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  1. The mitotic DNA damage checkpoint proteins Rad17 and Rad24 are required for repair of double-strand breaks during meiosis in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Miki; Sakai, Kazuko; Ogawa, Tomoko; Shinohara, Akira

    2003-01-01

    We show here that deletion of the DNA damage checkpoint genes RAD17 and RAD24 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae delays repair of meiotic double-strand breaks (DSBs) and results in an altered ratio of crossover-to-noncrossover products. These mutations also decrease the colocalization of immunostaining foci of the RecA homologs Rad51 and Dmc1 and cause a delay in the disappearance of Rad51 foci, but not of Dmc1. These observations imply that RAD17 and RAD24 promote efficient repair of meiotic DSBs by facilitating proper assembly of the meiotic recombination complex containing Rad51. Consistent with this proposal, extra copies of RAD51 and RAD54 substantially suppress not only the spore inviability of the rad24 mutant, but also the gamma-ray sensitivity of the mutant. Unexpectedly, the entry into meiosis I (metaphase I) is delayed in the checkpoint single mutants compared to wild type. The control of the cell cycle in response to meiotic DSBs is also discussed. PMID:12871899

  2. The Ddc1-Mec3-Rad17 Sliding Clamp Regulates Histone-Histone Chaperone Interactions and DNA Replication-coupled Nucleosome Assembly in Budding Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Rebecca J.; Han, Junhong; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2014-01-01

    The maintenance of genome integrity is regulated in part by chromatin structure and factors involved in the DNA damage response pathway. Nucleosome assembly is a highly regulated process that restores chromatin structure after DNA replication, DNA repair, and gene transcription. During S phase the histone chaperones Asf1, CAF-1, and Rtt106 coordinate to deposit newly synthesized histones H3-H4 onto replicated DNA in budding yeast. Here we describe synthetic genetic interactions between RTT106 and the DDC1-MEC3-RAD17 (9-1-1) complex, a sliding clamp functioning in the S phase DNA damage and replication checkpoint response, upon treatment with DNA damaging agents. The DNA damage sensitivity of rad17Δ rtt106Δ cells depends on the function of Rtt106 in nucleosome assembly. Epistasis analysis reveals that 9-1-1 complex components interact with multiple DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly factors, including Rtt106, CAF-1, and lysine residues of H3-H4. Furthermore, rad17Δ cells exhibit defects in the deposition of newly synthesized H3-H4 onto replicated DNA. Finally, deletion of RAD17 results in increased association of Asf1 with checkpoint kinase Rad53, which may lead to the observed reduction in Asf1-H3 interaction in rad17Δ mutant cells. In addition, we observed that the interaction between histone H3-H4 with histone chaperone CAF-1 or Rtt106 increases in cells lacking Rad17. These results support the idea that the 9-1-1 checkpoint protein regulates DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly in part through regulating histone-histone chaperone interactions. PMID:24573675

  3. Reconstitution of Rad53 Activation by Mec1 through Adaptor Protein Mrc1*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sheng-hong; Zhou, Huilin

    2009-01-01

    Upon DNA replication stress, stalled DNA replication forks serve as a platform to recruit many signaling proteins, leading to the activation of the DNA replication checkpoint. Activation of Rad53, a key effector kinase in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is essential for stabilizing DNA replication forks during replication stress. Using an activity-based assay for Rad53, we found that Mrc1, a replication fork-associated protein, cooperates with Mec1 to activate Rad53 directly. Reconstitution of Rad53 activation using purified Mec1 and Mrc1 showed that the addition of Mrc1 stimulated a more than 70-fold increase in the ability of Mec1 to activate Rad53. Instead of increasing the catalytic activity of Mec1, Mrc1 was found to facilitate the phosphorylation of Rad53 by Mec1 via promotion of a stronger enzyme-substrate interaction between them. Further, the conserved C-terminal domain of Mrc1 was found to be required for Rad53 activation. These results thus provide insights into the role of the adaptor protein Mrc1 in activating Rad53 in the DNA replication checkpoint. PMID:19457865

  4. DNA replication checkpoint signaling depends on a Rad53-Dbf4 N-terminal interaction in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Chou; Kenworthy, Jessica; Gabrielse, Carrie; Hänni, Christine; Zegerman, Philip; Weinreich, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK) and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) are essential to initiate DNA replication at individual origins. During replication stress, the S-phase checkpoint inhibits the DDK- and CDK-dependent activation of late replication origins. Rad53 kinase is a central effector of the replication checkpoint and both binds to and phosphorylates Dbf4 to prevent late-origin firing. The molecular basis for the Rad53-Dbf4 physical interaction is not clear but occurs through the Dbf4 N terminus. Here we found that both Rad53 FHA1 and FHA2 domains, which specifically recognize phospho-threonine (pT), interacted with Dbf4 through an N-terminal sequence and an adjacent BRCT domain. Purified Rad53 FHA1 domain (but not FHA2) bound to a pT Dbf4 peptide in vitro, suggesting a possible phospho-threonine-dependent interaction between FHA1 and Dbf4. The Dbf4-Rad53 interaction is governed by multiple contacts that are separable from the Cdc5- and Msa1-binding sites in the Dbf4 N terminus. Importantly, abrogation of the Rad53-Dbf4 physical interaction blocked Dbf4 phosphorylation and allowed late-origin firing during replication checkpoint activation. This indicated that Rad53 must stably bind to Dbf4 to regulate its activity.

  5. Asf1 facilitates dephosphorylation of Rad53 after DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Tsabar, Michael; Waterman, David P; Aguilar, Fiona; Katsnelson, Lizabeth; Eapen, Vinay V; Memisoglu, Gonen; Haber, James E

    2016-05-15

    To allow for sufficient time to repair DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs), eukaryotic cells activate the DNA damage checkpoint. In budding yeast, Rad53 (mammalian Chk2) phosphorylation parallels the persistence of the unrepaired DSB and is extinguished when repair is complete in a process termed recovery or when the cells adapt to the DNA damage checkpoint. A strain containing a slowly repaired DSB does not require the histone chaperone Asf1 to resume cell cycle progression after DSB repair. When a second, rapidly repairable DSB is added to this strain, Asf1 becomes required for recovery. Recovery from two repairable DSBs also depends on the histone acetyltransferase Rtt109 and the cullin subunit Rtt101, both of which modify histone H3 that is associated with Asf1. We show that dissociation of histone H3 from Asf1 is required for efficient recovery and that Asf1 is required for complete dephosphorylation of Rad53 when the upstream DNA damage checkpoint signaling is turned off. Our data suggest that the requirements for recovery from the DNA damage checkpoint become more stringent with increased levels of damage and that Asf1 plays a histone chaperone-independent role in facilitating complete Rad53 dephosphorylation following repair.

  6. Asf1 facilitates dephosphorylation of Rad53 after DNA double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Tsabar, Michael; Waterman, David P; Aguilar, Fiona; Katsnelson, Lizabeth; Eapen, Vinay V; Memisoglu, Gonen; Haber, James E

    2016-05-15

    To allow for sufficient time to repair DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs), eukaryotic cells activate the DNA damage checkpoint. In budding yeast, Rad53 (mammalian Chk2) phosphorylation parallels the persistence of the unrepaired DSB and is extinguished when repair is complete in a process termed recovery or when the cells adapt to the DNA damage checkpoint. A strain containing a slowly repaired DSB does not require the histone chaperone Asf1 to resume cell cycle progression after DSB repair. When a second, rapidly repairable DSB is added to this strain, Asf1 becomes required for recovery. Recovery from two repairable DSBs also depends on the histone acetyltransferase Rtt109 and the cullin subunit Rtt101, both of which modify histone H3 that is associated with Asf1. We show that dissociation of histone H3 from Asf1 is required for efficient recovery and that Asf1 is required for complete dephosphorylation of Rad53 when the upstream DNA damage checkpoint signaling is turned off. Our data suggest that the requirements for recovery from the DNA damage checkpoint become more stringent with increased levels of damage and that Asf1 plays a histone chaperone-independent role in facilitating complete Rad53 dephosphorylation following repair. PMID:27222517

  7. Hsp90 induces increased genomic instability toward DNA-damaging agents by tuning down RAD53 transcription

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Nidhi; Laskar, Shyamasree; Bhattacharyya, Mrinal K.; Bhattacharyya, Sunanda

    2016-01-01

    It is well documented that elevated body temperature causes tumors to regress upon radiotherapy. However, how hyperthermia induces DNA damage sensitivity is not clear. We show that a transient heat shock and particularly the concomitant induction of Hsp90 lead to increased genomic instability under DNA-damaging conditions. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model eukaryote, we demonstrate that elevated levels of Hsp90 attenuate efficient DNA damage signaling and dictate preferential use of the potentially mutagenic double-strand break repair pathway. We show that under normal physiological conditions, Hsp90 negatively regulates RAD53 transcription to suppress DNA damage checkpoint activation. However, under DNA damaging conditions, RAD53 is derepressed, and the increased level of Rad53p triggers an efficient DNA damage response. A higher abundance of Hsp90 causes increased transcriptional repression on RAD53 in a dose-dependent manner, which could not be fully derepressed even in the presence of DNA damage. Accordingly, cells behave like a rad53 loss-of-function mutant and show reduced NHEJ efficiency, with a drastic failure to up-regulate RAD51 expression and manifestly faster accumulation of CLN1 and CLN2 in DNA-damaged G1, cells leading to premature release from checkpoint arrest. We further demonstrate that Rad53 overexpression is able to rescue all of the aforementioned deleterious effects caused by Hsp90 overproduction. PMID:27307581

  8. Characterization of the interaction between Rfa1 and Rad24 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Piya, Gunjan; Mueller, Erica N; Haas, Heather K; Ghospurkar, Padmaja L; Wilson, Timothy M; Jensen, Jaime L; Colbert, Christopher L; Haring, Stuart J

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining the integrity of the genome requires the high fidelity duplication of the genome and the ability of the cell to recognize and repair DNA lesions. The heterotrimeric single stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding complex Replication Protein A (RPA) is central to multiple DNA processes, which are coordinated by RPA through its ssDNA binding function and through multiple protein-protein interactions. Many RPA interacting proteins have been reported through large genetic and physical screens; however, the number of interactions that have been further characterized is limited. To gain a better understanding of how RPA functions in DNA replication, repair, and cell cycle regulation and to identify other potential functions of RPA, a yeast two hybrid screen was performed using the yeast 70 kDa subunit, Replication Factor A1 (Rfa1), as a bait protein. Analysis of 136 interaction candidates resulted in the identification of 37 potential interacting partners, including the cell cycle regulatory protein and DNA damage clamp loader Rad24. The Rfa1-Rad24 interaction is not dependent on ssDNA binding. However, this interaction appears affected by DNA damage. The regions of both Rfa1 and Rad24 important for this interaction were identified, and the region of Rad24 identified is distinct from the region reported to be important for its interaction with Rfc2 5. This suggests that Rad24-Rfc2-5 (Rad24-RFC) recruitment to DNA damage substrates by RPA occurs, at least partially, through an interaction between the N terminus of Rfa1 and the C terminus of Rad24. The predicted structure and location of the Rad24 C-terminus is consistent with a model in which RPA interacts with a damage substrate, loads Rad24-RFC at the 5' junction, and then releases the Rad24-RFC complex to allow for proper loading and function of the DNA damage clamp.

  9. Chemogenetic profiling identifies RAD17 as synthetically lethal with checkpoint kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Shen, John Paul; Srivas, Rohith; Gross, Andrew; Li, Jianfeng; Jaehnig, Eric J; Sun, Su Ming; Bojorquez-Gomez, Ana; Licon, Katherine; Sivaganesh, Vignesh; Xu, Jia L; Klepper, Kristin; Yeerna, Huwate; Pekin, Daniel; Qiu, Chu Ping; van Attikum, Haico; Sobol, Robert W; Ideker, Trey

    2015-11-01

    Chemical inhibitors of the checkpoint kinases have shown promise in the treatment of cancer, yet their clinical utility may be limited by a lack of molecular biomarkers to identify specific patients most likely to respond to therapy. To this end, we screened 112 known tumor suppressor genes for synthetic lethal interactions with inhibitors of the CHEK1 and CHEK2 checkpoint kinases. We identified eight interactions, including the Replication Factor C (RFC)-related protein RAD17. Clonogenic assays in RAD17 knockdown cell lines identified a substantial shift in sensitivity to checkpoint kinase inhibition (3.5-fold) as compared to RAD17 wild-type. Additional evidence for this interaction was found in a large-scale functional shRNA screen of over 100 genotyped cancer cell lines, in which CHEK1/2 mutant cell lines were unexpectedly sensitive to RAD17 knockdown. This interaction was widely conserved, as we found that RAD17 interacts strongly with checkpoint kinases in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the setting of RAD17 knockdown, CHEK1/2 inhibition was found to be synergistic with inhibition of WEE1, another pharmacologically relevant checkpoint kinase. Accumulation of the DNA damage marker γH2AX following chemical inhibition or transient knockdown of CHEK1, CHEK2 or WEE1 was magnified by knockdown of RAD17. Taken together, our data suggest that CHEK1 or WEE1 inhibitors are likely to have greater clinical efficacy in tumors with RAD17 loss-of-function. PMID:26437225

  10. ‘AND’ logic gates at work: Crystal structure of Rad53 bound to Dbf4 and Cdc7

    PubMed Central

    Almawi, Ahmad W.; Matthews, Lindsay A.; Larasati; Myrox, Polina; Boulton, Stephen; Lai, Christine; Moraes, Trevor; Melacini, Giuseppe; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Duncker, Bernard P.; Guarné, Alba

    2016-01-01

    Forkhead-associated (FHA) domains are phosphopeptide recognition modules found in many signaling proteins. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae protein kinase Rad53 is a key regulator of the DNA damage checkpoint and uses its two FHA domains to interact with multiple binding partners during the checkpoint response. One of these binding partners is the Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), a heterodimer composed of the Cdc7 kinase and its regulatory subunit Dbf4. Binding of Rad53 to DDK, through its N-terminal FHA (FHA1) domain, ultimately inhibits DDK kinase activity, thereby preventing firing of late origins. We have previously found that the FHA1 domain of Rad53 binds simultaneously to Dbf4 and a phosphoepitope, suggesting that this domain functions as an ‘AND’ logic gate. Here, we present the crystal structures of the FHA1 domain of Rad53 bound to Dbf4, in the presence and absence of a Cdc7 phosphorylated peptide. Our results reveal how the FHA1 uses a canonical binding interface to recognize the Cdc7 phosphopeptide and a non-canonical interface to bind Dbf4. Based on these data we propose a mechanism to explain how Rad53 enhances the specificity of FHA1-mediated transient interactions. PMID:27681475

  11. Pph3 dephosphorylation of Rad53 is required for cell recovery from MMS-induced DNA damage in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haitao; Gao, Jiaxin; Li, Wanjie; Wong, Ada Hang-Heng; Hu, Kangdi; Chen, Kun; Wang, Yue; Sang, Jianli

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenic fungus Candida albicans switches from yeast growth to filamentous growth in response to genotoxic stresses, in which phosphoregulation of the checkpoint kinase Rad53 plays a crucial role. Here we report that the Pph3/Psy2 phosphatase complex, known to be involved in Rad53 dephosphorylation, is required for cellular responses to the DNA-damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) but not the DNA replication inhibitor hydroxyurea (HU) in C. albicans. Deletion of either PPH3 or PSY2 resulted in enhanced filamentous growth during MMS treatment and continuous filamentous growth even after MMS removal. Moreover, during this growth, Rad53 remained hyperphosphorylated, MBF-regulated genes were downregulated, and hypha-specific genes were upregulated. We have also identified S461 and S545 on Rad53 as potential dephosphorylation sites of Pph3/Psy2 that are specifically involved in cellular responses to MMS. Therefore, our studies have identified a novel molecular mechanism mediating DNA damage response to MMS in C. albicans.

  12. Sds22 participates in Glc7 mediated Rad53 dephosphorylation in MMS-induced DNA damage in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Yao, Guangyin; Wan, Junhua; Mu, Chunhua; Liu, Qizheng; Wang, Yue; Sang, Jianli

    2016-08-01

    The protein kinase Rad53 and its orthologs play a fundamental role in regulating the DNA damage checkpoint in eukaryotes. Rad53 is activated by phosphorylation in response to DNA damage and deactivated by dephosphorylation after the damage is repaired. However, the phosphatases involved in Rad53 deactivation are not entirely understood. In this study, by investigating the consequences of overexpressing SDS22, a gene encoding a regulatory subunit of the PP1 phosphatase Glc7, in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, we discovered that Sds22 plays an important role in Rad53 dephosphorylation and thus the deactivation of the DNA damage checkpoint. Sds22 cellular levels increase when cells are exposed to DNA damaging agents and decrease after removing the genotoxins. Depletion of Glc7 has similar phenotypes. We provide evidence that Sds2 acts through inhibitory physical association with Glc7. Our findings provide novel insights into the mechanisms for the control of DNA damage checkpoint. Furthermore, SDS22 overexpression reduces C. albicans virulence in a mouse model of systemic infection, suggesting potential targets for developing antifungal drugs.

