic studies with morning and evening assessments of pain threshold. Setting: Orofacial pain clinic and inpatient sleep research facility Participants: Fifty-three patients meeting research diagnostic criteria for myofascial TMD. Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: We determined sleep disorder diagnostic rates and conducted algometric measures of pressure pain threshold on the masseter and forearm. Heat pain threshold was measured on the forearm; 75% met self-report criteria for sleep bruxism, but only 17% met PSG criteria for active sleep bruxism. Two or more sleep disorders were diagnosed in 43% of patients. Insomnia disorder (36%) and sleep apnea (28.4%) demonstrated the highest frequencies. Primary insomnia (PI) (26%) comprised the largest subcategory of insomnia. Even after controlling for multiple potential confounds, PI was associated with reduced mechanical and thermal pain thresholds at all sites (P < 0.05). Conversely, the respiratory disturbance index was associated with increased mechanical pain thresholds on the forearm (P < 0.05). Conclusions: High rates of PI and sleep apnea highlight the need to refer TMD patients complaining of sleep disturbance for polysomnographic evaluation. The association of PI and hyperalgesia at a non-orofacial site suggests that PI may be linked with central sensitivity and could play an etiologic role in idiopathic pain disorders. The association between sleep disordered breathing and hypoalgesia requires further study and may provide novel insight into the complex interactions between sleep and pain-regulatory processes. Citation: Smith MT; Wickwire EM; Grace EG; Edwards RR; Buenaver LF; Peterson S; Klick B

  1. Association Between Stress, Sleep Quality and Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction: Simulated Mars Mission

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Balwant; Kaur, Jasdeep

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to test the association between quality of sleep and stress in individuals with TMD (temporomandibular joint dysfunction) in simulated Mars mission. Methods The 24 healthy crew members were recruited. The physiological measures of systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded. The Symptom Checklist-90-revised was used which was based on nine dimensions of psychological functioning. The Multidimensional Pain Inventory was pain severity, social and physical activities, affective distress, social support, and feelings of life control. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was used to measure the number of hours spent in bed and during asleep, frequency and reasons for awakening, and difficulty returning to sleep after awakening. The orofacial pain questionnaire was applied to measure pain experience using descriptors from the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Salivary cortisol and melatonin were measured. Results The 15 crew members reported temporomandibular joint pain after 6 days of mission. On dental examination, 5 crew members reported simple muscle pain (SM) and other 10 crew members with TMD. The TMD group endorsed more affective descriptors of their pain experience. Compared to the TMD group, the SM group also reported significantly poorer sleep duration. The TMD group reported nonsignificantly more daytime dysfunction than the control. Higher levels of salivary cortisol and salivary melatonin were reported in the TMD group as compared to other group. Conclusion This study concludes that both quality of sleep and stress levels due to extreme condition (simulated Mars mission) were associated with TMD in simulated Mars mission. PMID:23772292

  2. Temporomandibular joint synovial fluid sampling: estimation of dilution factor using calcium ion concentration.

    PubMed

    Aghabeigi, B; Cintra, N; Meghji, S; Evans, A; Crean, S J

    2002-12-01

    Saline aspirates have been commonly used in the biochemical investigations of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pathology. However, due to presence of adhesions in the diseased temporomandibular joint, full equilibration between the injected saline and the synovial fluid may not be achieved in all cases. We measured calcium ion concentration in the saline aspirates and the plasma to assess the degree of dilution of the synovial fluid by the injected media. Saline aspirates obtained prior to the arthroscopic examination of 17 patients with painful TMJs not responding to 3 months of conservative treatment were analysed for their calcium content by a highly sensitive spectrophotometric autoanalyser. In 10 patients with unilateral symptoms, the contralateral asymptomatic side was used as a control. Using a concentration volume equation the amount of the synovial fluid in the saline aspirates was calculated. The yield of the saline aspirates was variable ranging from 330 to 1000 microl. The mean calcium level was 0.787 mg/dl in the symptomatic group (C.I. 95% 0.337-1.237 mg/dl) and 0.512 mg/dl (C.I. 95% 0.235-0.797) in the asymptomatic group. Using a Student t-test there was no significant difference between the two groups. Furthermore, there was no demonstrable correlation between the volume of the aspirate and its synovial fluid content. This study confirms that the saline aspirate may not be a representative sample of the TMJ synovial fluid, and that expression of the results of the biochemical assays per volume of the aspirate may be misleading.

  3. Management of painful temporomandibular joint clicking with different intraoral devices and counseling: a controlled study

    PubMed Central

    CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues; CORRÊA, Ana Silvia da Mota; LAURIS, José Roberto Pereira; STUGINSKI-BARBOSA, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Objective The benefit of the use of some intraoral devices in arthrogenous temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients is still unknown. This study assessed the effectiveness of the partial use of intraoral devices and counseling in the management of patients with disc displacement with reduction (DDWR) and arthralgia. Materials and Methods A total of 60 DDWR and arthralgia patients were randomly divided into three groups: group I (n=20) wore anterior repositioning occlusal splints (ARS); group II (n=20) wore the Nociceptive Trigeminal Inhibition Clenching Suppression System devices (NTI-tss); and group III (n=20) only received counseling for behavioral changes and self-care (the control group). The first two groups also received counseling. Follow-ups were performed after 2 weeks, 6 weeks and 3 months. In these sessions, patients were evaluated by means of a visual analogue scale, pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), maximum range of motion and TMJ sounds. Possible adverse effects were also recorded, such as discomfort while using the device and occlusal changes. The results were analyzed with ANOVA, Tukey’s and Fisher Exact Test, with a significance level of 5%. Results Groups I and II showed improvement in pain intensity at the first follow-up. This progress was recorded only after 3 months in Group III. Group II showed an increased in joint sounds frequency. The PPT values, mandibular range of motion and the number of occlusal contacts did not change significantly. Conclusion The simultaneous use of intraoral devices (partial time) plus behavioral modifications seems to produce a more rapid pain improvement in patients with painful DDWR. The use of NTI-tss could increase TMJ sounds. Although intraoral devices with additional counseling should be considered for the management of painful DDWR, dentists should be aware of the possible side effects of the intraoral device’s design. PMID:26200526

  4. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PHYSICAL FACTORS IN THE TREATMENT OF COMPRESSION-DISLOCATION DYSFUNCTION OF THE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT.

    PubMed

    Rybalov, O; Yatsenko, P; Moskalenko, P; Yatsenko, O; Lakhtin, Yu

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was clinical and functional assessment of the effectiveness of physical factors in the treatment of patients with compression-dislocation dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint. We observed two groups of patients. All patients were undergone the repositioning of the joint heads of the lower jaw. Patients of the index group were assigned a vibrating massage of all masseter muscles, tourmaline ceramic on the joint area and a local physical therapy. Patients in the control group had only lidocaine blockade of periarticular area twice a week. Treatment efficacy was evaluated on the eighth day after the start of the treatment according to the bioelectric activity of the genuine masseter and temporal muscles, the intensity of pain according to in Visual Analog Scale, and according to the results of the clinical examination. In most patients of the index group the electromyography data after treatment were approaching to norm, the phenomenon of dysfunction of the temporomandibular joints was reversed. In the control group the full restoration of the functional activity of muscle did not occur. The addition to the complex of therapeutic measures a vibration massage, tourmaline ceramics and local physical therapy for patients with dysfunction of the temporomandibular joints allows to get a positive effect. PMID:27001782

  5. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PHYSICAL FACTORS IN THE TREATMENT OF COMPRESSION-DISLOCATION DYSFUNCTION OF THE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT.

    PubMed

    Rybalov, O; Yatsenko, P; Moskalenko, P; Yatsenko, O; Lakhtin, Yu

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was clinical and functional assessment of the effectiveness of physical factors in the treatment of patients with compression-dislocation dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint. We observed two groups of patients. All patients were undergone the repositioning of the joint heads of the lower jaw. Patients of the index group were assigned a vibrating massage of all masseter muscles, tourmaline ceramic on the joint area and a local physical therapy. Patients in the control group had only lidocaine blockade of periarticular area twice a week. Treatment efficacy was evaluated on the eighth day after the start of the treatment according to the bioelectric activity of the genuine masseter and temporal muscles, the intensity of pain according to in Visual Analog Scale, and according to the results of the clinical examination. In most patients of the index group the electromyography data after treatment were approaching to norm, the phenomenon of dysfunction of the temporomandibular joints was reversed. In the control group the full restoration of the functional activity of muscle did not occur. The addition to the complex of therapeutic measures a vibration massage, tourmaline ceramics and local physical therapy for patients with dysfunction of the temporomandibular joints allows to get a positive effect.

  6. On the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint and the muscles that act upon it: observations on the gray whale, Eschrichtius robustus.

    PubMed

    El Adli, Joseph J; Deméré, Thomas A

    2015-04-01

    The temporomandibular joint and its associated musculature are described in a neonate gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus) and serve as the basis for direct anatomical comparisons with the temporomandibular region in other clades of baleen whales (Mysticeti). Members of the right whale/bowhead whale clade (Balaenidae) are known to possess a synovial lower jaw joint, while members of the rorqual clade (Balaenopteridae) have a nonsynovial temporomandibular joint characterized by a highly flexible fibrocartilaginous pad and no joint capsule. In contrast, the gray whale possesses a modified temporomandibular joint (intermediate condition), with a vestigial joint cavity lacking a fibrous capsule, synovial membrane, and articular disk. In addition, the presence of a rudimentary fibrocartilaginous pad appears to be homologous to that seen in balaenopterid mysticetes. The intrinsic temporomandibular musculature in the gray whale was found to include a multibellied superficial masseter and a single-bellied deep masseter. The digastric and internal pterygoid muscles in E. robustus are enlarged relative to the condition documented in species of Balaenoptera. A relatively complex insertion of the temporalis muscle on the dentary is documented in the gray whale and the low, knob-like process on the gray whale dentary is determined to be homologous with the prominent coronoid process of rorquals. Comparison with the anatomy of the temporomandibular musculature in rorquals reveals an increased importance of alpha rotation of the dentary in the gray whale. This difference in muscular morphology and lines of muscle action is interpreted as representing adaptations for suction feeding.

  7. Development of temporomandibular joint ankylosis in rats: a preliminary experimental study.

    PubMed

    Porto, G; Vasconcelos, B; Silva, V

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate a model for the development of temporomandibular joint ankylosis in rats using disc removal and articular damage. In 30 adult male Wistar rats, articular damage was induced and disc removal performed in the right joint to induce ankylosis. The rats were divided into groups according to the time of killing (7, 15, 30, 60 and 90 days). Maximal mouth opening, mandibular deviation, initial and final weights, and duration of surgery were recorded and evaluated. After death, the joints were submitted to histological study in order to score the ankylosis. The mean duration of surgery was 14.23 min. Mean difference between initial and final maximal mouth opening was 3.38 mm, being greatest at the 15-day evaluation and lowest at 90 days, and was statistically significant at 15 days (p=0.043), 30 days (p=0.027) and 60 days (p=0.027). No mandibular deviation was observed at any of the evaluation times. Histological scores increased with time of evaluation from 7 to 30 days, when they started to fall. This study model permitted the development of fibrous ankylosis in the majority of the animals, and no bony bridge was observed between the mandibular condyle and the temporal bone.

  8. Does condylar height decrease more in temporomandibular joint nonreducing disc displacement than reducing disc displacement?

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ying-Kai; Yang, Chi; Cai, Xie-Yi; Xie, Qian-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to compare condylar height changes of anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDwR) and anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDwoR) in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) quantitatively, to get a better understanding of the changes in condylar height of patients with anterior disc displacement who had received no treatment, and to provide useful information for treatment protocol. This longitudinal retrospective study enrolled 206 joints in 156 patients, which were divided into ADDWR group and ADDwoR group based on magnetic resonance imaging examination. The joints were assessed quantitatively for condylar height at initial and follow-up visits. Also, both groups were further divided into 3 subgroups according to age: <15 years group, 15 to 21 years group, and 22 to 35 years group. Paired t test and independent t test were used to assess intra- and intergroup differences. The average age of the ADDwR group was 19.65 years with a mean of 9.47 months’ follow-up. The follow-up interval of the patients with ADDwoR was 7.96 months, with a mean age of 18.51 years. Condylar height in ADDwoR tended to decrease more than those in ADDwR, especially during the pubertal growth spurt and with the presence of osteoarthrosis, meaning ADDwoR could cause a severe disturbance in mandibular development. Thus, an early disc repositioning was suggested to avoid decrease in condylar height. PMID:27583909

  9. Investigation of an autologous blood treatment strategy for temporomandibular joint hypermobility in a pig model.

    PubMed

    Stembirek, J; Matalova, E; Buchtova, M; Machon, V; Misek, I

    2013-03-01

    Many different surgical and non-surgical techniques are used for the treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) hypermobility. One of these methods is autologous blood injection into the TMJ. The fate of the autologous blood used for treatment of recurring condylar dislocation is still not completely understood. The authors used 12 pigs (Sus scrota f. domestica) as a model species for autologous blood delivery into the TMJ. Blood injection was followed by histopathological analysis at different times after treatment (1h, 1, 2 and 4 weeks). Samples were examined by magnetic resonance imaging, macroscopic and histological methods. The deposition of the remaining blood was observed in the form of clots in the distal parts of the upper joint cavity 1h and 1 week after treatment. 2 weeks after treatment, small blood clots were still apparent in the distal part of the upper joint cavity. 4 weeks after surgery, no remnants of blood, changes or adhesions were apparent inside the TMJ. No morphological or histological changes were observed in the TMJ after the injection of autologous blood suggesting another mechanism is involved in the hypermobility treatment. PMID:22867740

  10. Dynamic and stress relaxation properties of the whole porcine temporomandibular joint disc under compression.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Eva; Pelayo, Fernández; Tanaka, Eiji; Lamela-Rey, María Jesús; Fernández-Canteli, Alfonso

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the dynamic and static compressive properties of the whole porcine temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc were investigated. The aim of the study was to develop a new simple method for the evaluation of joint viscoelasticity, enabling examination of the load-bearing capacity and joint flexibility of the entire disc. For the experiments, a novel testing fixture that reproduces the condylar and fossa surfaces of the TMJ was developed to replicate TMJ disc geometry. Ten porcine discs were used in the experiments. Each disc was dissected from the TMJ and sinusoidal compressive strain was applied to obtain the storage and loss moduli. Static strain control tests were carried out to obtain the relaxation modulus. The result of static and dynamic tests indicated that the whole disc presented viscoelastic behavior under compression. Storage and loss moduli increased with frequency and the relaxation modulus decreased over time. The loss tangent showed less frequency dependence, with values ranging from 0.2 to 0.3, suggesting that the viscous properties of the disc cannot be neglected. These results provide a better understanding of whole disc mechanical compression behavior under realistic TMJ working conditions.

  11. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporo-mandibular joint. Report of three cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Blankestijn, J; Panders, A K; Vermey, A; Scherpbier, A J

    1985-01-15

    Synovial chondromatosis of the temporo-mandibular joint is a rare affection, characterized by the formation of cartilage particles in the synovial membrane. These particles can break through and enter the joint compartments. The diagnosis must be considered for patients who complain of slowly progressive swelling, pain, and crepitus in the region of the temporo-mandibular joint. When the changes are not visible on plain X-rays due to absence of ossification, important diagnostic information can be obtained by a technetium 99m (99m Tc) bone scan and a computerized tomography (CT) sialogram. The diagnosis can be established only by histopathologic examination of surgically removed particles or resected synovial membrane. Discussed are 25 cases of histopathologically verified chondromatosis of the temporo-mandibular joint reported in the literature, as well as 3 new cases seen and treated at the University Hospital Groningen since 1970. A good clinical result can be obtained by removal of all particles and synovectomy. Condylectomy is seldom required.

  12. Correlating cone beam CT results with temporomandibular joint pain of osteoarthritic origin

    PubMed Central

    Palconet, G; Ludlow, JB; Tyndall, DA; Lim, PF

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine whether bony changes in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis (OA) is correlated with pain and other clinical signs and symptoms. Methods Clinical data and cone beam CT (CBCT) images of 30 patients with TMJ OA were analysed. The criteria of Koyama et al (Koyama J, Nishiyama H, Hayashi T. Follow-up study of condylar bony changes using helical computed tomography in patients with temporomandibular disorder. Dentomaxillofac Radiol 2007; 36: 472–477.) and Ahmad et al [Ahmad M, Hollender L, Anderson Q, Kartha K, Ohrbach R, Truelove EL, et al. Research diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (RDC/TMD): development of image analysis criteria and examiner reliability for image analysis. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 2009; 107: 844–860.] were used to classify the condyles observed on the CBCT. Clinical measures included self-reported pain, mandibular range of motion, TMJ sound, pain on palpation of the TMJ and masticatory muscles, and pain on jaw function. Generalized linear modelling was used to correlate the clinical and radiographic findings and Spearman's rho was used to correlate the two classification systems. Results There was poor correlation between the maximum condyle change and pain rating (Koyama: r2 = 0.1443, p = 0.3995; Ahmad: r2 = 0.0273, p = 0.9490), maximum mouth opening (Koyama: r2 = 0.2910, p = 0.0629; Ahmad: r2 = 0.2626, p = 0.0951), protrusion (Koyama: r2 = 0.0875, p = 0.7001; Ahmad: r2 = 0.1658, p = 0.3612), right lateral motion (Koyama: r2 = 0.0394, p = 0.9093; Ahmad: r2 = 0.0866, p = 0.6877) and left lateral motion (Koyama: r2 = 0.0943, p = 0.6494; Ahmad: r2 = 0.1704, p = 0.3236). Strong correlation was observed between Koyama et al's and Ahmad et al's classifications for average (r = 0.9216, p < 0.001) and maximum (r = 0.7694; p < 0.0001) bony change. Conclusions There was poor correlation between condylar changes (as observed on CBCT images), pain and

  13. Effectiveness of Physiotherapy and GaAlAs Laser in the Management of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hlinakova, Petra; Kasparova, Magdalena; Rehacek, Adam; Vavrickova, Lenka; Navrátil, Leoš

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) is a treatment method commonly used in physiotherapy for musculoskeletal disorders. The aim of this study was to monitor the function of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and surrounding tissues and compare the objective measurements of the effect of LLLT. Background data: LLLT has been considered effective in reducing pain and muscular tension; thus improving the quality of patients' lives. Materials and Methods: TMJ function was evaluated by cephalometric tracing analysis, orthopantomogram, TMJ tomogram, and computer face-bow record. Interalveolar space between central incisors before and after therapy was measured. Patients evaluated pain on the Visual Analog Scale. LLLT was performed in five treatment sessions (energy density of 15.4 J/cm2) by semiconductive GaAlAs laser with an output of 280 mW, emitting radiation wavelength of 830 mm. The laser supplied a spot of∼0.2 cm2. Results: Baseline comparisons between the healthy patients and patients with low-level laser application show that TMJ pain during function is based on anatomical and function changes in TMJ areas. Significant differences were seen in the posterior and anterior face height. The results comparing healthy and impaired TMJ sagittal condyle paths showed that patients with TMJ pain during function had significantly flatter nonanatomical movement during function. After therapy, the unpleasant feeling was reduced from 27.5 to 4.16 on the pain Visual Analog Scale. The pain had reduced the ability to open the mouth from 34 to 42 mm. Conclusions: The laser therapy was effective in the improvement of the range of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and promoted a significant reduction of pain symptoms. PMID:22551049

  14. Relationship between temporomandibular joint pain and magnetic resonance imaging findings of internal derangement.

    PubMed

    Emshoff, R; Innerhofer, K; Rudisch, A; Bertram, S

    2001-04-01

    In terms of clinical decision-making in instances of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and orofacial pain, there is controversy in the literature over the diagnostic significance of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ)-related variable disk-condyle relationship (DCR). The purpose of this study was to investigate whether in patients with TMJ-related pain, the variable of TMJ pain may be linked to magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of internal derangement (ID). The study comprised 163 consecutive TMJ pain patients. Criteria for including a patient were report of orofacial pain referred to the TMJ, and the presence of uni- or bilateral TMJ pain during palpation, during function, and/or during unassisted or assisted mandibular opening. Bilateral sagittal and coronal MR images were obtained to establish the prevalence of TMJ ID types. Analysis of the data revealed the presence of TMJ pain to be associated with significantly more MR imaging diagnoses of ID than an absence of ID (P<0.001), and disk displacement without reduction than disk displacement with reduction (P<0.001). Using chi-square analysis, the results showed a significant relationship between the presence of TMJ-related pain and the MR imaging diagnosis of TMJ ID (P=0.001), and TMJ ID type (P=0.000). Use of the Kappa statistical test indicated poor diagnostic agreement between the presence of TMJ pain and the MR imaging diagnosis of ID (K=0.16). The results suggest that the clinical variable of TMJ pain may have a significant effect on the prevalences of MR imaging diagnoses of TMJ ID. The data confirm the biological concept of DCR as a diagnostic approach in patients with signs and symptoms of TMJ-related pain.

  15. [Application of bioregulating therapy in complex treatment of temporomandibular joint diseases in people of elderly and senile age].

    PubMed

    Iordanishvili, A K; Samsonov, V V; Soldatova, L N; Polens, A A; Ryzhak, G A

    2012-01-01

    The results of dynamic supervision over application a peptide bioregulator of "Sigumir" in complex treatment of 62 patients of the senior age groups with various diseases of a temporomandibular joint are presented. It is shown that application of a complex of treatment-and-prophylactic actions, including rational tooth prosthetics, functional and pharmacotherapy (including accompanying diseases), and also use a peptide bioregulator of cartilaginous and bone tissues "Sigumir" in complex therapy of patients with diseases of a temporomandibular joint of a various etiology, enables to stop in short-terms a painful syndrome in such patients, to increase amplitude of opening of a mouth, to improve chewing function, to reduce terms of treatment and to provide preventive maintenance of relapses of TMJ's pathology during all period of supervision. PMID:22708467

  16. Influence of unilateral disc displacement on the stress response of the temporomandibular joint discs during opening and mastication

    PubMed Central

    Pérez del Palomar, A; Doblaré, M

    2007-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint plays a crucial role in human mastication acting as a guide of jaw movements. During these movements, the joint is subjected to loads which cause stresses and deformations in its cartilaginous structures. A perfect balance between the two sides of the joint is essential to maintain the physiological stress level within the tissues. Therefore, it has been suggested that a derangement of the joint is a contributing factor in the development of mandibular asymmetry, especially if problems of the temporomandibular joint start in childhood or adolescence. To analyze the movement of the mandible and the stresses undergone by the discs, two finite element models of the human temporomandibular joint including the masticatory system were developed, one corresponding to a healthy joint and the other with a unilateral anterior disc displacement with their movement controlled by muscle activation. A fibre-reinforced porohyperelastic model was used to simulate the behaviour of the articular discs. The stress distribution was analyzed in both models during free opening and closing, and during the introduction of a resistant force between incisors or molars. It was found that a slight unilateral anterior disc displacement does not lead to mandibular asymmetry but to a slight decrease of the maximum gape. With the introduction of a restriction between incisors, the maximum stresses moved to the anterior band in contrast to what happened if the restriction was imposed between molars where maximum stresses were located more posteriorly. Finally, the presence of a unilateral displacement of the disc involved a strong change in the overall behaviour of the joint including also the healthy side, where the maximum stresses moved to the posterior part. PMID:17725577

  17. Fine-needle aspiration of pigmented villonodular synovitis of the temporomandibular joint masquerading as a primary parotid gland lesion.

    PubMed

    Yu, G H; Staerkel, G A; Kershisnik, M M; Varma, D G

    1997-01-01

    The fine-needle aspiration findings in a case of pigmented villonodular synovitis of the temporomandibular joint are presented. The characteristic cytomorphologic and clinical features of this uncommon, benign fibrohistiocytic lesion are discussed. In addition, due to the initial clinical impression of a primary parotid gland lesion, the differential diagnosis for the cytomorphologic features observed (histiocytoid cells admixed with osteoclast-like giant cells) are discussed within the context of a primary salivary gland mass.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging features of the temporomandibular joint in normal dogs.

    PubMed

    Macready, Dawn M; Hecht, Silke; Craig, Linden E; Conklin, Gordon A

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the canine temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is important in the clinical diagnosis of animals presenting with dysphagia, malocclusion and jaw pain. In humans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice for evaluation of the TMJ. The objectives of this study were to establish a technical protocol for performing MRI of the canine TMJ and describe the MRI anatomy and appearance of the normal canine TMJ. Ten dogs (one fresh cadaver and nine healthy live dogs) were imaged. MRIs were compared with cadaveric tissue sections. T1-weighted (T1-W) transverse closed-mouth, T1-W sagittal closed-mouth, T1-W sagittal open-mouth, and T2-W sagittal open-mouth sequences were obtained. The condylar process of the mandible and the mandibular fossa of the temporal bone were hyperintense to muscle and isointense to hypointense to fat on T1-W images, mildly hyperintense to muscle on T2-W images, and were frequently heterogeneous. The articular disc was visible in 14/20 (70%) TMJs on T1-W images and 13/20 (65%) TMJs on T2-W images. The articular disc was isointense to hyperintense to muscle on T1-W images and varied from hypointense to hyperintense to muscle on T2-W images. The lateral collateral ligament was not identified in any joint. MRI allows evaluation of the osseous and certain soft tissue structures of the TMJ in dogs. PMID:20806876

  19. Inflammatory mediators and radiographic changes in temporomandibular joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Voog, Ulle; Alstergren, Per; Eliasson, Sören; Leibur, Edvitar; Kallikorm, Riina; Kopp, Sigvard

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between the inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) and serotonin (5-HT), the inflammatory markers erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP), as well as rheumatoid factor (RF) and thrombocyte particle concentration (TPC) in blood versus temporomandibular joint (TMJ) radiographic changes in patients with clinical TMJ involvement by rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty patients were included. Venous blood was collected for quantification of the mediators, markers, and TPC. The radiographic signs of erosion, flattening, sclerosis, subchondral pseudocyst, and osteophyte as well as radiographic grade were investigated with computed tomography. The median (IQR) plasma levels of TNFalpha and 5-HT were 0 (13) pg/ mL and 13 (22) nmol/L, respectively, while serum level of 5-HT was 1360 874) nmol/L ESR, CRP, and TPC were abnormally high in 53%, 250%, and 15% of the patients, respectively. The most frequent radiographic signs were sclerosis (75%), erosion (50%), and flattening (30%). Erosion was found to be associated with high TPC and flattening with high plasma level of TNFalpha. In conclusion, patients with clinical TMJ involvement by RA show an association between high level of TPC and TNFalpha in plasma versus radiographic signs of joint bone destruction. PMID:12635783

  20. Spontaneously developed osteoarthritis in the temporomandibular joint in STR/ort mice

    PubMed Central

    KUMAGAI, KENICHI; SUZUKI, SATSUKI; KANRI, YORIAKI; MATSUBARA, RYOTA; FUJII, KEISUKE; WAKE, MASAHIRO; SUZUKI, RYUJI; HAMADA, YOSHIKI

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis is typically a slowly progressive asymmetric disease. Little is known regarding the natural destruction of TMJ articular tissues. The aim of the present study was to investigate morphological changes in the TMJ of STR/ort mice, known to be the model for spontaneous osteoarthritis in the knee joint, and to evaluate STR/ort mice as a suitable animal model for TMJ osteoarthritis. TMJs from 32 STR/ort mice euthanized at 30, 40, 50 or 60 weeks of age, and from 6 CBA mice euthanized at 30, 40 or 60 weeks of age were examined. Toluidine blue and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining were used to assess histological changes in the articular cartilage. Morphological changes in the articular cartilage of the TMJ were evaluated using microcomputed tomography. At the age of 40–50 weeks, 17 (68%) of the 25 STR/ort mice had loss of articular cartilage on histology, with cavitation and erosion of the exposed bone and gradual changes in condylar shape. Furthermore, osteoarthritic morphological changes, and structural alterations were observed by microcomputed tomography. The STR/ort mouse strain appears to develop spontaneous osteoarthritis-like lesions in the TMJ with age, and would be a useful model to study the pathogenesis of TMJ osteoarthritis. PMID:26171147

  1. Effect of functional shift of the mandible on lubrication of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Kure-Hattori, Ikuko; Watari, Ippei; Takei, Maki; Ishida, Yuji; Yonemitsu, Ikuo; Ono, Takashi

    2012-07-01

    Lubrication of synovial joints reduces the coefficient of friction of the articular cartilage surface. To investigate the effect of malocclusion on the lubrication of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), we evaluated lubricin expression in the rat TMJ immunohistochemically, under conditions of functional lateral shift of the mandible, during period of growth. Thirty 5-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into experimental, recovery, and control groups. Each rt in the experimental and recovery groups was fitted with an acrylic-plate guiding appliance. The rats in the experimental and control groups were killed at 14 and 28 days after the appliance was attached. Each rat in the recovery group was detached from the appliance at 14 days, and was killed 14 days after the appliance was removed. In the experimental group, the expression of lubricin staining in TMJ cartilage was significantly decreased during the experimental period. In the recovery group, the expression of lubricin staining in TMJ cartilage was significantly greater than in the experimental group, and there was no significant difference at 28 days between the control and recovery groups. Analysis of these data suggests that a functional lateral shift of the mandible during the growth period influences lubrication of the TMJ.

  2. [The oto-meniscal relationship of temporo-mandibular joint in the new-born man (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Couly, G; Hureau, J

    1976-01-01

    Although they are anatomically immature at the time of birth, the temporo-mandibular joints are able to ensure efficient suction due to the branchial blastema interposed between the two articular nuclei. This conjunctive formation is the principal factor in the constitution of the meniscus and its frena, the articular surfaces, the capsule and the ligaments. This constitutes not only an embryological but also a functional entity. The joint runs the risk of paying heavily for this functionnal availability, by its relationship with the ear-drum which is a potentially infectious cavity. In fact, at birth there is still evidence of the original branchial continuum between the unknit tympanal and squamosal in the shape of the posterior meniscal frenum, the conjunctivo-vascular isthmus which puts the vascularization of the mucosa of the ear-drum in communication with the very rich vascularization of the neonatal temporo-mandibular joint. Therefore, 1/3 of the so-called congenital temporo-mandibular ankyloses, apparently without cause, could probably be explained by the otomeniscal relationship existing in the new-born baby and continuing during the first few months of life in the form of a conjunctivo-vascular link.

  3. [The temporo-mandibular joint in pathologic conditions: rheumatoid arthritis and seronegative spondyloarthritis].

    PubMed

    Scutellari, P N; Orzincolo, C; Ceruti, S

    1993-10-01

    Pain and dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are major clinical problems, especially in arthritides and allied conditions. In the last 10 years, such new imaging methods as arthrography, CT and MRI have been developed, but many problems are still to be solved. This study was aimed at reporting the radiographic patterns of lesions in TMJ rheumatoid arthritis and seronegative spondyloarthropathies and at investigating the role of conventional radiology in the assessment of these disorders. Digital hypocycloidal tomography of the TMJ was performed on 44 patients affected with rheumatoid arthritis, on 2 with Sjögren's syndrome, 2 with ankylosing spondylitis, 4 with psoriatic arthritis and 1 with Reiter's syndrome. CT, with sagittal and coronal scans, was performed only on 9 patients (18 joints) whose clinical and radiographic findings were particularly severe. The radiographic features of the lesions--i.e., erosions, osteophytes, subchondral bone sclerosis and condylar-glenoid fossa remodelling--cannot be distinguished from one another and from the so-called allied conditions; nevertheless, in rheumatoid arthritis abnormalities are usually bilateral and symmetric, whereas in seronegative arthropathies joint involvement is usually unilateral. In the first stage of the disease, these lesions are better demonstrated by CT than by tomography, thanks to better contrast and spatial resolution of the former, especially on the lateral and medial aspects of the joint. The most common findings were: erosions (68.2%), osteophytes (31.8%), subchondral bone sclerosis (28.6%) and condylar-glenoid fossa remodelling (9.1%). In the clinical practice sagittal multidirectional tomography remains today the method of choice because it can demonstrate several areas on the condylar surface, with finer anatomical detailing, and it can solve most diagnostic problems in TMJ disorders. Thus, CT is recommended only in the patients whose diagnosis remains questionable with the above

  4. Knockdown of FcγRIII in an arthritic temporomandibular joint reduced the nociceptive response

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Phillip R.; Puri, Jyoti; Bellinger, Larry L.

    2010-01-01

    FcγRIII (CD16) is a receptor expressed on immune cells that selectively binds immmunoglobulin G (IgG) molecules, IgG binding results in cellular activation and cytokine release. IgG is an important factor in arthritis and can be found in arthritic temporomandibular joints (TMJ). We hypothesize that a reduction in FcγRIII expression in the TMJ tissues will reduce the nociceptive and inflammatory response in an inflamed joint. To test this hypothesis siRNA, either naked or complexed with linear polyethylenimine (PEI) was injected into the superior joint space of the TMJ. After administration of siRNA the joint was injected with saline or with complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) to induce arthritis. Nociceptive responses were quantitated in the rat by measuring the animal’s meal duration. FcγRIII expression in the TMJ tissue was assayed by immunocytochemistry or western. Cleavage of FcγRIII transcript was then assayed by 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends method (5′ RACE). Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IgG content was measured in the TMJ tissue by ELISA. The results indicate that injection of FcγRIII siRNA reduced the amount of FcγRIII in the TMJ tissues and that the transcript was cleaved in a manner consistent with a RNA interference mechanism. Moreover, injection of FcγRIII siRNA reduced the nociceptive response of rats with an arthritic TMJ and reduced the amount of pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. We conclude that FcγRIII contributes to the pain resulting from inflammatory arthritis of the TMJ and that siRNA has the potential to be an effective treatment for this disorder. PMID:20589683

  5. Condylar distances in hypermobile temporomandibular joints of patients with excessive mouth openings by using computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Haghigaht, Abbas; Rybalov, Oleg; Hatami, Amin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: hypermobility in Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) can manifest higher range of motions in mandible. The aim of this study was to compare the position and distances of the head of condyle to glenoid fossa in TMJs of healthy individuals and patients with mild, moderate and severe TMJ hypermobility. Material and Methods: In this clinical study, 69 patients (between the ages of 22 to 42) with manifestation of joint hypermobility were included and Computed tomography were administered for both TMJs. The patients were divided into three groups based on their maximum mouth opening (MMO): (A) with MMO of 50-55 mm; (B) with MMO between 55 to 65 mm; and (C) with MMO >65 mm. Also, 15 healthy people with profiled tomography in the last 6 months were assumed as control group (N) with normal MMO (<50 mm). The position of condyle from articular eminence while MMO; and the distances from anterior, superior and posterior border of condyle and facing wall of glenoid fossa were measured in closed mouth from the tomography of all contributors. The collected data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, Post Hoc and Chi-Square tests using SPSS software version 15 at significant level of 0.05. Results: The superior and posterior distances were significantly higher in groups A, B and C than healthy individuals (all P values<0.01). The anterior distance was significant between groups B and N only in right TMJ (P=0.013). Conclusions: TMJ hypermobility showed the characteristic of increased condylar distance in posterior and superior specially in higher excessive mouth opening. Key words:Computed tomography, joint hypermobility, mandibular condyle, mouth opening. PMID:25674317

  6. Osteoarthritis of the temporo-mandibular joint in free-living Soay sheep on St Kilda.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Colin; Watt, Kathryn; Nussey, Daniel H; Pemberton, Josephine M; Pilkington, Jill G; Herman, Jeremy S; Timmons, Zena L; Clements, Dylan N; Scott, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative disease of synovial joints with the potential to cause pathology and welfare issues in both domestic and wild ruminants. Previous work has identified OA of the elbow joint in domestic sheep, but the prevalence of OA of the jaw and in particular the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has not been previously reported. Following up a previous report of a single case of TMJ OA in a free-living population of Soay sheep on St Kilda in the Outer Hebrides, an archive of 2736 jaw bones collected from this population between 1985 and 2010 was surveyed. Evidence of TMJ OA was found in 35 sheep. Of these, 15 cases were unilateral (11 right side, 4 left side) and the remaining 20 were bilateral. TMJ pathology was much more common in females than males: only 3/35 cases were in males, with overall prevalence at 2.3% for females and 0.2% in males. Radiographic examination of TMJ with OA revealed extensive bone re-modelling with osteophytosis, particularly of the condyle of the mandible. There was a highly significant age-dependence in TMJ OA incidence among age classes: 30/35 cases occurred in geriatric sheep (aged 7 years or more; 11.1% prevalence within this age class), four in adults (2-6 years old; 0.9% prevalence), one in yearlings (0.3% prevalence) and none in lambs. The low incidence in males was confounded by sex differences in longevity: while 18% of females sampled died in the geriatric age class, only 2% of males did so. Although the low prevalence of the pathology limited the ability to test its association with other traits, it was possible to examine relationships with reproductive performance measures amongst geriatric females with and without TMJ OA. Although there were trends towards lower fecundity and lower lamb birth weight in the breeding season prior to death, these were not statistically significant.

