Science.gov

Sample records for rabbit temporomandibular joint

  1. Sodium iodoacetate induced osteoarthrosis model in rabbit temporomandibular joint: CT and histological study (part I).

    PubMed

    Güler, N; Kürkçü, M; Duygu, G; Cam, B

    2011-11-01

    Studies to elucidate the pathophysiology of osteoarthrosis have been hampered by the lack of a rapid, reproducible animal model that mimics the histopathology and symptoms associated with the disease. The aim of this study is to evaluate the radiological, histological and histomorphometrical findings of four different concentrations of sodium iodoacetate (MIA) to create osteoarthrosis by using an arthrocentesis technique on rabbit temporomandibular joint (TMJ). 12 New Zealand white male rabbits received an injection of MIA (50 μl dose of 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3mg/ml concentrations) to a single joint of each group by arthrocentesis. Computed tomography (CT) images were obtained pre- and post-injections at 2, 4 and 6 weeks. Early osteoarthritic changes in the rabbit TMJ were found histologically at 4 weeks and with a 3mg/ml concentration of MIA. The mean subchondral bone volume depended on the concentration of MIA and was 62±2.6%, 63±4.1%, 42±3.6% and 38±3.8%, respectively. A minor abnormality was found on CT in six joints at the 4-week follow up. MIA injection and arthrocentesis offer a rapid and minimally invasive method of reproducing histologically osteoarthrotic lesions in the rabbit TMJ.

  2. Autologous adipose stem cells and polylactide discs in the replacement of the rabbit temporomandibular joint disc

    PubMed Central

    Ahtiainen, Katja; Mauno, Jari; Ellä, Ville; Hagström, Jaana; Lindqvist, Christian; Miettinen, Susanna; Ylikomi, Timo; Kellomäki, Minna; Seppänen, Riitta

    2013-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc lacks functional replacement after discectomy. We investigated tissue-engineered bilayer polylactide (PLA) discs and autologous adipose stem cells (ASCs) as a potential replacement for the TMJ disc. These ASC discs were pre-cultured either in control or in differentiation medium, including transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 for one week. Prior to implantation, expression of fibrocartilaginous genes was measured by qRT-PCR. The control and differentiated ASC discs were implanted, respectively, in the right and left TMJs of rabbits for six (n = 5) and 12 months (n = 5). Thereafter, the excised TMJ areas were examined with cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and histology. No signs of infection, inflammation or foreign body reactions were detected at histology, whereas chronic arthrosis and considerable condylar hypertrophy were observed in all operated joints at CBCT. The left condyle treated with the differentiated ASC discs appeared consistently smoother and more sclerotic than the right condyle. The ASC disc replacement resulted in dislocation and morphological changes in the rabbit TMJ. The ASC discs pre-treated with TGF-β1 enhanced the condylar integrity. While adverse tissue reactions were not shown, the authors suggest that with improved attachment and design, the PLA disc and biomaterial itself would hold potential for TMJ disc replacement. PMID:23720535

  3. Decreased Temporomandibular Joint Range of Motion in a Model of Early Osteoarthritis in the Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Sarah E.; Tudares, Mauro A.; Tashman, Scott; Almarza, Alejandro J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Analysis of mandibular biomechanics could help with understanding the mechanisms of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders (TMJDs), such as osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA), by investigating the effects of injury or disease on TMJ movement. The objective of the present study was to determine the functional kinematic implications of mild TMJ-OA degeneration caused by altered occlusion from unilateral splints in the rabbit. Materials and Methods Altered occlusion of the TMJ was mechanically induced in rabbits by way of a unilateral molar dental splint (n = 3). TMJ motion was assessed using 3-dimensional (3D) skeletal kinematics twice, once before and once after 6 weeks of splint placement with the splints removed, after allowing 3 days of recovery. The relative motion of the condyle to the fossa and the distance between the incisors were tracked. Results An overall decrease in the range of joint movement was observed at the incisors and in the joint space between the condyle and fossa. The incisor movement decreased from 7.0 ± 0.5 mm to 6.2 ± 0.5 mm right to left, from 5.5 ± 2.2 mm to 4.6 ± 0.8 mm anterior to posterior, and from 13.3 ± 1.8 mm to 11.6 ± 1.4 mm superior to inferior (P < .05). The total magnitude of the maximum distance between the points on the condyle and fossa decreased from 3.6 ± 0.8 mm to 3.1 ± 0.6 mm for the working condyle and 2.8 ± 0.4 mm to 2.5 ± 0.4 mm for the balancing condyle (P < .05). The largest decreases were seen in the anteroposterior direction for both condyles. Conclusion Determining the changes in condylar movement might lead to a better understanding of the early predictors in the development of TMJ-OA and determining when the symptoms become a chronic, irreversible problem. PMID:25889371

  4. Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects your jaw to the side of your head. When it works well, it enables you to ... For people with TMJ dysfunction, problems with the joint and muscles around it may cause Pain that ...

  5. Histological changes in the temporomandibular joint in rabbits depending on the extent of mandibular lengthening by osteodistraction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Gwan; Ha, Jeong-Wan; Park, Joo-Cheol

    2004-12-01

    We studied the histological changes in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) after unilateral mandibular distraction osteogenesis in rabbits. Eight rabbits were used, two of which served as controls and the other six had distraction of the left mandibular body after a latency period of 7 days at a rate of 0.5mm a day for a total of 2mm (n = 2), 3.5mm (n = 2), and 5mm (n = 2) of distraction. After a 14-day consolidation period, TMJs from both sides were harvested and prepared for histological examination under an optical microscope using haematoxylin and eosin stain. We found no degenerative or inflammatory changes in either TMJ in any of the groups. Endochondral ossification in the condyle was greater on the opposite side in the experimental group than in the condyles of the control group. Endochondral ossification was active in the 3.5-mm group.

  6. Rabbit model for osteoarthrosis of the temporomandibular joint as a basis for assessment of outcomes after intervention.

    PubMed

    Artuzi, Felipe Ernesto; Langie, Renan; Abreu, Maíra Cavallet de; Quevedo, Alexandre Silva; Corsetti, Adriana; Ponzoni, Deise; Puricelli, Edela

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis can be induced in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by primary or secondary trauma, or overloading of the joint. We have therefore systematically evaluated the histological progression of experimental osteoarthritis induced by a high concentration of monosodium iodoacetate into the rabbit TMJ. These findings may contribute to the establishment of a protocol to investigate the benefits of treatment of osteoarthritis of the TMJ. We used 21 male New Zealand rabbits; the 15 in the test group were given an intra-articular injection of monosodium iodoacetate 10mg/ml into the right TMJ and were killed after 60 (n=5), 80 (n=5), and 100 days (n=5). The six in the control group were given an injection of saline into the right TMJ. The assessment system for osteoarthritis based on six grades was used for the histological analysis of severity. The model was effective in producing histological changes in the cartilage consistent with those found in osteoarthritis at all time points. The within-group analysis indicated that the disease did not progress after 60 days. The successful induction of osteoarthritis in this way, its stabilisation after 60 days, and the appropriate size of the animal suggest that this experimental model is ideal for future studies of the effectiveness of treatment in osteoarthritis of the TMJ.

  7. [The temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Louryan, S

    1992-10-01

    With its discordant articular surfaces and complete division in two cavities separated by a disk, the temporomandibular joint appears as a complex anatomical and functional entity. Combined movements involving anteroposterior gliding between the disk and temporal bone in the upper cavity, anteroposterior condyle translation, hinge and rotation movements between the disk and mandibular condyle contribute to the different movements of the jaw. With dental occlusion, the masticatory apparatus therefore includes five functionally coordinated articular compartments. Various impairments of the normal static and dynamic features of the temporomandibular joint may lead to relatively frequent pathological conditions which can be easily diagnosed by modern imaging and arthroscopic methods.

  8. Temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Buescher, Jennifer J

    2007-11-15

    Temporomandibular joint disorders are common in adults; as many as one third of adults report having one or more symptoms, which include jaw or neck pain, headache, and clicking or grating within the joint. Most symptoms improve without treatment, but various noninvasive therapies may reduce pain for patients who have not experienced relief from self-care therapies. Physical therapy modalities (e.g., iontophoresis, phonophoresis), psychological therapies (e.g., cognitive behavior therapy), relaxation techniques, and complementary therapies (e.g., acupuncture, hypnosis) are all used for the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders; however, no therapies have been shown to be uniformly superior for the treatment of pain or oral dysfunction. Noninvasive therapies should be attempted before pursuing invasive, permanent, or semi-permanent treatments that have the potential to cause irreparable harm. Dental occlusion therapy (e.g., oral splinting) is a common treatment for temporomandibular joint disorders, but a recent systematic review found insufficient evidence for or against its use. Some patients with intractable temporomandibular joint disorders develop chronic pain syndrome and may benefit from treatment, including antidepressants or cognitive behavior therapy.

  9. Response properties of temporomandibular joint mechanosensitive neurons in the trigeminal sensory complex of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Osuke; Tsuboi, Akito; Tabata, Takayoshi; Takafuji, Yasuo; Sakurai, Takeshi; Watanabe, Makoto

    2012-10-01

    The neurophysiological properties of neurons sensitive to TMJ movement (TMJ neurons) in the trigeminal sensory complex (Vcomp) during passive movement of the isolated condyle were examined in 46 rabbits. Discharges of TMJ neurons from the rostral part of the Vcomp were recorded with a microelectrode when the isolated condyle was moved manually and with a computer-regulated mechanostimulator. A total of 443 neurons responding to mechanical stimulation of the face and oral cavity were recorded from the brainstem. Twenty-one TMJ neurons were detected rostrocaudally from the dorsal part of the trigeminal principal sensory nucleus (NVsnpr), subnucleus oralis of the trigeminal spinal nucleus, and reticular formation surrounding the trigeminal motor nucleus. Most of the TMJ neurons were located in the dorso-rostral part of the NVsnpr. Of the TMJ units recorded, 90 % were slowly adapting and 26 % had an accompanying resting discharge. The majority (86 %) of the TMJ units responded to the movement of the isolated condyle in the anterior and/or ventral directions, and half were sensitive to the condyle movement in a single direction. The discharge frequencies of TMJ units increased as the condyle displacement and constant velocity (5 mm/s) increased within a 5-mm anterior displacement of the isolated condyle. Based on these results, we conclude that sensory information is processed by TMJ neurons encoding at least joint position and displacement in the physiological range of mandibular displacement.

  10. Posttraumatic Temporomandibular Joint Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Giannakopoulos, Helen E.; Quinn, Peter D.; Granquist, Eric; Chou, Joli C.

    2009-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has many essential functions. None of its components are exempt from injury. Facial asymmetry, malocclusion, disturbances in growth, osteoarthritis, and ankylosis can manifest as complications from trauma to the TMJ. The goals of initial treatment include achievement of pretraumatic function, restoration of facial symmetry, and resolution of pain. These same objectives hold true for late repairs and reconstruction of the TMJ apparatus. Treatment is demanding, and with opposing approaches. The following article explores various treatment options for problems presenting as a result of a history of trauma to the TMJ. PMID:22110802

  11. Temporomandibular joint pain and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Herb, Kathleen; Cho, Sung; Stiles, Marlind Alan

    2006-12-01

    Pain caused by temporomandibular disorders originates from either muscular or articular conditions, or both. Distinguishing the precise source of the pain is a significant diagnostic challenge to clinicians, and effective management hinges on establishing a correct diagnosis. This paper examines terminology and regional anatomy as it pertains to functional and dysfunctional states of the temporomandibular joint and muscles of mastication. A review of the pathophysiology of the most common disorders is provided. Trends in evaluation, diagnosis, treatment, and research are presented.

  12. Temporomandibular joint disorders in children.

    PubMed

    Howard, James A

    2013-01-01

    A child's difficulty in verbalizing the precise location and nature of facial pain and jaw dysfunction often results in a nondefinitive history, increasing the importance of the dentist's awareness of the early signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). A focused examination of the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joints, and associated capsular and ligamentous structures can reveal if a patient's symptoms are TMD in origin. An accurate differential diagnosis enables timely referral to appropriate health care providers and minimizes the use of diagnostic imaging.

  13. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders and Orofacial Pain.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mansur; Schiffman, Eric L

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) affect 5% to 12% of the United States population. This article discusses common conditions related to temporomandibular joints, including disc displacements, inflammatory disturbances, loose joint bodies, traumatic disturbances, and developmental conditions. Also addressed are the appropriate imaging modalities and diagnostic criteria for TMD.

  14. Strapping for temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Babu, Abraham Samuel; John, Sandhya Mary; Unni, Amith

    2008-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD) is a common problem seen in many of the dental clinics. Management of this depends on an accurate diagnosis of the cause for the TMJD. Physical therapy and rehabilitation play a vital role in the management of these dysfunctions. Physical therapy is useful in treating post-traumatic stiffness of the TMJ while strapping of the TMJ for a dysfunction along with conventional physical therapy is of benefit in terms of reduction in click, decrease in pain, and an improvement in function.

  15. Characteristics of temporomandibular joint in patients with temporomandibular joint complaint

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanfeng; Guo, Xiaoqian; Sun, Xiaoxue; Wang, Ning; Xie, Min; Zhang, Jianqiang; Lv, Yuan; Han, Weili; Hu, Min; Liu, Hongchen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: This study was to investigate whether there was statistical difference between the bilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in patients with unilateral TMJ pain or joint sounds, using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods: TMJ CBCT images of 123 cases were used to preliminarily determine the indicators suitable for the measuring method. TMJ CBCT image reconstruction was performed and 19 indicators were measured. Thirty-six cases without TMJ complaint served as controls. The comparison of bilateral TMJs was analyzed by paired t-test to find out the indicators without statistical significance. Twenty-nine patients with unilateral TMJ pain or joint sounds who underwent CBCT at the hospital were enrolled for the comparative study. The measured values were analyzed by paired t-test to determine the indicators with statistical difference. Results: In the control group, only radius value of bilateral TMJ was different statistically (P < 0.05). In the TMJ complaint group, the vertical 60° joint space of the bilateral TMJ was statistically different (P < 0.05) and the rest of the measured values showed no statistical difference. Conclusions: In the patients with unilateral TMJ pain or joint sounds, the vertical 60° joint space of the symptomatic side was significantly increased comparing with the asymptomatic side. PMID:26629112

  16. [Condylar fracture and temporomandibular joint ankylosis].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi

    2016-03-01

    This article summarized the advances in treatment and research of temporomandibular joint surgery in the last 5 years which was presented in "The 2nd Condyle Fracture and Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis Symposium". The content includes 5 parts: non-surgical treatment of children condyle fracture and long-term follow-up, the improvement of operative approach for condyle fracture and key techniques, the importance and the method for the simultanesous reduction of disc in condylar fracture treatment, the development of traumatic temporomandibular joint ankylosis similar to hypertrophic non-union and the improved safety and accuracy by applying digital surgery in joint surgery.

  17. Reoperative temporomandibular joint surgery.

    PubMed

    Vega, Luis G; Gutta, Rajesh; Louis, Patrick

    2011-02-01

    TMJ surgeries are not always successful. Many potential pitfalls can occur during any phase of the treatment and can lead to complications, less than desirable results, and short- or long-term failures. Unsatisfactory results can occur for multiple reasons, including misdiagnosis of the original pathologic condition, incorrect selection of surgical technique, technical failures, complications, systemic disease, and unrealistic expectations. This article focuses on the reoperation of the TMJ primarily in cases of internal derangement and discusses TMJ arthrocentesis, arthroscopy, modified condylotomy, and open joint procedures.

  18. Engineering Alloplastic Temporomandibular Joint Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Sinno, Hani; Tahiri, Youssef; Gilardino, Mirko; Bobyn, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are part of a heterogeneous group of pathologies that manifest with a constellation of signs and symptoms. They are the most frequent cause of chronic orofacial pain and are prevalent in 12% of the general population. Despite the debilitating nature of these disorders, there is no standardization for treatment of the diseased temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this review, we present an overview of the functional anatomy of the TMJ and the engineering concepts that must be understood to better understand the indications for surgical management, the types of available treatments and the requirements for reconstruction. A comparison is made of the clinical outcomes with autogenous versus alloplastic reconstruction, including a history of alloplastic materials and the design features of currently available implants. Emphasis is made on material selection, modulus, stiffness, notch sensitivity and modularity. For the treatment of TMD, engineered TMJ alloplastic replacements have had considerable promise with additional room for improvement using new materials and recent design concepts. PMID:22363183

  19. [Temporomandibular joint, occlusion and bruxism].

    PubMed

    Orthlieb, J D; Ré, J P; Jeany, M; Giraudeau, A

    2016-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint and dental occlusion are joined for better and worse. TMJ has its own weaknesses, sometimes indicated by bad functional habits and occlusal disorders. Occlusal analysis needs to be addressed simply and clearly. The term "malocclusion" is not reliable to build epidemiological studies, etiologic mechanisms or therapeutic advice on this "diagnosis". Understanding the impact of pathogenic malocclusion is not just about occlusal relationships that are more or less defective, it requires to locate them within the skeletal framework, the articular and behavioural context of the patient, and above all to assess their impact on the functions of the masticatory system. The TMJ-occlusion couple is often symbiotic, developing together in relation to its environment, compensating for its own shortcomings. However, a third partner may alter this relationship, such as bruxism, or more generally oral parafunctions, trauma or an interventionist practitioner.

  20. Temporomandibular joint diagnostics using CBCT

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamsson, A-K; Kristensen, M; Arvidsson, L Z

    2015-01-01

    The present review will give an update on temporomandibular joint (TMJ) imaging using CBCT. It will focus on diagnostic accuracy and the value of CBCT compared with other imaging modalities for the evaluation of TMJs in different categories of patients; osteoarthritis (OA), juvenile OA, rheumatoid arthritis and related joint diseases, juvenile idiopathic arthritis and other intra-articular conditions. Finally, sections on other aspects of CBCT research related to the TMJ, clinical decision-making and concluding remarks are added. CBCT has emerged as a cost- and dose-effective imaging modality for the diagnostic assessment of a variety of TMJ conditions. The imaging modality has been found to be superior to conventional radiographical examinations as well as MRI in assessment of the TMJ. However, it should be emphasized that the diagnostic information obtained is limited to the morphology of the osseous joint components, cortical bone integrity and subcortical bone destruction/production. For evaluation of soft-tissue abnormalities, MRI is mandatory. There is an obvious need for research on the impact of CBCT examinations on patient outcome. PMID:25369205

  1. Subchondral bone changes and chondrogenic capacity of progenitor cells from subchondral bone in the collagenase-induced temporomandibular joints osteoarthritis rabbit model

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guomin; Zhu, Songsong; Sun, Xiumei; Hu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The goals of this study were to characterize subchondral bone changes, and to determine biological activity characteristics of progenitor cell populations from subchondral bone in the collagenase-induced temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJOA) rabbit model. Greater understanding of such pathological changes occurring in TMJOA samples is critical in the future treatment modalities regarding cartilage protection and repair. Furthermore, the use of progenitor cell populations in various cartilage regeneration strategies proves to be a fruitful avenue for research and clinical applications. Materials and methods: Bone remodeling and anabolic activity of subchondral bone was evaluated by hematoxylin-eosin (H&E), Alcian blue-periodic acid-Schiff (AB-PAS) staining and immuohistochemical staining. The biological activity characteristics of progenitor cells were assessed by expressions of collagen type II, CD44, SOX-9 and MMP-9 by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Results: In most of the specimens, cartilage of the digested area displayed a reaction characterized by thickening of the cartilage cellular structure with retraction structure formation in the subchondral bone. Most of the specimens focuses on chondroid metaplasia were observed in the subchondral bone, promoting its remodeling, which could develop to endochondral ossification and increasing subchondral bone size. Meanwhile, immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that CD44 expressions in subchondral bone were most significantly increased in TMJOA at 2 weeks group (P < 0.01). And, at 4, 6 and 8 weeks groups, the osteochondral junction had completely disappeared by active subchondral bone remodeling, and collagen type II, CD44, SOX-9 and MMP-9 expressions in active subchondral bone region were significantly increased in TMJOA (P < 0.05). In addition, western blot analysis revealed that CD44 expression significantly emerged in subchondral bone region at 2 weeks group (P < 0

  2. Temporomandibular joint multidisciplinary team clinic.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nabeela; Poate, Tim; Nacher-Garcia, Cristina; Pugh, Nicola; Cowgill, Helen; Page, Lisa; Matthews, N Shaun

    2014-11-01

    Patients with dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) commonly present to oral and maxillofacial departments and are increasingly being managed by a subspecialist group of surgeons. We review the outcomes of patients attending a specialist TMJ multidisciplinary team (MDT) clinic. All patients are simultaneously reviewed by a consultant oral and maxillofacial surgeon, consultant in oral medicine, specialist physiotherapist, and maxillofacial prosthetist, and they can also see a consultant liaison psychiatrist. They are referred from primary, secondary, and tertiary care when medical and surgical treatment in the routine TMJ clinic has failed, and are triaged by the attending maxillofacial surgeon. On discharge they are returned to the care of the referring practitioner. We review the outcomes of patients attending this clinic over a 2-year period and show improvements in pain scores and maximal incisal opening, as well as quality of life outcome measures. All units in the UK with an interest in the management of diseases of the TMJ should consider establishing this type of clinic and should use available resources and expertise to maximise outcomes.

  3. Pathogenesis of degenerative temporomandibular joint arthritides.

    PubMed

    Milam, Stephen B

    2005-09-01

    Over the past decade, remarkable progress has been made in the study of molecular mechanisms involved in degenerative temporomandibular joint arthritides. Based on recent findings, models of degenerative temporomandibular joint disease predict that mechanical loads trigger a cascade of molecular events leading to disease in susceptible individuals. These events involve the production or release of free radicals, cytokines, fatty acid catabolites, neuropeptides, and matrix-degrading enzymes. Under normal circumstances, these molecules may be involved in the remodeling of articular tissues in response to changing functional demands. However, if functional demands exceed the adaptive capacity of the temporomandibular joint or if the affected individual is susceptible to maladaptive responses, then a disease state will ensue. An individual's susceptibility to degenerative temporomandibular joint disease may be determined by several factors, including genetic backdrop, sex, age, and nutritional status. It is hoped that, by furthering our understanding of the molecular events that underlie degenerative temporomandibular joint diseases, improved diagnostics and effective therapies for these debilitating conditions will be developed.

  4. [Temporomandibular joint disorders: Physiotherapy and postural approaches].

    PubMed

    Breton-Torres, I; Trichot, S; Yachouh, J; Jammet, P

    2016-09-01

    Rehabilitation of temporomandibular joint dysfunctions has for a long time tried to treat symptoms: pain relief, joint kinetics restoration, disk re-capture by manual maneuvers. The authors present their own therapeutic approach, which is no longer limited to symptoms, but addresses the causes and identifies risk factors to prevent relapse.

  5. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to be... and Drug Administration on or before March 30, 1999, for any total temporomandibular joint...

  6. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. (a) Identification. A total temporomandibular joint prosthesis is a device that is intended to...

  7. Temporomandibular joint cytokine profiles in the horse.

    PubMed

    Carmalt, James L; Gordon, John R; Allen, Andrew L

    2006-06-01

    It has been suggested that dental abnormalities lead to temporomandibular joint inflammation and pain that may be mitigated by regular dental care. There is considerable literature on the pathophysiology of equine joint disease including studies on cytokine profiles in diseased appendicular joints. This study examined the effects of age and dental malocclusions summarized as a dental pathology score on equine temporomandibular joint cytokine (IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF alpha and TGF-beta1, -beta2, -beta3) concentrations. TGF-beta3 was not detected in any joint sample. IL-1, IL-6 and TNF alpha were not influenced by age. Foals had significantly lower concentrations of lL-8 and TGF-beta1, and higher levels of TGF-beta2 compared with older horses. Age did not effect cytokine concentration in older horses although there was a trend towards increasing 1L-8 with age. The dental pathology score increased with age in mature horses, however there was no effect of dental pathology score on cytokine concentration. There was no effect of incisor eruption, and presence or number of periodontal lesions on temporomandibular joint cytokine concentration. Our findings indicate that age but not dental pathology affected temporomandibular joint proinflammatory cytokine concentration in this population of horses.

  8. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Klüppel, Leandro Eduardo; Bernabé, Felipe Bueno Rosetti; Primo, Bruno Tochetto; Stringhini, Diego José; da Costa, Delson João; Rebellato, Nelson Luis Barbosa; Müller, Paulo Roberto

    2012-11-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint is a rare acute infectious disease that requires attention from physicians and, once misdiagnosed, can have several implications for a patient. The most common microorganisms related to this disease are Staphylococcus aureus, Neisseria, Haemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus. The infection of the joint may be caused by a direct spread of a local infection or by hematogenous inoculation from a distant focus. General predisposing factors, such as immunodepression, can eventually be found. The aim of the current study was to report a case in which a patient with an articular infection resulting from hematogenous dissemination from a distant site was successfully treated using joint drainage and systemic antibiotics. Secretion culture from the temporomandibular joint space was positive for S. aureus. After 1 month of antimicrobial therapy, the patient was asymptomatic and mandibular function was normal. Literature related to this topic was reviewed and discussed.

  9. [Kinesiotherapy and temporomandibular joint disorders].

    PubMed

    Bialas, C

    1997-01-01

    Physical therapy management is a part of the therapeutic treatment established in close relationship with the dentist or the maxillofacial surgery. The role of pain has always been an important evil, the psychological background has also to be taken into consideration. The sedative and calming role played by massage and relaxation can not occult the longterm improvement of functional rehabilitation. The aspect of physical therapy in relation to temporomandibular disorders is disregarded by the aspects because of its important role in functional treatment.

  10. Imaging of the temporomandibular joint: An update

    PubMed Central

    Bag, Asim K; Gaddikeri, Santhosh; Singhal, Aparna; Hardin, Simms; Tran, Benson D; Medina, Josue A; Curé, Joel K

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is continuously evolving with advancement of imaging technologies. Many different imaging modalities are currently used to evaluate the TMJ. Magnetic resonance imaging is commonly used for evaluation of the TMJ due to its superior contrast resolution and its ability to acquire dynamic imaging for demonstration of the functionality of the joint. Computed tomography and ultrasound imaging have specific indication in imaging of the TMJ. This article focuses on state of the art imaging of the temporomandibular joint. Relevant normal anatomy and biomechanics of movement of the TMJ are discussed for better understanding of many TMJ pathologies. Imaging of internal derangements is discussed in detail. Different arthropathies and common tumors are also discussed in this article. PMID:25170394

  11. Orthognathic surgery and temporomandibular joint symptoms.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hwi-Dong; Kim, Sang Yoon; Park, Hyung-Sik; Jung, Young-Soo

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this article is to review temporomandibular joint symptoms as well as the effects of orthognathic surgery(OGS) on temporomandibular joint(TMJ). The causes of temporomandibular joint disease(TMD) are multifactorial, and the symptoms of TMD manifest as a limited range of motion of mandible, pain in masticatory muscles and TMJ, Joint noise (clicking, popping, or crepitus), myofascial pain, and other functional limitations. Treatment must be started based on the proper diagnosis, and almost symptoms could be subsided by reversible options. Minimally invasive options and open arthroplasty are also available following reversible treatment when indicated. TMD manifesting in a variety of symptoms, also can apply abnormal stress to mandibular condyles and affect its growth pattern of mandible. Thus, adaptive developmental changes on mandibular condyles and post-developmental degenerative changes of mandibular condyles can create alteration on facial skeleton and occlusion. The changes of facial skeleton in DFD patients following OGS have an impact on TMJ, masticatory musculature, and surrounding soft tissues, and the changes of TMJ symptoms. Maxillofacial surgeons must remind that any surgical procedures involving mandibular osteotomy can directly affect TMJ symptoms, thus pre-existing TMJ symptoms and diagnoses should be considered prior to treatment planning and OGS.

  12. Imaging Approach to Temporomandibular Joint Disorders.

    PubMed

    Morales, H; Cornelius, R

    2016-03-01

    Internal derangement is the most common temporomandibular joint disorder. Degenerative osteoarthritis and trauma are next in frequency. Less common pathology includes rheumatoid arthritis, synovial chondromatosis, calcium pyrophosphate dehydrate deposition disease, pigmented villonodular synovitis, tumors, infection, and osteonecrosis. We provide a systematic approach to facilitate interpretation based on major anatomic structures: disc-attachments, joint space, condyle, and lateral pterygoid muscle. Relevant graphic anatomy and state of the art imaging are discussed in correlation with current clinical and therapeutic highlights of pathologic entities affecting the joint.

  13. Gnathological splint therapy in temporomandibular joint disorder

    PubMed Central

    Gnanashanmugham, K.; Saravanan, B.; Sukumar, M. R.; Tajir, T. Faisal

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) forms an integral functional part of stomatognathic system. Position, shape, structure and function of teeth have an influence on the proper functioning and health of TMJ. But a problem associated with TMJ is often neglected, and treatment for it is mostly restricted to palliative therapy. A proper understanding of the underlying cause of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) is necessary to device a proper treatment plan. Etiology of TMDs varies from idiopathic reasons to systemic disorders. The option of Gnathological splint is a conservative, safe and an effective mode of therapy for TMDs caused by occlusal discrepancies (fulcrum/interferences). This article presents a case report of a patient with TMD caused by occlusal discrepancy PMID:26015741

  14. [Tinnitus and temporomandibular joint: State of the art].

    PubMed

    Lina-Granade, G; Truy, E; Ionescu, E; Garnier, P; Thai Van, H

    2016-12-01

    Tinnitus has been described in temporomandibular joint dysfunction for a long time. Yet, other disorders, such as hearing loss, stress, anxiety and depression, play a major role in the pathophysiology of tinnitus. Temporomandibular joint dysfunctions seem to increase the risk of tinnitus in patients with other predisposing factors. Especially somatosensory tinnitus, which is characterized by sound modulations with neck or mandible movements, is frequently associated with temporomandibular joint dysfunction, but it is not pathognomonic of such a disorder. In such cases, functional therapy of the temporomandibular joint should be part of the multidisciplinary rehabilitation of patients with tinnitus.

  15. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction following shotgun injury.

    PubMed

    Taglialatela Scafati, C; Taglialatela Scafati, S; Gargiulo, M; Cassese, M; Parascandolo, S

    2008-04-01

    Shotgun injuries to the maxillofacial region may have minor or, more often, devastating consequences. The most important factor in determining the extent of injury is the distance of the victim from the muzzle of the gun: usually, the longer the distance, the less severe the damage. Here is reported a case of shotgun injury sustained from a distance of approximately 10 m in which the deeper penetration of a single lead pellet led to significant involvement of the temporomandibular joint.

  16. Temporomandibular joint biomechanical restrictions: the fluid and synovial membrane.

    PubMed

    Cascone, P; Vetrano, S; Nicolai, G; Fabiani, F

    1999-07-01

    The authors analyze the functions of the synovial membrane and the chemical-physical properties of synovial fluid. In particular they evaluate the role played by synovial fluid in the complex mechanism of the temporomandibular joint. Every single part that belongs to the temporomandibular joint, together with the stomatognathic apparatus, plays a specific and particular role according to the dynamics and to the preservation of the correct temporomandibular joint physiology. The physiological postural and functional relationship between the various parts of the temporomandibular joint is guaranteed by a number of biomechanical restrictions that lead and influence the regular execution of the articular movements. The most involved biomechanical restrictions in the temporomandibular joint are the temporomandibular ligament, the lateral disc ligament, the bilaminar zone or retrodiscal tissue, the synovial membrane, and the synovial fluid.

  17. Functional anatomy of the temporomandibular joint (I).

    PubMed

    Sava, Anca; Scutariu, Mihaela Monica

    2012-01-01

    Jaw movement is analyzed as the action between two rigid components jointed together in a particular way, the movable mandible against the stabilized cranium. Jaw articulation distinguishes form most other synovial joints of the body by the coincidence of certain characteristic features. Its articular surfaces are not covered by hyaline cartilage as elsewhere. The two jointed components carry teeth the shape, position and occlusion of which having a unique influence on specific positions and movements within the joint. A fibrocartilaginous disc is interposed between upper and lower articular surfaces; this disc compensates for the incongruities in opposing parts and allows sliding, pivoting, and rotating movements between the bony components. These are the reasons for our review of the functional anatomy of the temporomandibular joint.

  18. [Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Ros Mendoza, L H; Cañete Celestino, E; Velilla Marco, O

    2008-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a small joint with complex anatomy and function. Diverse pathologies with very different symptoms can affect the TMJ. While various imaging techniques such as plain-film radiography and computed tomography can be useful, magnetic resonance imaging's superior contrast resolution reveals additional structures like the articular disk, making this technique essential for accurate diagnosis and treatment planning. We analyze the MRI signs of the different pathologies that can affect the TMJ from the structural and functional points of view.

  19. Intrauterine Temporomandibular Joint Dislocation: Prenatal Sonographic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Çil, Ahmet Said; Bozkurt, Murat; Bozkurt, Duygu Kara

    2014-01-01

    Congenital temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases are very rare disorders and are usually diagnosed in childhood. Developmental disorders of the TMJ such as hypoplasia, hyperplasia, and aplasia of the TMJ compartments are characterized by TMJ dysfunction. In childhood, these patients experience recurrent dislocation, pain, and malocclusion. We present the case of a 25-week fetus with unilateral TMJ dislocation with fluid retention in the joint diagnosed by ultrasonography. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of TMJ dislocation diagnosed by ultrasonographic evaluation during the prenatal period. PMID:23669613

  20. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940 Section 872.3940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... and Drug Administration on or before March 30, 1999, for any total temporomandibular joint...

  1. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis. 872.3940 Section 872.3940 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... and Drug Administration on or before March 30, 1999, for any total temporomandibular joint...

  2. Temporomandibular joint: disorders, treatments, and biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Ingawalé, Shirish; Goswami, Tarun

    2009-05-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a complex, sensitive, and highly mobile joint. Millions of people suffer from temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in USA alone. The TMD treatment options need to be looked at more fully to assess possible improvement of the available options and introduction of novel techniques. As reconstruction with either partial or total joint prosthesis is the potential treatment option in certain TMD conditions, it is essential to study outcomes of the FDA approved TMJ implants in a controlled comparative manner. Evaluating the kinetics and kinematics of the TMJ enables the understanding of structure and function of normal and diseased TMJ to predict changes due to alterations, and to propose more efficient methods of treatment. Although many researchers have conducted biomechanical analysis of the TMJ, many of the methods have certain limitations. Therefore, a more comprehensive analysis is necessary for better understanding of different movements and resulting forces and stresses in the joint components. This article provides the results of a state-of-the-art investigation of the TMJ anatomy, TMD, treatment options, a review of the FDA approved TMJ prosthetic devices, and the TMJ biomechanics.

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hayt, M W; Abrahams, J J; Blair, J

    2000-04-01

    The spectrum of disease that affects the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) can be varied. To differentiate among the diseases that cause pain and dysfunction, an intimate knowledge of the anatomy, physiology, and pathology of this region is necessary. Due to the joint's complex anatomy and relationship to the skin, it has been difficult to image in the past. Magnetic resonance imaging is ideally suited for visualizing TMJ because of its superb contrast resolution when imaging soft tissues. Magnetic resonance imaging allows simultaneous bilateral visualization of both joints. The ability to noninvasively resolve anatomic detail can be performed easily and quickly using magnetic resonance imaging. The development of magnetic resonance imaging has greatly aided the diagnosis of TMJ disorders. An understanding of TMJ anatomy and pathogenesis of TMJ pain is crucial for interpretation of magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent treatment.

  4. Diaphyseal aclasis affecting the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Welsh, G A; MacLeod, I

    1999-09-01

    Diaphyseal aclasis is a rare disorder of bone development in which multiple, cartilagenous exostoses develop and enlarge mainly on the ends of long bones. It has also been described in the vertebral column where it may give rise to spinal cord compression but has not previously been reported as occurring in the jaws. A case is reported in which a patient known to suffer from diaphyseal aclasis at many other anatomical sites displays temporomandibular joint changes which are highly suggestive of the disease now manifesting in the jaws. The presentation, investigations and treatment are described and the literature concerning previous cases of diaphyseal aclasis is reviewed.

  5. Septic Arthritis in the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Al-Khalisy, Hassan Mahdi; Nikiforov, Ivan; Mansoora, Qurat; Goldman, John; Cheriyath, Pramil

    2015-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare event that has only been reported a few dozen times worldwide. This case is remarkable for septic arthritis of the TMJ joint in an otherwise healthy male. Case Report: A 24-year-old male presented to the emergency department with periauricular swelling, erythema, fever, myalgia's and generalized joint pain. He had previously sought medical attention and was placed on ciprofloxacin. However, he developed facial swelling and a rash and had to discontinue the antibiotic. On physical exam the patient had a large swelling and tenderness in his left periauricular area, with erythema and deviation of the right mandible which limited his ability to open the mouth. A computed tomography showed mild asymmetric soft tissue swelling in the left pharyngeal region but did not show joint effusion. Subsequent magnetic resonance imaging did show effusion of the joint space. The effusion was drained, and the synovial fluid was submitted for gram stain, culture, and sensitivity. The cultures grew menthicillin sensitive Staphyloccocus Aureus. The patient was discharged to complete a two week course of intravenous (IV) Ceftriaxone and IV Vancomycin via home infusion. Conclusion: Septic Arthritis of the TMJ is a rare event with very specific clinical symptoms. Due to the low sensitivity of the computed tomography scan, magnetic resonance imaging should be considered when computed tomography scan is negative for TMJ effusion. PMID:26713295

  6. 21 CFR 872.3940 - Total temporomandibular joint prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3940 Total temporomandibular joint... implanted in the human jaw to replace the mandibular condyle and augment the glenoid fossa to...

  7. A new approach to arthrocentesis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Alkan, A; Kilic, E

    2009-01-01

    We describe a new temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthrocentesis technique using the irrigation pump from a surgical and dental implant motor, providing the highest hydraulic pressure reported in the literature for TMJ lavage.

  8. Unexpected temporomandibular joint findings during fixed appliance therapy.

    PubMed

    Owen, A H

    1998-06-01

    Six hundred consecutively debonded patients were retrospectively examined for the development of any temporomandibular joint signs or symptoms that developed during orthopedic/orthodontic treatment. Sixteen (2.6%) patients were found to have developed unexpected temporomandibular joint findings during treatment. Considering such a small sample, no conclusive results could be found, but several tendencies seemed to be apparent. Those types of patients who seemed to be most predisposed to developing temporomandibular joint problems included female Class II patients with excessive overjet and overbite and moderate to severe crowding of the lower arch. Ninety-three percent of the patients experienced posterior net condylar change in spite of using several different treatment mechanics. The types of treatments used included FJO appliances, headgear, Class II and Class III elastics, no elastics of any kind, extraction and nonextraction. This small study seems to suggest that temporomandibular joint signs and symptoms are changing, inconsistent, and ephemeral in many orthodontic patients regardless of the treatment mechanics.

  9. [Pharmacological therapy of temporomandibular joint pain].

    PubMed

    Hugger, Alfons; Schindler, Hans J; Türp, Jens C; Hugger, Sybille

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacological interventions in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain differ from corresponding therapeutic interventions of jaw muscle (myofascial) pain. An actual systematic literature search lists and evaluates available articles on randomised controlled trials for treatment of arthralgia of the TMJ. On the basis of the few available trial reports, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) seem to be effective, but side effects and drug interactions need to be considered. In relation to other therapeutic modalities, the rapidity of the onset of action of NSAIDs seems to be different, and the extension of side effects can be varied or reduced by changing the application route (oral versus topical). Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) as dietary supplement for special medical purposes can apparently evoke positive therapeutic effects in TMJ arthralgia which need to be analysed in further studies.

  10. Absorbed doses from temporomandibular joint radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, S.L.; Lanzetta, M.L.

    1985-06-01

    Thermoluminescent dosimeters were used in a tissue-equivalent phantom to measure doses of radiation absorbed by various structures in the head when the temporomandibular joint was examined by four different radiographic techniques--the transcranial, transorbital, and sigmoid notch (Parma) projections and the lateral tomograph. The highest doses of radiation occurred at the point of entry for the x-ray beam, ranging from 112 mrad for the transorbital view to 990 mrad for the sigmoid notch view. Only the transorbital projection a radiation dose to the lens of the eye. Of the four techniques evaluated, the lateral tomograph produced the highest doses to the pituitary gland and the bone marrow, while the sigmoid notch radiograph produced the highest doses to the parotid gland.

  11. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis: report of 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Manganello-Souza, L C; Mariani, P B

    2003-02-01

    The authors present a review of 14 patients with temporomandibular joint ankylosis treated between March 1992 and February 1997. Etiology of the ankylosis was trauma in four patients, ear infection in two, systemic infection in one case, congenital in another, and unknown in six. Patients were divided into two groups, according to their age: 16 years and under and over 16 years of age. The basic principle of surgical treatment in both groups is ample access for osseous resection and coronoidectomy. Costochondral grafts were used in group one (nine patients), while interposition of a silicone block, was performed in the second group (five patients). Follow-up evaluations were from twelve to 53 months (average 28.2 months). One case of recurrence occurred in the first group and no recurrences in the second group. The average long-term mouth opening in both groups was 32.8 mm.

  12. Temporomandibular Joint Fibrocartilage Degeneration from Unilateral Dental Splints

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Sarah E.; Lowe, Jesse R.; Tudares, Mauro A.; Gold, Michael S.; Almarza, Alejandro J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which altered loading in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), as might be associated with a maloclussion, drives degeneration of articulating surfaces in the TMJ. We therefore sought to quantify the effects of altered joint loading on the mechanical properties and biochemical content and distribution of TMJ fibrocartilage in the rabbit. Design Altered TMJ loading was induced with a 1 mm splint placed unilaterally over the maxillary and mandibular molars for six weeks. At that time, TMJ fibrocartilage was assessed by compression testing, biochemical content (collagen, glycosaminoglycan (GAG), DNA) and distribution (histology), for both the TMJ disc and the condylar fibrocartilage. Results There were no changes in the TMJ disc for any of the parameters tested. The condylar fibrocartilage from the splinted animals was significantly stiffer and the DNA content was significantly lower than that in control animals. There was significant remodeling in the condylar fibrocartilage layers as manifested by a change in GAG and collagen II distribution and a loss of defined cell layers. Conclusions A connection between the compressive properties of TMJ condylar fibrocartilage after 6 weeks of splinting and the changes in histology was observed. These results suggest a change in joint loading, leads to condylar damage, which may contribute to pain associated with at least some forms of TMJ disease. PMID:25247778

  13. Arthrocentesis for temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Peter A; Ilankovan, Vellupillai

    2006-06-01

    The management of refractory temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain is both challenging and controversial. A number of simple, noninvasive approaches have been used in the management of this condition with variable success. In patients who fail to respond to conventional conservative measures, in a joint that is not deemed to be grossly mechanically deranged, we advocate the use of TMJ arthrocentesis. In our practice, this is followed by intra-articular morphine infusion in an attempt to give long-term pain relief. Arthrocentesis is a simple technique with minimal morbidity that can be tried instead of more invasive procedures. To date we have used arthrocentesis of the upper joint space, with intra-articular morphine injection in over 500 TMJs. Approximately 90% of patients have found the procedure beneficial, with pain often being reduced 1 year after the procedure. We recommend arthrocentesis as an effective, minimally invasive technique in patients with continuing pain in the TMJ that is unresponsive to conservative management. We additionally advocate the use of intra-articular morphine as a long acting analgesic in these patients. Although arthrocentesis is a well documented technique and there have been many studies published in relation to the use of intra-articular morphine in orthopedic surgery, further research is required, to delineate its use in the TMJ more fully.

  14. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Reyes Macías, Juan Francisco; Sánchez Prieto, Martín

    2007-01-01

    Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) is a disease whose etiology is unknown, can be defined as a benign synovial process characterized by the formation of metaplastic cartilaginous nodes inside connective tissue of articular surfaces, is considered an active metaplastic phenomenon better than a neoplastic process; it presents a greater preference to affect women who constitute almost 70% of reported cases, the age range is wide and oscillates between 18-75 years (average 44.6 years). Between the main clinical findings are: pain, crackle, volume augmentation and a limited buccal opening. SC is an unusual state and the reports in the English literature are no more than 75 cases, only 66 of those where histologically verified, most of those were affecting great joints like hip, knee and shoulder, but if SC is not frequent in this sites, is even more infrequent on temporomandibular joint. The aim of this paper is to report a clinical case and at the same time to realize a brief review of the literature.

  15. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis: the Egyptian experience.

    PubMed Central

    el-Sheikh, M. M.

    1999-01-01

    This is a review of 204 patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis treated according to a definitive protocol in the Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Department of the Alexandria University Hospital during the period 1990-1996 with a follow-up varying from 1.5 to 7 years. A history of trauma was confirmed in 98% of cases. Patients were grouped into: (1) Those with ankylosis not associated with facial deformities. The management involves release of the ankylosed joint(s) and reconstruction of the condyle ramus unit(s) (CRUs) using costochondral graft(s) (CCGs). (2) Those with mandibular ankylosis complicated by facial bone deformities, either asymmetric or bird face. The treatment consists of release of the ankylosis, reconstruction of the CRUs, and correction of jaw deformities--all performed simultaneously. Respiratory embarrassment was an important presenting symptom in the second group, all of whom complained of night snoring, eight of whom had obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). In this latter group, respiratory obstruction improved dramatically after surgical intervention. The degree of mouth opening, monitored as the interincisal distance (IID) improved from a range of 0-12 mm to over 30 mm in 62% of patients and to 20-30 mm in 29% of patients. However, reankylosis was still around 8% and was attributed to lack of patient compliance in 75% and to iatrogenic factors in 25% of patients. CCGs resorption, whether partial or complete, occurred in 27% of patients, resulting in retarded growth, relapse of deformities and night snoring. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10325678

  16. Nasal obstruction may alleviate bruxism related temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Bektas, Devrim; Cankaya, Mustafa; Livaoglu, Murat

    2011-02-01

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is a collective term used to identify a group of musculoskeletal conditions of the temporomandibular region. Bruxism is a non-functional activity characterized by repeated tooth clenching or grinding in an unconscious manner. Over the time bruxism may lead to TMD by the uploading it causes. Nasal obstruction is a common complaint that necessitates mouth breathing when severe. The treatment of bruxism is frequently performed by oral appliances, which induce occlusal disengagement and relax jaw musculature and therefore reduce the force on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). We believe that nasal obstruction may indirectly have a preemptive and therapeutic effect on sleep bruxism related TMD by causing mouth breathing.

  17. Temporomandibular Joint Anatomy Assessed by CBCT Images

    PubMed Central

    Storti, Ennio; Nota, Alessandro; Ehsani, Shideh; Gatto, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Aim. Since cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) has been used for the study of craniofacial morphology, the attention of orthodontists has also focused on the mandibular condyle. The purpose of this brief review is to summarize the recent 3D CBCT images of mandibular condyle. Material and Methods. The eligibility criteria for the studies are (a) studies aimed at evaluating the anatomy of the temporomandibular joint; (b) studies performed with CBCT images; (c) studies on human subjects; (d) studies that were not clinical case-reports and clinical series; (e) studies reporting data on children, adolescents, or young adults (data from individuals with age ≤ 30 years). Sources included PubMed from June 2008 to June 2016. Results. 43 full-text articles were initially screened for eligibility. 13 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility. 11 articles were finally included in qualitative synthesis. The main topics treated in the studies are the volume and surface of the mandibular condyle, the bone changes on cortical surface, the facial asymmetry, and the optimum position of the condyle in the glenoid fossa. Conclusion. Additional studies will be necessary in the future, constructed with longitudinal methodology, especially in growing subjects. The limits of CBCT acquisitions are also highlighted. PMID:28261607

  18. [Total temporomandibular joint replacement with alloplastic prosthesis].

    PubMed

    García-Huerta, Marco Antonio; Romero-Flores, Jovita; Mena-Gómez, Eddy

    2012-01-01

    Three total temporomandibular joint (TMJ) replacement surgeries were performed on two patients with TMJ ankylosis using W. Lorenz system. The first surgery was performed on a female patient with osseous ankylosis who had no mandibular movement since she was 18 months old. The second surgery was on a patient with fibrous ankylosis who had an interincisive opening distance of 12 mm. Her condition was the result of a three year old subcondylar fracture which didn't receive any treatment. The first patient had total replacement of both TMJs, while the other just one TMJ. The follow up until today has been of eight months with an interincisive opening of 29 mm in the first patient and 34 mm in the other. There has not been any mandibular deviation during opening, nor postoperative pain in both cases. Facial nerve affection was not permanent in both patients. For all of this, we can conclude that total TMJ replacement is an effective treatment with stable results in patients with TMJ ankylosis.

  19. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction in various rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Aceves-Avila, F J; Chávez-López, M; Chavira-González, J R; Ramos-Remus, C

    2013-07-24

    Temporomandibular disorder (TMD) is an inclusive term in which those conditions disturbing the masticatory function are embraced. It has been estimated that 33% of the population have signs of TMD, but less than 5% of the population will require treatment. The objective of this study was to measure the frequency of TMD in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthrosis (OA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and systemic lupus erythematosus, and to define the limitations in everyday's life that patients perceive when present. A six-month survey of consecutive outpatients in a rheumatology clinic in a teaching hospital in Mexico was carried out. We defined TMD as: 1) the presence of pain; 2) difficulty on mouth opening, chewing or speaking; 3) the presence of non-harmonic movements of the temporomaxilar joints. All three characteristics had to be present. Z test was used to define differences between proportions. We present the results of 171 patients. Overall, 50 patients had TMD according to our operational definition (29.24%). Up to 76% of the sample had symptoms associated with the condition. TMD is more frequent in OA and in AS (29.24% vs 38% OA, P=0.009; 39% AS; P=0.005). We found no association between the severity of TMD and the request for specific attention for the discomfort produced by the condition. Only 8 of 50 (16%) patients with TMD had requested medical help for their symptoms, and they were not the most severe cases. TMD is more frequent in RA and OA. Although it may produce severe impairment, patients seem to adapt easily.

  20. Temporomandibular joint disorder and inner ear pruritus: resolution by eminectomy.

    PubMed

    Pentyala, Sahana; Mysore, Pooja; Moller, Daryn; Pentyala, Srinivas; Kardovich, Richard; Martino, Andrew; Proothi, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Recurrent dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disk is caused by many factors. Dislocation can result in an acute or chronic closed lock condition. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction is often presented with otalgia symptoms. Other aural symptoms such as deafness, tinnitus, pressure/blockage, and vertigo are also commonly presented together with TMJ dysfunction (Clin Otolaryngol Allied Sci. 1980;5:23-36). However, pruritus associated with TMJ dysfunction in the inner ear has never been reported in the literature. We report a case history of TMJ dysfunction and associated inner ear pruritus, which are both resolved by eminectomy.

  1. Global Body Posture Evaluation in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Eliza Tiemi; Akashi, Paula Marie Hanai; de Camargo Neves Sacco, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To identify the relationship between anterior disc displacement and global posture (plantar arches, lower limbs, shoulder and pelvic girdle, vertebral spine, head and mandibles). Common signs and symptoms of anterior disc displacement were also identified. INTRODUCTION: Global posture deviations cause body adaptation and realignment, which may interfere with the organization and function of the temporomandibular joint. METHODS : Global posture evaluation was performed in a group of 10 female patients (20 to 30 years of age) with temporomandibular joint disc displacement and in a control group of 16 healthy female volunteers matched for age, weight and height. Anterior disc displacement signs, symptoms and the presence of parafunctional habits were also identified through interview. RESULTS: Patients with disc displacement showed a higher incidence of pain in the temporomandibular joint area, but there were no differences in parafunctional habits between the groups. In the disc displacement group, postural deviations were found in the pelvis (posterior rotation), lumbar spine (hyperlordosis), thoracic spine (rectification), head (deviation to the right) and mandibles (deviation to the left with open mouth). There were no differences in the longitudinal plantar arches between the groups. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest a close relationship between body posture and temporomandibular disorder, though it is not possible to determine whether postural deviations are the cause or the result of the disorder. Hence, postural evaluation could be an important component in the overall approach to providing accurate prevention and treatment in the management of patients with temporomandibular disorder. PMID:19142549

  2. Temporomandibular joint computed tomography: development of a direct sagittal technique

    SciTech Connect

    van der Kuijl, B.; Vencken, L.M.; de Bont, L.G.; Boering, G. )

    1990-12-01

    Radiology plays an important role in the diagnosis of temporomandibular disorders. Different techniques are used with computed tomography offering simultaneous imaging of bone and soft tissues. It is therefore suited for visualization of the articular disk and may be used in patients with suspected internal derangements and other disorders of the temporomandibular joint. Previous research suggests advantages to direct sagittal scanning, which requires special positioning of the patient and a sophisticated scanning technique. This study describes the development of a new technique of direct sagittal computed tomographic imaging of the temporomandibular joint using a specially designed patient table and internal light visor positioning. No structures other than the patient's head are involved in the imaging process, and misleading artifacts from the arm or the shoulder are eliminated. The use of the scanogram allows precise correction of the condylar axis and selection of exact slice level.

  3. Cryosectional observations of functional anatomy of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Westesson, P L; Kurita, K; Eriksson, L; Katzberg, R W

    1989-09-01

    The anatomy and function of the temporomandibular joint are complex, and our understanding about how the retrocondylar tissues change when the condyle translates anteriorly has been incomplete. We therefore examined the sectional anatomy of 24 fresh human temporomandibular joints at different gradations of jaw opening, protrusion, and laterotrusion. We found that the tissues of the posterior disk attachment expanded in volume and occupied the space behind the condyle when the mouth was opened, protruded, or laterotruded to the contralateral side. Volumetric expansion of the tissue seemed to be due mainly to distension of the venous structures in the retrodiskal area. In the lateral region of the joint, tissue from the superior aspect of the parotid gland also seemed to contribute to the filling of the space posterior to the condyle. Thus, the retrodiskal tissue appears to have a substantial capacity to expand and fill the mandibular fossa when the condyle translates anteriorly. The possibility of a dynamic vascular physiology is suggested.

  4. ADAM10 localization in temporomandibular joint disk with internal derangement: an ex vivo immunohistochemical study.

    PubMed

    Loreto, Carla; Chiarenza, Giovanni Paolo Salvatore; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Imbesi, Rosa; Ruggeri, Alessandra; Almeida, Luis Edoardo; Leonardi, Rosalia

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the presence of ADAM10 in temporomandibular joint disk with internal derangement. Twenty-five paraffin blocks of displaced temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disk specimens from earlier investigations were retrieved from the archives of the University of Catania. Of these 16 had been removed from females and 9 from males; 11 with anterior disk displacement with reduction (ADDwR) and 14 with anterior disk displacement without reduction (ADDwoR). The sections were dehydrated, embedded in paraffin and cut. Then they were incubated in 0.3% H2O2/methanol and half of sections from each sample were incubated in diluted rabbit polyclonal anti-ADAM10 antibody. Then biotinylated anti-mouse/anti-rabbit IgG was applied to the sections, followed by avidin-biotin-perioxidase complex. The results were analyzed and the results were that ADAM10 was overexpressed in the posterior band of sections from patients with ADDwR compared to the other bands of both ADDwR and ADDwoR sections. Overexpression correlated with severe histopathological degeneration. We believe these results have the potential to provide insights into the pathogenesis of TMJ disk degeneration and to help design new therapeutic approaches targeting the proteolytic events that lead to tissue degeneration. Early therapeutic block of ADAM10 activity could succeed in limiting aggrecan-rich matrix breakdown without affecting normal physiology.

  5. Herniation of the temporomandibular joint into the external auditory canal: a complication of otologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Selesnick, S H; Carew, J F; DiBartolomeo, J R

    1995-11-01

    Herniation of the temporomandibular joint into the external auditory canal has been reported as a result of trauma, neoplasia, infection, inflammatory processes, or developmental malformations. This paper reviews the intimate relation of the temporomandibular joint to the temporal bone as well as the literature describing temporomandibular joint herniation into the external auditory canal. Four cases of temporomandibular joint herniation into the external auditory canal resulting from otologic surgery are presented. Their characteristic location, clinical and radiographic findings are described and contrasted to previously reported cases. Despite striking displacement of the temporomandibular joint into the external auditory canal, there were no clinical symptoms referable to this finding. The absence of symptoms distinguished this postoperative etiology of temporomandibular joint herniation from other etiologies mentioned above.

  6. Prevalence of signs of temporomandibular joint dysfunction in asymptomatic edentulous subjects: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Rajesh

    2010-06-01

    Patients having complete dentures with reduced vertical dimension generally do not manifest Temporomandibular Joint problems. It is not understood as to why the closure of jaws in dentulous individuals can predispose to Temporomandibular Joint problems, while the same etiology in edentulous subjects does not cause any concern. This study was planned to find out the prevalence of various Temporomandibular Joint dysfunction signs in subjects who were edentulous for a period of 6 months to 2 year. The various signs were obtained from a population of 100 healthy asymptomatic edentulous subjects by a questionnaire and then were clinically examined for the presence or absence of signs of Temporomandibular Joint dysfunction. 59% of the subjects exhibited one or more signs of Temporomandibular Joint dysfunction, 41% of the subjects did not show any signs of Temporomandibular Joint dysfunction. 56.6% of males reported signs of Temporomandibular Joint dysfunction when compared with females which was 62.5%. 43.3% of males did not show any signs of Temporomandibular Joint dysfunction when compared with those of the females which was 37.5%. The number of subjects who showed two signs was 29%, subjects who had only one sign was 25%. It was found that dysfunction was prevalent among both men and women in more than half of the asymptomatic subjects examined. 59% had one or as many as three signs of Temporomandibular dysfunction. The most commonly seen Joint dysfunction was the joint sounds which was 47%

  7. Oral splint for temporomandibular joint disorders with revolutionary fluid system

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Rahul; Jyoti, Bhuvan; Devi, Parvathi

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases and disorders refer to a complex and poorly understood set of conditions, manifested by pain in the area of the jaw and associated muscles and limitations in the ability to make the normal movements of speech, facial expression, eating, chewing, and swallowing. The conventional soft occlusal splint therapy is a much safer and effective mode of a conservative line of therapy in comparison to the surgical therapy for temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). The purpose of this article is to review the Aqualizer™, an hydrostatic oral splint, as accurate, effective treatment and differential diagnostic tool in TMD that allow treating the patient's pain quickly and accurately saving valuable treatment time. The review article has been prepared doing a literature review from the world-wide web and pubmed/medline. PMID:24019797

  8. Rationale of arthroscopic surgery of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Murakami, KenIchiro

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic surgery has been widely used for treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangements and diseases for the last 40 years. Although 626 articles have been hit by Pubmed search in terms of "TMJ arthroscopic surgery", this review article is described based on distinguished publishing works and on my experiences with TMJ arthroscopic surgery and related research with an aim to analyse the rationale of arthroscopic surgeries of the temporomandibular joint. With arthrocentesis emerging as an alternative, less invasive, treatment for internal derangement with closed lock, the primary indication of arthroscopic surgery seems to be somewhat limited. However, the value of endoscopic inspection and surgery has its position for both patient and physician with its long-term reliable results.

  9. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis surgery in a child: case report.

    PubMed

    Lima, Paulo Valério Presser; Kramer, Paulo Floriani; Ioppi, Letícia; Hoffmann, Renata da Rocha

    2011-07-01

    Temporomandibular joint ankylosis is one of the most significant disorders of the stomatognathic system because it causes pain associated with severe functional limitations, such as difficulty in chewing and psychological and clinical problems due to poor oral hygiene. These disorders are quite significant in children, since the treatment is even more complex due to the fact that the condylar region is a site of active growth. The earlier the diagnosis is established, the better the treatment prognosis. Ankylosis can be treated by interposition arthroplasty of the temporalis muscle fascia in conjunction with ipsilateral coronoidectomy. The purpose of the present study was to report a clinical case of temporomandibular joint ankylosis in a pediatric patient treated by interposition arthroplasty of the temporalis muscle fascia associated with coronoidectomy.

  10. Oral splint for temporomandibular joint disorders with revolutionary fluid system.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Rahul; Jyoti, Bhuvan; Devi, Parvathi

    2013-05-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) diseases and disorders refer to a complex and poorly understood set of conditions, manifested by pain in the area of the jaw and associated muscles and limitations in the ability to make the normal movements of speech, facial expression, eating, chewing, and swallowing. The conventional soft occlusal splint therapy is a much safer and effective mode of a conservative line of therapy in comparison to the surgical therapy for temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). The purpose of this article is to review the Aqualizer™, an hydrostatic oral splint, as accurate, effective treatment and differential diagnostic tool in TMD that allow treating the patient's pain quickly and accurately saving valuable treatment time. The review article has been prepared doing a literature review from the world-wide web and pubmed/medline.

  11. Update on the vitek partial and total temporomandibular joint systems.

    PubMed

    Kent, J N; Block, M S; Halpern, J; Fontenot, M G

    1993-04-01

    A retrospective recall study was done on 262 VK I (N = 138) and VK II (N = 124) (Vitek, Inc, Houston, TX) partial and total temporomandibular joints placed between 1982 and 1990. The cumulative success rate of VK I total joints observed for up to 10 years was approximately 20%, whereas the success rate of VK II total joints observed up to 6 years was approximately 80%. At the 5- to 6-year interval for each, these rates were 44% and 79%, respectively. Wear of the Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene polymer surface was the primary reason for VK I failure; there was no material failure of the VK II prostheses. Slightly better pain relief, increase in interincisal opening, improvement in diet, and greater overall satisfaction were noted with the use of VK II. A highly significant improvement in success data was found if no surgery had been performed before either VK I or VK II total joint placement. Rib grafts were not particularly helpful after removal of total joint prostheses, particularly if the patient had a history of multiple surgeries. Total temporomandibular joint surgery must be reserved for patients in whom alternative surgical methods have failed or are no longer indicated. All total joint implants, particularly the VK I, must be observed closely with clinical examination and imaging and removed at the earliest sign of material failure.

  12. Vertiginous crisis following temporomandibular joint athrocentesis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Vaira, Luigi Angelo; Soma, Damiano; Meloni, Silvio Mario; Dellàversana Orabona, Giovanni; Piombino, Pasquale; De Riu, Giacomo

    2017-03-01

    Temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis and arthroscopy have recently exceeded open surgeries for disorders that failed to respond to conservative treatment. The efficacy of arthrocentesis in reestablishing normal mouth opening and reducing pain and dysfunctions is now commonly accepted, but in contrast to arthroscopy, there are no large series studies on arthrocentesis complications. We report the major complication occurred in our experience: a case of a patient that complained of a violent vertigo, without hearing disorders, following the procedure.

  13. Regional 3D superimposition to assess temporomandibular joint condylar morphology

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, J; Gomes, L C R; Benavides, E; Nguyen, T; Paniagua, B; Styner, M; Boen, V; Gonçalves, J R; Cevidanes, L H S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the reliability of regional three-dimensional registration and superimposition methods for assessment of temporomandibular joint condylar morphology across subjects and longitudinally. Methods: The sample consisted of cone beam CT scans of 36 patients. The across-subject comparisons included 12 controls, mean age 41.3 ± 12.0 years, and 12 patients with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis, mean age 41.3 ± 14.7 years. The individual longitudinal assessments included 12 patients with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis, mean age 37.8 ± 16.7 years, followed up at pre-operative jaw surgery, immediately after and one-year post-operative. Surface models of all condyles were constructed from the cone beam CT scans. Two previously calibrated observers independently performed all registration methods. A landmark-based approach was used for the registration of across-subject condylar models, and temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis vs control group differences were computed with shape analysis. A voxel-based approach was used for registration of longitudinal scans calculated x, y, z degrees of freedom for translation and rotation. Two-way random intraclass correlation coefficients tested the interobserver reliability. Results: Statistically significant differences between the control group and the osteoarthritis group were consistently located on the lateral and medial poles for both observers. The interobserver differences were ≤0.2 mm. For individual longitudinal comparisons, the mean interobserver differences were ≤0.6 mm in translation errors and 1.2° in rotation errors, with excellent reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient >0.75). Conclusions: Condylar registration for across-subjects and longitudinal assessments is reliable and can be used to quantify subtle bony differences in the three-dimensional condylar morphology. PMID:24170802

  14. Current concepts in the pathogenesis of traumatic temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis can be classified into fibrous, fibro-osseous and bony ankylosis. It is still a huge challenge for oral and maxillofacial surgeons due to the technical difficulty and high incidence of recurrence. The poor outcome of disease may be partially attributed to the limited understanding of its pathogenesis. The purpose of this article was to comprehensively review the literature and summarise results from both human and animal studies related to the genesis of TMJ ankylosis. PMID:25189735

  15. Early magnetic resonance imaging control after temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis

    PubMed Central

    Ângelo, David Faustino; Sousa, Rita; Pinto, Isabel; Sanz, David; Gil, F. Monje; Salvado, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lysis and lavage arthrocentesis with viscosupplementation are an effective treatment for acute disc displacement (DD) without reduction. Clinical success seems to be related to multiple factors despite the lack of understanding of its mechanisms. The authors present a case report of 17-year-old women with acute open mouth limitation (12 mm), right TMJ pain-8/10 visual analog scale, right deviation when opening her mouth. The clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis was acute DD without reduction of right TMJ. Right TMJ arthrocentesis was purposed to the patient with lysis, lavage, and viscosupplementation of the upper joint space. After 5 days, a new MRI was performed to confirm upper joint space distension and disc position. Clinical improvement was obtained 5 days and 1 month after arthrocentesis. Upper joint space increased 6 mm and the disc remained displaced. We report the first early TMJ MRI image postoperative, with measurable upper joint space. PMID:26981483

  16. Early magnetic resonance imaging control after temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis.

    PubMed

    Ângelo, David Faustino; Sousa, Rita; Pinto, Isabel; Sanz, David; Gil, F Monje; Salvado, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lysis and lavage arthrocentesis with viscosupplementation are an effective treatment for acute disc displacement (DD) without reduction. Clinical success seems to be related to multiple factors despite the lack of understanding of its mechanisms. The authors present a case report of 17-year-old women with acute open mouth limitation (12 mm), right TMJ pain-8/10 visual analog scale, right deviation when opening her mouth. The clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis was acute DD without reduction of right TMJ. Right TMJ arthrocentesis was purposed to the patient with lysis, lavage, and viscosupplementation of the upper joint space. After 5 days, a new MRI was performed to confirm upper joint space distension and disc position. Clinical improvement was obtained 5 days and 1 month after arthrocentesis. Upper joint space increased 6 mm and the disc remained displaced. We report the first early TMJ MRI image postoperative, with measurable upper joint space.

  17. [How I Treat. An Anterior Temporomandibular Joint Dislocation].

    PubMed

    Gilon, Y; Johnen, J; Nizet, J L

    2015-09-01

    Anterior dislocation of the temporomandibular joint is not uncommon and requires prompt management. A defect of dislocation reduction can lead to severe functional impairment of a complex, and often active joint. The diagnosis is clinical and relatively obvious. It is made by the frontline medical team, general practitioner or emergency doctor. Recurrent cases are a matter for maxillofacial surgeons. This article describes a conventional technique for anterior dislocation reduction, to achieve urgently. The second part of the article deals with the specialized surgical treatment of relapsing forms.

  18. [Nuclear magnetic resonance tomography of the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    König, H; Spitzer, W J

    1986-05-01

    Because of its position, the temporomandibular joint is difficult to demonstrate by conventional radiological methods. Even the use of complex methods, such as arthro-tomography or CT, does not result in the satisfactory demonstration of the soft tissues and, in particular, of the articular disc. Magnetic resonance was carried out in 24 patients; it was possible to differentiate functional from morphological changes in the cartilage and these are discussed. Measurements were carried out during progressive opening of the mouth. This permits direct demonstration of reversible and irreversible cartilage displacement and of other changes in the joint and cartilages.

  19. Pseudotumor of temporomandibular joint: destructive calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Pritzker, K P; Phillips, H; Luk, S C; Koven, I H; Kiss, A; Houpt, J B

    1976-03-01

    The clinical and pathological features of a tumor of the temporamandibular joint occurring in a 55 year old man, and subsequently identified as a calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) arthropathy, are reported. Crystalline deposits were identified by compensated light microscopy and confirmed with X-ray diffraction, transmission, and scanning electron microscopy. The relationship of this unique case to other clinical presentations of CPPD deposition disease and the implications of the histological features to the pathogenesis of pseudogout are discussed. This case demonstrates that CPPD arthropathy should be included in the differential diagnosis of an arthrosis or of a tumor involving the temporomandibular joint.

  20. Temporomandibular joint disorder in systemic sclerosis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Chebbi, Raja; Khalifa, Hanen Ben; Dhidah, Monia

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis have several effects on the orofacial region such as widening of the periodontal ligament space, xerostomia and bone resorption of the mandible. We report a case of systemic sclerosis with temporomandibular joint involvement in a 45-year-old female patient accompanied by severe limited mouth opening and pain in the right and left preauricular regions and tenderness in masseter muscles with a morning stiffness of jaws.Magnetic resonance imaging showed a resorption of mandibular condylar process, with disk and joint abnormalities. PMID:28292126

  1. Neurology of the temporomandibular joints: an experimental study.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, R. K.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments on anaesthetized cats are described in which the reflex effects of stimulation of the mechanoreceptors in the temporomandibular joints on the ipsilateral and contralateral mandibular muscles were studied. The effects on this reflex activity and on dynamic manidublar muscle activity of the production of temporary and permanent dysfunction of the mechanoreceptors in different regions of the joint capsule were also studied. The significance of the findings in relation to the maintenance of normal jaw posture and the disturbance of mandibular muscular function by trauma, disease, and malocclusion is discussed. PMID:1259326

  2. Three-dimensional temporomandibular joint modeling and animation.

    PubMed

    Cascone, Piero; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Pagnoni, Mario; Marianetti, Tito Matteo; Tedaldi, Massimiliano

    2008-11-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) model derives from a study of the cranium by 3D virtual reality and mandibular function animation. The starting point of the project is high-fidelity digital acquisition of a human dry skull. The cooperation between the maxillofacial surgeon and the cartoonist enables the reconstruction of the fibroconnective components of the TMJ that are the keystone for comprehension of the anatomic and functional features of the mandible. The skeletal model is customized with the apposition of the temporomandibular ligament, the articular disk, the retrodiskal tissue, and the medial and the lateral ligament of the disk. The simulation of TMJ movement is the result of the integration of up-to-date data on the biomechanical restrictions. The 3D TMJ model is an easy-to-use application that may be run on a personal computer for the study of the TMJ and its biomechanics.

