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Sample records for rabies virus glycoprotein

  1. A model of the rabies virus glycoprotein active site.

    PubMed

    Rustici, M; Bracci, L; Lozzi, L; Neri, P; Santucci, A; Soldani, P; Spreafico, A; Niccolai, N

    1993-06-01

    The glycoprotein from the neurotropic rabies virus shows a significant homology with the alpha neurotoxin that binds to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. The crystal structure of the alpha neurotoxins suggests that the Arg 37 guanidinium group and the Asp 31 side-chain carboxylate of the erabutoxin have stereochemical features resembling those of acetylcholine. Conformational studies on the Asn194-Ser195-Arg196-Gly197 tetrapeptide, an essential part of the binding site of the rabies virus glycoprotein, indicate that the side chains of Asn and Arg could also mimic the acetylcholine structure. This observation is consistent with the recently proposed mechanism of the viral infection.

  2. A Novel Rabies Vaccine Based on a Recombinant Parainfluenza Virus 5 Expressing Rabies Virus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhenhai; Zhou, Ming; Gao, Xiudan; Zhang, Guoqing; Ren, Guiping; Gnanadurai, Clement W.

    2013-01-01

    Untreated rabies virus (RABV) infection leads to death. Vaccine and postexposure treatment have been effective in preventing RABV infection. However, due to cost, rabies vaccination and treatment have not been widely used in developing countries. There are 55,000 human death caused by rabies annually. An efficacious and cost-effective rabies vaccine is needed. Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is thought to contribute to kennel cough, and kennel cough vaccines containing live PIV5 have been used in dogs for many years. In this work, a PIV5-vectored rabies vaccine was tested in mice. A recombinant PIV5 encoding RABV glycoprotein (G) (rPIV5-RV-G) was administered to mice via intranasal (i.n.), intramuscular (i.m.), and oral inoculation. The vaccinated mice were challenged with a 50% lethal challenge dose (LD50) of RABV challenge virus standard 24 (CVS-24) intracerebrally. A single dose of 106 PFU of rPIV5-RV-G was sufficient for 100% protection when administered via the i.n. route. The mice vaccinated with a single dose of 108 PFU of rPIV5-RV-G via the i.m. route showed very robust protection (90% to 100%). Intriguingly, the mice vaccinated orally with a single dose of 108 PFU of rPIV5-RV-G showed a 50% survival rate, which is comparable to the 60% survival rate among mice inoculated with an attenuated rabies vaccine strain, recombinant LBNSE. This is first report of an orally effective rabies vaccine candidate in animals based on PIV5 as a vector. These results indicate that rPIV5-RV-G is an excellent candidate for a new generation of recombinant rabies vaccine for humans and animals and PIV5 is a potential vector for oral vaccines. PMID:23269806

  3. A novel rabies vaccine based on a recombinant parainfluenza virus 5 expressing rabies virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhai; Zhou, Ming; Gao, Xiudan; Zhang, Guoqing; Ren, Guiping; Gnanadurai, Clement W; Fu, Zhen F; He, Biao

    2013-03-01

    Untreated rabies virus (RABV) infection leads to death. Vaccine and postexposure treatment have been effective in preventing RABV infection. However, due to cost, rabies vaccination and treatment have not been widely used in developing countries. There are 55,000 human death caused by rabies annually. An efficacious and cost-effective rabies vaccine is needed. Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is thought to contribute to kennel cough, and kennel cough vaccines containing live PIV5 have been used in dogs for many years. In this work, a PIV5-vectored rabies vaccine was tested in mice. A recombinant PIV5 encoding RABV glycoprotein (G) (rPIV5-RV-G) was administered to mice via intranasal (i.n.), intramuscular (i.m.), and oral inoculation. The vaccinated mice were challenged with a 50% lethal challenge dose (LD(50)) of RABV challenge virus standard 24 (CVS-24) intracerebrally. A single dose of 10(6) PFU of rPIV5-RV-G was sufficient for 100% protection when administered via the i.n. route. The mice vaccinated with a single dose of 10(8) PFU of rPIV5-RV-G via the i.m. route showed very robust protection (90% to 100%). Intriguingly, the mice vaccinated orally with a single dose of 10(8) PFU of rPIV5-RV-G showed a 50% survival rate, which is comparable to the 60% survival rate among mice inoculated with an attenuated rabies vaccine strain, recombinant LBNSE. This is first report of an orally effective rabies vaccine candidate in animals based on PIV5 as a vector. These results indicate that rPIV5-RV-G is an excellent candidate for a new generation of recombinant rabies vaccine for humans and animals and PIV5 is a potential vector for oral vaccines.

  4. Reversible conformational changes and fusion activity of rabies virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, Y; Tuffereau, C; Segretain, D; Knossow, M; Flamand, A

    1991-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the implication of the rabies virus glycoprotein (G) in the first steps of the viral cycle, we studied the pH dependence of virus-induced fusion and hemagglutination, as well as modifications of the structure and properties of the viral glycoprotein following pH acidification. Our results suggest that the G protein adopts at least three distinct configurations, each associated with different properties. At neutral pH, G did not fuse membranes or hemagglutinate erythrocytes. It was insensitive to digestion with bromelain and trypsin. At pH 6.4, the glycoprotein became sensitive to proteases. Hemagglutination was at its maximum and then sharply decreased with the pH. No fusion was detected. Aggregation of virus was also observed. The third configuration, at below pH 6.1, was associated with the appearance of fusion. Some neutralizing monoclonal antibodies were able to differentiate these three configurations. Preincubation of the virus at below pH 6 inhibited fusion, but this inhibition, like the structural modifications of the glycoprotein, was reversible when G was reincubated at neutral pH. Images PMID:1870204

  5. Peptide mimotopes of rabies virus glycoprotein with immunogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Houimel, Mehdi; Dellagi, Koussay

    2009-07-23

    A random constrained hexapeptide phage display library (Cys-6aa-Cys) was screened with purified neutralizing human anti-rabies virus IgG antibodies (hRABVIgG) to identify peptides that correspond to or mimic natural epitopes on rabies virus glycoprotein (RABVG) and to investigate their immunogenicities in vivo. After four rounds of biopanning, 20 phage clones randomly selected for their specificity to hRABVIgG, effectively blocked the binding of the inactive rabies virus (RABV) to hRABVIgG. The phage clones were sequenced and the deduced amino acid sequences were derived (C-KRDSTW-C; C-KYLWSK-C; C-KYWLSR-C; C-KYWWSK-C; C-KYAWSR-C; C-KYSMSK-C). Alignments to the amino acid sequence of RABVG showed good match with the antigenic site III (at 330-338 aa), indicating that the hRABVIgG antibodies most likely recognize preferentially this antigenic site. The selected mimotopes were able to inhibit the interactions of the hRABVIgG antibodies with RABV in a dose-dependent manner. Subcutaneous administration of phageKRDSTW expressing the RABVG site III mimotope induced an RABVG-specific IgG response in BALB/c mice. The results indicated that peptide mimotopes when displayed on phages, are accessible to the mice immune system to trigger a humoral response and to induce IgG production. The RABVG site III mimotope (C-KRDSTW-C) would provide a new and promising concept for the development of rabies vaccine.

  6. The rabies virus glycoprotein receptor p75NTR is not essential for rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Tuffereau, Christine; Schmidt, Klaus; Langevin, Christelle; Lafay, Florence; Dechant, Georg; Koltzenburg, Martin

    2007-12-01

    Rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG) is known to be the only factor that mediates rabies infection. The neurotrophin receptor (p75(NTR)), through its cysteine-rich domain 1, is a specific receptor for RVG and neutralizes virus infectivity, but its role in virus infection has remained obscure. We used adult mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons as a model to study the role of p75(NTR) in RV infection of primary neurons. We show that RV infects around 20% of DRG neurons, of which more than 80% are p75(NTR) positive, have large diameters, and are capsaicin insensitive. Surprisingly, RV binding and infection are absent in about half of the p75(NTR)-expressing DRG neurons which have small diameters and are often capsaicin sensitive. This indicates that p75(NTR) is not sufficient to mediate RV interaction in sensory neurons. The rate and specificity of neural infection are unchanged in RV-infected p75(NTRExonIV-/-) mice that lack all extracellular receptor domains and in wild-type mice infected with two independent RV mutants that lack p75(NTR) binding. Accordingly, the mortality rate is unchanged in the absence of RV-p75(NTR) interaction. We conclude that although p75(NTR) is a receptor for soluble RVG in transfected cells of heterologous expression systems, an RVG-p75(NTR) interaction is not necessary for RV infection of primary neurons. This means that other receptors are required to mediate RV infection in vivo and in vitro.

  7. Amino acid sequence similarity between rabies virus glycoprotein and snake venom curaremimetic neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Lentz, T L; Wilson, P T; Hawrot, E; Speicher, D W

    1984-11-16

    Evidence was presented earlier that a host-cell receptor for the highly neurotropic rabies virus might be the acetylcholine receptor. The amino acid sequence of the glycoprotein of rabies virus was compared by computer analysis with that of snake venom curaremimetic neurotoxins, potent ligands of the acetylcholine receptor. A statistically significant sequence relation was found between a segment of the rabies glycoprotein and the entire sequence of long neurotoxins. The greatest identity occurs with residues considered most important in neurotoxicity, including those interacting with the acetylcholine binding site of the acetylcholine receptor. Because of the similarity between the glycoprotein and the receptor-binding region of the neurotoxins, this region of the viral glycoprotein may function as a recognition site for the acetylcholine receptor. Direct binding of the rabies virus glycoprotein to the acetylcholine receptor could contribute to the neurotropism of this virus.

  8. A New Rabies Vaccine Based on a Recombinant Orf Virus (Parapoxvirus) Expressing the Rabies Virus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Ralf; Rohde, Jörg; Wulle, Ulrich; Conlee, Douglas; Raue, Rudiger; Martinon, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The present study describes the generation of a new Orf virus (ORFV) recombinant, D1701-V-RabG, expressing the rabies virus (RABV) glycoprotein that is correctly presented on the surface of infected cells without the need of replication or production of infectious recombinant virus. One single immunization with recombinant ORFV can stimulate high RABV-specific virus-neutralizing antibody (VNA) titers in mice, cats, and dogs, representing all nonpermissive hosts for the ORFV vector. The protective immune response against severe lethal challenge infection was analyzed in detail in mice using different dosages, numbers, and routes for immunization with the ORFV recombinant. Long-term levels of VNA could be elicited that remained greater than 0.5 IU per ml serum, indicative for the protective status. Single applications of higher doses (107 PFU) can be sufficient to confer complete protection against intracranial (i.c.) challenge, whereas booster immunization was needed for protection by the application of lower dosages. Anamnestic immune responses were achieved by each of the seven tested routes of inoculation, including oral application. Finally, in vivo antibody-mediated depletion of CD4-positive and/or CD8-posititve T cell subpopulations during immunization and/or challenge infection attested the importance of CD4 T cells for the induction of protective immunity by D1701-V-RabG. This report demonstrates another example of the potential of the ORFV vector and also indicates the capability of the new recombinant for vaccination of animals. PMID:23175365

  9. A new rabies vaccine based on a recombinant ORF virus (parapoxvirus) expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Amann, Ralf; Rohde, Jörg; Wulle, Ulrich; Conlee, Douglas; Raue, Rudiger; Martinon, Olivier; Rziha, Hanns-Joachim

    2013-02-01

    The present study describes the generation of a new Orf virus (ORFV) recombinant, D1701-V-RabG, expressing the rabies virus (RABV) glycoprotein that is correctly presented on the surface of infected cells without the need of replication or production of infectious recombinant virus. One single immunization with recombinant ORFV can stimulate high RABV-specific virus-neutralizing antibody (VNA) titers in mice, cats, and dogs, representing all nonpermissive hosts for the ORFV vector. The protective immune response against severe lethal challenge infection was analyzed in detail in mice using different dosages, numbers, and routes for immunization with the ORFV recombinant. Long-term levels of VNA could be elicited that remained greater than 0.5 IU per ml serum, indicative for the protective status. Single applications of higher doses (10(7) PFU) can be sufficient to confer complete protection against intracranial (i.c.) challenge, whereas booster immunization was needed for protection by the application of lower dosages. Anamnestic immune responses were achieved by each of the seven tested routes of inoculation, including oral application. Finally, in vivo antibody-mediated depletion of CD4-positive and/or CD8-posititve T cell subpopulations during immunization and/or challenge infection attested the importance of CD4 T cells for the induction of protective immunity by D1701-V-RabG. This report demonstrates another example of the potential of the ORFV vector and also indicates the capability of the new recombinant for vaccination of animals.

  10. The Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Receptor p75NTR Is Not Essential for Rabies Virus Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Tuffereau, Christine; Schmidt, Klaus; Langevin, Christelle; Lafay, Florence; Dechant, Georg; Koltzenburg, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG) is known to be the only factor that mediates rabies infection. The neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), through its cysteine-rich domain 1, is a specific receptor for RVG and neutralizes virus infectivity, but its role in virus infection has remained obscure. We used adult mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons as a model to study the role of p75NTR in RV infection of primary neurons. We show that RV infects around 20% of DRG neurons, of which more than 80% are p75NTR positive, have large diameters, and are capsaicin insensitive. Surprisingly, RV binding and infection are absent in about half of the p75NTR-expressing DRG neurons which have small diameters and are often capsaicin sensitive. This indicates that p75NTR is not sufficient to mediate RV interaction in sensory neurons. The rate and specificity of neural infection are unchanged in RV-infected p75NTRExonIV−/− mice that lack all extracellular receptor domains and in wild-type mice infected with two independent RV mutants that lack p75NTR binding. Accordingly, the mortality rate is unchanged in the absence of RV-p75NTR interaction. We conclude that although p75NTR is a receptor for soluble RVG in transfected cells of heterologous expression systems, an RVG-p75NTR interaction is not necessary for RV infection of primary neurons. This means that other receptors are required to mediate RV infection in vivo and in vitro. PMID:17928338

  11. Inactivated Recombinant Rabies Viruses Displaying Canine Distemper Virus Glycoproteins Induce Protective Immunity against Both Pathogens.

    PubMed

    da Fontoura Budaszewski, Renata; Hudacek, Andrew; Sawatsky, Bevan; Krämer, Beate; Yin, Xiangping; Schnell, Matthias J; von Messling, Veronika

    2017-04-15

    The development of multivalent vaccines is an attractive methodology for the simultaneous prevention of several infectious diseases in vulnerable populations. Both canine distemper virus (CDV) and rabies virus (RABV) cause lethal disease in wild and domestic carnivores. While RABV vaccines are inactivated, the live-attenuated CDV vaccines retain residual virulence for highly susceptible wildlife species. In this study, we developed recombinant bivalent vaccine candidates based on recombinant vaccine strain rabies virus particles, which concurrently display the protective CDV and RABV glycoprotein antigens. The recombinant viruses replicated to near-wild-type titers, and the heterologous glycoproteins were efficiently expressed and incorporated in the viral particles. Immunization of ferrets with beta-propiolactone-inactivated recombinant virus particles elicited protective RABV antibody titers, and animals immunized with a combination of CDV attachment protein- and fusion protein-expressing recombinant viruses were protected from lethal CDV challenge. However, animals that were immunized with only a RABV expressing the attachment protein of CDV vaccine strain Onderstepoort succumbed to infection with a more recent wild-type strain, indicating that immune responses to the more conserved fusion protein contribute to protection against heterologous CDV strains.IMPORTANCE Rabies virus and canine distemper virus (CDV) cause high mortality rates and death in many carnivores. While rabies vaccines are inactivated and thus have an excellent safety profile and high stability, live-attenuated CDV vaccines can retain residual virulence in highly susceptible species. Here we generated recombinant inactivated rabies viruses that carry one of the CDV glycoproteins on their surface. Ferrets immunized twice with a mix of recombinant rabies viruses carrying the CDV fusion and attachment glycoproteins were protected from lethal CDV challenge, whereas all animals that received

  12. Rabies virus glycoprotein as a carrier for anthrax protective antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Mary Ellen; Koser, Martin; Xiao Sa; Siler, Catherine; McGettigan, James P.; Calkins, Catherine; Pomerantz, Roger J.; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Schnell, Matthias J. . E-mail: matthias.schnell@jefferson.edu

    2006-09-30

    Live viral vectors expressing foreign antigens have shown great promise as vaccines against viral diseases. However, safety concerns remain a major problem regarding the use of even highly attenuated viral vectors. Using the rabies virus (RV) envelope protein as a carrier molecule, we show here that inactivated RV particles can be utilized to present Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA) domain-4 in the viral membrane. In addition to the RV glycoprotein (G) transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains, a portion of the RV G ectodomain was required to express the chimeric RV G anthrax PA on the cell surface. The novel antigen was also efficiently incorporated into RV virions. Mice immunized with the inactivated recombinant RV virions exhibited seroconversion against both RV G and anthrax PA, and a second inoculation greatly increased these responses. These data demonstrate that a viral envelope protein can carry a bacterial protein and that a viral carrier can display whole polypeptides compared to the limited epitope presentation of previous viral systems.

  13. A recombinant canine distemper virus expressing a modified rabies virus glycoprotein induces immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhili; Wang, Jigui; Yuan, Daoli; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Jiazeng; Yi, Bao; Hou, Qiang; Mao, Yaping; Liu, Weiquan

    2015-06-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) and rabies virus (RV) are two important pathogens of the dog. CDV, a member of the morbillivirus genus, has shown promise as an expression vector. The glycoprotein from RV is a main contributor to protective immunity and capable of eliciting the production of virus-neutralizing antibodies. In this study, we recovered an attenuated strain of canine distemper virus and constructed a recombinant virus, rCDV-RV-G, expressing a modified (R333Q) rabies virus glycoprotein (RV-G) of RV Flury strain LEP. RV-G expression by the recombinant viruses was confirmed. Furthermore, G was proved to be incorporated into the surface of CDV particles. While replication of the recombinant virus was slightly reduced compared with the parental CDV, it stably expressed the RV-G over ten serial passages. Inoculation of mice induced specific neutralizing antibodies against both RV-G and CDV. Therefore, the rCDV-RV-G has the potential as a vaccine that may be used to control rabies virus infection in dogs and other animals.

  14. Oral vaccination of racoons (Procyon lotor) with baculovirus-expressed rabies virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Fu, Z F; Rupprecht, C E; Dietzschold, B; Saikumar, P; Niu, H S; Babka, I; Wunner, W H; Koprowski, H

    1993-01-01

    Successful field oral vaccination and protection against viral diseases have so far been achieved only with live-attenuated or live-recombinant virus vaccines. In this communication, we present data that demonstrate that a glycoprotein derived from recombinant baculovirus-infected insect cells is efficacious as an oral vaccine. The glycoprotein (G) of rabies virus (Evelyn Rokitnicki Abelseth strain) was abundantly expressed in a baculovirus expression system and oral vaccination of racoons with the baculovirus-expressed G protein resulted in the production of rabies virus-neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal challenge with a street rabies virus. The potential for using the baculovirus-expressed G protein for oral immunization of wildlife is discussed.

  15. HPLC immunoaffinity purification of rabies virus glycoprotein using immobilized antipeptide antibodies.

    PubMed

    Santucci, A; Rustici, M; Bracci, L; Lozzi, L; Soldani, P; Neri, P

    1990-02-20

    It has been reported that the acetylcholine receptor may be used by the rabies virus to concentrate at sites in proximal to peripheral nerves. It has also been reported that the binding site for the receptor is located within the 190-203 region of the virus glycoprotein on the basis of its structural homology with the toxic center of snake neurotoxins, which are well known cholinergic ligands. We prepared monoclonal antibodies against the synthetic tetradecapeptide having the same sequence as the putative binding site of the rabies virus. One of three antibodies (clone 2PV 36-74) was able to recognize both the whole virus and its peplomeric glycoprotein and could bind acetylcholine. It was also able to inhibit the binding both of alpha-bungarotoxin and rabies virus glycoprotein to the acetylcholine receptor. We have covalently bound 2PV 36-74 to an HPLC affinity column and utilized it for specific purification of rabies virus glycoprotein. The immunoaffinity chromatographic method we describe is very sensitive and highly specific. Moreover this procedure does not denature the sample and is vary rapid and efficient.

  16. Molecular mimicry between the rabies virus glycoprotein and human immunodeficiency virus-1 GP120: cross-reacting antibodies induced by rabies vaccination.

    PubMed

    Bracci, L; Ballas, S K; Spreafico, A; Neri, P

    1997-11-01

    The 160-170 sequence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 gp120 mimics a nicotinic receptor-binding motif of rabies virus glycoprotein and snake neurotoxins. This sequence has been proposed to be involved in the binding of HIV-1 gp120 to the acetylcholine binding sites of nicotinic receptors. By using biomolecular interaction analysis (BIA) technology we have found that HIV-1 gp120 can bind to detergent-extracted nicotinic receptor from fetal calf muscle. The binding is inhibited by nicotine and by a synthetic peptide reproducing the gp120 160-170 sequence. The molecular mimicry between gp120 and rabies virus glycoprotein is confirmed by cross-reacting antibodies. We have found that vaccination against rabies can induce the production of anti-HIV-1 gp120 antibodies in humans. The cross-reacting antibodies are directed to the gp120 sequence involved in the mimicry with the rabies virus glycoprotein. The cross-reactivity between the rabies virus and HIV-1 has important implications in transfusion medicine. Moreover, the presence of cross-reacting antibodies between the nicotinic receptor binding site of rabies virus glycoprotein and a fragment of HIV-1 gp120 strengthens the hypothesis about the possible role of nicotinic receptors as potential receptors for HIV-1 in the central nervous system.

  17. Structural and conformational similarity between synthetic peptides of curaremimetic neurotoxins and rabies virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Donnelly-Roberts, D L; Lentz, T L

    1991-09-01

    Antibodies were raised in rabbits against synthetic peptides corresponding to loop 2, the 'toxic' loop reacting with the acetylcholine-binding site on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, of curaremimetic neurotoxins and the structurally similar segment of the rabies virus glycoprotein. Some of the antibodies cross-reacted with the corresponding peptides confirming the structural similarity between the neurotoxin and glycoprotein peptides. A polyclonal antibody raised against a 29 residue glycoprotein peptide (175-203) in the presence of 0.1% sodium dodecyl sulfate reacted with native alpha-bungarotoxin and rabies virus. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of the 29 residue glycoprotein peptide and a 20 residue king cobra loop 2 peptide (25-44) revealed these peptides to be conformationally similar and composed predominantly of beta sheet structure. These results show the rabies glycoprotein segment is structurally and conformationally similar to neurotoxin loop 2. This similarity may confer on the glycoprotein the capability of interacting with the neurotoxin-binding site on the acetylcholine receptor.

  18. Molecular Docking Studies with Rabies Virus Glycoprotein to Design Viral Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Tomar, N. R.; Singh, V.; Marla, S. S.; Chandra, R.; Kumar, R.; Kumar, A.

    2010-01-01

    The genome of rabies virus encodes five proteins; the nucleoprotein, the phosphoprotein, the matrix protein, the glycoprotein, and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Among these, the glycoprotein is the most important as it is the major contributor to pathogenicity and virus neutralizing antibody response. Keeping in mind that glycoprotein is the only protein exposed on the surface of virus and is thought to be responsible for the interaction with the cell membrane, it was attempted to target glycoprotein by a ligand polyethylene glycol 4000, which blocks its active site, as seen by molecular operating environment software, so that it may be possible to prevent the spread of virus into the host. The ligand polyethylene glycol 4000 was retrieved from Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics protein data bank by providing the glycoprotein sequence to the databank. In this study it was observed that the ligand was successfully docked on a major portion of antigenic site II of glycoprotein by mimicking the virus neutralizing antibodies. This knowledge may be important for the development of novel therapies for the treatment of rabies and other viral diseases in the future. PMID:21218060

  19. Immunogenic and antigenic properties of recombinant soluble glycoprotein of rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Praveen K; Sharma, Sameer; Walunj, Sameer S; Chaturvedi, V K; Raut, Ashwin A; Patial, Sonika; Rai, A; Pandey, K D; Saini, M

    2005-07-01

    Rabies virus glycoprotein is a type I transmembrane protein exposed on the surface on the mature virus particle that induces virus neutralizing antibodies. In the present study, 60 amino acid C-terminal hydrophobic anchor (transmembrane) and cytoplasmic domains of glycoprotein were deleted from full-length glycoprotein and fused with polyhistidine tag. The N-terminal viral signal peptide was also replaced with CD33 signal peptide for efficient secretion in mammalian cells. Following transfection of Madin Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells with plasmid encoding this soluble form of glycoprotein, polyclonal populations of stably transfected resistant cells were obtained after G418 selection. The protein was expressed as a glycosylated protein and secreted outside the cells utilizing N-terminal CD33 signal peptide. The secreted soluble glycoprotein was purified from cell culture supernatant by Ni--agarose affinity chromatography utilizing C-terminal polyhistidine tag. Like full-length glycoprotein, the expressed recombinant soluble glycoprotein was found to be immunogenic when injected in rabbits. In this study, we have assessed the potential of recombinant soluble glycoprotein as diagnostic antigen in ELISA and found that this recombinant protein can be used as diagnostic antigen in ELISA for detecting anti-glycoprotein antibodies in immunized host.

  20. Predicted 3D Model of the Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Trimer.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Bastida-González; Yersin, Celaya-Trejo; José, Correa-Basurto; Paola, Zárate-Segura

    2016-01-01

    The RABVG ectodomain is a homotrimer, and trimers are often called spikes. They are responsible for the attachment of the virus through the interaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). This makes them relevant in viral pathogenesis. The antigenic structure differs significantly between the trimers and monomers. Surfaces rich in hydrophobic amino acids are important for trimer stabilization in which the C-terminal of the ectodomain plays an important role; to understand these interactions between the G proteins, a mechanistic study of their functions was performed with a molecular model of G protein in its trimeric form. This verified its 3D conformation. The molecular modeling of G protein was performed by a I-TASSER server and was evaluated via a Rachamandran plot and ERRAT program obtained 84.64% and 89.9% of the residues in the favorable regions and overall quality factor, respectively. The molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on RABVG trimer at 310 K. From these theoretical studies, we retrieved the RMSD values from Cα atoms to assess stability. Preliminary model of G protein of rabies virus stable at 12 ns with molecular dynamics was obtained.

  1. Predicted 3D Model of the Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Trimer

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Bastida-González; Yersin, Celaya-Trejo; José, Correa-Basurto; Paola, Zárate-Segura

    2016-01-01

    The RABVG ectodomain is a homotrimer, and trimers are often called spikes. They are responsible for the attachment of the virus through the interaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). This makes them relevant in viral pathogenesis. The antigenic structure differs significantly between the trimers and monomers. Surfaces rich in hydrophobic amino acids are important for trimer stabilization in which the C-terminal of the ectodomain plays an important role; to understand these interactions between the G proteins, a mechanistic study of their functions was performed with a molecular model of G protein in its trimeric form. This verified its 3D conformation. The molecular modeling of G protein was performed by a I-TASSER server and was evaluated via a Rachamandran plot and ERRAT program obtained 84.64% and 89.9% of the residues in the favorable regions and overall quality factor, respectively. The molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on RABVG trimer at 310 K. From these theoretical studies, we retrieved the RMSD values from Cα atoms to assess stability. Preliminary model of G protein of rabies virus stable at 12 ns with molecular dynamics was obtained. PMID:27294109

  2. Generation and characterization of neutralizing human recombinant antibodies against antigenic site II of rabies virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lina; Chen, Zhe; Yu, Li; Wei, Jingshuang; Li, Chuan; Jin, Jing; Shen, Xinxin; Lv, Xinjun; Tang, Qing; Li, Dexin; Liang, Mifang

    2012-10-01

    The currently recommended treatment for individuals exposed to rabies virus (RV) is post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) through the combined administration of rabies vaccine and rabies immune globulin (RIG). Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralize RV offer an opportunity to replace RIG for rabies PEP. Here, a combinatorial human Fab library was constructed using antibody genes derived from the blood of RV-vaccinated donors. Selections of this library against purified RV virions resulted in the identification of 11 unique Fab antibodies specific for RV glycoprotein. Of the Fab antibodies, five were converted to full human IgG1 format. The human IgG antibodies revealed high binding affinity and neutralizing activities against RV fixed strains through a rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test in vitro as well as the early stage protective function after exposure to RV infection in vivo. Furthermore, epitope mapping and binding competition analysis showed that all of obtained human neutralizing and protective antibodies were directed to the antigenic site II of RV glycoprotein. Our results provide not only important insight into the protective immune response to RV in humans, but also more candidates eligible for use in a mAb cocktail aimed at replacing RIG for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis.

  3. Vesicular stomatitis virus with the rabies virus glycoprotein directs retrograde transsynaptic transport among neurons in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Kevin T.; Saunders, Arpiar B.; Oldenburg, Ian A.; Sabatini, Bernardo L.; Cepko, Constance L.

    2012-01-01

    Defining the connections among neurons is critical to our understanding of the structure and function of the nervous system. Recombinant viruses engineered to transmit across synapses provide a powerful approach for the dissection of neuronal circuitry in vivo. We recently demonstrated that recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) can be endowed with anterograde or retrograde transsynaptic tracing ability by providing the virus with different glycoproteins. Here we extend the characterization of the transmission and gene expression of recombinant VSV (rVSV) with the rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G), and provide examples of its activity relative to the anterograde transsynaptic tracer form of rVSV. rVSV with RABV-G was found to drive strong expression of transgenes and to spread rapidly from neuron to neuron in only a retrograde manner. Depending upon how the RABV-G was delivered, VSV served as a polysynaptic or monosynaptic tracer, or was able to define projections through axonal uptake and retrograde transport. In animals co-infected with rVSV in its anterograde form, rVSV with RABV-G could be used to begin to characterize the similarities and differences in connections to different areas. rVSV with RABV-G provides a flexible, rapid, and versatile tracing tool that complements the previously described VSV-based anterograde transsynaptic tracer. PMID:23403489

  4. A replication-deficient rabies virus vaccine expressing Ebola virus glycoprotein is highly attenuated for neurovirulence

    SciTech Connect

    Papaneri, Amy B.; Wirblich, Christoph; Cann, Jennifer A.; Cooper, Kurt; Jahrling, Peter B.; Schnell, Matthias J.; Blaney, Joseph E.

    2012-12-05

    We are developing inactivated and live-attenuated rabies virus (RABV) vaccines expressing Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein for use in humans and endangered wildlife, respectively. Here, we further characterize the pathogenesis of the live-attenuated RABV/EBOV vaccine candidates in mice in an effort to define their growth properties and potential for safety. RABV vaccines expressing GP (RV-GP) or a replication-deficient derivative with a deletion of the RABV G gene (RV{Delta}G-GP) are both avirulent after intracerebral inoculation of adult mice. Furthermore, RV{Delta}G-GP is completely avirulent upon intracerebral inoculation of suckling mice unlike parental RABV vaccine or RV-GP. Analysis of RV{Delta}G-GP in the brain by quantitative PCR, determination of virus titer, and immunohistochemistry indicated greatly restricted virus replication. In summary, our findings indicate that RV-GP retains the attenuation phenotype of the live-attenuated RABV vaccine, and RV{Delta}G-GP would appear to be an even safer alternative for use in wildlife or consideration for human use.

  5. Pyrosequencing of the rabies virus glycoprotein gene to demonstrate absence of vaccine-associated rabies cases following oral vaccination.

    PubMed

    De Benedictis, Paola; De Battisti, Cristian; Marciano, Sabrina; Mutinelli, Franco; Capua, Ilaria; Cattoli, Giovanni

    2013-03-01

    Replication competent vaccines have been used successfully for the control of terrestrial rabies, mainly in wildlife; however, these vaccine strains occasionally may induce rabies. In this study, a pyrosequencing protocol for the rapid identification of vaccine-associated rabies viruses was applied to the 2008-2011 Italian epidemic. There was no evidence of vaccine-associated rabies cases following oral vaccination of foxes with the SAG2 and SADB19 vaccine strains.

  6. Immunogenicity of a recombinant lumpy skin disease virus (neethling vaccine strain) expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein in cattle.

    PubMed

    Aspden, Kate; van Dijk, Alberdina A; Bingham, John; Cox, Dermot; Passmore, Jo-Ann; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2002-06-21

    Rabies virus (RV) readily infects cattle and causes a fatal neurological disease. A stable vaccine, which does not require the maintenance of a cold chain and that is administered once to elicit lifelong immunity to rabies would be advantageous. The present study describes the construction of a live recombinant lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) vaccine, expressing the glycoprotein of rabies virus (RG) and assessment of its ability to generate a humoral and cellular immune response against rabies virus in cattle. Cattle inoculated with the recombinant virus (rLSDV-RG) developed humoral immunity that was demonstrated in ELISA and neutralisation assays to RV. High titres of up to 1513IU/ml of RV neutralising antibodies were induced. In addition, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from rLSDV-RG-immunised animals demonstrated the ability to proliferate in response to stimulation with inactivated RV, whereas the animal vaccinated with wild type LSDV did not. This recombinant vaccine candidate thus has the potential to be used in ruminants as a cost-effective vaccine against both lumpy skin disease (LSD) and rabies.

  7. Rabies virus envelope glycoprotein targets lentiviral vectors to the axonal retrograde pathway in motor neurons.

    PubMed

    Hislop, James N; Islam, Tarin A; Eleftheriadou, Ioanna; Carpentier, David C J; Trabalza, Antonio; Parkinson, Michael; Schiavo, Giampietro; Mazarakis, Nicholas D

    2014-06-06

    Rabies pseudotyped lentiviral vectors have great potential in gene therapy, not least because of their ability to transduce neurons following their distal axonal application. However, very little is known about the molecular processes that underlie their retrograde transport and cell transduction. Using multiple labeling techniques and confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that pseudotyping with rabies virus envelope glycoprotein (RV-G) enabled the axonal retrograde transport of two distinct subtypes of lentiviral vector in motor neuron cultures. Analysis of this process revealed that these vectors trafficked through Rab5-positive endosomes and accumulated within a non-acidic Rab7 compartment. RV-G pseudotyped vectors were co-transported with both the tetanus neurotoxin-binding fragment and the membrane proteins thought to mediate rabies virus endocytosis (neural cell adhesion molecule, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, and p75 neurotrophin receptor), thus demonstrating that pseudotyping with RV-G targets lentiviral vectors for transport along the same pathway exploited by several toxins and viruses. Using motor neurons cultured in compartmentalized chambers, we demonstrated that axonal retrograde transport of these vectors was rapid and efficient; however, it was not able to transduce the targeted neurons efficiently, suggesting that impairment in processes occurring after arrival of the viral vector in the soma is responsible for the low transduction efficiency seen in vivo, which suggests a novel area for improvement of gene therapy vectors.

  8. Antipeptide monoclonal antibodies inhibit the binding of rabies virus glycoprotein and alpha-bungarotoxin to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Bracci, L; Antoni, G; Cusi, M G; Lozzi, L; Niccolai, N; Petreni, S; Rustici, M; Santucci, A; Soldani, P; Valensin, P E

    1988-09-01

    It has been reported that binding to muscle nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the post-synaptic membrane is an important event of the rabies virus neurotropism. The binding site can be located within the 190-203 region of the virus glycoprotein sharing a high degree of homology with the "toxic loop" of the curare-mimetic snake neurotoxins. We have synthesized a tetradecapeptide corresponding to this glycoprotein region and used it, following conjugation with an immunogenic carrier to raise MAbs. We found that some MAbs raised against the peptide were able to recognize both the virus glycoprotein and the snake neurotoxin alpha-bungarotoxin; moreover, they can inhibit the binding of rabies virus glycoprotein and alpha-bungarotoxin to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor extracted from the electric organs of Torpedo marmorata. On the basis of this cross-reactivity, we suggest that rabies virus glycoprotein and curare-mimetic snake neurotoxins share three-dimensionally similar structures in order to bind to the nicotinic cholinergic receptor. The potential use of the immunogenic properties of the peptide for the rational design of a synthetic vaccine against rabies is proposed.

  9. Rabies virus modifies host behaviour through a snake-toxin like region of its glycoprotein that inhibits neurotransmitter receptors in the CNS.

    PubMed

    Hueffer, Karsten; Khatri, Shailesh; Rideout, Shane; Harris, Michael B; Papke, Roger L; Stokes, Clare; Schulte, Marvin K

    2017-10-09

    Rabies virus induces drastic behaviour modifications in infected hosts. The mechanisms used to achieve these changes in the host are not known. The main finding of this study is that a region in the rabies virus glycoprotein, with homologies to snake toxins, has the ability to alter behaviour in animals through inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors present in the central nervous system. This finding provides a novel aspect to virus receptor interaction and host manipulation by pathogens in general. The neurotoxin-like region of the rabies virus glycoprotein inhibited acetylcholine responses of α4β2 nicotinic receptors in vitro, as did full length ectodomain of the rabies virus glycoprotein. The same peptides significantly altered a nicotinic receptor induced behaviour in C. elegans and increased locomotor activity levels when injected into the central nervous system of mice. These results provide a mechanistic explanation for the behavioural changes in hosts infected by rabies virus.

  10. First North American field release of a vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein recombinant virus.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, C A; Niezgoda, M; Hamir, A N; Schumacher, C; Koprowski, H; Rupprecht, C E

    1998-04-01

    Following nearly 10 yr of extensive laboratory evaluation, a vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein (V-RG) vaccine was the first recombinant virus to undergo limited North American field release on 20 August 1990. The free-ranging raccoon population on Parramore Island (Virginia, USA) was exposed to a high density (10 baits/ha) of vaccine-laden baits distributed on a 300 ha vaccination area. An annual total of 887 raccoons were live-trapped for sedation, physical examination and blood collection for rabies antibody determination; there was no evidence of adverse effects or lesions due to the vaccine. Age and sex distributions, mean body weights, and live-capture histories of raccoons from the vaccination and non-baited control areas were compared. There were no statistically significant differences in survivorship between the baited and non-baited areas, nor between rabies antibody-positive and antibody-negative raccoons from the vaccination area. There was no trend in field mortality that suggested an association with either tetracycline or sulfadimethoxine, used as biomakers, or with vaccine contact determined by antibody status. No gross or histopathologic lesions due to the vaccine were demonstrated among a subsample of live-trapped raccoons collected for gross necropsy, biomarker analysis, histopathologic examination, and V-RG virus isolation attempts. Recovery of V-RG virus was limited to the tonsils of two biomarker-positive, clinically healthy raccoons collected from the vaccination area for postmortem examination on days 2 and 4 following bait distribution. These data reinforce the extensive body of safety data on the V-RG virus and extend it to include field evaluation where vaccine is offered free-choice in abundance, in baits designed to attract free-ranging raccoons, in a relatively simple ecosystem.

  11. A monoclonal antibody to a synthetic fragment of rabies virus glycoprotein binds ligands of the nicotinic cholinergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Rustici, M; Santucci, A; Lozzi, L; Petreni, S; Spreafico, A; Neri, P; Bracci, L; Soldani, P

    1989-09-01

    Rabies virus glycoprotein and snake venom curaremimetic neurotoxins share a region of high homology (30-45 for neurotoxins and 190-203 for the glycoprotein) in the regions that are believed to be responsible for binding the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Monoclonal antibodies raised to the 190-203 synthetic fragment of rabies virus glycoprotein were immobilized on a high performance affinity chromatography column and were able to bind neurotoxins. Toxins were displaced from the affinity column by elution at acidic pH and by affinity competition with acetylcholine at neutral pH. Furthermore, the affinity column proved to be useful for the purification of cholinergic ligands. Overall, these results indicate that the paratope of our monoclonal antibodies could behave as an 'internal image' of the nicotinic cholinergic receptor acetylcholine binding site.

  12. Immunogenicity of ORFV-based vectors expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein in livestock species.

    PubMed

    Martins, Mathias; Joshi, Lok R; Rodrigues, Fernando S; Anziliero, Deniz; Frandoloso, Rafael; Kutish, Gerald F; Rock, Daniel L; Weiblen, Rudi; Flores, Eduardo F; Diel, Diego G

    2017-11-01

    The parapoxvirus Orf virus (ORFV) encodes several immunomodulatory proteins (IMPs) that modulate host-innate and pro-inflammatory responses and has been proposed as a vaccine delivery vector for use in animal species. Here we describe the construction and characterization of two recombinant ORFV vectors expressing the rabies virus (RABV) glycoprotein (G). The RABV-G gene was inserted in the ORFV024 or ORFV121 gene loci, which encode for IMPs that are unique to parapoxviruses and inhibit activation of the NF-κB signaling pathway. The immunogenicity of the resultant recombinant viruses (ORFV(∆024)RABV-G or ORFV(∆121)RABV-G, respectively) was evaluated in pigs and cattle. Immunization of the target species with ORFV(∆024)RABV-G and ORFV(∆121)RABV-G elicited robust neutralizing antibody responses against RABV. Notably, neutralizing antibody titers induced in ORFV(∆121)RABV-G-immunized pigs and cattle were significantly higher than those detected in ORFV(∆024)RABV-G-immunized animals, indicating a higher immunogenicity of ORFV(Δ121)-based vectors in these animal species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Characterization of epitopes on the rabies virus glycoprotein by selection and analysis of escape mutants.

    PubMed

    Fallahi, Firouzeh; Wandeler, Alexander I; Nadin-Davis, Susan A

    2016-07-15

    The glycoprotein (G) is the only surface protein of the lyssavirus particle and the only viral product known to be capable of eliciting the production of neutralizing antibodies. In this study, the isolation of escape mutants resistant to monoclonal antibody (Mab) neutralization was attempted by a selection strategy employing four distinct rabies virus strains: the extensively passaged Evelyn Rokitnicki Abelseth (ERA) strain and three field isolates representing two bat-associated variants and the Western Canada skunk variant (WSKV). No escape mutants were generated from either of the bat-associated viral variants but two neutralization mutants were derived from the WSKV isolate. Seven independent ERA mutants were recovered using Mabs directed against antigenic sites I (four mutants) and IIIa (three mutants) of the glycoprotein. The cross-neutralization patterns of these viral mutants were used to determine the precise location and nature of the G protein epitopes recognized by these Mabs. Nucleotide sequencing of the G gene indicated that those mutants derived using Mabs directed to antigenic site (AS) III all contained amino acid substitutions in this site. However, of the four mutants selected with AS I Mabs, two bore mutations within AS I as expected while the remaining two carried mutations in AS II. WSKV mutants exhibited mutations at the sites appropriate for the Mabs used in their selection. All ERA mutant preparations were more cytopathogenic than the parental virus when propagated in cell culture; when in vivo pathogenicity in mice was examined, three of these mutants exhibited reduced pathogenicity while the remaining four mutants exhibited comparable pathogenic properties to those of the parent virus.

  14. Chimeric rabies viruses for trans-species comparison of lyssavirus glycoprotein ectodomain functions in virus replication and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Genz, Berit; Nolden, Tobias; Negatsch, Alexandra; Teifke, Jens-Peter; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Finke, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The glycoprotein G of lyssaviruses is the major determinant of virus pathogenicity and serves as a target for immunological responses to virus infections. However, assessment of the exact contribution of lyssavirus G proteins to observed differences in the pathogenicity of lyssavirus species is challenging, since the direct comparison of natural lyssaviruses does not allow specific ascription to individual virus proteins or domains. Here we describe the generation and characterization of recombinant rabies viruses (RABV) that express chimeric G proteins comprising of a RABV cytoplasma domain fused to transmembrane and ectodomain G sequences of a virulent RABV (challenge virus standard; CVS-11) or two European bat lyssaviruses (EBLV- and EBLV-2). These "envelope-switched" recombinant viruses were recovered from cDNAs. Similar growth kinetics and protein expression in neuroblastoma cell cultures and successful targeting of primary neurons showed that the chimeric G proteins were able to replace the authentic G protein in a RABV based virus vector. Inoculation of six week old CD-1 mice by the intracranial (i. c.) route of infection further demonstrated that all recombinant viruses were able to spread in the brain and to induce disease. The "envelope-switched" RABV therefore represent an important tool to further investigate the influence of lyssavirus ectodomains on virus tropism, and pathogenicity.

  15. A Recombinant Rabies Virus Encoding Two Copies of the Glycoprotein Gene Confers Protection in Dogs against a Virulent Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhaojin; Chen, Jing; Ai, Jun; Dun, Can; Fu, Zhen F.; Niu, Xuefeng; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    The rabies virus (RABV) glycoprotein (G) is the principal antigen responsible for the induction of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA) and is the major modality of protective immunity in animals. A recombinant RABV HEP-Flury strain was generated by reverse genetics to encode two copies of the G-gene (referred to as HEP-dG). The biological properties of HEP-dG were compared to those of the parental virus (HEP-Flury strain). The HEP-dG recombinant virus grew 100 times more efficiently in BHK-21 cell than the parental virus, yet the virulence of the dG recombinant virus in suckling mice was lower than the parental virus. The HEP-dG virus can improve the expression of G-gene mRNA and the G protein and produce more offspring viruses in cells. The amount of G protein revealed a positive relationship with immunogenicity in mice and dogs. The inactivated HEP-dG recombinant virus induced higher levels of VNA and conferred better protection against virulent RABV in mice and dogs than the inactivated parental virus and a commercial vaccine. The protective antibody persisted for at least 12 months. These data demonstrate that the HEP-dG is stable, induces a strong VNA response and confers protective immunity more effectively than the RABV HEP-Flury strain. HEP-dG could be a potential candidate in the development of novel inactivated rabies vaccines PMID:24498294

  16. A unique substitution at position 333 on the glycoprotein of rabies virus street strains isolated from non-hematophagous bats in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sato, G; Kobayashi, Y; Motizuki, N; Hirano, S; Itou, T; Cunha, E M S; Ito, F H; Sakai, T

    2009-02-01

    The amino acid R or K at position 333 on the glycoprotein of the rabies virus is considered necessary for virulence in adult mice. Although some exceptions exist, substitution at this position causes expression of a phenotype that is either less pathogenic or non-virulent. To date, such substitutions have only been found in fixed strains of rabies virus. In this study, the authors found 333H, 333N, and 333Q substitutions at this position in rabies virus street strains isolated from non-hematophagous bats in Brazil. These strains showed pathogenicity and lethality on passage using adult mice with the intracerebral route and were confirmed rabies-positive by immunofluorescent assay. This suggests that these strains maintain virulence. Our findings indicate that rabies virus street strains with these substitutions exist in the field and may result in infection cycles.

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of Indian rabies virus isolates targeting the complete glycoprotein gene.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Susan; Singh, Rajendra; Singh, K P; Manjunatha Reddy, G B; Anjaneya; Ravi Kumar, G V P P S; Sumithra, T G; Singh, R P

    2015-12-01

    Rabies a fatal viral zoonosis is endemic in India. There is no report on phylogenetic study of Indian rabies virus isolates based on the complete G gene. In the present study, a total of 25 rabies positive brain samples collected during 2001-2014 from North India (UP, MP, Delhi, Rajasthan), South India (Kerala and Karnataka) and Gujarat states belonging to six different host species were subjected to G gene amplification by RT-PCR as three overlapping fragments of 881 bp, 991 bp and 618 bp. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all Indian rabies virus isolates are genetically closely related with Arctic-like 1a lineage viruses. However, two distinct clusters were identified namely, India South and India North. All the Indian rabies isolates had 95.5-100% homology related to geography, but not to host species. Deduced amino acids on comparison revealed two amino acid changes, aa 356 in ECTO; N→K and aa 458; M→I, which were found to distinguish between the India South and India North isolates.

  18. Synthetic peptides of neurotoxins and rabies virus glycoprotein behave as antagonists in a functional assay for the acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Donnelly-Roberts, D L; Lentz, T L

    1989-01-01

    Peptides of portions of loop 2 (the "toxic" loop) of snake venom curare-mimetic neurotoxins (alpha-bungarotoxin and king cobra toxin b) and of a structurally similar region of the rabies virus glycoprotein were synthesized. The effect of the peptides on carbachol-induced 22Na+ flux into BC3H-1 cells, which contain nicotinic acetylcholine receptors on their surfaces, was measured. Both the neurotoxin and glycoprotein peptides inhibited ion transport with IC50 values of 10(-4) M to 7 x 10(-7) M. The most effective peptides correspond to neurotoxin loop 2 and inhibited 22Na+ flux in the micromolar range comparable to the competitive antagonist d-tubocurarine. These findings show that neurotoxin loop 2 and the corresponding rabies virus glycoprotein segment interact with the agonist binding site of teh acetylcholine receptor and that short synthetic peptides representing portions of larger molecules by themselves can exert a biological effect on a large macromolecular complex like the acetylcholine receptor.

  19. Production and characterization of a fusion peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG29).

    PubMed

    Yang, Yu-Jiao; Zhao, Ping-Sen; Wu, Hong-Xia; Wang, Hua-Lei; Zhao, Li-Li; Xue, Xiang-Hong; Gai, Wei-Wei; Gao, Yu-Wei; Yang, Song-Tao; Xia, Xian-Zhu

    2014-12-01

    Gene therapy targeting the brain holds great promise in curing nervous system degenerative diseases in clinical applications. With this in mind, in a previous study a 29 amino-acid peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG29) with a nonamer stretch of arginine residues (RVG29-9R) at its carboxy-terminus was exploited as a ligand for brain-targeting gene delivery. Importantly, the report demonstrated that the RVG29-9R vector was able to cross the blood-brain barrier. RVG29-9R is currently synthesized by commercial companies with high associated costs. In this study, in order to reduce the costs of producing RVG29-9R, we have expressed and purified 6mg of a recombinant peptide (RVG29-9R-6His) from 0.4g of cultured Escherichia coli. We assessed the physiochemical properties of RVG29-9R-6His, its cytotoxicity, and the in vitro transfection efficiency in Neuro 2a cells (which express the acetylcholine receptor). Our results reveal that the RVG29-9R-6His peptide recognized Neuro 2a cells in a dose-dependent manner and it was also able to bind plasmid DNA and deliver it into the Neuro 2a cells effectively. Therefore, our study has demonstrated that the recombinant RVG29-9R-6His peptide retains the functions of RVG29-9R and so may provide an economically viable and alternative production method for the manufacture of RVG29-9R.

  20. Rabies virus in insectivorous bats: implications of the diversity of the nucleoprotein and glycoprotein genes for molecular epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Rafael de Novaes; de Souza, Sibele Pinheiro; Lobo, Renata Spinelli Vaz; Castilho, Juliana Galera; Macedo, Carla Isabel; Carnieli, Pedro; Fahl, Willian Oliveira; Achkar, Samira Maria; Scheffer, Karin Corrêa; Kotait, Ivanete; Carrieri, Maria Luiza; Brandão, Paulo Eduardo

    2010-09-30

    Insectivorous bats are the main reservoirs of rabies virus (RABV) in various regions of the world. The aims of this study were to (a) establish genealogies for RABV strains from different species of Brazilian insectivorous bats based on the nucleoprotein (N) and glycoprotein (G) genes, (b) investigate specific RABV lineages associated with certain genera of bats and (c) identify molecular markers that can distinguish between these lineages. The genealogic analysis of N and G from 57 RABV strains revealed seven genus-specific clusters related to the insectivorous bats Myotis, Eptesicus, Nyctinomops, Molossus, Tadarida, Histiotus and Lasiurus. Molecular markers in the amino acid sequences were identified which were specific to the seven clusters. These results, which constitute a novel finding for this pathogen, show that there are at least seven independent epidemiological rabies cycles maintained by seven genera of insectivorous bats in Brazil.

  1. Parainfluenza Virus 5 Expressing the G Protein of Rabies Virus Protects Mice after Rabies Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Chen, Zhenhai; Huang, Junhua

    2014-01-01

    Rabies remains a major public health threat around the world. Once symptoms appear, there is no effective treatment to prevent death. In this work, we tested a recombinant parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) strain expressing the glycoprotein (G) of rabies (PIV5-G) as a therapy for rabies virus infection: we have found that PIV5-G protected mice as late as 6 days after rabies virus infection. PIV5-G is a promising vaccine for prevention and treatment of rabies virus infection. PMID:25552723

  2. Glycoprotein-G-gene-based molecular and phylogenetic analysis of rabies viruses associated with a large outbreak of bovine rabies in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Cargnelutti, Juliana F; de Quadros, João M; Martins, Mathias; Batista, Helena B C R; Weiblen, Rudi; Flores, Eduardo F

    2017-08-30

    A large outbreak of hematophagous-bat-associated bovine rabies has been occurring in Rio Grande do Sul (RS), the southernmost Brazilian state, since 2011, with official estimates exceeding 50,000 cattle deaths. The present article describes a genetic characterization of rabies virus (RABV) recovered from 59 affected cattle and two sheep, from 56 herds in 16 municipalities (2012-2016). Molecular analysis was performed using the nucleotide (nt) and predicted amino acid (aa) sequences of RABV glycoprotein G (G). A high level of nt and aa sequence identity was observed among the examined G sequences, ranging from 98.4 to 100%, and from 97.3 to 100%, respectively. Likewise, high levels of nt and aa sequence identity were observed with bovine (nt, 99.8%; aa, 99.8%) and hematophagous bat (nt, 99.5%; aa, 99.4%) RABV sequences from GenBank, and lower levels were observed with carnivore RABV sequences (nt, 92.8%; aa, 88.1%). Some random mutations were observed in the analyzed sequences, and a few consistent mutations were observed in some sequences belonging to cluster 2, subcluster 2b. The clustering of the sequences was observed in a phylogenetic tree, where two distinct clusters were evident. Cluster 1 comprised RABV sequences covering the entire study period (2012 to 2016), but subclusters corresponding to different years could be identified, indicating virus evolution and/or introduction of new viruses into the population. In some cases, viruses from the same location obtained within a short period grouped into different subclusters, suggesting co-circulation of viruses of different origins. Subcluster segregation was also observed in sequences obtained in the same region during different periods, indicating the involvement of different viruses in the cases at different times. In summary, our results indicate that the outbreaks occurring in RS (2012 to 2016) probably involved RABV of different origins, in addition to a possible evolution of RABV isolates within this

  3. [Creation of DNA vaccine vector based on codon-optimized gene of rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) with consensus amino acid sequence].

    PubMed

    Starodubova, E S; Kuzmenko, Y V; Latanova, A A; Preobrazhenskaya, O V; Karpov, V L

    2016-01-01

    An optimized design of the rabies virus glycoprotein (G protein) for use within DNA vaccines has been suggested. The design represents a territorially adapted antigen constructed taking into account glycoprotein amino acid sequences of the rabies viruses registered in the Russian Federation and the vaccine Vnukovo-32 strain. Based on the created consensus amino acid sequence, the nucleotide codon-optimized sequence of this modified glycoprotein was obtained and cloned into the pVAX1 plasmid (a vector of the last generation used in the creation of DNA vaccines). A twofold increase in this gene expression compared to the expression of the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene in a similar vector was registered in the transfected cell culture. It has been demonstrated that the accumulation of modified G protein exceeds the number of the control protein synthesized using the plasmid with the Vnukovo-32 strain viral glycoprotein gene by 20 times. Thus, the obtained modified rabies virus glycoprotein can be considered to be a promising DNA vaccine antigen.

  4. Rabies virus binding at neuromuscular junctions.

    PubMed

    Burrage, T G; Tignor, G H; Smith, A L

    1985-04-01

    Morphological, immunocytochemical, biochemical, and immunological techniques have been used to describe rabies virus binding to a sub-cellular unit and molecular complex at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Early after infection in vivo, virus antigen and virus particles were found by immunofluorescence, electron microscopy and immunoelectron microscopy in regions of high density acetylcholine receptors (AChR) at NMJs. One monoclonal antibody (alpha-Mab) to the alpha subunit of the AChR blocked attachment of radio-labeled rabies virus to cultured muscle cells bearing high density patches of AChR. A sub-cellular structure, resembling an array of AChR monomers, bound both rabies virus antigens and alpha-Mab. By immunoblotting with electrophoretically transferred motor endplate proteins, rabies virus proteins and alpha-Mab bound to two proteins of 43 000 and 110 000 daltons. A rabies virus glycoprotein antibody detected virus antigen bound to the 110 000 dalton protein. An auto-immune (anti-idiotypic) response followed immunization of mice with rabies virus glycoprotein antigen; the antibody was directed to the 110 000 dalton protein. This auto-antibody altered the kinetics of neutralization by rabies virus antibody and induced the formation of rabies virus antibody after inoculation of mice. These results define, at the neuromuscular junction, a rabies virus receptor which may be part of the acetylcholine receptor complex.

  5. Synthetic peptides corresponding to sequences of snake venom neurotoxins and rabies virus glycoprotein bind to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Lentz, T L; Hawrot, E; Wilson, P T

    1987-01-01

    Peptides corresponding to portions of loop 2 of snake venom curare-mimetic neurotoxins and to a structurally similar region of rabies virus glycoprotein were synthesized. Interaction of these peptides with purified Torpedo electric organ acetylcholine receptor was tested by measuring their ability to block the binding of 125I-labeled alpha-bungarotoxin to the receptor. In addition, inhibition of alpha-bungarotoxin binding to a 32-residue synthetic peptide corresponding to positions 173-204 of the alpha-subunit was determined. Neurotoxin and glycoprotein peptides corresponding to toxin loop 2 inhibited labeled toxin binding to the receptor with IC50 values comparable to those of nicotine and the competitive antagonist d-tubocurarine and to the alpha-subunit peptides with apparent affinities between those of d-tubocurarine and alpha-cobratoxin. Substitution of neurotoxin residue Arg37, the proposed counterpart of the quaternary ammonium of acetylcholine, with a negatively charged Glu residue reduced the apparent affinity about 10-fold. Peptides containing the neurotoxin invariant residue Trp29 and 10- to 100-fold higher affinities than peptides lacking this residue. These results demonstrate that relatively short synthetic peptides retain some of the binding ability of the native protein from which they are derived, indicating that such peptides are useful in the study of protein-protein interactions. The ability of the peptides to compete alpha-bungarotoxin binding to the receptor with apparent affinities comparable to those of other cholinergic ligands indicates that loop 2 of the neurotoxins and the structurally similar segment of the rabies virus glycoprotein act as recognition sites for the acetylcholine receptor. Invariant toxin residues Arg37 and Trp29 and their viral homologs play important, although not essential, roles in binding, possibly by interaction with complementary anionic and hydrophobic subsites on the acetylcholine receptor. The alpha

  6. Binding properties of monoclonal antibodies to rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Cusi, M G; Valensin, P E; Tollis, M; Bracci, L; Petreni, S; Soldani, P

    1991-07-01

    The monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) obtained by immunizing mice with a tetradecapeptide corresponding to the 190-203 region of rabies virus glycoprotein, involved in binding to the acetylcholine receptor (AchR), displayed different specificities to different rabies virus strains. These mAbs, when used in immunofluorescence tests, allowed differentiation of wild rabies viruses from the attenuated ones.

  7. Rabies virus receptors.

    PubMed

    Lafon, Monique

    2005-02-01

    There is convincing in vitro evidence that the muscular form of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), the neuronal cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) bind rabies virus and/or facilitate rabies virus entry into cells. Other components of the cell membrane, such as gangliosides, may also participate in the entry of rabies virus. However, little is known of the role of these molecules in vivo. This review proposes a speculative model that accounts for the role of these different molecules in entry and trafficking of rabies virus into the nervous system.

  8. Growth of recombinant Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 cells producing rabies virus glycoprotein in bioreactor employing serum-free medium

    PubMed Central

    Galesi, Adriana L. L.; Aguiar, Marcelo A.; Astray, Renato M.; Augusto, Elisabeth F. P.

    2008-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster Schneider 2 (S2) cells have been increasingly used as a suitable expression system for the production of different recombinant proteins, and the employment of bioreactors for large-scale culture is an important tool for this purpose. In this work, Drosophila S2 cells producing the rabies virus glycoprotein RVGP were cultivated in bioreactor, employing a serum-free medium, aiming an improvement in cell growth and in glycoprotein production. To overcome cell growth limitation commonly observed in stirred flasks, different experiments in bioreactor were performed, in which some system modifications were carried out to attain the desired goal. The study showed that this cell line is considerably sensitive to hydrodynamic forces, and a high cell density (about 16.0 × 106 cells mL−1) was only obtained when Pluronic F68® percentage was increased to 0.6% (w/v). Despite ammonium concentration affected RVGP production, and also cell growth, an elevated amount of the target protein was obtained, attaining 563 ng 10−7 cells. PMID:19003175

  9. Brain-targeting gene delivery and cellular internalization mechanisms for modified rabies virus glycoprotein RVG29 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Huang, Rongqin; Han, Liang; Ke, Weilun; Shao, Kun; Ye, Liya; Lou, Jinning; Jiang, Chen

    2009-09-01

    A 29 amino-acid peptide derived from the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG29) was exploited as a ligand for efficient brain-targeting gene delivery. RVG29 was modified on polyamidoamine dendrimers (PAMAM) through bifunctional PEG, then complexed with DNA, yielding PAMAM-PEG-RVG29/DNA nanoparticles (NPs). The NPs were observed to be uptaken by brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) through a clathrin and caveolae mediated energy-depending endocytosis. The specific cellular uptake can be inhibited by free RVG29 and GABA but not by nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAchR) agonists/antagonists, indicating RVG29 probably relates to the GABA(B) receptor besides nAchR reported previously. PAMAM-PEG-RVG29/DNA NPs showed higher blood-brain barrier (BBB)-crossing efficiency than PAMAM/DNA NPs in an in vitro BBB model. In vivo imaging showed that the NPs were preferably accumulated in brain. The report gene expression of the PAMAM-PEG-RVG29/DNA NPs was observed in brain, and significantly higher than unmodified NPs. Thus, PAMAM-PEG-RVG29 provides a safe and noninvasive approach for the gene delivery across the BBB.

  10. The potential use of rabies virus glycoprotein-derived peptides to facilitate drug delivery into the central nervous system: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Huey, Rachel; Hawthorne, Susan

    2016-08-31

    Rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG), a 505 amino acid type-1 glycoprotein, is responsible for the neurotrophic nature of the rabies virus infection. Despite varying reports in the literature as to which receptor is ultimately responsible for interaction of RVG with the nervous system, there is a strong argument for major nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) involvement. Peptide derivatives of RVG, such as rabies virus-derived peptide (RDP) and RVG-29 are emerging as promising targeting ligands for the delivery of therapeutics to the central nervous system (CNS). The neurotrophic nature of RVG and indeed its derivatives may be due to interaction with ubiquitous nAChRs principally, but also association with other neural cell-specific molecules such as neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). It is possible that nAChR-mediated uptake of RVG-derived peptides may serve as an attractive new approach for targeting drug delivery to the brain. Potential application of this type of drug delivery system extends to many diseases affecting the CNS, where specific and effective drug delivery is normally a challenging process.

  11. Engineering of a recombinant trivalent single-chain variable fragment antibody directed against rabies virus glycoprotein G with improved neutralizing potency.

    PubMed

    Turki, Imène; Hammami, Akil; Kharmachi, Habib; Mousli, Mohamed

    2014-02-01

    Human and equine rabies immunoglobulins are currently available for passive immunization against rabies. However, these are hampered by the limited supply and some drawbacks. Advances in antibody engineering have led to overcome issues of clinical applications and to improve the protective efficacy. In the present study, we report the generation of a trivalent single-chain Fv (scFv50AD1-Fd), that recognizes the rabies virus glycoprotein, genetically fused to the trimerization domain of the bacteriophage T4 fibritin, termed 'foldon' (Fd). scFv50AD1-Fd was expressed as soluble recombinant protein in bacterial periplasmic space and purified through affinity chromatography. The molecular integrity and stability were analyzed by polyacrylamide gradient-gel electrophoresis, size-exclusion chromatography and incubation in human sera. The antigen-binding properties of the trimeric scFv were analyzed by direct and competitive-ELISA. Its apparent affinity constant was estimated at 1.4 ± 0.25 × 10(9)M(-1) and was 75-fold higher than its monovalent scFv (1.9 ± 0.68 × 10(7)M(-1)). The scFv50AD1-Fd neutralized rabies virus in a standard in vitro and in vivo neutralization assay. We showed a high neutralization activity up to 75-fold compared with monovalent format and the WHO standard serum. The gain in avidity resulting from multivalency along with an improved biological activity makes the trivalent scFv50AD1-Fd construct an important reagent for rabies protection. The antibody engineering approach presented here may serve as a strategy for designing a new generation of anti-rabies for passive immunotherapy.

  12. Structure-function relationships of curaremimetic neurotoxin loop 2 and of a structurally similar segment of rabies virus glycoprotein in their interaction with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Lentz, T.L. )

    1991-11-12

    Peptides corresponding to portions of curaremimetic neurotoxin loop 2 and to a structurally similar segment of rabies virus glycoprotein were synthetically modified in order to gain information on structure-function relationships of neurotoxin loop 2 interactions with the acetylcholine receptor. Binding of synthetic peptides to the acetylcholine receptor of Torpedo electric organ membranes was assessed by measuring their ability to inhibit the binding of {sup 125}I-{alpha}-bungarotoxin to the receptor. The peptides showing the highest affinity for the receptor were a peptide corresponding to the sequence of loop 2 (residues 25-44) of Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra) toxin b and the structurally similar segment of CVS rabies virus glycoprotein. These affinities were comparable to those of d-tubocurarine and suberyldicholine. These results demonstrate the importance of loop 2 in the neurotoxin interaction with the receptor. N- and C-terminal deletions of the loop 2 peptides and substitution of residues invariant or highly conserved among neurotoxins were performed in order to determine the role of individual residues in binding. Residues 25-40 are the most crucial in the interaction with the acetylcholine receptor. Since this region of the glycoprotein contains residues corresponding to all of the functionally invariant neurotoxin residues, it may interact with the acetylcholine receptor through a mechanism similar to that of the neurotoxins.

  13. A brain-targeted rabies virus glycoprotein-disulfide linked PEI nanocarrier for delivery of neurogenic microRNA.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Do Won; Son, Sejin; Jang, Jaeho; Youn, Hyewon; Lee, Song; Lee, Duhwan; Lee, Yun-Sang; Jeong, Jae Min; Kim, Won Jong; Lee, Dong Soo

    2011-07-01

    Recent advances in efficient microRNA (miRNA) delivery techniques using brain-targeted nanoparticles offer critical information for understanding the functional role of miRNAs in vivo, and for supporting targeted gene therapy in terms of treating miRNA-associated neurological diseases. Here, we report the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG)-labeled non-toxic SSPEI nanomaterials capable of neuron-specific miR-124a delivery to neuron in vivo. The RVG-labeled BPEI-SS (RVG-SSPEI) nanocarrier showed less toxicity in acetylcholine receptor-positive Neuro2a cells, and electrostatic interaction of RVG-SSPEI with miR-124a exhibited optimal transfection efficacy. The RVG-SSPEI polymer specifically targeted Neuro2a using cy5.5-miR-124a mixed with RVG-SSPEI. The functional action of miR-124a oligomers released from polyplexes in the cytoplasmic region was evaluated by a reporter vector containing a miR-124a -binding sequence, and showed a significantly reduced reporter signal in a dose-dependent manner. Cy5.5-miR-124a/RVG-SSPEI- injected into mice via tail veins displayed the enhanced accumulation of miR-124a in the isolated brain. Hindrance of the efficient penetration of neuronal cells by size limitation of the miR-124a/RVG-SSPEI improved with the help of mannitol through blood-brain barrier disruption. These findings indicated that the RVG peptide combined with mannitol infusion using SSPEI polymer for neuron-specific targeting in vivo is sufficient to deliver neurogenic microRNA into the brain.

  14. Expression and solubilization of insect cell-based rabies virus glycoprotein and assessment of its immunogenicity and protective efficacy in mice.

    PubMed

    Ramya, R; Mohana Subramanian, B; Sivakumar, V; Senthilkumar, R L; Sambasiva Rao, K R S; Srinivasan, V A

    2011-10-01

    Rabies is a fatal zoonotic disease of serious public health and economic significance worldwide. The rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG) has been the major target for subunit vaccine development, since it harbors domains responsible for induction of virus-neutralizing antibodies, infectivity, and neurovirulence. The glycoprotein (G) was cloned using the baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS) and expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf-9) cells. In order to obtain a soluble form of G suitable for experimentation in mice, 18 different combinations of buffers and detergents were evaluated for their ability to solubilize the insect cell membrane-associated G. The combination that involved 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)-dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) detergent in lysis buffer 1, formulated with Tris, NaCl, 10% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), and EDTA, gave the highest yield of soluble G, as evidenced by the experimental data. Subsequently, several other parameters, such as the concentration of CHAPS and the duration and temperature of the treatment for the effective solubilization of G, were optimized. The CHAPS detergent, buffered at a concentration of 0.4% to 0.7% (wt/vol) at room temperature (23 to 25°C) for 30 min to 1 h using buffer 1, containing 10% DMSO, resulted in consistently high yields. The G solubilized using CHAPS detergent was found to be immunogenic when tested in mice, as evidenced by high virus-neutralizing antibody titers in sera and 100% protection upon virulent intracerebral challenge with the challenge virus standard (CVS) strain of rabies virus. The results of the mice study indicated that G solubilized with CHAPS detergent retained the immunologically relevant domains in the native conformation, thereby paving the way for producing a cell-free and efficacious subunit vaccine.

  15. Inactivation of rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guanghui; Selden, David; Fooks, Anthony R; Banyard, Ashley

    2017-05-01

    Rabies virus is a notifiable pathogen that must be handled in high containment facilities where national and international guidelines apply. For the effective inactivation of rabies virus, a number of reagents were tested. Virkon S (1%) solution caused more than 4log reduction of rabies virus in culture medium supplemented with 10% foetal calf serum within 1min. Isopropyl alcohol (70%) treatment resulted in >3log reduction of rabies virus within 20s when applied at a ratio of 19:1, making it a suitable agent for surface decontamination whereas 70% ethanol was ineffective. Rabies virus (from 10(2.33) to 10(3)ffu/ml) was also inactivated when cell cultures were fixed with 3% or 4% paraformaldehyde for 30min. Regardless of inactivation procedure, when taking inactivated virus preparations out of a biological containment envelope, proof of inocuity must be demonstrated to cover any possible error/deviation from procedure. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The glycoprotein and the matrix protein of rabies virus affect pathogenicity by regulating viral replication and facilitating cell-to-cell spread.

    PubMed

    Pulmanausahakul, Rojjanaporn; Li, Jianwei; Schnell, Matthias J; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    2008-03-01

    While the glycoprotein (G) of rabies virus (RV) is known to play a predominant role in the pathogenesis of rabies, the function of the RV matrix protein (M) in RV pathogenicity is not completely clear. To further investigate the roles of these proteins in viral pathogenicity, we constructed chimeric recombinant viruses by exchanging the G and M genes of the attenuated SN strain with those of the highly pathogenic SB strain. Infection of mice with these chimeric viruses revealed a significant increase in the pathogenicity of the SN strain bearing the RV G from the pathogenic SB strain. Moreover, the pathogenicity was further increased when both G and M from SB were introduced into SN. Interestingly, the replacement of the G or M gene or both in SN by the corresponding genes of SB was associated with a significant decrease in the rate of viral replication and viral RNA synthesis. In addition, a chimeric SN virus bearing both the M and G genes from SB exhibited more efficient cell-to-cell spread than a chimeric SN virus in which only the G gene was replaced. Together, these data indicate that both G and M play an important role in RV pathogenesis by regulating virus replication and facilitating cell-to-cell spread.

