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  1. A quantitative comparison of regional myocardial motion in mice, rabbits and humans using in-vivo phase contrast CMR

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Genetically manipulated animals like mice or rabbits play an important role in the exploration of human cardiovascular diseases. It is therefore important to identify animal models that closely mimic physiological and pathological human cardiac function. Methods In-vivo phase contrast cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) was used to measure regional three-directional left ventricular myocardial motion with high temporal resolution in mice (N=18), rabbits (N=8), and humans (N=20). Radial, long-axis, and rotational myocardial velocities were acquired in left ventricular basal, mid-ventricular, and apical short-axis locations. Results Regional analysis revealed different patterns of motion: 1) In humans and rabbits, the apex showed slower radial velocities compared to the base. 2) Significant differences within species were seen in the pattern of long-axis motion. Long-axis velocities during systole were fairly homogeneously distributed in mice, whereas humans showed a dominant component in the lateral wall and rabbits in the base. 3) Rotational velocities and twist showed the most distinct patterns in both temporal evolution and relative contribution of base, mid-ventricle and apex, respectively. Interestingly, a marked difference in rotational behavior during early-systole was found in mice, which exhibited clockwise rotation in all slice locations compared to counter-clockwise rotation in rabbits and humans. Conclusions Phase contrast CMR revealed subtle, but significantly different regional myocardial motion patterns in mice, rabbits and humans. This finding has to be considered when investigating myocardial motion pattern in small animal models of heart disease. PMID:23270566

  2. Species differences in methanol and formic acid pharmacokinetics in mice, rabbits and primates

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeting, J. Nicole; Siu, Michelle; McCallum, Gordon P.; Miller, Lutfiya; Wells, Peter G.

    2010-08-15

    Methanol (MeOH) is metabolized primarily by alcohol dehydrogenase in humans, but by catalase in rodents, with species variations in the pharmacokinetics of its formic acid (FA) metabolite. The teratogenic potential of MeOH in humans is unknown, and its teratogenicity in rodents may not accurately reflect human developmental risk due to differential species metabolism, as for some other teratogens. To determine if human MeOH metabolism might be better reflected in rabbits than rodents, the plasma pharmacokinetics of MeOH and FA were compared in male CD-1 mice, New Zealand white rabbits and cynomolgus monkeys over time (24, 48 and 6 h, respectively) following a single intraperitoneal injection of 0.5 or 2 g/kg MeOH or its saline vehicle. Following the high dose, MeOH exhibited saturated elimination kinetics in all 3 species, with similar peak concentrations and a 2.5-fold higher clearance in mice than rabbits. FA accumulation within 6 h in primates was 5-fold and 43-fold higher than in rabbits and mice respectively, with accumulation being 10-fold higher in rabbits than mice. Over 48 h, FA accumulation was nearly 5-fold higher in rabbits than mice. Low-dose MeOH in mice and rabbits resulted in similarly saturated MeOH elimination in both species, but with approximately 2-fold higher clearance rates in mice. FA accumulation was 3.8-fold higher in rabbits than mice. Rabbits more closely than mice reflected primates for in vivo MeOH metabolism, and particularly FA accumulation, suggesting that developmental studies in rabbits may be useful for assessing potential human teratological risk.

  3. Rabbit Models for Studying Human Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xuwen; Knouse, John A; Hernon, Krista M

    2015-01-01

    Using an appropriate animal model is crucial for mimicking human disease conditions, and various facets including genetics, anatomy, and pathophysiology should be considered before selecting a model. Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are well known for their wide use in production of antibodies, eye research, atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. However, a systematic description of the rabbit as primary experimental models for the study of various human infectious diseases is unavailable. This review focuses on the human infectious diseases for which rabbits are considered a classic or highly appropriate model, including AIDS (caused by HIV1), adult T-cell leukemia–lymphoma (human T-lymphotropic virus type 1), papilloma or carcinoma (human papillomavirus) , herpetic stromal keratitis (herpes simplex virus type 1), tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), and syphilis (Treponema pallidum). In addition, particular aspects of the husbandry and care of rabbits used in studies of human infectious diseases are described. PMID:26678367

  4. Rabbit Models for Studying Human Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xuwen; Knouse, John A; Hernon, Krista M

    2015-12-01

    Using an appropriate animal model is crucial for mimicking human disease conditions, and various facets including genetics, anatomy, and pathophysiology should be considered before selecting a model. Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) are well known for their wide use in production of antibodies, eye research, atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. However, a systematic description of the rabbit as primary experimental models for the study of various human infectious diseases is unavailable. This review focuses on the human infectious diseases for which rabbits are considered a classic or highly appropriate model, including AIDS (caused by HIV1), adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (human T-lymphotropic virus type 1), papilloma or carcinoma (human papillomavirus) , herpetic stromal keratitis (herpes simplex virus type 1), tuberculosis (Mycobacterium tuberculosis), and syphilis (Treponema pallidum). In addition, particular aspects of the husbandry and care of rabbits used in studies of human infectious diseases are described. PMID:26678367

  5. Relative susceptibility of microsomes from lung, heart, liver, kidney, brain and testes to lipid peroxidation: correlation with vitamin E content. [Rats, rabbits, mice, human

    SciTech Connect

    Kornbrust, D.J.; Mavis, R.D.

    1980-01-01

    Rates of in vitro lipid peroxidation of microsomes and homogenates were found to vary widely among different tissues and species. In rats and rabbits, lung microsomes peroxidized at 25- to 50-fold lower rate than liver, kidney, testes and brain microsomes. Heart microsomes peroxidized at a rate slightly greater than, but most similar to, lung microsomes. Comparison of tissue homogenates also revealed the unique resistance of lung and heart to lipid peroxidation. Higher rates of peroxidation in mouse lung microsomes relative to rabbit, rat and human lung microsomes were similarly correlated with a lower ratio of vitamin E to peroxidizable fatty acids in mouse lung microsomes. These data provide strong support for the role of vitamin E as the major cellular antioxidant, especially in the highly oxygenated tissues of heart and lung, and demonstrate the utility of the microsomal system in characterizing tissue differences in susceptibility to peroxidative membrane decomposition.

  6. Dermal irritation of petrolatum in rabbits but not in mice, rats or minipigs.

    PubMed

    Chandra, S A; Peterson, R A; Melich, D; Merrill, C M; Bailey, D; Mellon-Kusibab, K; Adler, R

    2014-08-01

    Petrolatum is widely used in cosmetics, topical pharmaceuticals and also as a vehicle in dermal toxicity studies. New Zealand white rabbits treated with white petrolatum (vehicle control) in a 2-week dermal irritation study exhibited moderate to severe erythema starting on Day 7 that subsided towards the end of the study. Histological examination of abraded and non-abraded petrolatum-treated skin obtained at termination (Day 15) revealed mild acanthosis, hyperkeratosis, dermal edema with mixed inflammatory cells in the dermis. Macroscopic and microscopic features noted in rabbits were consistent with dermal irritation to petrolatum. Wistar-Han rats, CD1 mice, C57/Bl/6J mice and Göttingen minipigs treated topically with white petrolatum did not exhibit clinical or histologic evidence of dermal irritation. Therapeutic agents developed for topical application are generally tested in rabbits during some point in development. Interpretation of skin irritation data from a single species can impact risk assessment for humans and on product labeling.

  7. Lupus-like autoantibody development in rabbits and mice after immunization with EBNA-1 fragments

    PubMed Central

    Poole, Brian D.; Gross, Timothy; Maier, Shannon; Harley, John B.; James, Judith A.

    2010-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus has been implicated in the etiology of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) through serologic and immunologic studies. A potential mechanism for this influence is through molecular mimicry. The EBV nuclear antigen EBNA-1 contains a region, PPPGRRP, with considerable homology to the initial sequence targeted by antibodies in Sm B’ autoimmunity, PPPGMRPP. This study examined whether immunization of rabbits and mice with peptides containing the PPPGRRP sequence from EBNA-1 constructed on a poly-lysine backbone was able to drive the development of autoantibodies against the Smith antigen (Sm) and the related antigenic complex, the U1 nuclear ribonucleoproteins (nRNP). PPPGRRP immunization, and immunization with an EBNA-1 fragment containing PPPGRRP, led to autoantibodies in both rabbits and mice at high frequency (83% of rabbits and 43% of mice). Five out of six immunized rabbits developed either leucopenia or lymphopenia or both. The fine specificity of antibody binding against the lupus-associated autoantigens Sm B’, nRNP A, and nRNP C after immunization with the EBNA-1-derived peptides was very similar to the early antibody binding patterns against these proteins in human SLE. This similarity, as well as the prevalence of autoimmunity after immunization with these peptides, identifies PPPGRRP as a strong candidate for molecular mimicry in SLE etiology. PMID:18849143

  8. Peripherin-Reactive Antibodies in Mouse, Rabbit, and Human Blood

    PubMed Central

    Strom, Alexander; Sonier, Brigitte; Chapman, Harold D.; Mojibian, Majid; Wang, Gen-Sheng; Slatculescu, Cristina R.; Serreze, David V.; Scott, Fraser W.

    2011-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disorder that results from the destruction of insulin-producing β-cells in the islets of Langerhans. To date, autoimmune T-cell response and antibody reactivity to more than 20 autoantigens have been linked to this disease. Some studies have described the intermediate filament protein peripherin (PRPH) as an autoantigen associated with T1D in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. We evaluated immune reactivity of mouse and rabbit sera and human plasma to a 58 kDa protein expressed in RIN-m5F rat insulinoma cells. The protein was isolated using 2-DE and identified by mass spectrometry as PRPH. Antibodies from healthy humans and T1D patients, CD-1 mice, C57BL/6 mice, NOR (non-obese diabetes resistant) mice, and NOD mice reacted with PRPH on Western blots. However, antibody response to PRPH was stronger in NOD than non-autoimmune prone C57BL/6 mice. We conclude that immune reactivity to PRPH is not exclusively associated with NOD mice or human patients with T1D. Furthermore, the frequent occurrence of PRPH-reactive antibodies in mouse and human blood suggests that binding may be non-specific or could reflect the presence of natural autoantibodies against PRPH. These findings point to the need for a re-evaluation of PRPH as a T1D autoantigen in NOD mice and raise the question of the physiological relevance of such widespread immune reactivity against this peripheral nervous system protein. PMID:20113007

  9. Mice with human livers.

    PubMed

    Grompe, Markus; Strom, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Animal models are used to study many aspects of human disease and to test therapeutic interventions. However, some very important features of human biology cannot be replicated in animals, even in nonhuman primates or transgenic rodents engineered with human genes. Most human microbial pathogens do not infect animals and the metabolism of many xenobiotics is different between human beings and animals. The advent of transgenic immune-deficient mice has made it possible to generate chimeric animals harboring human tissues and cells, including hepatocytes. The liver plays a central role in many human-specific biological processes and mice with humanized livers can be used to model human metabolism, liver injury, gene regulation, drug toxicity, and hepatotropic infections.

  10. Transgenic rabbit that expresses a functional human lipoprotein (a)

    DOEpatents

    Rouy, Didier; Duverger, Nicolas; Emmanuel, Florence; Denefle, Patrice; Houdebine, Louis-Marie; Viglietta, Celine; Rubin, Edward M.; Hughes, Steven D.

    2003-01-01

    A transgenic rabbit which has in its genomic DNA sequences that encode apolipoprotein (a) and apolipoprotein B polypeptides which are capable of combining to produce lipoprotein (a), a process for creating such a rabbit, and the use of the rabbit to identify compounds which are effective in the treatment of human diseases which are associated with, induced and/or exacerbated by Lp(a) expression.

  11. Kinetics of Anti-Phlebotomus perniciosus Saliva Antibodies in Experimentally Bitten Mice and Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Martín, Inés; Molina, Ricardo; Jiménez, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    Background Sand flies are hematophagous arthropods that act as vectors of Leishmania parasites. When hosts are bitten they develop cellular and humoral responses against sand fly saliva. A positive correlation has been observed between the number of bites and antibody levels indicating that anti-saliva antibody response can be used as marker of exposure to sand flies. Little is known about kinetics of antibodies against Phlebotomus perniciosus salivary gland homogenate (SGH) or recombinant salivary proteins (rSP). This work focused on the study of anti-P. perniciosus saliva antibodies in sera of mice and rabbits that were experimentally exposed to the bites of uninfected sand flies. Methodology/Principal Findings Anti-saliva antibodies were evaluated by ELISA and Western blot. In addition, antibody levels against two P. perniciosus rSP, apyrase rSP01B and D7 related protein rSP04 were determined in mice sera. Anti-saliva antibody levels increased along the immunizations and correlated with the number of sand fly bites. Anti-SGH antibody levels were detected in sera of mice five weeks after exposure, and persisted for at least three months. Anti-apyrase rSP01B antibodies followed similar kinetic responses than anti-SGH antibodies while rSP04 showed a delayed response and exhibited a greater variability among sera of immunized mice. In rabbits, anti-saliva antibodies appeared after the second week of exposure and IgG antibodies persisted at high levels, even 7 months post-exposure. Conclusions/Significance Our results contributed to increase the knowledge on the type of immune response P. perniciosus saliva and individual proteins elicited highlighting the use of rSP01B as an epidemiological marker of exposure. Anti-saliva kinetics in sera of experimentally bitten rabbits were studied for the first time. Results with rabbit model provided useful information for a better understanding of the anti-saliva antibody levels found in wild leporids in the human leishmaniasis

  12. Preclinical pharmacokinetics of KBF611, a new antituberculosis agent in mice and rabbits, and comparison with thiacetazone.

    PubMed

    Shahab, F M; Kobarfard, F; Shafaghi, B; Dadashzadeh, S

    2010-03-01

    Thiacetazone (TAZ), one of the oldest known antituberculosis drugs, causes severe skin reactions in patients co-infected with tuberculosis and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). KBF611 is a new fluorinated thiacetazone analogue that has shown strong antituberculosis effects. In order to provide valuable information for subsequent preclinical development, pharmacokinetics of KBF611 and its analogue (TAZ) were studied and compared in two animal species (mice and rabbits) following intravenous and oral administration, and pharmacokinetic parameters were characterized. According to the calculated parameters, KBF611 showed a more favourable pharmacokinetics profile than TAZ in terms of half-life (0.89 h compared with 0.57 in mice, p < 0.05, and 2.71 compared with 0.98 in rabbits, p < 0.001) and volume of distribution (1.45 l kg(-1) compared with 0.86 l kg(-1) in mice, p < 0.05, and 1.01 l kg(-1) compared with 0.41 l kg(-1) in rabbits, p < 0.001) for tuberculosis therapy. In rabbits, the oral bioavailability of KBF611 was markedly lower than mice (39% compared with 82%), which may be attributed to a higher presystemic metabolism in rabbit liver. The results of in vivo studies on the metabolism of KBF611, supported by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis, showed that the incorporation of a fluorine atom to the TAZ structure made the molecule susceptible to N-deacetylation, a pathway not seen in TAZ metabolism. In summary, KBF611 could be considered a suitable candidate for further preclinical and clinical evaluation.

  13. Side effects of immunization with liver attenuated Trypanosoma cruzi in mice and rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Basombrío, M A; Besuschio, S; Cossio, P M

    1982-01-01

    Immunity against lethal, bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma cruzi was achieved in mice by preinoculation of approximately equal to 10(5) culture epimastigotes of an attenuated T. cruzi strain (TCC). The risks of TCC inoculation in terms of pathogenicity or eventual increase in virulence of TCC progeny were evaluated. No pathogenic parasites could be selected from TCC progeny by either mouse, triatome, or culture passages. Immunizing doses of live TCC did not induce in adult mice alterations resembling chronic Chagas' disease, as judged by patterns of mortality, tissue damage, autoantibodies, or parasite recovery. On the basis of the same criteria, However, a remarkable similarity could be established between the disease caused in mice by inoculation of low numbers (10(2)) of pathogenic trypomastigotes and human chronic Chagas' disease. Although patent parasitemias were never revealed in fresh blood mounts obtained from TCC-inoculated mice, a few hemocultures and xenodiagnoses gave positive results, particularly soon after inoculations at birth. The parasites recovered by either method remained in the attenuated, epimastigote stage. In rabbits, no local lesions, fever, weight loss, or histopathological alterations were detected after subcutaneous inoculation of 10(7) TCC organisms, although one fifth of the animals yielded positive hemocultures of epimastigotes. The contrasting host response to cultured epimastigotes as compared with blood trypomastigotes indicates that, in experimental Chagas' disease, immunoprotection is not necessarily associated with immunopathology. Images PMID:6804389

  14. Side effects of immunization with liver attenuated Trypanosoma cruzi in mice and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Basombrío, M A; Besuschio, S; Cossio, P M

    1982-04-01

    Immunity against lethal, bloodstream forms of Trypanosoma cruzi was achieved in mice by preinoculation of approximately equal to 10(5) culture epimastigotes of an attenuated T. cruzi strain (TCC). The risks of TCC inoculation in terms of pathogenicity or eventual increase in virulence of TCC progeny were evaluated. No pathogenic parasites could be selected from TCC progeny by either mouse, triatome, or culture passages. Immunizing doses of live TCC did not induce in adult mice alterations resembling chronic Chagas' disease, as judged by patterns of mortality, tissue damage, autoantibodies, or parasite recovery. On the basis of the same criteria, However, a remarkable similarity could be established between the disease caused in mice by inoculation of low numbers (10(2)) of pathogenic trypomastigotes and human chronic Chagas' disease. Although patent parasitemias were never revealed in fresh blood mounts obtained from TCC-inoculated mice, a few hemocultures and xenodiagnoses gave positive results, particularly soon after inoculations at birth. The parasites recovered by either method remained in the attenuated, epimastigote stage. In rabbits, no local lesions, fever, weight loss, or histopathological alterations were detected after subcutaneous inoculation of 10(7) TCC organisms, although one fifth of the animals yielded positive hemocultures of epimastigotes. The contrasting host response to cultured epimastigotes as compared with blood trypomastigotes indicates that, in experimental Chagas' disease, immunoprotection is not necessarily associated with immunopathology. PMID:6804389

  15. Attaching and effacing activities of rabbit and human enteropathogenic Escherichia coli in pig and rabbit intestines.

    PubMed

    Moon, H W; Whipp, S C; Argenzio, R A; Levine, M M; Giannella, R A

    1983-09-01

    Three strains of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC), originally isolated from humans and previously shown to cause diarrhea in human volunteers by unknown mechanisms, and one rabbit EPEC strain were shown to attach intimately to and efface microvilli and cytoplasm from intestinal epithelial cells in both the pig and rabbit intestine. The attaching and effacing activities of these EPEC were demonstrable by light microscopic examination of routine histological sections and by transmission electron microscopy. It was suggested that intact colostrum-deprived newborn pigs and ligated intestinal loops in pigs and rabbits may be useful systems to detect EPEC that have attaching and effacing activities and for studying the pathogenesis of such infections. The lesions (attachment and effacement) produced by EPEC in these systems were multifocal, with considerable animal-to-animal variation in response to the same strain of EPEC. The EPEC strains also varied in the frequency and extent of lesion production. For example, three human EPEC strains usually caused extensive lesions in rabbit intestinal loops, whereas two other human EPEC strains usually did not produce lesions in this system.

  16. Natural Pathogens of Laboratory Mice, Rats, and Rabbits and Their Effects on Research

    PubMed Central

    Baker, David G.

    1998-01-01

    Laboratory mice, rats, and rabbits may harbor a variety of viral, bacterial, parasitic, and fungal agents. Frequently, these organisms cause no overt signs of disease. However, many of the natural pathogens of these laboratory animals may alter host physiology, rendering the host unsuitable for many experimental uses. While the number and prevalence of these pathogens have declined considerably, many still turn up in laboratory animals and represent unwanted variables in research. Investigators using mice, rats, and rabbits in biomedical experimentation should be aware of the profound effects that many of these agents can have on research. PMID:9564563

  17. Toward an Animal Model of the Human Tear Film: Biochemical Comparison of the Mouse, Canine, Rabbit, and Human Meibomian Lipidomes

    PubMed Central

    Butovich, Igor A.; Lu, Hua; McMahon, Anne; Eule, J. Corinna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Secretions that are produced by meibomian glands (also known as meibum) are a major source of lipids for the ocular surface of humans and animals alike. Many animal species have been evaluated for their meibomian lipidomes. However, there have been a very small number of studies in which the animals were compared with humans side by side. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare meibum collected from humans and three typical laboratory animals, canines, mice, and rabbits, for their meibomian lipid composition in order to determine which animal species most resembles humans. Methods. High pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and gas-liquid chromatography (GLC) in combination with mass spectrometry were used to evaluate lipidomes of all tested species. Results. Among three tested animal species, mice were found to be the closest match to humans in terms of their meibomian lipidomes, while canines were the second closest species. The lipids of these three species were close to each other structurally and, for most lipid classes, quantitatively. The rabbit meibomian lipidome, on the other hand, was vastly different from lipidomes of all other tested species. Interestingly, a previously described class of lipids, acylated omega-hydroxy fatty acids (OAHFA), was found to be present in every tested species as the major amphiphilic component of meibum. Conclusions. Our side by side comparison of the rabbit and the human meibum demonstrated their vast differences. Thus, the rabbit seems to be a poor animal model of the human tear film, at least when studying its biochemistry and biophysics. PMID:22918629

  18. Neutralization of tetanus toxin by human and rabbit immunoglobulin classes and subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Ourth, D D; MacDonald, A B

    1977-01-01

    This investigation found that the human antibody class of importance in neutralizing tetanus toxin in mice was IgG, and that toxin neutralization was retained by the F(ab')2 and Fab' subunits of the human IgG class. Although human IgM and IgA classes appeared to neutralize tetanus toxin at very low levels, evidence was obtained that this neutralization was probably due to IgG contamination. Human Fabmu isolated from the IgM class did not neutralize tetanus toxin. Human antibodies of the IgG, IgM and IgA classes reacted with tetanus toxoid in the indirect haemagglutination (HA) test with IgG giving the highest HA titre. Rabbit antibodies of the IgG class also neutralized tetanus toxin, with neutralization being retained by the F(ab')2 and Fab' subunits of the rabbit IgG class. Absorption of several rabbit antisera to tetanus toxoid with goat-antirabbit Fc which is specific for absorption of IgG from antiserum, rendered them incapable of neutralizing tetanus toxin. Images Figure 1 PMID:590997

  19. Use of mucosal immunization with porcine zona pellucida (PZP) in mice and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Martin, Brent J; Suckow, Mark A; Wolter, William R; Berger, Thomas; Turner, John W

    2006-07-01

    Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and two strains of mice (Mus musculus, one inbred and one outbred) were immunized against porcine zona pellucida (PZP) antigen. Alginate microspheres or cholera toxin B were used alone or in combination when mucosal immunization routes were used. Serum antibody responses and fertility were assessed. Neither rabbit or mouse groups immunized by mucosal routes generated significant antibody responses to PZP as compared to parenteral immunization (ANOVA, P > 0.05). The study shows that porcine zona pellucida is not an effective mucosal antigen in small mammals.

  20. Disposition of human fibrinopeptide A in normal and nephrectomized rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Harenberg, J.; Stehle, G.; Waibel, S.; Hermann, H.J.; Eisenhut, M.; Zimmermann, R.

    1983-10-01

    The distribution, elimination, and metabolism of human fibrinopeptide A (FPA) were studied in normal and nephrectomized rabbits. The activity of /sup 125/I-labeled desamino-tyrosyl human FPA (DAT-FPA) was followed over 4 hours after i.v. administration. Results show that in normal rabbits (n . 10) DAT-FPA is eliminated from plasma in four phases with half-lives of 30 sec, 3.5 min, 15 min, and 90 min. The distribution of /sup 123/I-labeled DAT-FPA in plasma was determined in 15 control rabbits with scintigraphy over 2 hours. DAT-FPA was distributed primarily in the cardiovascular system, liver, and kidneys. In some animals minimal radioactivity was detected over the gall bladder. Radioactivity accumulated rapidly in the urinary bladder, approximately 50% being recorded after 15 min and 90% after 120 min. In the heart area radioactivity decreased with half-lives of 25 sec, 7.5 min, 25 min, and 180 min. Nephrectomized rabbits had similar initial fast distribution of DAT-FPA after administration of /sup 125/I-labeled (n . 10) and /sup 123/I-labeled peptide (n . 10). The estimated half-life of the slow component was in the order of several hours. The results of the scintigraphic and gel chromatographic studies show that FPA is primarily excreted in the urine. Previously reported half-lives of FPA reflect distribution rather than steady state conditions.

  1. Unusual metabolic characteristics in skeletal muscles of transgenic rabbits for human lipoprotein lipase

    PubMed Central

    Gondret, Florence; Jadhao, Sanjay B; Damon, Marie; Herpin, Patrick; Viglietta, Céline; Houdebine, Louis-Marie; Hocquette, Jean-François

    2004-01-01

    Background The lipoprotein lipase (LPL) hydrolyses circulating triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins. Thereby, LPL acts as a metabolic gate-keeper for fatty acids partitioning between adipose tissue for storage and skeletal muscle primarily for energy use. Transgenic mice that markedly over-express LPL exclusively in muscle, show increases not only in LPL activity, but also in oxidative enzyme activities and in number of mitochondria, together with an impaired glucose tolerance. However, the role of LPL in intracellular nutrient pathways remains uncertain. To examine differences in muscle nutrient uptake and fatty acid oxidative pattern, transgenic rabbits harboring a DNA fragment of the human LPL gene (hLPL) and their wild-type littermates were compared for two muscles of different metabolic type, and for perirenal fat. Results Analyses of skeletal muscles and adipose tissue showed the expression of the hLPL DNA fragment in tissues of the hLPL group only. Unexpectedly, the activity level of LPL in both tissues was similar in the two groups. Nevertheless, mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation rate, measured ex vivo using [1-14C]oleate as substrate, was lower in hLPL rabbits than in wild-type rabbits for the two muscles under study. Both insulin-sensitive glucose transporter GLUT4 and muscle fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) contents were higher in hLPL rabbits than in wild-type littermates for the pure oxidative semimembranosus proprius muscle, but differences between groups did not reach significance when considering the fast-twitch glycolytic longissimus muscle. Variations in both glucose uptake potential, intra-cytoplasmic binding of fatty acids, and lipid oxidation rate observed in hLPL rabbits compared with their wild-type littermates, were not followed by any modifications in tissue lipid content, body fat, and plasma levels in energy-yielding metabolites. Conclusions Expression of intracellular binding proteins for both fatty acids and glucose, and their

  2. Expression of SV40 T antigen under control of rabbit uteroglobin promoter in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    DeMayo, F J; Finegold, M J; Hansen, T N; Stanley, L A; Smith, B; Bullock, D W

    1991-08-01

    The rabbit uteroglobin gene is expressed in the lungs and reproductive tracts of male and female rabbits. To examine whether the promoter region of the uteroglobin gene could be used to target a heterologous gene to the lungs of transgenic mice, a fusion gene consisting of 3.3 kb of the 5'-flanking region of the rabbit uteroglobin gene and the large T antigen gene of the SV40 virus was constructed and microinjected into the pronuclei of one-cell mouse embryos. Eleven founder transgenic mice (5 female and 6 male) were generated. Seven of these mice developed bronchioalveolar neoplasms. Four of the founder males also developed primitive undifferentiated urogenital tract tumors. One founder female and one female offspring of a founder male developed glandular paraovarian tumors. Northern analysis revealed that the predominant site of expression of the transgene was the lung. Immunohistochemical staining showed T antigen predominantly in epithelial cells lining the bronchioles, the submucosal glands of the trachea, and the neoplasms. There appeared to be a high level of mosaicism for the transgene in the founder mice, with poor transmission of the transgene to subsequent generations. This suggests that, under the control of the uteroglobin promoter, the T antigen gene may be lethal to the fetus.

  3. Rabbit models for the study of human atherosclerosis: from pathophysiological mechanisms to translational medicine

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jianglin; Kitajima, Shuji; Watanabe, Teruo; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Jifeng; Liu, Enqi; Chen, Y. Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory animal models play an important role in the study of human diseases. Using appropriate animals is critical not only for basic research but also for the development of therapeutics and diagnostic tools. Rabbits are widely used for the study of human atherosclerosis. Because rabbits have a unique feature of lipoprotein metabolism (like humans but unlike rodents) and are sensitive to a cholesterol diet, rabbit models have not only provided many insights into the pathogenesis and development of human atherosclerosis but also made a great contribution to translational research. In fact, rabbit was the first animal model used for studying human atherosclerosis, more than a century ago. Currently, three types of rabbit model are commonly used for the study of human atherosclerosis and lipid metabolism: (1) cholesterol-fed rabbits, (2) Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits, analogous to human familial hypercholesterolemia due to genetic deficiency of LDL receptors, and (3) genetically modified (transgenic and knock-out) rabbits. Despite their importance, compared with the mouse, the most widely used laboratory animal model nowadays, the use of rabbit models is still limited. In this review, we focus on the features of rabbit lipoprotein metabolism and pathology of atherosclerotic lesions that make it the optimal model for human atherosclerotic disease, especially for the translational medicine. For the sake of clarity, the review is not an attempt to be completely inclusive, but instead attempts to summarize substantial information concisely and provide a guideline for experiments using rabbits. PMID:25277507

  4. Rabbit neutrophil chemotactic protein (NCP) activates both CXCR1 and CXCR2 and is the functional homologue for human CXCL6.

    PubMed

    Catusse, Julie; Struyf, Sofie; Wuyts, Anja; Weyler, Myke; Loos, Tamara; Gijsbers, Klara; Gouwy, Mieke; Proost, Paul; Van Damme, Jo

    2004-11-15

    Neutrophil chemotactic protein (NCP) is a rabbit CXC chemokine with activating and chemotactic properties on neutrophilic granulocytes. Although its selective activity on neutrophils is demonstrated, its interactions with specific chemokine receptors are not defined. For further functional characterization, NCP was chemically synthesized and was found to be equipotent as natural NCP in neutrophil chemotaxis. To identify its human homologue, we separately expressed two potential rabbit NCP receptors (CXCR1 and CXCR2) in Jurkat cells. Pure synthetic NCP was equally efficient to promote chemotaxis through either rabbit CXCR1 or CXCR2. Moreover, chemotaxis assays on rabbit CXCR1 and CXCR2 transfectants showed that NCP uses the same receptors as interleukin-8 (IL-8), a major rabbit CXC chemokine, but not rabbit GROalpha, which only recognized CXCR2. In addition, specific inhibitors for CXCR1 or CXCR2 reduced rabbit neutrophil chemotaxis induced by NCP and rabbit IL-8. Furthermore, NCP and the structurally related human CXCR1/CXCR2 agonist CXCL6/GCP-2 (granulocyte chemotactic protein-2) cross-desensitized each other in intracellular calcium release assays on human neutrophils, further indicating that both chemokines share the same receptors. The inflammatory role of NCP was also evidenced by its potent granulocytosis inducing capacity in rabbits upon systemic administration. This study provides in vitro and in vivo evidences that NCP is the functional rabbit homologue for human CXCL6/GCP-2 rather than the most related CXCR2 agonist CXCL5/ENA-78 (epithelial cell-derived neutrophil activating peptide-78). It is concluded that the rabbit is a better model to study human neutrophil activation compared to mice, which lack CXCL8/IL-8.

  5. Immunoreactive Proteins of Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum CCM 7952 and Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum CCDM 372 Identified by Gnotobiotic Mono-Colonized Mice Sera, Immune Rabbit Sera and Non-immune Human Sera

    PubMed Central

    Górska, Sabina; Dylus, Ewa; Rudawska, Angelika; Brzozowska, Ewa; Srutkova, Dagmar; Schwarzer, Martin; Razim, Agnieszka; Kozakova, Hana; Gamian, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The Bifidobacteria show great diversity in the cell surface architecture which may influence the physicochemical properties of the bacterial cell and strain specific properties. The immunomodulatory role of bifidobacteria has been extensively studied, however studies on the immunoreactivity of their protein molecules are very limited. Here, we compared six different methods of protein isolation and purification and we report identification of immunogenic and immunoreactive protein of two human Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum strains. We evaluated potential immunoreactive properties of proteins employing polyclonal sera obtained from germ free mouse, rabbit and human. The protein yield was isolation method-dependent and the reactivity of proteins detected by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting was heterogeneous and varied between different serum samples. The proteins with the highest immunoreactivity were isolated, purified and have them sequenced. Among the immunoreactive proteins we identified enolase, aspartokinase, pyruvate kinase, DnaK (B. longum ssp. longum CCM 7952) and sugar ABC transporter ATP-binding protein, phosphoglycerate kinase, peptidoglycan synthethase penicillin-binding protein 3, transaldolase, ribosomal proteins and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (B. longum ssp. longum CCDM 372). PMID:27746766

  6. Species differences in sirolimus stability in humans, rabbits, and rats.

    PubMed

    Ferron, G M; Jusko, W J

    1998-01-01

    Species differences in the in vitro stability of sirolimus was assessed in plasma and whole blood in relation to red blood cell distribution. Fresh blood and plasma samples obtained from humans, rabbits, and rats were aliquoted and spiked with sirolimus. After incubation from 0 to 144 hr in a shaking water bath maintained at 37 degrees C, sirolimus concentrations were quantified by a specific high-liquid performance chromatographic method. Sirolimus was unstable in both plasma and whole blood. Sirolimus degradation half-life in whole blood was 135 hr (vs. 7.2 hr in plasma) in humans, 62 hr (vs. 3.1 hr) in rabbits, and 15 hr (vs. 2.2 hr) in rats. Sirolimus stability is greater in whole blood compared with plasma in proportion to the whole blood/plasma ratio and hematocrit. In vivo instability may account for up to 36% of sirolimus clearance in humans and 13% in rabbits, and this is an important factor in the pharmacokinetics of this drug.

  7. Spontaneous fatal Human herpesvirus 1 encephalitis in two domestic rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus).

    PubMed

    de Matos, Ricardo; Russell, Duncan; Van Alstine, William; Miller, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    Despite the particular susceptibility of the rabbit to experimental infection with Human herpesvirus 1 (HHV-1) and the high seroprevalence of HHV-1 in human beings, reports of natural infection in pet rabbits are rare. The current report describes 2 cases of HHV encephalitis in pet rabbits in North America. Antemortem clinical signs included seizures, ptyalism, and muscle tremors. Results of complete blood cell count and plasma biochemistry panel were unremarkable except for a mild leukocytosis in both cases. Both rabbits died after a short period of hospitalization. Rabbit 1 presented mild optic chiasm hemorrhage on gross examination, while rabbit 2 had no gross lesions. Histologic findings for both cases included lymphocytic and/or lymphoplasmacytic encephalitis with necrosis and the presence of intranuclear inclusion bodies in neurons and glial cells. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of affected brain tissue using primers specific for Human herpesvirus 1 and 2 confirmed diagnosis of HHV encephalitis for rabbit 1. Immunohistochemical staining (poly- and monoclonal) and PCR analysis using primers specific to HHV-1 confirmed the diagnosis of HHV-1 encephalitis for rabbit 2. The owner of rabbit 2 was suspected to be the source of infection due to close contact during an episode of herpes labialis. Given the high susceptibility of rabbits to experimental HHV-1, high seroprevalence of HHV-1 in human beings, and severity of clinical disease in this species, clinician awareness and client education is important for disease prevention. Human herpesvirus 1 encephalitis should be considered as a differential diagnosis for rabbits with neurologic disease.

  8. Viral haemorrhagic disease of rabbits and human health.

    PubMed Central

    Carman, J. A.; Garner, M. G.; Catton, M. G.; Thomas, S.; Westbury, H. A.; Cannon, R. M.; Collins, B. J.; Tribe, I. G.

    1998-01-01

    Viral haemorrhagic disease of rabbits (VHD), a potential biological control for wild rabbits in Australia and New Zealand, escaped from quarantined field trials on Wardang Island and spread to the mainland of Australia in October 1995. This study looked for any evidence of infection or illness in people occupationally exposed to the virus. Two hundred and sixty-nine people were interviewed and 259 blood samples were collected. Exposures to VHD-infected rabbits ranged from nil to very high. No VHD antibodies were detected in any of the 259 sera when tested by VHD competitive enzyme immunoassay, which had been validated with 1013 VHDV-specific antibody negative sera. A questionnaire designed to elicit symptoms of disease in a range of organ systems found no significant differences between illness in those exposed and those not exposed to VHD, nor could an association be found between exposure and subsequent episodes of illness. The findings are consistent with the view that exposure to VHD is not associated with infection or disease in humans. PMID:9825794

  9. Comparative study of human and rabbit cell infection with cell-free HTLV-I.

    PubMed

    Yamade, I; Isono, T; Ishiguro, T; Yoshida, Y

    1993-01-01

    Infection of human and rabbit cells with cell-free HTLV-I was studied by PCR analysis. Both human and rabbit PBL were infected similarly by cell-free virus of both human and rabbit cell origin. Cells were infected with the cell-free virus without prior treatment and regardless of the concentration of the culture supernatant containing the virus. Human and rabbit cell lines were also infected similarly by the cell-free virus, the proviral DNA persisting for more than two months. The culture supernatants of HTLV-I-producing cells could thus be a potential cause of laboratory infections. PMID:8423456

  10. The developmental toxicity of boric acid in mice, rats, and rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Heindel, J J; Price, C J; Schwetz, B A

    1994-01-01

    Boric acid (BA) is a naturally occurring agent used in manufacturing processes and numerous consumer products. Because of the potential for both industrial and consumer exposure to boron-containing compounds, and the lack of developmental toxicity data, the National Toxicology Program evaluated the potential for boric acid to cause developmental toxicity in pregnant Swiss (CD-1) mice, Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 26-28/group), and New Zealand rabbits (n = 18-23/group). BA was provided in the feed to mice and rats at 0, 0.1, 0.2, or 0.4% throughout gestation to attain steady-state exposure as early as possible during development. Average doses (mg/kg/day) were 248, 452, or 1003 for mice, and 78, 163, or 330 in rats. A separate group of rats received 0.8% BA in the feed, or 539 mg/kg/day only on gestation days (gd) 6 to 15. Rabbits were given BA (0, 62.5, 125, or 250 mg/kg) by gavage administration on gd 6 to 19. Maternal body weight, food and/or water consumption and signs of toxicity were monitored at regular intervals. At termination, gd 17 (mice), 20 (rats), or 30 (rabbits), the uterus was examined to determine the number of resorptions, dead, or live fetuses. Fetuses were weighed and live fetuses were examined for external, visceral, and skeletal defects. Mouse dams exhibited mild renal lesions (> or = 248 mg/kg/day BA), increased water intake and relative kidney weight (1003 mg/kg/day BA), and decreased weight gain during treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7889869

  11. Studies of human pancreatic elastase treatment of rabbit and human vein rings to predict human therapeutic doses.

    PubMed

    Burke, Steven K; Bunton, David; Bingham, Karen; Moss, Emma; Bland, Kimberly S; Starcher, Barry; Wong, Marco D; Franano, F Nicholas

    2016-06-01

    Vascular tissue contains abundant elastic fibers that contribute to vessel elasticity. Vonapanitase (formerly PRT-201) is a recombinant human chymotrypsin-like elastase family member 1 (CELA1) shown to cleave the elastin component of elastic fibers, resulting in increased vessel diameter. The purpose of these current studies was to determine vein diameter, wall thickness, elastin content, and vonapanitase potency in veins used in a model of arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and in patients undergoing AVF creation for hemodialysis access to guide dose selection for human trials. Rabbit linguofacial, maxillary, and external jugular veins, and human basilic and upper and lower arm cephalic veins were dissected postmortem and sectioned into 2 mm length rings. Rings were incubated in vonapanitase at 37°C at varying concentrations and times. Elastin content was estimated histologically and by quantifying desmosine, a protein cross-link unique to elastin. Rabbit veins were substantially thinner and contained less elastin than human veins. In human veins, elastin content was greatest in basilic and least in lower arm cephalic. Vonapanitase removed elastin in a time- and concentration-dependent manner in all vein types. A lower concentration of vonapanitase was required to remove elastin from rabbit relative to human veins. In summary, vonapanitase reduced the elastin content of rabbit and human veins but did so at a lower concentration in the rabbit veins. Rabbit models may overestimate the potency of vonapanitase in humans. These results indicate that human dose selection should be guided by human vein ring experiments. PMID:27433340

  12. Hepatitis E Virus: First Description in a Pet House Rabbit. A New Transmission Route for Human?

    PubMed

    Caruso, C; Modesto, P; Prato, R; Scaglione, F E; De Marco, L; Bollo, E; Acutis, P L; Masoero, L; Peletto, S

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we identified for the first time hepatitis E virus (HEV) in a pet house rabbit, an adult 7 years old female of domestic rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Importantly, the resulting phylogenetic tree showed that the HEV strain identified in the pet house rabbit was closely related to a human HEV sequence; this finding reawakens concerns regarding the zoonotic risk represented by HEV in animals and expands to house rabbit the spectrum of potential source of infection for humans. Potential for domestic transmission of HEV to humans should be taken into account. PMID:25773737

  13. Disposition of enantiomers of sultopride in a human, rats and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kamizono, A; Inotsume, N; Fukushima, S; Nakano, M

    1993-11-01

    Pharmacokinetics of sultopride enantiomers was examined following a single dose in a human, rabbits and rats. Pharmacokinetic profiles were similar between (+)- and (-)-enantiomers of sultopride in human, whereas the serum concentrations of (-)-sultopride were slightly higher than those of (+)-sultopride after i.v. administration of 50 mg/kg of racemic sultopride to rats and rabbits.

  14. The tissue distribution in mice and pharmacokinetics in rabbits of oxaliplatin liposome.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-ping; Geng, Dan-qing; Xu, Hai-xing; Sui, Xiao-hui

    2009-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive, and simple high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method with an ultraviolet detector (UV) has been developed for the determination of oxaliplatin in the plasma of rabbits and tissues of mice. The sample preparation was carried out by complexation with 0.5 mL of DETC (diethyl-dithiocarbamate) solution and extracted by ether and chloroform. Then, 20 microL of supernatant was injected into the HPLC system with 0.25 mol/L of sodium chloride solution and methanol (30:70 v/v) as the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min. Separation was performed with a C(18) column at 25 degrees C. The peak was detected at 254 nm. The calibration curve was linear (R(2) > or = 0.9995) in the concentration range of 0.1 approximately 200 microg/mL in plasma and tissues. The intra- and interday variation coefficients were not more than 2.61 and 3.83%, respectively. The limit of detection was 20 ng/mL. The mean recoveries of oxaliplatin were ranged from 97.83 to 104.17% in plasma and tissues. The present method has been successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of oxaliplatin liposome in mice and rabbits.

  15. Preliminary pharmacokinetics of PEGylated oxaliplatin polylactic acid nanoparticles in rabbits and tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Wei, Haitian; Xu, Lisa; Sun, Yong; Li, Gaohong; Cui, Zhaoyuan; Yan, Guowen; Chen, Qian; Yin, Hongli; Ma, Chao

    2015-01-01

    To testify the targeting effect of PEGylated Oxaliplatin polylactic acid (OP-PEG-PLA) nanoparticles (NPs), we studied drug concentration in rabbit plasma and tissue distribution in tumor-bearing mice. Concentration of nanoparticle colloidal solution was performed with dialysis. Qualities of enriched NPs were characterized by particle size and drug content. OP concentration in samples was detected using ICP-MS. Compared to OP solution groups, OP concentration of NPs groups increased in the tumor (p < 0.05) and decreased in the kidney and heart (p < 0.05). Compared to OP-PLA NPs groups, OP concentration of OP-PEG-PLA NPs groups increased in the tumor and decreased in the liver and lung (p < 0.05). The concentrated OP-PEG-PLA NPs are good in clinical application and tumor delivery.

  16. Isoform specificity of N-deacetyl ketoconazole by human and rabbit flavin-containing monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, R J; Miranda, C L

    2000-09-01

    N-Deacetyl ketoconazole (DAK) is the major metabolite of orally administered ketoconazole. This major metabolite has been demonstrated to be further metabolized predominately by the flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) to the secondary hydroxylamine, N-deacetyl-N-hydroxyketoconazole (N-hydroxy-DAK) by adult and postnatal rat hepatic microsomes. Our current investigation evaluated the FMO isoform specificity of DAK in a pyrophosphate buffer (pH 8.8) containing the glucose 6-phosphate NADPH-generating system. cDNA-expressed human FMOs (FMO1, FMO3, and FMO5) and cDNA-expressed rabbit FMOs (FMO1, FMO2, FMO3, and FMO5) were used to assess the metabolism of DAK to its subsequent FMO-mediated metabolites by HPLC analysis. Human and rabbit cDNA-expressed FMO3 resulted in extensive metabolism of DAK in 1 h (71.2 and 64.5%, respectively) to N-hydroxy-DAK (48.2 and 47.7%, respectively) and two other metabolites, metabolite 1 (11.7 and 7.8%, respectively) and metabolite 3 (10.5 and 10.0%, respectively). Previous studies suggest that metabolite 1 is the nitrone formed after successive FMO-mediated metabolism of N-hydroxy-DAK. Moreover, these studies display similar metabolic profiles seen with adult and postnatal rat hepatic microsomes. The human and rabbit FMO1 metabolized DAK predominately to the N-hydroxy-DAK in 1 h (36.2 and 25.3%, respectively) with minimal metabolism to the other metabolites (Rabbit FMO2 metabolized DAK to N-hydroxy-DAK (15.9%) and metabolite 1 (6.6%). Last, DAK did not appear to be a substrate for human or rabbit FMO5. Heat inactivation of cDNA-expressed FMOs abolished DAK metabolite formation. These results suggest that DAK is a substrate for human and rabbit FMO1 and FMO3, rabbit FMO2, but not human or rabbit FMO5.

  17. Meibomian gland dysfunction. I. Keratin protein expression in normal human and rabbit meibomian glands.

    PubMed

    Jester, J V; Nicolaides, N; Smith, R E

    1989-05-01

    The expression of keratin proteins from meibomian glands and their correlation with skin epidermal keratins were determined. Keratin proteins were localized in both human and rabbit meibomian glands by indirect immunofluorescence using mouse monoclonal antibodies AE1, AE2 and AE3, which are known to react with human epidermal keratins as well as with keratins from other sources. Keratin proteins from rabbit meibomian glands were further isolated and characterized by SDS-PAGE and immunoblot using mouse monoclonal antibodies AE1 and AE3. Meibomian glands from human and rabbit showed similar immunofluorescent staining with each monoclonal antibody. AE1 antibody, which stains human basal epithelial cells of skin, stains all duct epithelial cells in the human but only the superficial duct epithelial cells in the rabbit meibomian gland. AE2 antibody, which stains human suprabasal epithelial cells of skin and is a marker for fully keratinized epithelia, stains the suprabasal epithelial cells of the central duct and ductules in both the human and rabbit meibomian gland. AE3 antibody, which stains all human epithelial cells of skin, stains all epithelial cells of the duct and ductules, as well as the basal epithelial cells of the acinus in both the human and rabbit meibomian gland. Keratins isolated from whole rabbit meibomian glands contained a 65-67 kD and 58 kD AE3-positive, and a 56.5 kD and 50 kD AE1-positive keratin protein. Expression of 65-67 kD/56.5 kD keratin proteins, and the immunofluorescent staining of the duct epithelium by the AE2 antibody, indicate that the meibomian gland duct epithelium is committed to the process of keratinization.

  18. Absorption and excretion of black currant anthocyanins in humans and watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Inge Lise F; Dragsted, Lars O; Ravn-Haren, Gitte; Freese, Riitta; Rasmussen, Salka E

    2003-04-23

    Anthocyanins are thought to protect against cardiovascular diseases. Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHL) rabbits are hypercholesterolemic and used as a model of the development of atherosclerosis. To compare the uptake and excretion of anthocyanins in humans and WHHL rabbits, single-dose black currant anthocyanin studies were performed. Procedures for workup and analyses of urine and plasma samples containing anthocyanins were developed with high recoveries (99 and 81%, respectively) and low limits of quantification (> or =6.6 and > or =1.1 nM, respectively). The excretion and absorption of anthocyanins from black currant juice were found to be within the same order of magnitude in the two species regarding urinary excretion within the first 4 h (rabbits, 0.035%; humans, 0.072%) and t(max) (rabbits, approximately 30 min; humans, approximately 45 min). A food matrix effect was detected in rabbits, resulting in the absorption of a higher proportion of the anthocyanins from black currant juice than from an aqueous citric acid matrix. In humans the absorption and urinary excretion of anthocyanins from black currant juice were found to be proportional with dose and not influenced by the ingestion of a rice cake. In both species a larger proportion of the anthocyanin rutinosides than of the glucosides was absorbed, whereas the structure of the aglycon had no influence on the absorption and excretion. The anthocyanins had no effect in rabbits on the antioxidant capacity of plasma measured as Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity and ferruc reducing ability of plasma. PMID:12696978

  19. Rabbit muscle creatine phosphokinase. CDNA cloning, primary structure and detection of human homologues.

    PubMed

    Putney, S; Herlihy, W; Royal, N; Pang, H; Aposhian, H V; Pickering, L; Belagaje, R; Biemann, K; Page, D; Kuby, S

    1984-12-10

    A cDNA library was constructed from rabbit muscle poly(A) RNA. Limited amino acid sequence information was obtained on rabbit muscle creatine phosphokinase and this was the basis for design and synthesis of two oligonucleotide probes complementary to a creatine kinase cDNA sequence which encodes a pentapeptide. Colony hybridizations with the probes and subsequent steps led to isolation of two clones, whose cDNA segments partially overlap and which together encode the entire protein. The primary structure was established from the sequence of two cDNA clones and from independently determined sequences of scattered portions of the polypeptide. The reactive cysteine has been located to position 282 within the 380 amino acid polypeptide. The rabbit cDNA hybridizes to digests of human chromosomal DNA. This reveals a restriction fragment length polymorphism associated with the human homologue(s) which hybridizes to the rabbit cDNA.

  20. Humanized mice with ectopic artificial liver tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alice A.; Thomas, David K.; Ong, Luvena L.; Schwartz, Robert E.; Golub, Todd R.; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2011-01-01

    “Humanized” mice offer a window into aspects of human physiology that are otherwise inaccessible. The best available methods for liver humanization rely on cell transplantation into immunodeficient mice with liver injury but these methods have not gained widespread use due to the duration and variability of hepatocyte repopulation. In light of the significant progress that has been achieved in clinical cell transplantation through tissue engineering, we sought to develop a humanized mouse model based on the facile and ectopic implantation of a tissue-engineered human liver. These human ectopic artificial livers (HEALs) stabilize the function of cryopreserved primary human hepatocytes through juxtacrine and paracrine signals in polymeric scaffolds. In contrast to current methods, HEALs can be efficiently established in immunocompetent mice with normal liver function. Mice transplanted with HEALs exhibit humanized liver functions persistent for weeks, including synthesis of human proteins, human drug metabolism, drug–drug interaction, and drug-induced liver injury. Here, mice with HEALs are used to predict the disproportionate metabolism and toxicity of “major” human metabolites using multiple routes of administration and monitoring. These advances may enable manufacturing of reproducible in vivo models for diverse drug development and research applications. PMID:21746904

  1. Recombination rate variation and speciation: theoretical predictions and empirical results from rabbits and mice.

    PubMed

    Nachman, Michael W; Payseur, Bret A

    2012-02-01

    Recently diverged taxa may continue to exchange genes. A number of models of speciation with gene flow propose that the frequency of gene exchange will be lower in genomic regions of low recombination and that these regions will therefore be more differentiated. However, several population-genetic models that focus on selection at linked sites also predict greater differentiation in regions of low recombination simply as a result of faster sorting of ancestral alleles even in the absence of gene flow. Moreover, identifying the actual amount of gene flow from patterns of genetic variation is tricky, because both ancestral polymorphism and migration lead to shared variation between recently diverged taxa. New analytic methods have been developed to help distinguish ancestral polymorphism from migration. Along with a growing number of datasets of multi-locus DNA sequence variation, these methods have spawned a renewed interest in speciation models with gene flow. Here, we review both speciation and population-genetic models that make explicit predictions about how the rate of recombination influences patterns of genetic variation within and between species. We then compare those predictions with empirical data of DNA sequence variation in rabbits and mice. We find strong support for the prediction that genomic regions experiencing low levels of recombination are more differentiated. In most cases, reduced gene flow appears to contribute to the pattern, although disentangling the relative contribution of reduced gene flow and selection at linked sites remains a challenge. We suggest fruitful areas of research that might help distinguish between different models.

  2. Human-derived nanoparticles and vascular response to injury in rabbit carotid arteries: proof of principle.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Maria A K; Lieske, John C; Kumar, Vivek; Farell-Baril, Gerard; Miller, Virginia M

    2008-01-01

    Self-calcifying, self-replicating nanoparticles have been isolated from calcified human tissues. However, it is unclear if these nanoparticles participate in disease processes. Therefore, this study was designed to preliminarily test the hypothesis that human-derived nanoparticles are causal to arterial disease processes. One carotid artery of 3 kg male rabbits was denuded of endothelium; the contralateral artery remained unoperated as a control. Each rabbit was injected intravenously with either saline, calcified, or decalcified nanoparticles cultured from calcified human arteries or kidney stones. After 35 days, both injured and control arteries were removed for histological examination. Injured arteries from rabbits injected with saline showed minimal, eccentric intimal hyperplasia. Injured arteries from rabbits injected with calcified kidney stone- and arterial-derived nanoparticles occluded, sometimes with canalization. The calcified kidney stone-derived nanoparticles caused calcifications within the occlusion. Responses to injury in rabbits injected with decalcified kidney stone-derived nanoparticles were similar to those observed in saline-injected animals. However, decalcified arterial-derived nanoparticles produced intimal hyperplasia that varied from moderate to occlusion with canalization and calcification. This study offers the first evidence that there may be a causal relationship between human-derived nanoparticles and response to injury including calcification in arteries with damaged endothelium. PMID:18686783

  3. Histopathological Studies on Rabbits Infected by Bacteria Causing Infectious Keratitis in Human through Eye Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Aldebasi, Yousef H.; Mohamed, Hala A.; Aly, Salah M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim This study aimed to investigate the pathogenic effect of bacteria causing infectious keratitis among patients through experimental study conducted on rabbits’ eyes with the aid of histopathology as eye infection is a common disease in developing countries that may complicate to loss of vision. Methodology 100 swab samples were collected from human infected eyes, at Qassim region during 2012, for the isolation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. The isolated pathogenic bacteria were tested to various antibiotics using some selected antibiotics discs through agar-well diffusion method. Then, experimental study conducted on 27 rabbits. The rabbits were divided randomly into three equal groups, each containing 9 rabbits. Rabbits of group (1) served as control group (Negative Control) and their eyes were inoculated with the buffer only. Rabbits of group (2) were inoculated through eyes with the isolated Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Rabbits of group (3) were inoculated through eyes with the isolated Staphylococcus aureus. Results Out of 100 collected swab samples from human infected eyes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus were isolated with a total percentage of 25.21% and 15.65%; respectively and used in this study. Both bacterial isolates were sensitive to Gentamicin and Cefuroxime. Clinically, experimentally infected rabbits by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, revealed varying degree corneal abrasions, corneal abscess and dense corneal opacity. Histopathologically, at 3rd day post-infection (PI), the cornea revealed polymorpho-nuclear cells infiltration with loss of the outer epithelial lining. At 7th day PI, neutrophils were seen in the stroma. At 15th day PI, proliferation of fibroblasts and new vascularisation were seen in the stroma. Clinically, rabbits experimentally infected with Staphylococcus aureus, revealed corneal ulcers and focal abscesses. Histopathologically, at 3rd and 7th day PI, the cornea revealed edema and infiltration of

  4. Studies of retroviral infection in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Matthew D; Zack, Jerome A

    2015-05-01

    Many important aspects of human retroviral infections cannot be fully evaluated using only in vitro systems or unmodified animal models. An alternative approach involves the use of humanized mice, which consist of immunodeficient mice that have been transplanted with human cells and/or tissues. Certain humanized mouse models can support robust infection with human retroviruses including different strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). These models have provided wide-ranging insights into retroviral biology, including detailed information on primary infection, in vivo replication and pathogenesis, latent/persistent reservoir formation, and novel therapeutic interventions. Here we describe the humanized mouse models that are most commonly utilized to study retroviral infections, and outline some of the important discoveries that these models have produced during several decades of intensive research.

  5. Studies of retroviral infection in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Matthew D.; Zack, Jerome A.

    2015-01-01

    Many important aspects of human retroviral infections cannot be fully evaluated using only in vitro systems or unmodified animal models. An alternative approach involves the use of humanized mice, which consist of immunodeficient mice that have been transplanted with human cells and/or tissues. Certain humanized mouse models can support robust infection with human retroviruses including different strains of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human T cell leukemia virus (HTLV). These models have provided wide-ranging insights into retroviral biology, including detailed information on primary infection, in vivo replication and pathogenesis, latent/persistent reservoir formation, and novel therapeutic interventions. Here we describe the humanized mouse models that are most commonly utilized to study retroviral infections, and outline some of the important discoveries that these models have produced during several decades of intensive research. PMID:25680625

  6. In vitro glutathione conjugation of methyl iodide in rat, rabbit, and human blood and tissues.

    PubMed

    Poet, Torka S; Wu, Hong; Corley, Richard A; Thrall, Karla D

    2009-05-01

    Methyl iodide (MeI) is an intermediate in the manufacture of some pesticides and pharmaceuticals, and is under review for US registration as a non-ozone depleting alternative for methyl bromide for pre-plant soil fumigation. MeI is primarily metabolized via conjugation with glutathione (GSH), with further metabolism to S-methyl cysteine and methanethiol. To facilitate extrapolations of animal pharmacokinetic data to humans, rate constants for the GSH metabolism of MeI were determined in cytosols prepared from the liver and kidneys of rats, human donors, female rabbits, and rabbit fetuses, from rabbit olfactory and respiratory epithelium, and from rabbit and rat blood using a headspace vial equilibration technique and two-compartment mathematical model. MeI was metabolized in liver and kidney from adults of all three species, but metabolism was not detectable in fetal rabbit kidney. Maximal metabolic rates (V(max)) were similar in liver from rat and human donors (approximately 40 and 47 nmol/min/mg, respectively) whereas the V(max) rates in kidney cytosols varied approximately three-fold between the three species. No difference was observed in the loss of MeI from active and inactive whole blood from either rats or rabbits. The metabolism in olfactory and respiratory epithelial cytosol had Michaelis-Menten constant (K(m)) values that were several times higher than for any other tissue, suggesting essentially first-order metabolism in the nose. The metabolism of MeI in human liver cytosol prepared from five individual donors indicated two potential populations, one high affinity/low capacity and one with a lower affinity but higher capacity. PMID:19519152

  7. Chemical compositions and properties of Schinus areira L. essential oil on airway inflammation and cardiovascular system of mice and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bigliani, María C; Rossetti, Víctor; Grondona, Ezequiel; Lo Presti, Silvina; Paglini, Patricia M; Rivero, Virginia; Zunino, María P; Ponce, Andrés A

    2012-07-01

    The main purpose was to investigate the effects of essential plant-oil of Schinus areira L. on hemodynamic functions in rabbits, as well as myocardial contractile strength and airways inflammation associated to bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mice. This study shows the important properties of the essential oil (EO) of S. areira studied and these actions on lung with significant inhibition associated to LPS, all of which was assessed in mice bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and evidenced by stability of the percentage of alveolar macrophages, infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and tumor necrosis factor-α concentration, and without pathway modifications in conjugated dienes activity. Clinical status (morbidity or mortality), macroscopic morphology and lung/body weight index were unaffected by the administration of the EO S. areira. Furthermore, the ex vivo analysis of isolated hearts demonstrated the negative inotropic action of the EO of S. areira in a mice model, and in rabbits changes in the hemodynamic parameters, such as a reduction of systolic blood pressure. We conclude that EO S. areira could be responsible for modifications on the cardiovascular and/or airway parameters. PMID:22546367

  8. Chemical compositions and properties of Schinus areira L. essential oil on airway inflammation and cardiovascular system of mice and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bigliani, María C; Rossetti, Víctor; Grondona, Ezequiel; Lo Presti, Silvina; Paglini, Patricia M; Rivero, Virginia; Zunino, María P; Ponce, Andrés A

    2012-07-01

    The main purpose was to investigate the effects of essential plant-oil of Schinus areira L. on hemodynamic functions in rabbits, as well as myocardial contractile strength and airways inflammation associated to bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in mice. This study shows the important properties of the essential oil (EO) of S. areira studied and these actions on lung with significant inhibition associated to LPS, all of which was assessed in mice bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and evidenced by stability of the percentage of alveolar macrophages, infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes and tumor necrosis factor-α concentration, and without pathway modifications in conjugated dienes activity. Clinical status (morbidity or mortality), macroscopic morphology and lung/body weight index were unaffected by the administration of the EO S. areira. Furthermore, the ex vivo analysis of isolated hearts demonstrated the negative inotropic action of the EO of S. areira in a mice model, and in rabbits changes in the hemodynamic parameters, such as a reduction of systolic blood pressure. We conclude that EO S. areira could be responsible for modifications on the cardiovascular and/or airway parameters.

  9. Effects of NCX 4050, a new NO donor, in rabbit and human corpus cavernosum.

    PubMed

    Filippi, S; Crescioli, C; Vannelli, G B; Fazzini, A; Natali, A; Riffaud, J P; Maggi, M; Ledda, F

    2003-04-01

    The effects of NCX 4050, a drug belonging to a new class of NO donors, was investigated in isolated preparations of human and rabbit corpus cavernosum (CC) and in human foetal corpora cavernosa (hfCC) smooth muscle cells. In strips of rabbit CC, NCX 4050 (0.001-100 microM) induced a concentration-dependent relaxation which was influenced neither by Nw-nitro-l-arginine-methyl-ester (l-NAME; 100 microm) nor by endothelium deprivation. The NCX 4050-induced relaxation was significantly reduced by the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ; 1 microm) and enhanced by a specific phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor, sildenafil (300 nm). Moreover, NCX 4050 (0.01-1 microm), induced a concentration-dependent potentiation of the relaxant response induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS) in rabbit preparations pre-treated with guanethidine and indomethacin. The relaxant effect of NCX 4050 was similar to that obtained by increasing concentrations (0.001-100 microm) of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in either rabbit or human preparations. To further investigate the activity of NCX 4050 on human corpora cavernosa, we exposed cultured hfCC smooth muscle cells to increasing concentrations of NCX 4050 and SNP. We found that both compounds dose-dependently reduced cell proliferation. The antiproliferative effect of all the concentration tested of NCX 4050 was completely blocked by ODQ (1 microm). These results suggest that in rabbit and human corpora cavernosa NCX 4050 acts by activating guanylate cyclase activity, induces smooth muscle relaxation and quiescence. Our results provide a rationale for a possible future use of NCX 4050 in the pharmacotherapy of erectile dysfunction linked to an impaired release of NO from the endothelium.

  10. A Rabbit Model of Acanthamoeba Keratitis That Better Reflects the Natural Human Infection.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xianmin; Zheng, Wenyu; Wang, Yuehua; Zhao, Donghai; Jiang, Xiaoming; Lv, Shijie

    2015-08-01

    Acanthamoeba species are ubiquitous, free-living protozoa that can invade the cornea and result in Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK), a painful progressive sight-threatening corneal disease. Disease progression in current animal models is too rapid to mimic AK in humans accurately. This study provides a novel method for establishing AK in rabbits and compared it with the conventional method with regard to pathogenesis and immune response in humans. The New Zealand white rabbits were randomly divided into two experimental groups (Groups A and B). Rabbits in the Group A (n = 14) received intrastromal injections of 1 × 10(4) /100 µL Acanthamoeba healyi trophozoites (conventional AK model). The Group B animals (n = 14) received microinjections of 1 × 10(4) /10 µL A. healyi trophozoites between the corneal epithelium and Bowman's layer, anterior to the corneal stroma (novel AK model). In addition, two rabbits were left untreated as normal controls. AK in the treated rabbits was evaluated clinically, histopathologically, and immunologically for 35 days. AK was successfully established in both the conventional and novel model groups. Compared with the Group A, AK in the Group B displayed an efficient immune response with less severe pathology. Moreover, the self-limiting but chronic nature of the infection in the Group B was strikingly similar to that of AK in humans. The novel animal model for AK described here more closely simulates the pathogenesis and immune response of Acanthamoeba corneal infection in humans than the animal models currently in use.

  11. Rabbit-specific fimbriae, Ral, alter the patterns of in vitro adherence and intestinal colonisation of rabbits by human-specific enteropathogenic E. coli.

    PubMed

    Hart, Emily; Tauschek, Marija; Bennett-Wood, Vicki; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Robins-Browne, Roy M

    2009-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) poses a significant threat to human health, causing diarrhoea in children worldwide, and is a leading cause of infant mortality in developing countries. The pathogenic effects of EPEC and other attaching-effacing (A/E) bacteria result from adhesion to the intestinal mucosa by a variety of mechanisms, including fimbrial adhesins, which are believed to contribute to the host and tissue specificity of EPEC by their interaction with specific receptors on cell surfaces. In this study we investigated the contribution of a fimbrial adhesin, Ral, of rabbit-specific EPEC (REPEC) to host specificity by introducing Ral into derivatives of human-specific EPEC (hEPEC) strain, E2348/69, in which expression of the fimbrial adhesin, Bfp, had been interrupted. Although unable to cause diarrhoeal disease in rabbits, Ral-bearing hEPEC strains colonised rabbit intestine more efficiently and showed altered intestinal localisation when compared to an isogenic Ral-negative strain. These findings suggest that Ral enhances the initial interaction between a DeltabfpA mutant of hEPEC and rabbit intestine and may influence tissue specificity, but is not sufficient on its own to transform hEPEC into a rabbit pathogen. This study affords new insights into the complex mechanisms which determine the host range of bacterial pathogens.

  12. Generation of Humanized Mice for Analysis of Human Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yasuyuki; Ellegast, Jana M; Manz, Markus G

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation of human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells into severe immunocompromised newborn mice allows the development of a human hemato-lymphoid system (HHLS) including dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo. Therefore, it can be a powerful tool to study human DC subsets, residing in different lymphoid and nonlymphoid organs. We have recently generated novel mouse strains called human cytokine knock-in mice in which human versions of several cytokines are knocked into Rag2(-/-)γC(-/-) strains. In addition, human SIRPα, which is a critical factor to prevent donor cell to be eliminated by host macrophages, is expressed as transgene. These mice efficiently support human myeloid cell development and, indeed, allow the analysis of three major subsets of human DC lineages, plasmacytoid DCs and CD1c(+) and CD141(+) classical DCs. Moreover, these strains also support cytokine-mobilized peripheral blood CD34(+) cell engraftment and subsequent DC development. Here we describe our standard methods to characterize DCs developed in human cytokine knock-in mice.

  13. Humanized Mice for Studying Human Leukocyte Integrins In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Soo; Kumar, Priti; Ye, Chunting; Shankar, Premlata

    2015-01-01

    Humanized mice have recently emerged as powerful translational animal models for studying human hematopoiesis, immune interactions, and diseases of the human immune system. Several important advances in the humanized mouse technology have been reported over the last few years, thereby resulting in improved engraftment, high levels of human chimerism, and sustained human hematopoiesis. This chapter describes the detailed procedures for generating various humanized mouse models including hu-PBL, hu-HSC, and BLT models and discusses considerations for choosing the appropriate model system. PMID:21909931

  14. Experimental observation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation into rabbit intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Hao; Lin, Yazhou; Zhang, Guoqing; Gu, Rui; Chen, Bohua

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC) transplantation has been investigated worldwide. However, few reports have addressed the survival status of human BMSCs in the intervertebral discs (IVDs) in vivo following transplantation. The current study aimed to observe the survival status of human BMSCs in rabbit IVDs. The IVDs of 15 New Zealand white rabbits were divided into three groups: Punctured blank control group (L1-2); punctured physiological saline control group (L2-3); and punctured human BMSCs transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) group (L3-4, L4-5 and L5-6). One, 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks after transplantation the IVDs were removed and a fluorescence microscope was used to observe the density of GFP-positive human BMSCs. The results indicated that in the sections of specimens removed at 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks post-transplantation, no GFP-positive cells were observed in the control groups, whereas GFP-positive cells were apparent in the nucleus pulposus at all periods in the GFP-labeled human BMSCs group, and the cell density at 6 and 8 weeks was significantly less than that at 1, 2 and 4 weeks post-transplantation (P<0.001). Thus, it was identified that human BMSCs were able to survive in the rabbit IVDs for 8 weeks. PMID:27588177

  15. Ocular and systemic safety of a recombinant AAV8 vector for X-linked retinoschisis gene therapy: GLP studies in rabbits and Rs1-KO mice

    PubMed Central

    Marangoni, Dario; Bush, Ronald A; Zeng, Yong; Wei, Lisa L; Ziccardi, Lucia; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Bartoe, Joshua T; Palyada, Kiran; Santos, Maria; Hiriyanna, Suja; Wu, Zhijian; Colosi, Peter; Sieving, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is a retinal disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the protein retinoschisin (RS1) and is one of the most common causes of macular degeneration in young men. Our therapeutic approach for XLRS is based on the administration of AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS, an adeno-associated viral vector coding the human RS1 protein, via the intravitreal (IVT) route. Two Good Laboratory Practice studies, a 9-month study in New Zealand White rabbits (n = 124) injected with AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS at doses of 2E9, 2E10, 2E11, and 1.5E12 vector genomes/eye (vg/eye), and a 6-month study in Rs1-KO mice (n = 162) dosed with 2E9 and 2E10 vg/eye of the same vector were conducted to assess ocular and systemic safety. A self-resolving, dose-dependent vitreal inflammation was the main ocular finding, and except for a single rabbit dosed with 1.5E12 vg/eye, which showed a retinal detachment, no other ocular adverse event was reported. Systemic toxicity was not identified in either species. Biodistribution analysis in Rs1-KO mice detected spread of vector genome in extraocular tissues, but no evidence of organ or tissues damage was found. These studies indicate that IVT administration of AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS is safe and well tolerated and support its advancement into a phase 1/2a clinical trial for XLRS.

  16. Ocular and systemic safety of a recombinant AAV8 vector for X-linked retinoschisis gene therapy: GLP studies in rabbits and Rs1-KO mice

    PubMed Central

    Marangoni, Dario; Bush, Ronald A; Zeng, Yong; Wei, Lisa L; Ziccardi, Lucia; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Bartoe, Joshua T; Palyada, Kiran; Santos, Maria; Hiriyanna, Suja; Wu, Zhijian; Colosi, Peter; Sieving, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is a retinal disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the protein retinoschisin (RS1) and is one of the most common causes of macular degeneration in young men. Our therapeutic approach for XLRS is based on the administration of AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS, an adeno-associated viral vector coding the human RS1 protein, via the intravitreal (IVT) route. Two Good Laboratory Practice studies, a 9-month study in New Zealand White rabbits (n = 124) injected with AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS at doses of 2E9, 2E10, 2E11, and 1.5E12 vector genomes/eye (vg/eye), and a 6-month study in Rs1-KO mice (n = 162) dosed with 2E9 and 2E10 vg/eye of the same vector were conducted to assess ocular and systemic safety. A self-resolving, dose-dependent vitreal inflammation was the main ocular finding, and except for a single rabbit dosed with 1.5E12 vg/eye, which showed a retinal detachment, no other ocular adverse event was reported. Systemic toxicity was not identified in either species. Biodistribution analysis in Rs1-KO mice detected spread of vector genome in extraocular tissues, but no evidence of organ or tissues damage was found. These studies indicate that IVT administration of AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS is safe and well tolerated and support its advancement into a phase 1/2a clinical trial for XLRS. PMID:27626041

  17. Ocular and systemic safety of a recombinant AAV8 vector for X-linked retinoschisis gene therapy: GLP studies in rabbits and Rs1-KO mice.

    PubMed

    Marangoni, Dario; Bush, Ronald A; Zeng, Yong; Wei, Lisa L; Ziccardi, Lucia; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Bartoe, Joshua T; Palyada, Kiran; Santos, Maria; Hiriyanna, Suja; Wu, Zhijian; Colosi, Peter; Sieving, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is a retinal disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the protein retinoschisin (RS1) and is one of the most common causes of macular degeneration in young men. Our therapeutic approach for XLRS is based on the administration of AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS, an adeno-associated viral vector coding the human RS1 protein, via the intravitreal (IVT) route. Two Good Laboratory Practice studies, a 9-month study in New Zealand White rabbits (n = 124) injected with AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS at doses of 2E9, 2E10, 2E11, and 1.5E12 vector genomes/eye (vg/eye), and a 6-month study in Rs1-KO mice (n = 162) dosed with 2E9 and 2E10 vg/eye of the same vector were conducted to assess ocular and systemic safety. A self-resolving, dose-dependent vitreal inflammation was the main ocular finding, and except for a single rabbit dosed with 1.5E12 vg/eye, which showed a retinal detachment, no other ocular adverse event was reported. Systemic toxicity was not identified in either species. Biodistribution analysis in Rs1-KO mice detected spread of vector genome in extraocular tissues, but no evidence of organ or tissues damage was found. These studies indicate that IVT administration of AAV8-scRS/IRBPhRS is safe and well tolerated and support its advancement into a phase 1/2a clinical trial for XLRS. PMID:27626041

  18. Application of Humanized Mice in Immunological Research.

    PubMed

    Tu, Wenwei; Zheng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, the development of humanized mouse models and their general applications in biomedical research greatly accelerated the translation of outcomes obtained from basic research into potential diagnostic and therapeutic strategies in clinic. In this chapter, we firstly present an overview on the history and current progress of diverse humanized mouse models and then focus on those equipped with reconstituted human immune system. The update advancement in the establishment of humanized immune system mice and their applications in the studies of the development of human immune system and the pathogenesis of multiple human immune-related diseases are intensively reviewed here, while the shortcoming and perspective of these potent tools are discussed as well. As a valuable bridge across the gap between bench work and clinical trial, progressive humanized mouse models will undoubtedly continue to play an indispensable role in the wide area of biomedical research.

  19. Induction of antibodies to nuclear antigens in rabbits by immunization with hydralazine-human serum albumin conjugates.

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Y; Litwin, A; Adams, L; Zimmer, H; Hess, E V

    1975-01-01

    The antihypertensive drug hydralazine can induce in man a syndrome similar to spontaneous systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The pathogenesis of this drug-induced syndrome is not understood. In this investigation, five groups of rabbits were studied: group I, 10 rabbits hyperimmunized with hydralazine conjugated to human serum albumin (HSA) in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA); group II, four rabbits with HSA in CFA; group III, four rabbits with CFA alone; group IV, five rabbits with hydralazine conjugated to rabbit serum albumin (RSA); and group V, four rabbits with a major metabolite of hydralazine conjugated to HSA. The rabbits immunized with hydralazine-HSA developed rising titers of antibodies to hydralazine and progressively increasing amounts of antibodies to both single-stranded and native DNA. The antibodies to DNA were cross-reactive with hydralazine as determined by inhibition of DNA binding and DNA hemagglutination tests. Similar results were obtained in rabbits immunized with the metabolite-HSA compound except the major hapten antibody response was to the metabolite. The DNA antibodies in this group were also capable of being absorbed by metabolite-HSA as well as hydralazine-HSA, indicative of the cross-reactivity between hydralazine and its metabolite. Immunization with hydralazine-RSA caused rabbits to produce antibodies to hydralazine but not to DNA, indicating the requirement for an immune response to the carrier protein in order for antibodies reactive with DNA to be produced. Thus, hyperimmunization of rabbits with hydralazine-protein conjugates may provide a useful animal model of SLE. The data suggests that an immune response to hydralazine may be important in human hydralazine-induced SLE. Images PMID:808562

  20. Can Humanized Mice Predict Drug "Behavior" in Humans?

    PubMed

    Xu, Dan; Peltz, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Most of what we know about a drug prior to human clinical studies is derived from animal testing. Because animals and humans have substantial differences in their physiology and in their drug metabolism pathways, we do not know very much about the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic behavior of a drug in humans until after it is administered to many people. Hence, drug-induced liver injury has become a significant public health problem, and we have a very inefficient drug development process with a high failure rate. Because the human liver is at the heart of these problems, chimeric mice with humanized livers could be used to address these issues. We examine recent evidence indicating that drug testing in chimeric mice could provide better information about a drug's metabolism, disposition, and toxicity (i.e., its "behavior") in humans and could aid in developing personalized medicine strategies, which would improve drug efficacy and safety.