  3. Genetic Influences on Temporomandibular Joint Development and Growth.

    PubMed

    Hinton, Robert J; Jing, Junjun; Feng, Jian Q

    2015-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a small synovial joint at which the mandible articulates with the skull during movements involved in speaking and mastication. However, the secondary cartilage lining its joint surfaces is indicative of a very different developmental history than limb cartilages. This review summarizes our current knowledge of genes that regulate the formation of primary components of the TMJ, as well as genes that regulate postnatal growth of the TMJ. Although the TMJ is regulated by some of the same genes that are important in limb joints, others appear unique to the TMJ or have different actions. Runx2, Sox9, and members of the TGF-β/BMP family are critical drivers of chondrogenesis during condylar cartilage morphogenesis, and Indian hedgehog (Ihh) is important for formation of the articular disc and cavitation. Osterix (Osx) is a critical regulator of endochondral bone formation during postnatal TMJ growth.

  4. Gout of the Temporomandibular Joint: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Isaac Nilton Fernandes; Gomes, Renata Caroline Ferreira; dos Santos, Raiane Rodrigues; Oliveira, Thiago de Paula; Pereira, Larissa Loiuse Cândida; Mainenti, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Gout is an illness characterized by the deposition of monosodium urate crystals in the joints or in soft tissues. The clinical manifestation results from inflammation of limb joints and pain with a rare presentation in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Case Report This study describes a 66-year-old white man with a chief complaint of “occasional pain in the left temporal muscle region.” The case disclosed a gout manifestation in the TMJ after physical, radiographic, and ultrasonographic exams, and the patient was referred to proper treatment. Conclusion Gout manifestation in the TMJ is an unusual presentation, and few reports in the English literature address to the subject. Gout in the TMJ should be included as a differential diagnosis for joint disorders. PMID:25992112

  5. [Standardizing a protocol of magnetic resonance imaging of temporomandibular joints. Part I].

    PubMed

    Bulanova, T V

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents the standard of a procedure for magnetic resonance imaging of temporomandibular joints, which has been used to examine 275 patients. It describes the study projections, that are most significant for visualization, and scanning protocols. Illustrations of magnetic resonance imaging of the structures of the intact temporomandibular joint are presented.

  6. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint in a 6-year-old child.

    PubMed

    Amos, M J; Patterson, A R; Worrall, S F

    2008-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is rare, and is almost exclusively confined to adults; we know of only four cases previously described in children. We present a 6-year-old girl who had septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint with no obvious cause. We stress the need for prompt diagnosis and intervention to prevent serious consequences.

  7. Temporomandibular Joint Hypermobility Manifestation Based on Clinical Observations

    PubMed Central

    Nosouhian, Saeid; Haghighat, Abbas; Mohammadi, Iman; Shadmehr, Elham; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Joint range of motion might affected by some factors like laxity and increase joint mobility. Generalized joint hypermobility and temporomandibular joint hypermobility (TMJH) are reported as risk factors for temporomandibular disorders. The aim of this study was to survey the etiological factors of TMJH and its relations to habitual status. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional descriptive study, 69 patients with TMJH were involved. After profiling personal information and medical history, the patients were divided into three groups based on their maximum mouth opening (MMO) as follow: (Light) MMO of 50-55 mm, (moderate): MMO between 55 and 65 mm, (severe) MMO >65 mm. For subjective observations, patients were asked to fill the prepared questionnaire. The objective evaluations conducted by a specialist. Finally, all the data subjected Chi-Square test by using SPSS software version 22 at a significant level of 0.05. Results: TMJH was more common in women (74.2%). The light group had significant differences with other groups in the discomfort of TMJ and TMJ sound (P < 0.05). Furthermore, sever group manifested highest percentage of masticatory pains, significantly (P < 0.05). Conclusion: It can be concluded that pain in TMJ would have a correlation with MMO. PMID:26464530

  8. Imaging of Temporomandibular Joint: Approach by Direct Volume Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Caradonna, Carola; Bruschetta, Daniele; Vaccarino, Gianluigi; Milardi, Demetrio

    2014-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to conduct a morphological analysis of the temporomandibular joint, a highly specialized synovial joint that permits movement and function of the mandible. Materials and Methods: We have studied the temporom-andibular joint anatomy, directly on the living, from 3D images obtained by medical imaging Computed Tomography and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance acquisition, and subsequent re-engineering techniques 3D Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering. Data were analysed with the goal of being able to isolate, identify and distinguish the anatomical structures of the joint, and get the largest possible number of information utilizing software for post-processing work. Results: It was possible to reproduce anatomy of the skeletal structures, as well as through acquisitions of Magnetic Resonance Imaging; it was also possible to visualize the vascular, muscular, ligamentous and tendinous components of the articular complex, and also the capsule and the fibrous cartilaginous disc. We managed the Surface Rendering and Volume Rendering, not only to obtain three-dimensional images for colour and for resolution comparable to the usual anatomical preparations, but also a considerable number of anatomical, minuter details, zooming, rotating and cutting the same images with linking, graduating the colour, transparency and opacity from time to time. Conclusion: These results are encouraging to stimulate further studies in other anatomical districts. PMID:25664280

  9. [Habitual dislocation of the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Hjortdal, O

    1975-02-01

    A case of recurrent dislocation of the left temporamandibular joint is reported. Different methods of treatment are reviewed. The present case was successfully treated with a combination of two methods: 1. Restriction of excessive condylar movement by means of continuous loop wiring and intermaxillary monofilament fishing line. 2. Intra-articular injections of autologous blood.

  10. Deficient cytokine control modulates temporomandibular joint pain in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Neveen; Catrina, Anca I; Alyamani, Ahmed O; Mustafa, Hamid; Alstergren, Per

    2015-08-01

    The aim was to investigate how endogenous cytokine control of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) influences temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain in relation to the role of anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Twenty-six consecutive patients with TMJ RA were included. Temporomandibular joint pain intensity was assessed at rest, on maximum mouth opening, on chewing, and on palpation. Mandibular movement capacity and degree of anterior open bite (a clinical sign of structural destruction of TMJ tissues) were also assessed. Systemic inflammatory activity was assessed using the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) for rheumatoid arthritis. Samples of TMJ synovial fluid and blood were obtained and analyzed for TNF, its soluble receptor, soluble TNF receptor II (TNFsRII), and ACPA. A high concentration of TNF in relation to the concentration of TNFsRII in TMJ synovial fluid was associated with TMJ pain on posterior palpation on maximum mouth opening. The ACPA concentration correlated significantly to the TNF concentration, but not to the TNFsRII concentration, indicating that increased inflammatory activity is mainly caused by an insufficient increase in anti-inflammatory mediators. This study indicates that TMJ pain on palpation in patients with RA is related to a deficiency in local cytokine control that contributes to increased inflammatory activity, including sensitization to mechanical stimuli over the TMJ.

  11. A new surgical classification for temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Dimitroulis, G

    2013-02-01

    The role of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) surgery is ill-defined, so a universal classification is needed to collate the evidence required to justify the surgical interventions undertaken to treat TMJ disorders. The aim of this article is to introduce a new classification that divides TMJ disorders into 5 categories of escalating degrees of joint disease that can be applied to TMJ surgery. Using a category scale from 1 to 5, with category 1 being normal, and category 5 referring to catastrophic changes to the joint, the new classification will provide the basis for enhanced quantitative and descriptive data collection that can be used in the field of TMJ surgery research and clinical practice. It is hoped that this new classification will form the basis of what will eventually become the universal standard surgical classification of TMJ disorders that will be adopted by both researchers and clinicians so that ultimately, the role of TMJ surgery will be based on evidence rather than conjecture.

  12. A study of the temporomandibular joint during bruxism.

    PubMed

    Commisso, María S; Martínez-Reina, Javier; Mayo, Juana

    2014-06-01

    A finite element model of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the human mandible was fabricated to study the effect of abnormal loading, such as awake and asleep bruxism, on the articular disc. A quasilinear viscoelastic model was used to simulate the behaviour of the disc. The viscoelastic nature of this tissue is shown to be an important factor when sustained (awake bruxism) or cyclic loading (sleep bruxism) is simulated. From the comparison of the two types of bruxism, it was seen that sustained clenching is the most detrimental activity for the TMJ disc, producing an overload that could lead to severe damage of this tissue.

  13. Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease. The most common symptoms of this disease are acute malocclusion, limited mouth opening, swelling, and tenderness of affected TMJ. These symptoms are often confused with internal derangement of the articular disc, rheumatoid arthritis, retrodiscitis, or osteoarthritis. Therefore, differential diagnosis by image examination is required. Usually, antimicrobial treatment and surgical drainage by needle aspiration, arthroscopy, or arthrotomy are effective treatment approaches. In this study, a patient who was diagnosed with septic arthritis was treated with arthrocentesis and antibiotics without significant complications. We present a case report with a review of the literature. PMID:27595091

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Arthur B; Laor, Tal

    2013-12-01

    For more than a century, it has been known that juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) can affect the temporomandibular joint. With advances in medical imaging in more recent decades, there has been an increase in awareness of the spectrum of pathology that can affect the temporomandibular joint in children with JIA. This pathology can lead to symptoms ranging from decreased chewing ability, jaw and facial pain, headaches and malocclusion to craniofacial morphological changes such as a retrognathic mandible. The purpose of this review is to suggest an MR imaging protocol for the temporomandibular joint and to illustrate normal and abnormal appearances of the joint in children with JIA.

  15. Temporomandibular joint degeneration in Alport's syndrome: review of literature and case report.

    PubMed

    Gingrass, D

    1993-01-01

    A case of Alport's syndrome and coincidental temporomandibular joint degenerative disease is reported. Alport's syndrome is an unusual genetic disease that ultimately results in renal failure and has a high incidence of sensorineural hearing loss. The patient presented had complaints of facial and joint pain that mimicked what is currently termed temporomandibular disorder, including headache, tinnitus, joint pain, and temporal swelling. The significance of renal osteodystrophy is briefly reviewed as it pertains to this clinical presentation. The clinician must be alert to the many potential causes of degeneration of the temporomandibular joint, one of which may be metabolic in origin.

  16. Development of the human temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Mérida-Velasco, J R; Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F; Mérida-Velasco, J A; Sánchez-Montesinos, I; Espín-Ferra, J; Jiménez-Collado, J

    1999-05-01

    A great deal of research has been published on the development of the human temporomandibularjoint (TMJ). However, there is some discordance about its morphological timing. The most controversial aspects concern the moment of the initial organization of the condyle and the squamous part of the temporal bone, the articular disc and capsule and also the cavitation and onset of condylar chondrogenesis. Serial sections of 70 human specimens between weeks 7 and 17 of development were studied by optical microscopy (25 embryos and 45 fetuses). All specimens were obtained from collections of the Institute of Embryology of the Complutense University of Madrid and the Department of Morphological Sciences of the University of Granada. Three phases in the development of the TMJ were identified. The first is the blastematic stage (weeks 7-8 of development), which corresponds with the onset of the organization of the condyle and the articular disc and capsule. During week 8 intramembranous ossification of the temporal squamous bone begins. The second stage is the cavitation stage (weeks 9-11 of development), corresponding to the initial formation of the inferior joint cavity (week 9) and the start condylar chondrogenesis. Week 11 marks the initiation of organization of the superior joint cavity. And the third stage is the maturation stage (after week 12 of development). This work establishes three phases in TMJ development: 1) the blastematic stage (weeks 7-8 of development); 2) the cavitation stage (weeks 9-11 of development); and 3) the maturation stage (after week 12 of development). This study identifies the critical period of TMJ morphogenesis as occurring between weeks 7 and 11 of development.

  17. Congenital Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Ryan Chin Taw; Kassam, Karim; Eccles, Simon; Hensher, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Congenital temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is an uncommon condition that presents itself at or soon after birth in the absence of acquired factors that could have contributed to the ankylosis such as infection and trauma. The experience of managing one such case is reported in light of a review of the literature on this condition. Key management principles include adequate removal of the ankylotic mass, costochondral grafting, and post-op physiotherapy. Most patients reported in the literature with the condition experienced relapse. This echoes our own experience where there was recurrence of the ankylosis. However, after removal of the ankylotic mass, the patient maintains a satisfactory maximal incisal opening (MIO) till the present day. The additional challenges faced in the congenital form in addition to the already complex management of acquired paediatric temporomandibular joint ankylosis are (1) much earlier insult to the TMJ, (2) reduced opportunity for neuromuscular development of the muscles of mastication, and (3) reduced compliance with postoperative physiotherapy programmes due to the younger age of these patients. PMID:27190665

  18. The prevalence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction in the mixed dentition.

    PubMed

    Tuerlings, Virginie; Limme, Michel

    2004-06-01

    A functional and articular examination was carried out of 136 children (70 boys, 66 girls) aged from 6 to 12 years (6 years 1 month to 12 years 9 months), all presenting with a malocclusion in the mixed dentition and who had not yet received orthodontic treatment. The aim of the study was to examine the prevalence of signs of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD) in this population and to evaluate the possible relationship between certain 'individual' parameters and TMD signs. The results showed an elevated prevalence of muscle tenderness, particularly in the lateral pterygoid muscle, which was found to be sensitive in 80.9 per cent of patients. Muscle tenderness had a tendency to increase with age and was greater on the right side. Temporomandibular joint sounds were present in 35.3 per cent of the subjects and more frequent in girls and in older children. Of the children who presented a mandibular deviation on maximal opening (19.8 per cent), 13.2 per cent had a predominance of opening deviation towards the left. Retruded contact position interferences were present in 57.4 per cent of the children and 72.1 per cent presented lateral and protrusive interferences. Assessment of the maximal amplitudes of mandibular movements did not reveal any limitations. These results indicate that few relationships exist between individual parameters and TMD signs.

  19. SAPHO syndrome with ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Müller-Richter, U D A; Roldán, J C; Mörtl, M; Behr, M; Reichert, T E; Driemel, O

    2009-12-01

    SAPHO syndrome is a rare combination of different symptoms with unknown aetiology. A complete ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in a patient with SAPHO syndrome has not been described previously. The goal of this case report is to present the disease, give an overview about the frequency of mandibular involvement and describe different therapeutic strategies. The complication of an ankylosis of the TMJ is noted and the literature is reviewed. The authors report a 42-year-old patient with SAPHO syndrome and recurrent swelling of the right mandible and the soft tissue. The persisting involvement of the mandible resulted in a complete osseous ankylosis of the right TMJ and required resection with alloplastic replacement of the right condyle. SAPHO syndrome should be suspected in some cases of 'therapy resistant osteomyelitis' of the mandible. Smaller joints, such as the TMJ may also be affected. Treatment of SAPHO syndrome should include antibiotics and NSAIDs; corticosteroids may be helpful. Surgery is the ultimate treatment.

  20. Jacob's disease associated with temporomandibular joint dysfunction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Capote, Ana; Rodríguez, Francisco J; Blasco, Ana; Muñoz, Mario F

    2005-01-01

    Jacob's disease is regarded a rare condition in which a joint formation is established between an enlarged mandibular coronoid process and the inner aspect of the zygomatic body. Chronic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disk displacement has been proposed as etiological factor of coronoid process enlargement. We present a 23-year-old woman with long-standing TMJ dysfunction and restricted interincisal opening, who developed a progressive zygomatic asymmetry. The patient underwent treatment by intraoral coronoidectomy and homolateral TMJ arthroscopy in the same surgery. The histopathological diagnosis of the coronoid sample was cartilage-capped exostoses with presence of articular fibrous cartilage. Although the low prevalence of this entity, it should be considered as a possible diagnosis in patients with progressive limitation of mouth opening, although a TMJ syndrome may be present as a cause of this entity.

  1. Fibrous Ankylosis of the Temporomandibular Joint in a Young Child.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Nigel R; Meena, Manoj; Dinkar, Ajit D; Khorate, Manisha M

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is an intracapsular union of the disccondyle complex to the temporal articular surface that restricts mandibular movements, including fibrous adhesions or bony fusion between the condyle, disc, glenoid fossa, and articular eminence. The leading causes include trauma and infection. It can be a serious and disabling condition that leads to difficulties in mastication, swallowing, speaking, esthetics and oral hygiene. Disturbances of facial and mandibular growth and acute compromise of the airway invariably result in physical and psychological disability. Treatment should be initiated as soon as the condition is recognized, with the main objective of re-establishing joint function and harmonious jaw function. The purpose of this report is to describe a case of unilateral fibrous ankylosis of the right TMJ in a three-year-old girl.

  2. Coronal joint spaces of the Temporomandibular joint: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Joana-Cristina; Pires, Carlos A.; Ponces-Ramalhão, Maria-João-Feio; Lopes, Jorge-Dias

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The joint space measurements of the temporomandibular joint have been used to determine the condyle position variation. Therefore, the aim of this study is to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis on the coronal joint spaces measurements of the temporomandibular joint. Material and Methods An electronic database search was performed with the terms “condylar position”; “joint space”AND”TMJ”. Inclusionary criteria included: tomographic 3D imaging of the TMJ, presentation of at least two joint space measurements on the coronal plane. Exclusionary criteria were: mandibular fractures, animal studies, surgery, presence of genetic or chronic diseases, case reports, opinion or debate articles or unpublished material. The risk of bias of each study was judged as high, moderate or low according to the “Cochrane risk of bias tool”. The values used in the meta-analysis were the medial, superior and lateral joint space measurements and their differences between the right and left joint. Results From the initial search 2706 articles were retrieved. After excluding the duplicates and all the studies that did not match the eligibility criteria 4 articles classified for final review. All the retrieved articles were judged as low level of evidence. All of the reviewed studies were included in the meta-analysis concluding that the mean coronal joint space values were: medial joint space 2.94 mm, superior 2.55 mm and lateral 2.16 mm. Conclusions the analysis also showed high levels of heterogeneity. Right and left comparison did not show statistically significant differences. Key words:Temporomandibular joint, systematic review, meta-analysis. PMID:26330944

  3. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders’ Impact on Pain, Function, and Disability

    PubMed Central

    Chantaracherd, P.; John, M.T.; Hodges, J.S.; Schiffman, E.L.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between more advanced stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorders (“TMJ intra-articular status”), representing a transition from normal joint structure to TMJ disc displacement with and without reduction (DDwR and DDwoR) to degenerative joint disease (DJD), and patient-reported outcomes of jaw pain, function, and disability (“TMD impact”). This cross-sectional study included 614 cases from the RDC/TMD Validation Project with at least one temporomandibular disorder (TMD) diagnosis. TMJ intra-articular status was determined by 3 blinded, calibrated radiologists using magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography as one of normal joint structure, DDwR, DDwoR, or DJD, representing the subject’s most advanced TMJ diagnosis. TMD impact was conceptualized as a latent variable consisting of 1) pain intensity (Characteristic Pain Index from the Graded Chronic Pain Scale [GCPS]), 2) jaw function (Jaw Functional Limitation Scale), and 3) disability (Disability Points from GCPS). A structural equation model estimated the association of TMJ intra-articular status with the latent measure TMD impact as a correlation coefficient in all TMD cases (n = 614) and in cases with a TMD pain diagnosis (n = 500). The correlations between TMJ intra-articular status and TMD impact were 0.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], −0.04 to 0.13) for all TMD cases and 0.07 (95% CI, −0.04 to 0.17) for cases with a pain diagnosis, which are neither statistically significant nor clinically relevant. Conceptualizing worsening of TMJ intra-articular disorders as 4 stages and characterizing impact from TMD as a composite of jaw pain, function, and disability, this cross-sectional study found no clinically significant association. Models of TMJ intra-articular status other than ours (normal structure → DDwR → DDwoR → DJD) should be explored. PMID:25572112

  4. Temporomandibular joint disorders' impact on pain, function, and disability.

    PubMed

    Chantaracherd, P; John, M T; Hodges, J S; Schiffman, E L

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the association between more advanced stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorders ("TMJ intra-articular status"), representing a transition from normal joint structure to TMJ disc displacement with and without reduction (DDwR and DDwoR) to degenerative joint disease (DJD), and patient-reported outcomes of jaw pain, function, and disability ("TMD impact"). This cross-sectional study included 614 cases from the RDC/TMD Validation Project with at least one temporomandibular disorder (TMD) diagnosis. TMJ intra-articular status was determined by 3 blinded, calibrated radiologists using magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography as one of normal joint structure, DDwR, DDwoR, or DJD, representing the subject's most advanced TMJ diagnosis. TMD impact was conceptualized as a latent variable consisting of 1) pain intensity (Characteristic Pain Index from the Graded Chronic Pain Scale [GCPS]), 2) jaw function (Jaw Functional Limitation Scale), and 3) disability (Disability Points from GCPS). A structural equation model estimated the association of TMJ intra-articular status with the latent measure TMD impact as a correlation coefficient in all TMD cases (n = 614) and in cases with a TMD pain diagnosis (n = 500). The correlations between TMJ intra-articular status and TMD impact were 0.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], -0.04 to 0.13) for all TMD cases and 0.07 (95% CI, -0.04 to 0.17) for cases with a pain diagnosis, which are neither statistically significant nor clinically relevant. Conceptualizing worsening of TMJ intra-articular disorders as 4 stages and characterizing impact from TMD as a composite of jaw pain, function, and disability, this cross-sectional study found no clinically significant association. Models of TMJ intra-articular status other than ours (normal structure → DDwR → DDwoR → DJD) should be explored.

  5. Pilot study of the short-term effects of range-of-motion exercise for the temporomandibular joint in patients with temporomandibular joint disc displacement without reduction

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Shigemitsu; Yamaguchi, Yoshihiro; Taguchi, Nozomu; Ogi, Nobumi; Kurita, Kenichi; Ito, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effectiveness of a short-term exercise program combining range-of-motion exercise for the temporomandibular joint and self-traction therapy in patients with temporomandibular joint disc displacement without reduction. [Subjects and Methods] The study participants comprised 36 females with jaw trismus and moderate to severe functional pain. The range-of-motion exercise for the temporomandibular joint was performed at the first visit by the therapist, and the patients were instructed to perform self-traction therapy in the morning and during daily bathing until the next visit 2 weeks later. Maximum mouth opening distance and the visual analogue scale score were used to compare pain on motion and mastication as well as the impact of the program on daily activities at the first consultation and 2 weeks later. [Results] All symptoms were significantly improved after 2 weeks of treatment. [Conclusion] A program that combines exercise for the temporomandibular joint and self-traction therapy can improve range of motion at the joint in the short term and reduce pain and difficulty associated with daily activity in patients with temporomandibular joint disc displacement without reduction. The results of this study suggest that such a program can serve as an effective conservative treatment. PMID:28265156

  6. No heritability of temporomandibular joint signs and symptoms.

    PubMed

    Michalowicz, B S; Pihlstrom, B L; Hodges, J S; Bouchard, T J

    2000-08-01

    The causes of temporomandibular joint (TMJ)-related signs and symptoms are largely unknown. We tested the hypotheses that these signs and symptoms, as well as oral parafunctional habits, are substantially heritable. Questionnaire and clinical data were collected from 494 twins, including pairs of reared-apart and reared-together monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins. A history of joint-area pain, joint noises, and clenching and grinding habits was scored as present or absent. Twenty-nine percent of the population experienced at least one sign or symptom. Nearly one-quarter of subjects clenched or ground their teeth, and 8.7% reported a history of joint-area pain. Pain was associated with clenching, grinding, and joint noises. MZ twins were no more similar than DZ twins for any outcome, suggesting that genetic factors do not influence these traits in the population. Reared-together MZ twins were no more similar than reared-apart MZ twins, suggesting a negligible effect of the family environment on these outcomes. Environmental factors unique to each twin appeared to be the major determinants of variation in this population.

  7. Manual therapy of the mandibular accessory ligaments for the management of temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Cuccia, Antonino Marco; Caradonna, Carola; Caradonna, Domenico

    2011-02-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders are characterized by chronic or acute musculoskeletal or myofascial pain with dysfunction of the masticatory system. Treatment modalities include occlusal splints, patient education, activity modification, muscle and joint exercises, myofascial therapy, acupuncture, and manipulative therapy. In the physiology of the temporomandibular joint, accessory ligaments limit the movement of the mandible. A thorough knowledge of the anatomy of accessory ligaments is necessary for good clinical management of temporomandibular joint disorders. Although general principles regarding the anatomy of the ligaments are relatively clear, very little substantiated information on the dimension, orientation, and function of the ligaments has been published, to the authors' knowledge. The authors review the literature concerning the accessory ligaments of the temporomandibular joint and describe treatment options, including manual techniques for mobilizing the accessory ligaments.

  8. Diagnostic group differences in temporomandibular joint energy densities

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, LM; Iwasaki, LR; Gonzalez, YM; Liu, H; Marx, DB; Nickel, JC

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Cartilage fatigue, due to mechanical work, may account for precocious development of degenerative joint disease in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This study compared energy densities (mJ/mm3) in TMJs of three diagnostic groups. Setting and Sample Population Sixty-eight subjects (44 women, 24 men) gave informed consent. Diagnostic criteria for temporomandibular disorders (DC/TMD) and imaging were used to group subjects according to presence of jaw muscle or joint pain (+P) and bilateral disc displacement (+DD). Material and Methods Subjects (+P+DD, n=16; −P+DD, n=16; and −P−DD, n=36) provided cone-beam computed tomography and magnetic resonance images, and jaw tracking data. Numerical modeling was used to determine TMJ loads (Fnormal). Dynamic stereometry was used to characterize individual-specific data of stress-field dynamics during 10 symmetrical jaw closing cycles. These data were used to estimate tractional forces (Ftraction). Energy densities were then calculated as W/Q(W=workdoneormechanicalenergyinput=tractionalforce×distanceofstress-fieldtranslation,Q=volumeofcartilage). ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer post-hoc analyses tested for intergroup differences. Results Mean ±standard error energy density for the +P+DD group was 12.7±1.5 mJ/mm3 and significantly greater (all adjusted p<0.04) when compared to −P+DD (7.4±1.4 mJ/mm3) and −P−DD (5.8±0.9 mJ/mm3) groups. Energy densities in −P+DD and −P−DD groups were not significantly different. Conclusion Diagnostic group differences in energy densities suggest that mechanical work may be a unique mechanism which contributes to cartilage fatigue in subjects with pain and disc displacement. PMID:25865545

  9. Can pterygoid plate asymmetry be linked to temporomandibular joint disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Maria Eugenia; Beltran, Jorge; de Laat, Antoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between pterygoid plate asymmetry and temporomandibular joint disorders. Materials and Methods Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images of 60 patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMD) involving pain were analyzed and compared with images of 60 age- and gender-matched controls. Three observers performed linear measurements of the lateral pterygoid plates. Results Statistically significant differences were found between measurements of the lateral pterygoid plates on the site that had pain and the contralateral site (p<0.05). The average length of the lateral pterygoid plates (LPPs) in patients with TMD was 17.01±3.64 mm on the right side and 16.21±3.51 mm on the left side, and in patients without TMD, it was 11.86±1.97 mm on the right side and 11.98±1.85 mm on the left side. Statistically significant differences in the LPP length, measured on CBCT, were found between patients with and without TMD (p<0.05). The inter-examiner reliability obtained in this study was very high for all the examiners (0.99, 95% confidence interval: 0.98-0.99). Conclusion Within the limits of the present study, CBCT lateral pterygoid plate measurements at the side with TMD were found to be significantly different from those on the side without TMD. More research is needed to explore potential etiological correlations and implications for treatment. PMID:26125003

  10. Sleep deprivation induces abnormal bone metabolism in temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Wei; Wu, Gaoyi; Huang, Fei; Zhu, Yong; Nie, Jia; He, Yuhong; Chen, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of experimental sleep deprivation (SD) on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of rats and the possible mechanism related to abnormal bone metabolism. Material and methods: SD was induced by a modified multiple platform method and assessed by serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level. TMJs were detached and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H&E). Expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) was evaluated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, H&E staining, immunohistochemical staining and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. Results: Compared with controls, SD significantly increased serum ACTH, indicating that the SD model was successful. In the SD group, H&E staining revealed greater vessel hyperplasia in the synovial membrane and thicker hypertrophic layers in condylar cartilages. Compared with controls, RNA and protein expression of the inflammatory factors IL-1β and TNF-α and the bone metabolism-related factor RANKL increased in condylar cartilage in the SD group, whereas OPG and the OPG/RANKL ratio decreased. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that OPG/RANKL immunopositive cells were mainly located in hypertrophic layers. Conclusions: These results suggest that sleep deprivation might play an important role in the occurrence and development of temporomandibular disorders, which may occur through abnormal secretion of inflammatory and bone metabolism-related factors. PMID:25785010

  11. Tiagabine May Reduce Bruxism and Associated Temporomandibular Joint Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kast, R. E.

    2005-01-01

    Tiagabine is an anticonvulsant gamma-aminobutyric acid reuptake inhibitor commonly used as an add-on treatment of refractory partial seizures in persons over 12 years old. Four of the 5 cases reported here indicate that tiagabine might also be remarkably effective in suppressing nocturnal bruxism, trismus, and consequent morning pain in the teeth, masticatory musculature, jaw, and temporomandibular joint areas. Tiagabine has a benign adverse-effect profile, is easily tolerated, and retains effectiveness over time. Bed partners of these patients report that grinding noises have stopped; therefore, the tiagabine effect is probably not simply antinociceptive. The doses used to suppress nocturnal bruxism at bedtime (4–8 mg) are lower than those used to treat seizures. PMID:16252740

  12. Management of bilateral temporomandibular joint ankylosis in children: case report.

    PubMed

    Akama, M K; Guthua, S; Chindia, M L; Kahuho, S K

    2009-01-01

    Long standing temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis may cause severe facial deformity and growth retardation as well as psychological problems when it occurs in children. Different kinds of opinion have been advanced as regards its management. This article discusses the aetiology and management of bilateral TMJ ankylosis in form of a case report in a patient with severe facial deformity, malocclusion and retarded growth following bilateral TMJ ankylosis secondary to trauma. The patient was successfully managed by placement of costochondral grafts and interpositional arthroplasty with partial temporal myofascialflaps. Good mouth opening was achieved and subsequent follow-ups showed improved mandibular and general body growth as well as psychosocial performance. The aim of this paper is to discuss the management challenges posed by bilateral TMJ ankylosis.

  13. Morphologic adaptation of temporomandibular joint after chincup therapy.

    PubMed

    Mimura, H; Deguchi, T

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the morphologic changes of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) after chincup application, with longitudinal TMJ cephalometric laminagraphs. The subjects were 19 prepubertal patients with true, mild skeletal Class III malocclusions with anterior crossbite. All underwent chincup therapy from the beginning of treatment. The control subjects were 16 patients with functional anterior crossbite, with normal jaw relationships. Cephalometric laminagraphs and lateral cephalograms were obtained before and after treatment. Statistical analysis of the data revealed the results as follows: (1) The chincup therapy changed the direction of growth of the mandible, especially, the ramus swing-back. (2) The chincup group showed a relatively more slender mandibular neck compared with the control group. (3) The condylar heads were bent forward after the chincup application, and the glenoid fossa was deepened and widened. The clearance between condyles and fossae was decreased by the orthopedic force of the chincup appliance.

  14. SAPHO syndrome of the temporomandibular joint associated with sudden deafness.

    PubMed

    Marsot-Dupuch, K; Doyen, J E; Grauer, W O; de Givry, S C

    1999-05-01

    We report a case of arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) associated with sclerosing osteomyelitis of the mandible and temporal bone, causing deafness. The presence of a palmoplantar pustulosis established the diagnosis of SAPHO syndrome. SAPHO (an acronym referring to synovitis, acne, palmoplantar pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis) syndrome is defined by the association of characteristic osteoarticular and dermatologic manifestations, with diffuse sclerosing osteomyelitis of the mandible being a part of this entity. We review the literature of SAPHO syndrome with mandibular manifestations and discuss the mechanisms of inflammatory spread from the TMJ to the cochlea. To our knowledge, this is the first description of skull base involvement in a patient with SAPHO syndrome leading to sudden deafness.

  15. Can orthodontic relapse be blamed on the temporomandibular joint?

    PubMed Central

    Wolford, Larry M

    2014-01-01

    There are many temporomandibular joint (TMJ) conditions that can cause orthodontic treatment instability and relapse. These conditions are often associated with dentofacial deformities, malocclusion, TMJ pain, headaches, myofascial pain, TMJ and jaw functional impairment, ear symptoms, etc., Many of these TMJ conditions can cause progressive and continuous changes in the occlusion and jaw relationships. Patients with these conditions may benefit from corrective orthodontic and surgical intervention. The difficulty for many clinicians may lie in identifying the presence of a TMJ condition, diagnosing the specific TMJ pathology, and selecting the proper treatment for that condition. This paper will discuss the most common TMJ pathologies that can adversely affect orthodontic stability and outcomes as well as present the treatment considerations to correct the specific TMJ conditions and associated jaw deformities to provide stable and predictable treatment results. PMID:25426452

  16. Posteroanterior cephalometric changes in subjects with temporomandibular joint disorders

    PubMed Central

    Almăşan, O C; Băciuţ, M; Hedeşiu, M; Bran, S; Almăşan, H; Băciuţ, G

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to establish the changes in posteroanterior cephalometric variables in subjects with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs). Methods Posteroanterior cephalograms of 61 subjects (age range 16–36.6 years, standard deviation 4.88 years) were used to determine cephalometric differences. Subjects were classified according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Joint Disorders into three groups: unilateral TMD, bilateral TMD and no TMD. 14 linear and angular measurements were assessed on the posteroanterior cephalogram. For assessing facial asymmetry, the asymmetry index for bilateral measurements was calculated between the right and the left side. In cases with unilateral TMD, the asymmetry index was calculated using the difference between the unaffected and affected side. The differences among multiple groups were analysed using the one-way analysis of variance test and Scheffé post hoc test. Results 47 subjects were females (77%) and 14 were males (23%). 19 subjects had unilateral TMDs and 16 subjects had bilateral TMDs. The asymmetry index of the distance from the horizontal plane to the antegonion was higher in subjects with unilateral TMD than in patients with bilateral or no TMD (p < 0.05). Also, the asymmetry index of the distances from the vertical plane to the condyle (p = 0.05), gonion (Go) (p = 0.0004), antegonion (p = 0.002) and chin (Ch) (p = 0.02) was higher in subjects with unilateral TMDs. The asymmetry index of the O point–Go–Go′ and O point–Ch–Ch′ angles differed significantly in subjects with unilateral TMDs (p < 0.05). Conclusions Unilateral TMDs are associated with changes in posteroanterior cephalometric measurements. The assessment of posteroanterior cephalometric variables could be used as a key factor for evaluating the presence of TMDs. PMID:23253565

  17. Incidence of systemic joint hypermobility and temporomandibular joint hypermobility in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Erika B; Rocabado, Mariano; Russo, Adriana K; Cogo, Jose C; Osorio, Rodrigo A L

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a possible correlation between systemic hypermobility and temporomandibular hypermobility during pregnancy. One hundred (100) healthy pregnant women were evaluated: 7% in the first trimester (1T), 38% in the second trimester (2T), and 55% in the third trimester (3T) of gestation. In the series, the authors analyzed systemic joint hypermobility (SJH), range of mandibular movement (MMR), head and shoulder posture, head lateralization, and the presence of noise, pain, and parafunction in the temporomandibular joint. They observed that pain is present to a mild degree mostly in the head and ears of all pregnant women who presented with pain. Most of the subjects had some type of parafunction, but only 42.8% had noises. Mild SJH was seen in 50% of the 2T and 3T subjects, and in 28.5% of 1T subjects. Mild mandibular hypermobility was found for jaw opening (46%) and lateralization to the right (44%) or to the left (46%). Most of the subjects had hypomobility for jaw protrusion and retraction. The subjects had head protrusion and anterior posture as a result of the change in their center of gravity brought about by pregnancy. The authors found no association between systemic joint hypermobility (SJH) and temporomandibular hypermobility, although hormonal changes and complex factors during pregnancy may represent a risk factor for both types of mobility change.

  18. Absence of the articular disc in the tasmanian devil temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Sugisaki, M; Kino, K; Ishikawa, T; Sugisaki, M; Abe, S

    2013-12-01

    The articular disc of the temporomandibular joint is a constant structure in mammals. According to Parsons' report in 1900, however, it is absent in four animals: the armadillo, two kinds of monotremes and the Tasmanian devil. Thereafter, no research was performed to confirm this observation. The aim of this study was to determine by anatomical and histological examination whether the Tasmanian devil has an articular disc in its temporomandibular joint. Six fresh frozen corpses and one dry skull of Tasmanian devils were obtained from the School of Zoology, University of Tasmania. The corpses were dissected and the morphology of the temporomandibular joint was carefully observed by gross anatomical and histological examination. The structure of the temporomandibular joint of the dry skull was examined macroscopically and by micro-computed tomography. In all cases, absence of the articular disc in the Tasmanian devil temporomandibular joint was morphologically confirmed. The surface layer of both the condyle and the glenoid fossa comprised a thick fibrous tissue. Micro-computed tomography revealed dense and fine trabecular bone in the condyle. The thick fibrous tissue covering the condyle and high-density trabecular bone in the condyle might play a role in absorption against powerful mastication and heavy loading of the Tasmanian devil temporomandibular joint.

  19. Degenerative disorders of the temporomandibular joint: etiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, E; Detamore, M S; Mercuri, L G

    2008-04-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders have complex and sometimes controversial etiologies. Also, under similar circumstances, one person's TMJ may appear to deteriorate, while another's does not. However, once degenerative changes start in the TMJ, this pathology can be crippling, leading to a variety of morphological and functional deformities. Primarily, TMJ disorders have a non-inflammatory origin. The pathological process is characterized by deterioration and abrasion of articular cartilage and local thickening. These changes are accompanied by the superimposition of secondary inflammatory changes. Therefore, appreciating the pathophysiology of the TMJ degenerative disorders is important to an understanding of the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of internal derangement and osteoarthrosis of the TMJ. The degenerative changes in the TMJ are believed to result from dysfunctional remodeling, due to a decreased host-adaptive capacity of the articulating surfaces and/or functional overloading of the joint that exceeds the normal adaptive capacity. This paper reviews etiologies that involve biomechanical and biochemical factors associated with functional overloading of the joint and the clinical, radiographic, and biochemical findings important in the diagnosis of TMJ-osteoarthrosis. In addition, non-invasive and invasive modalities utilized in TMJ-osteoarthrosis management, and the possibility of tissue engineering, are discussed.

  20. Juxta-articular Myxoma of the Temporomandibular Joint.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhou-Xi; Yang, Chi; Chen, Min-Jie; Wilson, Julian J

    2015-11-01

    The juxta-articular myxoma represents a benign mesenchymal neoplasm that arises from tissue within or adjacent to a joint space. There have been a number of reported cases involving myxomas of the knee, shoulder, elbow, wrist, and hip. To our knowledge there, however, have been no reported cases of juxta-articular myxomas of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This report describes the case of a 57-year-old woman with a juxta-articular myxoma of the left TMJ extending into the infratemporal fossa (ITF). Access to the tumor was accomplished via a preauricular incision and low condylar osteotomy which allowed for displacement of the condyle for direct visualization and excision of the tumor. The postoperative course was benign and the patient demonstrated no cosmetic or functional limitation. Likewise, follow-up at 30 months showed no evidence of recurrence. Benign encapsulated tumors of the ITF can be effectively accessed by means of a modified preauricular incision, low condylar osteotomy, and anterior meniscal release. This direct approach allows for excellent surgical exposure, minimal surgical site morbidity, and maintenance of physiologic joint function and occlusion.

  1. High-resolution arthrosonography of the temporomandibular joint with video and computer support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sader, Robert; Zeilhofer, Hans-Florian U.; Deppe, Herbert; Horch, Hans-Henning; Kling, Bettina

    1995-05-01

    Ultrasound imaging of the temporomandibular joint has been problematic due to the lower frequency of the transducers used up to the present time. Imaging of temporomandibular joint structures being utilizable for diagnosis and therapy was only possible through time-consuming and expensive radiological image yielding procedures (computertomography, magnetic resonance imaging). 84 temporomandibular joints in 42 patients were examined clinically, radiologically, by axiographic tracing, magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound imaging. An ultrasound unit was used with a high- frequency 13MHz transducer. The temporomandibular joint was examined preauricularily; by this the lateral section of the joint could be represented. The image sequences in functional condylus movements were taped via a video output into a film recorder. Selected ultrasound images from the beginning to the end of the movement could then be digitalized and read into a personal computer to be evaluated. The computer then calculated a line of movement and the angle of the joint's course. By ultrasound imaging the joint space could be represented and measured clearly. Compared with the space measured in the magnetic resonance image the value determined by ultrasonography was a tenth power more exact. The computer-supported image analysis of the condylus movements led to an exact presentation of the condylus course. The sonographically determined condylar guidance corresponded to the value traced by axiography with high significance within a range of 3 degrees. The temporomandibular joint's disc could be localized just as exactly as with the magnetic resonance imaging. The use of a 13MHz transducer offers a new low-cost method of noninvasive dynamic imaging of important temporomandibular joint structures. The possibility of video and computer support enables movement analysis and opens new possibilities in the morphological and functional evaluation of the temporomandibular joint.

  2. Outcomes of temporomandibular joint arthroscopy in patients with painful but otherwise normal joints.

    PubMed

    Dimitroulis, George

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this retrospective clinical study was to assess the clinical outcomes of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthroscopy in patients who presented with category 1 normal joints. The null hypothesis being tested was that patients with normal joints do not respond to TMJ arthroscopy. The clinical records of 116 patients who had undergone TMJ arthroscopy by the author from 2010 to 2013 were retrieved and individually analysed for inclusion in this retrospective, cohort clinical study. The inclusion criteria used to select patients for this study were those who had arthroscopically proven category 1 normal joints, free of intra-articular pathology. Of the 14 patients who were found to have normal joints, only 10 could be contacted for a follow-up survey. Despite the fact that all patients were informed that no joint pathology was found, six out of the 10 patients reported improvement in their temporomandibular disorder (TMD) symptoms that lasted for more than 6 months following TMJ arthroscopy. The results of this investigation indicate that we can reject the null hypothesis, and that patients with normal TMJs do indeed respond to TMJ arthroscopy. What this limited study has highlighted is the pervasive effects of the placebo that all surgeons need to keep in mind when formulating treatment plans for patients with TMD.

  3. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome: a close association with systemic joint laxity (the hypermobile joint syndrome)

    PubMed

    Buckingham, R B; Braun, T; Harinstein, D A; Oral, K; Bauman, D; Bartynski, W; Killian, P J; Bidula, L P

    1991-11-01

    Sixty-two patients admitted for elective reconstructive surgery of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and eight seen as outpatients with a chief complaint of TMJ dysfunction during the same time interval were evaluated for possible etiologic factors contributing to the disease. All hospitalized patients had severe, end-stage degenerative changes within the TMJ, whereas outpatients had less severe disease and did not require surgery. TMJ dysfunction in some patients was said to be a result of established causes including bruxism, malocclusion, and trauma. No patient in this series had evidence of a systemic inflammatory polyarthritis. Of the 70 patients, 38 (54%) met criteria, based on those of Carter and Wilkinson, as modified by Beighton et al., sufficient to warrant a diagnosis of the hypermobile joint syndrome. Five patients had classic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and therefore were not patients with "benign hypermobility," and an additional two cases were described as "marfanoid" and as possible Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, respectively. Radiographs showed TMJ hyperextensibility in four hypermobile patients. Long-term surgical outcome was identical in the hypermobile and nonhypermobile groups. The incidence of hypermobility in this series is strikingly higher than the expected incidence in an otherwise population. Magnetic resonance images of the TMJs on separate groups of asymptomatic normal and hypermobile women identified excessive anterior movement in the hypermobile group, together with abnormal anterior disk position in some. We hypothesize that hypermobility within the TMJ may cause accelerated disk destruction and degenerative disease.

  4. Stress-field translation in the healthy human temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Gallo, L M; Nickel, J C; Iwasaki, L R; Palla, S

    2000-10-01

    Movement over the surface of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc produces tractional forces. These forces potentially increase the magnitude of shear stresses and contribute to wear and fatigue of the disc. Theoretically, tractional forces in all synovial joints are the result of frictional forces, due to rubbing of the cartilage surfaces, and plowing forces, due to translation of the stress-field through the cartilage matrix as the joint surface congruency changes during motion. For plowing forces to occur in the TMJ, there must be mediolateral translation of the stress-field as the condyle moves dorsoventrally during jaw function. To test whether mediolateral stress-field translation occurs in the intact TMJ, we measured stress-field position and translation velocities in ten normal individuals during rhythmic jaw opening and closing. Magnetic resonance imaging and jaw tracking were combined to animate the three-dimensional position of the stress-field between the articulating surfaces. This allowed for mediolateral translation velocity measurements of the centroid of the stress-field. The results showed that during jaw opening and closing at 0.5 Hz, the average peak mediolateral translation velocity was 35 +/- 17 mm/sec. When opening and closing increased to 1.0 Hz, the average peak velocity was 40 +/- 19 mm/sec. Theoretical model estimates of the work done during such translation ranged from 6 to 709 mJ between the individual joints studied. The potential clinical importance of this measure is that long-term exposure of the TMJ disc to high work may result in fatigue failure of the TMJ disc.

  5. Synovial fluid dynamics with small disc perforation in temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Zhan, J; Zheng, Y; Han, Y; Zhang, Z; Xi, Y; Zhu, P

    2012-10-01

    The articular disc plays an important role as a stress absorber in joint movement, resulting in stress reduction and redistribution in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The flow of synovial fluid in the TMJ may follow a regular pattern during movement of the jaw. We hypothesised that the regular pattern is disrupted when the TMJ disc is perforated. By computed tomography arthrography, we studied the upper TMJ compartment in patients with small disc perforation during jaw opening-closing at positions from 0 to 3 cm. Finite element fluid dynamic modelling was accomplished to analyse the pattern of fluid flow and pressure distribution during the movements. The results showed that the fluid flow in the upper compartment generally formed an anticlockwise circulation but with local vortexes with the jaw opening up to 2 cm. However, when the jaw opening-closing reached 3 cm, an abnormal flow field and the fluid pressure change associated with the perforation may increase the risk of perforation expansion or rupture and is unfavourable for self-repair of the perforated disc.

  6. Tensile properties of the porcine temporomandibular joint disc.

    PubMed

    Detamore, Michael S; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2003-08-01

    Despite the significant morbidity associated with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), little is known about the pathophysiology of this complex joint. TMJ disc degeneration plays a central role in the progression of TMJ disorders, and therefore disc regeneration would be a crucial treatment modality. Unfortunately, scarce information about the structural and functional characteristics of the TMJ disc is available. The current study aims to provide a standard for the biomechanical behavior of the TMJ disc for future tissue engineering studies. The disc was loaded under uniaxial tension in two directions, mediolateral and anteroposterior, and in three locations per direction. In the mediolateral direction, the posterior band was 2.5 times stiffer, 2.4 times tougher (energy to maximum stress), and 2.2 times stronger than the anterior band, which was in turn 16 times stiffer and 5.7 times stronger than the intermediate zone. In the anteroposterior direction, the central and medial regions were 74% and 35% stiffer and 56% and 59% stronger than the lateral region, respectively, although similar to each other in strength and stiffness. There was no significant difference in toughness between regions in the anteroposterior direction. These results correlated qualitatively with collagen fiber orientation and fiber size obtained using polarized light microscopy.

  7. Gene Mutations Associated with Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Sangani, Dhruvee; Suzuki, Akiko; VonVille, Helena; Hixson, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Background The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a bilateral synovial joint between the mandible and the temporal bone of the skull. TMJ disorders (TMDs) are a set of complicated and poorly understood clinical conditions, in which TMDs are associated with a number of symptoms including pain and limited jaw movement. The increasing scientific evidence suggests that genetic factors play a significant role in the pathology of TMDs. However, the underlying mechanism of TMDs remains largely unknown. Objective The study aimed to determine the associated genes to TMDs in humans and animals. Methods The literature search was conducted through databases including Medline (Ovid), EMBASE (Ovid), and PubMed (NLM) by using scientific terms for TMDs and genetics in March 2015. Additional studies were identified by searching bibliographies of highly relevant articles and Scopus (Elsevier). Results Our systematic analyses identified 31 articles through literature searches. A total of 112 genes were identified to be significantly and specifically associated with TMDs. Conclusion Our systematic review provides a list of accurate genes associated with TMDs and suggests a genetic contribution to the pathology of TMDs. PMID:27695703

  8. Antioxidant capacity of synovial fluid in the temporomandibular joint correlated with radiological morphology of temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Kyoko; Ohba, Seigo; Yoshimura, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Shinpei; Ishimaru, Jun-Ichi; Sano, Kazuo

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the correlation between the antioxidant capacity of synovial fluid and radiological findings of intra-articular structures in patients with disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). We recruited 21 patients (9 men and 12 women, aged 18-84 years of age) with such disorders, excluding myofascial pain and dysfunction syndrome, or other muscular disorders. The clinical variables recorded included age, sex, interincisal distance, and visual analogue pain scores (VAS). Radiological findings were obtained from diagnostic arthrogram and cone-beam computed tomography (CT). The antioxidant capacity of the synovial fluid was measured by chemiluminescence. Eleven patients were radiologically diagnosed with closed lock, and the remaining 10 with no closed lock. An anchored intra-articular disc was most often seen on cone-beam CT (n=19) followed by perforated disc (n=7), osteoarthrosis (n=7), and anterior disc displacement without reduction (n=5). Although there were no significant differences between antioxidant capacity and age, sex, VAS, or any findings on cone-beam CT, antioxidant capacity was significantly decreased in the patients with closed lock compared with those who did not have closed lock (p=0.02). The results suggest an association between the oxidative stress of the synovial fluid and closed-lock in disorders of the TMJ.

  9. Effect of gonadal steroid hormones on formalin-induced temporomandibular joint inflammation.

    PubMed

    Torres-Chávez, K E; Sanfins, J M; Clemente-Napimoga, J T; Pelegrini-Da-Silva, A; Parada, C A; Fischer, L; Tambeli, C H

    2012-02-01

    We have recently demonstrated that gonadal steroid hormones decrease formalin-induced temporomandibular joint nociception in rats. Given that the attenuation of inflammation is a potential mechanism underlying this antinociceptive effect, we evaluated the effect of gonadal steroid hormones on formalin-induced temporomandibular joint inflammation. Plasma extravasation, a major sign of acute inflammation, and neutrophil migration, an important event related to tissue injury, were evaluated. Formalin induced significantly lower temporomandibular joint plasma extravasation and neutrophil migration in proestrus females than in males and in diestrus females. Since estradiol serum level is high in proestrus females and low in diestrus females and in males, these findings suggest that the high physiological level of estradiol decreases temporomandibular joint inflammation. Estradiol but not progesterone administration in ovariectomized females significantly decreased formalin-induced plasma extravasation and neutrophil migration, an effect that was blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780. Plasma extravasation and neutrophil migration were not affected by orchiectomy, but testosterone or estradiol administration in orchidectomized males significantly decreased them. The androgen receptor antagonist flutamide blocked the anti-inflammatory effect of testosterone while ICI 182780 blocked that of estradiol in males. Previous intravenous administration of a nonspecific selectin inhibitor significantly decreased formalin-induced temporomandibular joint nociception and neutrophil migration in males, revealing a potent and positive correlation between temporomandibular joint nociception and inflammation. Taken together, these findings demonstrate a pronounced anti-inflammatory effect of estradiol and testosterone in the temporomandibular joint region and suggest that this effect may mediate, at least in part, the antinociceptive effect of these hormones.

  10. Macroscopic and microscopic aspects of the temporomandibular joint related to its clinical implication.

    PubMed

    Siéssere, Selma; Vitti, Mathias; Semprini, Marisa; Regalo, Simone Cecílio Hallak; Iyomasa, Mamie Mizusaki; Dias, Fernando José; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; de Sousa, Luiz Gustavo

    2008-10-01

    In order to obtain a precise diagnosis and treatment for temporomandibular dysfunctions, it is necessary to have morphological and functional knowledge of the temporomandibular joint. Anatomic components are important to the understanding of the complexity of temporomandibular joint. Nonetheless, just as important are the anatomic relationships that this joint has with the neighboring structures. Thus, the aim of this study was to present the anatomic relationships of the temporomandibular joint in its various surfaces: external or lateral, anterior, posterior, medial, superior, and posterosuperior, considering the morphological and histological aspects. Nine human heads, fixed in formalin (10%) underwent sagittal medial section and were subsequently dissected, evidencing the anatomic components of all surfaces to be analyzed. Components of the external surface were: skin, subcutaneous tissue, lymphatic ganglia, parotid gland, superficial temporal artery, transverse facial artery, zygomatic-orbital artery, superficial temporal vein, facial and auriculotemporal nerves, masseter muscle, and pre-auricular lymphonodus. The anterior surface comprised the masseter and lateral pterygoid muscles (upper and inferior heads), pterygoid venous plexus, mandibular notch, posterior deep temporal artery, masseteric nerve, and deep posterior temporal branches. Medial surface components were: internal maxillary artery, of which middle meningeal artery was one of the closest branches to the TMJ, anterior tympanic artery, inferior alveolar, lingual, auriculotemporal, and chorda tympani nerves, which belonged to the surface posterior to the anterior wall of the auditory duct; auricolotemporal nerve, parotid gland; and petrotympanic fissure. The cerebral fossa (meninges and encephalon) belonged to the superior surface and the ear belonged to the posterosuperior surface. Histologically, the temporomandibular joint is composed by different tissues that compound the mandibular head

  11. Arthroscopic electrothermal capsulorrhaphy for the treatment of recurrent temporomandibular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Torres, Daniel E; McCain, Joseph P

    2012-06-01

    Acute temporomandibular joint dislocation is a common occurrence that is generally treated by conservative therapy. In some patients, this can become a chronic recurrent condition. This recurrent temporomandibular joint dislocation (RTD) can significantly decrease the patient's quality of life and require some form of surgical intervention for correction. The purpose of this study is to present a minimally invasive alternative treatment for RTD using operative arthroscopy. 11 patients treated for recurrent temporomandibular dislocation between 2004 and 2010 were retrospectively analyzed. Electrothermal capsulorrhaphy was performed using a standard double puncture operative arthroscopy with a Hol:YAG laser and/or electrocautery. Postoperatively the patients were monitored for 6 months to 6 years. Of the 11 subjects, 2 suffered a recurrence of temporomandibular dislocation and required open arthrotomy for correction. The other 9 patients had no signs of recurrence or any significant postoperative loss of function. Electrothermal capsulorrhaphy is an effective and minimally invasive method for the treatment of RTD.

  12. The Interface of Mechanics and Nociception in Joint Pathophysiology: Insights From the Facet and Temporomandibular Joints.

    PubMed

    Sperry, Megan M; Ita, Meagan E; Kartha, Sonia; Zhang, Sijia; Yu, Ya-Hsin; Winkelstein, Beth

    2017-02-01

    Chronic joint pain is a widespread problem that frequently occurs with aging and trauma. Pain occurs most often in synovial joints, the body's load bearing joints. The mechanical and molecular mechanisms contributing to synovial joint pain are reviewed using two examples, the cervical spinal facet joints and the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Although much work has focused on the macroscale mechanics of joints in health and disease, the combined influence of tissue mechanics, molecular processes, and nociception in joint pain has only recently become a focus. Trauma and repeated loading can induce structural and biochemical changes in joints, altering their microenvironment and modifying the biomechanics of their constitutive tissues, which themselves are innervated. Peripheral pain sensors can become activated in response to changes in the joint microenvironment and relay pain signals to the spinal cord and brain where pain is processed and perceived. In some cases, pain circuitry is permanently changed, which may be a potential mechanism for sustained joint pain. However, it is most likely that alterations in both the joint microenvironment and the central nervous system (CNS) contribute to chronic pain. As such, the challenge of treating joint pain and degeneration is temporally and spatially complicated. This review summarizes anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology of these joints and the sensory pain relays. Pain pathways are postulated to be sensitized by many factors, including degeneration and biochemical priming, with effects on thresholds for mechanical injury and/or dysfunction. Initiators of joint pain are discussed in the context of clinical challenges including the diagnosis and treatment of pain.

  13. Effects of Enzymatic Degradation after Loading in Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Asakawa-Tanne, Y.; Su, S.; Kunimatsu, R.; Hirose, N.; Mitsuyoshi, T.; Okamoto, Y.; Tanaka, E.; Tanne, K.

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fluid of the joint decreases friction between the cartilage surfaces and reduces cartilage wear during articulation. Characteristic changes of synovial fluid have been shown in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). OA is generally considered to be induced by excessive mechanical stress. However, whether the changes in synovial fluid precede the mechanical overloading or vice versa remains unclear. In the present study, our purpose was to examine if the breakdown of joint lubrication affects the frictional properties of mandibular condylar cartilage and leads to subsequent degenerative changes in TMJ. We measured the frictional coefficient in porcine TMJ by a pendulum device after digestion with hyaluronidase (HAase) or trypsin. Gene expressions of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), type II collagen, and histology were examined after prolonged cyclic loading by an active pendulum system. The results showed that the frictional coefficient increased significantly after HAase (35%) or trypsin (74%) treatment. Gene expression of IL-1β, COX-2, and MMPs-1, -3, and -9 increased significantly in enzyme-treated TMJs after cyclic loading. The increase in the trypsin-treated group was greater than that in the HAase-treated group. Type II collagen expression was reduced in both enzyme-treated groups. Histology revealed surface fibrillation and increased MMP-1 in the trypsin-treated group, as well as increased IL-1β in both enzyme-treated groups after cyclic loading. The findings demonstrated that the compromised lubrication in TMJ is associated with altered frictional properties and surface wear of condylar cartilage, accompanied by release of pro-inflammatory and matrix degradation mediators under mechanical loading. PMID:25503611

  14. Preliminary optical coherence tomography investigation of the temporo-mandibular joint disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mărcăuteanu, Corina; Demjan, Enikö; Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda; Motoc, Adrian; Lighezan, Rodica; Vasile, Liliana; Hughes, Mike; Bradu, Adrian; Dobre, George; Podoleanu, Adrian G.

    2010-02-01

    Aim and objectives. The morphology and position of the temporo-mandibular disc are key issues in the diagnosis and treatment of arthrogenous temporo-mandibular disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy are used today to identify: flattening of the pars posterior of the disc, perforation and/or adhesions in the pars intermedia of the disc and disc displacements. The present study proposes the investigation of the temporo-mandibular joint disc by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Material and methods. 8 human temporo-mandibular joint discs were harvested from dead subjects, under 40 year of age, and conserved in formalin. They had a normal morphology, with a thicker pars posterior (2,6 mm on the average) and a thinner pars intermedia (1mm on the average). We investigated the disc samples using two different OCT systems: an en-face OCT (time domain (TD)-OCT) system, working at 1300 nm (C-scan and B-scan mode) and a spectral OCT system (a Fourier domain (FD)-OCT) system , working at 840 nm (B-scan mode). Results. The OCT investigation of the temporo-mandibular joint discs revealed a homogeneous microstructure. The longer wavelength of the TD-OCT offers a higher penetration depth (2,5 mm in air), which is important for the analysis of the pars posterior, while the FD-OCT is much faster. Conclusions: OCT is a promising imaging method for the microstructural characterization of the temporo-mandibular disc.

  15. [Treatment of dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint by an occlusion splint].

    PubMed

    Zajko, J; Satko, I; Hirjak, D

    1990-06-01

    At present we include under the term arthropathy of the temporomandibular joint a large group of affections of this joint. In recent years the term myofacial painful dysfunction syndrome was defined in mode detail. It is a condition characterized by its polyaetiological nature and is linked to the area of the temporo-mandibular joint and its surroundings. It is associated with pain without apparent destructive changes on the X-ray picture. In the submitted paper attention is paid to conservative treatment of painful dysfunctional muscular syndrome by means of an occulsion splint. In a group of 32 patient the advantages of the method are demonstrated.

  16. Ankylosis of temporomandibular joint after the traumatic brain injury: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qinggong; Li, Bo; Long, Xing; Li, Jian; Yan, Quanmei

    2013-08-01

    Mouth opening limitation after the neurosurgical procedures is a common complication and usually resolves within 3 months. If limited mouth opening remains unresolved on the long term, an intra-articular ankylosis of temporomandibular joint may develop eventually. The possible mechanisms base on the myositis and atrophy of the masticatory muscles for these craniotomies are often involved in the temporalis. This article reports two unusual cases with the intra-articular ankylosis of temporomandibular joint after the traumatic brain injury, who received a modified surgical treatment for joint ankylosis. Therefore, the early diagnosis and intervention are important to minimize these complications.

  17. Estrogen aggravates iodoacetate-induced temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, X D; Kou, X X; Meng, Z; Bi, R Y; Liu, Y; Zhang, J N; Zhou, Y H; Gan, Y H

    2013-10-01

    Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJOA) is clinically characterized by female preponderance, with a female-to-male ratio of more than 2:1; however, the underlying mechanism remains obscure. We examined the effects of estrogen on TMJOA induced by monosodium iodoacetate. Female rats were randomly and equally divided into 5 groups: control, sham-ovariectomized, and ovariectomized rats treated, respectively, with 17β-estradiol (E2) at doses of 0 µg, 20 µg, and 80 µg/day until the end of the experiment. After induction of TMJOA, TMJs were evaluated by histopathology and microCT, and the expression of Fas, FasL, caspase 3, and caspase 8 was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain-reaction or immunohistochemistry. Another 5 groups of female rats were used to evaluate the effect of estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182780 on E2 effects on TMJOA, when injected intraperitoneally into the control, sham-ovariectomized, and 80-µg-E2-treated groups. We found that E2 potentiated cartilage degradation and subchondral bone erosion in iodoacetate-induced TMJOA. E2 also potentiated mRNA expression of Fas, FasL, caspase 3, and caspase 8 in the condylar cartilage. Moreover, the estrogen receptor antagonist partially blocked E2 effects on TMJOA. These findings suggest that E2 could aggravate TMJOA, which may be an important mechanism underlying the sexual dimorphism of TMJOA.

  18. Temporomandibular joint sounds and disc dislocations incidence after orotracheal intubation.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Estela T; Suazo, Iván C; Guimarães, Antonio S

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacement and articular sounds incidence after orotracheal intubation. A prospective cohort study was conducted in the Hospital Universitário do Oeste do Paraná (HUOP), in Cascavel, Brazil. 100 patients (aged 14-74 years, mean 44 years), 34 male and 66 female, in need of surgical procedure with orotracheal intubation were evaluated. The anterior disc displacement with reduction incidence and the nonclassifiable sounds incidence by the Research Diagnostic Criteria Axis I was evaluated in all patients after orotracheal intubation. The patients was evaluated one day before and until two days after the procedure. Eight percent present with anterior disc displacement with reduction and 10% presented nonclassifiable sounds after the orotracheal intubation. There was no correlation of any kind regarding gender related influence in the incidence of disc dislocations (P = 0.2591) and TMJ sounds (P = 0.487). Although anterior disc dislocations and TMJ sounds after anesthetic with orotracheal intubation presented a low incidence (8%-10%), it is recommended that the evaluation of TMJ signs and symptoms be done before the anesthetic procedure to take care with susceptible patients manipulation.

  19. Effects of four treatment strategies for temporomandibular joint closed lock

    PubMed Central

    Schiffman, E. L.; Velly, A. M.; Look, J. O.; Hodges, J. S.; Swift, J. Q.; Decker, K. L.; Anderson, Q. N.; Templeton, R. B.; Lenton, P. A.; Kang, W.; Fricton, J. R.

    2013-01-01

    A previous randomized controlled trial (RCT) by Schiffman et al. (2007)15 compared four treatments strategies for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacement without reduction with limited mouth opening (closed lock). In this parallel group RCT, 106 patients with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-confirmed TMJ closed lock were randomized between medical management, non-surgical rehabilitation, arthroscopic surgery, and arthroplasty. Surgical groups also received rehabilitation post-surgically. The current paper reassesses the effectiveness of these four treatment strategies using outcome measures recommended by the International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (IAOMS). Clinical assessments at baseline and at follow-up (3, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 60 months) included intensity and frequency of TMJ pain, mandibular range of motion, TMJ sounds, and impairment of chewing. TMJ MRIs were performed at baseline and 24 months, and TMJ tomograms at baseline, 24 and 60 months. Most IAOMS recommended outcome measures improved significantly over time (P ≤ 0.0003). There was no difference between treatment strategies relative to any treatment outcome at any follow-up (P ≥ 0.16). Patient self-assessment of treatment success correlated with their ability to eat, with pain-free opening ≥35 mm, and with reduced pain intensity. Given no difference between treatment strategies, non-surgical treatment should be employed for TMJ closed lock before considering surgery. PMID:24042068

  20. Tissue engineering osteochondral implants for temporomandibular joint repair.

    PubMed

    Schek, R M; Taboas, J M; Hollister, S J; Krebsbach, P H

    2005-11-01

    Tissue engineering has provided an alternative to traditional strategies to repair and regenerate temporomandibular joints (TMJ). A successful strategy to engineer osteochondral tissue, such as that found in the TMJ, will produce tissue that is both biologically and mechanically functional. Image-based design (IBD) and solid free-form (SFF) fabrication can be used to generate scaffolds that are load bearing and match patient and defect site geometry. The objective of this study was to demonstrate how scaffold design, materials, and biological factors can be used in an integrated approach to regenerate a multi-tissue interface. IBD and SFF were first used to create biomimetic scaffolds with appropriate bulk geometry and microarchitecture. Biphasic composite scaffolds were then manufactured with the same techniques and used to simultaneously generate bone and cartilage in discrete regions and provide for the development of a stable interface between cartilage and subchondral bone. Poly-l-lactic acid/hydroxyapatite composite scaffolds were differentially seeded with fibroblasts transduced with an adenovirus expressing bone morphogenetic protein-7 in the ceramic phase and fully differentiated chondrocytes in the polymeric phase, and were subcutaneously implanted into mice. Following implantation in the ectopic site, the biphasic scaffolds promoted the simultaneous growth of bone, cartilage, and a mineralized interface tissue. Within the ceramic phase, the pockets of tissue generated included blood vessels, marrow stroma, and adipose tissue. This combination of IBD and SFF-fabricated biphasic scaffolds with gene and cell therapy is a promising approach to regenerate osteochondral defects and, ultimately, the TMJ.

  1. Temporomandibular joint chondrosarcoma: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma is a malignant tumor that originates from cartilaginous cells and is characterized by cartilage formation. Only 5% to 10% of chondrosarcoma occurs in the head and neck area, and it is uncommon in the temporomandibular joint area. This report describes an unusual case with a rare, large chondrosarcoma in a 47-year-old woman who presented with painless swelling and trismus. Computed tomography showed a large mass approximately 8.5×6.0 cm in size arising adjacent to the lateral pterygoid plate and condyle. There were features suggestive of bone resorption. The tumor was resected in a single block with perilesional tissues, and a great auricular nerve graft was performed because of facial nerve sacrifice. Microscopic examination of sections stained with H&E revealed chondrocytes with irregular nuclei and heterogeneous hyper chromatic tumor cells embedded in the chondrocyte lacuna. The diagnosis was a grade I chondrosarcoma. There was no evidence of recurrence at the 8-month follow-up, and a reconstruction surgery with fibular osteocutaneous free flap was performed. We report this unusual entity and a review of the literature. PMID:27847738

  2. Early treatment of unilateral temporomandibular joint ankylosis: a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Ataç, Mustafa Sancar; Çakir, Merve; Yücel, Ergun; Gazioğlu, Çagri; Akkaya, Sevil

    2014-05-01

    Ankylosis of temporomandibular joint is a condition in which partial or complete immobilization of mandible occurs because of fusion between mandibular condyle and skull base. This condition can be treated orthodontically, surgically, or therapeutically or by prosthodontic rehabilitation. A 10-year-old female patient presented to the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Gazi University Faculty of Dentistry, with limited mouth opening. She got injury in the face when she was 5 years old. Extraoral and intraoral examination findings were facial asymmetry on the left side, micrognathic mandible, and 19-mm mouth opening. After radiographic examination, ankylosis (Shawney type I) on the left side was revealed, and the patient was referred to Department of Orthodontics. After orthodontic clinical examination, we create following multidisciplinary treatment approach: (1) acrylic posterior bite block with spring application, (2) interpositional arthroplasty operation, and (3) physiotherapy (passive mouth-opening exercises). After the follow-up of 9 months, significant improvement (5 mm) was noticed in the opening of the mouth, and we decided to remove appliance and operate on the patient. Surgical procedure was performed under general anesthesia via blinded nasotracheal intubation. To prevent postoperative relapse, temporal fascia was interpositioned and sutured. Passive mouth-opening exercises were started 10 days after the surgery. Thirty-one-millimeter mouth opening was reached after the surgery and passive mouth-opening exercises. Patient's routine controls have been continued for 2 years.

  3. A protocol for management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis in children.

    PubMed

    Kaban, Leonard B; Bouchard, Carl; Troulis, Maria J

    2009-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis in children is a challenging problem. Surgical correction is technically difficult and the incidence of recurrence after treatment is high. The purpose of the present report is to describe the protocol currently used at the Massachusetts General Hospital for the management of TMJ ankylosis in children. It has been our observation that the most common cause of treatment failure is inadequate resection of the ankylotic mass and failure to achieve adequate passive maximal opening in the operating room. The 7-step protocol consists of 1) aggressive excision of the fibrous and/or bony ankylotic mass, 2) coronoidectomy on the affected side, 3) coronoidectomy on the contralateral side, if steps 1 and 2 do not result in a maximal incisal opening greater than 35 mm or to the point of dislocation of the unaffected TMJ, 4) lining of the TMJ with a temporalis myofascial flap or the native disc, if it can be salvaged, 5) reconstruction of the ramus condyle unit with either distraction osteogenesis or costochondral graft and rigid fixation, and 6) early mobilization of the jaw. If distraction osteogenesis is used to reconstruct the ramus condyle unit, mobilization begins the day of the operation. In patients who undergo costochondral graft reconstruction, mobilization begins after 10 days of maxillomandibular fixation. Finally (step 7), all patients receive aggressive physiotherapy. A case series of children with ankylosis treated using this protocol is presented.