  17. The Glycoprotein and the Matrix Protein of Rabies Virus Affect Pathogenicity by Regulating Viral Replication and Facilitating Cell-to-Cell Spread▿

    PubMed Central

    Pulmanausahakul, Rojjanaporn; Li, Jianwei; Schnell, Matthias J.; Dietzschold, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    While the glycoprotein (G) of rabies virus (RV) is known to play a predominant role in the pathogenesis of rabies, the function of the RV matrix protein (M) in RV pathogenicity is not completely clear. To further investigate the roles of these proteins in viral pathogenicity, we constructed chimeric recombinant viruses by exchanging the G and M genes of the attenuated SN strain with those of the highly pathogenic SB strain. Infection of mice with these chimeric viruses revealed a significant increase in the pathogenicity of the SN strain bearing the RV G from the pathogenic SB strain. Moreover, the pathogenicity was further increased when both G and M from SB were introduced into SN. Interestingly, the replacement of the G or M gene or both in SN by the corresponding genes of SB was associated with a significant decrease in the rate of viral replication and viral RNA synthesis. In addition, a chimeric SN virus bearing both the M and G genes from SB exhibited more efficient cell-to-cell spread than a chimeric SN virus in which only the G gene was replaced. Together, these data indicate that both G and M play an important role in RV pathogenesis by regulating virus replication and facilitating cell-to-cell spread. PMID:18094173

  18. Molecular genetic characterization of rabies virus glycoprotein gene sequences from rabid dogs in Bangkok and neighboring provinces in Thailand, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Benjathummarak, Surachet; Fa-Ngoen, Chanon; Pipattanaboon, Chonlatip; Boonha, Khwanchit; Ramasoota, Pongrama; Pitaksajjakul, Pannamthip

    2016-05-01

    Because of its association with dogs, rabies virus (RABV) is still endemic in Thailand, where it is a serious public health problem. The genetic characterization of RABV in Thailand is limited. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the molecular epidemiology and genetic diversity of RABV in the endemic area. Viral RNA from 48 brain specimens from rabid dogs, collected in Bangkok and seven neighboring provinces in 2013-2014, was extracted and sequenced. The complete rabies glycoprotein (G) gene sequences (1575 nt) were aligned, and a phylogenetic analysis was performed using the maximum-likelihood method. All of the Thai rabies virus isolates belonged to lyssavirus genotype 1 and clustered in the same lineage as isolates from South East Asia (SEA) and China. The Thai rabies virus isolates formed two distinct clades, THA-1 and THA-2. Clade THA-1 was the predominant clade and could be divided into two subclades, THA-1A and THA-1B. Clade THA-2 was closely associated with human Thai isolates collected in a previous study. The overall mean rate of evolution based on the G gene was approximately 1.56 × 10(-4) substitutions/site/year. The genetic identities among the isolates from Thailand and other SEA countries were >88.4 % at the nucleotide sequence level and 95 % at the amino acid sequence level. The deduced amino acid sequences of the G proteins of the RABV isolates were compared. A single amino acid change (N194T) in subclade THA-1A distinguished the Thai RABV isolates from other RABV isolates. Our results suggest that these Thai dog RABV isolates share a common ancestor with the RABV isolates circulating in the endemic regions of SEA countries and China. Furthermore, there were strong genetic relationship to RABV from Cambodia, Vietnam and Laos. These data extend our understanding of the relatedness and genetic variation of RABV in Thailand.

  19. An mRNA Vaccine Encoding Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Induces Protection against Lethal Infection in Mice and Correlates of Protection in Adult and Newborn Pigs.

    PubMed

    Schnee, Margit; Vogel, Annette B; Voss, Daniel; Petsch, Benjamin; Baumhof, Patrick; Kramps, Thomas; Stitz, Lothar

    2016-06-01

    Rabies is a zoonotic infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS). In unvaccinated or untreated subjects, rabies virus infection causes severe neurological symptoms and is invariably fatal. Despite the long-standing existence of effective vaccines, vaccine availability remains insufficient, with high numbers of fatal infections mostly in developing countries. Nucleic acid based vaccines have proven convincingly as a new technology for the fast development of vaccines against newly emerging pathogens, diseases where no vaccine exists or for replacing already existing vaccines. We used an optimized non-replicating rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G) encoding messenger RNA (mRNA) to induce potent neutralizing antibodies (VN titers) in mice and domestic pigs. Functional antibody titers were followed in mice for up to one year and titers remained stable for the entire observation period in all dose groups. T cell analysis revealed the induction of both, specific CD4+ as well as CD8+ T cells by RABV-G mRNA, with the induced CD4+ T cells being higher than those induced by a licensed vaccine. Notably, RABV-G mRNA vaccinated mice were protected against lethal intracerebral challenge infection. Inhibition of viral replication by vaccination was verified by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CD4+ T cells are crucial for the generation of neutralizing antibodies. In domestic pigs we were able to induce VN titers that correlate with protection in adult and newborn pigs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a non-replicating mRNA rabies vaccine in small and large animals and highlights the promises of mRNA vaccines for the prevention of infectious diseases.

  20. An mRNA Vaccine Encoding Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Induces Protection against Lethal Infection in Mice and Correlates of Protection in Adult and Newborn Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Daniel; Petsch, Benjamin; Baumhof, Patrick; Kramps, Thomas; Stitz, Lothar

    2016-01-01

    Rabies is a zoonotic infectious disease of the central nervous system (CNS). In unvaccinated or untreated subjects, rabies virus infection causes severe neurological symptoms and is invariably fatal. Despite the long-standing existence of effective vaccines, vaccine availability remains insufficient, with high numbers of fatal infections mostly in developing countries. Nucleic acid based vaccines have proven convincingly as a new technology for the fast development of vaccines against newly emerging pathogens, diseases where no vaccine exists or for replacing already existing vaccines. We used an optimized non-replicating rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G) encoding messenger RNA (mRNA) to induce potent neutralizing antibodies (VN titers) in mice and domestic pigs. Functional antibody titers were followed in mice for up to one year and titers remained stable for the entire observation period in all dose groups. T cell analysis revealed the induction of both, specific CD4+ as well as CD8+ T cells by RABV-G mRNA, with the induced CD4+ T cells being higher than those induced by a licensed vaccine. Notably, RABV-G mRNA vaccinated mice were protected against lethal intracerebral challenge infection. Inhibition of viral replication by vaccination was verified by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, we demonstrate that CD4+ T cells are crucial for the generation of neutralizing antibodies. In domestic pigs we were able to induce VN titers that correlate with protection in adult and newborn pigs. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a non-replicating mRNA rabies vaccine in small and large animals and highlights the promises of mRNA vaccines for the prevention of infectious diseases. PMID:27336830

  1. Transduction of motor neurons and muscle fibers by intramuscular injection of HIV-1-based vectors pseudotyped with select rabies virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Mentis, George Z; Gravell, Maneth; Hamilton, Rebecca; Shneider, Neil A; O'Donovan, Michael J; Schubert, Manfred

    2006-10-30

    For studies of motor neuron function or for therapeutic purposes, novel pseudotype HIV-1-based vectors were developed that are capable of expressing transgenes in motor neurons following injection into mouse hind limb muscles. To specifically target motor neurons, glycoproteins from two rabies virus (RV) isolates, the mouse-brain adapted challenge virus 24 (CVS-24) variants, CVS-N2c and CVS-B2c were evaluated for pseudotype formation with an HIV-1-based vector. Both RV glycoproteins incorporated into vector envelopes, and both pseudotypes yielded high titers with Hek293T and cortical plate neuron cultures. Increased neuronotropism by the CVS-N2c pseudotype was not observed, suggesting that vector tropism is not solely determined by the fusogenic viral glycoprotein. Vector injection into hind limb muscles resulted in EYFP reporter gene expression in the injected muscle fibers and in spinal cord motor neurons innervating the same muscle, indicating retrograde vector transport. Intramuscular vector injections into the soleus and tibialis anterior muscles transduced 26% and 16% of all motor neurons in each motor nucleus, respectively. These transduction efficiencies may allow novel approaches to functional studies of the motor system and the treatment of neuromuscular disease.

  2. Structure-function relationships of curaremimetic neurotoxin loop 2 and of a structurally similar segment of rabies virus glycoprotein in their interaction with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Lentz, T L

    1991-11-12

    Peptides corresponding to portions of curaremimetic neurotoxin loop 2 and to a structurally similar segment of rabies virus glycoprotein were synthetically modified in order to gain information on structure-function relationships of neurotoxin loop 2 interactions with the acetylcholine receptor. Binding of synthetic peptides to the acetylcholine receptor of Torpedo electric organ membranes was assessed by measuring their ability to inhibit the binding of 125I-alpha-bungarotoxin to the receptor. The peptides showing the highest affinity for the receptor were a peptide corresponding to the sequence of loop 2 (residues 25-44) of Ophiophagus hannah (king cobra) toxin b (IC50 = 5.7 x 10(-6) M) and the structurally similar segment (residues 173-203) of CVS rabies virus glycoprotein (IC50 = 2.6 x 10(-6) M). These affinities were comparable to those of d-tubocurarine (IC50 = 3.4 x 10(-6) M) and suberyldicholine (IC50 = 2.5 x 10(-6) M). These results demonstrate the importance of loop 2 in the neurotoxin interaction with the receptor. N- and C-terminal deletions of the loop 2 peptides and substitution of residues invariant or highly conserved among neurotoxins were performed in order to determine the role of individual residues in binding. Residues 25-40 are the most crucial in the interaction with the acetylcholine receptor. Modifications involving Lys-27, Trp-29, Phe-33, Arg-37, and Gly-38 reduced affinity of binding. R37D and F33T modifications reduced the affinity of alpha-bungarotoxin residues 28-40 by an order of magnitude. Arg-37 may correspond to the positively charged quaternary ammonium group and Phe-33 to the hydrophobic acetyl methyl group of acetylcholine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Induction of a protective immune response to rabies virus in sheep after oral immunization with transgenic maize, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth; Rojas-Anaya, Edith; López, Juan; Olivera-Flores, María Teresa; Gómez-Lim, Miguel; Tapia-Pérez, Graciela

    2012-08-10

    The introduction of exogenous genes into plants permits the development of a new generation of biological products, i.e., edible vaccines. Cereals, especially maize, have been the systems of choice for the expression of antigenic proteins because the proteins can be expressed at high levels in the kernel and stored for prolonged periods without excessive deterioration. The utilization of plant-derived antigens for oral delivery provides an alternative strategy for the control of pathogens in animals compared to the current vaccine administration methods, such as injection. However, there is some doubt about the efficacy of these types of vaccines in polygastric animals due to the features of their digestive system. Here, we report the efficacy of an edible vaccine against rabies evaluated in sheep. Kernels containing different doses of G protein (0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2mg) were given in a single dose by the oral route. Cumulative survival was better in groups that received 2mg of G protein and for the positive control (inactivated rabies vaccine); this observation was supported by the presence of neutralizing antibodies. Animals in the control group died after challenge. The degree of protection achieved for 2mg of G protein was comparable to that conferred by a commercial vaccine. In conclusion, this is the first study in which an orally administered edible vaccine showed efficacy in a polygastric model. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of the single radial-immunodiffusion assay for measuring the glycoprotein content of rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Mayner, R E; Needy, C F

    1987-01-01

    The glycoprotein content of rabies vaccines containing the Pitman-Moore strain of rabies virus was measured by the single radial immunodiffusion assay and correlated with vaccine potency. The variability of this assay was 6.3% for a single vaccine lot tested over a one-year period. Using sera prepared against rabies virus glycoprotein from different strains of virus, the assay gave different values. These differences could be eliminated by using a homologous vaccine strain as an internal reference. Single radial-immunodiffusion values for Pitman-Moore vaccines correlated with the manufacturers' NIH potency assay, but required a mathematical transformation to convert values from one assay to the other. Single radial-immunodiffusion values for Street Alabama Dufferin and Flury-LEP vaccines did not correlate with NIH values. Modification of the single radial immunodiffusion technique and the feasibility of using this assay for the determination of rabies vaccine potency are discussed.

  5. Design and generation of recombinant rabies virus vectors

    PubMed Central

    Osakada, Fumitaka; Callaway, Edward M.

    2014-01-01

    Rabies viruses, negative-strand RNA viruses, infect neurons through axon terminals and spread transsynaptically in a retrograde direction between neurons. Rabies viruses whose glycoprotein (G) gene is deleted from the genome cannot spread across synapses. Complementation of G in trans, however, enables transsynaptic spreading of G-deleted rabies viruses to directly-connected, presynaptic neurons. Recombinant rabies viruses can encode genes of interest for labeling cells, controlling gene expression, and monitoring or manipulating neural activity. Cre-dependent or bridge-protein-mediated transduction and single-cell electroporation via EnvA/TVA or EnvB/TVB system allow cell-type-specific or single-cell-specific targeting. These rabies virus-based approaches permit the linking of connectivity to cell morphology and circuit function for particular cell types or single cells. Here we describe methods for construction of rabies viral vectors, recovery of G-deleted rabies viruses from cDNA, amplification of the viruses, pseudotyping them with EnvA or EnvB, and concentration and titration of the viruses. The entire protocol takes 6–8 weeks. PMID:23887178

  6. Enhanced BBB permeability of osmotically active poly(mannitol-co-PEI) modified with rabies virus glycoprotein via selective stimulation of caveolar endocytosis for RNAi therapeutics in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Tae-Eun; Singh, Bijay; Li, Huishan; Lee, Jun-Yeong; Kang, Sang-Kee; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Cho, Chong-Su

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) holds one of the promising tools for Alzheimer's disease (AD) treatment by directly arresting the causative genes. For successful RNAi therapeutics for AD, limited access of therapeutic genes to the brain needs to be overcome by developing siRNA delivery system that could cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, we report a non-viral vector, rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG)-modified poly(mannitol-co-PEI) gene transporter (PMT), R-PEG-PMT. The RVG ligand directed the PMT/siRNA complexes toward the brain through binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed on BBB. In mechanistic study using in vitro BBB model, we observed that osmotically-active PMT enhanced the receptor-mediated transcytosis by stimulating the caveolar endocytosis. The potential of RNAi therapeutics for AD using R-PEG-PMT/siBACE1 complexes was demonstrated in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that R-PEG-PMT is a powerful gene carrier system for brain targeted RNAi therapeutics with synergistic effect of RVG ligand and PMT on well-modulated receptor-mediated transcytosis through BBB.

  7. Pathogenesis of rabies virus infection in dogs.

    PubMed

    Fekadu, M

    1988-01-01

    Most dogs experimentally infected with street rabies virus showed clinical signs of rabies before death, but up to 18% of the dogs died without showing detectable signs of illness. In dogs showing signs, rabies was not invariably fatal. Up to 20% of dogs recovered without any supportive treatment. Some dogs inoculated with American (southern Texas) or Ethiopian canine street virus excreted virus in their saliva up to 14 days before signs appeared. There was no relation between the time of excretion of virus in the saliva and the titer of virus in the salivary glands at death. One dog that recovered from rabies intermittently excreted rabies virus in its saliva for a long time. The carrier state in rabies may play a significant role in the perpetuation and survival of the virus and may become a source for rabies outbreaks whenever a new generation of rabies susceptibles reaches critical density.

  8. The rabies viruses of bats.

    PubMed

    King, A; Davies, P; Lawrie, A

    1990-06-01

    In the 1930s rabies was shown to affect blood-, insect- and fruit-eating bats. We have prepared anti-nucleocapsid monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) using Mokola and bat (Lagos, Duvenhage and Denmark) rabies viruses as immunogens. With these MAbs we have examined rabies viruses from vampire, insectivorous and frugivorous bats from the Americas, Africa, Europe and the Soviet Union and have compared them with isolates from terrestrial species including man. As well as confirming the findings of others with viruses of African and American bat origin, the results revealed the presence of a second biotype in European bats and demonstrated the presence of serotype 1 as well as serotype 4 viruses in bats of the Soviet Union.

  9. Rabies and rabies virus in wildlife in mainland China, 1990-2013.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihua; Tang, Qing; Liang, Guodong

    2014-08-01

    The number of wildlife rabies and wildlife-associated human and livestock rabies cases has increased in recent years, particularly in the southeast and northeast regions of mainland China. To better understand wildlife rabies and its role in human and livestock rabies, we reviewed what is known about wildlife rabies from the 1990s to 2013 in mainland China. In addition, the genetic diversity and phylogeny of available wildlife-originated rabies viruses (RABVs) were analyzed. Several wildlife species carry rabies including the bat, Chinese ferret badger, raccoon dog, rat, fox, and wolf. RABVs have been isolated or detected in the bat, Chinese ferret badger, raccoon dog, Apodemus, deer, and vole. Among them, the bat, Chinese ferret badger, and raccoon dog may play a role in the ecology of lyssaviruses in mainland China. All wildlife-originated RABVs were found to belong to genotype 1 RABV except for a bat-originated Irkut virus isolated in 2012. Several substitutions were found between the glycoprotein of wildlife-originated RABVs and vaccine strains. Whether these substitutions could affect the efficacy of currently used vaccines against infections caused by these wildlife-originated RABVs needs to be investigated further. Phylogenetic analysis showed that RABVs in the bat, Chinese ferret badger, and raccoon dog were distinct from local dog-originated RABVs, and almost all collected wildlife-originated isolates were associated with older China clades II to V, suggesting the possibility of wildlife reservoirs in mainland China through the ages.

  10. A rapid immunochromatographic test strip for detecting rabies virus antibody.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hualei; Feng, Na; Yang, Songtao; Wang, Chengyu; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Yuwei; Su, Jianqing; Zheng, Xuexing; Hou, Xiaoqiang; Huang, Hainan; Yang, Ruimei; Zou, Xiaohuan; Huang, Geng; Xia, Xianzhu

    2010-12-01

    An immunochromatographic test strip (ICTS) for detecting antibodies to rabies virus was developed, using colloidal gold particles labeled with rabies virus glycoprotein as the tracer. The assay was evaluated using sera from dogs immunized with various commercial rabies vaccines, or from dogs in the clinics and sera from dogs immunized with vaccines against pathogens other than rabies virus, and negative sera from a wide variety of animal sources, including dogs, mice, and cats which had never been vaccinated. The ICTS was found to be highly specific for antibodies against rabies virus, with a detection limit of 0.5IU/ml as measured by the fluorescent antibody virus neutralization (FAVN) test. Compared with the FAVN test, the specificity and sensitivity of ICTS were 98.2% and 90.4%, respectively. There was an excellent agreement between results obtained by the ICTS and FAVN tests (kappa=0.888). Strips stored at 4°C in a plastic bag with a desiccant retained their specificity and sensitivity for at least 15 months, and strips stored at ambient temperature remained stable for 12 months. The immunochromatographic test strip may therefore be useful for clinical laboratories lacking specialized equipment and for diagnosis in the field for rapid detection of rabies virus-specific antibodies. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Rabies Virus-Induced Membrane Fusion Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gaudin, Yves

    2000-01-01

    Fusion of rabies virus with membranes is triggered at low pH and is mediated by the viral glycoprotein (G). The rabies virus-induced fusion pathway was studied by investigating the effects of exogenous lipids having various dynamic molecular shapes on the fusion process. Inverted cone-shaped lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs) blocked fusion at a stage subsequent to fusion peptide insertion into the target membrane. Consistent with the stalk-hypothesis, LPC with shorter alkyl chains inhibited fusion at lower membrane concentrations and this inhibition was compensated by the presence of oleic acid. However, under suboptimal fusion conditions, short chain LPCs, which were translocated in the inner leaflet of the membranes, considerably reduced the lag time preceding membrane merging, resulting in faster kinetics of fusion. This indicated that the rate limiting step for fusion is the formation of a fusion pore in a diaphragm of restricted hemifusion. The previously described cold-stabilized prefusion complex was also characterized. This intermediate is at a well-advanced stage of the fusion process when the hemifusion diaphragm is destabilized, but lipid mixing is still restricted, probably by a ring-like complex of glycoproteins. I provide evidence that this state has a dynamic character and that its lipid organization can reverse back to two lipid bilayers. PMID:10931871

  12. Rabies virus protein synthesis in infected BHK-21 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Madore, H P; England, J M

    1977-01-01

    Rabies virus specific polypeptide synthesis was examined under hypertonic conditions, which selectively inhibit cellular protein synthesis. The rabies virus proteins (L, G, N, M1, M2) were synthesized throughout the course of infection, with little change in their relative rates of synthesis. The rates of synthesis of the G and M1 polypeptides were more sensitive to increasing osmolarity than those of the L, N, and M2 polypeptides. Extrapolation to isotonicity of the results obtained under hypertonic conditions indicated that the molar ratios of the polypeptides synthesized under normal conditions were 0.4 (L), 64 (G), 100 (N), 75 (M1) and 35 (M2). A high-molecular-weight polypeptide (190,000), designated polypeptide L, was repeatedly detected both in infected cells and in extracellular virus. The estimated number of L polypeptide molecules per virion was 33. The synthesis of a viral glycoprotein precursor, designated gp78, , preceded the appearance of the mature viral glycoprotein in infected cells labeled with [3H]glucosamine under isotonic conditions. In cells labeled under hypertonic conditions, little or no mature viral glycoprotein was detected, but a virus-specific glycoprotein with an electrophoretic mobility similar to that of gp78 was observed. This glycoprotein could be chased into mature viral glycoprotein when the hypertonic conditions were made isotonic. These results suggest that a reversible block of viral glycoprotein synthesis occurs under hypertonic conditions. PMID:558341

  13. The Inability of Wild-Type Rabies Virus To Activate Dendritic Cells Is Dependent on the Glycoprotein and Correlates with Its Low Level of the De Novo-Synthesized Leader RNA

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Huang, Ying; Gnanadurai, Clement W.; Cao, Shengbo; Liu, Xueqin

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most efficient antigen-presenting cells, playing a key role in the adaptive immune responses to viral infections. Our studies demonstrate that wild-type (wt) rabies virus (RABV) does not activate DCs. Adoptive transfer of DCs primed with wt RABV did not activate DCs, stimulate virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA), or protect recipients against challenge. However, adoptive transfer of DCs primed with laboratory-attenuated RABV resulted in DC activation, production of VNA, and protection against challenge. In vitro studies with recombinant RABV (laboratory-attenuated RABV expressing the glycoprotein or the phosphoprotein from wt RABV) demonstrate that DC activation is dependent on the glycoprotein and involves the IPS-1 pathway. Furthermore, binding to and entry into DCs by wt RABV is severely blocked, and the copy number of de novo-synthesized leader RNA was two logs lower in DCs infected with the wt than in DCs treated with laboratory-attenuated RABV. However, transient transfection of DCs with synthesized leader RNA from either wt or attenuated RABV is capable of activating DCs in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, the inability of wt RABV to activate DCs correlates with its low level of the de novo-synthesized leader RNA. IMPORTANCE Rabies remains a public health threat, with more than 55,000 fatalities each year around the world. Since DCs play a key role in the adaptive immune responses to viral infections, we investigated the ability of rabies virus (RABV) to activate DCs. It was found that the adoptive transfer of DCs primed with wt RABV did not activate DCs, stimulate VNA, or protect mice against lethal challenge. However, laboratory-attenuated RABV mediates the activation of DCs via the IPS-1 pathway and is glycoprotein dependent. We further show that wt RABV evades DC-mediated immune activation by inefficient binding/entry into DCs and as a result of a reduced level of de novo-synthesized leader RNA. These findings may

  14. Selection of single chain variable fragments (scFv) against the glycoprotein antigen of the rabies virus from a human synthetic scFv phage display library and their fusion with the Fc region of human IgG1

    PubMed Central

    Ray, K; Embleton, M J; Jailkhani, B L; Bhan, M K; Kumar, R

    2001-01-01

    We have prepared human recombinant antibody molecules against the glycoprotein antigen of the rabies virus (GPRV) based on the single chain variable fragment (scFv) format. Anti-GPRV scFvs were selected from a human synthetic scFv phage display library with a repertoire of approximately 109 specificities. After three rounds of selection against the PV11 strain of the virus, 40% of the clones tested recognized the rabies antigen. Of the 20 positive clones that were sequenced, five distinct sequences were identified. These distinct scFvs were cloned into a mammalian expression vector carrying the human IgG1 Fc region. The specificity of the resulting scFv-Fc molecules for GPRV was established by ELISA, dot blot and western blot analyses and membrane immunofluorescence. Two of the scFv-Fc fusion proteins neutralized the PV11 strain in a standard in vivo neutralization assay where the virus was incubated with the scFv-Fc molecules before intracranial inoculation in mice. These anti-GPRV scFv-Fc molecules have the potential to be used as an alternative to the presently available HRIG, for use in post-exposure preventive treatment. PMID:11472431

  15. Epidemic and maintenance of rabies in Chinese ferret badgers (Melogale moschata) indicated by epidemiology and the molecular signatures of rabies viruses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shoufeng; Liu, Ye; Hou, Yanli; Zhao, Jinghui; Zhang, Fei; Wang, Ying; Hu, Rongliang

    2013-06-01

    An epidemic of Chinese ferret badger-associated human rabies was investigated in Wuyuan county, Jiangxi province and rabies viruses isolates from ferret badgers in different districts in Jiangxi and Zhejiang provinces were sequenced with their nucleotides and amino acids and aligned for epidemiological analysis. The results showed that the human rabies in Wuyuan are only associated with ferret badger bites; the rabies virus can be isolated in a high percentage of ferret badgers in the epidemic areas in Jiangxi and Zhejiang provinces; the isolates share the same molecular features in nucleotides and have characteristic amino acid signatures, i.e., 2 sites in the nucleoprotein and 3 sites in the glycoprotein, that are distinct from virus isolates from dogs in the same region. We conclude that rabies in Chinese ferret badgers has formed an independent transmission cycle and ferret badgers may serve as another important rabies reservoir independent of dog rabies in China.

  16. Rabies virus neuritic paralysis: immunopathogenesis of nonfatal paralytic rabies.

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, F; Cox, J H; Meyer, S; Dahme, E; Reddehase, M J

    1992-01-01

    Two pathogenetically distinct disease manifestations are distinguished in a murine model of primary rabies virus infection with the Evelyn-Rokitnicky-Abelseth strain, rabies virus neuritic paralysis (RVNP) and fatal encephalopathogenic rabies. RVNP develops with high incidence in immunocompetent mice after intraplantar infection as a flaccid paralysis restricted to the infected limb. The histopathologic correlate of this monoplegia is a degeneration of the myelinated motor neurons of the peripheral nerve involved. While, in this model, fatal encephalopathogenic rabies develops only after depletion of the CD4 subset of T lymphocytes and without contribution of the CD8 subset, RVNP is identified as an immunopathological process in which both the CD4 and CD8 subsets of T lymphocytes are critically implicated. Images PMID:1629964

  17. Rabies

    MedlinePlus

    Rabies is a deadly animal disease caused by a virus. It can happen in wild animals, including ... of an infected animal. In people, symptoms of rabies include fever, headache and fatigue, then confusion, hallucinations ...

  18. Rabies Virus-Inspired Silica-Coated Gold Nanorods as a Photothermal Therapeutic Platform for Treating Brain Tumors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Changkyu; Hwang, Ha Shin; Lee, Sungin; Kim, Bomi; Kim, Jong Oh; Oh, Kyung Taek; Lee, Eun Seong; Choi, Han-Gon; Youn, Yu Seok

    2017-04-01

    Rabies virus-inspired silica-coated gold nanorods are fabricated by mimicking size, shape, surface glycoprotein property and in vivo behavior of the rabies virus. These nanorods not only resemble the appearance of the actual rabies virus but also travel into the brain through the neuronal pathway bypassing the blood-brain barrier, and moreover respond to near-infrared laser (808 nm) irradiation, emit heat, and effectively suppress brain tumors.

  19. Rabies.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Nark

    2013-01-01

    Rabies has been a scourge of mankind since antiquity. The name itself, ?rabies? is derived from the ancient Sanskrit rabhas meaning ?to do violence? and has been found described in medical writings several thousand years old. The rabies virus is an RNA virus of the family Rhabdoviridae (Greek for ?rod-shaped virus?), genus Lyssavirus (Lyssa being the Greek God of frenzy and rage). Rabies infections have a worldwide spread, with only a few, mostly island nations laying claim to being ?rabies free.? 2013.

  20. Rabies Virus in Raccoons, Ohio, 2004

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, J. Caroline; Biek, Roman; Hanlon, Cathleen A.; O'Dee, Scott

    2008-01-01

    In 2004, the raccoon rabies virus variant emerged in Ohio beyond an area where oral rabies vaccine had been distributed to prevent westward spread of this variant. Our genetic investigation indicates that this outbreak may have begun several years before 2004 and may have originated within the vaccination zone. PMID:18394286

  1. Ecology and evolution of rabies virus in Europe.

    PubMed

    Bourhy, H; Kissi, B; Audry, L; Smreczak, M; Sadkowska-Todys, M; Kulonen, K; Tordo, N; Zmudzinski, J F; Holmes, E C

    1999-10-01

    The evolution of rabies viruses of predominantly European origin was studied by comparing nucleotide sequences of the nucleoprotein and glycoprotein genes, and by typing isolates using RFLP. Phylogenetic analysis of the gene sequence data revealed a number of distinct groups, each associated with a particular geographical area. Such a pattern suggests that rabies virus has spread westwards and southwards across Europe during this century, but that physical barriers such as the Vistula river in Poland have enabled localized evolution. During this dispersal process, two species jumps took place - one into red foxes and another into raccoon dogs, although it is unclear whether virus strains are preferentially adapted to particular animal species or whether ecological forces explain the occurrence of the phylogenetic groups.

  2. Solubilization of glycoproteins of envelope viruses by detergents

    SciTech Connect

    Berezin, V.E.; Zaides, V.M.; Artamsnov, A.F.; Isaeva, E.S.; Zhdanov, V.M.

    1986-11-20

    The action of a number of known ionic and nonionic detergents, as well as the new nonionic detergent MESK, on envelope viruses was investigated. It was shown that the nonionic detergents MESK, Triton X-100, and octyl-..beta..-D-glucopyranoside selectively solubilize the outer glycoproteins of the virus particles. The nonionic detergent MESK has the mildest action. Using MESK, purified glycoproteins of influenza, parainfluenza, Venezuelan equine encephalomyelitis, vesicular stomatitis, rabies, and herpes viruses were obtained. The procedure for obtaining glycoproteins includes incubation of the virus suspension with the detergent MESK, removal of subvirus structures by centrifuging, and purification of glycoproteins from detergents by dialysis. Isolated glycoproteins retain a native structure and biological activity and possess high immunogenicity. The detergent MESK is promising for laboratory tests and with respect to the production of subunit vaccines.

  3. Flagellin FljB as an adjuvant to the recombinant adenovirus rabies glycoprotein vaccine increases immune responses against rabies in mice.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xingxing; Zhang, Yun; Wei, Qiaolin; Yin, Xiangping

    2017-05-26

    Rabies virus (RABV) causes an acute progressive viral encephalitis. Although currently licensed vaccines have an excellent safety and efficacy record, the development of a safer and more cost-effective vaccine is still being sought. An E1-deleted, replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (HAd5) vector expressing RABV glycoprotein (HAd5-G) is thought to be a promising candidate vaccine for immune prophylaxis against rabies. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) flagellin is a well-known immune adjuvant. In this work, we have researched the adjuvant effect of flagellins (FljB and FliC) for HAd5 in mice for the first time. We found that the recombinant HAd5 expressing RABV glycoprotein and FljB (HAd5-GB), if administered intramuscularly, but not orally, could induce stronger immune responses and provide better protection against rabies than HAd5-G or the recombinant HAd5 expressing glycoprotein and FliC (HAd5-GC). These results suggest that the recombinant HAd5-GB has potential for development as a promising rabies vaccine.

  4. Chimeric Rabies Virus-Like Particles Containing Membrane-Anchored GM-CSF Enhances the Immune Response against Rabies Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hongtao; Qi, Yinglin; Wang, Hualei; Zheng, Xuexing; Gao, Yuwei; Li, Nan; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2015-01-01

    Rabies remains an important public health threat in most developing countries. To develop a more effective and safe vaccine against rabies, we have constructed a chimeric rabies virus-like particle (VLP), which containing glycoprotein (G) and matrix protein (M) of rabies virus (RABV) Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth (ERA) strain, and membrane-anchored granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and it was named of EVLP-G. The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of EVLP-G against RABV were evaluated by intramuscular administration in a mouse model. The EVLP-G was successfully produced in insect cells by coinfection with three recombinant baculoviruses expressing G, M, and GM-CSF, respectively. The membrane-anchored GM-CSF possesses a strong adjuvant activity. More B cells and dendritic cells (DCs) were recruited and/or activated in inguinal lymph nodes in mice immunized with EVLP-G. EVLP-G was found to induce a significantly increased RABV-specific virus-neutralizing antibody and elicit a larger and broader antibody subclass responses compared with the standard rabies VLP (sRVLP, consisting of G and M). The EVLP-G also elicited significantly more IFN-γ- or IL-4-secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells than the sRVLP. Moreover, the immune responses induced by EVLP-G protect all vaccinated mice from lethal challenge with RABV. These results suggest that EVLP-G has the potential to be developed as a novel vaccine candidate for the prevention and control of animal rabies. PMID:25768031

  5. [Rabies].

    PubMed

    Nishizono, Akira

    2009-02-01

    Rabies is a fetal viral encephalitis caused by the rabies virus, that is mainly transmitted through the saliva of infected domestic or wild animals. Rabies remains an important public health issue worldwide due to the prevalence of endemic dog rabies in developing countries. The epidemiological impact is particularly still high in Asian and African countries. In contrast, in the developed countries, including Japan, rabies is a re-emerging disease. The Lyssaviruses (types EBLV and ABL) and rabies virus infections via bats have recently emerged in Europe and the United States. Although the incubation period averages 1-3 months, there is no known treatment once the symptoms of rabies appear. On the basis of clinical manifestations, rabies can be classified into 2 types: furious and paralytic rabies. The former is characterized by the well-known symptoms of hydrophobia, aerophobia, and hypersalivation. However the latter type is likely to be misdiagnosed because of its similarity to Guillian-Barré syndrome and neuropsychiatric illnesses. Therefore, post-exposure treatment (PET) using a tissue-culture vaccine is the only way to prevent the disease. In the case of exposure to severe bites (WHO category III), rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) is essential for PET. Although the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of rabies remains poorly understood, the recent technique of reverse genetics can be a useful tool for understanding rabies pathogenesis at a genetic level. Japan has been free of rabies for over 50 years because of the proper registration of domestic animals and control over their vaccinations. However, it is necessary to always remember that rabies is still a global burden as a representative of a re-emerging disease.

  6. Rabies direct fluorescent antibody test does not inactivate rabies or eastern equine encephalitis viruses.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Jodie A; Franke, Mary A; Davis, April D

    2016-08-01

    An examination using the routine rabies direct fluorescent antibody test was performed on rabies or Eastern equine encephalitis positive mammalian brain tissue to assess inactivation of the virus. Neither virus was inactivated with acetone fixation nor the routine test, thus laboratory employees should treat all samples as rabies and when appropriate Eastern equine encephalitis positive throughout the whole procedure.

  7. Rabies virus binding to an acetylcholine receptor alpha-subunit peptide.

    PubMed

    Lentz, T L

    1990-04-01

    The binding of 125I-labeled rabies virus to a synthetic peptide comprising residues 173-204 of the alpha 1-subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor was investigated. Binding of rabies virus to the receptor peptide was dependent on pH, could be competed with by unlabeled homologous virus particles, and was saturable. Synthetic peptides of snake venom, curaremimetic neurotoxins and of the structurally similar segment of the rabies virus glycoprotein, were effective in competing with labeled virus binding to the receptor peptide at micromolar concentrations. Similarly, synthetic peptides of the binding domain on the acetylcholine receptor competed for binding. These findings suggest that both rabies virus and neurotoxins bind to residues 173-204 of the alpha 1-subunit of the acetylcholine receptor. Competition studies with shorter alpha-subunit peptides within this region indicate that the highest affinity virus binding determinants are located within residues 179-192. A rat nerve alpha 3-subunit peptide, that does not bind alpha-bungarotoxin, inhibited binding of virus to the alpha 1 peptide, suggesting that rabies binds to neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. These studies indicate that synthetic peptides of the glycoprotein binding domain and of the receptor binding domain may represent useful antiviral agents by targeting the recognition event between the viral attachment protein and the host cell receptor, and inhibiting attachment of virus to the receptor.

  8. Transcriptional mapping of rabies virus in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Flamand, A; Delagneau, J F

    1978-01-01

    Synthesis of the proteins of rabies virus was studied in hamster cells infected with UV-irradiated virus. The UV target size of genes L, N, M1, and M2 was measured during primary transcription. Except for N, the target size of the remaining genes was considerably larger than that of their physical sizes. The data fit the hypothesis that four genes occupy a single transcriptional unit and that transcription of rabies virus proceeds in the order N, M1, M2, and L. Images PMID:722860

  9. Molecular characterization of the complete genome of a street rabies virus WH11 isolated from donkey in China.

    PubMed

    Xie, Tingbo; Yu, Hua; Wu, Jie; Ming, Pinggang; Huang, Sijia; Shen, Zhijun; Xu, Gelin; Yan, Jiaxin; Yu, Bin; Zhou, Dunjin

    2012-12-01

    The complete genomic sequence of a rabies virus isolate WH11, isolated from brain tissue of a rabid donkey in China, was determined and compared with other rabies viruses. This is the first Chinese street strain which was isolated from donkey and the entire length and organization of the virus was similar to that of other rabies viruses. Multiple alignments of amino acid sequences of the nucleoprotein, phosphoprotein, matrix protein, glycoprotein, and large protein of WH11 with those of other rabies viruses were undertaken to examine the conservative degree of functional regions. Phylogenetic analysis using the complete genomic sequence of WH11 determined that this isolate is most closely related with rabies viruses previously isolated in China and the attenuated Chinese vaccine strain CTN181.

  10. Effects of aerosolized rabies virus exposure on bats and mice.

    PubMed

    Davis, April D; Rudd, Robert J; Bowen, Richard A

    2007-04-15

    Between 1956 and 1977, 4 human cases of rabies virus infection were attributed to aerosolized rabies virus; however, little work has been done to address this topic since the late 1960s. Employing modern nebulization equipment coupled with serologic, cell culture, and molecular technology, we have continued the investigation into aerosolized rabies virus as a potential route of transmission. Laboratory mice and 2 species of bats were exposed, through aerosol, to 3 variants of rabies virus. All bats survived exposure to aerosolized rabies virus and produced rabies neutralizing antibody. Several mice died of rabies as a result of aerosol exposure. Antibody response was followed for 6 months before animals were given an intramuscular challenge of rabies virus. Poor protection from challenge was afforded in bats, despite the presence of neutralizing antibodies.

  11. Rabies vaccine. Developments employing molecular biology methods.

    PubMed

    Paolazzi, C C; Pérez, O; De Filippo, J

    1999-04-01

    Rabies vaccines produced by means of molecular biology are described. Recombinant vaccines employing either viruses as vectors (vaccinia, adenovirus, poxvirus, baculovirus, plant viruses) or a plasmid vector carrying the rabies virus glycoprotein gene are discussed. Synthetic peptide technology directed to rabies vaccine production is also presented.

  12. Evidence from the anti-idiotypic network that the acetylcholine receptor is a rabies virus receptor.

    PubMed

    Hanham, C A; Zhao, F; Tignor, G H

    1993-01-01

    We have developed idiotype-anti-idiotype monoclonal antibodies that provide evidence for rabies virus binding to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR). Hybridoma cell lines 7.12 and 7.25 resulted after fusion of NS-1 myeloma cells with spleen cells from a BALB/c mouse immunized with rabies virus strain CVS. Antibody 7.12 reacted with viral glycoprotein and neutralized virus infectivity in vivo. It also neutralized infectivity in vitro when PC12 cells, which express neuronal AChR, but not CER cells or neuroblastoma cells (clone N18), which have no AChR, were used. Antibody 7.25 reacted with nucleocapsid protein. Anti-idiotypic monoclonal antibody B9 was produced from fusion of NS-1 cells with spleen cells from a mouse immunized with 7.12 Fab. In an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoprecipitation, B9 reacted with 7.12, polyclonal rabies virus immune dog serum, and purified AChR. The binding of B9 to 7.12 and immune dog serum was inhibited by AChR. B9 also inhibited the binding of 7.12 to rabies virus both in vitro and in vivo. Indirect immunofluorescence revealed that B9 reacted at neuromuscular junctions of mouse tissue. B9 also reacted in indirect immunofluorescence with distinct neurons in mouse and monkey brain tissue as well as with PC12 cells. B9 staining of neuronal elements in brain tissue of rabies virus-infected mice was greatly reduced. Rabies virus inhibited the binding of B9 to PC12 cells. Mice immunized with B9 developed low-titer rabies virus-neutralizing antibody. These mice were protected from lethal intramuscular rabies virus challenge. In contrast, anti-idiotypic antibody raised against nucleocapsid antibody 7.25 did not react with AChR.

  13. Synthetic peptides in the study of the interaction of rabies virus and the acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Lentz, T L; Hawrot, E; Donnelly-Roberts, D; Wilson, P T

    1988-01-01

    The neurotropism of some viruses may be explained in part by the attachment of these viruses to host cell receptors that are present on or even largely restricted to neurons. Rabies virus is an RNA virus that, after a period of replication in muscle, gains access to the central nervous system, where it selectively infects certain neuronal populations. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor occurs in high density at the neuromuscular junction and is present in the central nervous system. Although several different cell surface constituents may act as attachment determinants for rabies, direct binding of radioactively labeled virus to affinity-purified acetylcholine receptor has been demonstrated. Binding of virus to the receptor was saturable and inhibited by up to 50% by alpha-bungarotoxin, a snake venom neurotoxin that binds at or near the acetylcholine binding site on the receptor. The molecular basis for the virus-receptor interaction may lie in an amino acid sequence similarity between the snake venom neurotoxins and a segment of the rabies virus glycoprotein. Two peptides (10 and 13 residues) of the rabies virus glycoprotein and homologous bungarotoxin peptides were synthesized and tested for ability to compete with labeled alpha-bungarotoxin for binding to the acetylcholine receptor. The peptides were found to compete with toxin binding with affinities comparable to those of the cholinergic ligands d-tubocurarine and nicotine. These findings indicate that a segment of the rabies virus glycoprotein interacts with the acetylcholine receptor at or near the acetylcholine binding site of the receptor. The similarity between the virus glycoprotein and the neurotoxin was further evidenced by the cross reaction of antibody raised against the virus 10-mer with the bungarotoxin 10-mer. Binding of rabies virus to the acetylcholine receptor or to other neuronal bungarotoxin-binding proteins may be related to the neurotropism of this virus. In addition, knowledge of both

  14. Oral vaccination of raccoons (Procyon lotor) with genetically modified rabies virus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Blanton, Jesse D.; Self, Joshua; Niezgoda, Michael; Faber, Marie-Luise; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Rupprecht, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Oral vaccination is an important tool currently in use to control the spread of rabies in wildlife populations in various programs around the world. Oral rabies vaccination (ORV) of raccoons represents the largest targeted program to control wildlife rabies in the United States. Currently, the vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein recombinant virus vaccine (V-RG) is the only licensed oral rabies vaccine in the US. In the current study, captive raccoons were used to evaluate two previously described constructs of a rabies virus vaccine developed by reverse genetics (SPBNGAS and SPBNGAS-GAS) for immunogenicity and efficacy compared to the V-RG vaccine. Four of five control animals succumbed to rabies virus after severe challenge, while three of five animals vaccinated orally with SPBNGAS succumbed. No mortality was observed for animals administered SPBNGAS-GAS or the V-RG vaccine. The results of this preliminary study suggest that SPBNGAS-GAS provides comparable efficacy to V-RG. Additional studies will be needed to determine the duration of immunity and optimal dosage of SPBNGAS-GAS and to examine its efficacy in other reservoir species. PMID:17826874

  15. Oral vaccination of raccoons (Procyon lotor) with genetically modified rabies virus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Jesse D; Self, Joshua; Niezgoda, Michael; Faber, Marie-Luise; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Rupprecht, Charles

    2007-10-16

    Oral vaccination is an important tool currently in use to control the spread of rabies in wildlife populations in various programs around the world. Oral rabies vaccination (ORV) of raccoons represents the largest targeted program to control wildlife rabies in the United States. Currently, the vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein recombinant virus vaccine (V-RG) is the only licensed oral rabies vaccine in the US. In the current study, captive raccoons were used to evaluate two previously described constructs of a rabies virus vaccine developed by reverse genetics (SPBNGAS and SPBNGAS-GAS) for immunogenicity and efficacy compared to the V-RG vaccine. Four of five control animals succumbed to rabies virus after severe challenge, while three of five animals vaccinated orally with SPBNGAS succumbed. No mortality was observed for animals administered SPBNGAS-GAS or the V-RG vaccine. The results of this preliminary study suggest that SPBNGAS-GAS provides comparable efficacy to V-RG. Additional studies will be needed to determine the duration of immunity and optimal dosage of SPBNGAS-GAS and to examine its efficacy in other reservoir species.

  16. [Viruses and bats: rabies and Lyssavirus].

    PubMed

    Tordo, N; Marianneau, M Ph

    2009-01-01

    Recent emerging zoonoses (hemorrhagic fevers due to Ebola or Marburg virus, encephalitis due to Nipah virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome due to SRAS virus...) outline the potential of bats as vectors for transmission of infectious disease to humans. Such a potential is already known for rabies encephalitis since seven out of the eight genotypes of Lyssavirus are transmitted by bats. In addition, phylogenetic reconstructions indicate that Lyssavirus have evolved in chiropters before their emergence in carnivores. Nevertheless, carnivores remain the most critical vectors for public health, in particular dogs that are originating 55.000 rabies deaths per year, essentially in developing countries. Rabies control in carnivores by parenteral (dog) or oral (wild carnivores) vaccination is efficacious and campaigns start to be more widely applied. On the other hand, rabies control in bat still remains non realistic, particularly as the pathogenicity of bat Lyssavirus for bats is still under debate, suggesting that a "diplomatic relationship" between partners would have arisen from a long term cohabitation. While comparing the interactions that humans and bats establish with Lyssavirus, scientists try to understand the molecular basis ofpathogenicity in man, a indispensable prerequisite to identify antiviral targets in a perspective of therapy.

  17. Characterization of rabies virus isolates in Bolivia.

    PubMed

    Favi, Myriam; Nina, Aleida; Yung, Verónica; Fernández, Jorge

    2003-11-01

    In Latin America, rabies is still an important public health problem. Canine rabies, and wild animal rabies, especially transmitted by hematofagous and insectivorous bats, has become an emerging problem in the countries of this region. We received 363 samples with a laboratory-confirmed rabies diagnosis from Bolivia during l997-2001. From these, we could obtain 222 rabies virus isolates by intra-cerebral inoculation in mice. By antigenic characterization we could identify 147 isolates as variant 1, 2 isolates as variant 2, 3 isolates as variant 3, and 1 isolate as variant 5. Phylogenetic analysis of 84 isolates established that they segregated in 3 different branches, corresponding to 3 genetic variants, 78 isolates corresponding to antigenic variant 1 segregated in the same lineage as the antigenic variant 5, 2 isolates corresponding to antigenic variant 2 segregated in another lineage, and 3 isolates from antigenic variant 3 segregated in a different lineage.The genetic variant that mainly circulates in Bolivia is maintained in a cycle whose main reservoir are dogs, but it is not possible to discard the presence of other cycles, in which different species of bats or other wild mammals could be participating.

  18. Emergence of a sylvatic enzootic formosan ferret badger-associated rabies in Taiwan and the geographical separation of two phylogenetic groups of rabies viruses.

    PubMed

    Tsai, K J; Hsu, W C; Chuang, W C; Chang, J C; Tu, Y C; Tsai, H J; Liu, H F; Wang, F I; Lee, S H

    2016-01-01

    Taiwan had been declared rabies-free in humans and domestic animals for five decades until July 2013, when surprisingly, three Formosan ferret badgers (FB) were diagnosed with rabies. Since then, a variety of wild carnivores and other wildlife species have been found dead, neurologically ill, or exhibiting aggressive behaviors around the island. To determine the affected animal species, geographic areas, and environments, animal bodies were examined for rabies by direct fluorescent antibody test (FAT). The viral genomes from the brains of selected rabid animals were sequenced for the phylogeny of rabies viruses (RABV). Out of a total of 1016 wild carnivores, 276/831 (33.2%) Formosan FBs were FAT positive, with occasional biting incidents in 1 dog and suspected spillover in 1 house shrew. All other animals tested, including dogs, cats, bats, mice, house shrews, and squirrels, were rabies-negative. The rabies was badger-associated and confined to nine counties/cities in sylvatic environments. Phylogeny of nucleoprotein and glycoprotein genes from 59 Formosan FB-associated RABV revealed them to be clustered in two distinct groups, TWI and TWII, consistent with the geographic segregation into western and eastern Taiwan provided by the Central Mountain Range and into northern rabies-free and central-southern rabies-affected regions by a river bisecting western Taiwan. The unique features of geographic and genetic segregation, sylvatic enzooticity, and FB-association of RABV suggest a logical strategy for the control of rabies in this nation.

  19. In vitro and in vivo genetic stability studies of a human adenovirus type 5 recombinant rabies glycoprotein vaccine (ONRAB).

    PubMed

    Knowles, M Kimberly; Roberts, Danielle; Craig, Sheona; Sheen, Mary; Nadin-Davis, Susan A; Wandeler, Alexander I

    2009-05-05

    Investigation into the genetic stability of a replication-competent human adenovirus rabies glycoprotein recombinant (ONRAB) developed for use as an oral vaccine for wildlife rabies prevention is of major importance due to the vaccine's intended placement in the environment. Using a collection of murine monoclonal antibodies directed to six distinct antigenic sites on the rabies glycoprotein, preservation of all main immunogenic epitopes of the protein after virus growth in vitro was established. A competition experiment which involved the in vitro passaging of a mixture of ONRAB and wild-type human adenovirus type 5 demonstrated that the two viruses do not exhibit noticeably different fitness levels in this environment. Nucleotide sequencing of the expression cassette of multiple viral clones recovered after 20 serial passages in cell culture and 5 serial passages in cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus), a species susceptible to human adenovirus infection, indicated no changes in comparison to the original virus. These trials demonstrated the stability of the insert gene of ONRAB during in vivo and in vitro passaging.

  20. Binding of rabies virus to purified Torpedo acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Lentz, T L; Benson, R J; Klimowicz, D; Wilson, P T; Hawrot, E

    1986-12-01

    The binding of 125I- and 35S-labeled rabies virus (CVS strain) to affinity-purified acetylcholine receptor from Torpedo electric organ was demonstrated. The binding of rabies virus to the acetylcholine receptor increased with increasing receptor concentration, was dependent on the pH of the incubation medium, and was saturable with increasing virus concentration. Binding of radioactively labeled virus was effectively competed by unlabeled homologous virus particles. Binding of 35S-labeled rabies virus to the AChR was inhibited up to 50% by alpha-bungarotoxin and up to 30% by (+)-tubocurarine but was not affected by atropine. These results demonstrate direct binding of rabies virus to a well-defined neurotransmitter receptor, namely the acetylcholine receptor and indicate that at least a portion of the virus interaction occurs near the acetylcholine binding site on the receptor. These findings support the hypothesis that the acetylcholine receptor may serve as a rabies virus receptor in vivo.

  1. Therapeutic immune clearance of rabies virus from the CNS.

    PubMed

    Hooper, D Craig; Roy, Anirban; Kean, Rhonda B; Phares, Timothy W; Barkhouse, Darryll A

    2011-03-01

    The long-held concept that rabies infection is lethal in humans once the causative rabies virus has reached the CNS has been called into question by the recent survival of a number of patients with clinical rabies. Studies in animal models provide insight into why survival from a rabies virus infection that has spread to the CNS is possible and the immune mechanisms involved. In the CNS, both innate mechanisms capable of inhibiting virus replication and the activity of infiltrating rabies virus-specific T and B cells with the capacity to clear the virus are required. Deficiencies in the induction of either aspect of rabies immunity can lead to lethal consequences but may be overcome by novel approaches to active and passive immunization.

  2. Salivary excretion of rabies virus by healthy vampire bats.

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Setien, A.; Loza-Rubio, E.; Salas-Rojas, M.; Brisseau, N.; Cliquet, F.; Pastoret, P. P.; Rojas-Dotor, S.; Tesoro, E.; Kretschmer, R.

    2005-01-01

    Salivary excretion of rabies virus was evaluated in 14 adult vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) intramuscularly injected with a large dose (10(6) MICLD50) of vampire rabies virus variant CASS88. Saliva samples were obtained from surviving bats every other day for 30 days, then weekly for 2 months, and finally 1 and 2 years later. Rabies virus was isolated in murine neuroblastoma cells and in randomly selected cases by PCR. Rabies virus was not detected in the saliva of any of the 11 animals that succumbed (somewhat early) to rabies challenge, nor in the control bats. In contrast, virus was detected early, and only once (days 6, 6 and 21) in each of the three animals that survived rabies challenge and remained healthy for at least 2 years after challenge. At that time even vigorous dexamethasone and cyclosporine administration failed to provoke further viral excretion. PMID:15966107

  3. Therapeutic immune clearance of rabies virus from the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, D Craig; Roy, Anirban; Kean, Rhonda B; Phares, Timothy W; Barkhouse, Darryll A

    2011-01-01

    The long-held concept that rabies infection is lethal in humans once the causative rabies virus has reached the CNS has been called into question by the recent survival of a number of patients with clinical rabies. Studies in animal models provide insight into why survival from a rabies virus infection that has spread to the CNS is possible and the immune mechanisms involved. In the CNS, both innate mechanisms capable of inhibiting virus replication and the activity of infiltrating rabies virus-specific T and B cells with the capacity to clear the virus are required. Deficiencies in the induction of either aspect of rabies immunity can lead to lethal consequences but may be overcome by novel approaches to active and passive immunization. PMID:21686076

  4. Salivary excretion of rabies virus by healthy vampire bats.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Setien, A; Loza-Rubio, E; Salas-Rojas, M; Brisseau, N; Cliquet, F; Pastoret, P P; Rojas-Dotor, S; Tesoro, E; Kretschmer, R

    2005-06-01

    Salivary excretion of rabies virus was evaluated in 14 adult vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) intramuscularly injected with a large dose (10(6) MICLD50) of vampire rabies virus variant CASS88. Saliva samples were obtained from surviving bats every other day for 30 days, then weekly for 2 months, and finally 1 and 2 years later. Rabies virus was isolated in murine neuroblastoma cells and in randomly selected cases by PCR. Rabies virus was not detected in the saliva of any of the 11 animals that succumbed (somewhat early) to rabies challenge, nor in the control bats. In contrast, virus was detected early, and only once (days 6, 6 and 21) in each of the three animals that survived rabies challenge and remained healthy for at least 2 years after challenge. At that time even vigorous dexamethasone and cyclosporine administration failed to provoke further viral excretion.

  5. G gene-deficient single-round rabies viruses for neuronal circuit analysis.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Alexander; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus

    2016-05-02

    Rhabdoviruses like the neurotropic rabies virus are fully amenable to pseudotyping with homologous and heterologous membrane proteins, which is being harnessed for the study of viral envelope proteins, viral retargeting, or immunization purposes. Particularly, pseudotyped delta G rabies viruses are emerging as safe and superb tools for mapping direct synaptic connections and analyzing neuronal circuits in the central and peripheral nervous system, which is a fundamental pillar of modern neuroscience. Such retrograde rabies mono-transsynaptic tracers in combination with optogenetics and modern in vivo imaging methods are opening entirely new avenues of investigation in neuroscience and help in answering major outstanding questions of connectivity and function of the nervous system. Here, we provide a brief overview on the biology and life cycle of rabies virus with emphasis on neuronal infection via axon ends, transport, and transsynaptic transmission of the virus. Pseudotyping of single-round, G-deleted virus with foreign glycoproteins allows to determine tropism and entry route, resulting in either retro- or anterograde labeling of neurons. Pseudotyping in vitro also allows specific targeting of cells that serve as starter cells for transsynaptic tracing, and pseudotyping in situ for a single (mono-transsynaptic) step of transmission to presynaptic neurons. We describe principle and experimental variations for defining "starter" cells for mono-transsynaptic tracing with ΔG rabies virus and outline open questions and limitations of the approach.

  6. [Sequencing and analysis of the complete genome of a rabies virus isolate from Sika deer].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun-Jiao; Guo, Li; Huang, Ying; Zhang, Li-Shi; Qian, Ai-Dong

    2008-05-01

    One DRV strain was isolated from Sika Deer brain and sequenced. Nine overlapped gene fragments were amplified by RT-PCR through 3'-RACE and 5'-RACE method, and the complete DRV genome sequence was assembled. The length of the complete genome is 11863bp. The DRV genome organization was similar to other rabies viruses which were composed of five genes and the initiation sites and termination sites were highly conservative. There were mutated amino acids in important antigen sites of nucleoprotein and glycoprotein. The nucleotide and amino acid homologies of gene N, P, M, G, L in strains with completed genomie sequencing were compared. Compared with N gene sequence of other typical rabies viruses, a phylogenetic tree was established . These results indicated that DRV belonged to gene type 1. The highest homology compared with Chinese vaccine strain 3aG was 94%, and the lowest was 71% compared with WCBV. These findings provided theoretical reference for further research in rabies virus.

  7. Molecular epidemiology of human rabies viruses in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takashi; Ahmed, Kamruddin; Karunanayake, Dushantha; Wimalaratne, Omala; Nanayakkara, Susilakanthi; Perera, Devika; Kobayashi, Yuji; Nishizono, Akira

    2013-08-01

    Rabies is a lethal zoonotic disease caused by the rabies virus, which is transmitted by rabid animals to humans. Rabies is prevalent in all continents, with over 60% of human deaths occurring in Asia. Sri Lanka is a rabies-endemic country. This study shows that rabies afflicted more older individuals than children in Sri Lanka between 2008 and 2010. This novel finding indicates that older people in Sri Lanka should be more aware of the risk of rabies. Phylogenetic analyses of the rabies N and G genes showed that the Sri Lankan rabies viruses are distinct and probably originated from a single clone. The G-L noncoding region is highly diverse, and is suitable for the analysis of virus evolution within a country. A phylogenetic analysis of this region showed high diversity in the currently circulating Sri Lankan rabies viruses, which can be divided into seven clades. Some clades are unique to a specific geographic region, whereas others occur at multiple locations. This indicates that the movement of dogs, the main rabies-transmitting animal in Sri Lanka, is restricted in some areas but less limited in others. These data may help to formulate a more efficient rabies control program in Sri Lanka.

  8. Controlled viral glycoprotein expression as a safety feature in a bivalent rabies-ebola vaccine.

    PubMed

    Papaneri, Amy B; Bernbaum, John G; Blaney, Joseph E; Jahrling, Peter B; Schnell, Matthias J; Johnson, Reed F

    2015-02-02

    Using a recombinant rabies (RABV) vaccine platform, we have developed several safe and effective vaccines. Most recently, we have developed a RABV-based ebolavirus (EBOV) vaccine that is efficacious in nonhuman primates. One safety feature of this vaccine is the utilization of a live but replication-deficient RABV construct. In this construct, the RABV glycoprotein (G) has been deleted from the genome, requiring G trans complementation in order for new infectious viruses to be released from the initial infected cell. Here we analyze this safety feature of the bivalent RABV-based EBOV vaccine comprised of the G-deleted RABV backbone expressing EBOV glycoprotein (GP). We found that, while the level of RABV genome in infected cells is equivalent regardless of G supplementation, the production of infectious virus is indeed restricted by the lack of G, and most importantly, that the presence of EBOV GP does not substitute for G. These findings further support the safety profile of this replication-deficient RABV-EBOV bivalent vaccine.

  9. Rabies DNA vaccine encoding lysosome-targeted glycoprotein supplemented with Emulsigen-D confers complete protection in preexposure and postexposure studies in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manpreet; Saxena, Ankur; Rai, Anant; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2010-01-01

    The worldwide incidence of rabies and the inability of currently used vaccination strategies to provide highly potent and cost-effective therapy indicate the need for an improved rabies vaccine. Thus, DNA vaccine based on lysosome-targeted glycoprotein of the rabies virus was evaluated in BALB/c mice. It imparted partial protection (60%) against challenge with 20 LD(50) of the challenge virus standard (CVS) strain of rabies virus. To improve the outcome of vaccination, to ultimately enhance the immune response, we investigated different routes for DNA vaccine delivery, varied doses of DNA, and the influence of adjuvant supplementation. The highest immune response pertaining to IgG antibody titer, with a predominantly IgG1/IgG2a subclass distribution, effective cellular immunity, and a high level of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (RVNAs) was attained by the optimized DNA vaccine formulation comprising intramuscular administration of 100 microg of DNA vaccine supplemented with Emulsigen-D. In preexposure prophylaxis, a 3-dose regimen of this formulation generated a high RVNA titer (32 IU/ml) and conferred complete protection against challenge with 20 LD(50) of CVS. For postexposure efficacy analysis, rabies was experimentally induced with 50 LD(50) of CVS. Subsequent therapy with 5 doses of the formulation completely prevented rabies in BALB/c mice, which maintained protective RVNA titers of 4 IU/ml. The World Health Organization recommended rabies protective titer threshold is 0.5 IU/ml. Thus, this optimized DNA vaccine formulation provides an avenue for preventing and controlling rabies.

  10. Is the acetylcholine receptor a rabies virus receptor?

    PubMed

    Lentz, T L; Burrage, T G; Smith, A L; Crick, J; Tignor, G H

    1982-01-08

    Rabies virus was found on mouse diaphragms and on cultured chick myotubes in a distribution coinciding with that of the acetylcholine receptor. Treatment of the myotubes with alpha-bungarotoxin and d-tubocurarine before the addition of the virus reduced the number of myotubes that became infected with rabies virus. These findings together suggest that acetylcholine receptors may serve as receptors for rabies virus. The binding of virus to acetylcholine receptors, which are present in high density at the neuromuscular junction, would provide a mechanism whereby the virus could be locally concentrated at sites in proximity to peripheral nerves facilitating subsequent uptake and transfer to the central nervous system.

  11. Rabies

    MedlinePlus

    Hydrophobia; Animal bite - rabies; Dog bite - rabies; Bat bite - rabies; Raccoon bites - rabies ... in the United States usually resulted from a dog bite. Recently, more cases of human rabies have ...

  12. Vaccination of vampire bats using recombinant vaccinia-rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Setién, Alvaro; Leon, Yolanda Campos; Tesoro, Emiliano Cruz; Kretschmer, Roberto; Brochier, Bernard; Pastoret, Paul-Pierre

    2002-07-01

    Adult vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) were vaccinated by intramuscular, scarification, oral, or aerosol routes (n = 8 in each group) using a vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein recombinant virus. Sera were obtained before and 30 days after vaccination. All animals were then challenged intramuscularly with a lethal dose of rabies virus. Neutralizing antirabies antibodies were measured by rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). Seroconversion was observed with each of the routes employed, but some aerosol and orally vaccinated animals failed to seroconvert. The highest antibody titers were observed in animals vaccinated by intramuscular and scarification routes. All animals vaccinated by intramuscular, scarification, and oral routes survived the viral challenge, but one of eight vampire bats receiving aerosol vaccination succumbed to the challenge. Of 31 surviving vaccinated and challenged animals, nine lacked detectable antirabies antibodies by RFFIT (five orally and four aerosol immunized animals). In contrast, nine of 10 non-vaccinated control bats succumbed to viral challenge. The surviving control bat had antiviral antibodies 90 days after viral challenge. These results suggest that the recombinant vaccine is an adequate and safe immunogen for bats by all routes tested.

  13. Recombinant single-chain Fv antibody fragment-alkaline phosphatase conjugate: a novel in vitro tool to estimate rabies viral glycoprotein antigen in vaccine manufacture.

    PubMed

    Mousli, Mohamed; Turki, Imène; Kharmachi, Habib; Saadi, Mohamed; Dellagi, Koussay

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a novel in vitro tool by using recombinant protein technology to qualify the whole reagent preparation procedure, to be used to quantify rabies viral antigen preparation in a simple and rapid format for potency control of rabies vaccines. 50AD1 is a neutralizing monoclonal antibody directed against the rabies virus glycoprotein that binds to native conformational antigenic site III. In the present study, the DNA fragments encoding the variable domains of 50AD1 were inserted into a prokaryotic expression vector so as to produce a single-chain Fv antibody fragment (scFv) genetically fused to the bacterial alkaline phosphatase (AP). The recombinant fusion protein preserved both the AP enzymatic activity and the antigen-binding activity against the rabies virus glycoprotein nearly identical to the parental antibody, and was used successfully in different assays including ELISA, dot-blot and cell culture tests. The present study shows that the genetic fusion protein provides a new tool for one-step rabies virus immunodetection, which can be produced in homogeneous bifunctional reagent, easily, quickly and reproducibly. In addition, this recombinant immunoconjugate is a promising alternative reagent for applications involving immunodetection, it presents a similar sensitivity and specificity to that obtained with classical reagents.

  14. Preclinical Development of Inactivated Rabies Virus-Based Polyvalent Vaccine Against Rabies and Filoviruses.

    PubMed

    Willet, Mallory; Kurup, Drishya; Papaneri, Amy; Wirblich, Christoph; Hooper, Jay W; Kwilas, Steve A; Keshwara, Rohan; Hudacek, Andrew; Beilfuss, Stefanie; Rudolph, Grit; Pommerening, Elke; Vos, Adriaan; Neubert, Andreas; Jahrling, Peter; Blaney, Joseph E; Johnson, Reed F; Schnell, Matthias J

    2015-10-01

    We previously described the generation of a novel Ebola virus (EBOV) vaccine based on inactivated rabies virus (RABV) containing EBOV glycoprotein (GP) incorporated in the RABV virion. Our results demonstrated safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy in mice and nonhuman primates (NHPs). Protection against viral challenge depended largely on the quality of the humoral immune response against EBOV GP.Here we present the extension and improvement of this vaccine by increasing the amount of GP incorporation into virions via GP codon-optimization as well as the addition of Sudan virus (SUDV) and Marburg virus (MARV) GP containing virions. Immunogenicity studies in mice indicate similar immune responses for both SUDV GP and MARV GP compared to EBOV GP. Immunizing mice with multiple antigens resulted in immune responses similar to immunization with a single antigen. Moreover, immunization of NHP with the new inactivated RABV EBOV vaccine resulted in high titer neutralizing antibody levels and 100% protection against lethal EBOV challenge when applied with adjuvant.Our results indicate that an inactivated polyvalent vaccine against RABV filoviruses is achievable. Finally, the novel vaccines are produced on approved VERO cells and a clinical grade RABV/EBOV vaccine for human trials has been produced.

  15. [Rabies].

    PubMed

    Ribadeau-Dumas, Florence; Dacheux, Laurent; Bourhy, Hervé

    2013-01-01

    Rabies virus, a neurotropic lyssavirus responsible for unavoidable fatal encephalitis, is transmitted by saliva of infected animals through bite, scratch or licking of broken skin or a mucous membrane. Infection can be prevented by timely prevention (wash for several minutes, antisepsis and vaccination completed by antirabies immunoglobulins [Ig] according to the severity of exposure). The 55,000 human deaths estimated annually worldwide result mainly from uncontrolled canine rabies in enzootic countries (particularly in Africa and in Asia), attributable to a lack of resources or interest for this disease. Bat rabies, henceforth first cause of human's rabies in many countries in America, affects a very small number of individuals but seems more difficult to control. Shortened vaccine protocols, rationalized use of Ig and development of products of substitution should enhance access of exposed patients to prevention. Finally, research on the biological cycle, the pathogeny and on escape of virus-induced mechanisms from the immune system should continue to pave the way for presently unknown treatments of clinical rabies. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm / SRMS.

  16. Complete Genome Sequences of Six South African Rabies Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Phahladira, Baby; Marston, Denise A.; Wise, Emma L.; Ellis, Richard J.; Fooks, Anthony R.

    2015-01-01

    South African rabies viruses (RABVs) from dogs and jackals (canid viruses) are highly related and most likely originated from a single progenitor. RABV is the cause of most global human rabies cases. The complete genome sequences of 3 RABVs from South Africa and Zimbabwe are reported here. PMID:26430028

  17. Molecular Characterization of Canine Rabies Virus, Mali, 2006-2013.

    PubMed

    Traoré, Abdallah; Picard-Meyer, Evelyne; Mauti, Stephanie; Biarnais, Melanie; Balmer, Oliver; Samaké, Kassim; Kamissoko, Badian; Tembely, Saïdou; Sery, Amadou; Traoré, Abdel K; Coulibaly, Amy P; Robardet, Emmanuelle; Zinsstag, Jakob; Cliquet, Florence

    2016-05-01

    We genetically characterized 32 canine rabies viruses isolated in Mali during 2006-2013 and identified 3 subgroups that belonged to the Africa 2 lineage. We also detected subgroup F rabies virus. This information should be useful for development of mass vaccination campaigns for dogs and eventual large-scale control programs in this country.

  18. CULTURING RABIES (HYDROPHOBIA) VIRUSES IN A DEVELOPING CHICKEN EMBRYO

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This report states that 19 successive passages of the rabies virus strain 83 through the brain of a chicken embryo and 6 passages through the yolk...sac are feasible. In the process of cultivation of the rabies virus in the organism of chicken embryo there was a variation-fixation of it; shortening

  19. Molecular Characterization of Canine Rabies Virus, Mali, 2006–2013

    PubMed Central

    Traoré, Abdallah; Picard-Meyer, Evelyne; Mauti, Stephanie; Biarnais, Melanie; Balmer, Oliver; Samaké, Kassim; Kamissoko, Badian; Tembely, Saïdou; Sery, Amadou; Traoré, Abdel K.; Coulibaly, Amy P.; Robardet, Emmanuelle; Zinsstag, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    We genetically characterized 32 canine rabies viruses isolated in Mali during 2006–2013 and identified 3 subgroups that belonged to the Africa 2 lineage. We also detected subgroup F rabies virus. This information should be useful for development of mass vaccination campaigns for dogs and eventual large-scale control programs in this country. PMID:27089307

  20. 9 CFR 113.209 - Rabies Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... prepared from virus-bearing cell cultures or nerve tissues obtained from animals that have developed rabies... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rabies Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.209 Section 113.209 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  1. 9 CFR 113.209 - Rabies Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... prepared from virus-bearing cell cultures or nerve tissues obtained from animals that have developed rabies... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rabies Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.209 Section 113.209 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  2. 9 CFR 113.209 - Rabies Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... prepared from virus-bearing cell cultures or nerve tissues obtained from animals that have developed rabies... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rabies Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.209 Section 113.209 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  3. 9 CFR 113.209 - Rabies Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... prepared from virus-bearing cell cultures or nerve tissues obtained from animals that have developed rabies... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rabies Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.209 Section 113.209 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  4. 9 CFR 113.209 - Rabies Vaccine, Killed Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... prepared from virus-bearing cell cultures or nerve tissues obtained from animals that have developed rabies... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rabies Vaccine, Killed Virus. 113.209 Section 113.209 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  5. Experimentally induced rabies in four cats inoculated with a rabies virus isolated from a bat.