  13. Genetic polymorphism at codon 546 of the human RAD17 contributes to the risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Yukiko; Sakai, Akiko; Ito, Sachio; Mita, Yuichiro; Sonoyama, Takayuki; Tanabe, Shunsuke; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro; Naomoto, Yoshio; Katayama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Human RAD17, a human homolog of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell cycle checkpoint gene RAD17, plays a significant role in activating checkpoint signals in response to DNA damage. We evaluated the association of hRAD17 Leu546Arg (rs1045051), a missense single nucleotide polymorphism, with the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in relation to smoking and alcohol consumption history in 154 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma male patients and 695 cancer-free male controls by a case-control study conducted in Japan. The results showed that the hRAD17 Arg/Arg genotype compared to the Leu/Leu and Leu/Arg genotypes was significantly associated with the risk of the esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with an adjusted odds ratios of 2.22 (95% CI: 1.19-4.16 P=0.013). In stratified studies, the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma was markedly higher in light drinkers (less than 23 g ethanol/day) with the Arg/Arg genotype than in heavy drinkers (excess of 23 g ethanol/day) with the Arg/Arg genotype (OR=2.83, 95% CI: 1.05-7.61, P=0.04). We concluded that the genetic variant of hRAD17 Leu546Arg polymorphism exerts a significant effect on esophageal squamous cell carcinoma risk among Japanese men. PMID:27186329

  14. Genetic polymorphism at codon 546 of the human RAD17 contributes to the risk for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Yukiko; Sakai, Akiko; Ito, Sachio; Mita, Yuichiro; Sonoyama, Takayuki; Tanabe, Shunsuke; Shirakawa, Yasuhiro; Naomoto, Yoshio; Katayama, Hiroshi; Shimizu, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Human RAD17, a human homolog of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe cell cycle checkpoint gene RAD17, plays a significant role in activating checkpoint signals in response to DNA damage. We evaluated the association of hRAD17 Leu546Arg (rs1045051), a missense single nucleotide polymorphism, with the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in relation to smoking and alcohol consumption history in 154 esophageal squamous cell carcinoma male patients and 695 cancer-free male controls by a case-control study conducted in Japan. The results showed that the hRAD17 Arg/Arg genotype compared to the Leu/Leu and Leu/Arg genotypes was significantly associated with the risk of the esophageal squamous cell carcinoma with an adjusted odds ratios of 2.22 (95% CI: 1.19-4.16 P=0.013). In stratified studies, the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma was markedly higher in light drinkers (less than 23 g ethanol/day) with the Arg/Arg genotype than in heavy drinkers (excess of 23 g ethanol/day) with the Arg/Arg genotype (OR=2.83, 95% CI: 1.05-7.61, P=0.04). We concluded that the genetic variant of hRAD17 Leu546Arg polymorphism exerts a significant effect on esophageal squamous cell carcinoma risk among Japanese men. PMID:27186329

  15. The KYxxL motif in Rad17 protein is essential for the interaction with the 9-1-1 complex.

    PubMed

    Fukumoto, Yasunori; Ikeuchi, Masayoshi; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2016-09-01

    ATR-dependent DNA damage checkpoint is the major DNA damage checkpoint against UV irradiation and DNA replication stress. The Rad17-RFC and Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complexes interact with each other to contribute to ATR signaling, however, the precise regulatory mechanism of the interaction has not been established. Here, we identified a conserved sequence motif, KYxxL, in the AAA+ domain of Rad17 protein, and demonstrated that this motif is essential for the interaction with the 9-1-1 complex. We also show that UV-induced Rad17 phosphorylation is increased in the Rad17 KYxxL mutants. These data indicate that the interaction with the 9-1-1 complex is not required for Rad17 protein to be an efficient substrate for the UV-induced phosphorylation. Our data also raise the possibility that the 9-1-1 complex plays a negative regulatory role in the Rad17 phosphorylation. We also show that the nucleotide-binding activity of Rad17 is required for its nuclear localization. PMID:27387238

  16. Gain of function mutant p53 proteins cooperate with E2F4 to transcriptionally downregulate RAD17 and BRCA1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Fabio; Ganci, Federica; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Sacconi, Andrea; Strano, Sabrina; Blandino, Giovanni; Di Agostino, Silvia

    2015-03-20

    Genomic instability (IN) is a common feature of many human cancers. The TP53 tumour suppressor gene is mutated in approximately half of human cancers. Here, we show that BRCA1 and RAD17 genes, whose derived proteins play a pivotal role in DNA damage repair, are transcriptional targets of gain-of-function mutant p53 proteins. Indeed, high levels of mutp53 protein facilitate DNA damage accumulation and severely impair BRCA1 and RAD17 expression in proliferating cancer cells. The recruitment of mutp53/E2F4 complex onto specific regions of BRCA1 and RAD17 promoters leads to the inhibition of their expression. BRCA1 and RAD17 mRNA expression is reduced in HNSCC patients carrying TP53 mutations when compared to those bearing wt-p53 gene. Furthermore, the analysis of gene expression databases for breast cancer patients reveals that low expression of DNA repair genes correlates significantly with reduced relapse free survival of patients carrying TP53 gene mutations. Collectively, these findings highlight the direct involvement of transcriptionally active gain of function mutant p53 proteins in genomic instability through the impairment of DNA repair mechanisms.

  17. Sae2 promotes DNA damage resistance by removing the Mre11–Rad50–Xrs2 complex from DNA and attenuating Rad53 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Huan; Donnianni, Roberto A.; Handa, Naofumi; Deng, Sarah K.; Oh, Julyun; Timashev, Leonid A.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.; Symington, Lorraine S.

    2015-01-01

    The Mre11–Rad50–Xrs2/NBS1 (MRX/N) nuclease/ATPase complex plays structural and catalytic roles in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and is the DNA damage sensor for Tel1/ATM kinase activation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sae2 can function with MRX to initiate 5′-3′ end resection and also plays an important role in attenuation of DNA damage signaling. Here we describe a class of mre11 alleles that suppresses the DNA damage sensitivity of sae2Δ cells by accelerating turnover of Mre11 at DNA ends, shutting off the DNA damage checkpoint and allowing cell cycle progression. The mre11 alleles do not suppress the end resection or hairpin-opening defects of the sae2Δ mutant, indicating that these functions of Sae2 are not responsible for DNA damage resistance. The purified MP110LRX complex shows reduced binding to single- and double-stranded DNA in vitro relative to wild-type MRX, consistent with the increased turnover of Mre11 from damaged sites in vivo. Furthermore, overproduction of Mre11 causes DNA damage sensitivity only in the absence of Sae2. Together, these data suggest that it is the failure to remove Mre11 from DNA ends and attenuate Rad53 kinase signaling that causes hypersensitivity of sae2Δ cells to clastogens. PMID:25831494

  18. Phosphorylation-dependent inhibition of Cdc42 GEF Gef1 by 14-3-3 protein Rad24 spatially regulates Cdc42 GTPase activity and oscillatory dynamics during cell morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Maitreyi; Nuñez, Illyce; Rodriguez, Marbelys; Wiley, David J.; Rodriguez, Juan; Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R.; Buchwald, Peter; Verde, Fulvia

    2015-01-01

    Active Cdc42 GTPase, a key regulator of cell polarity, displays oscillatory dynamics that are anticorrelated at the two cell tips in fission yeast. Anticorrelation suggests competition for active Cdc42 or for its effectors. Here we show how 14-3-3 protein Rad24 associates with Cdc42 guanine exchange factor (GEF) Gef1, limiting Gef1 availability to promote Cdc42 activation. Phosphorylation of Gef1 by conserved NDR kinase Orb6 promotes Gef1 binding to Rad24. Loss of Rad24–Gef1 interaction increases Gef1 protein localization and Cdc42 activation at the cell tips and reduces the anticorrelation of active Cdc42 oscillations. Increased Cdc42 activation promotes precocious bipolar growth activation, bypassing the normal requirement for an intact microtubule cytoskeleton and for microtubule-dependent polarity landmark Tea4-PP1. Further, increased Cdc42 activation by Gef1 widens cell diameter and alters tip curvature, countering the effects of Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein Rga4. The respective levels of Gef1 and Rga4 proteins at the membrane define dynamically the growing area at each cell tip. Our findings show how the 14-3-3 protein Rad24 modulates the availability of Cdc42 GEF Gef1, a homologue of mammalian Cdc42 GEF DNMBP/TUBA, to spatially control Cdc42 GTPase activity and promote cell polarization and cell shape emergence. PMID:26246599

  19. Rad53 homologue forkhead-associated kinase A (FhkA) and Ca2+-binding protein 4a (CBP4a) are nucleolar proteins that differentially redistribute during mitosis in Dictyostelium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During mitosis most nucleolar proteins redistribute to other locales providing an opportunity to study the relationship between nucleolar protein localization and function. Dictyostelium is a model organism for the study of several fundamental biological processes and human diseases but only two nucleolar proteins have been studied during mitosis: NumA1 and Snf12. Both of them are linked to the cell cycle. To acquire a better understanding of nucleolar protein localization and dynamics in Dictyostelium we studied the nucleolar localization of two additional proteins during mitosis: Snf12-linked forkhead-associated kinase A (FhkA), which is involved in the cell cycle, and Ca2+-binding protein 4a (CBP4a), which is a binding partner of NumA1. Methods Polyclonal antibodies were produced in-house. Cells were fixed and probed with either anti-FhkA or anti-CBP4a in order to determine cellular localization during interphase and throughout the stages of mitosis. Colocalization with DAPI nuclear stain allowed us to determine the location of the nucleus and nucleolus while colocalization with anti-α-tubulin allowed us to determine the cell cycle stage. Results Here we verify two novel nucleolar proteins, Rad53 homologue FhkA which localized around the edge of the nucleolus and CBP4a which was detected throughout the entire nucleolus. Treatment with the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA (5 mM) showed that the nucleolar localization of CBP4a is Ca2+-dependent. In response to actinomycin D (0.05 mg/mL) CBP4a disappeared from the nucleolus while FhkA protruded from the nucleus, eventually pinching off as cytoplasmic circles. FhkA and CBP4a redistributed differently during mitosis. FhkA redistributed throughout the entire cell and at the nuclear envelope region from prometaphase through telophase. In contrast, during prometaphase CBP4a relocated to many large, discrete “CBP4a islands” throughout the nucleoplasm. Two larger “CBP4a islands” were also detected specifically

  20. Nitrosative stress induces a novel intra-S checkpoint pathway in Schizosaccharomyces pombe involving phosphorylation of Cdc2 by Wee1.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Pranjal; Kar, Puranjoy; Ghosh, Sanjay

    2015-09-01

    Excess production of nitric oxide and reactive nitrogen intermediates causes nitrosative stress on cells. Schizosaccharomyces pombe was used as a model to study the cell cycle regulation under nitrosative stress response. We discovered a novel intra-S-phase checkpoint that is activated in S. pombe under nitrosative stress. The mechanism for this intra-S-phase checkpoint activation is distinctly different than previously reported for genotoxic stress in S. pombe by methyl methane sulfonate. Our flow cytometry data established the fact that Wee1 phosphorylates Cdc2 Tyr15 which leads to replication slowdown in the fission yeast under nitrosative stress. We checked the roles of Rad3, Rad17, Rad26, Swi1, Swi3, Cds1, and Chk1 under nitrosative stress but those were not involved in the activation of the DNA replication checkpoint. Rad24 was found to be involved in intra-S-phase checkpoint activation in S. pombe under nitrosative stress but that was independent of Cdc25.

  1. The mechanism of nucleotide excision repair-mediated UV-induced mutagenesis in nonproliferating cells.

    PubMed

    Kozmin, Stanislav G; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-03-01

    Following the irradiation of nondividing yeast cells with ultraviolet (UV) light, most induced mutations are inherited by both daughter cells, indicating that complementary changes are introduced into both strands of duplex DNA prior to replication. Early analyses demonstrated that such two-strand mutations depend on functional nucleotide excision repair (NER), but the molecular mechanism of this unique type of mutagenesis has not been further explored. In the experiments reported here, an ade2 adeX colony-color system was used to examine the genetic control of UV-induced mutagenesis in nondividing cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We confirmed a strong suppression of two-strand mutagenesis in NER-deficient backgrounds and demonstrated that neither mismatch repair nor interstrand crosslink repair affects the production of these mutations. By contrast, proteins involved in the error-prone bypass of DNA damage (Rev3, Rev1, PCNA, Rad18, Pol32, and Rad5) and in the early steps of the DNA-damage checkpoint response (Rad17, Mec3, Ddc1, Mec1, and Rad9) were required for the production of two-strand mutations. There was no involvement, however, for the Pol η translesion synthesis DNA polymerase, the Mms2-Ubc13 postreplication repair complex, downstream DNA-damage checkpoint factors (Rad53, Chk1, and Dun1), or the Exo1 exonuclease. Our data support models in which UV-induced mutagenesis in nondividing cells occurs during the Pol ζ-dependent filling of lesion-containing, NER-generated gaps. The requirement for specific DNA-damage checkpoint proteins suggests roles in recruiting and/or activating factors required to fill such gaps.

  2. Phosphorylation of Sae2 Mediates Forkhead-associated (FHA) Domain-specific Interaction and Regulates Its DNA Repair Function.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jason; Suhandynata, Raymond T; Zhou, Huilin

    2015-04-24

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sae2 and its ortholog CtIP in higher eukaryotes have a conserved role in the initial processing of DNA lesions and influencing their subsequent repair pathways. Sae2 is phosphorylated by the ATR/ATM family kinases Mec1 and Tel1 in response to DNA damage. Among the Mec1/Tel1 consensus phosphorylation sites of Sae2, we found that mutations of Thr-90 and Thr-279 of Sae2 into alanine caused a persistent Rad53 activation in response to a transient DNA damage, similar to the loss of Sae2. To gain insight into the function of this phosphorylation of Sae2, we performed a quantitative proteomics analysis to identify its associated proteins. We found that phosphorylation of Thr-90 of Sae2 mediates its interaction with Rad53, Dun1, Xrs2, Dma1, and Dma2, whereas Rad53 and Dun1 additionally interact with phosphorylated Thr-279 of Sae2. Mutations of the ligand-binding residues of Forkhead-associated (FHA) domains of Rad53, Dun1, Xrs2, Dma1, and Dma2 abolished their interactions with Sae2, revealing the involvement of FHA-specific interactions. Mutations of Thr-90 and Thr-279 of Sae2 caused a synergistic defect when combined with sgs1Δ and exo1Δ and elevated gross chromosomal rearrangements. Likewise, mutations of RAD53 and DUN1 caused a synthetic growth defect with sgs1Δ and elevated gross chromosomal rearrangements. These findings suggest that threonine-specific phosphorylation of Sae2 by Mec1 and Tel1 contributes to DNA repair and genome maintenance via its interactions with Rad53 and Dun1.

  3. Crosstalk between mitochondrial stress signals regulates yeast chronological lifespan.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Elizabeth A; Shadel, Gerald S

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) exists in multiple copies per cell and is essential for oxidative phosphorylation. Depleted or mutated mtDNA promotes numerous human diseases and may contribute to aging. Reduced TORC1 signaling in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, extends chronological lifespan (CLS) in part by generating a mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) signal that epigenetically alters nuclear gene expression. To address the potential requirement for mtDNA maintenance in this response, we analyzed strains lacking the mitochondrial base-excision repair enzyme Ntg1p. Extension of CLS by mtROS signaling and reduced TORC1 activity, but not caloric restriction, was abrogated in ntg1Δ strains that exhibited mtDNA depletion without defects in respiration. The DNA damage response (DDR) kinase Rad53p, which transduces pro-longevity mtROS signals, is also activated in ntg1Δ strains. Restoring mtDNA copy number alleviated Rad53p activation and re-established CLS extension following mtROS signaling, indicating that Rad53p senses mtDNA depletion directly. Finally, DDR kinases regulate nucleus-mitochondria localization dynamics of Ntg1p. From these results, we conclude that the DDR pathway senses and may regulate Ntg1p-dependent mtDNA stability. Furthermore, Rad53p senses multiple mitochondrial stresses in a hierarchical manner to elicit specific physiological outcomes, exemplified by mtDNA depletion overriding the ability of Rad53p to transduce an adaptive mtROS longevity signal.

  4. Crosstalk between mitochondrial stress signals regulates yeast chronological lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Elizabeth A.; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) exists in multiple copies per cell and is essential for oxidative phosphorylation. Depleted or mutated mtDNA promotes numerous human diseases and may contribute to aging. Reduced TORC1 signaling in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, extends chronological lifespan (CLS) in part by generating a mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) signal that epigenetically alters nuclear gene expression. To address the potential requirement for mtDNA maintenance in this response, we analyzed strains lacking the mitochondrial base-excision repair enzyme Ntg1p. Extension of CLS by mtROS signaling and reduced TORC1 activity, but not caloric restriction, was abrogated in ntg1Δ strains that exhibited mtDNA depletion without defects in respiration. The DNA damage response (DDR) kinase Rad53p, which transduces pro-longevity mtROS signals, is also activated in ntg1Δ strains. Restoring mtDNA copy number alleviated Rad53p activation and re-established CLS extension mtROS-mediated longevity signaling, indicating that Rad53p senses mtDNA depletion directly. Finally, DDR kinases regulate nucleus-mitochondria localization dynamics of Ntg1p. From these results, we conclude that the DDR pathway senses mtDNA instability and regulates Ntg1p in response. Furthermore, Rad53p senses multiple mitochondrial stresses in a hierarchical manner to elicit specific physiological outcomes, exemplified by mtDNA depletion overriding the ability of Rad53p to transduce an adaptive mtROS longevity signal. PMID:24373996

  5. Mcm2-7 Is an Active Player in the DNA Replication Checkpoint Signaling Cascade via Proposed Modulation of Its DNA Gate

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Feng-Ling; Vijayraghavan, Sriram; Prinz, Joseph; MacAlpine, Heather K.; MacAlpine, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA replication checkpoint (DRC) monitors and responds to stalled replication forks to prevent genomic instability. How core replication factors integrate into this phosphorylation cascade is incompletely understood. Here, through analysis of a unique mcm allele targeting a specific ATPase active site (mcm2DENQ), we show that the Mcm2-7 replicative helicase has a novel DRC function as part of the signal transduction cascade. This allele exhibits normal downstream mediator (Mrc1) phosphorylation, implying DRC sensor kinase activation. However, the mutant also exhibits defective effector kinase (Rad53) activation and classic DRC phenotypes. Our previous in vitro analysis showed that the mcm2DENQ mutation prevents a specific conformational change in the Mcm2-7 hexamer. We infer that this conformational change is required for its DRC role and propose that it allosterically facilitates Rad53 activation to ensure a replication-specific checkpoint response. PMID:25870112

  6. The yeast copper response is regulated by DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Dong, Kangzhen; Addinall, Stephen G; Lydall, David; Rutherford, Julian C

    2013-10-01

    Copper is an essential but potentially toxic redox-active metal, so the levels and distribution of this metal are carefully regulated to ensure that it binds to the correct proteins. Previous studies of copper-dependent transcription in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have focused on the response of genes to changes in the exogenous levels of copper. We now report that yeast copper genes are regulated in response to the DNA-damaging agents methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and hydroxyurea by a mechanism(s) that requires the copper-responsive transcription factors Mac1 and AceI, copper superoxide dismutase (Sod1) activity, and the Rad53 checkpoint kinase. Furthermore, in copper-starved yeast, the response of the Rad53 pathway to MMS is compromised due to a loss of Sod1 activity, consistent with the model that yeast imports copper to ensure Sod1 activity and Rad53 signaling. Crucially, the Mac1 transcription factor undergoes changes in its redox state in response to changing levels of copper or MMS. This study has therefore identified a novel regulatory relationship between cellular redox, copper homeostasis, and the DNA damage response in yeast.