  1. Rabbit Neonates and Human Adults Perceive a Blending 6-Component Odor Mixture in a Comparable Manner

    PubMed Central

    Sinding, Charlotte; Thomas-Danguin, Thierry; Chambault, Adeline; Béno, Noelle; Dosne, Thibaut; Chabanet, Claire; Schaal, Benoist; Coureaud, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Young and adult mammals are constantly exposed to chemically complex stimuli. The olfactory system allows for a dual processing of relevant information from the environment either as single odorants in mixtures (elemental perception) or as mixtures of odorants as a whole (configural perception). However, it seems that human adults have certain limits in elemental perception of odor mixtures, as suggested by their inability to identify each odorant in mixtures of more than 4 components. Here, we explored some of these limits by evaluating the perception of three 6-odorant mixtures in human adults and newborn rabbits. Using free-sorting tasks in humans, we investigated the configural or elemental perception of these mixtures, or of 5-component sub-mixtures, or of the 6-odorant mixtures with modified odorants' proportion. In rabbit pups, the perception of the same mixtures was evaluated by measuring the orocephalic sucking response to the mixtures or their components after conditioning to one of these stimuli. The results revealed that one mixture, previously shown to carry the specific odor of red cordial in humans, was indeed configurally processed in humans and in rabbits while the two other 6-component mixtures were not. Moreover, in both species, such configural perception was specific not only to the 6 odorants included in the mixture but also to their respective proportion. Interestingly, rabbit neonates also responded to each odorant after conditioning to the red cordial mixture, which demonstrates their ability to perceive elements in addition to configuration in this complex mixture. Taken together, the results provide new insights related to the processing of relatively complex odor mixtures in mammals and the inter-species conservation of certain perceptual mechanisms; the results also revealed some differences in the expression of these capacities between species putatively linked to developmental and ecological constraints. PMID:23341948

  2. Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells Engraft into Rabbit Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; He, Na; Feng, Chenchen; Liu, Victor; Zhang, Luyi; Wang, Fei; He, Jiaping; Zhu, Tengfang; Wang, Shuyang; Qiao, Weiwei; Li, Suke; Zhou, Guangdong; Zhang, Li; Dai, Chengxiang; Cao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to have the potential for articular cartilage regeneration, and are suggested for the treatment of osteoarthritis (OA). Here, we investigated whether intra-articular injection of xenogeneic human adipose-derived mesenchymal progenitor cells (haMPCs) promoted articular cartilage repair in rabbit OA model and engrafted into rabbit articular cartilage. The haMPCs were cultured in vitro, and phenotypes and differentiation characteristics of cells were evaluated. OA was induced surgically by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) and medical meniscectomy of knee joints. At six weeks following surgery, hyaluronic acid (HA) or haMPCs was injected into the knee joints, the contralateral knee served as normal control. All animals were sacrificed at the 16th week post-surgery. Assessments were carried out by macroscopic examination, hematoxylin/eosin (HE) and Safranin-O/Fast green stainings and immunohistochemistry. The data showed that haMPC treatment promoted cartilage repair. Signals of human mitochondrial can be directly detected in haMPC treated cartilage. The haMPCs expressed human leukocyte antigen I (HLA-I) but not HLA-II-DR in vivo. These results suggest that intra-articular injection of haMPCs promotes regeneration of articular cartilage in rabbit OA model, and support the notion that MPCs are transplantable between HLA-incompatible individuals. PMID:26023716

  3. Opposite responses of rabbit and human globin mRNAs to translational inhibition by cap analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Shakin, S.H.; Liebhaber, S.A.

    1987-11-03

    The translational efficiency of an mRNA may be determined at the step of translational initiation by the efficiency of its interaction with the cap binding protein complex. To further investigate the role of these interactions in translational control, the authors compare in vitro the relative sensitivities of rabbit and human ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-globin mRNAs to translational inhibition by cap analogues. They find that rabbit ..beta..-globin mRNA is more resistant to translational inhibition by cap analogues than rabbit ..cap alpha..-globin mRNA, while in contrast, human ..beta..-globin mRNA is more sensitive to cap analogue inhibition than human ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-globin mRNAs is unexpected as direct in vivo and in vitro comparisons of polysome profiles reveal parallel translational handling of the ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-globin mRNAs from these two species. This discordance between the relative translational sensitivities of these mRNAs to cap analogues and their relative ribosome loading activities suggests that cap-dependent events may not be rate limiting in steady-state globin translation.

  4. Human amniotic membrane as an intestinal patch for neomucosal growth in the rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Barlas, M; Gökçora, H; Erekul, S; Dindar, H; Yücesan, S

    1992-05-01

    This experiment was carried out as a preliminary study, an attempt to grow new intestinal mucosa on human amniotic membrane in the terminal ileum in 37 rabbits. After ketamin sulfate anesthesia at laparatomy, 5-cm ileal defects were patched with human amniotic membrane (5 x 2 cm). These patched intestines were investigated on the first postoperative day and the 2nd, 5th, 10th, and 20th weeks corresponding to 4, 5, 5, 10, and 10 rabbits, respectively. Only three rabbits died in the early postoperative period. There was no evidence of intestinal obstruction or dilatation with barium meal. Microscopically, the neomucosa consisted of a thin layer of columnar epithelial cells at 2 weeks with more maturity of the villi and less irregularity and branching by 20 weeks. All patches were covered with neomucosa commencing at 2 weeks and covering the whole patch area by 20 weeks. This technique's advantages are the large size and the ease of the availability of the human amniotic membrane for neonates at risk without jeopardizing the neonates tissues. It is hoped that this method might be considered when neonatal material is scarce.

  5. Creation of chimeric human/rabbit APOBEC1 with HIV-1 restriction and DNA mutation activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Terumasa; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Koito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC1 (A1) proteins from lagomorphs and rodents have deaminase-dependent restriction activity against HIV-1, whereas human A1 exerts a negligible effect. To investigate these differences in the restriction of HIV-1 by A1 proteins, a series of chimeric proteins combining rabbit and human A1s was constructed. Homology models of the A1s indicated that their activities derive from functional domains that likely act in tandem through a dimeric interface. The C-terminal region containing the leucine-rich motif and the dimerization domains of rabbit A1 is important for its anti-HIV-1 activity. The A1 chimeras with strong anti-HIV-1 activity were incorporated into virions more efficiently than those without anti-HIV-1 activity, and exhibited potent DNA-mutator activity. Therefore, the C-terminal region of rabbit A1 is involved in both its packaging into the HIV-1 virion and its deamination activity against both viral cDNA and genomic RNA. This study identifies the novel molecular mechanism underlying the target specificity of A1.

  6. Creation of chimeric human/rabbit APOBEC1 with HIV-1 restriction and DNA mutation activities.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Terumasa; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Koito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC1 (A1) proteins from lagomorphs and rodents have deaminase-dependent restriction activity against HIV-1, whereas human A1 exerts a negligible effect. To investigate these differences in the restriction of HIV-1 by A1 proteins, a series of chimeric proteins combining rabbit and human A1s was constructed. Homology models of the A1s indicated that their activities derive from functional domains that likely act in tandem through a dimeric interface. The C-terminal region containing the leucine-rich motif and the dimerization domains of rabbit A1 is important for its anti-HIV-1 activity. The A1 chimeras with strong anti-HIV-1 activity were incorporated into virions more efficiently than those without anti-HIV-1 activity, and exhibited potent DNA-mutator activity. Therefore, the C-terminal region of rabbit A1 is involved in both its packaging into the HIV-1 virion and its deamination activity against both viral cDNA and genomic RNA. This study identifies the novel molecular mechanism underlying the target specificity of A1. PMID:26738439

  7. Creation of chimeric human/rabbit APOBEC1 with HIV-1 restriction and DNA mutation activities

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Terumasa; Ong, Eugene Boon Beng; Watanabe, Nobumoto; Sakaguchi, Nobuo; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Koito, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC1 (A1) proteins from lagomorphs and rodents have deaminase-dependent restriction activity against HIV-1, whereas human A1 exerts a negligible effect. To investigate these differences in the restriction of HIV-1 by A1 proteins, a series of chimeric proteins combining rabbit and human A1s was constructed. Homology models of the A1s indicated that their activities derive from functional domains that likely act in tandem through a dimeric interface. The C-terminal region containing the leucine-rich motif and the dimerization domains of rabbit A1 is important for its anti-HIV-1 activity. The A1 chimeras with strong anti-HIV-1 activity were incorporated into virions more efficiently than those without anti-HIV-1 activity, and exhibited potent DNA-mutator activity. Therefore, the C-terminal region of rabbit A1 is involved in both its packaging into the HIV-1 virion and its deamination activity against both viral cDNA and genomic RNA. This study identifies the novel molecular mechanism underlying the target specificity of A1. PMID:26738439

  8. Provocation of pulmonary vascular endothelial injury in rabbits by human recombinant interleukin-1 beta.

    PubMed Central

    Goldblum, S E; Yoneda, K; Cohen, D A; McClain, C J

    1988-01-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) mediates components of the acute-phase response, stimulates granulocyte metabolism, and induces endothelial cell surface changes. We studied the effects of human recombinant IL-1 beta (rIL-1 beta) or rIL-1 alpha on circulating granulocytes, their sequestration within the pulmonary microvasculature, pulmonary edema formation, and changes in pulmonary vascular permeability to 125I-labeled albumin. rIL-1 beta administration induced significant (P less than 0.03) but transient granulocytopenia followed by significant (P less than 0.04) neutrophilia and significant (P less than 0.04) pulmonary leukostasis compared with saline-infused rabbits. Rabbits preinfused with 125I-labeled rabbit serum albumin and administered saline, rIL-1 beta, or rIL-1 alpha were sacrificed, and lung wet/dry weight ratios and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and plasma 125I activities determined. Both rIL-1 beta and rIL-1 alpha increased lung wet/dry weight ratios (P less than 0.025 and P less than 0.01, respectively) compared with saline controls. rIL-1 beta increased bronchoalveolar lavage fluid/plasma 125I radioactivity ratios (P less than 0.025). Electron microscopic analysis of lung sections obtained from rIL-1 beta-infused animals demonstrated endothelial injury, perivascular edema, and extravasation of an ultrastructural permeability tracer. The observation that human rIL-1 can evoke acute pulmonary vascular endothelial injury and lung edema in rabbits supports the hypothesis that IL-1 may play a role in the pathogenesis of the adult respiratory distress syndrome. Images PMID:3261716

  9. Human Umbilical Cord Blood–Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Cultured Rabbit Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, D. Greg; Markova, Dessislava; An, Howard S.; Chee, Ana; Enomoto-Iwamoto, Motomi; Markov, Vladimir; Saitta, Biagio; Shi, Peng; Gupta, Chander; Zhang, Yejia

    2014-01-01

    Objective Back pain associated with symptomatic disc degeneration is a common clinical condition. Intervertebral disc (IVD) cell apoptosis and senescence increase with aging and degeneration. Repopulating the IVD with cells that could produce and maintain extracellular matrix would be an alternative therapy to surgery. The objective of this study was to determine the potential of human umbilical cord blood–derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs) as a novel cell source for disc repair. In this study, we intended to confirm the potential for hUCB-MSCs to differentiate and display a chondrocyte-like phenotype after culturing in micromass and after injection into the rabbit IVD explant culture. We also wanted to confirm hUCB-MSC survival after transplantation into the IVD explant culture. Design This study consisted of micromass cultures and in vitro rabbit IVD explant cultures to assess hUCB-MSC survival and differentiation to display chondrocyte-like phenotype. First, hUCB-MSCs were cultured in micromass and stained with Alcian blue dye. Second, to confirm cell survival, hUCB-MSCs were labeled with an infrared dye and a fluorescent dye before injection into whole rabbit IVD explants (host). IVD explants were then cultured for 4 wks. Cell survival was confirmed by two independent techniques: an imaging system detecting the infrared dye at the organ level and fluorescence microscopy detecting fluorescent dye at the cellular level. Cell viability was assessed by staining the explant with CellTracker green, a membrane-permeant tracer specific for live cells. Human type II collagen gene expression (from the graft) was assessed by polymerase chain reaction. Results We have shown that hUCB-MSCs cultured in micromass are stained blue with Alcian blue dye, which suggests that proteoglycan-rich extracellular matrix is produced. In the cultured rabbit IVD explants, hUCB-MSCs survived for at least 4 wks and expressed the human type II collagen gene, suggesting that the

  10. Generation of Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies from Immunised Mice and Rabbits via Flow Cytometry and Sorting of Antigen-Specific IgG+ Memory B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Starkie, Dale. O; Compson, Joanne E.; Rapecki, Stephen; Lightwood, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Single B cell screening strategies, which avoid both hybridoma fusion and combinatorial display, have emerged as important technologies for efficiently sampling the natural antibody repertoire of immunized animals and humans. Having access to a range of methods to interrogate different B cell subsets provides an attractive option to ensure large and diverse panels of high quality antibody are produced. The generation of multiple antibodies and having the ability to find rare B cell clones producing IgG with unique and desirable characteristics facilitates the identification of fit-for-purpose molecules that can be developed into therapeutic agents or research reagents. Here, we describe a multi-parameter flow cytometry single-cell sorting technique for the generation of antigen-specific recombinant monoclonal antibodies from single IgG+ memory B cells. Both mouse splenocytes and rabbit PBMC from immunised animals were used as a source of B cells. Reagents staining both B cells and other unwanted cell types enabled efficient identification of class-switched IgG+ memory B cells. Concurrent staining with antigen labelled separately with two spectrally-distinct fluorophores enabled antigen-specific B cells to be identified, i.e. those which bind to both antigen conjugates (double-positive). These cells were then typically sorted at one cell per well using FACS directly into a 96-well plate containing reverse transcriptase reaction mix. Following production of cDNA, PCR was performed to amplify cognate heavy and light chain variable region genes and generate transcriptionally-active PCR (TAP) fragments. These linear expression cassettes were then used directly in a mammalian cell transfection to generate recombinant antibody for further testing. We were able to successfully generate antigen-specific recombinant antibodies from both the rabbit and mouse IgG+ memory B cell subset within one week. This included the generation of an anti-TNFR2 blocking antibody from mice

  11. Determination of neomycin and bacitracin in human or rabbit serum by HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Mascher, Daniel G; Unger, Christian P; Mascher, Hermann J

    2007-01-17

    The method for the simultaneous determination of neomycin and bacitracin in human or rabbit serum was developed by using ion pairing reversed phase chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) detection with electrospray (ESI) in positive mode. Both substances elute under these conditions at the same time and also kanamycin as internal standard elutes almost at the same time. The sample preparation was simple-only using 0.1 mL serum by protein precipitation with acetonitrile. Neomycin and bacitracin were detected as two-fold charged ions as well as the internal standard. The calibration range of these quite difficult detectable substances was 0.2-50 microg/mL of serum. The method was validated for both human or rabbit serum. The inter batch precision of quality control samples in human serum for neomycin ranged from 4.46% to 8.99% and for bacitracin from 6.85% to 11.17%. The inter batch accuracy for neomycin ranged from 98.7% to 100.7% and for bacitracin from 99.2% to 103.0%. At lower limit of quantitation (LLOQ) level of 0.2 microg/mL inter batch precision in human serum for neomycin was 12.05% and for bacitracin 11.91%, whereas accuracies were 99.9% for neomycin and 102.7% for bacitracin. Bench top stability in human or rabbit serum was given over three freeze thaw cycles and 4h at room temperature. The method can be considered to be specific and recoveries for sample preparation were high.

  12. Disruption of mitochondrial activities in rabbit and human hepatocytes by a quinoxalinone anxiolytic and its carboxylic acid metabolite.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, R G; Bacon, J A; Cramer, C T; Petrella, D K; Sun, E L; Meglasson, M D; Holmuhamedov, E

    1998-11-01

    The quinoxalinone anxiolytic, panadiplon, was dropped from clinical development due to unexpected hepatic toxicity in human volunteers. Subsequent experimental studies in rabbits demonstrated a hepatic toxicity that resembled Reye's syndrome. In the present studies, we examined the effects of panadiplon and a metabolite, cyclopropane carboxylic acid (CPCA) on hepatic mitochondrial activities in vitro and ex vivo. Acute inhibition of beta-oidation of [14C]palmitate was observed in rabbit and human hepatocyte suspensions incubated with 100 microM panadiplon. Panadiplon (30 microM) also reduced mitochondrial uptake of rhodamine 123 (R123) in cultured rabbit and human, but not rat hepatocytes, following 18 h exposure. CPCA also impaired beta-oxidation and R123 uptake in rabbit and human hepatocytes. R123 uptake and beta-oxidation in cells from some donors was not impaired by either agent, and cell death was not observed in any experiment. Hepatocytes isolated from panadiplon-treated rabbits had reduced palmitate beta-oxidation rates and inhibited mitochondrial R123 uptake; R123 uptake remained inhibited until 48-72 h in culture. Rabbit mitochondrial respiration experiments revealed a slightly lower ratio of ATP formed/oxygen consumed in panadiplon-treated animals: direct exposure of normal rabbit liver mitochondria to panadiplon did not have this effect. Hepatocytes isolated from panadiplon-treated rabbits showed reduced respiratory control ratios and lower oxygen consumption compared to controls. Our results indicate that panadiplon induces a mitochondrial dysfunction in the liver, and suggest that this dysfunction may be attributed to the carboxylic acid metabolite.

  13. Methanol exposure does not produce oxidatively damaged DNA in lung, liver or kidney of adult mice, rabbits or primates

    SciTech Connect

    McCallum, Gordon P.; Siu, Michelle; Sweeting, J. Nicole; Wells, Peter G.

    2011-01-15

    In vitro and in vivo genotoxicity tests indicate methanol (MeOH) is not mutagenic, but carcinogenic potential has been claimed in one controversial long-term rodent cancer bioassay that has not been replicated. To determine whether MeOH could indirectly damage DNA via reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated mechanisms, we treated male CD-1 mice, New Zealand white rabbits and cynomolgus monkeys with MeOH (2.0 g/kg ip) and 6 h later assessed oxidative damage to DNA, measured as 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) by HPLC with electrochemical detection. We found no MeOH-dependent increases in 8-oxodG in lung, liver or kidney of any species. Chronic treatment of CD-1 mice with MeOH (2.0 g/kg ip) daily for 15 days also did not increase 8-oxodG levels in these organs. These results were corroborated in DNA repair-deficient oxoguanine glycosylase 1 (Ogg1) knockout (KO) mice, which accumulated 8-oxodG in lung, kidney and liver with age, but exhibited no increase following MeOH, despite a 2-fold increase in renal 8-oxodG in Ogg1 KO mice following treatment with a ROS-initiating positive control, the renal carcinogen potassium bromate (KBrO{sub 3}; 100 mg/kg ip). These observations suggest that MeOH exposure does not promote the accumulation of oxidatively damaged DNA in lung, kidney or liver, and that environmental exposure to MeOH is unlikely to initiate carcinogenesis in these organs by DNA oxidation.

  14. Augmentation of endotoxin fever by recombinant human beta interferon in rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, H; Moriyama, M; Tanaka, A

    1987-01-01

    Nonpyrogenic amounts of endotoxin (0.1 to 1 ng/kg), hardly detectable by conventional Limulus amoebocyte lysate tests, could produce a fever of around 1 degree C when injected with a nonpyrogenic dose (6 X 10(5) U/kg) of recombinant human beta interferon (IFN-beta) in rabbits. Release of endogenous IFN and tumor necrosis factor by endotoxin was also dramatically increased by recombinant human IFN-beta, and their levels in the blood were closely correlated with the increase of body temperature. These data suggest, if the synergism between IFN and endotoxin also operates in the homologous system (human IFN-human cells), that contaminating endotoxin in IFNs, even if not detectable by Limulus amoebocyte lysate test, can contribute to IFN fever to a considerable extent in humans. PMID:2437032

  15. Interspecies differences in the metabolism of methotrexate: An insight into the active site differences between human and rabbit aldehyde oxidase.

    PubMed

    Choughule, Kanika V; Joswig-Jones, Carolyn A; Jones, Jeffrey P

    2015-08-01

    Several drug compounds have failed in clinical trials due to extensive biotransformation by aldehyde oxidase (AOX) (EC 1.2.3.1). One of the main reasons is the difficulty in scaling clearance for drugs metabolised by AOX, from preclinical species to human. Using methotrexate as a probe substrate, we evaluated AOX metabolism in liver cytosol from human and commonly used laboratory species namely guinea pig, monkey, rat and rabbit. We found that the metabolism of methotrexate in rabbit liver cytosol was several orders of magnitude higher than any of the other species tested. The results of protein quantitation revealed that the amount of AOX1 in human liver was similar to rabbit liver. To understand if the observed differences in activity were due to structural differences, we modelled rabbit AOX1 using the previously generated human AOX1 homology model. Molecular docking of methotrexate into the active site of the enzyme led to the identification of important residues that could potentially be involved in substrate binding and account for the observed differences. In order to study the impact of these residue changes on enzyme activity, we used site directed mutagenesis to construct mutant AOX1 cDNAs by substituting nucleotides of human AOX1 with relevant ones of rabbit AOX1. AOX1 mutant proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli. Differences in the kinetic properties of these mutants have been presented in this study.

  16. Creation of “Humanized” Mice to Study Human Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Todd; Greiner, Dale L.; Shultz, Leonard D.

    2010-01-01

    “Humanized” mice are a promising translational model for studying human hematopoiesis and immunity. Their utility has been enhanced by the development of new stocks of immunodeficient hosts, most notably mouse strains such as NOD-scid IL2rγ null mice that lack the IL-2 receptor common gamma chain. These stocks of mice lack adaptive immune function, display multiple defects in innate immunity, and support heightened levels of human hematolymphoid engraftment. Humanized mice can support studies in many areas of immunology, including autoimmunity, transplantation, infectious diseases, and cancer. These models are particularly valuable in experimentation where there is no appropriate small animal model of the human disease, as in the case of certain viral infections. This unit details the creation of humanized mice by engraftment of immunodeficient mice with hematopoietic stem cells or peripheral blood mononuclear cells, provides methods for evaluating engraftment, and discusses considerations for choosing the appropriate model system to meet specific goals. PMID:18491294

  17. Human Umbilical Cord Blood Cells Ameliorates Motor Deficits In Rabbits In a Cerebral Palsy Model

    PubMed Central

    Drobyshevsky, A.; Cotten, C. M.; Shi, Z.; Luo, K.; Jiang, R.; Derrick, M.; Tracy, E. T.; Gentry, T.; Goldberg, R. N.; Kurtzberg, J.; Tan, S.

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) has significant impact on both patients and society but therapy is limited. Human umbilical cord blood cells (HUCBC), containing various stem and progenitor cells, have been used to treat various brain genetic conditions. In small animal experiments, HUCBC have improved outcomes after hypoxic-ischemic injury. Clinical trials using HUCBC are underway testing feasibility, safety and efficacy for neonatal injury as well as CP. We tested HUCBC therapy in a validated rabbit model of CP after acute changes secondary to hypoxic-ischemic (H-I) injury had subsided. Following uterine ischemia at 70% gestation, we infused HUCBC to newborn rabbit kits with either mild or severe neurobehavioral changes. Infusion of high dose HUCBC, 5x106 cells, dramatically altered the natural history of the injury alleviating the abnormal phenotype including posture, righting reflex, locomotion, tone, and dystonia. Half the high dose showed lesser but still significant improvement. The swimming test however showed that joint function did not restore to naïve control function in either group. Tracing HUCBCs with either MRI biomarkers or PCR for human DNA found little penetration of HUCBC in the newborn brain in the immediate newborn period, suggesting that the beneficial effects were not due to cellular integration or direct proliferative effects but rather to paracrine signaling. This is the first study to show that HUCBC improve motor performance in a dose-dependent manner perhaps by improving compensatory repair processes. PMID:25791742

  18. Inhibition of mutalysin II, a metalloproteinase from bushmaster snake venom by human alpha2-macroglobulin and rabbit immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Souza, C T; Moura, M B; Magalhaes, A; Heneine, L G; Olortegui, C C; Diniz, C R; Sanchez, E F

    2001-09-01

    Mutalysin II is a 22.5-kDa zinc endopeptidase isolated from Lachesis muta muta snake venom. In order to determine whether the inhibitors human alpha2-macroglobulin (alpha2-M) and rabbit antibody to mutalysin II share a common mechanism, we have investigated the inhibition of mutalysin II by these two different glycoproteins. The proteolytic activity of mutalysin II with dimethylcasein as substrate was completely inhibited by human alpha2-M and by a purified rabbit antibody to mutalysin II. The protection of fibrin(ogen) digestion by alpha2-M was slightly better than the protection offered by the antibody. In addition, the purified antibody reacted only with the metalloproteinase in bushmaster venom, as demonstrated by immunodiffusion. SDS-PAGE analysis of reduced samples showed that the interaction of mutalysin II with alpha2-M resulted in the formation of high molecular complex ( approximately 180000) and M(r) 90000 fragments generated by the venom enzyme. Also, fragments at 85 and 23 kDa were detected under non-reducing conditions after incubation of rabbit immunoglobulin with enzyme. Proteolysis of dimethylcasein as substrate revealed that the stoichiometry of inhibition was 1.0 mol of human alpha2-M and 1.5 mol of rabbit IgG antimutalysin II per mole of enzyme. Furthermore, dimethylcasein hydrolysis indicated that several viperid snake venoms, including Bothrops atrox, B. alternatus and Trimeresurus flavoviridis cross-reacted with the specific rabbit antibody to varying degrees. PMID:11544086

  19. Complete Genome Analysis of a Rabbit Rotavirus Causing Gastroenteritis in a Human Infant

    PubMed Central

    Bonica, Melisa Berenice; Zeller, Mark; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle; Heylen, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVA) are responsible for causing infantile diarrhea both in humans and animals. The molecular characteristics of lapine RVA strains are only studied to a limited extent and so far G3P[14] and G3P[22] were found to be the most common G/P-genotypes. During the 2012-2013 rotavirus season in Belgium, a G3P[14] RVA strain was isolated from stool collected from a two-year-old boy. We investigated whether RVA/Human-wt/BEL/BE5028/2012/G3P[14] is completely of lapine origin or the result of reassortment event(s). Phylogenetic analyses of all gene segments revealed the following genotype constellation: G3-P[14]-I2-R2-C2-M3-A9-N2-T6-E5-H3 and indicated that BE5028 probably represents a rabbit to human interspecies transmission able to cause disease in a human child. Interestingly, BE5028 showed a close evolutionary relationship to RVA/Human-wt/BEL/B4106/2000/G3P[14], another lapine-like strain isolated in a Belgian child in 2000. The phylogenetic analysis of the NSP3 segment suggests the introduction of a bovine(-like) NSP3 into the lapine RVA population in the past 12 years. Sequence analysis of NSP5 revealed a head-to-tail partial duplication, combined with two short insertions and a deletion, indicative of the continuous circulation of this RVA lineage within the rabbit population. PMID:25690801

  20. Pulmonary effects of inhaled zinc oxide in human subjects, guinea pigs, rats, and rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, T.; Chen, L.C.; Fine, J.M.; Schlesinger, R.B.; Su, W.Y.; Kimmel, T.A.; Amdur, M.O. )

    1992-08-01

    Occupational exposure to freshly formed zinc oxide (ZnO) particles (less than 1.0 micron aerodynamic diameter) produces a well-characterized response known as metal fume fever. An 8-hr threshold limit value (TLV) of 5 mg/m3 has been established to prevent adverse health effects because of exposure to ZnO fumes. Because animal toxicity studies have demonstrated pulmonary effects near the current TLV, the present study examined the time course and dose-response of the pulmonary injury produced by inhaled ZnO in guinea pigs, rats, rabbits, and human volunteers. The test animals were exposed to 0, 2.5, or 5.0 mg/m3 ZnO for up to 3 hr and their lungs lavaged. Both the lavage fluid and recovered cells were examined for evidence of inflammation or altered cell function. The lavage fluid from guinea pigs and rats exposed to 5 mg/m3 had significant increases in total cells, lactate dehydrogenase, beta-glucuronidase, and protein content. These changes were greatest 24 hr after exposure. Guinea pig alveolar macrophage function was depressed as evidenced by in vitro phagocytosis of opsonized latex beads. Significant changes in lavage fluid parameters were also observed in guinea pigs and rats exposed to 2.5 mg/m3 ZnO. In contrast, rabbits showed no increase in biochemical or cellular parameters following a 2-hr exposure to 5 mg/m3 ZnO. Differences in total lung burden of ZnO, as determined in additional animals by atomic absorption spectroscopy, appeared to account for the observed differences in species responses. Although the lungs of guinea pigs and rats retained approximately 20% and 12% of the inhaled dose, respectively, rabbits retained only 5%.

  1. Modeling HIV-1 Mucosal Transmission and Prevention in Humanized Mice.

    PubMed

    Veselinovic, Milena; Charlins, Paige; Akkina, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    The new generation humanized mice (hu-mice) that permit continuous de novo generation of human hematopoietic cells have led to novel strategies in studying HIV-1 pathogenesis, prevention and therapies. HIV-1 infection of hu-mice results in chronic viremia and CD4+ T cell loss, thus mimicking key aspects of the disease progression. In addition, the new generation hu-mice are permissive for HIV-1 sexual transmission by vaginal and rectal routes thus allowing in vivo efficacy testing of new anti-HIV-1 drugs for prevention. Two leading models are currently being used, namely the hu-HSC mice and the BLT mice. Here we describe the methodology for generating both hu-HSC and BLT mice and their use in the study of HIV-1 transmission and prevention of infection by topical and oral administration of anti-retroviral drugs. Practical aspects of the methodologies are emphasized.

  2. Biodistribution of a positron-emitting suicide inactivator of monoamine oxidase, carbon-11 pargyline, in mice and a rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiwata, K.; Ido, T.; Yanai, K.; Kawashima, K.; Miura, Y.; Monma, M.; Watanuki, S.; Takahashi, T.; Iwata, R.

    1985-06-01

    Carbon-11 (/sup 11/C) pargyline, which is a suicide inactivator of Type B monoamine oxidase (MAO), was synthesized by the reaction of N-demethylpargyline with /sup 11/CH/sub 3/l. Biodistribution was investigated in mice, and positron tomographic images of the heart and lung in a rabbit were obtained. The distribution of /sup 11/C after administration of (/sup 11/C)pargyline was measured in several organs and blood at various time intervals. After 30 min its concentrations in the organs were constant. Subcellular distribution studies in the brain, lung, liver, and kidney showed that 59-70% of the /sup 11/C became acid-insoluble and 9-33% was present in the crude mitochondrial fraction at 60 min after injection. The uptakes of the /sup 11/C in each organ except for the kidney and spleen seemed to correlate with the in vitro enzymatic activity of Type B MAO. At high loading dose a nonspecific uptake was observed.

  3. Rabbit M1 and M2 macrophages can be induced by human recombinant GM-CSF and M-CSF.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Kazuyoshi; Leung, Kai-Poon

    2016-09-01

    Macrophages can change their phenotype in response to environmental cues. Polarized macrophages are broadly classified into two groups: classical activated M1 and alternative activated M2. Characterization of human macrophages has been widely studied, but polarized macrophages in rabbits have not been characterized. We characterized rabbit macrophages that were polarized using human recombinant GM-CSF and M-CSF. GM-CSF-treated macrophages had higher mRNA expression of proinflammatory cytokines (M1 phenotype) than did the M-CSF-treated counterpart. By contrast, high levels of TGF-β and IL-10 expression (M2 phenotype) were found in M-CSF-treated macrophages. The present study may be useful to understand roles of polarized macrophages in rabbit disease models. PMID:27642558

  4. Mice with megabase humanization of their immunoglobulin genes generate antibodies as efficiently as normal mice.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Andrew J; Macdonald, Lynn E; Stevens, Sean; Karow, Margaret; Dore, Anthony T; Pobursky, Kevin; Huang, Tammy T; Poueymirou, William T; Esau, Lakeisha; Meola, Melissa; Mikulka, Warren; Krueger, Pamela; Fairhurst, Jeanette; Valenzuela, David M; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Yancopoulos, George D

    2014-04-01

    Mice genetically engineered to be humanized for their Ig genes allow for human antibody responses within a mouse background (HumAb mice), providing a valuable platform for the generation of fully human therapeutic antibodies. Unfortunately, existing HumAb mice do not have fully functional immune systems, perhaps because of the manner in which their genetic humanization was carried out. Heretofore, HumAb mice have been generated by disrupting the endogenous mouse Ig genes and simultaneously introducing human Ig transgenes at a different and random location; KO-plus-transgenic humanization. As we describe in the companion paper, we attempted to make mice that more efficiently use human variable region segments in their humoral responses by precisely replacing 6 Mb of mouse Ig heavy and kappa light variable region germ-line gene segments with their human counterparts while leaving the mouse constant regions intact, using a unique in situ humanization approach. We reasoned the introduced human variable region gene segments would function indistinguishably in their new genetic location, whereas the retained mouse constant regions would allow for optimal interactions and selection of the resulting antibodies within the mouse environment. We show that these mice, termed VelocImmune mice because they were generated using VelociGene technology, efficiently produce human:mouse hybrid antibodies (that are rapidly convertible to fully human antibodies) and have fully functional humoral immune systems indistinguishable from those of WT mice. The efficiency of the VelocImmune approach is confirmed by the rapid progression of 10 different fully human antibodies into human clinical trials.

  5. Pharmacokinetics of human activated protein C. 1st communication: plasma concentration and excretion of a lyophilized purified human activated protein C after intravenous administration in the mouse and the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Ishii, S; Mochizuki, T; Nagao, T; Sugiki, S; Kudo, S; Harakawa, N; Taniguchi, K; Igarashi, Y; Kondo, S; Kiyoki, M

    1995-05-01

    Pharmacokinetic studies of human activated protein C (CAS 42617-41-4, APC) were investigated in mice and rabbits with 125I-labeled compound. Plasma levels of APC were determined by three different assays: total radioactivity, APC antigenicity determined by sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the amidolytic activity which was performed by immunologically captured APC. APC concentration obtained from these assays were shown to be correlated well at early times post-dose. After intravenous administration, total radioactivity in the plasma declined tri-exponentially, but antigenicity and amidolytic activity in the plasma declined biexponentially. Plasma AUC increased proportionally with the dose, and the total body clearance and t1/2 did not change significantly. In addition, no significant difference was observed between the pharmacokinetics in male and female mice. In rabbit study, the profiles of times vs APC concentration in the plasma was similar to those in mice after single bolus injection. The plasma concentrations of APC during and after infusion in rabbits were also determined. APC concentration increased during infusion and reached almost steady state at the end of infusion. The profiles of the APC concentration in benzamidine citrate plasma corresponded to the simulated curves which were characterized by the parameters obtained from the single bolus experiment. Plasma disposition profiles of the protein were studied with high performance gel chromatography method. The radioactivity in the unchanged APC was observed at 15 min after administration. At 1 h, most of the radioactivity was observed in larger molecule fraction than the intact APC. These results corresponded to the decrease of amidolytic activity in the plasma.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7612068

  6. Characterization of recombinant human C1 inhibitor secreted in milk of transgenic rabbits.

    PubMed

    van Veen, Harrie A; Koiter, Jaco; Vogelezang, Carla J M; van Wessel, Noucha; van Dam, Tijtje; Velterop, Ingeborg; van Houdt, Kristina; Kupers, Luc; Horbach, Danielle; Salaheddine, Mourad; Nuijens, Jan H; Mannesse, Maurice L M

    2012-12-31

    C1 inhibitor (C1INH) is a single-chain glycoprotein that inhibits activation of the contact system of coagulation and the complement system. C1INH isolated from human blood plasma (pd-hC1INH) is used for the management of hereditary angioedema (HAE), a disease caused by heterozygous deficiency of C1INH, and is a promise for treatment of ischemia-reperfusion injuries like acute myocardial or cerebral infarction. To obtain large quantities of C1INH, recombinant human C1INH (rhC1INH) was expressed in the milk of transgenic rabbits (12 g/l) harboring genomic human C1INH sequences fused to 5' bovine αS(1) casein promoter sequences. Recombinant hC1INH was isolated from milk to a specific activity of 6.1 U/mg and a purity of 99%; by size-exclusion chromatography the 1% impurities consisted of multimers and N-terminal cleaved C1INH species. Mass spectrometric analysis of purified rhC1INH revealed a relative molecular mass (M(r)) of 67,200. Differences in M(r) on SDS PAGE and mass spectrometric analysis between rhC1INH and pd-hC1INH are explained by differential glycosylation (calculated carbohydrate contents of 21% and 28%, respectively), since protein sequencing analysis of rhC1INH revealed intact N- and C-termini. Host-related impurity analysis by ELISA revealed trace amounts of rabbit protein (approximately 10 ppm) in purified batches, but not endogenous rabbit C1INH. The kinetics of inhibition of the target proteases C1s, Factor XIIa, kallikrein and Factor XIa by rhC1INH and pd-hC1INH, indicated comparable inhibitory potency and specificity. Recently, rhC1INH (Ruconest(®)) has been approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of acute attacks of HAE. PMID:22995741

  7. The effect of local injection of the human growth hormone on the mandibular condyle growth in rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Feizbakhsh, Masood; Razavi, Mohammad; Minaian, Mohsen; Teimoori, Fatemeh; Dadgar, Sepideh; Maghsoodi, Shahlaa

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of local injection of human growth hormone (GH) in stimulating cartilage and bone formation in a rabbit model of temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Materials and Methods: In an experimental animal study, 16 male Albino New Zealand white rabbits aged 12 weeks were divided into two groups: In the first group (7 rabbits) 2 mg/kg/1 ml human GH and in the control group (9 rabbits) 1 ml normal saline was administered locally in both mandibular condyles. Injections were employed under sedation and by single experienced person. Injections were made for 6 times with 3 injections a week in the all test and control samples. Rabbits were sacrified at the 20th day from the beginning of study and TMJs were histologically examined. ANOVA (two-sided) with Dunnett post hoc test was used to compare data of bone and cartridge thickness while chi-square test was used to analyze hyperplasia and disk deformity data. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: Cartilage layer thickness was greater in the GH-treated (0.413 ± 0.132) than the control group (0.287 ± 0.098) (P value = 0.02). Although bone thickness and condylar cartilage hyperplasia were greater in the GH-treated group, these differences were not statistically significant (P value = 0.189 and 0.083, respectively). There was no statistically significant difference between two groups regarding the disc deformity (P value = 0.46). Conclusion: Local injection of human GH in the TMJ is able to accelerate growth activity of condylar cartilage in rabbit. PMID:25225555

  8. Biochemical characteristics of human renin expressed in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Takaori, K; Kim, S; Fukamizu, A; Sagara, M; Hosoi, M; Katsuki, M; Murakami, K; Yamamoto, K

    1993-01-01

    1. Biochemical properties of human renin expressed in transgenic mice (hRN8-12 mice) carrying the human renin gene (Fukamizu et al. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 1989; 165: 826-32) were examined. The optimum pH of the enzymic activity against human angiotensinogen was 5.5 for both plasma and renal human renin in the hRN8-12 mice. Plasma concentrations of human active and inactive renin in the plasma of hRN8-12 mice were 16.7 +/- 2.8 and 79.9 +/- 14.0 pmol of angiotensin Ih-1 ml-1, respectively, thereby indicating that the predominant form of plasma human renin is the inactive form, as is the case in humans. 2. The molecular masses of plasma human active and inactive renin and renal human active renin in the hRN8-12 mice were estimated to be 46 kDa, 48 kDa and 44 kDa, respectively, as determined by h.p.l.c. on G3,000SW. 3. Human renin in the hRN8-12 mouse kidney was bound to a concanavalin A-Sepharose column, and was eluted with alpha-methyl-D-mannoside, showing that this renin is glycosylated, as is native human renin. 4. Low sodium treatment of the hRN8-12 mice for 2 weeks increased plasma human active renin, renal human renin and renal human renin mRNA levels by 2.6-, 3.8- and 2.8-fold, respectively. Thus, the biosynthesis and secretion of renal human renin in these transgenic mice are obviously stimulated by sodium depletion.

  9. Human brain disease recreated in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, J.

    1990-12-14

    In the early 1980s, neurologist Stanley Prusiner suggested that scrapie, an apparently infectious degenerative brain disease of sheep, could be transmitted by prions, infectious particles made just of protein - and containing no nucleic acids. But prion research has come a long way since then. In 1985, the cloning of the gene encoding the prion protein proved that it does in fact exist. And the gene turned out to be widely expressed in the brains of higher organisms, a result suggesting that the prion protein has a normal brain function that can somehow be subverted, leading to brain degeneration. Then studies done during the past 2 years suggested that specific mutations in the prion gene might cause two similar human brain diseases, Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS) and Creutzfelt-Jakob disease. Now, Prusiner's group at the University of California, San Francisco, has used genetic engineering techniques to recreate GSS by transplanting the mutated prion gene into mice. Not only will the animal model help neurobiologists answer the many remaining questions about prions and how they work, but it may also shed some light on other neurodegenerative diseases as well.

  10. Enzyme therapy for pompe disease with recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from rabbit milk.

    PubMed

    Van den Hout, J M; Reuser, A J; de Klerk, J B; Arts, W F; Smeitink, J A; Van der Ploeg, A T

    2001-04-01

    Pompe disease is a metabolic myopathy caused by deficiency of lysosomal acid alpha-glucosidase. In this report we review the first 36 weeks of a clinical study on the safety and efficacy of enzyme therapy aimed at correcting the deficiency. Four patients with infantile Pompe disease were enrolled. They received recombinant human alpha-glucosidase from transgenic rabbit milk. The product is generally well tolerated and reaches the primary target tissues. Normalization of alpha-glucosidase activity in skeletal muscle was obtained and degradation of PAS-positive material was seen in tissue sections. The clinical condition of all patients improved. The effect on heart was most significant, with an impressive reduction of the left ventricular mass index (LVMI). Motor function improved. The positive preliminary results stimulate continuation and extension of efforts towards the realization of enzyme therapy for Pompe disease.

  11. Postmortem stability of cocaine and cocaethylene in blood and tissues of humans and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Moriya, F; Hashimoto, Y

    1996-07-01

    A study was conducted to examine the postmortem stability of cocaine and cocaethylene in rabbit blood and tissues, and to determine whether cocaethylene is produced in decomposed human specimens containing cocaine and endogenous ethanol. Heart blood, liver, brain and femoral muscle taken from rabbits 20 min after oral administration of 20 mg/kg cocaine together with 2 g/kg ethanol were kept at 20-25 degrees C for 5 days. Cocaine and cocaethylene concentrations were in the order brain > liver > muscle > blood, and showed very large intersubject variations at the time of death. Cocaine was degraded rapidly in the blood and liver. However, 12.0 +/- 8.5% and 26.2% +/- 19.4% of the original cocaine was still detectable in the brain and muscle, respectively. Cocaethylene was degraded more slowly than cocaine in all of the specimens. The pH of the blood remained around 7.4 during a 5-day period; all the other specimens showed pH values of 6.2-6.7 on and after the first day postmortem. When 10,000 ng/g cocaine was incubated with decomposed human blood, liver, brain and muscle homogenates containing 0.29-0.60 mg/g endogenous ethanol at 20-25 degrees C and 37 degrees C, no change in cocaine concentration was observed during the study period of 24 h, and no cocaethylene was detected. The pH values of the homogenates were within the range 4.2 to 5.2 at the beginning of the experiment. It was found that: 1) cocaethylene was more stable in postmortem specimens than cocaine; 2) muscle as well as brain was specimen of choice for detecting cocaine and cocaethylene postmortem; 3) cocaine was resistant to decomposition under acidic conditions; and 4) putrefactive bacteria had no ability to produce cocaethylene even in the presence of cocaine and endogenous ethanol.

  12. N-/O-glycosylation analysis of human FVIIa produced in the milk of transgenic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Chevreux, Guillaume; Faid, Valegh; Scohyers, Jean-Marc; Bihoreau, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    Human coagulation factor VIIa is a glycoprotein that promotes haemostasis through activation of the coagulation cascade extrinsic pathway. Most haemophilia A/B patients with inhibitors are treated by injection of plasma-derived or recombinant FVIIa. The use of recombinant products raises questions about the ability of the host cell to produce efficiently post-translationally modified proteins. Glycosylation is especially critical considering that it can modulate protein safety and efficacy. The present paper reports the N-/O-glycosylation pattern of a new recombinant human factor VIIa expressed in the mammary glands of transgenic rabbits. Glycosylation was investigated by chromatography and advanced mass spectrometry techniques for glycan identification and quantitation. Mass spectrometry (MS)/MS analyses were performed to confirm the glycan structures as well as the position and branching of specific monosaccharides or substituents. The two N-glycosylation sites were found to be fully occupied mostly by mono- and bi-sialylated biantennary complex-type structures, the major form being A(2)G(2)S(1). Some oligomannose/hybrid structures were retrieved in lower abundance, the major ones being GlcNAcα1,O-phosphorylated at the C6-position of a Man residue (Man-6-(GlcNAcα1,O-)phosphate motif) as commonly observed on lysosomal proteins. No immunogenic glycotopes such as Galili (Galα1,3Gal) and HD antigens (N-glycolylneuraminic acid (NeuGc)) were detected. Concerning O-glycosylation, the product exhibited O-fucose and O-glucose-(xylose)(0, 1, 2) motifs as expected. The N-glycosylation consistency was also investigated by varying production parameters such as the period of lactation, the number of consecutive lactations and rabbit generations. Results show that the transgenesis technology is suitable for the long-term production of rhFVIIa with a reproducible glycosylation pattern.

  13. Culicidae (Diptera) selection of humans, chickens and rabbits in three different environments in the province of Chaco, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Marina; Zalazar, Laura; Willener, Juana Alicia; Almeida, Francisco Ludueña; Almirón, Walter Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the selection of humans, chickens and rabbits by Culicidae in three different environments in the province of Chaco, Argentina. Mosquitoes were collected fortnightly using cylindrical metal traps containing animal bait (chickens and rabbits). The mosquitoes were collected between June 2001-May 2002. During the same period and with the same frequency, mosquitoes biting the human operators of the traps were collected during the first 15 min of exposure within different time intervals: from 09:00 am-11:00 am, 01:00 pm-03:00 pm, 05:00 pm-07:00 pm and 09:00 pm-10:00 pm. A total of 19,430 mosquitoes of 49 species belonging to 10 genera were collected. Culex species mainly selected chicken bait and Wyeomyia species selected rabbit bait. Ochlerotatus and Psorophora species were more abundant in rabbit-baited traps. Anopheles triannulatus, Coquillettidia nigricans, Ochlerotatus scapularis, Mansonia titillans and Psorophora albigenu showed a strong attraction for human bait. The Anopheles, Coquillettidia, Culex and Mansonia species were more active between 05:00 pm-09:00 pm, while Ochlerotatus, Psorophora, Haemagogus and Wyeomyia were most active from 09:00 am-07:00 pm. This study provides additional information about the biology and ecology of arbovirus vectors in Chaco. PMID:23903970

  14. Culicidae (Diptera) selection of humans, chickens and rabbits in three different environments in the province of Chaco, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Stein, Marina; Zalazar, Laura; Willener, Juana Alicia; Almeida, Francisco Ludueña; Almirón, Walter Ricardo

    2013-08-01

    Studies were conducted to determine the selection of humans, chickens and rabbits by Culicidae in three different environments in the province of Chaco, Argentina. Mosquitoes were collected fortnightly using cylindrical metal traps containing animal bait (chickens and rabbits). The mosquitoes were collected between June 2001-May 2002. During the same period and with the same frequency, mosquitoes biting the human operators of the traps were collected during the first 15 min of exposure within different time intervals: from 09:00 am-11:00 am, 01:00 pm-03:00 pm, 05:00 pm-07:00 pm and 09:00 pm-10:00 pm. A total of 19,430 mosquitoes of 49 species belonging to 10 genera were collected. Culex species mainly selected chicken bait and Wyeomyia species selected rabbit bait. Ochlerotatus and Psorophora species were more abundant in rabbit-baited traps. Anopheles triannulatus, Coquillettidia nigricans, Ochlerotatus scapularis, Mansonia titillans and Psorophora albigenu showed a strong attraction for human bait. The Anopheles, Coquillettidia, Culex and Mansonia species were more active between 05:00 pm-09:00 pm, while Ochlerotatus, Psorophora, Haemagogus and Wyeomyia were most active from 09:00 am-07:00 pm. This study provides additional information about the biology and ecology of arbovirus vectors in Chaco.

  15. Ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME) and propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PGME): inhalation fertility and teratogenicity studies in rats, mice and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hanley, T R; Young, J T; John, J A; Rao, K S

    1984-08-01

    A combined dominant lethal-fertility study was conducted in which male and female Sprague-Dawley (CD) rats were exposed to 0, 30, 100 or 300 ppm of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME) vapor for 6 hr/day, 5 days/week for 13 weeks and then mated to untreated counterparts. Among males, fertility was completely suppressed after exposure to 300 ppm. A partial restoration of reproductive function was evident following 13 weeks of recovery. No treatment-related reproductive effects were observed among males exposed subchronically to 100 ppm, or among females exposed to 300 ppm or below of EGME. Studies to assess the effects of inhaled EGME on embryonal and fetal development were also conducted in Fischer 344 rats, CF-1 mice, and New Zealand White rabbits. Rats and rabbits were exposed to concentrations of 0, 3, 10 or 50 ppm for 6 hr/day on days 6-15 or 6-18 of gestation, respectively. Exposure of rabbits to 50 ppm resulted in significant teratologic effects, an increased resorption rate, and decreased fetal body weight. Slight fetotoxicity in the form of skeletal variations were observed among rats exposed to 50 ppm. Exposure of pregnant mice to 0, 10, or 50 ppm for 6 hr/day on days 6-15 of gestation resulted in slight fetotoxicity at 50 ppm. No significant treatment-related effects were observed at 10 ppm of EGME or below in any of the species tested. Separate groups of pregnant rats and rabbits were exposed to 0, 500, 1500 or 3000 ppm of propylene glycol monomethyl ether (PGME) during organogenesis.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Traumatic spinal cord injury in mice with human immune systems

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Randall S.; Kigerl, Kristina A.; Marbourg, Jessica M.; Gaudet, Andrew D.; Huey, Devra; Niewiesk, Stefan; Popovich, Phillip G.

    2015-01-01

    Mouse models have provided key insight into the cellular and molecular control of human immune system function. However, recent data indicate that extrapolating the functional capabilities of the murine immune system into humans can be misleading. Since immune cells significantly affect neuron survival and axon growth and also are required to defend the body against infection, it is important to determine the pathophysiological significance of spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced changes in human immune system function. Research projects using monkeys or humans would be ideal; however, logistical and ethical barriers preclude detailed mechanistic studies in either species. Humanized mice, i.e., immunocompromised mice reconstituted with human immune cells, can help overcome these barriers and can be applied in various experimental conditions that are of interest to the SCI community. Specifically, newborn NOD-SCID-IL2rgnull (NSG) mice engrafted with human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells develop normally without neurological impairment. In this report, new data show that when mice with human immune systems receive a clinically-relevant spinal contusion injury, spontaneous functional recovery is indistinguishable from that achieved after SCI using conventional inbred mouse strains. Moreover, using routine immunohistochemical and flow cytometry techniques, one can easily phenotype circulating human immune cells and document the composition and distribution of these cells in the injured spinal cord. Lesion pathology in humanized mice is typical of mouse contusion injuries, producing a centralized lesion epicenter that becomes occupied by phagocytic macrophages and lymphocytes and enclosed by a dense astrocytic scar. Specific human immune cell types, including three distinct subsets of human monocytes, were readily detected in blood, spleen and liver. Future studies that aim to understand the functional consequences of manipulating the neuro-immune axis after SCI should

  17. Traumatic spinal cord injury in mice with human immune systems.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Randall S; Kigerl, Kristina A; Marbourg, Jessica M; Gaudet, Andrew D; Huey, Devra; Niewiesk, Stefan; Popovich, Phillip G

    2015-09-01

    Mouse models have provided key insight into the cellular and molecular control of human immune system function. However, recent data indicate that extrapolating the functional capabilities of the murine immune system into humans can be misleading. Since immune cells significantly affect neuron survival and axon growth and also are required to defend the body against infection, it is important to determine the pathophysiological significance of spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced changes in human immune system function. Research projects using monkeys or humans would be ideal; however, logistical and ethical barriers preclude detailed mechanistic studies in either species. Humanized mice, i.e., immunocompromised mice reconstituted with human immune cells, can help overcome these barriers and can be applied in various experimental conditions that are of interest to the SCI community. Specifically, newborn NOD-SCID-IL2rg(null) (NSG) mice engrafted with human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells develop normally without neurological impairment. In this report, new data show that when mice with human immune systems receive a clinically-relevant spinal contusion injury, spontaneous functional recovery is indistinguishable from that achieved after SCI using conventional inbred mouse strains. Moreover, using routine immunohistochemical and flow cytometry techniques, one can easily phenotype circulating human immune cells and document the composition and distribution of these cells in the injured spinal cord. Lesion pathology in humanized mice is typical of mouse contusion injuries, producing a centralized lesion epicenter that becomes occupied by phagocytic macrophages and lymphocytes and enclosed by a dense astrocytic scar. Specific human immune cell types, including three distinct subsets of human monocytes, were readily detected in the blood, spleen and liver. Future studies that aim to understand the functional consequences of manipulating the neuro-immune axis after SCI

  18. Traumatic spinal cord injury in mice with human immune systems.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Randall S; Kigerl, Kristina A; Marbourg, Jessica M; Gaudet, Andrew D; Huey, Devra; Niewiesk, Stefan; Popovich, Phillip G

    2015-09-01

    Mouse models have provided key insight into the cellular and molecular control of human immune system function. However, recent data indicate that extrapolating the functional capabilities of the murine immune system into humans can be misleading. Since immune cells significantly affect neuron survival and axon growth and also are required to defend the body against infection, it is important to determine the pathophysiological significance of spinal cord injury (SCI)-induced changes in human immune system function. Research projects using monkeys or humans would be ideal; however, logistical and ethical barriers preclude detailed mechanistic studies in either species. Humanized mice, i.e., immunocompromised mice reconstituted with human immune cells, can help overcome these barriers and can be applied in various experimental conditions that are of interest to the SCI community. Specifically, newborn NOD-SCID-IL2rg(null) (NSG) mice engrafted with human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells develop normally without neurological impairment. In this report, new data show that when mice with human immune systems receive a clinically-relevant spinal contusion injury, spontaneous functional recovery is indistinguishable from that achieved after SCI using conventional inbred mouse strains. Moreover, using routine immunohistochemical and flow cytometry techniques, one can easily phenotype circulating human immune cells and document the composition and distribution of these cells in the injured spinal cord. Lesion pathology in humanized mice is typical of mouse contusion injuries, producing a centralized lesion epicenter that becomes occupied by phagocytic macrophages and lymphocytes and enclosed by a dense astrocytic scar. Specific human immune cell types, including three distinct subsets of human monocytes, were readily detected in the blood, spleen and liver. Future studies that aim to understand the functional consequences of manipulating the neuro-immune axis after SCI

  19. Targeting arterial wall sulfated glycosaminoglycans in rabbit atherosclerosis with a mouse/human chimeric antibody.

    PubMed

    Soto, Yosdel; Mesa, Niurka; Alfonso, Yumisley; Pérez, Arlenis; Batlle, Fernando; Griñán, Tania; Pino, Adonis; Viera, Justo; Frómeta, Milagros; Brito, Victor; Olivera, Armando; Zayas, Francisco; Vázquez, Ana M

    2014-01-01

    The progression of atherosclerosis is favored by increasing amounts of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in the artery wall. We previously reported the reactivity of chP3R99 monoclonal antibody (mAb) with sulfated glycosaminoglycans and its association with the anti-atherogenic properties displayed. Now, we evaluated the accumulation of this mAb in atherosclerotic lesions and its potential use as a probe for specific in vivo detection of the disease. Atherosclerosis was induced in NZW rabbits (n = 14) by the administration of Lipofundin 20% using PBS-receiving animals as control (n = 8). Accumulation of chP3R99 mAb in atherosclerotic lesions was assessed either by immunofluorescence detection of human IgG in fresh-frozen sections of aorta, or by immunoscintigraphy followed by biodistribution of the radiotracer upon administration of (99m)Tc-chP3R99 mAb. Immunofluorescence studies revealed the presence of chP3R99 mAb in atherosclerotic lesions 24 h after intravenous administration, whereas planar images showed an evident accumulation of (99m)Tc-chP3R99 mAb in atherosclerotic rabbit carotids. Accordingly, (99m)Tc-chP3R99 mAb uptake by lesioned aortic arch and thoracic segment was increased 5.6-fold over controls and it was 3.9-folds higher in carotids, in agreement with immunoscintigrams. Moreover, the deposition of (99m)Tc-chP3R99 mAb in the artery wall was associated both with the presence and size of the lesions in the different portions of evaluated arteries and was greater than in non-targeted organs. In conclusion, chP3R99 mAb preferentially accumulates in arterial atherosclerotic lesions supporting the potential use of this anti-glycosaminoglycans antibody for diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerosis.

  20. Demineralized dentin matrix combined with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in rabbit calvarial defects

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the osteogenic effects of demineralized dentin matrix (DDM) combined with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) in rabbit calvarial defects with DDM and anorganic bovine bone (ABB) combined with rhBMP-2. Materials and Methods Four round defects with 8-mm diameters were created in each rabbit calvaria. Each defect was treated with one of the following: 1) DDM, 2) ABB/rhBMP-2, or 3) DDM/rhBMP-2. The rhBMP-2 was combined with DDM and ABB according to a stepwise dry and dip lyophilizing protocol. Histological and microcomputed tomography (µCT) analyses were performed to measure the amount of bone formation and bone volume after 2- and 8-week healing intervals. Results Upon histological observation at two weeks, the DDM and ABB/rhBMP-2 groups showed osteoconductive bone formation, while the DDM/rhBMP-2 group showed osteoconductive and osteoinductive bone formation. New bone formation was higher in DDM/rhBMP-2, DDM and ABB decreasing order. The amounts of bone formation were very similar at two weeks; however, at eight weeks, the DDM/rhBMP-2 group showed a two-fold greater amount of bone formation compared to the DDM and ABB/rhBMP-2 groups. The µCT analysis showed markedly increased bone volume in the DDM/rhBMP-2 group at eight weeks compared with that of the DDM group. Notably, there was a slight decrease in bone volume in the ABB/rhBMP-2 group at eight weeks. There were no significant differences among the DDM, ABB/rhBMP-2, and DDM/rhBMP-2 groups at two or eight weeks. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, DDM appears to be a suitable carrier for rhBMP-2 in orthotopic sites. PMID:27162749

  1. Rabbit antithymocyte globulin–induced serum sickness disease and human kidney graft survival

    PubMed Central

    Couvrat-Desvergnes, Grégoire; Salama, Apolline; Le Berre, Ludmilla; Evanno, Gwénaëlle; Viklicky, Ondrej; Hruba, Petra; Vesely, Pavel; Guerif, Pierrick; Dejoie, Thomas; Rousse, Juliette; Nicot, Arnaud; Bach, Jean-Marie; Ang, Evelyn; Foucher, Yohann; Brouard, Sophie; Castagnet, Stéphanie; Giral, Magali; Harb, Jean; Perreault, Hélène; Charreau, Béatrice; Lorent, Marine; Soulillou, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Rabbit-generated antithymocyte globulins (ATGs), which target human T cells, are widely used as immunosuppressive agents during treatment of kidney allograft recipients. However, ATGs can induce immune complex diseases, including serum sickness disease (SSD). Rabbit and human IgGs have various antigenic differences, including expression of the sialic acid Neu5Gc and α-1-3-Gal (Gal), which are not synthesized by human beings. Moreover, anti-Neu5Gc antibodies have been shown to preexist and be elicited by immunization in human subjects. This study aimed to assess the effect of SSD on long-term kidney allograft outcome and to compare the immunization status of grafted patients presenting with SSD following ATG induction treatment. METHODS. We analyzed data from a cohort of 889 first kidney graft recipients with ATG induction (86 with SSD [SSD+] and 803 without SSD [SSD–]) from the Données Informatisées et Validées en Transplantation data bank. Two subgroups of SSD+ and SSD– patients that had received ATG induction treatment were then assessed for total anti-ATG, anti-Neu5Gc, and anti-Gal antibodies using ELISA assays on sera before and after transplantation. RESULTS. SSD was significantly associated with long-term graft loss (>10 years, P = 0.02). Moreover, SSD+ patients exhibited significantly elevated titers of anti-ATG (P = 0.043) and anti-Neu5Gc (P = 0.007) IgGs in late post-graft samples compared with SSD– recipients. CONCLUSION. In conclusion, our data indicate that SSD is a major contributing factor of late graft loss following ATG induction and that anti-Neu5Gc antibodies increase over time in SSD+ patients. FUNDING. This study was funded by Société d’Accélération du Transfert de Technologies Ouest Valorisation, the European FP7 “Translink” research program, the French National Agency of Research, Labex Transplantex, the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and the Canadian Foundation for Innovation. PMID

  2. Intestinal microbiota modulates gluten-induced immunopathology in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Galipeau, Heather J; McCarville, Justin L; Huebener, Sina; Litwin, Owen; Meisel, Marlies; Jabri, Bana; Sanz, Yolanda; Murray, Joseph A; Jordana, Manel; Alaedini, Armin; Chirdo, Fernando G; Verdu, Elena F

    2015-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The recent increase in CD incidence suggests that additional environmental factors, such as intestinal microbiota alterations, are involved in its pathogenesis. However, there is no direct evidence of modulation of gluten-induced immunopathology by the microbiota. We investigated whether specific microbiota compositions influence immune responses to gluten in mice expressing the human DQ8 gene, which confers moderate CD genetic susceptibility. Germ-free mice, clean specific-pathogen-free (SPF) mice colonized with a microbiota devoid of opportunistic pathogens and Proteobacteria, and conventional SPF mice that harbor a complex microbiota that includes opportunistic pathogens were used. Clean SPF mice had attenuated responses to gluten compared to germ-free and conventional SPF mice. Germ-free mice developed increased intraepithelial lymphocytes, markers of intraepithelial lymphocyte cytotoxicity, gliadin-specific antibodies, and a proinflammatory gliadin-specific T-cell response. Antibiotic treatment, leading to Proteobacteria expansion, further enhanced gluten-induced immunopathology in conventional SPF mice. Protection against gluten-induced immunopathology in clean SPF mice was reversed after supplementation with a member of the Proteobacteria phylum, an enteroadherent Escherichia coli isolated from a CD patient. The intestinal microbiota can both positively and negatively modulate gluten-induced immunopathology in mice. In subjects with moderate genetic susceptibility, intestinal microbiota changes may be a factor that increases CD risk.

  3. Intestinal microbiota modulates gluten-induced immunopathology in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Galipeau, Heather J; McCarville, Justin L; Huebener, Sina; Litwin, Owen; Meisel, Marlies; Jabri, Bana; Sanz, Yolanda; Murray, Joseph A; Jordana, Manel; Alaedini, Armin; Chirdo, Fernando G; Verdu, Elena F

    2015-11-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy triggered by gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The recent increase in CD incidence suggests that additional environmental factors, such as intestinal microbiota alterations, are involved in its pathogenesis. However, there is no direct evidence of modulation of gluten-induced immunopathology by the microbiota. We investigated whether specific microbiota compositions influence immune responses to gluten in mice expressing the human DQ8 gene, which confers moderate CD genetic susceptibility. Germ-free mice, clean specific-pathogen-free (SPF) mice colonized with a microbiota devoid of opportunistic pathogens and Proteobacteria, and conventional SPF mice that harbor a complex microbiota that includes opportunistic pathogens were used. Clean SPF mice had attenuated responses to gluten compared to germ-free and conventional SPF mice. Germ-free mice developed increased intraepithelial lymphocytes, markers of intraepithelial lymphocyte cytotoxicity, gliadin-specific antibodies, and a proinflammatory gliadin-specific T-cell response. Antibiotic treatment, leading to Proteobacteria expansion, further enhanced gluten-induced immunopathology in conventional SPF mice. Protection against gluten-induced immunopathology in clean SPF mice was reversed after supplementation with a member of the Proteobacteria phylum, an enteroadherent Escherichia coli isolated from a CD patient. The intestinal microbiota can both positively and negatively modulate gluten-induced immunopathology in mice. In subjects with moderate genetic susceptibility, intestinal microbiota changes may be a factor that increases CD risk. PMID:26456581

  4. Doubly Branched Hexasaccharide Epitope on the Cell Wall Polysaccharide of Group A Streptococci Recognized by Human and Rabbit Antisera

    PubMed Central

    Michon, Francis; Moore, Samuel L.; Kim, John; Blake, Milan S.; Auzanneau, France-Isabelle; Johnston, Blair D.; Johnson, Margaret A.; Pinto, B. Mario

    2005-01-01

    A number of epitope specificities associated with the cell wall polysaccharide antigen of group A streptococci were identified in a polyclonal rabbit antiserum induced in rabbits by whole group A streptococci and in polyclonal convalescent human antisera from children that had recovered from streptococcal A infections. The identification was achieved by using a series of synthetic oligosaccharides, glycoconjugates, and bacterial polysaccharide inhibitors to inhibit the binding of the group A helical polysaccharide to the polyclonal antisera. The exclusively dominant epitope expressed in the convalescent human antisera was the doubly branched extended helical hexasaccharide with the structure α-l-Rhap(1→2)[β-d-GlcpNAc(1→3)]α-l-Rhap(1→3)α-l-Rhap(1→2)[β-d-GlcpNAc(1→3)]α-l-Rhap. The hexasaccharide epitope also bound with the highest immunoreactivity to the rabbit antiserum. In contrast, the human antisera did not show significant binding to the singly branched pentasaccharide with the structure α-l-Rhap(1→2)α-l-Rhap(1→3)α-l-Rhap(1→2)[β-d-GlcpNAc(1→3)]α-l-Rhap or the branched trisaccharide α-l-Rhap(1→2)[β-d-GlcpNAc(1→3)]α-l-Rhap, although both these haptens bound significantly to the same rabbit antiserum, albeit with less immunoreactivity than the hexasaccharide. Inhibition studies using streptococcal group A and B rabbit antisera and the inhibitors indicated above also suggested that the group A carbohydrate, unlike the group B streptococcal polysaccharide, does not contain the disaccharide α-l-Rhap(1→2)α-l-Rhap motif at its nonreducing chain terminus, stressing the importance of mapping the determinant specificities of these two important streptococcal subcapsular group polysaccharides to fully understand the serological relationships between group A and group B streptococci. PMID:16177309

  5. [Xenograft of human nasopharyngeal mucosa in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Huang, P

    1989-01-01

    Human nasopharyngeal mucosa from 22-cases of chronic nasopharyngitis was transplanted into 26 nude mice. The xenografts were examined on 15, 30, 45 and 60 days after transplantation, and found to have survived in 19 mice. The survival rate was 73.1 per cent. The developed epithelia took the shape of cystic cavities, which gradually enlarged and the thickly laminated columnar epithelia with cells in mitoses or squamous metaplasia changed into thin and flat ones. The epithelium proliferated actively after 15 to 30 days of transplantation. The results afford useful reference to the study of induction of cancer in human nasopharyngeal mucosa transplanted into nude mice.

  6. Aptamer RA36 inhibits of human, rabbit, and rat plasma coagulation activated with thrombin or snake venom coagulases.

    PubMed

    Savchik, E Yu; Kalinina, T B; Drozd, N N; Makarov, V A; Zav'yalova, E G; Lapsheva, E N; Mudrik, N N; Babij, A V; Pavlova, G V; Golovin, A V; Kopylov, A M

    2013-11-01

    RA36 DNA aptamer is a direct anticoagulant prolonging clotting time of human, rabbit, and rat plasma in the thrombin time test. Anticoagulant activity of RA36 is lower than that of recombinant hirudin. During inhibition of human plasma clotting activated with echitox (coagulase from Echis multisquamatus venom), the aptamer presumably binds to meisothrombin exosite I. The sensitivity of human plasma to the aptamer 5-fold surpasses that of rat plasma. Analysis of RA36 binding to coagulase of Agkistrodon halys venom (ancistron) is required for proving the effect of aptamer on polymerization of human fibrinogen. PMID:24319726

  7. Increased cardiac injury in NZB/W F1 mice received antibody against human parvovirus B19 VP1 unique region protein.

    PubMed

    Tzang, Bor-Show; Lin, Tsung-Ming; Tsai, Chun-Chou; Hsu, Jeng-Dong; Yang, Lien-Chuan; Hsu, Tsai-Ching

    2011-07-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19) infection has been postulated to both myocardial injury and development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, the influence of anti-B19-VP1u antibodies on cardiac disorders in SLE is still obscure. To elucidate the effects of anti-B19-VP1u IgG in SLE, passive transfer of PBS, normal rabbit IgG or rabbit anti-B19-VP1u IgG was injected intravenously into NZB/W F1 mice, respectively. Significant expression of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α were detected in NZB/W F1 mice receiving rabbit anti-B19-VP1u IgG. Markedly cardiomyocyte disarray and lymphocyte infiltration were observed in left ventricle of hearts from NZB/W F1 mice receiving rabbit anti-B19-VP1u IgG. Additionally, significant increases of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) activity and protein expression were detected in left ventricle of hearts from NZB/W F1 mice receiving B19-VP1u IgG. Accordingly, significant increase of phosphorylated p-38 and NF-κB proteins were observed in left ventricle of hearts from NZB/W F1 mice receiving B19-VP1u IgG. However, no significant variation of cardiac atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (h-FABP) and creatine kinase MB (CK-MB) were detected among all experimental groups. These findings firstly demonstrated the aggravated effects of anti-B19 VP1u IgG on cardiac injury by induction of inflammatory but not myocardial infarction-associated proteins through activation of phosphorylated p-38 and NF-κB signaling.

  8. Detection thresholds for amplitude modulations of tones in budgerigar, rabbit, and human.

    PubMed

    Carney, Laurel H; Ketterer, Angela D; Abrams, Kristina S; Schwarz, Douglas M; Idrobo, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Envelope fluctuations of complex sounds carry information that is -essential for many types of discrimination and for detection in noise. To study the neural representation of envelope information and mechanisms for processing of this temporal aspect of sounds, it is useful to identify an animal model that can -sensitively detect amplitude modulations (AM). Low modulation frequencies, which dominate speech sounds, are of particular interest. Yet, most animal -models studied previously are relatively insensitive to AM at low modulation -frequencies. Rabbits have high thresholds for low-frequency modulations, -especially for tone carriers. Rhesus macaques are less sensitive than humans to low-frequency -modulations of wideband noise (O'Conner et al. Hear Res 277, 37-43, 2011). Rats and -chinchilla also have higher thresholds than humans for amplitude -modulations of noise (Kelly et al. J Comp Psychol 120, 98-105, 2006; Henderson et al. J Acoust Soc Am 75, -1177-1183, 1984). In contrast, the budgerigar has thresholds for AM detection of wideband noise similar to those of human listeners at low -modulation frequencies (Dooling and Searcy. Percept Psychophys 46, 65-71, 1981). A -one-interval, two-alternative operant conditioning procedure was used to estimate AM -detection thresholds for 4-kHz tone carriers at low modulation -frequencies (4-256 Hz). Budgerigar thresholds are comparable to those of human subjects in a comparable task. Implications of these comparative results for temporal coding of complex sounds are discussed. Comparative results for masked AM detection are also presented. PMID:23716245

  9. Mice Expressing RHAG and RHD Human Blood Group Genes

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Dominique; da Silva, Nelly; Metral, Sylvain; Cortes, Ulrich; Callebaut, Isabelle; Picot, Julien; Mouro-Chanteloup, Isabelle; Cartron, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Anti-RhD prophylaxis of haemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn (HDFN) is highly effective, but as the suppressive mechanism remains uncertain, a mouse model would be of interest. Here we have generated transgenic mice expressing human RhAG and RhD erythrocyte membrane proteins in the presence and, for human RhAG, in the absence, of mouse Rhag. Human RhAG associates with mouse Rh but not mouse Rhag on red blood cells. In Rhag knockout mice transgenic for human RHAG, the mouse Rh protein is “rescued” (re-expressed), and co-immunoprecipitates with human RhAG, indicating the presence of hetero-complexes which associate mouse and human proteins. RhD antigen was expressed from a human RHD gene on a BAC or from RHD cDNA under control of β-globin regulatory elements. RhD was never observed alone, strongly indicative that its expression absolutely depends on the presence of transgenic human RhAG. This first expression of RhD in mice is an important step in the creation of a mouse model of RhD allo-immunisation and HDFN, in conjunction with the Rh-Rhag knockout mice we have developed previously. PMID:24260394

  10. Volume regulatory potassium transport in rabbit and human sickle erythrocytes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Rohil, N.S.

    1988-01-01

    One approach to the therapy of sickle cell anemia is to decrease the hemoglobin concentration by inducing a slight swelling of the cell to retard the rate of hemoglobin polymerization. We found that a prolonged incubation of rabbit or human SS red cell in hypotonic medium caused an inactivation of the inactivation of swelling-stimulated potassium transport. The inactivation may have important practical consequences for the therapy of sickle cell anemia. Large cytoskeleton-free vesicles were prepared in order to study the possible role of the spectrin-actin membrane skeleton in the swelling-stimulated and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM)-stimulated transport. NEM pretreatment stimulated {sup 86}Rb efflux in vesicles by a factor of 2.4 + 0.55 (mean {plus minus} S.D.). The NEM effect on {sup 86}Rb efflux was specific in that the {sup 22}Na efflux into a Na medium was not stimulated but actually inhibited. The {sup 86}Rb efflux from the vesicles was not stimulated by hypotonic media. This finding is consistent with a role of the membrane skeleton in the detection and/or transduction of the signal by which cell swelling activates the transport.

  11. Distinct effects of Cu2+-binding on oligomerization of human and rabbit prion proteins.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kejiang; Yu, Ziyao; Yu, Yuanhui; Liao, Xinli; Huang, Pei; Guo, Chenyun; Lin, Donghai

    2015-10-01

    The cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) is a kind of cell-surface Cu(2+)-binding glycoprotein. The oligomerization of PrP(C) is highly related to transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). Cu(2+) plays a vital role in the oligomerization of PrP(C), and participates in the pathogenic process of TSE diseases. It is expected that Cu(2+)-binding has different effects on the oligomerization of TSE-sensitive human PrP(C) (HuPrP(C)) and TSE-resistant rabbit PrP(C) (RaPrP(C)). However, the details of the distinct effects remain unclear. In the present study, we measured the interactions of Cu(2+) with HuPrP(C) (91-230) and RaPrP(C) (91-228) by isothermal titration calorimetry, and compared the effects of Cu(2+)-binding on the oligomerization of both PrPs. The measured dissociation constants (Kd) of Cu(2+) were 11.1 ± 2.1 μM for HuPrP(C) and 21.1 ± 3.1 μM for RaPrP(C). Cu(2+)-binding promoted the oligomerization of HuPrP(C) more significantly than that of RaPrP(C). The far-ultraviolet circular dichroism spectroscopy experiments showed that Cu(2+)-binding induced more significant secondary structure change and increased more β-sheet content for HuPrP(C) compared with RaPrP(C). Moreover, the urea-induced unfolding transition experiments indicated that Cu(2+)-binding decreased the conformational stability of HuPrP(C) more distinctly than that of RaPrP(C). These results suggest that RaPrP(C) possesses a low susceptibility to Cu(2+), potentially weakening the risk of Cu(2+)-induced TSE diseases. Our work sheds light on the Cu(2+)-promoted oligomerization of PrP(C), and may be helpful for further understanding the TSE-resistance of rabbits. PMID:26350098

  12. Characterization of the rabbit homolog of human MUC1 glycoprotein isolated from bladder by affinity chromatography on immobilized jacalin.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, T; Xin, P; Buckley, M S; Erickson, D R; Bhavanandan, V P

    2000-07-01

    The urinary bladder is lined by transitional epithelium, the glycocalyx on the luminal surface has interesting properties and is implicated in protective functions. Glycoconjugates are major components of the glycocalyx, but their biochemical nature is not well understood. Previous studies on rabbit bladder indicated the presence of significant levels of sialoglycoproteins compared to glycosaminoglycans in the epithelium. In this study, rabbit explant cultures were radiolabeled by precursor sugars or amino acids and a major lectin-reactive glycoprotein of rabbit bladder mucosa was isolated by affinity chromatography on jacalin-agarose. The radiolabeled glycoprotein was purified to homogeneity by a second cycle on the lectin column, followed by gel filtration and density gradient centrifugation. The average molecular mass of the glycoprotein was estimated to be 245 kDa and 210 kDa by gel filtration and SDS-PAGE, respectively. Its buoyant density was 1.40 g/ml, suggesting a carbohydrate content of approximately 50%. The percent distribution of glucosamine-derived tritium label in sialic acid, galactosamine, and glucosamine was 30, 52, and 18, respectively. The glycoprotein consisted entirely of small sialylated and neutral oligosaccharides O-glycosidically linked to serine and threonine residues. The same glycoprotein could be immunoprecipitated with an antibody against the carboxy terminal 17 amino acid peptide of human MUC1 mucin glycoprotein. This suggests that this mucin glycoprotein is the rabbit homolog of MUC1 glycoprotein, which has been previously established to be a component of human bladder urothelium and has been purified from human urine and biochemically characterized.