    PubMed

    Trimarchi, C V; Rudd, R J; Abelseth, M K

    1986-04-01

    Four cats were inoculated IM with rabies virus isolated from the salivary gland of a naturally infected big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus). The 4 cats developed clinical signs of rabies after a median incubation period of 42 days. The median duration of clinical illness was 5 days. Results of fluorescent antibody evaluation, mouse inoculation, and tissue culture isolation indicated large differences in virus concentrations in various areas of the CNS of individual cats. These differences also were observed between cats. Rabies virus was isolated from the salivary glands and saliva of 2 cats; urinary bladder was the only other nonneural tissue found infected. Our observations indicated that cat rabies can be caused by bat rabies virus; that cats thus infected have infectious saliva during aggressive behavior and can therefore transmit the disease; and that adequate specimens of hippocampus, cerebellum, and brain stem are essential for reliable determination of rabies infection. The findings support recommendations for regular rabies vaccination of cats, even in areas of rabies-free terrestrial mammals.

  6. Genetic Diversity and Geographic Distribution of Genetically Distinct Rabies Viruses in the Philippines

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Mariko; Oshitani, Hitoshi; Orbina, Jun Ryan C.; Tohma, Kentaro; de Guzman, Alice S.; Kamigaki, Taro; Demetria, Catalino S.; Manalo, Daria L.; Noguchi, Akira; Inoue, Satoshi; Quiambao, Beatriz P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Rabies continues to be a major public health problem in the Philippines, where 200–300 human cases were reported annually between 2001 and 2011. Understanding the phylogeography of rabies viruses is important for establishing a more effective and feasible control strategy. Methods We performed a molecular analysis of rabies viruses in the Philippines using rabied animal brain samples. The samples were collected from 11 of 17 regions, which covered three island groups (Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao). Partial nucleoprotein (N) gene sequencing was performed on 57 samples and complete glycoprotein (G) gene sequencing was performed on 235 samples collected between 2004 and 2010. Results The Philippine strains of rabies viruses were included in a distinct phylogenetic cluster, previously named Asian 2b, which appeared to have diverged from the Chinese strain named Asian 2a. The Philippine strains were further divided into three major clades, which were found exclusively in different island groups: clades L, V, and M in Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao, respectively. Clade L was subdivided into nine subclades (L1–L9) and clade V was subdivided into two subclades (V1 and V2). With a few exceptions, most strains in each subclade were distributed in specific geographic areas. There were also four strains that were divided into two genogroups but were not classified into any of the three major clades, and all four strains were found in the island group of Luzon. Conclusion We detected three major clades and two distinct genogroups of rabies viruses in the Philippines. Our data suggest that viruses of each clade and subclade evolved independently in each area without frequent introduction into other areas. An important implication of these data is that geographically targeted dog vaccination using the island group approach may effectively control rabies in the Philippines. PMID:23593515

  7. Genetic diversity and geographic distribution of genetically distinct rabies viruses in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Saito, Mariko; Oshitani, Hitoshi; Orbina, Jun Ryan C; Tohma, Kentaro; de Guzman, Alice S; Kamigaki, Taro; Demetria, Catalino S; Manalo, Daria L; Miranda, Mary Elizabeth G; Noguchi, Akira; Inoue, Satoshi; Quiambao, Beatriz P

    2013-01-01

    Rabies continues to be a major public health problem in the Philippines, where 200-300 human cases were reported annually between 2001 and 2011. Understanding the phylogeography of rabies viruses is important for establishing a more effective and feasible control strategy. We performed a molecular analysis of rabies viruses in the Philippines using rabied animal brain samples. The samples were collected from 11 of 17 regions, which covered three island groups (Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao). Partial nucleoprotein (N) gene sequencing was performed on 57 samples and complete glycoprotein (G) gene sequencing was performed on 235 samples collected between 2004 and 2010. The Philippine strains of rabies viruses were included in a distinct phylogenetic cluster, previously named Asian 2b, which appeared to have diverged from the Chinese strain named Asian 2a. The Philippine strains were further divided into three major clades, which were found exclusively in different island groups: clades L, V, and M in Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao, respectively. Clade L was subdivided into nine subclades (L1-L9) and clade V was subdivided into two subclades (V1 and V2). With a few exceptions, most strains in each subclade were distributed in specific geographic areas. There were also four strains that were divided into two genogroups but were not classified into any of the three major clades, and all four strains were found in the island group of Luzon. We detected three major clades and two distinct genogroups of rabies viruses in the Philippines. Our data suggest that viruses of each clade and subclade evolved independently in each area without frequent introduction into other areas. An important implication of these data is that geographically targeted dog vaccination using the island group approach may effectively control rabies in the Philippines.

  8. Phylogeographic analysis of rabies viruses in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Tohma, Kentaro; Saito, Mariko; Kamigaki, Taro; Tuason, Laarni T; Demetria, Catalino S; Orbina, Jun Ryan C; Manalo, Daria L; Miranda, Mary E; Noguchi, Akira; Inoue, Satoshi; Suzuki, Akira; Quiambao, Beatriz P; Oshitani, Hitoshi

    2014-04-01

    Rabies still remains a public health threat in the Philippines. A significant number of human rabies cases, about 200-300 cases annually, have been reported, and the country needs an effective strategy for rabies control. To develop an effective control strategy, it is important to understand the transmission patterns of the rabies viruses. We conducted phylogenetic analyses by considering the temporal and spatial evolution of rabies viruses to reveal the transmission dynamics in the Philippines. After evaluating the molecular clock and phylogeographic analysis, we estimated that the Philippine strains were introduced from China around the beginning of 20th century. Upon this introduction, the rabies viruses evolved within the Philippines to form three major clades, and there was no indication of introduction of other rabies viruses from any other country. However, within the Philippines, island-to-island migrations were observed. Since then, the rabies viruses have diffused and only evolved within each island group. The evolutionary pattern of these viruses was strongly shaped by geographical boundaries. The association index statistics demonstrated a strong spatial structure within the island group, indicating that the seas were a significant geographical barrier for viral dispersal. Strong spatial structure was also observed even at a regional level, and most of the viral migrations (79.7% of the total median number) in Luzon were observed between neighboring regions. Rabies viruses were genetically clustered at a regional level, and this strong spatial structure suggests a geographical clustering of transmission chains and the potential effectiveness of rabies control that targets geographical clustering. Dog vaccination campaigns have been conducted independently by local governments in the Philippines, but it could be more effective to implement a coordinated vaccination campaign among neighboring areas to eliminate geographically-clustered rabies

  9. Recombinant canine distemper virus serves as bivalent live vaccine against rabies and canine distemper.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xijun; Feng, Na; Ge, Jinying; Shuai, Lei; Peng, Liyan; Gao, Yuwei; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu; Bu, Zhigao

    2012-07-20

    Effective, safe, and affordable rabies vaccines are still being sought. Attenuated live vaccine has been widely used to protect carnivores from canine distemper. In this study, we generated a recombinant canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine strain, rCDV-RVG, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG) by using reverse genetics. The recombinant virus rCDV-RVG retained growth properties similar to those of vector CDV in Vero cell culture. Animal studies demonstrated that rCDV-RVG was safe in mice and dogs. Mice inoculated intracerebrally or intramuscularly with rCDV-RVG showed no apparent signs of disease and developed a strong rabies virus (RABV) neutralizing antibody response, which completely protected mice from challenge with a lethal dose of street virus. Canine studies showed that vaccination with rCDV-RVG induced strong and long-lasting virus neutralizing antibody responses to RABV and CDV. This is the first study demonstrating that recombinant CDV has the potential to serve as bivalent live vaccine against rabies and canine distemper in animals.

  10. The phylogeography and spatiotemporal spread of south-central skunk rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, Natalia A; Lemey, Philippe; Kuzmin, Ivan V; Mayes, Bonny C; Ellison, James A; Orciari, Lillian A; Hightower, Dillon; Taylor, Steven T; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    The south-central skunk rabies virus (SCSK) is the most broadly distributed terrestrial viral lineage in North America. Skunk rabies has not been efficiently targeted by oral vaccination campaigns and represents a natural system of pathogen invasion, yielding insights to rabies emergence. In the present study we reconstructed spatiotemporal spread of SCSK in the whole territory of its circulation using a combination of Bayesian methods. The analysis based on 241 glycoprotein gene sequences demonstrated that SCSK is much more divergent phylogenetically than was appreciated previously. According to our analyses the SCSK originated in the territory of Texas ~170 years ago, and spread geographically during the following decades. The wavefront velocity in the northward direction was significantly greater than in the eastward and westward directions. Rivers (except the Mississippi River and Rio Grande River) did not constitute significant barriers for epizootic spread, in contrast to deserts and mountains. The mean dispersal rate of skunk rabies was lower than that of the raccoon and fox rabies. Viral lineages circulate in their areas with limited evidence of geographic spread during decades. However, spatiotemporal reconstruction shows that after a long period of stability the dispersal rate and wavefront velocity of SCSK are increasing. Our results indicate that there is a need to develop control measures for SCSK, and suggest how such measure can be implemented most efficiently. Our approach can be extrapolated to other rabies reservoirs and used as a tool for investigation of epizootic patterns and planning interventions towards disease elimination.

  11. Evaluation of a rapid immunodiagnostic test kit for rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Kang, BoKyu; Oh, JinSik; Lee, ChulSeung; Park, Bong-Kyun; Park, YoungNam; Hong, KyungSoo; Lee, KyungGi; Cho, ByungKi; Song, DaeSub

    2007-10-01

    A rapid immunodiagnostic test kit for rabies virus detection was evaluated using 51 clinical samples and 4 isolates of rabies virus. The quick detection of rabies virus under field conditions may be helpful in determining if post-exposure prophylaxis is needed, thereby avoiding unnecessary treatments, as well as undue economic burden. There are several widely used diagnostic methods for rabies, including fluorescent antibody tests, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, and electron microscopy; however, these methods include time-consuming, intricate, and costly procedures. The rapid immunodiagnostic test was able to detect rabies virus in clinical samples, including brain tissue and saliva, in addition to 10(3.2) 50% lethal dose (LD(50))/mL cell-adapted rabies virus. The assay was not cross-reactive with non-rabies virus microbes. When the performance of the rapid immunodiagnostic test was compared to a fluorescent antibody test, the rapid immunodiagnostic test had a sensitivity of 91.7% and specificity of 100% (95.8% CI).

  12. Unifying the spatial population dynamics and molecular evolution of epidemic rabies virus

    PubMed Central

    Real, Leslie A.; Henderson, J. Caroline; Biek, Roman; Snaman, Jennifer; Jack, Tracy Lambert; Childs, James E.; Stahl, Eli; Waller, Lance; Tinline, Rowland; Nadin-Davis, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Infectious disease emergence is under the simultaneous influence of both genetic and ecological factors. Yet, we lack a general framework for linking ecological dynamics of infectious disease with underlying molecular and evolutionary change. As a model, we illustrate the linkage between ecological and evolutionary dynamics in rabies virus during its epidemic expansion into eastern and southern Ontario. We characterized the phylogeographic relationships among 83 isolates of fox rabies virus variant using nucleotide sequences from the glycoprotein-encoding glycoprotein gene. The fox rabies virus variant descended as an irregular wave with two arms invading from northern Ontario into southern Ontario over the 1980s and 1990s. Correlations between genetic and geographic distance suggest an isolation by distance population structure for the virus. The divergence among viral lineages since the most recent common ancestor correlates with position along the advancing wave front with more divergent lineages near the origin of the epidemic. Based on divergence from the most recent common ancestor, the regional population can be partitioned into two subpopulations, each corresponding to an arm of the advancing wave. Subpopulation A (southern Ontario) showed reduced isolation by distance relative to subpopulation B (eastern Ontario). The temporal dynamics of subpopulation A suggests that the subregional viral population may have undergone several smaller waves that reduced isolation by distance. The use of integrated approaches, such as the geographical analysis of sequence variants, coupled with information on spatial dynamics will become indispensable aids in understanding patterns of disease emergence. PMID:16103358

  13. Prevalence of tetracycline and rabies virus antibody in raccoons, skunks, and foxes following aerial distribution of V-RG baits to control raccoon rabies in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Rosatte, R; Allan, M; Bachmann, P; Sobey, K; Donovan, D; Davies, J C; Silver, A; Bennett, K; Brown, L; Stevenson, B; Buchanan, T; Bruce, L; Wandeler, A; Fehlner-Gardiner, C; Beresford, A; Beath, A; Escobar, M; Maki, J; Schumacher, C

    2008-10-01

    More than 3.6 million baits containing a recombinant vaccinia virus-rabies glycoprotein (V-RG) oral rabies vaccine were aerially or hand-distributed during 1999-2006 in an approximate 4,000-9,000 km(2) area of eastern Ontario, Canada, as part of a multitactic approach to control the raccoon variant of rabies. The efficacy of the program was assessed through the collection and testing of > 6,900 animals for bait acceptance and rabies virus-specific antibodies. Raccoon acceptance of rabies vaccine baits was significantly greater (71-83% ) in areas baited at a density of 150 baits/km(2) compared to areas baited at 75 baits/km(2) (26-58% ), and more raccoons consumed vaccine baits in areas baited with a flight line spacing of 0.75 km (45.3% [321/708]) than with a spacing of 1.5 km (33.8% [108/320]). In addition, greater numbers of raccoons consumed vaccine baits during a drop in September (52.7% [213/404]) as opposed to a June bait drop (34.6% [216/624]). Seropositivity rates for raccoons ranged between 7% and 28% in areas baited at 75/km(2) and 10% to 27% in areas baited at 150/km(2) with statistical differences varying among years and treatments. The last case of raccoon-variant rabies reported in Ontario was in September 2005. The control of raccoon rabies in Ontario has resulted in an estimated $6M to $10 M Cdn annual savings in rabies-associated costs.

  14. Characterization of Russian rabies virus vaccine strain RV-97.

    PubMed

    Metlin, A; Paulin, L; Suomalainen, S; Neuvonen, E; Rybakov, S; Mikhalishin, V; Huovilainen, A

    2008-03-01

    The RV-97 rabies virus vaccine strain is widely used in Russia as a component of the live attenuated oral anti-rabies vaccine "Sinrab". This vaccine has also been used in some other countries, such as Kazakhstan, Belarus, and Ukraine. Entire genome sequencing is an effective tool for studying the genetic properties of virus strains. In this study, a simple technique for obtaining the entire genome sequence of the rabies virus was used. The entire genome sequence and the deduced amino acid sequences of the major viral proteins were compared with those of other rabies vaccine virus strains. The RV-97 strain forms a separate phylogenetic branch and seems to be phylogenetically more related to the group of Japanese vaccine strains. It also contains several unique amino acid changes in known immunodominant sites of G and P proteins.

  15. A single immunization with a recombinant canine adenovirus expressing the rabies virus G protein confers protective immunity against rabies in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jianwei; Faber, Milosz; Papaneri, Amy; Faber, Marie-Luise; McGettigan, James P.; Schnell, Matthias J.; Dietzschold, Bernhard . E-mail: bernhard.dietzschold@jefferson.edu

    2006-12-20

    Rabies vaccines based on live attenuated rabies viruses or recombinant pox viruses expressing the rabies virus (RV) glycoprotein (G) hold the greatest promise of safety and efficacy, particularly for oral immunization of wildlife. However, while these vaccines induce protective immunity in foxes, they are less effective in other animals, and safety concerns have been raised for some of these vaccines. Because canine adenovirus 2 (CAV2) is licensed for use as a live vaccine for dogs and has an excellent efficacy and safety record, we used this virus as an expression vector for the RVG. The recombinant CAV2-RV G produces virus titers similar to those produced by wild-type CAV2, indicating that the RVG gene does not affect virus replication. Comparison of RVG expressed by CAV2-RV G with that of vaccinia-RV G recombinant virus (V-RG) revealed similar amounts of RV G on the cell surface. A single intramuscular or intranasal immunization of mice with CAV2-RVG induced protective immunity in a dose-dependent manner, with no clinical signs or discomfort from the virus infection regardless of the route of administration or the amount of virus.

  16. Efficacy and bait acceptance of vaccinia vectored rabies glycoprotein vaccine in captive foxes (Vulpes vulpes), raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides) and dogs (Canis familiaris).

    PubMed

    Cliquet, F; Barrat, J; Guiot, A L; Caël, N; Boutrand, S; Maki, J; Schumacher, C L

    2008-08-26

    The red fox, dog, and raccoon dog are known to play a major role in the global epidemiology of rabies. These three canid species were used to compare the appetency and efficacy of two commercial bait formats, each containing a single dose of vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein (V-RG) vaccine. Square and rectangular RABORAL V-RG baits were fed to individual caged animal, and results were evaluated using three parameters: bait consumption, induction of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection after a virulent rabies challenge. The rectangular and square RABORAL V-RG baits were found to deliver the oral rabies vaccine in a similar manner to all three species resulting in acceptable seroconversion and effective protection levels after the rabies challenge. Appetency of each bait type was measured by bait consumption and found to be similar for both RABORAL V-RG bait formats in the fox and dog. The square RABORAL V-RG bait, however, was consumed more effectively than the rectangular RABORAL V-RG bait by the raccoon dog.

  17. Infection of Bergmann glia in the cerebellum of a skunk experimentally infected with street rabies virus.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, A C; Phelan, C C; Rossiter, J P

    2000-01-01

    Rabies virus is a highly neuronotropic virus and glial cell infection is not prominent in the central nervous system (CNS). Paraffin-embedded tissues from the cerebella of skunks experimentally infected with either a skunk salivary gland isolate of street rabies virus or the challenge virus standard (CVS) strain of fixed rabies virus were examined with immunoperoxidase staining for rabies virus antigen by using an anti-rabies virus nucleocapsid protein monoclonal antibody. A skunk infected with street rabies virus showed prominent infection of Bergmann glia. Although infected Purkinje cells were observed, they usually demonstrated a relatively small amount of antigen in their perikarya. A CVS-infected skunk showed many intensely labeled Purkinje cells and a relatively small number of infected Bergmann glia. These findings indicate that although rabies virus is a highly neuronotropic virus, street rabies virus strains do not always demonstrate strict neuronotropism in the central nervous system. Images Figure 1. PMID:11041500

  18. Infection of Bergmann glia in the cerebellum of a skunk experimentally infected with street rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Jackson, A C; Phelan, C C; Rossiter, J P

    2000-10-01

    Rabies virus is a highly neuronotropic virus and glial cell infection is not prominent in the central nervous system (CNS). Paraffin-embedded tissues from the cerebella of skunks experimentally infected with either a skunk salivary gland isolate of street rabies virus or the challenge virus standard (CVS) strain of fixed rabies virus were examined with immunoperoxidase staining for rabies virus antigen by using an anti-rabies virus nucleocapsid protein monoclonal antibody. A skunk infected with street rabies virus showed prominent infection of Bergmann glia. Although infected Purkinje cells were observed, they usually demonstrated a relatively small amount of antigen in their perikarya. A CVS-infected skunk showed many intensely labeled Purkinje cells and a relatively small number of infected Bergmann glia. These findings indicate that although rabies virus is a highly neuronotropic virus, street rabies virus strains do not always demonstrate strict neuronotropism in the central nervous system.

  19. Multicenter comparative study of a new ELISA, PLATELIA RABIES II, for the detection and titration of anti-rabies glycoprotein antibodies and comparison with the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) on human samples from vaccinated and non-vaccinated people.

    PubMed

    Feyssaguet, M; Dacheux, L; Audry, L; Compoint, A; Morize, J L; Blanchard, I; Bourhy, H

    2007-03-08

    The envelope glycoprotein G of rabies virus induces the production of neutralising antibodies, which are important in protection against rabies. Therefore, titration of anti-envelope glycoprotein antibodies is a good indicator of the degree of immunity in people during anti-rabies treatment or after vaccination. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, a booster vaccine dose should be given if the rabies antibody titre falls below 0.5 IU/ml. Titration of anti-rabies antibodies is also useful for plasma centers in the preparation and standardization of human anti-rabies gamma-globulins for therapeutic use and to a lesser extent for the diagnosis of rabies in human sera and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This paper presents a new enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), PLATELIA RABIES II, developed for rabies envelope glycoprotein antibody detection or titration and its comparison to the current reference method (RFFIT). The data collected during validation of the test in a multicenter study are analysed to give a sound overall knowledge of the capabilities of the PLATELIA RABIES II, for instance specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, detection limit and quantitation limit. To this aim, human serum samples from a total of 1348 vaccinated or non-vaccinated people were tested in parallel using the new ELISA and the RFFIT for the presence of anti-rabies antibodies. Data generated indicate a linear relationship across the range of titration between the two methods. The sensitivity reaches 98.6% and the specificity 99.4%. This study indicates that this new ELISA test is as sensitive and specific as the current standardized reference method. The method is simple, safe, rapid and can be considered as a useful alternative to the neutralisation test.

  20. An arctic fox rabies virus strain as the cause of human rabies in Russian Siberia.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, I V

    1999-01-01

    A case of human rabies in the arctic zone of Siberia is described. The victim was bitten by a wolf, but characterization of the isolate by monoclonal antibodies showed that it was an arctic fox virus strain. This discovery reaffirmed the value of strain typing rabies virus isolates in regions where this has not been done already: such characterization pertains to the identification of the reservoir host, to the natural history of the virus in the reservoir, and to future surveillance, post-exposure treatment, and public education in the region.

  1. Two potential recombinant rabies vaccines expressing canine parvovirus virion protein 2 induce immunogenicity to canine parvovirus and rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Shi, Hehe; Tan, Yeping; Niu, Xuefeng; Long, Teng; Zhao, Jing; Tian, Qin; Wang, Yifei; Chen, Hao; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2016-08-17

    Both rabies virus (RABV) and canine parvovirus (CPV) cause lethal diseases in dogs. In this study, both high egg passage Flury (HEP-Flury) strains of RABV and recombinant RABV carrying double RABV glycoprotein (G) gene were used to express the CPV virion protein 2 (VP2) gene, and were designated rHEP-VP2 and, rHEP-dG-VP2 respectively. The two recombinant RABVs maintained optimal virus titration according to their viral growth kinetics assay compared with the parental strain HEP-Flury. Western blotting indicated that G protein and VP2 were expressed in vitro. The expression of VP2 in Crandell feline kidney cells post-infection by rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence assay with antibody against VP2. Immunogenicity of recombinant rabies viruses was tested in Kunming mice. Both rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 induced high levels of rabies antibody compared with HEP-Flury. Mice immunized with rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 both had a high level of antibodies against VP2, which can protect against CPV infection. A challenge experiment indicated that more than 80% mice immunized with recombinant RABVs survived after infection of challenge virus standard 24 (CVS-24). Together, this study showed that recombinant RABVs expressing VP2 induced protective immune responses to RABV and CPV. Therefore, rHEP-VP2 and rHEP-dG-VP2 might be potential combined vaccines for RABV and CPV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Protective Effect of Different Anti-Rabies Virus VHH Constructs against Rabies Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Terryn, Sanne; Francart, Aurélie; Lamoral, Sophie; Hultberg, Anna; Rommelaere, Heidi; Wittelsberger, Angela; Callewaert, Filip; Stohr, Thomas; Meerschaert, Kris; Ottevaere, Ingrid; Stortelers, Catelijne; Vanlandschoot, Peter; Kalai, Michael; Van Gucht, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Rabies virus causes lethal brain infection in about 61000 people per year. Each year, tens of thousands of people receive anti-rabies prophylaxis with plasma-derived immunoglobulins and vaccine soon after exposure. Anti-rabies immunoglobulins are however expensive and have limited availability. VHH are the smallest antigen-binding functional fragments of camelid heavy chain antibodies, also called Nanobodies. The therapeutic potential of anti-rabies VHH was examined in a mouse model using intranasal challenge with a lethal dose of rabies virus. Anti-rabies VHH were administered directly into the brain or systemically, by intraperitoneal injection, 24 hours after virus challenge. Anti-rabies VHH were able to significantly prolong survival or even completely rescue mice from disease. The therapeutic effect depended on the dose, affinity and brain and plasma half-life of the VHH construct. Increasing the affinity by combining two VHH with a glycine-serine linker into bivalent or biparatopic constructs, increased the neutralizing potency to the picomolar range. Upon direct intracerebral administration, a dose as low as 33 µg of the biparatopic Rab-E8/H7 was still able to establish an anti-rabies effect. The effect of systemic treatment was significantly improved by increasing the half-life of Rab-E8/H7 through linkage with a third VHH targeted against albumin. Intraperitoneal treatment with 1.5 mg (2505 IU, 1 ml) of anti-albumin Rab-E8/H7 prolonged the median survival time from 9 to 15 days and completely rescued 43% of mice. For comparison, intraperitoneal treatment with the highest available dose of human anti-rabies immunoglobulins (65 mg, 111 IU, 1 ml) only prolonged survival by 2 days, without rescue. Overall, the therapeutic benefit seemed well correlated with the time of brain exposure and the plasma half-life of the used VHH construct. These results, together with the ease-of-production and superior thermal stability, render anti-rabies VHH into valuable

  3. Genetic characterisation of attenuated SAD rabies virus strains used for oral vaccination of wildlife.

    PubMed

    Geue, Lutz; Schares, Susann; Schnick, Christina; Kliemt, Jeannette; Beckert, Aline; Freuling, Conrad; Conraths, Franz J; Hoffmann, Bernd; Zanoni, Reto; Marston, Denise; McElhinney, Lorraine; Johnson, Nicholas; Fooks, Anthony R; Tordo, Noel; Müller, Thomas

    2008-06-19

    The elimination of rabies from the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) in Western Europe has been achieved by the oral rabies vaccination (ORV) of wildlife with a range of attenuated rabies virus strains. With the exception of the vaccinia rabies glycoprotein recombinant vaccine (VRG), all strains were originally derived from a common ancestor; the Street Alabama Dufferin (SAD) field strain. However, after more than 30 years of ORV it is still not possible to distinguish these vaccine strains and there is little information on the genetic basis for their attenuation. We therefore sequenced and compared the full-length genome of five commercially available SAD vaccine viruses (SAD B19, SAD P5/88, SAG2, SAD VA1 and SAD Bern) and four other SAD strains (the original SAD Bern, SAD VA1, ERA and SAD 1-3670 Wistar). Nucleotide sequencing allowed identifying each vaccine strain unambiguously. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the majority of the currently used commercial attenuated rabies virus vaccines appear to be derived from SAD B19 rather than from SAD Bern. One commercially available vaccine virus did not contain the SAD strain mentioned in the product information of the producer. Two SAD vaccine strains appeared to consist of mixed genomic sequences. Furthermore, in-del events targeting A-rich sequences (in positive strand) within the 3' non-coding regions of M and G genes were observed in SAD-derivates developed in Europe. Our data also supports the idea of a possible recombination that had occurred during the derivation of the European branch of SAD viruses. If confirmed, this recombination event would be the first one reported among RABV vaccine strains.

  4. Inactivation of rabies virus in reagents used for the fluorescent rabies antibody test.

    PubMed Central

    White, L A; Chappell, W A

    1982-01-01

    Procedures for inactivating rabies virus in reagents used for the fluorescent rabies antibody test are described. Mouse brain adsorbing suspensions containing greater than or equal to 10(9) 50% lethal doses of virus per ml were rendered noninfectious by treatment with 0.1% beta-propiolactone or by heating at 56 degrees for greater than or equal to 30 min. Viable virus in tissue impression smears was inactivated by acetone fixation at 50 degrees C for greater than or equal to 30 min or by immersion in 0.1% beta-propiolactone at 37 degrees C for 2 h. Inactivated reagents gave specific and sensitive reactions in the fluorescent rabies antibody test. PMID:6749889

  5. Generation and evaluation of a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara vaccine for rabies.

    PubMed

    Weyer, Jacqueline; Rupprecht, Charles E; Mans, Janet; Viljoen, Gerrit J; Nel, Louis H

    2007-05-22

    Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) has become a vaccine vector of choice for recombinant vaccine development. A MVA-based rabies vaccine would be advantageous for use as a vaccine for dogs (and wildlife), particularly if it proves innocuous and efficacious by the oral route. Here, the generation and immunological testing of a recombinant MVA expressing a rabies virus glycoprotein gene is described. In a murine model, higher dosages of recombinant MVA were needed to induce equivocal immune responses as with Vaccinia Copenhagen or Vaccinia Western Reserve recombinants, when administered by a parenteral route. The MVA recombinant was not immunogenic or efficacious when administered per os in naïve mice. The ability of the recombinant MVA to induce anamnestic responses in dogs and raccoons was also investigated. Recombinant MVA boosted humoral immune responses in these animals when administered peripherally, but not when administered orally.

  6. Rabies virus interaction with various cell lines is independent of the acetylcholine receptor.

    PubMed

    Reagan, K J; Wunner, W H

    1985-01-01

    Rabies virus infects most cells in vitro. The presence of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor on the plasma membrane of various cell lines is not an obligate factor for rabies virus susceptibility of those cells.

  7. Genetically engineered colorimetric single-chain antibody fusion protein for rapid diagnosis of rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Mousli, M; Turki, I; Kharmachi, H; Dellagi, K

    2008-01-01

    The most widely used test for rabies diagnostics is the fluorescent antibody test, which is recommended by both the World Health Organization and the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE). This test may be used directly on a smear, and can also be used to confirm the presence of rabies antigen in cell culture or in brain tissue for diagnosis. The colorimetric enzymes are usually coupled to an antibody by chemical means using cross-linking reagents. However, such non-specific procedures lead to heterogeneous conjugates, sometimes with reduced activity and specificity. To bypass these problems, genetic engineering has provided a way to create chimeric bifunctional molecules in which the variable domains of an antibody are genetically linked to unrelated protein tracers. In this study, we describe the successful production of a bifunctional chimeric protein based on alkaline phosphatase-fused anti-rabies virus glycoprotein scFv antibody fragment. We also report the antigen binding properties and the alkaline phosphatase activity of the recombinant conjugate protein. We established its value as a novel in vitro tool for detecting the rabies virus in brain smear in a one-step procedure; it presents a similar sensitivity and specificity to that obtained using standard reagents.

  8. Fusion Peptide Improves Stability and Bioactivity of Single Chain Antibody against Rabies Virus.

    PubMed

    Xi, Hualong; Zhang, Kaixin; Yin, Yanchun; Gu, Tiejun; Sun, Qing; Shi, Linqing; Zhang, Renxia; Jiang, Chunlai; Kong, Wei; Wu, Yongge

    2017-04-28

    The combination of rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) with a vaccine is currently effective against rabies infections, but improvements are needed. Genetic engineering antibody technology is an attractive approach for developing novel antibodies to replace RIG. In our previous study, a single-chain variable fragment, scFv57R, against rabies virus glycoprotein was constructed. However, its inherent weak stability and short half-life compared with the parent RIG may limit its diagnostic and therapeutic application. Therefore, an acidic tail of synuclein (ATS) derived from the C-terminal acidic tail of human alpha-synuclein protein was fused to the C-terminus of scFv57R in order to help it resist adverse stress and improve the stability and halflife. The tail showed no apparent effect on the preparation procedure and affinity of the protein, nor did it change the neutralizing potency in vitro. In the ELISA test of molecular stability, the ATS fusion form of the protein, scFv57R-ATS, showed an increase in thermal stability and longer half-life in serum than scFv57R. The protection against fatal rabies virus challenge improved after fusing the tail to the scFv, which may be attributed to the improved stability. Thus, the ATS fusion approach presented here is easily implemented and can be used as a new strategy to improve the stability and half-life of engineered antibody proteins for practical applications.

  9. Genetic strain modification of a live rabies virus vaccine widely used in Europe for wildlife oral vaccination.

    PubMed

    Cliquet, Florence; Robardet, Emmanuelle; Picard Meyer, Evelyne

    2013-10-01

    In Europe, the main reservoir and vector of rabies has been the red fox (Vulpes vulpes). Oral immunization of foxes with live vaccines, using attenuated rabies strains (SAD B19, SAD Bern), apathogenic mutants of an attenuated strain (SAG2) and the vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein recombinant virus vaccine (V-RG), has been shown to be the most effective method for the control and elimination of rabies. Among all vaccines currently used for wildlife oral vaccination, one vaccine (marketed as SAD Bern strain) has been widely used in Europe since 1992 with the distribution of 17million of baits in 2011. Because of the potential environmental safety risk of a live virus which could revert to virulence, the full genome sequencing of this vaccine was undertaken and the sequence was characterized and compared with those of referenced rabies viruses. The vaccine showed higher similarity to the strains belonging to the SAD B19 vaccine virus strains than to the SAD Bern vaccines. This study is the first one reporting on virus strain identity changes in this attenuated vaccine.

  10. Rabies Virus Maintained by Dogs in Humans and Terrestrial Wildlife, Ceará State, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    de Mattos, Cecília C.; de Morais, Nélio B.; Carrieri, Maria Luíza; Rolim, Benedito N.; Silva, Lucia M.; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Durigon, Edison L.; de Mattos, Carlos A.

    2006-01-01

    Rabies viruses circulating in Ceará, Brazil, were identified by molecular analysis to be related to variants maintained by dogs, bats, and other wildlife. Most of these viruses are associated with human rabies cases. We document the emergence of a rabies virus variant responsible for an independent epidemic cycle in the crab-eating fox (Cerdocyon thous). PMID:17326958

  11. Monoclonal antibody characterization of rabies virus isolates from Russia, Finland and Estonia.

    PubMed

    Metlin, A E; Cox, J; Rybakov, S S; Huovilainen, A; Grouzdev, K N; Neuvonen, E

    2004-03-01

    Five different rabies virus variants were identified among rabies virus-positive samples from Russia, Finland and Estonia, using a panel of five anti-nucleocapsid monoclonal antibodies. Two rabies virus isolates showed a different reaction pattern, suggesting the presence of a new antigenic variant. The results were compared with the data obtained by other research groups.

  12. The phylodynamics of the rabies virus in the Russian Federation

    PubMed Central

    Lukashev, Alexander N.; Poleshchuk, Elena M.; Dedkov, Vladimir G.; Tkachev, Sergey E.; Sidorov, Gennadiy N.; Karganova, Galina G.; Galkina, Irina V.; Shchelkanov, Mikhail Yu.; Shipulin, German A.

    2017-01-01

    Near complete rabies virus N gene sequences (1,110 nt) were determined for 82 isolates obtained from different regions of Russia between 2008 and 2016. These sequences were analyzed together with 108 representative GenBank sequences from 1977–2016 using the Bayesian coalescent approach. The timing of the major evolutionary events was estimated. Most of the isolates represented the steppe rabies virus group C, which was found over a vast geographic region from Central Russia to Mongolia and split into three groups (C0-C2) with discrete geographic prevalence. A single strain of the steppe rabies virus lineage was isolated in the far eastern part of Russia (Primorsky Krai), likely as a result of a recent anthropogenic introduction. For the first time the polar rabies virus group A2, previously reported in Alaska, was described in the northern part of European Russia and at the Franz Josef Land. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that all currently circulating rabies virus groups in the Russian Federation were introduced within the few last centuries, with most of the groups spreading in the 20th century. The dating of evolutionary events was highly concordant with the historical epidemiological data. PMID:28225771

  13. Rabies virus binding to cellular membranes measured by enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Lentz, T L; Chester, J; Benson, R J; Hawrot, E; Tignor, G H; Smith, A L

    1985-05-01

    The binding of rabies virus to cellular membranes was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Virus binding to membranes adsorbed to the wells of microtiter plates was detected with rabies virus antibody and alkaline phosphatase-linked second antibody. The greatest degree of binding was to myotube, neuroblastoma, and salivary gland membranes; intermediate levels occurred in striated muscle and nerve membranes; and low levels of binding were found in other membranes, including those of most parenchymal organs. Binding of rabies virus to myotube membranes was saturable, dependent on pH (with an optimum of pH 6.0), facilitated by the divalent cations Ca++, Mn++, and Mg++, and was temperature dependent. Binding was greatly reduced by inactivation of virus with beta-propiolactone or treatment of virus with trypsin. In embryonic chick myotubes, total acetylcholine receptor content and acetylcholinesterase activity undergo marked changes during development, first increasing and then decreasing at the time of hatching. Binding of rabies virus followed a similar pattern, indicating that the virus may interact with the acetylcholine receptor or other surface molecules undergoing similar developmental changes.

  14. 9 CFR 113.312 - Rabies Vaccine, Live Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rabies Vaccine, Live Virus. 113.312 Section 113.312 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... cell cultures or embryonated chicken eggs. Only Master Seed Virus which has been established as pure...

  15. 9 CFR 113.312 - Rabies Vaccine, Live Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rabies Vaccine, Live Virus. 113.312 Section 113.312 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... cell cultures or embryonated chicken eggs. Only Master Seed Virus which has been established as pure...

  16. 9 CFR 113.312 - Rabies Vaccine, Live Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rabies Vaccine, Live Virus. 113.312 Section 113.312 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... cell cultures or embryonated chicken eggs. Only Master Seed Virus which has been established as pure...

  17. 9 CFR 113.312 - Rabies Vaccine, Live Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rabies Vaccine, Live Virus. 113.312 Section 113.312 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... cell cultures or embryonated chicken eggs. Only Master Seed Virus which has been established as pure...

  18. 9 CFR 113.312 - Rabies Vaccine, Live Virus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rabies Vaccine, Live Virus. 113.312 Section 113.312 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... cell cultures or embryonated chicken eggs. Only Master Seed Virus which has been established as pure...

  19. Recombinant rabies virus expressing dog GM-CSF is an efficacious oral rabies vaccine for dogs.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ming; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Songqin; Wang, Zhao; Ruan, Juncheng; Tang, Lijun; Jia, Ziming; Cui, Min; Zhao, Ling; Fu, Zhen F

    2015-11-17

    Developing efficacious oral rabies vaccines is an important step to increase immunization coverage for stray dogs, which are not accessible for parenteral vaccination. Our previous studies have demonstrated that recombinant rabies virus (RABV) expressing cytokines/chemokines induces robust protective immune responses after oral immunization in mice by recruiting and activating dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells. To develop an effective oral rabies vaccine for dogs, a recombinant attenuated RABV expressing dog GM-CSF, designated as LBNSE-dGM-CSF was constructed and used for oral vaccination in a dog model. Significantly more DCs or B cells were activated in the peripheral blood of dogs vaccinated orally with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than those vaccinated with the parent virus LBNSE, particularly at 3 days post immunization (dpi). As a result, significantly higher levels of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNAs) were detected in dogs immunized with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than with the parent virus. All the immunized dogs were protected against a lethal challenge with 4500 MICLD50 of wild-type RABV SXTYD01. LBNSE-dGM-CSF was found to replicate mainly in the tonsils after oral vaccination as detected by nested RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Taken together, our results indicate that LBNSE-dGM-CSF could be a promising oral rabies vaccine candidate for dogs.

  20. Recombinant rabies virus expressing dog GM-CSF is an efficacious oral rabies vaccine for dogs

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao; Ruan, Juncheng; Tang, Lijun; Jia, Ziming; Cui, Min; Zhao, Ling; Fu, Zhen F.

    2015-01-01

    Developing efficacious oral rabies vaccines is an important step to increase immunization coverage for stray dogs, which are not accessible for parenteral vaccination. Our previous studies have demonstrated that recombinant rabies virus (RABV) expressing cytokines/chemokines induces robust protective immune responses after oral immunization in mice by recruiting and activating dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells. To develop an effective oral rabies vaccine for dogs, a recombinant attenuated RABV expressing dog GM-CSF, designated as LBNSE-dGM-CSF was constructed and used for oral vaccination in a dog model. Significantly more DCs or B cells were activated in the peripheral blood of dogs vaccinated orally with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than those vaccinated with the parent virus LBNSE, particularly at 3 days post immunization (dpi). As a result, significantly higher levels of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNAs) were detected in dogs immunized with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than with the parent virus. All the immunized dogs were protected against a lethal challenge with 4500 MICLD50 of wild-type RABV SXTYD01. LBNSE-dGM-CSF was found to replicate mainly in the tonsils after oral vaccination as detected by nested RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Taken together, our results indicate that LBNSE-dGM-CSF could be a promising oral rabies vaccine candidate for dogs. PMID:26436700

  1. Excretion of rabies virus in the saliva of dogs.

    PubMed

    Fekadu, M; Shaddock, J H; Baer, G M

    1982-05-01

    Thirty-nine dogs were injected intramuscularly with either an Ethiopian strain or a Mexican strain of rabies virus. The excretion of rabies virus in the saliva was studied before and during illness. Nine of 17 dogs that died after injection with the Ethiopian strain had virus in the submaxillary glands. Four of these dogs excreted virus in the saliva up to 13 days before signs of disease were observed. Sixteen of 22 dogs that died after injection with the Mexican strain had virus in the submaxillary glands. Eight of these dogs also excreted virus in the saliva up to seven days before signs of disease were observed. These findings indicate that rabid dogs may excrete virus in their saliva much earlier than previously reported.

  2. Antigenic Diversity and Distribution of Rabies Virus in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Villa, Andrés; Gómez-Sierra, Mauricio; Hernández-Rodríguez, Gustavo; Juárez-Islas, Victor; Meléndez-Félix, Alejandra; Vargas-Pino, Fernando; Velázquez-Monroy, Oscar; Flisser, Ana

    2002-01-01

    Rabies remains a public health problem in the Americas because of the great diversity of wild reservoirs that maintain the virus in nature. Here we report the antigenic characterization of 254 rabies viruses isolated from 148 nonreservoir and 106 reservoir hosts collected in 27 states of Mexico. Nine out of 11 antigenic variants previously reported in the United States were detected in Mexico by using the limited panel of monoclonal antibodies donated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Some rabies virus variants were isolated from their natural reservoirs, which were also taxonomically identified. Terrestrial reservoirs included stray dogs with V1, Urocyon cineroargenteus (gray foxes) with V7, and two subspecies of Spilogale putorius (spotted skunks) with different viral variants (V8 and V10). Aerial hosts included Tadarida brasiliensis mexicana and Desmodus rotundus, which harbored V9 and V4 and harbored V11, respectively. All variants, with the exception of V9, were isolated from nonreservoir hosts, while V3, V4, and V5 were not isolated from their natural reservoirs but only from livestock. Rabies virus antigenic typing allowed us to determine rabies reservoirs and their distribution in Mexico, data which will probably improve prevention and control of the illness in humans and in the reservoir hosts. PMID:11880422

  3. Antigenic diversity and distribution of rabies virus in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Villa, Andrés; Gómez-Sierra, Mauricio; Hernández-Rodríguez, Gustavo; Juárez-Islas, Victor; Meléndez-Félix, Alejandra; Vargas-Pino, Fernando; Velázquez-Monroy, Oscar; Flisser, Ana

    2002-03-01

    Rabies remains a public health problem in the Americas because of the great diversity of wild reservoirs that maintain the virus in nature. Here we report the antigenic characterization of 254 rabies viruses isolated from 148 nonreservoir and 106 reservoir hosts collected in 27 states of Mexico. Nine out of 11 antigenic variants previously reported in the United States were detected in Mexico by using the limited panel of monoclonal antibodies donated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Some rabies virus variants were isolated from their natural reservoirs, which were also taxonomically identified. Terrestrial reservoirs included stray dogs with V1, Urocyon cineroargenteus (gray foxes) with V7, and two subspecies of Spilogale putorius (spotted skunks) with different viral variants (V8 and V10). Aerial hosts included Tadarida brasiliensis mexicana and Desmodus rotundus, which harbored V9 and V4 and harbored V11, respectively. All variants, with the exception of V9, were isolated from nonreservoir hosts, while V3, V4, and V5 were not isolated from their natural reservoirs but only from livestock. Rabies virus antigenic typing allowed us to determine rabies reservoirs and their distribution in Mexico, data which will probably improve prevention and control of the illness in humans and in the reservoir hosts.

  4. Genetic heterogeneity of Russian, Estonian and Finnish field rabies viruses.

    PubMed

    Metlin, A E; Rybakov, S; Gruzdev, K; Neuvonen, E; Huovilainen, A

    2007-01-01

    Thirty-five field rabies virus strains were collected in recent years in different regions of the Russian Federation in order to characterize their genetic heterogeneity and to study their molecular epidemiology. In addition to the Russian viruses, seven archive samples from Estonia and Finland and two Russian vaccine strains were also included in the study. The viruses collected were subjected to two different reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction tests, the amplicons were sequenced and the sequences were analysed phylogenetically. Among the field viruses studied, two main phylogenetic groups were found and designated as Pan-Eurasian and Caucasian according to their geographic origin. The Pan-Eurasian group, comprising some reference viruses from Europe, was further divided into four subgroups. All of the vaccine strains were clearly different from the field strains. No recombination between the field and vaccine virus strains was observed. The data obtained here show the critical role of geographical isolation and limitation for the genetic clustering and evolution of the rabies virus and also help in predicting its distribution from rabies-affected areas to rabies-free areas.

  5. Naturally Acquired Rabies Virus Infections in Wild-Caught Bats

    PubMed Central

    Gordy, Paul; Rudd, Robert; Jarvis, Jodie A.; Bowen, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The study of a zoonotic disease requires an understanding of the disease incidence in animal reservoirs. Rabies incidence in bats submitted to diagnostic laboratories does not accurately reflect the true incidence in wild bat populations as a bias exists for testing bats that have been in contact with humans or pets. This article details the rabies incidence in two species of bats collected from natural settings without such bias. In this study, brain smears from 0.6% and 2.5% of wild-caught and apparently healthy Tadarida brasiliensis and Eptesicus fuscus, respectively, were positive for rabies virus (RV) antigen. Conversely, 92% of the grounded T. brasiliensis were positive for RV. Serology performed on captive colony and sick bats reveal an immune response to rabies. This work illustrates the complex interplay between immunity, disease state, and the conundrum of RV maintenance in bats. PMID:21923271

  6. Typing of the rabies virus in Chile, 2002-2008.

    PubMed

    Yung, V; Favi, M; Fernandez, J

    2012-12-01

    In Chile, dog rabies has been controlled and insectivorous bats have been identified as the main rabies reservoir. This study aimed to determine the rabies virus (RABV) variants circulating in the country between 2002 and 2008. A total of 612 RABV isolates were tested using a panel with eight monoclonal antibodies against the viral nucleoprotein (N-mAbs) for antigenic typing, and a product of 320-bp of the nucleoprotein gene was sequenced from 99 isolates. Typing of the isolates revealed six different antigenic variants but phylogenetic analysis identified four clusters associated with four different bat species. Tadarida brasiliensis bats were confirmed as the main reservoir. This methodology identified several independent rabies enzootics maintained by different species of insectivorous bats in Chile.

  7. Naturally acquired rabies virus infections in wild-caught bats.

    PubMed

    Davis, April; Gordy, Paul; Rudd, Robert; Jarvis, Jodie A; Bowen, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    The study of a zoonotic disease requires an understanding of the disease incidence in animal reservoirs. Rabies incidence in bats submitted to diagnostic laboratories does not accurately reflect the true incidence in wild bat populations as a bias exists for testing bats that have been in contact with humans or pets. This article details the rabies incidence in two species of bats collected from natural settings without such bias. In this study, brain smears from 0.6% and 2.5% of wild-caught and apparently healthy Tadarida brasiliensis and Eptesicus fuscus, respectively, were positive for rabies virus (RV) antigen. Conversely, 92% of the grounded T. brasiliensis were positive for RV. Serology performed on captive colony and sick bats reveal an immune response to rabies. This work illustrates the complex interplay between immunity, disease state, and the conundrum of RV maintenance in bats.

  8. The acetylcholine receptor as a cellular receptor for rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Lentz, T L; Burrage, T G; Smith, A L; Tignor, G H

    1983-01-01

    Characterization of specific host cell receptors for enveloped viruses is a difficult problem because many enveloped viruses bind to a variety of substrates which are not obviously related to tissue tropisms in the intact host. Viruses with a limited cellular tropism in infected animals present useful models for studying the mechanisms by which virus attachment regulates the disease process. Rabies virus is a rhabdovirus which exhibits a marked neuronotropism in infected animals. Limited data suggest that spread occurs by transsynaptic transfer of virus. The results of recent experiments at Yale suggest that viral antigen is localized very soon after injection at neuromuscular junctions, the motor nerve endings on muscle tissue. On cultured muscle cells, similar co-localization with the acetylcholine receptor is seen both before and after virus multiplication. Pretreatment of these cells with some ligands of the acetylcholine receptor results in reduced viral infection. These findings suggest that a neurotransmitter receptor or a closely associated molecule may serve as a specific host cell receptor for rabies virus and thus may be responsible for the tissue tropism exhibited by this virus. In addition to clarifying aspects of rabies virus pathogenesis, these studies have broad implications regarding the mechanism by which other viruses or viral immunizations might mediate autoimmune diseases such as myasthenia gravis.

  9. Safety and immunogenicity of recombinant rabies virus (ERAGS) in mice and raccoon dogs

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The development of a genetically modified live rabies vaccine applicable to wild raccoon dogs is necessary for the eradication of rabies in Korea. Thus, we constructed a recombinant rabies virus (RABV) called the ERAGS strain, using a reverse genetic system and evaluated its safety and efficacy in mice and its safety and immunogenicity in raccoon dogs. Materials and Methods ERAGS, which has Asn194Ser and Arg333Glu substitutions in the glycoprotein, was constructed using site-directed mutagenesis. Mice were inoculated with the ERAGS strain (either 105.0 or 107.0 FAID50/mL) via intramuscular (IM) or intracranial injections and then challenged with a virulent RABV. Raccoon dogs were administered the ERAGS strain (108.0 FAID50/mL) either orally or via the IM route and the immunogenicity of the strain was evaluated using fluorescent antibody virus neutralization tests. Results The ERAGS strain inoculated into murine neuroblastoma cells reached 107.8 FAID50/mL at 96-hour post-inoculation. The virus was not pathogenic and induced complete protection from virulent RABV in immunized 4- and 6-week-old mice. Korean raccoon dogs immunized with the ERAGS strain via IM or oral route were also safe from the virus and developed high titer levels (26.4-32.8 IU/mL) of virus-neutralizing antibody (VNA) at 4 weeks post-inoculation. Conclusion The ERAGS RABV strain was effectively protective against rabies in mice and produced a high VNA titer in raccoon dogs. PMID:27489806

  10. Use of mouse anti-rabies monoclonal antibodies in postexposure treatment of rabies.

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, C L; Dietzschold, B; Ertl, H C; Niu, H S; Rupprecht, C E; Koprowski, H

    1989-01-01

    Immunization of mice and hamsters with a cocktail of mouse MAbs specific for rabies virus nucleocapsid protein and glycoprotein protected animals not only when challenged with a lethal dose of rabies virus after immunization, but also in post-exposure situations. Hamsters treated with the MAb cocktail 3 h after virus inoculation were completely protected from lethal rabies virus infection, and 80% of the animals survived when the MAb cocktail was given 36 h after virus challenge. The potential usefulness of this MAb cocktail for the postexposure treatment of human rabies is discussed. PMID:2760222

  11. Diagnosis and molecular characterization of rabies virus from a buffalo in China: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Rabies virus (RABV) can infect many different species of warm-blooded animals. Glycoprotein G plays a key role in viral pathogenicity and neurotropism, and includes antigenic domains that are responsible for membrane fusion and host cell receptor recognition. Case presentation A case of buffalo rabies in China was diagnosed by direct fluorescent antibody test, G gene reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and RABV mouse inoculation test. Molecular characterization of the RABV was performed using DNA sequencing, phylogenetic analysis and amino acid sequence comparison based on the G gene from different species of animals. Conclusion The results confirmed that the buffalo with suspected rabies was infected by RABV, which was genetically closely related to HNC (FJ602451) that was isolated from cattle in China in 2007. Comparison of the G gene among different species of animal showed that there were almost no amino acid changes among RABVs isolated from the same species of animals that distributed in a near region. However, there were many changes among RABVs that were isolated from different species of animal, or the same species from different geographic regions. This is believed to be the first case report of buffalo rabies in China, and the results may provide further information to understand the mechanism by which RABV breaks through the species barrier. PMID:21375773

  12. Molecular epidemiology of rabies virus in Mongolia, 2005-2008.

    PubMed

    Boldbaatar, Bazartseren; Inoue, Satoshi; Tuya, Nasan; Dulam, Purevtseren; Batchuluun, Damdinjav; Sugiura, Naoko; Okutani, Akiko; Kaku, Yoshihiro; Noguchi, Akira; Kotaki, Akira; Yamada, Akio

    2010-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the genetic diversity of rabies virus (RABV) in Mongolia based on the nucleotide sequences of viral N gene. A total of 24 rabies-positive samples from seven different domestic and wild animal species collected in western and central Mongolia between 2005 and 2008 were examined for their N gene sequences. The results showed that the endemic Mongolian RABVs could be divided into two different groups closely related to the Steppe-type and Arctic-like viruses isolated in Russia.

  13. Stray dogs in Bangkok, Thailand: rabies virus infection and rabies antibody prevalence.

    PubMed

    Kasempimolporn, S; Sichanasai, B; Saengseesom, W; Puempumpanich, S; Sitprija, V

    2008-01-01

    In Thailand, the animal most reported rabid is the stray dog. Dog bite related rabies cases in humans account for 70-95% of rabies related deaths. The reported incidence of dog bites is highest in the central part of the country, especially in Bangkok. This epidemiological survey shows that at least five different canine rabies virus types are present in Bangkok. Rabies antigen and antibody prevalence in stray dogs in Bangkok was also investigated. Saliva and serum samples were taken from 3,314 stray dogs, captured between December 2003 and June 2004. One two year-old female was antigen positive by latex agglutination test and the result was confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The overall antibody seroprevalence by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was 62% (95% CI: 54, 70%). Antibody seroprevalence was higherfor dogs captured within central Bangkok (86% of 1,208 dogs captured) than in the dogs captured on the outskirts of the greater metropolitan area (49% of 2,106 dogs captured). If our sample of stray dogs is representative, then the seroprevalence achieved from previous vaccination campaigns is insufficient in order to break the rabies transmission cycle among stray and feral dogs.

  14. Rabies

    MedlinePlus

    ... has rabies, quick treatment can prevent the illness. Animal Bites Rabies is very serious and can make ... important for someone who's been bitten by an animal to see a doctor. This is especially important ...

  15. The neural cell adhesion molecule is a receptor for rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Thoulouze, M I; Lafage, M; Schachner, M; Hartmann, U; Cremer, H; Lafon, M

    1998-09-01

    Previous reports strongly suggest that, in addition to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, rabies virus can use other, as-yet-unidentified receptors. We found that laboratory cell lines susceptible to rabies virus infection express the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) (CD56) on their surface, whereas resistant cells do not, supporting the idea that NCAM could be a rabies virus receptor. We observed that (i) incubation with rabies virus decreases the surface expression of NCAM; (ii) treatment of susceptible cells with heparan sulfate, a ligand for NCAM, or with NCAM antibodies significantly reduces the rabies virus infection; and (iii) preincubation of rabies virus inoculum with soluble NCAM protein as a receptor decoy drastically neutralizes the capacity of rabies virus to infect susceptible cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that transfection of resistant L fibroblasts with the NCAM-encoding gene induces rabies virus susceptibility whereas absence of NCAM in the primary cortical cell cultures prepared from NCAM-deficient mice reduces the rabies virus infection and virus production. This provides evidence that NCAM is an in vitro receptor for the rabies virus. Moreover, the in vivo relevance for the use of NCAM as a receptor was demonstrated by the infection of NCAM-deficient mice, in which rabies mortality was delayed and brain invasion by rabies virus was drastically restricted. Our results showed that NCAM, which is expressed mainly in the adult nervous system, plays an important role in rabies infection. However, it cannot be excluded that receptors other than NCAM are utilized. Thus, the description of NCAM as a new rabies virus receptor would be another example of the use by viruses of more than one receptor to gain entry into the host.

  16. Overwintering of Rabies Virus in Silver Haired Bats (Lasionycteris noctivagans)

    PubMed Central

    Davis, April D.; Morgan, Shannon M. D.; Dupuis, Michelle; Poulliott, Craig E.; Jarvis, Jodie A.; Franchini, Rhianna; Clobridge, Anne; Rudd, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Silver-haired bats, (Lasionycteris noctivagans) are semi-colonial, migratory tree bats that have infrequent contact with humans. Despite the species rarity, the L. noctivagans rabies variant is the most commonly reported rabies virus variant (RABV) in domestically acquired human rabies cases in the US. Unlike big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) and little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus), L. noctivagans are not considered true hibernators. It is unknown if RABV can overwinter in hibernating L. noctivagans or is only maintained in members of this taxa that migrate to warmer climates. To better understand RABV overwintering in this species, L. noctivagans were inoculated intramuscularly with either a homologous RABV (L. noctivagans Virus 1) or one of two heterologous RABV (Eptesicus fuscus Virus 2 and Myotis lucifugus Virus 1). Five days following inoculation, L. noctivagans were placed in a hibernation chamber for 6 weeks. Our results demonstrate that rabies virus can overwinter in L. noctivagans yet the incubation period was extended 6 weeks when compared to bats maintained at ambient temperatures. Additionally, we found that the longer the incubation period, the greater the viral dissemination to the salivary glands. Similar to our previous studies, L. noctivagans were most susceptible to a homologous variant. In summary, we found that RABV incubation is extended following a subcutaneous exposure or maintenance in hibernation and longer incubation times increase dissemination and potential for transmission. PMID:27195489

  17. Molecular epidemiology of rabies virus in Vietnam (2006-2009).

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh K T; Nguyen, Dong V; Ngo, Giang C; Nguyen, Thu T; Inoue, Satoshi; Yamada, Akio; Dinh, Xuyen K; Nguyen, Dung V; Phan, Thao X; Pham, Bao Q; Nguyen, Hien T; Nguyen, Hanh T H

    2011-01-01

    This study was aimed at determining the molecular epidemiology of rabies virus (RABV) circulating in Vietnam. Intra vitam samples (saliva and cerebrospinal fluid) were collected from 31 patients who were believed to have rabies and were admitted to hospitals in northern provinces of Vietnam. Brain samples were collected from 176 sick or furious rabid dogs from all over the country. The human and canine samples were subjected to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. The findings showed that 23 patients tested positive for RABV. Interestingly, 5 rabies patients did not have any history of dog or cat bites, but they had an experience of butchering dogs or cats, or consuming their meat. RABV was also detected in 2 of the 100 sick dogs from slaughterhouses. Molecular epidemiological analysis of 27 RABV strains showed that these viruses could be classified into two groups. The RABVs classified into Group 1 were distributed throughout Vietnam and had sequence similarity with the strains from China, Thailand, Malaysia, and the Philippines. However, the RABVs classified into Group 2 were only found in the northern provinces of Vietnam and showed high sequence similarity with the strain from southern China. This finding suggested the recent influx of Group 2 RABVs between Vietnam and China across the border. Although the incidence of rabies due to circulating RABVs in slaughterhouses is less common than that due to dog bite, the national program for rabies control and prevention in Vietnam should include monitoring of the health of dogs meant for human consumption and vaccination for workers at dog slaughterhouses. Further, monitoring of and research on the circulating RABVs in dog markets may help to determine the cause of rabies and control the spread of rabies in slaughterhouses in Vietnam.

  18. Seroprevalence of rabies virus antibodies in bats from southern China.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Wang, Lili; Lu, Zongji; Xuan, Hua; Han, Xiaohu; Xia, Xianzhu; Zhao, Fuguang; Tu, Changchun

    2010-03-01

    Members of the Order Chiroptera are the natural reservoirs of lyssaviruses and play an important role in the transmission of rabies to animals and humans. In this present study, the seroprevalence for rabies virus was determined for bats sampled from four southern provinces on the Chinese mainland. A total of 685 bats of 8 species representing 4 families were collected from 10 sites, and were tested by the indirect fluorescent antibody test using fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-conjugated protein A/G mixture and viral neutralization test. Rabies antibody response was only detected from three bat species (Rousettus leschenaulti, Rhinolophus blythi, and Rhinolophus ferrumequinum). The overall rabies seroconversion rate was only 2.2% (15/685). Of the 15 positive sera, 13 (12 fruit bats and 1 insectivorous bat) were indirect fluorescent antibody test positive, and two insectivorous bats were virus neutralization positive when tested by the modified fluorescent antibody viral neutralization test, albeit extremely low. To our knowledge, this is the first published report describing rabies seroprevalences from Chinese bats. These results suggest that bats may play a role in the ecology of lyssaviruses in China, and further surveillance for the presence of lyssaviruses in bats should be undertaken throughout the country and extended to other species.

  19. Pre- and post-exposure safety and efficacy of attenuated rabies virus vaccines are enhanced by their expression of IFNγ

    SciTech Connect

    Barkhouse, Darryll A.; Faber, Milosz; Hooper, D. Craig

    2015-01-01

    Consistent with evidence of a strong correlation between interferon gamma (IFNγ) production and rabies virus (RABV) clearance from the CNS, we recently demonstrated that engineering a pathogenic RABV to express IFNγ highly attenuates the virus. Reasoning that IFNγ expression by RABV vaccines would enhance their safety and efficacy, we reverse-engineered two proven vaccine vectors, GAS and GASGAS, to express murine IFNγ. Mortality and morbidity were monitored during suckling mice infection, immunize/challenge experiments and mixed intracranial infections. We demonstrate that GASγ and GASγGAS are significantly attenuated in suckling mice compared to the GASGAS vaccine. GASγ better protects mice from lethal DRV4 RABV infection in both pre- and post-exposure experiments compared to GASGAS. Finally, GASγGAS reduces post-infection neurological sequelae, compared to control, during mixed intracranial infection with DRV4. These data show IFNγ expression by a vaccine vector can enhance its safety while increasing its efficacy as pre- and post-exposure treatment. - Highlights: • IFNγ expression improves attenuated rabies virus safety and immunogenicity. • IFNγ expression is safer and more immunogenic than doubling glycoprotein expression. • Co-infection with IFNγ-expressing RABV prevents wild-type rabies virus lethality. • Vaccine safety and efficacy is additive for IFNγ and double glycoprotein expression.

  20. Innate immune responses in raccoons after raccoon rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Srithayakumar, Vythegi; Sribalachandran, Hariharan; Rosatte, Rick; Nadin-Davis, Susan A; Kyle, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Zoonotic wildlife diseases pose significant health risks not only to their primary vectors but also to humans and domestic animals. Rabies is a lethal encephalitis caused by rabies virus (RV). This RNA virus can infect a range of terrestrial mammals but each viral variant persists in a particular reservoir host. Active management of these host vectors is needed to minimize the negative impacts of this disease, and an understanding of the immune response to RV infection aids strategies for host vaccination. Current knowledge of immune responses to RV infection comes primarily from rodent models in which an innate immune response triggers activation of several genes and signalling pathways. It is unclear, however, how well rodent models represent the immune response of natural hosts. This study investigates the innate immune response of a primary host, the raccoon, to a peripheral challenge using the raccoon rabies virus (RRV). The extent and temporal course of this response during RRV infection was analysed using genes predicted to be upregulated during infection (IFNs; IFN regulatory factors; IL-6; Toll like receptor-3; TNF receptor). We found that RRV activated components of the innate immune system, with changes in levels of transcripts correlated with presence of viral RNA. Our results suggest that natural reservoirs of rabies may not mimic the immune response triggered in rodent models, highlighting the need for further studies of infection in primary hosts.

  1. Genetic diversity of Chinese rabies viruses: evidence for the presence of two distinct clades in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Zhen; Xiong, Cheng-Long; Lin, Xian-Dan; Zhou, Dun-Jin; Jiang, Ren-Jie; Xiao, Qi-You; Xie, Xin-Yao; Yu, Xiang-Xiang; Tan, You-Jiang; Li, Ming Hui; Ai, Quan-Shan; Zhang, Li-Jie; Zou, Yang; Huang, Chun; Fu, Zhen F

    2009-01-01

    There have been three major rabies epidemics in China since the 1950s. To gain more insights into the molecular epidemiology of rabies viruses (RVs) for the third (the current) epidemic, we isolated RV from dogs and humans in major endemic areas, and characterized these isolates genetically by sequencing the entire glycoprotein (G) gene and the G-L non-coding region. These sequences were also compared phylogenetically with RVs isolated in China during previous epidemics and those around the world. Comparison of the entire G genes among the Chinese isolates revealed up to 21.8% divergence at the nucleotide level and 17.8% at the amino acid level. The available Chinese isolates could be divided into two distinct clades, each of which could be further divided into six lineages. Viruses in clade I include most of the Chinese viruses as well as viruses from southeast Asian countries including Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. The viruses in the other clade were found infrequently in China, but are closely related to viruses distributed worldwide among terrestrial animals. Interestingly, most of the viruses isolated during the past 10 years belong to lineage A viruses within clade I whereas most of the viruses isolated before 1996 belong to other lineages within clades I and II. Our results indicated that lineages A viruses have been predominant during the past 10 years and thus are largely responsible for the third and the current epidemic in China. Our results also suggested that the Chinese RV isolates in clade I share a common recent ancestor with those circulating in southeast Asia.

  2. Contrasting landscape epidemiology of two sympatric rabies virus strains.

    PubMed

    Barton, Heather D; Gregory, Andrew J; Davis, Rolan; Hanlon, Cathleen A; Wisely, Samantha M

    2010-07-01

    Viral strain evolution and disease emergence are influenced by anthropogenic change to the environment. We investigated viral characteristics, host ecology, and landscape features in the rabies-striped skunk disease system of the central Great Plains to determine how these factors interact to influence disease emergence. We amplified portions of the N and G genes of rabies viral RNA from 269 samples extracted from striped skunk brains throughout the distribution of two different rabies strains for which striped skunks were the reservoir. Because the distribution of these two strains overlapped on the landscape and were present in the same host population, we could evaluate how viral properties influenced epidemiological patterns in the area of sympatry. We found that South Central Skunk rabies (SCSK) exhibited intense purifying selection and high infectivity, which are both characteristics of an epizootic virus. Conversely, North Central Skunk rabies (NCSK) exhibited relaxed purifying selection and comparatively lower infectivity, suggesting the presence of an enzootic virus. The host population in the area of sympatry was highly admixed, and skunks among allopatric and sympatric areas had similar effective population sizes. Spatial analysis indicated that landscape features had minimal influence on NCSK movement across the landscape, but those same features were partial barriers to the spread of SCSK. We conclude that NCSK and SCSK have different epidemiological properties that interact differently with both host and landscape features to influence rabies spread in the central Great Plains. We suggest a holistic approach for future studies of emerging infectious diseases that includes studies of viral properties, host characteristics, and spatial features.

  3. Rabies virus infection of IMR-32 human neuroblastoma cells and effect of neurochemical and other agents.

    PubMed

    Lentz, T L; Fu, Y; Lewis, P

    1997-06-01

    IMR-32 human neuroblastoma cells are a continuous nerve cell line expressing neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. These cells were found to be susceptible to infection by rabies virus (CVS strain). After infection, viral antigen accumulated in the cell body in puncta and larger masses and spread out into the processes until at 3-4 days the entire cell was filled with antigen and lysed. A variety of chemical agents including cholinergic agonists and antagonists were tested for ability to inhibit infection of IMR-32 cells in a fluorescent focus assay. Agents found to inhibit infection were antibodies against the viral glycoprotein, gangliosides, a synthetic peptide of the neurotoxin-binding site of Torpedo acetylcholine receptor alpha1 subunit, alpha-bungarotoxin, and lysosomotropic agents. All other agents tested including other cholinergic ligands and synthetic peptides were not effective. Except for lysosomotropic agents, the agents which inhibited infection also inhibited attachment of virus to the cell surface. These results indicate that IMR-32 cells are a useful model in studying the interaction of a neurotropic virus with human neurons. The ability of alpha-bungarotoxin to inhibit infection suggests that neuronal alpha-bungarotoxin-binding receptors might serve as central nervous system receptors for rabies virus.

  4. Protection of Non-Human Primates against Rabies with an Adenovirus Recombinant Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Z.Q.; Greenberg, L.; Ertl, H. C.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2014-01-01

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. PMID:24503087

  5. Immunogenicity and safety of recombinant rabies viruses used for oral vaccination of stray dogs and wildlife.

    PubMed

    Faber, M; Dietzschold, B; Li, J

    2009-08-01

    Rabies is a zoonotic disease and stray dogs, wild carnivores and bats are the natural reservoirs of rabies. Oral immunization with live vaccines is the only practical approach to eradicate rabies in free ranging terrestrial animals. We have developed the double glycoprotein (G) rabies virus (RV) variant SPBNGAS-GAS that has great promise to be used as a live-attenuated vaccine. Oral immunization of rodents and several target animal species with this double G RV variant resulted in the induction of protective immunity, superior to that induced by a single RV G variant (SPBNGAS). The high oral efficacy of SPBNGAS-GAS is likely because of its increased ability to infect monocytes or immature dendritic cells (DCs), thereby inducing their conversion into mature DCs. Furthermore, infection of DCs with the double G variant resulted in a strong up-regulation of the expression of genes related to the NFjB signalling pathway including IFN-α and IFN-β, which might underlie the protection conferred by this live RV vaccine. A potential problem associated with the use of live RVs for oral vaccination could rest in the possibility of reversion to the pathogenic phenotype because of the high mutation rate characteristic for all RNA viruses. In this respect, the presence of a second non-pathogenic G gene decreases considerably the risk of reversion to the pathogenic phenotype because a nonpathogenic G is dominant over a pathogenic G in determining the pathogenicity of the double G RV variant. Because of its excellent efficacy and safety, the SPBNGAS-GAS vaccine may provide a distinct advantage over other live RV vaccine in its ability to vaccinate a broad range of mammalian species.

  6. Complex genetic structure of the rabies virus in Bangkok and its surrounding provinces, Thailand: implications for canine rabies control.