  7. Osteoarthritis of the temporo-mandibular joint in free-living Soay sheep on St Kilda.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Colin; Watt, Kathryn; Nussey, Daniel H; Pemberton, Josephine M; Pilkington, Jill G; Herman, Jeremy S; Timmons, Zena L; Clements, Dylan N; Scott, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative disease of synovial joints with the potential to cause pathology and welfare issues in both domestic and wild ruminants. Previous work has identified OA of the elbow joint in domestic sheep, but the prevalence of OA of the jaw and in particular the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has not been previously reported. Following up a previous report of a single case of TMJ OA in a free-living population of Soay sheep on St Kilda in the Outer Hebrides, an archive of 2736 jaw bones collected from this population between 1985 and 2010 was surveyed. Evidence of TMJ OA was found in 35 sheep. Of these, 15 cases were unilateral (11 right side, 4 left side) and the remaining 20 were bilateral. TMJ pathology was much more common in females than males: only 3/35 cases were in males, with overall prevalence at 2.3% for females and 0.2% in males. Radiographic examination of TMJ with OA revealed extensive bone re-modelling with osteophytosis, particularly of the condyle of the mandible. There was a highly significant age-dependence in TMJ OA incidence among age classes: 30/35 cases occurred in geriatric sheep (aged 7 years or more; 11.1% prevalence within this age class), four in adults (2-6 years old; 0.9% prevalence), one in yearlings (0.3% prevalence) and none in lambs. The low incidence in males was confounded by sex differences in longevity: while 18% of females sampled died in the geriatric age class, only 2% of males did so. Although the low prevalence of the pathology limited the ability to test its association with other traits, it was possible to examine relationships with reproductive performance measures amongst geriatric females with and without TMJ OA. Although there were trends towards lower fecundity and lower lamb birth weight in the breeding season prior to death, these were not statistically significant. PMID:25458883

  8. Expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the rat trigeminal ganglion during the development of temporomandibular joint inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, G.C.; Rizzi, E.; Gerlach, R.F.; Leite-Panissi, C.R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial pain is a prevalent symptom in modern society. Some musculoskeletal orofacial pain is caused by temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). This condition has a multi-factorial etiology, including emotional factors and alteration of the masticator muscle and temporomandibular joints (TMJs). TMJ inflammation is considered to be a cause of pain in patients with TMD. Extracellular proteolytic enzymes, specifically the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), have been shown to modulate inflammation and pain. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the expression and level of gelatinolytic activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the trigeminal ganglion are altered during different stages of temporomandibular inflammation, as determined by gelatin zymography. This study also evaluated whether mechanical allodynia and orofacial hyperalgesia, induced by the injection of complete Freund's adjuvant into the TMJ capsule, were altered by an MMP inhibitor (doxycycline, DOX). TMJ inflammation was measured by plasma extravasation in the periarticular tissue (Evans blue test) and infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils into the synovial fluid (myeloperoxidase enzyme quantification). MMP expression in the trigeminal ganglion was shown to vary during the phases of the inflammatory process. MMP-9 regulated the early phase and MMP-2 participated in the late phase of this process. Furthermore, increases in plasma extravasation in periarticular tissue and myeloperoxidase activity in the joint tissue, which occurred throughout the inflammation process, were diminished by treatment with DOX, a nonspecific MMP inhibitor. Additionally, the increases of mechanical allodynia and orofacial hyperalgesia were attenuated by the same treatment. PMID:24270905

  9. Temporomandibular joint morphology changes with mandibular advancement surgery and rigid internal fixation: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Kersey, Michael L; Nebbe, Brian; Major, Paul W

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the effect of bilateral sagittal split mandibular osteotomy (BSSO) with rigid internal fixation (RIF) on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) morphology. Controlled trials of BSSO with RIF treatment of Class II patients using transcranial radiographs, submental vertex (SMV) radiographs, tomographic radiography, computed tomography (CT) scan, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess TMJ morphology were identified by Medline (1966-2001) and PubMed. Case reports were excluded. On the basis of our search only six studies were included in this review. All studies used internal controls with pre- and posttreatment imaging. Two studies used SMV, one used transcranial radiographs, one used tomography, two used CT scan and one used MRI. Methodological deficiencies prevent major conclusions regarding osseous remodeling and disk status. There was a wide range of individual variability in condyle position change. The reviewed studies have highlighted the importance of further research. Prospective controlled studies using serial MRI and tomography or CT scan are required to establish effect of BSSO with RIF on TMJ morphology.

  10. Effect of Herbst treatment on temporomandibular joint morphology: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Popowich, Kurt; Nebbe, Brian; Major, Paul W

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this systematic review was to evaluate the effect of Herbst appliance therapy on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) morphology, with special reference to glenoid fossa remodeling, condylar remodeling, condylar position, and articular disc position. Publications of controlled trials of Herbst treatment of Class II patients using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computerized tomography scans, or tomography to assess TMJ morphology were identified with Medline (1966-2001), Best Evidence (1991-2001), Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (second quarter, 2001), and Embase (1998-2001). Case reports were excluded. Based on our search, only 5 studies met the selection criteria. All studies used internal controls with pretreatment and posttreatment imaging. Four studies used MRI, and 1 used tomograms. The 4 MRI studies used overlapping patient samples and were not considered as independent evidence. The MRI studies did not provide conclusive evidence of osseous remodeling or condyle position change. The tomography study demonstrated minor condyle position change. Methodological deficiencies prevented major conclusions regarding disc position. The reviewed studies highlight the importance of further research. Prospective controlled studies using serial MRI and tomography are required to establish the effect of Herbst treatment on TMJ morphology.

  11. Changes in Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction Symptoms Following Massage Therapy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Melissa Joan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this case report was to describe the effects that massage therapy had on a woman with temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Participant The 26-year-old woman’s primary symptoms were pain, decreased range of motion, clicking, and crepitus. These symptoms were reportedly associated with emotional stress and bruxism. Intervention Ten 45-minute massage therapy treatments were administered over a five-week period. The client’s progress was monitored by an initial, midway, and final assessment, using range of motion testing, personal interview, an orthopedic test, and postural analysis. Progress was also evaluated by the use of a daily journal. The client participated in a home care routine consisting of stretches, self-massage, postural training, a proprioception exercise, and hydrotherapy. Results Results include an increase in maximal opening from 3.1 cm to 3.8 cm, an overall increase in neck range of motion, a decrease in muscle hypertonicity using the Wendy Nickel’s Scale, a decrease in pain from 7/10 to 3/10 on a numerical pain scale, and a decline in stress. Conclusion Although the client in this report experienced positive results, more extensive studies are needed to understand the effects of massage on TMD. PMID:22211156

  12. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorders in Caucasian children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tecco, Simona; Crincoli, Vito; Di Bisceglie, Beatrice; Saccucci, Matteo; Macrĺ, Monica; Polimeni, Antonella; Festa, Felice

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a population of children and adolescents. TMD signs and symptoms were recorded in 1134 subjects (593 males and 541 females; age range 5-15 years), divided into various groups according to the: (i) Angle dental class; (ii) presence and type of crossbite; (iii) gender; and (iv) age (ages 5-11 and 12-15 years). The percentages of signs and symptoms were compared using the chi2-test to determine the differences among the groups for the rates of TMD symptoms, bruxism, joint sounds, deviation during opening, reduced opening/lateral/protrusive movements, and myofascial pain. Subjects who were 12-15 years old showed a significantly higher prevalence of myofascial pain than those who were 5-11 years old (chi2 = 4.263; p < 0.05). Females showed a significantly higher prevalence of myofascial pain than males (chi2 = 3.882; p < 0.05). Subjects with posterior, unilateral crossbite showed a significantly higher prevalence of TMD symptoms (chi2 = 33.877; p < 0.001) and reduction of functional movements (chi2 = 10.800; p < 0.05) than those with no crossbite, or with anterior or posterior bilateral crossbite. TMD's signs and symptoms seem to be associated to some definite characteristics of the patient, such as female gender, young age, and presence of posterior unilateral crossbite.

  13. Aetiology and presentation of ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint: report of 23 cases from Abuja, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Bello, Seidu Adebayo; Aluko Olokun, Bayo; Olaitan, Abayomi Ademola; Ajike, Sunday O

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have reviewed the management of ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), but only a few focused on the aetiology and clinical features. We retrospectively studied the aetiology and clinical features of patients with ankylosis of the TMJ who presented to the Maxillofacial Unit, National Hospital, Abuja, Nigeria, between 2004 and 2009. There were 13 male and 10 female patients, M:F ratio 1.3:1, age range 6-62, mean (SD) 20 (13) years. The aetiological factors were trauma (n=11) that comprised falls (n=6), untreated fractures of the zygomatic arch (n=4) and myositis ossificans (n=1); infection (n=9), that comprised cancrum oris (n=3) and ear infection (n=6); congenital or unknown (n=2), and coronoid hyperplasia (n=1). The maximum interincisal distance at presentation ranged from 0 to 25 mm (mean (SD) 6.7 (7.2) mm). Seventeen had facial deformities. The diagnoses recorded were as follows: left extracapsular ankylosis, (n=8); right intracapsular bony ankylosis, (n=6); left intracapsular bony ankylosis, (n=4); bilateral intracapsular bony ankylosis, (n=4), and bilateral intracapsular fibrous ankylosis (n=1). Extreme poverty was the main predisposing factor. There is a need for a concerted effort among healthcare providers, policy makers, and the world in general to eradicate poverty and improve healthcare to limit the incidence of ankylosis of the TMJ.

  14. The role of three-dimensional computed tomography in the evaluation of temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    Kavin, Thangavelu; John, Reena; Venkataraman, Siva Subramaniyam

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate the role of three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) in the assessment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis and its importance in treatment planning. The objectives of study were to measure and assess the mediolateral extent of ankylosis mass in 3D-CT and to compare the extent with intraoperative assessment. The study was also aimed to measure the coronoid process elongation in 3D-CT and its significance in treatment planning. Materials and Methods: This prospective study included 3D-CT evaluation of 11 patients with TMJ ankylosis during the period of February 2006–October 2007. Results: The 3D-CT assessment provided the length of the coronoid process and the relation of vital structures including maxillary artery to the ankylosed mass. Measurement of ankylosed mass also aids in preoperative measurement of the graft required to reconstruct the defect following removal of the ankylosed mass. Conclusion: Our study concludes that 3D-CT is a useful tool in the diagnosis and treatment planning of TMJ ankylosis. PMID:23066255

  15. Prediction of volumetric strain in the human temporomandibular joint cartilage during jaw movement

    PubMed Central

    Koolstra, J H; van Eijden, T M G J

    2006-01-01

    Human temporomandibular joint loading causes pressurization and flow of interstitial fluid in its cartilaginous structures. This largely determines its load-bearing and maintenance capacity. It was hypothesized that during cyclical jaw movements normal pressure distribution dynamics would enable fluid to reach all necessary cartilage regions. This was tested qualitatively by analysis of local volumetric strain dynamics during jaw open–close movements predicted by a dynamic model of the human masticatory system. Finite-element analysis was performed in separate regions of the articular cartilage layers and articular disc. Heterogeneous patterns of dilatation and compression were predicted. Compression was found to be more dominant during jaw closing than opening. The pressure gradient in the superior layer of the articular disc was more mediolaterally orientated than in its inferior layer. The findings suggest that, where necessary, regionally the cartilage can imbibe fluid to protect the subchondral bone from impact loads effectively. In the disc itself presumably all areas receive regular refreshment of interstitial fluid. PMID:16928205

  16. Osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Arzi, B; Winer, J N; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2013-11-01

    Museum skull specimens (n = 1,008) of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) were examined macroscopically according to defined criteria for the presence, severity and characteristics of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA). The specimens were from stranded young adult to adult animals. Overall, 4.1% of the specimens had findings consistent with TMJ-OA. Of these, 61.0% were from females and 39.0% were from males. In addition, 85.4% of the affected specimens were from adults and 14.6% were from young adults. However, there was no significant association between age and sex with the presence or severity of TMJ-OA. Lesion severity was mild in 41.5%, moderate in 19.5% and severe in 39.0% of affected specimens. The most prominent changes were the presence of osteophytes and subchondral bone defects and porosity. The mandibular condylar process and fossa were affected equally. The lengths of the right and left mandibular heads were significantly associated with age (P = 0.002 and P = 0.003, respectively) and sex (P = 0.0009 and P = 0.001, respectively), but not with the presence of TMJ-OA. The significance of this disease in sea otters remains elusive, but this condition may play an important role in survival of these animals.

  17. Eminectomy for Habitual Luxation of the Temporomandibular Joint with Sedation and Local Anesthesia: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yoshiaki; Kusukawa, Jingo; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2016-01-01

    Eminectomy which is one of the popular and most effective treatments for habitual temporomandibular joint luxation was first described by Myrhaug in 1951. There are few reports which described eminectomy being performed under local anesthesia and conscious sedation. We present a case series of habitual luxation of the TMJ treated by eminectomy performed under local anesthesia and conscious sedation and general anesthesia. Five patients were examined and found to have recurrent luxation of the TMJ. The age of patients ranged from 18 to 93 years. Bilateral eminectomy of the TMJ was performed for two patients, and unilateral eminectomy was performed for three patients. Two were examined under intravenous propofol sedation and local anesthesia, while three patients were examined under general anesthesia. One patient died from ileus one month after surgery. The follow-up period except for the case that died from ileus ranged from 12 to 33 months. No recurrent dislocation of the TMJ has been identified. Based on our experience and two other series in the literature, eminectomy with sedation and local anesthesia can be considered and might be a good option in elderly patients.

  18. Whiplash injuries of the temporomandibular joint in motor vehicle accidents: speculations and facts.

    PubMed

    McKay, D C; Christensen, L V

    1998-10-01

    Referring to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of the human mandibular locomotor system, it has been asserted that displacement of the TMJ disc and inflammation of TMJ tissues are the results of acute and indirect trauma to the TMJ; on occasion this is allegedly experienced in motor vehicle accidents and commonly known as a TMJ whiplash injury. It is postulated that the TMJ whiplash injury is released in the occupant or occupants of a target vehicle when its rear end is impacted by the front end of a bullet vehicle. On the basis of detailed analyses of TMJ trauma/pain histories and TMJ magnetic resonance images, presented as circumstantial evidence in favour of the postulated TMJ whiplash injury, and detailed analyses of the mathematical biophysics of the mandibular locomotor system as well as direct experimental evidence, it is concluded that the postulated TMJ whiplash injury does not exist as a single and independent disease entity caused by motor vehicle accidents. If TMJ disc displacement and inflammation are present, they are expressions of an insidious and progressive pre-existing (pre-accident) disease entity that is comprised of TMJ synovitis/osteoarthritis (phase of inflammation with presence of immune system cells), TMJ internal derangement (phase of disc displacement and deformation with presence of proteinases), and TMJ osteoarthrosis (phase of degeneration with absence of immune system cells). For the asserted TMJ whiplash manoeuvre and ensuing injury to occur as postulated, the laws of physics and biology would have to be suspended. PMID:9802580

  19. Surface electromyographic assessment of patients with long lasting temporomandibular joint disorder pain.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Gianluca M; Lodetti, Gianluigi; Paiva, Guiovaldo; De Felicio, Claudia Maria; Sforza, Chiarella

    2011-08-01

    The normalized electromyographic characteristics of masticatory muscles in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) and healthy controls were compared. Thirty TMD patients (15 men, 15 women, mean age 23 years) with long lasting pain (more than 6 months), and 20 control subjects matched for sex and age were examined. All patients had arthrogenous TMD according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD). Surface electromyography of masseter and temporal muscles was performed during maximum teeth clenching either on cotton rolls or in intercuspal position. Standardized EMG indices and the median power frequency were obtained, and compared between the two groups and sexes using ANOVAs. During clenching, the TMD patients had larger asymmetry in their temporalis muscles, larger temporalis activity relative to masseter, and reduced mean power frequencies than the control subjects (p<0.05, ANOVA). In both groups, the mean power frequencies of the temporalis muscles were larger than those of the masseter muscles (p<0.001). No sex related differences, and no sex × group interactions were found. In conclusion, young adult patients with long lasting TMD have an increased and more asymmetric standardized activity of their temporalis anterior muscle, and reduced mean power frequencies, relative to healthy controls.

  20. Zurich pediatric distractor for ramal condylar unit distraction in temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Brig N. K.; Roy, I. D.; Sharma, Rohit; Kaur, Maj Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) Ankylosis is an extremely disabling condition characterized by difficulty or inability to open the mouth resulting in facial asymmetry, malocclusion and dental problems. Surgical excision of the ankylosed mass is the only treatment option available to gain mouth opening. The loss in vertical height of ramus following release of ankylosis is difficult to manage in both unilateral and bilateral TMJ ankylosis. Out of all the methods to restore this height Distraction Osteogenesis (DO) is gaining popularity because of predictable gain in the length without any associated morbidity. Recurrent bilateral TMJ ankylosis in a 32 year old male was treated by osteoarthrectomy and temporal fascia interpositioning arthroplasty. Bilateral reconstruction of ramal condylar unit (RCU) was carried out by Zurich paediatric distractor (KLS Martin, Tuttlingen Germany). Following a latency period of 7 days distraction was carried out at a rate of 1mm/day for 8 days. Distractors were removed after 12 weeks of consolidation period. The case was followed up for 12 months during which the mouth opening was maintained at 38 mm and there was no anterior open bite. PMID:27563617

  1. Presence of neuroreceptors in normal and diseased temporo-mandibular joints.

    PubMed

    Favia, G; Maiorano, E

    1995-01-01

    An immunohistochemical study was performed on the articular disk and periarticular tissues of the temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) in order to ascertain the presence of neuroreceptors (NRec) in these sites. The study was carried out with the APAAP technique on tissue samples obtained from 10 subjects without known TMJ disease and from 5 patients with severe TMJ arthritis or arthrosis. The antibodies used were directed against the following antigens: Gliofibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP), Leu-7, Myelin Basic Protein (MBP), Neurofilaments 68 kD (NF), Neuron Specific Enolase (NSE), S-100 protein (S-100) and Synaptophysin (SYN). This study revealed that Ruffini's-like, Pacini's-like and Golgi's-like receptors can be demonstrated in TMJ periarticular tissues and that free nervous endings are present in the subsynovial but not within the articular disk. In the latter, elongated cytoplasmic processes of chondrocytes demonstrated strong S-100 immunoreactivity but they were unreactive with all other antibodies. These cytoplasmic processes were more abundant and thicker in the samples obtained from patients with diseased TMJ. The results of this study confirm that different NRec are detectable in TMJ periarticular tissues but they are absent within the articular disk. In the latter site, only chondrocytic processes are evident, especially in diseased TMJ, and they might have been confused with nervous endings in previous morphological studies. Nevertheless the absence of immunoreactivity for NF, NSE and SYN proves that they are not of neural origin.

  2. Distraction osteogenesis in the treatment of temporomandibular joint ankylosis with mandibular micrognathia

    PubMed Central

    Giraddi, Girish B.; Arora, Kirti; Sai Anusha, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: The aims of the study were to evaluate the efficacy of simultaneous interpositional arthroplasty with distraction osteogenesis (DO) as a single procedure and to give the patient acceptable functional rehabilitation with correction of the gross facial asymmetry. Materials and Methods: Nine patients of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis with micrognathia were treated with interpositional arthroplasty and simultaneous DO and followed for a period of minimum 3 years. Preoperative, immediate postoperative, at the end of distraction, at 6 months and 3 years postdistraction consolidation radiographs were taken along with the clinical examination for mouth opening, deviation, length of the mandible and ramus, midline shift, occlusal cant, and occlusion. Results: The results showed an increase in the mouth opening, length of the mandible and ramus height, correction of deviation, occlusion, and midline shift. Relapse was not seen in any case, rather one patient developed infection at the distractor site and two patients had fracture of the roots of the teeth at the osteotomy site. There was an overall improvement in the facial asymmetry. Conclusion: Simultaneous interpositional arthroplasty with DO should be used to correct TMJ ankylosis associated with facial asymmetry/micrognathia, as it reduces the need for second surgery, thereby saving the trauma of a second surgery and difficulty in intubation, increases the length of the mandible, corrects the deformity, thereby resulting in an acceptable facial esthetics and function. PMID:27563611

  3. The articular disc surface in different functional conditions of the human temporo-mandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, C; Bernasconi, G; Reguzzoni, M; Farina, A

    1997-07-01

    The peripheral discal tissue and the surface covering layer have been studied in normal and in variously damaged human temporo-mandibular joint discs. In the normal disc the tissue consisted of dense bundles of fibers and rare fibrocytes. The surface of the disc was covered by a regular basophilic and electron-dense layer. These morphological characteristics persisted also in some pathological discs in which fibrous derangements had already occurred in the deep parts. In very deformed and damaged discs associated with serious functional anomalies, the superficial discal tissue consisted of rare fibers dispersed in a loose ground substance and of an increased number of cells. The superficial coating was formed by an irregular dense lamina and aggregates of various materials containing cellular debris, vesicles, filaments and amorphous components. These deposits are probably due to degeneration processes of discal tissue. This investigation suggests that the superficial discal tissue and the covering layer are together involved in maintaining the functional properties of the articular surfaces. Their structural modification in severe functional anomalies leads to failure in the maintenance of nonadherence conditions and to deterioration of the functional defect.

  4. Pre-arthroplastic and simultaneous mandibular distraction for correction of facial deformity in temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    Chellappa, A.L.; Mehrotra, D.; Vishwakarma, K.; Mahajan, N.; Bhutia, D.P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In cases of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis, interposition arthroplasty allows return of functional jaw movements. In order to improve the facial appearance, distraction osteogenesis is the treatment of choice, and may be timed either as a pre-arthroplastic, simultaneous or post-arthroplastic procedure. This study was planned to compare the treatment outcomes of pre-arthroplastic distraction (PAD) and simultaneous arthroplastic distraction (SAD) to establish the better treatment modality in terms of improvement in function and aesthetics. Materials and methods This prospective randomized experimental study included 20 children and adolescents suffering from facial deformity due to long standing unilateral TMJ ankylosis. They were randomly allocated to the two surgical groups with ten in each group. Result Both groups resulted in good facial symmetry and aesthetics. Initially, during the distraction period, mouth opening of SAD group scored less than that of PAD group but became comparable in 30 days. More pain at the distraction site and over the normal TMJ was observed in PAD group. The excursive movements were almost comparable in both the groups. Conclusion We conclude that both procedures are effective in correcting the post-ankylotic deformity and improving function. Although PAD has better control over movement of the distracting segment, the contralateral TMJ may experience pain. SAD requires a shorter management period but is associated with a temporary decrease in function. Also, control of distraction may be difficult and chances of reankylosis are always there. PMID:26587380

  5. Movement of temporomandibular joint tissues during mastication and passive manipulation in miniature pigs.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zongyang; Liu, Zi-Jun; Herring, Susan W

    2002-04-01

    Movement is an important aspect of the biomechanics of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). To track the relative movements of TMJ components, radio-opaque markers were implanted in the left squamosal bone, mandible and retrodiscal tissue of miniature pigs. Medial-lateral (ML) and dorsal-ventral (DV) fluoroscopic records were made 8-10 weeks later during chewing and passive manipulation. Marker movements were digitized from the videotapes. During passive manipulation, the deformation of the lateral capsule was also measured with a differential variable-reluctance transducer. The results provide new details about porcine chewing pattern, which is distinguished by a regularly alternating chewing side. During masticatory opening, the mandible had a centre of rotation (CR) well inferior to the condyle and close to the angle. In contrast, the passive opening movement showed a higher CR location close to the condylar neck, indicating a different motion from masticatory opening. The retrodiscal tissue followed the movements of the mandibular condyle during both mastication and passive manipulation. The lateral capsule elongated during ipsilateral shifts and retrusion, implying a possible role in limiting such movements. These movement characteristics provide a useful reference for studies on the TMJ using pigs.

  6. The contribution of computerized axiography to the functional evaluation of the temporomandibular joint: a case report

    PubMed Central

    BOTOS, ALEXANDRA MARIA; MESAROS, ANCA STEFANIA; ZIMBRAN, ADELA IOANA

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to give comprehensive information on the clinical use of computerized axiography (CA) in the evaluation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) mobility in a patient who undergoes orthognatic surgery. A 20-year-old female patient with class III skeletal anomaly and who underwent orthognatic surgery is presented. Pre- and postsurgical CA recordings for the patient are compared in order to evaluate the functional modifications that appear. The CA is a functional investigation of the TMJ and records the border movements of the mandible: protrusion, lateral movements and open/close. The starting point for every movement is the centric relation position. This allows for very high reproducibility of the CA and the data can later become available for comparison of examinations performed at different times. The CA can offer data to programme an articulator or to evaluate the functional evolution of the TMJs after various occlusal interventions (prosthodontic, orthodontic or orthognatic). After comparing the pre- and postsurgical CA recordings, a significant improvement of the TMJ function after the repositioning of the maxilla and mandible through orthognatic surgery was confirmed. In conclusion, our case confirms the results in literature that CA is a reproducible and reliable investigation method in the evaluation of TMJ function in orthognatic surgery patients, that it facilitates the monitoring of the evolution of the functionality of the TMJ ever time and that it allows for comparative evaluation of the two TMJs. PMID:27547067

  7. Association between Ear Fullness, Earache, and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Julya; Doi, Marcelo; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa; Gorres, Vanessa; Mendes, Marina Stephany; Silva, Izabele Machado; Navarro, Ricardo; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza

    2014-10-01

    Introduction An earache (otalgia or ear pain) is pain in one or both ears that may last a short or long time. Earache is prevalent in the population with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJDs), but there is a dearth of epidemiologic studies regarding the association between TMJD and ear pain and ear fullness in older people. Objective To assess the presence of earache and ear fullness in elderly patients with TMJD. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in independently living, elderly individuals. TMJD was assessed by dental evaluation and earache was verified by medical history. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test and relative risk. Results Of the 197 subjects evaluated in this part of the study, 22 had earache, and 35 was verified by ear fullness. Of the 22 subjects with earache, none had conductive or mixed hearing loss in the ears tested. There was a significant association (p = 0.036) between the TMJD and earache (odds ratio = 2.3), but there was no significant association between the TMJD and ear fullness. Conclusion These results highlight the importance of identifying risk factors for earache that can be modified through specific interventions, which is essential in the prevention of future episodes, as well as managing the process of treatment of elderly patients in general. PMID:25992127

  8. Occlusal changes secondary to temporomandibular joint conditions: a critical review and implications for clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    CALDAS, Waleska; CONTI, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; JANSON, Guilherme; Paulo César Rodrigues, CONTI

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The relationship between Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and malocclusion is an extremely critical issue in dentistry. Contrary to the old concept that malocclusion causes TMD, occlusal changes, especially those observed as sudden, may be secondary and reflect joint or muscle disorders due to the obvious connection between these structures and the dental occlusion. Objectives The aim of this article is to present the most commonly occlusal changes secondary to TMD. Methods The clinical presentation of these conditions is discussed. Details regarding diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients presenting TMD prior or during treatment are also presented. Conclusions All plans for irreversible therapy should be preceded by a meticulous analysis of TMD signs and symptoms in such a way that patients are not submitted to irreversible treatment, based on an untrue occlusal relationship, secondary to articular and/or muscular disorders. When present, TMD symptoms must always be controlled to reestablish a “normal” occlusion and allow proper treatment strategy. PMID:27556214

  9. The contribution of computerized axiography to the functional evaluation of the temporomandibular joint: a case report.

    PubMed

    Botos, Alexandra Maria; Mesaros, Anca Stefania; Zimbran, Adela Ioana

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to give comprehensive information on the clinical use of computerized axiography (CA) in the evaluation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) mobility in a patient who undergoes orthognatic surgery. A 20-year-old female patient with class III skeletal anomaly and who underwent orthognatic surgery is presented. Pre- and postsurgical CA recordings for the patient are compared in order to evaluate the functional modifications that appear. The CA is a functional investigation of the TMJ and records the border movements of the mandible: protrusion, lateral movements and open/close. The starting point for every movement is the centric relation position. This allows for very high reproducibility of the CA and the data can later become available for comparison of examinations performed at different times. The CA can offer data to programme an articulator or to evaluate the functional evolution of the TMJs after various occlusal interventions (prosthodontic, orthodontic or orthognatic). After comparing the pre- and postsurgical CA recordings, a significant improvement of the TMJ function after the repositioning of the maxilla and mandible through orthognatic surgery was confirmed. In conclusion, our case confirms the results in literature that CA is a reproducible and reliable investigation method in the evaluation of TMJ function in orthognatic surgery patients, that it facilitates the monitoring of the evolution of the functionality of the TMJ ever time and that it allows for comparative evaluation of the two TMJs. PMID:27547067

  10. Diagnostic index of three-dimensional osteoarthritic changes in temporomandibular joint condylar morphology

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Liliane R.; Gomes, Marcelo; Jung, Bryan; Paniagua, Beatriz; Ruellas, Antonio C.; Gonçalves, João Roberto; Styner, Martin A.; Wolford, Larry; Cevidanes, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. This study aimed to investigate imaging statistical approaches for classifying three-dimensional (3-D) osteoarthritic morphological variations among 169 temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyles. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were acquired from 69 subjects with long-term TMJ osteoarthritis (OA), 15 subjects at initial diagnosis of OA, and 7 healthy controls. Three-dimensional surface models of the condyles were constructed and SPHARM-PDM established correspondent points on each model. Multivariate analysis of covariance and direction-projection-permutation (DiProPerm) were used for testing statistical significance of the differences between the groups determined by clinical and radiographic diagnoses. Unsupervised classification using hierarchical agglomerative clustering was then conducted. Compared with healthy controls, OA average condyle was significantly smaller in all dimensions except its anterior surface. Significant flattening of the lateral pole was noticed at initial diagnosis. We observed areas of 3.88-mm bone resorption at the superior surface and 3.10-mm bone apposition at the anterior aspect of the long-term OA average model. DiProPerm supported a significant difference between the healthy control and OA group (p-value=0.001). Clinically meaningful unsupervised classification of TMJ condylar morphology determined a preliminary diagnostic index of 3-D osteoarthritic changes, which may be the first step towards a more targeted diagnosis of this condition. PMID:26158119

  11. Association between Ear Fullness, Earache, and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Julya; Doi, Marcelo; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa; Gorres, Vanessa; Mendes, Marina Stephany; Silva, Izabele Machado; Navarro, Ricardo; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction An earache (otalgia or ear pain) is pain in one or both ears that may last a short or long time. Earache is prevalent in the population with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJDs), but there is a dearth of epidemiologic studies regarding the association between TMJD and ear pain and ear fullness in older people. Objective To assess the presence of earache and ear fullness in elderly patients with TMJD. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in independently living, elderly individuals. TMJD was assessed by dental evaluation and earache was verified by medical history. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test and relative risk. Results Of the 197 subjects evaluated in this part of the study, 22 had earache, and 35 was verified by ear fullness. Of the 22 subjects with earache, none had conductive or mixed hearing loss in the ears tested. There was a significant association (p = 0.036) between the TMJD and earache (odds ratio = 2.3), but there was no significant association between the TMJD and ear fullness. Conclusion These results highlight the importance of identifying risk factors for earache that can be modified through specific interventions, which is essential in the prevention of future episodes, as well as managing the process of treatment of elderly patients in general. PMID:25992127

  12. Inhibition of fibrous adhesion formation in the temporomandibular joint of tenascin-C knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Y; Okamoto, K; Goh, Y; Kiga, N; Tojyo, I; Fujita, S

    2014-10-22

    Tenascin-C (TNC) is a large hexameric extracellular matrix glycoprotein that is expressed in developing organs and tumors. It has been reported that TNC is expressed in inflamed synovial membranes and deformed discs of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder. However, the role of TNC in TMJ is not fully known. In this study, the role of TNC in fibrous adhesion formation of TMJ was examined using TNC knockout (TNCKO) mice. Hypermobility was produced by excessive mouth opening method on the TMJ of both wild-type (WT) and TNCKO mice. TMJ wound healing was compared histologically, and the expression of TNC, fibronectin (FN) and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in the wounded TMJ was examined by immunohistochemical and immunoblot analyses. Based on histologic analysis, fibrous adhesions were observed in the TMJ of both TNCKO and wild-type (WT) mice after excessive mouth opening. However, fibrous adhesion formation in TNCKO mice occurred later than in WT mice. TNC was expressed in the wounded TMJ disc and mandibular fossa. Although FN and α-SMA expression in the TMJ of TNCKO and WT mice was up-regulated after excessive mouth opening, FN and α-SMA protein levels were higher in WT mice at the same time points. In the wounded TMJ, TNC appears to enhance the expression of FN and α-SMA, and a lack of TNC may reduce fibrous adhesion formation in the TMJ. TNC plays an important role in TMJ wound healing, especially for wounds generated by mechanical stress.