  13. Human spleen microanatomy: why mice do not suffice.

    PubMed

    Steiniger, Birte S

    2015-07-01

    The microanatomical structure of the spleen has been primarily described in mice and rats. This leads to terminological problems with respect to humans and their species-specific splenic microstructure. In mice, rats and humans the spleen consists of the white pulp embedded in the red pulp. In the white pulp, T and B lymphocytes form accumulations, the periarteriolar lymphatic sheaths and the follicles, located around intermediate-sized arterial vessels, the central arteries. The red pulp is a reticular connective tissue containing all types of blood cells. The spleen of mice and rats exhibits an additional well-delineated B-cell compartment, the marginal zone, between white and red pulp. This area is, however, absent in human spleen. Human splenic secondary follicles comprise three zones: a germinal centre, a mantle zone and a superficial zone. In humans, arterioles and sheathed capillaries in the red pulp are surrounded by lymphocytes, especially by B cells. Human sheathed capillaries are related to the splenic ellipsoids of most other vertebrates. Such vessels are lacking in rats or mice, which form an evolutionary exception. Capillary sheaths are composed of endothelial cells, pericytes, special stromal sheath cells, macrophages and B lymphocytes. Human spleens most probably host a totally open circulation system, as connections from capillaries to sinuses were not found in the red pulp. Three stromal cell types of different phenotype and location occur in the human white pulp. Splenic white and red pulp structure is reviewed in rats, mice and humans to encourage further investigations on lymphocyte recirculation through the spleen.

  14. Adoptive transfer of macrophages from adult mice reduces mortality in mice infected with human enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangning; Li, Xiaoying; Fan, Xiaoxu; Ma, Chunmei; Qin, Chuan; Zhang, Lianfeng

    2013-02-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) causes hand, foot and mouth disease in children under 6 years of age, and the neurological complications of this virus can lead to death. Until now, no vaccines or drugs have been available for the clinical control of this epidemic. Macrophages can engulf pathogens and mediate a series of host immune responses that play a role in the defence against infectious diseases. Using immunohistochemistry, we observed the localizations of virus in muscle tissues of EV71-infected mice. The macrophages isolated from the adult mice could kill the virus gradually in vitro, as shown using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and virus titration. Co-localisation of lysosomes and virus within macrophages suggested that the lysosomes were possibly responsible for the phagocytosis of EV71. Activation of the macrophages in the peritoneal cavity of mice four days pre-infection reduced the mortality of mice upon lethal EV71 infection. The adoptive transfer of macrophages from adult mice inhibited virus replication in the muscle tissues of infected mice, and this was followed by a relief of symptoms and a significant reduction of mortality, which suggested that the adoptive transfer of macrophages from adult humans represents a potential strategy to treat EV71-infected patients.

  15. Acute Radiation Hypotension in the Rabbit: a Model for the Human Radiation Shock Syndrome.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makale, Milan Theodore

    This study has shown that total body irradiation (TBI) of immature (40 to 100 day old) rabbits leads to an acute fall in mean arterial pressure (MAP) 30 to 90 minutes after exposure, which takes no more than about three minutes, and often results in pressures which are less than 50% of the lowest pre-exposure MAP. This is termed acute cardiovascular collapse (ACC). ACC is often accompanied by ECG T-wave elevation, a sharp rise in ear temperature, labored breathing, pupillary constriction, bladder emptying, and loss of abdominal muscle tone. About 73% of 40 to 100 day rabbits exhibit ACC; the others and most older rabbits display gradual pressure reductions (deliberate hypotension) which may be profound, and which may be accompanied by the same changes associated with ACC. ACC and deliberate hypotension occurred in rabbits cannulated in the dorsal aorta, and in non-operated animals. The decline in MAP for all 40 to 100 day cannulated rabbits (deliberate and ACC responders) is 55.4%. The experiments described below only involved 40 to 100 day cannulated TBI rabbits. Heart region irradiation resulted in an average MAP decline of 29.1%, with 1/15 rabbits showing ACC. Heart shielding during TBI reduced the decline in MAP to 19%, with 1/10 rabbits experiencing ACC. These results imply that the heart region, which includes the heart, part of the lungs, neural receptors, roots of the systemic vessels, and the blood, is a sensitive target. Bilateral vagotomy reduced the decline in MAP to 24.9%, and abolished ACC. Atropine (6 mg/kg) reduced the frequency of ACC to 26%, and the decline in MAP to 41.4%. In 11/13 rabbits the voltage generated by left vagal transmission rose after TBI. The vagi appear to participate in radiation hypotension. Heart shielding together with bilateral vagotomy reduced the decline in MAP to only 9.9%, with no ACC responders. The mean right ventricular pressure (MRVP) rose after TBI in 8/10 rabbits. In animals which displayed either ACC or steep

  16. Transfection of the Human Heme Oxygenase Gene Into Rabbit Coronary Microvessel Endothelial Cells: Protective Effect Against Heme and Hemoglobin Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, N. G.; Lavrovsky, Y.; Schwartzman, M. L.; Stoltz, R. A.; Levere, R. D.; Gerritsen, M. E.

    1995-07-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) is a stress protein and has been suggested to participate in defense mechanisms against agents that may induce oxidative injury such as metals, endotoxin, heme/hemoglobin, and various cytokines. Overexpression of HO in cells might therefore protect against oxidative stress produced by certain of these agents, specifically heme and hemoglobin, by catalyzing their degradation to bilirubin, which itself has antioxidant properties. We report here the successful in vitro transfection of rabbit coronary microvessel endothelial cells with a functioning gene encoding the human HO enzyme. A plasmid containing the cytomegalovirus promoter and the human HO cDNA complexed to cationic liposomes (Lipofectin) was used to transfect rabbit endothelial cells. Cells transfected with human HO exhibited an ≈3.0-fold increase in enzyme activity and expressed a severalfold induction of human HO mRNA as compared with endogenous rabbit HO mRNA. Transfected and nontransfected cells expressed factor VIII antigen and exhibited similar acetylated low-density lipoprotein uptake (two important features that characterize endothelial cells) with >85% of cells staining positive for each marker. Moreover, cells transfected with the human HO gene acquired substantial resistance to toxicity produced by exposure to recombinant hemoglobin and heme as compared with nontransfected cells. The protective effect of HO overexpression against heme/hemoglobin toxicity in endothelial cells shown in these studies provides direct evidence that the inductive response of human HO to such injurious stimuli represents an important tissue adaptive mechanism for moderating the severity of cell damage produced by these blood components.

  17. Quantitative comparison of myocardial fiber structure between mice, rabbit, and sheep using diffusion tensor cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Accurate interpretations of cardiac functions require precise structural models of the myocardium, but the latter is not available always and for all species. Although scaling or substitution of myocardial fiber information from alternate species has been used in cardiac functional modeling, the validity of such practice has not been tested. Methods Fixed mouse (n = 10), rabbit (n = 6), and sheep (n = 5) hearts underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The myocardial structures in terms of the left ventricular fiber orientation helix angle index were quantitatively compared between the mouse rabbit and sheep hearts. Results The results show that significant fiber structural differences exist between any two of the three species. Specifically, the subepicardial fiber orientation, and the transmural range and linearity of fiber helix angles are significantly different between the mouse and either rabbit or sheep. Additionally, a significant difference was found between the transmural helix angle range between the rabbit and sheep. Across different circumferential regions of the heart, the fiber orientation was not found to be significantly different. Conclusions The current study indicates that myocardial structural differences exist between different size hearts. An immediate implication of the present findings for myocardial structural or functional modeling studies is that caution must be exercised when extrapolating myocardial structures from one species to another. PMID:22117695

  18. Developmental Toxicity and Fertility Assessment in Rabbits with Tabalumab: A Human IgG4 Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Breslin, William J; Hilbish, Kim G; Martin, Jennifer A; Halstead, Carolyn A; Edwards, Tammy L

    2015-06-01

    Tabalumab is a human immunoglobulin G subclass 4 monoclonal antibody that has been under development for autoimmune disorders. Tabalumab has full neutralizing activity against both soluble and membrane B-cell activating factor, a B-cell survival factor. The objectives of these studies were to assess the effects of tabalumab on embryo-fetal development and on male (M) and female (F) fertility in rabbits, a pharmacologically relevant species. Doses were administered at 0 (vehicle control), 0.3 (embryo-fetal study only), 1.0, and 30 mg/kg. In the embryo-fetal study, pregnant rabbits does were given a single dose by intravenous injection on gestation day (GD) 7. In the fertility studies, tabalumab was administered by intravenous injection every 7 days starting 2 (F) or 4 (M) weeks before mating, during cohabitation, and until necropsy (M) or through GD 18 (F). Treated animals were mated with untreated partners. Parental clinical signs, body weight, food consumption, blood lymphocyte phenotyping, organ weights, morphologic pathology, ovarian and uterine observations, sperm parameters, and fertility indices were evaluated along with conceptus viability, weight, and morphology. Exposure assessments were made in all main study animals and satellite animals. No adverse parental, reproductive, or developmental effects were observed in any study at any dose. A pharmacodynamic response consisting of dose-dependent decreases in the percent and number of total B lymphocytes and increases in the percent and/or number of total T lymphocytes was observed in parental rabbits at 1.0 and 30 mg/kg. In conclusion, no adverse reproductive or developmental effects were observed in rabbits following exposure to tabalumab at doses as high as 30 mg/kg and exposures at least 14-fold greater than human exposure levels. PMID:26195315

  19. Laying the Foundations for a Human-Predator Conflict Solution: Assessing the Impact of Bonelli's Eagle on Rabbits and Partridges

    PubMed Central

    Moleón, Marcos; Sánchez-Zapata, José A.; Gil-Sánchez, José M.; Barea-Azcón, José M.; Ballesteros-Duperón, Elena; Virgós, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    Background Predation may potentially lead to negative effects on both prey (directly via predators) and predators (indirectly via human persecution). Predation pressure studies are, therefore, of major interest in the fields of theoretical knowledge and conservation of prey or predator species, with wide ramifications and profound implications in human-wildlife conflicts. However, detailed works on this issue in highly valuable –in conservation terms– Mediterranean ecosystems are virtually absent. This paper explores the predator-hunting conflict by examining a paradigmatic, Mediterranean-wide (endangered) predator-two prey (small game) system. Methodology/Principal Findings We estimated the predation impact (‘kill rate’ and ‘predation rate’, i.e., number of prey and proportion of the prey population eaten, respectively) of Bonelli's eagle Aquila fasciata on rabbit Oryctolagus cuniculus and red-legged partridge Alectoris rufa populations in two seasons (the eagle's breeding and non-breeding periods, 100 days each) in SE Spain. The mean estimated kill rate by the seven eagle reproductive units in the study area was c. 304 rabbits and c. 262 partridges in the breeding season, and c. 237 rabbits and c. 121 partridges in the non-breeding period. This resulted in very low predation rates (range: 0.3–2.5%) for both prey and seasons. Conclusions/Significance The potential role of Bonelli's eagles as a limiting factor for rabbits and partridges at the population scale was very poor. The conflict between game profitability and conservation interest of either prey or predators is apparently very localised, and eagles, quarry species and game interests seem compatible in most of the study area. Currently, both the persecution and negative perception of Bonelli's eagle (the ‘partridge-eating eagle’ in Spanish) have a null theoretical basis in most of this area. PMID:21818399

  20. Steroid metabolism in chimeric mice with humanized liver.

    PubMed

    Lootens, Leen; Van Eenoo, Peter; Meuleman, Philip; Pozo, Oscar J; Van Renterghem, Pieter; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Delbeke, Frans T

    2009-11-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids are considered to be doping agents and are prohibited in sports. Their metabolism needs to be elucidated to allow for urinary detection by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) or liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Steroid metabolism was assessed using uPA(+/+) SCID mice with humanized livers (chimeric mice). This study presents the results of 19-norandrost-4-ene-3,17-dione (19-norAD) administration to these in vivo mice. As in humans, 19-norandrosterone and 19-noretiocholanolone are the major detectable metabolites of 19-norAD in the urine of chimeric mice.A summary is given of the metabolic pathways found in chimeric mice after administration of three model steroid compounds (methandienone, androst-4-ene-3,17-dione and 19-norandrost-4-ene-3,17-dione). From these studies we can conclude that all major metabolic pathways for anabolic steroids in humans are present in the chimeric mouse. It is hoped that, in future, this promising chimeric mouse model might assist the discovery of new and possible longer detectable metabolites of (designer) steroids. PMID:20355169

  1. Modeling cognition and disease using human glial chimeric mice.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Steven A; Nedergaard, Maiken; Windrem, Martha S

    2015-08-01

    As new methods for producing and isolating human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs) have been developed, the disorders of myelin have become especially compelling targets for cell-based therapy. Yet as animal modeling of glial progenitor cell-based therapies has progressed, it has become clear that transplanted hGPCs not only engraft and expand within murine hosts, but dynamically outcompete the resident progenitors so as to ultimately dominate the host brain. The engrafted human progenitor cells proceed to generate parenchymal astrocytes, and when faced with a hypomyelinated environment, oligodendrocytes as well. As a result, the recipient brains may become inexorably humanized with regards to their resident glial populations, yielding human glial chimeric mouse brains. These brains provide us a fundamentally new tool by which to assess the species-specific attributes of glia in modulating human cognition and information processing. In addition, the cellular humanization of these brains permits their use in studying glial infectious and inflammatory disorders unique to humans, and the effects of those disorders on the glial contributions to cognition. Perhaps most intriguingly, by pairing our ability to construct human glial chimeras with the production of patient-specific hGPCs derived from pluripotential stem cells, we may now establish mice in which a substantial proportion of resident glia are both human and disease-derived. These mice in particular may provide us new opportunities for studying the human-specific contributions of glia to psychopathology, as well as to higher cognition. As such, the assessment of human glial chimeric mice may provide us new insight into the species-specific contributions of glia to human cognitive evolution, as well as to the pathogenesis of human neurological and neuropsychiatric disease.

  2. Inhibition of Human Colon Cancer Growth by Antibody-Directed Human LAK Cells in SCID Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Nakada, Tetsuya; Puisieux, Isabelle

    1993-03-01

    Advanced human colon cancer does not respond to lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells. In order to direct cytotoxic cells to the tumor, human LAK cells linked with antibodies to a tumor cell surface antigen were tested with established hepatic metastases in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These cells had increased uptake into the tumor and suppression of tumor growth as compared with LAK cells alone, thereby improving the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Thus, tumor growth can be inhibited by targeted LAK cells, and SCID mice can be used to test the antitumor properties of human effector cells.

  3. Engraftment Potential of Adipose Tissue-Derived Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells After Transplantation in the Fetal Rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-González, Itziar; Moreno, Rafael; Petriz, Jordi; Gratacós, Eduard

    2012-01-01

    Due to their favorable intrinsic features, including engraftment, differentiation, and immunomodulatory potential, adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been proposed for therapeutic in utero intervention. Further improvement of such attributes for particular diseases might merely be achieved by ex vivo MSC genetic engineering previous to transplantation. Here, we evaluated for the first time the feasibility, biodistribution, long-term engraftment, and transgenic enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression of genetically engineered human adipose tissue-derived MSCs (EGFP+-ASCs) after intra-amniotic xenotransplantation at E17 of gestation into our validated pregnant rabbit model. Overall, the procedure was safe (86.4% survival rate; absence of anatomical defects). Stable, low-level engraftment of EGFP+-ASCs was confirmed by assessing the presence of the pWT-EGFP lentiviral provirus in the young transplanted rabbit tissues. Accordingly, similar frequencies of provirus-positive animals were found at both 8 weeks (60%) and 16 weeks (66.7%) after in utero intervention. The presence of EGFP+-ASCs was more frequent in respiratory epithelia (lung and trachea), according to the route of administration. However, we were unable to detect EGFP expression, neither by real-time polymerase chain reaction nor by immunohistochemistry, in the provirus-positive tissues, suggesting EGFP transgene silencing mediated by epigenetic events. Moreover, we noticed lack of both host cellular immune responses against xenogeneic ASCs and humoral immune responses against transgenic EGFP. Therefore, the fetal microchimerism achieved by the EGFP+-ASCs in the young rabbit hosts indicates induction of donor-specific tolerance after fetal rabbit xenotransplantation, which should boost postnatal transplantation for the early treatment/prevention of many devastating congenital disorders. PMID:22738094

  4. FDTD analysis of temperature elevation in the lens of human and rabbit models due to near-field and far-field exposures at 2.45 GHz.

    PubMed

    Oizumi, Takuya; Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa; Fujiwara, Osamu; Watanabe, Soichi; Taki, Masao; Kojima, Masami; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Kazuyuki

    2013-07-01

    The eye is said to be one of the most sensitive organs to microwave heating. According to previous studies, the possibility of microwave-induced cataract formation has been experimentally investigated in rabbit and monkey eyes, but not for the human eye due to ethical reasons. In the present study, the temperature elevation in the lens, the skin around the eye and the core temperature of numerical human and rabbit models for far-field and near-field exposures at 2.45 GHz are investigated. The temperature elevations in the human and rabbit models were compared with the threshold temperatures for inducing cataracts, thermal pain in the skin and reversible health effects such as heat exhaustion or heat stroke. For plane-wave exposure, the core temperature elevation is shown to be essential both in the human and in the rabbit models as suggested in the international guidelines and standards. For localised exposure of the human eye, the temperature elevation of the skin was essential, and the lens temperature did not reach its threshold for thermal pain. On the other hand, the lens temperature elevation was found to be dominant for the rabbit eye.

  5. Activation of GPR119 Stimulates Human β-Cell Replication and Neogenesis in Humanized Mice with Functional Human Islets

    PubMed Central

    Ansarullah; Free, Colette; Christopherson, Jenica; Chen, Quanhai; Gao, Jie; Liu, Chengyang; Naji, Ali; Rabinovitch, Alex; Guo, Zhiguang

    2016-01-01

    Using humanized mice with functional human islets, we investigated whether activating GPR119 by PSN632408, a small molecular agonist, can stimulate human β-cell regeneration in vivo. Human islets were transplanted under the left kidney capsule of immunodeficient mice with streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetes. The recipient mice were treated with PSN632408 or vehicle and BrdU daily. Human islet graft function in the mice was evaluated by nonfasting glucose levels, oral glucose tolerance, and removal of the grafts. Immunostaining for insulin, glucagon, and BrdU or Ki67 was performed in islet grafts to evaluate α- and β-cell replication. Insulin and CK19 immunostaining was performed to evaluate β-cell neogenesis. Four weeks after human islet transplantation, 71% of PSN632408-treated mice achieved normoglycaemia compared with 24% of vehicle-treated mice. Also, oral glucose tolerance was significantly improved in the PSN632408-treated mice. PSN632408 treatment significantly increased both human α- and β-cell areas in islet grafts and stimulated α- and β-cell replication. In addition, β-cell neogenesis was induced from pancreatic duct cells in the islet grafts. Our results demonstrated that activation of GPR119 increases β-cell mass by stimulating human β-cell replication and neogenesis. Therefore, GPR119 activators may qualify as therapeutic agents to increase human β-cell mass in patients with diabetes. PMID:27413754

  6. Pancreatic expression of human insulin gene in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Bucchini, D; Ripoche, M A; Stinnakre, M G; Desbois, P; Lorès, P; Monthioux, E; Absil, J; Lepesant, J A; Pictet, R; Jami, J

    1986-04-01

    We have investigated the possibility of obtaining integration and expression of a native human gene in transgenic mice. An 11-kilobase (kb) human chromosomal DNA fragment including the insulin gene (1430 base pairs) was microinjected into fertilized mouse eggs. This fragment was present in the genomic DNA of several developing animals. One transgenic mouse and its progeny were analyzed for expression of the foreign gene. Synthesis and release of human insulin was revealed by detection of the human C-peptide in the plasma and urine. Human insulin mRNA was found in pancreas but not in other tissues. These findings indicate that the 11-kb human DNA fragment carries the sequences necessary for tissue-specific expression of the insulin gene and the human regulatory sequences react to homologous signals in the mouse.

  7. Effects of HIV-1 on Cognition in Humanized NSG Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhter, Sidra Pervez

    Host species specificity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) creates a challenge to study the pathology, diagnostic tools, and therapeutic agents. The closely related simian immunodeficiency virus and studies of neurocognitive impairments on transgenic animals expressing partial viral genome have significant limitations. The humanized mice model provides a small animal system in which a human immune system can be engrafted and immunopathobiology of HIV-1 infection can be studied. However, features of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) were not evaluated in this model. Open field activity test was selected to characterize behavior of original strain NOD/scid-IL-2Rgammac null (NSG) mice, effects of engraftment of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and functional human immune system (huNSG), and finally, investigate the behavior changes induced by chronic HIV-1 infection. Long-term infected HuNSG mice showed the loss of working memory and increased anxiety in the open field. Additionally, these animals were utilized for evaluation of central nervous system metabolic and structural changes. Detected behavioral abnormalities are correlated with obtained neuroimaging and histological abnormalities published.

  8. Disposal rabbit

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, L.C.; Trammell, D.R.

    1983-10-12

    A disposable rabbit for transferring radioactive samples in a pneumatic transfer system comprises aerated plastic shaped in such a manner as to hold a radioactive sample and aerated such that dissolution of the rabbit in a solvent followed by evaporation of the solid yields solid waste material having a volume significantly smaller than the original volume of the rabbit.

  9. Disposable rabbit

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Leroy C.; Trammell, David R.

    1986-01-01

    A disposable rabbit for transferring radioactive samples in a pneumatic transfer system comprises aerated plastic shaped in such a manner as to hold a radioactive sample and aerated such that dissolution of the rabbit in a solvent followed by evaporation of the solid yields solid waste material having a volume significantly smaller than the original volume of the rabbit.

  10. Bacillus cereus G9241 makes anthrax toxin and capsule like highly virulent B. anthracis Ames but behaves like attenuated toxigenic nonencapsulated B. anthracis Sterne in rabbits and mice.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Melissa K; Vergis, James M; Alem, Farhang; Palmer, John R; Keane-Myers, Andrea M; Brahmbhatt, Trupti N; Ventura, Christy L; O'Brien, Alison D

    2011-08-01

    Bacillus cereus G9241 was isolated from a welder with a pulmonary anthrax-like illness. The organism contains two megaplasmids, pBCXO1 and pBC218. These plasmids are analogous to the Bacillus anthracis Ames plasmids pXO1 and pXO2 that encode anthrax toxins and capsule, respectively. Here we evaluated the virulence of B. cereus G9241 as well as the contributions of pBCXO1 and pBC218 to virulence. B. cereus G9241 was avirulent in New Zealand rabbits after subcutaneous inoculation and attenuated 100-fold compared to the published 50% lethal dose (LD(50)) values for B. anthracis Ames after aerosol inoculation. A/J and C57BL/6J mice were comparably susceptible to B. cereus G9241 by both subcutaneous and intranasal routes of infection. However, the LD(50)s for B. cereus G9241 in both mouse strains were markedly higher than those reported for B. anthracis Ames and more like those of the toxigenic but nonencapsulated B. anthracis Sterne. Furthermore, B. cereus G9241 spores could germinate and disseminate after intranasal inoculation into A/J mice, as indicated by the presence of vegetative cells in the spleen and blood of animals 48 h after infection. Lastly, B. cereus G9241 derivatives cured of one or both megaplasmids were highly attenuated in A/J mice. We conclude that the presence of the toxin- and capsule-encoding plasmids pBCXO1 and pBC218 in B. cereus G9241 alone is insufficient to render the strain as virulent as B. anthracis Ames. However, like B. anthracis, full virulence of B. cereus G9241 for mice requires the presence of both plasmids.

  11. Thiocyanate supplementation decreases atherosclerotic plaque in mice expressing human myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Morgan, P E; Laura, R P; Maki, R A; Reynolds, W F; Davies, M J

    2015-06-01

    Elevated levels of the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) are associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. MPO predominantly catalyzes formation of the oxidants hypochlorous acid (HOCl) from Cl(-), and hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN) from SCN(-), with these anions acting as competitive substrates. HOSCN is a less powerful and more specific oxidant than HOCl, and selectively targets thiols; such damage is largely reversible, unlike much HOCl-induced damage. We hypothesized that increased plasma SCN(-), and hence HOSCN formation instead of HOCl, may decrease artery wall damage. This was examined using high-fat fed atherosclerosis-prone LDLR(-/-) mice transgenic for human MPO, with and without SCN(-) (10 mM) added to drinking water. Serum samples, collected fortnightly, were analyzed for cholesterol, triglycerides, thiols, MPO, and SCN(-); study-long exposure was calculated by area under the curve (AUC). Mean serum SCN(-) concentrations were elevated in the supplemented mice (200-320 μM) relative to controls (< 120 μM). Normalized aortic root plaque areas at sacrifice were 26% lower in the SCN(-)-supplemented mice compared with controls (P = 0.0417), but plaque morphology was not appreciably altered. Serum MPO levels steadily increased in mice on the high-fat diet, however, comparison of SCN(-)-supplemented versus control mice showed no significant changes in MPO protein, cholesterol, or triglyceride levels; thiol levels were decreased in supplemented mice at one time-point. Plaque areas increased with higher cholesterol AUC (r = 0.4742; P = 0.0468), and decreased with increasing SCN(-) AUC (r = - 0.5693; P = 0.0134). These data suggest that increased serum SCN(-) levels, which can be achieved in humans by dietary manipulation, may decrease atherosclerosis burden.

  12. Thiocyanate supplementation decreases atherosclerotic plaque in mice expressing human myeloperoxidase

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, P. E.; Laura, R. P.; Maki, R. A.; Reynolds, W. F.; Davies, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Elevated levels of the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) are associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. MPO predominantly catalyzes formation of the oxidants hypochlorous acid (HOCl) from Cl−, and hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN) from SCN−, with these anions acting as competitive substrates. HOSCN is a less powerful and more specific oxidant than HOCl, and selectively targets thiols; such damage is largely reversible, unlike much HOCl-induced damage. We hypothesized that increased plasma SCN−, and hence HOSCN formation instead of HOCl, may decrease artery wall damage. This was examined using high-fat fed atherosclerosis-prone LDLR−/− mice transgenic for human MPO, with and without SCN− (10 mM) added to drinking water. Serum samples, collected fortnightly, were analyzed for cholesterol, triglycerides, thiols, MPO and SCN−; study-long exposure was calculated by area under the curve (AUC). Mean serum SCN− concentrations were elevated in the supplemented mice (200-320 μM) relative to controls (<120 μM). Normalized aortic root plaque areas at sacrifice were 26% lower in the SCN−-supplemented mice compared to controls (P=0.0417), but plaque morphology was not appreciably altered. Serum MPO levels steadily increased in mice on the high-fat diet, however, comparison of SCN−- supplemented vs. control mice showed no significant changes in MPO protein, cholesterol or triglyceride levels; thiol levels were decreased in supplemented mice at one time-point. Plaque areas increased with higher cholesterol AUC (r=0.4742; P=0.0468), and decreased with increasing SCN− AUC (r=−0.5693; P=0.0134). These data suggest that increased serum SCN− levels, which can be achieved in humans by dietary manipulation, may decrease atherosclerosis burden. PMID:25812586

  13. Iloprost- and isoproterenol-induced increases in cAMP are regulated by different phosphodiesterases in erythrocytes of both rabbits and humans.

    PubMed

    Adderley, Shaquria P; Dufaux, Eileen A; Sridharan, Meera; Bowles, Elizabeth A; Hanson, Madelyn S; Stephenson, Alan H; Ellsworth, Mary L; Sprague, Randy S

    2009-05-01

    Activation of the G protein G(s) results in increases in cAMP, a necessary step in the pathway for ATP release from rabbit and human erythrocytes. In all cells, the level of cAMP is the product of its synthesis by adenylyl cyclase and its hydrolysis by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Both iloprost (Ilo), a PGI(2) analog, and isoproterenol (Iso), a beta-agonist, stimulate receptor-mediated increases in cAMP in rabbit and human erythrocytes. However, the specific PDEs associated with each of these signaling pathways in the erythrocyte have not been fully characterized. Previously, we reported that PDE3B is present in rabbit and human erythrocyte membranes and that PDE3 inhibitors potentiate Ilo-induced increases in cAMP. Here we report that inhibitors of either PDE2 or PDE4, erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)adenine (EHNA) and rolipram, respectively, potentiate Iso-induced increases in cAMP in rabbit and human erythrocytes. Importantly, these inhibitors had no effect on cAMP increases associated with the incubation of erythrocytes with Ilo. In addition, we establish, for the first time, the presence of PDE2A protein in rabbit and human erythrocyte membranes. Finally, we determined that preincubation of human erythrocytes with EHNA and rolipram together potentiate Iso-induced ATP release, whereas preincubation with cilostazol enhances Ilo-induced release of ATP. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that, in rabbit and human erythrocytes, Ilo-induced increases in cAMP and ATP release are regulated by PDE3, whereas those associated with Iso are regulated by the activities of both PDE2 and PDE4. These studies demonstrate that PDE activity in these cells is localized to specific signaling pathways. PMID:19252089

  14. Identification of human connective tissue in transplant of human oral mucosa in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Holmstrup, P; Hansen, I L; Harder, F; Dabelsteen, E

    1984-01-01

    The present study describes a method for identification of connective tissue of human oral mucosal transplants in nude mice. The method was based on the development of a murine antiserum to human fibroblasts. After absorption with murine fibroblasts the antiserum in an immunofluorescence method appeared to react specifically with human connective tissue of frozen sections, whereas the antiserum did not react with murine connective tissue. The antiserum, applied to frozen sections of human oral mucosal transplants in nude mice, could distinguish between human and murine connective tissue in the sections. The ability to distinguish between the two types of tissue was utilized to elucidate a possible relation between epithelial morphology and underlying type of connective tissue. It was found that the formation of rete ridges of transplanted human oral epithelium was dependent on the presence of subepithelial human connective tissue. The method described may be useful for the recognition of human tissue in experimental studies of human transplants to other species.

  15. Use of humanized severe combined immunodeficient mice for human vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Gloria C; Hasan, Aisha; O’Reilly, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    The severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse has no adaptive immunity, lacking mature T and B cells in the peripheral blood or the lymphoid organs. It has been used extensively in biomedical research as a valuable translational model for xeno-engraftment of human tissues and cells. This review focuses on the engraftment of human peripheral blood cells and tissues in SCID mice, as well as in the newly established and more permissive SCID mice deficient in the IL-2 receptor γ-chain. Human immune responses could be elicited and assessed in these humanized SCID mice upon vaccination or sensitization with allogeneic tissues. A translational model is proposed to attain preclinical data for testing human vaccines. PMID:19093778

  16. Molecular phylogeny of the pinworms of mice, rats and rabbits, and its use to develop molecular beacon assays for the detection of pinworms in mice.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Sanford H; Bowman, Susan G

    2007-10-01

    Though pinworm infestation has been prevalent since the early years of laboratory animal medicine, the genomes of these parasites have not yet been sequenced. The authors used high-fidelity polymerase chain reaction to amplify a large portion of the ribosomal gene complex of four pinworm species commonly found in lab rodents and rabbits (Aspiculuris tetraptera, Passalurus ambiguus, Syphacia muris and Syphacia obvelata). They determined DNA sequences for these complexes and carried out phylogenetic analysis. Using this information, the authors developed real-time molecular beacon assays for pinworm detection, comparing the new diagnostic approach with traditional methods such as perianal tape testing, fecal flotation and direct examination of intestinal content.

  17. Auditory distance coding in rabbit midbrain neurons and human perception: monaural amplitude modulation depth as a cue.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duck O; Zahorik, Pavel; Carney, Laurel H; Bishop, Brian B; Kuwada, Shigeyuki

    2015-04-01

    Mechanisms underlying sound source distance localization are not well understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that a novel mechanism can create monaural distance sensitivity: a combination of auditory midbrain neurons' sensitivity to amplitude modulation (AM) depth and distance-dependent loss of AM in reverberation. We used virtual auditory space (VAS) methods for sounds at various distances in anechoic and reverberant environments. Stimulus level was constant across distance. With increasing modulation depth, some rabbit inferior colliculus neurons increased firing rates whereas others decreased. These neurons exhibited monotonic relationships between firing rates and distance for monaurally presented noise when two conditions were met: (1) the sound had AM, and (2) the environment was reverberant. The firing rates as a function of distance remained approximately constant without AM in either environment and, in an anechoic condition, even with AM. We corroborated this finding by reproducing the distance sensitivity using a neural model. We also conducted a human psychophysical study using similar methods. Normal-hearing listeners reported perceived distance in response to monaural 1 octave 4 kHz noise source sounds presented at distances of 35-200 cm. We found parallels between the rabbit neural and human responses. In both, sound distance could be discriminated only if the monaural sound in reverberation had AM. These observations support the hypothesis. When other cues are available (e.g., in binaural hearing), how much the auditory system actually uses the AM as a distance cue remains to be determined.

  18. Auditory Distance Coding in Rabbit Midbrain Neurons and Human Perception: Monaural Amplitude Modulation Depth as a Cue

    PubMed Central

    Zahorik, Pavel; Carney, Laurel H.; Bishop, Brian B.; Kuwada, Shigeyuki

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying sound source distance localization are not well understood. Here we tested the hypothesis that a novel mechanism can create monaural distance sensitivity: a combination of auditory midbrain neurons' sensitivity to amplitude modulation (AM) depth and distance-dependent loss of AM in reverberation. We used virtual auditory space (VAS) methods for sounds at various distances in anechoic and reverberant environments. Stimulus level was constant across distance. With increasing modulation depth, some rabbit inferior colliculus neurons increased firing rates whereas others decreased. These neurons exhibited monotonic relationships between firing rates and distance for monaurally presented noise when two conditions were met: (1) the sound had AM, and (2) the environment was reverberant. The firing rates as a function of distance remained approximately constant without AM in either environment and, in an anechoic condition, even with AM. We corroborated this finding by reproducing the distance sensitivity using a neural model. We also conducted a human psychophysical study using similar methods. Normal-hearing listeners reported perceived distance in response to monaural 1 octave 4 kHz noise source sounds presented at distances of 35–200 cm. We found parallels between the rabbit neural and human responses. In both, sound distance could be discriminated only if the monaural sound in reverberation had AM. These observations support the hypothesis. When other cues are available (e.g., in binaural hearing), how much the auditory system actually uses the AM as a distance cue remains to be determined. PMID:25834060

  19. [Electrophysiological analysis of bruxisma of rabbits as natural model of the first bruxism in human being].

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Iu P; Kromin, A A

    2010-01-01

    In chronic experiences on 5 rabbits subjected to airmentary deprivation, impulse activity of the chewing muscles before and after the food was given to them was studied. It has been established, that flashes of bruxism nonoperiodically arise in rabbits in conditions of hunger and satiation and are shown in electric activity of masseter and mylohyoideus muscles in the form of burst type phase impulse activity of MU. Bruxism in conditions of hunger and satiation reflects in the same type way in structure of the time organization of impulse activity of the chewing muscles in the form of bimodal distributions of interpulse intervals and monomodal distributions of periods of the burst type rhythmic of action potentials. The alimentary motivation exerts inhibitory modulating influence on frequency of phase discharge activity of chewing center motoneurons in medulla oblongata and frequency of generation of the action potentials' bursts by the chewing muscles participating in bruxism. Impulse activity of chewing muscles during bruxism and food intake behaviour has the same-type character. Bruxism arises due to reorganization of the impulse activity of chewing center motoneurons innervating masseter and mylohyoideus muscles. There is no basis to suppose the presence of the special center of bruxism in medulla oblongata.Bruxism in rabbits an be considered as natural model of the first type bruxism in man. PMID:20436404

  20. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated GJA8 knockout in rabbits recapitulates human congenital cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lin; Sui, Tingting; Chen, Mao; Deng, Jichao; Huang, Yongye; Zeng, Jian; Lv, Qingyan; Song, Yuning; Li, Zhanjun; Lai, Liangxue

    2016-01-01

    Cataracts are the leading cause of vision loss in the world, although surgical treatment can restore vision in cataract patients. Until now, there have been no adequate animal models for in vivo studies of artificial lens safety and drug interactions. Genetic studies have demonstrated that GJA8 is involved in maintaining lens opacity and proper lens development. In this study, a cataract model with GJA8 gene knockout was developed via co-injection of Cas9/sgRNA mRNA into rabbit zygotes. Our results showed that gene mutation efficiency in the GJA8 locus reached 98.7% in embryos and 100% in pups, demonstrating that the Cas9/sgRNA system is a highly efficient tool for gene editing in rabbits. In agreement with other studies, our genetic and histology results showed that impaired GJA8 function caused microphthalmia, small lens size and cataracts. In summary, our novel rabbit model of cataracts will be an important drug-screening tool for cataract prevention and treatment. PMID:26912477

  1. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated GJA8 knockout in rabbits recapitulates human congenital cataracts.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lin; Sui, Tingting; Chen, Mao; Deng, Jichao; Huang, Yongye; Zeng, Jian; Lv, Qingyan; Song, Yuning; Li, Zhanjun; Lai, Liangxue

    2016-01-01

    Cataracts are the leading cause of vision loss in the world, although surgical treatment can restore vision in cataract patients. Until now, there have been no adequate animal models for in vivo studies of artificial lens safety and drug interactions. Genetic studies have demonstrated that GJA8 is involved in maintaining lens opacity and proper lens development. In this study, a cataract model with GJA8 gene knockout was developed via co-injection of Cas9/sgRNA mRNA into rabbit zygotes. Our results showed that gene mutation efficiency in the GJA8 locus reached 98.7% in embryos and 100% in pups, demonstrating that the Cas9/sgRNA system is a highly efficient tool for gene editing in rabbits. In agreement with other studies, our genetic and histology results showed that impaired GJA8 function caused microphthalmia, small lens size and cataracts. In summary, our novel rabbit model of cataracts will be an important drug-screening tool for cataract prevention and treatment. PMID:26912477

  2. Heavy water delays growth of human carcinoma in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Altermatt, H J; Gebbers, J O; Laissue, J A

    1988-08-01

    Deuterium-enriched water has an antiproliferative effect on transplantable mouse tumors without toxic side effects. Since the response to treatment of human carcinomas growing in nude mice is deemed to be a good indicator of the potential clinical behavior of these tumors, we studied the influence of this stable isotope of hydrogen on the growth of xenotransplanted human carcinomas of various histologic types, grades, and primary sites. Seven-week-old Balb/c-nu/nu mice were inoculated subcutaneously, either with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas or with carcinomas of the large intestine. After tumor inoculation, the mice were given drinking water containing 30 atom% D2O. Heavy water effectively retarded the growth of the human carcinomas. At the end of the experiment, the weight of the tumors was reduced to values ranging from 22% to 65% of the control values. The reproducible antiproliferative effect was more conspicuous in poorly differentiated carcinomas than in moderately well-differentiated variants. Since animals in both groups, kept under identical conditions, drank the same amount of water and had similar body weights, the difference in tumor growth can be attributed to the moderate deuteration of the hosts.

  3. De Novo Generated Human Red Blood Cells in Humanized Mice Support Plasmodium falciparum Infection.

    PubMed

    Amaladoss, Anburaj; Chen, Qingfeng; Liu, Min; Dummler, Sara K; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Chen, Jianzhu; Preiser, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Immunodeficient mouse-human chimeras provide a powerful approach to study host specific pathogens like Plasmodium (P.) falciparum that causes human malaria. Existing mouse models of P. falciparum infection require repeated injections of human red blood cells (RBCs). In addition, clodronate lipsomes and anti-neutrophil antibodies are injected to suppress the clearance of human RBCs by the residual immune system of the immunodeficient mice. Engraftment of NOD-scid Il2rg-/- mice with human hematopoietic stem cells leads to reconstitution of human immune cells. Although human B cell reconstitution is robust and T cell reconstitution is reasonable in the recipient mice, human RBC reconstitution is generally poor or undetectable. The poor reconstitution is mainly the result of a deficiency of appropriate human cytokines that are necessary for the development and maintenance of these cell lineages. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding human erythropoietin and interleukin-3 into humanized mice by hydrodynamic tail-vein injection resulted in significantly enhanced reconstitution of erythrocytes. With this improved humanized mouse, here we show that P. falciparum infects de novo generated human RBCs, develops into schizonts and causes successive reinvasion. We also show that different parasite strains exhibit variation in their ability to infect these humanized mice. Parasites could be detected by nested PCR in the blood samples of humanized mice infected with P. falciparum K1 and HB3 strains for 3 cycles, whereas in other strains such as 3D7, DD2, 7G8, FCR3 and W2mef parasites could only be detected for 1 cycle. In vivo adaptation of K1 strain further improves the infection efficiency and parasites can be detected by microscopy for 3 cycles. The parasitemia ranges between 0.13 and 0.25% at the first cycle of infection, falls between 0.08 and 0.15% at the second cycle, and drops to barely detectable levels at the third cycle of infection. Compared to existing mouse models, our

  4. Co-transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells and human breast cancer cells in NSG mice

    PubMed Central

    Wege, Anja K; Schmidt, Marcus; Ueberham, Elke; Ponnath, Marvin; Ortmann, Olaf; Brockhoff, Gero; Lehmann, Jörg

    2014-01-01

    Humanized tumor mice (HTM) were generated by the co-transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells and human breast cancer cells overexpressing HER2 into neonatal NOD-scid IL2Rγnull (NSG) mice. These mice are characterized by the development of a human immune system in combination with human breast cancer growth. Due to concurrent transplantation into newborn mice, transfer of MHC-mismatched tumor cells resulted in solid coexistence and immune cell activation (CD4+ T cells, natural killer cells, and myeloid cells), but without evidence for rejection. Histological staining of the spleen of HTM revealed co-localization of human antigen-presenting cells together with human T and B cells allowing MHC-dependent interaction, and thereby the generation of T cell-dependent antibody production. Here, we investigated the capability of these mice to generate human tumor-specific antibodies and correlated immunoglobulin titers with tumor outgrowth. We found detectable IgM and also IgG amounts in the serum of HTM, which apparently controlled tumor development when IgG serum concentrations were above 10 µg/ml. Western blot analyses revealed that the tumor-specific antibodies generated in HTM did not recognize HER2/neu antigens, but different, possibly relevant antigens for breast cancer therapy. In conclusion, HTM offer a novel approach to generate complete human monoclonal antibodies that do not require further genetic manipulation (e. g., humanization) for a potential application in humans. In addition, efficacy and safety of the generated antibodies can be tested in the same mouse model under human-like conditions. This might be of particular interest for cancer subtypes with no currently available antibody therapy. PMID:24870377

  5. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 suspended in fibrin glue enhances bone formation during distraction osteogenesis in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunfeng; Li, Rui; Hu, Jing; Song, Donghui; Jiang, Xiaowen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) has high potential for bone formation, but its in vivo effects are unpredictable due to the short life time. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of recombinant human (rh) BMP-2 suspended in fibrin on bone formation during distraction osteogenesis (DO) in rabbits. Material and methods The in vitro release kinetics of rhBMP-2 suspended in fibrin was tested using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Unilateral tibial lengthening for 10 mm was achieved in 48 rabbits. At the completion of osteodistraction, vehicle, fibrin, rhBMP-2 or rhBMP-2 suspended in fibrin (rhBMP-2 + fibrin) was injected into the center of the lengthened gap, with 12 animals in each group. Eight weeks later, the distracted callus was examined by histology, micro-CT and biomechanical testing. Radiographs of the distracted tibiae were taken at both 4 and 8 weeks after drug treatment. Results It was found that fibrin prolonged the life span of rhBMP-2 in vitro with sustained release during 17 days. The rhBMP-2 + fibrin treated animals showed the best results in bone mineral density, bone volume fraction, cortical bone thickness by micro-CT evaluation and mechanical properties by the three-point bending test when compared to the other groups (p < 0.05). In histological images, rhBMP-2 + fibrin treatment showed increased callus formation and better gap bridging compared to the other groups. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that fibrin holds promise to be a good carrier of rhBMP-2, and rhBMP-2 suspended in fibrin showed a stronger promoting effect on bone formation during DO in rabbits. PMID:27279839

  6. Application of chimeric mice with humanized liver for study of human-specific drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bateman, Thomas J; Reddy, Vijay G B; Kakuni, Masakazu; Morikawa, Yoshio; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2014-06-01

    Human-specific or disproportionately abundant human metabolites of drug candidates that are not adequately formed and qualified in preclinical safety assessment species pose an important drug development challenge. Furthermore, the overall metabolic profile of drug candidates in humans is an important determinant of their drug-drug interaction susceptibility. These risks can be effectively assessed and/or mitigated if human metabolic profile of the drug candidate could reliably be determined in early development. However, currently available in vitro human models (e.g., liver microsomes, hepatocytes) are often inadequate in this regard. Furthermore, the conduct of definitive radiolabeled human ADME studies is an expensive and time-consuming endeavor that is more suited for later in development when the risk of failure has been reduced. We evaluated a recently developed chimeric mouse model with humanized liver on uPA/SCID background for its ability to predict human disposition of four model drugs (lamotrigine, diclofenac, MRK-A, and propafenone) that are known to exhibit human-specific metabolism. The results from these studies demonstrate that chimeric mice were able to reproduce the human-specific metabolite profile for lamotrigine, diclofenac, and MRK-A. In the case of propafenone, however, the human-specific metabolism was not detected as a predominant pathway, and the metabolite profiles in native and humanized mice were similar; this was attributed to the presence of residual highly active propafenone-metabolizing mouse enzymes in chimeric mice. Overall, the data indicate that the chimeric mice with humanized liver have the potential to be a useful tool for the prediction of human-specific metabolism of xenobiotics and warrant further investigation.

  7. Effects of recombinant human interleukin-10 on Treg cells, IL-10 and TGF-β in transplantation of rabbit skin

    PubMed Central

    LIU, KAI SHAN; FAN, XIAO QIN; ZHANG, LEI; WEN, QIONG NA; FENG, JI HONG; CHEN, FU CHAO; LUO, JUN MIN; SUN, WAN BANG

    2014-01-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the rejection and survival time of grafted skin, and the changes of Treg cells, interleukin 10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) in peripheral blood following skin transplantation with recombinant human interleukin-10 (rhIL-10) or cyclosporin A (CsA), as well as the role of IL-10 in immunological rejection mechanisms. A total of 36 rabbits were divided into two groups. The skin of a donor rabbit was transplanted onto the back of one receptor rabbit. Receptors were randomly divided into six groups, including rhIL-10 low-dose (5 μg/kg/d), rhIL-10 high-dose (10 μg/kg/d), CsA low-dose (5 mg/kg/d), CsA high-dose (10 mg/kg/d), rhIL-10 (5 μg/kg/d) and CsA (5 mg/kg/d) and negative control normal saline (NS; 1 ml/d). All groups received intramuscular drug injection for ten days, beginning one day prior to skin transplantation surgery. Following transplantation, each rabbit’s peripheral blood was collected at different times. The changes of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells, IL-10 and TGF-β were determined by flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. When compared with the control group, the rejection and survival times of the experimental groups were longer following skin graft. Compared with the two CsA groups and the control group, the proportion of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells of rhIL-10 groups was significantly upregulated on the 4th and 7th days following surgery. However, TGF-β levels were not significantly different. Data suggested that the concentration of IL-10 was positively correlated with the proportion of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. In addition, IL-10 may delay the rejection time of rabbit skin transplantation and prolong the survival time. Thus, the role of IL-10 in inhibited allograft rejection may be associated with CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells and IL-10, and may be independent of TGF-β. PMID:24270972

  8. Mechanism of vasodilation induced by alpha-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide in rabbit and guinea-pig renal arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, K; Ishimatsu, T; Kuriyama, H

    1986-01-01

    Effects of alpha-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (alpha-HANP) on electrical and mechanical properties of smooth muscle cells of the guinea-pig and rabbit renal arteries and of the guinea-pig mesenteric artery were investigated. alpha-HANP (up to 10 nM) modified neither the membrane potential nor resistance of smooth muscle cells of the guinea-pig and rabbit renal arteries. In the guinea-pig mesenteric and renal arteries, alpha-HANP (up to 10 nM) had no effect on the amplitude and facilitation (mesenteric artery) or depression (renal artery) of excitatory junction potentials nor on action potentials. In the guinea-pig renal artery, alpha-HANP (up to 10 nM) had no effect on the depolarization induced by noradrenaline (NA) (up to 10 microM) but markedly inhibited NA-induced contraction. alpha-HANP (10 nM) slightly inhibited the K-induced contraction. In the rabbit renal artery, alpha-HANP (10 nM) inhibited the NA-induced contraction and to a lesser extent the K-induced contraction. In the rabbit renal artery, the effects of alpha-HANP on the release of Ca from the cellular storage by two applications of NA, and its re-storage, were investigated in Ca-free solution containing 2 mM-EGTA. When 5 nM-alpha-HANP was applied before and during the first application of 0.5 microM-NA, the contraction was markedly inhibited but the contraction to a second application of 10 microM-NA was potentiated. If the first dose of NA was 10 microM the effect was very small. Under the same experimental procedures, nitroglycerine (10 microM) showed almost the same effects as alpha-HANP on the NA-induced contractions. When both the first (3 mM) and second (10 mM) contractions were evoked by caffeine in Ca-free solution, alpha-HANP (5 nM) and nitroglycerine (10 microM) inhibited both contractions to the same extent. In the rabbit renal artery, applications of alpha-HANP or nitroglycerine increased the amount of guanosine 3',5'-phosphate (cyclic GMP) in a dose-dependent manner. However, a

  9. Rabbit anti-rabies immunoglobulins production and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinjian; Liu, Qiongqiong; Feng, Xiaomin; Tang, Qi; Wang, Zhongcan; Li, Suqing; Feng, Zhenqing; Zhu, Jin; Guan, Xiaohong

    2011-04-01

    Due to the disadvantages of human and equine rabies immunoglobulin, it is necessary to develop a substitute for HRIG and ERIG, especially for those people living in the developing countries. Because of higher affinity and lower immunogenicity of rabbit's immunoglobulins, anti-rabies immunoglobulins specific to rabies virus were produced in rabbits as a bioreactor, and had been characterized by ELISA, affinity assay, immunofluorescence assay (IFA), immunocytochemistry, rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). ELISA, affinity assay and IFA showed that rabbit RIG (RRIG) bound specifically to rabies virions. RFFIT result showed that RRIG has neutralization activity. This result was confirmed in vivo in a Kunming mouse challenge model and the protection rate of the treatment with RRIG was higher (25%) than that offered by HRIG when mice were challenged with a lethal RV dose. Our results demonstrate that RRIG is safe and efficacious as a candidate drug to replace rabies immunoglobulin in post-exposure prophylaxis.

  10. Generation and phenotypic analysis of a transgenic line of rabbits secreting active recombinant human erythropoietin in the milk.

    PubMed

    Mikus, Tomás; Poplstein, Martin; Sedláková, Jirina; Landa, Vladimír; Jeníkova, Gabriela; Trefil, Pavel; Lidický, Jan; Malý, Petr

    2004-10-01

    Production of recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) for therapeutic purposes relies on its expression in selected clones of transfected mammalian cells. Alternatively, this glycoprotein can be produced by targeted secretion into the body fluid of transgenic mammals. Here, we report on the generation of a transgenic rabbits producing rhEPO in the lactating mammary gland. Transgenic individuals are viable, fertile and transmit the rhEPO gene to the offspring. Northern blot data indicated that the expression of the transgene in the mammary gland is controlled by whey acidic protien (WAP) regulatory sequences during the period of lactation. While the hybridization with total RNA revealed the expression only in the lactating mammary gland, the highly sensitive combinatory approach using RT-PCR/hybridization technique detected a minor ectopic expression. The level of rhEPO secretion in the founder female, measured in the period of lactation, varied in the range of 60-178 and 60-162 mIU/ml in the milk and blood plasma, respectively. Biological activity of the milk rhEPO was confirmed by a standard [3H]-thymidine incorporation test. Thus, we describe the model of a rhEPO-transgenic rabbit, valuable for studies of rhEPO glycosylation and function, which can be useful for the development of transgenic approaches designed for the preparation of recombinant proteins by alternative biopharmaceutical production.

  11. Glucuronidation of Drugs and Drug-Induced Toxicity in Humanized UDP-Glucuronosyltransferase 1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kutsuno, Yuki; Itoh, Tomoo; Tukey, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) are phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes that catalyze glucuronidation of various drugs. Although experimental rodents are used in preclinical studies to predict glucuronidation and toxicity of drugs in humans, species differences in glucuronidation and drug-induced toxicity have been reported. Humanized UGT1 mice in which the original Ugt1 locus was disrupted and replaced with the human UGT1 locus (hUGT1 mice) were recently developed. In this study, acyl-glucuronidations of etodolac, diclofenac, and ibuprofen in liver microsomes of hUGT1 mice were examined and compared with those of humans and regular mice. The kinetics of etodolac, diclofenac, and ibuprofen acyl-glucuronidation in hUGT1 mice were almost comparable to those in humans, rather than in mice. We further investigated the hepatotoxicity of ibuprofen in hUGT1 mice and regular mice by measuring serum alanine amino transferase (ALT) levels. Because ALT levels were increased at 6 hours after dosing in hUGT1 mice and at 24 hours after dosing in regular mice, the onset pattern of ibuprofen-induced liver toxicity in hUGT1 mice was different from that in regular mice. These data suggest that hUGT1 mice can be valuable tools for understanding glucuronidations of drugs and drug-induced toxicity in humans. PMID:24764149

  12. Human Genetic Disorders and Knockout Mice Deficient in Glycosaminoglycan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are constructed through the stepwise addition of respective monosaccharides by various glycosyltransferases and maturated by epimerases and sulfotransferases. The structural diversity of GAG polysaccharides, including their sulfation patterns and sequential arrangements, is essential for a wide range of biological activities such as cell signaling, cell proliferation, tissue morphogenesis, and interactions with various growth factors. Studies using knockout mice of enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of the GAG side chains of proteoglycans have revealed their physiological functions. Furthermore, mutations in the human genes encoding glycosyltransferases, sulfotransferases, and related enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of GAGs cause a number of genetic disorders including chondrodysplasia, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, and Ehlers-Danlos syndromes. This review focused on the increasing number of glycobiological studies on knockout mice and genetic diseases caused by disturbances in the biosynthetic enzymes for GAGs. PMID:25126564

  13. Human cone pigment expressed in transgenic mice yields altered vision.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, G H; Fenwick, J C; Calderone, J B; Deeb, S S

    1999-04-15

    Genetically driven alterations in the complement of retinal photopigments are fundamental steps in the evolution of vision. We sought to determine how a newly added photopigment might impact vision by studying a transgenic mouse that expresses a human cone photopigment. Electroretinogram (ERG) measurements indicate that the added pigment works well, significantly changing spectral sensitivity without deleteriously affecting the operation of the native cone pigments. Visual capacities of the transgenic mice were established in behavioral tests. The new pigment was found to provide a significant expansion of the spectral range over which mice can perceive light, thus underlining the immediate utility of acquiring a new photopigment. The transgenic mouse also has the receptor basis for a novel color vision capacity, but tests show that potential was not realized. This failure likely reflects limitations in the organizational arrangement of the mouse retina.

  14. Development of a cytotoxic T-cell assay in rabbits to evaluate early immune response to human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 infection.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Rashade A H; Phipps, Andrew J; Yamamoto, Brenda; Green, Patrick; Lairmore, Michael D

    2009-12-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection causes adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia (ATL) following a prolonged clinical incubation period, despite a robust adaptive immune response against the virus. Early immune responses that allow establishment of the infection are difficult to study without effective animal models. We have developed a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) assay to monitor the early events of HTLV-1 infection in rabbits. Rabbit skin fibroblast cell lines were established by transformation with a plasmid expressing simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen and used as autochthonous targets (derived from same individual animal) to measure CTL activity against HTLV-1 infection in rabbits. Recombinant vaccinia virus (rVV) constructs expressing either HTLV-1 envelope surface unit (SU) glycoprotein 46 or Tax proteins were used to infect fibroblast targets in a (51)Cr-release CTL assay. Rabbits inoculated with Jurkat T cells or ACH.2 cells (expressing ACH HTLV-1 molecule clone) were monitored at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 13, 21, and 34 wk post-infection. ACH.2-inoculated rabbits were monitored serologically and for viral infected cells following ex vivo culture. Proviral load analysis indicated that rabbits with higher proviral loads had significant CTL activity against HTLV-1 SU as early as 2 wk post-infection, while both low- and high-proviral-load groups had minimal Tax-specific CTL activity throughout the study. This first development of a stringent assay to measure HTLV-1 SU and Tax-specific CTL assay in the rabbit model will enhance immunopathogenesis studies of HTLV-1 infection. Our data suggest that during the early weeks following infection, HTLV-1-specific CTL responses are primarily targeted against Env-SU. PMID:19951176

  15. Mice carrying a human GLUD2 gene recapitulate aspects of human transcriptome and metabolome development

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Guo, Song; Jiang, Xi; Bryk, Jaroslaw; Naumann, Ronald; Enard, Wolfgang; Tomita, Masaru; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Khaitovich, Philipp; Pääbo, Svante

    2016-01-01

    Whereas all mammals have one glutamate dehydrogenase gene (GLUD1), humans and apes carry an additional gene (GLUD2), which encodes an enzyme with distinct biochemical properties. We inserted a bacterial artificial chromosome containing the human GLUD2 gene into mice and analyzed the resulting changes in the transcriptome and metabolome during postnatal brain development. Effects were most pronounced early postnatally, and predominantly genes involved in neuronal development were affected. Remarkably, the effects in the transgenic mice partially parallel the transcriptome and metabolome differences seen between humans and macaques analyzed. Notably, the introduction of GLUD2 did not affect glutamate levels in mice, consistent with observations in the primates. Instead, the metabolic effects of GLUD2 center on the tricarboxylic acid cycle, suggesting that GLUD2 affects carbon flux during early brain development, possibly supporting lipid biosynthesis. PMID:27118840

  16. Cytochrome P450 and Xenobiotic Receptor Humanized Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Frank J.; Yu, Ai-Ming

    2006-01-01

    Most xenobiotics that enter the body are subjected to metabolism that functions primarily to facilitate their elimination. Metabolism of certain xenobiotics can also result in the production of electrophilic derivatives that can cause cell toxicity and transformation. Many xenobiotics can also activate receptors that in turn induce the expression of genes encoding xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes and xenobiotic transporters. However, there are marked species differences in the way mammals respond to xenobiotics, which are due in large part to molecular differences in receptors and xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes. This presents a problem in extrapolating data obtained with rodent model systems to humans. There are also polymorphisms in xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes that can impact drug therapy and cancer susceptibility. In an effort to generate more reliable in vivo systems to study and predict human response to xenobiotics, humanized mice are under development. PMID:16402898

  17. Requirement of the human T-cell leukemia virus p12 and p30 products for infectivity of human dendritic cells and macaques but not rabbits.

    PubMed

    Valeri, Valerio W; Hryniewicz, Anna; Andresen, Vibeke; Jones, Kathy; Fenizia, Claudio; Bialuk, Izabela; Chung, Hye Kyung; Fukumoto, Risaku; Parks, Robyn Washington; Ferrari, Maria Grazia; Nicot, Christophe; Cecchinato, Valentina; Ruscetti, Frank; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2010-11-11

    The identification of the genes necessary for human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-1) persistence in humans may provide targets for therapeutic approaches. We demonstrate that ablation of the HTLV-1 genes encoding p12, p30, or the HBZ protein, does not affect viral infectivity in rabbits and in this species, only the absence of HBZ is associated with a consistent reduction in virus levels. We observed reversion of the HTLV-1 mutants to the HTLV-1 wild-type genotype in none of the inoculated rabbits. In contrast, in macaques, the absence of HBZ was associated with reversion of the mutant virus to the wild-type genotype in 3 of the 4 animals within weeks from infection. Similarly, reversion to the wild type was observed in 2 of the 4 macaque inoculated with the p30 mutant. The 4 macaques exposed to the p12 knock remained seronegative, and only 2 animals were positive at a single time point for viral DNA in tissues. Interestingly, we found that the p12 and the p30 mutants were also severely impaired in their ability to replicate in human dendritic cells. These data suggest that infection of dendritic cells may be required for the establishment and maintenance of HTLV-1 infection in primate species.

  18. Photoaffinity labeling of human platelet and rabbit kidney. cap alpha. -adrenoceptors with (/sup 3/H)SKF 102229

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J.W.; Raymond, J.R.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; DeMarinis, R.M.

    1986-06-13

    A newly developed ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic photoaffinity ligand, 3-methyl-6-chloro-9-azido-1H-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-benzazepine (SKF 102229), has been radiolabeled with tritium to a specific activity of approx. 80 Ci/mmol. Using membranes prepared from human platelets and from rabbit kidney, ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptors have been covalently labeled following photolysis in the presence of (/sup 3/H)SKF 102229. As determined by SDS-PAGE, the apparent molecular weight of ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptors from both of these tissues was 64,000. The yield of covalent insertion of (/sup 3/H)SKF 102229 into the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptor was very good. Thus, following photolysis up to 90% of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptors could be irreversibly labeled with (/sup 3/H)SKF 102229.

  19. Common-path Fourier domain optical coherence tomography of irradiated human skin and ventilated isolated rabbit lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, A.; Wendel, M.; Knels, L.; Knuschke, P.; Mehner, M.; Koch, T.; Boller, D.; Koch, P.; Koch, E.

    2005-08-01

    A compact common path Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) system based on a broadband superluminescence diode is used for biomedical imaging. The epidermal thickening of human skin after exposure to ultraviolet radiation is measured to proof the feasibility of FD-OCT for future substitution of invasive biopsies in a long term study on natural UV skin protection. The FD-OCT system is also used for imaging lung parenchyma. FD-OCT images of a formalin fixated lung show the same alveolar structure as scanning electron microscopy images. In the ventilated and blood-free perfused isolated rabbit lung FD-OCT is used for real-time cross-sectional image capture of alveolar mechanics throughout tidal ventilation. The alveolar mechanics changing from alternating recruitment-derecruitment at zero positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to persistent recruitment after applying a PEEP of 5 cm H2O is observed in the OCT images.

  20. Two outer membrane lipoproteins from Histophilus somni are immunogenic in rabbits and sheep and induce protection against bacterial challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Guzmán-Brambila, Carolina; Rojas-Mayorquín, Argelia E; Flores-Samaniego, Beatriz; Ortuño-Sahagún, Daniel

    2012-11-01

    Histophilus somni is an economically important pathogen of cattle and other ruminants and is considered one of the key components of the bovine respiratory disease (BRD) complex, the leading cause of economic loss in the livestock industry. BRD is a multifactorial syndrome, in which a triad of agents, including bacteria, viruses, and predisposing factors or "stressors," combines to induce disease. Although vaccines against H. somni have been used for many decades, traditional bacterins have failed to demonstrate effective protection in vaccinated animals. Hence, the BRD complex continues to produce strong adverse effects on the health and well-being of stock and feeder cattle. The generation of recombinant proteins may facilitate the development of more effective vaccines against H. somni, which could confer better protection against BRD. In the present study, primers were designed to amplify, clone, express, and purify two recombinant lipoproteins from H. somni, p31 (Plp4) and p40 (LppB), which are structural proteins of the outer bacterial membrane. The results presented here demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that when formulated, an experimental vaccine enriched with these two recombinant lipoproteins generates high antibody titers in rabbits and sheep and exerts a protective effect in mice against septicemia induced by H. somni bacterial challenge. PMID:22971783

  1. Two Outer Membrane Lipoproteins from Histophilus somni Are Immunogenic in Rabbits and Sheep and Induce Protection against Bacterial Challenge in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán-Brambila, Carolina; Rojas-Mayorquín, Argelia E.; Flores-Samaniego, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Histophilus somni is an economically important pathogen of cattle and other ruminants and is considered one of the key components of the bovine respiratory disease (BRD) complex, the leading cause of economic loss in the livestock industry. BRD is a multifactorial syndrome, in which a triad of agents, including bacteria, viruses, and predisposing factors or “stressors,” combines to induce disease. Although vaccines against H. somni have been used for many decades, traditional bacterins have failed to demonstrate effective protection in vaccinated animals. Hence, the BRD complex continues to produce strong adverse effects on the health and well-being of stock and feeder cattle. The generation of recombinant proteins may facilitate the development of more effective vaccines against H. somni, which could confer better protection against BRD. In the present study, primers were designed to amplify, clone, express, and purify two recombinant lipoproteins from H. somni, p31 (Plp4) and p40 (LppB), which are structural proteins of the outer bacterial membrane. The results presented here demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that when formulated, an experimental vaccine enriched with these two recombinant lipoproteins generates high antibody titers in rabbits and sheep and exerts a protective effect in mice against septicemia induced by H. somni bacterial challenge. PMID:22971783

  2. Effect of Recombinant Human Growth Hormone on Osseointegration of Titanium Implants: A Histologic and Biomechanical Study in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Marcelo Emir Requia; Valiati, Renato; Hubler, Roberto; Moraes, Aury Nunes; Antonini, Fernando; de Oliveira, Henrique do Couto; Pagnoncelli, Rogério Miranda

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the action of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on osseointegration of titanium implants in rabbits. Fourteen adult New Zealand rabbits, aged 30 weeks, were used in the study, and randomly divided into 2 groups. In each animal, 2 (2.2 mm × 6 mm) pure titanium implants were placed in the left tibia. In one group (test group), 1 IU (0.3 mg) of rhGH as a lyophilized powder was applied to each osteotomy site prior to implant placement. Only titanium implants were placed in osteotomy sites of the other group (control). Animals were humanely killed at 14 and 42 days after surgery, and samples were then prepared for histologic analysis and biomechanical test. The biomechanical test showed tensile pull-out stress values of 33.88 N/cm(2) for controls and 59.26 N/cm(2) for the rhGH group at 14 days and 25.99 N/cm(2) and 29.69 N/cm(2) for the control and the test group, respectively, at 42 days. Scanning electron microscope analysis showed more uniform and abundant bone tissue in contact with the implants for the test group at 14 days, and no differences between groups at 42 days. Furthermore, histologic analysis also showed accelerated bone repair in 14 days and a more advanced stage of bone remodeling for the rhGH-treated group when compared to controls after 42 days of repair. Such results show that the topical use of rhGH induces new bone formation in the early stages of bone repair and hence accelerates osseointegration of titanium dental implants.

  3. Corneal haze induced by excimer laser photoablation in rabbits is reduced by preserved human amniotic membrane graft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ming X.; Gray, Trevor; Prabhasawat, Pinnita; Ma, Xiong; Culbertson, William; Forster, Richard; Hanna, Khalil; Tseng, Scheffer C. G.

    1998-06-01

    We conducted a study to determine if preserved human amniotic membrane can reduce corneal haze induced by excimer laser photoablation. Excimer photoablation was performed bilaterally on 40 New Zealand white rabbits with a 6 mm ablation zone and 120 micrometer depth (PTK) using the VISX Star. One eye was randomly covered with a preserved human amniotic membrane and secured using four interrupted 10 - 0 nylon sutures; the other eye served as control. The amniotic membranes were removed at one week, and the corneal haze was graded with a slit-lamp biomicroscopy by three masked corneal specialists (WC, KH and RF) biweekly for the ensuing 12 weeks. Histology and in situ TUNEL staining (for fragmented DNA as an index for apoptosis) was performed at days 1, 3 and 7 and at 12 weeks. One week after excimer photoablation, the amniotic membrane-covered corneas showed more anterior stromal edema, which resolved at the second week. A consistent grading of organized reticular corneal haze was noted among the three masked observers. Such corneal haze peaked at the seventh week in both groups. The amniotic membrane-covered group showed statistically significant less corneal haze (0.50 plus or minus 0.15) than the control groups (1.25 plus or minus 0.35) (p less than 0.001). The amniotic membrane-covered corneas had less inflammatory response at days 1 and 3, showing nearly nil DNA fragmentation on keratocytes on the ablated anterior stromal and less stromal fibroblast activation. There is less altered epithelial cell morphology and less epithelial hyperplasia at 1 week in these amniotic membrane-treated eyes. We concluded from this study that amniotic membrane matrix is effective in reducing corneal haze induced by excimer photoablation in rabbits and may have clinical applications.

  4. Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Pulmonary Infection in Humanized Mice Induces Human Anti-RSV Immune Responses and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anurag; Wu, Wenzhu; Sung, Biin; Huang, Jing; Tsao, Tiffany; Li, Xiangming; Gomi, Rika; Tsuji, Moriya

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract disease, which causes high rates of morbidity and mortality in infants and the elderly. Models of human RSV pulmonary disease are needed to better understand RSV pathogenesis and to assess the efficacy of RSV vaccines. We assessed the RSV-specific human innate, humoral, and cellular immune responses in humanized mice (mice with a human immune system [HIS mice]) with functional human CD4+ T and B cells. These mice were generated by introduction of HLA class II genes, various human cytokines, and human B cell activation factor into immunodeficient NOD scid gamma (NSG) mice by the use of an adeno-associated virus vector, followed by engraftment of human hematopoietic stem cells. During the first 3 days of infection, HIS mice lost more weight and cleared RSV faster than NSG mice. Human chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 3 (CCL3) and human interleukin-1β (IL-1β) expression was detected in the RSV-infected HIS mice. The pathological features induced by RSV infection in HIS mice included peribronchiolar inflammation, neutrophil predominance in the bronchioalveolar lavage fluid, and enhanced airway mucus production. Human anti-RSV IgG and RSV-neutralizing antibodies were detected in serum and human anti-RSV mucosal IgA was detected in bronchioalveolar lavage fluid for up to 6 weeks. RSV infection induced an RSV-specific human gamma interferon response in HIS mouse splenocytes. These results indicate that human immune cells can induce features of RSV lung disease, including mucus hyperplasia, in murine lungs and that HIS mice can be used to elicit human anti-RSV humoral and cellular immunity. IMPORTANCE Infections with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) are common and can cause severe lung disease in infants and the elderly. The lack of a suitable animal model with disease features similar to those in humans has hampered efforts to predict the efficacy of novel anti-RSV therapies and

  5. Expression of Human DNAJ (Heat Shock Protein-40) B3 in Humanized UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mitsugi, Ryo; Itoh, Tomoo; Fujiwara, Ryoichi

    2015-01-01

    The human DNAJB3 gene encodes a DNAJ (Heat shock protein 40; Hsp40) homolog, subfamily B, member 3 chaperone protein (DNAJB3), which can be down-regulated in disease conditions, as observed in decreased expression of DNAJB3 mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of obese patients. Recently, humanized UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1 mice (hUGT1 mice) were developed, in which the introduced human UGT1 gene contained a gene encoding human DNAJB3. In the present study, we analyzed the expression of human DNAJB3 mRNA in hUGT1 mice. Among the examined tissues, the testis had the highest expression of human DNAJB3 mRNA, while the lowest expression was observed in the liver. We found that the pattern of tissue-specific expression of mouse Dnajb3 in hUGT1 mice was very similar to that of human DNAJB3. We further demonstrated that the expression of human DNAJB3 in the liver was significantly reduced in high-fat-diet-fed hUGT1 mice compared to the expression level in the control mice, indicating that the expression of human DNAJB3 in hUGT1 mice could be similarly regulated in disease conditions such as obesity. Humanized UGT1 mice might therefore be useful to investigate the physiological role of human DNAJB3 in vivo. PMID:26147428

  6. Hantavirus-induced pathogenesis in mice with a humanized immune system.

    PubMed

    Kobak, Lidija; Raftery, Martin J; Voigt, Sebastian; Kühl, Anja A; Kilic, Ergin; Kurth, Andreas; Witkowski, Peter; Hofmann, Jörg; Nitsche, Andreas; Schaade, Lars; Krüger, Detlev H; Schönrich, Günther

    2015-06-01

    Hantaviruses are emerging zoonotic pathogens that can cause severe disease in humans. Clinical observations suggest that human immune components contribute to hantavirus-induced pathology. To address this issue we generated mice with a humanized immune system. Hantavirus infection of these animals resulted in systemic infection associated with weight loss, decreased activity, ruffled fur and inflammatory infiltrates of lung tissue. Intriguingly, after infection, humanized mice harbouring human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I-restricted human CD8+ T cells started to lose weight earlier (day 10) than HLA class I-negative humanized mice (day 15). Moreover, in these mice the number of human platelets dropped by 77 % whereas the number of murine platelets did not change, illustrating how differences between rodent and human haemato-lymphoid systems may contribute to disease development. To our knowledge this is the first description of a humanized mouse model of hantavirus infection, and our results indicate a role for human immune cells in hantaviral pathogenesis.

  7. Transgenic knockout mice with exclusively human sickle hemoglobinand sickle cell disease

    SciTech Connect

    Paszty, C.; Brion, C.; Manci, E.; Witkowska, E.; Stevens, M.; Narla, M.; Rubin, E.

    1997-06-13

    To create mice expressing exclusively human sicklehemoglobin (HbS), transgenic mice expressing human alpha-, gamma-, andbeta[S]-globin were generated and bred with knockout mice that haddeletions of the murine alpha- and beta-globin genes. These sickle cellmice have the major features (irreversibly sickled red cells, anemia,multiorgan pathology) found in humans with sickle cell disease and, assuch, represent a useful in vivo system to accelerate the development ofimproved therapies for this common genetic disease.

  8. Recombinant saphenous vein 5-HT1B receptors of the rabbit: comparative pharmacology with human 5-HT1B receptors.

    PubMed

    Wurch, T; Palmier, C; Colpaert, F C; Pauwels, P J

    1997-01-01

    1. The rabbit recombinant saphenous vein 5-hydroxytryptamine1B (r 5-HT1B) receptor stably transfected in rat C6-glial cells was characterized by measuring adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cycle AMP) formation upon exposure to various 5-HT receptor ligands. The effects of agonists and antagonists were compared with their effects determined previously at the human cloned 5-HT1B (h 5-HT1B) receptor under similar experimental conditions. 2. Intact C6-glial cells expressing rb HT1B receptors exhibited [3H]-5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT) binding sites with a Kd of 0.80 +/- 0.13 nM and a Bmax between 225 to 570 fmol mg-1 protein. The binding affinities of a series of 5-HT receptor ligands determined in a membrane preparation with [3H]-5-CT or [3H]-N-[4-methoxy-3-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)phenyl]-3-methyl-4-(-4 -pyridyl) benzamide (GR 125,743) were similar. With the exception of ketanserin, ligand affinities were comparable to those determined at the clones h 5-HT1B receptor site. 3. rb 5-HT1B receptors were negatively coupled to cyclic AMP formation upon stimulation with 5-HT agonists. Of the several 5-HT agonists tested, 5-CT was the most potent, the potency rank order being: 5-CT > 5-HT > zolmitriptan > naratriptan > rizatriptan > sumatriptan > R (+)-8-(hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT). The maximal responses of these agonists were similar to those induced by 5-HT. The potency of these agonists showed a positive correlation (r2 = 0.87; P < 0.002) with their potency at the cloned h 5-HT1B receptor subtype. 4. 2'-Methyl-4-(5-methyl-[1,2,4]oxadiazol-3-yl)-biphenyl-4-carboxylic acid [4-methoxy-e-(4-methyl-piperazin-1-yl)-phenyl]-amide (GR 127,935), methiothepin and ketanserin each behaved as silent, competitive antagonists at rb 5HT1B receptors; pKB values were 8.41, 8.32 and 7.05, respectively when naratriptan was used as an agonist. These estimates accorded with their binding affinities and the potencies found on 5-HT and/or sumatriptan

  9. Human immune system mice immunized with Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein induce protective human humoral immunity against malaria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Li, Xiangming; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G A; Zhang, Min; Mitchell, Robert; Nogueira, Raquel Tayar; Tsao, Tiffany; Noe, Amy R; Ayala, Ramses; Sahi, Vincent; Gutierrez, Gabriel M; Nussenzweig, Victor; Wilson, James M; Nardin, Elizabeth H; Nussenzweig, Ruth S; Tsuji, Moriya

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we developed human immune system (HIS) mice that possess functional human CD4+ T cells and B cells, named HIS-CD4/B mice. HIS-CD4/B mice were generated by first introducing HLA class II genes, including DR1 and DR4, along with genes encoding various human cytokines and human B cell activation factor (BAFF) to NSG mice by adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vectors, followed by engrafting human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HIS-CD4/B mice, in which the reconstitution of human CD4+ T and B cells resembles to that of humans, produced a significant level of human IgG against Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite (PfCS) protein upon immunization. CD4+ T cells in HIS-CD4/B mice, which possess central and effector memory phenotypes like those in humans, are functional, since PfCS protein-specific human CD4+ T cells secreting IFN-γ and IL-2 were detected in immunized HIS-CD4/B mice. Lastly, PfCS protein-immunized HIS-CD4/B mice were protected from in vivo challenge with transgenic P. berghei sporozoites expressing the PfCS protein. The immune sera collected from protected HIS-CD4/B mice reacted against transgenic P. berghei sporozoites expressing the PfCS protein and also inhibited the parasite invasion into hepatocytes in vitro. Taken together, these studies show that our HIS-CD4/B mice could mount protective human anti-malaria immunity, consisting of human IgG and human CD4+ T cell responses both specific for a human malaria antigen.