    PubMed

    Lumlertdacha, Boonlert; Wacharapluesadee, Supaporn; Denduangboripant, Jessada; Ruankaew, Nipada; Hoonsuwan, Wirongrong; Puanghat, Apirom; Sakarasaeranee, Plyyonk; Briggs, Deborrah; Hemachudha, Thiravat

    2006-03-01

    Dog vaccination and population management have been suggested as priorities in attempts at disease control in canine rabies-endemic countries. Budget limitations and the complexity of social, cultural and religious variables have complicated progress in the developing world. In Bangkok, Thailand, an intensive canine vaccination and sterilization programme has been in place since November 2002. Our objective was to determine if the rabies virus could be mapped according to its genetic variations and geographical location on the small localized scale of Bangkok and its surrounding provinces. Phylogenetic characterization of 69 samples from Bangkok and five neighbouring and two remote provinces, by limited sequence analysis of the rabies virus nucleoprotein gene, distinguished six different clades. Rabies viruses of four clades were intermixed in Bangkok and in the surrounding highly populated regions whereas the other two clades were confined to rural and less populated provinces. Such a complex pattern of gene flow, particularly in Bangkok, may affect the outcome of canine control programmes.

  7. Ifit2 Is a Restriction Factor in Rabies Virus Pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Davis, Benjamin M; Fensterl, Volker; Lawrence, Tessa M; Hudacek, Andrew W; Sen, Ganes C; Schnell, Matthias J

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the interactions between rabies virus (RABV) and individual host cell proteins is critical for the development of targeted therapies. Here we report that interferon-induced protein with tetratricopeptide repeats 2 (Ifit2), an interferon-stimulated gene (ISG) with possible RNA-binding capacity, is an important restriction factor for rabies virus. When Ifit2 was depleted, RABV grew more quickly in mouse neuroblastoma cells in vitro This effect was replicated in vivo, where Ifit2 knockout mice displayed a dramatically more severe disease phenotype than wild-type mice after intranasal inoculation of RABV. This increase in pathogenicity correlated to an increase in RABV mRNA and live viral load in the brain, as well as to an accelerated spread to brain regions normally affected by this RABV model. These results suggest that Ifit2 exerts its antiviral effect mainly at the level of viral replication, as opposed to functioning as a mechanism that restricts viral entry/egress or transports RABV particles through axons.IMPORTANCE Rabies is a fatal zoonotic disease with a nearly 100% case fatality rate. Although there are effective vaccines for rabies, this disease still takes the lives of about 50,000 people each year. Victims tend to be children living in regions without comprehensive medical infrastructure who present to health care workers too late for postexposure prophylaxis. The protein discussed in our report, Ifit2, is found to be an important restriction factor for rabies virus, acting directly or indirectly against viral replication. A more nuanced understanding of this interaction may reveal a step of a pathway or site at which the system could be exploited for the development of a targeted therapy. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. Experimental oral and nasal transmission of rabies virus in mice.

    PubMed

    Charlton, K M; Casey, G A

    1979-01-01

    Weanling female white Swiss mice were exposed to challenge virus standard rabies virus and street virus isolates from various domestic and wild animals. Virus was given free choice as suspension or as infected mouse brain by stomach tube, by single injection of suspension into the oral cavity of unanesthetized mice, by repeated injection into the oral cavity of anesthetized mice and by single application to the external nares of anesthetized mice. Challenge virus standard virus in mouse brain suspension and a suspension of skunk salivary glands infected with street virus (titers greater than or equal to 10(6)MICLD50/0.03 ml) consistently produced high rates of infection in mice exposed intranasally, low to high rates of infection in mice exposed by forced feeding and other artificial methods of oral exposure and very low rates of infection when given free choice. Street virus isolates passaged intracerebrally in mice had titers less than or equal to 10(4.5) MICLD50/0.03 ml and rarely caused rabies in mice exposed orally or nasally by any method. The results indicate that with the isolates used, virus of high titer (greater than or equal to 10(6)MICLD50/0.03 ml) is required to consistently produce infection in mice by the nasal route and that the mucosa of the nasal cavity probably is the chief route of infection even after oral administration.

  9. Experimental oral and nasal transmission of rabies virus in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, K M; Casey, G A

    1979-01-01

    Weanling female white Swiss mice were exposed to challenge virus standard rabies virus and street virus isolates from various domestic and wild animals. Virus was given free choice as suspension or as infected mouse brain by stomach tube, by single injection of suspension into the oral cavity of unanesthetized mice, by repeated injection into the oral cavity of anesthetized mice and by single application to the external nares of anesthetized mice. Challenge virus standard virus in mouse brain suspension and a suspension of skunk salivary glands infected with street virus (titers greater than or equal to 10(6)MICLD50/0.03 ml) consistently produced high rates of infection in mice exposed intranasally, low to high rates of infection in mice exposed by forced feeding and other artificial methods of oral exposure and very low rates of infection when given free choice. Street virus isolates passaged intracerebrally in mice had titers less than or equal to 10(4.5) MICLD50/0.03 ml and rarely caused rabies in mice exposed orally or nasally by any method. The results indicate that with the isolates used, virus of high titer (greater than or equal to 10(6)MICLD50/0.03 ml) is required to consistently produce infection in mice by the nasal route and that the mucosa of the nasal cavity probably is the chief route of infection even after oral administration. PMID:427634

  10. Rabies virus dissemination in neural tissues of autopsy cases due to rabies imported into Japan from the Philippines: immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Tobiume, Minoru; Sato, Yuko; Katano, Harutaka; Nakajima, Noriko; Tanaka, Keiko; Noguchi, Akira; Inoue, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Hideki; Iwasa, Yoko; Tanaka, Junichi; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Sachiko; Kurane, Ichiro; Sata, Tetsutaro

    2009-08-01

    Two Japanese men, 65 and 69 years old, developed rabies in Japan around 2-3 months after dog-bite exposure in the Philippines. Laboratory diagnosis of rabies was made following the detection of rabies virus genome on reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction from saliva, and on immunohistochemistry of a nuchal skin punch biopsy in one case. The patients died 9 and 19 days after clinical onset. At autopsy, no macroscopic changes in the CNS were observed. Histopathology indicated that eosinophilic and cytoplasmic inclusion bodies, Negri bodies, were seen in neuronal cells of the CNS. Inflammatory cell reactions were scarce, and no apoptosis in the CNS was detected. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that rabies virus nucleoprotein (N) and phosphoprotein (P) were disseminated to all neural tissues and cells in the body with a similar pattern in both cases. Interestingly, there were no differences of localization between N and P antigen in the brain, but the N antigen was located at the peripheral nerve sheaths and the P antigen was localized in axons. These data indicate that rabies virus dissemination in all neural tissues causes disease development and death. Immunohistochemistry for rabies is a powerful tool to understand the pathogenesis of rabies.

  11. Population structure of two rabies hosts relative to the known distribution of rabies virus variants in Alaska.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Elizabeth W; Renshaw, Benjamin; Clement, Christopher J; Himschoot, Elizabeth A; Hundertmark, Kris J; Hueffer, Karsten

    2016-02-01

    For pathogens that infect multiple species, the distinction between reservoir hosts and spillover hosts is often difficult. In Alaska, three variants of the arctic rabies virus exist with distinct spatial distributions. We tested the hypothesis that rabies virus variant distribution corresponds to the population structure of the primary rabies hosts in Alaska, arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) and red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) to possibly distinguish reservoir and spillover hosts. We used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence and nine microsatellites to assess population structure in those two species. mtDNA structure did not correspond to rabies virus variant structure in either species. Microsatellite analyses gave varying results. Bayesian clustering found two groups of arctic foxes in the coastal tundra region, but for red foxes it identified tundra and boreal types. Spatial Bayesian clustering and spatial principal components analysis identified 3 and 4 groups of arctic foxes, respectively, closely matching the distribution of rabies virus variants in the state. Red foxes, conversely, showed eight clusters comprising two regions (boreal and tundra) with much admixture. These results run contrary to previous beliefs that arctic fox show no fine-scale spatial population structure. While we cannot rule out that the red fox is part of the maintenance host community for rabies in Alaska, the distribution of virus variants appears to be driven primarily by the arctic fox. Therefore, we show that host population genetics can be utilized to distinguish between maintenance and spillover hosts when used in conjunction with other approaches.

  12. Population Structure of Two Rabies Hosts Relative to the Known Distribution of Rabies Virus Variants in Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Goldsmith, Elizabeth W.; Renshaw, Benjamin; Clement, Christopher J.; Himschoot, Elizabeth A.; Hundertmark, Kris J.; Hueffer, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    For pathogens that infect multiple species the distinction between reservoir hosts and spillover hosts is often difficult. In Alaska, three variants of the arctic rabies virus exist with distinct spatial distributions. We test the hypothesis that rabies virus variant distribution corresponds to the population structure of the primary rabies hosts in Alaska, arctic foxes (Vulpes lagopus) and red foxes (V. vulpes) in order to possibly distinguish reservoir and spill over hosts. We used mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence and nine microsatellites to assess population structure in those two species. mtDNA structure did not correspond to rabies virus variant structure in either species. Microsatellite analyses gave varying results. Bayesian clustering found 2 groups of arctic foxes in the coastal tundra region, but for red foxes it identified tundra and boreal types. Spatial Bayesian clustering and spatial principal components analysis identified 3 and 4 groups of arctic foxes, respectively, closely matching the distribution of rabies virus variants in the state. Red foxes, conversely, showed eight clusters comprising 2 regions (boreal and tundra) with much admixture. These results run contrary to previous beliefs that arctic fox show no fine-scale spatial population structure. While we cannot rule out that the red fox is part of the maintenance host community for rabies in Alaska, the distribution of virus variants appears to be driven primarily by the artic fox Therefore we show that host population genetics can be utilized to distinguish between maintenance and spillover hosts when used in conjunction with other approaches. PMID:26661691

  13. Incidence of human rabies and characterization of rabies virus nucleoprotein gene in dogs in Fujian Province, Southeast China, 2002-2012.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Ming; Zhang, Zhi-Shan; Deng, Yan-Qin; Wu, Shou-Li; Wang, Wei; Yan, Yan-Sheng

    2017-08-30

    Rabies is a global fatal infectious viral disease that is characterized by a high mortality after onset of clinical symptoms. Recently, there has been an increase in the incidence of rabies in China. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of human rabies and characterize the rabies virus nucleoprotein gene in dogs sampled from Fujian Province, Southeast China from 2002 to 2012. Data pertaining to human rabies cases in Fujian Province during the period from 2002 through 2012 were collected, and the epidemiological profiles were described. The saliva and brain specimens were collected from dogs in Quanzhou, Longyan and Sanming cities of the province, and the rabies virus antigen was determined in the canine saliva specimens using an ELISA assay. Rabies virus RNA was extracted from canine brain specimens, and rabies virus nucleoprotein gene was amplified using a nested RT-PCR assay, followed by sequencing and genotyping. A total of 226 human rabies cases were reported in Fujian Province from 2002 to 2012, in which 197 cases were detected in three cities of Quanzhou, Longyan and Sanming. ELISA assay revealed positive rabies virus antigen in six of eight rabid dogs and 165 of 3492 seemingly healthy dogs. The full-length gene fragment of the rabies virus nucleoprotein gene was amplified from the brain specimens of seven rabid dogs and 12 seemingly healthy dogs. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis revealed that these 19 rabies virus nucleoprotein genes all belonged to genotype I, and were classified into three genetic groups. Sequencing analysis showed a 99.7% to 100% intra-group and an 86.4% to 89.3% inter-group homology. This study is the first description pertaining to the epidemiological characteristics of human rabies cases and characterization of the rabies virus nucleoprotein gene in dogs in Fujian Province, Southeast China. Our findings may provide valuable knowledge for the development of strategies targeting the prevention and control of

  14. Alum adjuvanted rabies DNA vaccine confers 80% protection against lethal 50 LD50 rabies challenge virus standard strain.

    PubMed

    Garg, Rajni; Kaur, Manpreet; Saxena, Ankur; Prasad, Rajendra; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2017-03-03

    Rabies is a serious concern world-wide. Despite availability of rabies vaccines for long; their efficacy, safety, availability and cost effectiveness has been a tremendous issue. This calls for improvement of rabies vaccination strategies. DNA vaccination has immense potential in this regard. The DNA vaccine pgp.LAMP-1 conferred 60% protection to BALB/c mice against 20 LD50 rabies challenge virus standard (CVS) strain challenge. Upon supplementation with Emulsigen-D, the vaccine formulation conferred complete protection against lethal challenge. To assess the feasibility of this vaccine formulation for human use, it was tested along with other FDA approved adjuvants, namely, Alum, Immuvac, Montanide ISA720 VG. Enhanced immune response correlated with high IgG antibody titer, Th2 biased response with a high level of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (RVNAs) and IgG1/IgG2a ratio >1, observed upon alum supplementation of the rabies DNA vaccine. The total IgG antibody titer was 2IU/ml and total RVNA titer was observed to be 4IU/ml which is eight times higher than the minimum protective titer recommended by WHO. Furthermore, it conferred 80% protection against challenge with 50 LD50 of the rabies CVS strain, conducted in compliance with the potency test for rabies recommended by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), USA. Previously, we have established pre-clinical safety of this vaccine as per the guidelines of Schedule Y, FDA as well as The European Agency for evaluation of Medicinal Products. The vaccine showed no observable toxicity at the site of injection as well as at systemic level in Wistar rats when administered with 10X recommended dose. Therefore, supplementation of rabies DNA vaccine, pgp.LAMP-1 with alum would lead to development of a non-toxic, efficacious, stable and affordable vaccine that can be used to combat high numbers of fatal rabies infections tormenting developing countries.

  15. Susceptibility of neuroblastoma cells to rabies virus may be affected by passage number.

    PubMed

    Pouliott, Craig; Dupuis, Michelle; Appler, Kim; Brunt, Scott; Rudd, Robert; Davis, April

    2017-09-01

    Maintaining a healthy, continuous immortalized cell line is essential for rabies laboratories that perform virus isolation assays and test for the presence of viral neutralizing antibodies. Individuals who routinely work with rabies virus, such as rabies laboratory employees, or those who may have a high potential for exposure to rabies virus, including veterinarians, should be tested for the presence of anti-rabies viral neutralizing antibodies (VNA) every 6-24 months, depending on potential exposure level. The gold standard for serum neutralization assays require the use of live rabies virus and cells that are sensitive to rabies virus infection. Additionally, virus isolation assays are routinely performed in rabies laboratories as a back-up for the direct fluorescent antibody test (dFAT). Currently there are no guidelines or publications recommending the use of low, intermediate, or high passage cell lines in rabies assays. In this study, we compared the sensitivity of intermediate, high, and extremely high passaged neuroblastomas to rabies virus using virus isolation, serum neutralization, and real time RT-PCR techniques. Additionally, cells were examined microscopically to determine changes in morphology and dissemination of rabies virus antigen between intermediate, high, and extremely high passage cells. No significant difference was found between cell passage numbers and viral susceptibility between intermediate and high passaged cells. However, extremely high passaged cells (≥1200 passages) were less susceptible to viral infection and/or produced less virus following inoculation. As a result, rabies laboratories that use viral isolation and serum neutralization assays should regularly assess cell susceptibility to ensure the integrity and repeatability of the test. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Immunofluorescent examination of the skin of rabies-infected animals as a means of early detection of rabies virus antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Blenden, D C; Bell, J F; Tsao, A T; Umoh, J U

    1983-01-01

    Correlations were made on immunofluorescence positivity to antirabies conjugate between cranium-derived nerve fibers in skin and traditional samplings of brain tissue from several species and illness categories of animals with naturally acquired rabies. The overall correlation of results from all categories was about 98% (n, 104) for those that were brain positive and 100% (n, 99) for those that were brain negative. Some animals that ultimately developed rabies were found to have immunofluorescence-positive results 2 or more days before the onset of clinical signs in both natural and experimental infections. The percentage of those with positive skin immunofluorescence results increased as the onset of symptoms approached. From the midcourse period of illness to death, the correlation between skin and brain approached 100%. Different vaccines, commonly given to prevent rabies and other diseases of dogs and cats, were administered to groups of mice and were found to not produce false-positive results when their skin was examined by immunofluorescence for rabies virus antigen. These data suggest that examination of surgical biopsy specimens by immunofluorescence for rabies virus antigen is a useful and reliable diagnostic tool to evaluate the rabies status of biting dogs or cats, or to confirm a clinical diagnosis of rabies in the species tested. The biopsy evaluation of any other species as a means of assessing bite risk is not suggested by these data. PMID:6355152

  17. Diversity of currently circulating rabies virus strains in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Lojkić, Ivana; Cac, Zeljko; Bedeković, Tomislav; Lemo, Nina; Brstilo, Mate; Müller, Thomas; Freuling, Conrad M

    2012-01-01

    Sylvatic rabies has been present in Croatia for more than three decades, with the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) as the main reservoir. The present epidemic of sylvatic rabies in Croatia started already in 1977 and in the past ten years the disease has become enzootic in the entire country and thus represents a considerable veterinary and public health threat. A genetic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of rabies virus isolates (RABV) from Croatia was performed using panel of 32 selected rabies-positive brain samples from domestic and wild animals collected between 2008 and 2010. Based on the comparison of 367-nucleotide sequences of a conserved region of the nucleoprotein (N) gene (nucleotides 75-441), the phylogenetic analysis revealed a low genetic diversity of currently circulating RABV strains in Croatia. 18 RABV isolates mainly originating from Eastern Croatia clustered with the formerly established Eastern European (EE) lineage, and the rest (14) were identical with the West European (WE) group. Both phylogenetic groups seem to coincide in central regions on both sides along the Save River. A high sequence identity in the N gene of the RABV isolates from neighbouring countries was found.

  18. The origin and phylogeography of dog rabies virus

    PubMed Central

    Bourhy, Hervé; Reynes, Jean-Marc; Dunham, Eleca J.; Dacheux, Laurent; Larrous, Florence; Huong, Vu Thi Que; Xu, Gelin; Yan, Jiaxin; Miranda, Mary Elizabeth G.; Holmes, Edward C.

    2012-01-01

    Rabies is a progressively fatal and incurable viral encephalitis caused by a lyssavirus infection. Almost all of the 55 000 annual rabies deaths in humans result from infection with dog rabies viruses (RABV). Despite the importance of rabies for human health, little is known about the spread of RABV in dog populations, and patterns of biodiversity have only been studied in limited geographical space. To address these questions on a global scale, we sequenced 62 new isolates and performed an extensive comparative analysis of RABV gene sequence data, representing 192 isolates sampled from 55 countries. From this, we identified six clades of RABV in non-flying mammals, each of which has a distinct geographical distribution, most likely reflecting major physical barriers to gene flow. Indeed, a detailed analysis of phylogeographic structure revealed only limited viral movement among geographical localities. Using Bayesian coalescent methods we also reveal that the sampled lineages of canid RABV derive from a common ancestor that originated within the past 1500 years. Additionally, we found no evidence for either positive selection or widespread population bottlenecks during the global expansion of canid RABV. Overall, our study reveals that the stochastic processes of genetic drift and population subdivision are the most important factors shaping the global phylogeography of canid RABV. PMID:18931062

  19. Molecular Diversity of Rabies Viruses Associated with Bats in Mexico and Other Countries of the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Villa, Andrés; Orciari, Lillian A.; Juárez-Islas, Víctor; Gómez-Sierra, Mauricio; Padilla-Medina, Irma; Flisser, Ana; Souza, Valeria; Castillo, Amanda; Franka, Richard; Escalante-Mañe, Maribel; Sauri-González, Isaias; Rupprecht, Charles E.

    2006-01-01

    Bat rabies and its transmission to humans and other species in Mexico were investigated. Eighty-nine samples obtained from rabid livestock, cats, dogs, and humans in Mexico were studied by antigenic typing and partial sequence analysis. Samples were further compared with enzootic rabies associated with different species of bats in the Americas. Patterns of nucleotide variation allowed the definition of at least 20 monophyletic clusters associated with 9 or more different bat species. Several lineages associated with distinctive antigenic patterns were found in rabies viruses related to rabies in vampire bats in Mexico. Vampire bat rabies virus lineages associated with antigenic variant 3 are widely spread from Mexico to South America, suggesting these lineages as the most likely ancestors of vampire bat rabies and the ones that have been moved by vampire bat populations throughout the Americas. Rabies viruses related to Lasiurus cinereus, Histiotus montanus, and some other not yet identified species of the genus Lasiurus were found circulating in Mexico. Long-range dissemination patterns of rabies are not necessarily associated with migratory bat species, as in the case of rabies in Desmodus rotundus and Histiotus montanus. Human rabies was associated with vampire bat transmission in most cases, and in one case, rabies transmission from free-tailed bats was inferred. The occurrence of rabies spillover from bats to domestic animals was also demonstrated. Genetic typing of rabies viruses allowed us to distinguish trends of disease dissemination and to address, in a preliminary fashion, aspects of the complex evolution of rabies viruses in different host-reservoir species. PMID:16672396

  20. Molecular diversity of rabies viruses associated with bats in Mexico and other countries of the Americas.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Villa, Andrés; Orciari, Lillian A; Juárez-Islas, Víctor; Gómez-Sierra, Mauricio; Padilla-Medina, Irma; Flisser, Ana; Souza, Valeria; Castillo, Amanda; Franka, Richard; Escalante-Mañe, Maribel; Sauri-González, Isaias; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2006-05-01

    Bat rabies and its transmission to humans and other species in Mexico were investigated. Eighty-nine samples obtained from rabid livestock, cats, dogs, and humans in Mexico were studied by antigenic typing and partial sequence analysis. Samples were further compared with enzootic rabies associated with different species of bats in the Americas. Patterns of nucleotide variation allowed the definition of at least 20 monophyletic clusters associated with 9 or more different bat species. Several lineages associated with distinctive antigenic patterns were found in rabies viruses related to rabies in vampire bats in Mexico. Vampire bat rabies virus lineages associated with antigenic variant 3 are widely spread from Mexico to South America, suggesting these lineages as the most likely ancestors of vampire bat rabies and the ones that have been moved by vampire bat populations throughout the Americas. Rabies viruses related to Lasiurus cinereus, Histiotus montanus, and some other not yet identified species of the genus Lasiurus were found circulating in Mexico. Long-range dissemination patterns of rabies are not necessarily associated with migratory bat species, as in the case of rabies in Desmodus rotundus and Histiotus montanus. Human rabies was associated with vampire bat transmission in most cases, and in one case, rabies transmission from free-tailed bats was inferred. The occurrence of rabies spillover from bats to domestic animals was also demonstrated. Genetic typing of rabies viruses allowed us to distinguish trends of disease dissemination and to address, in a preliminary fashion, aspects of the complex evolution of rabies viruses in different host-reservoir species.

  1. Rabies Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by a virus. Rabies is mainly a disease of animals. Humans get rabies when they are bitten by infected ... and paralysis. Rabies is almost always fatal.Wild animals, especially bats, ... can also transmit the disease.Human rabies is rare in the United States. ...

  2. An evaluation of two commercially available ELISAs and one in-house reference laboratory ELISA for the determination of human anti-rabies virus antibodies.

    PubMed

    Welch, Ryan J; Anderson, Brian L; Litwin, Christine M

    2009-06-01

    The envelope glycoprotein G of rabies virus in vaccines induces the production of neutralizing antibodies important in the protection against the disease. The measurement of anti-envelope glycoprotein antibodies is a good predictor of the degree of humoral immunity in people during anti-rabies treatment or after vaccination. Several assays exist for the serological determination of antibody protection against rabies virus infection. Antibody neutralization by the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) or the fluorescent antibody virus neutralization (FAVN) test is currently the gold standard. Performance of the highly complex RFFIT and FAVN tests, however, requires specialized reference laboratories with expertise with this assay. Although not widely used, ELISA test kits are available and may be an additional option for testing that is more accessible. The aim of the present study was to evaluate available ELISA assays for the determination of anti-rabies antibodies. We compared the Bio-Rad Platelia Rabies II ELISA, DRG Rabies Virus IgG Ab ELISA and Focus Diagnostics Rabies Antibody Detection by ELISA to RFFIT. Bland-Altman plots comparing the Bio-Rad Platelia assay and the Focus Diagnostics assay to RFFIT showed a low degree of variability between the ELISA assays and RFFIT results except in samples with high RFFIT values. The agreement, sensitivity and specificity of Bio-Rad Platelia Rabies II ELISA when compared to RFFIT were 95.1 %, 94.1 % and 95.8 %, respectively. The DRG Rabies assay compared to RFFIT had an agreement of 77.7 %, a sensitivity of 86.7 % and a specificity of 69.4 %. The agreement, sensitivity and specificity of Focus Diagnostics Rabies Detection by ELISA when compared to RFFIT were 82.2 %, 91.7 % and 73.0 %, respectively. Overall, the Bio-Rad Platelia assay showed higher accuracy and specificity than either the DRG or Focus assays. All of these ELISAs, however, measure all antibody types and do not discriminate the neutralizing

  3. Report of isolations of unusual lyssaviruses (rabies and Mokola virus) identified retrospectively from Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Bingham, J; Javangwe, S; Sabeta, C T; Wandeler, A I; Nel, L H

    2001-06-01

    Rabies isolates that had been stored between 1983 and 1997 were examined with a panel of anti-lyssavirus nucleocapsid monoclonal antibodies. Out of 56 isolates from cats and various wild carnivore species, 1 isolate of Mokola virus and 5 other non-typical rabies viruses were identified. The Mokola virus isolate was diagnosed as rabies in 1993 from a cat. Genetic analysis of this isolate suggests that it falls in a distinct subgroup of the Mokola virus genotype. The 5 non-typical rabies viruses were isolated from honey badgers (Mellivora capensis), African civets (Civettictis civetta) and an unidentified mongoose (Herpestidae). These isolates are representatives of rarely-reported wildlife-associated strains of rabies, probably maintained by the slender mongoose (Galerella sanguinea). These findings indicate that both Mokola virus and the mongoose-associated variant may be more common in Zimbabwe than is apparent from routine surveillance.

  4. Spatial Temporal Dynamics and Molecular Evolution of Re-Emerging Rabies Virus in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yung-Cheng; Chu, Pei-Yu; Chang, Mei-Yin; Hsiao, Kuang-Liang; Lin, Jih-Hui; Liu, Hsin-Fu

    2016-01-01

    Taiwan has been recognized by the World Organization for Animal Health as rabies-free since 1961. Surprisingly, rabies virus (RABV) was identified in a dead Formosan ferret badger in July 2013. Later, more infected ferret badgers were reported from different geographic regions of Taiwan. In order to know its evolutionary history and spatial temporal dynamics of this virus, phylogeny was reconstructed by maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods based on the full-length of glycoprotein (G), matrix protein (M), and nucleoprotein (N) genes. The evolutionary rates and phylogeographic were determined using Beast and SPREAD software. Phylogenetic trees showed a monophyletic group containing all of RABV isolates from Taiwan and it further separated into three sub-groups. The estimated nucleotide substitution rates of G, M, and N genes were between 2.49 × 10−4–4.75 × 10−4 substitutions/site/year, and the mean ratio of dN/dS was significantly low. The time of the most recent common ancestor was estimated around 75, 89, and 170 years, respectively. Phylogeographic analysis suggested the origin of the epidemic could be in Eastern Taiwan, then the Formosan ferret badger moved across the Central Range of Taiwan to western regions and separated into two branches. In this study, we illustrated the evolution history and phylogeographic of RABV in Formosan ferret badgers. PMID:26999115

  5. Intracerebral Administration of Recombinant Rabies Virus Expressing GM-CSF Prevents the Development of Rabies after Infection with Street Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hualei; Zhang, Guoqing; Wen, Yongjun; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu; Fu, Zhen F.

    2011-01-01

    Recently it was found that prior immunization with recombinant rabies virus (RABV) expressing granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) (LBNSE-GM-CSF) resulted in high innate/adaptive immune responses and protection against challenge with virulent RABV (Wen et al., JVI, 2011). In this study, the ability of LBNSE-GM-CSF to prevent animals from developing rabies was investigated in mice after infection with lethal doses of street RABV. It was found that intracerebral administration of LBNSE-GM-CSF protected more mice from developing rabies than sham-treated mice as late as day 5 after infection with street RABV. Intracerebral administration of LBNSE-GM-CSF resulted in significantly higher levels of chemokine/cytokine expression and more infiltration of inflammatory and immune cells into the central nervous system (CNS) than sham-administration or administration with UV-inactivated LBNSE-GM-CSF. Enhancement of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and increases in virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA) were also observed in mice treated with LBNSE-GM-CSF. On the other hand, intracerebral administration with UV-inactivated LBNSE-GM-CSF did not increase protection despite the fact that VNA were induced in the periphery. However, intracerebral administration with chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, also termed CCL2) increased significantly the protective efficacy of UV-inactivated LBNSE-GM-CSF. Together these studies confirm that direct administration of LBNSE-GM-CSF can enhance the innate and adaptive immunity as well as the BBB permeability, thus allowing infiltration of inflammatory cells and other immune effectors enter into the CNS to clear the virus and prevent the development of rabies. PMID:21980450

  6. Comparison of immune responses to attenuated rabies virus and street virus in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Miao, Fa-Ming; Zhang, Shou-Feng; Wang, Shu-Chao; Liu, Ye; Zhang, Fei; Hu, Rong-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Rabies is a lethal neurological disease caused by the neurotropic rabies virus (RABV). To investigate the innate immune response in the brain during rabies infection, key gene transcripts indicative of innate immunity in a mouse model system were measured using real-time RT-PCR. Mice were infected via the intracerebral or intramuscular route with either attenuated rabies virus (SRV9) or pathogenic rabies virus (BD06). Infection with SRV9 resulted in the early detection of viral replication and the rapid induction of innate immune response gene expression in the brain. BD06 infection elicited innate immune response gene expression during only the late stage of infection. We measured Na-fluorescein uptake to assess blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, which was enhanced during the early stage of SRV9 infection and significantly enhanced during the late stage of BD06 infection. Furthermore, early SRV9 replication increased the maturation and differentiation of dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells in the inguinal lymph nodes and initiated the generation of virus-neutralizing antibodies (VNAs), which cooperate with the innate immune response to eliminate virus from the CNS. However, BD06 infection did not stimulate VNA production; thus, the virus was able to evade the host immune response and cause encephalitis. The rabies virus phosphoprotein has been reported to counteract IFN activation. In an in vitro study of the relationship between IFN antagonism and RABV pathogenicity, we demonstrated that SRV9 more strongly antagonized IFN activity than did BD06. Therefore, there is no positive relationship between the IFN antagonist activity of the virus and its pathogenicity.

  7. iTRAQ protein profile analysis of neuroblastoma (NA) cells infected with the rabies viruses rHep-Flury and Hep-dG

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Youtian; Liu, Wenjun; Yan, Guangrong; Luo, Yongwen; Zhao, Jing; Yang, Xianfeng; Mei, Mingzhu; Wu, Xiaowei; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    The rabies virus (RABV) glycoprotein (G) is the principal contributor to the pathogenicity and protective immunity of RABV. In a previous work, we reported that recombinant rabies virus Hep-dG, which was generated by reverse genetics to carry two copies of the G-gene, showed lower virulence than the parental virus rHep-Flury in suckling mice with a better immune protection effect. To better understand the mechanisms underlying rabies virus attenuation and the role of glycoprotein G, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) was performed to identify and quantify distinct proteins. 10 and 111 differentially expressed proteins were obtained in rHep-Flury and Hep-dG infection groups, respectively. Selected data were validated by western blot and qRT-PCR. Bioinformatics analysis of the distinct protein suggested that glycoprotein over-expression in the attenuated RABV strain can induce activation of the interferon signaling. Furthermore, it may promote the antiviral response, MHC-I mediated antigen-specific T cell immune response, apoptosis and autophagy in an IFN-dependent manner. These findings might not only improve the understanding of the dynamics of RABV and host interaction, but also help understand the mechanisms underlying innate and adaptive immunity during RABV infection. PMID:26217322

  8. Antigenic and genetic characterization of rabies virus isolates from Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Guarino, Helena; Castilho, Juliana Galera; Souto, Juanita; Oliveira, Rafael de Novaes; Carrieri, Maria Luiza; Kotait, Ivanete

    2013-05-01

    After 25 years without any reported cases of rabies in Uruguay, the northern region of the country experienced an epizootic of bovine paralytic rabies in October 2007. The outbreak affected bovines and equines, and the main source of infection was the bat Desmodus rotundus, the only hematophagous species in the country. From October 2007 to July 2008, 42 bovine, 3 equine and 120 chiropteran samples were submitted to the National Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory for rabies testing. A total of 12 samples (7 bovine, 2 equine and 3 from D. rotundus) were positive by the fluorescent antibody test, and viruses were isolated by the mouse inoculation test. The objective of this study was to compare the antigenic and genetic characteristics of these isolates and three isolates from insectivorous bats from other regions. Antigenic typing using a panel of eight monoclonal antibodies identified all 12 viruses as variant 3 (AgV3), a variant associated with D. rotundus. Two isolates from insectivorous bats (Tadarida brasiliensis and Molossus sp.) were characterized as antigenic variant 4 (AgV4) while the third, from Myotis sp., could not be characterized using this panel as its reactivity pattern did not match that of any of the known antigenic variants. Partial N-gene sequences (nt 149-1420) of these isolates were aligned with homologous sequences derived from GenBank by the CLUSTAL/W method and used to build a neighbor-joining distance tree with the Kimura 2-parameter model. All 12 isolates were genetically grouped into the D. rotundus cluster as they shared 100% identity. In the phylogenetic analysis, the three isolates from insectivorous bats segregated into three clusters: one related to T. brasiliensis, one to Myotis sp. and the other to Lasiurus sp., although the isolate associated with the latter came from a Molossus sp. specimen. These results indicate that AgV3 was associated with the outbreak of bovine paralytic rabies in Uruguay. This is the first report of rabies

  9. [Rabies virus isolation in the salivary glands of insectivorous bats].

    PubMed

    Gury Dohmen, F; Beltrán, F

    2009-12-01

    This study determined the presence of the rabies virus in salivary glands, as well as its titre and antigenic characterisation and the level of exposure to the virus from contact between domestic animals and humans. Twenty-six positive brain samples were selected, 80% of which were from the Brazilian free-tailed bat, Tadarida brasiliensis, corresponding to the period 1999-2005. Antigenic characterisation was conducted on a panel of 19 monoclonal antibodies targeting the rabies virus nucleoprotein supplied by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta in the United States of America. The results revealed a high percentage of isolations in salivary glands (76.9%). Their average titres were compared in a batch of positive samples of brain and salivary glands, giving values of 4.75 and 3.81 respectively (expressed as log LD50/0.03 ml). The isolated viruses corresponded principally to variant 4 associated with T brasiliensis and variant 6 associated with the hoary bat, Lasiurus cinereus, and the red bat, L. borealis, and their respective subvariants. The level of exposure in domestic animals and humans was 50% during the period under study.

  10. Subversion of the Immune Response by Rabies Virus.

    PubMed

    Scott, Terence P; Nel, Louis H

    2016-08-19

    Rabies has affected mankind for several centuries and is one of the oldest known zoonoses. It is peculiar how little is known regarding the means by which rabies virus (RABV) evades the immune response and kills its host. This review investigates the complex interplay between RABV and the immune system, including the various means by which RABV evades, or advantageously utilizes, the host immune response in order to ensure successful replication and spread to another host. Different factors that influence immune responses-including age, sex, cerebral lateralization and temperature-are discussed, with specific reference to RABV and the effects on host morbidity and mortality. We also investigate the role of apoptosis and discuss whether it is a detrimental or beneficial mechanism of the host's response to infection. The various RABV proteins and their roles in immune evasion are examined in depth with reference to important domains and the downstream effects of these interactions. Lastly, an overview of the means by which RABV evades important immune responses is provided. The research discussed in this review will be important in determining the roles of the immune response during RABV infections as well as to highlight important therapeutic target regions and potential strategies for rabies treatment.

  11. Subversion of the Immune Response by Rabies Virus

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Terence P.; Nel, Louis H.

    2016-01-01

    Rabies has affected mankind for several centuries and is one of the oldest known zoonoses. It is peculiar how little is known regarding the means by which rabies virus (RABV) evades the immune response and kills its host. This review investigates the complex interplay between RABV and the immune system, including the various means by which RABV evades, or advantageously utilizes, the host immune response in order to ensure successful replication and spread to another host. Different factors that influence immune responses—including age, sex, cerebral lateralization and temperature—are discussed, with specific reference to RABV and the effects on host morbidity and mortality. We also investigate the role of apoptosis and discuss whether it is a detrimental or beneficial mechanism of the host’s response to infection. The various RABV proteins and their roles in immune evasion are examined in depth with reference to important domains and the downstream effects of these interactions. Lastly, an overview of the means by which RABV evades important immune responses is provided. The research discussed in this review will be important in determining the roles of the immune response during RABV infections as well as to highlight important therapeutic target regions and potential strategies for rabies treatment. PMID:27548204

  12. Intracellular Spread of Rabies Virus Is Reduced in the Paralytic Form of Canine Rabies Compared to the Furious Form.

    PubMed

    Shuangshoti, Shanop; Thorner, Paul Scott; Teerapakpinyo, Chinachote; Thepa, Nisachol; Phukpattaranont, Pornchai; Intarut, Nirun; Lumlertdacha, Boonlert; Tepsumethanon, Veera; Hemachudha, Thiravat

    2016-06-01

    Studies of the furious and paralytic forms of canine rabies at the early stage of disease have shown a more rapid viral colonization of the cerebral hemispheres in the furious form, as measured by viral antigen within neuronal cell bodies and viral RNA levels. Measurement of cellular processes separate from neuronal cell body provides a visual record of the spread of rabies virus which occurs across synapses. In this study, the amount of rabies viral antigen within cell processes was quantitatively assessed by image analysis in a cohort of naturally rabies infected non-vaccinated dogs (5 furious and 5 paralytic) that were sacrificed shortly after developing illness. Measurements were taken at different levels of the spinal cord, brain stem, and cerebrum. Results were compared to the amount of rabies viral antigen in neuronal cell bodies. Generally, the amount of rabies viral antigen in cell processes decreased in a rostral direction, following the pattern for the amount of rabies viral antigen in neuronal cell bodies and the percentage of involved cell bodies. However, there was a delay in cell process involvement following cell body involvement, consistent with replication occurring in the cell body region and subsequent transport out to cell processes. Greater amounts of antigen were seen in cell processes in dogs with the furious compared to paralytic form, at all anatomic levels examined. This difference was even evident when comparing (1) neurons with similar amounts of antigen, (2) similar percentages of involved neurons, and (3) anatomic levels that showed 100% positive neurons. These findings suggest that intracellular transport of the virus may be slower in the paralytic form, resulting in slower viral propagation. Possible mechanisms might involve host-specific differences in intracellular virus transport. The latter could be cytokine-mediated, since previous studies have documented greater inflammation in the paralytic form.

  13. Intracellular Spread of Rabies Virus Is Reduced in the Paralytic Form of Canine Rabies Compared to the Furious Form

    PubMed Central

    Shuangshoti, Shanop; Thorner, Paul Scott; Teerapakpinyo, Chinachote; Thepa, Nisachol; Phukpattaranont, Pornchai; Intarut, Nirun; Lumlertdacha, Boonlert; Tepsumethanon, Veera; Hemachudha, Thiravat

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the furious and paralytic forms of canine rabies at the early stage of disease have shown a more rapid viral colonization of the cerebral hemispheres in the furious form, as measured by viral antigen within neuronal cell bodies and viral RNA levels. Measurement of cellular processes separate from neuronal cell body provides a visual record of the spread of rabies virus which occurs across synapses. In this study, the amount of rabies viral antigen within cell processes was quantitatively assessed by image analysis in a cohort of naturally rabies infected non-vaccinated dogs (5 furious and 5 paralytic) that were sacrificed shortly after developing illness. Measurements were taken at different levels of the spinal cord, brain stem, and cerebrum. Results were compared to the amount of rabies viral antigen in neuronal cell bodies. Generally, the amount of rabies viral antigen in cell processes decreased in a rostral direction, following the pattern for the amount of rabies viral antigen in neuronal cell bodies and the percentage of involved cell bodies. However, there was a delay in cell process involvement following cell body involvement, consistent with replication occurring in the cell body region and subsequent transport out to cell processes. Greater amounts of antigen were seen in cell processes in dogs with the furious compared to paralytic form, at all anatomic levels examined. This difference was even evident when comparing (1) neurons with similar amounts of antigen, (2) similar percentages of involved neurons, and (3) anatomic levels that showed 100% positive neurons. These findings suggest that intracellular transport of the virus may be slower in the paralytic form, resulting in slower viral propagation. Possible mechanisms might involve host-specific differences in intracellular virus transport. The latter could be cytokine-mediated, since previous studies have documented greater inflammation in the paralytic form. PMID:27253394

  14. Experimental infection of Artibeus intermedius with a vampire bat rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Obregón-Morales, Cirani; Aguilar-Setién, Álvaro; Perea Martínez, Leonardo; Galvez-Romero, Guillermo; Martínez-Martínez, Flor Olivia; Aréchiga-Ceballos, Nidia

    2017-06-01

    Experimental infection of Artibeus intermedius, the great fruit-eating bat, was performed with vampire bat rabies isolates. Bats (n=35) were captured in the wild and quarantined prior to experimental infection. No rabies antibodies were detected by rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) prior to infection. Three doses of rabies virus (RV) and three different routes of infection were used. One out of 35 bats died without showing any clinical signs at day 14 and was positive for rabies. None of the 34 other bats showed clinical signs for rabies, but high antibody titers were detected post-inoculation, suggesting either innate immune response to the vampire bat rabies virus or possible pre-exposure to RV and inoculation leading to a booster effect. Rabies virus was detected by hemi-nested RT-PCR (hnRT-PCR) in the brain (n=3), stomach (n=1) of bats that were negative by immunofluorescence and that survived rabies infection. The bat that died on day 14 was positive by hnRT-PCR on the brain, heart and liver. These results suggest that either previous non-lethal exposure to RV or natural low susceptibility to vampire bat viruses somehow protected Artibeus intermedius from clinical rabies infection leading to a marginal lethality effect on this bats species population in the wild. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Rabies Epidemiology and Control in Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Prado, Esteban; Ponce-Zea, Jorge; Ramirez, Dario; Stewart-Ibarra, Anna M.; Armijos, Luciana; Yockteng, Jaime; Cárdenas, Washington B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Describe the epidemiology and the control effort for rabies in Ecuador. Methods: This observational study included data from the Ecuadorian National Institute of Census and Statistics (INEC), and mortality and morbidity data reported by the Ministry of Public Health and the National Institute for Social Security. We conducted a phylogeny analyses to compare the N gene from the Challenge Virus Standard (CVS) vaccine strain used in Ecuador with published Cosmopolitan, Asian and Sylvatic strains. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to determine the significance of the data. Results: In 1996 Ecuador suffered the highest rate of rabies per capita in the Americas, with an incidence rate of 0.56 cases per 100 000 people per year. Human and canine rabies showed a sharp decline until 2012. Between 1994 and 2014, we found a correlation of 0.925 (p<0.01) between annual cases of dog and human rabies. In 2011, there was an epidemic of sylvatic rabies transmitted to people by vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) in the Amazon region, specifically in Morona Santiago, leading to 11 fatalities. Phylogenetic analyses of the CVS vaccine N gene showed an association with urban canine rabies strains (the Cosmopolitan lineage and Asian strains), whereas sylvatic rabies, like those reported in the Amazon region, were found to be grouped in a different clade represented mainly by bat-derived strains. Conclusions: This study presents the first compilation of epidemiological data on rabies in Ecuador. The incidence of human and canine rabies, also known as urban rabies, has clearly decreased due to massive canine vaccination campaigns. Phylogenetic analysis of the prevailing vaccine used in the country showed a clear separation from bat-derived rabies, the source of recent rabies outbreaks. Efforts are ongoing to develop rabies vaccines that are highly specific to the rabies virus genotype circulating in the region, including sylvatic rabies. These efforts include the

  16. Rabies Epidemiology and Control in Ecuador.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Prado, Esteban; Ponce-Zea, Jorge; Ramirez, Dario; Stewart-Ibarra, Anna M; Armijos, Luciana; Yockteng, Jaime; Cardenas, Washington Bolivar

    2015-07-12

    Describe the epidemiology and the control effort for rabies in Ecuador. This observational study included data from the Ecuadorian National Institute of Census and Statistics (INEC), and mortality and morbidity data reported by the Ministry of Public Health and the National Institute for Social Security. We conducted a phylogeny analyses to compare the N gene from the Challenge Virus Standard (CVS) vaccine strain used in Ecuador with published Cosmopolitan, Asian and Sylvatic strains. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to determine the significance of the data. In 1996 Ecuador suffered the highest rate of rabies per capita in the Americas, with an incidence rate of 0.56 cases per 100 000 people per year. Human and canine rabies showed a sharp decline until 2012. Between 1994 and 2014, we found a correlation of 0.925 (p<0.01) between annual cases of dog and human rabies. In 2011, there was an epidemic of sylvatic rabies transmitted to people by vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) in the Amazon region, specifically in Morona Santiago, leading to 11 fatalities. Phylogenetic analyses of the CVS vaccine N gene showed an association with urban canine rabies strains (the Cosmopolitan lineage and Asian strains), whereas sylvatic rabies, like those reported in the Amazon region, were found to be grouped in a different clade represented mainly by bat-derived strains. This study presents the first compilation of epidemiological data on rabies in Ecuador. The incidence of human and canine rabies, also known as urban rabies, has clearly decreased due to massive canine vaccination campaigns. Phylogenetic analysis of the prevailing vaccine used in the country showed a clear separation from bat-derived rabies, the source of recent rabies outbreaks. Efforts are ongoing to develop rabies vaccines that are highly specific to the rabies virus genotype circulating in the region, including sylvatic rabies. These efforts include the implementation of reverse genetics to

  17. Genetic characterization and phylogenetic analysis of skunk-associated rabies viruses in North America with special emphasis on the central plains.

    PubMed

    Davis, Rolan; Nadin-Davis, Susan A; Moore, Michael; Hanlon, Cathleen

    2013-06-01

    Across North America the skunk acts as a reservoir for several rabies virus variants. Some of these variants are geographically restricted in range as is the case for the California skunk variant and two distinct variants present in Mexico. In contrast the North Central and South Central skunk rabies viruses are dispersed in overlapping ranges over large areas of the Midwestern region of the United States with the former extending into southern parts of the Canadian prairies. Despite this extensive range, there has been only very limited molecular characterization of these two viral variants. This study has examined the genetic diversity of the rabies viruses associated with North American skunks, with particular emphasis on the South Central skunk variant which was found to comprise three distinct geographically restricted groups of viruses that could in some cases be further sub-divided. The phylogenetic relationships of these groups and sub-groups allowed us to infer the likely direction of spread of these variants in some instances. Patterns of amino acid replacement of North American skunk-associated rabies viruses for both the nucleoprotein and glycoprotein products are also examined. These patterns reflect the virus phylogeny but no amino acid residues associated specifically with the skunk host were identified.

  18. Rabies (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... messages between the brain and the body. The rabies virus spreads through the nerves, first causing flu- ... to hallucinations, delirium, and insomnia. If left untreated, rabies is nearly always fatal.

  19. A phylogenetic reconstruction of the epidemiological history of canine rabies virus variants in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Gareth J; Páez, Andrés; Bóshell, Jorge; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2004-03-01

    Historically, canine rabies in Colombia has been caused by two geographically distinct canine variants of rabies virus (RV) which between 1992 and 2002 accounted for approximately 95% of Colombian rabies cases. Genetic variant 1 (GV1) has been isolated up until 1997 in the Central Region and the Department of Arauca, and is now considered extinct through a successful vaccination program. Genetic variant 2 (GV2) has been isolated from the northern Caribbean Region and continues to circulate at present. Here we have analyzed two sets of sequence data based upon either a 147 nucleotide region of the glycoprotein (G) gene or a 258 nucleotide region that combines a fragment of the non-coding intergenic region and a fragment of the polymerase gene. Using both maximum likelihood (ML) and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods we have estimated the time of the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of the two variants to be between 1983 and 1988. Reconstructions of the population history suggest that GV2 has been circulating in Colombia since the 1960s and that GV1 evolved as a separate lineage from GV2. Estimations of the effective population size at present show the GV2 outbreak to be approximately 20 times greater than that of GV1. Demographic reconstructions were unable to detect a decrease in population size concurrent with the elimination of GV1. We find a raised rate of nucleotide substitution for GV1 gene sequences when compared to that of GV2, although all estimates have wide confidence limits. We demonstrate that phylogenetic reconstructions and sequence analysis can be used to support incidence data from the field in the assessment of RV epidemiology.

  20. PATHOLOGY AND MOLECULAR DETECTION OF RABIES VIRUS IN FERRET BADGERS ASSOCIATED WITH A RABIES OUTBREAK IN TAIWAN.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Hue-Ying; Jeng, Chian-Ren; Wang, Hurng-Yi; Inoue, Satoshi; Chan, Fang-Tse; Liao, Jiunn-Wang; Chiou, Ming-Tang; Pang, Victor Fei

    2016-01-01

    Until Rabies virus (RABV) infection in Taiwan ferret badgers (TWFB; Melogale moschata subaurantiaca) was diagnosed in mid-June 2013, Taiwan had been considered rabies free for >50 yr. Although rabies has also been reported in ferret badgers in China, the pathologic changes and distribution of viral antigens of ferret badger-associated rabies have not been described. We performed a comprehensive pathologic study and molecular detection of rabies virus in three necropsied rabid TWFBs and evaluated archival paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of six other TWFBs necropsied during 2004 and 2012. As in other RABV-infected species, the characteristic pathologic changes in TWFBs were nonsuppurative meningoencephalomyelitis, ganglionitis, and the formation of typical intracytoplasmic Negri bodies, with the brain stem most affected. There was also variable spongiform degeneration, primarily in the perikaryon of neurons and neuropil, in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, and brain stem. In nonnervous system tissues, representative lesions included adrenal necrosis and lymphocytic interstitial sialadenitis. Immunohistochemical staining and fluorescent antibody test demonstrated viral antigens in the perikaryon of the neurons and axonal or dendritic processes throughout the nervous tissue and in the macrophages in various tissues. Similar to raccoons (Procyon lotor) and skunks (Mephitidae), the nervous tissue of rabid TWFBs displayed widely dispersed lesions, RABV antigens, and large numbers of Negri bodies. We traced the earliest rabid TWFB case back to 2004.

  1. Expression of rabies glycoprotein and ricin toxin B chain (RGP-RTB) fusion protein in tomato hairy roots: a step towards oral vaccination for rabies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ankit; Srivastava, Subhi; Chouksey, Ankita; Panwar, Bhupendra Singh; Verma, Praveen C; Roy, Sribash; Singh, Pradhyumna K; Saxena, Gauri; Tuli, Rakesh

    2015-04-01

    Transgenic hairy roots of Solanum lycopersicum were engineered to express a recombinant protein containing a fusion of rabies glycoprotein and ricin toxin B chain (rgp-rtxB) antigen under the control of constitutive CaMV35S promoter. Asialofetuin-mediated direct ELISA of transgenic hairy root extracts was performed using polyclonal anti-rabies antibodies (Ab1) and epitope-specific peptidal anti-RGP (Ab2) antibodies which confirmed the expression of functionally viable RGP-RTB fusion protein. Direct ELISA based on asialofetuin-binding activity was used to screen crude protein extracts from five transgenic hairy root lines. Expressions of RGP-RTB fusion protein in different tomato hairy root lines varied between 1.4 and 8 µg in per gram of tissue. Immunoblotting assay of RGP-RTB fusion protein from these lines showed a protein band on monomeric size of ~84 kDa after denaturation. Tomato hairy root line H03 showed highest level of RGP-RTB protein expression (1.14 %) and was used further in bench-top bioreactor for the optimization of scale-up process to produce large quantity of recombinant protein. Partially purified RGP-RTB fusion protein was able to induce the immune response in BALB/c mice after intra-mucosal immunization. In the present investigation, we have not only successfully scaled up the hairy root culture but also established the utility of this system to produce vaccine antigen which subsequently will reduce the total production cost for implementing rabies vaccination programs in developing nations. This study in a way aims to provide consolidated base for low-cost preparation of improved oral vaccine against rabies.

  2. Detection of rabies virus antibodies in Brazilian free-ranging wild carnivores.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Rodrigo Silva Pinto; Pereira, Monicque Silva; Morato, Ronaldo Gonçalves; Scheffer, Karin C; Carnieli, Pedro; Ferreira, Fernando; Furtado, Mariana Malzoni; Kashivakura, Cyntia Kayo; Silveira, Leandro; Jacomo, Anah T A; Lima, Edson Souza; de Paula, Rogério Cunha; May-Junior, Joares Adenílson

    2010-10-01

    Rabies virus is a pathogen of major concern in free-ranging wild carnivores in several regions of the world, but little is known about its circulation in Brazilian wild carnivores. Sera from 211 free-ranging wild carnivores, captured from 2000 to 2006 in four locations of two Brazilian biomes (Pantanal and Cerrado), were tested for rabies antibodies. Twenty-six individuals (12.3%) had neutralizing antibody titers ≥0.10 IU/ml. The four sampled locations had antibody-positive animals, suggesting that Rabies virus circulates in all of these regions. Results underscore the risk posed by rabies for conservation of Brazilian carnivores and the possibility of the animals acting as reservoirs for the Rabies virus.

  3. Phylogeography of the current rabies viruses in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Dibia, I Nyoman; Sumiarto, Bambang; Susetya, Heru; Putra, Anak Agung Gde; Scott-Orr, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Rabies is a major fatal zoonotic disease in Indonesia. This study was conducted to determine the recent dynamics of rabies virus (RABV) in various areas and animal species throughout Indonesia. A total of 27 brain samples collected from rabid animals of various species in Bali, Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, Java, and Flores in 2008 to 2010 were investigated. The cDNA of the nucleoprotein gene from each sample was generated and amplified by one-step reverse transcription-PCR, after which the products were sequenced and analyzed. The symmetric substitution model of a Bayesian stochastic search variable selection extension of the discrete phylogeographic model of the social network was applied in BEAST ver. 1.7.5 software. The spatial dispersal was visualized in Cartographica using Spatial Phylogenetic Reconstruction of Evolutionary Dynamics. We demonstrated inter-island introduction and reintroduction, and dog was found to be the only source of infection of other animals. Ancestors of Indonesian RABVs originated in Java and its descendants were transmitted to Kalimantan, then further to Sumatra, Flores, and Bali. The Flores descendent was subsequently transmitted to Sulawesi and back to Kalimantan. The viruses found in various animal species were transmitted by the dog. PMID:25643792

  4. Phylogeography of the current rabies viruses in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Dibia, I Nyoman; Sumiarto, Bambang; Susetya, Heru; Putra, Anak Agung Gde; Scott-Orr, Helen; Mahardika, Gusti Ngurah

    2015-01-01

    Rabies is a major fatal zoonotic disease in Indonesia. This study was conducted to determine the recent dynamics of rabies virus (RABV) in various areas and animal species throughout Indonesia. A total of 27 brain samples collected from rabid animals of various species in Bali, Sumatra, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, Java, and Flores in 2008 to 2010 were investigated. The cDNA of the nucleoprotein gene from each sample was generated and amplified by one-step reverse transcription-PCR, after which the products were sequenced and analyzed. The symmetric substitution model of a Bayesian stochastic search variable selection extension of the discrete phylogeographic model of the social network was applied in BEAST ver. 1.7.5 software. The spatial dispersal was visualized in Cartographica using Spatial Phylogenetic Reconstruction of Evolutionary Dynamics. We demonstrated inter-island introduction and reintroduction, and dog was found to be the only source of infection of other animals. Ancestors of Indonesian RABVs originated in Java and its descendants were transmitted to Kalimantan, then further to Sumatra, Flores, and Bali. The Flores descendent was subsequently transmitted to Sulawesi and back to Kalimantan. The viruses found in various animal species were transmitted by the dog.

  5. Experimental rabies virus infection of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus).

    PubMed

    Jackson, Felix R; Turmelle, Amy S; Farino, David M; Franka, Richard; McCracken, Gary F; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2008-07-01

    A captive colony of adult Big Brown Bats (Eptesicus fuscus) was experimentally infected with a rabies virus (RABV) variant isolated from the salivary glands of a naturally infected Big Brown Bat and passaged once through murine neuroblastoma cell culture. Bats were divided into 11 groups, which were composed of one to three noninfected and one to three infected individuals each. Twenty of 38 animals were infected intramuscularly into both left and right masseter muscles; they received a total of 10(3.2) median mouse intracerebral lethal dose (MICLD50) of Big Brown Bat RABV variant. Experimental outcome after viral exposure was followed in the bats for 140 days postinoculation (PI). Of 20 infected bats, 16 developed clinical rabies, and the mean incubation period was 24 days (range: 13-52 days). Three infected bats never seroconverted and succumbed early to infection (13 days). Four infected bats that survived until the end of the experiment without any signs of disease maintained detectable antibody titers until the third month PI, peaking between days 13 and 43, and consequent drop-off below the threshold for detection occurred by day 140. Limited excretion of virus in saliva of infected bats during the clinical course of disease was observed in two individuals on days 13 and 15 PI (<24 hr prior to onset of clinical illness). No bat-to-bat transmission of RABV to noninfected bats was detected.

  6. Antibody Response In Vitro to an Animal Virus: Production of Rabies Virus Neutralizing Antibodies by Mouse Cells in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Koprowski, H.; Mocarelli, P.; Wiktor, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    Rabies virus neutralizing antibodies were produced in vitro by the exposure of mouse spleen cells to live and inactivated rabies virus suspensions and to sheep erythrocytes coated with rabies virus. These antibodies did not neutralize two other rhabdoviruses: Kern Canyon and vesicular stomatitis viruses, and were precipitable by treatment with an antiserum to mouse IgG. Removal of “glass-adhering” cells from mouse spleen cell suspensions abolished the antibody response, which could be restored by the addition of mouse peritoneal exudate cells, rich in macrophages. PMID:4341695

  7. Investigation of the role of healthy dogs as potential carriers of rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Zhen; Fu, Zhen F; Wang, Ding-Ming; Zhou, Jing-Zhu; Wang, Zhao-Xiao; Lv, Tai-Fu; Xiong, Cheng-Long; Zou, Yang; Yao, Wen-Rong; Li, Ming-Hui; Dong, Guan-Mu; Xu, Ge-Lin; Niezgoda, Michael; Kuzmin, Ivan V; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2008-06-01

    To investigate whether healthy animals are potential carriers of rabies virus in China, 153 domestic dogs were collected from a rabies enzootic area, Anlong county in Guizhou Province, and monitored for 6 months. Initially, findings of rabies virus antigen in the saliva of 15 dogs by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) test suggested they might be carriers. These 15 dogs were kept under observation for 6 months. None of the dogs showed any clinical signs of rabies during the observation period. Moreover, using the ELISA test alone, detection of rabies virus antigen in saliva of some animals was not consistent during the observation period. However, none of the saliva samples collected either at the time of acquisition or during the observation period was found to be positive for rabies virus RNA by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Furthermore, neither viral antigen nor viral RNA was detected in the brain samples collected at the time of euthanasia. These results do not provide support for the contention that healthy dogs act as carriers in rabies. Caution is urged when preliminary and nondefinitive tests, such as ELISA, are used to infer clinical status related to rabies.

  8. Processing of virus-specific glycoproteins of varicella zoster virus

    SciTech Connect

    Namazue, J.; Campo-Vera, H.; Kitamura, K.; Okuno, T.; Yamanishi, K.

    1985-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to varicella zoster virus (VZV) glycoproteins were used to study the processing of three glycoproteins with molecular weights of 83K-94K (gp 2), 64K (gp 3), and 55K (gp 5). Immunoprecipitation experiments performed with VZV-infected cells, pulse labeled with (/sup 3/H)glucosamine in the presence of tunicamycin, suggest that O-linked oligosaccharide is present on the glycoprotein of gp 2. Use of the enzyme endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H revealed that the fully processed form of gp 3 had high-mannose type and that of gp 5 had only complex type of N-linked oligosaccharides. Experiments with monensin suggest that the precursor form (116K) of gp 3 is cleaved during the processing from Golgi apparatus to cell surface membrane. The extension of O-linked oligosaccharide chain and the complex type of N-linked oligosaccharide chains also occurs during this processing.

  9. Regular exposure to rabies virus and lack of symptomatic disease in Serengeti spotted hyenas

    PubMed Central

    East, Marion L.; Hofer, Heribert; Cox, James H.; Wulle, Ulrich; Wiik, Harald; Pitra, Christian

    2001-01-01

    We report a previously unrecognized complexity to the ecology of rabies in wildlife. Rabies-specific virus-neutralizing antibodies in spotted hyenas, the most numerous large carnivore in the Serengeti ecosystem (Tanzania, East Africa), revealed a high frequency of exposure of 37.0% to rabies virus, and reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR demonstrated rabies RNA in 13.0% of hyenas. Despite this high frequency, exposure neither caused symptomatic rabies nor decreased survival among members of hyena social groups monitored for 9 to13 years. Repeated, intermittent presence of virus in saliva of 45.5% of seropositive hyenas indicated a “carrier” state. Rabies isolates from Serengeti hyenas differed significantly (8.5% sequence divergence) from those isolated from other Serengeti carnivores, suggesting that at least two separate strains circulate within the Serengeti carnivore community. This finding is consistent with the fact that exposure in hyenas increased with age and social status, following a pattern predicted by intraspecific age and social-status-dependent oral and bite contact rates. High seroprevalence of rabies, low basic reproductive rate of the virus (R0) of 1.9, a carrier state, and the absence of symptomatic rabies in a carnivore in an ecosystem with multihost and multistrain maintenance has not been previously demonstrated for rabies. Because of the substantial differences between the hyena viral isolates and those from canids and viverrids in the Serengeti, it is unlikely that spotted hyenas were the source of rabies virus that killed several African wild dog packs in the Serengeti ecosystem in the 1990s. PMID:11742089

  10. Regular exposure to rabies virus and lack of symptomatic disease in Serengeti spotted hyenas.

    PubMed

    East, M L; Hofer, H; Cox, J H; Wulle, U; Wiik, H; Pitra, C

    2001-12-18

    We report a previously unrecognized complexity to the ecology of rabies in wildlife. Rabies-specific virus-neutralizing antibodies in spotted hyenas, the most numerous large carnivore in the Serengeti ecosystem (Tanzania, East Africa), revealed a high frequency of exposure of 37.0% to rabies virus, and reverse transcriptase (RT) PCR demonstrated rabies RNA in 13.0% of hyenas. Despite this high frequency, exposure neither caused symptomatic rabies nor decreased survival among members of hyena social groups monitored for 9 to 13 years. Repeated, intermittent presence of virus in saliva of 45.5% of seropositive hyenas indicated a "carrier" state. Rabies isolates from Serengeti hyenas differed significantly (8.5% sequence divergence) from those isolated from other Serengeti carnivores, suggesting that at least two separate strains circulate within the Serengeti carnivore community. This finding is consistent with the fact that exposure in hyenas increased with age and social status, following a pattern predicted by intraspecific age and social-status-dependent oral and bite contact rates. High seroprevalence of rabies, low basic reproductive rate of the virus (R(0)) of 1.9, a carrier state, and the absence of symptomatic rabies in a carnivore in an ecosystem with multihost and multistrain maintenance has not been previously demonstrated for rabies. Because of the substantial differences between the hyena viral isolates and those from canids and viverrids in the Serengeti, it is unlikely that spotted hyenas were the source of rabies virus that killed several African wild dog packs in the Serengeti ecosystem in the 1990s.

  11. [Proteomic Analyses of Purified Particles of the Rabies Virus].

    PubMed

    Tu, Zhongzhong; Gong, Wenjie; Zhang, Yan; Feng, Ye; Li, Nan; Tu, Changchun

    2015-05-01

    The rabies virus (RABV) is an enveloped RNA virus. It mainly damages the central nervous system and causes anencephaly in mammals and humans. There is now compelling evidence that enveloped virions released from infected cells can carry many host proteins, some of which may play an important part in viral replication. Several host proteins have been reported to be incorporated into RABV particles. However, a systematic study to reveal the proteomics of RABV particles has not been conducted. In the present study, after virus culture and purification by sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation, a proteomics approach was used to analyze the protein composition of purified RABV particles to understand the molecular mechanisms of virus-cell interactions. Fifty host proteins, along with five virus-encoded structural proteins, were identified in purified RABV particles. These proteins could be classified into ten categories according to function: intracellular trafficking (14%), molecular chaperone (12%), cytoskeletal (24%), signal transduction (8%), transcription regulation (12%), calcium ion-binding (6%), enzyme binding (6%), metabolic process (2%), ubiquitin (2%) and other (14%). Of these, four proteins (beta-actin, p-tubulin, Cofilin, Hsc70) were validated by western blotting to be present in purified RABV particles. This novel study of the composition of host proteins in RABV particles may aid investigation of the mechanism of RABV replication.

  12. Involvement of the Rabies Virus Phosphoprotein Gene in Neuroinvasiveness

    PubMed Central

    Yamaoka, Satoko; Ito, Naoto; Ohka, Seii; Kaneda, Shohei; Nakamura, Hiroko; Agari, Takahiro; Masatani, Tatsunori; Nakagawa, Keisuke; Okada, Kazuma; Okadera, Kota; Mitake, Hiromichi; Fujii, Teruo

    2013-01-01

    Rabies virus (RABV), which is transmitted via a bite wound caused by a rabid animal, infects peripheral nerves and then spreads to the central nervous system (CNS) before causing severe neurological symptoms and death in the infected individual. Despite the importance of this ability of the virus to spread from a peripheral site to the CNS (neuroinvasiveness) in the pathogenesis of rabies, little is known about the mechanism underlying the neuroinvasiveness of RABV. In this study, to obtain insights into the mechanism, we conducted comparative analysis of two fixed RABV strains, Nishigahara and the derivative strain Ni-CE, which cause lethal and asymptomatic infections, respectively, in mice after intramuscular inoculation. Examination of a series of chimeric viruses harboring the respective genes from Nishigahara in the genetic background of Ni-CE revealed that the Nishigahara phosphoprotein (P) gene plays a major role in the neuroinvasiveness by mediating infection of peripheral nerves. The results obtained from both in vivo and in vitro experiments strongly suggested that the Nishigahara P gene, but not the Ni-CE P gene, is important for stable viral replication in muscle cells. Further investigation based on the previous finding that RABV phosphoprotein counteracts the host interferon (IFN) system demonstrated that the Nishigahara P gene, but not the Ni-CE P gene, functions to suppress expression of the beta interferon (IFN-β) gene (Ifn-β) and IFN-stimulated genes in muscle cells. In conclusion, we provide the first data strongly suggesting that RABV phosphoprotein assists viral replication in muscle cells by counteracting the host IFN system and, consequently, enhances infection of peripheral nerves. PMID:24027304

  13. Rabies virus phosphoprotein interacts with mitochondrial Complex I and induces mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kammouni, Wafa; Wood, Heidi; Saleh, Ali; Appolinario, Camila M; Fernyhough, Paul; Jackson, Alan C

    2015-08-01

    Our previous studies in an experimental model of rabies showed neuronal process degeneration in association with severe clinical disease. Cultured adult rodent dorsal root ganglion neurons infected with challenge virus standard (CVS)-11 strain of rabies virus (RABV) showed axonal swellings and reduced axonal growth with evidence of oxidative stress. We have shown that CVS infection alters a variety of mitochondrial parameters and increases reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial Complex I activity vs. mock infection. We have hypothesized that a RABV protein targets mitochondria and triggers dysfunction. Mitochondrial extracts of mouse neuroblastoma cells were analyzed with a proteomics approach. We have identified peptides belonging to the RABV nucleocapsid protein (N), phosphoprotein (P), and glycoprotein (G), and our data indicate that the extract was most highly enriched with P. P was also detected by immunoblotting in RABV-infected purified mitochondrial extracts and also in Complex I immunoprecipitates from the extracts but not in mock-infected extracts. A plasmid expressing P in cells increased Complex I activity and increased ROS generation, whereas expression of other RABV proteins did not. We have analyzed recombinant plasmids encoding various P gene segments. Expression of a peptide from amino acid 139-172 increased Complex I activity and ROS generation similar to expression of the entire P protein, whereas peptides that did not contain this region did not increase Complex I activity or induce ROS generation. These results indicate that a region of the RABV P interacts with Complex I in mitochondria causing mitochondrial dysfunction, increased generation of ROS, and oxidative stress.

  14. Persistence of Rabies Virus-Neutralizing Antibodies after Vaccination of Rural Population following Vampire Bat Rabies Outbreak in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Rita; Jusot, Viviane; Houillon, Guy; Rasuli, Anvar; Martorelli, Luzia; Kataoka, Ana Paula; Mechlia, Mohamed Ben; Le Guern, Anne-Sophie; Rodrigues, Liliam; Assef, Rhomero; Maestri, Alvino; Lima, Reynaldo; Rotivel, Yolande; Bosch-Castells, Valérie; Tordo, Noël

    2016-09-01

    Animal control measures in Latin America have decreased the incidence of urban human rabies transmitted by dogs and cats; currently most cases of human rabies are transmitted by bats. In 2004-2005, rabies outbreaks in populations living in rural Brazil prompted widespread vaccination of exposed and at-risk populations. More than 3,500 inhabitants of Augusto Correa (Pará State) received either post-exposure (PEP) or pre-exposure (PrEP) prophylaxis. This study evaluated the persistence of rabies virus-neutralizing antibodies (RVNA) annually for 4 years post-vaccination. The aim was to evaluate the impact of rabies PrEP and PEP in a population at risk living in a rural setting to help improve management of vampire bat exposure and provide additional data on the need for booster vaccination against rabies. This prospective study was conducted in 2007 through 2009 in a population previously vaccinated in 2005; study participants were followed-up annually. An RVNA titer >0.5 International Units (IU)/mL was chosen as the threshold of seroconversion. Participants with titers ≤0.5 IU/mL or Equivalent Units (EU)/mL at enrollment or at subsequent annual visits received booster doses of purified Vero cell rabies vaccine (PVRV). Adherence of the participants from this Amazonian community to the study protocol was excellent, with 428 of the 509 (84%) who attended the first interview in 2007 returning for the final visit in 2009. The long-term RVNA persistence was good, with 85-88.0% of the non-boosted participants evaluated at each yearly follow-up visit remaining seroconverted. Similar RVNA persistence profiles were observed in participants originally given PEP or PrEP in 2005, and the GMT of the study population remained >1 IU/mL 4 years after vaccination. At the end of the study, 51 subjects (11.9% of the interviewed population) had received at least one dose of booster since their vaccination in 2005. This study and the events preceding it underscore the need for the

  15. Persistence of Rabies Virus-Neutralizing Antibodies after Vaccination of Rural Population following Vampire Bat Rabies Outbreak in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Rita; Jusot, Viviane; Houillon, Guy; Rasuli, Anvar; Martorelli, Luzia; Kataoka, Ana Paula; Mechlia, Mohamed Ben; Le Guern, Anne-Sophie; Rodrigues, Liliam; Assef, Rhomero; Maestri, Alvino; Bosch-Castells, Valérie; Tordo, Noël

    2016-01-01

    Background Animal control measures in Latin America have decreased the incidence of urban human rabies transmitted by dogs and cats; currently most cases of human rabies are transmitted by bats. In 2004–2005, rabies outbreaks in populations living in rural Brazil prompted widespread vaccination of exposed and at-risk populations. More than 3,500 inhabitants of Augusto Correa (Pará State) received either post-exposure (PEP) or pre-exposure (PrEP) prophylaxis. This study evaluated the persistence of rabies virus-neutralizing antibodies (RVNA) annually for 4 years post-vaccination. The aim was to evaluate the impact of rabies PrEP and PEP in a population at risk living in a rural setting to help improve management of vampire bat exposure and provide additional data on the need for booster vaccination against rabies. Methodology/Principal Findings This prospective study was conducted in 2007 through 2009 in a population previously vaccinated in 2005; study participants were followed-up annually. An RVNA titer >0.5 International Units (IU)/mL was chosen as the threshold of seroconversion. Participants with titers ≤0.5 IU/mL or Equivalent Units (EU)/mL at enrollment or at subsequent annual visits received booster doses of purified Vero cell rabies vaccine (PVRV). Adherence of the participants from this Amazonian community to the study protocol was excellent, with 428 of the 509 (84%) who attended the first interview in 2007 returning for the final visit in 2009. The long-term RVNA persistence was good, with 85–88.0% of the non-boosted participants evaluated at each yearly follow-up visit remaining seroconverted. Similar RVNA persistence profiles were observed in participants originally given PEP or PrEP in 2005, and the GMT of the study population remained >1 IU/mL 4 years after vaccination. At the end of the study, 51 subjects (11.9% of the interviewed population) had received at least one dose of booster since their vaccination in 2005. Conclusions

  16. Antigen detection, rabies virus isolation, and Q-PCR in the quantification of viral load in a natural infection of the North American beaver (Castor canadensis).