  4. Topical versus systemic diclofenac in the treatment of temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction symptoms.

    PubMed

    Di Rienzo Businco, L; Di Rienzo Businco, A; D'Emilia, M; Lauriello, M; Coen Tirelli, G

    2004-10-01

    The most frequent symptom of craniomandibular dysfunction is pain in the preauricular area or in the temporo-mandibular joint, usually localized at the level of the masticatory musculature. Patients sometimes also complain of reflect otalgia, headaches and facial pain. Osteoarthrosis is a frequent degenerative debilitating chronic disorder that can affect the temporomandibular joint. It causes pain and articular rigidity, a reduction in mobility, and radiological alterations are visible in stratigraphy. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of a topically applied non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug that has recently become commercially available (diclofenac sodium in a patented carrier containing dimethyl sulfoxide, that favours transcutaneous absorption) which is commonly used to alleviate pain in knee or elbow joints, versus oral diclofenac, in the treatment of symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint was diagnosed in 36 adult patients. The patients were randomized in two age- and gender -matched groups. Group A (18 patients) received oral diclofenac sodium administered after a meal in 50-mg tablets twice a day for 14 days. Group B (18 patients) received 16 mg/ml topical diclofenac (diclofenac topical solution, 10 drops 4 times a day for 14 days). All patients completed a questionnaire at the start and end of therapy. Patients were asked to quantify on a graded visual analogue scale and to reply to questions about the pain and tenderness of the temporomandibular joint and the functional limitation of mouth opening. Patients were also requested to report side-effects of the treatment. All patients showed relief from pain after treatment: the difference between the two groups was not significant (p > 0.05). Post-treatment, 16 patients of group A had epigastralgic symptoms. Three patients treated with topical diclofenac showed a modest irritation of the temporomandibular joint region, and disappeared

  5. [Inferior hemiarthroplasty of the temporo-mandibular joint with articulated condylar prosthesis type Stryker].

    PubMed

    Bucur, A; Dincă, O; Totan, C; Ghită, V

    2007-01-01

    The optimal reconstruction of the mandible and of the temporo-mandibular joint after mandibular hemi-resection with disarticulation is still controversial in literature. This paperwork presents our experience on four cases in the reconstruction of the mandible together with the inferior arthroplasty of the temporo-mandibular joint, after the resection of extended benign tumors of the mandible, based on fibular free vascularized grafts having attached a Stryker titanium condylar prosthesis reconstructing the inferior segment of the temporo-mandibular joint. Our results for the this technique were excellent, with a functional rehabilitation very close to normal. After reviewing the various techniques and their arguments in literature, with accent on the TMJ reconstruction, we consider this method to be optimal for the reconstruction of mandibular defects in patients with neoplastic conditions.

  6. Chronic temporomandibular joint dislocation by mandibular distraction in a patient with Melnick-needles syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Patrick; Mata, Carlos; Da Silveira, Adriana

    2010-01-01

    Melnick-Needles syndrome is a congenital syndrome associated with severe architectural disorder of the skeletal system that can cause significant effects on the craniofacial skeleton including the mandible and temporomandibular joint. We report on a case of a young adult patient who experienced chronic dislocation, pain, and dysfunction of her temporomandibular joints related to both a severe bite dysfunction (mandibular hypoplasia) and the underlying bony architectural disorder associated with Melnick-Needles syndrome. The patient underwent bilateral mandibular distraction to correct her skeletal malocclusion and improve the condylar relationship with the temporomandibular joint fossae. The inherent bony abnormalities presented unique challenges to distraction. The patient was successfully distracted using internal mandibular distractors, rhBMP-2, and a prolonged distraction protocol. The patient experienced complete resolution of symptoms and resumed an unrestricted diet 6 months after removal of devices and has been pain-free for more than 24 months.

  7. Morphological characteristics of the temporomandibular joint in the pouch young of the Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, K; Sugisaki, M; Kino, K; Ishikawa, T; Kawashima, S; Amemiya, T

    2015-04-01

    We recently reported the absence of the articular disc, which is a constant structure in mammals, in the temporomandibular joint of the adult Tasmanian devil. However, whether the articular disc disappears with growth of the animal was unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether a pouch young of the Tasmanian devil has the articular disc. The temporomandibular joint of a fresh carcass of the pouch young, whose crown-rump length was 43 mm, was examined microscopically and by microcomputed tomography. The absence of the articular disc in the pouch young temporomandibular joint was histologically confirmed. It is suggested that the articular disc of the Tasmanian devil is naturally absent.

  8. Management of Temporomandibular Joint Reankylosis in Syndromic Patients Corrected with Joint Prostheses: Surgical and Rehabilitation Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Clauser, Luigi C.; Consorti, Giuseppe; Elia, Giovanni; Tieghi, Riccardo; Galiè, Manlio

    2013-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA) is a severe disorder described as an intracapsular union of the disc-condyle complex to the temporal articular surface with bony fusion. The management of this disability is challenging and rarely based on surgical and rehabilitation protocols. We describe the treatment in two young adults affected by Goldenhar syndrome and Pierre Robin sequence with reankylosis after previous surgical treatments. There are three main surgical procedures for the treatment of TMJA: gap arthroplasty, interpositional arthroplasty, and joint reconstruction. Various authors have described reankylosis as a frequent event after treatment. Treatment failure could be associated with surgical errors and/or inadequate intensive postoperative physiotherapy. Surgical treatment should be individually tailored and adequate postoperative physiotherapy protocol is mandatory for success. PMID:24624260

  9. Angioarchitecture and morphology of temporomandibular joint of Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Minucci, Matheus Silvestre; Issa, João Paulo Mardegan; Yokoyama, Fernando Yukio; Dias, Fernando José; Iyomasa, Daniela Mizusaki; Guimarães, Elaine Aparecida Del-Bel Belluz; Watanabe, Ii-Sei; Iyomasa, Mamie Mizusaki

    2016-09-01

    The opossum Monodelphis domestica presents movement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) reflecting adaptation to eating habits similar to movement in humans, but the structure of the TMJ is not yet known. Thus, nine young M. domestica, of both sexes were weighed, anesthetized with xylazine (10 mg kg(-1) ), and ketamine (70 mg kg(-1) ) and processed for: 1. The analyses of the macroscopic angioarchitecture after latex injection, as well as the topography of the TMJ; 2. The analysis of microvascularization after injection of Mercox resin and corrosion of soft tissue with NaOH using scanning electron microscopy and; 3. The histological evaluation of the TMJ with an optical microscope. Macroscopic analysis of the latex injected vessels revealed the distribution of the arteries from the common carotid artery, receiving branches of the superficial temporal and maxillary arteries. The mandibular condyle has the long axis in the lateral-lateral direction, and is convex in the anterior-posterior direction. Its topography was determined in relation to the eye and external acoustic meatus. With scanning electron microscopy, microvascularization consists of arterioles of varying diameter (85-15 µm) of the meandering capillary network in the retrodiscal region, and a network of straight capillaries in the TMJ anterior region. Via light microscopy the TMJ has similar histological features to those of humans. These macroscopic, microscopic and ultrastructural data from TMJ of the M. domestica could be a suitable model for TMJ physiology and pathophysiology studies for then speculate on possible human studies. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:806-813, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Design and wear testing of a temporomandibular joint prosthesis articulation.

    PubMed

    van Loon, J P; Verkerke, G J; de Vries, M P; de Bont, L G

    2000-02-01

    As part of the development of a total temporomandibular joint prosthesis, a prosthesis articulation was designed. The articulation consists of a spherical head (ball) of the mandibular part, rotating against an enveloping ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) disc with a flat cranial side, which slides along the opposing skull part. The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro wear rate of the articulation, and to predict the in vivo wear rate from the results. Based on a disc thickness of 5 mm and a ball diameter of 8 mm, the stresses within the disc were calculated by means of a finite element computer model. The wear rate of the ball-disc articulation was determined by in vitro wear tests, with a stainless-steel ball rotating against a UHMWPE disc in a serum-based lubricant. Eight discs were tested for seven million cycles each. The in vitro wear rate of the disc-skull part articulation was calculated from the test results of the ball-disc articulation. The maximum Von Mises' stress was less than the yield strength of UHMWPE and, therefore, was sufficiently low. The in vitro wear rate of the ball-disc articulation was 0.47 mm3 per million cycles. The in vivo expected total wear rate is 0.65 mm3 per year, corresponding with a yearly decrease of disc thickness of 0.0094 mm. Although it is difficult to judge whether this wear rate is sufficiently low, because the influence of UHMWPE wear particles in the TMJ region is unknown, both the expected wear rate and the decrease of thickness appear to be acceptable.

  11. 3D superimposition and understanding temporomandibular joint arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Cevidanes, LHS; Gomes, LR; Jung, BT; Gomes, MR; Ruellas, ACO; Goncalves, JR; Schilling, J; Styner, M; Nguyen, T; Kapila, S; Paniagua, B

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the 3D morphological variations in 169 Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) condyles, using novel imaging statistical modeling approaches. Setting and Sample Population The Department of Orthodontics and Pediatric Dentistry at the University of Michigan. Cone beam CT scans were acquired from 69 subjects with long-term TMJ osteoarthritis (OA, mean age 39.1 ± 15.7 years), 15 subjects at initial consult diagnosis of OA (mean age 44.9 ± 14.8 years) and 7 healthy controls (mean age 43 ± 12.4 years). Material & Methods 3D surface models of the condyles were constructed and homologous correspondent points on each model were established. The statistical framework included Direction-Projection-Permutation (DiProPerm) for testing statistical significance of the differences between healthy controls and the OA groups determined by clinical and radiographic diagnoses. Results Condylar morphology in OA and healthy subjects varied widely with categorization from mild to severe bone degeneration or overgrowth. DiProPerm statistics supported a significant difference between the healthy control group and the initial diagnosis of OA group (t=6.6, empirical p-value = 0.006), and between healthy and long term-diagnosis of OA group (t = 7.2, empirical p-value = 0). Compared with healthy controls, the average condyle in OA subjects was significantly smaller in all dimensions, except its anterior surface, even in subjects with initial diagnosis of OA. Conclusion This new statistical modeling of condylar morphology allows the development of more targeted classifications of this condition than previously possible. PMID:25865530

  12. Psychoeducation Program on Strategies for Coping with Stress in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lack of educational projects in the available literature was an inspiration to develop a psychoeducational program. The objective was to provide patients with basic information on the contribution of stressors in the occurrence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and educate on methods for coping with stress most commonly used in psychology. In the course of three meetings, patients are familiarised with the issue of experienced stress as a potential source of psychosomatic illnesses (in particular, temporomandibular joint dysfunction). Preliminary patients' opinions, expressed through self-report methods, indicate significant usefulness of the developed psychoeducational program for the process of treatment and the quality of patients' lives. PMID:25610871

  13. Psychoeducation program on strategies for coping with stress in patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Biegańska, Joanna; Pihut, M

    2014-01-01

    Lack of educational projects in the available literature was an inspiration to develop a psychoeducational program. The objective was to provide patients with basic information on the contribution of stressors in the occurrence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction and educate on methods for coping with stress most commonly used in psychology. In the course of three meetings, patients are familiarised with the issue of experienced stress as a potential source of psychosomatic illnesses (in particular, temporomandibular joint dysfunction). Preliminary patients' opinions, expressed through self-report methods, indicate significant usefulness of the developed psychoeducational program for the process of treatment and the quality of patients' lives.

  14. [Dissertations 25 years after date 43. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction and condylar resorption following orthognathic surgery].

    PubMed

    Kerstens, H C J

    2015-12-01

    A surgical-orthodontic treatment has a direct influence on a patient's skeletal, dental, functional and psychological factors. A variety of surgical and anatomical factors determine the result of this complex treatment. Risk factors are a retrognathy with a steep mandibular angle, and the anatomy of the mandibular condyles and the fossa. The customary surgical techniques have an enhancing influence on the function of the temporomandibular joint. The role of the position of the articular disc remains unclear. Since 1989, more insight has gradually been gained in the aspects having an influence on the function of the temporomandibular joint following orthognathic surgery.

  15. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis overview and involvement of the temporomandibular joint: prevalence, systemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Carrasco, Ruy

    2015-02-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is one of the many joints involved in the inflammatory arthritides. As imaging of joints has developed, so have the data regarding extent and prevalence of TMJ involvement in these diseases. TMJ disease is especially prevalent in juvenile arthritis. The adult and pediatric inflammatory arthritides share common pathophysiology but are still markedly different. The preponderance of TMJ arthritis research exists in juvenile arthritis. This article discusses classification, treatment, and TMJ involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  16. Gait changes after using a temporomandibular joint exerciser in patients who underwent lower limb joint surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Gu-Young; Choi, Geun-Seok; Shin, Ki-Young; Park, Joon-Soo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The improvements in gait of the patients with lower limb disease who used a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) exerciser were verified. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven subjects were included. Their mean age was 53.2 years. The lower limb joint angles before and after using the TMJ exerciser were measured using a gait analyzer. Before the gait experiment, the TMJ exerciser setting process and one-leg stance balance test (OLST) were repeated until the balance maintenance time improved. [Results] Because of the OLST, the mean change in the body center point after the subjects used the exerciser improved from 5.76 mm to 4.20 mm. When the TMJ exerciser was used, the joint angle range of the subjects approached that of the normal individuals. [Conclusion] According to the gait experiments, the angles of the subjects’ hips, knees, and ankle joints approached to those of the normal individuals after the subjects used the TMJ exerciser; however, the results did not completely match. The changes in the hip, knee, and ankle joint angles were statistically significant, which confirm the usefulness of the TMJ exerciser. PMID:27313377

  17. The temporomandibular joint in video motion--noninvasive image techniques to present the functional anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kordass, B

    1999-01-01

    The presentation of the functional anatomy of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is involved with difficulties if dynamic aspects are to be of prime interest, and it should be demonstrated with the highest resolution. Usually noninvasive techniques like MRI and sonography are available for presenting functionality of the temporomandibular joint in video motion. Such images reflect the functional anatomy much better than single pictures of figures could do. In combination with computer aided records of the condyle movements the video motion of MR and sonographical images represent tools for better understanding the relationships between functional or dysfunctional patterns and the morphological or dysmorphological shape and structure of the temporomandibular joint. The possibilities of such tools will be explained and discussed in detail relating, in addition, to loading effects caused by transmitted occlusal pressure onto the joint compartments. If pressure occurs the condyle slides mainly more or less retrocranially whereas the articular disc takes up a more displaced position and a deformed shape. In a few extreme cases the disc prolapses out of the joint space. These video pictures offer new aspects for the diagnosis of the disc-condyle stability and can also be used for explicit educational programs on the complex dysfunction-dysmorphology-relationship of temporomandibular diseases.

  18. Advanced imaging findings and computer-assisted surgery of suspected synovial chondromatosis in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hohlweg-Majert, Bettina; Metzger, Marc C; Böhm, Joachim; Muecke, Thomas; Schulze, Dirk

    2008-11-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the joint occurs mainly in teenagers and young adults. Only 3% of these neoplasms are located in the head and neck region. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint is therefore a very rare disorder. Therefore, developing a working, histological confirmation is required for differential diagnosis. In this case series, the outcome of histological investigation and imaging techniques are compared. Based on clinical symptoms, five cases of suspected synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint are presented. In each of the subjects, the diagnosis was confirmed by histology. Specific imaging features for each case are described. The tomography images were compared with the histological findings. All patients demonstrated preauricular swelling, dental midline deviation, and limited mouth opening. Computer-assisted surgery was performed. Histology disclosed synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint in four cases. The other case was found to be a developmental disorder of the tympanic bone. The diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint can only be based on histology. Clinical symptoms are too general and the available imaging techniques only show nonspecific tumorous destruction, infiltration, and/or residual calcified bodies, they are only for advanced cases. A rare developmental disorder of the tympanic bone--persistence of foramen of Huschke--has to be differentiated.

  19. Cytopathologic diagnosis on joint lavage fluid for patients with temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Toshinari; Kumagai, Akiko; Aomura, Tomoyuki; Javed, Fawad; Sugiyama, Yoshiki; Mizuki, Harumi; Takeda, Yasunori

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders (TMD) are usually diagnosed based on the patient's clinical findings and the results of image investigations; however, understanding of the inflammatory process in TMJ is difficult. In addition, many of the TMJ disease types share common principal symptoms. Therefore, TMJ diseases in the early stage can be misdiagnosed with TMD. It is hypothesized that cytopathologic examination of the joint lavage fluids is useful in interpreting the TMD-associated inflammatory process from a cellular aspect. The aim of this study was to assess the TMJ lavage fluid cytopathologically in TMD patients. Thirty-nine patients, clinically diagnosed as TMD, were included in the present study. Clinical symptoms of the patients were recorded. Forty-four samples of TMJ lavage fluid were collected and paraffin-embedded cell sections were made by cell block tissue array method. Cytologic conditions in upper articular cavity of TMJ were cytopathologically diagnosed and were compared with the clinical symptoms of each patient. Cell components were detected in 22 of the 44 analyzed joint lavage fluids. There was a correlation between cytopathologic findings and clinical symptoms. Variety of cytopathology and inflammatory conditions in patients with similar clinical symptoms were also found. The results suggested that cytopathologic examination of the joint lavage fluids from TMD patients is helpful for gaining an understanding of the inner local conditions of TMJ at the cellular level.

  20. Titanium/titanium nitride temporomandibular joint prosthesis: historical background and a six-year clinical review.

    PubMed

    Bütow, K W; Blackbeard, G A; van der Merwe, A E

    2001-08-01

    The titanium/titanium nitride temporomandibular joint (TTN-TMJ) prosthesis, for the combined replacement of both the joint and the glenoid fossa, was developed in 1992 and introduced clinically in 1994. This joint prosthesis is manufactured from pure titanium and the condylar surfaces, as well as the fossa, are coated with titanium nitride for hardening of the contact surfaces. In two different research projects, the joint were first placed in experimental animals, before they were successfully placed in human subjects. Twenty seven joint prostheses used in human subjects have been analysed for this review.

  1. Minimally Invasive Treatment of Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis and Fibrosis of Temporalis Muscle.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jungsuk; Kim, James Y; Wotman, Michael T; Behrman, David A; Israel, Howard

    2016-04-01

    A case of severe mandibular hypomobility due to fibrosis of the left temporalis tendon, combined with ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint, is presented. This case emphasizes the importance of reconstructing the historical timeline to establish a correct diagnosis, ultimately leading to appropriate treatment. The use of minimally invasive surgical techniques and the importance of postoperative rehabilitation are emphasized.

  2. [Features of the hormonal status in patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction and class II malocclusion].

    PubMed

    Gus, L A; Arsenina, O I; Komolov, I S

    2015-01-01

    The article presents data on androgen levels in female patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction of varying degree and class II malocclusion. The study revealed significant correlation between degenerative and inflammatory TMJ changes and androgens level in patients with stigmas of connective tissue dysplasia (p<0.05), probably due to indirect proinflammatory action of androgens as they stimulate inflammatory mediators expression.

  3. [Electrophysiological evaluation of occlusal splint treatment of patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Nuño Licona, A; Angeles Medina, F; García Ruiz, J; García Moreira, C

    1991-08-01

    Blink reflex time records were obtained from patients with temporomandibular joint disfunction (TMJD), before and after treatment with occlusal splint, since blink reflex time helps to study the trigeminal-facial functional relationship. Results suggest that the impaired sensory-motor function in the trigeminal-facial complex of TMJD patients, may return to normal latency values following such treatment.

  4. Ossifying fibroma in the temporomandibular joint: report of an unusual case and treatment perspectives.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Z; Abdelrehem, A; Zhang, S Y; Yang, C

    2015-11-01

    An unusual case of ossifying fibroma involving the right temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in a 7-year-old girl is presented. The treatment protocol comprised TMJ reconstruction with a costochondral graft following radical tumour resection, with the use of both pedicled and free fat grafts to improve the surgical outcome. Pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis. Aspects of the treatment are discussed.

  5. Squamous cell carcinoma invading the right temporomandibular joint in a Belgian mare

    PubMed Central

    Perrier, Melanie; Schwarz, Tobias; Gonzalez, Olga; Brounts, Sabrina

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a rare case of squamous cell carcinoma invading the right temporomandibular joint, right guttural pouch, and calvarium. Radiography, computed tomography, and histopathology were performed in the diagnostic workup. Computed tomography depicted more accurately than radiography the invasive nature, exact location, and extent of the lesion. PMID:21037891

  6. Temporomandibular joint ankylosis caused by chondroid hyperplasia from the callus of condylar neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soung Min; Park, Jung Min; Kim, Ji Hyuck; Kwon, Kwang Jun; Park, Young Wook; Lee, Jong Ho; Lee, Sang Shin; Lee, Suk Keun

    2009-01-01

    A patient who complained of difficulty in opening his mouth after condylar neck fracture 1 year ago presented typical features of temporomandibular joint ankylosis in clinical and radiologic examinations. To demonstrate a possible pathogenesis of temporomandibular joint ankylosis after condylar neck fracture, the fractured condylar portion removed was examined by histologic and immunohistochemical stainings. Interpositional gap arthroplasty was performed by removing the inferomesially displaced fractured condyle, and reconstruction with subcutaneous dermis to the previous vertical height was performed immediately. The fractured condylar portion was almost intact with slight erosion of the condylar cartilage. In the hematoxylin and eosin and Masson trichrome stainings, an extensive chondroid hyperplasia with abundant hyaline cartilage was shown in the removed condylar portion. There were also hyperplastic features of the synovial membrane, which were abnormally distributed throughout the chondroid tissues. In the immunohistochemical stainings of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and BMP-4, the chondroid tissues were conspicuously hyperplastic and strongly positive for BMP-4 but sparse for BMP-2. From these results, we think that the hyperplastic chondroid tissue was derived from the callus of the primary fractured site of the condylar neck and propose that the chondroid tissue could proliferate continuously because of synovial tissue support from around the temporomandibular joint, resulting in temporomandibular joint ankylosis. This pathogenesis is quite different from those of other diaphyseal fracture of long bones.

  7. Biofeedback and Relaxation Therapy for Chronic Temporomandibular Joint Pain: Predicting Successful Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funch, Donna P.; Gale, Elliot N.

    1984-01-01

    Randomly assigned 57 patients with chronic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain to receive either relaxation or biofeedback therapy. Successful patients in the relaxation condition tended to be younger and had experienced TMJ pain for a shorter period of time than the successful biofeedback patients. (BH)

  8. Management of congenital bilateral temporomandibular joint ankylosis with secondary mandibular hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Attiguppe Ramasetty; Rai, Kirthi Kumar; Bedi, Sumit

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this article is to present the course of the condition in a case of congenital temporomandibular joint ankylosis that caused facial disfigurement, significant reduction of mouth opening, difficulty in feeding and breathing, and general interference with physical development.

  9. Dental and Temporomandibular Joint Pathology of the Walrus (Odobenus rosmarus).

    PubMed

    Winer, J N; Arzi, B; Leale, D M; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2016-01-01

    Maxillae and/or mandibles from 76 walruses (Odobenus rosmarus) were examined macroscopically according to predefined criteria. The museum specimens were acquired between 1932 and 2014. Forty-five specimens (59.2%) were from male animals, 29 (38.2%) from female animals and two (2.6%) from animals of unknown sex, with 58 adults (76.3%) and 18 young adults (23.7%) included in this study. The number of teeth available for examination was 830 (33.6%); 18.5% of teeth were absent artefactually, 3.3% were deemed to be absent due to acquired tooth loss and 44.5% were absent congenitally. The theoretical complete dental formula was confirmed to be I 3/3, C 1/1, P 4/3, M 2/2, while the most probable dental formula is I 1/0, C 1/1, P 3/3, M 0/0; none of the specimens in this study possessed a full complement of theoretically possible teeth. The majority of teeth were normal in morphology; only five teeth (0.6% of available teeth) were malformed. Only one tooth had an aberrant number of roots and only one supernumerary tooth was encountered. No persistent deciduous teeth were found in any of the young adult or adult specimens, nor were any specimens affected by enamel hypoplasia. The majority of teeth (85.5%) displayed attrition/abrasion. Of the adult and young adult specimens, 90.8% showed some degree of attrition/abrasion on at least one tooth. Tooth fractures were noted in eight walruses, affecting 10.5% of specimens and 1.3% of the total number of teeth, nearly three-quarters of which were maxillary canine teeth (tusks). Three specimens (3.9%), all adult males, displayed overt periapical disease. The majority (99.2%) of dental alveoli did not have bony changes indicative of periodontitis, with only five specimens (6.6%) affected by periodontitis. Lesions consistent with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) were found in 46 specimens (60.5%) and TMJ-OA was significantly more common in adults than young adults and males than females. Although the clinical

  10. The relationship between the temporomandibular joint capsule, articular disc and jaw muscles.

    PubMed Central

    Schmolke, C

    1994-01-01

    The anatomy of the temporomandibular joint capsule and its possible relationships to other structures near the joint are not fully understood. A 3-dimensional analysis based on sagittal, frontal and horizontal serial sections through the human temporomandibular joint region was therefore undertaken. Capsular elements which directly connect the temporal bone with the mandible were seen only on the lateral side of the joint. In the posterior, anterior and medial regions of the joint the upper and lower laminae of the articular disc are attached separately either to the temporal bone or to the mandibular condyle. The shaping of the articular cavities and the texture of the joint capsule permit movements of the articular disc predominantly in the anteromedial direction. On the entire medial side of the joint the articular disc and its capsular attachments are in close contact with the fascia of the lateral pterygoid muscle whereby a small portion of the upper head of this muscle inserts directly into the anteromedial part of the articular disc. Thus both the upper and the lower heads of the lateral pterygoid muscle are likely to influence the position of the articular disc directly during temporomandibular joint movements. Laterally, the articular disc is attached to the fascia of the masseter muscle, and part of the lateral ligament inserts into the temporalis fascia. Since these attachments are relatively weak, neither the temporalis nor the masseter muscles are considered to act directly on the articular disc; instead, via afferents from muscle spindles, they may take part in signalling the position of the temporomandibular joint components, including that of the articular disc. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8014124

  11. [The relationship between whiplash injury and temporomandibular joint dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Barak, Shlomo

    2013-10-01

    This article aims to discuss the possible relationship between rapid extension-flexion of the neck-whiplash injury and temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Clinical experience and studies revealed that whiplash injury may cause TMD. The pathophysiology of TMD is described as well as clinical and imaging diagnostic criteria. The treatment modalities for TMD are: physiotherapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and occlusal splints.

  12. MRI Slice Segmentation and 3D Modelling of Temporomandibular Joint Measured by Microscopic Coil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirg, O.; Liberda, O.; Smekal, Z.; Sprlakova-Pukova, A.

    2012-01-01

    The paper focuses on the segmentation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) slices and 3D modelling of the temporomandibular joint disc in order to help physicians diagnose patients with dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The TMJ is one of the most complex joints in the human body. The most common joint dysfunction is due to the disc. The disc is a soft tissue, which in principle cannot be diagnosed by the CT method. Therefore, a 3D model is made from the MRI slices, which can image soft tissues. For the segmentation of the disc in individual slices a new method is developed based on spatial distribution and anatomical TMJ structure with automatic thresholding. The thresholding is controlled by a genetic algorithm. The 3D model is realized using the marching cube method.

  13. [The temporomandibular joint in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: what radiologists need to look for on magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    De La Hoz Polo, M; Navallas, M

    2014-01-01

    The term "juvenile idiopathic arthritis" (JIA) encompasses a group of arthritis of unknown cause with onset before the age of 16 years that last for at least 6 weeks. The prevalence of temporomandibular joint involvement in published series ranges from 17% to 87%. Temporomandibular joint involvement is difficult to detect clinically, so imaging plays a key role in diagnosis and monitoring treatment. MRI is the technique of choice for the study of arthritis of the temporomandibular joint because it is the most sensitive technique for detecting acute synovitis and bone edema. Power Doppler ultrasonography can also detect active synovitis by showing the hypervascularization of the inflamed synovial membrane, but it cannot identify bone edema. This article describes the MRI technique for evaluating the temporomandibular joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, defines the parameters to look for, and illustrates the main findings.

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint: value of pseudodynamic images.

    PubMed

    Ren, Y F; Westesson, P L; Isberg, A

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic resonance fast scanning technique (gradient recalled acquisition at steady state) has been reported to be useful when evaluating the dynamics of the temporomandibular joint and also to be accurate for determining the disk position. Yet in our clinical experience gradient recalled acquisition at steady state images have frequently been inferior to proton density images for diagnosis of temporomandibular joint internal derangement. The first aim of this study was to compare gradient recalled acquisition at steady state images with proton density images for diagnosis of disk position. The second aim was to identify what additional information could be gathered from gradient recalled acquisition at steady state images when compared with static proton density images. We obtained unilateral images from 20 patients with signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint internal derangement and from 20 asymptomatic volunteers. Multiple gradient recalled acquisition at steady state images were obtained during mouth opening and closing and proton density images were obtained at the closed and open mouth positions. The results showed that the gradient recalled acquisition at steady state images were in accordance with the proton density images in 32 joints (80%) and were false negative in 8 joints (20%). Six of the joints with false-negative gradient recalled acquisition at steady state images showed sideways disk displacement, and two showed partial anterior disk displacement. Gradient recalled acquisition at steady state images, on the other hand, provided information about movement pattern and also demonstrated impingement of the joint structures on the muscles anterior to the joint at maximal mouth opening. It was concluded that gradient recalled acquisition at steady state images cannot replace proton density images for diagnosis of disk position but they can provide supplementary information for evaluation of joint function.

  15. Rigid internal fixation and the effects on the temporomandibular joint and masticatory system: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Smith, V; Williams, B; Stapleford, R

    1992-12-01

    A prospective study of 22 patients who underwent a bilateral sagittal osteotomy to advance the mandible and subsequent rigid internal fixation, were examined for signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and masticatory dysfunction. A modified Helkimo index was used to analyze the anamnestic, clinical, and occlusal data. In addition, 12 of the cases chosen at random were mounted on a semiadjustable (SAM2) articulator and analyzed with the mandibular position indicator (MPI) to determine the amount and the direction of condylar displacement postoperatively. Anamnestic dysfunction decreased because of a reported decrease in muscular pain, joint noise, headache frequency, and parafunctional habits postoperatively. Clinical dysfunction remained unchanged, with a decrease in muscular soreness but with an increased incidence of joint clicking of 7%. The increased incidence of temporomandibular joint pain postoperatively was 4%. Increase in clinical dysfunction was most often seen in women and older patients. Occlusal dysfunction decreased, with the majority of interferences remaining after surgery as a result of insufficient lingual crown torque of the maxillary buccal segments. Occlusion is thought to have played only a minor role in temporomandibular joint and masticatory dysfunction. Reduction in range of motion was 10%, indicating the added benefit of early mobilization with rigid internal fixation procedures. The MPI study found the condyles inferiorly or inferoposteriorly displaced less than 1 mm from their preoperative position. These findings suggest that rigid internal fixation had no adverse effects on the temporomandibular and masticatory system. The variable responses and results can be attributed, at least in part, to the heterogenous population of patients studied and the variations in surgical techniques employed.

  16. Clinical-surgical treatment of temporomandibular joint disorder in a psoriatic arthritis patient

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Condylotomy is a surgical procedure that has been used as an option to treat temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. This technique has the advantage of avoiding intra-capsular alterations that might be found involving other surgical procedures. Its use, even when unilateral, has positive effect on treatment of both joints. Methods In order to better evaluate the benefits of a clinical-surgical treatment for TMD, the present report describes the case of a psoriatic arthritis patient. The case was clinically characterized by dental malloclusion, and imaging exams showed joint degeneration of the right mandibular condyle. The patient was treated by condylotomy technique after a prosthetic oral rehabilitation. Results No clinical-radiological signs or symptoms of progression of articular disease were observed within a period of 16 months after surgery. Furthermore, there was functional stability of the temporomandibular joint, total absence of local pain and improvement of mouth opening. Conclusion The present study suggests that condylotomy can be considered as a valid option for the management of TMD, since it has low surgical morbidity and favorable clinical outcomes. In this case, the patient had a medical diagnosis of systemic disease presenting general pain and pain at the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), in addition of causal agent of TMD (dental malloclusion). The difficulty of finding a single etiology (malocclusion vs. systemic disease) did not exclude the indication of a clinical-surgical treatment to re-establish the balance of TMJ. PMID:23556553

  17. Clinical evaluation of physical therapy in the management of internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Kirk, W S; Calabrese, D K

    1989-02-01

    This clinical cross-sectional study examines the favorable functional improvement in patients undergoing physical therapy for mild to moderate internal disc derangements of the temporomandibular joint. Sixty-eight patients with internal derangements were treated with physical therapeutic modalities as described by Rocabado. A success rate of 86% was achieved in patients with early- to mid-opening and late- to mid-closing clicks of the temporomandibular joint. Approximately one third of these patients required short-term occlusal bite appliances to assist in their management. A success rate of 7% was achieved in patients with late-opening and late-closing clicks. No patient with clicking on mediolateral movement was successfully managed with physical therapy. Likewise, patients with nonreducing anteriorly displaced discs of the temporomandibular joint did not respond well to physical therapy. Pain management was evaluated separately and showed subjective improvement in 82% of patients with mild to moderate disc dysfunction and pain. Only 29% of patients with late-opening clicking or locked joints experienced pain relief. When patients were classified according to occurrence of the clicking phenomenon, interesting trends relating to duration of symptoms were found. Twenty-two patients who did not respond favorably to physical therapy underwent surgical procedures. Findings in these patients offer suggestions about why nonsurgical therapy is not successful in certain cases.

  18. Temporomandibular pain

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, S Raghavendra; Kumar, N Ravi; Shruthi, HR; Kalavathi, SD

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain has various medical and dental etiological factors. The etiology of the temporomandibular joint pain is enigmatic, no single etiological factor is regarded as the cause. Its distribution is also not confined to a single area. This article presents the basic etiologic factors, its epidemiology, distribution of pain, classification of patients and the psychosocial behavior of patients suffering with temporomandibular pain. As overwhelming majority of medical and dental conditions/issues related to etiology of temporomandibular pain in patients have traditionally been presented and interpreted from the clinician's point of view. PMID:27601822

  19. Use of opioids in long-term management of temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bouloux, Gary F

    2011-07-01

    The long-term treatment of patients with chronic temporomandibular joint dysfunction has been challenging. The long-term use of opioids in these patients can be neither supported nor refuted based on current evidence. However, evidence is available to support the long-term use of opioids in other chronic noncancer pain states with reduced pain, improved function, and improved quality of life. One group of patients with chronic temporomandibular joint pain, for whom both noninvasive and invasive treatment has failed, might benefit from long-term opioid medication. The choices include morphine, fentanyl, oxycodone, tramadol, hydrocodone, and methadone. Adjunct medication, including antidepressant and anticonvulsant drugs, can also be used. The safety of these medications has been well established, but the potential for adverse drug-related behavior does exist, requiring appropriate patient selection, adequate monitoring, and intervention when needed.

  20. Temporomandibular joint dislocation reduction technique: a new external method vs. the traditional.

    PubMed

    Ardehali, Mojtaba Mohamadi; Kouhi, Ali; Meighani, Ali; Rad, Farshid Mahboubi; Emami, Hamed

    2009-08-01

    The traditional intraoral approach for temporomandibular joint dislocations reduction, although effective, has some disadvantages. Here, a new extraoral approach is described. This study was performed to evaluate this new method's success rate. Patients visiting an emergency room were randomly allocated to 2 groups; one group was reduced with the extraoral approach and the other with the intraoral method. Among 29 attempts with the conventional method, 25 were successful (86.2%; 95% confidence interval: 73-100) and among 29 attempts with the external method, 16 were successful (55.2%; 95% confidence interval: 39-79). This difference was statistically significant. Because of the benefits of the external approach, such as avoiding hand bites and disease transfer, it can be a reasonable choice to reduce a dislocated temporomandibular joint.

  1. Therapeutic outcome assessment in permanent temporomandibular joint disc displacement.

    PubMed

    Kropmans, T J; Dijkstra, P U; Stegenga, B; de Bont, L G

    1999-05-01

    In permanent temporomandibular disc displacement (TMJ-DD) outcome studies many authors claim positive effects of arthroscopic surgery, arthrocentesis and physical therapy. This literature review was undertaken to analyse whether the claimed effects are based on acceptable methodology. The recorded papers were analysed by two independent observers according to (1) method of investigation, (2) therapeutic intervention studied, (3) therapeutic outcome variables used, and (4) claimed effectiveness of the intervention. Agreement between observers was calculated. Twenty-four papers were found in which therapeutic outcome of interventions on temporomandibular disorders were studied. Six studies applied a true experimental design. Each of these six studies compared a different set of interventions. Twenty-two papers used maximal mouth opening (MMO) as an outcome variable, nine studied pain intensity on a visual analogue scale, one paper assessed the mandibular function impairment questionnaire. Kappa for overall agreement concerning the reviewing criteria was 0.82 (P < or = 0.001). No distinguishing effects on MMO, pain or function impairment were reported between arthroscopic surgery, arthrocentesis and physical therapy. Results of methodological sound outcome studies evaluating the effects of arthroscopic surgery, arthrocentesis and physical therapy are needed.

  2. [Diagnosis of temporo-mandibular joint dysfunction caused by occlusion pathology and treatment of such patients].

    PubMed

    Semkin, V A; Rabukhina, N A; Kravchenko, D V

    2007-01-01

    Patients with temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction need complex treatment that includes prosthetic treatment in intrajoint relation stabilization. In cases of TMJ pathology it is necessary to examine patients and make axiography, function analysis, MPI-analysis, magnetic resonance tomography and zonography of TMJ, electromyography of the masticatory muscles. The authors examined 47 patients with TMJ dysfunction, 43 of them had occlusion pathology. We managed to eliminate the dysfunction symptoms and to receive stable result of the treatment in all the patients.

  3. The Role of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation in the Management of Temporomandibular Joint Disorder.

    PubMed

    Awan, Kamran Habib; Patil, Shankargouda

    2015-12-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) constitutes of a group of diseases that functionally affect the masticatory system, including the muscles of mastication and temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A number of etiologies with specific treatment have been identified, including the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS). The current paper presents a literature review on the use of TENS in the management of TMD patients. Temporomandibular joint disorder is very common disorder with approximately 75% of people showing some signs, while more than quarter (33%) having at least one symptom. An attempt to treat the pain should be made whenever possible. However, in cases with no defined etiology, starting with less intrusive and reversible techniques is prescribed. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is one such treatment modality, i.e. useful in the management of TMD. It comprises of controlled exposure of electrical current to the surface of skin, causing hyperactive muscles relaxation and decrease pain. Although the value of TENS to manage chronic pain in TMD patients is still controversial, its role in utilization for masticatory muscle pain is significant. However, an accurate diagnosis is essential to minimize its insufficient use. Well-controlled randomized trials are needed to determine the utilization of TENS in the management of TMD patients.

  4. Do costochondral grafts have any growth potential in temporomandibular joint surgery? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Praveen; Rattan, Vidya; Rai, Sachin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the study To assess the growth potential of costochondral graft in temporomandibular joint reconstruction in patients with temporomandibular ankylosis and hemifacial microsomia. Method Systematic review after inclusion of articles fulfilling the following criteria: (1) only human studies; (2) patients of temporomandibular joint ankylosis and hemifacial microsomia; and (3) studies with minimum of five cases and with a minimum follow-up for a period of 5 years. The primary outcome measure was the percentage of patients with optimum growth of costochondral graft. Secondary outcomes were any abnormal growth and restoration of function. Delphi's criteria were used for assessing the quality of the included studies. Result Only three studies satisfied all the inclusion criteria. A total of 96 costochondral grafts were placed in the included studies. Optimum growth was reported in 54 grafts, undergrowth in 1 graft, overgrowth in 7 grafts, lateral overgrowth in 1 graft and no growth in 1 graft. Graft resorption, reankylosis and sequestration were seen in 21, 8 and 3 cases, respectively. When the Delphi's criteria were applied to the case series for the assessment of quality, majority of the studies could be considered as satisfying at least 50% of the criteria. Conclusion There are no randomised clinical trials and the only evidence is in the form of case series that is considered as the lowest level of evidence for any study. No inference can be interpreted regarding growth potential of costochondral graft. Thus, on the basis of available evidence, it can be concluded that use of costochondral graft for temporomandibular joint reconstruction lacks scientific evidence. PMID:26605146

  5. Giant Solitary Synovial Chondromatosis of the Temporomandibular Joint with Intracranial Extension

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Salú, José L.; Lázaro, Rafael; Aldasoro, José; Gonzalez-Darder, José M.

    1998-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis are rare entities but are well-described lesions in the literature that can affect many joint areas of the body. A case of tumoral synovial chondromatosis involving the temporomandibular joint with intracranial extension through mandibular fossa is reported. As long as there was significant infratemporal and extradural invasion of the middle and posterior fossa, a transtemporal and infratemporal approach was performed and total removal of the lesions was achieved. A brief review of skull base synovial chondromatosis is presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11 PMID:17171059

  6. Development of Synovial Membrane in the Temporomandibular Joint of the Human Fetus

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, R.C.; Arraéz-Aybar, L.A.; Klein, O.; Mérida-Velasco, J.R.; Alonso, L.G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of the synovial membrane was analyzed in serial sections of 21 temporomandibular joints of human fetuses at 9 to 13 weeks of gestation. Sections of two fetuses at 12 weeks of development were used to perform immunohistochemical expression of the markers CD68 and Hsp27 on the synovial lining. Macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells, which express CD68 and Hsp27, respectively, were observed at the twelfth week of development. Our results suggest that the development of the synovial membrane is related to the vascularization of the joint and the formation of the articular cavities. PMID:26708184

  7. Temporomandibular joint orthopedics with anterior repositioning appliance therapy and therapeutic injections.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Clifton

    2014-08-01

    TMD orthopedics is the assessment, diagnosis and management of orthopedic disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Anterior repositioning appliance (ARA) therapy for TMJ internal derangements is successful in long-term recapturing of disks in reducing and nonreducing joints at a rate of 64 percent and in regenerating degenerated condyles in some cases. ARA therapy for TMJ internal derangements is subjectively successful in relieving symptoms in reducing and nonreducing disk displacement TMJs in this study at an average rate of 94.5 percent.

  8. Evaluation of temporomandibular joint disc displacement as a risk factor for osteoarthrosis.

    PubMed

    Dias, I M; Cordeiro, P C de F; Devito, K L; Tavares, M L F; Leite, I C G; Tesch, R de S

    2016-03-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacement is a clinical sign often found in patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and associated with TMJ osteoarthrosis. Osteoarthrosis is a degenerative joint disease that may be associated with pain and functional disability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the odds ratio (OR) of joints with disc displacement presenting osteoarthrosis via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analysis. In total, 224 TMJ images from patients with signs and symptoms of a TMD were evaluated. The OR, a measure of association, was used to calculate the likelihood of TMJ disc displacement (with or without reduction) with osteoarthrosis. Joints with anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDwR) and anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDwoR) were 2.73- and 8.25-times, respectively, more likely to have osteoarthrosis. A nine-times greater likelihood of osteophyte occurrence was observed in cases of ADDwoR, whereas a lower OR for their occurrence (OR 2.96) was observed in cases of ADDwR. The significant OR of joints with disc displacement presenting osteoarthrosis, particularly in cases of ADDwoR, emphasizes the importance of accurate assessment of changes in disc position, which may be associated with other painful and functional disorders of the TMJ.

  9. Usefulness of cone beam computed tomography in temporomandibular joints with soft tissue pathology

    PubMed Central

    Alkhader, M; Kuribayashi, A; Ohbayashi, N; Nakamura, S; Kurabayashi, T

    2010-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of cone beam CT (CBCT) in temporomandibular joints (TMJs) with soft tissue pathology. Methods 106 TMJs of 55 patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) were examined by MRI and CBCT. MR images were used for the evaluation of disc displacement, disc deformity, joint effusion and obscurity of temporal posterior attachment (TPA). CBCT images were evaluated for the presence or absence of osseous abnormalities. The χ2 test was used to analyse the association between MRI and CBCT findings. Results MRI of 106 TMJs revealed disc displacement, disc deformity, joint effusion and obscurity of the TPA in 68, 73, 28 and 27 joints, respectively. Of the 68 TMJs with disc displacement, anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDWR) was seen most frequently (47/68). CBCT imaging found 65 TMJs were characterized by the presence of osseous abnormalities and were significantly associated with disc deformity and ADDWR (P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant association between the presence of joint effusion and obscurity of TPA and TMJ osseous abnormalities. Conclusions TMD patients with confirmed ADDWR or disc deformity on MRI are at risk of having osseous abnormalities in the TMJ and further examination with CBCT is recommended. PMID:20729183

  10. Cyclic Tensile Strain Suppresses Catabolic Effects of Interleukin-1β in Fibrochondrocytes From the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sudha; Long, Ping; Gassner, Robert; Piesco, Nicholas P.; Buckley, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To discern the effects of continuous passive motion on inflamed temporomandibular joints (TMJ). Methods The effects of continuous passive motion on TMJ were simulated by exposing primary cultures of rabbit TMJ fibrochondrocyte monolayers to cyclic tensile strain (CTS) in the presence of recombinant human interleukin-1β (rHuIL-1β) in vitro. The messenger RNA (mRNA) induction of rHuIL-1β response elements was examined by semiquantitative reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction. The synthesis of nitric oxide was examined by Griess reaction, and the synthesis of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) was examined by radioimmunoassay. The synthesis of proteins was examined by Western blot analysis of the cell extracts, and synthesis of proteoglycans via incorporation of 35S-sodium sulfate in the culture medium. Results Exposure of TMJ fibrochondrocytes to rHuIL-1β resulted in the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), which were paralleled by NO and PGE2 production. Additionally, IL-1β induced significant levels of collagenase (matrix metalloproteinase 1 [MMP-1]) within 4 hours, and this was sustained over a period of 48 hours. Concomitant application of CTS abrogated the catabolic effects of IL-1β on TMJ chondrocytes by inhibiting iNOS, COX-2, and MMP-1 mRNA production and NO, PGE2, and MMP-1 synthesis. CTS also counteracted cartilage degradation by augmenting expression of mRNA for tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 2 that is inhibited by rHuIL-1β. In parallel, CTS also counteracted rHuIL-1β–induced suppression of proteoglycan synthesis. Nevertheless, the presence of an inflammatory signal was a prerequisite for the observed CTS actions, because fibrochondrocytes, when exposed to CTS alone, did not exhibit any of the effects described above. Conclusion CTS acts as an effective antagonist of rHuIL-1β by potentially diminishing its catabolic actions on TMJ fibrochondrocytes. Furthermore, CTS actions appear

  11. [The importance of individual mandibular movements in case of temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Case report].

    PubMed

    Nagy, Zsanett; Schmidt, Péter; Hermann, Péter

    2012-12-01

    The present article describes the prosthodontic management of an adult patient with anterior deep bite (Angle 11/2) and concomitant temporomandibular disorder (TMD). In the presence of steep incisor inclination undesirable effects could be observed in the temporomandibular joint. The aim of our treatment was to achieve anterior guidance that harmonically relates to the condylar inclination. Once the vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO) had been increased, an adequate anterior guidance was achieved. The VDO was increased in two steps with 5 mm at the anterior region, which resulted in 2 mm increase at the molars. Restorative treatment was completed in a semi-adjustable articulator (KaVo Protar 5B) according to the patient's centric relation. The new anterior guidance was then established in an individual articulator (KaVo Protar 9) according to the increased VDO.

  12. Manipulative management of the temporomandibular joint pain-dysfunction syndrome: a report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Nykoliation, J. W.; Cassidy, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    The temporomandibular pain-dysfunction syndrome (TMJ-PDS) is a frequent but often unappreciated cause of head, neck, and facial pain. Information regarding its etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment is fragmentary, and often reflects an approach influenced by the background specialty of the involved practitioner. Current treatment is often multidisciplinary, involving the use of various dental splints in conjunction with physiotherapy, psychotherapy, and analgesic medication. This paper suggests that chiropractic manipulation to the temporomandibular joints (TMJ) may be an effective approach to treatment of TJM-PDS. Illustrative cases are presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9

  13. Recent Tissue Engineering Advances for the Treatment of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders.

    PubMed

    Aryaei, Ashkan; Vapniarsky, Natalia; Hu, Jerry C; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2016-12-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are among the most common maxillofacial complaints and a major cause of orofacial pain. Although current treatments provide short- and long-term relief, alternative tissue engineering solutions are in great demand. Particularly, the development of strategies, providing long-term resolution of TMD to help patients regain normal function, is a high priority. An absolute prerequisite of tissue engineering is to understand normal structure and function. The current knowledge of anatomical, mechanical, and biochemical characteristics of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and associated tissues will be discussed, followed by a brief description of current TMD treatments. The main focus is on recent tissue engineering developments for regenerating TMJ tissue components, with or without a scaffold. The expectation for effectively managing TMD is that tissue engineering will produce biomimetic TMJ tissues that recapitulate the normal structure and function of the TMJ.

  14. Internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: A review of the anatomy, diagnosis, and management

    PubMed Central

    Young, Andrew L.

    2015-01-01

    Internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint are conditions in which the articular disc has become displaced from its original position the condylar head. Relevant anatomic structures and their functional relationships are briefly discussed. The displacement of the disc can result in numerous presentations, with the most common being disc displacement with reduction (with or without intermittent locking), and disc displacement without reduction (with or without limited opening). These are described in this article according to the standardized Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, as well as the less common posterior disc displacement. Appropriate management usually ranges from patient education and monitoring to splints, physical therapy, and medications. In rare and select cases, surgery may be necessary. However, in for the majority of internal derangements, the prognosis is good, particularly with conservative care. PMID:26929478

  15. The effects of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid (Hylan G-F 20) on experimentally induced temporomandibular joint osteoartrosis: part II.

    PubMed

    Duygu, G; Güler, N; Cam, B; Kürkçü, M

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the efficacy of Hylan G-F 20 on experimentally induced osteoarthritic changes in rabbit temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A 3mg/ml concentration of sodium mono iodoacetate (MIA) had been injected into both joints of 24 rabbits to create osteoartrosis. The study group was injected with Hylan G-F 20 in one joint and saline in the contralateral joint as a control (once a week for 3 weeks). Histological changes in articular cartilage, osteochondral junction, chondrocyte appearance and subchondral bone were determined at 4, 6, and 8 weeks. Regarding cartilage, there was a statistically significant difference between the two groups at 4 weeks. Degenerative bony changes to subchondral bone were significantly higher in the controls. No statistical difference was found in the study group at 6 weeks. A positive correlation was found between osteochondral junction and subchondral bone in the study group at 8 weeks. The changes in chondrocyte appearance were significantly decreased in the study group at all follow-up times. Intra-articular injection of Hylan G-F 20 decreased cartilage changes in early stage TMJ osteoartrosis and clustering of chondrocytes showed the chondroprotective effects of Hylan G-F 20 caused by hypertrophic responses.

  16. The frictional coefficient of the temporomandibular joint and its dependency on the magnitude and duration of joint loading.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, E; Kawai, N; Tanaka, M; Todoh, M; van Eijden, T; Hanaoka, K; Dalla-Bona, D A; Takata, T; Tanne, K

    2004-05-01

    In synovial joints, friction between articular surfaces leads to shear stress within the cartilaginous tissue, which might result in tissue rupture and failure. Joint friction depends on synovial lubrication of the articular surfaces, which can be altered due to compressive loading. Therefore, we hypothesized that the frictional coefficient of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is affected by the magnitude and duration of loading. We tested this by measuring the frictional coefficient in 20 intact porcine TMJs using a pendulum-type friction tester. The mean frictional coefficient was 0.0145 (SD 0.0027) after a constant loading of 50 N during 5 sec. The frictional coefficient increased with the length of the preceding loading duration and exceeded 0.0220 (SD 0.0014) after 1 hr. Application of larger loading (80 N) resulted in significantly larger frictional coefficients. In conclusion, the frictional coefficient in the TMJ was proportional to the magnitude and duration of joint loading.

  17. [Etiologic factors in temporomandibular joint disorders and pain].

    PubMed

    De Laat, A

    1997-01-01

    Parallel to the construction of better classifications and the identification of subgroups of temporomandibular disorders, an important development has taken place in research concerning its etiology. The etiological factors implied in muscle problems refer to more generalised disorders as myofascial pain syndrome and fibromyalgia. The role of occlusal and articular factors has been brought down to realistic proportions, indicating a minor contribution. Similarly, doubt has arisen concerning the existence of a vicious cycle of pain/spasm/pain. With regard to internal derangements, emphasis has been put on the high prevalence in an otherwise normal population and the fluctuating character of the symptom. Also here, developments point towards constitutional and systemic factors, more than local influences. Trauma, however, seems to play an increasing role. The development of osteoarthrosis has been studied more in depth revealing local processes of inflammation, neurogenic inflammation and the existence of specific markers which might be important in the future. The relationship between disc derangement and the development of osteoarthrosis remains unclear.

  18. Normal and abnormal temporomandibular joints as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Kreipke, D L; Conces, D J; Sondhi, A; Lappas, J C; Augustyn, G T

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) was performed on two normal volunteer subjects and two symptomatic subjects using a 0.15 T resistive magnet. A spin echo pulse sequence with a TE of 38 ms and a TR of 500 ms was employed. The TMJ meniscus is a low signal structure, and the bilaminar zone behind it is a relatively high signal structure. In normal closed mouths, the demarcation between meniscus and bilaminar zone is located at the vertex position above the mandibular condyle. When the condyle translates, the posterior portion of the meniscus bulges into the joint space. Dislocated meniscus can be identified by a gray mass anterior to the condylar head. The joint space is filled with the higher signal of the bilaminar zone. In non-reducible dislocations, the meniscus remains anterior to the condylar head with opening of the mouth. Reduced dislocations appear similar to normal joints in the open mouth.

  19. Disc and condylar head position in the temporomandibular joint with and without disc displacement.

    PubMed

    Badel, Tomislav; Pavicin, Ivana Savić; Jakovac, Marko; Kern, Josipa; Zadravec, Dijana

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference between disc and condyle position between temporomandibular joints (TMJs) without disc displacement (DD) in asymptomatic volunteers, and patients who have DD in contralateral joints, respectively unilateral DD. Secondly, there were two TMJ groups which consisted of measurements from patients' symptomatic DD and volunteers with asymptomatic DD. The study included 79 TMJs of 40 patients with unilateral DD. In the group of 25 asymptomatic volunteers, 20 volunteers were without DD bilaterally (40 joints), while five had DD in at least one TMJ. All subjects were examined clinically and DD was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Left and right TMJs were analysed independently for each participant based on their DD status (symptomatic, asymptomatic, and without DD). All asymptomatic TMJs did not have any clinical signs of TMJ functional abnormalities. There was a significant statistical difference between disc position among TMJs without DD in asymptomatic volunteers and TMJs without DD in patients (p = 0.016). Moreover, no significant differences were found between condyle position in the same groups of joints (p = 0.706). There were no significant differences in the DD position (p = 0.918) or condyle position (p = 0.453) between the group with asymptomatic volunteers' joints and the group with symptomatic patients' joints. There was a significant difference between patient and volunteers' joints without DD: the disc was positioned more anteriorly in patients' joints without DD than in joints of asymptomatic volunteers without DD.

  20. Application of the rapid prototyping technique to design a customized temporomandibular joint used to treat temporomandibular ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    Chaware, Suresh M.; Bagaria, Vaibhav; Kuthe, Abhay

    2009-01-01

    Anthropometric variations in humans make it difficult to replace a temporomandibular joint (TMJ), successfully using a standard “one-size-fits-all” prosthesis. The case report presents a unique concept of total TMJ replacement with customized and modified TMJ prosthesis, which is cost-effective and provides the best fit for the patient. The process involved in designing and modifications over the existing prosthesis are also described. A 12-year- old female who presented for treatment of left unilateral TMJ ankylosis underwent the surgery for total TMJ replacement. A three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) scan suggested features of bony ankylosis of left TMJ. CT images were converted to a sterolithographic model using CAD software and a rapid prototyping machine. A process of rapid manufacturing was then used to manufacture the customized prosthesis. Postoperative recovery was uneventful, with an improvement in mouth opening of 3.5 cm and painless jaw movements. Three years postsurgery, the patient is pain-free, has a mouth opening of about 4.0 cm and enjoys a normal diet. The postoperative radiographs concur with the excellent clinical results. The use of CAD/CAM technique to design the custom-made prosthesis, using orthopaedically proven structural materials, significantly improves the predictability and success rates of TMJ replacement surgery. PMID:19881026

  1. Temporomandibular joint involvement in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Aliko, A; Ciancaglini, R; Alushi, A; Tafaj, A; Ruci, D

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) symptoms and clinical findings in Albanian patients with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic sclerosis. The authors examined 124 consecutive hospitalized patients (88 with rheumatoid arthritis, 22 with systemic lupus erythematosus and 14 with systemic sclerosis) and 124 age- and gender-matched healthy controls using a questionnaire and an oro-facial clinical examination for assessing the presence of TMJ sounds, pain in the TMJ area, tenderness of masticatory muscles and limited mouth opening. Significantly more patients (67%) reported TMJ symptoms than controls (19%). A significantly higher proportion of patients (65%) exhibited clinical signs of temporomandibular dysfunction compared with controls (26%). The most frequent findings in rheumatoid arthritis were temporomandibular sounds and pain. Pain was found in a significantly higher proportion in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus compared with controls. Difficulty and limitation in mouth opening were observed in the majority of systemic sclerosis patients, and in only a minority of rheumatoid arthritis patients. This study supports the notion that TMJ examination should be encouraged in the rheumatology setting and clinicians should be able to provide pain management and patient support.

  2. Hyperintensity signal in the joint space of the temporomandibular joint on fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Yura, Shinya; Nobata, Koji; Shima, Tsuyoshi

    2010-12-01

    Our aim was to investigate the incidence of a hyperintense signal in the joint space of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) on fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRIs). We studied 112 patients (224 joints) with disorders of the TMJ who were examined by T2-weighted MRI, and recorded the association between displacement of the disc and the hyperintense signal using the κ coefficient. A hyperintense signal was found in 4 of 91 joints (4%) when the disc was in the normal position, in all 19 joints with anterior disc displacement with reduction, and in 108 of the 114 joints (95%) with anterior disc displacement without reduction. There was a significant correlation between displacement of the disc and the hyperintense signal (p<0.001). The κ coefficient was 0.91. Such a signal in the joint space of the TMJ on fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI may indicate the presence of synovial fluid in the joint space with displacement of the disc.

  3. [Proposal for a dynamic study of the temporo-mandibular joint, using a computerized image analyzer].

    PubMed

    Tedde, G; Mazzanti, V; Devilla, L; Chessa, G

    1990-04-01

    With the aim to go deep into the knowledge of the morpho-functional anatomical characteristics of the temporo-mandibular joint in humans, a dynamic method of study by means of a computerized analyzer of images is suggested. The acquired advantages are the following: a) the accuracy of evaluation of the chosen morphometric parameters; b) the working speed, from which results: c) the possibility to increase adequately the number of cases and d) the possibility to easily investigate many parameters with a very high accuracy of the quantitative results. Both right and left temporo-mandibular joints of adult individuals aged from 18 to 53 have been studied utilizing lateral tomographies focused at 3.3 mm to the lateral surface of the condylar head. The evaluations were done both in the position of completely closed mouth and in extreme opening. From the barycentre of the condyle several straight lines were drawn according to the figure 2. The length of the segment a-b (distance of profiles of the condyle and mandibular fossa) were evaluated in all the lines counter-clockwise and the results submitted to a statistical analysis. The results furnish very good information on the normal or pathological anatomical characteristics, of the joint.

  4. The relationship between unilateral mandibular angle fracture and temporomandibular joint function.

    PubMed

    Baltrusaityte, Ausra; Surna, Algimantas; Pileicikiene, Gaivile; Kubilius, Ricardas; Gleiznys, Alvydas; Zilinskas, Juozas

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE. Aim of this study was to analyze relation of occlusal correction and alterations of temporomandibular joint function during treatment of unilateral mandibular fractures. MATERIALS AND METHODS. We compared 49 patients treated for unilateral mandibular fracture without occlusal correction with 21 patient treated for unilateral mandibular fracture along with early and consequent occlusal analysis and correction and with 49 control subjects. Patients' complaints, mandibular movements and occlusal parameters were evaluated during the period of healing. ZEBRIS ultrasound system (Jaw Motion Analyzer, Zebris Medical GmbH, Isny, Germany) was used for analysis of mandibular movements and T-Scan analyzer (Tekscan, Inc., Boston, MA, USA) was used for occlusal analysis. RESULTS. Findings of our study showed statistically significant (p<0.05) diminution of patients complaints, mandibular movement alterations and occlusal disturbances in patients who received occlusal correction during MF treatment if compared to patients treated without occlusal correction, except noises from the joint in the injured side and mandibular lateral track to the injured side in the final stage of investigation. Despite applied treatment recovery of the TMJ function was not complete and the investigated parameters remained worse if compared to the control group. CONCLUSIONS. Results of this study confirmed positive influence of early and subsequent occlusal analysis and correction during stages of MF treatment on diminution of functional alterations of the temporomandibular joint function. Timely occlusal correction improves and hastens process of rehabilitation therefore it is indispensable part of MF treatment.

  5. Gene Expression Profiling of IL-17A-Treated Synovial Fibroblasts from the Human Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Toshio; Ogura, Naomi; Akutsu, Miwa; Kawashima, Mutsumi; Watanabe, Suguru; Ito, Ko; Kondoh, Toshirou

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fibroblasts contribute to the inflammatory temporomandibular joint under pathogenic stimuli. Synovial fibroblasts and T cells participate in the perpetuation of joint inflammation in a mutual activation feedback, via secretion of cytokines and chemokines that stimulate each other. IL-17 is an inflammatory cytokine produced primarily by Th17 cells which plays critical role in the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Here, we investigated the roles of IL-17A in temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) using genome-wide analysis of synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with TMD. IL-17 receptors were expressed in synovial fibroblasts as assessed using real-time PCR. Microarray analysis indicated that IL-17A treatment of synovial fibroblasts upregulated the expression of IL-6 and chemokines. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the gene expression of IL-6, CXCL1, IL-8, and CCL20 was significantly higher in IL-17A-treated synovial fibroblasts compared to nontreated controls. IL-6 protein production was increased by IL-17A in a time- and a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, IL-17A simulated IL-6 protein production in synovial fibroblasts samples isolated from three patients. Furthermore, signal inhibitor experiments indicated that IL-17-mediated induction of IL-6 was transduced via activation of NFκB and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt. These results suggest that IL-17A is associated with the inflammatory progression of TMD. PMID:26839464

  6. Etiopathogenesis of disk displacement of the temporomandibular joint: a review of the mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Manfredini, Daniele

    2009-01-01

    Disk displacement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a clinically important condition, showing a high prevalence in both patient and non-patient populations. Despite its clinical importance, there is incomplete understanding of the etiopathogenic mechanisms leading to disk displacement. A number of possible risk factors have been identified. This article analyzes the etiopathogenesis from both the clinical and the biomechanical viewpoints and also reviews the literature on the association between disk displacement and the main risk factors (i.e., trauma, altered disk shape and/or dynamic properties, occlusal abnormalities, steepness of the articular eminence, hyperactivity of the lateral pterygoid muscle, joint hypermobility, etc.). According to our interpretation of available data, an impairment of joint lubrication may be a common finding in cases of disk displacement, thus suggesting the need for future studies addressing both local and systemic neuroendocrine aspects influencing the friction coefficient of the TMJ. A full comprehension of the etiopathogenesis of disk displacement is far from being achieved, and clinicians must take into account this consideration when treating patients with temporomandibular disorders.

  7. [Morphological analysis for kinetic X-ray images of the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Bandai, Natsuko; Sanada, Shigeru; Ueki, Kouichiro; Funabasama, Shintaro; Tsuduki, Shinji; Matsui, Takeshi

    2003-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a screening technique for temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and assist dentists in objectively observing and evaluating pre/post-treatment status. Dynamic images of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) from one healthy volunteer were obtained by digital fluoroscopy in the lateral view on both right and left sides. Outlines of the glenoid fossa and the condyle were extracted, respectively, by using sobel operator (7x7) thresholding and labeling. Morphological parameters in time-sequence, such as fossa ratio, area, and distance of the joint space, were then analyzed. There were no differences between manual and computer analysis in extracting the outline of the glenoid fossa and the condyle. Deformity of the outline of the glenoid fossa and the condyle was not identified in this subject. The fossa ratio was 0.30+/-0.01 on the right and 0.29+/-0.02 on the left. The area and distance of the joint space in the post-glenoid fossa were slightly larger than those in the articular eminence on both sides. These morphological parameters were useful for screening and pre- and post-treatment evaluation of TMD patients.

  8. Dislocation of the temporomandibular joint meniscus: contrast arthrography vs. computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.R.; Christiansen, E.; Sauser, D.; Hasso, A.N.; Hinshaw, D.B. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A prospective study to determine the accuracy of computed tomography (CT) for the diagnosis of dislocation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) meniscus was made by performing both CT and contrast arthrography on 18 joints suspected of meniscus dislocation. Arthography rather than surgery was chosen as the quality standard for comparing CT findings, as not all patients undergoing the studies underwent surgery. The results of each test were reported independently by the radiologist who obtained either all of the arthograms or all of the CT scans. For dislocation of the meniscus, there were excellent agreement between the two methods. CT seems to be nearly as accurate as arthrography for showing meniscus dislocation, is performed with lower x-ray exposure, and is noninvasive. Arthrograpy discloses more detailed information about the joint meniscus, such as perforation and maceration, and should continue to be used when this kind of information is clinically important.

  9. Derangement, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis of the temporomandibular joint: implications, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Broussard, Jack S

    2005-04-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction is often believed to bea young person's malady. However, geriatric patients also present with clinical findings of TMJ clicking, locking, crepitation, limited opening, and pain. With our aging population and the high prevalence of rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases in the elderly, it is important to understand the etiopathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management of derangement, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoarthritis of the TMJ. Although arthritis of the TMJ usually causes only mild-to-moderate dysfunction in older patients, they present challenges related to medication use and comorbidity. This article presents the most recent understanding and therapeutic protocols for patient diagnosis and management.

  10. Clinical treatment of a ruptured temporomandibular joint disc: morphological changes at 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Lucas; Porto, Felipe; Agarwal, Sachin; Grossman, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthrosis is a disease that affects the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This case report chronicles the diagnosis and treatment of a patient for whom this pathological condition was accompanied by a rupture of the articular disc. The patient presented with loud sounds in the left TMJ and an irregular mandibular occlusal plane due to condylar intrusion in the glenoid fossa on the ipsilateral side. A noninvasive treatment was selected. A 4-month follow-up revealed remission of the articular sounds, and tissue regeneration was noted. These improvements remained visible at 5-year follow-up.

  11. [The theoretical substantiation of myofunctional correction of sagittal occlusion abnormalities and temporomandibular joint dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Danilova, M A; Ishmurzin, P V; Zakharov, S V

    2012-01-01

    Simulation in 3D-model of skeletal forms of sagittal malocclusion revealed tendency in tonus' modification of muscles of mastication in formation of distal and mesial occlusion. It's shown that distal occlusion is characterized by hypotonic condition of muscles of mastication, except posterior fibers of temporal muscle. Mesial occlusion is characterized by complex combination of muscle tone with prevalence of hypotonic condition of anterior fibers of temporal muscle, superficial portion of masseter muscle and medial pterygoid muscle. We have detected that using of myofunctional devices in treatment of sagittal malocclusion, temporomandibular joint dysfunction promotes of tone increasing of muscles of mastication.

  12. [The role of occlusal disorders in development of temporomandibular joint dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Arsenina, O I; Popova, A V; Gus, L A

    2014-01-01

    Currently Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction is a very highly discussed topic by both researchers and clinicians. the incidence of the of TMJ is dysfunctions still not very well established because of heterogeneity of the diagnostic criteria used by different authors. This article is dedicated to the analysis of basic theories of the etiology of the aforementioned pathology, including overview of main pathophysiological mechanisms of the TMJ, dysfunctions occlusive disorders in particular. The main problem being analyzed is the use and efficacy of the electronic axiography in successful diagnostic and therapy of the TMJ dysfunction.

  13. Metastatic breast cancer in the mandibular condyle mimicking temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disease

    PubMed Central

    Della Chiesa, Andrea; Scherrer, Beat; Kuttenberger, Johannes J.

    2014-01-01

    Metastases or tumour to the jaws are rare and those to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are even rarer. The symptoms like preauricular pain, swelling and clicking are generally associated with TMJ disease. But the same symptoms are also found in tumours of the jaws or other diseases. We report on the case of a 48-year-old woman with a 12-year history of breast cancer who was referred to our department for clarification of preauricular swelling and pain. The possible aetiology of TMJ disorders and the frequency and localization of metastases to the jaws are discussed. PMID:24876331

  14. Orthodontic and surgical treatment of a patient with an ankylosed temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Motta, Alexandre; Louro, Rafael Seabra; Medeiros, Paulo José D'Albuquerque; Capelli, Jonas

    2007-06-01

    This article describes the surgical and orthodontic treatment of a girl with facial deformities and functional involvement. The left temporomandibular joint was ankylosed, and the lower third of the face was markedly deficient, with mandibular retrusion and severe laterognathism to the left side. Mouth-opening was limited, and the patient had problems speaking and chewing. Two surgical procedures had been performed previously at another institution. We treated the patient with condylar surgery while she was still growing, followed by orthodontic treatment and orthognathic surgery after growth was complete. Twelve-year follow-up records are presented.