  10. Human immune system mice immunized with Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein induce protective human humoral immunity against malaria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Li, Xiangming; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G A; Zhang, Min; Mitchell, Robert; Nogueira, Raquel Tayar; Tsao, Tiffany; Noe, Amy R; Ayala, Ramses; Sahi, Vincent; Gutierrez, Gabriel M; Nussenzweig, Victor; Wilson, James M; Nardin, Elizabeth H; Nussenzweig, Ruth S; Tsuji, Moriya

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we developed human immune system (HIS) mice that possess functional human CD4+ T cells and B cells, named HIS-CD4/B mice. HIS-CD4/B mice were generated by first introducing HLA class II genes, including DR1 and DR4, along with genes encoding various human cytokines and human B cell activation factor (BAFF) to NSG mice by adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) vectors, followed by engrafting human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). HIS-CD4/B mice, in which the reconstitution of human CD4+ T and B cells resembles to that of humans, produced a significant level of human IgG against Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite (PfCS) protein upon immunization. CD4+ T cells in HIS-CD4/B mice, which possess central and effector memory phenotypes like those in humans, are functional, since PfCS protein-specific human CD4+ T cells secreting IFN-γ and IL-2 were detected in immunized HIS-CD4/B mice. Lastly, PfCS protein-immunized HIS-CD4/B mice were protected from in vivo challenge with transgenic P. berghei sporozoites expressing the PfCS protein. The immune sera collected from protected HIS-CD4/B mice reacted against transgenic P. berghei sporozoites expressing the PfCS protein and also inhibited the parasite invasion into hepatocytes in vitro. Taken together, these studies show that our HIS-CD4/B mice could mount protective human anti-malaria immunity, consisting of human IgG and human CD4+ T cell responses both specific for a human malaria antigen. PMID:26410104

  11. Production of Apolipoprotein C-III Knockout Rabbits using Zinc Finger Nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongshan; Zhang, Jifeng; Xu, Jie; Zhu, Tianqing; Fan, Yanbo; Fan, Jianglin; Chen, Y. Eugene

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (Apo) C-III (ApoCIII) resides on the surface of plasma chylomicron (CM), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) and high density lipoproteins (HDL). It has been recognized that high levels of plasma ApoCIII constitutea risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Elevated plasma ApoCIII level often correlates with insulin resistance, obesity, and hypertriglyceridemia. Invaluable knowledge on the roles of ApoCIIIin lipid metabolisms and CVD has been obtained from transgenic mouse models including ApoCIII knockout (KO) mice; however, it is noted that the metabolism of lipoprotein in mice is different from that of humans in many aspects. It is not known until now whether elevated plasma ApoCIII is directly atherogenic. We worked to develop ApoCIII KO rabbits in the present study based on the hypothesis that rabbits can serve as a reasonablemodelfor studying human lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis. Zinc finger nuclease (ZFN) sets targeting rabbit ApoCIIIgene were subjected to in vitro validation prior to embryo microinjection. The mRNA was injected to the cytoplasm of 35 rabbit pronuclear stage embryos, and evaluated the mutation rates at the blastocyst state. Of sixteen blastocysts that were assayed, a satisfactory 50% mutation rate (8/16) at the targeting site was achieved, supporting the use of Set 1 for in vivo experiments. Next, we microinjected 145 embryos with Set 1 mRNA, and transferred these embryos to 7 recipient rabbits. After 30 days gestation, 21 kits were born, out of which five were confirmed as ApoCIII KO rabbits after PCR sequencing assays. The KO animal rate (#KO kits/total born) was 23.8%. The overall production efficiency is 3.4% (5 kits/145 embryos transferred). The present work demonstrated that ZFN is a highly efficient method to produce KO rabbits. These ApoCIII KO rabbits are novel resources to study the roles of ApoCIII in lipid metabolisms. PMID:24301055

  12. High-level expression of a novel recombinant human plasminogen activator (rhPA) in the milk of transgenic rabbits and its thrombolytic bioactivity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Song, Shaozheng; Ge, Xin; Cheng, Yaobin; Lu, Rui; Zhang, Ting; Yu, Baoli; Ji, Xueqiao; Qi, Zhengqiang; Rong, Yao; Yuan, Yuguo; Cheng, Yong

    2016-08-01

    The human tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a key kinase of fibrinolysis that plays an important role in dissolving fibrin clots to promote thrombolysis. The recombinant human plasminogen activator (rhPA) has more thrombolytic advantages than the wild type tPA. To increase the half-life and thrombolytic activity of tPA, a mutant containing only the essential K2 fibrin-binding and P activating plasminogen domains of the wild type tPA was cloned. This fragment was then inserted into goat β-casein regulatory sequences. Then, a mammary gland-specific expression vector, PCL25/rhPA, was constructed, and the transgenic rabbits were generated. In this study, 18 live transgenic founders (12♀, 6♂) were generated using pronuclear microinjection. Six transgenic rabbits were obtained, and the expression levels of rhPA in the milk had a range of 15.2-630 µg/ml. A fibrin agarose plate assay of rhPA showed that it had strong thrombolytic bioactivity in vitro, and the highest specific activity was >360 (360 times more than that of alteplase). The results indicated that the rhPA containing only the K2 and P domains is efficiently expressed with higher thrombolytic bioactivity in the milk of transgenic rabbits. Our study also demonstrated a new method for the large-scale production of clinically relevant recombinant pharmaceutical proteins in the mammary glands of transgenic rabbits. PMID:27230577

  13. Transplantation of human spleen into immunodeficient NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) mice generates humanized mice that improve functional B cell development.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yun Shin; Son, Jin Kyung; Choi, Bongkum; Park, Jae Berm; Chang, Jun; Kim, Sung Joo

    2015-12-01

    We previously generated humanized TB34N mice that received human fetal thymus (T), bone tissue (B) and fetal liver-derived (FL)-CD34(+) cells (34) in immunodeficient, NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) (N) mice. Although humanized TB34N mice had excellent hematopoiesis, here, we sought to further improve this model by additional transplantation of human spleen tissue (S) as a secondary hematopoietic tissue (TBS34N). The human spleen grafts were enlarged and differentiated into a similar morphology of adult humans, including follicular lymphoid structures with T- and B-cells. The TBS34N mice mimicked mature human immune system (HIS): mature T- and B-cells and follicular dendritic cells; activated germinal center B-cells expressing CD71, BR3(+) cells, memory B-cells and activation-induced cytidine deaminase(+) B-cells; CD138(+) plasma cells were enriched in the mouse spleen. HBsAg-specific hIgG antibodies were secreted into the sera of all TBS34N mice upon immunization with HBsAg. Taken together, the humanized TBS34N mice improved mature HIS and achieved adaptive antibody responses. PMID:26360254

  14. Transplantation of human spleen into immunodeficient NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) mice generates humanized mice that improve functional B cell development.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yun Shin; Son, Jin Kyung; Choi, Bongkum; Park, Jae Berm; Chang, Jun; Kim, Sung Joo

    2015-12-01

    We previously generated humanized TB34N mice that received human fetal thymus (T), bone tissue (B) and fetal liver-derived (FL)-CD34(+) cells (34) in immunodeficient, NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) (N) mice. Although humanized TB34N mice had excellent hematopoiesis, here, we sought to further improve this model by additional transplantation of human spleen tissue (S) as a secondary hematopoietic tissue (TBS34N). The human spleen grafts were enlarged and differentiated into a similar morphology of adult humans, including follicular lymphoid structures with T- and B-cells. The TBS34N mice mimicked mature human immune system (HIS): mature T- and B-cells and follicular dendritic cells; activated germinal center B-cells expressing CD71, BR3(+) cells, memory B-cells and activation-induced cytidine deaminase(+) B-cells; CD138(+) plasma cells were enriched in the mouse spleen. HBsAg-specific hIgG antibodies were secreted into the sera of all TBS34N mice upon immunization with HBsAg. Taken together, the humanized TBS34N mice improved mature HIS and achieved adaptive antibody responses.

  15. Capsomer Vaccines Protect Mice from Vaginal Challenge with Human Papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wai-Hong; Gersch, Elizabeth; Kwak, Kihyuck; Jagu, Subhashini; Karanam, Balasubramanyam; Huh, Warner K.; Garcea, Robert L.; Roden, Richard B. S.

    2011-01-01

    Capsomers were produced in bacteria as glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins with human papillomavirus type 16 L1 lacking the first nine and final 29 residues (GST-HPV16L1Δ) alone or linked with residues 13–47 of HPV18, HPV31 and HPV45 L2 in tandem (GST-HPV16L1Δ-L2x3). Subcutaneous immunization of mice with GST-HPV16L1Δ or GST-HPV16L1Δ-L2x3 in alum and monophosphoryl lipid A induced similarly high titers of HPV16 neutralizing antibodies. GST-HPV16L1Δ-L2x3 also elicited moderate L2-specific antibody titers. Intravaginal challenge studies showed that immunization of mice with GST-HPV16 L1Δ or GST-HPV16L1Δ-L2x3 capsomers, like Cervarix®, provided complete protection against HPV16. Conversely, vaccination with GST-HPV16 L1Δ capsomers failed to protect against HPV18 challenge, whereas mice immunized with either GST-HPV16L1Δ-L2x3 capsomers or Cervarix® were each completely protected. Thus, while the L2-specific response was moderate, it did not interfere with immunity to L1 in the context of GST-HPV16L1Δ-L2x3 and is sufficient to mediate L2-dependent protection against an experimental vaginal challenge with HPV18. PMID:22069498

  16. The half-lives of intact and elastase cleaved human corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) are identical in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Lewis, John G; Saunders, Katie; Dyer, Arron; Elder, Peter A

    2015-05-01

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) is a non-inhibitory member of the serpin superfamily of serine protease inhibitors and carries the majority of cortisol in circulation. It can be cleaved by neutrophil elastase at its exposed reactive centre loop which decreases its affinity for cortisol allowing the release of most of the cortisol at sites of inflammation. Intact and elastase cleaved CBG can be distinguished from each other and can coexist in circulation but with unknown half-lives. Here we treated a portion of purified human CBG with elastase, terminated the digestion and then combined this portion with intact human CBG and measured their respective half-lives in rabbits by ELISA. This investigation shows for the first time that the half-lives of intact and elastase cleaved CBG are identical (∼10h). This is an important finding as it implies that in conditions such as sepsis and septic shock where levels of intact CBG are low and the proportion of cleaved CBG is high that this is likely sustained which may affect the CBG mediated targeted delivery of cortisol to sites of inflammation. Furthermore the residual binding of cortisol to cleaved CBG may alter the overall buffering capacity of CBG for cortisol resetting the baseline concentration of free cortisol.

  17. Efficient hydrolysis of the chemical warfare nerve agent tabun by recombinant and purified human and rabbit serum paraoxonase 1.

    PubMed

    Valiyaveettil, Manojkumar; Alamneh, Yonas; Biggemann, Lionel; Soojhawon, Iswarduth; Doctor, Bhupendra P; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P

    2010-12-01

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) has been described as an efficient catalytic bioscavenger due to its ability to hydrolyze organophosphates (OPs) and chemical warfare nerve agents (CWNAs). It is the future most promising candidate as prophylactic medical countermeasure against highly toxic OPs and CWNAs. Most of the studies conducted so far have been focused on the hydrolyzing potential of PON1 against nerve agents, sarin, soman, and VX. Here, we investigated the hydrolysis of tabun by PON1 with the objective of comparing the hydrolysis potential of human and rabbit serum purified and recombinant human PON1. The hydrolysis potential of PON1 against tabun, sarin, and soman was evaluated by using an acetylcholinesterase (AChE) back-titration Ellman method. Efficient hydrolysis of tabun (100 nM) was observed with ∼25-40 mU of PON1, while higher concentration (80-250 mU) of the enzyme was required for the complete hydrolysis of sarin (11 nM) and soman (3 nM). Our data indicate that tabun hydrolysis with PON1 was ∼30-60 times and ∼200-260 times more efficient than that with sarin and soman, respectively. Moreover, the catalytic activity of PON1 varies from source to source, which also reflects their efficiency of hydrolyzing different types of nerve agents. Thus, efficient hydrolysis of tabun by PON1 suggests its promising potential as a prophylactic treatment against tabun exposure.

  18. Human monoclonal antibody AVP-21D9 to protective antigen reduces dissemination of the Bacillus anthracis Ames strain from the lungs in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Johnny W; Comer, Jason E; Baze, Wallace B; Noffsinger, David M; Wenglikowski, Autumn; Walberg, Kristin G; Hardcastle, Jason; Pawlik, Jennifer; Bush, Kathryn; Taormina, Joanna; Moen, Scott; Thomas, John; Chatuev, Bagram M; Sower, Laurie; Chopra, Ashok K; Stanberry, Lawrence R; Sawada, Ritsuko; Scholz, Wolfgang W; Sircar, Jagadish

    2007-07-01

    Dutch-belted and New Zealand White rabbits were passively immunized with AVP-21D9, a human monoclonal antibody to protective antigen (PA), at the time of Bacillus anthracis spore challenge using either nasal instillation or aerosol challenge techniques. AVP-21D9 (10 mg/kg) completely protected both rabbit strains against lethal infection with Bacillus anthracis Ames spores, regardless of the inoculation method. Further, all but one of the passively immunized animals (23/24) were completely resistant to rechallenge with spores by either respiratory challenge method at 5 weeks after primary challenge. Analysis of the sera at 5 weeks after primary challenge showed that residual human anti-PA levels decreased by 85 to 95%, but low titers of rabbit-specific anti-PA titers were also measured. Both sources of anti-PA could have contributed to protection from rechallenge. In a subsequent study, bacteriological and histopathology analyses revealed that B. anthracis disseminated to the bloodstream in some naïve animals as early as 24 h postchallenge and increased in frequency with time. AVP-21D9 significantly reduced the dissemination of the bacteria to the bloodstream and to various organs following infection. Examination of tissue sections from infected control animals, stained with hematoxylin-eosin and the Gram stain, showed edema and/or hemorrhage in the lungs and the presence of bacteria in mediastinal lymph nodes, with necrosis and inflammation. Tissue sections from infected rabbits dosed with AVP-21D9 appeared comparable to corresponding tissues from uninfected animals despite lethal challenge with B. anthracis Ames spores. Concomitant treatment with AVP-21D9 at the time of challenge conferred complete protection in the rabbit inhalation anthrax model. Early treatment increased the efficacy progressively and in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, AVP-21D9 could offer an adjunct or alternative clinical treatment regimen against inhalation anthrax. PMID:17452469

  19. Human Monoclonal Antibody AVP-21D9 to Protective Antigen Reduces Dissemination of the Bacillus anthracis Ames Strain from the Lungs in a Rabbit Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Johnny W.; Comer, Jason E.; Baze, Wallace B.; Noffsinger, David M.; Wenglikowski, Autumn; Walberg, Kristin G.; Hardcastle, Jason; Pawlik, Jennifer; Bush, Kathryn; Taormina, Joanna; Moen, Scott; Thomas, John; Chatuev, Bagram M.; Sower, Laurie; Chopra, Ashok K.; Stanberry, Lawrence R.; Sawada, Ritsuko; Scholz, Wolfgang W.; Sircar, Jagadish

    2007-01-01

    Dutch-belted and New Zealand White rabbits were passively immunized with AVP-21D9, a human monoclonal antibody to protective antigen (PA), at the time of Bacillus anthracis spore challenge using either nasal instillation or aerosol challenge techniques. AVP-21D9 (10 mg/kg) completely protected both rabbit strains against lethal infection with Bacillus anthracis Ames spores, regardless of the inoculation method. Further, all but one of the passively immunized animals (23/24) were completely resistant to rechallenge with spores by either respiratory challenge method at 5 weeks after primary challenge. Analysis of the sera at 5 weeks after primary challenge showed that residual human anti-PA levels decreased by 85 to 95%, but low titers of rabbit-specific anti-PA titers were also measured. Both sources of anti-PA could have contributed to protection from rechallenge. In a subsequent study, bacteriological and histopathology analyses revealed that B. anthracis disseminated to the bloodstream in some naïve animals as early as 24 h postchallenge and increased in frequency with time. AVP-21D9 significantly reduced the dissemination of the bacteria to the bloodstream and to various organs following infection. Examination of tissue sections from infected control animals, stained with hematoxylin-eosin and the Gram stain, showed edema and/or hemorrhage in the lungs and the presence of bacteria in mediastinal lymph nodes, with necrosis and inflammation. Tissue sections from infected rabbits dosed with AVP-21D9 appeared comparable to corresponding tissues from uninfected animals despite lethal challenge with B. anthracis Ames spores. Concomitant treatment with AVP-21D9 at the time of challenge conferred complete protection in the rabbit inhalation anthrax model. Early treatment increased the efficacy progressively and in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, AVP-21D9 could offer an adjunct or alternative clinical treatment regimen against inhalation anthrax. PMID:17452469

  20. Expression of human factor IX in rabbit hepatocytes by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer: Potential for gene therapy of hemophilia B

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, A.R. Puget Sound Blood Center, Seattle, WA ); Darlington, G. ); Armentano, D.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1990-08-01

    Hemophilia B (Christmas disease) is a chromosome X-linked blood clotting disorder which results when factor IX is deficient or functionally defective. The enzyme is synthesized in the liver, and the existence of animal models for this genetic disease will permit the development of somatic gene therapy protocols aimed at transfer of the functional gene into the liver. The authors report the construction of an N2-based recombinant retroviral vector, NCMVFIX, for efficient transfer and expression of human factor IX cDNA in primary rabbit hepatocytes. In this construct the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter directs the expression of factor IX. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3-week-old New Zealand White rabbits, infected with the recombinant virus, and analyzed for secretion of active factor IX. The infected rabbit hepatocytes produced human factor IX that is indistinguishable from enzyme derived from normal human plasma. The recombinant protein is sufficiently {gamma}-carboxylated and is functionally active in clotting assays. These results establish the feasibility of using infected hepatocytes for the expression of this protein and are a step toward the goal of correcting hemophilia B by hepatic gene transfer.

  1. Expression of human factor IX in rabbit hepatocytes by retrovirus-mediated gene transfer: potential for gene therapy of hemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Armentano, D; Thompson, A R; Darlington, G; Woo, S L

    1990-08-01

    Hemophilia B (Christmas disease) is a chromosome X-linked blood clotting disorder which results when factor IX is deficient or functionally defective. The enzyme is synthesized in the liver, and the existence of animal models for this genetic disease will permit the development of somatic gene therapy protocols aimed at transfer of the functional gene into the liver. We report the construction of an N2-based recombinant retroviral vector, NCMVFIX, for efficient transfer and expression of human factor IX cDNA in primary rabbit hepatocytes. In this construct the human cytomegalovirus immediate early promoter directs the expression of factor IX. Hepatocytes were isolated from 3-week-old New Zealand White rabbits, infected with the recombinant virus, and analyzed for secretion of active factor IX. The infected rabbit hepatocytes produced human factor IX that is indistinguishable from enzyme derived from normal human plasma. The recombinant protein is sufficiently gamma-carboxylated and is functionally active in clotting assays. These results establish the feasibility of using infected hepatocytes for the expression of this protein and are a step toward the goal of correcting hemophilia B by hepatic gene transfer.

  2. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:26824989

  3. ELISA for herpes simplex virus (HSV) type-specific antibodies in human sera using HSV type 1 and type 2 polyspecific antigens blocked with type-heterologous rabbit antibodies.

    PubMed

    Vestergaard, B F; Grauballe, P C

    1979-08-01

    Crude antigenic preparations made from rabbit cornea cells infected with either HSV type 1 or type 2 could be used in ELISA for titration of HSV type-specific antibodies in human sera. After immunochemical binding of the crude HSV antigens in microtitre wells by use of type-homologous rabbit antibodies, type-common antigenic sties were blocked with type-heterologous rabbit antibodies. Titration of human sera in this system showed that high concentrations of type heterologous rabbit antibodies were capable of completely blocking type-common antigenic sites, while leaving type-specific antigenic sites unblocked and capable of reacting with human antibodies. Thus HSV type-specific antibodies in human sera could be measured in ELISA without the use of purified typespecific antigens.

  4. Prophylaxis With a Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV)-Specific Human Monoclonal Antibody Protects Rabbits From MERS-CoV Infection.

    PubMed

    Houser, Katherine V; Gretebeck, Lisa; Ying, Tianlei; Wang, Yanping; Vogel, Leatrice; Lamirande, Elaine W; Bock, Kevin W; Moore, Ian N; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Subbarao, Kanta

    2016-05-15

    With >1600 documented human infections with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and a case fatality rate of approximately 36%, medical countermeasures are needed to prevent and limit the disease. We examined the in vivo efficacy of the human monoclonal antibody m336, which has high neutralizing activity against MERS-CoV in vitro. m336 was administered to rabbits intravenously or intranasally before infection with MERS-CoV. Prophylaxis with m336 resulted in a reduction of pulmonary viral RNA titers by 40-9000-fold, compared with an irrelevant control antibody with little to no inflammation or viral antigen detected. This protection in rabbits supports further clinical development of m336.

  5. Generation of Novel Chimeric Mice with Humanized Livers by Using Hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID Mice.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Chise; Kawase, Yosuke; Tobita, Yoshimi; Hamamura, Satoko; Ohshita, Hiroki; Yokomichi, Hiroshi; Sanada, Harumi; Kakuni, Masakazu; Shiota, Akira; Kojima, Yuha; Ishida, Yuji; Shitara, Hiroshi; Wada, Naoko A; Tateishi, Hiromi; Sudoh, Masayuki; Nagatsuka, Shin-Ichiro; Jishage, Kou-Ichi; Kohara, Michinori

    2015-01-01

    We have used homozygous albumin enhancer/promoter-driven urokinase-type plasminogen activator/severe combined immunodeficient (uPA/SCID) mice as hosts for chimeric mice with humanized livers. However, uPA/SCID mice show four disadvantages: the human hepatocytes (h-heps) replacement index in mouse liver is decreased due to deletion of uPA transgene by homologous recombination, kidney disorders are likely to develop, body size is small, and hemizygotes cannot be used as hosts as more frequent homologous recombination than homozygotes. To solve these disadvantages, we have established a novel host strain that has a transgene containing albumin promoter/enhancer and urokinase-type plasminogen activator cDNA and has a SCID background (cDNA-uPA/SCID). We applied the embryonic stem cell technique to simultaneously generate a number of transgenic lines, and found the line with the most appropriate levels of uPA expression-not detrimental but with a sufficiently damaged liver. We transplanted h-heps into homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice via the spleen, and monitored their human albumin (h-alb) levels and body weight. Blood h-alb levels and body weight gradually increased in the hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice and were maintained until they were approximately 30 weeks old. By contrast, blood h-alb levels and body weight in uPA/SCID chimeric mice decreased from 16 weeks of age onwards. A similar decrease in body weight was observed in the homozygous cDNA-uPA/SCID genotype, but h-alb levels were maintained until they were approximately 30 weeks old. Microarray analyses revealed identical h-heps gene expression profiles in homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice were identical to that observed in the uPA/SCID mice. Furthermore, like uPA/SCID chimeric mice, homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID chimeric mice were successfully infected with hepatitis B virus and C virus. These results indicate that hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice may be novel and useful hosts for

  6. Generation of Novel Chimeric Mice with Humanized Livers by Using Hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID Mice.

    PubMed

    Tateno, Chise; Kawase, Yosuke; Tobita, Yoshimi; Hamamura, Satoko; Ohshita, Hiroki; Yokomichi, Hiroshi; Sanada, Harumi; Kakuni, Masakazu; Shiota, Akira; Kojima, Yuha; Ishida, Yuji; Shitara, Hiroshi; Wada, Naoko A; Tateishi, Hiromi; Sudoh, Masayuki; Nagatsuka, Shin-Ichiro; Jishage, Kou-Ichi; Kohara, Michinori

    2015-01-01

    We have used homozygous albumin enhancer/promoter-driven urokinase-type plasminogen activator/severe combined immunodeficient (uPA/SCID) mice as hosts for chimeric mice with humanized livers. However, uPA/SCID mice show four disadvantages: the human hepatocytes (h-heps) replacement index in mouse liver is decreased due to deletion of uPA transgene by homologous recombination, kidney disorders are likely to develop, body size is small, and hemizygotes cannot be used as hosts as more frequent homologous recombination than homozygotes. To solve these disadvantages, we have established a novel host strain that has a transgene containing albumin promoter/enhancer and urokinase-type plasminogen activator cDNA and has a SCID background (cDNA-uPA/SCID). We applied the embryonic stem cell technique to simultaneously generate a number of transgenic lines, and found the line with the most appropriate levels of uPA expression-not detrimental but with a sufficiently damaged liver. We transplanted h-heps into homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice via the spleen, and monitored their human albumin (h-alb) levels and body weight. Blood h-alb levels and body weight gradually increased in the hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice and were maintained until they were approximately 30 weeks old. By contrast, blood h-alb levels and body weight in uPA/SCID chimeric mice decreased from 16 weeks of age onwards. A similar decrease in body weight was observed in the homozygous cDNA-uPA/SCID genotype, but h-alb levels were maintained until they were approximately 30 weeks old. Microarray analyses revealed identical h-heps gene expression profiles in homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice were identical to that observed in the uPA/SCID mice. Furthermore, like uPA/SCID chimeric mice, homozygous and hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID chimeric mice were successfully infected with hepatitis B virus and C virus. These results indicate that hemizygous cDNA-uPA/SCID mice may be novel and useful hosts for

  7. A 5-fluorouracil-loaded floating gastroretentive hollow microsphere: development, pharmacokinetic in rabbits, and biodistribution in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Wei, Yumeng; Yang, Hongru; Pi, Chao; Liu, Hao; Ye, Yun; Zhao, Ling

    2016-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) was loaded in hollow microspheres to improve its oral bioavailability. 5-FU hollow microspheres were developed by a solvent diffusion-evaporation method. The effect of Span 80 concentration, ether/ethanol volume ratio, and polyvinyl pyrrolidone/ethyl cellulose weight ratio on physicochemical characteristics, floating, and in vitro release behaviors of 5-FU hollow microspheres was investigated and optimized. The formulation and technology composed of Span 80 (1.5%, w/v), ether/ethanol (1.0:10.0, v/v), and polyvinyl pyrrolidone/ethyl cellulose (1.0:10.0, w/w) were employed to develop three batch samples, which showed an excellent reproducibility. The microspheres were spherical with a hollow structure with high drug loading amount (28.4%±0.5%) and production yield (74.2%±0.6%); they exhibited excellent floating and sustained release characteristics in simulated gastric and intestinal fluid. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that 5-FU hollow microspheres significantly enhanced oral bioavailability (area under curve, [AUC](0-t): 12.53±1.65 mg/L(*)h vs 7.80±0.83 and 5.82±0.83 mg/L(*)h) with longer elimination half-life (t1/2) (15.43±2.12 hours vs 2.25±0.22 and 1.43±0.18 hours) and mean residence time (7.65±0.97 hours vs 3.61±0.41 and 2.34±0.35 hours), in comparison with its solid microspheres and powder. In vivo distribution results from tumor-bearing nude mice demonstrated that the animals administered with 5-FU hollow microspheres had much higher drug content in tumor, plasma, and stomach at 1 and 8 hours except for 0.5 hours sample collection time point in comparison with those administered with 5-FU solid microspheres and its powder. These results suggested that the hollow microspheres would be a promising controlled drug delivery system for an oral chemotherapy agent like 5-FU.

  8. A 5-fluorouracil-loaded floating gastroretentive hollow microsphere: development, pharmacokinetic in rabbits, and biodistribution in tumor-bearing mice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu; Wei, Yumeng; Yang, Hongru; Pi, Chao; Liu, Hao; Ye, Yun; Zhao, Ling

    2016-01-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) was loaded in hollow microspheres to improve its oral bioavailability. 5-FU hollow microspheres were developed by a solvent diffusion–evaporation method. The effect of Span 80 concentration, ether/ethanol volume ratio, and polyvinyl pyrrolidone/ethyl cellulose weight ratio on physicochemical characteristics, floating, and in vitro release behaviors of 5-FU hollow microspheres was investigated and optimized. The formulation and technology composed of Span 80 (1.5%, w/v), ether/ethanol (1.0:10.0, v/v), and polyvinyl pyrrolidone/ethyl cellulose (1.0:10.0, w/w) were employed to develop three batch samples, which showed an excellent reproducibility. The microspheres were spherical with a hollow structure with high drug loading amount (28.4%±0.5%) and production yield (74.2%±0.6%); they exhibited excellent floating and sustained release characteristics in simulated gastric and intestinal fluid. Pharmacokinetic studies demonstrated that 5-FU hollow microspheres significantly enhanced oral bioavailability (area under curve, [AUC](0−t): 12.53±1.65 mg/L*h vs 7.80±0.83 and 5.82±0.83 mg/L*h) with longer elimination half-life (t1/2) (15.43±2.12 hours vs 2.25±0.22 and 1.43±0.18 hours) and mean residence time (7.65±0.97 hours vs 3.61±0.41 and 2.34±0.35 hours), in comparison with its solid microspheres and powder. In vivo distribution results from tumor-bearing nude mice demonstrated that the animals administered with 5-FU hollow microspheres had much higher drug content in tumor, plasma, and stomach at 1 and 8 hours except for 0.5 hours sample collection time point in comparison with those administered with 5-FU solid microspheres and its powder. These results suggested that the hollow microspheres would be a promising controlled drug delivery system for an oral chemotherapy agent like 5-FU. PMID:27042001

  9. Transgenic mice with overexpression of mutated human optineurin(E50K) in the retina.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingfeng; Xiao, Zheng; Yuan, Huiping; Xue, Fei; Zhu, Yuanmao; Zhou, Xinrong; Yang, Binbin; Sun, Jingbo; Meng, Bo; Sun, Xian; Cheng, Fang

    2012-02-01

    In the present work, Site-directed mutagenesis to insert the Glu50Lys amino acid substitution was achieved by PCR using plasmid pBluescript-OPTN. Mutated human OPTN(E50K) gene-driven mouse c-kit promoter was constructed and confirmed by endonuclease digestion and sequence analysis. Transgenic mice were generated via the microinjection method. PCR and DNA dot blot were used to screen the positive transgenic mice. RT-PCR analyzed the RNA level and location of mutated human OPTN(E50K) mRNA expression in transgenic mice. Western blot and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the level and location of mutated human OPTN(E50K) expression in transgenic mice. A transgenic mouse model with overexpression of mutated human OPTN(E50K) in retina was successfully established. The transgene was integrated and transmitted into the chromosome of transgenic mice. Mutated human OPTN(E50K) gene was controlled by c-kit promoter and expressed in the retina in mice. Mutated human OPTN(E50K) in transgenic mice was higher than that of wild type C57BL/6J mice. Our studies had provided a new transgenic model for investigating the molecular properties of mutated human OPTN(E50K). PMID:21681420

  10. 70 years of radiation genetics: Fruit flies, mice and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahamson, S.

    1997-03-01

    Radiation protection`s function is to protect society from the potential hazards that might occur through the human use of radiation, whether it be from energy production, medical uses or other sources of exposure. To do so, various scientific bodies are called upon to develop risk estimates which will provide society with adequate protection to the adverse effects of radiation, as best we can understand those adverse affects. Geneticists have the added burden, in that they must attempt to provide protection not only to the offspring of the present generation but also for all subsequent generations. While most of us have difficulty in thinking of effects that might be manifest only one or two generations into the future, some have projected potential risks for 50 to 100 generations. Here the author reviews work on fruit flies and mice, and studies of human exposures, which has provided much of the foundational information upon which geneticists can derive conclusions with regard to radiation protection questions.

  11. Translational genetic approaches to substance use disorders: bridging the gap between mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Abraham A.; de Wit, Harriet

    2012-01-01

    While substance abuse disorders only occur in humans, mice and other model organisms can make valuable contributions to genetic studies of these disorders. In this review, we consider a few specific examples of how model organisms have been used in conjunction with studies in humans to study the role of genetic factors in substance use disorders. In some examples genes that were first discovered in mice were subsequently studied in humans. In other examples genes or specific polymorphisms in genes were first studied in humans and then modeled in mice. Using anatomically and temporally specific genetic, pharmacological and other environmental manipulations in conjunction with histological analyses, mechanistic insights that would be difficult to obtain in humans have been obtained in mice. We hope these examples illustrate how novel biological insights about the effect of genes on substance use disorders can be obtained when mouse and human genetic studies are successfully integrated. PMID:22170288

  12. Influence of human myasthenia gravis thymus on the differentiation of human cord blood stem cells in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian Ru; Liu, Ping Ping; Xuan, Xiao Yan; Guan, Sha Sha; Du, Ying; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Qing Yong

    2014-02-01

    The normal thymus contributes to T lymphocytes differentiation and induction of tolerance to self-antigens. Myasthenia gravis (MG) is characterized by abnormal thymic hyperplasia. To assess the potential influence of MG-thymus on the differentiation of T lymphocytes differentiation, we used the MG-thymus transplanted severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice model to evaluate the human cord blood stem cells differentiation. Thymus fragments from MG patient and human cord blood stem cells were transplanted into SCID mice successively. SCID mice were observed to develop sustained human T lymphocytes and a functional anti-tumor immune. The levels of various T cell subsets in SCID mice with MG-thymus were different from that of control group. Among that, the frequency of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells was significant lower in SCID mice with MG-thymus. The deficiency of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells seens to contribute to the pathogenesis of MG.

  13. Immunochemical studies on L-rhamno-D-mannans of Sporothrix schenckii and related fungi by use of rabbit and human antisera.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, K O; Travassos, L R

    1975-03-01

    Antisera were prepared in rabbits against the human pathogenic yeast Sporothrix schenckii (strain 1099.12) grown at two different temperatures (25 degrees and 37 degrees). Precipitation and inhibition data showed that the former serum had a specificity directed against alpha-L-Rhap-(1 yields 2)-alpha-L-Rhap-(1 yields 3)-D-Man-(1 yields determinants, whereas the latter had a broad specificity in which alpha-L-rhamnosyl or alpha-L-Rhap-(1 yields 3)-D-Man- was the immunodominant structure. These results are consistent with data on the structures of the L-rhamno-D-mannans isolated from the organism grown at the two different temperatures. Human sera from patients with sporotrichosis were shown to have different specificities resembling the specificities developed in the rabbits. The rabbit antisera were also used to examine the cross-reactivity with L-rhamno-D-mannans from species of the genus Ceratocystis, which is reputed to include the ascigerous (perfect) state of S. schenckii. Polysaccharides from four species of Ceratocystis grown at 25 degrees reacted with the antisera in a manner resembling that of the L-rhamno-D-mannan from S. schenckii grown at 37 degrees. This is in accord with earlier data that showed that only S. schenckii, of the species studied, produces a polysaccharide with large amounts of alpha-L-Rhap-(1 yields 2)-alpha-L-Rhap-(1 yields side-chains when grown at 25 degrees.

  14. Normalizing the environment recapitulates adult human immune traits in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Beura, Lalit K; Hamilton, Sara E; Bi, Kevin; Schenkel, Jason M; Odumade, Oludare A; Casey, Kerry A; Thompson, Emily A; Fraser, Kathryn A; Rosato, Pamela C; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Sekaly, Rafick P; Jenkins, Marc K; Vezys, Vaiva; Haining, W Nicholas; Jameson, Stephen C; Masopust, David

    2016-04-28

    Our current understanding of immunology was largely defined in laboratory mice, partly because they are inbred and genetically homogeneous, can be genetically manipulated, allow kinetic tissue analyses to be carried out from the onset of disease, and permit the use of tractable disease models. Comparably reductionist experiments are neither technically nor ethically possible in humans. However, there is growing concern that laboratory mice do not reflect relevant aspects of the human immune system, which may account for failures to translate disease treatments from bench to bedside. Laboratory mice live in abnormally hygienic specific pathogen free (SPF) barrier facilities. Here we show that standard laboratory mouse husbandry has profound effects on the immune system and that environmental changes produce mice with immune systems closer to those of adult humans. Laboratory mice--like newborn, but not adult, humans--lack effector-differentiated and mucosally distributed memory T cells. These cell populations were present in free-living barn populations of feral mice and pet store mice with diverse microbial experience, and were induced in laboratory mice after co-housing with pet store mice, suggesting that the environment is involved in the induction of these cells. Altering the living conditions of mice profoundly affected the cellular composition of the innate and adaptive immune systems, resulted in global changes in blood cell gene expression to patterns that more closely reflected the immune signatures of adult humans rather than neonates, altered resistance to infection, and influenced T-cell differentiation in response to a de novo viral infection. These data highlight the effects of environment on the basal immune state and response to infection and suggest that restoring physiological microbial exposure in laboratory mice could provide a relevant tool for modelling immunological events in free-living organisms, including humans. PMID:27096360

  15. Normalizing the environment recapitulates adult human immune traits in laboratory mice.

    PubMed

    Beura, Lalit K; Hamilton, Sara E; Bi, Kevin; Schenkel, Jason M; Odumade, Oludare A; Casey, Kerry A; Thompson, Emily A; Fraser, Kathryn A; Rosato, Pamela C; Filali-Mouhim, Ali; Sekaly, Rafick P; Jenkins, Marc K; Vezys, Vaiva; Haining, W Nicholas; Jameson, Stephen C; Masopust, David

    2016-04-28

    Our current understanding of immunology was largely defined in laboratory mice, partly because they are inbred and genetically homogeneous, can be genetically manipulated, allow kinetic tissue analyses to be carried out from the onset of disease, and permit the use of tractable disease models. Comparably reductionist experiments are neither technically nor ethically possible in humans. However, there is growing concern that laboratory mice do not reflect relevant aspects of the human immune system, which may account for failures to translate disease treatments from bench to bedside. Laboratory mice live in abnormally hygienic specific pathogen free (SPF) barrier facilities. Here we show that standard laboratory mouse husbandry has profound effects on the immune system and that environmental changes produce mice with immune systems closer to those of adult humans. Laboratory mice--like newborn, but not adult, humans--lack effector-differentiated and mucosally distributed memory T cells. These cell populations were present in free-living barn populations of feral mice and pet store mice with diverse microbial experience, and were induced in laboratory mice after co-housing with pet store mice, suggesting that the environment is involved in the induction of these cells. Altering the living conditions of mice profoundly affected the cellular composition of the innate and adaptive immune systems, resulted in global changes in blood cell gene expression to patterns that more closely reflected the immune signatures of adult humans rather than neonates, altered resistance to infection, and influenced T-cell differentiation in response to a de novo viral infection. These data highlight the effects of environment on the basal immune state and response to infection and suggest that restoring physiological microbial exposure in laboratory mice could provide a relevant tool for modelling immunological events in free-living organisms, including humans.

  16. Xeno-repopulation of Fah -/- Nod/Scid mice livers by human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Su, Baoliang; Liu, Changcheng; Xiang, Dao; Zhang, Haibin; Yuan, Siming; Wang, Minjun; Chen, Fei; Zhu, Haiying; He, Zhiying; Wang, Xin; Hu, Yiping

    2011-03-01

    Functional human hepatocytes xenografted into the liver of mice can be used as a model system to study pharmacokinetics, infection of hepatitis viruses, and the efficacy of hepatitis vaccines. Significant levels of liver xeno-repopulation have been reported in Fah (-/-) Rag2 (-/-) Il2rg (-/-) mice. However, A new model, termed Fah (-/-) Nod/Scid mice, which combines the advantages of liver repopulation in Fah (-/-) mice with the ease of xenotransplantation in Nod/Scid mice was obtained by gradual cross-breeding. Fah (-/-) Nod/Scid mice were easily maintained in breeding colonies and in adult animal care facilities. FK506 treatment combined with gradual withdrawal of NTBC before cell transplantation ensured that Fah (-/-) Nod/Scid mice were susceptible to liver xeno-repopulation by human hepatocytes; the proportion of engrafted human hepatocytes reached 33.6%. The function of the expanded human hepatocytes within the chimeric liver was confirmed by weight curve analysis, the expression of characteristic proteins, and the biochemical analysis of liver function. These results show that Fah (-/-) Nod/Scid mice are an ideal humanized liver mouse model with many useful applications.

  17. Transcriptional repression of Caveolin-1 (CAV1) gene expression by GATA-6 in bladder smooth muscle hypertrophy in mice and human beings.

    PubMed

    Boopathi, Ettickan; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Goldfarb, Robert; John, Mary; Srinivasan, Vittala Gopal; Alanzi, Jaber; Malkowicz, S Bruce; Kathuria, Hasmeena; Zderic, Stephen A; Wein, Alan J; Chacko, Samuel

    2011-05-01

    Hypertrophy occurs in urinary bladder wall smooth muscle (BSM) in men with partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO) caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and in animal models of PBOO. Hypertrophied BSM from the rabbit model exhibits down-regulation of caveolin-1, a structural and functional protein of caveolae that function as signaling platforms to mediate interaction between receptor proteins and adaptor and effector molecules to regulate signal generation, amplification, and diversification. Caveolin-1 expression is diminished in PBOO-induced BSM hypertrophy in mice and in men with BPH. The proximal promoter of the human and mouse caveolin-1 (CAV1) gene was characterized, and it was observed that the transcription factor GATA-6 binds this promoter, causing reduced expression of caveolin-1. Furthermore, caveolin-1 expression levels inversely correlate with the abundance of GATA-6 in BSM hypertrophy in mice and human beings. Silencing of GATA6 gene expression up-regulates caveolin-1 expression, whereas overexpression of GATA-6 protein sustains the transcriptional repression of caveolin-1 in bladder smooth muscle cells. Together, these data suggest that GATA-6 acts as a transcriptional repressor of CAV1 gene expression in PBOO-induced BSM hypertrophy in men and mice. GATA-6-induced transcriptional repression represents a new regulatory mechanism of CAV1 gene expression in pathologic BSM, and may serve as a target for new therapy for BPH-induced bladder dysfunction in aging men.

  18. Cholesterol efflux potential of sera from mice expressing human cholesteryl ester transfer protein and/or human apolipoprotein AI.

    PubMed Central

    Atger, V; de la Llera Moya, M; Bamberger, M; Francone, O; Cosgrove, P; Tall, A; Walsh, A; Moatti, N; Rothblat, G

    1995-01-01

    The ability of whole serum to promote cell cholesterol efflux and the relationships between apoprotein and lipoprotein components of human serum efflux have been investigated previously (de la Llera Moya, M., V. Atger, J.L. Paul, N. Fournier, N. Moatti, P. Giral, K.E. Friday, and G.H. Rothblat. 1994. Arterioscler. Thromb. 14:1056-1065). We have now used this experimental system to study the selective effects of two human lipoprotein-related proteins, apoprotein AI (apo AI) and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) on cell cholesterol efflux, when these proteins are expressed in transgenic mice. The percent efflux values for cholesterol released in 4 h from Fu5AH donor cells to 5% sera from the different groups of mice were in the order: background = human apo AI transgenic (HuAITg) > human CETP transgenic (HuCETPTg) > human apo AI and CETP transgenic (HuAICETPTg) >> apo AI knockout mice. In each group of mice a strong, positive correlation (r2 ranging from 0.64 to 0.76) was found between efflux and HDL cholesterol concentrations. The slopes of these regression lines differed between groups of mice, indicating that the cholesterol acceptor efficiencies of the sera differed among groups. These differences in relative efficiencies can explain why cholesterol efflux was not proportional to the different HDL levels in the various groups of mice. We can conclude that: (a) HDL particles from HuAITg mice are less efficient as cholesterol acceptors than HDL from the background mice; (b) despite a lower average efflux due to lower HDL cholesterol concentrations, HDL particles are more efficient in the HuCETPTg mice than in the background mice; and (c) the coexpression of both human apo AI and CETP improves the efficiency of HDL particles in the HuAICETPTg mice when compared with the HuAITg mice. We also demonstrated that the esterification of the free cholesterol released from the cells by lecithin cholesterol acyltransferase in the serum was reduced in the HuAITg and AI

  19. Induction of lymphomas on implantation of human oral squamous cell carcinomas in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Teni, T R; Saranath, D; Mahale, A M; Pai, S A; Ahire, S D; Ingle, A D

    2001-02-01

    Cancer cells from five oral cancer patients and pleomorphic adenoma cells from one individual were inoculated as single cell suspension into subcutis of 30 Swiss nude mice and tail vein of additional 30 mice. Further, tumor tissue pieces from three oral cancer patients were xenografted s.c. in 18 nude mice, and 10 mice were kept as controls. In animals implanted with tumor pieces, 7/18 (39%) mice, developed squamous cell carcinoma at the site of inoculation within 8-15 days, while tumors were not observed in mice inoculated with single cell suspension, up to 60/90 days. In 8/68 (12%) mice, white foci were observed in several tissues, with hepatomegaly and splenomegaly noted in 27/68 (39%) mice. Histopathological examination of various tissues revealed presence of large cell lymphoma in several organs in 14/68 (21%) mice. No regional or distant metastasis of the implanted oral tumor cells was detected. Mice injected with cells from pleomorphic adenoma, also demonstrated large cell lymphoma in 2/10 (20%) mice, whereas none of the 10 control animals showed any gross abnormalities or microscopic abnormalities in several organs. 2/16 (12%) lymphomas exhibited positive reaction with mouse B cell antibodies illustrating the murine origin of the lymphomas, and these were immunophenotyed as B cell lymphomas. The lymphomas were also examined with mouse T cell antibodies and none reacted positively with the mouse T cell antibodies. The lymphomas also failed to react with human T cell, B cell and human Leucocyte common antigen (LCA) antibodies, indicating that the induced lymphomas were not of human origin. The tumor specimens from seven of eight oral cancer patients and the pleomorphic adenoma patient induced lymphomas in nude mice. Thus it appears that xenografting oral tumor cells into nude mice may cause induction of the murine lymphomas, and this needs further investigation.

  20. Neuropathy in Human and Mice with PMP22 null

    PubMed Central

    Saporta, Mario Andre; Katona, Istvan; Zhang, Xuebao; Roper, Helen P.; Carr, Louise; Macdonald, Fiona; Brueton, Louise; Blake, Julian; Suter, Ueli; Reilly, Mary M.; Shy, Michael E.; Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background/Objective Haploinsufficiency of PMP22 causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP). However, the biological functions of PMP22 in humans are largely unexplored due to the absence of patients with PMP22 null mutations. Design, Setting and Participants We have evaluated a 7-year-old boy with PMP22 null. Findings were compared with those from nerves of Pmp22 null mice. Results Motor and sensory deficits in the proband were non-length dependent. Weakness was found in cranial muscles, but not in the limbs. Large fiber sensory modalities were profoundly abnormal, which started prior to the maturation of myelin. This is in line with the temporal pattern of PMP22 expression predominantly in cranial motor neurons and DRG during embryonic development, becoming undetectable in adulthood. Moreover, there were conspicuous maturation defects of myelinating Schwann cells that were more significant in motor nerve fibers than in sensory nerve fibers. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that PMP22 is important for the normal function of neurons that express PMP22 during early development, such as cranial motor neurons and spinal sensory neurons. Moreover, PMP22 deficiency differentially affects myelination between motor and sensory nerves, which may have contributed to the unique clinical phenotype in the patient with absence of PMP22. PMID:21670407

  1. Improved Engraftment of Human Spleen Cells in NOD/LtSz-scid/scid Mice as Compared with C.B-17-scid/scid Mice

    PubMed Central

    Greiner, Dale L.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Yates, Jon; Appel, Michael C.; Perdrizet, George; Hesselton, RuthAnn M.; Schweitzer, Isabelle; Beamer, Wes G.; Shultz, Kathryn L.; Pelsue, Stephen C.; Leif, Jean H.; Rajan, Thiruchandurai V.

    1995-01-01

    T and B lymphocyte-deficient mice homozygous for the severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mutation can be immunologically engrafted with human lymphocytes. However, low levels of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell engraftment are commonly observed, impeding full use of this model We now demonstrate that strain background in mice homozygous for the scid mutation is a strong determinant of levels of human lymphocyte engraftment. NOD/LtSz-scid/scid mice support higher levels of engraftment of both human spleen and peripheral blood mononuclear cells than do C.B-17-scid/scid mice. We observed, using human spleen cell injected scid mice, 1), high levels of engraftment of the host peripheral lymphoid tissues with human CD45+ (leukocytes), CD3+ (T cells), CD4+ (helper/inducer), and CD8+ (suppressor/cytotoxic) lymphoid cells for up to 24 weeks in NOD/LtSz-scid/scid mice; 2), migration of high numbers of human lymphocytes to peripheral lymphoid and nonlymphoid organs in NOD/LtSz-scid/scid, but not in C.B-17-scid/scid mice; 3), higher levels of serum immunoglobulin of human origin in NOD/LtSz-scid/scid mice than in C.B-17-scid/scid mice; 4), histological lesions character-istic of human anti-mouse xenoreactivity in NOD/LtSz-scid/scid mice; and 5), human origin antibodies against filarial antigens after engraftment with naive human spleen cells. The use of NOD/LtSz-scid/scid mice as recipients to achieve significantly enhanced human lymphopoietic cell engraftment will now enable human immunity to be more easily studied in animal models. ImagesFigure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 12 PMID:7717456

  2. The use of SCID mice in biotechnology and as a model for human disease

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, J.S. |; Boynton, E.; Gorczynski, R.; Hozumi, N.

    1996-05-01

    The use of SCID (severe combined immunodeficient) mice in medical research and biotechnology has increased tremendously in recent years. This review outlines the major characteristics of these animals and the impediments that they poise to the engraftment of human cells and tissues. The development of the SCID mice pretreatment protocol (anti-asialo GM 1 antisera and radiation) is described, and the results of xenotransplantation studies of human cells and tissues in these pretreated animals are outlined. Wherever possible, data from transplantation studies (of human tissues and cells) in pretreated and nonpretreated animals are compared. The potential of the pretreated SCID mice for medical research and biotechnology is discussed.

  3. Malignant Potential of Murine Stromal Cells after Transplantation of Human Tumors into Nude Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldenberg, David M.; Pavia, Rose A.

    1981-04-01

    Human malignant cancer tumors grafted into nude mice produce tumors containing both human cancer cells and the host's stromal cells. After short-term propagation of these tumors in vitro, the murine mesenchymal cells appear transformed and are tumorigenic in nude mice. However, established human cancer cell lines fail to similarly alter adjacent murine stromal cells when used to produce tumors in nude mice. These experiments suggest that cancer cells may recruit normal cells to become malignant, qualifying the view of the clonal (unicellular) origin of cancer.

  4. Plasmodium falciparum full life cycle and Plasmodium ovale liver stages in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Soulard, Valérie; Bosson-Vanga, Henriette; Lorthiois, Audrey; Roucher, Clémentine; Franetich, Jean- François; Zanghi, Gigliola; Bordessoulles, Mallaury; Tefit, Maurel; Thellier, Marc; Morosan, Serban; Le Naour, Gilles; Capron, Frédérique; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Snounou, Georges; Moreno-Sabater, Alicia; Mazier, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Experimental studies of Plasmodium parasites that infect humans are restricted by their host specificity. Humanized mice offer a means to overcome this and further provide the opportunity to observe the parasites in vivo. Here we improve on previous protocols to achieve efficient double engraftment of TK-NOG mice by human primary hepatocytes and red blood cells. Thus, we obtain the complete hepatic development of P. falciparum, the transition to the erythrocytic stages, their subsequent multiplication, and the appearance of mature gametocytes over an extended period of observation. Furthermore, using sporozoites derived from two P. ovale-infected patients, we show that human hepatocytes engrafted in TK-NOG mice sustain maturation of the liver stages, and the presence of late-developing schizonts indicate the eventual activation of quiescent parasites. Thus, TK-NOG mice are highly suited for in vivo observations on the Plasmodium species of humans. PMID:26205537

  5. Differential effects of human interferon alpha and interferon gamma on xenografted human thyroid tissue in severe combined immunodeficient mice and nude mice.

    PubMed

    Kawai, K; Enomoto, T; Fornasier, V; Resetkova, E; Volpé, R

    1997-03-01

    We have studied the in vivo effects of human interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) and interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) administration on human thyroid tissue xenografted into two mouse strains: severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice and nude mice. Human lymphocytes survive in SCID mice but are lysed in nude mice. Thyroid tissues from Graves' disease or Hashimoto's thyroiditis, or paranodular [normal, (N)] tissue was xenografted into SCID mice (0.8 g/mouse) pretreated with anti-asialo GM-1 antiserum and radiation and also into nude mice. One week after xenografting, SCID and nude mice were divided into three groups. Group A was treated with IFN-alpha intraperitoneally (2,000 units/mouse) three times weekly; group B was treated with IFN-gamma similarly; group C was treated with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) only (control). Autologous human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were added to mice receiving N xenografts. Blood was taken every 2 weeks for levels of IgG and thyroid antibodies (TAb). After 6 weeks of treatment, mice were sacrificed, and xenograft thyrocyte histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA-DR) and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) expression were measured. In addition, thyrocyte cultures were stimulated in vitro with 200 units/ml of either IFN-alpha or IFN-gamma or PBS (control). SCID mice xenografted with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) in group A showed a significantly higher TAb production than group C, whereas in group B, TAb production was not statistically increased compared to control (group C). SCID mice xenografted with N did not produce TAb in any group, nor did nude mice xenografted with AITD. Thyrocyte HLA-DR expression was markedly increased in group A and B in SCID mice xenografted with Graves' disease, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and N tissue compared to group C. In contrast, only group B (IFN-gamma) showed an increase in thyrocyte HLA-DR in nude mice. In the in vitro studies, only IFN-gamma (not IFN-alpha) stimulated

  6. A Safety Study on Intrathecal Delivery of Autologous Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Rabbits Directly Supporting Phase I Human Trials

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bingkun K.; Staff, Nathan P.; Knight, Andrew M.; Nesbitt, Jarred J.; Butler, Greg W.; Padley, Douglas J.; Parisi, Joseph E.; Dietz, Allan B.; Windebank, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Background There are no effective treatments that slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. A major challenge of treatment in neurodegenerative diseases is appropriate delivery of pharmaceuticals into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of affected individuals. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs – either naïve or modified) are a promising therapy in neurodegenerative diseases and may be delivered directly into the CSF where they can reside for months. In this preclinical study, we evaluated the safety of intrathecal autologous MSCs in a rabbit model. Methods Autologous adipose-derived MSCs (or a-CSF) were delivered intrathecally, either with single or repeated injections into the foramen magnum of healthy rabbits, and monitored for 4 and 12 weeks, respectively. Results Rabbits tolerated injections well and no definitive MSC-related side effects were observed apart from three rabbits that had delayed death secondary to traumatic foramen magnum puncture. Functional assessments and body weights were equivalent between groups. Gross pathology and histology did not reveal any abnormalities or tumor growth. Complete blood count (CBC) data were normal and there were no differences in CSF IL-6 levels in all groups tested. Discussion Our data suggest that intrathecal delivery of autologous MSCs is safe in a rabbit model. Data from this study has supported two successful Investigational New Drug (IND) applications to the FDA, resulting in the initiation of two clinical trials using autologous MSCs in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple system atrophy. PMID:25413276

  7. Molecular Evidence and Functional Expression of a Novel Drug Efflux pump (ABCC2) in Human Corneal Epithelium and Rabbit Cornea and its role in Ocular drug efflux

    PubMed Central

    Karla, Pradeep K.; Pal, Dhananjay; Quinn, Tim; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2007-01-01

    Cornea is considered as a major barrier for ocular drug delivery. Low ocular bioavailability of drugs has been attributed primarily to low permeability across corneal epithelium thus leading to sub-therapeutic concentrations of drug in the eye and treatment failure. The role of drug efflux proteins, particularly the Pglycoprotein in ocular drug bioavailability has been reported. The objective of this research was to determine whether human corneal epithelium expresses multi drug resistance associated proteins contributing to drug efflux by employing both cultured corneal cells and freshly excised rabbit cornea. SV40 HCEC and rPCEC were selected for in-vitro testing. SV40-HCEC and freshly excised rabbit corneas were utilized for transport studies. [3H]-cyclosporine-A and [14C]-erythromycin which are known substrates for ABCC2 and MK-571, a specific inhibitor for MRP were applied in this study. RT-PCR indicated a unique and distinct band at ∼272 bp corresponding to ABCC2 in HCEC, SV40-HCEC, rabbit cornea, rPCEC and MDCKII-MRP2 cells. Also RT-PCR indicated a unique band ∼181 bp for HCEC and SV40-HCEC. Immunoprecipitation followed by Western Blot analysis revealed a specific band at ∼190-kDa in membrane fraction of SV40-HCEC, MDCKII-MRP2 and no band with isotype control. Uptake of [3H]-cyclosporine-A and [14C]-erythromycin in the presence of MK-571 was significantly enhanced than control in both SV40 HCEC and rPCEC. Similarly a significant elevation in (A→B) permeability of [3H]-cyclosporine-A and [14C]-erythromycin was observed in the presence of MK-571 in SV40-HCEC. A→B transport of [3H]-cyclosporine-A was elevated in the presence of MK-571 in freshly excised rabbit cornea indicating potential role of this efflux transporter and high clinical significance of this finding. PMID:17156953

  8. Myelostimulatory activity of recombinant human interleukin-2 in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Talmadge, J.E.; Schneider, M.; Keller, J.; Ruscetti, F.; Longo, D.; Pennington, R.; Bowersox, O.; Tribble, H.

    1989-05-01

    In a series of studies designed to extend our understanding of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and to study the effect of biologic response modifiers on bone marrow, we observed that administering recombinant human (rH) IL-2 to normal mice resulted in an increase in the frequency of colony-forming units-culture (CFU-C) in bone marrow. In addition, rH IL-2 was able to accelerate host recovery from cyclophosphamide (CTX)- or radiation-induced bone marrow depression and peripheral blood leukopenia. Not only can rH IL-2 accelerate, in a dose-dependent manner, the return of bone marrow, peripheral blood cellularity, and CFU-C frequency to normal levels following cytoreduction by CTX or irradiation, but it also significantly increases CFU-C frequency to greater than normal levels. Furthermore, rH IL-2 can significantly prolong survival of animals receiving a lethal dose of irradiation or CTX. Thus, multiple mechanisms are responsible for the synergistic therapeutic activity associated with rH IL-2 and CTX. rH IL-2 does not act only as an immunomodulatory agent in the presence or absence of suppressor T cells, but also accelerates host recovery from cytoreductive agents, resulting in decreased leukopenia and perhaps resistances to secondary infection. Thus, rH IL-2 plus chemotherapy may increase therapeutic activity against neoplastic disease, not only by adding immune stimulation to the direct antitumor effect of the drug but also by allowing delivery of higher, more effective doses of chemotherapy.

  9. Cardiovascular physiology and diseases of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Pariaut, Romain

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews what is known about the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular diseases in the pet rabbit. Current knowledge is based on anecdotal reports, derived from research data using the rabbit as an animal model of human cardiovascular diseases, but most importantly canine and feline cardiology. It is likely that, as cardiovascular diseases are more often recognized, more specific information will soon become available for the treatment of the pet rabbit with cardiac disease.

  10. Tularemia among Free-Ranging Mice without Infection of Exposed Humans, Switzerland, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Origgi, Francesco C.; König, Barbara; Lindholm, Anna K.; Mayor, Désirée

    2015-01-01

    The animals primarily infected by Francisella tularensis are rapidly consumed by scavengers, hindering ecologic investigation of the bacterium. We describe a 2012 natural tularemia epizootic among house mice in Switzerland and the assessment of infection of exposed humans. The humans were not infected, but the epizootic coincided with increased reports of human cases in the area. PMID:25531919

  11. Tularemia among free-ranging mice without infection of exposed humans, Switzerland, 2012.

    PubMed

    Origgi, Francesco C; König, Barbara; Lindholm, Anna K; Mayor, Désirée; Pilo, Paola

    2015-01-01

    The animals primarily infected by Francisella tularensis are rapidly consumed by scavengers, hindering ecologic investigation of the bacterium. We describe a 2012 natural tularemia epizootic among house mice in Switzerland and the assessment of infection of exposed humans. The humans were not infected, but the epizootic coincided with increased reports of human cases in the area.

  12. Immunohistochemical demonstration of epidermal growth factor in human gastric cancer xenografts of nude mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshiyuki, T; Shimizu, Y; Onda, M; Tokunaga, A; Kiyama, T; Nishi, K; Mizutani, T; Matsukura, N; Tanaka, N; Akimoto, M

    1990-02-15

    Thirty-two surgical specimens and three cell lines of human gastric cancers were used for subcutaneous transplantation into nude mice, resulting in the establishment of eight (25%) xenografts from the surgical specimens and two (67%) from the cell lines. The localization of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in the surgical specimens and cell lines of the gastric cancers and their xenografts in nude mice was then investigated immunohistochemically. Epidermal growth factor was stained in the cytoplasm of the cancer cells, being detected in 16 (50%) of the 32 surgical specimens and in all of the cell lines. Seven (44%) of the sixteen EGF-positive surgical specimens and one (6%) of the 16 EGF-negative ones were tumorigenic in nude mice. All of the xenografts in nude mice were positive for EGF. The tumorigenicity of human gastric cancer xenografts in nude mice may, therefore, be correlated with the presence of EGF in cancer cells.

  13. Transfer of human nasal papilloma into nude mice.

    PubMed

    Riglar, C; Mackay, I R; Burns, G F; Dowling, J P; Millar, H S

    1984-08-01

    We transferred tumor tissue from two inverted schneiderian nasal papillomas to hypothymic nude mice. Tissue from one tumor, which later underwent malignant change, was transferred three times. Forty days lapsed before growth was evident, with a subsequent period of rapid growth. Histologic appearances of the primary tumor and xenografts were similar. Although the data are derived from only two cases, our findings suggest that the capacity of these tumors to grow in nude mice may be an index of their malignant potential.

  14. In vivo regulation of the heme oxygenase-1 gene in humanized transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Junghyun; Zarjou, Abolfazl; Traylor, Amie M.; Bolisetty, Subhashini; Jaimes, Edgar A.; Hull, Travis D.; George, James F.; Mikhail, Fady M.; Agarwal, Anupam

    2012-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in heme degradation producing equimolar amounts of carbon monoxide, iron, and biliverdin. Induction of HO-1 is a beneficial response to tissue injury in diverse animal models of diseases including acute kidney injury. In vitro analysis has shown that the human HO-1 gene is transcriptionally regulated by changes in chromatin conformation but whether such control occurs in vivo is not known. To enable such analysis, we generated transgenic mice, harboring an 87-kb bacterial artificial chromosome expressing human HO-1 mRNA and protein and bred these mice with HO-1 knockout mice to generate humanized BAC transgenic mice. This successfully rescued the phenotype of the knockout mice including reduced birth rates, tissue iron overload, splenomegaly, anemia, leukocytosis, dendritic cell abnormalities and survival after acute kidney injury induced by rhabdomyolysis or cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Transcription factors such as USF1/2, JunB, Sp1, and CTCF were found to associate with regulatory regions of the human HO-1 gene in the kidney following rhabdomyolysis. Chromosome Conformation Capture and ChIP-loop assays confirmed this in the formation of chromatin looping in vivo. Thus, these bacterial artificial chromosome humanized HO-1 mice are a valuable model to study the human HO-1 gene providing insight to the in vivo architecture of the gene in acute kidney injury and other diseases. PMID:22495295

  15. Functional properties of DENV EDIII‑reactive antibodies in human DENV‑1‑infected sera and rabbit antiserum to EDIII.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Wen, Kun; Li, Xiao-Quan; Yi, Hai-Su; Ding, Xi-Xia; Huang, Yan-Fen; Pan, Yu-Xian; Hu, Dong-Mei; Di, Biao; Che, Xiao-Yan; Fu, Ning

    2016-08-01

    The envelope domain III (EDIII) of the dengue virus (DENV) has been confirmed to be involved in receptor binding. It is the target of specific neutralizing antibodies, and is considered to be a promising subunit dengue vaccine candidate. However, several recent studies have shown that anti‑EDIII antibodies contribute little to the neutralizing or enhancing ability of human DENV‑infected serum. The present study involved an analysis of the neutralization and antibody‑dependent enhancement (ADE) activities of EDIII‑reactive antibodies in human convalescent sera from patients with primary DENV‑1 infection and rabbit antiserum immunized with recombinant DENV‑1 EDIII protein. The results indicated that serum neutralization was not associated with titres of EDIII‑binding antibodies in the human DENV‑1‑infected sera. The depletion of anti‑EDIII antibodies from these serum samples revealed that the anti‑EDIII antibodies of the patients contributed little to neutralization and ADE. However, the EDIII‑reactive antibodies from the rabbit antiserum exhibited protective abilities of neutralization at a high dilution (~1:50,000) and ADE at a low dilution (~1:5,000) for the homotypic DENV infection. Notably, the rabbit antiserum displayed ADE activity only at a dilution of 1:40 for the heterotypic virus infection, which suggests that EDIII‑reactive antibodies may be safe in secondary infection with heterotypic viruses. These results suggest that DENV EDIII is not the predominant antigen of the DENV infection process; however, purified or recombinant DENV EDIII may be used as a subunit vaccine to provoke an effective and safe antibody response. PMID:27357403

  16. Transplantation of human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells in a silk fibroin/hydroxyapatite scaffold improves bone repair in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jun; Wang, Jun; Huang, Jian; Huang, Fang; Fu, Jianhong; Yang, Xinjing; Miao, Zongning

    2014-11-01

    The main requirements for successful tissue engineering of the bone are non-immunogenic cells with osteogenic potential and a porous biodegradable scaffold. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential of a silk fibroin/hydroxyapatite (SF/HA) porous material as a delivery vehicle for human placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells (PMSCs) in a rabbit radius defect model. In this study, we randomly assigned 16 healthy adult New Zealand rabbits into two groups, subjected to transplantation with either SF/HA and PMSCs (experimental group) or SF/HA alone (control group). To evaluate fracture healing, we assessed the extent of graft absorption, the quantity of newly formed bone, and re-canalization of the cavitas medullaris using radiographic and histological tools. We performed flow cytometric analysis to characterize PMSCs, and found that while they express CD90, CD105 and CD73, they stain negative for HLA-DR and the hematopoietic cell surface markers CD34 and CD45. When PMSCs were exposed to osteogenic induction medium, they secreted calcium crystals that were identified by von Kossa staining. Furthermore, when seeded on the surface of SF/HA scaffold, they actively secreted extracellular matrix components. Here, we show, through radiographic and histological analyses, that fracture healing in the experimental group is significantly improved over the control group. This strongly suggests that transplantation of human PMSCs grown in an SF/HA scaffold into injured radius segmental bone in rabbits, can markedly enhance tissue repair. Our finding provides evidence supporting the utility of human placenta as a potential source of stem cells for bone tissue engineering.

  17. [Preliminary establishment of transplanted human chronic myeloid leukemia model in nude mice].

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Min; Ding, Xin; Zhang, Long-Zhen; Cen, Jian-Nong; Chen, Zi-Xing

    2011-12-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a malignant clonal disease derived from hematopoietic stem cells. CML stem cells were thought to be the root which could lead disease development and ultimately rapid change. However, a stable animal model for studying the characteristics of CML stem cells is currently lacking. This study was aimed to establish a transplanted human CML nude-mice model to further explore the biological behavior of CML stem cells in vivo, and to enrich CML stem cells in nude mice by series transplantation. The 4 - 6 weeks old BALB/c nude mice pretreated by splenectomy (S), cytoxan intraperitoneal injection (C) and sublethal irradiation (I) were transplanted intravenously with (5 - 7) × 10(7) of bone marrow mononuclear cells from CML patients in chronic phase. Alternatively, 4 - 6 weeks old BALB/c nude mice pretreated by lethal irradiation were transplanted intravenously with 5 × 10(6) homologous bone marrow cells of BALB/c nude mice together with (5 - 7) × 10(7) of bone marrow mononuclear cells from CML patients in chronic phase simultaneously. The leukemic cells engrafted and infiltrated in organs and bone marrow of the mice were tracked by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), plastic-embedded biopsy and flow cytometry. The results of these two methods were compared. The results showed that human CML cells engrafted and infiltrating into the bone marrow of two nude mice pretreated with SCI could be detected. In spite of the low successful rate, results suggested the feasibility of this method by using BALB/c nude mice as a human CML animal model. In contrast, in nude mice pretreated by the lethal dose irradiation, CML cells in the bone marrow could not be found. It is concluded that human bone marrow CML cells can results in leukemia in nude mice pretreated by SCI. Thus this study provides a new strategy for establishment of CML animal models which deserves further elaboration.

  18. Type 1 diabetes vaccine candidates promote human Foxp3+Treg induction in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Serr, Isabelle; Fürst, Rainer W.; Achenbach, Peter; Scherm, Martin G.; Gökmen, Füsun; Haupt, Florian; Sedlmeier, Eva-Maria; Knopff, Annette; Shultz, Leonard; Willis, Richard A.; Ziegler, Anette-Gabriele; Daniel, Carolin

    2016-01-01

    Immune tolerance is executed partly by Foxp3+regulatory T (Treg) cells, which suppress autoreactive T cells. In autoimmune type 1 diabetes (T1D) impaired tolerance promotes destruction of insulin-producing β-cells. The development of autoantigen-specific vaccination strategies for Foxp3+Treg-induction and prevention of islet autoimmunity in patients is still in its infancy. Here, using human haematopoietic stem cell-engrafted NSG-HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice, we provide direct evidence for human autoantigen-specific Foxp3+Treg-induction in vivo. We identify HLA-DQ8-restricted insulin-specific CD4+T cells and demonstrate efficient human insulin-specific Foxp3+Treg-induction upon subimmunogenic vaccination with strong agonistic insulin mimetopes in vivo. Induced human Tregs are stable, show increased expression of Treg signature genes such as Foxp3, CTLA4, IL-2Rα and TIGIT and can efficiently suppress effector T cells. Such Foxp3+Treg-induction does not trigger any effector T cells. These T1D vaccine candidates could therefore represent an expedient improvement in the challenge to induce human Foxp3+Tregs and to develop novel precision medicines for prevention of islet autoimmunity in children at risk of T1D. PMID:26975663

  19. Reconstitution of SCID mice with human lymphoid and myeloid cells after transplantation with human fetal bone marrow without the requirement for exogenous human cytokines.

    PubMed

    Kollmann, T R; Kim, A; Zhuang, X; Hachamovitch, M; Goldstein, H

    1994-08-16

    Investigation of human hematopoietic maturation has been hampered by the lack of in vivo models. Although engraftment of irradiated C.B-17 scid/scid (SCID) mice with human progenitor cells occurred after infusion with human pediatric bone marrow cells, significant engraftment of the mouse bone marrow with human cells was dependent upon continuous treatment with exogenous human cytokines. Furthermore, despite cytokine treatment, only minimal peripheral engraftment of these mice with human cells was observed. In the present study, after infusion of irradiated SCID mice with pre-cultured human fetal bone marrow cells (BM-SCID-hu mice), their bone marrow became significantly engrafted with human precursor cells and their peripheral lymphoid compartment became populated with human B cells and monocytes independently of the administration of extraneous human cytokines. Examination of the bone marrow of the BM-SCID-hu mice for human cytokine mRNA gene expression demonstrated human leukemia inhibitory factor mRNA and interleukin 7 mRNA in nine of nine BM-SCID-hu mice and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor mRNA in seven of eight BM-SCID-hu mice. This was an intriguing observation because these cytokines regulate different stages of human hematopoiesis. Since engraftment occurs in the absence of exogenous cytokine treatment, the BM-SCID-hu mouse model described should provide a useful in vivo system for studying factors important in the maturation of human myeloid and lymphoid cells in the bone marrow and the behavior of the mature human cells after dissemination into the peripheral lymphoid tissue.

  20. Reconstitution of SCID mice with human lymphoid and myeloid cells after transplantation with human fetal bone marrow without the requirement for exogenous human cytokines.

    PubMed Central

    Kollmann, T R; Kim, A; Zhuang, X; Hachamovitch, M; Goldstein, H

    1994-01-01

    Investigation of human hematopoietic maturation has been hampered by the lack of in vivo models. Although engraftment of irradiated C.B-17 scid/scid (SCID) mice with human progenitor cells occurred after infusion with human pediatric bone marrow cells, significant engraftment of the mouse bone marrow with human cells was dependent upon continuous treatment with exogenous human cytokines. Furthermore, despite cytokine treatment, only minimal peripheral engraftment of these mice with human cells was observed. In the present study, after infusion of irradiated SCID mice with pre-cultured human fetal bone marrow cells (BM-SCID-hu mice), their bone marrow became significantly engrafted with human precursor cells and their peripheral lymphoid compartment became populated with human B cells and monocytes independently of the administration of extraneous human cytokines. Examination of the bone marrow of the BM-SCID-hu mice for human cytokine mRNA gene expression demonstrated human leukemia inhibitory factor mRNA and interleukin 7 mRNA in nine of nine BM-SCID-hu mice and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor mRNA in seven of eight BM-SCID-hu mice. This was an intriguing observation because these cytokines regulate different stages of human hematopoiesis. Since engraftment occurs in the absence of exogenous cytokine treatment, the BM-SCID-hu mouse model described should provide a useful in vivo system for studying factors important in the maturation of human myeloid and lymphoid cells in the bone marrow and the behavior of the mature human cells after dissemination into the peripheral lymphoid tissue. Images PMID:7914701

  1. Fatal autoimmunity in mice reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells encoding defective FOXP3.

    PubMed

    Goettel, Jeremy A; Biswas, Subhabrata; Lexmond, Willem S; Yeste, Ada; Passerini, Laura; Patel, Bonny; Yang, Siyoung; Sun, Jiusong; Ouahed, Jodie; Shouval, Dror S; McCann, Katelyn J; Horwitz, Bruce H; Mathis, Diane; Milford, Edgar L; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia; Fiebiger, Edda; Marasco, Wayne A; Bacchetta, Rosa; Quintana, Francisco J; Pai, Sung-Yun; Klein, Christoph; Muise, Aleixo M; Snapper, Scott B

    2015-06-18

    Mice reconstituted with a human immune system provide a tractable in vivo model to assess human immune cell function. To date, reconstitution of murine strains with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from patients with monogenic immune disorders have not been reported. One obstacle precluding the development of immune-disease specific "humanized" mice is that optimal adaptive immune responses in current strains have required implantation of autologous human thymic tissue. To address this issue, we developed a mouse strain that lacks murine major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) and instead expresses human leukocyte antigen DR1 (HLA-DR1). These mice displayed improved adaptive immune responses when reconstituted with human HSCs including enhanced T-cell reconstitution, delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, and class-switch recombination. Following immune reconstitution of this novel strain with HSCs from a patient with immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome, associated with aberrant FOXP3 function, mice developed a lethal inflammatory disorder with multiorgan involvement and autoantibody production mimicking the pathology seen in affected humans. This humanized mouse model permits in vivo evaluation of immune responses associated with genetically altered HSCs, including primary immunodeficiencies, and should facilitate the study of human immune pathobiology and the development of targeted therapeutics.

  2. Fatal autoimmunity in mice reconstituted with human hematopoietic stem cells encoding defective FOXP3.

    PubMed

    Goettel, Jeremy A; Biswas, Subhabrata; Lexmond, Willem S; Yeste, Ada; Passerini, Laura; Patel, Bonny; Yang, Siyoung; Sun, Jiusong; Ouahed, Jodie; Shouval, Dror S; McCann, Katelyn J; Horwitz, Bruce H; Mathis, Diane; Milford, Edgar L; Notarangelo, Luigi D; Roncarolo, Maria-Grazia; Fiebiger, Edda; Marasco, Wayne A; Bacchetta, Rosa; Quintana, Francisco J; Pai, Sung-Yun; Klein, Christoph; Muise, Aleixo M; Snapper, Scott B

    2015-06-18

    Mice reconstituted with a human immune system provide a tractable in vivo model to assess human immune cell function. To date, reconstitution of murine strains with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from patients with monogenic immune disorders have not been reported. One obstacle precluding the development of immune-disease specific "humanized" mice is that optimal adaptive immune responses in current strains have required implantation of autologous human thymic tissue. To address this issue, we developed a mouse strain that lacks murine major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) and instead expresses human leukocyte antigen DR1 (HLA-DR1). These mice displayed improved adaptive immune responses when reconstituted with human HSCs including enhanced T-cell reconstitution, delayed-type hypersensitivity responses, and class-switch recombination. Following immune reconstitution of this novel strain with HSCs from a patient with immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome, associated with aberrant FOXP3 function, mice developed a lethal inflammatory disorder with multiorgan involvement and autoantibody production mimicking the pathology seen in affected humans. This humanized mouse model permits in vivo evaluation of immune responses associated with genetically altered HSCs, including primary immunodeficiencies, and should facilitate the study of human immune pathobiology and the development of targeted therapeutics. PMID:25833964

  3. A humanized version of Foxp2 does not affect ultrasonic vocalization in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, K; Schreiweis, C; Minge, C; Pääbo, S; Fischer, J; Enard, W

    2015-11-01

    The transcription factor FOXP2 has been linked to severe speech and language impairments in humans. An analysis of the evolution of the FOXP2 gene has identified two amino acid substitutions that became fixed after the split of the human and chimpanzee lineages. Studying the functional consequences of these two substitutions in the endogenous Foxp2 gene of mice showed alterations in dopamine levels, striatal synaptic plasticity, neuronal morphology and cortico-striatal-dependent learning. In addition, ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs) of pups had a significantly lower average pitch than control littermates. To which degree adult USVs would be affected in mice carrying the 'humanized' Foxp2 variant remained unclear. In this study, we analyzed USVs of 68 adult male mice uttered during repeated courtship encounters with different females. Mice carrying the Foxp2(hum/hum) allele did not differ significantly in the number of call elements, their element structure or in their element composition from control littermates. We conclude that neither the structure nor the usage of USVs in adult mice is affected by the two amino acid substitutions that occurred in FOXP2 during human evolution. The reported effect for pup vocalization thus appears to be transient. These results are in line with accumulating evidence that mouse USVs are hardly influenced by vocal learning. Hence, the function and evolution of genes that are necessary, but not sufficient for vocal learning in humans, must be either studied at a different phenotypic level in mice or in other organisms.

