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Sample records for rac1 regulates production

  1. Regulation of Rac1 and Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Response to Infection of Gastrointestinal Epithelia.

    PubMed

    den Hartog, Gerco; Chattopadhyay, Ranajoy; Ablack, Amber; Hall, Emily H; Butcher, Lindsay D; Bhattacharyya, Asima; Eckmann, Lars; Harris, Paul R; Das, Soumita; Ernst, Peter B; Crowe, Sheila E

    2016-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during infection is an immediate host defense leading to microbial killing. APE1 is a multifunctional protein induced by ROS and after induction, protects against ROS-mediated DNA damage. Rac1 and NAPDH oxidase (Nox1) are important contributors of ROS generation following infection and associated with gastrointestinal epithelial injury. The purpose of this study was to determine if APE1 regulates the function of Rac1 and Nox1 during oxidative stress. Gastric or colonic epithelial cells (wild-type or with suppressed APE1) were infected with Helicobacter pylori or Salmonella enterica and assessed for Rac1 and NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide production. Rac1 and APE1 interactions were measured by co-immunoprecipitation, confocal microscopy and proximity ligation assay (PLA) in cell lines or in biopsy specimens. Significantly greater levels of ROS were produced by APE1-deficient human gastric and colonic cell lines and primary gastric epithelial cells compared to control cells after infection with either gastric or enteric pathogens. H. pylori activated Rac1 and Nox1 in all cell types, but activation was higher in APE1 suppressed cells. APE1 overexpression decreased H. pylori-induced ROS generation, Rac1 activation, and Nox1 expression. We determined that the effects of APE1 were mediated through its N-terminal lysine residues interacting with Rac1, leading to inhibition of Nox1 expression and ROS generation. APE1 is a negative regulator of oxidative stress in the gastrointestinal epithelium during bacterial infection by modulating Rac1 and Nox1. Our results implicate APE1 in novel molecular interactions that regulate early stress responses elicited by microbial infections.

  2. Regulation of Rac1 and Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Response to Infection of Gastrointestinal Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Ablack, Amber; Hall, Emily H.; Butcher, Lindsay D.; Bhattacharyya, Asima; Eckmann, Lars; Harris, Paul R.; Das, Soumita; Ernst, Peter B.; Crowe, Sheila E.

    2016-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during infection is an immediate host defense leading to microbial killing. APE1 is a multifunctional protein induced by ROS and after induction, protects against ROS-mediated DNA damage. Rac1 and NAPDH oxidase (Nox1) are important contributors of ROS generation following infection and associated with gastrointestinal epithelial injury. The purpose of this study was to determine if APE1 regulates the function of Rac1 and Nox1 during oxidative stress. Gastric or colonic epithelial cells (wild-type or with suppressed APE1) were infected with Helicobacter pylori or Salmonella enterica and assessed for Rac1 and NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide production. Rac1 and APE1 interactions were measured by co-immunoprecipitation, confocal microscopy and proximity ligation assay (PLA) in cell lines or in biopsy specimens. Significantly greater levels of ROS were produced by APE1-deficient human gastric and colonic cell lines and primary gastric epithelial cells compared to control cells after infection with either gastric or enteric pathogens. H. pylori activated Rac1 and Nox1 in all cell types, but activation was higher in APE1 suppressed cells. APE1 overexpression decreased H. pylori-induced ROS generation, Rac1 activation, and Nox1 expression. We determined that the effects of APE1 were mediated through its N-terminal lysine residues interacting with Rac1, leading to inhibition of Nox1 expression and ROS generation. APE1 is a negative regulator of oxidative stress in the gastrointestinal epithelium during bacterial infection by modulating Rac1 and Nox1. Our results implicate APE1 in novel molecular interactions that regulate early stress responses elicited by microbial infections. PMID:26761793

  3. Redox regulation of Rac1 by thiol oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, G. Aaron; Mitchell, Lauren E.; Arrington, Megan E.; Gunawardena, Harsha P.; DeCristo, Molly J.; Loeser, Richard F.; Chen, Xian; Cox, Adrienne D.; Campbell, Sharon L.

    2016-01-01

    The Rac1 GTPase is an essential and ubiquitous protein that signals through numerous pathways to control critical cellular processes, including cell growth, morphology, and motility. Rac1 deletion is embryonic lethal, and its dysregulation or mutation can promote cancer, arthritis, cardiovascular disease, and neurological disorders. Rac1 activity is highly regulated by modulatory proteins and posttranslational modifications. Whereas much attention has been devoted to guanine nucleotide exchange factors that act on Rac1 to promote GTP loading and Rac1 activation, cellular oxidants may also regulate Rac1 activation by promoting guanine nucleotide exchange. Herein, we show that Rac1 contains a redox-sensitive cysteine (Cys18) that can be selectively oxidized at physiological pH because of its lowered pKa. Consistent with these observations, we show that Rac1 is glutathiolated in primary chondrocytes. Oxidation of Cys18 by glutathione greatly perturbs Rac1 guanine nucleotide binding and promotes nucleotide exchange. As aspartate substitutions have been previously used to mimic cysteine oxidation, we characterized the biochemical properties of Rac1C18D. We also evaluated Rac1C18S as a redox-insensitive variant and found that it retains structural and biochemical properties similar to those of Rac1WT but is resistant to thiol oxidation. In addition, Rac1C18D, but not Rac1C18S, shows greatly enhanced nucleotide exchange, similar to that observed for Rac1 oxidation by glutathione. We employed Rac1C18D in cell-based studies to assess whether this fast-cycling variant, which mimics Rac1 oxidation by glutathione, affects Rac1 activity and function. Expression of Rac1C18D in Swiss 3T3 cells showed greatly enhanced GTP-bound Rac1 relative to Rac1WT and the redox-insensitive Rac1C18S variant. Moreover, expression of Rac1C18D in HEK-293T cells greatly promoted lamellipodia formation. Our results suggest that Rac1 oxidation at Cys18 is a novel posttranslational modification that

  4. Differential Rac1 signalling by guanine nucleotide exchange factors implicates FLII in regulating Rac1-driven cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Marei, Hadir; Carpy, Alejandro; Woroniuk, Anna; Vennin, Claire; White, Gavin; Timpson, Paul; Macek, Boris; Malliri, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 has been implicated in the formation and dissemination of tumours. Upon activation by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), Rac1 associates with a variety of proteins in the cell thereby regulating various functions, including cell migration. However, activation of Rac1 can lead to opposing migratory phenotypes raising the possibility of exacerbating tumour progression when targeting Rac1 in a clinical setting. This calls for the identification of factors that influence Rac1-driven cell motility. Here we show that Tiam1 and P-Rex1, two Rac GEFs, promote Rac1 anti- and pro-migratory signalling cascades, respectively, through regulating the Rac1 interactome. In particular, we demonstrate that P-Rex1 stimulates migration through enhancing the interaction between Rac1 and the actin-remodelling protein flightless-1 homologue, to modulate cell contraction in a RhoA-ROCK-independent manner. PMID:26887924

  5. Rac1 Regulates Endometrial Secretory Function to Control Placental Development.

    PubMed

    Davila, Juanmahel; Laws, Mary J; Kannan, Athilakshmi; Li, Quanxi; Taylor, Robert N; Bagchi, Milan K; Bagchi, Indrani C

    2015-08-01

    During placenta development, a succession of complex molecular and cellular interactions between the maternal endometrium and the developing embryo ensures reproductive success. The precise mechanisms regulating this maternal-fetal crosstalk remain unknown. Our study revealed that the expression of Rac1, a member of the Rho family of GTPases, is markedly elevated in mouse decidua on days 7 and 8 of gestation. To investigate its function in the uterus, we created mice bearing a conditional deletion of the Rac1 gene in uterine stromal cells. Ablation of Rac1 did not affect the formation of the decidua but led to fetal loss in mid gestation accompanied by extensive hemorrhage. To gain insights into the molecular pathways affected by the loss of Rac1, we performed gene expression profiling which revealed that Rac1 signaling regulates the expression of Rab27b, another GTPase that plays a key role in targeting vesicular trafficking. Consequently, the Rac1-null decidual cells failed to secrete vascular endothelial growth factor A, which is a critical regulator of decidual angiogenesis, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4, which regulates the bioavailability of insulin-like growth factors that promote proliferation and differentiation of trophoblast cell lineages in the ectoplacental cone. The lack of secretion of these key factors by Rac1-null decidua gave rise to impaired angiogenesis and dysregulated proliferation of trophoblast cells, which in turn results in overexpansion of the trophoblast giant cell lineage and disorganized placenta development. Further experiments revealed that RAC1, the human ortholog of Rac1, regulates the secretory activity of human endometrial stromal cells during decidualization, supporting the concept that this signaling G protein plays a central and conserved role in controlling endometrial secretory function. This study provides unique insights into the molecular mechanisms regulating endometrial secretions that mediate stromal

  6. Rac1 Regulates Endometrial Secretory Function to Control Placental Development

    PubMed Central

    Davila, Juanmahel; Laws, Mary J.; Kannan, Athilakshmi; Li, Quanxi; Taylor, Robert N.; Bagchi, Milan K.; Bagchi, Indrani C.

    2015-01-01

    During placenta development, a succession of complex molecular and cellular interactions between the maternal endometrium and the developing embryo ensures reproductive success. The precise mechanisms regulating this maternal-fetal crosstalk remain unknown. Our study revealed that the expression of Rac1, a member of the Rho family of GTPases, is markedly elevated in mouse decidua on days 7 and 8 of gestation. To investigate its function in the uterus, we created mice bearing a conditional deletion of the Rac1 gene in uterine stromal cells. Ablation of Rac1 did not affect the formation of the decidua but led to fetal loss in mid gestation accompanied by extensive hemorrhage. To gain insights into the molecular pathways affected by the loss of Rac1, we performed gene expression profiling which revealed that Rac1 signaling regulates the expression of Rab27b, another GTPase that plays a key role in targeting vesicular trafficking. Consequently, the Rac1-null decidual cells failed to secrete vascular endothelial growth factor A, which is a critical regulator of decidual angiogenesis, and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 4, which regulates the bioavailability of insulin-like growth factors that promote proliferation and differentiation of trophoblast cell lineages in the ectoplacental cone. The lack of secretion of these key factors by Rac1-null decidua gave rise to impaired angiogenesis and dysregulated proliferation of trophoblast cells, which in turn results in overexpansion of the trophoblast giant cell lineage and disorganized placenta development. Further experiments revealed that RAC1, the human ortholog of Rac1, regulates the secretory activity of human endometrial stromal cells during decidualization, supporting the concept that this signaling G protein plays a central and conserved role in controlling endometrial secretory function. This study provides unique insights into the molecular mechanisms regulating endometrial secretions that mediate stromal

  7. Rac1 activity regulates proliferation of aggressive metastatic melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Natalie N. Chen Yihwen; Samant, Rajeev S.; Shevde, Lalita A.; Fodstad, Oystein

    2007-11-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying the different capacity of two in vivo selected human melanoma cell variants to form experimental metastases were studied. The doubling times of the FEMX-I and FEMX-V cell sublines in vitro were 15 and 25 h, respectively. The invasive capacity of FEMX-I cells was 8-fold higher than FEMX-V cells, and the time to form approximately 10 mm s.c. tumors in nude mice was 21 versus 35 days. FEMX-I displayed a spindle-like formation in vitro, whereas FEMX-V cells had a rounded shape. Hence, we examined known determinants of cell shape and proliferation, the small GTPases. The four studied showed equal expression in both cell types, but Rac1 activity was significantly decreased in FEMX-V cells. Rac1 stimulates NF{kappa}B, and we found that endogenous NF{kappa}B activity of FEMX-V cells was 2% of that of FEMX-I cells. Inhibition of Rac1 resulted in blocked NF{kappa}B activity. Specific inhibition of either Rac1 or NF{kappa}B significantly reduced proliferation and invasion of FEMX-I cells, the more pronounced effects observed with Rac1 inhibition. These data indicate that Rac1 activity in FEMX cells regulates cell proliferation and invasion, in part via its effect on NF{kappa}B, signifying Rac1 as a key molecule in melanoma progression and metastasis.

  8. Phosphorylation of Rac1 T108 by Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase in Response to Epidermal Growth Factor: a Novel Mechanism To Regulate Rac1 Function

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Junfeng; Li, Laiji; Ballermann, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has implicated Rho GTPases, including Rac1, in many aspects of cancer development. Recent findings suggest that phosphorylation might further contribute to the tight regulation of Rho GTPases. Interestingly, sequence analysis of Rac1 shows that Rac1 T108 within the 106PNTP109 motif is likely an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation site and that Rac1 also has an ERK docking site, 183KKRKRKCLLL192 (D site), at the C terminus. Indeed, we show here that both transfected and endogenous Rac1 interacts with ERK and that this interaction is mediated by its D site. Green fluorescent protein (GFP)-Rac1 is threonine (T) phosphorylated in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF), and EGF-induced Rac1 threonine phosphorylation is dependent on the activation of ERK. Moreover, mutant Rac1 with the mutation of T108 to alanine (A) is not threonine phosphorylated in response to EGF. In vitro ERK kinase assay further shows that pure active ERK phosphorylates purified Rac1 but not mutant Rac1 T108A. We also show that Rac1 T108 phosphorylation decreases Rac1 activity, partially due to inhibiting its interaction with phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1). T108 phosphorylation targets Rac1 to the nucleus, which isolates Rac1 from other guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and hinders Rac1's role in cell migration. We conclude that Rac1 T108 is phosphorylated by ERK in response to EGF, which plays an important role in regulating Rac1. PMID:24043306

  9. Rac1 regulates skin tumors by regulation of keratin 17 through recruitment and interaction with CD11b+Gr1+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ying; Zhu, Shaojun; Liu, Juanjuan; Wang, Dong; Deng, Anmei; Wang, Zhipeng

    2014-01-01

    Rac1 is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases that control cells proliferation, differentiation, migration, and inflammation. Rac1 is crucial in tumorigenesis and development. Keratin17 and CD11b+Gr1+ cells are considered to regulate skin inflmmation. Here we discuss the regulation of Rac1 on skin tumor formation and its relationship. In samples from human skin squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), Rac1 activity was higher in cancer tissues than in normal skin and activity correlated with keratin 17 overexpression. In a DMBA/TPA-induced mouse skin tumor model, inhibition of Rac1 activity and depletion of CD11b+Gr1+ cells resulted in significant tumor formation. TPA induced recruitment of CD11b+Gr1+ cells into dermis; however, Rac1 inhibitor abolished this recruitment. In vitro, Rac1 induced interferon (IFN) and interlukin (IL6) production in keratinocytes, repression of keratin 17 inhibited IFN and IL6 production induced by Rac1. Moreover, both inhibition of Rac1 activity and repression of keratin 17 restricted proliferation and induction of differentiation in keratinocytes. Coculture of CD11b+Gr1+ cells with keratinocytes activated Wnt pathway in keratinocytes, resulting in enhanced Rac1 activity, overexpression of keratin 17, and hyperproliferation of keratinocytes. Our results suggested that hyperactive Rac1 recruited and interacted with CD11b+Gr1+ cells, inducing keratin 17-regulated inflammation and promoting skin tumor formation. PMID:24962779

  10. Rac1 is a novel regulator of contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Sylow, Lykke; Jensen, Thomas E; Kleinert, Maximilian; Mouatt, Joshua R; Maarbjerg, Stine J; Jeppesen, Jacob; Prats, Clara; Chiu, Tim T; Boguslavsky, Shlomit; Klip, Amira; Schjerling, Peter; Richter, Erik A

    2013-04-01

    In skeletal muscle, the actin cytoskeleton-regulating GTPase, Rac1, is necessary for insulin-dependent GLUT4 translocation. Muscle contraction increases glucose transport and represents an alternative signaling pathway to insulin. Whether Rac1 is activated by muscle contraction and regulates contraction-induced glucose uptake is unknown. Therefore, we studied the effects of in vivo exercise and ex vivo muscle contractions on Rac1 signaling and its regulatory role in glucose uptake in mice and humans. Muscle Rac1-GTP binding was increased after exercise in mice (~60-100%) and humans (~40%), and this activation was AMP-activated protein kinase independent. Rac1 inhibition reduced contraction-stimulated glucose uptake in mouse muscle by 55% in soleus and by 20-58% in extensor digitorum longus (EDL; P < 0.01). In agreement, the contraction-stimulated increment in glucose uptake was decreased by 27% (P = 0.1) and 40% (P < 0.05) in soleus and EDL muscles, respectively, of muscle-specific inducible Rac1 knockout mice. Furthermore, depolymerization of the actin cytoskeleton decreased contraction-stimulated glucose uptake by 100% and 62% (P < 0.01) in soleus and EDL muscles, respectively. These are the first data to show that Rac1 is activated during muscle contraction in murine and human skeletal muscle and suggest that Rac1 and possibly the actin cytoskeleton are novel regulators of contraction-stimulated glucose uptake.

  11. Spatio-Temporal Regulation of Rac1 Mobility by Actin Islands.

    PubMed

    Lakhani, Vinal V; Hinde, Elizabeth; Gratton, Enrico; Elston, Timothy C

    2015-01-01

    Rho GTPases play important roles in many aspects of cell migration, including polarity establishment and organizing actin cytoskeleton. In particular, the Rho GTPase Rac1 has been associated with the generation of protrusions at leading edge of migrating cells. Previously we showed the mobility of Rac1 molecules is not uniform throughout a migrating cell (Hinde E et. al. PNAS 2013). Specifically, the closer a Rac1 molecule is to the leading edge, the slower the molecule diffuses. Because actin-bound Rac1 diffuses slower than unbound Rac1, we hypothesized that regions of high actin concentration, called "actin islands", act as diffusive traps and are responsible for the non-uniform diffusion observed in vivo. Here, in silico model simulations demonstrate that equally spaced actin islands can regulate the time scale for Rac1 diffusion in a manner consistent with data from live-cell imaging experiments. Additionally, we find this mechanism is robust; different patterns of Rac1 mobility can be achieved by changing the actin islands' positions or their affinity for Rac1.

  12. Spatio-Temporal Regulation of Rac1 Mobility by Actin Islands

    PubMed Central

    Lakhani, Vinal V.; Hinde, Elizabeth; Gratton, Enrico; Elston, Timothy C.

    2015-01-01

    Rho GTPases play important roles in many aspects of cell migration, including polarity establishment and organizing actin cytoskeleton. In particular, the Rho GTPase Rac1 has been associated with the generation of protrusions at leading edge of migrating cells. Previously we showed the mobility of Rac1 molecules is not uniform throughout a migrating cell (Hinde E et. al. PNAS 2013). Specifically, the closer a Rac1 molecule is to the leading edge, the slower the molecule diffuses. Because actin-bound Rac1 diffuses slower than unbound Rac1, we hypothesized that regions of high actin concentration, called “actin islands”, act as diffusive traps and are responsible for the non-uniform diffusion observed in vivo. Here, in silico model simulations demonstrate that equally spaced actin islands can regulate the time scale for Rac1 diffusion in a manner consistent with data from live-cell imaging experiments. Additionally, we find this mechanism is robust; different patterns of Rac1 mobility can be achieved by changing the actin islands’ positions or their affinity for Rac1. PMID:26606145

  13. RhoA and Rac1 GTPases Differentially Regulate Agonist-Receptor Mediated Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, Huzoor; Duan, Xin; Saleem, Saima; Davis, Ashley K.; Zheng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Agonist induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by NADPH oxidases (NOX) enhances platelet aggregation and hence the risk of thrombosis. RhoA and Rac1 GTPases are involved in ROS generation by NOX in a variety of cells, but their roles in platelet ROS production remain unclear. In this study we used platelets from RhoA and Rac1 conditional knockout mice as well as human platelets treated with Rhosin and NSC23767, rationally designed small molecule inhibitors of RhoA and Rac GTPases, respectively, to better define the contributions of RhoA and Rac1 signaling to ROS generation and platelet activation. Treatment of platelets with Rhosin inhibited: (a) U46619 induced activation of RhoA; (b) phosphorylation of p47phox, a critical component of NOX; (c) U46619 or thrombin induced ROS generation; (d) phosphorylation of myosin light chain (MLC); (e) platelet shape change; (f) platelet spreading on immobilized fibrinogen; and (g) release of P-selectin, secretion of ATP and aggregation. Conditional deletion of RhoA or Rac1 gene inhibited thrombin induced ROS generation in platelets. Addition of Y27632, a RhoA inhibitor, NSC23766 or Phox-I, an inhibitor of Rac1-p67phox interaction, to human platelets blocked thrombin induced ROS generation. These data suggest that: (a) RhoA/ROCK/p47phox signaling axis promotes ROS production that, at least in part, contributes to platelet activation in conjunction with or independent of the RhoA/ROCK mediated phosphorylation of MLC; and (b) RhoA and Rac1 differentially regulate ROS generation by inhibiting phosphorylation of p47phox and Rac1-p67phox interaction, respectively. PMID:27681226

  14. ARF1 and ARF6 regulate recycling of GRASP/Tamalin and the Rac1-GEF Dock180 during HGF-induced Rac1 activation.

    PubMed

    Koubek, Emily J; Santy, Lorraine C

    2016-08-12

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent signaling factor that acts on epithelial cells, causing them to dissociate and scatter. This migration is coordinated by a number of small GTPases, such as ARF6 and Rac1. Active ARF6 is required for HGF-stimulated migration and intracellular levels of ARF6-GTP and Rac1-GTP increase following HGF treatment. During migration, cross talk between ARF6 and Rac1 occurs through formation of a multi-protein complex containing the ARF-GEF cytohesin-2, the scaffolding protein GRASP/Tamalin, and the Rac1-GEF Dock180. Previously, the role of ARF6 in this process was unclear. We have now found that ARF6 and ARF1 regulate trafficking of GRASP and Dock180 to the plasma membrane following HGF treatment. Trafficking of GRASP and Dock180 is impaired by blocking ARF6-mediated recycling pathways and is required for HGF-stimulated Rac1 activation. Finally, HGF treatment stimulates association of GRASP and Dock180. Inhibition of ARF6 trafficking pathways traps GRASP and Dock180 as a complex in the cell.

  15. Regulation of microtubule destabilizing activity of Op18/stathmin downstream of Rac1.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Torsten; Bokoch, Gary M; Waterman-Storer, Clare M

    2004-02-13

    In the leading edge of migrating cells, a subset of microtubules exhibits net growth in a Rac1- and p21-activated kinase-dependent manner. Here, we explore the possibility of whether phosphorylation and inactivation of the microtubule-destabilizing protein Op18/stathmin could be a mechanism regulating microtubule dynamics downstream of Rac1 and p21-activated kinases. We find that, in vitro, Pak1 phosphorylates Op18/stathmin specifically at serine 16 and inactivates its catastrophe promoting activity in biochemical and time lapse microscopy microtubule assembly assays. Furthermore, phosphorylation of either serine 16 or 63 is sufficient to inhibit Op18/stathmin in vitro. In cells, the microtubule-destabilizing effect of an excess of Op18/stathmin can be partially overcome by expression of constitutively active Rac1(Q61L), which is dependent on Pak activity, suggesting that the microtubule cytoskeleton can be regulated through inactivation of Op18/stathmin downstream of Rac1 and Pak in vivo. However, in vivo, Pak1 activity alone is not sufficient to phosphorylate Op18, indicating that additional pathways downstream of Rac1 are required for Op18 regulation.

  16. TIPE1 induces apoptosis by negatively regulating Rac1 activation in hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Liang, X; Gao, L; Ma, H; Liu, X; Pan, Y; Yan, W; Shan, H; Wang, Z; Chen, Y H; Ma, C

    2015-05-14

    TIPE1 (tumor necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8-like 1 or TNFAIP8L1) is a newly identified member of the TIPE (TNFAIP8) family, which play roles in regulating cell death. However, the biologic functions of TIPE1 in physiologic and pathologic conditions are largely unknown. Here, we report the roles of TIPE1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Evaluated by immunohistochemical staining, HCC tissues showed significantly downregulated TIPE1 expression compared with adjacent non-tumor tissues, which positively correlated with tumor pathologic grades and patient survival. Using a homograft tumor model in Balb/c mice, we discovered that TIPE1 significantly diminished the growth and tumor weight of murine liver cancer homografts. Consistently, TIPE1 inhibited both cell growth and colony formation ability of cultured HCC cell lines, which was further identified to be due to TIPE1-inducing apoptosis in a caspase-independent, necrostatin-1 (Nec-1)-insensitive manner. Furthermore, mechanistic investigations revealed that TIPE1 interacted with Rac1, and inhibited the activation of Rac1 and its downstream p65 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathway. Moreover, overexpression of constitutively active Rac1 partially rescued the apoptosis induced by TIPE1, and Rac1 knockdown significantly restored the deregulated cell growth induced by TIPE1 small interfering RNA. Our findings revealed that TIPE1 induced apoptosis in HCC cells by negatively regulating Rac1 pathway, and loss of TIPE1 might be a new prognostic indicator for HCC patients.

  17. Epidermal Rac1 regulates the DNA damage response and protects from UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis and skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Haase, Ingo

    2017-03-09

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common type of cancer. Increased expression and activity of Rac1, a small Rho GTPase, has been shown previously in NMSC and other human cancers; suggesting that Rac1 may function as an oncogene in skin. DMBA/TPA skin carcinogenesis studies in mice have shown that Rac1 is required for chemically induced skin papilloma formation. However, UVB radiation by the sun, which causes DNA damage, is the most relevant cause for NMSC. A potential role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far. To investigate this, we irradiated mice with epidermal Rac1 deficiency (Rac1-EKO) and their controls using a well-established protocol for long-term UV-irradiation. Most of the Rac1-EKO mice developed severe skin erosions upon long-term UV-irradiation, unlike their controls. These skin erosions in Rac1-EKO mice healed subsequently. Surprisingly, we observed development of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) within the UV-irradiation fields. This shows that the presence of Rac1 in the epidermis protects from UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis. Short-term UV-irradiation experiments revealed increased UV-light-induced apoptosis of Rac1-deficient epidermal keratinocytes in vitro as well as in vivo. Further investigations using cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyase transgenic mice revealed that the observed increase in UV-light-induced keratinocyte apoptosis in Rac1-EKO mice is DNA damage dependent and correlates with caspase-8 activation. Furthermore, Rac1-deficient keratinocytes showed reduced levels of p53, γ-H2AX and p-Chk1 suggesting an attenuated DNA damage response upon UV-irradiation. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence for a protective role of Rac1 in UV-light-induced skin carcinogenesis and keratinocyte apoptosis probably through regulating mechanisms of the DNA damage response and repair pathways.

  18. Cleavage of Hyaluronan and CD44 Adhesion Molecule Regulate Astrocyte Morphology via Rac1 Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Konopka, Anna; Zeug, Andre; Skupien, Anna; Kaza, Beata; Mueller, Franziska; Chwedorowicz, Agnieszka; Ponimaskin, Evgeni; Wilczynski, Grzegorz M.; Dzwonek, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Communication of cells with their extracellular environment is crucial to fulfill their function in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. The literature data provide evidence that such a communication is also important in case of astrocytes. Mechanisms that contribute to the interaction between astrocytes and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are still poorly understood. Hyaluronan is the main component of ECM in the brain, where its major receptor protein CD44 is expressed by a subset of astrocytes. Considering the fact that functions of astrocytes are tightly coupled with changes in their morphology (e.g.: glutamate clearance in the synaptic cleft, migration, astrogliosis), we investigated the influence of hyaluronan cleavage by hyaluronidase, knockdown of CD44 by specific shRNA and CD44 overexpression on astrocyte morphology. Our results show that hyaluronidase treatment, as well as knockdown of CD44, in astrocytes result in a “stellate”-like morphology, whereas overexpression of CD44 causes an increase in cell body size and changes the shape of astrocytes into flattened cells. Moreover, as a dynamic reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton is supposed to be responsible for morphological changes of cells, and this reorganization is controlled by small GTPases of the Rho family, we hypothesized that GTPase Rac1 acts as a downstream effector for hyaluronan and CD44 in astrocytes. We used FRET-based biosensor and a dominant negative mutant of Rac1 to investigate the involvement of Rac1 activity in hyaluronidase- and CD44-dependent morphological changes of astrocytes. Both, hyaluronidase treatment and knockdown of CD44, enhances Rac1 activity while overexpression of CD44 reduces the activity state in astrocytes. Furthermore, morphological changes were blocked by specific inhibition of Rac1 activity. These findings indicate for the first time that regulation of Rac1 activity is responsible for hyaluronidase and CD44-driven morphological changes of

  19. Tiam1 Regulates the Wnt/Dvl/Rac1 Signaling Pathway and the Differentiation of Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Čajánek, Lukáš; Ganji, Ranjani Sri; Henriques-Oliveira, Catarina; Theofilopoulos, Spyridon; Koník, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that drive the differentiation of dopaminergic (DA) neurons is crucial for successful development of novel therapies for Parkinson's disease, in which DA neurons progressively degenerate. However, the mechanisms underlying the differentiation-promoting effects of Wnt5a on DA precursors are poorly understood. Here, we present the molecular and functional characterization of a signaling pathway downstream of Wnt5a, the Wnt/Dvl/Rac1 pathway. First, we characterize the interaction between Rac1 and Dvl and identify the N-terminal part of Dvl3 as necessary for Rac1 binding. Next, we show that Tiam1, a Rac1 guanosine exchange factor (GEF), is expressed in the ventral midbrain, interacts with Dvl, facilitates Dvl-Rac1 interaction, and is required for Dvl- or Wnt5a-induced activation of Rac1. Moreover, we show that Wnt5a promotes whereas casein kinase 1 (CK1), a negative regulator of the Wnt/Dvl/Rac1 pathway, abolishes the interactions between Dvl and Tiam1. Finally, using ventral midbrain neurosphere cultures, we demonstrate that the generation of DA neurons in culture is impaired after Tiam1 knockdown, indicating that Tiam1 is required for midbrain DA differentiation. In summary, our data identify Tiam1 as a novel regulator of DA neuron development and as a Dvl-associated and Rac1-specific GEF acting in the Wnt/Dvl/Rac1 pathway. PMID:23109420

  20. Rac1 is Required for Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 Production by Chondrocytes in Response to Fibronectin Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Long, David L.; Willey, Jeffrey S.; Loeser, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objective Matrix fragments, including fibronectin fragments (Fnf), accumulate during the development of osteoarthritis (OA) stimulating chondrocyte matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) production. The objective of this study was to determine the role of the small GTPase Rac1 in chondrocyte signaling stimulated by Fnf that results in MMP-13 production. Methods Normal human cartilage was from tissue donors and OA cartilage from knee arthroplasty specimens. Rac1 activity was modulated with a chemical inhibitor, siRNA knock-down, constitutively active (CA)-Rac or dominant negative (DN)-Rac adenovirus. Cells were treated with Fnf or without known Rac activators, epidermal growth factor (EGF) or transforming growth factorα (TGFα). Rac1 activity was measured with a colorometric activity ELISA, pulldown assay, and immunostaining with a monoclonal antibody against active Rac. Results Chemical inhibition of Rac1, as well as knockdown by siRNA and expression of DN-Rac blocked Fnf stimulated MMP-13 production while expression of CA-Rac increased MMP-13. Inhibition of Rho-associated kinase had no effect. EGF and TGFα, but not Fnf, increased Rac1 activity and promoted the increase in MMP-13 above that stimulated by Fnf alone. Active Rac was detected by immunostaining in OA cartilage. Conclusion Rac1 is required for Fnf induced signaling that results in increased MMP-13 production. EGF receptor ligands, which activate Rac, can promote this effect. The presence of active Rac in OA cartilage and the ability of Rac to stimulate MMP-13 production suggests that it could play a role in the cartilage matrix destruction seen in OA. PMID:23460186

  1. CDKL5, a protein associated with rett syndrome, regulates neuronal morphogenesis via Rac1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qian; Zhu, Yong-Chuan; Yu, Jing; Miao, Sheng; Zheng, Jing; Xu, Li; Zhou, Yang; Li, Dan; Zhang, Chi; Tao, Jiong; Xiong, Zhi-Qi

    2010-09-22

    Mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5), also known as serine/threonine kinase 9 (STK9), have been identified in patients with Rett syndrome (RTT) and X-linked infantile spasm. However, the function of CDKL5 in the brain remains unknown. Here, we report that CDKL5 is a critical regulator of neuronal morphogenesis. We identified a neuron-specific splicing variant of CDKL5 whose expression was markedly induced during postnatal development of the rat brain. Downregulating CDKL5 by RNA interference (RNAi) in cultured cortical neurons inhibited neurite growth and dendritic arborization, whereas overexpressing CDKL5 had opposite effects. Furthermore, knocking down CDKL5 in the rat brain by in utero electroporation resulted in delayed neuronal migration, and severely impaired dendritic arborization. In contrast to its proposed function in the nucleus, we found that CDKL5 regulated dendrite development through a cytoplasmic mechanism. In fibroblasts and in neurons, CDKL5 colocalized and formed a protein complex with Rac1, a critical regulator of actin remodeling and neuronal morphogenesis. Overexpression of Rac1 prevented the inhibition of dendrite growth caused by CDKL5 knockdown, and the growth-promoting effect of ectopically expressed CDKL5 on dendrites was abolished by coexpressing a dominant-negative form of Rac1. Moreover, CDKL5 was required for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-induced activation of Rac1. Together, these results demonstrate a critical role of CDKL5 in neuronal morphogenesis and identify a Rho GTPase signaling pathway which may contribute to CDKL5-related disorders.

  2. Modulation of Rac1 Activity by ADMA/DDAH Regulates Pulmonary Endothelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Torondel, Belen; Zhao, Lan; Renné, Thomas; Leiper, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Endogenously produced nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, asymmetric methylarginine (ADMA) is associated with vascular dysfunction and endothelial leakage. We studied the role of ADMA, and the enzymes metabolizing it, dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolases (DDAH) in the regulation of endothelial barrier function in pulmonary macrovascular and microvascular cells in vitro and in lungs of genetically modified heterozygous DDAHI knockout mice in vivo. We show that ADMA increases pulmonary endothelial permeability in vitro and in in vivo and that this effect is mediated by nitric oxide (NO) acting via protein kinase G (PKG) and independent of reactive oxygen species formation. ADMA-induced remodeling of actin cytoskeleton and intercellular adherens junctions results from a decrease in PKG-mediated phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and a subsequent down-regulation of Rac1 activity. The effects of ADMA on endothelial permeability, Rac1 activation and VASP phosphorylation are prevented by overexpression of active DDAHI and DDAHII, whereas inactive DDAH mutants have no effect. These findings demonstrate for the first time that ADMA metabolism critically determines pulmonary endothelial barrier function by modulating Rac1-mediated remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton and intercellular junctions. PMID:18923147

  3. ARF1 controls Rac1 signaling to regulate migration of MDA-MB-231 invasive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lewis-Saravalli, Sebastian; Campbell, Shirley; Claing, Audrey

    2013-09-01

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are monomeric G proteins that regulate many cellular processes such as reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. We have previously shown that ARF1 is overexpressed in highly invasive breast cancer cells and contribute to their enhanced migration. In this study, we propose to define the molecular mechanism by which ARF1 regulates this complex cellular response by investigating the role of this ARF GTPase on the activation process of Rac1, a Rho GTPase, associated with lamellipodia formation during cell migration. Here, we first show that inhibition of ARF1 or Rac1 expression markedly impacts the ability of MDA-MB-231 cells to migrate upon EGF stimulation. However, the effect of ARF1 depletion can be reversed by overexpression of the Rac1 active mutant, Rac1 Q(61)L. Depletion of ARF1 also impairs the ability of EGF stimulation to promote GTP-loading of Rac1. To further investigate the possible cross-talk between ARF1 and Rac1, we next examined whether they could form a complex. We observed that the two GTPases could directly interact independently of the nature of the nucleotide bound to them. EGF treatment however resulted in the association of Rac1 with its effector IRSp53, which was completely abrogated in ARF1 depleted cells. We present evidences that this ARF isoform is responsible for the plasma membrane targeting of both Rac1 and IRSp53, a step essential for lamellipodia formation. In conclusion, this study provides a new mechanism by which ARF1 regulates cell migration and identifies this GTPase as a promising pharmacological target to reduce metastasis formation in breast cancer patients.

  4. mTOR regulate EMT through RhoA and Rac1 pathway in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, XianGuo; Cheng, HaiYan; Pan, TengFei; Liu, Yi; Su, Yang; Ren, CuiPing; Huang, DaKe; Zha, XiaoJun; Liang, ChaoZhao

    2015-10-01

    Recently, an increasing number of studies have suggested that mTOR plays a critical role in the regulation of tumor cell motility, invasion and cancer metastasis. However, little is known about the signaling mechanisms in regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of prostate cancer. In this study, we found that the expression levels of Raptor and Rictor in prostate cancer tissues were elevated, which may suggest that Raptor and Rictor signaling pathways are associated with prostate cancer progression and metastasis. Inhibition of mTORC1 or mTORC2 by knock down of Raptor or Rictor, respectively, migration and invasion of prostate cancer were attenuated. Furthermore, EMT, a characterized by the changed expression levels of various markers like E-cadherin, β-catenin, N-cadherin, and vimentin emergend following inhibition of Raptor or Rictor. Finally, the small GTPases (RhoA and Rac1) which were crucial regulatory proteins in cell migration and invasion were inactivited after downregulating Raptor and Rictor. These results suggest that mTOR regulate EMT at least in part by down regulation of RhoA and Rac1 signaling pathways. Our findings provide novel very attractive target strategies that the inhibition of mTOR signaling pathways may retard prostate cancer migration and invasion at early stages.

  5. Regulation of Rac1 GTPase activity by quinine through G-protein and bitter taste receptor T2R4.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Crystal; Jaggupilli, Appalaraju; Chelikani, Prashen; Bhullar, Rajinder P

    2017-02-01

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family of small GTPases and regulates actin cytoskeleton reorganization. T2R4 is a bitter taste receptor belonging to the G protein-coupled receptor family of proteins. In addition to mediating bitter taste perception from the tongue, T2R4s are found in extra-oral tissues, e.g., nasal epithelium, airways, brain, testis suggesting a much broader physiological function for these receptors. Anti-malarial drug and a bitter tasting compound, quinine, is a known agonist for T2R4, whereas BCML (Nα,Nα-Bis(carboxymethyl)-L-lysine) acts as an inverse agonist. Using western blot and Ca(++) mobilization assays, the effects of quinine on Rac1 activity in HEK293T cells stably expressing T2R4/Gα16/44, T2R4, or Gα16/44 and transiently transfected with HA-Rac1 were investigated. Quinine treatment caused a significant reduction in the amount of active Rac1, whereas in the presence of BCML, quinine failed to cause any significant change in active Rac1. No significant change in Rac1 activity was observed in BAPTA-AM plus quinine-treated Gα16/44 cells, suggesting possibility of a pathway in addition to the canonical Ca(++)-dependent pathway. A noticeable role for Gα16/44 independent of T2R4 is observed in quinine-mediated Rac1 inactivation. Further, a significant difference in quinine-induced Ca(++) response in T2R4/Gα16/44 or T2R4 cells was observed validating the partial role of calcium and importance of Gα16/44. This study is the first to show an inhibitory downstream action of a T2R4 agonist on Rac1 function. Further investigation will help in better understanding the downstream signal transduction network of T2R4 and its extra-oral physiological roles.

  6. Geometry sensing through POR1 regulates Rac1 activity controlling early osteoblast differentiation in response to nanofiber diameter.

    PubMed

    Higgins, A M; Banik, B L; Brown, J L

    2015-02-01

    Bone grafting procedures in the United States rely heavily upon autografts and allografts, which are donor-dependent, cause donor site pain, and can transmit disease. Synthetic bone grafts can reduce these risks; however, synthetics lack the bone differentiating (osteoinductive) abilities of auto- and allografts. Achieving innate osteoinductive properties of synthetics through surface modifications is currently under investigation. This study focuses on nanofibers, with emphasis on how fiber diameter and the potential curvature sensor POR1 affect the activation of the signaling molecules Rac1 and Arf1, and leading to expression of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), an osteoinductive marker. Diameters of 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 μm were compared against a flat control. The highest level of Rac1 activation was achieved on the smallest fibers (0.1 μm), a trend that was lost in POR1 knockdowns. This supports the hypothesis that on small nanofibers, POR1 favorably binds to highly curved cell membranes, which allows Rac1 to subsequently dissociate and activate. When the curvature is insufficient to bind POR1, POR1 binds to inactive Rac1 and competitively inhibits its activation. Arf1 activation followed an opposite trend, with the largest nanofibers exhibiting the highest activity. This trend reinforces the known interaction between Rac1 and Arf1 through the GIT-PIX complex, an Arf1 GAP and Rac1 GEF, respectively. Large, (1.0 μm), nanofibers demonstrated the highest ALP activity, indicating that ALP expression is inversely dependent on Rac1 activation. Knockdown of POR1 resulted in increased ALP activity across the substrates but without regard to the curvature sensing trend seen previously. Thus, POR1 senses curvature and increases Rac1 activity, which negatively regulates bone differentiation.

  7. Fibronectin matrix polymerization regulates smooth muscle cell phenotype through a Rac1 dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shi, Feng; Long, Xiaochun; Hendershot, Allison; Miano, Joseph M; Sottile, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells are maintained in a differentiated state in the vessel wall, but can be modulated to a synthetic phenotype following injury. Smooth muscle phenotypic modulation is thought to play an important role in the pathology of vascular occlusive diseases. Phenotypically modulated smooth muscle cells exhibit increased proliferative and migratory properties that accompany the downregulation of smooth muscle cell marker proteins. Extracellular matrix proteins, including fibronectin, can regulate the smooth muscle phenotype when used as adhesive substrates. However, cells produce and organize a 3-dimensional fibrillar extracellular matrix, which can affect cell behavior in distinct ways from the protomeric 2-dimensional matrix proteins that are used as adhesive substrates. We previously showed that the deposition/polymerization of fibronectin into the extracellular matrix can regulate the deposition and organization of other extracellular matrix molecules in vitro. Further, our published data show that the presence of a fibronectin polymerization inhibitor results in increased expression of smooth muscle cell differentiation proteins and inhibits vascular remodeling in vivo. In this manuscript, we used an in vitro cell culture system to determine the mechanism by which fibronectin polymerization affects smooth muscle phenotypic modulation. Our data show that fibronectin polymerization decreases the mRNA levels of multiple smooth muscle differentiation genes, and downregulates the levels of smooth muscle α-actin and calponin proteins by a Rac1-dependent mechanism. The expression of smooth muscle genes is transcriptionally regulated by fibronectin polymerization, as evidenced by the increased activity of luciferase reporter constructs in the presence of a fibronectin polymerization inhibitor. Fibronectin polymerization also promotes smooth muscle cell growth, and decreases the levels of actin stress fibers. These data define a Rac1-dependent pathway wherein

  8. Hippocampal Activation of Rac1 Regulates the Forgetting of Object Recognition Memory.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunlong; Du, Shuwen; Lv, Li; Lei, Bo; Shi, Wei; Tang, Yikai; Wang, Lianzhang; Zhong, Yi

    2016-09-12

    Forgetting is a universal feature for most types of memories. The best-defined and extensively characterized behaviors that depict forgetting are natural memory decay and interference-based forgetting [1, 2]. Molecular mechanisms underlying the active forgetting remain to be determined for memories in vertebrates. Recent progress has begun to unravel such mechanisms underlying the active forgetting [3-11] that is induced through the behavior-dependent activation of intracellular signaling pathways. In Drosophila, training-induced activation of the small G protein Rac1 mediates natural memory decay and interference-based forgetting of aversive conditioning memory [3]. In mice, the activation of photoactivable-Rac1 in recently potentiated spines in a motor learning task erases the motor memory [12]. These lines of evidence prompted us to investigate a role for Rac1 in time-based natural memory decay and interference-based forgetting in mice. The inhibition of Rac1 activity in hippocampal neurons through targeted expression of a dominant-negative Rac1 form extended object recognition memory from less than 72 hr to over 72 hr, whereas Rac1 activation accelerated memory decay within 24 hr. Interference-induced forgetting of this memory was correlated with Rac1 activation and was completely blocked by inhibition of Rac1 activity. Electrophysiological recordings of long-term potentiation provided independent evidence that further supported a role for Rac1 activation in forgetting. Thus, Rac1-dependent forgetting is evolutionarily conserved from invertebrates to vertebrates.

  9. Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases regulate shear stress-driven β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Yokota, Hiroki; Na, Sungsoo

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Shear stress increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated β-catenin nuclear localization. •Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA displayed distinct dynamic activity patterns under flow. •Rac1 and Cdc42, but not RhoA, regulate shear stress-driven TCF/LEF activation. •Cytoskeleton did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activation. -- Abstract: Beta-catenin-dependent TCF/LEF (T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancing factor) is known to be mechanosensitive and an important regulator for promoting bone formation. However, the functional connection between TCF/LEF activity and Rho family GTPases is not well understood in osteoblasts. Herein we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying oscillatory shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells using live cell imaging. We employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based biosensors, which allowed us to monitor signal transduction in living cells in real time. Oscillatory (1 Hz) shear stress (10 dynes/cm{sup 2}) increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus with the distinct activity patterns of Rac1 and Cdc42. The shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity was blocked by the inhibition of Rac1 and Cdc42 with their dominant negative mutants or selective drugs, but not by a dominant negative mutant of RhoA. In contrast, constitutively active Rac1 and Cdc42 mutants caused a significant enhancement of TCF/LEF activity. Moreover, activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 increased the basal level of TCF/LEF activity, while their inhibition decreased the basal level. Interestingly, disruption of cytoskeletal structures or inhibition of myosin activity did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity. Although Rac1 is reported to be involved in β-catenin in cancer cells, the involvement of Cdc42 in β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts has not been identified. Our findings in this study demonstrate

  10. Regulation of lymphatic-blood vessel separation by endothelial Rac1

    PubMed Central

    D'Amico, Gabriela; Jones, Dylan T.; Nye, Emma; Sapienza, Karen; Ramjuan, Antoine R.; Reynolds, Louise E.; Robinson, Stephen D.; Kostourou, Vassiliki; Martinez, Dolores; Aubyn, Deborah; Grose, Richard; Thomas, Gareth J.; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Zicha, Daniel; Davies, Derek; Tybulewicz, Victor; Hodivala-Dilke, Kairbaan M.

    2009-01-01

    Sprouting angiogenesis and lymphatic-blood vessel segregation both involve the migration of endothelial cells, but the precise migratory molecules that govern the decision of blood vascular endothelial cells to segregate into lymphatic vasculature are unknown. Here, we deleted endothelial Rac1 in mice (Tie1-Cre+;Rac1fl/fl) and revealed, unexpectedly, that whereas blood vessel morphology appeared normal, lymphatic-blood vessel separation was impaired, with corresponding edema, haemorrhage and embryonic lethality. Importantly, normal levels of Rac1 were essential for directed endothelial cell migratory responses to lymphatic-inductive signals. Our studies identify Rac1 as a crucial part of the migratory machinery required for endothelial cells to separate and form lymphatic vasculature. PMID:19906871

  11. Hypoxia/reoxygenation-experienced cancer cell migration and metastasis are regulated by Rap1- and Rac1-GTPase activation via the expression of thymosin beta-4.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Wook; Ryu, Yun-Kyoung; Ji, Young-Hoon; Kang, Joo Hyun; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Signaling by small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPase), Rap1/Rac1, is one of the major pathways controlling cancer cell migration and tumor metastasis. Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4), an actin-sequestering protein, has been shown to increase migration of cancer cells. Episodes of hypoxia and re-oxygenation (H/R) are an important phenomenon in tumor microenvironment (TME). We investigated whether Tβ4 could play as an intermediary to crosstalk between Rac1- and Rap1- GTPase activation under hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) conditions. Inhibition of Tβ4 expression using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) significantly decreased lung metastasis of B16F10 cells. Rac1 and Rap1 activity, as well as cancer cell migration, increased following induction of Tβ4 expression in normoxia- or H/R-experienced cells, but were barely detectable in Tβ4-depleted cells. Rap1-regulated Rac1 activity was decreased by a dominant negative Rap1 (Rap1N17), and increased by 8-(4-chloro-phenylthio)-2'-O-methyladenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (CPT), a Rap1 activator. In contrast, a Rac1-specific inhibitor, NSC23766, and dominant negative Rac1 (Rac1N17) enhanced Tβ4 expression and aberrant Rap1 activity. While NSC23766 and Rac1N17 incompletely inhibited tumor metastasis in vivo, and H/R-experienced cancer cell migration in vitro, more efficient attenuation of cancer cell migration was accomplished by simultaneous inactivation of Rap1 and Rac1 with Rap1N17 and Rac1N17, respectively. These data suggest that a combination therapy targeting both Rap1 and Rac1 activity may be an effective method of inhibiting tumor metastasis.

  12. Regulation of cell-matrix adhesion dynamics and Rac-1 by integrin linked kinase.

    PubMed

    Boulter, Etienne; Grall, Dominique; Cagnol, Sébastien; Van Obberghen-Schilling, Ellen

    2006-07-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) receptors of the integrin family initiate changes in cell shape and motility by recruiting signaling components that coordinate these events. Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is one such partner of beta1 integrins that participates in dynamic rearrangement of cell-matrix adhesions and cell spreading by mechanisms that are not well understood. To further elucidate the role of ILK in these events, we engineered a chimeric molecule comprising ILK fused to a membrane-targeted green fluorescent protein (ILK-GFP-F). ILK-GFP-F is highly enriched in cell-matrix adhesions, and its expression in fibroblasts leads to an accumulation of focal adhesions (2-5 microm) and elongated adhesions (>5 microm). ILK-GFP-F enhances cell spreading on fibronectin and induces a constitutive increase in the levels of GTP-bound Rac-1. Conversely, ILK knock-down by siRNA transfection decreases active Rac-1. Endogenous ILK was found to associate with PKL (paxillin kinase linker) and the Rac/Cdc42 guanine nucleotide exchange factor betaPIX. Further, expression of a dominant negative betaPIX mutant reversed the increase in active Rac-1 levels of ILK-GFP-F-expressing cells, thus placing betaPIX in the pathway leading from ILK to Rac-1 activation. However, expression of constitutively active Rac only partially restores the spreading defects of ILK-depleted cells, suggesting that an additional ILK-dependent signal is required for cell spreading.

  13. MAP1B Regulates Axonal Development by Modulating Rho-GTPase Rac1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Montenegro-Venegas, Carolina; Tortosa, Elena; Rosso, Silvana; Peretti, Diego; Bollati, Flavia; Bisbal, Mariano; Jausoro, Ignacio; Avila, Jesus; Cáceres, Alfredo

    2010-01-01

    Cultured neurons obtained from MAP1B-deficient mice have a delay in axon outgrowth and a reduced rate of axonal elongation compared with neurons from wild-type mice. Here we show that MAP1B deficiency results in a significant decrease in Rac1 and cdc42 activity and a significant increase in Rho activity. We found that MAP1B interacted with Tiam1, a guanosine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac1. The decrease in Rac1/cdc42 activity was paralleled by decreases in the phosphorylation of the downstream effectors of these proteins, such as LIMK-1 and cofilin. The expression of a constitutively active form of Rac1, cdc42, or Tiam1 rescued the axon growth defect of MAP1B-deficient neurons. Taken together, these observations define a new and crucial function of MAP1B that we show to be required for efficient cross-talk between microtubules and the actin cytoskeleton during neuronal polarization. PMID:20719958

  14. Actin depolymerization mediated loss of SNTA1 phosphorylation and Rac1 activity has implications on ROS production, cell migration and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Sehar Saleem; Parray, Arif Ali; Mushtaq, Umar; Fazili, Khalid Majid; Khanday, Firdous Ahmad

    2016-06-01

    Alpha-1-syntrophin (SNTA1) and Rac1 are part of a signaling pathway via the dystrophin glycoprotein complex (DGC). Both SNTA1 and Rac1 proteins are over-expressed in various carcinomas. It is through the DGC signaling pathway that SNTA1 has been shown to act as a link between the extra cellular matrix, the internal cell signaling apparatus and the actin cytoskeleton. SNTA1 is involved in the modulation of the actin cytoskeleton and actin reorganization. Rac1 also controls actin cytoskeletal organization in the cell. In this study, we present the interplay between f-actin, SNTA1 and Rac1. We analyzed the effect of actin depolymerization on SNTA1 tyrosine phosphorylation and Rac1 activity using actin depolymerizing drugs, cytochalasin D and latrunculin A. Our results indicate a marked decrease in the tyrosine phosphorylation of SNTA1 upon actin depolymerization. Results suggest that actin depolymerization mediated loss of SNTA1 phosphorylation leads to loss of interaction between SNTA1 and Rac1, with a concomitant loss of Rac1 activation. The loss of SNTA1tyrosine phosphorylation and Rac1 activity by actin depolymerization results in increased apoptosis, decreased cell migration and decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in breast carcinoma cells. Collectively, our results present a possible role of f-actin in the SNTA1-Rac1 signaling pathway and implications of actin depolymerization on cell migration, ROS production and apoptosis.

  15. The Rac1 regulator ELMO controls basal body migration and docking in multiciliated cells through interaction with Ezrin.

    PubMed

    Epting, Daniel; Slanchev, Krasimir; Boehlke, Christopher; Hoff, Sylvia; Loges, Niki T; Yasunaga, Takayuki; Indorf, Lara; Nestel, Sigrun; Lienkamp, Soeren S; Omran, Heymut; Kuehn, E Wolfgang; Ronneberger, Olaf; Walz, Gerd; Kramer-Zucker, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that are present on most cells and are required for normal tissue development and function. Defective cilia cause complex syndromes with multiple organ manifestations termed ciliopathies. A crucial step during ciliogenesis in multiciliated cells (MCCs) is the association of future basal bodies with the apical plasma membrane, followed by their correct spacing and planar orientation. Here, we report a novel role for ELMO-DOCK1, which is a bipartite guanine nucleotide exchange factor complex for the small GTPase Rac1, and for the membrane-cytoskeletal linker Ezrin, in regulating centriole/basal body migration, docking and spacing. Downregulation of each component results in ciliopathy-related phenotypes in zebrafish and disrupted ciliogenesis in Xenopus epidermal MCCs. Subcellular analysis revealed a striking impairment of basal body docking and spacing, which is likely to account for the observed phenotypes. These results are substantiated by showing a genetic interaction between elmo1 and ezrin b. Finally, we provide biochemical evidence that the ELMO-DOCK1-Rac1 complex influences Ezrin phosphorylation and thereby probably serves as an important molecular switch. Collectively, we demonstrate that the ELMO-Ezrin complex orchestrates ciliary basal body migration, docking and positioning in vivo.

  16. Inositol phospholipids regulate the guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor Tiam1 by facilitating its binding to the plasma membrane and regulating GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    Binding of the Rac1-specific guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor, Tiam1, to the plasma membrane requires the N-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. In the present study, we show that membrane-association is mediated by binding of PtdIns(4,5)P2 to the pleckstrin homology domain. Moreover, in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, translocation of Tiam1 to the cytosol, following receptor-mediated stimulation of PtdIns(4,5)P2 breakdown, correlates with decreased Rac1-GTP levels, indicating that membrane-association is required for GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1. In addition, we show that platelet-derived growth factor activates Rac1 in vivo by increasing PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 concentrations, rather than the closely related lipid, PtdIns(3,4)P2. Finally, the data demonstrate that PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 bind to the same pleckstrin homology domain in Tiam1 and that soluble inositol phosphates appear to compete with lipids for this binding. Together, these novel observations provide strong evidence that distinct phosphoinositides regulate different functions of this enzyme, indicating that local concentrations of signalling lipids and the levels of cytosolic inositol phosphates will play crucial roles in determining its activity in vivo. PMID:15242348

  17. Inositol phospholipids regulate the guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor Tiam1 by facilitating its binding to the plasma membrane and regulating GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ian N; Batty, Ian H; Prescott, Alan R; Gray, Alex; Kular, Gursant S; Stewart, Hazel; Downes, C Peter

    2004-09-15

    Binding of the Rac1-specific guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor, Tiam1, to the plasma membrane requires the N-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. In the present study, we show that membrane-association is mediated by binding of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) to the pleckstrin homology domain. Moreover, in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells, translocation of Tiam1 to the cytosol, following receptor-mediated stimulation of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) breakdown, correlates with decreased Rac1-GTP levels, indicating that membrane-association is required for GDP/GTP exchange on Rac1. In addition, we show that platelet-derived growth factor activates Rac1 in vivo by increasing PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) concentrations, rather than the closely related lipid, PtdIns(3,4)P(2). Finally, the data demonstrate that PtdIns(4,5)P(2) and PtdIns(3,4,5)P(3) bind to the same pleckstrin homology domain in Tiam1 and that soluble inositol phosphates appear to compete with lipids for this binding. Together, these novel observations provide strong evidence that distinct phosphoinositides regulate different functions of this enzyme, indicating that local concentrations of signalling lipids and the levels of cytosolic inositol phosphates will play crucial roles in determining its activity in vivo.

  18. Induction of Non-Apoptotic Cell Death by Activated Ras Requires Inverse Regulation of Rac1 and Arf6

    PubMed Central

    Bhanot, Haymanti; Young, Ashley M.; Overmeyer, Jean H.; Maltese, William A.

    2010-01-01

    Methuosis is a unique form of non-apoptotic cell death triggered by alterations in the trafficking of clathrin-independent endosomes, ultimately leading to extreme vacuolization and rupture of the cell. Methuosis can be induced in glioblastoma cells by expression of constitutively active Ras. This study identifies the small GTPases, Rac1 and Arf6, and the Arf6 GTPase-activating-protein, GIT1, as key downstream components of the signaling pathway underlying Ras-induced methuosis. The extent to which graded expression of active H-Ras(G12V) triggers cytoplasmic vacuolization correlates with the amount of endogenous Rac1 in the active GTP state. Blocking Rac1 activation with the specific Rac inhibitor, EHT 1864, or co-expression of dominant-negative Rac1(T17N), prevents the accumulation of vacuoles induced by H-Ras(G12V). Coincident with Rac1 activation, H-Ras(G12V) causes a decrease in the amount of active Arf6, a GTPase that functions in recycling of clathrin-independent endosomes. The effect of H-Ras(G12V) on Arf6 is blocked by EHT 1864, indicating that the decrease in Arf6-GTP is directly linked to activation of Rac1. Constitutively active Rac1(G12V) interacts with GIT1 in immunoprecipitation assays. Ablation of GIT1 by shRNA prevents the decrease in active Arf6, inhibits vacuolization, and prevents loss of cell viability in cells expressing Rac1(G12V). Together the results suggest that perturbations of endosome morphology associated with Ras-induced methuosis are due to downstream activation of Rac1, combined with reciprocal inactivation of Arf6. The latter appears to be mediated through Rac1 stimulation of GIT1. Further insights into this pathway could suggest opportunities for induction of methuosis in cancers that are resistant to apoptotic cell death. PMID:20713492

  19. RAC1 inhibition targets amyloid precursor protein processing by gamma-secretase and decreases Abeta production in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Désiré, Laurent; Bourdin, Jérôme; Loiseau, Nadia; Peillon, Hélène; Picard, Virginie; De Oliveira, Catherine; Bachelot, Florence; Leblond, Bertrand; Taverne, Thierry; Beausoleil, Eric; Lacombe, Sandrine; Drouin, Dominique; Schweighoffer, Fabien

    2005-11-11

    beta-Amyloid peptides (Abeta) that form the senile plaques of Alzheimer disease consist mainly of 40- and 42-amino acid (Abeta 40 and Abeta 42) peptides generated from the cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Generation of Abeta involves beta-secretase and gamma-secretase activities and is regulated by membrane trafficking of the proteins involved in Abeta production. Here we describe a new small molecule, EHT 1864, which blocks the Rac1 signaling pathways. In vitro, EHT 1864 blocks Abeta 40 and Abeta 42 production but does not impact sAPPalpha levels and does not inhibit beta-secretase. Rather, EHT 1864 modulates APP processing at the level of gamma-secretase to prevent Abeta 40 and Abeta 42 generation. This effect does not result from a direct inhibition of the gamma-secretase activity and is specific for APP cleavage, since EHT 1864 does not affect Notch cleavage. In vivo, EHT 1864 significantly reduces Abeta 40 and Abeta 42 levels in guinea pig brains at a threshold that is compatible with delaying plaque accumulation and/or clearing the existing plaque in brain. EHT 1864 is the first derivative of a new chemical series that consists of candidates for inhibiting Abeta formation in the brain of AD patients. Our findings represent the first pharmacological validation of Rac1 signaling as a target for developing novel therapies for Alzheimer disease.

  20. Angiotensin Receptor Blockers and Statins Could Alleviate Atrial Fibrosis via Regulating Platelet-Derived Growth Factor/Rac1 /Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Axis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongfang; Yuan, Jia; Liu, Gan; Ling, Zhiyu; Zeng, Haiyan; Chen, Yunqing; Zhang, Yue; She, Qiang; Zhou, Xue

    2013-01-01

    Aims: To investigate whether the administration of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) inhibitors and statins could alleviate atrial fibrosis via platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)/Rac1 /nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) axis. Methods and Results: In human left atrium, the degree of atrial fibrosis, as well as the expression levels of PDGF, Rac1 and NF-κB increased 1.5 to 2.9 folds in patients with atrial fibrillation compared to that with sinus rhythm, (P<0.0001). There were strongly positive correlations between angiotensin II (Ang II) or procollagen type III-alpha-1 (COL3A1) with PDGF, Rac1, NF-κB, and among PDGF, Rac1 and NF-κB (all P<0.05). At 3 weeks after the transverse aorta constriction (TAC) operation in rat model and with intervention of irbesartan or/and simvastatin, the collagen volume fraction (CVF) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) values respectively increased 6-folds and 3.5-folds in the TAC group compared to SHAM group (P<0.0001), but these levels decreased by 16% to 63% with following drug intervention (all P<0.0001), the combined treatment was the lowest. Accordingly, the expression levels of PDGF (3-folds), Rac1 (1.6-folds), NF-κB (7-folds) and AngII (12-folds) significantly increased in the TAC group compared to the SHAM group, and these levels were also reduced by 25% to 64% with following drug intervention. The highest reduction could be seen after treatment with irbesartan and simvastatin in combination (all P<0.001).There were strongly positive correlations between AngII or CVF with PDGF, Rac1, NF-κB, and among PDGF, Rac1 and NF-κB (all P<0.05). Conclusions: Irbesartan or/and simvastatin can improve atrial fibrosis by regulating PDGF/Rac1/NF-κB axis. PMID:23794945

  1. Regulation of sphingosine 1-phosphate-induced endothelial cytoskeletal rearrangement and barrier enhancement by S1P1 receptor, PI3 kinase, Tiam1/Rac1, and alpha-actinin.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Patrick A; Dudek, Steven M; Chiang, Eddie T; Garcia, Joe G N

    2005-10-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) barrier dysfunction results in increased vascular permeability observed in inflammation, tumor angiogenesis, and atherosclerosis. The platelet-derived phospholipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) decreases EC permeability in vitro and in vivo and thus has obvious therapeutic potential. We examined S1P-mediated human pulmonary artery EC signaling and barrier regulation in caveolin-enriched microdomains (CEM). Immunoblotting from S1P-treated EC revealed S1P-mediated rapid recruitment (1 microM, 5 min) to CEMs of the S1P receptors S1P1 and S1P3, p110 PI3 kinase alpha and beta catalytic subunits, the Rac1 GEF, Tiam1, and alpha-actinin isoforms 1 and 4. Immunoprecipitated p110 PI3 kinase catalytic subunits from S1P-treated EC exhibited PIP3 production in CEMs. Immunoprecipitation of S1P receptors from CEM fractions revealed complexes containing Tiam1 and S1P1. PI3 kinase inhibition (LY294002) attenuated S1P-induced Tiam1 association with S1P1, Tiam1/Rac1 activation, alpha-actinin-1/4 recruitment, and EC barrier enhancement. Silencing of either S1P1 or Tiam1 expression resulted in the loss of S1P-mediated Rac1 activation and alpha-actinin-1/4 recruitment to CEM. Finally, silencing S1P1, Tiam1, or both alpha-actinin isoforms 1/4 inhibits S1P-induced cortical F-actin rearrangement and S1P-mediated barrier enhancement. Taken together, these results suggest that S1P-induced recruitment of S1P1 to CEM fractions promotes PI3 kinase-mediated Tiam1/Rac1 activation required for alpha-actinin-1/4-regulated cortical actin rearrangement and EC barrier enhancement.

  2. The RhoGAP SPIN6 Associates with SPL11 and OsRac1 and Negatively Regulates Programmed Cell Death and Innate Immunity in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jinling; Park, Chan Ho; He, Feng; Nagano, Minoru; Wang, Mo; Bellizzi, Maria; Zhang, Kai; Zeng, Xiaoshan; Liu, Wende; Ning, Yuese; Kawano, Yoji; Wang, Guo-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system in plants plays important roles in plant-microbe interactions and in immune responses to pathogens. We previously demonstrated that the rice U-box E3 ligase SPL11 and its Arabidopsis ortholog PUB13 negatively regulate programmed cell death (PCD) and defense response. However, the components involved in the SPL11/PUB13-mediated PCD and immune signaling pathway remain unknown. In this study, we report that SPL11-interacting Protein 6 (SPIN6) is a Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP) that interacts with SPL11 in vitro and in vivo. SPL11 ubiquitinates SPIN6 in vitro and degrades SPIN6 in vivo via the 26S proteasome-dependent pathway. Both RNAi silencing in transgenic rice and knockout of Spin6 in a T-DNA insertion mutant lead to PCD and increased resistance to the rice blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae and the bacterial blight pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae. The levels of reactive oxygen species and defense-related gene expression are significantly elevated in both the Spin6 RNAi and mutant plants. Strikingly, SPIN6 interacts with the small GTPase OsRac1, catalyze the GTP-bound OsRac1 into the GDP-bound state in vitro and has GAP activity towards OsRac1 in rice cells. Together, our results demonstrate that the RhoGAP SPIN6 acts as a linkage between a U-box E3 ligase-mediated ubiquitination pathway and a small GTPase-associated defensome system for plant immunity. PMID:25658451

  3. Gain-of-Function Mutations of ARHGAP31, a Cdc42/Rac1 GTPase Regulator, Cause Syndromic Cutis Aplasia and Limb Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Southgate, Laura; Machado, Rajiv D.; Snape, Katie M.; Primeau, Martin; Dafou, Dimitra; Ruddy, Deborah M.; Branney, Peter A.; Fisher, Malcolm; Lee, Grace J.; Simpson, Michael A.; He, Yi; Bradshaw, Teisha Y.; Blaumeiser, Bettina; Winship, William S.; Reardon, Willie; Maher, Eamonn R.; FitzPatrick, David R.; Wuyts, Wim; Zenker, Martin; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie; Trembath, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of cell proliferation and motility is essential for normal development. The Rho family of GTPases plays a critical role in the control of cell polarity and migration by effecting the cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, and cell adhesion. We investigated a recognized developmental disorder, Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS), characterized by the combination of aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) and terminal transverse limb defects (TTLD). Through a genome-wide linkage analysis, we detected a locus for autosomal-dominant ACC-TTLD on 3q generating a maximum LOD score of 4.93 at marker rs1464311. Candidate-gene- and exome-based sequencing led to the identification of independent premature truncating mutations in the terminal exon of the Rho GTPase-activating protein 31 gene, ARHGAP31, which encodes a Cdc42/Rac1 regulatory protein. Mutant transcripts are stable and increase ARHGAP31 activity in vitro through a gain-of-function mechanism. Constitutively active ARHGAP31 mutations result in a loss of available active Cdc42 and consequently disrupt actin cytoskeletal structures. Arhgap31 expression in the mouse is substantially restricted to the terminal limb buds and craniofacial processes during early development; these locations closely mirror the sites of impaired organogenesis that characterize this syndrome. These data identify the requirement for regulated Cdc42 and/or Rac1 signaling processes during early human development. PMID:21565291

  4. ApoER2 and Reelin are expressed in regenerating peripheral nerve and regulate Schwann cell migration by activating the Rac1 GEF protein, Tiam1.

    PubMed

    Pasten, Consuelo; Cerda, Joaquín; Jausoro, Ignacio; Court, Felipe A; Cáceres, Alfredo; Marzolo, Maria-Paz

    2015-11-01

    ApoER2 and its ligand Reelin participate in neuronal migration during development. Upon receptor binding, Reelin induces the proteolytic processing of ApoER2 as well as the activation of signaling pathway, including small Rho GTPases. Besides its presence in the central nervous system (CNS), Reelin is also secreted by Schwann cells (SCs), the glial cells of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Reelin deficient mice (reeler) show decreased axonal regeneration in the PNS; however neither the presence of ApoER2 nor the role of the Reelin signaling pathway in the PNS have been evaluated. Interestingly SC migration occurs during PNS development and during injury-induced regeneration and involves activation of small Rho GTPases. Thus, Reelin-ApoER2 might regulate SC migration during axon regeneration in the PNS. Here we demonstrate the presence of ApoER2 in PNS. After sciatic nerve injury Reelin was induced and its receptor ApoER2 was proteolytically processed. In vitro, SCs express both Reelin and ApoER2 and Reelin induces SC migration. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying Reelin-dependent SC migration, we examined the involvement of Rac1, a conspicuous small GTPase family member. FRET experiments revealed that Reelin activates Rac1 at the leading edge of SCs. In addition, Tiam1, a major Rac1-specific GEF was required for Reelin-induced SC migration. Moreover, Reelin-induced SC migration was decreased after suppression of the polarity protein PAR3, consistent with its association to Tiam1. Even more interesting, we demonstrated that PAR3 binds preferentially to the full-length cytoplasmic tail of ApoER2 corresponding to the splice-variant containing the exon 19 that encodes a proline-rich insert and that ApoER2 was required for SC migration. Our study reveals a novel function for Reelin/ApoER2 in PNS, inducing cell migration of SCs, a process relevant for PNS development and regeneration.

  5. Characterization of Novel Molecular Mechanisms Favoring Rac1 Membrane Translocation.

    PubMed

    Castro-Castro, Antonio; Muriel, Olivia; Del Pozo, Miguel A; Bustelo, Xosé R

    2016-01-01

    The Rac1 GTPase plays key roles in cytoskeletal organization, cell motility and a variety of physiological and disease-linked responses. Wild type Rac1 signaling entails dissociation of the GTPase from cytosolic Rac1-Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) complexes, translocation to membranes, activation by exchange factors, effector binding, and activation of downstream signaling cascades. Out of those steps, membrane translocation is the less understood. Using transfections of a expression cDNA library in cells expressing a Rac1 bioreporter, we previously identified a cytoskeletal feedback loop nucleated by the F-actin binding protein coronin 1A (Coro1A) that promotes Rac1 translocation to the plasma membrane by facilitating the Pak-dependent dissociation of Rac1-Rho GDI complexes. This screening identified other potential regulators of this process, including WDR26, basigin, and TMEM8A. Here, we show that WDR26 promotes Rac1 translocation following a Coro1A-like and Coro1A-dependent mechanism. By contrast, basigin and TMEM8A stabilize Rac1 at the plasma membrane by inhibiting the internalization of caveolin-rich membrane subdomains. This latter pathway is F-actin-dependent but Coro1A-, Pak- and Rho GDI-independent.