  15. Full-thickness skin graft interposition after temporomandibular joint ankylosis surgery. A study of 31 cases.

    PubMed

    Chossegros, C; Guyot, L; Cheynet, F; Blanc, J L; Cannoni, P

    1999-10-01

    Recurrence is a major problem after release of temporomandibular joint ankylosis. Early physiotherapy and choice of interpositional material are important in preventing recurrence. Currently, the most used technique is gap arthroplasty associated with coronoidectomy, temporalis muscle flap interposition and reconstruction of the condylar unit with a costochondral graft. Full-thickness skin graft interposition, using the technique described by Popescu & Vasiliu, can also be used. This retrospective review of 31 patients confirms the reliability of full-thickness skin graft interposition. Results were successful in 90% of the 20 patients with follow-up longer than one year.

  16. Biglycan and Fibromodulin Have Essential Roles in Regulating Chondrogenesis and Extracellular Matrix Turnover in Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Embree, Mildred C.; Kilts, Tina M.; Ono, Mitsuaki; Inkson, Colette A.; Syed-Picard, Fatima; Karsdal, Morten A.; Oldberg, Åke; Bi, Yanming; Young, Marian F.

    2010-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint is critical for jaw movements and allows for mastication, digestion of food, and speech. Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis is a degenerative disease that is marked by permanent cartilage destruction and loss of extracellular matrix (ECM). To understand how the ECM regulates mandibular condylar chondrocyte (MCC) differentiation and function, we used a genetic mouse model of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis that is deficient in two ECM proteins, biglycan and fibromodulin (Bgn−/0Fmod−/−). Given the unavailability of cell lines, we first isolated primary MCCs and found that they were phenotypically unique from hyaline articular chondrocytes isolated from the knee joint. Using Bgn−/0 Fmod−/− MCCs, we discovered the early basis for temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis arises from abnormal and accelerated chondrogenesis. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 is a growth factor that is critical for chondrogenesis and binds to both biglycan and fibromodulin. Our studies revealed the sequestration of TGF-β1 was decreased within the ECM of Bgn−/0 Fmod−/− MCCs, leading to overactive TGF-β1 signal transduction. Using an explant culture system, we found that overactive TGF-β1 signals induced chondrogenesis and ECM turnover in this model. We demonstrated for the first time a comprehensive study revealing the importance of the ECM in maintaining the mandibular condylar cartilage integrity and identified biglycan and fibromodulin as novel key players in regulating chondrogenesis and ECM turnover during temoporomandibular joint osteoarthritis pathology. PMID:20035055

  17. Functional anatomy of the temporo-mandibular joint (II).

    PubMed

    Sava, Anca; Scutariu, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Jaw movement is analyzed as an action between two rigid components jointed together in a particular way, the movable mandible against the stabilized cranium. Opening and closing movements are symmetrical; that is, both sides of the cranio-mandibular articulation are making the same movements. Protrusive and retrusive movements may also be symmetrical. The mandibular muscles determine all the complicated postures and-movements of the jaw. Their behavior can be greatly clarified by restating certain fundamentals crucial to purposive muscular activity. The joint derives its arterial supply from the superficial temporal artery and the maxillary artery. Branches of the auriculo-temporal and masseteric nerves and postganglionic sympathetic nerves supply the tissues associated with the capsular ligament and the looser posterior bilaminar extension of the disc.

  18. Chondromatosis of the Temporomandibular Joint as a Consequence of Persistent Long-Lasting Joint Dysfunction: Late Diagnosis of a Rare Occurrence.

    PubMed

    Paparo, Francesco; Massarelli, Mauro; Cordeschi, Riccardo; Sciannameo, Vito; Spallaccia, Fabrizio

    2016-10-01

    The authors present a rare patient of right synovial chondromatosis (SC) of the temporomandibular joint in which diagnosis was late and delay led to SC extension to the cranial base. Synovial chondromatosis is a rare benign disorder characterized by multiple cartilaginous free-floating nodules originated from the synovial membrane of large articular joints of the body. Differential diagnosis is with neoplasm and radical surgical removal is essential. The patient came to the authors' observation complaining about long-lasting temporomandibular joint dysfunction. The patient already underwent either functional or medical therapy in times without any improvement. Clinical examination showed limited mouth opening and swelling of the right preauricolar region with no signs of facial nerve palsy and without paresthesia or hearing loss. No history of recent trauma was recorded. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a mucous-like hyperintense mass with small hypointense spots inside. A preoperative computed tomography scan was performed and showed a mass extending from the superior aspect of the temporomandibular joint to the glenoid fossa, which was partially eroded. The patient underwent either open joint surgery or arthroscopy of the superior joint space and a large number of chondrocytes were removed. No complications were recorded postoperatively and the patient completely recovered after 6 months. Histology confirmed the diagnosis of synovial condromatosys of the right temporomandibular joint.

  19. Regional differences of type II collagen synthesis in the human temporomandibular joint disc: immunolocalization study of carboxy-terminal type II procollagen peptide (chondrocalcin).

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Toshirou; Hamada, Yoshiki; Iino, Mitsuyoshi; Takahashi, Tetsu; Kikuchi, Toshiyuki; Fujikawa, Kyousuke; Seto, Kannichi

    2003-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the regional differences of distribution of the carboxy-terminal type II procollagen peptide (pCOL-II-C; chondrocalcin) as markers of cartilaginous expression in the human temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc. Twelve human TMJ discs without morphologic abnormalities were obtained from 12 fresh cadavers. All specimens were analysed for pCOL-II-C expression using polyclonal rabbit anti-human pCOL-II-C antibody in avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex staining. The results were demonstrated that the percentage of pCOL-II-C immunoreactive disc cells was significantly higher in the outer part (the articular surfaces) than in the inner part (the deep central areas) of the disc. These findings suggest that the tissue heterogeneity of cartilaginous expression reflects the functional demands of the remodelling process in the human TMJ disc.

  20. Computed tomography assessment of temporomandibular joint position and dimensions in patients with class II division 1 and division 2 malocclusions

    PubMed Central

    Ciger, Semra

    2017-01-01

    Background This study aimed to investigate and compare the positions and dimensions of the temporomandibular joint and its components, respectively, in patients with Class II division 1 and division 2 malocclusions. Material and Methods Computed tomography images of 14 patients with Class II division 1 and 14 patients with Class II division 2 malocclusion were included with a mean age of 11.4 ± 1.2 years. The following temporomandibular joint measurements were made with OsiriX medical imaging software program. From the sagittal images, the anterior, superior, and posterior joint spaces and the mandibular fossa depths were measured. From the axial images, the greatest anteroposterior and mediolateral diameters of the mandibular condyles, angles between the long axis of the mandibular condyle and midsagittal plane, and vertical distances from the geometric centers of the condyles to midsagittal plane were measured. The independent samples t-test was used for comparing the measurements between the two sides and between the Class II division 1 and 2 groups. Results No statistically significant differences were observed between the right and left temporomandibular joints; therefore, the data were pooled. There were statistically significant differences between the Class II division 1 and 2 groups with regard to mandibular fossa depth and anterior joint space measurements. Conclusions In Class II patients, the right and left temporomandibular joints were symmetrical. In the Class II division 1 group, the anterior joint space was wider than that in Class II division 2 group, and the mandibular fossa was deeper and wider in the Class II division 1 group. Key words:Temporomandibular joint, Class II malocclusion, Cone beam computed tomography. PMID:28298985

  1. Alloplastic total temporomandibular joint replacements: do they perform like natural joints? Prospective cohort study with a historical control.

    PubMed

    Wojczyńska, A; Leiggener, C S; Bredell, M; Ettlin, D A; Erni, S; Gallo, L M; Colombo, V

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to qualitatively and quantitatively describe the biomechanics of existing total alloplastic reconstructions of temporomandibular joints (TMJ). Fifteen patients with unilateral or bilateral TMJ total joint replacements and 15 healthy controls were evaluated via dynamic stereometry technology. This non-invasive method combines three-dimensional imaging of the subject's anatomy with jaw tracking. It provides an insight into the patient's jaw joint movements in real time and provides a quantitative evaluation. The patients were also evaluated clinically for jaw opening, protrusive and laterotrusive movements, pain, interference with eating, and satisfaction with the joint replacements. The qualitative assessment revealed that condyles of bilateral total joint replacements displayed similar basic motion patterns to those of unilateral prostheses. Quantitatively, mandibular movements of artificial joints during opening, protrusion, and laterotrusion were all significantly shorter than those of controls. A significantly restricted mandibular range of motion in replaced joints was also observed clinically. Fifty-three percent of patients suffered from chronic pain at rest and 67% reported reduced chewing function. Nonetheless, patients declared a high level of satisfaction with the replacement. This study shows that in order to gain a comprehensive understanding of complex therapeutic measures, a multidisciplinary approach is needed.

  2. Immunohistochemical expression of collagen type IV antibody in the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint of human fetuses.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Luís Otávio Carvalho; Lodi, Fábio Redivo; Gomes, Thiago Simão; Marques, Sergio Ricardo; Fernandes Junior, João Antão; Oshima, Celina Tizuko Fijiyama; Alonso, Luís Garcia

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to study the morphology of the articular disc and analyze the immunohistochemical expression of the marker of type IV collagen in the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of human fetuses of different gestational ages. Twenty TMJ from human fetuses aging from 21 to 24 weeks of intrauterine life were studied. The TMJ were supplied by the Federal University of Uberaba. The ages of the fetuses were determined by measuring the crown-rump length (CRL). Macroscopically, the fetuses were fixed in a formalin solution at 10% and dissected by removing the skin and the subcutaneous tissue, exposing the deep structures. An immunohistochemical marker of type IV collagen was used in order to characterize the presence of blood vessels in the central region of the temporomandibular joint disc. Analysis of the immunohistochemical marker of type IV collagen showed the presence of blood vessels in the central region of the temporomandibular disc in human fetuses.

  3. Differential Diagnostics of Pain in the Course of Trigeminal Neuralgia and Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Pihut, M.; Szuta, M.; Ferendiuk, E.; Zeńczak-Więckiewicz, D.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic oral and facial pain syndromes are an indication for intervention of physicians of numerous medical specialties, while the complex nature of these complaints warrants interdisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Oftentimes, lack of proper differentiation of pain associated with pathological changes of the surrounding tissues, neurogenic pain, vascular pain, or radiating pain from idiopathic facial pain leads to improper treatment. The objective of the paper is to provide detailed characterization of pain developing in the natural history of trigeminal neuralgia and temporomandibular joint dysfunction, with particular focus on similarities accounting for the difficulties in diagnosis and treatment as well as on differences between both types of pain. It might seem that trigeminal neuralgia can be easily differentiated from temporomandibular joint dysfunction due to the acute, piercing, and stabbing nature of neuralgic pain occurring at a single facial location to spread along the course of the nerve on one side, sometimes a dozen or so times a day, without forewarning periods. Both forms differ significantly in the character and intensity of pain. The exact analysis of the nature, intensity, and duration of pain may be crucial for the differential diagnostics of the disorders of our interest. PMID:24995309

  4. Increased Risk of Temporomandibular Joint Closed Lock: A Case-Control Study of ANKH Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Boyen; Takahashi, Katsu; Sakata, Tomoko; Kiso, Honoka; Sugai, Manabu; Fujimura, Kazuma; Shimizu, Akira; Kosugi, Shinji; Sato, Tosiya; Bessho, Kazuhisa

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to carry out a histological examination of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in ank mutant mice and to identify polymorphisms of the human ANKH gene in order to establish the relationship between the type of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and ANKH polymorphisms. Materials and Methods Specimens from the TMJ of ank mutant and wild-type mice were inspected with a haematoxylin and eosin staining method. A sample of 55 TMD patients were selected. Each was examined with standard clinical procedures and genotyping techniques. Results The major histological finding in ank mutant mice was joint space narrowing. Within TMD patients, closed lock was more prevalent among ANKH-OR homozygotes (p = 0.011, OR = 7.7, 95% CI 1.6–36.5) and the elder (p = 0.005, OR = 2.4, 95% CI 1.3–4.3). Conclusions Fibrous ankylosis was identified in the TMJ of ank mutant mice. In the human sample, ANKH-OR polymorphism was found to be a genetic marker associated with TMJ closed lock. Future investigations correlating genetic polymorphism to TMD are indicated. PMID:22003394

  5. Long-term stability of conservative orthodontic treatment in a patient with temporomandibular joint disorder.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Silvia Naomi; Yasue, Akihiro; Kuroda, Shingo; Tanaka, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the orthodontic treatment of a 20-year-old patient with dental crowding and temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs). The patient presented moderate anterior crowding with a Class I molar relationship and masticatory disturbance in the mandibular position induced by previous splint therapy. Orthodontic treatment with multi-bracket appliance was initiated to correct the anterior crowding in both dental arches, after the extraction of first premolars and third molars, and also to maintain the splint-induced position of the condyles. After 26 months of treatment, an acceptable occlusion was achieved without any TMD symptoms. After 18-month retention, flattening on the right condyle was observed, possibly as an adaptative remodeling. After 16-year retention period, the occlusion was maintained without recurrence of any TMD symptoms, indicating a long-term stability of occlusion and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) components. Our results suggest the possibility of compromised treatment in patients with TMD to achieve a long-term stability in occlusion and TMJ function.

  6. Differential diagnostics of pain in the course of trigeminal neuralgia and temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Pihut, M; Szuta, M; Ferendiuk, E; Zeńczak-Więckiewicz, D

    2014-01-01

    Chronic oral and facial pain syndromes are an indication for intervention of physicians of numerous medical specialties, while the complex nature of these complaints warrants interdisciplinary diagnostic and therapeutic approach. Oftentimes, lack of proper differentiation of pain associated with pathological changes of the surrounding tissues, neurogenic pain, vascular pain, or radiating pain from idiopathic facial pain leads to improper treatment. The objective of the paper is to provide detailed characterization of pain developing in the natural history of trigeminal neuralgia and temporomandibular joint dysfunction, with particular focus on similarities accounting for the difficulties in diagnosis and treatment as well as on differences between both types of pain. It might seem that trigeminal neuralgia can be easily differentiated from temporomandibular joint dysfunction due to the acute, piercing, and stabbing nature of neuralgic pain occurring at a single facial location to spread along the course of the nerve on one side, sometimes a dozen or so times a day, without forewarning periods. Both forms differ significantly in the character and intensity of pain. The exact analysis of the nature, intensity, and duration of pain may be crucial for the differential diagnostics of the disorders of our interest.

  7. The Effect of Relaxation Exercises for the Masticator Muscles on Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction (TMD).

    PubMed

    Bae, Youngsook; Park, Yongnam

    2013-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the influence of relaxation exercises for the masticator muscles on the limited ROM and pain of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 10 men and 31 women in their 20s and 30s. They were randomly divided into no treatment, active exercises and relaxation exercise for the masticator muscle groups. The exercise groups performed exercises three times or more a day over a period of four weeks, performing exercise for 10 minutes each time. Before and after the four weeks, all the subjects were measured for ROM, deviation, occlusion, and pain in the temporomandibular joint. [Results] ROM, deviation and pain showed statistically significant in improvements after the intervention in the active exercise and relaxation exercise for the masticator muscle groups. Deviation also showed a statistically significant difference between the active exercise and relaxation exercise groups. [Conclusion] The results verify that as with active exercises, relaxation exercises for the masticatory muscles are an effective treatment for ROM and pain in TMD. Particularly, masticatory muscle relaxation exercises were found to be a treatment that is also effective for deviation.

  8. Long-term stability of conservative orthodontic treatment in a patient with temporomandibular joint disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mitsui, Silvia Naomi; Yasue, Akihiro; Kuroda, Shingo; Tanaka, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the orthodontic treatment of a 20-year-old patient with dental crowding and temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs). The patient presented moderate anterior crowding with a Class I molar relationship and masticatory disturbance in the mandibular position induced by previous splint therapy. Orthodontic treatment with multi-bracket appliance was initiated to correct the anterior crowding in both dental arches, after the extraction of first premolars and third molars, and also to maintain the splint-induced position of the condyles. After 26 months of treatment, an acceptable occlusion was achieved without any TMD symptoms. After 18-month retention, flattening on the right condyle was observed, possibly as an adaptative remodeling. After 16-year retention period, the occlusion was maintained without recurrence of any TMD symptoms, indicating a long-term stability of occlusion and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) components. Our results suggest the possibility of compromised treatment in patients with TMD to achieve a long-term stability in occlusion and TMJ function. PMID:27556023

  9. Effectiveness of a home exercise program in combination with ultrasound therapy for temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Ucar, Mehmet; Sarp, Ümit; Koca, İrfan; Eroğlu, Selma; Yetisgin, Alparslan; Tutoglu, Ahmet; Boyacı, Ahmet

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effectiveness of home exercise alone versus home exercise combined with ultrasound for patients with temporomandibular joint disorders. [Subjects and Methods] This study enrolled 23 female and 15 male patients who were divided randomly into two groups. The home exercise group performed a home exercise program consisting of an exercise program and patient education, and the home exercise combined with ultrasound group received ultrasound therapy in addition to the home exercise program. Pain intensity was evaluated using a visual analogue scale. Pain free maximum mouth opening was evaluated at baseline and 2 weeks after the treatment. [Results] There was no difference between the two groups in baseline values. After the treatment, the visual analogue scale decreased and pain free maximum mouth opening scores improved significantly in each group. Additionally, both values were higher in the home exercise combined with ultrasound group than in the home exercise group. [Conclusion] The combination of home exercise combined with ultrasound appears to be more effective at providing pain relief and increasing mouth opening than does home exercise alone for patients with temporomandibular joint disorders.

  10. Treatment of a case of skeletal class II malocclusion with temporomandibular joint disorder using miniscrew anchorage.

    PubMed

    Kaku, Masato; Koseki, Hiroyuki; Kawazoe, Aki; Abedini, Sara; Kojima, Shunichi; Motokawa, Masahide; Ohtani, Junji; Fujita, Tadashi; Kawata, Toshitsugu; Tanne, Kazuo

    2011-04-01

    At the present time, there are no reports in the literature on the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) by intrusion of molars using mini-screws. This case report describes the treatment for a female patient, aged 19 years seven months, with a TMD and an excessive lower anterior facial height. Overjet and overbite were +5.0 mm and +0.5 mm, respectively. The patient had a history of orthodontic treatment in which her first premolars were all extracted. During the first orthodontic treatment, a clockwise mandibular rotation was observed as a result of the increase of posterior dentoalveolar height. She had temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain during mouth opening and complained of difficulty in eating due to masticatory dysfunction. The pretreatment Schuller views of both TMJ showed a posterior condyle position. In order to correct the overjet, molar relationship and the mandibular condyle position, a miniscrew was inserted into the palatal region of the upper first molar to intrude the upper posterior teeth. As the upper molars were intruded, the overjet was decreased, and a class I molar relationship was achieved by a counterclockwise mandibular rotation. After one year of treatment, an acceptable occlusion was achieved, and the condyle moved into centric position in the glenoid fossa. The patient's teeth continued to be stable, and she had no pain in TMJ after a retention period of three years. The result of this treatment showed that molar intrusion using miniscrew anchorage is effective for treatment of a TMD patient with a posterior condyle position.

  11. Dynamic magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint using FLASH sequences.

    PubMed

    Conway, W F; Hayes, C W; Campbell, R L

    1988-11-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a suitable modality for the visualization of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in both normal and pathologic conditions. Until recently, MRI had been unable to provide diagnostic dynamic images of the TMJ during opening. A series of 30 TMJ MRI examinations of 17 symptomatic patients and two normal volunteers (15 to 43 years old; 14 men and five women) was performed. Fast low angle shot (FLASH) sequences were used to provide a series of dynamic images of the TMJ in various phases of opening. In 30% of the joint examined, FLASH sequences contributed clinically significant information not available with standard T1-weighted sequences. These results suggest that FLASH images are particularly useful in distinguishing normal disc variants from pathologic conditions in which the disc is displaced anteriorly to a mild extent. The short imaging time of FLASH sequences decreases motion artifact in patients who have difficulty remaining still during the examination.

  12. Estrogen receptors in the temporomandibular joint of the baboon (Papio cynocephalus): an autoradiographic study

    SciTech Connect

    Aufdemorte, T.B.; Van Sickels, J.E.; Dolwick, M.F.; Sheridan, P.J.; Holt, G.R.; Aragon, S.B.; Gates, G.A.

    1986-04-01

    Using an autoradiographic method, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) complex of five aged female baboons was studied for the presence of receptors for estradiol-17 beta. The study was performed in an effort to learn more of the pathophysiology of this joint and in an attempt to provide a scientific basis to explain the reported preponderance of women who seek and undergo treatment for signs and symptoms referable to the TMJ. This experiment revealed that the TMJ complex contains numerous cells with receptors for estrogen, particularly the articular surface of the condyle, articular disk, and capsule. Muscles of mastication contained relatively fewer receptors. As a result, one may postulate a role for the sex steroid hormones in the maintenance, repair, and/or pathogenesis of the TMJ. Additional studies are necessary to fully determine the significance of hormone receptors in this site and any correlation between diseases of the TMJ and the endocrine status of affected patients.

  13. Custom Anatomical 3D Spacer for Temporomandibular Joint Resection and Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Green, John Marshall; Lawson, Sarah T.; Liacouras, Peter C.; Wise, Edward M.; Gentile, Michael A.; Grant, Gerald Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Two cases are presented using a two-stage approach and a custom antibiotic spacer placement. Temporomandibular reconstruction can be very demanding and accomplished with a variety of methods in preparation of a total joint and ramus reconstruction with total joint prostheses (TMJ Concepts, Ventura, CA). Three-dimensional reconstructions from diagnostic computed tomography were used to establish a virtually planned resection which included the entire condyle-ramus complex. From these data, digital designs were used to manufacture molds to facilitate intraoperative fabrication of precise custom anatomic spacers from rapidly setting antibiotic-impregnated polymethyl methacrylate. Molds were manufactured using vat polymerization (stereolithography) with a photopolymer in the first case and powder bed fusion (electron beam melting) with Ti6AL4V for the second. Surgical methodology and the use of molds for intraoperative spacer fabrication for each case are discussed. PMID:26889353

  14. Custom Anatomical 3D Spacer for Temporomandibular Joint Resection and Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Green, John Marshall; Lawson, Sarah T; Liacouras, Peter C; Wise, Edward M; Gentile, Michael A; Grant, Gerald Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Two cases are presented using a two-stage approach and a custom antibiotic spacer placement. Temporomandibular reconstruction can be very demanding and accomplished with a variety of methods in preparation of a total joint and ramus reconstruction with total joint prostheses (TMJ Concepts, Ventura, CA). Three-dimensional reconstructions from diagnostic computed tomography were used to establish a virtually planned resection which included the entire condyle-ramus complex. From these data, digital designs were used to manufacture molds to facilitate intraoperative fabrication of precise custom anatomic spacers from rapidly setting antibiotic-impregnated polymethyl methacrylate. Molds were manufactured using vat polymerization (stereolithography) with a photopolymer in the first case and powder bed fusion (electron beam melting) with Ti6AL4V for the second. Surgical methodology and the use of molds for intraoperative spacer fabrication for each case are discussed.

  15. The value of magnetic resonance arthrography of the temporomandibular joint in imaging disc adhesions and perforations

    PubMed Central

    Venetis, G; Pilavaki, M; Triantafyllidou, K; Papachristodoulou, A; Lazaridis, N; Palladas, P

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study attempted to validate MR arthrography (MRAr) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in detecting the position, integrity and relations of the articular disc and retrodiscal tissue. Methods A total of 20 TMJs from 10 patients with severe TMJ dysfunction underwent MRI and MRAr. A paramagnetic contrast medium was injected into the upper joint compartment to observe possible adhesions and/or leakage into the lower compartment. 15 TMJs were surgically or arthroscopically explored and restored. Results MRAr was approximately in the same diagnostic value as MRI when locating position, but superior in detecting disc perforations (eight TMJs) and adhesions (seven TMJs) appearing together in four cases. Surgery confirmed radiological findings in all but one case, where arthroscopy and surgery failed to confirm a disc perforation indicated by MRAr. Conclusions TMJ MRAr may simultaneously reveal adhesions and perforations. Sensitivity and the probability of false-positive results require further study. PMID:21239570

  16. TNF Accelerates Death of Mandibular Condyle Chondrocytes in Rats with Biomechanical Stimulation-Induced Temporomandibular Joint Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongyun; Zhang, Jing; Jing, Lei; Liao, Lifan; Wang, Meiqing

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine if temporomandibular joint chondrocyte apoptosis is induced in rats with dental biomechanical stimulation and what a role TNF takes. Methods Thirty-two rats were divided into 4 groups (n = 8/group) and exposed to incisor mal-occlusion induced by unilateral anterior crossbite biomechanical stimulation. Two groups were sampled at 2 or 4 weeks. The other two groups were treated with local injections of a TNF inhibitor or PBS into the temporomandibular joints area at 2 weeks and then sampled at 4 weeks. Twenty-four rats either served as unilateral anterior crossbite mock operation controls (n = 8/group) with sampling at 2 or 4 weeks or received a local injection of the TNF inhibitor at 2 weeks with sampling at 4 weeks. Chondrocytes were isolated from the temporomandibular joints of 6 additional rats and treated with TNF in vitro. Joint samples were assessed using Hematoxylin&eosin, Safranin O, TUNEL and immunohistochemistry staining, real-time PCR, fluorogenic activity assays and Western blot analyses. The isolated chondrocytes were also analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Unilateral anterior crossbite stimulation led to temporomandibular joint cartilage degradation, associated with an increase in TUNEL-positive chondrocytes number, caspase-9 expression levels, and the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria at 2 weeks without changes in TNF and caspase-8 levels until after 4 weeks. TNF stimulated apoptosis of the isolated chondrocytes and up-regulated caspase-8 expression, but did not change caspase-9 expression levels. Local injection of TNF inhibitor down-regulated caspase-8 expression and reduced TUNEL-positive cell number, but did not reverse cartilage thickness reduction, caspase-9 up-regulation or cytochrome c release. Conclusions Unilateral anterior crossbite stimulation induces mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis of articular chondrocytes. TNF accelerated the unilateral anterior crossbite induced chondrocytes apoptosis via death

  17. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders and radiologically observed abnormalities in the condyles of the temporomandibular joints of professional violin and viola players.

    PubMed

    Kovero, O; Könönen, M

    1995-04-01

    The frequency of temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and radiologically observed abnormalities in the condyles of the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of professional violin and viola players was investigated in 26 orchestra violinists/violists (VP group) and in their sex-, age-, and dentition-matched controls (C group). A routine clinical stomatognathic examination, a standardized interview, and radiography of the condyles were carried out for all subjects. The VP group showed a higher frequency of subjective symptoms and clinical signs of TMD, such as palpatory tenderness of masticatory muscles, TMJ clicking, painful mandibular movements, and deviation on opening or closing. There was no difference between the groups in terms of radiologic findings in the condyles. Weekly playing hours correlated positively with some signs of TMD. It is concluded that professional violin or viola playing might be a predisposing factor for TMD.

  18. Unrecognized bilateral temporomandibular joint dislocation after general anesthesia with a delay in diagnosis and management: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Anterior bilateral temporomandibular joint dislocation is not an uncommon occurrence and has been reported before. However, its diagnosis can easily be overlooked, especially by clinicians who are unfamiliar with this pathology. Continuous discussion of the pathology is required to prevent delays in diagnosis, which can lead to long-term sequelae for the patient. Case presentation We present the case of a 66-year-old Somali woman who experienced a bilateral anterior temporomandibular joint dislocation after a general anesthetic for an exploratory laparotomy for excision of a pelvic sarcoma. She first presented in the intensive care unit with preauricular pain and an inability to close her mouth, and was initially misdiagnosed and treated for a muscle spasm. The cause of her misdiagnosis was multifactorial - opioid-related sedation, language and cultural barrier, and unfamiliarity with the pathology. Her diagnosis was proven 18 hours after the completion of surgery with a plain X-ray. A manual closed reduction was performed with minimal sedation by oral surgery. Conclusion We provided an in-depth discussion of temporomandibular joint dislocation and suggest a simple test that would prevent delayed diagnosis of temporomandibular joint dislocation in any patient undergoing general anesthesia. A normal mandibular excursion should be tested in every patient after surgery in the postoperative care unit, by asking the patient to open and close their mouth during the immediate postoperative recovery period or passively performing the range of motion test. PMID:24139071

  19. MR imaging of temporomandibular joint abnormalities associated with cervical hyperextension/hyperflexion (whiplash) injuries.

    PubMed

    Pressman, B D; Shellock, F G; Schames, J; Schames, M

    1992-01-01

    Patients often have temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction-related symptoms after cervical hyperextension/hyperflexion injuries ("whiplash") caused by rear-end motor-vehicle collisions. To determine abnormalities of the TMJ associated with these injuries, 33 consecutive symptomatic patients (66 joints) with no direct trauma to the jaw, mouth, head, or face due to the accident and no prior history of TMJ dysfunction underwent magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, and the images were retrospectively analyzed. Overall, 29 (88%) patients had some type of TMJ abnormality related to whiplash injury. Displacement of the disk was seen in 37 (56%) of the TMJs as follows: 21 (32%) had anterior displacement with reduction, nine (14%) had anterior displacement without reduction, six (9%) had lateral or medial displacement, and one (2%) had posterior displacement. On T2-weighted images, 43 (65%) TMJs had abnormal joint fluid or edema, predominantly affecting the joint capsule and/or lateral pterygoid muscles. The finding that many of the patients had joint fluid and/or soft-tissue edema indicates that T2-weighted images are especially useful for assessment of patients with a history of whiplash injury.

  20. Impact of functional mandibular advancement appliances on the temporomandibular joint - a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ivorra-Carbonell, Laura; Montiel-Company, José-María; Almerich-Silla, José-Manuel; Paredes-Gallardo, Vanessa

    2016-01-01

    Background Although many orthodontists have no doubts about the effectiveness of functional appliances for mandibular advancement, the impact on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is still in dispute. The objective of this systematic review is to examine the main effects on the TMJ of using functional appliances, both in healthy patients and in patients with a pre-existing disorder. Material and Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. Only systematic reviews, meta-analyses, randomized clinical trials (RCTs), case-control studies and cohort studies were included. A detailed language-independent electronic search was conducted in the Pubmed, Scopus, Cochrane Library and Embase databases. All studies published between 2000 and 2015 were included. Results A total of 401 articles were identified. Of these, 159 were duplicates and were excluded. On reading the title and abstract, 213 articles were excluded because they did not answer the research question, leaving a total of 29 articles. These articles were read and assessed. Following critical reading of the full text, eight articles were excluded: seven because they were considered of low quality and one because it published redundant data. As a result, 21 articles were included. Conclusions After treatment with functional appliances, the condyle was found to be in a more advanced position, with remodelling of the condyle and adaptation of the morphology of the glenoid fossa. No significant adverse effects on the TMJ were observed in healthy patients and the appliances could improve joints that initially presented forward dislocation of the disk. Key words:Temporomandibular joint, TMJ, orthodontic appliances, functional, mandibular advancement, herbst appliance, bionator. PMID:27475694

  1. Magnetic Resonance Image Evaluation of Temporomandibular Joint Osteophytes: Influence of Clinical Factors and Artrogenics Changes.

    PubMed

    Grossmann, Eduardo; Remedi, Marcelo Pereira; Ferreira, Luciano Ambrosio; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires

    2016-03-01

    This research aims to examine the presence of osteophyte in patients with arthrogenic temporomandibular disorders through magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); to investigate the influence of sex and clinical symptoms in its prevalence; and the position of the osteophytes in the condyle. The study was based on 100 MRI and on reports of patients, which corresponded to the evaluation of 200 joints. Patients of both sexes were aged from 18 to 82 years (average = 49.48) and were subjected to the aforementioned examination from January 2006 to March 2009. The assessment considered the type of disc displacement, the presence of effusion, bone marrow edema, condyle changes, joint noise and pain. The MRI machine used was the GE Signa HDX (General Electric, Milwaukee, WI), with T1 and T2-weighted, 1.5 T magnetic field, sagittal oblique (mouth closed, mouth open) and coronal (mouth closed) imaging, with spherical surface coil and an asymmetric matrix. All images were interpreted by an experienced radiologist. A total of 28% (n = 56) of the temporomandibular joints showed osteophytes on the anterior surface of the mandible. No relationship was found between sex and osteophytes. The authors found a statistically significant difference between osteophytes and disc displacement without reduction (P < 0.001). The presence of osteophytes suggested a possible cause and effect relationship between osteoarthritis and disc displacement without reduction; the osteophyte was always located in the anterior surface of condyle, regardless of the sex variable; no significant difference was found between osteophytes and the main complaints of the patient.

  2. Risk factors associated with temporomandibular joint sounds in children 6 to 12 years of age.

    PubMed

    Keeling, S D; McGorray, S; Wheeler, T T; King, G J

    1994-03-01

    The relationship between temporomandibular joint (TMJ) sounds and a person's dental and skeletal characteristics is poorly understood. In this study, data were obtained from 3428 grade schoolchildren (mean age = 9.0 years, SD = 0.8, range 6 to 12 years), without a history of orthodontic treatment. Each child had been examined independently by one of six orthodontists to assess: TMJ sounds (none, click, crepitus), gender, age, race (white/black), skeletal relationships (convexity, maxillary, and mandibular positions), malocclusion (molar class, overjet, overbite, anterior crowding, posterior crossbite), maximum opening, chin trauma (none, cut, scar), and history of lower facial trauma. Temporomandibular joint sounds were present in 344 children (10.0% of the sample); 276 (8.1%) had an isolated unilateral sound, 254 (7.4%) had unilateral clicking, 50 (1.5%) had bilateral clicking, 22 (0.6%) had unilateral crepitus, and 11 (0.3%) had bilateral crepitus. Univariate analyses compared children with and without sounds for each variable; logistic regression analyses examined the relationship between groups of variables and TMJ sounds. The prevalence of TMJ sounds was associated with examiner (chi 2 = 23.4, df = 5, p < 0.001); increased prevalence of TMJ sounds occurred in children with maxillary anterior crowding (t = 2.8, p < 0.006), mandibular anterior crowding (t = 3.0, p < 0.002), and increased maximum opening (t = 4.7, p < 0.001). In contrast to other reports on children, the prevalence of joint sounds was not associated with age, race, gender, or molar class.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Assessment of Condylar Changes in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Pain Using Digital Volumetric Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Ujwala Shivarama; Burde, Krishna N.; Naikmasur, Venkatesh G.; Sattur, Atul P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficiency of DVT in comparison with OPG in the assessment of bony condylar changes in patients of TMJ pain. Methods. 100 temporomandibular joints of 62 patients with the complaint of temporomandibular joint pain were included in the study. DVT and OPG radiographs were taken for all the 100 joints. Three observers interpreted the DVT and OPG radiograph for the bony changes separately for two times with an interval of one week. The bony changes seen in the condyle were given coding from 0 to 6. (0: Normal, 1: Erosion, 2: Flattening, 3: Osteophyte, 4: Sclerosis, 5: Resorption, and 6: other changes). Interobserver and intraobserver variability was assessed with one-way ANOVA statistics. Z test was used to see the significant difference between OPG and DVT. Results. In the present study the interexaminer reliability for OPG and DVT was 0.903 and 0.978, respectively. Intraexaminer reliability for OPG and DVT was 0.908 and 0.980, respectively. The most common condylar bony change seen in OPG and DVT was erosion followed by flattening and osteophyte. There was significant difference between OPG and DVT in detecting erosion and osteophytes. The other changes observed in our study were Ely's cyst, pointed condyle, and bifid condyle. All the bony changes are more commonly seen in females than males. Conclusion. DVT provides more valid and accurate information on condylar bony changes. The DVT has an added advantage of lesser radiation exposure to the patient and cost effectiveness and could be easily accessible in a dental hospital. PMID:25332835

  4. Clinical comparative study of microcurrent electrical stimulation to mid-laser and placebo treatment in degenerative joint disease of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Bertolucci, L E; Grey, T

    1995-04-01

    Mid-laser and microcurrent stimulation (MENS) have been found to be effective in the reduction of painful temporomandibular joints (TMJ) with internal derangement. There was significant improvement in mobility with the reduction of pain. Mid-laser was superior to MENS in its application and effect, and both were significantly better than the placebo treatment.

  5. Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Assessment of Mandibular Condylar Position in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction and in Healthy Subjects.

    PubMed

    Paknahad, Maryam; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Iranpour, Shiva; Mirhadi, Sabah; Paknahad, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem. The clinical significance of condyle-fossa relationships in the temporomandibular joint is a matter of controversy. Different studies have evaluated whether the position of the condyle is a predictor of the presence of temporomandibular disorder. Purpose. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the condylar position according to gender in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and healthy controls using cone-beam computed tomography. Materials and Methods. CBCT of sixty temporomandibular joints in thirty patients with TMD and sixty joints of thirty subjects without TMJ disorder was evaluated in this study. The condylar position was assessed on the CBCT images. The data were analyzed using Pearson chi-square test. Results. No statistically significant differences were found regarding the condylar position between symptomatic and asymptomatic groups. Posterior condylar position was more frequently observed in women and anterior condylar position was more prevalent in men in the symptomatic group. However, no significant differences in condylar position were found in asymptomatic subjects according to gender. Conclusion. This study showed no apparent association between condylar positioning and clinical findings in TMD patients.

  6. Cone-Beam Computed Tomographic Assessment of Mandibular Condylar Position in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction and in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Paknahad, Maryam; Shahidi, Shoaleh; Iranpour, Shiva; Mirhadi, Sabah; Paknahad, Majid

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem. The clinical significance of condyle-fossa relationships in the temporomandibular joint is a matter of controversy. Different studies have evaluated whether the position of the condyle is a predictor of the presence of temporomandibular disorder. Purpose. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the condylar position according to gender in patients with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and healthy controls using cone-beam computed tomography. Materials and Methods. CBCT of sixty temporomandibular joints in thirty patients with TMD and sixty joints of thirty subjects without TMJ disorder was evaluated in this study. The condylar position was assessed on the CBCT images. The data were analyzed using Pearson chi-square test. Results. No statistically significant differences were found regarding the condylar position between symptomatic and asymptomatic groups. Posterior condylar position was more frequently observed in women and anterior condylar position was more prevalent in men in the symptomatic group. However, no significant differences in condylar position were found in asymptomatic subjects according to gender. Conclusion. This study showed no apparent association between condylar positioning and clinical findings in TMD patients. PMID:26681944

  7. Influence of estrogen cycle on temporomandibular joint synovial membrane in rat with deviated mandible.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Giovanna; Hosomichi, Jun; Muramoto, Takeshi; Kanno, Zuisei; Soma, Kunimichi

    2007-03-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are known to be more prevalent and severe in women than in men, especially in those who are in their reproductive age. In those patients reproductive hormones may play a vital role in the host adaptive capacity of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In order to clarify the relationship between TMD prevalence and estrogen cycle, a mandible deviated animal model was carried out, and the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), an essential enzyme in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis, was investigated in the rat's synovial tissue. An appliance was attached to the rat's incisors to produce a lateral deviation of the mandible during the metestrus phase, and the animals were sacrificed in the proestrus and estrus phase, when the estrogen was at the highest and lowest level, respectively. Immunostaining was then performed for 2 consecutive estrous cycles to demonstrate iNOS expression in the synovial membrane of the TMJ. The immunoreactivity for iNOS was more intense in the synovial membrane on the contralateral side in the proestrus phase (estrogen peak phase). These observations suggest that iNOS expression in the synovial membrane with mandibular deviation may be exacerbated in the presence of estrogen.

  8. Analysis of the cytokine profiles of the synovial fluid in a normal temporomandibular joint: preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Kyun; Kim, Su-Gwan; Kim, Bum-Soo; Lee, Jeong-Yun; Yun, Pil-Young; Bae, Ji-Hyun; Oh, Ji-Su; Ahn, Jong-Mo; Kim, Jae-Sung; Lee, Sook-Young

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the cytokine profiles of the synovial fluid from the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) spaces of normal individuals and temporomandibular disorder (TMD) patients. Thirty-four patients with planned orthognathic surgery did not present abnormalities of the TMJ on magnetic resonance images and radiographs and did not show the symptoms identified by the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC-TMD); as a result, they were assigned to the control group. Twenty-two patients who sought treatment for TMD during the same period were assigned to the TMD group. Synovial fluid was collected from superior TMJ spaces, and cytokine expression was analysed by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Significant differences were tested using Fisher's exact test (p<0.05). Granulocyte Macrophage Colony stimulating Factor (GM-CSF), interferon (INF), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α were detected in the TMD group, whereas no cytokines were detected in the control group. The most prevalent cytokines in the TMD group were IL-1β, IL-6 and GM-CSF. IL-4 and IL-5 were not detected in either the TMD group or in the control group. None of the cytokines that were detected in patients with TMD were found in the articular spaces of normal individuals.

  9. BIOPSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH THE SUBCATEGORIES OF ACUTE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DISORDERS*

    PubMed Central

    Dougall, Angela Liegey; Jimenez, Carmen A.; Haggard, Robbie A.; Stowell, Anna W.; Riggs, Richard R.; Gatchel, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Aims The purpose of this study was to assess the biopsychosocial factors associated with acute temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) based upon the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). Methods Participants were assessed in community-based dental clinics, and evaluated by trained clinicians on physical and psychosocial measures. A total of 207 subjects were evaluated. Patients’ high-risk versus low-risk status for potentially developing chronic TMD was also determined. Analyses of variance and chi square analyses were applied to these data. Results Participants’ characteristic pain intensity differed among RDC/TMD Axis I diagnoses. They also significantly varied in their: self-reported graded chronic pain; depression; somatization, pain inclusive; somatization, pain excluded, and physical well-being. In addition, participants with differing RDC/TMD Axis I diagnoses varied in self-reported pain during their chewing performance. Finally, there were also significant differences in chewing performance between high-risk vs. low-risk (for developing chronic TMD) patients. Conclusions Participants with multiple diagnoses reported higher pain, as well as other symptoms, relative to participants without a TMD diagnosis. For chewing performance, participants with mutual diagnoses reported more pain compared to other participants. Finally, the risk-status of patients significantly affected chewing performance. PMID:22292135

  10. Review of temporomandibular joint pathology. Part I: classification, epidemiology and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Poveda Roda, Rafael; Bagan, José V; Díaz Fernández, José María; Hernández Bazán, Sergio; Jiménez Soriano, Yolanda

    2007-08-01

    Pathology of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) affects an important part of the population, though it is not viewed as a public health problem. Between 3-7% of the population seeks treatment for pain and dysfunction of the ATM or related structures. The literature reports great variability in the prevalence of the clinical symptoms (6-93%) and signs (0-93%), probably as a result of the different clinical criteria used. In imaging studies it is common to observe alterations that have no clinical expression of any kind. Radiographic changes corresponding to osteoarthrosis are observed in 14-44% of the population. Age is a risk factor, though with some particularities. In elderly patients there is an increased prevalence of clinical and radiological signs, though also a lesser prevalence of symptoms and of treatment demands than in younger adults. Approximately 7% of the population between 12 and 18 years of age is diagnosed with mandibular pain-dysfunction. Temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) is more frequent in females. No clear relationship has been established between occlusal alterations and TMJ disease. Only disharmony between centric relation and maximum intercuspidation, and unilateral crossbite, have demonstrated a certain TMJ disease-predictive potential. Both local and systemic hyperlaxity has been postulated as a possible cause of TMD. Parafunctional habits and bruxism are considered risk factors of TMD with odds ratios (ORs) of up to 4.8. Psychophysiological theory holds stress as a determinant factor in myofascial pain. Genetic factors and orthodontic treatment have not been shown to cause TMD.

  11. Size and form of the human temporomandibular joint in African-Americans and Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Cecilia; Magnusson, Tomas

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine contemporary human skull material for possible differences between Caucasians and African-Americans in respect to size and form of the temporomandibular condyles. The material consisted of a total of 129 Caucasian skulls (94 males and 35 females) and 76 African-American skulls (40 males and 36 females). Their mean age at death was 46 years for the Caucasians (range: 19-89 years) and 37 years for the African-Americans (range: 18-70 years). The mediolateral and anteroposterior dimensions of the 410 condyles were measured, and the condylar form was estimated using both anterior and superior views. No statistically significant differences could be found between Caucasians and African-Americans for any of the recorded variables. In conclusion, the present results lend no support for the existence of ethnic differences between the two groups examined in respect of temporomandibular joint size and form. It is likely that other factors such as evolution, overall cranial size, dietary differences, and genetic factors, irrespective of ethnicity, can explain the differences found in different skull samples.

  12. Association between headache and temporomandibular joint disorders in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Branco, Luciana P; Santis, Tatiana O; Alfaya, Thays A; Godoy, Camila H L; Fragoso, Yara D; Bussadori, Sandra K

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the relationship between temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJD) and headache in children and adolescents. A prospective cross-sectional cohort study was carried out involving 93 children and adolescents (6 to 14 years of age) at the outpatient service of a dental school. All participants underwent a clinical examination involving Axis 1 of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders, along with a characterization of headache and an anthropometric evaluation. Statistical analysis involved the chi-squared test for quantitative variables and the Student's t-test, ANOVA and Tukey's test for quantitative data. An adjusted logistic regression model was used to determine significant associations among gender, age, TMJD and headache. Mild TMJD was identified in 35.8% of the sample and was not associated the presence of headache. Moderate TMJD was found in 25.8% of patients and severe TMJD was found in 11.8%; both forms of TMJD were associated with headache. A significant correlation was found between the intensity of TMJD and the risk of headache. The present findings demonstrate a positive correlation between TMJD and headache in children and adolescents, independently of gender and age.

  13. On the development, morphology and function of the temporomandibular joint in the light of the orofacial system.

    PubMed

    Fanghänel, Jochen; Gedrange, Tomasz

    2007-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint has a key role in the biocybernetic functional cycle of the orofacial system. It has developed as a "secondary joint" and displays a number of features relating to the articular tubercle, the mandibular condyle, the articular disc, the joint cartilage and the retroarticular pad. The joint cartilage of the mandibular condyle is a primary compensatory growth centre also comprising distant effects. The coordinate course of the mandibular movements is controlled by a complex reflex mechanism and neuronal controller cycles. Morphology, function and clinical aspects are of equal interest to both physicians and dentists.

  14. Evaluation of the applicability of temporomandibular opening index in Turkish children with and without signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Sari, Saziye; Kucukesmen, Cigdem; Sonmez, Hayriye

    2008-07-01

    Limitation of mandibular movement is one of the cardinal signs of temporomandibular disorders. Temporomandibular Opening Index (TOI) is a new technique to determine the restricted mouth opening in temporomandibular joint dysfunction syndrome (TMD). The purpose of this study was to compare the TOI of Turkish children with and without TMD in primary, mixed, and permanent dentitions. In this study, a total of 270 children were evaluated. One hundred thirty-five (135) subjects had no signs or symptoms of TMD (Group 1), while the remaining 135 subjects did have signs and symptoms of TMD (Group 2). Forty-five (45) patients were selected for each dentition for two groups. "Maximum Voluntary Mouth Opening" (MVMO) values and TOI ranges were calculated. A Mann-Whitney U test and a Kruskal Wallis test were used to compare the data (p<0.05). TOI showed statistical differences between all dentitions with and without TMD (p<0.05). There were no significant differences between different dentitions or genders in Group 1 or Group 2 (p<0.05).

  15. Emerging intra-articular drug delivery systems for the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Mountziaris, Paschalia M; Kramer, Phillip R; Mikos, Antonios G

    2009-02-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders are a heterogeneous group of diseases that cause progressive joint degeneration leading to chronic pain and reduced quality of life. Both effective pain reduction and restoration of TMJ function remain unmet challenges. Intra-articular injections of corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid are currently used to treat chronic pain, but these methods require multiple injections that increase the risk of iatrogenic joint damage and other complications. The small and emerging field of TMJ tissue engineering aims to reduce pain and disability through novel strategies that induce joint tissue regeneration. Development of methods for sustained, intra-articular release of growth factors and other pro-regenerative signals will be critical for the success of TMJ tissue engineering strategies. This review discusses methods of intra-articular drug delivery to the TMJ, as well as emerging injectable controlled release systems with potential to improve TMJ drug delivery, to encourage further research in the development of sustained release systems for both long-term pain management and to enhance tissue engineering strategies for TMJ regeneration.

  16. Lubricin in synovial fluid of mild and severe temporomandibular joint internal derangements

    PubMed Central

    Perrotta, Rosario E.; Almeida, Luis-Eduardo; Loreto, Carla; Musumeci, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Background To understand the molecular basis of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pathologies, we aimed to investigate the lubricin levels in the TMJ synovial fluid (SF) of patients with mild to severe internal derangements (IDs). Material and Methods A total, 34 joints were the study group. Only patients, with a Wilkes stage of III, IV and V were included, in this sample. Control group consisted of SF from eight joints, from patients undergoing to orthognatic surgery. Concentrations of lubricin in the SF from both samples were measured using ELISA system. Results The mean lubricin concentration was 7.029 ± 0.21 µg/mL in stage III patients; 5.64 ± 0.10 µg/mL in stage IV patients, and 4.78 ± 0.11 µg/mL in stage V patients. The lubricin levels from stage IV and stage V patients differed significantly (P ≤ 0.001) from those of control subjects. Lubricin levels were inversely correlated with age and to VAS score. Conclusions The results of this cross-sectional study highlight the relationship between disease severity and the levels of lubricin in TMJ SF. Our findings suggest that novel biotherapeutic approaches, including the administration of recombinant lubricin in the joint cavity, for the treatment of TMJ diseases can be developed. Key words:Lubricin, TMJ, derangements, synovial fluid. PMID:27694778

  17. Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A Review of Etiology, Clinical Management, and Tissue Engineering Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Meghan K.; MacBarb, Regina F.; Wong, Mark E.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiology reports state temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) affect up to 25% of the population, yet their etiology and progression are poorly understood. As a result, treatment options are limited and fail to meet the long-term demands of the relatively young patient population. TMD are a class of degenerative musculoskeletal conditions associated with morphological and functional deformities. In up to 70% of cases, TMD are accompanied by malpositioning of the TMJ disc, termed “internal derangement.” Though onset is not well characterized, correlations between internal derangement and osteoarthritic change have been identified. Due to the complex and unique nature of each TMD case, diagnosis requires patient-specific analysis accompanied by various diagnostic modalities. Likewise, treatment requires customized plans to address the specific characteristics of each patient’s disease. In the mechanically demanding and biochemically active environment of the TMJ, therapeutic approaches capable of restoring joint functionality while responding to changes in the joint have become a necessity. Capable of integration and adaptation in the TMJ, one such approach, tissue engineering, carries significant potential in the development of repair and replacement tissues. The following review presents a synopsis of etiology, current treatment methods, and the future of tissue engineering for repairing and/or replacing diseased joint components, specifically the mandibular condyle and TMJ disc. Preceding the current trends in tissue engineering is an analysis of native tissue characterization, toward identifying tissue engineering objectives and validation metrics for restoring healthy and functional structures of the TMJ. PMID:24278954

  18. A retrospective study of temporomandibular joint ankylosis secondary to surgical treatment of mandibular condylar fractures.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Guo-lin; Long, Xing; Deng, Mo-hong; Han, Qian-chao; Meng, Qing-gong; Li, Bo

    2014-03-01

    We investigated the incidence of ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) after open operations for fractures of the mandibular condyle, and analysed possible risk factors in a total of 385 patients with 492 condylar fractures who had been operated on in our department from 2001 to 2010. Sixteen patients developed postoperative ankylosis of the TMJ with 26 joints (5%) affected during a follow-up of 6 months-10 years. Of the 492 condylar fractures, the most common ones that were associated with postoperative ankylosis were those of the condylar head (20/248), followed by the condylar neck (6/193). Subcondylar fractures did not cause postoperative ankylosis (0/51). Among the 16 patients with postoperative ankylosis, 13 had associated anterior mandibular fractures. Long-screw (bicortical screw) fixation of fractures of the condylar head seemed to be associated with a lower incidence of postoperative ankylosis than fixation by miniplate and wire or removal of the fractured fragment. The articular discs were damaged in all ankylosed joints, and the remaining fractured fragment was found in 10 ankylosed joints after fractures of the condylar head. The results suggest that fractures of the condylar head are more prone to lead to postoperative ankylosis of the TMJ, and that the possible risk factors seem to include the technique used for fixation and damage to the disc, together with an anterior mandibular fracture with the fractured fragment remaining.

  19. Microbiological investigation of retrodiscal tissues from patients with advanced internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, M; Dimitroulis, G

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of bacteria in samples of retrodiscal tissues taken from patients suffering from advanced internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). 12 fresh retrodiscal tissue samples were taken from 12 consecutive patients who underwent unilateral TMJ discectomy for advanced TMJ internal derangement (Wilkes stage IV). The retrodiscal tissue samples were stained and cultured for the presence of micro-organisms in microbiology laboratories. No evidence of bacteria or other micro-organisms was found in any of the tissue specimens procured from the TMJ. This study failed to identify the presence of bacteria or other micro-organisms in fresh retrodiscal tissue specimens of the TMJ in patients with advanced TMJ internal derangement.

  20. Management of severe sleep apnea secondary to juvenile arthritis with temporomandibular joint replacement and mandibular advancement

    PubMed Central

    Paul, S. Arun; Simon, S. Sibu; Issac, Barney; Kumar, Saurav

    2015-01-01

    Variations affecting the growth centers can severely affect the normal formation and subsequent function of vital musculoskeletal structures. We report a case of bilateral condylar atrophy with a history of juvenile arthritis (JA) resulting in progressive obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in adulthood. In addition to this, the case report emphasizes the role of temporomandibular joint replacement and advancement of the mandible to correct progressive OSA secondary to idiopathic JA. Computed tomography revealed micrognathia, condylar hypoplasia, and decreased pharyngeal airway space. The resultant increase in the retrolingual-pharyngeal airway space following the surgery, helped to completely resolve the presenting symptoms. It is hoped that the described technique could be used in similar cases with a predictable outcome. PMID:26538944

  1. Effectiveness of bone scans in the diagnosis of osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J-H; Kim, Y-K; Kim, S-G; Yun, P-Y; Kim, J-D; Min, J-H

    2012-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of bone scan procedures for the diagnosis of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis. Methods From February 2009 to June 2009, 22 patients (4 males and 18 females) from Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Republic of Korea, were diagnosed with TMJ disorder. They were examined by clinical examination, plain radiograph and bone scan and were categorized into three groups: normal, internal derangement and osteoarthritis. TMJ uptake ratios and asymmetrical indices were calculated. Results There were no significant differences in uptake ratios associated with pain and bone change. However, significant results were obtained when comparing uptake ratios between the osteoarthritis and non-osteoarthritis groups. Conclusion It was concluded from this study that bone scans may help to diagnose osteoarthritis when increased uptake ratios are observed. PMID:22116124

  2. A rare case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome following temporomandibular joint surgery.

    PubMed

    Lehman, H; Rushinek, H

    2015-08-01

    Surgical approaches to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) have been designed specifically to minimize injury to the temporal branch of the facial nerve. In spite of this, facial nerve dysfunction occurs in 1-32% of patients undergoing TMJ surgery. Ramsay Hunt syndrome is characterized by peripheral facial paralysis that often involves other cranial nerves, mostly cranial nerve VIII. The pathology is attributed to the reactivation of latent varicella zoster virus in the geniculate ganglion. The diagnosis is based mostly on history and physical findings. Surgical procedures have been known to reactivate varicella zoster virus, but Ramsay Hunt syndrome subsequent to TMJ surgery has not been described yet. This report describes a case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome associated with TMJ surgery. Because of the relatively high incidence of facial nerve dysfunction associated with TMJ surgery, patients with varicella zoster virus reactivation may initially be misdiagnosed with iatrogenic facial palsy, or vice versa.

  3. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD)/Pseudogout of the temporomandibular joint - FNA findings and microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Asghar H; Abraham, Jerrold L; Kellman, Robert M; Khurana, Kamal K

    2008-04-21

    We report a case of a Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD) presenting as a mass in the parotid and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) that simulated a parotid tumor. A 35 year-old man presented with pain in the left ear area. A CT Scan of the area showed a large, calcified mass surrounding the left condylar head, and extending into the infratemporal fossa. FNA of the mass showed birefringent crystals, most of which were rhomboid with occasional ones being needle shaped, embedded in an amorphous pink substance. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of these crystals showed peaks corresponding to calcium and phosphorus. SEM/EDS is a rapid method of diagnosing calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD) and an alternative to more commonly used method of special staining of cell block sections coupled with polarizing microscopy.

  4. Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of the Temporomandibular Joint in Two Normal Camels

    PubMed Central

    Arencibia, Alberto; Blanco, Diego; González, Nelson; Rivero, Miguel A.

    2012-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) image features of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and associated structures in two mature dromedary camels were obtained with a third-generation equipment CT and a superconducting magnet RM at 1.5 Tesla. Images were acquired in sagittal and transverse planes. Medical imaging processing with imaging software was applied to obtain postprocessing CT and MR images. Relevant anatomic structures were identified and labelled. The resulting images provided excellent anatomic detail of the TMJ and associated structures. Annotated CT and MR images from this study are intended as an anatomical reference useful in the interpretation for clinical CT and MR imaging studies of the TMJ of the dromedary camels. PMID:22567308

  5. Internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: findings in the pediatric age group

    SciTech Connect

    Katzberg, R.W.; Tallents, R.H.; Hayakawa, K.; Miller, T.L.; Goske, M.J.; Wood, B.P.

    1985-01-01

    Findings in 31 pediatric patients with pain and dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are reported. The average age was 14 years and the average duration of symptoms was 21.4 months. Internal derangements were found in 29 patients (94%) and degenerative arthritis in 13 (42%). In 12 patients (39%), the problem could be traced to an injury to the jaw. Secondary condylar hypoplasia was associated with the meniscal abnormality in 3 patients (10%). Further awareness of internal derangements of the TMJ in the pediatric population should permit greater recognition of their etiology. It is important that threatment be initiated as soon as possible, not only to minimize the development of osseous disease in young adults but also to prevent facial growth deformities.

  6. Severe bony ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint on one side and contralateral adhesion: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Gon; Choi, Hang-Moon; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2015-01-01

    Bony fusion between the mandibular condyle and skull base involves temporomandibular joint (TMJ) bony ankylosis. This condition might originate from trauma, infection, or systemic disease. TMJ adhesion can develop after synovial damage. Both TMJ ankylosis and adhesion lead to functional impairment and pain. Here, we present a case of a 50-year-old female who had bony ankylosis of the right TMJ and adhesion of the left TMJ. She had otitis media in the right ear. A large mass in the right TMJ was observed on computed tomograph. Magnetic resonance image showed a large fused bone mass with normal bone marrow in the right TMJ and flattening of the condyle with a thin disk in the left TMJ. Gap arthroplasty with temporal fascia was performed on the right TMJ, and discectomy, high condylectomy, and coronoidectomy were performed on the left TMJ. During a 2-year follow-up after surgery, the patient had no recurrence. PMID:26125005

  7. Post-surgical unilateral temporomandibular joint dislocation treated by open reduction followed by orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Satake, H; Yamada, T; Kitamura, N; Yoshimura, T; Sasabe, E; Yamamoto, T

    2011-03-01

    A case of prolonged unilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation, which was treated by open surgical reduction and post-surgical orthodontic therapy, is presented. A 58-year-old woman presented complaining of facial asymmetry and malocclusion. She had received surgery for a malignant tumour in the right retromolar region 7 years previously. It was considered that contraction of the pterygoid muscle by surgical injury caused anterior meniscal displacement and TMJ dislocation. Since manual manipulation failed, direct open reduction was performed after separation of the lateral pterygoid muscle from the condylar head and removal of the intra-articular scar tissues. Although the condylar head was returned to the glenoid fossa, optimal occlusion was not obtained because of compensatory tooth movement and inclination. Satisfactory occlusion and symmetric facial appearance were brought about by post-surgical orthodontic therapy.

  8. Diagnosis and prevention of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) or odontostomatognathic (OSG) injury in dental practice.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Fattah, R A

    1990-04-01

    Malpractice lawsuit cases due to temporomandibular joint/soft tissue injuries following dental therapy are increasing. Therefore, dentists and their staffs must know how to recognize, document and avoid any possible aggravation or precipitation of TMJ disorder. TMJ anatomy, biomechanics and mechanisms of TMJ injuries are presented. Etiological factors such as psychological factors, parafunctional activities, malocclusion, trauma, iatrogenic causes, systemic conditions, developmental disorders, neoplastic growth or medications are discussed. Preventive measures addressed include: history-taking, patient examination, complete records, the assessment of the patient's general condition, documentation of pre-existing findings, informing and educating the patient, performing only the necessary procedures, modifying appointments, selecting less traumatic dental techniques, avoiding sudden occlusal alterations and preparedness to handle unwanted complications.

  9. Treatment of temporomandibular joint ankylosis with temporalis muscle and fascia flap.

    PubMed

    Su-Gwan, K

    2001-06-01

    This study sought to determine the efficacy of interpositional arthroplasty with temporalis muscle and fascia flap in the treatment of unilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis in adults. This retrospective study of seven cases evaluated the postoperative results of interpositional arthroplasty on temporalis muscle and fascia flap in adults. The operative protocol for unilateral TMJ ankylosis entailed, (1) resection of ankylotic mass, (2) intraoral ipsilateral coronoidectomy, (3) contralateral coronoidectomy when necessary, (4) interpositional tissue transfer to the TMJ with temporalis muscle and fascia flap, (5) maxillomandibular fixation (MMF), and (6) early mobilization and aggressive physiotherapy. The results of this protocol were encouraging, while the functional results of interpositional arthroplasty on temporalis muscle and fascia flap were satisfactory. The findings of this study support the use of temporalis muscle and fascia flap in adult patients with unilateral TMJ ankylosis. Early postoperative initial exercise, physiotherapy, and strict follow-up play an important role in preventing postoperative adhesions.

  10. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF PHYSICAL FACTORS IN THE TREATMENT OF COMPRESSION-DISLOCATION DYSFUNCTION OF THE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT.

    PubMed

    Rybalov, O; Yatsenko, P; Moskalenko, P; Yatsenko, O; Lakhtin, Yu

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the study was clinical and functional assessment of the effectiveness of physical factors in the treatment of patients with compression-dislocation dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint. We observed two groups of patients. All patients were undergone the repositioning of the joint heads of the lower jaw. Patients of the index group were assigned a vibrating massage of all masseter muscles, tourmaline ceramic on the joint area and a local physical therapy. Patients in the control group had only lidocaine blockade of periarticular area twice a week. Treatment efficacy was evaluated on the eighth day after the start of the treatment according to the bioelectric activity of the genuine masseter and temporal muscles, the intensity of pain according to in Visual Analog Scale, and according to the results of the clinical examination. In most patients of the index group the electromyography data after treatment were approaching to norm, the phenomenon of dysfunction of the temporomandibular joints was reversed. In the control group the full restoration of the functional activity of muscle did not occur. The addition to the complex of therapeutic measures a vibration massage, tourmaline ceramics and local physical therapy for patients with dysfunction of the temporomandibular joints allows to get a positive effect.

  11. Cytokine profile in the synovial fluid of patients with temporomandibular joint disorders: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kellesarian, Sergio Varela; Al-Kheraif, Abdulaziz A; Vohra, Fahim; Ghanem, Alexis; Malmstrom, Hans; Romanos, Georgios E; Javed, Fawad

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the cytokine profiles in the synovial fluid (SF) of patients with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJD). Databases were searched from 1965 till September 2015 using different combinations of the following key words: "Temporomandibular joint"; "Cytokine"; "disorder"; and "synovial fluid" and "inflammation". Titles and abstracts of studies identified using the above-described protocol were screened and checked for agreement. Full-texts of articles judged by title and abstract to be relevant were read and independently evaluated. Hand-searching of the reference lists of potentially relevant original and review articles was also performed. The pattern of the present systematic review was customized to mainly summarize the relevant data. Fifteen studies were included. In 12 studies, cytokine profile of patients with TMJD was assessed using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay; and in 2 studies, histological analysis was performed to assess the cytokine profile of patients with TMJD. Patients with TMJD presented raised levels of interleukin (IL)-6 in 8 studies, IL-1beta (1β) in 5 studies and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) in 5 studies. Two studies showed no significant difference in TNF-α levels in patients with and without TMJD; and IL-1β levels were comparable in patients with and without TMJD in 2 studies. Raised levels of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-8, and IFN-γ in the SF have been associated with inflammation in patients with TMJD. Cytokines IL-10, osteoclastogenesis inhibitory factor/osteoprotegerin (OCIF/OPG), and VEGF found in the SF of TMJs could have an anti-inflammatory effect.

  12. Association Between Stress, Sleep Quality and Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction: Simulated Mars Mission

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Balwant; Kaur, Jasdeep

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to test the association between quality of sleep and stress in individuals with TMD (temporomandibular joint dysfunction) in simulated Mars mission. Methods The 24 healthy crew members were recruited. The physiological measures of systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded. The Symptom Checklist-90-revised was used which was based on nine dimensions of psychological functioning. The Multidimensional Pain Inventory was pain severity, social and physical activities, affective distress, social support, and feelings of life control. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was used to measure the number of hours spent in bed and during asleep, frequency and reasons for awakening, and difficulty returning to sleep after awakening. The orofacial pain questionnaire was applied to measure pain experience using descriptors from the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Salivary cortisol and melatonin were measured. Results The 15 crew members reported temporomandibular joint pain after 6 days of mission. On dental examination, 5 crew members reported simple muscle pain (SM) and other 10 crew members with TMD. The TMD group endorsed more affective descriptors of their pain experience. Compared to the TMD group, the SM group also reported significantly poorer sleep duration. The TMD group reported nonsignificantly more daytime dysfunction than the control. Higher levels of salivary cortisol and salivary melatonin were reported in the TMD group as compared to other group. Conclusion This study concludes that both quality of sleep and stress levels due to extreme condition (simulated Mars mission) were associated with TMD in simulated Mars mission. PMID:23772292

  13. Sleep Disorders and their Association with Laboratory Pain Sensitivity in Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael T.; Wickwire, Emerson M.; Grace, Edward G.; Edwards, Robert R.; Buenaver, Luis F.; Peterson, Stephen; Klick, Brendan; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: We characterized sleep disorder rates in temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) and evaluated possible associations between sleep disorders and laboratory measures of pain sensitivity. Design: Research diagnostic examinations were conducted, followed by two consecutive overnight polysomnographic studies with morning and evening assessments of pain threshold. Setting: Orofacial pain clinic and inpatient sleep research facility Participants: Fifty-three patients meeting research diagnostic criteria for myofascial TMD. Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: We determined sleep disorder diagnostic rates and conducted algometric measures of pressure pain threshold on the masseter and forearm. Heat pain threshold was measured on the forearm; 75% met self-report criteria for sleep bruxism, but only 17% met PSG criteria for active sleep bruxism. Two or more sleep disorders were diagnosed in 43% of patients. Insomnia disorder (36%) and sleep apnea (28.4%) demonstrated the highest frequencies. Primary insomnia (PI) (26%) comprised the largest subcategory of insomnia. Even after controlling for multiple potential confounds, PI was associated with reduced mechanical and thermal pain thresholds at all sites (P < 0.05). Conversely, the respiratory disturbance index was associated with increased mechanical pain thresholds on the forearm (P < 0.05). Conclusions: High rates of PI and sleep apnea highlight the need to refer TMD patients complaining of sleep disturbance for polysomnographic evaluation. The association of PI and hyperalgesia at a non-orofacial site suggests that PI may be linked with central sensitivity and could play an etiologic role in idiopathic pain disorders. The association between sleep disordered breathing and hypoalgesia requires further study and may provide novel insight into the complex interactions between sleep and pain-regulatory processes. Citation: Smith MT; Wickwire EM; Grace EG; Edwards RR; Buenaver LF; Peterson S; Klick B

  14. Temporomandibular joint involvement in rheumatoid arthritis patients: association between clinical and tomographic data.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Patrícia Cf; Guimaraes, Josemar P; de Souza, Viviane A; Dias, Isabela M; Silva, Jesca Nn; Devito, Karina L; Bonato, Leticia L

    2016-12-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation and synovial hyperplasia, which usually affects multiple joints. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) becomes susceptible to the development of changes resulting from RA. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of TMD and degenerative bone changes in TMJ in patients diagnosed with RA (rheumatoid arthritis). The Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/ TMD) questionnaire was used for clinical evaluation of the TMJ and for TMD classification of 49 patients of both sexes and all ages. Individuals who had already undergone prior treatment for TMD and/or with a history of craniofacial trauma were excluded. The participants underwent cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) exams to assess possible degenerative changes in the mandibular condyle and the articular eminence. The frequencies of the changes found are presented and the possible associations between clinical and CT findings analyzed using the chisquare test. It was found that 75% of the patients had complaints of pain in the orofacial region, including arthralgia, myalgia or both. As for the diagnoses, 100% of the sample was diagnosed as RDC/TMD Group III (arthralgia, osteoarthritis or osteoarthrosis). The presence of degenerative bone changes was found in 90% of the subjects, the most prevalent being flattening (78.7%) and osteophytes (39.3%). The association test suggested a greater tendency to develop degenerative changes in asymptomatic individuals (p = 0.01). The asymptomatic nature of the involvement of the TMJ in RA can hide structural damage seen in imaging. Thus, the importance of early diagnosis and treatment to reduce structural and functional damage is emphasized.