  4. Lack of fear response in mice (Mus musculus) exposed to human urine odor.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Germain F; Moser, Emily G; D'Ambrose, Steven P; Lin, David M

    2014-03-01

    A goal of the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals is to improve animal welfare by minimizing sources of fear, anxiety, and stress. As a result, it includes recommendations on overcrowding, frequency of cage changes, enrichment, and group housing. However, human odorants are a potential but unexplored source of fear, anxiety, and stress. Although mice have been maintained for decades for animal research, whether mice perceive humans as predators is unknown. If so, this would necessitate changes in animal care and use procedures to minimize this source of chronic fear, anxiety, and stress. Odorants from predator urine are well known to elicit strong fear responses in mice, leading to modification of animal behavior and elevated levels of stress. To begin asking whether human odors influence mouse behavior, we tested the effect of human urine odor on fear response in mice. We assessed mouse behavior by using a modified shuttle cage to record various parameters of mouse exposure to odorants. We found that mice displayed fear responses to 2,4,5-trimethylthiazoline, a synthetic analog of red fox feces, but no fear response to DMSO, the diluent for 2,4,5-trimethylthiazoline. In contrast, mice exposed to human urine samples showed no significant fear response. PMID:24602539

  5. Utilization of an antibody specific for human dystrophin to follow myoblast transplantation in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Huard, J; Tremblay, G; Verreault, S; Labrecque, C; Tremblay, J P

    1993-01-01

    Human myoblasts were transplanted in nude mice. The efficacy of these transplantations was analyzed using a monoclonal antibody (NCLDys3) specific for human dystrophin. This antibody did not reveal any dystrophin in nude mice that did not receive a human myoblast transplantation. However, about 30 days after a human myoblast transplantation, dystrophin-positive muscle fibers were observed. They were not abundant, and were present either in small clusters or isolated. This technique follows the fate of myoblast transplantation in animals that already have dystrophin, and distinguishes between new dystrophin-positive fibers due to the transplantation and the revertant fibers in mdx mice. Moreover, this technique does not require any labelling of the myoblasts before transplantation. It can also be used to detect dystrophin produced following the fusion of myoblasts transfected with the human dystrophin gene.

  6. Impaired human responses to tetanus toxoid in vitamin A-deficient SCID mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Molrine, D C; Polk, D B; Ciamarra, A; Phillips, N; Ambrosino, D M

    1995-08-01

    Vitamin A deficiency is associated with increased childhood morbidity and mortality from respiratory and diarrheal diseases. In order to evaluate the effect of vitamin A on human antibody responses, we developed a vitamin A-deficient severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model. Vitamin A-deficient mice were produced by depriving them of vitamin A at day 7 of gestation. Mice were reconstituted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes (huPBL) from tetanus toxoid immune donors at 6 weeks of age and immunized with tetanus toxoid at 6 and 8 weeks of age. Secondary human antibody responses were determined 10 days later. The geometric mean human anti-tetanus toxoid immunoglobulin G concentrations were 3.75 micrograms/ml for the deficient mice and 148 micrograms/ml for controls (P = 0.0005). Vitamin A-deficient mice had only a 2.9-fold increase in human anti-tetanus toxoid antibody compared with a 74-fold increase in controls (P < 0.01). Supplementation with vitamin A prior to reconstitution restored human antibody responses to normal. These data suggest that vitamin A deficiency impairs human antibody responses. We speculate that impaired responses could increase susceptibility to certain infections. Furthermore, we propose that effects of other nutritional deficiencies on the human immune system could be evaluated in the SCID-huPBL model.

  7. [Na+/H+- and Na+/Na+-countertransport in human, rabbit, and rat erythrocytes: evidence for the existence of two independent ion-transporting systems].

    PubMed

    Orlov, S N; Kuznetsov, S R; Kolosova, I A; Makarov, V L

    1994-05-01

    The activity and regulatory features of the Na+/H(+)- and Na+/Na(+)-exchange were studied in human, rabbit and rat red blood cells. No basal activity of the Na+/H(+)-exchange (the amyloride-inhibited component of the 22Na+ influx) in erythrocytes of these species was observed. The rate of 22Na+ influx increased rapidly when the experiments were carried out on acid-loaded cells in an alkaline (pH0 = 8.0) incubation medium (delta mu H(+)-induced Na+/H(+)-exchange). The ratio of delta mu H(+)-induced Na+/H(+)-exchange activities in human, rabbit and rat red blood cells was 1.0 : 1.1 : 2.3, respectively, whereas that of the Na+/Na(+)-exchange activities (the phloretin-inhibited component of the 22Na+ influx) in erythrocytes of these species was 1.0 : 4.6 : 0.2. The osmotic shrinkage of rat and rabbit erythrocytes led to the stimulation of the Na+/H(+)- (but not Na+/Na+) exchange. Amyloride (1 mM) inhibited the shrinkage-induced 22Na+ entry as well as the delta mu H(+)-induced 22Na+ entry--by 95 and 10-20%, respectively. Heat treatment (10 min, 49-51 degrees C), disturbing the membrane cytoskeleton suppressed both the shrinkage-induced activation and the delta mu H(+)-induced activation of the Na+/H(+)-exchange. The data obtained indicate that the both transport systems are mediated by two distinct transport carriers. It may be suggested that the delta mu H(+)-induced Na+/H(+)-exchange, on the one hand, and the shrinkage-induced Na+/H(+)-exchange, on the other, are mediated by two different Na+/H(+)-exchanger subtypes. PMID:8043690

  8. Only humans have human placentas: molecular differences between mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, André; Morales-Prieto, Diana M; Pastuschek, Jana; Fröhlich, Karolin; Markert, Udo R

    2015-04-01

    The placenta is one of the organs with the highest evolutionary diversity among animal species. In consequence, an animal model that reflects human placentation exactly does not exist. However, the mouse is the most frequently used animal model for placenta and pregnancy research. It possesses a hemochorial placenta, which is similar, but also different from the human placenta. The question whether the similarities are sufficient for the achievement of useful results with regard to human pregnancy was debated recently at the 11th Congress of the European Society for Reproductive Immunology (Budapest, Hungary). Here, we discuss the molecular features of the human placenta that are restricted to primates or even to humans. Many of the primate-specific genetic novelties, e.g., the large microRNA cluster on chromosome 19, have been detected during the last 10-15 years and could not be referred to in earlier discussions. Now, in the light of recent findings and a better understanding of interspecies differences, we conclude that the mouse model is often overvalued. Owing to the increasing number of known human-specific factors in human placentation we consider that many aspects of human placentation can only be understood on the basis of experiments on human cells and tissues in combination with data collections from human subject studies.

  9. Transmission of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease from humans to transgenic mice expressing chimeric human-mouse prion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Telling, G C; Scott, M; Hsiao, K K; Foster, D; Yang, S L; Torchia, M; Sidle, K C; Collinge, J; DeArmond, S J; Prusiner, S B

    1994-01-01

    Transgenic (Tg) mice were constructed that express a chimeric prion protein (PrP) in which a segment of mouse (Mo) PrP was replaced with the corresponding human (Hu) PrP sequence. The chimeric PrP, designated MHu2MPrP, differs from MoPrP by 9 amino acids between residues 96 and 167. All of the Tg(MHu2M) mice developed neurologic disease approximately 200 days after inoculation with brain homogenates from three patients dying of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Inoculation of Tg(MHu2M) mice with CJD prions produced MHu2MPrPSc (where PrPSc is the scrapie isoform of PrP); inoculation with Mo prions produced Mo-PrPSc. The patterns of MHu2MPrPSc and MoPrPSc accumulation in the brains of Tg(MHu2M) mice were different. About 10% of Tg(HuPrP) mice expressing HuPrP and non-Tg mice developed neurologic disease > 500 days after inoculation with CJD prions. The different susceptibilities of Tg(HuPrP) and Tg(MHu2M) mice to Hu prions indicate that additional species-specific factors are involved in prion replication. Diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of Hu prion diseases should be facilitated by Tg(MHu2M) mice. Images PMID:7937921

  10. Increased Susceptibility of Humanized NSG Mice to Panton-Valentine Leukocidin and Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Ching Wen; Kolar, Stacey L.; Müller, Sabrina; Rodriguez, Maria D.; Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Fan, Xuemo; Beenhouwer, David O.; Town, Terrence; Liu, George Y.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of skin and soft-tissue infections worldwide. Mice are the most commonly used animals for modeling human staphylococcal infections. However a supra-physiologic S. aureus inoculum is required to establish gross murine skin pathology. Moreover, many staphylococcal factors, including Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) elaborated by community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA), exhibit selective human tropism and cannot be adequately studied in mice. To overcome these deficiencies, we investigated S. aureus infection in non-obese diabetic (NOD)/severe combined immune deficiency (SCID)/IL2rγnull (NSG) mice engrafted with human CD34+ umbilical cord blood cells. These “humanized” NSG mice require one to two log lower inoculum to induce consistent skin lesions compared with control mice, and exhibit larger cutaneous lesions upon infection with PVL+ versus isogenic PVL- S. aureus. Neutrophils appear important for PVL pathology as adoptive transfer of human neutrophils alone to NSG mice was sufficient to induce dermonecrosis following challenge with PVL+ S. aureus but not PVL- S. aureus. PMX53, a human C5aR inhibitor, blocked PVL-induced cellular cytotoxicity in vitro and reduced the size difference of lesions induced by the PVL+ and PVL- S. aureus, but PMX53 also reduced recruitment of neutrophils and exacerbated the infection. Overall, our findings establish humanized mice as an important translational tool for the study of S. aureus infection and provide strong evidence that PVL is a human virulence factor. PMID:26618545

  11. Control of Mycobacterial Infections in Mice Expressing Human Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) but Not Mouse TNF.

    PubMed

    Olleros, Maria L; Chavez-Galan, Leslie; Segueni, Noria; Bourigault, Marie L; Vesin, Dominique; Kruglov, Andrey A; Drutskaya, Marina S; Bisig, Ruth; Ehlers, Stefan; Aly, Sahar; Walter, Kerstin; Kuprash, Dmitry V; Chouchkova, Miliana; Kozlov, Sergei V; Erard, François; Ryffel, Bernard; Quesniaux, Valérie F J; Nedospasov, Sergei A; Garcia, Irene

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is an important cytokine for host defense against pathogens but is also associated with the development of human immunopathologies. TNF blockade effectively ameliorates many chronic inflammatory conditions but compromises host immunity to tuberculosis. The search for novel, more specific human TNF blockers requires the development of a reliable animal model. We used a novel mouse model with complete replacement of the mouse TNF gene by its human ortholog (human TNF [huTNF] knock-in [KI] mice) to determine resistance to Mycobacterium bovis BCG and M. tuberculosis infections and to investigate whether TNF inhibitors in clinical use reduce host immunity. Our results show that macrophages from huTNF KI mice responded to BCG and lipopolysaccharide similarly to wild-type macrophages by NF-κB activation and cytokine production. While TNF-deficient mice rapidly succumbed to mycobacterial infection, huTNF KI mice survived, controlling the bacterial burden and activating bactericidal mechanisms. Administration of TNF-neutralizing biologics disrupted the control of mycobacterial infection in huTNF KI mice, leading to an increased bacterial burden and hyperinflammation. Thus, our findings demonstrate that human TNF can functionally replace murine TNF in vivo, providing mycobacterial resistance that could be compromised by TNF neutralization. This new animal model will be helpful for the testing of specific biologics neutralizing human TNF.

  12. Transgenic Mice Expressing Human Transferrin as a Model for Meningococcal Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Zarantonelli, Maria-Leticia; Szatanik, Marek; Giorgini, Dario; Hong, Eva; Huerre, Michel; Guillou, Florian; Alonso, Jean-Michel; Taha, Muhamed-Kheir

    2007-01-01

    The pathogenesis of meningococcal disease is poorly understood due to the lack of a relevant animal model. Moreover, the use of animal models is not optimal as most meningococcal virulence determinants recognize receptors that are specifically expressed in human tissues. One major element of the host specificity is the system of meningococcal iron uptake by transferrin-binding proteins that bind specifically human transferrin but not murine transferrin. We developed a new mouse model for experimental meningococcal infection using transgenic mice expressing human transferrin. Intraperitoneal challenge of transgenic mice induced bacteremia for at least 48 h with an early stage of multiplication, whereas the initial inoculum was rapidly cleared from blood in wild-type mice. Inflammation in the subarachnoidal space with a high influx of polymorphonuclear cells was observed only in transgenic mice. Meningococcal mutants that were unable to use transferrin as a source of iron were rapidly cleared from both wild-type and transgenic mice. Thus, transgenic mice expressing human transferrin may represent an important advance as a new mouse model for in vivo studies of meningococcal virulence and immunogenicity factors. PMID:17893132

  13. Highly stable maintenance of a mouse artificial chromosome in human cells and mice.

    PubMed

    Kazuki, Kanako; Takehara, Shoko; Uno, Narumi; Imaoka, Natsuko; Abe, Satoshi; Takiguchi, Masato; Hiramatsu, Kei; Oshimura, Mitsuo; Kazuki, Yasuhiro

    2013-12-01

    Human artificial chromosomes (HACs) and mouse artificial chromosomes (MACs) display several advantages as gene delivery vectors, such as stable episomal maintenance that avoids insertional mutations and the ability to carry large gene inserts including the regulatory elements. Previously, we showed that a MAC vector developed from a natural mouse chromosome by chromosome engineering was more stably maintained in adult tissues and hematopoietic cells in mice than HAC vectors. In this study, to expand the utility for a gene delivery vector in human cells and mice, we investigated the long-term stability of the MACs in cultured human cells and transchromosomic mice. We also investigated the chromosomal copy number-dependent expression of genes on the MACs in mice. The MAC was stably maintained in human HT1080 cells in vitro during long-term culture. The MAC was stably maintained at least to the F8 and F4 generations in ICR and C57BL/6 backgrounds, respectively. The MAC was also stably maintained in hematopoietic cells and tissues derived from old mice. Transchromosomic mice containing two or four copies of the MAC were generated by breeding. The DNA contents were comparable to the copy number of the MACs in each tissue examined, and the expression of the EGFP gene on the MAC was dependent on the chromosomal copy number. Therefore, the MAC vector may be useful not only for gene delivery in mammalian cells but also for animal transgenesis.

  14. The cottontail rabbits of Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Llewellyn, L.M.; Handley, C.O.

    1945-01-01

    Five races of cottontail rabbits belonging to three species occur in Virginia. One of them, the Mearns cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus mearnsi), is reported here for the first time. It occurs in six southwestern counties of the state, while the eastern cottontail (S. f. mallurus) occurs in the remainder of the state with the exception of Smith and Fishermans islands off the eastern coast of Cape Charles, where it is replaced by Hitchens cottontail (S. f. hitchensi). The New England cottontail (S. transitionalis) is found on the higher mountain peaks, above 3000 feet, and the swamp rabbit (S. palustris) occurs in the Dismal Swamp region of southeastern Virginia.....The height of the breeding season for the eastern cottontail in Virginia is March and April, but breeding continues through the entire year except in December and January. The average litter size based on embryo counts was 4.7. The sex ratio of 234 specimens from all parts of the state, taken mostly in the December to February period, was 53 males to 47 females. That of a group of 145 rabbits live-trapped at Blacksburg during February and Marchwas 58 males to 42 females. The figures show that males are more active than females during the winter months, and therefore are more easily taken then....In transplanting cottontails from one section of the state to another, it is recommended that only cottontails of the same race as those originally present in the region being restocked be released there....Tularemia is not a common disease among rabbits in Virginia, but the rabbit ticks are often carriers of the disease and may transmit it to rabbits. Rabbit ticks are also found to be carriers of Rocky Mountain fever and American Q. fever. After the ticks drop off the rabbits to hibernate in the ground, which is likely to occur during mid-winter in Virginia, there is relatively little danger of humans contracting tularemia by contact with rabbits. Present laws in Virginia which prohibit rabbit hunting until the

  15. Spontaneous bilateral avulsion fracture of the tuberositas tibiae in a New Zealand White rabbit - a counterpart to Osgood-Schlatter disease in humans?

    PubMed

    Nehrbass, D; Arens, D; Zeiter, S

    2015-02-01

    The first reported case describing a spontaneous bilateral avulsion fracture of the tuberositas tibiae in a New Zealand White rabbit is presented. So far in animals, this condition has been only described in dogs and horses. In humans, this condition is also called Osgood-Schlatter disease (OSD) or syndrome, traction apophysitis of the tibial tubercle (ATT) or patellar tendon enthesopathy of the tibial tuberosity respectively. It is mainly seen in young adolescents coinciding with periods of growth spurts. In humans, its pathogenesis is believed to be caused by repetitive tendon/muscle strain at the insertion of the patellar tendon to the immature tibial tuberosity, which has its own secondary ossification center. Morphologically this case is characterized by bilateral chronic avulsion with incomplete separation of the tuberositas tibae, and proximal dislocation of the patella (patella alta). Despite these marked pathological changes, the animal was clinically without findings. Nevertheless, this case emphasizes the need for thorough clinical and radiological examination of rabbits intended for preclinical research studies prior to study begin, especially in orthopedic research. PMID:25435475

  16. An improved Protein G with higher affinity for human/rabbit IgG Fc domains exploiting a computationally designed polar network

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Ramesh K.; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.; Strauss, Charlie E.M.

    2014-01-01

    Protein G is an IgG binding protein that has been widely exploited for biotechnological purposes. Rosetta protein modeling identified a set of favorable polar mutations in Protein G, at its binding interface with the Fc domain of Immunoglobulin G, that were predicted to increase the stability and tighten the binding relative to native Protein G, with only a minor perturbation of the binding mode seen in the crystal structure. This triple mutant was synthesized and evaluated experimentally. Relative to the native protein G, the mutant showed a 3.5-fold enhancement in display level on the surface of yeast and a 5-fold tighter molar affinity for rabbit and human IgG. We attribute the improved affinity to a network of hydrogen bonds exploiting specific polar groups on human and rabbit Fc. The relative specificity increased as well since there was little affinity enhancement for goat and mouse Fc, while the affinity for rat Fc was poorer by half. This designed Protein G will be useful in biotechnological applications as a recombinant protein, where its improved affinity, display and specificity will increase antibody capture sensitivity and capacity. Furthermore, the display of this protein on the surface of yeast introduces the concept of the use of yeast as an affinity matrix. PMID:24632761

  17. The NHLBI-Sponsored Consortium for preclinicAl assESsment of cARdioprotective Therapies (CAESAR): A New Paradigm for Rigorous, Accurate, and Reproducible Evaluation of Putative Infarct-Sparing Interventions in Mice, Rabbits, and Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Steven P.; Tang, Xian-Liang; Guo, Yiru; Steenbergen, Charles; Lefer, David J.; Kukreja, Rakesh C.; Kong, Maiying; Li, Qianhong; Bhushan, Shashi; Zhu, Xiaoping; Du, Junjie; Nong, Yibing; Stowers, Heather L.; Kondo, Kazuhisa; Hunt, Gregory N.; Goodchild, Traci T.; Orr, Adam; Chang, Carlos C.; Ockaili, Ramzi; Salloum, Fadi N.; Bolli, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Despite four decades of intense effort and substantial financial investment, the cardioprotection field has failed to deliver a single drug that effectively reduces myocardial infarct size in patients. A major reason is insufficient rigor and reproducibility in preclinical studies. Objective To develop a multicenter randomized controlled trial (RCT)-like infrastructure to conduct rigorous and reproducible preclinical evaluation of cardioprotective therapies. Methods and Results With NHLBI support, we established the Consortium for preclinicAl assESsment of cARdioprotective therapies (CAESAR), based on the principles of randomization, investigator blinding, a priori sample size determination and exclusion criteria, appropriate statistical analyses, and assessment of reproducibility. To validate CAESAR, we tested the ability of ischemic preconditioning (IPC) to reduce infarct size in three species (at two sites/species): mice (n=22-25/group), rabbits (n=11-12/group), and pigs (n=13/group). During this validation phase, i) we established protocols that gave similar results between Centers and confirmed that IPC significantly reduced infarct size in all species, and ii) we successfully established a multi-center structure to support CAESAR’s operations, including two surgical Centers for each species, a Pathology Core (to assess infarct size), a Biomarker Core (to measure plasma cardiac troponin levels), and a Data Coordinating Center – all with the oversight of an external Protocol Review and Monitoring Committee. Conclusions CAESAR is operational, generates reproducible results, can detect cardioprotection, and provides a mechanism for assessing potential infarct-sparing therapies with a level of rigor analogous to multicenter RCTs. This is a revolutionary new approach to cardioprotection. Importantly, we provide state-of-the-art, detailed protocols (“CAESAR protocols”) for measuring infarct size in mice, rabbits, and pigs in a manner that is

  18. Identification of GLA/SE as an effective adjuvant for the induction of robust humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to EBV-gp350 in mice and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Heeke, Darren S; Lin, Rui; Rao, Eileen; Woo, Jennifer C; McCarthy, Michael P; Marshall, Jason D

    2016-05-17

    Childhood infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is often asymptomatic and may result in mild flu-like symptoms, but exposure during adolescence and young adulthood can lead to acute infectious mononucleosis (AIM) with a pathology characterized by swollen lymph nodes, sore throat, and severe fatigue lasting weeks or months. A vaccine targeting the envelope glycoprotein gp350 adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide complexed with the TLR4 agonist monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) achieved a 78% reduction in AIM incidence in a small phase II trial of college-age individuals, but development of this vaccine was halted by the manufacturer. Here, we report the evaluation in mice and rabbits of an EBV-gp350 vaccine combined with an adjuvant composed of the synthetic TLR4 agonist glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA) integrated into stable emulsion (SE). In mice, GLA/SE-adjuvanted gp350 generated high IgG titers (both IgG1 and IgG2a/c subtypes), elevated EBV-neutralizing antibody titers, and robust poly-functional anti-gp350 CD4(+) T cell responses. In addition, GLA/SE routinely demonstrated superior performance over aluminum hydroxide in all immunological readouts, including induction of durable neutralizing antibody titers out to at least 1 year post-vaccination. Both components of the GLA/SE adjuvant were found to be required to get optimal responses in both arms of the immune response: specifically, SE for neutralizing antibodies and GLA for induction of T cell responses. Furthermore, this vaccine also elicited high neutralizing antibody titers in a second species, rabbit. These promising results suggest that clinical development of a vaccine comprised of EBV-gp350 plus GLA/SE has the potential to prevent AIM in post-adolescents. PMID:27085175

  19. Activation of Human T Cells in Hypertension: Studies of Humanized Mice and Hypertensive Humans.

    PubMed

    Itani, Hana A; McMaster, William G; Saleh, Mohamed A; Nazarewicz, Rafal R; Mikolajczyk, Tomasz P; Kaszuba, Anna M; Konior, Anna; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Norlander, Allison E; Chen, Wei; Bonami, Rachel H; Marshall, Andrew F; Poffenberger, Greg; Weyand, Cornelia M; Madhur, Meena S; Moore, Daniel J; Harrison, David G; Guzik, Tomasz J

    2016-07-01

    Emerging evidence supports an important role for T cells in the genesis of hypertension. Because this work has predominantly been performed in experimental animals, we sought to determine whether human T cells are activated in hypertension. We used a humanized mouse model in which the murine immune system is replaced by the human immune system. Angiotensin II increased systolic pressure to 162 versus 116 mm Hg for sham-treated animals. Flow cytometry of thoracic lymph nodes, thoracic aorta, and kidney revealed increased infiltration of human leukocytes (CD45(+)) and T lymphocytes (CD3(+) and CD4(+)) in response to angiotensin II infusion. Interestingly, there was also an increase in the memory T cells (CD3(+)/CD45RO(+)) in the aortas and lymph nodes. Prevention of hypertension using hydralazine and hydrochlorothiazide prevented the accumulation of T cells in these tissues. Studies of isolated human T cells and monocytes indicated that angiotensin II had no direct effect on cytokine production by T cells or the ability of dendritic cells to drive T-cell proliferation. We also observed an increase in circulating interleukin-17A producing CD4(+) T cells and both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that produce interferon-γ in hypertensive compared with normotensive humans. Thus, human T cells become activated and invade critical end-organ tissues in response to hypertension in a humanized mouse model. This response likely reflects the hypertensive milieu encountered in vivo and is not a direct effect of the hormone angiotensin II.

  20. Activation of Human T Cells in Hypertension: Studies of Humanized Mice and Hypertensive Humans.

    PubMed

    Itani, Hana A; McMaster, William G; Saleh, Mohamed A; Nazarewicz, Rafal R; Mikolajczyk, Tomasz P; Kaszuba, Anna M; Konior, Anna; Prejbisz, Aleksander; Januszewicz, Andrzej; Norlander, Allison E; Chen, Wei; Bonami, Rachel H; Marshall, Andrew F; Poffenberger, Greg; Weyand, Cornelia M; Madhur, Meena S; Moore, Daniel J; Harrison, David G; Guzik, Tomasz J

    2016-07-01

    Emerging evidence supports an important role for T cells in the genesis of hypertension. Because this work has predominantly been performed in experimental animals, we sought to determine whether human T cells are activated in hypertension. We used a humanized mouse model in which the murine immune system is replaced by the human immune system. Angiotensin II increased systolic pressure to 162 versus 116 mm Hg for sham-treated animals. Flow cytometry of thoracic lymph nodes, thoracic aorta, and kidney revealed increased infiltration of human leukocytes (CD45(+)) and T lymphocytes (CD3(+) and CD4(+)) in response to angiotensin II infusion. Interestingly, there was also an increase in the memory T cells (CD3(+)/CD45RO(+)) in the aortas and lymph nodes. Prevention of hypertension using hydralazine and hydrochlorothiazide prevented the accumulation of T cells in these tissues. Studies of isolated human T cells and monocytes indicated that angiotensin II had no direct effect on cytokine production by T cells or the ability of dendritic cells to drive T-cell proliferation. We also observed an increase in circulating interleukin-17A producing CD4(+) T cells and both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells that produce interferon-γ in hypertensive compared with normotensive humans. Thus, human T cells become activated and invade critical end-organ tissues in response to hypertension in a humanized mouse model. This response likely reflects the hypertensive milieu encountered in vivo and is not a direct effect of the hormone angiotensin II. PMID:27217403

  1. An apolipoprotein influencing triglycerides in humans and mice revealed by comparative sequencing.

    PubMed

    Pennacchio, L A; Olivier, M; Hubacek, J A; Cohen, J C; Cox, D R; Fruchart, J C; Krauss, R M; Rubin, E M

    2001-10-01

    Comparison of genomic DNA sequences from human and mouse revealed a new apolipoprotein (APO) gene (APOAV) located proximal to the well-characterized APOAI/CIII/AIV gene cluster on human 11q23. Mice expressing a human APOAV transgene showed a decrease in plasma triglyceride concentrations to one-third of those in control mice; conversely, knockout mice lacking Apoav had four times as much plasma triglycerides as controls. In humans, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the APOAV locus were found to be significantly associated with plasma triglyceride levels in two independent studies. These findings indicate that APOAV is an important determinant of plasma triglyceride levels, a major risk factor for coronary artery disease.

  2. Human cryptosporidiosis caused by Cryptosporidium tyzzeri and C. parvum isolates presumably transmitted from wild mice.

    PubMed

    Rasková, Veronika; Kvetonová, Dana; Sak, Bohumil; McEvoy, John; Edwinson, Adam; Stenger, Brianna; Kvác, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of severe human cryptosporidiosis caused by Cryptosporidium tyzzeri and C. parvum with an unusually high frequency of liquid stools. Wild mice were the most likely source of infection, demonstrating the potential for wild-mouse-borne Cryptosporidium to infect humans and highlighting the health risks associated with synantropic rodents.

  3. Hyperlipidemia and cutaneous abnormalities in transgenic mice overexpressing human apolipoprotein C1.

    PubMed

    Jong, M C; Gijbels, M J; Dahlmans, V E; Gorp, P J; Koopman, S J; Ponec, M; Hofker, M H; Havekes, L M

    1998-01-01

    Transgenic mice were generated with different levels of human apolipoprotein C1 (APOC1) expression in liver and skin. At 2 mo of age, serum levels of cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), and FFA were strongly elevated in APOC1 transgenic mice compared with wild-type mice. These elevated levels of serum cholesterol and TG were due mainly to an accumulation of VLDL particles in the circulation. In addition to hyperlipidemia, APOC1 transgenic mice developed dry and scaly skin with loss of hair, dependent on the amount of APOC1 expression in the skin. Since these skin abnormalities appeared in two independent founder lines, a mutation related to the specific insertion site of the human APOC1 gene as the cause for the phenotype can be excluded. Histopathological analysis of high expressor APOC1 transgenic mice revealed a disorder of the skin consisting of epidermal hyperplasia and hyperkeratosis, and atrophic sebaceous glands lacking sebum. In line with these results, epidermal lipid analysis showed that the relative amounts of the sebum components TG and wax diesters in the epidermis of high expressor APOC1 transgenic mice were reduced by 60 and 45%, respectively. In addition to atrophic sebaceous glands, the meibomian glands were also found to be severely atrophic in APOC1 transgenic mice. High expressor APOC1 transgenic mice also exhibited diminished abdominal adipose tissue stores (a 60% decrease compared with wild-type mice) and a complete deficiency of subcutaneous fat. These results indicate that, in addition to the previously reported inhibitory role of apoC1 on hepatic remnant uptake, overexpression of apoC1 affects lipid synthesis in the sebaceous gland and/or epidermis as well as adipose tissue formation. These APOC1 transgenic mice may serve as an interesting in vivo model for the investigation of lipid homeostasis in the skin.

  4. Plasma High-Mannose and Complex/Hybrid N-Glycans Are Associated with Hypercholesterolemia in Humans and Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Liang; Li, Qianwei; Li, Lingmei; Lin, Yan; Zhao, Sihai; Wang, Weirong; Wang, Rong; Li, Yongqin; Yuan, Jiangbei; Wang, Chengjian; Wang, Zhongfu; Fan, Jianglin; Liu, Enqi

    2016-01-01

    N-glycans play important roles in various pathophysiological processes and can be used as clinical diagnosis markers. However, plasma N-glycans change and their pathophysiological significance in the setting of hypercholesterolemia, a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, is unknown. Here, we collected plasma from both hypercholesterolemic patients and cholesterol-fed hypercholesterolemic rabbits, and determined the changes in the whole-plasma N-glycan profile by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We found that both the hypercholesterolemic patients and rabbits showed a dramatic change in their plasma glycan profile. Compared with healthy subjects, the hypercholesterolemic patients exhibited higher plasma levels of a cluster of high-mannose and complex/hybrid N-glycans (mainly including undecorated or sialylated glycans), whereas only a few fucosylated or fucosylated and sialylated N-glycans were increased. Additionally, cholesterol-fed hypercholesterolemic rabbits also displayed increased plasma levels of high-mannose in addition to high complex/hybrid N-glycan levels. The whole-plasma glycan profiles revealed that the plasma N-glycan levels were correlated with the plasma cholesterol levels, implying that N-glycans may be a target for treatment of hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26999365

  5. Plasma High-Mannose and Complex/Hybrid N-Glycans Are Associated with Hypercholesterolemia in Humans and Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bai, Liang; Li, Qianwei; Li, Lingmei; Lin, Yan; Zhao, Sihai; Wang, Weirong; Wang, Rong; Li, Yongqin; Yuan, Jiangbei; Wang, Chengjian; Wang, Zhongfu; Fan, Jianglin; Liu, Enqi

    2016-01-01

    N-glycans play important roles in various pathophysiological processes and can be used as clinical diagnosis markers. However, plasma N-glycans change and their pathophysiological significance in the setting of hypercholesterolemia, a major risk factor for atherosclerosis, is unknown. Here, we collected plasma from both hypercholesterolemic patients and cholesterol-fed hypercholesterolemic rabbits, and determined the changes in the whole-plasma N-glycan profile by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. We found that both the hypercholesterolemic patients and rabbits showed a dramatic change in their plasma glycan profile. Compared with healthy subjects, the hypercholesterolemic patients exhibited higher plasma levels of a cluster of high-mannose and complex/hybrid N-glycans (mainly including undecorated or sialylated glycans), whereas only a few fucosylated or fucosylated and sialylated N-glycans were increased. Additionally, cholesterol-fed hypercholesterolemic rabbits also displayed increased plasma levels of high-mannose in addition to high complex/hybrid N-glycan levels. The whole-plasma glycan profiles revealed that the plasma N-glycan levels were correlated with the plasma cholesterol levels, implying that N-glycans may be a target for treatment of hypercholesterolemia. PMID:26999365

  6. Histidine decarboxylase deficiency causes Tourette syndrome: parallel findings in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Baldan, Lissandra Castellan; Rapanelli, Maximiliano; Crowley, Michael; Anderson, George M.; Loring, Erin; Gorczyca, Roxanne; Billingslea, Eileen; Wasylink, Suzanne; Panza, Kaitlyn E.; Ercan-Sencicek, A. Gulhan; Krusong, Kuakarun; Leventhal, Bennett L.; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Bloch, Michael H.; Hughes, Zoë A.; Krystal, John H.; Mayes, Linda; de Araujo, Ivan; Ding, Yu-Shin; State, Matthew W.; Pittenger, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is characterized by tics, sensorimotor gating deficiencies, and abnormalities of cortico-basal ganglia circuits. A mutation in histidine decarboxylase (Hdc), the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of histamine (HA), has been implicated as a rare genetic cause. Hdc knockout mice exhibited potentiated tic-like stereotypies, recapitulating core phenomenology of TS; these were mitigated by the dopamine D2 antagonist haloperidol, a proven pharmacotherapy, and by HA infusion into the brain. Prepulse inhibition was impaired in both mice and humans carrying Hdc mutations. HA infusion reduced striatal dopamine (DA) levels; in Hdc knockout mice, striatal DA was increased and the DA-regulated immediate early gene Fos was upregulated. Dopamine D2/D3 receptor binding was altered both in mice and in humans carrying the Hdc mutation. These data confirm HDC deficiency as a rare cause of TS and identify histamine-dopamine interactions in the basal ganglia as an important locus of pathology. PMID:24411733

  7. Histidine decarboxylase deficiency causes tourette syndrome: parallel findings in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Castellan Baldan, Lissandra; Williams, Kyle A; Gallezot, Jean-Dominique; Pogorelov, Vladimir; Rapanelli, Maximiliano; Crowley, Michael; Anderson, George M; Loring, Erin; Gorczyca, Roxanne; Billingslea, Eileen; Wasylink, Suzanne; Panza, Kaitlyn E; Ercan-Sencicek, A Gulhan; Krusong, Kuakarun; Leventhal, Bennett L; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Bloch, Michael H; Hughes, Zoë A; Krystal, John H; Mayes, Linda; de Araujo, Ivan; Ding, Yu-Shin; State, Matthew W; Pittenger, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is characterized by tics, sensorimotor gating deficiencies, and abnormalities of cortico-basal ganglia circuits. A mutation in histidine decarboxylase (Hdc), the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of histamine (HA), has been implicated as a rare genetic cause. Hdc knockout mice exhibited potentiated tic-like stereotypies, recapitulating core phenomenology of TS; these were mitigated by the dopamine (DA) D2 antagonist haloperidol, a proven pharmacotherapy, and by HA infusion into the brain. Prepulse inhibition was impaired in both mice and humans carrying Hdc mutations. HA infusion reduced striatal DA levels; in Hdc knockout mice, striatal DA was increased and the DA-regulated immediate early gene Fos was upregulated. DA D2/D3 receptor binding was altered both in mice and in humans carrying the Hdc mutation. These data confirm histidine decarboxylase deficiency as a rare cause of TS and identify HA-DA interactions in the basal ganglia as an important locus of pathology. PMID:24411733

  8. Humanized TLR7/8 expression drives proliferative multisystemic histiocytosis in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Jessica M; Treuting, Piper M; Nagy, Lee; Yam, Cathy; Yi, Jaehun; Brasfield, Alicia; Nguyen, Lisa Phuong Anh; Hajjar, Adeline M

    2014-01-01

    A humanized TLR7/TLR8 transgenic mouse line was engineered for studies using TLR7/8 ligands as vaccine adjuvants. The mice developed a spontaneous immune-mediated phenotype prior to six months of age characterized by runting, lethargy, blepharitis, and corneal ulceration. Histological examination revealed a marked, multisystemic histiocytic infiltrate that effaced normal architecture. The histological changes were distinct from those previously reported in mouse models of systemic lupus erythematosus. When the mice were crossed with MyD88-/- mice, which prevented toll-like receptor signaling, the inflammatory phenotype resolved. Illness may be caused by constitutive activation of human TLR7 or TLR8 in the bacterial artificial chromosome positive mice as increased TLR7 and TLR8 expression or activation has previously been implicated in autoimmune disease. PMID:25229618

  9. Conditional expression of human bone Gla protein in osteoblasts causes skeletal abnormality in mice.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Tsukui, Tohru; Tanaka, Daisuke; Maruyama, Yojiro; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-07-20

    Bone Gla protein (BGP), also known as osteocalcin, is one of the most abundant γ-carboxylated noncollagenous protein in bone matrix and plays important roles in mineralization and calcium ion homeostasis. BGP is synthesized specifically in osteoblasts; however, its precise function in bone metabolism has not been fully elucidated. To investigate the in vivo function of human BGP (hBGP), we generated CAG-GFP(floxed)-hBGP transgenic mice carrying a transgene cassette composed of the promoter and a floxed GFP linked to hBGP cDNA. The mice were crossed with ColI-Cre mice, which express the Cre recombinase driven by the mouse collagen type 1a1 gene promoter, to obtain hBGP(ColI) conditional transgenic mice that expressed human BGP in osteoblasts. The hBGP(ColI) mice did not survive more than 2days after birth. The analysis of the 18.5-day post coitum fetuses of the hBGP(ColI) mice revealed that they displayed abnormal skeletal growth such as deformity of the rib and short femur and cranium lengths. Moreover, increased BGP levels were detected in the serum of the neonates. These findings indicate that hBGP expression in osteoblasts resulted in the abnormal skeletal growth in the mice. Our study provides a valuable model for understanding the fundamental role of BGP in vivo.

  10. Human enterovirus 71 subgenotype B3 lacks coxsackievirus A16-like neurovirulence in mice infection

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yoke-Fun; AbuBakar, Sazaly

    2005-01-01

    Background At least three different EV-71 subgenotypes were identified from an outbreak in Malaysia in 1998. The subgenotypes C2 and B4 were associated with the severe and fatal infections, whereas the B3 virus was associated with mild to subclinical infections. The B3 virus genome sequences had ≥85% similarity at the 3' end to CV-A16. This offers opportunities to examine if there are characteristic similarities and differences in virulence between CV-A16, EV-71 B3 and EV-71 B4 and to determine if the presence of the CV-A16-liked genes in EV-71 B3 would also confer the virus with a CV-A16-liked neurovirulence in mice model infection. Results Analysis of human enterovirus 71 (EV-71) subgenotype B3 genome sequences revealed that the 3D RNA polymerase and domain Z of the 3'-untranslating region RNA secondary structure had high similarity to CV-A16. Intracerebral inoculation of one-day old mice with the virus resulted in 16% of the mice showing swollen hind limbs and significantly lower weight gain in comparison to EV-71 B4-infected mice. None of the mice presented with hind leg paralysis typical in all the CV-A16 infected mice. CV-A16 genome sequences were amplified from the CV-A16-infected mice brain but no amplification was obtained from all the EV-71-inoculated mice suggesting that no replication had taken place in the suckling mice brain. Conclusion The findings presented here suggest that EV-71 B3 viruses had CV-A16-liked non-structural gene features at the 3'-end of the genome. Their presence could have affected virulence by affecting the mice general health but was insufficient to confer the EV-71 B3 virus a CV-A16-liked neurovirulence in mice model infection. PMID:16122396

  11. A competitive advantage by neonatally engrafted human glial progenitors yields mice whose brains are chimeric for human glia.

    PubMed

    Windrem, Martha S; Schanz, Steven J; Morrow, Carolyn; Munir, Jared; Chandler-Militello, Devin; Wang, Su; Goldman, Steven A

    2014-11-26

    Neonatally transplanted human glial progenitor cells (hGPCs) densely engraft and myelinate the hypomyelinated shiverer mouse. We found that, in hGPC-xenografted mice, the human donor cells continue to expand throughout the forebrain, systematically replacing the host murine glia. The differentiation of the donor cells is influenced by the host environment, such that more donor cells differentiated as oligodendrocytes in the hypomyelinated shiverer brain than in myelin wild-types, in which hGPCs were more likely to remain as progenitors. Yet in each recipient, both the number and relative proportion of mouse GPCs fell as a function of time, concomitant with the mitotic expansion and spread of donor hGPCs. By a year after neonatal xenograft, the forebrain GPC populations of implanted mice were largely, and often entirely, of human origin. Thus, neonatally implanted hGPCs outcompeted and ultimately replaced the host population of mouse GPCs, ultimately generating mice with a humanized glial progenitor population. These human glial chimeric mice should permit us to define the specific contributions of glia to a broad variety of neurological disorders, using human cells in vivo.

  12. Measles Virus Infection of SLAM (CD150) Knockin Mice Reproduces Tropism and Immunosuppression in Human Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Ohno, Shinji; Ono, Nobuyuki; Seki, Fumio; Takeda, Makoto; Kura, Shinobu; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2007-01-01

    The human signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM, also called CD150), a regulator of antigen-driven T-cell responses and macrophage functions, acts as a cellular receptor for measles virus (MV), and its V domain is necessary and sufficient for receptor function. We report here the generation of SLAM knockin mice in which the V domain of mouse SLAM was replaced by that of human SLAM. The chimeric SLAM had an expected distribution and normal function in the knockin mice. Splenocytes from the SLAM knockin mice permitted the in vitro growth of a virulent MV strain but not that of the Edmonston vaccine strain. Unlike in vitro infection, MV could grow only in SLAM knockin mice that also lacked the type I interferon receptor (IFNAR). After intraperitoneal or intranasal inoculation, MV was detected in the spleen and lymph nodes throughout the body but not in the thymus. Notably, the virus appeared first in the mediastinal lymph node after intranasal inoculation. Splenocytes from MV-infected IFNAR−/− SLAM knockin mice showed suppression of proliferative responses to concanavalin A. Thus, MV infection of SLAM knockin mice reproduces lymphotropism and immunosuppression in human infection, serving as a useful small animal model for measles. PMID:17135325

  13. MUC1-specific immune responses in human MUC1 transgenic mice immunized with various human MUC1 vaccines.

    PubMed

    Acres, B; Apostolopoulos, V; Balloul, J M; Wreschner, D; Xing, P X; Ali-Hadji, D; Bizouarne, N; Kieny, M P; McKenzie, I F

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of MUC1-specific cytotoxic T cell precursor (CTLp) frequencies were performed in mice immunized with three different MUC1 vaccine immunotherapeutic agents. Mice were immunized with either a fusion protein comprising MUC1 and glutathione S-transferase (MUC1-GST), MUC1-GST fusion protein coupled to mannan (MFP) or with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing both MUC1 and interleukin-2. Mouse strain variations in immune responsiveness have been observed with these vaccines. We have constructed mice transgenic for the human MUC1 gene to study MUC1-specific immune responses and the risk of auto-immunity following MUC1 immunization. Transgenic mice immunized with MUC1 were observed to be partially tolerant in that the MUC1-specific antibody response is lower than that observed in syngeneic but non-transgenic mice. However, a significant MUC1-specific CTLp response to all three vaccines was observed, indicating the ability to overcome T cell, but to a lesser extent B cell, tolerance to MUC1 in these mice. Histological analysis indicates no evidence of auto-immunity to the cells expressing the human MUC1 molecule. These results suggest that it is possible to generate an immune response to a cancer-related antigen without damage to normal tissues expressing the antigen. PMID:10630311

  14. Transgenic mice expressing high plasma concentrations of human apolipoprotein B100 and lipoprotein(a).

    PubMed Central

    Linton, M F; Farese, R V; Chiesa, G; Grass, D S; Chin, P; Hammer, R E; Hobbs, H H; Young, S G

    1993-01-01

    The B apolipoproteins, apo-B48 and apo-B100, are key structural proteins in those classes of lipoproteins considered to be atherogenic [e.g., chylomicron remnants, beta-VLDL, LDL, oxidized LDL, and Lp(a)]. Here we describe the development of transgenic mice expressing high levels of human apo-B48 and apo-B100. A 79.5-kb human genomic DNA fragment containing the entire human apo-B gene was isolated from a P1 bacteriophage library and microinjected into fertilized mouse eggs. 16 transgenic founders expressing human apo-B were generated, and the animals with the highest expression had plasma apo-B100 levels nearly as high as those of normolipidemic humans (approximately 50 mg/dl). The human apo-B100 in transgenic mouse plasma was present largely in lipoproteins of the LDL class as shown by agarose gel electrophoresis, chromatography on a Superose 6 column, and density gradient ultracentrifugation. When the human apo-B transgenic founders were crossed with transgenic mice expressing human apo(a), the offspring that expressed both transgenes had high plasma levels of human Lp(a). Both the human apo-B and Lp(a) transgenic mice will be valuable resources for studying apo-B metabolism and the role of apo-B and Lp(a) in atherosclerosis. Images PMID:8254057

  15. Physiological time structure of the tibialis anterior motor activity during sleep in mice, rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Silvani, Alessandro; Lo Martire, Viviana; Salvadè, Agnese; Bastianini, Stefano; Ferri, Raffaele; Berteotti, Chiara; Baracchi, Francesca; Pace, Marta; Bassetti, Claudio L; Zoccoli, Giovanna; Manconi, Mauro

    2015-12-01

    The validation of rodent models for restless legs syndrome (Willis-Ekbom disease) and periodic limb movements during sleep requires knowledge of physiological limb motor activity during sleep in rodents. This study aimed to determine the physiological time structure of tibialis anterior activity during sleep in mice and rats, and compare it with that of healthy humans. Wild-type mice (n = 9) and rats (n = 8) were instrumented with electrodes for recording the electroencephalogram and electromyogram of neck muscles and both tibialis anterior muscles. Healthy human subjects (31 ± 1 years, n = 21) underwent overnight polysomnography. An algorithm for automatic scoring of tibialis anterior electromyogram events of mice and rats during non-rapid eye movement sleep was developed and validated. Visual scoring assisted by this algorithm had inter-rater sensitivity of 92-95% and false-positive rates of 13-19% in mice and rats. The distribution of the time intervals between consecutive tibialis anterior electromyogram events during non-rapid eye movement sleep had a single peak extending up to 10 s in mice, rats and human subjects. The tibialis anterior electromyogram events separated by intervals <10 s mainly occurred in series of two-three events, their occurrence rate in humans being lower than in mice and similar to that in rats. In conclusion, this study proposes reliable rules for scoring tibialis anterior electromyogram events during non-rapid eye movement sleep in mice and rats, demonstrating that their physiological time structure is similar to that of healthy young human subjects. These results strengthen the basis for translational rodent models of periodic limb movements during sleep and restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease.

  16. Electrocardiograms Corresponding to the Development of Myocardial Infarction in Anesthetized WHHLMI Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), an Animal Model for Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Ito, Takashi; Yamada, Satoshi; Kuniyoshi, Nobue; Shiomi, Masashi

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether features indicative of myocardial ischemia occur in the electrocardiograms (ECG) in myocardial infarction-prone Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHLMI) rabbits, an animal model for human familial hypercholesterolemia. ECG were recorded in 110 anesthetized WHHLMI rabbits (age, 10 to 39 mo) by using unipolar and bipolar limb leads with or without chest leads. We noted the following electrocardiographic changes: T wave inversion (37.4%), ST segment depression (31.8%), deep Q wave (16.3%), reduced R wave amplitude (7.3%), ST segment elevation (2.7%), and high T wave (1.8%). These ECG changes resembled those in human patients with coronary heart disease. Histopathologic examination revealed that the left ventricular wall showed acute myocardial lesions, including loss of cross-striations, vacuolar degeneration, coagulation necrosis of cardiac myocytes, and edema between myofibrils, in addition to chronic myocardial lesions such as myocardial fibrosis. The coronary arteries that caused these ECG changes were severely stenosed due to atherosclerotic lesions. Ischemic ECG changes corresponded to the locations of the myocardial lesions. Normal ECG waveforms were similar between WHHLMI rabbits and humans, in contrast to the large differences between rabbits and mice or rats. In conclusion, ischemic ECG changes in WHHLMI rabbits reflect the location of myocardial lesions, making this model useful for studying coronary heart disease. PMID:23114045

  17. Electrocardiograms corresponding to the development of myocardial infarction in anesthetized WHHLMI rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus), an animal model for familial hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Ito, Takashi; Yamada, Satoshi; Kuniyoshi, Nobue; Shiomi, Masashi

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether features indicative of myocardial ischemia occur in the electrocardiograms (ECG) in myocardial infarction-prone Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic (WHHLMI) rabbits, an animal model for human familial hypercholesterolemia. ECG were recorded in 110 anesthetized WHHLMI rabbits (age, 10 to 39 mo) by using unipolar and bipolar limb leads with or without chest leads. We noted the following electrocardiographic changes: T wave inversion (37.4%), ST segment depression (31.8%), deep Q wave (16.3%), reduced R wave amplitude (7.3%), ST segment elevation (2.7%), and high T wave (1.8%). These ECG changes resembled those in human patients with coronary heart disease. Histopathologic examination revealed that the left ventricular wall showed acute myocardial lesions, including loss of cross-striations, vacuolar degeneration, coagulation necrosis of cardiac myocytes, and edema between myofibrils, in addition to chronic myocardial lesions such as myocardial fibrosis. The coronary arteries that caused these ECG changes were severely stenosed due to atherosclerotic lesions. Ischemic ECG changes corresponded to the locations of the myocardial lesions. Normal ECG waveforms were similar between WHHLMI rabbits and humans, in contrast to the large differences between rabbits and mice or rats. In conclusion, ischemic ECG changes in WHHLMI rabbits reflect the location of myocardial lesions, making this model useful for studying coronary heart disease. PMID:23114045

  18. CD19xCD3 DART protein mediates human B-cell depletion in vivo in humanized BLT mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Perry; Thayer, William O; Liu, Liqin; Silvestri, Guido; Nordstrom, Jeffrey L; Garcia, J Victor

    2016-01-01

    Novel therapeutic strategies are needed for the treatment of hematologic malignancies; and bispecific antibody-derived molecules, such as dual-affinity re-targeting (DART) proteins, are being developed to redirect T cells to kill target cells expressing tumor or viral antigens. Here we present our findings of specific and systemic human B-cell depletion by a CD19xCD3 DART protein in humanized BLT mice. Administration of the CD19xCD3 DART protein resulted in a dramatic sustained depletion of human CD19+ B cells from the peripheral blood, as well as a dramatic systemic reduction of human CD19+ B-cell levels in all tissues (bone marrow, spleen, liver, lung) analyzed. When human CD8+ T cells were depleted from the mice, no significant B-cell depletion was observed in response to CD19xCD3 DART protein treatment, confirming that human CD8+ T cells are the primary effector cells in this in vivo model. These studies validate the use of BLT humanized mice for the in vivo evaluation and preclinical development of bispecific molecules that redirect human T cells to selectively deplete target cells. PMID:27119115

  19. Oral administration of dextran sodium sulphate induces a caecum-localized colitis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Irina; Nicholls, Flora; Atrott, Kirstin; Cee, Alexandra; Tewes, Bernhard; Greinwald, Roland; Rogler, Gerhard; Frey-Wagner, Isabelle

    2015-06-01

    Trichuris suis ova (TSO) have shown promising results in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) but the mechanisms which underlies this therapeutic effect cannot be studied in mice and rats as T. suis fails to colonize the rodent intestine, whilst hatching in humans and rabbits. As a suitable rabbit IBD model is currently not available, we developed a rabbit colitis model by administration of dextran sodium sulphate (DSS). White Himalayan rabbits (n = 12) received 0.1% DSS in the daily water supply for five days. Clinical symptoms were monitored daily, and rabbits were sacrificed at different time points. A genomewide expression analysis was performed with RNA isolated from caecal lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) and intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). The disease activity index of DSS rabbits increased up to 2.1 ± 0.4 (n = 6) at day 10 (controls <0.5). DSS induced a caecum-localized pathology with crypt architectural distortion, stunted villous surface and inflammatory infiltrate in the lamina propria. The histopathology score reached a peak of 14.2 ± 4.9 (n = 4) at day 10 (controls 7.7 ± 0.9, n = 5). Expression profiling revealed an enrichment of IBD-related genes in both LPMC and IEC. Innate inflammatory response, Th17 signalling and chemotaxis were among the pathways affected significantly. We describe a reproducible and reliable rabbit model of DSS colitis. Localization of the inflammation in the caecum and its similarities to IBD make this model particularly suitable to study TSO therapy in vivo.

  20. Risk of zoonotic transmission of HEV from rabbits.

    PubMed

    Lhomme, Sébastien; Dubois, Martine; Abravanel, Florence; Top, Sokunthea; Bertagnoli, Stéphane; Guerin, Jean-Luc; Izopet, Jacques

    2013-10-01

    Hepatitis E virus strains from rabbits indicate that these mammals may be a reservoir for HEVs that cause infection in humans. Further issues remain to be clarified, including whether the genotype of rabbit HEV differs from human and swine HEV genotype 3 and whether rabbit HEV can infect human and other animals. HEV was found in farmed rabbits in several geographic areas of China, in USA and more recently in France. The prevalence of antibodies against HEV was 36%, 57% and 55% in rabbits from Virginia (USA), Gansu Province and Beijing (China), respectively. HEV RNA was detected in 16.5% of serum samples from farmed rabbits in Virginia, 7.5% in Gansu Province and 7.0% in Beijing. HEV RNA was detected in 7% of bile samples from farmed rabbits and in 23% of liver samples from wild rabbits in France. The full-length genomic sequences analysis indicates that all the rabbit strains belong to the same clade. Nucleotide sequences were 72.2-78.2% identical to HEV genotypes 1-4. Comparison with HEV sequences of human strains circulating in France and reference sequences identified a human strain closely related to rabbit HEV. A 93-nucleotide insertion in the X domain of the ORF1 of the human strain and in all the rabbit HEV strains was found. Moreover, the ability of rabbit HEV to cause cross-species infection in a pig model has recently been demonstrated. Rabbit HEV can replicate efficiently in human cell lines. Collectively, these data support the possibility of zoonotic transmission of HEV from rabbits. PMID:23474012

  1. Cernunnos Deficiency Reduces Thymocyte Life Span and Alters the T Cell Repertoire in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Vera, Gabriella; Rivera-Munoz, Paola; Abramowski, Vincent; Malivert, Laurent; Lim, Annick; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Martin, Christelle; Florkin, Benoit; Latour, Sylvain; Revy, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Cernunnos is a DNA repair factor of the nonhomologous end-joining machinery. Its deficiency in humans causes radiosensitive severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) with microcephaly, characterized in part by a profound lymphopenia. In contrast to the human condition, the immune system of Cernunnos knockout (KO) mice is not overwhelmingly affected. In particular, Cernunnos is dispensable during V(D)J recombination in lymphoid cells. Nevertheless, the viability of thymocytes is reduced in Cernunnos KO mice, owing to the chronic activation of a P53-dependent DNA damage response. This translates into a qualitative alteration of the T cell repertoire to one in which the most distal Vα and Jα segments are missing. This results in the contraction of discrete T cell populations, such as invariant natural killer T (iNKT) and mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells, in both humans and mice. PMID:23207905

  2. Atypical scrapie prions from sheep and lack of disease in transgenic mice overexpressing human prion protein.

    PubMed

    Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Joiner, Susan; Linehan, Jacqueline M; Balkema-Buschmann, Anne; Spiropoulos, John; Simmons, Marion M; Griffiths, Peter C; Groschup, Martin H; Hope, James; Brandner, Sebastian; Asante, Emmanuel A; Collinge, John

    2013-11-01

    Public and animal health controls to limit human exposure to animal prions are focused on bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), but other prion strains in ruminants may also have zoonotic potential. One example is atypical/Nor98 scrapie, which evaded statutory diagnostic methods worldwide until the early 2000s. To investigate whether sheep infected with scrapie prions could be another source of infection, we inoculated transgenic mice that overexpressed human prion protein with brain tissue from sheep with natural field cases of classical and atypical scrapie, sheep with experimental BSE, and cattle with BSE. We found that these mice were susceptible to BSE prions, but disease did not develop after prolonged postinoculation periods when mice were inoculated with classical or atypical scrapie prions. These data are consistent with the conclusion that prion disease is less likely to develop in humans after exposure to naturally occurring prions of sheep than after exposure to epizootic BSE prions of ruminants.

  3. Altered neurotransmission in the lateral amygdala in aged human apoE4 targeted replacement mice.

    PubMed

    Klein, Rebecca C; Acheson, Shawn K; Mace, Brian E; Sullivan, Patrick M; Moore, Scott D

    2014-09-01

    The human APOE4 allele is associated with an early age of onset and increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Apolipoprotein E is secreted as part of a high-density lipoprotein-like particle by glial cells in the brain for the primary purpose of transport of lipophilic compounds involved in the maintenance of synapses. Previous studies examining synaptic integrity in the amygdala of human apoE targeted replacement (TR) mice showed a decrease in spontaneous excitatory synaptic activity, dendritic arbor, and spine density associated with apoE4 compared with apoE3 and apoE2 in adult male mice. In the present study, we assessed how APOE genotype affects synaptic integrity of amygdala neurons by comparing electrophysiological and morphometric properties in human apoE3, E4, and E2/4 TR mice at the age of 18-20 months. In contrast to adult mice, we found that aged apoE4 TR mice exhibited the highest level of excitatory synaptic activity compared with other cohorts. Additionally, apoE4 mice had significantly greater spontaneous inhibitory activity than all other cohorts. Taken together, there was a significant interaction between genotypes when comparing inhibition relative to excitation; there was a simple main effect of frequency type with an imbalance toward inhibition in apoE4 mice but not in apoE3 or apoE2/4 mice. These results suggest that apoE isoforms differentially influence synaptic transmission throughout the life span, where aging coupled with apoE4 expression, results in an imbalance in maintaining integrity of synaptic transmission.

  4. Seroprevalence of toxoplasma gondii infection in domestic rabbits in Durango State, Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Toxoplasma gondii infection in rabbits is of public health importance because rabbit meat is consumed by humans, and rabbits are preyed upon by cats that then shed environmentally resistant oocysts. Antibodies to T. gondii were determined in 429 domestic rabbits in Durango State, Mexico using the mo...

  5. The use of BLT humanized mice to investigate the immune reconstitution of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Angela; Victor Garcia, J

    2014-08-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) track represents an important battlefield where pathogens first try to gain entry into a host. It is also a universe where highly diverse and ever changing inhabitants co-exist in an exceptional equilibrium without parallel in any other organ system of the body. The gut as an organ has its own well-developed and fully functional immune organization that is similar and yet different in many important ways to the rest of the immune system. Both a compromised and an overactive immune system in the gut can have dire and severe consequences to human health. It has therefore been of great interest to develop animal models that recapitulate key aspects of the human condition to better understand the interplay of the host immune system with its friends and its foes. However, reconstitution of the GI tract in humanized mice has been difficult and highly variable in different systems. A better molecular understanding of the development of the gut immune system in mice has provided critical cues that have been recently used to develop novel humanized mouse models that fully recapitulate the genesis and key functions of the gut immune system of humans. Of particular interest is the presence of human gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) aggregates in the gut of NOD/SCID BLT humanized mice that demonstrate the faithful development of bona fide human plasma cells capable of migrating to the lamina propria and producing human IgA1 and IgA2.

  6. Development of human B cells and antibodies following human hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Anne; Hallam, Steven J; Nielsen, Stanton J; Cuadra, German I; Berges, Bradford K

    2015-06-01

    Humanized mice represent a valuable model system to study the development and functionality of the human immune system. In the RAG-hu mouse model highly immunodeficient Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) mice are transplanted with human CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells, resulting in human hematopoiesis and a predominant production of B and T lymphocytes. Human adaptive immune responses have been detected towards a variety of antigens in humanized mice but both cellular and humoral immune responses tend to be weak and sporadically detected. The underlying mechanisms for inconsistent responses are poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the kinetics of human B cell development and antibody production in RAG-hu mice to better understand the lack of effective antibody responses. We found that T cell levels in blood did not significantly change from 8 to 28 weeks post-engraftment, while B cells reached a peak at 14 weeks. Concentrations of 3 antibody classes (IgM, IgG, IgA) were found to be at levels about 0.1% or less of normal human levels, but human antibodies were still detected up to 32 weeks after engraftment. Human IgM was detected in 92.5% of animals while IgG and IgA were detected in about half of animals. We performed flow cytometric analysis of human B cells in bone marrow, spleen, and blood to examine the presence of precursor B cells, immature B cells, naïve B cells, and plasma B cells. We detected high levels of surface IgM(+) B cells (immature and naïve B cells) and low levels of plasma B cells in these organs, suggesting that B cells do not mature properly in this model. Low levels of human T cells in the spleen were observed, and we suggest that the lack of T cell help may explain poor B cell development and antibody responses. We conclude that human B cells that develop in humanized mice do not receive the signals necessary to undergo class-switching or to secrete antibody effectively, and we discuss strategies to potentially overcome these barriers.

  7. Pharmacokinetics and effects on serum cholinesterase activities of organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Suemizu, Hiroshi; Sota, Shigeto; Kuronuma, Miyuki; Shimizu, Makiko; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Organophosphorus pesticides acephate and chlorpyrifos in foods have potential to impact human health. The aim of the current study was to investigate the pharmacokinetics of acephate and chlorpyrifos orally administered at lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level doses in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. Absorbed acephate and its metabolite methamidophos were detected in serum from wild type mice and chimeric mice orally administered 150mg/kg. Approximately 70% inhibition of cholinesterase was evident in plasma of chimeric mice with humanized liver (which have higher serum cholinesterase activities than wild type mice) 1day after oral administrations of acephate. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents from chimeric mice studies were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors and in vitro metabolic clearance data with a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model. Estimated plasma concentrations of acephate and chlorpyrifos in humans were consistent with reported concentrations. Acephate cleared similarly in humans and chimeric mice but accidental/incidental overdose levels of chlorpyrifos cleared (dependent on liver metabolism) more slowly from plasma in humans than it did in mice. The data presented here illustrate how chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes in combination with a simple PBPK model can assist evaluations of toxicological potential of organophosphorus pesticides.

  8. Inhibition of Acute in vivo Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection by Human Interleukin 10 Treatment of SCID Mice Implanted with Human Fetal Thymus and Liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollmann, Tobias R.; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo; Katopodis, Nikos F.; Hachamovitch, Moshe; Rubinstein, Arye; Kim, Ana; Goldstein, Harris

    1996-04-01

    To improve the usefulness of in vivo models for the investigation of the pathophysiology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, we modified the construction of SCID mice implanted with human fetal thymus and liver (thy/liv-SCID-hu mice) so that the peripheral blood of the mice contained significant numbers of human monocytes and T cells. After inoculation with HIV-159, a primary patient isolate capable of infecting monocytes and T cells, the modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice developed disseminated HIV infection that was associated with plasma viremia. The development of plasma viremia and HIV infection in thy/liv-SCID-hu mice inoculated with HIV-159 was inhibited by acute treatment with human interleukin (IL) 10 but not with human IL-12. The human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in these modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice were responsive in vivo to treatment with exogenous cytokines. Human interferon γ expression in the circulating human peripheral blood mononuclear cells was induced by treatment with IL-12 and inhibited by treatment with IL-10. Thus, these modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice should prove to be a valuable in vivo model for examining the role of immunomodulatory therapy in modifying HIV infection. Furthermore, our demonstration of the in vivo inhibitory effect of IL-10 on acute HIV infection suggests that further studies may be warranted to evaluate whether there is a role for IL-10 therapy in preventing HIV infection in individuals soon after exposure to HIV such as for children born to HIV-infected mothers.

  9. Inhibition of acute in vivo human immunodeficiency virus infection by human interleukin 10 treatment of SCID mice implanted with human fetal thymus and liver.

    PubMed Central

    Kollmann, T R; Pettoello-Mantovani, M; Katopodis, N F; Hachamovitch, M; Rubinstein, A; Kim, A; Goldstein, H

    1996-01-01

    To improve the usefulness of in vivo mode for the investigation of the pathophysiology of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, we modified the construction of SCID mice implanted with human fetal thymus and liver (thy/liv-SCID-hu mice) so that the peripheral blood of the mice contained significant numbers of human monocytes and T cells. After inoculation with HIV-1(59), a primary patient isolate capable of infecting monocytes and T cells, the modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice developed disseminated HIV infection that was associated with plasma viremia. The development of plasma viremia and HIV infection in thy/liv-SCID-hu mice inoculated with HIV-1(59) was inhibited by acute treatment with human interleukin (IL) 10 but not with human IL-12. The human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in these modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice were responsive to in vivo treatment with exogenous cytokines. Human interferon gamma expression in the circulating human peripheral blood mononuclear cells was induced by treatment with IL-12 and inhibited by treatment with IL-10. Thus, these modified thy/liv-SCID-hu mice should prove to be a valuable in vivo model for examining the role of immunomodulatory therapy in modifying HIV infection. Furthermore, our demonstration of the vivo inhibitory effect of IL-10 on acute HIV infection suggests that further studies may be warranted to evaluate whether there is a role for IL-10 therapy in preventing HIV infection in individuals soon after exposure to HIV such as for children born to HIV-infected mothers. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8610180

  10. Susceptibility to hepatotoxicity in transgenic mice that express a dominant-negative human keratin 18 mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Ku, N O; Michie, S A; Soetikno, R M; Resurreccion, E Z; Broome, R L; Oshima, R G; Omary, M B

    1996-01-01

    Keratins 8 and 18 (K8/18) are intermediate filament phosphoglycoproteins that are expressed preferentially in simple-type epithelia. We recently described transgenic mice that express point-mutant human K18 (Ku, N.-O., S. Michie, R.G. Oshima, and M.B. Omary. 1995. J. Cell Biol. 131:1303-1314) and develop chronic hepatitis and hepatocyte fragility in association with hepatocyte keratin filament disruption. Here we show that mutant K18 expressing transgenic mice are highly susceptible to hepatotoxicity after acute administration of acetaminophen (400 mg/Kg) or chronic ingestion of griseofulvin (1.25% wt/wt of diet). The predisposition to hepatotoxicity results directly from the keratin mutation since nontransgenic or transgenic mice that express normal human K18 are more resistant. Hepatotoxicity was manifested by a significant difference in lethality, liver histopathology, and biochemical serum testing. Keratin glycosylation decreased in all griseofulvin-fed mice, whereas keratin phosphorylation increased dramatically preferentially in mice expressing normal K18. The phosphorylation increase in normal K18 after griseofulvin feeding appears to involve sites that are different to those that increase after partial hepatectomy. Our results indicate that hepatocyte intermediate filament disruption renders mice highly susceptible to hepatotoxicity, and raises the possibility that K18 mutations may predispose to drug hepatotoxicity. The dramatic phosphorylation increase in nonmutant keratins could provide survival advantage to hepatocytes. PMID:8770877

  11. GFAP expression and social deficits in transgenic mice overexpressing human sAPPα

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Antoinette R; Hou, Huayan; Song, Min; Obregon, Demian F; Portis, Samantha; Barger, Steven; Shytle, Doug; Stock, Saundra; Mori, Takashi; Sanberg, Paul G; Murphy, Tanya; Tan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Autistic individuals display impaired social interactions and language, and restricted, stereotyped behaviors. Elevated levels of secreted amyloid precursor protein-alpha (sAPPα), the product of α-secretase cleavage of APP, are found in the plasma of some individuals with autism. The sAPPα protein is neurotrophic and neuroprotective and recently showed a correlation to glial differentiation in human neural stem cells (NSCs) via the IL-6 pathway. Considering evidence of gliosis in postmortem autistic brains, we hypothesized that subsets of patients with autism would exhibit elevations in CNS sAPPα and mice generated to mimic this observation would display markers suggestive of gliosis and autism-like behavior. Elevations in sAPPα levels were observed in brains of autistic patients compared to controls. Transgenic mice engineered to overexpress human sAPPα (TgsAPPα mice) displayed hypoactivity, impaired sociability, increased brain glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, and altered Notch1 and IL-6 levels. NSCs isolated from TgsAPPα mice, and those derived from wild-type mice treated with sAPPα, displayed suppressed β-tubulin III and elevated GFAP expression. These results suggest that elevations in brain sAPPα levels are observed in subsets of individuals with autism and TgsAPPα mice display signs suggestive of gliosis and behavioral impairment. PMID:23840007

  12. Copper transport during lactation in transgenic mice expressing the human ATP7A protein

    PubMed Central

    Llanos, Roxana M.; Michalczyk, Agnes A.; Freestone, David J.; Currie, Scott; Linder, Maria C.; Ackland, M. Leigh; Mercer, Julian F.B.

    2008-01-01

    Both copper transporting ATPases, ATP7A and ATP7B, are expressed in mammary epithelial cells but their role in copper delivery to milk has not been clarified. We investigated the role of ATP7A in delivery of copper to milk using transgenic mice that over-express human ATP7A. In mammary gland of transgenic mice, human ATP7A protein was 10- to 20-fold higher than in control mice, and was localized to the basolateral membrane of mammary epithelial cells in lactating mice. The copper concentration in the mammary gland of transgenic dams and stomach contents of transgenic pups was significantly reduced compared to non-transgenic mice. The mRNA levels of endogenous Atp7a, Atp7b, and Ctr1 copper transporters in the mammary gland were not altered by the expression of the ATP7A transgene, and the protein levels of Atp7b and ceruloplasmin were similar in transgenic and non-transgenic mice. These data suggest that ATP7A plays a role in removing excess copper from the mammary epithelial cells rather than supplying copper to milk. PMID:18515074

  13. GFAP expression and social deficits in transgenic mice overexpressing human sAPPα.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Antoinette R; Hou, Huayan; Song, Min; Obregon, Demian F; Portis, Samantha; Barger, Steven; Shytle, Doug; Stock, Saundra; Mori, Takashi; Sanberg, Paul G; Murphy, Tanya; Tan, Jun

    2013-09-01

    Autistic individuals display impaired social interactions and language, and restricted, stereotyped behaviors. Elevated levels of secreted amyloid precursor protein-alpha (sAPPα), the product of α-secretase cleavage of APP, are found in the plasma of some individuals with autism. The sAPPα protein is neurotrophic and neuroprotective and recently showed a correlation to glial differentiation in human neural stem cells (NSCs) via the IL-6 pathway. Considering evidence of gliosis in postmortem autistic brains, we hypothesized that subsets of patients with autism would exhibit elevations in CNS sAPPα and mice generated to mimic this observation would display markers suggestive of gliosis and autism-like behavior. Elevations in sAPPα levels were observed in brains of autistic patients compared to controls. Transgenic mice engineered to overexpress human sAPPα (TgsAPPα mice) displayed hypoactivity, impaired sociability, increased brain glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression, and altered Notch1 and IL-6 levels. NSCs isolated from TgsAPPα mice, and those derived from wild-type mice treated with sAPPα, displayed suppressed β-tubulin III and elevated GFAP expression. These results suggest that elevations in brain sAPPα levels are observed in subsets of individuals with autism and TgsAPPα mice display signs suggestive of gliosis and behavioral impairment. PMID:23840007

  14. Replication and pathogenicity of attenuated human metapneumovirus F mutants in severe combined immunodeficiency mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chun-mei; Li, Rong-pei; Chen, Xin; Liu, Ping; Zhao, Xiao-dong

    2012-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the replication and pathogenicity of attenuated human metapneumovirus (HMPV) mutants in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. SCID mice were intranasally infected with either wild type GFP-rHMPV (WT), or mutant viruses (M1, M2 and M4) with the N-linked glycosylation(s) of the F protein removed. The organs were collected for viral isolation, titration, pulmonary histopathology and mRNA detection by PCR at different time points. WT or mutant viruses were successfully isolated from the lungs of infected mice after inoculation. The titers of WT and M1 peaked on 5th day and remained detectable until 14th day post-inoculation. M2 reached approximately 4 logs lower titer on 5th and 9th day post-inoculation as compared to WT and M1. M4 showed similar growth kinetics to M2. Viral signal was never detected from the heart, liver, spleen, kidney and brain on 5th day post-inoculation. The pulmonary pathology score in the M1 infected mice was similar to WT infected mice but higher than in M2 or M4 infected mice. WT and HMPV mutants can thus only replicate in the lungs of SCID mice. Attenuated M2 and M4 may be considered as candidates for the preparation of vaccine against HMPV.

  15. Enhanced Transmural Fiber Rotation and Connexin 43 Heterogeneity Are Associated With an Increased Upper Limit of Vulnerability in a Transgenic Rabbit Model of Human Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ripplinger, Crystal M.; Li, Wenwen; Hadley, Jennifer; Chen, Junjie; Rothenberg, Florence; Lombardi, Raffaella; Wickline, Samuel A.; Marian, Ali J.; Efimov, Igor R.

    2008-01-01

    Human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, characterized by cardiac hypertrophy and myocyte disarray, is the most common cause of sudden cardiac death in the young. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is often caused by mutations in sarcomeric genes. We sought to determine arrhythmia propensity and underlying mechanisms contributing to arrhythmia in a transgenic (TG) rabbit model (β-myosin heavy chain–Q403) of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Langendorff-perfused hearts from TG (n = 6) and wild-type (WT) rabbits (n = 6) were optically mapped. The upper and lower limits of vulnerability, action potential duration (APD) restitution, and conduction velocity were measured. The transmural fiber angle shift was determined using diffusion tensor MRI. The transmural distribution of connexin 43 was quantified with immunohistochemistry. The upper limit of vulnerability was significantly increased in TG versus WT hearts (13.3 ± 2.1 versus 7.4 ± 2.3 V/cm; P = 3.2e−5), whereas the lower limits of vulnerability were similar. APD restitution, conduction velocities, and anisotropy were also similar. Left ventricular transmural fiber rotation was significantly higher in TG versus WT hearts (95.6 ± 10.9° versus 79.2 ± 7.8°; P = 0.039). The connexin 43 density was significantly increased in the mid-myocardium of TG hearts compared with WT (5.46 ± 2.44% versus 2.68 ± 0.77%; P = 0.024), and similar densities were observed in the endo- and epicardium. Because a nearly 2-fold increase in upper limit of vulnerability was observed in the TG hearts without significant changes in APD restitution, conduction velocity, or the anisotropy ratio, we conclude that structural remodeling may underlie the elevated upper limit of vulnerability in human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. PMID:17885214

  16. Inhibition of megakaryocyte development in the bone marrow underlies dengue virus-induced thrombocytopenia in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Sridharan, Aishwarya; Chen, Qingfeng; Tang, Kin Fai; Ooi, Eng Eong; Hibberd, Martin L; Chen, Jianzhu

    2013-11-01

    A characteristic clinical feature of dengue virus infection is thrombocytopenia, though its underlying mechanism is not definitively determined. By adoptive transfer of human CD34(+) fetal liver cells into immunodeficient mice, we have constructed humanized mice with significant levels of human platelets, monocytes/macrophages, and hepatocytes. Infection of these mice with both lab-adapted and clinical strains of dengue virus induces characteristic human hematological changes, including transient leukopenia and thrombocytopenia. We show that the specific depletion of human platelets is not mediated by antibodies in the periphery or reduced production of human thrombopoietin in the liver but reduction of human megakaryocytes and megakaryocyte progenitors in the bone marrow of the infected mice. These findings identify inhibition of platelet production in the bone marrow as a key mechanism underlying dengue-induced thrombocytopenia and suggest the utility of the improved humanized mouse model in studying dengue virus infection and pathogenesis in a human cell context.

  17. Evaluation of the efficiency of human immune system reconstitution in NSG mice and NSG mice containing a human HLA.A2 transgene using hematopoietic stem cells purified from different sources.

    PubMed

    Patton, John; Vuyyuru, Raja; Siglin, Amanda; Root, Michael; Manser, Tim

    2015-07-01

    Severely immunodeficient mice such as the NOD/SCID/IL2rγ(null) (NSG) strain can be engrafted with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), resulting in chimeric mice containing many components of the human immune system (Human Immune System mice or HIS mice). HIS mice can both support the replication of and recapitulate much of the immunological response to a variety of pathogens, including ones with strict human tropism, such as HIV-1. In an effort to develop a better mouse model for human infectious pathogen infection and possible immune resolution, we compared the human immune system reconstitution of NSG mice following injection with human CD34(+) HSCs purified from either fetal liver (FL) or umbilical cord blood (UCB). We analyzed reconstitution in standard NSG mice as well as a derivative of these mice containing an HLA.A2 encoding transgene (NSG.A2). HSCs from both sources effectively reconstituted hematopoietic lineages when injected into NSG mice. In marked contrast, total CD45(+) human hematopoietic cells in NSG.A2 mice were well reconstituted by HSCs from UCB but very poorly by HSCs purified from FL. Moreover, the reconstitution of T cell lineages in NSG.A2 mice by HSCs from UCB was inferior to that obtained using NSG mice. We also found that FL CD34(+) HSCs contain a much higher percentage of cells with a phenotype consistent with primitive progenitors than UCB HSCs. We discuss possible explanations for the influence of the HLA.A2 transgene on hematopoietic reconstitution using the two sources of HSCs.