  7. The Yeast Copper Response Is Regulated by DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Kangzhen; Addinall, Stephen G.; Lydall, David

    2013-01-01

    Copper is an essential but potentially toxic redox-active metal, so the levels and distribution of this metal are carefully regulated to ensure that it binds to the correct proteins. Previous studies of copper-dependent transcription in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have focused on the response of genes to changes in the exogenous levels of copper. We now report that yeast copper genes are regulated in response to the DNA-damaging agents methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and hydroxyurea by a mechanism(s) that requires the copper-responsive transcription factors Mac1 and AceI, copper superoxide dismutase (Sod1) activity, and the Rad53 checkpoint kinase. Furthermore, in copper-starved yeast, the response of the Rad53 pathway to MMS is compromised due to a loss of Sod1 activity, consistent with the model that yeast imports copper to ensure Sod1 activity and Rad53 signaling. Crucially, the Mac1 transcription factor undergoes changes in its redox state in response to changing levels of copper or MMS. This study has therefore identified a novel regulatory relationship between cellular redox, copper homeostasis, and the DNA damage response in yeast. PMID:23959798

  8. Dmc1 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe plays a role in meiotic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Kentaro; Tanaka, Yoshimi; Nabeshima, Kentaro; Yoneki, Takahiro; Tougan, Takahiro; Tanaka, Seiji; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    We report here a Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene (dmc1+) that resembles budding yeast DMC1 in the region immediately upstream of the rad24+ gene. We showed by northern and Southern blot analysis that dmc1+ and rad24+ are co-transcribed as a bicistronic mRNA of 2.8 kb with meiotic specificity, whereas rad24+ itself is constitutively transcribed as a 1.0-kb mRNA species during meiosis. Induction of the bicistronic transcript is under the control of a meiosis-specific transcription factor, Ste11. Disruption of both dmc1+ and rad24+ had no effect on mitosis or spore formation, and dmc1Δ cells displayed no change in sensitivity to UV or γ irradiation relative to the wild type. Tetrad analysis indicated that Dmc1 is involved in meiotic recombination. Analysis of gene conversion frequencies using single and double mutants of dmc1 and rhp51 indicated that both Dmc1 and Rhp51 function in meiotic gene conversion. These observations, together with a high level of sequence identity, indicate that the dmc1+ gene of S.pombe is a structural homolog of budding yeast DMC1, sharing both similar and distinct functions in meiosis. PMID:10908327

  9. Dmc1 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe plays a role in meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, K; Tanaka, Y; Nabeshima, K; Yoneki, T; Tougan, T; Tanaka, S; Nojima, H

    2000-07-15

    We report here a Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene (dmc1(+)) that resembles budding yeast DMC1 in the region immediately upstream of the rad24(+) gene. We showed by northern and Southern blot analysis that dmc1(+) and rad24(+) are co-transcribed as a bicistronic mRNA of 2.8 kb with meiotic specificity, whereas rad24(+) itself is constitutively transcribed as a 1.0-kb mRNA species during meiosis. Induction of the bicistronic transcript is under the control of a meiosis-specific transcription factor, Ste11. Disruption of both dmc1(+) and rad24(+) had no effect on mitosis or spore formation, and dmc1Delta cells displayed no change in sensitivity to UV or gamma irradiation relative to the wild type. Tetrad analysis indicated that Dmc1 is involved in meiotic recombination. Analysis of gene conversion frequencies using single and double mutants of dmc1 and rhp51 indicated that both Dmc1 and Rhp51 function in meiotic gene conversion. These observations, together with a high level of sequence identity, indicate that the dmc1(+) gene of S. POMBE: is a structural homolog of budding yeast DMC1, sharing both similar and distinct functions in meiosis. PMID:10908327

  10. Telomere binding of checkpoint sensor and DNA repair proteins contributes to maintenance of functional fission yeast telomeres.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Toru M; Moser, Bettina A; Russell, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Telomeres, the ends of linear chromosomes, are DNA double-strand ends that do not trigger a cell cycle arrest and yet require checkpoint and DNA repair proteins for maintenance. Genetic and biochemical studies in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe were undertaken to understand how checkpoint and DNA repair proteins contribute to telomere maintenance. On the basis of telomere lengths of mutant combinations of various checkpoint-related proteins (Rad1, Rad3, Rad9, Rad17, Rad26, Hus1, Crb2, Chk1, Cds1), Tel1, a telomere-binding protein (Taz1), and DNA repair proteins (Ku70, Rad32), we conclude that Rad3/Rad26 and Tel1/Rad32 represent two pathways required to maintain telomeres and prevent chromosome circularization. Rad1/Rad9/Hus1/Rad17 and Ku70 are two additional epistasis groups, which act in the Rad3/Rad26 pathway. However, Rad3/Rad26 must have additional target(s), as cells lacking Tel1/Rad32, Rad1/Rad9/Hus1/Rad17, and Ku70 groups did not circularize chromosomes. Cells lacking Rad3/Rad26 and Tel1/Rad32 senesced faster than a telomerase trt1Delta mutant, suggesting that these pathways may contribute to telomere protection. Deletion of taz1 did not suppress chromosome circularization in cells lacking Rad3/Rad26 and Tel1/Rad32, also suggesting that two pathways protect telomeres. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses found that Rad3, Rad1, Rad9, Hus1, Rad17, Rad32, and Ku70 associate with telomeres. Thus, checkpoint sensor and DNA repair proteins contribute to telomere maintenance and protection through their association with telomeres. PMID:12196391

  11. Molecular anatomy and regulation of a stable replisome at a paused eukaryotic DNA replication fork.

    PubMed

    Calzada, Arturo; Hodgson, Ben; Kanemaki, Masato; Bueno, Avelino; Labib, Karim

    2005-08-15

    Eukaryotic cells regulate the progression and integrity of DNA replication forks to maintain genomic stability and couple DNA synthesis to other processes. The budding yeast proteins Mrc1 and Tof1 associate with the putative MCM-Cdc45 helicase and limit progression of the replisome when nucleotides are depleted, and the checkpoint kinases Mec1 and Rad53 stabilize such stalled forks and prevent disassembly of the replisome. Forks also pause transiently during unperturbed chromosome replication, at sites where nonnucleosomal proteins bind DNA tightly. We describe a method for inducing prolonged pausing of forks at protein barriers assembled at unique sites on a yeast chromosome, allowing us to examine for the first time the effects of pausing upon replisome integrity. We show that paused forks maintain an intact replisome that contains Mrc1, Tof1, MCM-Cdc45, GINS, and DNA polymerases alpha and epsilon and that recruits the Rrm3 helicase. Surprisingly, pausing does not require Mrc1, although Tof1 and Csm3 are both important. In addition, the integrity of the paused forks does not require Mec1, Rad53, or recombination. We also show that paused forks at analogous barriers in the rDNA are regulated similarly. These data indicate that paused and stalled eukaryotic replisomes resemble each other but are regulated differently.

  12. Phosphopeptide binding by Sld3 links Dbf4-dependent kinase to MCM replicative helicase activation.

    PubMed

    Deegan, Tom D; Yeeles, Joseph Tp; Diffley, John Fx

    2016-05-01

    The initiation of eukaryotic DNA replication requires the assembly of active CMG (Cdc45-MCM-GINS) helicases at replication origins by a set of conserved and essential firing factors. This process is controlled during the cell cycle by cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) and Dbf4-dependent kinase (DDK), and in response to DNA damage by the checkpoint kinase Rad53/Chk1. Here we show that Sld3, previously shown to be an essential CDK and Rad53 substrate, is recruited to the inactive MCM double hexamer in a DDK-dependent manner. Sld3 binds specifically to DDK-phosphorylated peptides from two MCM subunits (Mcm4, 6) and then recruits Cdc45. MCM mutants that cannot bind Sld3 or Sld3 mutants that cannot bind phospho-MCM or Cdc45 do not support replication. Moreover, phosphomimicking mutants in Mcm4 and Mcm6 bind Sld3 without DDK and facilitate DDK-independent replication. Thus, Sld3 is an essential "reader" of DDK phosphorylation, integrating signals from three distinct protein kinase pathways to coordinate DNA replication during S phase. PMID:26912723

  13. Differential repair of UV damage in rad mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a possible function of G2 arrest upon UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Terleth, C; Schenk, P; Poot, R; Brouwer, J; van de Putte, P

    1990-09-01

    After UV irradiation, the transcriptionally active MAT alpha locus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is preferentially repaired compared with the inactive HML alpha locus. The effect of rad mutations from three different epistasis groups on differential repair was investigated. Three mutants, rad9, rad16, and rad24, were impaired in the removal of UV dimers from the inactive HML alpha locus, whereas they had generally normal repair of the active MAT alpha locus. Since RAD9 is necessary for G2 arrest after UV irradiation, we propose that the G2 stage plays a role in making the dimers accessible for repair, at least in the repressed HML alpha locus.

  14. The DNA replication and damage checkpoint pathways induce transcription by inhibition of the Crt1 repressor.

    PubMed

    Huang, M; Zhou, Z; Elledge, S J

    1998-09-01

    We have identified the yeast CRT1 gene as an effector of the DNA damage and replication checkpoint pathway. CRT1 encodes a DNA-binding protein that recruits the general repressors Ssn6 and Tup1 to the promoters of damage-inducible genes. Derepression of the Crt1 regulon suppresses the lethality of mec1 and rad53 null alleles and is essential for cell viability during replicative stress. In response to DNA damage and replication blocks, Crt1 becomes hyperphosphorylated and no longer binds DNA, resulting in transcriptional induction. CRT1 is autoregulated and is itself induced by DNA damage, indicating the existence of a negative feedback pathway that facilitates return to the repressed state after elimination of damage. The inhibition of an autoregulatory repressor in response to DNA damage is a strategy conserved throughout prokaryotic and eukaryotic evolution.

  15. Epigenetic Silencing Mediates Mitochondria Stress-induced Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Elizabeth A.; Raimundo, Nuno; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play complex roles in aging, having both damaging effects and signaling functions. Transiently elevating mitochondrial stress, including mitochondrial ROS (mtROS), elicits beneficial responses that extend lifespan. However, these adaptive, longevity-signaling pathways remain poorly understood. We show here that Tel1p and Rad53p, homologs of the mammalian DNA-damage-response kinases ATM and Chk2, mediate a hormetic mtROS longevity signal that extends yeast chronological lifespan. This pathway senses mtROS in a manner distinct from the nuclear DNA-damage response and ultimately imparts longevity by inactivating the histone demethylase Rph1p specifically at subtelomeric heterochromatin, enhancing binding of the silencing protein Sir3p, and repressing subtelomeric transcription. These results demonstrate the existence of conserved mitochondria-to-nucleus stress-signaling pathways that regulate aging through epigenetic modulation of nuclear gene expression. PMID:23747251

  16. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Diffraction Analysis of motif N from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dbf4

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, L.; Duong, A; Prasad, A; Duncker, B; Guarne, A

    2009-01-01

    The Cdc7-Dbf4 complex plays an instrumental role in the initiation of DNA replication and is a target of replication-checkpoint responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cdc7 is a conserved serine/threonine kinase whose activity depends on association with its regulatory subunit, Dbf4. A conserved sequence near the N-terminus of Dbf4 (motif N) is necessary for the interaction of Cdc7-Dbf4 with the checkpoint kinase Rad53. To understand the role of the Cdc7-Dbf4 complex in checkpoint responses, a fragment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dbf4 encompassing motif N was isolated, overproduced and crystallized. A complete native data set was collected at 100 K from crystals that diffracted X-rays to 2.75 {angstrom} resolution and structure determination is currently under way.

  17. Analysis of ssDNA Gaps and DSBs in Genetically Unstable Yeast Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jie; Raghuraman, M.K.; Feng, Wenyi

    2015-01-01

    DNA replication defects are an underlying cause of genome instability, which could stem from alterations in replication intermediates such as extensive single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Under replication stress, ssDNA is a precursor of the ultimate double-strand breaks (DSBs). Indeed, mutations that render the cell incapable of mediating and protecting the replication forks produce ssDNA genome-wide at high frequency and cause lethality when encountering DNA damage or replication perturbation. Here we describe two related microarray-based methods to query genetically unstable yeast cultures, such as the mec1 and rad53 mutants. These mutants are defective in central protein kinases in the checkpoint pathway. To induce ssDNA and DSB formation in these mutants, we utilize hydroxyurea, a drug that causes nucleotide shortage in the cell. PMID:24906332

  18. Replication Factor C3 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a Small Subunit of Replication Factor C Complex, Plays a Role in Both Replication and Damage Checkpoints

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Midori; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Tanaka, Seiji; Tougan, Takahiro; Tamai, Katsuyuki K.; Shimoda, Chikashi; Nojima, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    We report here the isolation and functional analysis of the rfc3+ gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which encodes the third subunit of replication factor C (RFC3). Because the rfc3+ gene was essential for growth, we isolated temperature-sensitive mutants. One of the mutants, rfc3-1, showed aberrant mitosis with fragmented or unevenly separated chromosomes at the restrictive temperature. In this mutant protein, arginine 216 was replaced by tryptophan. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis suggested that rfc3-1 cells had defects in DNA replication. rfc3-1 cells were sensitive to hydroxyurea, methanesulfonate (MMS), and gamma and UV irradiation even at the permissive temperature, and the viabilities after these treatments were decreased. Using cells synchronized in early G2 by centrifugal elutriation, we found that the replication checkpoint triggered by hydroxyurea and the DNA damage checkpoint caused by MMS and gamma irradiation were impaired in rfc3-1 cells. Association of Rfc3 and Rad17 in vivo and a significant reduction of the phosphorylated form of Chk1 in rfc3-1 cells after treatments with MMS and gamma or UV irradiation suggested that the checkpoint signal emitted by Rfc3 is linked to the downstream checkpoint machinery via Rad17 and Chk1. From these results, we conclude that rfc3+ is required not only for DNA replication but also for replication and damage checkpoint controls, probably functioning as a checkpoint sensor. PMID:10588638

  19. Replication factor C3 of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, a small subunit of replication factor C complex, plays a role in both replication and damage checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Shimada, M; Okuzaki, D; Tanaka, S; Tougan, T; Tamai, K K; Shimoda, C; Nojima, H

    1999-12-01

    We report here the isolation and functional analysis of the rfc3(+) gene of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which encodes the third subunit of replication factor C (RFC3). Because the rfc3(+) gene was essential for growth, we isolated temperature-sensitive mutants. One of the mutants, rfc3-1, showed aberrant mitosis with fragmented or unevenly separated chromosomes at the restrictive temperature. In this mutant protein, arginine 216 was replaced by tryptophan. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis suggested that rfc3-1 cells had defects in DNA replication. rfc3-1 cells were sensitive to hydroxyurea, methanesulfonate (MMS), and gamma and UV irradiation even at the permissive temperature, and the viabilities after these treatments were decreased. Using cells synchronized in early G2 by centrifugal elutriation, we found that the replication checkpoint triggered by hydroxyurea and the DNA damage checkpoint caused by MMS and gamma irradiation were impaired in rfc3-1 cells. Association of Rfc3 and Rad17 in vivo and a significant reduction of the phosphorylated form of Chk1 in rfc3-1 cells after treatments with MMS and gamma or UV irradiation suggested that the checkpoint signal emitted by Rfc3 is linked to the downstream checkpoint machinery via Rad17 and Chk1. From these results, we conclude that rfc3(+) is required not only for DNA replication but also for replication and damage checkpoint controls, probably functioning as a checkpoint sensor. PMID:10588638

  20. The DNA damage checkpoint pathway promotes extensive resection and nucleotide synthesis to facilitate homologous recombination repair and genome stability in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Blaikley, Elizabeth J; Tinline-Purvis, Helen; Kasparek, Torben R; Marguerat, Samuel; Sarkar, Sovan; Hulme, Lydia; Hussey, Sharon; Wee, Boon-Yu; Deegan, Rachel S; Walker, Carol A; Pai, Chen-Chun; Bähler, Jürg; Nakagawa, Takuro; Humphrey, Timothy C

    2014-05-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can cause chromosomal rearrangements and extensive loss of heterozygosity (LOH), hallmarks of cancer cells. Yet, how such events are normally suppressed is unclear. Here we identify roles for the DNA damage checkpoint pathway in facilitating homologous recombination (HR) repair and suppressing extensive LOH and chromosomal rearrangements in response to a DSB. Accordingly, deletion of Rad3(ATR), Rad26ATRIP, Crb2(53BP1) or Cdc25 overexpression leads to reduced HR and increased break-induced chromosome loss and rearrangements. We find the DNA damage checkpoint pathway facilitates HR, in part, by promoting break-induced Cdt2-dependent nucleotide synthesis. We also identify additional roles for Rad17, the 9-1-1 complex and Chk1 activation in facilitating break-induced extensive resection and chromosome loss, thereby suppressing extensive LOH. Loss of Rad17 or the 9-1-1 complex results in a striking increase in break-induced isochromosome formation and very low levels of chromosome loss, suggesting the 9-1-1 complex acts as a nuclease processivity factor to facilitate extensive resection. Further, our data suggest redundant roles for Rad3ATR and Exo1 in facilitating extensive resection. We propose that the DNA damage checkpoint pathway coordinates resection and nucleotide synthesis, thereby promoting efficient HR repair and genome stability.

  1. The DNA damage checkpoint pathway promotes extensive resection and nucleotide synthesis to facilitate homologous recombination repair and genome stability in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Blaikley, Elizabeth J.; Tinline-Purvis, Helen; Kasparek, Torben R.; Marguerat, Samuel; Sarkar, Sovan; Hulme, Lydia; Hussey, Sharon; Wee, Boon-Yu; Deegan, Rachel S.; Walker, Carol A.; Pai, Chen-Chun; Bähler, Jürg; Nakagawa, Takuro; Humphrey, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can cause chromosomal rearrangements and extensive loss of heterozygosity (LOH), hallmarks of cancer cells. Yet, how such events are normally suppressed is unclear. Here we identify roles for the DNA damage checkpoint pathway in facilitating homologous recombination (HR) repair and suppressing extensive LOH and chromosomal rearrangements in response to a DSB. Accordingly, deletion of Rad3ATR, Rad26ATRIP, Crb253BP1 or Cdc25 overexpression leads to reduced HR and increased break-induced chromosome loss and rearrangements. We find the DNA damage checkpoint pathway facilitates HR, in part, by promoting break-induced Cdt2-dependent nucleotide synthesis. We also identify additional roles for Rad17, the 9-1-1 complex and Chk1 activation in facilitating break-induced extensive resection and chromosome loss, thereby suppressing extensive LOH. Loss of Rad17 or the 9-1-1 complex results in a striking increase in break-induced isochromosome formation and very low levels of chromosome loss, suggesting the 9-1-1 complex acts as a nuclease processivity factor to facilitate extensive resection. Further, our data suggest redundant roles for Rad3ATR and Exo1 in facilitating extensive resection. We propose that the DNA damage checkpoint pathway coordinates resection and nucleotide synthesis, thereby promoting efficient HR repair and genome stability. PMID:24623809

  2. The DNA damage checkpoint pathway promotes extensive resection and nucleotide synthesis to facilitate homologous recombination repair and genome stability in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Blaikley, Elizabeth J; Tinline-Purvis, Helen; Kasparek, Torben R; Marguerat, Samuel; Sarkar, Sovan; Hulme, Lydia; Hussey, Sharon; Wee, Boon-Yu; Deegan, Rachel S; Walker, Carol A; Pai, Chen-Chun; Bähler, Jürg; Nakagawa, Takuro; Humphrey, Timothy C

    2014-05-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can cause chromosomal rearrangements and extensive loss of heterozygosity (LOH), hallmarks of cancer cells. Yet, how such events are normally suppressed is unclear. Here we identify roles for the DNA damage checkpoint pathway in facilitating homologous recombination (HR) repair and suppressing extensive LOH and chromosomal rearrangements in response to a DSB. Accordingly, deletion of Rad3(ATR), Rad26ATRIP, Crb2(53BP1) or Cdc25 overexpression leads to reduced HR and increased break-induced chromosome loss and rearrangements. We find the DNA damage checkpoint pathway facilitates HR, in part, by promoting break-induced Cdt2-dependent nucleotide synthesis. We also identify additional roles for Rad17, the 9-1-1 complex and Chk1 activation in facilitating break-induced extensive resection and chromosome loss, thereby suppressing extensive LOH. Loss of Rad17 or the 9-1-1 complex results in a striking increase in break-induced isochromosome formation and very low levels of chromosome loss, suggesting the 9-1-1 complex acts as a nuclease processivity factor to facilitate extensive resection. Further, our data suggest redundant roles for Rad3ATR and Exo1 in facilitating extensive resection. We propose that the DNA damage checkpoint pathway coordinates resection and nucleotide synthesis, thereby promoting efficient HR repair and genome stability. PMID:24623809

  3. A novel gene, msa1, inhibits sexual differentiation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hee Tae; Ozoe, Fumiyo; Tanaka, Katsunori; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi; Matsuda, Hideyuki; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2004-01-01

    Sexual differentiation in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe is triggered by nutrient starvation or by the presence of mating pheromones. We identified a novel gene, msa1, which encodes a 533-aa putative RNA-binding protein that inhibits sexual differentiation. Disruption of the msa1 gene caused cells to hypersporulate. Intracellular levels of msa1 RNA and Msa1 protein diminished after several hours of nitrogen starvation. Genetic analysis suggested that the function of msa1 is independent of the cAMP pathway and stress-responsive pathway. Deletion of the ras1 gene in diploid cells inhibited sporulation and in haploid cells decreased expression of mating-pheromone-induced genes such as mei2, mam2, ste11, and rep1; simultaneous deletion of msa1 reversed both phenotypes. Overexpression of msa1 decreased activated Ras1(Val17)-induced expression of mam2. Phenotypic hypersporulation was similar between cells with deletion of only rad24 and both msa1 and rad24, but simultaneous deletion of msa1 and msa2/nrd1 additively increased hypersporulation. Therefore, we suggest that the primary function of Msa1 is to negatively regulate sexual differentiation by controlling the expression of Ste11-regulated genes, possibly through the pheromone-signaling pathway. PMID:15166138

  4. Functional Identification of Tumor Suppressor Genes Through an in vivo RNA Interference Screen in a Mouse Lymphoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Bric, Anka; Miething, Cornelius; Bialucha, Carl Uli; Scuoppo, Claudio; Zender, Lars; Krasnitz, Alexander; Xuan, Zhenyu; Zuber, Johannes; Wigler, Michael; Hicks, James; McCombie, Richard W.; Hemann, Michael T.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Powers, Scott; Lowe, Scott W.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) capable of stably suppressing gene function by RNA interference (RNAi) can mimic tumor suppressor gene loss in mice. By selecting for shRNAs capable of accelerating lymphomagenesis in a well-characterized mouse lymphoma model, we identified over ten candidate tumor suppressors, including Sfrp1, Numb, Mek1, and Angiopoietin 2. Several components of the DNA damage response machinery were also identified, including Rad17, which acts as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor that responds to oncogenic stress and whose loss is associated with poor prognosis in human patients. Our results emphasize the utility of in vivo RNAi screens, identify and validate a diverse set of tumor suppressors, and have therapeutic implications. PMID:19800577

  5. Interaction of Ddc1 and RPA with single-stranded/double-stranded DNA junctions in yeast whole cell extracts: Proteolytic degradation of the large subunit of replication protein A in ddc1Δ strains.