  13. Comparison of different approaches to the reduction of anterior temporomandibular joint dislocation: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Ardehali, M M; Tari, N; Bastaninejad, Sh; Amirizad, E

    2016-08-01

    This randomized clinical trial was designed to compare three different reduction methods for anterior temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation. The three methods evaluated were the conventional method, wrist pivot method, and extraoral method. The study sample comprised 90 consecutive patients suffering from anterior dislocation of the TMJ, who were allocated randomly to one of the three groups. This study found success rates of 86.7% for the conventional method, 96.7% for the wrist pivot method, and 66.7% for the extraoral method. The extraoral method was more difficult for the physician and the patient than the other two methods. For the patients, the wrist pivot method was easier than the other methods. For the doctors, the extraoral method was significantly more difficult than the other methods. In conclusion, due to the absence of a biting risk with the extraoral method and the lack of a significant difference in success between this method and the conventional method, the extraoral method could be considered the appropriate first-line treatment where there is a risk of the patient biting the surgeon's hand. Given the overall benefits of the wrist pivot method, this method could be considered the first-line and gold standard treatment modality in other cases. PMID:27160610

  14. Early-onset osteoarthritis of mouse temporomandibular joint induced by partial discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, L.; Polur, I.; Lim, C.; Servais, J. M.; Dobeck, J.; Li, Y.; Olsen, B. R.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Objective The objective of this study is to characterize mouse temporomandibular joint (TMJ) following partial discectomy, since there is no documentation of whether or not partial discectomy can induce early-onset osteoarthritis (OA) in mouse TMJ. Methods Partial discs of TMJ in mice were removed by microsurgery. Histology was performed to characterize articular cartilages from the TMJ of mice. The morphology of the articular cartilages was evaluated using a modified Mankin scoring system. Immunohistostaining was carried out to examine the expression of discoidin domain receptor 2 (Ddr2), a type II collagen receptor, matrix metalloproteinase 13 (Mmp-13), and Mmp-derived type II collagen fragments in the articular cartilage of condyles from the mouse TMJ. Results Articular cartilage degeneration was seen in the mouse TMJ post discectomy, including increased proteoglycan staining in the extracellular matrix at 4 weeks, the appearance of chondrocyte clusters at 8 weeks, reduced proteoglycan staining and fibrillation at 12 weeks and the loss of articular cartilage at 16 weeks. Increased immunostaining for Ddr2, Mmp-13, and Mmp-derived type II collagen fragments was detected. Conclusion Results indicate that partial discectomy induces early-onset OA in mouse TMJ and that increased expression of Mmp-13, likely due to the elevated expression of Ddr2, may be one of the factors responsible for the early-onset OA in mouse TMJ. PMID:19230720

  15. Management of acquired open bite associated with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis using miniscrew anchorage

    PubMed Central

    Yamano, Eizo; Inubushi, Toshihiro; Kuroda, Shingo

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the orthodontic treatment of a patient with skeletal mandibular retrusion and an anterior open bite due to temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) using miniscrew anchorage. A 46-year-old woman had a Class II malocclusion with a retropositioned mandible. Her overjet and overbite were 7.0 mm and -1.6 mm, respectively. She had limited mouth opening, TMJ sounds, and pain. Condylar resorption was observed in both TMJs. Her TMJ pain was reduced by splint therapy, and then orthodontic treatment was initiated. Titanium miniscrews were placed at the posterior maxilla to intrude the molars. After 2 years and 7 months of orthodontic treatment, an acceptable occlusion was achieved without any recurrence of TMJ symptoms. The retropositioned mandible was considerably improved, and the lips showed less tension upon lip closure. The maxillary molars were intruded by 1.5 mm, and the mandible was subsequently rotated counterclockwise. Magnetic resonance imaging of both condyles after treatment showed avascular necrosis-like structures. During a 2-year retention period, an acceptable occlusion was maintained without recurrence of the open bite. In conclusion, correction of open bite and clockwise-rotated mandible through molar intrusion using titanium miniscrews is effective for the management of TMJ-OA with jaw deformity. PMID:23112945

  16. Osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Arzi, B; Winer, J N; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2013-11-01

    Museum skull specimens (n = 1,008) of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) were examined macroscopically according to defined criteria for the presence, severity and characteristics of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA). The specimens were from stranded young adult to adult animals. Overall, 4.1% of the specimens had findings consistent with TMJ-OA. Of these, 61.0% were from females and 39.0% were from males. In addition, 85.4% of the affected specimens were from adults and 14.6% were from young adults. However, there was no significant association between age and sex with the presence or severity of TMJ-OA. Lesion severity was mild in 41.5%, moderate in 19.5% and severe in 39.0% of affected specimens. The most prominent changes were the presence of osteophytes and subchondral bone defects and porosity. The mandibular condylar process and fossa were affected equally. The lengths of the right and left mandibular heads were significantly associated with age (P = 0.002 and P = 0.003, respectively) and sex (P = 0.0009 and P = 0.001, respectively), but not with the presence of TMJ-OA. The significance of this disease in sea otters remains elusive, but this condition may play an important role in survival of these animals. PMID:23721871

  17. Osteoarthritis in Temporomandibular Joint of Col2a1 Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ricks, M. L.; Farrell, J.T.; Falk, D. J.; Holt, D W.; Rees, M.; Carr, J.; Williams, T.; Nichols, B.A.; Bridgewater, L. C.; Reynolds, P. R.; Kooyman, D L; Seegmiller, R. E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Col2a1 gene mutations cause premature degeneration of knee articular cartilage in disproportionate micromelia (Dmm) and spondyloepiphesial dysplasia congenita (sedc) mice. The present study analyzes the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in Col2a1 mutant mice in order to provide an animal model of TMJ osteoarthritis (OA) that may offer better understanding of the progression of this disease in humans. Design Dmm/+ mice and controls were compared at two, six, nine and 12 months. Craniums were fixed, processed to paraffin sections, stained with Safranin-O/Fast Green, and analyzed with light microscopy. OA was quantified using a Mankin scoring procedure. Unfolded protein response (UPR) assay was performed and immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to assay for known OA biomarkers. Results Dmm/+ TMJs showed fissuring of condylar cartilage as early as 6 months of age. Chondrocytes were clustered, leaving acellular regions in the matrix. Significant staining of HtrA1, Ddr2 and Mmp-13 was observed in Dmm/+ mice (p< 0.01). We detected upregulation of the UPR in knee but not TMJ. Conclusions Dmm/+ mice are subject to early-onset OA in the TMJ. We observed upregulation of biomarkers and condylar cartilage degradation concomitant with OA. An upregulated UPR may exacerbate the onset of OA. The Dmm/+ mouse TMJ is a viable model for the study of the progression of OA in humans. PMID:23518238

  18. Management of acquired open bite associated with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis using miniscrew anchorage.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Eiji; Yamano, Eizo; Inubushi, Toshihiro; Kuroda, Shingo

    2012-06-01

    This article reports the orthodontic treatment of a patient with skeletal mandibular retrusion and an anterior open bite due to temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) using miniscrew anchorage. A 46-year-old woman had a Class II malocclusion with a retropositioned mandible. Her overjet and overbite were 7.0 mm and -1.6 mm, respectively. She had limited mouth opening, TMJ sounds, and pain. Condylar resorption was observed in both TMJs. Her TMJ pain was reduced by splint therapy, and then orthodontic treatment was initiated. Titanium miniscrews were placed at the posterior maxilla to intrude the molars. After 2 years and 7 months of orthodontic treatment, an acceptable occlusion was achieved without any recurrence of TMJ symptoms. The retropositioned mandible was considerably improved, and the lips showed less tension upon lip closure. The maxillary molars were intruded by 1.5 mm, and the mandible was subsequently rotated counterclockwise. Magnetic resonance imaging of both condyles after treatment showed avascular necrosis-like structures. During a 2-year retention period, an acceptable occlusion was maintained without recurrence of the open bite. In conclusion, correction of open bite and clockwise-rotated mandible through molar intrusion using titanium miniscrews is effective for the management of TMJ-OA with jaw deformity. PMID:23112945

  19. Injecting vascular endothelial growth factor into the temporomandibular joint induces osteoarthritis in mice.

    PubMed

    Shen, Pei; Jiao, ZiXian; Zheng, Ji Si; Xu, Wei Feng; Zhang, Shang Yong; Qin, An; Yang, Chi

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can initiate osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this study we evaluated the effects of intra-articular injection of exogenous VEGF in the TMJ in mice on the early stage. Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley mice were equally divided into 3 groups. In the vegf group, the mice received an injection of VEGF solution (50 μL) in the TMJ once a week over a period of 4 weeks. In the sham group, the mice received an injection of saline (50 μL). The control group did not receive any injection. Four mice from each group were sacrificed at 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks. Gradual prominent cartilage degeneration was observed in the vegf group. Additionally, this group showed higher expressions of metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-13, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa-B ligand (RANKL), and a higher number of apoptotic chondrocytes and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-positive chondrocytes. Micro-computed tomography (CT) revealed prominent subchondral bone resorption in the vegf group, with a high number of osteoclasts in the subchondral bone. In vitro study demonstrated that VEGF can promote osteoclast differentiation. In conclusion, our study found that VEGF can initiate TMJ OA by destroying cartilage and subchondral bone. PMID:26531672

  20. Injecting vascular endothelial growth factor into the temporomandibular joint induces osteoarthritis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Pei; Jiao, ZiXian; Zheng, Ji Si; Xu, Wei Feng; Zhang, Shang Yong; Qin, An; Yang, Chi

    2015-01-01

    It is unclear whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) can initiate osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this study we evaluated the effects of intra-articular injection of exogenous VEGF in the TMJ in mice on the early stage. Forty-eight male Sprague-Dawley mice were equally divided into 3 groups. In the vegf group, the mice received an injection of VEGF solution (50 μL) in the TMJ once a week over a period of 4 weeks. In the sham group, the mice received an injection of saline (50 μL). The control group did not receive any injection. Four mice from each group were sacrificed at 1, 2, 4, and 8 weeks. Gradual prominent cartilage degeneration was observed in the vegf group. Additionally, this group showed higher expressions of metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-13, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa-B ligand (RANKL), and a higher number of apoptotic chondrocytes and VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2)-positive chondrocytes. Micro-computed tomography (CT) revealed prominent subchondral bone resorption in the vegf group, with a high number of osteoclasts in the subchondral bone. In vitro study demonstrated that VEGF can promote osteoclast differentiation. In conclusion, our study found that VEGF can initiate TMJ OA by destroying cartilage and subchondral bone. PMID:26531672

  1. Mice deficient in biglycan and fibromodulin as a model for temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Sunil; Embree, Mildred; Ameye, Laurent; Young, Marian F

    2005-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) within the craniofacial complex is unique. In humans, the TMJ can become diseased resulting in severe and disabling pain. There are no cures for TMJ disease at this time. Animal models of TMJ disease are scarce, but some exist, and they are described in this paper. We present in greater detail one animal model that is deficient in two extracellular matrix (ECM) proteoglycans, biglycan (BGN) and fibromodulin (FMOD). Doubly deficient BGN/FMOD mice develop premature TMJ osteoarthritis (OA). In order to explore the mechanistic basis of TMJ-OA, tissues from the condyle of mutant mice were examined for their relative capacity to differentiate and undergo apoptosis. Our data show that there is a redistribution of the critical ECM protein, type II collagen, in mutant mice compared with controls. Mutant mice also have increased apoptosis of the chondrocytes embedded in the articular cartilage. We speculate that the overall imbalance in apoptosis may be the cellular basis for the abnormal production of structural ECM proteins. The abnormal production of the ECM could, in turn, lead to premature erosion and degradation of the articular surface resulting in TMJ-OA. These data underscore the importance of the ECM in controlling the structural integrity of the TMJ. PMID:16612079

  2. Long-term Outcomes of Shamanic Treatment for Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vuckovic, Nancy H; Williams, Louise A; Schneider, Jennifer; Ramirez, Michelle; Gullion, Christina M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) are chronic, often refractory, pain conditions affecting the jaw and face. Patients least likely to respond to allopathic treatment have the most marked biologic responsiveness to external stressors and concomitant psychosocial and emotional difficulties. From a shamanic healing perspective, this describes individuals who are thought to be “dispirited” and may benefit from this ancient form of spiritual healing. Objective: To report on the long-term quantitative and qualitative outcomes relative to end-of-treatment status of a phase I study that evaluated the feasibility and efficacy of shamanic healing for people with TMDs. Methods/Design: Participants were contacted by telephone at one, three, six, and nine months after treatment and asked to report pain and disability outcomes and qualitative feedback. Setting: Portland, OR. Participants: Twenty-three women aged 25 to 55 years diagnosed with TMD. Primary Outcome Measures: Participants rated their TMD-related pain and disability (on the TMD Research Diagnostic Criteria Axis II Pain Related Disability and Psychological Status Scale) at each follow-up call and were asked to describe their condition qualitatively. Results: Improvements in usual pain, worst pain, and functional impairment reported at end of treatment did not change during the 9 months after treatment ended (p > 0.18). Conclusion: Shamanic healing had lasting effects on TMDs in this small cohort of women. PMID:22745613

  3. Zurich pediatric distractor for ramal condylar unit distraction in temporomandibular joint ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Brig N K; Roy, I D; Sharma, Rohit; Kaur, Maj Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) Ankylosis is an extremely disabling condition characterized by difficulty or inability to open the mouth resulting in facial asymmetry, malocclusion and dental problems. Surgical excision of the ankylosed mass is the only treatment option available to gain mouth opening. The loss in vertical height of ramus following release of ankylosis is difficult to manage in both unilateral and bilateral TMJ ankylosis. Out of all the methods to restore this height Distraction Osteogenesis (DO) is gaining popularity because of predictable gain in the length without any associated morbidity. Recurrent bilateral TMJ ankylosis in a 32 year old male was treated by osteoarthrectomy and temporal fascia interpositioning arthroplasty. Bilateral reconstruction of ramal condylar unit (RCU) was carried out by Zurich paediatric distractor (KLS Martin, Tuttlingen Germany). Following a latency period of 7 days distraction was carried out at a rate of 1mm/day for 8 days. Distractors were removed after 12 weeks of consolidation period. The case was followed up for 12 months during which the mouth opening was maintained at 38 mm and there was no anterior open bite. PMID:27563617

  4. Use of adipose stem cells and polylactide discs for tissue engineering of the temporomandibular joint disc

    PubMed Central

    Mäenpää, Katja; Ellä, Ville; Mauno, Jari; Kellomäki, Minna; Suuronen, Riitta; Ylikomi, Timo; Miettinen, Susanna

    2010-01-01

    There is currently no suitable replacement for damaged temporomandibular joint (TMJ) discs after discectomy. In the present study, we fabricated bilayer biodegradable polylactide (PLA) discs comprising a non-woven mat of poly(L/D)lactide (P(L/D)LA) 96/4 and a P(L/DL)LA 70/30 membrane plate. The PLA disc was examined in combination with adipose stem cells (ASCs) for tissue engineering of the fibrocartilaginous TMJ disc in vitro. ASCs were cultured in parallel in control and chondrogenic medium for a maximum of six weeks. Relative expression of the genes, aggrecan, type I collagen and type II collagen present in the TMJ disc extracellular matrix increased in the ASC-seeded PLA discs in the chondrogenic medium. The hypertrophic marker, type X collagen, was moderately induced. Alcian blue staining showed accumulation of sulphated glycosaminoglycans. ASC differentiation in the PLA discs was close to that observed in pellet cultures. Comparison of the mRNA levels revealed that the degree of ASC differentiation was lower than that in TMJ disc-derived cells and tissue. The pellet format supported the phenotype of the TMJ disc-derived cells under chondrogenic conditions and also enhanced their hyalinization potential, which is considered part of the TMJ disc degeneration process. Accordingly, the combination of ASCs and PLA discs has potential for the development of a tissue-engineered TMJ disc replacement. PMID:19474082

  5. Stress analysis in human temporomandibular joint affected by anterior disc displacement during prolonged clenching.

    PubMed

    Abe, S; Kawano, F; Kohge, K; Kawaoka, T; Ueda, K; Hattori-Hara, E; Mori, H; Kuroda, S; Tanaka, E

    2013-04-01

    Parafunctional habits, such as prolonged clenching and bruxism, have been associated with dysfunctional overloading in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this study, stress distributions in the TMJ were analysed during prolonged clenching, using three-dimensional finite element (FE) models of the TMJ with and without disc displacement. The aim of this study was to investigate stress distribution of the cartilaginous tissues in the TMJ with and without disc displacement. Finite element models were developed on the basis of magnetic resonance images from two subjects with and without anterior disc displacement. Condylar movements recorded during a 5-min clenching were used as the loading condition for stress analysis. In the asymptomatic model, the highest von Mises stresses were located in the lateral area (4·91 MPa) of the disc surfaces, and after 5-min clenching, the higher stresses were still located at the lateral area (3·65 MPa). In all the cartilaginous tissues, 30-50% of stress reduction occurred during 5-min clenching. In contrast, the von Mises stress in the cartilaginous tissues of the symptomatic model with disc displacement was markedly lower, compared with the asymptomatic model. However, in the condylar cartilage, stress relaxation during clenching was not recognised. Furthermore, relatively high stresses were observed in the retrodiscal tissues throughout clenching. The present results indicate that disc position could be involved in the stress distribution of the TMJ components during prolonged clenching.

  6. Effects of masticatory muscle force on temporomandibular joint disc growth in rats.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Makoto; Yonemitsu, Ikuo; Muramoto, Takeshi; Soma, Kunimichi

    2007-12-01

    Biomechanical factors in masticatory function are related to the development of the mandible and the condyle. Previous studies have reported that reduced masticatory muscle force influences mandibular bone formation and chondroblastic proliferation. We examined the importance of compressive force in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc growth by reducing the masticatory load. Thirty 3-week-old male Wistar rats were used in this study. In the experimental group, the masseter muscles were bilaterally resected to evaluate the influence of masticatory muscle force on morphology and composition of TMJ disc during growth. No surgery was performed in the control group. The thickness of the TMJ disc was measured to evaluate the morphological changes. The localization of type I collagen and decorin was performed by immunostaining to examine compositional change. Cell proliferation in the disc was identified by insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1r) immunostaining. The disc thickness at each region in the experimental group was reduced compared to the control group. While in the control group, type I collagen and decorin were identified throughout the disc, it was concentrated on the superior portion of the disc at the anterior and posterior bands in the experimental group. The expression of IGF-1r immunopositive cells in the experimental group was also significantly lower than in the control. We conclude that masticatory muscle force is closely related to TMJ disc morphology and composition during growth.

  7. Temporomandibular joint alterations and their orofacial complications in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Renata Teixeira de; Braga, Flávia Silva Farah Ferreira; Brito, Fernanda; Capelli Junior, Jonas; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo; Sztajnbok, Flávio Roberto

    2012-12-01

    Patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) can have alterations in bone metabolism and skeletal growth, as well as damage to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), which can generate extra and/or intraoral alterations, resulting in craniofacial disorders. Our goal is to carry out a review of the literature on orofacial alterations in patients with JIA. Among the orofacial disorders in patients with JIA, alterations in mandibular growth, caused by dysfunctions in the TMJ region, seem highly prevalent in these patients. The most often found alterations are: retrognathia, micrognathia, anterior open bite, dental crowding, facial asymmetry and mouth opening limitation. Thus, the rheumatologist becomes a key agent in the early detection of these disorders, helping with patient referral to a dentist. The diagnosis, in turn, should be performed by the orthodontist, using clinical examination and imaging methods, allowing early treatment and a favorable prognosis. TMJ disorders should be treated by a multidisciplinary team, including pharmacological treatment for pain control and dental care through functional appliance and/or orthodontic therapy, physical therapy and sometimes, speech therapy. We conclude that among the orofacial disorders in patients with JIA, alterations in mandibular growth generated by dysfunctions in the TMJ region seem highly prevalent. Such dysfunctions can cause mainly open bite, mandibular retrusion, micrognathia, dental crowding and facial asymmetry. The rheumatologist can detect these alterations at an early stage, with immediate patient referral to a team that should preferably be a multidisciplinary one, consisting of an orthodontist, physical therapist and speech therapist, to reduce future occlusal and mandibular growth complications.

  8. Temporo-mandibular joint chondrosarcoma: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Giorgione, C; Passali, F M; Varakliotis, T; Sibilia, M; Ottaviani, F

    2015-06-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal tumour of cartilaginous origin. It represents 11% of all malignant primary bone tumours, and the pelvis, ribs, femur and humerus are most frequently involved. Chondrosarcoma of the head and neck region is a rare disease, and represents approximately 0.1% of all head and neck neoplasms. This report describes a rare localisation of chondrosarcoma in a 56-year-old man who presented with swelling in the right preauricular area and mild limitation and pain in the mouth opening. Since 1959, just a few cases of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) chondrosarcoma have been described. Computed tomography revealed a large mass (39 x 46 x 40 mm) in the right preauricular and parotid region with morpho-structural alterations of the condyle and an intense periostotic reaction. The tumour was treated by total parotidectomy and condylotomy. The VII cranial nerve was preserved. Histopathologic examination revealed a low grade chondrosarcoma with a 50% proliferation index. At present, the patient is still receiving routine follow-up after radiotherapy and physiotherapy.

  9. [Various mechanic characteristics of bony structures of the temporo-mandibular joint in several classes of mammals studied by measurement of hardness and resistance to penetration].

    PubMed

    Planche, R; Fournier, J; Guillot, M; Scheye, T; Escande, G; Chazal, J; Vanneuville, G

    1990-06-01

    Applying the principles of mechanics, the authors have studied and compared the bony structures of the temporo-mandibular joint. Using the means of investigation usually implemented in the metallurgical sector, they have tried to establish a link between the morphology and mechanical strength of the various components of this joint in some subjects belonging to the mammals classification and with various feeding modes. The results obtained by hardness micrometry tend to show that during masticatory movements, the temporo-mandibular joint works in a hanging rather than in a compressed mode.

  10. [Topographological-anatomic changes in the structure of temporo-mandibular joint in case of fracture of the mandible condylar process at cervical level].

    PubMed

    Volkov, S I; Bazhenov, D V; Semkin, V A

    2011-01-01

    Pathological changes in soft tissues surrounding the fracture site as well as in the structural elements of temporo-mandibular joint always occured in condylar process fracture with shift at cervical mandibular jaw level. Other changes were also seen in the joint on the opposite normal side. Modelling of condylar process fracture at mandibular cervical level by means of three-dimensional computer model of temporo-mandibular joint contributed to proper understanding of this pathology emergence as well as to prediction and elimination of disorders arising in adjacent to the fracture site tissues.

  11. A clinical study on SSP (silver spike point) electro-therapy combined with splint therapy for temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, K; Konda, T; Shimahara, M; Hyodo, M; Kitade, T

    1995-01-01

    When the functional limits of the muscles related to the temporo-mandibular joint and adjacent tissue exceed their anatomical capability, pain, crepitation, and functional abnormality appear as the main complaints. Although the precise nature of the condition is unknown, pain at the temporo-mandibular joint sometimes in combination with muscular tension is assumed to be due to compression of the myoneural mechanism. It is reported that occlusal lifting using a splint enables the alleviation of this muscular tension. On the other hand, there are only a few reports on the usefulness of SSP therapy for Temporo-Mandibular Joint Dysfunction. We studied the efficacy of SSP therapy combined with splint therapy in 33 patients diagnosed as having Temporo-Mandibular Joint Dysfunction who consulted our department primarily due to pain, and report our findings below. Evaluation of the results was conducted 2 weeks later. Very beneficial results were seen in 6 cases. Beneficial results were seen in 7 cases. Slightly beneficial results were seen in 18 cases, while there were no changes found in 2 cases. When combined SSP and splint therapies were conducted for Temporo-Mandibular Joint Dysfunction, favorable results were seen in about 90% of the cases.

  12. Change the Myofascial Pain and Range of Motion of the Temporomandibular Joint Following Kinesio Taping of Latent Myofascial Trigger Points in the Sternocleidomastoid Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Youngsook

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the changes in the myofascial pain and range of the motion of temporomandibular joint when Kinesio taping is applied to patients with latent myofascial trigger points of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 42 males and females aged 20 to 30 years (male 17, female 25). They were randomly divided into the control group and the experimental group, which would receive Kinesio taping. Kinesio taping was applied to the sternocleidomastoid muscle three times per week for two weeks. The pain triggered when the taut band or nodule was palpated was measured. Pain intensity was measured using the visual analog scale (VAS) and pressure pain threshold (PPT). The range of motion of the temporomandibular joint was measured. In all subjects, VAS, PPT, and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] In the experimental group, it was found that pain in the SCM was relived, as the VAS and PPT score decrease significantly and range of motion of temporomandibular joint increase significantly. In comparison between the groups, significant differences were shown in the VAS and PPT scores and in the range of motion of the temporomandibular joint. [Conclusion] Kinesio taping is thought to be an intervention method that can be applied to latent myofascial trigger points. PMID:25276008

  13. Distribution of elastic fibres in the developing rabbit craniomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Nagy, N B; Daniel, J C

    1991-01-01

    The biomechanical properties of the CMJ disc depend upon the composition and organization of the extracellular matrix. Elastic fibres are important elements of the matrix and may be in part responsible for the resilience of the disc during jaw movements. Elastic fibres first appeared after the establishment of a miniature CMJ at 23 days of prenatal development. The first elastic fibres appeared in the antero-inferior and postero-inferior attachment regions of the disc. In the newborn rabbit there were elastic fibres in the articulating surfaces of the joint and by one week fibres could be seen in the intermediate zone portion of the disc. At two weeks, when the animals were beginning to experiment with solid food, the disc band areas showed accumulations of elastic fibres and proteoglycans. The findings suggest that the elastic elements of the disc, squamosal and condylar articulations may have a resilience function which develops in response to functional loads placed upon the joint as the rabbit grows and changes diet.

  14. Effectiveness of different surgical modalities in the management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohan; Shen, Pei; Zhang, Shanyong; Yang, Chi; Wang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background: A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of three surgical modalities-gap arthroplasty (GA), interpositional gap arthroplasty (IPG) and joint reconstruction (AR)-in treating temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis. Methods: A systematic review was performed using the PUBMED, EMBASE and OVID search engines in February 2015 to identify cohort studies with no restrictions, with the aim of evaluating the three surgical modalities. The outcome was the change between the pre- and postoperative maximal incisal opening (MIO). Analyses of category, heterogeneity, sensitivity and publication bias were performed. A fixed-effects model was used to compute the pooled weighted mean difference in the MIO among the different groups. Result: Seventeen studies with 740 participants were included in the final analysis. The IPG therapy showed a significantly greater MIO when compared to GA (WMD=1.16 mm; 95% CI, 0.15-2.16) and AR (WMD=0.99 mm; 95% CI, 0.05-1.92) therapies. The weighted mean difference between the AR and GA modalities was 2.94 mm (95% CI, 0.12-5.75). The pooled odds ratios (ORs) of the recurrence rate for IPG, GA and AR were 0.01 (95% CI, 0.00-0.03), 0.03 (95% CI, 0.00-0.07) and 0.06 (95% CI, 0.04-0.09), respectively. Conclusion: The analysis showed that IPG was more effective and displayed a lower recurrence rate, followed by AR and GA, in treating TMJ ankylosis. Thus, this analysis provides strong evidence supporting IPG as a first-line therapy for TMJ ankylosis. PMID:26884893

  15. Characterization of the Temporomandibular Joint of Southern Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Lieske, Danielle; Vapniarsky, Natalia; Verstraete, Frank J M; Leale, Dustin M; Young, Colleen; Arzi, Boaz

    2015-01-01

    The structure-function relationship of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of southern sea otter has largely not been described. This study aims to describe the histological, biochemical, and biomechanical features of the TMJ disk in the southern sea otter. The TMJ disks from fresh cadaver heads of southern sea otter adult males (n = 8) and females (n = 8) acquired from strandings were examined. Following macroscopical evaluation, the TMJs were investigated for their histological, mechanical, and biochemical properties. We found that the sea otter TMJ disks are, in general, similar to other carnivores. Macroscopically, the TMJ disk was highly congruent, and the mandibular head was encased tightly by the mandibular fossa with a thin disk separating the joint into two compartments. Histologically, the articular surfaces were lined with dense fibrous connective tissue that gradually transitioned into one to two cell thick layer of hyaline-like cartilage. The disk fibers were aligned primarily in the rostrocaudal direction and had occasional lacuna with chondrocyte-like cells. The disk was composed primarily of collagen type 1. Biochemical analysis indicates sulfated glycosaminoglycan content lower than other mammals, but significantly higher in male sea otters than female sea otters. Finally, mechanical analysis demonstrated a disk that was not only stronger and stiffer in the rostrocaudal direction than the mediolateral direction but also significantly stronger and stiffer in females than males. We conclude that the congruent design of the TMJ, thin disk, biochemical content, and mechanical properties all reflect a structure-function relationship within the TMJ disk that is likely designed for the sea otter's hard diet and continuous food intake.

  16. Characterization of the Temporomandibular Joint of Southern Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    PubMed Central

    Lieske, Danielle; Vapniarsky, Natalia; Verstraete, Frank J. M.; Leale, Dustin M.; Young, Colleen; Arzi, Boaz

    2015-01-01

    The structure–function relationship of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of southern sea otter has largely not been described. This study aims to describe the histological, biochemical, and biomechanical features of the TMJ disk in the southern sea otter. The TMJ disks from fresh cadaver heads of southern sea otter adult males (n = 8) and females (n = 8) acquired from strandings were examined. Following macroscopical evaluation, the TMJs were investigated for their histological, mechanical, and biochemical properties. We found that the sea otter TMJ disks are, in general, similar to other carnivores. Macroscopically, the TMJ disk was highly congruent, and the mandibular head was encased tightly by the mandibular fossa with a thin disk separating the joint into two compartments. Histologically, the articular surfaces were lined with dense fibrous connective tissue that gradually transitioned into one to two cell thick layer of hyaline-like cartilage. The disk fibers were aligned primarily in the rostrocaudal direction and had occasional lacuna with chondrocyte-like cells. The disk was composed primarily of collagen type 1. Biochemical analysis indicates sulfated glycosaminoglycan content lower than other mammals, but significantly higher in male sea otters than female sea otters. Finally, mechanical analysis demonstrated a disk that was not only stronger and stiffer in the rostrocaudal direction than the mediolateral direction but also significantly stronger and stiffer in females than males. We conclude that the congruent design of the TMJ, thin disk, biochemical content, and mechanical properties all reflect a structure–function relationship within the TMJ disk that is likely designed for the sea otter’s hard diet and continuous food intake. PMID:26664997

  17. Characterization of the Temporomandibular Joint of Southern Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Lieske, Danielle; Vapniarsky, Natalia; Verstraete, Frank J M; Leale, Dustin M; Young, Colleen; Arzi, Boaz

    2015-01-01

    The structure-function relationship of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of southern sea otter has largely not been described. This study aims to describe the histological, biochemical, and biomechanical features of the TMJ disk in the southern sea otter. The TMJ disks from fresh cadaver heads of southern sea otter adult males (n = 8) and females (n = 8) acquired from strandings were examined. Following macroscopical evaluation, the TMJs were investigated for their histological, mechanical, and biochemical properties. We found that the sea otter TMJ disks are, in general, similar to other carnivores. Macroscopically, the TMJ disk was highly congruent, and the mandibular head was encased tightly by the mandibular fossa with a thin disk separating the joint into two compartments. Histologically, the articular surfaces were lined with dense fibrous connective tissue that gradually transitioned into one to two cell thick layer of hyaline-like cartilage. The disk fibers were aligned primarily in the rostrocaudal direction and had occasional lacuna with chondrocyte-like cells. The disk was composed primarily of collagen type 1. Biochemical analysis indicates sulfated glycosaminoglycan content lower than other mammals, but significantly higher in male sea otters than female sea otters. Finally, mechanical analysis demonstrated a disk that was not only stronger and stiffer in the rostrocaudal direction than the mediolateral direction but also significantly stronger and stiffer in females than males. We conclude that the congruent design of the TMJ, thin disk, biochemical content, and mechanical properties all reflect a structure-function relationship within the TMJ disk that is likely designed for the sea otter's hard diet and continuous food intake. PMID:26664997

  18. Non-surgical treatment of sports-related temporomandibular joint disorders in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Muhtaroğullari, Mehmet; Demiralp, Burak; Ertan, Atila

    2004-12-01

    In this study, 18 basketball players (11 female, seven male; age range 14-32 years) with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) problems who had a history of sport injuries related to head or jaw region were evaluated and the results of the treatment were presented. A standardized functional examination of the masticatory system was performed including measurement of maximal jaw movements, recording of joint sounds, pain on movement of the jaw as well as tenderness to palpation of the both TMJ or masticatory muscles. Patients were also evaluated periodontally. Diagnosis was made according the criteria, described by Okeson, and appropriate treatment was applied using different kind of splints. At the end of treatment only one patient continued with right TMJ reduction with slight pain. Except for that patient, none of the patients had pain after treatment. The maximum opening of the jaws and the maximal jaw movements were statistically increased after treatment. Patients with TMJ problems also showed periodontal problems, most likely due to inadequate oral hygiene because of the limited jaw movements and pain. Periodontal parameters including probing depth (PD), Plaque index (PI), and Sulcus Bleeding Index (SBI) improved after treatment. Sports-related TMJ injuries may result in complex problems such as pain, TMJ sounds, limitation in maximal jaw movements and maximum opening of the mouth, difficulty in chewing. With the appropriate diagnosis this could be treated non-surgically in 6-8 months. This study also showed that the TMJ disorders may cause periodontal problems, which may affect all teeth and also the general health of the athlete.

  19. The interposition of Lyodura in operations for ankylosis of the temporo-mandibular joint. An experimental study using pigs.

    PubMed

    Timmel, R; Grundschober, F

    1982-11-01

    Experimental investigations using domestic pigs were carried out in order to study the subject of resorption of lyophilized Dura (Lyodura) interposed in the region of the temporo-mandibular joint after operations for ankylosis. The condyle of the mandible was partially resected on one or both sides, the joint capsule and disc excised and the mandibular fossa stripped of cartilage. Lyodura was interposed between the surfaces of the bones and intravital sequential labelling of the bones was carried out using fluorochromes. The animals were sacrificed after 18, 36, 50 and 120-130 days and the joint region excised. Undecalcified microtome (5-8 mu) and ground sections were prepared and contact microradiographs made. It was found that the Lyodura remained in place in spite of the mechanical loading until it was assimilated by a foreign body reaction and replaced by largely collagenous, endogenous connective tissue. Spaces similar to the joint cavity and lined with pseudosynovia were found after 120-130 days.

  20. Cyclophosphamide-induced temporomandibular synostosis.

    PubMed

    Bacon, W

    1983-06-01

    The study of malformations helps toward a better understanding of normal development, which is of significance to the orthodontist. Experiments in teratology have induced an extensive variety of facial abnormalities, but temporomandibular joint (TMJ) synostosis has never been previously reported. Ten pregnant female rabbits were treated with a daily injection of 50 mg. cyclophosphamide (DNA synthesis inhibitor), from day 11 to day 14, which is the period that precedes formation of the face. The control sample comprised five female rabbits. The fetuses were obtained by cesarean section on day 28 and stained with alizarin. Six of the ten treated female animals produced offspring that had TMJ synostosis. The skull with TMJ synostosis showed a retrognathic mandibular pattern in relation to the maxilla, and the bony trabeculae in the mandibular angle showed a downward orientation instead of the horizontal orientation seen in animals without synostosis. The length of the heads was significantly smaller in the treatment group than in the control group; within the treatment group, the heads with synostosis were significantly smaller than those without synostosis. It could be hypothesized that the cyclophosphamide might have affected intrinsic factors in the temporomandibular mesenchyma; an impairment in the development and function of the mandibular musculature, which is a vital factor in joint development and maintenance, might also have contributed to the genesis of the malformation. The association of immobilization and mandibular hypodevelopment seems to be in agreement with today's theories on maxillofacial growth.

  1. Insulin-like growth factor-1 suspended in hyaluronan improves cartilage and subchondral cancellous bone repair in osteoarthritis of temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Liu, X-W; Hu, J; Man, C; Zhang, B; Ma, Y-Q; Zhu, S-S

    2011-02-01

    This study sought to evaluate the effects of intra-articular injection of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) suspended in hyaluronan (HA) on the cartilage and subchondral cancellous bone repair in osteoarthritis (OA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Disc perforation was performed bilaterally in rabbit TMJs to induce OA. Four groups of animals (n=12) received OA induction only, and either intra-articular HA injection alone, intra-articular IGF-1 injection alone, or a combination of HA and IGF-1 injection. All therapy was begun 4 weeks after OA induction. The animals were killed 12 or 24 weeks after the first injection, for histology and micro-CT examinations. Two additional animals were used as normal controls. Typical cartilage and subchondral cancellous bone lesions were observed in the OA group. No protective effect on cartilage and subchondral cancellous bone was found in the HA or IGF-1 alone groups. Better histological repair and nearly normal micro-architectural properties of the subchondral cancellous bone were observed in the HA+IGF-1 group compared with the HA or IGF-1 alone groups. HA may be used as an effective carrier for intra-articular injection of IGF-1 and the combination of HA/IGF-1 shows promise as a new rational approach to therapy of TMJ OA. PMID:21055904

  2. Association of Temporomandibular Joint Signs & Symptoms with Dental Fluorosis & Skeletal Manifestations in Endemic Fluoride Areas of Dungarpur District, Rajasthan, India

    PubMed Central

    Asawa, Kailash; Bhat, Nagesh; Tak, Mridula; Shinde, Kushal; Jain, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Endemic fluorosis resulting from high fluoride concentration in groundwater is a major public health problem. India is among the numerous nations, where fluoride sullied groundwater is creating wellbeing issues. Safe drinking water in rural areas of India is predominantly rely on groundwater sources, which are exceptionally contaminated with fluoride. Aim To investigate the association of temporomandibular joint Signs & Symptoms with Dental Fluorosis & Skeletal Manifestations among people living in Dad, Bokersal & Deotalab villages of Dungarpur District, Rajasthan, India. Materials and Methods The study group consisted of 750 subjects who were born & brought up in Dad, Bokersal & Deotalab villages of Dungarpur District, Rajasthan. Temporomandibular joint & Dental fluorosis was assessed by performing type III clinical examination according to WHO guidelines (1997). For the assessment of skeletal manifestations, participants were asked to perform three diagnostic tests: (1)Touching the toes without bending the knees; (2) Touching the chest with the chin; (3) Stretching the arms sideways & folding the arms to touch the back of the head. Chi Square test & Multiple Logistic Regression were applied for statistical analysis. Results Among the 750 (462 males & 288 females) who participated in the study, 53% had moderate grade of dental fluorosis. The most prominent symptom suggesting Temporomandibular Joint Disorder was the clicking sound affecting 21.4% population.(p>0.001). TMJ Signs & Symptoms were prominent in the age group of 45-54 years & males were highly affected than females. Conclusion Clinical examination of TMJ in Dental Fluorosis & Skeletal Fluorosis subjects showed a significant association with Dental Fluorosis & Skeletal Fluorosis. PMID:26816986

  3. Digital panoramic radiography for diagnosis of the temporomandibular joint: CBCT as the gold standard.

    PubMed

    Ladeira, Daniela Brait Silva; da Cruz, Adriana Dibo; de Almeida, Solange Maria

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional imaging modalities have been reported to be more accurate than panoramic radiographs (PR) for the assessment of bone components of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). No exact prior information is available that demonstrates which specific limitations occur in terms of TMJ diagnosis when using PR for this purpose. This study aimed to assess the clinical validity of digital panoramic radiography (DPR) when diagnosing morphological disorders of the TMJ using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images as the gold standard. A sample composed of TMJ images (N = 848), including 212 DPR and 212 CBCT images obtained from the same patient, was used to assess any morphological changes in the TMJ. Four appraisers diagnosed all of the DPR images, whereas the CBCT images were used to establish the gold standard. The reliability of each appraiser's response pattern was analyzed using the Kappa test (κ), and diagnostic tests were performed to assess each appraiser's performance using a significance level setting of 5% (α = 0.05). Reliability of each appraiser's response pattern compared to the gold standard ranged from a slight-to-moderate agreement (0.18 ≤ κ ≤ 0.45); and among the different appraisers, the response pattern showed a fair agreement (0.22 ≤ κ ≤ 0.39). Diagnostic tests showed a wide range among the different possible morphological changes diagnosed. DPR does not have validity when diagnosing morphological changes in the TMJ; it underestimates the radiological findings with higher prevalence, and thus, it cannot be used effectively as a diagnostic tool for bone components within this region.