  18. Vitamin E and diabetic nephropathy in mice model and humans.

    PubMed

    Farid, Nakhoul; Inbal, Dahan; Nakhoul, Nakhoul; Evgeny, Farber; Miller-Lotan, Rachel; Levy, Andrew P; Rabea, Asleh

    2013-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with increased oxidative stress due to elevated glucose levels in the plasma. Glucose promotes glycosylation of both plasma and cellular proteins with increased risk for vascular events. Diabetic patients suffer from a higher incidence of cardiovascular complications such as diabetic nephropathy. Haptoglobin (Hp) is an antioxidant plasma protein which binds free hemoglobin, thus preventing heme-iron mediated oxidation. Two alleles exist at the Hp gene locus (1 and 2) encoding three possible Hp genotypes that differ in their antioxidant ability, and may respond differently to vitamin E treatment. Several clinical studies to have shown that Hp 1-1 genotype is a superior antioxidant to the Hp 2-2 genotype and Hp 2-2 genotype is associated with a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease. Vitamin E was found to have beneficial effect in patient and mice with Hp 2-2 genotype. In this review we have summarized the results of our studies in patients with diabetic nephropathy treated with vitamin E and in diabetic mice with different haptoglobin genotypes. PMID:24255894

  19. Comparative Pharmacokinetics of Perfluorobutyrate in Rats, Mice,Monkeys, and Humans and Relevance to Human Exposurevia Drinking Water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorobutyrate (PFBA) has been detected in precipitation, surface waters, water treatment effluent, and in public and private wells in Minnesota at up to low mg/l concentrations. We evaluated the pharmacokinetics of PFBA in rats, mice, monkeys, and humans to provide a rati...

  20. Comparative phamacokinetics of perfluorobutyrate (PFBA) in rats, mice, monkeys and humans and relevance to human exposure via drinking water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorobutyrate (PFBA) has been detected in precipitation, surface waters, water treatment effluent, and in public and private wells in Minnesota at up to low mug/L concentrations. We evaluated the pharmacokinetics of PFBA in rats, mice, monkeys, and humans to provide a rationa...

  1. Animal models to study the pathogenesis of human and animal Clostridium perfringens infections.

    PubMed

    Uzal, Francisco A; McClane, Bruce A; Cheung, Jackie K; Theoret, James; Garcia, Jorge P; Moore, Robert J; Rood, Julian I

    2015-08-31

    The most common animal models used to study Clostridium perfringens infections in humans and animals are reviewed here. The classical C. perfringens-mediated histotoxic disease of humans is clostridial myonecrosis or gas gangrene and the use of a mouse myonecrosis model coupled with genetic studies has contributed greatly to our understanding of disease pathogenesis. Similarly, the use of a chicken model has enhanced our understanding of type A-mediated necrotic enteritis in poultry and has led to the identification of NetB as the primary toxin involved in disease. C. perfringens type A food poisoning is a highly prevalent bacterial illness in the USA and elsewhere. Rabbits and mice are the species most commonly used to study the action of enterotoxin, the causative toxin. Other animal models used to study the effect of this toxin are rats, non-human primates, sheep and cattle. In rabbits and mice, CPE produces severe necrosis of the small intestinal epithelium along with fluid accumulation. C. perfringens type D infection has been studied by inoculating epsilon toxin (ETX) intravenously into mice, rats, sheep, goats and cattle, and by intraduodenal inoculation of whole cultures of this microorganism in mice, sheep, goats and cattle. Molecular Koch's postulates have been fulfilled for enterotoxigenic C. perfringens type A in rabbits and mice, for C. perfringens type A necrotic enteritis and gas gangrene in chickens and mice, respectively, for C. perfringens type C in mice, rabbits and goats, and for C. perfringens type D in mice, sheep and goats. PMID:25770894

  2. An AAV vector-mediated gene delivery approach facilitates reconstitution of functional human CD8+ T cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Li, Xiangming; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G A; Wilson, James M; Tsuji, Moriya

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, a novel adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector-mediated gene delivery approach was taken to improve the reconstitution of functional CD8(+) T cells in humanized mice, thereby mimicking the human immune system (HIS). Human genes encoding HLA-A2 and selected human cytokines (A2/hucytokines) were introduced to an immune-deficient mouse model [NOD/SCID/IL2rγ(null) (NSG) mice] using AAV serotype 9 (AAV9) vectors, followed by transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells. NSG mice transduced with AAV9 encoding A2/hucytokines resulted in higher levels of reconstitution of human CD45(+) cells compared to NSG mice transduced with AAV9 encoding HLA-A2 alone or HLA-A2-transgenic NSG mice. Furthermore, this group of HIS mice also mounted the highest level of antigen-specific A2-restricted human CD8(+) T-cell response upon vaccination with recombinant adenoviruses expressing human malaria and HIV antigens. Finally, the human CD8(+) T-cell response induced in human malaria vaccine-immunized HIS mice was shown to be functional by displaying cytotoxic activity against hepatocytes that express the human malaria antigen in the context of A2 molecules. Taken together, our data show that AAV vector-mediated gene delivery is a simple and efficient method to transfer multiple human genes to immune-deficient mice, thus facilitating successful reconstitution of HIS in mice. The HIS mice generated in this study should ultimately allow us to swiftly evaluate the T-cell immunogenicity of various human vaccine candidates in a pre-clinical setting. PMID:24516613

  3. Differential Sex Response to Aspirin in Decreasing Aneurysm Rupture in Humans and Mice.

    PubMed

    Chalouhi, Nohra; Starke, Robert M; Correa, Tatiana; Jabbour, Pascal M; Zanaty, Mario; Brown, Robert D; Torner, James C; Hasan, David M

    2016-08-01

    We previously found that aspirin decreases the risk of cerebral aneurysm rupture in humans. We aim to assess whether a sex differential exists in the response of human cerebral aneurysms to aspirin and confirm these observations in a mouse model of cerebral aneurysm. A nested case-control analysis from the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms was performed to assess whether a sex differential exists in the response of human cerebral aneurysms to aspirin. A series of experiments were subsequently performed in a mouse model of cerebral aneurysms. Aneurysms were induced with hypertension and elastase injection into mice basal cisterns. We found that aspirin decreased the risk of aneurysm rupture more significantly in men than in women in the International Study of Unruptured Intracranial Aneurysms. In mice, aspirin and cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor did not affect cerebral aneurysm formation but significantly decreased the incidence of rupture. The incidence of rupture was significantly lower in male versus female mice on aspirin. Gene expression analysis from cerebral arteries showed higher 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase levels in male mice. The rate of cerebral aneurysm rupture was similar in male mice receiving aspirin and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase inhibitor compared with females receiving aspirin and 15-hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase agonist, signaling a reversal of the sex-differential response to aspirin. Aspirin decreases aneurysm rupture in human and mice, in part through cyclooxygenase-2 pathways. Evidence from animal and human studies suggests a consistent differential effect by sex. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase activation in females reduces the incidence of rupture and eliminates the sex-differential response to aspirin. PMID:27296993

  4. Interleukin 1-induced augmentation of experimental metastases from a human melanoma in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Giavazzi, R.; Garofalo, A.; Bani, M.R.; Abbate, M.; Ghezzi, P.; Boraschi, D.; Mantovani, A.; Dejana, E. )

    1990-08-01

    This study has examined the effect of the cytokine interleukin 1 (IL-1) on metastasis formation by the human melanoma A375M in nude mice. We have found that human recombinant IL-1 beta (a single injection greater than 0.01 micrograms per mouse i.v. given before tumor cells) induced an augmentation of experimental lung metastases from the A375M tumor cells in nude mice. This effect was rapidly induced and reversible within 24 h after IL-1 injection. A similar effect was induced by human recombinant IL-1 alpha and human recombinant tumor necrosis factor, but not by human recombinant interleukin 6. 5-(125I)odo-2'-deoxyuridine-radiolabeled A375M tumor cells injected i.v. remained at a higher level in the lungs of nude mice receiving IL-1 than in control mice. In addition, IL-1 injected 1 h, but not 24 h, after tumor cells enhanced lung colonization as well, thus suggesting an effect of IL-1 on the vascular transit of tumor cells. These findings may explain the observation of enhanced secondary localization of tumor cells at inflammatory sites and suggest that modulation of secondary spread should be carefully considered when assessing the ability of this cytokine to complement cytoreductive therapies.

  5. Highly active antiretroviral therapy potently suppresses HIV infection in humanized Rag2-/-gammac-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Sango, Kaori; Joseph, Aviva; Patel, Mahesh; Osiecki, Kristin; Dutta, Monica; Goldstein, Harris

    2010-07-01

    Humanized Rag2(-/-)gamma(c)(-/-) mice (Hu-DKO mice) become populated with functional human T cells, B cells, and dendritic cells following transplantation with human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and represent an improved model for studying HIV infection in vivo. In the current study we demonstrated that intrasplenic inoculation of hu-DKO mice with HIV-1 initiated a higher level of HIV infection than intravenous or intraperitoneal inoculation, associated with a reciprocal decrease in peripheral CD4(+) T cells and increase in peripheral CD8(+) T cells. HIV infection by intrasplenic injection increased serum levels of human IgG and IgM including human IgM and IgG specific for HIV-1 gp120. There was a significant inverse correlation between the level of HIV-1 infection and the extent of CD4(+) T cell depletion. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiated 1 week after HIV-1 inoculation markedly suppressed HIV-1 infection and prevented CD4(+) T cell depletion. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that intrasplenic injection of hu-DKO mice with HIV is a more efficient route of HIV infection than intravenous or intraperitoneal injection and generates increased infection associated with an increased anti-HIV humoral response. This animal model can serve as a valuable in vivo model to study the efficacy of anti-HIV therapies.

  6. Osteogenesis and mineralization in a rabbit mandibular distraction osteogenesis model is promoted by the human LMP-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaowen; Chen, Yanzhe; Fan, Xiaosheng; Zhang, Hao; Kun, Lu

    2015-04-01

    To observe the effects of LIM mineralization protein-1 (LMP-1) on bone regeneration in the distraction zone based on gene transduction, 36 New Zealand white rabbits underwent mandibular lengthening with a distraction rate of 2 mm/day. The animals were then randomly divided into group A and group B (n = 18, each). At the end of the distraction, Ad5-EGFP viruses and Ad5-LMP-1/EGFP viruses were injected into the distraction gaps in groups A and B, respectively. Seven days later, five randomly selected animals from each group were sacrificed to evaluate the survival of the virus. Four and 8 weeks after distraction osteogenesis (DO), six samples randomly selected from each group underwent CT scanning and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry detection. Eight weeks after DO, the rabbits were sacrificed, and the distracted mandibles were harvested. Six animals from each group processed for radiography, micro-CT, histology, and the rest samples were taken three-point bend testing. Using this model, better bone formation and mineralization in the distracted callus were observed in group B when compared with those in group A. The results suggest local transduction with LMP-1 gene promotes osteogenesis and mineralization in DO.

  7. Smoothened Agonist Reduces Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown in Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vir B.; Singh, Meera V.; Gorantla, Santhi; Poluektova, Larisa Y.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.

    2016-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV)-associated neurocognitive disorder is characterized by recruitment of activated/infected leukocytes into the CNS via disrupted Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) that contributes to persistent neuro-inflammation. In this report, humanized NOD/scid-IL2Rγcnull mice were used to establish that impaired Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is associated with loss of BBB function and neurological damage, and that modulating Shh signaling can rescue these detrimental effects. Plasma viral load, p24 levels and CD4+ T cells were measured as markers of productive HIV infection. These mice also showed impaired exclusion of Evans blue dye from the brain, increased plasma levels of S100B, an astrocytic protein, and down-regulation of tight junction proteins Occludin and Claudin5, collectively indicating BBB dysfunction. Further, brain tissue from HIV+ mice indicated reduced synaptic density, neuronal atrophy, microglial activation, and astrocytosis. Importantly, reduced expression of Shh and Gli1 was also observed in these mice, demonstrating diminished Shh signaling. Administration of Shh mimetic, smoothened agonist (SAG) restored BBB integrity and also abated the neuropathology in infected mice. Together, our results suggest a neuroprotective role for Shh signaling in the context of HIV infection, underscoring the therapeutic potential of SAG in controlling HAND pathogenesis. PMID:27241024

  8. Smoothened Agonist Reduces Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Breakdown in Humanized Mice.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vir B; Singh, Meera V; Gorantla, Santhi; Poluektova, Larisa Y; Maggirwar, Sanjay B

    2016-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV)-associated neurocognitive disorder is characterized by recruitment of activated/infected leukocytes into the CNS via disrupted Blood Brain Barrier (BBB) that contributes to persistent neuro-inflammation. In this report, humanized NOD/scid-IL2Rγc(null) mice were used to establish that impaired Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is associated with loss of BBB function and neurological damage, and that modulating Shh signaling can rescue these detrimental effects. Plasma viral load, p24 levels and CD4(+) T cells were measured as markers of productive HIV infection. These mice also showed impaired exclusion of Evans blue dye from the brain, increased plasma levels of S100B, an astrocytic protein, and down-regulation of tight junction proteins Occludin and Claudin5, collectively indicating BBB dysfunction. Further, brain tissue from HIV(+) mice indicated reduced synaptic density, neuronal atrophy, microglial activation, and astrocytosis. Importantly, reduced expression of Shh and Gli1 was also observed in these mice, demonstrating diminished Shh signaling. Administration of Shh mimetic, smoothened agonist (SAG) restored BBB integrity and also abated the neuropathology in infected mice. Together, our results suggest a neuroprotective role for Shh signaling in the context of HIV infection, underscoring the therapeutic potential of SAG in controlling HAND pathogenesis. PMID:27241024

  9. Evidence of the presence of rheumatoid factor and antibodies reacting with human and rabbit IgA in fluid from non-keratinizing jaw cysts.

    PubMed

    Skaug, N

    1976-01-01

    Fluid from an apical periodontal and a follicular jaw cyst formed, in double diffusion in agarose gel, a continuous precipitin line against IgA isolated from human and rabbit serum, IgA myeloma protein, and secretory IgA. Results of immunoelectrophoresis and absorption experiments indicated that the IgA precipitating factor was an immunoglobulin belonging to the IgM class. Furthermore, the two cyst fluids contained immune complexes, possibly IgA-anti-IgA, which precipitated in agar gel. The same two cyst fluids showed a positive reaction in the Waaler-Rose test with tires of 40 and 80, respectively. A series of the other cyst fluids examined were negative in the Waaler-Rose test. None of the cyst fluids conatined antinuclear antibodies.

  10. Tissue-specific expression of human CD4 in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, F P; Doros, L; Vitale, J; Blackwell, C; Gosselin, J; Snyder, B W; Wadsworth, S C

    1993-05-01

    The gene for the human CD4 glycoprotein, which serves as the receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1, along with approximately 23 kb of sequence upstream of the translational start site, was cloned. The ability of 5' flanking sequences to direct tissue-specific expression was tested in cell culture and in transgenic mice. A 5' flanking region of 6 kb was able to direct transcription of the CD4 gene in NIH 3T3 cells but did not result in detectable expression in the murine T-cell line EL4 or in four lines of transgenic mice. A larger 5' flanking region of approximately 23 kb directed high-level CD4 transcription in the murine T-cell line EL4 and in three independent lines of transgenic mice. Human CD4 expression in all tissues analyzed was tightly correlated with murine CD4 expression; the highest levels of human CD4 RNA expression were found in the thymus and spleen, with relatively low levels detected in other tissues. Expression of human CD4 protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells was examined by flow cytometry in these transgenic animals and found to be restricted to the murine CD4+ subset of lymphocytes. Human CD4 protein, detected with an anti-human CD4 monoclonal antibody, was present on the surface of 45 to 50% of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from all transgenic lines. PMID:8474453

  11. Increased Infectivity of Anchorless Mouse Scrapie Prions in Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Human Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Katie; Meade-White, Kimberly; Striebel, James; Chesebro, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Prion protein (PrP) is found in all mammals, mostly as a glycoprotein anchored to the plasma membrane by a C-terminal glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) linkage. Following prion infection, host protease-sensitive prion protein (PrPsen or PrPC) is converted into an abnormal, disease-associated, protease-resistant form (PrPres). Biochemical characteristics, such as the PrP amino acid sequence, and posttranslational modifications, such as glycosylation and GPI anchoring, can affect the transmissibility of prions as well as the biochemical properties of the PrPres generated. Previous in vivo studies on the effects of GPI anchoring on prion infectivity have not examined cross-species transmission. In this study, we tested the effect of lack of GPI anchoring on a species barrier model using mice expressing human PrP. In this model, anchorless 22L prions derived from tg44 mice were more infectious than 22L prions derived from C57BL/10 mice when tested in tg66 transgenic mice, which expressed wild-type anchored human PrP at 8- to 16-fold above normal. Thus, the lack of the GPI anchor on the PrPres from tg44 mice appeared to reduce the effect of the mouse-human PrP species barrier. In contrast, neither source of prions induced disease in tgRM transgenic mice, which expressed human PrP at 2- to 4-fold above normal. IMPORTANCE Prion protein (PrP) is found in all mammals, usually attached to cells by an anchor molecule called GPI. Following prion infection, PrP is converted into a disease-associated form (PrPres). While most prion diseases are species specific, this finding is not consistent, and species barriers differ in strength. The amino acid sequence of PrP varies among species, and this variability affects prion species barriers. However, other PrP modifications, including glycosylation and GPI anchoring, may also influence cross-species infectivity. We studied the effect of PrP GPI anchoring using a mouse-to-human species barrier model. Experiments showed that

  12. Transplantation of human adipose tissue to nude mice.

    PubMed

    Bach-Mortensen, N; Romert, P; Ballegaard, S

    1976-08-01

    Human adipose tissue was transplanted to the mouse mutant nude (nu/nu). All the grafts were accepted and contained fat cells easily distinguishable from those of the mouse. No detectable relation between the histological pictures before and after grafting was found. In some transplants nerve tissue, and in others macrophages containing fat droplets, were found. The fat tissue graft might be useful for investigation of the influence of various hormones on human fat cells.

  13. Theoretical analysis of the neuraminidase epitope of the Mexican A H1N1 influenza strain, and experimental studies on its interaction with rabbit and human hosts.

    PubMed

    Loyola, Paola Kinara Reyes; Campos-Rodríguez, R; Bello, Martiniano; Rojas-Hernández, S; Zimic, Mirko; Quiliano, Miguel; Briz, Verónica; Muñoz-Fernández, M Angeles; Tolentino-López, Luis; Correa-Basurto, Jose

    2013-05-01

    The neuraminidase (NA) epitope from the Mexican AH1N1 influenza virus was identified by using sequences registered at the GenBank during the peak of a pandemic (from April 2009 to October 2010). First, NA protein sequences were submitted for multiple alignment analysis, and their three-dimensional models (3-D) were then built by using homology modeling. The most common sequence (denominated wild-type) and its mutants were submitted to linear and nonlinear epitope predictors, which included the major histocompatibility complex type II (MHC II) and B-cell peptides. The epitope prediction was in accordance with evolutionary behavior and some protein structural properties. The latter included a low NA mutation rate, NA 3-D surface exposure, and the presence of high hindrance side chain residues. After selecting the epitope, docking studies and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were used to explore interactions between the epitope and MHC II. Afterward, several experimental assays were performed to validate the theoretical study by using antibodies from humans (infected by pandemic H1N1) and rabbits (epitope vaccination). The results show 119 complete sequences that were grouped into 28 protein sequences according to their identity (one wild-type and 27 representative mutants (1-5 mutations)). The predictors yielded several epitopes, with the best fit being the one located in the C-terminal region. Theoretical methods demonstrated that the selected epitope reached the P4, P6, P7, and P9 pockets of MHC II, whereas the experimental evidence indicates that the epitope is recognized by human antibodies and also by rabbit antibodies immunized with the peptide.

  14. Evolution of expression of cardiac phenotypes over a 4-year period in the β-myosin heavy chain-Q403 transgenic rabbit model of human hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nagueh, Sherif F.; Chen, Suetnee; Patel, Rajnikant; Tsybouleva, Natalia; Lutucuta, Silvia; Kopelen, Helen A.; Zoghbi, William A.; Quiñones, Miguel A.; Roberts, Robert; Marian, A.J.

    2009-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), the most common cause of sudden cardiac death in the young, is characterized by a diverse array of cardiac phenotypes evolving over several decades. We have developed transgenic rabbits that fully recapitulate the phenotype of human HCM and provide for the opportunity to delineate the sequence of evolution of cardiac phenotypes, and thus, the pathogenesis of HCM. We determined evolution of biochemical, molecular, histological, structural and functional phenotypes at 4 age-periods in 47 β-myosin heavy chain-glutamine (MyHC-Q)-403 transgenic rabbits. Ca+2 sensitivity of myofibrillar ATPase activity was reduced very early and in the absence of other discernible phenotypes. Myocyte disarray also occurred early, prior to, and independent of hypertrophy and fibrosis. The latter phenotypes evolved predominantly during puberty in conjunction with activation of stress-related signaling kinases. Myocardial contraction and relaxation velocities were decreased early despite normal global cardiac function and in the absence of histological phenotype. Global cardiac function declined with aging, while left atrial size was increased along with Doppler indices of left ventricular filling pressure. Thus, Ca+2 sensitivity of myofibrillar ATPase activity is a primary phenotype expressed early and independent of the ensuing phenotypes. Pathogenesis of myocyte disarray, which exhibits age-independent penetrance, differs from those of hypertrophy and fibrosis, which show age-dependent expression. Myocardial dysfunction is an early marker that predicts subsequent development of hypertrophy. These findings in an animal model that recapitulates the phenotype of human HCM, implicate involvement of multiple independent mechanisms in the pathogenesis of cardiac phenotypes in HCM. PMID:15135661

  15. Binding of Yersinia enterocolitica to purified, native small intestinal mucins from rabbits and humans involves interactions with the mucin carbohydrate moiety.

    PubMed Central

    Mantle, M; Husar, S D

    1994-01-01

    Plasmid-bearing (but not plasmid-cured) Yersinia enterocolitica is known to bind to purified small intestinal mucins from rabbits and humans. This study examined which region(s) of the mucin molecule is important for bacterial adherence. Pronase digestion of mucin and removal of nonglycosylated or poorly glycosylated peptide regions had no effect on bacterial binding, suggesting that plasmid-bearing Y. enterocolitica interacts with mucin carbohydrate. Periodate oxidation also did not alter bacterial adherence, indicating that vicinal hydroxyl groups in the mucin sugars are not important for binding. Boiling of mucin, depolymerization by reduction of disulfide bonds, or removal of noncovalently associated lipid actually enhanced bacterial adherence, suggesting that plasmid-bearing Y. enterocolitica can interact with additional domains in the mucin molecule revealed by these treatments. These domains were destroyed by pronase digestion. In delipidated mucin (but not in reduced or boiled mucin), binding to these domains appeared to be hydrophobic since it could be prevented by treatment of bacteria with tetramethyl urea. Oligosaccharides obtained from both human and rabbit small intestinal mucins were capable of inhibiting attachment of plasmid-bearing (but not plasmid-cured) Y. enterocolitica to mucin. After removal of terminal and backbone sugar residues by treatment of mucin with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid, binding of plasmid-bearing bacteria increased significantly when N-acetylgalactosamine, either alone or with galactose attached, was revealed, indicating that core regions of the sugar side chains are involved in bacterial binding. Adherence of plasmid-cured organisms was unaffected by trifluoromethanesulfonic acid treatment of mucin. We concluded that virulent Y. enterocolitica interacts with the carbohydrate moiety of native small intestinal mucin through a plasmid-mediated process. When mucin becomes denatured, binding of the organism can increase through

  16. Substrate specificity of the electrogenic sodium/bicarbonate cotransporter NBCe1-A (SLC4A4, variant A) from humans and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seong-Ki; Boron, Walter F; Parker, Mark D

    2013-04-01

    In the basolateral membrane of proximal-tubule cells, NBCe1-A (SLC4A4, variant A), operating with an apparent Na(+):HCO(3)(-) stoichiometry of 1:3, contributes to the reclamation of HCO(3)(-) from the glomerular filtrate, thereby preventing whole body acidosis. Others have reported that NBCe1-like activity in human, rabbit, and rat renal preparations is substantially influenced by lithium, sulfite, oxalate, and harmaline. These data were taken as evidence for the presence of distinct Na(+) and CO(3)(2-) binding sites in NBCe1-A, favoring a model of 1 Na(+):1 HCO(3)(-):1 CO(3)(2-). Here, we reexamine these findings by expressing human or rabbit NBCe1-A clones in Xenopus oocytes. In oocytes, NBCe1-A exhibits a 1:2 stoichiometry and could operate in one of five thermodynamically equivalent transport modes: 1) cotransport of Na(+) + 2 HCO(3)(-), 2) cotransport of Na(+) + CO(3)(2-), 3) transport of NaCO(3)(-), 4) exchange of Na(+) + HCO(3)(-) for H(+), or 5) HCO(3)(-)-activated exchange of Na(+) for 2 H(+). In contrast to the behavior of NBCe1-like activity in renal preparations, we find that cloned NBCe1-A is only slightly stimulated by Li(+), not at all influenced by sulfite or oxalate, and only weakly inhibited by harmaline. These negative data do not uniquely support any of the five models above. In addition, we find that NBCe1-A mediates a small amount of Na(+)-independent NO(3)(-) transport and that NBCe1-A is somewhat inhibited by extracellular benzamil. We suggest that the features of NBCe1-like activity in renal preparations are influenced by yet-to-be-identified renal factors. Thus the actual ionic substrates of NBCe1 remain to be identified.

  17. Transplantation of insulin-secreting cells differentiated from human adipose tissue-derived stem cells into type 2 diabetes mice.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ji Sun; Kang, Hyun Mi; Kim, Jiyoung; Park, Seah; Kim, Haekwon; Ahn, Chul Woo; Park, Jin Oh; Kim, Kyung Rae

    2014-01-10

    Currently, there are limited ways to preserve or recover insulin secretory capacity in human pancreas. We evaluated the efficacy of cell therapy using insulin-secreting cells differentiated from human eyelid adipose tissue-derived stem cells (hEAs) into type 2 diabetes mice. After differentiating hEAs into insulin-secreting cells (hEA-ISCs) in vitro, cells were transplanted into a type 2 diabetes mouse model. Serum levels of glucose, insulin and c-peptide were measured, and changes of metabolism and inflammation were assessed in mice that received undifferentiated hEAs (UDC group), differentiated hEA-ISCs (DC group), or sham operation (sham group). Human gene expression and immunohistochemical analysis were done. DC group mice showed improved glucose level, and survival up to 60 days compared to those of UDC and sham group. Significantly increased levels of human insulin and c-peptide were detected in sera of DC mice. RT-PCR and immunohistochemical analysis showed human gene expression and the presence of human cells in kidneys of DC mice. When compared to sham mice, DC mice exhibited lower levels of IL-6, triglyceride and free fatty acids as the control mice. Transplantation of hEA-ISCs lowered blood glucose level in type 2 diabetes mice by increasing circulating insulin level, and ameliorating metabolic parameters including IL-6.

  18. USING DNA MICROARRAYS TO CHARACTERIZE GENE EXPRESSION IN TESTES OF FERTILE AND INFERTILE HUMANS AND MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    USING DNA MICROARRAYS TO CHARACTERIZE GENE EXPRESSION
    IN TESTES OF FERTILE AND INFERTILE HUMANS AND MICE

    John C. Rockett1, J. Christopher Luft1, J. Brian Garges1, M. Stacey Ricci2, Pasquale Patrizio2, Norman B. Hecht2 and David J. Dix1
    Reproductive Toxicology Divisio...

  19. Importance of nicotinamide dose on blood pressure changes in mice and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Horsman, M.R.; Christensen, K.L.; Overgaard, J. )

    1994-06-15

    The importance of nicotinamide dose on inducing blood pressure changes in mice and humans was investigated. Blood pressure measurements in human volunteers were made using an inflated cuff procedure after oral ingestion of 3 or 6 g nicotinamide. Animal blood pressure measurements were performed in fully awake nonanesthetized female CDF1 mice, 24 h after cannulation of the carotid artery. In humans, the average ([+-] 1 SE) resting systolic and diastolic pressures were 122.8 mmHg ([+-] 2.5) and 80.6 mmHg ([+-] 2.1), respectively. They were unchanged during the first 3 h after ingestion of either 3 g or 6 g nicotinamide. The resting value ([+-] 1 SE) in mice was 115.1 mmHg ([+-] 4.0) and this was significantly reduced following intraperitoneal injection of 400-1000 mg/kg nicotinamide. This decrease was maximal within 15-30 min after injection and was linearly dependent on drug dose. At doses of 200 mg/kg or less, no significant effect on blood pressure was observed. Doses between 100-200 mg/kg in mice are known to be equivalent to 6 g in man and can also produce maximal radiosensitization in murine tumors. The results, therefore, not only show that the mouse and human data are entirely consistent, but also suggest that nicotinamide-induced decreases in blood pressure are not necessary for radiosensitization. 29 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Mapping superficial lymphatic territories in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Soto-Miranda, Miguel A; Suami, Hiroo; Chang, David W

    2013-06-01

    Little is known about the anatomy of the lymphatic system in the rabbit with regard to relationships between the lymphatic vessel and lymph node. According to our previous studies in human cadavers and canines, the superficial lymphatic system could be divided into lymphatic territories. The aim of this study was to completely map the superficial lymphatic system in the rabbit. We used our microinjection technique and histological analysis for dissecting studies and recently developed indocyanine green (ICG) fluorescent lymphography for demonstrating dynamic lymph flow in living rabbits. Real-time ICG fluorescent lymphography was performed in two living New Zealand White rabbits, and direct dye microinjection of the lymphatic vessels was performed in eight dead rabbits. To assess the relationships between the vascular and lymphatic systems in rabbits, we performed radiocontrast injection into arteries in two dead rabbits prior to the lymphatic injection. The ICG fluorescent lymphography revealed eight lymphatic territories in the preauricular, submandibular, root of the lateral neck, axillary, lumbar, inguinal, root of the tail, and popliteal regions. We injected blue acrylic dye into every lymphatic vessel 0.1 mm in diameter or larger. We then dissected and chased the stained lymphatic vessels proximally until the vessels connected to the first tier lymph node. This procedure was repeated throughout the body until all the relationships between the lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes were defined. The lymphatic system of the rabbit could be defined as eight lymphatic territories, each with its own lymphatic vessels and lymph node.

  1. Allelic exclusion in transgenic mice carrying mutant human IgM genes

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Expression of the membrane-bound version of the human mu chain in transgenic mice results in the allelic exclusion of endogenous mouse Ig heavy chain genes (6). The secreted version of the human Ig transgene has no such effect. F1 hybrid animals that carry transgenes for both secreted and membrane-bound human mu chains produce both forms of the human heavy chain while strongly suppressing endogenous mouse mu expression. The simultaneous expression of the two rearranged transgenes in primary B cells suggests that allelic exclusion operates before the formation of a second functionally rearranged heavy chain gene in vivo. PMID:3133444

  2. The genetic immunodeficiency disease, leukocyte adhesion deficiency, in humans, dogs, cattle, and mice.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yu-Chen; Bauer, Thomas R; Ackermann, Mark R; Smith, C Wayne; Kehrli, Marcus E; Starost, Matthew F; Hickstein, Dennis D

    2004-08-01

    This review highlights the genotype-phenotype relationship of the genetic immunodeficiency disease leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) in humans, dogs, cattle, and mice, and provides assessment of the opportunities that each animal species provides in the understanding of leukocyte biology and in developing new therapeutic approaches to LAD in humans. This comparison is important since animal models of genetic diseases in humans provide the opportunity to test new therapeutic approaches in an appropriate, disease-specific model. The success of this approach is dependent on the relationship of the phenotype in the animal to the phenotype of the disease in humans. PMID:15357315

  3. Metabolomics reveals the metabolic map of procainamide in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei; Patterson, Andrew D.; Krausz, Kristopher W.; Dick, Bernhard; Frey, Felix J.; Gonzalez, Frank J.; Idle, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Procainamide, a type I antiarrhythmic agent, is used to treat a variety of atrial and ventricular dysrhythmias. It was reported that long-term therapy with procainamide may cause lupus erythematosus in 25–30% of patients. Interestingly, procainamide does not induce lupus erythematosus in mouse models. To explore the differences in this side-effect of procainamide between humans and mouse models, metabolomic analysis using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-QTOFMS) was conducted on urine samples from procainamide-treated humans, CYP2D6-humanized mice, and wild-type mice. Thirteen urinary procainamide metabolites, including nine novel metabolites, derived from P450-dependent, FMO-dependent oxidations and acylation reactions, were identified and structurally elucidated. In vivo metabolism of procainamide in CYP2D6-humanized mice as well as in vitro incubations with microsomes and recombinant P450s suggested that human CYP2D6 plays a major role in procainamide metabolism. Significant differences in N-acylation and N-oxidation of the drug between humans and mice largely account for the interspecies differences in procainamide metabolism. Significant levels of the novel N-oxide metabolites produced by FMO1 and FMO3 in humans might be associated with the development of procainamide-induced systemic lupus erythematosus. Observations based on this metabolomic study offer clues to understanding procainamide-induced lupus in humans and the effect of P450s and FMOs on procainamide N-oxidation. PMID:22387617

  4. An immunocytochemical and ultrastructural study of adenohypophyses of mice transgenic for human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Stefaneanu, L; Kovacs, K; Horvath, E; Losinski, N E; Mayerhofer, A; Wagner, T E; Bartke, A

    1990-01-01

    Adenohypophysial morphology in 12 mice transgenic for methallothionein-I-human (h) GH fusion gene was investigated by immunocytochemistry and electron microscopy. The sustained oversecretion of hGH stimulated body growth. The pituitary glands of 6-month-old transgenic mice were significantly decreased in weight and showed marked morphological changes in somatotrophs, lactotrophs, corticotrophs, and gonadotrophs. GH-immunoreactive cells were greatly reduced in size and midly decreased in number; by electron microscopy, the organelles implicated in hormone synthesis were inconspicuous in this cell type. Transgenic males were hypoprolactinemic, presumably due to lactogenic activity of hGH in rodents. Their pituitaries displayed few and slender PRL-immunoreactive cells; ultrastructurally, they belonged to immature (type II) lactotrophs. However, in females, PRL-containing cells showed no change in number, size, or distribution compared to controls. Prior biochemical studies demonstrated high blood levels of LH in males. Their pituitaries contained highly active gonadotrophs resembling gonadectomy cells, consistent with the view that these changes are related to PRL-like activity of hGH in mice. In both sexes, stimulated corticotrophs were present. The results indicate that some changes in adenohypophysial cells of mice transgenic for hGH can be attributed to protracted overproduction of the heterologous GH, whereas others can be explained by lactotrophic activity of hGH in mice. The divergent morphological responses of lactotrophs and gonadotrophs in the two sexes may reflect differences in the hormonal regulatory mechanisms between male and female mice. PMID:2104591

  5. Dynamic Tracking Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Tropism following Smoke Inhalation Injury in NOD/SCID Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, MeiJuan; Zhang, XiuWei; Sun, ShuLi; Xiao, PeiXin; Hou, ShiKe; Ding, Hui; Liu, ZiQuan; Dong, WenLong; Wang, JinQiang; Wang, Xue; Sun, ZhiGuang

    2016-01-01

    Multiple preclinical evidences have supported the potential value of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for treatment of acute lung injury (ALI). However, few studies focus on the dynamic tropism of MSCs in animals with acute lung injury. In this study, we track systemically transplanted human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBMSCs) in NOD/SCID mice with smoke inhalation injury (SII) through bioluminescence imaging (BLI). The results showed that hBMSCs systemically delivered into healthy NOD/SCID mouse initially reside in the lungs and then partially translocate to the abdomen after 24 h. Compared with the uninjured control group treated with hBMSCs, higher numbers of hBMSCs were found in the lungs of the SII NOD/SCID mice. In both the uninjured and SII mice, the BLI signals in the lungs steadily decreased over time and disappeared by 5 days after treatment. hBMSCs significantly attenuated lung injury, elevated the levels of KGF, decreased the levels of TNF-α in BALF, and inhibited inflammatory cell infiltration in the mice with SII. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that more systemically infused hBMSCs localized to the lungs in mice with SII. hBMSC xenografts repaired smoke inhalation-induced lung injury in mice. This repair was maybe due to the effect of anti-inflammatory and secreting KGF of hMSCs but not associated with the differentiation of the hBMSCs into alveolar epithelial cells. PMID:27725837

  6. Triclosan causes spontaneous abortion accompanied by decline of estrogen sulfotransferase activity in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Chen, Xiaojiao; Feng, Xuejiao; Chang, Fei; Chen, Minjian; Xia, Yankai; Chen, Ling

    2015-12-15

    Triclosan (TCS), an antibacterial agent, is identified in serum and urine of humans. Here, we show that the level of urinary TCS in 28.3% patients who had spontaneous abortion in mid-gestation were increased by 11.3-fold (high-TCS) compared with normal pregnancies. Oral administration of TCS (10 mg/kg/day) in mice (TCS mice) caused an equivalent urinary TCS level as those in the high-TCS abortion patients. The TCS-exposure from gestation day (GD) 5.5 caused dose-dependently fetal death during GD12.5-16.5 with decline of live fetal weight. GD15.5 TCS mice appeared placental thrombus and tissue necrosis with enhancement of platelet aggregation. The levels of placenta and plasma estrogen sulfotransferase (EST) mRNA and protein in TCS mice or high-TCS abortion patients were not altered, but their EST activities were significantly reduced compared to controls. Although the levels of serum estrogen (E2) in TCS mice and high-TCS abortion patients had no difference from controls, their ratio of sulfo-conjugated E2 and unconjugated E2 was reduced. The estrogen receptor antagonist ICI-182,780 prevented the enhanced platelet aggregation and placental thrombosis and attenuated the fetal death in TCS mice. The findings indicate that TCS-exposure might cause spontaneous abortion probably through inhibition of EST activity to produce placental thrombosis.

  7. Of mice and men: olfactory neuroblastoma among animals and humans.

    PubMed

    Lubojemska, A; Borejko, M; Czapiewski, P; Dziadziuszko, R; Biernat, W

    2016-09-01

    Olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB) is a rare tumour of nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses that arises from the olfactory neuroepithelium and has unpredictable clinical course. As the sense of smell is phylogenetically one of the first senses and olfactory neuroepithelium is evolutionary conserved with striking similarities among different species, we performed an extensive analysis of the literature in order to evaluate the similarities and differences between animals and humans on the clinical, morphological, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural and molecular level. Our analysis revealed that ONB was reported mainly in mammals and showed striking similarities to human ONB. These observations provide rationale for introduction of therapy modalities used in humans into the veterinary medicine. Animal models of neuroblastoma should be considered for the preclinical studies evaluating novel therapies for ONB. PMID:25041470

  8. Impact of residual and therapeutic doses of ciprofloxacin in the human-flora-associated mice model.

    PubMed

    Perrin-Guyomard, Agnes; Poul, Jean-Michel; Corpet, Denis E; Sanders, Pascal; Fernández, A Haydée; Bartholomew, Mary

    2005-07-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effects of therapeutic and residual doses of ciprofloxacin on the human intestinal flora implanted into germ-free mice. Ciprofloxacin was administered daily via drinking water at concentrations to provide doses of 0, 0.125, 1.25, and 12.5mg/kg b.w. Changes in the intestinal flora composition, alteration in bacterial enzyme activities, fecal short chain fatty acid concentration and bacterial cellular fatty acid profiles, overgrowth of resistant bacteria, and disruption of the colonization barrier were the endpoints evaluated in the feces of human-flora-associated (HFA) mice. Ciprofloxacin at all tested doses decreased significantly the aerobic populations and particularly the population of Enterobacteriaceae. Selection of resistant Bacteroides fragilis group was noticed in HFA mice receiving 12.5mg/kg b.w. In mice challenged with a Salmonella strain, exogenous Salmonella persisted in the feces of all treated mice indicating that the flora responsible for the colonization barrier effect was disturbed by the antibiotic treatment. None of the studied metabolic parameters of the flora were affected by ciprofloxacin at any dose level. Under the experimental conditions of the study, the no-observed-effect level of ciprofloxacin was found to be less than 0.125 mg/kg b.w.

  9. Exploratory study of oral mucosal colonization of human gastric Helicobacter pylori in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Xueqin; Tang, Dongsheng; Zhang, Xiaohuan; Li, Hongming; Cui, Zhixin; Hu, Sijuan; Huang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    In this study, human gastric Helicobacter pylori (Hp) was closely attached to the pre-treated mouse buccal mucosa by using artificial oral film to induce the growth and colonization of Hp on the buccal mucosa in mice. Sixty BALB/c mice were divided into three groups, in which Hp biofilm colonization was detected in three mice in Hp film group (Hp mesh biofilm accumulation under an optical microscope; Hp accumulated colonization under an electron microscope). There were no Hp biofilms detected in Hp smear group or the control group with black film. In this study, human gastric Hp was first used to artificially induce the growth and colonization of Hp on the buccal mucosa in mice. The mouse model of oral infection with Hp was initially established, providing animal experimental evidences for oral conditions of growth and colonization of Hp on the buccal mucosa in mice, and providing a workable animal modeling method for further research of joint infection of Hp on the mouth and stomach, as well as the relationship between oral Hp and gastric Hp. PMID:24753744

  10. Differential Muscle Involvement in Mice and Humans Affected by McArdle Disease.

    PubMed

    Krag, Thomas O; Pinós, Tomàs; Nielsen, Tue L; Brull, Astrid; Andreu, Antoni L; Vissing, John

    2016-05-01

    McArdle disease (muscle glycogenosis type V) is caused by myophosphorylase deficiency, which leads to impaired glycogen breakdown. We investigated how myophosphorylase deficiency affects muscle physiology, morphology, and glucose metabolism in 20-week-old McArdle mice and compared the findings to those in McArdle disease patients. Muscle contractions in the McArdle mice were affected by structural degeneration due to glycogen accumulation, and glycolytic muscles fatigued prematurely, as occurs in the muscles of McArdle disease patients. Homozygous McArdle mice showed muscle fiber disarray, variations in fiber size, vacuoles, and some internal nuclei associated with cytosolic glycogen accumulation and ongoing regeneration; structural damage was seen only in a minority of human patients. Neither liver nor brain isoforms of glycogen phosphorylase were upregulated in muscles, thus providing no substitution for the missing muscle isoform. In the mice, the tibialis anterior (TA) muscles were invariably more damaged than the quadriceps muscles. This may relate to a 7-fold higher level of myophosphorylase in TA compared to quadriceps in wild-type mice and suggests higher glucose turnover in the TA. Thus, despite differences, the mouse model of McArdle disease shares fundamental physiological and clinical features with the human disease and could be used for studies of pathogenesis and development of therapies. PMID:27030740

  11. The Developmental Basis of Quantitative Craniofacial Variation in Humans and Mice.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Mitteroecker, Philipp; Parsons, Trish E; Esparza, Mireia; Sjøvold, Torstein; Rolian, Campbell; Richtsmeier, Joan T; Hallgrímsson, Benedikt

    2012-12-01

    The human skull is a complex and highly integrated structure that has long held the fascination of anthropologists and evolutionary biologists. Recent studies of the genetics of craniofacial variation reveal a very complex and multifactorial picture. These findings contrast with older ideas that posit much simpler developmental bases for variation in cranial morphology such as the growth of the brain or the growth of the chondrocranium relative to the dermatocranium. Such processes have been shown to have major effects on cranial morphology in mice. It is not known, however, whether they are relevant to explaining normal phenotypic variation in humans. To answer this question, we obtained vectors of shape change from mutant mouse models in which the developmental basis for the craniofacial phenotype is known to varying degrees, and compared these to a homologous dataset constructed from human crania obtained from a single population with a known genealogy. Our results show that the shape vectors associated with perturbations to chondrocranial growth, brain growth, and body size in mice do largely correspond to axes of covariation in humans. This finding supports the view that the developmental basis for craniofacial variation funnels down to a relatively small number of key developmental processes that are similar across mice and humans. Understanding these processes and how they influence craniofacial shape provides fundamental insights into the developmental basis for evolutionary change in the human skull as well as the developmental-genetic basis for normal phenotypic variation in craniofacial form. PMID:23226904

  12. HIV-1 cellular and tissue replication patterns in infected humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Araínga, Mariluz; Su, Hang; Poluektova, Larisa Y; Gorantla, Santhi; Gendelman, Howard E

    2016-01-01

    Humanized mice have emerged as a testing platform for HIV-1 pathobiology by reflecting natural human disease processes. Their use to study HIV-1 biology, virology, immunology, pathogenesis and therapeutic development has served as a robust alternative to more-well developed animal models for HIV/AIDS. A critical component in reflecting such human pathobiology rests in defining the tissue and cellular sites for HIV-1 infection. To this end, we examined the tissue sites for viral infection in bone marrow, blood, spleens, liver, gut, brain, kidney and lungs of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cell engrafted virus-infected NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice. Cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and sorted from species mixtures defined as CD34+ lineage negative progenitor cells, CD14+CD16+ monocyte-macrophages and central, stem cell and effector memory T cells. The cell distribution and viral life cycle were found dependent on the tissue compartment and time of infection. Cell subsets contained HIV-1 total and integrated DNA as well as multi-spliced and unspliced RNA in divergent proportions. The data support the idea that humanized mice can provide a means to examine the multifaceted sites of HIV-1 replication including, but not limited to progenitor cells and monocyte-macrophages previously possible only in macaques and human. PMID:26996968

  13. Olfactory Sensitivity for Six Predator Odorants in CD-1 Mice, Human Subjects, and Spider Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Sarrafchi, Amir; Odhammer, Anna M. E.; Hernandez Salazar, Laura Teresa; Laska, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Using a conditioning paradigm, we assessed the olfactory sensitivity of six CD-1 mice (Mus musculus) for six sulfur-containing odorants known to be components of the odors of natural predators of the mouse. With all six odorants, the mice discriminated concentrations <0.1 ppm (parts per million) from the solvent, and with five of the six odorants the best-scoring animals were even able to detect concentrations <1 ppt (parts per trillion). Four female spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) and twelve human subjects (Homo sapiens) tested in parallel were found to detect the same six odorants at concentrations <0.01 ppm, and with four of the six odorants the best-scoring animals and subjects even detected concentrations <10 ppt. With all three species, the threshold values obtained here are generally lower than (or in the lower range of) those reported for other chemical classes tested previously, suggesting that sulfur-containing odorants may play a special role in olfaction. Across-species comparisons showed that the mice were significantly more sensitive than the human subjects and the spider monkeys with four of the six predator odorants. However, the human subjects were significantly more sensitive than the mice with the remaining two odorants. Human subjects and spider monkeys significantly differed in their sensitivity with only two of the six odorants. These comparisons lend further support to the notion that the number of functional olfactory receptor genes or the relative or absolute size of the olfactory bulbs are poor predictors of a species’ olfactory sensitivity. Analysis of odor structure–activity relationships showed that in both mice and human subjects the type of alkyl rest attached to a thietane and the type of oxygen moiety attached to a thiol significantly affected olfactory sensitivity. PMID:24278296

  14. Immunopathological assessments of human Blastocystis spp. in experimentally infected immunocompetent and immunosuppresed mice.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hafeez, Ekhlas H; Ahmad, Azza K; Abdelgelil, Noha H; Abdellatif, Manal Z M; Kamal, Amany M; Hassanin, Kamel M A; Abdel-Razik, Abdel-Razik H; Abdel-Raheem, Ehab M

    2016-05-01

    Blastocystis spp., one of the most common parasites colonizing the human intestine, is an extracellular, luminal protozoan with controversial pathogenesis. The host's immune response against Blastocystis spp. infection has also not been defined yet. Therefore, this research aimed to assess the potential pathogenicity of this parasite and its ability to modulate the immune response in experimental infected immunocompetent and immunosuppresed mice. These results demonstrated that the infected immunosuppressed mice were more affected than infected immunocompetent mice. Histopathological examination of the small intestine in the infected immunosuppressed mice showed that Blastocystis spp. infiltrated all the layers. Moreover, the epithelia showed exfoliation and inflammatory cell infiltration in submucosa compared to that of the infected immunocompetent mice. As well, examination of the large intestine of the infected immunosuppressed group showed severe goblet cell hyperplasia. Blastocystis spp. infiltrated all the large intestine layers compared to that of the infected immunocompetent group. Furthermore, there was a significant upregulation of the expression of proinflammatory cytokines: interleukin 12 (IL-12) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in the infected immunosuppressed mice compared to that of the infected immunocompetent ones (p ≤ 0.004 and p ≤ 0.002, respectively). However, the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines (IL-4 and IL-10) was significantly downregulated in the infected immunosuppressed group compared to that of the infected immunocompetent group one at 10 days postinfection (p ≤ 0.002 and p ≤ 0.001, respectively). The results of this study revealed that Blastocystis spp. affected the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in both groups of mice compared to healthy normal (naive) group. Additionally, these data showed that there was a significant upregulation (p ≤ 0.005) of the locally

  15. Pathophysiological effects of human TNF-alpha-producing tumor xenografts in immunosuppressed mice.

    PubMed

    Nagy, T; Jánossy, T; Vizler, C; Bohus, K; Joó, F; Végh, P; Duda, E

    1999-10-01

    Groups of CBA mice immunosuppressed with anti-thymocyte serum (ATS) treatment were xeno-transplanted with either HeLa human cervical carcinoma cells or genetically modified cells expressing the human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) gene (All cells). Both cell lines were highly resistant to the cytotoxic effects of TNF. If 3 x 10(6) tumor cells were inoculated s.c. into female mice, HeLa cells grew progressively into large tumors and killed 74% of the recipients, while TNF-expressing All cells caused fatal tumor growth only in 22% of the mice. 3 x 10(6) or 1.5 x 10(7). All cells produced progressive tumor growth and lethality in all male recipients. In sera of all the A11-cell-transplanted mice, biologically active TNF was detected shortly (4.5 h) after tumor inoculation (6 39 U/ml), decreasing to below detection level in the circulation by day 3. In recipients of 15 million A11 cells, circulating TNF reappeared and reached high levels (12-1000 U/ml) 3 to 7 weeks later, when the animals bore large tumors (14-23 mm). Generally, such mice became cachectic, severely anemic, hypothermic, and soon died. On account of calcium mobilization from bones, their serum Ca levels were high. Electron microscopy revealed severe liver damage, but there were no signs of chronic arthritis. These results suggest that ATS-treated mice xenotransplanted with TNF-gene-transfected A11 human tumor cells provide a new model for studying the pathophysiological and anti-tumor effects of TNF. PMID:10549587

  16. Vitamin D and Human Health: Lessons from Vitamin D Receptor Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bouillon, Roger; Carmeliet, Geert; Verlinden, Lieve; van Etten, Evelyne; Verstuyf, Annemieke; Luderer, Hilary F.; Lieben, Liesbet; Mathieu, Chantal; Demay, Marie

    2008-01-01

    The vitamin D endocrine system is essential for calcium and bone homeostasis. The precise mode of action and the full spectrum of activities of the vitamin D hormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25-(OH)2D], can now be better evaluated by critical analysis of mice with engineered deletion of the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Absence of a functional VDR or the key activating enzyme, 25-OHD-1α-hydroxylase (CYP27B1), in mice creates a bone and growth plate phenotype that mimics humans with the same congenital disease or severe vitamin D deficiency. The intestine is the key target for the VDR because high calcium intake, or selective VDR rescue in the intestine, restores a normal bone and growth plate phenotype. The VDR is nearly ubiquitously expressed, and almost all cells respond to 1,25-(OH)2D exposure; about 3% of the mouse or human genome is regulated, directly and/or indirectly, by the vitamin D endocrine system, suggesting a more widespread function. VDR-deficient mice, but not vitamin D- or 1α-hydroxylase-deficient mice, and man develop total alopecia, indicating that the function of the VDR and its ligand is not fully overlapping. The immune system of VDR- or vitamin D-deficient mice is grossly normal but shows increased sensitivity to autoimmune diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease or type 1 diabetes after exposure to predisposing factors. VDR-deficient mice do not have a spontaneous increase in cancer but are more prone to oncogene- or chemocarcinogen-induced tumors. They also develop high renin hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, and increased thrombogenicity. Vitamin D deficiency in humans is associated with increased prevalence of diseases, as predicted by the VDR null phenotype. Prospective vitamin D supplementation studies with multiple noncalcemic endpoints are needed to define the benefits of an optimal vitamin D status. PMID:18694980

  17. Anaemia and resistance to malaria in transgenic mice expressing human tumour necrosis factor.

    PubMed Central

    Taverne, J; Sheikh, N; de Souza, J B; Playfair, J H; Probert, L; Kollias, G

    1994-01-01

    Transgenic mice carrying a modified human tumour necrosis factor (huTNF)/beta-globin gene construct linked to the T-cell-specific locus control region of the human CD2 gene express huTNF in their T cells which is released into the circulation and causes the development of a wasting syndrome. We now report that the mice develop anaemia, probably through enhanced erythrophagocytosis rather than inhibition of reticulocyte production. Thus autologous erythrocytes, as well as sheep erythrocytes, were cleared more rapidly from the circulation of transgenic mice than from littermate controls. By contrast, peritoneal macrophages from transgenic mice were less phagocytic in vitro than cells from controls. They also secreted less murine (mu)TNF when stimulated by either bacterial lipopolysaccharide or toxic malarial antigens. The yields of muTNF approached normal levels, however, when these refractory cells from the transgenic mice were stimulated in the presence of a high concentration of indomethacin, suggesting that the production of muTNF was inhibited by enhanced synthesis of prostaglandins. The parasitaemia of transgenic mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii was about 10-fold less at its peak than in controls, although it followed the same time-course, and the multiplication of P. chabaudi was inhibited to an even greater degree. This control of parasitaemia may also be explained by enhancement of macrophage activity, mediated by huTNF acting on the murine p55 receptor, presumably by increasing the removal of parasites by phagocytosis or their killing by toxic products released by the activated macrophages. These observations suggest that a factor in the anaemia of human malaria may be macrophage activation caused by the secretion of TNF that occurs in this disease. PMID:7959874

  18. The T cell response of HLA-DR transgenic mice to human myelin basic protein and other antigens in the presence and absence of human CD4

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of HLA class II transgenic mice has progressed in recent years from analysis of single chain HLA class II transgenes with expression of mixed mouse/human heterodimers to double transgenic mice expressing normal human heterodimers. Previous studies have used either HLA transgenic mice in which there is a species-matched interaction with CD4 or mice which lack this interaction. Since both systems are reported to generate HLA-restricted responses, the matter of the requirement for species-matched CD4 remains unclear. We have generated triple transgenic mice expressing three human transgenes, DRA, DRB, and CD4, and compared HLA-restricted responses to peptide between human- CD4+ (Hu-CD4+) and Hu-CD4- littermates. We saw no difference between Hu- CD4+ and Hu-CD4- groups, supporting the notion that for some responses at least the requirement for species-matched CD4 may not be absolute. Evidence for positive selection of mouse T cell receptors in HLA-DR transgenic mice came both from the acquisition of new, HLA-restricted responses to various peptides and from an increased frequency of T cells using the TCR V beta 4 gene segment. An important goal with respect to the analysis of function in HLA transgenic mice is the clarification of mechanisms which underpin the recognition of self- antigens in human autoimmune disease. As a first step towards 'humanized' disease models in HLA transgenic mice, we analyzed the responses of HLA-DR transgenic mice to the human MPB 139-154 peptide which has been implicated as an epitope recognized by T cells of multiple sclerosis patients. We obtained T cell responses to this epitope in transgenic mice but not in nontransgenic controls. This study suggests that HLA transgenic mice will be valuable in the analysis of HLA-restricted T cell epitopes implicated in human disease and possibly in the design of new disease models. PMID:7532684

  19. SCRIB expression is deregulated in human prostate cancer, and its deficiency in mice promotes prostate neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Helen B.; Perez-Mancera, Pedro A.; Dow, Lukas E.; Ryan, Andrew; Tennstedt, Pierre; Bogani, Debora; Elsum, Imogen; Greenfield, Andy; Tuveson, David A.; Simon, Ronald; Humbert, Patrick O.

    2011-01-01

    Loss of cellular polarity is a hallmark of epithelial cancers, raising the possibility that regulators of polarity have a role in suppressing tumorigenesis. The Scribble complex is one of at least three interacting protein complexes that have a critical role in establishing and maintaining epithelial polarity. In human colorectal, breast, and endometrial cancers, expression of the Scribble complex member SCRIB is often mislocalized and deregulated. Here, we report that Scrib is indispensable for prostate homeostasis in mice. Scrib heterozygosity initiated prostate hyperplasia, while targeted biallelic Scrib loss predisposed mice to prostate intraepithelial neoplasia. Mechanistically, Scrib was shown to negatively regulate the MAPK cascade to suppress tumorigenesis. Further analysis revealed that prostate-specific loss of Scrib in mice combined with expression of an oncogenic Kras mutation promoted the progression of prostate cancer that recapitulated the human disease. The clinical significance of the work in mice was highlighted by our observation that SCRIB deregulation strongly correlated with poor survival in human prostate cancer. These data suggest that the polarity network could provide a new avenue for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21965329

  20. Spontaneous diabetes mellitus in transgenic mice expressing human islet amyloid polypeptide.

    PubMed Central

    Janson, J; Soeller, W C; Roche, P C; Nelson, R T; Torchia, A J; Kreutter, D K; Butler, P C

    1996-01-01

    The islet in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) is characterized by loss of beta cells and large local deposits of amyloid derived from the 37-amino acid protein, islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP). We have hypothesized that IAPP amyloid forms intracellularly causing beta-cell destruction under conditions of high rates of expression. To test this we developed a homozygous transgenic mouse model with high rates of expression of human IAPP. Male transgenic mice spontaneously developed diabetes mellitus by 8 weeks of age, which was associated with selective beta-cell death and impaired insulin secretion. Small intra- and extracellular amorphous IAPP aggregates were present in islets of transgenic mice during the development of diabetes mellitus. However, IAPP derived amyloid deposits were found in only a minority of islets at approximately 20 weeks of age, notably after development of diabetes mellitus in male transgenic mice. Approximately 20% of female transgenic mice spontaneously developed diabetes mellitus at 30+ weeks of age, when beta-cell degeneration and both amorphous and amyloid deposits of IAPP were present. We conclude that overexpression of human IAPP causes beta-cell death, impaired insulin secretion, and diabetes mellitus. Large deposits of IAPP derived amyloid do not appear to be important in this cytotoxicity, but early, small amorphous intra- and extracellular aggregates of human IAPP were consistently present at the time of beta-cell death and therefore may be the most cytotoxic form of IAPP. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8692984

  1. The European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus), a source of zoonotic cryptosporidiosis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, G; Chalmers, R M

    2010-12-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. have been found in the faeces of over 150 mammalian host species, but the risks to public health from wildlife are poorly understood. In summer 2008, the Cryptosporidium sp. rabbit genotype was identified as the aetiological agent in an outbreak of waterborne human cryptosporidiosis. The source was a wild rabbit that had entered a treated water tank. To establish current knowledge about Cryptosporidium spp. infecting lagomorphs, especially the host range and biological characteristics of the rabbit genotype, and the potential risks to public health that rabbits may pose in the transmission of zoonotic cryptosporidiosis, we undertook a literature and data review. The literature returned demonstrates that although the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) has been the most widely studied lagomorph, few large scale studies were found. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium spp. in wild rabbit populations in the two large scale studies was 0.9% (95%CI 0.2-5.0) and 0.0% (95%CI 0.0-1.6). Neither study provided age nor sex profiles nor typing of Cryptosporidium isolates. The infecting Cryptosporidium species was confirmed in just four other studies of rabbits, all of which showed the rabbit genotype. Human-infectious Cryptosporidium species including Cryptosporidium parvum have caused experimental infections in rabbits and it is likely that this may also occur naturally. No published studies of the host range and biological features of the Cryptosporidium rabbit genotype were identified, but information was generated on the identification and differentiation of the rabbit genotype at various genetic loci. Both pet and wild rabbits are a potential source of human cryptosporidiosis and as such, good hygiene practices are recommended during and after handling rabbits or exposure to their faeces, or potentially contaminated surfaces. Water supplies should be protected against access by wildlife, including rabbits.

  2. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Humanized Mice Infected with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Nusbaum, Rebecca J.; Calderon, Veronica E.; Huante, Matthew B.; Sutjita, Putri; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Lancaster, Katrina L.; Hunter, Robert L.; Actor, Jeffrey K.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Aronson, Judith; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Lisinicchia, Joshua G.; Valbuena, Gustavo; Endsley, Janice J.

    2016-01-01

    Co-infection with HIV increases the morbidity and mortality associated with tuberculosis due to multiple factors including a poorly understood microbial synergy. We developed a novel small animal model of co-infection in the humanized mouse to investigate how HIV infection disrupts pulmonary containment of Mtb. Following dual infection, HIV-infected cells were localized to sites of Mtb-driven inflammation and mycobacterial replication in the lung. Consistent with disease in human subjects, we observed increased mycobacterial burden, loss of granuloma structure, and increased progression of TB disease, due to HIV co-infection. Importantly, we observed an HIV-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine signature (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-8), neutrophil accumulation, and greater lung pathology in the Mtb-co-infected lung. These results suggest that in the early stages of acute co-infection in the humanized mouse, infection with HIV exacerbates the pro-inflammatory response to pulmonary Mtb, leading to poorly formed granulomas, more severe lung pathology, and increased mycobacterial burden and dissemination. PMID:26908312

  3. Severe combined immunodeficiency mice engrafted with human T cells, B cells, and myeloid cells after transplantation with human fetal bone marrow or liver cells and implanted with human fetal thymus: a model for studying human gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Yurasov, S; Kollmann, T R; Kim, A; Raker, C A; Hachamovitch, M; Wong-Staal, F; Goldstein, H

    1997-03-01

    To develop an in vivo model wherein human hematopoiesis occurs, we transplanted severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with either human fetal bone marrow (HFBM) or human fetal liver (HFL). After transplantation of SCID mice with cultured HFBM (BM-SCID-hu mice) or HFL cells (Liv-SCID-hu mice), significant engraftment of the mouse bone marrow (BM) and population of the peripheral blood with human leukocytes was detected. Human colony-forming unit-granulocyte macrophage and burst forming unit-erythroid were detected in the BM of the BM-SCID-hu and Liv-SCID-hu mice up to 8 months after transplantation. When the HFBM or HFL cells were transduced with a retroviral vector before transplantation, integrated retroviral sequences were detected in human precursor cells present in the SCID mouse BM and in leukocytes circulating in the peripheral blood (PB) up to 7 months after transplantation. The PB of the BM-SCID-hu mice also became populated with human T cells after implantation with human thymic tissue, which provided a human microenvironment wherein human pre-T cells from the BM could mature. When the HFBM was retrovirally transduced before transplantation, integrated retrovirus was detected in sorted CD4+CD8+ double positive and CD4+ single positive cells from the thymic implant and CD4+ cells from the PB. Taken together, these data indicated that the BM of our BM-SCID-hu and Liv-SCID-hu mice became engrafted with retrovirally transduced human hematopoietic precursors that undergo the normal human hematopoietic program and populate the mouse PB with human cells containing integrated retroviral sequences. In addition to being a model for studying in vivo human hematopoiesis, these mice should also prove to be a useful model for investigating in vivo gene therapy using human stem/precursor cells.

  4. Survival of Human Neurofibroma in Immunodeficient Mice and Initial Results of Therapy With Pirfenidone

    PubMed Central

    Babovic-Vuksanovic, Dusica

    2004-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type I is a common tumor predisposing disease in humans. Surgical therapy can be applied only in selected patients with resectable masses. Hence, development of new therapies for this disease is urgent. We used human neurofibroma implants in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) as a model to test the toxicity and potential efficacy of pirfenidone, a new therapeutic agent. Two hundred twelve human neurofibromas were transplanted into various locations in 59 experimental animals, and 30 mice with implants received oral pirfenidone for up to six weeks. Survival of neurofibromas in animals treated with pirfenidone was lower than in the control group (P=.02). Tumors did not change histologic appearance or vascularization in response to pirfenidone. Treatment with pirfenidone, a new antifibrotic agent, inhibits survival of some tumors without causing toxicity in animals. PMID:15240917

  5. Expression of the human growth hormone variant gene in cultured fibroblasts and transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Selden, R.F.; Wagner, T.E.; Blethen, S.; Yun, J.S.; Rowe, M.E.; Goodman, H.M. )

    1988-11-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the human growth hormone variant gene, one of the five members of the growth hormone gene family, predicts that it encodes a growth hormone-like protein. As a first step in determining whether this gene is functional in humans, the authors have expressed a mouse methallothionein I/human growth hormone variant fusion gene in mouse L cells and in transgenic mice. The growth hormone variant protein expressed in transiently transfected L cells is distinct from growth hormone itself with respect to reactivity with anti-growth hormone monoclonal antibodies, behavior during column chromatography, and isoelectric point. Transgenic mice expressing the growth hormone variant protein are 1.4- to 1.9-fold larger than nontransgenic controls, suggesting that the protein has growth-promoting properties.

  6. Human cathepsin L rescues the neurodegeneration and lethality incathepsin B/L double deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Sevenich, Lisa; Pennacchio, Len A.; Peters, Christoph; Reinheckel, Thomas

    2006-01-09

    Cathepsin B (CTSB) and cathepsin L (CTSL) are two widelyexpressed cysteine proteases thought to predominantly reside withinlysosomes. Functional analysis of CTSL in humans is complicated by theexistence of two CTSL-like homologues (CTSL and CTSL2), in contrast tomice which contain only one CTSL enzyme. Thus transgenic expression ofhuman CTSL in CTSL deficient mice provides an opportunity to study the invivo functions of this human protease without interference by its highlyrelated homologue. While mice with single gene deficiencies for murineCTSB or CTSL survive without apparent neuromuscular impairment, murineCTSB/CTSL double deficient mice display degeneration of cerebellarPurkinje cells and neurons of the cerebral cortex, resulting in severehypotrophy, motility defects, and lethality during their third to fourthweek of life. Here we show that expression of human CTSL through agenomic transgene results in widespread expression of human CTSL in themouse which is capable of rescuing the lethality found in CTSB/CTSLdouble-deficient animals. Human CTSL is expressed in the brain of thesecompound mutants predominantly in neurons of the cerebral cortex and inPurkinje cells of the cerebellum, where it appears to prevent neuronalcell death.

  7. Presence of subclinical infection in gene-targeted human prion protein transgenic mice exposed to atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Rona; Dobie, Karen; Hunter, Nora; Casalone, Cristina; Baron, Thierry; Barron, Rona M

    2013-12-01

    The transmission of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) to humans, leading to variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease has demonstrated that cattle transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) can pose a risk to human health. Until recently, TSE disease in cattle was thought to be caused by a single agent strain, BSE, also known as classical BSE, or BSE-C. However, due to the initiation of a large-scale surveillance programme throughout Europe, two atypical BSE strains, bovine amyloidotic spongiform encephalopathy (BASE, also named BSE-L) and BSE-H have since been discovered. To model the risk to human health, we previously inoculated these two forms of atypical BSE (BASE and BSE-H) into gene-targeted transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the human prion protein (PrP) (HuTg) but were unable to detect any signs of TSE pathology in these mice. However, despite the absence of TSE pathology, upon subpassage of some BASE-challenged HuTg mice, a TSE was observed in recipient gene-targeted bovine PrP Tg (Bov6) mice but not in HuTg mice. Disease transmission from apparently healthy individuals indicates the presence of subclinical BASE infection in mice expressing human PrP that cannot be identified by current diagnostic methods. However, due to the lack of transmission to HuTg mice on subpassage, the efficiency of mouse-to-mouse transmission of BASE appears to be low when mice express human rather than bovine PrP.

  8. Human RPE Stem Cells Grown into Polarized RPE Monolayers on a Polyester Matrix Are Maintained after Grafting into Rabbit Subretinal Space

    PubMed Central

    Stanzel, Boris V.; Liu, Zengping; Somboonthanakij, Sudawadee; Wongsawad, Warapat; Brinken, Ralf; Eter, Nicole; Corneo, Barbara; Holz, Frank G.; Temple, Sally; Stern, Jeffrey H.; Blenkinsop, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Transplantation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is being developed as a cell-replacement therapy for age-related macular degeneration. Human embryonic stem cell (hESC) and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived RPE are currently translating toward clinic. We introduce the adult human RPE stem cell (hRPESC) as an alternative RPE source. Polarized monolayers of adult hRPESC-derived RPE grown on polyester (PET) membranes had near-native characteristics. Trephined pieces of RPE monolayers on PET were transplanted subretinally in the rabbit, a large-eyed animal model. After 4 days, retinal edema was observed above the implant, detected by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and fundoscopy. At 1 week, retinal atrophy overlying the fetal or adult transplant was observed, remaining stable thereafter. Histology obtained 4 weeks after implantation confirmed a continuous polarized human RPE monolayer on PET. Taken together, the xeno-RPE survived with retained characteristics in the subretinal space. These experiments support that adult hRPESC-derived RPE are a potential source for transplantation therapies. PMID:24511471

  9. Correlation Between Intraluminal Oxygen Gradient and Radial Partitioning of Intestinal Microbiota in Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Albenberg, L; Esipova, TV; Judge, CP; Bittinger, K; Chen, J; Laughlin, A; Grunberg, S; Baldassano, RN; Lewis, JD; Li, H; Thom, SR; Bushman, FD; Vinogradov, SA; Wu, GD

    2014-01-01

    Background & Aims The gut microbiota is a complex and densely populated community in a dynamic environment determined by host physiology. We investigated how intestinal oxygen levels affect the composition of the fecal and mucosally adherent microbiota. Methods We used the phosphorescence quenching method and a specially designed intraluminal oxygen probe to dynamically quantify gut luminal oxygen levels in mice. 16S rRNA gene sequencing was used to characterize the microbiota in intestines of mice exposed to hyperbaric oxygen, human rectal biopsy and mucosal swab samples, and paired human stool samples. Results Average pO2 values in the lumen of the cecum were extremely low (<1 mmHg). In altering oxygenation of intestines of mice, we observed that oxygen diffused from intestinal tissue and established a radial gradient the extended from the tissue interface into the lumen. Increasing tissue oxygenation with hyperbaric oxygen altered the composition of the gut microbioita in mice. In humans, 16S rRNA gene analyses revealed an increased proportion of oxygen-tolerant organisms of the Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria phyla associated with the rectal mucosa, compared with the feces, indicating an effect of oxygenation on the microbiota. A consortium of asaccharolytic bacteria of the Firmicute and Bacteroidetes phyla, which primarily metabolize peptones and amino acids, was associated primarily with mucus. This could be due to the presence of proteinaceous substrates provided by mucus and the shedding of the intestinal epithelium. Conclusions In an analysis of intestinal microbiota of mice and humans, we observed a radial gradient of microbes linked to distribution of oxygen and nutrients provided by host tissue. PMID:25046162

  10. Neutrophil activation during acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and repair in mice and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C. David; Bajt, Mary Lynn; Sharpe, Matthew R.; McGill, Mitchell R.; Farhood, Anwar; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    Following acetaminophen (APAP) overdose there is an inflammatory response triggered by the release of cellular contents from necrotic hepatocytes into the systemic circulation which initiates the recruitment of neutrophils into the liver. It has been demonstrated that neutrophils do not contribute to APAP-induced liver injury, but their role and the role of NADPH oxidase in injury resolution are controversial. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to APAP overdose and neutrophil activation status was determined during liver injury and liver regeneration. Additionally, human APAP overdose patients (ALT: > 800 U/L) had serial blood draws during the injury and recovery phases for the determination of neutrophil activation. Neutrophils in the peripheral blood of mice showed an increasing activation status (CD11b expression and ROS priming) during and after the peak of injury but returned to baseline levels prior to complete injury resolution. Hepatic sequestered neutrophils showed an increased and sustained CD11b expression, but no ROS priming was observed. Confirming that NADPH oxidase is not critical to injury resolution, gp91{sup phox}−/− mice following APAP overdose displayed no alteration in injury resolution. Peripheral blood from APAP overdose patients also showed increased neutrophil activation status after the peak of liver injury and remained elevated until discharge from the hospital. In mice and humans, markers of activation, like ROS priming, were increased and sustained well after active liver injury had subsided. The similar findings between surviving patients and mice indicate that neutrophil activation may be a critical event for host defense or injury resolution following APAP overdose, but not a contributing factor to APAP-induced injury. - Highlights: • Neutrophil (PMN) function increases during liver repair after acetaminophen overdose. • Liver repair after acetaminophen (APAP)-overdose is not dependent on NADPH oxidase. • Human PMNs do not appear

  11. Laser-induced hyperthemia in the treatment of ocular tumors: experimental evaluation of temperature rise in rabbits' eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svaasand, Lars O.; Morinelli, Elisa; Gomer, Charles J.

    1990-08-01

    Experimental results for the optical properties of ocular tumors in the red to near infrared region from 600-900 nm and at the near infrared wavelength of 1064 nm are presented. The tumor models have been human retinoblastoma heterotransplanted in athyinic mice and B16 melanotic melanoma in athymic mice. The steady state retinal and tumor temperature rise during 1064 nm laser irradiation have been examined in vivo in normal albino and pigmented rabbits eye and in Greene''s melanoma inoculated in the retinachoroidal layers. 2.

  12. Of Mice and Men-Warning: Intact Versus Castrated Adult Male Mice as Xenograft Hosts Are Equivalent to Hypogonadal Versus Abiraterone Treated Aging Human Males, Respectively

    PubMed Central

    Sedelaar, J.P. Michiel; Dalrymple, Susan S.; Isaacs, John T.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Immune deficient male mice bearing human prostate cancer xenografts are used to evaluate therapeutic response to novel androgen ablation approaches and the results compared to surgical castration based upon assumption that testosterone microenvironment in intact and castrated adult male mice mimics eugonadal and castrated aging adult human males. METHODS To test these assumptions, serum total testosterone (TT) and free testosterone (FT) were determined longitudinally in groups (n > 20) of intact versus castrated adult male nude, NOG, and immune competent C57BL/6 mice. RESULTS In adult male mice, TT and FT varies by 30- to 100-fold within the same animal providing a microenvironment that is only equivalent to hypogonadal, not eugonadal, adult human males (TT is 1.7 ± 1.2 ng/ml [5.8 ± 4.1 nM] in nude and 2.5 ± 1.3 ng/ml [8.7 ± 4.4 nM] in NOG mice versus >4.2 ng/ml [14.7 nM] in eugonadal humans). This was confirmed based upon enhanced growth of androgen dependent human prostate cancer xenografts inoculated into mice supplemented with exogenous testosterone to elevate and chronically maintain serum TT at a level (5 ng/ml [18 nM]) equivalent to a 50-year-old eugonadal human male. In castrated mice, TT and FT range from 2 to 20 pg/ml (7–70 pM) and <0.8 pg/ml (<2.6 pM), respectively, which is equivalent to castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with abiraterone. This was confirmed based upon the inability of another CYP17A1 inhibitor, ketoconazole, to inhibit the growth of CRPC xenografts in castrated mice. CONCLUSIONS Adult male mice supplemented with testosterone mimic eugonadal human males, while unsupplemented animals mimic standard androgen ablation and castrated animals mimic abiraterone treated patients. These studies confirm what is claimed in Robert Burns’ poem “To a Mouse” that “The best laid schemes of mice and men/often go awry. PMID:23775398

  13. Plasmodium vivax liver stage development and hypnozoite persistence in human liver-chimeric mice.

    PubMed

    Mikolajczak, Sebastian A; Vaughan, Ashley M; Kangwanrangsan, Niwat; Roobsoong, Wanlapa; Fishbaugher, Matthew; Yimamnuaychok, Narathatai; Rezakhani, Nastaran; Lakshmanan, Viswanathan; Singh, Naresh; Kaushansky, Alexis; Camargo, Nelly; Baldwin, Michael; Lindner, Scott E; Adams, John H; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Prachumsri, Jetsumon; Kappe, Stefan H I

    2015-04-01

    Plasmodium vivax malaria is characterized by periodic relapses of symptomatic blood stage parasite infections likely initiated by activation of dormant liver stage parasites-hypnozoites. The lack of tractable P. vivax animal models constitutes an obstacle in examining P. vivax liver stage infection and drug efficacy. To overcome this obstacle, we have used human liver-chimeric (huHep) FRG KO mice as a model for P. vivax infection. FRG KO huHep mice support P. vivax sporozoite infection, liver stage development, and hypnozoite formation. We show complete P. vivax liver stage development, including maturation into infectious exo-erythrocytic merozoites as well as the formation and persistence of hypnozoites. Prophylaxis or treatment with the antimalarial primaquine can prevent and eliminate liver stage infection, respectively. Thus, P. vivax-infected FRG KO huHep mice are a model to investigate liver stage development and dormancy and may facilitate the discovery of drugs targeting relapsing malaria.