  6. Characterization of Novel Molecular Mechanisms Favoring Rac1 Membrane Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Castro, Antonio; Muriel, Olivia; del Pozo, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    The Rac1 GTPase plays key roles in cytoskeletal organization, cell motility and a variety of physiological and disease-linked responses. Wild type Rac1 signaling entails dissociation of the GTPase from cytosolic Rac1-Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (GDI) complexes, translocation to membranes, activation by exchange factors, effector binding, and activation of downstream signaling cascades. Out of those steps, membrane translocation is the less understood. Using transfections of a expression cDNA library in cells expressing a Rac1 bioreporter, we previously identified a cytoskeletal feedback loop nucleated by the F-actin binding protein coronin 1A (Coro1A) that promotes Rac1 translocation to the plasma membrane by facilitating the Pak-dependent dissociation of Rac1-Rho GDI complexes. This screening identified other potential regulators of this process, including WDR26, basigin, and TMEM8A. Here, we show that WDR26 promotes Rac1 translocation following a Coro1A-like and Coro1A-dependent mechanism. By contrast, basigin and TMEM8A stabilize Rac1 at the plasma membrane by inhibiting the internalization of caveolin-rich membrane subdomains. This latter pathway is F-actin-dependent but Coro1A-, Pak- and Rho GDI-independent. PMID:27835684

  7. Cocaine activates Rac1 to control structural and behavioral plasticity in caudate putamen.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Zhenzhong; Xie, Minjuan; Huang, Lu; Xue, Jinhua; Liu, Yutong; Liu, Nuyun; Guo, Fukun; Zheng, Yi; Kong, Jiming; Zhang, Lin; Zhang, Lu

    2015-03-01

    Repeated exposure to cocaine was previously found to cause sensitized behavioral responses and structural remodeling on medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate putamen (CPu). Rac1 has emerged as a key integrator of environmental cues that regulates dendritic cytoskeletons. In this study, we investigated the role of Rac1 in cocaine-induced dendritic and behavioral plasticity in the CPu. We found that Rac1 activation was reduced in the NAc but increased in the CPu following repeated cocaine treatment. Inhibition of Rac1 activity by a Rac1-specific inhibitor NSC23766, overexpression of a dominant negative mutant of Rac1 (T17N-Rac1) or local knockout of Rac1 attenuated the cocaine-induced increase in dendrites and spine density in the CPu, whereas overexpression of a constitutively active Rac1 exert the opposite effect. Moreover, NSC23766 reversed the increased number of asymmetric spine synapses in the CPu following chronic cocaine exposure. Downregulation of Rac1 activity likewise attenuates behavioral reward responses to cocaine exposure, with activation of Rac1 producing the opposite effect. Thus, Rac1 signaling is differentially regulated in the NAc and CPu after repeated cocaine treatment, and induction of Rac1 activation in the CPu is important for cocaine exposure-induced dendritic remodeling and behavioral plasticity.

  8. The N-Terminal DH-PH Domain of Trio Induces Cell Spreading and Migration by Regulating Lamellipodia Dynamics in a Rac1-Dependent Fashion

    PubMed Central

    van Rijssel, Jos; Hoogenboezem, Mark; Wester, Lynn; Hordijk, Peter L.; Van Buul, Jaap D.

    2012-01-01

    The guanine-nucleotide exchange factor Trio encodes two DH-PH domains that catalyze nucleotide exchange on Rac1, RhoG and RhoA. The N-terminal DH-PH domain is known to activate Rac1 and RhoG, whereas the C-terminal DH-PH domain can activate RhoA. The current study shows that the N-terminal DH-PH domain, upon expression in HeLa cells, activates Rac1 and RhoG independently from each other. In addition, we show that the flanking SH3 domain binds to the proline-rich region of the C-terminus of Rac1, but not of RhoG. However, this SH3 domain is not required for Rac1 or RhoG GDP-GTP exchange. Rescue experiments in Trio-shRNA-expressing cells showed that the N-terminal DH-PH domain of Trio, but not the C-terminal DH-PH domain, restored fibronectin-mediated cell spreading and migration defects that are observed in Trio-silenced cells. Kymograph analysis revealed that the N-terminal DH-PH domain, independent of its SH3 domain, controls the dynamics of lamellipodia. Using siRNA against Rac1 or RhoG, we found that Trio-D1-induced lamellipodia formation required Rac1 but not RhoG expression. Together, we conclude that the GEF Trio is responsible for lamellipodia formation through its N-terminal DH-PH domain in a Rac1-dependent manner during fibronectin-mediated spreading and migration. PMID:22238672

  9. Neurexin-Neuroligin Synaptic Complex Regulates Schizophrenia-Related DISC1/Kal-7/Rac1 “Signalosome”

    PubMed Central

    Owczarek, Sylwia; Bang, Marie Louise; Berezin, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Neurexins (NXs) and neuroligins (NLs) are cell adhesion molecules that are localized at opposite sites of synaptic membranes. They interact with each other to promote the assembly, maintenance, and function of synapses in the central nervous system. Both NX and NL are cleaved from a membrane-attached intracellular domain in an activity-dependent manner, generating the soluble ectodomain of NX or NL. Expression of the NX1 and NX3 genes in the brain appears to be regulated by a schizophrenia-related protein, DISC1. Here, we show that soluble ecto-NX1β can regulate the expression of DISC1 and induce signaling downstream of DISC1. We also show that NL1 binds to a well-characterized DISC1 interaction partner, Kal-7, and this interaction can be compromised by DISC1. Our results indicate that the NX/NL synaptic complex is intrinsically involved in the regulation of DISC1 function, thus contributing to a better understanding of the pathology of schizophrenia. PMID:26078884

  10. The Crystal Structure of the Plant Small GTPase OsRac1 Reveals Its Mode of Binding to NADPH Oxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Kosami, Ken-ichi; Ohki, Izuru; Nagano, Minoru; Furuita, Kyoko; Sugiki, Toshihiko; Kawano, Yoji; Kawasaki, Tsutomu; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Shimamoto, Ko; Kojima, Chojiro

    2014-01-01

    Rac/Rop proteins are Rho-type small GTPases that act as molecular switches in plants. Recent studies have identified these proteins as key components in many major plant signaling pathways, such as innate immunity, pollen tube growth, and root hair formation. In rice, the Rac/Rop protein OsRac1 plays an important role in regulating the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the NADPH oxidase OsRbohB during innate immunity. However, the molecular mechanism by which OsRac1 regulates OsRbohB remains unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of OsRac1 complexed with the non-hydrolyzable GTP analog guanosine 5′-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate at 1.9 Å resolution; this represents the first active-form structure of a plant small GTPase. To elucidate the ROS production in rice cells, structural information was used to design OsRac1 mutants that displayed reduced binding to OsRbohB. Only mutations in the OsRac1 Switch I region showed attenuated interactions with OsRbohB in vitro. In particular, Tyr39 and Asp45 substitutions suppressed ROS production in rice cells, indicating that these residues are critical for interaction with and activation of OsRbohB. Structural comparison of active-form OsRac1 with AtRop9 in its GDP-bound inactive form showed a large conformational difference in the vicinity of these residues. Our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of the immune response through OsRac1 and the various cellular responses associated with plant Rac/Rop proteins. PMID:25128531

  11. Neuronal Rac1 Is Required for Learning-Evoked Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Matthew P.; Freewoman, Julia; Cord, Branden; Babu, Harish; Brakebusch, Cord

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampus-dependent learning and memory relies on synaptic plasticity as well as network adaptations provided by the addition of adult-born neurons. We have previously shown that activity-induced intracellular signaling through the Rho family small GTPase Rac1 is necessary in forebrain projection neurons for normal synaptic plasticity in vivo, and here we show that selective loss of neuronal Rac1 also impairs the learning-evoked increase in neurogenesis in the adult mouse hippocampus. Earlier work has indicated that experience elevates the abundance of adult-born neurons in the hippocampus primarily by enhancing the survival of neurons produced just before the learning event. Loss of Rac1 in mature projection neurons did reduce learning-evoked neurogenesis but, contrary to our expectations, these effects were not mediated by altering the survival of young neurons in the hippocampus. Instead, loss of neuronal Rac1 activation selectively impaired a learning-evoked increase in the proliferation and accumulation of neural precursors generated during the learning event itself. This indicates that experience-induced alterations in neurogenesis can be mechanistically resolved into two effects: (1) the well documented but Rac1-independent signaling cascade that enhances the survival of young postmitotic neurons; and (2) a previously unrecognized Rac1-dependent signaling cascade that stimulates the proliferative production and retention of new neurons generated during learning itself. PMID:23884931

  12. Inhibition of Rac1 GTPase activity affects porcine oocyte maturation and early embryo development

    PubMed Central

    Song, Si-Jing; Wang, Qiao-Chu; Jia, Ru-Xia; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian oocyte asymmetric division relies on the eccentric positioning of the spindle, resulting in the polar body formation. Small signaling G protein Rac1 is a member of GTPases, which regulates a diverse array of cellular events, including the control of cell growth, cytoskeletal reorganization, and the activation of protein kinases. However, effects of Rac1 on the porcine oocyte maturation and early embryo development are not fully understood. In present study we investigated the role of Rac1 in oocyte maturation and embryo cleavage. We first found that Rac1 localized at the cortex of the porcine oocytes, and disrupting the Rac1 activities by treating with NSC 23766 led to the failure of polar body emission. In addition, a majority of treated oocytes exhibited abnormal spindle morphology, indicating that Rac1 may involve into porcine oocyte spindle formation. This might be due to the regulation of Rac1 on MAPK, since p-MAPK expression decreased after NSC 23766 treatments. Moreover, we found that the position of most meiotic spindles in treated oocytes were away from the cortex, indicating the roles of Rac1 on meiotic spindle positioning. Our results also showed that inhibition of Rac1 activity caused the failure of early embryo development. Therefore, our study showed the critical roles of Rac1 GTPase on porcine oocyte maturation and early embryo cleavage. PMID:27694954

  13. Inhibition of Rac1 Activity in the Hippocampus Impairs the Forgetting of Contextual Fear Memory.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lizhu; Mao, Rongrong; Zhou, Qixin; Yang, Yuexiong; Cao, Jun; Ding, Yuqiang; Yang, Yuan; Zhang, Xia; Li, Lingjiang; Xu, Lin

    2016-03-01

    Fear is crucial for survival, whereas hypermnesia of fear can be detrimental. Inhibition of the Rac GTPase is recently reported to impair the forgetting of initially acquired memory in Drosophila. Here, we investigated whether inhibition of Rac1 activity in rat hippocampus could contribute to the hypermnesia of contextual fear. We found that spaced but not massed training of contextual fear conditioning caused inhibition of Rac1 activity in the hippocampus and heightened contextual fear. Furthermore, intrahippocampal injection of the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 heightened contextual fear in massed training, while Rac1 activator CN04-A weakened contextual fear in spaced training rats. Our study firstly demonstrates that contextual fear memory in rats is actively regulated by Rac1 activity in the hippocampus, which suggests that the forgetting impairment of traumatic events in posttraumatic stress disorder may be contributed to the pathological inhibition of Rac1 activity in the hippocampus.

  14. CdGAP/ARHGAP31, a Cdc42/Rac1 GTPase regulator, is critical for vascular development and VEGF-mediated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Christine; DeGeer, Jonathan; Fournier, Patrick; Duquette, Philippe M.; Luangrath, Vilayphone; Ishii, Hidetaka; Karimzadeh, Fereshteh; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie; Royal, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the CdGAP/ARHGAP31 gene, which encodes a GTPase-activating protein for Rac1 and Cdc42, have been reported causative in the Adams-Oliver developmental syndrome often associated with vascular defects. However, despite its abundant expression in endothelial cells, CdGAP function in the vasculature remains unknown. Here, we show that vascular development is impaired in CdGAP-deficient mouse embryos at E15.5. This is associated with superficial vessel defects and subcutaneous edema, resulting in 44% embryonic/perinatal lethality. VEGF-driven angiogenesis is defective in CdGAP−/− mice, showing reduced capillary sprouting from aortic ring explants. Similarly, VEGF-dependent endothelial cell migration and capillary formation are inhibited upon CdGAP knockdown. Mechanistically, CdGAP associates with VEGF receptor-2 and controls VEGF-dependent signaling. Consequently, CdGAP depletion results in impaired VEGF-mediated Rac1 activation and reduced phosphorylation of critical intracellular mediators including Gab1, Akt, PLCγ and SHP2. These findings are the first to demonstrate the importance of CdGAP in embryonic vascular development and VEGF-induced signaling, and highlight CdGAP as a potential therapeutic target to treat pathological angiogenesis and vascular dysfunction. PMID:27270835

  15. Dynamic Control of Excitatory Synapse Development by a Rac1 GEF/GAP Regulatory Complex

    PubMed Central

    Um, Kyongmi; Niu, Sanyong; Duman, Joseph G.; Cheng, Jinxuan; Tu, Yen-Kuei; Schwechter, Brandon; Liu, Feng; Hiles, Laura; Narayanan, Anjana; Ash, Ryan T.; Mulherkar, Shalaka; Alpadi, Kannan; Smirnakis, Stelios M.; Tolias, Kimberley F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The small GTPase Rac1 orchestrates actin-dependent remodeling essential for numerous cellular processes including synapse development. While precise spatiotemporal regulation of Rac1 is necessary for its function, little is known about the mechanisms that enable Rac1 activators (GEFs) and inhibitors (GAPs) to act in concert to regulate Rac1 signaling. Here we identify a regulatory complex composed of a Rac-GEF (Tiam1) and a Rac-GAP (Bcr) that cooperate to control excitatory synapse development. Disruption of Bcr function within this complex increases Rac1 activity and dendritic spine remodeling, resulting in excessive synaptic growth that is rescued by Tiam1 inhibition. Notably, EphB receptors utilize the Tiam1-Bcr complex to control synaptogenesis. Following EphB activation, Tiam1 induces Rac1-dependent spine formation, whereas Bcr prevents Rac1-mediated receptor internalization, promoting spine growth over retraction. The finding that a Rac-specific GEF/GAP complex is required to maintain optimal levels of Rac1 signaling provides an important insight into the regulation of small GTPases. PMID:24960694

  16. bFGF Promotes the Migration of Human Dermal Fibroblasts under Diabetic Conditions through Reactive Oxygen Species Production via the PI3K/Akt-Rac1- JNK Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Hongxue; Cheng, Yi; Ye, Jingjing; Cai, Pingtao; Zhang, Jinjing; Li, Rui; Yang, Ying; Wang, Zhouguang; Zhang, Hongyu; Lin, Cai; Lu, Xianghong; Jiang, Liping; Hu, Aiping; Zhu, Xinbo; Zeng, Qiqiang; Fu, Xiaobing; Li, Xiaokun; Xiao, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblasts play a pivotal role in the process of cutaneous wound repair, whereas their migratory ability under diabetic conditions is markedly reduced. In this study, we investigated the effect of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on human dermal fibroblast migration in a high-glucose environment. bFGF significantly increased dermal fibroblast migration by increasing the percentage of fibroblasts with a high polarity index and reorganizing F-actin. A significant increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was observed in dermal fibroblasts under diabetic conditions following bFGF treatment. The blockage of bFGF-induced ROS production by either the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) or the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodonium chloride (DPI) almost completely neutralized the increased migration rate of dermal fibroblasts promoted by bFGF. Akt, Rac1 and JNK were rapidly activated by bFGF in dermal fibroblasts, and bFGF-induced ROS production and promoted dermal fibroblast migration were significantly attenuated when suppressed respectively. In addition, bFGF-induced increase in ROS production was indispensable for the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and paxillin. Therefore, our data suggested that bFGF promotes the migration of human dermal fibroblasts under diabetic conditions through increased ROS production via the PI3K/Akt-Rac1-JNK pathways. PMID:26078726

  17. NADPH Oxidase Contributes to Photoreceptor Degeneration in Constitutively Active RAC1 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hongman; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Zeng, Yong; Marangoni, Dario; Bush, Ronald A.; Wu, Zhijian; Sieving, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The active form of small GTPase RAC1 is required for activation of NADPH oxidase (NOX), which in turn generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in nonphagocytic cells. We explored whether NOX-induced oxidative stress contributes to rod degeneration in retinas expressing constitutively active (CA) RAC1. Methods Transgenic (Tg)–CA-RAC1 mice were given apocynin (10 mg/kg, intraperitoneal), a NOX inhibitor, or vehicle daily for up to 13 weeks. Superoxide production and oxidative damage were assessed by dihydroethidium staining and by protein carbonyls and malondialdehyde levels, respectively. Outer nuclear layer (ONL) cells were counted and electroretinogram (ERG) amplitudes measured in Tg-CA-RAC1 mice. Outer nuclear layer cells were counted in wild-type (WT) mice after transfer of CA-Rac1 gene by subretinal injection of AAV8-pOpsin-CA Rac1-GFP. Results Transgenic-CA-RAC1 retinas had significantly fewer photoreceptor cells and more apoptotic ONL cells than WT controls from postnatal week (Pw) 3 to Pw13. Superoxide accumulation and protein and lipid oxidation were increased in Tg-CA-RAC1 retinas and were reduced in mice treated with apocynin. Apocynin reduced the loss of photoreceptors and increased the rod ERG a- and b-wave amplitudes when compared with vehicle-injected transgenic controls. Photoreceptor loss was also observed in regions of adult WT retina transduced with AAV8-pOpsin-CA Rac1-GFP but not in neighboring regions that were not transduced or in AAV8-pOpsin-GFP–transduced retinas. Conclusions Constitutively active RAC1 promotes photoreceptor cell death by oxidative damage that occurs, at least partially, through NOX-induced ROS. Reactive oxygen species are likely involved in multiple forms of retinal degenerations, and our results support investigating RAC1 inhibition as a therapeutic approach that targets this disease pathway. PMID:27233035

  18. A function for Rac1 in the terminal differentiation and pigmentation of hair.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, Kristina; Klatte, Jennifer; Pofahl, Ruth; Bloch, Wilhelm; Smyth, Neil; Tscharntke, Michael; Krieg, Thomas; Paus, Ralf; Niessen, Carien; Niemann, Catherin; Brakebusch, Cord; Haase, Ingo

    2012-02-15

    The small GTPase Rac1 is ubiquitously expressed in proliferating and differentiating layers of the epidermis and hair follicles. Previously, Rac1 was shown to regulate stem cell behaviour in these compartments. We have asked whether Rac1 has, in addition, a specific, stem-cell-independent function in the regulation of terminal hair follicle differentiation. To address this, we have expressed a constitutively active mutant of Rac1, L61Rac1, only in the basal epidermal layer and outer root sheath of mice possessing an epidermis-specific deletion of endogenous Rac1, which experience severe hair loss. The resulting 'rescue' mice exhibited a hair coat throughout their lives. Therefore, expression of Rac1 activity in the keratin-14-positive compartment of the skin is sufficient for the formation of hair follicles and hair in normal quantities. The quality of hair formed in rescue mice was, however, not normal. Rescue mice showed a grey, dull hair coat, whereas that of wild-type and L61Rac1-transgenic mice was black and shiny. Hair analysis in rescue mice revealed altered structures of the hair shaft and the cuticle and disturbed organization of medulla cells and pigment distribution. Disorganization of medulla cells correlates with the absence of cortical, keratin-filled spikes that normally protrude from the cortex into the medulla. The desmosomal cadherin Dsc2, which normally decorates these protrusions, was found to be reduced or absent in the hair of rescue mice. Our study demonstrates regulatory functions for Rac1 in the formation of hair structure and pigmentation and thereby identifies, for the first time, a role for Rac1 in terminal differentiation.

  19. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a rice Rac/Rop GTPase, OsRac1

    PubMed Central

    Kosami, Ken-ichi; Ohki, Izuru; Hayashi, Kokoro; Tabata, Ryo; Usugi, Sayaka; Kawasaki, Tsutomu; Fujiwara, Toshimichi; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Shimamoto, Ko; Kojima, Chojiro

    2014-01-01

    Small GTPases regulate a large variety of key cellular processes. Plant small Rac/Rop GTPases have recently received broad attention as it is becoming clear that these enzymes regulate various plant cellular processes. OsRac1, a rice Rac/Rop protein, is a key regulator of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and induces immune responses. Although four structures of plant small GTPases have been reported, all of these were of the inactive form. Here, OsRac1 was purified and co-crystallized with the GTP analogue 5′-guanylyl imidodiphos­phate (GMPPNP). The crystal belonged to space group P212121 and a complete data set was collected to 1.9 Å resolution. PMID:24419631

  20. Critical roles for Rac1 and Rac2 GTPases in B cell development and signaling.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, Marita J; Ooi, Steen K T; Reynolds, Lucinda F; Smith, Susan Harless; Ruf, Sandra; Mathiot, Anne; Vanes, Lesley; Williams, David A; Cancro, Michael P; Tybulewicz, Victor L J

    2003-10-17

    The Rac1 guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) has been implicated in multiple cellular functions, including actin dynamics, proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and migration resulting from signaling by multiple receptors, including the B cell antigen receptor (BCR). We used conditional gene targeting to generate mice with specific Rac1 deficiency in the B cell lineage. In the absence of both Rac1 and the highly related Rac2, B cell development was almost completely blocked. Both GTPases were required to transduce BCR signals leading to proliferation, survival and up-regulation of BAFF-R, a receptor for BAFF, a key survival molecule required for B cell development and maintenance.

  1. Deletion of Rac1GTPase in the Myeloid Lineage Protects against Inflammation-Mediated Kidney Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nagase, Miki; Kurihara, Hidetake; Aiba, Atsu; Young, Morag J.; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage-mediated inflammation has been implicated in various kidney diseases. We previously reported that Rac1, a Rho family small GTP-binding protein, was overactivated in several chronic kidney disease models, and that Rac1 inhibitors ameliorated renal injury, in part via inhibition of inflammation, but the detailed mechanisms have not been clarified. In the present study, we examined whether Rac1 in macrophages effects cytokine production and the inflammatory mechanisms contributing to kidney derangement. Myeloid-selective Rac1 flox control (M-Rac1 FC) and knockout (M-Rac1 KO) mice were generated using the cre-loxP system. Renal function under basal conditions did not differ between M-Rac1 FC and KO mice. Accordingly, lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-evoked kidney injury model was created. LPS elevated blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine, enhanced expressions of kidney injury biomarkers, Kim-1 and Ngal, and promoted tubular injury in M-Rac1 FC mice. By contrast, deletion of myeloid Rac1 almost completely prevented the LPS-mediated renal impairment. LPS triggered a marked induction of macrophage-derived inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNFα, in M-Rac1 FC mice, which was accompanied by Rac1 activation, stimulation of reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, and reactive oxygen species overproduction. These changes were inhibited in M-Rac1 KO mice. LPS evoked F4/80-positive macrophages accumulation in the kidney, which was not affected by myeloid Rac1 deficiency. We further tested the role of Rac1 signaling in cytokine production using macrophage cell line, RAW264.7. Exposure to LPS increased IL-6 and TNFα mRNA expression. The LPS-driven cytokine induction was dose-dependently blocked by the Rac1 inhibitor EHT1864, NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium, and NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082. In conclusion, genetic ablation of Rac1 in the myeloid lineage protected against LPS-induced renal inflammation and injury, by suppressing

  2. Novel aspects of the roles of Rac1 GTPase in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Naoki; Li, Yuxin; Liao, James K

    2010-04-01

    Rac1 GTPase is an established master regulator of cell motility through cortical actin re-organization and of reactive oxygen species generation through regulation of NADPH oxidase activity. Numerous molecular and cellular studies have implicated Rac1 in various cardiovascular pathologies: vascular smooth muscle proliferation, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, and endothelial cell shape change. The physiological relevance of these in vitro findings, however, is just beginning to be reassessed with the newly developed, conditional mouse mutagenesis technology. Conditional gene targeting has also revealed unexpected, cell type-specific roles of Rac1. The aim of this review is to summarize the recent advance made in Rac1 research in the cardiovascular system, with special focus on its novel roles in the regulation of endothelial function, angiogenesis, and endothelium-mediated neuroprotection.

  3. p21-activated Kinases (PAKs) Mediate the Phosphorylation of PREX2 Protein to Initiate Feedback Inhibition of Rac1 GTPase.

    PubMed

    Barrows, Douglas; Schoenfeld, Sarah M; Hodakoski, Cindy; Silkov, Antonina; Honig, Barry; Couvillon, Anthony; Shymanets, Aliaksei; Nürnberg, Bernd; Asara, John M; Parsons, Ramon

    2015-11-27

    Phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3)-dependent Rac exchanger 2 (PREX2) is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) GTPase, facilitating the exchange of GDP for GTP on Rac1. GTP-bound Rac1 then activates its downstream effectors, including p21-activated kinases (PAKs). PREX2 and Rac1 are frequently mutated in cancer and have key roles within the insulin-signaling pathway. Rac1 can be inactivated by multiple mechanisms; however, negative regulation by insulin is not well understood. Here, we show that in response to being activated after insulin stimulation, Rac1 initiates its own inactivation by decreasing PREX2 GEF activity. Following PREX2-mediated activation of Rac1 by the second messengers PIP3 or Gβγ, we found that PREX2 was phosphorylated through a PAK-dependent mechanism. PAK-mediated phosphorylation of PREX2 reduced GEF activity toward Rac1 by inhibiting PREX2 binding to PIP3 and Gβγ. Cell fractionation experiments also revealed that phosphorylation prevented PREX2 from localizing to the cellular membrane. Furthermore, the onset of insulin-induced phosphorylation of PREX2 was delayed compared with AKT. Altogether, we propose that second messengers activate the Rac1 signal, which sets in motion a cascade whereby PAKs phosphorylate and negatively regulate PREX2 to decrease Rac1 activation. This type of regulation would allow for transient activation of the PREX2-Rac1 signal and may be relevant in multiple physiological processes, including diseases such as diabetes and cancer when insulin signaling is chronically activated.

  4. p21-activated Kinases (PAKs) Mediate the Phosphorylation of PREX2 Protein to Initiate Feedback Inhibition of Rac1 GTPase*

    PubMed Central

    Barrows, Douglas; Schoenfeld, Sarah M.; Hodakoski, Cindy; Silkov, Antonina; Honig, Barry; Couvillon, Anthony; Shymanets, Aliaksei; Nürnberg, Bernd; Asara, John M.; Parsons, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3)-dependent Rac exchanger 2 (PREX2) is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) GTPase, facilitating the exchange of GDP for GTP on Rac1. GTP-bound Rac1 then activates its downstream effectors, including p21-activated kinases (PAKs). PREX2 and Rac1 are frequently mutated in cancer and have key roles within the insulin-signaling pathway. Rac1 can be inactivated by multiple mechanisms; however, negative regulation by insulin is not well understood. Here, we show that in response to being activated after insulin stimulation, Rac1 initiates its own inactivation by decreasing PREX2 GEF activity. Following PREX2-mediated activation of Rac1 by the second messengers PIP3 or Gβγ, we found that PREX2 was phosphorylated through a PAK-dependent mechanism. PAK-mediated phosphorylation of PREX2 reduced GEF activity toward Rac1 by inhibiting PREX2 binding to PIP3 and Gβγ. Cell fractionation experiments also revealed that phosphorylation prevented PREX2 from localizing to the cellular membrane. Furthermore, the onset of insulin-induced phosphorylation of PREX2 was delayed compared with AKT. Altogether, we propose that second messengers activate the Rac1 signal, which sets in motion a cascade whereby PAKs phosphorylate and negatively regulate PREX2 to decrease Rac1 activation. This type of regulation would allow for transient activation of the PREX2-Rac1 signal and may be relevant in multiple physiological processes, including diseases such as diabetes and cancer when insulin signaling is chronically activated. PMID:26438819

  5. Rac1 Is a Critical Mediator of Endothelium-Derived Neurotrophic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Naoki; Kim, Hyung-Hwan; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Liao, James K.

    2009-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of neurotrophic factors has been hampered by their inability to achieve adequate tissue penetration. Brain blood vessels, however, could be an alternative target for neuro-salvage therapies by virtue of their close proximity to neurons. Here we show that hemizygous deletion of Rac1 in mouse endothelial cells (ECs) attenuates brain injury and edema after focal cerebral ischemia. Microarray analysis of Rac1+/− ECs revealed enrichment of stress response genes, basement membrane components, and neurotrophic factors that could affect neuronal survival. Consistent with these expression profiles, endothelial Rac1 hemizygosity enhanced antioxidative and endothelial barrier capacities and potentiated paracrine neuroprotective activities through the up-regulation of the neurotrophic factor, artemin. Endothelial Rac1, therefore, could be an important therapeutic target for promoting endothelial barrier integrity and neurotrophic activity. PMID:19278959

  6. Distinct Effects of Rac1 on Differentiation of Primary Avian Myoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Rita; Serafini, Marco; Castellani, Loriana; Falcone, Germana; Alemà, Stefano

    1999-01-01

    Rho family GTPases have been implicated in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton in response to extracellular cues and in the transduction of signals from the membrane to the nucleus. Their role in development and cell differentiation, however, is little understood. Here we show that the transient expression of constitutively active Rac1 and Cdc42 in unestablished avian myoblasts is sufficient to cause inhibition of myogenin expression and block of the transition to the myocyte compartment, whereas activated RhoA affects myogenic differentiation only marginally. Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) appears not to be essential for block of differentiation because, although Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases modestly activate JNK in quail myoblasts, a Rac1 mutant defective for JNK activation can still inhibit myogenic differentiation. Stable expression of active Rac1, attained by infection with a recombinant retrovirus, is permissive for terminal differentiation, but the resulting myotubes accumulate severely reduced levels of muscle-specific proteins. This inhibition is the consequence of posttranscriptional events and suggests the presence of a novel level of regulation of myogenesis. We also show that myotubes expressing constitutively active Rac1 fail to assemble ordered sarcomeres. Conversely, a dominant-negative Rac1 variant accelerates sarcomere maturation and inhibits v-Src–induced selective disassembly of I-Z-I complexes. Collectively, our findings provide a role for Rac1 during skeletal muscle differentiation and strongly suggest that Rac1 is required downstream of v-Src in the signaling pathways responsible for the dismantling of tissue-specific supramolecular structures. PMID:10512856

  7. Fluctuation-based imaging of nuclear Rac1 activation by protein oligomerisation

    PubMed Central

    Hinde, Elizabeth; Yokomori, Kyoko; Gaus, Katharina; Hahn, Klaus M.; Gratton, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe a fluctuation-based method to quantify how protein oligomerisation modulates signalling activity of a multifunctional protein. By recording fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data of a FRET biosensor in a format that enables concomitant phasor and cross Number and Brightness (cN&B) analysis, we measure the nuclear dynamics of a Rac1 FRET biosensor and assess how Rac1 homo-oligomers (N&B) regulate Rac1 activity (hetero-oligomerisation with the biosensor affinity reagent, PBD, by FLIM-FRET) or interaction with an unknown binding partner (cN&B). The high spatiotemporal resolution of this method allowed us to discover that upon DNA damage monomeric and active Rac1 in the nucleus is segregated from dimeric and inactive Rac1 in the cytoplasm. This reorganisation requires Rac1 GTPase activity and is associated with an importin-α2 redistribution. Only with this multiplexed approach can we assess the oligomeric state a molecular complex must form in order to regulate a complex signalling network. PMID:24573109

  8. Cdc42, Rac1, and Rac2 Display Distinct Patterns of Activation during PhagocytosisV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Adam D.; Swanson, Joel A.

    2004-01-01

    The small G proteins Cdc42, Rac1, and Rac2 regulate the rearrangements of actin and membrane necessary for Fcγ receptor-mediated phagocytosis by macrophages. Activated, GTP-bound Cdc42, Rac1, and Rac2 bind to the p21-binding domain (PBD) of PAK1, and this interaction provided a basis for microscopic methods to localize activation of these G proteins inside cells. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based stoichiometry of fluorescent chimeras of actin, PBD, Cdc42, Rac1, and Rac2 was used to quantify G protein activation relative to actin movements during phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized erythrocytes. The activation dynamics of endogenous G proteins, localized using yellow fluorescent protein-labeled PBD, was restricted to phagocytic cups, with a prominent spike of activation over an actin-poor region at the base of the cup. Refinements of fluorescence resonance energy transfer stoichiometry allowed calculation of the fractions of activated GTPases in forming phagosomes. Cdc42 activation was restricted to the leading margin of the cell, whereas Rac1 was active throughout the phagocytic cup. During phagosome closure, activation of Rac1 and Rac2 increased uniformly and transiently in the actin-poor region of phagosomal membrane. These distinct roles for Cdc42, Rac1, and Rac2 in the component activities of phagocytosis indicate mechanisms by which their differential regulation coordinates rearrangements of actin and membranes. PMID:15169870

  9. Rac1b enhances cell survival through activation of the JNK2/c-JUN/Cyclin-D1 and AKT2/MCL1 pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Wei, Si-Si; Chen, Jie; Chen, Yi-He; Xu, Wei-Ping; Jie, Qi-Qiang; Zhou, Qing; Li, Yi-Gang; Wei, Yi-Dong; Wang, Yue-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Rac1b is a constitutively activated, alternatively spliced form of the small GTPase Rac1. Previous studies showed that Rac1b promotes cell proliferation and inhibits apoptosis. In the present study, we used microarray analysis to detect genes differentially expressed in HEK293T cells and SW480 human colon cancer cells stably overexpressing Rac1b. We found that the pro-proliferation genes JNK2, c-JUN and cyclin-D1 as well as anti-apoptotic AKT2 and MCL1 were all upregulated in both lines. Rac1b promoted cell proliferation and inhibited apoptosis by activating the JNK2/c-JUN/cyclin-D1 and AKT2/MCL1 pathways, respectively. Very low Rac1b levels were detected in the colonic epithelium of wild-type Sprague-Dawley rats. Knockout of the rat Rac1 gene exon-3b or knockdown of endogenous Rac1b in HT29 human colon cancer cells downregulated only the AKT2/MCL1 pathway. Our study revealed that very low levels of endogenous Rac1b inhibit apoptosis, while Rac1b upregulation both promotes cell proliferation and inhibits apoptosis. It is likely the AKT2/MCL1 pathway is more sensitive to Rac1b regulation. PMID:26918455

  10. Coronin1 Proteins Dictate Rac1 Intracellular Dynamics and Cytoskeletal Output

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Virginia; Castro-Castro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Rac1 regulates lamellipodium formation, myosin II-dependent contractility, and focal adhesions during cell migration. While the spatiotemporal assembly of those processes is well characterized, the signaling mechanisms involved remain obscure. We report here that the cytoskeleton-related Coronin1A and -1B proteins control a myosin II inactivation-dependent step that dictates the intracellular dynamics and cytoskeletal output of active Rac1. This step is signaling-branch specific, since it affects the functional competence of active Rac1 only when forming complexes with downstream ArhGEF7 and Pak proteins in actomyosin-rich structures. The pathway is used by default unless Rac1 is actively rerouted away from the structures by upstream activators and signals from other Rho GTPases. These results indicate that Coronin1 proteins are at the center of a regulatory hub that coordinates Rac1 activation, effector exchange, and the F-actin organization state during cell signaling. Targeting this route could be useful to hamper migration of cancer cells harboring oncogenic RAC1 mutations. PMID:24980436

  11. RAC1 GTPase plays an important role in γ-irradiation induced G2/M checkpoint activation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In response to gamma-irradiation (IR)-induced double-strand DNA breaks, cells undergo cell-cycle arrest, allowing time for DNA repair before reentering the cell cycle. G2/M checkpoint activation involves activation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)/ATM- and rad3-related (ATR) kinases and inhibition of Cdc25 phosphatases, resulting in inhibition of Cdc2 kinase and subsequent G2/M cell-cycle arrest. Previous studies from our laboratory showed that the G2/M checkpoint activation after IR exposure of MCF-7 breast cancer cells is dependent on the activation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) signaling. In the present studies, we investigated the role of Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) in IR-induced G2/M checkpoint response and ERK1/2 activation, as well as in cell survival after IR. Methods With Rac1-specific inhibitor, dominant negative mutant Rac1 (N17Rac1) and specific small interfering RNA, the effect of Rac1 on IR-induced G2/M checkpoint response and ERK1/2 activation was examined in human breast cancer cells. In addition, the effect of Rac1 on cell survival after irradiation was assessed by using Rac1-specific inhibitor. Results IR exposure of MCF-7 breast cancer cells was associated with a marked activation of Rac1 GTPase. Furthermore, inhibition of Rac1 by using specific inhibitor, dominant-negative Rac1 mutant, or specific siRNA resulted in attenuation of IR-induced G2/M arrest and concomitant diminution of IR-induced activation of ATM, ATR, Chk1, and Chk2 kinases, as well as phosphorylation of Cdc2-Tyr15. Moreover, Rac1 inhibition or decreased Rac1 expression also abrogated IR-induced phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 and 2 (MEK1/2) and ERK1/2. Ultimately, inhibition of Rac1 markedly increased cellular sensitivity to IR exposure, which involves induction of apoptosis. Conclusion Studies in this report suggest that Rac1 GTPase plays an

  12. A critical role of the small GTPase Rac1 in Akt2-mediated GLUT4 translocation in mouse skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Izawa, Rumi; Wu, Junyuan; Kitagawa, Kaho; Nihata, Yuma; Hosooka, Tetsuya; Noguchi, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Wataru; Aiba, Atsu; Satoh, Takaya

    2014-03-01

    Insulin promotes glucose uptake in skeletal muscle by inducing the translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 to the plasma membrane. The serine/threonine kinase Akt2 has been implicated as a key regulator of this insulin action. However, the mechanisms whereby Akt2 regulates multiple steps of GLUT4 translocation remain incompletely understood. Recently, the small GTPase Rac1 has been identified as a skeletal muscle-specific regulator of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Here, we show that Rac1 is a critical downstream component of the Akt2 pathway in mouse skeletal muscle as well as cultured myocytes. GLUT4 translocation induced by constitutively activated Akt2 was totally dependent on the expression of Rac1 in L6 myocytes. Moreover, we observed the activation of Rac1 when constitutively activated Akt2 was ectopically expressed. Constitutively activated Akt2-triggered Rac1 activation was diminished by knockdown of FLJ00068, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac1. Knockdown of Akt2, on the other hand, markedly reduced Rac1 activation by a constitutively activated mutant of phosphoinositide 3-kinase. In mouse skeletal muscle, constitutively activated mutants of Akt2 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase, when ectopically expressed, induced GLUT4 translocation. Muscle-specific rac1 knockout markedly diminished Akt2- or phosphoinositide 3-kinase-induced GLUT4 translocation, highlighting a crucial role of Rac1 downstream of Akt2. Taken together, these results strongly suggest a novel regulatory link between Akt2 and Rac1 in insulin-dependent signal transduction leading to glucose uptake in skeletal muscle.

  13. Mena associates with Rac1 and modulates connexin 43 remodeling in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Ram, Rashmi; Wescott, Andrew P; Varandas, Katherine; Dirksen, Robert T; Blaxall, Burns C

    2014-01-01

    Mena, a member of the Ena/VASP family of actin regulatory proteins, modulates microfilaments and interacts with cytoskeletal proteins associated with heart failure. Mena is localized at the intercalated disc (ICD) of adult cardiac myocytes, colocalizing with numerous cytoskeletal proteins. Mena's role in the maintainence of mechanical myocardial stability at the cardiomyocyte ICD remains unknown. We hypothesized that Mena may modulate signals from the sarcolemma to the actin cytoskeleton at the ICD to regulate the expression and localization of connexin 43 (Cx43). The small GTPase Rac1 plays a pivotal role in the regulation of actin cytoskeletal reorganization and mediating morphological and transcriptional changes in cardiomyocytes. We found that Mena is associated with active Rac1 in cardiomyocytes and that RNAi knockdown of Mena increased Rac1 activity significantly. Furthermore, Mena knockdown increased Cx43 expression and altered Cx43 localization and trafficking at the ICD, concomitant with faster intercellular communication, as assessed by dye transfer between cardiomyocyte pairs. In mice overexpressing constitutively active Rac1, left ventricular Mena expression was increased significantly, concomitant with lateral redistribution of Cx43. These results suggest that Mena is a critical regulator of the ICD and is required for normal localization of Cx43 in part via regulation of Rac1.

  14. A Rac1 GTPase is a critical factor in the immune response of shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) to Vibrio alginolyticus infection.

    PubMed

    Cha, Gui-Hong; Wang, Wei-Na; Peng, Ting; Huang, Ming-Zhu; Liu, Yuan

    2015-08-01

    The small GTPase Rac1 acts as a molecular switch for signal transduction that regulates various cellular functions. However, its functions in crustaceans remain unclear. In this study, a cDNA encoding a RAS GTPase (LvRac1) in the Pacific white shrimp (L. vannamei) was identified and characterized. A recombinant variant of this GTPase, rLvRac1, was expressed in the model organism P. pastoris and its expression was confirmed by mass spectrometry. Biochemical assays indicated that the recombinant protein retained GTPase activity and was expressed in all of the organism's tested tissues. Injection of the bacterium V. alginolyticus into L. vannamei induced hepatopancreatic upregulation of LvRac1 expression. Moreover, knocking down LvRac1 in vivo significantly reduced the expression of the L. vannamei p53 and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase genes (Lvp53 and LvCu/Zn SOD, respectively) while increasing that of the galectin gene (Lvgal). Hemolymph samples from control and LvRac1-silenced L. vannamei individuals were analyzed by flow cytometry, revealing that the latter exhibited significantly reduced respiratory burst activity and total hemocyte counts. Cumulative mortality in shrimp lacking LvRac1 was significantly greater than in control groups following V. alginolyticus challenge. The silencing of LvRac1 by double-stranded RNA injection thus increased the V. alginolyticus challenge sensitivity of L. vannamei and weakened its bacterial clearance ability in vivo. Suppressing LvRac1 also promoted the upregulation of Lvp53, LvCu/ZnSOD, and Lvgal following V. alginolyticus injection. Taken together, these results suggest that LvRac1 is important in the innate immune response of shrimp to V. alginolyticus infection.

  15. RhoB controls endothelial barrier recovery by inhibiting Rac1 trafficking to the cell border

    PubMed Central

    Marcos-Ramiro, Beatriz; García-Weber, Diego; Barroso, Susana; Feito, Jorge; Ortega, María C.; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Reglero-Real, Natalia; Fernández-Martín, Laura; Durán, Maria C.; Alonso, Miguel A.; Correas, Isabel; Cox, Susan; Ridley, Anne J.

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial barrier dysfunction underlies chronic inflammatory diseases. In searching for new proteins essential to the human endothelial inflammatory response, we have found that the endosomal GTPase RhoB is up-regulated in response to inflammatory cytokines and expressed in the endothelium of some chronically inflamed tissues. We show that although RhoB and the related RhoA and RhoC play additive and redundant roles in various aspects of endothelial barrier function, RhoB specifically inhibits barrier restoration after acute cell contraction by preventing plasma membrane extension. During barrier restoration, RhoB trafficking is induced between vesicles containing RhoB nanoclusters and plasma membrane protrusions. The Rho GTPase Rac1 controls membrane spreading and stabilizes endothelial barriers. We show that RhoB colocalizes with Rac1 in endosomes and inhibits Rac1 activity and trafficking to the cell border during barrier recovery. Inhibition of endosomal trafficking impairs barrier reformation, whereas induction of Rac1 translocation to the plasma membrane accelerates it. Therefore, RhoB-specific regulation of Rac1 trafficking controls endothelial barrier integrity during inflammation. PMID:27138256

  16. Tiam1/Rac1 complex controls Il17a transcription and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Kurdi, Ahmed T.; Bassil, Ribal; Olah, Marta; Wu, Chuan; Xiao, Sheng; Taga, Mariko; Frangieh, Michael; Buttrick, Thomas; Orent, William; Bradshaw, Elizabeth M.; Khoury, Samia J.; Elyaman, Wassim

    2016-01-01

    RORγt is a master transcription factor of Th17 cells and considered as a promising drug target for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. Here, we show the guanine nucleotide exchange factor, Tiam1, and its cognate Rho-family G protein, Rac1, regulate interleukin (IL)17A transcription and autoimmunity. Whereas Tiam1 genetic deficiency weakens IL-17A expression partially and inhibits the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), deletion of Rac1 in T cells exhibits more robust effects on Th17 cells and EAE. We demonstrate Tiam1 and Rac1 form a complex with RORγt in the nuclear compartment of Th17 cells, and together bind and activate the Il17 promoter. The clinical relevance of these findings is emphasized by pharmacological targeting of Rac1 that suppresses both murine and human Th17 cells as well as EAE. Thus, our findings highlight a regulatory pathway of Tiam1/Rac1 in Th17 cells and suggest that it may be a therapeutic target in multiple sclerosis. PMID:27725632

  17. Rac1 GTPase-deficient mouse lens exhibits defects in shape, suture formation, fiber cell migration and survival.

    PubMed

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Chauhan, Bharesh K; Walker, Christopher; Zheng, Yi; Robinson, Michael L; Lang, Richard A; Rao, Ponugoti V

    2011-12-01

    Morphogenesis and shape of the ocular lens depend on epithelial cell elongation and differentiation into fiber cells, followed by the symmetric and compact organization of fiber cells within an enclosed extracellular matrix-enriched elastic capsule. The cellular mechanisms orchestrating these different events however, remain obscure. We investigated the role of the Rac1 GTPase in these processes by targeted deletion of expression using the conditional gene knockout (cKO) approach. Rac1 cKO mice were derived from two different Cre (Le-Cre and MLR-10) transgenic mice in which lens-specific Cre expression starts at embryonic day 8.75 and 10.5, respectively, in both the lens epithelium and fiber cells. The Le-Cre/Rac1 cKO mice exhibited an early-onset (E12.5) and severe lens phenotype compared to the MLR-10/Rac1 cKO (E15.5) mice. While the Le-Cre/Rac1 cKO lenses displayed delayed primary fiber cell elongation, lenses from both Rac1 cKO strains were characterized by abnormal shape, impaired secondary fiber cell migration, sutural defects and thinning of the posterior capsule which often led to rupture. Lens fiber cell N-cadherin/β-catenin/Rap1/Nectin-based cell-cell junction formation and WAVE-2/Abi-2/Nap1-regulated actin polymerization were impaired in the Rac1 deficient mice. Additionally, the Rac1 cKO lenses were characterized by a shortened epithelial sheet, reduced levels of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and increased apoptosis. Taken together, these data uncover the essential role of Rac1 GTPase activity in establishment and maintenance of lens shape, suture formation and capsule integrity, and in fiber cell migration, adhesion and survival, via regulation of actin cytoskeletal dynamics, cell adhesive interactions and ECM turnover.

  18. Type II cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase inhibits Rac1 activation in gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YING; CHEN, YONGCHANG; WU, MIN; LAN, TING; WU, YAN; LI, YUEYING; QIAN, HAI

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced motility of cancer cells is a critical step in promoting tumor metastasis, which remains the major cause of gastric cancer-associated mortality. The small GTPase Rac1 is a key signaling component in the regulation of cell migration. Previous studies have demonstrated that Rac1 activity may be regulated by protein kinase G (PKG); however, the underlying mechanism is not yet clear. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of type II cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG II) on Rac1 activity. The human gastric cancer cell line AGS was infected with adenoviral constructs encoding PKG II to increase the expression of this enzyme, and treated with a cGMP analog (8-pCPT-cGMP) to induce its activation. A Transwell assay was employed to measure cell migration, and the activity of Rac1 was assessed using a pull-down assay. Immunoprecipitation was used to isolate the Rac1 protein. Phosphorylation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate 3 kinase (PI3K) and its downstream effecter protein kinase B (Akt) are associated with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced motility/migration of cancer cells. Extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) is the major signaling molecule of the Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) mediated signaling pathway. ERK and its upstream activator MAPK kinase (MEK) are also involved in LPA-induced motility/migration of cancer cells. Phosphorylation of PI3K/Akt, MEK/ERK and enriched Rac1 were detected by western blotting. The results revealed that blocking the activation of Rac1 by ectopically expressing an inactive Rac1 mutant (T17N) impeded LPA-induced cell migration. Increased PKG II activity inhibited LPA-induced migration and LPA-induced activation of Rac1; however, it had no effect on the phosphorylation of Rac1. PKG II also inhibited the activation of PI3K/Akt and MEK/ERK mediated signaling, which is important for LPA-induced Rac1 activation. These results suggest that PKG II affects LPA

  19. Cryptococcus neoformans phospholipase B1 activates host cell Rac1 for traversal across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Maruvada, Ravi; Zhu, Longkun; Pearce, Donna; Zheng, Yi; Perfect, John; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J; Kim, Kwang Sik

    2012-10-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans penetration into the central nervous system (CNS) requires traversal of the blood-brain barrier that is composed of a single layer of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC), but the underlying mechanisms of C. neoformans traversal remain incompletely understood. C. neoformans transcytosis of HBMEC monolayer involves rearrangements of the host cell actin cytoskeleton and small GTP-binding Rho family proteins such as Rac1 are shown to regulate host cell actin cytoskeleton. We, therefore, examined whether C. neoformans traversal of the blood-brain barrier involves host Rac1. While the levels of activated Rac1 (GTP-Rac1) in HBMEC increased significantly upon incubation with C. neoformans strains, pharmacological inhibition and down-modulation of Rac1 significantly decreased C. neoformans transcytosis of HBMEC monolayer. Also, Rac1 inhibition was efficient in preventing C. neoformans penetration into the brain. In addition, C. neoformans phospholipase B1 (Plb1) was shown to contribute to activating host cell Rac1, andSTAT3 was observed to associate with GTP-Rac1 in HBMEC that were incubated with C. neoformans strain but not with its Δplb1 mutant. These findings demonstrate for the first time that C. neoformans Plb1 aids fungal traversal across the blood-brain barrier by activating host cell Rac1 and its association with STAT3, and suggest that pharmacological intervention of host-microbial interaction contributing to traversal of the blood-brain barrier may prevent C. neoformans penetration into the brain.

  20. Rac1 modulates cardiomyocyte adhesion during mouse embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Abu-Issa, Radwan

    2015-01-24

    Rac1, a member of the Rho subfamily of small GTPases, is involved in morphogenesis and differentiation of many cell types. Here we define a role of Rac1 in cardiac development by specifically deleting Rac1 in the pre-cardiac mesoderm using the Nkx2.5-Cre transgenic driver line. Rac1-conditional knockout embryos initiate heart development normally until embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5); their cardiac mesoderm is specified, and the heart tube is formed and looped. However, by E12.5-E13.5 the mutant hearts start failing and embryos develop edema and hemorrhage which is probably the cause for the lethality observed soon after. The hearts of Rac1-cKO embryos exhibit disorganized and thin myocardial walls and defects in outflow tract alignment. No significant differences of cardiomyocyte death or proliferation were found between developing control and mutant embryos. To uncover the role of Rac1 in the heart, E11.5 primary heart cells were cultured and analyzed in vitro. Rac1-deficient cardiomyocytes were less spread, round and loosely attached to the substrate and to each other implying that Rac1-mediated signaling is required for appropriate cell-cell and/or cellmatrix adhesion during cardiac development.

  1. Inhibition of the Rho GTPase, Rac1, decreases estrogen receptor levels and is a novel therapeutic strategy in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt, Adena E; Garcia, Maria Ines; Lyons, Leah; Xie, Yingqiu; Maiorino, Carol; Désiré, Laurent; Slingerland, Joyce; Burnstein, Kerry L

    2011-04-01

    Rac1, a Rho GTPase, modulates diverse cellular processes and is hyperactive in some cancers. Estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα) in concert with intracellular signaling pathways regulates genes associated with cell proliferation, tumor development, and breast cancer cell survival. Therefore, we examined the possibility of Rac1 and ERα crosstalk in breast cancer cells. We found that Rac1 enhanced ERα transcriptional activity in breast cancer cells. Vav3, a Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor that activates Rac1, was an upstream mediator, and P21/Cdc42/Rac1 activating kinase-1 (Pak-1) was a downstream effector of Rac1 enhancement of ERα activity. These results suggest that Rac1 may prove to be a therapeutic target. To test this hypothesis, we used a small molecule Rac inhibitor, EHT 1864, and found that EHT 1864 inhibited ERα transcriptional activity. Furthermore, EHT 1864 inhibited estrogen-induced cell proliferation in breast cancer cells and decreased tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cell growth. EHT 1864 decreased activity of the promoter of the ERα gene resulting in down-regulation of ERα mRNA and protein levels. Therefore, ERα down-regulation by EHT 1864 is the likely mechanism of EHT 1864-mediated inhibition of ERα activity and estrogen-stimulated breast cancer cell proliferation. Since ERα plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer and the Rac inhibitor EHT 1864 down-regulates ERα expression and breast cancer cell proliferation, further investigation of the therapeutic potential of Rac1 targeting in the treatment of breast cancer is warranted.

  2. Preclinical Development of Novel Rac1-GEF Signaling Inhibitors using a Rational Design Approach in Highly Aggressive Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Cardama, Georgina A; Comin, Maria J; Hornos, Leandro; Gonzalez, Nazareno; Defelipe, Lucas; Turjanski, Adrian G; Alonso, Daniel F; Gomez, Daniel E; Menna, Pablo Lorenzano

    2014-01-01

    Rho GTPases play a key role in the regulation of multiple essential cellular processes, including actin dynamics, gene transcription and cell cycle progression. Aberrant activation of Rac1, a member of Rho family of small GTPases, is associated with tumorigenesis, cancer progression, invasion and metastasis. Particularly, Rac1 is overexpressed and hyperactivated in highly aggressive breast cancer. Thus, Rac1 appears to be a promising and relevant target for the development of novel anticancer drugs. We identified the novel Rac1 inhibitor ZINC69391 through a docking-based virtual library screening targeting Rac1 activation by GEFs. This compound was able to block Rac1 interaction with its GEF Tiam1, prevented EGF-induced Rac1 activation and inhibited cell proliferation, cell migration and cell cycle progression in highly aggressive breast cancer cell lines. Moreover, ZINC69391 showed an in vivo antimetastatic effect in a syngeneic animal model. We further developed the novel analog 1A-116 by rational design and showed to be specific and more potent than the parental compound in vitro and interfered Rac1-P-Rex1 interaction. We also showed an enhanced in vivo potency of 1A-116 analog. These results show that we have developed novel Rac1 inhibitors that may be used as a novel anticancer therapy. PMID:24066799

  3. Tiam1/Rac1 signaling pathway mediates palmitate-induced, ceramide-sensitive generation of superoxides and lipid peroxides and the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Syed, Ismail; Jayaram, Bhavaani; Subasinghe, Wasanthi; Kowluru, Anjaneyulu

    2010-09-15

    The phagocytic NADPH oxidase [NOX] has been implicated in the generation of superoxides in the pancreatic beta-cell. Herein, using normal rat islets and clonal INS 832/13 cells, we tested the hypothesis that activation of the small G-protein Rac1, which is a member of the NOX holoenzyme, is necessary for palmitate [PA]-induced generation of superoxides in pancreatic beta-cells. Incubation of isolated beta-cells with PA potently increased the NOX activity culminating in a significant increase in the generation of superoxides and lipid peroxides in these cells; such effects of PA were attenuated by diphenyleneiodonium [DPI], a known inhibitor of NOX. In addition, PA caused a transient, but significant activation [i.e., GTP-bound form] of Rac1 in these cells. NSC23766, a selective inhibitor of Rac1, but not Cdc42 or Rho activation, inhibited Rac1 activation and the generation of superoxides and lipid peroxides induced by PA. Fumonisin B-1 [FB-1], which inhibits de novo synthesis of ceramide [CER] from PA, also attenuated PA-induced superoxide and lipid peroxide generation and NOX activity implicating intracellularly generated CER in the metabolic effects of PA; such effects were also demonstrable in the presence of the cell-permeable C2-CER. Further, NSC23766 prevented C2-CER-induced Rac1 activation and production of superoxides and lipid peroxides. Lastly, C2-CER, but not its inactive analogue, significantly reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential, which was prevented to a large degree by NSC23766. Together, our findings suggest that Tiam1/Rac1 signaling pathway regulates PA-induced, CER-dependent superoxide generation and mitochondrial dysfunction in pancreatic beta-cells.

  4. Rac1 modulates cardiomyocyte adhesion during mouse embryonic development

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Issa, Radwan

    2015-01-24

    Highlights: • Conditional knockout of Rac1 using Nkx2.5 Cre line is lethal at E13.5. • The myocardium of the mutant is thin and disorganized. • The phenotype is not due to cardiomyocyte low proliferation or apoptosis. • The phenotype is due to specific defect in cardiomyocyte adhesion. - Abstract: Rac1, a member of the Rho subfamily of small GTPases, is involved in morphogenesis and differentiation of many cell types. Here we define a role of Rac1 in cardiac development by specifically deleting Rac1 in the pre-cardiac mesoderm using the Nkx2.5-Cre transgenic driver line. Rac1-conditional knockout embryos initiate heart development normally until embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5); their cardiac mesoderm is specified, and the heart tube is formed and looped. However, by E12.5-E13.5 the mutant hearts start failing and embryos develop edema and hemorrhage which is probably the cause for the lethality observed soon after. The hearts of Rac1-cKO embryos exhibit disorganized and thin myocardial walls and defects in outflow tract alignment. No significant differences of cardiomyocyte death or proliferation were found between developing control and mutant embryos. To uncover the role of Rac1 in the heart, E11.5 primary heart cells were cultured and analyzed in vitro. Rac1-deficient cardiomyocytes were less spread, round and loosely attached to the substrate and to each other implying that Rac1-mediated signaling is required for appropriate cell–cell and/or cellmatrix adhesion during cardiac development.

  5. Resveratrol Inhibition of Rac1-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species by AMPK Decreases Blood Pressure in a Fructose-Induced Rat Model of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Pei-Wen; Lee, Hui-Chieh; Lu, Pei-Jung; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Lai, Chi-Cheng; Sun, Gwo-Ching; Yeh, Tung-Chen; Hsiao, Michael; Lin, Yu-Te; Liu, Chun-Peng; Tseng, Ching-Jiunn

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) suppressed oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to examine whether the activation of AMPK in the brain decreased Rac1-induced ROS generation, thereby reducing blood pressure (BP) in rats with fructose-induced hypertension. The inhibition of ROS by treatment with an AMPK activator (oral resveratrol, 10 mg/kg/day) for 1 week decreased the BP and increased the NO production in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) of fructose-fed rats but not in control Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. In addition, resveratrol treatment abolished the Rac1-induced increases in the activity of the NADPH oxidase subunits p22-phox and reduced the activity of SOD2, while treatment with an AMPK inhibitor (compound C, 40 μM/day) had the opposite effect, in the fructose-fed rats. Interestingly, the activation of AMPK abolished Rac1 activation and decreased BP by inducing the activities of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and ribosomal protein S6 kinase (RSK) and nNOS phosphorylation in the fructose-fed rats. We conclude that the activation of AMPK decreased BP, abolished ROS generation, and enhanced ERK1/2-RSK-nNOS pathway activity by negatively regulating Racl-induced NADPH oxidase levels in the RVLM during oxidative stress–associated hypertension. PMID:27138844

  6. Distinctive and selective route of PI3K/PKCα-PKCδ/RhoA-Rac1 signaling in osteoclastic cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Mi Yeong; Lee, Kyunghee; Jeong, Daewon

    2016-12-05

    Cell migration during specialized stages of osteoclast precursors, mononuclear preosteoclasts, and multinucleated mature osteoclasts remain uncertain. M-CSF- and osteopontin-induced osteoclastic cell migration was inhibited by function-blocking monoclonal antibodies specific to the integrin αv and β3 subunits, suggesting that integrin αvβ3 mediates migratory signaling induced by M-CSF and osteopontin. M-CSF and osteopontin stimulation was shown to regulate two branched signaling processes, PI3K/PKCα/RhoA axis and PI3K/PKCδ/Rac1 axis. Interestingly, inactivation of RhoA or Rac1 blocked preosteoclast and mature osteoclast migration but not osteoclast precursor migration in a transwell-based cell migration assay. Moreover, the inhibitory effect on preosteoclast and mature osteoclast migration induced by Rac1 inactivation was more effective than that by RhoA inactivation. Collectively, our findings suggest that osteoclast precursor migration depends on PI3K/PKCα-PKCδ signaling mediated via integrin αvβ3 bypassing RhoA and Rac1, whereas preosteoclast and mature osteoclast migration relies on PI3K/PKCα-PKCδ/RhoA-Rac1 axis signaling mediated via integrin αvβ3 with increased dependency on PKCδ/Rac1 signaling route as differentiation progresses.

  7. Identification of cancer-associated missense mutations in hace1 that impair cell growth control and Rac1 ubiquitylation

    PubMed Central

    Andrio, Emilie; Lotte, Romain; Hamaoui, Daniel; Cherfils, Jacqueline; Doye, Anne; Daugaard, Mads; Sorensen, Poul H.; Bost, Frédéric; Ruimy, Raymond; Mettouchi, Amel; Lemichez, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    The E3 ubiquitin ligase HACE1 is a potent tumor suppressor that controls cell proliferation and ubiquitylates the small GTPase Rac1 to target it to proteasomal degradation. Whether and how the activity of HACE1 is regulated by the N-terminal ankyrin (ANK) and the middle (MID) domains is ill defined. Here, we identified in the version 64 of the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC) 13 missense mutations of hace1 located outside the HECT domain, and found that all lead to defective control of cell proliferation. In addition, several mutations located in the ankyrin domain displayed a dramatic reduction in Rac1 ubiquitylation associated with a decrease of colony formation in soft agar. 3D structure modelling of the 7 ankyrin-repeats coupled to functional analysis identified a surface epitope centered on one of the mutated residue, Gly-175, which is critical for controlling Rac1 binding and ubiquitylation. We also identified a role for the MID domain in conferring the specificity of association of HACE1 to the active form of Rac1. Our study of the functional interplay between HACE1 and Rac1 in cancer thus sheds a new light on the molecular mechanism of Rac1 ubiquitylation by HACE1 and the impact of its cancer-associated mutations in cell proliferation. PMID:28317937

  8. Benefit of Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonism in AKI: Role of Vascular Smooth Muscle Rac1.

    PubMed

    Barrera-Chimal, Jonatan; André-Grégoire, Gwennan; Nguyen Dinh Cat, Aurelie; Lechner, Sebastian M; Cau, Jérôme; Prince, Sonia; Kolkhof, Peter; Loirand, Gervaise; Sauzeau, Vincent; Hauet, Thierry; Jaisser, Frédéric

    2017-01-13

    AKI is a frequent complication in hospitalized patients. Unfortunately, there is no effective pharmacologic approach for treating or preventing AKI. In rodents, mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonism prevents AKI induced by ischemia-reperfusion (IR). We investigated the specific role of vascular MR in mediating AKI induced by IR. We also assessed the protective effect of MR antagonism in IR-induced AKI in the Large White pig, a model of human AKI. In mice, MR deficiency in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) protected against kidney IR injury. MR blockade by the novel nonsteroidal MR antagonist, finerenone, or genetic deletion of MR in SMCs associated with weaker oxidative stress production. Moreover, ischemic kidneys had higher levels of Rac1-GTP, required for NADPH oxidase activation, than sham control kidneys, and genetic deletion of Rac1 in SMCs protected against AKI. Furthermore, genetic deletion of MR in SMCs blunted the production of Rac1-GTP after IR. Pharmacologic inhibition of MR also prevented AKI induced by IR in the Large White pig. Altogether, we show that MR antagonism, or deletion of the MR gene in SMCs, limited the renal injury induced by IR through effects on Rac1-mediated MR signaling. The benefits of MR antagonism in the pig provide a rational basis for future clinical trials assessing the benefits of this approach in patients with IR-mediated AKI.

  9. RhoA Phosphorylation Induces Rac1 Release from Guanine Dissociation Inhibitor α and Stimulation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration▿

    PubMed Central

    Rolli-Derkinderen, Malvyne; Toumaniantz, Gilles; Pacaud, Pierre; Loirand, Gervaise

    2010-01-01

    Although overactivation of RhoA is recognized as a common component of vascular disorders, the molecular mechanisms regulating RhoA activity in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) are still unclear. We have previously shown that in VSMC, RhoA is phosphorylated on Ser188 by nitric oxide (NO)-stimulated cGMP-dependent kinase (PKG), which leads to RhoA-Rho kinase pathway inhibition. In this study, we showed that expression of phosphoresistant RhoA mutants prevented the stimulation of VSMC migration and adhesion induced by NO-PKG pathway activation. In contrast, under basal conditions, phosphomimetic RhoA mutants stimulated VSMC adhesion and migration through a signaling pathway requiring Rac1 and the Rho exchange factor Vav3. RhoA phosphorylation or phosphomimetic RhoA mutants induced Rac1 activation but did not activate Vav3. Indeed, phosphorylated RhoA or phosphomimetic mutants trapped guanine dissociation inhibitor α (GDIα), leading to the release of Rac1 and its translocation to the membrane, where it was then activated by the basal Vav3 nucleotide exchange activity. In vivo, RhoA phosphorylation induced by PKG activation in the aortas of rats treated with sildenafil induced dissociation of Rac1 from GDIα and activation of the Rac1 signaling pathway. These results suggest that the phosphorylation of RhoA represents a novel potent and physiological GDIα displacement factor that leads to Rac1 activation and regulation of Rac1-dependent VSMC functions. PMID:20696841

  10. Snail promotes cell migration through PI3K/AKT-dependent Rac1 activation as well as PI3K/AKT-independent pathways during prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Veronica; Smith, Basil; Burton, Liza J; Randle, Diandra; Morris, Marisha; Odero-Marah, Valerie A

    2015-01-01

    Snail, a zinc-finger transcription factor, induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is associated with increased cell migration and metastasis in cancer cells. Rac1 is a small G-protein which upon activation results in formation of lamellipodia, the first protrusions formed by migrating cells. We have previously shown that Snail promotes cell migration through down-regulation of maspin tumor suppressor. We hypothesized that Snail's regulation of cell migration may also involve Rac1 signaling regulated by PI3K/AKT and/or MAPK pathways. We found that Snail overexpression in LNCaP and 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells increased Rac1 activity associated with increased cell migration, and the Rac1 inhibitor, NSC23766, could inhibit Snail-mediated cell migration. Conversely, Snail downregulation using shRNA in the aggressive C4–2 prostate cancer cells decreased Rac1 activity and cell migration. Moreover, Snail overexpression increased ERK and PI3K/AKT activity in 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells. Treatment of Snail-overexpressing 22Rv1 cells with LY294002, PI3K/AKT inhibitor or U0126, MEK inhibitor, decreased cell migration significantly, but only LY294002 significantly reduced Rac1 activity, suggesting that Snail promotes Rac1 activation via the PI3K/AKT pathway. Furthermore, 22Rv1 cells overexpressing Snail displayed decreased maspin levels, while inhibition of maspin expression in 22Rv1 cells with siRNA, led to increased PI3K/AKT, Rac1 activity and cell migration, without affecting ERK activity, suggesting that maspin is upstream of PI3K/AKT. Overall, we have dissected signaling pathways by which Snail may promote cell migration through MAPK signaling or alternatively through PI3K/AKT-Rac1 signaling that involves Snail inhibition of maspin tumor suppressor. This may contribute to prostate cancer progression. PMID:26207671

  11. BLNK required for coupling Syk to PLC gamma 2 and Rac1-JNK in B cells.

    PubMed

    Ishiai, M; Kurosaki, M; Pappu, R; Okawa, K; Ronko, I; Fu, C; Shibata, M; Iwamatsu, A; Chan, A C; Kurosaki, T

    1999-01-01

    Signaling through the B cell receptor (BCR) is essential for B cell function and development. Despite the key role of Syk in BCR signaling, little is known about the mechanism by which Syk transmits downstream effectors. BLNK (B cell LiNKer protein), a substrate for Syk, is now shown to be essential in activating phospholipase C (PLC)gamma 2 and JNK. The BCR-induced PLC gamma 2 activation, but not the JNK activation, was restored by introduction of PLC gamma 2 membrane-associated form into BLNK-deficient B cells. As JNK activation requires both Rac1 and PLC gamma 2, our results suggest that BLNK regulates the Rac1-JNK pathway, in addition to modulating PLC gamma 2 localization.

  12. Tetrandrine inhibits migration and invasion of rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes through down-regulating the expressions of Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA GTPases and activation of the PI3K/Akt and JNK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qi; Zhu, Xian-Yang; Xia, Yu-Feng; Dai, Yue; Wei, Zhi-Feng

    2015-11-01

    Tetrandrine (Tet), the main active constituent of Stephania tetrandra root, has been demonstrated to alleviate adjuvant-induced arthritis in rats. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Tet on the migration and invasion of rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes (RA-FLS) and explore the underlying mechanisms. By using cultures of primary FLS isolated from synoviums of RA patients and cell line MH7A, Tet (0.3, 1 μmol·L(-1)) was proven to significantly impede migration and invasion of RA-FLS, but not cell proliferation. Tet also greatly reduced the activation and expressions of matrix degrading enzymes MMP-2/9, the expression of F-actin and the activation of FAK, which controlled the morphologic changes in migration process of FLS. To identify the key signaling pathways by which Tet exerts anti-migration effect, the specific inhibitors of multiple signaling pathways LY294002, Triciribine, SP600125, U0126, SB203580, and PDTC (against PI3K, Akt, JNK, ERK, p38 MAPK and NF-κB-p65, respectively) were used. Among them, LY294002, Triciribine, and SP600125 were shown to obviously inhibit the migration of MH7A cells. Consistently, Tet was able to down-regulate the activation of Akt and JNK as demonstrated by Western blotting assay. Moreover, Tet could reduce the expressions of migration-related proteins Rho GTPases Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA in MH7A cells. In conclusion, Tet can impede the migration and invasion of RA-FLS, which provides a plausible explanation for its protective effect on RA. The underlying mechanisms involve the reduction of the expressions of Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA, inhibition of the activation of Akt and JNK, and subsequent down-regulation of activation and/or expressions of MMP-2/9, F-actin, and FAK.