  4. Temporomandibular Joint Condylar Changes Following Maxillomandibular Advancement and Articular Disc Repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Joao Roberto; Wolford, Larry Miller; Cassano, Daniel Serra; da Porciuncula, Guilherme; Paniagua, Beatriz; Cevidanes, Lucia Helena

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate condylar changes 1 year after bimaxillary surgical advancement with or without articular disc repositioning using longitudinal quantitative measurements in 3-dimensional (3D) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) models. Methods Twenty-seven patients treated with maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) underwent cone-beam computed tomography before surgery immediately after surgery and at 1-year follow-up. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging before surgery to assess disc displacements. Ten patients without disc displacement received MMA only. Seventeen patients with articular disc displacement received MMA with simultaneous TMJ disc repositioning (MMA-Drep). Pre- and postsurgical 3D models were superimposed using a voxel-based registration on the cranial base. Results The location, direction, and magnitude of condylar changes were displayed and quantified by graphic semitransparent overlays and 3D color-coded surface distance maps. Rotational condylar displacements were similar in the 2 groups. Immediately after surgery, condylar translational displacements of at least 1.5 mm occurred in a posterior, superior, or mediolateral direction in patients treated with MMA, whereas patients treated with MMA-Drep presented more marked anterior, inferior, and mediolateral condylar displacements. One year after surgery, more than half the patients in the 2 groups presented condylar resorptive changes of at least 1.5 mm. Patients treated with MMA-Drep presented condylar bone apposition of at least 1.5 mm at the superior surface in 26.4%, the anterior surface in 23.4%, the posterior surface in 29.4%, the medial surface in 5.9%, or the lateral surface in 38.2%, whereas bone apposition was not observed in patients treated with MMA. Conclusions One year after surgery, condylar resorptive changes greater than 1.5 mm were observed in the 2 groups. Articular disc repositioning facilitated bone apposition in localized condylar regions in patients treated with MMA

  5. Gap Arthroplasty versus Interpositional Arthroplasty for Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junli; Liang, Limin; Jiang, Hua; Gu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gap arthroplasty (GA) and interpositional arthroplasty (IA) are widely used for the treatment of temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA). However, controversy remains as to whether IA is superior to GA. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Web of science and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure were searched for literature regarding these procedures (published from 1946 to July 28, 2014). A study was included in this analysis if it was: (1) a randomized controlled trial or non-randomized observational cohort study; (2) comparing the clinical outcomes between GA and IA with respect to the maximal incisal opening (MIO) and reankylosis; (3) with a follow-up period of at least 12 months. The methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale Eight non-randomized observational cohort studies with 272 patients were included. All the statistical analyses were performed using the RevMan 5.3 and Stat 12. The pooled analysis showed no significant difference in the incidence of reankylosis between the IA group (13/120) and the GA group (29/163) (RR= 0.67, 95% CI=0.38 to 1.16; Z=1.43, p=0.15). The IA group showed a significantly larger MIO than the GA group (MD=1.96, 95% CI=0.21 to 3.72, Z=2.19, p=0.03, I2=0%). In conclusion, patients with TMJA could benefit more from IA than GA, with a larger MIO and a similar incidence of reankylosis. IA shows to be an adequate option in the treatment of TMJA based on the results of maximal incisal opening. PMID:26010224

  6. Differential gene expression in the perichondrium and cartilage of the neonatal mouse temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hinton, R J; Serrano, M; So, S

    2009-08-01

    Our goal was to discover genes differentially expressed in the perichondrium (PC) of the mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC) that might enhance regenerative medicine or orthopaedic therapies directed at the tissues of the temporomandibular joint. We used targeted gene arrays (osteogenesis, stem cell) to identify genes preferentially expressed in the PC and the cartilaginous (C) portions of the MCC in 2-day-old mice. Genes with higher expression in the PC sample related to growth factor ligand-receptor interactions [FGF-13 (6.4x), FGF-18 (4x), NCAM (2x); PGDF receptors, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and IGF-1], the Notch isoforms (especially Notch 3 and 4) and their ligands or structural proteins/proteoglycans [collagen XIV (21x), collagen XVIII (4x), decorin (2.5x)]. Genes with higher expression in the C sample consisted mostly of known cartilage-specific genes [aggrecan (11x), procollagens X (33x), XI (14x), IX (4.5x), Sox 9 (4.4x) and Indian hedgehog (6.7x)]. However, the functional or structural roles of several genes that were expressed at higher levels in the PC sample are unclear [myogenic factor (Myf) 9 (9x), tooth-related genes such as tuftelin (2.5x) and dentin sialophosphoprotein (1.6x), VEGF-B (2x) and its receptors (3-4x) and sclerostin (1.7x)]. FGF, Notch and TGF-beta signalling may be important regulators of MCC proliferation and differentiation; the relatively high expression of genes such as Myf6 and VEGF-B and its receptors suggests a degree of unsuspected plasticity in PC cells. PMID:19627518

  7. Small field of view cone beam CT temporomandibular joint imaging dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Lukat, T D; Wong, J C M; Lam, E W N

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Cone beam CT (CBCT) is generally accepted as the imaging modality of choice for visualisation of the osseous structures of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The purpose of this study was to compare the radiation dose of a protocol for CBCT TMJ imaging using a large field of view Hitachi CB MercuRay™ unit (Hitachi Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan) with an alternative approach that utilizes two CBCT acquisitions of the right and left TMJs using the Kodak 9000® 3D system (Carestream, Rochester, NY). Methods: 25 optically stimulated luminescence dosemeters were placed in various locations of an anthropomorphic RANDO® Man phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories, Stanford, CT). Dosimetric measurements were performed for each technique, and effective doses were calculated using the 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection tissue weighting factor recommendations for all protocols. Results: The radiation effective dose for the CB MercuRay technique was 223.6 ± 1.1 μSv compared with 9.7 ± 0.1 μSv (child), 13.5 ± 0.9 μSv (adolescent/small adult) and 20.5 ± 1.3 μSv (adult) for the bilateral Kodak acquisitions. Conclusions: Acquisitions of individual right and left TMJ volumes using the Kodak 9000 3D CBCT imaging system resulted in a more than ten-fold reduction in the effective dose compared with the larger single field acquisition with the Hitachi CB MercuRay. This decrease is made even more significant when lower tube potential and tube current settings are used. PMID:24048693

  8. Accurate 3D kinematic measurement of temporomandibular joint using X-ray fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Takaharu; Matsumoto, Akiko; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Matsumoto, Ken; Kakimoto, Naoya; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2014-04-01

    Accurate measurement and analysis of 3D kinematics of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very important for assisting clinical diagnosis and treatment of prosthodontics and orthodontics, and oral surgery. This study presents a new 3D kinematic measurement technique of the TMJ using X-ray fluoroscopic images, which can easily obtain the TMJ kinematic data in natural motion. In vivo kinematics of the TMJ (maxilla and mandibular bone) is determined using a feature-based 2D/3D registration, which uses beads silhouette on fluoroscopic images and 3D surface bone models with beads. The 3D surface models of maxilla and mandibular bone with beads were created from CT scans data of the subject using the mouthpiece with the seven strategically placed beads. In order to validate the accuracy of pose estimation for the maxilla and mandibular bone, computer simulation test was performed using five patterns of synthetic tantalum beads silhouette images. In the clinical applications, dynamic movement during jaw opening and closing was conducted, and the relative pose of the mandibular bone with respect to the maxilla bone was determined. The results of computer simulation test showed that the root mean square errors were sufficiently smaller than 1.0 mm and 1.0 degree. In the results of clinical application, during jaw opening from 0.0 to 36.8 degree of rotation, mandibular condyle exhibited 19.8 mm of anterior sliding relative to maxillary articular fossa, and these measurement values were clinically similar to the previous reports. Consequently, present technique was thought to be suitable for the 3D TMJ kinematic analysis.

  9. Gap Arthroplasty versus Interpositional Arthroplasty for Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junli; Liang, Limin; Jiang, Hua; Gu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gap arthroplasty (GA) and interpositional arthroplasty (IA) are widely used for the treatment of temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA). However, controversy remains as to whether IA is superior to GA. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Web of science and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure were searched for literature regarding these procedures (published from 1946 to July 28, 2014). A study was included in this analysis if it was: (1) a randomized controlled trial or non-randomized observational cohort study; (2) comparing the clinical outcomes between GA and IA with respect to the maximal incisal opening (MIO) and reankylosis; (3) with a follow-up period of at least 12 months. The methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale Eight non-randomized observational cohort studies with 272 patients were included. All the statistical analyses were performed using the RevMan 5.3 and Stat 12. The pooled analysis showed no significant difference in the incidence of reankylosis between the IA group (13/120) and the GA group (29/163) (RR= 0.67, 95% CI=0.38 to 1.16; Z=1.43, p=0.15). The IA group showed a significantly larger MIO than the GA group (MD=1.96, 95% CI=0.21 to 3.72, Z=2.19, p=0.03, I(2)=0%). In conclusion, patients with TMJA could benefit more from IA than GA, with a larger MIO and a similar incidence of reankylosis. IA shows to be an adequate option in the treatment of TMJA based on the results of maximal incisal opening.

  10. Differential gene expression in the perichondrium and cartilage of the neonatal mouse temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, RJ; Serrano, M; So, S

    2009-01-01

    Objective To discover genes differentially expressed in the perichondrium of the mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC) that might enhance regenerative medicine or orthopedic therapies directed at the tissues of the temporomandibular joint Design We used targeted gene arrays (osteogenesis, stem cell) to identify genes preferentially expressed in the perichondrium (PC) and the cartilaginous (C) portions of the MCC in 2 day-old mice Results Genes with higher expression in the PC sample related to growth factor ligand-receptor interactions (FGF-13 (6.4X), FGF-18 (4X), NCAM (2X); PGDF receptors, TGF-β, and IGF-1), the Notch isoforms (especially Notch 3 and 4) and their ligands, or structural proteins/ proteoglycans (collagen XIV (21X), collagen XVIII (4X), decorin (2.5X)). Genes with higher expression in the C sample consisted mostly of known cartilage-specific genes (aggrecan (11X), procollagens X (33X), XI (14X), IX (4.5X), Sox 9 (4.4X), and Indian hedgehog (6.7X)). However, the functional or structural roles of several genes that were expressed at higher levels in the PC sample are unclear (myogenic factor 9 (9X), tooth-related genes such as tuftelin (2.5X) and dentin sialophosphoprotein (1.6X), VEGF–B (2X) and its receptors (3–4X), and sclerostin (1.7X)). Conclusions FGF, Notch, and TGF-β signaling may be important regulators of MCC proliferation and differentiation; the relatively high expression of genes such as myogenic factor 6 and VEGF–B and its receptors suggests a degree of unsuspected plasticity in PC cells. PMID:19627518

  11. Single- or multiple-session viscosupplementation protocols for temporomandibular joint degenerative disorders: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Guarda-Nardini, L; Rossi, A; Arboretti, R; Bonnini, S; Stellini, E; Manfredini, D

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effectiveness of two single-session protocols, either adopting high- (protocol A) or medium-molecular weight hyaluronic acid (protocol B), with the reference five-session protocol of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lavage plus viscosupplementation (protocol C) in the management of chronic TMJ degenerative disorders. A randomized clinical trial (RCT) with ten participants per treatment group was designed, with multiple observation points, ending at 6 months after treatment. Pain levels on a 10-point VAS scale were selected as the primary outcome variable to rate treatment effectiveness, along with a number of secondary outcome parameters. Findings showed that Group C patients had the highest decrease in pain levels. Nonparametric permutation analyses revealed that the global effect of treatment was significantly different between the three protocols (P = 0·024). Pairwise comparisons showed that the differences of treatment effect between the two single-session interventions were negligible (global P-value = 0·93). On the contrary, the five-session protocol was significantly superior to both single-session protocols (global P-values ranging from 0·003 to 0·012). In conclusion, in a population of age-, sex-, and psychosocial aspects-matched study groups, the standard of reference five-session protocol proved to be superior at 6 months as far as the decrease in pain levels was concerned, whilst there were no differences between the two single-session interventions. The absence of differences in treatment effect as for some other secondary clinical outcome variables may suggest that there is further space for future investigations attempting to reduce the number of multiple interventions for TMJ viscosupplementation.

  12. Reducing dietary loading decreases mouse temporomandibular joint degradation induced by anterior crossbite prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y.-D.; Liao, L.-F.; Zhang, H.-Y.; Lu, L.; Jiao, K.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, J.; He, J.-J.; Wu, Y.-P.; Chen, D.; Wang, M.-Q.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Dietary loading has been reported to have an effect on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) remodeling via periodontal-muscular reflex. We therefore examined whether reducing dietary loading decreased TMJ degradation induced by the unilateral anterior crossbite prosthesis as we recently reported. Methods Forty 6-week-old female C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into two experimental and two control groups. One experimental and one control group received small-size diet and the other two groups received large-size diet. Unilateral anterior crossbite prosthesis was created in the two experimental groups. The TMJ samples were collected 3 weeks after experimental operation. Histological changes in condylar cartilage and subchondral bone were assessed by Hematoxylin & Eosin, toluidine blue, Safranin O and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or immunohistochemistry were performed to evaluate the expression levels of Collagen II, Aggrecan, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 5 (ADAMTS-5) and RANKL/RANK/OPG in TMJ condylar cartilage and/or subchondral bone. Results Thinner and degraded cartilage, reduced cartilage cellular density, decreased expression levels of Collagen II and Aggrecan, loss of subchondral bone and enhanced osteoclast activity were observed in TMJs of both experimental groups. However, the cartilage degradation phenotype was less severe and cartilage ADAMTS-5 mRNA was lower while OPG/RANKL ratio in cartilage and subchondral bone was higher in the small-size than large-size diet experimental group. No differences of histomorphology and the tested molecules were found between the two control groups. Conclusions The current findings suggest that a lower level of functional loading by providing small-size diet could reduce TMJ degradation induced by the biomechanical stimulation from abnormal occlusion. PMID:24316289

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of osteoarthrosis and effusion in patients with unilateral temporomandibular joint pain.

    PubMed

    Emshoff, R; Brandimaier, I; Bertram, S; Rudisch, A

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the presence of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of osteoarthrosis (OA), and effusion. The study comprised 112 consecutive TMJ pain patients. Criteria for including a patient were report of unilateral pain near the TMJ, with the presence of unilateral TMJ pain during palpation, function, and/or unassisted or assisted mandibular opening. Bilateral sagittal and coronal MR images were obtained to establish the presence or absence of TMJ OA, and/or effusion. Comparison of the TMJ side-related data showed a significant relationship between the clinical finding of TMJ pain and the MR imaging diagnoses of TMJ OA (P=0.000), and TMJ effusion (P=0.000). Further, there was a significant relationship between the MR imaging diagnosis of TMJ OA and TMJ effusion (P=0.000). Use of the Kappa statistical test indicated poor diagnostic agreement between the presence of TMJ pain and the MR imaging diagnosis of TMJ OA (K=0.22), TMJ effusion (K=0.29), and TMJ 'OA and effusion' (K=0.30). The study's findings suggest that while clinical pain is correlated to TMJ-related MR imaging findings, clinical pain in and of itself, is not reliable for predicting the presence of TMJ OA and/or effusion. Validation of MR imaging diagnoses would involve the investigation of cross-sectional and longitudinal evidence to assess decisive differences in terms of prognosis and/or treatment outcome. PMID:12521314

  14. Analysis of Microarchitectural Changes in a Mouse Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthritis Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J.; Gupta, T.; Barasz, J.A.; Kalajzic, Z.; Yeh, W-C.; Drissi, H.; Hand, A.R.; Wadhwa, S.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Little is known about the natural progression of the disease process of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis (OA), which affects approximately 1 % of the US population. The goal of this study was to examine the early microarchitectural and molecular changes in the condylar cartilage and subchondral bone in biglycan/fibromodulin (Bgn/Fmod) double-deficient mice, which develop TMJ-OA at 6 months. Methods TMJs from 3 month old (n=44) and 9 month old (n=52) wild-type (WT n=46) and Bgn/Fmod (n=50) double-deficient mice were evaluated. Micro-CT analysis of the subchondral bone (n=24), transmission electron microscopy for condylar cartilage fibril diameters (n=26), and real time PCR analysis for gene expression for bone and cartilage maturation markers (n=45) was performed. Results A statistically significant increase in collagen fibril diameter of the condylar cartilage and a decrease in expression of Parathyroid related protein in the mandibular condylar head were observed in the 3 month Bgn/Fmod double-deficient mice compared to WT controls. The 9 month Bgn/Fmod double-deficient mouse demonstrated an increase in bone volume and total volume in subchondral bone, and an increase in the expression of Collagen Type X and Aggrecan in the mandibular condylar head compared to the WT controls. Conclusion We found that changes in the microarchitecture of the condylar cartilage preceded changes in the subchondral bone during OA in the TMJ in Bgn/Fmod double-deficient mice. PMID:19896116

  15. Efficacy of pulsed radio frequency energy therapy in temporomandibular joint pain and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Al-Badawi, Emad A; Mehta, Noshir; Forgione, Albert G; Lobo, Silvia Lobo; Zawawi, Khalid H

    2004-01-01

    This randomized double-blind study evaluated the effectiveness of pulsed radio frequency energy therapy (PRFE) in patients with temporomandibular joint arthralgia. Forty subjects (age range 22 to 55 yrs.) were assigned randomly into two equal groups: (1) Experimental group received PRFE using the Energex unit (Energex, Inc. Emerson, New Jersey) and (2) Control group received PRFE placebo treatment using a sham device. Both groups received six applications to the TMJ area over two weeks. Data were analyzed for the following times: baseline, first and second follow-up visits. Numerical Rating Scale scores for TMJ pain showed a significant reduction over time for the experimental group (mean = 6.13 to 3.05, p < 0.001). There was also a significant effect for the controls (mean = 5.35 to 4.20, p = 0.01). The effect for experimental subjects was a mean reduction of 3.07 versus 1.15 for controls. The significant reduction in controls was attributed to the placebo effect. The experimental group showed a significant increase in mouth opening (mean = 34.95 to 41.70 mm, p = 0.002), right lateral movement (mean = 7.85 to 10.80 mm, p = 0.001) and left lateral movement (mean = 7.65 to 10.85 mm, p < 0.0001). No significant (p > 0.1) change in the control group occurred for mouth opening (mean = 38.50 to 39.65 mm), right lateral movement (mean = 8.60 to 8.75 mm) and left lateral movement (mean = 8.50 to 8.80 mm). No side effects were reported during the treatment and the two week follow-up. These results suggest strongly that PRFE is a safe and effective treatment for TMJ arthralgia as well as for increasing mandibular range of motion.

  16. Realization of masticatory movement by 3-dimensional simulation of the temporomandibular joint and the masticatory muscles.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Tae; Lee, Jae-Gi; Won, Sung-Yoon; Lee, Sang-Hee; Cha, Jung-Yul; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2013-07-01

    Masticatory muscles are closely involved in mastication, pronunciation, and swallowing, and it is therefore important to study the specific functions and dynamics of the mandibular and masticatory muscles. However, the shortness of muscle fibers and the diversity of movement directions make it difficult to study and simplify the dynamics of mastication. The purpose of this study was to use 3-dimensional (3D) simulation to observe the functions and movements of each of the masticatory muscles and the mandible while chewing. To simulate the masticatory movement, computed tomographic images were taken from a single Korean volunteer (30-year-old man), and skull image data were reconstructed in 3D (Mimics; Materialise, Leuven, Belgium). The 3D-reconstructed masticatory muscles were then attached to the 3D skull model. The masticatory movements were animated using Maya (Autodesk, San Rafael, CA) based on the mandibular motion path. During unilateral chewing, the mandible was found to move laterally toward the functional side by contracting the contralateral lateral pterygoid and ipsilateral temporalis muscles. During the initial mouth opening, only hinge movement was observed at the temporomandibular joint. During this period, the entire mandible rotated approximately 13 degrees toward the bicondylar horizontal plane. Continued movement of the mandible to full mouth opening occurred simultaneously with sliding and hinge movements, and the mandible rotated approximately 17 degrees toward the center of the mandibular ramus. The described approach can yield data for use in face animation and other simulation systems and for elucidating the functional components related to contraction and relaxation of muscles during mastication.

  17. Reactive arthritis in relation to internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Lund, Bodil; Holmlund, Anders; Wretlind, Bengt; Jalal, Shah; Rosén, Annika

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to find out if reactive arthritis was involved in the aetiology of chronic closed lock of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by looking for bacterial antigens in the synovial membrane of the TMJ, and by studying the antibody serology and carriage of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) B27 in patients with chronic closed lock. Patients with reciprocal clicking and healthy subjects acted as controls. We studied a total of 43 consecutive patients, 15 with chronic closed lock, 13 with reciprocal clicking, and 15 healthy controls with no internal derangements of the TMJ. Venous blood samples were collected from all subjects for measurement of concentrations of HLA tissue antigen and serology against Chlamydia trachomatis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Samples of synovial tissue from patients with closed lock and reciprocal clicking were obtained during discectomy and divided into two pieces, the first of which was tested by strand displacement amplification for the presence of C trachomatis, and the second of which was analysed for the presence of species-specific bacterial DNA using 16s rRNA pan-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). There were no significant differences between the groups in the incidence of antibodies against M pneumoniae, Salmonella spp. or Y enterocolitica. No patient had antibodies towards C trachomatis or C jejuni. We found no bacterial DNA in the synovial fluid from any patient. The HLA B27 antigen was present in 2/15 subjects in both the closed lock and control groups, and none in the reciprocal clicking group. In conclusion, reactive arthritis does not seem to be the mechanism of internal derangement of the TMJ.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging findings of osteoarthrosis and effusion in patients with unilateral temporomandibular joint pain.

    PubMed

    Emshoff, R; Brandimaier, I; Bertram, S; Rudisch, A

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the presence of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of osteoarthrosis (OA), and effusion. The study comprised 112 consecutive TMJ pain patients. Criteria for including a patient were report of unilateral pain near the TMJ, with the presence of unilateral TMJ pain during palpation, function, and/or unassisted or assisted mandibular opening. Bilateral sagittal and coronal MR images were obtained to establish the presence or absence of TMJ OA, and/or effusion. Comparison of the TMJ side-related data showed a significant relationship between the clinical finding of TMJ pain and the MR imaging diagnoses of TMJ OA (P=0.000), and TMJ effusion (P=0.000). Further, there was a significant relationship between the MR imaging diagnosis of TMJ OA and TMJ effusion (P=0.000). Use of the Kappa statistical test indicated poor diagnostic agreement between the presence of TMJ pain and the MR imaging diagnosis of TMJ OA (K=0.22), TMJ effusion (K=0.29), and TMJ 'OA and effusion' (K=0.30). The study's findings suggest that while clinical pain is correlated to TMJ-related MR imaging findings, clinical pain in and of itself, is not reliable for predicting the presence of TMJ OA and/or effusion. Validation of MR imaging diagnoses would involve the investigation of cross-sectional and longitudinal evidence to assess decisive differences in terms of prognosis and/or treatment outcome.

  19. Proposal for a new self-compiled questionnaire in patients affected by temporo-mandibular joint disorders (TMD).

    PubMed

    Agrillo, A; Ramieri, V; Bianca, C; Nastro Siniscalchi, E; Fatone, F M G; Arangio, P

    2010-07-01

    In this work, we propose a self-compiled questionnaire, for those patients showing dysfunctions of the temporomandibular joint. The questionnaire, composed by 33 closed multiple-choice questions, represents one of the steps in the diagnostic procedure, together with the clinical notes compiled by the medical specialist and with the other necessary diagnostic researches. It also has the purpose to make easier anamnesis and clinic procedure and gathering of all informations useful for a right clinical diagnosis, and so for an appropriate therapy.

  20. Differential activation by cytokines of mitogen-activated protein kinases in bovine temporomandibular-joint disc cells.

    PubMed

    Landesberg, R; Takeuchi, E; Puzas, J E

    1999-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders affect a significant proportion of the population. While their aetiology is not well defined, recent histological studies suggest that the majority are similar to the osteoarthritis seen in other joints. Inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha appear to be important in the cascade of events leading to joint destruction in osteoarthritis. Here, cells from the disc of bovine temporomandibular joint were used to examine the response to various cytokines in vitro. Disc cells were stimulated with interleukin-1alpha, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, transforming growth factor-beta, platelet-derived growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor. Their effects were monitored by assessing the phosphorylation of selected signal-transduction intermediates using western blot. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (Erk 1, Erk 2) were rapidly phosphorylated by exposure to basic fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and tumour necrosis factor-alpha, while interleukin-1alpha showed a weak response. Transforming growth factor-beta failed to activate these kinases. Examination of the effect of these cytokines on p38 (an intermediate in the stress-activated protein-kinase pathway) showed an increase in phosphorylated p38 when stimulated with tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1alpha. The amounts of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 did not significantly increase when the cells were exposed to any of the cytokines. PMID:10075149

  1. Pseudogout in the temporomandibular joint with imaging, arthroscopic, operative, and pathologic findings. Report of an unusual case.

    PubMed

    Laviv, Amir; Sadow, Peter M; Keith, David A

    2015-06-01

    The authors present a case of a 60-year-old woman with a destructive painful condition in the right temporomandibular joint (TMJ) that proved to be calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposits at subsequent biopsy examination. The patient presented with the chief complaints of pain and limitation that had not resolved with splint therapy, medications, and habit control. Magnetic resonance imaging studies showed internal derangement without reduction. Right TMJ arthroscopy with manipulation of the jaw under anesthesia showed unique findings of fronds of synovial tissue in the posterior joint space and areas of white matter. Because there was no long-term improvement in her clinical symptoms, she subsequently underwent arthroplasty of the right joint, with the white material clearly seen at surgery, and the biopsy examination confirmed the clinical and arthroscopic impression of pseudogout. The presentation, diagnosis, pathology, and treatment of pseudogout of the TMJ are discussed.

  2. The comparison of outcomes of surgically treated bilateral temporomandibular joint disorder in different groups: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Pernu, Hannu; Oikarinen, Kyosti; Raustia, Aune

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The main purpose of this study was to determine the prognosis and outcomes of the patients with bilateral temporomandibular disorder which underwent bilateral temporomandibular joint surgery in a consecutive number of patients in a retrospective study. Study Design: Sixty five patients with 130 bilateral TMJ were included the study with the selection from consecutive 256 TMJ patients who were treated with open surgery who do not respond to conservative treatment. 65 patients were divided in to 3 main groups according to the clinical diagnosis of bilateral TMJ site. In the first group comprised 29 patients with 48 TMJ, the clinical diagnosis was bilaterally presence of anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDR). In the second group comprised 19 patients with 26 TMJ, bilateral presence of TMD consisted of anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDNR) on both site. In the third group comprised 27 patients with 46 TMJ, bilaterally presence of TMD consist of ADDR on one site and ADDNR on another site. The patients in three different groups were operated either high condylectomy alone or high condylectomy with additional surgical procedures. Results: In the evaluation of pain relief, clicking, crepitation, headache, marked improvement was determined in all groups, but it was statistically insignificant in the comparison of 3 groups. Slight increase in maximal mouth opening was determined in the mean values of the 3 groups and also in the comparison of 3 groups it was not statistically significant. Conclusions: These similar succesfull outcomes of bilateral TMD with the respect of TMJ surgical procedures were obtained in 3 main groups although different diagnosis on the patients’ groups waspresent. Key words:Temporomandibular joint, prognosis, retrospective studies. PMID:22926476

  3. Hydroxyapatite/collagen block with platelet rich plasma in temporomandibular joint ankylosis: a pilot study in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, D; Kumar, S; Dhasmana, S

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using preshaped hydroxyapatite/collagen condyles as carriers for platelet-rich plasma after gap arthroplasty in patients with temporomandibular ankylosis, to assess the aesthetic and functional outcomes, and to find out if neocondylar regeneration was possible. We studied 19 patients with temporomandibular joint ankylosis (25 joints), in whom preshaped hydroxyapatite/collagen condyles with platelet-rich plasma were fixed to the ramus with a titanium miniplate, and temporal fascia was placed in between. We evaluated the type of ankylosis, mouth opening before and after operation, deviation on mouth opening, lateral excursion, protrusion, postoperative anterior open bite, radiographic assessment, and complications. All patients showed appreciable improvements in mouth opening and excursion of the jaw. There were a few complications such as mild fever, and temporary involvement of the facial nerve, which improved with time. No open bite or recurrence was reported during the 18 months' follow up. Radiographic evaluation at 3 months showed a less opaque condyle, but the opacity at 18 months was more defined, suggesting a newly formed condyle. A preshaped hydroxyapatite/collagen condyle with platelet-rich plasma improves both aesthetics and function. However, a long term study is required to follow the growth patterns to see if the patients develop any facial deformity as they grow. PMID:22293028

  4. Clinical effects of an avocado-soybean unsaponifiable extract on arthralgia and osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Catunda, I S; Vasconcelos, B C do E; Andrade, E S de S; Costa, D F N

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present preliminary study was to investigate the effectiveness of an avocado-soybean unsaponifiable extract (ASU) in patients with arthralgia and osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was carried out. Fourteen women diagnosed with arthralgia and osteoarthritis of the TMJ using the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders were included in the statistical analysis. The women were allocated randomly to two groups: ASU group and placebo group. Pain was measured using a visual analogue scale and pressure algometer. Mandibular function was evaluated through measurement of mandibular movements. Quality of life was measured using the Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP-14). The medication (ASU capsules or placebo capsules) was used for 4 months and the total follow-up was 6 months. Those taking the ASU extract had a decrease in pain symptoms and an improvement in quality of life. Moreover, a significant reduction in the use of rescue medication was found in the ASU group compared to the placebo group. This preliminary study provides strong evidence of the effectiveness of an avocado-soybean unsaponifiable extract in patients with degenerative joint diseases and arthralgia in the TMJ. Further studies with larger samples should be performed. PMID:27026059

  5. A three-dimensional model of the human masticatory system, including the mandible, the dentition and the temporomandibular joints.

    PubMed

    Pileicikiene, Gaivile; Varpiotas, Edvinas; Surna, Rimas; Surna, Algimantas

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to create a three-dimensional mathematical model of a human masticatory system, including the mandible, the dentition and the temporomandibular joints. Object of research was one 20 year old dead man. The research was approved by Committee of bioethics (Kaunas University of Medicine). Required extent of computed tomography scanning and required high amount and high resolution of images increased X-ray radiation for the object and made this research impossible to perform on alive human. Spiral computed tomography scanning was performed to achieve two-dimensional images, necessary for creating three-dimensional model. The 3D modeling was done using the "Image pro plus" and "Imageware"software. A three-dimensional physiological (normal) model of a human masticatory system, simulating the mandible, the dentition and the temporomandibular joints was generated. This model system will be used subsequently in stress analysis comparison for the physiological and pathological systems after improvement of its physical properties. We suggest that computer simulation is a promising way to study musculoskeletal biomechanics of masticatory system.

  6. Primary intra- and juxta-articular vascular malformations of the temporomandibular joint: a clinical analysis of 8 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qin; Yang, Chi; Chen, Min-Jie; Qiu, Ya-Ting; Qiu, Wei-Liu; Zheng, Jia-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze primary intra- and juxta-articular vascular malformations of the temporomandibular joint. Patients and methods: This study retrospectively reviewed eight patients (seven venous malformations and one lymphatico-venous malformation) who were treated for intra- or juxta-articular vascular malformations of the temporomandibular joint from November 2005 to January 2011. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) preoperatively. Results: According to MRI findings, vascular malformations involving TMJ could be divided into 3 types; homogenous, lacunar and mixed types. All patients underwent surgical resection, and the final clinical diagnoses were confirmed by postoperative histopathology and immunohistochemical examinations. All treated patients had no clinical or radiographic signs of recurrence. Conclusion: Owing to the lower incidence and nonspecific clinical presentations, preoperative diagnosis of vascular malformations involving the TMJ region is very difficult. The classification based on MRI manifestations is proposed first, then it may greatly help in the initial diagnosis. Surgical resection is considered the first option for these TMJ lesions with excellent results. PMID:25932158

  7. Testosterone and estrogen have opposing actions on inflammation-induced plasma extravasation in the rat temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Flake, Natasha M; Hermanstyne, Tracey O; Gold, Michael S

    2006-08-01

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that estrogen exacerbates inflammation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Evans blue dye was used to quantify plasma extravasation (PE) around the rat TMJ. In an initial set of experiments, TMJ PE was compared in naïve intact male and female rats, as well as in both groups after complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammation of the TMJ. In contrast to our hypothesis, TMJ PE was significantly greater in both naïve and CFA-inflamed male rats than in females. To determine whether these differences were due to gonadal hormones, four additional groups of rats were studied: gonadectomized (Gx) males and females, Gx males with chronic testosterone (T) replacement, and Gx females with chronic estrogen (E) replacement. The sex difference in baseline TMJ PE appeared to reflect the actions of T. However, in the presence of TMJ inflammation, T augmented TMJ PE in males, while E attenuated TMJ PE in females. Changes in PE were also assessed in the contralateral TMJ. Results from this analysis indicated that there is a transient contralateral increase in TMJ PE in females but not males. Given that there is an inverse relationship between PE and joint damage, our results suggest that testosterone may mitigate, but estrogen may exacerbate, TMJ damage, particularly in the presence of overt inflammation. Importantly, our results may help explain both the higher prevalence and severity of temporomandibular disorder pain in females than males. PMID:16469833

  8. Changes in urinary bone resorption markers (pyridinoline, deoxypyridinoline) resulting from experimentally-induced osteoarthritis in the temporomandibular joint of rats.