  14. Adenoviral-mediated transfer of human BMP-6 gene accelerates healing in a rabbit ulnar osteotomy model.

    PubMed

    Bertone, A L; Pittman, D D; Bouxsein, M L; Li, J; Clancy, B; Seeherman, H J

    2004-11-01

    This study evaluated healing of rabbit bilateral ulnar osteotomies 6 and 8 weeks after surgery in response to percutaneous injection of transgenic adenoviral (Ad) bone morphogenetic protein-6 (BMP-6) vector or green fluorescent protein vector control (Ad-GFP) administered 7 days after surgery compared to untreated osteotomy controls. The amount, composition and biomechanical properties of the healing bone repair tissue were compared among groups and to historical data for intact rabbit ulnae obtained from similar studies at the same institution. Quantitative computed tomography was used to determine area, density and mineral content of the mineralized callus in the harvested ulnae. Maximum torque, torsional stiffness, and energy absorbed to failure were determined at 1.5 degrees /s. Calcified sections of excised ulnae (5 microm) were stained with Goldner's Trichrome and Von Kossa, and evaluated for callus composition, maturity, cortical continuity, and osteotomy bridging. Radiographic assessment of bone formation indicated greater mineralized callus in the ulnae injected with Ad-hBMP-6 as early as 1 week after treatment (2 weeks after surgery) compared to untreated osteotomy ulnae (p < 0.006) and Ad-GFP treated osteotomy ulnae (p < 0.002). Quantitative computed tomography confirmed greater bone area and bone mineral content at the osteotomy at 6 weeks in Ad-BMP-6 treated osteotomy as compared to untreated osteotomy ulnae (p < 0.001) and Ad-GFP treated osteotomy ulnae (p < 0.01). Ad-BMP-6 treated osteotomy ulnae were stronger (p < 0.001 and 0.003) and stiffer (p < 0.004 and 0.003) in torsion at 6 weeks than untreated osteotomy ulnae or Ad-GFP treated osteotomy ulnae, respectively. Maximum torque, torsional stiffness, and energy absorbed to failure were greater in Ad-BMP-6 treated osteotomy ulnae compared to their respective untreated contralateral osteotomy ulnae at 8 weeks [p < 0.03]. Maximum torque and torsional stiffness in the Ad-BMP-6 treated osteotomy ulnae

  15. Rabbits, if anything, are likely Glires.

    PubMed

    Douzery, Emmanuel J P; Huchon, Dorothée

    2004-12-01

    Rodentia (e.g., mice, rats, dormice, squirrels, and guinea pigs) and Lagomorpha (e.g., rabbits, hares, and pikas) are usually grouped into the Glires. Status of this controversial superorder has been evaluated using morphology, paleontology, and mitochondrial plus nuclear DNA sequences. This growing corpus of data has been favoring the monophyly of Glires. Recently, Misawa and Janke [Mol. Phylogenet. Evol. 28 (2003) 320] analyzed the 6441 amino acids of 20 nuclear proteins for six placental mammals (rat, mouse, rabbit, human, cattle, and dog) and two outgroups (chicken and xenopus), and observed a basal position of the two murine rodents among the former. They concluded that "the Glires hypothesis was rejected." We here reanalyzed [loc. cit.] data set under maximum likelihood and Bayesian tree-building approaches, using phylogenetic models that take into account among-site variation in evolutionary rates and branch-length variation among proteins. Our observations support both the association of rodents and lagomorphs and the monophyly of Euarchontoglires (=Supraprimates) as the most likely explanation of the protein alignments. We conducted simulation studies to evaluate the appropriateness of lissamphibian and avian outgroups to root the placental tree. When the outgroup-to-ingroup evolutionary distance increases, maximum parsimony roots the topology along the long Mus-Rattus branch. Maximum likelihood, in contrast, roots the topology along different branches as a function of their length. Maximum likelihood appears less sensitive to the "long-branch attraction artifact" than is parsimony. Our phylogenetic conclusions were confirmed by the analysis of a different protein data set using a similar sample of species but different outgroups. We also tested the effect of the addition of afrotherian and xenarthran taxa. Using the linearized tree method, [loc. cit.] estimated that mice and rats diverged about 35 million years ago. Molecular dating based on the Bayesian

  16. Pigmentation, pleiotropy, and genetic pathways in humans and mice

    SciTech Connect

    Barsh, G.S.

    1995-10-01

    Some of the most striking polymorphisms in human populations affect the color of our eyes, hair, or skin. Despite some simple lessons from high school biology (blue eyes are recessive; brown are dominant), the genetic basis of such phenotypic variability has, for the most part, eluded Mendelian description. A logical place to search for the keys to understanding common variation in human pigmentation are genes in which defects cause uncommon conditions such as albinism or piebaldism. The area under this lamppost has recently gotten larger, with two articles, one in this issue of the Journal, that describe the map position for Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) and with the recent cloning of a gene that causes X-linked ocular albinism (OA1). In addition, a series of three recent articles in Cell demonstrate (1) that defects in the gene encoding the endothelin B (ET{sub B}) receptor cause hypopigmentation and Hirschsprung disease in a Mennonite population and the mouse mutation piebald(s) and (2) that a defect in the edn3 gene, which encodes one of the ligands for the ET{sub B} receptor, causes the lethal spotting (ls) mouse mutation. 47 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Effects of lentivirus mediated STAT3 silencing on human chronic myeloid leukemia cells and leukemia mice

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xinyan; Yang, Wenzhong; Han, Jia; Xiong, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of lentivirus mediated STAT3 silencing on human chronic myeloid leukemia cells (K562) and the growth of chronic myeloid leukemia mice as well as to explore the potential mechanisms. Methods: Unbtreated K562 cells (CON), blank lentivirus transfected K562 cells (NC) and K562 cells expressing STAT3 siRNA (STAT3 siRNA) were injected into SCID mice to establish the chronic myeloid leukemia model in mice. The growth, peripheral white blood cell count and spleen index in these mice were determined. Results: In vitro experiment showed, when compared with control group, the interference efficiency of STAT3 expression was as high as 97.5% in K562 cells. Western blot assay revealed that the expression of c-Myc, Bcl-xL and Cyclin D1 reduced by 17.01%, 7.3% and 6.82%, respectively, showing significant difference when compared with control group (P < 0.01). These findings were consistent with those from fluorescence quantitative PCR. In vivo experiment showed the body weight of mice reduced progressively and the peripheral white blood cell count increased gradually in control group, accompanied by dragging hind limbs and progressive enlargement of the spleen. The body weight remained unchanged, peripheral white blood cell count reduced gradually and the spleen did not enlarge in mice treated with STAT3 siRNA expressing cells. Conclusion: Lentivirus mediated STAT3 silencing may inhibit the expression of its downstream genes (c-Myc, Bcl-xL and Cyclin D1) related to cell proliferation, apoptosis and cycle to suppress the malignant biological behaviors, and STAT3 silencing also inhibit the leukemogenic potency of K562 cells in mice. PMID:25550912

  18. Cloning, Characteristics, and Functional Analysis of Rabbit NADPH Oxidase 5

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Feng; Yin, Caiyong; Dimitropoulou, Christiana; Fulton, David J. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nox5 was the last member of the Nox enzyme family to be identified. Functionally distinct from the other Nox isoforms, our understanding of its physiological significance has been hampered by the absence of Nox5 in mouse and rat genomes. Nox5 is present in the genomes of other species such as the rabbit that have broad utility as models of cardiovascular disease. However, the mRNA sequence, characteristics, and functional analysis of rabbit Nox5 has not been fully defined and were the goals of the current study. Methods: Rabbit Nox5 was amplified from rabbit tissue, cloned, and sequenced. COS-7 cells were employed for expression and functional analysis via Western blotting and measurements of superoxide. We designed and synthesized miRNAs selectively targeting rabbit Nox5. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of rabbit Nox5 were aligned with those of putative rabbit isoforms (X1, X2, X3, and X4). A phylogenetic tree was generated based on the mRNA sequence for Nox5 from rabbit and other species. Results: Sequence alignment revealed that the identified rabbit Nox5 was highly conserved with the predicted sequence of rabbit Nox5. Cell based experiments reveal that rabbit Nox5 was robustly expressed and produced superoxide at rest and in a calcium and PMA-dependent manner that was susceptible to superoxide dismutase and the flavoprotein inhibitor, DPI. miRNA-1 was shown to be most effective in down-regulating the expression of rabbit Nox5. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship between rabbit and armadillo Nox5. Rabbit Nox5 was relatively closely related to human Nox5, but lies in a distinct cluster. Conclusion: Our study establishes the suitability of the rabbit as a model organism to further our understanding of the role of Nox5 in cardiovascular and other diseases and provides new information on the genetic relationship of Nox5 genes in different species. PMID:27486403

  19. Glucosinolates Are Mainly Absorbed Intact in Germfree and Human Microbiota-Associated Mice.

    PubMed

    Budnowski, Julia; Hanske, Laura; Schumacher, Fabian; Glatt, Hansruedi; Platz, Stefanie; Rohn, Sascha; Blaut, Michael

    2015-09-30

    Chemoprotective or genotoxic effects of glucosinolates occurring in Brassica vegetables are attributed to their hydrolysis products formed upon tissue damage by plant myrosinase. Since Brassica vegetables, in which myrosinase has been heat-inactivated, still display bioactivity, glucosinolate activation has been attributed to intestinal bacteria. The aim of this study was to investigate whether this is true. Glucoraphanin (172 mg/kg body weight) and neoglucobrassicin (297 mg/kg body weight) were administered intragastrically to germ free and human microbiota associated (HMA) mice. Approximately 30% of the applied doses of glucoraphanin and neoglucobrassicin were excreted unchanged in the urine of both germ free and HMA mice. Isothiocyanates, sulforaphane, and erucin, formed from glucoraphanin, were mainly excreted as urinary N-acetyl-l-cysteine conjugates. N-Methoxyindole-3-carbinol formed from neoglucobrassicin was observed in small amounts in both germ free and HMA mice. Formation of DNA adducts from neoglucobrassicin was also independent from bacterial colonization of the mice. Hence, intestinal bacteria are involved in the bioactivation of glucosinolates in the gut, but their contribution to glucosinolate transformation in HMA mice is apparently very small. PMID:26365197

  20. Effects of cinnarizine, a calcium antagonist that produces human parkinsonism, in parkin knock out mice.

    PubMed

    Serrano, A; Menéndez, J; Casarejos, M J; Solano, R M; Gallego, E; Sánchez, M; Mena, M A; García de Yebenes, J

    2005-08-01

    Cinnarizine, a calcium antagonist that produces parkinsonism in humans, induces behavioural changes such as alopecia, buco-lingual dyskinesia and reduction of motor activity in female parkin knock out (PK-KO) mice but not in wild-type (WT) controls. PK-KO mice have high striatal dopamine levels and increased dopamine metabolism in spite of low reduced tyrosine hydroxylase protein. Cinnarizine, which blocks dopamine receptors and increases dopamine release, further increased dopamine metabolism. PK-KO mice increased GSH levels as a compensatory mechanism against enhanced free radical production related to acceleration of dopamine turnover. Neuronal markers, such as beta-tubulin slightly increased in PK-KO and furthermore with cinnarizine. Astroglial markers were decreased in PK-KO mice, and this effect was potentiated by cinnarizine, suggesting abnormal glia in these animals. Microglia was hyperactivated in PK-KO midbrain, suggesting inflammation in these animals. Proapoptotic proteins were increased by cinnarizine and, to a lesser extent, in PK-KO mice. Our data indicate that mutation of parkin is a risk factor for drug-induced parkinsonism. PMID:15993444

  1. Cigarette Smoke Induces Immune Responses to Vimentin in both, Arthritis-Susceptible and -Resistant Humanized Mice.

    PubMed

    Bidkar, Mitali; Vassallo, Robert; Luckey, David; Smart, Michele; Mouapi, Kelly; Taneja, Veena

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease marked by chronic synovial inflammation and both, genetic and environmental factors are involved in its pathogenesis. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DRB1*0401 is associated with susceptibility to develop RA, while cigarette smoke (CS) exposure promotes seropositive disease with increased severity in DRB1*0401+ individuals. Smokers have higher levels of antibodies against citrullinated peptides. In this study, we determined whether the response to a known autoantigen, Vimentin (Vim) is shared epitope specific and how CS influences this response using transgenic-mice carrying RA-susceptible,*0401, and -resistant, *0402, genes. Following relatively brief exposure to CS, peptidyl arginine deiminase (PAD) enzyme expression was increased in murine lungs. Cigarette smoking led to production of Interferon (IFN)-γ with reduced levels of Interleukin (IL)-10 by splenocytes of *0401 mice. In contrast, CS augmented Th2 cytokines along with T-regulatory cells in *0402 mice. An increase in levels of antibodies to native and citrullinated Vim was observed in naïve mice of both strains following CS exposure. Our data showed that both arthritis-susceptible and -resistant mice can generate cellular and humoral immunity to Vim; however CS-induced modulation of host immunity is dependent on the interaction with the host HLA genes. PMID:27602574

  2. Glucagon Receptor Blockade With a Human Antibody Normalizes Blood Glucose in Diabetic Mice and Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Haruka; Kim, Jinrang; Aglione, JohnPaul; Lee, Joseph; Cavino, Katie; Na, Erqian; Rafique, Ashique; Kim, Jee Hae; Harp, Joyce; Valenzuela, David M; Yancopoulos, George D; Murphy, Andrew J; Gromada, Jesper

    2015-08-01

    Antagonizing glucagon action represents an attractive therapeutic option for reducing hepatic glucose production in settings of hyperglycemia where glucagon excess plays a key pathophysiological role. We therefore generated REGN1193, a fully human monoclonal antibody that binds and inhibits glucagon receptor (GCGR) signaling in vitro. REGN1193 administration to diabetic ob/ob and diet-induced obese mice lowered blood glucose to levels observed in GCGR-deficient mice. In diet-induced obese mice, REGN1193 reduced food intake, adipose tissue mass, and body weight. REGN1193 increased circulating levels of glucagon and glucagon-like peptide 1 and was associated with reversible expansion of pancreatic α-cell area. Hyperglucagonemia and α-cell hyperplasia was observed in fibroblast growth factor 21-deficient mice treated with REGN1193. Single administration of REGN1193 to diabetic cynomolgus monkeys normalized fasting blood glucose and glucose tolerance and increased circulating levels of glucagon and amino acids. Finally, administration of REGN1193 for 8 weeks to normoglycemic cynomolgus monkeys did not cause hypoglycemia or increase pancreatic α-cell area. In summary, the GCGR-blocking antibody REGN1193 normalizes blood glucose in diabetic mice and monkeys but does not produce hypoglycemia in normoglycemic monkeys. Thus, REGN1193 provides a potential therapeutic modality for diabetes mellitus and acute hyperglycemic conditions. PMID:26020795

  3. Cigarette Smoke Induces Immune Responses to Vimentin in both, Arthritis-Susceptible and -Resistant Humanized Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bidkar, Mitali; Vassallo, Robert; Luckey, David; Smart, Michele; Mouapi, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease marked by chronic synovial inflammation and both, genetic and environmental factors are involved in its pathogenesis. Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DRB1*0401 is associated with susceptibility to develop RA, while cigarette smoke (CS) exposure promotes seropositive disease with increased severity in DRB1*0401+ individuals. Smokers have higher levels of antibodies against citrullinated peptides. In this study, we determined whether the response to a known autoantigen, Vimentin (Vim) is shared epitope specific and how CS influences this response using transgenic-mice carrying RA-susceptible,*0401, and -resistant, *0402, genes. Following relatively brief exposure to CS, peptidyl arginine deiminase (PAD) enzyme expression was increased in murine lungs. Cigarette smoking led to production of Interferon (IFN)-γ with reduced levels of Interleukin (IL)-10 by splenocytes of *0401 mice. In contrast, CS augmented Th2 cytokines along with T-regulatory cells in *0402 mice. An increase in levels of antibodies to native and citrullinated Vim was observed in naïve mice of both strains following CS exposure. Our data showed that both arthritis-susceptible and -resistant mice can generate cellular and humoral immunity to Vim; however CS-induced modulation of host immunity is dependent on the interaction with the host HLA genes. PMID:27602574

  4. Sustained Engraftment of Cryopreserved Human Bone Marrow CD34(+) Cells in Young Adult NSG Mice.

    PubMed

    Wiekmeijer, Anna-Sophia; Pike-Overzet, Karin; Brugman, Martijn H; Salvatori, Daniela C F; Egeler, R Maarten; Bredius, Robbert G M; Fibbe, Willem E; Staal, Frank J T

    2014-06-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are defined by their ability to repopulate the bone marrow of myeloablative conditioned and/or (lethally) irradiated recipients. To study the repopulating potential of human HSCs, murine models have been developed that rely on the use of immunodeficient mice that allow engraftment of human cells. The NSG xenograft model has emerged as the current standard for this purpose allowing for engraftment and study of human T cells. Here, we describe adaptations to the original NSG xenograft model that can be readily implemented. These adaptations encompass use of adult mice instead of newborns and a short ex vivo culture. This protocol results in robust and reproducible high levels of lympho-myeloid engraftment. Immunization of recipient mice with relevant antigen resulted in specific antibody formation, showing that both T cells and B cells were functional. In addition, bone marrow cells from primary recipients exhibited repopulating ability following transplantation into secondary recipients. Similar results were obtained with cryopreserved human bone marrow samples, thus circumventing the need for fresh cells and allowing the use of patient derived bio-bank samples. Our findings have implications for use of this model in fundamental stem cell research, immunological studies in vivo and preclinical evaluations for HSC transplantation, expansion, and genetic modification.

  5. Partial Conservation between Mice and Humans in Olfactory Bulb Interneuron Transcription Factor Codes

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Nana; Cave, John W.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian main olfactory bulb (OB) has a large population of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons that contains several subtypes defined by the co-expression other neurotransmitters and calcium binding proteins. The three most commonly studied OB interneuron subtypes co-express either Calretinin, Calbindin, or Tyrosine hydroxylase (Th). Combinations of transcription factors used to specify the phenotype of progenitors are referred to as transcription factor codes, and the current understanding of transcription factor codes that specify OB inhibitory neuron phenotypes are largely based on studies in mice. The conservation of these transcription factor codes in the human OB, however, has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to establish whether transcription factor codes in OB interneurons are conserved between mice and humans. This study compared the co-expression of Foxp2, Meis2, Pax6, and Sp8 transcription factors with Calretinin, Calbindin, or Th in human and mouse OB interneurons. This analysis found strong conservation of Calretinin co-expression with Sp8 and Meis2 as well as Th co-expression with Pax6 and Meis2. This analysis also showed that selective Foxp2 co-expression with Calbindin was conserved between mice and humans, which suggests Foxp2 is a novel determinant of the OB Calbindin interneuron phenotype. Together, the findings in this study provide insight into the conservation of transcription codes for OB interneuron phenotypes between humans and mice, as well as reveal some important differences between the species. This advance in our understanding of transcription factor codes in OB interneurons provides an important complement to the codes that have been established for other regions within the mammalian central nervous system, such as the cortex and spinal cord. PMID:27489533

  6. Partial Conservation between Mice and Humans in Olfactory Bulb Interneuron Transcription Factor Codes.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Nana; Cave, John W

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian main olfactory bulb (OB) has a large population of GABAergic inhibitory interneurons that contains several subtypes defined by the co-expression other neurotransmitters and calcium binding proteins. The three most commonly studied OB interneuron subtypes co-express either Calretinin, Calbindin, or Tyrosine hydroxylase (Th). Combinations of transcription factors used to specify the phenotype of progenitors are referred to as transcription factor codes, and the current understanding of transcription factor codes that specify OB inhibitory neuron phenotypes are largely based on studies in mice. The conservation of these transcription factor codes in the human OB, however, has not been investigated. The aim of this study was to establish whether transcription factor codes in OB interneurons are conserved between mice and humans. This study compared the co-expression of Foxp2, Meis2, Pax6, and Sp8 transcription factors with Calretinin, Calbindin, or Th in human and mouse OB interneurons. This analysis found strong conservation of Calretinin co-expression with Sp8 and Meis2 as well as Th co-expression with Pax6 and Meis2. This analysis also showed that selective Foxp2 co-expression with Calbindin was conserved between mice and humans, which suggests Foxp2 is a novel determinant of the OB Calbindin interneuron phenotype. Together, the findings in this study provide insight into the conservation of transcription codes for OB interneuron phenotypes between humans and mice, as well as reveal some important differences between the species. This advance in our understanding of transcription factor codes in OB interneurons provides an important complement to the codes that have been established for other regions within the mammalian central nervous system, such as the cortex and spinal cord. PMID:27489533

  7. DMP1 C-Terminal Mutant Mice Recapture the Human ARHR Tooth Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Baichun; Cao, Zhengguo; Lu, Yongbo; Janik, Carol; Lauziere, Stephanie; Xie, Yixia; Poliard, Anne; Qin, Chunlin; Ward, Leanne M; Feng, Jian Q

    2010-01-01

    DMP1 mutations in autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR) patients and mice lacking Dmp1 display an overlapping pathophysiology, such as hypophosphatemia. However, subtle differences exist between the mouse model and human ARHR patients. These differences could be due to a species specificity of human versus mouse, or it may be that the mutant DMP1 in humans maintains partial function of DMP1. In this study we report a deformed tooth phenotype in a human DMP1 deletion mutation case. Unexpectedly, the deletion of nucleotides 1484 to 1490 (c.1484_1490delCTATCAC, delMut, resulting in replacement of the last 18 residues with 33 random amino acids) showed a severe dentin and enamel defect similar to a dentinogenesis imperfecta (DI) III–like phenotype. To address the molecular mechanism behind this phenotype, we generated delMut transgenic mice with the endogenous Dmp1 gene removed. These mutant mice did not recapture the abnormal phenotype observed in the human patient but displayed a mild rachitic tooth phenotype in comparison with that in the Dmp1-null mice, suggesting that the DI III–like phenotype may be due to an as-yet-undetermined acquired gene modifier. The mechanism studies showed that the mutant fragment maintains partial function of DMP1 such as stimulating MAP kinase signaling in vitro. Last, the in vitro and in vivo data support a role of odontoblasts in the control of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF-23) regulation during early postnatal development, although this regulation on Pi homeostasis is likely limited. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:20499360

  8. Lethal Skeletal Dysplasia in Mice and Humans Lacking the Golgin GMAP-210

    PubMed Central

    Smits, Patrick; Bolton, Andrew D.; Funari, Vincent; Hong, Minh; Boyden, Eric D.; Lu, Lei; Manning, Danielle K.; Dwyer, Noelle D.; Moran, Jennifer L.; Prysak, Mary; Merriman, Barry; Nelson, Stanley F.; Bonafé, Luisa; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Ikegawa, Shiro; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H.; Kirchhausen, Tom; Warman, Matthew L.; Beier, David R.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Establishing the genetic basis of phenotypes such as skeletal dysplasia in model organisms can provide insights into biologic processes and their role in human disease. METHODS We screened mutagenized mice and observed a neonatal lethal skeletal dysplasia with an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. Through genetic mapping and positional cloning, we identified the causative mutation. RESULTS Affected mice had a nonsense mutation in the thyroid hormone receptor interactor 11 gene (Trip11), which encodes the Golgi microtubule-associated protein 210 (GMAP-210); the affected mice lacked this protein. Golgi architecture was disturbed in multiple tissues, including cartilage. Skeletal development was severely impaired, with chondrocytes showing swelling and stress in the endoplasmic reticulum, abnormal cellular differentiation, and increased cell death. Golgi-mediated glycosylation events were altered in fibroblasts and chondrocytes lacking GMAP-210, and these chondrocytes had intracellular accumulation of perlecan, an extracellular matrix protein, but not of type II collagen or aggrecan, two other extracellular matrix proteins. The similarities between the skeletal and cellular phenotypes in these mice and those in patients with achondrogenesis type 1A, a neonatal lethal form of skeletal dysplasia in humans, suggested that achondrogenesis type 1A may be caused by GMAP-210 deficiency. Sequence analysis revealed loss-of-function mutations in the 10 unrelated patients with achondrogenesis type 1A whom we studied. CONCLUSIONS GMAP-210 is required for the efficient glycosylation and cellular transport of multiple proteins. The identification of a mutation affecting GMAP-210 in mice, and then in humans, as the cause of a lethal skeletal dysplasia underscores the value of screening for abnormal phenotypes in model organisms and identifying the causative mutations. PMID:20089971

  9. Damascenine induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity in mice and in vitro assessed human erythrocyte toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bouguezza, Yacine; Khettal, Bachra; Tir, Lydia; Boudrioua, Souad

    2015-09-01

    Nigella damascena seed is characterized by the presence of the major alkaloid, damascenine and its related metabolites. To our knowledge, no detailed subchronic toxicological assessment of damascenine (DA) has been reported. The present study evaluated the potential toxicity of DA in vivo after sub-chronic intraperitoneal (i.p) administration in mice and in vitro following human erythrocyte hemolysis. In vivo, a total of 48 adult male and female Swiss albino mice were used in a sub-chronic toxicity study. The mice received intraperitoneally two doses of DA (20 and 100 mg/kg) for 28 days. Food intake, body weight and central body temperature were measured during the experiment. After completion of drug treatment, biochemical and histological analyses were performed. No mortality was observed in any of the treatment groups of mice, showing no toxic effects during the study. Neither were biochemical parameters altered; no significant differences were observed concerning glucose, bilirubin, aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), urea, and creatinine parameters. No histopathological alterations were found in kidney and liver structures. In vitro, we focused on the human erythrocyte hemolytic process in the presence of several concentrations of DA. High level concentration of 1 000 μg/ml of DA revealed normal cell shapes and absence of hemolysis and deformation. PMID:27486370

  10. Damascenine induced hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity in mice and in vitro assessed human erythrocyte toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Khettal, Bachra; Tir, Lydia; Boudrioua, Souad

    2015-01-01

    Nigella damascena seed is characterized by the presence of the major alkaloid, damascenine and its related metabolites. To our knowledge, no detailed subchronic toxicological assessment of damascenine (DA) has been reported. The present study evaluated the potential toxicity of DA in vivo after sub-chronic intraperitoneal (i.p) administration in mice and in vitro following human erythrocyte hemolysis. In vivo, a total of 48 adult male and female Swiss albino mice were used in a sub-chronic toxicity study. The mice received intraperitoneally two doses of DA (20 and 100 mg/kg) for 28 days. Food intake, body weight and central body temperature were measured during the experiment. After completion of drug treatment, biochemical and histological analyses were performed. No mortality was observed in any of the treatment groups of mice, showing no toxic effects during the study. Neither were biochemical parameters altered; no significant differences were observed concerning glucose, bilirubin, aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), urea, and creatinine parameters. No histopathological alterations were found in kidney and liver structures. In vitro, we focused on the human erythrocyte hemolytic process in the presence of several concentrations of DA. High level concentration of 1 000 μg/ml of DA revealed normal cell shapes and absence of hemolysis and deformation. PMID:27486370

  11. Transgenic expression of the human MRP2 transporter reduces cisplatin accumulation and nephrotoxicity in Mrp2-null mice.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xia; Buckley, Brian; McCandlish, Elizabeth; Goedken, Michael J; Syed, Samira; Pelis, Ryan; Manautou, José E; Aleksunes, Lauren M

    2014-05-01

    The chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin is actively transported into proximal tubules, leading to acute renal injury. Previous studies suggest that the multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2) transporter may efflux cisplatin conjugates from cells. We sought to determine whether the absence of Mrp2 alters the accumulation and toxicity of platinum in the kidneys of mice and whether transgenic expression of the human MRP2 gene could protect against cisplatin injury in vivo. Plasma, kidneys, and livers from vehicle- and cisplatin-treated wild-type and Mrp2-null mice were collected for quantification of platinum and toxicity. By 24 hours, twofold higher concentrations of platinum were detected in the kidneys and livers of Mrp2-null mice compared with wild types. Enhanced platinum concentrations in Mrp2-null mice were observed in DNA and cytosolic fractions of the kidneys. Four days after cisplatin treatment, more extensive proximal tubule injury was observed in Mrp2-null mice compared with wild-type mice. Kidneys from naive Mrp2-null mice had elevated glutathione S-transferase mRNA levels, which could increase the formation of cisplatin-glutathione conjugates that may be metabolized to toxic thiol intermediates. Transgenic expression of the human MRP2 gene in Mrp2-null mice reduced the accumulation and nephrotoxicity of cisplatin to levels observed in wild-type mice. These data suggest that deficiency in Mrp2 lowers platinum excretion and increases susceptibility to kidney injury, which can be rescued by the human MRP2 ortholog.

  12. Co-transplantation of human fetal thymus, bone and CD34(+) cells into young adult immunodeficient NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) mice optimizes humanized mice that mount adaptive antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yun Shin; Son, Jin Kyung; Choi, Bongkum; Joo, Sung-Yeon; Lee, Yong-Soo; Park, Jae Berm; Moon, Hana; Kim, Tae Jin; Kim, Se Ho; Hong, Seokmann; Chang, Jun; Kang, Myung-Soo; Kim, Sung Joo

    2015-04-01

    Both the thymus (T) and bone (B) are necessary hematopoietic niches in adult humans. We previously showed that co-transplantation of human fetal T and B tissues into neonatal immunodeficient NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) (NSG, N) mice facilitated hematopoiesis. However, transplantation into neonatal mice resulted in high frequency of early death, making it unrealistic for repetitive experiments. In this study, young adult N mice were pre-engrafted with T and B, T alone, B alone or no tissues. The animals were irradiated and injected with autologous fetal liver (FL)-derived CD34(+) cells (34). The resultant mice were TB34N, T34N, B34N and 34N, respectively, and challenged with T cell dependent antigens (Ags). The humanized TB34N mice showed best performance of these mouse models in many aspects resembling the adult human Ag-experienced spleen. The TB34N mice exhibited better hematopoietic reconstitution; balanced development of T- and B-cell, and common progenitor cells; follicular lymphoid structures with a functional germinal center (GC) enriched with follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) and plasma cells (PCs); secretion of hIgG in the sera in response to Ags at comparable levels to those of human; derivations of hIgG mAb-secreting hybridoma clones. Collectively, the humanized TB34N mice could develop an adaptive immunity that was capable of producing Ag-specific hIgG at a significant level via class switching. This unprecedented TB34N platform in humanized mice would be useful in dissecting human immunity, for generating human Abs and clinical applications. PMID:25725428

  13. Co-transplantation of human fetal thymus, bone and CD34(+) cells into young adult immunodeficient NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) mice optimizes humanized mice that mount adaptive antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yun Shin; Son, Jin Kyung; Choi, Bongkum; Joo, Sung-Yeon; Lee, Yong-Soo; Park, Jae Berm; Moon, Hana; Kim, Tae Jin; Kim, Se Ho; Hong, Seokmann; Chang, Jun; Kang, Myung-Soo; Kim, Sung Joo

    2015-04-01

    Both the thymus (T) and bone (B) are necessary hematopoietic niches in adult humans. We previously showed that co-transplantation of human fetal T and B tissues into neonatal immunodeficient NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) (NSG, N) mice facilitated hematopoiesis. However, transplantation into neonatal mice resulted in high frequency of early death, making it unrealistic for repetitive experiments. In this study, young adult N mice were pre-engrafted with T and B, T alone, B alone or no tissues. The animals were irradiated and injected with autologous fetal liver (FL)-derived CD34(+) cells (34). The resultant mice were TB34N, T34N, B34N and 34N, respectively, and challenged with T cell dependent antigens (Ags). The humanized TB34N mice showed best performance of these mouse models in many aspects resembling the adult human Ag-experienced spleen. The TB34N mice exhibited better hematopoietic reconstitution; balanced development of T- and B-cell, and common progenitor cells; follicular lymphoid structures with a functional germinal center (GC) enriched with follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) and plasma cells (PCs); secretion of hIgG in the sera in response to Ags at comparable levels to those of human; derivations of hIgG mAb-secreting hybridoma clones. Collectively, the humanized TB34N mice could develop an adaptive immunity that was capable of producing Ag-specific hIgG at a significant level via class switching. This unprecedented TB34N platform in humanized mice would be useful in dissecting human immunity, for generating human Abs and clinical applications.

  14. Human endodermal sinus tumour in nude mice and its markers for diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, T; Nakayasu, M; Hirohashi, S; Kameya, T; Kaneko, M; Yokomori, K; Tsuchida, Y

    1979-01-01

    Two human endodermal sinus tumours (yolk sac tumours) were transplanted successfully into nude mice. The transplanted tumours maintained not only morphological characters, such as Schiller-Duval bodies, but also the ability to synthesise alpha-fetoprotein, lactic dehydrogenase 1, liver and bone type alkaline phosphatase, and some human serum proteins. Since these tumours produced lactic dehydrogenase 1 but not the other four isozymes of lactic dehydrogenase, this isozyme, like alpha-fetoprotein, seems to be a good marker for the diagnosis and management of cases of endodermal sinus tumour. One of the two tumours produced another fetal antigen or carcinoembryonic antigen in addition to alpha-fetoprotein. These two endodermal sinus tumours, with their various markers in nude mice, will be useful in studies on diagnostic markers. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:91627

  15. Detection of PIVKA II produced by human hepatoma cells in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Kohda, H; Ono, M; Sekiya, C; Ohta, H; Ohhira, M; Ohhira, M; Yoshida, Y; Ikeda, N; Namiki, M

    1991-03-01

    A novel experimental nude mouse model, which is useful for investigation of the mechanisms of PIVKA II synthesis, was established by inoculation with PIVKA II-producing human hepatoma cells (huH-1). We have found markedly elevated levels of PIVKA II in the plasma of nude mice transplanted with huH-1 cells and increased PIVKA II content in huH-1 tumor tissues. Whereas we have not found detectable level of PIVKA II neither in the plasma nor in tumor tissues of nude mice transplanted different human hepatoma cells (HLF) which is not producing PIVKA II. Histology of the tumor tissues produced by huH-1 cells revealed a thick trabecular pattern with blood spaces.

  16. Human melanopsin-AAV2/8 transfection to retina transiently restores visual function in rd1 mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ming-Ming; Dai, Jia-Man; Liu, Wen-Yi; Zhao, Cong-Jian; Lin, Bin; Yin, Zheng-Qin

    2016-01-01

    AIM To explore whether ectopic expression of human melanopsin can effectively and safely restore visual function in rd1 mice. METHODS Hematoxylin-eosin staining of retinal sections from rd1 mice was used to detect the thickness of the outer nuclear layer to determine the timing of surgery. We constructed a human melanopsin-AAV2/8 viral vector and injected it into the subretinal space of rd1 mice. The Phoenix Micron IV system was used to exclude the aborted injections, and immunohistochemistry was used to validate the ectopic expression of human melanopsin. Furthermore, visual electrophysiology and behavioral tests were used to detect visual function 30 and 45d after the injection. The structure of the retina was compared between the human melanopsin-injected group and phosphate buffer saline (PBS)-injected group. RESULTS Retinas of rd1 mice lost almost all of their photoreceptors on postnatal day 28 (P28). We therefore injected the human melanopsin-adeno-associated virus (AAV) 2/8 viral vector into P30 rd1 mice. After excluding aborted injections, we used immunohistochemistry of the whole mount retina to confirm the ectopic expression of human melanopsin by co-expression of human melanopsin and YFP that was carried by a viral vector. At 30d post-injection, visual electrophysiology and the behavioral test significantly improved. However, restoration of vision disappeared 45d after human melanopsin injection. Notably, human melanopsin-injected mice did not show any structural differences in their retinas compared with PBS-injected mice. CONCLUSION Ectopic expression of human melanopsin effectively and safely restores visual function in rd1 mice. PMID:27275417

  17. Progressive squamous epithelial neoplasia in K14-human papillomavirus type 16 transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Arbeit, J M; Münger, K; Howley, P M; Hanahan, D

    1994-01-01

    To model human papillomavirus-induced neoplastic progression, expression of the early region of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) was targeted to the basal cells of the squamous epithelium in transgenic mice, using a human keratin 14 (K14) enhancer/promoter. Twenty-one transgenic founder mice were produced, and eight lines carrying either wild-type or mutant HPV16 early regions that did not express the E1 or E2 genes were established. As is characteristic of human cancers, the E6 and E7 genes remained intact in these mutants. The absence of E1 or E2 function did not influence the severity of the phenotype that eventually developed in the transgenic mice. Hyperplasia, papillomatosis, and dysplasia appeared at multiple epidermal and squamous mucosal sites, including ear and truncal skin, face, snout and eyelids, and anus. The ears were the most consistently affected site, with pathology being present in all lines with 100% penetrance. This phenotype also progressed through discernible stages. An initial mild hyperplasia was followed by hyperplasia, which further progressed to dysplasia and papillomatosis. During histopathological progression, there was an incremental increase in cellular DNA synthesis, determined by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation, and a profound perturbation in keratinocyte terminal differentiation, as revealed by immunohistochemistry to K5, K14, and K10 and filaggrin. These K14-HPV16 transgenic mice present an opportunity to study the role of the HPV16 oncogenes in the neoplastic progression of squamous epithelium and provide a model with which to identify genetic and epigenetic factors necessary for carcinogenesis. Images PMID:7515971

  18. Humanized Monoclonal Antibody That Passively Protects Mice against Systemic and Intranasal Ricin Toxin Challenge.

    PubMed

    Van Slyke, Greta; Sully, Erin K; Bohorova, Natasha; Bohorov, Ognian; Kim, Do; Pauly, Michael H; Whaley, Kevin J; Zeitlin, Larry; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2016-09-01

    PB10 is a murine monoclonal antibody against an immunodominant epitope on ricin toxin's enzymatic subunit. Here, we characterize a fully humanized version of PB10 IgG1 (hPB10) and demonstrate that it has potent in vitro and in vivo toxin-neutralizing activities. We also report the minimum serum concentrations of hPB10 required to protect mice against 10 times the 50% lethal dose of ricin when delivered by injection and inhalation. PMID:27466351

  19. Exaggerated Waiting Impulsivity Associated with Human Binge Drinking, and High Alcohol Consumption in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Roige, Sandra; Baro, Victor; Trick, Leanne; Peña-Oliver, Yolanda; Stephens, David N; Duka, Theodora

    2014-01-01

    There are well-established links between impulsivity and alcohol use in humans and animal models; however, whether exaggerated impulsivity is a premorbid risk factor or a consequence of alcohol intake remains unclear. In a first approach, human young (18–25 years) social binge and non-binge drinkers were tested for motor impulsivity and attentional abilities in a human version of the Five-Choice Serial Reaction Time Task (Sx-5CSRTT), modeled on the rodent 5CSRTT. Participants completed four variants of the Sx-5CSRT, in addition to being screened for impulsive traits (BIS-11 questionnaire) and impulsive behavior (by means of the Delay Discounting Questionnaire, Two-Choice Impulsivity Paradigm (TCIP), Stop Signal Reaction Time, and Time Estimation Task). Using a second approach, we compared one of these impulsivity measures, 5CSRTT performance, in two inbred strains of mice known to differ in alcohol intake. Compared with non-bingers (NBD; n=22), binge drinkers (BD, n=22) showed robust impairments in attention and premature responding when evaluated under increased attentional load, in addition to presenting deficits in decision making using the TCIP. The best predictors for high binge drinking score were premature responding in the Sx-5CSRTT, trait impulsivity in the BIS-11, and decision making in the TCIP. Alcohol-naïve C57BL/6J (B6) mice (alcohol preferring) were more impulsive in the 5CSRTT than DBA2/J (D2) mice (alcohol averse); the degree of impulsivity correlated with subsequent alcohol consumption. Homologous measures in animal and human studies indicate increased premature responding in young social BD and in the ethanol-preferring B6 strain of mice. PMID:24947901

  20. Demonstration of Nondeclarative Sequence Learning in Mice: Development of an Animal Analog of the Human Serial Reaction Time Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christie, Michael A.; Hersch, Steven M.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate nondeclarative sequence learning in mice using an animal analog of the human serial reaction time task (SRT) that uses a within-group comparison of behavior in response to a repeating sequence versus a random sequence. Ten female B6CBA mice performed eleven 96-trial sessions containing 24 repetitions of a 4-trial…

  1. AGIA Tag System Based on a High Affinity Rabbit Monoclonal Antibody against Human Dopamine Receptor D1 for Protein Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Tomoya; Takeda, Hiroyuki; Uematsu, Atsushi; Yamanaka, Satoshi; Nomura, Shunsuke; Nemoto, Keiichirou; Iwasaki, Takahiro; Takahashi, Hirotaka; Sawasaki, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Polypeptide tag technology is widely used for protein detection and affinity purification. It consists of two fundamental elements: a peptide sequence and a binder which specifically binds to the peptide tag. In many tag systems, antibodies have been used as binder due to their high affinity and specificity. Recently, we obtained clone Ra48, a high-affinity rabbit monoclonal antibody (mAb) against dopamine receptor D1 (DRD1). Here, we report a novel tag system composed of Ra48 antibody and its epitope sequence. Using a deletion assay, we identified EEAAGIARP in the C-terminal region of DRD1 as the minimal epitope of Ra48 mAb, and we named this sequence the “AGIA” tag, based on its central sequence. The tag sequence does not include the four amino acids, Ser, Thr, Tyr, or Lys, which are susceptible to post-translational modification. We demonstrated performance of this new tag system in biochemical and cell biology applications. SPR analysis demonstrated that the affinity of the Ra48 mAb to the AGIA tag was 4.90 × 10−9 M. AGIA tag showed remarkably high sensitivity and specificity in immunoblotting. A number of AGIA-fused proteins overexpressed in animal and plant cells were detected by anti-AGIA antibody in immunoblotting and immunostaining with low background, and were immunoprecipitated efficiently. Furthermore, a single amino acid substitution of the second Glu to Asp (AGIA/E2D) enabled competitive dissociation of AGIA/E2D-tagged protein by adding wild-type AGIA peptide. It enabled one-step purification of AGIA/E2D-tagged recombinant proteins by peptide competition under physiological conditions. The sensitivity and specificity of the AGIA system makes it suitable for use in multiple methods for protein analysis. PMID:27271343

  2. EGF receptor mutations in lung cancer: from humans to mice and maybe back to humans.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Carlos L

    2006-06-01

    Deletions in exon 19 and nucleotide substitutions in exon 21 are the most common mutations of the EGFR (ErbB1) in NSCLC. These mutations endow the receptor with constitutive kinase activity. Most tumors expressing these mutants respond well to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors, suggesting that they are dependent on mutant EGFR signaling. Two groups developed transgenic mice in which expression of these mutants is temporally induced in mouse lung. Mice expressing EGFR mutants develop bronchioloalveolar cancer and lung adenocarcinoma, which are highly sensitive to EGFR inhibitors. These mouse models provide important opportunities for studying the biology of NSCLC and the refinement of anti-EGFR therapies.

  3. [Establishment of a keloid model by transplanting human keloid onto the backs of nude mice].

    PubMed

    Philandrianos, C; Gonnelli, D; Andrac-Meyer, L; Bruno, M; Magalon, G; Mordon, S

    2014-08-01

    Keloid scar is a proliferative healing dysfunction formed by an excessive build-up of collagen fibers on the dermis. It is responsible of aesthetic and functional disabilities. There is no ideal treatment and recurrence occurs very often. Keloid scars occur only to human, that's why animal model needs to be made to study this pathology and new treatments. Few models have been described using human keloid scars implanted into subcutaneous tissue of nude mice or rat. To allow study of topical and laser treatment we have developed a new animal model using human keloid scar fragment with epidermal and dermal tissue implanted into back of nude mice like a full thickness skin graft. Keloid fragments from five donors have been grafted onto 40 nudes mice. Macroscopic and microscopic studies have been made at day 28, 56, 84 and 112. We observed integration of the fragments in all cases. Hyalinized collagen bundles were observed in all implant biopsies confirming the stability of the keloid architecture within 112 days. This model is easily reproducible and allows the study of topical treatment and laser due to the accessibility of the keloid.

  4. Apolipoprotein A5: A newly identified gene impacting plasmatriglyceride levels in humans and mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pennacchio, Len A.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-09-15

    Apolipoprotein A5 (APOA5) is a newly described member of theapolipoprotein gene family whose initial discovery arose from comparativesequence analysis of the mammalian APOA1/C3/A4 gene cluster. Functionalstudies in mice indicated that alteration in the level of APOA5significantly impacted plasma triglyceride concentrations. Miceover-expressing human APOA5 displayed significantly reducedtriglycerides, while mice lacking apoA5 had a large increase in thislipid parameter. Studies in humans have also suggested an important rolefor APOA5 in determining plasma triglyceride concentrations. In theseexperiments, polymorphisms in the human gene were found to define severalcommon haplotypes that were associated with significant changes intriglyceride concentrations in multiple populations. Several separateclinical studies have provided consistent and strong support for theeffect with 24 percent of Caucasians, 35 percent of African-Americans and53 percent of Hispanics carrying APOA5 haplotypes associated withincreased plasma triglyceride levels. In summary, APOA5 represents anewly discovered gene involved in triglyceride metabolism in both humansand mice whose mechanism of action remains to be deciphered.

  5. Transgenic mice expressing human glucocerebrosidase variants: utility for the study of Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Angela; Hemmelgarn, Harmony; Melrose, Heather L; Hein, Leanne; Fuller, Maria; Clarke, Lorne A

    2013-08-01

    Gaucher disease is an autosomal recessively inherited storage disorder caused by deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase, acid β-glucosidase. The disease manifestations seen in Gaucher patients are highly heterogeneous as is the responsiveness to therapy. The elucidation of the precise factors responsible for this heterogeneity has been challenging as the development of clinically relevant animal models of Gaucher disease has been problematic. Although numerous murine models for Gaucher disease have been described each has limitations in their specific utility. We describe here, transgenic murine models of Gaucher disease that will be particularly useful for the study of pharmacological chaperones. We have produced stable transgenic mouse strains that individually express wild type, N370S and L444P containing human acid β-glucosidase and show that each of these transgenic lines rescues the lethal phenotype characteristic of acid β-glucosidase null mice. Both the N370S and L444P transgenic models show early and progressive elevations of tissue sphingolipids with L444P mice developing progressive splenic Gaucher cell infiltration. We demonstrate the potential utility of these new transgenic models for the study of Gaucher disease pathogenesis. In addition, since these mice produce only human enzyme, they are particularly relevant for the study of pharmacological chaperones that are specifically targeted to human acid β-glucosidase and the common mutations underlying Gaucher disease. PMID:23642305

  6. Cross-species transmission of gibbon and orangutan hepatitis B virus to uPA/SCID mice with human hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Sa-Nguanmoo, Pattaratida; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Ratanakorn, Parntep; Sugiyama, Masaya; Murakami, Shuko; Payungporn, Sunchai; Sommanustweechai, Angkana; Mizokami, Masashi; Poovorawan, Yong

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the potential of cross-species transmission of non-human primate HBV to humans, severe combined immunodeficiency mice transgenic for urokinase-type plasminogen activator, in which the mouse liver has been engrafted with human hepatocytes, were inoculated with non-human primate HBV. HBV-DNA positive serum samples from a gibbon or orangutan were inoculated into 6 chimeric mice. HBV-DNA, hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), and HB core-related antigen in sera and HBV cccDNA in liver were detectable in 2 of 3 mice each from the gibbon and orangutan. Likewise, applying immunofluorescence HBV core protein was only found in human hepatocytes expressing human albumin. The HBV sequences from mouse sera were identical to those from orangutan and gibbon sera determined prior to inoculation. In conclusion, human hepatocytes have been infected with gibbon/orangutan HBV.

  7. Effect of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor on granulocytopenia in mice induced by irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fushiki, M.; Ono, K.; Sasai, K.; Shibamoto, Y.; Tsutsui, K.; Nishidai, T.; Takahashi, M.; Abe, M. )

    1990-02-01

    We report the effect of human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) on the recovery from granulocytopenia induced by irradiation. Female 9-week old C3H/He mice were used. The irradiation schedule was as follows: Group 1 and 2 received whole-body irradiation of 1 Gy and 5 Gy, respectively, on day 0; Group 3 and 4 received whole-body irradiation of 0.5 and 1.0 Gy, respectively, for 5 consecutive days; Group 5 received upper hemibody irradiation of 3 Gy for 5 consecutive days. Daily subcutaneous injections of G-CSF (3 x 10(5) Unit/mouse) or 0.3 ml of saline to each group were started from the day after the first irradiation and continued for 18 days. Mice were sampled randomly from each group, and the total number of leukocytes, erythrocytes of peripheral blood, nucleated cells in femur, and spleen weight were counted and measured, respectively, on day 0, 3, 5, 7, 9, 12, and 18. The leukocyte counts decreased with an increase in radiation doses. In Group 1 and 2 mice, G-CSF enhanced the leukocyte count more than saline. In Group 3 mice, the recovery of leukocytopenia was facilitated by G-CSF, but in Group 4 mice, G-CSF had no effect on the leukocyte count decrease or on leukocytopenia recovery. In Group 5 mice, G-CSF greatly affected leukocytopenia recovery. Increase in spleen weight paralleled the peripheral leukocyte count. Daily administration of recombinant hG-CSF accelerated the granulocytopenia recovery which was induced by irradiation, and it may be a useful therapeutic agent for treating myelosuppressive cases.

  8. Generating double knockout mice to model genetic intervention for diabetic cardiomyopathy in humans.

    PubMed

    Chavali, Vishalakshi; Nandi, Shyam Sundar; Singh, Shree Ram; Mishra, Paras Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a rapidly increasing disease that enhances the chances of heart failure twofold to fourfold (as compared to age and sex matched nondiabetics) and becomes a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. There are two broad classifications of diabetes: type1 diabetes (T1D) and type2 diabetes (T2D). Several mice models mimic both T1D and T2D in humans. However, the genetic intervention to ameliorate diabetic cardiomyopathy in these mice often requires creating double knockout (DKO). In order to assess the therapeutic potential of a gene, that specific gene is either overexpressed (transgenic expression) or abrogated (knockout) in the diabetic mice. If the genetic mice model for diabetes is used, it is necessary to create DKO with transgenic/knockout of the target gene to investigate the specific role of that gene in pathological cardiac remodeling in diabetics. One of the important genes involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling in diabetes is matrix metalloproteinase-9 (Mmp9). Mmp9 is a collagenase that remains latent in healthy hearts but induced in diabetic hearts. Activated Mmp9 degrades extracellular matrix (ECM) and increases matrix turnover causing cardiac fibrosis that leads to heart failure. Insulin2 mutant (Ins2+/-) Akita is a genetic model for T1D that becomes diabetic spontaneously at the age of 3-4 weeks and show robust hyperglycemia at the age of 10-12 weeks. It is a chronic model of T1D. In Ins2+/- Akita, Mmp9 is induced. To investigate the specific role of Mmp9 in diabetic hearts, it is necessary to create diabetic mice where Mmp9 gene is deleted. Here, we describe the method to generate Ins2+/-/Mmp9-/- (DKO) mice to determine whether the abrogation of Mmp9 ameliorates diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:25064116

  9. Effects of herbal medicine on human uterine tumor-bearing nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Ohh, Mi Hyang; Kim, Seong Jin; Han, Jong Kwon; Pak, Sok Cheon; Chee, Kew-mahn

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Uterine leiomyomas are the most common benign uterine neoplasms associated with significant morbidity. Herbal formulas capable of restoring yin-yang balance by dispersing blood stasis may be useful for managing fibroid symptoms. Materials and Methods: In this study, the antitumor properties of three herbs viz., Trogopterus xanthipes Milen-Edwards, Paeonia lactiflora Pallas, and Ulmus davidiana Planch were evaluated in nude mice injected intravenously with human malignant myomas. Tumor fragments were xenografted subcutaneously through a flank incision in female mice. The mice entered the study for 8 weeks when their tumors reached the threshold volume (260 mm3). The mice were randomly allocated to receive subcutaneous injections of normal saline (Group 1; negative control), P. lactiflora Pallas (Group 2), U. davidiana Planch (Group 3), T. xanthipes Milen-Edwards (Group 4), and intravenous injections of paclitaxel (Group 5; positive control). The weight and tumor volume were measured, followed by histopathology. Results: A few cases of abdominal distention and death were observed in the negative control group. Furthermore, a considerable enlargement of the liver and spleen was observed in the negative control group at autopsy with a gradual increase in body weight during the experiment. The mean tumor volume which increased in negative control mice reduced in mice treated with herbal remedies or paclitaxel from day 14 onwards (P < 0.05). The degree of necrosis and apoptosis induction from herbal treatments was similar to that of paclitaxel. Conclusion: Collectively, three herbs viz., T. xanthipes Milen-Edwards, P. lactiflora Pallas, and U. davidiana Planch were able to induce necrosis and apoptosis of uterine leiomyoma cells, proving antitumor properties against uterine fibroids. PMID:27757274

  10. Generating double knockout mice to model genetic intervention for diabetic cardiomyopathy in humans.

    PubMed

    Chavali, Vishalakshi; Nandi, Shyam Sundar; Singh, Shree Ram; Mishra, Paras Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a rapidly increasing disease that enhances the chances of heart failure twofold to fourfold (as compared to age and sex matched nondiabetics) and becomes a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. There are two broad classifications of diabetes: type1 diabetes (T1D) and type2 diabetes (T2D). Several mice models mimic both T1D and T2D in humans. However, the genetic intervention to ameliorate diabetic cardiomyopathy in these mice often requires creating double knockout (DKO). In order to assess the therapeutic potential of a gene, that specific gene is either overexpressed (transgenic expression) or abrogated (knockout) in the diabetic mice. If the genetic mice model for diabetes is used, it is necessary to create DKO with transgenic/knockout of the target gene to investigate the specific role of that gene in pathological cardiac remodeling in diabetics. One of the important genes involved in extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling in diabetes is matrix metalloproteinase-9 (Mmp9). Mmp9 is a collagenase that remains latent in healthy hearts but induced in diabetic hearts. Activated Mmp9 degrades extracellular matrix (ECM) and increases matrix turnover causing cardiac fibrosis that leads to heart failure. Insulin2 mutant (Ins2+/-) Akita is a genetic model for T1D that becomes diabetic spontaneously at the age of 3-4 weeks and show robust hyperglycemia at the age of 10-12 weeks. It is a chronic model of T1D. In Ins2+/- Akita, Mmp9 is induced. To investigate the specific role of Mmp9 in diabetic hearts, it is necessary to create diabetic mice where Mmp9 gene is deleted. Here, we describe the method to generate Ins2+/-/Mmp9-/- (DKO) mice to determine whether the abrogation of Mmp9 ameliorates diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  11. A repeated injection of polyethyleneglycol-conjugated recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase elicits immune response in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Chilukuri, Nageswararao Sun Wei; Parikh, Kalpana; Naik, Ramachandra S.; Tang Lin; Doctor, Bhupendra P.; Saxena, Ashima

    2008-09-15

    Human serum butyrylcholinesterase (Hu BChE) serves as an efficacious bioscavenger of highly toxic organophosphorus (OP) compounds. Since there is a concern that the supply of native Hu BChE may be limited, monomeric and tetrameric forms of recombinant Hu BChE (rHu BChE) were evaluated as replacements and found that they lacked sufficient stability in vivo. However, their in vivo stability could be significantly prolonged by conjugation with polyethyleneglycol-20K (PEG) suggesting that monomeric and tetrameric PEG-rHu BChE could function as bioscavengers. Here, the immunogenicity of PEG-rHu BChE was evaluated in mice following two injections given four weeks apart. In addition to pharmacokinetic parameters, such as mean residence time, maximal concentration, time to reach the maximal concentration, elimination half-life and area under the plasma concentration-time curve extrapolated to infinity, the presence of circulating anti-rHu BChE antibodies was also determined. Although the pharmacokinetic parameters were significantly improved for the first injection of monomeric and tetrameric PEG-rHu BChEs, they were much lower for the second injection. Anti-rHu BChE antibodies were detected in the blood of mice following the first and second enzyme injections and their levels were approximately higher by 5-fold and 2-fold in mice injected with monomeric and tetrameric PEG-rHu BChEs as compared to mice injected with unconjugated enzymes. The findings that the rapid clearance of a repeat injection of PEG-rHu BChEs in mice which coincides with the presence of circulating anti-rHu BChE antibodies suggest that PEG conjugation prolonged the circulatory stability of rHu BChE but failed to eliminate its immunogenicity in mice.

  12. Human urine and plasma concentrations of bisphenol A extrapolated from pharmacokinetics established in in vivo experiments with chimeric mice with humanized liver and semi-physiological pharmacokinetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Miyaguchi, Takamori; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Makiko; Shida, Satomi; Nishiyama, Sayako; Takano, Ryohji; Murayama, Norie; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to extrapolate to humans the pharmacokinetics of estrogen analog bisphenol A determined in chimeric mice transplanted with human hepatocytes. Higher plasma concentrations and urinary excretions of bisphenol A glucuronide (a primary metabolite of bisphenol A) were observed in chimeric mice than in control mice after oral administrations, presumably because of enterohepatic circulation of bisphenol A glucuronide in control mice. Bisphenol A glucuronidation was faster in mouse liver microsomes than in human liver microsomes. These findings suggest a predominantly urinary excretion route of bisphenol A glucuronide in chimeric mice with humanized liver. Reported human plasma and urine data for bisphenol A glucuronide after single oral administration of 0.1mg/kg bisphenol A were reasonably estimated using the current semi-physiological pharmacokinetic model extrapolated from humanized mice data using algometric scaling. The reported geometric mean urinary bisphenol A concentration in the U.S. population of 2.64μg/L underwent reverse dosimetry modeling with the current human semi-physiological pharmacokinetic model. This yielded an estimated exposure of 0.024μg/kg/day, which was less than the daily tolerable intake of bisphenol A (50μg/kg/day), implying little risk to humans. Semi-physiological pharmacokinetic modeling will likely prove useful for determining the species-dependent toxicological risk of bisphenol A.

  13. Gluten exacerbates IgA nephropathy in humanized mice through gliadin-CD89 interaction.

    PubMed

    Papista, Christina; Lechner, Sebastian; Ben Mkaddem, Sanae; LeStang, Marie-Bénédicte; Abbad, Lilia; Bex-Coudrat, Julie; Pillebout, Evangéline; Chemouny, Jonathan M; Jablonski, Mathieu; Flamant, Martin; Daugas, Eric; Vrtovsnik, François; Yiangou, Minas; Berthelot, Laureline; Monteiro, Renato C

    2015-08-01

    IgA1 complexes containing deglycosylated IgA1, IgG autoantibodies, and a soluble form of the IgA receptor (sCD89), are hallmarks of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Food antigens, notably gluten, are associated with increased mucosal response and IgAN onset, but their implication in the pathology remains unknown. Here, an IgAN mouse model expressing human IgA1 and CD89 was used to examine the role of gluten in IgAN. Mice were given a gluten-free diet for three generations to produce gluten sensitivity, and then challenged for 30 days with a gluten diet. A gluten-free diet resulted in a decrease of mesangial IgA1 deposits, transferrin 1 receptor, and transglutaminase 2 expression, as well as hematuria. Mice on a gluten-free diet lacked IgA1-sCD89 complexes in serum and kidney eluates. Disease severity depended on gluten and CD89, as shown by reappearance of IgAN features in mice on a gluten diet and by direct binding of the gluten-subcomponent gliadin to sCD89. A gluten diet exacerbated intestinal IgA1 secretion, inflammation, and villous atrophy, and increased serum IgA1 anti-gliadin antibodies, which correlated with proteinuria in mice and patients. Moreover, early treatment of humanized mice with a gluten-free diet prevented mesangial IgA1 deposits and hematuria. Thus, gliadin-CD89 interaction may aggravate IgAN development through induction of IgA1-sCD89 complex formation and a mucosal immune response. Hence, early-stage treatment with a gluten-free diet could be beneficial to prevent disease.

  14. MR imaging of human pancreatic cancer xenograft labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao Ying; Pu, Yu; Liu, Gang; Shao, Yang; Ma, Qing Song; Zhang, Xiao Ming

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the MRI findings on tumor xenografts induced in nude mice by the inoculation of human pancreatic cancer cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO), and to monitor the kinetics of SPIO distribution in tumor xenografts. The labeled cancer cells were subcutaneously inoculated into 11 nude mice to induce tumor xenograft. The unlabeled cancer cells served as a control inoculated into nine nude mice. MR imaging was performed with a 1.5 T MR scanner for the tumor xenograft at the first, second and third week after the inoculation. We found that the tumor xenograft was induced in 100% nude mice on MR imaging for both groups in the first week after the inoculation. In the SPIO group, the tumors showed homogeneous hypointensity on T₁ - and T₂ -weighted and FIESTA images 1 week after inoculation. Two and 3 weeks after inoculation, the center of the tumors was still hypointense on all the above sequences. The tumor periphery was isointense on T₁ -weighted, and hyperintense on T₂ -weighted and FIESTA images. The tumors in control group were homogeneously hypointense or isointense on T₁ -weighted, and hyperintense on T₂ -weighted and FIESTA images in the first, second and third week after the inoculation. The size and signal-to-noise ratio of the tumor center in the SPIO group had decreased subsequent to the inoculation in all T₁ - and T₂ -weighted images and FIESTA. Our results showed the human pancreatic cancer cells labeled with SPIO can induce tumor xenograft in nude mice and MRI can monitor the kinetics of SPIO distribution in tumor xenografts.

  15. A human apolipoprotein E mimetic peptide reduces atherosclerosis in aged apolipoprotein E null mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanyong; Liu, Hongmei; Liu, Mengting; Li, Feifei; Liu, Liangchen; Du, Fen; Fan, Daping; Yu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is well known as an antiatherogenic protein via regulating lipid metabolism and inflammation. We previously reported that a human apoE mimetic peptide, EpK, reduced atherosclerosis in apoE null (apoE-/-) mice through reducing inflammation without affecting plasma lipid levels. Here, we construct another human apoE mimetic peptide, named hEp, and investigate whether expression of hEp can reduce atherosclerotic lesion development in aged female apoE-/- mice with pre-existing lesions. We found that chemically synthesized hEp significantly decreased cholesterol accumulation induced by oxidized low density lipoprotein and the expression of inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-6 induced by lipopolysaccharide in macrophages. In an in vivo study, Lv-hEp-GFP lentiviruses were intravenously injected into 9 month-old apoE-/- mice. Mice were then fed a chow diet for 18 weeks. Results showed that in comparison to the Lv-GFP lentivirus injection (Lv-GFP) group, Lv-hEp-GFP lentivirus injection achieved hepatic hEp expression and secretion in apoE-/- mice. It was observed that hEp expression significantly reduced plasma VLDL and LDL cholesterol levels and decreased aortic atherosclerotic lesions. This was accompanied by an increase of LDL receptor expression and a reduction of TNFα and IL-6 mRNA levels in the liver. Moreover, expression of hEp increased plasma paraoxonase-1 activity and decreased plasma myeloperoxidase activity and serum amyloid A levels. Our study provides evidence that hEp may be developed as a promising therapeutic apoE mimetic peptide for atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular diseases through its induction of plasma VLDL/LDL cholesterol clearance as well as its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities.

  16. Effect of High Sugar Intake on Glucose Transporter and Weight Regulating Hormones in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Ritze, Yvonne; Bárdos, Gyöngyi; D’Haese, Jan G.; Ernst, Barbara; Thurnheer, Martin; Schultes, Bernd; Bischoff, Stephan C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Sugar consumption has increased dramatically over the last decades in Western societies. Especially the intake of sugar-sweetened beverages seems to be a major risk for the development of obesity. Thus, we compared liquid versus solid high-sugar diets with regard to dietary intake, intestinal uptake and metabolic parameters in mice and partly in humans. Methods Five iso-caloric diets, enriched with liquid (in water 30% vol/vol) or solid (in diet 65% g/g) fructose or sucrose or a control diet were fed for eight weeks to C57bl/6 mice. Sugar, liquid and caloric intake, small intestinal sugar transporters (GLUT2/5) and weight regulating hormone mRNA expression, as well as hepatic fat accumulation were measured. In obese versus lean humans that underwent either bariatric surgery or small bowel resection, we analyzed small intestinal GLUT2, GLUT5, and cholecystokinin expression. Results In mice, the liquid high-sucrose diet caused an enhancement of total caloric intake compared to the solid high-sucrose diet and the control diet. In addition, the liquid high-sucrose diet increased expression of GLUT2, GLUT5, and cholecystokinin expression in the ileum (P<0.001). Enhanced liver triglyceride accumulation was observed in mice being fed the liquid high-sucrose or -fructose, and the solid high-sucrose diet compared to controls. In obese, GLUT2 and GLUT5 mRNA expression was enhanced in comparison to lean individuals. Conclusions We show that the form of sugar intake (liquid versus solid) is presumably more important than the type of sugar, with regard to feeding behavior, intestinal sugar uptake and liver fat accumulation in mice. Interestingly, in obese individuals, an intestinal sugar transporter modulation also occurred when compared to lean individuals. PMID:25010715

  17. A human apolipoprotein E mimetic peptide reduces atherosclerosis in aged apolipoprotein E null mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanyong; Liu, Hongmei; Liu, Mengting; Li, Feifei; Liu, Liangchen; Du, Fen; Fan, Daping; Yu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is well known as an antiatherogenic protein via regulating lipid metabolism and inflammation. We previously reported that a human apoE mimetic peptide, EpK, reduced atherosclerosis in apoE null (apoE(-/-)) mice through reducing inflammation without affecting plasma lipid levels. Here, we construct another human apoE mimetic peptide, named hEp, and investigate whether expression of hEp can reduce atherosclerotic lesion development in aged female apoE(-/-) mice with pre-existing lesions. We found that chemically synthesized hEp significantly decreased cholesterol accumulation induced by oxidized low density lipoprotein and the expression of inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-6 induced by lipopolysaccharide in macrophages. In an in vivo study, Lv-hEp-GFP lentiviruses were intravenously injected into 9 month-old apoE(-/-) mice. Mice were then fed a chow diet for 18 weeks. Results showed that in comparison to the Lv-GFP lentivirus injection (Lv-GFP) group, Lv-hEp-GFP lentivirus injection achieved hepatic hEp expression and secretion in apoE(-/-) mice. It was observed that hEp expression significantly reduced plasma VLDL and LDL cholesterol levels and decreased aortic atherosclerotic lesions. This was accompanied by an increase of LDL receptor expression and a reduction of TNFα and IL-6 mRNA levels in the liver. Moreover, expression of hEp increased plasma paraoxonase-1 activity and decreased plasma myeloperoxidase activity and serum amyloid A levels. Our study provides evidence that hEp may be developed as a promising therapeutic apoE mimetic peptide for atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular diseases through its induction of plasma VLDL/LDL cholesterol clearance as well as its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:27648138

  18. Human IL-32 expression protects mice against a hypervirulent strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xiyuan; Shang, Shaobin; Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Basaraba, Randall J; Ovrutsky, Alida R; Matsuda, Jennifer L; Takeda, Katsuyuki; Chan, Mallory M; Dakhama, Azzeddine; Kinney, William H; Trostel, Jessica; Bai, An; Honda, Jennifer R; Achcar, Rosane; Hartney, John; Joosten, Leo A B; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Orme, Ian; Dinarello, Charles A; Ordway, Diane J; Chan, Edward D

    2015-04-21

    Silencing of interleukin-32 (IL-32) in a differentiated human promonocytic cell line impairs killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) but the role of IL-32 in vivo against MTB remains unknown. To study the effects of IL-32 in vivo, a transgenic mouse was generated in which the human IL-32γ gene is expressed using the surfactant protein C promoter (SPC-IL-32γTg). Wild-type and SPC-IL-32γTg mice were infected with a low-dose aerosol of a hypervirulent strain of MTB (W-Beijing HN878). At 30 and 60 d after infection, the transgenic mice had 66% and 85% fewer MTB in the lungs and 49% and 68% fewer MTB in the spleens, respectively; the transgenic mice also exhibited greater survival. Increased numbers of host-protective innate and adaptive immune cells were present in SPC-IL-32γTg mice, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) positive lung macrophages and dendritic cells, and IFN-gamma (IFNγ) and TNFα positive CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the lungs and mediastinal lymph nodes. Alveolar macrophages from transgenic mice infected with MTB ex vivo had reduced bacterial burden and increased colocalization of green fluorescent protein-labeled MTB with lysosomes. Furthermore, mouse macrophages made to express IL-32γ but not the splice variant IL-32β were better able to limit MTB growth than macrophages capable of producing both. The lungs of patients with tuberculosis showed increased IL-32 expression, particularly in macrophages of granulomas and airway epithelial cells but also B cells and T cells. We conclude that IL-32γ enhances host immunity to MTB.

  19. Human IL-32 expression protects mice against a hypervirulent strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Xiyuan; Shang, Shaobin; Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Basaraba, Randall J.; Ovrutsky, Alida R.; Matsuda, Jennifer L.; Takeda, Katsuyuki; Chan, Mallory M.; Dakhama, Azzeddine; Kinney, William H.; Trostel, Jessica; Bai, An; Honda, Jennifer R.; Achcar, Rosane; Hartney, John; Joosten, Leo A. B.; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Orme, Ian; Dinarello, Charles A.; Ordway, Diane J.; Chan, Edward D.

    2015-01-01

    Silencing of interleukin-32 (IL-32) in a differentiated human promonocytic cell line impairs killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) but the role of IL-32 in vivo against MTB remains unknown. To study the effects of IL-32 in vivo, a transgenic mouse was generated in which the human IL-32γ gene is expressed using the surfactant protein C promoter (SPC-IL-32γTg). Wild-type and SPC-IL-32γTg mice were infected with a low-dose aerosol of a hypervirulent strain of MTB (W-Beijing HN878). At 30 and 60 d after infection, the transgenic mice had 66% and 85% fewer MTB in the lungs and 49% and 68% fewer MTB in the spleens, respectively; the transgenic mice also exhibited greater survival. Increased numbers of host-protective innate and adaptive immune cells were present in SPC-IL-32γTg mice, including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) positive lung macrophages and dendritic cells, and IFN-gamma (IFNγ) and TNFα positive CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the lungs and mediastinal lymph nodes. Alveolar macrophages from transgenic mice infected with MTB ex vivo had reduced bacterial burden and increased colocalization of green fluorescent protein-labeled MTB with lysosomes. Furthermore, mouse macrophages made to express IL-32γ but not the splice variant IL-32β were better able to limit MTB growth than macrophages capable of producing both. The lungs of patients with tuberculosis showed increased IL-32 expression, particularly in macrophages of granulomas and airway epithelial cells but also B cells and T cells. We conclude that IL-32γ enhances host immunity to MTB. PMID:25820174

  20. A human apolipoprotein E mimetic peptide reduces atherosclerosis in aged apolipoprotein E null mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanyong; Liu, Hongmei; Liu, Mengting; Li, Feifei; Liu, Liangchen; Du, Fen; Fan, Daping; Yu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is well known as an antiatherogenic protein via regulating lipid metabolism and inflammation. We previously reported that a human apoE mimetic peptide, EpK, reduced atherosclerosis in apoE null (apoE-/-) mice through reducing inflammation without affecting plasma lipid levels. Here, we construct another human apoE mimetic peptide, named hEp, and investigate whether expression of hEp can reduce atherosclerotic lesion development in aged female apoE-/- mice with pre-existing lesions. We found that chemically synthesized hEp significantly decreased cholesterol accumulation induced by oxidized low density lipoprotein and the expression of inflammatory cytokines TNFα and IL-6 induced by lipopolysaccharide in macrophages. In an in vivo study, Lv-hEp-GFP lentiviruses were intravenously injected into 9 month-old apoE-/- mice. Mice were then fed a chow diet for 18 weeks. Results showed that in comparison to the Lv-GFP lentivirus injection (Lv-GFP) group, Lv-hEp-GFP lentivirus injection achieved hepatic hEp expression and secretion in apoE-/- mice. It was observed that hEp expression significantly reduced plasma VLDL and LDL cholesterol levels and decreased aortic atherosclerotic lesions. This was accompanied by an increase of LDL receptor expression and a reduction of TNFα and IL-6 mRNA levels in the liver. Moreover, expression of hEp increased plasma paraoxonase-1 activity and decreased plasma myeloperoxidase activity and serum amyloid A levels. Our study provides evidence that hEp may be developed as a promising therapeutic apoE mimetic peptide for atherosclerosis-related cardiovascular diseases through its induction of plasma VLDL/LDL cholesterol clearance as well as its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:27648138

  1. Aldolase-B knockout in mice phenocopies hereditary fructose intolerance in humans.

    PubMed

    Oppelt, Sarah A; Sennott, Erin M; Tolan, Dean R

    2015-03-01

    The rise in fructose consumption, and its correlation with symptoms of metabolic syndrome (MBS), has highlighted the need for a better understanding of fructose metabolism. To that end, valid rodent models reflecting the same metabolism as in humans, both biochemically and physiologically, are critical. A key to understanding any type of metabolism comes from study of disease states that affect such metabolism. A serious defect of fructose metabolism is the autosomal recessive condition called hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI), caused by mutations in the human aldolase B gene (Aldob). Those afflicted with HFI experience liver and kidney dysfunction after fructose consumption, which can lead to death, particularly during infancy. With very low levels of fructose exposure, HFI patients develop non-alcoholic fatty acid liver disease and fibrosis, sharing liver pathologies also seen in MBS. A major step toward establishing that fructose metabolism in mice mimics that of humans is reported by investigating the consequences of targeting the mouse aldolase-B gene (Aldo2) for deletion in mice (Aldo2(-/-)). The Aldo2(-/-) homozygous mice show similar pathology following exposure to fructose as humans with HFI such as failure to thrive, liver dysfunction, and potential morbidity. Establishing that this mouse reflects the symptoms of HFI in humans is critical for comparison of rodent studies to the human condition, where this food source is increasing, and increasingly controversial. This animal should provide a valuable resource for answering remaining questions about fructose metabolism in HFI, as well as help investigate the biochemical mechanisms leading to liver pathologies seen in MBS from high fructose diets.

  2. Targeting breast cancer stem cells by dendritic cell vaccination in humanized mice with breast tumor: preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Phuc Van; Le, Hanh Thi; Vu, Binh Thanh; Pham, Viet Quoc; Le, Phong Minh; Phan, Nhan Lu-Chinh; Trinh, Ngu Van; Nguyen, Huyen Thi-Lam; Nguyen, Sinh Truong; Nguyen, Toan Linh; Phan, Ngoc Kim

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer (BC) is one of the leading cancers in women. Recent progress has enabled BC to be cured with high efficiency. However, late detection or metastatic disease often renders the disease untreatable. Additionally, relapse is the main cause of death in BC patients. Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are considered to cause the development of BC and are thought to be responsible for metastasis and relapse. This study aimed to target BCSCs using dendritic cells (DCs) to treat tumor-bearing humanized mice models. Materials and methods NOD/SCID mice were used to produce the humanized mice by transplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells. Human BCSCs were injected into the mammary fat pad to produce BC humanized mice. Both hematopoietic stem cells and DCs were isolated from the human umbilical cord blood, and immature DCs were produced from cultured mononuclear cells. DCs were matured by BCSC-derived antigen incubation for 48 hours. Mature DCs were vaccinated to BC humanized mice with a dose of 106 cells/mice, and the survival percentage was monitored in both treated and untreated groups. Results The results showed that DC vaccination could target BCSCs and reduce the tumor size and prolong survival. Conclusion These results suggested that targeting BCSCs with DCs is a promising therapy for BC. PMID:27499638

  3. Immunomodulating Activity of Agaricus brasiliensis KA21 in Mice and in Human Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Fukuwatari, Yasushi; Okumura, Ko; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Ishibashi, Ken-ichi; Furukawa, Mai; Ohno, Naohito; Mori, Kazu; Gao, Ming; Motoi, Masuro

    2008-01-01

    We performed studies on murine models and human volunteers to examine the immunoenhancing effects of the naturally outdoor-cultivated fruit body of Agaricus brasiliensis KA21 (i.e. Agaricus blazei). Antitumor, leukocyte-enhancing, hepatopathy-alleviating and endotoxin shock-alleviating effects were found in mice. In the human study, percentage body fat, percentage visceral fat, blood cholesterol level and blood glucose level were decreased, and natural killer cell activity was increased. Taken together, the results strongly suggest that the A. brasiliensis fruit body is useful as a health-promoting food. PMID:18604247

  4. Increased expression of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 in liver from NZB/W F1 mice received antibody against human parvovirus B19 VP1 unique region protein

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chun-Chou; Tzang, Bor-Show; Chiang, Szu-Yi; Hsu, Gwo-Jong; Hsu, Tsai-Ching

    2009-01-01

    Background Human parvovirus B19 infection has been postulated to the anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS) in autoimmunity. However, the influence of anti-B19-VP1u antibody in autoimmune diseases is still obscure. Methods To elucidate the effect of anti-B19-VP1u antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), passive transfer of rabbit anti-B19-VP1u IgG was injected intravenously into NZB/W F1 mice. Results Significant reduction of platelet count and prolonged thrombocytopenia time were detected in anti-B19-VP1u IgG group as compared to other groups, whereas significant increases of anti-B19-VP1u, anti-phospholipid (APhL), and anti-double strand DNA (dsDNA) antibody binding activity were detected in anti-B19-VP1u group. Additionally, significant increases of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) activity and protein expression were detected in B19-VP1u IgG group. Notably, phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate kinase (PI3K) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) proteins were involved in the induction of MMP9. Conclusion These experimental results firstly demonstrated the aggravated effects of anti-B19-VP1u antibody in disease activity of SLE. PMID:19272186

  5. Faithful expression of the human 5q31 cytokine cluster intransgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy, Dee A.; Wang, Zhi-En; Symula, Derek J.; McArthur, CliffordJ.; Rubin, Edward M.; Frazer, Kelly A.; Locksley, Richard M.