  15. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Evaluation for Anterior Disc Displacement of the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhongjun; Wang, Mingguo; Ma, Yingwei; Lai, Qingguo; Tong, Dongdong; Zhang, Fenghe; Dong, Lili

    2017-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the criterion standard imaging technique for visualization of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region, and is currently considered the optimum modality for comprehensive evaluation in patients with temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD). This study was aimed at finding the value of MRI in pre-clinical diagnosis of TMJ disc displacement. Material/Methods Patients primarily diagnosed as having anterior disc displacement by clinical symptoms and X-ray were selected in the present study. MRI was used to evaluate surrounding anatomical structures and position, as well as morphological and signal intensity change between patients and normal controls. Results Posterior band position was significantly different between the patient group and control group. At the maximum opened-mouth position, the location of disc intermediate zone returned to normal. At closed-mouth position, the thickness of anterior and middle, but not posterior, band increased. The motion range of the condyle in the anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDWR) patient group was significantly less than the value in the anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDR) patient group and the control group. Whether at closed-mouth position or maximum opened-mouth position, the exudate volume in the patient group was greater than in the normal group. Conclusions MRI can be successfully used to evaluate multiple morphological changes at different mouth positions of normal volunteers and patients. The disc-condyle relationship can serve as an important indicator in assessing anterior disc displacement, and can be used to distinguish disc displacement with or without reduction. PMID:28176754

  16. Management of painful temporomandibular joint clicking with different intraoral devices and counseling: a controlled study

    PubMed Central

    CONTI, Paulo César Rodrigues; CORRÊA, Ana Silvia da Mota; LAURIS, José Roberto Pereira; STUGINSKI-BARBOSA, Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Objective The benefit of the use of some intraoral devices in arthrogenous temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients is still unknown. This study assessed the effectiveness of the partial use of intraoral devices and counseling in the management of patients with disc displacement with reduction (DDWR) and arthralgia. Materials and Methods A total of 60 DDWR and arthralgia patients were randomly divided into three groups: group I (n=20) wore anterior repositioning occlusal splints (ARS); group II (n=20) wore the Nociceptive Trigeminal Inhibition Clenching Suppression System devices (NTI-tss); and group III (n=20) only received counseling for behavioral changes and self-care (the control group). The first two groups also received counseling. Follow-ups were performed after 2 weeks, 6 weeks and 3 months. In these sessions, patients were evaluated by means of a visual analogue scale, pressure pain threshold (PPT) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), maximum range of motion and TMJ sounds. Possible adverse effects were also recorded, such as discomfort while using the device and occlusal changes. The results were analyzed with ANOVA, Tukey’s and Fisher Exact Test, with a significance level of 5%. Results Groups I and II showed improvement in pain intensity at the first follow-up. This progress was recorded only after 3 months in Group III. Group II showed an increased in joint sounds frequency. The PPT values, mandibular range of motion and the number of occlusal contacts did not change significantly. Conclusion The simultaneous use of intraoral devices (partial time) plus behavioral modifications seems to produce a more rapid pain improvement in patients with painful DDWR. The use of NTI-tss could increase TMJ sounds. Although intraoral devices with additional counseling should be considered for the management of painful DDWR, dentists should be aware of the possible side effects of the intraoral device’s design. PMID:26200526

  17. A survey of temporomandibular joint dislocation: aetiology, demographics, risk factors and management in 96 Nigerian cases.

    PubMed

    Ugboko, V I; Oginni, F O; Ajike, S O; Olasoji, H O; Adebayo, E T

    2005-07-01

    A retrospective study of 96 cases of temporomandibular joint dislocation was undertaken. Patients' ages ranged from 9 to 85 years (mean+/-SD, 35.3+/-17.4 years) and peak incidence was at 20-29 years. Mean duration was 7.9 weeks (range, 1h to 3 years). Acute, chronic and recurrent dislocations were seen in 46 (47.9%), 29 (30.2%) and 21 (21.9%) patients, respectively. Males dominated in all three categories but this was not statistically significant (P = 0.8). Excessive mouth opening while yawning (44 cases) was the commonest cause of dislocation, followed by road traffic accidents (13 cases). Ten patients (10.4%) had an underlying systemic disease, the commonest being epilepsy (four cases); those with acute dislocation recorded the highest incidence of underlying illness. Bilateral anterior (86 cases) dislocations were the most frequent. Of the 96 patients, 89 (92.7%) were available for treatment. Manual reduction with or without anaesthesia proved effective for 38/45 acute, 5/24 chronic and 14/20 recurrent cases. Chronic dislocations were treated mainly by surgical osteotomy (13/24). Vertical subsigmoid and oblique ramus osteotomies were the commonest surgical techniques recorded. Treatment was satisfactory for all patients surgically handled except for one case of anterior open bite postoperatively. This study has shown that excessive mouth opening while yawning is the commonest cause of temporomandibular joint dislocation in Nigerians, and conservative approaches to management remain quite effective irrespective of the duration and clinical subtype. The best choice of surgical technique should be determined by proper clinical evaluation and the need to avoid or minimize postoperative morbidity.

  18. The reproducibility of temporomandibular joint vibrations over time in the human.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Whittle, T; Wang, L; Murray, G M

    2014-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the reproducibility of vibrations recorded from the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in a group of healthy subjects. The vibrations from TMJ were recorded bilaterally from 34 healthy subjects by electrovibratography in three sessions at intervals of 3 min and again after 1 week. The total integral of the vibration energy, the ratio of the integral between frequencies above 300 Hz and below 300 Hz (ratio of >300 Hz/<300 Hz), peak frequency, median frequency, peak amplitude and distance to centric occlusion position were calculated. Data were analysed with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and two-way anova for repeated measures. All variables showed good to excellent reliability across different sessions (ICCday1 : 0·935-0·987; ICCday2 : 0·910-0·992) and across different days (ICC: 0·738-0·907). According to anova for repeated measures, all variables showed good reproducibility (P > 0·05) between sessions at the same day. There was no significant difference between the 2 days for the frequency-related variables including peak frequency (P = 0·083), median frequency (P = 0·188) and ratio of >300 Hz/<300 Hz (P = 0·26). There was a statistical difference between the 2 days for the intensity-related vibration variables including total integral (P = 0·045) and peak amplitude (P = 0·026). The wave patterns of the power-frequency spectra were qualitatively similar over both the sessions and days. Joint vibration analysis could provide a fast, non-invasive, and repeatable method to record the status of TMJ. Further studies are needed to identify the characteristic waveforms for different subgroups of temporomandibular disorders and to evaluate the possibility of diagnostic value.

  19. Alloplastic temporomandibular joint replacement: rationale for the use of custom devices.

    PubMed

    Mercuri, L G

    2012-09-01

    The essential life functions of mastication, speech, airway support and deglutition are supported by temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function and form. Over a lifetime, this puts the TMJ complex under more cyclical loading and unloading than any other joint. Therefore, to provide long-term effective outcomes, the TMJ total joint replacement (TJR) device selected must be capable of managing the anatomical, functional and aesthetic discrepancies that dictated its use. The primary goal of TMJ TJR is the restoration of mandibular function and form. Outcomes data confirm that any pain relief attained must be considered of only secondary benefit. Despite persistent but reduced chronic pain, increased mandibular function and form improvement have been reported, resulting in quality of life improvement for 85% of custom TMJ TJR patients studied long-term. Based on the literature and the accepted orthopaedic criteria for the development and utilisation of successful TJR devices, this paper presents a rationale for the use of custom TMJ TJR devices as a 'fitting' management option for end-stage TMJ disorders.

  20. Intra-articular injection of tenoxicam following temporomandibular joint arthrocentesis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Aktas, I; Yalcin, S; Sencer, S

    2010-05-01

    This study examined the clinical and radiological effects of intra-articular tenoxicam injection following arthrocentesis and compared them with arthrocentesis alone in patients with disc displacement without reduction (DDwoR). 24 temporomandibular joints (TMJs) in 21 patients with DDwoR were studied. Patients were divided randomly into Group A in which only arthrocentesis was performed (14 TMJs in 14 patients) and Group AT which received arthrocentesis plus intra-articular injection of tenoxicam (10 TMJs in 7 patients). Patients were evaluated before the procedure, on postoperative day 7, then 2, 3, 4 weeks, and 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 months postoperatively. Intensity of joint pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Maximum mouth opening was recorded at each follow-up. TMJ sounds and palpation scores were noted as positive or negative. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed before and 6 months after treatment in both groups. Disc form, disc location during neutral position, reduction with movement, joint effusion, structures of the articular surfaces, and bone marrow anomalies were evaluated all in MRIs. Both treatments succesfully increased maximum mouth opening and reduced TMJ pain; there were no complications. Difference between the groups was not statistically significant and a larger controlled study is necessary to clarify this use of tenoxicam.

  1. Does condylar height decrease more in temporomandibular joint nonreducing disc displacement than reducing disc displacement?

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ying-Kai; Yang, Chi; Cai, Xie-Yi; Xie, Qian-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study was to compare condylar height changes of anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDwR) and anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDwoR) in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) quantitatively, to get a better understanding of the changes in condylar height of patients with anterior disc displacement who had received no treatment, and to provide useful information for treatment protocol. This longitudinal retrospective study enrolled 206 joints in 156 patients, which were divided into ADDWR group and ADDwoR group based on magnetic resonance imaging examination. The joints were assessed quantitatively for condylar height at initial and follow-up visits. Also, both groups were further divided into 3 subgroups according to age: <15 years group, 15 to 21 years group, and 22 to 35 years group. Paired t test and independent t test were used to assess intra- and intergroup differences. The average age of the ADDwR group was 19.65 years with a mean of 9.47 months’ follow-up. The follow-up interval of the patients with ADDwoR was 7.96 months, with a mean age of 18.51 years. Condylar height in ADDwoR tended to decrease more than those in ADDwR, especially during the pubertal growth spurt and with the presence of osteoarthrosis, meaning ADDwoR could cause a severe disturbance in mandibular development. Thus, an early disc repositioning was suggested to avoid decrease in condylar height. PMID:27583909

  2. Investigating activity of masticatory muscles in patients with hypermobile temporomandibular joints by using EMG

    PubMed Central

    Davoudi, Amin; Rybalov, Oleg; Shadmehr, Elham; Hatami, Amin

    2015-01-01

    Background Temporomandibular joint hypermobility (TMJH) can manifest higher range of motions in mandible. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare the activity of masticatory muscle of TMJs in healthy individuals and patients with mild, moderate and severe TMJH. Material and Methods In this clinical study, 69 patients (between the ages of 22 to 42) with manifestation of TMJH were included. The patients were divided into three groups based on their maximum mouth opening (MMO): (light) with MMO of 50-55 mm; (moderate) with MMO between 55 to 65 mm; and (severe) with MMO >65 mm. Also, 20 healthy people with profiled tomography in the last 6 months were invited as control group (healthy) with normal MMO (<50 mm). All the groups subjected to electromyogram (EMG) in 2 steps: maximal voluntary clenching (MVC) of the jaws; and during chewing of bread by using one side of the jaws voluntary. The collected data were analyzed by Student T-test and Chi-Square tests using SPSS software version 15 at significant level of 0.05. Results Both TMJs of light, moderate and severe groups showed significant differences in frequency, time of activity and rest in comparison with healthy group during chewing and MVC (all p values < 0.01). Conclusions Masticatory muscles activity reduced in relation with the severity of TMJH and higher excessive mouth opening. Key words:Electromyography, joint hypermobility, mouth opening, tempormandibular joint. PMID:26155352

  3. [Application of bioregulating therapy in complex treatment of temporomandibular joint diseases in people of elderly and senile age].

    PubMed

    Iordanishvili, A K; Samsonov, V V; Soldatova, L N; Polens, A A; Ryzhak, G A

    2012-01-01

    The results of dynamic supervision over application a peptide bioregulator of "Sigumir" in complex treatment of 62 patients of the senior age groups with various diseases of a temporomandibular joint are presented. It is shown that application of a complex of treatment-and-prophylactic actions, including rational tooth prosthetics, functional and pharmacotherapy (including accompanying diseases), and also use a peptide bioregulator of cartilaginous and bone tissues "Sigumir" in complex therapy of patients with diseases of a temporomandibular joint of a various etiology, enables to stop in short-terms a painful syndrome in such patients, to increase amplitude of opening of a mouth, to improve chewing function, to reduce terms of treatment and to provide preventive maintenance of relapses of TMJ's pathology during all period of supervision.

  4. [Relationship between the mandibular hypoplasia and temporomandibular joint internal derangement in adolescents with skeletal class Ⅱ malocclusion].

    PubMed

    Fang, B

    2017-03-09

    Mandibular hypoplasia is very common clinically. Studies have reported that temporomandibular joint internal derangement (TMJID) might manifest as mandibular retrusion, and whether there is a direct correlation between them remains controversial in academia. On the other hand, for adolescent patients with skeletal class Ⅱ malocclusion, the growth of mandible could be motivated by orthopedic force, and then the mandibular retrusion corrected. However, if TMJID is the direct cause of mandibular retrusion, orthopedic treatment will not have a significant effect on it. Base on literature review and analysis as well as our own research, this article will review the distribution of structural abnormalities of the temporomandibular joint in adolescents with mandibular hypoplasia and its association with skeletal class Ⅱ malocclusion, as well as the effect of TMJID on the treatment of skeletal class Ⅱ malocclusion in adolescents.

  5. Comparison of Serum and Salivary Antioxidants in Patients with Temporomandibular Joint Disorders and Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Lawaf, Shirin; Tabarestani, Tohid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD) is a group of disorders in the facial region and temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Biomarkers are assumed to play a role in pain and early detection of destruction. The aim of this study was to compare the saliva and serum antioxidant levels in patients with TMD and healthy subjects. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was conducted on 28 TMD patients without pain, 28 TMD patients with pain and 28 healthy controls. The total antioxidant capacity of saliva and serum of patients was measured. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tamhane’s test. Results: The mean (±SD) total antioxidant capacity of serum (plasma TAC) was 0.8900 (±0.11627) mmol/L in TMD patients with pain, 1.2717 (±0.18711) mmol/L in TMD patients without pain and 1.7500(±0.18711) mmol/L in the control group. Based on ANOVA, the difference in this regard among the three groups was statistically significant (P=0.000). The mean salivary TAC was 1.34 (±0.06721) mmol/L in TMD patients with pain, 1.42 (±0.16677) mmol/L in TMD patients without pain and 1.35 (±0.11627) mmol/L in the control group. The difference in this respect among the three groups was not significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: The mean plasma TAC in TMD patients with/without pain was significantly lower than that in the control group but no significant difference was detected in salivary TAC among the three groups. PMID:26622281

  6. Effect of Low-Level Laser on Healing of Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthritis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Peimani, Ali; Sardary, Farimah

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are clinical conditions characterized by pain and sounds of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). This study was designed to assess the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on healing of osteoarthritis in rats with TMD. Materials and Methods: Thirty-two male Wistar rats (250–200 g) were housed in standard plastic cages. After injection of Complete Freund’s adjuvant into the TMJ, rats were randomly divided into two groups of 16 (case and control) and anesthetized; then osteoarthritis was induced via intraarticular injection of 50 µl of Complete Freund’s adjuvant; into the bilateral TMJs. In the case group, LLLT was done transcutaneously for 10 minutes daily, starting the day after the confirmation of osteoarthritis. Exposure was performed for 10 minutes at the right side of the TMJ with 880 nm low-level laser with 100 mW power and a probe diameter of 0.8 mm. Control rats were not treated with laser. Results: After three days of treatment the grade of cartilage defects, number of inflammatory cells, angiogenesis, number of cell layers and arthritis in rats in the case group were not significantly different compared with controls (P>0.05). After seven days, the grade of cartilage defects, number of inflammatory cells, number of cell layers, and arthritis in the case group improved compared to controls (P<0.05); angiogenesis in both groups was similar. Conclusion: Treatment of TMD with LLLT after 7 days of irradiation with a wavelength of 880 nm was associated with a greater improvement compared to the control group. PMID:25628667

  7. [HYALURONIC ACID: STRUCTURE, FUNCTIONS, THE POSSIBILITES OF APPLYING IN THE COMPLEX TREATMENT OF THE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DISEASES. A REWIEW].

    PubMed

    Volovar, O S; Malanchuk, V A; Kryzhanivska, O A

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade the use of hyaluronic acid has become increasingly important in treatment of degenerative disorders of the temporomandibular joint. Urgency is caused by numerous studies in biology and pharmacology on structure and function of hyaluronic acid and its influence on the processes of repair damaged bone and articular cartilage restoration, as well as the positive long-term results of treatment in this group of patients.

  8. Stakeholder engagement analysis - a bioethics dilemma in patient-targeted intervention: patients with temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Barkhordarian, Andre; Demerjian, Gary; Jan, Allison; Sama, Nateli; Nguyen, Mia; Du, Angela; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2015-01-20

    Modern health care in the field of Medicine, Dentistry and Nursing is grounded in fundamental philosophy and epistemology of translational science. Recently in the U.S major national initiatives have been implemented in the hope of closing the gaps that sometimes exist between the two fundamental components of translational science, the translational research and translational effectiveness. Subsequent to these initiatives, many improvements have been made; however, important bioethical issues and limitations do still exist that need to be addressed. One such issue is the stakeholder engagement and its assessment and validation. Federal, state and local organizations such as PCORI and AHRQ concur that the key to a better understanding of the relationship between translational research and translational effectiveness is the assessment of the extent to which stakeholders are actively engaged in the translational process of healthcare. The stakeholder engagement analysis identifies who the stakeholders are, maps their contribution and involvement, evaluates their priorities and opinions, and accesses their current knowledge base. This analysis however requires conceptualization and validation from the bioethics standpoint. Here, we examine the bioethical dilemma of stakeholder engagement analysis in the context of the person-environment fit (PE-fit) theoretical model. This model is an approach to quantifying stakeholder engagement analysis for the design of patient-targeted interventions. In our previous studies of Alzheimer patients, we have developed, validated and used a simple instrument based on the PE-fit model that can be adapted and utilized in a much less studied pathology as a clinical model that has a wide range of symptoms and manifestations, the temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD). The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is the jaw joint endowed with sensory and motor innervations that project from within the central nervous system and its dysfunction can

  9. Sexual dimorphism on cytokines expression in the temporomandibular joint: the role of gonadal steroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Torres-Chávez, Karla E; Fischer, Luana; Teixeira, Juliana Maia; Fávaro-Moreira, Nadia Cristina; Obando-Pereda, Gustavo Alberto; Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Tambeli, Claudia Herrera

    2011-10-01

    Temporomandibular joint pain-related conditions are generally characterized by local inflammation; however, little studies have focused on the role of gonadal hormones in the expression of inflammatory mediators, such as cytokines. Therefore, we asked whether gonadal steroid hormones affect formalin-induced cytokines expression in the rat temporomcandibular joint. The expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC)-1 was significantly higher in males than in diestrus and proestrus females and was decreased by orchiectomy and restored by testosterone replacement. The expression of IL-6 was significantly higher in diestrus and proestrus females than in males, and was decreased by ovariectomy and restored by estradiol or progesterone administration. We conclude that testosterone increases the expression of TNF-α, IL-1β and CINC-1, and estradiol and progesterone increase the expression of IL-6. New clinical approaches based on inhibition of pro-inflammatory mediators are starting to supplant traditional immunosuppressive therapies and gonadal hormones may influence their effectiveness or clinical dosage.

  10. Arthrocentesis and temporomandibular joint disorders: clinical and radiological results of a prospective study.

    PubMed

    De Riu, Giacomo; Stimolo, Mirella; Meloni, Silvio Mario; Soma, Damiano; Pisano, Milena; Sembronio, Salvatore; Tullio, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We evaluated the efficacy of arthrocentesis in the treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. Material and Methods. In this prospective clinical case series, 30 consecutive patients with TMJ disorders underwent arthrocentesis using saline and sodium hyaluronate injections. Outcome measures were TMJ pain, maximum mouth opening (MMO), joint noises, and anatomical changes in the TMJ architecture. Patients were evaluated using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the beginning of treatment and 60 days after the last arthrocentesis. Pretreatment and posttreatment clinical parameters were compared using paired and unpaired t-tests, and McNemar's test was used to evaluate CBCT and MRI changes (P < 0.05). Results. At 1-year follow-up examinations, visual analogue scale scores indicated that pain was reduced significantly and mean postoperative MMO was increased significantly. CBCT findings showed no significant change, and MRI showed only slight reductions in inflammatory signs. Conclusions. Within the limitations of this study, we can conclude that arthrocentesis is a simple, minimally invasive procedure with a relatively low risk of complications and significant clinical benefits in patients with TMJ disorders. This trial is registered with NCT01903512.

  11. Osteoarthrosis of Temporomandibular Joint Related to the Defects of Posterior Dentition: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Levorová, Jitka; Machoň, Vladimír; Guha, Anasuya; Foltán, René

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthrosis (OA) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a progressive degenerative disease, gradually affecting cartilage, synovial membrane and bone structures. OA of TMJ clinically manifests with joint noises, pain and restricted mouth opening. In late stages, it results in severe damage of TMJ structures and development of ankylosis. Osteoarthrosis is a multifactorial disease; the occurrence is associated with TMJ overloading. The cohort included 619 patients [538 women (87%) and 81 men (13%), with average age 40.6 years (age range 8-89 years)] with TMJ disorder, who were examined in the year 2014 in Department of Dental Medicine, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University and General University Hospital in Prague, Czech Republic. The aim of this retrospective study was to analyse, if the lack of posterior teeth (supporting teeth zones) is the main etiologic factor of osteoarthrosis of TMJ. Diagnosis of OA was established on the clinical signs and the panoramic X-ray signs. Simultaneously other etiologic factors of OA were assessed. The presence of OA changes on X-ray had 171 patients (i.e. 27.6% of the total number of 619). 17.5% from these patients with OA had defect in posterior dentition. Other aetiological factors (stress, skeletal or vertebrogenous disorders) showed higher incidence of OA changes on X-ray. Defect of posterior dentition is not negligible, but it is not the main aetiological factor for osteoarthrosis of TMJ.

  12. Matrix metalloproteinase and its inhibitor in temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis after indirect trauma in young goats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Liang; Li, Xin-Jun; Qin, Rui-Feng; Lei, De-Lin; Liu, Yan-Pu; Wu, Gao-Yi; Zhang, Yong-Jie; Yan-Jin; Wang, Da-Zhang; Hu, Kai-Jin

    2008-04-01

    Our aim was to examine the change in expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-13), matrix metalloproteinases-3 (MMP-3), and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) in the articular cartilage of goats with experimentally-induced osteoarthrosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) at various times. Osteoarthrosis was induced in 20 goats in the bilateral TMJ and 5 goats acted as controls. There were 5 goats in each group, and a group was killed at 7 days, and 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively. The samples were collected, and the joints evaluated histologically. Immunofluorescence was used to detect the presence of MMPs and TIMP-1 in the articular disc and condylar cartilage. The ultrastructure of the articular disc and condylar surface at 1 month was examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Osteoarthrosis of the TMJ progressed gradually over time. MMP-13, MMP-3, and TIMP-1 were expressed strongly in the TMJ soon after injury; MMP-13 became gradually weakened, and MMP-3 strengthened later. None of these were expressed in the normal condyle. After a month the surface of the arthrotic condyle was uneven, and the underlying collagen fibrils were exposed in irregular fissures on the surface. The secretion of TIMP-1 was related closely to the changes of MMPs during osteoarthrosis of the TMJ. The unbalanced ratio between them caused degradation of the matrix of the cartilage and might be the cause of osteoarthrosis of the TMJ.

  13. Spontaneously developed osteoarthritis in the temporomandibular joint in STR/ort mice.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Kenichi; Suzuki, Satsuki; Kanri, Yoriaki; Matsubara, Ryota; Fujii, Keisuke; Wake, Masahiro; Suzuki, Ryuji; Hamada, Yoshiki

    2015-07-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis is typically a slowly progressive asymmetric disease. Little is known regarding the natural destruction of TMJ articular tissues. The aim of the present study was to investigate morphological changes in the TMJ of STR/ort mice, known to be the model for spontaneous osteoarthritis in the knee joint, and to evaluate STR/ort mice as a suitable animal model for TMJ osteoarthritis. TMJs from 32 STR/ort mice euthanized at 30, 40, 50 or 60 weeks of age, and from 6 CBA mice euthanized at 30, 40 or 60 weeks of age were examined. Toluidine blue and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining were used to assess histological changes in the articular cartilage. Morphological changes in the articular cartilage of the TMJ were evaluated using microcomputed tomography. At the age of 40-50 weeks, 17 (68%) of the 25 STR/ort mice had loss of articular cartilage on histology, with cavitation and erosion of the exposed bone and gradual changes in condylar shape. Furthermore, osteoarthritic morphological changes, and structural alterations were observed by microcomputed tomography. The STR/ort mouse strain appears to develop spontaneous osteoarthritis-like lesions in the TMJ with age, and would be a useful model to study the pathogenesis of TMJ osteoarthritis.

  14. Spontaneously developed osteoarthritis in the temporomandibular joint in STR/ort mice

    PubMed Central

    KUMAGAI, KENICHI; SUZUKI, SATSUKI; KANRI, YORIAKI; MATSUBARA, RYOTA; FUJII, KEISUKE; WAKE, MASAHIRO; SUZUKI, RYUJI; HAMADA, YOSHIKI

    2015-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis is typically a slowly progressive asymmetric disease. Little is known regarding the natural destruction of TMJ articular tissues. The aim of the present study was to investigate morphological changes in the TMJ of STR/ort mice, known to be the model for spontaneous osteoarthritis in the knee joint, and to evaluate STR/ort mice as a suitable animal model for TMJ osteoarthritis. TMJs from 32 STR/ort mice euthanized at 30, 40, 50 or 60 weeks of age, and from 6 CBA mice euthanized at 30, 40 or 60 weeks of age were examined. Toluidine blue and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining were used to assess histological changes in the articular cartilage. Morphological changes in the articular cartilage of the TMJ were evaluated using microcomputed tomography. At the age of 40–50 weeks, 17 (68%) of the 25 STR/ort mice had loss of articular cartilage on histology, with cavitation and erosion of the exposed bone and gradual changes in condylar shape. Furthermore, osteoarthritic morphological changes, and structural alterations were observed by microcomputed tomography. The STR/ort mouse strain appears to develop spontaneous osteoarthritis-like lesions in the TMJ with age, and would be a useful model to study the pathogenesis of TMJ osteoarthritis. PMID:26171147

  15. Finite element analysis of a condylar support prosthesis to replace the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Abel, Eric W; Hilgers, André; McLoughlin, Philip M

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a finite element study of a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) prosthesis in which the mandibular component sits on the condyle after removal of only the diseased articular surface and minimal amount of condylar bone. The condylar support prosthesis (CSP) is customised to fit the patient and allows a large part of the joint force to be transmitted through the condyle to the ramus, rather than relying only on transfer of the load by the screws that fix the prosthesis to the ramus. The 3-dimensional structural finite element analysis compared a design of CSP with a standard commercial prosthesis and one that was modified to fit the ramus, to relate the findings to the different designs and geometrical features. The models simulated an incisal bite under high loading. In the CSP and in its fixation screws, the stresses were much lower than those in the other 2 prostheses and the bone strains were at physiological levels. The CSP gives a more physiological form of load transfer than is possible without the condylar contact, and considerably reduces the amount of strain on the bone around the screws.

  16. Total alloplastic temporomandibular joint reconstruction using Biomet stock prostheses: the University of Florida experience.

    PubMed

    Sanovich, R; Mehta, U; Abramowicz, S; Widmer, C; Dolwick, M F

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the subjective and objective outcomes of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) replacement with Biomet stock prostheses at a single institution in Florida. In this retrospective study, patients who underwent TMJ replacement using a Biomet stock prosthesis from 2005 to 2012 were analyzed. Subjective (pain, diet) and objective (maximal incisal opening) information was obtained. In addition, a quality of life measure was obtained pre- and postoperatively. Significance was set at <0.01. Thirty-six patients (26 bilateral, 6 left, and 4 right) who underwent TMJ replacement using a Biomet stock prosthesis were eligible for the study. Maximal incisal opening improved from 26.1mm preoperatively to a mean of 34.4mm postoperatively. The pain score decreased from 7.9 preoperatively to a mean of 3.8 postoperatively. Diet restriction decreased from 6.8 preoperatively to a mean of 3.5 postoperatively. Quality of life improved from a median of 4 preoperatively to a postoperative median of 2. Four implants were removed/replaced because of heterotopic bone formation, infection, and/or loose hardware. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 83 months. Overall, TMJ reconstruction using the Biomet stock joint is effective and safe in this patient population.

  17. Arthrocentesis and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: Clinical and Radiological Results of a Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    De Riu, Giacomo; Soma, Damiano; Pisano, Milena; Sembronio, Salvatore; Tullio, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. We evaluated the efficacy of arthrocentesis in the treatment of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders. Material and Methods. In this prospective clinical case series, 30 consecutive patients with TMJ disorders underwent arthrocentesis using saline and sodium hyaluronate injections. Outcome measures were TMJ pain, maximum mouth opening (MMO), joint noises, and anatomical changes in the TMJ architecture. Patients were evaluated using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the beginning of treatment and 60 days after the last arthrocentesis. Pretreatment and posttreatment clinical parameters were compared using paired and unpaired t-tests, and McNemar's test was used to evaluate CBCT and MRI changes (P < 0.05). Results. At 1-year follow-up examinations, visual analogue scale scores indicated that pain was reduced significantly and mean postoperative MMO was increased significantly. CBCT findings showed no significant change, and MRI showed only slight reductions in inflammatory signs. Conclusions. Within the limitations of this study, we can conclude that arthrocentesis is a simple, minimally invasive procedure with a relatively low risk of complications and significant clinical benefits in patients with TMJ disorders. This trial is registered with NCT01903512. PMID:24319462

  18. Temporomandibular joint health status in war veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mottaghi, Ahmad; Zamani, Elham

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aim: The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMJD) in the Iran/Iraq war veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 subjects in the age range of 27 to 55 years were included; it included case group (30 war veterans with PTSD) and three control groups (30 patients with PTSD who had not participated in the War, 30 healthy war veterans, and 30 healthy subjects who had not participated in the War). All subjects underwent a clinical TMJ examination that involved the clinical assessment of the TMJ signs and symptoms. Results: The groups of veterans had high prevalence of TMJD signs and symptoms vs. other groups; history of Trauma to joint was significantly higher in subjects who had participated in the war compare with subjects who had not participated in the war (P = 0.0006). Furthermore, pain in palpation of masseter, temporal, pterygoideus, digastric, and sternocleidomastoid muscles in the groups of veterans was significantly greater than other groups (P < 0.0001). Clicking noise during mouth chewing was significantly different between groups (P = 0.01). And, there was significant difference in the frequencies of maximum opening of the mouth between groups (P = 0.001). Conclusion: The results of this study showed that subjects’ war veterans with PTSD have significantly poorer TMJ functional status than the control subjects. PMID:25077153

  19. Bilateral asymptomatic fibrous-ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint associated with rheumatoid arthritis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Carolina Ortigosa; Pinto, Lívia Maria Sales; de Mendonça, Luana Menezes; Saldanha, Aline Dantas Diógenes; Conti, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; Conti, Paulo César Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    The American Academy of Orofacial Pain (AAOP) defines ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) as a restriction of movements due to intracapsular fibrous adhesions, fibrous changes in capsular ligaments (fibrous-ankylosis) and osseous mass formation resulting in the fusion of the articular components (osseous-ankylosis). The clinical features of the fibrous-ankylosis are severely limited mouth-opening capacity (limited range of motion during the opening), usually no pain and no joint sounds, marked deflection to the affected side and marked limitation of movement to the contralateral side. A variety of factors may cause TMJ ankylosis, such as trauma, local and systemic inflammatory conditions, neoplasms and TMJ infection. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of the systemic inflammatory conditions that affect the TMJ and can cause ankylosis. The aim of this study is to present a case of a female patient diagnosed with bilateral asymptomatic fibrous-ankylosis of the TMJ associated with asymptomatic rheumatoid arthritis. This case illustrates the importance of a comprehensive clinical examination and correct diagnosis of an unusual condition causing severe mouth opening limitation.

  20. Gap arthroplasty of temporomandibular joint ankylosis by transoral access: a case series.

    PubMed

    Rajan, R; Reddy, N V V; Potturi, A; Jhawar, D; Muralidhar, P V; Reddy, B

    2014-12-01

    This article describes a technique of gap arthroplasty in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis performed by transoral access. The treatment of TMJ ankylosis by creating an adequate gap is of paramount importance in preventing any future recurrence and this can be achieved only when good access is gained to this complex anatomical joint. Five patients with TMJ ankylosis (eight TMJ) were treated by gap arthroplasty using an intraoral approach. The average mouth opening before surgery was 8.6mm and the average mouth opening achieved postsurgery was 37.9 mm. The average follow-up time was 13 months and none of the patients had any recurrence or significant complications during or after surgery. Our technique relies on the use of a stable landmark to trace the superior-most extent of the ankylotic mass thereby facilitating the removal of the entire mass including the medial extent. We found that even though transoral access is technically challenging and took an average time of 84 min, it has many advantages over conventional extraoral approaches in terms of facial scars and facial nerve injury. The authors also emphasize the importance of good postoperative physiotherapy and presurgical patient counselling to prevent future recurrences.

  1. Physiotherapy in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders: a comparative study of four treatment methods.

    PubMed

    Gray, R J; Quayle, A A; Hall, C A; Schofield, M A

    1994-04-09

    Temporomandibular joint pain dysfunction syndrome (TMJPDS) comprises of a constellation of signs and symptoms including joint tenderness and pain on function, restricted jaw movement, clicking, jaw locking and tenderness in the muscles of mastication. Headache may also be a feature. Physiotherapy is commonly employed in the treatment of this condition but there is little published material reporting the relative efficacy of the different types of treatment currently available. Further, no attempt seems to have been made to compare the costs of physiotherapy with other forms of treatment of this disorder such as occlusal splint therapy. This paper reports a comparative evaluation of four different physiotherapy treatments and placebo in the management of TMJPDS and comments on their cost benefit aspects compared with that of splint therapy. The four methods of physiotherapy tested were short-wave diathermy, megapulse, ultrasound and soft laser. There was no statistically significant difference in success rate between any of the four tested (range 70.4-77.7%) although each individually was significantly better than placebo treatment. The time of improvement appeared to vary between the four methods.

  2. [Explanation of some physiological characteristics of homeostasis in elderly patients with temporomandibular joint dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Babich, V V; Ryzhak, G A; Iordanishvili, A K

    2014-01-01

    Most number of patients, particularly adult and older women with temporomandibular disfunction suffers from pain reaction in maxillofacial area. Pain symptom associated with temporomandibular disfunction is followed by some changes of physiological statistics (high sympathetic level). Temporomandibular disfunction in adult and older women is most pronounced and can serve as an indicator of concomitant chronic diseases among patients with endocrine disorder (hypothyroidism), cardiological pathology (arterial hypertension).

  3. The ligaments and sesamoid bones of knee joint in New Zealand rabbits.

    PubMed

    Orhan, I O; Haziroglu, R M; Gultiken, M E

    2005-04-01

    This study has been conducted on the knee joints of the New Zealand rabbits. A total of 20 knee joints from 10 (five female, five male) adult New Zealand rabbits were studied in the study. Fourteen ligaments and four sesamoid bones including the patellar bone, the infrapatellar adipose body, and the suprapatellar cartilage specifically present in rabbits were grossly observed. The caudal meniscotibial ligaments of the lateral meniscus were noted to be lacking in these rabbits. Moreover, the medial collateral ligament did not have a capsular character in nature. Thus, adipose tissue was determined at a point where the suprapatellar cartilage and patella fused.

  4. Single stage treatment of ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint using patient-specific total joint replacement and virtual surgical planning.

    PubMed

    Haq, Jahrad; Patel, Nishma; Weimer, Katherine; Matthews, N Shaun

    2014-04-01

    Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a debilitating condition that can result in pain, trismus, and a poor quality of life. It can be caused by injury, infection, and rheumatoid disease. Current management includes gap arthroplasty, interpositional arthroplasty, and reconstruction. Traditionally, joints are reconstructed using stock implants, or the procedure is done in two stages with an additional computed tomography (CT) scan between the resective and reconstructive procedures and use of stereolithographic models to aid the design of the definitive prostheses. We describe a technique for the resection of ankylosis and reconstruction of the joint in a single operation using virtually designed custom-made implants. Five patients with ankylosis of the TMJ had a single stage operation with reconstruction between 2010 and 2012. All had preoperative high-resolution CT with contrast angiography. During an international web-based teleconference between the surgeon and the engineer a virtual resection of the ankylosis was done using the reconstructed CT images. The bespoke cutting guides and implants were designed virtually at the same time and were then manufactured precisely using computer-aided design and manufacture (CAD-CAM) over 6 weeks. After release of the ankylosis and reconstruction, the patients underwent an exercise regimen to improve mouth opening. Follow-up was for a minimum of 6 months. Four patients had one operation, and one patient had two. Median/Mean maximum incisal opening increased from 0.6mm before operation to 25 mm afterwards (range 23-27), and there was minimal surgical morbidity. This new method effectively treats ankylosis of the TMJ in a single stage procedure. Fewer operations and hospital stays, and the maintenance of overall clinical outcome are obvious advantages.

  5. A personalized 3D-printed prosthetic joint replacement for the human temporomandibular joint: From implant design to implantation.

    PubMed

    Ackland, David C; Robinson, Dale; Redhead, Michael; Lee, Peter Vee Sin; Moskaljuk, Adrian; Dimitroulis, George

    2017-05-01

    Personalized prosthetic joint replacements have important applications in cases of complex bone and joint conditions where the shape and size of off-the-shelf components may not be adequate. The objective of this study was to design, test and fabricate a personalized 3D-printed prosthesis for a patient requiring total joint replacement surgery of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The new 'Melbourne' prosthetic TMJ design featured a condylar component sized specifically to the patient and fixation screw positions that avoid potential intra-operative damage to the mandibular nerve. The Melbourne prosthetic TMJ was developed for a 58-year-old female recipient with end-stage osteoarthritis of the TMJ. The load response of the prosthesis during chewing and a maximum-force bite was quantified using a personalized musculoskeletal model of the patient's masticatory system developed using medical images. The simulations were then repeated after implantation of the Biomet Microfixation prosthetic TMJ, an established stock device. The maximum condylar stresses, screw stress and mandibular stress at the screw-bone interface were lower in the Melbourne prosthetic TMJ (259.6MPa, 312.9MPa and 198.4MPa, respectively) than those in the Biomet Microfixation device (284.0MPa, 416.0MPa and 262.2MPa, respectively) during the maximum-force bite, with similar trends also observed during the chewing bite. After trialing surgical placement and evaluating prosthetic TMJ stability using cadaveric specimens, the prosthesis was fabricated using 3D printing, sterilized, and implanted into the female recipient. Six months post-operatively, the prosthesis recipient had a normal jaw opening distance (40.0 mm), with no complications identified. The new design features and immediate load response of the Melbourne prosthetic TMJ suggests that it may provide improved clinical and biomechanical joint function compared to a commonly used stock device, and reduce risk of intra-operative nerve damage

  6. Osteoarthritis of the temporo-mandibular joint in free-living Soay sheep on St Kilda.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Colin; Watt, Kathryn; Nussey, Daniel H; Pemberton, Josephine M; Pilkington, Jill G; Herman, Jeremy S; Timmons, Zena L; Clements, Dylan N; Scott, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common degenerative disease of synovial joints with the potential to cause pathology and welfare issues in both domestic and wild ruminants. Previous work has identified OA of the elbow joint in domestic sheep, but the prevalence of OA of the jaw and in particular the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has not been previously reported. Following up a previous report of a single case of TMJ OA in a free-living population of Soay sheep on St Kilda in the Outer Hebrides, an archive of 2736 jaw bones collected from this population between 1985 and 2010 was surveyed. Evidence of TMJ OA was found in 35 sheep. Of these, 15 cases were unilateral (11 right side, 4 left side) and the remaining 20 were bilateral. TMJ pathology was much more common in females than males: only 3/35 cases were in males, with overall prevalence at 2.3% for females and 0.2% in males. Radiographic examination of TMJ with OA revealed extensive bone re-modelling with osteophytosis, particularly of the condyle of the mandible. There was a highly significant age-dependence in TMJ OA incidence among age classes: 30/35 cases occurred in geriatric sheep (aged 7 years or more; 11.1% prevalence within this age class), four in adults (2-6 years old; 0.9% prevalence), one in yearlings (0.3% prevalence) and none in lambs. The low incidence in males was confounded by sex differences in longevity: while 18% of females sampled died in the geriatric age class, only 2% of males did so. Although the low prevalence of the pathology limited the ability to test its association with other traits, it was possible to examine relationships with reproductive performance measures amongst geriatric females with and without TMJ OA. Although there were trends towards lower fecundity and lower lamb birth weight in the breeding season prior to death, these were not statistically significant.

  7. Condylar distances in hypermobile temporomandibular joints of patients with excessive mouth openings by using computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Haghigaht, Abbas; Rybalov, Oleg; Hatami, Amin

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: hypermobility in Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) can manifest higher range of motions in mandible. The aim of this study was to compare the position and distances of the head of condyle to glenoid fossa in TMJs of healthy individuals and patients with mild, moderate and severe TMJ hypermobility. Material and Methods: In this clinical study, 69 patients (between the ages of 22 to 42) with manifestation of joint hypermobility were included and Computed tomography were administered for both TMJs. The patients were divided into three groups based on their maximum mouth opening (MMO): (A) with MMO of 50-55 mm; (B) with MMO between 55 to 65 mm; and (C) with MMO >65 mm. Also, 15 healthy people with profiled tomography in the last 6 months were assumed as control group (N) with normal MMO (<50 mm). The position of condyle from articular eminence while MMO; and the distances from anterior, superior and posterior border of condyle and facing wall of glenoid fossa were measured in closed mouth from the tomography of all contributors. The collected data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, Post Hoc and Chi-Square tests using SPSS software version 15 at significant level of 0.05. Results: The superior and posterior distances were significantly higher in groups A, B and C than healthy individuals (all P values<0.01). The anterior distance was significant between groups B and N only in right TMJ (P=0.013). Conclusions: TMJ hypermobility showed the characteristic of increased condylar distance in posterior and superior specially in higher excessive mouth opening. Key words:Computed tomography, joint hypermobility, mandibular condyle, mouth opening. PMID:25674317

  8. Expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the rat trigeminal ganglion during the development of temporomandibular joint inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, G.C.; Rizzi, E.; Gerlach, R.F.; Leite-Panissi, C.R.A.

    2013-01-01

    Orofacial pain is a prevalent symptom in modern society. Some musculoskeletal orofacial pain is caused by temporomandibular disorders (TMDs). This condition has a multi-factorial etiology, including emotional factors and alteration of the masticator muscle and temporomandibular joints (TMJs). TMJ inflammation is considered to be a cause of pain in patients with TMD. Extracellular proteolytic enzymes, specifically the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), have been shown to modulate inflammation and pain. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether the expression and level of gelatinolytic activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the trigeminal ganglion are altered during different stages of temporomandibular inflammation, as determined by gelatin zymography. This study also evaluated whether mechanical allodynia and orofacial hyperalgesia, induced by the injection of complete Freund's adjuvant into the TMJ capsule, were altered by an MMP inhibitor (doxycycline, DOX). TMJ inflammation was measured by plasma extravasation in the periarticular tissue (Evans blue test) and infiltration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils into the synovial fluid (myeloperoxidase enzyme quantification). MMP expression in the trigeminal ganglion was shown to vary during the phases of the inflammatory process. MMP-9 regulated the early phase and MMP-2 participated in the late phase of this process. Furthermore, increases in plasma extravasation in periarticular tissue and myeloperoxidase activity in the joint tissue, which occurred throughout the inflammation process, were diminished by treatment with DOX, a nonspecific MMP inhibitor. Additionally, the increases of mechanical allodynia and orofacial hyperalgesia were attenuated by the same treatment. PMID:24270905

  9. Temporomandibular joint injection with corticosteroid and local anesthetic for limited mouth opening.

    PubMed

    Samiee, Aveed; Sabzerou, Daniel; Edalatpajouh, Faraz; Clark, Glenn T; Ram, Saravanan

    2011-09-01

    It is unclear whether temporomandibular joint (TMJ) injections with local anesthetic and corticosteroid are an effective first-line management modality for patients with limited mouth opening. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of TMJ injections in patients with disc displacement without reduction (DDWOR), i.e. closed lock, at the University of Southern California Orofacial Pain and Oral Medicine Center. A retrospective chart review was conducted using a database of over 4000 patient records from 2003-2010. We identified 17 patients (16 female; 1 male) between the ages of 16 and 70 years who had been diagnosed with DDWOR and received a TMJ injection. Active mouth opening before injection ranged between 15 and 40 mm (average 29 mm), and active mouth opening after injection and manual mobilization ranged between 25 and 50 mm (average 39 mm). The average increase in mouth opening after injection and manual mobilization was 10 mm (P = 0.0004). TMJ injection with corticosteroid and local anesthetic is suitable as an alternative first-line management modality for DDWOR.

  10. Diagnostic index of three-dimensional osteoarthritic changes in temporomandibular joint condylar morphology

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Liliane R.; Gomes, Marcelo; Jung, Bryan; Paniagua, Beatriz; Ruellas, Antonio C.; Gonçalves, João Roberto; Styner, Martin A.; Wolford, Larry; Cevidanes, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. This study aimed to investigate imaging statistical approaches for classifying three-dimensional (3-D) osteoarthritic morphological variations among 169 temporomandibular joint (TMJ) condyles. Cone-beam computed tomography scans were acquired from 69 subjects with long-term TMJ osteoarthritis (OA), 15 subjects at initial diagnosis of OA, and 7 healthy controls. Three-dimensional surface models of the condyles were constructed and SPHARM-PDM established correspondent points on each model. Multivariate analysis of covariance and direction-projection-permutation (DiProPerm) were used for testing statistical significance of the differences between the groups determined by clinical and radiographic diagnoses. Unsupervised classification using hierarchical agglomerative clustering was then conducted. Compared with healthy controls, OA average condyle was significantly smaller in all dimensions except its anterior surface. Significant flattening of the lateral pole was noticed at initial diagnosis. We observed areas of 3.88-mm bone resorption at the superior surface and 3.10-mm bone apposition at the anterior aspect of the long-term OA average model. DiProPerm supported a significant difference between the healthy control and OA group (p-value=0.001). Clinically meaningful unsupervised classification of TMJ condylar morphology determined a preliminary diagnostic index of 3-D osteoarthritic changes, which may be the first step towards a more targeted diagnosis of this condition. PMID:26158119

  11. Association between Ear Fullness, Earache, and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders in the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Macedo, Julya; Doi, Marcelo; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa; Gorres, Vanessa; Mendes, Marina Stephany; Silva, Izabele Machado; Navarro, Ricardo; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza

    2014-01-01

    Introduction An earache (otalgia or ear pain) is pain in one or both ears that may last a short or long time. Earache is prevalent in the population with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJDs), but there is a dearth of epidemiologic studies regarding the association between TMJD and ear pain and ear fullness in older people. Objective To assess the presence of earache and ear fullness in elderly patients with TMJD. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in independently living, elderly individuals. TMJD was assessed by dental evaluation and earache was verified by medical history. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test and relative risk. Results Of the 197 subjects evaluated in this part of the study, 22 had earache, and 35 was verified by ear fullness. Of the 22 subjects with earache, none had conductive or mixed hearing loss in the ears tested. There was a significant association (p = 0.036) between the TMJD and earache (odds ratio = 2.3), but there was no significant association between the TMJD and ear fullness. Conclusion These results highlight the importance of identifying risk factors for earache that can be modified through specific interventions, which is essential in the prevention of future episodes, as well as managing the process of treatment of elderly patients in general. PMID:25992127

  12. Simultaneous treatment of temporomandibular joint ankylosis with severe mandibular deficiency by standard TMJ prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, YiHui; Zhang, LuZhu; He, DongMei; Yang, Chi; Chen, MinJie; Zhang, ShanYong; Li, Hui; Ellis III, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is a refractory disease that is difficult to predictably treat. This study evaluated the prognosis of using standard alloplastic TMJ prostheses for the treatment of TMJ ankylosis in Chinese patients with severe mandibular deficiency. Patients treated from 2013 to 2015 were reviewed. The computer-aided design and manufacture (CAD/CAM) technique was used to guide bony mass removal and locate the TMJ prosthesis (Biomet, USA). Eleven patients were included in this study. All prostheses were successfully installed and stabilized intraoperatively. In 4 patients with severe mandibular deficiency, their mandibular ramus was elongated by the TMJ prosthesis and 2 patients were combined with Le Fort I osteotomy guided by digital templates. Their mean chin advancement was 10.19 mm. Their SNB and ramus heights were also significantly improved after operation (P < 0.05). There was no prosthesis loosening, breakage, or infection leading to removal after a mean follow-up period of 22 months (range, 12-31mos.). Mouth opening was significantly improved from 5.5 mm preoperatively to 31.5 mm postoperatively. TMJ reconstruction with standard alloplastic prosthesis is a reliable treatment for ankylosis, especially in recurrent cases. By CAD/CAM technique, it can correct jaw deformities simultaneously and produce stable results. PMID:28337986

  13. Depression, anhedonia and anxiety in temporomandibular joint and other facial pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Marbach, J J; Lund, P

    1981-08-01

    Depression, anhedonia, state anxiety (A-state), trait anxiety (A-trait), and self-reported pain estimate were measured in almost 500 facial pain patients. These patients were divided into 3 diagnostic categories: myofacial pain dysfunction syndrome (MPD) [18], arthritis of the temporomandibular joints (TMJ arthritis), and trigeminal neuralgia. Three control groups were measured for comparison. They consisted of an normal, or non-patient group, a group of arthritis patients, and a group of movement disorder patients attending a neurology clinic. Among the facial pain patients and the normal controls few differences were found with regard to anhedonia and depression, The arthritis and neurology patients produced significantly higher depression and anhedonia scores than did several of the facial pain groups. Pain estimate ranged from 0 for control, to a mean of 67.6 +/- 31.3 for the trigeminal neuralgia patients with the MPD (means = 56.2 +/- 32.5) and the TMJ arthritis patients (means = 46.7 +/- 30.8) somewhat lower. Clinical variables such as duration of pain, help seeking behavior and total number of symptoms were correlated with depression but not with anhedonia scores, It is hypothesized that anhedonia is a measure separate from depression and may be more closely linked to suffering behavior that to pain behavior. Psychological variables did not discriminate among facial pain patients and in particular did not distinguish between so-called functional and organic illness.

  14. Eminectomy for Habitual Luxation of the Temporomandibular Joint with Sedation and Local Anesthesia: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yoshiaki; Kusukawa, Jingo; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2016-01-01

    Eminectomy which is one of the popular and most effective treatments for habitual temporomandibular joint luxation was first described by Myrhaug in 1951. There are few reports which described eminectomy being performed under local anesthesia and conscious sedation. We present a case series of habitual luxation of the TMJ treated by eminectomy performed under local anesthesia and conscious sedation and general anesthesia. Five patients were examined and found to have recurrent luxation of the TMJ. The age of patients ranged from 18 to 93 years. Bilateral eminectomy of the TMJ was performed for two patients, and unilateral eminectomy was performed for three patients. Two were examined under intravenous propofol sedation and local anesthesia, while three patients were examined under general anesthesia. One patient died from ileus one month after surgery. The follow-up period except for the case that died from ileus ranged from 12 to 33 months. No recurrent dislocation of the TMJ has been identified. Based on our experience and two other series in the literature, eminectomy with sedation and local anesthesia can be considered and might be a good option in elderly patients. PMID:27818803

  15. Electromyographic power spectrum of jaw muscles during clenching in unilateral temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Park, I H; McCall, W D; Chung, J W

    2012-09-01

    The relationship between temporomandibular joints (TMJ) osteoarthritis and masticatory muscle disorders is poorly understood. The data are sparse, the results are conflicting, and electromyographic (EMG) power spectrum analysis has not been used. The aims of this study were to compare the differences in EMG power spectrum during, and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) before and after, sustained clenching in patients with unilateral TMJ osteoarthritis and healthy control subjects. Nineteen patients with unilateral TMJ osteoarthritis without masticatory muscle pain and 20 control subjects were evaluated. We measured EMG amplitudes at maximum voluntary contraction, median frequency from the EMG power spectrum during sustained clenching at 70% and PPTs before and after the clenching in both temporalis and masseter muscles. There were no significant differences in PPT decrease between muscles or between groups during sustained clenching. There were no significant differences in maximum voluntary contraction EMG activity ratios of affected to unaffected sides between groups, or of masseter to temporalis muscles between affected and unaffected side of patients with TMJ osteoarthritis. Median frequencies decreased from the beginning to the end of the sustained clench, and the interaction between group and clench was significant: the median frequency decrease was larger in the osteoarthritis group. Our results suggested that masticatory muscles of patients with unilateral TMJ osteoarthritis are more easily fatigued during sustained clenching than normal subjects.

  16. Effectiveness of combining manual therapy and acupuncture on temporomandibular joint dysfunction: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Shin, Byung-Cheul; Ha, Chung-Hyo; Song, Yung-Sun; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2007-01-01

    This retrospective study investigated the effects of combining manual therapy and acupuncture on the pain and maximal mouth opening (MMO), which were associated with temporomandibular joint dysfunction (TMD). The 49 TMD patients (15 men, 34 women; mean age = 30.47 years, SD = 13.52 years) were treated with a combination of acupuncture and manual therapy two or three times a week at the hospital. The pain and maximal mouth opening were assessed before and after 1 and 4 weeks of treatment. The combination therapy produced significant changes in pain levels (p < 0.001) and mouth opening (p < 0.001). All pairwise non-parametric comparison showed a significant improvement in pain (p < 0.05 for all pairs) and MMO (p < 0.05 for all pairs). These findings suggest that combining manual therapy and acupuncture decreases the pain level and increases the MMO of TMD patients. However, future studies should further investigate the efficacy of combined treatment on TMD with more rigorous randomized clinical trials.

  17. A comparison of primary and passaged chondrocytes for use in engineering the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Johns, D.E.; Athanasiou, K.A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective This study examines the tissue engineering potential of passaged (P3) and primary (P0) articular chondrocytes (ACs) and costal chondrocytes (CCs) from skeletally-mature goats for use in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Design These four cell types were assembled into scaffoldless tissue engineered constructs and cultured for 4 wks. The constructs were then tested for cell, collagen, and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content with biochemical assays, and collagen types I and II with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Constructs were also tested under tension and compression to determine biomechanical properties. Results Both primary and passaged CC constructs had greater GAG/wet weight than AC constructs. Primary AC constructs had significantly less total collagen and contained no collagen type I. AC P3 constructs had the largest collagen I/collagen II ratio, which was also greater in passaged CC constructs relative to primary groups. Primary AC constructs were not mechanically testable, while passaged AC and CC constructs had significantly greater tensile properties than primary CC constructs. Conclusions Primary CCs are considerably better than primary ACs and have potential use in tissue engineering when larger quantities of collagen type II are desired. The poor performance of the ACs, in this study, which contradicts the results seen with previous studies using immature bovine ACs, may thus be attributed to the animals’ maturity. However, CC P3 cells appear particularly well-suited for tissue engineering fibrocartilage of the TMJ due to the high quantity of collagen and GAG, and tensile and compressive mechanical properties. PMID:19013549

  18. Methotrexate pharmacotherapy for implant-related temporomandibular joint pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J Paul; Peterson, Erik J; Durham, Justin; Nixdorf, Donald R

    2014-08-01

    This article presents a patient experiencing several years of pain associated with bilateral failed temporomandibular joint (TMJ) Proplast/Teflon fossa prostheses. Despite surgical removal of the prostheses and comprehensive conservative management, including typical pharmacotherapy approaches for chronic pain, pain was still not relieved, and management was revised to target a putative chronic inflammatory disorder. Methotrexate was prescribed because of its known efficacy for inflammation and pain reduction in rheumatoid arthritis. Titration of methotrexate dosage over 5 months to a weekly dose of 20 mg resulted in reduced pain intensity at rest, increased pain-free maximal jaw opening, and a reduction in the sensory component of the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Maximum assisted jaw opening remained the same, as did the palpation tenderness of both TMJs and of the masseter and temporalis muscles. Methotrexate pharmacotherapy may represent a viable option when conservative treatments have failed to provide significant pain relief in patients who have had Proplast/Teflon TMJ implants.

  19. Surface electromyographic assessment of patients with long lasting temporomandibular joint disorder pain.

    PubMed

    Tartaglia, Gianluca M; Lodetti, Gianluigi; Paiva, Guiovaldo; De Felicio, Claudia Maria; Sforza, Chiarella

    2011-08-01

    The normalized electromyographic characteristics of masticatory muscles in patients with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) and healthy controls were compared. Thirty TMD patients (15 men, 15 women, mean age 23 years) with long lasting pain (more than 6 months), and 20 control subjects matched for sex and age were examined. All patients had arthrogenous TMD according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (RDC/TMD). Surface electromyography of masseter and temporal muscles was performed during maximum teeth clenching either on cotton rolls or in intercuspal position. Standardized EMG indices and the median power frequency were obtained, and compared between the two groups and sexes using ANOVAs. During clenching, the TMD patients had larger asymmetry in their temporalis muscles, larger temporalis activity relative to masseter, and reduced mean power frequencies than the control subjects (p<0.05, ANOVA). In both groups, the mean power frequencies of the temporalis muscles were larger than those of the masseter muscles (p<0.001). No sex related differences, and no sex × group interactions were found. In conclusion, young adult patients with long lasting TMD have an increased and more asymmetric standardized activity of their temporalis anterior muscle, and reduced mean power frequencies, relative to healthy controls.

  20. Incremental increase in percentage mouth opening after coronoidectomy in temporomandibular joint ankylosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, P; Singh, V; Agrawal, A; Bhagol, A; Bali, R

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incremental improvement in mouth opening following coronoidectomy. Twenty-three patients with unilateral temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis (Sawhney types I-III) were assessed preoperatively; physical and radiological examinations were done (panoramic radiography and computed tomography). Data including demographic and clinical parameters were recorded. Patients with bilateral ankylosis, recurrent cases, and those with Sawhney type IV TMJ ankylosis were not included. The improvement in mouth opening was measured after ostectomy, after ipsilateral coronoidectomy, and after contralateral coronoidectomy. The improvements in mouth opening at each stage were analysed using the Student's t-test and Pearson's correlation coefficient. There was a marked improvement in maximal incisal opening (MIO) from 5.7 ± 4.2mm to 23.7 ± 5.9 mm after removal of the ankylotic bony mass. MIO was significantly increased after ipsilateral coronoidectomy (31.6 ± 7.4mm), and after contralateral coronoidectomy, a mean MIO of 39.4 ± 11.2mm was achieved. At more than 1 year of follow-up, all patients showed improved mouth opening. In conclusion, coronoidectomy plays an important role in improving mouth opening in the treatment of TMJ ankylosis.

  1. Modified Leclerc blocking procedure with miniplates and temporal fascial flap for recurrent temporomandibular joint dislocation.

    PubMed

    Ying, Binbin; Hu, Jing; Zhu, Songsong

    2013-05-01

    This study introduced the modified Leclerc blocking procedure with miniplate and temporal fascial flap for recurrent temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dislocation and evaluated its clinical effects. Seven patients were treated by the modified Leclerc blocking procedure with miniplate and temporal fascial flap. The postoperative follow-up period ranged from half a year to 2 years to access the maximal mouth opening, TMJ disorder symptoms (pain and sound), and incidence of recurrence. No recurrence was observed in all of the 7 patients postoperatively. The mean preoperative and postoperative MMOs were 49.7 mm and 40.1 mm, respectively. There were 3 patients who reported the alleviation of pain and/or sound postoperatively. Two older patients with long-term course of disease reported no improvement of the TMJ symptoms in terms of pain and sound postoperatively. Our results showed that the modified Leclerc blocking procedure with miniplates and temporal fascial flap provided a more stable support for the condylar movement with less recurrence, suggesting that this operation could be a good alternative for the treatment of recurrent TMJ dislocation.

  2. Osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Arzi, B; Winer, J N; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2013-11-01

    Museum skull specimens (n = 1,008) of southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) were examined macroscopically according to defined criteria for the presence, severity and characteristics of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA). The specimens were from stranded young adult to adult animals. Overall, 4.1% of the specimens had findings consistent with TMJ-OA. Of these, 61.0% were from females and 39.0% were from males. In addition, 85.4% of the affected specimens were from adults and 14.6% were from young adults. However, there was no significant association between age and sex with the presence or severity of TMJ-OA. Lesion severity was mild in 41.5%, moderate in 19.5% and severe in 39.0% of affected specimens. The most prominent changes were the presence of osteophytes and subchondral bone defects and porosity. The mandibular condylar process and fossa were affected equally. The lengths of the right and left mandibular heads were significantly associated with age (P = 0.002 and P = 0.003, respectively) and sex (P = 0.0009 and P = 0.001, respectively), but not with the presence of TMJ-OA. The significance of this disease in sea otters remains elusive, but this condition may play an important role in survival of these animals.

  3. Stress analysis in human temporomandibular joint affected by anterior disc displacement during prolonged clenching.

    PubMed

    Abe, S; Kawano, F; Kohge, K; Kawaoka, T; Ueda, K; Hattori-Hara, E; Mori, H; Kuroda, S; Tanaka, E

    2013-04-01

    Parafunctional habits, such as prolonged clenching and bruxism, have been associated with dysfunctional overloading in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). In this study, stress distributions in the TMJ were analysed during prolonged clenching, using three-dimensional finite element (FE) models of the TMJ with and without disc displacement. The aim of this study was to investigate stress distribution of the cartilaginous tissues in the TMJ with and without disc displacement. Finite element models were developed on the basis of magnetic resonance images from two subjects with and without anterior disc displacement. Condylar movements recorded during a 5-min clenching were used as the loading condition for stress analysis. In the asymptomatic model, the highest von Mises stresses were located in the lateral area (4·91 MPa) of the disc surfaces, and after 5-min clenching, the higher stresses were still located at the lateral area (3·65 MPa). In all the cartilaginous tissues, 30-50% of stress reduction occurred during 5-min clenching. In contrast, the von Mises stress in the cartilaginous tissues of the symptomatic model with disc displacement was markedly lower, compared with the asymptomatic model. However, in the condylar cartilage, stress relaxation during clenching was not recognised. Furthermore, relatively high stresses were observed in the retrodiscal tissues throughout clenching. The present results indicate that disc position could be involved in the stress distribution of the TMJ components during prolonged clenching.

  4. Changes in Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction Symptoms Following Massage Therapy: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Melissa Joan

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this case report was to describe the effects that massage therapy had on a woman with temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Participant The 26-year-old woman’s primary symptoms were pain, decreased range of motion, clicking, and crepitus. These symptoms were reportedly associated with emotional stress and bruxism. Intervention Ten 45-minute massage therapy treatments were administered over a five-week period. The client’s progress was monitored by an initial, midway, and final assessment, using range of motion testing, personal interview, an orthopedic test, and postural analysis. Progress was also evaluated by the use of a daily journal. The client participated in a home care routine consisting of stretches, self-massage, postural training, a proprioception exercise, and hydrotherapy. Results Results include an increase in maximal opening from 3.1 cm to 3.8 cm, an overall increase in neck range of motion, a decrease in muscle hypertonicity using the Wendy Nickel’s Scale, a decrease in pain from 7/10 to 3/10 on a numerical pain scale, and a decline in stress. Conclusion Although the client in this report experienced positive results, more extensive studies are needed to understand the effects of massage on TMD. PMID:22211156

  5. Effects of high molecular weight hyaluronic acid on induced arthritis of the temporomandibular joint in rats.

    PubMed

    Lemos, George Azevedo; Rissi, Renato; Pimentel, Edson Rosa; Palomari, Evanisi Teresa

    2015-07-01

    High molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HMWHA) has been used to treat temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorders, but controversial results have been described. This study aimed to characterize the morphological and biochemical actions of HMWHA on induced arthritis of the TMJ. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were used, and arthritis of the TMJ was induced through an intra-articular injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) (50 μl). One week after arthritis induction, the animals were treated with HMWHA (once per week for three weeks). Histological analyses were performed using sections stained with hematoxylin-eosin, toluidine blue and Picrosirius. Were also performed histomorphometric analysis and birefringence of collagenous fibers (polarization microscopy). Biochemical analyses of TMJ tissues were carried out through measurements of sulfated glycosaminoglycans and zymography for evaluation of metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2 and -9). Data were analyzed using paired t-test and unpaired t-test, with a 5% significance level. HMWHA reduced histologic changes and thickness of the articular disc, led to a greater arrangement of collagenous fibers, lower concentration of sulfated glycosaminoglycans and lower activity in all isoforms of MMP-2 and -9 in TMJs with induced arthritis. These findings suggest that HMWHA may exert a protective effect on the TMJ.

  6. Occlusal changes secondary to temporomandibular joint conditions: a critical review and implications for clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    CALDAS, Waleska; CONTI, Ana Cláudia de Castro Ferreira; JANSON, Guilherme; Paulo César Rodrigues, CONTI

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The relationship between Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) and malocclusion is an extremely critical issue in dentistry. Contrary to the old concept that malocclusion causes TMD, occlusal changes, especially those observed as sudden, may be secondary and reflect joint or muscle disorders due to the obvious connection between these structures and the dental occlusion. Objectives The aim of this article is to present the most commonly occlusal changes secondary to TMD. Methods The clinical presentation of these conditions is discussed. Details regarding diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of patients presenting TMD prior or during treatment are also presented. Conclusions All plans for irreversible therapy should be preceded by a meticulous analysis of TMD signs and symptoms in such a way that patients are not submitted to irreversible treatment, based on an untrue occlusal relationship, secondary to articular and/or muscular disorders. When present, TMD symptoms must always be controlled to reestablish a “normal” occlusion and allow proper treatment strategy. PMID:27556214

  7. Zurich pediatric distractor for ramal condylar unit distraction in temporomandibular joint ankylosis

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Brig N. K.; Roy, I. D.; Sharma, Rohit; Kaur, Maj Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) Ankylosis is an extremely disabling condition characterized by difficulty or inability to open the mouth resulting in facial asymmetry, malocclusion and dental problems. Surgical excision of the ankylosed mass is the only treatment option available to gain mouth opening. The loss in vertical height of ramus following release of ankylosis is difficult to manage in both unilateral and bilateral TMJ ankylosis. Out of all the methods to restore this height Distraction Osteogenesis (DO) is gaining popularity because of predictable gain in the length without any associated morbidity. Recurrent bilateral TMJ ankylosis in a 32 year old male was treated by osteoarthrectomy and temporal fascia interpositioning arthroplasty. Bilateral reconstruction of ramal condylar unit (RCU) was carried out by Zurich paediatric distractor (KLS Martin, Tuttlingen Germany). Following a latency period of 7 days distraction was carried out at a rate of 1mm/day for 8 days. Distractors were removed after 12 weeks of consolidation period. The case was followed up for 12 months during which the mouth opening was maintained at 38 mm and there was no anterior open bite. PMID:27563617

  8. The contribution of computerized axiography to the functional evaluation of the temporomandibular joint: a case report

    PubMed Central

    BOTOS, ALEXANDRA MARIA; MESAROS, ANCA STEFANIA; ZIMBRAN, ADELA IOANA

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case report is to give comprehensive information on the clinical use of computerized axiography (CA) in the evaluation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) mobility in a patient who undergoes orthognatic surgery. A 20-year-old female patient with class III skeletal anomaly and who underwent orthognatic surgery is presented. Pre- and postsurgical CA recordings for the patient are compared in order to evaluate the functional modifications that appear. The CA is a functional investigation of the TMJ and records the border movements of the mandible: protrusion, lateral movements and open/close. The starting point for every movement is the centric relation position. This allows for very high reproducibility of the CA and the data can later become available for comparison of examinations performed at different times. The CA can offer data to programme an articulator or to evaluate the functional evolution of the TMJs after various occlusal interventions (prosthodontic, orthodontic or orthognatic). After comparing the pre- and postsurgical CA recordings, a significant improvement of the TMJ function after the repositioning of the maxilla and mandible through orthognatic surgery was confirmed. In conclusion, our case confirms the results in literature that CA is a reproducible and reliable investigation method in the evaluation of TMJ function in orthognatic surgery patients, that it facilitates the monitoring of the evolution of the functionality of the TMJ ever time and that it allows for comparative evaluation of the two TMJs. PMID:27547067

  9. Effectiveness of treatment with viscosupplementation in temporomandibular joints with or without effusion.

    PubMed

    Guarda-Nardini, L; Rossi, A; Ramonda, R; Punzi, L; Ferronato, G; Manfredini, D

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether the effectiveness of viscosupplementation with hyaluronic acid (HA) in patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) degenerative disorders depends on the presence of intra-articular effusion. In this study of case-control design, two groups of 25 patients were recruited: patients with a clinical diagnosis of painful chronic TMJ osteoarthritis and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signs of TMJ degeneration, with (effusion group) or without (no effusion group) MRI evidence of TMJ effusion. All patients underwent five weekly single-needle arthrocenteses plus medium molecular weight HA and 6 months of follow-up. Several clinical outcome parameters were assessed. For all variables, analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measures was performed to assess the existence of significant within-group and between-group treatment effects. Over time, both groups showed significant improvements in all outcome parameters, which were maintained at the 6-month follow-up (P<0.05). Between-group comparisons showed that the treatment effects did not differ significantly for either the primary outcome variable (pain levels: F=0.849, P=0.548) or secondary outcome variables (chewing efficiency: F=0.854, P=0.544; functional limitation: F=1.35, P=0.226; mouth opening: F=0.658, P=0.707). The null hypothesis that there are no differences in treatment effectiveness between patients with and without effusion could not be rejected.

  10. Temporomandibular joint involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: clinical predictors of magnetic resonance imaging signs.

    PubMed

    Argyropoulou, Maria I; Margariti, Persefoni N; Karali, Aikaterini; Astrakas, Loukas; Alfandaki, Sapfo; Kosta, Paraskevi; Siamopoulou, Antigoni

    2009-03-01

    The aim of the study was to define clinical predictors of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Forty-six patients, aged 2.08-36.7 years, with JIA (oligoartitular 18, polyarticular 17, systemic type 11) were examined with standard plain and contrast-enhanced sequences. Of 88 TMJs examined, an abnormal condyle was observed in 32%, flattened articular eminence in 27%, flattened articular disk in 17%, intra-articular fluid in 10%, enhancing pannus in 45% and restricted condylar motion in 9%. Logistic regression analysis revealed that for abnormal condyle and flattened articular eminence, independent predictors were type of JIA (P < 0.015), age at onset (P < 0.038), and duration of disease activity (P < 0.001). Plots of the logistic regression models showed that TMJ involvement approached certainty for systemic sooner than for the other JIA types. Pannus was present with probability >0.5 when the disease started before 4 years of age. In conclusion, the systemic type of JIA, young age at onset and long duration of activity are risk factors for TMJ damage. MRI of the TMJ should be performed in patients who are less than 4 years of age at the onset of JIA, and in those with the systemic type, whatever the age of onset.