    PubMed

    Imada, Masae; Tanimoto, Kotaro; Ohno, Shigeru; Sasaki, Akiko; Sugiyama, Hiroki; Tanne, Kazuo

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify the urinary bone resorption markers, pyridinoline (Pyr) and deoxypyridinoline (Dpyr), excreted from experimentally-induced osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of rats. Osteoarthritic lesions were induced by intra-articular injection of collagenase into the right TMJs of 16-week-old male rats. The whole day's urine was collected from each animal one day before the injection and 5, 7, 11 and 14 days after the injection. Urine samples were analyzed by high-perfomance liquid chromatography and fluorescence spectroscopy. Histological changes in condyle were examined by using paraffin sections with toluidine blue staining. Degenerative changes were observed in the articular cartilage of the experimental group on day 7 and day 14 after the injection of collagenase. The concentration of Pyr was remarkably high in the experimental group, and consequently the Pyr to Dpyr ratio was significantly higher (p<0.05) in the experimental group than in the control group from 7-14 days after the injection. These findings suggest that a urinary Pyr/Dpyr ratio would be available for the detection of degenerative changes in condyle relevant to temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ OA). PMID:12555930

  9. Effect of diazepam on temporomandibular joints in rats with increased occlusal vertical dimension.

    PubMed

    Figueroba, S R; Desjardins, M P; Nani, B D; Ferreira, L E N; Rossi, A C; Santos, F A; Venâncio, P C; Aguiar, F H B; Groppo, F C

    2014-05-01

    Anxiolytic agents, mainly benzodiazepines, have been used to treat symptomatic disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Our aim was to evaluate the effect of diazepam on the TMJ of rats with increased occlusal vertical dimension (iOVD). Forty male rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups: control rats were given sham iOVD plus saline solution daily for 7 days. The first experimental group was given sham iOVD plus diazepam 2.5mg/kg/intramuscularly daily for 7 days (diazepam alone group); the second had iOVD induced in molars for 7 days plus saline daily for 7 days (iOVD alone group); and the third had iOVD induced in molars for 7 days plus diazepam 2.5mg/kg/intramuscularly daily for 7 days (iOVD plus diazepam group). At the end of each experiment the animals were killed and their bilateral TMJs were removed, randomly stained with haematoxylin and eosin and sirius-red, and immunoassayed. The thickness of condylar cartilage and of fibrous, proliferating, mature, and hypertrophic layers, number of collagen fibres, and the articular area were measured. Proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α) were also measured. ANOVA and Tukey's tests or the Kruskal-Wallis test were used to compare data among groups (α=5%). Condylar cartilage was thicker in the control group than in the other groups, the diazepam alone group being thicker than the other 2 experimental groups. There were fewer collagen fibres in the 2 groups given diazepam than in the other 2 groups, and there were no significant differences in the area of cartilage among groups. The controls had lower concentrations of all cytokines (p<0.05) than the 3 experimental groups, except for IL-6. Both iOVD groups had higher concentrations of IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-6 than the diazepam alone group. Diazepam alone was associated with increased concentrations of all cytokines except IL-6. We conclude that both iOVD and diazepam induced significant changes in rats

  10. Dental and Temporomandibular Joint Pathology of the Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Winer, J N; Arzi, B; Leale, D M; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2016-01-01

    Museum specimens (maxillae and/or mandibles) from 317 polar bears (Ursus maritimus) were examined macroscopically according to predefined criteria and 249 specimens were included in this study. The specimens were acquired between 1906 and 2011. There were 126 specimens (50.6%) from male animals, 93 (37.3%) from female animals and 30 (12.1%) from animals of unknown sex. The ages of the animals ranged from neonate to adult, with 125 adults (50.2%) and 124 young adults (49.8%) included and neonates/juveniles excluded from the study. The number of teeth available for examination was 7,638 (73.5%); 12.3% of teeth were absent artefactually, 0.8% were deemed absent due to acquired tooth loss and 13.4% were absent congenitally. With respect to tooth morphology, 20 teeth (0.26% of available teeth) in 18 specimens (7.2% of available specimens) were small vestigial structures with crowns that were flush with the level of surrounding alveolar bone. One supernumerary tooth and one tooth with enamel hypoplasia were encountered. Persistent deciduous teeth and teeth with an aberrant number of roots were not found. Relatively few teeth (3.7%) displayed attrition/abrasion, 90% of which were the maxillary and mandibular incisor teeth, in 41 polar bears (16.5%). Nearly twice as many adult specimens exhibited attrition/abrasion as those from young adults; significantly more males were affected than females. Dental fractures were noted in 52 polar bears, affecting 20.9% of specimens and 1.3% of the total number of teeth present. More adult polar bears had dental fractures than young adults. There were 21 specimens (8.4%) that displayed overt periapical disease, affecting a total of 24 dental alveoli (0.23%). Some degree of periodontitis was seen in 199 specimens (79.9%); however, only 12.6% of dental alveoli had bony changes indicative of periodontitis. Lesions consistent with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) were found in 23 specimens (9.2%). TMJ-OA was significantly

  11. ACTIVATION OF B-CATENIN SIGNALLING LEADS TO TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DEFECTS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M.; Li, S.; Xie, W.; Shen, J.; Im, H-J.; Holz, J.D.; Wang, M.; Diekwisch, T.G.H.; Chen, D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive research in knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA), the underlying mechanism of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder remains largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the constitutive activation of β-catenin in the middle and deep layers of the articular cartilage can compromise the homeostasis of this tissue in the TMJ. Co12CreERT2 transgenic mice were bred with RosamT/mG reporter mice to determine Cre recombination efficiency. Co12CreERT2 mice were then crossed with β-cateninflox (ex3)/+ mice to generate β-catenin conditional activation mice, β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER. TMJ samples were harvested when the mice were 1-, 3- or 6-month-old and evaluated using histology, histomorphometry and immunohistochemistry. β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice were further crossed with Mmp13flox/flox and Adamts5−/− mice to generate β-catenin(ex3)/Mmp13)Co12ER and β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER)/Adamts5−/− double mutant mice to investigate the role of Mmp13 and Adamts5 in the development of TMJ disorder. High levels of Cre-recombination were seen in Co12CreERT2;RosamT/mG mice. Progressive TMJ defects developed in 1-, 3- and 6-month-old β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice, as revealed by histology and histomorphometry. Results further demonstrated that the defects observed in β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice were significantly decelerated after deletion of the Mmp13 or Adamts5 gene in (β-catenin(ex3)/Mmp13)co12ER or β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER/ Adamts5−/− double mutant mice. In summary, we found that β-catenin is a critical gene in the induction of TMJ cartilage degeneration, and over-expressing β-catenin in TMJ cartilage leads to defects assembling an OA-like phenotype. Deletion of Mmp13 and Adamts5 in β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice ameliorates the development of TMJ defects. This study suggests that Mmp13 and Adamts5 could be potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of TMJ disorders. PMID:25340802

  12. Poly (Glycerol Sebacate): A Novel Scaffold Material for Temporomandibular Joint Disc Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Hagandora, Catherine K.; Gao, Jin; Wang, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    The preponderance of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders involving TMJ disc injury inspires the need to further explore tissue engineering strategies. The objective of this study was to examine the potential of poly (glycerol sebacate) (PGS), a biocompatible, biodegradable elastomer, as a porous scaffold material for the TMJ disc. Goat fibrochondrocytes were seeded on PGS at three seeding densities (25, 50, 100 million cells/mL scaffold), respectively, and cultured for 24 h, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks. The resulting histological, biochemical, and biomechanical properties were determined. Histological staining revealed an abundance of both collagen and glycosaminoglycans (GAG) throughout the high seeding density scaffolds at 4 weeks. There was also a significant increase in the cellular content in all groups over the four-week period, showing that the scaffolds promoted cell attachment and proliferation. The PGS scaffolds supported the deposition of large quantities of extracellular matrix, with differences noted between seeding density groups. At 4 weeks, the medium and high seeding density groups had significantly more collagen per scaffold (181±46 μg and 218±24 μg, respectively) than the low seeding density group (105±28 μg) (p<0.001). At 4 weeks, the medium and high seeding density groups also had a significantly higher GAG content per scaffold (702±253 μg and 773±187 μg, respectively), than the low seeding density group (324±73 μg) (p<0.001). The compression tangent modulus was significantly greater at 4 weeks than 24 h (123.6±86 kPa and 26.2±5 kPa, respectively) (seeding density groups combined) (p<0.001), with no differences between seeding groups at each time point. After 4 weeks, the tangent modulus of the low seeding density group was in a similar range of the goat TMJ disc (180±127 kPa compared to 304±141 kPa, respectively). The results show that cell seeding density and culture time do have an effect on both the

  13. Dental and Temporomandibular Joint Pathology of the Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Winer, J N; Arzi, B; Leale, D M; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2016-01-01

    Museum specimens (maxillae and/or mandibles) from 317 polar bears (Ursus maritimus) were examined macroscopically according to predefined criteria and 249 specimens were included in this study. The specimens were acquired between 1906 and 2011. There were 126 specimens (50.6%) from male animals, 93 (37.3%) from female animals and 30 (12.1%) from animals of unknown sex. The ages of the animals ranged from neonate to adult, with 125 adults (50.2%) and 124 young adults (49.8%) included and neonates/juveniles excluded from the study. The number of teeth available for examination was 7,638 (73.5%); 12.3% of teeth were absent artefactually, 0.8% were deemed absent due to acquired tooth loss and 13.4% were absent congenitally. With respect to tooth morphology, 20 teeth (0.26% of available teeth) in 18 specimens (7.2% of available specimens) were small vestigial structures with crowns that were flush with the level of surrounding alveolar bone. One supernumerary tooth and one tooth with enamel hypoplasia were encountered. Persistent deciduous teeth and teeth with an aberrant number of roots were not found. Relatively few teeth (3.7%) displayed attrition/abrasion, 90% of which were the maxillary and mandibular incisor teeth, in 41 polar bears (16.5%). Nearly twice as many adult specimens exhibited attrition/abrasion as those from young adults; significantly more males were affected than females. Dental fractures were noted in 52 polar bears, affecting 20.9% of specimens and 1.3% of the total number of teeth present. More adult polar bears had dental fractures than young adults. There were 21 specimens (8.4%) that displayed overt periapical disease, affecting a total of 24 dental alveoli (0.23%). Some degree of periodontitis was seen in 199 specimens (79.9%); however, only 12.6% of dental alveoli had bony changes indicative of periodontitis. Lesions consistent with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) were found in 23 specimens (9.2%). TMJ-OA was significantly

  14. Otitis interna, media, and externa with destruction of the left tympanic bulla and subluxation and septic arthritis of the left temporomandibular joint in an alpaca (Vicugna pacos).

    PubMed

    Galvan, Noe; Middleton, John R; Cook, Cristi; Britt, Lisa G; Kuroki, Keiichi

    2013-03-01

    A 1.5-year-old, 37.7 kg, female alpaca was evaluated for a 2-week history of weight loss, left ear droop, and deviation of the rostral mandible to the right. Antemortem radiography and postmortem examination revealed otitis interna, media, and externa, destruction of the left tympanic bulla, and subluxation and septic arthritis of the left temporomandibular joint.

  15. Mandibular condylectomy in a cow with a chronic luxation of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Holly D.; Roquet, Imma; MacKay, Angela; Barber, Spencer

    2014-01-01

    A cow, presented after being struck by a motor vehicle, continued to have difficulty eating after mandibular fracture repair. Imaging showed a temporomandibular luxation and a mandibular condylectomy was performed. Mastication improved greatly but the cow was euthanized due to infection. This is the first report of mandibular condylectomy in cattle. PMID:24891643

  16. Mandibular condylectomy in a cow with a chronic luxation of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Holly D; Roquet, Imma; MacKay, Angela; Barber, Spencer

    2014-06-01

    A cow, presented after being struck by a motor vehicle, continued to have difficulty eating after mandibular fracture repair. Imaging showed a temporomandibular luxation and a mandibular condylectomy was performed. Mastication improved greatly but the cow was euthanized due to infection. This is the first report of mandibular condylectomy in cattle. PMID:24891643

  17. The use of low level laser therapy in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders. Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Herranz-Aparicio, Judit; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo; Arnabat-Domínguez, Josep; España-Tost, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) have been identified as the most important cause of pain in the facial region. The low level laser therapy (LLLT) has demonstrated to have an analgesic, anti-inflammatory and biostimulating effects. The LLLT is a noninvasive, quick and safe, non-pharmaceutical intervention that may be beneficial for patients with TMDs. However the clinical efficiency of LLLT in the treatment of this kind of disorders is controversial. Objectives: Literature review in reference to the use of LLLT in the treatment of TMDs, considering the scientific evidence level of the published studies. Material and Methods: A MEDLINE and COCHRANE database search was made for articles. The keywords used were “temporomandibular disorders” and “low level laser therapy” or “phototherapy” and by means of the Boolean operator “AND”. The search provided a bank of 35 articles, and 16 relevant articles were selected to this review. These articles were critically analyzed and classified according to their level of scientific evidence. This analysis produced 3 literature review articles and 13 are clinical trials. The SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy) was used to classify the articles. Results: Only one article presented an evidence level 1, twelve presented an evidence level 2, and three presented an evidence level 3. According to the principle of evidence-based dentistry, currently there is a scientific evidence level B in favor of using LLLT for treatment of TMDs. Discussion and conclusions: Publications on the use of LLLT for treatment of TMDs are limited making difficult to compare the different studies due to the great variability of the studied variables and the selected laser parameters. The great majority of the studies concluded that the results should be taken with caution due to the methodological limitations. Key words:Low level laser therapy; phototherapy; temporomandibular joint disorders. PMID:23722130

  18. Histopathological features of hypertrophic bone mass of temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA): An explanation of pathogenesis of TMJA.

    PubMed

    Duan, Denghui; Li, Jiangming; Xiao, E; He, Linhai; Yan, Yingbin; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Yi

    2015-07-01

    Temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA) is a severe organic disease with progressive limitation of the mouth opening. Histopathologically, a residual joint space is reported to consist of fibrous tissue and/or cartilage, indicating two types of interface (osteo-fibrous and osteo-chondral) of residual joint space. It is well known that adverse mechanical stress results in pathological changes of osteoarthritis and enthesopathy in these interfaces. What would happen pathologically in these interfaces of TMJA under repeated mandible movement has not been elucidated. Fourteen tissue samples of residual joint space and temporal and condylar bone were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and evaluated by collagen I and II immunohistochemistry. A pathological study of 14 TMJA patients showed that the residual joint space presented a fibrocartilage entheses structure and an articular cartilage structure. Moreover, these two structures were associated with pathological alterations of both osteoarthritis and enthesopathy, including degenerated and necrotized tissue, chondrocyte cloning, crack and fissure, various bone scleroses, and inflammatory granulation tissue. It is suggested that the pathological alterations of both osteoarthritis and enthesopathy occurred in TMJA, which hints at mechanical stress on TMJA development. PMID:26026887

  19. Modified Labial Button Technique for Maintaining Occlusion After Caudal Mandibular Fracture/Temporomandibular Joint Luxation in the Cat.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Alice E; Carmichael, Daniel T

    2016-03-01

    Maxillofacial trauma in cats often results in mandibular symphyseal separation in addition to injuries of the caudal mandible and/or temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Caudal mandibular and TMJ injuries are difficult to access and stabilize using direct fixation techniques, thus indirect fixation is commonly employed. The immediate goals of fixation include stabilization for return to normal occlusion and function with the long-term objective of bony union. Indirect fixation techniques commonly used for stabilization of caudal mandibular and temporomandibular joint fracture/luxation include maxillomandibular fixation (MMF) with acrylic composite, interarcade wiring, tape muzzles, and the bignathic encircling and retaining device (BEARD) technique. This article introduces a modification of the previously described "labial reverse suture through buttons" technique used by Koestlin et al and the "labial locking with buttons" technique by Rocha et al. In cases with minimally displaced subcondylar and pericondylar fractures without joint involvement, the labial button technique can provide sufficient stabilization for healing. Advantages of the modified labial button technique include ease of application, noninvasive nature, and use of readily available materials. The construct can remain in place for a variable of amount of time, depending on its intended purpose. It serves as an alternative to the tape muzzle, which is rarely tolerated by cats. This technique can be easily used in conjunction with other maxillomandibular repairs, such as cerclage wire fixation of mandibular symphyseal separation. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate a modified labial button technique for maintaining occlusion of feline caudal mandibular fractures/TMJ luxations in a step-by-step fashion. PMID:27487655

  20. A Study of the Association Between Sleep Bruxism, Low Quality of Sleep, and Degenerative Changes of the Temporomandibular Joint.

    PubMed

    Dias, Glaucia Marques; Bonato, Letícia Ladeira; Guimarães, Josemar Parreira; Silva, Jesca Neftali Nogueira; Ferreira, Luciano Ambrosio; Grossmann, Eduardo; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of degenerative bone changes of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in individuals suffering from sleep bruxism (SB), associating these characteristics with the quality of sleep. For this, we followed the International Classification of Sleep Disorders for the diagnosis of SB, in addition to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) for the classification of TMD and cone beam computed tomography. It was found that 97.7% of the individuals with bruxism had at least 1 RDC/TMD group III diagnosis, 75.6% of the subjects considered their sleep quality as poor, and the largest group (23%) had centric bruxism. There was no significant association between the pattern of sleep quality (P = 0.36), the type of SB (P = 0.277), and the presence of degenerative changes of the TMJ. Regardless of the quality of sleep and the type of bruxism presented, the prevalence of degenerative bone disorders was high (67%) among women with a mean age of 46 years and a clinical diagnosis of SB.

  1. A cross-sectional study of the relationship between serum sexual hormone levels and internal derangement of temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Madani, A S; Shamsian, A A; Hedayati-Moghaddam, M R; Fathi-Moghadam, F; Sabooni, M R; Mirmortazavi, A; Golmohamadi, M

    2013-08-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are defined as clinical conditions that involve the masticatory muscles, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) or both. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum 17β-oestradiol and progesterone levels in menstruating women affected by internal derangement of the TMJ. A total of 142 women (mean age 30·2 ± 6·7) who referred to medical diagnostic laboratory of Iranian Academic Centre for Education, Culture and Research (ACECR), Mashhad Branch, were enrolled during 2007 and 2008. Forty-seven individuals had disc displacement with reduction (Group IIa) according to Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC)/TMD Axis I diagnosis. Radioimmunoassay was used for the detection of serum 17β-oestradiol and progesterone levels in all 142 subjects. The mean progesterone level was significantly higher in control group (11·6 ± 10·4 ng mL(-1) ) compared to women with TMD (8·4 ± 6·8 ng mL(-1) , P = 0·03). No significant difference was found in two groups regarding 17β-oestradiol level. Lower progesterone level in women with TMD can suggest the more important role of this hormone in the development of the disorder.

  2. Retrospective evaluation of airway management with blind awake intubation in temporomandibular joint ankylosis patients: A review of 48 cases

    PubMed Central

    Sankar, Duraiswamy; Krishnan, Radhika; Veerabahu, Muthusubramanian; Vikraman, Bhaskara Pandian; Nathan, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to determine the morbidity or mortality associated with the blind awake intubation technique in temporomandibular ankylosis patients. Settings and Design: A total of 48 cases with radiographically and clinically confirmed cases of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis were included in the study for evaluation of anesthetic management and its complications. Materials and Methods: Airway assessment was done with standard proforma including Look externally, evaluate 3-3-2 rule, Mallampati classification, Obstruction, Neck mobility (LEMON) score assessment in all TMJ ankylosis patients. The intubation was carried out with the standard departmental anesthetic protocol in all the patients. The preoperative difficulty assessment and postoperative outcome were recorded. Results: Blind awake intubation was done in 92% of cases, 6% of cases were intubated by fiberoptic awake intubation, and 2% patient required surgical airway. Ninety-eight percent of the patients were cooperative during the awake intubation. The frequent complications encountered during the blind awake intubation were epistaxis and sore throat. Conclusion: In an anesthetic setup, where fiberoptic intubation is not available, blind awake intubation could be considered in the anesthetic management algorithm. PMID:27563608

  3. Alloplastic total temporomandibular joint replacement using stock prosthesis: a one-year follow-up report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hoon; Ryu, Da-Jung; Kim, Hye-Sun; Kim, Hyung-Gon

    2013-01-01

    Alloplastic total replacement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was developed in recent decades. In some conditions, previous studies suggested the rationale behind alloplastic TMJ replacement rather than reconstruction with autogenous grafts. Currently, three prosthetic products are available and approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Among these products, customized prostheses are manufactured, via computer aided design/computer aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system for customized design; stock-type prostheses are provided in various sizes and shapes. In this report, two patients (a 50-year-old female who had undergone condylectomy for the treatment of osteochondroma extending to the cranial base on the left condyle, and a 21-year-old male diagnosed with left temporomandibular ankylosis) were treated using the alloplastic total replacement of TMJ using stock prosthesis. The follow-up results of a favorable one-year, short-term therapeutic outcome were obtained for the alloplastic total TMJ replacement using a stock-type prosthesis. PMID:24516821

  4. Comparison of the instructional efficacy of an internet-based temporomandibular joint (TMJ) tutorial with a traditional seminar.

    PubMed

    Al-Riyami, S; Moles, D R; Leeson, R; Cunningham, S J

    2010-12-11

    There has been growing interest in the use of virtual learning environments (VLEs) by universities over the past decade to supplement traditional teaching methods. In this study a tutorial providing information about the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), temporomandibular disorders and teaching of a thorough TMJ examination was developed on a VLE platform to enable students to enhance their examination and diagnostic skills. The success of this VLE tutorial was compared with conventional teaching by a cross-over trial. Thirty students were initially randomly allocated to one of two groups; Group 1 completed the VLE tutorial and Group 2 attended the face-to-face seminar in the first instance. The groups then crossed over and had the other method of teaching provided. The findings from the cross-over trial and the students' feedback indicated that no differences were found between either teaching modes, and both are equally effective at delivering information to students. In addition, the order in which the students received the teaching did not make a difference, but giving the teaching twice reinforced their knowledge. There is a strong case to be made for introducing clinical lectures on a VLE platform, and this form of e-learning is, in general, well perceived by new generations of students. PMID:21151070

  5. Derangement of the temporomandibular joint; a case study using Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Krog, C; May, S

    2012-10-01

    Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy (MDT) is widely used for spinal problems, and more recently the principles and mechanical syndromes have been applied to extremity musculoskeletal problems. One of the most common classifications is derangement syndrome, which describes a presentation in which repeated movements causes a decrease in symptoms and a restoration of restricted range of movement. The case study describes the application of repeated movements to a patient with a 7-year history of non-specific temporomandibular pain and reduced function, who had had lots of previous failed treatment. Examination using repeated movements resulted in a classification of derangement, and the patient rapidly responded in 4 treatment sessions, with an abolition of pain and full restoration of function, and remained improved after many years. The case study demonstrates the application of Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy principles to a patient with a temporomandibular problem. PMID:22177711

  6. Integration of rehabilitation and acupuncture in the treatment of a professional musician with temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Emma K

    2011-12-01

    This case study describes the use of acupuncture in a professional musician with myogenic temporomandibular dysfunction. The 3-year history of symptoms was associated with persistent episodic tension-type headaches. Acupuncture was used for trigger point release, primarily of the masticatory muscles, in conjunction with exercise therapy. After 8 weekly acupuncture sessions, the patient's pain had completely resloved, headaches had resolved and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale showed significant improvements.

  7. Integration of rehabilitation and acupuncture in the treatment of a professional musician with temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Emma K

    2011-12-01

    This case study describes the use of acupuncture in a professional musician with myogenic temporomandibular dysfunction. The 3-year history of symptoms was associated with persistent episodic tension-type headaches. Acupuncture was used for trigger point release, primarily of the masticatory muscles, in conjunction with exercise therapy. After 8 weekly acupuncture sessions, the patient's pain had completely resloved, headaches had resolved and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale showed significant improvements. PMID:21685109

  8. Changes in disc status in the reducing and nonreducing anterior disc displacement of temporomandibular joint: a longitudinal retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ying Kai; Yang, Chi; Xie, Qian Yang

    2016-01-01

    Treatment procedures for anterior disc displacement (ADD) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are far from reaching a consensus. The aim of the study was to evaluate disc status changes of anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDWR) and without reduction (ADDWoR) comparatively, to get a better understanding of the disease progress without intervention. This longitudinal retrospective study included 217 joints in 165 patients, which were divided into ADDWR group and ADDWoR group based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. The joints were assessed quantitatively for disc length and displacement distance at initial and follow-up visits. Disc morphology, which was classified in 5 types, was also evaluated. Paired t-test and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used to assess intra-group differences and independent t-test for inter-group differences. Moreover, analysis of covariance was applied to analyze influential factors for changes in disc length and displacement distance. According to our results, discs tended to become shorter, move further forward and distort more seriously in ADDWoR group than in ADDWR group after follow-up. Moreover, discs were prone to become shorter and more anteriorly displaced in teenagers, type I and III morphologies, advanced Wilkes stages, or those with joint effusion. Follow-up period seemed to be not critical. PMID:27671371

  9. Dental and Temporomandibular Joint Pathology of the Eastern Pacific Harbour Seal (Phoca vitulina richardii).

    PubMed

    Aalderink, M T; Nguyen, H P; Kass, P H; Arzi, B; Verstraete, F J M

    2015-05-01

    .2%) in seven animals. Periapical lesions were found in four skulls (2.1% of the total number of specimens). None of the specimens showed signs of enamel hypoplasia. More than half (55.6%) of alveoli, either with or without teeth, showed signs of alveolar bony changes consistent with periodontitis. A total of 178 specimens (91.8%) had at least one tooth associated with mild periodontitis. Lesions consistent with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) were found in 67 specimens (34.5%). The most common articular surface to be affected was the left mandibular fossa of the temporal bone, with lesions in 44 cases (32.8% of all lesions). In 13 specimens (6.7%) all articular surfaces were affected. Both periodontal disease and TMJ-OA were significantly more common in adults than in juveniles (P <0.0001). Although the significance of the high incidence of periodontitis and TMJ-OA in the Eastern Pacific harbor seal remains unknown, the occurrence and severity of these diseases as found in this study may play an important role in the morbidity and mortality of this species. PMID:25824118

  10. Dental and Temporomandibular Joint Pathology of the Northern Fur Seal (Callorhinus ursinus).

    PubMed

    Aalderink, M T; Nguyen, H P; Kass, P H; Arzi, B; Verstraete, F J M

    2015-05-01

    associated with mild periodontitis. Lesions consistent with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) were found in 29 specimens (20.0%). Both periodontal disease and TMJ-OA were significantly more common in adults than in juveniles (P <0.0001). Periodontitis was found to be more common in males than in females (P <0.012). Although the significance of the high incidence of periodontitis and TMJ-OA in the northern fur seal remains unknown, the occurrence and severity of these diseases found in this study may play an important role in this species morbidity and mortality. PMID:25824117

  11. Contribution of synovial lining cells to synovial vascularization of the rat temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Nozawa-Inoue, Kayoko; Harada, Fumiko; Magara, Jin; Ohazama, Atsushi; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2016-03-01

    The lining layer of the synovial membrane in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) contains two types of lining cells: macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells. The type B cells are particularly heterogeneous in their morphology and immunoreactivity, so that details of their functions remain unclear. Some of the type B cells exhibit certain resemblances in their ultrastructure to those of an activated capillary pericyte at the initial stage of the angiogenesis. The articular surface, composed of cartilage and the disc in the TMJ, has few vasculatures, whereas the synovial lining layer is richly equipped with blood capillaries to produce the constituent of synovial fluid. The present study investigated at both the light and electron microscopic levels the immunocytochemical characteristics of the synovial lining cells in the adult rat TMJ, focusing on their contribution to the synovial vascularization. It also employed an intravascular perfusion with Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) lectin to identify functional vessels in vivo. Results showed that several type B cells expressed desmin, a muscle-specific intermediate filament which is known as the earliest protein to appear during myogenesis as well as being a marker for the immature capillary pericyte. These desmin-positive type B cells showed immunoreactions for vimentin and pericyte markers (neuron-glial 2; NG2 and PDGFRβ) but not for the other markers of myogenic cells (MyoD and myogenin) or a contractile apparatus (αSMA and caldesmon). Immunoreactivity for RECA-1, an endothelial marker, was observed in the macrophage-like type A cells. The arterioles and venules inside the synovial folds extended numerous capillaries with RECA-1-positive endothelial cells and desmin-positive pericytes to distribute densely in the lining layer. The distal portion of these capillaries showing RECA-1-immunoreactivity lacked lectin-staining, indicating a loss of blood-circulation due to sprouting or termination in the

  12. Dental and Temporomandibular Joint Pathology of the Northern Fur Seal (Callorhinus ursinus).

    PubMed

    Aalderink, M T; Nguyen, H P; Kass, P H; Arzi, B; Verstraete, F J M

    2015-05-01

    associated with mild periodontitis. Lesions consistent with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) were found in 29 specimens (20.0%). Both periodontal disease and TMJ-OA were significantly more common in adults than in juveniles (P <0.0001). Periodontitis was found to be more common in males than in females (P <0.012). Although the significance of the high incidence of periodontitis and TMJ-OA in the northern fur seal remains unknown, the occurrence and severity of these diseases found in this study may play an important role in this species morbidity and mortality.

  13. Versatility of full thickness skin-subcutaneous fat grafts as interpositional material in the management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Thangavelu, A; Santhosh Kumar, K; Vaidhyanathan, A; Balaji, M; Narendar, R

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a review of seven patients (eight joints) with temporomandibular ankylosis treated between 2007 and 2008. The aim of this retrospective study was to present the experience of using full thickness skin-subcutaneous fat grafts, harvested from the patient's abdomen as interpositional material after gap arthroplasty. All patients presented with osseous ankylosis and were graded according to Topazian's classification. Postoperative follow up ranged from 12 to 24 months. Maximal inter-incisal opening (MIO) on presentation ranged from 0 to 8mm, which stabilized to 27-44mm at follow up. There was no evidence of re-ankylosis. This study found merit in the use of autogenous full thickness skin-subcutaneous fat graft as an interpositional material for up to 2 years following ankylosis release.

  14. Tenosynovial, Diffuse Type Giant Cell Tumor of the Temporomandibular Joint, Diagnosis and Management of a Rare Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Bredell, Marius; Schucknecht, Bernhard; Bode-Lesniewska, Baete

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to describe a rare unusual case of primary mandibular condylar tenosynovial giant cell tumor of diffuse type with predominantly intraosseous growth and its management by resection and functional reconstruction with a vascularized costochondral graft. Clinical presentation was swelling in the right condylar area and limited mouth opening with radiological evidence of central bone destruction and magnetic resonance imaging showed central hemosiderin deposition. Fine needle aspiration did not lead to a diagnosis and an open biopsy had to be performed. Management consisted of tumor resection and reconstruction with a free vascularized costochondral graft. Tenosynovial diffuse type giant cell tumor of the temporomandibular joint is very rare. Complete resection leads to a low recurrence rate and reconstruction with a costochondral free vascularized flap leads to an excellent functional outcome. PMID:25699124

  15. Open-close movements in the human temporomandibular joint: does a pure rotation around the intercondylar hinge axis exist?

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Miani, A; Serrao, G; Tartaglia, G

    1996-06-01

    Mandibular movements near the maximum intercuspal position were analysed for the location of the mean instantaneous centre of curvature of the interincisal point path. Measurements were performed using a kinesiograph in 28 healthy young adults with sound dentitions and free from temporomandibular joint disorders. The subjects performed habitual open-close cycles at different speeds; opening movements starting from the centric relation occlusion were also analysed. In none of the 28 subjects was the interincisal point path derived from pure rotation movements performed around the intercondylar axis, not even in the first millimetres of motion. Translation and rotation were always combined, and the position of the centre of curvature changed during the motion, showing different characteristics in the open and close movements; these patterns were also dependent upon motion speed. The results show that the hinge axis theory cannot explain the mandibular movements because a pure rotation did not occur around the intercondylar axis.

  16. Collagen fiber arrangement in temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) disks from human subjects with functional diseases. Scanning electron microscopy investigations.

    PubMed

    Piacentini, C; Marchetti, C; Bernasconi, G; Menghini, P; Baciliero, U; Brusotti, C

    1994-01-01

    Twelve articular disks from patients with temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) arthropathy were studied and compared with two normal disks. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of the surfaces and of longitudinal and cross-sections of the disks allowed the observation of the arrangement of the collagen fiber component in different parts of the disk. The superficial part of the articular disks appears to be formed by rather compact fibers. The internal portion is usually formed by bundles of collagen fibers in sheets, alternating with isolated fibers arranged in a parallel or irregular way. In some samples, blood vessels were observed. Our investigations suggested that the appearance of vascularization is the first remarkable histological change that can be observed in functionally abnormal articular disks.

  17. Immunohistochemical expression of types I and III collagen antibodies in the temporomandibular joint disc of human foetuses

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, L.O.C.; Lodi, F.R.; Gomes, T.S.; Marques, S.R.; Oshima, C.T.F.; Lancellotti, C.L.P.; Rodríguez-Vázquez, J.F.; Mérida-Velasco, J.R.; Alonso, L.G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to study the morphology of the articular disc and analyse the immunohistochemical expression of types I and III collagen markers in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc of human foetuses of different gestational ages. Twenty TMJ from human foetuses supplied by Universidade Federal de Uberaba with gestational ages from 17 to 24 weeks were studied. The gestational age of the foetuses was determined by measuring the crown-rump (CR) length. Macroscopically, the foetuses were fixed in 10% formalin solution and dissected by removing the skin and subcutaneous tissue and exposing the deep structures. Immunohistochemical markers of type I and III were used to characterize the existence of collagen fibres. Analysis of the immunohistochemical markers of types I and III collagen revealed the presence of heterotypical fibril networks. PMID:22073371

  18. Immunohistochemical expression of types I and III collagen antibodies in the temporomandibular joint disc of human foetuses.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, L O C; Lodi, F R; Gomes, T S; Marques, S R; Oshima, C T F; Lancellotti, C L P; Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F; Mérida-Velasco, J R; Alonso, L G

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to study the morphology of the articular disc and analyse the immunohistochemical expression of types I and III collagen markers in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc of human foetuses of different gestational ages. Twenty TMJ from human foetuses supplied by Universidade Federal de Uberaba with gestational ages from 17 to 24 weeks were studied. The gestational age of the foetuses was determined by measuring the crown-rump (CR) length. Macroscopically, the foetuses were fixed in 10% formalin solution and dissected by removing the skin and subcutaneous tissue and exposing the deep structures. Immunohistochemical markers of type I and III were used to characterize the existence of collagen fibres. Analysis of the immunohistochemical markers of types I and III collagen revealed the presence of heterotypical fibril networks.

  19. TRAIL, DR5 and caspase 3-dependent apoptosis in vessels of diseased human temporomandibular joint disc. An immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Loreto, C.; Almeida, L.E.; Migliore, M.R.; Caltabiano, M.; Leonardi, R.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the apoptosis involvement in the angiogenesis as a self-limiting process in patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) degenerated disc vessels, we assessed, by immunohistochemistry, the detection of TRAIL, its death receptor DR5 and caspase 3. TRAIL, its death receptor DR5 and caspase 3 expression were studied by immunohistochemistry in 15 TMJ discs displaced without reduction and in 4 unaffected discs. These apoptosis molecules were detected in the intima and media layers of newly formed vessels affected discs. In conclusion, vessels apoptosis activation in TMJ disc with ID could be regarded as a self-limiting process that try to leads to vessel regression; in this way an inhibition of angiogenic vessels may prove a key strategy in limiting pathological angiogenesis, by cutting off blood supply to tumors, or by reducing harmful inflammation. PMID:20839416

  20. Temporomandibular Joint Septic Arthritis and Mandibular Osteomyelitis Arising From an Odontogenic Infection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Gams, Kevin; Freeman, Phillip

    2016-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has been infrequently reported in the literature. Some investigators believe that this condition is under-reported because it is underdiagnosed. Misdiagnosis or late diagnosis of this condition can lead to serious morbidity, including fistula formation, intracranial abscess, fibrous or bony ankylosis, temporal bone or condylar osteomyelitis, growth alteration, and several others. This report describes a case of septic TMJ arthritis arising from direct spread of an odontogenic infection with subsequent development of mandibular osteomyelitis. The purpose of this case report is to 1) increase awareness of an underdiagnosed condition, 2) establish the seriousness of this infection, 3) for the first time report on a case of TMJ septic arthritis caused by Bacteroides infection, and 4) provide a review of the relevant literature.

  1. [An attempt to use ultrasonic technique for confirming the diagnosis, planning and observation of long-term treatment results of painful temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Ey-Chmielewska, H

    1998-01-01

    The author presents an attempt of using ultrasonographic technique in diagnosis, planning and observation of treatment results of temporo-mandibular joint pain dysfunctions. Temporo-mandibular joint pain dysfunctions are interchangeably also called temporo-mandibular joint functional disorders. The assessment of pain symptoms in temporo-mandibular joint dysfunctions pain symptoms is principally based on a subjective estimation by the examining practitioner. There is no univocal definition of the disease or a simple index evidencing important symptoms in decision making. Additionally X-ray technique examinations, being hitherto used, in early stages of the disorder do not allow to diagnose it, and are also burdensome to a patient. The aim of this study was to confirm visibility of anatomical elements of the temporo-mandibular joint in an ultrasound examination, assess the mobility of the articular disc before, during and after prosthetic treatment with and without the use of ultrasound technique, and to determine the period of time necessary to obtain a therapeutic effect. The study material consisted of 180 patients, 128 women and 52 men, aged 20 to 60 years, treated by applying prostheses because of temporo-mandibular joint pain dysfunction, in the Department of Prosthetic Dentistry of the Pomeranian Medical Academy. The patients were divided into 2 groups, control and study group. The control group consisted of 90 patients, 63 women and 27 men. In this group prosthetic treatment planning and observation of results was based on a subjective estimation of the practitioner. The study group here comprised 90 patients, 65 women and 25 men, aged 26 to 60 years. In this group prosthetic treatment planning and observation of treatment results were carried on with the use of ultrasound technique. Data from both groups concerning history, results of examinations carried out by ultrasound technique, and the assessment of ultrasound examination were noted on standard

  2. Serum levels of BMP-2, 4, 7 and AHSG in patients with degenerative joint disease requiring total arthroplasty of the hip and temporomandibular joints.

    PubMed

    Albilia, Jonathan B; Tenenbaum, Howard C; Clokie, Cameron M L; Walt, David R; Baker, Gerald I; Psutka, David J; Backstein, David; Peel, Sean A F

    2013-01-01

    To date, there is no objective or reliable means of assessing the severity of degenerative joint disease (DJD) and need for joint replacement surgery. Hence, it is difficult to know when an individual with DJD has reached a point where total arthroplasty is indicated. The purpose of the present study is to determine whether serum levels of Alpha-2 HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) as well as bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP-2, 4, 7) can be used to predict the presence of severe DJD of the hip and/or temporomandibular joint (TMJ) (specifically: joints that require replacement). A total of 30 patients scheduled for arthroplasty (diseased) (15 HIP, 15 TMJ) and 120 age-matched controls (healthy/non-diseased) were included. Blood samples were collected from all patients ≥8 weeks after the last arthroplasty. Concentrations of serum analytes were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and these were compared between the Diseased and Healthy groups, utilizing the Mann-Whitney U-test. Patients with disease had significantly higher levels of BMP-2 and BMP-4 and lower levels of AHSG in serum compared to non-diseased humans (p < 0.01). Higher levels of BMP-2, 4 and reduced levels of AHSG appear to characterize patients who have DJD that is severe enough to require total joint replacement. Perhaps measurements of these proteins can be used to make objective decisions regarding the need for total arthroplasty as opposed to the current subjective approaches.