    1999-12-03

    ILs 4,5, and 13, cardinal cytokines produced by Th2 cells,are coordinately expressed and clustered in the 150-kb syntenic regions on mouse chromosome 11 and human chromosome 5q31. We analyzed two sets of human yeast artificial chromosome transgenic mice that contained the5931cytokines to assess whether conserved sequences required for their coordinate and cell-specific regulation are contained within the cytokine cluster itself. Human Il-4, IL-13, and Il-5 were expressed under Th2, but not Th1, conditions in vitro. Each of these cytokines was produced during infection with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, a Th2 inducing stimulus, and human Il-4 was generated after activation of NK T cells in vivo.Consistently fewer cells produced the endogenous mouse cytokines in transgenic than in control mice, suggesting competition for stable expression between the mouse and human genes. These data imply the existence of both conserved trans-activating factors and cis-regulatory elements that underlie the coordinate expression and lineage specificity of the type 2 ctyokine genes in lymphocytes.

  6. Global metabolite profiling of human colorectal cancer xenografts in mice using HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Neil J; Lai, Lindsay; Wilkinson, Robert W; Odedra, Rajesh; Wilson, Ian D; Barnes, Alan J

    2013-06-01

    Reversed-phase gradient LC-MS was used to perform untargeted metabonomic analysis on extracts of human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines (COLO 205, HT-29, HCT 116 and SW620) subcutaneously implanted into age-matched athymic nude male mice to study small molecule metabolic profiles and examine possible correlations with human cancer biopsies. Following high mass accuracy data analysis using MS and MS/MS, metabolites were identified by searching against major metabolite databases including METLIN, MASSBANK, The Human Metabolome Database, PubChem, Biospider, LipidMaps and KEGG. HT-29 and COLO 205 tumor xenografts showed a distribution of metabolites that differed from SW620 and HCT 116 xenografts (predominantly on the basis of relative differences in the amounts of amino acids and lipids detected). This finding is consistent with NMR-based analysis of human colorectal tissue, where the metabolite profiles of HT-29 tumors exhibit the greatest similarity to human rectal cancer tissue with respect to changes in the relative amounts of lipids and choline-containing compounds. As the metabolic signatures of cancer cells result from oncogene-directed metabolic reprogramming, the HT-29 xenografts in mice may prove to be a useful model to further study the tumor microenvironment and cancer biology. PMID:23631600

  7. Modeling recent human evolution in mice by expression of a selected EDAR variant

    PubMed Central

    Kamberov, Yana G.; Wang, Sijia; Tan, Jingze; Gerbault, Pascale; Wark, Abigail; Tan, Longzhi; Yang, Yajun; Li, Shilin; Tang, Kun; Chen, Hua; Powell, Adam; Itan, Yuval; Fuller, Dorian; Lohmueller, Jason; Mao, Junhao; Schachar, Asa; Paymer, Madeline; Hostetter, Elizabeth; Byrne, Elizabeth; Burnett, Melissa; McMahon, Andrew P.; Thomas, Mark G.; Lieberman, Daniel E.; Jin, Li; Tabin, Clifford J.; Morgan, Bruce A.; Sabeti, Pardis C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary An adaptive variant of the human Ectodysplasin receptor, EDARV370A, is one of the strongest candidates of recent positive selection from genome-wide scans. We have modeled EDAR370A in mice and characterized its phenotype and evolutionary origins in humans. Our computational analysis suggests the allele arose in Central China approximately 30,000 years ago. Although EDAR370A has been associated with increased scalp hair thickness and changed tooth morphology in humans, its direct biological significance and potential adaptive role remain unclear. We generated a knock-in mouse model and find that, as in humans, hair thickness is increased in EDAR370A mice. We identify novel biological targets affected by the mutation, including mammary and eccrine glands. Building on these results, we find that EDAR370A is associated with an increased number of active eccrine glands in the Han Chinese. This interdisciplinary approach yields unique insight into the generation of adaptive variation among modern humans. PMID:23415220

  8. Global metabolite profiling of human colorectal cancer xenografts in mice using HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Neil J; Lai, Lindsay; Wilkinson, Robert W; Odedra, Rajesh; Wilson, Ian D; Barnes, Alan J

    2013-06-01

    Reversed-phase gradient LC-MS was used to perform untargeted metabonomic analysis on extracts of human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines (COLO 205, HT-29, HCT 116 and SW620) subcutaneously implanted into age-matched athymic nude male mice to study small molecule metabolic profiles and examine possible correlations with human cancer biopsies. Following high mass accuracy data analysis using MS and MS/MS, metabolites were identified by searching against major metabolite databases including METLIN, MASSBANK, The Human Metabolome Database, PubChem, Biospider, LipidMaps and KEGG. HT-29 and COLO 205 tumor xenografts showed a distribution of metabolites that differed from SW620 and HCT 116 xenografts (predominantly on the basis of relative differences in the amounts of amino acids and lipids detected). This finding is consistent with NMR-based analysis of human colorectal tissue, where the metabolite profiles of HT-29 tumors exhibit the greatest similarity to human rectal cancer tissue with respect to changes in the relative amounts of lipids and choline-containing compounds. As the metabolic signatures of cancer cells result from oncogene-directed metabolic reprogramming, the HT-29 xenografts in mice may prove to be a useful model to further study the tumor microenvironment and cancer biology.

  9. Pregnane X Receptor-Humanized Mice Recapitulate Gender Differences in Ethanol Metabolism but Not Hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Spruiell, Krisstonia; Gyamfi, Afua A; Yeyeodu, Susan T; Richardson, Ricardo M; Gonzalez, Frank J; Gyamfi, Maxwell A

    2015-09-01

    Both human and rodent females are more susceptible to developing alcoholic liver disease following chronic ethanol (EtOH) ingestion. However, little is known about the relative effects of acute EtOH exposure on hepatotoxicity in female versus male mice. The nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR; NR1I2) is a broad-specificity sensor with species-specific responses to toxic agents. To examine the effects of the human PXR on acute EtOH toxicity, the responses of male and female PXR-humanized (hPXR) transgenic mice administered oral binge EtOH (4.5 g/kg) were analyzed. Basal differences were observed between hPXR males and females in which females expressed higher levels of two principal enzymes responsible for EtOH metabolism, alcohol dehydrogenase 1 and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2, and two key mediators of hepatocyte replication and repair, cyclin D1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. EtOH ingestion upregulated hepatic estrogen receptor α, cyclin D1, and CYP2E1 in both genders, but differentially altered lipid and EtOH metabolism. Consistent with higher basal levels of EtOH-metabolizing enzymes, blood EtOH was more rapidly cleared in hPXR females. These factors combined to provide greater protection against EtOH-induced liver injury in female hPXR mice, as revealed by markers for liver damage, lipid peroxidation, and endoplasmic reticulum stress. These results indicate that female hPXR mice are less susceptible to acute binge EtOH-induced hepatotoxicity than their male counterparts, due at least in part to the relative suppression of cellular stress and enhanced expression of enzymes involved in both EtOH metabolism and hepatocyte proliferation and repair in hPXR females. PMID:26159875

  10. Pregnane X Receptor–Humanized Mice Recapitulate Gender Differences in Ethanol Metabolism but Not Hepatotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Spruiell, Krisstonia; Gyamfi, Afua A.; Yeyeodu, Susan T.; Richardson, Ricardo M.; Gonzalez, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    Both human and rodent females are more susceptible to developing alcoholic liver disease following chronic ethanol (EtOH) ingestion. However, little is known about the relative effects of acute EtOH exposure on hepatotoxicity in female versus male mice. The nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR; NR1I2) is a broad-specificity sensor with species-specific responses to toxic agents. To examine the effects of the human PXR on acute EtOH toxicity, the responses of male and female PXR-humanized (hPXR) transgenic mice administered oral binge EtOH (4.5 g/kg) were analyzed. Basal differences were observed between hPXR males and females in which females expressed higher levels of two principal enzymes responsible for EtOH metabolism, alcohol dehydrogenase 1 and aldehyde dehydrogenase 2, and two key mediators of hepatocyte replication and repair, cyclin D1 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen. EtOH ingestion upregulated hepatic estrogen receptor α, cyclin D1, and CYP2E1 in both genders, but differentially altered lipid and EtOH metabolism. Consistent with higher basal levels of EtOH-metabolizing enzymes, blood EtOH was more rapidly cleared in hPXR females. These factors combined to provide greater protection against EtOH-induced liver injury in female hPXR mice, as revealed by markers for liver damage, lipid peroxidation, and endoplasmic reticulum stress. These results indicate that female hPXR mice are less susceptible to acute binge EtOH-induced hepatotoxicity than their male counterparts, due at least in part to the relative suppression of cellular stress and enhanced expression of enzymes involved in both EtOH metabolism and hepatocyte proliferation and repair in hPXR females. PMID:26159875

  11. Infectious Chikungunya Virus in the Saliva of Mice, Monkeys and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Joy; Rudd, Penny A.; Prow, Natalie A.; Belarbi, Essia; Roques, Pierre; Larcher, Thibaut; Gresh, Lionel; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva; Schroder, Wayne A.; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a reemerging, ordinarily mosquito-transmitted, alphavirus that occasionally produces hemorrhagic manifestations, such as nose bleed and bleeding gums, in human patients. Interferon response factor 3 and 7 deficient (IRF3/7-/-) mice, which are deficient for interferon α/β responses, reliably develop hemorrhagic manifestations after CHIKV infection. Here we show that infectious virus was present in the oral cavity of CHIKV infected IRF3/7-/- mice, likely due to hemorrhagic lesions in the olfactory epithelium that allow egress of infected blood into the nasal, and subsequently, oral cavities. In addition, IRF3/7-/- mice were more susceptible to infection with CHIKV via intranasal and oral routes, with IRF3/7-/- mice also able to transmit virus mouse-to-mouse without an arthropod vector. Cynomolgus macaques often show bleeding gums after CHIKV infection, and analysis of saliva from several infected monkeys also revealed the presence of viral RNA and infectious virus. Furthermore, saliva samples collected from several acute CHIKV patients with hemorrhagic manifestations were found to contain viral RNA and infectious virus. Oral fluids can therefore be infectious during acute CHIKV infections, likely due to hemorrhagic manifestations in the oral/nasal cavities. PMID:26447467

  12. Infectious Chikungunya Virus in the Saliva of Mice, Monkeys and Humans.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Joy; Rudd, Penny A; Prow, Natalie A; Belarbi, Essia; Roques, Pierre; Larcher, Thibaut; Gresh, Lionel; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva; Schroder, Wayne A; Suhrbier, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a reemerging, ordinarily mosquito-transmitted, alphavirus that occasionally produces hemorrhagic manifestations, such as nose bleed and bleeding gums, in human patients. Interferon response factor 3 and 7 deficient (IRF3/7-/-) mice, which are deficient for interferon α/β responses, reliably develop hemorrhagic manifestations after CHIKV infection. Here we show that infectious virus was present in the oral cavity of CHIKV infected IRF3/7-/- mice, likely due to hemorrhagic lesions in the olfactory epithelium that allow egress of infected blood into the nasal, and subsequently, oral cavities. In addition, IRF3/7-/- mice were more susceptible to infection with CHIKV via intranasal and oral routes, with IRF3/7-/- mice also able to transmit virus mouse-to-mouse without an arthropod vector. Cynomolgus macaques often show bleeding gums after CHIKV infection, and analysis of saliva from several infected monkeys also revealed the presence of viral RNA and infectious virus. Furthermore, saliva samples collected from several acute CHIKV patients with hemorrhagic manifestations were found to contain viral RNA and infectious virus. Oral fluids can therefore be infectious during acute CHIKV infections, likely due to hemorrhagic manifestations in the oral/nasal cavities.

  13. Mammary gland-specific expression of biologically active human osteoprotegerin in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yoon-Young; Lee, Chul-Sang

    2013-03-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a secreted glycoprotein that regulates bone resorption by inhibiting differentiation and activation of osteoclast, thereby potentially useful for the treatment of many bone diseases associated with increased bone loss. In this study, we designed a novel cDNA expression cassette by modifying the potent and mammary gland-specific goat β-casein/hGH hybrid gene construct and examined human OPG (hOPG) cDNA expression in transgenic mice. Six transgenic mice all successfully expressed hOPG in their milk at the level of 0.06-2,000 µg/ml. An estimated molecular weight of the milk hOPG was 55 kDa in SDS-PAGE, which is the same as a naturally glycosylated monomer. This hOPG expression was highly specific to the mammary glands of transgenic mice. hOPG mRNA was not detected in any organs analyzed except mammary gland. Functional integrity of milk hOPG was evaluated by TRAP (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase) activity assay in bone marrow cell cultures. OPG ligand (OPG-L) treatment increased TRAP activity by two fold but it was completely abolished by co-treatment with transgenic milk containing hOPG. Taken together, our novel cDNA expression cassette could direct an efficient expression of biologically active hOPG, a potential candidate pharmaceutical for bone diseases, only in the mammary gland of transgenic mice.

  14. ANGPTL3 blockade with a human monoclonal antibody reduces plasma lipids in dyslipidemic mice and monkeys.

    PubMed

    Gusarova, Viktoria; Alexa, Corey A; Wang, Yan; Rafique, Ashique; Kim, Jee Hae; Buckler, David; Mintah, Ivory J; Shihanian, Lisa M; Cohen, Jonathan C; Hobbs, Helen H; Xin, Yurong; Valenzuela, David M; Murphy, Andrew J; Yancopoulos, George D; Gromada, Jesper

    2015-07-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein 3 (ANGPTL3) is a circulating protein synthesized exclusively in the liver that inhibits LPL and endothelial lipase (EL), enzymes that hydrolyze TGs and phospholipids in plasma lipoproteins. Here we describe the development and testing of a fully human monoclonal antibody (REGN1500) that binds ANGPTL3 with high affinity. REGN1500 reversed ANGPTL3-induced inhibition of LPL activity in vitro. Intravenous administration of REGN1500 to normolipidemic C57Bl/6 mice increased LPL activity and decreased plasma TG levels by ≥50%. Chronic administration of REGN1500 to dyslipidemic C57Bl/6 mice for 8 weeks reduced circulating plasma levels of TG, LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), and HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) without any changes in liver, adipose, or heart TG contents. Studies in EL knockout mice revealed that REGN1500 reduced serum HDL-C through an EL-dependent mechanism. Finally, administration of a single dose of REGN1500 to dyslipidemic cynomolgus monkeys caused a rapid and pronounced decrease in plasma TG, nonHDL-C, and HDL-C. REGN1500 normalized plasma TG levels even in monkeys with a baseline plasma TG greater than 400 mg/dl. Collectively, these data demonstrate that neutralization of ANGPTL3 using REGN1500 reduces plasma lipids in dyslipidemic mice and monkeys, and thus provides a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of patients with hyperlipidemia. PMID:25964512

  15. Sleep deprivation impairs performance in the 5-choice continuous performance test: similarities between humans and mice.

    PubMed

    van Enkhuizen, Jordy; Acheson, Dean; Risbrough, Victoria; Drummond, Sean; Geyer, Mark A; Young, Jared W

    2014-03-15

    Several groups undergo extended periods without sleep due to working conditions or mental illness. Such sleep deprivation (SD) can deleteriously affect attentional processes and disrupt work and family functioning. Understanding the biological underpinnings of SD effects may assist in developing sleep therapies and cognitive enhancers. Utilizing cross-species tests of attentional processing in humans and rodents would aid in mechanistic studies examining SD-induced inattention. We assessed the effects of 36h of: (1) Total SD (TSD) in healthy male and female humans (n=50); and (2) REM SD (RSD) in male C57BL/6 mice (n=26) on performance in the cross-species 5-choice continuous performance test (5C-CPT). The 5C-CPT includes target trials on which subjects were required to respond and non-target trials on which subjects were required to inhibit from responding. TSD-induced effects on human psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) were also examined. Effects of SD were also examined on mice split into good and poor performance groups based on pre-deprivation scores. In the human 5C-CPT, TSD decreased hit rate and vigilance with trend-level effects on accuracy. In the PVT, TSD slowed response times and increased lapses. In the mouse 5C-CPT, RSD reduced accuracy and hit rate with trend-level effects on vigilance, primarily in good performers. In conclusion, SD induced impaired 5C-CPT performance in both humans and mice and validates the 5C-CPT as a cross-species translational task. The 5C-CPT can be used to examine mechanisms underlying SD-induced deficits in vigilance and assist in testing putative cognitive enhancers.

  16. Development of a Zealand white rabbit deposition model to study inhalation anthrax.

    PubMed

    Asgharian, Bahman; Price, Owen; Kabilan, Senthil; Jacob, Richard E; Einstein, Daniel R; Kuprat, Andrew P; Corley, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Despite using rabbits in several inhalation exposure experiments to study diseases such as anthrax, there is a lack of understanding regarding deposition characteristics and fate of inhaled particles (bio-aerosols and viruses) in the respiratory tracts of rabbits. Such information allows dosimetric extrapolation to humans to inform human outcomes. The lung geometry of the New Zealand white rabbit (referred to simply as rabbits throughout the article) was constructed using recently acquired scanned images of the conducting airways of rabbits and available information on its acinar region. In addition, functional relationships were developed for the lung and breathing parameters of rabbits as a function of body weight. The lung geometry and breathing parameters were used to extend the existing deposition model for humans and several other species to rabbits. Evaluation of the deposition model for rabbits was made by comparing predictions with available measurements in the literature. Deposition predictions in the lungs of rabbits indicated smaller deposition fractions compared to those found in humans across various particle diameter ranges. The application of the deposition model for rabbits was demonstrated by extrapolating deposition predictions in rabbits to find equivalent human exposure concentrations assuming the same dose-response relationship between the two species. Human equivalent exposure concentration levels were found to be much smaller than those for rabbits.

  17. Expression of human protamine P1 in sperm of transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Keith, C.; Stilwell, J.; Lowe, X.; Anderson, G.

    1994-12-31

    Transgenic mice were produced by pronuclear injection with DNA constructs containing human protamine P1 cDNA recombined with a murine protamine P1 promoter, and were identified by PCR. Expression of human P1 was investigated using huplm, a monoclonal antibody specific for human P1, applied to murine testicular cells, smears of epididymal sperm, and smears of detergent-isolated sperm nuclei. Various antibodies and nontransgenic littermates were used as controls. Two male founders (T3 and T7) sired more than five generations of transgenic offspring each with continued expression of human P1 in their sperm. Transgenic animals appear of normal fertility with sperm of typical nuclear morphology. The human P1 transgene was expressed postmeioticly in both lines, as expected. Nearly 100% of sperm of T3 and T7 hemizygotes labeled with huplm, consistent with complete diffusion of human P1 protein through the intercellular bridge of spermatogenic cells. Human P1 labeling of sperm nuclei was not visibly affected by sonication or by treatment with the detergent MATAB or the reducing agent DTT. A third founder female (T5) showed a transmission pattern consistent with insertion of the transgene into an X chromosome; her transgenic offspring expressed human P1 in only a small fraction of sperm. Human P1 transgenes may serve as efficient targets for germinal mutations and transgenicmice may provide promising models for investigating the DNA complexes.

  18. Three-dimensional bioprinting of multilayered constructs containing human mesenchymal stromal cells for osteochondral tissue regeneration in the rabbit knee joint.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jin-Hyung; Jang, Ki-Mo; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Park, Ju Young; Jung, Hyuntae; Oh, Kyunghoon; Park, Kyeng Min; Yeom, Junseok; Park, Sun Hwa; Kim, Sung Won; Wang, Joon Ho; Kim, Kimoon; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2016-03-01

    The use of cell-rich hydrogels for three-dimensional (3D) cell culture has shown great potential for a variety of biomedical applications. However, the fabrication of appropriate constructs has been challenging. In this study, we describe a 3D printing process for the preparation of a multilayered 3D construct containing human mesenchymal stromal cells with a hydrogel comprised of atelocollagen and supramolecular hyaluronic acid (HA). This construct showed outstanding regenerative ability for the reconstruction of an osteochondral tissue in the knee joints of rabbits. We found that the use of a mechanically stable, host-guest chemistry-based hydrogel was essential and allowed two different types of extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogels to be easily printed and stacked into one multilayered construct without requiring the use of potentially harmful chemical reagents or physical stimuli for post-crosslinking. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to validate the potential of a 3D printed multilayered construct consisting of two different ECM materials (atelocollagen and HA) for heterogeneous tissue regeneration using an in vivo animal model. We believe that this 3D printing-based platform technology can be effectively exploited for regeneration of various heterogeneous tissues as well as osteochondral tissue.

  19. A murine monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody detects a common idiotope on human, mouse and rabbit antibodies to allergen Lol p IV.

    PubMed

    Zhou, E M; Dzuba-Fischer, J M; Rector, E S; Sehon, A H; Kisil, F T

    1991-09-01

    A syngeneic mouse monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibody (anti-Id), designated as B1/1, was generated against a monoclonal antibody (MoAb 91) specific for Ryegrass pollen allergen Lol p IV. This anti-Id recognized an idiotope (Id) that was also present on other monoclonal antibodies with the same specificity as MoAb 91. Observations that (i) the anti-Id inhibited the binding of MoAb 91 to Lol p IV and (ii) the Id-anti-Id interaction could be inhibited by Lol p IV indicated that the Id was located within or near the antigen combining site. These properties served to characterize B1/1 as an internal image anti-Id. Evidence that an immune response in different species to Lol p IV elicits the formation of antibodies which express a common Id was provided by the observations that (i) the Id-anti-Id interactions could be inhibited by mouse, human and rabbit antisera to Lol p IV and (ii) the binding of these antisera to Lol p IV could be inhibited by the anti-Id. Interestingly, the internal image anti-Id B1/1 also recognized an Id on a monoclonal antibody which was directed to an epitope of Lol p IV, different from that recognized by MoAb 91.

  20. Defects in the CAPN1 Gene Result in Alterations in Cerebellar Development and Cerebellar Ataxia in Mice and Humans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yubin; Hersheson, Joshua; Lopez, Dulce; Hammer, Monia; Liu, Yan; Lee, Ka-Hung; Pinto, Vanessa; Seinfeld, Jeff; Wiethoff, Sarah; Sun, Jiandong; Amouri, Rim; Hentati, Faycal; Baudry, Neema; Tran, Jennifer; Singleton, Andrew B; Coutelier, Marie; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni; Durr, Alexandra; Bi, Xiaoning; Houlden, Henry; Baudry, Michel

    2016-06-28

    A CAPN1 missense mutation in Parson Russell Terrier dogs is associated with spinocerebellar ataxia. We now report that homozygous or heterozygous CAPN1-null mutations in humans result in cerebellar ataxia and limb spasticity in four independent pedigrees. Calpain-1 knockout (KO) mice also exhibit a mild form of ataxia due to abnormal cerebellar development, including enhanced neuronal apoptosis, decreased number of cerebellar granule cells, and altered synaptic transmission. Enhanced apoptosis is due to absence of calpain-1-mediated cleavage of PH domain and leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase 1 (PHLPP1), which results in inhibition of the Akt pro-survival pathway in developing granule cells. Injection of neonatal mice with the indirect Akt activator, bisperoxovanadium, or crossing calpain-1 KO mice with PHLPP1 KO mice prevented increased postnatal cerebellar granule cell apoptosis and restored granule cell density and motor coordination in adult mice. Thus, mutations in CAPN1 are an additional cause of ataxia in mammals, including humans.

  1. Use of Humanized Mice to Study the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune and Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Koboziev, Iurii; Jones-Hall, Yava; Valentine, John F.; Webb, Cynthia Reinoso; Furr, Kathryn L.; Grisham, Matthew B.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models of disease have been used extensively by the research community for the past several decades to better understand the pathogenesis of different diseases as well as assess the efficacy and toxicity of different therapeutic agents. Retrospective analyses of numerous preclinical intervention studies using mouse models of acute and chronic inflammatory diseases reveal a generalized failure to translate promising interventions or therapeutics into clinically-effective treatments in patients. Although several possible reasons have been suggested to account for this generalized failure to translate therapeutic efficacy from the laboratory bench to the patient’s bedside, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the mouse immune system may not adequately recapitulate the immuno-pathological mechanisms observed in human diseases. Indeed, it is well-known that >80 major differences exist between mouse and human immunology; all of which contribute to significant differences in immune system development, activation and responses to challenges in innate and adaptive immunity. This inconvenient reality has prompted investigators to attempt to humanize the mouse immune system in order to address important, human-specific questions that are impossible to study in patients. The successful long-term engraftment of human hemato-lymphoid cells in mice would provide investigators with a relatively inexpensive, small animal model to study clinically-relevant mechanisms as well as facilitate the evaluation of human-specific therapies in vivo. The discovery that targeted mutation of the IL-2 receptor common gamma chain in lymphopenic mice allows for the long-term engraftment of functional human immune cells has advanced greatly our ability to humanize the mouse immune system. The objective of this review is to present a brief overview of the recent advances that have been made in the development and use of humanized mice with special emphasis on autoimmune and chronic

  2. Prescription diets for rabbits.

    PubMed

    Proença, Laila Maftoum; Mayer, Jörg

    2014-09-01

    Dietary management can be used with drug therapy for the successful treatment of many diseases. Therapeutic nutrition is well-recognized in dogs and cats and is beginning to increase among other pet species, including rabbits. The nutritional component of some rabbit diseases (eg, urolithiasis) is not completely understood, and the clinician should evaluate the use of prescription diets based on the scientific literature and individual needs. Long-term feeding trials are needed to further evaluate the efficacy of prescription diets in rabbits. Prescription diets are available for selected diseases in rabbits, including diets for immediate-term, short-term, and long-term management. PMID:25155667

  3. The junction zone of human epithelium and foreign stroma. Ultrastructural observations in human oral mucosal transplants in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Holmstrup, P; Andersen, L; Harder, F

    1984-07-01

    This study describes ultrastructural features of epithelial-stromal junction of human buccal and palatal mucosal transplants and their outgrowths in nude mice. The investigation included transplant epithelium overlying human connective tissue in 27 cases, epithelial outgrowth formed over murine connective tissue in 33 cases, and over Millipore filter in 12 cases. The epithelial-stromal junction of the transplants differed from the normal state only in the presence of lamina densa loops projecting into the connective tissue and in lamina densa interruptions and duplications. In contrast the epithelial outgrowths demonstrated flattening of epithelial basal cells, lack of proximal epithelial cell projections, lack of complete hemidesmosome complexes, lack of distinct lamina densa, and lack of anchoring fibrils. It is suggested that these changes may be due to lack of necessary interaction between the human epithelium and the foreign stroma.

  4. Bridging Mice to Men: Using HLA Transgenic Mice to Enhance the Future Prediction and Prevention of Autoimmune Type 1 Diabetes in Humans.

    PubMed

    Serreze, David V; Niens, Marijke; Kulik, John; DiLorenzo, Teresa P

    2016-01-01

    Similar to the vast majority of cases in humans, the development of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the NOD mouse model is due to T-cell mediated autoimmune destruction of insulin producing pancreatic β cells. Particular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotypes (designated HLA in humans; and H2 in mice) provide the primary genetic risk factor for T1D development. It has long been appreciated that within the MHC, particular unusual class II genes contribute to the development of T1D in both humans and NOD mice by allowing for the development and functional activation of β cell autoreactive CD4 T cells. However, studies in NOD mice have revealed that through interactions with other background susceptibility genes, the quite common class I variants (K(d), D(b)) characterizing this strain's H2 (g7) MHC haplotype aberrantly acquire an ability to support the development of β cell autoreactive CD8 T cell responses also essential to T1D development. Similarly, recent studies indicate that in the proper genetic context some quite common HLA class I variants also aberrantly contribute to T1D development in humans. This review focuses on how "humanized" HLA transgenic NOD mice can be created and used to identify class I dependent β cell autoreactive CD8 T cell populations of clinical relevance to T1D development. There is also discussion on how HLA transgenic NOD mice can be used to develop protocols that may ultimately be useful for the prevention of T1D in humans by attenuating autoreactive CD8 T cell responses against pancreatic β cells. PMID:27150089

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of rabbit nasal airflows for the development of hybrid CFD/PBPK models

    PubMed Central

    Corley, R. A.; Minard, K. R.; Kabilan, S.; Einstein, D. R.; Kuprat, A. P.; Harkema, J. R.; Kimbell, J. S.; Gargas, M. L.; Kinzell, John H.

    2010-01-01

    The percentages of total airflows over the nasal respiratory and olfactory epithelium of female rabbits were calculated from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of steady-state inhalation. These airflow calculations, along with nasal airway geometry determinations, are critical parameters for hybrid CFD/physiologically based pharmacokinetic models that describe the nasal dosimetry of water-soluble or reactive gases and vapors in rabbits. CFD simulations were based upon three-dimensional computational meshes derived from magnetic resonance images of three adult female New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. In the anterior portion of the nose, the maxillary turbinates of rabbits are considerably more complex than comparable regions in rats, mice, monkeys, or humans. This leads to a greater surface area to volume ratio in this region and thus the potential for increased extraction of water soluble or reactive gases and vapors in the anterior portion of the nose compared to many other species. Although there was considerable interanimal variability in the fine structures of the nasal turbinates and airflows in the anterior portions of the nose, there was remarkable consistency between rabbits in the percentage of total inspired airflows that reached the ethmoid turbinate region (~50%) that is presumably lined with olfactory epithelium. These latter results (airflows reaching the ethmoid turbinate region) were higher than previous published estimates for the male F344 rat (19%) and human (7%). These differences in regional airflows can have significant implications in interspecies extrapolations of nasal dosimetry. PMID:19519151

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of rabbit nasal airflows for the development of hybrid CFD/PBPK models

    SciTech Connect

    Corley, Richard A; Minard, Kevin R; Kabilan, Senthil; Einstein, Daniel R; Kuprat, Andrew P; harkema, J R; Kimbell, Julia; Gargas, M L; Kinzell, John H

    2009-06-01

    The percentages of total airflows over the nasal respiratory and olfactory epithelium of female rabbits were calculated from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of steady-state inhalation. These airflows calculations, along with nasal airway geometry determinations, are critical parameters for hybrid CFD/physiologically based pharmacokinetic models that describe the nasal dosimetry of water-soluble or reactive gases and vapors in rabbits. CFD simulations were based upon three-dimensional computational meshes derived from magnetic resonance images of three adult female New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. In the anterior portion of the nose, the maxillary turbinates of rabbits are considerably more complex than comparable regions in rats, mice, monkeys, or humans. This leads to a greater surface area to volume ratio in this region and thus the potential for increased extraction of water soluble or reactive gases and vapors in the anterior portion of the nose compared to many other species. Although there was considerable interanimal variability in the fine structures of the nasal turbinates and airflows in the anterior portions of the nose, there was remarkable consistency between rabbits in the percentage of total inspired airflows that reached the ethmoid turbinate region (~50%) that is presumably lined with olfactory epithelium. These latter results (airflows reaching the ethmoid turbinate region) were higher than previous published estimates for the male F344 rat (19%) and human (7%). These differences in regional airflows can have significant implications in interspecies extrapolations of nasal dosimetry.

  7. Effects of tetrandrine and fangchinoline on experimental thrombosis in mice and human platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Zhang, Y H; Yun, Y P

    1999-03-01

    Tetrandrine (TET) and fangchinoline (FAN) are two naturally occurring analogues with a bisbenzylisoquinoline structure. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of TET and FAN on the experimental thrombosis induced by collagen plus epinephrine (EP) in mice, and platelet aggregation and blood coagulation in vitro. In the in vivo study, the administration (50 mg/kg, i.p.) of TET and FAN in mice showed the inhibition of thrombosis by 55% and 35%, respectively, while acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, 50 mg/kg, i.p.), a positive control, showed only 30% inhibition. In the vitro human platelet aggregations induced by the agonists used in tests, TET and FAN showed the inhibitions dose dependently. In addition, neither TET nor FAN showed any anticoagulation activities in the measurement of the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT) and thrombin time (TT) using human-citrated plasma. These results suggest that antithrombosis of TET and FAN in mice may be mainly related to the antiplatelet aggregation activities. PMID:10193204

  8. Inhibition of early atherogenesis in transgenic mice by human apolipoprotein AI.

    PubMed

    Rubin, E M; Krauss, R M; Spangler, E A; Verstuyft, J G; Clift, S M

    1991-09-19

    Epidemiological surveys have identified a strong inverse relationship between the amount in the plasma of high density lipoproteins (HDL), apolipoprotein AI (ApoA-I), the major protein component of HDL, and the risk for atherosclerosis in humans. It is not known if this relationship arises from a direct antiatherogenic effect of these plasma components or if it is the result of other factors also associated with increases in ApoA-I and HDL levels. Because some strains of mice are susceptible to diet-induced formation of preatherosclerotic fatty streak lesions, and because of available techniques for the genetic manipulation of this organism, the murine system offers a unique setting in which to investigate the process of early atherogenesis. To test the hypothesis that induction of a high plasma concentration of ApoA-I and HDL would inhibit this process, we studied the effects of atherogenic diets on transgenic mice expressing high amounts of human ApoA-I. We report that transgenic mice with high plasma ApoA-I and HDL levels were significantly protected from the development of fatty streak lesions.

  9. Bone formation in vitro and in nude mice by human osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ogose, A; Motoyama, T; Hotta, T; Watanabe, H; Takahashi, H E

    1995-01-01

    Osteosarcomas contain variable amounts of bony tissue, but the mechanism of bone formation by osteosarcoma is not well understood. While a number of cultured human osteosarcoma cell lines have been established, they are maintained by different media and differ qualitatively with regard to bone formation. We examined different media for their ability to support bone formation in vitro and found the alpha-modification of Eagle's minimal essential medium supplemented with beta glycerophosphate was best for this purpose, because it contained the proper calcium and phosphate concentrations. Subsequently, we compared seven human osteosarcoma cell lines under the same experimental conditions to clarify their ability to induce bone formation. NOS-1 cells most frequently exhibited features of bone formation in vitro and in nude mice. Collagen synthesis by tumour cells themselves seemed to be the most important factor for bone volume. However, even HuO9 cells, which lacked collagen synthesis and failed to form bone in vitro, successfully formed tumours containing bone in nude mice. Histological analysis of HuO9 cells in diffusion chambers implanted in nude mice and the findings of polymerase chain reaction indicated that the phenomenon was probably due to bone morphogenetic protein.

  10. Extensive personal human gut microbiota culture collections characterized and manipulated in gnotobiotic mice

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Andrew L.; Kallstrom, George; Faith, Jeremiah J.; Reyes, Alejandro; Moore, Aimee; Dantas, Gautam; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2011-01-01

    The proportion of the human gut bacterial community that is recalcitrant to culture remains poorly defined. In this report, we combine high-throughput anaerobic culturing techniques with gnotobiotic animal husbandry and metagenomics to show that the human fecal microbiota consists largely of taxa and predicted functions that are represented in its readily cultured members. When transplanted into gnotobiotic mice, complete and cultured communities exhibit similar colonization dynamics, biogeographical distribution, and responses to dietary perturbations. Moreover, gnotobiotic mice can be used to shape these personalized culture collections to enrich for taxa suited to specific diets. We also demonstrate that thousands of isolates from a single donor can be clonally archived and taxonomically mapped in multiwell format to create personalized microbiota collections. Retrieving components of a microbiota that have coexisted in single donors who have physiologic or disease phenotypes of interest and reuniting them in various combinations in gnotobiotic mice should facilitate preclinical studies designed to determine the degree to which tractable bacterial taxa are able to transmit donor traits or influence host biology. PMID:21436049

  11. Tregs control the development of symptomatic West Nile virus infection in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Lanteri, Marion C; O'Brien, Katie M; Purtha, Whitney E; Cameron, Mark J; Lund, Jennifer M; Owen, Rachel E; Heitman, John W; Custer, Brian; Hirschkorn, Dale F; Tobler, Leslie H; Kiely, Nancy; Prince, Harry E; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Nixon, Douglas F; Kamel, Hany T; Kelvin, David J; Busch, Michael P; Rudensky, Alexander Y; Diamond, Michael S; Norris, Philip J

    2009-11-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes asymptomatic infection in most humans, but for undefined reasons, approximately 20% of immunocompetent individuals develop West Nile fever, a potentially debilitating febrile illness, and approximately 1% develop neuroinvasive disease syndromes. Notably, since its emergence in 1999, WNV has become the leading cause of epidemic viral encephalitis in North America. We hypothesized that CD4+ Tregs might be differentially regulated in subjects with symptomatic compared with those with asymptomatic WNV infection. Here, we show that in 32 blood donors with acute WNV infection, Tregs expanded significantly in the 3 months after index (RNA+) donations in all subjects. Symptomatic donors exhibited lower Treg frequencies from 2 weeks through 1 year after index donation yet did not show differences in systemic T cell or generalized inflammatory responses. In parallel prospective experimental studies, symptomatic WNV-infected mice also developed lower Treg frequencies compared with asymptomatic mice at 2 weeks after infection. Moreover, Treg-deficient mice developed lethal WNV infection at a higher rate than controls. Together, these results suggest that higher levels of peripheral Tregs after infection protect against severe WNV disease in immunocompetent animals and humans.

  12. Chronic wasting disease prions are not transmissible to transgenic mice overexpressing human prion protein.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Malin K; Al-Doujaily, Huda; Sigurdson, Christina J; Glatzel, Markus; O'Malley, Catherine; Powell, Caroline; Asante, Emmanuel A; Linehan, Jacqueline M; Brandner, Sebastian; Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Collinge, John

    2010-10-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a prion disease that affects free-ranging and captive cervids, including mule deer, white-tailed deer, Rocky Mountain elk and moose. CWD-infected cervids have been reported in 14 USA states, two Canadian provinces and in South Korea. The possibility of a zoonotic transmission of CWD prions via diet is of particular concern in North America where hunting of cervids is a popular sport. To investigate the potential public health risks posed by CWD prions, we have investigated whether intracerebral inoculation of brain and spinal cord from CWD-infected mule deer transmits prion infection to transgenic mice overexpressing human prion protein with methionine or valine at polymorphic residue 129. These transgenic mice have been utilized in extensive transmission studies of human and animal prion disease and are susceptible to BSE and vCJD prions, allowing comparison with CWD. Here, we show that these mice proved entirely resistant to infection with mule deer CWD prions arguing that the transmission barrier associated with this prion strain/host combination is greater than that observed with classical BSE prions. However, it is possible that CWD may be caused by multiple prion strains. Further studies will be required to evaluate the transmission properties of distinct cervid prion strains as they are characterized.

  13. Metabolic shifts induced by human H460 cells in tumor-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linsheng; Wang, Yaqiong; Zheng, Tian; Cao, Bei; Li, Mengjie; Shi, Jian; Aa, Nan; Wang, Xinwen; Zhao, Chunyan; Aa, Jiye; Wang, Guangji

    2016-03-01

    Tumor markers are most popularly used in diagnosis of various cancers clinically. However, the confounding factors of individual background diversities, such as genetics, food preferences, living styles, physical exercises, etc., greatly challenge the identification of tumor markers. Study of the metabolic impact of inoculated tumors on model animals can facilitate the identification of metabolomic markers relevant to tumor insult. In this study, serum metabolites from nude mice (n = 14) inoculated with human H460 cells (human nonsmall cell lung carcinoma) were profiled using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The mice with inoculated tumors showed an obviously different metabolic pattern from the control; identification of the discriminatory metabolites suggested the metabolic perturbation of free fatty acids, amino acids, glycolysis and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle turnover. The significantly decreased TCA intermediates, free fatty acids, 3-hydroxybutyric acid and fluctuating amino acids (t-test, p < 0.05) in serum of tumor-bearing mice characterized the metabolic impact of local inoculated H460 tumor cells on the whole system. This indicates that they are candidate metabolomic markers for translational study of lung cancer, clinically. PMID:26147780

  14. ISG15 deficiency and increased viral resistance in humans but not mice.

    PubMed

    Speer, Scott D; Li, Zhi; Buta, Sofija; Payelle-Brogard, Béatrice; Qian, Li; Vigant, Frederic; Rubino, Erminia; Gardner, Thomas J; Wedeking, Tim; Hermann, Mark; Duehr, James; Sanal, Ozden; Tezcan, Ilhan; Mansouri, Nahal; Tabarsi, Payam; Mansouri, Davood; Francois-Newton, Véronique; Daussy, Coralie F; Rodriguez, Marisela R; Lenschow, Deborah J; Freiberg, Alexander N; Tortorella, Domenico; Piehler, Jacob; Lee, Benhur; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Pellegrini, Sandra; Bogunovic, Dusan

    2016-01-01

    ISG15 is an interferon (IFN)-α/β-induced ubiquitin-like protein. It exists as a free molecule, intracellularly and extracellularly, and conjugated to target proteins. Studies in mice have demonstrated a role for Isg15 in antiviral immunity. By contrast, human ISG15 was shown to have critical immune functions, but not in antiviral immunity. Namely, free extracellular ISG15 is crucial in IFN-γ-dependent antimycobacterial immunity, while free intracellular ISG15 is crucial for USP18-mediated downregulation of IFN-α/β signalling. Here we describe ISG15-deficient patients who display no enhanced susceptibility to viruses in vivo, in stark contrast to Isg15-deficient mice. Furthermore, fibroblasts derived from ISG15-deficient patients display enhanced antiviral protection, and expression of ISG15 attenuates viral resistance to WT control levels. The species-specific gain-of-function in antiviral immunity observed in ISG15 deficiency is explained by the requirement of ISG15 to sustain USP18 levels in humans, a mechanism not operating in mice. PMID:27193971

  15. ISG15 deficiency and increased viral resistance in humans but not mice

    PubMed Central

    Speer, Scott D.; Li, Zhi; Buta, Sofija; Payelle-Brogard, Béatrice; Qian, Li; Vigant, Frederic; Rubino, Erminia; Gardner, Thomas J.; Wedeking, Tim; Hermann, Mark; Duehr, James; Sanal, Ozden; Tezcan, Ilhan; Mansouri, Nahal; Tabarsi, Payam; Mansouri, Davood; Francois-Newton, Véronique; Daussy, Coralie F.; Rodriguez, Marisela R.; Lenschow, Deborah J.; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Tortorella, Domenico; Piehler, Jacob; Lee, Benhur; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Pellegrini, Sandra; Bogunovic, Dusan

    2016-01-01

    ISG15 is an interferon (IFN)-α/β-induced ubiquitin-like protein. It exists as a free molecule, intracellularly and extracellularly, and conjugated to target proteins. Studies in mice have demonstrated a role for Isg15 in antiviral immunity. By contrast, human ISG15 was shown to have critical immune functions, but not in antiviral immunity. Namely, free extracellular ISG15 is crucial in IFN-γ-dependent antimycobacterial immunity, while free intracellular ISG15 is crucial for USP18-mediated downregulation of IFN-α/β signalling. Here we describe ISG15-deficient patients who display no enhanced susceptibility to viruses in vivo, in stark contrast to Isg15-deficient mice. Furthermore, fibroblasts derived from ISG15-deficient patients display enhanced antiviral protection, and expression of ISG15 attenuates viral resistance to WT control levels. The species-specific gain-of-function in antiviral immunity observed in ISG15 deficiency is explained by the requirement of ISG15 to sustain USP18 levels in humans, a mechanism not operating in mice. PMID:27193971

  16. Species specificity and augmentation of responses to class II major histocompatibility complex molecules in human CD4 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Murine T cell responses to human class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules were shown to be a minimum of 20-70-fold lower than responses to allogeneic molecules. Transgenic mice expressing slightly below normal (75-95%) or very high (250-380%) cell surface levels of human CD4 were utilized to determine whether this was due to a species-specific interaction between murine CD4 and class II molecules. Human CD4 was shown to function in signal transduction events in murine T cells based on the ability of anti-human CD4 antibody to synergize with suboptimal doses of anti-murine CD3 antibody in stimulating T cell proliferation. In mice expressing lower levels of human CD4, T cell responses to human class II molecules were enhanced up to threefold, whereas allogeneic responses were unaltered. In mice expressing high levels of human CD4, responses to human class II molecules were enhanced at least 10-fold, whereas allogeneic responses were between one and three times the level of normal responses. The relatively greater enhancement of the response to human class II molecules in both lines argues for a preferential interaction between human CD4 and human class II molecules. In mice expressing lower levels of human CD4, responses to human class II molecules were blocked by antibodies to CD4 of either species, indicating participation by both molecules. In mice expressing high levels of human CD4, responses to both human and murine class II molecules were almost completely blocked with anti-human CD4 antibody, whereas anti-murine CD4 antibody had no effect. However, anti-murine CD4 continued to synergize with anti-CD3 in stimulating T cell proliferation in these mice. Thus, overexpression of human CD4 selectively impaired the ability of murine CD4 to assist in the process of antigen recognition. The ability of human CD4 to support a strong allogeneic response under these conditions indicates that this molecule can interact with murine class II molecules to a

  17. Preconditioning allows engraftment of mouse and human embryonic lung cells, enabling lung repair in mice.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Chava; Shezen, Elias; Aronovich, Anna; Klionsky, Yael Zlotnikov; Yaakov, Yasmin; Assayag, Miri; Biton, Inbal Eti; Tal, Orna; Shakhar, Guy; Ben-Hur, Herzel; Shneider, David; Vaknin, Zvi; Sadan, Oscar; Evron, Shmuel; Freud, Enrique; Shoseyov, David; Wilschanski, Michael; Berkman, Neville; Fibbe, Willem E; Hagin, David; Hillel-Karniel, Carmit; Krentsis, Irit Milman; Bachar-Lustig, Esther; Reisner, Yair

    2015-08-01

    Repair of injured lungs represents a longstanding therapeutic challenge. We show that human and mouse embryonic lung tissue from the canalicular stage of development (20-22 weeks of gestation for humans, and embryonic day 15-16 (E15-E16) for mouse) are enriched with progenitors residing in distinct niches. On the basis of the marked analogy to progenitor niches in bone marrow (BM), we attempted strategies similar to BM transplantation, employing sublethal radiation to vacate lung progenitor niches and to reduce stem cell competition. Intravenous infusion of a single cell suspension of canalicular lung tissue from GFP-marked mice or human fetal donors into naphthalene-injured and irradiated syngeneic or SCID mice, respectively, induced marked long-term lung chimerism. Donor type structures or 'patches' contained epithelial, mesenchymal and endothelial cells. Transplantation of differentially labeled E16 mouse lung cells indicated that these patches were probably of clonal origin from the donor. Recipients of the single cell suspension transplant exhibited marked improvement in lung compliance and tissue damping reflecting the energy dissipation in the lung tissues. Our study provides proof of concept for lung reconstitution by canalicular-stage human lung cells after preconditioning of the pulmonary niche.

  18. Distinct Differences on Neointima Formation in Immunodeficient and Humanized Mice after Carotid or Femoral Arterial Injury

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Jill; van Ark, Joris; van Dijk, Marcory C.; Greiner, Dale L.; Shultz, Leonard D.; van Goor, Harry; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention is widely adopted to treat patients with coronary artery disease. However, restenosis remains an unsolved clinical problem after vascular interventions. The role of the systemic and local immune response in the development of restenosis is not fully understood. Hence, the aim of the current study was to investigate the role of the human immune system on subsequent neointima formation elicited by vascular injury in a humanized mouse model. Immunodeficient NOD.Cg-PrkdcscidIL2rgtm1Wjl(NSG) mice were reconstituted with human (h)PBMCs immediately after both carotid wire and femoral cuff injury were induced in order to identify how differences in the severity of injury influenced endothelial regeneration, neointima formation, and homing of human inflammatory and progenitor cells. In contrast to non-reconstituted mice, hPBMC reconstitution reduced neointima formation after femoral cuff injury whereas hPBMCs promoted neointima formation after carotid wire injury 4 weeks after induction of injury. Neointimal endothelium and smooth muscle cells in the injured arteries were of mouse origin. Our results indicate that the immune system may differentially respond to arterial injury depending on the severity of injury, which may also be influenced by the intrinsic properties of the arteries themselves, resulting in either minimal or aggravated neointima formation. PMID:27759053

  19. DOCK8 deficiency impairs CD8 T cell survival and function in humans and mice

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Katrina L.; Chan, Stephanie S.-Y.; Ma, Cindy S.; Fung, Ivan; Mei, Yan; Yabas, Mehmet; Tan, Andy; Arkwright, Peter D.; Al Suwairi, Wafaa; Lugo Reyes, Saul Oswaldo; Yamazaki-Nakashimada, Marco A.; de la Luz Garcia-Cruz, Maria; Smart, Joanne M.; Picard, Capucine; Okada, Satoshi; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Lambe, Teresa; Cornall, Richard J.; Russell, Sarah; Oliaro, Jane; Tangye, Stuart G.; Bertram, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    In humans, DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome is characterized by severe cutaneous viral infections. Thus, CD8 T cell function may be compromised in the absence of DOCK8. In this study, by analyzing mutant mice and humans, we demonstrate a critical, intrinsic role for DOCK8 in peripheral CD8 T cell survival and function. DOCK8 mutation selectively diminished the abundance of circulating naive CD8 T cells in both species, and in DOCK8-deficient humans, most CD8 T cells displayed an exhausted CD45RA+CCR7− phenotype. Analyses in mice revealed the CD8 T cell abnormalities to be cell autonomous and primarily postthymic. DOCK8 mutant naive CD8 T cells had a shorter lifespan and, upon encounter with antigen on dendritic cells, exhibited poor LFA-1 synaptic polarization and a delay in the first cell division. Although DOCK8 mutant T cells underwent near-normal primary clonal expansion after primary infection with recombinant influenza virus in vivo, they showed greatly reduced memory cell persistence and recall. These findings highlight a key role for DOCK8 in the survival and function of human and mouse CD8 T cells. PMID:22006977

  20. Analysis of the safety and pharmacodynamics of human fibrinogen concentrate in animals.

    PubMed

    Beyerle, Andrea; Nolte, Marc W; Solomon, Cristina; Herzog, Eva; Dickneite, Gerhard

    2014-10-01

    Fibrinogen, a soluble 340kDa plasma glycoprotein, is critical in achieving and maintaining hemostasis. Reduced fibrinogen levels are associated with an increased risk of bleeding and recent research has investigated the efficacy of fibrinogen concentrate for controlling perioperative bleeding. European guidelines on the management of perioperative bleeding recommend the use of fibrinogen concentrate if significant bleeding is accompanied by plasma fibrinogen levels less than 1.5-2.0g/l. Plasma-derived human fibrinogen concentrate has been available for therapeutic use since 1956. The overall aim of the comprehensive series of non-clinical investigations presented was to evaluate i) the pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic characteristics and ii) the safety and tolerability profile of human fibrinogen concentrate Haemocomplettan P® (RiaSTAP®). Pharmacodynamic characteristics were assessed in rabbits, pharmacokinetic parameters were determined in rabbits and rats and a safety pharmacology study was performed in beagle dogs. Additional toxicology tests included: single-dose toxicity tests in mice and rats; local tolerance tests in rabbits; and neoantigenicity tests in rabbits and guinea pigs following the introduction of pasteurization in the manufacturing process. Human fibrinogen concentrate was shown to be pharmacodynamically active in rabbits and dogs and well tolerated, with no adverse events and no influence on circulation, respiration or hematological parameters in rabbits, mice, rats and dogs. In these non-clinical investigations, human fibrinogen concentrate showed a good safety profile. This data adds to the safety information available to date, strengthening the current body of knowledge regarding this hemostatic agent.

  1. Cardiac Aging in Mice and Humans: the Role of Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Dao-Fu; Rabinovitch, Peter S.

    2009-01-01

    Age is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, not only because it prolongs exposure to several other cardiovascular risks, but also owing to intrinsic cardiac aging, which reduces cardiac functional reserve, predisposes the heart to stress and contributes to increased cardiovascular mortality in the elderly. Intrinsic cardiac aging in the murine model closely recapitulates age-related cardiac changes in humans, including left ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction. Cardiac aging in mice is accompanied by accumulation of mitochondrial protein oxidation, increased mitochondrial DNA mutations, increased mitochondrial biogenesis, as well as decreased cardiac SERCA2 protein. All of these age-related changes are significantly attenuated in mice overexpressing catalase targeted to mitochondria (mCAT). These findings demonstrate the critical role of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiac aging and support the potential application of mitochondrial antioxidants to cardiac aging and age-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:20382344

  2. Survival of human parathyroid tissue xenotransplanted in nude mice after 9 to 55 months' cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Smeds, S; Trulsson, L; Garovoy, M; Gumbert, M; Clark, O H

    1999-04-01

    Survival of human parathyroid tissue xenotransplanted after cryopreservation was studied. Peroperative biopsies from 26 patients were cryopreserved and xenotransplanted into nude mice after 9 to 55 months. At 8 to 12 weeks after transplantation, the morphology of the transplanted tissue was compared to that of the original tissue after thawing and before transplantation. Morphologically viable tissue was observed in 20 out of 26 nude mice (77%). Based on the morphological appearance, the parathyroid transplants were arranged into four "quality" groups. No correlation existed between the quality of the transplants and duration of storage, or between the age and sex of the patients. There was no correlation between initial clinical diagnosis or histopathological patterns (primary, secondary and tertiary hyperplasia [n=16], adenoma [n=9], one case undetermined) and transplant survival. After thawing and transplantation, all parathyroid grafts, except one, were morphologically either of the same or somewhat lower quality.

  3. Mice Expressing Mutant Trpv4 Recapitulate the Human TRPV4 Disorders††

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuqing; Lee, Brendan; Cohn, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    Activating mutations in TRPV4 are known to cause a spectrum of skeletal dysplasias ranging from autosomal dominant brachyolmia to lethal metatropic dysplasia. To develop an animal model of these disorders, we created transgenic mice expressing either wild-type or mutant TRPV4. Mice transgenic for wild-type Trpv4 showed no morphological changes at embryonic day 16.5, but did have a delay in bone mineralization. Overexpression of a mutant TRPV4 caused a lethal skeletal dysplasia that phenocopied many abnormalities associated with metatropic dysplasia in humans, including dumbbell-shaped long bones, a small ribcage, abnormalities in the autopod, and abnormal ossification in the vertebrae. The difference in phenotype between embryos transgenic for wild-type or mutant Trpv4 demonstrates that an increased amount of wild-type protein can be tolerated and that an activating mutation of this protein is required to produce a skeletal dysplasia phenotype. PMID:24644033

  4. Cystic fibrosis mice carrying the missense mutation G551D replicate human genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, S J; Alton, E W; Smith, S N; Lunn, D P; Farley, R; Lovelock, P K; Thomson, S A; Hume, D A; Lamb, D; Porteous, D J; Dorin, J R; Wainwright, B J

    1996-01-01

    We have generated a mouse carrying the human G551D mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) by a one-step gene targeting procedure. These mutant mice show cystic fibrosis pathology but have a reduced risk of fatal intestinal blockage compared with 'null' mutants, in keeping with the reduced incidence of meconium ileus in G551D patients. The G551D mutant mice show greatly reduced CFTR-related chloride transport, displaying activity intermediate between that of cftr(mlUNC) replacement ('null') and cftr(mlHGU) insertional (residual activity) mutants and equivalent to approximately 4% of wild-type CFTR activity. The long-term survival of these animals should provide an excellent model with which to study cystic fibrosis, and they illustrate the value of mouse models carrying relevant mutations for examining genotype-phenotype correlations. Images PMID:8605891

  5. Deletion of nef slows but does not prevent CD4-positive T-cell depletion in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected human-PBL-SCID mice.

    PubMed Central

    Gulizia, R J; Collman, R G; Levy, J A; Trono, D; Mosier, D E

    1997-01-01

    The pathogenicity of four human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates with nef deleted for SCID mice repopulated with human peripheral blood leukocytes (hu-PBL-SCID mice) was studied. Deletion of nef led to a substantial reduction in CD4-positive T-cell depletion and delayed kinetics of plasma viremia in infected hu-PBL-SCID mice. Deletion of the nef gene impacts both the efficiency of primary infection and the cytopathicity of virus for infected CD4-positive T cells in this animal model of HIV-1 infection. PMID:9094701

  6. Immunogenicity in mice of human metapneumovirus with a truncated SH glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Tedcastle, A B; Fenwick, F; Robinson, M J; Toms, G L

    2014-04-01

    The SH glycoprotein of human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is twice the size of that of human respiratory syncytial virus and possesses a large, hydrophilic luminal domain. The glycoprotein is located on the surface of the virion and of virus infected cells and, if immunogenic, might be expected to play a role in anti-viral immunity. Initial attempts to study anti-SH antibody immunogenicity were thwarted by the instability of the SH gene on passage both in human bronchial epithelial cells and in mice. Repeated passage of virus isolates in human bronchial epithelial cells in culture resulted in the appearance and eventual predominance of HMPV mutants lacking all or most of the luminal domain of SH coincidental with the loss of productive infection in mouse lungs. Where infection was established in mice with an early cell culture passage, the virus recovered from mouse lung differed markedly from the inoculum, carrying 19 coding mutations in the SH luminal domain. Immunization of mice with a mutant virus variant expressing only 14 amino acids of the luminal domain of SH induced a cross-reactive antibody response to both the F glycoprotein and the SH glycoprotein but a largely sub-group specific response to the G glycoprotein. Similar patterns of response were achieved by immunization with individual HMPV glycoproteins expressed from recombinant vaccinia viruses. Recombinant truncated SH glycoprotein induced sub-group cross-reactive antibodies capable of neutralizing wild-type virus. Recombinant F glycoprotein also induced cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies whilst recombinant G glycoprotein induced largely strain-specific, non-neutralizing antibodies.

  7. Toxicity studies with 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and its metabolite 5-sulphooxymethylfurfural in wild-type mice and transgenic mice expressing human sulphotransferases 1A1 and 1A2.

    PubMed

    Bauer-Marinovic, Morana; Taugner, Felicitas; Florian, Simone; Glatt, Hansruedi

    2012-05-01

    5-Sulphooxymethylfurfural (SMF), an electrophilic metabolite of the abundant Maillard product 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), was intraperitoneally administered to FVB/N mice. At a dosage of 250 mg/kg, most animals died after 5-11 days due to massive damage to proximal tubules. At lower dosages, administered repeatedly, tubules also were the major target of toxicity, with regeneration and atypical hyperplasia occurring at later periods. Additionally, hepatotoxic effects and serositis of peritoneal tissues were observed. SMF is a minor metabolite of HMF in conventional mice, but HMF is an excellent substrate for a major sulphotransferase (hSULT1A1) in humans. Parental FVB/N mice and FVB/N-hSULT1A1/2 mice, carrying multiple copies of the hSULT1A1/2 gene cluster, were exposed to HMF in drinking water (0, 134 and 536 mg/kg body mass/day) for 12 weeks. Nephrotoxic effects and enhanced proliferation of hepatocytes were only detected at the high dosage. They were mild and, surprisingly, unaffected by hSULT1A1/2 expression. Thus, SMF was a potent nephrotoxicant when administered as a bolus, but did not reach levels sufficient to produce serious toxicity when generated from HMF administered continuously via drinking water. This was even the case in transgenic mice expressing clearly higher HMF sulphation activity in liver and kidney than humans.

  8. Effects of subchronic exposures to concentrated ambient particles in mice. IX. Integral assessment and human health implications of subchronic exposures of mice to CAPs.

    PubMed

    Lippmann, Morton; Gordon, Terry; Chen, Lung Chi

    2005-04-01

    In order to examine the biologic plausibility of adverse chronic cardiopulmonary effects in humans associated with ambient particulate matter (PM) exposure, we exposed groups of normal mice (C57) and knockout mice that develop atherosclerotic plaque (ApoE-/- and ApoE-/- LDLr-/-) for 6 h/day, 5 days/wk for 5 or 6 mo during the spring/summer of 2003 to either filtered air or 10-fold concentrated ambient particles (CAPs) in Tuxedo, NY (average PM2.5 concentration during exposure = 110 microg/m3). Some of the mice had implanted electrocardiographic monitors. We demonstrated that: (1) this complex interdisciplinary study was technically feasible in terms of daily exposure, collection of air quality monitoring data, the collection, analysis, and interpretation of continuous data on cardiac function, and the collection and analyses of tissues of the animals sacrificed at the end of the study; (2) the daily variations in CAPs were significantly associated, in ApoE-/- mice, with daily variations in cardiac functions; (3) there were significant differences between CAPs and sham-exposed ApoE-/- mice in terms of cardiac function after the end of exposure period, as well as small differences in atherosclerotic plaque density, coronary artery disease, and cell density in the substantia nigra in the brain in the ApoE-/- mice; (4) there are suggestive indications of gene expression changes for genes associated with the control of circadian rhythm in the ApoE-/- LDLr-/- double knockout (DK) mice. These various CAPs-related effects on cardiac function and the development of histological evidence of increased risk of clinically significant disease at the end of exposures in animal models of atherosclerosis provide biological plausibility for the premature mortality associated with PM2.5 exposure in human subjects and provide suggestive evidence for neurogenic disease as well.

  9. Development of both human connective tissue-type and mucosal-type mast cells in mice from hematopoietic stem cells with identical distribution pattern to human body.

    PubMed

    Kambe, Naotomo; Hiramatsu, Hidefumi; Shimonaka, Mika; Fujino, Hisanori; Nishikomori, Ryuta; Heike, Toshio; Ito, Mamoru; Kobayashi, Kimio; Ueyama, Yoshito; Matsuyoshi, Norihisa; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi

    2004-02-01

    The transplantation of primitive human cells into sublethally irradiated immune-deficient mice is the well-established in vivo system for the investigation of human hematopoietic stem cell function. Although mast cells are the progeny of hematopoietic stem cells, human mast cell development in mice that underwent human hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has not been reported. Here we report on human mast cell development after xenotransplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells into nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID)/gamma(c)(null) (NOG) mice with severe combined immunodeficiency and interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor gamma-chain allelic mutation. Supported by the murine environment, human mast cell clusters developed in mouse dermis, but they required more time than other forms of human cell reconstitution. In lung and gastric tract, mucosal-type mast cells containing tryptase but lacking chymase located on gastric mucosa and in alveoli, whereas connective tissue-type mast cells containing both tryptase and chymase located on gastric submucosa and around major airways, as in the human body. Mast cell development was also observed in lymph nodes, spleen, and peritoneal cavity but not in the peripheral blood. Xenotransplantation of human hematopoietic stem cells into NOG mice can be expected to result in a highly effective model for the investigation of human mast cell development and function in vivo.

  10. Transgenic Mice Expressing Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 in Immune Cells Develop a Severe AIDS-Like Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Zaher; Kay, Denis G.; Cool, Marc; Jothy, Serge; Rebai, Najet; Jolicoeur, Paul

    1998-01-01

    We have constructed transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the entire human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) coding sequences in cells targeted by HIV-1 infection in humans. These Tg mice developed a severe AIDS-like disease leading to early death (<1 month). They developed muscle wasting, severe atrophy and fibrosis of lymphoid organs, tubulointerstitial nephritis, and lymphoid interstitial pneumonitis. In addition the expression of RANTES was increased in various tissues of these Tg mice relative to that in the normal controls. Disease appearance was correlated with the levels of transgene expression. The numerous pathologies observed in these mice are remarkably similar to those observed in human AIDS and, more specifically, in pediatric AIDS. PMID:9420207

  11. Replacing the Promoter of the Murine Gene Encoding P-selectin with the Human Promoter Confers Human-like Basal and Inducible Expression in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhenghui; Zhang, Nan; Shao, Bojing; Panicker, Sumith R; Fu, Jianxin; McEver, Rodger P

    2016-01-15

    In humans and mice, megakaryocytes/platelets and endothelial cells constitutively synthesize P-selectin and mobilize it to the plasma membrane to mediate leukocyte rolling during inflammation. TNF-α, interleukin 1β, and LPS markedly increase P-selectin mRNA in mice but decrease P-selectin mRNA in humans. Transgenic mice bearing the entire human SELP gene recapitulate basal and inducible expression of human P-selectin and reveal human-specific differences in P-selectin function. Differences in the human SELP and murine Selp promoters account for divergent expression in vitro, but their significance in vivo is not known. Here we generated knockin mice that replace the 1.4-kb proximal Selp promoter with the corresponding SELP sequence (Selp(KI)). Selp(KI) (/) (KI) mice constitutively expressed more P-selectin on platelets and more P-selectin mRNA in tissues but only slightly increased P-selectin mRNA after injection of TNF-α or LPS. Consistent with higher basal expression, leukocytes rolled more slowly on P-selectin in trauma-stimulated venules of Selp(KI) (/) (KI) mice. However, TNF-α did not further reduce P-selectin-dependent rolling velocities. Blunted up-regulation of P-selectin mRNA during contact hypersensitivity reduced P-selectin-dependent inflammation in Selp(KI) (/-) mice. Higher basal P-selectin in Selp(KI) (/) (KI) mice compensated for this defect. Therefore, divergent sequences in a short promoter mediate most of the functionally significant differences in expression of human and murine P-selectin in vivo.

  12. Denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody to RANKL, inhibits bone resorption and increases BMD in knock-in mice that express chimeric (murine/human) RANKL.

    PubMed

    Kostenuik, Paul J; Nguyen, Hung Q; McCabe, James; Warmington, Kelly S; Kurahara, Carol; Sun, Ning; Chen, Ching; Li, Luke; Cattley, Russ C; Van, Gwyneth; Scully, Shelia; Elliott, Robin; Grisanti, Mario; Morony, Sean; Tan, Hong Lin; Asuncion, Frank; Li, Xiaodong; Ominsky, Michael S; Stolina, Marina; Dwyer, Denise; Dougall, William C; Hawkins, Nessa; Boyle, William J; Simonet, William S; Sullivan, John K

    2009-02-01

    RANKL is a TNF family member that mediates osteoclast formation, activation, and survival by activating RANK. The proresorptive effects of RANKL are prevented by binding to its soluble inhibitor osteoprotegerin (OPG). Recombinant human OPG-Fc recognizes RANKL from multiple species and reduced bone resorption and increased bone volume, density, and strength in a number of rodent models of bone disease. The clinical development of OPG-Fc was discontinued in favor of denosumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody that specifically inhibits primate RANKL. Direct binding assays showed that denosumab bound to human RANKL but not to murine RANKL, human TRAIL, or other human TNF family members. Denosumab did not suppress bone resorption in normal mice or rats but did prevent the resorptive response in mice challenged with a human RANKL fragment encoded primarily by the fifth exon of the RANKL gene. To create mice that were responsive to denosumab, knock-in technology was used to replace exon 5 from murine RANKL with its human ortholog. The resulting "huRANKL" mice exclusively express chimeric (human/murine) RANKL that was measurable with a human RANKL assay and that maintained bone resorption at slightly reduced levels versus wildtype controls. In young huRANKL mice, denosumab and OPG-Fc each reduced trabecular osteoclast surfaces by 95% and increased bone density and volume. In adult huRANKL mice, denosumab reduced bone resorption, increased cortical and cancellous bone mass, and improved trabecular microarchitecture. These huRANKL mice have potential utility for characterizing the activity of denosumab in a variety of murine bone disease models.

  13. Formation of the accumulative human metabolite and human-specific glutathione conjugate of diclofenac in TK-NOG chimeric mice with humanized livers.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Hidetaka; Ito, Satoshi; Nozawa, Kohei; Nakamura, Shota; Chijiwa, Hiroyuki; Nagatsuka, Shin-ichiro; Kuronuma, Miyuki; Ohnishi, Yasuyuki; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Ninomiya, Shin-ichi

    2015-03-01

    3'-Hydroxy-4'-methoxydiclofenac (VI) is a human-specific metabolite known to accumulate in the plasma of patients after repeated administration of diclofenac sodium. Diclofenac also produces glutathione-conjugated metabolites, some of which are human-specific. In the present study, we investigated whether these metabolites could be generated in humanized chimeric mice produced from TK-NOG mice. After a single oral administration of diclofenac to humanized mice, the unchanged drug in plasma peaked at 0.25 hour and then declined with a half-life (t1/2) of 2.4 hours. 4'-Hydroxydiclofenac (II) and 3'-hydroxydiclofenac also peaked at 0.25 hour and were undetectable within 24 hours. However, VI peaked at 8 hours and declined with a t1/2 of 13 hours. When diclofenac was given once per day, peak and trough levels of VI reached plateau within 3 days. Studies with administration of II suggested VI was generated via II as an intermediate. Among six reported glutathione-conjugated metabolites of diclofenac, M1 (5-hydroxy-4-(glutathion-S-yl)diclofenac) to M6 (2'-(glutathion-S-yl)monoclofenac), we found three dichlorinated conjugates [M1, M2 (4'-hydroxy-3'-(glutathion-S-yl)diclofenac), and M3 (5-hydroxy-6-(glutathion-S-yl)diclofenac)], and a single monochlorinated conjugate [M4 (2'-hydroxy-3'-(glutathion-S-yl)monoclofenac) or M5 (4'-hydroxy-2'-(glutathion-S-yl)monoclofenac)], in the bile of humanized chimeric mice. M4 and M5 are positional isomers and have been previously reported as human-specific in vitro metabolites likely generated via arene oxide and quinone imine-type intermediates, respectively. The biliary monochlorinated metabolite exhibited the same mass spectrum as those of M4 and M5, and we discuss whether this conjugate corresponded to M4 or M5. Overall, humanized TK-NOG chimeric mice were considered to be a functional tool for the study of drug metabolism of diclofenac in humans.

  14. Enhanced human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 expression and neuropathogenesis in knockout mice lacking Type I interferon responses.

    PubMed

    He, Hongxia; Sharer, Leroy R; Chao, Wei; Gu, Chao-Jiang; Borjabad, Alejandra; Hadas, Eran; Kelschenbach, Jennifer; Ichiyama, Koji; Do, Meilan; Potash, Mary Jane; Volsky, David J

    2014-01-01

    The roles of Type I interferon (IFN) in human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 (HIV-1) neuropathogenesis are poorly understood; both protective and deleterious effects of IFN signaling have been described. We used genetically modified mice deficient in the Type I IFN receptor (IFNRKO) to analyze the progress of HIV-1 brain infection and neuropathogenesis in the absence of IFN signaling. IFNRKO and wild-type (WT) mice on the 129xSv/Ev or C57BL/6 strain backgrounds were infected systemically with EcoHIV, a chimeric HIV-1 that productively infects mice. IFNRKO mice showed higher HIV-1 expression in spleen and peritoneal macrophages and greater virus infiltration into the brain compared to WT mice. Neuropathogenesis was studied by histopathological, immunohistochemical, immunofluorescence, and polymerase chain reaction analyses of brain tissues after the virus was inoculated into the brain by stereotaxic intracerebral injection. Both IFNRKO and WT mice showed readily detectable HIV-1 and brain lesions, including microglial activation, astrocytosis, and increased expression of genes coding for inflammatory cytokines and chemokines typical of human HIV-1 brain disease. Parameters of HIV-1 neuropathogenesis, including HIV-1 expression in microglia/macrophages, were significantly greater in IFNRKO than in WT mice. Our results show unequivocally that Type I IFN signaling and responses limit HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis in the brains of mice.

  15. [The effect of anti-human AFP serum for AFP producing stomach cancer xenotransplanted nude mice].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Y; Akimoto, R; Mai, M; Sakai, T; Sudo, K

    1984-04-01

    The effect of anti-human alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) on growth, serum AFP levels and histological changes of two lines of AFP producing stomach cancer serially xenotransplanted in nude mice were examined. The efficacy of anti-human AFP antibody on tumor growth was observed specifically for the tumor producing AFP, but there was great difference on growth between two lines. The AFP levels of the serum disclosed a rapid decrease after administration of antibody and maintained as level of Ong/ml for a long period. On histopathologic examination, there were not observed any changes on the tumor cells and structure and necrotic change was not demonstrated. By the immunohistochemical examination (PAP method), anti-human AFP antibody was identified in tumor even 50 th days later after injection.

  16. Lessons learned from mice and man: mimicking human allergy through mouse models.

    PubMed

    Graham, Michelle T; Nadeau, Kari C

    2014-11-01

    The relevance of using mouse models to represent human allergic pathologies is still unclear. Recent studies suggest the limitations of using models as a standard for assessing immune response and tolerance mechanisms, as mouse models often do not sufficiently depict human atopic conditions. Allergy is a combination of aberrant responses to innocuous environmental agents and the subsequent TH2-mediated inflammatory responses. In this review, we will discuss current paradigms of allergy - specifically, TH2-mediated and IgE-associated immune responses - and current mouse models used to recreate these TH2-mediated pathologies. Our overall goal is to highlight discrepancies that exist between mice and men by examining the advantages and disadvantages of allergic mouse models with respect to the human allergic condition.

  17. Genetic tracking of mice and other bioproxies to infer human history.

    PubMed

    Jones, Eleanor P; Eager, Heidi M; Gabriel, Sofia I; Jóhannesdóttir, Fríða; Searle, Jeremy B

    2013-05-01

    The long-distance movements made by humans through history are quickly erased by time but can be reconstructed by studying the genetic make-up of organisms that travelled with them. The phylogeography of the western house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus), whose current widespread distribution around the world has been caused directly by the movements of (primarily) European people, has proved particularly informative in a series of recent studies. The geographic distributions of genetic lineages in this commensal have been linked to the Iron Age movements within the Mediterranean region and Western Europe, the extensive maritime activities of the Vikings in the 9th to 11th centuries, and the colonisation of distant landmasses and islands by the Western European nations starting in the 15th century. We review here recent insights into human history based on phylogeographic studies of mice and other species that have travelled with humans, and discuss how emerging genomic methodologies will increase the precision of these inferences.

  18. A rabbit ear model for cold stress testing.

    PubMed

    Smith, T L; Gordon, S; Holden, M B; Smith, B P; Russell, G B; Koman, L A

    1994-01-01

    A rabbit ear model resembling the human digit was studied to determine the vascular response of the rabbit ear to a cold stress. Following moderate cooling (10 minutes at 5 degrees - 8 degrees C), auricular blood flow and cutaneous perfusion were reduced. This decrease was reversed by 30 minutes of warming. The response in the rabbit ear to cold stress is similar to that of normal human digits. The similarities between the control of the circulation in human digits and rabbit ears may result from the similarities in digital and auricular vascular receptors and receptor subtypes. Verification of the rabbit model provides an experimental method for obtaining important data regarding digital pathophysiology and the treatment of cold intolerance. Further study with this model will provide clinically relevant information regarding the pathophysiology of digital thermoregulatory abnormalities. PMID:7830538

  19. Xenogenic transplantation of human breast adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction enhances recovery of erectile function in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Das, Nando Dulal; Song, Kang-Moon; Yin, Guo Nan; Batbold, Dulguun; Kwon, Mi-Hye; Kwon, Ki-Dong; Kim, Woo Jean; Kim, Yeon Soo; Ryu, Ji-Kan; Suh, Jun-Kyu

    2014-03-01

    The adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) is an ideal source of stem and stromal cells. The aim of this study was to examine whether and how xenogenic transplantation of human breast SVF restores erectile function in diabetic mice. Human SVF was isolated from five patients (age, 20-45 yr) undergoing reduction mammoplasty. Eight-week-old C57BL/6J mice were used, and diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin. At 8 wk after induction of diabetes, the animals were randomly distributed into controls and diabetic mice treated with a single intracavernous injection of PBS, human SVF at different concentrations, or human SVF lysate. Two weeks later, erectile function was measured by cavernous nerve stimulation, and the penis was then harvested for biochemical examinations. Erectile function was significantly improved in diabetic mice treated with human SVF (2 × 10(5), 5 × 10(5), and 1 × 10(6) cells/20 μl) and SVF lysate. Human SVF treatment in diabetic mice significantly increased cavernous endothelial and smooth muscle cell contents, induced eNOS phosphorylation, and restored penile nNOS-positive nerve fibers. Human SVF lysate induced secretion of angiogenic factors and expression of their receptors. Human SVF did not increase serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines. A limitation of this study was that the exact composition of the human SVF was not examined. In summary, xenogenic transplantation of human SVF did not induce systemic inflammation and successfully improved erectile function in diabetic mice through enhanced penile angiogenesis and neural regeneration.

  20. Endogenous and xenobiotic metabolite profiling of liver extracts from SCID and chimeric humanized mice following repeated oral administration of troglitazone.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Alan J; Baker, David R; Hobby, Kirsten; Ashton, Simon; Michopoulos, Filippos; Spagou, Konstantina; Loftus, Neil J; Wilson, Ian D

    2014-01-01

    1. Metabonomic analysis, via a combination of untargeted and targeted liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and untargeted (1)H NMR spectroscopy-based metabolite profiling, was performed on aqueous (AQ) and organic liver extracts from control (SCID) and chimeric humanized (PXB) mice dosed with troglitazone at 0, 300 and 600 mg/kg/day for seven days. 2. LC-MS analysis of AQ liver extracts showed a more "human-like" profile for troglitazone metabolites for PXB, compared with