    PubMed

    Sukhanova, Maria V; D'Herin, Claudine; Boiteux, Serge; Lavrik, Olga I

    2014-10-01

    To characterize proteins that interact with single-stranded/double-stranded (ss/ds) DNA junctions in whole cell free extracts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we used [(32)P]-labeled photoreactive partial DNA duplexes containing a 3'-ss/ds-junction (3'-junction) or a 5'-ss/ds-junction (5'-junction). Identification of labeled proteins was achieved by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry peptide mass fingerprinting and genetic analysis. In wild-type extract, one of the components of the Ddc1-Rad17-Mec3 complex, Ddc1, was found to be preferentially photocrosslinked at a 3'-junction. On the other hand, RPAp70, the large subunit of the replication protein A (RPA), was the predominant crosslinking product at a 5'-junction. Interestingly, ddc1Δ extracts did not display photocrosslinking of RPAp70 at a 5'-junction. The results show that RPAp70 crosslinked to DNA with a 5'-junction is subject to limited proteolysis in ddc1Δ extracts, whereas it is stable in WT, rad17Δ, mec3Δ and mec1Δ extracts. The degradation of the RPAp70-DNA adduct in ddc1Δ extract is strongly reduced in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG 132. We also addressed the question of the stability of free RPA, using anti-RPA antibodies. The results show that RPAp70 is also subject to proteolysis without photocrosslinking to DNA upon incubation in ddc1Δ extract. The data point to a novel property of Ddc1, modulating the turnover of DNA binding proteins such as RPAp70 by the proteasome.

  6. The yeast mitogen-activated protein kinase Slt2 is involved in the cellular response to genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The maintenance of genomic integrity is essential for cell viability. Complex signalling pathways (DNA integrity checkpoints) mediate the response to genotoxic stresses. Identifying new functions involved in the cellular response to DNA-damage is crucial. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SLT2 gene encodes a member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade whose main function is the maintenance of the cell wall integrity. However, different observations suggest that SLT2 may also have a role related to DNA metabolism. Results This work consisted in a comprehensive study to connect the Slt2 protein to genome integrity maintenance in response to genotoxic stresses. The slt2 mutant strain was hypersensitive to a variety of genotoxic treatments, including incubation with hydroxyurea (HU), methylmetanosulfonate (MMS), phleomycin or UV irradiation. Furthermore, Slt2 was activated by all these treatments, which suggests that Slt2 plays a central role in the cellular response to genotoxic stresses. Activation of Slt2 was not dependent on the DNA integrity checkpoint. For MMS and UV, Slt2 activation required progression through the cell cycle. In contrast, HU also activated Slt2 in nocodazol-arrested cells, which suggests that Slt2 may respond to dNTP pools alterations. However, neither the protein level of the distinct ribonucleotide reductase subunits nor the dNTP pools were affected in a slt2 mutant strain. An analysis of the checkpoint function revealed that Slt2 was not required for either cell cycle arrest or the activation of the Rad53 checkpoint kinase in response to DNA damage. However, slt2 mutant cells showed an elongated bud and partially impaired Swe1 degradation after replicative stress, indicating that Slt2 could contribute, in parallel with Rad53, to bud morphogenesis control after genotoxic stresses. Conclusions Slt2 is activated by several genotoxic treatments and is required to properly cope with DNA damage. Slt2 function is important

  7. Identifying and Characterizing Alternative Molecular Markers for the Symbiotic and Free-Living Dinoflagellate Genus Symbiodinium

    PubMed Central

    Pochon, Xavier; Putnam, Hollie M.; Burki, Fabien; Gates, Ruth D.

    2012-01-01

    Dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium are best known as endosymbionts of corals and other invertebrate as well as protist hosts, but also exist free-living in coastal environments. Despite their importance in marine ecosystems, less than 10 loci have been used to explore phylogenetic relationships in this group, and only the multi-copy nuclear ribosomal Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions 1 and 2 have been used to characterize fine-scale genetic diversity within the nine clades (A–I) that comprise the genus. Here, we describe a three-step molecular approach focused on 1) identifying new candidate genes for phylogenetic analysis of Symbiodinium spp., 2) characterizing the phylogenetic relationship of these candidate genes from DNA samples spanning eight Symbiodinium clades (A–H), and 3) conducting in-depth phylogenetic analyses of candidate genes displaying genetic divergences equal or higher than those within the ITS-2 of Symbiodinium clade C. To this end, we used bioinformatics tools and reciprocal comparisons to identify homologous genes from 55,551 cDNA sequences representing two Symbiodinium and six additional dinoflagellate EST libraries. Of the 84 candidate genes identified, 7 Symbiodinium genes (elf2, coI, coIII, cob, calmodulin, rad24, and actin) were characterized by sequencing 23 DNA samples spanning eight Symbiodinium clades (A–H). Four genes displaying higher rates of genetic divergences than ITS-2 within clade C were selected for in-depth phylogenetic analyses, which revealed that calmodulin has limited taxonomic utility but that coI, rad24, and actin behave predictably with respect to Symbiodinium lineage C and are potential candidates as new markers for this group. The approach for targeting candidate genes described here can serve as a model for future studies aimed at identifying and testing new phylogenetically informative genes for taxa where transcriptomic and genomics data are available. PMID:22238660

  8. DNA resection proteins Sgs1 and Exo1 are required for G1 checkpoint activation in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Balogun, Fiyinfolu O.; Truman, Andrew W.; Kron, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) in budding yeast trigger activation of DNA damage checkpoints, allowing repair to occur. Although resection is necessary for initiating damage-induced cell cycle arrest in G2, no role has been assigned to it in the activation of G1 checkpoint. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the resection proteins Sgs1 and Exo1 are required for efficient G1 checkpoint activation. We find in G1 arrested cells that histone H2A phosphorylation in response to ionizing radiation is independent of Sgs1 and Exo1. In contrast, these proteins are required for damage-induced recruitment of Rfa1 to the DSB sites, phosphorylation of the Rad53 effector kinase, cell cycle arrest and RNR3 expression. Checkpoint activation in G1 requires the catalytic activity of Sgs1, suggesting that it is DNA resection mediated by Sgs1 that stimulates the damage response pathway rather than protein-protein interactions with other DDR proteins. Together, these results implicate DNA resection, which is thought to be minimal in G1, as necessary for activation of the G1 checkpoint. PMID:23835406

  9. R loops are linked to histone H3 S10 phosphorylation and chromatin condensation.

    PubMed

    Castellano-Pozo, Maikel; Santos-Pereira, José M; Rondón, Ana G; Barroso, Sonia; Andújar, Eloisa; Pérez-Alegre, Mónica; García-Muse, Tatiana; Aguilera, Andrés

    2013-11-21

    R loops are transcription byproducts that constitute a threat to genome integrity. Here we show that R loops are tightly linked to histone H3 S10 phosphorylation (H3S10P), a mark of chromatin condensation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip (ChIP-chip) analyses reveal H3S10P accumulation at centromeres, pericentromeric chromatin, and a large number of active open reading frames (ORFs) in R-loop-accumulating yeast cells, better observed in G1. Histone H3S10 plays a key role in maintaining genome stability, as scored by ectopic recombination and plasmid loss, Rad52 foci, and Rad53 checkpoint activation. H3S10P coincides with the presence of DNA-RNA hybrids, is suppressed by ribonuclease H overexpression, and causes reduced accessibility of restriction endonucleases, implying a tight connection between R loops, H3S10P, and chromatin compaction. Such histone modifications were also observed in R-loop-accumulating Caenorhabditis elegans and HeLa cells. We therefore provide a role of RNA in chromatin structure essential to understand how R loops modulate genome dynamics. PMID:24211264

  10. Chromosome-wide histone deacetylation by sirtuins prevents hyperactivation of DNA damage-induced signaling upon replicative stress

    PubMed Central

    Simoneau, Antoine; Ricard, Étienne; Weber, Sandra; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Wong, Lai Hong; Sellam, Adnane; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Raymond, Martine; Wurtele, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes five sirtuins (Sir2 and Hst1–4), which constitute a conserved family of NAD-dependent histone deacetylases. Cells lacking any individual sirtuin display mild growth and gene silencing defects. However, hst3Δ hst4Δ double mutants are exquisitely sensitive to genotoxins, and hst3Δ hst4Δ sir2Δ mutants are inviable. Our published data also indicate that pharmacological inhibition of sirtuins prevents growth of several fungal pathogens, although the biological basis is unclear. Here, we present genome-wide fitness assays conducted with nicotinamide (NAM), a pan-sirtuin inhibitor. Our data indicate that NAM treatment causes yeast to solicit specific DNA damage response pathways for survival, and that NAM-induced growth defects are mainly attributable to inhibition of Hst3 and Hst4 and consequent elevation of histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56ac). Our results further reveal that in the presence of constitutive H3K56ac, the Slx4 scaffolding protein and PP4 phosphatase complex play essential roles in preventing hyperactivation of the DNA damage-response kinase Rad53 in response to spontaneous DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species. Overall, our data support the concept that chromosome-wide histone deacetylation by sirtuins is critical to mitigate growth defects caused by endogenous genotoxins. PMID:26748095

  11. Strand-specific analysis shows protein binding at replication forks and PCNA unloading from lagging strands when forks stall.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanhe; Gan, Haiyun; Han, Junhong; Zhou, Zhi-Xiong; Jia, Shaodong; Chabes, Andrei; Farrugia, Gianrico; Ordog, Tamas; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2014-11-20

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA replication proceeds with continuous synthesis of leading-strand DNA and discontinuous synthesis of lagging-strand DNA. Here we describe a method, eSPAN (enrichment and sequencing of protein-associated nascent DNA), which reveals the genome-wide association of proteins with leading and lagging strands of DNA replication forks. Using this approach in budding yeast, we confirm the strand specificities of DNA polymerases delta and epsilon and show that the PCNA clamp is enriched at lagging strands compared with leading-strand replication. Surprisingly, at stalled forks, PCNA is unloaded specifically from lagging strands. PCNA unloading depends on the Elg1-containing alternative RFC complex, ubiquitination of PCNA, and the checkpoint kinases Mec1 and Rad53. Cells deficient in PCNA unloading exhibit increased chromosome breaks. Our studies provide a tool for studying replication-related processes and reveal a mechanism whereby checkpoint kinases regulate strand-specific unloading of PCNA from stalled replication forks to maintain genome stability.

  12. The Mek1 phosphorylation cascade plays a role in meiotic recombination of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Tougan, Takahiro; Kasama, Takashi; Ohtaka, Ayami; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Saito, Takamune T; Russell, Paul; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2010-12-01

    Mek1 is a Chk2/Rad53/Cds1-related protein kinase that is required for proper meiotic progression of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. However, the molecular mechanisms of Mek1 regulation and Mek1 phosphorylation targets are unclear. Here, we report that Mek1 is phosphorylated at serine-12 (S12), S14 and threonine-15 (T15) by Rad3 (ATR) and/or Tel1 (ATM) kinases that are activated by meiotic programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs). Mutations of these sites by alanine replacement caused abnormal meiotic progression and recombination rates. Phosphorylation of these sites triggers autophosphorylation of Mek1; indeed, alanine replacement mutations of Mek1-T318 and -T322 residues in the activation loop of Mek1 reduced Mek1 kinase activity and meiotic recombination rates. Substrates of Mek1 include Mus81-T275, Rdh54-T6 and Rdh54-T673. Mus81-T275 is known to regulate the Mus81 function in DNA cleavage, whereas Rdh54-T6A/T673A mutant cells showed abnormal meiotic recombination. Taken together, we conclude that the phosphorylation of Mek1 by Rad3 or Tel1, Mek1 autophosphorylation and Mus81 or Rdh54 phosphorylation by Mek1 regulate meiotic progression in S. pombe. PMID:21084840

  13. The Mek1 phosphorylation cascade plays a role in meiotic recombination of Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Ohtaka, Ayami; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Saito, Takamune T; Russell, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Mek1 is a Chk2/Rad53/Cds1-related protein kinase that is required for proper meiotic progression of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. However, the molecular mechanisms of Mek1 regulation and Mek1 phosphorylation targets are unclear. Here, we report that Mek1 is phosphorylated at serine-12 (S12), S14 and threonine-15 (T15) by Rad3 (ATR) and/or Tel1 (ATM) kinases that are activated by meiotic programmed double-strand breaks (DSBs). Mutations of these sites by alanine replacement caused abnormal meiotic progression and recombination rates. Phosphorylation of these sites triggers autophosphorylation of Mek1; indeed, alanine replacement mutations of Mek1-T318 and -T322 residues in the activation loop of Mek1 reduced Mek1 kinase activity and meiotic recombination rates. Substrates of Mek1 include Mus81-T275, Rdh54-T6 and Rdh54-T673. Mus81-T275 is known to regulate the Mus81 function in DNA cleavage, whereas Rdh54-T6A/T673A mutant cells showed abnormal meiotic recombination. Taken together, we conclude that the phosphorylation of Mek1 by Rad3 or Tel1, Mek1 autophosphorylation and Mus81 or Rdh54 phosphorylation by Mek1 regulate meiotic progression in S. pombe. PMID:21084840

  14. A conserved Polϵ binding module in Ctf18-RFC is required for S-phase checkpoint activation downstream of Mec1.

    PubMed

    García-Rodríguez, Luis J; De Piccoli, Giacomo; Marchesi, Vanessa; Jones, Richard C; Edmondson, Ricky D; Labib, Karim

    2015-10-15

    Defects during chromosome replication in eukaryotes activate a signaling pathway called the S-phase checkpoint, which produces a multifaceted response that preserves genome integrity at stalled DNA replication forks. Work with budding yeast showed that the 'alternative clamp loader' known as Ctf18-RFC acts by an unknown mechanism to activate the checkpoint kinase Rad53, which then mediates much of the checkpoint response. Here we show that budding yeast Ctf18-RFC associates with DNA polymerase epsilon, via an evolutionarily conserved 'Pol ϵ binding module' in Ctf18-RFC that is produced by interaction of the carboxyl terminus of Ctf18 with the Ctf8 and Dcc1 subunits. Mutations at the end of Ctf18 disrupt the integrity of the Pol ϵ binding module and block the S-phase checkpoint pathway, downstream of the Mec1 kinase that is the budding yeast orthologue of mammalian ATR. Similar defects in checkpoint activation are produced by mutations that displace Pol ϵ from the replisome. These findings indicate that the association of Ctf18-RFC with Pol ϵ at defective replication forks is a key step in activation of the S-phase checkpoint. PMID:26250113

  15. Three Different Pathways Prevent Chromosome Segregation in the Presence of DNA Damage or Replication Stress in Budding Yeast.

    PubMed

    Palou, Gloria; Palou, Roger; Zeng, Fanli; Vashisht, Ajay A; Wohlschlegel, James A; Quintana, David G

    2015-09-01

    A surveillance mechanism, the S phase checkpoint, blocks progression into mitosis in response to DNA damage and replication stress. Segregation of damaged or incompletely replicated chromosomes results in genomic instability. In humans, the S phase checkpoint has been shown to constitute an anti-cancer barrier. Inhibition of mitotic cyclin dependent kinase (M-CDK) activity by Wee1 kinases is critical to block mitosis in some organisms. However, such mechanism is dispensable in the response to genotoxic stress in the model eukaryotic organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show here that the Wee1 ortholog Swe1 does indeed inhibit M-CDK activity and chromosome segregation in response to genotoxic insults. Swe1 dispensability in budding yeast is the result of a redundant control of M-CDK activity by the checkpoint kinase Rad53. In addition, our results indicate that Swe1 is an effector of the checkpoint central kinase Mec1. When checkpoint control on M-CDK and on Pds1/securin stabilization are abrogated, cells undergo aberrant chromosome segregation. PMID:26332045

  16. Replication in Hydroxyurea: It's a Matter of Time▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Alvino, Gina M.; Collingwood, David; Murphy, John M.; Delrow, Jeffrey; Brewer, Bonita J.; Raghuraman, M. K.

    2007-01-01

    Hydroxyurea (HU) is a DNA replication inhibitor that negatively affects both the elongation and initiation phases of replication and triggers the “intra-S phase checkpoint.” Previous work with budding yeast has shown that, during a short exposure to HU, MEC1/RAD53 prevent initiation at some late S phase origins. In this study, we have performed microarray experiments to follow the fate of all origins over an extended exposure to HU. We show that the genome-wide progression of DNA synthesis, including origin activation, follows the same pattern in the presence of HU as in its absence, although the time frames are very different. We find no evidence for a specific effect that excludes initiation from late origins. Rather, HU causes S phase to proceed in slow motion; all temporal classes of origins are affected, but the order in which they become active is maintained. We propose a revised model for the checkpoint response to HU that accounts for the continued but slowed pace of the temporal program of origin activation. PMID:17636020

  17. The protein factor-arrest 11 (Far11) is essential for the toxicity of human caspase-10 in yeast and participates in the regulation of autophagy and the DNA damage signaling.