  11. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorders in Caucasian children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Tecco, Simona; Crincoli, Vito; Di Bisceglie, Beatrice; Saccucci, Matteo; Macrĺ, Monica; Polimeni, Antonella; Festa, Felice

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of the signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a population of children and adolescents. TMD signs and symptoms were recorded in 1134 subjects (593 males and 541 females; age range 5-15 years), divided into various groups according to the: (i) Angle dental class; (ii) presence and type of crossbite; (iii) gender; and (iv) age (ages 5-11 and 12-15 years). The percentages of signs and symptoms were compared using the chi2-test to determine the differences among the groups for the rates of TMD symptoms, bruxism, joint sounds, deviation during opening, reduced opening/lateral/protrusive movements, and myofascial pain. Subjects who were 12-15 years old showed a significantly higher prevalence of myofascial pain than those who were 5-11 years old (chi2 = 4.263; p < 0.05). Females showed a significantly higher prevalence of myofascial pain than males (chi2 = 3.882; p < 0.05). Subjects with posterior, unilateral crossbite showed a significantly higher prevalence of TMD symptoms (chi2 = 33.877; p < 0.001) and reduction of functional movements (chi2 = 10.800; p < 0.05) than those with no crossbite, or with anterior or posterior bilateral crossbite. TMD's signs and symptoms seem to be associated to some definite characteristics of the patient, such as female gender, young age, and presence of posterior unilateral crossbite.

  12. Botulinum toxin therapy for temporomandibular joint disorders: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y-W; Chiu, Y-W; Chen, C-Y; Chuang, S-K

    2015-08-01

    The objective of this study was to undertake a systematic review to assess the efficacy of botulinum toxin therapy (BTX) for temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs). A comprehensive search of major databases through PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane CENTRAL was conducted to locate all relevant articles published from inception to October 2014. Eligible studies were selected based on inclusion criteria and included English language, peer-reviewed publications of randomized controlled trials comparing BTX versus any alternative intervention or placebo. Quality assessment and data extraction were done according to the Cochrane risk of bias tool and recommendations. The entire systematic search and selection process was done independently by two reviewers. Five relevant study trials were identified, involving 117 participants. Two trials revealed a significant between-group difference in myofascial pain reduction, another trial that compared BTX with fascial manipulation showed equal efficacy of pain relief on TMDs, while the remaining two trials showed no significant difference between the BTX and placebo groups. Because of considerable variations in study methods and evaluation of results, a meta-analysis could not be performed. Based on this review, no consensus could be reached on the therapeutic benefits of BTX on TMDs. A more rigorous design of trials should be carried out in future studies.

  13. Association between Ear Fullness, Earache, and Temporomandibular Joint Disorders in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Julya; Doi, Marcelo; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa; Gorres, Vanessa; Mendes, Marina Stephany; Silva, Izabele Machado; Navarro, Ricardo; Marchiori, Luciana Lozza

    2014-10-01

    Introduction An earache (otalgia or ear pain) is pain in one or both ears that may last a short or long time. Earache is prevalent in the population with temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJDs), but there is a dearth of epidemiologic studies regarding the association between TMJD and ear pain and ear fullness in older people. Objective To assess the presence of earache and ear fullness in elderly patients with TMJD. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in independently living, elderly individuals. TMJD was assessed by dental evaluation and earache was verified by medical history. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test and relative risk. Results Of the 197 subjects evaluated in this part of the study, 22 had earache, and 35 was verified by ear fullness. Of the 22 subjects with earache, none had conductive or mixed hearing loss in the ears tested. There was a significant association (p = 0.036) between the TMJD and earache (odds ratio = 2.3), but there was no significant association between the TMJD and ear fullness. Conclusion These results highlight the importance of identifying risk factors for earache that can be modified through specific interventions, which is essential in the prevention of future episodes, as well as managing the process of treatment of elderly patients in general.

  14. Animal models of temporomandibular joint disorders: implications for tissue engineering approaches.

    PubMed

    Almarza, Alejandro J; Hagandora, Catherine K; Henderson, Sarah E

    2011-10-01

    Animal models for temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD) or degradation are necessary for assessing the value of current and future tissue engineering therapies. After reviewing the literature, it is quite apparent that most TMD animal studies can be categorized into chemical approaches or surgical/mechanical approaches. Overall, it was found that the top five cited manuscripts for all chemical models were cited by almost 40% more manuscripts than the top five manuscripts for surgical/mechanical models. It is clear that the chemical approaches have focused on the inflammatory aspect of TMDs and its relationship to pain. However, chemical irritants must be tested in larger animal models, and the effect of short-term inflammation on the mechanical properties of the fibrocartilage must be examined. Nevertheless, therapeutic approaches aimed at reducing or controlling inflammation could use the established chemical methods. Surgical/mechanical methods can be used as negative controls for first generation TMJ tissue engineering approaches when the therapy is applied immediately after injury. Next generation tissue engineering approaches will require testing on tissues degenerated for a few months after the surgical/mechanical methods, with enhanced functional assessment techniques.

  15. The effect of physical therapy intervention on incisal opening after temporomandibular joint surgery.

    PubMed

    Braun, B L

    1987-11-01

    A retrospective study of 58 postoperative patients who underwent temporomandibular joint surgery was done to determine the effect of a physical therapy treatment program of ultrasound, superficial heat, and exercise on incisal opening 6 to 12 months after surgery. Twenty-nine of the subjects had surgery and physical therapy intervention, while 29 had surgery only. Patients referred for physical therapy had more complaints of pain and significantly less incisal opening after surgery than those not referred for physical therapy. Both groups, however, had achieved a comparable amount of incisal opening 6 to 12 months after surgery. Chi square analysis indicated that patients with an incisal opening of less than 30 mm postoperatively were more likely to have an incisal opening of 40 mm 6 to 12 months after surgery if they received physical therapy treatments. Patients having more than 30 mm of incisal opening a month after surgery showed a greater tendency to achieve more than 40 mm of opening if physical therapy was included in the postoperative management.

  16. Change the Myofascial Pain and Range of Motion of the Temporomandibular Joint Following Kinesio Taping of Latent Myofascial Trigger Points in the Sternocleidomastoid Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Youngsook

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the changes in the myofascial pain and range of the motion of temporomandibular joint when Kinesio taping is applied to patients with latent myofascial trigger points of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 42 males and females aged 20 to 30 years (male 17, female 25). They were randomly divided into the control group and the experimental group, which would receive Kinesio taping. Kinesio taping was applied to the sternocleidomastoid muscle three times per week for two weeks. The pain triggered when the taut band or nodule was palpated was measured. Pain intensity was measured using the visual analog scale (VAS) and pressure pain threshold (PPT). The range of motion of the temporomandibular joint was measured. In all subjects, VAS, PPT, and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] In the experimental group, it was found that pain in the SCM was relived, as the VAS and PPT score decrease significantly and range of motion of temporomandibular joint increase significantly. In comparison between the groups, significant differences were shown in the VAS and PPT scores and in the range of motion of the temporomandibular joint. [Conclusion] Kinesio taping is thought to be an intervention method that can be applied to latent myofascial trigger points. PMID:25276008

  17. Change the myofascial pain and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint following kinesio taping of latent myofascial trigger points in the sternocleidomastoid muscle.

    PubMed

    Bae, Youngsook

    2014-09-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the changes in the myofascial pain and range of the motion of temporomandibular joint when Kinesio taping is applied to patients with latent myofascial trigger points of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 42 males and females aged 20 to 30 years (male 17, female 25). They were randomly divided into the control group and the experimental group, which would receive Kinesio taping. Kinesio taping was applied to the sternocleidomastoid muscle three times per week for two weeks. The pain triggered when the taut band or nodule was palpated was measured. Pain intensity was measured using the visual analog scale (VAS) and pressure pain threshold (PPT). The range of motion of the temporomandibular joint was measured. In all subjects, VAS, PPT, and range of motion of the temporomandibular joint were measured before and after the intervention. [Results] In the experimental group, it was found that pain in the SCM was relived, as the VAS and PPT score decrease significantly and range of motion of temporomandibular joint increase significantly. In comparison between the groups, significant differences were shown in the VAS and PPT scores and in the range of motion of the temporomandibular joint. [Conclusion] Kinesio taping is thought to be an intervention method that can be applied to latent myofascial trigger points.

  18. Temporomandibular joint disorders and maxillomandibular malformations: role of condylar "repositionin" plate.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Noemi; Matteini, Claudio; Incisivo, Veronica; Belli, Evaristo; Evaristo, Belli

    2009-05-01

    Even if the relationship between condylar position and/or temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and dentofacial deformity is controversial in literature, several patients presenting malocclusion refer to pain and TMDs as the main trouble. There are also various opinions concerning the alterations or improvements of temporomandibular joint symptoms after orthognathic surgery. In agreement with the experience of Universität Würzburg, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity of splint technique to reproduce centric condyle positioning in bimaxillary osteotomy surgeries for the patients with skeletal-facial disorders and coexisting TMDs. The present study is based on a sample of patients with maxillomandibular malocclusion and coexisting TMDs who underwent bimaxillary osteotomy surgeries with splint technique. All patients underwent a protocol consisting of various steps: Pretreatment evaluation consisted of a questionnaire on subjective symptoms, clinical examinations, photographs of the occlusion, plaster casts, bite registrations, examination of the posture; instrumental examinations; panoramic, teleradiography, and cephalometric analysis; stratigraphy of TMD; and electromyography. Presurgical treatment consisted of therapy by modified Farrar splint associated with a pharmacologic therapy for the acute symptoms; orthodontic treatment associated with a global reeducation of the posture and a pompage of the masticatory muscles; and manufacturing of an occlusal splint in the most posterior asymptomatic position. Surgical treatment consisted of bimaxillary osteotomies performed after registering condyle position by a "repositioning" plate. The condyle position is guided by the intermaxillary fixation with the interposition of the occlusal splint. Surgery on maxillary is performed through Le Fort I osteotomy and fixation. Later, sagittal splint osteotomy of mandible is performed. Position of ramus and TMD complex is guided by the positioning of the plates

  19. GABAergic influence on temporomandibular joint-responsive spinomedullary neurons depends on estrogen status.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, A; Bereiter, D A; Thompson, R; Nishida, Y

    2014-02-14

    Sensory input from the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) to neurons in superficial laminae at the spinomedullary (Vc/C1-2) region is strongly influenced by estrogen status. This study determined if GABAergic mechanisms play a role in estrogen modulation of TMJ nociceptive processing in ovariectomized female rats treated with high- (HE) or low-dose (LE) estradiol (E2) for 2days. Superficial laminae neurons were activated by ATP (1mM) injections into the joint space. The selective GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline methiodide (BMI, 5 or 50μM, 30μl), applied at the site of recording greatly enhanced the magnitude and duration of ATP-evoked responses in LE rats, but not in units from HE rats. The convergent cutaneous receptive field (RF) area of TMJ neurons was enlarged after BMI in LE but not HE rats, while resting discharge rates were increased after BMI independent of estrogen status. By contrast, the selective GABAA receptor agonist, muscimol (50μM, 30μl), significantly reduced the magnitude and duration of ATP-evoked activity, resting discharge rate, and cutaneous RF area of TMJ neurons in LE and HE rats, whereas lower doses (5μM) affected only units from LE rats. Protein levels of GABAA receptor β3 isoform at the Vc/C1-2 region were similar for HE and LE rats. These results suggest that GABAergic mechanisms contribute significantly to background discharge rates and TMJ-evoked input to superficial laminae neurons at the Vc/C1-2 region. Estrogen status may gate the magnitude of GABAergic influence on TMJ neurons at the earliest stages of nociceptive processing at the spinomedullary region.

  20. Characterization of the Temporomandibular Joint of Southern Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris nereis)

    PubMed Central

    Lieske, Danielle; Vapniarsky, Natalia; Verstraete, Frank J. M.; Leale, Dustin M.; Young, Colleen; Arzi, Boaz

    2015-01-01

    The structure–function relationship of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of southern sea otter has largely not been described. This study aims to describe the histological, biochemical, and biomechanical features of the TMJ disk in the southern sea otter. The TMJ disks from fresh cadaver heads of southern sea otter adult males (n = 8) and females (n = 8) acquired from strandings were examined. Following macroscopical evaluation, the TMJs were investigated for their histological, mechanical, and biochemical properties. We found that the sea otter TMJ disks are, in general, similar to other carnivores. Macroscopically, the TMJ disk was highly congruent, and the mandibular head was encased tightly by the mandibular fossa with a thin disk separating the joint into two compartments. Histologically, the articular surfaces were lined with dense fibrous connective tissue that gradually transitioned into one to two cell thick layer of hyaline-like cartilage. The disk fibers were aligned primarily in the rostrocaudal direction and had occasional lacuna with chondrocyte-like cells. The disk was composed primarily of collagen type 1. Biochemical analysis indicates sulfated glycosaminoglycan content lower than other mammals, but significantly higher in male sea otters than female sea otters. Finally, mechanical analysis demonstrated a disk that was not only stronger and stiffer in the rostrocaudal direction than the mediolateral direction but also significantly stronger and stiffer in females than males. We conclude that the congruent design of the TMJ, thin disk, biochemical content, and mechanical properties all reflect a structure–function relationship within the TMJ disk that is likely designed for the sea otter’s hard diet and continuous food intake. PMID:26664997

  1. Ruptured disc after arthroscopic repositioning in the temporomandibular joint: a retrospective magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Cai, Xieyi; Yang, Chi; Wang, Shaoyi; Huang, Linjian

    2014-07-01

    Our aim was to explore the incidence of rupture after arthroscopic repositioning of the disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by reviewing magnetic resonance images (MRI) of the TMJ taken before and after operation, and to investigate correlations retrospectively. We studied 247 patients with anterior disc displacement of the TMJ, and categorised them into 3 groups based on the postoperative MRI. The first group comprised those whose disc ruptured after repositioning, the second those who had a possible rupture of the disc after repositioning, and the third had no rupture of the disc after repositioning. Age, sex, duration of symptoms, maximum incisal mouth opening, whether the anterior disc displacement was unilateral or bilateral, and the Wilkes stage, were included in the analysis. The incidence of rupture (5/247) was 2%. Weak points at the intermediate zone of the disc were found in 4 of the 5 joints. The patients whose discs ruptured were significantly younger than the other 2 groups (p=0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in preoperative duration of symptoms and mouth opening among the groups. The proportions of unilateral and bilateral disc displacement (p=0.047) and Wilkes stage (p=0.027) differed among the 3 groups. The Wilkes stages was significantly more advanced in the ruptured group than in the other 2 groups (p=0.027) with 4/5 being bilateral. The weak point in the intermediate zone of the disc on MRI could be a sign of rupture. Teenagers and young adults with anterior disc displacement without reduction, particularly those in whom it is bilateral, are at a higher risk of a rupture after repositioning of the disc by arthroscopy.

  2. Functional anatomy of the equine temporomandibular joint: Collagen fiber texture of the articular surfaces.

    PubMed

    Adams, K; Schulz-Kornas, E; Arzi, B; Failing, K; Vogelsberg, J; Staszyk, C

    2016-11-01

    In the last decade, the equine masticatory apparatus has received much attention. Numerous studies have emphasized the importance of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in the functional process of mastication. However, ultrastructural and histological data providing a basis for biomechanical and histopathological considerations are not available. The aim of the present study was to analyze the architecture of the collagen fiber apparatus in the articular surfaces of the equine TMJ to reveal typical morphological features indicating biomechanical adaptions. Therefore, the collagen fiber alignment was visualized using the split-line technique in 16 adult warmblood horses without any history of TMJ disorders. Within the central two-thirds of the articular surfaces of the articular tubercle, the articular disc and the mandibular head, split-lines ran in a correspondent rostrocaudal direction. In the lateral and medial aspects of these articular surfaces, the split-line pattern varied, displaying curved arrangements in the articular disc and punctual split-lines in the bony components. Mediolateral orientated split-lines were found in the rostral and caudal border of the articular disc and in the mandibular fossa. The complex movements during the equine chewing cycle are likely assigned to different areas of the TMJ. The split-line pattern of the equine TMJ is indicative of a relative movement of the joint components in a preferential rostrocaudal direction which is consigned to the central aspects of the TMJ. The lateral and medial aspects of the articular surfaces provide split-line patterns that indicate movements particularly around a dorsoventral axis.

  3. Characterization of the Temporomandibular Joint of Southern Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris nereis).

    PubMed

    Lieske, Danielle; Vapniarsky, Natalia; Verstraete, Frank J M; Leale, Dustin M; Young, Colleen; Arzi, Boaz

    2015-01-01

    The structure-function relationship of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of southern sea otter has largely not been described. This study aims to describe the histological, biochemical, and biomechanical features of the TMJ disk in the southern sea otter. The TMJ disks from fresh cadaver heads of southern sea otter adult males (n = 8) and females (n = 8) acquired from strandings were examined. Following macroscopical evaluation, the TMJs were investigated for their histological, mechanical, and biochemical properties. We found that the sea otter TMJ disks are, in general, similar to other carnivores. Macroscopically, the TMJ disk was highly congruent, and the mandibular head was encased tightly by the mandibular fossa with a thin disk separating the joint into two compartments. Histologically, the articular surfaces were lined with dense fibrous connective tissue that gradually transitioned into one to two cell thick layer of hyaline-like cartilage. The disk fibers were aligned primarily in the rostrocaudal direction and had occasional lacuna with chondrocyte-like cells. The disk was composed primarily of collagen type 1. Biochemical analysis indicates sulfated glycosaminoglycan content lower than other mammals, but significantly higher in male sea otters than female sea otters. Finally, mechanical analysis demonstrated a disk that was not only stronger and stiffer in the rostrocaudal direction than the mediolateral direction but also significantly stronger and stiffer in females than males. We conclude that the congruent design of the TMJ, thin disk, biochemical content, and mechanical properties all reflect a structure-function relationship within the TMJ disk that is likely designed for the sea otter's hard diet and continuous food intake.

  4. Temporomandibular joint osseous morphology in a consecutive sample of ankylosing spondylitis patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Remus, C.; Major, P.; Gomez-Vargas, A.; Petrikowski, G.; Hernandez-Chavez, A.; Gonzalez-Marin, E.; Russell, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osseous morphology in a consecutive sample of Mexican patients with ankylosing spondylitis.
METHODS—Consecutive patients with a diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis who attended two secondary care outpatient rheumatology clinics were included in the study. Patients had a rheumatological assessment using a structured questionnaire and examination. Recorded variables included demographic data, disease characteristics, TMJ symptoms, and axial mobility measurements. Hypocycloidal tomography of the TMJ was obtained on all subjects. Radiographic variables included condyle position, superior joint space, range of movement, condylar osseous changes, and temporal osseous changes. Patients also underwent standard cervical spine radiography. A control group of normal people without either TMJ symptoms or systemic rheumatic disease was obtained.
RESULTS—65 subjects were studied (65 right sided and 63 left sided tomograms). The control group consisted of 22 individuals. Both groups were similar in age [33 (SD 11) v 34 (9) years, P = 0.8]. Patients with ankylosing spondylitis had more variability in TMJ mobility than controls (P < 0.05) and showed increased frequency of condylar erosions (P < 0.01), flattening (P < 0.01), sclerosis (P < 0.01), and temporal flattening (P < 0.01). Condylar erosions were associated with longer duration of ankylosing spondylitis (P < 0.05), neck complaints (P < 0.05), and atlantoaxial subluxation (P < 0.05).
CONCLUSIONS—TMJ involvement is frequent in this population of patients with ankylosing spondylitis and is associated with variables that suggest more severe disease.

 PMID:9068282

  5. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC APPEARANCE OF THE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT IN 1018 ASYMPTOMATIC HORSES: A MULTI-INSTITUTION STUDY.

    PubMed

    Carmalt, James L; Kneissl, Sibylle; Rawlinson, Jennifer E; Zwick, Timo; Zekas, Lisa; Ohlerth, Stefanie; Bienert-Zeit, Astrid

    2016-05-01

    Published descriptions of nonseptic arthritis of the equine temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are rare and large studies investigating variations in the TMJ for asymptomatic horses are lacking. The objectives of this cross-sectional, retrospective, multi-institutional study were to describe anatomical variations in the TMJ detected using computed tomography (CT) in an equid population asymptomatic for TMJ disease and determine whether these variations were associated with patient signalment, reason for CT examination, or CT slice width. Medical records at eight hospitals were searched for horses that had head/neck CT scans and no clinical signs of TMJ disease. Age, breed, sex, clinical presentation, and CT slice width data were recorded. Alterations in CT contour and density of the mandibular condyles, mandibular fossae, and TMJ intra-articular discs were described for each horse. Generalized logistic regression was used to test associations between anatomical variations and horse age. A total of 1018 horses were sampled. Anatomical variations were found in TMJ CT images for 40% of horses and 29% of joints. These were dichotomous with regard to age. Horses <1 year old commonly had alterations in the shape and density of the mandibular condyle. Older horses commonly had spherical hypodensities within the mandibular condyles consistent with bone cysts; and hyperdense regions of the intra-articular disc consistent with dystrophic mineralization. Findings indicated that TMJ anatomic variations were common in CT images of younger and older horses asymptomatic for TMJ disease. Future studies are needed to more definitively characterize these CT variations using gross pathology and histopathology.

  6. Transcriptional regulation of proteoglycan 4 by 17β-estradiol in immortalized baboon temporomandibular joint disc cells.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Jennifer S; Akula Suresh Babu, Ramya; Navarro, Mary M; LeBaron, Richard G

    2014-04-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMDs) affect a significant portion of the population of the USA, with the majority of those seeking treatment being women of childbearing age. Owing to this striking sexual dimorphism it has been postulated that sex hormones play a role in the maintenance of normal temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function. Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) is a secreted lubricating molecule required for maintaining low frictional levels within articular joints; however, its role in the TMJ is not well characterized. In this study we describe the development of immortalized baboon cells isolated from specific regions of the TMJ disc and their use in the investigation of PRG4 expression and localization patterns in the TMJ. We identified conserved estrogen response elements within the 5' flanking region of the PRG4 gene of several species, and found that treatment of baboon TMJ disc cells with estrogen led to reduced PRG4 promoter activity and reduced expression of PRG4 mRNA in vitro. The observed negative regulation of PRG4 by estrogen could lead to increased friction and degradation of joint components over time. This study, for the first time, provides evidence of the regulatory potential of estrogen on PRG4 gene expression and suggests a novel etiology for the gender disparity observed among TMD patients.

  7. Temporomandibular joint reconstruction with a 2-part chrome-cobalt prosthesis, chondro-osseous graft, and silastic: clinical and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Kummoona, Raja

    2009-11-01

    Seventy-six patients including 27 females and 49 males, with ages ranging between 4 and 35 years (mean, 19.5 y), all experienced loss of weight, stiff temporomandibular joints and inability to chew food, and facial deformities. These patients were treated in the Maxillofacial Unit, Surgical Specialties Hospital, Medical City, Baghdad, Iraq, using 4 different techniques according to the requirement of each case and the facilities available. These patients were divided into 4 groups: the first group consists of 16 children (21.06%) treated with a chondro-osseous graft; the second group, 10 children (13.16%) treated with a 2-part chrome-cobalt prosthesis; the third group, 32 children (42.11%) treated with a Sialastic rubber silicone implant (Koken Co, Tokyo, Japan); and the fourth group, 18 children (23.69%) treated with interposition arthroplasty with a temporalis muscle flap. The follow-up period of the cases ranged between 3 and 15 years. Experimental studies were done on using rabbits to assess the viability of the chondro-osseous graft and on monkeys to demonstrate the biological acceptability of the 2-part chrome-cobalt prosthesis. The aim of this clinical and experimental study was to show our experience in managing difficult tasks that craniofacial or maxillofacial surgeons may face and to share these experiences with other colleagues all over the world.

  8. Association of Temporomandibular Joint Signs & Symptoms with Dental Fluorosis & Skeletal Manifestations in Endemic Fluoride Areas of Dungarpur District, Rajasthan, India

    PubMed Central

    Asawa, Kailash; Bhat, Nagesh; Tak, Mridula; Shinde, Kushal; Jain, Sandeep

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Endemic fluorosis resulting from high fluoride concentration in groundwater is a major public health problem. India is among the numerous nations, where fluoride sullied groundwater is creating wellbeing issues. Safe drinking water in rural areas of India is predominantly rely on groundwater sources, which are exceptionally contaminated with fluoride. Aim To investigate the association of temporomandibular joint Signs & Symptoms with Dental Fluorosis & Skeletal Manifestations among people living in Dad, Bokersal & Deotalab villages of Dungarpur District, Rajasthan, India. Materials and Methods The study group consisted of 750 subjects who were born & brought up in Dad, Bokersal & Deotalab villages of Dungarpur District, Rajasthan. Temporomandibular joint & Dental fluorosis was assessed by performing type III clinical examination according to WHO guidelines (1997). For the assessment of skeletal manifestations, participants were asked to perform three diagnostic tests: (1)Touching the toes without bending the knees; (2) Touching the chest with the chin; (3) Stretching the arms sideways & folding the arms to touch the back of the head. Chi Square test & Multiple Logistic Regression were applied for statistical analysis. Results Among the 750 (462 males & 288 females) who participated in the study, 53% had moderate grade of dental fluorosis. The most prominent symptom suggesting Temporomandibular Joint Disorder was the clicking sound affecting 21.4% population.(p>0.001). TMJ Signs & Symptoms were prominent in the age group of 45-54 years & males were highly affected than females. Conclusion Clinical examination of TMJ in Dental Fluorosis & Skeletal Fluorosis subjects showed a significant association with Dental Fluorosis & Skeletal Fluorosis. PMID:26816986

  9. Splint therapy for disc displacement with reduction of the temporomandibular joint. part I: modified mandibular splint therapy.

    PubMed

    Huang, I-Yueh; Wu, Ju-Hui; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Chen, Chao-Ming; Chen, Chun-Ming; Yang, Yi-Hsin

    2011-08-01

    The aims of this preliminary study were to present a modified mandibular splint together with a treatment regimen and to evaluate their effects on the treatment of reciprocal joint sounds of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The study participants were recruited from 312 consecutive patients in the temporomandibular disorder clinic of a medical center in Taiwan from January 2003 to December 2003. From among these, 59 cases with typical reciprocal clicking were selected for this study. All participants were treated with a modified mandibular splint and then followed up for 6 months. Successful treatment was defined as leading to the disappearance of the joint sounds of TMJ, as described by patients. Based on clinical evaluation, the overall success rate was 71.2% (42/59) with minimal temporary complications. Patients with clicking at less than 3.5 cm of interincisal opening had a success rate of 92.5%, which was higher than the success rate of patients with clicking at a mouth opening of 3.5 cm or more. This study showed that a modified mandibular splint can be used to treat reciprocal clicking of the TMJ effectively and encouraged us to conduct further study on the efficacy of this splint to treat disc displacement with reduction of TMJ using magnetic resonance imaging examination.

  10. Unilateral Ankylosis of Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) with Contralateral Condylar Aplasia and Related Orthopedic Deformity - Syndromic or Nonsyndromic?

    PubMed

    Vijay, Pradkhshana; Pardhe, Nilesh; Sunil, Vsb; Bajpai, Manas; Chhibber, Neha

    2015-01-01

    Condylar aplasia which means "failure of development" is a rare condition and can be unilateral or bilateral. Mandibular condylar Aplasia without any association with syndrome is extremely rare. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis results from trauma, infection and inadequate surgical treatment of the condylar area. Congenital cases are very rare. We report case of congenital unilateral aplasia of left mandibular condyle with ankylosis of right condyle, with an associated orthopedic deformity in a nine-year-old male patient, which may be a part of some unreported syndrome that has not been mentioned so far in literature. As per our best knowledge, no other case including such clinical features has been reported.

  11. Congenital infiltrating lipomatosis of the face with exophytic temporomandibular joint ankylosis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sahai, S; Rajan, S; Singh, N; Arora, H

    2013-01-01

    Congenital infiltrating lipomatosis of the face (CIL-F) is a rare lipomatous lesion with diffuse fatty infiltration of tissues and hyperplasia of underlying bone. We report clinical and CT findings in an unusual case of CIL-F presenting with progressive hemifacial asymmetry, manifesting as severely restricted mouth opening owing to exophytic temporomandibular joint ankylosis. The role of imaging in diagnosis is presented with a review of the literature. Differential diagnosis of CIL-F and its exclusion as a cause of hemifacial hyperplasia are also discussed.

  12. An adult case of temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis treated with splint therapy and the subsequent orthodontic occlusal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Hanefi; Oztaş, Evren; Gençel, Burç; Taşan, Demet Ataman; Oztaş, Derya

    2011-10-01

    Herein we report treatment for a 19-year-old female patient with severe osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint. The patient had severe open bite with a Class II molar relationship. She had limited mouth opening and pain. Clinical examination and magnetic resonance imaging revealed that she had anterior disc displacement without reduction. By splint therapy, limited mouth opening and pain was eliminated, but an anterior open bite developed after the treatment. By orthodontic treatment, an acceptable occlusion was achieved with a Class I molar relationship.

  13. Estradiol-potentiated cadherin-11 in synovial membrane involves in temporomandibular joint inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kou, Xiao-Xing; Wang, Xue-Dong; Li, Chen-Shuang; Bi, Rui-Yun; Meng, Zhen; Li, Bei; Zhou, Yan-Heng; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2014-09-01

    Estrogen is involved in inflammation/pain of temporomandibular joint (TMJ), but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Cadherin-11 plays an essential role in synovial inflammation. This study examined whether estrogen could potentiate cadherin-11 in synoviocytes and contribute to TMJ inflammatory pain. Female rats were ovariectomized, treated with increasing doses of 17β-estradiol for 10 days, and injected intra-articularly with complete Freund's adjuvant to induce TMJ inflammation. The expression of cadherin-11 in synovial membrane was evaluated. TMJ pain was blocked with intra-articular injection of anti-cadherin-11 antibody and evaluated by head withdrawal threshold. Primary TMJ synoviocytes were treated with estradiol and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α or blocked with anti-cadherin-11 antibody to assess the expression of cadherin-11, interleukin (IL)-6, cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2), and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). We observed that estradiol potentiated the inflammation-induced expression of cadherin-11 in the synoviocytes of synovial membrane from inflamed TMJ. Estradiol induced cadherin-11 expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in primary synoviocytes and further potentiated the induction of cadherin-11 by TNF-α in synoviocytes. Furthermore, an estrogen receptor antagonist or a NF-κB inhibitor partially blocked the effects of estradiol on cadherin-11 induction in the synovial membrane. Blocking cadherin-11 partially reversed the TMJ inflammatory pain and estradiol-potentiated proliferation of synovial lining cells accompanied with iNOS expression. In addition, blocking cadherin-11 reversed TNF-α-induced and estradiol-potentiated transcription of IL-6, COX-2, and iNOS in primary synoviocytes. These results suggest that estrogen aggravated TMJ inflammatory pain partially through cadherin-11-mediated release of proinflammatory cytokines and enzymes in the synoviocytes.

  14. Single- or multiple-session viscosupplementation protocols for temporomandibular joint degenerative disorders: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Guarda-Nardini, L; Rossi, A; Arboretti, R; Bonnini, S; Stellini, E; Manfredini, D

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effectiveness of two single-session protocols, either adopting high- (protocol A) or medium-molecular weight hyaluronic acid (protocol B), with the reference five-session protocol of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) lavage plus viscosupplementation (protocol C) in the management of chronic TMJ degenerative disorders. A randomized clinical trial (RCT) with ten participants per treatment group was designed, with multiple observation points, ending at 6 months after treatment. Pain levels on a 10-point VAS scale were selected as the primary outcome variable to rate treatment effectiveness, along with a number of secondary outcome parameters. Findings showed that Group C patients had the highest decrease in pain levels. Nonparametric permutation analyses revealed that the global effect of treatment was significantly different between the three protocols (P = 0·024). Pairwise comparisons showed that the differences of treatment effect between the two single-session interventions were negligible (global P-value = 0·93). On the contrary, the five-session protocol was significantly superior to both single-session protocols (global P-values ranging from 0·003 to 0·012). In conclusion, in a population of age-, sex-, and psychosocial aspects-matched study groups, the standard of reference five-session protocol proved to be superior at 6 months as far as the decrease in pain levels was concerned, whilst there were no differences between the two single-session interventions. The absence of differences in treatment effect as for some other secondary clinical outcome variables may suggest that there is further space for future investigations attempting to reduce the number of multiple interventions for TMJ viscosupplementation.

  15. Infliximab partially alleviates the bite force reduction in a mouse model of temporomandibular joint pain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Hyon; Son, Chang-Nam; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Cho, Ho-Chan; Jung, Sung-Won; Hur, Ji An; Baek, Won-Ki; Jung, Hye Ra; Hong, Ji Hee

    2015-05-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder is clinically important because of its prevalence, chronicity, and therapy-refractoriness of the pain. In this study, we investigated the effect of infliximab in a mouse model of TMJ pain using a specially-engineered transducer for evaluating the changes in bite force (BF). The mice were randomly divided into three groups (7 mice per group): the control group, the complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) group, and the infliximab group. BF was measured at day 0 (baseline BF). After measuring the baseline BF, CFA or incomplete Freund's adjuvant was injected into both TMJs and then the changes in BF were measured at days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, and 13 after the TMJ injection. For measuring the BF, we used a custom-built BF transducer. Control, CFA, and infliximab groups showed similar baseline BF at day 0. From day 1, a significant reduction in BF was observed in the CFA group, and this reduction in BF was statistically significant compared to that in the control group (P < 0.05). This reduction in BF was maintained until day 7, and BF started to recover gradually from day 9. In the infliximab group also, the reduction in BF was observed on day 1, and this reduction was maintained until day 7. However, the degree of reduction in BF was less remarkable compared to that in the CFA group. The reduction in BF caused by injection of CFA into the TMJ could be partially alleviated by the injection of anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha, infliximab.

  16. Histological evaluation of the temporomandibular joint after bilateral vertical ramus mandibular distraction in a canine model.

    PubMed

    Sant'Anna, Eduardo F; Gomez, David F; Polley, John W; Sumner, Rick D; Williams, James M; Figueroa, Alvaro A; Bolognese, Ana Maria

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to histologically evaluate the effect of bilateral vertical mandibular distraction osteogenesis (DO) on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in a canine model. Eight male beagle dogs underwent DO, with the placement of single-vector internal distractors. One unoperated animal served as control. After a latency period of 7 days, distraction was performed at a rate of 1 mm a day for an average of 12 days. The animals were divided into two groups (n = 4) and sacrificed after one or two months of consolidation. Eighteen TMJs were prepared for histological evaluation. Control TMJs surfaces were smooth, with no irregularities and trabecular bone was thick and multiply connected. In the one-month group, thinning of the trabecular bone was evident. The trabeculae were long, not multiply connected, parallel to each other and perpendicular to the articular surface. Although overall fibrous-cartilaginous tissues covering the TMJs were maintained with no signs of degenerative changes, one condyle from the one-month group had depressions and erosions of the fibro-cartilage layer and subcortical bone. In the two-month group, overall bone and cartilage architecture was more similar to the control specimens. This study indicates that, in the short term, gross changes can occur in the TMJ after bilateral mandibular vertical ramus distraction. These changes seem to be a process of biological adaptation to the pressure and functional changes secondary to surgery and distraction. However, long-term studies are needed to confirm whether the changes are completely reversible.

  17. Timing interventions in relation to temporomandibular joint closed lock duration: a systematic review of 'locking duration'.

    PubMed

    Al-Baghdadi, M; Durham, J; Steele, J

    2014-01-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) 'closed lock' (CL) is a clinical condition causing TMJ pain and limited mouth opening (painful locking) that is mostly attributed to disc displacement without reduction (DDwoR), or less commonly to anchored disc phenomenon (ADP). Both conditions are described clinically as CL that can be 'acute' or 'chronic' depending on the duration of locking. There is, however, no consensus about the duration of locking that defines the acute state and its effect on the success of interventions. This review paper, therefore, aims to provide: (i) a narrative review of the pathophysiological need for early intervention in DDwoR and the clinical implications of acute/chronic CL stages on the management pathway; (ii) a systematic review investigating the effects of locking duration on the success of interventions for CL management. Electronic and manual searches until mid-August 2013 were conducted for English-language studies of any design investigating the effects of non-surgical and surgical interventions for acute or chronic CL (DDwoR or ADP). A total of 626 records were identified, and 113 studies were included. Data extraction and quality assessment were completed for all included studies. Included studies were, however, heterogeneous and mostly of poor-quality leading to contradictory and inconsistent evidence on the effect of the duration of locking on treatment outcomes. Future high-quality trials investigating the effect of CL duration on treatment outcome are needed. At present, early intervention by 'unlock' mandibular manipulation seems to be the most practical and realistic approach that can be attempted first in every CL patient as an initial diagnostic/therapeutic approach.

  18. Temporomandibular joint pain: a critical role for Trpv4 in the trigeminal ganglion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Williams, Susan H; McNulty, Amy L; Hong, Ji Hee; Lee, Suk Hee; Rothfusz, Nicole E; Parekh, Puja K; Moore, Carlene; Gereau, Robert W; Taylor, Andrea B; Wang, Fan; Guilak, Farshid; Liedtke, Wolfgang

    2013-08-01

    Temporomandibular joint disorder (TMJD) is known for its mastication-associated pain. TMJD is medically relevant because of its prevalence, severity, chronicity, the therapy-refractoriness of its pain, and its largely elusive pathogenesis. Against this background, we sought to investigate the pathogenetic contributions of the calcium-permeable TRPV4 ion channel, robustly expressed in the trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons, to TMJ inflammation and pain behavior. We demonstrate here that TRPV4 is critical for TMJ-inflammation-evoked pain behavior in mice and that trigeminal ganglion pronociceptive changes are TRPV4-dependent. As a quantitative metric, bite force was recorded as evidence of masticatory sensitization, in keeping with human translational studies. In Trpv4(-/-) mice with TMJ inflammation, attenuation of bite force was significantly less than in wildtype (WT) mice. Similar effects were seen with systemic application of a specific TRPV4 inhibitor. TMJ inflammation and mandibular bony changes were apparent after injections of complete Freund adjuvant but were remarkably independent of the Trpv4 genotype. It was intriguing that, as a result of TMJ inflammation, WT mice exhibited significant upregulation of TRPV4 and phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in TMJ-innervating trigeminal sensory neurons, which were absent in Trpv4(-/-) mice. Mice with genetically-impaired MEK/ERK phosphorylation in neurons showed resistance to reduction of bite force similar to that of Trpv4(-/-) mice. Thus, TRPV4 is necessary for masticatory sensitization in TMJ inflammation and probably functions upstream of MEK/ERK phosphorylation in trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons in vivo. TRPV4 therefore represents a novel pronociceptive target in TMJ inflammation and should be considered a target of interest in human TMJD.

  19. Distribution of pericellular matrix molecules in the temporomandibular joint and their chondroprotective effects against inflammation.

    PubMed

    Chu, Wern Cui; Zhang, Shipin; Sng, Timothy J; Ong, Yu Jie; Tan, Wen-Li; Ang, Vivien Y; Foldager, Casper B; Toh, Wei Seong

    2017-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) determine the distribution and synthesis of pericellular matrix (PCM) molecules (collagen VI, collagen IV and laminin) in rat temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and (2) investigate the effects of PCM molecules on chondrocytes against inflammation in osteoarthritis. Four zones (fibrous, proliferating, mature and hypertrophic) of condylar cartilage and three bands (anterior, intermediate and posterior) of disc were analysed by immunohistochemistry for the presence of PCM molecules in rat TMJs. Isolated chondrocytes were pre-treated with PCM molecules before being subjected to interleukin (IL)-1β treatment to stimulate inflammation. The responses of the chondrocytes were analysed using gene expression, nitric oxide release and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 production measures. Histomorphometric analyses revealed that the highest areal deposition of collagen VI (67.4%), collagen IV (45.7%) and laminin (52.4%) was in the proliferating zone of TMJ condylar cartilage. No significant difference in the distribution of PCM molecules was noted among the three bands of the TMJ disc. All three PCM molecules were expressed intracellularly by chondrocytes cultured in the monolayer. Among the PCM molecules, pre-treatment with collagen VI enhanced cellular proliferation, ameliorated IL-1β-induced MMP-3, MMP-9, MMP-13 and inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression, and attenuated the downregulation of cartilage matrix genes, including collagen I, aggrecan and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). Concurrently, collagen VI pretreatment inhibited nitric oxide and MMP-13 production. Our study demonstrates for the first time the distribution and role of PCM molecules, particularly collagen VI, in the protection of chondrocytes against inflammation.

  20. Reactive arthritis in relation to internal derangements of the temporomandibular joint: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Lund, Bodil; Holmlund, Anders; Wretlind, Bengt; Jalal, Shah; Rosén, Annika

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to find out if reactive arthritis was involved in the aetiology of chronic closed lock of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) by looking for bacterial antigens in the synovial membrane of the TMJ, and by studying the antibody serology and carriage of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) B27 in patients with chronic closed lock. Patients with reciprocal clicking and healthy subjects acted as controls. We studied a total of 43 consecutive patients, 15 with chronic closed lock, 13 with reciprocal clicking, and 15 healthy controls with no internal derangements of the TMJ. Venous blood samples were collected from all subjects for measurement of concentrations of HLA tissue antigen and serology against Chlamydia trachomatis, Yersinia enterocolitica, Salmonella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Samples of synovial tissue from patients with closed lock and reciprocal clicking were obtained during discectomy and divided into two pieces, the first of which was tested by strand displacement amplification for the presence of C trachomatis, and the second of which was analysed for the presence of species-specific bacterial DNA using 16s rRNA pan-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). There were no significant differences between the groups in the incidence of antibodies against M pneumoniae, Salmonella spp. or Y enterocolitica. No patient had antibodies towards C trachomatis or C jejuni. We found no bacterial DNA in the synovial fluid from any patient. The HLA B27 antigen was present in 2/15 subjects in both the closed lock and control groups, and none in the reciprocal clicking group. In conclusion, reactive arthritis does not seem to be the mechanism of internal derangement of the TMJ.

  1. The function of the disco-muscular apparatus in the human temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Bade, H

    1999-01-01

    The morphology and function of the disco-muscular apparatus of the human TMJ is a controversial subject. Connections between the muscles which move the mandible and the "disco-capsular complex" have been described in a contradictory way. The disco-muscular apparatus is also described as being more extensive than that of the M. pterygoideus alone to include to the Mm. temporalis and masseter. However, the involvement of the latter is considered to be a peripheral variation of the normal anatomy and of little, if any, functional significance. The existence of independent relationships between the deep portions of the masseter and temporal muscles and the disco-capsular apparatus of the human TMJ is rarely discussed or explained. The morphologic findings were derived from fixed and unfixed human temporomandibular joints (TMJ) of varying ages and both sexes, whereby the functional maturity of the masticatory apparatus was taken into consideration. The results of the study show that aside from fibers originating from the superior venter of the M. pterygoideus lateralis, additional muscle or connective tissue fibers from the perimysium of the M. masseter are inserted to varying extents into the disc. The same is true for the M. temporalis, which is also directly connected to the disc via muscular or fibrous elements, or indirectly via fibers from the M. masseter. The insertion of the M. pterygoideus lateralis is always in the medial portion of the Discus articularis and those of the Mm. temporalis and masseter in the middle and lateral portions of the disc respectively. It is highly probable that a direct force transfer through the Mm. temporalis and masseter to the articular disc takes place, and that these muscles contribute to the movement of the disc during jaw movement, whereas the size and form of the muscle insertions are subject to a great deal of individual variation.

  2. Temporomandibular Joint Condylar Changes Following Maxillomandibular Advancement and Articular Disc Repositioning

    PubMed Central

    Goncalves, Joao Roberto; Wolford, Larry Miller; Cassano, Daniel Serra; da Porciuncula, Guilherme; Paniagua, Beatriz; Cevidanes, Lucia Helena

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate condylar changes 1 year after bimaxillary surgical advancement with or without articular disc repositioning using longitudinal quantitative measurements in 3-dimensional (3D) temporomandibular joint (TMJ) models. Methods Twenty-seven patients treated with maxillomandibular advancement (MMA) underwent cone-beam computed tomography before surgery immediately after surgery and at 1-year follow-up. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging before surgery to assess disc displacements. Ten patients without disc displacement received MMA only. Seventeen patients with articular disc displacement received MMA with simultaneous TMJ disc repositioning (MMA-Drep). Pre- and postsurgical 3D models were superimposed using a voxel-based registration on the cranial base. Results The location, direction, and magnitude of condylar changes were displayed and quantified by graphic semitransparent overlays and 3D color-coded surface distance maps. Rotational condylar displacements were similar in the 2 groups. Immediately after surgery, condylar translational displacements of at least 1.5 mm occurred in a posterior, superior, or mediolateral direction in patients treated with MMA, whereas patients treated with MMA-Drep presented more marked anterior, inferior, and mediolateral condylar displacements. One year after surgery, more than half the patients in the 2 groups presented condylar resorptive changes of at least 1.5 mm. Patients treated with MMA-Drep presented condylar bone apposition of at least 1.5 mm at the superior surface in 26.4%, the anterior surface in 23.4%, the posterior surface in 29.4%, the medial surface in 5.9%, or the lateral surface in 38.2%, whereas bone apposition was not observed in patients treated with MMA. Conclusions One year after surgery, condylar resorptive changes greater than 1.5 mm were observed in the 2 groups. Articular disc repositioning facilitated bone apposition in localized condylar regions in patients treated with MMA

  3. Small field of view cone beam CT temporomandibular joint imaging dosimetry

    PubMed Central

    Lukat, T D; Wong, J C M; Lam, E W N

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Cone beam CT (CBCT) is generally accepted as the imaging modality of choice for visualisation of the osseous structures of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The purpose of this study was to compare the radiation dose of a protocol for CBCT TMJ imaging using a large field of view Hitachi CB MercuRay™ unit (Hitachi Medical Systems, Tokyo, Japan) with an alternative approach that utilizes two CBCT acquisitions of the right and left TMJs using the Kodak 9000® 3D system (Carestream, Rochester, NY). Methods: 25 optically stimulated luminescence dosemeters were placed in various locations of an anthropomorphic RANDO® Man phantom (Alderson Research Laboratories, Stanford, CT). Dosimetric measurements were performed for each technique, and effective doses were calculated using the 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection tissue weighting factor recommendations for all protocols. Results: The radiation effective dose for the CB MercuRay technique was 223.6 ± 1.1 μSv compared with 9.7 ± 0.1 μSv (child), 13.5 ± 0.9 μSv (adolescent/small adult) and 20.5 ± 1.3 μSv (adult) for the bilateral Kodak acquisitions. Conclusions: Acquisitions of individual right and left TMJ volumes using the Kodak 9000 3D CBCT imaging system resulted in a more than ten-fold reduction in the effective dose compared with the larger single field acquisition with the Hitachi CB MercuRay. This decrease is made even more significant when lower tube potential and tube current settings are used. PMID:24048693

  4. Accurate 3D kinematic measurement of temporomandibular joint using X-ray fluoroscopic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Takaharu; Matsumoto, Akiko; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Matsumoto, Ken; Kakimoto, Naoya; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2014-04-01

    Accurate measurement and analysis of 3D kinematics of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is very important for assisting clinical diagnosis and treatment of prosthodontics and orthodontics, and oral surgery. This study presents a new 3D kinematic measurement technique of the TMJ using X-ray fluoroscopic images, which can easily obtain the TMJ kinematic data in natural motion. In vivo kinematics of the TMJ (maxilla and mandibular bone) is determined using a feature-based 2D/3D registration, which uses beads silhouette on fluoroscopic images and 3D surface bone models with beads. The 3D surface models of maxilla and mandibular bone with beads were created from CT scans data of the subject using the mouthpiece with the seven strategically placed beads. In order to validate the accuracy of pose estimation for the maxilla and mandibular bone, computer simulation test was performed using five patterns of synthetic tantalum beads silhouette images. In the clinical applications, dynamic movement during jaw opening and closing was conducted, and the relative pose of the mandibular bone with respect to the maxilla bone was determined. The results of computer simulation test showed that the root mean square errors were sufficiently smaller than 1.0 mm and 1.0 degree. In the results of clinical application, during jaw opening from 0.0 to 36.8 degree of rotation, mandibular condyle exhibited 19.8 mm of anterior sliding relative to maxillary articular fossa, and these measurement values were clinically similar to the previous reports. Consequently, present technique was thought to be suitable for the 3D TMJ kinematic analysis.

  5. Differential gene expression in the perichondrium and cartilage of the neonatal mouse temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, RJ; Serrano, M; So, S

    2009-01-01

    Objective To discover genes differentially expressed in the perichondrium of the mandibular condylar cartilage (MCC) that might enhance regenerative medicine or orthopedic therapies directed at the tissues of the temporomandibular joint Design We used targeted gene arrays (osteogenesis, stem cell) to identify genes preferentially expressed in the perichondrium (PC) and the cartilaginous (C) portions of the MCC in 2 day-old mice Results Genes with higher expression in the PC sample related to growth factor ligand-receptor interactions (FGF-13 (6.4X), FGF-18 (4X), NCAM (2X); PGDF receptors, TGF-β, and IGF-1), the Notch isoforms (especially Notch 3 and 4) and their ligands, or structural proteins/ proteoglycans (collagen XIV (21X), collagen XVIII (4X), decorin (2.5X)). Genes with higher expression in the C sample consisted mostly of known cartilage-specific genes (aggrecan (11X), procollagens X (33X), XI (14X), IX (4.5X), Sox 9 (4.4X), and Indian hedgehog (6.7X)). However, the functional or structural roles of several genes that were expressed at higher levels in the PC sample are unclear (myogenic factor 9 (9X), tooth-related genes such as tuftelin (2.5X) and dentin sialophosphoprotein (1.6X), VEGF–B (2X) and its receptors (3–4X), and sclerostin (1.7X)). Conclusions FGF, Notch, and TGF-β signaling may be important regulators of MCC proliferation and differentiation; the relatively high expression of genes such as myogenic factor 6 and VEGF–B and its receptors suggests a degree of unsuspected plasticity in PC cells. PMID:19627518

  6. Realization of masticatory movement by 3-dimensional simulation of the temporomandibular joint and the masticatory muscles.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-Tae; Lee, Jae-Gi; Won, Sung-Yoon; Lee, Sang-Hee; Cha, Jung-Yul; Kim, Hee-Jin

    2013-07-01

    Masticatory muscles are closely involved in mastication, pronunciation, and swallowing, and it is therefore important to study the specific functions and dynamics of the mandibular and masticatory muscles. However, the shortness of muscle fibers and the diversity of movement directions make it difficult to study and simplify the dynamics of mastication. The purpose of this study was to use 3-dimensional (3D) simulation to observe the functions and movements of each of the masticatory muscles and the mandible while chewing. To simulate the masticatory movement, computed tomographic images were taken from a single Korean volunteer (30-year-old man), and skull image data were reconstructed in 3D (Mimics; Materialise, Leuven, Belgium). The 3D-reconstructed masticatory muscles were then attached to the 3D skull model. The masticatory movements were animated using Maya (Autodesk, San Rafael, CA) based on the mandibular motion path. During unilateral chewing, the mandible was found to move laterally toward the functional side by contracting the contralateral lateral pterygoid and ipsilateral temporalis muscles. During the initial mouth opening, only hinge movement was observed at the temporomandibular joint. During this period, the entire mandible rotated approximately 13 degrees toward the bicondylar horizontal plane. Continued movement of the mandible to full mouth opening occurred simultaneously with sliding and hinge movements, and the mandible rotated approximately 17 degrees toward the center of the mandibular ramus. The described approach can yield data for use in face animation and other simulation systems and for elucidating the functional components related to contraction and relaxation of muscles during mastication.

  7. Gap Arthroplasty versus Interpositional Arthroplasty for Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Junli; Liang, Limin; Jiang, Hua; Gu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Gap arthroplasty (GA) and interpositional arthroplasty (IA) are widely used for the treatment of temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA). However, controversy remains as to whether IA is superior to GA. PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the Web of science and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure were searched for literature regarding these procedures (published from 1946 to July 28, 2014). A study was included in this analysis if it was: (1) a randomized controlled trial or non-randomized observational cohort study; (2) comparing the clinical outcomes between GA and IA with respect to the maximal incisal opening (MIO) and reankylosis; (3) with a follow-up period of at least 12 months. The methodological quality of the included studies was evaluated according to the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale Eight non-randomized observational cohort studies with 272 patients were included. All the statistical analyses were performed using the RevMan 5.3 and Stat 12. The pooled analysis showed no significant difference in the incidence of reankylosis between the IA group (13/120) and the GA group (29/163) (RR= 0.67, 95% CI=0.38 to 1.16; Z=1.43, p=0.15). The IA group showed a significantly larger MIO than the GA group (MD=1.96, 95% CI=0.21 to 3.72, Z=2.19, p=0.03, I2=0%). In conclusion, patients with TMJA could benefit more from IA than GA, with a larger MIO and a similar incidence of reankylosis. IA shows to be an adequate option in the treatment of TMJA based on the results of maximal incisal opening. PMID:26010224

  8. Impact of tobacco use on the symptoms of painful temporomandibular joint disorders.

    PubMed

    Weingarten, Toby N; Iverson, Barton C; Shi, Yu; Schroeder, Darrell R; Warner, David O; Reid, Kevin I

    2009-12-15

    This study examines the relationship between the severity of painful temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) symptoms and current tobacco use in patients evaluated at a specialized orofacial pain clinic. Medical records, including responses to the Chronic Pain Grading Scale (CPGS), from 606 consecutive patients evaluated at the Mayo Clinic orofacial pain clinic with TMD by RDC-TMD criteria were retrospectively reviewed. Univariate analyses were performed comparing tobacco users and non-users. Analysis of covariance and multiple logistic regression models were used to adjust for demographic variables. A p value

  9. Modeling of muscle forces in humans with and without temporomandibular joint disorders

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, LR; Liu, H; Gonzalez, YM; Marx, DB; Nickel, JC

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Subjects with/without temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJD) were tested for differences in muscle forces. Setting and Sample Population School of Dental Medicine, University at Buffalo. Ninety-one subjects were classified in 4 groups based on presence/absence (+/-) of chronic myofascial and/or TMJ pain (P) and bilateral disc displacement (DD). Material & Methods Validated numerical models employed an organizational objective and subjects’ anatomy to calculate masticatory muscle forces during static biting. ANOVA and Holm step-down procedure post-hoc tests assessed group differences. Theoretical geometries, representing the range of subjects’ muscle orientations, were surveyed via numerical models to identify key combinations resulting in high muscle forces. Effect-size (Cohen’s d) and ANOVA/post-hoc tests assessed group differences in key muscle orientations. Results +P-DD subjects had significantly higher muscle forces, especially for lateral pterygoid muscles, compared to the other groups (P<0.01) for bite-forces that were directed posteromedially or posterolaterally on mandibular molars and posteriorly and slightly medially on mandibular incisors. Key muscle orientations for peak lateral pterygoid muscle forces were identified and group comparisons showed mean orientation in +P-DD compared to other diagnostic groups was ≥5° more upright for masseter and ≥3° more posteriorly-directed for temporalis muscles (all Cohen’s d ≥0.8). Conclusion Predicted lateral pterygoid muscle forces were significantly higher in +P-DD compared to other groups for specific biting conditions and were attributable, in part, to differences in masseter and temporalis muscle orientations. PMID:25865546

  10. [The role of therapeutic exercises in the combined treatment and rehabilitation of patients with pain syndrome associated with the dysfunction of temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Silant'eva, E N

    2010-01-01

    In a group of patients with pain syndrome associated with the dysfunction of temporomandibular joint positive results of combined therapy and rehabilitative treatment including remedial gymnastics persisted significantly longer than in controls (p < 0.01). Results of long-term follow-up confirmed the desirability of rehabilitation based on therapeutic exercises. This approach permits to enhance the effectiveness of therapy and rehabilitation of patients with pain syndrome associated with the dysfunction of temporomandibular joint, reduce the number of the patients' visits for repeated treatment and its total duration during a year.

  11. The comparison of outcomes of surgically treated bilateral temporomandibular joint disorder in different groups: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Pernu, Hannu; Oikarinen, Kyosti; Raustia, Aune

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The main purpose of this study was to determine the prognosis and outcomes of the patients with bilateral temporomandibular disorder which underwent bilateral temporomandibular joint surgery in a consecutive number of patients in a retrospective study. Study Design: Sixty five patients with 130 bilateral TMJ were included the study with the selection from consecutive 256 TMJ patients who were treated with open surgery who do not respond to conservative treatment. 65 patients were divided in to 3 main groups according to the clinical diagnosis of bilateral TMJ site. In the first group comprised 29 patients with 48 TMJ, the clinical diagnosis was bilaterally presence of anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDR). In the second group comprised 19 patients with 26 TMJ, bilateral presence of TMD consisted of anterior disc displacement without reduction (ADDNR) on both site. In the third group comprised 27 patients with 46 TMJ, bilaterally presence of TMD consist of ADDR on one site and ADDNR on another site. The patients in three different groups were operated either high condylectomy alone or high condylectomy with additional surgical procedures. Results: In the evaluation of pain relief, clicking, crepitation, headache, marked improvement was determined in all groups, but it was statistically insignificant in the comparison of 3 groups. Slight increase in maximal mouth opening was determined in the mean values of the 3 groups and also in the comparison of 3 groups it was not statistically significant. Conclusions: These similar succesfull outcomes of bilateral TMD with the respect of TMJ surgical procedures were obtained in 3 main groups although different diagnosis on the patients’ groups waspresent. Key words:Temporomandibular joint, prognosis, retrospective studies. PMID:22926476

  12. Anterior repositioning splint in the treatment of temporomandibular joints with reciprocal clicking: comparison with a flat occlusal splint and an untreated control group.

    PubMed

    Lundh, H; Westesson, P L; Kopp, S; Tillström, B

    1985-08-01

    The anterior repositioning splint is widely used to treat temporomandibular joints with reciprocal clicking. This treatment was compared to a flat occlusal splint and to an untreated control group. The anterior repositioning splint decreased joint pain at rest, during chewing, and during protrusion. Reciprocal clicking was eliminated and palpatory tenderness of the joint and muscles was reduced. This favorable effect was of short duration. The majority of the patients reported pain and clicking and demonstrated tenderness following removal of the splint after 6 weeks' treatment. The flat occlusal splint decreased joint tenderness but did not affect clicking or muscle tenderness. In the control group the clicking remained and the frequency of muscle tenderness increased. The results indicate that temporomandibular joints with reciprocal clicking can be successfully treated by positioning the mandible anteriorly. Since the symptoms returned when the splint was removed a more permanent change of mandibular position seems necessary.

  13. Testosterone and estrogen have opposing actions on inflammation-induced plasma extravasation in the rat temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Flake, Natasha M; Hermanstyne, Tracey O; Gold, Michael S

    2006-08-01

    The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that estrogen exacerbates inflammation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Evans blue dye was used to quantify plasma extravasation (PE) around the rat TMJ. In an initial set of experiments, TMJ PE was compared in naïve intact male and female rats, as well as in both groups after complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-induced inflammation of the TMJ. In contrast to our hypothesis, TMJ PE was significantly greater in both naïve and CFA-inflamed male rats than in females. To determine whether these differences were due to gonadal hormones, four additional groups of rats were studied: gonadectomized (Gx) males and females, Gx males with chronic testosterone (T) replacement, and Gx females with chronic estrogen (E) replacement. The sex difference in baseline TMJ PE appeared to reflect the actions of T. However, in the presence of TMJ inflammation, T augmented TMJ PE in males, while E attenuated TMJ PE in females. Changes in PE were also assessed in the contralateral TMJ. Results from this analysis indicated that there is a transient contralateral increase in TMJ PE in females but not males. Given that there is an inverse relationship between PE and joint damage, our results suggest that testosterone may mitigate, but estrogen may exacerbate, TMJ damage, particularly in the presence of overt inflammation. Importantly, our results may help explain both the higher prevalence and severity of temporomandibular disorder pain in females than males.

  14. Hydroxyapatite/collagen block with platelet rich plasma in temporomandibular joint ankylosis: a pilot study in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Mehrotra, D; Kumar, S; Dhasmana, S

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using preshaped hydroxyapatite/collagen condyles as carriers for platelet-rich plasma after gap arthroplasty in patients with temporomandibular ankylosis, to assess the aesthetic and functional outcomes, and to find out if neocondylar regeneration was possible. We studied 19 patients with temporomandibular joint ankylosis (25 joints), in whom preshaped hydroxyapatite/collagen condyles with platelet-rich plasma were fixed to the ramus with a titanium miniplate, and temporal fascia was placed in between. We evaluated the type of ankylosis, mouth opening before and after operation, deviation on mouth opening, lateral excursion, protrusion, postoperative anterior open bite, radiographic assessment, and complications. All patients showed appreciable improvements in mouth opening and excursion of the jaw. There were a few complications such as mild fever, and temporary involvement of the facial nerve, which improved with time. No open bite or recurrence was reported during the 18 months' follow up. Radiographic evaluation at 3 months showed a less opaque condyle, but the opacity at 18 months was more defined, suggesting a newly formed condyle. A preshaped hydroxyapatite/collagen condyle with platelet-rich plasma improves both aesthetics and function. However, a long term study is required to follow the growth patterns to see if the patients develop any facial deformity as they grow.

  15. Three-dimensional changes in the temporomandibular joint after maxillary protraction in children with skeletal Class III malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunju; Son, Woo-Sung; Kwak, Chun; Kang, Eun-Hee; Kim, Seong-Sik; Park, Soo-Byung; Kim, Yong-Il

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated 3-dimensional changes in the temporomandibular joints of children with skeletal Class III malocclusion and maxillary deficiency after facemask therapy for maxillary protraction. Eighteen children with anterior crossbite and a Class III molar relationship underwent facemask therapy for maxillary protraction, after which they exhibited positive overjet and a Class II molar relationship. Three-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography images of the patients were obtained before (T1) and after (T2) facemask protraction, and the 3-dimensional coordinates of the anatomical landmarks in T1 and T2 images were compared. After facemask therapy, the mandibular condyles of the patients were displaced outside, upward, and backward. Additionally, the anterior and posterior walls of the glenoid fossa had negative values for anteroposterior change. Three-dimensional analysis of the temporomandibular joint showed that facemask therapy resulted in bone apposition (to the anterior wall) and bone resorption (of the posterior wall) in the glenoid fossa. This bone remodeling resulted in upward and backward displacement of the condyle.(J Oral Sci 58, 501-508, 2016).

  16. A potential reference point for assessment of condylar bone marrow of the temporomandibular joint on proton density weighted images.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Aya; Sano, Tsukasa; Otonari-Yamamoto, Mika; Nishikawa, Keiichi; Kwok, Edmund

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine a potential reference point for measurement of signal intensity of bone marrow of the condyle on proton density-weighted images (PDW) prior to analysis of bone marrow abnormality related to symptomatic osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The study was based on 79 joints in 41 patients. The regions of interest (ROI) were placed over the bone marrow of the condyle and four other structures, It was hypothesized that a correlation between signal intensity of ROI over bone marrow and that of another structure would provide a potential reference point4or measurement of signal intensity of bone marrow. A significant positive linear correlation was found in the group for gray matter-1 and bone marrow. The correlation coefficient was 0.3 (Pearson correlation coefficient; p < 0.05). It was determined that gray matter is a potential reference point in evaluating the signal intensity of bone marrow in the mandibular condyle.

  17. Contribution of synovial lining cells to synovial vascularization of the rat temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Nozawa-Inoue, Kayoko; Harada, Fumiko; Magara, Jin; Ohazama, Atsushi; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2016-03-01

    The lining layer of the synovial membrane in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) contains two types of lining cells: macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells. The type B cells are particularly heterogeneous in their morphology and immunoreactivity, so that details of their functions remain unclear. Some of the type B cells exhibit certain resemblances in their ultrastructure to those of an activated capillary pericyte at the initial stage of the angiogenesis. The articular surface, composed of cartilage and the disc in the TMJ, has few vasculatures, whereas the synovial lining layer is richly equipped with blood capillaries to produce the constituent of synovial fluid. The present study investigated at both the light and electron microscopic levels the immunocytochemical characteristics of the synovial lining cells in the adult rat TMJ, focusing on their contribution to the synovial vascularization. It also employed an intravascular perfusion with Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) lectin to identify functional vessels in vivo. Results showed that several type B cells expressed desmin, a muscle-specific intermediate filament which is known as the earliest protein to appear during myogenesis as well as being a marker for the immature capillary pericyte. These desmin-positive type B cells showed immunoreactions for vimentin and pericyte markers (neuron-glial 2; NG2 and PDGFRβ) but not for the other markers of myogenic cells (MyoD and myogenin) or a contractile apparatus (αSMA and caldesmon). Immunoreactivity for RECA-1, an endothelial marker, was observed in the macrophage-like type A cells. The arterioles and venules inside the synovial folds extended numerous capillaries with RECA-1-positive endothelial cells and desmin-positive pericytes to distribute densely in the lining layer. The distal portion of these capillaries showing RECA-1-immunoreactivity lacked lectin-staining, indicating a loss of blood-circulation due to sprouting or termination in the

  18. Dental and Temporomandibular Joint Pathology of the Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Winer, J N; Arzi, B; Leale, D M; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2016-01-01

    Museum specimens (maxillae and/or mandibles) from 317 polar bears (Ursus maritimus) were examined macroscopically according to predefined criteria and 249 specimens were included in this study. The specimens were acquired between 1906 and 2011. There were 126 specimens (50.6%) from male animals, 93 (37.3%) from female animals and 30 (12.1%) from animals of unknown sex. The ages of the animals ranged from neonate to adult, with 125 adults (50.2%) and 124 young adults (49.8%) included and neonates/juveniles excluded from the study. The number of teeth available for examination was 7,638 (73.5%); 12.3% of teeth were absent artefactually, 0.8% were deemed absent due to acquired tooth loss and 13.4% were absent congenitally. With respect to tooth morphology, 20 teeth (0.26% of available teeth) in 18 specimens (7.2% of available specimens) were small vestigial structures with crowns that were flush with the level of surrounding alveolar bone. One supernumerary tooth and one tooth with enamel hypoplasia were encountered. Persistent deciduous teeth and teeth with an aberrant number of roots were not found. Relatively few teeth (3.7%) displayed attrition/abrasion, 90% of which were the maxillary and mandibular incisor teeth, in 41 polar bears (16.5%). Nearly twice as many adult specimens exhibited attrition/abrasion as those from young adults; significantly more males were affected than females. Dental fractures were noted in 52 polar bears, affecting 20.9% of specimens and 1.3% of the total number of teeth present. More adult polar bears had dental fractures than young adults. There were 21 specimens (8.4%) that displayed overt periapical disease, affecting a total of 24 dental alveoli (0.23%). Some degree of periodontitis was seen in 199 specimens (79.9%); however, only 12.6% of dental alveoli had bony changes indicative of periodontitis. Lesions consistent with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) were found in 23 specimens (9.2%). TMJ-OA was significantly

  19. Dental and Temporomandibular Joint Pathology of the American Black Bear (Ursus americanus).

    PubMed

    Clark, E J; Chesnutt, S R; Winer, J N; Kass, P H; Verstraete, F J M

    2016-12-15

    (22.2%). Exactly half of the specimens (n = 174) possessed lesions consistent with mild temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis. The occurrence and severity of the dental pathology encountered in this study may play an important role in the morbidity and mortality of the American black bear.

  20. ACTIVATION OF B-CATENIN SIGNALLING LEADS TO TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT DEFECTS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M.; Li, S.; Xie, W.; Shen, J.; Im, H-J.; Holz, J.D.; Wang, M.; Diekwisch, T.G.H.; Chen, D.

    2014-01-01

    Despite extensive research in knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA), the underlying mechanism of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder remains largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the constitutive activation of β-catenin in the middle and deep layers of the articular cartilage can compromise the homeostasis of this tissue in the TMJ. Co12CreERT2 transgenic mice were bred with RosamT/mG reporter mice to determine Cre recombination efficiency. Co12CreERT2 mice were then crossed with β-cateninflox (ex3)/+ mice to generate β-catenin conditional activation mice, β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER. TMJ samples were harvested when the mice were 1-, 3- or 6-month-old and evaluated using histology, histomorphometry and immunohistochemistry. β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice were further crossed with Mmp13flox/flox and Adamts5−/− mice to generate β-catenin(ex3)/Mmp13)Co12ER and β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER)/Adamts5−/− double mutant mice to investigate the role of Mmp13 and Adamts5 in the development of TMJ disorder. High levels of Cre-recombination were seen in Co12CreERT2;RosamT/mG mice. Progressive TMJ defects developed in 1-, 3- and 6-month-old β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice, as revealed by histology and histomorphometry. Results further demonstrated that the defects observed in β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice were significantly decelerated after deletion of the Mmp13 or Adamts5 gene in (β-catenin(ex3)/Mmp13)co12ER or β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER/ Adamts5−/− double mutant mice. In summary, we found that β-catenin is a critical gene in the induction of TMJ cartilage degeneration, and over-expressing β-catenin in TMJ cartilage leads to defects assembling an OA-like phenotype. Deletion of Mmp13 and Adamts5 in β-catenin(ex3)Co12ER mice ameliorates the development of TMJ defects. This study suggests that Mmp13 and Adamts5 could be potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of TMJ disorders. PMID:25340802

  1. Preliminary Findings on the Temporomandibular Joint Sounds of Lateral Cross-Bite Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    van der Weele LTh, ”Signs and Symptoms of Temporomandibular dissorder (TMD) and Craniofacial form,” Am J Orthod Dentofac Or- thop, 8:73-110, 1996...Disorders: Re- view, Criteria, Examinations and Specifications, Cri- tique,” J Craniomand Disord Facial Oral Pain , 6:301- 355, 1992. [18] Hardison J.D

  2. Mandibular condylectomy in a cow with a chronic luxation of the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Holly D.; Roquet, Imma; MacKay, Angela; Barber, Spencer

    2014-01-01

    A cow, presented after being struck by a motor vehicle, continued to have difficulty eating after mandibular fracture repair. Imaging showed a temporomandibular luxation and a mandibular condylectomy was performed. Mastication improved greatly but the cow was euthanized due to infection. This is the first report of mandibular condylectomy in cattle. PMID:24891643

  3. Orthodontics and the temporomandibular joint: where are we now? Part 2. Functional occlusion, malocclusion, and TMD.

    PubMed

    Luther, F

    1998-08-01

    In this second of two articles, the role of occlusion and malocclusion is assessed with respect to orthodontics and temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Some have suggested that malocclusion may cause TMD, or that by introducing a form of malocclusion, orthodontic treatment could be iatrogenic. Pertinent evidence relating to these issues will be assessed.