  13. Loss of Either Rac1 or Rac3 GTPase Differentially Affects the Behavior of Mutant Mice and the Development of Functional GABAergic Networks

    PubMed Central

    Pennucci, Roberta; Talpo, Francesca; Astro, Veronica; Montinaro, Valentina; Morè, Lorenzo; Cursi, Marco; Castoldi, Valerio; Chiaretti, Sara; Bianchi, Veronica; Marenna, Silvia; Cambiaghi, Marco; Tonoli, Diletta; Leocani, Letizia; Biella, Gerardo; D'Adamo, Patrizia; de Curtis, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Rac GTPases regulate the development of cortical/hippocampal GABAergic interneurons by affecting the early development and migration of GABAergic precursors. We have addressed the function of Rac1 and Rac3 proteins during the late maturation of hippocampal interneurons. We observed specific phenotypic differences between conditional Rac1 and full Rac3 knockout mice. Rac1 deletion caused greater generalized hyperactivity and cognitive impairment compared with Rac3 deletion. This phenotype matched with a more evident functional impairment of the inhibitory circuits in Rac1 mutants, showing higher excitability and reduced spontaneous inhibitory currents in the CA hippocampal pyramidal neurons. Morphological analysis confirmed a differential modification of the inhibitory circuits: deletion of either Rac caused a similar reduction of parvalbumin-positive inhibitory terminals in the pyramidal layer. Intriguingly, cannabinoid receptor-1-positive terminals were strongly increased only in the CA1 of Rac1-depleted mice. This increase may underlie the stronger electrophysiological defects in this mutant. Accordingly, incubation with an antagonist for cannabinoid receptors partially rescued the reduction of spontaneous inhibitory currents in the pyramidal cells of Rac1 mutants. Our results show that Rac1 and Rac3 have independent roles in the formation of GABAergic circuits, as highlighted by the differential effects of their deletion on the late maturation of specific populations of interneurons. PMID:26582364

  14. Chemo-enzymatic synthesis of rac 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and its analogues.

    PubMed

    Vijeeta, Tadla; Balakrishna, Marrapu; Lakshmi Karuna, Mallampalli Sri; Surya Koppeswara Rao, Bhamidipati Venkata; Narayana Prasad, Rachapudi Badari

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of rac 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines (6a-c), blood platelet activating ether lipid analogues has been achieved in a four-step sequence from epichlorohydrin (1). Etherification of epichlorohydrin with different alcohols namely tetradecyl (2a), hexadecyl (2b) and octadecyl (2c) alcohols gave glycidyl ethers (3a-c) with 78-80% yields. The second step involved opening of the epoxide by acetic anhydride to give acetylated products (4a-c, 76-78% yield), which were subsequently hydrolyzed selectively, a key step of the method employing a 1,3 specific lipase to obtain rac 1-O-alkyl-2- acetylglycerol (5a-c) with 45-50% yields. The hydrolyzed products (5a-c) were phosphorylated to obtain rac 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines (6a-c) in 80-85% yields.

  15. Rac1 expression in epithelial ovarian cancer: effect on cell EMT and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Leng, Ruobing; Liao, Gang; Wang, Haixia; Kuang, Jun; Tang, Liangdan

    2015-02-01

    Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (rac1) has been implicated in tumor epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT); however, limited information is available regarding the role of rac1 in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). This study aimed to evaluate the correlation of rac1 expression with EMT and EOC prognosis. Rac1 protein levels of 150 EOC specimens were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining. Survival analysis was performed to determine the correlation between rac1 expression and survival. Cellular and molecular changes were also examined after rac1 in ovarian cancer cells was silenced in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism of rac1 on EMT was investigated by Western blot analysis. Rac1 was highly expressed in EOC. Rac1 overexpression was closely associated with advanced stage based on International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics, poor grade, serum Ca-125, and residual tumor size. Survival analyses demonstrated that patients with high rac1 expression levels were more susceptible to early tumor recurrence with very poor prognosis. This study revealed that rac1 downregulation decreased cell EMT and proliferation capability in vitro and in vivo. Rac1 expression possibly altered cell EMT by interacting with p21-activated kinase 1 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. The present study showed that rac1 overexpression is associated with cell EMT and poor EOC prognosis. Rac1 possibly plays an important role in predicting EOC metastasis.

  16. Exome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic RAC1 mutations in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Krauthammer, Michael; Kong, Yong; Ha, Byung Hak; Evans, Perry; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; McCusker, James P; Cheng, Elaine; Davis, Matthew J; Goh, Gerald; Choi, Murim; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Capatana, Ana; Holman, Edna C; Bosenberg, Marcus; Sznol, Mario; Kluger, Harriet M; Brash, Douglas E; Stern, David F; Materin, Miguel A; Lo, Roger S; Mane, Shrikant; Ma, Shuangge; Kidd, Kenneth K; Hayward, Nicholas K; Lifton, Richard P; Schlessinger, Joseph; Boggon, Titus J; Halaban, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    We characterized the mutational landscape of melanoma, the form of skin cancer with the highest mortality rate, by sequencing the exomes of 147 melanomas. Sun-exposed melanomas had markedly more ultraviolet (UV)-like C>T somatic mutations compared to sun-shielded acral, mucosal and uveal melanomas. Among the newly identified cancer genes was PPP6C, encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase, which harbored mutations that clustered in the active site in 12% of sun-exposed melanomas, exclusively in tumors with mutations in BRAF or NRAS. Notably, we identified a recurrent UV-signature, an activating mutation in RAC1 in 9.2% of sun-exposed melanomas. This activating mutation, the third most frequent in our cohort of sun-exposed melanoma after those of BRAF and NRAS, changes Pro29 to serine (RAC1P29S) in the highly conserved switch I domain. Crystal structures, and biochemical and functional studies of RAC1P29S showed that the alteration releases the conformational restraint conferred by the conserved proline, causes an increased binding of the protein to downstream effectors, and promotes melanocyte proliferation and migration. These findings raise the possibility that pharmacological inhibition of downstream effectors of RAC1 signaling could be of therapeutic benefit. PMID:22842228

  17. Exome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic RAC1 mutations in melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Krauthammer, Michael; Kong, Yong; Ha, Byung Hak; Evans, Perry; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; McCusker, James P.; Cheng, Elaine; Davis, Matthew J.; Goh, Gerald; Choi, Murim; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Capatana, Ana; Holman, Edna C.; Bosenberg, Marcus; Sznol, Mario; Kluger, Harriet M.; Brash, Douglas E.; Stern, David F.; Materin, Miguel A.; Lo, Roger S.; Mane, Shrikant; Ma, Shuangge; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Lifton, Richard P.; Schlessinger, Joseph; Boggon, Titus J.; Halaban, Ruth

    2012-10-11

    We characterized the mutational landscape of melanoma, the form of skin cancer with the highest mortality rate, by sequencing the exomes of 147 melanomas. Sun-exposed melanomas had markedly more ultraviolet (UV)-like C>T somatic mutations compared to sun-shielded acral, mucosal and uveal melanomas. Among the newly identified cancer genes was PPP6C, encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase, which harbored mutations that clustered in the active site in 12% of sun-exposed melanomas, exclusively in tumors with mutations in BRAF or NRAS. Notably, we identified a recurrent UV-signature, an activating mutation in RAC1 in 9.2% of sun-exposed melanomas. This activating mutation, the third most frequent in our cohort of sun-exposed melanoma after those of BRAF and NRAS, changes Pro29 to serine (RAC1{sup P29S}) in the highly conserved switch I domain. Crystal structures, and biochemical and functional studies of RAC1{sup P29S} showed that the alteration releases the conformational restraint conferred by the conserved proline, causes an increased binding of the protein to downstream effectors, and promotes melanocyte proliferation and migration. These findings raise the possibility that pharmacological inhibition of downstream effectors of RAC1 signaling could be of therapeutic benefit.

  18. Suppression of Rac1 Signaling by Influenza A Virus NS1 Facilitates Viral Replication

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Sheng, Chunjie; Gu, Xiuling; Liu, Dong; Yao, Chen; Gao, Shijuan; Chen, Shuai; Huang, Yinghui; Huang, Wenlin; Fang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) is a major human pathogen with the potential to become pandemic. IAV contains only eight RNA segments; thus, the virus must fully exploit the host cellular machinery to facilitate its own replication. In an effort to comprehensively characterize the host machinery taken over by IAV in mammalian cells, we generated stable A549 cell lines with over-expression of the viral non-structural protein (NS1) to investigate the potential host factors that might be modulated by the NS1 protein. We found that the viral NS1 protein directly interacted with cellular Rac1 and facilitated viral replication. Further research revealed that NS1 down-regulated Rac1 activity via post-translational modifications. Therefore, our results demonstrated that IAV blocked Rac1-mediated host cell signal transduction through the NS1 protein to facilitate its own replication. Our findings provide a novel insight into the mechanism of IAV replication and indicate new avenues for the development of potential therapeutic targets. PMID:27869202

  19. Rac1 Activation in Podocytes Induces Rapid Foot Process Effacement and Proteinuria

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haiyang; Suleiman, Hani; Kim, Alfred H. J.; Miner, Jeffrey H.; Dani, Adish; Akilesh, Shreeram

    2013-01-01

    The kidney's vital filtration function depends on the structural integrity of the glomerulus, the proximal portion of the nephron. Within the glomerulus, the architecturally complex podocyte forms the final cellular barrier to filtration. Injury to the podocyte results in a morphological change called foot process effacement, which is a ubiquitous feature of proteinuric diseases. The exact mechanism underlying foot process effacement is not known, but recently it has been proposed that this change might reflect activation of the Rac1 GTPase. To test this hypothesis, we generated a podocyte-specific, inducible transgenic mouse line that expressed constitutively active Rac1. When the Rac1 transgene was induced, we observed a rapid onset of proteinuria with focal foot process effacement. Using superresolution imaging, we verified that the induced transgene was expressed in damaged podocytes with altered foot process morphology. This work sheds new light on the complex balance of Rho GTPase signaling that is required for proper regulation of the podocyte cytoskeleton. PMID:24061480

  20. RAC1 — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    From NCBI Gene: The protein encoded by this gene is a GTPase which belongs to the RAS superfamily of small GTP-binding proteins. Members of this superfamily appear to regulate a diverse array of cellular events, including the control of cell growth, cytoskeletal reorganization, and the activation of protein kinases. Two transcript variants encoding different isoforms have been found for this gene. [provided by RefSeq, Mar 2009

  1. KAI1/CD82 decreases Rac1 expression and cell proliferation through PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in H1299 lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Un-Jong; Jee, Bo-Keun; Lim, Young; Lee, Kweon-Haeng

    2009-01-01

    Although the KAI1/CD82 protein has been reported to inhibit cell metastasis in many studies, its mechanism of action has not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the possible effects of KAI1/CD82 on the metastatic phenotype in H1299 lung carcinoma cells. These studies were based on the pivotal role that the acquisition of motile phenotype plays on the initial steps of metastasis. KAI1/CD82-mediated morphological changes were observed using phase contrast microscopy. We report here, that a KAI1/CD82-induced phenotypic change was involved in the decrease of Rac1 expression and GTPase activity. However, we found that KAI1/CD82 did not regulate Rac1 mRNA levels. This suggests the existence of another regulatory mechanism of Rac1 protein maturation or activation. To identify the signaling pathway of Rac1 regulation, we investigated the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway, since the PI3K/Akt pathway regulates Rac1 activation and mTOR is known to play a regulatory role in protein translation. H1299/CD82-transfectants showed lower mTOR expression and cell growth than the control group. The data obtained from this study suggested that KAI1/CD82 decreased the metastatic phenotype of H1299 lung carcinoma cells by down-regulating Rac1 expression through the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway.

  2. Rac1 and Cdc42 differentially modulate cigarette smoke-induced airway cell migration through p120-catenin-dependent and -independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lili; Gallup, Marianne; Zlock, Lorna; Finkbeiner, Walter E; McNamara, Nancy A

    2013-06-01

    The adherens junction protein p120-catenin (p120ctn) shuttles between E-cadherin-bound and cytoplasmic pools to regulate E-cadherin/catenin complex stability and cell migration, respectively. When released from the adherens junction, p120ctn promotes cell migration through modulation of the Rho GTPases Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA. Accordingly, the down-regulation and cytoplasmic mislocalization of p120ctn has been reported in all subtypes of lung cancers and is associated with grave prognosis. Previously, we reported that cigarette smoke induced cytoplasmic translocation of p120ctn and cell migration, but the underlying mechanism was unclear. Using primary human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to smoke-concentrated medium (Smk), we observed the translocation of Rac1 and Cdc42, but not RhoA, to the leading edge of polarized and migrating human bronchial epithelial cells. Rac1 and Cdc42 were robustly activated by smoke, whereas RhoA was inhibited. Accordingly, siRNA knockdown of Rac1 or Cdc42 completely abolished Smk-induced cell migration, whereas knockdown of RhoA had no effect. p120ctn/Rac1 double knockdown completely abolished Smk-induced cell migration, whereas p120ctn/Cdc42 double knockdown did not. These data suggested that Rac1 and Cdc42 coactivation was essential to smoke-promoted cell migration in the presence of p120ctn, whereas migration proceeded via Rac1 alone in the absence of p120ctn. Thus, Rac1 may provide an omnipotent therapeutic target in reversing cell migration during the early (intact p120ctn) and late (loss of p120ctn) stages of lung carcinogenesis.

  3. Blocking hepatic metastases of colon cancer cells using an shRNA against Rac1 delivered by activatable cell-penetrating peptide

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yongliang; Feng, Wenming; Sun, Xinrong; Tang, Chengwu; Wang, Xiang; Shen, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic metastasis is one of the critical progressions of colon cancer. Blocking this process is key to prolonging survival time in cancer patients. Studies on activatable cell-penetrating peptides (dtACPPs) have demonstrated their potential as gene carriers. It showed high tumor cell-targeting specificity and transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity in the in vitro settings of drug delivery. However, using this system to silence target genes to inhibit metastasis in colorectal cancer cells has not been widely reported and requires further investigation. In this study, we observed that expression of Rac1, a key molecule for cytoskeletal reorganization, was higher in hepatic metastatic tumor tissue compared with prime colon cancer tissue and that patients with high Rac1-expressing colon cancer showed shorter survival time. Base on these findings, we created dtACPP-PEG-DGL (dtACPPD)/shRac1 nanoparticles and demonstrated that they downregulated Rac1 expression in colon cancer cells. Moreover, we observed inhibitory effects on migration, invasion and adhesion in HCT116 colorectal cancer cells in vitro, and our results showed that Rac1 regulated colon cancer cell matrix adhesion through the regulation of cytofilament dynamics. Moreover, mechanically, repression of Rac1 inhibiting cells migration and invasion by enhancing cell to cell adhesion and reducing cell to extracellular matrix adhesion. Furthermore, when atCDPPD/shRac1 nanoparticles were administered intravenously to a HCT116 xenograft model, significant tumor metastasis to the liver was inhibited. Our results suggest that atCDPP/shRac1 nanoparticles may enable the blockade of hepatic metastasis in colon cancer. PMID:27791203

  4. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-09-04

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  5. Rac1 protein signaling is required for DNA damage response stimulated by topoisomerase II poisons.

    PubMed

    Huelsenbeck, Stefanie C; Schorr, Anne; Roos, Wynand P; Huelsenbeck, Johannes; Henninger, Christian; Kaina, Bernd; Fritz, Gerhard

    2012-11-09

    To investigate the potency of the topoisomerase II (topo II) poisons doxorubicin and etoposide to stimulate the DNA damage response (DDR), S139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX) was analyzed using rat cardiomyoblast cells (H9c2). Etoposide caused a dose-dependent increase in the γH2AX level as shown by Western blotting. By contrast, the doxorubicin response was bell-shaped with high doses failing to increase H2AX phosphorylation. Identical results were obtained by immunohistochemical analysis of γH2AX focus formation, comet assay-based DNA strand break analysis, and measuring the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. At low dose, doxorubicin activated ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) but not ATM and Rad3-related (ATR). Both the lipid-lowering drug lovastatin and the Rac1-specific inhibitor NSC23766 attenuated doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated H2AX phosphorylation, induction of DNA strand breaks, and topo II-DNA complex formation. Lovastatin and NSC23766 acted in an additive manner. They did not attenuate doxorubicin-induced increase in p-ATM and p-Chk2 levels. DDR stimulated by topo II poisons was partially blocked by inhibition of type I p21-associated kinases. DDR evoked by the topoisomerase I poison topotecan remained unaffected by lovastatin. The data show that the mechanisms involved in DDR stimulated by topo II poisons are agent-specific with anthracyclines lacking DDR-stimulating activity at high doses. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 signaling counteracts doxorubicin- and etoposide-stimulated DDR by disabling the formation of the topo II-DNA cleavable complex. Based on the data we suggest that Rac1-regulated mechanisms are required for DNA damage induction and subsequent activation of the DDR following treatment with topo II but not topo I poisons.

  6. Carbon-Ion Irradiation Suppresses Migration and Invasiveness of Human Pancreatic Carcinoma Cells MIAPaCa-2 via Rac1 and RhoA Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Mayumi; Imadome, Kaori; Shoji, Yoshimi; Isozaki, Tetsurou; Endo, Satoshi; Yamada, Shigeru; Imai, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the mechanisms underlying the inhibition of cancer cell migration and invasion by carbon (C)-ion irradiation. Methods and Materials: Human pancreatic cancer cells MIAPaCa-2, AsPC-1, and BxPC-3 were treated by x-ray (4 Gy) or C-ion (0.5, 1, 2, or 4 Gy) irradiation, and their migration and invasion were assessed 2 days later. The levels of guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-bound Rac1 and RhoA were determined by the active GTPase pull-down assay with or without a proteasome inhibitor, and the binding of E3 ubiquitin ligase to GTP-bound Rac1 was examined by immunoprecipitation. Results: Carbon-ion irradiation reduced the levels of GTP-bound Rac1 and RhoA, 2 major regulators of cell motility, in MIAPaCa-2 cells and GTP-bound Rac1 in AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells. Proteasome inhibition reversed the effect, indicating that C-ion irradiation induced Rac1 and RhoA degradation via the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome pathway. E3 Ub ligase X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP), which directly targets Rac1, was selectively induced in C-ion–irradiated MIAPaCa-2 cells and coprecipitated with GTP-bound Rac1 in C-ion–irradiated cells, which was associated with Rac1 ubiquitination. Cell migration and invasion reduced by C-ion radiation were restored by short interfering RNA–mediated XIAP knockdown, indicating that XIAP is involved in C-ion–induced inhibition of cell motility. Conclusion: In contrast to x-ray irradiation, C-ion treatment inhibited the activity of Rac1 and RhoA in MIAPaCa-2 cells and Rac1 in AsPC-1 and BxPC-3 cells via Ub-mediated proteasomal degradation, thereby blocking the motility of these pancreatic cancer cells.

  7. RAC1P29S is a spontaneously activating cancer-associated GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Matthew J.; Ha, Byung Hak; Holman, Edna C.; Halaban, Ruth; Schlessinger, Joseph; Boggon, Titus J.

    2013-01-01

    RAC1 is a small, Ras-related GTPase that was recently reported to harbor a recurrent UV-induced signature mutation in melanoma, resulting in substitution of P29 to serine (RAC1P29S), ranking this the third most frequently occurring gain-of-function mutation in melanoma. Although the Ras family GTPases are mutated in about 30% of all cancers, mutations in the Rho family GTPases have rarely been observed. In this study, we demonstrate that unlike oncogenic Ras proteins, which are primarily activated by mutations that eliminate GTPase activity, the activated melanoma RAC1P29S protein maintains intrinsic GTP hydrolysis and is spontaneously activated by substantially increased inherent GDP/GTP nucleotide exchange. Determination and comparison of crystal structures for activated RAC1 GTPases suggest that RAC1F28L—a known spontaneously activated RAC1 mutant—and RAC1P29S are self-activated in distinct fashions. Moreover, the mechanism of RAC1P29S and RAC1F28L activation differs from the common oncogenic mutations found in Ras-like GTPases that abrogate GTP hydrolysis. The melanoma RAC1P29S gain-of-function point mutation therefore represents a previously undescribed class of cancer-related GTPase activity. PMID:23284172

  8. RAC1 activation drives pathologic interactions between the epidermis and immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Winge, Mårten C.G.; Ohyama, Bungo; Dey, Clara N.; Boxer, Lisa M.; Li, Wei; Ehsani-Chimeh, Nazanin; Truong, Allison K.; Wu, Diane; Armstrong, April W.; Makino, Teruhiko; Davidson, Matthew; Starcevic, Daniela; Nguyen, Ngon T.; Hashimoto, Takashi; Homey, Bernard; Khavari, Paul A.; Bradley, Maria; Waterman, Elizabeth A.; Marinkovich, M. Peter

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between the epidermis and the immune system govern epidermal tissue homeostasis. These epidermis-immune interactions are altered in the inflammatory disease psoriasis; however, the pathways that underlie this aberrant immune response are not well understood. Here, we determined that Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (RAC1) is a key mediator of epidermal dysfunction. RAC1 activation was consistently elevated in psoriatic epidermis and primary psoriatic human keratinocytes (PHKCs) exposed to psoriasis-related stimuli, but not in skin from patients with basal or squamous cell carcinoma. Expression of a constitutively active form of RAC1 (RACV12) in mice resulted in the development of lesions similar to those of human psoriasis that required the presence of an intact immune system. RAC1V12-expressing mice and human psoriatic skin showed similar RAC1-dependent signaling as well as transcriptional overlap of differentially expressed epidermal and immune pathways. Coculture of PHKCs with immunocytes resulted in the upregulation of RAC1-dependent proinflammatory cytokines, an effect that was reproduced by overexpressing RAC1 in normal human keratinocytes. In keratinocytes, modulating RAC1 activity altered differentiation, proliferation, and inflammatory pathways, including STAT3, NFκB, and zinc finger protein 750 (ZNF750). Finally, RAC1 inhibition in xenografts composed of human PHKCs and immunocytes abolished psoriasiform hyperplasia and inflammation in vivo. These studies implicate RAC1 as a potential therapeutic target for psoriasis and as a key orchestrator of pathologic epidermis-immune interactions. PMID:27294528

  9. Ofloxacin induces apoptosis via β1 integrin-EGFR-Rac1-Nox2 pathway in microencapsulated chondrocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Zhi-Guo; Huang, Wei; Liu, Yu-Xiang; Yuan, Ye; Zhu, Ben-Zhan

    2013-02-15

    Quinolones (QNs)-induced arthropathy is an important toxic side-effect in immature animals leading to the restriction of their therapeutic use in pediatrics. Ofloxacin, a typical QN, was found to induce the chondrocytes apoptosis in the early phase (12–48 h) of arthropathy in our previous study. However, the exact mechanism(s) is unclear. Microencapsulated juvenile rabbit joint chondrocytes, a three-dimensional culture system, is utilized to perform the present study. Ofloxacin, at a therapeutically relevant concentration (10 μg/ml), disturbs the interaction between β1 integrin and activated intracellular signaling proteins at 12 h, which is inhibited when supplementing Mg{sup 2+}. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) significantly increases in a time-dependent manner after exposure to ofloxacin for 12–48 h. Furthermore, ofloxacin markedly enhances the level of activated Rac1 and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation, and its inhibition in turn reduces the ROS production, apoptosis and Rac1 activation. Silencing Nox2, Rac1 or supplementing Mg{sup 2+} inhibits ROS accumulation, apoptosis occurrence and EGFR phosphorylation induced by ofloxacin. However, depletion of Nox2, Rac1 and inhibition of EGFR do not affect ofloxacin-mediated loss of interaction between β1 integrin and activated intracellular signaling proteins. In addition, ofloxacin also induces Vav2 phosphorylation, which is markedly suppressed after inactivating EGFR or supplementing Mg{sup 2+}. These results suggest that ofloxacin causes Nox2-mediated intracellular ROS production by disrupting the β1 integrin function and then activating the EGFR-Vav2-Rac1 pathway, finally resulting in apoptosis within 12–48 h exposure. The present study provides a novel insight regarding the potential role of Nox-driven ROS in QNs-induced arthropathy. - Highlights: ► Ofloxacin induces Nox2-driven ROS in encapsulated chondrocyte at 12–48 h. ► Ofloxacin stimulates ROS production via

  10. HS1 deficiency impairs neutrophil recruitment in vivo and activation of the small GTPases Rac1 and Rap1.

    PubMed

    Latasiewicz, Joanna; Artz, Annette; Jing, Ding; Blanco, Mariana Pacheco; Currie, Silke M; Avila, Martha Velázquez; Schnoor, Michael; Vestweber, Dietmar

    2017-01-25

    Neutrophil extravasation is a critical step of the innate immune system's response to inflammation. This multistep process is tightly regulated by adhesion and signaling molecules in the endothelium and neutrophils. Activation of the β2 integrin LFA-1 is critical for adhesion of leukocytes to postcapillary venules. This step requires coordinated activation of signaling pathways in chemokine-stimulated neutrophils, including GTPase activation and cytoskeletal remodeling, leading to conformational changes in LFA-1. Hematopoietic cell-specific lyn substrate 1 (HS1) is a cortactin-related and leukocyte-specific actin-binding protein (ABP) that regulates several processes in various immune cells. It has been shown in vitro that HS1 is important for neutrophil chemotaxis and transendothelial migration of NK cells, but its role in neutrophil extravasation in vivo has not been investigated yet. Intravital microscopy of CXCL1-stimulated cremaster venules revealed an increased rolling velocity and reduced neutrophil adhesion and transmigration in HS1 knockout (KO) mice. CXCL1-induced rapid neutrophil arrest in vivo and adhesion under flow conditions in vitro were also reduced significantly. Whereas random motility of neutrophils was unaffected, chemotaxis toward a CXCL1 gradient was reduced in the absence of HS1. Further analysis of the underlying mechanisms demonstrated that HS1 controls CXCL1-induced activation of the small GTPases Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) and Ras-related protein 1 (Rap1), thus supporting LFA-1-mediated neutrophil adhesion. Importantly, with the use of Rac1 KO neutrophils, we could show that Rac1 acts upstream of Rap1. Our results establish HS1 as an important regulator of proper Rac1 and Rap1 activation and neutrophil extravasation.

  11. Extending the Impact of RAC1b Overexpression to Follicular Thyroid Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Márcia; Capinha, Liliana; Simões-Pereira, Joana; Bugalho, Maria João; Silva, Ana Luísa

    2016-01-01

    RAC1b is a hyperactive variant of the small GTPase RAC1 known to be a relevant molecular player in different cancers. Previous studies from our group lead to the evidence that its overexpression in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is associated with an unfavorable prognosis. In the present study, we intended to extend the analysis of RAC1b expression to thyroid follicular neoplasms and to seek for clinical correlations. RAC1b expression levels were determined by RT-qPCR in thyroid follicular tumor samples comprising 23 follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTCs) and 33 follicular thyroid adenomas (FTAs). RAC1b was found to be overexpressed in 33% of carcinomas while no RAC1b overexpression was documented among follicular adenomas. Patients with a diagnosis of FTC were divided into two groups based on longitudinal evolution and final outcome. RAC1b overexpression was significantly associated with both the presence of distant metastases (P = 0.01) and poorer clinical outcome (P = 0.01) suggesting that, similarly to that previously found in PTCs, RAC1b overexpression in FTCs is also associated with worse outcomes. Furthermore, the absence of RAC1b overexpression in follicular adenomas hints its potential as a molecular marker likely to contribute, in conjunction with other putative markers, to the preoperative differential diagnosis of thyroid follicular lesions. PMID:27127508

  12. Proinflammatory cytokines provoke oxidative damage to actin in neuronal cells mediated by Rac1 and NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Barth, Brian M; Stewart-Smeets, Shelli; Kuhn, Thomas B

    2009-06-01

    The proinflammatory cytokines TNFalpha and Il-1beta orchestrate the progression of CNS inflammation, which substantially contributes to neurodegeneration in many CNS pathologies. TNFalpha and Il-1beta stimulate actin filament reorganization in non-neuronal cells often accompanied by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Actin filament dynamics is vital for cellular plasticity, mitochondrial function, and gene expression despite being highly susceptible to oxidative damage. We demonstrated that, in neuronal cells, TNFalpha and Il-1beta stimulate a transient, redox-dependent reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton into lamellipodia under the regulation of Rac1 and a neuronal NADPH oxidase as the source of ROS. The persistent presence of intracellular ROS provoked oxidative damage (carbonylation) to actin coinciding with the loss of lamellipodia and arrest of cellular plasticity. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity or Rac1 abolished the adverse effects of cytokines. These findings suggest that oxidative damage to the neuronal actin cytoskeleton could represent a key step in CNS neurodegeneration.

  13. Activated Rac1 requires gp130 for Stat3 activation, cell proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Arulanandam, Rozanne; Geletu, Mulu; Feracci, Helene; Raptis, Leda

    2010-03-10

    Rac1 (Rac) is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases which controls cell migration by regulating the organization of actin filaments. Previous results suggested that mutationally activated forms of the Rho GTPases can activate the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3 (Stat3), but the exact mechanism is a matter of controversy. We recently demonstrated that Stat3 activity of cultured cells increases dramatically following E-cadherin engagement. To better understand this pathway, we now compared Stat3 activity levels in mouse HC11 cells before and after expression of the mutationally activated Rac1 (Rac{sup V12}), at different cell densities. The results revealed for the first time a dramatic increase in protein levels and activity of both the endogenous Rac and Rac{sup V12} with cell density, which was due to inhibition of proteasomal degradation. In addition, Rac{sup V12}-expressing cells had higher Stat3, tyrosine-705 phosphorylation and activity levels at all densities, indicating that Rac{sup V12} is able to activate Stat3. Further examination of the mechanism of Stat3 activation showed that Rac{sup V12} expression caused a surge in mRNA of Interleukin-6 (IL6) family cytokines, known potent Stat3 activators. Knockdown of gp130, the common subunit of this family reduced Stat3 activity, indicating that these cytokines may be responsible for the Stat3 activation by Rac{sup V12}. The upregulation of IL6 family cytokines was required for cell migration and proliferation induced by Rac{sup V12}, as shown by gp130 knockdown experiments, thus demonstrating that the gp130/Stat3 axis represents an essential effector of activated Rac for the regulation of key cellular functions.

  14. The Role of Rac1 in the Growth Cone Dynamics and Force Generation of DRG Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sayyad, Wasim A.; Fabris, Paolo; Torre, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    We used optical tweezers, video imaging, immunocytochemistry and a variety of inhibitors to analyze the role of Rac1 in the motility and force generation of lamellipodia and filopodia from developing growth cones of isolated Dorsal Root Ganglia neurons. When the activity of Rac1 was inhibited by the drug EHop-016, the period of lamellipodia protrusion/retraction cycles increased and the lamellipodia retrograde flow rate decreased; moreover, the axial force exerted by lamellipodia was reduced dramatically. Inhibition of Arp2/3 by a moderate amount of the drug CK-548 caused a transient retraction of lamellipodia followed by a complete recovery of their usual motility. This recovery was abolished by the concomitant inhibition of Rac1. The filopodia length increased upon inhibition of both Rac1 and Arp2/3, but the speed of filopodia protrusion increased when Rac1 was inhibited and decreased instead when Arp2/3 was inhibited. These results suggest that Rac1 acts as a switch that activates upon inhibition of Arp2/3. Rac1 also controls the filopodia dynamics necessary to explore the environment. PMID:26766136

  15. Nuclear expression of Rac1 in cervical premalignant lesions and cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Abnormal expression of Rho-GTPases has been reported in several human cancers. However, the expression of these proteins in cervical cancer has been poorly investigated. In this study we analyzed the expression of the GTPases Rac1, RhoA, Cdc42, and the Rho-GEFs, Tiam1 and beta-Pix, in cervical pre-malignant lesions and cervical cancer cell lines. Methods Protein expression was analyzed by immunochemistry on 102 cervical paraffin-embedded biopsies: 20 without Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (SIL), 51 Low- grade SIL, and 31 High-grade SIL; and in cervical cancer cell lines C33A and SiHa, and non-tumorigenic HaCat cells. Nuclear localization of Rac1 in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells was assessed by cellular fractionation and Western blotting, in the presence or not of a chemical Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766). Results Immunoreacivity for Rac1, RhoA, Tiam1 and beta-Pix was stronger in L-SIL and H-SIL, compared to samples without SIL, and it was significantly associated with the histological diagnosis. Nuclear expression of Rac1 was observed in 52.9% L-SIL and 48.4% H-SIL, but not in samples without SIL. Rac1 was found in the nucleus of C33A and SiHa cells but not in HaCat cells. Chemical inhibition of Rac1 resulted in reduced cell proliferation in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells. Conclusion Rac1 is expressed in the nucleus of epithelial cells in SILs and cervical cancer cell lines, and chemical inhibition of Rac1 reduces cellular proliferation. Further studies are needed to better understand the role of Rho-GTPases in cervical cancer progression. PMID:22443139

  16. RhoA and Rac1 GTPases play major and differential roles in stromal cell–derived factor-1–induced cell adhesion and chemotaxis in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Azab, Abdel Kareem; Azab, Feda; Blotta, Simona; Pitsillides, Costas M.; Thompson, Brian; Runnels, Judith M.; Roccaro, Aldo M.; Ngo, Hai T.; Melhem, Molly R.; Sacco, Antonio; Jia, Xiaoying; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Lin, Charles P.; Rollins, Barrett J.

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of multiple myeloma (MM) cells with the bone marrow (BM) milieu plays a crucial role in MM pathogenesis. Stromal cell–derived factor-1 (SDF1) regulates homing of MM cells to the BM. In this study, we examined the role of RhoA and Rac1 GTPases in SDF1-induced adhesion and chemotaxis of MM. We found that both RhoA and Rac1 play key roles in SDF1-induced adhesion of MM cells to BM stromal cells, whereas RhoA was involved in chemotaxis and motility. Furthermore, both ROCK and Rac1 inhibitors reduced SDF1-induced polymerization of actin and activation of LIMK, SRC, FAK, and cofilin. Moreover, RhoA and Rac1 reduced homing of MM cells to BM niches. In conclusion, we characterized the role of RhoA and Rac1 GTPases in SDF1-induced adhesion, chemotaxis, and homing of MM cells to the BM, providing the framework for targeting RhoA and Rac1 GTPases as novel MM therapy. PMID:19443661

  17. Expression of Rac1 alternative 3' UTRs is a cell specific mechanism with a function in dendrite outgrowth in cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Braz, Sandra Oliveira; Cruz, Andrea; Lobo, Andrea; Bravo, Joana; Moreira-Ribeiro, Joana; Pereira-Castro, Isabel; Freitas, Jaime; Relvas, Joao B; Summavielle, Teresa; Moreira, Alexandra

    2017-03-06

    The differential expression of mRNAs containing tandem alternative 3' UTRs, achieved by mechanisms of alternative polyadenylation and post-transcriptional regulation, has been correlated with a variety of cellular states. In differentiated cells and brain tissues there is a general use of distal polyadenylation signals, originating mRNAs with longer 3' UTRs, in contrast with proliferating cells and other tissues such as testis, where most mRNAs contain shorter 3' UTRs. Although cell type and state are relevant in many biological processes, how these mechanisms occur in specific brain cell types is still poorly understood. Rac1 is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases with essential roles in multiple cellular processes, including cell differentiation and axonal growth. Here we used different brain cell types and tissues, including oligodendrocytes, microglia, astrocytes, cortical and hippocampal neurons, and optical nerve, to show that classical express mRNAs with alternative 3' UTRs differently, by gene- and cell- specific mechanisms. In particular, we show that Rac1 originate mRNA isoforms with longer 3' UTRs specifically during neurite growth of cortical, but not hippocampal neurons. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the longest Rac1 3' UTR is necessary for driving the mRNA to the neurites, and also for neurite outgrowth in cortical neurons. Our results indicate that the expression of Rac1 longer 3' UTR is a gene and cell-type specific mechanism in the brain, with a new physiological function in cortical neuron differentiation.

  18. Remedial Strategies in Structural Proteomics: Expression, Purification and Crystallization of the Vav1/Rac1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Brooun, Alexei; Foster, Scott A.; Chrencik, Jill E.; Chien, Ellen Y.T.; Kolatkar, Anand R.; Streiff, Markus; Ramage, Paul; Widmer, Hans; Weckbecker, Gisbert; Kuhn, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The signal transduction pathway involving the Vav1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) and the Rac1 GTPase plays several key roles in the immune response mediated by the T cell receptor. Vav1 is also a unique member of the GEF family in that it contains a cysteine-rich domain (CRD) that is critical for Rac1 binding and maximal guanine nucleotide exchange activity, and thus may provide a unique protein-protein interface compared to other GEF/GTPase pairs. Here we have applied a number of remedial structural proteomics strategies, such as construct and expression optimization, surface mutagenesis, limited proteolysis, and protein formulation to successfully express, purify, and crystallize the Vav1-DH-PH-CRD/Rac1 complex in an active conformation. We have also systematically characterized various Vav1 domains in a GEF assay, and Rac1 in vitro binding experiments. In the context of Vav1-DH-PH-CRD, the zinc finger motif of the CRD is required for the expression of stable Vav1, as well as for activity in both a GEF assay and in vitro formation of a Vav1/Rac1 complex suitable for biophysical and structural characterization. Our data also indicate that the isolated CRD maintains a low level of specific binding to Rac1, appears to be folded based on 1D-NMR analysis and coordinates two zinc ions based on ICP-MS analysis. The protein reagents generated here are essential tools for the determination of a three dimensional Vav1/Rac1 complex crystal structure and possibly for the identification of inhibitors of the Vav1/Rac1 protein-protein interaction with potential to inhibit lymphocyte activation. PMID:17275330

  19. Unprenylated RhoA Contributes to IL-1β Hypersecretion in Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency Model through Stimulation of Rac1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    van der Burgh, Robert; Pervolaraki, Kalliopi; Turkenburg, Marjolein; Waterham, Hans R.; Frenkel, Joost; Boes, Marianne

    2014-01-01

    Protein prenylation is a post-translational modification whereby non-sterol isoprenoid lipid chains are added, thereby modifying the molecular partners with which proteins interact. The autoinflammatory disease mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is characterized by a severe reduction in protein prenylation. A major class of proteins that are affected are small GTPases, including Rac1 and RhoA. It is not clear how protein prenylation of small GTPases relates to GTP hydrolysis activity and downstream signaling. Here, we investigated the contribution of RhoA prenylation to the biochemical pathways that underlie MKD-associated IL-1β hypersecretion using human cell cultures, Rac1 and RhoA protein variants, and pharmacological inhibitors. We found that when unprenylated, the GTP-bound levels of RhoA decrease, causing a reduction in GTPase activity and increased protein kinase B (PKB) phosphorylation. Cells expressing unprenylated RhoA produce increased levels of interleukin 1β mRNA. Of other phenotypic cellular changes seen in MKD, increased mitochondrial potential and mitochondrial elongation, only mitochondrial elongation was observed. Finally, we show that pharmacological inactivation of RhoA boosts Rac1 activity, a small GTPase whose activity was earlier implied in MKD pathogenesis. Together, our data show that RhoA plays a pivotal role in MKD pathogenesis through Rac1/PKB signaling toward interleukin 1β production and elucidate the effects of protein prenylation in monocytes. PMID:25107911

  20. PLC-gamma1 and Rac1 coregulate EGF-induced cytoskeleton remodeling and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Li, Siwei; Wang, Qian; Wang, Yi; Chen, Xinmei; Wang, Zhixiang

    2009-06-01

    It is well established that epidermal growth factor (EGF) induces the cytoskeleton reorganization and cell migration through two major signaling cascades: phospholipase C-gamma1 (PLC-gamma1) and Rho GTPases. However, little is known about the cross talk between PLC-gamma1 and Rho GTPases. Here we showed that PLC-gamma1 forms a complex with Rac1 in response to EGF. This interaction is direct and mediated by PLC-gamma1 Src homology 3 (SH3) domain and Rac1 (106)PNTP(109) motif. This interaction is critical for EGF-induced Rac1 activation in vivo, and PLC-gamma1 SH3 domain is actually a potent and specific Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor in vitro. We have also demonstrated that the interaction between PLC-gamma1 SH3 domain and Rac1 play a significant role in EGF-induced F-actin formation and cell migration. We conclude that PLC-gamma1 and Rac1 coregulate EGF-induced cell cytoskeleton remodeling and cell migration by a direct functional interaction.

  1. Rac1 functions as a reversible tension modulator to stabilize VE-cadherin trans-interaction

    PubMed Central

    Daneshjou, Nazila; Sieracki, Nathan; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P.; Conway, Daniel E.; Schwartz, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    The role of the RhoGTPase Rac1 in stabilizing mature endothelial adherens junctions (AJs) is not well understood. In this paper, using a photoactivatable probe to control Rac1 activity at AJs, we addressed the relationship between Rac1 and the dynamics of vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin). We demonstrated that Rac1 activation reduced the rate of VE-cadherin dissociation, leading to increased density of VE-cadherin at AJs. This response was coupled to a reduction in actomyosin-dependent tension across VE-cadherin adhesion sites. We observed that inhibiting myosin II directly or through photo-release of the caged Rho kinase inhibitor also reduced the rate of VE-cadherin dissociation. Thus, Rac1 functions by stabilizing VE-cadherin trans-dimers in mature AJs by counteracting the actomyosin tension. The results suggest a new model of VE-cadherin adhesive interaction mediated by Rac1-induced reduction of mechanical tension at AJs, resulting in the stabilization of VE-cadherin adhesions. PMID:25559184

  2. Proapoptotic and antiinvasive activity of Rac1 small molecule inhibitors on malignant glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cardama, Georgina A; Gonzalez, Nazareno; Ciarlantini, Matias; Gandolfi Donadío, Lucia; Comin, María Julieta; Alonso, Daniel F; Menna, Pablo Lorenzano; Gomez, Daniel E

    2014-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are characterized by an intrinsic ability to invade diffusely throughout the normal brain tissue. This feature contributes mainly to the failure of existing therapies. Deregulation of small GTPases signaling, in particular Rac1 activity, plays a key role in the invasive phenotype of gliomas. Here we report the effect of ZINC69391, a specific Rac1 inhibitor developed by our group, on human glioma cell lines LN229 and U-87 MG. ZINC69391 is able to interfere with the interaction of Rac1 with Dock180, a relevant Rac1 activator in glioma invasion, and to reduce Rac1-GTP levels. The kinase Pak1, a downstream effector of Dock180–Rac1 signaling, was also downregulated upon ZINC69391 treatment. ZINC69391 reduced cell proliferation, arrested cells in G1 phase, and triggered apoptosis in glioma cells. Importantly, ZINC69391 dramatically affected cell migration and invasion in vitro, interfering with actin cytoskeleton dynamics. We also evaluated the effect of analog 1A-116, a compound derived from ZINC69391 structure. 1A-116 showed an improved antiproliferative and antiinvasive activity on glioma cells. These findings encourage further preclinical testing in clinically relevant animal models. PMID:25378937

  3. Activation of RhoA, but Not Rac1, Mediates Early Stages of S1P-Induced Endothelial Barrier Enhancement.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xun E; Adderley, Shaquria P; Breslin, Jerome W

    2016-01-01

    Compromised endothelial barrier function is a hallmark of inflammation. Rho family GTPases are critical in regulating endothelial barrier function, yet their precise roles, particularly in sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-induced endothelial barrier enhancement, remain elusive. Confluent cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) or human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) were used to model the endothelial barrier. Barrier function was assessed by determining the transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) using an electrical cell-substrate impedance sensor (ECIS). The roles of Rac1 and RhoA were tested in S1P-induced barrier enhancement. The results show that pharmacologic inhibition of Rac1 with Z62954982 failed to block S1P-induced barrier enhancement. Likewise, expression of a dominant negative form of Rac1, or knockdown of native Rac1 with siRNA, failed to block S1P-induced elevations in TER. In contrast, blockade of RhoA with the combination of the inhibitors Rhosin and Y16 significantly reduced S1P-induced increases in TER. Assessment of RhoA activation in real time using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor showed that S1P increased RhoA activation primarily at the edges of cells, near junctions. This was complemented by myosin light chain-2 phosphorylation at cell edges, and increased F-actin and vinculin near intercellular junctions, which could all be blocked with pharmacologic inhibition of RhoA. The results suggest that S1P causes activation of RhoA at the cell periphery, stimulating local activation of the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, and resulting in endothelial barrier enhancement. S1P-induced Rac1 activation, however, does not appear to have a significant role in this process.

  4. The GTPase-activating protein n-chimaerin cooperates with Rac1 and Cdc42Hs to induce the formation of lamellipodia and filopodia.

    PubMed Central

    Kozma, R; Ahmed, S; Best, A; Lim, L

    1996-01-01

    n-Chimaerin is a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) mainly for Rac1 and less so for Cdc42Hs in vitro. The GAP activity of n-chimaerin is regulated by phospholipids and phorbol esters. Microinjection of Rac1 and Cdc42Hs into mammalian cells induces formation of the actin-based structures lamellipodia and filopodia, respectively, with the former being prevented by coinjection of the chimaerin GAP domain. Strikingly, microinjection of the full-length n-chimaerin into fibroblasts and neuroblastoma cells induces the simultaneous formation of lamellipodia and filopodia. These structures undergo cycles of dissolution and formation, resembling natural morphological events occurring at the leading edge of fibroblasts and neuronal growth cones. The effects of n-chimaerin on formation of lamellipodia and filopodia were inhibited by dominant negative Rac1(T17N) and Cdc42Hs(T17N), respectively. n-Chimaerin's effects were also inhibited by coinjection with Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor or by treatment with phorbol ester. A mutant n-chimaerin with no GAP activity and impaired p21 binding was ineffective in inducing morphological changes, while a mutant lacking GAP activity alone was effective. Microinjected n-chimaerin colocalized in situ with F-actin. Taken together, these results suggest that n-chimaerin acts synergistically with Rac1 and Cdc42Hs to induce actin-based morphological changes and that this action involves Rac1 and Cdc42Hs binding but not GAP activity. Thus, GAPs may have morphological functions in addition to downregulation of GTPases. PMID:8756665

  5. Inhibition of endothelial nitric oxyde synthase increases capillary formation via Rac1-dependent induction of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Petry, Andreas; BelAiba, Rachida S; Weitnauer, Michae; Görlach, Agnes

    2012-11-01

    Disruption of endothelial homeostasis results in endothelial dysfunction, characterised by a dysbalance between nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels often accompanied by a prothrombotic and proproliferative state. The serine protease thrombin not only is instrumental in formation of the fibrin clot, but also exerts direct effects on the vessel wall by activating proliferative and angiogenic responses. In endothelial cells, thrombin can induce NO as well as ROS levels. However, the relative contribution of these reactive species to the angiogenic response towards thrombin is not completely clear. Since plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), a direct target of the proangiogenic transcription factors hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), exerts prothrombotic and proangiogenic activities we investigated the role of ROS and NO in the regulation of HIF-1α, PAI-1 and capillary formation in response to thrombin. Thrombin enhanced the formation of NO as well as ROS generation involving the GTPase Rac1 in endothelial cells. Rac1-dependent ROS formation promoted induction of HIF-1α, PAI-1 and capillary formation by thrombin, while NO reduced ROS bioavailability and subsequently limited induction of HIF-1α, PAI-1 and the angiogenic response. Importantly, thrombin activation of Rac1 was diminished by NO, but enhanced by ROS. Thus, our findings show that capillary formation induced by thrombin via Rac1-dependent activation of HIF-1 and PAI-1 is limited by the concomitant release of NO which reduced ROS bioavailability. Rac1 activity is sensitive to ROS and NO, thereby playing an essential role in fine tuning the endothelial response to thrombin.

  6. RAC1b overexpression stimulates proliferation and NF-kB-mediated anti-apoptotic signaling in thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Faria, Márcia; Matos, Paulo; Pereira, Teresa; Cabrera, Rafael; Cardoso, Bruno A; Bugalho, Maria João; Silva, Ana Luísa

    2017-01-01

    Overexpression of tumor-associated RAC1b has been recently highlighted as one of the most promising targets for therapeutic intervention in colon, breast, lung and pancreatic cancer. RAC1b is a hyperactive variant of the small GTPase RAC1 and has been recently shown to be overexpressed in a subset of papillary thyroid carcinomas associated with unfavorable outcome. Using the K1 PTC derived cell line as an in vitro model, we observed that both RAC1 and RAC1b were able to induce a significant increase on NF-kB and cyclin D1 reporter activity. A clear p65 nuclear localization was found in cells transfected with RAC1b-WT, confirming NF-kB canonical pathway activation. Consistently, we observed a RAC1b-mediated decrease in IκBα (NF-kB inhibitor) protein levels. Moreover, we show that RAC1b overexpression stimulates G1/S progression and protects thyroid cells against induced apoptosis, the latter through a process involving the NF-kB pathway. Present data support previous findings suggesting an important role for RAC1b in the development of follicular cell-derived thyroid malignancies and point out NF-kB activation as one of the molecular mechanisms associated with the pro-tumorigenic advantage of RAC1b overexpression in thyroid carcinomas.

  7. RAC1b overexpression stimulates proliferation and NF-kB-mediated anti-apoptotic signaling in thyroid cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Márcia; Matos, Paulo; Pereira, Teresa; Cabrera, Rafael; Cardoso, Bruno A.; Bugalho, Maria João

    2017-01-01

    Overexpression of tumor-associated RAC1b has been recently highlighted as one of the most promising targets for therapeutic intervention in colon, breast, lung and pancreatic cancer. RAC1b is a hyperactive variant of the small GTPase RAC1 and has been recently shown to be overexpressed in a subset of papillary thyroid carcinomas associated with unfavorable outcome. Using the K1 PTC derived cell line as an in vitro model, we observed that both RAC1 and RAC1b were able to induce a significant increase on NF-kB and cyclin D1 reporter activity. A clear p65 nuclear localization was found in cells transfected with RAC1b-WT, confirming NF-kB canonical pathway activation. Consistently, we observed a RAC1b-mediated decrease in IκBα (NF-kB inhibitor) protein levels. Moreover, we show that RAC1b overexpression stimulates G1/S progression and protects thyroid cells against induced apoptosis, the latter through a process involving the NF-kB pathway. Present data support previous findings suggesting an important role for RAC1b in the development of follicular cell-derived thyroid malignancies and point out NF-kB activation as one of the molecular mechanisms associated with the pro-tumorigenic advantage of RAC1b overexpression in thyroid carcinomas. PMID:28234980

  8. Local extracellular matrix alignment directs cellular protrusion dynamics and migration through Rac1 and FAK.

    PubMed

    Carey, Shawn P; Goldblatt, Zachary E; Martin, Karen E; Romero, Bethsabe; Williams, Rebecca M; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A

    2016-08-08

    Cell migration within 3D interstitial microenvironments is sensitive to extracellular matrix (ECM) properties, but the mechanisms that regulate migration guidance by 3D matrix features remain unclear. To examine the mechanisms underlying the cell migration response to aligned ECM, which is prevalent at the tumor-stroma interface, we utilized time-lapse microscopy to compare the behavior of MDA-MB-231 breast adenocarcinoma cells within randomly organized and well-aligned 3D collagen ECM. We developed a novel experimental system in which cellular morphodynamics during initial 3D cell spreading served as a reductionist model for the complex process of matrix-directed 3D cell migration. Using this approach, we found that ECM alignment induced spatial anisotropy of cells' matrix probing by promoting protrusion frequency, persistence, and lengthening along the alignment axis and suppressing protrusion dynamics orthogonal to alignment. Preference for on-axis behaviors was dependent upon FAK and Rac1 signaling and translated across length and time scales such that cells within aligned ECM exhibited accelerated elongation, front-rear polarization, and migration relative to cells in random ECM. Together, these findings indicate that adhesive and protrusive signaling allow cells to respond to coordinated physical cues in the ECM, promoting migration efficiency and cell migration guidance by 3D matrix structure.

  9. Opposing effects of TIGAR- and RAC1-derived ROS on Wnt-driven proliferation in the mouse intestine.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Eric C; Lee, Pearl; Ceteci, Fatih; Nixon, Colin; Blyth, Karen; Sansom, Owen J; Vousden, Karen H

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in numerous cell responses, including proliferation, DNA damage, and cell death. Based on these disparate activities, both promotion and inhibition of ROS have been proposed for cancer therapy. However, how the ROS response is determined is not clear. We examined the activities of ROS in a model of Apc deletion, where loss of the Wnt target gene Myc both rescues APC loss and prevents ROS accumulation. Following APC loss, Myc has been shown to up-regulate RAC1 to promote proliferative ROS through NADPH oxidase (NOX). However, APC loss also increased the expression of TIGAR, which functions to limit ROS. To explore this paradox, we used three-dimensional (3D) cultures and in vivo models to show that deletion of TIGAR increased ROS damage and inhibited proliferation. These responses were suppressed by limiting damaging ROS but enhanced by lowering proproliferative NOX-derived ROS. Despite having opposing effects on ROS levels, loss of TIGAR and RAC1 cooperated to suppress intestinal proliferation following APC loss. Our results indicate that the pro- and anti-proliferative effects of ROS can be independently modulated in the same cell, with two key targets in the Wnt pathway functioning to integrate the different ROS signals for optimal cell proliferation.

  10. Nectin-4 mutations causing ectodermal dysplasia with syndactyly perturb the rac1 pathway and the kinetics of adherens junction formation.

    PubMed

    Fortugno, Paola; Josselin, Emmanuelle; Tsiakas, Konstantinos; Agolini, Emanuele; Cestra, Gianluca; Teson, Massimo; Santer, René; Castiglia, Daniele; Novelli, Giuseppe; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Kurth, Ingo; Lopez, Marc; Zambruno, Giovanna; Brancati, Francesco

    2014-08-01

    Defective nectin-1 and -4 have been implicated in ectodermal dysplasia (ED) syndromes with variably associated features including orofacial and limb defects. In particular, nectin-1 mutations cause cleft lip/palate ED (CLPED1; OMIM#225060), whereas defective nectin-4 is associated with ED-syndactyly syndrome (EDSS1; OMIM#613573). Although the broad phenotypic overlap suggests a common mode of action of nectin-1 and -4, little is known about the pathogenic mechanisms involved. We report the identification of, to our knowledge, a previously undescribed nectin-4 homozygous p.Val242Met missense mutation in a patient with EDSS1. We used patient skin biopsy and primary keratinocytes, as well as nectin-4 ectopic expression in epithelial cell lines, to characterize functional consequences of p.Val242Met and p.Thr185Met mutations, the latter previously identified in compound heterozygosity with a truncating mutation. We show that nectin-4-altered expression perturbs nectin-1 clustering at keratinocyte contact sites and delays, but does not impede cell-cell aggregation and cadherin recruitment at adherens junctions (AJs). Moreover, trans-interaction of nectin-1 and -4 induces the activation of Rac1, a member of the Rho family of small GTPases, and regulates E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. These data outline a synergistic action of nectin-1 and -4 in the early steps of AJ formation and implicate this interaction in modulating the Rac1 signaling pathway.

  11. CD147 promotes Src-dependent activation of Rac1 signaling through STAT3/DOCK8 during the motility of hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Pu; Zhang, Yang; Fu, Zhi-Guang; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Jiang, Jian-Li

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is considered a dynamic process in tumor development that is related to abnormal migration and invasion. Tumor cells can move as individual cells in two interconvertible modes: mesenchymal-type and amoeboid. Previously, we reported that the interaction between CD147 and Annexin II can inhibit the amoeboid movement in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. However, the mechanism of CD147 involved in mesenchymal movement is still unclear. Notably, our results show overexpression of CD147 led to mesenchymal-type movement in HCC cells. Evidence indicated that the mesenchymal-type cell movement induced by CD147 was Src dependent, as observed by confocal microscopy and Rac1 activity assay. The phosphorylation of Src (pY416-Src) can be up-regulated by CD147, and this regulation is mediated by focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Next, we identified DOCK8 as a GEF for Rac1, a key molecule driving mesenchymal-type movement. We also found that Src promotes STAT3 phosphorylation and STAT3 facilitates DOCK8 transcription, thus enhancing DOCK8 expression and Rac1 activation. This study provides a novel mechanism of CD147 regulating mesenchymal-type movement in HCC cells. PMID:25428919

  12. CD147 promotes Src-dependent activation of Rac1 signaling through STAT3/DOCK8 during the motility of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shi-Jie; Cui, Hong-Yong; Liu, Yan-Mei; Zhao, Pu; Zhang, Yang; Fu, Zhi-Guang; Chen, Zhi-Nan; Jiang, Jian-Li

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is considered a dynamic process in tumor development that is related to abnormal migration and invasion. Tumor cells can move as individual cells in two interconvertible modes: mesenchymal-type and amoeboid. Previously, we reported that the interaction between CD147 and Annexin II can inhibit the amoeboid movement in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. However, the mechanism of CD147 involved in mesenchymal movement is still unclear. Notably, our results show overexpression of CD147 led to mesenchymal-type movement in HCC cells. Evidence indicated that the mesenchymal-type cell movement induced by CD147 was Src dependent, as observed by confocal microscopy and Rac1 activity assay. The phosphorylation of Src (pY416-Src) can be up-regulated by CD147, and this regulation is mediated by focal adhesion kinase (FAK). Next, we identified DOCK8 as a GEF for Rac1, a key molecule driving mesenchymal-type movement. We also found that Src promotes STAT3 phosphorylation and STAT3 facilitates DOCK8 transcription, thus enhancing DOCK8 expression and Rac1 activation. This study provides a novel mechanism of CD147 regulating mesenchymal-type movement in HCC cells.

  13. miR-101 inhibits cell proliferation by targeting Rac1 in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    LIN, XIAOJIE; GUAN, HONGYU; LI, HAI; LIU, LIEHUA; LIU, JUAN; WEI, GUOHONG; HUANG, ZHIMIN; LIAO, ZHIHONG; LI, YANBING

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that some microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) progression. However, it remains necessary to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms involved. In the present study, we investigated the role of microRNA-101 (miR-101) in PTC via targeting of Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1). The results showed that miR-101 was significantly downregulated in PTC tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues. Restoration of miR-101 expression significantly inhibited cell proliferation in the K1 PTC cell line. Moreover, algorithm-based and experimental strategies verified Rac1 as a direct target of miR-101 in the K1 cell line. Taken together, these findings suggest that miR-101 inhibited PTC growth via the downregulation of Rac1 expression, providing a better understanding of miRNA-modulated signaling networks for future cancer therapeutics. PMID:24649082

  14. Rac-1 as a new therapeutic target in cerebro- and cardio-vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Carrizzo, Albino; Forte, Maurizio; Lembo, Maria; Formisano, Luigi; Puca, Annibale A; Vecchione, Carmine

    2014-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a prominent role in the development of cardio- and cerebro-vascular diseases. Among the mechanisms identified to produce oxidative stress in the vascular wall, those mediated by membrane-bound NAD(P)H oxidases represent a major one. NAD(P)H oxidases are a family of enzymes that generate ROS both in phagocytic and non-phagocytic cell types. Vascular NAD(P)H oxidase contains the membrane-bound subunits Nox1, Nox2 (gp91phox), Nox4 and p22phox, the catalytic site of the oxidase, and the cytosolic components p47phox and p67phox. Rac1 (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate1) is a small GTPase essential for the assembly and activation of NADPH oxidase. Several molecular and cellular studies have reported the involvement of Rac1 in different cardiovascular pathologies, such as vascular smooth muscle proliferation, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, endothelial cell shape change, atherosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction in hypertension. In addition, increased activation of NADPH oxidase by Rac1 has been reported in animals and humans after myocardial infarction and heart failure. The Rac1/NADPH pathway has also been found involved in different pathologies of the cerebral district, such as ischemic stroke, cognitive impairment, subaracnoid hemorrhage and neuronal oxidative damage typical of several neurodegenerative disorders. In addition, thrombotic events are an important step in the onset of cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases. Rac1 has been found involved also in platelet activation, inducing actin polymerization and lamellipodia formation, which are necessary steps for platelet aggregation. Taken together, the evidence candidates Rac1 as a new pharmacological target of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. Although the involvement of Rac1 in the beneficial pleiotropic effects of drugs such as statins is well known, and the onset of numerous side effects has raised concern for the

  15. Junctional actin assembly is mediated by Formin-like 2 downstream of Rac1

    PubMed Central

    Grikscheit, Katharina; Frank, Tanja; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial integrity is vitally important, and its deregulation causes early stage cancer. De novo formation of an adherens junction (AJ) between single epithelial cells requires coordinated, spatial actin dynamics, but the mechanisms steering nascent actin polymerization for cell–cell adhesion initiation are not well understood. Here we investigated real-time actin assembly during daughter cell–cell adhesion formation in human breast epithelial cells in 3D environments. We identify formin-like 2 (FMNL2) as being specifically required for actin assembly and turnover at newly formed cell–cell contacts as well as for human epithelial lumen formation. FMNL2 associates with components of the AJ complex involving Rac1 activity and the FMNL2 C terminus. Optogenetic control of Rac1 in living cells rapidly drove FMNL2 to epithelial cell–cell contact zones. Furthermore, Rac1-induced actin assembly and subsequent AJ formation critically depends on FMNL2. These data uncover FMNL2 as a driver for human epithelial AJ formation downstream of Rac1. PMID:25963818

  16. Rac1-mediated membrane raft localization of PI3K/p110β is required for its activation by GPCRs or PTEN loss.

    PubMed

    Cizmecioglu, Onur; Ni, Jing; Xie, Shaozhen; Zhao, Jean J; Roberts, Thomas M

    2016-10-04

    We aimed to understand how spatial compartmentalization in the plasma membrane might contribute to the functions of the ubiquitous class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) isoforms, p110α and p110β. We found that p110β localizes to membrane rafts in a Rac1-dependent manner. This localization potentiates Akt activation by G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Thus genetic targeting of a Rac1 binding-deficient allele of p110β to rafts alleviated the requirement for p110β-Rac1 association for GPCR signaling, cell growth and migration. In contrast, p110α, which does not play a physiological role in GPCR signaling, is found to reside in nonraft regions of the plasma membrane. Raft targeting of p110α allowed its EGFR-mediated activation by GPCRs. Notably, p110β dependent, PTEN null tumor cells critically rely upon raft-associated PI3K activity. Collectively, our findings provide a mechanistic account of how membrane raft localization regulates differential activation of distinct PI3K isoforms and offer insight into why PTEN-deficient cancers depend on p110β.

  17. Rac1-mediated membrane raft localization of PI3K/p110β is required for its activation by GPCRs or PTEN loss

    PubMed Central

    Cizmecioglu, Onur; Ni, Jing; Xie, Shaozhen; Zhao, Jean J; Roberts, Thomas M

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to understand how spatial compartmentalization in the plasma membrane might contribute to the functions of the ubiquitous class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) isoforms, p110α and p110β. We found that p110β localizes to membrane rafts in a Rac1-dependent manner. This localization potentiates Akt activation by G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Thus genetic targeting of a Rac1 binding-deficient allele of p110β to rafts alleviated the requirement for p110β-Rac1 association for GPCR signaling, cell growth and migration. In contrast, p110α, which does not play a physiological role in GPCR signaling, is found to reside in nonraft regions of the plasma membrane. Raft targeting of p110α allowed its EGFR-mediated activation by GPCRs. Notably, p110β dependent, PTEN null tumor cells critically rely upon raft-associated PI3K activity. Collectively, our findings provide a mechanistic account of how membrane raft localization regulates differential activation of distinct PI3K isoforms and offer insight into why PTEN-deficient cancers depend on p110β. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17635.001 PMID:27700986

  18. Spatio-temporal co-ordination of RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 activation during prototypical edge protrusion and retraction dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Katrin; Reimann, Andreas; Fritz, Rafael D.; Ryu, Hyunryul; Jeon, Noo Li; Pertz, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The three canonical Rho GTPases RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 co-ordinate cytoskeletal dynamics. Recent studies indicate that all three Rho GTPases are activated at the leading edge of motile fibroblasts, where their activity fluctuates at subminute time and micrometer length scales. Here, we use a microfluidic chip to acutely manipulate fibroblast edge dynamics by applying pulses of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) or the Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 (which lowers contractility). This induces acute and robust membrane protrusion and retraction events, that exhibit stereotyped cytoskeletal dynamics, allowing us to fairly compare specific morphodynamic states across experiments. Using a novel Cdc42, as well as previously described, second generation RhoA and Rac1 biosensors, we observe distinct spatio-temporal signaling programs that involve all three Rho GTPases, during protrusion/retraction edge dynamics. Our results suggest that Rac1, Cdc42 and RhoA regulate different cytoskeletal and adhesion processes to fine tune the highly plastic edge protrusion/retraction dynamics that power cell motility. PMID:26912264

  19. Disruption of ArhGAP15 results in hyperactive Rac1, affects the architecture and function of hippocampal inhibitory neurons and causes cognitive deficits

    PubMed Central

    Zamboni, Valentina; Armentano, Maria; Sarò, Gabriella; Ciraolo, Elisa; Ghigo, Alessandra; Germena, Giulia; Umbach, Alessandro; Valnegri, Pamela; Passafaro, Maria; Carabelli, Valentina; Gavello, Daniela; Bianchi, Veronica; D’Adamo, Patrizia; de Curtis, Ivan; El-Assawi, Nadia; Mauro, Alessandro; Priano, Lorenzo; Ferri, Nicola; Hirsch, Emilio; Merlo, Giorgio R.

    2016-01-01

    During brain development, the small GTPases Rac1/Rac3 play key roles in neuronal migration, neuritogenesis, synaptic formation and plasticity, via control of actin cytoskeleton dynamic. Their activity is positively and negatively regulated by GEFs and GAPs molecules, respectively. However their in vivo roles are poorly known. The ArhGAP15 gene, coding for a Rac-specific GAP protein, is expressed in both excitatory and inhibitory neurons of the adult hippocampus, and its loss results in the hyperactivation of Rac1/Rac3. In the CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the ArhGAP15 mutant hippocampus the CR+, PV+ and SST+ inhibitory neurons are reduced in number, due to reduced efficiency and directionality of their migration, while pyramidal neurons are unaffected. Loss of ArhGAP15 alters neuritogenesis and the balance between excitatory and inhibitory synapses, with a net functional result consisting in increased spike frequency and bursts, accompanied by poor synchronization. Thus, the loss of ArhGAP15 mainly impacts on interneuron-dependent inhibition. Adult ArhGAP15−/− mice showed defective hippocampus-dependent functions such as working and associative memories. These findings indicate that a normal architecture and function of hippocampal inhibitory neurons is essential for higher hippocampal functions, and is exquisitely sensitive to ArhGAP15-dependent modulation of Rac1/Rac3. PMID:27713499

  20. Disruption of ArhGAP15 results in hyperactive Rac1, affects the architecture and function of hippocampal inhibitory neurons and causes cognitive deficits.

    PubMed

    Zamboni, Valentina; Armentano, Maria; Sarò, Gabriella; Ciraolo, Elisa; Ghigo, Alessandra; Germena, Giulia; Umbach, Alessandro; Valnegri, Pamela; Passafaro, Maria; Carabelli, Valentina; Gavello, Daniela; Bianchi, Veronica; D'Adamo, Patrizia; de Curtis, Ivan; El-Assawi, Nadia; Mauro, Alessandro; Priano, Lorenzo; Ferri, Nicola; Hirsch, Emilio; Merlo, Giorgio R

    2016-10-07

    During brain development, the small GTPases Rac1/Rac3 play key roles in neuronal migration, neuritogenesis, synaptic formation and plasticity, via control of actin cytoskeleton dynamic. Their activity is positively and negatively regulated by GEFs and GAPs molecules, respectively. However their in vivo roles are poorly known. The ArhGAP15 gene, coding for a Rac-specific GAP protein, is expressed in both excitatory and inhibitory neurons of the adult hippocampus, and its loss results in the hyperactivation of Rac1/Rac3. In the CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) regions of the ArhGAP15 mutant hippocampus the CR+, PV+ and SST+ inhibitory neurons are reduced in number, due to reduced efficiency and directionality of their migration, while pyramidal neurons are unaffected. Loss of ArhGAP15 alters neuritogenesis and the balance between excitatory and inhibitory synapses, with a net functional result consisting in increased spike frequency and bursts, accompanied by poor synchronization. Thus, the loss of ArhGAP15 mainly impacts on interneuron-dependent inhibition. Adult ArhGAP15(-/-) mice showed defective hippocampus-dependent functions such as working and associative memories. These findings indicate that a normal architecture and function of hippocampal inhibitory neurons is essential for higher hippocampal functions, and is exquisitely sensitive to ArhGAP15-dependent modulation of Rac1/Rac3.

  1. Inhibitory effect of capsaicin on B16-F10 melanoma cell migration via the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/Rac1 signal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Ok-Hee; Jun, Hye-Seung

    2008-01-01

    Capsaicin (trans-8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide), the major pungent ingredient of red pepper, has been reported to possess anti-carcinogenic and anti-mutagenic activities. In this study, the anti-migration activity of capsaicin on highly metastatic B16-F10 melanoma cells was investigated. Capsaicin significantly inhibited the migration of melanoma cells without showing obvious cellular cytotoxicity at low doses. This effect correlated with the down-regulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) and its downstream target, Akt. Although B16-F10 cell migration was increased by the PI3-K activator through the activation of Akt, these PI3-K activator-induced phenomena were attenuated by capsaicin. Moreover, capsaicin was found to significantly inhibit Rac1 activity in a pull-down assay. These results demonstrate that capsaicin inhibits the migration of B16-F10 cells through the inhibition of the PI3-K/Akt/Rac1 signal pathway. The present investigation suggests that capsaicin targets PI3-K/Akt/Rac1-mediated cellular events in B16-F10 melanoma cells. Consequently, capsaicin administration should be considered an effective approach for the suppression of invasion and metastasis in malignant melanoma chemotherapy. PMID:18985006

  2. NSC23766, a widely used inhibitor of Rac1 activation, additionally acts as a competitive antagonist at muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    PubMed

    Levay, Magdolna; Krobert, Kurt Allen; Wittig, Karola; Voigt, Niels; Bermudez, Marcel; Wolber, Gerhard; Dobrev, Dobromir; Levy, Finn Olav; Wieland, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Small molecules interfering with Rac1 activation are considered as potential drugs and are already studied in animal models. A widely used inhibitor without reported attenuation of RhoA activity is NSC23766 [(N(6)-[2-[[4-(diethylamino)-1-methylbutyl]amino]-6-methyl-4-pyrimidinyl]-2-methyl-4,6-quinolinediamine trihydrochloride]. We found that NSC23766 inhibits the M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 mAChR)-induced Rac1 activation in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. Surprisingly, NSC27366 concomitantly suppressed the carbachol-induced RhoA activation and a M2 mAChR-induced inotropic response in isolated neonatal rat hearts requiring the activation of Rho-dependent kinases. We therefore aimed to identify the mechanisms by which NSC23766 interferes with the differentially mediated, M2 mAChR-induced responses. Interestingly, NSC23766 caused a rightward shift of the carbachol concentration response curve for the positive inotropic response without modifying carbachol efficacy. To analyze the specificity of NSC23766, we compared the carbachol and the similarly Giβγ-mediated, adenosine-induced activation of Gi protein-regulated potassium channel (GIRK) channels in human atrial myocytes. Application of NSC23766 blocked the carbachol-induced K(+) current but had no effect on the adenosine-induced GIRK current. Similarly, an adenosine A1 receptor-induced positive inotropic response in neonatal rat hearts was not attenuated by NSC23766. To investigate its specificity toward the different mAChR types, we studied the carbachol-induced elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK-293) cells expressing M1, M2, or M3 mAChRs. NSC23766 caused a concentration-dependent rightward shift of the carbachol concentration response curves at all mAChRs. Thus, NSC23766 is not only an inhibitor of Rac1 activation, but it is within the same concentration range a competitive antagonist at mAChRs. Molecular docking analysis at M2 and M3 mAChR crystal

  3. Rac-1 and Raf-1 kinases, components of distinct signaling pathways, activate myotonic dystrophy protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.; Wang, W.; Walch, E. T.; Dunne, P. W.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) is a serine-threonine protein kinase encoded by the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus on human chromosome 19q13.3. It is a close relative of other kinases that interact with members of the Rho family of small GTPases. We show here that the actin cytoskeleton-linked GTPase Rac-1 binds to DMPK, and coexpression of Rac-1 and DMPK activates its transphosphorylation activity in a GTP-sensitive manner. DMPK can also bind Raf-1 kinase, the Ras-activated molecule of the MAP kinase pathway. Purified Raf-1 kinase phosphorylates and activates DMPK. The interaction of DMPK with these distinct signals suggests that it may play a role as a nexus for cross-talk between their respective pathways and may partially explain the remarkable pleiotropy of DM.