    PubMed

    Lisa-Santamaría, Patricia; Jiménez, Alberto; Revuelta, José L

    2012-08-24

    The heterologous expression of human caspase-10 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae induces a lethal phenotype, which includes some hallmarks of apoptosis and autophagy, alterations in the intra-S checkpoint, and cell death. To determine the cellular processes and pathways that are responsible of the caspase-10-induced cell death we have designed a loss-of-function screening system to identify genes that are essential for the lethal phenotype. We observed that the ER-Golgi-localized family of proteins Far, MAPK signaling, the autophagy machinery, and several kinases and phosphatases are essential for caspase-10 toxicity. We also found that the expression of caspase-10 elicits a simultaneous activation of the MAP kinases Fus3, Kss1, and Slt2. Furthermore, the protein Far11, which is a target of MAP kinases, is essential for the dephosphorylation of Atg13 and, consequently, for the induction of autophagy. In addition, Far11 participates in the regulation of the DNA damage response through the dephosphorylation of Rad53. Finally, we have also demonstrated that Far11 is able to physically interact with the phosphatases Pph21, Pph22, and Pph3. Overall, our results indicate that the expression of human caspase-10 in S. cerevisiae activates an intracellular death signal that depends on the Far protein complex and that Far11 may function as a regulator subunit of phosphatases in different processes, thus representing a mechanistic link between them. PMID:22782902

  18. Protein phosphatases pph3, ptc2, and ptc3 play redundant roles in DNA double-strand break repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Ae; Hicks, Wade M; Li, Jin; Tay, Sue Yen; Haber, James E

    2011-02-01

    In response to a DNA double-strand break (DSB), cells undergo a transient cell cycle arrest prior to mitosis until the break is repaired. In budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), the DNA damage checkpoint is regulated by a signaling cascade of protein kinases, including Mec1 and Rad53. When DSB repair is complete, cells resume cell cycle progression (a process called "recovery") by turning off the checkpoint. Recovery involves two members of the protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) family, Ptc2 and Ptc3, as well as the protein phosphatase 4 (PP4) enzyme, Pph3. Here, we demonstrate a new function of these three phosphatases in DSB repair. Cells lacking all three phosphatases Pph3, Ptc2, and Ptc3 exhibit synergistic sensitivities to the DNA-damaging agents camptothecin and methyl methanesulfonate, as well as hydroxyurea but not to UV light. Moreover, the simultaneous absence of Pph3, Ptc2, and Ptc3 results in defects in completing DSB repair, whereas neither single nor double deletion of the phosphatases causes a repair defect. Specifically, cells lacking all three phosphatases are defective in the repair-mediated DNA synthesis. Interestingly, the repair defect caused by the triple deletion of Pph3, Ptc2, and Ptc3 is most prominent when a DSB is slowly repaired and the DNA damage checkpoint is fully activated.

  19. Analysis of origin recognition complex in saccharomyces cerevisiae by use of Degron mutants.

    PubMed

    Makise, Masaki; Matsui, Nanako; Yamairi, Fumiko; Takahashi, Naoko; Takehara, Masaya; Asano, Teita; Mizushima, Tohru

    2008-04-01

    Origin recognition complex (ORC), a six-protein complex (Orc1p-Orc6p), may deeply involve in initiation of chromosomal DNA replication. However, since most temperature-sensitive orc mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae show the accumulation of cells with nearly 2C DNA content, the exact stage at which ORC acts is not fully understood. In this study, we constructed a heat-inducible degron mutant for each ORC subunit. As well as each targeted subunit, other subunits of ORC were also rapidly degraded under non-permissive conditions. In the orc5 degron mutant, incubation under the non-permissive conditions caused accumulation of cells with nearly 2C DNA content, and phosphorylation of Rad53p. When Orc5p (ORC) is depleted, this inhibits G1/S transition and formation of a pre-replicative complex (pre-RC). For pre-RC to form, and G1/S transition to proceed, Orc5p (ORC) must be present in late G1, rather than early G1, or G2/M. Block and release experiments revealed that Orc5p (ORC) is not necessary for S and G2/M phase progression. We therefore propose that ORC is necessary for the G1/S transition and pre-RC formation, and accumulation of cells with nearly 2C DNA content seen in various orc mutants is due to inefficient pre-RC formation, and/or induction of checkpoint systems. PMID:18211918

  20. The amino-terminal tails of histones H2A and H3 coordinate efficient base excision repair, DNA damage signaling and postreplication repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Meas, Rithy; Smerdon, Michael J; Wyrick, John J

    2015-05-26

    Histone amino-terminal tails (N-tails) are required for cellular resistance to DNA damaging agents; therefore, we examined the role of histone N-tails in regulating DNA damage response pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Combinatorial deletions reveal that the H2A and H3 N-tails are important for the removal of MMS-induced DNA lesions due to their role in regulating the basal and MMS-induced expression of DNA glycosylase Mag1. Furthermore, overexpression of Mag1 in a mutant lacking the H2A and H3 N-tails rescues base excision repair (BER) activity but not MMS sensitivity. We further show that the H3 N-tail functions in the Rad9/Rad53 DNA damage signaling pathway, but this function does not appear to be the primary cause of MMS sensitivity of the double tailless mutants. Instead, epistasis analyses demonstrate that the tailless H2A/H3 phenotypes are in the RAD18 epistasis group, which regulates postreplication repair. We observed increased levels of ubiquitylated PCNA and significantly lower mutation frequency in the tailless H2A/H3 mutant, indicating a defect in postreplication repair. In summary, our data identify novel roles of the histone H2A and H3 N-tails in (i) regulating the expression of a critical BER enzyme (Mag1), (ii) supporting efficient DNA damage signaling and (iii) facilitating postreplication repair.

  1. R loops are linked to histone H3 S10 phosphorylation and chromatin condensation.

    PubMed

    Castellano-Pozo, Maikel; Santos-Pereira, José M; Rondón, Ana G; Barroso, Sonia; Andújar, Eloisa; Pérez-Alegre, Mónica; García-Muse, Tatiana; Aguilera, Andrés

    2013-11-21

    R loops are transcription byproducts that constitute a threat to genome integrity. Here we show that R loops are tightly linked to histone H3 S10 phosphorylation (H3S10P), a mark of chromatin condensation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip (ChIP-chip) analyses reveal H3S10P accumulation at centromeres, pericentromeric chromatin, and a large number of active open reading frames (ORFs) in R-loop-accumulating yeast cells, better observed in G1. Histone H3S10 plays a key role in maintaining genome stability, as scored by ectopic recombination and plasmid loss, Rad52 foci, and Rad53 checkpoint activation. H3S10P coincides with the presence of DNA-RNA hybrids, is suppressed by ribonuclease H overexpression, and causes reduced accessibility of restriction endonucleases, implying a tight connection between R loops, H3S10P, and chromatin compaction. Such histone modifications were also observed in R-loop-accumulating Caenorhabditis elegans and HeLa cells. We therefore provide a role of RNA in chromatin structure essential to understand how R loops modulate genome dynamics.

  2. Profiling DNA damage-induced phosphorylation in budding yeast reveals diverse signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chunshui; Elia, Andrew E H; Naylor, Maria L; Dephoure, Noah; Ballif, Bryan A; Goel, Gautam; Xu, Qikai; Ng, Aylwin; Chou, Danny M; Xavier, Ramnik J; Gygi, Steven P; Elledge, Stephen J

    2016-06-28

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is regulated by a protein kinase signaling cascade that orchestrates DNA repair and other processes. Identifying the substrate effectors of these kinases is critical for understanding the underlying physiology and mechanism of the response. We have used quantitative mass spectrometry to profile DDR-dependent phosphorylation in budding yeast and genetically explored the dependency of these phosphorylation events on the DDR kinases MEC1, RAD53, CHK1, and DUN1. Based on these screens, a database containing many novel DDR-regulated phosphorylation events has been established. Phosphorylation of many of these proteins has been validated by quantitative peptide phospho-immunoprecipitation and examined for functional relevance to the DDR through large-scale analysis of sensitivity to DNA damage in yeast deletion strains. We reveal a link between DDR signaling and the metabolic pathways of inositol phosphate and phosphatidyl inositol synthesis, which are required for resistance to DNA damage. We also uncover links between the DDR and TOR signaling as well as translation regulation. Taken together, these data shed new light on the organization of DDR signaling in budding yeast. PMID:27298372

  3. A conserved Polϵ binding module in Ctf18-RFC is required for S-phase checkpoint activation downstream of Mec1

    PubMed Central

    García-Rodríguez, Luis J.; De Piccoli, Giacomo; Marchesi, Vanessa; Jones, Richard C.; Edmondson, Ricky D.; Labib, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Defects during chromosome replication in eukaryotes activate a signaling pathway called the S-phase checkpoint, which produces a multifaceted response that preserves genome integrity at stalled DNA replication forks. Work with budding yeast showed that the ‘alternative clamp loader’ known as Ctf18-RFC acts by an unknown mechanism to activate the checkpoint kinase Rad53, which then mediates much of the checkpoint response. Here we show that budding yeast Ctf18-RFC associates with DNA polymerase epsilon, via an evolutionarily conserved ‘Pol ϵ binding module’ in Ctf18-RFC that is produced by interaction of the carboxyl terminus of Ctf18 with the Ctf8 and Dcc1 subunits. Mutations at the end of Ctf18 disrupt the integrity of the Pol ϵ binding module and block the S-phase checkpoint pathway, downstream of the Mec1 kinase that is the budding yeast orthologue of mammalian ATR. Similar defects in checkpoint activation are produced by mutations that displace Pol ϵ from the replisome. These findings indicate that the association of Ctf18-RFC with Pol ϵ at defective replication forks is a key step in activation of the S-phase checkpoint. PMID:26250113

  4. Chromosome-wide histone deacetylation by sirtuins prevents hyperactivation of DNA damage-induced signaling upon replicative stress.

    PubMed

    Simoneau, Antoine; Ricard, Étienne; Weber, Sandra; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Wong, Lai Hong; Sellam, Adnane; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Raymond, Martine; Wurtele, Hugo

    2016-04-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes five sirtuins (Sir2 and Hst1-4), which constitute a conserved family of NAD-dependent histone deacetylases. Cells lacking any individual sirtuin display mild growth and gene silencing defects. However, hst3Δ hst4Δ double mutants are exquisitely sensitive to genotoxins, and hst3Δ hst4Δ sir2Δmutants are inviable. Our published data also indicate that pharmacological inhibition of sirtuins prevents growth of several fungal pathogens, although the biological basis is unclear. Here, we present genome-wide fitness assays conducted with nicotinamide (NAM), a pan-sirtuin inhibitor. Our data indicate that NAM treatment causes yeast to solicit specific DNA damage response pathways for survival, and that NAM-induced growth defects are mainly attributable to inhibition of Hst3 and Hst4 and consequent elevation of histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56ac). Our results further reveal that in the presence of constitutive H3K56ac, the Slx4 scaffolding protein and PP4 phosphatase complex play essential roles in preventing hyperactivation of the DNA damage-response kinase Rad53 in response to spontaneous DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species. Overall, our data support the concept that chromosome-wide histone deacetylation by sirtuins is critical to mitigate growth defects caused by endogenous genotoxins. PMID:26748095

  5. Protein kinase C controls activation of the DNA integrity checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Soriano-Carot, María; Quilis, Inma; Bañó, M. Carmen; Igual, J. Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) superfamily plays key regulatory roles in numerous cellular processes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains a single PKC, Pkc1, whose main function is cell wall integrity maintenance. In this work, we connect the Pkc1 protein to the maintenance of genome integrity in response to genotoxic stresses. Pkc1 and its kinase activity are necessary for the phosphorylation of checkpoint kinase Rad53, histone H2A and Xrs2 protein after deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage, indicating that Pkc1 is required for activation of checkpoint kinases Mec1 and Tel1. Furthermore, Pkc1 electrophoretic mobility is delayed after inducing DNA damage, which reflects that Pkc1 is post-translationally modified. This modification is a phosphorylation event mediated by Tel1. The expression of different mammalian PKC isoforms at the endogenous level in yeast pkc1 mutant cells revealed that PKCδ is able to activate the DNA integrity checkpoint. Finally, downregulation of PKCδ activity in HeLa cells caused a defective activation of checkpoint kinase Chk2 when DNA damage was induced. Our results indicate that the control of the DNA integrity checkpoint by PKC is a mechanism conserved from yeast to humans. PMID:24792164

  6. Telomerase is essential to alleviate pif1-induced replication stress at telomeres.

    PubMed

    Chang, Michael; Luke, Brian; Kraft, Claudine; Li, Zhijian; Peter, Matthias; Lingner, Joachim; Rothstein, Rodney

    2009-11-01

    Pif1, an evolutionarily conserved helicase, negatively regulates telomere length by removing telomerase from chromosome ends. Pif1 has also been implicated in DNA replication processes such as Okazaki fragment maturation and replication fork pausing. We find that overexpression of Saccharomyces cervisiae PIF1 results in dose-dependent growth inhibition. Strong overexpression causes relocalization of the DNA damage response factors Rfa1 and Mre11 into nuclear foci and activation of the Rad53 DNA damage checkpoint kinase, indicating that the toxicity is caused by accumulation of DNA damage. We screened the complete set of approximately 4800 haploid gene deletion mutants and found that moderate overexpression of PIF1, which is only mildly toxic on its own, causes growth defects in strains with mutations in genes involved in DNA replication and the DNA damage response. Interestingly, we find that telomerase-deficient strains are also sensitive to PIF1 overexpression. Our data are consistent with a model whereby increased levels of Pif1 interfere with DNA replication, causing collapsed replication forks. At chromosome ends, collapsed forks result in truncated telomeres that must be rapidly elongated by telomerase to maintain viability. PMID:19704012

  7. The N-terminus of Mcm10 is important for interaction with the 9-1-1 clamp and in resistance to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Alver, Robert C.; Zhang, Tianji; Josephrajan, Ajeetha; Fultz, Brandy L.; Hendrix, Chance J.; Das-Bradoo, Sapna; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Accurate replication of the genome requires the evolutionarily conserved minichromosome maintenance protein, Mcm10. Although the details of the precise role of Mcm10 in DNA replication are still debated, it interacts with the Mcm2-7 core helicase, the lagging strand polymerase, DNA polymerase-α and the replication clamp, proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Loss of these interactions caused by the depletion of Mcm10 leads to chromosome breakage and cell cycle checkpoint activation. However, whether Mcm10 has an active role in DNA damage prevention is unknown. Here, we present data that establish a novel role of the N-terminus of Mcm10 in resisting DNA damage. We show that Mcm10 interacts with the Mec3 subunit of the 9-1-1 clamp in response to replication stress evoked by UV irradiation or nucleotide shortage. We map the interaction domain with Mec3 within the N-terminal region of Mcm10 and demonstrate that its truncation causes UV light sensitivity. This sensitivity is not further enhanced by a deletion of MEC3, arguing that MCM10 and MEC3 operate in the same pathway. Since Rad53 phosphorylation in response to UV light appears to be normal in N-terminally truncated mcm10 mutants, we propose that Mcm10 may have a role in replication fork restart or DNA repair. PMID:24972833

  8. Yeast Dun1 Kinase Regulates Ribonucleotide Reductase Inhibitor Sml1 in Response to Iron Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sanvisens, Nerea; Romero, Antonia M.; An, Xiuxiang; Zhang, Caiguo; de Llanos, Rosa; Martínez-Pastor, María Teresa; Bañó, M. Carmen

    2014-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for all eukaryotic organisms because it participates as a redox-active cofactor in many biological processes, including DNA replication and repair. Eukaryotic ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) are Fe-dependent enzymes that catalyze deoxyribonucleoside diphosphate (dNDP) synthesis. We show here that the levels of the Sml1 protein, a yeast RNR large-subunit inhibitor, specifically decrease in response to both nutritional and genetic Fe deficiencies in a Dun1-dependent but Mec1/Rad53- and Aft1-independent manner. The decline of Sml1 protein levels upon Fe starvation depends on Dun1 forkhead-associated and kinase domains, the 26S proteasome, and the vacuolar proteolytic pathway. Depletion of core components of the mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster assembly leads to a Dun1-dependent diminution of Sml1 protein levels. The physiological relevance of Sml1 downregulation by Dun1 under low-Fe conditions is highlighted by the synthetic growth defect observed between dun1Δ and fet3Δ fet4Δ mutants, which is rescued by SML1 deletion. Consistent with an increase in RNR function, Rnr1 protein levels are upregulated upon Fe deficiency. Finally, dun1Δ mutants display defects in deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) biosynthesis under low-Fe conditions. Taken together, these results reveal that the Dun1 checkpoint kinase promotes RNR function in response to Fe starvation by stimulating Sml1 protein degradation. PMID:24958100

  9. Requirement of the FATC domain of protein kinase Tel1 for localization to DNA ends and target protein recognition.

    PubMed

    Ogi, Hiroo; Goto, Greicy H; Ghosh, Avik; Zencir, Sevil; Henry, Everett; Sugimoto, Katsunori

    2015-10-01

    Two large phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinases (PIKKs), ATM and ATR, play a central role in the DNA damage response pathway. PIKKs contain a highly conserved extreme C-terminus called the FRAP-ATM-TRRAP-C-terminal (FATC) domain. In budding yeast, ATM and ATR correspond to Tel1 and Mec1, respectively. In this study, we characterized functions of the FATC domain of Tel1 by introducing substitution or truncation mutations. One substitution mutation, termed tel1-21, and a truncation mutation, called tel1-ΔC, did not significantly affect the expression level. The tel1-21 mutation impaired the cellular response to DNA damage and conferred moderate telomere maintenance defect. In contrast, the tel1-ΔC mutation behaved like a null mutation, conferring defects in both DNA damage response and telomere maintenance. Tel1-21 protein localized to DNA ends as effectively as wild-type Tel1 protein, whereas Tel1-ΔC protein failed. Introduction of a hyperactive TEL1-hy mutation suppressed the tel1-21 mutation but not the tel1-ΔC mutation. In vitro analyses revealed that both Tel1-21 and Tel1-ΔC proteins undergo efficient autophosphorylation but exhibit decreased kinase activities toward the exogenous substrate protein, Rad53. Our results show that the FATC domain of Tel1 mediates localization to DNA ends and contributes to phosphorylation of target proteins.

  10. Impaired tRNA nuclear export links DNA damage and cell-cycle checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Ghavidel, Ata; Kislinger, Thomas; Pogoutse, Oxana; Sopko, Richelle; Jurisica, Igor; Emili, Andrew

    2007-11-30

    In response to genotoxic stress, cells evoke a plethora of physiological responses collectively aimed at enhancing viability and maintaining the integrity of the genome. Here, we report that unspliced tRNA rapidly accumulates in the nuclei of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae after DNA damage. This response requires an intact MEC1- and RAD53-dependent signaling pathway that impedes the nuclear export of intron-containing tRNA via differential relocalization of the karyopherin Los1 to the cytoplasm. The accumulation of unspliced tRNA in the nucleus signals the activation of Gcn4 transcription factor, which, in turn, contributes to cell-cycle arrest in G1 in part by delaying accumulation of the cyclin Cln2. The regulated nucleocytoplasmic tRNA trafficking thus constitutes an integral physiological adaptation to DNA damage. These data further illustrate how signal-mediated crosstalk between distinct functional modules, namely, tRNA nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, protein synthesis, and checkpoint execution, allows for functional coupling of tRNA biogenesis and cell-cycle progression.