  3. Preservation of condyle and disc in the surgical treatment of type III temporomandibular joint ankylosis: a long-term follow-up clinical study of 111 joints.

    PubMed

    Jakhar, S K; Agarwal, M; Gupta, D K; Tiwari, A D

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the role of retaining the condyle and disc in the treatment of type III ankylosis, by clinical and computed tomography (CT) evaluation. A total of 90 patients with type III ankylosis met the inclusion criteria; 42 patients had left temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis, 27 patients had right TMJ ankylosis, and 21 had bilateral TMJ ankylosis, thus a total 111 joints were treated. Considerable improvements in mandibular movement and maximum mouth opening were noted in all patients. At the end of a minimum follow-up of 2 years, the mean inter-incisal mouth opening was 30.7 mm. Postoperative occlusion was normal in all patients, and open bite did not occur in any case because the ramus height was maintained through preservation of the pseudo-joint. Only three patients had recurrence of ankylosis, which was due to a lack of postoperative physiotherapy. The advantages of condyle and disc preservation in type III ankylosis are: (1) surgery is relatively safe; (2) the disc helps to prevent recurrence of ankylosis; (3) the existing ramus height is maintained; (4) the growth site is preserved; and (5) there is no need to reconstruct the joint with autogenous or alloplastic material. It is recommended that the disc and condyle are preserved in type III TMJ ankylosis.

  4. A longitudinal study on the osteoarthritic change of the temporomandibular joint based on 1-year follow-up computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong-Yun; Kim, Dae-Jung; Lee, Sang-Goo; Chung, Jin-Woo

    2012-12-01

    This study aims to report the results of a 1-year computed tomographic (CT) follow up of 54 temporomandibular joints (TMJs) affected by osteoarthritis (OA) and to provide longitudinal information on changes in OA and its relationship with clinical signs and symptoms. TMJ OA was diagnosed by history, clinical and CT examinations. The second CT examination was done after about 1 year of conservative treatment. Joints were divided into three groups labeled as no change, improved CT, and worsened CT groups depending on the longitudinal bony change of OA observed in the CT. The sex distribution, mean age, joint noise, subjective pain, joint tenderness, masticatory muscle tenderness, and improvement of subjective symptoms were not different between the groups at the first and second examination, while maximum (p < 0.01) and painless mouth opening range (p < 0.001) at the first examination were both smaller in the worsened CT group. Although the clinical signs and symptoms of OA were improved in 40 joints, 74.1%, at 7.2 ± 4.6 months, the amount if improvement did not differ between the groups. The extent of the destructive change of the condyle was highest in the improved CT group at the first (p < 0.001) and in the worsened CT group at the second examination (p < 0.001). These results imply that the prognosis of OA changes may be independent of the clinical signs and symptoms. More specific longitudinal information as regards OA changes of the TMJ based on a larger sample and a longer follow-up period would be likely to provide a better understanding of TMJ OA. PMID:22075324

  5. The Relaxation Response Resiliency Enhancement Program in the Management of Chronic Refractory Temporomandibular Joint Disorder: Results from a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Vranceanu, Ana-Maria; Shaefer, Jeffery R.; Saadi, Ashkan Fahandej; Slawsby, Ellen; Sarin, Jaya; Scult, Matthew; Benson, Herbert; Denninger, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This is an open-pilot study to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability and efficacy of a pain-specific version of an established mind–body medicine program, the Relaxation Response [RR] Resiliency Program [R3P], in patients with chronic temporomandibular disorder [TMD]. Methods Male and female with at least a six-month history of pain involving the masticatory muscles were sought in the Orofacial Pain Centers of the Massachusetts General Hospital [MGH] or through an advertisement sent to MGH employees from 2008 to 2010. Eligible participants underwent the R3P intervention [eight group sessions] after standard medical management. Pre- and post-group patients underwent objective measures of impairment [vertical and lateral range of motion with and without pain, temporomandibular joint and muscle pain palpation, and algometer measures] and completed psychosocial measures [Symptom Severity Index, Perceived Stress Scale, the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised and Short Form 36 Health Survey]. Results Twenty-four subjects [16 females, 90% from MGH Orofacial Pain Centers,10% from among MGH employees], mean age 38 years, met eligibility criteria and participated in the study. The intervention was highly feasible and accepted by patients, as evidenced by a 92% rate of completion. Paired t-test analyses revealed improvement on self-reported pain measures: pain intensity [p<0.02], pain frequency [p<0.002], pain duration [p<0.027], pain tolerability [p<0.009] and on several objective tests. Conclusions The pain specific R3P is efficacious in reducing objective and subjective symptoms in patients with chronic refractory TMD. The comprehensive intervention, which combines educational information about pain with RR, cognitive behavioral and resiliency-enhancement skills, is accepted by patients and may be more efficacious than other treatments with fewer elements. PMID:26568669

  6. Progression of Cartilage Degradation, Bone Resorption and Pain in Rat Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthritis Induced by Injection of Iodoacetate

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xue-Dong; Kou, Xiao-Xing; He, Dan-Qing; Zeng, Min-Min; Meng, Zhen; Bi, Rui-Yun; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Jie-Ni; Gan, Ye-Hua; Zhou, Yan-Heng

    2012-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis (OA) is an important subtype of temporomandibular disorders. A simple and reproducible animal model that mimics the histopathologic changes, both in the cartilage and subchondral bone, and clinical symptoms of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJOA) would help in our understanding of its process and underlying mechanism. Objective To explore whether injection of monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) into the upper compartment of rat TMJ could induce OA-like lesions. Methods Female rats were injected with varied doses of MIA into the upper compartment and observed for up to 12 weeks. Histologic, radiographic, behavioral, and molecular changes in the TMJ were evaluated by light and electron microscopy, MicroCT scanning, head withdrawal threshold test, real-time PCR, immunohistochemistry, and TUNEL assay. Results The intermediate zone of the disc loosened by 1 day post-MIA injection and thinned thereafter. Injection of an MIA dose of 0.5 mg or higher induced typical OA-like lesions in the TMJ within 4 weeks. Condylar destruction presented in a time-dependent manner, including chondrocyte apoptosis in the early stages, subsequent cartilage matrix disorganization and subchondral bone erosion, fibrosis, subchondral bone sclerosis, and osteophyte formation in the late stages. Nociceptive responses increased in the early stages, corresponding to severe synovitis. Furthermore, chondrocyte apoptosis and an imbalance between anabolism and catabolism of cartilage and subchondral bone might account for the condylar destruction. Conclusions Multi-level data demonstrated a reliable and convenient rat model of TMJOA could be induced by MIA injection into the upper compartment. The model might facilitate TMJOA related researches. PMID:22984604

  7. Three-Dimensional Measurement and Cluster Analysis for Determining the Size Ranges of Chinese Temporomandibular Joint Replacement Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu-Zhu; Meng, Shuai-Shuai; He, Dong-Mei; Fu, Yu-Zhuo; Liu, Ting; Wang, Fei-Yu; Dong, Min-Jun; Chang, Yu-Si

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to investigate the osseous characteristics of Chinese temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and detect the size clusters for total joint prostheses design. Computer tomography (CT) data from 448 Chinese adults (226 male and 222 female, aged from 20 to 83 years, mean age 39.3 years) with 896 normal TMJs were chosen from the Department of Radiology in the Shanghai 9th People's Hospital. Proplan CMF 1.4 software was used to reconstruct the skulls. Three-dimensional (3D) measurements of the TMJ fossa and condyle-ramus units with 13 parameters were performed. Size clusters for prostheses design were determined by hierarchical cluster analyses, nonhierarchical (K-means) cluster analysis, and discriminant analysis. The glenoid fossa was grouped into 3 clusters, and the condyle-ramus units were grouped into 4 clusters. Discriminant analyses were capable of correctly classifying 97.24% of the glenoid fossa and 94.98% of the condyle-ramus units. The means and standard deviations for the parameter values in each cluster were determined. Fossa depth and angles between the condyle and ramus were important parameters for Chinese TMJ prostheses design. 3D measurements and cluster analysis of the osseous morphology of the TMJ provided an anatomical reference and identified the dimensions of the minimum numbers of prosthesis sizes required for Chinese TMJ replacement. PMID:26937929

  8. β2-adrenergic signal transduction plays a detrimental role in subchondral bone loss of temporomandibular joint in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Kai; Niu, Li-Na; Li, Qi-hong; Ren, Gao-tong; Zhao, Chang-ming; Liu, Yun-dong; Tay, Franklin R.; Wang, Mei-qing

    2015-01-01

    The present study tested whether activation of the sympathetic tone by aberrant joint loading elicits abnormal subchondral bone remodeling in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis. Abnormal dental occlusion was created in experimental rats, which were then intraperitoneally injected by saline, propranolol or isoproterenol. The norepinephrine contents, distribution of sympathetic nerve fibers, expression of β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) and remodeling parameters in the condylar subchondral bone were investigated. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from condylar subchondral bones were harvested for comparison of their β-ARs, pro-osteoclastic gene expressions and pro-osteoclastic function. Increases in norepinephrine level, sympathetic nerve fiber distribution and β2-AR expression were observed in the condylar subchondral bone of experimental rats, together with subchondral bone loss and increased osteoclast activity. β-antagonist (propranolol) suppressed subchondral bone loss and osteoclast hyperfunction while β-agonist (isoproterenol) exacerbated those responses. MSCs from experimental condylar subchondral bone expressed higher levels of β2-AR and RANKL; norepinephrine stimulation further increased their RANKL expression and pro-osteoclastic function. These effects were blocked by inhibition of β2-AR or the PKA pathway. RANKL expression by MSCs decreased after propranolol administration and increased after isoproterenol administration. It is concluded that β2-AR signal-mediated subchondral bone loss in TMJ osteoarthritisis associated with increased RANKL secretion by MSCs. PMID:26219508

  9. β2-Adrenergic signal transduction plays a detrimental role in subchondral bone loss of temporomandibular joint in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Kai; Niu, Li-Na; Li, Qi-hong; Ren, Gao-tong; Zhao, Chang-ming; Liu, Yun-dong; Tay, Franklin R; Wang, Mei-qing

    2015-07-29

    The present study tested whether activation of the sympathetic tone by aberrant joint loading elicits abnormal subchondral bone remodeling in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis. Abnormal dental occlusion was created in experimental rats, which were then intraperitoneally injected by saline, propranolol or isoproterenol. The norepinephrine contents, distribution of sympathetic nerve fibers, expression of β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) and remodeling parameters in the condylar subchondral bone were investigated. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from condylar subchondral bones were harvested for comparison of their β-ARs, pro-osteoclastic gene expressions and pro-osteoclastic function. Increases in norepinephrine level, sympathetic nerve fiber distribution and β2-AR expression were observed in the condylar subchondral bone of experimental rats, together with subchondral bone loss and increased osteoclast activity. β-antagonist (propranolol) suppressed subchondral bone loss and osteoclast hyperfunction while β-agonist (isoproterenol) exacerbated those responses. MSCs from experimental condylar subchondral bone expressed higher levels of β2-AR and RANKL; norepinephrine stimulation further increased their RANKL expression and pro-osteoclastic function. These effects were blocked by inhibition of β2-AR or the PKA pathway. RANKL expression by MSCs decreased after propranolol administration and increased after isoproterenol administration. It is concluded that β2-AR signal-mediated subchondral bone loss in TMJ osteoarthritisis associated with increased RANKL secretion by MSCs.

  10. Is dextrose prolotherapy superior to placebo for the treatment of temporomandibular joint hypermobility? A randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cömert Kiliç, S; Güngörmüş, M

    2016-07-01

    A randomized clinical trial involving adult patients with bilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) hypermobility referred for treatment was implemented. The sample comprised 30 consecutive patients, who were divided randomly into two groups. The TMJ hypermobility was treated with either saline (placebo group) or dextrose injections (study group). The solution was injected into five different TMJ areas in three sessions at monthly intervals. The predictor variable was the treatment technique. The outcome variables were visual analogue scale (VAS) evaluations and maximum inter-incisal opening (MIO). Outcome variables were recorded preoperatively and at 12 months postoperatively. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were computed, and significance was set at a P-value of <0.05. The follow-up sample comprised 26 subjects: 12 in the placebo group and 14 in the study group. Masticatory efficiency increased and general pain complaints and joint sounds decreased significantly in both groups. MIO decreased significantly only in the study group. Insignificant changes in the other parameters were found for both groups. After estimating differences between follow-up and baseline outcomes, the mean change in primary outcome variables showed no statistically significant difference between the two groups. These findings suggest that dextrose prolotherapy is no more effective than placebo treatment for any of the outcome variables of TMJ hypermobility assessed. PMID:26846795

  11. [Maxillo-facial surgery in skeletal Class II: repercussions on the temporo-mandibular joints].

    PubMed

    Manière-Ezvan, Armelle; Savoldelli, Charles; Busson, Floriant; Oueiss, Arlette; Orthlieb, Jean-Daniel

    2016-03-01

    These interventions usually aimed at the correction of the skeletal discrepancy by mandibular retrognatism with an advancement of the distal portion of the mandible after mandibular osteotomy. The position of the condyle is determined during the osteosynthesis with miniplates. Condyles are set back in relation with the supine position of the patient and the weakness of his (her) curarized muscle. All studies show that surgery of mandibular advancement causes a lateral, torque and backward movement of the condyles, all harmful to the condyles. Factors that predispose to condylar resorption are "the patient": a woman, young (between 15 and 40), high mandibular angle, with a history of temporo-mandibular disorders and surgical overload applied to the condyles. What are the possible solutions to avoid failures? Patient preparation before surgery and surgery simulation with an articulator, condylar position control during surgery, working with surgeons to achieve a condylar portion stabilization system (with the CAD), quickly set up a mobilization of the mandible by physiotherapy.

  12. Numerical simulation of a relaxation test designed to fit a quasi-linear viscoelastic model for temporomandibular joint discs.

    PubMed

    Commisso, Maria S; Martínez-Reina, Javier; Mayo, Juana; Domínguez, Jaime

    2013-02-01

    The main objectives of this work are: (a) to introduce an algorithm for adjusting the quasi-linear viscoelastic model to fit a material using a stress relaxation test and (b) to validate a protocol for performing such tests in temporomandibular joint discs. This algorithm is intended for fitting the Prony series coefficients and the hyperelastic constants of the quasi-linear viscoelastic model by considering that the relaxation test is performed with an initial ramp loading at a certain rate. This algorithm was validated before being applied to achieve the second objective. Generally, the complete three-dimensional formulation of the quasi-linear viscoelastic model is very complex. Therefore, it is necessary to design an experimental test to ensure a simple stress state, such as uniaxial compression to facilitate obtaining the viscoelastic properties. This work provides some recommendations about the experimental setup, which are important to follow, as an inadequate setup could produce a stress state far from uniaxial, thus, distorting the material constants determined from the experiment. The test considered is a stress relaxation test using unconfined compression performed in cylindrical specimens extracted from temporomandibular joint discs. To validate the experimental protocol, the test was numerically simulated using finite-element modelling. The disc was arbitrarily assigned a set of quasi-linear viscoelastic constants (c1) in the finite-element model. Another set of constants (c2) was obtained by fitting the results of the simulated test with the proposed algorithm. The deviation of constants c2 from constants c1 measures how far the stresses are from the uniaxial state. The effects of the following features of the experimental setup on this deviation have been analysed: (a) the friction coefficient between the compression plates and the specimen (which should be as low as possible); (b) the portion of the specimen glued to the compression plates (smaller

  13. On the analysis of condylar path versus real motion of the temporomandibular joint: application for Sicat Function.

    PubMed

    Kordaß, Bernd; Ruge, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function using condylar path tracings is a challenge in functionally oriented dentistry. In most cases, reference points on the skin surface over the TMJ region are defined as "arbitrary", "individual" or "kinematic" condylar hinge axis points, which are displayed as "condylar paths" in motion. To what extent these reference points represent the actual condylar paths in each individual patient is ultimately unclear because the geometric relationship of the actual condyle to the selected reference point is usually unknown. Depending on the location of the point on the condyle and the centers of rotation of mandibular movement, these trajectories can vary greatly during combined rotational and sliding movements (eg, opening and closing movements of the mandible); this represents a grid of points located in the vicinity of the TMJ. To record the actual condylar path as the movement trajectory of a given point (eg, the condylar center), technological solutions are needed with which to link the tracing technology with the appropriate imaging technology capable of scanning the condyle, including the points of interest, and displaying them in real dynamic motion. Sicat Function (Sicat, D-Bonn) is such a solution. Sicat Function links cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans (made using the Galileos CBCT scanner; Sirona, Bensheim, Germany) with ultrasound-based, three-dimensional (3D) functional jaw movement recordings of the mandible (made using the JMT+ Jaw Motion Tracker; Sicat, Bonn, Germany). Digital images of the dental arches acquired with the intraoral scanner Cerec system (Sirona) can also be superimposed. This results in the generation of a 3D model of the bony mandible, including the TMJ, which reproduces the 3D real dynamic movement of the condyles simultaneously with that of the condylar paths at defined points (with the condylar centers being a particular point of interest). Sicat Function is an integrated, digital

  14. Observing the development of the temporomandibular joint in embryonic and post-natal mice using various staining methods

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, WENNA; LI, XIHAI; GAO, BIZHEN; GAN, HUIJUAN; LIN, XUEJUAN; LIAO, LINGHONG; LI, CANDONG

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a specialized synovial joint that is essential for the movement and function of the mammalian jaw. The TMJ develops from two mesenchymal condensations, and is composed of the glenoid fossa that originates from the otic capsule by intramembranous ossification, the mandibular condyle of the temporal bone and a fibrocartilagenous articular disc derived from a secondary cartilaginous joint by endochondral ossification. However, the development of the TMJ remains unclear. In the present study, the formation and development of the mouse TMJ was investigated between embryonic day 13.5 and post-natal day 180 in order to elucidate the morphological and molecular alterations that occur during this period. TMJ formation appeared to proceed in three stages: Initiation or blastema stage; growth and cavitation stage; and the maturation or completion stage. In order to investigate the activity of certain transcription factors on TMJ formation and development, the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM), sex determining region Y-box 9, runt-related transcription factor 2, Indian hedgehog homolog, Osterix, collagen I, collagen II, aggrecan, total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), MMP-9 and MMP-13 were detected in the TMJ using in situ and/or immunohistochemistry. The results indicate that the transcription factors, ECM and MMP serve critical functions in the formation and development of the mouse TMJ. In summary, the development of the mouse TMJ was investigated, and the molecular regulation of mouse TMJ formation was partially characterized. The results of the present study may aid the systematic understanding of the physiological processes underlying TMJ formation and development in mice. PMID:26893634

  15. Differences Regarding Branded HA in Italy, Part 2: Data from Clinical Studies on Knee, Hip, Shoulder, Ankle, Temporomandibular Joint, Vertebral Facets, and Carpometacarpal Joint

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, A.; Bizzi, E.; De Lucia, O.; Delle Sedie, A.; Tropea, S.; Bentivegna, M.; Mahmoud, A.; Foti, C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of the current study is to collect scientific data on all branded hyaluronic acid (HA) products in Italy that are in use for intra-articular (IA) injection in osteoarthritis (OA) compared with that reported in the leaflet. METHODS An extensive literature research was performed for all articles reporting data on the IA use of HA in OA. Selected studies were taken into consideration only if they are related to products based on HAs that are currently marketed in Italy with the specific joint indication for IA use in patients affected by OA. RESULTS Sixty-two HA products are marketed in Italy: 30 products are indicated for the knee but only 8 were proved with some efficacy; 9 products were effective for the hip but only 6 had hip indication; 7 products proved to be effective for the shoulder but only 3 had the indication; 5 products proved effective for the ankle but only one had the indication; 6 products were effective for the temporomandibular joint but only 2 had the indication; only 2 proved effective for vertebral facet joints but only 1 had the indication; and 5 products proved effective for the carpometacarpal joint but only 2 had the indication. CONCLUSIONS There are only a few products with some evidences, while the majority of products remain without proof. Clinicians and regulators should request postmarketing studies from pharmaceuticals to corroborate with that reported in the leaflet and to gather more data, allowing the clinicians to choose the adequate product for the patient. PMID:27279754

  16. Phenotypic alterations of neuropeptide Y and calcitonin gene-related peptide-containing neurons innervating the rat temporomandibular joint during carrageenan-induced arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Damico, J.P.; Ervolino, E.; Torres, K.R.; Batagello, D.S.; Cruz-Rizzolo, R.J.; Casatti, C.A.; Bauer, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify immunoreactive neuropeptide Y (NPY) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) neurons in the autonomic and sensory ganglia, specifically neurons that innervate the rat temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A possible variation between the percentages of these neurons in acute and chronic phases of carrageenan-induced arthritis was examined. Retrograde neuronal tracing was combined with indirect immunofluorescence to identify NPY-immunoreactive (NPY-IR) and CGRP- immunoreactive (CGRP-IR) neurons that send nerve fibers to the normal and arthritic temporomandibular joint. In normal joints, NPY-IR neurons constitute 78±3%, 77±6% and 10±4% of double-labeled nucleated neuronal profile originated from the superior cervical, stellate and otic ganglia, respectively. These percentages in the sympathetic ganglia were significantly decreased in acute (58±2% for superior cervical ganglion and 58±8% for stellate ganglion) and chronic (60±2% for superior cervical ganglion and 59±15% for stellate ganglion) phases of arthritis, while in the otic ganglion these percentages were significantly increased to 19±5% and 13±3%, respectively. In the trigeminal ganglion, CGRP-IR neurons innervating the joint significantly increased from 31±3% in normal animals to 54±2% and 49±3% in the acute and chronic phases of arthritis, respectively. It can be concluded that NPY neurons that send nerve fibers to the rat temporomandibular joint are located mainly in the superior cervical, stellate and otic ganglia. Acute and chronic phases of carrageenan-induced arthritis lead to an increase in the percentage of NPY-IR parasympathetic and CGRP-IR sensory neurons and to a decrease in the percentage of NPY-IR sympathetic neurons related to TMJ innervation. PMID:23027347

  17. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: bacterial diversity in temporomandibular joint synovial fluid in comparison with immunological and clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Olsen-Bergem, H; Kristoffersen, A K; Bjørnland, T; Reseland, J E; Aas, J A

    2016-03-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) occurs in up to 80% of affected children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of bacterial DNA in synovial fluid, and to compare this with clinical and immunological findings in children with JIA, adults with persistent JIA, and adults with rheumatoid arthritis, in order to detect whether bacteria contribute to inflammation in TMJ arthritis. Synovial fluid and skin swab samples were collected from 30 patients (54 TMJs). Bacterial detection was performed using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. Bacterial DNA was detected in 31 TMJs (57%) in 19 patients (63%). A positive statistically significant correlation was registered between bacterial DNA detected in TMJ synovial fluid and the following factors: total protein concentration in synovial fluid, interleukin 1β, tumour necrosis factor alpha, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and adiponectin, as well as the duration of the general medical disease. Fourteen different bacterial species were detected in synovial fluid. Bacterial DNA in TMJ synovial fluid without contamination was detected in more than 50% of the patients. Studies are needed to evaluate the consequences of this bacterial DNA in synovial fluid with regard to TMJ arthritis. PMID:26554824

  18. Augmented Indian hedgehog signaling in cranial neural crest cells leads to craniofacial abnormalities and dysplastic temporomandibular joint in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ling; Gu, Shuping; Ye, Wenduo; Song, Yingnan; Chen, YiPing

    2016-01-01

    Extensive studies have pinpointed the crucial role of Indian hedgehog (Ihh) signaling in the development of the appendicular skeleton and the essential function of Ihh in the formation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this study, we have investigated the effect of augmented Ihh signaling in TMJ development. We took a transgenic gain-of-function approach by overexpressing Ihh in the cranial neural crest (CNC) cells using a conditional Ihh transgenic allele and the Wnt1-Cre allele. We found that Wnt1-Cre-mediated tissue-specific overexpression of Ihh in the CNC lineage caused severe craniofacial abnormalities, including cleft lip/palate, encephalocele, anophthalmos, micrognathia, and defective TMJ development. In the mutant TMJ, the glenoid fossa was completely absent, whereas the condyle and the articular disc appeared relatively normal with slightly delayed chondrocyte differentiation. Our findings thus demonstrate that augmented Ihh signaling is detrimental to craniofacial development, and that finely tuned Ihh signaling is critical for TMJ formation. Our results also provide additional evidence that the development of the condyle and articular disc is independent of the glenoid fossa. PMID:26553654

  19. Evaluation of the effective dose of cone beam CT and multislice CT for temporomandibular joint examinations at optimized exposure levels

    PubMed Central

    Kadesjö, N; Benchimol, D; Falahat, B; Näsström, K

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the effective dose to patients from temporomandibular joint examinations using a dental CBCT device and a multislice CT (MSCT) device, both before and after dose optimization. Methods: A Promax® 3D (Planmeca, Helsinki, Finland) dental CBCT and a LightSpeed VCT® (GE Healthcare, Little Chalfont, UK) multislice CT were used. Organ doses and effective doses were estimated from thermoluminescent dosemeters at 61 positions inside an anthropomorphic phantom at the exposure settings in clinical use. Optimized exposure protocols were obtained through an optimization study using a dry skull phantom, where four observers rated image quality taken at different exposure levels. The optimal exposure level was obtained when all included criteria were rated as acceptable or better by all observers. Results: The effective dose from a bilateral examination was 184 µSv for Promax 3D and 113 µSv for LightSpeed VCT before optimization. Post optimization, the bilateral effective dose was 92 µSv for Promax 3D and 124 µSv for LightSpeed VCT. Conclusions: At optimized exposure levels, the effective dose from CBCT was comparable to MSCT. PMID:26119344

  20. Management of open bite that developed during treatment for internal derangement and osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Won; Nakaoka, Kazutoshi; Hamada, Yoshiki; Nakamura, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    This case report describes the orthodontic treatment performed for open bite caused by internal derangement (ID) and osteoarthritis (OA) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A Japanese woman, aged 31 years and 11 months, referred to our department by an oral surgeon had an open bite with clockwise rotation of the mandible and degeneration of the condyle. The overbite was corrected through intrusion of the maxillary and mandibular molars using mini-screw implants to induce counterclockwise rotation of the mandible. Then, the mandibular second premolars were extracted and comprehensive orthodontic treatment was performed to establish a Class I molar relationship with distalization of the maxillary arch and to eliminate anterior crowding. Following treatment, her facial profile improved and a functional and stable occlusion was achieved without recurrence of the TMJ symptoms. These results suggest that orthodontic intrusion of the molars is one of the safer and less stressful alternatives for the management of open bite due to degeneration of the condyles caused by ID and OA of TMJ. PMID:26023542

  1. Evaluation of validity and reliability of a methodology for measuring human postural attitude and its relation to temporomandibular joint disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Ramón Fuentes; Carter, Pablo; Muñoz, Sergio; Silva, Héctor; Venegas, Gonzalo Hernán Oporto; Cantin, Mario; Ottone, Nicolás Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJDs) are caused by several factors such as anatomical, neuromuscular and psychological alterations. A relationship has been established between TMJDs and postural alterations, a type of anatomical alteration. An anterior position of the head requires hyperactivity of the posterior neck region and shoulder muscles to prevent the head from falling forward. This compensatory muscular function may cause fatigue, discomfort and trigger point activation. To our knowledge, a method for assessing human postural attitude in more than one plane has not been reported. Thus, the aim of this study was to design a methodology to measure the external human postural attitude in frontal and sagittal planes, with proper validity and reliability analyses. METHODS The variable postures of 78 subjects (36 men, 42 women; age 18–24 years) were evaluated. The postural attitudes of the subjects were measured in the frontal and sagittal planes, using an acromiopelvimeter, grid panel and Fox plane. RESULTS The method we designed for measuring postural attitudes had adequate reliability and validity, both qualitatively and quantitatively, based on Cohen’s Kappa coefficient (> 0.87) and Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r = 0.824, > 80%). CONCLUSION This method exhibits adequate metrical properties and can therefore be used in further research on the association of human body posture with skeletal types and TMJDs. PMID:26768173

  2. Temporomandibular joint effusion and its relationship with perceived disability assessed using musculoskeletal ultrasound and a patient-reported disability index

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Lance; Bright, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between effusion of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and patient-reported disability is poorly researched. This pilot study explored the link between TMJ inflammation as measured by ultrasound and patient disability assessed by the Steigerwald Maher TMD Disability Index (SMTDI). The study design used a prospective correlational approach involving a sample with TMJ dysfunction (TMD). Twenty-four patients were recruited from the European School of Osteopathy and a Kent dental practice. Participants completed the SMTDI to determine the level of TMD (symptomatic score >20). A SonoSite SLA “Hockey Stick” [13-6 MHz] musculo-skeletal transducer was placed over the TMJ in a transverse direction and effusion was calculated indirectly by measuring capsular width. An upper left quadrant protocol was used throughout. A regression analysis was run with participants’ gender, age and capsular width as predictor variables modelled against reported SMTDI. Larger capsular widths were found to be significant predictors of SMTDI scores (r = 0.803, p < 0.0001). The patient profile matched with the previous studies and the TMD sufferer population, indicating external validity. Results suggest that the SMTDI could be integrated into practice life as a quick, accessible and easy tool to monitor patients’ progress and assess levels of inflammation, without the need for repetitive imaging. The study design proved reproducible and a larger scale study is indicated. PMID:27433242

  3. Platelet-derived growth factor enhances proliferation and matrix synthesis of temporomandibular joint disc-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Hanaoka, Koichi; Tanaka, Eiji; Takata, Takashi; Miyauchi, Mutsumi; Aoyama, Junko; Kawai, Nobuhiko; Dalla-Bona, Diego A; Yamano, Eizo; Tanne, Kazuo

    2006-05-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is an essential signaling molecule for wound healing and tissue repair. This study was aimed at evaluating the effect of PDGF on the proliferation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc-derived cells and extracellular matrix synthesis. The number of cultured cells were counted by COULTER Z1. The assay for collagen synthesis was performed using a sircol soluble collagen assay. Hyaluronic acid (HA) synthesis was analyzed by a high performance liquid chromatography. The expression of collagens, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) were examined using SYBR Green in terms of the RNA levels. PDGF treatment significantly (P < .01) increased the proliferation rate of the disc-derived cells as compared with the controls when the dose was 5 ng/ mL or greater. Treatment with more than 5 ng/mL PDGF resulted in an amount of collagen synthesis significantly (P < .01) higher than the controls. HA synthesis was maximal with 5 ng/mL PDGF treatment. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that treatment with 5 ng/mL of PDGF-BB upregulated the mitochondrial RNA levels of type I and II collagens, MMPs, and TIMPs within 6 hours. It is concluded that PDGF, if its concentration is optimal, enhanced proliferation and matrix synthesis of TMJ disc-derived cells, indicating that PDGF may be effective for use in tissue engineering of the TMJ disc. PMID:16637732

  4. Multidisciplinary approach in the management of absolute trismus with bilateral temporomandibular joint replacements for a patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fanaras, Nikolaos; Parry, Nicholas S; Matthews, N Shaun

    2014-11-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is an exclusion diagnosis that gathers together all forms of arthritis that begin before the age of 16 years, persist for more than 6 weeks and are of unknown origin. We present the case of a 42 year old woman with a 20 year history of absolute trismus, secondary to bilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis caused by JIA. The trismus resulted in grossly compromised oral hygiene and limited the patient to a semi-solid diet. JIA also affected her neck leading to a severe cervico-thoracic kyphosis. The patient who had been wheelchair bound developed severe lymphoedema of both lower limbs, complicating the pre-operative work up further. This particularly challenging case required input from specialists in anaesthetics, neurosurgery, special care dentistry, intensive care and maxillofacial surgery. Treatment consisted of ankylosis release, dental clearance and bilateral alloplastic replacement of her TMJs with custom implants. A full range of hinge movement and good functional outcome was achieved. This case presents the multidisciplinary approach to a severely compromised patient and illustrates the pre-, intra- and postoperative management of bilateral TMJ ankylosis with bespoke implants. PMID:25085804

  5. Activation of α2A-adrenergic signal transduction in chondrocytes promotes degenerative remodelling of temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Kai; Zeng, Guang; Niu, Li-Na; Yang, Hong-xu; Ren, Gao-tong; Xu, Xin-yue; Li, Fei-fei; Tay, Franklin R.; Wang, Mei-qing

    2016-01-01

    This study tested whether activation of adrenoreceptors in chondrocytes has roles in degenerative remodelling of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and to determine associated mechanisms. Unilateral anterior crossbite (UAC) was established to induce TMJ degeneration in rats. Saline vehicle, α2- and β-adrenoreceptor antagonists or agonists were injected locally into the TMJ area of UAC rats. Cartilage degeneration, subchondral bone microarchitecture and the expression of adrenoreceptors, aggrecans, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and RANKL by chondrocytes were evaluated. Chondrocytes were stimulated by norepinephrine to investigate signal transduction of adrenoreceptors. Increased α2A-adrenoreceptor expression was observed in condylar cartilage of UAC rats, together with cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone loss. Norepinephrine depresses aggrecans expression but stimulates MMP-3, MMP-13 and RANKL production by chondrocytes through ERK1/2 and PKA pathway; these effects were abolished by an α2A-adrenoreceptor antagonist. Furthermore, inhibition of α2A-adrenoreceptor attenuated degenerative remodelling in the condylar cartilage and subchondral bone, as revealed by increased cartilage thickness, proteoglycans and aggrecan expression, and decreased MMP-3, MMP-13 and RANKL expressions in cartilage, increased BMD, BV/TV, and decreased Tb.Sp in subchondral bone. Conversely, activation of α2A-adrenoreceptor intensified aforementioned degenerative changes in UAC rats. It is concluded that activation of α2A-adrenergic signal in chondrocytes promotes TMJ degenerative remodelling by chondrocyte-mediated pro-catabolic activities. PMID:27452863

  6. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis caused by condylar fractures: a retrospective analysis of cases at an urban teaching hospital in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Anyanechi, C E

    2015-08-01

    Mandibular condylar fractures are common presentations to hospitals across the globe and remain the most important cause of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis. This study aimed to analyze cases of mandibular condylar fracture complicated by TMJ ankylosis after treatment. A 16-year retrospective analysis was performed at the dental and maxillofacial surgery clinic of the study institution; patient data were collected from the hospital records and entered into a pro-forma questionnaire. It was found that 56/3596 (1.6%) fractures resulted in TMJ ankylosis. The age of patients with ankylosis ranged from 12 to 47 years. The age (P=0.03) and gender (P=0.01) distributions were significant, with most cases of ankylosis occurring in those aged 11-30 years (n=43/56, 76.8%). Fractures complicated by ankylosis were intracapsular (n=22/56, 39.3%) and extracapsular (n=34/56, 60.7%). Ankylosis increased significantly with the increase in time lag between injury and fracture treatment (P=0.001). Ankylosis was associated with concomitant mandibular (85.7%) and middle third (66.1%) fractures. Treatment methods were not significantly related to ankylosis (P=0.32). All cases of ankylosis were unilateral, and complete (n=36, 64.3%) and incomplete ankylosis (n=20, 35.7%) were diagnosed clinically. The incorporation of computed tomography scans and rigid internal fixation in the management of condylar fractures will reduce ankylosis.

  7. Radiation-induced temporo-mandibular joint disorder in post-radiotherapy nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients: assessment and treatment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Vincent W C; Lam, Ying-Na

    2016-06-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is endemic in southern China, and its incidence in Hong Kong is relatively high. Radiotherapy is the mainstay treatment for NPC due to its relatively high radiosensitivity and deep-seated anatomical position, which is not readily accessible by surgery. Although the technique of radiotherapy in NPC has been advancing and offers promising treatment outcome, complications around the irradiation areas are inevitable and the quality of life of the post-radiotherapy patients is often compromised. Trismus, which is defined as the restricted mouth opening or jaw movement due to the disorder of temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ), is one of the possible late complications for radiotherapy of NPC and is found in 5-17% of the post-radiotherapy (post-RT) patients. Trismus at early stage may only affect the speech, but in severe cases nutritional intake and oral hygiene condition may deteriorate seriously. This article reviewed the possible causes of radiation-induced TMJ damage, the various assessments including imaging modalities and possible treatments. The conclusion is that the availability of simple, yet effective examinations for trismus is essential for delaying the progression and restoring TMJ functions. Although there is no absolutely effective treatment for trismus, many supportive, restorative and palliative management are possible under different clinical situations.