  4. Nuclear PKCι-ECT2-Rac1 and Ribosome Biogenesis: A Novel Axis in Lung Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Baker, Martin J; Cooke, Mariana; Kazanietz, Marcelo G

    2017-02-13

    The RhoGEF Ect2 controls cell division and exerts oncogenic functions in multiple cancers. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Justilien et al. report that Ect2 is required for lung tumorigenesis and identified a role for this GEF in ribosomal RNA (rRNA) synthesis that is mediated by Rac1 and PKCι-dependent phosphorylation.

  5. Establishing epithelial glandular polarity: interlinked roles for ARF6, Rac1, and the matrix microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Monteleon, Christine L; Sedgwick, Alanna; Hartsell, Alyssa; Dai, Michael; Whittington, Catherine; Voytik-Harbin, Sherry; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2012-12-01

    Epithelial cysts comprise the structural units of the glandular epithelium. Although glandular inversion in epithelial tumors is thought to be a potential mechanism for the establishment of metastatic disease, little is known about the morphogenic cues and signaling pathways that govern glandular polarity and organization. Using organotypic cultures of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells in reconstituted basement membrane, we show that cellular depletion of the small GTP-binding protein ARF6 promotes the formation of inverted cysts, wherein the apical cell membrane faces the cyst exterior, and the basal domain faces the central lumen, while individual cell polarity is maintained. These cysts are also defective in interactions with laminin at the cyst-matrix interface. This inversion of glandular orientation is accompanied by Rac1 inactivation during early cystogenesis, and temporal activation of Rac1 is sufficient to recover the normal cyst phenotype. In an unnatural collagen I microenvironment, ARF6-depleted, inverted epithelial cysts exhibit some loss of cell polarity, a marked increase in Rho activation and Rac1 inactivation, and striking rearrangement of the surrounding collagen I matrix. These studies demonstrate the importance of ARF6 as a critical determinant of glandular orientation and the matrix environment in dictating structural organization of epithelial cysts.

  6. Involvement of a Rac1-Dependent Macropinocytosis Pathway in Plasmid DNA Delivery by Electrotransfection.

    PubMed

    Mao, Mao; Wang, Liangli; Chang, Chun-Chi; Rothenberg, Katheryn E; Huang, Jianyong; Wang, Yingxiao; Hoffman, Brenton D; Liton, Paloma B; Yuan, Fan

    2017-03-01

    Electrotransfection is a widely used method for delivering genes into cells with electric pulses. Although different hypotheses have been proposed, the mechanism of electrotransfection remains controversial. Previous studies have indicated that uptake and intracellular trafficking of plasmid DNA (pDNA) are mediated by endocytic pathways, but it is still unclear which pathways are directly involved in the delivery. To this end, the present study investigated the dependence of electrotransfection on macropinocytosis. Data from the study demonstrated that electric pulses induced cell membrane ruffling and actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Using fluorescently labeled pDNA and a macropinocytosis marker (i.e., dextran), the study showed that electrotransfected pDNA co-localized with dextran in intracellular vesicles. Furthermore, electrotransfection efficiency could be decreased significantly by reducing temperature or treatment of cells with a pharmacological inhibitor of Rac1 and could be altered by changing Rac1 activity. Taken together, the findings suggested that electrotransfection of pDNA involved Rac1-dependent macropinocytosis.

  7. Rac1 and Cdc42 but not RhoA or Rho kinase activities are required for neurite outgrowth induced by the Netrin-1 receptor DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer) in N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaodong; Saint-Cyr-Proulx, Etienne; Aktories, Klaus; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie

    2002-04-26

    Netrins are chemotropic guidance cues that attract or repel growing axons during development. DCC (deleted in colorectal cancer), a transmembrane protein that is a receptor for netrin-1, is implicated in mediating both responses. However, the mechanism by which this is achieved remains unclear. Here we report that Rho GTPases are required for embryonic spinal commissural axon outgrowth induced by netrin-1. Using N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells, we found that both Rac1 and Cdc42 activities are required for DCC-induced neurite outgrowth. In contrast, down-regulation of RhoA and its effector Rho kinase stimulates the ability of DCC to induce neurite outgrowth. In Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, DCC was found to trigger actin reorganization through activation of Rac1 but not Cdc42 or RhoA. We detected that stimulation of DCC receptors with netrin-1 resulted in a 4-fold increase in Rac1 activation. These results implicate the small GTPases Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA as essential components that participate in signaling the response of axons to netrin-1 during neural development.

  8. Rac1 overexpression is correlated with epithelial mesenchymal transition and predicts poor prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yujuan; Liao, Qianjin; Han, Yaqian; Chen, Jie; Liu, Zhigang; Ling, Hang; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Wenjuan; Oyang, Linda; Xia, Longzheng; Wang, Li; Wang, Heran; Xue, Lei; Wang, Hui; Hu, Bingqiang

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate1(Rac1) and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) are key therapeutic targets in cancer. We investigated the clinical significance of Rac1 and markers of EMT expression in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and their possible correlation with EMT phenotype. Methods: Immunohistochemistry was used to assess the expression of Rac1, Snail1, Twist1, N-cadherin (N-cad), Vimentin (Vim), and E-cadherin (E-cad) in 153 NSCLC paraffin-embedded specimens and 45 normal specimens adjacent to tumors. The correlation of Rac1 and EMT markers with clinicopathological characteristics and the relationship between the protein levels and progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed. Results: Compared with non-tumor tissues, the NSCLC tissues showed marked elevation in the levels of Rac1, Snail1, Twist1, N-cad, and Vim levels, whereas the E-cad levels were significantly decreased (P < 0.05). The aberrant expression of Rac1 and EMT markers was significantly associated with TNM stage and metastasis (P < 0.05). Increased expression of Rac1 may be associated with poor OS and PFS compared with low expression (P<0.001 and P=0.004). Significant correlations were observed between the EMT markers expressed and OS or PFS(P<0.01). In addition, multivariate analysis indicated that the expression of Rac1, Snail1, Twist1, N-cad, Vim, and E-cad was an independent prognostic factor in NSCLC. Interestingly, Rac1 expression was positively correlated with Snail1, Twist1, N-cad, and Vim levels (r=0.563, r=0.440, r=0.247 r=0.536, P<0.01, respectively) and negatively correlated with E-cad levels (r=-0.464, P<0.001) in NSCLC tissues. Rac1, Twist, Snail1, Vim and N-cad were highly expressed in lung cancer patients resistant to radiotherapy, while E-cad was poorly expressed. Conclusion: Rac1 may promote NSCLC progression and metastasis via EMT, which may be considered as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:27877226

  9. Prelamin A Accumulation Attenuates Rac1 Activity and Increases the Intrinsic Migrational Persistence of Aged Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Lauren J.; Holt, Mark R.; Soong, Daniel; Shanahan, Catherine M.; Warren, Derek T.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) motility is essential during both physiological and pathological vessel remodeling. Although ageing has emerged as a major risk factor in the development of cardiovascular disease, our understanding of the impact of ageing on VSMC motility remains limited. Prelamin A accumulation is known to drive VSMC ageing and we show that presenescent VSMCs, that have accumulated prelamin A, display increased focal adhesion dynamics, augmented migrational velocity/persistence and attenuated Rac1 activity. Importantly, prelamin A accumulation in proliferative VSMCs, induced by depletion of the prelamin A processing enzyme FACE1, recapitulated the focal adhesion, migrational persistence and Rac1 phenotypes observed in presenescent VSMCs. Moreover, lamin A/C-depleted VSMCs also display reduced Rac1 activity, suggesting that prelamin A influences Rac1 activity by interfering with lamin A/C function at the nuclear envelope. Taken together, these data demonstrate that lamin A/C maintains Rac1 activity in VSMCs and prelamin A disrupts lamin A/C function to reduce Rac1 activity and induce migrational persistence during VSMC ageing. PMID:27854297

  10. The small Rho GTPase Rac1 controls normal human dermal fibroblasts proliferation with phosphorylation of the oncoprotein c-myc

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolova, Ekaterina; Mitev, Vanio; Zhelev, Nikolai; Deroanne, Christophe F. . E-mail: yves.poumay@fundp.ac.be

    2007-08-03

    Proliferation of dermal fibroblasts is crucial for the maintenance of skin. The small Rho GTPase, Rac1, has been identified as a key transducer of proliferative signals in various cell types, but in normal human dermal fibroblasts its significance to cell growth control has not been studied. In this study, we applied the method of RNA interference to suppress endogenous Rac1 expression and examined the consequences on human skin fibroblasts. Rac1 knock-down resulted in inhibition of DNA synthesis. This effect was not mediated by inhibition of the central transducer of proliferative stimuli, ERK1/2 or by activation of the pro-apoptotic p38. Rather, as a consequence of the suppressed Rac1 expression we observed a significant decrease in phosphorylation of c-myc, revealing for the first time that in human fibroblasts Rac1 exerts control on proliferation through c-myc phosphorylation. Thus Rac1 activates proliferation of normal fibroblasts through stimulation of c-myc phosphorylation without affecting ERK1/2 activity.

  11. Roles of Rac1 and Rac3 GTPases during the development of cortical and hippocampal GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    de Curtis, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Rac GTPases are regulators of the cytoskeleton that play an important role in several aspects of neuronal and brain development. Two distinct Rac GTPases are expressed in the developing nervous system, the widely expressed Rac1 and the neural-specific Rac3 proteins. Recent experimental evidence supports a central role of these two Rac proteins in the development of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons, important modulatory elements of the brain circuitry. The combined inactivation of the genes for the two Rac proteins has profound effects on distinct aspects of interneuron development, and has highlighted a synergistic contribution of the two proteins to the postmitotic maturation of specific populations of cortical and hippocampal interneurons. Rac function is modulated by different types of regulators, and can influence the activity of specific effectors. Some of these proteins have been associated to the development and maturation of interneurons. Cortical interneuron dysfunction is implicated in several neurological and psychiatric diseases characterized by cognitive impairment. Therefore the description of the cellular processes regulated by the Rac GTPases, and the identification of the molecular networks underlying these processes during interneuron development is relevant to the understanding of the role of GABAergic interneurons in cognitive functions.

  12. Whither tobacco product regulation?

    PubMed

    McNeill, Ann; Hammond, David; Gartner, Coral

    2012-03-01

    Despite decades of industry innovation and regulatory efforts, the harmfulness of conventional cigarettes has not changed. There are several pitfalls in this area, including the long time lag before health impacts of product regulatory changes become apparent, the danger of consumers deriving false reassurance of lesser harm in the interim period, the lack of relevant expertise and the lack of an internationally agreed and evidence-based strategic approach. Articles 9 and 10 of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control provide the potential for such a global strategy, and knowledge and research has increased significantly over recent years. However, there are huge opportunity costs in implementing product disclosure and regulatory strategies: most national regulators have very limited human and financial resources, which should be focused on other evidence-based tobacco control interventions. We believe therefore that it is now time to abandon the notion of safe or safer cigarettes while moving consumers towards cleaner nicotine products as soon as possible. In parallel to this, we recommend a number of other strategies be implemented including: reducing the appeal of all tobacco products, forbidding new tobacco products or brand variants being marketed without evidence of reduced harm, appeal or addictiveness, and developing a tobacco industry resourced, but industry independent, Framework Convention on Tobacco Control global repository to assist national regulators in understanding and regulating the products on their markets.

  13. Disease-causing mutations of RhoGDIα induce Rac1 hyperactivation in podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Auguste, David; Maier, Mirela; Baldwin, Cindy; Aoudjit, Lamine; Robins, Richard; Gupta, Indra R.; Takano, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nephrotic syndrome (NS) describes a group of kidney disorders in which there is injury to podocyte cells, specialized cells within the kidney's glomerular filtration barrier, allowing proteins to leak into the urine. Three mutations in ARHGDIA, which encodes Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor α (GDIα), have been reported in patients with heritable NS and encode the following amino acid changes: ΔD185, R120X, and G173V. To investigate the impact of these mutations on podocyte function, endogenous GDIα was knocked-down in cultured podocytes by shRNA and then the cells were re-transfected with wild-type or mutant GDIα constructs. Among the 3 prototypical Rho-GTPases, Rac1 was markedly hyperactivated in podocytes with any of the 3 mutant forms of GDIα while the activation of RhoA and Cdc42 was modest and variable. All three mutant GDIα proteins resulted in slow podocyte motility, suggesting that podocytes are sensitive to the relative balance of Rho-GTPase activity. In ΔD185 podocytes, both random and directional movements were impaired and kymograph analysis of the leading edge showed increased protrusion and retraction of leading edge (phase switching). The mutant podocytes also showed impaired actin polymerization, smaller cell size, and increased cellular projections. In the developing kidney, GDIα expression increased as podocytes matured. Conversely, active Rac1 was detected only in immature, but not in mature, podocytes. The results indicate that GDIα has a critical role in suppressing Rac1 activity in mature podocytes, to prevent podocyte injury and nephrotic syndrome. PMID:26726844

  14. Novel Activities of Select NSAID R-Enantiomers against Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Oprea, Tudor I.; Sklar, Larry A.; Agola, Jacob O.; Guo, Yuna; Silberberg, Melina; Roxby, Joshua; Vestling, Anna; Romero, Elsa; Surviladze, Zurab; Murray-Krezan, Cristina; Waller, Anna; Ursu, Oleg; Hudson, Laurie G.; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Rho family GTPases (including Rac, Rho and Cdc42) collectively control cell proliferation, adhesion and migration and are of interest as functional therapeutic targets in numerous epithelial cancers. Based on high throughput screening of the Prestwick Chemical Library® and cheminformatics we identified the R-enantiomers of two approved drugs (naproxen and ketorolac) as inhibitors of Rac1 and Cdc42. The corresponding S-enantiomers are considered the active component in racemic drug formulations, acting as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with selective activity against cyclooxygenases. Here, we show that the S-enantiomers of naproxen and ketorolac are inactive against the GTPases. Additionally, more than twenty other NSAIDs lacked inhibitory action against the GTPases, establishing the selectivity of the two identified NSAIDs. R-naproxen was first identified as a lead compound and tested in parallel with its S-enantiomer and the non-chiral 6-methoxy-naphthalene acetic acid (active metabolite of nabumetone, another NSAID) as a structural series. Cheminformatics-based substructure analyses—using the rotationally constrained carboxylate in R-naproxen—led to identification of racemic [R/S] ketorolac as a suitable FDA-approved candidate. Cell based measurement of GTPase activity (in animal and human cell lines) demonstrated that the R-enantiomers specifically inhibit epidermal growth factor stimulated Rac1 and Cdc42 activation. The GTPase inhibitory effects of the R-enantiomers in cells largely mimic those of established Rac1 (NSC23766) and Cdc42 (CID2950007/ML141) specific inhibitors. Docking predicts that rotational constraints position the carboxylate moieties of the R-enantiomers to preferentially coordinate the magnesium ion, thereby destabilizing nucleotide binding to Rac1 and Cdc42. The S-enantiomers can be docked but are less favorably positioned in proximity to the magnesium. R-naproxen and R-ketorolac have potential for rapid translation and

  15. Differential Tiam1/Rac1 activation in hippocampal and cortical neurons mediates differential spine shrinkage in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Suárez, Elena; Fiuza, Maria; Liu, Xun; Chakkarapani, Elavazhagan; Hanley, Jonathan G

    2014-01-01

    Distinct neuronal populations show differential sensitivity to global ischemia, with hippocampal CA1 neurons showing greater vulnerability compared to cortical neurons. The mechanisms that underlie differential vulnerability are unclear, and we hypothesize that intrinsic differences in neuronal cell biology are involved. Dendritic spine morphology changes in response to ischemic insults in vivo, but cell type-specific differences and the molecular mechanisms leading to such morphologic changes are unexplored. To directly compare changes in spine size in response to oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) in cortical and hippocampal neurons, we used separate and equivalent cultures of each cell type. We show that cortical neurons exhibit significantly greater spine shrinkage compared to hippocampal neurons. Rac1 is a Rho-family GTPase that regulates the actin cytoskeleton and is involved in spine dynamics. We show that Rac1 and the Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Tiam1 are differentially activated by OGD in hippocampal and cortical neurons. Hippocampal neurons express more Tiam1 than cortical neurons, and reducing Tiam1 expression in hippocampal neurons by shRNA enhances OGD-induced spine shrinkage. Tiam1 knockdown also reduces hippocampal neuronal vulnerability to OGD. This work defines fundamental differences in signalling pathways that regulate spine morphology in distinct neuronal populations that may have a role in the differential vulnerability to ischemia. PMID:25248834

  16. MALAT1 functions as a competing endogenous RNA to mediate Rac1 expression by sequestering miR-101b in liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Fujun; Lu, Zhongqiu; Cai, Jing; Huang, Kate; Chen, Bicheng; Li, Guojun; Dong, Peihong; Zheng, Jianjian

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence shows that Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) plays a pivotal role in cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in tumors. However, the biological role and underlying mechanism of MALAT1 in liver fibrosis remains undefined. In this study, up-regulation of MALAT1 was observed in fibrotic liver tissues and in activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). In addition, depletion of MALAT1 inhibited the activation of HSCs in vitro and attenuated collagen deposits in vivo. Our results demonstrated that MALAT1 expression is negatively correlated with microRNA-101b (miR-101b) expression. Furthermore, there was a negative feedback loop between the levels of MALAT1 and miR-101b. Luciferase reporter assay indicated that MALAT1 and RAS-related C3 botulinum substrate 1 (Rac1) are targets of miR-101b. We uncovered that MALAT1 regulates Rac1 expression through miR-101b as a competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA), thereby influencing the proliferation, cell cycle and activation of primary HSCs. Collectively, The ceRNA regulatory network may prompt a better understanding of liver fibrogenesis and contribute to a novel therapeutic strategy for liver fibrosis. PMID:26697839

  17. Rac1 is deactivated at integrin activation sites through an IQGAP1–filamin-A–RacGAP1 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jacquemet, Guillaume; Morgan, Mark R.; Byron, Adam; Humphries, Jonathan D.; Choi, Colin K.; Chen, Christopher S.; Caswell, Patrick T.; Humphries, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Cell migration makes a fundamental contribution to both normal physiology and disease pathogenesis. Integrin engagement with extracellular ligands spatially controls, via the cyclical activation and deactivation of the small GTPase Rac1, the dynamic membrane protrusion and cytoskeletal reorganization events that are required for directional migration. Although the pathways that control integrin-mediated Rac1 activation are reasonably well defined, the mechanisms that are responsible for switching off activity are poorly understood. Here, proteomic analysis of activated integrin-associated complexes suggests filamin-A and IQ-motif-containing GTPase-activating protein 1 (IQGAP1) as candidates that link β1 integrin to Rac1. siRNA-mediated knockdown of either filamin-A or IQGAP1 induced high, dysregulated Rac1 activity during cell spreading on fibronectin. Using immunoprecipitation and immunocytochemistry, filamin-A and IQGAP1 were shown to be part of a complex that is recruited to active β1 integrin. Mass spectrometric analysis of individual filamin-A, IQGAP1 and Rac1 pull-downs and biochemical analysis, identified RacGAP1 as a novel IQGAP1 binding partner. Further immunoprecipitation and immunocytochemistry analyses demonstrated that RacGAP1 is recruited to IQGAP1 and active β1 integrin, and that suppression of RacGAP1 expression triggered elevated Rac1 activity during spreading on fibronectin. Consistent with these findings, reduced expression of filamin-A, IQGAP1 or RacGAP1 triggered unconstrained membrane protrusion and disrupted directional cell migration on fibrillar extracellular matrices. These findings suggest a model whereby integrin engagement, followed by filamin-A, IQGAP1 and RacGAP1 recruitment, deactivates Rac1 to constrain its activity spatially and thereby coordinate directional cell migration. PMID:23843620

  18. PTEN inhibits PREX2-catalyzed activation of RAC1 to restrain tumor cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Mense, Sarah M; Barrows, Douglas; Hodakoski, Cindy; Steinbach, Nicole; Schoenfeld, David; Su, William; Hopkins, Benjamin D; Su, Tao; Fine, Barry; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Parsons, Ramon

    2015-03-31

    The tumor suppressor PTEN restrains cell migration and invasion by a mechanism that is independent of inhibition of the PI3K pathway and decreased activation of the kinase AKT. PREX2, a widely distributed GEF that activates the GTPase RAC1, binds to and inhibits PTEN. We used mouse embryonic fibroblasts and breast cancer cell lines to show that PTEN suppresses cell migration and invasion by blocking PREX2 activity. In addition to metabolizing the phosphoinositide PIP₃, PTEN inhibited PREX2-induced invasion by a mechanism that required the tail domain of PTEN, but not its lipid phosphatase activity. Fluorescent nucleotide exchange assays revealed that PTEN inhibited the GEF activity of PREX2 toward RAC1. PREX2 is a frequently mutated GEF in cancer, and examination of human tumor data showed that PREX2 mutation was associated with high PTEN expression. Therefore, we tested whether cancer-derived somatic PREX2 mutants, which accelerate tumor formation of immortalized melanocytes, were inhibited by PTEN. The three stably expressed, somatic PREX2 cancer mutants that we tested were resistant to PTEN-mediated inhibition of invasion but retained the ability to inhibit the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN. In vitro analysis showed that PTEN did not block the GEF activity of two PREX2 cancer mutants and had a reduced binding affinity for the third. Thus, PTEN antagonized migration and invasion by restraining PREX2 GEF activity, and PREX2 mutants are likely selected in cancer to escape PTEN-mediated inhibition of invasion.

  19. Rac1 signaling in the establishment of the fucoid algal body plan

    PubMed Central

    Hable, Whitney E.

    2014-01-01

    Fucoid zygotes use environmental vectors, including sunlight, to initiate a growth axis a few hours after fertilization. The first division is then transversely oriented by the growth axis, producing daughter cells of distinct fates. The tip growing rhizoid cell gives rise to the holdfast, anchoring the alga to the intertidal substratum, while the opposite thallus cell mainly generates the photosynthetic and reproductive stipe and fronds. Elaboration of this simple growth axis thus establishes the basic body plan of the adult; and elucidating the mechanisms responsible for formation of the growth axis is paramount to understanding fucoid morphogenesis. Recent studies have culminated in a model whereby sunlight, and perhaps other environmental cues, activate the signaling protein Rac1 at the rhizoid pole. Here it sets in motion nucleation of a patch of actin filaments that in turn, targets ions, proteins, and cellular processes to the future growth site. At germination, Rac1 initiates morphogenesis by inducing transformation of the patch of actin filaments to a structure that delivers vesicles to the growing tip, and a few hours later orients the spindle and cytokinetic plate. PMID:25540648

  20. CCN1 promotes tumorigenicity through Rac1/Akt/NF-κB signaling pathway in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuqing; Deng, Yuezhen; Mao, Zhengfa; Ma, Xiaoyan; Fan, Xin; Cui, Lei; Qu, Jianguo; Xie, Dong; Zhang, Jianxin

    2012-10-01

    Aberrant CCN1 expression has been reported to play an important role in the tumor development. However, the pattern and the role of CCN1 in pancreatic cancer remain largely unknown. Therefore, we further deciphered the role CCN1 played in pancreatic cancer. We first evaluated the CCN1 expression in human pancreatic cancer tissues and pancreatic cancer cells. Then we forced expression and silenced CCN1 expression in pancreatic cancer cell lines MIA PaCa2 and PANC-1 respectively, using lentivirus vectors. We characterized the stable cells in vitro and in vivo using a nude mouse xenograft model. In this study, we found that CCN1 expression was significantly higher in cancer specimens which positively correlated with the expression level of phosphorylated Akt and p65. and poorer outcome. Moreover, our results demonstrated that CCN1 positively regulated pancreatic cell growth in vitro and in vivo and helped cancer cells resist to tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, we disclosed that activation of CCN1/ras-related c3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1)/V-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog (Akt)/nuclear factor-kappa B pathway inhibited apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cells. CCN1 is upregulated in pancreatic cancer and promotes the survival of pancreatic cancer cells. Taken together, these results indicate that CCN1 may be a potential target for pancreatic cancer therapy.

  1. Kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside from Afgekia mahidoliae promotes keratinocyte migration through FAK and Rac1 activation.

    PubMed

    Petpiroon, Nareerat; Suktap, Chalermlat; Pongsamart, Sunanta; Chanvorachote, Pithi; Sukrong, Suchada

    2015-07-01

    The restoration of the epidermal epithelium through re-epithelialization is a critical process in wound healing. Directed keratinocyte migration to the wound is required, and the retardation of this process may result in a chronic, non-healing wound. The present study contributes to research aiming to identify promising compounds that promote wound healing using a human keratinocyte model. The effects of three kaempferol glycosides from an Afgekia mahidoliae leaf extract, kaempferol-3-O-arabinoside, kaempferol-3-O-glucoside, and kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, on keratinocyte migration were determined. Interestingly, kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside exhibited a pronounced effect on wound closure in comparison to the parental kaempferol and other glycosides. The mechanism by which kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside enhances cell migration involves the induction of filopodia and lamellipodia formation, increased cellular levels of phosphorylated FAK (Tyr 397) and phosphorylated Akt (Ser 473), and up-regulation of active Rac1-GTP. The data obtained in this study may support the development of this compound for use in wound healing therapies.

  2. Rac1 GTPase-deficient HeLa cells present reduced DNA repair, proliferation, and survival under UV or gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Espinha, Gisele; Osaki, Juliana H; Magalhaes, Yuli T; Forti, Fabio Luis

    2015-06-01

    Rac1 GTPase controls essential cellular functions related to the cytoskeleton, such as motility and adhesion. Rac1 is overexpressed in many tumor cells, including breast cancers, where it is also involved in the proliferation and checkpoint control necessary for the cell's recovery after exposure to ionizing radiation. However, its role in DNA damage and repair remains obscure in other tumor cells and under different genotoxic conditions. Here, we compare HeLa cells with mutants exogenously expressing a dominant-negative Rac1 (HeLa-Rac1-N17) by their responses to DNA damage induced by gamma or UV radiation. In HeLa cells, these treatments led to increased levels of active Rac1 (Rac1-GTP) and of stress fibers, with a diminished ability to migrate compared to untreated cells. However, the reduction of Rac1-GTP in Rac1-N17-deficient clones resulted in much higher levels of polymerized stress fibers accompanied by a strong impairment of cell migration, even after both radiation treatments. With regard to proliferation and genomic stability, dominant-negative Rac1 cells were more sensitive to gamma and UV radiation, exhibiting reduced proliferation and survival consistent with increased DNA damage and delayed or reduced DNA repair observed in this Rac1-deficient clone. The DNA damage response, as indicated by pH2AX and pChk1 levels, was increased in HeLa cells but was not effectively triggered in the Rac1-N17 clone after radiation treatment, which is likely the main cause of DNA damage accumulation. These data suggest that Rac1 GTPase plays an important role in signaling and contributes to the sensitivity of cervical cancer cells under UV or gamma radiation treatments.

  3. Acid fibroblast growth factor preserves blood-brain barrier integrity by activating the PI3K-Akt-Rac1 pathway and inhibiting RhoA following traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fenzan; Chen, Zaifeng; Tang, Chonghui; Zhang, Jinjing; Cheng, Li; Zuo, Hongxia; Zhang, Hongyu; Chen, Daqing; Xiang, Liping; Xiao, Jian; Li, Xiaokun; Xu, Xinlong; Wei, Xiaojie

    2017-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays important roles in the recovery of traumatic brain injury (TBI) which is a major factor contributing to cerebral edema. Acid fibroblast growth factor (aFGF) contributes to maintain vascular integrity and restores nerve function. However, whether aFGF protects BBB following TBI remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether exogenous aFGF preserves BBB integrity by activating the PI3K-Akt-Rac1 pathway and inhibiting RhoA after TBI. BBB permeability was assessed using evans blue dye and fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran fluorescence. Neurofunctional tests, such as the garcia test, were conducted in a blinded fashion, and protein expression was evaluated via western blotting and immunofluorescence staining. Our results showed that aFGF improved neurofunctional deficits, preserved BBB integrity, and up-regulated tight junction proteins and adherens junction proteins 24 h after experimental TBI. However, the PI3K/Akt inhibitor LY294002 reversed the protective effects of aFGF on neurofunctional deficits and junction protein expression and significantly suppressed p-Akt and GTP-Rac1 activity. Furthermore, aFGF administration significantly decreased GTP-RhoA expression in the treated group compared with the vehicle group, while PI3K/Akt inhibition increased GTP-RhoA expression. Similar results were observed in vitro, as aFGF exerted protective effects on endothelial cell integrity by up-regulating junction proteins and PI3K-Akt-Rac1 pathway and down-regulating RhoA expression under oxygen-glucose deprivation/reoxygenation (OGD) conditions. These data suggest that exogenous aFGF reduces RhoA activity in part by activating the PI3K-Akt-Rac1 signaling pathway, thus improving neurofunctional deficits and preserving BBB integrity after TBI. PMID:28386321

  4. Tumor Cell-derived MMP-3 Orchestrates Rac1b and Tissue Alterations that Promote Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mehner, Christine; Miller, Erin; Khauv, Davitte; Nassar, Aziza; Oberg, Ann L.; Bamlet, William R.; Zhang, Lizhi; Waldmann, Jens; Radisky, Evette S.; Crawford, Howard C.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) arises at the convergence of genetic alterations in KRAS with a fostering microenvironment shaped by immune cell influx and fibrotic changes; identification of the earliest tumorigenic molecular mediators evokes the proverbial chicken and egg problem. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are key drivers of tumor progression that originate primarily from stromal cells activated by the developing tumor. Here matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3), known to be expressed in PDA, was found to be associated with expression of Rac1b, a tumorigenic splice isoform of Rac1, in all stages of pancreatic cancer. Using a large cohort of human PDA tissue biopsies specimens, both MMP3 and Rac1b are expressed in PDA cells, that the expression levels of the two markers are highly correlated, and that the subcellular distribution of Rac1b in PDA is significantly associated with patient outcome. Using transgenic mouse models, co-expression of MMP3 with activated KRAS in pancreatic acinar cells stimulates metaplasia and immune cell infiltration, priming the stromal microenvironment for early tumor development. Finally, exposure of cultured pancreatic cancer cells to recombinant MMP3 stimulates expression of Rac1b, increases cellular invasiveness, and activation of tumorigenic transcriptional profiles. Implications MMP3 acts as a co-conspirator of oncogenic KRAS in pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis and progression, both through Rac1b-mediated phenotypic control of pancreatic cancer cells themselves, and by giving rise to the tumorigenic microenvironment; these findings also point to inhibition of this pathway as a potential therapeutic strategy for pancreatic cancer. PMID:24850902

  5. Deletion of epidermal Rac1 inhibits HPV-8 induced skin papilloma formation and facilitates HPV-8- and UV-light induced skin carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Pfister, Herbert; Haase, Ingo

    2016-09-06

    Overexpression and increased activity of the small Rho GTPase Rac1 has been linked to squamous cell carcinoma of the epidermis and mucosa in humans. Targeted deletion of Rac1 or inhibition of Rac1 activity in epidermal keratinocytes reduced papilloma formation in a chemical skin carcinogenesis mouse model. However, a potential role of Rac1 in HPV- and UV-light induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far, solar UV radiation being an important carcinogen to the skin.To investigate this, we deleted Rac1 or modulated its activity in mice with transgenic expression of Human papilloma virus type-8 (HPV-8) in epidermal keratinocytes. Our data show that inhibition or deletion of Rac1 results in reduced papilloma formation upon UV-irradiation with a single dose, whereas constitutive activation of Rac1 strongly increases papilloma frequency in these mice. Surprisingly, we observed that, upon chronic UV-irradiation, the majority of mice with transgenic expression of HPV-8 and epidermis specific Rac1 deletion developed squamous cell carcinomas. Taken together, our data show that Rac1 exerts a dual role in skin carcinogenesis: its activation is, on one hand, required for HPV-8- and UV-light induced papilloma formation but, on the other, suppresses the development of squamous cell carcinomas.

  6. Deletion of epidermal Rac1 inhibits HPV-8 induced skin papilloma formation and facilitates HPV-8- and UV-light induced skin carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Deshmukh, Jayesh; Pofahl, Ruth; Pfister, Herbert; Haase, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression and increased activity of the small Rho GTPase Rac1 has been linked to squamous cell carcinoma of the epidermis and mucosa in humans. Targeted deletion of Rac1 or inhibition of Rac1 activity in epidermal keratinocytes reduced papilloma formation in a chemical skin carcinogenesis mouse model. However, a potential role of Rac1 in HPV- and UV-light induced skin carcinogenesis has not been investigated so far, solar UV radiation being an important carcinogen to the skin. To investigate this, we deleted Rac1 or modulated its activity in mice with transgenic expression of Human papilloma virus type-8 (HPV-8) in epidermal keratinocytes. Our data show that inhibition or deletion of Rac1 results in reduced papilloma formation upon UV-irradiation with a single dose, whereas constitutive activation of Rac1 strongly increases papilloma frequency in these mice. Surprisingly, we observed that, upon chronic UV-irradiation, the majority of mice with transgenic expression of HPV-8 and epidermis specific Rac1 deletion developed squamous cell carcinomas. Taken together, our data show that Rac1 exerts a dual role in skin carcinogenesis: its activation is, on one hand, required for HPV-8- and UV-light induced papilloma formation but, on the other, suppresses the development of squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:27506937

  7. Rac1-PAK2 pathway is essential for zebrafish heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiangwen; He, Quanze; Li, Guobao; Ma, Jinmin; Zhong, Tao P

    2016-04-15

    P-21 activated kinases, or PAKs, are serine-threonine kinases that play important roles in diverse heart functions include heart development, cardiovascular development and function in a range of models; however, the mechanisms by which PAKs mediate heart regeneration are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that PAK2 and PAK4 expression is induced in cardiomyocytes and vessels, respectively, following zebrafish heart injury. Inhibition of PAK2 and PAK4 using a specific small molecule inhibitor impedes cardiomyocyte proliferation/dedifferentiation and cardiovascular regeneration, respectively. Cdc42 is specifically expressed in the ventricle and may function upstream of PAK2 but not PAK4 under normal conditions and that cardiomyocyte proliferentation during heart regeneration relies on Rac1-mediated activation of Pak2. Our results indicate that PAKs play a key role in heart regeneration.

  8. Compromized geranylgeranylation of RhoA and Rac1 in mevalonate kinase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Henneman, L.; Schneiders, M. S.; Turkenburg, M.

    2010-01-01

    Mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD) is an autoinflammatory disorder caused by mutations in the MVK gene resulting in decreased activity of the enzyme mevalonate kinase (MK). Although MK is required for biosynthesis of all isoprenoids, in MKD, in particular, the timely synthesis of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate appears to be compromised. Because small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) depend on geranylgeranylation for their proper signaling function, we studied the effect of MK deficiency on geranylgeranylation and activation of the two small GTPases, RhoA and Rac1. We demonstrate that both geranylgeranylation and activation of the two GTPases are more easily disturbed in MKD cells than in control cells when the flux though the isoprenoid biosynthesis pathway is suppressed by low concentrations of simvastatin. The limited capacity of geranylgeranylation in MKD cells readily leads to markedly increased levels of nonisoprenylated and activated GTPases, which will affect proper signaling by these GTPases. PMID:20814828

  9. Harmine Induces Adipocyte Thermogenesis through RAC1-MEK-ERK-CHD4 Axis

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Tao; Hui, Xiaoyan; Mao, Liufeng; Nie, Baoming; Li, Kuai; Sun, Wei; Gao, Xuefei; Tang, Xiaofeng; Xu, Yong; Jiang, Baishan; Tu, Zhengcao; Li, Peng; Ding, Ke; Han, Weiping; Zhang, Shaoping; Xu, Aimin; Ding, Sheng; Liu, Pentao; Patterson, Adam; Cooper, Garth; Wu, Donghai

    2016-01-01

    Harmine is a natural compound possessing insulin-sensitizing effect in db/db diabetic mice. However its effect on adipose tissue browning is unknown. Here we reveal that harmine antagonizes high fat diet-induced adiposity. Harmine-treated mice gained less weight on a high fat diet and displayed increased energy expenditure and adipose tissue thermogenesis. In vitro, harmine potently induced the expression of thermogenic genes in both brown and white adipocytes, which was largely abolished by inhibition of RAC1/MEK/ERK pathway. Post-transcriptional modification analysis revealed that chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 4 (CHD4) is a potential downstream target of harmine-mediated ERK activation. CHD4 directly binds the proximal promoter region of Ucp1, which is displaced upon treatment of harmine, thereby serving as a negative modulator of Ucp1. Thus, here we reveal a new application of harmine in combating obesity via this off-target effect in adipocytes. PMID:27805061

  10. Regulation of biomedical products.

    PubMed

    Gillett, Grant; Saville-Cook, Donald

    2010-05-01

    Two recent decisions, one from Australia and one from Canada, should cause us to examine the ethical issues surrounding the regulation of biomedical products. The protection of vulnerable consumers from variable quality and poorly prepared drugs with uncertain parameters of safety and efficacy is a priority for any community and should not have to be weighed against possible costs based on restrictions of trade. However, the possibility of an environment in which the multinational biomedical industry edges out any other players in the treatment of various illnesses has its own dangers. Not least is the apparent collusion between regulators and industry that ramps up the costs and intensity of licensing and risk management so that only an industry-type budget can sustain the costs of compliance. This has the untoward effect of delivering contemporary health care into the hands of those who make immense fortunes out of it. An approach to regulation that tempers bureaucratic mechanisms with a dose of common sense and realistic evidence-based risk assessment could go a long way in avoiding the Scylla and Charybdis awaiting the clinical world in these troubled waters.

  11. PTEN inhibits PREX2-catalyzed activation of RAC1 to restrain tumor cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Mense, Sarah M.; Barrows, Douglas; Hodakoski, Cindy; Steinbach, Nicole; Schoenfeld, David; Su, William; Hopkins, Benjamin D.; Su, Tao; Fine, Barry; Hibshoosh, Hanina; Parsons, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor PTEN restrains cell migration and invasion by a mechanism that is independent of inhibition of the PI3K pathway and decreased activation of the kinase AKT. PREX2, a widely distributed GEF that activates the GTPase RAC1, binds to and inhibits PTEN. We used mouse embryonic fibroblasts and breast cancer cell lines to show that PTEN suppresses cell migration and invasion by blocking PREX2 activity. In addition to metabolizing the phosphoinositide PIP3, PTEN inhibited PREX2-induced invasion by a mechanism that required the tail domain of PTEN, but not its lipid phosphatase activity. Fluorescent nucleotide exchange assays revealed that PTEN inhibited the GEF activity of PREX2 toward RAC1. PREX2 is a frequently mutated GEF in cancer, and examination of human tumor data showed that PREX2 mutation was associated with high PTEN expression. Therefore, we tested whether cancer-derived somatic PREX2 mutants, which accelerate tumor formation of immortalized melanocytes, were inhibited by PTEN. The three stably expressed, somatic PREX2 cancer mutants that we tested were resistant to PTEN-mediated inhibition of invasion but retained the ability to inhibit the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN. In vitro analysis showed that PTEN did not block the GEF activity of two PREX2 cancer mutants and had a reduced binding affinity for the third. Thus, PTEN antagonized migration and invasion by restraining PREX2 GEF activity, and PREX2 mutants are likely selected in cancer to escape PTEN-mediated inhibition of invasion. PMID:25829446

  12. Renin-angiotensin system acting on reactive oxygen species in paraventricular nucleus induces sympathetic activation via AT1R/PKCγ/Rac1 pathway in salt-induced hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Su, Qing; Huo, Chan-Juan; Li, Hong-Bao; Liu, Kai-Li; Li, Xiang; Yang, Qing; Song, Xin-Ai; Chen, Wen-Sheng; Cui, Wei; Zhu, Guo-Qing; Shi, Xiao-Lian; Liu, Jin-Jun; Kang, Yu-Ming

    2017-01-01

    Brain renin-angiotensin system (RAS) could regulate oxidative stress in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in the development of hypertension. This study was designed to explore the precise mechanisms of RAS acting on reactive oxygen species (ROS) in salt-induced hypertension. Male Wistar rats were administered with a high-salt diet (HS, 8.0% NaCl) for 8 weeks to induced hypertension. Those rats were received PVN infusion of AT1R antagonist losartan (LOS, 10 μg/h) or microinjection of small interfering RNAs for protein kinase C γ (PKCγ siRNA) once a day for 2 weeks. High salt intake resulted in higher levels of AT1R, PKCγ, Rac1 activity, superoxide and malondialdehyde (MDA) activity, but lower levels of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) in PVN than control animals. PVN infusion of LOS not only attenuated the PVN levels of AT1R, PKCγ, Rac1 activity, superoxide and decreased the arterial pressure, but also increased the PVN antioxidant capacity in hypertension. PVN microinjection of PKCγ siRNA had the same effect on LOS above responses to hypertension but no effect on PVN level of AT1R. These results, for the first time, identified that the precise signaling pathway of RAS regulating ROS in PVN is via AT1R/PKCγ/Rac1 in salt-induced hypertension. PMID:28338001

  13. 1–42 β-Amyloid peptide requires PDK1/nPKC/Rac 1 pathway to induce neuronal death

    PubMed Central

    Manterola, L; Hernando-Rodríguez, M; Ruiz, A; Apraiz, A; Arrizabalaga, O; Vellón, L; Alberdi, E; Cavaliere, F; Lacerda, H M; Jimenez, S; Parada, L A; Matute, C; Zugaza, J L

    2013-01-01

    1–42 β-Amyloid (Aβ1–42) peptide is a key molecule involved in the development of Alzheimer's disease. Some of its effects are manifested at the neuronal morphological level. These morphological changes involve loss of neurites due to cytoskeleton alterations. However, the mechanism of Aβ1–42 peptide activation of the neurodegenerative program is still poorly understood. Here, Aβ1–42 peptide-induced transduction of cellular death signals through the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/phosphoinositol-dependent kinase (PDK)/novel protein kinase C (nPKC)/Rac 1 axis is described. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of PDK1 and nPKC activities blocks Rac 1 activation and neuronal cell death. Our results provide insights into an unsuspected connection between PDK1, nPKCs and Rac 1 in the same signal-transduction pathway and points out nPKCs and Rac 1 as potential therapeutic targets to block the toxic effects of Aβ1–42 peptide in neurons. PMID:23340502

  14. Bistability in the Rac1, PAK, and RhoA Signaling Network Drives Actin Cytoskeleton Dynamics and Cell Motility Switches

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Kate M.; Monsefi, Naser; Dawson, John C.; Degasperi, Andrea; Bukowski-Wills, Jimi-Carlo; Volinsky, Natalia; Dobrzyński, Maciej; Birtwistle, Marc R.; Tsyganov, Mikhail A.; Kiyatkin, Anatoly; Kida, Katarzyna; Finch, Andrew J.; Carragher, Neil O.; Kolch, Walter; Nguyen, Lan K.; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Dynamic interactions between RhoA and Rac1, members of the Rho small GTPase family, play a vital role in the control of cell migration. Using predictive mathematical modeling, mass spectrometry-based quantitation of network components, and experimental validation in MDA-MB-231 mesenchymal breast cancer cells, we show that a network containing Rac1, RhoA, and PAK family kinases can produce bistable, switch-like responses to a graded PAK inhibition. Using a small chemical inhibitor of PAK, we demonstrate that cellular RhoA and Rac1 activation levels respond in a history-dependent, bistable manner to PAK inhibition. Consequently, we show that downstream signaling, actin dynamics, and cell migration also behave in a bistable fashion, displaying switches and hysteresis in response to PAK inhibition. Our results demonstrate that PAK is a critical component in the Rac1-RhoA inhibitory crosstalk that governs bistable GTPase activity, cell morphology, and cell migration switches. PMID:27136688

  15. CD99 triggering induces methuosis of Ewing sarcoma cells through IGF-1R/RAS/Rac1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Manara, Maria Cristina; Terracciano, Mario; Mancarella, Caterina; Sciandra, Marika; Guerzoni, Clara; Pasello, Michela; Grilli, Andrea; Zini, Nicoletta; Picci, Piero; Colombo, Mario P.; Morrione, Andrea; Scotlandi, Katia

    2016-01-01

    CD99 is a cell surface molecule that has emerged as a novel target for Ewing sarcoma (EWS), an aggressive pediatric bone cancer. This report provides the first evidence of methuosis in EWS, a non-apoptotic form of cell death induced by an antibody directed against the CD99 molecule. Upon mAb triggering, CD99 induces an IGF-1R/RAS/Rac1 complex, which is internalized into RAB5-positive endocytic vacuoles. This complex is then dissociated, with the IGF-1R recycling to the cell membrane while CD99 and RAS/Rac1 are sorted into immature LAMP-1-positive vacuoles, whose excessive accumulation provokes methuosis. This process, which is not detected in CD99-expressing normal mesenchymal cells, is inhibited by disruption of the IGF-1R signaling, whereas enhanced by IGF-1 stimulation. Induction of IGF-1R/RAS/Rac1 was also observed in the EWS xenografts that respond to anti-CD99 mAb, further supporting the role of the IGF/RAS/Rac1 axis in the hyperstimulation of macropinocytosis and selective death of EWS cells. Thus, we describe a vulnerability of EWS cells, including those resistant to standard chemotherapy, to a treatment with anti-CD99 mAb, which requires IGF-1R/RAS signaling but bypasses the need for their direct targeting. Overall, we propose CD99 targeting as new opportunity to treat EWS patients resistant to canonical apoptosis-inducing agents. PMID:27835596

  16. S-Adenosylmethionine suppresses the expression of Smad3/4 in activated human hepatic stellate cells via Rac1 promoter methylation

    PubMed Central

    BIAN, KANGQI; ZHANG, FENG; WANG, TINGTING; ZOU, XIAOPING; DUAN, XUHONG; CHEN, GUANGXIA; ZHUGE, YUZHENG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) was able to suppress activated human hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Human LX-2 HSCs were cultured with SAM or NSC23766, and were transfected with plasmids encoding ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) protein or an empty expression vector. Cell proliferation was detected by Cell Counting Kit-8. Cell migration and invasion were determined using the Transwell assay. The expression levels of Rac1 and Smad3/4 were detected by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or western blotting. The methylation status of Rac1 promoters was measured by methylation-specific PCR. The results demonstrated that SAM and NSC23766 suppressed the expression of Smad3/4 in LX-2 cells. The overexpression of Rac1 enhanced the proliferation, migration and invasion of LX-2 cells. In addition, compared with the control groups, a marked increase was observed in the protein expression levels of Smad3/4 in the LX-2 cells transfected with Rac1 plasmids. The methylation-specific PCR findings showed that SAM increased the methylation of Rac1 promoters. The results of the present study suggested that Rac1 enhanced the expression of Smad3/4 in activated HSCs; however, this increase may be suppressed by SAM-induced methylation of Rac1 promoters. PMID:26986629

  17. CXCL12 induces connective tissue growth factor expression in human lung fibroblasts through the Rac1/ERK, JNK, and AP-1 pathways.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Huang; Shih, Chung-Huang; Tseng, Chih-Chieh; Yu, Chung-Chi; Tsai, Yuan-Jhih; Bien, Mauo-Ying; Chen, Bing-Chang

    2014-01-01

    CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor-1, SDF-1) is a potent chemokine for homing of CXCR4+ fibrocytes to injury sites of lung tissue, which contributes to pulmonary fibrosis. Overexpression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) plays a critical role in pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the roles of Rac1, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and activator protein-1 (AP-1) in CXCL12-induced CTGF expression in human lung fibroblasts. CXCL12 caused concentration- and time-dependent increases in CTGF expression and CTGF-luciferase activity. CXCL12-induced CTGF expression was inhibited by a CXCR4 antagonist (AMD3100), small interfering RNA of CXCR4 (CXCR4 siRNA), a dominant negative mutant of Rac1 (RacN17), a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK) inhibitor (PD98059), a JNK inhibitor (SP600125), a p21-activated kinase inhibitor (PAK18), c-Jun siRNA, and an AP-1 inhibitor (curcumin). Treatment of cells with CXCL12 caused activations of Rac1, Rho, ERK, and c-Jun. The CXCL12-induced increase in ERK phosphorylation was inhibited by RacN17. Treatment of cells with PD98059 and SP600125 both inhibited CXCL12-induced c-Jun phosphorylation. CXCL12 caused the recruitment of c-Jun and c-Fos binding to the CTGF promoter. Furthermore, CXCL12 induced an increase in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, a myofibroblastic phenotype, and actin stress fiber formation. CXCL12-induced actin stress fiber formation and α-SMA expression were respectively inhibited by AMD3100 and CTGF siRNA. Taken together, our results suggest that CXCL12, acting through CXCR4, activates the Rac/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, which in turn initiates c-Jun phosphorylation, and recruits c-Jun and c-Fos to the CTGF promoter and ultimately induces CTGF expression in human lung fibroblasts. Moreover, overexpression of CTGF mediates CXCL12-induced α-SMA expression.

  18. CXCL12 Induces Connective Tissue Growth Factor Expression in Human Lung Fibroblasts through the Rac1/ERK, JNK, and AP-1 Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chih-Chieh; Yu, Chung-Chi; Tsai, Yuan-Jhih; Bien, Mauo-Ying; Chen, Bing-Chang

    2014-01-01

    CXCL12 (stromal cell-derived factor-1, SDF-1) is a potent chemokine for homing of CXCR4+ fibrocytes to injury sites of lung tissue, which contributes to pulmonary fibrosis. Overexpression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) plays a critical role in pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the roles of Rac1, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and activator protein-1 (AP-1) in CXCL12-induced CTGF expression in human lung fibroblasts. CXCL12 caused concentration- and time-dependent increases in CTGF expression and CTGF-luciferase activity. CXCL12-induced CTGF expression was inhibited by a CXCR4 antagonist (AMD3100), small interfering RNA of CXCR4 (CXCR4 siRNA), a dominant negative mutant of Rac1 (RacN17), a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinase (MEK) inhibitor (PD98059), a JNK inhibitor (SP600125), a p21-activated kinase inhibitor (PAK18), c-Jun siRNA, and an AP-1 inhibitor (curcumin). Treatment of cells with CXCL12 caused activations of Rac1, Rho, ERK, and c-Jun. The CXCL12-induced increase in ERK phosphorylation was inhibited by RacN17. Treatment of cells with PD98059 and SP600125 both inhibited CXCL12-induced c-Jun phosphorylation. CXCL12 caused the recruitment of c-Jun and c-Fos binding to the CTGF promoter. Furthermore, CXCL12 induced an increase in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, a myofibroblastic phenotype, and actin stress fiber formation. CXCL12-induced actin stress fiber formation and α-SMA expression were respectively inhibited by AMD3100 and CTGF siRNA. Taken together, our results suggest that CXCL12, acting through CXCR4, activates the Rac/ERK and JNK signaling pathways, which in turn initiates c-Jun phosphorylation, and recruits c-Jun and c-Fos to the CTGF promoter and ultimately induces CTGF expression in human lung fibroblasts. Moreover, overexpression of CTGF mediates CXCL12-induced α-SMA expression. PMID:25121739

  19. ADP-Ribosylation Factor 6 Regulates Mammalian Myoblast Fusion through Phospholipase D1 and Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Anne-Sophie; Enjalbert, Sandrine; Comunale, Franck; Bodin, Stéphane; Vitale, Nicolas; Charrasse, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    Myoblast fusion is an essential step during myoblast differentiation that remains poorly understood. M-cadherin–dependent pathways that signal through Rac1 GTPase activation via the Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Trio are important for myoblast fusion. The ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF)6 GTPase has been shown to bind to Trio and to regulate Rac1 activity. Moreover, Loner/GEP100/BRAG2, a GEF of ARF6, has been involved in mammalian and Drosophila myoblast fusion, but the specific role of ARF6 has been not fully analyzed. Here, we show that ARF6 activity is increased at the time of myoblast fusion and is required for its implementation in mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Specifically, at the onset of myoblast fusion, ARF6 is associated with the multiproteic complex that contains M-cadherin, Trio, and Rac1 and accumulates at sites of myoblast fusion. ARF6 silencing inhibits the association of Trio and Rac1 with M-cadherin. Moreover, we demonstrate that ARF6 regulates myoblast fusion through phospholipase D (PLD) activation and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate production. Together, these data indicate that ARF6 is a critical regulator of C2C12 myoblast fusion and participates in the regulation of PLD activities that trigger both phospholipids production and actin cytoskeleton reorganization at fusion sites. PMID:20505075

  20. Drug design for cardiovascular disease: the effect of solvation energy on Rac1-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Maggi, Norbert; Arrigo, Patrizio; Ruggiero, Carmelina

    2011-01-01

    'OMICS' techniques have deeply changed the drug discovery process. The availability of many different potential druggable genes, generated by these new techniques, have exploited the complexity of new lead compounds screening. 'Virtual screening', based on the integration of different analytical tools on high performance hardware platforms, has speeded up the search for new chemical entities suitable for experimental validation. Docking is a key step in the screening process. The aim of this paper is the evaluation of binding differences due to solvation. We have compared two commonly used software, one of which takes into account solvation, on a set of small molecules (Morpholines, flavonoids and imidazoles) which are able to target the RAC1 protein--a cardiovascular target. We have evaluated the degree of agreement between the two different programs using a machine learning approach combined with statistical test. Our analysis, on a sample of small molecules, has pointed out that 35% of the molecules seem to be sensitive to solvation. This result, even though quite preliminary, stresses the need to combine different algorithms to obtain a more reliable filtered set of ligands.

  1. Exploration of supramolecular assemblies of rac-1,3-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Lopamudra; Pedireddi, V. R.

    2015-11-01

    Supramolecular assemblies of rac-1,3-cyclohexanedicarboxylic acid (1) with melamine (a), 1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethene (b); 1, 2-bis(4pyridyl)ethane (c) in the presence of Co(II), and 1,10-phenanthroline (d) along with Cu(II) and Ni(II), respectively 1a - 1d and 1d', have been reported. All the assemblies were prepared by crystallization method, through slow-evaporation process, at ambient conditions. All the complexes yield sheet structures that are stacked in three-dimensional arrangement, however, each structure is unique within three-dimensional networks with varied arrangements of either organic entities or coordinated ensembles. For instance, while a host-guest type assembly was observed in 1a, only crinkled tapes are observed in 1b. Among coordination complexes, 1c has an interpenetrated cubic network, whereas 1d and 1d' form host-guest networks. A noteworthy feature to highlight is that the water molecules in the channels of 1d organize in the form of pentamers, which are further held together through tetrameric network, with the aid of hydrogen bonds. A further interesting feature is the presence of acid 1 in different conformations in the complexes as cis form in 1b, 1c and 1d and trans form in 1d'. However, in 1a both cis and trans conformers are observed.

  2. Programmed Application of Transforming Growth Factor β3 and Rac1 Inhibitor NSC23766 Committed Hyaline Cartilage Differentiation of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Osteochondral Defect Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shouan; Chen, Pengfei; Wu, Yan; Xiong, Si; Sun, Heng; Xia, Qingqing; Shi, Libing

    2014-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage differentiation is always the challenge with application of stem cells for joint repair. Transforming growth factors (TGFs) and bone morphogenetic proteins can initiate cartilage differentiation but often lead to hypertrophy and calcification, related to abnormal Rac1 activity. In this study, we developed a strategy of programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 to commit the hyaline cartilage differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) for joint cartilage repair. ADSCs were isolated and cultured in a micromass and pellet culture model to evaluate chondrogenic and hypertrophic differentiation. The function of Rac1 was investigated with constitutively active Rac1 mutant and dominant negative Rac1 mutant. The efficacy of ADSCs with programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor for cartilage repair was studied in a rat model of osteochondral defects. The results showed that TGFβ3 promoted ADSCs chondro-lineage differentiation and that NSC23766 prevented ADSC-derived chondrocytes from hypertrophy in vitro. The combination of ADSCs, TGFβ3, and NSC23766 promoted quality osteochondral defect repair in rats with much less chondrocytes hypertrophy and significantly higher International Cartilage Repair Society macroscopic and microscopic scores. The findings have illustrated that programmed application of TGFβ3 and Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 can commit ADSCs to chondro-lineage differentiation and improve the efficacy of ADSCs for cartilage defect repair. These findings suggest a promising stem cell-based strategy for articular cartilage repair. PMID:25154784

  3. Loss of the E3 ubiquitin ligase HACE1 results in enhanced Rac1 signaling contributing to breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Goka, E T; Lippman, M E

    2015-01-01

    The transition from ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) to invasive breast cancer (IBC) is a crucial step in breast cancer progression. The specific alterations that govern this transition have not been elucidated. HER2/neu is frequently overexpressed in DCIS but is less common in IBC, thereby suggesting additional requirements for transformation. To identify genes capable of cooperating with HER2/neu to fully transform mammary epithelial cells, we used an insertional mutagenesis screen on cells isolated from wild-type neu expressing mice and identified the E3 ligase HACE1 as HER2 cooperative tumor suppressor gene. Loss of HACE1 expression is commonly seen in clinical breast cancer data sets. HACE1 downregulation in normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) results in the accumulation of the activated GTP-bound Rac1 partially transforming these cells. Overexpression of HER2 activates Rac1, which further accumulates upon HACE1 loss resulting in Rac1 hyperactivation. Although the knockdown of HACE1 or overexpression of HER2 alone in HMECs is not sufficient for tumorigenesis, HER2 overexpression combined with HACE1 downregulation fully transforms HMECs resulting in robust tumor formation. The pharmaceutical interference of Rac function abrogates the effects of HACE1 loss both in vitro and in vivo, resulting in marked reduction in tumor burden. Our work supports a critical role for HACE1 in breast cancer progression and identifies patients that may benefit from Rac-targeted therapies. PMID:25659579

  4. Streptococcus pneumoniae ClpL Modulates Adherence to A549 Human Lung Cells through Rap1/Rac1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Cuong Thach; Le, Nhat-Tu; Tran, Thao Dang-Hien; Kim, Eun-Hye; Park, Sang-Sang; Luong, Truc Thanh; Chung, Kyung-Tae; Pyo, Suhkneung

    2014-01-01

    Caseinolytic protease L (ClpL) is a member of the HSP100/Clp chaperone family, which is found mainly in Gram-positive bacteria. ClpL is highly expressed during infection for refolding of stress-induced denatured proteins, some of which are important for adherence. However, the role of ClpL in modulating pneumococcal virulence is poorly understood. Here, we show that ClpL impairs pneumococcal adherence to A549 lung cells by inducing and activating Rap1 and Rac1, thus increasing phosphorylation of cofilin (inactive form). Moreover, infection with a clpL mutant (ΔclpL) causes a greater degree of filopodium formation than D39 wild-type (WT) infection. Inhibition of Rap1 and Rac1 impairs filopodium formation and pneumococcal adherence. Therefore, ClpL can reduce pneumococcal adherence to A549 cells, likely via modulation of Rap1- and Rac1-mediated filopodium formation. These results demonstrate a potential role for ClpL in pneumococcal resistance to host cell adherence during infection. This study provides insight into further understanding the interactions between hosts and pathogens. PMID:24980975

  5. Fine tuning of Rac1 and RhoA alters cuspal shapes by remolding the cellular geometry

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liwen; Tang, Qinghuang; Nakamura, Takashi; Suh, Jun-Gyo; Ohshima, Hayato; Jung, Han-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The anatomic and functional combinations of cusps and lophs (ridges) define the tooth shape of rodent molars, which distinguishes species. The species-specific cusp patterns result from the spatiotemporal induction of enamel knots (EKs), which require precisely controlled cellular behavior to control the epithelial invagination. Despite the well-defined roles of EK in cusp patterning, the determinants of the ultimate cuspal shapes and involvement of epithelial cellular geometry are unknown. Using two typical tooth patterns, the lophodont in gerbils and the bunodont in mice, we showed that the cuspal shape is determined by the dental epithelium at the cap stage, whereas the cellular geometry in the inner dental epithelium (IDE) is correlated with the cuspal shape. Intriguingly, fine tuning Rac1 and RhoA interconvert cuspal shapes between two species by remolding the cellular geometry. Either inhibition of Rac1 or ectopic expression of RhoA could region-distinctively change the columnar shape of IDE cells in gerbils to drive invagination to produce cusps. Conversely, RhoA reduction in mice inhibited invagination and developed lophs. Furthermore, we found that Rac1 and RhoA modulate the choices of cuspal shape by coordinating adhesion junctions, actin distribution, and fibronectin localization to drive IDE invagination. PMID:27892530

  6. Vav3 modulates B cell receptor responses by regulating phosphoinositide 3-kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Inabe, Kazunori; Ishiai, Masamichi; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Freshney, Norman; Downward, Julian; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2002-01-21

    To elucidate the mechanism(s) by which Vav3, a new member of the Vav family proteins, participates in B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling, we have generated a B cell line deficient in Vav3. Here we report that Vav3 influences phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) function through Rac1 in that phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) generation was attenuated by loss of Vav3 or by expression of a dominant negative form of Rac1. The functional interaction between PI3K and Rac1 was also demonstrated by increased PI3K activity in the presence of GTP-bound Rac1. In addition, we show that defects of calcium mobilization and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in Vav3-deficient cells are relieved by deletion of a PIP3 hydrolyzing enzyme, SH2 domain-containing inositol polyphosphate 5'-phosphatase (SHIP). Hence, our results suggest a role for Vav3 in regulating the B cell responses by promoting the sustained production of PIP3 and thereby calcium flux.

  7. Vav3 Modulates B Cell Receptor Responses by Regulating Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Inabe, Kazunori; Ishiai, Masamichi; Scharenberg, Andrew M.; Freshney, Norman; Downward, Julian; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2002-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism(s) by which Vav3, a new member of the Vav family proteins, participates in B cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling, we have generated a B cell line deficient in Vav3. Here we report that Vav3 influences phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) function through Rac1 in that phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) generation was attenuated by loss of Vav3 or by expression of a dominant negative form of Rac1. The functional interaction between PI3K and Rac1 was also demonstrated by increased PI3K activity in the presence of GTP-bound Rac1. In addition, we show that defects of calcium mobilization and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activation in Vav3-deficient cells are relieved by deletion of a PIP3 hydrolyzing enzyme, SH2 domain-containing inositol polyphosphate 5′-phosphatase (SHIP). Hence, our results suggest a role for Vav3 in regulating the B cell responses by promoting the sustained production of PIP3 and thereby calcium flux. PMID:11805146

  8. Dock10, a Cdc42 and Rac1 GEF, induces loss of elongation, filopodia, and ruffles in cervical cancer epithelial HeLa cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Lafuente, Natalia; Alcaraz-García, María-José; García-Serna, Azahara-María; Sebastián-Ruiz, Silvia; Moya-Quiles, María-Rosa; García-Alonso, Ana-María; Parrado, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Dock10 is one of the three members of the Dock-D family of Dock proteins, a class of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Rho GTPases. Its homologs Dock9 and Dock11 are Cdc42 GEFs. Dock10 is required for maintenance of rounded morphology and amoeboid-type movement. Full-length isoforms of Dock10 have been recently cloned. Here, we address GTPase specificity and GEF activity of Dock10. In order of decreasing intensity, Dock10 interacted with nucleotide-free Rac1, Cdc42, and Rac3, and more weakly with Rac2, RhoF, and RhoG. Inducible expression of Dock10 in HeLa epithelial cells promoted GEF activity on Cdc42 and Rac1, and a morphologic change in two-dimensional culture consisting in loss of cell elongation, increase of filopodia, and ruffles. Area in contact with the substrate of cells that spread with non-elongated morphology was larger in cells expressing Dock10. Inducible expression of constitutively active mutants of Cdc42 and Rac1 in HeLa cells also induced loss of elongation. However, Cdc42 induced filopodia and contraction, and Rac1 induced membrane ruffles and flattening. When co-expressed with Dock10, Cdc42 potentiated filopodia, and Rac1 potentiated ruffles. These results suggest that Dock10 functions as a dual GEF for Cdc42 and Rac1, affecting cell morphology, spreading and actin cytoskeleton protrusions of adherent HeLa cells. PMID:25862245

  9. Vitreous-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements via the Rac1 GTPase-dependent signaling pathway in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xionggao; Wei, Yantao; Ma, Haizhi; Zhang, Shaochong

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vitreous induces morphological changes and cytoskeletal rearrangements in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac1 is activated in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac inhibition prevents morphological changes in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac inhibition suppresses cytoskeletal rearrangements in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The vitreous-induced effects are mediated by a Rac1 GTPase/LIMK1/cofilin pathway. -- Abstract: Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is mainly caused by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration, invasion, proliferation and transformation into fibroblast-like cells that produce the extracellular matrix (ECM). The vitreous humor is known to play an important role in PVR. An epithelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT) of human RPE cells induced by 25% vitreous treatment has been linked to stimulation of the mesenchymal phenotype, migration and invasion. Here, we characterized the effects of the vitreous on the cell morphology and cytoskeleton in human RPE cells. The signaling pathway that mediates these effects was investigated. Serum-starved RPE cells were incubated with 25% vitreous, and the morphological changes were examined by phase-contrast microscopy. Filamentous actin (F-actin) was examined by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Protein phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, Smad2/3, LIM kinase (LIMK) 1 and cofilin was analyzed by Western blot analysis. Vitreous treatment induced cytoskeletal rearrangements, activated Rac1 and enhanced the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2 and Smad2/3. When the cells were treated with a Rac activation-specific inhibitor, the cytoskeletal rearrangements were prevented, and the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 was blocked. Vitreous treatment also enhanced the phosphorylation of LIMK1 and cofilin and the Rac inhibitor blocked this effect. We propose that vitreous

  10. Human tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced protein 8-like 2 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis through inhibiting Rac1

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor invasion and metastasis are the major reasons for leading death of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Therefore, to identify molecules that can suppress invasion and metastasis of tumor will provide novel targets for HCC therapies. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced protein 8-like 2, TIPE2, is a novel immune negative molecule and an inhibitor of the oncogenic Ras in mice but its function in human is unclear. Our previous research has shown that TIPE2 is downregulated in human primary HCC compared with the paired adjacent non-tumor tissues. Results In present study, we provide evidence that TIPE2 inhibits effectively human hepatocellular carcinoma metastasis. The forced expression of TIPE2 in HCC-derived cell lines markedly inhibits tumor cell growth, migration and invasion in vitro and suppresses growth and metastasis of HCC in vivo. Clinical information from a cohort of 112 patients reveals that loss or reduced expression of TIPE2 in primary HCC tissues is significantly associated with tumor metastasis. Mechanically, TIPE2 inhibits the migration and invasion through targeting Rac1 and then reduces F-actin polymerization and expression of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). Conclusion Our results indicate that human TIPE2 is endogenous inhibitor of Rac1 in HCC by which it attenuates invasion and metastasis of HCC. The data suggest that TIPE2 will be a new target for HCC therapy. PMID:24274578

  11. TIPE2 suppresses angiogenesis and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) invasiveness via inhibiting Rac1 activation and VEGF expression

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zequn; Guo, Chun; Liu, Xianglan; Zhou, Chengjun; Zhu, Faliang; Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Qun; Shi, Yongyu; Wang, Jianing; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Lining

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the leading causes of all cancer-related deaths worldwide. Despite extensive efforts to improve the diagnosis and treatment of this neoplasm, limited progress has been made. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha-induced protein 8-like 2 (TIPE2 or TNFAIP8L2) is a newly introduced negative immune regulator, which also controls tumorigenesis. However, the role of TIPE2 in angiogenesis is unknown. In the present study, we investigated the expression and roles of TIPE2 in NSCLC. TIPE2 upregulation in human NSCLC tissues was negatively associated with the primary tumor size, lymph node metastasis, and advanced clinical stage, which can be used to predict lymph node metastasis. Moreover, overexpression of TIPE2 not only inhibited the colony formation, migration, and invasion of NSCLC cells but also indirectly suppressed the proliferation, migration, and tube formation of vascular endothelial cells. Furthermore, TIPE2 suppressed tumor invasiveness and angiogenesis via inhibiting the activation of Rac1 and subsequently weakening its downstream effects, including F-actin polymerization and VEGF expression. Collectively, these results indicate that TIPE2 plays a key role in NSCLC metastasis, suggesting that forced TIPE2 expression might be a novel strategy for the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:27556698

  12. The PERK pathway independently triggers apoptosis and a Rac1/Slpr/JNK/Dilp8 signaling favoring tissue homeostasis in a chronic ER stress Drosophila model

    PubMed Central

    Demay, Y; Perochon, J; Szuplewski, S; Mignotte, B; Gaumer, S

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has a major role in protein folding. The accumulation of unfolded proteins in the ER induces a stress, which can be resolved by the unfolded protein response (UPR). Chronicity of ER stress leads to UPR-induced apoptosis and in turn to an unbalance of tissue homeostasis. Although ER stress-dependent apoptosis is observed in a great number of devastating human diseases, how cells activate apoptosis and promote tissue homeostasis after chronic ER stress remains poorly understood. Here, using the Drosophila wing imaginal disc as a model system, we validated that Presenilin overexpression induces chronic ER stress in vivo. We observed, in this novel model of chronic ER-stress, a PERK/ATF4-dependent apoptosis requiring downregulation of the antiapoptotic diap1 gene. PERK/ATF4 also activated the JNK pathway through Rac1 and Slpr activation in apoptotic cells, leading to the expression of Dilp8. This insulin-like peptide caused a developmental delay, which partially allowed the replacement of apoptotic cells. Thanks to a novel chronic ER stress model, these results establish a new pathway that both participates in tissue homeostasis and triggers apoptosis through an original regulation. PMID:25299777

  13. Lck/PLCγ control migration and proliferation of interleukin (IL)-2-stimulated T cells via the Rac1 GTPase/glycogen phosphorylase pathway.

    PubMed

    Llavero, Francisco; Artaso, Alain; Lacerda, Hadriano M; Parada, Luis A; Zugaza, José L

    2016-11-01

    Recently, we have reported that the IL-2-stimulated T cells activate PKCθ in order to phosphorylate the serine residues of αPIX-RhoGEF, and to switch on the Rac1/PYGM pathway resulting in T cell migration and proliferation. However, the molecular mechanism connecting the activated IL-2-R with the PKCθ/αPIX/Rac1/PYGM pathway is still unknown. In this study, the use of a combined pharmacological and genetic approach identified Lck, a Src family member, as the tyrosine kinase phosphorylating PLCγ leading to Rac1 and PYGM activation in the IL-2-stimulated Kit 225 T cells via the PKCθ/αPIX pathway. The PLCγ tyrosine phosphorylation was required to activate first PKCθ, and then αPIX and Rac1/PYGM. The results presented here delineate a novel signalling pathway ranking equally in importance to the three major pathways controlled by the IL-2-R, i.e. PI3K, Ras/MAPK and JAK/STAT pathways. The overall evidence strongly indicates that the central biological role of the novel IL-2-R/Lck/PLCγ/PKCθ/αPIX/Rac1/PYGM signalling pathway is directly related to the control of fundamental cellular processes such as T cell migration and proliferation.