  11. Nonsense-mediated decay regulates key components of homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Janke, Ryan; Kong, Jeremy; Braberg, Hannes; Cantin, Greg; Yates, John R.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Cells frequently experience DNA damage that requires repair by homologous recombination (HR). Proteins involved in HR are carefully coordinated to ensure proper and efficient repair without interfering with normal cellular processes. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rad55 functions in the early steps of HR and is regulated in response to DNA damage through phosphorylation by the Mec1 and Rad53 kinases of the DNA damage response. To further identify regulatory processes that target HR, we performed a high-throughput genetic interaction screen with RAD55 phosphorylation site mutants. Genes involved in the mRNA quality control process, nonsense-mediated decay (NMD), were found to genetically interact with rad55 phospho-site mutants. Further characterization revealed that RAD55 transcript and protein levels are regulated by NMD. Regulation of HR by NMD extends to multiple targets beyond RAD55, including RAD51, RAD54 and RAD57. Finally, we demonstrate that loss of NMD results in an increase in recombination rates and resistance to the DNA damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate, suggesting this pathway negatively regulates HR under normal growth conditions. PMID:27001511

  12. A conserved Polϵ binding module in Ctf18-RFC is required for S-phase checkpoint activation downstream of Mec1.

    PubMed

    García-Rodríguez, Luis J; De Piccoli, Giacomo; Marchesi, Vanessa; Jones, Richard C; Edmondson, Ricky D; Labib, Karim

    2015-10-15

    Defects during chromosome replication in eukaryotes activate a signaling pathway called the S-phase checkpoint, which produces a multifaceted response that preserves genome integrity at stalled DNA replication forks. Work with budding yeast showed that the 'alternative clamp loader' known as Ctf18-RFC acts by an unknown mechanism to activate the checkpoint kinase Rad53, which then mediates much of the checkpoint response. Here we show that budding yeast Ctf18-RFC associates with DNA polymerase epsilon, via an evolutionarily conserved 'Pol ϵ binding module' in Ctf18-RFC that is produced by interaction of the carboxyl terminus of Ctf18 with the Ctf8 and Dcc1 subunits. Mutations at the end of Ctf18 disrupt the integrity of the Pol ϵ binding module and block the S-phase checkpoint pathway, downstream of the Mec1 kinase that is the budding yeast orthologue of mammalian ATR. Similar defects in checkpoint activation are produced by mutations that displace Pol ϵ from the replisome. These findings indicate that the association of Ctf18-RFC with Pol ϵ at defective replication forks is a key step in activation of the S-phase checkpoint.

  13. Rpb1 sumoylation in response to UV radiation or transcriptional impairment in yeast.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuefeng; Ding, Baojin; LeJeune, Danielle; Ruggiero, Christine; Li, Shisheng

    2009-01-01

    Covalent modifications of proteins by ubiquitin and the Small Ubiquitin-like MOdifier (SUMO) have been revealed to be involved in a plethora of cellular processes, including transcription, DNA repair and DNA damage responses. It has been well known that in response to DNA damage that blocks transcription elongation, Rpb1, the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (Pol II), is ubiquitylated and subsequently degraded in mammalian and yeast cells. However, it is still an enigma regarding how Pol II responds to damaged DNA and conveys signal(s) for DNA damage-related cellular processes. We found that Rpb1 is also sumoylated in yeast cells upon UV radiation or impairment of transcription elongation, and this modification is independent of DNA damage checkpoint activation. Ubc9, an E2 SUMO conjugase, and Siz1, an E3 SUMO ligase, play important roles in Rpb1 sumoylation. K1487, which is located in the acidic linker region between the C-terminal domain and the globular domain of Rpb1, is the major sumoylation site. Rpb1 sumoylation is not affected by its ubiquitylation, and vice versa, indicating that the two processes do not crosstalk. Abolishment of Rpb1 sumoylation at K1487 does not affect transcription elongation or transcription coupled repair (TCR) of UV-induced DNA damage. However, deficiency in TCR enhances UV-induced Rpb1 sumoylation, presumably due to the persistence of transcription-blocking DNA lesions in the transcribed strand of a gene. Remarkably, abolishment of Rpb1 sumoylation at K1487 causes enhanced and prolonged UV-induced phosphorylation of Rad53, especially in TCR-deficient cells, suggesting that the sumoylation plays a role in restraining the DNA damage checkpoint response caused by transcription-blocking lesions. Our results demonstrate a novel covalent modification of Rpb1 in response to UV induced DNA damage or transcriptional impairment, and unravel an important link between the modification and the DNA damage checkpoint response. PMID:19384408

  14. Transcriptome analysis identifies genes involved in ethanol response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Agave tequilana juice.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Córdova, Jesús; Drnevich, Jenny; Madrigal-Pulido, Jaime Alberto; Arrizon, Javier; Allen, Kirk; Martínez-Velázquez, Moisés; Alvarez-Maya, Ikuri

    2012-08-01

    During ethanol fermentation, yeast cells are exposed to stress due to the accumulation of ethanol, cell growth is altered and the output of the target product is reduced. For Agave beverages, like tequila, no reports have been published on the global gene expression under ethanol stress. In this work, we used microarray analysis to identify Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in the ethanol response. Gene expression of a tequila yeast strain of S. cerevisiae (AR5) was explored by comparing global gene expression with that of laboratory strain S288C, both after ethanol exposure. Additionally, we used two different culture conditions, cells grown in Agave tequilana juice as a natural fermentation media or grown in yeast-extract peptone dextrose as artificial media. Of the 6368 S. cerevisiae genes in the microarray, 657 genes were identified that had different expression responses to ethanol stress due to strain and/or media. A cluster of 28 genes was found over-expressed specifically in the AR5 tequila strain that could be involved in the adaptation to tequila yeast fermentation, 14 of which are unknown such as yor343c, ylr162w, ygr182c, ymr265c, yer053c-a or ydr415c. These could be the most suitable genes for transforming tequila yeast to increase ethanol tolerance in the tequila fermentation process. Other genes involved in response to stress (RFC4, TSA1, MLH1, PAU3, RAD53) or transport (CYB2, TIP20, QCR9) were expressed in the same cluster. Unknown genes could be good candidates for the development of recombinant yeasts with ethanol tolerance for use in industrial tequila fermentation.

  15. Cell Cycle- and Ribonucleotide Reductase-Driven Changes in mtDNA Copy Number Influence mtDNA Inheritance Without Compromising Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lebedeva, Maria A.; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2008-01-01

    Most eukaryotes maintain multiple copies of mtDNA, ranging from 20–50 in yeast to as many as 10,000 in mammalian cells. The mitochondrial genome encodes essential subunits of the respiratory chain, but the number of mtDNA molecules is apparently in excess of that needed to sustain adequate respiration, as evidenced by the “threshold effect” in mitochondrial diseases. Thus, other selective pressures apparently have contributed to the universal maintenance of multiple mtDNA molecules/cell. Here we analyzed the interplay between the two pathways proposed to regulate mtDNA copy number in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the requirement of normal mtDNA copy number for mitochondrial gene expression, respiration, and inheritance. We provide the first direct evidence that upregulation of mtDNA can be achieved by increasing ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) activity via derepression of nuclear RNR gene transcription or elimination of allosteric-feedback regulation. Analysis of rad53 mutant strains also revealed upregulation of mtDNA copy number independent of that resulting from elevated RNR activity. We present evidence that a prolonged cell cycle allows accumulation of mtDNA in these strains. Analysis of multiple strains with increased or decreased mtDNA revealed that mechanisms are in place to prevent significant changes in mitochondrial gene expression and respiration in the face of ∼two-fold alterations in mtDNA copy number. However, depletion of mtDNA in abf2 null strains leads to defective mtDNA inheritance that is partially rescued by replenishing mtDNA via overexpression of RNR1. These results indicate that one role for multiple mtDNA copies is to ensure optimal inheritance of mtDNA during cell division. PMID:17721079

  16. Inner nuclear membrane protein Lem2 facilitates Rad3-mediated checkpoint signaling under replication stress induced by nucleotide depletion in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong-Jie

    2016-04-01

    DNA replication checkpoint is a highly conserved cellular signaling pathway critical for maintaining genome integrity in eukaryotes. It is activated when DNA replication is perturbed. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, perturbed replication forks activate the sensor kinase Rad3 (ATR/Mec1), which works cooperatively with mediator Mrc1 and the 9-1-1 checkpoint clamp to phosphorylate the effector kinase Cds1 (CHK2/Rad53). Phosphorylation of Cds1 promotes autoactivation of the kinase. Activated Cds1 diffuses away from the forks and stimulates most of the checkpoint responses under replication stress. Although this signaling pathway has been well understood in fission yeast, how the signaling is initiated and thus regulated remains incompletely understood. Previous studies have shown that deletion of lem2(+) sensitizes cells to the inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase, hydroxyurea. However, the underlying mechanism is still not well understood. This study shows that in the presence of hydroxyurea, Lem2 facilitates Rad3-mediated checkpoint signaling for Cds1 activation. Without Lem2, all known Rad3-dependent phosphorylations critical for replication checkpoint signaling are seriously compromised, which likely causes the aberrant mitosis and drug sensitivity observed in this mutant. Interestingly, the mutant is not very sensitive to DNA damage and the DNA damage checkpoint remains largely intact, suggesting that the main function of Lem2 is to facilitate checkpoint signaling in response to replication stress. Since Lem2 is an inner nuclear membrane protein, these results also suggest that the replication checkpoint may be spatially regulated inside the nucleus, a previously unknown mechanism.

  17. The C terminus of the histone chaperone Asf1 cross-links to histone H3 in yeast and promotes interaction with histones H3 and H4.

    PubMed

    Dennehey, Briana K; Noone, Seth; Liu, Wallace H; Smith, Luke; Churchill, Mair E A; Tyler, Jessica K

    2013-02-01

    The central histone H3/H4 chaperone Asf1 comprises a highly conserved globular core and a divergent C-terminal tail. While the function and structure of the Asf1 core are well known, the function of the tail is less well understood. Here, we have explored the role of the yeast (yAsf1) and human (hAsf1a and hAsf1b) Asf1 tails in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show, using a photoreactive, unnatural amino acid, that Asf1 tail residue 210 cross-links to histone H3 in vivo and, further, that loss of C-terminal tail residues 211 to 279 weakens yAsf1-histone binding affinity in vitro nearly 200-fold. Via several yAsf1 C-terminal truncations and yeast-human chimeric proteins, we found that truncations at residue 210 increase transcriptional silencing and that the hAsf1a tail partially substitutes for full-length yAsf1 with respect to silencing but that full-length hAsf1b is a better overall substitute for full-length yAsf1. In addition, we show that the C-terminal tail of Asf1 is phosphorylated at T270 in yeast. Loss of this phosphorylation site does not prevent coimmunoprecipitation of yAsf1 and Rad53 from yeast extracts, whereas amino acid residue substitutions at the Asf1-histone H3/H4 interface do. Finally, we show that residue substitutions in yAsf1 near the CAF-1/HIRA interface also influence yAsf1's function in silencing.

  18. Interplay Between Histone H3 Lysine 56 Deacetylation and Chromatin Modifiers in Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Simoneau, Antoine; Delgoshaie, Neda; Celic, Ivana; Dai, Junbiao; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Costantino, Santiago; Thibault, Pierre; Boeke, Jef D.; Verreault, Alain; Wurtele, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56Ac) is present in newly synthesized histones deposited throughout the genome during DNA replication. The sirtuins Hst3 and Hst4 deacetylate H3K56 after S phase, and virtually all histone H3 molecules are K56 acetylated throughout the cell cycle in hst3∆ hst4∆ mutants. Failure to deacetylate H3K56 causes thermosensitivity, spontaneous DNA damage, and sensitivity to replicative stress via molecular mechanisms that remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that unlike wild-type cells, hst3∆ hst4∆ cells are unable to complete genome duplication and accumulate persistent foci containing the homologous recombination protein Rad52 after exposure to genotoxic drugs during S phase. In response to replicative stress, cells lacking Hst3 and Hst4 also displayed intense foci containing the Rfa1 subunit of the single-stranded DNA binding protein complex RPA, as well as persistent activation of DNA damage–induced kinases. To investigate the basis of these phenotypes, we identified histone point mutations that modulate the temperature and genotoxic drug sensitivity of hst3∆ hst4∆ cells. We found that reducing the levels of histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation or H3 lysine 79 methylation partially suppresses these sensitivities and reduces spontaneous and genotoxin-induced activation of the DNA damage-response kinase Rad53 in hst3∆ hst4∆ cells. Our data further suggest that elevated DNA damage–induced signaling significantly contributes to the phenotypes of hst3∆ hst4∆ cells. Overall, these results outline a novel interplay between H3K56Ac, H3K79 methylation, and H4K16 acetylation in the cellular response to DNA damage. PMID:25786853

  19. Xbp1 Directs Global Repression of Budding Yeast Transcription during the Transition to Quiescence and Is Important for the Longevity and Reversibility of the Quiescent State

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Shawna; Li, Lihong; Davison, Jerry; Breeden, Linda L.

    2013-01-01

    Pure populations of quiescent yeast can be obtained from stationary phase cultures that have ceased proliferation after exhausting glucose and other carbon sources from their environment. They are uniformly arrested in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, and display very high thermo-tolerance and longevity. We find that G1 arrest is initiated before all the glucose has been scavenged from the media. Maintaining G1 arrest requires transcriptional repression of the G1 cyclin, CLN3, by Xbp1. Xbp1 is induced as glucose is depleted and it is among the most abundant transcripts in quiescent cells. Xbp1 binds and represses CLN3 transcription and in the absence of Xbp1, or with extra copies of CLN3, cells undergo ectopic divisions and produce very small cells. The Rad53-mediated replication stress checkpoint reinforces the arrest and becomes essential when Cln3 is overproduced. The XBP1 transcript also undergoes metabolic oscillations under glucose limitation and we identified many additional transcripts that oscillate out of phase with XBP1 and have Xbp1 binding sites in their promoters. Further global analysis revealed that Xbp1 represses 15% of all yeast genes as they enter the quiescent state and over 500 of these transcripts contain Xbp1 binding sites in their promoters. Xbp1-repressed transcripts are highly enriched for genes involved in the regulation of cell growth, cell division and metabolism. Failure to repress some or all of these targets leads xbp1 cells to enter a permanent arrest or senescence with a shortened lifespan. PMID:24204289

  20. Transcriptome analysis identifies genes involved in ethanol response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Agave tequilana juice.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Córdova, Jesús; Drnevich, Jenny; Madrigal-Pulido, Jaime Alberto; Arrizon, Javier; Allen, Kirk; Martínez-Velázquez, Moisés; Alvarez-Maya, Ikuri

    2012-08-01

    During ethanol fermentation, yeast cells are exposed to stress due to the accumulation of ethanol, cell growth is altered and the output of the target product is reduced. For Agave beverages, like tequila, no reports have been published on the global gene expression under ethanol stress. In this work, we used microarray analysis to identify Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in the ethanol response. Gene expression of a tequila yeast strain of S. cerevisiae (AR5) was explored by comparing global gene expression with that of laboratory strain S288C, both after ethanol exposure. Additionally, we used two different culture conditions, cells grown in Agave tequilana juice as a natural fermentation media or grown in yeast-extract peptone dextrose as artificial media. Of the 6368 S. cerevisiae genes in the microarray, 657 genes were identified that had different expression responses to ethanol stress due to strain and/or media. A cluster of 28 genes was found over-expressed specifically in the AR5 tequila strain that could be involved in the adaptation to tequila yeast fermentation, 14 of which are unknown such as yor343c, ylr162w, ygr182c, ymr265c, yer053c-a or ydr415c. These could be the most suitable genes for transforming tequila yeast to increase ethanol tolerance in the tequila fermentation process. Other genes involved in response to stress (RFC4, TSA1, MLH1, PAU3, RAD53) or transport (CYB2, TIP20, QCR9) were expressed in the same cluster. Unknown genes could be good candidates for the development of recombinant yeasts with ethanol tolerance for use in industrial tequila fermentation. PMID:22535436

  1. A Network of Conserved Synthetic Lethal Interactions for Exploration of Precision Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Srivas, Rohith; Shen, John Paul; Yang, Chih Cheng; Sun, Su Ming; Li, Jianfeng; Gross, Andrew M; Jensen, James; Licon, Katherine; Bojorquez-Gomez, Ana; Klepper, Kristin; Huang, Justin; Pekin, Daniel; Xu, Jia L; Yeerna, Huwate; Sivaganesh, Vignesh; Kollenstart, Leonie; van Attikum, Haico; Aza-Blanc, Pedro; Sobol, Robert W; Ideker, Trey

    2016-08-01

    An emerging therapeutic strategy for cancer is to induce selective lethality in a tumor by exploiting interactions between its driving mutations and specific drug targets. Here we use a multi-species approach to develop a resource of synthetic lethal interactions relevant to cancer therapy. First, we screen in yeast ∼169,000 potential interactions among orthologs of human tumor suppressor genes (TSG) and genes encoding drug targets across multiple genotoxic environments. Guided by the strongest signal, we evaluate thousands of TSG-drug combinations in HeLa cells, resulting in networks of conserved synthetic lethal interactions. Analysis of these networks reveals that interaction stability across environments and shared gene function increase the likelihood of observing an interaction in human cancer cells. Using these rules, we prioritize ∼10(5) human TSG-drug combinations for future follow-up. We validate interactions based on cell and/or patient survival, including topoisomerases with RAD17 and checkpoint kinases with BLM. PMID:27453043

  2. Src Family Kinases Promote Silencing of ATR-Chk1 Signaling in Termination of DNA Damage Checkpoint*

    PubMed Central

    Fukumoto, Yasunori; Morii, Mariko; Miura, Takahito; Kubota, Sho; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Honda, Takuya; Okamoto, Aya; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Iwama, Atsushi; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage checkpoint arrests cell cycle progression to allow time for repair. Once DNA repair is completed, checkpoint signaling is terminated. Currently little is known about the mechanism by which checkpoint signaling is terminated, and the disappearance of DNA lesions is considered to induce the end of checkpoint signaling; however, here we show that the termination of checkpoint signaling is an active process promoted by Src family tyrosine kinases. Inhibition of Src activity delays recovery from the G2 phase DNA damage checkpoint following DNA repair. Src activity is required for the termination of checkpoint signaling, and inhibition of Src activity induces persistent activation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and Rad3-related (ATR) and Chk1 kinases. Src-dependent nuclear protein tyrosine phosphorylation and v-Src expression suppress the ATR-mediated Chk1 and Rad17 phosphorylation induced by DNA double strand breaks or DNA replication stress. Thus, Src family kinases promote checkpoint recovery through termination of ATR- and Chk1-dependent G2 DNA damage checkpoint. These results suggest a model according to which Src family kinases send a termination signal between the completion of DNA repair and the initiation of checkpoint termination. PMID:24634213