  8. Activation of α2A-adrenergic signal transduction in chondrocytes promotes degenerative remodelling of temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Kai; Zeng, Guang; Niu, Li-Na; Yang, Hong-Xu; Ren, Gao-Tong; Xu, Xin-Yue; Li, Fei-Fei; Tay, Franklin R; Wang, Mei-Qing

    2016-07-25

    This study tested whether activation of adrenoreceptors in chondrocytes has roles in degenerative remodelling of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and to determine associated mechanisms. Unilateral anterior crossbite (UAC) was established to induce TMJ degeneration in rats. Saline vehicle, α2- and β-adrenoreceptor antagonists or agonists were injected locally into the TMJ area of UAC rats. Cartilage degeneration, subchondral bone microarchitecture and the expression of adrenoreceptors, aggrecans, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and RANKL by chondrocytes were evaluated. Chondrocytes were stimulated by norepinephrine to investigate signal transduction of adrenoreceptors. Increased α2A-adrenoreceptor expression was observed in condylar cartilage of UAC rats, together with cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone loss. Norepinephrine depresses aggrecans expression but stimulates MMP-3, MMP-13 and RANKL production by chondrocytes through ERK1/2 and PKA pathway; these effects were abolished by an α2A-adrenoreceptor antagonist. Furthermore, inhibition of α2A-adrenoreceptor attenuated degenerative remodelling in the condylar cartilage and subchondral bone, as revealed by increased cartilage thickness, proteoglycans and aggrecan expression, and decreased MMP-3, MMP-13 and RANKL expressions in cartilage, increased BMD, BV/TV, and decreased Tb.Sp in subchondral bone. Conversely, activation of α2A-adrenoreceptor intensified aforementioned degenerative changes in UAC rats. It is concluded that activation of α2A-adrenergic signal in chondrocytes promotes TMJ degenerative remodelling by chondrocyte-mediated pro-catabolic activities.

  9. Effect of Stomatognathic Alignment Exercise on Temporomandibular Joint Function and Swallowing Function of Stroke Patients with Limited Mouth Opening

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Duck-Won; Kang, Tae-Woo; Kim, Sun-Ju

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of stomatognathic alignment exercise on temporomandibular joint function and swallowing function of stroke patients presenting limited mouth opening. [Subjects] Fourteen subjects with post-stroke hemiparesis presenting limited mouth opening were randomly assigned to either the experimental group or the control group, with 7 subjects in each group. [Methods] Subjects in the experimental group participated in a stomatognathic alignment exercise program that consisted of mobility exercises of the TMJ and neck and postural correction. Main outcome measures were neck mobility, the active maximum range of mouth opening, the craniomandibular index (CMI), and the Mann assessment of swallowing ability (MASA) score. [Results] The changes in the values of the range of mouth opening, CMI, MASA, and all the parameters of neck mobility were significantly different between the groups. Furthermore, post-test values appeared to be significantly different for the range of mouth opening, the craniomandibular index, and the MASA scores between the groups (p>0.05). [Conclusion] Stomatognathic alignment exercise may improve TMJ function and swallowing function of patients with post-stroke hemiparesis. PMID:24259786

  10. Experimental investigations of the use of an erbium:YAG laser on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) structures: first experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuebler-Moritz, Michael; Niederdellmann, Herbert; Hering, Peter; Deuerling, Christian; Dammer, Ralf; Behr, M.

    1995-04-01

    The following paper introduces the results of an interdisciplinary research project. With the aid of photomacroscopic examination, light and scanning electron microscope investigations, changes to temporomandibular joint structures were detected in vitro after irradiation with an Erbium:YAG laser system. The solid-state Erbium:YAG laser, operating at a wavelength of 2.94 micrometers was used in the normal- spiking mode. The free-running laser beam was focussed onto freshly excised porcine tissue samples using a 108-mm sapphire lens. In this study the output was generally pulsed at a repetition rate of 4 Hz, with a pulse duration varying from 120 microsecond(s) to 500 microsecond(s) . Between 50 mJ and 500 mJ per pulse were applied to create pinpoint lesions. The optimum average energy density and pulse duration of the Erbium:YAG laser radiation for the purpose of TMJ-surgery (as far as it concerns meniscus and articulating facets) - which means efficient etch rate and minimal adjacent injury - seems to be about 24-42 J/cm2 and 120 microsecond(s) -240 microsecond(s) , respectively.

  11. Retrospective study of absorbable gelatin sponge soaked in triamicinolone acetonide as interpositioning material in temporomandibular joint ankylosis in 350 patients

    PubMed Central

    Pal, U.S.; Singh, Nimisha; Malkunje, Laxman R.; Singh, R.K.; Dhasmana, Satish; Yadav, Arvind Kumar; Chand, Sharad

    2012-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of absorbable gelatin sponge soaked in triamcinolone acetonide as an interposition material in the treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis. Materials and methods This retrospective study was conducted in 350 patients of TMJ ankylosis who visited our outpatient department between 2000 and 2010, and were treated by the same surgeon. Patients were randomly divided into two groups, where in group 1, absorbable gelatin sponge soaked with triamcinolone acetonide was interposed in the surgical gap created after arthroplasty and in group 2, temporalis fascia was interposed. Preoperative assessment included history and physical examination, along with cause of ankylosis, Postoperative observation were undertaken for maximum mouth opening (MMO), facial nerve paralysis and recurrence. Results At one year follow-up, in group 1 MMO ranged from 35 to 45 mm with no case of re-ankylosis while in the other group 25–43 mm, with re-ankylosis in 20 patients (13.69%). Conclusion The findings of this study showed successful management of TMJ ankylosis using absorbable gelatin sponge soaked in triamcinolone acetonide in cases which did not require condylar reconstruction. PMID:25737875

  12. Conditional Deletion of Fgfr3 in Chondrocytes leads to Osteoarthritis-like Defects in Temporomandibular Joint of Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Siru; Xie, Yangli; Li, Wei; Huang, Junlan; Wang, Zuqiang; Tang, Junzhou; Xu, Wei; Sun, Xianding; Tan, Qiaoyan; Huang, Shuo; Luo, Fengtao; Xu, Meng; Wang, Jun; Wu, Tingting; chen, Liang; Chen, Hangang; Su, Nan; Du, Xiaolan; Shen, Yue; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a common degenerative disease in adult, which is characterized by progressive destruction of the articular cartilage. To investigate the role of FGFR3 in the homeostasis of TMJ cartilage during adult stage, we generated Fgfr3f/f; Col2a1-CreERT2 (Fgfr3 cKO) mice, in which Fgfr3 was deleted in chondrocytes at 2 months of age. OA-like defects were observed in Fgfr3 cKO TMJ cartilage. Immunohistochemical staining and quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant increase in expressions of COL10, MMP13 and AMAMTS5. In addition, there was a sharp increase in chondrocyte apoptosis at the Fgfr3 cKO articular surface, which was accompanied by a down-regulation of lubricin expression. Importantly, the expressions of RUNX2 and Indian hedgehog (IHH) were up-regulated in Fgfr3 cKO TMJ. Primary Fgfr3 cKO chondrocytes were treated with IHH signaling inhibitor, which significantly reduced expressions of Runx2, Col10, Mmp13 and Adamts5. Furthermore, the IHH signaling inhibitor partially alleviated OA-like defects in the TMJ of Fgfr3 cKO mice, including restoration of lubricin expression and improvement of the integrity of the articular surface. In conclusion, our study proposes that FGFR3/IHH signaling pathway plays a critical role in maintaining the homeostasis of TMJ articular cartilage during adult stage. PMID:27041063

  13. Prevalence of clinical and radiographic signs of osteoarthrosis of the temporomandibular joint in an older persons community

    PubMed Central

    Schmitter, M; Essig, M; Seneadza, V; Balke, Z; Schröder, J; Rammelsberg, P

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to assess the prevalence of osteoarthrosis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in a sample of older people by use of contrast agent-enhanced MRI. Methods 30 patients (73–75 years old) were drawn from a representative sample and were examined clinically. The shape of the condyle was assessed using gadolinium-enhanced MR images, which were evaluated by two independent raters. Statistical assessment was performed by using descriptive statistics, the χ2 test and kappa statistics. Results Agreement between raters was excellent with respect to the presence/absence of OA (kappa = 0.8). Only one subject reported pain in a TMJ. Fine and/or coarse crepitus was not heard in any subject. MRI showed that 70% displayed signs of OA in at least one TMJ. There were no gender-related differences in the prevalence of OA (P > 0.05). Conclusion Gadolinium-enhanced MRI showed that OA of the TMJ is common in older people (70%), although the prevalence of clinical signs of OA is very low. PMID:20395464

  14. 1,25(OH)2D deficiency induces temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis via secretion of senescence-associated inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ming; Luo, Yuqian; Niu, Yuming; Chen, Lulu; Yuan, Xiaoqin; Goltzman, David; Chen, Ning; Miao, Dengshun

    2013-08-01

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)(2)D] insufficiency appears to be associated with several age-related diseases. Insufficient levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D has been shown to lead to the progression of osteoarthritis (OA) while underlying biological mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this study, we sought to determine whether 1,25(OH)(2)D deficiency has a direct effect on the process of murine temporomandibular joint (TMJ) OA in 25-hydroxyvitamin D 1α-hydroxylase knockout [1α(OH)ase(-/-)] mice that had been fed a rescue diet (high calcium, phosphate, and lactose) from weaning until 6 or 18 months of age. Our results showed that the bone mineral density and subchondral bone volume were reduced in mandibular condyles, articular surfaces were collapsed, the thickness of articular cartilage and cartilage matrix protein abundance were progressively decreased and eventually led to an erosion of articular cartilage of mandibular condyles. We also found that DNA damage, cellular senescence and the production of senescence-associated inflammatory cytokines were increased significantly in 1α(OH)ase(-/-) mice. This study demonstrates that 1,25(OH)(2)D deficiency causes an erosive TMJ OA phenotype by inducing DNA damage, cellular senescence and the production of senescence-associated inflammatory cytokines. Our results indicate that 1,25(OH)(2)D plays an important role in preventing the development and progression of OA. PMID:23624390

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging-verified temporomandibular joint disk displacement in relation to sagittal and vertical jaw deformities.

    PubMed

    Jung, W-S; Kim, H; Jeon, D-M; Mah, S-J; Ahn, S-J

    2013-09-01

    This retrospective study was designed to analyze the relationships between temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disk displacement and skeletal deformities in orthodontic patients. Subjects consisted of 460 adult patients. Before treatment, lateral cephalograms and TMJ magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were recorded. Subjects were divided into six groups based on TMJ MRI according to increasing severity of TMJ disk displacement, in the following order: bilateral normal TMJs, unilateral disk displacement with reduction (DDR) and contralateral normal, bilateral DDR, unilateral disk displacement without reduction (DDNR) and contralateral normal, unilateral DDR and contralateral DDNR, and bilateral DDNR. Subjects were subdivided sagittally into skeletal Class I, II, and III deformities based on the ANB (point A, nasion, point B) angle and subdivided vertically into hypodivergent, normodivergent, and hyperdivergent deformities based on the facial height ratio. Linear trends between severity of TMJ disk displacement and sagittal or vertical deformities were analyzed by Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test. The severity of TMJ disk displacement increased as the sagittal skeletal classification changed from skeletal Class III to skeletal Class II and the vertical skeletal classification changed from hypodivergent to hyperdivergent. There were no significant differences in the linear trend of TMJ disk displacement severity between the sexes according to the skeletal deformities. This study suggests that subjects with skeletal Class II and/or hyperdivergent deformities have a high possibility of severe TMJ disk displacement, regardless of sex.

  16. Activation of α2A-adrenergic signal transduction in chondrocytes promotes degenerative remodelling of temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Kai; Zeng, Guang; Niu, Li-Na; Yang, Hong-Xu; Ren, Gao-Tong; Xu, Xin-Yue; Li, Fei-Fei; Tay, Franklin R; Wang, Mei-Qing

    2016-01-01

    This study tested whether activation of adrenoreceptors in chondrocytes has roles in degenerative remodelling of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and to determine associated mechanisms. Unilateral anterior crossbite (UAC) was established to induce TMJ degeneration in rats. Saline vehicle, α2- and β-adrenoreceptor antagonists or agonists were injected locally into the TMJ area of UAC rats. Cartilage degeneration, subchondral bone microarchitecture and the expression of adrenoreceptors, aggrecans, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and RANKL by chondrocytes were evaluated. Chondrocytes were stimulated by norepinephrine to investigate signal transduction of adrenoreceptors. Increased α2A-adrenoreceptor expression was observed in condylar cartilage of UAC rats, together with cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone loss. Norepinephrine depresses aggrecans expression but stimulates MMP-3, MMP-13 and RANKL production by chondrocytes through ERK1/2 and PKA pathway; these effects were abolished by an α2A-adrenoreceptor antagonist. Furthermore, inhibition of α2A-adrenoreceptor attenuated degenerative remodelling in the condylar cartilage and subchondral bone, as revealed by increased cartilage thickness, proteoglycans and aggrecan expression, and decreased MMP-3, MMP-13 and RANKL expressions in cartilage, increased BMD, BV/TV, and decreased Tb.Sp in subchondral bone. Conversely, activation of α2A-adrenoreceptor intensified aforementioned degenerative changes in UAC rats. It is concluded that activation of α2A-adrenergic signal in chondrocytes promotes TMJ degenerative remodelling by chondrocyte-mediated pro-catabolic activities. PMID:27452863

  17. [Maxillo-facial surgery in skeletal Class II: repercussions on the temporo-mandibular joints].

    PubMed

    Manière-Ezvan, Armelle; Savoldelli, Charles; Busson, Floriant; Oueiss, Arlette; Orthlieb, Jean-Daniel

    2016-03-01

    These interventions usually aimed at the correction of the skeletal discrepancy by mandibular retrognatism with an advancement of the distal portion of the mandible after mandibular osteotomy. The position of the condyle is determined during the osteosynthesis with miniplates. Condyles are set back in relation with the supine position of the patient and the weakness of his (her) curarized muscle. All studies show that surgery of mandibular advancement causes a lateral, torque and backward movement of the condyles, all harmful to the condyles. Factors that predispose to condylar resorption are "the patient": a woman, young (between 15 and 40), high mandibular angle, with a history of temporo-mandibular disorders and surgical overload applied to the condyles. What are the possible solutions to avoid failures? Patient preparation before surgery and surgery simulation with an articulator, condylar position control during surgery, working with surgeons to achieve a condylar portion stabilization system (with the CAD), quickly set up a mobilization of the mandible by physiotherapy. PMID:27083225

  18. Nanocrystalline diamond thin films on titanium-6 aluminum-4 vanadium alloy temporomandibular joint prosthesis simulants by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fries, Marc Douglas

    A course of research has been performed to assess the suitability of nanocrystal-line diamond (NCD) films on Ti-6Al-4V alloy as wear-resistant coatings in biomedical implant use. A series of temporomandibular (TMJ) joint condyle simulants were polished and acid-passivated as per ASTM F86 standard for surface preparation of implants. A 3-mum-thick coating of NCD film was deposited by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) over the hemispherical articulation surfaces of the simulants. Plasma chemistry conditions were measured and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy (OES), using hydrogen as a relative standard. The films consist of diamond grains around 20 nm in diameter embedded in an amorphous carbon matrix, free of any detectable film stress gradient. Hardness averages 65 GPa and modulus measures 600 GPa at a depth of 250 nm into the film surface. A diffuse film/substrate boundary produces a minimal film adhesion toughness (GammaC) of 158 J/m2. The mean RMS roughness is 14.6 +/- 4.2 nm, with an average peak roughness of 82.6 +/- 65.9 nm. Examination of the surface morphology reveals a porous, dendritic surface. Wear testing resulted in two failed condylar coatings out of three tests. No macroscopic delamination was found on any sample, but micron-scale film pieces broke away, exposing the substrate. Electrochemical corrosion testing shows a seven-fold reduction in corrosion rate with the application of an NCD coating as opposed to polished, passivated Ti-6Al-4V, producing a corrosion rate comparable to wrought Co-Cr-Mo. In vivo biocompatibility testing indicates that implanted NCD films did not elicit an immune response in the rabbit model, and osteointegration was apparent for both compact and trabecular bone on both NCD film and bare Ti-6Al-4V. Overall, NCD thin film material is reasonably smooth, biocompatible, and very well adhered. Wear testing indicates that this material is unacceptable for use in demanding TMJ applications without

  19. A new method to measure post-traumatic joint contractures in the rabbit knee.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Kevin A; Holmberg, Michael; Shrive, Nigel

    2003-12-01

    A new device and method to measure rabbit knee joint angles are described. The method was used to measure rabbit knee joint angles in normal specimens and in knee joints with obvious contractures. The custom-designed and manufactured gripping device has two clamps. The femoral clamp sits on a pinion gear that is driven by a rack attached to a materials testing system. A 100 N load cell in series with the rack gives force feedback. The tibial clamp is attached to a rotatory potentiometer. The system allows the knee joint multiple degrees-of-freedom (DOF). There are two independent DOF (compression-distraction and internal-external rotation) and two coupled motions (medial-lateral translation coupled with varus-valgus rotation; anterior-posterior translation coupled with flexion-extension rotation). Knee joint extension-flexion motion is measured, which is a combination of the materials testing system displacement (converted to degrees of motion) and the potentiometer values (calibrated to degrees). Internal frictional forces were determined to be at maximum 2% of measured loading. Two separate experiments were performed to evaluate rabbit knees. First, normal right and left pairs of knees from four New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were subjected to cyclic loading. An extension torque of 0.2 Nm was applied to each knee. The average change in knee joint extension from the first to the fifth cycle was 1.9 deg +/- 1.5 deg (mean +/- sd) with a total of 49 tests of these eight knees. The maximum extension of the four left knees (tested 23 times) was 14.6 deg +/- 7.1 deg, and of the four right knees (tested 26 times) was 12.0 deg +/- 10.9 deg. There was no significant difference in the maximum extension between normal left and right knees. In the second experiment, nine skeletally mature NZW rabbits had stable fractures of the femoral condyles of the right knee that were immobilized for five, six or 10 weeks. The left knee served as an unoperated control. Loss of knee joint

  20. Cryoanalgesia in the management of intractable pain in the temporomandibular joint: a five-year retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Sidebottom, A J; Carey, E C; Madahar, A K

    2011-12-01

    Cryoanalgesia is a controversial adjunct to the management of chronic pain, but we know of no studies that have investigated its effect in the management of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain. In this five-year retrospective study we treated 17 patients who had severe pain that had failed to respond to all forms of conventional conservative treatment and were not appropriate for simple open operation. None had a clear indication for open operation on the joint or had too severe disease to warrant a simple procedure. Preliminary diagnostic injections of bupivacaine to the TMJ relieved the pain. We applied the cryoprobe in the region of the auriculotemporal nerve and TMJ capsule. There was a small but insignificant improvement in mean mouth opening together with a significant (p=0.000) improvement in visual analogue pain scores (VAS) from 6.8 (range 4-10) to 2.0 (range 0-7). Two patients had no change in their pain scores, and 2 had complete resolution of their pain. The mean number of pain-free months after treatment was 7 (IQR 3-15). Three patients had long-term pain relief, and 12 temporary relief; 6 of these subsequently had successful relief after total replacement of the TMJ. One patient had further cryoanalgesia, one was referred for specialist pain management, and one controlled the pain with nortriptyline. Of the 17 cases studied, 2 had temporary complications after cryoanalgesia. Cryoanalgesia is a useful adjunct to the management of intractable pain in the TMJ. Short-term pain relief can be achieved, and long-term relief is possible in some, deferring more complex and costly treatments. PMID:21177004

  1. Effects of age on the ability of the rat temporomandibular joint to respond to changing functional demands.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, M

    1988-09-01

    This investigation examined the ability of the tissues of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) to adapt to changing functional demands in young, growing rats compared with mature rats. Functional demands on the TMJ were varied by feeding diets with different physical consistencies. The first group was fed a soft diet for the experimental period. The second group was fed a hard diet, and the third group was initially fed the soft diet, then switched to the hard diet at the mid-point of the experimental period. Gross dimensions of the condyle, mandible, and maxilla were measured with calipers. Thickness of the articular, proliferative, transitional, and hypertrophic zones of the condylar cartilage, and the amount of bone in the subcondylar region and condylar neck were measured on histological sections. Gross dimensions of the condyle were significantly smaller in the soft-diet group compared with the hard- and soft/hard-diet groups in both growing and mature rats. The individual zones of the condylar cartilage were also significantly narrower in the soft-diet group in both growing and mature rats. However, the soft/hard-diet group of mature rats showed only a significant reduction in the thickness of the articular zone of the condylar cartilage compared with the hard-diet group. There were also narrower proliferative and transitional zones in the mature rats fed a soft/hard diet. In contrast, all of these zones showed full recovery in the young rats fed a soft/hard diet. The data presented here suggest that increasing age may diminish the capacity of the TMJ to adapt to altered function and consequently may play a significant role in the development of degenerative joint disease.

  2. Is aggressive gap arthroplasty essential in the management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis?-a prospective clinical study of 15 cases.

    PubMed

    Babu, Lokesh; Jain, Manoj Kumar; Ramesh, C; Vinayaka, N

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this three-year, prospective, follow-up study was to evaluate whether aggressive gap arthroplasty is essential in the management of ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Fifteen patients were treated by the creation of a minimal gap of 5-8mm and insertion of an interpositional gap arthroplasty using the temporalis fascia. Eleven patients had unilateral coronoidectomy and 4 bilateral coronoidectomy based on Kaban's protocol. Preoperative assessment included recording of history, clinical and radiological examinations, personal variables, the aetiology of the ankylosis, the side affected, and any other relevant findings. Patients were assessed postoperatively by a surgeon unaware of the treatment given for a minimum of 3 years, which included measurement of the maximal incisal opening, presence of facial nerve paralysis, recurrence, and any other relevant findings. Of the 15 patients (17 joints), 12 had unilateral and three had bilateral involvement, with trauma being the most common cause. The patients were aged between 7 and 29 years (mean (SD) age 20 (8) years). Preoperative maximal incisal opening was 0-2mm in 8 cases and 2-9mm in 9. Postoperatively adequate mouth opening of 30-40mm was achieved in all cases, with no recurrence or relevant malocclusion during 3-year follow up. However, patients will be followed up for 10 years. Aggressive gap arthroplasty is not essential in the management of ankylosis of the TMJ. Minimal gap interpositional arthroplasty with complete removal of the mediolateral ankylotic mass is a feasible and effective method of preventing recurrence. PMID:23219020

  3. Investigation of human frontal cortex under noxious thermal stimulation of temporo-mandibular joint using functional near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yennu, Amarnath; Rawat, Rohit; Manry, Michael T.; Gatchel, Robert; Liu, Hanli

    2013-03-01

    According to American Academy of Orofacial Pain, 75% of the U.S. population experiences painful symptoms of temporo-mandibular joint and muscle disorder (TMJMD) during their lifetime. Thus, objective assessment of pain is crucial for efficient pain management. We used near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a tool to explore hemodynamic responses in the frontal cortex to noxious thermal stimulation of temporomadibular joint (TMJ). NIRS experiments were performed on 9 healthy volunteers under both low pain stimulation (LPS) and high pain stimulation (HPS), using a temperature-controlled thermal stimulator. To induce thermal pain, a 16X16 mm2 thermode was strapped onto the right TMJ of each subject. Initially, subjects were asked to rate perceived pain on a scale of 0 to 10 for the temperatures from 41°C to 47°C. For the NIRS measurement, two magnitudes of temperatures, one rated as 3 and another rated as 7, were chosen as LPS and HPS, respectively. By analyzing the temporal profiles of changes in oxy-hemoglobin concentration (HbO) using cluster-based statistical tests, we were able to identify several regions of interest (ROI), (e.g., secondary somatosensory cortex and prefrontal cortex), where significant differences (p<0.05) between HbO responses to LPS and HPS are shown. In order to classify these two levels of pain, a neural-network-based classification algorithm was used. With leave-one-out cross validation from 9 subjects, the two levels of pain were identified with 100% mean sensitivity, 98% mean specificity and 99% mean accuracy to high pain. From the receiver operating characteristics curve, 0.99 mean area under curve was observed.

  4. [Myoarthropathy of the temporomandibular joint and masticatory muscles. Pain therapy management and relaxation instead of aggressive surgery].

    PubMed

    Türp, J C

    2003-05-01

    Temporomandibular pain is often characterized by a mismatch between symptoms and findings. The dentist's well-established therapeutic strategies for the management of acute pain are therefore frequently not effective in patients with painful temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Instead, dentists should apply the tried and tested principles that are applied in general medicine to the diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal pain (e.g. arthritic pain or fibromyalgia). When consulted by patients with rheumatic diseases, physicians should routinely enquire whether they also experience temporomandibular pain.

  5. Association Between Harmful Oral Habits and Sign and Symptoms of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders Among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jayaprakash; Kamate, Shivalingesh; Kushwaha, Sumedha; Anand, Richa; Gupta, Neha; Gupta, Bhuvandeep; Singh, Ishan

    2015-01-01

    Context Temporomandibular disorder (TDM) is defined as a heterogenous group of psychophysiological disorders commonly characterised by orofacial pain, chewing dysfunction or both. Various Epidemiological studies had shown occurrence of TMD in all age groups including children. Also research had shown that non nutritional oral habits to be associated with TMD. Aim Present study aimed to find whether harmful oral habits are associated with sign and symptoms of TMD among adolescents in Greater Noida. Setting and Design Schools in Gautam Buddha district and descriptive study. Materials and Methods Cross sectional study was carried out among 240 adolescents (10 – 19 years) studying in schools of Greater Noida. Study population were selected by random sampling to whom screening questionnaires recommended by American Academy of Orofacial Pain (AAOP) were distributed. Patient history and clinical examination was used to determine harmful oral habits. Data analysis was done in SPSS version 21 and Chi-square test was applied. Results Sixty one participants (25.4%) displayed no sign and symptoms of TMD, 34 (14.2%) responded affirmatively to atleast one item on the questionnaire and 108(46%) gave at least three affirmative responses. Headache, Neckpain and Toothache were most frequent reported sign and symptoms of TMD (46.2%). There was statistically significant association between gender and sign and symptoms of TMD on three items of the questionnaire (p < 0.05). Nail Biting (45.8%), Biting Lips/objects (37%) were most common habits among the study group. There was statistically significant association between Nail Biting (p = 0.001), Lip Biting/ object biting (p=0.001), Grinding of teeth (p = 0.01) and sign and symptoms of TMD. Conclusion A statistically significant association was found between nail biting, lip/ object biting and grinding of teeth with signs and/or symptoms of TMD. Thus there is need for preventive dental treatment and community dental education so that

  6. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint: a clinical, radiological and histological study.

    PubMed

    Martín-Granizo, Rafael; Sánchez, Juan Jesús; Jorquera, Manuela; Ortega, Luis

    2005-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) is a cartilaginous metaplasy of the mesenchymal remnants of the synovial tissue of the joints. It is characterized by the formation of cartilaginous nodules in the synovium and inside the articular space (loose bodies). SC mainly affects to big synovial joints such as the knee and the elbow, being uncommon the onset within the TMJ, where 75 cases have been published. The main symptoms are pain, inflammation, limitation of the movements of the jaw and crepitation. Different methods of diagnosis include panoramic radiograph, CT, MR and arthroscopy of the TMJ. We report a new case of unilateral SC of the TMJ, including diagnostic images, treatment performed and histological analysis.

  7. Changes in the temporomandibular joint space after functional treatment of disk displacement with reduction.

    PubMed

    Ma, ZhiGui; Xie, QianYang; Yang, Chi; Zhang, ShanYong; Shen, YuQing; Cai, XieYi

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the changes of temporomandibularjoint (TMJ) space in the treatment of disk displacement with reduction (DDWR) for class II cases. Forty-two adolescent patients with unilateral DDWR, who were successfully treated by functional appliance, were selected in this study. Magnetic resonance imaging scans were used before treatment (T1), at the start of treatment (T2), and after functional treatment (T3). Compared with the normal joint, the change of joint space index was calculated. The anterior, posterior, and superior joint spaces were analyzed on the largest sagittal plane among T1, T2, and T3. Student's t-test was used for statistical analysis. The mean treatment period was 10 months (6-16 mo). Functional appliance was effective in eliminating pain and clicking. During the phase of T1, the value of the joint space index of DDWR was significantly higher than that of the control (P < 0.05). There was a significant decrease in the anterior space and an increase in the postsuperior space at T2 (P < 0.01), and then the contrary changes occurred at T3. However, there was a significant increase in the postsuperior space and no significant decrease in the anterior space when T1 and T3 were compared. This study indicates that the TMJ space is well distributed after disk repositioning with functional treatment of DDWR. It is also suggested that the adaptive remodeling in TMJ occurs via functional treatment.

  8. [Benign tumors and pseudotumors of temporo-mandibular joint: radiologic aspects].

    PubMed

    Izzo, L; Caputo, M; Buffone, A; Casullo, A; Perrone, A; Sassi, S; Impara, L; Luppi, G; Mazza, D; Marini, Marina

    2005-01-01

    Benign tumors and tumor-like lesions that involve temporo mandibular joint are very rare. Those more frequent are osteochondroma, chondroma, osteoma, pigmented villonodular synovitis and synovial chondromatosis. The Authors report six cases of patients affected by these pathologies in which imaging, such as TC, MRI and/or ortopantomography have been useful to have a diagnosis.

  9. The Protective Effects of Salubrinal on the Cartilage and Subchondral Bone of the Temporomandibular Joint under Various Compressive Mechanical Stimulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Caixia; Chen, Sheng; Li, Huang

    2016-01-01

    Excessive mechanical loads on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) can cause mandibular cartilage degradation and subchondral bone erosion, but the treatment of these conditions remains challenging. Salubrinal, which target eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha, has been shown to have multiple beneficial effects on skeletal tissue. Here, we examined the effect of a Salubrinal injection on the mandibular cartilage and subchondral bone of the TMJ under various compressive stresses. We conducted in vivo analyses in rat models using various compressive stresses (40 g and 80 g), and we observed time-related degeneration and pathological changes in the cartilage and subchondral bone of the TMJ at days 1, 3 and 7 through histological measurements, subcellular observation, and changes in proliferation and apoptosis. After the Salubrinal injection, the thickness of the cartilage recovered, and the pathological change was alleviated. In the Salubrinal/light (Sal/light) compressive stress group, the drug altered the proliferation and apoptosis of chondrocytes most significantly at day 1. In the Salubrinal/heavy (Sal/heavy) compressive stress group, the drug increased the proliferation of chondrocytes most significantly at day 1 and reduced the apoptosis of chondrocytes most significantly at day 7. Salubrinal also increased the area of the bone trabeculae and suppressed inflammatory responses and pathological change in the subchondral bone of the TMJ. Together, these results indicate that the administration of Salubrinal reduces apoptosis and strengthens the proliferation of chondrocyte to varying degrees at days 1, 3 and 7 under various compressive mechanical stresses, both of which contribute to the recovery of cartilage thickness and the alleviation of pathological change. Salubrinal also suppresses inflammatory responses and pathological change in the subchondral bone of the TMJ. PMID:27196267

  10. [Changes in ingestive behavior during growth affects the functional maturation of temporomandibular joint nociceptive neurons of rats].

    PubMed

    Maya, Hiranuma

    2013-03-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) loading during development promotes its growth and maintains normal structure/function. Continuous change in diet consistency is related to development and maturation of the peripheral nervous system, including the nociceptive system. However, the functional modulation of TMJ-nociceptive neurons under different ingestive behavior is unclear. We fed growing rats a liquid diet to investigate the effects of low TMJ loading on the response properties of neurons in the trigeminal spinal tract subnucleus caudalis (Sp5C). Forty 2-week-old male rats were used. They were fed chow pellets (n = 20, C group) or a liquid diet (n = 20, LD group) soon after weaning. Firing activities of single sensory units in response to TMJ pressure stimuli were recorded at 4, 5, 7 and 9 weeks. In TMJ-nociceptive neurons, the firing threshold (FT) in the LD group was significantly lower than that in the C group at each recording age. The FT in the C group remained unchanged throughout the recording period, whereas that in the LD group was the highest at 4 weeks, and gradually decreased. On the other hand, the initial firing frequency (IFF) was significantly higher in the LD group than in the C group at each recording age. The IFF in the C group remained unchanged throughout the experimental period, whereas that in the LD group was at its lowest at 4 weeks, and gradually increased. Based on these findings, ingestive behavior that results from continuous changes in the physical consistency of the diet during growth may affect the functional maturation of TMJ-nociceptive neurons. PMID:23659164

  11. Changes in collagens and chondrocytes in the temporomandibular joint cartilage in growing rats fed a liquid diet.

    PubMed

    Uekita, Hiroki; Takahashi, Shigeru; Domon, Takanori; Yamaguchi, Taihiko

    2015-11-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of growing rats fed a soft diet is reported to be smaller in size and to have thinner condyle and glenoid fossa cartilage than rats fed a solid diet. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a soft diet on the collagens and chondrocytes in the growing TMJ cartilage. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were divided into a control group fed a solid diet and an experimental group fed a liquid diet for 1-8 weeks. After the experimental period, the TMJs were harvested and examined histologically, immunohistochemically for collagen types I, II, and X, and with transmission electron microscopy. The condylar cartilage in the experimental rats showed weak immunoreactions for three types of collagens compared with the controls. The ultrastructure had fewer fine collagen fibrils in the experimental rats compared with that of the controls. The glenoid fossa cartilage in the experimental rats showed narrower Alcian blue-positive areas than the control staining. The immunoreactions for three types of collagen in the experimental rats were also weaker than those of the controls. The chondrocytes in the experimental rats appeared dark, had extended thin cytoplasmic processes, and had formed gap junctions, as assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Fewer fine collagen fibrils, but thick bands of collagen fibrils were observed in the glenoid fossa of the experimental cartilage. The results of the present study showed that a liquid diet had deleterious effects on the quality and quantity of collagens and chondrocytes in the TMJ cartilage in growing rats.

  12. Effects of Chronic Sleep Deprivation on the Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Pathway in the Temporomandibular Joint of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peihuan; Wu, Longmei; Zhu, Guoxiong; Zhao, Huaqiang

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine the possible involvement and regulatory mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of rats subjected to chronic sleep deprivation (CSD). Methods Rats were subjected to CSD using the modified multiple platform method (MMPM). The serum levels of corticosterone (CORT) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were tested and histomorphology and ultrastructure of the TMJ were observed. The ERK and phospho-ERK (p-ERK) expression levels were detected by Western blot analysis, and the MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 expression levels were detected by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting. Results The elevated serum CORT and ACTH levels confirmed that the rats were under CSD stress. Hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed pathological alterations in the TMJ following CSD; furthermore, the p-ERK was activated and the mRNA and protein expression levels of MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 were upregulated after CSD. In the rats administered with the selective ERK inhibitor U0126, decreased tissue destruction was observed. Phospho-ERK activation was visibly blocked and the MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 mRNA and protein levels were lower than the corresponding levels in the CSD without U0126 group. Conclusion These findings indicate that CSD activates the ERK pathway and upregulates the MMP-1, MMP-3, and MMP-13 mRNA and protein levels in the TMJ of rats. Thus, CSD induces ERK pathway activation and causes pathological alterations in the TMJ. ERK may be associated with TMJ destruction by promoting the expression of MMPs. PMID:25226519

  13. Are temporomandibular joint signs and symptoms associated with magnetic resonance imaging findings in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients? A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Zwir, Liete M L Figueiredo; Terreri, Maria Teresa R A; Sousa, Soraia Ale; Fernandes, Artur Rocha Corrêa; Guimarães, Antônio Sérgio; Hilário, Maria Odete E

    2015-12-01

    The aims of this longitudinal study were to perform a comprehensive clinical evaluation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and to investigate the association between the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in the TMJs of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Seventy-five patients with JIA participated in this study. All patients underwent a rheumatological examination performed by a paediatric rheumatologist, a TMJ examination performed by a single dentist and an MRI with contrast of the TMJs. These examinations were scheduled on the same date. The patients were examined again 1 year later. Twenty-eight (37.3 %) patients reported symptoms at the first evaluation and 11 (14.7 %) patients at the second evaluation. In relation to signs, 35 (46.7 %) of the patients presented at least one sign at the first evaluation and 29 (38.7 %) at the second. Intense contrast enhancement of TMJ was significantly associated with disease activity (p < 0.001) at the first evaluation and a trend to significance was observed at the second (p = 0.056), with poly/systemic subtypes (p = 0.028 and p = 0.049, respectively), with restricted mouth opening capacity (p = 0.013 and p = 0.001, respectively), with the presence of erosions at both evaluations (p = 0.0001 and p < 0.0001, respectively) and with altered condylar shape at the second evaluation (p = 0.0005). TMJ involvement is highly prevalent in JIA patients, with asymptomatic children presenting severe structural alterations of the TMJ. The TMJ should always be evaluated in JIA patients, even in the absence of signs and symptoms.