  14. Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition of Ovarian Cancer Cells Is Sustained by Rac1 through Simultaneous Activation of MEK1/2 and Src Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Dongdong; Chen, Huijun; Zhu, Jessica Y; Wang, Wei; Teng, Yong; Ding, Han-Fei; Jing, Qing; Su, Shi-Bing; Huang, Shuang

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is regarded as a crucial contributing factor to cancer progression. Diverse factors have been identified as potent EMT inducers in ovarian cancer. However, molecular mechanism sustaining EMT of ovarian cancer cells remains elusive. Here, we show that the presence of SOS1/EPS8/ABI1 complex is critical for sustained EMT traits of ovarian cancer cells. Consistent with the role of SOS1/EPS8/ABI1 complex as a Rac1-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor, depleting Rac1 results in the loss of most of mesenchymal traits in mesenchymal-like ovarian cancer cells while expressing constitutively active Rac1 leads to EMT in epithelial-like ovarian cancer cells. With the aid of clinically tested inhibitors targeting various EMT-associated signaling pathways, we show that only combined treatment of MEK1/2 and Src inhibitors can abolish constitutively active Rac1-led EMT and mesenchymal traits displayed by mesenchymal-like ovarian cancer cells. Further experiments also reveal that EMT can be induced in epithelial-like ovarian cancer cells by co-expressing constitutively active MEK1 and Src rather than either alone. As the activities of Erk and Src are higher in ovarian cancer cells with constitutively active Rac1, we conclude that Rac1 sustains ovarian cancer cell EMT through simultaneous activation of MEK1/2 and Src signaling pathways. Importantly, we demonstrate that combined use of MEK1/2 and Src inhibitors effectively suppresses development of intraperitoneal xenografts and prolongs the survival of ovarian cancer-bearing mice. This study suggests that cocktail of MEK1/2 and Src inhibitors represents an effective therapeutic strategy against ovarian cancer progression. PMID:27617576

  15. Kinetic resolution of rac-1-phenylethanol with immobilized lipases: a critical comparison of microwave and conventional heating protocols.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Rodrigo Octavio M A; Antunes, Octavio A C; Kroutil, Wolfgang; Kappe, C Oliver

    2009-08-21

    The lipase-catalyzed kinetic resolution of rac-1-phenylethanol with vinyl acetate as acyl donor and cyclohexane as solvent has been investigated applying both microwave dielectric heating and conventional thermal heating in order to probe the existence of nonthermal microwave effects. All transformations were conducted at 40 degrees C in a dedicated reactor setup that allowed accurate internal reaction temperature measurements with use of fiber-optic probes. Quartz reaction vessels that allow higher levels of microwave power to be administered to the reaction mixture were used for all experiments. For all five studied immobilized lipases, the observed reactivities and enantioselectivities in microwave and oil bath experiments were identical and thus not related to the presence of the microwave field. The effect of magnetic stirring proved critical as too rapid stirring in some instances destroyed the enzyme support structure and led to altered reactivities and selectivities.

  16. Alpha1-chimaerin, a Rac1 GTPase-activating protein, is expressed at reduced mRNA levels in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Tomoko; Konishi, Yoshihiro; Shimohama, Shun; Beach, Thomas G.; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Alpha1-chimaerin is a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for Rac1, a member of the Rho small GTPase family, whose action leads to the inactivation of Rac1. Rac1 activity is upregulated in Alzheimer's disease, but little is known about the role of α1-chimaerin. In this study, we investigated the expression and localization of α1-chimaerin mRNA in postmortem human brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease and control subjects. In situ hybridization studies demonstrated that α1-chimaerin was expressed by neurons in the neo-cortex of the temporal lobe and the hippocampus of both controls and Alzheimer's disease cases, with the signal intensity dramatically decreased in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Real-time PCR analysis confirmed a significant reduction of α1-chimaerin mRNA expression in the temporal cortex of Alzheimer's disease cases. In contrast, α2-chimaerin mRNA levels showed no significant difference between the groups. The present study showed reduced α1-chimaerin expression in the brain of Alzheimer's disease cases, suggesting a role in the upregulation of Rac1 activity during the disease process. PMID:25676811

  17. Periodic mechanical stress activates EGFR-dependent Rac1 mitogenic signals in rat nucleus pulpous cells via ERK1/2.

    PubMed

    Gao, Gongming; Shen, Nan; Jiang, Xuefeng; Sun, Huiqing; Xu, Nanwei; Zhou, Dong; Nong, Luming; Ren, Kewei

    2016-01-15

    The mitogenic effects of periodic mechanical stress on nucleus pulpous cells have been studied extensively but the mechanisms whereby nucleus pulpous cells sense and respond to mechanical stimulation remain a matter of debate. We explored this question by performing cell culture experiments in our self-developed periodic stress field and perfusion culture system. Under periodic mechanical stress, rat nucleus pulpous cell proliferation was significantly increased (p < 0.05 for each) and was associated with increases in the phosphorylation and activation of EGFR, Rac1, and ERK1/2 (p < 0.05 for each). Pretreatment with the ERK1/2 selective inhibitor PD98059 reduced periodic mechanical stress-induced nucleus pulpous cell proliferation (p < 0.05 for each), while the activation levels of EGFR and Rac1 were not inhibited. Proliferation and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 were inhibited after pretreatment with the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 in nucleus pulpous cells in response to periodic mechanical stress (p < 0.05 for each), while the phosphorylation site of EGFR was not affected. Inhibition of EGFR activity with AG1478 abrogated nucleus pulpous cell proliferation (p < 0.05 for each) and attenuated Rac1 and ERK1/2 activation in nucleus pulpous cells subjected to periodic mechanical stress (p < 0.05 for each). These findings suggest that periodic mechanical stress promotes nucleus pulpous cell proliferation in part through the EGFR-Rac1-ERK1/2 signaling pathway, which links these three important signaling molecules into a mitogenic cascade.

  18. Tuberin, the tuberous sclerosis complex 2 tumor suppressor gene product, regulates Rho activation, cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Astrinidis, Aristotelis; Cash, Timothy P; Hunter, Deborah S; Walker, Cheryl L; Chernoff, Jonathan; Henske, Elizabeth P

    2002-12-05

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a tumor suppressor gene syndrome characterized by seizures, mental retardation, autism, and tumors of the brain, kidney, heart, retina, and skin. TSC is caused by mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2, both of which are tumor suppressor genes. Hamartin, the protein product of TSC1, was found to interact with the ezrin-radixin-moesin family of cytoskeletal proteins and to activate the small GTPase Rho. To determine whether tuberin, the TSC2 product, can also activate Rho, we stably expressed full-length human tuberin in two cell types: MDCK cells and ELT3 cells. ELT3 cells lack endogenous tuberin expression. We found that expression of human tuberin in both MDCK and ELT3 cells was associated with an increase in the amount of Rho-GTP, but not in Rac1-GTP or cdc42-GTP. Tuberin expression increased cell adhesion in both cell types, and decreased chemotactic cell migration in ELT3 cells. In MDCK cells, there was a decrease in the amount of total Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and an increase in the fraction of phosphorylated FAK. These findings demonstrate for the first time that tuberin activates Rho and regulates cell adhesion and migration. Pathways involving Rho activation may have relevance to the clinical manifestations of TSC, including pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

  19. Radiation damage on Langmuir monolayers of the anionic 1.2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (sodium salt)(DPPG) phospholipid at the air-DNA solution interface.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Paulo J; Gonçalves da Silva, Amélia M P S; Ribeiro, Paulo A; Oliveira, Osvaldo N; Raposo, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The resilience of cells to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is probably associated with the effects induced in biological molecules such as DNA and in the cell membrane. In this study, we investigated UV damage to the anionic 1.2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-[phospho-rac-(1-glycerol)] (sodium salt) (DPPG) phospholipid, which is an important component of cell membranes. In films cast from DPPG emulsions, UV irradiation induced cleavage of C-O, C=O and -PO(2-) bonds, while in Langmuir monolayers at the air/water interface representing the cell membrane this irradiation caused the monolayer stability to decrease. When DNA was present in the subphase, however, the effects from UV irradiation were smaller, since the ionic products from degradation of either DPPG or DNA stabilize the intact DPPG molecules. This mechanism may explain why UV irradiation does not cause immediate cell collapse, thus providing time for the cellular machinery to repair elements damaged by UV.

  20. Impairment of PDGF-induced chemotaxis by extracellular α-synuclein through selective inhibition of Rac1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Taro; Hirai, Chihoko; Badawy, Shaymaa Mohamed Mohamed; Zhang, Lifang; Kajimoto, Taketoshi; Nakamura, Shun-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by α-synuclein (α-Syn)-positive intracytoplasmic inclusions, known as Lewy bodies. Although it is known that extracellular α-Syn is detected in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid, its physiological significance remains unclear. Here, we show that extracellular α-Syn suppresses platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced chemotaxis in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The inhibitory effect was stronger in the mutant α-Syn(A53T), found in hereditary PD, and the degree of inhibition was time-dependent, presumably because of the oligomerization of α-Syn. PDGF-induced activation of Akt or Erk was not influenced by α-Syn(A53T). Further studies revealed that α-Syn(A53T) inhibited PDGF-induced Rac1 activation, whereas Cdc42 activation remained unaffected, resulting in unbalanced actin filament remodeling. These results shed light on the understanding of pathological as well as physiological functions of extracellular α-Syn in neuronal cells. PMID:27886249

  1. Dlc1 interaction with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9) and Rac1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Sabbir, Mohammad G.; Dillon, Rachelle; Mowat, Michael R. A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Deleted in liver cancer 1 (Dlc1) gene codes for a Rho GTPase-activating protein that also acts as a tumour suppressor gene. Several studies have consistently found that overexpression leads to excessive cell elongation, cytoskeleton changes and subsequent cell death. However, none of these studies have been able to satisfactorily explain the Dlc1-induced cell morphological phenotypes and the function of the different Dlc1 isoforms. Therefore, we have studied the interacting proteins associated with the three major Dlc1 transcriptional isoforms using a mass spectrometric approach in Dlc1 overexpressing cells. We have found and validated novel interacting partners in constitutive Dlc1-expressing cells. Our study has shown that Dlc1 interacts with non-muscle myosin heavy chain II-A (Myh9), plectin and spectrin proteins in different multiprotein complexes. Overexpression of Dlc1 led to increased phosphorylation of Myh9 protein and activation of Rac1 GTPase. These data support a role for Dlc1 in induced cell elongation morphology and provide some molecular targets for further analysis of this phenotype. PMID:26977077

  2. Exploring the multifactorial nature of autism through computational systems biology: calcium and the Rho GTPase RAC1 under the spotlight.

    PubMed

    Zeidán-Chuliá, Fares; Rybarczyk-Filho, José Luiz; Salmina, Alla B; de Oliveira, Ben-Hur Neves; Noda, Mami; Moreira, José Cláudio F

    2013-06-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired social interaction and communication accompanied with repetitive behavioral patterns and unusual stereotyped interests. Autism is considered a highly heterogeneous disorder with diverse putative causes and associated factors giving rise to variable ranges of symptomatology. Incidence seems to be increasing with time, while the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms remain virtually uncharacterized (or unknown). By systematic review of the literature and a systems biology approach, our aims were to examine the multifactorial nature of autism with its broad range of severity, to ascertain the predominant biological processes, cellular components, and molecular functions integral to the disorder, and finally, to elucidate the most central contributions (genetic and/or environmental) in silico. With this goal, we developed an integrative network model for gene-environment interactions (GENVI model) where calcium (Ca(2+)) was shown to be its most relevant node. Moreover, considering the present data from our systems biology approach together with the results from the differential gene expression analysis of cerebellar samples from autistic patients, we believe that RAC1, in particular, and the RHO family of GTPases, in general, could play a critical role in the neuropathological events associated with autism.

  3. Integrin alpha1beta1 controls reactive oxygen species synthesis by negatively regulating epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated Rac activation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiwu; Abair, Tristin D; Ibanez, Maria R; Su, Yan; Frey, Mark R; Dise, Rebecca S; Polk, D Brent; Singh, Amar B; Harris, Raymond C; Zent, Roy; Pozzi, Ambra

    2007-05-01

    Integrins control many cell functions, including generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and regulation of collagen synthesis. Mesangial cells, found in the glomerulus of the kidney, are able to produce large amounts of ROS via the NADPH oxidase. We previously demonstrated that integrin alpha1-null mice develop worse fibrosis than wild-type mice following glomerular injury and this is due, in part, to excessive ROS production by alpha1-null mesangial cells. In the present studies, we describe the mechanism whereby integrin alpha1-null mesangial cells produce excessive ROS. Integrin alpha1-null mesangial cells have constitutively increased basal levels of activated Rac1, which result in its increased translocation to the cell membrane, excessive ROS production, and consequent collagen IV deposition. Basal Rac1 activation is a direct consequence of ligand-independent increased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation in alpha1-null mesangial cells. Thus, our study demonstrates that integrin alpha1beta1-EGFR cross talk is a key step in negatively regulating Rac1 activation, ROS production, and excessive collagen synthesis, which is a hallmark of diseases characterized by irreversible fibrosis.

  4. EHT 1864, a small molecule inhibitor of Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1), attenuates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Sidarala, Vaibhav; Veluthakal, Rajakrishnan; Syeda, Khadija; Kowluru, Anjaneyulu

    2015-06-01

    Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in the pancreatic β-cells entails a variety of signaling mechanisms including activation of small GTP-binding proteins (G-proteins). Previous studies from our laboratory in human islets, rodent islets and clonal β-cells have demonstrated that G-proteins (e.g., Arf6, Cdc42 and Rac1) play novel roles in cytoskeletal remodeling, which is a critical step in the trafficking of insulin-laden secretory granules for fusion with plasma membrane and release of insulin. To further understand regulatory roles of Rac1 in GSIS, we utilized, herein, EHT 1864, a small molecule inhibitor, which attenuates Rac1 activation by retaining the G-protein in an inert/inactive state, thereby preventing activation of its downstream effector proteins. We demonstrate that EHT 1864 markedly attenuated GSIS in INS-1 832/13 cells. In addition, EHT 1864 significantly reduced glucose-induced activation and membrane targeting of Rac1 in INS-1 832/13 cells. This Rac1 inhibitor also suppressed glucose-induced activation of ERK1/2 and p53, but not Akt. Lastly, unlike the inhibitors of protein prenylation (simvastatin), EHT 1864 did not exert any significant effects on cell morphology (cell rounding) under the conditions it attenuated Rac1-sensitive signaling steps leading to GSIS. Based on these findings, we conclude that EHT 1864 specifically inhibits glucose-induced Rac1 activation and membrane association and associated downstream signaling events culminating in inhibition of GSIS.

  5. CD66-mediated phagocytosis of Opa52 Neisseria gonorrhoeae requires a Src-like tyrosine kinase- and Rac1-dependent signalling pathway.

    PubMed

    Hauck, C R; Meyer, T F; Lang, F; Gulbins, E

    1998-01-15

    The interaction of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with human phagocytes is a hallmark of gonococcal infections. Recently, CD66 molecules have been characterized as receptors for Opa52-expressing gonococci on human neutrophils. Here we show that Opa52-expressing gonococci or Escherichia coli or F(ab) fragments directed against CD66, respectively, activate a signalling cascade from CD66 via Src-like protein tyrosine kinases, Rac1 and PAK to Jun-N-terminal kinase. The induced signal is distinct from Fcgamma-receptor-mediated signalling and is specific for Opa52, since piliated Opa- gonococci, commensal Neisseria cinerea or E.coli do not stimulate this signalling pathway. Inhibition of Src-like kinases or Rac1 prevents the uptake of Opa52 bacteria, demonstrating the crucial role of this signalling cascade for the opsonin-independent, Opa52/CD66-mediated phagocytosis of pathogenic Neisseria.

  6. Growth arrest of lung carcinoma cells (A549) by polyacrylate-anchored peroxovanadate by activating Rac1-NADPH oxidase signalling axis.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nirupama; Anwar, Tarique; Islam, Nashreen S; Ramasarma, T; Ramakrishna, Gayatri

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is often required in sublethal, millimolar concentrations to show its oxidant effects on cells in culture as it is easily destroyed by cellular catalase. Previously, we had shown that diperoxovanadate, a physiologically stable peroxovanadium compound, can substitute H2O2 effectively in peroxidation reactions. We report here that peroxovanadate when anchored to polyacrylic acid (PAPV) becomes a highly potent inhibitor of growth of lung carcinoma cells (A549). The early events associated with PAPV treatment included cytoskeletal modifications, increase in GTPase activity of Rac1, accumulation of the reactive oxygen species, and also increase in phosphorylation of H2AX (γH2AX), a marker of DNA damage. These effects persisted even at 24 h after removal of the compound and culminated in increased levels of p53 and p21 together with growth arrest. The PAPV-mediated growth arrest was significantly abrogated in cells pre-treated with the N-acetylcysteine, Rac1 knocked down by siRNA and DPI an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. In conclusion, our results show that polyacrylate derivative of peroxovanadate efficiently arrests growth of A549 cancerous cells by activating the axis of Rac1-NADPH oxidase leading to oxidative stress and DNA damage.

  7. TGF-{beta}1 increases invasiveness of SW1990 cells through Rac1/ROS/NF-{kappa}B/IL-6/MMP-2

    SciTech Connect

    Binker, Marcelo G.; Binker-Cosen, Andres A.; Gaisano, Herbert Y.; Cosen, Rodica H. de; Cosen-Binker, Laura I.

    2011-02-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Rac1 mediates TGF-{beta}1-induced SW1990 invasion through MMP-2 secretion and activation. {yields} NADPH-generated ROS act downstream of Rac1 in TGF-{beta}1-challenged SW1990 cells. {yields} TGF-{beta}1-stimulated ROS activate NF-{kappa}B in SW1990 cells. {yields} NF{kappa}B-induced IL-6 release is required for secretion and activation of MMP-2 in SW1990 cells. -- Abstract: Human pancreatic cancer invasion and metastasis have been found to correlate with increased levels of active matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2). The multifunctional cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-{beta}1) has been shown to increase both secretion of MMP-2 and invasion by several pancreatic cancer cell types. In the present study, we investigated the signaling pathway involved in TGF-{beta}1-promoted MMP-2 secretion and invasion by human pancreatic cancer cells SW1990. Using specific inhibitors, we found that stimulation of these tumor cells with TGF-{beta}1 induced secretion and activation of the collagenase MMP-2, which was required for TGF-{beta}1-stimulated invasion. Our results also indicate that signaling events involved in TGF-{beta}1-enhanced SW1990 invasiveness comprehend activation of Rac1 followed by generation of reactive oxygen species through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase, activation of nuclear factor-kappa beta, release of interleukin-6, and secretion and activation of MMP-2.

  8. Rac-1 superactivation triggers insulin-independent glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation that bypasses signaling defects exerted by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)- and ceramide-induced insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Tim Ting; Sun, Yi; Koshkina, Alexandra; Klip, Amira

    2013-06-14

    Insulin activates a cascade of signaling molecules, including Rac-1, Akt, and AS160, to promote the net gain of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) at the plasma membrane of muscle cells. Interestingly, constitutively active Rac-1 expression results in a hormone-independent increase in surface GLUT4; however, the molecular mechanism and significance behind this effect remain unresolved. Using L6 myoblasts stably expressing myc-tagged GLUT4, we found that overexpression of constitutively active but not wild-type Rac-1 sufficed to drive GLUT4 translocation to the membrane of comparable magnitude with that elicited by insulin. Stimulation of endogenous Rac-1 by Tiam1 overexpression elicited a similar hormone-independent gain in surface GLUT4. This effect on GLUT4 traffic could also be reproduced by acutely activating a Rac-1 construct via rapamycin-mediated heterodimerization. Strategies triggering Rac-1 "superactivation" (i.e. to levels above those attained by insulin alone) produced a modest gain in plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate, moderate Akt activation, and substantial AS160 phosphorylation, which translated into GLUT4 translocation and negated the requirement for IRS-1. This unique signaling capacity exerted by Rac-1 superactivation bypassed the defects imposed by JNK- and ceramide-induced insulin resistance and allowed full and partial restoration of the GLUT4 translocation response, respectively. We propose that potent elevation of Rac-1 activation alone suffices to drive insulin-independent GLUT4 translocation in muscle cells, and such a strategy might be exploited to bypass signaling defects during insulin resistance.

  9. Angiotensin II activates signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 via Rac1 in the atrial tissue in permanent atrial fibrillation patients with rheumatic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiao-Dong; Huang, Jian-Hua; Wang, Hui-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Patients with rheumatic heart disease (RHD) often experience persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) associated with adverse atrial structural remodeling (ASR) manifested by atrial fibrosis and left atrial enlargement. The aim of this study was to explore the potential molecular signaling mechanisms for atrial fibrosis and ASR. Twenty RHD patients with persistent AF and 10 RHD patients with sinus rhythm (Group A) were recruited in our study, which all underwent transthoracic echocardiography. Right atrial appendage (RAA) tissue samples were obtained from these patients during mitral/aortic valve replacement operation. The AF patients were further divided into two groups according to left atrial diameter (LAD): Group B with LAD ranging 50-65 mm and Group C with LAD >65 mm. Histological examinations were performed with hematoxylin-eosin staining and Masson's trichrome staining. Atrial angiotensin II (AngII) content was measured by ELISA. Rac1 and STAT3 protein levels were determined by Western blot analysis. Hematoxylin-eosin staining demonstrated highly organized arrangement of atrial muscles in control Group A and significant derangement in both Group B and C AF patients with reduced cell density and increased cell size. Moreover, Masson's trichrome staining showed that atrial myocytes were surrounded by large trunks of collagen fibers in both Group B and C, but not in Group A. There was a positive correlation between atrial tissue fibrosis and LAD. AngII content was markedly higher in Group C than in Group B than in Group A, which was positively correlated with LAD. Similarly, Rac1 and STAT3 protein levels were found considerably higher in Group C and B than in Group A with excellent correlation to LAD. Our study unraveled for the first time the AngII/Rac1/STAT3 signaling as a mechanism for ASR thereby AF in a particular clinical setting-RHD patients with persistent AF and indicated inhibition of this pathway may help ameliorating adverse ASR.

  10. Regulating food products without impeding innovation.

    PubMed

    Mathioudakis, B; Przyrembel, H; Hermus, R

    1999-12-01

    Industry and regulatory bodies share a common goal of making beneficial products available to consumers, but the relationship between industry and regulators can become adversarial if it is not handled properly. When industry views the regulatory process as an obstacle to product development and marketing, and regulators view petitioners as having only a profit motive, the opportunity to work together efficiently to get products to market is lost. While it is difficult to codify how industry and regulators should interact, it is worthwhile to look at some of the most provocative issues and see how they might be addressed. The discussion that follows will examine the functioning of regulatory bodies in the European Union, consider how more flexibility might be added to the regulatory process, and raise the issue of how regulatory bodies can function to serve the consumer while promoting innovation.

  11. Protein kinase CK2 interacts at the neuromuscular synapse with Rapsyn, Rac1, 14-3-3γ, and Dok-7 proteins and phosphorylates the latter two.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Dustin; Straubinger, Marion; Hashemolhosseini, Said

    2015-09-11

    Previously, we demonstrated that the protein kinase CK2 associates with and phosphorylates the receptor tyrosine kinase MuSK (muscle specific receptor tyrosine kinase) at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), thereby preventing fragmentation of the NMJs (Cheusova, T., Khan, M. A., Schubert, S. W., Gavin, A. C., Buchou, T., Jacob, G., Sticht, H., Allende, J., Boldyreff, B., Brenner, H. R., and Hashemolhosseini, S. (2006) Genes Dev. 20, 1800-1816). Here, we asked whether CK2 interacts with other proteins involved in processes at the NMJ, which would be consistent with the previous observation that CK2 appears enriched at the NMJ. We identified the following proteins to interact with protein kinase CK2: (a) the α and β subunits of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with weak interaction, (b) dishevelled (Dsh), and (c) another four proteins, Rapsyn, Rac1, 14-3-3γ, and Dok-7, with strong interaction. CK2 phosphorylated 14-3-3γ at serine residue 235 and Dok-7 at several serine residues but does not phosphorylate Rapsyn or Rac1. Furthermore, phosphomimetic Dok-7 mutants aggregated nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in C2C12 myotubes with significantly higher frequency than wild type Dok-7. Additionally, we mapped the interacting epitopes of all four binding partners to CK2 and thereby gained insights into the potential role of the CK2/Rapsyn interaction.

  12. Filamin B Plays a Key Role in Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-induced Endothelial Cell Motility through Its Interaction with Rac-1 and Vav-2*

    PubMed Central

    del Valle-Pérez, Beatriz; Martínez, Vanesa Gabriela; Lacasa-Salavert, Cristina; Figueras, Agnès; Shapiro, Sandor S.; Takafuta, Toshiro; Casanovas, Oriol; Capellà, Gabriel; Ventura, Francesc; Viñals, Francesc

    2010-01-01

    Actin-binding proteins filamin A (FLNA) and B (FLNB) are expressed in endothelial cells and play an essential role during vascular development. In order to investigate their role in adult endothelial cell function, we initially confirmed their expression pattern in different adult mouse tissues and cultured cell lines and found that FLNB expression is concentrated mainly in endothelial cells, whereas FLNA is more ubiquitously expressed. Functionally, small interfering RNA knockdown of endogenous FLNB in human umbilical vein endothelial cells inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced in vitro angiogenesis by decreasing endothelial cell migration capacity, whereas FLNA ablation did not alter these parameters. Moreover, FLNB-depleted cells increased their substrate adhesion with more focal adhesions. The molecular mechanism underlying this effect implicates modulation of small GTP-binding protein Rac-1 localization and activity, with altered activation of its downstream effectors p21 protein Cdc42/Rac-activated kinase (PAK)-4/5/6 and its activating guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav-2. Moreover, our results suggest the existence of a signaling complex, including FLNB, Rac-1, and Vav-2, under basal conditions that would further interact with VEGFR2 and integrin αvβ5 after VEGF stimulation. In conclusion, our results reveal a crucial role for FLNB in endothelial cell migration and in the angiogenic process in adult endothelial cells. PMID:20110358

  13. Rac1 activation driven by 14-3-3ζ dimerization promotes prostate cancer cell-matrix interactions, motility and transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Goc, Anna; Abdalla, Maha; Al-Azayzih, Ahmad; Somanath, Payaningal R

    2012-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins are ubiquitously expressed dimeric adaptor proteins that have emerged as key mediators of many cell signaling pathways in multiple cell types. Its effects are mainly mediated by binding to selective phosphoserine/threonine proteins. The importance of 14-3-3 proteins in cancer have only started to become apparent and its exact role in cancer progression as well as the mechanisms by which 14-3-3 proteins mediate cancer cell function remain unknown. While protein 14-3-3σ is widely accepted as a tumor suppressor, 14-3-3ζ, β and γ isoforms have been shown to have tumor promoting effects. Despite the importance of 14-3-3 family in mediating various cell processes, the exact role and mechanism of 14-3-3ζ remain unexplored. In the current study, we investigated the role of protein 14-3-3ζ in prostate cancer cell motility and transendothelial migration using biochemical, molecular biology and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing approaches as well as cell based functional assays. Our study indicated that expression with wild-type protein 14-3-3ζ significantly enhanced Rac activity in PC3 cells. In contrast, expression of dimer-resistant mutant of protein 14-3-3ζ (DM-14-3-3) inhibited Rac activity and associated phosphorylation of p21 activated kinase-1 and 2. Expression with wild-type 14-3-3ζ or constitutively active Rac1 enhanced extracellular matrix recognition, lamellipodia formation, cell migration and trans-endothelial migration by PC3 cells. In contrast, expression with DM 14-3-3ζ or DN-Rac1 in PC3 cells significantly inhibited these cell functions. Our results demonstrate for the first time that 14-3-3ζ enhances prostate cancer cell-matrix interactions, motility and transendothelial migration in vitro via activation of Rac1-GTPase and is an important target for therapeutic interventions for prostate cancer.

  14. Heregulin/ErbB3 Signaling Enhances CXCR4-Driven Rac1 Activation and Breast Cancer Cell Motility via Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Haber, Cynthia; Barrio-Real, Laura; Casado-Medrano, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    The growth factor heregulin (HRG), a ligand of ErbB3 and ErbB4 receptors, contributes to breast cancer development and the promotion of metastatic disease, and its expression in breast tumors has been associated with poor clinical outcome and resistance to therapy. In this study, we found that breast cancer cells exposed to sustained HRG treatment show markedly enhanced Rac1 activation and migratory activity in response to the CXCR4 ligand SDF-1/CXCL12, effects mediated by P-Rex1, a Rac-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) aberrantly expressed in breast cancer. Notably, HRG treatment upregulates surface expression levels of CXCR4, a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) implicated in breast cancer metastasis and an indicator of poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. A detailed mechanistic analysis revealed that CXCR4 upregulation and sensitization of the Rac response/motility by HRG are mediated by the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) via ErbB3 and independently of ErbB4. HRG caused prominent induction in the nuclear expression of HIF-1α, which transcriptionally activates the CXCR4 gene via binding to a responsive element located in positions −1376 to −1372 in the CXCR4 promoter, as revealed by mutagenesis analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Our results uncovered a novel function for ErbB3 in enhancing breast cancer cell motility and sensitization of the P-Rex1/Rac1 pathway through HIF-1α-mediated transcriptional induction of CXCR4. PMID:27185877

  15. The Chromobacterium violaceum type III effector CopE, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac1 and Cdc42, is involved in bacterial invasion of epithelial cells and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Miki, Tsuyoshi; Akiba, Kinari; Iguchi, Mirei; Danbara, Hirofumi; Okada, Nobuhiko

    2011-06-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) encoded by Chromobacterium pathogenicity islands 1 and 1a (Cpi-1/-1a) is critical for Chromobacterium violaceum pathogenesis. T3SS-dependent virulence is commonly characterized by type III effector virulence function, but the full repertoire of the effector proteins of Cpi-1/-1a T3SS is unknown. In this study, we showed that expression of Cpi-1/-1a T3SS is controlled by the master regulator CilA. We used transcriptional profiling with DNA microarrays to define CilA regulon and identified genes encoding T3SS effectors whose translocation into host cells was dependent on Cpi-1/-1a T3SS. From these effectors, we found that CopE (CV0296) has similarities to a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Rho GTPases in its C-terminal portion. The N-terminal portions (1-81 amino acids) of CopE and a CivB as a putative chaperone were required for its translocation. CopE specifically activates Rac1 and Cdc42 followed by the induction of actin cytoskeletal rearrangement. Interestingly, C. violaceum invades human epithelial HeLa cells in a Cpi-1/-1a-encoded T3SS- and CopE-dependent manner. Finally, C. violaceum strains lacking copE and expressing a CopE-G168V deficient in GEF activity were attenuated for virulence in mice, suggesting that CopE contributes to the virulence of this pathogen.

  16. Regulated Exopolysaccharide Production in Myxococcus xanthus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Ramaswamy, Srinivas; Downard, John

    1999-01-01

    Myxococcus xanthus fibrils are cell surface-associated structures composed of roughly equal amounts of polysaccharide and protein. The level of M. xanthus polysaccharide production under different conditions in the wild type and in several mutants known to have alterations in fibril production was investigated. Wild-type exopolysaccharide increased significantly as cells entered the stationary phase of growth or upon addition of Ca2+ to growing cells, and the polysaccharide-induced cells exhibited an enhanced capacity for cell-cell agglutination. The activity of the key gluconeogenic pathway enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (Pck) also increased under these conditions. Most fibril-deficient mutants failed to produce polysaccharide in a stationary-phase- or Ca2+-dependent fashion. However, regulation of Pck activity was generally unimpaired in these mutant strains. In an stk mutant, which overproduces fibrils, polysaccharide production and Pck activity were constitutively high under the conditions tested. Polysaccharide production increased in most fibril-deficient strains when an stk mutant allele was present, indicating that these fibril-deficient mutants retained the basic cellular components required for fibril polysaccharide production. In contrast to other divalent cations tested, Sr2+ effectively replaced Ca2+ in stimulating polysaccharide production, and either Ca2+ or Sr2+ was required for fruiting-body formation by wild-type cells. By using transmission electron microscopy of freeze-substituted log-phase wild-type cells, fibril material was observed as a cell surface-associated layer of uniform thickness composed of filaments with an ordered structure. PMID:10049381

  17. Regulation of Macropinocytosis by Diacylglycerol Kinase ζ.

    PubMed

    Ard, Ryan; Mulatz, Kirk; Pomoransky, Julia L; Parks, Robin J; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Bell, John C; Gee, Stephen H

    2015-01-01

    Macropinosomes arise from the closure of plasma membrane ruffles to bring about the non-selective uptake of nutrients and solutes into cells. The morphological changes underlying ruffle formation and macropinosome biogenesis are driven by actin cytoskeleton rearrangements under the control of the Rho GTPase Rac1. We showed previously that Rac1 is activated by diacylglycerol kinase ζ (DGKζ), which phosphorylates diacylglycerol to yield phosphatidic acid. Here, we show DGKζ is required for optimal macropinocytosis induced by growth factor stimulation of mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Time-lapse imaging of live cells and quantitative analysis revealed DGKζ was associated with membrane ruffles and nascent macropinosomes. Macropinocytosis was attenuated in DGKζ-null cells, as determined by live imaging and vaccinia virus uptake experiments. Moreover, macropinosomes that did form in DGKζ-null cells were smaller than those found in wild type cells. Rescue of this defect required DGKζ catalytic activity, consistent with it also being required for Rac1 activation. A constitutively membrane bound DGKζ mutant substantially increased the size of macropinosomes and potentiated the effect of a constitutively active Rac1 mutant on macropinocytosis. Collectively, our results suggest DGKζ functions in concert with Rac1 to regulate macropinocytosis.

  18. Tristetraprolin regulation of interleukin-22 production.

    PubMed

    Härdle, Lorena; Bachmann, Malte; Bollmann, Franziska; Pautz, Andrea; Schmid, Tobias; Eberhardt, Wolfgang; Kleinert, Hartmut; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Mühl, Heiko

    2015-10-21

    Interleukin (IL)-22 is a STAT3-activating cytokine displaying characteristic AU-rich elements (ARE) in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of its mRNA. This architecture suggests gene regulation by modulation of mRNA stability. Since related cytokines undergo post-transcriptional regulation by ARE-binding tristetraprolin (TTP), the role of this destabilizing protein in IL-22 production was investigated. Herein, we demonstrate that TTP-deficient mice display augmented serum IL-22. Likewise, IL-22 mRNA was enhanced in TTP-deficient splenocytes and isolated primary T cells. A pivotal role for TTP is underscored by an extended IL-22 mRNA half-life detectable in TTP-deficient T cells. Luciferase-reporter assays performed in human Jurkat T cells proved the destabilizing potential of the human IL-22-3'-UTR. Furthermore, overexpression of TTP in HEK293 cells substantially decreased luciferase activity directed by the IL-22-3'-UTR. Transcript destabilization by TTP was nullified upon cellular activation by TPA/A23187, an effect dependent on MEK1/2 activity. Accordingly, IL-22 mRNA half-life as determined in TPA/A23187-stimulated Jurkat T cells decreased under the influence of the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126. Altogether, data indicate that TTP directly controls IL-22 production, a process counteracted by MEK1/2. The TTP-dependent regulatory pathway described herein likely contributes to the role of IL-22 in inflammation and cancer and may evolve as novel target for pharmacological IL-22 modulation.

  19. Piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) modulates axonal guidance growth of rat cortical neurons via RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42 pathways.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jianqiang; Liu, Meili

    2014-03-01

    Electrical stimulation is critical for axonal connection, which can stimulate axonal migration and deformation to promote axonal growth in the nervous system. Netrin-1, an axonal guidance cue, can also promote axonal guidance growth, but the molecular mechanism of axonal guidance growth under indirect electric stimulation is still unknown. We investigated the molecular mechanism of axonal guidance growth under piezoelectric ceramic lead zirconate titanate (PZT) stimulation in the primary cultured cortical neurons. PZT induced marked axonal elongation. Moreover, PZT activated the excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) by increasing the frequency and amplitude of EPSCs of the cortical neurons in patch clamp assay. PZT downregulated the expression of Netrin-1 and its receptor Deleted in Colorectal Cancer (DCC). Rho GTPase signaling is involved in interactions of Netrin-1 and DCC. PZT activated RhoA. Dramatic decrease of Cdc42 and Rac1 was also observed after PZT treatment. RhoA inhibitor Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme (C3-Exo) prevented the PZT-induced downregulation of Netrin-1 and DCC. We suggest that PZT can promote axonal guidance growth by downregulation of Netrin-1 and DCC to mediate axonal repulsive responses via the Rho GTPase signaling pathway. Obviously, piezoelectric materials may provide a new approach for axonal recovery and be beneficial for clinical therapy in the future.

  20. Chemoenzymatic dynamic kinetic resolution of rac-1-phenylethanol in ionic liquids and ionic liquids/supercritical carbon dioxide systems.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Pedro; De Diego, Teresa; Larnicol, Mickaël; Vaultier, Michel; Iborra, José L

    2006-10-01

    Continuous dynamic kinetic resolution processes in different ionic liquid/supercritical carbon dioxide biphasic systems were carried out by simultaneously using both immobilized Candida antarctica lipase B (Novozym 435) and silica modified with benzenosulfonic acid (SCX) catalysts at 40 degrees C and 10 MPa. SCX was seen to act as an efficient heterogeneous chemical catalyst for the racemization of (S)-1-phenylethanol in different ionic liquid media ([emim][NTf(2)], [btma][NTf(2)] and [bmim][PF(6)]). Coating both chemical and enzymatic catalysts with ILs greatly improved the efficiency of the process, providing a good yield (76%) of (R)-1-phenylethyl propionate product with excellent enantioselectivity (ee = 91-98%) in continuous operation.

  1. Regulating Tradeoffs to Improve Rice Production

    PubMed Central

    Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms that are continuously exposed to a wide range of environmental stresses. To cope with various stresses using limited resources, plants have evolved diverse mechanisms of “tradeoff” that enable the allocation of resources to address the most life-threatening stress. During our studies on induced disease resistance in rice, we have found some important phenomena relevant to tradeoffs between biotic and abiotic stress responses, and between stress response and plant growth. We characterized these tradeoff phenomena from viewpoints of signaling crosstalks associated with transcriptional regulation. Here, I describe following topics: (1) PTP1-dependent increased disease susceptibility of rice under low temperature and high salinity conditions, (2) OsNPR1-dependent tradeoff between pathogen defense and photosynthesis, (3) tradeoff between pathogen defense and abiotic stress tolerance in WRKY45-overexpressing rice plants, and (4) WRKY62-dependent tradeoff between pathogen defense and hypoxia tolerance. Lastly, I discuss my view regarding the significance of such tradeoffs in agricultural production that should be considered in crop breeding; that is, the tradeoffs, although they benefit plants in nature, can be rather disadvantageous in agricultural production. PMID:28232844

  2. Regulation of protease production in Clostridium sporogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, C; Macfarlane, G T

    1990-01-01

    The physiological and nutritional factors that regulate protease synthesis in Clostridium sporogenes C25 were studied in batch and continuous cultures. Formation of extracellular proteases occurred at the end of active growth and during the stationary phase in batch cultures. Protease production was inversely related to growth rate in glucose-excess and glucose-limited chemostats over the range D = 0.05 to 0.70 h-1. In pulse experiments, glucose, ammonia, phosphate, and some amino acids (tryptophan, proline, tyrosine, and isoleucine) strongly repressed protease synthesis. This repression was not relieved by addition of 4 mM cyclic AMP, cyclic GMP, or dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Protease formation was markedly inhibited by 4 mM ATP and ADP, but GTP and GDP had little effect on the process. It is concluded that protease production by C. sporogenes is strongly influenced by the amount of energy available to the cells, with the highest levels of protease synthesis occurring under energy-limiting conditions. PMID:2268158

  3. Regulating Tradeoffs to Improve Rice Production.

    PubMed

    Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms that are continuously exposed to a wide range of environmental stresses. To cope with various stresses using limited resources, plants have evolved diverse mechanisms of "tradeoff" that enable the allocation of resources to address the most life-threatening stress. During our studies on induced disease resistance in rice, we have found some important phenomena relevant to tradeoffs between biotic and abiotic stress responses, and between stress response and plant growth. We characterized these tradeoff phenomena from viewpoints of signaling crosstalks associated with transcriptional regulation. Here, I describe following topics: (1) PTP1-dependent increased disease susceptibility of rice under low temperature and high salinity conditions, (2) OsNPR1-dependent tradeoff between pathogen defense and photosynthesis, (3) tradeoff between pathogen defense and abiotic stress tolerance in WRKY45-overexpressing rice plants, and (4) WRKY62-dependent tradeoff between pathogen defense and hypoxia tolerance. Lastly, I discuss my view regarding the significance of such tradeoffs in agricultural production that should be considered in crop breeding; that is, the tradeoffs, although they benefit plants in nature, can be rather disadvantageous in agricultural production.

  4. 7 CFR 966.4 - Production area and regulated area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Production area and regulated area. 966.4 Section 966... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 966.4 Production area and regulated area....

  5. 7 CFR 966.4 - Production area and regulated area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Production area and regulated area. 966.4 Section 966... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 966.4 Production area and regulated area....

  6. 7 CFR 966.4 - Production area and regulated area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Production area and regulated area. 966.4 Section 966... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 966.4 Production area and regulated area....

  7. 7 CFR 966.4 - Production area and regulated area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Production area and regulated area. 966.4 Section 966... SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 966.4 Production area and regulated area....

  8. ROS production as a common mechanism of ENaC regulation by EGF, insulin, and IGF-1.

    PubMed

    Ilatovskaya, Daria V; Pavlov, Tengis S; Levchenko, Vladislav; Staruschenko, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) is a key transporter participating in the fine tuning of Na(+) reabsorption in the nephron. ENaC activity is acutely upregulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), insulin, and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). It was also proposed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) have a stimulatory effect on ENaC. Here we studied whether effects of EGF, insulin, and IGF-1 correlate with ROS production in the mouse cortical collecting duct (mpkCCD(c14)) cells. Western blotting confirmed the expression of the NADPH oxidase complex subunits in these cells. Treatment of mpkCCD(c14) cells with EGF, insulin, or IGF-1 evoked an increase in ROS production as measured by CM-H(2)DCF-DA fluorescence. ROS production caused by a xanthine-xanthine oxidase reaction also resulted in a significant elevation in short-circuit current through the mpkCCD(c14) monolayer. Transepithelial current measurements showed an acute increase of amiloride-sensitive current through the mpkCCD(c14) monolayer in response to EGF, insulin, or IGF-1. Pretreatment with the nonselective NADPH oxidase activity inhibitor apocynin blunted both ROS production and increase in ENaC-mediated current in response to these drugs. To further test whether NADPH oxidase subunits are involved in the effect of EGF, we used a stable M-1 cell line with a knockdown of Rac1, which is one of the key subunits of the NADPH oxidase complex, and measured amiloride-sensitive currents in response to EGF. In contrast to control cells, EGF had no effect in Rac1 knockdown cells. We hypothesize that EGF, insulin, and IGF-1 have a common stimulatory effect on ENaC mediated by ROS production.

  9. Beta2-chimaerin provides a diacylglycerol-dependent mechanism for regulation of adhesion and chemotaxis of T cells.

    PubMed

    Siliceo, María; García-Bernal, David; Carrasco, Silvia; Díaz-Flores, Ernesto; Coluccio Leskow, Federico; Leskow, Federico C; Teixidó, Joaquín; Kazanietz, Marcelo G; Mérida, Isabel

    2006-01-01

    The small GTPase Rac contributes to regulation of cytoskeletal rearrangement during chemokine-induced lymphocyte adhesion and migration in a multi-step process that is very precisely coordinated. Chimaerins are Rac1-specific GTPase-activating proteins of unknown biological function, which have a canonical diacylglycerol C1-binding domain. Here we demonstrate endogenous expression of beta2-chimaerin in T lymphocytes and study the functional role of this protein in phorbol ester and chemokine (CXCL12)-regulated T-cell responses. We used green fluorescent protein-tagged beta2-chimaerin and phorbol ester stimulation to investigate changes in protein localization in living lymphocytes. Our results demonstrate that active Rac cooperates with C1-dependent phorbol ester binding to induce sustained GFP-beta2-chimaerin localization to the membrane. Subcellular distribution of GFP beta2-chimaerin in living cells showed no major changes following CXCL12 stimulation. Nonetheless Rac1-GTP levels were severely inhibited in GFP-beta2-chimaerin-expressing cells, which displayed reduced CXCL12-induced integrin-dependent adhesion and spreading. This effect was dependent on chimaerin GTPase-activating protein function and required diacylglycerol generation. Whereas beta2-chimaerin overexpression decreased static adhesion, it enhanced CXCL12-dependent migration via receptor-dependent diacylglycerol production. These studies demonstrate that beta2-chimaerin provides a novel, diacylglycerol-dependent mechanism for Rac regulation in T cells and suggest a functional role for this protein in Rac-mediated cytoskeletal remodeling.

  10. Exposure to chronic hyperglycemic conditions results in Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1)-mediated activation of p53 and ATM kinase in pancreatic β-cells.

    PubMed

    Sidarala, Vaibhav; Kowluru, Anjaneyulu

    2017-02-21

    Chronic hyperglycemia (HG) promotes pancreatic islet dysfunction which leads to the onset of T2DM. This study is aimed at defining regulatory roles of Rac1, a small G-protein, in the activation of p53 and ATM kinase in pancreatic β-cells, under the duress of HG conditions. We report significant stimulatory effects of HG (20 mM; 24 h) on p53 activation in INS-1 832/13 cells, normal rodent and human islets. Pharmacological inhibition of Rac1 (EHT1864 or NSC23766) significantly suppressed HG-induced p53 activation in INS-1 832/13 cells and rat islets, suggesting novel roles for this small G-protein in the activation of p53. Inhibition of Rac1 geranylgeranylation with simvastatin or GGTI-2147, significantly attenuated HG-induced p53 activation, suggesting requisite roles for this signaling step in HG-mediated effects on β-cells. HG-induced p53 activation was also suppressed by SB203580, a known inhibitor of p38MAPK. Additionally, we observed increased activation of ATM kinase under HG conditions, which was blocked in presence of EHT1864. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of ATM kinase (KU55933) reduced activation of ATM kinase, but not p53, suggesting that HG-mediated activation of p53 and ATM could represent independent pro-apoptotic events. In conclusion, these data indicate that sustained activation of Rac1-p38MAPK signaling axis leads to activation of p53 leading to β-cell dysfunction under the duress of chronic hyperglycemic conditions.

  11. An unexpected co-crystal with a variable degree of order: 1:1 rac-1,2-cyclohexanediol/triphenylphosphine oxide.

    PubMed

    Siegler, Maxime A; Fu, Yigang; Simpson, Greg H; King, Daniel P; Parkin, Sean; Brock, Carolyn Pratt

    2007-12-01

    A 1:1 co-crystal of rac-trans-1,2-C(6)H(10)(OH)(2) and (C(6)H(5))(3)PO has been found that is unusual because there are no strong interactions between the two kinds of molecules, which are segregated into layers. Furthermore, neither pure rac-1,2-cyclohexanediol (CHD) nor pure triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO) has any obvious packing problem that would make the formation of inclusion complexes likely. The TPPO layers are very much like those found in two of the four known polymorphs of pure TPPO. The hydrogen-bonded ribbons of CHD are similar to those found in other vic-diol crystals. The co-crystals are triclinic (space group P\\overline 1), but the deviations from monoclinic symmetry (space group C2/c) are small. The magnitudes of those deviations depend on the solvent from which the crystal is grown; the deviations are largest for crystals grown from acetone, smallest for crystals grown from toluene, and intermediate for crystals grown from ethanol. The deviations arise from incomplete enantiomeric disorder of the R,R and S,S diols; this disorder is not required by symmetry in either space group, but occupancy factors are nearly 0.50 when the structure is refined as monoclinic. When the structure is refined as triclinic the deviations of the occupancy factors from 0.50 mirror the deviations from monoclinic symmetry because information about the partial R,R/S,S ordering is transmitted from one diol layer to the next through the very pseudosymmetric TPPO layer. Analyses suggest individual CHD layers are at least mostly ordered. The degree of order seems to be established at the time the crystal is grown and is unlikely to change with heating or cooling. Thermal data suggest the existence of the co-crystal is a consequence of kinetic rather than thermodynamic factors.

  12. The challenges of regulating stem cell-based products.

    PubMed

    von Tigerstrom, Barbara J

    2008-12-01

    Appropriate regulation of stem cell-based products is essential to ensure public safety and trust while minimising unnecessary barriers to product development, but presents numerous challenges. Weaknesses of existing legal frameworks include variation between jurisdictions and poor fit between product categories and new technologies. The new European Regulation on advanced therapy medicinal products is an important attempt to provide a consolidated regulatory framework for novel products. Others can learn from issues encountered in its development, including definition of product categories, ethical concerns, and the application of regulations to small-scale production. Several aspects of the Regulation will be useful models, but some larger questions remain unresolved. As reform efforts move forward, harmonisation and sharing of expertise will be vital to effective regulation.

  13. Arf nucleotide binding site opener [ARNO] promotes sequential activation of Arf6, Cdc42 and Rac1 and insulin secretion in INS 832/13 β-cells and rat islets

    PubMed Central

    Jayaram, Bhavaani; Syed, Ismail; Kyathanahalli, Chandrashekara N.; Rhodes, Christopher J.; Kowluru, Anjaneyulu

    2011-01-01

    Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion [GSIS] involves interplay between small G-proteins and their regulatory factors. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that Arf nucleotide binding site opener [ARNO], a guanine nucleotide exchange factor [GEF] for the small G-protein Arf6, mediates the functional activation of Arf6, and that ARNO/Arf6 signaling axis, in turn, controls the activation of Cdc42 and Rac1, which have been implicated in GSIS. Molecular biological [i.e., expression of inactive mutants or siRNA] and pharmacological approaches were employed to assess the roles for ARNO/Arf6 signaling pathway in insulin secretion in normal rat islets and INS 832/13 cells. Degrees of activation of Arf6 and Cdc42/Rac1 were quantitated by GST-GGA3 and PAK-1 kinase pull-down assays, respectively. ARNO is expressed in INS 832/13 cells, rat islets and human islets. Expression of inactive mutants of Arf6 [Arf6-T27N] or ARNO [ARNO-E156K] or siRNA-ARNO markedly reduced GSIS in isolated β-cells. secinH3, a selective inhibitor of ARNO/Arf6 signaling axis, also inhibited GSIS in INS 832/13 cells and rat islets. Stimulatory concentrations of glucose promoted Arf6 activation, which was inhibited by secinH3 or siRNA-ARNO, suggesting that ARNO/Arf6 signaling cascade is necessary for GSIS. secinH3 or siRNA-ARNO also inhibited glucose-induced activation of Cdc42 and Rac1 suggesting that ARNO/Arf6 might be upstream to Cdc42 and Rac1 activation steps, which are necessary for GSIS. Lastly, co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopic studies suggested increased association between Arf6 and ARNO in glucose-stimulated β-cells. These findings provide the first evidence to implicate ARNO in the sequential activation of Arf6, Cdc42 and Rac1 culminating in GSIS. PMID:21276423

  14. Elmo2 Is a Regulator of Insulin-dependent Glut4 Membrane Translocation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yingmin; Côté, Jean-François; Du, Keyong

    2016-07-29

    Elmo2, a member of the Elmo protein family, has been implicated in the regulation of Rac1 and Akt activation. Recently, we found that Elmo2 specifically interacts with ClipR-59. Because Akt and Rac1 have been implicated in insulin dependent Glut4 membrane translocation, we hypothesize here that Elmo2 may play a role in insulin-dependent Glut4 membrane translocation. Accordingly, we found that overexpression of Elmo2 enhanced, whereas its knockdown suppressed, insulin-dependent Glut4 membrane translocation in both 3T3-L1 adipocytes and L6 skeletal muscle cells. We also examined whether Elmo2 contributes to the insulin-mediated activation of Rac1 and Akt. We found that Elmo2 is required for insulin-induced Rac1 GTP loading, but not AKT activation, in L6 cells induced by insulin. Instead, Elmo2 is required to promote the insulin-induced membrane association of Akt. Together, our studies demonstrate that Elmo2 is a new regulator of insulin-dependent Glut4 membrane translocation through modulating Rac1 activity and Akt membrane compartmentalization.

  15. 7 CFR 966.4 - Production area and regulated area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Production area and regulated area. 966.4 Section 966.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE...

  16. The regulation of cell therapy products in Canada.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, Anthony A G

    2015-09-01

    This article provides a high level view of how cell therapy products are regulated in Canada and addresses the regulatory framework, pathways and underlying regulatory authority. The regulatory approach involves, primarily, two major sets of regulations; and the scientific basis for product categorization and the application of each of these pathways is discussed. Products that undergo more than minimal levels of processing, or meet certain other criteria, are regulated as biological drugs under the applicable parts of the Food and Drug Regulations. Other cellular products, primarily those for allogeneic transplantation and with an established therapeutic use, are regulated under the more recently promulgated Safety of Human Cells, Tissues and Organs for Transplantation Regulations, which incorporate a standards-based approach. Various concerns and challenges for these classes of products are discussed and information is provided on current sources of relevant guidance, including specific Health Canada guidance currently being developed. Health Canada strongly supports and participates in efforts aimed at international regulatory convergence and harmonization.

  17. 77 FR 57043 - Regulations Under the Fur Products Labeling Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ...The Federal Trade Commission proposes to amend its Regulations under the Fur Products Labeling Act to update its Fur Products Name Guide, provide more labeling flexibility, incorporate recently enacted Truth in Fur Labeling Act provisions, and eliminate unnecessary requirements. The Commission does not propose changing or providing alternatives to the required name on labels for nyctereutes......

  18. TLR4-Activated MAPK-IL-6 Axis Regulates Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Guan-Lin; Wu, Jing-Yiing; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Lin, Chih-Yuan; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Lin, Chin-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Fu; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Hsu, Yu-Juei; Kuo, Cheng-Chin

    2016-08-24

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) into the intima is considered to be a vital event in the pathophysiology of atherosclerosis. Despite substantial evidence supporting the pathogenic role of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) in the progression of atherogenesis, its function in the regulation of VSMC migration remains unclear. The goal of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism by which TLR4 regulates VSMC migration. Inhibitor experiments revealed that TLR4-induced IL-6 secretion and VSMC migration were mediated via the concerted actions of MyD88 and TRIF on the activation of p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling. Neutralizing anti-IL-6 antibodies abrogated TLR4-driven VSMC migration and F-actin polymerization. Blockade of p38 MAPK or ERK1/2 signaling cascade inhibited TLR4 agonist-mediated activation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB). Moreover, siRNA-mediated suppression of CREB production repressed TLR4-induced IL-6 production and VSMC migration. Rac-1 inhibitor suppressed TLR4-driven VSMC migration but not IL-6 production. Importantly, the serum level of IL-6 and TLR4 endogenous ligand HMGB1 was significantly higher in patients with coronary artery diseases (CAD) than in healthy subjects. Serum HMGB1 level was positively correlated with serum IL-6 level in CAD patients. The expression of both HMGB1 and IL-6 was clearly detected in the atherosclerotic tissue of the CAD patients. Additionally, there was a positive association between p-CREB and HMGB1 in mouse atherosclerotic tissue. Based on our findings, we concluded that, upon ligand binding, TLR4 activates p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling through MyD88 and TRIF in VSMCs. These signaling pathways subsequently coordinate an additive augmentation of CREB-driven IL-6 production, which in turn triggers Rac-1-mediated actin cytoskeleton to promote VSMC migration.

  19. Federal Environmental Regulations Impacting Hydrocarbon Exploration, Drilling, and Production Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, Herbert B.; Johnson, William I.

    1999-04-27

    Waste handling and disposal from hydrocarbon exploration, drilling, and production are regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) through federal and state regulations and/or through implementation of federal regulations. Some wastes generated in these operations are exempt under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) but are not exempt under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), and other federal environmental laws. Exempt wastes remain exempt only if they are not mixed with hazardous wastes or hazardous substances. Once mixture occurs, the waste must be disposed as a hazardous material in an approved hazardous waste disposal facility. Before the Clean Air Act as amended in 1990, air emissions from production, storage, steam generation, and compression facilities associated with hydrocarbon exploration, drilling, and production industry were not regulated. A critical proposed regulatory change which will significantly effect Class II injection wells for disposal of produced brine and injection for enhanced oil recovery is imminent. Federal regulations affecting hydrocarbon exploration, drilling and production, proposed EPA regulatory changes, and a recent significant US Court of Appeals decision are covered in this report. It appears that this industry will, in the future, fall under more stringent environmental regulations leading to increased costs for operators.

  20. Regulating interface science healthcare products: myths and uncertainties

    PubMed Central

    Bravery, Christopher A.

    2010-01-01

    Whenever new technology emerges it brings with it concerns and uncertainties about whether or how it will need to be regulated, particularly when it is applied to human healthcare. Drawing on the recent history in the European Union (EU) of the regulation of cell-based medicinal products, and in particular tissue-engineered products, this paper explores the myths that persist around their regulation and speculates on whether the existing regulatory landscape in the EU is flexible enough to incorporate nanotechnology and other new technologies into healthcare products. By untangling these myths a number of clear conclusions are revealed that, when considered in the context of risk–benefit, make it clear that what hinders the uptake of new technology is not regulatory process but basic science. PMID:20861040

  1. Histamine Regulates Actin Cytoskeleton in Human Toll-like Receptor 4-activated Monocyte-derived Dendritic Cells Tuning CD4+ T Lymphocyte Response.

    PubMed

    Aldinucci, Alessandra; Bonechi, Elena; Manuelli, Cinzia; Nosi, Daniele; Masini, Emanuela; Passani, Maria Beatrice; Ballerini, Clara

    2016-07-08

    Histamine, a major mediator in allergic diseases, differentially regulates the polarizing ability of dendritic cells after Toll-like receptor (TLR) stimulation, by not completely explained mechanisms. In this study we investigated the effects of histamine on innate immune reaction during the response of human monocyte-derived DCs (mDCs) to different TLR stimuli: LPS, specific for TLR4, and Pam3Cys, specific for heterodimer molecule TLR1/TLR2. We investigated actin remodeling induced by histamine together with mDCs phenotype, cytokine production, and the stimulatory and polarizing ability of Th0. By confocal microscopy and RT-PCR expression of Rac1/CdC42 Rho GTPases, responsible for actin remodeling, we show that histamine selectively modifies actin cytoskeleton organization induced by TLR4, but not TLR2 and this correlates with increased IL4 production and decreased IFNγ by primed T cells. We also demonstrate that histamine-induced cytoskeleton organization is at least in part mediated by down-regulation of small Rho GTPase CdC42 and the protein target PAK1, but not by down-regulation of Rac1. The presence and relative expression of histamine receptors HR1-4 and TLRs were determined as well. Independently of actin remodeling, histamine down-regulates IL12p70 and CXCL10 production in mDCs after TLR2 and TLR4 stimulation. We also observed a trend of IL10 up-regulation that, despite previous reports, did not reach statistical significance.

  2. [Legislative regulation of production and turnover of products for people with different diseases].

    PubMed

    Pritul'skaia, N V; Motuzka, Iu N; Antiushko, D L

    2013-01-01

    This article presents results of analysis of existing regulatory documents and approaches to the legislative regulation of production and turnover of special dietary products for people with specific diseases in EU, Ukraine and Russian Federation. According to the EU legislation, production and turnover of food products for nutritional support of people during specific diseases and the rehabilitation period are regulated by the Commission Directive 1999/21/EC, 2009/39/ES, by Regulation Commission (EU) No 953/2009 and documents of Codex Committee. Special food products for people with specific diseases in Ukrainian legislation are classified as nutrition products for special dietary use and are regulated by the following Laws of Ukraine "On the safety and quality of food", "On ensuring of sanitary and epidemiological welfare of the population", "On Consumer Rights Protection", "On advertising" and by other non-legislative acts. According to the current legislation of the Russian Federation, the products for people with specific diseases are classified as healthy dietary food products. The basis of the legal framework are federal laws "On the quality and safety of food", "On the sanitary-epidemiological welfare of the populations", "On technical regulations and technical regulations of the Customs Union "On Food Safety" and "On the safety of certain types of specialized food products, including healthy dietary food products and therapeutic dietary food products". There is no common approach to the legal regulation of production and turnover of products for people with specific diseases in the world. The proposals for further harmonization of regulatory control in this area have been developed.

  3. Increased ROS production in non-polarized mammary epithelial cells induces monocyte infiltration in 3D culture.

    PubMed

    Li, Linzhang; Chen, Jie; Xiong, Gaofeng; St Clair, Daret K; Xu, Wei; Xu, Ren

    2017-01-01

    Loss of epithelial cell polarity promotes cell invasion and cancer dissemination. Therefore, identification of factors that disrupt polarized acinar formation is crucial. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) drive cancer progression and promote inflammation. Here, we show that the non-polarized breast cancer cell line T4-2 generates significantly higher ROS levels than polarized S1 and T4R cells in three-dimensional (3D) culture, accompanied by induction of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway and cytokine expression. Minimizing ROS in T4-2 cells with antioxidants reestablished basal polarity and inhibited cell proliferation. Introducing constitutively activated RAC1 disrupted cell polarity and increased ROS levels, indicating that RAC1 is a crucial regulator that links cell polarity and ROS generation. We also linked monocyte infiltration with disruption of polarized acinar structure using a 3D co-culture system. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments demonstrated that increased ROS in non-polarized cells is necessary and sufficient to enhance monocyte recruitment. ROS also induced cytokine expression and NF-κB activity. These results suggest that increased ROS production in mammary epithelial cell leads to disruption of cell polarity and promotes monocyte infiltration.

  4. Dehydro-α-lapachone, a plant product with antivascular activity

    PubMed Central

    Garkavtsev, Igor; Chauhan, Vikash P.; Wong, Hon Kit; Mukhopadhyay, Arpita; Glicksman, Marcie A.; Peterson, Randall T.; Jain, Rakesh K.

    2011-01-01

    Antivascular agents have become a standard of treatment for many malignancies. However, most of them target the VEGF pathway and lead to refractoriness. To improve the diversity of options for antivascular therapy, we applied a high-throughput screen for small molecules targeting cell adhesion. We then assayed the resulting antiadhesion hits in a transgenic zebrafish line with endothelial expression of EGFP (Tg(fli1:EGFP)y1) to identify nontoxic molecules with antivascular activity selective to neovasculature. This screen identified dehydro-α-lapachone (DAL), a natural plant product. We found that DAL inhibits vessel regeneration, interferes with vessel anastomosis, and limits plexus formation in zebrafish. Furthermore, DAL induces vascular pruning and growth delay in orthotopic mammary tumors in mice. We show that DAL targets cell adhesion by promoting ubiquitination of the Rho-GTPase Rac1, which is frequently up-regulated in many different cancers. PMID:21709229

  5. Regulation of Cell and Gene Therapy Medicinal Products in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Chu; Wang, Po-Yu; Tsai, Shih-Chih; Lin, Chien-Liang; Tai, Hsuen-Yung; Lo, Chi-Fang; Wu, Shiow-Ing; Chiang, Yu-Mei; Liu, Li-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the rapid and mature development of emerging biotechnology in the fields of cell culture, cell preservation, and recombinant DNA technology, more and more cell or gene medicinal therapy products have been approved for marketing, to treat serious diseases which have been challenging to treat with current medical practice or medicine. This chapter will briefly introduce the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration (TFDA) and elaborate regulation of cell and gene therapy medicinal products in Taiwan, including regulatory history evolution, current regulatory framework, application and review procedures, and relevant jurisdictional issues. Under the promise of quality, safety, and efficacy of medicinal products, it is expected the regulation and environment will be more flexible, streamlining the process of the marketing approval of new emerging cell or gene therapy medicinal products and providing diverse treatment options for physicians and patients.

  6. 78 FR 38055 - Building Research Capacity in Global Tobacco Product Regulation Program (U18)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Building Research Capacity in Global Tobacco Product... for Tobacco Product's (CTP's) Building Research Capacity in Global Tobacco Product Regulation Program... authority to regulate the manufacture, distribution, marketing, and sale of tobacco products in the...

  7. Regulation of primary productivity rate in the equatorial Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, R.T. ); Chavez, F.P. )

    1991-12-01

    Analysis of the Chl-specific rate of primary productivity (P{sup B}) as a function of subsurface nutrient concentration at >300 equatorial stations provides an answer to the question: What processes regulate primary productivity rate in the high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll waters of the equatorial Pacific In the western Pacific where there is a gradient in 60-m (NO{sub 3}) from 0 to {approximately}12 {mu}M, the productivity rate is a linear function of nutrient concentration; in the eastern Pacific where the gradient is from 12 to 28 {mu}M, the productivity rate is independent of nutrient concentration and limited to {approximately}36 mg C(mg Chl){sup {minus}1} d{sup {minus}1}, or a mean euphotic zone C-specific growth rate ({mu}) of 0.47 d{sup {minus}1}. However, rates downstream of the Galapagos Islands are not limited; they are 46.4 mg C(mg Chl){sup {minus}1} d{sup {minus}1} and {mu} = 0.57 d{sup {minus}1}, very close to the predicted nutrient-regulated rates in the absence of other limitation. This pattern of rate regulation can be accounted for by a combination of eolian Fe, subsurface nutrients, and sedimentary Fe derived from the Galapagos platform. In the low-nutrient western Pacific the eolian supply of Fe is adequate to allow productivity rate to be set by subsurface nutrient concentration. In the nutrient-rich easter equatorial region eolian Fe is inadequate to support productivity rates proportional to the higher nutrient concentrations, so in this region eolian Fe is rate limiting. Around the Galapagos Islands productivity rates reach levels consistent with nutrient concentrations; sedimentary Fe from the Galapagos platform seems adequate to support increased nutrient-regulated productivity rates in this region.

  8. Regulation, financial incentives, and the production of quality.

    PubMed

    Avery, George; Schultz, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    An economic model for the production of health care quality is presented, encompassing financial and altruistic returns, penalties and rewards, and transaction costs. After maximizing returns from quality and service volume, the role of regulatory policies and pay-for-performance proposals in producing quality is examined. The tension between the production of quantity and quality is demonstrated. Specifically, the model shows that increasing the costs of a quality improvement program reduces program effectiveness, sanctions for low quality will not improve the performance of high-quality providers, noncompliance with regulation can be a rational decision, and some pay-for-performance programs will not improve quality for low-quality providers. The model suggests incentive structures to improve quality for all providers. This model has application to a variety of social regulatory programs of importance in public health and health care, including health care quality (ie, regulation of nursing homes or medical laboratories) and environmental and food safety regulation.

  9. Genetic regulation and manipulation for natural product discovery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianwei; Wu, Qihao; Hawas, Usama W; Wang, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Natural products are an important source of modern medical development, e.g., antibiotics, anticancers, immune modulators, etc. and will continue to be a powerful driving force for the discovery of novel potential drugs. In the heterologous hosts, natural products are biosynthesized using dedicated metabolic networks. By gene engineering, pathway reconstructing, and enzyme engineering, metabolic networks can be modified to synthesize novel compounds containing enhanced structural feature or produce a large quantity of known valuable bioactive compounds. The review introduces some important technical platforms and relevant examples of genetic regulation and manipulation to improve natural product titers or drive novel secondary metabolite discoveries.

  10. Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi conceals the invasion-associated type three secretion system from the innate immune system by gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Winter, Sebastian E; Winter, Maria G; Poon, Victor; Keestra, A Marijke; Sterzenbach, Torsten; Faber, Franziska; Costa, Luciana F; Cassou, Fabiane; Costa, Erica A; Alves, Geraldo E S; Paixão, Tatiane A; Santos, Renato L; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-07-01

    Delivery of microbial products into the mammalian cell cytosol by bacterial secretion systems is a strong stimulus for triggering pro-inflammatory host responses. Here we show that Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi), the causative agent of typhoid fever, tightly regulates expression of the invasion-associated type III secretion system (T3SS-1) and thus fails to activate these innate immune signaling pathways. The S. Typhi regulatory protein TviA rapidly repressed T3SS-1 expression, thereby preventing RAC1-dependent, RIP2-dependent activation of NF-κB in epithelial cells. Heterologous expression of TviA in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) suppressed T3SS-1-dependent inflammatory responses generated early after infection in animal models of gastroenteritis. These results suggest that S. Typhi reduces intestinal inflammation by limiting the induction of pathogen-induced processes through regulation of virulence gene expression.

  11. The role of muscle cells in regulating cartilage matrix production

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Dana M.; Lee, Philip G.; Uchimura, Tomoya; Seufert, Christopher R.; Kwon, Heenam; Zeng, Li

    2009-01-01

    Muscle is one of the tissues located in close proximity to cartilage tissue. Although it has been suggested that muscle could influence skeletal development through generating mechanical forces by means of contraction, very little is known regarding whether muscle cells release biochemical signals to regulate cartilage gene expression. We tested the hypothesis that muscle cells directly regulate cartilage matrix production by analyzing chondrocytes co-cultured with muscle cells in 2D or 3D conditions. We found that chondrocytes cultured with C2C12 muscle cells exhibited enhanced alcian blue staining and elevated expression of collagen II and collagen IX proteins. While non-muscle cells do not promote cartilage matrix production, converting them into muscle cells enhanced their pro-chondrogenic activity. Furthermore, muscle cell-conditioned medium led to increased cartilage matrix production, suggesting that muscle cells secrete pro-chondrogenic factors. Taken together, our study suggests that muscle cells may play an important role in regulating cartilage gene expression. This result may ultimately lead to the discovery of novel factors that regulate cartilage formation and homeostasis, and provide insights into improving the strategies for regenerating cartilage. PMID:19813241

  12. NFAT regulates calcium-sensing receptor-mediated TNF production.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Huda Ismail; Pedraza, Paulina L; Hao, Shoujin; Rodland, Karin D; McGiff, John C; Ferreri, Nicholas R

    2006-05-01

    Because nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) has been implicated in TNF production as well as osmoregulation and salt and water homeostasis, we addressed whether calcium-sensing receptor (CaR)-mediated TNF production in medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) cells was NFAT dependent. TNF production in response to addition of extracellular Ca(2+) (1.2 mM) was abolished in mTAL cells transiently transfected with a dominant-negative CaR construct (R796W) or pretreated with the phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (PI-PLC) inhibitor U-73122. Cyclosporine A (CsA), an inhibitor of the serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin, and a peptide ligand, VIVIT, that selectively inhibits calcineurin-NFAT signaling, also prevented CaR-mediated TNF production. Increases in calcineurin activity in cells challenged with Ca(2+) were inhibited after pretreatment with U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that CaR activation increases calcineurin activity in a PI-PLC-dependent manner. Moreover, U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT inhibited CaR-dependent activity of an NFAT construct that drives expression of firefly luciferase in transiently transfected mTAL cells. Collectively, these data verify the role of calcineurin and NFAT in CaR-mediated TNF production by mTAL cells. Activation of the CaR also increased the binding of NFAT to a consensus oligonucleotide, an effect that was blocked by U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that a calcineurin- and NFAT-dependent pathway increases TNF production in mTAL cells. This mechanism likely regulates TNF gene transcription as U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT blocked CaR-dependent activity of a TNF promoter construct. Elucidating CaR-mediated signaling pathways that regulate TNF production in the mTAL will be crucial to understanding mechanisms that regulate extracellular fluid volume and salt balance.

  13. NFAT regulates calcium-sensing receptor-mediated TNF production

    SciTech Connect

    abdullah, huda ismail; Pedraza, Paulina L.; Hao, Shoujin; Rodland, Karin D.; McGiff, John C.; Ferreri, Nicholas R.