  4. The use of low level laser therapy in the treatment of temporomandibular joint disorders. Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Herranz-Aparicio, Judit; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo; Arnabat-Domínguez, Josep; España-Tost, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) have been identified as the most important cause of pain in the facial region. The low level laser therapy (LLLT) has demonstrated to have an analgesic, anti-inflammatory and biostimulating effects. The LLLT is a noninvasive, quick and safe, non-pharmaceutical intervention that may be beneficial for patients with TMDs. However the clinical efficiency of LLLT in the treatment of this kind of disorders is controversial. Objectives: Literature review in reference to the use of LLLT in the treatment of TMDs, considering the scientific evidence level of the published studies. Material and Methods: A MEDLINE and COCHRANE database search was made for articles. The keywords used were “temporomandibular disorders” and “low level laser therapy” or “phototherapy” and by means of the Boolean operator “AND”. The search provided a bank of 35 articles, and 16 relevant articles were selected to this review. These articles were critically analyzed and classified according to their level of scientific evidence. This analysis produced 3 literature review articles and 13 are clinical trials. The SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy) was used to classify the articles. Results: Only one article presented an evidence level 1, twelve presented an evidence level 2, and three presented an evidence level 3. According to the principle of evidence-based dentistry, currently there is a scientific evidence level B in favor of using LLLT for treatment of TMDs. Discussion and conclusions: Publications on the use of LLLT for treatment of TMDs are limited making difficult to compare the different studies due to the great variability of the studied variables and the selected laser parameters. The great majority of the studies concluded that the results should be taken with caution due to the methodological limitations. Key words:Low level laser therapy; phototherapy; temporomandibular joint disorders. PMID:23722130

  5. Histopathological features of hypertrophic bone mass of temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA): An explanation of pathogenesis of TMJA.

    PubMed

    Duan, Denghui; Li, Jiangming; Xiao, E; He, Linhai; Yan, Yingbin; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Yi

    2015-07-01

    Temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA) is a severe organic disease with progressive limitation of the mouth opening. Histopathologically, a residual joint space is reported to consist of fibrous tissue and/or cartilage, indicating two types of interface (osteo-fibrous and osteo-chondral) of residual joint space. It is well known that adverse mechanical stress results in pathological changes of osteoarthritis and enthesopathy in these interfaces. What would happen pathologically in these interfaces of TMJA under repeated mandible movement has not been elucidated. Fourteen tissue samples of residual joint space and temporal and condylar bone were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and evaluated by collagen I and II immunohistochemistry. A pathological study of 14 TMJA patients showed that the residual joint space presented a fibrocartilage entheses structure and an articular cartilage structure. Moreover, these two structures were associated with pathological alterations of both osteoarthritis and enthesopathy, including degenerated and necrotized tissue, chondrocyte cloning, crack and fissure, various bone scleroses, and inflammatory granulation tissue. It is suggested that the pathological alterations of both osteoarthritis and enthesopathy occurred in TMJA, which hints at mechanical stress on TMJA development.

  6. Estradiol promotes M1-like macrophage activation through cadherin-11 to aggravate temporomandibular joint inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kou, Xiao-Xing; Li, Chen-Shuang; He, Dan-Qing; Wang, Xue-Dong; Hao, Ting; Meng, Zhen; Zhou, Yan-Heng; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2015-03-15

    Macrophages play a major role in joint inflammation. Estrogen is involved in rheumatoid arthritis and temporomandibular disorders. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. This study was done to verify and test how estrogen affects M1/M2-like macrophage polarization and then contributes to joint inflammation. Female rats were ovariectomized and treated with increasing doses of 17β-estradiol for 10 d and then intra-articularly injected with CFA to induce temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation. The polarization of macrophages and expression of cadherin-11 was evaluated at 24 h after the induction of TMJ inflammation and after blocking cadherin-11 or estrogen receptors. NR8383 macrophages were treated with estradiol and TNF-α, with or without blocking cadherin-11 or estrogen receptors, to evaluate the expression of the M1/M2-like macrophage-associated genes. We found that estradiol increased the infiltration of macrophages with a proinflammatory M1-like predominant profile in the synovium of inflamed TMJ. In addition, estradiol dose-dependently upregulated the expressions of the M1-associated proinflammatory factor inducible NO synthase (iNOS) but repressed the expressions of the M2-associated genes IL-10 and arginase in NR8383 macrophages. Furthermore, estradiol mainly promoted cadherin-11 expression in M1-like macrophages of inflamed TMJ. By contrast, blockage of cadherin-11 concurrently reversed estradiol-potentiated M1-like macrophage activation and TMJ inflammation, as well as reversed TNF-α-induced induction of inducible NO synthase and NO in NR8383 macrophages. The blocking of estrogen receptors reversed estradiol-potentiated M1-like macrophage activation and cadherin-11 expression. These results suggested that estradiol could promote M1-like macrophage activation through cadherin-11 to aggravate the acute inflammation of TMJs.

  7. A Study of the Association Between Sleep Bruxism, Low Quality of Sleep, and Degenerative Changes of the Temporomandibular Joint.

    PubMed

    Dias, Glaucia Marques; Bonato, Letícia Ladeira; Guimarães, Josemar Parreira; Silva, Jesca Neftali Nogueira; Ferreira, Luciano Ambrosio; Grossmann, Eduardo; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of degenerative bone changes of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in individuals suffering from sleep bruxism (SB), associating these characteristics with the quality of sleep. For this, we followed the International Classification of Sleep Disorders for the diagnosis of SB, in addition to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) for the classification of TMD and cone beam computed tomography. It was found that 97.7% of the individuals with bruxism had at least 1 RDC/TMD group III diagnosis, 75.6% of the subjects considered their sleep quality as poor, and the largest group (23%) had centric bruxism. There was no significant association between the pattern of sleep quality (P = 0.36), the type of SB (P = 0.277), and the presence of degenerative changes of the TMJ. Regardless of the quality of sleep and the type of bruxism presented, the prevalence of degenerative bone disorders was high (67%) among women with a mean age of 46 years and a clinical diagnosis of SB.

  8. A cross-sectional study of the relationship between serum sexual hormone levels and internal derangement of temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Madani, A S; Shamsian, A A; Hedayati-Moghaddam, M R; Fathi-Moghadam, F; Sabooni, M R; Mirmortazavi, A; Golmohamadi, M

    2013-08-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are defined as clinical conditions that involve the masticatory muscles, temporomandibular joint (TMJ) or both. The aim of this study was to evaluate serum 17β-oestradiol and progesterone levels in menstruating women affected by internal derangement of the TMJ. A total of 142 women (mean age 30·2 ± 6·7) who referred to medical diagnostic laboratory of Iranian Academic Centre for Education, Culture and Research (ACECR), Mashhad Branch, were enrolled during 2007 and 2008. Forty-seven individuals had disc displacement with reduction (Group IIa) according to Research Diagnostic Criteria (RDC)/TMD Axis I diagnosis. Radioimmunoassay was used for the detection of serum 17β-oestradiol and progesterone levels in all 142 subjects. The mean progesterone level was significantly higher in control group (11·6 ± 10·4 ng mL(-1) ) compared to women with TMD (8·4 ± 6·8 ng mL(-1) , P = 0·03). No significant difference was found in two groups regarding 17β-oestradiol level. Lower progesterone level in women with TMD can suggest the more important role of this hormone in the development of the disorder.

  9. Association of GDF5, SMAD3 and RUNX2 polymorphisms with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis in female Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J-L; Meng, J-H; Gan, Y-H; Zhou, C-Y; Ma, X-C

    2015-07-01

    Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJOA) is a complex disease and has a strong genetic component in its pathogenesis. Experimental evidence suggests the involvement of biological pathway in the disease. This case-control study was designed to investigate whether five common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in GDF5, SMAD3, RUNX2, TGFβ1 and CHST11, respectively, are associated with TMJOA in female Han Chinese patients. A total of 240 participants were evaluated comprising 114 female patients diagnosed with TMJOA based on Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders and 126 healthy female controls. The SNPs of the five genes in the genomic DNA were examined by sequencing, and their allelic, genotypic and carriage rate frequency distributions, as well as the triple combination of the risk genotypes, were analysed using the logistic regression model. The SNP in GDF5 or SMAD3 showed significant association with TMJOA, a relatively weak association was observed in RUNX2. In the triple combinational analysis, the risk of TMJOA grew 5·09 times in the patients with five or six risk alleles (P < 0·01). This is the first study to evaluate the association of GDF5, SMAD3, RUNX2, TGFβ1 and CHST11 with TMJOA in female Han Chinese. Our study suggests that the SNPs of genes related to TGFβ family might contribute to the risk of TMJOA.

  10. Mechanisms involved in antinociception induced by a polysulfated fraction from seaweed Gracilaria cornea in the temporomandibular joint of rats.

    PubMed

    Coura, Chistiane Oliveira; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos; do Val, Danielle Rocha; Vieira, Lorena Vasconcelos; Silveira, Felipe Dantas; Dos Santos Lopes, Fernanda Maxcynne Lino; Gomes, Francisco Isaac Fernandes; Frota, Annyta Fernandes; Souza, Ricardo Basto; Clemente-Napimoga, Juliana Trindade; Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Benevides, Norma Maria Barros

    2017-04-01

    Temporomandibular disorder is a common clinical condition involving pain in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region. This study assessed the antinociceptive effects of a polysulfated fraction from the red seaweed Gracilaria cornea (Gc-FI) on the formalin-induced TMJ hypernociception in rats and investigated the involvement of different mechanisms. Male Wistar rats were pretreated with injection (sc) of saline or Gc-FI 1h before intra- TMJ injection of formalin to evaluate the nociception. The results showed that pretreatment with Gc-FI significantly reduced formalin-induced nociceptive behavior. Moreover, the antinociceptive effect of the Gc-FI was blocked by naloxone (a non-selective opioid antagonist), suggesting the involvement of opioids selective receptors. Thus, the pretreatment with selective opioids receptors antagonists, reversed the antinociceptive effect of the Gc-FI in the TMJ. The Gc-FI antinociceptive effect depends on the nitric oxide/cyclic GMP/protein kinase G/ATP-sensitive potassium channel (NO/cGMP/PKG/K(+)ATP) pathway because it was prevented by pretreatment with inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase, guanylate cyclase enzyme, PKG and a K(+)ATP blocker. In addition, after inhibition with a specific heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor, the antinociceptive effect of the Gc-FI was not observed. Collectively, these data suggest that the antinociceptive effect induced by Gc-FI is mediated by μ/δ/κ-opioid receptors and by activation NO/cGMP/PKG/K(+)ATP channel pathway, besides of HO-1.

  11. Changes in disc status in the reducing and nonreducing anterior disc displacement of temporomandibular joint: a longitudinal retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying Kai; Yang, Chi; Xie, Qian Yang

    2016-09-27

    Treatment procedures for anterior disc displacement (ADD) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are far from reaching a consensus. The aim of the study was to evaluate disc status changes of anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDWR) and without reduction (ADDWoR) comparatively, to get a better understanding of the disease progress without intervention. This longitudinal retrospective study included 217 joints in 165 patients, which were divided into ADDWR group and ADDWoR group based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. The joints were assessed quantitatively for disc length and displacement distance at initial and follow-up visits. Disc morphology, which was classified in 5 types, was also evaluated. Paired t-test and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used to assess intra-group differences and independent t-test for inter-group differences. Moreover, analysis of covariance was applied to analyze influential factors for changes in disc length and displacement distance. According to our results, discs tended to become shorter, move further forward and distort more seriously in ADDWoR group than in ADDWR group after follow-up. Moreover, discs were prone to become shorter and more anteriorly displaced in teenagers, type I and III morphologies, advanced Wilkes stages, or those with joint effusion. Follow-up period seemed to be not critical.

  12. Changes in disc status in the reducing and nonreducing anterior disc displacement of temporomandibular joint: a longitudinal retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ying Kai; Yang, Chi; Xie, Qian Yang

    2016-01-01

    Treatment procedures for anterior disc displacement (ADD) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are far from reaching a consensus. The aim of the study was to evaluate disc status changes of anterior disc displacement with reduction (ADDWR) and without reduction (ADDWoR) comparatively, to get a better understanding of the disease progress without intervention. This longitudinal retrospective study included 217 joints in 165 patients, which were divided into ADDWR group and ADDWoR group based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. The joints were assessed quantitatively for disc length and displacement distance at initial and follow-up visits. Disc morphology, which was classified in 5 types, was also evaluated. Paired t-test and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used to assess intra-group differences and independent t-test for inter-group differences. Moreover, analysis of covariance was applied to analyze influential factors for changes in disc length and displacement distance. According to our results, discs tended to become shorter, move further forward and distort more seriously in ADDWoR group than in ADDWR group after follow-up. Moreover, discs were prone to become shorter and more anteriorly displaced in teenagers, type I and III morphologies, advanced Wilkes stages, or those with joint effusion. Follow-up period seemed to be not critical. PMID:27671371

  13. Serum levels of BMP-2, 4, 7 and AHSG in patients with degenerative joint disease requiring total arthroplasty of the hip and temporomandibular joints.

    PubMed

    Albilia, Jonathan B; Tenenbaum, Howard C; Clokie, Cameron M L; Walt, David R; Baker, Gerald I; Psutka, David J; Backstein, David; Peel, Sean A F

    2013-01-01

    To date, there is no objective or reliable means of assessing the severity of degenerative joint disease (DJD) and need for joint replacement surgery. Hence, it is difficult to know when an individual with DJD has reached a point where total arthroplasty is indicated. The purpose of the present study is to determine whether serum levels of Alpha-2 HS-glycoprotein (AHSG) as well as bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP-2, 4, 7) can be used to predict the presence of severe DJD of the hip and/or temporomandibular joint (TMJ) (specifically: joints that require replacement). A total of 30 patients scheduled for arthroplasty (diseased) (15 HIP, 15 TMJ) and 120 age-matched controls (healthy/non-diseased) were included. Blood samples were collected from all patients ≥8 weeks after the last arthroplasty. Concentrations of serum analytes were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and these were compared between the Diseased and Healthy groups, utilizing the Mann-Whitney U-test. Patients with disease had significantly higher levels of BMP-2 and BMP-4 and lower levels of AHSG in serum compared to non-diseased humans (p < 0.01). Higher levels of BMP-2, 4 and reduced levels of AHSG appear to characterize patients who have DJD that is severe enough to require total joint replacement. Perhaps measurements of these proteins can be used to make objective decisions regarding the need for total arthroplasty as opposed to the current subjective approaches.

  14. Integration of rehabilitation and acupuncture in the treatment of a professional musician with temporomandibular joint dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Emma K

    2011-12-01

    This case study describes the use of acupuncture in a professional musician with myogenic temporomandibular dysfunction. The 3-year history of symptoms was associated with persistent episodic tension-type headaches. Acupuncture was used for trigger point release, primarily of the masticatory muscles, in conjunction with exercise therapy. After 8 weekly acupuncture sessions, the patient's pain had completely resloved, headaches had resolved and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale showed significant improvements.

  15. Temporomandibular Joint Septic Arthritis and Mandibular Osteomyelitis Arising From an Odontogenic Infection: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Gams, Kevin; Freeman, Phillip

    2016-04-01

    Septic arthritis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) has been infrequently reported in the literature. Some investigators believe that this condition is under-reported because it is underdiagnosed. Misdiagnosis or late diagnosis of this condition can lead to serious morbidity, including fistula formation, intracranial abscess, fibrous or bony ankylosis, temporal bone or condylar osteomyelitis, growth alteration, and several others. This report describes a case of septic TMJ arthritis arising from direct spread of an odontogenic infection with subsequent development of mandibular osteomyelitis. The purpose of this case report is to 1) increase awareness of an underdiagnosed condition, 2) establish the seriousness of this infection, 3) for the first time report on a case of TMJ septic arthritis caused by Bacteroides infection, and 4) provide a review of the relevant literature.

  16. Open-close movements in the human temporomandibular joint: does a pure rotation around the intercondylar hinge axis exist?

    PubMed

    Ferrario, V F; Sforza, C; Miani, A; Serrao, G; Tartaglia, G

    1996-06-01

    Mandibular movements near the maximum intercuspal position were analysed for the location of the mean instantaneous centre of curvature of the interincisal point path. Measurements were performed using a kinesiograph in 28 healthy young adults with sound dentitions and free from temporomandibular joint disorders. The subjects performed habitual open-close cycles at different speeds; opening movements starting from the centric relation occlusion were also analysed. In none of the 28 subjects was the interincisal point path derived from pure rotation movements performed around the intercondylar axis, not even in the first millimetres of motion. Translation and rotation were always combined, and the position of the centre of curvature changed during the motion, showing different characteristics in the open and close movements; these patterns were also dependent upon motion speed. The results show that the hinge axis theory cannot explain the mandibular movements because a pure rotation did not occur around the intercondylar axis.

  17. Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD)/Pseudogout of the temporomandibular joint – FNA findings and microanalysis

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Asghar H; Abraham, Jerrold L; Kellman, Robert M; Khurana, Kamal K

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of a Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD) presenting as a mass in the parotid and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) that simulated a parotid tumor. A 35 year-old man presented with pain in the left ear area. A CT Scan of the area showed a large, calcified mass surrounding the left condylar head, and extending into the infratemporal fossa. FNA of the mass showed birefringent crystals, most of which were rhomboid with occasional ones being needle shaped, embedded in an amorphous pink substance. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) of these crystals showed peaks corresponding to calcium and phosphorus. SEM/EDS is a rapid method of diagnosing calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD) and an alternative to more commonly used method of special staining of cell block sections coupled with polarizing microscopy. PMID:18426573

  18. Immunohistochemical expression of types I and III collagen antibodies in the temporomandibular joint disc of human foetuses

    PubMed Central

    de Moraes, L.O.C.; Lodi, F.R.; Gomes, T.S.; Marques, S.R.; Oshima, C.T.F.; Lancellotti, C.L.P.; Rodríguez-Vázquez, J.F.; Mérida-Velasco, J.R.; Alonso, L.G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective was to study the morphology of the articular disc and analyse the immunohistochemical expression of types I and III collagen markers in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc of human foetuses of different gestational ages. Twenty TMJ from human foetuses supplied by Universidade Federal de Uberaba with gestational ages from 17 to 24 weeks were studied. The gestational age of the foetuses was determined by measuring the crown-rump (CR) length. Macroscopically, the foetuses were fixed in 10% formalin solution and dissected by removing the skin and subcutaneous tissue and exposing the deep structures. Immunohistochemical markers of type I and III were used to characterize the existence of collagen fibres. Analysis of the immunohistochemical markers of types I and III collagen revealed the presence of heterotypical fibril networks. PMID:22073371

  19. Relationship between habitual occlusal position and flat bite plane induced occlusal position in volunteers with and without temporomandibular joint sounds.

    PubMed

    Torii, Kengo; Chiwata, Ichiro

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether temporomandibular joint (TMJ) sounds are associated with the difference between the habitual occlusal position (HOP) and the bite plane induced occlusal position (BPOP). Fifteen dental technician school students who had complete natural dentition, normal occlusion and who exhibited TMJ sounds were compared with fifteen healthy control subjects. HOP was recorded by voluntary jaw closing while in an upright position, and BPOP was recorded after wearing an anterior bite plane for a short period of time. Three interocclusal records were obtained in both positions with a vinyl polysiloxane material, and the recorded maxillomandibular relations were analyzed three-dimensionally and compared. Subjects with TMJ sounds had statistically larger differences between HOP and BPOP than controls (p<.05). Within this study population, an association was found between TMJ sounds and the difference between HOP and BPOP.

  20. Dental and Temporomandibular Joint Pathology of the Northern Fur Seal (Callorhinus ursinus).

    PubMed

    Aalderink, M T; Nguyen, H P; Kass, P H; Arzi, B; Verstraete, F J M

    2015-05-01

    associated with mild periodontitis. Lesions consistent with temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis (TMJ-OA) were found in 29 specimens (20.0%). Both periodontal disease and TMJ-OA were significantly more common in adults than in juveniles (P <0.0001). Periodontitis was found to be more common in males than in females (P <0.012). Although the significance of the high incidence of periodontitis and TMJ-OA in the northern fur seal remains unknown, the occurrence and severity of these diseases found in this study may play an important role in this species morbidity and mortality.

  1. Preservation of condyle and disc in the surgical treatment of type III temporomandibular joint ankylosis: a long-term follow-up clinical study of 111 joints.

    PubMed

    Jakhar, S K; Agarwal, M; Gupta, D K; Tiwari, A D

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish the role of retaining the condyle and disc in the treatment of type III ankylosis, by clinical and computed tomography (CT) evaluation. A total of 90 patients with type III ankylosis met the inclusion criteria; 42 patients had left temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis, 27 patients had right TMJ ankylosis, and 21 had bilateral TMJ ankylosis, thus a total 111 joints were treated. Considerable improvements in mandibular movement and maximum mouth opening were noted in all patients. At the end of a minimum follow-up of 2 years, the mean inter-incisal mouth opening was 30.7 mm. Postoperative occlusion was normal in all patients, and open bite did not occur in any case because the ramus height was maintained through preservation of the pseudo-joint. Only three patients had recurrence of ankylosis, which was due to a lack of postoperative physiotherapy. The advantages of condyle and disc preservation in type III ankylosis are: (1) surgery is relatively safe; (2) the disc helps to prevent recurrence of ankylosis; (3) the existing ramus height is maintained; (4) the growth site is preserved; and (5) there is no need to reconstruct the joint with autogenous or alloplastic material. It is recommended that the disc and condyle are preserved in type III TMJ ankylosis.

  2. Establishment of temporomandibular joint puncture technique in rats using in vivo micro-computed tomography (R_mCT®)

    PubMed Central

    Kameoka, S; Matsumoto, K; Kai, Y; Yonehara, Y; Arai, Y; Honda, K

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the report was to establish puncture techniques for the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) cavity in rats. The experimental sample comprised 30 male Sprague–Dawley rats. Under general anaesthesia the superior joint cavity of the rat was punctured either laterally (lateral puncture technique (LPT), n = 11), anteriorly (anterosuperior puncture technique (ASPT), n = 13) or anteroinferior puncture technique (AIPT), n = 6) using a 27-gauge needle. After the tip of the needle was confirmed by micro-CT (R-mCT®, Rigaku, Tokyo, Japan) located on the mandibular fossa, 0.05 ml of contrast media was injected under micro-CT fluoroscopic guidance. After confirmation that the joint cavity was filled with contrast media, micro-CT imaging was carried out. The puncture for LPT was accurate in 5 of the 11 animals. The ASPT was accurate in all 13 animals. The AIPT punctured 3 of the 6 animals. Furthermore, the ASPT and AIPT demonstrated improved preservation of the needle; it was harder to detach the needle, which led to greater stability. These results suggest that ASPT assisted by R-mCT® is useful for basic research, including drug discovery and pathogenesis of TMJ diseases. PMID:20841463

  3. Establishment of temporomandibular joint puncture technique in rats using in vivo micro-computed tomography (R_mCT®).

    PubMed

    Kameoka, S; Matsumoto, K; Kai, Y; Yonehara, Y; Arai, Y; Honda, K

    2010-10-01

    The aim of the report was to establish puncture techniques for the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) cavity in rats. The experimental sample comprised 30 male Sprague-Dawley rats. Under general anaesthesia the superior joint cavity of the rat was punctured either laterally (lateral puncture technique (LPT), n = 11), anteriorly (anterosuperior puncture technique (ASPT), n = 13) or anteroinferior puncture technique (AIPT), n = 6) using a 27-gauge needle. After the tip of the needle was confirmed by micro-CT (R-mCT®, Rigaku, Tokyo, Japan) located on the mandibular fossa, 0.05 ml of contrast media was injected under micro-CT fluoroscopic guidance. After confirmation that the joint cavity was filled with contrast media, micro-CT imaging was carried out. The puncture for LPT was accurate in 5 of the 11 animals. The ASPT was accurate in all 13 animals. The AIPT punctured 3 of the 6 animals. Furthermore, the ASPT and AIPT demonstrated improved preservation of the needle; it was harder to detach the needle, which led to greater stability. These results suggest that ASPT assisted by R-mCT® is useful for basic research, including drug discovery and pathogenesis of TMJ diseases.

  4. Outcomes of open temporomandibular joint surgery following failure to improve after arthroscopy: is there an algorithm for success?

    PubMed

    Tzanidakis, Konstantinos; Sidebottom, Andrew J

    2013-12-01

    We reviewed the results of one surgeon's experience of open surgical management of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in patients who fail to respond to arthroscopy and aimed to identify groups of patients that may or may not benefit from the intervention. Over a 7-year period (2005-2012) we retrospectively collected data from the medical notes of patients who underwent discectomy, disc plication, eminectomy, eminoplasty, and adhesiolysis, according to the clinical findings for joint pain, restriction, and locking. A total of 22 patients (71%) reported improvement in pain score and 19 (61%) reported an improvement in mouth opening 12 months postoperatively. Overall, 12 patients (39%) ultimately needed TMJ replacement. This group included 5/6 patients in Wilkes' stage IV and 6/15 in stage V, 5/7 patients with a preoperative pain score of 90-100, and half of those with preoperative mouth opening of 20-29 mm (7/14). Open surgical management of the TMJ can benefit patients despite the previous failure of arthroscopy to manage pain, restriction, and locking. Arthroscopy seems to reduce the percentage of patients that need open TMJ surgery, but also the success of subsequent operations compared with previous studies. TMJ replacement is increasingly being done successfully to treat end-stage disease. These results may be used when obtaining a patient's consent for open TMJ surgery, particularly if they are in the groups considered to have a high risk of subsequently requiring a replacement joint.

  5. A new method to measure post-traumatic joint contractures in the rabbit knee.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Kevin A; Holmberg, Michael; Shrive, Nigel

    2003-12-01

    A new device and method to measure rabbit knee joint angles are described. The method was used to measure rabbit knee joint angles in normal specimens and in knee joints with obvious contractures. The custom-designed and manufactured gripping device has two clamps. The femoral clamp sits on a pinion gear that is driven by a rack attached to a materials testing system. A 100 N load cell in series with the rack gives force feedback. The tibial clamp is attached to a rotatory potentiometer. The system allows the knee joint multiple degrees-of-freedom (DOF). There are two independent DOF (compression-distraction and internal-external rotation) and two coupled motions (medial-lateral translation coupled with varus-valgus rotation; anterior-posterior translation coupled with flexion-extension rotation). Knee joint extension-flexion motion is measured, which is a combination of the materials testing system displacement (converted to degrees of motion) and the potentiometer values (calibrated to degrees). Internal frictional forces were determined to be at maximum 2% of measured loading. Two separate experiments were performed to evaluate rabbit knees. First, normal right and left pairs of knees from four New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits were subjected to cyclic loading. An extension torque of 0.2 Nm was applied to each knee. The average change in knee joint extension from the first to the fifth cycle was 1.9 deg +/- 1.5 deg (mean +/- sd) with a total of 49 tests of these eight knees. The maximum extension of the four left knees (tested 23 times) was 14.6 deg +/- 7.1 deg, and of the four right knees (tested 26 times) was 12.0 deg +/- 10.9 deg. There was no significant difference in the maximum extension between normal left and right knees. In the second experiment, nine skeletally mature NZW rabbits had stable fractures of the femoral condyles of the right knee that were immobilized for five, six or 10 weeks. The left knee served as an unoperated control. Loss of knee joint

  6. 17-Beta-estradiol enhanced allodynia of inflammatory temporomandibular joint through upregulation of hippocampal TRPV1 in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Wei; Bi, Ye-Ping; Kou, Xiao-Xing; Xu, Wen; Ma, Li-Qun; Wang, Ke-Wei; Gan, Ye-Hua; Ma, Xu-Chen

    2010-06-30

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) predominantly affect reproductive female patients, with pain the most frequent complaint. Although estrogens are believed to play important roles in TMD pain, the mechanism underlying modulation of TMD pain by estrogens remains largely unknown. Accumulating evidence implies that the hippocampus is involved in sexual dimorphism of pain sensitivity. In this study, we investigated the hippocampal TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1) expression in ovariectomized rats that received 17-beta-estradiol substitution and found that 17-beta-estradiol enhanced the mechanical allodynia of inflamed temporomandibular joint (TMJ) induced by complete Freund's adjuvant. Real-time PCR and immunoblotting demonstrated that TMJ inflammation significantly induced hippocampal TRPV1 expression compared with the control group but failed to induce it in the ovariectomized rats that received no estradiol replacement. In addition, estradiol potentiated TMJ inflammation-induced hippocampal TRPV1 expression in a dose-dependent manner in the ovariectomized rats. In contrast, TRPV1 transcription in amygdala, prefrontal cortex, and thalamus was not affected by TMJ inflammation and estradiol. Immunostaining showed TRPV1 localized in the processes and cytoplasm of pyramidal neurons in CA1-CA3 regions of the hippocampus. Moreover, intrahippocampal injection of TRPV1 antagonists capsazepine and 5'-iodo-resiniferatoxin into the CA1 region of the hippocampus significantly attenuated allodynia of inflamed TMJ in both nonovariectomized and ovariectomized rats that received estradiol replacement. Our results suggested that hippocampal TRPV1 can modulate central pain processing and estradiol may contribute to the sexual dimorphism of TMD pain sensitivity through upregulation of TRPV1 expression in the hippocampus.

  7. Effect of estrogen on bone resorption and inflammation in the temporomandibular joint cellular elements.

    PubMed

    Galal, Nadia; El Beialy, Waleed; Deyama, Yoshiaki; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka; Yoshikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Kuniaki; Totsuka, Yasunori

    2008-06-01

    Several epidemiological studies have reported that temporomandibular disorder is more prevalent in women, which suggests the involvement of sex hormones, such as estrogen, in the pathogenesis of this disease. PCR amplification and Western blotting were employed to target the expression of estrogen receptors (ERs) in human fibroblast-like synovial and ATDC5 cells. The effect of estrogen was investigated through the expression of RANKL, osteoprotegerin (OPG), M-CSF/CSF-1 and c-fms. We showed expression of M-CSF/ CSF-1 and c-fms, with time-dependent increase in both after the addition of estrogen. Based on previous studies reporting that M-CSF/CSF-1 regulates the proliferation and differentiation of hemopoietic progenitor cells into mature macrophages, we put forward a new hypothesis based on the increased inflammation and tendency of females to suffer more from temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in the presence of external exacerbating factors. Detection of RANKL and OPG in ATDC5 and expression of both in HFLS was confirmed with complete disappearance of the RANKL band, and marked increase in the expression of OPG after 1 h from the addition of estrogen.

  8. Assessment of magnetic resonance images of displacement of the disc of the temporomandibular joint in different types of condylar fracture.

    PubMed

    Zheng, JiSi; Zhang, ShanYong; Yang, Chi; Abdelrehem, Ahmed; He, DongMei; Chiu, HanHsuan

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the displacement of the disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) in different types of condylar fracture we studied 160 patients (222 joints) from May 2009-June 2014. All patients had computed tomographic scans (CT) and magnetic resonance images (MRI) taken preoperatively, and 24 patients (32 joints) had MRI postoperatively. CT scans were reviewed to categorise the types of condylar fracture (intracapsular, condylar neck, and subcondylar), and intracapsular condylar fractures were further classified into subtypes A, B, C, and M. MRI were then reviewed to record the position of the disc in each type of condylar fracture. The results were compared using the chi square test. There were 160 intracapsular condylar fractures, 40 fractures of the condylar neck, and 22 subcondylar fractures. Of the intracapsular condylar fractures, 75 were type A, 49 type B, 11 type C, and 25 type M. Discs were displaced in 153 intracapsular condylar fractures, 17 fractures of the condylar neck, and eight subcondylar fractures. Among the type A intracapsular condylar fractures, discs were displaced in 71/75, type B in 47/49, type C in 10/11, and in all 25 type M. The incidence of displaced discs between intracapsular condylar fractures on the one hand, and those of the condylar neck or subcondylar region on the other, was significant (p<0.001), but there were no differences among the various subtypes of intracapsular condylar fractures. Postoperative MRI showed successful results in 28/32 joints. Intracapsular condylar fractures were more likely to have displaced discs than the other types. But there were no differences among different subtypes of intracapsular condylar fractures.

  9. Mode I and Mode III fractures in intermediate zone of full-thickness porcine temporomandibular joint discs.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Mark W; Hohl, Rebecca H; Nickel, Jeffrey C; Iwasaki, Laura R; Pidaparti, Ramana M

    2008-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the critical energy required to induce flaw propagation in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc when tensile and shear stresses were applied. J-integrals were measured for Mode I and III fractures because excessive tensile and shear stresses promote disc failure. Single edge notch (Mode I) and trouser tear (Mode III) specimens were constructed with flaws oriented parallel to the predominant anteroposteriorly oriented collagen fibers of the TMJ disc. Disks with and without an impulsive pre-load of 3 N s were studied to compare impact-damaged and healthy tissues. Results demonstrated that impulsive loading stiffened the tissues and significantly increased the Mode I fracture energy (J (IC)) but not Mode III (J (IIIC)) (p < or = 0.05). J (IC) and J (IIIC) values were similar for undamaged tissues, but J (IC) values were 2.3 times higher for impulsively loaded tissues (p < or = 0.05). This suggests that when flaws are introduced through impact, the TMJ disc responds by requiring more energy for tensile flaw extension. This research is a first step towards characterizing the mechanical microenvironment that initiates joint disease. This characterization is essential for successful integration of engineered replacement tissues for damaged TMJs.

  10. An Ex Vivo Study on Immunohistochemical Localization of MMP-7 and MMP-9 in Temporomandibular Joint Discs with Internal Derangement

    PubMed Central

    Loreto, C.; Leonardi, R.; Musumeci, G.; Pannone, G.; Castorina, S.

    2013-01-01

    Internal derangement (ID) is among the most common disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Previous research by our group highlighted a correlation between apoptosis and TMJ ID. Metalloproteinases (MMP)-7 and -9 have been shown to play an important role in extracellular matrix ECM) homeostasis and, through it, in joint disc remodelling. The immunohistochemical expression of MMP-7 and -9 was investigated in discs from patients with TMJ ID and from healthy donors and compared with the degree of histological tissue degeneration. The collagen fibre arrangement in pathological discs exhibited varying degrees of disruption. New vessels were consistently detected; endothelial cells from these vessels were immunolabelled with both MMP-7 and MMP-9. More or less intense MMP-7 and MMP-9 immunolabelling was detected in the cytoplasm of disc cells from all patients. MMP-7 and MMP-9 immunostaining was significantly different between pathological and normal discs and correlated with the extent of histopathological degeneration. MMP-7 and MMP-9 upregulation in discs from patients with TMJ ID demonstrates their involvement in disc damage in this disorder. A greater understanding of these processes could help identify ways to curb MMP overproduction without affecting their tissue remodelling action. The design of specific inhibitors for these MMPs would not only help to gain insights into the biological roles of MMPs, but would also aid in developing therapeutic interventions for diseases associated with abnormal ECM degradation. PMID:23807291

  11. β2-adrenergic signal transduction plays a detrimental role in subchondral bone loss of temporomandibular joint in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Kai; Niu, Li-Na; Li, Qi-hong; Ren, Gao-tong; Zhao, Chang-ming; Liu, Yun-dong; Tay, Franklin R.; Wang, Mei-qing

    2015-01-01

    The present study tested whether activation of the sympathetic tone by aberrant joint loading elicits abnormal subchondral bone remodeling in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis. Abnormal dental occlusion was created in experimental rats, which were then intraperitoneally injected by saline, propranolol or isoproterenol. The norepinephrine contents, distribution of sympathetic nerve fibers, expression of β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) and remodeling parameters in the condylar subchondral bone were investigated. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from condylar subchondral bones were harvested for comparison of their β-ARs, pro-osteoclastic gene expressions and pro-osteoclastic function. Increases in norepinephrine level, sympathetic nerve fiber distribution and β2-AR expression were observed in the condylar subchondral bone of experimental rats, together with subchondral bone loss and increased osteoclast activity. β-antagonist (propranolol) suppressed subchondral bone loss and osteoclast hyperfunction while β-agonist (isoproterenol) exacerbated those responses. MSCs from experimental condylar subchondral bone expressed higher levels of β2-AR and RANKL; norepinephrine stimulation further increased their RANKL expression and pro-osteoclastic function. These effects were blocked by inhibition of β2-AR or the PKA pathway. RANKL expression by MSCs decreased after propranolol administration and increased after isoproterenol administration. It is concluded that β2-AR signal-mediated subchondral bone loss in TMJ osteoarthritisis associated with increased RANKL secretion by MSCs. PMID:26219508

  12. Elimination of tritium-labelled hyaluronic acid from normal and osteoarthritic rabbit knee joints.

    PubMed

    Lindenhayn, K; Heilmann, H H; Niederhausen, T; Walther, H U; Pohlenz, K

    1997-05-01

    The half-life of [3H]hyaluronic acid in rabbit knee joints was estimated using two methods: (i) by following the [3H]hyaluronan content of the synovial fluid after intra-articular injection and (ii) by following the 3H2O radioactivity of plasma after intra-articular injection of [3H]hyaluronan. For normal rabbits we obtained a half-life of 15.8 hours (method I) and 17.5 +/- 1.0 hours (mean +/- SEM, method II), respectively. The second method was used to estimate the kinetics of the hyaluronan elimination from normal, sham-operated, as well as from osteoarthritic rabbit knee joints (Colombo model of osteoarthritis). Four weeks after injury, during the developing phase of osteoarthritis, the half-life of hyaluronan rose significantly to 23.5 +/- 2.1 hours and returned to normal levels (17.4 +/- 2.7 hours) 12 weeks after the operation (osteoarthritis developed). At the stage of developed osteoarthritis, the clearance rates were considerably higher than in normal rabbits.

  13. Observing the development of the temporomandibular joint in embryonic and post-natal mice using various staining methods

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, WENNA; LI, XIHAI; GAO, BIZHEN; GAN, HUIJUAN; LIN, XUEJUAN; LIAO, LINGHONG; LI, CANDONG

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a specialized synovial joint that is essential for the movement and function of the mammalian jaw. The TMJ develops from two mesenchymal condensations, and is composed of the glenoid fossa that originates from the otic capsule by intramembranous ossification, the mandibular condyle of the temporal bone and a fibrocartilagenous articular disc derived from a secondary cartilaginous joint by endochondral ossification. However, the development of the TMJ remains unclear. In the present study, the formation and development of the mouse TMJ was investigated between embryonic day 13.5 and post-natal day 180 in order to elucidate the morphological and molecular alterations that occur during this period. TMJ formation appeared to proceed in three stages: Initiation or blastema stage; growth and cavitation stage; and the maturation or completion stage. In order to investigate the activity of certain transcription factors on TMJ formation and development, the expression of extracellular matrix (ECM), sex determining region Y-box 9, runt-related transcription factor 2, Indian hedgehog homolog, Osterix, collagen I, collagen II, aggrecan, total matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), MMP-9 and MMP-13 were detected in the TMJ using in situ and/or immunohistochemistry. The results indicate that the transcription factors, ECM and MMP serve critical functions in the formation and development of the mouse TMJ. In summary, the development of the mouse TMJ was investigated, and the molecular regulation of mouse TMJ formation was partially characterized. The results of the present study may aid the systematic understanding of the physiological processes underlying TMJ formation and development in mice. PMID:26893634

  14. Cyclic movement stimulates hyaluronan secretion into the synovial cavity of rabbit joints.

    PubMed

    Ingram, K R; Wann, A K T; Angel, C K; Coleman, P J; Levick, J R

    2008-03-15

    The novel hypothesis that the secretion of the joint lubricant hyaluronan (HA) is coupled to movement has implications for normal function and osteoarthritis, and was tested in the knee joints of anaesthetized rabbits. After washing out the endogenous synovial fluid HA (miscibility coefficient 0.4), secretion into the joint cavity was measured over 5 h in static joints and in passively cycled joints. The net static secretion rate (11.2 +/- 0.7 microg h(-1), mean +/- s.e.m., n = 90) correlated with the variable endogenous HA mass (mean 367 +/- 8 microg), with a normalized value of 3.4 +/- 0.2 microg h(-1) (100 microg)(-1) . Cyclic joint movement approximately doubled the net HA secretion rate to 22.6 +/- 1.2 microg h(-1) (n = 77) and raised the normalized percentage to 5.9 +/- 0.3 microg h(-1) (100 microg)(-1). Secretion was inhibited by 2-deoxyglucose and iodoacetate, confirming active secretion. The net accumulation rate underestimated true secretion rate due to some trans-synovial loss. HA turnover time (endogenous mass/secretion rate) was 17-30 h (static) to 8-15 h (moved) The results demonstrate for the first time that the active secretion of HA is coupled to joint usage. Movement-secretion coupling may protect joints against the damaging effects of repetitive joint use, replace HA lost during periods of immobility (overnight), and contribute to the clinical benefit of exercise therapy in moderate osteoarthritis.

  15. Differences Regarding Branded HA in Italy, Part 2: Data from Clinical Studies on Knee, Hip, Shoulder, Ankle, Temporomandibular Joint, Vertebral Facets, and Carpometacarpal Joint

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, A.; Bizzi, E.; De Lucia, O.; Delle Sedie, A.; Tropea, S.; Bentivegna, M.; Mahmoud, A.; Foti, C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The aim of the current study is to collect scientific data on all branded hyaluronic acid (HA) products in Italy that are in use for intra-articular (IA) injection in osteoarthritis (OA) compared with that reported in the leaflet. METHODS An extensive literature research was performed for all articles reporting data on the IA use of HA in OA. Selected studies were taken into consideration only if they are related to products based on HAs that are currently marketed in Italy with the specific joint indication for IA use in patients affected by OA. RESULTS Sixty-two HA products are marketed in Italy: 30 products are indicated for the knee but only 8 were proved with some efficacy; 9 products were effective for the hip but only 6 had hip indication; 7 products proved to be effective for the shoulder but only 3 had the indication; 5 products proved effective for the ankle but only one had the indication; 6 products were effective for the temporomandibular joint but only 2 had the indication; only 2 proved effective for vertebral facet joints but only 1 had the indication; and 5 products proved effective for the carpometacarpal joint but only 2 had the indication. CONCLUSIONS There are only a few products with some evidences, while the majority of products remain without proof. Clinicians and regulators should request postmarketing studies from pharmaceuticals to corroborate with that reported in the leaflet and to gather more data, allowing the clinicians to choose the adequate product for the patient. PMID:27279754

  16. The use of pseudo-dynamic magnetic resonance imaging for evaluating the relationship between temporomandibular joint anterior disc displacement and joint pain.

    PubMed

    Lin, W-C; Lo, C-P; Chiang, I-C; Hsu, C-C; Hsu, W-L; Liu, D-W; Juan, Y-H; Liu, G-C

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) finding of articular disc displacement is debated. The purpose of this study is to investigate the correlation between TMJ pain and anterior disc displacement (ADD) using pseudo-dynamic MRI. A retrospective review of MRI studies was carried out on 130 TMJs in 65 patients presenting unilateral TMJ pain. The contralateral asymptomatic joints served as the control group. Bilateral oblique sagittal and coronal MRIs as well as pseudo-dynamic studies in the oblique sagittal plane were obtained. The disc-condyle relationship was divided into three subtypes (normal disc position, ADD with reduction, and ADD without reduction), based on the pseudo-dynamic MRI findings. Fisher's exact test was used to determine whether the TMJ pain was linked to ADD. The results showed that TMJ pain was significantly related to ADD (with and without reduction) compared to the group with a normal disc position (P=.0001). A significant correlation was found between TMJ pain and the ADD subtype without reduction, as compared to the ADD subtype with reduction (P=.0156). These data suggest that a displaced disc, particularly in the subtype without reduction, is an important source of pain.

  17. Superior half of the sternoclavicular joint pedicled with the sternocleidomastoid muscle for reconstruction of the temporomandibular joint: a preliminary study with a simplified technique and expanded indications.

    PubMed

    Chen, M; Yang, C; Qiu, Y; He, D; Huang, D; Wei, W

    2015-06-01

    The sternoclavicular joint (SCJ) has similar anatomical and physical characteristics to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The purpose of this article is to introduce a modified technique for the pedicled SCJ and the expanded indications for its use. During the period June 2011 to June 2014, six TMJs were reconstructed using the superior half of the SCJ pedicled with the sternocleidomastoid muscle. The inclusion criteria were (1) poor vascularization jeopardizing a non-vascularized TMJ replacement, and/or (2) a large defect of both bone and soft tissue. The average follow-up period was 14.8 months (range 7-39 months). Fracture of the clavicle occurred in one patient (16.7%). No recurrence, graft resorption, or secondary deformity was found. Reconstruction of the TMJ using the superior half of the SCJ pedicled with the clavicle head of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and sternocleidomastoid branch of the superior thyroid artery benefited patients who had a poor blood supply and a medullary condition or who had a defect in both the condyle and surrounding soft tissue.

  18. Arthrocentesis with or without additional drugs in temporomandibular joint inflammatory-degenerative disease: comparison of six treatment protocols*.

    PubMed

    Manfredini, D; Rancitelli, D; Ferronato, G; Guarda-Nardini, L

    2012-04-01

    The aim of the present pilot investigation was to compare the effectiveness of six treatment protocols providing temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthrocentesis with or without additional drugs to manage symptoms in patients with inflammatory-degenerative TMJ disease. A consecutive series of 72 patients with TMJ osteoarthritis (axis group IIIb) with pain lasting from more than 6 months were randomly assigned to one of the groups receiving the following treatment protocols: single-session two-needle arthrocentesis (A), single-session two-needle arthrocentesis plus corticosteroid (B), single-session two-needle arthrocentesis plus low molecular weight hyaluronic acid (HA) (C), single-session two-needle arthrocentesis plus high molecular weight HA (D), 5 weekly two-needle arthrocenteses plus low molecular weight HA (E) and 5 weekly single-needle arthrocenteses plus low molecular weight HA (F). At the 3-month follow-up, improvement with respect to mean baseline values was recorded in all the five treatment groups completing the protocol. No significant differences emerged between groups in any outcome variable. The protocol providing five sessions of two-needle arthrocenteses plus low molecular weight HA allowed achieving the highest improvement in almost all the outcome variables. Findings suggested that no statistically significant differences existed between the treatment groups. The clinical significance of these findings needs to be tested with future studies on larger samples with longer follow-up periods.

  19. Effect of hyaluronic acid on the regulation of inflammatory mediators in osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Iturriaga, V; Bornhardt, T; Manterola, C; Brebi, P

    2017-05-01

    Osteoarthritis is one of the most frequent pathologies affecting the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). There is evidence that the use of intra-articular hyaluronic acid (HA) for the treatment of this disorder achieves positive effects through a reduction in inflammatory mediators. A systematic review of the available evidence regarding the regulation of inflammatory mediators when applying HA in osteoarthritis of the TMJ in humans was performed. The Web of Science, Embase, ScienceDirect, MEDLINE, Scopus, EBSCOhost, and LILACS databases, SciELO library, and search engine Trip Database were searched systematically. Two thousand eight hundred and sixty-three related articles were found, of which only two met the selection criteria (both were clinical trials and evidence level 2b for treatment studies). These two articles represented a population of 87 patients. Both articles reported that the application of HA had a positive effect on the regulation of inflammatory mediators; the mediators studied were those of the plasminogen activator system and levels of nitric oxide. The limited evidence available suggests that the application of HA regulates various inflammatory mediators in osteoarthritic processes in the TMJ. Nevertheless, further evidence in this regard is required, through the study of specific pathologies of the TMJ, complementing the assessment of clinical parameters with molecular studies, and generating good quality clinical studies with larger sample sizes.

  20. Lateral cephalometric analysis of mandibular morphology: discrimination among subjects with and without temporomandibular joint disk displacement and osteoarthrosis.

    PubMed

    Bertram, S; Moriggl, A; Neunteufel, N; Rudisch, A; Emshoff, R

    2012-02-01

    To assess whether in patients with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) arthralgia cephalometric variables of mandibular morphology may discriminate among the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-based TMJ groups of 'bilateral presence of disk displacement without reduction (DDwoR) and osteoarthrosis (OA)' and 'bilateral absence of bilateral DDwoR and OA'. Bilateral MR imaging of the TMJ was performed in 45 consecutive TMJ arthralgia patients to identify individuals with the specific structural characteristics of bilateral TMJ DDwoR associated with OA. Linear and angular cephalometric measurements were taken from lateral cephalograms to apply selected criteria of mandibular morphology. A discriminant function analysis was used to investigate how cephalometric parameters discriminate among the TMJ groups of 'bilateral presence of DDwoR with OA' and 'bilateral absence of DDwoR and OA'. Ramus height (Ar-Go) and effective mandibular length (Ar-Pog) produced a significant discriminant function that predicted TMJ group membership (P < 0·001). This function correctly classified 80·2% of original and cross-validated grouped cases. This study supports the concept that cephalometric variables of mandibular morphology discriminate among subjects with and without bilateral TMJ DDwoR and OA.

  1. Efficacy of arthroscopic surgery and midlaser treatments for chronic temporomandibular joint articular disc derangement following motor vehicle accident.

    PubMed

    McNamara, D C; Rosenberg, I; Jackson, P A; Hogben, J

    1996-12-01

    As a result of motor vehicle accident soft-tissue injury, temporomandibular joint articular disc derangement may develop and persist despite symptomatic treatment and medication. This study reports the effectiveness of management directed at controlling the TMJ and masticatory neuromuscular pain dysfunction with a TMJ/interocclusal stabilization appliance, specific biofeedback and ultrasound therapy. Following these conservative measures residual articular disc derangement was present in some subjects who were offered arthroscopic surgery and infrared midlaser with TMJ/occlusal stabilization. Twenty subjects with residual disc derangement were randomly selected into two groups with and without arthroscopic surgery, and analyses of variance made before treatment, 12 months after conservative procedures, 3 months following arthroscopic surgery and midlaser therapy and 3 years since commencement of management. Dependent variables compared were pain-discomfort, Clinical Dysfunction Index, articular disc derangement and maximal voluntary jaw opening. Conservative management alone provided significant reduction of pain-discomfort and clinical dysfunction, while arthroscopic surgery resulted in significant reduction in articular disc derangement. The midlaser with TMJ/occlusal stabilization maintained significant improvement in the variables (p < 0.01) for both groups. The common articular deviations in form found at arthroscopy were soft tissue alteration with hyperaemia, synovitis, synovial membrane and posterior attachment folding with connective tissue hyperplasia, and disc displacement with fibrous adhesions. The Global Status Score of pain behaviour compared with residual function, confirmed the presence of greater pain before treatment commenced.

  2. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: bacterial diversity in temporomandibular joint synovial fluid in comparison with immunological and clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Olsen-Bergem, H; Kristoffersen, A K; Bjørnland, T; Reseland, J E; Aas, J A

    2016-03-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) occurs in up to 80% of affected children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of bacterial DNA in synovial fluid, and to compare this with clinical and immunological findings in children with JIA, adults with persistent JIA, and adults with rheumatoid arthritis, in order to detect whether bacteria contribute to inflammation in TMJ arthritis. Synovial fluid and skin swab samples were collected from 30 patients (54 TMJs). Bacterial detection was performed using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. Bacterial DNA was detected in 31 TMJs (57%) in 19 patients (63%). A positive statistically significant correlation was registered between bacterial DNA detected in TMJ synovial fluid and the following factors: total protein concentration in synovial fluid, interleukin 1β, tumour necrosis factor alpha, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and adiponectin, as well as the duration of the general medical disease. Fourteen different bacterial species were detected in synovial fluid. Bacterial DNA in TMJ synovial fluid without contamination was detected in more than 50% of the patients. Studies are needed to evaluate the consequences of this bacterial DNA in synovial fluid with regard to TMJ arthritis.

  3. High-Resolution Morphologic and Ultrashort Time-to-Echo Quantitative Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Won C; Tafur, Monica; Chang, Eric Y.; Du, Jiang; Biswas, Reni; Kwack, Kyu-Sung; Healey, Robert; Statum, Sheronda; Chung, Christine B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To implement high-resolution morphologic and quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) using ultrashort time-to-echo (UTE) techniques in cadavers and volunteers. Methods This study was approved by the institutional review board. TMJs of cadavers and volunteers were imaged on a 3T-MR system. High-resolution morphologic and quantitative sequences using conventional and UTE techniques were performed in cadaveric TMJs. Morphologic and UTE quantitative sequences were performed in asymptomatic and symptomatic volunteers. Results Morphologic evaluation demonstrated the TMJ structures in open and closed-mouth position. UTE techniques facilitated the visualization of the disc and fibrocartilage. Quantitative UTE MRI was successfully performed ex-vivo and in-vivo reflecting the degree of degeneration. There was a difference in the mean UTE T2* values between asymptomatic and symptomatic volunteers. Conclusions MRI evaluation of the TMJ using UTE techniques allows characterization of the internal structure and quantification of the MR properties of the disc. Quantitative UTE MRI can be performed in-vivo with short scan times. PMID:26685898

  4. How effective are geometric morphometric techniques for assessing functional shape variation? An example from the great ape temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Terhune, Claire E

    2013-08-01

    Functional shape analyses have long relied on the use of shape ratios to test biomechanical hypotheses. This method is powerful because of the ease with which results are interpreted, but these techniques fall short in quantifying complex morphologies that may not have a strong biomechanical foundation but may still be functionally informative. In contrast, geometric morphometric methods are continually being adopted for quantifying complex shapes, but they tend to prove inadequate in functional analyses because they have little foundation in an explicit biomechanical framework. The goal of this study was to evaluate the intersection of these two methods using the great ape temporomandibular joint as a case study. Three-dimensional coordinates of glenoid fossa and mandibular condyle shape were collected using a Microscribe digitizer. Linear distances extracted from these landmarks were analyzed using a series of one-way ANOVAs; further, the landmark configurations were analyzed using geometric morphometric techniques. Results suggest that the two methods are broadly similar, although the geometric morphometric data allow for the identification of shape differences among taxa that were not immediately apparent in the univariate analyses. Furthermore, this study suggests several new approaches for translating these shape data into a biomechanical context by adjusting the data using a biomechanically relevant variable.

  5. Evaluation of validity and reliability of a methodology for measuring human postural attitude and its relation to temporomandibular joint disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Ramón Fuentes; Carter, Pablo; Muñoz, Sergio; Silva, Héctor; Venegas, Gonzalo Hernán Oporto; Cantin, Mario; Ottone, Nicolás Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJDs) are caused by several factors such as anatomical, neuromuscular and psychological alterations. A relationship has been established between TMJDs and postural alterations, a type of anatomical alteration. An anterior position of the head requires hyperactivity of the posterior neck region and shoulder muscles to prevent the head from falling forward. This compensatory muscular function may cause fatigue, discomfort and trigger point activation. To our knowledge, a method for assessing human postural attitude in more than one plane has not been reported. Thus, the aim of this study was to design a methodology to measure the external human postural attitude in frontal and sagittal planes, with proper validity and reliability analyses. METHODS The variable postures of 78 subjects (36 men, 42 women; age 18–24 years) were evaluated. The postural attitudes of the subjects were measured in the frontal and sagittal planes, using an acromiopelvimeter, grid panel and Fox plane. RESULTS The method we designed for measuring postural attitudes had adequate reliability and validity, both qualitatively and quantitatively, based on Cohen’s Kappa coefficient (> 0.87) and Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r = 0.824, > 80%). CONCLUSION This method exhibits adequate metrical properties and can therefore be used in further research on the association of human body posture with skeletal types and TMJDs. PMID:26768173

  6. Activation of α2A-adrenergic signal transduction in chondrocytes promotes degenerative remodelling of temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Kai; Zeng, Guang; Niu, Li-Na; Yang, Hong-xu; Ren, Gao-tong; Xu, Xin-yue; Li, Fei-fei; Tay, Franklin R.; Wang, Mei-qing

    2016-01-01

    This study tested whether activation of adrenoreceptors in chondrocytes has roles in degenerative remodelling of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and to determine associated mechanisms. Unilateral anterior crossbite (UAC) was established to induce TMJ degeneration in rats. Saline vehicle, α2- and β-adrenoreceptor antagonists or agonists were injected locally into the TMJ area of UAC rats. Cartilage degeneration, subchondral bone microarchitecture and the expression of adrenoreceptors, aggrecans, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and RANKL by chondrocytes were evaluated. Chondrocytes were stimulated by norepinephrine to investigate signal transduction of adrenoreceptors. Increased α2A-adrenoreceptor expression was observed in condylar cartilage of UAC rats, together with cartilage degeneration and subchondral bone loss. Norepinephrine depresses aggrecans expression but stimulates MMP-3, MMP-13 and RANKL production by chondrocytes through ERK1/2 and PKA pathway; these effects were abolished by an α2A-adrenoreceptor antagonist. Furthermore, inhibition of α2A-adrenoreceptor attenuated degenerative remodelling in the condylar cartilage and subchondral bone, as revealed by increased cartilage thickness, proteoglycans and aggrecan expression, and decreased MMP-3, MMP-13 and RANKL expressions in cartilage, increased BMD, BV/TV, and decreased Tb.Sp in subchondral bone. Conversely, activation of α2A-adrenoreceptor intensified aforementioned degenerative changes in UAC rats. It is concluded that activation of α2A-adrenergic signal in chondrocytes promotes TMJ degenerative remodelling by chondrocyte-mediated pro-catabolic activities. PMID:27452863

  7. Effect of Stomatognathic Alignment Exercise on Temporomandibular Joint Function and Swallowing Function of Stroke Patients with Limited Mouth Opening

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Duck-Won; Kang, Tae-Woo; Kim, Sun-Ju

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of stomatognathic alignment exercise on temporomandibular joint function and swallowing function of stroke patients presenting limited mouth opening. [Subjects] Fourteen subjects with post-stroke hemiparesis presenting limited mouth opening were randomly assigned to either the experimental group or the control group, with 7 subjects in each group. [Methods] Subjects in the experimental group participated in a stomatognathic alignment exercise program that consisted of mobility exercises of the TMJ and neck and postural correction. Main outcome measures were neck mobility, the active maximum range of mouth opening, the craniomandibular index (CMI), and the Mann assessment of swallowing ability (MASA) score. [Results] The changes in the values of the range of mouth opening, CMI, MASA, and all the parameters of neck mobility were significantly different between the groups. Furthermore, post-test values appeared to be significantly different for the range of mouth opening, the craniomandibular index, and the MASA scores between the groups (p>0.05). [Conclusion] Stomatognathic alignment exercise may improve TMJ function and swallowing function of patients with post-stroke hemiparesis. PMID:24259786

  8. Prostaglandin E2 Upregulated Trigeminal Ganglionic Sodium Channel 1.7 Involving Temporomandibular Joint Inflammatory Pain in Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Gan, Ye-Hua

    2017-03-27

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is a key proinflammatory mediator that contributes to inflammatory hyperalgesia. Voltage-gated sodium channel 1.7 (Nav1.7) plays an important role in inflammatory pain. However, the modulation of Nav1.7 in inflammatory pain remains poorly understood. We hypothesized that PGE2 might regulate Nav1.7 expression in inflammatory pain. We here showed that treatment of rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) explants with PGE2 significantly upregulated the mRNA and protein expressions of Nav1.7 through PGE2 receptor EP2. This finding was confirmed by studies on EP2-selective antagonist PF-04418948. We also demonstrated that Nav1.7 and COX-2 expressions, as well as PGE2 levels, were upregulated in the TG after induction of rats' temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation. Correspondingly, hyperalgesia, as indicated by head withdrawal threshold, was observed. Moreover, TMJ inflammation-induced upregulation of Nav1.7 expression and PGE2 levels in the TG could be reversed by COX-2-selective inhibitor meloxicam given by oral gavage, and meanwhile, the hyperalgesia of inflamed TMJ was also mitigated. So we concluded that PGE2 upregulated trigeminal ganglionic Nav1.7 expression to contribute to TMJ inflammatory pain in rats. Our finding suggests that PGE2 was an important regulator of Nav1.7 in TMJ inflammatory pain, which may help increase understanding on the hyperalgesia of peripheral inflammation and develop a new strategy to address inflammatory pain.

  9. Application of a computer-assisted surgical navigation system in temporomandibular joint ankylosis surgery: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    He, Y; Huang, T; Zhang, Y; An, J; He, L

    2017-02-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the effect of surgical computer-assisted navigation in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis gap arthroplasty. Eighteen patients (25 sides) with bony ankylosis who underwent surgical treatment under computer-assisted navigation (navigation group) from May 2011 to April 2013 were assessed, along with 19 such patients (25 sides) treated without computer-assisted navigation (non-navigation group) from March 2009 to April 2011. The navigation group patients underwent surgery with the preservation of ≥3mm bone thickness in the skull base and anterior wall of the external auditory canal. Postoperatively, computed tomography (CT) was used to measure the residual bone thickness in the skull base and anterior wall of the external auditory canal. Maximum mouth opening (MMO) changes were evaluated at >1 year of follow-up. Postoperative CT measurements showed that the lowest skull base thickness in the navigation group was significantly lower than that in the non-navigation group (3.86±1.95mm vs. 6.01±3.07mm, P=0.009). The lowest thicknesses of the anterior wall of the external auditory canal were similar in the two groups. Postoperative follow-up showed similar average MMO in the two groups. Therefore, with the navigation system, TMJ ankylosis gap arthroplasty can achieve more extensive removal of the ankylosed bone, at least towards the skull base, under the premise of ensuring a safety distance of 3mm.

  10. Interpositional Gap Arthroplasty by Versatile Pedicled Temporalis Myofascial Flap in the Management of Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis- A Case Series Study

    PubMed Central

    Aneja, Vikas; Bansal, Anupam; Kumawat, Vinod; Kaur, Jasleen; Shaikh, Ahemer Arif

    2016-01-01

    Temporomandibular Joint (TMJ) ankylosis is a situation in which the mandibular condyle is fused to the glenoid fossa by bone or fibrous tissue. The management of TMJ ankylosis has a complicated chore and it is challenging for the maxillofacial surgeon because of technical hitches and high rate of re-ankylosis. Interpositional gap arthroplasty is one of the modalities for its management. A range of inter-positional materials have been used to avert recurrence after gap arthroplasty in TMJ ankylosis. The aim of this series was to evaluate the effectiveness of the temporomyofacial flap in the treatment of TMJ ankylosis as an interpositional gap arthroplasty. A total of 10 cases with unilateral TMJ ankylosis were treated by interpositional gap arthroplasty by pedicled temporalis myofacial flap and evaluated with a follow-up of 6 months to 5 years (Mean 3.3 years) for the functional stability of TMJ. All the patients were successfully treated. There were no signs of recurrence in any patients up to last follow up visit. The result showed that temporalis myofascial flap is a preferable choice for inter-positional gap arthroplasty which proves its versatility as an inter-positional material. PMID:27891496

  11. Conditional Deletion of Fgfr3 in Chondrocytes leads to Osteoarthritis-like Defects in Temporomandibular Joint of Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Siru; Xie, Yangli; Li, Wei; Huang, Junlan; Wang, Zuqiang; Tang, Junzhou; Xu, Wei; Sun, Xianding; Tan, Qiaoyan; Huang, Shuo; Luo, Fengtao; Xu, Meng; Wang, Jun; Wu, Tingting; chen, Liang; Chen, Hangang; Su, Nan; Du, Xiaolan; Shen, Yue; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a common degenerative disease in adult, which is characterized by progressive destruction of the articular cartilage. To investigate the role of FGFR3 in the homeostasis of TMJ cartilage during adult stage, we generated Fgfr3f/f; Col2a1-CreERT2 (Fgfr3 cKO) mice, in which Fgfr3 was deleted in chondrocytes at 2 months of age. OA-like defects were observed in Fgfr3 cKO TMJ cartilage. Immunohistochemical staining and quantitative real-time PCR analyses revealed a significant increase in expressions of COL10, MMP13 and AMAMTS5. In addition, there was a sharp increase in chondrocyte apoptosis at the Fgfr3 cKO articular surface, which was accompanied by a down-regulation of lubricin expression. Importantly, the expressions of RUNX2 and Indian hedgehog (IHH) were up-regulated in Fgfr3 cKO TMJ. Primary Fgfr3 cKO chondrocytes were treated with IHH signaling inhibitor, which significantly reduced expressions of Runx2, Col10, Mmp13 and Adamts5. Furthermore, the IHH signaling inhibitor partially alleviated OA-like defects in the TMJ of Fgfr3 cKO mice, including restoration of lubricin expression and improvement of the integrity of the articular surface. In conclusion, our study proposes that FGFR3/IHH signaling pathway plays a critical role in maintaining the homeostasis of TMJ articular cartilage during adult stage. PMID:27041063

  12. Radiation-induced temporo-mandibular joint disorder in post-radiotherapy nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients: assessment and treatment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Vincent W C; Lam, Ying-Na

    2016-06-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is endemic in southern China, and its incidence in Hong Kong is relatively high. Radiotherapy is the mainstay treatment for NPC due to its relatively high radiosensitivity and deep-seated anatomical position, which is not readily accessible by surgery. Although the technique of radiotherapy in NPC has been advancing and offers promising treatment outcome, complications around the irradiation areas are inevitable and the quality of life of the post-radiotherapy patients is often compromised. Trismus, which is defined as the restricted mouth opening or jaw movement due to the disorder of temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ), is one of the possible late complications for radiotherapy of NPC and is found in 5-17% of the post-radiotherapy (post-RT) patients. Trismus at early stage may only affect the speech, but in severe cases nutritional intake and oral hygiene condition may deteriorate seriously. This article reviewed the possible causes of radiation-induced TMJ damage, the various assessments including imaging modalities and possible treatments. The conclusion is that the availability of simple, yet effective examinations for trismus is essential for delaying the progression and restoring TMJ functions. Although there is no absolutely effective treatment for trismus, many supportive, restorative and palliative management are possible under different clinical situations.

  13. Temporomandibular joint effusion and its relationship with perceived disability assessed using musculoskeletal ultrasound and a patient-reported disability index

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Lance; Bright, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between effusion of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and patient-reported disability is poorly researched. This pilot study explored the link between TMJ inflammation as measured by ultrasound and patient disability assessed by the Steigerwald Maher TMD Disability Index (SMTDI). The study design used a prospective correlational approach involving a sample with TMJ dysfunction (TMD). Twenty-four patients were recruited from the European School of Osteopathy and a Kent dental practice. Participants completed the SMTDI to determine the level of TMD (symptomatic score >20). A SonoSite SLA “Hockey Stick” [13-6 MHz] musculo-skeletal transducer was placed over the TMJ in a transverse direction and effusion was calculated indirectly by measuring capsular width. An upper left quadrant protocol was used throughout. A regression analysis was run with participants’ gender, age and capsular width as predictor variables modelled against reported SMTDI. Larger capsular widths were found to be significant predictors of SMTDI scores (r = 0.803, p < 0.0001). The patient profile matched with the previous studies and the TMD sufferer population, indicating external validity. Results suggest that the SMTDI could be integrated into practice life as a quick, accessible and easy tool to monitor patients’ progress and assess levels of inflammation, without the need for repetitive imaging. The study design proved reproducible and a larger scale study is indicated. PMID:27433242

  14. Temporomandibular Joint Surgery: What Does it Mean to India in the 21st Century?

    PubMed

    Dimitroulis, George

    2012-09-01

    While India boasts the largest collective experience in the surgical management of TMJ ankylosis, times are changing and Indian Surgeons will need to begin thinking about other TMJ disorders that have previously gone under the radar. A growing Indian middle class with greater access to health facilities will demand treatment for TMJ disorders like myofacial pain and dysfunction, internal derangement and osteoarthrosis which Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeons must be prepared to manage. The aim of this paper is to review the role of TMJ surgery and its place in the treatment armamentarium of temporomandibular disorders. Indications, rationale for surgery, risks vs benefits are discussed and complemented with examples of clinical cases treated by the author. As India moves up the economic ladder of success, TMJ disorders that have largely been confined to Western nations will begin to appear in the rising middle classes of India. Indian Oral & Maxillofacial Surgeons must be prepared to recognize and manage disorders which present with more complex symptomatology where the role of TMJ surgery is less clear cut.

  15. Passaged costal chondrocytes provide a viable cell source for temporomandibular joint tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Johns, D.E.; Athanasiou, K.A.