    PubMed

    Morgan, Shannon M D; Pouliott, Craig E; Rudd, Robert J; Davis, April D

    2015-01-01

    All mammals are believed susceptible to rabies virus infection, yet transmission from nonreservoir hosts to humans is uncommon. However, interactions between nonreservoir hosts and humans occur frequently and risk of exposure increases where rabies is enzootic. We describe rabies and apparent pantropism of rabies virus in a beaver (Castor canadensis).

  17. Detection of rabies virus antigen in dog saliva using a latex agglutination test.

    PubMed

    Kasempimolporn, S; Saengseesom, W; Lumlertdacha, B; Sitprija, V

    2000-08-01

    Dog bites are responsible for more than 90% of human rabies deaths in Asia. We developed a simple and inexpensive test based on latex agglutination (LA) for rabies virus antigen detection in dog saliva. Rabies virus antigen could be detected by agglutination on a glass slide using latex particles coated with gamma globulin. By evaluation of paired saliva-brain specimens from 238 dogs, the LA test using saliva was 99% specific and 95% sensitive compared to the fluorescent antibody test (FAT) on brain smears. The advantages of the LA test over the standard FAT are that it is comparatively simple and there is no need to kill the animal before examination.

  18. Intermittent excretion of rabies virus in the saliva of a dog two and six months after it had recovered from experimental rabies.

    PubMed

    Fekadu, M; Shaddock, J H; Baer, G M

    1981-09-01

    A dog inoculated with a rabies virus isolate from the saliva of an apparently healthy Ethiopian dog was followed for more than 9 months. Saliva and blood specimens were collected three times weekly and cerebrospinal fluid weekly. Saliva samples collected on days 42 and 169 after the dog's recovery produced fatal rabies infections in mice inoculated intracerebrally.

  19. Expression of rabies virus G protein in carrots (Daucus carota).

    PubMed

    Rojas-Anaya, Edith; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth; Olivera-Flores, Maria Teresa; Gomez-Lim, Miguel

    2009-12-01

    Antigens derived from various pathogens can readily be synthesized at high levels in plants in their authentic forms. Such antigens administered orally can induce an immune response and, in some cases, result in protection against a subsequent challenge. We here report the expression of rabies virus G protein into carrots. The G gene was subcloned into the pUCpSSrabG vector and then used to transform carrot embryogenic cells by particle bombardment. The carrot cells were selected in liquid medium, a method previously unreported. The presence of the transgene was verified by PCR, and by RT-PCR. By western blot, G protein transgene was identified in 93.3% of adult carrot roots. The G protein was quantified by densitometric analysis (range 0.4-1.2%). The expressed protein was antigenic in mice. This confirms that the carrot is an adequate system for antigen expression.

  20. Molecular epidemiology and a loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for diagnosis of infection with rabies virus in Zambia.

    PubMed

    Muleya, Walter; Namangala, Boniface; Mweene, Aaron; Zulu, Luke; Fandamu, Paul; Banda, Douglas; Kimura, Takashi; Sawa, Hirofumi; Ishii, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    The National Livestock Epidemiology and Information Center (NALEIC) in Zambia reported over 132 cases of canine rabies diagnosed by the direct fluorescent antibody test (DFAT) from 2004 to 2009. In this study, the lineage of rabies virus (RABV) in Zambia was determined by phylogenetic analysis of the nucleoprotein (N) and glycoprotein (G) gene sequences. Total RNA was extracted from 87-DFAT brain specimens out of which only 35 (40%) were positive on nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for each gene, and 26 being positive for both genes. Positive specimens for the N (n=33) and G (n=35) genes were used for phylogenetic analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of the N gene showed two phylogenetic clusters in Zambia belonging to the Africa 1b lineage present in eastern and southern Africa. While one cluster exclusively comprised Zambian strains, the other was more heterogeneous regarding the RABV origins and included strains from Tanzania, Mozambique and Zambia. Phylogenetic analysis of the G gene revealed similar RABV strains in different hosts and regions of Zambia. We designed primers for reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay from the consensus sequence of the N gene in an attempt to improve the molecular diagnosis of RABV in Zambia. The specificity and reproducibility of the RT-LAMP assay was confirmed with actual clinical specimens. Therefore, the RT-LAMP assay presented in this study may prove to be useful for routine diagnosis of rabies in Zambia.

  1. Rabies and rabies-related viruses: a modern perspective on an ancient disease.

    PubMed

    Cliquet, F; Picard-Meyer, E

    2004-08-01

    Rabies is a worldwide zoonosis caused by a lyssavirus, with many host species acting as reservoirs for infection. The epidemiology of rabies has changed over recent years, as this disease has been brought under control or eliminated in many terrestrial animal species in Europe and North America. A large number of Lyssavirus variants have now been characterised, and their distribution and animal hosts have become known. However, new lyssaviruses have been isolated from bats, prompting scientists to question the efficacy of the existing human and veterinary vaccines against these new strains. The epidemiology of bat rabies should be fully explored, so that the precise risks to the health of humans and domestic and wild carnivores may be determined and methods of preventing the disease among people who handle bats can be discovered. Rabies is still a significant public health problem, particularly in areas where canine rabies is still endemic, such as countries in Africa and Asia.

  2. Ferret badger rabies origin and its revisited importance as potential source of rabies transmission in Southeast China

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The frequent occurrence of ferret badger-associated human rabies cases in southeast China highlights the lack of laboratory-based surveillance and urges revisiting the potential importance of this animal in rabies transmission. To determine if the ferret badgers actually contribute to human and dog rabies cases, and the possible origin of the ferret badger-associated rabies in the region, an active rabies survey was conducted to determine the frequency of rabies infection and seroprevalence in dogs and ferret badgers. Methods A retrospective survey on rabies epidemics was performed in Zhejiang, Jiangxi and Anhui provinces in southeast China. The brain tissues from ferret badgers and dogs were assayed by fluorescent antibody test. Rabies virus was isolated and sequenced for phylogenetic analysis. The sera from ferret badgers and dogs were titrated using rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA) test. Results The ferret badgers presented a higher percentage of rabies seroconversion than dogs did in the endemic region, reaching a maximum of 95% in the collected samples. Nine ferret badger-associated rabies viruses were isolated, sequenced, and were phylogenetically clustered as a separate group. Nucleotide sequence revealed 99.4-99.8% homology within the ferret badger isolates, and 83-89% homology to the dog isolates in the nucleoprotein and glycoprotein genes in the same rabies endemic regions. Conclusions Our data suggest ferret badger-associated rabies has likely formed as an independent enzootic originating from dogs during the long-term rabies infestation in southeast China. The eventual role of FB rabies in public health remains unclear. However, management of ferret badger bites, rabies awareness and control in the related regions should be an immediate need. PMID:20691095

  3. Anthropogenic roost switching and rabies virus dynamics in house-roosting big brown bats.

    PubMed

    Streicker, Daniel G; Franka, Richard; Jackson, Felix R; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2013-07-01

    Big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) are the most commonly encountered rabid bat in North America and represent an important source of wildlife rabies epizootics. Urban and suburban colonies of E. fuscus are often evicted from their roosts in houses, with poorly understood consequences for bat dispersal, population dynamics, and rabies virus transmission. We combined radiotelemetry and mark-recapture of E. fuscus with enhanced surveillance to understand the frequency of rabies virus exposure in house-roosting bats and to assess the potential for behavioral responses of eviction to exacerbate viral transmission. Serology demonstrated the circulation of rabies virus in nearly all sites, with an overall seroprevalence of 12%, but no bats were excreting rabies virus at the time of capture. Bats that were excluded from roosts relocated to houses <1 km from the original roost. However, behavioral responses to eviction differed, with bats switching repeatedly among new roosts in 1 site, but fusing with a neighboring colony in another. These findings confirm the circulation of rabies virus in E. fuscus that live in close contact with humans and companion animals, suggest mechanisms through which anthropogenic disturbance of bats might influence pathogen transmission, and highlight simple strategies to balance conservation and public health priorities.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of a Vampire Bat Rabies Virus from French Guiana.

    PubMed

    Lavergne, Anne; Darcissac, Edith; Bourhy, Hervé; Tirera, Sourakhata; de Thoisy, Benoît; Lacoste, Vincent

    2016-04-07

    A rabies virus was detected in a common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) in French Guiana. Its genomic sequence was obtained and found to be closely related to other hematophagous bat-related viruses that widely circulate in the northern Amazon region. This virus is named AT6. Copyright © 2016 Lavergne et al.

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of a Vampire Bat Rabies Virus from French Guiana

    PubMed Central

    Lavergne, Anne; Darcissac, Edith; Bourhy, Hervé; Tirera, Sourakhata; de Thoisy, Benoît

    2016-01-01

    A rabies virus was detected in a common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) in French Guiana. Its genomic sequence was obtained and found to be closely related to other hematophagous bat-related viruses that widely circulate in the northern Amazon region. This virus is named AT6. PMID:27056216

  6. Differential Host Immune Responses after Infection with Wild-Type or Lab-Attenuated Rabies Viruses in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying; Li, Zhenguang; Leyson, Christina M.; Cooper, Tanya L.; Platt, Simon R.; Harvey, Stephen B.; Hooper, Douglas C.; Faber, Milosz; Fu, Zhen F.

    2015-01-01

    Rabies virus (RABV) induces encephalomyelitis in humans and animals. One of the major problems with rabies is that the infected individuals most often do not develop virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA). In this study we have investigated the host immune response to RABV infection in dogs, using a live-attenuated (TriGAS) or a wild-type (wt) (DRV-NG11) RABV isolated from a rabid dog. Methodology/Principal Findings The experimental infection of dogs with TriGAS induced high levels of VNA in the serum, whereas wt RABV infection did not. Dogs infected with TriGAS developed antibodies against the virus including its glycoprotein, whereas dogs infected with DRV-NG11 only developed rabies antibodies that are presumably specific for the nucleoprotein, (N) and not the glycoprotein (G). We show that infection with TriGAS induces early activation of B cells in the draining lymph nodes and persistent activation of DCs and B cells in the blood. On the other hand, infection with DRV-NG11 fails to induce the activation of DCs and B cells and further reduces CD4 T cell production. Further, we show that intrathecal (IT) immunization of TriGAS not only induced high levels of VNA in the serum but also in the CSF while intramuscular (IM) immunization of TriGAS induced VNA only in the serum. In addition, high levels of total protein and WBC were detected in the CSF of IT immunized dogs, indicating the transient enhancement of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, which is relevant to the passage of immune effectors from periphery into the CNS. Conclusions/Significance IM infection of dogs with TriGAS induced the production of serum VNA whereas, IT immunization of TriGAS in dogs induces high levels of VNA in the periphery as well as in the CSF and transiently enhances BBB permeability. In contrast, infection with wt DRV-NG11 resulted in the production of RABV-reactive antibodies but VNA and antibodies specific for G were absent. As a consequence, all of the dogs infected with wt DRV

  7. Bat rabies in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    Ellison, James A; Gilbert, Amy T; Recuenco, Sergio; Moran, David; Alvarez, Danilo A; Kuzmina, Natalia; Garcia, Daniel L; Peruski, Leonard F; Mendonça, Mary T; Lindblade, Kim A; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2014-01-01

    Rabies in bats is considered enzootic throughout the New World, but few comparative data are available for most countries in the region. As part of a larger pathogen detection program, enhanced bat rabies surveillance was conducted in Guatemala, between 2009 and 2011. A total of 672 bats of 31 species were sampled and tested for rabies. The prevalence of rabies virus (RABV) detection among all collected bats was low (0.3%). Viral antigens were detected and infectious virus was isolated from the brains of two common vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus). RABV was also isolated from oral swabs, lungs and kidneys of both bats, whereas viral RNA was detected in all of the tissues examined by hemi-nested RT-PCR except for the liver of one bat. Sequencing of the nucleoprotein gene showed that both viruses were 100% identical, whereas sequencing of the glycoprotein gene revealed one non-synonymous substitution (302T,S). The two vampire bat RABV isolates in this study were phylogenetically related to viruses associated with vampire bats in the eastern states of Mexico and El Salvador. Additionally, 7% of sera collected from 398 bats demonstrated RABV neutralizing antibody. The proportion of seropositive bats varied significantly across trophic guilds, suggestive of complex intraspecific compartmentalization of RABV perpetuation.

  8. Bat Rabies in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    Ellison, James A.; Gilbert, Amy T.; Recuenco, Sergio; Moran, David; Alvarez, Danilo A.; Kuzmina, Natalia; Garcia, Daniel L.; Peruski, Leonard F.; Mendonça, Mary T.; Lindblade, Kim A.; Rupprecht, Charles E.

    2014-01-01

    Rabies in bats is considered enzootic throughout the New World, but few comparative data are available for most countries in the region. As part of a larger pathogen detection program, enhanced bat rabies surveillance was conducted in Guatemala, between 2009 and 2011. A total of 672 bats of 31 species were sampled and tested for rabies. The prevalence of rabies virus (RABV) detection among all collected bats was low (0.3%). Viral antigens were detected and infectious virus was isolated from the brains of two common vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus). RABV was also isolated from oral swabs, lungs and kidneys of both bats, whereas viral RNA was detected in all of the tissues examined by hemi-nested RT-PCR except for the liver of one bat. Sequencing of the nucleoprotein gene showed that both viruses were 100% identical, whereas sequencing of the glycoprotein gene revealed one non-synonymous substitution (302T,S). The two vampire bat RABV isolates in this study were phylogenetically related to viruses associated with vampire bats in the eastern states of Mexico and El Salvador. Additionally, 7% of sera collected from 398 bats demonstrated RABV neutralizing antibody. The proportion of seropositive bats varied significantly across trophic guilds, suggestive of complex intraspecific compartmentalization of RABV perpetuation. PMID:25080103

  9. Protection of non-human primates against rabies with an adenovirus recombinant vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, Z.Q.; Greenberg, L.; Ertl, H.C.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2014-02-15

    Rabies remains a major neglected global zoonosis. New vaccine strategies are needed for human rabies prophylaxis. A single intramuscular immunization with a moderate dose of an experimental chimpanzee adenovirus (Ad) vector serotype SAd-V24, also termed AdC68, expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, resulted in sustained titers of rabies virus neutralizing antibodies and protection against a lethal rabies virus challenge infection in a non-human primate model. Taken together, these data demonstrate the safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy of the recombinant Ad-rabies vector for further consideration in human clinical trials. - Highlights: • Pre-exposure vaccination with vaccine based on a chimpanzee derived adenovirus protects against rabies. • Protection is sustained. • Protection is achieved with single low-dose of vaccine given intramuscularly. • Protection is not affected by pre-existing antibodies to common human serotypes of adenovirus.

  10. Oral immunisation of mice with a recombinant rabies virus vaccine incorporating the heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit of Escherichia coli in an attenuated Salmonella strain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuelin; Liu, Juan; Wu, Xiuping; Yu, Lu; Chen, Haiying; Guo, Heng; Zhang, Maolin; Li, Huiping; Liu, Xue; Sun, Shumin; Zhao, Lijing; Zhang, Xinyue; Gao, Lifang; Liu, Mingyuan

    2012-10-01

    To investigate effective new rabies vaccines, a fusion protein consisting of the rabies virus (RV) glycoprotein and the heat-labile enterotoxin B subunit of Escherichia coli (LTB) was successfully constructed and delivered in a live attenuated Salmonella strain LH430. Mice were immunised with LH430 carrying pVAX1-G, pVAX1-G-LTB or pVAX1-ori-G-LTB. The antibody titres of mice immunised with oral LH430 carrying pVAX1-G-LTB or pVAX1-ori-G-LTB were significantly higher than those of pVAX1-G-immunised mice. The results of the challenge with the rabies virus standard strain (CVS-11) showed that the LH430 strain carrying the G-LTB gene induced immunity and elevated IL-2 levels in immunised mice ((∗∗)P<0.01), whereas LH430 carrying pVAX1-G did not contribute to protection. These results show that LH430 carrying recombinant G-LTB could provide overall immunity against challenge with CVS-11 and should be considered to be a potential rabies vaccine.

  11. Mapping the neutralizing epitopes on the glycoprotein of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus, a fish rhabdovirus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, C.; Chien, M.S.; Landolt, M.L.; Batts, W.; Winton, J.

    1996-01-01

    Twelve neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the fish rhabdovirus, infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), were used to select 20 MAb escape mutants. The nucleotide sequence of the entire glycoprotein (G) gene was determined for six mutants representing differing cross-neutralization patterns and each had a single nucleotide change leading to a single amino acid substitution within one of three regions of the protein. These data were used to design nested PCR primers to amplify portions of the G gene of the 14 remaining mutants. When the PCR products from these mutants were sequenced, they also had single nucleotide substitutions coding for amino acid substitutions at the same, or nearby, locations. Of the 20 mutants for which all or part of the glycoprotein gene was sequenced, two MAbs selected mutants with substitutions at amino acids 230-231 (antigenic site I) and the remaining MAbs selected mutants with substitutions at amino acids 272-276 (antigenic site II). Two MAbs that selected mutants mapping to amino acids 272-276, selected other mutants that mapped to amino acids 78-81, raising the possibility that this portion of the N terminus of the protein was part of a discontinuous epitope defining antigenic site II. CLUSTAL alignment of the glycoproteins of rabies virus, vesicular stomatitis virus and IHNV revealed similarities in the location of the neutralizing epitopes and a high degree of conservation among cysteine residues, indicating that the glycoproteins of three different genera of animal rhabdoviruses may share a similar three-dimensional structure in spite of extensive sequence divergence.

  12. Evidence for prenatal transfer of rabies virus in the Mexican free-tailed bat (Tadarida brasiliensis Mexicana).

    PubMed

    Steece, R S; Calisher, C H

    1989-07-01

    Fetuses were collected from four Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis mexicana) and a fetal bat cell (FBC) line was established and tested for its ability to support the replication of the ERA vaccine strain of rabies virus. Cytopathic effects were detected in ERA virus-inoculated as well as uninoculated FBC's. Immunofluorescent antibody testing of uninoculated FBC's provided no evidence for the presence of rabies virus. However, mice inoculated intracranially with supernatant fluid from uninoculated FBC's died. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescent antibody testing revealed rabies virus in the brains of these mice. Tests with a panel of monoclonal antibodies indicated that the isolate was the same as that isolated from Mexican free-tailed bats from the southwestern United States. We conclude that the fetuses from which the FBC line was derived had been infected in utero with rabies virus. We believe this may represent the first observation of prenatal transfer of rabies virus in naturally infected bats.

  13. Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Rabies Virus (But Were Afraid to Ask).

    PubMed

    Davis, Benjamin M; Rall, Glenn F; Schnell, Matthias J

    2015-11-01

    The cultural impact of rabies, the fatal neurological disease caused by infection with rabies virus, registers throughout recorded history. Although rabies has been the subject of large-scale public health interventions, chiefly through vaccination efforts, the disease continues to take the lives of about 40,000-70,000 people per year, roughly 40% of whom are children. Most of these deaths occur in resource-poor countries, where lack of infrastructure prevents timely reporting and postexposure prophylaxis and the ubiquity of domestic and wild animal hosts makes eradication unlikely. Moreover, although the disease is rarer than other human infections such as influenza, the prognosis following a bite from a rabid animal is poor: There is currently no effective treatment that will save the life of a symptomatic rabies patient. This review focuses on the major unanswered research questions related to rabies virus pathogenesis, especially those connecting the disease progression of rabies with the complex dysfunction caused by the virus in infected cells. The recent applications of cutting-edge research strategies to this question are described in detail.

  14. Unique characteristics of bat rabies viruses in big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus).

    PubMed

    Davis, April D; Gordy, Paul A; Bowen, Richard A

    2013-04-01

    Rabies virus infection has been documented in several North American bat species, including Eptesicus fuscus. The virus-host relationship between bats and rabies virus (RV) is not well understood. The incidence of non-lethal RV exposure, based on the presence of viral neutralizing antibodies, demonstrates that exposure to RV does not always lead to clinical infection in bats. It is unknown how the route of exposure, rabies virus variant, or health of the bat affects the outcome following exposure. This paper describes the pathogenesis of two big brown bat RV variants in homologous host species. Our study demonstrates that RV variants obtained from the same species of bat from similar geographical areas may result in a diverse clinical progression of disease.

  15. Monosynaptic circuit tracing in vivo through Cre-dependent targeting and complementation of modified rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Wall, Nicholas R; Wickersham, Ian R; Cetin, Ali; De La Parra, Mauricio; Callaway, Edward M

    2010-12-14

    We describe a powerful system for revealing the direct monosynaptic inputs to specific cell types in Cre-expressing transgenic mice through the use of Cre-dependent helper virus and a modified rabies virus. We generated helper viruses that target gene expression to Cre-expressing cells, allowing us to control initial rabies virus infection and subsequent monosynaptic retrograde spread. Investigators can use this system to elucidate the connections onto a desired cell type in a high-throughput manner, limited only by the availability of Cre mouse lines. This method allows for identification of circuits that would be extremely tedious or impossible to study with other methods and can be used to build subcircuit maps of inputs onto many different types of cells within the same brain region. Furthermore, by expressing various transgenes from the rabies genome, this system also has the potential to allow manipulation of targeted neuronal circuits without perturbing neighboring cells.

  16. Rabies virus binding to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha subunit demonstrated by virus overlay protein binding assay.

    PubMed

    Gastka, M; Horvath, J; Lentz, T L

    1996-10-01

    A virus overlay protein binding assay was used to study binding of 125I-labelled rabies virus to the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) from Torpedo californica electric organ membranes. After gel electrophoresis of electric organ membranes and transfer of proteins to nitrocellulose, 125I-labelled alpha-bungarotoxin, a curaremimetic neurotoxin, bound to a 40 kDa band and 125I-labelled rabies virus bound to 51 kDa and 40 kDa bands. Binding of rabies virus to the 40 kDa band was inhibited by unlabelled alpha-bungarotoxin. In blots of affinity-purified AChR, labelled virus bound to the 40 kDa alpha subunit and was competed by alpha-bungarotoxin. Based on binding of rabies virus to the alpha subunit and the ability of alpha-bungarotoxin to compete for binding, rabies virus appears to bind to the neurotoxin-binding site of the nicotinic AChR alpha subunit.

  17. Canine adenovirus based rabies vaccines.

    PubMed

    Tordo, N; Foumier, A; Jallet, C; Szelechowski, M; Klonjkowski, B; Eloit, M

    2008-01-01

    Adenovirus based vectors are very attractive candidates for vaccination purposes as they induce in mammalian hosts potent humoral, mucosal and cellular immune responses to antigens encoded by the inserted genes. We have generated E1-deleted and replication-competent recombinant canine type-2 adenoviruses expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein (G). The effectiveness of both vectors to express a native G protein has been characterized in vitro in permissive cell lines. We compared the humoral and cellular immune responses induced in mice by intramuscular injection of the recombinant canine adenovirus vectors with those induced by a human (Ad5) E1-deleted virus expressing the same rabies G protein. Humoral responses specific to the adenoviruses or the rabies glycoprotein antigens were studied. The influence of the mouse strain was observed using replication-competent canine adenovirus. A high level of rabies neutralizing antibody was observed upon i.m. inoculation, and 100% of mice survived lethal challenge. These results are very promising in the perspective of oral vaccine for dog rabies control.

  18. Effects of G-gene Deletion and Replacement on Rabies Virus Vector Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Sho; Ohara, Shinya; Tsutsui, Ken-Ichiro; Iijima, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    The glycoprotein-gene (G gene) -deleted rabies virus (RV) vector is a powerful tool to examine the function and structure of neural circuits. We previously reported that the deletion of the G gene enhances the transgene expression level of the RV vector. However, the mechanism of this enhancement remains to be clarified. We presume that there are two possible factors for this enhancement. The first factor is the glycoprotein of RV, which shows cytotoxicity; thus, may cause a dysfunction in the translation process of infected cells. The second possible factor is the enhanced expression of the L gene, which encodes viral RNA polymerase. In the RV, it is known that the gene expression level is altered depending on the position of the gene. Since G-gene deletion displaces the L gene in the genome, the expression of the L gene and viral transcription may be enhanced. In this study, we compared the transgene expression level and viral transcription of three recombinant RV vectors. The effect of glycoprotein was examined by comparing the viral gene expression of G-gene-intact RV and G-gene-replaced RV. Despite the fact that the L-gene transcription level of these two RV vectors was similar, the G-gene-replaced RV vector showed higher viral transcription and transgene expression level than the G-gene-intact RV vector. To examine the effect of the position of the L gene, we compared the viral gene expression of the G-gene-deleted RV and G-gene-replaced RV. The G-gene-deleted RV vector showed higher L-gene transcription, viral transcription, and transgene expression level than the G-gene-replaced RV vector. These results indicate that G-gene deletion enhances the transgene expression level through at least two factors, the absence of glycoprotein and enhancement of L-gene expression. These findings enable investigators to design a useful viral vector that shows a controlled desirable transgene expression level in applications. PMID:26023771

  19. The production of antibody by invading B cells is required for the clearance of rabies virus from the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Hooper, D Craig; Phares, Timothy W; Fabis, Marzena J; Roy, Anirban

    2009-10-06

    The pathogenesis of rabies is associated with the inability to deliver immune effectors across the blood-brain barrier and to clear virulent rabies virus from CNS tissues. However, the mechanisms that facilitate immune effector entry into CNS tissues are induced by infection with attenuated rabies virus. Infection of normal mice with attenuated rabies virus but not immunization with killed virus can promote the clearance of pathogenic rabies virus from the CNS. T cell activity in B cell-deficient mice can control the replication of attenuated virus in the CNS, but viral mRNA persists. Low levels of passively administered rabies virus-neutralizing antibody reach infected cells in the cerebellum of B cell-deficient mice but are not sufficient to mediate virus clearance. Production of rabies virus-specific antibody by B cells invading CNS tissues is required for this process, and a substantial proportion of the B cells that accumulate in the CNS of mice infected with attenuated rabies virus produce virus-specific antibodies. The mechanisms required for immune effectors to enter rabies virus-infected tissues are induced by infection with attenuated rabies virus but not by infection with pathogenic rabies viruses or immunization with killed virus. T cell activities can inhibit rabies virus replication, but the production of rabies virus-specific antibodies by infiltrating B cells, as opposed to the leakage of circulating antibody across the BBB, is critical to elimination of the virus. These findings suggest that a pathogenic rabies virus infection may be treatable after the virus has reached the CNS tissues, providing that the appropriate immune effectors can be targeted to the infected tissues.

  20. Phylogenetic analysis and victim contact tracing of rabies virus from humans and dogs in Bali, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Mahardika, G N K; Dibia, N; Budayanti, N S; Susilawathi, N M; Subrata, K; Darwinata, A E; Wignall, F S; Richt, J A; Valdivia-Granda, W A; Sudewi, A A R

    2014-06-01

    The emergence of human and animal rabies in Bali since November 2008 has attracted local, national and international interest. The potential origin and time of introduction of rabies virus to Bali is described. The nucleoprotein (N) gene of rabies virus from dog brain and human clinical specimens was sequenced using an automated DNA sequencer. Phylogenetic inference with Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) analysis using the Bayesian Evolutionary Analysis by Sampling Trees (BEAST) v. 1.7.5 software confirmed that the outbreak of rabies in Bali was caused by an Indonesian lineage virus following a single introduction. The ancestor of Bali viruses was the descendant of a virus from Kalimantan. Contact tracing showed that the event most likely occurred in early 2008. The introduction of rabies into a large unvaccinated dog population in Bali clearly demonstrates the risk of disease transmission for government agencies and should lead to an increased preparedness and efforts for sustained risk reduction to prevent such events from occurring in future.

  1. Probable Rabies Virus Transmission through Organ Transplantation, China, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hang; Zhu, Wuyang; Zeng, Jun; He, Jianfeng; Liu, Kai; Li, Yu; Zhou, Shuwu; Mu, Di; Zhang, Kechun; Yu, Pengcheng; Li, Zhijian; Zhang, Meng; Chen, Xueqiong; Guo, Chun

    2016-01-01

    During July 2015, physicians at a hospital in Beijing, China, diagnosed rabies in 2 patients who had each received a kidney from a common organ donor who had died from acute progressive encephalitis of unknown cause. The patients had rabies incubation periods of 42 and 48 days. Altered mental status developed in both patients and progressively worsened to deep coma within 80 days after transplantation; both patients died. Two other transplant recipients received corneas but remained well after receiving timely rabies prophylaxis. An effective regulatory system for testing donors should be implemented to decrease the occurrence of donor-derived infectious diseases. In addition, health education should be improved to enhance public awareness of transplant-associated infectious diseases. Transplant recipients and other persons with exposure to organs or tissues from donors with rabies must be provided consistent health monitoring and follow-up, including rabies postexposure prophylaxis; any remaining organs and tissues must be quarantined and not transplanted. PMID:27331337

  2. Rabies viruses leader RNA interacts with host Hsc70 and inhibits virus replication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ran; Liu, Chuangang; Cao, Yunzi; Jamal, Muhammad; Chen, Xi; Zheng, Jinfang; Li, Liang; You, Jing; Zhu, Qi; Liu, Shiyong; Dai, Jinxia; Cui, Min; Fu, Zhen F; Cao, Gang

    2017-03-23

    Viruses have been shown to be equipped with regulatory RNAs to evade host defense system. It has long been known that rabies virus (RABV) transcribes a small regulatory RNA, leader RNA (leRNA), which mediates the transition from viral RNA transcription to replication. However, the detailed molecular mechanism remains enigmatic. In the present study, we determined the genetic architecture of RABV leRNA and demonstrated its inhibitory effect on replication of wild-type rabies, DRV-AH08. The RNA immunoprecipitation results suggest that leRNA inhibits RABV replication via interfering the binding of RABV nucleoprotein with genomic RNA. Furthermore, we identified heat shock cognate 70 kDa protein (Hsc70) as a leRNA host cellular interacting protein, of which the expression level was dynamically regulated by RABV infection. Notably, our data suggest that Hsc70 was involved in suppressing RABV replication by leader RNA. Finally, our experiments imply that leRNA might be potentially useful as a novel drug in rabies post-exposure prophylaxis. Together, this study suggested leRNA in concert with its host interacting protein Hsc70, dynamically down-regulate RABV replication.

  3. Molecular epidemiology identifies only a single rabies virus variant circulating in complex carnivore communities of the Serengeti

    PubMed Central

    Lembo, T; Haydon, D.T; Velasco-Villa, A; Rupprecht, C.E; Packer, C; Brandão, P.E; Kuzmin, I.V; Fooks, A.R; Barrat, J; Cleaveland, S

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the transmission dynamics of generalist pathogens that infect multiple host species is essential for their effective control. Only by identifying those host populations that are critical to the permanent maintenance of the pathogen, as opposed to populations in which outbreaks are the result of ‘spillover’ infections, can control measures be appropriately directed. Rabies virus is capable of infecting a wide range of host species, but in many ecosystems, particular variants circulate among only a limited range of potential host populations. The Serengeti ecosystem (in northwestern Tanzania) supports a complex community of wild carnivores that are threatened by generalist pathogens that also circulate in domestic dog populations surrounding the park boundaries. While the combined assemblage of host species appears capable of permanently maintaining rabies in the ecosystem, little is known about the patterns of circulation within and between these host populations. Here we use molecular phylogenetics to test whether distinct virus–host associations occur in this species-rich carnivore community. Our analysis identifies a single major variant belonging to the group of southern Africa canid-associated viruses (Africa 1b) to be circulating within this ecosystem, and no evidence for species-specific grouping. A statistical parsimony analysis of nucleoprotein and glycoprotein gene sequence data is consistent with both within- and between-species transmission events. While likely differential sampling effort between host species precludes a definitive inference, the results are most consistent with dogs comprising the reservoir of rabies and emphasize the importance of applying control efforts in dog populations. PMID:17609187

  4. Effect of cellular cholesterol depletion on rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hotta, Kozue; Bazartseren, Boldbarrtar; Kaku, Yoshihiro; Noguchi, Akira; Okutani, Akiko; Inoue, Satoshi; Yamada, Akio

    2009-01-01

    Although there are several reports on candidates for rabies virus (RABV) receptor, possible roles played by these receptor candidates in determination of highly neurotropic nature of RABV have not been well understood. Since these candidate receptors for RABV were reported to be frequently associated with cholesterol-rich microdomains characterized by lipid rafts and caveolae structures, we attempted to determine whether the disturbance of microdomains caused by the cholesterol depletion showed any effects on RABV infection. When the cellular cholesterol was depleted by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MBCD) treatment, increase in RABV adsorption and infection, but not multiplication rather than suppression was observed in both BHK-21 and HEp-2 cells. These effects exerted by MBCD treatment on RABV infection could be reversed by cholesterol reconstitution. These results suggest that RABV enters BHK-21 or HEp-2 cells through ports of entry other than those located on cholesterol-rich microdomains and raise the possibility that RABV uses different mechanisms to enter the non-neuronal cells.

  5. Re-emergence of rabies virus maintained by canid populations in Paraguay.

    PubMed

    Amarilla, A C F; Pompei, J C A; Araujo, D B; Vázquez, F A; Galeano, R R; Delgado, L M; Bogado, G; Colman, M; Sanabria, L; Iamamoto, K; Garcia, R; Assis, D; Recalde, R; Martorelli, L F; Quiñones, E; Cabello, A; Martini, M; Cosivi, O; Durigon, E L; Favoretto, S R

    2017-09-14

    Paraguay has registered no human cases of rabies since 2004, and the last case in dogs, reported in 2009, was due to a variant maintained in the common vampire bat "Desmodus rotundus". In 2014, a dog was diagnosed as positive for rabies with aggression towards a boy and all required measures of control were successfully adopted. Epidemiological investigation revealed that the dog was not vaccinated and had been attacked by a crab-eating fox, "zorro" (Cerdocyon thous). The sample was diagnosed by the Official Veterinary Service of the Country and sent to the Center on Rabies Research from the University of São Paulo, Brazil, for antigenic and genetic characterization. A second sample from a dog positive for rabies in the same region in 2015 and 11 samples from a rabies outbreak from Asuncion in 1996 were also characterized. The antigenic profile of the samples, AgV2, was compatible with one of the variants maintained by dogs in Latin America. In genetic characterization, the samples segregated in the canine (domestic and wild species)-related group in an independent subgroup that also included samples from Argentina. These results and the epidemiology of the case indicate that even with the control of rabies in domestic animals, the virus can still circulate in wildlife and may be transmitted to domestic animals and humans, demonstrating the importance of continuous and improved surveillance and control of rabies, including in wild species, to prevent outbreaks in controlled areas. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Rabies vaccination at a virus-inoculated site as an alternative option to rabies immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Kinjiro; Khawplod, Pakamatz; Sato, Yuichiro; Virojanapirom, Phatthamon; Hemachudha, Thiravat

    2016-09-01

    Combined active and passive immunization has been established to be an optimal strategy for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP). Prompt administration of vaccine and rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) can reliably prevent the disease. However, RIG is unavailable and unaffordable in the majority of cases. On the basis of a model experiment using hamsters, we demonstrated that vaccine injection at the wound site in the same manner as administration of RIG provided protective efficacy that was not inferior to the current optimal PEP, a combination of vaccination and RIG. Further study is needed to determine whether it can replace the use of RIG.

  7. Analysis of vaccine-virus-associated rabies cases in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) after oral rabies vaccination campaigns in Germany and Austria.

    PubMed

    Müller, Thomas; Bätza, H-J; Beckert, A; Bunzenthal, C; Cox, J H; Freuling, C M; Fooks, A R; Frost, J; Geue, L; Hoeflechner, A; Marston, D; Neubert, A; Neubert, L; Revilla-Fernández, S; Vanek, E; Vos, A; Wodak, E; Zimmer, K; Mettenleiter, T C

    2009-01-01

    To eradicate rabies in foxes, almost 97 million oral rabies vaccine baits have been distributed in Germany and Austria since 1983 and 1986, respectively. Since 2007, no terrestrial cases have been reported in either country. The most widely used oral rabies vaccine viruses in these countries were SAD (Street Alabama Dufferin) strains, e.g. SAD B19 (53.2%) and SAD P5/88 (44.5%). In this paper, we describe six possible vaccine-virus-associated rabies cases in red foxes (Vulpes vulpes) detected during post-vaccination surveillance from 2001 to 2006, involving two different vaccines and different batches. Compared to prototypic vaccine strains, full-genome sequencing revealed between 1 and 5 single nucleotide alterations in the L gene in 5 of 6 SAD isolates, resulting in up to two amino acid substitutions. However, experimental infection of juvenile foxes showed that those mutations had no influence on pathogenicity. The cases described here, coming from geographically widely separated regions, do not represent a spatial cluster. More importantly, enhanced surveillance showed that the vaccine viruses involved did not become established in the red fox population. It seems that the number of reported vaccine virus-associated rabies cases is determined predominantly by the intensity of surveillance after the oral rabies vaccination campaign and not by the selection of strains.

  8. Persistence of genetic variants of the arctic fox strain of Rabies virus in southern Ontario.

    PubMed

    Nadin-Davis, Susan A; Muldoon, Frances; Wandeler, Alexander I

    2006-01-01

    Genetic-variant analysis of rabies viruses provides the most sensitive epidemiologic tool for following the spread and persistence of these viruses in their wildlife hosts. Since its introduction by a southern epizootic movement that began in the far north, the arctic fox (AFX) strain of Rabies virus has been enzootic in Ontario for almost 50 y. Prior genetic studies identified 4 principal genetic variants (ONT.T1 to ONT.T4) that were localized to different regions of the province; furthermore, these viruses could be distinguished from the variant circulating in northern regions of Quebec, Newfoundland, and arctic zones, ARC.T5. Despite an intensive provincial control program undertaken over the last decade that involved aerial distribution of baits laden with rabies vaccine to combat fox rabies throughout the enzootic zone of Ontario, pockets of rabies activity persist. Re-evaluation of the genetic characteristics of the viral variants circulating in these areas of persistence has been undertaken. These data demonstrate that the recent outbreaks are, with 1 exception, due to persistence of the regional variant first identified in the area in the early 1990s. In contrast, the disease in the Georgian Bay area is a consequence of the incursion of a variant previously found further south. An outbreak that occurred in northern Ontario north and west of North Bay and in the neighboring border areas of Quebec in 2000-2001 was due to renewed incursion of the ARC.T5 variant from more northerly areas.

  9. Phylogenetic comparison of rabies viruses from disease outbreaks on the Svalbard Islands.

    PubMed

    Johnson, N; Dicker, A; Mork, T; Marston, D A; Fooks, A R; Tryland, M; Fuglei, E; Müller, T

    2007-01-01

    Periodic wildlife rabies epizootics occur in Arctic regions. The original sources of these outbreaks are rarely identified. In 1980, a wildlife epizootic of rabies occurred on the previously rabies-free Svalbard Islands, Norway. After this outbreak of rabies in the arctic fox population (Alopex lagopus), only single cases have been reported from the Islands over the following two decades. Phylogenetic characterization of four viruses isolated from infected arctic foxes from Svalbard from three different time periods suggest that the source of these epizootics could have been migration of this species from the Russian mainland. Arctic fox migration has likely contributed to the establishment of another zoonotic disease, Echinococcus multilocularis, on Svalbard in recent years.

  10. Characterization of rabies virus isolated from a colony of Eptesicus furinalis bats in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Marilene Fernandes de; Favoretto, Silvana R; Martorelli, Luzia F Alves; Trezza-Netto, José; Campos, Angélica Cristine de Almeida; Ozahata, Carlos H; Sodré, Miriam Martos; Kataoka, Ana Paula A G; Sacramento, Débora R Veiga; Durigon, Edison L

    2011-01-01

    Some bat species have adapted to the expanding human population by acquiring the ability to roost in urban buildings, increasing the exposure risk for people and domestic animals, and consequently, the likelihood of transmitting rabies. Three dead bats were found in the yard of a house in an urban area of Jundiaí city in the state of São Paulo in southeast Brazil. Two of the three bats tested positive for rabies, using Fluorescent Antibody and Mouse Inoculation techniques. A large colony of Eptesicus furinalis was found in the house's attic, and of the 119 bats captured, four more tested positive for rabies. The objectives of this study were to report the rabies diagnosis, characterize the isolated virus antigenically and genetically, and study the epidemiology of the colony.

  11. Genealogical analyses of rabies virus strains from Brazil based on N gene alleles.

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, M. B.; Fernandes-Matioli, F. M. C.; Cortez, A.; Soares, R. M.; Sakamoto, S. M.; Bernardi, F.; Ito, F. H.; Madeira, A. M. B. N.; Richtzenhain, L. J.

    2002-01-01

    Thirty rabies virus isolates from cows and vampire bats from different regions of São Paulo State, Southeastern Brazil and three rabies vaccines were studied genetically. The analysis was based on direct sequencing of PCR-amplified products of 600 nucleotides coding for the amino terminus of nucleoprotein gene. The sequences were checked to verify their genealogical and evolutionary relationships and possible implication for health programmes. Statistical data indicated that there were no significant genetic differences between samples isolated from distinct hosts, from different geographical regions and between samples collected in the last two decades. According to the HKA test, the variability observed in the sequences is probably due to genetic drift. Since changes in genetic material may produce modifications in the protein responsible for immunogenicity of virus, which may eventually cause vaccine failure in herds, we suggest that continuous efforts in monitoring genetic diversity in rabies virus field strains, in relation to vaccine strains, must be conducted. PMID:12113496

  12. Replacement of in vivo human rabies vaccine potency testing by in vitro glycoprotein quantification using ELISA - Results of an international collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Morgeaux, Sylvie; Poirier, Bertrand; Ragan, C Ian; Wilkinson, Dianna; Arabin, Ulrich; Guinet-Morlot, Françoise; Levis, Robin; Meyer, Heidi; Riou, Patrice; Shaid, Shahjahan; Volokhov, Dmitriy; Tordo, Noël; Chapsal, Jean-Michel

    2017-02-07

    Three different ELISAs quantifying rabies glycoprotein were evaluated as in vitro alternatives to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in vivo potency test for batch release of human rabies vaccines. The evaluation was carried out as an international collaborative study supported by the European Partnership for Alternatives to Animal Testing (EPAA). This pre-validation study, the results of which are presented in this paper, compared three different ELISA designs, assessing their within- and between-laboratory precision. One of the ELISA designs was proposed to the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM) and accepted for an international collaborative study under the umbrella of the Biological Standardisation Programme.

  13. Post-exposure Treatment with Anti-rabies VHH and Vaccine Significantly Improves Protection of Mice from Lethal Rabies Infection.

    PubMed

    Terryn, Sanne; Francart, Aurélie; Rommelaere, Heidi; Stortelers, Catelijne; Van Gucht, Steven

    2016-08-01

    Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) against rabies infection consists of a combination of passive immunisation with plasma-derived human or equine immune globulins and active immunisation with vaccine delivered shortly after exposure. Since anti-rabies immune globulins are expensive and scarce, there is a need for cheaper alternatives that can be produced more consistently. Previously, we generated potent virus-neutralising VHH, also called Nanobodies, against the rabies glycoprotein that are effectively preventing lethal disease in an in vivo mouse model. The VHH domain is the smallest antigen-binding functional fragment of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies that can be manufactured in microbial expression systems. In the current study we evaluated the efficacy of half-life extended anti-rabies VHH in combination with vaccine for PEP in an intranasal rabies infection model in mice. The PEP combination therapy of systemic anti-rabies VHH and intramuscular vaccine significantly delayed the onset of disease compared to treatment with anti-rabies VHH alone, prolonged median survival time (35 versus 14 days) and decreased mortality (60% versus 19% survival rate), when treated 24 hours after rabies virus challenge. Vaccine alone was unable to rescue mice from lethal disease. As reported also for immune globulins, some interference of anti-rabies VHH with the antigenicity of the vaccine was observed, but this did not impede the synergistic effect. Post exposure treatment with vaccine and human anti-rabies immune globulins was unable to protect mice from lethal challenge. Anti-rabies VHH and vaccine act synergistically to protect mice after rabies virus exposure, which further validates the possible use of anti-rabies VHH for rabies PEP.

  14. Post-exposure Treatment with Anti-rabies VHH and Vaccine Significantly Improves Protection of Mice from Lethal Rabies Infection

    PubMed Central

    Terryn, Sanne; Francart, Aurélie; Rommelaere, Heidi; Stortelers, Catelijne; Van Gucht, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) against rabies infection consists of a combination of passive immunisation with plasma-derived human or equine immune globulins and active immunisation with vaccine delivered shortly after exposure. Since anti-rabies immune globulins are expensive and scarce, there is a need for cheaper alternatives that can be produced more consistently. Previously, we generated potent virus-neutralising VHH, also called Nanobodies, against the rabies glycoprotein that are effectively preventing lethal disease in an in vivo mouse model. The VHH domain is the smallest antigen-binding functional fragment of camelid heavy chain-only antibodies that can be manufactured in microbial expression systems. In the current study we evaluated the efficacy of half-life extended anti-rabies VHH in combination with vaccine for PEP in an intranasal rabies infection model in mice. The PEP combination therapy of systemic anti-rabies VHH and intramuscular vaccine significantly delayed the onset of disease compared to treatment with anti-rabies VHH alone, prolonged median survival time (35 versus 14 days) and decreased mortality (60% versus 19% survival rate), when treated 24 hours after rabies virus challenge. Vaccine alone was unable to rescue mice from lethal disease. As reported also for immune globulins, some interference of anti-rabies VHH with the antigenicity of the vaccine was observed, but this did not impede the synergistic effect. Post exposure treatment with vaccine and human anti-rabies immune globulins was unable to protect mice from lethal challenge. Anti-rabies VHH and vaccine act synergistically to protect mice after rabies virus exposure, which further validates the possible use of anti-rabies VHH for rabies PEP. PMID:27483431

  15. Generation of a novel live rabies vaccine strain with a high level of safety by introducing attenuating mutations in the nucleoprotein and glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Kento; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Katayama, Yukie; Oba, Mami; Mitake, Hiromichi; Okada, Kazuma; Yamaoka, Satoko; Takashima, Yasuhiro; Masatani, Tatsunori; Okadera, Kota; Ito, Naoto; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Sugiyama, Makoto

    2017-10-09

    The current live rabies vaccine SAG2 is attenuated by only one mutation (Arg-to-Glu) at position 333 in the glycoprotein (G333). This fact generates a potential risk of the emergence of a pathogenic revertant by a back mutation at this position during viral propagation in the body. To circumvent this risk, it is desirable to generate a live vaccine strain highly and stably attenuated by multiple mutations. However, the information on attenuating mutations other than that at G333 is very limited. We previously reported that amino acids at positions 273 and 394 in the nucleoprotein (N273/394) (Leu and His, respectively) of fixed rabies virus Ni-CE are responsible for the attenuated phenotype by enhancing interferon (IFN)/chemokine gene expressions in infected neural cells. In this study, we found that amino acid substitutions at N273/394 (Phe-to-Leu and Tyr-to-His, respectively) attenuated the pathogenicity of the oral live vaccine ERA, which has a virulent-type Arg at G333. Then we generated ERA-N273/394-G333 attenuated by the combination of the above attenuating mutations at G333 and N273/394, and checked its safety. Similar to the ERA-G333, which is attenuated by only the mutation at G333, ERA-N273/394-G333 did not cause any symptoms in adult mice after intracerebral inoculation, indicating a low level of residual pathogenicity of ERA-N273/394-G333. Further examination revealed that infection with ERA-N273/394-G333 induces IFN-β and CXCL10 mRNA expressions more strongly than ERA-G333 infection in a neuroblastoma cell line. Importantly, we found that the ERA-N273/394-G333 stain has a lower risk for emergence of a pathogenic revertant than does the ERA-G333. These results indicate that ERA-N273/394-G333 has a potential to be a promising candidate for a live rabies vaccine strain with a high level of safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 envelope glycoproteins: Dimerization of the glycoprotein precursor during processing

    SciTech Connect

    Rey, M.A.; Krust, B.; Laurent, A.G.; Montagnier, L.; Hovanessian, A.G.

    1989-02-01

    For glycoproteins with apparent molecular weights of 300,000, 140,000, 125,000, and 36,000 (gp300, gp140, gp125, and gp36) were detectable in human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2)-infected cells. They have identical isoelectric points, suggesting that gp300 might be a dimeric form of the immature precursor, gp140. The purified gp300 can be dissociated in a slightly acidic buffer to give rise to monomers of 140,000 molecular weight. Such dissociated monomers and the purified gp140 showed identical patterns of polypeptides after partial proteolysis with Staphylococcus aureus V8 protease. Pulse-chase experiments indicated that gp300 is formed after synthesis of gp140 and before the detection of the mature external envelope glycoprotein, gp125. These results were confirmed by using various inhibitors of glycosylation and inhibitors of trimming enzymes. Dimer formation of the envelope glycoprotein precursor was also observed in cells infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), a virus closely related to HIV-2. On the other hand, the envelope glycoprotein precursor of HIV-1 did not form a dimer during its processing. Therefore, dimer formation seems to be a specific property of HIV-2 and SIV envelope gene expression. Such transient dimerization of the glycoprotein precursor might be required for its efficient transport to the Golgi apparatus and for its processing.

  17. Oral immunization of raccoons and skunks with a canine adenovirus recombinant rabies vaccine.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Heather; Jackson, Felix; Bean, Kayla; Panasuk, Brian; Niezgoda, Michael; Slate, Dennis; Li, Jianwei; Dietzschold, Bernard; Mattis, Jeff; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2009-11-27

    Oral vaccination is an important part of wildlife rabies control programs. Currently, the vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein recombinant virus is the only oral rabies vaccine licensed in the United States, and it is not effective in skunks. In the current study, captive raccoons and skunks were used to evaluate a vaccine developed by incorporating the rabies virus glycoprotein gene into a canine adenovirus serotype 2 vector (CAV2-RVG). Seven of 7 raccoons orally vaccinated with CAV2-RVG developed virus neutralizing antibodies and survived lethal challenge. Five of 5 and 6 of 6 skunks in 2 experimental groups receiving 10-fold different dilutions of CAV2-RVG developed neutralizing antibodies and survived challenge. The results of this preliminary study suggest that CAV2-RVG stimulates protective immunity against rabies in raccoons and skunks.

  18. Phylogeography of rabies virus isolated from herbivores and bats in the Espírito Santo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Luiz Fernando Pereira; Pereira, Sílvia Regina Ferreira Gonçalves; Carnieli, Pedro; Tavares, Luiz Carlos Barbosa; Kotait, Ivanete

    2013-04-01

    Rabies is enzootic in the State of Espírito Santo, Brazil. Every year, cattle and horses die from rabies that is transmitted by the vampire bat Desmodus rotundus. This paper describes the spread of the rabies virus by the continuous diffusion model using relaxed random walks with BEAST software. Forty-one (41) sequences of gene G from the rabies virus that was isolated from bats and domestic herbivores from several areas of the state between 2006 and 2010 were analyzed. The phylogenetic tree showed three main clusters as well as two sub-clusters under cluster 2. A spatial analysis showed that three strains of the rabies virus spread independently. In general, central Espírito Santo, which is mountainous, was the area where separation of the virus strains occurred. This physical barrier, however, was overcome at some point in time, as samples from different lineages were found in the same microarea.

  19. Phylogenetic analysis of rabies virus isolated from canids in North and Northeast Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Débora Nunes; Carnieli, Pedro; Macedo, Carla Isabel; de Novaes Oliveira, Rafael; de Carvalho Ruthner Batista, Helena Beatriz; Rodrigues, Adriana Candido; Pereira, Patricia Mariano Cruz; Achkar, Samira Maria; Vieira, Luiz Fernando Pereira; Kawai, Juliana Galera Castilho

    2017-01-01

    Cases of canine rabies continue to occur in North and Northeast Brazil, and the number of notifications of rabies cases in wild canids has increased as a result of the expansion of urban areas at the expense of areas with native vegetation. In light of this, we performed molecular characterization of rabies virus isolates from dogs and Cerdocyon thous from various states in North and Northeast Brazil. In all, 102 samples from dogs (n = 56) and Cerdocyon thous (n = 46) collected between 2006 and 2012 were used. The nucleotide sequences obtained for the N gene of rabies virus were analyzed, and phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of two distinct genetic lineages, one associated with canids and one with bats, and, within the canid cluster, two distinct sublineages circulating among dogs and Cerdocyon thous. In addition, phylogenetic groups associated with geographic region and fourteen cases of interspecific infection were observed among the isolates from canids. Our findings show that analysis of rabies virus lineages isolated from reservoirs such as canids must be constantly evaluated because the mutation rate is high.

  20. Efficacy and safety of a live canine adenovirus-vectored rabies virus vaccine in swine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Zhang, Shoufeng; Ma, Guangpeng; Zhang, Fei; Hu, Rongliang

    2008-10-03

    Rabies infections in swine have been reported occasionally in recent years in certain geographic locations. Although a protective vaccine consisting of inactivated rabies virus is available for use in swine, searching for a more economically viable formulation for use in developing countries is always a priority. This work describes the testing of a canine adenovirus that expresses a rabies viral epitope (CAV-2-E3Delta-RGP) in a porcine rabies model. The data presented here show that the recombinant viral vaccine was effective in protecting swine against rabies if administered intramuscularly, but not orally or intranasally, and that protection was probably related to the development of a humoral response that lasted at least 28 weeks. Following vaccination, no behavioral abnormalities were observed in vaccinated swine and virus particles were not detected in either tissues or body fluids, indicating that this formulation was safe. The recombinant virus stimulated an effective level of antibody response in the immunized swine after a single intramuscular inoculation.

  1. The phylogeography of Myotis bat-associated rabies viruses across Canada.

    PubMed

    Nadin-Davis, Susan; Alnabelseya, Noor; Knowles, M Kimberly

    2017-05-01

    As rabies in carnivores is increasingly controlled throughout much of the Americas, bats are emerging as a significant source of rabies virus infection of humans and domestic animals. Knowledge of the bat species that maintain rabies is a crucial first step in reducing this public health problem. In North America, several bat species are known to be rabies virus reservoirs but the role of bats of the Myotis genus has been unclear due to the scarcity of laboratory confirmed cases and the challenges encountered in species identification of poorly preserved diagnostic submissions by morphological traits alone. This study has employed a collection of rabid bat specimens collected across Canada over a 25 year period to clearly define the role of particular Myotis species as rabies virus reservoirs. The virus was characterised by partial genome sequencing and host genetic barcoding, used to confirm species assignment of specimens, proved crucial to the identification of certain bat species as disease reservoirs. Several variants were associated with Myotis species limited in their Canadian range to the westernmost province of British Columbia while others were harboured by Myotis species that circulate across much of eastern and central Canada. All of these Myotis-associated viral variants, except for one, clustered as a monophyletic MYCAN clade, which has emerged from a lineage more broadly distributed across North America; in contrast one distinct variant, associated with the long-legged bat in Canada, represents a relatively recent host jump from a big brown bat reservoir. Together with evidence from South America, these findings demonstrate that rabies virus has emerged in the Myotis genus independently on multiple occasions and highlights the potential for emergence of new viral-host associations within this genus.

  2. The phylogeography of Myotis bat-associated rabies viruses across Canada

    PubMed Central

    Alnabelseya, Noor; Knowles, M. Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    As rabies in carnivores is increasingly controlled throughout much of the Americas, bats are emerging as a significant source of rabies virus infection of humans and domestic animals. Knowledge of the bat species that maintain rabies is a crucial first step in reducing this public health problem. In North America, several bat species are known to be rabies virus reservoirs but the role of bats of the Myotis genus has been unclear due to the scarcity of laboratory confirmed cases and the challenges encountered in species identification of poorly preserved diagnostic submissions by morphological traits alone. This study has employed a collection of rabid bat specimens collected across Canada over a 25 year period to clearly define the role of particular Myotis species as rabies virus reservoirs. The virus was characterised by partial genome sequencing and host genetic barcoding, used to confirm species assignment of specimens, proved crucial to the identification of certain bat species as disease reservoirs. Several variants were associated with Myotis species limited in their Canadian range to the westernmost province of British Columbia while others were harboured by Myotis species that circulate across much of eastern and central Canada. All of these Myotis-associated viral variants, except for one, clustered as a monophyletic MYCAN clade, which has emerged from a lineage more broadly distributed across North America; in contrast one distinct variant, associated with the long-legged bat in Canada, represents a relatively recent host jump from a big brown bat reservoir. Together with evidence from South America, these findings demonstrate that rabies virus has emerged in the Myotis genus independently on multiple occasions and highlights the potential for emergence of new viral-host associations within this genus. PMID:28542160

  3. The glycoprotein genes and gene junctions of the fish rhabdoviruses spring viremia of carp virus and hirame rhabdovirus: analysis of relationships with other rhabdoviruses.

    PubMed

    Björklund, H V; Higman, K H; Kurath, G

    1996-06-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the glycoprotein genes and all of the internal gene junctions of the fish pathogenic rhabdoviruses spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) and hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV) have been determined from cDNA clones generated from viral genomic RNA. The SVCV glycoprotein gene sequence is 1588 nucleotides (nt) long and encodes a 509 amino acid (aa) protein. The HIRRV glycoprotein gene sequence comprises 1612 nt, coding for a 508 aa protein. In sequence comparisons of 15 rhabdovirus glycoproteins, the SVCV glycoprotein gene showed the highest amino acid sequence identity (31.2-33.2%) with vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus (VSNJV), Chandipura virus (CHPV) and vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus (VSIV). The HIRRV glycoprotein gene showed a very high amino acid sequence identity (74.3%) with the glycoprotein gene of another fish pathogenic rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), but no significant similarity with glycoproteins of VSIV or rabies virus (RABV). In phylogenetic analyses SVCV was grouped consistently with VSIV, VSNJV and CHPV in the Vesiculovirus genus of Rhabdoviridae. The fish rhabdoviruses HIRRV, IHNV and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) showed close relationships with each other, but only very distant relationships with mammalian rhabdoviruses. The gene junctions are highly conserved between SVCV and VSIV, well conserved between IHNV and HIRRV, but not conserved between HIRRV/IHNV and RABV. Based on the combined results we suggest that the fish lyssa-type rhabdoviruses HIRRV, IHNV and VHSV may be grouped in their own genus within the family Rhabdoviridae. Aquarhabdovirus has been proposed for the name of this new genus.

  4. The glycoprotein genes and gene junctions of the fish rhabdoviruses spring viremia of carp virus and hirame rhabdovirus: Analysis of relationships with other rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bjorklund, H.V.; Higman, K.H.; Kurath, G.

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the glycoprotein genes and all of the internal gene junctions of the fish pathogenic rhabdoviruses spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) and hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV) have been determined from cDNA clones generated from viral genomic RNA. The SVCV glycoprotein gene sequence is 1588 nucleotides (nt) long and encodes a 509 amino acid (aa) protein. The HIRRV glycoprotein gene sequence comprises 1612 nt, coding for a 508 aa protein. In sequence comparisons of 15 rhabdovirus glycoproteins, the SVCV glycoprotein gene showed the highest amino acid sequence identity (31.2–33.2%) with vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus (VSNJV), Chandipura virus (CHPV) and vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus (VSIV). The HIRRV glycoprotein gene showed a very high amino acid sequence identity (74.3%) with the glycoprotein gene of another fish pathogenic rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), but no significant similarity with glycoproteins of VSIV or rabies virus (RABV). In phylogenetic analyses SVCV was grouped consistently with VSIV, VSNJV and CHPV in the Vesiculovirus genus of Rhabdoviridae. The fish rhabdoviruses HIRRV, IHNV and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) showed close relationships with each other, but only very distant relationships with mammalian rhabdoviruses. The gene junctions are highly conserved between SVCV and VSIV, well conserved between IHNV and HIRRV, but not conserved between HIRRV/IHNV and RABV. Based on the combined results we suggest that the fish lyssa-type rhabdoviruses HIRRV, IHNV and VHSV may be grouped in their own genus within the family Rhabdoviridae. Aquarhabdovirus has been proposed for the name of this new genus.

  5. The glycoprotein genes and gene junctions of the fish rhabdoviruses spring viremia of carp virus and hirame rhabdovirus: Analysis of relationships with other rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bjorklund, H.V.; Higman, K.H.; Kurath, G.

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the glycoprotein genes and all of the internal gene junctions of the fish pathogenic rhabdoviruses spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) and hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV) have been determined from cDNA clones generated from viral genomic RNA. The SVCV glycoprotein gene sequence is 1588 nucleotides (nt) long and encodes a 509 amino acid (aa) protein. The HIRRV glycoprotein gene sequence comprises 1612 nt, coding for a 508 aa protein. In sequence comparisons of 15 rhabdovirus glycoproteins, the SVCV glycoprotein gene showed the highest amino acid sequence identity (31.2-33.2%) with vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus (VSNJV), Chandipura virus (CHPV) and vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus (VSIV). The HIRRV glycoprotein gene showed a very high amino acid sequence identity (74.3%) with the glycoprotein gene of another fish pathogenic rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), but no significant similarity with glycoproteins of VSIV or rabies virus (RABV). In phylogenetic analyses SVCV was grouped consistently with VSIV, VSNJV and CHPV in the Vesiculovirus genus of Rhabdoviridae. The fish rhabdoviruses HIRRV, IHNV and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) showed close relationships with each other, but only very distant relationships with mammalian rhabdoviruses. The gene junctions are highly conserved between SVCV and VSIV, well conserved between IHNV and HIRRV, but not conserved between HIRRV/IHNV and RABV. Based on the combined results we suggest that the fish lyssa-type rhabdoviruses HIRRV, IHNV and VHSV may be grouped in their own genus within the family Rhabdoviridae. Aquarhabdovirus has been proposed for the name of this new genus.

  6. Genetically modified rabies virus ERA strain is safe and induces long-lasting protective immune response in dogs after oral vaccination.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Lei; Feng, Na; Wang, Xijun; Ge, Jinying; Wen, Zhiyuan; Chen, Weiye; Qin, Lide; Xia, Xianzhu; Bu, Zhigao

    2015-09-01

    Oral immunization in free-roaming dogs is one of the most practical approaches to prevent rabies for developing countries. The safe, efficient and long-lasting protective oral rabies vaccine for dogs is highly sought. In this study, rabies virus (RABV) Evelyn-Rokitnicki-Abelseth (ERA) strain wild-type (rERA) and a genetically modified type (rERAG333E) containing a mutation from arginine to glutamic acid at residue 333 of glycoprotein (G333E) were generated by reverse genetic. The recombinant virus rERAG333E retained growth properties of similar to the parent strain rERA in BHK-21 cell culture. The G333E mutation showed genetic stability during passage into neuroblastoma cells and in the brains of suckling mice and was significantly reduced the virulence of rERA in mice. rERAG333E was immunogenic in dogs by intramuscular inoculation. Mice orally vaccinated with rERAG333E induced strong and one year longer virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA) to RABV, and were completely protected from challenge with lethal street virus at 12months after immunization. Dogs received oral vaccination with rERAG333E induced strong protective RABV VNA response, which lasted for over 3years, and moderate saliva RABV-specific IgA. Moreover, sizeable booster responses to RABV VNA were induced by a second oral dose 1year after the first dose. These results demonstrated that the genetically modified ERA vaccine strain has the potential to serve as a safe and efficient oral live vaccine against rabies in dogs.

  7. Rabies virus production in non-woven polyester fabric(NWPF) packed-bed reactors.

    PubMed

    Gümüşderelioğlu, M; Aslankaraoğlu, E; Gürhan, S I

    2001-06-01

    The production of rabies virus from baby hamster kidney-Ankara66 (BHK-An(66), HUKUK 99050302) monolayer cells was examinedin a packed-bed reactor containing non-woven polyester fabric (NWPF)discs. At first, growth characteristics of the cells were determined instatic culture. The suspension culture studies were realized in a 1litre spinner basket with NWPF support. BHK-An(66) cells(inoculation density, 5x10(4) cells.ml(-1)) were maintained in the reactor loaded with5 g.l(-1) carrier. The culture medium wasEagle's minimal essential medium supplemented with 10% (v/v)fetal bovine serum at 37 degrees C. During the culture, the mediumwas sampled daily to assess glucose and lactate concentrations. At theend of the 7 day culture period the cell density was found to be2.2x10(7) cells.ml(-1), and thereactor was inoculated with 5 ml [1.7x10(6) focus-forming units (ffu).ml(-1)] of the CVS 11(Challenge Virus Standard) strain of rabies virus. After a 72 hincubation period, the cultures were stained with fluorescein-conjugated anti-rabies globulin and were observed using a fluorescencemicroscope. Virus titres determined by the Spearman-Kärber method were 2.2x10(5) ffu.ml(-1). In conclusion, NWPF packedreactors can be considered as a suitable system for the large-scaleproduction of rabies virus.

  8. Potential effect of prior raccoonpox virus infection in raccoons on vaccinia-based rabies immunization

    PubMed Central

    Root, J Jeffrey; McLean, Robert G; Slate, Dennis; MacCarthy, Kathleen A; Osorio, Jorge E

    2008-01-01

    Background The USDA, Wildlife Services cooperative oral rabies vaccination (ORV) program uses a live vaccinia virus-vectored (genus Orthopoxvirus) vaccine, Raboral V-RG® (V-RG), to vaccinate specific wildlife species against rabies virus in several regions of the U.S. Several naturally occurring orthopoxviruses have been found in North America, including one isolated from asymptomatic raccoons (Procyon lotor). The effect of naturally occurring antibodies to orthopoxviruses on successful V-RG vaccination in raccoons is the focus of this study. Results Overall, raccoons pre-immunized (n = 10) with a recombinant raccoonpox virus vaccine (RCN-F1) responded to vaccination with V-RG with lower rabies virus neutralizing antibody (VNA) titers than those which were not pre-immunized (n = 10) and some failed to seroconvert for rabies VNA to detectable levels. Conclusion These results suggest that the success of some ORV campaigns may be hindered where raccoonpox virus or possibly other orthopoxvirus antibodies are common in wildlife species targeted for ORV. If these areas are identified, different vaccination strategies may be warranted. PMID:18834520

  9. Monoclonal antibody characterization of rabies virus strains isolated in the River Plate Basin.

    PubMed

    Delpietro, H A; Gury-Dhomen, F; Larghi, O P; Mena-Segura, C; Abramo, L

    1997-10-01

    In this study, 91 strains isolated in the River Plate Basin, South America, were examined from the epidemiological standpoint and with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to the nucleocapsid of rabies virus. Such strains reacted to MAbs in accordance with nine different patterns (antigenic variants). Rabies virus was isolated from 49 cattle, 21 dogs, 11 non-haematophagous bats, four vampire bats, two foxes, two horses, one buffalo, and one human. Five of the variants had not been described previously. It was also found that two cases of rabies in wild foxes (Cerdocyon thous) which had attacked persons in the Province of Chaco, Argentina, had been caused by variants from dog and vampire bat, while two cases in frugivorous bats (Artibeus lituratus) from Argentina and Brazil, had been infected by vampire bat variants. In addition, symptoms shown by cattle infected with strains which reacted as originating in canine vectors, differed from those observed in bovines from which the variants isolated corresponded to vampire bats.

  10. Detection of Rabies Virus Antigen in Dog Saliva Using a Latex Agglutination Test

    PubMed Central

    Kasempimolporn, S.; Saengseesom, W.; Lumlertdacha, B.; Sitprija, V.

    2000-01-01

    Dog bites are responsible for more than 90% of human rabies deaths in Asia. We developed a simple and inexpensive test based on latex agglutination (LA) for rabies virus antigen detection in dog saliva. Rabies virus antigen could be detected by agglutination on a glass slide using latex particles coated with gamma globulin. By evaluation of paired saliva-brain specimens from 238 dogs, the LA test using saliva was 99% specific and 95% sensitive compared to the fluorescent antibody test (FAT) on brain smears. The advantages of the LA test over the standard FAT are that it is comparatively simple and there is no need to kill the animal before examination. PMID:10921987

  11. [Rabies virus in naturally infected bats in the State of São Paulo, Southeastern Brazil].

    PubMed

    Scheffer, Karin Corrêa; Carrieri, Maria Luiza; Albas, Avelino; Santos, Helaine Cristina Pires dos; Kotait, Ivanete; Ito, Fumio Honma

    2007-06-01

    To identify the species of bats involved in maintaining the rabies cycle; to investigate the distribution of the rabies virus in the tissues and organs of bats and the time taken for mortality among inoculated mice. From April 2002 to November 2003, bats from municipalities in the State of São Paulo were screened for the presence of the rabies virus, by means of direct immunofluorescence. The virus distribution in the bats was evaluated by inoculating mice and N2A cells with 20% suspensions prepared from fragments of different organs and tissues, plus the brain and salivary glands. The time taken for mortality among the mice was monitored daily, following intracerebral inoculation. Out of the 4,395 bats received, 1.9% were found positive for the rabies virus. They belonged to ten genera, with predominance of insectivores. The maximum mean times taken for mortality among the mice following inoculation with brain and salivary gland material were 15.33+/-2.08 days and 11.33+/-2.30 days for vampire bats, 16.45+/-4.48 days and 18.91+/-6.12 days for insectivorous bats, and 12.60+/-2.13 days and 15.67+/-4.82 days for frugivorous bats, respectively. The species infected with the rabies virus were: Artibeus lituratus, Artibeus sp., Myotis nigricans, Myotis sp., Eptesicus sp., Lasiurus ega, Lasiurus cinereus, Nyctinomops laticaudatus, Tadarida brasiliensis, Histiotus velatus, Molossus rufus, Eumops sp. and Desmodus rotundus. Virus investigation in the different tissues and organs showed that the brain and salivary glands were the most suitable sites for virus isolation.