    2006-05-01

    Because nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) has been implicated in TNF production as well as osmoregulation and salt and water homeostasis, we addressed whether calcium-sensing receptor (CaR)-mediated TNF production in medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) cells was NFAT dependent. TNF production in response to addition of extracellular Ca2+ (1.2 mM) was abolished in mTAL cells transiently transfected with a dominant-negative CaR construct (R796W) or pretreated with the phosphatidylinositol phospholipase C (PI-PLC) inhibitor U-73122. Cyclosporine A (CsA), an inhibitor of the serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin, and a peptide ligand, VIVIT, that selectively inhibits calcineurin-NFAT signaling, also prevented CaR-mediated TNF production. Increases in calcineurin activity in cells challenged with Ca2+ were inhibited after pretreatment with U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that CaR activation increases calcineurin activity in a PI-PLC-dependent manner. Moreover, U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT inhibited CaR-dependent activity of an NFAT construct that drives expression of firefly luciferase in transiently transfected mTAL cells. Collectively, these data verify the role of calcineurin and NFAT in CaR-mediated TNF production by mTAL cells. Activation of the CaR also increased the binding of NFAT to a consensus oligonucleotide, an effect that was blocked by U-73122 and CsA, suggesting that a calcineurin- and NFAT-dependent pathway increases TNF production in mTAL cells. This mechanism likely regulates TNF gene transcription as U-73122, CsA, and VIVIT blocked CaR-dependent activity of a TNF promoter construct. Elucidating CaR-mediated signaling pathways that regulate TNF production in the mTAL will be crucial to understanding mechanisms that regulate extracellular fluid volume and salt balance.

  14. Cdc42 and Rac family GTPases regulate mode and speed but not direction of primary fibroblast migration during platelet-derived growth factor-dependent chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Monypenny, James; Zicha, Daniel; Higashida, Chiharu; Oceguera-Yanez, Fabian; Narumiya, Shuh; Watanabe, Naoki

    2009-05-01

    Cdc42 and Rac family GTPases are important regulators of morphology, motility, and polarity in a variety of mammalian cell types. However, comprehensive analysis of their roles in the morphological and behavioral aspects of chemotaxis within a single experimental system is still lacking. Here we demonstrate using a direct viewing chemotaxis assay that of all of the Cdc42/Rac1-related GTPases expressed in primary fibroblasts, Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoG are required for efficient migration towards platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). During migration, Cdc42-, Rac1-, and RhoG-deficient cells show aberrant morphology characterized as cell elongation and cell body rounding, loss of lamellipodia, and formation of thick membrane extensions, respectively. Analysis of individual cell trajectories reveals that cell speed is significantly reduced, as well as persistence, but to a smaller degree, while the directional response to the gradient of PDGF is not affected. Combined knockdown of Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoG results in greater inhibition of cell speed than when each protein is knocked down alone, but the cells are still capable of migrating toward PDGF. We conclude that, Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoG function cooperatively during cell migration and that, while each GTPase is implicated in the control of morphology and cell speed, these and other Cdc42/Rac-related GTPases are not essential for the directional response toward PDGF.

  15. Crucial roles of TNFAIP8 protein in regulating apoptosis and Listeria infection.

    PubMed

    Porturas, Thomas P; Sun, Honghong; Buchlis, George; Lou, Yunwei; Liang, Xiaohong; Cathopoulis, Terry; Fayngerts, Svetlana; Johnson, Derek S; Wang, Zhaojun; Chen, Youhai H

    2015-06-15

    TNF-α-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8 or TIPE) is a newly described regulator of cancer and infection. However, its precise roles and mechanisms of actions are not well understood. We report in this article that TNFAIP8 regulates Listeria monocytogenes infection by controlling pathogen invasion and host cell apoptosis in a RAC1 GTPase-dependent manner. TNFAIP8-knockout mice were resistant to lethal L. monocytogenes infection and had reduced bacterial load in the liver and spleen. TNFAIP8 knockdown in murine liver HEPA1-6 cells increased apoptosis, reduced bacterial invasion into cells, and resulted in dysregulated RAC1 activation. TNFAIP8 could translocate to plasma membrane and preferentially associate with activated RAC1-GTP. The combined effect of reduced bacterial invasion and increased sensitivity to TNF-α-induced clearance likely protected the TNFAIP8-knockout mice from lethal listeriosis. Thus, by controlling bacterial invasion and the death of infected cells through RAC1, TNFAIP8 regulates the pathogenesis of L. monocytogenes infection.

  16. Crucial roles of TNFAIP8 protein in regulating apoptosis and Listeria infection

    PubMed Central

    Porturas, Thomas P.; Sun, Honghong; Buchlis, George; Lou, Yunwei; Liang, Xiaohong; Cathopoulis, Terry; Fayngerts, Svetlana; Johnson, Derek S.; Wang, Zhaojun; Chen, Youhai H.

    2015-01-01

    TNFα-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8 or TIPE) is a newly described regulator of cancer and infection. However, its precise roles and mechanisms of actions are not well understood. We report here that TNFAIP8 regulates Listeria monocytogenes infection by controlling pathogen invasion and host cell apoptosis in a RAC1 GTPase-dependent manner. TNFAIP8 knockout mice were found to be resistant to lethal L. monocytogenes infection and had reduced bacterial load in the liver and spleen. TNFAIP8-knockdown in murine liver HEPA1-6 cells increased apoptosis, reduced bacterial invasion into cells, and resulted in dysregulated RAC1 activation. TNFAIP8 could translocate to plasma membrane and preferentially associate with activated GTP-RAC1. The combined effect of reduced bacterial invasion and increased sensitivity to TNFα-induced clearance likely protected the TNFAIP8 knockout mice from lethal listeriosis. Thus, by controlling bacterial invasion and the death of infected cells through RAC1, TNFAIP8 regulates the pathogenesis of L. monocytogenes infection. PMID:25948813

  17. Inhibition of Apoptosis-Regulated Signaling Kinase-1 and Prevention of Congestive Heart Failure by Estrogen

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Minoru; Matter, Christian M.; Ogita, Hisakazu; Takeshita, Kyosuke; Wang, Chao-Yung; Dorn, Gerald W.; Liao, James K.

    2008-01-01

    Background Epidemiological studies have shown gender differences in the incidence of congestive heart failure (CHF); however, the role of estrogen in CHF is not known. We hypothesize that estrogen prevents cardiomyocyte apoptosis and the development of CHF. Methods and Results 17β-Estradiol (E2, 0.5 mg/60-day release) or placebo pellet was implanted subcutaneously into male Gαq transgenic (Gq) mice. After 8 weeks, E2 treatment decreased the extent of cardiac hypertrophy and dilation and improved contractility in Gq mice. E2 treatment also attenuated nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity and superoxide anion production via downregulation of Rac1. This correlated with reduced apoptosis in cardiomyocytes of Gq mice. The antioxidative properties of E2 were also associated with increased expression of thioredoxin (Trx), Trx reductases, and Trx reductase activity in the hearts of Gq mice. Furthermore, the activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 and its downstream effectors, c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, in the hearts of Gq mice was reduced by long-term E2 treatment. Indeed, E2 (10 nmol/L)-treated cardiomyocytes were much more resistant to angiotensin II–induced apoptosis. These antiapoptotic and cardioprotective effects of E2 were blocked by an estrogen receptor antagonist (ICI 182,780) and by a Trx reductase inhibitor (azelaic acid). Conclusions These findings indicate that long-term E2 treatment improves CHF by antioxidative mechanisms that involve the upregulation of Trx and inhibition of Rac1-mediated attenuated nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activity and apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 /c-Jun N-terminal kinase/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase–mediated apoptosis. These results suggest that estrogen may be a useful adjunctive therapy for patients with CHF. PMID:17562954

  18. RhoGTPase Regulators Orchestrate Distinct Stages of Synaptic Development

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Vilchez, Samuel; Whitmore, Leanna; Asmussen, Hannelore; Zareno, Jessica; Horwitz, Rick; Newell-Litwa, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Small RhoGTPases regulate changes in post-synaptic spine morphology and density that support learning and memory. They are also major targets of synaptic disorders, including Autism. Here we sought to determine whether upstream RhoGTPase regulators, including GEFs, GAPs, and GDIs, sculpt specific stages of synaptic development. The majority of examined molecules uniquely regulate either early spine precursor formation or later maturation. Specifically, an activator of actin polymerization, the Rac1 GEF β-PIX, drives spine precursor formation, whereas both FRABIN, a Cdc42 GEF, and OLIGOPHRENIN-1, a RhoA GAP, regulate spine precursor elongation. However, in later development, a novel Rac1 GAP, ARHGAP23, and RhoGDIs inactivate actomyosin dynamics to stabilize mature synapses. Our observations demonstrate that specific combinations of RhoGTPase regulatory proteins temporally balance RhoGTPase activity during post-synaptic spine development. PMID:28114311

  19. Crp is a global regulator of antibiotic production in streptomyces.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chan; Hindra; Mulder, David; Yin, Charles; Elliot, Marie A

    2012-12-11

    Cyclic AMP receptor protein (Crp) is a transcription regulator controlling diverse cellular processes in many bacteria. In Streptomyces coelicolor, it is well established that Crp plays a critical role in spore germination and colony development. Here, we demonstrate that Crp is a key regulator of secondary metabolism and antibiotic production in S. coelicolor and show that it may additionally coordinate precursor flux from primary to secondary metabolism. We found that crp deletion adversely affected the synthesis of three well-characterized antibiotics in S. coelicolor: actinorhodin (Act), undecylprodigiosin (Red), and calcium-dependent antibiotic (CDA). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-microarray (ChIP-chip) assays, we determined that eight (out of 22) secondary metabolic clusters encoded by S. coelicolor contained Crp-associated sites. We followed the effect of Crp induction using transcription profiling analyses and found secondary metabolic genes to be significantly affected: included in this Crp-dependent group were genes from six of the clusters identified in the ChIP-chip experiments. Overexpressing Crp in a panel of Streptomyces species led to enhanced antibiotic synthesis and new metabolite production, suggesting that Crp control over secondary metabolism is broadly conserved in the streptomycetes and that Crp overexpression could serve as a powerful tool for unlocking the chemical potential of these organisms. IMPORTANCE Streptomyces produces a remarkably diverse array of secondary metabolites, including many antibiotics. In recent years, genome sequencing has revealed that these products represent only a small proportion of the total secondary metabolite potential of Streptomyces. There is, therefore, considerable interest in discovering ways to stimulate the production of new metabolites. Here, we show that Crp (the classical regulator of carbon catabolite repression in Escherichia coli) is a master regulator of secondary metabolism in Streptomyces

  20. MicroRNAs regulating apolipoprotein B-containing lipoprotein production.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Liye; Irani, Sara; Sirwi, Alaa; Hussain, M Mahmood

    2016-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRs) are small, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression and have been implicated in many pathological conditions. Significant progress has been made to unveil their role in lipid metabolism. This review aims at summarizing the role of different miRs that regulate hepatic assembly and secretion of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins. Overproduction and/or impaired clearance of these lipoproteins from circulation increase plasma concentrations of lipids enhancing risk for cardiovascular disease. So far, three miRs, miR-122, miR-34a, and miR-30c have been shown to modulate hepatic production of apoB-containing low density lipoproteins. In this review, we will first provide a brief overview of lipid metabolism and apoB-containing lipoprotein assembly to orient readers to different steps that have been shown to be regulated by miRs. Then, we will discuss the role of each miR on plasma lipids and atherosclerotic burden. Furthermore, we will summarize mechanistic studies explaining how these miRs regulate hepatic lipid synthesis, fatty acid oxidation, and lipoprotein secretion. Finally, we will briefly highlight the potential use of each miR as a therapeutic drug for treating cardiovascular diseases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: MicroRNAs and lipid/energy metabolism and related diseases edited by Carlos Fernández-Hernando and Yajaira Suárez.

  1. Redox-sensing regulator Rex regulates aerobic metabolism, morphological differentiation, and avermectin production in Streptomyces avermitilis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xingchao; Cheng, Yaqing; Lyu, Mengya; Wen, Ying; Song, Yuan; Chen, Zhi; Li, Jilun

    2017-01-01

    The regulatory role of redox-sensing regulator Rex was investigated in Streptomyces avermitilis. Eleven genes/operons were demonstrated to be directly regulated by Rex; these genes/operons are involved in aerobic metabolism, morphological differentiation, and secondary metabolism. Rex represses transcription of target genes/operons by binding to Rex operator (ROP) sequences in the promoter regions. NADH reduces DNA-binding activity of Rex to target promoters, while NAD+ competitively binds to Rex and modulates its DNA-binding activity. Rex plays an essential regulatory role in aerobic metabolism by controlling expression of the respiratory genes atpIBEFHAGDC, cydA1B1CD, nuoA1-N1, rex-hemAC1DB, hppA, and ndh2. Rex also regulates morphological differentiation by repressing expression of wblE, which encodes a putative WhiB-family transcriptional regulator. A rex-deletion mutant (Drex) showed higher avermectin production than the wild-type strain ATCC31267, and was more tolerant of oxygen limitation conditions in regard to avermectin production. PMID:28303934

  2. The Ras/Rac1/Cdc42/SEK/JNK/c-Jun Cascade Is a Key Pathway by Which Agonists Stimulate DNA Synthesis in Primary Cultures of Rat Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Auer, Kelly L.; Contessa, Joseph; Brenz-Verca, Stefano; Pirola, Luciano; Rusconi, Sandro; Cooper, Geoffrey; Abo, Arie; Wymann, Matthias P.; Davis, Roger J.; Birrer, Michael; Dent, Paul

    1998-01-01

    The ability of signaling via the JNK (c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase)/stress-activated protein kinase cascade to stimulate or inhibit DNA synthesis in primary cultures of adult rat hepatocytes was examined. Treatment of hepatocytes with media containing hyperosmotic glucose (75 mM final), tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα, 1 ng/ml final), and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, 1 ng/ml final) caused activation of JNK1. Glucose, TNFα, or HGF treatments increased phosphorylation of c-Jun at serine 63 in the transactivation domain and stimulated hepatocyte DNA synthesis. Infection of hepatocytes with poly-l-lysine–coated adenoviruses coupled to constructs to express either dominant negatives Ras N17, Rac1 N17, Cdc42 N17, SEK1−, or JNK1− blunted the abilities of glucose, TNFα, or HGF to increase JNK1 activity, to increase phosphorylation of c-Jun at serine 63, and to stimulate DNA synthesis. Furthermore, infection of hepatocytes by a recombinant adenovirus expressing a dominant-negative c-Jun mutant (TAM67) also blunted the abilities of glucose, TNFα, and HGF to stimulate DNA synthesis. These data demonstrate that multiple agonists stimulate DNA synthesis in primary cultures of hepatocytes via a Ras/Rac1/Cdc42/SEK/JNK/c-Jun pathway. Glucose and HGF treatments reduced glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) activity and increased c-Jun DNA binding. Co-infection of hepatocytes with recombinant adenoviruses to express dominant- negative forms of PI3 kinase (p110α/p110γ) increased basal GSK3 activity, blocked the abilities of glucose and HGF treatments to inhibit GSK3 activity, and reduced basal c-Jun DNA binding. However, expression of dominant-negative PI3 kinase (p110α/p110γ) neither significantly blunted the abilities of glucose and HGF treatments to increase c-Jun DNA binding, nor inhibited the ability of these agonists to stimulate DNA synthesis. These data suggest that signaling by the JNK/stress-activated protein kinase cascade, rather than by the PI3 kinase cascade

  3. 75 FR 51246 - Petition Requesting Regulations Restricting Cadmium in Children's Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Petition Requesting Regulations Restricting Cadmium in Children's Products AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Consumer Product Safety Commission...

  4. Gonadotropin regulation of in vitro androgen production by reptilian testes.

    PubMed

    Wo Tsui, H; Licht, P

    1977-04-01

    The hormonal regulation of in vitro androgen production by minced testes from 7 species of reptiles representing the 3 major orders was studied using purified follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) from tetrapod species. Androgen content was measured by radioimmunoassay. All 7 species showed a dose-dependent response to all preparations of FSH and LH tested. However, variations were found depending on the species tested and the source of the hormone. All snake hormones were particularly inactive in turtles. Some of the variation in relative potencies of hormone reflect phylogenetic specificity in the testes. Synergism between FSH and LH was tested in the sea turtle. While subliminal doses of FSH and LH produced a small stimulation of androgen production, each alone was ineffective. Both gonadotropins have intrinsic activity with regard to the stimulation of steroidogenesis.

  5. Transport and transcriptional regulation of oil production in plants.

    PubMed

    Manan, Sehrish; Chen, Beibei; She, Guangbiao; Wan, Xiaochun; Zhao, Jian

    2016-08-23

    Triacylglycerol (TAG) serves as an energy reservoir and phospholipids as build blocks of biomembrane to support plant life. They also provide human with foods and nutrients. Multi-compartmentalized biosynthesis, trafficking or cross-membrane transport of lipid intermediates or precursors and their regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood. Recent progress has aided our understanding of how fatty acids (FAs) and phospholipids are transported between the chloroplast, the cytoplasm, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and how the ins and outs of lipids take place in the peroxisome and other organelles for lipid metabolism and function. In addition, information regarding the transcriptional regulation network associated with FA and TAG biosynthesis has been further enriched. Recent breakthroughs made in lipid transport and transcriptional regulation has provided significant insights into our comprehensive understanding of plant lipid biology. This review attempts to highlight the recent progress made on lipid synthesis, transport, degradation, and their regulatory mechanisms. Metabolic engineering, based on these knowledge-powered technologies for production of edible oils or biofuels, is reviewed. The biotechnological application of metabolic enzymes, transcription factors and transporters, for oil production and composition improvement, are discussed in a broad context in order to provide a fresh scenario for researchers and to guide future research and applications.

  6. Detection of regulated disinfection by-products in cheeses.

    PubMed

    Cardador, Maria Jose; Gallego, Mercedes; Cabezas, Lourdes; Fernández-Salguero, Jose

    2016-08-01

    Cheese can contain regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs), mainly through contact with brine solutions prepared in disinfected water or sanitisers used to clean all contact surfaces, such as processing equipment and tanks. This study has focused on the possible presence of up to 10 trihalomethanes (THMs) and 13 haloacetic acids (HAAs) in a wide range of European cheeses. The study shows that 2 THMs, (in particular trichloromethane) and 3 HAAs (in particular dichloroacetic acid) can be found at μg/kg levels in the 56 cheeses analysed. Of the two types of DBPs, HAAs were generally present at higher concentrations, due to their hydrophilic and non-volatile nature. Despite their different nature (THMs are lipophilic), both of them have an affinity for fatty cheeses, increasing their concentrations as the percentage of water decreased because the DBPs were concentrated in the aqueous phase of the cheeses.

  7. TIM-1 signaling in B cells regulates antibody production

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Juan; Usui, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Harada, Norihiro; Yagita, Hideo; Okumura, Ko; Akiba, Hisaya

    2011-03-11

    Highlights: {yields} TIM-1 is highly expressed on anti-IgM + anti-CD40-stimulated B cells. {yields} Anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and Ig production on activated B cell in vitro. {yields} TIM-1 signaling regulates Ab production by response to TI-2 and TD antigens in vivo. -- Abstract: Members of the T cell Ig and mucin (TIM) family have recently been implicated in the control of T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study, we found TIM-1 expression on anti-IgM- or anti-CD40-stimulated splenic B cells, which was further up-regulated by the combination of anti-IgM and anti-CD40 Abs. On the other hand, TIM-1 ligand was constitutively expressed on B cells and inducible on anti-CD3{sup +} anti-CD28-stimulated CD4{sup +} T cells. In vitro stimulation of activated B cells by anti-TIM-1 mAb enhanced proliferation and expression of a plasma cell marker syndecan-1 (CD138). We further examined the effect of TIM-1 signaling on antibody production in vitro and in vivo. Higher levels of IgG2b and IgG3 secretion were detected in the culture supernatants of the anti-TIM-1-stimulated B cells as compared with the control IgG-stimulated B cells. When immunized with T-independent antigen TNP-Ficoll, TNP-specific IgG1, IgG2b, and IgG3 Abs were slightly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice. When immunized with T-dependent antigen OVA, serum levels of OVA-specific IgG2b, IgG3, and IgE Abs were significantly increased in the anti-TIM-1-treated mice as compared with the control IgG-treated mice. These results suggest that TIM-1 signaling in B cells augments antibody production by enhancing B cell proliferation and differentiation.

  8. Smad4 regulates growth plate matrix production and chondrocyte polarity

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Amanda T.; Berthet, Ellora; Cantu, Andrea; Laird, Diana J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Smad4 is an intracellular effector of the TGFβ family that has been implicated in Myhre syndrome, a skeletal dysplasia characterized by short stature, brachydactyly and stiff joints. The TGFβ pathway also plays a critical role in the development, organization and proliferation of the growth plate, although the exact mechanisms remain unclear. Skeletal phenotypes in Myhre syndrome overlap with processes regulated by the TGFβ pathway, including organization and proliferation of the growth plate and polarity of the chondrocyte. We used in vitro and in vivo models of Smad4 deficiency in chondrocytes to test the hypothesis that deregulated TGFβ signaling leads to aberrant extracellular matrix production and loss of chondrocyte polarity. Specifically, we evaluated growth plate chondrocyte polarity in tibiae of Col2-Cre+/−;Smad4fl/fl mice and in chondrocyte pellet cultures. In vitro and in vivo, Smad4 deficiency decreased aggrecan expression and increased MMP13 expression. Smad4 deficiency disrupted the balance of cartilage matrix synthesis and degradation, even though the sequential expression of growth plate chondrocyte markers was intact. Chondrocytes in Smad4-deficient growth plates also showed evidence of polarity defects, with impaired proliferation and ability to undergo the characteristic changes in shape, size and orientation as they differentiated from resting to hypertrophic chondrocytes. Therefore, we show that Smad4 controls chondrocyte proliferation, orientation, and hypertrophy and is important in regulating the extracellular matrix composition of the growth plate. PMID:28167493

  9. Terminal platelet production is regulated by von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Poirault-Chassac, Sonia; Nguyen, Kim Anh; Pietrzyk, Audrey; Casari, Caterina; Veyradier, Agnes; Denis, Cecile V; Baruch, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    It is established that proplatelets are formed from mature megakaryocytes (MK) as intermediates before platelet production. Recently, the presence of proplatelets was described in blood incubated in static conditions. We have previously demonstrated that platelet and proplatelet formation is upregulated by MK exposure to high shear rates (1800 s(-1)) on immobilized von Willebrand factor (VWF). The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether VWF is involved in the regulation of terminal platelet production in blood. To this end, Vwf (-/-) mice, a model of severe von Willebrand disease, were used to create a situation in which blood cells circulate in a vascular tree that is completely devoid of VWF. Murine platelets were isolated from Vwf (-/-) and Vwf (+/+) blood, exposed to VWF at 1800 s(-1) in a microfluidic platform, and examined by means of videomicroscopy, as well as fluorescence and activation studies. Proplatelets became visible within 5 minutes, representing 38% of all platelets after 12 minutes and 46% after 28 min. The proportion of proplatelets was 1.8-fold higher in blood from Vwf(-/-) mice than from Vwf(+/+) mice, suggesting a role of VWF in vivo. Fragmentation of these proplatelets into smaller discoid platelets was also observed in real-time. Platelets remained fully activatable by thrombin. Compensation of plasmatic VWF following hydrodynamic gene transfer in Vwf(-/-) mice reduced the percentage of proplatelets to wild-type levels. A thrombocytopenic mouse model was studied in the flow system, 7 days after a single 5-FU injection. Compared to untreated mouse blood, a 2-fold increase in the percentage of proplatelets was detected following exposure to 1800 s(-1) on VWF of samples from mice treated with 5-FU. In conclusion, VWF and shear stress together appear to upregulate proplatelet reorganization and platelet formation. This suggests a new function for VWF in vivo as regulator of bloodstream thrombopoiesis.

  10. EU Regulation of Nanobiocides: Challenges in Implementing the Biocidal Product Regulation (BPR)

    PubMed Central

    Brinch, Anna; Hansen, Steffen Foss; Hartmann, Nanna B.; Baun, Anders

    2016-01-01

    The Biocidal Products Regulation (BPR) contains several provisions for nanomaterials (NMs) and is the first regulation in the European Union to require specific testing and risk assessment for the NM form of a biocidal substance as a part of the information requirements. Ecotoxicological data are one of the pillars of the information requirements in the BPR, but there are currently no standard test guidelines for the ecotoxicity testing of NMs. The overall objective of this work was to investigate the implications of the introduction of nano-specific testing requirements in the BPR and to explore how these might be fulfilled in the case of copper oxide nanoparticles. While there is information and data available in the open literature that could be used to fulfill the BPR information requirements, most of the studies do not take the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s nanospecific test guidelines into consideration. This makes it difficult for companies as well as regulators to fulfill the BPR information requirements for nanomaterials. In order to enable a nanospecific risk assessment, best practices need to be developed regarding stock suspension preparation and characterization, exposure suspensions preparation, and for conducting ecotoxicological test.

  11. Production and transcriptional regulation of proanthocyanidin biosynthesis in forage legumes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Meiliang; Wei, Li; Sun, Zhanmin; Gao, Lihua; Meng, Yu; Tang, Yixiong; Wu, Yanmin

    2015-05-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PA), also known as condensed tannins, contribute to important forage legumes traits including disease resistance and forage quality. PA in forage plants has both positive and negative effects on feed digestibility and animal performance. The analytical methods and their applicability in measuring the contents of PA in forage plants are essential to studies on their nutritional effects. In spite of important breakthroughs in our understanding of the PA biosynthesis, important questions still remain to be answered such as the PA polymerization and transport. Recent advances in the understanding of transcription factor-mediated gene regulation mechanisms in anthocyanin and PA biosynthetic pathway in model plants suggest new approaches for the metabolic engineering of PA in forage plants. The present review will attempt to present the state-of-the-art of research in these areas and provide an update on the production and metabolic engineering of PA in forage plants. We hope that this will contribute to a better understanding of the ways in which PA production to manipulate the content of PA for beneficial effects in forage plants.

  12. Oxygen-­dependent regulation of bacterial lipid production

    DOE PAGES

    Lemmer, Kimberly C.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Noguera, Daniel R.; ...

    2015-05-02

    Understanding the mechanisms of lipid accumulation in microorganisms is important for several reasons. In addition to providing insight into assembly of biological membranes, lipid accumulation has important applications in the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is an attractive organism to study lipid accumulation, as it has the somewhat unique ability to increase membrane production at low O₂ tensions. Under these conditions, R. sphaeroides develops invaginations of the cytoplasmic membrane to increase its membrane surface area for housing of the membrane-bound components of its photosynthetic apparatus. Here we use fatty acid levels as a reportermore » of membrane lipid content. We show that, under low-O₂ and anaerobic conditions, the total fatty acid content per cell increases 3-fold. We also find that the increases in the amount of fatty acid and photosynthetic pigment per cell are correlated as O₂ tensions or light intensity are changed. To ask if lipid and pigment accumulation were genetically separable, we analyzed strains with mutations in known photosynthetic regulatory pathways. While a strain lacking AppA failed to induce photosynthetic pigment-protein complex accumulation, it increased fatty acid content under low O2 conditions. We also found that an intact PrrBA pathway is required for low O2-induced fatty acid accumulation. In conclusion, our findings suggest a previously unknown role of R. sphaeroides transcriptional regulators in increasing fatty acid and phospholipid accumulation in response to decreased O₂ tension.« less

  13. Oxygen-Dependent Regulation of Bacterial Lipid Production

    PubMed Central

    Lemmer, Kimberly C.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Noguera, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Understanding the mechanisms of lipid accumulation in microorganisms is important for several reasons. In addition to providing insight into assembly of biological membranes, lipid accumulation has important applications in the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is an attractive organism to study lipid accumulation, as it has the ability to increase membrane production at low O2 tensions. Under these conditions, R. sphaeroides develops invaginations of the cytoplasmic membrane to increase its membrane surface area for housing of the membrane-bound components of its photosynthetic apparatus. Here we use fatty acid levels as a reporter of membrane lipid content. We show that, under low-O2 and anaerobic conditions, the total fatty acid content per cell increases 3-fold. We also find that the increases in the amount of fatty acid and photosynthetic pigment per cell are correlated as O2 tensions or light intensity are changed. To ask if lipid and pigment accumulation were genetically separable, we analyzed strains with mutations in known photosynthetic regulatory pathways. While a strain lacking AppA failed to induce photosynthetic pigment-protein complex accumulation, it increased fatty acid content under low-O2 conditions. We also found that an intact PrrBA pathway is required for low-O2-induced fatty acid accumulation. Our findings suggest a previously unknown role of R. sphaeroides transcriptional regulators in increasing fatty acid and phospholipid accumulation in response to decreased O2 tension. IMPORTANCE Lipids serve important functions in living systems, either as structural components of membranes or as a form of carbon storage. Understanding the mechanisms of lipid accumulation in microorganisms is important for providing insight into the assembly of biological membranes and additionally has important applications in the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. In this study, we

  14. Oxygen-­dependent regulation of bacterial lipid production

    SciTech Connect

    Lemmer, Kimberly C.; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Noguera, Daniel R.; Donohue, Timothy J.

    2015-05-02

    Understanding the mechanisms of lipid accumulation in microorganisms is important for several reasons. In addition to providing insight into assembly of biological membranes, lipid accumulation has important applications in the production of renewable fuels and chemicals. The photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides is an attractive organism to study lipid accumulation, as it has the somewhat unique ability to increase membrane production at low O₂ tensions. Under these conditions, R. sphaeroides develops invaginations of the cytoplasmic membrane to increase its membrane surface area for housing of the membrane-bound components of its photosynthetic apparatus. Here we use fatty acid levels as a reporter of membrane lipid content. We show that, under low-O₂ and anaerobic conditions, the total fatty acid content per cell increases 3-fold. We also find that the increases in the amount of fatty acid and photosynthetic pigment per cell are correlated as O₂ tensions or light intensity are changed. To ask if lipid and pigment accumulation were genetically separable, we analyzed strains with mutations in known photosynthetic regulatory pathways. While a strain lacking AppA failed to induce photosynthetic pigment-protein complex accumulation, it increased fatty acid content under low O2 conditions. We also found that an intact PrrBA pathway is required for low O2-induced fatty acid accumulation. In conclusion, our findings suggest a previously unknown role of R. sphaeroides transcriptional regulators in increasing fatty acid and phospholipid accumulation in response to decreased O₂ tension.

  15. Pupils' Readiness for Self-Regulated Learning in the Forethought Phase of Exploratory Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metsärinne, Mika; Kallio, Manne; Virta, Kalle

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses pupils' readiness for self-regulation in Exploratory Production in Technology Education. In the forethought phase of Exploratory Production, pupils envision and regulate their technological production activities. Next, in the performance phase, the envisioned goals are tried and implemented through ideating, planning and…

  16. 78 FR 72057 - Rules and Regulations Under the Wool Products Labeling Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... CFR Part 300 Rules and Regulations Under the Wool Products Labeling Act AGENCY: Federal Trade... proposed amendments to the Rules and Regulations under the Wool Products Labeling Act of 1939 (``Wool Rules... Commission issued the Wool Rules to implement the Wool Products Labeling Act of 1939, 15 U.S.C. 68-68j....

  17. 77 FR 234 - Rules and Regulations Under the Textile Fiber Products Identification Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ...; ] FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION 16 CFR Part 303 Rules and Regulations Under the Textile Fiber Products... Rules and Regulations under the Textile Fiber Products Identification Act (``Textile Rules'').\\1\\ The... the Textile Rules to implement the Textile Fiber Products Identification Act, 15 U.S.C. 70-70k....

  18. 10 CFR 431.402 - Preemption of State regulations for commercial HVAC & WH products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... products. 431.402 Section 431.402 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM... regulations for commercial HVAC & WH products. Beginning on the effective date of such standard, an energy... regulation concerning the energy efficiency or energy use of that product, except as provided for in......

  19. 10 CFR 431.402 - Preemption of State regulations for commercial HVAC & WH products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... products. 431.402 Section 431.402 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM... regulations for commercial HVAC & WH products. Beginning on the effective date of such standard, an energy... regulation concerning the energy efficiency or energy use of that product, except as provided for in......

  20. 10 CFR 431.402 - Preemption of State regulations for commercial HVAC & WH products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... products. 431.402 Section 431.402 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM... regulations for commercial HVAC & WH products. Beginning on the effective date of such standard, an energy... regulation concerning the energy efficiency or energy use of that product, except as provided for in......

  1. 10 CFR 431.402 - Preemption of State regulations for commercial HVAC & WH products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... products. 431.402 Section 431.402 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM... regulations for commercial HVAC & WH products. Beginning on the effective date of such standard, an energy... regulation concerning the energy efficiency or energy use of that product, except as provided for in......

  2. Sequences affecting the regulation of solvent production in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Scotcher, Miles C; Huang, Ke-xue; Harrison, Mary L; Rudolph, Frederick B; Bennett, George N

    2003-07-01

    The high solvent phenotype of Clostridium acetobutylicum mutants B and H was complemented by the introduction of a plasmid that contains either an intact or partially-deleted copy of solR, restoring acetone and butanol production to wild-type levels. This demonstrates that the solR open reading frame on pSOLThi is not required to restore solvent levels. The promoter region upstream of alcohol dehydrogense E (adhE) was examined in efforts to identify sites that play major roles in the control of expression. A series of adhE promoter fragments was constructed and the expression of each in acid- and solvent-phases of growth was analyzed using a chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase reporter system. Our results show that a region beyond the 0A box is needed for full induction of the promoter. Additionally, we show that the presence of sequences around a possible processing site designated S2 may have a negative role in the regulation of adhE expression.

  3. Central insulin-mediated regulation of hepatic glucose production [Review].

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Insulin controls hepatic glucose production (HGP) and maintains glucose homeostasis through the direct action of hepatic insulin receptors, as well as the indirect action of insulin receptors in the central nervous system. Insulin acts on insulin receptors in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, activates ATP-sensitive potassium channels in a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent manner, induces hyperpolarization of the hypothalamic neurons, and regulates HGP via the vagus nerve. In the liver, central insulin action augments IL-6 expression in Kupffer cells and activates STAT3 transcription factors in hepatocytes. Activated STAT3 suppresses the gene expression of gluconeogenic enzymes, thereby reducing HGP. It has become evident that nutrients such as glucose, fatty acids, and amino acids act upon the hypothalamus together with insulin, affecting HGP. On the other hand, HGP control by central insulin action is impeded in obesity and impeded by insulin resistance due to disturbance of PI3K signaling and inflammation in the hypothalamus or inhibition of STAT3 signaling in the liver. Although the mechanism of control of hepatic gluconeogenic gene expression by central insulin action is conserved across species, its importance in human glucose metabolism has not been made entirely clear and its elucidation is anticipated in the future.

  4. Occurrence of regulated and non-regulated disinfection by-products in small drinking water systems.

    PubMed

    Guilherme, Stéphanie; Rodriguez, Manuel J

    2014-12-01

    The occurrence of regulated and non-regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs) was investigated in the drinking water of small systems in two provinces in Canada, Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) and Quebec (QC), through an intensive sampling program. Sixteen DBPs were studied: four trihalomethanes (THMs), five haloacetic acids (HAAs), four haloacetonitriles (HANs), one halonitromethane, chloropikrin (CPK) and two haloketones (HKs). Average measured concentrations of these compounds were much higher than those reported in the literature for medium and large systems. The measured average value for THMs was 75 μg L(-1) (Stdv=69μgL(-1)); HAAs, 77 μg L(-1) (Stdv=75 μg L(-1)); HANs, 2.5 μg L(-1) (Stdv=1.8 μg L(-1)); CPK, 0.4 μg L(-1) (Stdv=0.3 μg L(-1)) and HKs, 6.0 μg L(-1) (Stdv=4.5 μg L(-1)). The gap (some 10 times difference) between the average levels of regulated DBPs (THMs, HAAs) and non-regulated DBPs (HANs, CPK and HKs) is comparable to that observed in large systems where the occurrence of the same compounds has been reported. Generally, investigated DBPs followed a comparable seasonal evolution during the year: they decreased between the fall and winter and then increased to eventually reach a maximum in late summer. This trend was less observable in NL than in QC. However, observed seasonal fluctuations of DBPs were less considerable than those observed in medium and large systems located in similar temperate environments reported in the literature. Spatial variations from the plant to the extremities were high and comparable to those observed in large systems, which is surprising, considering the smaller size of distribution networks supplying small communities. Generally speaking, the results support the premise that problems associated with implementing treatment that removes DBP precursors in water submitted to chlorination can increase population exposure to these contaminants in small systems.

  5. 9 CFR 327.3 - No product to be imported without compliance with applicable regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false No product to be imported without compliance with applicable regulations. 327.3 Section 327.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND... microbiological testing of the finished product shall be installed by the processor, the product is subjected...

  6. 9 CFR 327.3 - No product to be imported without compliance with applicable regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false No product to be imported without compliance with applicable regulations. 327.3 Section 327.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND... microbiological testing of the finished product shall be installed by the processor, the product is subjected...

  7. 9 CFR 327.3 - No product to be imported without compliance with applicable regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false No product to be imported without compliance with applicable regulations. 327.3 Section 327.3 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND... microbiological testing of the finished product shall be installed by the processor, the product is subjected...

  8. Clarification of When Products Made or Derived From Tobacco Are Regulated as Drugs, Devices, or Combination Products; Amendments to Regulations Regarding "Intended Uses." Final rule.

    PubMed

    2017-01-09

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing this final rule to describe the circumstances in which a product made or derived from tobacco that is intended for human consumption will be subject to regulation as a drug, device, or a combination product under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act). This action is intended to provide direction to regulated industry and to help avoid consumer confusion.

  9. Japanese regulation of biosimilar products: past experience and current challenges.

    PubMed

    Arato, Teruyo

    2016-07-01

    Seven biosimilar products have been approved in Japan since the March 2009 publication of the 'Guideline for quality, safety and efficacy assurance of biosimilar products' by the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW). Four years previously, the 'Guideline on similar biological medicinal products' was issued in the European Union (EU), and 13 products as of February 2016 have been approved as biosimilar. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first biosimilar product in the US in March 2015 and final Guidance was issued at the end of April 2015. Over the past decade, the challenges regarding the development of biosimilar products have been discussed extensively. In this article, the data packages of biosimilar products in Japan are compared with those overseas in order to clarify the concepts used by the Japanese regulatory authority, i.e., the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency (PMDA). The challenges in the development of biosimilar products in Japan are also addressed.

  10. 10 CFR 431.402 - Preemption of State regulations for commercial HVAC & WH products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preemption of State regulations for commercial HVAC & WH... regulations for commercial HVAC & WH products. Beginning on the effective date of such standard, an energy conservation standard set forth in this Part for a commercial HVAC & WH product supersedes any State or...

  11. 76 FR 34715 - Draft Guidance for Industry; Considering Whether an FDA-Regulated Product Involves the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ...-Regulated Product Involves the Application of Nanotechnology; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug... the Application of Nanotechnology''. This guidance is intended to provide industry with FDA's current... nanotechnology. The points to consider are intended to be broadly applicable to all FDA-regulated products,...

  12. The cytosolic component p47(phox) is not a sine qua non participant in the activation of NADPH oxidase but is required for optimal superoxide production.

    PubMed

    Koshkin, V; Lotan, O; Pick, E

    1996-11-29

    The superoxide (O-2)-generating NADPH oxidase of phagocytes is a multicomponent complex consisting of a membrane-associated flavocytochrome (cytochrome b559), bearing the NADPH binding site and two redox centers (FAD and heme) and three cytosolic activating components: p47(phox), p67(phox), and the small GTPase Rac (1 or 2). The canonical view is that the induction of O-2 generation involves the stimulus-dependent assembly of all three cytosolic components with cytochrome b559, a process mimicked in vitro by a cell-free system activated by anionic amphiphiles. We studied the requirement for individual cytosolic components in the activation of NADPH oxidase in a cell-free system consisting of purified and relipidated cytochrome b559, recombinant p47(phox), p67(phox), and Rac1, and the amphiphile, lithium dodecyl sulfate. We found that pronounced activation of NADPH oxidase can be achieved by exposing cytochrome b559 to p67(phox) and Rac1, in the total absence of p47(phox) (turnover = 60 mol O-2/s/mol cytochrome b559). However, maximal activation (turnover = 153 mol O-2/s/mol cytochrome b559) could only be obtained in the presence of p47(phox). O-2 production, in the absence of p47(phox), was dependent on: high molar ratios of p67(phox) and Rac1 to cytochrome b559, Rac1 being in the GTP-bound form, cytochrome b559 being saturated with FAD, and an optimal concentration of amphiphile. Single cytosolic components or combinations of two cytosolic components, other than p67(phox) and Rac1, were incapable of activation. We conclude that p67(phox) and Rac1 are the only cytosolic components directly involved in the induction of electron transport in cytochrome b559. p47(phox) appears to facilitate or stabilize the interaction of p67(phox) and, possibly, Rac1 with cytochrome b559, and is required for optimal generation of O-2 under physiological conditions.

  13. EPA announces final regulation to ban new asbestos products

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-08-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency on July 6 banned almost all asbestos-containing products in the United States in stages over the next seven years. The ban will apply to new product manufacture, importation and processing. It affects at least 94 percent of US production and imports, based on 1985 production-volume estimates. Virtually all asbestos-containing products will be replaced with safer alternatives. The final rule, promulgated under the Toxic Substances Control Act (section 6) bans, manufacturing, importing and processing of most US asbestos products in three stages, beginning with certain products on Sept. 1, 1990, and with others on the same date in 1993 and 1996. Corresponding bans on distribution will occur in 1992 and 1997. A primary factor in determining the stage at which a category of products should be banned was the agency's projection of the availability of a safe substitute for each asbestos product. Exposure to asbestos, a fibrous mineral, has been linked to a number of fatal diseases, including lung cancer, mesothelioma (a cancer of the chest and abdominal linings), gastro-intestinal cancer and asbestosis. It also is associated with a variety of other diseases. Controlling the risks posed by asbestos exposure has been especially troublesome because asbestos fibers are odorless, typically minute in size, easily suspended in air and extremely durable. Humans often are exposed unknowingly to asbestos fibers with little means of protection.

  14. Growth Regulator Herbicides Prevent Invasive Annual Grass Seed Production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Auxinic herbicides, such as 2,4-D and dicamba, that act as plant growth regulators are commonly used for broadleaf weed control in cereal crops (e.g. wheat, barley), grasslands, and non-croplands. If applied at later growth stages, while cereals are developing reproductive parts, the herbicides can...

  15. Further amendments to general regulations of the Food and Drug Administration to incorporate tobacco products. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-02-02

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending certain of its general regulations to include tobacco products, where appropriate, in light of FDA's authority to regulate these products under the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (Tobacco Control Act). With these amendments, tobacco products are subject to the same general requirements that apply to other FDA-regulated products.

  16. Biogas Production on Demand Regulated by Butyric Acid Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, K.; Schiffels, J.; Krafft, S.; Kuperjans, I.; Elbers, G.; Selmer, T.

    2016-03-01

    Investigating effects of volatile fatty acids on the biogas process it was observed that butyric acid can be used for transient stimulation of the methane production in biogas plants operating with low energy substrates like cattle manure. Upon addition of butyrate the methane output of the reactors doubled within 24 h and reached almost 3-times higher methane yields within 3-4 days. Butyrate was quantitatively eliminated and the reactors returned to the original productivity state within 3 days when application of butyrate was stopped. The opportunity to use butyrate feeding for increased biogas production on demand is discussed.

  17. Regulation for Optimal Liquid Products during Biomass Pyrolysis: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, F.; Hu, L. J.; Zheng, Y. W.; Huang, Y. B.; Yang, X. Q.; Liu, C.; Kang, J.; Zheng, Z. F.

    2016-08-01

    The liquid product obtained from biomass pyrolysis is very valuable that it could be used for extraction of chemicals as well as for liquid fuel. The desire goal is to obtain the most bio-oil with desired higher heating value (HHV), high physicochemical stability. The yields and chemical composition of products from biomass pyrolysis are closely related to the feedstock, pyrolysis parameters and catalysts. Current researches mainly concentrated on the co-pyrolysis of different biomass and introduce of novel catalysts as well as the combined effect of catalysts and pyrolysis parameters. This review starts with the chemical composition of biomass and the fundamental parameters and focuses on the influence of catalysts on bio-oil. What is more, the pyrolysis facilities at commercial scales were also involved. The classic researches and the current literature about the yield and composition of products (mainly liquid products) are summarized.

  18. 77 FR 31026 - Requirements for Importing Food and Drug Administration Regulated Products Into the United States

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... respect to importing pharmaceutical products, medical devices, food products, as well as technology which... No: 2012-12592] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2012-N-0001] Requirements for Importing Food and Drug Administration Regulated Products Into the...

  19. State regulation and power plant productivity: background and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    This report was prepared by representatives of several state regulatory agencies. It is a guide to some of the activities currently under way in state agencies to promote increased availability of electrical generating power plants. Standard measures of plant performance are defined and the nature of data bases that report such measures is discussed. It includes reviews of current state, federal, and industry programs to enhance power plant productivity and provides detailed outlines of programs in effect in California, Illinois, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, and Texas. A number of actions are presented that could be adopted by state regulatory agencies, depending on local conditions. They include: develop a commission position or policy statement to encourage productivity improvements by utilities; coordinate state efforts with ongoing industry and government programs to improve the acquisition of power plant performance data and the maintenance of quality information systems; acquire the capability to perform independent analyses of power plant productivity; direct the establishment of productivity improvement programs, including explicit performance objectives for both existing and planned power plants, and a performance program; establish a program of incentives to motivate productivity improvement activities; and participate in ongoing efforts at all levels and initiate new actions to promote productivity improvements.

  20. Melatonin production: proteasomal proteolysis in serotonin N-acetyltransferase regulation.

    PubMed

    Gastel, J A; Roseboom, P H; Rinaldi, P A; Weller, J L; Klein, D C

    1998-02-27

    The nocturnal increase in circulating melatonin in vertebrates is regulated by 10- to 100-fold increases in pineal serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT) activity. Changes in the amount of AA-NAT protein were shown to parallel changes in AA-NAT activity. When neural stimulation was switched off by either light exposure or L-propranolol-induced beta-adrenergic blockade, both AA-NAT activity and protein decreased rapidly. Effects of L-propranolol were blocked in vitro by dibutyryl adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) or inhibitors of proteasomal proteolysis. This result indicates that adrenergic-cAMP regulation of AA-NAT is mediated by rapid reversible control of selective proteasomal proteolysis. Similar proteasome-based mechanisms may function widely as selective molecular switches in vertebrate neural systems.

  1. Adiponectin Signaling Regulates Lipid Production in Human Sebocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yu Ra; Lee, Jin-Hyup; Sohn, Kyung-Cheol; Lee, Young; Seo, Young-Joon; Kim, Chang-Deok; Lee, Jeung-Hoon; Hong, Seung-Phil; Seo, Seong-Jun; Kim, Seong-Jin; Im, Myung

    2017-01-01

    Adiponectin plays important roles in metabolic function, inflammation and multiple biological activities in various tissues. However, evidence for adiponectin signaling in sebaceous glands is lacking, and its role remains to be clarified. This study investigated the role of adiponectin in lipid production in sebaceous glands in an experimental study of human sebocytes. We demonstrated that human sebaceous glands in vivo and sebocytes in vitro express adiponectin receptor and that adiponectin increased cell proliferation. Moreover, based on a lipogenesis study using Oil Red O, Nile red staining and thin layer chromatography, adiponectin strongly upregulated lipid production in sebocytes. In three-dimensional culture of sebocytes, lipid synthesis was markedly enhanced in sebocytes treated with adiponectin. This study suggested that adiponectin plays a significant role in human sebaceous gland biology. Adiponectin signaling is a promising target in the clinical management of barrier disorders in which sebum production is decreased, such as in atopic dermatitis and aged skin. PMID:28081218

  2. Antibiotic production by actinomycetes: the Janus faces of regulation.

    PubMed

    Cundliffe, Eric

    2006-07-01

    This manuscript reviews some of the common regulatory mechanisms that control antibiotic production in actinomycetes. These ubiquitous bacteria, collectively responsible for the earthy smell of soil, are prolific producers of antibiotics and other secondary metabolites. The content of this review is biased towards the author's current research interests, concerning the action of regulatory gene products that control transcription of antibiotic-biosynthetic genes and the associated involvement of low molecular weight signalling molecules of the gamma-butyrolactone family. As a result, much fertile ground remains unturned particularly in the area of environmental monitoring and responses of actinomycetes to stimuli so perceived. Reviews casting a broader net are cited in the text.

  3. The Adhesion-GPCR BAI1 Regulates Synaptogenesis by Controlling the Recruitment of the Par3/Tiam1 Polarity Complex to Synaptic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Duman, Joseph G.; Tzeng, Christopher P.; Tu, Yen-Kuei; Munjal, Tina; Schwechter, Brandon; Ho, Tammy Szu-Yu; Tolias, Kimberley F.

    2013-01-01

    Excitatory synapses are polarized structures that primarily reside on dendritic spines in the brain. The small GTPase Rac1 regulates the development and plasticity of synapses and spines by modulating actin dynamics. By restricting the Rac1-guanine nucleotide exchange factor Tiam1 to spines, the polarity protein Par3 promotes synapse development by spatially controlling Rac1 activation. However, the mechanism for recruiting Par3 to spines is unknown. Here, we identify brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1 (BAI1) as a synaptic adhesion GPCR that is required for spinogenesis and synaptogenesis in mice and rats. We show that BAI1 interacts with Par3/Tiam1 and recruits these proteins to synaptic sites. BAI1 knockdown results in Par3/Tiam1 mislocalization and loss of activated Rac1 and filamentous actin from spines. Interestingly, BAI1 also mediates Rac-dependent engulfment in professional phagocytes through its interaction with a different Rac1-guanine nucleotide exchange factor module, ELMO/DOCK180. However, this interaction is dispensable for BAI1’s role in synapse development because a BAI1 mutant that cannot interact with ELMO/DOCK180 rescues spine defects in BAI1-knockdown neurons, whereas a mutant that cannot interact with Par3/Tiam1 rescues neither spine defects nor Par3 localization. Further, overexpression of Tiam1 rescues BAI1 knockdown spine phenotypes. These results indicate that BAI1 plays an important role in synaptogenesis that is mechanistically distinct from its role in phagocytosis. Furthermore, our results provide the first example of a cell surface receptor that targets members of the PAR polarity complex to synapses. PMID:23595754

  4. Linking gene regulation to mRNA production and export.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana; Hurt, Ed

    2011-06-01

    Regulation of gene expression can occur at many different levels. One important step in the gene expression process is the transport of mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. In recent years, studies have described how nuclear mRNA export depends on the steps preceding and following transport through nuclear pore complexes. These include gene activation, transcription, mRNA processing and mRNP assembly and disassembly. In this review, we summarise recent insights into the links between these steps in the gene expression cascade.

  5. Abnormal regulation of IgG production in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Hogan, E L; Arnaud, P

    1982-03-01

    After stimulation with pokeweed mitogen (PWM), peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) from patients with active multiple sclerosis (MS) produced significantly more IgG (8595 ng per milliliter, p less than 0.01) then MNC from normal age-matched controls (5477 ng per milliliter), whereas those tested during stable periods produced less IgG (4076 ng per milliliter, p less than 0.01). Treatment of MNC with sodium periodate (SP) generated suppressor cells for PWM-driven IgG production in normal controls and in most of the stable MS patients but in only 26% of those during active disease, in whom an increase in IgG production was often seen. This suggests a deficiency of inducible suppressor T cells associated with a supranormal B-cell response to polyclonal activation; T lymphocytes obtained from MS patients during active episodes strongly suppressed IgG production by normal B lymphocytes, whereas their B cells often produced more IgG in the presence of normal T cells. In active MS, a relative B-cell unresponsiveness to activated suppressor T cells would leave helper signals unbalanced, thus leading to increased B-cell activation, which might deplete the pool of inducible suppressor cells for IgG production.

  6. New production regulates export stoichiometry in the ocean.

    PubMed

    Tamelander, Tobias; Reigstad, Marit; Olli, Kalle; Slagstad, Dag; Wassmann, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The proportion in which carbon and growth-limiting nutrients are exported from the oceans' productive surface layer to the deep sea is a crucial parameter in models of the biological carbon pump. Based on >400 vertical flux observations of particulate organic carbon (POC) and nitrogen (PON) from the European Arctic Ocean we show the common assumption of constant C:N stoichiometry not to be met. Exported POC:PON ratios exceeded the classical Redfield atomic ratio of 6.625 in the entire region, with the largest deviation in the deep Central Arctic Ocean. In this part the mean exported POC:PON ratio of 9.7 (a:a) implies c. 40% higher carbon export compared to Redfield-based estimates. When spatially integrated, the potential POC export in the European Arctic was 10-30% higher than suggested by calculations based on constant POC:PON ratios. We further demonstrate that the exported POC:PON ratio varies regionally in relation to nitrate-based new production over geographical scales that range from the Arctic to the subtropics, being highest in the least productive oligotrophic Central Arctic Ocean and subtropical gyres. Accounting for variations in export stoichiometry among systems of different productivity will improve the ability of models to resolve regional patterns in carbon export and, hence, the oceans' contribution to the global carbon cycle will be predicted more accurately.

  7. 76 FR 17127 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Information Collection; Environmentally Sound Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... Regulation; Information Collection; Environmentally Sound Products AGENCIES: Department of Defense (DOD... extension of a currently approved information collection requirement concerning environmentally sound...., Washington, DC 20405, telephone (202) 501-4755. Please cite OMB control No. 9000-0134, Environmentally...

  8. Ror2/Frizzled Complex Mediates Wnt5a-Induced AP-1 Activation by Regulating Dishevelled Polymerization▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Nishita, Michiru; Itsukushima, Sumiyo; Nomachi, Akira; Endo, Mitsuharu; Wang, ZhiChao; Inaba, Daisuke; Qiao, Sen; Takada, Shinji; Kikuchi, Akira; Minami, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase Ror2 acts as a receptor or coreceptor for Wnt5a to mediate Wnt5a-induced activation of the Wnt/JNK pathway and inhibition of the β-catenin-dependent canonical Wnt pathway. However, little is known about how Ror2 cooperates with another receptor component(s) to mediate Wnt5a signaling. We show here that Ror2 regulates Wnt5a-induced polymerization of Dishevelled (Dvl) and that this Ror2-mediated regulation of Dvl is independent of the cytoplasmic region of Ror2. Ror2 can associate with Frizzled7 (Fz7) via its extracellular cysteine-rich domain to form a receptor complex that is required for the regulation of Dvl and activation of the AP-1 promoter after Wnt5a stimulation. Suppressed expression of Fz7 indeed results in the inhibition of Wnt5a-induced polymerization of Dvl and AP-1 activation. Interestingly, both the DIX and the DEP domains of Dvl are indispensable for Dvl polymerization and subsequent AP-1 activation after Wnt5a stimulation. We further show that polymerized Dvl is colocalized with Rac1 and that suppressed expression of Rac1 inhibits Wnt5a-induced AP-1 activation. Collectively, our results indicate that Ror2/Fz receptor complex plays an important role in the Wnt5a/Rac1/AP-1 pathway by regulating the polymerization of Dvl. PMID:20457807

  9. Effects of growth regulator herbicide on downy brome (Bromus tectorum) seed production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous research showed growth regulator herbicides, such as picloram and aminopyralid, have a sterilizing effect on Japanese brome (Bromus japonicus Thunb.) that can reduce this invasive annual grass’s seed production nearly 100%. This suggests growth regulators might be used to control invasive ...

  10. Genomic gems: SINE RNAs regulate mRNA production.

    PubMed

    Ponicsan, Steven L; Kugel, Jennifer F; Goodrich, James A

    2010-04-01

    Mammalian short interspersed elements (SINEs) are abundant retrotransposons that have long been considered junk DNA; however, RNAs transcribed from mouse B2 and human Alu SINEs have recently been found to control mRNA production at multiple levels. Upon cell stress B2 and Alu RNAs bind RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and repress transcription of some protein-encoding genes. Bi-directional transcription of a B2 SINE establishes a boundary that places the growth hormone locus in a permissive chromatin state during mouse development. Alu RNAs embedded in Pol II transcripts can promote evolution and proteome diversity through exonization via alternative splicing. Given the diverse means by which SINE encoded RNAs impact production of mRNAs, this genomic junk is proving to contain hidden gems.

  11. Flow regulation of collecting duct endothelin-1 production.

    PubMed

    Lyon-Roberts, Brianna; Strait, Kevin A; van Peursem, Evan; Kittikulsuth, Wararat; Pollock, Jennifer S; Pollock, David M; Kohan, Donald E

    2011-03-01

    Collecting duct (CD) endothelin-1 (ET-1) is an important autocrine inhibitor of CD Na(+) reabsorption. Salt loading is thought to increase CD ET-1 production; however, definitive evidence of this, as well as understanding of the mechanisms transducing this effect, is lacking. Tubule fluid flow increases in response to Na(+) loading; hence, we studied flow modulation of CD ET-1 production. Three days of a high-salt diet increased mouse and rat inner medullary CD (IMCD) ET-1 mRNA expression. Acute furosemide infusion increased urinary ET-1 excretion in anesthetized rats. Primary cultures of mouse or rat IMCD detached in response to flow using a closed perfusion chamber, consequently a CD cell line (mpkCCDcl4) was examined. Flow increased ET-1 mRNA at shear stress rates exceeding 1 dyne/cm(2), with the maximal effect seen between 2 and 10 dyne/cm(2). Induction of ET-1 mRNA was first evident after 1 h, and most apparent after 2 h, of flow. Inhibition of calmodulin or dihydropyridine-sensitive Ca(2+) channels did not alter the flow response; however, chelation of intracellular Ca(2+) or removal of extracellular Ca(2+) largely prevented flow-stimulated ET-1 mRNA accumulation. Downregulation of protein kinase C (PKC) using phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, or PKC inhibition with calphostin C, markedly reduced flow-stimulated ET-1 mRNA levels. Flow-stimulated ET-1 mRNA accumulation was abolished by inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC). Taken together, these data indicate that flow increases CD ET-1 production and this is dependent on extracellular and intracellular Ca(2+), PKC, and PLC. These studies suggest a novel pathway for coupling alterations in extracellular fluid volume to CD ET-1 production and ultimately control of CD Na(+) reabsorption.

  12. [Labile blood product traceability: definition, regulation, evaluation, and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Pélissier, E; Nguyen, L

    2000-06-01

    The traceability of blood products is an essential part of hemovigilance and transfusion safety. Law no 94-68 of 24 January 1994 is the legal foundation of the system of traceability. In this article, the structures of the system and the main actors are discussed. An evaluation of the system of traceability showed that it is both feasible and adaptable. An evaluation process is needed to assess the proper functioning of the system and to detect and prevent possible deficiencies.

  13. Options for state and local governments to regulate non-cigarette tobacco products.

    PubMed

    Freiberg, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Most tobacco control laws were written to address the scourge of smoking--particularly smoking cigarettes. As a result, these laws frequently exclude non-cigarette tobacco products, which are becoming more prevalent on the market. These regulatory gaps jeopardize public health by increasing the possibility that these products will be used--particularly by minors and young adults. This article examines gaps in regulation using five products as case studies: dissolvable tobacco products, electronic cigarettes, little cigars, snus, and water pipes. In addition, this article presents policy options that state and local governments can adopt to regulate these products more effectively, including regulations relating to price, flavors, youth access, use in public places, point-of-sale warnings, and marketing. Furthermore, this article contains extensive discussion of the recently adopted federal Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, which both limits and expands the power of state and local governments.

  14. RhoG regulates anoikis through a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaki, Nao; Negishi, Manabu; Katoh, Hironori . E-mail: hirokato@pharm.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2007-08-01

    In normal epithelial cells, cell-matrix interaction is required for cell survival and proliferation, whereas disruption of this interaction causes epithelial cells to undergo apoptosis called anoikis. Here we show that the small GTPase RhoG plays an important role in the regulation of anoikis. HeLa cells are capable of anchorage-independent cell growth and acquire resistance to anoikis. We found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of RhoG promoted anoikis in HeLa cells. Previous studies have shown that RhoG activates Rac1 and induces several cellular functions including promotion of cell migration through its effector ELMO and the ELMO-binding protein Dock180 that function as a Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor. However, RhoG-induced suppression of anoikis was independent of the ELMO- and Dock180-mediated activation of Rac1. On the other hand, the regulation of anoikis by RhoG required phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activity, and constitutively active RhoG bound to the PI3K regulatory subunit p85{alpha} and induced the PI3K-dependent phosphorylation of Akt. Taken together, these results suggest that RhoG protects cells from apoptosis caused by the loss of anchorage through a PI3K-dependent mechanism, independent of its activation of Rac1.

  15. Schisandra lignans production regulated by different bioreactor type.

    PubMed

    Szopa, Agnieszka; Kokotkiewicz, Adam; Luczkiewicz, Maria; Ekiert, Halina

    2017-04-10

    Schisandra chinensis (Chinese magnolia vine) is a rich source of therapeutically relevant dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans with anticancer, immunostimulant and hepatoprotective activities. In this work, shoot cultures of S. chinensis were grown in different types of bioreactors with the aim to select a system suitable for the large scale in vitro production of schisandra lignans. The cultures were maintained in Murashige-Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with 3mg/l 6-benzylaminopurine (BA) and 1mg/l 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). Five bioreactors differing with respect to cultivation mode were tested: two liquid-phase systems (baloon-type bioreactor and bubble-column bioreactor with biomass immobilization), the gas-phase spray bioreactor and two commercially available temporary immersion systems: RITA(®) and Plantform. The experiments were run for 30 and 60 days in batch mode. The harvested shoots were evaluated for growth and lignan content determined by LC-DAD and LC-DAD-ESI-MS. Of the tested bioreactors, temporary immersion systems provided the best results with respect to biomass production and lignan accumulation: RITA(®) bioreactor yielded 17.86g/l (dry weight) during 60 day growth period whereas shoots grown for 30 days in Plantform bioreactor contained the highest amount of lignans (546.98mg/100g dry weight), with schisandrin, deoxyschisandrin and gomisin A as the major constituents (118.59, 77.66 and 67.86mg/100g dry weight, respectively).

  16. Tightly regulated bacteriolysis for production of empty Salmonella Enteritidis envelope.

    PubMed

    Jawale, Chetan V; Kim, Sam Woong; Lee, John Hwa

    2014-03-14

    To avoid leaky expression of the bacterial host-toxic PhiX174 lysis gene E from the λpR promoter, a convergent promoter construct was made in which gene E was placed between a sense λpR promoter and an anti-sense P araBAD promoter. In the presence of l-arabinose, leaky transcription of lysis gene E at 28°C from the sense λpR promoter was repressed by an anti-sense RNA simultaneously expressed from the P araBAD promoter. The stringent repression of lysis gene E in the absence of induction temperature resulted into higher concentration of bacteria in culture suspension, and consequently higher and stable production of a Salmonella Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) ghost. The immunogenicity of the S. Enteritidis ghost was evaluated by immunizing chickens. Chickens from the immunized group demonstrated a significant increase in the levels of S. Enteritidis-specific plasma IgG, intestinal sIgA, and lymphocyte proliferative response. After virulent S. Enteritidis challenge, the immunized group exhibited decreased bacterial recovery from organs compared with the non-immunized group. Together, these results demonstrate that the stringent molecular control over leaky transcription of lysis gene E enabled the stable production of S. Enteritidis ghost, and immunization with the S. Enteritidis ghost can protect chickens by inducing robust humoral and cellular immune responses.

  17. Integrin-mediated Ras–Extracellular Regulated Kinase (ERK) Signaling Regulates Interferon γ Production in Human Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mainiero, Fabrizio; Gismondi, Angela; Soriani, Alessandra; Cippitelli, Marco; Palmieri, Gabriella; Jacobelli, Jordan; Piccoli, Mario; Frati, Luigi; Santoni, Angela

    1998-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that integrin engagement results in the activation of biochemical signaling events important for regulating different cell functions, such as migration, adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and specific gene expression. Here, we report that β1 integrin ligation on human natural killer (NK) cells results in the activation of Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Formation of Shc–growth factor receptor–bound protein 2 (Grb2) and Shc–proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2–Grb2 complexes are the receptor-proximal events accompanying the β1 integrin–mediated Ras activation. In addition, we demonstrate that ligation of β1 integrins results in the stimulation of interferon γ (IFN-γ) production, which is under the control of extracellular signal–regulated kinase 2 activation. Overall, our data indicate that β1 integrins, by delivering signals capable of triggering IFN-γ production, may function as NK-activating receptors. PMID:9763606

  18. DNA Inversion Regulates Outer Membrane Vesicle Production in Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama-Imaohji, Haruyuki; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Yamasaki, Hisashi; Yoneda, Saori; Nariya, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Motoo; Secher, Thomas; Miyake, Yoichiro; Oswald, Eric; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Kuwahara, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Phase changes in Bacteroides fragilis, a member of the human colonic microbiota, mediate variations in a vast array of cell surface molecules, such as capsular polysaccharides and outer membrane proteins through DNA inversion. The results of the present study show that outer membrane vesicle (OMV) formation in this anaerobe is also controlled by DNA inversions at two distantly localized promoters, IVp-I and IVp-II that are associated with extracellular polysaccharide biosynthesis and the expression of outer membrane proteins. These promoter inversions are mediated by a single tyrosine recombinase encoded by BF2766 (orthologous to tsr19 in strain NCTC9343) in B. fragilis YCH46, which is located near IVp-I. A series of BF2766 mutants were constructed in which the two promoters were locked in different configurations (IVp-I/IVp-II = ON/ON, OFF/OFF, ON/OFF or OFF/ON). ON/ON B. fragilis mutants exhibited hypervesiculating, whereas the other mutants formed only a trace amount of OMVs. The hypervesiculating ON/ON mutants showed higher resistance to treatment with bile, LL-37, and human β-defensin 2. Incubation of wild-type cells with 5% bile increased the population of cells with the ON/ON genotype. These results indicate that B. fragilis regulates the formation of OMVs through DNA inversions at two distantly related promoter regions in response to membrane stress, although the mechanism underlying the interplay between the two regions controlled by the invertible promoters remains unknown. PMID:26859882

  19. ALPK1 affects testosterone mediated regulation of proinflammatory cytokines production.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tzer-Min; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Hsu, Hui-Ting; Chiang, Shang-Lun; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Huang, Chung-Ming; Tu, Hung-Pin; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Ko, Ying-Chin

    2015-11-01

    Alpha-protein kinase 1, also known as alpha-kinase 1 (ALPK1), is associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD), myocardial infarction, gout and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). In addition to having an inductive effect on the proinflammatory cytokines in monocytic THP1 cells, ALPK1 is expressed abundantly in the mouse testes. Low testosterone levels are commonly associated with arthritis, CKD, type 2 DM, cardiovascular disease and inflammation. The testosterone's anti-inflammatory effect has been demonstrated to reduce proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules. In this study, we found that ALPK1 transgenic mice showed lower levels of testosterone in both the testes and the serum. Decreasing endogenous ALPK1 enhanced testosterone levels and transcripts of testosterone-regulated genes (P450scc, 3beta-HSD, P450C17, 17beta-HSD, StAR, and INSL3) in TM3 Leydig cells. In contrast, increasing testosterone decreased ALPK1 in both TM3 and monocytic THP1 cells. This decrease was accompanied by a reduction of the proinflammatory cytokines. Increased ALPK1 levels attenuated the testosterone effects in THP1 cells. Finally, we also found that ALPK1 increased the release of TNF-alpha and TGF-beta1 in the human embryonic kidney 293 cells, while testosterone inhibited ALPK1 in the primary kidney cells. Taken together, this data suggests that the balance between ALPK1 and testosterone plays a critical role in the testosterone-mediated inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines.

  20. The professionalization of Western herbalists: response to new product regulations in Canada.

    PubMed

    Moss, Karen; Boon, Heather; Ballantyne, Peri; Kachan, Natasha

    2007-12-01

    New Canadian Natural Health Products regulations (NHP regulations) came into law January 1st, 2004 and will be implemented over 6 years. These regulations have the potential to impact a variety of stakeholders, in particular complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) practitioners. In this article, we document Canadian Western herbalist leaders' responses to the new regulations, so as to provide insight into how new healthcare policy serves as a stimulus for the organization of an emerging healthcare profession. The data are derived from key informant interviews with Western herbalist leaders in Canada (n=9). The NHP regulations include "good manufacturing practices" and Western herbalist leaders are concerned that many small companies, often owned and run by Western herbalists, will find the regulations too costly to implement, causing them to reduce the number and diversity of products they manufacture, or go out of business all together. Furthermore, lack of availability of whole plant products could severely restrict the practice of Canadian Western herbalists. In response to this challenge, herbalists are attempting to (i) organize as a more cohesive group, (ii) define their unique body of knowledge and (iii) increase the perceived legitimacy of their practices in the eyes of the public, conventional healthcare practitioners, and regulators, in an attempt to protect their unique practices. An examination of the findings reveals the extent to which external factors (i.e., the new NHP regulations) both provoke and shape the professionalization of this group of healthcare practitioners.

  1. Encountering Challenges with the EU Regulation on Advance Therapy Medical Products.

    PubMed

    Mansnérus, Juli

    2015-12-01

    This article aims at analysing how well the Advanced Therapy Medical Product Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007 (ATMP Regulation) meets the needs of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMES), academia and public tissue establishments developing advanced therapy medical products (ATMPS). Benefits and shortcomings of the ATMP Regulation are identified, and possible amendments are proposed to accelerate the translation of research into advanced therapies and to facilitate the commercialisation of ATMPS whilst ensuring safety. It was set up as a lex specialis to ensure the free movement of ATMPS within the EU in order to facilitate their access to the internal market and to foster the competitiveness of European pharmaceutical companies, while guaranteeing the highest level protection of public health. Since the adoption of the ATMP Regulation in late 2008, only 5 ATMPS have been granted marketing authorisations thus far. Hence, there is a need to analyse whether the ATMP Regulation meets its objectives.