  3. Hyper-Acetylation of Histone H3K56 Limits Break-Induced Replication by Inhibiting Extensive Repair Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Che, Jun; Smith, Stephanie; Kim, Yoo Jung; Shim, Eun Yong; Myung, Kyungjae; Lee, Sang Eun

    2015-01-01

    Break-induced replication (BIR) has been implicated in restoring eroded telomeres and collapsed replication forks via single-ended invasion and extensive DNA synthesis on the recipient chromosome. Unlike other recombination subtypes, DNA synthesis in BIR likely relies heavily on mechanisms enabling efficient fork progression such as chromatin modification. Herein we report that deletion of HST3 and HST4, two redundant de-acetylases of histone H3 Lysine 56 (H3K56), inhibits BIR, sensitizes checkpoint deficient cells to deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate pool depletion, and elevates translocation-type gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCR). The basis for deficiency in BIR and gene conversion with long gap synthesis in hst3Δ hst4Δ cells can be traced to a defect in extensive DNA synthesis. Distinct from other cellular defects associated with deletion of HST3 and HST4 including thermo-sensitivity and elevated spontaneous mutagenesis, the BIR defect in hst3Δ hst4Δ cannot be offset by the deletion of RAD17 or MMS22, but rather by the loss of RTT109 or ASF1, or in combination with the H3K56R mutation, which also restores tolerance to replication stress in mrc1 mutants. Our studies suggest that acetylation of H3K56 limits extensive repair synthesis and interferes with efficient fork progression in BIR. PMID:25705897

  4. Overexpression of Arabidopsis molybdenum cofactor sulfurase gene confers drought tolerance in maize (Zea mays L.).

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; Li, Yajun; Zhang, Jiachang; Xiao, Yitao; Yue, Yuesen; Duan, Liusheng; Zhang, Mingcai; Li, Zhaohu

    2013-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a key component of the signaling system that integrates plant adaptive responses to abiotic stress. Overexpression of Arabidopsis molybdenum cofactor sulfurase gene (LOS5) in maize markedly enhanced the expression of ZmAO and aldehyde oxidase (AO) activity, leading to ABA accumulation and increased drought tolerance. Transgenic maize (Zea mays L.) exhibited the expected reductions in stomatal aperture, which led to decreased water loss and maintenance of higher relative water content (RWC) and leaf water potential. Also, transgenic maize subjected to drought treatment exhibited lower leaf wilting, electrolyte leakage, malondialdehyde (MDA) and H(2)O(2) content, and higher activities of antioxidative enzymes and proline content compared to wild-type (WT) maize. Moreover, overexpression of LOS5 enhanced the expression of stress-regulated genes such as Rad 17, NCED1, CAT1, and ZmP5CS1 under drought stress conditions, and increased root system development and biomass yield after re-watering. The increased drought tolerance in transgenic plants was associated with ABA accumulation via activated AO and expression of stress-related gene via ABA induction, which sequentially induced a set of favorable stress-related physiological and biochemical responses.

  5. The meiotic recombination checkpoint is regulated by checkpoint rad+ genes in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Shimada, Midori; Nabeshima, Kentaro; Tougan, Takahiro; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    During the course of meiotic prophase, intrinsic double-strand breaks (DSBs) must be repaired before the cell can engage in meiotic nuclear division. Here we investigate the mechanism that controls the meiotic progression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe that have accumulated excess meiotic DSBs. A meiotic recombination-defective mutant, meu13Δ, shows a delay in meiotic progression. This delay is dependent on rec12+, namely on DSB formation. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that meiotic DSB repair in meu13Δ was retarded. We also found that the delay in entering nuclear division was dependent on the checkpoint rad+, cds1+ and mek1+ (the meiotic paralog of Cds1/Chk2). This implies that these genes are involved in a checkpoint that provides time to repair DSBs. Consistently, the induction of an excess of extrinsic DSBs by ionizing radiation delayed meiotic progression in a rad17+-dependent manner. dmc1Δ also shows meiotic delay, however, this delay is independent of rec12+ and checkpoint rad+. We propose that checkpoint monitoring of the status of meiotic DSB repair exists in fission yeast and that defects other than DSB accumulation can cause delays in meiotic progression. PMID:12032093

  6. The meiotic recombination checkpoint is regulated by checkpoint rad+ genes in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Midori; Nabeshima, Kentaro; Tougan, Takahiro; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2002-06-01

    During the course of meiotic prophase, intrinsic double-strand breaks (DSBs) must be repaired before the cell can engage in meiotic nuclear division. Here we investigate the mechanism that controls the meiotic progression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe that have accumulated excess meiotic DSBs. A meiotic recombination-defective mutant, meu13Delta, shows a delay in meiotic progression. This delay is dependent on rec12+, namely on DSB formation. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis revealed that meiotic DSB repair in meu13Delta was retarded. We also found that the delay in entering nuclear division was dependent on the checkpoint rad+, cds1+ and mek1+ (the meiotic paralog of Cds1/Chk2). This implies that these genes are involved in a checkpoint that provides time to repair DSBs. Consistently, the induction of an excess of extrinsic DSBs by ionizing radiation delayed meiotic progression in a rad17(+)-dependent manner. dmc1Delta also shows meiotic delay, however, this delay is independent of rec12+ and checkpoint rad+. We propose that checkpoint monitoring of the status of meiotic DSB repair exists in fission yeast and that defects other than DSB accumulation can cause delays in meiotic progression. PMID:12032093

  7. A subset of ATM- and ATR-dependent phosphorylation events requires the BRCA1 protein

    PubMed Central

    Foray, Nicolas; Marot, Didier; Gabriel, Anastasia; Randrianarison, Voahangy; Carr, Antony M.; Perricaudet, Michel; Ashworth, Alan; Jeggo, Penny

    2003-01-01

    BRCA1 is a central component of the DNA damage response mechanism and defects in BRCA1 confer sensitivity to a broad range of DNA damaging agents. BRCA1 is required for homologous recombination and DNA damage-induced S and G2/M phase arrest. We show here that BRCA1 is required for ATM- and ATR-dependent phosphorylation of p53, c-Jun, Nbs1 and Chk2 following exposure to ionizing or ultraviolet radiation, respectively, and is also required for ATM phosphorylation of CtIP. In contrast, DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of the histone variant H2AX is independent of BRCA1. We also show that the presence of BRCA1 is dispensable for DNA damage-induced phosphorylation of Rad9, Hus1 and Rad17, and for the relocalization of Rad9 and Hus1. We propose that BRCA1 facilitates the ability of ATM and ATR to phosphorylate downstream substrates that directly influence cell cycle checkpoint arrest and apoptosis, but that BRCA1 is dispensable for the phosphorylation of DNA-associated ATM and ATR substrates. PMID:12773400

  8. Replication factor C recruits DNA polymerase delta to sites of nucleotide excision repair but is not required for PCNA recruitment.

    PubMed

    Overmeer, René M; Gourdin, Audrey M; Giglia-Mari, Ambra; Kool, Hanneke; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; Siegal, Gregg; Fousteri, Maria I; Mullenders, Leon H F; Vermeulen, Wim

    2010-10-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) operates through coordinated assembly of repair factors into pre- and postincision complexes. The postincision step of NER includes gap-filling DNA synthesis and ligation. However, the exact composition of this NER-associated DNA synthesis complex in vivo and the dynamic interactions of the factors involved are not well understood. Using immunofluorescence, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and live-cell protein dynamic studies, we show that replication factor C (RFC) is implicated in postincision NER in mammalian cells. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of RFC impairs upstream removal of UV lesions and abrogates the downstream recruitment of DNA polymerase delta. Unexpectedly, RFC appears dispensable for PCNA recruitment yet is required for the subsequent recruitment of DNA polymerases to PCNA, indicating that RFC is essential to stably load the polymerase clamp to start DNA repair synthesis at 3' termini. The kinetic studies are consistent with a model in which RFC exchanges dynamically at sites of repair. However, its persistent localization at stalled NER complexes suggests that RFC remains targeted to the repair complex even after loading of PCNA. We speculate that RFC associates with the downstream 5' phosphate after loading; such interaction would prevent possible signaling events initiated by the RFC-like Rad17 and may assist in unloading of PCNA. PMID:20713449

  9. Replication Factor C Recruits DNA Polymerase δ to Sites of Nucleotide Excision Repair but Is Not Required for PCNA Recruitment▿

    PubMed Central

    Overmeer, René M.; Gourdin, Audrey M.; Giglia-Mari, Ambra; Kool, Hanneke; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Siegal, Gregg; Fousteri, Maria I.; Mullenders, Leon H. F.; Vermeulen, Wim

    2010-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) operates through coordinated assembly of repair factors into pre- and postincision complexes. The postincision step of NER includes gap-filling DNA synthesis and ligation. However, the exact composition of this NER-associated DNA synthesis complex in vivo and the dynamic interactions of the factors involved are not well understood. Using immunofluorescence, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and live-cell protein dynamic studies, we show that replication factor C (RFC) is implicated in postincision NER in mammalian cells. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of RFC impairs upstream removal of UV lesions and abrogates the downstream recruitment of DNA polymerase delta. Unexpectedly, RFC appears dispensable for PCNA recruitment yet is required for the subsequent recruitment of DNA polymerases to PCNA, indicating that RFC is essential to stably load the polymerase clamp to start DNA repair synthesis at 3′ termini. The kinetic studies are consistent with a model in which RFC exchanges dynamically at sites of repair. However, its persistent localization at stalled NER complexes suggests that RFC remains targeted to the repair complex even after loading of PCNA. We speculate that RFC associates with the downstream 5′ phosphate after loading; such interaction would prevent possible signaling events initiated by the RFC-like Rad17 and may assist in unloading of PCNA. PMID:20713449

  10. Inhibition of Transforming Growth Factor-Beta1 SignalingAttenuates Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Activity in Response toGenotoxic Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Kirshner, Julia; Jobling, Michael F.; Pajares, Maria Jose; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Glick, Adam; Lavin, Martin F.; Koslov, Sergei; Shiloh, Yosef; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2006-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes DNA damage that elicits a cellular program of damage control coordinated by the kinase activity of ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM). Transforming growth factor {beta} (TGF{beta})-1, which is activated by radiation, is a potent and pleiotropic mediator of physiologic and pathologic processes. Here we show that TGF{beta} inhibition impedes the canonical cellular DNA damage stress response. Irradiated Tgf{beta}I null murine epithelial cells or human epithelial cells treated with a small-molecule inhibitor of TGF{beta} type I receptor kinase exhibit decreased phosphorylation of Chk2, Rad17, and p53; reduced H2AX radiation-induced foci; and increased radiosensitivity compared with TGF{beta} competent cells. We determined that loss of TGF{beta} signaling in epithelial cells truncated ATM autophosphorylation and significantly reduced its kinase activity, without affecting protein abundance. Addition of TGF{beta} restored functional ATM and downstream DNA damage responses. These data reveal a heretofore undetected critical link between the microenvironment and ATM, which directs epithelial cell stress responses, cell fate, and tissue integrity. Thus, Tgf{beta}I, in addition to its role in homoeostatic growth control, plays a complex role in regulating responses to genotoxic stress, the failure of which would contribute to the development of cancer; conversely, inhibiting TGF{beta} may be used to advantage in cancer therapy.

  11. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Vpr Induces DNA Replication Stress In Vitro and In Vivo▿

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Erik S.; Sherman, Michael P.; Blackett, Jana L.; Neidleman, Jason A.; Kreis, Christophe; Mundt, Pamela; Williams, Samuel A.; Warmerdam, Maria; Kahn, James; Hecht, Frederick M.; Grant, Robert M.; de Noronha, Carlos M. C.; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Greene, Warner C.; Planelles, Vicente

    2006-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral protein R (Vpr) causes cell cycle arrest in G2. Vpr-expressing cells display the hallmarks of certain forms of DNA damage, specifically activation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related kinase, ATR. However, evidence that Vpr function is relevant in vivo or in the context of viral infection is still lacking. In the present study, we demonstrate that HIV-1 infection of primary, human CD4+ lymphocytes causes G2 arrest in a Vpr-dependent manner and that this response requires ATR, as shown by RNA interference. The event leading to ATR activation in CD4+ lymphocytes is the accumulation of replication protein A in nuclear foci, an indication that Vpr likely induces stalling of replication forks. Primary macrophages are refractory to ATR activation by Vpr, a finding that is consistent with the lack of detectable ATR, Rad17, and Chk1 protein expression in these nondividing cells. These observations begin to explain the remarkable resilience of macrophages to HIV-1-induced cytopathicity. To study the in vivo consequences of Vpr function, we isolated CD4+ lymphocytes from HIV-1-infected individuals and interrogated the cell cycle status of anti-p24Gag-immunoreactive cells. We report that infected cells in vivo display an aberrant cell cycle profile whereby a majority of cells have a 4N DNA content, consistent with the onset of G2 arrest. PMID:16956949

  12. DNA damage checkpoints in mammals.

    PubMed

    Niida, Hiroyuki; Nakanishi, Makoto

    2006-01-01

    DNA damage is a common event and probably leads to mutation or deletion within chromosomal DNA, which may cause cancer or premature aging. DNA damage induces several cellular responses including DNA repair, checkpoint activity and the triggering of apoptotic pathways. DNA damage checkpoints are associated with biochemical pathways that end delay or arrest of cell-cycle progression. These checkpoints engage damage sensor proteins, such as the Rad9-Rad1-Hus1 (9-1-1) complex, and the Rad17-RFC complex, in the detection of DNA damage and transduction of signals to ATM, ATR, Chk1 and Chk2 kinases. Chk1 and Chk2 kinases regulate Cdc25, Wee1 and p53 that ultimately inactivate cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) which inhibit cell-cycle progression. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which DNA damage is recognized by sensor proteins and signals are transmitted to Cdks. We classify the genes involved in checkpoint signaling into four categories, namely sensors, mediators, transducers and effectors, although their proteins have the broad activity, and thus this classification is for convenience and is not definitive. PMID:16314342

  13. Psoralen-sensitive mutant pso9-1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains a mutant allele of the DNA damage checkpoint gene MEC3.

    PubMed

    Cardone, J M; Revers, L F; Machado, R M; Bonatto, D; Brendel, M; Henriques, J A P

    2006-02-01

    Complementation analysis of the pso9-1 yeast mutant strain sensitive to photoactivated mono- and bifunctional psoralens, UV-light 254 nm, and nitrosoguanidine, with pso1 to pso8 mutants, confirmed that it contains a novel pso mutation. Molecular cloning via the reverse genetics complementation approach using a yeast genomic library suggested pso9-1 to be a mutant allele of the DNA damage checkpoint control gene MEC3. Non-complementation of several sensitivity phenotypes in pso9-1/mec3Delta diploids confirmed allelism. The pso9-1 mutant allele contains a -1 frameshift mutation (deletion of one A) at nucleotide position 802 (802delA), resulting in nine different amino acid residues from that point and a premature termination. This mutation affected the binding properties of Pso9-1p, abolishing its interactions with both Rad17p and Ddc1p. Further interaction assays employing mec3 constructions lacking the last 25 and 75 amino acid carboxyl termini were also not able to maintain stable interactions. Moreover, the pso9-1 mutant strain could no longer sense DNA damage since it continued in the cell cycle after 8-MOP + UVA treatment. Taken together, these observations allowed us to propose a model for checkpoint activation generated by photo-induced adducts. PMID:16202664

  14. Atrazine Triggers DNA Damage Response and Induces DNA Double-Strand Breaks in MCF-10A Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peixin; Yang, John; Ning, Jie; Wang, Michael; Song, Qisheng

    2015-06-24

    Atrazine, a pre-emergent herbicide in the chloro-s-triazine family, has been widely used in crop lands and often detected in agriculture watersheds, which is considered as a potential threat to human health. Although atrazine and its metabolites showed an elevated incidence of mammary tumors in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, no molecular evidence was found relevant to its carcinogenesis in humans. This study aims to determine whether atrazine could induce the expression of DNA damage response-related proteins in normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and to examine the cytotoxicity of atrazine at a molecular level. Our results indicate that a short-term exposure of MCF-10A to an environmentally-detectable concentration of atrazine (0.1 µg/mL) significantly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1) and phosphorylated Rad17 in the cells. Atrazine treatment increased H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) and the formation of γH2AX foci in the nuclei of MCF-10A cells. Atrazine also sequentially elevated DNA damage checkpoint proteins of ATM- and RAD3-related (ATR), ATRIP and phospho-Chk1, suggesting that atrazine could induce DNA double-strand breaks and trigger the DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway in MCF-10A cells. Further investigations are needed to determine whether atrazine-triggered DNA double-strand breaks and DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway occur in vivo.

  15. Clamping the Mec1/ATR checkpoint kinase into action.

    PubMed

    Majka, Jerzy; Burgers, Peter M J

    2007-05-15

    The yeast checkpoint protein kinase Mec1, the ortholog of human ATR, is the essential upstream regulator of the cell cycle checkpoint in response to DNA damage and to stalling of DNA replication forks. The activity of Mec1/ATR is not directly regulated by the DNA substrates that signal checkpoint activation. Rather the signal appears to be transduced to Mec1 by factors that interact with the signaling DNA substrates. One of these factors, the DNA damage checkpoint clamp Rad17-Mec3-Ddc1 (human 9-1-1) is loaded onto gapped DNA resulting from the partial repair of DNA damage, and the Ddc1 subunit of this complex activates Mec1. In vertebrate cells, the TopBP1 protein (Cut5 in S. pombe and Dpb11 in S. cervisiae) that is also required for establishment of the replication fork, functions during replication fork dysfunction to activate ATR. Both mechanisms of activation generally upregulate the kinase activity towards all downstream targets. PMID:17495536

  16. Inhibition of TGFbeta1 Signaling Attenutates ATM Activity inResponse to Genotoxic Stress

    SciTech Connect

    Kirshner, Julia; Jobling, Michael F.; Pajares, Maria Jose; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Glick, Adam B.; Lavin, Martin J.; Koslov, Sergei; Shiloh, Yosef; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2006-09-15

    Ionizing radiation causes DNA damage that elicits a cellular program of damage control coordinated by the kinase activity of ataxia telangiectasia mutated protein (ATM). Transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF{beta}), which is activated by radiation, is a potent and pleiotropic mediator of physiological and pathological processes. Here we show that TGF{beta} inhibition impedes the canonical cellular DNA damage stress response. Irradiated Tgf{beta}1 null murine epithelial cells or human epithelial cells treated with a small molecule inhibitor of TGF{beta} type I receptor kinase exhibit decreased phosphorylation of Chk2, Rad17 and p53, reduced {gamma}H2AX radiation-induced foci, and increased radiosensitivity compared to TGF{beta} competent cells. We determined that loss of TGF{beta} signaling in epithelial cells truncated ATM autophosphorylation and significantly reduced its kinase activity, without affecting protein abundance. Addition of TGF{beta} restored functional ATM and downstream DNA damage responses. These data reveal a heretofore undetected critical link between the microenvironment and ATM that directs epithelial cell stress responses, cell fate and tissue integrity. Thus, TGF{beta}1, in addition to its role in homoeostatic growth control, plays a complex role in regulating responses to genotoxic stress, the failure of which would contribute to the development of cancer; conversely, inhibiting TGF{beta} may be used to advantage in cancer therapy.