  12. Genetic tracking of the raccoon variant of rabies virus in eastern North America.

    PubMed

    Szanto, Annamaria G; Nadin-Davis, Susan A; Rosatte, Richard C; White, Bradley N

    2011-06-01

    To gain insight into the incursion of the raccoon variant of rabies into the raccoon population in three Canadian provinces, a collection of 192 isolates of the raccoon rabies virus (RRV) strain was acquired from across its North American range and was genetically characterized. A 516-nucleotide segment of the non-coding region between the G and L protein open reading frames, corresponding to the most variable region of the rabies virus genome, was sequenced. This analysis identified 119 different sequences, and phylogenetic analysis of the dataset supports the documented history of RRV spread. Three distinct geographically restricted RRV lineages were identified. Lineage 1 was found in Florida, Alabama and Georgia and appears to form the ancestral lineage of the raccoon variant of rabies. Lineage 2, represented by just two isolates, was found only in Florida, while the third lineage appears broadly distributed throughout the rest of the eastern United States and eastern Canada. In New York State, two distinct spatially segregated variants were identified; the one occupying the western and northern portions of the state was responsible for an incursion of raccoon rabies into the Canadian province of Ontario. Isolates from New Brunswick and Quebec form distinct, separate clusters, consistent with their independent origins from neighboring areas of the United States. The data are consistent with localized northward incursion into these three separate areas with no evidence of east-west viral movement between the three Canadian provinces.

  13. Rabies Virus in Bats, State of Pará, Brazil, 2005-2011.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Armando de Souza; Casseb, Livia Medeiros Neves; Barbosa, Taciana Fernandes Souza; Begot, Alberto Lopes; Brito, Roberto Messias Oliveira; Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando da Costa; Travassos da Rosa, Elizabeth Salbé

    2017-08-01

    Rabies is an acute, progressive zoonotic viral infection that in general produces a fatal outcome. This disease is responsible for deaths in humans and animals worldwide and, because it can affect all mammals, is considered one of the most important viral infections for public health. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of rabies in bats of different species found in municipalities of the state of Pará from 2005 to 2011. The rabies virus was detected in 12 (0.39%) bats in a total of 3100 analyzed, including hematophagous, frugivorous, and insectivorous bats. Of these, eleven were characterized as AgV3, which is characteristic of the hematophagous bat Desmodus rotundus (E. Geoffroy 1810); one insectivorous animal showed a different profile compatible with the Eptesicus pattern and may therefore be a new antigenic variant. This study identified the need for greater intensification of epidemiological surveillance in municipalities lacking rabies surveillance (silent areas); studies of rabies virus in bats with different alimentary habits, studies investigating the prevalence of AgV3, and prophylactic measures in areas where humans may be infected are also needed.

  14. Molecular inferences suggest multiple host shifts of rabies viruses from bats to mesocarnivores in Arizona during 2001-2009.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, Ivan V; Shi, Mang; Orciari, Lillian A; Yager, Pamela A; Velasco-Villa, Andres; Kuzmina, Natalia A; Streicker, Daniel G; Bergman, David L; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2012-01-01

    In nature, rabies virus (RABV; genus Lyssavirus, family Rhabdoviridae) represents an assemblage of phylogenetic lineages, associated with specific mammalian host species. Although it is generally accepted that RABV evolved originally in bats and further shifted to carnivores, mechanisms of such host shifts are poorly understood, and examples are rarely present in surveillance data. Outbreaks in carnivores caused by a RABV variant, associated with big brown bats, occurred repeatedly during 2001-2009 in the Flagstaff area of Arizona. After each outbreak, extensive control campaigns were undertaken, with no reports of further rabies cases in carnivores for the next several years. However, questions remained whether all outbreaks were caused by a single introduction and further perpetuation of bat RABV in carnivore populations, or each outbreak was caused by an independent introduction of a bat virus. Another question of concern was related to adaptive changes in the RABV genome associated with host shifts. To address these questions, we sequenced and analyzed 66 complete and 20 nearly complete RABV genomes, including those from the Flagstaff area and other similar outbreaks in carnivores, caused by bat RABVs, and representatives of the major RABV lineages circulating in North America and worldwide. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that each Flagstaff outbreak was caused by an independent introduction of bat RABV into populations of carnivores. Positive selection analysis confirmed the absence of post-shift changes in RABV genes. In contrast, convergent evolution analysis demonstrated several amino acids in the N, P, G and L proteins, which might be significant for pre-adaptation of bat viruses to cause effective infection in carnivores. The substitution S/T₂₄₂ in the viral glycoprotein is of particular merit, as a similar substitution was suggested for pathogenicity of Nishigahara RABV strain. Roles of the amino acid changes, detected in our study, require

  15. Efficiency of live attenuated and inactivated rabies viruses in prophylactic and post exposure vaccination against the street virus strain.

    PubMed

    Huang, F; Ahmad, W; Duan, M; Liu, Z; Guan, Z; Zhang, M; Qiao, B; Li, Y; Song, Y; Song, Y; Chen, Y; Amjad Ali, M

    2015-06-01

    Rabies remains an enigmatic and widely discussed global infectious disease and causes an increasing number of deaths. The currently used highly effective prophylactic and post exposure (p.e.) vaccination depends solely upon inexpensive, effective and safe vaccines to counteract the spread of the disease. In this study, the potential of an attenuated Chinese rabies vaccine (SRV9) strain in prophylactic and p.e. vaccination against the street strain of rabies virus (RV) was evaluated in mice. Prophylactic vaccination consisting of one intramuscular (i.m.) dose of SRV9 protected 100% of mice from intracerebral (i.c.) challenge with a lethal dose of the street virus. The latter was detected in the brain of mice at day 6 post challenge by RT-PCR. Post exposure vaccination was performed at days 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 post infection (p.i.) with either SRV9 or inactivated rabies vaccine. The survival rates after i.m. inoculation of SRV9 at the indicated days were 70%, 50%, 30%, 20%, 10%, and 0%, respectively; the corresponding survival rates for the inactivated rabies vaccine were 30%, 20%, 10%, 0%, 0%, and 0%, respectively. However, 100%, 90%, 70%, 50%, 20%, 10%, and 10% of mice survived after i.c. inoculation of SRV9 at the indicated days. The increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier and the infiltration of CD19+ B cells into the central nervous system after i.c. inoculation of SRV9 are regarded as prerequisites for the clearance of the street virus. The obtained data suggest that SRV9 is a promising candidate for prophylactic and p.e. vaccination against rabies infection and that it exhibits a potential for the control of rabies in China.

  16. Foreign Glycoproteins Can Be Actively Recruited to Virus Assembly Sites during Pseudotyping▿

    PubMed Central

    Jorgenson, Rebecca L.; Vogt, Volker M.; Johnson, Marc C.

    2009-01-01

    Retroviruses like human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), as well as many other enveloped viruses, can efficiently produce infectious virus in the absence of their own surface glycoprotein if a suitable glycoprotein from a foreign virus is expressed in the same cell. This process of complementation, known as pseudotyping, often can occur even when the glycoprotein is from an unrelated virus. Although pseudotyping is widely used for engineering chimeric viruses, it has remained unknown whether a virus can actively recruit foreign glycoproteins to budding sites or, alternatively, if a virus obtains the glycoproteins through a passive mechanism. We have studied the specificity of glycoprotein recruitment by immunogold labeling viral glycoproteins and imaging their distribution on the host plasma membrane using scanning electron microscopy. Expressed alone, all tested viral glycoproteins were relatively randomly distributed on the plasma membrane. However, in the presence of budding HIV-1 or Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) particles, some glycoproteins, such as those encoded by murine leukemia virus and vesicular stomatitis virus, were dramatically redistributed to viral budding sites. In contrast, the RSV Env glycoprotein was robustly recruited only to the homologous RSV budding sites. These data demonstrate that viral glycoproteins are not in preformed membrane patches prior to viral assembly but rather that glycoproteins are actively recruited to certain viral assembly sites. PMID:19224995

  17. [Viruses without boundaries--risk of rabies during travel].

    PubMed

    Hatz, Ch

    2003-10-01

    Rabies infection is a rare, but real threat to travellers and longterm residents in endemic areas. Preexposure vaccination is recommended for persons travelling to or staying in remote endemic areas, especially for children, as well as for professionally exposed persons in the field and in the laboratory. Three doses of a cell culture vaccine on days 0.7 and 21 or 28, followed by another dose on day 365, provide a basic protection which needs to be boostered by 2-3 doses after each potential rabies contact. Postexposure treatment includes thorough cleansing with soap, water and a disinfectant, and tetanus booster if needed. Cases without previous vaccination receive active plus passive protection from cell culture vaccine at days 0, 3, 7, 14 and 30, and preferably human rabies immune globulins (20 IU/kg BW) on day 0, injected around the site of the bite.

  18. Evidence of Rabies Virus Exposure among Humans in the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Amy T.; Petersen, Brett W.; Recuenco, Sergio; Niezgoda, Michael; Gómez, Jorge; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto; Rupprecht, Charles

    2012-01-01

    In May of 2010, two communities (Truenococha and Santa Marta) reported to be at risk of vampire bat depredation were surveyed in the Province Datem del Marañón in the Loreto Department of Perú. Risk factors for bat exposure included age less than or equal to 25 years and owning animals that had been bitten by bats. Rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (rVNAs) were detected in 11% (7 of 63) of human sera tested. Rabies virus ribonucleoprotein (RNP) immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies were detected in the sera of three individuals, two of whom were also seropositive for rVNA. Rabies virus RNP IgM antibodies were detected in one respondent with no evidence of rVNA or RNP IgG antibodies. Because one respondent with positive rVNA results reported prior vaccination and 86% (six of seven) of rVNA-positive respondents reported being bitten by bats, these data suggest nonfatal exposure of persons to rabies virus, which is likely associated with vampire bat depredation. PMID:22855749

  19. Evidence of rabies virus exposure among humans in the Peruvian Amazon.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Amy T; Petersen, Brett W; Recuenco, Sergio; Niezgoda, Michael; Gómez, Jorge; Laguna-Torres, V Alberto; Rupprecht, Charles

    2012-08-01

    In May of 2010, two communities (Truenococha and Santa Marta) reported to be at risk of vampire bat depredation were surveyed in the Province Datem del Marañón in the Loreto Department of Perú. Risk factors for bat exposure included age less than or equal to 25 years and owning animals that had been bitten by bats. Rabies virus neutralizing antibodies (rVNAs) were detected in 11% (7 of 63) of human sera tested. Rabies virus ribonucleoprotein (RNP) immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies were detected in the sera of three individuals, two of whom were also seropositive for rVNA. Rabies virus RNP IgM antibodies were detected in one respondent with no evidence of rVNA or RNP IgG antibodies. Because one respondent with positive rVNA results reported prior vaccination and 86% (six of seven) of rVNA-positive respondents reported being bitten by bats, these data suggest nonfatal exposure of persons to rabies virus, which is likely associated with vampire bat depredation.

  20. Pathogenicity of different rabies virus isolates and protection test in vaccinated mice.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Elenice M S; Nassar, Alessandra F C; Lara, Maria do Carmo C S H; Villalobos, Eliana C M; Sato, Go; Kobayashi, Yuki; Shoji, Youko; Itou, Takuya; Sakai, Takeo; Ito, Fumio H

    2010-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate and compare the pathogenicity of rabies virus isolated from bats and dogs, and to verify the efficacy of a commercial rabies vaccine against these isolates. For evaluation of pathogenicity, mice were inoculated by the intramuscular route (IM) with 500MICLD₅₀/0.03 mL of the viruses. The cross-protection test was performed by vaccinating groups of mice by the subcutaneous route and challenged through the intracerebral (IC) route. Isolates were fully pathogenic when inoculated by the IC route. When inoculated intramuscularly, the pathogenicity observed showed different death rates: 60.0% for the Desmodus rotundus isolate; 50.0% for dog and Nyctinomops laticaudatus isolates; 40.0% for Artibeus lituratus isolate; 9.5% Molossus molossus isolate; and 5.2% for the Eptesicus furinalis isolate. Mice receiving two doses of the vaccine and challenged by the IC route with the isolates were fully protected. Mice receiving only one dose of vaccine were partially protected against the dog isolate. The isolates from bats were pathogenic by the IC route in mice. However, when inoculated through the intramuscular route, the same isolates were found with different degrees of pathogenicity. The results of this work suggest that a commercial vaccine protects mice from infection with bat rabies virus isolates, in addition to a canine rabies virus isolate.

  1. Complete genome sequences of three rabies viruses isolated from rabid raccoon dogs and a cow in Korea.

    PubMed

    Oem, Jae-Ku; Kim, Seong-Hee; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Lee, Kyoung-Ki

    2013-12-01

    The complete genomes of three rabies viruses (BD0406CC, BV9901PJ, and 08F40) of two raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides koreensis) and a cow were determined. The genomic organization is typical of rabies viruses, and the open reading frames of the N, P, M, G, and L genes are 1,353, 894, 609, 1,575, and 6,384 bases in length, respectively. The full genome length of the three strains was 11,928 nucleotides, and the sequence similarity between the rabies viruses at the nucleotide level was 98.5-99.5%. Sequence comparisons indicated that these rabies viruses belong to the "Arctic and Arctic-like" group, with high homology to the Eurasian cluster. All Korean strains were clustered with the Mongolia strains, which belong to Arctic-like 1 clade. The 08F40 and BD0406CC strains were constructed with rabies virus strains isolated in Gangwon province. The BV9901PJ strain was closely related to strains isolated in Gyeonggi province in Korea. Three strains were more dependent upon geographical distribution and time period than host species. Complete genome sequencing of different host-origin rabies viruses will provide information that should contribute to understanding the transmission cycle and genetic variability of rabies from different hosts.

  2. Characterization of Lassa virus glycoprotein oligomerization and influence of cholesterol on virus replication.

    PubMed

    Schlie, Katrin; Maisa, Anna; Lennartz, Frank; Ströher, Ute; Garten, Wolfgang; Strecker, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Mature glycoprotein spikes are inserted in the Lassa virus envelope and consist of the distal subunit GP-1, the transmembrane-spanning subunit GP-2, and the signal peptide, which originate from the precursor glycoprotein pre-GP-C by proteolytic processing. In this study, we analyzed the oligomeric structure of the viral surface glycoprotein. Chemical cross-linking studies of mature glycoprotein spikes from purified virus revealed the formation of trimers. Interestingly, sucrose density gradient analysis of cellularly expressed glycoprotein showed that in contrast to trimeric mature glycoprotein complexes, the noncleaved glycoprotein forms monomers and oligomers spanning a wide size range, indicating that maturation cleavage of GP by the cellular subtilase SKI-1/S1P is critical for formation of the correct oligomeric state. To shed light on a potential relation between cholesterol and GP trimer stability, we performed cholesterol depletion experiments. Although depletion of cholesterol had no effect on trimerization of the glycoprotein spike complex, our studies revealed that the cholesterol content of the viral envelope is important for the infectivity of Lassa virus. Analyses of the distribution of viral proteins in cholesterol-rich detergent-resistant membrane areas showed that Lassa virus buds from membrane areas other than those responsible for impaired infectivity due to cholesterol depletion of lipid rafts. Thus, derivation of the viral envelope from cholesterol-rich membrane areas is not a prerequisite for the impact of cholesterol on virus infectivity.

  3. In vitro and in vivo inhibition of rabies virus replication by RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Durymanova Ono, Ekaterina A.; Iamamoto, Keila; Castilho, Juliana G.; Carnieli, Pedro; de Novaes Oliveira, Rafael; Achkar, Samira M.; Carrieri, Maria L.; Kotait, Ivanete; Brandão, Paulo E.

    2013-01-01

    Rabies is a zoonotic disease that affects all mammals and leads to more than 55,000 human deaths every year, caused by rabies virus (RABV) (Mononegavirales: Rhabdoviridae: Lyssavirus). Currently, human rabies treatment is based on the Milwaukee Protocol which consists on the induction of coma and massive antiviral therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the decrease in the titer of rabies virus both in vitro and in vivo using short-interfering RNAs. To this end, three siRNAs were used with antisense strands complementary to rabies virus nucleoprotein (N) mRNA. BHK-21 cells monolayers were infected with 1000 to 0.1 TCID50 of PV and after 2 hours the cells were transfected with each of tree RNAs in separate using Lipofectamine-2000. All three siRNAs reduced the titer of PV strain in a least 0.72 logTCID50/mL and no cytotoxic effect was observed in the monolayers treated with Lipofectamine-2000. Swiss albino mice infected with 10.000 to 1 LD of PV strain by the intracerebral route were also transfected after two hours of infection with a pool 3 siRNAs with Lipofectamine-2000 by the intracerebral route, resulting in a survival rate of 30% in mice inoculated with 100 LD50, while the same dose led to 100% mortality in untreated animals. Lipofectamine-2000 showed no toxic effect in control mice. These results suggest that intracerebral administration of siRNAs might be an effective antiviral strategy for rabies. PMID:24516427

  4. Multidisciplinary approach to epizootiology and pathogenesis of bat rabies viruses in the United States.

    PubMed

    Ellison, J A; Johnson, S R; Kuzmina, N; Gilbert, A; Carson, W C; VerCauteren, K C; Rupprecht, C E

    2013-02-01

    Zoonotic disease surveillance is typically initiated after an animal pathogen has caused disease in humans. Early detection of potentially high-risk pathogens within animal hosts may facilitate medical interventions to cope with an emerging disease. To effectively spillover to a novel host, a pathogen may undergo genetic changes resulting in varying transmission potential in the new host and potentially to humans. Rabies virus (RABV) is one model pathogen to consider for studying the dynamics of emerging infectious diseases under both laboratory and field conditions. The evolutionary history of RABV is characterized by regularly documented spillover infections and a series of notable host shifts. Within this context, enhanced field surveillance to improve detection of spillover infections will require validated techniques to non-invasively differentiate infected from non-infected individuals. In this study, we evaluate the use of infrared thermography to detect thermal changes associated with experimental RABV infection in big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) in a captive colony. Our results indicated that 62% of rabid bats had detectable facial temperature decreases (-4.6°C, SD ± 2.5) compared with pre-inoculation baseline values. These data suggest potential utility for discriminating rabid bats in natural field settings. In addition, focusing upon RABV circulating in the United States between 2008 and 2011, we confirmed spillover events of bat RABV among carnivores and identified cross-species transmission events caused by four lineages of RABV associated with insectivorous bats. Additionally, our analysis of RABV glycoprotein sequences identified substitutions in antigenic sites that may affect neutralizing activity associated with monoclonal antibodies proposed for use in human post-exposure prophylaxis. This study provides a glimpse into RABV pathobiology and spillover dynamics among and between bats and a variety of mesocarnivores.

  5. Government Response to the Discovery of a Rabies Virus Reservoir Species on a Previously Designated Rabies-Free Island, Taiwan, 1999-2014.

    PubMed

    Chang, S-S; Tsai, H-J; Chang, F-Y; Lee, T-S; Huang, K-C; Fang, K-Y; Wallace, R M; Inoue, S; Fei, C-Y

    2016-08-01

    Taiwan had been considered rabies free since 1961. In 2013, Taiwan confirmed the detection of rabies virus in wild Taiwan ferret-badgers. Up to December 2014, there have been 423 rabies-confirmed ferret-badgers and three cases of spillover infection into non-reservoir hosts. Genetic analysis indicates that TFBV is distinct from all other known rabies virus variants. To date, ferret-badger rabies is known to occur only in China and Taiwan. The temporal dynamics of rabid ferret-badgers in Taiwan suggests that the epizootic appears to have subsided to enzootic levels as of December 2014. According to the current epidemiologic data, there is only one TFBV strain in Taiwan. TFBV is still sequestered to the mountainous regions. Humans are at risk mainly through exposure to the virus from infected domestic meso-carnivores, mainly dogs and cats. Dogs and cats should be vaccinated to establish an immunological barrier to stop the spread of the disease from mountainous regions to domestic meso-carnivores. © 2015 The Authors. Zoonoses and Public Health Published by Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Roles of the Rabies Virus Phosphoprotein Isoforms in Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Kazuma; Ito, Naoto; Yamaoka, Satoko; Masatani, Tatsunori; Ebihara, Hideki; Goto, Hideo; Nakagawa, Kento; Mitake, Hiromichi; Okadera, Kota

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rabies virus (RABV) P gene mRNA encodes five in-frame start codons, resulting in expression of full-length P protein (P1) and N-terminally truncated P proteins (tPs), designated P2, P3, P4, and P5. Despite the fact that some tPs are known as interferon (IFN) antagonists, the importance of tPs in the pathogenesis of RABV is still unclear. In this study, to examine whether tPs contribute to pathogenesis, we exploited a reverse genetics approach to generate CE(NiP)ΔP2-5, a mutant of pathogenic CE(NiP) in which the P gene was mutated by replacing all of the start codons (AUG) for tPs with AUA. We confirmed that while CE(NiP) expresses detectable levels of P2 and P3, CE(NiP)ΔP2-5 has an impaired ability to express these tPs. After intramuscular inoculation, CE(NiP)ΔP2-5 caused significantly lower morbidity and mortality rates in mice than did CE(NiP), indicating that tPs play a critical role in RABV neuroinvasiveness. Further examinations revealed that this less neuroinvasive phenotype of CE(NiP)ΔP2-5 correlates with its impaired ability to replicate in muscle cells, indicative of the importance of tPs in viral replication in muscle cells. We also demonstrated that CE(NiP)ΔP2-5 infection induced a higher level of Ifn-β gene expression in muscle cells than did CE(NiP) infection, consistent with the results of an IFN-β promoter reporter assay suggesting that all tPs function to antagonize IFN induction in muscle cells. Taken together, our findings strongly suggest that tPs promote viral replication in muscle cells through their IFN antagonist activities and thereby support infection of peripheral nerves. IMPORTANCE Despite the fact that previous studies have demonstrated that P2 and P3 of RABV have IFN antagonist activities, the actual importance of tPs in pathogenesis has remained unclear. Here, we provide the first evidence that tPs contribute to the pathogenesis of RABV, especially its neuroinvasiveness. Our results also show the mechanism underlying

  7. New isolations of the rabies-related Mokola virus from South Africa.

    PubMed

    Coertse, Jessica; Markotter, Wanda; le Roux, Kevin; Stewart, Daniel; Sabeta, Claude T; Nel, Louis H

    2017-01-31

    Mokola virus (MOKV) is a rabies-related lyssavirus and appears to be exclusive to the African continent. Only 24 cases of MOKV, which includes two human cases, have been reported since its identification in 1968. MOKV has an unknown reservoir host and current commercial vaccines do not confer protection against MOKV. We describe three new isolations of MOKV from domestic cats in South Africa. Two cases were retrospectively identified from 2012 and an additional one in 2014. These cases emphasize the generally poor surveillance for rabies-related lyssaviruses and our inadequate comprehension of the epidemiology and ecology of Mokola lyssavirus per se.

  8. Intracellular processing of the Newcastle disease virus fusion glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, T.; Ward, L.J.; Semerjian, A.

    1985-03-01

    The fusion glycoprotein (Fo) of Newcastle disease virus is cleaved at an intracellular site into F1 and F2. This result was confirmed by comparing the transit time of the fusion protein to the cell surface with the time course of cleavage of Fo. The time required for cleavage of half of the pulse-labeled Fo protein is ca. 40 min faster than the half time of the transit of the fusion protein to the cell surface. To determine the cell compartment in which cleavage occurs, use was made of inhibitors which block glycoprotein migration at specific points and posttranslational modifications known to occur in specific cell membranes. Cleavage of Fo is inhibited by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone; thus, cleavage does not occur in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. Monensin blocks the incorporation of Newcastle disease virus glycoproteins into virions and blocks the cleavage of the fusion glycoprotein. However, Fo cannot be radioactively labeled with (/sup 3/H) fucose, whereas F1 is readily labeled. These results argue that cleavage occurs in the trans Golgi membranes or in a cell compartment occupied by glycoproteins quite soon after their transit through the trans Golgi membranes. The implications of the results presented for the transit times of the fusion protein between subcellular organelles are discussed.

  9. Genetic divergence of rabies viruses from bat species of Colorado, USA.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Vidya; Orciari, Lillian A; De Mattos, Cecilia; Kuzmin, Ivan V; Pape, W John; O'Shea, Thomas J; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2005-01-01

    Molecular epidemiological studies have linked many cryptic human rabies cases in the United States with exposure to rabies virus (RV) variants associated with insectivorous bats. In Colorado, bats accounted for 98% of all reported animal rabies cases between 1977 and 1996. The genetic divergence of RV was investigated in bat and terrestrial animal specimens that were submitted for rabies diagnosis to the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE), Colorado, USA. RV isolates from animal specimens across the United States were also included in the analysis. Phylogenetic analyses were performed on partial nucleoprotein (N) gene sequences, which revealed seven principal clades. RV associated with the colonial big brown bat, Eptesicus fuscus, an bats of the genus Myotis were found to segregate into two distinct clades (I and IV). Clade I was harbored by E. fuscus and Myotis species, but was also identified in terrestrial animals such as domestic cats and striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis). Clade IV was divided into subclades IVA, IVB, and IVC; IVA was identified in E. fuscus, and Myotis species bats, and also in a fox; subclades IVB and IVC circulated predominantly in E. fuscus. Clade II was formed by big free-tailed bat (Nyctinomops macrotis) and striped skunk (Mephitis mephitis) samples. Clade III included RVs that are maintained by generally solitary, migratory bats such as the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans) and bats of the genus Lasiurus. Big brown bats were found to harbor this RV variant. None of the Colorado specimens segregated with clades V and VII that harbor RVs associated with terrestrial animals. Different species of bats had the same RV variant, indicating active inter-species rabies transmission. In Colorado, animal rabies occurs principally in bats, and the identification of bat RVs in cat, gray fox Urocyon cinereoargenteus), and striped skunks demonstrated the importance of rabies spillover from bats to domestic and

  10. Short interfering RNAs targeting a vampire-bat related rabies virus phosphoprotein mRNA.

    PubMed

    Ono, Ekaterina Alexandrovna Durymanova; Taniwaki, Sueli Akemi; Brandão, Paulo

    The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro and in vivo effects of short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) against rabies virus phosphoprotein (P) mRNA in a post-infection treatment for rabies as an extension of a previous report (Braz J Microbiol. 2013 Nov 15;44(3):879-82). To this end, rabies virus strain RABV-4005 (related to the Desmodus rotundus vampire bat) were used to inoculate BHK-21 cells and mice, and the transfection with each of the siRNAs was made with Lipofectamine-2000™. In vitro results showed that siRNA 360 was able to inhibit the replication of strain RABV-4005 with a 1log decrease in virus titter and 5.16-fold reduction in P mRNA, 24h post-inoculation when compared to non-treated cells. In vivo, siRNA 360 was able to induce partial protection, but with no significant difference when compared to non-treated mice. These results indicate that, despite the need for improvement for in vivo applications, P mRNA might be a target for an RNAi-based treatment for rabies. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of a modified shell vial culture procedure with conventional mouse inoculation for rabies virus isolation.

    PubMed

    Ribas Antúnez, María de los Angeles; Girón, Blanca; Monsalvez, Iraima; Morier, Luis; Acosta, Gretel; Tejero, Yahisel; Cordero, Yanislet; Piedra, Dainelyd

    2013-04-01

    Rabies is a neurotropic disease that is often lethal. The early diagnosis of rabies infection is important and requires methods that allow for the isolation of the virus from animals and humans. The present study compared a modified shell vial (MSV) procedure using 24-well tissue culture plates with the mouse inoculation test (MIT), which is considered the gold standard for rabies virus isolation. Thirty brain samples (25 positive and 5 negative by the fluorescent antibody test) obtained from different animal species at the National Institute of Hygiene Rafael Rangel in Caracas, Venezuela, were studied by the MIT and MSV assays. Nine samples (36%) were positive at 24 h, 10 (40%) were positive at 48 h and six (24%) were positive at 72 h by the MSV assay. With the MIT assay, 76% were positive at six days post inoculation and 12% were positive at 12 and 18 days post inoculation. One sample that was negative according to the MSV assay was positive with MIT on the 12th day. The MSV procedure exhibited a sensitivity of 96.2%, a specificity of 100%, a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value 80%. This procedure allowed for rapid rabies virus detection. MIT can be employed as an alternative method in laboratories without tissue culture facilities.

  12. A new phylogenetic lineage of rabies virus associated with western pipistrelle bats (Pipistrellus hesperus).

    PubMed

    Franka, Richard; Constantine, Denny G; Kuzmin, Ivan; Velasco-Villa, Andres; Reeder, Serena A; Streicker, Daniel; Orciari, Lillian A; Wong, Anna J; Blanton, Jesse D; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2006-08-01

    Bats represent the major source of human rabies cases in the New World. In the USA, most cases are associated with species that are not commonly found or reported rabid. To understand better the epidemiology and public health significance of potentially important bat species, a molecular study was performed on samples collected from naturally infected rabid western pipistrelle (Pipistrellus hesperus), eastern pipistrelle (Pipistrellus subflavus) and silver-haired bats (Lasionycteris noctivagans) from different regions of their geographical distribution in the USA. A 264 bp fragment at the 5' end of the N gene coding region was sequenced and analysed in comparison with rabies virus variants circulating within other North American mammals. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that P. hesperus bats maintain a unique rabies virus variant. Preliminary data also suggest that P. subflavus and Lasionycteris noctivagans may harbour two different rabies virus variants (Ps and Ln) that are likely to be maintained independently by each bat species, which recently appear to have emerged as major vectors of human disease.

  13. Rabies veterinary virus vaccine produced in BHK-21 cells grown on microcarriers in a bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Gallegos Gallegos, R M; Espinosa Larios, E L; Ramos Ramírez, L; Kretschmer Schmid, R; Aguilar Setién, A

    1995-01-01

    BHK-21 cells were grown in microcarriers in the CELLIGEN CL 50 bioreactor to produce a stock of rabies veterinary virus vaccine PV (Pasteur virus) strain. Perfusion mode operation of this bioreactor produced between two- and fourfold larger yields (cells/ml) than traditional stationary cell culture systems (i.e., Blake, and Roller bottles or cell factory multitrays). The method employed harvested 281 of rabies virus in 200 h (infectivity titer 0.6 +/- 1.4 x 10(7) LD50 per ml) in a single operation. The risk of contamination is thus reduced when compared with traditional stationary methods which, in order to obtain the same amount of virus, would require the operation of 285 Blake bottles, or 143 Roller bottles, or 15 Cell Factory multitrays (10 trays). By perfusion mode operation of the bioreactor, 89% of the cell culture medium was recovered as vaccinal virus, which contrasts with the yield of only 50-59% using traditional cell culture systems. On the other hand, only 925 ml of fetal serum was required to obtain the 281 of rabies virus harvest as compared to the 3420 ml required by traditional methods.

  14. The importance of immune evasion in the pathogenesis of rabies virus

    PubMed Central

    ITO, Naoto; MOSELEY, Gregory W.; SUGIYAMA, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Rabies is a zoonotic disease caused by the Lyssavirus rabies virus (RABV) that can infect most mammals, including humans, where it has a case-fatality rate of almost 100%. Although preventable by vaccination, rabies causes c. 59,000 human fatalities every year worldwide. Thus, there exists an urgent need to establish an effective therapy and/or improve dissemination of vaccines for humans and animals. These outcomes require greater understanding of the mechanisms of RABV pathogenesis to identify new molecular targets for the development of therapeutics and/or live vaccines with high levels of safety. Importantly, a number of studies in recent years have indicated that RABV specifically suppresses host immunity through diverse mechanisms and that this is a key process in pathogenicity. Here, we review current understanding of immune modulation by RABV, with an emphasis on its significance to pathogenicity and the potential exploitation of this knowledge to develop new vaccines and antivirals. PMID:27041139

  15. Characterization and mapping of a nonessential pseudorabies virus glycoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Wathen, M.W.; Wathen, L.M.K.

    1986-04-01

    Antigenic variants of pseudorabies virus (PRV) containing mutations in a viral glycoprotein with a molecular weight of 82,000 (gIII) were isolated by selecting for resistance to a complement-dependent neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MCA82-2) directed against gIII. These mutants were completely resistant to neutralization with MCA82-2 in the presence of complement. Two mutants selected for further studies either did not express gIII or expressed an improperly processed form of the glycoproteins. The mutations were also associated with an altered plaque morphology (syncytium formation). The gIII gene was mapped by the marker rescue of a gIII/sup -/ mutant with cloned restriction enzyme fragments to the long unique region of the PRV genome between 0.376 and 0.383 map units. This corresponds to the map location of a glycoprotein described by Robbins et al. Since gIII is nonessential for viral replication in cell culture and has several other characteristics in common with the herpes simplex virus glycoprotein gC, gIII may represent the PRV equivalent to herpes simplex virus gC.

  16. Three-year rabies duration of immunity in dogs following vaccination with a core combination vaccine against canine distemper virus, canine adenovirus type-1, canine parvovirus, and rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Nallakannu; Gore, Thomas C; Duncan, Karen L; Coyne, Michael J; Lum, Melissa A; Sterner, Frank J

    2006-01-01

    Thirty-two seronegative pups were vaccinated at 8 weeks of age with modified-live canine distemper virus (CDV), canine adenovirus type-2 (CAV-2), and canine parvovirus (CPV) vaccine and at 12 weeks with a modified-live CDV, CAV-2, CPV, and killed rabies virus vaccine. An additional 31 seronegative pups served as age-matched, nonvaccinated controls. All test dogs were strictly isolated for 3 years after receiving the second vaccination and then were challenged with virulent rabies virus. Clinical signs of rabies were prevented in 28 (88%) of the 32 vaccinated dogs. In contrast, 97% (30 of 31) of the control dogs died of rabies infection. These study results indicated that no immunogenic interference occurred between the modified-live vaccine components and the killed rabies virus component. Furthermore, these results indicated that the rabies component in the test vaccine provided protection against virulent rabies challenge in dogs 12 weeks of age or older for a minimum of 3 years following vaccination.

  17. Rapid detection of rabies virus by reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Boldbaatar, Bazartseren; Inoue, Satoshi; Sugiura, Naoko; Noguchi, Akira; Orbina, Jun Ryan C; Demetria, Catalino; Miranda, Mary Elizabeth; Yamada, Akio

    2009-05-01

    In this study, reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) was established which can detect 10(3) copies of viral RNA corresponding to approximately 5 fg of RNA. RT-LAMP with the Phil primer set designed according to the nucleotide sequences obtained from a Kyoto patient who contracted rabies in the Philippines was able to amplify all 16 street viral sequences derived from the Philippines. The specificity of RT-LAMP products was easily confirmed by digestion with RsaI restriction enzyme. The reaction of RT-LAMP could be completed within 1 h and could be conducted under isothermal conditions using a conventional water bath or heat blocks, indicating that RT-LAMP is ideal for the diagnosis of rabies in developing countries. Although further study is required to establish more universal RT-LAMP primers applicable to viruses from other regions or countries, the fast, easy, simple, sensitive and specific RT-LAMP method established here might be useful for rabies diagnosis and can facilitate studies of rabies epidemiology where rabies is enzootic, particularly in developing countries.

  18. Ecological Potential for Rabies Virus Transmission via Scavenging of Dead Bats by Mesocarnivores.

    PubMed

    Theimer, Tad C; Dyer, Annie C; Keeley, Brian W; Gilbert, Amy T; Bergman, David L

    2017-01-17

    Multiple species of bats are reservoirs of rabies virus in the Americas and are occasionally the source of spillover infections into mesocarnivore species. Although rabies transmission generally is assumed to occur via bite, laboratory studies have demonstrated the potential for rabies transmission via ingestion of rabid animals. We investigated the ecological potential for this mode of transmission by assessing mesocarnivore scavenging behavior of dead bats in suburban habitats of Flagstaff, Arizona. In autumn 2013, summer 2014, and autumn 2015, we placed 104 rabies-negative bat carcasses either near buildings, in wildland areas, or in residential yards and then monitored them with trail cameras for 5 d. Overall, 52 (50%) bat carcasses were scavenged, with 39 (75%) of those scavenged by striped skunks ( Mephitis mephitis ). Within our study area, striped skunks had a higher ecological potential to contract rabies via ingestion of bat carcasses compared to other mesocarnivore species, due both to a greater number of encounters and a higher probability of ingestion per encounter (91%), and they were significantly more likely to approach bat carcasses in yards than in wildland areas. Raccoons ( Procyon lotor ) and gray foxes ( Urocyon cinereoargenteus ) had fewer encounters (nine and 13, respectively) and lower probability of ingesting bats (33 and 8%, respectively).

  19. Elucidating the phylodynamics of endemic rabies virus in eastern Africa using whole-genome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Brunker, Kirstyn; Marston, Denise A; Horton, Daniel L; Cleaveland, Sarah; Fooks, Anthony R; Kazwala, Rudovick; Ngeleja, Chanasa; Lembo, Tiziana; Sambo, Maganga; Mtema, Zacharia J; Sikana, Lwitiko; Wilkie, Gavin; Biek, Roman; Hampson, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Many of the pathogens perceived to pose the greatest risk to humans are viral zoonoses, responsible for a range of emerging and endemic infectious diseases. Phylogeography is a useful tool to understand the processes that give rise to spatial patterns and drive dynamics in virus populations. Increasingly, whole-genome information is being used to uncover these patterns, but the limits of phylogenetic resolution that can be achieved with this are unclear. Here, whole-genome variation was used to uncover fine-scale population structure in endemic canine rabies virus circulating in Tanzania. This is the first whole-genome population study of rabies virus and the first comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of rabies virus in East Africa, providing important insights into rabies transmission in an endemic system. In addition, sub-continental scale patterns of population structure were identified using partial gene data and used to determine population structure at larger spatial scales in Africa. While rabies virus has a defined spatial structure at large scales, increasingly frequent levels of admixture were observed at regional and local levels. Discrete phylogeographic analysis revealed long-distance dispersal within Tanzania, which could be attributed to human-mediated movement, and we found evidence of multiple persistent, co-circulating lineages at a very local scale in a single district, despite on-going mass dog vaccination campaigns. This may reflect the wider endemic circulation of these lineages over several decades alongside increased admixture due to human-mediated introductions. These data indicate that successful rabies control in Tanzania could be established at a national level, since most dispersal appears to be restricted within the confines of country borders but some coordination with neighbouring countries may be required to limit transboundary movements. Evidence of complex patterns of rabies circulation within Tanzania necessitates the use of whole

  20. Elucidating the phylodynamics of endemic rabies virus in eastern Africa using whole-genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Brunker, Kirstyn; Marston, Denise A; Horton, Daniel L; Cleaveland, Sarah; Fooks, Anthony R; Kazwala, Rudovick; Ngeleja, Chanasa; Lembo, Tiziana; Sambo, Maganga; Mtema, Zacharia J; Sikana, Lwitiko; Wilkie, Gavin; Biek, Roman; Hampson, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Many of the pathogens perceived to pose the greatest risk to humans are viral zoonoses, responsible for a range of emerging and endemic infectious diseases. Phylogeography is a useful tool to understand the processes that give rise to spatial patterns and drive dynamics in virus populations. Increasingly, whole-genome information is being used to uncover these patterns, but the limits of phylogenetic resolution that can be achieved with this are unclear. Here, whole-genome variation was used to uncover fine-scale population structure in endemic canine rabies virus circulating in Tanzania. This is the first whole-genome population study of rabies virus and the first comprehensive phylogenetic analysis of rabies virus in East Africa, providing important insights into rabies transmission in an endemic system. In addition, sub-continental scale patterns of population structure were identified using partial gene data and used to determine population structure at larger spatial scales in Africa. While rabies virus has a defined spatial structure at large scales, increasingly frequent levels of admixture were observed at regional and local levels. Discrete phylogeographic analysis revealed long-distance dispersal within Tanzania, which could be attributed to human-mediated movement, and we found evidence of multiple persistent, co-circulating lineages at a very local scale in a single district, despite on-going mass dog vaccination campaigns. This may reflect the wider endemic circulation of these lineages over several decades alongside increased admixture due to human-mediated introductions. These data indicate that successful rabies control in Tanzania could be established at a national level, since most dispersal appears to be restricted within the confines of country borders but some coordination with neighbouring countries may be required to limit transboundary movements. Evidence of complex patterns of rabies circulation within Tanzania necessitates the use of whole

  1. Ultra-deep sequencing of intra-host rabies virus populations during cross-species transmission.

    PubMed

    Borucki, Monica K; Chen-Harris, Haiyin; Lao, Victoria; Vanier, Gilda; Wadford, Debra A; Messenger, Sharon; Allen, Jonathan E

    2013-11-01

    One of the hurdles to understanding the role of viral quasispecies in RNA virus cross-species transmission (CST) events is the need to analyze a densely sampled outbreak using deep sequencing in order to measure the amount of mutation occurring on a small time scale. In 2009, the California Department of Public Health reported a dramatic increase (350) in the number of gray foxes infected with a rabies virus variant for which striped skunks serve as a reservoir host in Humboldt County. To better understand the evolution of rabies, deep-sequencing was applied to 40 unpassaged rabies virus samples from the Humboldt outbreak. For each sample, approximately 11 kb of the 12 kb genome was amplified and sequenced using the Illumina platform. Average coverage was 17,448 and this allowed characterization of the rabies virus population present in each sample at unprecedented depths. Phylogenetic analysis of the consensus sequence data demonstrated that samples clustered according to date (1995 vs. 2009) and geographic location (northern vs. southern). A single amino acid change in the G protein distinguished a subset of northern foxes from a haplotype present in both foxes and skunks, suggesting this mutation may have played a role in the observed increased transmission among foxes in this region. Deep-sequencing data indicated that many genetic changes associated with the CST event occurred prior to 2009 since several nonsynonymous mutations that were present in the consensus sequences of skunk and fox rabies samples obtained from 20032010 were present at the sub-consensus level (as rare variants in the viral population) in skunk and fox samples from 1995. These results suggest that analysis of rare variants within a viral population may yield clues to ancestral genomes and identify rare variants that have the potential to be selected for if environment conditions change.

  2. Evidence of two distinct phylogenetic lineages of dog rabies virus circulating in Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Mey, Channa; Metlin, Artem; Duong, Veasna; Ong, Sivuth; In, Sotheary; Horwood, Paul F; Reynes, Jean-Marc; Bourhy, Hervé; Tarantola, Arnaud; Buchy, Philippe

    2016-03-01

    This first extensive retrospective study of the molecular epidemiology of dog rabies in Cambodia included 149 rabies virus (RABV) entire nucleoprotein sequences obtained from 1998-2011. The sequences were analyzed in conjunction with RABVs from other Asian countries. Phylogenetic reconstruction confirmed the South-East Asian phylogenetic clade comprising viruses from Cambodia, Vietnam, Thailand, Laos and Myanmar. The present study represents the first attempt to classify the phylogenetic lineages inside this clade, resulting in the confirmation that all the Cambodian viruses belonged to the South-East Asian (SEA) clade. Three distinct phylogenetic lineages in the region were established with the majority of viruses from Cambodia closely related to viruses from Thailand, Laos and Vietnam, forming the geographically widespread phylogenetic lineage SEA1. A South-East Asian lineage SEA2 comprised two viruses from Cambodia was identified, which shared a common ancestor with RABVs originating from Laos. Viruses from Myanmar formed separate phylogenetic lineages within the major SEA clade. Bayesian molecular clock analysis suggested that the time to most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of all Cambodian RABVs dated to around 1950. The TMRCA of the Cambodian SEA1 lineage was around 1964 and that of the SEA2 lineage was around 1953. The results identified three phylogenetically distinct and geographically separated lineages inside the earlier identified major SEA clade, covering at least five countries in the region. A greater understanding of the molecular epidemiology of rabies in South-East Asia is an important step to monitor progress on the efforts to control canine rabies in the region.

  3. The effect of neurotoxin on rabies virus binding to mouse neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Briggs, D J; Phillips, R M

    1991-08-01

    Mouse neuroblastoma cells were exposed to alpha bungarotoxin, a neurotoxin known to inhibit rabies virus binding to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor located at the neuromuscular junction in muscle tissue. The total amount of 3H-CVS virus that bound to neurotoxin treated cells was separated into specific and non-specific binding using a cold competition assay. Comparison of untreated and neurotoxin treated cells demonstrated that the majority of cell-associated virus in untreated cells was of a specific nature whereas the majority of the cell-associated virus in neurotoxin treated cells was due to non-specific binding.

  4. An update on safety studies of SAD B19 rabies virus vaccine in target and non-target species.

    PubMed Central

    Vos, A.; Neubert, A.; Aylan, O.; Schuster, P.; Pommerening, E.; Müller, T.; Chivatsi, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    SAD B19 is an attenuated vaccine virus for oral vaccination of carnivores against rabies. The safety of SAD B19 was investigated in 16 animal species by different routes of administration. During the observation period all animals given the vaccine virus, irrespective of the route of administration, did not show any clinical signs of rabies, with the exception of certain rodent species. In these animals a low residual pathogenicity was observed, however transmission of the vaccine virus to control animals was not demonstrable. No vaccine virus could be detected in the saliva of the six mammal species examined. Furthermore, the genetical stability was shown for SAD B19 through passaging in neural tissue of dogs, foxes and mice. From the results presented here on innocuity and stability, it can be concluded that SAD B19 rabies vaccine is suitable for oral vaccination campaigns for carnivores against rabies. PMID:10487653

  5. Cross-reactivity between herpes simplex virus glycoprotein B and a 63,000-dalton varicella-zoster virus envelope glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Edson, C M; Hosler, B A; Respess, R A; Waters, D J; Thorley-Lawson, D A

    1985-01-01

    Cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies recognizing both herpes simplex virus (HSV) glycoprotein B and a major 63,000-dalton varicella-zoster virus (VZV) envelope glycoprotein were isolated and found to neutralize VZV infection in vitro. None of the other VZV glycoproteins was recognized by any polyclonal anti-HSV serum tested. These results demonstrate that HSV glycoprotein B and the 63,000-dalton VZV glycoprotein share antigenic epitopes and raise the possibility that these two proteins have a similar function in infection. Images PMID:2993665

  6. Detection of rabies viral RNA by TaqMan real-time RT-PCR using non-neural specimens from dogs infected with rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Wacharapluesadee, Supaporn; Tepsumethanon, Veera; Supavonwong, Pornpun; Kaewpom, Thongchai; Intarut, Nirun; Hemachudha, Thiravat

    2012-09-01

    To determine the burden of rabies in developing countries, a reliable and accurate diagnostic test for the examination of the brains of animals is needed. Recently, the number of samples and carcasses submitted to rabies diagnostic units has been declining. Methods for obtaining tissues from different regions of the brain are even more difficult, and direct florescent antibody examination may fail if the samples decomposed. The spread of rabies virus to peripheral non-nervous tissues starts early during the pre-clinical phase. It has been shown that saliva and skin biopsies taken at the neck and containing hair follicles can be used in the ante-mortem diagnosis of rabies in humans. Obtaining oral swab samples, whisker or hair follicles from the heads of canines is easy and practical and can be performed without special equipment. The objective of this study was to determine whether these non-neural specimens can be used for the detection of rabies viral RNA. The RNAs extracted from these specimens were tested using a real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The sensitivity of the TaqMan real-time RT-PCR analysis using samples from dogs confirmed to be infected with rabies virus was 84.6% (55/65), 81.8% (54/66) and 66.7% (44/66) when using oral swab samples, extracted whisker follicles and extracted hair follicles; the specificity of all specimen types was 100%. The negative predictive values were 77.8%, 74.4% and 61.4%, respectively. Although the rate of positivity when combining the three non-neural specimen types was increased to 86.4%, this level of sensitivity was not sufficient to help physicians whether to administer post exposure prophylaxis. However, these oral swab and whisker specimens may serve to enhance epidemiological surveillance; such data will contribute in the planning of rabies control programs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence of rabies virus infection and rabies antibody in stray dogs: a survey in Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Kasempimolporn, S; Sichanasai, B; Saengseesom, W; Puempumpanich, S; Chatraporn, S; Sitprija, V

    2007-03-17

    To investigate the rabies antigen and antibody prevalences among stray dogs in Bangkok, Thailand, we took both a saliva and serum sample from each of 3314 stray dogs captured once each between December 2003 and June 2004. One 2-year-old female was antigen positive in the latex-agglutination test and confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The overall antibody seroprevalence from the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that we used was 62% (95% CI: 54, 70%). Antibody seroprevalence was greater for dogs captured within central Bangkok (86% of 1208 dogs captured) than in the dogs captured in the outskirts of the greater metropolitan area (49% of 2106 dogs captured). If our samples of stray dogs are representative, then the seroprevalence achieved from previous vaccination campaigns is too low to protect the dog and human populations.

  8. [Comparative study of the susceptibility of suckling and adult mice used for the isolation of rabies virus from the saliva of dogs with natural rabies].

    PubMed

    Côrtes, V de A; Côrtes, J de A; Vasconcellos, S A; Ito, F H; Rozas, C E; Nilsson, M R; Paim, G V

    1979-01-01

    Forty two saliva samples from rabid dogs were examined by intracerebral inoculation of weanling and suckling mice. Although rabies virus assay were successful in all of the samples in both groups of mice used, a significant higher death proportion (p < 0.01) were observed in the suckling mice group.

  9. Emerging Technologies for the Detection of Rabies Virus: Challenges and Hopes in the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Fooks, Anthony R.; Johnson, Nicholas; Freuling, Conrad M.; Wakeley, Philip R.; Banyard, Ashley C.; McElhinney, Lorraine M.; Marston, Denise A.; Dastjerdi, Akbar; Wright, Edward; Weiss, Robin A.; Müller, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis of rabies is routinely based on clinical and epidemiological information, especially when exposures are reported in rabies-endemic countries. Diagnostic tests using conventional assays that appear to be negative, even when undertaken late in the disease and despite the clinical diagnosis, have a tendency, at times, to be unreliable. These tests are rarely optimal and entirely dependent on the nature and quality of the sample supplied. In the course of the past three decades, the application of molecular biology has aided in the development of tests that result in a more rapid detection of rabies virus. These tests enable viral strain identification from clinical specimens. Currently, there are a number of molecular tests that can be used to complement conventional tests in rabies diagnosis. Indeed the challenges in the 21st century for the development of rabies diagnostics are not of a technical nature; these tests are available now. The challenges in the 21st century for diagnostic test developers are two-fold: firstly, to achieve internationally accepted validation of a test that will then lead to its acceptance by organisations globally. Secondly, the areas of the world where such tests are needed are mainly in developing regions where financial and logistical barriers prevent their implementation. Although developing countries with a poor healthcare infrastructure recognise that molecular-based diagnostic assays will be unaffordable for routine use, the cost/benefit ratio should still be measured. Adoption of rapid and affordable rabies diagnostic tests for use in developing countries highlights the importance of sharing and transferring technology through laboratory twinning between the developed and the developing countries. Importantly for developing countries, the benefit of molecular methods as tools is the capability for a differential diagnosis of human diseases that present with similar clinical symptoms. Antemortem testing for human

  10. Genetic characterization and geographic distribution of rabies virus isolates in Brazil: identification of two reservoirs, dogs and vampire bats.

    PubMed

    Ito, M; Arai, Y T; Itou, T; Sakai, T; Ito, F H; Takasaki, T; Kurane, I

    2001-06-05

    We analyzed 50 rabies virus samples isolated in Brazil from 12 dogs, 11 cats, 5 vampire bats, 15 cattle, 2 horses, 1 pig, 1 sheep, and 3 humans to investigate the molecular epidemiology of rabies viruses. We sequenced 203 nucleotides on the nucleoprotein gene by direct sequencing of the PCR-amplified products. All the isolates belonged to the genotype 1 and homology of the 203 nucleotides was at least 83.7% among isolates. The main reservoirs were estimated based on the homology of nucleotide sequences. Brazilian rabies virus isolates were clustered into two reservoir groups: dogs and vampire bats. All the dog-related rabies virus isolates showed nucleotide homology greater than 99.0%. Vampire bat-related rabies virus isolates showed nucleotide homology greater than 96.6% and could be further divided into subgroups corresponding to areas where viruses were isolated. These data suggest that circulating rabies variants belong to at least two different genotype clusters in Brazil and that these two clusters are maintained independently among vampire bats and dogs.

  11. Profile of Cytokines and Chemokines Triggered by Wild-Type Strains of Rabies Virus in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Appolinário, Camila Michele; Allendorf, Susan Dora; Peres, Marina Gea; Ribeiro, Bruna Devidé; Fonseca, Clóvis R.; Vicente, Acácia Ferreira; de Paula Antunes, João Marcelo A.; Megid, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Rabies is a lethal infectious disease that causes 55,000 human deaths per year and is transmitted by various mammalian species, such as dogs and bats. The host immune response is essential for avoiding viral progression and promoting viral clearance. Cytokines and chemokines are crucial in the development of an immediate antiviral response; the rabies virus (RABV) attempts to evade this immune response. The virus's capacity for evasion is correlated with its pathogenicity and the host's inflammatory response, with highly pathogenic strains being the most efficient at hijacking the host's defense mechanisms and thereby decreasing inflammation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression of a set of cytokine and chemokine genes that are related to the immune response in the brains of mice inoculated intramuscularly or intracerebrally with two wild-type strains of RABV, one from dog and the other from vampire bat. The results demonstrated that the gene expression profile is intrinsic to the specific rabies variant. The prompt production of cytokines and chemokines seems to be more important than their levels of expression for surviving a rabies infection. PMID:26711511

  12. A comparative study of rabies virus isolates from hematophagous bats in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Castilho, Juliana G; Carnieli, Pedro; Oliveira, Rafael N; Fahl, Willian O; Cavalcante, Rosangela; Santana, Antonio A; Rosa, Wellington L G A; Carrieri, Maria L; Kotait, Ivanete

    2010-10-01

    The Brazilian chiropteran fauna consists of 167 species; of which, three are hematophagous: the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), the white-winged vampire bat (Diaemus youngi), and the hairy-legged vampire bat (Diphylla ecaudata). The aim of this study was to describe the isolation of Rabies virus from common and hairy-legged vampire bats and to report the first comparative antigenic and genetic studies of isolates from these bats. Antigenic and genetic typing of both isolates identified them as antigenic variant 3 (AgV3), the variant frequently isolated from common vampire bats. Phylogenetic analysis showed 99.3% identity between the isolates. This is the first time since 1934 that Rabies virus has been isolated from hairy-legged vampire bats in Brazil. Our analysis provides evidence that the existence of rabies-positive isolates from hairy-legged vampire bats may be the result of an interspecific rabies transmission event from common vampire bats and suggests that roost cohabitation may occur.

  13. Human contacts with oral rabies vaccine baits distributed for wildlife rabies management--Ohio, 2012.

    PubMed

    2013-04-12

    Baits laden with oral rabies vaccines are important for the management of wildlife rabies in the United States. In August 2012, the Wildlife Services program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service began a field trial involving limited distribution of a new oral rabies vaccine bait in five states, including Ohio. The vaccine consisted of live recombinant human adenovirus type 5 vector, expressing rabies virus glycoprotein (AdRG1.3) (Onrab). A previously used oral rabies vaccine consisting of a live recombinant vaccinia vector, expressing rabies virus glycoprotein (V-RG) (Raboral V-RG), was distributed in other areas of Ohio. To monitor human contacts and potential vaccine virus exposure, surveillance was conducted by the Ohio Department of Health, local Ohio health agencies, and CDC. During August 23-September 7, 2012, a total of 776,921 baits were distributed in Ohio over 4,379 square miles (11,341 square kilometers). During August 24-September 12, a total of 89 baits were reported found by the general public, with 55 human contacts with baits identified (some contacts involved more than one bait). In 27 of the 55 human contacts, the bait was not intact, and a barrier (e.g., gloves) had not been used to handle the bait, leaving persons at risk for vaccine exposure and vaccine virus infection. However, no adverse events were reported. Continued surveillance of human contacts with oral rabies vaccine baits and public warnings to avoid contact with baits are needed because of the potential for vaccine virus infection.

  14. A VL-linker-VH Orientation Dependent Single Chain Variable Antibody Fragment Against Rabies Virus G Protein with Enhanced Neutralizing Potency in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yue; Li, Zhuang; Xi, Hualong; Gu, Tiejun; Yuan, Ruosen; Chen, Xiaoxu; Jiang, Chunlai; Kong, Wei; Wu, Yongge

    2016-01-01

    Lethal rabies can be prevented effectively by post-exposure prophylactic (PEP) with rabies immunoglobulin (RIG). Single-chain variable fragment (scFv), which is composed of a variable heavy chain (VH) and variable light chain (VL) connected by a peptide linker, may be developed as alternative to RIG for neutralizing rabies virus (RV). However, our previously constructed scFv (FV57S) with the (NH2) VH-linker-VL (COOH) orientation showed a lower neutralizing potency than its parent RIG. This orientation may inhibit FV57S from refolding into an intact and correct conformation. Therefore, the RFV57S protein with a VL-linker-VH orientation was constructed based on FV57S. A HIS tag was incorporated to aid in purification and detection of RFV57S and FV57S. However, abilities of RFV57S and FV57S to bind with the anti-HIS tag mAb were different. Therefore, a novel direct ELISA was established by utilizing a biotin-labeled truncated glycoprotein of RV. Although with similar stability and in vitro neutralizing potency as FV57S, RFV57S showed enhanced binding ability, affinity and in vivo protective efficacy against lethal dose of RV. Our studies support the feasibility of developing a scFv with reversed orientation and provide a novel method for evaluating the binding ability, stability and affinity of engineered antibodies recognizing linear epitope.

  15. Whole genome sequence phylogenetic analysis of four Mexican rabies viruses isolated from cattle.

    PubMed

    Bárcenas-Reyes, I; Loza-Rubio, E; Cantó-Alarcón, G J; Luna-Cozar, J; Enríquez-Vázquez, A; Barrón-Rodríguez, R J; Milián-Suazo, F

    2017-08-04

    Phylogenetic analysis of the rabies virus in molecular epidemiology has been traditionally performed on partial sequences of the genome, such as the N, G, and P genes; however, that approach raises concerns about the discriminatory power compared to whole genome sequencing. In this study we characterized four strains of the rabies virus isolated from cattle in Querétaro, Mexico by comparing the whole genome sequence to that of strains from the American, European and Asian continents. Four cattle brain samples positive to rabies and characterized as AgV11, genotype 1, were used in the study. A cDNA sequence was generated by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) using oligo dT. cDNA samples were sequenced in an Illumina NextSeq 500 platform. The phylogenetic analysis was performed with MEGA 6.0. Minimum evolution phylogenetic trees were constructed with the Neighbor-Joining method and bootstrapped with 1000 replicates. Three large and seven small clusters were formed with the 26 sequences used. The largest cluster grouped strains from different species in South America: Brazil, and the French Guyana. The second cluster grouped five strains from Mexico. A Mexican strain reported in a different study was highly related to our four strains, suggesting common source of infection. The phylogenetic analysis shows that the type of host is different for the different regions in the American Continent; rabies is more related to bats. It was concluded that the rabies virus in central Mexico is genetically stable and that it is transmitted by the vampire bat Desmodus rotundus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres: a potent oral delivery system to elicit systemic immune response against inactivated rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Ramya, R; Verma, P C; Chaturvedi, V K; Gupta, P K; Pandey, K D; Madhanmohan, M; Kannaki, T R; Sridevi, R; Anukumar, B

    2009-03-26

    Rabies is an endemic, fatal zoonotic disease in the developing countries. Oral vaccination strategies are suitable for rabies control in developing countries. Studies were performed to investigate the suitability of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) microspheres as an oral delivery system for beta-propiolactone inactivated concentrated rabies virus (CRV). Immune responses induced by encapsulated (PLG+CRV) and un-encapsulated inactivated rabies virus after oral and intraperitoneal route administrations were compared. The anti-rabies virus IgG antibody titer, virus neutralizing antibody (VNA) titers obtained by mouse neutralization test (MNT) and IgG2a and IgG1 titers of mice group immunized orally with PLG+CRV showed significantly (p<0.001) higher response than the group immunized orally with un-encapsulated CRV. There was no significant difference (p>0.05) between groups inoculated by intraperitoneal route. The stimulation index (SI) obtained by lymphoproliferation assay of PLG+CRV oral group also showed significantly (p<0.001) higher response than the group immunized orally with un-encapsulated CRV, suggesting that oral immunization activates Th1-mediated cellular immunity. Immunized mice of all experimental groups were challenged intracerebrally with a lethal dose of virulent rabies virus Challenge Virus Standard (CVS). The survival rates of mice immunized orally with PLG+CRV and CRV alone were 75% and 50%, respectively, whereas intraperitoneally immunized groups showed 100% protection. The overall results of humoral, cellular immune response and survival rates of mice immunized orally with PLG+CRV were significantly (p<0.001) higher than those of mice immunized orally with CRV alone. These data suggest that the PLG encapsulated inactivated rabies virus can be used for oral immunization against rabies.

  17. Rabies virus inactivation by binary ethylenimine: new method for inactivated vaccine production.

    PubMed Central

    Larghi, O P; Nebel, A E

    1980-01-01

    The inactivation dynamics of rabies virus (PV strain) by binary ethylenimine, and the immunogenic properites and the stability of the vaccines prepared using this agent, were studied. Binary ethylenimine at a final concentration of 0.01 M was prepared wtih 2-bromoethylamine hydrobromide in alkaline solutions, either separately from or in suspensions of rabies virus propagated in BHK cells. The infectivity of virus suspensions containing more than 108 plaque-forming units per 0.1 ml was inactivated in 2 h when the inactivating agent was prepared before its addition to the suspensions, and in3 h when prepared directly in the suspensions. Liquid vaccines prepared in this manner and stored at different temperatures maintained potency for 1 month at 37 degrees C and for 6 months at 4 degrees C and 22 to 25 degrees C. Lyophilized vaccine maintained its potency for 6 months at the three temperatures. The inactivated vaccine mixed with aluminum or oil adjuvant at high dilutions protected guinea pigs against challenge. This safer procedure for rabies virus inactivation offers promise for the production of effective vaccines for the immunization of dogs and cattle. PMID:7358836

  18. Pseudotyping of vesicular stomatitis virus with the envelope glycoproteins of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Gert; Locher, Samira; Berger Rentsch, Marianne; Halbherr, Stefan J

    2014-08-01

    Pseudotype viruses are useful for studying the envelope proteins of harmful viruses. This work describes the pseudotyping of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) with the envelope glycoproteins of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. VSV lacking the homotypic glycoprotein (G) gene (VSVΔG) was used to express haemagglutinin (HA), neuraminidase (NA) or the combination of both. Propagation-competent pseudotype viruses were only obtained when HA and NA were expressed from the same vector genome. Pseudotype viruses containing HA from different H5 clades were neutralized specifically by immune sera directed against the corresponding clade. Fast and sensitive reading of test results was achieved by vector-mediated expression of GFP. Pseudotype viruses expressing a mutant VSV matrix protein showed restricted spread in IFN-competent cells. This pseudotype system will facilitate the detection of neutralizing antibodies against virulent influenza viruses, circumventing the need for high-level biosafety containment. © 2014 The Authors.

  19. Rabies virus infection selectively impairs membrane receptor functions in neuronal model cells.

    PubMed

    Koschel, K; Halbach, M

    1979-03-01

    A persistent infection with rabies virus (HEP-Flury) was established in the CNS-derived hybrid cell line 108CC15 which possesses specific membrane receptors for prostaglandins, catecholamines and acetylcholine. We report a differential virus influence on the specific receptor response to PGE, isoproterenol and acetycholine as indicated by typical changes of the intracellular cyclic AMP levels. As the adenylate cyclase activity was unchanged in infected cells in vitro, a selective virus influence on specific receptors themselves or their coupling to the cAMP synthesizing system must be considered.

  20. Studies on antigenic and genomic properties of Brazilian rabies virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, R; Batista, H B R; Franco, A C; Rijsewijk, F A M; Roehe, P M

    2005-05-20

    Despite the recognized stability of rabies virus, differences among isolates from different species have been found. This work was carried out with the aim to identify antigenic and genomic differences in Brazilian rabies virus isolates and to verify whether such alterations would bear any relationship with the different hosts for the virus in nature. For that, 79 Brazilian rabies viruses isolated from different host species and from distinct regions within Brazil were submitted to antigenic characterization with a panel of 11 monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) directed to lyssavirus antigens and to genomic analyses by the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification of the N gene followed by restriction endonuclease analysis (REA). In addition, the nucleotide sequences of part of the N gene (225 bp) of seven isolates, taken as representative of the majority of the viruses under study, were determined. The analyses with the Mabs and RT-PCR/REA allowed the identification of two major groups of variants, the first formed by most isolates of cattle and bats and the second formed by viruses of dog origin. Partial sequencing of the N gene confirmed the similarity among isolates from cattle origin and those of vampire bats. However, viruses from non-haematophagous bats exhibited consistent differences from those of vampire bat isolates. Such findings suggest that the variants have evolved fairly stable modifications, which are not altered after passage in a dead-end host of a distinct species. No association could be established between antigenic or genomic alterations and geographic distribution of the isolates, which suggests that evolution of the virus has been directed to adaptation to the host species.

  1. Genetic stability (in vivo) of the attenuated oral rabies virus vaccine SAD B19.

    PubMed

    Beckert, Aline; Geue, Lutz; Vos, Ad; Neubert, Andreas; Freuling, Conrad; Müller, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The distribution of oral rabies vaccine baits containing replication-competent live viruses poses certain environmental safety risks; among others, the possibility of reversion to or an increase in virulence. Hence, the genetic stability of the complete genome of the most widely used oral rabies vaccine virus, SAD B19, was examined after four and 10 serial i.c. passages in foxes and mice, respectively. It was shown that the consensus strain of SAD B19 was extremely stable in vivo. After 10 consecutive passages in mice not a single mutation was observed. In foxes, seven single nucleotide exchanges were found between the first and fourth passage, of which only one resulted in an amino acid exchange at position 9240 of the L-gene. This mutation was not observed during the first three passages and, furthermore, it was shown that this mutation was not linked to enhanced virulence.

  2. Rabies virus immunity in genetically selected high- and low-responder lines of mice.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, M R; Sant'anna, O A; Siqueira, M; Nilsson, T T; Gennari, M

    1979-01-01

    The antibody responsiveness to and the specific vaccination effect of rabies virus infection were investigated in high- and low-responder lines of mice produced by two-way selective breedings for quantitative production of antibodies to flagellar (H/f and L/f lines) or somatic (H/s and L/s lines) antigens of salmonellae. After specific immunization, both high lines were more resistant to rabies virus infection than were the low lines, and the protector effect was related to the level of antibody produced, as demonstrated by neutralizing serum activity. The present findings confirm the nonspecific genetic modification of the general antibody responsiveness induced in high- and low-responder lines selected for quantitative antibody production. PMID:478636

  3. Vaccination of small Asian mongoose (Herpestes javanicus) against rabies.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Jesse D; Meadows, Anastasia; Murphy, Staci M; Manangan, Jamie; Hanlon, Cathleen A; Faber, Marie-Luise; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2006-07-01

    Oral vaccination of free-ranging wildlife is a promising technique in rabies control. The small Asian mongoose (Herpestes javanicus) is an important reservoir of rabies on several Caribbean islands, but no vaccines have been evaluated for this species. Captive mongooses were used to test the safety and efficacy of the commercially licensed vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein (V-RG) recombinant vaccine and a newly developed genetically engineered oral rabies virus vaccine (SPBNGA-S). In one study using V-RG, no vaccinated animals developed detectable rabies virus-neutralizing antibodies, and all but one died after experimental challenge with rabies virus. In contrast, all animals given SPBNGA-S demonstrated seroconversion within 7 to 14 days after vaccination and survived rabies virus challenge. On the basis of these preliminary results indicating the greater efficacy of SPBNGA-S vs. V-RG vaccine, additional investigations will be necessary to determine the optimal dose and duration of vaccination, as well as incorporation of the SPBNGA-S vaccine into edible bait.

  4. High Diversity of Rabies Viruses Associated with Insectivorous Bats in Argentina: Presence of Several Independent Enzootics

    PubMed Central

    Piñero, Carolina; Gury Dohmen, Federico; Beltran, Fernando; Martinez, Leila; Novaro, Laura; Russo, Susana; Palacios, Gustavo; Cisterna, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Rabies is a fatal infection of the central nervous system primarily transmitted by rabid animal bites. Rabies virus (RABV) circulates through two different epidemiological cycles: terrestrial and aerial, where dogs, foxes or skunks and bats, respectively, act as the most relevant reservoirs and/or vectors. It is widely accepted that insectivorous bats are not important vectors of RABV in Argentina despite the great diversity of bat species and the extensive Argentinean territory. Methods We studied the positivity rate of RABV detection in different areas of the country, and the antigenic and genetic diversity of 99 rabies virus (RABV) strains obtained from 14 species of insectivorous bats collected in Argentina between 1991 and 2008. Results Based on the analysis of bats received for RABV analysis by the National Rabies system of surveillance, the positivity rate of RABV in insectivorous bats ranged from 3.1 to 5.4%, depending on the geographic location. The findings were distributed among an extensive area of the Argentinean territory. The 99 strains of insectivorous bat-related sequences were divided into six distinct lineages associated with Tadarida brasiliensis, Myotis spp, Eptesicus spp, Histiotus montanus, Lasiurus blosseviilli and Lasiurus cinereus. Comparison with RABV sequences obtained from insectivorous bats of the Americas revealed co-circulation of similar genetic variants in several countries. Finally, inter-species transmission, mostly related with Lasiurus species, was demonstrated in 11.8% of the samples. Conclusions This study demonstrates the presence of several independent enzootics of rabies in insectivorous bats of Argentina. This information is relevant to identify potential areas at risk for human and animal infection. PMID:22590657

  5. A new Ebola virus nonstructural glycoprotein expressed through RNA editing.

    PubMed

    Mehedi, Masfique; Falzarano, Darryl; Seebach, Jochen; Hu, Xiaojie; Carpenter, Michael S; Schnittler, Hans-Joachim; Feldmann, Heinz

    2011-06-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV), an enveloped, single-stranded, negative-sense RNA virus, causes severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates. The EBOV glycoprotein (GP) gene encodes the nonstructural soluble glycoprotein (sGP) but also produces the transmembrane glycoprotein (GP₁,₂) through transcriptional editing. A third GP gene product, a small soluble glycoprotein (ssGP), has long been postulated to be produced also as a result of transcriptional editing. To identify and characterize the expression of this new EBOV protein, we first analyzed the relative ratio of GP gene-derived transcripts produced during infection in vitro (in Vero E6 cells or Huh7 cells) and in vivo (in mice). The average percentages of transcripts encoding sGP, GP₁,₂, and ssGP were approximately 70, 25, and 5%, respectively, indicating that ssGP transcripts are indeed produced via transcriptional editing. N-terminal sequence similarity with sGP, the absence of distinguishing antibodies, and the abundance of sGP made it difficult to identify ssGP through conventional methodology. Optimized 2-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis analyses finally verified the expression and secretion of ssGP in tissue culture during EBOV infection. Biochemical analysis of recombinant ssGP characterized this protein as a disulfide-linked homodimer that was exclusively N glycosylated. In conclusion, we have identified and characterized a new EBOV nonstructural glycoprotein, which is expressed as a result of transcriptional editing of the GP gene. While ssGP appears to share similar structural properties with sGP, it does not appear to have the same anti-inflammatory function on endothelial cells as sGP.