  14. The Protective Effects of Salubrinal on the Cartilage and Subchondral Bone of the Temporomandibular Joint under Various Compressive Mechanical Stimulations.

    PubMed

    Wen, Juan; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Caixia; Chen, Sheng; Li, Huang

    2016-01-01

    Excessive mechanical loads on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) can cause mandibular cartilage degradation and subchondral bone erosion, but the treatment of these conditions remains challenging. Salubrinal, which target eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha, has been shown to have multiple beneficial effects on skeletal tissue. Here, we examined the effect of a Salubrinal injection on the mandibular cartilage and subchondral bone of the TMJ under various compressive stresses. We conducted in vivo analyses in rat models using various compressive stresses (40 g and 80 g), and we observed time-related degeneration and pathological changes in the cartilage and subchondral bone of the TMJ at days 1, 3 and 7 through histological measurements, subcellular observation, and changes in proliferation and apoptosis. After the Salubrinal injection, the thickness of the cartilage recovered, and the pathological change was alleviated. In the Salubrinal/light (Sal/light) compressive stress group, the drug altered the proliferation and apoptosis of chondrocytes most significantly at day 1. In the Salubrinal/heavy (Sal/heavy) compressive stress group, the drug increased the proliferation of chondrocytes most significantly at day 1 and reduced the apoptosis of chondrocytes most significantly at day 7. Salubrinal also increased the area of the bone trabeculae and suppressed inflammatory responses and pathological change in the subchondral bone of the TMJ. Together, these results indicate that the administration of Salubrinal reduces apoptosis and strengthens the proliferation of chondrocyte to varying degrees at days 1, 3 and 7 under various compressive mechanical stresses, both of which contribute to the recovery of cartilage thickness and the alleviation of pathological change. Salubrinal also suppresses inflammatory responses and pathological change in the subchondral bone of the TMJ. PMID:27196267

  15. Inhibition of temporomandibular joint input to medullary dorsal horn neurons by 5HT3 receptor antagonist in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Keiichiro; Katagiri, Ayano; Rahman, Mostafeezur; Thompson, Randall; Bereiter, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Repeated forced swim (FS) conditioning enhances nociceptive responses to temporomandibular joint (TMJ) stimulation in male and female rats. The basis for FS-induced TMJ hyperalgesia remains unclear. To test the hypothesis that serotonin 3 receptor (5HT3R) mechanisms contribute to enhanced TMJ nociception after FS, ovariectomized female rats were treated with estradiol and subjected to FS for three days. On day 4, rats were anesthetized with isoflurane and TMJ-responsive neurons were recorded from superficial and deep laminae at the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis/upper cervical (Vc/C1–2) region and electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from the masseter muscle. Only Vc/C1–2 neurons activated by intra-TMJ injections of ATP were included for further analysis. Although neurons in both superficial and deep laminae were activated by ATP, only neurons in deep laminae displayed enhanced responses after FS. Local application of the 5HT3R antagonist, ondansetron (OND), at the Vc/C1–2 region reduced the ATP-evoked responses of neurons in superficial and deep laminae and reduced the EMG response in both sham and FS rats. OND also decreased the spontaneous firing rate of neurons in deep laminae and reduced the high threshold convergent cutaneous receptive field area of neurons in superficial and deep laminae in both sham and FS rats. These results revealed that central application of a 5HT3R antagonist, had widespread effects on the properties of TMJ-responsive neurons at the Vc/C1–2 region and on jaw muscle reflexes under sham and FS conditions. It is concluded that 5HT3R does not play a unique role in mediating stress-induced hyperalgesia related to TMJ nociception. PMID:25913635

  16. Temporomandibular joint internal derangement type III: relationship to magnetic resonance imaging findings of internal derangement and osteoarthrosis. An intraindividual approach.

    PubMed

    Emshoff, R; Rudisch, A; Innerhofer, K; Bösch, R; Bertram, S

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether in patients with a clinical unilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ)-related finding of internal derangement type (ID)-III (disk displacement without reduction) in combination with TMJ-related pain, the intraindividual variable of 'unilateral TMJ ID-III pain' may be linked to subject-related magnetic resonance (MR) imaging findings of TMJ ID, and TMJ osteoarthrosis (OA). The study comprised 48 consecutive TMJ pain patients, who were assigned a clinical unilateral TMJ pain side-related diagnosis of ID-III. Bilateral sagittal and coronal MR images were obtained to establish the presence or absence of TMJ ID and/or OA. Comparison of the TMJ side-related data showed a significant relationship between the clinical finding of TMJ ID-III pain and the MR imaging diagnoses of TMJ ID (P=0.000) and TMJ ID type (P=0.000). There was no correlation between the clinical finding of TMJ ID-III pain and the MR imaging diagnosis of TMJ OA (P=0.217), nor between the MR imaging diagnosis of TMJ OA and that of TMJ ID (P=0.350). Regarding the diagnostic subgroups of TMJ ID, a significant relationship was found between the presence of TMJ OA and the MR imaging diagnoses of TMJ ID type(P=0.002). Use of the Kappa statistical test indicated a fair diagnostic agreement between the presence of TMJ ID-III pain and the MR imaging diagnosis of disk displacement without reduction (DDNR) (K=0.42). The results suggest that TMJ ID-III pain is related to TMJ-related MR imaging diagnoses of ID. Further, the data confirm the biological concept of 'DDNR and OA' as an underlying mechanism in the etiology of TMJ-related pain and dysfunction. PMID:11720040

  17. Connexin43 Hemichannels Mediate Small Molecule Exchange between Chondrocytes and Matrix in Biomechanically-Stimulated Temporomandibular Joint Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Hongyun; Zhang, Mian; Qiu, Zhongying; Wu, Yaoping; Callaway, Danielle A.; Jiang, Jean X.; Lu, Lei; Jing, Lei; Yang, Ting; Wang, Meiqing

    2015-01-01

    Objective Connexin (Cx) 43 hemichannels play a role in mechanotransduction. This study was undertaken in order to determine if Cx43 hemichannels were activated in rat temporomandibular joint (TMJ) chondrocytes under mechanical stimulation. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were stimulated dental-mechanically. Cx43 expression in rat TMJ cartilage was determined with immunohistochemistry and real-time PCR, and Cx43 hemichannel opening was evaluated by the extra- and intracellular levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Both primary rat chondrocytes and ATDC5 cells were treated with fluid flow shear stress (FFSS) to induce hemichannel opening. The Cx43 expression level was then determined by real-time PCR or western blotting, and the extent of Cx43 hemichannel opening was evaluated by measuring both PGE2 release and cellular dye uptake. Results Cx43 expression and intra- and extracellular PGE2 levels were increased in mechanically-stimulated rat TMJ cartilage compared to the unstimulated control. The FFSS treatment increased Cx43 expression and induced Cx43 hemichannel opening in primary rat chondrocytes and ATDC5 cells indicated by enhanced PGE2 release and dye uptake. Furthermore, the Cx43 hemichannel opening could be blocked by the addition of 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid, a connexin channel inhibitor, Cx43-targeting siRNA, or by withdrawal of FFSS stimulation. The migration of cytosolic Cx43 protein to the plasma membrane in ATDC5 cells was still significant after 8h post 2-h FFSS treatment, and the Cx43 protein level was still high at 48h which returned to control levels at 72h after treatment. Conclusion Cx43 hemichannels are activated and mediate small molecule exchange between TMJ chondrocytes and matrix under mechanical stimulation. PMID:24704497

  18. [Changes in ingestive behavior during growth affects the functional maturation of temporomandibular joint nociceptive neurons of rats].

    PubMed

    Maya, Hiranuma

    2013-03-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) loading during development promotes its growth and maintains normal structure/function. Continuous change in diet consistency is related to development and maturation of the peripheral nervous system, including the nociceptive system. However, the functional modulation of TMJ-nociceptive neurons under different ingestive behavior is unclear. We fed growing rats a liquid diet to investigate the effects of low TMJ loading on the response properties of neurons in the trigeminal spinal tract subnucleus caudalis (Sp5C). Forty 2-week-old male rats were used. They were fed chow pellets (n = 20, C group) or a liquid diet (n = 20, LD group) soon after weaning. Firing activities of single sensory units in response to TMJ pressure stimuli were recorded at 4, 5, 7 and 9 weeks. In TMJ-nociceptive neurons, the firing threshold (FT) in the LD group was significantly lower than that in the C group at each recording age. The FT in the C group remained unchanged throughout the recording period, whereas that in the LD group was the highest at 4 weeks, and gradually decreased. On the other hand, the initial firing frequency (IFF) was significantly higher in the LD group than in the C group at each recording age. The IFF in the C group remained unchanged throughout the experimental period, whereas that in the LD group was at its lowest at 4 weeks, and gradually increased. Based on these findings, ingestive behavior that results from continuous changes in the physical consistency of the diet during growth may affect the functional maturation of TMJ-nociceptive neurons.

  19. A multidisciplinary approach to the management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis in a sickle-cell anemia patient in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Braimah, Ramat Oyebunmi; Oladejo, Taoreed; Olarinoye, Timothy Oyetunde; Adetoye, Adedapo Omowonuola; Osho, Patrick Olanrewaju

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the multidisciplinary management of a 35-year-old female sickle-cell anemia patient who had unilateral bony ankylosis of the left temporomandibular joint secondary to septic arthritis. She was managed by a team comprising of maxillofacial surgeons, anesthetists, otorhinolaryngologist, and hematologist. Unilateral left interpositional arthroplasty and ipsilateral coronoidectomy through a postrami approach were done and followed by aggressive jaw physiotherapy in the postsurgical period. No perioperative morbidity was encountered. Mouth opening of 3.5 cm was achieved and maintained 7 months after surgery. Challenges and rationale for the use of a multidisciplinary team approach in treatment of such cases were discussed. PMID:27563622

  20. Reduction of temporomandibular joint dislocation: an ancient technique that has stood the test of time.

    PubMed

    Forshaw, R J

    2015-07-01

    The first known recorded evidence for the reduction of a mandibular joint dislocation is documented in a papyrus dated to c. 1500 BC that originated from ancient Egypt. This same technique was later discussed by Hippocrates in Greece and the Hippocratic corpus is referred to in early Islamic writings. It is detailed in medieval European texts and eventually was incorporated into modern dental and medical practice. Today, mandibular joint dislocation is probably not that common but to be included in an important ancient Egyptian treatise, predominately concerned with trauma to the head and neck, could suggest it was a more frequent occurrence in antiquity. This could relate to the heavy tooth wear, frequent antemortem tooth loss and the related sequelae of severe malocclusion and overclosure evident in many surviving ancient Egyptian skulls. PMID:26114704

  1. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint: a clinical, radiological and histological study.

    PubMed

    Martín-Granizo, Rafael; Sánchez, Juan Jesús; Jorquera, Manuela; Ortega, Luis

    2005-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) is a cartilaginous metaplasy of the mesenchymal remnants of the synovial tissue of the joints. It is characterized by the formation of cartilaginous nodules in the synovium and inside the articular space (loose bodies). SC mainly affects to big synovial joints such as the knee and the elbow, being uncommon the onset within the TMJ, where 75 cases have been published. The main symptoms are pain, inflammation, limitation of the movements of the jaw and crepitation. Different methods of diagnosis include panoramic radiograph, CT, MR and arthroscopy of the TMJ. We report a new case of unilateral SC of the TMJ, including diagnostic images, treatment performed and histological analysis. PMID:15876973

  2. Reduction of temporomandibular joint dislocation: an ancient technique that has stood the test of time.

    PubMed

    Forshaw, R J

    2015-07-01

    The first known recorded evidence for the reduction of a mandibular joint dislocation is documented in a papyrus dated to c. 1500 BC that originated from ancient Egypt. This same technique was later discussed by Hippocrates in Greece and the Hippocratic corpus is referred to in early Islamic writings. It is detailed in medieval European texts and eventually was incorporated into modern dental and medical practice. Today, mandibular joint dislocation is probably not that common but to be included in an important ancient Egyptian treatise, predominately concerned with trauma to the head and neck, could suggest it was a more frequent occurrence in antiquity. This could relate to the heavy tooth wear, frequent antemortem tooth loss and the related sequelae of severe malocclusion and overclosure evident in many surviving ancient Egyptian skulls.

  3. Use of autologous conditioned serum (Orthokine®) for the treatment of the dege-nerative osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint. Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Camino, Juan C.; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) using autologous conditioned serum (ACS) has become in recent years an alternative to consider in the approach of the degenerative joint disease of the knee. There is no support in the literature for the use of ACS for the treatment of OA of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), although the promising results obtained in human patients with knee joint disease as well as in animal studies are opening the way for its use at the TMJ. The aim of this paper is to conduct a review of the published literature regarding the use of the ACS for the treatment of OA in humans, considering the level of scientific evidence, and following the principles of the evidence-based medicine and dentistry. Material and Methods: A PubMed-MEDLINE search was carried out of articles published between 1980 and 2011. After an initial search, a total of 102 articles were obtained, followed by a selection of the most relevant articles according to the topic; a total of 8 articles were selected, which were stratified according to their level of scientific evidence using SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy). Results: At the time of this review, there is no available literature referring the use of ACS at the TMJ. However, the use of the ACS in other joints is well documented, both experimentally and clinically, in humans and animals. The reviewed articles, with a level of evidence 1 and 2 according to the SORT criteria, have generally promising results. Discussion and Conclusions: The use of ACS in the treatment of OA in joints other than the TMJ, is endorsed by the level of evidence found in the literature, which opens the door to future studies to determine the feasibility of the use of the ACS in the treatment of degenerative OA that affects TMJ. Key words:Osteoarthritis, temporomandibular joint, autologous conditioned serum. PMID:23524415

  4. Differences in skeletal components of temporomandibular joint of an early medieval and contemporary Croatian population obtained by different methods.

    PubMed

    Kranjcic, Josip; Slaus, Mario; Persic, Sanja; Vodanovic, Marin; Vojvodic, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is one of the most complex joints in the human body. The anatomical configuration of the TMJ allows for a large range of mandibular movements as well as transmission of masticatory forces and loads to the skull base. The measurements of the TMJ's anatomical structures and their interpretations contribute to the understanding of how pathological changes, tooth loss, and the type of diet (changing throughout human history) can affect biomechanical conditions of the masticatory system and the TMJ. The human TMJ and its constituent parts are still the subject of extensive investigation and comparisons of measurement methods are being made in order to determine the most precise and suitable measurement methods. The aim of this study has been to examine the morphology of skeletal components of TMJ of an early medieval population (EMP) in Croatia and to compare measured values with TMJ values of the contemporary Croatian population (CP) using various methods of measurement. The study was performed on 30 EMP specimens - human dry skulls, aged from 18 to 55 years, and 30 CP human dry skulls, aged from 18 to 65 years. Only fully preserved specimens (in measured areas) were included. The articular eminence (AE) inclination was measured in relation to the Frankfurt horizontal using two methods. Also, the AE height (glenoid fossa depth) and the length of the curved line - highest to the lowest point of the AE were measured. Measurements were performed on lateral skull photographs, panoramic radiographs and lateral cephalograms using VistaMetrix software on skull images. The results were statistically analyzed using SPSS statistical software. No statistically significant differences were obtained for AE parameters between the EMP and CP populations independent of age and gender. However, statistically significant (p<0.05) differences were revealed when comparing results of three different measuring methods. It could not be determined which of

  5. Lubricin immunohistochemical expression in human temporomandibular joint disc with internal derangement.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Rosalia; Almeida, Luis Eduardo; Loreto, Carla

    2011-08-01

    Lubricin is a chondroprotective, mucinous glycoprotein which contribute to joint lubrication, especially to boundary lubrication and maintains joint integrity. The present investigation aimed to study the immunolocalization of lubricin in TMJ discs from patients affected by anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDwR) ADDwoR. Eighteen TMJ displaced disc affected by ADDwoR were processed immunohistochemically, with a polyclonal anti-lubricin antibody, used at 1:50 working dilution. The percentage of lubricin immunopositive cells (extent score = ES) and the extent of lubricin staining of the disc extracellular matrix (ECM), were evaluated. Each sample was scored for histopathological changes. Percentage of immunostained surface disc cells was the same (ES = 4) in both control and ADDwOR cells, being this data not statistically significant (P < 0.05). In pathological specimens the percentages of lubricin-stained cells was very high with an ES of 4 respect to control specimen, and this difference was statistically significant different (P > 0.05). The extracellular matrix (ECM) of discs at the disc surfaces of both pathological and normal specimens was very heavily stained (++++). Both the ES and ECM staining were not statistically correlated to the TMJ degeneration score according to the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. According to our findings, a longstanding TMJ disc injury, affects lubricin expression in the TMJ disc tissue and not its surfaces, moreover, lubricin immunostaining is not correlated to TMJ disc histopathological changes.

  6. Topical diagnostics of traumatic condylar injuries and alloplastic reconstruction of temporomandibular joint heads.

    PubMed

    Gvenetadze, Z; Danelia, T; Nemsadze, G; Gvenetadze, G

    2014-04-01

    Condylar fractures have an important place in facial traumatic injuries. Classification of condylar fractures according to clinical-anatomic picture is common in clinical practice. According to this classification there are: 1) fractures of mandibular joint head, aka intraarticular fractures, 2) condylar neck fractures or high extra articular fractures, 3) condylar base fractures. Radiographic imaging plays important role in diagnosing condylar fractures along with knowledge of clinical symptoms. We used computer tomography imaging in our clinical practice. Three-dimensional imaging of computer tomography gives exact information about location of condylar fractures, impact of fractured fragments, displacement of condylar head from articular fossa. This method is mostly important for the cases which are hard to diagnose (fractures of mandibular joint head, aka intraarticular fractures). For this group of patients surgical treatment is necessary with the method of arthroplasty. We have observed 5 patients with bilateral, fragmented, high condylar fractures. In all cases the surgery was performed on both sides with bone cement and titanium mini-plates. Long-term effects of the treatment included observation from 6 months to 2 years. In all cases anatomic and functional results were good. Shape of the mandible is restored, opening of mouth 3-3.5 cm, absence of malocclusion. PMID:24850598

  7. Cephalometric Analysis of the Facial Skeletal Morphology of Female Patients Exhibiting Skeletal Class II Deformity with and without Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuo; Lei, Jie; Fu, Kai-Yuan; Wang, Xing; Yi, Biao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the differences in the facial morphological characteristics of female patients exhibiting skeletal class II deformity with and without temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis. Methods Eighty-three female patients with skeletal class II deformity were included in this study; these patients were classified into three groups on the basis of the condylar features shown in cone-beam computed tomography scans: normal group, indeterminate for osteoarthrosis group, and osteoarthrosis group. The cephalometric differences among the three groups were evaluated through one-way ANOVA. Results Of the 83 patients, 52.4% were diagnosed with osteoarthrosis, as indicated by the changes in the condylar osseous component. The cephalometric measurements that represented skeletal characteristics, including mandibular position relative to the cranial base, mandibular plane angle (MP-SN), posterior facial height (S-Go), and facial height ratio, were significantly different among the three groups (p < 0.05). The patients in the osteoarthrosis group yielded the smallest S-Go, the highest MP-SN, and the most retruded mandible. Conclusions Temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis is commonly observed in female patients with skeletal class II deformity. The morphological characteristics of the facial skeleton in patients with bilateral condylar osteoarthrosis may be altered. PMID:26474490

  8. Characterization of degenerative changes in the temporomandibular joint of the bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) and siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Murphy, M K; Arzi, B; Vapniarsky-Arzi, N; Athanasiou, K A

    2013-11-01

    The articulation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is composed of the temporal bone dorsally, the mandibular condyle ventrally and a fibrous articular disc. The TMJ disc plays an essential role in distributing load between the two articular surfaces. Degeneration of the disc in the presence of joint pathology has been shown in man; however, TMJ pathology has not been documented previously in tigers (Panthera tigris). The mandibular condyle and TMJ disc of a Bengal tiger (P. tigris tigris) and a Siberian tiger (P. tigris altaica) were evaluated grossly and the TMJ disc was characterized biochemically and mechanically. Characterization of the TMJ disc verified region- and direction-dependent biochemical and mechanical properties, reflective of the functional demands on the joint. Degenerative joint disease was observed in both cases and this was more severe in the Siberian tiger. Simultaneous evaluation of joint pathology, biochemical composition and mechanical properties of the TMJ disc revealed a loss in functional properties (tensile anisotropy) of the disc as joint pathology advanced from moderate to severe. TMJ degeneration may compromise the ability of the animal to eat and thrive and may be a factor contributing to the endangered status of these species.

  9. Characterization of degenerative changes in the temporomandibular joint of the bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) and siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Murphy, M K; Arzi, B; Vapniarsky-Arzi, N; Athanasiou, K A

    2013-11-01

    The articulation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is composed of the temporal bone dorsally, the mandibular condyle ventrally and a fibrous articular disc. The TMJ disc plays an essential role in distributing load between the two articular surfaces. Degeneration of the disc in the presence of joint pathology has been shown in man; however, TMJ pathology has not been documented previously in tigers (Panthera tigris). The mandibular condyle and TMJ disc of a Bengal tiger (P. tigris tigris) and a Siberian tiger (P. tigris altaica) were evaluated grossly and the TMJ disc was characterized biochemically and mechanically. Characterization of the TMJ disc verified region- and direction-dependent biochemical and mechanical properties, reflective of the functional demands on the joint. Degenerative joint disease was observed in both cases and this was more severe in the Siberian tiger. Simultaneous evaluation of joint pathology, biochemical composition and mechanical properties of the TMJ disc revealed a loss in functional properties (tensile anisotropy) of the disc as joint pathology advanced from moderate to severe. TMJ degeneration may compromise the ability of the animal to eat and thrive and may be a factor contributing to the endangered status of these species. PMID:23809909

  10. Characterization of Degenerative Changes in the Temporomandibular Joint of the Bengal Tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) and Siberian Tiger (Panthera tigris altaica)

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, M. K.; Arzi, B.; Vapniarsky-Arzi, N.; Athanasiou, K. A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The articulation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is composed of the temporal bone dorsally, the mandibular condyle ventrally and a fibrous articular disc. The TMJ disc plays an essential role in distributing load between the two articular surfaces. Degeneration of the disc in the presence of joint pathology has been shown in man; however, TMJ pathology has not been documented previously in tigers (Panthera tigris). The mandibular condyle and TMJ disc of a Bengal tiger (P. tigris tigris) and a Siberian tiger (P. tigris altaica) were evaluated grossly and the TMJ disc was characterized biochemically and mechanically. Characterization of the TMJ disc verified region- and direction-dependent biochemical and mechanical properties, reflective of the functional demands on the joint. Degenerative joint disease was observed in both cases and this was more severe in the Siberian tiger. Simultaneous evaluation of joint pathology, biochemical composition and mechanical properties of the TMJ disc revealed a loss in functional properties (tensile anisotropy) of the disc as joint pathology advanced from moderate to severe. TMJ degeneration may compromise the ability of the animal to eat and thrive and may be a factor contributing to the endangered status of these species. PMID:23809909

  11. Alterations in intermediate filaments expression in disc cells from the rat temporomandibular joint following exposure to continuous compressive force.

    PubMed

    Magara, Jin; Nozawa-Inoue, Kayoko; Suzuki, Akiko; Kawano, Yoshiro; Ono, Kazuhiro; Nomura, Shuichi; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2012-06-01

    The articular disc in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) that serves in load relief and stabilizing in jaw movements is a dense collagenous tissue consisting of extracellular matrices and disc cells. The various morphological configurations of the disc cells have given us diverse names, such as fibroblasts, chondrocyte-like cells and fibrochondrocytes; however, the characteristics of these cells have remained to be elucidated in detail. The disc cells have been reported to exhibit heterogeneous immunoreaction patterns for intermediate filaments including glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), nestin and vimentin in the adult rat TMJ. Because these intermediate filaments accumulate in the disc cells as tooth eruption proceeds during postnatal development, it might be surmised that the expression of these intermediate filaments in the disc cells closely relates to mechanical stress. The present study was therefore undertaken to examine the effect of a continuous compressive force on the immunoexpression of these intermediate filaments and an additional intermediate filament - muscle-specific desmin - in the disc cells of the TMJ disc using a rat experimental model. The rats wore an appliance that exerts a continuous compressive load on the TMJ. The experimental period with the appliance was 5 days as determined by previous studies, after which some experimental animals were allowed to survive another 5 days after removal of the appliance. Histological observations demonstrated that the compressive force provoked a remarkable acellular region and a decrease in the thickness of the condylar cartilage of the mandible, and a sparse collagen fiber distribution in the articular disc. The articular disc showed a significant increase in the number of desmin-positive cells as compared with the controls. In contrast, immunopositive cells for GFAP, nestin and vimentin remained unchanged in number as well as intensity. At 5 days after removal of the appliance, both the disc and

  12. Risk factors for temporomandibular joint pain in patients with disc displacement without reduction - a magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Emshoff, R; Brandlmaier, I; Bertram, S; Rudisch, A

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging variables of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangement, osteoarthrosis and/or effusion may predict the presence of pain in patients with a clinical disorder of an internal derangement type (ID)-III. The relationship between TMJ ID-III pain and TMJ internal derangement, osteoarthrosis and effusion was analysed in MR images of 84 TMJs in 42 patients with a clinical unilateral diagnosis of TMJ ID-III pain. Criteria for including a TMJ ID-III pain patient were report of orofacial pain referred to the TMJ, with the presence of unilateral TMJ pain during palpation, function and/or unassisted or assisted mandibular opening. Bilateral sagittal and coronal MR images were obtained to establish the presence or absence of TMJ internal derangement, osteoarthrosis and effusion. Using chi-square analysis for pair-wise comparison, the data showed a significant relationship between the MR imaging findings of TMJ ID-III pain and those of internal derangement (P=0.01) and effusion (P=0.00). Of the MR imaging variables considered simultaneously in the multiple logistic regression analysis, osteoarthrosis (P=0.82) and effusion (P=0.08) dropped out as non-significant in the diagnostic TMJ pain group when compared with the TMJ non-pain group. The odds ratio that a TMJ with an internal derangement type of disk displacement without reduction might belong to the pain group was strong (2.7:1) and highly significant (P=0.00). Significant increases in risk of TMJ pain occurred with 'disk displacement without reduction in combination with osteoarthrosis' (5.2:1) (P=0.00) and/or 'disk displacement without reduction in combination with osteoarthrosis and effusion' (6.6:1) (P=0.00). The results suggest that TMJ pain is related to internal derangement, osteoarthrosis and effusion. However, the data re-emphasize the aspect that these MR imaging variables may not be regarded as the unique and dominant

  13. Age-dependent increase of discoidin domain receptor 2 and matrix metalloproteinase 13 expression in temporomandibular joint cartilage of type IX and type XI collagen-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Lam, N. P.; Li, Y.; Waldman, A. B.; Brussiau, J.; Lee, P. L.; Olsen, B. R.; Xu, L.

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that mutations in type IX and type XI collagens in mice caused osteoarthritis (OA)-like changes in knee and temporomandibular (TM) joints. We also found that the overexpression of matrix metalloproteinase 13 (Mmp-13) was probably due to the up-regulation of a collagen receptor, discoidin domain receptor 2 (Ddr2), which was responsible for knee cartilage degeneration in mutant mice. The objective of our study was to determine whether the expression of Mmp-3, Mmp-13 and Ddr2 was increased in OA-like TM joints in mutant mice using immunohistochemistry. We found that the staining for Ddr2, Mmp-13 and Mmp-derived type II collagen fragments in tissue sections from 6 month-old mice was increased in TM joints of the mutant mice. In contrast, we found no difference in the staining for Mmp-3 amongst the two mutant mice and their wild-type littermates. We conclude that, similar to previous observations in knee joints, the overexpression of Ddr2 and Mmp-13 may be responsible for the OA-like change in TM joints in mutant mice. PMID:17125729

  14. Age-dependent increase of discoidin domain receptor 2 and matrix metalloproteinase 13 expression in temporomandibular joint cartilage of type IX and type XI collagen-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Lam, N P; Li, Y; Waldman, A B; Brussiau, J; Lee, P L; Olsen, B R; Xu, L

    2007-06-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that mutations in type IX and type XI collagens in mice caused osteoarthritis (OA)-like changes in knee and temporomandibular (TM) joints. We also found that the overexpression of matrix metalloproteinase 13 (Mmp-13) was probably due to the up-regulation of a collagen receptor, discoidin domain receptor 2 (Ddr2), which was responsible for knee cartilage degeneration in mutant mice. The objective of our study was to determine whether the expression of Mmp-3, Mmp-13 and Ddr2 was increased in OA-like TM joints in mutant mice using immunohistochemistry. We found that the staining for Ddr2, Mmp-13 and Mmp-derived type II collagen fragments in tissue sections from 6-month-old mice was increased in TM joints of the mutant mice. In contrast, we found no difference in the staining for Mmp-3 amongst the two mutant mice and their wild-type littermates. We conclude that, similar to previous observations in knee joints, the overexpression of Ddr2 and Mmp-13 may be responsible for the OA-like change in TM joints in mutant mice. PMID:17125729

  15. [Interposition of a full-thickness skin graft in the surgery of temporomandibular joint ankylosis. A study of 31 cases of which 20 had long-term follow-up].

    PubMed

    Guyot, L; Chossegros, C; Cheynet, F; Gola, R; Lachard, J; Blanc, J L

    1995-01-01

    Recurrence is the main problem in temporo-mandibular joint ankylosis treatment. Two therapy are used against this, physiotherapy and surgical joint interposition. Following ankylosis removal, many materials can be interposed but, for us, fullthickness skin graft using Popescu and Vasiliu technique seems to be the best and simplest one. This retrospective study of 31 cases, 20 with long-term follow-up, shows that good results are obtained using this skin graft, with 90% successful rate.

  16. Evaluation of Sports-Related Temporomandibular Dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Sailors, Matthew E.

    1996-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the steps used in evaluation of sports- related temporomandibular dysfunctions and make recommendation for treatment and referral based upon the evaluation findings. Data Sources: This review searched Cinahl (1982 to 1995) and Medline (1986 to 1995). Key words searched included “sports related temporomandibular dysfunction,” “temporomandibular dysfunction,” and “temporomandibular joint.” Data Synthesis: This paper provides an introduction to the anatomy and biomechanics of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) as well as causes of temporomandibular disorders in athletes. An analysis of the evaluative steps used for the temporomandibular joint is also given. Findings that suggest specific temporomandibular dysfunctions are discussed. Conclusions/Recommendations: Recommendations about when dental consultation is most appropriate or if conservative treatment is indicated are included. Hopefully, this will provide the sports medicine practitioner with a better understanding of the joint and its dysfunctions, as well as eliminate some unnecessary and costly dental referrals for our athletes. ImagesFig 2.Fig 3.Fig 4. PMID:16558422

  17. Evaluation of anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activity of low-level laser therapy on temporomandibular joint inflammation in rodents.

    PubMed

    Barretto, S R; de Melo, G C; dos Santos, J C; de Oliveira, M G B; Pereira-Filho, R N; Alves, A V F; Ribeiro, M A G; Lima-Verde, I B; Quintans Júnior, L J; de Albuquerque-Júnior, R L C; Bonjardim, L R

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the nociceptive behavioral as well as histomorphological aspects induced by injection of formalin and carrageenan into the rat temporomandibular joint. The 2.5% formalin injection (FRG group) induced behavioral responses characterized by rubbing the orofacial region and flinching the head quickly, which were quantified for 45 min. The pretreatment with systemic administration of diclofenac sodium-DFN group (10 mg/kg i.p.) as well as the irradiation with LLLT infrared (LST group, 780 nm, 70 mW, 30 s, 2.1 J, 52.5 J/cm(2), GaAlAs) significantly reduced the formalin-induced nociceptive responses. The 1% carrageenan injection (CRG group) induced inflammatory responses over the time-course of the study (24 h, and 3 and 7 days) characterized by the presence of intense inflammatory infiltrate rich in neutrophils, scanty areas of liquefactive necrosis and intense interstitial edema, extensive hemorrhagic areas, and enlargement of the joint space on the region. The DFN and LST groups showed an intensity of inflammatory response that was significantly lower than in CRG group over the time-course of the study, especially in the LST group, which showed exuberant granulation tissue with intense vascularization, and deposition of newly formed collagen fibers (3 and 7 days). It was concluded that the LLLT presented an anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory response on the inflammation induced in the temporomandibular joint of rodents.

  18. Synovial TGF-β1 and MMP-3 levels and their correlation with the progression of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis combined with disc displacement: A preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, QIAN; QIU, YA-TING; CHEN, MIN-JIE; ZHANG, ZHI-YUAN; YANG, CHI

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a slow progressing degenerative disease that affects the joints, including the temporomandibular joint. In the present study, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) in synovial fluid (SF) were examined in detecting cartilage synthesis and degradation in progression of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ OA) combined with disc displacement (DD) diseases. SF was obtained from 16 patients with TMJ OA combined with DD and 10 normal volunteers. TGF-β1 and MMP-3 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, TMJ OA combined with DD was classified into three stages based on radiographic signs on the preoperative tomograms and surgical findings at operation, and different treatment options were administered according to the stages. SF from TMJs with TMJ OA combined with DD showed higher levels of TGF-β1 and MMP-3 compared with the asymptomatic control TMJs. With the progression of TMJ OA combined with DD, TGF-β1 levels in SF were lower, while MMP-3 levels in SF were significantly higher. In conclusion, these data suggest that MMP-3 is not only involved in the pathological destruction process of TMJ OA combined with DD initially, but also has a positive correlation with the degree of pathological changes. Furthermore, a significant increase of TGF-β1 levels was found in the SF that were able to counteract the deleterious effects of MMP-3 at the early stage of TMJ OA combined DD, providing the scientific basis on repositioning displaced disc as early as possible for these patients. PMID:24648922

  19. Synovial TGF-β1 and MMP-3 levels and their correlation with the progression of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis combined with disc displacement: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qian; Qiu, Ya-Ting; Chen, Min-Jie; Zhang, Zhi-Yuan; Yang, Chi

    2013-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a slow progressing degenerative disease that affects the joints, including the temporomandibular joint. In the present study, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3) in synovial fluid (SF) were examined in detecting cartilage synthesis and degradation in progression of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ OA) combined with disc displacement (DD) diseases. SF was obtained from 16 patients with TMJ OA combined with DD and 10 normal volunteers. TGF-β1 and MMP-3 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, TMJ OA combined with DD was classified into three stages based on radiographic signs on the preoperative tomograms and surgical findings at operation, and different treatment options were administered according to the stages. SF from TMJs with TMJ OA combined with DD showed higher levels of TGF-β1 and MMP-3 compared with the asymptomatic control TMJs. With the progression of TMJ OA combined with DD, TGF-β1 levels in SF were lower, while MMP-3 levels in SF were significantly higher. In conclusion, these data suggest that MMP-3 is not only involved in the pathological destruction process of TMJ OA combined with DD initially, but also has a positive correlation with the degree of pathological changes. Furthermore, a significant increase of TGF-β1 levels was found in the SF that were able to counteract the deleterious effects of MMP-3 at the early stage of TMJ OA combined DD, providing the scientific basis on repositioning displaced disc as early as possible for these patients. PMID:24648922

  20. The evaluation of lateral pterygoid muscle pathologic changes and insertion patterns in temporomandibular joints with or without disc displacement using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Imanimoghaddam, M; Madani, A S; Hashemi, E M

    2013-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacement is a common disorder in patients with internal derangement. Certain anatomic features of TMJ may make the patient prone to this condition, namely lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) insertion variations. The aim of this study was to investigate LPM attachments and their relationships with disc displacement and subsequent pathologic changes. A total of 26 patients with clinical temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and a control group of 14 unaffected individuals were studied. Magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were taken to evaluate LPM insertion patterns, superior LPM head pathologic changes, and relative disc to condyle position. Data registration and analysis were done using SPSS v. 16.0. The most common variation (type I) was shown to be the superior head with two bundles, one attached to the disc and another to the condyle. No significant relationship between LPM insertion type and disc displacement or pathologic changes of the muscle was found. However, a link between disc displacement and muscle pathologic changes was established (P=0.001).