  17. Overexpression of Arabidopsis Molybdenum Cofactor Sulfurase Gene Confers Drought Tolerance in Maize (Zea mays L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiachang; Xiao, Yitao; Yue, Yuesen; Duan, Liusheng; Zhang, Mingcai; Li, Zhaohu

    2013-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a key component of the signaling system that integrates plant adaptive responses to abiotic stress. Overexpression of Arabidopsis molybdenum cofactor sulfurase gene (LOS5) in maize markedly enhanced the expression of ZmAO and aldehyde oxidase (AO) activity, leading to ABA accumulation and increased drought tolerance. Transgenic maize (Zea mays L.) exhibited the expected reductions in stomatal aperture, which led to decreased water loss and maintenance of higher relative water content (RWC) and leaf water potential. Also, transgenic maize subjected to drought treatment exhibited lower leaf wilting, electrolyte leakage, malondialdehyde (MDA) and H2O2 content, and higher activities of antioxidative enzymes and proline content compared to wild-type (WT) maize. Moreover, overexpression of LOS5 enhanced the expression of stress-regulated genes such as Rad 17, NCED1, CAT1, and ZmP5CS1 under drought stress conditions, and increased root system development and biomass yield after re-watering. The increased drought tolerance in transgenic plants was associated with ABA accumulation via activated AO and expression of stress-related gene via ABA induction, which sequentially induced a set of favorable stress-related physiological and biochemical responses. PMID:23326325

  18. Analysis of S. pombe SIN protein association to the SPB reveals two genetically separable states of the SIN.

    PubMed

    Wachowicz, Paulina; Chasapi, Anastasia; Krapp, Andrea; Cano Del Rosario, Elena; Schmitter, Daniel; Sage, Daniel; Unser, Michael; Xenarios, Ioannis; Rougemont, Jacques; Simanis, Viesturs

    2015-02-15

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe septation initiation network (SIN) regulates cytokinesis, and asymmetric association of SIN proteins with the mitotic spindle pole bodies (SPBs) is important for its regulation. Here, we have used semi-automated image analysis to study SIN proteins in large numbers of wild-type and mutant cells. Our principal conclusions are: first, that the association of Cdc7p with the SPBs in early mitosis is frequently asymmetric, with a bias in favour of the new SPB; second, that the early association of Cdc7p-GFP to the SPB depends on Plo1p but not Spg1p, and is unaffected by mutations that influence its asymmetry in anaphase; third, that Cdc7p asymmetry in anaphase B is delayed by Pom1p and by activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint, and is promoted by Rad24p; and fourth, that the length of the spindle, expressed as a fraction of the length of the cell, at which Cdc7p becomes asymmetric is similar in cells dividing at different sizes. These data reveal that multiple regulatory mechanisms control the SIN in mitosis and lead us to propose a two-state model to describe the SIN.

  19. Potential spoilage yeasts in winery environments: Characterization and proteomic analysis of Trigonopsis cantarellii.

    PubMed

    Portugal, Cauré; Pinto, Luís; Ribeiro, Miguel; Tenorio, Carmen; Igrejas, Gilberto; Ruiz-Larrea, Fernanda

    2015-10-01

    Wine microbiota is complex and includes a wide diversity of yeast species. Few of them are able to survive under the restrictive conditions of dry red wines. In our study we detected and identified seven yeast species of the order Saccharomycetales that can be considered potential spoilers of wines due to physiological traits such as acidogenic metabolism and off-odor generation: Arthroascus schoenii, Candida ishiwadae, Meyerozyma guilliermondii, Pichia holstii, Pichia manshurica, Trigonopsis cantarellii, and Trigonopsis variabilis. Based on the prevalence of T. cantarellii isolates in the wine samples of our study, we further characterized this species, determined molecular and phenotypic features, and performed a proteomic analysis to identify differentially expressed proteins at mid-exponential growth phase in the presence of ethanol in the culture broth. This yeast species is shown to be able to grow in the presence of ethanol by expressing heat shock proteins (Hsp70, Hsp71) and a DNA damage-related protein (Rad24), and to be able to confer spoilage characteristics on wine. PMID:26119188

  20. Spatial control of translation repression and polarized growth by conserved NDR kinase Orb6 and RNA-binding protein Sts5.

    PubMed

    Nuñez, Illyce; Rodriguez Pino, Marbelys; Wiley, David J; Das, Maitreyi E; Chen, Chuan; Goshima, Tetsuya; Kume, Kazunori; Hirata, Dai; Toda, Takashi; Verde, Fulvia

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins contribute to the formation of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granules by phase transition, but regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood. Conserved fission yeast NDR (Nuclear Dbf2-Related) kinase Orb6 governs cell morphogenesis in part by spatially controlling Cdc42 GTPase. Here we describe a novel, independent function for Orb6 kinase in negatively regulating the recruitment of RNA-binding protein Sts5 into RNPs to promote polarized cell growth. We find that Orb6 kinase inhibits Sts5 recruitment into granules, its association with processing (P) bodies, and degradation of Sts5-bound mRNAs by promoting Sts5 interaction with 14-3-3 protein Rad24. Many Sts5-bound mRNAs encode essential factors for polarized cell growth, and Orb6 kinase spatially and temporally controls the extent of Sts5 granule formation. Disruption of this control system affects cell morphology and alters the pattern of polarized cell growth, revealing a role for Orb6 kinase in the spatial control of translational repression that enables normal cell morphogenesis. PMID:27474797

  1. Spatial control of translation repression and polarized growth by conserved NDR kinase Orb6 and RNA-binding protein Sts5

    PubMed Central

    Nuñez, Illyce; Rodriguez Pino, Marbelys; Wiley, David J; Das, Maitreyi E; Chen, Chuan; Goshima, Tetsuya; Kume, Kazunori; Hirata, Dai; Toda, Takashi; Verde, Fulvia

    2016-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins contribute to the formation of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) granules by phase transition, but regulatory mechanisms are not fully understood. Conserved fission yeast NDR (Nuclear Dbf2-Related) kinase Orb6 governs cell morphogenesis in part by spatially controlling Cdc42 GTPase. Here we describe a novel, independent function for Orb6 kinase in negatively regulating the recruitment of RNA-binding protein Sts5 into RNPs to promote polarized cell growth. We find that Orb6 kinase inhibits Sts5 recruitment into granules, its association with processing (P) bodies, and degradation of Sts5-bound mRNAs by promoting Sts5 interaction with 14-3-3 protein Rad24. Many Sts5-bound mRNAs encode essential factors for polarized cell growth, and Orb6 kinase spatially and temporally controls the extent of Sts5 granule formation. Disruption of this control system affects cell morphology and alters the pattern of polarized cell growth, revealing a role for Orb6 kinase in the spatial control of translational repression that enables normal cell morphogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14216.001 PMID:27474797

  2. Impaired Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Regulation in Response to Ionizing Radiation in Human Fibroblast Cells with Individual Knock-down of 25 Genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Casey, Rachael; Mehta, Satish; Jeevarajan, Antony; Pierson, Duane; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have demonstrated that genes with upregulated expression induced by IR may play important roles in DNA damage sensing, cell cycle checkpoint and chromosomal repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR and its impact on cytogenetic responses to ionizing radiation has not been systematically studied. In our present study, the expression of 25 genes selected based on their transcriptional changes in response to IR or from their known DNA repair roles were individually knocked down by siRNA transfection in human fibroblast cells. Chromosome aberrations (CA) and micronuclei (MN) formation were measured as the cytogenetic endpoints. Our results showed that the yield of MN and/or CA formation were significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes that included Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway; XPA in the NER pathway; RPA1 in the MMR pathway; RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes including MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, and SESN1 and SUMO1 showed significant inhibition of cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, p21 and MLH1 expression resulted in both enhanced cell cycle progression and significantly higher yield of cytogenetic damage, indicating the involvement of these gene products in both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Of these 11 genes that affected the cytogenetic response, 9 were up-regulated in the cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulating the biological consequences after IR. Failure to express these IR-responsive genes, such as by gene mutation, could seriously change the outcome of the post IR scenario and lead to carcinogenesis.

  3. Evaluating HapMap SNP data transferability in a large-scale genotyping project involving 175 cancer-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Ribas, Gloria; González-Neira, Anna; Salas, Antonio; Milne, Roger L; Vega, Ana; Carracedo, Begoña; González, Emilio; Barroso, Eva; Fernández, Lara P; Yankilevich, Patricio; Robledo, Mercedes; Carracedo, Angel; Benítez, Javier

    2006-02-01

    One of the many potential uses of the HapMap project is its application to the investigation of complex disease aetiology among a wide range of populations. This study aims to assess the transferability of HapMap SNP data to the Spanish population in the context of cancer research. We have carried out a genotyping study in Spanish subjects involving 175 candidate cancer genes using an indirect gene-based approach and compared results with those for HapMap CEU subjects. Allele frequencies were very consistent between the two samples, with a high positive correlation (R) of 0.91 (P<1x10(-6)). Linkage disequilibrium patterns and block structures across each gene were also very similar, with disequilibrium coefficient (r (2)) highly correlated (R=0.95, P<1x10(-6)). We found that of the 21 genes that contained at least one block larger than 60 kb, nine (ATM, ATR, BRCA1, ERCC6, FANCC, RAD17, RAD50, RAD54B and XRCC4) belonged to the GO category "DNA repair". Haplotype frequencies per gene were also highly correlated (mean R=0.93), as was haplotype diversity (R=0.91, P<1x10(-6)). "Yin yang" haplotypes were observed for 43% of the genes analysed and 18% of those were identical to the ancestral haplotype (identified in Chimpazee). Finally, the portability of tagSNPs identified in the HapMap CEU data using pairwise r (2) thresholds of 0.8 and 0.5 was assessed by applying these to the Spanish and current HapMap data for 66 genes. In general, the HapMap tagSNPs performed very well. Our results show generally high concordance with HapMap data in allele frequencies and haplotype distributions and confirm the applicability of HapMap SNP data to the study of complex diseases among the Spanish population.

  4. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  5. Atrazine Triggers DNA Damage Response and Induces DNA Double-Strand Breaks in MCF-10A Cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Peixin; Yang, John; Ning, Jie; Wang, Michael; Song, Qisheng

    2015-01-01

    Atrazine, a pre-emergent herbicide in the chloro-s-triazine family, has been widely used in crop lands and often detected in agriculture watersheds, which is considered as a potential threat to human health. Although atrazine and its metabolites showed an elevated incidence of mammary tumors in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, no molecular evidence was found relevant to its carcinogenesis in humans. This study aims to determine whether atrazine could induce the expression of DNA damage response-related proteins in normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and to examine the cytotoxicity of atrazine at a molecular level. Our results indicate that a short-term exposure of MCF-10A to an environmentally-detectable concentration of atrazine (0.1 µg/mL) significantly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1) and phosphorylated Rad17 in the cells. Atrazine treatment increased H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) and the formation of γH2AX foci in the nuclei of MCF-10A cells. Atrazine also sequentially elevated DNA damage checkpoint proteins of ATM- and RAD3-related (ATR), ATRIP and phospho-Chk1, suggesting that atrazine could induce DNA double-strand breaks and trigger the DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway in MCF-10A cells. Further investigations are needed to determine whether atrazine-triggered DNA double-strand breaks and DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway occur in vivo. PMID:26114388

  6. Atrazine Triggers DNA Damage Response and Induces DNA Double-Strand Breaks in MCF-10A Cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peixin; Yang, John; Ning, Jie; Wang, Michael; Song, Qisheng

    2015-01-01

    Atrazine, a pre-emergent herbicide in the chloro-s-triazine family, has been widely used in crop lands and often detected in agriculture watersheds, which is considered as a potential threat to human health. Although atrazine and its metabolites showed an elevated incidence of mammary tumors in female Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats, no molecular evidence was found relevant to its carcinogenesis in humans. This study aims to determine whether atrazine could induce the expression of DNA damage response-related proteins in normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and to examine the cytotoxicity of atrazine at a molecular level. Our results indicate that a short-term exposure of MCF-10A to an environmentally-detectable concentration of atrazine (0.1 µg/mL) significantly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1) and phosphorylated Rad17 in the cells. Atrazine treatment increased H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) and the formation of γH2AX foci in the nuclei of MCF-10A cells. Atrazine also sequentially elevated DNA damage checkpoint proteins of ATM- and RAD3-related (ATR), ATRIP and phospho-Chk1, suggesting that atrazine could induce DNA double-strand breaks and trigger the DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway in MCF-10A cells. Further investigations are needed to determine whether atrazine-triggered DNA double-strand breaks and DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway occur in vivo. PMID:26114388

  7. Small ubiquitin-related modifier ligase activity of Mms21 is required for maintenance of chromosome integrity during the unperturbed mitotic cell division cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rai, Ragini; Varma, Satya P M V; Shinde, Nikhil; Ghosh, Shilpa; Kumaran, Srikala P; Skariah, Geena; Laloraya, Shikha

    2011-04-22

    The SUMO ligase activity of Mms21/Nse2, a conserved member of the Smc5/6 complex, is required for resisting extrinsically induced genotoxic stress. We report that the Mms21 SUMO ligase activity is also required during the unchallenged mitotic cell cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. SUMO ligase-defective cells were slow growing and spontaneously incurred DNA damage. These cells required caffeine-sensitive Mec1 kinase-dependent checkpoint signaling for survival even in the absence of extrinsically induced genotoxic stress. SUMO ligase-defective cells were sensitive to replication stress and displayed synthetic growth defects with DNA damage checkpoint-defective mutants such as mec1, rad9, and rad24. MMS21 SUMO ligase and mediator of replication checkpoint 1 gene (MRC1) were epistatic with respect to hydroxyurea-induced replication stress or methyl methanesulfonate-induced DNA damage sensitivity. Subjecting Mms21 SUMO ligase-deficient cells to transient replication stress resulted in enhancement of cell cycle progression defects such as mitotic delay and accumulation of hyperploid cells. Consistent with the spontaneous activation of the DNA damage checkpoint pathway observed in the Mms21-mediated sumoylation-deficient cells, enhanced frequency of chromosome breakage and loss was detected in these mutant cells. A mutation in the conserved cysteine 221 that is engaged in coordination of the zinc ion in Loop 2 of the Mms21 SPL-RING E3 ligase catalytic domain resulted in strong replication stress sensitivity and also conferred slow growth and Mec1 dependence to unchallenged mitotically dividing cells. Our findings establish Mms21-mediated sumoylation as a determinant of cell cycle progression and maintenance of chromosome integrity during the unperturbed mitotic cell division cycle in budding yeast. PMID:21324902

  8. A Genetic Screen for Fission Yeast Gene Deletion Mutants Exhibiting Hypersensitivity to Latrunculin A

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Farzad; Michalski, Dorothy; Karagiannis, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Fission yeast cells treated with low doses of the actin depolymerizing drug, latrunculin A (LatA), delay entry into mitosis via a mechanism that is dependent on both the Clp1p and Rad24p proteins. During this delay, cells remain in a cytokinesis-competent state that is characterized by continuous repair and/or reestablishment of the actomyosin ring. In this manner, cells ensure the faithful completion of the preceding cytokinesis in response to perturbation of the cell division machinery. To uncover other genes with a role in this response, or simply genes with roles in adapting to LatA-induced stress, we carried out a genome-wide screen and identified a group of 38 gene deletion mutants that are hyper-sensitive to the drug. As expected, we found genes affecting cytokinesis and/or the actin cytoskeleton within this set (ain1, acp2, imp2). We also identified genes with roles in histone modification (tra1, ngg1), intracellular transport (apl5, aps3), and glucose-mediated signaling (git3, git5, git11, pka1, cgs2). Importantly, while the identified gene deletion mutants are prone to cytokinesis failure in the presence of LatA, they are nevertheless fully capable of cell division in the absence of the drug. These results indicate that fission yeast cells make use of a diverse set of regulatory modules to counter abnormal cytoskeletal perturbations, and furthermore, that these modules act redundantly to ensure cell survival and proliferation. PMID:27466272

  9. Cytogenetic Response to Ionizing Radiation Exposure in Human Fibroblasts with Suppressed Expression of Non-DSB Repair Genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Hammond, Dianne; Mehta, Satish K.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Pierson, Duane L.; Wu, Honglu

    2009-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in double-strand break (DSB) repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been well studied. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of IR inducible genes in radiation-induced chromosome aberrations and micronuclei formation. In the study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. Frequencies of micronuclei (MN) formation and chromosome aberrations were measured to determine the efficiency of cytogenetic repair, and the fraction of bi-nucleated cells in the MN analysis was used as a marker for cell cycle progression. In response to gamma radiation, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of five genes: Ku70 (DSB repair pathway), XPA (nucleotide excision repair pathway), RPA1 (mismatch repair pathway), RAD17 and RBBP8 (cell cycle control). Knocked-down expression of four genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Moreover, decreased XPA, p21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Nine of these eleven genes, whose knock-down expression affected cytogenetic repair, were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate IR

  10. c-Myc quadruplex-forming sequence Pu-27 induces extensive damage in both telomeric and nontelomeric regions of DNA.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Ashraful; Thomas, Shelia D; Murty, Vundavalli V; Sedoris, Kara J; Miller, Donald M

    2014-03-21

    Quadruplex-forming DNA sequences are present throughout the eukaryotic genome, including in telomeric DNA. We have shown that the c-Myc promoter quadruplex-forming sequence Pu-27 selectively kills transformed cells (Sedoris, K. C., Thomas, S. D., Clarkson, C. R., Muench, D., Islam, A., Singh, R., and Miller, D. M. (2012) Genomic c-Myc quadruplex DNA selectively kills leukemia. Mol. Cancer Ther. 11, 66-76). In this study, we show that Pu-27 induces profound DNA damage, resulting in striking chromosomal abnormalities in the form of chromatid or chromosomal breaks, radial formation, and telomeric DNA loss, which induces γ-H2AX in U937 cells. Pu-27 down-regulates telomeric shelterin proteins, DNA damage response mediators (RAD17 and RAD50), double-stranded break repair molecule 53BP1, G2 checkpoint regulators (CHK1 and CHK2), and anti-apoptosis gene survivin. Interestingly, there are no changes of DNA repair molecules H2AX, BRCA1, and the telomere maintenance gene, hTERT. ΔB-U937, where U937 cells stably transfected with deleted basic domain of TRF2 is partially sensitive to Pu-27 but exhibits no changes in expression of shelterin proteins. However, there is an up-regulation of CHK1, CHK2, H2AX, BRCA1, and survivin. Telomere dysfunction-induced foci assay revealed co-association of TRF1with γ-H2AX in ATM deficient cells, which are differentially sensitive to Pu-27 than ATM proficient cells. Alt (alternating lengthening of telomere) cells are relatively resistant to Pu-27, but there are no significant changes of telomerase activity in both Alt and non-Alt cells. Lastly, we show that this Pu-27-mediated sensitivity is p53-independent. The data therefore support two conclusions. First, Pu-27 induces DNA damage within both telomeric and nontelomeric regions of the genome. Second, Pu-27-mediated telomeric damage is due, at least in part, to compromise of the telomeric shelterin protein complex.