  2. Endothelin Regulates Porphyromonas gingivalis-Induced Production of Inflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji-Hye; Lee, Dong Eun; Kang, Si-Mook; Lee, So Yun; Choi, Lin; Sun, Ji Su; Kim, Seul Ki; Park, Wonse; Kim, Baek Il; Yoo, Yun-Jung; Chang, Inik; Shin, Dong Min

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a very common oral inflammatory disease that results in the destruction of supporting connective and osseous tissues of the teeth. Although the exact etiology is still unclear, Gram-negative bacteria, especially Porphyromonas gingivalis in subgingival pockets are thought to be one of the major etiologic agents of periodontitis. Endothelin (ET) is a family of three 21-amino acid peptides, ET-1, -2, and -3, that activate G protein-coupled receptors, ETA and ETB. Endothelin is involved in the occurrence and progression of various inflammatory diseases. Previous reports have shown that ET-1 and its receptors, ETA and ETB are expressed in the periodontal tissues and, that ET-1 levels in gingival crevicular fluid are increased in periodontitis patients. Moreover, P. gingivalis infection has been shown to induce the production of ET-1 along with other inflammatory cytokines. Despite these studies, however, the functional significance of endothelin in periodontitis is still largely unknown. In this study, we explored the cellular and molecular mechanisms of ET-1 action in periodontitis using human gingival epithelial cells (HGECs). ET-1 and ETA, but not ETB, were abundantly expressed in HGECs. Stimulation of HGECs with P. gingivalis or P. gingivalis lipopolysaccharide increased the expression of ET-1 and ETA suggesting the activation of the endothelin signaling pathway. Production of inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β, TNFα, and IL-6, was significantly enhanced by exogenous ET-1 treatment, and this effect depended on the mitogen-activated protein kinases via intracellular Ca2+ increase, which resulted from the activation of the phospholipase C/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate pathway. The inhibition of the endothelin receptor-mediated signaling pathway with the dual receptor inhibitor, bosentan, partially ameliorated alveolar bone loss and immune cell infiltration. These results suggest that endothelin plays an important role in P. gingivalis

  3. 76 FR 57682 - Petition Requesting Regulations Restricting Cadmium in Children's Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... COMMISSION 16 CFR Chapter II Petition Requesting Regulations Restricting Cadmium in Children's Products... cadmium in children's products, especially toy metal jewelry. On September 6, 2011, the Commission granted... cadmium in children's jewelry is published by ASTM International, Inc. (``ASTM'') within three...

  4. Regulations applicable to plant food supplements and related products in the European Union.

    PubMed

    Silano, Vittorio; Coppens, Patrick; Larrañaga-Guetaria, Ainhoa; Minghetti, Paola; Roth-Ehrang, René

    2011-12-01

    This paper deals with the current regulatory and legal settings of traditional plant food supplements and herbal medicinal products in the European Union (EU). Marketing of botanicals in foods and food supplements in the EU is subject to several provisions of food law, which cover aspects of safety, production, labelling and product composition, including the use of additives and maximum levels of contaminants and residues. However, due to limited harmonization at the EU level, specific national regulations adopted at a Member State level also apply and mutual recognition is the mechanism through which such products can be marketed in EU countries other than those of origin. Unlike food supplements, marketing of traditional herbal medicinal products is regulated by an ad hoc Directive (i.e. Directive 2004/24/EC) covering in detail all the relevant aspects of these products, including a facilitated registration procedure at national level. However, by distinguishing traditional herbal medicinal products from plant food supplements and establishing selective marketing modalities for these two product categories, the EU has been confronted with implementation difficulties for traditional herbal medicinal products and a lack of homogeneity in the regulatory approaches adopted in different EU Member States. In fact, currently the nature of the commercial botanical products made available to consumers as traditional medicinal products or food supplements, depends largely on the EU Member State under consideration as a consequence of how competent National Authorities and manufacturing companies interpret and apply current regulations rather than on the intrinsic properties of the botanical products and their constituents. When the EU approach is compared with approaches adopted in some non-European countries to regulate these product categories, major differences become evident.

  5. CdtR Regulates TcdA and TcdB Production in Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Shelley A.; Hutton, Melanie L.; Rood, Julian I.; Cheung, Jackie K.; Lyras, Dena

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a global health burden and the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhoea worldwide, causing severe gastrointestinal disease and death. Three well characterised toxins are encoded by this bacterium in two genetic loci, specifically, TcdB (toxin B) and TcdA (toxin A) in the Pathogenicity Locus (PaLoc) and binary toxin (CDT) in the genomically distinct CDT locus (CdtLoc). Toxin production is controlled by regulators specific to each locus. The orphan response regulator, CdtR, encoded within the CdtLoc, up-regulates CDT production. Until now there has been no suggestion that CdtR influences TcdA and TcdB production since it is not carried by all PaLoc-containing strains and CdtLoc is not linked genetically to PaLoc. Here we show that, in addition to CDT, CdtR regulates TcdA and TcdB production but that this effect is strain dependent. Of clinical relevance, CdtR increased the production of TcdA, TcdB and CDT in two epidemic ribotype 027 human strains, modulating their virulence in a mouse infection model. Strains traditionally from animal lineages, notably ribotype 078 strains, are increasingly being isolated from humans and their genetic and phenotypic analysis is critical for future studies on this important pathogen. Here we show that CdtR-mediated toxin regulation did not occur in other strain backgrounds, including a ribotype 078 animal strain. The finding that toxin gene regulation is strain dependent highlights the regulatory diversity between C. difficile isolates and the importance of studying virulence regulation in diverse lineages and clinically relevant strains. Our work provides the first evidence that TcdA, TcdB and CDT production is linked by a common regulatory mechanism and that CdtR may act as a global regulator of virulence in epidemic 027 strains. PMID:27414650

  6. Redirecting metabolic flux in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through regulation of cofactors in UMP production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Liu, Qingguo; Chen, Xiaochun; Wu, Jinglan; Guo, Ting; Zhu, Chenjie; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-04-01

    Although it is generally known that cofactors play a major role in the production of different fermentation products, their role has not been thoroughly and systematically studied. To understand the impact of cofactors on physiological functions, a systematic approach was applied, which involved redox state analysis, energy charge analysis, and metabolite analysis. Using uridine 5'-monophosphate metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model, we demonstrated that regulation of intracellular the ratio of NADPH to NADP(+) not only redistributed the carbon flux between the glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways, but also regulated the redox state of NAD(H), resulting in a significant change of ATP, and a significantly altered spectrum of metabolic products.

  7. Cyfip1 Regulates Presynaptic Activity during Development

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Kuangfu; Harony-Nicolas, Hala; Buxbaum, Joseph D.

    2016-01-01

    Copy number variations encompassing the gene encoding Cyfip1 have been associated with a variety of human diseases, including autism and schizophrenia. Here we show that juvenile mice hemizygous for Cyfip1 have altered presynaptic function, enhanced protein translation, and increased levels of F-actin. In developing hippocampus, reduced Cyfip1 levels serve to decrease paired pulse facilitation and increase miniature EPSC frequency without a change in amplitude. Higher-resolution examination shows these changes to be caused primarily by an increase in presynaptic terminal size and enhanced vesicle release probability. Short hairpin-mediated knockdown of Cyfip1 coupled with expression of mutant Cyfip1 proteins indicates that the presynaptic alterations are caused by dysregulation of the WAVE regulatory complex. Such dysregulation occurs downstream of Rac1 as acute exposure to Rac1 inhibitors rescues presynaptic responses in culture and in hippocampal slices. The data serve to highlight an early and essential role for Cyfip1 in the generation of normally functioning synapses and suggest a means by which changes in Cyfip1 levels could impact the generation of neural networks and contribute to abnormal and maladaptive behaviors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Several developmental brain disorders have been associated with gene duplications and deletions that serve to increase or decrease levels of encoded proteins. Cyfip1 is one such protein, but the role it plays in brain development is poorly understood. We asked whether decreased Cyfip1 levels altered the function of developing synapses. The data show that synapses with reduced Cyfip1 are larger and release neurotransmitter more rapidly. These effects are due to Cyfip1's role in actin polymerization and are reversed by expression of a Cyfip1 mutant protein retaining actin regulatory function or by inhibiting Rac1. Thus, Cyfip1 has a more prominent early role regulating presynaptic activity during a stage of development when

  8. Transcription factor Fli-1 positively regulates lipopolysaccharide-induced interleukin-27 production in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng; Yuan, Ming; Ma, Xianwei; Jiang, Wei; Zhu, Lingxi; Wen, Mingyue; Xu, Jing; Liu, Qiuyan; An, Huazhang

    2016-03-01

    IL-27 is an important regulator of TLR4-activated innate immune. The mechanism by which IL-27 production is regulated in TLR4-activated innate immune remains largely unclear. Here we show that expression of transcription factor Fli-1 at protein level is increased in macrophages following LPS stimulation. Fli-1 overexpression increases LPS-activated IL-27 production in macrophages. Consistently, Fli-1 knockdown inhibits LPS-induced IL-27 production in macrophages. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay reveals that Fli-1 binds the promoter of IL-27 p28 subunit. Further experiments manifest that Fli-1 binds the region between -250 and -150 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site of p28 gene and increases p28 gene promoter-controlled transcription. These results demonstrate that Fli-1 positively regulates IL-27 production in TLR4-activated immune response by promoting transcription of IL-27 p28 gene.

  9. US Food and Drug Administration international collaborations for cellular therapy product regulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cellular therapy products are an emerging medical product class undergoing rapid scientific and clinical innovation worldwide. These products pose unique regulatory challenges both for countries with existing regulatory frameworks and for countries where regulatory frameworks for cellular therapy products are under development. The United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) has a history of productive working relationships with international regulatory authorities, and seeks to extend this to the cellular therapy field. The US FDA and its global regulatory counterparts are engaged in collaborations focused on the convergence of scientific and regulatory approaches, and the education of scientists, clinicians, regulators, and the public at large on the development of cellular therapies. PMID:23021082

  10. Carvedilol differentially regulates cytokine production from activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Ping; Ho, Ling-Jun; Cheng, Shu-Meng; Hsu, Yu-Lin; Tsao, Tien-Ping; Chang, Deh-Ming; Lai, Jenn-Haung

    2004-05-01

    Chronic inflammation is one of the important mechanisms involved in atherosclerosis formation. The activated monocytes and their secreted cytokines contribute significantly to this inflammatory process. Here we examined the effects of carvedilol, a recently introduced cardio-protective alpha-1- and beta-receptor blocker, on cytokine production from various stimuli-activated human immune effector cells. By ELISA analysis, we showed that carvedilol inhibited interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), but enhanced interleukin (IL)-12 production in phytohemagglutinin (PHA)- and concanavalin A (ConA)-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) was marginally affected. When purified monocytes were examined, we observed the consistent up-regulation of IL-12 production while both IL-10 and TNF-alpha were unaffected or marginally down-regulated, respectively, by carvedilol. In agreement with the observation in monocytes, the production of IL-12 from activated macrophages was also up-regulated by carvedilol. We concluded that carvedilol might mediate its therapeutic effects through differentially regulating cytokine production from activated mononuclear cells, including at least monocytes and macrophages.

  11. FoxO1 mediates insulin-dependent regulation of hepatic VLDL production in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kamagate, Adama; Qu, Shen; Perdomo, German; Su, Dongming; Kim, Dae Hyun; Slusher, Sandra; Meseck, Marcia; Dong, H. Henry

    2008-01-01

    Excessive production of triglyceride-rich VLDL is attributable to hypertriglyceridemia. VLDL production is facilitated by microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) in a rate-limiting step that is regulated by insulin. To characterize the underlying mechanism, we studied hepatic MTP regulation by forkhead box O1 (FoxO1), a transcription factor that plays a key role in hepatic insulin signaling. In HepG2 cells, MTP expression was induced by FoxO1 and inhibited by exposure to insulin. This effect correlated with the ability of FoxO1 to bind and stimulate MTP promoter activity. Deletion or mutation of the FoxO1 target site within the MTP promoter disabled FoxO1 binding and resulted in abolition of insulin-dependent regulation of MTP expression. We generated mice that expressed a constitutively active FoxO1 transgene and found that increased FoxO1 activity was associated with enhanced MTP expression, augmented VLDL production, and elevated plasma triglyceride levels. In contrast, RNAi-mediated silencing of hepatic FoxO1 was associated with reduced MTP and VLDL production in adult mice. Furthermore, we found that hepatic FoxO1 abundance and MTP production were increased in mice with abnormal triglyceride metabolism. These data suggest that FoxO1 mediates insulin regulation of MTP production and that augmented MTP levels may be a causative factor for VLDL overproduction and hypertriglyceridemia in diabetes. PMID:18497885

  12. The regulation of work activity and the new labor and production contexts.

    PubMed

    Silva, Elaine Cristina; Bento, Paulo Eduardo Gomes

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, there has been a rise in the use o lean production model techniques. Through this approach, companies become more flexible, a fact that increases the interest in studies regarding the introduction of this model in businesses and its impacts on working conditions. Important observations concerning ergonomics, such as the theme of work activity regulation, have been highlighted in such studies. This article aims to discuss strategies and regulations adopted by the workers on assembly lines that are considered flexible. The article presents the results of a study in a company that adopts some lean production techniques. The study was analyzed using the activity analysis as one of the premises of the Ergonomic Work Analysis (EWA). Many aspects of the traditional assembly line remain present in the scenario that was studied, however a new language was employed and aspects in the nature of regulations demonstrate that the relation with lean production techniques influence the operators' operational modes.

  13. Multihormonal regulation of thyroglobulin production by the OVNIS 6H thyroid cell line.

    PubMed

    Aouani, A; Hovsépian, S; Fayet, G

    1988-02-01

    The hormonal regulation of thyroglobulin production has been studied using a clone of the ovine thyroid cell line: OVNIS 6H. 3 among the 6 hormones proposed for serum replacement are required for an optimal thyroglobulin production; insulin, hydrocortisone and thyrotropin. Insulin alone stimulates thyroglobulin production. The presence of insulin is also required to observe hydrocortisone and TSH stimulations. Newborn calf serum inhibits thyroglobulin production. The best conditions for optimal thyroglobulin expression and TSH responsiveness are obtained in serum-free medium supplemented with 5 micrograms/ml insulin, 100 nM hydrocortisone and 1 mU/ml TSH.

  14. The proposed EU-regulation on clinical trials on medicinal products: an unethical proposal?

    PubMed

    Heringa, Jilles; Dute, Joseph

    2013-09-01

    The Commission has proposed a regulation 'on clinical trials on medicinal products for human use' to introduce one regulatory framework for clinical trials in the European Union. This regulation should replace the current clinical trials directive (2001/20/EC). In this article we describe and critically review the main provisions of the proposed regulation. We assess the consequences for a sound authorisation procedure of clinical trials and the level of protection for human subjects. We note that the proposed regulation is inconsistent with applicable international legal documents, such as the Biomedicine Convention and the Declaration of Helsinki. We conclude that the proposed regulation does not ensure a "high level of human health protection"--required by its legal basis in the TFEU--because it may force Member States concerned to accept a reporting Member States' approval of--in their estimation--an unethical clinical trial.

  15. Unfinished business in the regulation of shale gas production in the United States.

    PubMed

    Centner, Terence J; O'Connell, Laura Kathryn

    2014-04-01

    With increased drilling for natural gas, toxic chemicals used to fracture wells have been introduced into the environment accompanied by allegations of injuries. This article evaluates laws and regulations governing shale gas production to disclose ideas for offering further protection to people and the environment. The aim of the study is to offer state governments ideas for addressing contractual obligations of drilling operators, discerning health risks, disclosing toxic chemicals, and reporting sufficient information to detect problems and enforce regulations. The discussion suggests opportunities for state regulators to become more supportive of public health through greater oversight of shale gas extraction.

  16. Revocation of regulation on positron emission tomography drug products--FDA. Final rule; revocation.

    PubMed

    1997-12-19

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is revoking a regulation on positron emission tomography (PET) radiopharmaceutical drug products. The regulation permits FDA to approve requests from manufacturers of PET drugs for exceptions or alternatives to provisions of the current good manufacturing practice (CGMP) regulations. FDA is taking this action in accordance with provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (Modernization Act). Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is publishing a notice revoking two notices concerning certain guidance documents on PET drugs and the guidance documents to which the notices relate.

  17. Positive allosteric feedback regulation of the stringent response enzyme RelA by its product

    PubMed Central

    Shyp, Viktoriya; Tankov, Stoyan; Ermakov, Andrey; Kudrin, Pavel; English, Brian P; Ehrenberg, Måns; Tenson, Tanel; Elf, Johan; Hauryliuk, Vasili

    2012-01-01

    During the stringent response, Escherichia coli enzyme RelA produces the ppGpp alarmone, which in turn regulates transcription, translation and replication. We show that ppGpp dramatically increases the turnover rate of its own ribosome-dependent synthesis by RelA, resulting in direct positive regulation of an enzyme by its product. Positive allosteric regulation therefore constitutes a new mechanism of enzyme activation. By integrating the output of individual RelA molecules and ppGpp degradation pathways, this regulatory circuit contributes to a fast and coordinated transition to stringency. PMID:22814757

  18. From stem cell to erythroblast: regulation of red cell production at multiple levels by multiple hormones.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Harvey; Flygare, Johan; Chou, Song

    2010-07-01

    This article reviews the regulation of production of red blood cells at several levels: (1) the ability of erythropoietin and adhesion to a fibronectin matrix to stimulate the rapid production of red cells by inducing terminal proliferation and differentiation of committed erythroid CFU-E progenitors; (2) the regulated expansion of the pool of earlier BFU-E erythroid progenitors by glucocorticoids and other factors that occurs during chronic anemia or inflammation; and (3) the expansion of thehematopoietic cell pool to produce more progenitors of all hematopoietic lineages.

  19. Nitrogen availability regulates proline and ethylene production and alleviates salinity stress in mustard (Brassica juncea).

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Noushina; Umar, Shahid; Khan, Nafees A

    2015-04-15

    Proline content and ethylene production have been shown to be involved in salt tolerance mechanisms in plants. To assess the role of nitrogen (N) in the protection of photosynthesis under salt stress, the effect of N (0, 5, 10, 20 mM) on proline and ethylene was studied in mustard (Brassica juncea). Sufficient N (10 mM) optimized proline production under non-saline conditions through an increase in proline-metabolizing enzymes, leading to osmotic balance and protection of photosynthesis through optimal ethylene production. Excess N (20 mM), in the absence of salt stress, inhibited photosynthesis and caused higher ethylene evolution but lower proline production compared to sufficient N. In contrast, under salt stress with an increased demand for N, excess N optimized ethylene production, which regulates the proline content resulting in recovered photosynthesis. The effect of excess N on photosynthesis under salt stress was further substantiated by the application of the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor, 1-aminoethoxy vinylglycine (AVG), which inhibited proline production and photosynthesis. Without salt stress, AVG promoted photosynthesis in plants receiving excess N by inhibiting stress ethylene production. The results suggest that a regulatory interaction exists between ethylene, proline and N for salt tolerance. Nitrogen differentially regulates proline production and ethylene formation to alleviate the adverse effect of salinity on photosynthesis in mustard.

  20. Leucine metabolism regulates TRI6 expression and affects deoxynivalenol production and virulence in Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Rajagopal; Narayanan, Swara; Walkowiak, Sean; Wang, Li; Joshi, Manisha; Rocheleau, Hélène; Ouellet, Thérèse; Harris, Linda J

    2015-11-01

    TRI6 is a positive regulator of the trichothecene gene cluster and the production of trichothecene mycotoxins [deoxynivalenol (DON)] and acetylated forms such as 15-Acetyl-DON) in the cereal pathogen Fusarium graminearum. As a global transcriptional regulator, TRI6 expression is modulated by nitrogen-limiting conditions, sources of nitrogen and carbon, pH and light. However, the mechanism by which these diverse environmental factors affect TRI6 expression remains underexplored. In our effort to understand how nutrients affect TRI6 regulation, comparative digital expression profiling was performed with a wild-type F. graminearum and a Δtri6 mutant strain, grown in nutrient-rich conditions. Analysis showed that TRI6 negatively regulates genes of the branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolic pathway. Feeding studies with deletion mutants of MCC, encoding methylcrotonyl-CoA-carboxylase, one of the key enzymes of leucine metabolism, showed that addition of leucine specifically down-regulated TRI6 expression and reduced 15-ADON accumulation. Constitutive expression of TRI6 in the Δmcc mutant strain restored 15-ADON production. A combination of cellophane breach assays and pathogenicity experiments on wheat demonstrated that disrupting the leucine metabolic pathway significantly reduced disease. These findings suggest a complex interaction between one of the primary metabolic pathways with a global regulator of mycotoxin biosynthesis and virulence in F. graminearum.

  1. Water productivity, yield, and berry composition in sustained versus regulated deficit irrigation of Merlot grapevines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The wine grape cultivar Merlot (Vitis vinifera L.) was irrigated at incremental fractions of estimated crop evapotranspiration or a regulated deficit (RDI) regime to identify which practice best optimized water productivity and berry composition without compromising yield. Three severities of susta...

  2. Regulation of tattoo ink production and the tattoo business in the US.

    PubMed

    Haugh, I M; Laumann, S L; Laumann, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    The production of tattoo ink and pigments in the US is unregulated. There are no guidelines or standards issued by national agencies. However, the practice of tattooing is regulated at the state and local levels but varies widely. Adverse events are addressed when a problem is reported.

  3. 77 FR 74177 - Information Collection Requirement; Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Production...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Regulation Supplement; Production Surveillance and Reporting (OMB Control Number 0704-0250) AGENCY: Defense.... ADDRESSES: You may submit comments, identified by OMB Control Number 0704-0250, using any of the following... comments. Email: dfars@osd.mil . Include OMB Control Number 0704-0250 in the subject line of the...

  4. 78 FR 57808 - Rules and Regulations Under the Wool Products Labeling Act of 1939

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ...Based on comments received in response to its Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, the Federal Trade Commission (the ``Commission'' or ``FTC'') proposes amending its rules and regulations under the Wool Products Labeling Act of 1939 (``Wool Rules'' or ``Rules'') to: conform to the requirements of the Wool Suit Fabric Labeling Fairness and International Standards Conforming Act, which revised......

  5. Regulating Tobacco Product Advertising and Promotions in the Retail Environment: A Roadmap for States and Localities.

    PubMed

    Lange, Tamara; Hoefges, Michael; Ribisl, Kurt M

    2015-01-01

    Recent amendments to federal law and a burgeoning body of research have intensified public health officials' interest in reducing youth initiation of tobacco use, including by regulating the time, place, or manner of tobacco product advertising at the point of sale. This article analyzes legal obstacles to various strategies for reducing youth initiation.

  6. 76 FR 32843 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Fire-Resistant Fiber for Production of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-06

    ... Regulation Supplement; Fire-Resistant Fiber for Production of Military Uniforms (DFARS Case 2011-D021) AGENCY... fiber in solicitations issued before January 1, 2015. DATES: Effective date: June 6, 2011. Comment date... 2011 (Pub. L. 111-383). Section 821 prohibits specification of the use of fire-resistant rayon fiber...

  7. VANADYL SULFATE INHIBITS NO PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATING SERINE/THREONINE PHOSPHORYLATION OF ENOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    VANADYL SULFATE INHIBITS NO PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATING SERINE/THREONINE PHOSPHORYLATION OF eNOS.

    Zhuowei Li, Jacqueline D. Carter, Lisa A. Dailey, Joleen Soukup, Yuh-Chin T. Huang. CEMALB, University of North Carolina and NHEERL, US EPA, Chapel Hill, North Ca...

  8. VANADL SULFATE INHIBITS NO PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATING SERINE/THREONINE PHOSPHORYLATION OF ENOS

    EPA Science Inventory

    VANADYL SULFATE INHIBITS NO PRODUCTION BY DIFFERENTIALLY REGULATING SERINE/THREONINE PHOSPHORYLATION OF eNOS. Zhuowei Li, Jacqueline D. Carter, Lisa A. Dailey, Joleen Soukup, Yuh-Chin T. Huang. CEMALB, University of North Carolina and ORD, US EPA, Chapel Hill, North Carolina
    V...

  9. 77 FR 4498 - Rules and Regulations Under the Wool Products Labeling Act of 1939

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ... meaning set forth in Sec. 303.12 of the Textile Rules. 16 CFR 300.1(k). \\6\\ Federal Trade Commission... ``trimmings'' in Sec. 300.1(k), which incorporates by reference Section 303.12 of the Textile Rules? If so....12 of the Rules and Regulations Under the Textile Fiber Products Identification Act (``Textile...

  10. Intra-Testicular Signals Regulate Germ Cell Progression and Production of Qualitatively Mature Spermatozoa in Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Meccariello, Rosaria; Chianese, Rosanna; Chioccarelli, Teresa; Ciaramella, Vincenza; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo; Cobellis, Gilda

    2014-01-01

    Spermatogenesis, a highly conserved process in vertebrates, is mainly under the hypothalamic–pituitary control, being regulated by the secretion of pituitary gonadotropins, follicle stimulating hormone, and luteinizing hormone, in response to stimulation exerted by gonadotropin releasing hormone from hypothalamic neurons. At testicular level, gonadotropins bind specific receptors located on the somatic cells regulating the production of steroids and factors necessary to ensure a correct spermatogenesis. Indeed, besides the endocrine route, a complex network of cell-to-cell communications regulates germ cell progression, and a combination of endocrine and intra-gonadal signals sustains the production of high quality mature spermatozoa. In this review, we focus on the recent advances in the area of the intra-gonadal signals supporting sperm development. PMID:24847312

  11. Insights into the global regulation of anaerobic metabolism for improved biohydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuan; Zhao, Hongxin; Zhang, Chong; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2016-01-01

    To improve the biohydrogen yield in bacterial dark fermentation, a new approach of global anaerobic regulation was introduced. Two cellular global regulators FNR and NarP were overexpressed in two model organisms: facultatively anaerobic Enterobacter aerogenes (Ea) and strictly anaerobic Clostridium paraputrificum (Cp). The overexpression of FNR and NarP greatly altered anaerobic metabolism and increased the hydrogen yield by 40%. Metabolic analysis showed that the global regulation caused more reducing environment inside the cell. To get a thorough understanding of the global metabolic regulation, more genes (fdhF, fhlA, ppk, Cb-fdh1, and Sc-fdh1) were overexpressed in different Ea and Cp mutants. For the first time, it demonstrated that there were approximately linear relationships between the relative change of hydrogen yield and the relative change of NADH yield or ATP yield. It implied that cellular reducing power and energy level played vital roles in the biohydrogen production.

  12. Applying tobacco carcinogen and toxicant biomarkers in product regulation and cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Stephen S; Yuan, Jian-Min; Hatsukami, Dorothy

    2010-06-21

    Tobacco carcinogen and toxicant biomarkers are metabolites or protein or DNA adducts of specific compounds in tobacco products. Highly reliable analytical methods, based mainly on mass spectrometry, have been developed and applied in large studies of many of these biomarkers. A panel of tobacco carcinogen and toxicant biomarkers is suggested here, and typical values for smokers and nonsmokers are summarized. This panel of biomarkers has potential applications in the new and challenging area of tobacco product regulation and in the development of rational approaches to cancer prevention by establishing carcinogen and toxicant uptake and excretion in people exposed to tobacco products.

  13. Applying Tobacco Carcinogen and Toxicant Biomarkers in Product Regulation and Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Hecht, Stephen S.; Yuan, Jian-Min; Hatsukami, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    Tobacco carcinogen and toxicant biomarkers are metabolites or protein or DNA adducts of specific compounds in tobacco products. Highly reliable analytical methods, based mainly on mass spectrometry, have been developed and applied in large studies of many of these biomarkers. A panel of tobacco carcinogen and toxicant biomarkers is suggested here, and typical values for smokers and non-smokers are summarized. This panel of biomarkers has potential applications in the new and challenging area of tobacco product regulation and in development of rational approaches to cancer prevention by establishing carcinogen and toxicant uptake and excretion in people exposed to tobacco products. PMID:20408564

  14. Complex marine natural products as potential epigenetic and production regulators of antibiotics from a marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Waters, Amanda L; Sims, James W; Fullmer, Alexis; Ellison, Serena; Hamann, Mark T

    2013-05-01

    Marine microbes are capable of producing secondary metabolites for defense and competition. Factors exerting an impact on secondary metabolite production of microbial communities included bioactive natural products and co-culturing. These external influences may have practical applications such as increased yields or the generation of new metabolites from otherwise silent genes in addition to reducing or limiting the production of undesirable metabolites. In this paper, we discuss the metabolic profiles of a marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the presence of a number of potential chemical epigenetic regulators, adjusting carbon sources and co-culturing with other microbes to induce a competitive response. As a result of these stressors certain groups of antibiotics or antimalarial agents were increased most notably when treating P. aeruginosa with sceptrin and co-culturing with another Pseudomonas sp. An interesting cross-talking event between these two Pseudomonas species when cultured together and exposed to sceptrin was observed.

  15. Complex marine natural products as potential epigenetic and production regulators of antibiotics from a marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bin; Waters, Amanda L.; Sims, James W.; Fullmer, Alexis; Ellison, Serena; Hamann, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Marine microbes are capable of producing secondary metabolites for defense and competition. Factors exerting an impact on secondary metabolite production of microbial communities included bioactive natural products and co-culturing. These external influences may have practical applications such as increased yields or the generation of new metabolites from otherwise silent genes in addition to reducing or limiting the production of undesirable metabolites. In this paper, we discuss the metabolic profiles of a marine Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the presence of a number of potential chemical epigenetic regulators, adjusting carbon sources and co-culturing with other microbes to induce a competitive response. As a result of these stressors certain groups of antibiotics or antimalarial agents were increased most notably when treating P. aeruginosa with sceptrin and co-culturing with another Pseudomonas sp. An interesting cross-talking event between these two Pseudomonas species when cultured together and exposed to sceptrin was observed. PMID:23563743

  16. Monitoring of transcriptional regulation in Pichia pastoris under protein production conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gasser, Brigitte; Maurer, Michael; Rautio, Jari; Sauer, Michael; Bhattacharyya, Anamitra; Saloheimo, Markku; Penttilä, Merja; Mattanovich, Diethard

    2007-01-01

    Background It has become evident that host cells react to recombinant protein production with a variety of metabolic and intrinsic stresses such as the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway. Additionally, environmental conditions such as growth temperature may have a strong impact on cell physiology and specific productivity. However, there is little information about the molecular reactions of the host cells on a genomic level, especially in context to recombinant protein secretion. For the first time, we monitored transcriptional regulation of a subset of marker genes in the common production host Pichia pastoris to gain insights into the general physiological status of the cells under protein production conditions, with the main focus on secretion stress related genes. Results Overexpression of the UPR activating transcription factor Hac1p was employed to identify UPR target genes in P. pastoris and the responses were compared to those known for Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Most of the folding/secretion related genes showed similar regulation patterns in both yeasts, whereas genes associated with the general stress response were differentially regulated. Secretion of an antibody Fab fragment led to induction of UPR target genes in P. pastoris, however not to the same magnitude as Hac1p overproduction. Overexpression of S. cerevisiae protein disulfide isomerase (PDI1) enhances Fab secretion rates 1.9 fold, but did not relief UPR stress. Reduction of cultivation temperature from 25°C to 20°C led to a 1.4-fold increase of specific product secretion rate in chemostat cultivations, although the transcriptional levels of the product genes (Fab light and heavy chain) were significantly reduced at the lower temperature. A subset of folding related genes appeared to be down-regulated at the reduced temperature, whereas transcription of components of the ER associated degradation and the secretory transport was enhanced. Conclusion Monitoring of genomic regulation of

  17. Capillary electrophoresis as an analytical tool for monitoring nicotine in ATF regulated tobacco products.

    PubMed

    Ralapati, S

    1997-07-18

    Tobacco products are classified at different excise tax rates according to the Code of Federal Regulations. These include cigars, cigarettes, pipe tobacco, roll-your-own tobacco, chewing tobacco and snuff. Nicotine is the primary determinant of what constitutes a tobacco product from a regulatory standpoint. Determination of nicotine, therefore, is of primary importance and interest to ATF. Since nicotine is also the most abundant alkaloid found in tobacco, comprising about 98% of the total alkaloid content, a rapid method for the determination of nicotine in ATF regulated products is desirable. Capillary electrophoresis (CE), as an analytical technique, is rapidly gaining importance capturing the interest of analysts in several areas. The unique and powerful capabilities of CE including high resolution and short analysis times, make it a powerful analytical tool in the regulatory area as well. Preliminary studies using a 25 mM sodium phosphate buffer, pH 2.5 at 260 nm have yielded promising results for the analysis of nicotine in tobacco products. Application of an analytical method for the determination of nicotine by CE to ATF regulated tobacco products will be presented.

  18. Physical state and acidity of inorganic sulfate can regulate the production of secondary organic material from isoprene photooxidation products.

    PubMed

    Kuwata, Mikinori; Liu, Yingjun; McKinney, Karena; Martin, Scot T

    2015-02-28

    The production of secondary organic material (SOM) by the reactive uptake of isoprene photooxidation products was investigated using partially to wholly neutralized sulfuric acid particles. The experiments were performed at a relative humidity (RH) of <5% and a temperature of 20 °C. The extent X of neutralization was adjusted from that of sulfuric acid (X = 0) to that of ammonium sulfate (X = 1). Significant SOM production was observed only for X < 0.7. The threshold of 0.7 corresponded to the transition point of the sulfate particles from aqueous to solid for <5% RH. The phase transition of inorganic sulfate therefore regulated the particle-phase reactions that produce isoprene SOM, at least for the investigated conditions. For aqueous particles, a decreasing extent of neutralization was associated with increasing production of SOM, including increased production of oligomers and organosulfates. These results can underpin treatments of phase-dependent SOM production within chemical transport models, thereby improving the accuracy of simulations of biogenic-anthropogenic interactions in the atmosphere and the associated impacts of aerosol particles on climate and air quality.

  19. [Effects of menthol as an additive in tobacco products and the need for regulation].

    PubMed

    Kahnert, S; Nair, U; Mons, U; Pötschke-Langer, M

    2012-03-01

    Menthol is the most widely used and the most prominent tobacco additive in tobacco products advertised and marketed by the tobacco industry. Besides its characteristic flavor, it possesses a variety of pharmacological properties facilitating tobacco smoke inhalation and potentiating dependence. These properties of menthol not only favor tobacco initiation and consumption but can also prevent smoking cessation. This article summarizes the effect of menthol as an additive in tobacco products and its effect on tobacco consumption that causes a number of chronic diseases and premature death and, therefore, counteracts tobacco control measures. Currently, there is no legislative regulation in Germany that considers the health hazard, addiction-enhancing and attractiveness-increasing properties of additives permitted in tobacco products. Effective regulation or even a ban could contribute to a reduction of tobacco consumption and, hence, save many people from a long-lasting tobacco dependence.

  20. CARD9 negatively regulates NLRP3-induced IL-1β production on Salmonella infection of macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Milton; Tourlomousis, Panagiotis; Wright, John; P. Monie, Tom; Bryant, Clare E.

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a proinflammatory cytokine required for host control of bacterial infections, and its production must be tightly regulated to prevent excessive inflammation. Here we show that caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9), a protein associated with induction of proinflammatory cytokines by fungi, has a negative role on IL-1β production during bacterial infection. Specifically, in response to activation of the nucleotide oligomerization domain receptor pyrin-domain containing protein 3 (NLRP3) by Salmonella infection, CARD9 negatively regulates IL-1β by fine-tuning pro-IL-1β expression, spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK)-mediated NLRP3 activation and repressing inflammasome-associated caspase-8 activity. CARD9 is suppressed during Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, facilitating increased IL-1β production. CARD9 is, therefore, a central signalling hub that coordinates a pathogen-specific host inflammatory response. PMID:27670879

  1. CARD9 negatively regulates NLRP3-induced IL-1β production on Salmonella infection of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Milton; Tourlomousis, Panagiotis; Wright, John; P Monie, Tom; Bryant, Clare E

    2016-09-27

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a proinflammatory cytokine required for host control of bacterial infections, and its production must be tightly regulated to prevent excessive inflammation. Here we show that caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9), a protein associated with induction of proinflammatory cytokines by fungi, has a negative role on IL-1β production during bacterial infection. Specifically, in response to activation of the nucleotide oligomerization domain receptor pyrin-domain containing protein 3 (NLRP3) by Salmonella infection, CARD9 negatively regulates IL-1β by fine-tuning pro-IL-1β expression, spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK)-mediated NLRP3 activation and repressing inflammasome-associated caspase-8 activity. CARD9 is suppressed during Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection, facilitating increased IL-1β production. CARD9 is, therefore, a central signalling hub that coordinates a pathogen-specific host inflammatory response.

  2. Biotechnological production and application of the antibiotic pimaricin: biosynthesis and its regulation.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Jesús F; Barreales, Eva G; Payero, Tamara D; Vicente, Cláudia M; de Pedro, Antonio; Santos-Aberturas, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Pimaricin (natamycin) is a small polyene macrolide antibiotic used worldwide. This efficient antimycotic and antiprotozoal agent, produced by several soil bacterial species of the genus Streptomyces, has found application in human therapy, in the food and beverage industries and as pesticide. It displays a broad spectrum of activity, targeting ergosterol but bearing a particular mode of action different to other polyene macrolides. The biosynthesis of this only antifungal agent with a GRAS status has been thoroughly studied, which has permitted the manipulation of producers to engineer the biosynthetic gene clusters in order to generate several analogues. Regulation of its production has been largely unveiled, constituting a model for other polyenes and setting the leads for optimizing the production of these valuable compounds. This review describes and discusses the molecular genetics, uses, mode of action, analogue generation, regulation and strategies for increasing pimaricin production yields.

  3. SRSF10 Plays a Role in Myoblast Differentiation and Glucose Production via Regulation of Alternative Splicing.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ning; Cheng, Yuanming; Wang, Zhijia; Liu, Yuguo; Luo, Chunling; Liu, Lina; Chen, Linlin; Xie, Zhiqin; Lu, Yun; Feng, Ying

    2015-11-24

    Alternative splicing is a major mechanism of controlling gene expression and protein diversity in higher eukaryotes. We report that the splicing factor SRSF10 functions during striated muscle development, myoblast differentiation, and glucose production both in cells and in mice. A combination of RNA-sequencing and molecular analysis allowed us to identify muscle-specific splicing events controlled by SRSF10 that are critically involved in striated muscle development. Inclusion of alternative exons 16 and 17 of Lrrfip1 is a muscle-specific event that is activated by SRSF10 and essential for myoblast differentiation. On the other hand, in mouse primary hepatocytes, PGC1α is a key target of SRSF10 that regulates glucose production by fasting. SRSF10 represses inclusion of PGC1α exon 7a and facilitates the production of functional protein. The results highlight the biological significance of SRSF10 and regulated alternative splicing in vivo.

  4. Wallenda regulates JNK-mediated cell death in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ma, X; Xu, W; Zhang, D; Yang, Y; Li, W; Xue, L

    2015-01-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway plays essential roles in regulating a variety of cellular processes including proliferation, migration and survival. Previous genetic studies in Drosophila have identified numerous cell death regulating genes, providing new insights into the mechanisms for related diseases. Despite the known role of the small GTPase Rac1 in regulating cell death, the downstream components and underlying mechanism remain largely elusive. Here, we show that Rac1 promotes JNK-dependent cell death through Wallenda (Wnd). In addition, we find that Wnd triggers JNK activation and cell death via its kinase domain. Moreover, we show that both MKK4 and Hep are critical for Wnd-induced cell death. Furthermore, Wnd is essential for ectopic Egr- or Rho1-induced JNK activation and cell death. Finally, Wnd is physiologically required for loss of scribble-induced JNK-dependent cell death. Thus, our data suggest that wnd encodes a novel essential cell death regulator in Drosophila. PMID:25950467

  5. Spo0A Differentially Regulates Toxin Production in Evolutionarily Diverse Strains of Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Mackin, Kate E.; Carter, Glen P.; Howarth, Pauline; Rood, Julian I.; Lyras, Dena

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is an important pathogen of humans and animals, representing a significant global healthcare problem. The last decade has seen the emergence of epidemic BI/NAP1/027 and ribotype 078 isolates, associated with the onset of more severe disease and higher rates of morbidity and mortality. However, little is known about these isolates at the molecular level, partly due to difficulties in the genetic manipulation of these strains. Here we report the development of an optimised Tn916-mediated plasmid transfer system, and the use of this system to construct and complement spo0A mutants in a number of different C. difficile strain backgrounds. Spo0A is a global regulator known to control sporulation, but may also be involved in the regulation of potential virulence factors and other phenotypes. Recent studies have failed to elucidate the role of Spo0A in toxin A and toxin B production by C. difficile, with conflicting data published to date. In this study, we aimed to clarify the role of Spo0A in production of the major toxins by C. difficile. Through the construction and complementation of spo0A mutants in two ribotype 027 isolates, we demonstrate that Spo0A acts as a negative regulator of toxin A and toxin B production in this strain background. In addition, spo0A was disrupted and subsequently complemented in strain 630Δerm and, for the first time, in a ribotype 078 isolate, JGS6133. In contrast to the ribotype 027 strains, Spo0A does not appear to regulate toxin production in strain 630Δerm. In strain JGS6133, Spo0A appears to negatively regulate toxin production during early stationary phase, but has little effect on toxin expression during late stationary phase. These data suggest that Spo0A may differentially regulate toxin production in phylogenetically distinct C. difficile strain types. In addition, Spo0A may be involved in regulating some aspects of C. difficile motility. PMID:24236153

  6. Temperature regulates methane production through the function centralization of microbial community in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qiang; De Vrieze, Jo; He, Guihua; Li, Xiangzhen; Li, Jiabao

    2016-09-01

    Temperature is crucial for the performance of anaerobic digestion process. In this study of anaerobic digestion of swine manure, the relationship between the microbial gene expression and methane production at different temperatures (25-55°C) was revealed through metatranscriptomic analysis. Daily methane production and total biogas production increased with temperature up to 50°C, but decreased at 55°C. The functional gene expression showed great variation at different temperatures. The function centralization (opposite to alpha-diversity), assessed by the least proportions of functional pathways contributing for at least 50% of total reads positively correlated to methane production. Temperature regulated methane production probably through reducing the diversity of functional pathways, but enhancing central functional pathways, so that most of cellular activities and resource were invested in methanogenesis and related pathways, enhancing the efficiency of conversion of substrates to methane. This research demonstrated the importance of function centralization for efficient system functioning.

  7. Regulation Policy on Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy Products in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jeong Ok

    2015-12-01

    Extensive investment on research and development of cell therapy products (CTPs) and tissue-engineered products (TEPs) has been made in Korea, and various commercial products are born in market. The Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS) in Korea regulates CTPs and TEPs as biological products under the authority of the Pharmaceutical Affairs Act. The Korean MFDS approved 16 CTPs and 4 stem CTPs and authorized 135 clinical trials, including 60 sponsor-investigator trials. Currently, the advent of stem cell technology and new biomaterials gives an impetus to develop more innovative CTPs and TEPs to treat intractable and serious diseases. This article deals about the regulatory process for approving CTPs and TEPs in Korea. Regulatory policies of the MFDS for supporting the development of novel products and ensuring the safety of the CTPs and TEPs are reviewed.

  8. The Rac-GAP Bcr is a novel regulator of the Par complex that controls cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Anjana S.; Reyes, Steve B.; Um, Kyongmi; McCarty, Joseph H.; Tolias, Kimberley F.

    2013-01-01

    Cell polarization is essential for many biological processes, including directed cell migration, and loss of polarity contributes to pathological conditions such as cancer. The Par complex (Par3, Par6, and PKCζ) controls cell polarity in part by recruiting the Rac-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor T-lymphoma invasion and metastasis 1 (Tiam1) to specialized cellular sites, where Tiam1 promotes local Rac1 activation and cytoskeletal remodeling. However, the mechanisms that restrict Par-Tiam1 complex activity to the leading edge to maintain cell polarity during migration remain unclear. We identify the Rac-specific GTPase-activating protein (GAP) breakpoint cluster region protein (Bcr) as a novel regulator of the Par-Tiam1 complex. We show that Bcr interacts with members of the Par complex and inhibits both Rac1 and PKCζ signaling. Loss of Bcr results in faster, more random migration and striking polarity defects in astrocytes. These polarity defects are rescued by reducing PKCζ activity or by expressing full-length Bcr, but not an N-terminal deletion mutant or the homologous Rac-GAP, Abr, both of which fail to associate with the Par complex. These results demonstrate that Bcr is an integral member of the Par-Tiam1 complex that controls polarized cell migration by locally restricting both Rac1 and PKCζ function. PMID:24152735

  9. Performance-based regulation: enterprise responsibility for reducing death, injury, and disease caused by consumer products.

    PubMed

    Sugarman, Stephen D

    2009-12-01

    This article offers a bold new idea for confronting the staggering level of death, injury, and disease caused by five consumer products: cigarettes, alcohol, guns, junk food, and motor vehicles. Business leaders try to frame these negative outcomes as "collateral damage" that is someone else's problem. That framing not only is morally objectionable but also overlooks the possibility that, with proper prodding, industry could substantially lessen these public health disasters. I seek to reframe the public perception of who is responsible and propose to deploy a promising approach called "performance-based regulation" to combat the problem. Performance-based regulation would impose on manufacturers a legal obligation to reduce the negative social costs of their products. Rather than involving them in litigation or forcing them to operate differently (as "command-and-control" regimes do), performance-based regulation allows the firms to determine how best to decrease bad public health consequences. Like other public health strategies, performance-based regulation focuses on those who are far more likely than individual consumers to achieve real gains. Analogous to a tax on causing harm that exceeds a threshold level, performance-based regulation seeks to harness private initiative in pursuit of the public good.

  10. TCF7L2 is a master regulator of insulin production and processing.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuedan; Park, Soo-Young; Su, Jing; Bailey, Kathleen; Ottosson-Laakso, Emilia; Shcherbina, Liliya; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Zhang, Enming; Thevenin, Thomas; Fadista, João; Bennet, Hedvig; Vikman, Petter; Wierup, Nils; Fex, Malin; Rung, Johan; Wollheim, Claes; Nobrega, Marcelo; Renström, Erik; Groop, Leif; Hansson, Ola

    2014-12-15

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed >60 loci associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D), but the underlying causal variants and functional mechanisms remain largely elusive. Although variants in TCF7L2 confer the strongest risk of T2D among common variants by presumed effects on islet function, the molecular mechanisms are not yet well understood. Using RNA-sequencing, we have identified a TCF7L2-regulated transcriptional network responsible for its effect on insulin secretion in rodent and human pancreatic islets. ISL1 is a primary target of TCF7L2 and regulates proinsulin production and processing via MAFA, PDX1, NKX6.1, PCSK1, PCSK2 and SLC30A8, thereby providing evidence for a coordinated regulation of insulin production and processing. The risk T-allele of rs7903146 was associated with increased TCF7L2 expression, and decreased insulin content and secretion. Using gene expression profiles of 66 human pancreatic islets donors', we also show that the identified TCF7L2-ISL1 transcriptional network is regulated in a genotype-dependent manner. Taken together, these results demonstrate that not only synthesis of proinsulin is regulated by TCF7L2 but also processing and possibly clearance of proinsulin and insulin. These multiple targets in key pathways may explain why TCF7L2 has emerged as the gene showing one of the strongest associations with T2D.

  11. Ceramide and ceramide 1-phosphate are negative regulators of TNF-α production induced by lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Józefowski, Szczepan; Czerkies, Maciej; Łukasik, Anna; Bielawska, Alicja; Bielawski, Jacek; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna; Sobota, Andrzej

    2010-12-01

    LPS is a constituent of cell walls of Gram-negative bacteria that, acting through the CD14/TLR4 receptor complex, causes strong proinflammatory activation of macrophages. In murine peritoneal macrophages and J774 cells, LPS at 1-2 ng/ml induced maximal TNF-α and MIP-2 release, and higher LPS concentrations were less effective, which suggested a negative control of LPS action. While studying the mechanism of this negative regulation, we found that in J774 cells, LPS activated both acid sphingomyelinase and neutral sphingomyelinase and moderately elevated ceramide, ceramide 1-phosphate, and sphingosine levels. Lowering of the acid sphingomyelinase and neutral sphingomyelinase activities using inhibitors or gene silencing upregulated TNF-α and MIP-2 production in J774 cells and macrophages. Accordingly, treatment of those cells with exogenous C8-ceramide diminished TNF-α and MIP-2 production after LPS stimulation. Exposure of J774 cells to bacterial sphingomyelinase or interference with ceramide hydrolysis using inhibitors of ceramidases also lowered the LPS-induced TNF-α production. The latter result indicates that ceramide rather than sphingosine suppresses TNF-α and MIP-2 production. Of these two cytokines, only TNF-α was negatively regulated by ceramide 1-phosphate as was indicated by upregulated TNF-α production after silencing of ceramide kinase gene expression. None of the above treatments diminished NO or RANTES production induced by LPS. Together the data indicate that ceramide negatively regulates production of TNF-α and MIP-2 in response to LPS with the former being sensitive to ceramide 1-phosphate as well. We hypothesize that the ceramide-mediated anti-inflammatory pathway may play a role in preventing endotoxic shock and in limiting inflammation.

  12. ATP-Based Ratio Regulation of Glucose and Xylose Improved Succinate Production

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fengyu; Li, Jiaojiao; Liu, Huaiwei; Liang, Quanfeng; Qi, Qingsheng

    2016-01-01

    We previously engineered E. coli YL104H to efficiently produce succinate from glucose. Furthermore, the present study proved that YL104H could also co-utilize xylose and glucose for succinate production. However, anaerobic succinate accumulation using xylose as the sole carbon source failed, probably because of an insufficient supply of energy. By analyzing the ATP generation under anaerobic conditions in the presence of glucose or xylose, we indicated that succinate production was affected by the intracellular ATP level, which can be simply regulated by the substrate ratio of xylose to glucose. This finding was confirmed by succinate production using an artificial mixture containing different xylose to glucose ratios. Using xylose mother liquor, a waste containing both glucose and xylose derived from xylitol production, a final succinate titer of 61.66 g/L with an overall productivity of 0.95 g/L/h was achieved, indicating that the regulation of the intracellular ATP level may be a useful and efficient strategy for succinate production and can be extended to other anaerobic processes. PMID:27315279

  13. Osmolar regulation of endothelin-1 production by rat inner medullary collecting duct.

    PubMed Central

    Kohan, D E; Padilla, E

    1993-01-01

    Recent evidence has implicated endothelin-1 (ET-1) as an autocrine inhibitor of inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) sodium and water transport. The regulators of IMCD ET-1 production are, however, largely unknown. Because of the unique hypertonic environment of the IMCD, the effect of varying extracellular tonicity on IMCD ET-1 production was evaluated. Increasing media osmolality from 300 to 450 mosmol with NaCl or mannitol but not urea caused a marked dose- and time-dependent reduction in ET-1 release by and ET-1 mRNA in cultured rat IMCD cells. In contrast, increasing osmolality had no effect on ET-1 production by rat endothelial or mesangial cells. To see if ET-1 varies in a similar manner in vivo, ET-1 production was assessed in volume expanded (lower medullary tonicity) or volume depleted (high medullary tonicity) rats. Urinary ET-1 excretion and inner medulla ET-1 mRNA were significantly reduced in volume depleted as compared to volume expanded animals. These results indicate that extracellular sodium concentration inhibits ET-1 production specifically in IMCD cells. We speculate that extracellular sodium concentration, via regulation of ET-1 production, provides a link between volume status and IMCD sodium and water reabsorption. PMID:8450052

  14. A strategy for controlling the marketing of tobacco products: a regulated market model

    PubMed Central

    Borland, R

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To outline a novel strategy for controlling the tobacco market. Arguments: More comprehensive controls over the tobacco market are essential and long overdue. Effective controls need to encourage the development of less harmful products; control commercial communication to ensure that potential harms are highlighted relative to any benefits; and provide mechanisms to move consumers away from tobacco use, or at least towards less harmful alternatives. Achieving this by regulating the existing industry is one strategy. This paper puts the case for an alternative: to have marketing controlled by an agency (called here the Tobacco Products Agency, or TPA) which tendered to manufacturers for product and which distributed to retailers in ways that reduce incentives to bend or break the law. The TPA would be backed by legislation that made tobacco a controlled substance with possession sale and use only allowed as permitted by the regulations, which in reality would be only as provided by the TPA. Conclusions: The overall effect of such a model, which we call a "regulated market model", would be to eliminate most of the incentives and remaining opportunities for commercial promotion of tobacco and to create incentives to encourage the development of less harmful tobacco products. Such a model preserves the competition inherent in a free market, but directs it towards the challenge of reducing the harm from tobacco use. PMID:14660771

  15. Mangotoxin production of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae is regulated by MgoA

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The antimetabolite mangotoxin is a key factor in virulence of Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae strains which cause apical necrosis of mango trees. Previous studies showed that mangotoxin biosynthesis is governed by the mbo operon. Random mutagenesis led to the identification of two other gene clusters that affect mangotoxin biosynthesis. These are the gacS/gacA genes and mgo operon which harbors the four genes mgoBCAD. Results The current study shows that disruption of the nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene mgoA resulted in loss of mangotoxin production and reduced virulence on tomato leaves. Transcriptional analyses by qPCR and promoter reporter fusions revealed that mbo expression is regulated by both gacS/gacA and mgo genes. Also, expression of the mgo operon was shown to be regulated by gacS/gacA. Heterologous expression under the native promoter of the mbo operon resulted in mangotoxin production in non-producing P. syringae strains, but not in other Pseudomonas species. Also introduction of the mbo and mgo operons in nonproducing P. protegens Pf-5 did not confer mangotoxin production but did enhance transcription of the mbo promoter. Conclusions From the data obtained in this study, we conclude that both mbo and mgo operons are under the control of the gacS/gacA two-component system and that the MgoA product acts as a positive regulator of mangotoxin biosynthesis. PMID:24555804

  16. TPL-2 negatively regulates interferon-β production in macrophages and myeloid dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Frank; Cook, Dorthe; Papoutsopoulou, Stamatia; Rajsbaum, Ricardo; Wu, Xuemei; Yang, Huei-Ting; Grant, Susan; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola; Tsichlis, Philip N.; O'Garra, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) on macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) by pathogen-derived products induces the production of cytokines, which play an important role in immune responses. Here, we investigated the role of the TPL-2 signaling pathway in TLR induction of interferon-β (IFN-β) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) in these cell types. It has previously been suggested that IFN-β and IL-10 are coordinately regulated after TLR stimulation. However, in the absence of TPL-2 signaling, lipopolysaccharide (TLR4) and CpG (TLR9) stimulation resulted in increased production of IFN-β while decreasing IL-10 production by both macrophages and myeloid DCs. In contrast, CpG induction of both IFN-α and IFN-β by plasmacytoid DCs was decreased in the absence of TPL-2, although extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation was blocked. Extracellular signal-related kinase–dependent negative regulation of IFN-β in macrophages was IL-10–independent, required protein synthesis, and was recapitulated in TPL-2–deficient myeloid DCs by retroviral transduction of the ERK-dependent transcription factor c-fos. PMID:19667062

  17. Positive and negative regulation by SLP-76/ADAP and Pyk2 of chemokine-stimulated T-lymphocyte adhesion mediated by integrin α4β1

    PubMed Central

    Dios-Esponera, Ana; Isern de Val, Soledad; Sevilla-Movilla, Silvia; García-Verdugo, Rosa; García-Bernal, David; Arellano-Sánchez, Nohemí; Cabañas, Carlos; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation by chemokines of integrin α4β1–dependent T-lymphocyte adhesion is a crucial step for lymphocyte trafficking. The adaptor Vav1 is required for chemokine-activated T-cell adhesion mediated by α4β1. Conceivably, proteins associating with Vav1 could potentially modulate this adhesion. Correlating with activation by the chemokine CXCL12 of T-lymphocyte attachment to α4β1 ligands, a transient stimulation in the association of Vav1 with SLP-76, Pyk2, and ADAP was observed. Using T-cells depleted for SLP-76, ADAP, or Pyk2, or expressing Pyk2 kinase–inactive forms, we show that SLP-76 and ADAP stimulate chemokine-activated, α4β1-mediated adhesion, whereas Pyk2 opposes T-cell attachment. While CXCL12-promoted generation of high-affinity α4β1 is independent of SLP-76, ADAP, and Pyk2, the strength of α4β1-VCAM-1 interaction and cell spreading on VCAM-1 are targets of regulation by these three proteins. GTPase assays, expression of activated or dominant-negative Rac1, or combined ADAP and Pyk2 silencing indicated that Rac1 activation by CXCL12 is a common mediator response in SLP-76–, ADAP-, and Pyk2-regulated cell adhesion involving α4β1. Our data strongly suggest that chemokine-stimulated associations between Vav1, SLP-76, and ADAP facilitate Rac1 activation and α4β1-mediated adhesion, whereas Pyk2 opposes this adhesion by limiting Rac1 activation. PMID:26202465

  18. Efficient L-Alanine Production by a Thermo-Regulated Switch in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Li; Deng, Can; Cui, Wen-Jing; Liu, Zhong-Mei; Zhou, Zhe-Min

    2016-01-01

    L-Alanine has important applications in food, pharmaceutical and veterinary and is used as a substrate for production of engineered thermoplastics. Microbial fermentation could reduce the production cost and promote the application of L-alanine. However, the presence of L-alanine significantly inhibit cell growth rate and cause a decrease in the ultimate L-alanine productivity. For efficient L-alanine production, a thermo-regulated genetic switch was designed to dynamically control the expression of L-alanine dehydrogenase (alaD) from Geobacillus stearothermophilus on the Escherichia coli B0016-060BC chromosome. The optimal cultivation conditions for the genetically switched alanine production using B0016-060BC were the following: an aerobic growth phase at 33 °C with a 1-h thermo-induction at 42 °C followed by an oxygen-limited phase at 42 °C. In a bioreactor experiment using the scaled-up conditions optimized in a shake flask, B0016-060BC accumulated 50.3 g biomass/100 g glucose during the aerobic growth phase and 96 g alanine/100 g glucose during the oxygen-limited phase, respectively. The L-alanine titer reached 120.8 g/l with higher overall and oxygen-limited volumetric productivities of 3.09 and 4.18 g/l h, respectively, using glucose as the sole carbon source. Efficient cell growth and L-alanine production were reached separately, by switching cultivation temperature. The results revealed the application of a thermo-regulated strategy for heterologous metabolic production and pointed to strategies for improving L-alanine production.

  19. Aerobic exercise regulates Rho/cofilin pathways to rescue synaptic loss in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yan; Zhao, Li; Gu, Boya; Cai, Jiajia; Lv, Yuanyuan; Yu, Laikang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The role of exercise to prevent or reverse aging-induced cognitive decline has been widely reported. This neuroprotection is associated with changes in the synaptic structure plasticity. However, the mechanisms of exercise-induced synaptic plasticity in the aging brain are still unclear. Thus, the aim of the present study is to investigate the aging-related alterations of Rho-GTPase and the modulatory influences of exercise training. Methods Young and old rats were used in this study. Old rats were subjected to different schedules of aerobic exercise (12 m/min, 60 min/d, 3d/w or 5d/w) or kept sedentary for 12 w. After 12 w of aerobic exercise, the synapse density in the cortex and hippocampus was detected with immunofluorescent staining using synaptophysin as a marker. The total protein levels of RhoA, Rac1, Cdc42 and cofilin in the cortex and hippocampus were detected with Western Blot. The activities of RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 were determined using a pull down assay. Results We found that synapse loss occurred in aging rats. However, the change of expression and activity of RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 was different in the cortex and hippocampus. In the cortex, the expression and activity of Rac1 and Cdc42 was greatly increased with aging, whereas there were no changes in the expression and activity of RhoA. In the hippocampus, the expression and activity of Rac1 and Cdc42 was greatly decreased and there were no changes in the expression and activity of RhoA. As a major downstream substrate of the Rho GTPase family, the increased expression of cofilin was only observed in the cortex. High frequency exercise ameliorated all aging-related changes in the cortex and hippocampus. Conclusions These data suggest that aerobic exercise reverses synapse loss in the cortex and hippocampus in aging rats, which might be related to the regulation of Rho GTPases. PMID:28152068

  20. Reproductive toxicity of a mixture of regulated drinking-water disinfection by-products in a multigenerational rat bioassay

    EPA Science Inventory

    BACKGROUND:Trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloaretic acids (HAAs) are regulated disinfection by-products (DBPs); their joint reproductive toxicity in drinking water is unknown.OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate a drinking water mixture of the four regulated THMs and five regulated HAAs ...

  1. Regulation of photoreceptor gene transcription via a highly conserved transcriptional regulatory element by vsx gene products

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yi; Comiskey, Daniel F.; Kelly, Lisa E.; Chandler, Dawn S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The photoreceptor conserved element-1 (PCE-1) sequence is found in the transcriptional regulatory regions of many genes expressed in photoreceptors. The retinal homeobox (Rx or Rax) gene product functions by binding to PCE-1 sites. However, other transcriptional regulators have also been reported to bind to PCE-1. One of these, vsx2, is expressed in retinal progenitor and bipolar cells. The purpose of this study is to identify Xenopus laevis vsx gene products and characterize vsx gene product expression and function with respect to the PCE-1 site. Methods X. laevis vsx gene products were amplified with PCR. Expression patterns were determined with in situ hybridization using whole or sectioned X. laevis embryos and digoxigenin- or fluorescein-labeled antisense riboprobes. DNA binding characteristics of the vsx gene products were analyzed with electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) using in vitro translated proteins and radiolabeled oligonucleotide probes. Gene transactivation assays were performed using luciferase-based reporters and in vitro transcribed effector gene products, injected into X. laevis embryos. Results We identified one vsx1 and two vsx2 gene products. The two vsx2 gene products are generated by alternate mRNA splicing. We verified that these gene products are expressed in the developing retina and that expression resolves into distinct cell types in the mature retina. Finally, we found that vsx gene products can bind the PCE-1 site in vitro and that the two vsx2 isoforms have different gene transactivation activities. Conclusions vsx gene products are expressed in the developing and mature neural retina. vsx gene products can bind the PCE-1 site in vitro and influence the expression of a rhodopsin promoter-luciferase reporter gene. The two isoforms of vsx have different gene transactivation activities in this reporter gene system. PMID:28003732

  2. AmyR is a novel negative regulator of amylovoran production in Erwinia amylovora.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongping; Korban, Schuyler S; Pusey, P Lawrence; Zhao, Youfu

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to understand the role of an orphan gene amyR in Erwinia amylovora, a functionally conserved ortholog of ybjN in Escherichia coli, which has recently been characterized. Amylovoran, a high molecular weight acidic heteropolymer exopolysaccharide, is a virulent factor of E. amylovora. As reported earlier, amylovoran production in an amyR knockout mutant was about eight-fold higher than that in the wild type (WT) strain of E. amylovora. When a multicopy plasmid containing the amyR gene was introduced into the amyR mutant or WT strains, amylovoran production was strongly inhibited. Furthermore, amylovoran production was also suppressed in various amylovoran-over-producing mutants, such as grrSA containing multicopies of the amyR gene. Consistent with amylovoran production, an inverse correlation was observed between in vitro expression of amyR and that of amylovoran biosynthetic genes. However, both the amyR knockout mutant and over-expression strains showed reduced levan production, another exopolysaccharide produced by E. amylovora. Virulence assays demonstrated that while the amyR mutant was capable of inducing slightly greater disease severity than that of the WT strain, strains over-expressing the amyR gene did not incite disease on apple shoots or leaves, and only caused reduced disease on immature pear fruits. Microarray studies revealed that amylovoran biosynthesis and related membrane protein-encoding genes were highly expressed in the amyR mutant, but down-regulated in the amyR over-expression strains in vitro. Down-regulation of amylovoran biosynthesis genes in the amyR over-expression strain partially explained why over-expression of amyR led to non-pathogenic or reduced virulence in vivo. These results suggest that AmyR plays an important role in regulating exopolysaccharide production, and thus virulence in E. amylovora.

  3. Self-regulation of exopolysaccharide production in Bacillus subtilis by a tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Elsholz, Alexander K W; Wacker, Sarah A; Losick, Richard

    2014-08-01

    We report that the Bacillus subtilis exopolysaccharide (EPS) is a signaling molecule that controls its own production. EPS synthesis depends on a tyrosine kinase that consists of a membrane component (EpsA) and a kinase component (EpsB). EPS interacts with the extracellular domain of EpsA, which is a receptor, to control kinase activity. In the absence of EPS, the kinase is inactivated by autophosphorylation. The presence of EPS inhibits autophosphorylation and instead promotes the phosphorylation of a glycosyltransferase in the biosynthetic pathway, thereby stimulating the production of EPS. Thus, EPS production is subject to a positive feedback loop that ties its synthesis to its own concentration. Tyrosine kinase-mediated self-regulation could be a widespread feature of the control of exopolysaccharide production in bacteria.

  4. miR-124-regulated RhoG

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Stefan; Franke, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    RhoG is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases sharing highest sequence similarity with Rac and Cdc42. Mig-2 and Mtl represent the functional equivalents of RhoG in Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila, respectively. RhoG has attracted great interest because it plays a central role in the regulation of cytoskeletal reorganization in various physiological and pathophysiological situations. For example, it is fundamental to phagocytotic processes, is able to regulate gene expression, cell survival and proliferation, and is involved in cell migration and in the invasion of pathogenic bacteria. The activation of Rac1 via an ELMO/Dock180 module has been elaborated to be important for RhoG signaling. Although a stimulatory role for neurite outgrowth in the pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line has been assigned to RhoG, the exact function of this GTPase for the development of the processes of primary neurons remains to be clarified. In this view, we discuss the impact of RhoG on axonal and dendritic differentiation, its role as a conductor of Rac1 and Cdc42 activity and the functional regulation of RhoG expression by the microRNA miR-124. PMID:23303397

  5. Products of lipid, protein and RNA oxidation as signals and regulators of gene expression in plants

    PubMed Central

    Chmielowska-Bąk, Jagna; Izbiańska, Karolina; Deckert, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are engaged in several processes essential for normal cell functioning, such as differentiation, anti-microbial defense, stimulus sensing and signaling. Interestingly, recent studies imply that cellular signal transduction and gene regulation are mediated not only directly by ROS but also by the molecules derived from ROS-mediated oxidation. Lipid peroxidation leads to non-enzymatic formation of oxylipins. These molecules were shown to modulate expression of signaling associated genes including genes encoding phosphatases, kinases and transcription factors. Oxidized peptides derived from protein oxidation might be engaged in organelle-specific ROS signaling. In turn, oxidation of particular mRNAs leads to decrease in the level of encoded proteins and thus, contributes to the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Present mini review summarizes latest findings concerning involvement of products of lipid, protein and RNA oxidation in signal transduction and gene regulation. PMID:26082792

  6. Regulation of extracellular polygalacturonase production in Pseudomonas solanacearum. Progress report, [May 1, 1992--April 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.

    1994-06-01

    Pseudomonas solanacearum is an economically important plant pathogen that causes bacterial wilt disease of diverse crops. The bacterium produces at least three isozymes of polygalacturonase, which degrade plant cell walls and contribute substantially to bacterial wilt disease development. The central objective of this research project is to determine how expression of these enzymes is regulated. To this end, we isolated a positive trans-acting regulator of polygalacturonase production (pehR). We have focused on further characterization of the pehR mutant pheonotype, and studies of pehR expression. Preliminary results suggest pehR also regulates bacterial motility. An investigation of two unusual tyrosine phosphoproteins in P. solanacearum is also described.

  7. Regulation of sialidase production in Clostridium perfringens by the orphan sensor histidine kinase ReeS.

    PubMed

    Hiscox, Thomas J; Harrison, Paul F; Chakravorty, Anjana; Choo, Jocelyn M; Ohtani, Kaori; Shimizu, Tohru; Cheung, Jackie K; Rood, Julian I

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is ubiquitous in nature and is often found as a commensal of the human and animal gastrointestinal tract. It is the primary etiological agent of clostridial myonecrosis, or gas gangrene, a serious infection that results in extensive tissue necrosis due to the action of one or more potent extracellular toxins. α-toxin and perfringolysin O are the major extracellular toxins involved in the pathogenesis of gas gangrene, but histotoxic strains of C. perfringens, such as strain 13, also produce many degradative enzymes such as collagenases, hyaluronidases, sialidases and the cysteine protease, α-clostripain. The production of many of these toxins is regulated either directly or indirectly by the global VirSR two-component signal transduction system. By isolating a chromosomal mutant and carrying out microarray analysis we have identified an orphan sensor histidine kinase, which we have named ReeS (regulator of extracellular enzymes sensor). Expression of the sialidase genes nanI and nanJ was down-regulated in a reeS mutant. Since complementation with the wild-type reeS gene restored nanI and nanJ expression to wild-type levels, as shown by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and sialidase assays we concluded that ReeS positively regulates the expression of these sialidase genes. However, mutation of the reeS gene had no significant effect on virulence in the mouse myonecrosis model. Sialidase production in C. perfringens has been previously shown to be regulated by both the VirSR system and RevR. In this report, we have analyzed a previously unknown sensor histidine kinase, ReeS, and have shown that it also is involved in controlling the expression of sialidase genes, adding further complexity to the regulatory network that controls sialidase production in C. perfringens.

  8. Regulation of Sialidase Production in Clostridium perfringens by the Orphan Sensor Histidine Kinase ReeS

    PubMed Central

    Hiscox, Thomas J.; Harrison, Paul F.; Chakravorty, Anjana; Choo, Jocelyn M.; Ohtani, Kaori; Shimizu, Tohru

    2013-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens is ubiquitous in nature and is often found as a commensal of the human and animal gastrointestinal tract. It is the primary etiological agent of clostridial myonecrosis, or gas gangrene, a serious infection that results in extensive tissue necrosis due to the action of one or more potent extracellular toxins. α-toxin and perfringolysin O are the major extracellular toxins involved in the pathogenesis of gas gangrene, but histotoxic strains of C. perfringens, such as strain 13, also produce many degradative enzymes such as collagenases, hyaluronidases, sialidases and the cysteine protease, α-clostripain. The production of many of these toxins is regulated either directly or indirectly by the global VirSR two-component signal transduction system. By isolating a chromosomal mutant and carrying out microarray analysis we have identified an orphan sensor histidine kinase, which we have named ReeS (regulator of extracellular enzymes sensor). Expression of the sialidase genes nanI and nanJ was down-regulated in a reeS mutant. Since complementation with the wild-type reeS gene restored nanI and nanJ expression to wild-type levels, as shown by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR and sialidase assays we concluded that ReeS positively regulates the expression of these sialidase genes. However, mutation of the reeS gene had no significant effect on virulence in the mouse myonecrosis model. Sialidase production in C. perfringens has been previously shown to be regulated by both the VirSR system and RevR. In this report, we have analyzed a previously unknown sensor histidine kinase, ReeS, and have shown that it also is involved in controlling the expression of sialidase genes, adding further complexity to the regulatory network that controls sialidase production in C. perfringens. PMID:24023881

  9. Efficient and regulated erythropoietin production by naked DNA injection and muscle electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Rizzuto, Gabriella; Cappelletti, Manuela; Maione, Domenico; Savino, Rocco; Lazzaro, Domenico; Costa, Patrizia; Mathiesen, Iacob; Cortese, Riccardo; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Laufer, Ralph; La Monica, Nicola; Fattori, Elena

    1999-01-01

    We show that an electric treatment in the form of high-frequency, low-voltage electric pulses can increase more than 100-fold the production and secretion of a recombinant protein from mouse skeletal muscle. Therapeutical erythopoietin (EPO) levels were achieved in mice with a single injection of as little as 1 μg of plasmid DNA, and the increase in hematocrit after EPO production was stable and long-lasting. Pharmacological regulation through a tetracycline-inducible promoter allowed regulation of serum EPO and hematocrit levels. Tissue damage after stimulation was transient. The method described thus provides a potentially safe and low-cost treatment for serum protein deficiencies. PMID:10339602

  10. Regulation of thiamine synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for improved pyruvate production.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guoqiang; Hua, Qiang; Duan, Ningjun; Liu, Liming; Chen, Jian

    2012-06-01

    Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for high-yield production of carboxylic acid requires a cytosolic pyruvate pool as precursor. In this study, a novel strategy to improve pyruvate production and reduce metabolic by-products via regulating thiamine synthesis was explored. Two of the thiamine biosynthesis regulatory genes, THI2 and THI3, were disrupted in the S. cerevisiae parent strain FMME-002. The mutants FMME-002ΔTHI2 and FMME-002ΔTHI3 both exhibited an enhanced pyruvate yield. Moreover, FMME-002ΔTHI2 achieved a relatively higher pyruvate production, and the highest concentration of pyruvate was achieved when 0.04 µ m thiamine was added. Enzyme assays and fermentation profiles of the THI2-complemented strain indicated that the observed metabolic changes represented intrinsic effects of THI2 deletion on the physiology of S. cerevisiae. Under optimal C:N ratio conditions, FMME-002ΔTHI2 produced pyruvate up to 8.21 ± 0.30 g/l, whereas the ethanol titre decreased to 2.21 ± 0.24 g/l after 96 h of cultivation. These results demonstrate the possibility of improving pyruvate production by regulating thiamine synthesis in S. cerevisiae.