    2010-01-01

    Costal cartilage is commonly harvested for various types of facial reconstructive surgery. The ability of costal chondrocytes (CCs) to produce relevant extracellular matrix, including glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), collagen type I, and collagen type II, makes them an appealing cell source for fibrocartilage tissue engineering. In order to obtain enough cells for tissue engineering, however, cell expansion will likely be necessary. This study examined CCs at passages 0, 1, 3, and 5, as well as temporomandibular (TMJ) disc cells, in a scaffoldless tissue engineering approach. TMJ disc constructs had over twice the collagen content of any other group, as well as the largest tensile properties; however, the substantial contraction of the constructs and limited cell numbers make it a non-feasible cell source for tissue engineering. In general, statistical differences in mechanical properties or total collagen content of the various CC groups were not observed; however, significantly more GAG was produced in the passaged CCs than the primary CCs. More collagen type II was also observed in some of the passaged cell groups than in passage 0. These results suggest not only feasibility but potential superiority of passaged CCs over primary CCs, which may lead to a functional engineered fibrocartilage tissue. PMID:18830818

  16. Investigation of human frontal cortex under noxious thermal stimulation of temporo-mandibular joint using functional near infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yennu, Amarnath; Rawat, Rohit; Manry, Michael T.; Gatchel, Robert; Liu, Hanli

    2013-03-01

    According to American Academy of Orofacial Pain, 75% of the U.S. population experiences painful symptoms of temporo-mandibular joint and muscle disorder (TMJMD) during their lifetime. Thus, objective assessment of pain is crucial for efficient pain management. We used near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a tool to explore hemodynamic responses in the frontal cortex to noxious thermal stimulation of temporomadibular joint (TMJ). NIRS experiments were performed on 9 healthy volunteers under both low pain stimulation (LPS) and high pain stimulation (HPS), using a temperature-controlled thermal stimulator. To induce thermal pain, a 16X16 mm2 thermode was strapped onto the right TMJ of each subject. Initially, subjects were asked to rate perceived pain on a scale of 0 to 10 for the temperatures from 41°C to 47°C. For the NIRS measurement, two magnitudes of temperatures, one rated as 3 and another rated as 7, were chosen as LPS and HPS, respectively. By analyzing the temporal profiles of changes in oxy-hemoglobin concentration (HbO) using cluster-based statistical tests, we were able to identify several regions of interest (ROI), (e.g., secondary somatosensory cortex and prefrontal cortex), where significant differences (p<0.05) between HbO responses to LPS and HPS are shown. In order to classify these two levels of pain, a neural-network-based classification algorithm was used. With leave-one-out cross validation from 9 subjects, the two levels of pain were identified with 100% mean sensitivity, 98% mean specificity and 99% mean accuracy to high pain. From the receiver operating characteristics curve, 0.99 mean area under curve was observed.

  17. Is aggressive gap arthroplasty essential in the management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis?-a prospective clinical study of 15 cases.

    PubMed

    Babu, Lokesh; Jain, Manoj Kumar; Ramesh, C; Vinayaka, N

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this three-year, prospective, follow-up study was to evaluate whether aggressive gap arthroplasty is essential in the management of ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Fifteen patients were treated by the creation of a minimal gap of 5-8mm and insertion of an interpositional gap arthroplasty using the temporalis fascia. Eleven patients had unilateral coronoidectomy and 4 bilateral coronoidectomy based on Kaban's protocol. Preoperative assessment included recording of history, clinical and radiological examinations, personal variables, the aetiology of the ankylosis, the side affected, and any other relevant findings. Patients were assessed postoperatively by a surgeon unaware of the treatment given for a minimum of 3 years, which included measurement of the maximal incisal opening, presence of facial nerve paralysis, recurrence, and any other relevant findings. Of the 15 patients (17 joints), 12 had unilateral and three had bilateral involvement, with trauma being the most common cause. The patients were aged between 7 and 29 years (mean (SD) age 20 (8) years). Preoperative maximal incisal opening was 0-2mm in 8 cases and 2-9mm in 9. Postoperatively adequate mouth opening of 30-40mm was achieved in all cases, with no recurrence or relevant malocclusion during 3-year follow up. However, patients will be followed up for 10 years. Aggressive gap arthroplasty is not essential in the management of ankylosis of the TMJ. Minimal gap interpositional arthroplasty with complete removal of the mediolateral ankylotic mass is a feasible and effective method of preventing recurrence.

  18. ROCK/actin/MRTF signaling promotes the fibrogenic phenotype of fibroblast-like synoviocytes derived from the temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Seiji; Chosa, Naoyuki; Kyakumoto, Seiko; Kimura, Hitomichi; Ibi, Miho; Kamo, Masaharu; Satoh, Kazuro; Ishisaki, Akira

    2017-01-01

    Malocclusion caused by abnormal jaw development or muscle overuse during mastication results in abnormal mechanical stress to the tissues surrounding the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Excessive mechanical stress against soft and hard tissues around the TMJ is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases, including osteoarthritis (OA). OA-related fibrosis is a possible cause of joint stiffness in OA. However, cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying fibrosis around the TMJ remain to be clarified. Here, we established a cell line of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) derived from the mouse TMJ. Then, we examined whether the Rho-associated coiled-coil forming kinase (ROCK)/actin/myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF) gene regulatory axis positively regulates the myofibroblast (MF) differentiation status of FLSs. We found that i) FLSs extensively expressed the MF markers α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and type I collagen; and ii) an inhibitor against the actin-polymerizing agent ROCK, Y-27632; iii) an actin-depolymerizing agent cytochalasin B; iv) an inhibitor of the MRTF/serum response factor-regulated transcription, CCG-100602, clearly suppressed the mRNA levels of α-SMA and type I collagen in FLSs; and v) an MF differentiation attenuator fibroblast growth factor-1 suppressed filamentous actin formation and clearly suppressed the mRNA levels of α-SMA and type I collagen in FLSs. These results strongly suggest that the ROCK/actin/MRTF axis promotes the fibrogenic activity of synoviocytes around the TMJ. Our findings partially clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying the emergence of TMJ-OA and may aid in identifying drug targets for treating this condition at the molecular level. PMID:28259960

  19. Temporomandibular Joint and Muscle Disorder (TMJMD) - type pain and Co-morbid Pains in a National US Sample

    PubMed Central

    Plesh, O; Adams, SH; Gansky, SA

    2013-01-01

    Aims To compare prevalences of self-reported comorbid headaches, neck, back, and joint pains in respondents with temporomandibular joint and muscle disorder (TMJMD)-type pain in the 2000–2005 US National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), and to analyze these self-reported pains by gender and age for Non-Hispanic (NH) Whites (Caucasians), Hispanics and NH Blacks (African Americans). Methods Data from the 2000–2005 NHIS included information on gender, age, race, ethnicity, education, different common types of pain (specifically: TMJMD-type, severe headache/migraine, neck, and low back pains), changes in health status; and health care utilization. Estimates and test statistics (i.e. Pearson correlations, regressions and logistic models) were conducted using SAS survey analysis and SUDAAN software that take into account the complex sample design. Results A total of 189,977 people: 52% female and 48% males; 73% NH Whites, 12% Hispanic, 11% NH Blacks and 4% “Other” were included. A total of 4.6% reported TMJMD-type pain and only 0.77% overall reported it without any comorbid headache/migraine, neck, or low back pains; also 59% of the TMJMD-type pain (N = 8,964) reported ≥two comorbid pain. Females reported more comorbid pain than males (odds ratio (OR) = 1.41, p <0.001), Hispanic and NH Blacks reported more than NH Whites (OR = 1.56, p <0.001; OR = 1.38, p <0.001, respectively). In addition, 53% of those with TMJMD-type pain had severe headache/migraines; 54% had neck pain, 64% low back pain and 62% joint pain. Differences in gender, race by age patterns were detected. For females, headache/migraine pain with TMJMD-type pain peaked around age 40 and decreased thereafter regardless of race/ethnicity. Neck pain continued to increase up to about age 60, with higher prevalence for Hispanic women at younger ages, and more pronounced in males, being the highest in the non-Whites. Low back pain was higher in Black and Hispanic females across the age span and higher

  20. Association Between Harmful Oral Habits and Sign and Symptoms of Temporomandibular Joint Disorders Among Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Jayaprakash; Kamate, Shivalingesh; Kushwaha, Sumedha; Anand, Richa; Gupta, Neha; Gupta, Bhuvandeep; Singh, Ishan

    2015-01-01

    Context Temporomandibular disorder (TDM) is defined as a heterogenous group of psychophysiological disorders commonly characterised by orofacial pain, chewing dysfunction or both. Various Epidemiological studies had shown occurrence of TMD in all age groups including children. Also research had shown that non nutritional oral habits to be associated with TMD. Aim Present study aimed to find whether harmful oral habits are associated with sign and symptoms of TMD among adolescents in Greater Noida. Setting and Design Schools in Gautam Buddha district and descriptive study. Materials and Methods Cross sectional study was carried out among 240 adolescents (10 – 19 years) studying in schools of Greater Noida. Study population were selected by random sampling to whom screening questionnaires recommended by American Academy of Orofacial Pain (AAOP) were distributed. Patient history and clinical examination was used to determine harmful oral habits. Data analysis was done in SPSS version 21 and Chi-square test was applied. Results Sixty one participants (25.4%) displayed no sign and symptoms of TMD, 34 (14.2%) responded affirmatively to atleast one item on the questionnaire and 108(46%) gave at least three affirmative responses. Headache, Neckpain and Toothache were most frequent reported sign and symptoms of TMD (46.2%). There was statistically significant association between gender and sign and symptoms of TMD on three items of the questionnaire (p < 0.05). Nail Biting (45.8%), Biting Lips/objects (37%) were most common habits among the study group. There was statistically significant association between Nail Biting (p = 0.001), Lip Biting/ object biting (p=0.001), Grinding of teeth (p = 0.01) and sign and symptoms of TMD. Conclusion A statistically significant association was found between nail biting, lip/ object biting and grinding of teeth with signs and/or symptoms of TMD. Thus there is need for preventive dental treatment and community dental education so that

  1. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint: a clinical, radiological and histological study.

    PubMed

    Martín-Granizo, Rafael; Sánchez, Juan Jesús; Jorquera, Manuela; Ortega, Luis

    2005-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) is a cartilaginous metaplasy of the mesenchymal remnants of the synovial tissue of the joints. It is characterized by the formation of cartilaginous nodules in the synovium and inside the articular space (loose bodies). SC mainly affects to big synovial joints such as the knee and the elbow, being uncommon the onset within the TMJ, where 75 cases have been published. The main symptoms are pain, inflammation, limitation of the movements of the jaw and crepitation. Different methods of diagnosis include panoramic radiograph, CT, MR and arthroscopy of the TMJ. We report a new case of unilateral SC of the TMJ, including diagnostic images, treatment performed and histological analysis.

  2. [Temporomandibular dysfunction causes orofacial pain].

    PubMed

    Bakke, Merete

    2010-11-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMD) are the most common cause of chronic orofacial pain. They are characterized by painful and hampered jaw function. Especially disc displacements, osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint and masticatory muscle problems are frequent. The pain is localized in the jaws, face and temples, and jaw opening may be reduced, asymmetrical or irregular with noises from the temporomandibular joints. In cases with restricted jaw mobility or when the pain is provoked or aggravated by jaw function, referral to odontological examination is indicated. The prognosis is good, but full recovery may take years.

  3. Changes in temporomandibular joint spaces after arthroscopic disc repositioning: a self-control study

    PubMed Central

    Kai Hu, Ying; Abdelrehem, Ahmed; Yang, Chi; Cai, Xie Yi; Xie, Qian Yang; Sah, Manoj Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Disc repositioning is a common procedure for patients with anterior disc displacement (ADD). The purpose of this retrospective record-based study was to evaluate changes in the widths of joint spaces and condylar position changes in patients with unilateral ADD following arthroscopic disc repositioning, with the healthy sides as self-control, using magnetic resonance images (MRI).Widths of anterior, superior, and posterior joint spaces (AS, SS, and PS) were measured. The condylar position was described as anterior, centric or posterior, expressed as . Paired-t test and Chi-square test were used to analyze the data. Fifty-four records conformed to the inclusion criteria (mean age of 21.02 years). Widths of SS and PS increased significantly after surgery (P < 0.001) on the operative sides, while joint spaces of healthy sides and AS of operative sides had no significant changes. Dominant location of condyles of operative sides changed from a posterior position to an anterior position, while healthy sides were mostly centric condylar position no matter preoperatively or postoperatively. Therefore, the results of this study indicate that unilateral arthroscopic disc repositioning significantly increases the posterior and superior spaces of the affected joints, without affecting spaces of the healthy sides. PMID:28361905

  4. [Total alloplastic temporomandibular joint reconstruction combined with orthodontic treatment in a patient with idiopathic condylar resorption].

    PubMed

    Chung, Chooryung J; Choi, Yoon-Jeong; Kim, In-Sil; Huh, Jong-Ki; Kim, Hyung-Gon; Kim, Kyung-Ho

    2012-09-01

    This case report describes the successful treatment of an adult patient with skeletal Class II open-bite malocclusion secondary to idiopathic condylar resorption. Total alloplastic joint reconstruction and counterclockwise rotation of the maxillomandibular complex combined with orthodontic treatment provided a satisfying outcome with maximum functional and esthetic improvement.

  5. Total alloplastic temporomandibular joint reconstruction combined with orthodontic treatment in a patient with idiopathic condylar resorption.

    PubMed

    Chung, Chooryung J; Choi, Yoon-Jeong; Kim, In-Sil; Huh, Jong-Ki; Kim, Hyung-Gon; Kim, Kyung-Ho

    2011-09-01

    This case report describes the successful treatment of an adult patient with skeletal Class II open-bite malocclusion secondary to idiopathic condylar resorption. Total alloplastic joint reconstruction and counterclockwise rotation of the maxillomandibular complex combined with orthodontic treatment provided a satisfying outcome with maximum functional and esthetic improvement.

  6. Histological study of effects of colloidal 90 yttrium on knee joint tissues of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Pavelka, K; Meier-Ruge, W; Müller, W; Fridrich, R

    1975-02-01

    The administration of 0-2-0-4 mCi 90 yttrium (90Y) into a normal rabbit knee joint fails to induce medical synovectomy and results in the proliferation of the synovialis. The synovial mesothelium shows early radiation damage but subsequently follows a restitution of the whole. Later (within 4 to 16 weeks) an extensive fibrosis of the stratum synovialis develops, as well as an occlusion and sclerosis of smaller synovial vessels and capillaries. These changes explain the beneficial therapeutic effect of 90Y in a chronic inflammatory joint effusion. After irradiation that joint cartilage shows an increased cellular proliferation of the superficial tangential cells and in the vicinity of the cruciate ligaments small foci of degenerated cartilage are present. The overall pattern of a joint treated with intra-articular 90Y corresponds to the histological pattern encountered regularly in joints of older people. Changes of the cartilage after the 90Y radiation could represent a factor predisposing the treated joint to a subsequent development of osteoarthrosis.

  7. Effects of tissue-engineered articular disc implants on the biomechanical loading of the human temporomandibular joint in a three-dimensional finite element model.

    PubMed

    Al-Sukhun, Jehad; Ashammakhi, Nureddin; Penttila, Heikki

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate biomechanical loading of the temporomandibular joint when using a biodegradable laminate implant to replace the articular disc and to test the hypothesis that the use of the implant reduces stress distribution in the condyle, implant, and glenoid fossa. A finite element model of a female human mandible, including the temporomandibular joint, which had two standard endosseous implants inserted bilaterally in the premolar region, was constructed from computed tomography scan images using a commercially available finite element software. The disc, condyle, and glenoid fossa were arbitrarily divided into five regions: the anterior, posterior, medial, lateral, and central. The disc was then replaced with a poly-L/DL-lactide biodegradable laminate. The finite element model was then used to predict principal and Von Mises stresses. The use of poly-L/DL-lactide implant resulted in remarkable reduction in Von Mises stresses (approximately threefold) in the anterior, central, and medial regions of the mandibular condyle in comparison with slight to moderate stress reductions in the corresponding regions of the implant and glenoid fossa. The mandibular condyle also demonstrated the largest total displacement in all directions followed by the implant and glenoid fossa. The use of an alloplastic implant such as the bioresorbable, poly-L/DL-lactide laminate to replace the articular disc reduces loading of the mandibular condyle rather than the implant and glenoid fossa. These findings lead to support the hypothesis that the mandibular condyle more likely functions as a shock absorber than the disc. The use of bioresorbable laminate implants might prove an efficient technique to replace the articular disc and promote normal function of the temporomandibular joint.

  8. A multidisciplinary approach to the management of temporomandibular joint ankylosis in a sickle-cell anemia patient in a resource-limited setting.

    PubMed

    Braimah, Ramat Oyebunmi; Oladejo, Taoreed; Olarinoye, Timothy Oyetunde; Adetoye, Adedapo Omowonuola; Osho, Patrick Olanrewaju

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the multidisciplinary management of a 35-year-old female sickle-cell anemia patient who had unilateral bony ankylosis of the left temporomandibular joint secondary to septic arthritis. She was managed by a team comprising of maxillofacial surgeons, anesthetists, otorhinolaryngologist, and hematologist. Unilateral left interpositional arthroplasty and ipsilateral coronoidectomy through a postrami approach were done and followed by aggressive jaw physiotherapy in the postsurgical period. No perioperative morbidity was encountered. Mouth opening of 3.5 cm was achieved and maintained 7 months after surgery. Challenges and rationale for the use of a multidisciplinary team approach in treatment of such cases were discussed.

  9. The Protective Effects of Salubrinal on the Cartilage and Subchondral Bone of the Temporomandibular Joint under Various Compressive Mechanical Stimulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Caixia; Chen, Sheng; Li, Huang

    2016-01-01

    Excessive mechanical loads on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) can cause mandibular cartilage degradation and subchondral bone erosion, but the treatment of these conditions remains challenging. Salubrinal, which target eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha, has been shown to have multiple beneficial effects on skeletal tissue. Here, we examined the effect of a Salubrinal injection on the mandibular cartilage and subchondral bone of the TMJ under various compressive stresses. We conducted in vivo analyses in rat models using various compressive stresses (40 g and 80 g), and we observed time-related degeneration and pathological changes in the cartilage and subchondral bone of the TMJ at days 1, 3 and 7 through histological measurements, subcellular observation, and changes in proliferation and apoptosis. After the Salubrinal injection, the thickness of the cartilage recovered, and the pathological change was alleviated. In the Salubrinal/light (Sal/light) compressive stress group, the drug altered the proliferation and apoptosis of chondrocytes most significantly at day 1. In the Salubrinal/heavy (Sal/heavy) compressive stress group, the drug increased the proliferation of chondrocytes most significantly at day 1 and reduced the apoptosis of chondrocytes most significantly at day 7. Salubrinal also increased the area of the bone trabeculae and suppressed inflammatory responses and pathological change in the subchondral bone of the TMJ. Together, these results indicate that the administration of Salubrinal reduces apoptosis and strengthens the proliferation of chondrocyte to varying degrees at days 1, 3 and 7 under various compressive mechanical stresses, both of which contribute to the recovery of cartilage thickness and the alleviation of pathological change. Salubrinal also suppresses inflammatory responses and pathological change in the subchondral bone of the TMJ. PMID:27196267

  10. Value of cone-beam computed tomography in the process of diagnosis and management of disorders of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    de Boer, E W J; Dijkstra, P U; Stegenga, B; de Bont, L G M; Spijkervet, F K L

    2014-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the value of cone-beam computed tomographic (CT) images in the primary diagnosis and management of 128 outpatients with disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Before a diagnosis was made and treatment planned, the history was taken, physical examination made, and the orthopantomogram studied. After assessment of the cone-beam CT, the oral and maxillofacial surgeon (specialist or resident) was allowed to revise the provisional primary diagnosis and management. The degree of certainty was rated by the clinician before and after the cone-beam CT had been assessed. The primary diagnosis was changed in 32 patients (25%), additional diagnostic procedures were changed in 57 (45%), and the treatment was changed in 15 (12%) (in 4 the treatment was changed to a (minimally) invasive procedure). A total of 74 patients (58%) had their diagnosis and management changed after the cone-beam CT had been assessed. Changes in diagnosis and management were clinically relevant in 9/32 and 9/61 patients, respectively. The clinician's certainty about the primary diagnosis increased after the cone-beam CT had been assessed in 57 patients. Logistic regression analysis showed that the odds in favour of changes in primary diagnosis and management increased when limited mandibular function was a primary symptom, the patient was taking medication for pain, and the articular eminence could not be assessed on OPT. Assessment of cone-beam CT led to changes in primary diagnosis and management in more than half the patients with disorders of the TMJ.

  11. ACCURACY AND PRECISION OF A METHOD TO STUDY KINEMATICS OF THE TEMPOROMANDIBULAR JOINT: COMBINATION OF MOTION DATA AND CT IMAGING

    PubMed Central

    Baltali, Evre; Zhao, Kristin D.; Koff, Matthew F.; Keller, Eugene E.; An, Kai-Nan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to test the precision and accuracy of a method used to track selected landmarks during motion of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). A precision phantom device was constructed and relative motions between two rigid bodies on the phantom device were measured using optoelectronic (OE) and electromagnetic (EM) motion tracking devices. The motion recordings were also combined with a 3D CT image for each type of motion tracking system (EM+CT and OE+CT) to mimic methods used in previous studies. In the OE and EM data collections, specific landmarks on the rigid bodies were determined using digitization. In the EM+CT and OE+CT data sets, the landmark locations were obtained from the CT images. 3D linear distances and 3D curvilinear path distances were calculated for the points. The accuracy and precision for all 4 methods were evaluated (EM, OE, EM+CT and OE+CT). In addition, results were compared with and without the CT imaging (EM vs. EM+CT, OE vs. OE+CT). All systems overestimated the actual 3D curvilinear path lengths. All systems also underestimated the actual rotation values. The accuracy of all methods was within 0.5 mm for 3D curvilinear path calculations, 0.05 mm for 3D linear distance calculations, and 0.2° for rotation calculations. In addition, Bland-Altman plots for each configuration of the systems suggest that measurements obtained from either system are repeatable and comparable. PMID:18617178

  12. Inhibition of temporomandibular joint input to medullary dorsal horn neurons by 5HT3 receptor antagonist in female rats

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Keiichiro; Katagiri, Ayano; Rahman, Mostafeezur; Thompson, Randall; Bereiter, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Repeated forced swim (FS) conditioning enhances nociceptive responses to temporomandibular joint (TMJ) stimulation in male and female rats. The basis for FS-induced TMJ hyperalgesia remains unclear. To test the hypothesis that serotonin 3 receptor (5HT3R) mechanisms contribute to enhanced TMJ nociception after FS, ovariectomized female rats were treated with estradiol and subjected to FS for three days. On day 4, rats were anesthetized with isoflurane and TMJ-responsive neurons were recorded from superficial and deep laminae at the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis/upper cervical (Vc/C1–2) region and electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from the masseter muscle. Only Vc/C1–2 neurons activated by intra-TMJ injections of ATP were included for further analysis. Although neurons in both superficial and deep laminae were activated by ATP, only neurons in deep laminae displayed enhanced responses after FS. Local application of the 5HT3R antagonist, ondansetron (OND), at the Vc/C1–2 region reduced the ATP-evoked responses of neurons in superficial and deep laminae and reduced the EMG response in both sham and FS rats. OND also decreased the spontaneous firing rate of neurons in deep laminae and reduced the high threshold convergent cutaneous receptive field area of neurons in superficial and deep laminae in both sham and FS rats. These results revealed that central application of a 5HT3R antagonist, had widespread effects on the properties of TMJ-responsive neurons at the Vc/C1–2 region and on jaw muscle reflexes under sham and FS conditions. It is concluded that 5HT3R does not play a unique role in mediating stress-induced hyperalgesia related to TMJ nociception. PMID:25913635

  13. Are temporomandibular joint signs and symptoms associated with magnetic resonance imaging findings in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients? A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Zwir, Liete M L Figueiredo; Terreri, Maria Teresa R A; Sousa, Soraia Ale; Fernandes, Artur Rocha Corrêa; Guimarães, Antônio Sérgio; Hilário, Maria Odete E

    2015-12-01

    The aims of this longitudinal study were to perform a comprehensive clinical evaluation of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and to investigate the association between the clinical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in the TMJs of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Seventy-five patients with JIA participated in this study. All patients underwent a rheumatological examination performed by a paediatric rheumatologist, a TMJ examination performed by a single dentist and an MRI with contrast of the TMJs. These examinations were scheduled on the same date. The patients were examined again 1 year later. Twenty-eight (37.3 %) patients reported symptoms at the first evaluation and 11 (14.7 %) patients at the second evaluation. In relation to signs, 35 (46.7 %) of the patients presented at least one sign at the first evaluation and 29 (38.7 %) at the second. Intense contrast enhancement of TMJ was significantly associated with disease activity (p < 0.001) at the first evaluation and a trend to significance was observed at the second (p = 0.056), with poly/systemic subtypes (p = 0.028 and p = 0.049, respectively), with restricted mouth opening capacity (p = 0.013 and p = 0.001, respectively), with the presence of erosions at both evaluations (p = 0.0001 and p < 0.0001, respectively) and with altered condylar shape at the second evaluation (p = 0.0005). TMJ involvement is highly prevalent in JIA patients, with asymptomatic children presenting severe structural alterations of the TMJ. The TMJ should always be evaluated in JIA patients, even in the absence of signs and symptoms.

  14. Investigation of the relationship between oral parafunctions and temporomandibular joint dysfunction in Turkish children with mixed and permanent dentition.

    PubMed

    Sari, S; Sonmez, H

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dysfunction, bruxism and oral parafunctions in the permanent and mixed dentition of Turkish children. Examinations were performed on 59 children (26 girls and 33 boys) without TMJ dysfunction and 123 children (54 boys and 69 girls) with TMJ dysfunction in the mixed dentition. In the permanent dentition 89 children without TMJ dysfunction (45 girls and 44 boys) and 123 children with TMJ dysfunction (69 girls and 54 boys) were inducted into this study. The children with oral parafunctions (bruxism, nail biting and thumb/finger sucking) were determined through questionnaires. The Z-test was used for the analyses of the correlation between variables and differences between the groups. Generally a significant correlation was found between finger/thumb sucking and nail biting and TMJ dysfunction in the mixed dentition and bruxism was observed significantly to be associated with TMJ dysfunction in the permanent dentition (P < 0.05). The evaluation of the results showed that in the mixed dentition groups nail biting was significantly higher in the girls with TMJ dysfunction and finger or thumb sucking was significantly higher in the boys with TMJ dysfunction compared with those without TMJ dysfunction (P < 0.01). In the permanent dentition; bruxism and thumb/finger sucking were significantly higher in girls with TMJ dysfunction higher than those without TMJ dysfunction (P < 0.05). However, thumb/finger sucking was significantly higher in boys without TMJ dysfunction than with TMJ dysfunction (P < 0.05). The results of this study showed that the association of parafunctions and TMJ dysfunction is present in the mixed (thumb/finger sucking and nail biting) and the permanent dentitions (bruxism).

  15. Inhibition of temporomandibular joint input to medullary dorsal horn neurons by 5HT3 receptor antagonist in female rats.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, K; Katagiri, A; Rahman, M; Thompson, R; Bereiter, D A

    2015-07-23

    Repeated forced swim (FS) conditioning enhances nociceptive responses to temporomandibular joint (TMJ) stimulation in female rats. The basis for FS-induced TMJ hyperalgesia remains unclear. To test the hypothesis that serotonin 3 receptor (5HT3R) mechanisms contribute to enhanced TMJ nociception after FS, ovariectomized female rats were treated with estradiol and subjected to FS for three days. On day 4, rats were anesthetized with isoflurane and TMJ-responsive neurons were recorded from superficial and deep laminae at the trigeminal subnucleus caudalis/upper cervical (Vc/C1-2) region and electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded from the masseter muscle. Only Vc/C1-2 neurons activated by intra-TMJ injections of ATP were included for further analysis. Although neurons in both superficial and deep laminae were activated by ATP, only neurons in deep laminae displayed enhanced responses after FS. Local application of the 5HT3R antagonist, ondansetron (OND), at the Vc/C1-2 region reduced the ATP-evoked responses of neurons in superficial and deep laminae and reduced the EMG response in both sham and FS rats. OND also decreased the spontaneous firing rate of neurons in deep laminae and reduced the high-threshold convergent cutaneous receptive field area of neurons in superficial and deep laminae in both sham and FS rats. These results revealed that central application of a 5HT3R antagonist, had widespread effects on the properties of TMJ-responsive neurons at the Vc/C1-2 region and on jaw muscle reflexes under sham and FS conditions. It is concluded that 5HT3R does not play a unique role in mediating stress-induced hyperalgesia related to TMJ nociception.

  16. Changes in collagens and chondrocytes in the temporomandibular joint cartilage in growing rats fed a liquid diet.

    PubMed

    Uekita, Hiroki; Takahashi, Shigeru; Domon, Takanori; Yamaguchi, Taihiko

    2015-11-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of growing rats fed a soft diet is reported to be smaller in size and to have thinner condyle and glenoid fossa cartilage than rats fed a solid diet. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a soft diet on the collagens and chondrocytes in the growing TMJ cartilage. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were divided into a control group fed a solid diet and an experimental group fed a liquid diet for 1-8 weeks. After the experimental period, the TMJs were harvested and examined histologically, immunohistochemically for collagen types I, II, and X, and with transmission electron microscopy. The condylar cartilage in the experimental rats showed weak immunoreactions for three types of collagens compared with the controls. The ultrastructure had fewer fine collagen fibrils in the experimental rats compared with that of the controls. The glenoid fossa cartilage in the experimental rats showed narrower Alcian blue-positive areas than the control staining. The immunoreactions for three types of collagen in the experimental rats were also weaker than those of the controls. The chondrocytes in the experimental rats appeared dark, had extended thin cytoplasmic processes, and had formed gap junctions, as assessed by transmission electron microscopy. Fewer fine collagen fibrils, but thick bands of collagen fibrils were observed in the glenoid fossa of the experimental cartilage. The results of the present study showed that a liquid diet had deleterious effects on the quality and quantity of collagens and chondrocytes in the TMJ cartilage in growing rats.

  17. Construction of tissue-engineered osteochondral composites and repair of large joint defects in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Deng, Tianzheng; Lv, Jing; Pang, Jianliang; Liu, Bing; Ke, Jie

    2014-07-01

    In this study, a novel three-dimensional (3D) heterogeneous/bilayered scaffold was constructed to repair large defects in rabbit joints. The scaffold includes two distinct but integrated layers corresponding to the cartilage and bone components. The upper layer consists of gelatin, chondroitin sulphate and sodium hyaluronate (GCH), and the lower layer consists of gelatin and ceramic bovine bone (GCBB). The two form a 3D bilayered scaffold (GCH-GCBB), which mimics the natural osteochondral matrix for use as a scaffold for osteochondral tissue engineering. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of this novel scaffold, combined with chondrocytes and bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) to repair large defects in rabbit joints. Thirty-six large defects in rabbit femoral condyles were created; 12 defects were treated with the same scaffold combined with cells (group A); another 12 defects were treated with cell-free scaffolds (group B); the others were untreated (group C). At 6 and 12 weeks, in group A hyaline-like cartilage formation could be observed by histological examination; the newly formed cartilage, which stained for type II collagen, was detected by RT-PCR at high-level expression. Most of the GCBB was replaced by bone, while little remained in the underlying cartilage. At 36 weeks, GCBB was completely resorbed and a tidemark was observed in some areas. In contrast, groups B and C showed no cartilage formation but a great amount of fibrous tissue, with only a little bone formation. In summary, this study demonstrated that a novel scaffold, comprising a top layer of GCH, having mechanical properties comparable to native cartilage, and a bottom layer composed of GCBB, could be used to repair large osteochondral defects in joints.

  18. Reduction of temporomandibular joint dislocation: an ancient technique that has stood the test of time.

    PubMed

    Forshaw, R J

    2015-07-01

    The first known recorded evidence for the reduction of a mandibular joint dislocation is documented in a papyrus dated to c. 1500 BC that originated from ancient Egypt. This same technique was later discussed by Hippocrates in Greece and the Hippocratic corpus is referred to in early Islamic writings. It is detailed in medieval European texts and eventually was incorporated into modern dental and medical practice. Today, mandibular joint dislocation is probably not that common but to be included in an important ancient Egyptian treatise, predominately concerned with trauma to the head and neck, could suggest it was a more frequent occurrence in antiquity. This could relate to the heavy tooth wear, frequent antemortem tooth loss and the related sequelae of severe malocclusion and overclosure evident in many surviving ancient Egyptian skulls.

  19. Use of autologous conditioned serum (Orthokine®) for the treatment of the dege-nerative osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint. Review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Camino, Juan C.; Vázquez-Delgado, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) using autologous conditioned serum (ACS) has become in recent years an alternative to consider in the approach of the degenerative joint disease of the knee. There is no support in the literature for the use of ACS for the treatment of OA of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), although the promising results obtained in human patients with knee joint disease as well as in animal studies are opening the way for its use at the TMJ. The aim of this paper is to conduct a review of the published literature regarding the use of the ACS for the treatment of OA in humans, considering the level of scientific evidence, and following the principles of the evidence-based medicine and dentistry. Material and Methods: A PubMed-MEDLINE search was carried out of articles published between 1980 and 2011. After an initial search, a total of 102 articles were obtained, followed by a selection of the most relevant articles according to the topic; a total of 8 articles were selected, which were stratified according to their level of scientific evidence using SORT criteria (Strength of Recommendation Taxonomy). Results: At the time of this review, there is no available literature referring the use of ACS at the TMJ. However, the use of the ACS in other joints is well documented, both experimentally and clinically, in humans and animals. The reviewed articles, with a level of evidence 1 and 2 according to the SORT criteria, have generally promising results. Discussion and Conclusions: The use of ACS in the treatment of OA in joints other than the TMJ, is endorsed by the level of evidence found in the literature, which opens the door to future studies to determine the feasibility of the use of the ACS in the treatment of degenerative OA that affects TMJ. Key words:Osteoarthritis, temporomandibular joint, autologous conditioned serum. PMID:23524415

  20. Impact orientation can significantly affect the outcome of a blunt impact to the rabbit patellofemoral joint.

    PubMed

    Ewers, Benjamin J; Weaver, Brian T; Haut, Roger C

    2002-12-01

    This laboratory has developed a subfracture, joint trauma model in rabbits. Using a dropped impact mass directed onto a slightly abducted joint, chronic softening of retropatellar cartilage and thickening of underlying subchondral bone are documented in studies to 1 year post-insult. It has been hypothesized that these tissue changes are initiated by stresses developed during impact loading. A previous analytical study by this laboratory suggests that tensile strains in retropatellar cartilage can be significantly lowered, without significantly changing the intensity of stresses in the underlying subchondral bone, by reorientation of patellar impact more centrally on the joint. In the current study comparative experiments were performed on groups of animals after either an impact directed on the slightly abducted limb or a more central impact. One-year post-trauma in animals subjected to the central-oriented impact no degradation of the shear modulus for the retropatellar cartilage was documented, but the thickness of the underlying subchondral bone was significantly increased. In contrast, alterations in cartilage and underlying bone following impact on the slightly abducted limb were consistent with previous studies. The current experimental investigation showed the sensitivity of post-trauma alterations in joint tissues to slight changes in the orientation of impact load on the joint. Interestingly, for this trauma model thickening of the underlying subchondral plate occurred without mechanical degradation of the overlying articular cartilage. This supports the current laboratory hypothesis that alterations in the subchondral bone and overlying cartilage occur independently in this animal model.

  1. Differences in skeletal components of temporomandibular joint of an early medieval and contemporary Croatian population obtained by different methods.

    PubMed

    Kranjcic, Josip; Slaus, Mario; Persic, Sanja; Vodanovic, Marin; Vojvodic, Denis

    2016-01-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is one of the most complex joints in the human body. The anatomical configuration of the TMJ allows for a large range of mandibular movements as well as transmission of masticatory forces and loads to the skull base. The measurements of the TMJ's anatomical structures and their interpretations contribute to the understanding of how pathological changes, tooth loss, and the type of diet (changing throughout human history) can affect biomechanical conditions of the masticatory system and the TMJ. The human TMJ and its constituent parts are still the subject of extensive investigation and comparisons of measurement methods are being made in order to determine the most precise and suitable measurement methods. The aim of this study has been to examine the morphology of skeletal components of TMJ of an early medieval population (EMP) in Croatia and to compare measured values with TMJ values of the contemporary Croatian population (CP) using various methods of measurement. The study was performed on 30 EMP specimens - human dry skulls, aged from 18 to 55 years, and 30 CP human dry skulls, aged from 18 to 65 years. Only fully preserved specimens (in measured areas) were included. The articular eminence (AE) inclination was measured in relation to the Frankfurt horizontal using two methods. Also, the AE height (glenoid fossa depth) and the length of the curved line - highest to the lowest point of the AE were measured. Measurements were performed on lateral skull photographs, panoramic radiographs and lateral cephalograms using VistaMetrix software on skull images. The results were statistically analyzed using SPSS statistical software. No statistically significant differences were obtained for AE parameters between the EMP and CP populations independent of age and gender. However, statistically significant (p<0.05) differences were revealed when comparing results of three different measuring methods. It could not be determined which of

  2. Topical diagnostics of traumatic condylar injuries and alloplastic reconstruction of temporomandibular joint heads.

    PubMed

    Gvenetadze, Z; Danelia, T; Nemsadze, G; Gvenetadze, G

    2014-04-01

    Condylar fractures have an important place in facial traumatic injuries. Classification of condylar fractures according to clinical-anatomic picture is common in clinical practice. According to this classification there are: 1) fractures of mandibular joint head, aka intraarticular fractures, 2) condylar neck fractures or high extra articular fractures, 3) condylar base fractures. Radiographic imaging plays important role in diagnosing condylar fractures along with knowledge of clinical symptoms. We used computer tomography imaging in our clinical practice. Three-dimensional imaging of computer tomography gives exact information about location of condylar fractures, impact of fractured fragments, displacement of condylar head from articular fossa. This method is mostly important for the cases which are hard to diagnose (fractures of mandibular joint head, aka intraarticular fractures). For this group of patients surgical treatment is necessary with the method of arthroplasty. We have observed 5 patients with bilateral, fragmented, high condylar fractures. In all cases the surgery was performed on both sides with bone cement and titanium mini-plates. Long-term effects of the treatment included observation from 6 months to 2 years. In all cases anatomic and functional results were good. Shape of the mandible is restored, opening of mouth 3-3.5 cm, absence of malocclusion.

  3. Histologic appearance of the bilaminar zone in internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hall, M B; Brown, R W; Baughman, R A

    1984-10-01

    Light microscopy was used to examine twenty-six specimens of bilaminar zone tissue excised during surgery for correction of internal derangement of the temporamandibular joint. Each of the specimens was examined for the presence of inflammation, amount of vascularity, arterial wall thickness, presence of fat, appearance of collagen, and amount of elastin present. Wide variation in the histologic appearance was noted among the specimens, although no significant inflammation was observed in any of them. Some indications that this tissue is undergoing adaptive changes include the presence of thickened arterial walls suggesting a decreased blood flow and the tendency for decreased amounts of elastin to be associated with denser-appearing collagen. There is also a tendency for patients with complete dislocation to exhibit less elastin than those with partial dislocation of the meniscus.

  4. Estrogen status and psychophysical stress modify temporomandibular joint input to medullary dorsal horn neurons in a lamina-specific manner in female rats.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Keiichiro; Thompson, Randall; Katagiri, Ayano; Bereiter, David A

    2013-07-01

    Estrogen status and psychological stress contribute to the expression of several chronic pain conditions including temporomandibular muscle and joint disorders (TMJD). Sensory neurons that supply the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region terminate in laminae I and V of the spinal trigeminal nucleus (Vc/C1-2 region); however, little is known about lamina-specificity and environmental influences on the encoding properties of TMJ brainstem neurons. To test the hypothesis that Vc/C1-2 neurons integrate both interoceptive and exteroceptive signals relevant for TMJ nociception, we recorded TMJ-evoked activity in superficial and deep laminae of ovariectomized rats under high and low estradiol (E2) and stress conditions. Rats received daily injections of low (LE) or high (HE) dose E2 and were subjected to forced swim (FS) or sham swim conditioning for 3days. The results revealed marked lamina-specificity in that HE rats displayed enhanced TMJ-evoked activity in superficial, but not deep, laminae independent of stress conditioning. By contrast, FS conditioned rats displayed increased background firing and TMJ-evoked activity of neurons in deep, but not superficial, laminae independent of E2 status. FS also enhanced TMJ-evoked masseter muscle activity and suggested the importance of deep dorsal horn neurons in mediating evoked jaw muscle activity. In conclusion, E2 status and psychophysical stress play a significant role in modifying the encoding properties of TMJ-responsive medullary dorsal horn neurons with a marked lamina-specificity.

  5. Cephalometric Analysis of the Facial Skeletal Morphology of Female Patients Exhibiting Skeletal Class II Deformity with and without Temporomandibular Joint Osteoarthrosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuo; Lei, Jie; Fu, Kai-Yuan; Wang, Xing; Yi, Biao

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study evaluated the differences in the facial morphological characteristics of female patients exhibiting skeletal class II deformity with and without temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis. Methods Eighty-three female patients with skeletal class II deformity were included in this study; these patients were classified into three groups on the basis of the condylar features shown in cone-beam computed tomography scans: normal group, indeterminate for osteoarthrosis group, and osteoarthrosis group. The cephalometric differences among the three groups were evaluated through one-way ANOVA. Results Of the 83 patients, 52.4% were diagnosed with osteoarthrosis, as indicated by the changes in the condylar osseous component. The cephalometric measurements that represented skeletal characteristics, including mandibular position relative to the cranial base, mandibular plane angle (MP-SN), posterior facial height (S-Go), and facial height ratio, were significantly different among the three groups (p < 0.05). The patients in the osteoarthrosis group yielded the smallest S-Go, the highest MP-SN, and the most retruded mandible. Conclusions Temporomandibular joint osteoarthrosis is commonly observed in female patients with skeletal class II deformity. The morphological characteristics of the facial skeleton in patients with bilateral condylar osteoarthrosis may be altered. PMID:26474490

  6. The Effect of Fibromyalgia and Widespread Pain on the Clinically Significant Temporomandibular Muscle and Joint Pain Disorders - A Prospective 18-Month Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Velly, Ana Miriam; Look, John O.; Schiffman, Eric; Lenton, Patricia A.; Kang, Wenjun; Messner, Ronald P.; Holcroft, Christina A.; Fricton, James R.

    2010-01-01

    Although most cases of Temporomandibular Muscle and Joint Disorders (TMJD) are mild and self-limiting, about 10% of TMJD patients develop severe disorders associated with chronic pain and disability. It has been suggested that fibromyalgia and widespread pain play a significant role in the Temporomandibular Muscle and Joint Disorders (TMJD) chronicity. This paper assessed the effects of fibromyalgia and widespread pain on clinically significant TMJD pain (GCPS II-IV). Four hundred eighty-five participants recruited from the Minneapolis/St. Paul area through media advertisements and local dentists received examinations and completed the Graded Chronic Pain Scale (GCPS) at baseline and at 18th months. Baseline widespread pain (OR: 2.53, P=0.04) and depression (OR: 5.30, P=0.005) were associated with onset of clinically significant pain (GCPS II-IV) within 18 months after baseline. The risk associated with baseline fibromyalgia was moderate, but not significant (OR: 2.74, P=0.09). Persistence of clinically significant pain was related to fibromyalgia (OR: 2.48, P=0.02) and with depression (OR: 2.48, P=0.02). These results indicate that these centrally generated pain conditions play a role in the onset and persistence of clinically significant TMJD. PMID:20466595

  7. Conservative care of temporomandibular joint disorder in a 35-year-old patient with spinal muscular atrophy type III: a case study☆

    PubMed Central

    Houle, Sébastien; Descarreaux, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective This article describes the chiropractic clinical management and therapeutic benefits accruing to a patient with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disorder and spinal muscular atrophy type III. Clinical Features A 35-year-old white man presented at the university chiropractic outpatient clinic with a complaint of masseter muscle pain and mouth-opening restriction. Temporomandibular joint range of motion evaluation revealed restricted opening (11 mm interincisival), and pain was rated by the patient at an intensity of 5 on a pain scale of 0 to 10. Intervention and Outcome Chiropractic care was provided and included TMJ mobilization, myofascial therapy, trigger point therapy, and light spinal mobilizations of the upper cervical vertebrae. Final evaluation of TMJ range of motion showed active opening of 12 mm with absence of pain and muscle tenderness of the jaw. Conclusion This case suggests that a patient with musculoskeletal disorders related to underlying neurodegenerative pathologies may benefit from chiropractic management adapted to their condition. In the present case, chiropractic treatment of the TMJ represented a viable, low-cost approach with limited adverse effects compared with surgery. PMID:19948309

  8. Characterization of degenerative changes in the temporomandibular joint of the bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) and siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica).

    PubMed

    Murphy, M K; Arzi, B; Vapniarsky-Arzi, N; Athanasiou, K A

    2013-11-01

    The articulation of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is composed of the temporal bone dorsally, the mandibular condyle ventrally and a fibrous articular disc. The TMJ disc plays an essential role in distributing load between the two articular surfaces. Degeneration of the disc in the presence of joint pathology has been shown in man; however, TMJ pathology has not been documented previously in tigers (Panthera tigris). The mandibular condyle and TMJ disc of a Bengal tiger (P. tigris tigris) and a Siberian tiger (P. tigris altaica) were evaluated grossly and the TMJ disc was characterized biochemically and mechanically. Characterization of the TMJ disc verified region- and direction-dependent biochemical and mechanical properties, reflective of the functional demands on the joint. Degenerative joint disease was observed in both cases and this was more severe in the Siberian tiger. Simultaneous evaluation of joint pathology, biochemical composition and mechanical properties of the TMJ disc revealed a loss in functional properties (tensile anisotropy) of the disc as joint pathology advanced from moderate to severe. TMJ degeneration may compromise the ability of the animal to eat and thrive and may be a factor contributing to the endangered status of these species.

  9. Signal pathways regulating hyaluronan secretion into static and cycled synovial joints of rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ingram, K R; Wann, A K T; Wingate, R M; Coleman, P J; McHale, N; Levick, J R

    2009-09-01

    Joint lubrication, synovial fluid conservation and many pathophysiological processes depend on hyaluronan (HA). Intra-articular HA injection and exercise, which stimulates articular HA production, ameliorate osteoarthritis. We therefore investigated the pathways regulating movement-stimulated articular HA secretion rate ( ) in vivo. Endogenous HA was removed from the knee joint cavity of anaesthetised rabbits by washout. Joints were then cycled passively or remained static for 5 h, with/without intra-articular agonist/inhibitor, after which newly secreted HA was harvested for analysis. Movement almost doubled . Similar or larger increases were elicited in static joints by the intra-articular Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin, prostaglandin E(2), cAMP-raising agents, serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor and activation of protein kinase C (PKC). PKC-stimulated secretion was inhibited by the PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I and inhibitors of the downstream kinases MEK-ERK (U0126, PD98059). These agents inhibited movement-stimulated secretion of HA (MSHA) only when the parallel p38 kinase path was simultaneously inhibited by SB203580 (ineffective alone). The phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 almost fully blocked MSHA (P = 0.001, n = 10), without affecting static . The ENaC channel blocker amiloride inhibited MSHA, whereas other inhibitors of stretch-activated channels (Gd(3+), ruthenium red, SKF96365) did not. It is proposed that MSHA may be mediated by PLC activation, leading to activation of parallel PKC-MEK-ERK and p38 kinase pathways.

  10. Surface electromyographic patterns of masticatory, neck, and trunk muscles in temporomandibular joint dysfunction patients undergoing anterior repositioning splint therapy.

    PubMed

    Tecco, Simona; Tetè, Stefano; D'Attilio, Michele; Perillo, Letizia; Festa, Felice

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the surface electromyographic (sEMG) activity of neck, trunk, and masticatory muscles in subjects with temporomandibular joint (TMJ) internal derangement treated with anterior mandibular repositioning splints. sEMG activities of the muscles in 34 adult subjects (22 females and 12 males; mean age 30.4 years) with TMJ internal derangement were compared with a control group of 34 untreated adults (20 females and 14 males; mean age 31.8 years). sEMG activities of seven muscles (anterior and posterior temporalis, masseter, posterior cervicals, sternocleidomastoid, and upper and lower trapezius) were studied bilaterally, with the mandible in the rest position and during maximal voluntary clenching (MVC), at the beginning of therapy (T0) and after 10 weeks of treatment (T1). Paired and Student's t-tests were undertaken to determine differences between the T0 and T1 data and in sEMG activity between the study and control groups. At T0, paired masseter, sternocleidomastoid, and cervical muscles, in addition to the left anterior temporal and right lower trapezius, showed significantly greater sEMG activity (P = 0.0001; P = 0.0001; for left cervical, P = 0.03; for right cervical, P = 0.0001; P = 0.006 and P = 0.007 muscles, respectively) compared with the control group. This decreased over the remaining study period, such that after treatment, sEMG activity revealed no statistically significant difference when compared with the control group. During MVC at T0, paired masseter and anterior and posterior temporalis muscles showed significantly lower sEMG activity (P = 0.03; P = 0.005 and P = 0.04, respectively) compared with the control group. In contrast, at T1 sEMG activity significantly increased (P = 0.02; P = 0.004 and P = 0.04, respectively), but no difference was observed in relation to the control group. Splint therapy in subjects with internal disk derangement seems to affect sEMG activity of the masticatory, neck, and trunk

  11. IL-1β impedes the chondrogenic differentiation of synovial fluid mesenchymal stem cells in the human temporomandibular joint

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenjing; Sun, Yangpeng; He, Yiqing; Zhang, Hong; Zheng, Youhua; Yao, Yu; Zhang, Zhiguang

    2017-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell-based therapy has great therapeutic potential for temporomandibular joint (TMJ) cartilage repair. However, the behavior of mesenchymal stem cells in the inflammatory milieu following their delivery remains poorly understood. Synovial fluid-derived mesenchymal stem cells (SFMSCs) are a promising resource for TMJ cartilage repair, as they are easily obtained from patients with TMJ disorders (TMD). In this study, we obtained SFMSCs from patients with TMD and expanded them in vitro; we then stimulated the cells with interleukin (IL)-8, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IL-12p. The cells expressed CD90, CD44, CD105 and CD73, and were negative for CD45, CD34, CD11b, CD19 and HLA-DR. They could be induced to differentiate into osteogenic, chondrogenic, adipogenic and neurogenic lineages in vitro. Only the levels of IL-6 and IL-8 were upregulated significantly following stimulation with IL-8, IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and IL-12p. Furthermore, IL-6 and IL-8 expression was driven mainly by IL-1β-dependent nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway activation, and was independent of IL-8, IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and IL-12p. IL-6 and IL-8 expression was inhibited completely by treatment with the NF-κB inhibitor, BAY11-7082. SRY-box 9 (SOX9) was downregulated and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)13 was upregulated upon chondrogenic differentiation induced in the cells also exposed to IL-1β. Sulfated glycosaminoglycan production was also reduced upon chondrogenic differentiation in the presence of IL-6, but not IL-8. Thus, IL-1β in the inflammatory milieu is crucial in regulating SFMSCs. In doing so, IL-1β impedes the chondrogenic differentiation of SFMSCs. The upregulation of IL-6 and NF-κB pathway activation also contribute to this biological behavior. The findings of our study indicate the potential adverse effects of IL-1β on the chondrogenic differentiation of SFMSCs, and may thus provide new insight into the pathogenesis of TMD. PMID

  12. Temporomandibular joint disorders treated with articular injection: the effectiveness of plasma rich in growth factors-Endoret.

    PubMed

    Giacomello, Maurizio; Giacomello, Alberto; Mortellaro, Carmen; Gallesio, Giorgia; Mozzati, Marco

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis treatment through articular injections of plasma rich in growth factors (PGRF)-Endoret. Thirteen patients (median age, 47.64 y; SD, 7.51; range, 40-64 y; male-female ratio, 2:11) with osteoarthritis of TMJ associated to chronic pain have been selected. They were treated with articular injections of PRGF-Endoret, measuring the maximum mouth opening and pain level before the first injection (t0), 30 days after just before the second (t1), and after 6 months (t2). Data were analyzed using the paired Student's t-test data. The visual analogue scale score at t0 is 7.69 (range, 4-10; SD, 1.9), whereas that at t1 is 1.54 (range, 0-5; SD, 1.74) and that at t2 is 0.23 (range, 0-2; SD, 0.65). These differences in the results are statistically highly significant (P < 0.0001 comparison t0-t1 and t0-t2 and P < 0.01 comparison t1-t2). In terms of maximum mouth opening, it reduced from 30.15 mm at t0 (range, 26-40 mm; SD, 4.44) to 37.54 mm at t1 (range, 31-51 mm; SD, 5.10), with an increase of 7.38 mm (range, 4-11 mm; SD, 2.02) and a highly significant difference (P < 0.0001). At t2, it was 39.54 mm (range, 34-51; SD, 4.55) with an increase of 9.38 mm (range, 5-12 mm; SD, 2.21) compared with t0 and that of 2.00 mm compared with t1. Both differences in the results are statistically significant (P < 0.0001 and P < 0.01, respectively). The articular injections of PRGF-Endoret represent a very efficient method to control pain and to improve the TMJ mobility.

  13. Implant-supported prostheses with temporomandibular joint reproduction after hemimandibular resection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Carini, Fabrizio; Longoni, Salvatore; Pisapia, Valeria; Gatti, Gianbattista; Monai, Dario; Porcaro, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Summary Aim of the study The change in anatomy and physiology resulting from radical mandible surgery is often exacerbated by radiation therapies that make the mucosa atrophic and susceptible to irritation and ulceration rendering the task of areating functional complete dentures for edentulous subjects very challenging to prosthodontists. The aim of this study is to describe an implant supported denture rehabilitation in an edentulous hemimandibulectomized patient with a singular prosthetic design in order to compensate for the lack of a condylar process. Materials and methods The subject of the clinical case, had a history of squamous cell carcinoma of the right tonsillar region for which it was subjected to a hemimandibulectomy and was primarily rehabilitated with an over denture mounted onto a bar furnished by a resin condylar eminence in articulation with the glenoid fossa of the upper denture. The need to provide greater stabilization for the upper prosthesis led to a maxillary implant insertion and to the realization of a new joint connection that was constituted inferiorly by a titanium condyle and superiorly by a teflon acetabulum. Discussion The prosthetic balance guaranteed by the second rehabilitation greatly affected the biomechanics of mastication leading to a reduction of eccentric interferences, a stabilization of centric occlusion, and a lowering of intensity contraction by masticatory muscles. This difference is well represented by two and three-dimensional plans obtained from the application of a T-Scan III device. Conclusions The rehabilitative solution proposed was effective in resolving the lateral deviation, in relieving masticatory and speech discomfort, as well as restoring an aesthetically acceptable appearance in a hemimandibulectomized and not reconstructed patient. PMID:25678945

  14. Diagnostic accuracy of fat-saturated T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of perforation of the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Yura, Shinya; Nobata, Koji; Shima, Tsuyoshi

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy of diagnosing a perforation of the articular disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is poor with conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We recently reported that a high signal-intensity area is usually found on fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI in the joint space between the articular disc and cartilage surface in joints in which the disc is displaced. A discrete image with an area of high signal-intensity in the middle of the articular disc may indicate perforation or rupture. The purpose of this study was to compare the accuracy of diagnosis of a perforated articular disc by fat-saturated T2-weighted MRI with that of arthroscopy. We studied 50 joints in 50 patients with closed lock of the TMJ who were examined with MRI and then by arthroscopy using an ultra-thin arthroscope. The agreement between the two methods of diagnosis was assessed using the κ coefficient. Evidence of perforation of the disc on MRI and arthroscopically was found in the same 7 joints; there was complete concordance (κ=1.00, p<0.001). The accuracy of diagnosis of perforation of a disc by fat-saturated MRI was therefore the same as that by arthroscopy using an ultra-thin arthroscope.

  15. The evaluation of lateral pterygoid muscle pathologic changes and insertion patterns in temporomandibular joints with or without disc displacement using magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Imanimoghaddam, M; Madani, A S; Hashemi, E M

    2013-09-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc displacement is a common disorder in patients with internal derangement. Certain anatomic features of TMJ may make the patient prone to this condition, namely lateral pterygoid muscle (LPM) insertion variations. The aim of this study was to investigate LPM attachments and their relationships with disc displacement and subsequent pathologic changes. A total of 26 patients with clinical temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) and a control group of 14 unaffected individuals were studied. Magnetic resonance images (MRIs) were taken to evaluate LPM insertion patterns, superior LPM head pathologic changes, and relative disc to condyle position. Data registration and analysis were done using SPSS v. 16.0. The most common variation (type I) was shown to be the superior head with two bundles, one attached to the disc and another to the condyle. No significant relationship between LPM insertion type and disc displacement or pathologic changes of the muscle was found. However, a link between disc displacement and muscle pathologic changes was established (P=0.001).

  16. Technetium-99m-labeled annexin V imaging for detecting prosthetic joint infection in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Tang, Cheng; Wang, Feng; Hou, Yanjie; Lu, Shanshan; Tian, Wei; Xu, Yan; Jin, Chengzhe; Wang, Liming

    2015-05-01

    Accurate and timely diagnosis of prosthetic joint infection is essential to initiate early treatment and achieve a favorable outcome. In this study, we used a rabbit model to assess the feasibility of technetium-99m-labeled annexin V for detecting prosthetic joint infection. Right knee arthroplasty was performed on 24 New Zealand rabbits. After surgery, methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus was intra-articularly injected to create a model of prosthetic joint infection (the infected group, n = 12). Rabbits in the control group were injected with sterile saline (n = 12). Seven and 21 days after surgery, technetium-99m-labeled annexin V imaging was performed in 6 rabbits of each group. Images were acquired 1 and 4 hours after injection of technetium-99m-labeled annexin V (150 MBq). The operated-to-normal-knee activity ratios were calculated for quantitative analysis. Seven days after surgery, increased technetium-99m-labeled annexin V uptake was observed in all cases. However, at 21 days a notable decrease was found in the control group, but not in the infected group. The operated-to-normal-knee activity ratios of the infected group were 1.84 ± 0.29 in the early phase and 2.19 ± 0.34 in the delay phase, both of which were significantly higher than those of the control group (P = 0.03 and P = 0.02). The receiver operator characteristic curve analysis showed that the operated-to-normal-knee activity ratios of the delay phase at 21 days was the best indicator, with an accuracy of 80%. In conclusion, technetium-99m-labeled annexin V imaging could effectively distinguish an infected prosthetic joint from an uninfected prosthetic joint in a rabbit model.

  17. The hip joint: the fibrillar collagens associated with development and ageing in the rabbit

    PubMed Central

    BLAND, YVETTE S.; ASHHURST, DOREEN E.

    2001-01-01

    The fibrillar collagens associated with the articular cartilages, joint capsule and ligamentum teres of the rabbit hip joint were characterised from the 17 d fetus to the 2-y-old adult by immunohistochemical methods. Initially the putative articular cartilage contains types I, III and V collagens, but when cavitation is complete in the 25 d fetus, type II collagen appears. In the 17 d fetus, the cells of the chondrogenous layers express type I collagen mRNA, but not that of type II collagen. Types III and V collagens are present throughout life, particularly pericellularly. Type I collagen is lost. In all respects, the articular cartilage of the hip joint is similar to that of the knee. The joint capsule contains types I, III and V collagens. In the fetus the ligamentum teres contains types I and V collagens and the cells express type I collagen mRNA; type III collagen is confined mainly to its surface and insertions. After birth, the same distribution remains, but there is more type III collagen in the ligament, proper. The attachment to the cartilage of the head of the femur is marked only by fibres of type I collagen traversing the cartilage; the attachment cannot be distinguished in preparations localising types III and V collagens. The attachment to the bone at the lip of the acetabulum is via fibres of types I and V collagens and little type III is present. The ligament is covered by a sheath of types III and V collagens. Type II collagen was not located in any part of the ligamentum teres. The distribution of collagens in the ligamentum teres is similar to that in the collateral ligaments of the knee. Its insertions are unusual because no fibrocartilage was detected. PMID:11215763

  18. [The relation between socio-economic class and demographic factors in the occurrence of temporomandibular joint dysfunction].

    PubMed

    Martins, Ronald Jefferson; Garcia, Alício Rosalino; Garbin, Cléa Adas Saliba; Sundefeld, Maria Lúcia Marçal Mazza

    2008-12-01

    Different factors like stress and occlusion can decrease the adaptive capacity of the stomatognathic system and lead to the occurrence of temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). The objective of this study was to verify the relation of the variables socio-economic level, schooling, sex and age with the occurrence of temporomandibular dysfunction. The population of this study consisted of a statistically significant sample of subjects of both sexes belonging to different socio-economic classes living in the urban area of the city of Piacatu, São Paulo, Brazil. The Criterion of Economic Classification Brazil (CCEB) was used for the economic stratification of the population. Fonseca's Questionnaire was applied to samples collected from each extract to verify the level of TMD. The data collected were statistically analyzed using the Chi-square Test, with a significance level of 5%. In total, 354 heads of families participated in the research. No statistically significant relation was found between socio-economic class, schooling, age group and temporomandibular dysfunction (TMD). There was a relation between sex and TMD (p<0.02). The variables socio-economic class, schooling and age group had no influence upon the occurrence of TMD, however there is a significant relation with the sex of the individual.

  19. Temporomandibular joint, skull base and mandibular ramus functional reconstruction with homologous bank tissue and free flap: a case report with 30 months follow-up.

    PubMed

    Maranzano, Massimo; Rizzo, Roberto; Cicognini, Alessandro; Sorato, Renzo; Recchia, Guglielmo; De Grazia, Raffaella; Di Paola, Francesco; Paolin, Adolfo; Mazzoleni, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Big craniofacial resections for highly invasive malignant neoplasm, including skull base and maxillary bones, always represent a difficult chance for the reconstructive surgeon. In these cases it is not easy to restore anatomy and function simultaneously even adopting complex microsurgical techniques. In maxillofacial and oral surgery, simple bone homotransplantation for small bone segments reconstruction has been developing as popular technique and tissue banks offer not only bone segments but also many different tissues including complex body parts. In this paper we present, a case report of a homotransplantation of a complete temporomandibular joint (TMJ) together with a portion of the medial skull base and mandibular ramus folded with an ante-brachial fascio-periosteal free flap as secondary reconstruction after nearly 5 years from the removal of a sarcoma of the TMJ involving the skull base and a follow up of more than 30 months.

  20. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α in Temporomandibular Joint Synovial Fluid Predicts Treatment Effects on Pain by Intra-Articular Glucocorticoid Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Lars; Alstergren, Per; Kopp, Sigvard

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) synovial fluid and blood on the treatment effect on TMJ pain by intra-articular injection of glucocorticoid in patients with chronic inflammatory TMJ disorders. High pretreatment level of TNF-α in the synovial fluid was associated with a decrease of TNF-α and elimination of pain upon maximal mouth opening. Elimination of this TMJ pain was accordingly associated with decrease in synovial fluid level of TNF-α. There was also a significant decrease of C-reactive protein and TMJ resting pain after treatment. In conclusion, this study indicates that presence of TNF-α in the synovial fluid predicts a treatment effect of intra-articular injection of glucocorticoid on TMJ movement pain in patients with chronic TMJ inflammatory disorders. PMID:17392588

  1. Severe destruction of the temporomandibular joint with complete resorption of the condyle associated with synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Yasumitsu; Tanaka, Ray; Kurokawa, Akira; Ohnuki, Hisashi; Sultana, Sara; Hayashi, Takafumi; Iizuka, Tateyuki; Takagi, Ritsuo

    2013-08-01

    The synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome consists of a combination of inflammatory bone disorders and dermatologic pathology. Bone lesions as a form of diffuse sclerosing osteomyelitis in the mandible occur in the posterior body and ramus. Bone lesions rarely spread to the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) where ankylosis may result. Herein we present an unusual case of SAPHO syndrome with TMJ involvement in which severe destruction of the TMJ occurred. We observed an extension of the invasive soft tissue lesion into the infratemporal fossa from the TMJ with complete resorption of the condyle. In contrast to other previously reported cases, in our case the condyle was strongly suspected as the primary site of the bone lesion with subsequent extension to the ramus and infratemporal fossa. The destructive nature and related symptoms resembled a malignant tumor.

  2. Successful use of stellate ganglion block and a new centrally acting analgesic with dual mode of action in a resistant temporomandibular joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Gareth Peter; Tripathi, Shiva Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Stellate ganglion blocks have been shown to provide effective pain relief in a number of different conditions involving the upper body. This was demonstrated in a 65-year-old woman who had experienced severe debilitating pain in her left temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the surrounding area of her face for over 10 years. The pain was unresponsive to indomethacin, carbamazepine, sodium valproate, gabapentin, lithium, melatonin and amitriptyline. She had also had four surgical procedures to the TMJ without success. The pain was partially responsive to Syndol tablets and pregabalin, although the use of pregabalin was limited by its adverse effects. The patient underwent 13 ultrasound guided stellate ganglion blocks over a 24-month period which demonstrated 90% pain relief for up to 10 weeks. Pulsed radio frequency lesioning showed no benefit over stellate ganglion block. More recently, tapentadol was found to be effective and this replaced the stellate ganglion blocks. PMID:24849638

  3. Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... information you need from the Academy of General Dentistry Sunday, April 9, 2017 About | Contact InfoBites Quick ... Terms and Conditions © 1996-2017 Academy of General Dentistry. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Temporomandibular Joint, Open

    MedlinePlus

    ... form does not collect any actual information. External Web Site Policy This graphic notice ( ) means that you are ... the link. Home Contact Us Viewers and Players Site Map FOIA Web Policies Privacy Policy National Institute of Dental and ...

  5. Temporomandibular Joint, Closed

    MedlinePlus

    ... form does not collect any actual information. External Web Site Policy This graphic notice ( ) means that you are ... the link. Home Contact Us Viewers and Players Site Map FOIA Web Policies Privacy Policy National Institute of Dental and ...

  6. Long-term side effects on the temporomandibular joints and oro-facial function in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea treated with a mandibular advancement device.

    PubMed

    Knappe, S W; Bakke, M; Svanholt, P; Petersson, A; Sonnesen, L

    2017-01-17

    Patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in long-term treatment with a mandibular advancement device (MAD) to increase the upper airway space may develop changes in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and the oro-facial function due to the protruded jaw position during sleep. The aim was to investigate the influence of long-term MAD treatment on the TMJs, oro-facial function and occlusion. This prospective study included 30 men and 13 women (median age 54) with OSA [Apnoea-Hypopnoea Index (AHI): 7-57]. They were examined with the Nordic Orofacial Test Screening (NOT-S), the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) of the TMJs. The examination was performed before MAD treatment (T0), and 3-6 months (T1, no CBCT), 1 year (T2) and 3 years (T3) after treatment start. The results were analysed as long term (T0-T3, n = 14) and short term (T0-T2, n = 24) by t-test, Fisher's exact test and anova. Both long- and short-term analyses revealed a reduction in AHI (P < 0·002). Significant long term were increased scores in the NOT-S Interview (P < 0·045), reduced vertical overbite (P < 0·031) and increased jaw protrusive movement (P < 0·027). TMJ changes were found as joint sounds in terms of reciprocal clicking and crepitus, short term as a decrease and subsequent recurrence (P < 0·053; P < 0·037). No significant radiological changes were found. In conclusion, MAD treatment is beneficial to some OSA patients, but might induce changes in the TMJs, the oro-facial function and the occlusion. However, these changes seemed to be less harmful than previously reported with careful adaptation, control and follow-ups.

  7. A serial study on the development of the temporomandibular joint in the fetal mouse--in particular on the fibrous component in the condylar cartilage.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, M

    1990-06-01

    The development of the temporomandibular joint of 400 fetal mice at stages ranging from the 13th to the 20th day after insemination was investigated under the light, scanning (SEM) and transmission electron (TEM) microscopes. The differentiation and development of a cartilaginous tissue were observed at the supero-posterior end of the mandible at the 13 days after insemination. This tissue grew backward, upward and lateralward continuously and maintained a constant articulation with the squamosal part of the temporal bone. Seventeen days after insemination, cell layers in the condylar process and articular disc were arranged regularly. An supero- and inferno-directional cellular differentiation initiated from the subfibrous (SF) layer toward the articular spaces and cartilaginous layer was observed. The perichondrial ossification had taken place with the invasion of capillaries and the differentiation of osteoblasts in the SF layer, and was followed with a hypertrophic degeneration and endochondral ossification in the condylar process. Such a bi-directional growth of collagen and elastic fibers starting from the SF layer was also observed. Observation under SEM and TEM on the autoclaved condylar process revealed a complicated network consisted of main elastic fibers running in the sagittal direction. These fibers as well as the proteoglycan which contributes to the resilient property of the condylar cartilage and the ability to endure tensile or compressive stress from surrounding tissues during the growth and development of the mandibular condyle. The developing cartilaginous tissue was stimulated with the pressure from the masticatory muscles to initiate an active differentiation of the fibrous layer, which was invaded by the blood capillary system closely related with the subsequent endochondral ossification. These results elucidate that the development of the temporomandibular joint has closely kept relations with the functional influences from surrounding

  8. Rabbit knee model of post-traumatic joint contractures: the long-term natural history of motion loss and myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Kevin A; Sutherland, Craig; Zhang, Mei

    2004-03-01

    Our objective is to describe the natural history of motion loss with time and myofibroblast numbers in a rabbit knee model of post-traumatic joint contractures. Twenty-eight skeletally mature New Zealand White female rabbits had five-mm-squares of cortical bone removed from the medial and lateral femoral condyles of the right knee. A Kirschner wire (K-wire) was used to immobilize the knee joint in maximum flexion. A second operation was performed 8 weeks later to remove the K-wire. The rabbits were divided into four groups depending on the time of remobilization; 0, 8, 16 or 32 weeks. The average flexion contracture of the experimental knees in the 0-week and 8-week remobilization groups (38 degrees and 33 degrees, respectively) were significantly greater when compared with the values of the unoperated contralateral knees (8 degrees). The average flexion contractures of the experimental knees in the 16-week and 32-week remobilization groups were also greater than the unoperated contralateral knees, although they were not statistically significant. The average flexion contractures of the 16-week and 32-week groups were 19 degrees and 18 degrees, respectively, indicating a stabilization of the motion loss. Myofibroblast numbers in the posterior joint capsules were elevated 4-5x in the knees with contractures when compared to the contralateral knees. The initial decrease in severity followed by stabilization of motion loss and the association of motion loss with myofibroblasts mimics the human scenario of permanent post-traumatic joint contractures.

  9. Does condylar height decrease more in temporomandibular joint nonreducing disc displacement than reducing disc displacement?: A magnetic resonance imaging retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying-Kai; Yang, Chi; Cai, Xie-Yi; Xie, Qian-Yang

    2016-08-01