  6. Evaluation of In vitro Antiviral Activity of Datura metel Linn. Against Rabies Virus

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Soumen; Mukherjee, Sandeepan; Pawar, Sandip; Chowdhary, Abhay

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The soxhlet and cold extracts of Datura metel Linn. were evaluated for in vitro antirabies activity. Materials and Methods: Soxhlet and cold extraction method were used to extract Datura (fruit and seed) extracts. In vitro cytotoxicity assay was performed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Based on the CC50 range, the in vitro antirabies activity of the extracts was screened by rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test and molecular method. Results: The Datura (fruit and seed) extracts were not cytotoxic below 5 mg/ml (CC50). Titer of 10−4 rabies virus challenge virus standard (RV CVS) (1 50% tissue culture infective dose [1 TCID50]) was obtained by RFFT method and the challenge dose of 10 TCID50 was used for antirabies assay. Datura fruit and seed (soxhlet and cold) extracts showed 50% inhibition of RV CVS at 2.5 mg/ml and 1.25 mg/ml (inhibitory concentration 50% [IC50]), respectively. The tested extracts showed selectivity index (CC50/IC50) ranging from 2 to 4. The viral RNA was extracted and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed which also revealed a 2-fold reduction of viral load at 1.25 mg/ml of the Datura seed (soxhlet methanolic and cold aqueous) extracts. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study of in vitro antiviral activity of D. metel Linn. against rabies virus. Datura seed extracts have a potential in vitro antirabies activity and, in future, can be further screened for in vivo activity against rabies virus in murine model. SUMMARY In the present study, Datura metel. Linn showed and in-vitro anti rabies activity in Vero cell line which was determined by RFFIT method and PCR method PMID:27695266

  7. Use of filter paper (FTA) technology for sampling, recovery and molecular characterisation of rabies viruses.

    PubMed

    Picard-Meyer, E; Barrat, J; Cliquet, F

    2007-03-01

    This study evaluates the feasibility of the use of the FTA Gene Guard System (a commercial product consisting of filter paper impregnated with patented chemicals supplied by the Whatman company) for the shipment, storage and detection of RNA rabies viruses by a simplified hemi-nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. HnRT-PCR of the rabies virus nucleoprotein gene with specific primers showed that viral RNA extracted from crude infected tissues remained stable after fixation on the filter paper under diverse environmental conditions for at least 35 days. The sequence analysis of the products amplified from five out of the seven known genotypes of Lyssaviruses showed the stability of viral RNA viruses after fixation on the filter paper. Furthermore, the sensitivity of the hnRT-PCR following RNA fixation on the filter paper was equivalent to that of standard hnRT-PCR. In conclusion, the stability of viral RNA and the inactivation of infectivity make the FTA technology useful for the storage, transport, collection and subsequent molecular analysis of viral rabies RNA, facilitating epidemiological investigations in the field.

  8. Interferon-inducible GTPase: a novel viral response protein involved in rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Wang, Hualei; Jin, Hongli; Cao, Zengguo; Feng, Na; Zhao, Yongkun; Zheng, Xuexing; Wang, Jianzhong; Li, Qian; Zhao, Guoxing; Yan, Feihu; Wang, Lina; Wang, Tiecheng; Gao, Yuwei; Tu, Changchun; Yang, Songtao; Xia, Xianzhu

    2016-05-01

    Rabies virus infection is a major public health concern because of its wide host-interference spectrum and nearly 100 % lethality. However, the interactions between host and virus remain unclear. To decipher the authentic response in the central nervous system after rabies virus infection, a dynamic analysis of brain proteome alteration was performed. In this study, 104 significantly differentially expressed proteins were identified, and intermediate filament, interferon-inducible GTPases, and leucine-rich repeat-containing protein 16C were the three outstanding groups among these proteins. Interferon-inducible GTPases were prominent because of their strong upregulation. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR showed distinct upregulation of interferon-inducible GTPases at the level of transcription. Several studies have shown that interferon-inducible GTPases are involved in many biological processes, such as viral infection, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, and autophagy. These findings indicate that interferon-inducible GTPases are likely to be a potential target involved in rabies pathogenesis or the antiviral process.

  9. Real-time Imaging of Rabies Virus Entry into Living Vero cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haijiao; Hao, Xian; Wang, Shaowen; Wang, Zhiyong; Cai, Mingjun; Jiang, Junguang; Qin, Qiwei; Zhang, Maolin; Wang, Hongda

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of rabies virus (RABV) infection is vital for prevention and therapy of virulent rabies. However, the infection mechanism remains largely uncharacterized due to the limited methods and viral models. Herein, we utilized a powerful single-virus tracking technique to dynamically and globally visualize the infection process of the live attenuated rabies vaccine strain-SRV9 in living Vero cells. Firstly, it was found that the actin-enriched filopodia is in favor of virus reaching to the cell body. Furthermore, by carrying out drug perturbation experiments, we confirmed that RABV internalization into Vero cells proceeds via classical dynamin-dependent clathrin-mediated endocytosis with requirement for intact actin, but caveolae-dependent endocytosis is not involved. Then, our real-time imaging results unambiguously uncover the characteristics of viral internalization and cellular transport dynamics. In addition, our results directly and quantitatively reveal that the intracellular motility of internalized RABV particles is largely microtubule-dependent. Collectively, our work is crucial for understanding the initial steps of RABV infection, and elucidating the mechanisms of post-infection. Significantly, the results provide profound insight into development of novel and effective antiviral targets. PMID:26148807

  10. A recombinant rabies virus (ERAGS) for use in a bait vaccine for swine

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Rabies viruses (RABV) circulating worldwide in various carnivores occasionally cause fatal encephalitis in swine. In this study, the safety and immunogenicity of a recombinant rabies virus, the ERAGS strain constructed with a reverse genetics system, was evaluated in domestic pigs. Materials and Methods Growing pigs were administered 1 mL (108.0 FAID50/mL) of the ERAGS strain via intramuscular (IM) or oral routes and were observed for 4 weeks' post-inoculation. Three sows were also inoculated with 1 mL of the ERAGS strain via the IM route. The safety and immunogenicity in swine were evaluated using daily observation and a virus-neutralizing assay (VNA). Fluorescent antibody tests (FAT) for the RABV antigen and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays for the detection of the nucleocapsid (N) gene of RABV were conducted with brain tissues from the sows after necropsy. Results The growing pigs and sows administered the ERAGS strain did not exhibit any clinical sign of rabies during the test period test and did develop VNA titers. The growing pigs inoculated with the ERAGS strain via the IM route showed higher VNA titers than did those receiving oral administration. FAT and RT-PCR assays were unable to detect RABV in several tissues, including brain samples from the sows. Conclusion Our results suggest that the ERAGS strain was safe in growing pigs and sows and induced moderate VNA titers in pigs. PMID:27489807

  11. Role of systemic injection of rabies immunoglobulin in rabies vaccination.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weichen; Liu, Shuqing; Yu, Pengcheng; Tao, Xiaoyan; Lu, Xuexin; Yan, Jianghong; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Zongshen; Zhu, Wuyang

    2017-06-01

    To determine the role of systemic injection of rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) in rabies vaccination, we analyzed the level of antibody against rabies virus in the serum of mice that received various doses of RIG combined with rabies vaccine. Our results indicate that systemic injection of RIG does not contribute detectably to passive or adaptive immunization, suggesting that the main function of RIG in individuals with category III exposure is to neutralize rabies virus via immediate local infiltration of the wound.

  12. The effect of interferon on the receptor sites to rabies virus on mouse neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Briggs, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    The binding of rabies virus to mouse neuroblastoma cells (MNA) primed with alpha interferon (IFN-{alpha}), beta interferon (IFN-{beta}), or alpha bungarotoxin (BTX) was examined. A saturable number of receptor sites to rabies virus was calculated by increasing the amount of {sup 3}H-CVS added to a constant number of untreated MNA cells. MNA cells were then exposed to 20 I.U. of IFN-{alpha}, IFN-{beta}, or 1 {mu}g of BTX and assayed to determine if these treatments had an effect on the number of receptor sites to rabies virus. Total amount of {sup 3}H-CVS bound to MNA cells was determined during a three hour incubation period. Cold competition assays using 1,000 fold excess unlabeled CVS were used to determine non-specific binding for each treatment. Specific binding was then calculated by subtracting non-specific binding from the total amount of CVS bound to MNA cells. A similar amount of total viral protein bound to untreated and IFN-{beta}, and BTX treated cells after 180 minutes of incubation. The bound protein varied by only 0.07 {mu}g. However, the amount of specific and non-specific binding varied a great deal between treatments. BTX caused an increase in non-specific and a decrease in specific binding of rabies virus. IFN-{beta} produced variable results in non-specific and specific binding while IFN-{alpha} caused mainly specific binding to occur. The most significant change brought about by IFN-{alpha} was an increase in the rate of viral attachment. At 30 minutes post-infection, IFN-{alpha} treated cells had bound 90% of the total amount of virus bound to untreated cells after 180 minutes. The increased binding rate did not cause a productive infection of rabies virus. No viral production was evident after an incubation period of 48 hours in either IFN-{alpha} or IFN-{beta} treated cells.

  13. Proteome analysis of virus-host cell interaction: rabies virus replication in Vero cells in two different media.

    PubMed

    Kluge, Sabine; Rourou, Samia; Vester, Diana; Majoul, Samy; Benndorf, Dirk; Genzel, Yvonne; Rapp, Erdmann; Kallel, Héla; Reichl, Udo

    2013-06-01

    The use of Vero cells for rabies vaccine production was recommended from the WHO in 2005. A controlled production process is necessary to reduce the risk of contaminants in the product. One step towards this is to turn away from animal-derived components (e.g. serum, trypsin, bovine serum albumin) and face a production process in animal component-free medium. In this study, a proteomic approach was applied, using 2-D differential gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry to compare rabies virus propagation in Vero cells under different cultivation conditions in microcarrier culture. Protein alterations were investigated for uninfected and infected Vero cells over a time span from 1 to 8 days post-infection in two different types of media (serum-free versus serum-containing media). For mock-infected cells, proteins involved in stress response, redox status, protease activity or glycolysis, and protein components in the endoplasmic reticulum were found to be differentially expressed comparing both cultivation media at all sampling points. For virus-infected cells, additionally changes in protein expression involved in general cell regulation and in calcium homeostasis were identified under both cultivation conditions. The fact that neither of these additional proteins was identified for cells during mock infection, but similar protein expression changes were found for both systems during virus propagation, indicates for a specific response of the Vero cell proteome on rabies virus infection.

  14. Antibodies to rabies virus in terrestrial wild mammals in native rainforest on the north coast of São Paulo State, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Danielle B; Martorelli, Luzia A; Kataoka, Ana Paula G A; Campos, Angélica C A; Rodrigues, Camila S; Sanfilippo, Luiz F; Cunha, Elenice S; Durigon, Edison L; Favoretto, Silvana R

    2014-07-01

    Rabies causes thousands of human and animal deaths worldwide each year. The emergent importance of rabies in wild animals demonstrates the necessity of epidemiologic studies of infection in these species toward the development of better strategies for prevention and control of rabies. We analyzed the circulation of rabies virus among wildlife species from a native rainforest in São Paulo State, Brazil. We used the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) to test for rabies virus-neutralizing antibodies in 139 captured terrestrial mammals and the fluorescent antibody test (FAT), mouse inoculation test (MIT), and reverse-transcriptase (RT)-PCR to test for virus in samples from the central nervous system of 53 animals found dead. The percentage of samples positive by RFFIT was 10.8%. All samples tested by FAT, MIT, and RT-PCR were negative. Research should be continued to obtain a better understanding of the role of wildlife in the circulation and transmission of rabies virus.

  15. Detection of multiple strains of rabies virus RNA using primers designed to target Mexican vampire bat variants.

    PubMed Central

    Loza-Rubio, E.; Rojas-Anaya, E.; Banda-Ruíz, V. M.; Nadin-Davis, S. A.; Cortez-García, B.

    2005-01-01

    A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), that uses primers specifically designed to amplify a portion of the N gene of vampire bat strains of rabies that circulate in Mexico, but also recognizing most of the rabies variants circulating in endemic areas, was established. This standardized PCR assay was able to detect viral RNA in tenfold serial dilutions up to a 10(7) dilution using stock virus at an original titre of 10(7.5) LD50. The assay was highly specific for rabies virus. Forty different rabies isolates recovered from different species and geographical regions in the country were diagnosed as positive and negative by the fluorescent antibody test (FAT). These same samples were re-examined by both PCR and the mouse inoculation test (MIT). Compared with MIT the PCR exhibited an epidemiological sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 91% while its positive predictive value was 96%. PMID:16181515

  16. Molecular characterization of atypical antigenic variants of canine rabies virus reveals its reintroduction by wildlife vectors in southeastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; Aréchiga-Ceballos, Nidia; Ortiz-Alcántara, Joanna M; González-Durán, Elizabeth; Pérez-Agüeros, Sandra I; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Torres-Longoria, Belem; López-Martínez, Irma; Hernández-Rivas, Lucía; Díaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto; Ramírez-González, José Ernesto

    2017-08-17

    Rabies is an infectious viral disease that is practically always fatal following the onset of clinical signs. In Mexico, the last case of human rabies transmitted by dogs was reported in 2006 and canine rabies has declined significantly due to vaccination campaigns implemented in the country. Here we report on the molecular characterization of six rabies virus strains found in Yucatan and Chiapas, remarkably, four of them showed an atypical reaction pattern when antigenic characterization with a reduced panel of eight monoclonal antibodies was performed. Phylogenetic analyses on the RNA sequences unveiled that the three atypical strains from Yucatan are associated with skunks. Analysis using the virus entire genome showed that they belong to a different lineage distinct from the variants described for this animal species in Mexico. The Chiapas atypical strain was grouped in a lineage that was considered extinct, while the others are clustered within classic dog variants.

  17. Expression of interferon gamma by a recombinant rabies virus strongly attenuates the pathogenicity of the virus via induction of type I interferon.

    PubMed

    Barkhouse, Darryll A; Garcia, Samantha A; Bongiorno, Emily K; Lebrun, Aurore; Faber, Milosz; Hooper, D Craig

    2015-01-01

    Previous animal model experiments have shown a correlation between interferon gamma (IFN-γ) expression and both survival from infection with attenuated rabies virus (RABV) and reduction of neurological sequelae. Therefore, we hypothesized that rapid production of murine IFN-γ by the rabies virus itself would induce a more robust antiviral response than would occur naturally in mice. To test this hypothesis, we used reverse engineering to clone the mouse IFN-γ gene into a pathogenic rabies virus backbone, SPBN, to produce the recombinant rabies virus designated SPBNγ. Morbidity and mortality were monitored in mice infected intranasally with SPBNγ or SPBN(-) control virus to determine the degree of attenuation caused by the expression of IFN-γ. Incorporation of IFN-γ into the rabies virus genome highly attenuated the virus. SPBNγ has a 50% lethal dose (LD50) more than 100-fold greater than SPBN(-). In vitro and in vivo mouse experiments show that SPBNγ infection enhances the production of type I interferons. Furthermore, knockout mice lacking the ability to signal through the type I interferon receptor (IFNAR(-/-)) cannot control the SPBNγ infection and rapidly die. These data suggest that IFN-γ production has antiviral effects in rabies, largely due to the induction of type I interferons. Survival from rabies is dependent upon the early control of virus replication and spread. Once the virus reaches the central nervous system (CNS), this becomes highly problematic. Studies of CNS immunity to RABV have shown that control of replication begins at the onset of T cell entry and IFN-γ production in the CNS prior to the appearance of virus-neutralizing antibodies. Moreover, antibody-deficient mice are able to control but not clear attenuated RABV from the CNS. We find here that IFN-γ triggers the early production of type I interferons with the expected antiviral effects. We also show that engineering a lethal rabies virus to express IFN-γ directly in the

  18. Rabies virus infection in Eptesicus fuscus bats born in captivity (naïve bats).

    PubMed

    Davis, April D; Jarvis, Jodie A; Pouliott, Craig; Rudd, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    The study of rabies virus infection in bats can be challenging due to quarantine requirements, husbandry concerns, genetic differences among animals, and lack of medical history. To date, all rabies virus (RABV) studies in bats have been performed in wild caught animals. Determining the RABV exposure history of a wild caught bat based on the presence or absence of viral neutralizing antibodies (VNA) may be misleading. Previous studies have demonstrated that the presence of VNA following natural or experimental inoculation is often ephemeral. With this knowledge, it is difficult to determine if a seronegative, wild caught bat has been previously exposed to RABV. The influence of prior rabies exposure in healthy, wild caught bats is unknown. To investigate the pathogenesis of RABV infection in bats born in captivity (naïve bats), naïve bats were inoculated intramuscularly with one of two Eptesicus fuscus rabies virus variants, EfV1 or EfV2. To determine the host response to a heterologous RABV, a separate group of naïve bats were inoculated with a Lasionycteris noctivagans RABV (LnV1). Six months following the first inoculation, all bats were challenged with EfV2. Our results indicate that naïve bats may have some level of innate resistance to intramuscular RABV inoculation. Additionally, naïve bats inoculated with the LnV demonstrated the lowest clinical infection rate of all groups. However, primary inoculation with EfV1 or LnV did not appear to be protective against a challenge with the more pathogenic EfV2.

  19. A Case of Fatal Serotonin Syndrome–Like Human Rabies Caused by Tricolored Bat–Associated Rabies Virus

    PubMed Central

    Regunath, Hariharan; Chinnakotla, Bhavana; Rojas-Moreno, Christian; Salzer, William; Hughes, Natalie J.; Sangha, Harbaksh

    2016-01-01

    Human rabies is a fatal disease, transmitted by saliva of infected animals, and the diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion. Very few cases are reported annually in the United States. We present a case of human rabies without a clear exposure history that masqueraded as serotonin syndrome. PMID:27001756

  20. In situ apoptosis of adaptive immune cells and the cellular escape of rabies virus in CNS from patients with human rabies transmitted by Desmodus rotundus.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Elaine Raniero; de Andrade, Heitor Franco; Lancellotti, Carmen Lúcia Penteado; Quaresma, Juarez Antônio Simões; Demachki, Samia; da Costa Vasconcelos, Pedro Fernando; Duarte, Maria Irma Seixas

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the current study was to investigate the apoptosis of neurons, astrocytes and immune cells from human patients that were infected with rabies virus by vampire bats bite. Apoptotic neurons were identified by their morphology and immune cells were identified using double immunostaining. There were very few apoptotic neurons present in infected tissue samples, but there was an increase of apoptotic infiltrating CD4+ and TCD8+ adaptive immune cells in the rabies infected tissue. No apoptosis was present in NK, macrophage and astrocytes. The dissemination of the human rabies virus within an infected host may be mediated by viral escape of the virus from an infected cell and may involve an anti-apoptotic mechanism, which does not kill the neuron or pro-apoptosis of TCD4+ and TCD8+ lymphocytes and which allows for increased proliferation of the virus within the CNS by attenuation of the adaptive immune response. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Life-Long Genetic and Functional Access to Neural Circuits Using Self-Inactivating Rabies Virus.

    PubMed

    Ciabatti, Ernesto; González-Rueda, Ana; Mariotti, Letizia; Morgese, Fabio; Tripodi, Marco

    2017-07-13

    Neural networks are emerging as the fundamental computational unit of the brain and it is becoming progressively clearer that network dysfunction is at the core of a number of psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Yet, our ability to target specific networks for functional or genetic manipulations remains limited. Monosynaptically restricted rabies virus facilitates the anatomical investigation of neural circuits. However, the inherent cytotoxicity of the rabies largely prevents its implementation in long-term functional studies and the genetic manipulation of neural networks. To overcome this limitation, we developed a self-inactivating ΔG-rabies virus (SiR) that transcriptionally disappears from the infected neurons while leaving permanent genetic access to the traced network. SiR provides a virtually unlimited temporal window for the study of network dynamics and for the genetic and functional manipulation of neural circuits in vivo without adverse effects on neuronal physiology and circuit function. Copyright © 2017 MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Rabies virus selectively alters 5-HT1 receptor subtypes in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ceccaldi, P E; Fillion, M P; Ermine, A; Tsiang, H; Fillion, G

    1993-04-15

    Rabies virus infection in man induces a series of clinical symptoms, some suggesting involvement of the central serotonergic system. The results of the present study show that, 5 days after rabies virus infection in rat, the total reversible high-affinity binding of [3H]5-HT in the hippocampus is not affected, suggesting that 5-HT1A binding is not altered. 5-HT1B sites identified by [125I]cyanopindolol binding are not affected in the cortex 3 and 5 days after the infection. Accordingly, the cellular inhibitory effect of trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine (TFMPP) on the [3H]acetylcholine-evoked release, presumably related to 5-HT1B receptor activity, is not modified 3 days after infection. In contrast, [3H]5-HT binding determined in the presence of drugs masking 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT1C receptors, is markedly (50%) reduced 3 days after the viral infection. These results suggest that 5-HT1D-like receptor subtypes may be affected specifically and at an early stage after rabies viral infection.

  3. Pseudorabies virus glycoprotein L is necessary for virus infectivity but dispensable for virion localization of glycoprotein H.

    PubMed Central

    Klupp, B G; Fuchs, W; Weiland, E; Mettenleiter, T C

    1997-01-01

    Herpesviruses contain a number of envelope glycoproteins which play important roles in the interaction between virions and target cells. Although several glycoproteins are not present in all herpesviruses, others, including glycoproteins H and L (gH and gL), are conserved throughout the Herpesviridae. To elucidate common properties and differences in herpesvirus glycoprotein function, corresponding virus mutants must be constructed and analyzed in different herpesvirus backgrounds. Analysis of gH- mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and pseudorabies virus (PrV) showed that in both viruses gH is essential for penetration and cell-to-cell spread and that its presence is required for virion localization of gL. Since gH homologs are found complexed with gL, it was of interest to assess the phenotype of gL- mutant viruses. By using this approach, HSV-1 gL has been shown to be required for entry and for virion localization of gH (C. Roop, L. Hutchinson, and D. Johnson, J. Virol. 67:2285-2297, 1993). To examine whether a similar phenotype is associated with lack of gL in another alphaherpesvirus, PrV, we constructed two independent gL- PrV mutants by insertion and deletion-insertion mutagenesis. The salient findings are as follows: (i) PrV gL is required for penetration of virions and cell-to-cell spread; (ii) unlike HSV-1, PrV gH is incorporated into the virion in the absence of gL; (iii) virion localization of gH in the absence of gL is not sufficient for infectivity; (iv) in the absence of gL, N-glycans on PrV gH are processed to a greater extent than in the presence of gL, indicating masking of N-glycans by association with gL; and (v) an anti-gL polyclonal antiserum is able to neutralize virion infectivity but did not inhibit cell-to-cell spread. Thus, whereas PrV gL is essential for virus replication, as is HSV-1 gL, gL- PrV mutants exhibit properties strikingly different from those of HSV-1. In conclusion, our data show an important functional role for

  4. Typing of field rabies virus strains in FR Yugoslavia by limited sequence analysis and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Stankov, S

    2001-01-01

    A total of 32 rabies virus isolates (15 of fox, 14 of cat and 3 of dog origin) from the territory of FR Yugoslavia were collected from December 1996 till February 1998 and analyzed by limited sequencing of N gene and by indirect immunofluorescence and a panel of 20 antinucleocapsid monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). All examined strains were characterized as sylvatic fox strains. Two main genetic variants were detected, 15 isolates belonging to Group I, 14 belonging to Group II, while the remaining 3 could not be classified into any group. This classification was confirmed by MAbs. The obtained results indicate at least two independent cycles of rabies transmission, probably resulting from multiple modes of transmission to the territories now belonging to FR Yugoslavia.

  5. Development of Rabies Virus-Like Particles for Vaccine Applications: Production, Characterization, and Protection Studies.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Diego; Etcheverrigaray, Marina; Kratje, Ricardo; Prieto, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Rabies is a viral infection of the central nervous system for which vaccination is the only treatment possible. Besides preexposure, vaccination is highly recommended for people living in endemic areas, veterinarians, and laboratory workers. Our group has developed rabies virus-like particles (RV-VLPs) with immunogenic features expressed in mammalian cells for vaccine applications. In this chapter the methods to obtain and characterize a stable HEK293 cell line expressing RV-VLPs are detailed. Further, analytical ultracentrifugation steps to purify the obtained VLPs are developed, as well as western blot, dynamic light scattering, and immunogold electron microscopy to analyze the size, distribution, shape, and antigenic conformation of the purified particles. Finally, immunization protocols are described to study the immunogenicity of RV-VLPs.

  6. Hematologic profile of hematophagous Desmodus rotundus bats before and after experimental infection with rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Marilene Fernandes de; Trezza-Netto, José; Aires, Caroline Cotrin; Barros, Rodrigo Fernandes de; Rosa, Adriana Ruckert da; Massad, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Hematophagous Desmodus rotundus bats play an important role in the rabies lifecycle. This study describes the hematological profile of these bats before and after experimental infection with rabies virus. Cells counts were performed in a Neubauer chamber. The average values of erythrocytes and leucocytes counts in blood before experimental infections were 9.97 × 10(6)mm3 and 4.80 × 10(3)mm3, respectively. Neutrophils represented 69.9% of white blood cells and the lymphocytes represented 26.9%. Following the experimental infections, the average numbers of erythrocytes and leucocytes was 9.43 × 106mm3 and 3.98 × 10(3)mm3, respectively. Neutrophils represented 40% of white blood cells and the lymphocytes represented 59%. The hematological profile given in this study can serve as reference values for D. rotundus bats.

  7. Desmodus rotundus and Artibeus spp. bats might present distinct rabies virus lineages.

    PubMed

    Fahl, Willian Oliveira; Carnieli, Pedro; Castilho, Juliana Galera; Carrieri, Maria Luiza; Kotait, Ivanete; Iamamoto, Keila; Oliveira, Rafael Novaes; Brandão, Paulo Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    In Brazil, bats have been assigned an increasing importance in public health as they are important rabies reservoirs. Phylogenetic studies have shown that rabies virus (RABV) strains from frugivorous bats Artibeus spp. are closely associated to those from the vampire bat Desmodus rotundus, but little is known about the molecular diversity of RABV in Artibeus spp. The N and G genes of RABV isolated from Artibeus spp. and cattle infected by D. rotundus were sequenced, and phylogenetic trees were constructed. The N gene nucleotides tree showed three clusters: one for D. rotundus and two for Artibeus spp. Regarding putative N amino acid-trees, two clusters were formed, one for D. rotundus and another for Artibeus spp. RABV G gene phylogeny supported the distinction between D. rotundus and Artibeus spp. strains. These results show the intricate host relationship of RABV's evolutionary history, and are invaluable for the determination of RABV infection sources.

  8. Immune response and protection in raccoons (Procyon lotor) following consumption of baits containing ONRAB®, a human adenovirus rabies glycoprotein recombinant vaccine.

    PubMed

    Brown, L J; Rosatte, R C; Fehlner-Gardiner, C; Taylor, J S; Davies, J C; Donovan, D

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the immune response and protection conferred in raccoons (Procyon lotor) following consumption of ONRAB(®) oral rabies vaccine baits. Forty-two wild-caught, captive raccoons were each offered an ONRAB vaccine bait; 21 controls received no vaccine baits. Blood samples collected from all raccoons before treatment, and each week posttreatment for 16 wk, were assessed for the presence of rabies virus antibody. In the bait group, an individual was considered to have responded to vaccination if serum samples from three or more consecutive weeks were antibody-positive. Using this criterion, 77% (20/26) of raccoons that consumed ONRAB baits with no observed vaccine spillage (full dose) demonstrated a humoral immune response. In the group that received a partial dose (0.05-0.90 mL vaccine recovered), 50% (8/16) of raccoons responded to vaccination. Regardless of the vaccine dose received, among the 28 raccoons that responded to vaccination 18 had antibody initially detectable at week 2 and 22 remained antibody-positive for at least 10 consecutive weeks. Kinetics of the humoral immune response suggest that the best time to conduct postbaiting surveillance for evidence of vaccination would be 6-13 wk following bait deployment, with the highest antibody prevalence expected between weeks 8-10. A sub-sample of 29 raccoons (20 ONRAB, 9 controls) was challenged with raccoon rabies virus variant 350 days posttreatment. Eight of nine controls (89%) developed rabies whereas 15/20 vaccinates (75%) survived. Survival following rabies challenge was significantly higher in raccoons presented ONRAB vaccine baits.

  9. Arctic and Arctic-like rabies viruses: distribution, phylogeny and evolutionary history

    PubMed Central

    KUZMIN, I. V.; HUGHES, G. J.; BOTVINKIN, A. D.; GRIBENCHA, S. G.; RUPPRECHT, C. E.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Forty-one newly sequenced isolates of Arctic and Arctic-like rabies viruses, were genetically compared to each other and to those available from GenBank. Four phylogenetic lineages of Arctic viruses were identified. Arctic-1 viruses circulate in Ontario, Arctic-2 viruses circulate in Siberia and Alaska, Arctic-3 viruses circulate circumpolarly, and a newly described lineage Arctic-4 circulates locally in Alaska. The oldest available isolates from Siberia (between 1950 and 1960) belong to the Arctic-2 and Arctic-3 lineages and share 98·6–99·2% N gene identity with contemporary viruses. Two lineages of Arctic-like viruses were identified in southern Asia and the Middle East (Arctic-like-1) and eastern Asia (Arctic-like-2). A time-scaled tree demonstrates that the time of the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of Arctic and Arctic-like viruses is dated between 1255 and 1786. Evolution of the Arctic viruses has occurred through a northerly spread. The Arctic-like-2 lineage diverged first, whereas Arctic viruses share a TMRCA with Arctic-like-1 viruses. PMID:17599781

  10. Host phylogeny constrains cross-species emergence and establishment of rabies virus in bats.

    PubMed

    Streicker, Daniel G; Turmelle, Amy S; Vonhof, Maarten J; Kuzmin, Ivan V; McCracken, Gary F; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2010-08-06

    For RNA viruses, rapid viral evolution and the biological similarity of closely related host species have been proposed as key determinants of the occurrence and long-term outcome of cross-species transmission. Using a data set of hundreds of rabies viruses sampled from 23 North American bat species, we present a general framework to quantify per capita rates of cross-species transmission and reconstruct historical patterns of viral establishment in new host species using molecular sequence data. These estimates demonstrate diminishing frequencies of both cross-species transmission and host shifts with increasing phylogenetic distance between bat species. Evolutionary constraints on viral host range indicate that host species barriers may trump the intrinsic mutability of RNA viruses in determining the fate of emerging host-virus interactions.

  11. Susceptibility and Pathogenesis of Little Brown Bats (Myotis lucifugus) to Heterologous and Homologous Rabies Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Jodie A.; Pouliott, Craig E.; Morgan, Shannon, M. D.; Rudd, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Rabies virus (RABV) maintenance in bats is not well understood. Big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus), and Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) are the most common bats species in the United States. These colonial bat species also have the most frequent contact with humans and domestic animals. However, the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans) RABV is associated with the majority of human rabies virus infections in the United States and Canada. This is of interest because silver-haired bats are more solitary bats with infrequent human interaction. Our goal was to determine the likelihood of a colonial bat species becoming infected with and transmitting a heterologous RABV. To ascertain the potential of heterologous RABV infection in colonial bat species, little brown bats were inoculated with a homologous RABV or one of two heterologous RABVs. Additionally, to determine if the route of exposure influenced the disease process, bats were inoculated either intramuscularly (i.m.) or subcutaneously (s.c.) with a homologous or heterologous RABV. Our results demonstrate that intramuscular inoculation results in a more rapid progression of disease onset, whereas the incubation time in bats inoculated s.c. is significantly longer. Additionally, cross protection was not consistently achieved in bats previously inoculated with a heterologous RABV following a challenge with a homologous RABV 6 months later. Finally, bats that developed rabies following s.c. inoculation were significantly more likely to shed virus in their saliva and demonstrated increased viral dissemination. In summary, bats inoculated via the s.c. route are more likely to shed virus, thus increasing the likelihood of transmission. PMID:23741002

  12. Susceptibility and pathogenesis of little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) to heterologous and homologous rabies viruses.

    PubMed

    Davis, April D; Jarvis, Jodie A; Pouliott, Craig E; Morgan, Shannon M D; Rudd, Robert J

    2013-08-01

    Rabies virus (RABV) maintenance in bats is not well understood. Big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus), little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus), and Mexican free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) are the most common bats species in the United States. These colonial bat species also have the most frequent contact with humans and domestic animals. However, the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans) RABV is associated with the majority of human rabies virus infections in the United States and Canada. This is of interest because silver-haired bats are more solitary bats with infrequent human interaction. Our goal was to determine the likelihood of a colonial bat species becoming infected with and transmitting a heterologous RABV. To ascertain the potential of heterologous RABV infection in colonial bat species, little brown bats were inoculated with a homologous RABV or one of two heterologous RABVs. Additionally, to determine if the route of exposure influenced the disease process, bats were inoculated either intramuscularly (i.m.) or subcutaneously (s.c.) with a homologous or heterologous RABV. Our results demonstrate that intramuscular inoculation results in a more rapid progression of disease onset, whereas the incubation time in bats inoculated s.c. is significantly longer. Additionally, cross protection was not consistently achieved in bats previously inoculated with a heterologous RABV following a challenge with a homologous RABV 6 months later. Finally, bats that developed rabies following s.c. inoculation were significantly more likely to shed virus in their saliva and demonstrated increased viral dissemination. In summary, bats inoculated via the s.c. route are more likely to shed virus, thus increasing the likelihood of transmission.

  13. A seven-segmented influenza A virus expressing the influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qinshan; Brydon, Edward W A; Palese, Peter

    2008-07-01

    Influenza viruses are classified into three types: A, B, and C. The genomes of A- and B-type influenza viruses consist of eight RNA segments, whereas influenza C viruses only have seven RNAs. Both A and B influenza viruses contain two major surface glycoproteins: the hemagglutinin (HA) and the neuraminidase (NA). Influenza C viruses have only one major surface glycoprotein, HEF (hemagglutinin-esterase fusion). By using reverse genetics, we generated two seven-segmented chimeric influenza viruses. Each possesses six RNA segments from influenza virus A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PB2, PB1, PA, NP, M, and NS); the seventh RNA segment encodes either the influenza virus C/Johannesburg/1/66 HEF full-length protein or a chimeric protein HEF-Ecto, which consists of the HEF ectodomain and the HA transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions. To facilitate packaging of the heterologous segment, both the HEF and HEF-Ecto coding regions are flanked by HA packaging sequences. When introduced as an eighth segment with the NA packaging sequences, both viruses are able to stably express a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene, indicating a potential use for these viruses as vaccine vectors to carry foreign antigens. Finally, we show that incorporation of a GFP RNA segment enhances the growth of seven-segmented viruses, indicating that efficient influenza A viral RNA packaging requires the presence of eight RNA segments. These results support a selective mechanism of viral RNA recruitment to the budding site.

  14. [Clinical feature of human rabies].

    PubMed

    Takayama, Naohide

    2005-12-01

    Rabies is one of the most typical zoonosis that has been well known since ancient ages. Although no rabies case has been reported since 1957 in Japan, there are many areas where rabies is yet endemic or epidemic. Usually men contract rabies through rabid animal bite. However, human-to-human transmission of rabies virus occurred through organ transplantations. Rabies causes fatal encephalitis in animals and humans and effective methods to treat rabies patients have not yet been available. The only means to escape rabies death is to receive the post-exposure prophylaxis of rabies with rabies vaccine as soon after animal bite as possible. We should keep in mind that rabies is preventable but incurable.

  15. Quantitative Proteome Profiling of Street Rabies Virus-Infected Mouse Hippocampal Synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoning; Shi, Ning; Li, Ying; Dong, Chunyan; Zhang, Maolin; Guan, Zhenhong; Duan, Ming

    2016-09-01

    It is well established now that neuronal dysfunction rather than structural damage may be responsible for the development of rabies. In order to explore the underlying mechanisms in rabies virus (RABV) and synaptic dysfunctions, a quantitative proteome profiling was carried out on synaptosome samples from mice hippocampus. Synaptosome samples from mice hippocampus were isolated and confirmed by Western blot and transmission electron microscopy. Synaptosome protein content changes were quantitatively detected by Nano-LC-MS/MS. Protein functions were classified by the Gene Ontology (GO) and KEGG pathway. PSICQUIC was used to create a network. MCODE algorithm was applied to obtain subnetworks. Of these protein changes, 45 were upregulated and 14 were downregulated following RABV infection relative to non-infected (mock) synaptosomes. 28 proteins were unique to mock treatment and 12 were unique to RABV treatment. Proteins related to metabolism and synaptic vesicle showed the most changes in expression levels. Furthermore, protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks revealed that several key biological processes related to synaptic functions potentially were modulated by RABV, including energy metabolism, cytoskeleton organization, and synaptic transmission. These data will be useful for better understanding of neuronal dysfunction of rabies and provide the foundation for future research.

  16. Evaluation of a rapid immunochromatographic test strip for detection of Rabies virus in dog saliva samples.

    PubMed

    Kasempimolporn, Songsri; Saengseesom, Wachiraporn; Huadsakul, Samrerng; Boonchang, Supatsorn; Sitprija, Visith

    2011-11-01

    An immunochromatographic test strip for Rabies virus was evaluated with dog saliva samples. The test was initially validated against 237 dogs of known infection status, and then evaluated in the field with 1,290 live dogs. By validation of paired saliva-brain specimens obtained from dogs at necropsy, the saliva strip test was 94.4% specific and 93.0% sensitive when compared to the gold standard fluorescent antibody test (FAT) on brain smears. The sensitivity and specificity of a nested polymerase chain reaction (nPCR) assay using saliva were 100% compared to the FAT results. The performance of strip test with field saliva samples from street dogs had a specificity of 98.7% in comparison to nPCR as the reference method. As the strip test kit can potentially be used outside the laboratory and be applicable as an on-site testing assay, it represents a powerful screening tool for epidemiological surveys and disease control. The test could be useful for the surveillance of rabies in dogs and, in particular, be used to monitor the success of rabies control programs.

  17. A Bivalent, Chimeric Rabies Virus Expressing Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Envelope Induces Multifunctional Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Dunkel, Amber; Shen, Shixue; LaBranche, Celia C.; Montefiori, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We previously showed that a matrix (M) gene-deleted rabies virus (RABV)-based vaccine (RABV-ΔM) is highly immunogenic and induces potent B cell responses in the context of RABV infection. We speculated that RABV-ΔM expressing HIV proteins would also induce potent B cell responses against HIV antigens. As a prerequisite to future studies in nonhuman primates, we completed immunogenicity studies in mice to confirm the ability of RABV-ΔM to induce polyfunctional B cell responses in the context of HIV. To that end, the envelope protein from the mac239 strain of SIV (SIVmac239Env) was cloned into RABV-ΔM, resulting in RABV-ΔM-Env. Infectious virus was recovered following standard methods and propagated on baby hamster kidney cells stably expressing RABV M [>107 focus forming units (ffu)/ml]. Western blot analysis of cell lysates or of purified virions confirmed Env expression on the surface of infected cells and within virus particles, respectively. Positive neutralization activity against a neutralization-sensitive SIV strain and to a lesser extent against a neutralization-resistant SIV strain was detected in mice after a single intramuscular inoculation with RABV-ΔM-Env. The quality, but not quantity, of the antibody response was enhanced via boosting with recombinant gp130 or RABV-ΔM-Env as measured by an increase in antibody avidity and a skewing toward a Th1-type antibody response. We also show that an intradermal inoculation induces higher antibodies than an intramuscular or intranasal inoculation. An intradermal inoculation of RABV-ΔM-Env followed by a boost inoculation with recombinant gp130 produced anti-SIV antibodies with neutralizing and nonneutralizing antibody (nNAb) effector functions. Together, RABV-ΔM-Env induces B cells to secrete antibodies against SIV with the potential to clear both “free” and cell-associated virus. Strategies capable of eliciting both NAbs as well as nNAbs might help to improve the efficacy of HIV-1 vaccines

  18. Antibodies Targeting Novel Neutralizing Epitopes of Hepatitis C Virus Glycoprotein Preclude Genotype 2 Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kai; Liu, Ruyu; Rao, Huiying; Jiang, Dong; Wang, Jianghua; Xie, Xingwang; Wei, Lai

    2015-01-01

    Currently, there is no effective vaccine to prevent hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, partly due to our insufficient understanding of the virus glycoprotein immunology. Most neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) were identified using glycoprotein immunogens, such as recombinant E1E2, HCV pseudoparticles or cell culture derived HCV. However, the fact that in the HCV acute infection phase, only a small proportion of patients are self-resolved accompanied with the emergence of nAbs, indicates the limited immunogenicity of glycoprotein itself to induce effective antibodies against a highly evolved virus. Secondly, in previous reports, the immunogen sequence was mostly the genotype of the 1a H77 strain. Rarely, other genotypes/subtypes have been studied, although theoretically one genotype/subtype immunogen is able to induce cross-genotype neutralizing antibodies. To overcome these drawbacks and find potential novel neutralizing epitopes, 57 overlapping peptides encompassing the full-length glycoprotein E1E2 of subtype 1b were synthesized to immunize BALB/c mice, and the neutralizing reactive of the induced antisera against HCVpp genotypes 1-6 was determined. We defined a domain comprising amino acids (aa) 192-221, 232-251, 262-281 and 292-331 of E1, and 421-543, 564-583, 594-618 and 634-673 of E2, as the neutralizing regions of HCV glycoprotein. Peptides PUHI26 (aa 444-463) and PUHI45 (aa 604-618)-induced antisera displayed the most potent broad neutralizing reactive. Two monoclonal antibodies recognizing the PUHI26 and PUHI45 epitopes efficiently precluded genotype 2 viral (HCVcc JFH and J6 strains) infection, but they did not neutralize other genotypes. Our study mapped a neutralizing epitope region of HCV glycoprotein using a novel immunization strategy, and identified two monoclonal antibodies effective in preventing genotype 2 virus infection.

  19. Reemergence of rabies in the southern Han river region, Korea.

    PubMed

    Oem, Jae-Ku; Kim, Seong-Hee; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Lee, Kyoung-Ki

    2014-07-01

    Recently, 11 cases of animal rabies were reported in the southern region (Suwon and Hwaseong cities) of Gyeonggi Province, South Korea. The cases were temporally separated into two cases in dogs (Canis lupus familiaris) in spring 2012 and nine cases in domestic animals and wildlife in winter 2012-13. All carcasses were submitted for histopathologic examination and viral antigen identification. Sequences of the glycoprotein, nucleoprotein, and glycoprotein-large polymerase protein intergenic noncoding loci of the 11 strains were determined and compared with published reference sequences. All rabies strains were closely related to the Gangwon strains isolated in 2008-09, suggesting that the rabies virus strains isolated in Gyeonggi were introduced from Gangwon Province.

  20. Interaction of the Rabies Virus P Protein with the LC8 Dynein Light Chain

    PubMed Central

    Raux, Hélène; Flamand, Anne; Blondel, Danielle

    2000-01-01

    The rabies virus P protein is involved in viral transcription and replication but its precise function is not clear. We investigated the role of P (CVS strain) by searching for cellular partners by using a two-hybrid screening of a PC12 cDNA library. We isolated a cDNA encoding a 10-kDa dynein light chain (LC8). LC8 is a component of cytoplasmic dynein involved in the minus end-directed movement of organelles along microtubules. We confirmed that this molecule interacts with P by coimmunoprecipitation in infected cells and in cells transfected with a plasmid encoding P protein. LC8 was also detected in virus particles. Series of deletions from the N- and C-terminal ends of P protein were used to map the LC8-binding domain to the central part of P (residues 138 to 172). These results are relevant to speculate that dynein may be involved in the axonal transport of rabies virus along microtubules through neuron cells. PMID:11024151

  1. Complex Epidemiology of a Zoonotic Disease in a Culturally Diverse Region: Phylogeography of Rabies Virus in the Middle East

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Daniel L.; McElhinney, Lorraine M.; Freuling, Conrad M.; Marston, Denise A.; Banyard, Ashley C.; Goharrriz, Hooman; Wise, Emma; Breed, Andrew C.; Saturday, Greg; Kolodziejek, Jolanta; Zilahi, Erika; Al-Kobaisi, Muhannad F.; Nowotny, Norbert; Mueller, Thomas; Fooks, Anthony R.

    2015-01-01

    The Middle East is a culturally and politically diverse region at the gateway between Europe, Africa and Asia. Spatial dynamics of the fatal zoonotic disease rabies among countries of the Middle East and surrounding regions is poorly understood. An improved understanding of virus distribution is necessary to direct control methods. Previous studies have suggested regular trans-boundary movement, but have been unable to infer direction. Here we address these issues, by investigating the evolution of 183 rabies virus isolates collected from over 20 countries between 1972 and 2014. We have undertaken a discrete phylogeographic analysis on a subset of 139 samples to infer where and when movements of rabies have occurred. We provide evidence for four genetically distinct clades with separate origins currently circulating in the Middle East and surrounding countries. Introductions of these viruses have been followed by regular and multidirectional trans-boundary movements in some parts of the region, but relative isolation in others. There is evidence for minimal regular incursion of rabies from Central and Eastern Asia. These data support current initiatives for regional collaboration that are essential for rabies elimination. PMID:25811659

  2. Safety evaluation of the SAG2 rabies virus mutant in Tunisian dogs and several non-target species.

    PubMed

    Hammami, S; Schumacher, C L; Cliquet, F; Barrat, J; Tlatli, A; Ben Osman, R; Aouina, T; Aubert, A; Aubert, M

    1999-01-01

    The safety of the SAG2 rabies virus, a highly attenuated mutant of the SAD strain intended to vaccinate dogs by the oral route, was evaluated in local Tunisian dogs and in five other local species likely to consume vaccine baits. These species were the domestic cat (Felis catus), the jackal (Canis aureus), the jerboa (Jaculus orientalis), the merion (Meriones sp.) and the gerbil (Gerbillus campestris). The vaccine was administered orally to 21 dogs, 11 cats and eight jackals and orally or intramuscularly to 62 wild rodents of the above-mentioned species. Seven dogs, one cat, five jackals all juvenile and with poor health status) and two rodents died for intercurrent causes. The others were observed for 60-180 days. No animal showed any rabies symptom. Seroneutralizing antibodies were observed in all experimental groups, only after vaccination, with the highest rate being observed in jackals and rodents. The rabies virus was detected in the oral cavity of three cats 6 h after oral instillation, but was not isolated later either in saliva or in salivary glands. Tissue samples (brain and salivary glands) from dead or euthanized animals were examined for the rabies virus antigen by a fluorescent antibody test. No rabies antigen was detected. These trials confirm the safety of the SAG2 strain on the Tunisian species already demonstrated by other authors on many other target and non target species.

  3. BECN1-dependent CASP2 incomplete autophagy induction by binding to rabies virus phosphoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juan; Wang, Hailong; Gu, Jinyan; Deng, Tingjuan; Yuan, Zhuangchuan; Hu, Boli; Xu, Yunbin; Yan, Yan; Zan, Jie; Liao, Min; DiCaprio, Erin; Li, Jianrong; Su, Shuo; Zhou, Jiyong

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Autophagy is an essential component of host immunity and used by viruses for survival. However, the autophagy signaling pathways involved in virus replication are poorly documented. Here, we observed that rabies virus (RABV) infection triggered intracellular autophagosome accumulation and results in incomplete autophagy by inhibiting autophagy flux. Subsequently, we found that RABV infection induced the reduction of CASP2/caspase 2 and the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-AKT-MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) and AMPK-MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathways. Further investigation revealed that BECN1/Beclin 1 binding to viral phosphoprotein (P) induced an incomplete autophagy via activating the pathways CASP2-AMPK-AKT-MTOR and CASP2-AMPK-MAPK by decreasing CASP2. Taken together, our data first reveals a crosstalk of BECN1 and CASP2-dependent autophagy pathways by RABV infection. PMID:28129024

  4. Right Place, Wrong Species: A 20-Year Review of Rabies Virus Cross Species Transmission among Terrestrial Mammals in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Ryan M.; Gilbert, Amy; Slate, Dennis; Chipman, Richard; Singh, Amber; Cassie Wedd; Blanton, Jesse D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In the continental US, four terrestrial mammalian species are reservoirs for seven antigenic rabies virus variants. Cross species transmission (CST) occurs when a rabies virus variant causes disease in non-reservoir species. Methods This study analyzed national surveillance data for rabies in terrestrial mammals. The CST rate was defined as: number of rabid non-reservoir animals/number of rabid reservoir animals. CST rates were analyzed for trend. Clusters of high CST rate counties were evaluated using space-time scanning statistics. Results The number of counties reporting a raccoon variant CST rate >1.0 increased from 75 in 1992 to 187 in 2011; counties with skunk variant CST rates >1.0 remained unchanged during the same period. As of 2011, for every rabid raccoon reported within the raccoon variant region, there were 0.73 cases of this variant reported in non-reservoir animals. Skunks were the most common non-reservoir animal reported with the raccoon rabies variant. Domestic animals were the most common non-reservoir animal diagnosed with a skunk rabies virus variant (n = 1,601). Cross species transmission rates increased fastest among domestic animals. Conclusions Cross species transmission of rabies virus variants into non-reservoir animals increases the risk of human exposures and threatens current advances toward rabies control. Cross species transmission in raccoon rabies enzootic regions increased dramatically during the study period. Pet owners should vaccinate their dogs and cats to ensure against CST, particularly in regions with active foci of rabies circulation. Clusters of high CST activity represent areas for further study to better understand interspecies disease transmission dynamics. Each CST event has the potential to result in a rabies virus adapted for sustained transmission in a new species; therefore further understanding of the dynamics of CST may help in early detection or prevention of the emergence of new terrestrial

  5. Vaccinating the vampire bat Desmodus rotundus against rabies.

    PubMed

    Almeida, M F; Martorelli, L F A; Aires, C C; Barros, R F; Massad, E

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study was to extend the previous work of indirect oral rabies immunization of vampire bats (Desmodus rotundus) maintained in captivity, which demonstrated the immunogenicity of the V-RG vaccine (Vaccinia-Rabies Glycoprotein) and indicated that although the results had been encouraging, a new method for concentrating the vaccine should be tested in order to avoid vaccine loss and increase the survival proportion of bats after rabies challenge. In this study, three groups of seven bats each were tested with vaccine concentrated by ultrafiltration through a cellulose membrane. The vaccine was homogenized in Vaseline paste and applied to the back of one vector bat, which was then reintroduced into its group. A dose of 10(5.0) MICLD(50) rabies virus was used by intramuscular route to challenge the bats postvaccination. The survival proportion in the three groups after the challenge was 71.4%, 71.4% and 100%.

  6. First administration to humans of a monoclonal antibody cocktail against rabies virus: safety, tolerability, and neutralizing activity.

    PubMed

    Bakker, A B H; Python, C; Kissling, C J; Pandya, P; Marissen, W E; Brink, M F; Lagerwerf, F; Worst, S; van Corven, E; Kostense, S; Hartmann, K; Weverling, G J; Uytdehaag, F; Herzog, C; Briggs, D J; Rupprecht, C E; Grimaldi, R; Goudsmit, J

    2008-11-05

    Immediate passive immune prophylaxis as part of rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) often cannot be provided due to limited availability of human or equine rabies immunoglobulin (HRIG and ERIG, respectively). We report first clinical data from two phase I studies evaluating a monoclonal antibody cocktail CL184 against rabies. The studies included healthy adult subjects in the USA and India and involved two parts. First, subjects received a single intramuscular dose of CL184 or placebo in a double blind, randomized, dose-escalation trial. Second, open-label CL184 (20IU/kg) was co-administered with rabies vaccine. Safety was the primary objective and rabies virus neutralizing activity (RVNA) was investigated as efficacy parameter. Pain at the CL184 injection site was reported by less than 40% of subjects; no fever or local induration, redness or swelling was observed. RVNA was detectable from day 1 to day 21 after a single dose of CL184 20 or 40IU/kg. All subjects had adequate (>0.5IU/mL) RVNA levels from day 14 onwards when combined with rabies vaccine. CL184 appears promising as an alternative to RIG in PEP.

  7. Use of influenza C virus glycoprotein HEF for generation of vesicular stomatitis virus pseudotypes.

    PubMed

    Hanika, Andrea; Larisch, Birthe; Steinmann, Eike; Schwegmann-Wessels, Christel; Herrler, Georg; Zimmer, Gert

    2005-05-01

    Influenza C virus contains two envelope glycoproteins: CM2, a putative ion channel protein; and HEF, a unique multifunctional protein that performs receptor-binding, receptor-destroying and fusion activities. Here, it is demonstrated that expression of HEF is sufficient to pseudotype replication-incompetent vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) that lacks the VSV glycoprotein (G) gene. The pseudotyped virus showed characteristic features of influenza C virus with respect to proteolytic activation, receptor usage and cell tropism. Chimeric glycoproteins composed of HEF ectodomain and VSV-G C-terminal domains were efficiently incorporated into VSV particles and showed receptor-binding and receptor-destroying activities but, unlike authentic HEF, did not mediate efficient infection, probably because of impaired fusion activity. HEF-pseudotyped VSV efficiently infected polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cells via the apical plasma membrane, whereas entry of VSV-G-complemented virus was restricted to the basolateral membrane. These findings suggest that pseudotyping of viral vectors with HEF might be useful for efficient apical gene transfer into polarized epithelial cells and for targeting cells that express 9-O-acetylated sialic acids.

  8. Lyophilisation of influenza, rabies and Marburg lentiviral pseudotype viruses for the development and distribution of a neutralisation -assay-based diagnostic kit.

    PubMed

    Mather, Stuart T; Wright, Edward; Scott, Simon D; Temperton, Nigel J

    2014-12-15

    Pseudotype viruses (PVs) are chimeric, replication-deficient virions that mimic wild-type virus entry mechanisms and can be safely employed in neutralisation assays, bypassing the need for high biosafety requirements and performing comparably to established serological assays. However, PV supernatant necessitates -80°C long-term storage and cold-chain maintenance during transport, which limits the scope of dissemination and application throughout resource-limited laboratories. We therefore investigated the effects of lyophilisation on influenza, rabies and Marburg PV stability, with a view to developing a pseudotype virus neutralisation assay (PVNA) based kit suitable for affordable global distribution. Infectivity of each PV was calculated after lyophilisation and immediate reconstitution, as well as subsequent to incubation of freeze-dried pellets at varying temperatures, humidities and timepoints. Integrity of glycoprotein structure following treatment was also assessed by employing lyophilised PVs in downstream PVNAs. In the presence of 0.5M sucrose-PBS cryoprotectant, each freeze-dried pseudotype was stably stored for 4 weeks at up to 37°C and could be neutralised to the same potency as unlyophilised PVs when employed in PVNAs. These results confirm the viability of a freeze-dried PVNA-based kit, which could significantly facilitate low-cost serology for a wide portfolio of emerging infectious viruses.

  9. Prevalence of antibody against rabies among confined, free-roaming and stray dogs in a transit city of Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Olugasa, Babasola O; Aiyedun, Julius O; Emikpe, Benjamin O

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of anti-glycoprotein antibodies against rabies virus is studied in the sera of confined, free-roaming and stray dogs in Ilorin, the capital city of Kwara State, Nigeria. A quantitative indirect enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (i-ELISA) was used to detect rabies virus anti-glycoprotein antibodies in sera from 116 confined, 61 free-roaming, and 13 stray dogs. The sera were collected between June and December 2008 from apparently healthy dogs. Of these 190 dogs, 81 (42.6%), consisting of 57 confined (49.1%), 23 free-roaming (37.7%) and 1 stray (7.7%), had antibody titres that exceeded the positive threshold of 0.5 equivalent units (eu)/ml against rabies, while 109 (57.4%) presented titres that were below the threshold. Prevalence of rabies anti-glycoprotein antibody was higher in the confined dogs compared to free-roaming and stray dogs. Our results indicated low anti-rabies sero-prevalence (42.6%) in the dog population of Ilorin, a transit city that lies between northern and southern Nigeria. This is the first community-based prevalence report on the anti-rabies serological profile of dogs in Nigeria. The need for primary and booster mass vaccination of dogs and the impact of these findings on rabies control in Nigeria are discussed.

  10. In silico-based vaccine design against Ebola virus glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Dash, Raju; Das, Rasel; Junaid, Md; Akash, Md Forhad Chowdhury; Islam, Ashekul; Hosen, SM Zahid

    2017-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is one of the lethal viruses, causing more than 24 epidemic outbreaks to date. Despite having available molecular knowledge of this virus, no definite vaccine or other remedial agents have been developed yet for the management and avoidance of EBOV infections in humans. Disclosing this, the present study described an epitope-based peptide vaccine against EBOV, using a combination of B-cell and T-cell epitope predictions, followed by molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation approach. Here, protein sequences of all glycoproteins of EBOV were collected and examined via in silico methods to determine the most immunogenic protein. From the identified antigenic protein, the peptide region ranging from 186 to 220 and the sequence HKEGAFFLY from the positions of 154–162 were considered the most potential B-cell and T-cell epitopes, correspondingly. Moreover, this peptide (HKEGAFFLY) interacted with HLA-A*32:15 with the highest binding energy and stability, and also a good conservancy of 83.85% with maximum population coverage. The results imply that the designed epitopes could manifest vigorous enduring defensive immunity against EBOV. PMID:28356762

  11. A high-resolution genetic signature of demographic and spatial expansion in epizootic rabies virus

    PubMed Central

    Biek, Roman; Henderson, J. Caroline; Waller, Lance A.; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Real, Leslie A.

    2007-01-01

    Emerging pathogens potentially undergo rapid evolution while expanding in population size and geographic range during the course of invasion, yet it is generally difficult to demonstrate how these processes interact. Our analysis of a 30-yr data set covering a large-scale rabies virus outbreak among North American raccoons reveals the long lasting effect of the initial infection wave in determining how viral populations are genetically structured in space. We further find that coalescent-based estimates derived from the genetic data yielded an amazingly accurate reconstruction of the known spatial and demographic dynamics of the virus over time. Our study demonstrates the combined evolutionary and population dynamic processes characterizing the spread of pathogen after its introduction into a fully susceptible host population. Furthermore, the results provide important insights regarding the spatial scale of rabies persistence and validate the use of coalescent approaches for uncovering even relatively complex population histories. Such approaches will be of increasing relevance for understanding the epidemiology of emerging zoonotic diseases in a landscape context. PMID:17470818

  12. A recombinant rabies virus carrying GFP between N and P affects viral transcription in vitro.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Zhao, Jing; Tian, Qin; Mo, Weiyu; Wang, Yifei; Chen, Hao; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2016-06-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the rabies virus to be a perfect potential vaccine vector to insert foreign genes into the target genome. For this study, a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was cloned into the rabies virus (RABV) genome between the N and P gene. CT dinucleotide was inserted as intergenic region. The recombinant high egg passage Flury strain (HEP-Flury) of RABV, carrying GFP (rHEP-NP-GFP), was generated in BHK-21 cells using reverse genetics. According to the viral growth kinetics assay, the addition of GFP between N and P gene has little effect on the viral growth compared to the parental strain HEP-Flury. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) indicated that rHEP-NP-GFP showed different viral gene transcription, especially for G gene, compared to HEP-Flury. The same is true for one other recombinant RABV carrying GFP between G and L gene in NA cells. In addition, parent HEP-Flury showed more expression of innate immune-related molecules in NA cells. Compared to HEP-Flury, Western blotting (WB) indicated that insertion of a foreign gene following N gene enhanced the expression of M and G proteins. According to the qPCR and WB, GFP expression levels of rHEP-NP-GFP were significantly higher than rHEP-GFP. This study indicates HEP-Flury as valid vector to express exogenous genes between N and P.

  13. Characterization of a wild rabies virus isolate of porcine origin in China.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yongwen; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Xiangyin; Yang, Youtian; Yang, Xianfeng; Zheng, Zezhong; Deng, Xianbo; Wu, Xiaowei; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2013-07-01

    Rabies virus (RABV) that circulates worldwide in a variety of mammals can cause fatal encephalomyelitis. GD-SH-01, a street rabies virus, was isolated from a rabid pig in China. We investigated the pathogenicity of GD-SH-01 in suckling and adult mice, and compared the susceptibility of NA and BHK-21 cells in the culture to infection by GD-SH-01 and CVS-24. The complete GD-SH-01 genome sequence was determined and compared with known RABV wild strains to understand the mutations and genetic diversity that allow RABV to spread and adapt in new hosts, such as pigs. Our results suggest that GD-SH-01 possesses the characteristics of a virulent strain in Southern China and shows higher pathogenicity index than that of CVS-24 regardless of its lower level of replication in mouse brain. Up to 47 unique nucleotide substitutions were found in the genome, including five missense mutations. These data provide useful information for further understanding the transmission mechanism and the genetic variation of RABV in dissimilar hosts. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Hepatitis C Virus E2 Envelope Glycoprotein Core Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Leopold; Giang, Erick; Nieusma, Travis; Kadam, Rameshwar U.; Cogburn, Kristin E.; Hua, Yuanzi; Dai, Xiaoping; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Burton, Dennis R.; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Law, Mansun

    2014-08-26

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV), a Hepacivirus, is a major cause of viral hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV envelope glycoproteins E1 and E2 mediate fusion and entry into host cells and are the primary targets of the humoral immune response. The crystal structure of the E2 core bound to broadly neutralizing antibody AR3C at 2.65 angstroms reveals a compact architecture composed of a central immunoglobulin-fold β sandwich flanked by two additional protein layers. The CD81 receptor binding site was identified by electron microscopy and site-directed mutagenesis and overlaps with the AR3C epitope. The x-ray and electron microscopy E2 structures differ markedly from predictions of an extended, three-domain, class II fusion protein fold and therefore provide valuable information for HCV drug and vaccine design.

  15. Expression of the interferon-alpha/beta-inducible bovine Mx1 dynamin interferes with replication of rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Leroy, M; Pire, G; Baise, E; Desmecht, D

    2006-03-01

    Rabies is a fatal anthropozoonotic viral infection of the central nervous system that remains a serious public health problem in many countries. As several animal cases of spontaneous survival to infection were reported and because type 1 interferons were shown to protect against the virus, it was suggested that innate resistance mechanisms exist. Among the antiviral proteins that are synthesized in response to interferon-alpha/beta stimulation, Mx proteins from several species are long known to block the replication of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). As both VSV and rabies virus belongs to the Rhabdoviridae family, this study was started with the aim to establish whether the anti-VSV activity of a mammalian Mx protein could be extended to rabies virus. This question was addressed by inoculating the virus onto a bovine Mx1 or human MxA-expressing Vero cell clone. Plaque formation was unambiguously blocked, and viral yields were reduced 100- to 1000-fold by bovine Mx1 expression for both SAG2 and SADB19 viral strains. In opposition, only SAG2 strain could be inhibited by the expression of human MxA protein. The effect of both proteins expression was then evaluated at the viral protein expression level. Again, boMx1 was able to repress protein expression in both strain, whereas only SAG2 proteins were inhibited in human MxA-expressing cells. These results suggest that protection conferred by interferon-alpha/beta against rabies could be, at least partially, attributable to the Mx pathway. Alternatively, bovine Mx1 could be unique in its ability to repress rabies virus which, if confirmed in vivo, would open an avenue for the development of new antirabies therapeutic strategies.

  16. Applications of pox virus vectors to vaccination: an update.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, E

    1996-10-15

    Recombinant pox viruses have been generated for vaccination against heterologous pathogens. Amongst these, the following are notable examples. (i) The engineering of the Copenhagen strain of vaccinia virus to express the rabies virus glycoprotein. When applied in baits, this recombinant has been shown to vaccinate the red fox in Europe and raccoons in the United States, stemming the spread of rabies virus infection in the wild. (ii) A fowlpox-based recombinant expressing the Newcastle disease virus fusion and hemagglutinin glycoproteins has been shown to protect commercial broiler chickens for their lifetime when the vaccine was administered at 1 day of age, even in the presence of maternal immunity against either the Newcastle disease virus or the pox vector. (iii) Recombinants of canarypox virus, which is restricted for replication to avian species, have provided protection against rabies virus challenge in cats and dogs, against canine distemper virus, feline leukemia virus, and equine influenza virus disease. In humans, canarypox virus-based recombinants expressing antigens from rabies virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and HIV have been shown to be safe and immunogenic. (iv) A highly attenuated vaccinia derivative, NYVAC, has been engineered to express antigens from both animal and human pathogens. Safety and immunogenicity of NYVAC-based recombinants expressing the rabies virus glycoprotein, a polyprotein from Japanese encephalitis virus, and seven antigens from Plasmodium falciparum have been demonstrated to be safe and immunogenic in early human vaccine studies.

  17. Hantavirus Gn and Gc Envelope Glycoproteins: Key Structural Units for Virus Cell Entry and Virus Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Cifuentes-Muñoz, Nicolás; Salazar-Quiroz, Natalia; Tischler, Nicole D.

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, ultrastructural studies of viral surface spikes from three different genera within the Bunyaviridae family have revealed a remarkable diversity in their spike organization. Despite this structural heterogeneity, in every case the spikes seem to be composed of heterodimers formed by Gn and Gc envelope glycoproteins. In this review, current knowledge of the Gn and Gc structures and their functions in virus cell entry and exit is summarized. During virus cell entry, the role of Gn and Gc in receptor binding has not yet been determined. Nevertheless, biochemical studies suggest that the subsequent virus-membrane fusion activity is accomplished by Gc. Further, a class II fusion protein conformation has been predicted for Gc of hantaviruses, and novel crystallographic data confirmed such a fold for the Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) Gc protein. During virus cell exit, the assembly of different viral components seems to be established by interaction of Gn and Gc cytoplasmic tails (CT) with internal viral ribonucleocapsids. Moreover, recent findings show that hantavirus glycoproteins accomplish important roles during virus budding since they self-assemble into virus-like particles. Collectively, these novel insights provide essential information for gaining a more detailed understanding of Gn and Gc functions in the early and late steps of the hantavirus infection cycle. PMID:24755564

  18. Vaccinia Virus Recombinant Expressing Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Glycoprotein D Prevents Latent Herpes in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Kenneth J.; Mackett, Michael; Wohlenberg, Charles; Notkins, Abner Louis; Moss, Bernard

    1985-05-01

    In humans, herpes simplex virus causes a primary infection and then often a latent ganglionic infection that persists for life. Because these latent infections can recur periodically, vaccines are needed that can protect against both primary and latent herpes simplex infections. Infectious vaccinia virus recombinants that contain the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D gene under control of defined early or late vaccinia virus promoters were constructed. Tissue culture cells infected with these recombinant viruses synthesized a glycosylated protein that had the same mass (60,000 daltons) as the glycoprotein D produced by HSV-1. Immunization of mice with one of these recombinant viruses by intradermal, subcutaneous, or intraperitoneal routes resulted in the production of antibodies that neutralized HSV-1 and protected the mice against subsequent lethal challenge with HSV-1 or HSV-2. Immunization with the recombinant virus also protected the majority of the mice against the development of a latent HSV-1 infection of the trigeminal ganglia. This is the first demonstration that a genetically engineered vaccine can prevent the development of latency.

  19. Differential use of the nicotinic receptor by rabies virus based upon substrate origin.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Castellanos, David R; Castellanos, Jaime E; Hurtado, Hernán

    2002-04-01

    To determine the role that the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor plays in the adsorption process of rabies virus (RV), adult dorsal root ganglion dissociated cultures were exposed to nicotinic agonists before being inoculated. The fixed strain of RV Challenge Virus Standard-11 (CVS-11) was used after being passaged in two different ways, in baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells and in adult mouse brain (MB). Carbachol and nicotine reduced the percentage of CVS-MB infected neurons, yet none of the agonists tested changed the proportion of CVS-BHK infected neurons. This result suggests that the RV phenotype changes depending on its replication environment and neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are preferentially used for infection by RV strains adapted to adult mouse brain but not to fibroblasts.

  20. Antibody to the E3 Glycoprotein Protects Mice against Lethal Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Infection▿

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Michael D.; Buckley, Marilyn J.; Melanson, Vanessa R.; Glass, Pamela J.; Norwood, David; Hart, Mary Kate

    2010-01-01

    Six monoclonal antibodies were isolated that exhibited specificity for a furin cleavage site deletion mutant (V3526) of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV). These antibodies comprise a single competition group and bound the E3 glycoprotein of VEEV subtype I viruses but failed to bind the E3 glycoprotein of other alphaviruses. These antibodies neutralized V3526 virus infectivity but did not neutralize the parental strain of Trinidad donkey (TrD) VEEV. However, the E3-specific antibodies did inhibit the production of virus from VEEV TrD-infected cells. In addition, passive immunization of mice demonstrated that antibody to the E3 glycoprotein provided protection against lethal VEEV TrD challenge. This is the first recognition of a protective epitope in the E3 glycoprotein. Furthermore, these results indicate that E3 plays a critical role late in the morphogenesis of progeny virus after E3 appears on the surfaces of infected cells. PMID:20926570

  1. Leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 4 facilitates vesicular stomatitis virus infection by binding vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Huang, Hongjun; Tan, Binghe; Wei, Yinglei; Xiong, Qingqing; Yan, Yan; Hou, Lili; Wu, Nannan; Siwko, Stefan; Cimarelli, Andrea; Xu, Jianrong; Han, Honghui; Qian, Min; Liu, Mingyao; Du, Bing

    2017-10-06

    Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and rabies and Chandipura viruses belong to the Rhabdovirus family. VSV is a common laboratory virus to study viral evolution and host immune responses to viral infection, and recombinant VSV-based vectors have been widely used for viral oncolysis, vaccination, and gene therapy. Although the tropism of VSV is broad, and its envelope glycoprotein G is often used for pseudotyping other viruses, the host cellular components involved in VSV infection remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the host protein leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 4 (Lgr4) is essential for VSV and VSV-G pseudotyped lentivirus (VSVG-LV) to infect susceptible cells. Accordingly, Lgr4-deficient mice had dramatically decreased VSV levels in the olfactory bulb. Furthermore, Lgr4 knockdown in RAW 264.7 cells also significantly suppressed VSV infection, and Lgr4 overexpression in RAW 264.7 cells enhanced VSV infection. Interestingly, only VSV infection relied on Lgr4, whereas infections with Newcastle disease virus, influenza A virus (A/WSN/33), and herpes simplex virus were unaffected by Lgr4 status. Of note, assays of virus entry, cell ELISA, immunoprecipitation, and surface plasmon resonance indicated that VSV bound susceptible cells via the Lgr4 extracellular domain. Pretreating cells with an Lgr4 antibody, soluble LGR4 extracellular domain, or R-spondin 1 blocked VSV infection by competitively inhibiting VSV binding to Lgr4. Taken together, the identification of Lgr4 as a VSV-specific host factor provides important insights into understanding VSV entry and its pathogenesis and lays the foundation for VSV-based gene therapy and viral oncolytic therapeutics. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Synergic effects between ocellatin-F1 and bufotenine on the inhibition of BHK-21 cellular infection by the rabies virus.