  11. Blimp-1-Dependent IL-10 Production by Tr1 Cells Regulates TNF-Mediated Tissue Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Montes de Oca, Marcela; Kumar, Rajiv; de Labastida Rivera, Fabian; Amante, Fiona H; Sheel, Meru; Faleiro, Rebecca J.; Bunn, Patrick T.; Best, Shannon E.; Beattie, Lynette; Ng, Susanna S.; Edwards, Chelsea L.; Muller, Werner; Cretney, Erika; Nutt, Stephen L.; Smyth, Mark J.; Haque, Ashraful; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Sundar, Shyam; Kallies, Axel; Engwerda, Christian R.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is critical for controlling many intracellular infections, but can also contribute to inflammation. It can promote the destruction of important cell populations and trigger dramatic tissue remodeling following establishment of chronic disease. Therefore, a better understanding of TNF regulation is needed to allow pathogen control without causing or exacerbating disease. IL-10 is an important regulatory cytokine with broad activities, including the suppression of inflammation. IL-10 is produced by different immune cells; however, its regulation and function appears to be cell-specific and context-dependent. Recently, IL-10 produced by Th1 (Tr1) cells was shown to protect host tissues from inflammation induced following infection. Here, we identify a novel pathway of TNF regulation by IL-10 from Tr1 cells during parasitic infection. We report elevated Blimp-1 mRNA levels in CD4+ T cells from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) patients, and demonstrate IL-12 was essential for Blimp-1 expression and Tr1 cell development in experimental VL. Critically, we show Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 production by Tr1 cells prevents tissue damage caused by IFNγ-dependent TNF production. Therefore, we identify Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 produced by Tr1 cells as a key regulator of TNF-mediated pathology and identify Tr1 cells as potential therapeutic tools to control inflammation. PMID:26765224

  12. A SWI/SNF Chromatin Remodelling Protein Controls Cytokinin Production through the Regulation of Chromatin Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Jégu, Teddy; Domenichini, Séverine; Blein, Thomas; Ariel, Federico; Christ, Aurélie; Kim, Soon-Kap; Crespi, Martin; Boutet-Mercey, Stéphanie; Mouille, Grégory; Bourge, Mickaël; Hirt, Heribert; Bergounioux, Catherine; Raynaud, Cécile; Benhamed, Moussa

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin architecture determines transcriptional accessibility to DNA and consequently gene expression levels in response to developmental and environmental stimuli. Recently, chromatin remodelers such as SWI/SNF complexes have been recognized as key regulators of chromatin architecture. To gain insight into the function of these complexes during root development, we have analyzed Arabidopsis knock-down lines for one sub-unit of SWI/SNF complexes: BAF60. Here, we show that BAF60 is a positive regulator of root development and cell cycle progression in the root meristem via its ability to down-regulate cytokinin production. By opposing both the deposition of active histone marks and the formation of a chromatin regulatory loop, BAF60 negatively regulates two crucial target genes for cytokinin biosynthesis (IPT3 and IPT7) and one cell cycle inhibitor (KRP7). Our results demonstrate that SWI/SNF complexes containing BAF60 are key factors governing the equilibrium between formation and dissociation of a chromatin loop controlling phytohormone production and cell cycle progression. PMID:26457678

  13. Blimp-1-Dependent IL-10 Production by Tr1 Cells Regulates TNF-Mediated Tissue Pathology.

    PubMed

    Montes de Oca, Marcela; Kumar, Rajiv; de Labastida Rivera, Fabian; Amante, Fiona H; Sheel, Meru; Faleiro, Rebecca J; Bunn, Patrick T; Best, Shannon E; Beattie, Lynette; Ng, Susanna S; Edwards, Chelsea L; Muller, Werner; Cretney, Erika; Nutt, Stephen L; Smyth, Mark J; Haque, Ashraful; Hill, Geoffrey R; Sundar, Shyam; Kallies, Axel; Engwerda, Christian R

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is critical for controlling many intracellular infections, but can also contribute to inflammation. It can promote the destruction of important cell populations and trigger dramatic tissue remodeling following establishment of chronic disease. Therefore, a better understanding of TNF regulation is needed to allow pathogen control without causing or exacerbating disease. IL-10 is an important regulatory cytokine with broad activities, including the suppression of inflammation. IL-10 is produced by different immune cells; however, its regulation and function appears to be cell-specific and context-dependent. Recently, IL-10 produced by Th1 (Tr1) cells was shown to protect host tissues from inflammation induced following infection. Here, we identify a novel pathway of TNF regulation by IL-10 from Tr1 cells during parasitic infection. We report elevated Blimp-1 mRNA levels in CD4+ T cells from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) patients, and demonstrate IL-12 was essential for Blimp-1 expression and Tr1 cell development in experimental VL. Critically, we show Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 production by Tr1 cells prevents tissue damage caused by IFNγ-dependent TNF production. Therefore, we identify Blimp-1-dependent IL-10 produced by Tr1 cells as a key regulator of TNF-mediated pathology and identify Tr1 cells as potential therapeutic tools to control inflammation.

  14. Effect of Food Regulation on the Spanish Food Processing Industry: A Dynamic Productivity Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kapelko, Magdalena; Oude Lansink, Alfons; Stefanou, Spiro E

    2015-01-01

    This article develops the decomposition of the dynamic Luenberger productivity growth indicator into dynamic technical change, dynamic technical inefficiency change and dynamic scale inefficiency change in the dynamic directional distance function context using Data Envelopment Analysis. These results are used to investigate for the Spanish food processing industry the extent to which dynamic productivity growth and its components are affected by the introduction of the General Food Law in 2002 (Regulation (EC) No 178/2002). The empirical application uses panel data of Spanish meat, dairy, and oils and fats industries over the period 1996-2011. The results suggest that in the oils and fats industry the impact of food regulation on dynamic productivity growth is negative initially and then positive over the long run. In contrast, the opposite pattern is observed for the meat and dairy processing industries. The results further imply that firms in the meat processing and oils and fats industries face similar impacts of food safety regulation on dynamic technical change, dynamic inefficiency change and dynamic scale inefficiency change.

  15. Effect of Food Regulation on the Spanish Food Processing Industry: A Dynamic Productivity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kapelko, Magdalena; Lansink, Alfons Oude; Stefanou, Spiro E.

    2015-01-01

    This article develops the decomposition of the dynamic Luenberger productivity growth indicator into dynamic technical change, dynamic technical inefficiency change and dynamic scale inefficiency change in the dynamic directional distance function context using Data Envelopment Analysis. These results are used to investigate for the Spanish food processing industry the extent to which dynamic productivity growth and its components are affected by the introduction of the General Food Law in 2002 (Regulation (EC) No 178/2002). The empirical application uses panel data of Spanish meat, dairy, and oils and fats industries over the period 1996-2011. The results suggest that in the oils and fats industry the impact of food regulation on dynamic productivity growth is negative initially and then positive over the long run. In contrast, the opposite pattern is observed for the meat and dairy processing industries. The results further imply that firms in the meat processing and oils and fats industries face similar impacts of food safety regulation on dynamic technical change, dynamic inefficiency change and dynamic scale inefficiency change. PMID:26057878

  16. Phytotoxin production in Aspergillus terreus is regulated by independent environmental signals

    PubMed Central

    Gressler, Markus; Meyer, Florian; Heine, Daniel; Hortschansky, Peter; Hertweck, Christian; Brock, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Secondary metabolites have a great potential as pharmaceuticals, but there are only a few examples where regulation of gene cluster expression has been correlated with ecological and physiological relevance for the producer. Here, signals, mediators, and biological effects of terrein production were studied in the fungus Aspergillus terreus to elucidate the contribution of terrein to ecological competition. Terrein causes fruit surface lesions and inhibits plant seed germination. Additionally, terrein is moderately antifungal and reduces ferric iron, thereby supporting growth of A. terreus under iron starvation. In accordance, the lack of nitrogen or iron or elevated methionine levels induced terrein production and was dependent on either the nitrogen response regulators AreA and AtfA or the iron response regulator HapX. Independent signal transduction allows complex sensing of the environment and, combined with its broad spectrum of biological activities, terrein provides a prominent example of adapted secondary metabolite production in response to environmental competition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07861.001 PMID:26173180

  17. Presenilin and nicastrin regulate each other and determine amyloid β-peptide production via complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Edbauer, Dieter; Winkler, Edith; Haass, Christian; Steiner, Harald

    2002-01-01

    Amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) is generated by the consecutive cuts of two membrane-bound proteases. β-Secretase cuts at the N terminus of the Aβ domain, whereas γ-secretase mediates the C-terminal cut. Recent evidence suggests that the presenilin (PS) proteins, PS1 and PS2, may be γ-secretases. Because PSs principally exist as high molecular weight protein complexes, biologically active γ-secretases likely require other cofactors such as nicastrin (Nct) for their activities. Here we show that preferentially mature Nct forms a stable complex with PSs. Furthermore, we have down-regulated Nct levels by using a highly specific and efficient RNA interference approach. Very similar to a loss of PS function, down-regulation of Nct levels leads to a massive accumulation of the C-terminal fragments of the β-amyloid precursor protein. In addition, Aβ production was markedly reduced. Strikingly, down-regulation of Nct destabilized PS and strongly lowered levels of the high molecular weight PS1 complex. Interestingly, absence of the PS1 complex in PS1−/− cells was associated with a strong down-regulation of the levels of mature Nct, suggesting that binding to PS is required for trafficking of Nct through the secretory pathway. Based on these findings we conclude that Nct and PS regulate each other and determine γ-secretase function via complex formation. PMID:12048259

  18. Dynamic gene expression regulation model for growth and penicillin production in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Douma, Rutger D; Verheijen, Peter J T; de Laat, Wim T A M; Heijnen, Joseph J; van Gulik, Walter M

    2010-07-01

    As is often the case for microbial product formation, the penicillin production rate of Penicillium chrysogenum has been observed to be a function of the growth rate of the organism. The relation between the biomass specific rate of penicillin formation (q(p)) and growth rate (mu) has been measured under steady state conditions in carbon limited chemostats resulting in a steady state q(p)(mu) relation. Direct application of such a relation to predict the rate of product formation during dynamic conditions, as they occur, for example, in fed-batch experiments, leads to errors in the prediction, because q(p) is not an instantaneous function of the growth rate but rather lags behind because of adaptational and regulatory processes. In this paper a dynamic gene regulation model is presented, in which the specific rate of penicillin production is assumed to be a linear function of the amount of a rate-limiting enzyme in the penicillin production pathway. Enzyme activity assays were performed and strongly indicated that isopenicillin-N synthase (IPNS) was the main rate-limiting enzyme for penicillin-G biosynthesis in our strain. The developed gene regulation model predicts the expression of this rate limiting enzyme based on glucose repression, fast decay of the mRNA encoding for the enzyme as well as the decay of the enzyme itself. The gene regulation model was combined with a stoichiometric model and appeared to accurately describe the biomass and penicillin concentrations for both chemostat steady-state as well as the dynamics during chemostat start-up and fed-batch cultivation.

  19. A novel role for IkappaBzeta in the regulation of IFNgamma production.

    PubMed

    Raices, Raquel M; Kannan, Yashaswini; Bellamkonda-Athmaram, Vedavathi; Seshadri, Sudarshan; Wang, Huating; Guttridge, Denis C; Wewers, Mark D

    2009-08-26

    IkappaBzeta is a novel member of the IkappaB family of NFkappaB regulators, which modulates NFkappaB activity in the nucleus, rather than controlling its nuclear translocation. IkappaBzeta is specifically induced by IL-1beta and several TLR ligands and positively regulates NFkappaB-mediated transcription of genes such as IL-6 and NGAL as an NFkappaB binding co-factor. We recently reported that the IL-1 family cytokines, IL-1beta and IL-18, strongly synergize with TNFalpha for IFNgamma production in KG-1 cells, whereas the same cytokines alone have minimal effects on IFNgamma production. Given the striking similarities between the IL-1R and IL-18R signaling pathways we hypothesized that a common signaling event or gene product downstream of these receptors is responsible for the observed synergy. We investigated IkappaBzeta protein expression in KG-1 cells upon stimulation with IL-1beta, IL-18 and TNFalpha. Our results demonstrated that IL-18, as well as IL-1beta, induced moderate IkappaBzeta expression in KG-1 cells. However, TNFalpha synergized with IL-1beta and IL-18, whereas by itself it had a minimal effect on IkappaBzeta expression. NFkappaB inhibition resulted in decreased IL-1beta/IL-18/TNFalpha-stimulated IFNgamma release. Moreover, silencing of IkappaBzeta expression led to a specific decrease in IFNgamma production. Overall, our data suggests that IkappaBzeta positively regulates NFkappaB-mediated IFNgamma production in KG-1 cells.

  20. A Novel Role for IκBζ in the Regulation of IFNγ Production

    PubMed Central

    Raices, Raquel M.; Kannan, Yashaswini; Bellamkonda-Athmaram, Vedavathi; Seshadri, Sudarshan; Wang, Huating; Guttridge, Denis C.; Wewers, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    IκBζ is a novel member of the IκB family of NFκB regulators, which modulates NFκB activity in the nucleus, rather than controlling its nuclear translocation. IκBζ is specifically induced by IL-1β and several TLR ligands and positively regulates NFκB-mediated transcription of genes such as IL-6 and NGAL as an NFκB binding co-factor. We recently reported that the IL-1 family cytokines, IL-1β and IL-18, strongly synergize with TNFα for IFNγ production in KG-1 cells, whereas the same cytokines alone have minimal effects on IFNγ production. Given the striking similarities between the IL-1R and IL-18R signaling pathways we hypothesized that a common signaling event or gene product downstream of these receptors is responsible for the observed synergy. We investigated IκBζ protein expression in KG-1 cells upon stimulation with IL-1β, IL-18 and TNFα. Our results demonstrated that IL-18, as well as IL-1β, induced moderate IκBζ expression in KG-1 cells. However, TNFα synergized with IL-1β and IL-18, whereas by itself it had a minimal effect on IκBζ expression. NFκB inhibition resulted in decreased IL-1β/IL-18/TNFα-stimulated IFNγ release. Moreover, silencing of IκBζ expression led to a specific decrease in IFNγ production. Overall, our data suggests that IκBζ positively regulates NFκB-mediated IFNγ production in KG-1 cells. PMID:19707556

  1. Regulation of insulin secretion and reactive oxygen species production by free fatty acids in pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Graciano, Maria Fernanda Rodrigues; Valle, Maíra M R; Kowluru, Anjan; Curi, Rui; Carpinelli, Angelo R

    2011-01-01

    Free fatty acids regulate insulin secretion through metabolic and intracellular signaling mechanisms such as induction of malonyl-CoA/long-chain CoA pathway, production of lipids, GPRs (G protein-coupled receptors) activation and the modulation of calcium currents. Fatty acids (FA) are also important inducers of ROS (reactive oxygen species) production in β-cells. Production of ROS for short periods is associated with an increase in GSIS (glucose-stimulated insulin secretion), but excessive or sustained production of ROS is negatively correlated with the insulin secretory process. Several mechanisms for FA modulation of ROS production by pancreatic β-cells have been proposed, such as the control of mitochondrial complexes and electron transport, induction of uncoupling proteins, NADPH oxidase activation, interaction with the renin-angiotensin system, and modulation of the antioxidant defense system. The major sites of superoxide production within mitochondria derive from complexes I and III. The amphiphilic nature of FA favors their incorporation into mitochondrial membranes, altering the membrane fluidity and facilitating the electron leak. The extra-mitochondrial ROS production induced by FA through the NADPH oxidase complex is also an important source of these species in β-cells.

  2. Structure, control and regulation of the formal market for medicinal plants' products in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Oguntade, Adegboyega E; Oluwalana, Isaac B

    2011-01-01

    There are informal and formal markets for medicinal plants' products in Nigeria. The formal market is subject to the national regulatory framework for Food and Drug Administration and Control. It is relatively new and underdeveloped. This study was designed to appraise this market with special emphasis on the market participants, market structure, marketing functions performed, conduct of sellers in the market and; standards and regulations to which the market is subject. Information used for this study was collected through personal interviews and interactions with key participants in the market; especially the officials of regulatory agency. The market structure was analysed in terms of the share of market controlled by participants and product types. Concentration Ratios (CR2 and CR4) were used to assess the market share. Marketing functions being performed were described in terms of the exchange, physical and facilitating functions while the conduct was described in terms of pricing and promotional strategies. The regulatory framework under which the market operates was appraised. The market was highly concentrated with a CR2 and CR4 of 58.5% and 80.8 %; respectively. Imported products accounted for only 12.3% of the market. The predominant modes of presentation of the product were capsule (41.6%) and liquid (36.2%). About 20.77% of the products were classified as multivitamins, 13.85% were antibiotics while 10.77% addressed sexual dysfunctional problems. These products were regulated under the Food and Drug Administration and Control (NAFDAC) decrees, 1993-1999. Only 2.3% of the products have received full registration status while the others were only listed.

  3. Inhibitors of Serine Proteases in Regulating the Production and Function of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps

    PubMed Central

    Majewski, Pawel; Majchrzak-Gorecka, Monika; Grygier, Beata; Skrzeczynska-Moncznik, Joanna; Osiecka, Oktawia; Cichy, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), DNA webs released into the extracellular environment by activated neutrophils, are thought to play a key role in the entrapment and eradication of microbes. However, NETs are highly cytotoxic and a likely source of autoantigens, suggesting that NET release is tightly regulated. NET formation involves the activity of neutrophil elastase (NE), which cleaves histones, leading to chromatin decondensation. We and others have recently demonstrated that inhibitors of NE, such as secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) and SerpinB1, restrict NET production in vitro and in vivo. SLPI was also identified as a NET component in the lesional skin of patients suffering from the autoinflammatory skin disease psoriasis. SLPI-competent NET-like structures (a mixture of SLPI with neutrophil DNA and NE) stimulated the synthesis of interferon type I (IFNI) in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) in vitro. pDCs uniquely respond to viral or microbial DNA/RNA but also to nucleic acids of “self” origin with the production of IFNI. Although IFNIs are critical in activating the antiviral/antimicrobial functions of many cells, IFNIs also play a role in inducing autoimmunity. Thus, NETs decorated by SLPI may regulate skin immunity through enhancing IFNI production in pDCs. Here, we review key aspects of how SLPI and SerpinB1 can control NET production and immunogenic function. PMID:27446090

  4. Regulation of a novel gene cluster involved in secondary metabolite production in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Hindra; Pak, Patricia; Elliot, Marie A

    2010-10-01

    Antibiotic biosynthesis in the streptomycetes is a complex and highly regulated process. Here, we provide evidence for the contribution of a novel genetic locus to antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor. The overexpression of a gene cluster comprising four protein-encoding genes (abeABCD) and an antisense RNA-encoding gene (α-abeA) stimulated the production of the blue-pigmented metabolite actinorhodin on solid medium. Actinorhodin production also was enhanced by the overexpression of an adjacent gene (abeR) encoding a predicted Streptomyces antibiotic regulatory protein (SARP), while the deletion of this gene impaired actinorhodin production. We found the abe genes to be differentially regulated and controlled at multiple levels. Upstream of abeA was a promoter that directed the transcription of abeABCD at a low but constitutive level. The expression of abeBCD was, however, significantly upregulated at a time that coincided with the initiation of aerial development and the onset of secondary metabolism; this expression was activated by the binding of AbeR to four heptameric repeats upstream of a promoter within abeA. Expressed divergently to the abeBCD promoter was α-abeA, whose expression mirrored that of abeBCD but did not require activation by AbeR. Instead, α-abeA transcript levels were subject to negative control by the double-strand-specific RNase, RNase III.

  5. An R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor Regulates Eugenol Production in Ripe Strawberry Fruit Receptacles.

    PubMed

    Medina-Puche, Laura; Molina-Hidalgo, Francisco Javier; Boersma, Maaike; Schuurink, Robert C; López-Vidriero, Irene; Solano, Roberto; Franco-Zorrilla, José-Manuel; Caballero, José Luis; Blanco-Portales, Rosario; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan

    2015-06-01

    Eugenol is a volatile phenylpropanoid that contributes to flower and ripe fruit scent. In ripe strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) fruit receptacles, eugenol is biosynthesized by eugenol synthase (FaEGS2). However, the transcriptional regulation of this process is still unknown. We have identified and functionally characterized an R2R3 MYB transcription factor (emission of benzenoid II [FaEOBII]) that seems to be the orthologous gene of PhEOBII from Petunia hybrida, which contributes to the regulation of eugenol biosynthesis in petals. The expression of FaEOBII was ripening related and fruit receptacle specific, although high expression values were also found in petals. This expression pattern of FaEOBII correlated with eugenol content in both fruit receptacle and petals. The expression of FaEOBII was repressed by auxins and activated by abscisic acid, in parallel to the ripening process. In ripe strawberry receptacles, where the expression of FaEOBII was silenced, the expression of cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase1 and FaEGS2, two structural genes involved in eugenol production, was down-regulated. A subsequent decrease in eugenol content in ripe receptacles was also observed, confirming the involvement of FaEOBII in eugenol metabolism. Additionally, the expression of FaEOBII was under the control of FaMYB10, another R2R3 MYB transcription factor that regulates the early and late biosynthetic genes from the flavonoid/phenylpropanoid pathway. In parallel, the amount of eugenol in FaMYB10-silenced receptacles was also diminished. Taken together, these data indicate that FaEOBII plays a regulating role in the volatile phenylpropanoid pathway gene expression that gives rise to eugenol production in ripe strawberry receptacles.

  6. Chromatin landscaping in algae reveals novel regulation pathway for biofuels production

    SciTech Connect

    Ngan, Chew Yee; Wong, Chee-Hong; Choi, Cindy; Pratap, Abhishek; Han, James; Wei, Chia-Lin

    2013-02-19

    The diminishing reserve of fossil fuels calls for the development of biofuels. Biofuels are produced from renewable resources, including photosynthetic organisms, generating clean energy. Microalgae is one of the potential feedstock for biofuels production. It grows easily even in waste water, and poses no competition to agricultural crops for arable land. However, little is known about the algae lipid biosynthetic regulatory mechanisms. Most studies relied on the homology to other plant model organisms, in particular Arabidopsis or through low coverage expression analysis to identify key enzymes. This limits the discovery of new components in the biosynthetic pathways, particularly the genetic regulators and effort to maximize the production efficiency of algal biofuels. Here we report an unprecedented and de novo approach to dissect the algal lipid pathways through disclosing the temporal regulations of chromatin states during lipid biosynthesis. We have generated genome wide chromatin maps in chlamydomonas genome using ChIP-seq targeting 7 histone modifications and RNA polymerase II in a time-series manner throughout conditions activating lipid biosynthesis. To our surprise, the combinatory profiles of histone codes uncovered new regulatory mechanism in gene expression in algae. Coupled with matched RNA-seq data, chromatin changes revealed potential novel regulators and candidate genes involved in the activation of lipid accumulations. Genetic perturbation on these candidate regulators further demonstrated the potential to manipulate the regulatory cascade for lipid synthesis efficiency. Exploring epigenetic landscape in microalgae shown here provides powerful tools needed in improving biofuel production and new technology platform for renewable energy generation, global carbon management, and environmental survey.

  7. SrGAP2-Dependent Integration of Membrane Geometry and Slit-Robo-Repulsive Cues Regulates Fibroblast Contact Inhibition of Locomotion.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Rafael Dominik; Menshykau, Denis; Martin, Katrin; Reimann, Andreas; Pontelli, Valeria; Pertz, Olivier

    2015-10-12

    Migrating fibroblasts undergo contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL), a process that was discovered five decades ago and still is not fully understood at the molecular level. We identify the Slit2-Robo4-srGAP2 signaling network as a key regulator of CIL in fibroblasts. CIL involves highly dynamic contact protrusions with a specialized actin cytoskeleton that stochastically explore cell-cell overlaps between colliding fibroblasts. A membrane curvature-sensing F-BAR domain pre-localizes srGAP2 to protruding edges and terminates their extension phase in response to cell collision. A FRET-based biosensor reveals that Rac1 activity is focused in a band at the tip of contact protrusions, in contrast to the broad activation gradient in contact-free protrusions. SrGAP2 specifically controls the duration of Rac1 activity in contact protrusions, but not in contact-free protrusions. We propose that srGAP2 integrates cell edge curvature and Slit-Robo-mediated repulsive cues to fine-tune Rac1 activation dynamics in contact protrusions to spatiotemporally coordinate CIL.

  8. Cross-talk between light and glucose regulation controls toxin production and morphogenesis in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Atoui, A; Kastner, C; Larey, C M; Thokala, R; Etxebeste, O; Espeso, E A; Fischer, R; Calvo, A M

    2010-12-01

    Light is a major environmental stimulus that has a broad effect on organisms, triggering a cellular response that results in an optimal adaptation enhancing fitness and survival. In fungi, light affects growth, and causes diverse morphological changes such as those leading to reproduction. Light can also affect fungal metabolism, including the biosynthesis of natural products. In this study we show that in Aspergillus nidulans the effect of light on the production of the sterigmatocystin (ST) toxin depends on the glucose concentration. In cultures grown with 1% glucose and exposed to light, ST production was lower than when grown in the dark. This lower ST production coincided with an elevated rate of cellular damage with partial loss of nuclear integrity and vacuolated cytoplasm. However, in cultures grown with 2% glucose these effects were reversed and light enhanced ST production. Glucose abundance also affected the light-dependent subcellular localization of the VeA (velvet) protein, a key regulator necessary for normal light-dependent morphogenesis and secondary metabolism in Aspergilli and other fungal genera. The role of other VeA-associated proteins, particularly the blue-light-sensing proteins LreA and LreB (WC-1 and WC-2 orthologs), on conidiation could also be modified by the abundance of glucose. We also show that LreA and LreB, as well as the phytochrome FphA, modulate not only the synthesis of sterigmatocystin, but also the production of the antibiotic penicillin.

  9. One carbon metabolism in anaerobic bacteria: Regulation of carbon and electron flow during organic acid production

    SciTech Connect

    Zeikus, J.G.; Jain, M.

    1993-12-31

    The project deals with understanding the fundamental biochemical mechanisms that physiologically control and regulate carbon and electron flow in anaerobic chemosynthetic bacteria that couple metabolism of single carbon compounds and hydrogen to the production of organic acids (formic, acetic, butyric, and succinic) or methane. The authors compare the regulation of carbon dioxide and hydrogen metabolism by fermentation, enzyme, and electron carrier analysis using Butyribacterium methylotrophicum, Anaeroblospirillum succiniciproducens, Methanosarcina barkeri, and a newly isolated tri-culture composed of a syntrophic butyrate degrader strain IB, Methanosarcina mazei and Methanobacterium formicicum as model systems. To understand the regulation of hydrogen metabolism during butyrate production or acetate degradation, hydrogenase activity in B. methylotrophicum or M. barkeri is measured in relation to growth substrate and pH; hydrogenase is purified and characterized to investigate number of hydrogenases; their localization and functions; and, their sequences are determined. To understand the mechanism for catabolic CO{sub 2} fixation to succinate the PEP carboxykinase enzyme and gene of A. succiniciproducens are purified and characterized. Genetically engineered strains of Escherichia coli containing the phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxykinase gene are examined for their ability to produce succinate in high yield. To understand the mechanism of fatty acid degradation by syntrophic acetogens during mixed culture methanogenesis formate and hydrogen production are characterized by radio tracer studies. It is intended that these studies provide strategies to improve anaerobic fermentations used for the production of organic acids or methane and, new basic understanding on catabolic CO{sub 2} fixation mechanisms and on the function of hydrogenase in anaerobic bacteria.

  10. Micro-RNA378 (miR-378) regulates ovarian estradiol production by targeting aromatase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shengyu; Linher-Melville, Katja; Yang, Burton B; Wu, De; Li, Julang

    2011-10-01

    Estradiol is a steroid hormone that not only plays an important role in ovarian follicular development but also is associated with many reproductive disorders. Owing to the importance of aromatase in the production of estradiol, the regulation of aromatase gene expression at the transcriptional level has been an extensive area of study for over two decades. However, its regulation at the posttranscriptional level has remained unclear. Here, we show that micro-RNA378 (miR-378) is spatiotemporally expressed in porcine granulosa cells, the cells that generate estradiol in the ovary during follicular development, in an inverse manner compared with the expression of aromatase. In vitro overexpression and inhibition experiments revealed that aromatase expression, and therefore estradiol production, by granulosa cells, is posttranscriptionally down-regulated by miR-378. Furthermore, site-directed mutation studies identified two binding sites in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the aromatase coding sequence that are critical for the action of miR-378. Interestingly, overexpression of the aromatase 3'-UTR enhanced aromatase expression at the protein level in granulosa cells, possibly mediated by the binding of miR-378 within this region, thereby reducing the binding of this micro-RNA to the endogenous aromatase 3'-UTR.

  11. Phylum-specific regulation of resistomycin production in a Streptomyces sp. via microbial coculture.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Skylar; Tanouye, Urszula; Omarsdottir, Sesselja; Murphy, Brian T

    2015-03-27

    Actinomycete genomes are encoded with immense potential to produce secondary metabolites, however standard laboratory culture experiments rarely provide the conditions under which associated biosynthetic pathways are expressed. Despite years of research attempting to access these pathways and aside from a few well-studied bacterial quorum sensing systems, little is known about the specificity of secondary metabolite regulation in bacteria, such as the conditions under which a bacterium produces an antibiotic and the extent to which it does so in recognition of a particular species in the immediate environment. In the current study, we observed that the cocultivation of a Streptomyces sp. (strain B033) with four pathogenic strains of the phylum Proteobacteria resulted in the production of the antibiotic resistomycin. After further coculture experiments, we determined that Proteobacteria induced the production of resistomycin in B033 at significantly higher rates (65%) than strains from the phyla Firmicutes (5.9%) and Actinobacteria (9.1%), supporting that the regulation of secondary metabolism in bacteria can be dependent on the species present in the immediate environment. These results suggest a lack of promiscuity of antibiotic biosynthetic pathway regulation and indicate that it is feasible to mine existing microbial strain libraries for antibiotics in a phylum-specific manner.

  12. [A contribution to the development of advertising in pharmacy II. Historical development of regulation of advertising of medicinal products].

    PubMed

    Vranová, Vilma

    2012-10-01

    The article deals with the development of regulation of advertising of medicinal products in the Czech Lands of the Habsburg Monarchy and Czechoslovakia in the years 1775-1938. Advertising medicines had and has its specifics and its regulation had been addressed by specific standards and linked to other health laws and regulations. Regulation of advertising of medicinal products has undergone a long process from the initial total ban on advertising to the establishment of clear rules, some of which, such as restrictions on advertising prescription-only medicines only to the professional healthcare press, are still valid.

  13. Regulation of Hepatitis C Virion Production via Phosphorylation of the NS5A Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tellinghuisen, Timothy L.; Foss, Katie L.; Treadaway, Jason

    2008-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a significant pathogen, infecting some 170 million people worldwide. Persistent virus infection often leads to cirrhosis and liver cancer. In the infected cell many RNA directed processes must occur to maintain and spread infection. Viral genomic RNA is constantly replicating, serving as template for translation, and being packaged into new virus particles; processes that cannot occur simultaneously. Little is known about the regulation of these events. The viral NS5A phosphoprotein has been proposed as a regulator of events in the HCV life cycle for years, but the details have remained enigmatic. NS5A is a three-domain protein and the requirement of domains I and II for RNA replication is well documented. NS5A domain III is not required for RNA replication, and the function of this region in the HCV lifecycle is unknown. We have identified a small deletion in domain III that disrupts the production of infectious virus particles without altering the efficiency of HCV RNA replication. This deletion disrupts virus production at an early stage of assembly, as no intracellular virus is generated and no viral RNA and nucleocapsid protein are released from cells. Genetic mapping has indicated a single serine residue within the deletion is responsible for the observed phenotype. This serine residue lies within a casein kinase II consensus motif, and mutations that mimic phosphorylation suggest that phosphorylation at this position regulates the production of infectious virus. We have shown by genetic silencing and chemical inhibition experiments that NS5A requires casein kinase II phosphorylation at this position for virion production. A mutation that mimics phosphorylation at this position is insensitive to these manipulations of casein kinase II activity. These data provide the first evidence for a function of the domain III of NS5A and implicate NS5A as an important regulator of the RNA replication and virion assembly of HCV. The ability to

  14. Laminin regulates postnatal oligodendrocyte production by promoting oligodendrocyte progenitor survival in the subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Relucio, Jenne; Menezes, Michael J; Miyagoe-Suzuki, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Colognato, Holly

    2012-10-01

    The laminin family of extracellular matrix proteins are expressed broadly during embryonic brain development, but are enriched at ventricular and pial surfaces where laminins mediate radial glial attachment during corticogenesis. In the adult brain, however, laminin distribution is restricted, yet is found within the vascular basal lamina and associated fractones of the ventricular zone (VZ)-subventricular zone (SVZ) stem cell niche, where laminins regulate adult neural progenitor cell proliferation. It remains unknown, however, if laminins regulate the wave of oligodendrogenesis that occurs in the neonatal/early postnatal VZ-SVZ. Here we report that Lama2, the gene that encodes the laminin α2-subunit, regulates postnatal oligodendrogenesis. At birth, Lama2-/- mice had significantly higher levels of dying oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) in the OPC germinal zone of the dorsal SVZ. This translated into fewer OPCs, both in the dorsal SVZ well as in an adjacent developing white matter tract, the corpus callosum. In addition, intermediate progenitor cells that give rise to OPCs in the Lama2-/- VZ-SVZ were mislocalized and proliferated nearer to the ventricle surface. Later, delays in oligodendrocyte maturation (with accompanying OPC accumulation), were observed in the Lama2-/- corpus callosum, leading to dysmyelination by postnatal day 21. Together these data suggest that prosurvival laminin interactions in the developing postnatal VZ-SVZ germinal zone regulate the ability, or timing, of oligodendrocyte production to occur appropriately.

  15. Regulation of transcription of the adenovirus EII promoter by gene products: Absence of sequence specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Kingston, R.E.; Kaufman, R.J.; Sharp, P.A.

    1984-10-01

    During adenovirus infection, the EII promoter is positively regulated by products of the EIa region. The authors have studied this regulation by fusing a DNA segment containing the adenovirus EII promoter to a dihydrofolate reductase cDNA segment. Expression of this hybrid gene is stimulated in trans when cell lines containing an integrated copy are either transfected with plasmids carrying the EIa region or infected with adenovirus. This suggests that EIa activity regulates transcription of the EII promoter in the absence of other viral proteins and that this stimulation can occur when the EII promoter is organized in cellular chromatin. Transcription from the EII promoter is initiated at two sites in cell lines lacking EIa activity. Introduction of the EIa region preferentially stimulated transcription from one of these two sites. A sensitive, stable cotransfection assay was used to test for specific EII sequences required for stimulation. EIa activity stimulates all mutaant promoters; the most extensive deletion retained only 18 base pairs of sequences upstream of the initiation site. They suggest that regulation of a promoter by the EIa region does not depend on the presence of a set of specific sequences, but instead reflects a characteristic of promoters that have been exogenously introduced into cells. Insertion of the 72-base-pair repeat of simian-virus 40 in cis enhances transcription from the EII promoter. The stimulatory effects of EIa activity and of the simian virus 40 sequence are additive and appear to differ mechanistically.

  16. Mitochondrial ROS production correlates with, but does not directly regulate lifespan in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Alberto; Fernández-Ayala, Daniel J M; Stefanatos, Rhoda Ka; Jacobs, Howard T

    2010-04-01

    The Mitochondrial Free Radical Theory of Aging (MFRTA) is currently one of the most widely accepted theories used to explain aging. From MFRTA three basic predictions can be made: long-lived individuals or species should produce fewer mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (mtROS) than short-lived individuals or species; a decrease in mtROS production will increase lifespan; and an increase in mtROS production will decrease lifespan. It is possible to add a further fourth prediction: if ROS is controlling longevity separating these parameters through selection would be impossible. These predictions have been tested in Drosophila melanogaster. Firstly, we studied levels of mtROS production and lifespan of three wild-type strains of Drosophila, Oregon R, Canton S and Dahomey. Oregon R flies live the longest and produce significantly fewer mtROS than both Canton S and Dahomey. These results are therefore in accordance with the first prediction. A new transgenic Drosophila model expressing the Ciona intestinalis Alternative Oxidase (AOX) was used to test the second prediction. In fungi and plants, AOX expression regulates both free radical production and lifespan. In Drosophila, AOX expression decreases mtROS production, but does not increase lifespan. This result contradicts the second prediction of MFRTA. The third prediction was tested in flies mutant for the gene dj-1beta. These flies are characterized by an age-associated decline in locomotor function and increased levels of mtROS production. Nevertheless, dj-1beta mutant flies do not display decreased lifespan, which again is in contradiction with MFRTA. In our final experiment we utilized flies with DAH mitochondrial DNA in an OR nuclear background, and OR mitochondrial DNA in DAH nuclear background. From this, Mitochondrial DNA does not control free radical production, but it does determine longevity of females independently of mtROS production. In summary, these results do not systematically support the

  17. The safety and regulation of natural products used as foods and food ingredients.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Ali; Anyangwe, Njwen; Carlacci, Louis; Casper, Steve; Danam, Rebecca P; Enongene, Evaristus; Erives, Gladys; Fabricant, Daniel; Gudi, Ramadevi; Hilmas, Corey J; Hines, Fred; Howard, Paul; Levy, Dan; Lin, Ying; Moore, Robert J; Pfeiler, Erika; Thurmond, T Scott; Turujman, Saleh; Walker, Nigel J

    2011-10-01

    The use of botanicals and dietary supplements derived from natural substances as an adjunct to an improved quality of life or for their purported medical benefits has become increasingly common in the United States. This review addresses the safety assessment and regulation of food products containing these substances by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The issue of safety is particularly critical given how little information is available on the toxicity of some of these products. The first section uses case studies for stevia and green tea extracts as examples of how FDA evaluates the safety of botanical and herbal products submitted for consideration as Generally Recognized as Safe under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetics Act. The 1994 Dietary Supplement Health Education Act (DSHEA) created a regulatory framework for dietary supplements. The article also discusses the regulation of this class of dietary supplements under DSHEA and addresses the FDA experience in analyzing the safety of natural ingredients described in pre-market safety submissions. Lastly, we discuss an ongoing interagency collaboration to conduct safety testing of nominated dietary supplements.

  18. [Food supplements on the Hungarian market: regulations of marketing and of the composition of the products].

    PubMed

    Lugasi, Andrea; Horacsek, Márta; Martos, Eva

    2010-09-26

    According to recent legislation, food supplements are foodstuffs with the purpose of supplementing normal diet. Food supplements are concentrated sources of nutrients such as vitamins and minerals and other substances with a physiological or nutritional effect. In Hungary, marketing of food supplements has not been bound to pre-market authorization since joining to the European Union. The food business operator, who is responsible for production or distribution of the product, must notify it at National Institute for Food and Nutrition Science latest at the time when the product has been placed on the market and it can be distributed simultaneously. Distribution, ingredients, and all those information which appear on the label are determined by numerous regulations and prescriptions but at the same time the lack of harmonized legislation at certain places may cause a lot of problems on Community level. The first part of the study shows the laws and regulations influencing the distribution and ingredients of food supplements, while the main target of the second part is to introduce the evaluation process of components from nutritional and physiological point of view, and the role played by the food supplements in nutrition.

  19. Abnormal regulation for progesterone production in placenta with prenatal cocaine exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, L; Yan, J; Qu, S C; Feng, Y Q; Jiang, X L

    2012-12-01

    Cocaine abuse in pregnant women is currently a significant public hygiene problem and is tightly associated with elevated risk for preterm delivery. Placental steroidogenesis especially progesterone production was essential for success and maintenance of pregnancy in humans and rodents. In the present study, we determined the impact of prenatal cocaine exposure on pathways of placental progesterone synthesis in rats. Pregnant rats were treated cocaine twice daily (15 mg/kg/day) during the third trimester, and the maternal and fetal plasma progesterone and pregnenolone concentrations were detected. We also examined both the protein and mRNA expression of some key enzymes and regulators for progesterone production in placenta. Results showed that, after maternal cocaine use during pregnancy, progesterone and pregnenolone concentrations in both maternal and fetal rats were significantly decreased. Although prenatal cocaine exposure had no effects on placental 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (3βHSD1) expression, protein and mRNA expression of the cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc/CYP11a) in placenta was significantly inhibited. Moreover, protein and mRNA expressions of MLN64 that regulating cholesterol transport and activating protein 2γ (AP2γ/Tfap2c) that controlling P450scc/CYP11a gene expression in placenta were both decreased following maternal cocaine use in pregnancy. Collectively, this study suggested that prenatal cocaine exposure could insult the placental progesterone production in rats possibly associated with the high risk for preterm delivery.

  20. Nitric oxide production and NO synthase gene expression contribute to vascular regulation during exercise.

    PubMed

    Shen, W; Zhang, X; Zhao, G; Wolin, M S; Sessa, W; Hintze, T H

    1995-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a vasodilator produced under normal physiologic conditions primarily by the vascular endothelium lining all blood vessels. The primary stimulus for the production of nitric oxide by the constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (ECNOS, Type II) found in blood vessels is most likely the shear stress, the frictional force, caused by blood flowing through blood vessels. During exercise there is an increase in cardiac output and redistribution of blood flow to increase blood flow in skeletal muscle and in the coronary circulation. These adjustments provide increased oxygen delivery to support aerobic energy production and to sustain the exercise response. NO may be involved in the regulation of vascular tone in exercising skeletal and cardiac muscle by promoting, enhancing the metabolic vasodilation. In addition, the production of NO by capillary endothelium may regulate oxygen consumption by mitochondria through chemical interactions between NO and the iron-sulfur center of these enzymes. Finally, brief exercise training may alter the gene expression for the enzyme, the constitutive endothelial NO synthase, which forms NO and may be part of the vascular adaptation seen after aerobic exercise training. Furthermore, if there is a genetic predisposition to produce NO, as in world class athletes or animals bred to race, NO may contribute to spectacular exercise performance. These three potential roles of NO will be discussed and data presented to support each of these in our review.

  1. Up-regulation of cyclooxygenase-2 by product-prostaglandin E2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    The development of prostate cancer has been linked to high level of dietary fat intake. Our laboratory investigates the connection between cancer cell growth and fatty acid products. Studying human prostatic carcinoma PC-3 cells, we found that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increased cell growth and up-regulated the gene expression of its own synthesizing enzyme, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). PGE2 increased COX-2 mRNA expression dose-dependently with the highest levels of stimulation seen at the 3-hour period following PGE2 addition. The NSAID flurbiprofen (5 microM), in the presence of exogenous PGE2, inhibited the up-regulation of COX-2 mRNA and cell growth. These data suggest that the levels of local intracellular PGE2 play a major role in the growth of prostate cancer cells through an activation of COX-2 gene expression.

  2. Insulin regulates nitric oxide production in the kidney collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Gaurav; Makhija, Ekta; George, Nelson; Chakravarti, Bandana; Godbole, Madan M; Ecelbarger, Carolyn M; Tiwari, Swasti

    2015-02-27

    The kidney is an important organ for arterial blood pressure (BP) maintenance. Reduced NO generation in the kidney is associated with hypertension in insulin resistance. NO is a critical regulator of vascular tone; however, whether insulin regulates NO production in the renal inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD), the segment with the greatest enzymatic activity for NO production in kidney, is not clear. Using an NO-sensitive 4-amino-5-methylamino-2',7'-difluorofluorescein (DAF-FM) fluorescent dye, we found that insulin increased NO production in mouse IMCD cells (mIMCD) in a time- and dose-dependent manner. A concomitant dose-dependent increase in the NO metabolite (NOx) was also observed in the medium from insulin-stimulated cells. NO production peaked in mIMCD cells at a dose of 100 nm insulin with simultaneously increased NOx levels in the medium. At this dose, insulin significantly increased p-eNOS(Ser1177) levels in mIMCD cells. Pretreatment of cells with a PI 3-kinase inhibitor or insulin receptor silencing with RNA interference abolished these effects of insulin, whereas insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) silencing had no effect. We also showed that chronic insulin infusion to normal C57BL/6J mice resulted in increased endothelial NOS (eNOS) protein levels and NO production in the inner medulla. However, insulin-infused IRKO mice, with targeted deletion of insulin receptor from tubule epithelial cells of the kidney, had ∼50% reduced eNOS protein levels in their inner medulla along with a significant rise in BP relative to WT littermates. We have previously reported increased baseline BP and reduced urine NOx in IRKO mice. Thus, reduced insulin receptor signaling in IMCD could contribute to hypertension in the insulin-resistant state.

  3. FoxO6 integrates insulin signaling with MTP for regulating VLDL production in the liver.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae Hyun; Zhang, Ting; Lee, Sojin; Calabuig-Navarro, Virtu; Yamauchi, Jun; Piccirillo, Ann; Fan, Yong; Uppala, Radha; Goetzman, Eric; Dong, H Henry

    2014-04-01

    Excessive production of triglyceride-rich very low-density lipoproteins (VLDL-TG) contributes to hypertriglyceridemia in obesity and type 2 diabetes. To understand the underlying mechanism, we studied hepatic regulation of VLDL-TG production by (forkhead box O6) FoxO6, a forkhead transcription factor that integrates insulin signaling to hepatic metabolism. We showed that transgenic mice expressing a constitutively active FoxO6 allele developed hypertriglyceridemia, culminating in elevated VLDL-TG levels and impaired postprandial TG clearance. This effect resulted in part from increased hepatic VLDL-TG production. We recapitulated these findings in cultured HepG2 cells and human primary hepatocytes, demonstrating that FoxO6 promoted hepatic VLDL-TG secretion. This action correlated with the ability of FoxO6 to stimulate hepatic production of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP), a molecular chaperone that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in VLDL-TG assembly and secretion. FoxO6 was shown to bind to the MTP promoter and stimulate MTP promoter activity in HepG2 cells. This effect was inhibited by insulin, consistent with the ability of insulin to promote FoxO6 phosphorylation and disable FoxO6 DNA-binding activity. Mutations of the FoxO6 target site within the MTP promoter abrogated FoxO6-mediated induction of MTP promoter activity. Hepatic FoxO6 expression became deregulated in insulin-resistant mice with obesity and type 2 diabetes. FoxO6 inhibition in insulin-resistant liver suppressed hepatic MTP expression and curbed VLDL-TG overproduction, contributing to the amelioration of hypertriglyceridemia in obese and diabetic db/db mice. These results characterize FoxO6 as an important signaling molecule upstream of MTP for regulating hepatic VLDL-TG production.

  4. Regulation of human lung fibroblast glycosaminoglycan production by recombinant interferons, tumor necrosis factor, and lymphotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Elias, J A; Krol, R C; Freundlich, B; Sampson, P M

    1988-01-01

    Mononuclear cells may be important regulators of fibroblast glycosaminoglycan (GAG) biosynthesis. However, the soluble factors mediating these effects, the importance of intercytokine interactions in this regulation and the mechanisms of these alterations remain poorly understood. We analyzed the effect of recombinant (r) tumor necrosis factor (TNF), lymphotoxin (LT), and gamma, alpha, and beta 1 interferons (INF-gamma, -alpha and -beta 1), alone and in combination, on GAG production by normal human lung fibroblasts. rTNF, rLT, and rINF-gamma each stimulated fibroblast GAG production. In addition, rIFN-gamma synergized with rTNF and rLT to further augment GAG biosynthesis. In contrast, IFN-alpha A, -alpha D, and -beta 1 neither stimulated fibroblast GAG production nor interacted with rTNF or rLT to regulate GAG biosynthesis. The effects of the stimulatory cytokines and cytokine combinations were dose dependent and were abrogated by the respective monoclonal antibodies. In addition, these cytokines did not cause an alteration in the distribution of GAG between the fibroblast cell layer and supernatant. However, the stimulation was at least partially specific for particular GAG moieties with hyaluronic acid biosynthesis being markedly augmented without a comparable increase in the production of sulfated GAGs. Fibroblast prostaglandin production did not mediate these alterations since indomethacin did not decrease the stimulatory effects of the cytokines. In contrast, protein and mRNA synthesis appeared to play a role since the stimulatory effects of the cytokines were abrogated by cyclohexamide and actinomycin D, respectively. In addition, the cytokines and cytokine combinations increased cellular hyaluronate synthetase activity in proportion to their effects on hyaluronic acid suggesting that induction of this enzyme(s) is important in this stimulatory process. These studies demonstrate that IFN-gamma, TNF, and LT are important stimulators of fibroblast GAG

  5. Nutrient regulation of bacterial production and ectoenzyme activities in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donachie, Stuart P.; Christian, James R.; Karl, David M.

    Interactions between Bacteria and dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the open ocean are poorly understood. While it is likely that particular compounds may disproportionately regulate heterotrophic activity, very little is known about the underlying processes. Through 10 cruises between December 1996 and April 1998 we investigated how heterotrophic (non-pigmented) Bacteria cell production, per cell α- and β-glucosidase and leucine aminopeptidase (LAPase) activities, and 14C-glucose uptake in 0.8 μm filtered seawater (fsw) cultures at Station ALOHA (22°45'N, 158°W) responded to organic and inorganic nutrient additions (glucose, single amino acids, NH 4+, NO 3-). Bacterial cell production did not change significantly in fsw with glucose (1 μM) or single exogenous N sources (1 μM N) compared to that in fsw alone. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in heterotrophic bacterial cell production in fsw amended with organic or inorganic N, nor between that in fsw with organic N and glucose, or inorganic N and glucose. Cell production did increase significantly, however, in fsw with exogenous glucose (0.38 μM) plus 1 μM inorganic N (NH 4+) relative to that in fsw only, in fsw with glucose, and in fsw with 1 μM N as amino acids (His, Tyr, Leu). There was no significant difference between heterotrophic bacterial cell production in fsw with glucose, glucose plus amino acids, and that in fsw alone. Cell-specific LAPase activity increased significantly relative to that in unamended fsw when exogenous glucose plus NH 4+ or NO 3- were provided, but amino acids, glucose, NH 4+ or NO 3- alone had little or no effect. α-Glucosidase activity tended to increase with exogenous His and Tyr additions. Our results suggest that heterotrophic activity at Station ALOHA can be regulated by the abundance of particular compounds, regardless of their total concentrations. It appears that auxotrophy and de novo synthesis of cell protein from glucose may coexist among Bacteria

  6. The regulation of allogeneic human cells and tissue products as biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Yano, Kazuo; Tsuyuki, Kenichiro; Watanabe, Natsumi; Kasanuki, Hiroshi; Yamato, Masayuki

    2013-04-01

    The current definition of biomaterials differs vastly from it of just a decade ago. According to advancing technologies, it encompasses unpredictable materials such as engineered human cells and tissue. These biomaterials also have to be approved to use in health care business by regulatory authority, which are defined as drug, medical device, or biologics in the regulation. This Leading Opinion Paper addresses the regulatory issues of engineered human cells and tissue products using allogeneic cells that should have a great possibility to develop therapeutics for life-threating diseases or orphan diseases. Six allogeneic human cells and tissue products derived from neonatal or infant fibroblasts and/or keratinocytes were approved as medical devices or biologics in the United States as well as a hematopoietic cell product. For five of the seven products, well-controlled comparative clinical trials were conducted as pre-approval evaluation followed by post-approval evaluation. Although these products avoid a sterilization process usually used for medical devices, no serious malfunction that would lead to class 1 recall was reported. This article would provide insight for development of the engineered human cells and tissue.

  7. Enhanced pinocembrin production in Escherichia coli by regulating cinnamic acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weijia; Ma, Weichao; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Bowen; Cao, Xun; Chen, Kequan; Li, Yan; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2016-01-01

    Microbial biosynthesis of pinocembrin is of great interest in the area of drug research and human healthcare. Here we found that the accumulation of the pathway intermediate cinnamic acid adversely affected pinocembrin production. Hence, a stepwise metabolic engineering strategy was carried out aimed at eliminating this pathway bottleneck and increasing pinocembrin production. The screening of gene source and the optimization of gene expression was first employed to regulate the synthetic pathway of cinnamic acid, which showed a 3.53-fold increase in pinocembrin production (7.76 mg/L) occurred with the alleviation of cinnamic acid accumulation in the engineered E. coli. Then, the downstream pathway that consuming cinnamic acid was optimized by the site-directed mutagenesis of chalcone synthase and cofactor engineering. S165M mutant of chalcone synthase could efficiently improve the pinocembrin production, and allowed the product titer of pinocembrin increased to 40.05 mg/L coupled with the malonyl-CoA engineering. With a two-phase pH fermentation strategy, the cultivation of the optimized strain resulted in a final pinocembrin titer of 67.81 mg/L. The results and engineering strategies demonstrated here would hold promise for the titer improvement of other flavonoids. PMID:27586788

  8. Baicalin Down-Regulates IL-1β-Stimulated Extracellular Matrix Production in Nasal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Min; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Lee, Seoung-Ae; Park, Il-Ho; Lee, Heung-Man

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Baicalin, a Chinese herbal medicine, has anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects. The aims of present study were to investigate the effects of baicalin on the myofibroblast differentiation, extracellular matrix production, migration, and collagen contraction of interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts and to determine the molecular mechanism of baicalin in nasal fibroblasts. Methods Nasal fibroblasts were isolated from the inferior turbinate of patients. Baicalin was used to treat IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts. To evaluate cytotoxicity, a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay was used. The expression levels of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), fibronectin, phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-MAPK), p-Akt, p-p50, p-p65, and p-IκBα were measured by western blotting, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT—PCR),or immunofluorescence staining. Fibroblast migration was analyzed with scratch assays and transwell migration assays. Total collagen was evaluated with the Sircol collagen assay. Contractile activity was measured with a collagen gel contraction assay. Results Baicalin (0–50 μM) had no significant cytotoxic effects in nasal fibroblasts. The expression of α–SMA and fibronectin were significantly down-regulated in baicalin-treated nasal fibroblasts. Migration, collagen production, and contraction of IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts were significantly inhibited by baicalin treatment. Baicalin also significantly down-regulated p-MAPK, p-Akt, p-p50, p-p65, and p-IκBα in IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts. Conclusions We showed that baicalin down-regulated myofibroblast differentiation, extracellular matrix production, migration, and collagen contraction via the MAPK and Akt/ NF-κB pathways in IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts. PMID:28002421

  9. Hydrogen peroxide production regulates the mitochondrial function in insulin resistant muscle cells: effect of catalase overexpression.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Marina R; Sampaio, Igor H; Teodoro, Bruno G; Sousa, Thais A; Zoppi, Claudio C; Queiroz, André L; Passos, Madla A; Alberici, Luciane C; Teixeira, Felipe R; Manfiolli, Adriana O; Batista, Thiago M; Cappelli, Ana Paula Gameiro; Reis, Rosana I; Frasson, Danúbia; Kettelhut, Isis C; Parreiras-e-Silva, Lucas T; Costa-Neto, Claudio M; Carneiro, Everardo M; Curi, Rui; Silveira, Leonardo R

    2013-10-01

    The mitochondrial redox state plays a central role in the link between mitochondrial overloading and insulin resistance. However, the mechanism by which the ROS induce insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells is not completely understood. We examined the association between mitochondrial function and H2O2 production in insulin resistant cells. Our hypothesis is that the low mitochondrial oxygen consumption leads to elevated ROS production by a mechanism associated with reduced PGC1α transcription and low content of phosphorylated CREB. The cells were transfected with either the encoded sequence for catalase overexpression or the specific siRNA for catalase inhibition. After transfection, myotubes were incubated with palmitic acid (500μM) and the insulin response, as well as mitochondrial function and fatty acid metabolism, was determined. The low mitochondrial oxygen consumption led to elevated ROS production by a mechanism associated with β-oxidation of fatty acids. Rotenone was observed to reduce the ratio of ROS production. The elevated H2O2 production markedly decreased the PGC1α transcription, an effect that was accompanied by a reduced phosphorylation of Akt and CREB. The catalase transfection prevented the reduction in the phosphorylated level of Akt and upregulated the levels of phosphorylated CREB. The mitochondrial function was elevated and H2O2 production reduced, thus increasing the insulin sensitivity. The catalase overexpression improved mitochondrial respiration protecting the cells from fatty acid-induced, insulin resistance. This effect indicates that control of hydrogen peroxide production regulates the mitochondrial respiration preventing the insulin resistance in skeletal muscle cells by a mechanism associated with CREB phosphorylation and β-oxidation of fatty acids.

  10. 75 FR 79320 - Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Regulation of Carcinogenic Compounds in Food-Producing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 500 Animal Drugs, Feeds, and Related Products; Regulation of Carcinogenic Compounds in Food-Producing Animals AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... regulations regarding compounds of carcinogenic concern used in food-producing animals. Specifically,...

  11. DasR positively controls monensin production at two-level regulation in Streptomyces cinnamonensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Lin, Chun-Yan; Li, Xiao-Mei; Tang, Zheng-Kun; Qiao, Jianjun; Zhao, Guang-Rong

    2016-12-01

    The polyether ionophore antibiotic monensin is produced by Streptomyces cinnamonensis and is used as a coccidiostat for chickens and growth-promoting agent for cattle. Monensin biosynthetic gene cluster has been cloned and partially characterized. The GntR-family transcription factor DasR regulates antibiotic production and morphological development in Streptomyces coelicolor and Saccharopolyspora erythraea. In this study, we identified and characterized the two-level regulatory cascade of DasR to monensin production in S. cinnamonensis. Forward and reverse genetics by overexpression and antisense RNA silence of dasR revealed that DasR positively controls monensin production under nutrient-rich condition. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) showed that DasR protein specifically binds to the promoter regions of both pathway-specific regulatory gene monRII and biosynthetic genes monAIX, monE and monT. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR further confirmed that DasR upregulates the transcriptional levels of these genes during monensin fermentation. Subsequently, co-overexpressed dasR with pathway-specific regulatory genes monRI, monRII or monH greatly improved monensin production.

  12. Microcystin production and regulation under nutrient stress conditions in toxic microcystis strains.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Juliana S M; Giani, Alessandra

    2014-09-01

    Microcystin is a common and well-known cyanobacterial toxin whose intracellular role is still under investigation. Increasing knowledge on microcystin gene expression and regulation can contribute to the understanding of its putative cellular function. In this work, reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to investigate the transcriptional response of the mcyD gene to nitrogen (nitrate and ammonium) and phosphorus limitation in two toxic Microcystis strains. The existence of a direct correlation between transcripts of mcyD and ntcA genes was also identified. In previous studies, NtcA (global nitrogen regulator) has been described as a potential component in the control of microcystin biosynthesis. This research showed that stress agents linked to nutrient deprivation could lead to a significant increase of microcystin production in both strains studied. The more toxic strain proved to be more resistant to nutrient limitation. The similar outcomes of mcyD regulation observed for all nutrients suggest that this response can be linked to oxidative stress of cells undergoing adverse growth conditions.

  13. JAK/STAT controls organ size and fate specification by regulating morphogen production and signalling

    PubMed Central

    Recasens-Alvarez, Carles; Ferreira, Ana; Milán, Marco

    2017-01-01

    A stable pool of morphogen-producing cells is critical for the development of any organ or tissue. Here we present evidence that JAK/STAT signalling in the Drosophila wing promotes the cycling and survival of Hedgehog-producing cells, thereby allowing the stable localization of the nearby BMP/Dpp-organizing centre in the developing wing appendage. We identify the inhibitor of apoptosis dIAP1 and Cyclin A as two critical genes regulated by JAK/STAT and contributing to the growth of the Hedgehog-expressing cell population. We also unravel an early role of JAK/STAT in guaranteeing Wingless-mediated appendage specification, and a later one in restricting the Dpp-organizing activity to the appendage itself. These results unveil a fundamental role of the conserved JAK/STAT pathway in limb specification and growth by regulating morphogen production and signalling, and a function of pro-survival cues and mitogenic signals in the regulation of the pool of morphogen-producing cells in a developing organ. PMID:28045022

  14. A comparison of US and Norwegian regulation of coumarin in tobacco products

    PubMed Central

    Givel, M

    2003-01-01

    Objective: This paper examines policy processes regarding why the USA and Norway have not regulated coumarin in tobacco. Design: A qualitative analysis of all tobacco industry documents regarding coumarin since the 1950s from the 1998 US Master Settlement Agreement and subsequent legal settlements. Additional data were collected from newspaper reports, general internet search engines, journal articles, scholarly reports, court cases, statutes, regulations, and informal correspondence with tobacco control experts in Norway. Main outcome measure: An overview, summary, and analysis of all documents related to coumarin. Results: In the USA from 1954 until 1985 when coumarin was reportedly removed from domestic cigarettes, but not from pipe tobacco until 1996, and not at all from imported Indian bidi cigarettes, regulatory efforts were stymied. In Norway, from 1973 to the present, the tobacco industry has never disclosed whether its tobacco products contain coumarin. In both the USA and Norway, the extreme delay and lack of vigorous evidence gathering and significant remedies were caused by tobacco industry assertions that revealing tobacco additives was a violation of trade secrets, and by weak regulatory authority and efforts to regulate coumarin. Conclusion: Vigorous and expeditious regulatory investigations and remedies for harmful additives in tobacco, such as coumarin, can protect the public health. Astute insider and outsider political advocacy by health advocates is required to hold elected officials and civil servants publicly accountable for failing to enact disclosure laws and to engage in effective regulatory efforts. PMID:14660776

  15. Role of ACTH and Other Hormones in the Regulation of Aldosterone Production in Primary Aldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    El Ghorayeb, Nada; Bourdeau, Isabelle; Lacroix, André

    2016-01-01

    The major physiological regulators of aldosterone production from the adrenal zona glomerulosa are potassium and angiotensin II; other acute regulators include adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and serotonin. Their interactions with G-protein coupled hormone receptors activate cAMP/PKA pathway thereby regulating intracellular calcium flux and CYP11B2 transcription, which is the specific steroidogenic enzyme of aldosterone synthesis. In primary aldosteronism (PA), the increased production of aldosterone and resultant relative hypervolemia inhibits the renin and angiotensin system; aldosterone secretion is mostly independent from the suppressed renin–angiotensin system, but is not autonomous, as it is regulated by a diversity of other ligands of various eutopic or ectopic receptors, in addition to activation of calcium flux resulting from mutations of various ion channels. Among the abnormalities in various hormone receptors, an overexpression of the melanocortin type 2 receptor (MC2R) could be responsible for aldosterone hypersecretion in aldosteronomas. An exaggerated increase in plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) is found in patients with PA secondary either to unilateral aldosteronomas or bilateral adrenal hyperplasia (BAH) following acute ACTH administration compared to normal individuals. A diurnal increase in PAC in early morning and its suppression by dexamethasone confirms the increased role of endogenous ACTH as an important aldosterone secretagogue in PA. Screening using a combination of dexamethasone and fludrocortisone test reveals a higher prevalence of PA in hypertensive populations compared to the aldosterone to renin ratio. The variable level of MC2R overexpression in each aldosteronomas or in the adjacent zona glomerulosa hyperplasia may explain the inconsistent results of adrenal vein sampling between basal levels and post ACTH administration in the determination of source of aldosterone excess. In the rare cases of glucocorticoid remediable

  16. ApoE production in human monocytes and its regulation by inflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Braesch-Andersen, Sten; Paulie, Staffan; Smedman, Christian; Mia, Sohel; Kumagai-Braesch, Makiko

    2013-01-01

    The apoE production by tissue macrophages is crucial for the prevention of atherosclerosis and the aim of this study was to further elucidate how this apolipoprotein is regulated by cytokines present during inflammation. Here we studied apoE production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and analysis was made with a newly developed apoE ELISpot assay. In PBMC, apoE secretion was restricted to monocytes with classical (CD14(++)CD16(-)) and intermediate (CD14(+)CD16(+)) monocytes being the main producers. As earlier described for macrophages, production was strongly upregulated by TGF-β and downregulated by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the inflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-1β. We could here show that a similar down-regulatory effect was also observed with the type I interferon, IFN-α, while IL-6, often regarded as one of the more prominent inflammatory cytokines, did not affect TGF-β-induced apoE production. The TNF-α inhibitor Enbrel could partly block the down-regulatory effect of IFN-γ, IFN-α and IL-1β, indicating that inhibition of apoE by these cytokines may be dependent on or synergize with TNF-α. Other cytokines tested, IL-2, IL-4, IL-12, IL-13, IL-17A and IL-23, had no inhibitory effect on apoE production. In contrast to the effect on monocytes, apoE production by primary hepatocytes and the hepatoma cell line HepG2 was more or less unaffected by treatment with cytokines or LPS.

  17. The Pool of ADP and ATP Regulates Anaerobic Product Formation in Resting Cells of Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Palmfeldt, Johan; Paese, Marco; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; van Niel, Ed W. J.

    2004-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis grows homofermentatively on glucose, while its growth on maltose under anaerobic conditions results in mixed acid product formation in which formate, acetate, and ethanol are formed in addition to lactate. Maltose was used as a carbon source to study mixed acid product formation as a function of the growth rate. In batch and nitrogen-limited chemostat cultures mixed acid product formation was shown to be linked to the growth rate, and homolactic fermentation occurred only in resting cells. Two of the four lactococcal strains investigated with maltose, L. lactis 65.1 and MG1363, showed more pronounced mixed acid product formation during growth than L. lactis ATCC 19435 or IL-1403. In resting cell experiments all four strains exhibited homolactic fermentation. In resting cells the intracellular concentrations of ADP, ATP, and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate were increased and the concentration of Pi was decreased compared with the concentrations in growing cells. Addition of an ionophore (monensin or valinomycin) to resting cultures of L. lactis 65.1 induced mixed acid product formation concomitant with decreases in the ADP, ATP, and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate concentrations. ADP and ATP were shown to inhibit glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase, and alcohol dehydrogenase in vitro. Alcohol dehydrogenase was the most sensitive enzyme and was totally inhibited at an adenine nucleotide concentration of 16 mM, which is close to the sum of the intracellular concentrations of ADP and ATP of resting cells. This inhibition of alcohol dehydrogenase might be partially responsible for the homolactic behavior of resting cells. A hypothesis regarding the level of the ATP-ADP pool as a regulating mechanism for the glycolytic flux and product formation in L. lactis is discussed. PMID:15345435

  18. Regulation of schistosome egg production by HMG CoA reductase

    SciTech Connect

    VandeWaa, E.A.; Bennett, J.L.

    1986-03-05

    Hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMG CoA reductase) catalyzes the conversion of HMG CoA to mevalonate in the synthesis of steroids, isoprenoids and terpenes. Mevinolin, an inhibitor of this enzyme, decreased egg production in Schistosoma mansoni during in vitro incubations. This was associated with a reduction in the incorporation of /sup 14/C-acetate into polyisoprenoids and a reduction in the formation of a lipid-linked oligosaccharide. In vivo, mevinolin in daily doses of 50 mg/kg (p.o., from days 30-48 post-infection) caused no change in gross liver pathology in S. mansoni infected mice. However, when parasites exposed to mevinolin or its vehicle in vivo were cultured in vitro, worms from mevinolin-treated mice produced six times more eggs than control parasites. When infected mice were dosed with 250 mg/kg mevinolin daily (p.o., from days 35-45 post-infection), liver pathology was reduced in comparison to control mice. Thus, during in vivo exposure to a high dose of the drug egg production is decreased, while at a lower dose it appears unaffected until the parasites are cultured in a drug-free in vitro system wherein egg production is stimulated to extraordinarily high levels. It may be that at low doses mevinolin, by inhibiting the enzyme, is blocking the formation of a product (such as an isoprenoid) which normally acts to down-regulate enzyme synthesis, resulting in enzyme induction. Induction of HMG CoA reductase is then expressed as increased egg production when the worms are removed from the drug. These data suggest that HMG CoA reductase plays a role in schistosome egg production.

  19. Calcium-dependent protein kinases regulate the production of reactive oxygen species by potato NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michie; Ohura, Ikuko; Kawakita, Kazuhito; Yokota, Naohiko; Fujiwara, Masayuki; Shimamoto, Ko; Doke, Noriyuki; Yoshioka, Hirofumi

    2007-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated in plant innate immunity. NADPH oxidase (RBOH; for Respiratory Burst Oxidase Homolog) plays a central role in the oxidative burst, and EF-hand motifs in the N terminus of this protein suggest possible regulation by Ca(2+). However, regulatory mechanisms are largely unknown. We identified Ser-82 and Ser-97 in the N terminus of potato (Solanum tuberosum) St RBOHB as potential phosphorylation sites. An anti-phosphopeptide antibody (pSer82) indicated that Ser-82 was phosphorylated by pathogen signals in planta. We cloned two potato calcium-dependent protein kinases, St CDPK4 and St CDPK5, and mass spectrometry analyses showed that these CDPKs phosphorylated only Ser-82 and Ser-97 in the N terminus of St RBOHB in a calcium-dependent manner. Ectopic expression of the constitutively active mutant of St CDPK5, St CDPK5VK, provoked ROS production in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. The CDPK-mediated ROS production was disrupted by knockdown of Nb RBOHB in N. benthamiana. The loss of function was complemented by heterologous expression of wild-type potato St RBOHB but not by a mutant (S82A/S97A). Furthermore, the heterologous expression of St CDPK5VK phosphorylated Ser-82 of St RBOHB in N. benthamiana. These results suggest that St CDPK5 induces the phosphorylation of St RBOHB and regulates the oxidative burst.

  20. Natural Compounds as Regulators of NLRP3 Inflammasome-Mediated IL-1β Production

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    IL-1β is one of the main proinflammatory cytokines that regulates a broad range of immune responses and also participates in several physiological processes. The canonical production of IL-1β requires multiprotein complexes called inflammasomes. One of the most intensively studied inflammasome complexes is the NLRP3 inflammasome. Its activation requires two signals: one signal “primes” the cells and induces the expression of NLRP3 and pro-IL-1β, while the other signal leads to the assembly and activation of the complex. Several stimuli were reported to function as the second signal including reactive oxygen species, lysosomal rupture, or cytosolic ion perturbation. Despite very intensive studies, the precise function and regulation of the NLRP3 inflammasome are still not clear. However, many chronic inflammatory diseases are related to the overproduction of IL-1β that is mediated via the NLRP3 inflammasome. In this review, we aimed to provide an overview of studies that demonstrated the effect of plant-derived natural compounds on NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated IL-1β production. Although many of these studies lack the mechanistic explanation of their action, these compounds may be considered as complementary supplements in the treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases, consumed as preventive agents, and may also be considered as molecular tools to study NLRP3 function. PMID:27672241