    PubMed

    Cunha Neto, Rene Dos Santos; Vigerelli, Hugo; Jared, Carlos; Antoniazzi, Marta Maria; Chaves, Luciana Botelho; da Silva, Andréa de Cássia Rodrigues; Melo, Robson Lopes de; Sciani, Juliana Mozer; Pimenta, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    Rabies is an incurable neglected zoonosis with worldwide distribution characterized as a lethal progressive acute encephalitis caused by a lyssavirus. Animal venoms and secretions have long been studied as new bioactive molecular sources, presenting a wide spectrum of biological effects, including new antiviral agents. Bufotenine, for instance, is an alkaloid isolated from the skin secretion of the anuran Rhinella jimi that inhibits cellular penetration by the rabies virus. Antimicrobial peptides, such as ocellatin-P1 and ocellatin-F1, are present in the skin secretion of anurans from the genus Leptodactylus and provide chemical defense against predators and microorganisms. Skin secretion from captive Leptodactylus labyrinthicus was collected by mechanical stimulation, analyzed by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, and assayed for antiviral and cytotoxic activities. Synthetic peptides were obtained using solid phase peptide synthesis, purified by liquid chromatography and structurally characterized by mass spectrometry, and assayed in the same models. Cytotoxicity assays based on changes in cellular morphology were performed using baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells. Fixed Rabies virus (Pasteur Virus - PV) strain was used for virological assays based on rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test. Herein, we describe a synergic effect between ocellatin-F1 and bufotenine. This synergism was observed when screening the L. labyrinthicus skin secretion for antiviral activities. The active fraction major component was the antimicrobial peptide ocellatin-F1. Nevertheless, when the pure synthetic peptide was assayed, little antiviral activity was detectable. In-depth analyses of the active fraction revealed the presence of residual alkaloids together with ocellatin-F1. By adding sub-effective doses (e.g. < IC50) of pure bufotenine to synthetic ocellatin-F1, the antiviral effect was regained. Moreover, a tetrapetide derived from ocellatin-F1, based on alignment with

  3. Rabies virus inactivates cofilin to facilitate viral budding and release.

    PubMed

    Zan, Jie; An, Shu-Ting; Mo, Kai-Kun; Zhou, Jian-Wei; Liu, Juan; Wang, Hai-Long; Yan, Yan; Liao, Min; Zhou, Ji-Yong

    2016-09-02

    Cytoplasmic actin and actin-associated proteins have been identified in RABV particles. Although actin is involved in RABV entry into cells, the specific role of actin in RABV budding and release remains unknown. Our study found that RABV M protein-mediated virion budding depends on intact actin filaments. Confocal microscopy demonstrated a block to virions budding, with a number of M protein-mediated budding vesicles detained in the cell cytoplasm. Furthermore, RABV infection resulted in inactivation of cofilin and upregulation of phosphorylated cofilin. Knockdown of cofilin reduced RABV release. These results for the first time indicate that RABV infection resulted in upregulation of phosphorylated cofilin to facililtate actin polymerization for virus budding. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Phosphoprotein Gene Contributes to the Enhanced Apoptosis Induced by Wild-Type Rabies Virus GD-SH-01 In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Qin; Wang, Yifei; Zhang, Qiong; Luo, Jun; Jiang, He; Zhang, Boyue; Mei, Mingzhu; Wu, Fan; Wu, Yuting; Peng, Jiaojiao; Long, Teng; Luo, Yongwen; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-01

    Previous research demonstrated that the matrix protein (M) and glycoprotein (G) of attenuated rabies virus (RABV) strains are involved in the induction of host cell apoptosis. In this work, we show that wild-type (wt) RABV GD-SH-01 induces significantly greater apoptosis than the attenuated strain HEP-Flury. In order to identify the gene(s) accounting for this phenotype, five recombinant RABVs (rRABVs) were constructed by replacing each single gene of HEP-Flury with the corresponding gene of GD-SH-01. By using these rRABVs, we found that not only M and G, but also the phosphoprotein (P) plays an important role in inducing apoptosis. In order to figure out the different role of P gene in inducing apoptosis from the highly divergent background, another rRABV rGDSH-P, which carries the P gene of HEP-Flury in the background of the GD-SH-01 was generated. It was found that infection of NA cells with GD-SH-01 or the recombinant strain rHEP-shP, which carries P gene of GD-SH-01, induced significantly greater apoptosis than HEP-Flury or rGDSH-P in a caspase-dependent pathway that ultimately leads to the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, which is well characterized with the downregulation of bcl-2, the decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, and finally the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Our results imply that wt P from GD-SH-01 mediates this effect may partly by facilitating viral RNA synthesis but not by viral replication. In sum, we demonstrate a wt RABV strain GD-SH-01 to induce stronger apoptosis than an attenuated RABV HEP-Flury and propose that wt P from GD-SH-01 is involved in this process. PMID:28928726

  5. Phosphoprotein Gene Contributes to the Enhanced Apoptosis Induced by Wild-Type Rabies Virus GD-SH-01 In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qin; Wang, Yifei; Zhang, Qiong; Luo, Jun; Jiang, He; Zhang, Boyue; Mei, Mingzhu; Wu, Fan; Wu, Yuting; Peng, Jiaojiao; Long, Teng; Luo, Yongwen; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2017-01-01

    Previous research demonstrated that the matrix protein (M) and glycoprotein (G) of attenuated rabies virus (RABV) strains are involved in the induction of host cell apoptosis. In this work, we show that wild-type (wt) RABV GD-SH-01 induces significantly greater apoptosis than the attenuated strain HEP-Flury. In order to identify the gene(s) accounting for this phenotype, five recombinant RABVs (rRABVs) were constructed by replacing each single gene of HEP-Flury with the corresponding gene of GD-SH-01. By using these rRABVs, we found that not only M and G, but also the phosphoprotein (P) plays an important role in inducing apoptosis. In order to figure out the different role of P gene in inducing apoptosis from the highly divergent background, another rRABV rGDSH-P, which carries the P gene of HEP-Flury in the background of the GD-SH-01 was generated. It was found that infection of NA cells with GD-SH-01 or the recombinant strain rHEP-shP, which carries P gene of GD-SH-01, induced significantly greater apoptosis than HEP-Flury or rGDSH-P in a caspase-dependent pathway that ultimately leads to the activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, which is well characterized with the downregulation of bcl-2, the decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3, and finally the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase. Our results imply that wt P from GD-SH-01 mediates this effect may partly by facilitating viral RNA synthesis but not by viral replication. In sum, we demonstrate a wt RABV strain GD-SH-01 to induce stronger apoptosis than an attenuated RABV HEP-Flury and propose that wt P from GD-SH-01 is involved in this process.

  6. Recombinant rabies virus expressing the H protein of canine distemper virus protects dogs from the lethal distemper challenge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng-Xue; Zhang, Shu-Qin; Zhu, Hong-Wei; Yang, Yong; Sun, Na; Tan, Bin; Li, Zhen-Guang; Cheng, Shi-Peng; Fu, Zhen F; Wen, Yong-Jun

    2014-12-05

    The rabies virus (RV) vector LBNSE expressing foreign antigens have shown considerable promise as vaccines against viral and bacteria diseases, which is effective and safe. We produced a new RV-based vaccine vehicle expressing 1.824 kb hemagglutinin (H) gene of the canine distemper virus (CDV) by reverse genetics technology. The recombinant virus LBNSE-CDV-H retained growth properties similar to those of vector LBNSE both in BSR and mNA cell culture. The H gene of CDV was expressed and detected by immunostaining. To compare the immunogenicity of LBNSE-CDV-H, dogs were immunized with each of these recombinant viruses by intramuscular (i.m.). The dogs were bled at third weeks after the immunization for the measurement of virus neutralizing antibody (VNA) and then challenged with virulent virus (ZJ 7) at fourth weeks. The parent virus (LBNSE) without expression of any foreign molecules was included for comparison. Dogs inoculated with LBNSE-CDV-H showed no any signs of disease and exhibited seroconversion against both RV and CDV H protein. The LBNSE-CDV-H did not cause disease in dogs and conferred protection from challenge with a lethal wild type CDV strain, demonstrating its potential value for wildlife conservation efforts. Together, these studies suggest that recombinant RV expressing H protein from CDV stimulated high levels of adaptive immune responses (VNA), and protected all dogs challenge infection.

  7. Antibody Derived Peptides for Detection of Ebola Virus Glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Luis Mario; Marquez-Ipiña, Alan Roberto; López-Pacheco, Felipe; Pérez-Chavarría, Roberto; González-Vázquez, Juan Carlos; González-González, Everardo; Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Ponce-Ponce de León, César Alejandro; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali; Alvarez, Mario Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Current Ebola virus (EBOV) detection methods are costly and impractical for epidemic scenarios. Different immune-based assays have been reported for the detection and quantification of Ebola virus (EBOV) proteins. In particular, several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been described that bind the capsid glycoprotein (GP) of EBOV GP. However, the currently available platforms for the design and production of full-length mAbs are cumbersome and costly. The use of antibody fragments, rather than full-length antibodies, might represent a cost-effective alternative for the development of diagnostic and possibly even therapeutic alternatives for EBOV. We report the design and expression of three recombinant anti-GP mAb fragments in Escherichia coli cultures. These fragments contained the heavy and light variable portions of the three well-studied anti-GP full-length mAbs 13C6, 13F6, and KZ52, and are consequently named scFv-13C6, scFv-13F6, and Fab-KZ52, respectively. All three fragments exhibited specific anti-GP binding activity in ELISA experiments comparable to that of full-length anti-GP antibodies (i.e., the same order of magnitude) and they are easily and economically produced in bacterial cultures. Antibody fragments might represent a useful, effective, and low cost alternative to full-length antibodies in Ebola related capture and diagnostics applications.

  8. Antibody Derived Peptides for Detection of Ebola Virus Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    López-Pacheco, Felipe; Pérez-Chavarría, Roberto; González-Vázquez, Juan Carlos; González-González, Everardo; Trujillo-de Santiago, Grissel; Ponce-Ponce de León, César Alejandro; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali; Alvarez, Mario Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Background Current Ebola virus (EBOV) detection methods are costly and impractical for epidemic scenarios. Different immune-based assays have been reported for the detection and quantification of Ebola virus (EBOV) proteins. In particular, several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been described that bind the capsid glycoprotein (GP) of EBOV GP. However, the currently available platforms for the design and production of full-length mAbs are cumbersome and costly. The use of antibody fragments, rather than full-length antibodies, might represent a cost-effective alternative for the development of diagnostic and possibly even therapeutic alternatives for EBOV. Methods/Principal Findings We report the design and expression of three recombinant anti-GP mAb fragments in Escherichia coli cultures. These fragments contained the heavy and light variable portions of the three well-studied anti-GP full-length mAbs 13C6, 13F6, and KZ52, and are consequently named scFv-13C6, scFv-13F6, and Fab-KZ52, respectively. All three fragments exhibited specific anti-GP binding activity in ELISA experiments comparable to that of full-length anti-GP antibodies (i.e., the same order of magnitude) and they are easily and economically produced in bacterial cultures. Conclusion/Significance Antibody fragments might represent a useful, effective, and low cost alternative to full-length antibodies in Ebola related capture and diagnostics applications. PMID:26489048

  9. In vivo differential susceptibility of sensory neurons to rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Velandia-Romero, Myriam L; Castellanos, Jaime E; Martínez-Gutiérrez, Marlén

    2013-08-20

    There is controversy with regard to the entry pathway of the rabies virus (RABV) into the central nervous system (CNS). Some authors have suggested that the virus inoculated at the periphery is captured and transported to CNS only by motor neurons; however, it has been reported that dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons capture and transport the virus to the spinal cord (SC) and then to the brain. It is probable that preferences for one pathway or another depend on the site of inoculation and the post-infection time. Therefore, in the present study, we evaluated different vertebral segments and post-infection times, along with the location, number, and subpopulation of sensory neurons susceptible to infection after inoculating RABV in the footpads of adult mice. It was noted that the virus inoculated in the footpad preferentially entered the CNS through the large-sized DRG sensory neurons, while infection of the motor neurons occurred later. Further, it was found that the virus was dispersed in spinal cord trans-synaptically through the interneurons, arriving at both sensory neurons and contralateral motor neurons. In conclusion, we observed that RABV inoculated in the plantar footpad is captured preferentially by large sensory neurons and is transported to the DRG, where it replicates and is spread to the SC using transynaptic jumps, infecting sensory and motor neurons at the same level before ascending to the brain.

  10. A method for simultaneous detection and identification of Brazilian dog- and vampire bat-related rabies virus by reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay.

    PubMed

    Saitou, Yasumasa; Kobayashi, Yuki; Hirano, Shinji; Mochizuki, Nobuyuki; Itou, Takuya; Ito, Fumio H; Sakai, Takeo

    2010-09-01

    At present, the sporadic occurrence of human rabies in Brazil can be attributed primarily to dog- and vampire bat-related rabies viruses. Reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) was employed as a simultaneous detection method for both rabies field variants within 60 min. Vampire bat-related rabies viruses could be distinguished from dog variants by digesting amplicons of the RT-LAMP reaction using the restriction enzyme AlwI. Amplification and digestion could both be completed within 120 min after RNA extraction. In addition, the RT-LAMP assay also detected rabies virus in isolates from Brazilian frugivorous bats and Ugandan dog, bovine and goat samples. In contrast, there were false negative results from several Brazilian insectivorous bats and all of Chinese dog, pig, and bovine samples using the RT-LAMP assay. This study showed that the RT-LAMP assay is effective for the rapid detection of rabies virus isolates from the primary reservoir in Brazil. Further improvements are necessary so that the RT-LAMP assay can be employed for the universal detection of genetic variants of rabies virus in the field.

  11. Recombinant rabies virus expressing IL-21 enhances immunogenicity through activation of T follicular helper cells and germinal centre B cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yajing; Zhou, Ming; Wang, Zhao; Yang, Jie; Li, Mingming; Wang, Kunlun; Cui, Min; Chen, Huanchun; Fu, Zhen F; Zhao, Ling

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that the lack of interleukin-21 (IL-21) signalling could affect specific antibody induction after rabies vaccination. Here, to further investigate the over-expression of IL-21 on the immunogenicity of rabies virus (RABV), a recombinant RABV expressing murine IL-21, designated LBNSE-IL21, was constructed and evaluated in a mouse model. It was found that in mice immunized with LBNSE-IL21, there was a substantial increase in the number of T follicular helper cells and germinal centre B cells but no enhancement of dendritic cell activation. Furthermore, significantly higher rabies virus-neutralizing antibody (VNA) titres were produced in mice immunized with LBNSE-IL21 than in mice immunized with the parent virus LBNSE in the first six weeks, resulting in higher protection. Together, these results suggest that LBNSE-IL21 can induce a rapid and robust VNA titre, and it has the potential to be developed as a promising rabies vaccine.

  12. Spatial and temporal dynamics of rabies virus variants in big brown bat populations across Canada: footprints of an emerging zoonosis.

    PubMed

    Nadin-Davis, Susan A; Feng, Yuqin; Mousse, Delphine; Wandeler, Alexander I; Aris-Brosou, Stéphane

    2010-05-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of a collection of rabies viruses that currently circulate in Canadian big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) identified five distinct lineages which have emerged from a common ancestor that existed over 400 years ago. Four of these lineages are regionally restricted in their range while the fifth lineage, comprising two-thirds of all specimens, has emerged in recent times and exhibits a recent demographic expansion with rapid spread across the Canadian range of its host. Four of these viral lineages are shown to circulate in the US. To explore the role of the big brown bat host in dissemination of these viral variants, the population structure of this species was explored using both mitochondrial DNA and nuclear microsatellite markers. These data suggest the existence of three subpopulations distributed in British Columbia, mid-western Canada (Alberta and Saskatchewan) and eastern Canada (Quebec and Ontario), respectively. We suggest that these three bat subpopulations may differ by their level of female phylopatry, which in turn affects the spread of rabies viruses. We discuss how this bat population structure has affected the historical spread of rabies virus variants across the country and the potential impact of these events on public health concerns regarding rabies.

  13. New rabies virus variant found during an epizootic in white-nosed coatis from the Yucatan Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Aréchiga-Ceballos, N; Velasco-Villa, A; Shi, M; Flores-Chávez, S; Barrón, B; Cuevas-Domínguez, E; González-Origel, A; Aguilar-Setién, A

    2010-11-01

    In February 2008, three white-nosed coatis (Nasua narica) were found dead in a recreational park in Cancun, Mexico. The diagnosis of rabies virus (RABV) infection was confirmed by direct immunofluorescence test. The phylogenetic analysis performed with the complete RABV nucleoprotein gene positioned this isolate close to a sequence of a human rabies case reported during 2008 from Oaxaca, Mexico, sharing 93% similarity. In turn, these two variants are related to another variant found in rabid Tadarida brasiliensis mexicana bats across North America. Anti-RABV neutralizing activity (1.3 IU/ml) was found in the serum of one white-nosed coati captured with another five that cohabited with the dead animals. Enhanced rabies surveillance and pathogenesis studies should be conducted in coatis and insectivorous bats of the region to clarify the role of these species as potential emergent or long-term unidentified RABV reservoirs.

  14. [Prokaryotic expression and immunogenicity analysis of glycoprotein from infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus].

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-ming; Liu, Hong-bai; Yin, Jia-sheng; Lu, Tong-yan

    2013-09-01

    In order to detect Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus with immunological methods, the surface glycoprotein of a recent IHNV-Sn isolated from farmed rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ) in China was amplified and cloned into pET27b(+) vector (designated as pET27b-G ). The expression of recombinant plasmid pET27b-G in E. coli BL21(DE3) was induced and determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. The predicted molecular weight of glycoprotein protein was approximately 55 kD and was confirmed in this study. The inclusion body of glycoprotein was treated with urea at different urea concentrations, and dialyzed into PBS buffer. Purified glycoprotein with high concentration was obtained after dialyzed in the PBS buffer. Antisera against glycoprotein were produced from immunized rabbits. The prepared antisera could react specifically with both the recombinant glycoprotein and natural glycoprotein of the IHNV-Sn isolated in the test of indirect ELISA, and the titer against the recombinant glycoprotein was 1:20,000. IFA showed that the antisera can recognize the glycoprotein located on the surface of IHNV-Sn and IHNV reference strain. These results indicated that the expressed glycoprotein was immunogenical and antigenical and could be functional as the natural IHNV glycoprotein. These results established a foundation for further study on vaccine and rapid diagnosis of IHNV.

  15. Immune Clearance of Attenuated Rabies Virus Results in Neuronal Survival with Altered Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Gomme, Emily A.; Wirblich, Christoph; Addya, Sankar; Rall, Glenn F.; Schnell, Matthias J.

    2012-01-01

    Rabies virus (RABV) is a highly neurotropic pathogen that typically leads to mortality of infected animals and humans. The precise etiology of rabies neuropathogenesis is unknown, though it is hypothesized to be due either to neuronal death or dysfunction. Analysis of human brains post-mortem reveals surprisingly little tissue damage and neuropathology considering the dramatic clinical symptomology, supporting the neuronal dysfunction model. However, whether or not neurons survive infection and clearance and, provided they do, whether they are functionally restored to their pre-infection phenotype has not been determined in vivo for RABV, or any neurotropic virus. This is due, in part, to the absence of a permanent “mark” on once-infected cells that allow their identification long after viral clearance. Our approach to study the survival and integrity of RABV-infected neurons was to infect Cre reporter mice with recombinant RABV expressing Cre-recombinase (RABV-Cre) to switch neurons constitutively expressing tdTomato (red) to expression of a Cre-inducible EGFP (green), permanently marking neurons that had been infected in vivo. We used fluorescence microscopy and quantitative real-time PCR to measure the survival of neurons after viral clearance; we found that the vast majority of RABV-infected neurons survive both infection and immunological clearance. We were able to isolate these previously infected neurons by flow cytometry and assay their gene expression profiles compared to uninfected cells. We observed transcriptional changes in these “cured” neurons, predictive of decreased neurite growth and dysregulated microtubule dynamics. This suggests that viral clearance, though allowing for survival of neurons, may not restore them to their pre-infection functionality. Our data provide a proof-of-principle foundation to re-evaluate the etiology of human central nervous system diseases of unknown etiology: viruses may trigger permanent neuronal damage that

  16. Expression of interleukin-6 by a recombinant rabies virus enhances its immunogenicity as a potential vaccine.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Zhang, Boyue; Wu, Yuting; Tian, Qin; Zhao, Jing; Lyu, Ziyu; Zhang, Qiong; Mei, Mingzhu; Luo, Yongwen; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2017-02-07

    Several studies have confirmed that interleukin-6 (IL6) mediates multiple biological effects that enhance immune responses when used as an adjuvant. In the present study, recombinant rabies virus (RABV) expressing canine IL6 (rHEP-CaIL6) was rescued and its pathogenicity and immunogenicity were investigated in mice. We demonstrated that mice received a single intramuscular immunization with rHEP-CaIL6 showed an earlier increase and higher maximum titres of virus-neutralizing antibody (VNA) as well as anti-RABV antibodies compared with mice immunized with the parent strain. Moreover, survival rates of mice immunized with rHEP-CaIL6 were higher compared with mice immunized with parent HEP-Flury according to the challenge assay. Flow cytometry further confirmed that immunization with rHEP-CaIL6 induced the strong recruitment of mature B cells and CD8(+) T cells to lymph nodes, which may partially explain the high levels of VNA and enhanced cellular immunity. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that rHEP-CaIL6 induced stronger inflammatory and immune responses in the central nervous system, which might have allowed virus clearance in the early infection phase. Furthermore, mice infected intranasally with rHEP-CaIL6 developed no clinical symptoms while mice infected with HEP-Flury showed piloerection. In summary, these data indicate that rHEP-CaIL6 induces a strong, protective immune response with a good safety profile. Therefore, a recombinant RABV strain expressing canine IL6 may aid the development of an effective, safe attenuated rabies vaccine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Sequencing and analysis of complete genome of rabies viruses isolated from Chinese Ferret-Badger and dog in Zhejiang province].

    PubMed

    Lei, Yong-Liang; Wang, Xiao-Guang; Tao, Xiao-Yan; Li, Hao; Meng, Sheng-Li; Chen, Xiu-Ying; Liu, Fu-Ming; Ye, Bi-Feng; Tang, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Based on sequencing the full-length genomes of four Chinese Ferret-Badger and dog, we analyze the properties of rabies viruses genetic variation in molecular level, get the information about rabies viruses prevalence and variation in Zhejiang, and enrich the genome database of rabies viruses street strains isolated from China. Rabies viruses in suckling mice were isolated, overlapped fragments were amplified by RT-PCR and full-length genomes were assembled to analyze the nucleotide and deduced protein similarities and phylogenetic analyses from Chinese Ferret-Badger, dog, sika deer, vole, used vaccine strain were determined. The four full-length genomes were sequenced completely and had the same genetic structure with the length of 11, 923 nts or 11, 925 nts including 58 nts-Leader, 1353 nts-NP, 894 nts-PP, 609 nts-MP, 1575 nts-GP, 6386 nts-LP, and 2, 5, 5 nts- intergenic regions(IGRs), 423 nts-Pseudogene-like sequence (psi), 70 nts-Trailer. The four full-length genomes were in accordance with the properties of Rhabdoviridae Lyssa virus by BLAST and multi-sequence alignment. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences among Chinese strains had the highest similarity, especially among animals of the same species. Of the four full-length genomes, the similarity in amino acid level was dramatically higher than that in nucleotide level, so the nucleotide mutations happened in these four genomes were most synonymous mutations. Compared with the reference rabies viruses, the lengths of the five protein coding regions had no change, no recombination, only with a few point mutations. It was evident that the five proteins appeared to be stable. The variation sites and types of the four genomes were similar to the reference vaccine or street strains. And the four strains were genotype 1 according to the multi-sequence and phylogenetic analyses, which possessed the distinct district characteristics of China. Therefore, these four rabies viruses are likely to be street viruses

  18. Genetic demography at the leading edge of the distribution of a rabies virus vector.

    PubMed

    Piaggio, Antoinette J; Russell, Amy L; Osorio, Ignacio A; Jiménez Ramírez, Alejandro; Fischer, Justin W; Neuwald, Jennifer L; Tibbels, Annie E; Lecuona, Luis; McCracken, Gary F

    2017-07-01

    The common vampire bat, Desmodus rotundus, ranges from South America into northern Mexico in North America. This sanguivorous species of bat feeds primarily on medium to large-sized mammals and is known to rely on livestock as primary prey. Each year, there are hotspot areas of D. rotundus-specific rabies virus outbreaks that lead to the deaths of livestock and economic losses. Based on incidental captures in our study area, which is an area of high cattle mortality from D. rotundus transmitted rabies, it appears that D. rotundus are being caught regularly in areas and elevations where they previously were thought to be uncommon. Our goal was to investigate demographic processes and genetic diversity at the north eastern edge of the range of D. rotundus in Mexico. We generated control region sequences (441 bp) and 12-locus microsatellite genotypes for 602 individuals of D. rotundus. These data were analyzed using network analyses, Bayesian clustering approaches, and standard population genetic statistical analyses. Our results demonstrate panmixia across our sampling area with low genetic diversity, low population differentiation, loss of intermediate frequency alleles at microsatellite loci, and very low mtDNA haplotype diversity with all haplotypes being very closely related. Our study also revealed strong signals of population expansion. These results follow predictions from the leading-edge model of expanding populations and supports conclusions from another study that climate change may allow this species to find suitable habitat within the U.S. border.

  19. Human rabies transmitted by vampire bats: antigenic and genetic characterization of rabies virus isolates from the Amazon region (Brazil and Ecuador).

    PubMed

    Castilho, Juliana Galera; Carnieli, Pedro; Durymanova, Ekaterina A; Fahl, Willian de Oliveira; Oliveira, Rafael de Novaes; Macedo, Carla Isabel; da Rosa, Elizabeth Salbe Travassos; Mantilla, Anibal; Carrieri, Maria Luiza; Kotait, Ivanete

    2010-10-01

    Since 2004, the main transmitter of human rabies in Latin America has been the vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus). Based on the nucleoprotein of the rabies virus (RV), we analyzed antigenic and genetic profiles of isolates from 29 samples taken from humans living in different areas of the Amazon region. Two isolates were from Ecuador and 27 from the Northern and Northeastern regions of Brazil, which were obtained during outbreaks in various municipalities in the states of Pará and Maranhão in the years 2004 and 2005. The partial N gene (nt 104-1477) of the 29 isolates was sequenced, and the sequences were used to build a neighbor-joining tree with the Kimura-2 parameter model. All 29 human RV isolates were identified as belonging to antigenic variant 3 (AgV3) and were genetically grouped into the D. rotundus cluster, which was divided into two subclusters (A and B), subcluster A in turn being divided into four genetic groups (A1, A2, A3 and A4). Genetic and molecular markers characterizing these genetic lineages were also identified. The results of this study show that the isolates belong to the same rabies cycle as that of the vampire bat D. rotundus. However, the division of clusters within the lineage associated with D. rotundus shows that different genetic sublineages of the virus were circulating in the Amazon region during the study period. Our findings suggest that there are phylogeographic differences between isolates obtained over a short period. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Differential effects of rabies and borna disease viruses on immediate-early- and late-response gene expression in brain tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Z F; Weihe, E; Zheng, Y M; Schäfer, M K; Sheng, H; Corisdeo, S; Rauscher, F J; Koprowski, H; Dietzschold, B

    1993-01-01

    In situ hybridization and Northern blot analysis were used to examine expression of the immediate-early-response genes (IEGs) egr-1, junB, and c-fos, and the late response gene encoding enkephalin in the brains of rats infected intranasally with Borna disease virus (BDV) or rabies virus. In both Borna disease and rabies virus infections, a dramatic and specific induction of IEGs was detected in particular regions of the hippocampus and the cortex. Increased IEG mRNA expression overlapped with the characteristic expression patterns of BDV RNA and rabies virus RNA, although relative expression levels of viral RNA and IEG mRNA differed, particularly in the hippocampal formation. Furthermore, the temporal relationship between viral RNA synthesis and activation of IEG mRNA expression in BDV infection differed markedly from that in rabies virus infection, suggesting that IEG expression is upregulated by different mechanisms. Expression of proenkephalin (pENK) mRNA was also significantly increased in BDV infection, whereas in rabies virus infection, pENK mRNA levels and also the levels of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA were reduced at terminal stages of the disease, probably reflecting a generalized suppression of cellular protein synthesis due to massive production of rabies virus mRNA. The correlation between activated IEG mRNA expression and the strong increase in viral RNA raises the possibility that IEG products induce some phenotypic changes in neurons that render them more susceptible to viral replication. Images PMID:8411369

  1. Differential effects of rabies and borna disease viruses on immediate-early- and late-response gene expression in brain tissues.

    PubMed

    Fu, Z F; Weihe, E; Zheng, Y M; Schäfer, M K; Sheng, H; Corisdeo, S; Rauscher, F J; Koprowski, H; Dietzschold, B

    1993-11-01

    In situ hybridization and Northern blot analysis were used to examine expression of the immediate-early-response genes (IEGs) egr-1, junB, and c-fos, and the late response gene encoding enkephalin in the brains of rats infected intranasally with Borna disease virus (BDV) or rabies virus. In both Borna disease and rabies virus infections, a dramatic and specific induction of IEGs was detected in particular regions of the hippocampus and the cortex. Increased IEG mRNA expression overlapped with the characteristic expression patterns of BDV RNA and rabies virus RNA, although relative expression levels of viral RNA and IEG mRNA differed, particularly in the hippocampal formation. Furthermore, the temporal relationship between viral RNA synthesis and activation of IEG mRNA expression in BDV infection differed markedly from that in rabies virus infection, suggesting that IEG expression is upregulated by different mechanisms. Expression of proenkephalin (pENK) mRNA was also significantly increased in BDV infection, whereas in rabies virus infection, pENK mRNA levels and also the levels of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA were reduced at terminal stages of the disease, probably reflecting a generalized suppression of cellular protein synthesis due to massive production of rabies virus mRNA. The correlation between activated IEG mRNA expression and the strong increase in viral RNA raises the possibility that IEG products induce some phenotypic changes in neurons that render them more susceptible to viral replication.

  2. Rabies control in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Lucas, C H Alvarez; Pino, F Vargas; Baer, G; Morales, P Kuri; Cedillo, V Gutiérrez; Blanco, M A Llanas; Avila, M Hernández

    2008-01-01

    Rabies in dogs was unknown in the Americas before the arrival of the Spanish "Conquistadores". Until the mid-1980s rabies in animals and, in turn in humans, changed little from year to year, with the number of dog vaccinations reported annually rarely reaching one million. In Mexico, the national rabies control programme using mass parenteral vaccination of dogs started in 1990 with about seven million dogs vaccinated the same year. The number of vaccinated dogs exceeded 10 and 15 million in 1995 and 2005, respectively. Modern cell culture-based inactivated rabies virus vaccines were used. A key factor for the success of the dog rabies control program was the supply of potent canine rabies vaccines. Between 1990 and 2005, more than 150 million vaccine doses from 300 lots were administered. Each lot was tested for potency prior to use in the field. The required minimum content of rabies virus antigen for vaccines was 2 IU, in accord with WHO standards. Testing revealed antigen contents ranging from 3.28 to 5.59 IU. As a result of the mass dog vaccination campaigns, human rabies cases due to dog-mediated rabies decreased from 60 in 1990 to 0 in 2000. The number of rabies cases in dogs decreased from 3,049 in 1990 to 70 cases last year.

  3. Complement inhibition enables tumor delivery of LCMV glycoprotein pseudotyped viruses in the presence of antiviral antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Evgin, Laura; Ilkow, Carolina S; Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude; de Souza, Christiano Tanese; Stubbert, Lawton; Huh, Michael S; Jennings, Victoria A; Marguerie, Monique; Acuna, Sergio A; Keller, Brian A; Lefebvre, Charles; Falls, Theresa; Le Boeuf, Fabrice; Auer, Rebecca A; Lambris, John D; McCart, J Andrea; Stojdl, David F; Bell, John C

    2016-01-01

    The systemic delivery of therapeutic viruses, such as oncolytic viruses or vaccines, is limited by the generation of neutralizing antibodies. While pseudotyping of rhabdoviruses with the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein has previously allowed for multiple rounds of delivery in mice, this strategy has not translated to other animal models. For the first time, we provide experimental evidence that antibodies generated against the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein mediate robust complement-dependent viral neutralization via activation of the classical pathway. We show that this phenotype can be capitalized upon to deliver maraba virus pseudotyped with the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein in a Fischer rat model in the face of neutralizing antibody through the use of complement modulators. This finding changes the understanding of the humoral immune response to arenaviruses, and also describes methodology to deliver viral vectors to their therapeutic sites of action without the interference of neutralizing antibody. PMID:27909702

  4. A vesicular stomatitis pseudovirus expressing the surface glycoproteins of influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Cheresiz, S V; Kononova, A A; Razumova, Yu V; Dubich, T S; Chepurnov, A A; Kushch, A A; Davey, R; Pokrovsky, A G

    2014-10-01

    Pseudotyped viruses bearing the glycoprotein(s) of a donor virus over the nucleocapsid core of a surrogate virus are widely used as safe substitutes for infectious virus in virology studies. Retroviral particles pseudotyped with influenza A virus glycoproteins have been used recently for the study of influenza hemagglutinin and neuraminidase-dependent processes. Here, we report the development of vesicular-stomatitis-virus-based pseudotypes bearing the glycoproteins of influenza A virus. We show that pseudotypes bearing the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase of H5N1 influenza A virus mimic the wild-type virus in neutralization assays and sensitivity to entry inhibitors. We demonstrate the requirement of NA for the infectivity of pseudotypes and show that viruses obtained with different NA proteins are significantly different in their transduction activities. Inhibition studies with oseltamivir carboxylate show that neuraminidase activity is required for pseudovirus production, but not for the infection of target cells with H5N1-VSV pseudovirus. The HA-NA-VSV pseudoviruses have high transduction titers and better stability than the previously reported retroviral pseudotypes and can replace live influenza virus in the development of neutralization assays, screening of potential antivirals, and the study of different HA/NA reassortants.

  5. [Evaluation of the ERA antirabies vaccine against antigenic variants of rabies virus in various post-immunization periods].

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, C C; Silva, E V; Miguel, O; Germano, P M

    1990-12-01

    Protection levels of an attenuated antirabies vaccine, of ERA origin, prepared in Kidney tissue culture, were evaluated in mice. Two schemes of vaccination were utilized: a single dose and 6 doses on alternate days. Animals of different experimental groups were challenged at 15, 30, 60 and 120 days postimmunization with six antigenic variants of rabies virus: strains of dog origin (S. Paulo, Brazil and Nigeria), vampire origin (DR-19 and Pernambuco, Brazil), fox origin (Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil), and CVS (Challenge Virus Standard). The results showed the effectiveness of the ERA vaccine against all antigenic variants of street and sylvatic rabies virus, independently of the vaccination scheme. Against the laboratory strains (DR-19 and CVS) the ERA vaccine was less effective, mainly in the groups vaccinated with a single dose.

  6. Recombinant measles virus vaccine expressing the Nipah virus glycoprotein protects against lethal Nipah virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Misako; Georges-Courbot, Marie-Claude; Ikeda, Fusako; Ishii, Miho; Nagata, Noriyo; Jacquot, Frederic; Raoul, Hervé; Sato, Hiroki; Kai, Chieko

    2013-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) is a member of the genus Henipavirus, which emerged in Malaysia in 1998. In pigs, infection resulted in a predominantly non-lethal respiratory disease; however, infection in humans resulted in over 100 deaths. Nipah virus has continued to re-emerge in Bangladesh and India, and person-to-person transmission appeared in the outbreak. Although a number of NiV vaccine studies have been reported, there are currently no vaccines or treatments licensed for human use. In this study, we have developed a recombinant measles virus (rMV) vaccine expressing NiV envelope glycoproteins (rMV-HL-G and rMV-Ed-G). Vaccinated hamsters were completely protected against NiV challenge, while the mortality of unvaccinated control hamsters was 90%. We trialed our vaccine in a non-human primate model, African green monkeys. Upon intraperitoneal infection with NiV, monkeys showed several clinical signs of disease including severe depression, reduced ability to move and decreased food ingestion and died at 7 days post infection (dpi). Intranasal and oral inoculation induced similar clinical illness in monkeys, evident around 9 dpi, and resulted in a moribund stage around 14 dpi. Two monkeys immunized subcutaneously with rMV-Ed-G showed no clinical illness prior to euthanasia after challenge with NiV. Viral RNA was not detected in any organ samples collected from vaccinated monkeys, and no pathological changes were found upon histopathological examination. From our findings, we propose that rMV-NiV-G is an appropriate NiV vaccine candidate for use in humans.

  7. Recombinant rabies virus expressing IFNα1 enhanced immune responses resulting in its attenuation and stronger immunogenicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yifei; Tian, Qin; Xu, Xiaojuan; Yang, Xianfeng; Luo, Jun; Mo, Weiyu; Peng, Jiaojiao; Niu, Xuefeng; Luo, Yongwen; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2014-11-01

    Several studies have shown that type 1 interferons (IFNs) exert multiple biological effects on both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we investigated the pathogenicity and immunogenicity of recombinant rabies virus (RABV) expressing canine interferon α1 (rHEP-CaIFNα1). It was shown that Kun Ming (KM) mice that received a single intramuscular immunization with rHEP-CaIFNα1 had an earlier increase and a higher level of virus-neutralizing antibody titers compared with immunization of the parent HEP-Flury. A challenge experiment further confirmed that more mice that were immunized with rHEP-CaIFNα1 survived compared with mice immunized with the parent virus. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that rHEP-CaIFNα1 induced a stronger innate immune response, especially the type 1 IFN response. Flow cytometry was conducted to show that rHEP-CaIFNα1 recruited more activated B cells in lymph nodes and CD8 T cells in the peripheral blood, which is beneficial to achieve virus clearance in the early infective stage.

  8. [Risks of transmitting rabies virus from captive domiciliary common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) to human beings, in the metropolitan region of Fortaleza, state of Ceará, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Tereza D'ávila de Freitas; Costa, Edmara Chaves; Rolim, Benedito Neilson; Romijn, Phyllis Catharina; Morais, Nélio Batista de; Teixeira, Maria Fátima da Silva

    2011-01-01

    In the State of Ceará, a new variant of the rabies virus was identified associated with cases of human rabies transmitted by common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus), which are frequently kept as pets. This new variant does not present antigenic proximity or genetic relationship to variants of the virus isolated from bats and terrestrial mammals from the American continent. The present study aimed to evaluate the risk factors of rabies virus transmission from common marmosets (C. jacchus) maintained as pets in the metropolitan region of Fortaleza, State of Ceará, Brazil, to human beings. A questionnaire focusing on animal management and interaction between humans and primates was applied to individuals who had marmosets in the municipalities of Aquiraz and Maranguape. In order to evaluate the presence of rabies antigens by direct immunofluorescence test (DIF), samples of saliva were collected from domiciliary captive marmosets. Based on the detection of rabies antigens, biopsy samples of central nervous system (CNS) were analyzed. Analysis of questionnaire data verified that a close relation exists between humans and their pet marmosets, especially during management practices. Additionally, these people showed minimal knowledge regarding rabies, which represents a greater risk of infection. Of the 29 saliva samples evaluated, one (3.4%) was positive for DIF reaction and of the 11 CNS samples, three (27.3%) were positive. Laboratory data are in agreement with the questionnaire findings, which confirm an increased risk of rabies virus transmission due to the close relation between humans and marmosets.

  9. Use of lambdagt11 to isolate genes for two pseudorabies virus glycoproteins with homology to herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus glycoproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovskis, E.A.; Timmins, J.G.; Post, L.E.

    1986-10-01

    A library of pseudorabies virus (PRV) DNA fragments was constructed in the expression cloning vector lambdagt11. The library was screened with antisera which reacted with mixtures of PRV proteins to isolate recombinant bacteriophages expressing PRV proteins. By the nature of the lambdagt11 vector, the cloned proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli as ..beta..-galactosidase fusion proteins. The fusion proteins from 35 of these phages were purified and injected into mice to raise antisera. The antisera were screened by several different assays, including immunoprecipitation of (/sup 14/C)glucosamine-labeled PRV proteins. This method identified phages expressing three different PRV glycoproteins: the secreted glycoprotein, gX; gI; and a glycoprotein that had not been previously identified, which we designate gp63. The gp63 and gI genes map adjacent to each other in the small unique region of the PRV genome. The DNA sequence was determined for the region of the genome encoding gp63 and gI. It was found that gp63 has a region of homology with a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) protein, encoded by US7, and also with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) gpIV. The gI protein sequence has a region of homology with HSV-1 gE and VZV gpI. It is concluded that PRV, HSV, and VZV all have a cluster of homologous glycoprotein genes in the small unique components of their genomes and that the organization of these genes is conserved.

  10. A comparative approach between heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy and DNA vaccinations for rabies.

    PubMed

    Borhani, Kiandokht; Ajorloo, Mehdi; Bamdad, Taravat; Mozhgani, Sayed Hamid Reza; Ghaderi, Mostafa; Gholami, Ali Reza

    2015-04-01

    Rabies is a widespread neurological zoonotic disease causing significant mortality rates, especially in developing countries. Although a vaccine for rabies is available, its production and scheduling are costly in such countries. Advances in recombinant DNA technology have made it a good candidate for an affordable vaccine. Among the proteins of rabies virus, the Glycoprotein (RVG) has been the major target for new vaccine development which plays the principal role in providing complete protection against RV challenge. The aim of this study is to produce recombinant RVG which could be a DNA vaccine candidate and to evaluate the efficiency of this construct in a prime-boost vaccination regimen, compared to commercial vaccine. Cloning to pcDNA3.1(+) and expression of rabies virus glycoprotein gene in BSR cell  line were performed followed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis of the expressed glycoprotein. The resulting genetic construct was used as a DNA vaccine by injecting 80 µg of the plasmid to MNRI mice twice. Prime-Boost vaccination strategy was performed using 80 µg plasmid construct as prime dose and the second dose of an inactivated rabies virus vaccine. Production of rabies virus neutralizing antibody (RVNA) titers of the serum samples were determined by RFFIT. In comparisons between heterologous prime-boost vaccination strategy and DNA vaccinations, the potency of group D that received Prime-Boost vaccine with the second dose of pcDNA3.1(+)-Gp was enhanced significantly compared to the group C which had received pcDNA3.1(+)-Gp as first injection. In this study, RVGP expressing construct was used in a comparative approach between Prime-Boost vaccination strategy and DNA vaccination and compared with the standard method of rabies vaccination. It was concluded that this strategy could lead to induction of acceptable humoral immunity.

  11. Development of Primer Pairs from Molecular Typing of Rabies Virus Variants Present in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Hernández, Dolores G.; Lara-Padilla, Eleazar; Zárate-Segura, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoprotein (N) gene from rabies virus (RABV) is a useful sequence target for variant studies. Several specific RABV variants have been characterized in different mammalian hosts such as skunk, dog, and bats by using anti-nucleocapsid monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) via indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test, a technique not available in many laboratories in Mexico. In the present study, a total of 158 sequences of N gene from RABV were used to design eight pairs of primers (four external and four internal primers), for typing four different RABV variants (dog, skunk, vampire bat, and nonhematophagous bat) which are most common in Mexico. The results indicate that the primer and the typing variant from the brain samples, submitted to nested and/or real-time PCR, are in agreement in all four singleplex reactions, and the designed primer pairs are an alternative for use in specific variant RABV typing. PMID:27563666

  12. Development of Primer Pairs from Molecular Typing of Rabies Virus Variants Present in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bastida-González, Fernando; Ramírez-Hernández, Dolores G; Chavira-Suárez, Erika; Lara-Padilla, Eleazar; Zárate-Segura, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoprotein (N) gene from rabies virus (RABV) is a useful sequence target for variant studies. Several specific RABV variants have been characterized in different mammalian hosts such as skunk, dog, and bats by using anti-nucleocapsid monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) via indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) test, a technique not available in many laboratories in Mexico. In the present study, a total of 158 sequences of N gene from RABV were used to design eight pairs of primers (four external and four internal primers), for typing four different RABV variants (dog, skunk, vampire bat, and nonhematophagous bat) which are most common in Mexico. The results indicate that the primer and the typing variant from the brain samples, submitted to nested and/or real-time PCR, are in agreement in all four singleplex reactions, and the designed primer pairs are an alternative for use in specific variant RABV typing.

  13. Effects of High Ambient Temperature on Various Stages of Rabies Virus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bell, J. F.; Moore, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Effects of high ambient temperatures on various stages of rabies virus infection have been studied. Ambient temperature increased within the tolerated range was found to have little effect upon body temperature of normal mice, but caused marked elevation of temperature during illness. Temperatures at onset of patent illness in mice were lower than normal. Increased body temperature in the higher thermic ambience during the incubation period was associated with decreased mortality and frequent abortive infections. Exposure to high ambient temperature late in the incubation period delayed onset of illness, decreased mortality, and increased frequency of abortive infections, but exposure to high ambient temperature after onset of patent illness did not affect the course of the disease. PMID:4426698

  14. Recovery of Protective Activity in Rabies Virus Vaccines Concentrated and Purified by Four Different Methods

    PubMed Central

    Aasletad, H. G.; Wiktor, T. J.

    1972-01-01

    Rabies vaccines concentrated by ultrafiltration, zinc acetate precipitation, ammonium sulfate precipitation, or aluminum phosphate gel adsorption were compared with respect to recovery of protective activity and purity, as measured by protective activity per mg of protein. Vaccine obtained by ammonium sulfate precipitation had a better recovery rate and a higher purity than those prepared by the other methods. Potent vaccines were also obtained by the zinc acetate precipitation and aluminum phosphate gel adsorption methods, whereas ultrafiltration was the least satisfactory method from the standpoint of vaccine purity. Chromatography of virus concentrated by ultrafiltration on a cellulose ion exchange column reduced the level of nonviral proteins. The protective activity data obtained for the vaccines examined in these experiments were found to correlate with the vaccine's complement fixation titer per mg of protein. PMID:5057372

  15. Mapping sensory circuits by anterograde trans-synaptic transfer of recombinant rabies virus

    PubMed Central

    Zampieri, Niccolò; Jessell, Thomas M.; Murray, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Primary sensory neurons convey information from the external world to relay circuits within the central nervous system (CNS), but the identity and organization of the neurons that process incoming sensory information remains sketchy. Within the CNS viral tracing techniques that rely on retrograde trans-synaptic transfer provide a powerful tool for delineating circuit organization. Viral tracing of the circuits engaged by primary sensory neurons has, however, been hampered by the absence of a genetically tractable anterograde transfer system. In this study we demonstrate that rabies virus can infect sensory neurons in the somatosensory system, is subject to anterograde trans-synaptic transfer from primary sensory to spinal target neurons, and can delineate output connectivity with third-order neurons. Anterograde trans-synaptic transfer is a feature shared by other classes of primary sensory neurons, permitting the identification and potentially the manipulation of neural circuits processing sensory feedback within the mammalian CNS. PMID:24486087

  16. Revealing the secrets of neuronal circuits with recombinant rabies virus technology.

    PubMed

    Ginger, Melanie; Haberl, Matthias; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Schwarz, Martin K; Frick, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of how the brain processes information requires knowledge of the architecture of its underlying neuronal circuits, as well as insights into the relationship between architecture and physiological function. A range of sophisticated tools is needed to acquire this knowledge, and recombinant rabies virus (RABV) is becoming an increasingly important part of this essential toolbox. RABV has been recognized for years for its properties as a synapse-specific trans-neuronal tracer. A novel genetically modified variant now enables the investigation of specific monosynaptic connections. This technology, in combination with other genetic, physiological, optical, and computational tools, has enormous potential for the visualization of neuronal circuits, and for monitoring and manipulating their activity. Here we will summarize the latest developments in this fast moving field and provide a perspective for the use of this technology for the dissection of neuronal circuit structure and function in the normal and diseased brain.

  17. Evolutionary history and phylogeography of rabies viruses associated with outbreaks in Trinidad.

    PubMed

    Seetahal, Janine F R; Velasco-Villa, Andres; Allicock, Orchid M; Adesiyun, Abiodun A; Bissessar, Joseph; Amour, Kirk; Phillip-Hosein, Annmarie; Marston, Denise A; McElhinney, Lorraine M; Shi, Mang; Wharwood, Cheryl-Ann; Fooks, Anthony R; Carrington, Christine V F

    2013-01-01

    Bat rabies is an emerging disease of public health significance in the Americas. The Caribbean island of Trinidad experiences periodic outbreaks within the livestock population. We performed molecular characterisation of Trinidad rabies virus (RABV) and used a Bayesian phylogeographic approach to investigate the extent to which outbreaks are a result of in situ evolution versus importation of virus from the nearby South American mainland. Trinidadian RABV sequences were confirmed as bat variant and clustered with Desmodus rotundus (vampire bat) related sequences. They fell into two largely temporally defined lineages designated Trinidad I and II. The Trinidad I lineage which included sequences from 1997-2000 (all but two of which were from the northeast of the island) was most closely related to RABV from Ecuador (2005, 2007), French Guiana (1990) and Venezuela (1993, 1994). Trinidad II comprised sequences from the southwest of the island, which clustered into two groups: Trinidad IIa, which included one sequence each from 2000 and 2007, and Trinidad IIb including all 2010 sequences. The Trinidad II sequences were most closely related to sequences from Brazil (1999, 2004) and Uruguay (2007, 2008). Phylogeographic analyses support three separate RABV introductions from the mainland from which each of the three Trinidadian lineages arose. The estimated dates for the introductions and subsequent lineage expansions suggest periods of in situ evolution within Trinidad following each introduction. These data also indicate co-circulation of Trinidad lineage I and IIa during 2000. In light of these findings and the likely vampire bat origin of Trinidadian RABV, further studies should be conducted to investigate the relationship between RABV spatiotemporal dynamics and vampire bat population ecology, in particular any movement between the mainland and Trinidad.

  18. Evolutionary History and Phylogeography of Rabies Viruses Associated with Outbreaks in Trinidad

    PubMed Central

    Seetahal, Janine F. R.; Velasco-Villa, Andres; Allicock, Orchid M.; Adesiyun, Abiodun A.; Bissessar, Joseph; Amour, Kirk; Phillip-Hosein, Annmarie; Marston, Denise A.; McElhinney, Lorraine M.; Shi, Mang; Wharwood, Cheryl-Ann; Fooks, Anthony R.; Carrington, Christine V. F.

    2013-01-01

    Bat rabies is an emerging disease of public health significance in the Americas. The Caribbean island of Trinidad experiences periodic outbreaks within the livestock population. We performed molecular characterisation of Trinidad rabies virus (RABV) and used a Bayesian phylogeographic approach to investigate the extent to which outbreaks are a result of in situ evolution versus importation of virus from the nearby South American mainland. Trinidadian RABV sequences were confirmed as bat variant and clustered with Desmodus rotundus (vampire bat) related sequences. They fell into two largely temporally defined lineages designated Trinidad I and II. The Trinidad I lineage which included sequences from 1997–2000 (all but two of which were from the northeast of the island) was most closely related to RABV from Ecuador (2005, 2007), French Guiana (1990) and Venezuela (1993, 1994). Trinidad II comprised sequences from the southwest of the island, which clustered into two groups: Trinidad IIa, which included one sequence each from 2000 and 2007, and Trinidad IIb including all 2010 sequences. The Trinidad II sequences were most closely related to sequences from Brazil (1999, 2004) and Uruguay (2007, 2008). Phylogeographic analyses support three separate RABV introductions from the mainland from which each of the three Trinidadian lineages arose. The estimated dates for the introductions and subsequent lineage expansions suggest periods of in situ evolution within Trinidad following each introduction. These data also indicate co-circulation of Trinidad lineage I and IIa during 2000. In light of these findings and the likely vampire bat origin of Trinidadian RABV, further studies should be conducted to investigate the relationship between RABV spatiotemporal dynamics and vampire bat population ecology, in particular any movement between the mainland and Trinidad. PMID:23991230

  19. Toremifene interacts with and destabilizes the Ebola virus glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Harlos, Karl; Jones, Daniel M.; Zeltina, Antra; Bowden, Thomas A.; Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Fry, Elizabeth E.; Stuart, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Ebola viruses (EBOVs) are responsible for repeated outbreaks of fatal infections, including the recent deadly epidemic in West Africa. There are currently no approved therapeutic drugs or vaccines for the disease. EBOV has a membrane envelope decorated by trimers of a glycoprotein (GP, cleaved by furin to form GP1 and GP2 subunits) which is solely responsible for host cell attachment, endosomal entry and membrane fusion1–7. GP is thus a primary target for the development of antiviral drugs. Here we report the first unliganded structure of EBOV GP, and complexes with an anticancer drug toremifene and the painkiller ibuprofen. The high-resolution apo structure gives a more complete and accurate picture of the molecule, and allows conformational changes introduced by antibody and receptor binding to be deciphered8–10. Unexpectedly both toremifene and ibuprofen bind in a cavity between the attachment (GP1) and fusion (GP2) subunits at the entrance to a large tunnel that links with equivalent tunnels from the other monomers of the trimer at the 3-fold axis. Protein-drug interactions, with both GP1 and GP2, are predominately hydrophobic. Residues lining the binding site are highly conserved amongst filoviruses except Marburg virus (MARV), suggesting that MARV may not bind these drugs. Thermal shift assays show up to a 14 °C decrease in protein melting temperature upon toremifene binding, while ibuprofen has only a marginal effect and is a less potent inhibitor. The results suggest that inhibitor binding destabilizes GP and triggers premature release of GP2, therefore preventing fusion between the viral and endosome membranes. Thus these complex structures reveal the mechanism of inhibition and may guide the development of more powerful anti-EBOV drugs. PMID:27362232

  20. Purification and structural characterization of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein C

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, G.E.; Baker, S.A.; Merajver, S.D.; Coligan, J.E.; Levine, M.; Glorioso, J.C.; Nairn, R.

    1987-01-27

    Purification of herpes simplex virus glycoprotein C (gC) in microgram amounts yielded sufficient material for an analysis of its secondary structure. Purification was facilitated by using the mutant virus gC-3, which bears a point mutation that interrupts the putative hydrophobic membrane anchor sequence, causing the secretion of gC-3 protein into the cell culture medium. gC-3 protein was purified by size fractionation of concentrated culture medium from infected cells on a gel filtration column of Sephacryl S-200, followed by immunoaffinity chromatography on a column constructed of gC-specific monoclonal antibodies cross-linked to a protein A-Sepharose CL-4B matrix. Purified gC-3 had a molecular weight of 130,000 as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the size expected for gC, was reactive with gC-specific monoclonal antibodies in protein immunoblots, and contained amino acid sequences characteristic of gC as determined by radiochemical amino acid microsequence analyses. Polyclonal antisera obtained from a rabbit immunized with gC-3 reacted with wild-type gC in immunoprecipitation, enzyme immunoassay, and immunoelectroblot (western blot) assays. Deglycosylation by treatment with trifluoromethanesulfonic acid reduced the molecular weight of gC-3 by approximately 35%. Analyses of both native and deglycosylated gC-3 by Raman spectroscopy showed that the native molecule consists of about 17%..cap alpha..-helix, 24% ..beta..-sheet, and 60% disordered secondary structures, whereas deglycosylated gC-3 consists of about 8% ..cap alpha..-helix, 10% ..beta..-sheet, 81% disordered structures. These data were in good agreement with the 11% ..cap alpha..-helix, 18% ..beta..-sheet, 61% ..beta..-turn, and 9% disordered structures calculated from Chou-Fasman analysis of the primary sequence of gC-3.

  1. Respiratory syncytial virus envelope glycoprotein (G) has a novel structure.

    PubMed Central

    Satake, M; Coligan, J E; Elango, N; Norrby, E; Venkatesan, S

    1985-01-01

    Amino acid sequence of human respiratory syncytial virus envelope glycoprotein (G) was deduced from the DNA sequence of a recombinant plasmid and confirmed by limited amino acid microsequencing of purified 90K G protein. The calculated molecular mass of the protein encoded by the only long open reading frame of 298 amino acids was 32,588 daltons and was somewhat smaller than the 36K polypeptide translated in vitro from mRNA selected by this plasmid. Inspection of the sequence revealed a single hydrophobic domain of 23 amino acids capable of membrane insertion at 41 residues from the N-terminus. There was no N-terminal signal sequence and the hydrophilic N-terminal 20 residues probably represent the cytoplasmic tail of the protein. The N-terminally oriented membrane insertion was somewhat analogous to paramyxovirus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and influenza neuraminidase (NA). The protein was moderately hydrophilic and rich in hydroxy-amino acids. It was both N- and O-glycosylated with the latter contributing significantly to the net molecular mass 90K. Images PMID:4069997

  2. Disulfide Bonds in Hepatitis C Virus Glycoprotein E1 Control the Assembly and Entry Functions of E2 Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Wahid, Ahmed; Helle, François; Descamps, Véronique; Duverlie, Gilles; Penin, François

    2013-01-01

    Class II membrane fusion proteins have been described in viruses in which the envelope proteins are derived from a precursor polyprotein containing two transmembrane glycoproteins arranged in tandem. Although the second protein, which carries the membrane fusion function, is in general well characterized, the companion protein, which is a protein chaperone for the folding of the fusion protein, is less well characterized for some viruses, like hepatitis C virus (HCV). To investigate the role of the class II companion glycoprotein E1 of HCV, we chose to target conserved cysteine residues in the protein, and we systematically mutated them in a full-length infectious HCV clone by reverse genetics. All the mutants were infectious, albeit with lower titers than the wild-type virus. The reduced infectivity was in part due to a decrease in viral assembly, as revealed by measurement of intracellular infectivity and by quantification of core protein released from cells transfected with mutant genomes. Analyses of mutated proteins did not show any major defect in folding. However, the mutations reduced virus stability, and they could also affect the density of infectious viral particles. Mutant viruses also showed a defect in cell-to-cell transmission. Finally, our data indicate that HCV glycoprotein E1 can also affect the fusion protein E2 by modulating its recognition by the cellular coreceptor CD81. Therefore, in the context of HCV, our data identify an additional function of a class II companion protein as a molecule that can control the binding capacity of the fusion protein. PMID:23175356

  3. Baculovirus expression of the glycoprotein gene of Lassa virus and characterization of the recombinant protein.

    PubMed

    Hummel, K B; Martin, M L; Auperin, D D

    1992-09-01

    A recombinant baculovirus was constructed that expresses the glycoprotein gene of Lassa virus (Josiah strain) under the transcriptional control of the polyhedrin promoter. The expressed protein (B-LSGPC) comigrated with the authentic viral glycoprotein as observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), was reactive with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) in Western blots, and was glycosylated. Although the recombinant protein was not processed into the mature glycoproteins, G1 and G2, it demonstrated reactivity with all known epitopes as measured by indirect immunofluorescence (IFA), and it was immunogenic, eliciting antisera in rabbits that recognized whole virus in IFAs. Regarding future applications to diagnostic assays, the recombinant glycoprotein proved to be an effective substitute for Lassa virus-infected mammalian cells in IFAs and it was able to distinguish sera from several human cases of Lassa fever, against a panel of known negative sera of African origin, in an enzyme immunoassay (EIA).

  4. Animal-associated exposure to rabies virus among travelers, 1997-2012.

    PubMed

    Gautret, Philippe; Harvey, Kira; Pandey, Prativa; Lim, Poh Lian; Leder, Karin; Piyaphanee, Watcharapong; Shaw, Marc; McDonald, Susan C; Schwartz, Eli; Esposito, Douglas H; Parola, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Among travelers, rabies cases are rare, but animal bites are relatively common. To determine which travelers are at highest risk for rabies, we studied 2,697 travelers receiving care for animal-related exposures and requiring rabies postexposure prophylaxis at GeoSentinel clinics during 1997-2012. No specific demographic characteristics differentiated these travelers from other travelers seeking medical care, making it challenging to identify travelers who might benefit from reinforced pretravel rabies prevention counseling. Median travel duration was short for these travelers: 15 days for those seeking care after completion of travel and 20 days for those seeking care during travel. This finding contradicts the view that preexposure rabies vaccine recommendations should be partly based on longer travel durations. Over half of exposures occurred in Thailand, Indonesia, Nepal, China, and India. International travelers to rabies-endemic regions, particularly Asia, should be informed about potential rabies exposure and benefits of pretravel vaccination, regardless of demographics or length of stay.

  5. Demonstration of non-infectious hemagglutinating particles of rabies virus and isolation of the hemagglutinin by disruption of the virion with Nonidet P-40.

    PubMed

    Arai, Y T; Kondo, A; Suzuki, K

    1976-01-01

    Non-infectious hemagglutinating particles of rabies virus accumulated in the fluid phase of chick embryo cell cultures at 6 days post-infection, though they were undetectable at 4 days. They were characterized as looped filaments resembling viral envelope as revealed by electron microscopy. Another form of hemagglutinin (HAnin) was obtained by solubilization of partially purified virions with Nonidet P-40 (NP-40) followed by successive high speed and CsCl density gradient centrifugations. The density of the isolated HAnin averaged 1.28 g/cm3. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the HAnin demonstrated that it was mainly composed of a glycoprotein (G) with a molecular weight of 83,000. Electron microscopically, it differed from the above non-infectious hemagglutinating particles, being much smaller in size and showing a star- or rosette-like appearance with a diameter of about 25 nm, composed of a central particle surrounded by particles resembling envelope-spikes. Virus-neutralizing (VN) and hemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibodies were produced in rabbits immunized with the HAnin isolated from virions.

  6. Palmitoylation of the Rous Sarcoma Virus Transmembrane Glycoprotein Is Required for Protein Stability and Virus Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ochsenbauer-Jambor, Christina; Miller, David C.; Roberts, Charles R.; Rhee, Sung S.; Hunter, Eric

    2001-01-01

    The Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) transmembrane (TM) glycoprotein is modified by the addition of palmitic acid. To identify whether conserved cysteines within the hydrophobic anchor region are the site(s) of palmitoylation, and to determine the role of acylation in glycoprotein function, cysteines at residues 164 and 167 of the TM protein were mutated to glycine (C164G, C167G, and C164G/C167G). In CV-1 cells, palmitate was added to env gene products containing single mutations but was absent in the double-mutant Env. Although mutant Pr95 Env precursors were synthesized with wild-type kinetics, the phenotypes of the mutants differed markedly. Env-C164G had properties similar to those of the wild type, while Env-C167G was degraded faster, and Env containing the double mutant C164G/C167G was very rapidly degraded. Degradation occurred after transient plasma membrane expression. The decrease in steady-state surface expression and increased rate of internalization into endosomes and lysosomes paralleled the decrease in palmitoylation observed for the mutants. The phenotypes of mutant viruses were assessed in avian cells in the context of the pATV8R proviral genome. Virus containing the C164G mutation replicated with wild-type kinetics but exhibited reduced peak reverse transcriptase levels. In contrast, viruses containing either the C167G or the C164G/C167G mutation were poorly infectious or noninfectious, respectively. These phenotypes correlated with different degrees of glycoprotein incorporation into virions. Infectious revertants of the double mutant demonstrated the importance of cysteine-167 for efficient plasma membrane expression and Env incorporation. The observation that both cysteines within the membrane-spanning domain are accessible for acylation has implications for the topology of this region, and a model is proposed. PMID:11689636

  7. [Effect of rabies virus infection on the expression of parvalbumin, calbindin and calretinin in mouse cerebral cortex].

    PubMed

    Torres-Fernández, Orlando; Yepes, Gloria E; Gómez, Javier E; Pimienta, Hernán J

    2004-03-01

    Some clinical features of rabies and experimental evidence from cell culture and laboratory animals suggest impairment of gabaergic neurotransmission. Several types of gabaergic neurons occur in the cerebral cortex. They can be identified by three neuronal markers: the calcium binding proteins (CaBPs) parvalbumin (PV), calbindin (CB) and calretinin (CR). Rabies virus spreads throughout the cerebral cortex; however, rabies cytopathic effects on gabaergic neurons are unknown. The expression of calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) parvalbumin (PV), calbindin (CB) and calretinin (CR) was studied in the frontal cortex of mice. The effect of gabaergic neurons was evaluated immunohistochemically. The distribution patterns of CaBPs in normal mice and in mice infected with 'fixed' or 'street' rabies virus were compared. PV was found in multipolar neurons located in all cortical layers except layer I, and in pericellular clusters of terminal knobs surrounding the soma of pyramidal neurons. CB-immunoreactivity was distributed in two cortical bands. One was composed of round neurons enclosed by a heavily labeled neuropil; this band corresponds to supragranular layers II and III. The other was a weakly stained band of neuropil which contained scattered multipolar CB-ir neurons; this corresponds to infragranular layers V and VI. The CR-ir neurons were bipolar fusiform cells located in all layers of cortex, but concentrated in layers II and III. A feature common to samples infected with both types of viruses was a more intense immunoreactivity to PV in contrast to normal samples. The infection with 'street' virus did not cause additional changes in the expression of CaBPs. However, the infection with 'fixed' virus produced a remarkable reduction of CB-immunoreactivity demonstrated by the loss of CB-ir neurons and low neuropil stain in the frontal cortex. In addition, the size of CR-ir neurons in the cingulate cortex was decreased.

  8. Immunostained plaque assay for detection and titration of rabies virus infectivity.

    PubMed

    Park, Jun-Sun; Um, Jihye; Choi, Young-Ki; Lee, Yeong Seon; Ju, Young Ran; Kim, Su Yeon

    2016-02-01

    The fluorescent antibody test (FAT) is the most commonly used method for detection of the rabies virus (RV). The plaque assay can only be applied to fixed RVs, and cannot be used for street RVs. In this study, plaque formation allowing the determination of both fixed and street RVs was achieved using the immune plaque assay. The immune plaque assay carried out using both fixed and street RVs showed the formation of clear and countable plaques after immunostaining with anti-RV P monoclonal antibody and HRP-conjugated anti-mouse IgG. Plaque size increased with incubation time, and the plaque morphology differed according to viral strain. Fixed RVs had the dot-shaped regular plaque morphology and street RVs had the small irregular-shape plaque morphology. In addition, no significant differences were observed between the growth kinetics of the KGH strain when the virus was titrated using the FAT and the immune plaque assay. It allowed the successful detection and quantification of both street and fixed RVs through the production of clear, countable plaques, making it easy to obtain objective results. The assay is an applicable tool for the detection of RVs in various investigations, including virus neutralizing antibody testing, cell-to-cell spread, and viral drug sensitivity testing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Uncoupling GP1 and GP2 Expression in the Lassa Virus Glycoprotein Complex: Implications for GP1 Ectodomain Shedding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-23

    widely reported and characterized in Ebola virus (EBOV) glycoprotein expression, which has similar fea- tures to that of LASV and other arenaviral GPCs...Volchkov VE, Volchkova VA, Slenczka W, Klenk HD, Feldmann H: Release of viral glycoproteins during Ebola virus infection. Virol 1998, 245:110-9. 22...Volchkova VA, Feldmann H, Klenk D, Volchkov VE: The nonstruc- tural small glycoprotein of Ebola virus is secreted as an antiparallel-orientated homodimer

  10. Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperones in the Folding of Hepatitis C Virus Glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Choukhi, Amélie; Ung, Sophana; Wychowski, Czeslaw; Dubuisson, Jean

    1998-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) genome encodes two envelope glycoproteins (E1 and E2) which interact noncovalently to form a heterodimer (E1-E2). During the folding and assembly of HCV glycoproteins, a large portion of these proteins are trapped in aggregates, reducing the efficiency of native E1-E2 complex assembly. To better understand this phenomenon and to try to increase the efficiency of HCV glycoprotein folding, endoplasmic reticulum chaperones potentially interacting with these proteins were studied. Calnexin, calreticulin, and BiP were shown to interact with E1 and E2, whereas no interaction was detected between GRP94 and HCV glycoproteins. The association of HCV glycoproteins with calnexin and calreticulin was faster than with BiP, and the kinetics of interaction with calnexin and calreticulin were very similar. However, calreticulin and BiP interacted preferentially with aggregates whereas calnexin preferentially associated with monomeric forms of HCV glycoproteins or noncovalent complexes. Tunicamycin treatment inhibited the binding of HCV glycoproteins to calnexin and calreticulin, indicating the importance of N-linked oligosaccharides for these interactions. The effect of the co-overexpression of each chaperone on the folding of HCV glycoproteins was also analyzed. However, the levels of native E1-E2 complexes were not increased. Together, our data suggest that calnexin plays a role in the productive folding of HCV glycoproteins whereas calreticulin and BiP are probably involved in a nonproductive pathway of folding. PMID:9557669

  11. Identification of a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope Glycoprotein Variant Resistant to Cold Inactivation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kassa, Aemro; Finzi, Andrés; Pancera, Marie; Courter, Joel R.; Smith, Amos B.; Sodroski, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein trimer consists of gp120 and gp41 subunits and undergoes a series of conformational changes upon binding to the receptors, CD4 and CCR5/CXCR4, that promote virus entry. Surprisingly, we found that the envelope glycoproteins of some HIV-1 strains are functionally inactivated by prolonged incubation on ice. Serial exposure of HIV-1 to extremes of temperature, followed by expansion of replication-competent viruses, allowed selection of a temperature-resistant virus. The envelope glycoproteins of this virus resisted cold inactivation due to a single passage-associated change, H66N, in the gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein. Histidine 66 is located within the gp41-interactive inner domain of gp120 and, in other studies, has been shown to decrease the sampling of the CD4-bound conformation by unliganded gp120. Substituting asparagine or other amino acid residues for histidine 66 in cold-sensitive HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins resulted in cold-stable phenotypes. Cold inactivation of the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins occurred even at high pH, indicating that protonation of histidine 66 is not necessary for this process. Increased exposure of epitopes in the ectodomain of the gp41 transmembrane envelope glycoprotein accompanied cold inactivation, but shedding of gp120 did not. An amino acid change in gp120 (S375W) that promotes the CD4-bound state or treatment with soluble CD4 or a small-molecule CD4 mimic resulted in increased cold sensitivity. These result