Science.gov

Sample records for radar absorbing structures

  1. Microcellular ceramic foams for radar absorbing structures

    SciTech Connect

    Huling, J.; Phillips, D.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this project is to develop a lightweight, semi-structural, radar-absorbing ceramic foam that can be incorporated into aircraft exhaust systems to replace many of the currently used dense ceramic parts and thereby improve the radar cross section. Although the conventional processes for producing ceramic foams have not been able to provide materials that meet the design specifications for high strength at low density, we have developed and demonstrated a novel sol-gel emulsion process for preparing microcellular ceramic foams in which compositional and microstructural control is expected to provide the requisite high-temperature radar-absorption, strength-to-weight ratio, and thermal insulative properties.

  2. Radar Absorbing Material Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    simulations of coated plates were performed to estimate the effectiveness of the absorbing layers in reducing radar cross section . The reduction in monostatic... radar cross section value is shown by plotting the radar cross section of the plate with and without radar absorbing material. ε t 15. NUMBER OF

  3. The design of broadband radar absorbing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suk, Go H.

    1990-09-01

    There has been a growing and widespread interest in radar absorbing material technology. As the name implies, radar absorbing materials or RAM's are coatings whose electric and magnetic properties have been selected to allow the absorption of microwave energy at discrete or broadband frequencies. In military applications low radar cross section (RCS) of a vehicle may be required in order to escape detection while a covert mission is being carried on. These requirements have led to the very low observable or stealth technology that reduces the probability of detection of an aircraft. The design of radar absorbing materials is limited by constraints on the allowable volume and weight of the surface coating, and it is difficult to design a broadband radar absorbing structure in limited volume. This thesis investigates the use of lossy dielectric materials of high dielectric permittivity in multilayer composites for the production of low radar cross section (RCS). The analysis is done by computing the plane wave reflection coefficient at the exterior surface of the composite coating by means of a computer program which selects layer parameters which determine low reflection coefficients for electromagnetic radiation under constraint of limited layer thickness as well as maximum frequency bandwidth.

  4. Radar Absorbing Materials for Cube Stealth Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheli, D.; Pastore, R.; Vricella, A.; Marchetti, M.

    A Cube Stealth Satellite is proposed for potential applications in defense system. Particularly, the faces of the satellite exposed to the Earth are made of nanostructured materials able to absorb radar surveillance electromagnetic waves, conferring stealth capability to the cube satellite. Microwave absorbing and shielding material tiles are proposed using composite materials consisting in epoxy-resin and carbon nanotubes filler. The electric permittivity of the composite nanostructured materials is measured and discussed. Such data are used by the modeling algorithm to design the microwave absorbing and the shielding faces of the cube satellite. The electromagnetic modeling takes into account for several incidence angles (0-80°), extended frequency band (2-18 GHz), and for the minimization of the electromagnetic reflection coefficient. The evolutionary algorithm used for microwave layered microwave absorber modeling is the recently developed Winning Particle Optimization. The mathematical model of the absorbing structure is finally experimentally validated by comparing the electromagnetic simulation to the measurement of the manufactured radar absorber tile. Nanostructured composite materials manufacturing process and electromagnetic reflection measurements methods are described. Finally, a finite element method analysis of the electromagnetic scattering by cube stealth satellite is performed.

  5. Multilayer Radar Absorbing Non-Woven Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedov, A. V.; Nazarov, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    We study the electrical properties of multilayer radar absorbing materials obtained by adding nonwoven sheets of dielectric fibers with an intermediate layer of electrically conductive carbon fibers. Multilayer materials that absorb electromagnetic radiation in a wide frequency range are obtained by varying the content of the carbon fibers. The carbon-fiber content dependent mechanism of absorption of electromagnetic radiation by sheets and multilayer materials is considered.

  6. Graphene based tunable fractal Hilbert curve array broadband radar absorbing screen for radar cross section reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xianjun; Hu, Zhirun; Liu, Peiguo

    2014-11-15

    This paper proposes a new type of graphene based tunable radar absorbing screen. The absorbing screen consists of Hilbert curve metal strip array and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) graphene sheet. The graphene based screen is not only tunable when the chemical potential of the graphene changes, but also has broadband effective absorption. The absorption bandwidth is from 8.9GHz to 18.1GHz, ie., relative bandwidth of more than 68%, at chemical potential of 0eV, which is significantly wider than that if the graphene sheet had not been employed. As the chemical potential varies from 0 to 0.4eV, the central frequency of the screen can be tuned from 13.5GHz to 19.0GHz. In the proposed structure, Hilbert curve metal strip array was designed to provide multiple narrow band resonances, whereas the graphene sheet directly underneath the metal strip array provides tunability and averagely required surface resistance so to significantly extend the screen operation bandwidth by providing broadband impedance matching and absorption. In addition, the thickness of the screen has been optimized to achieve nearly the minimum thickness limitation for a nonmagnetic absorber. The working principle of this absorbing screen is studied in details, and performance under various incident angles is presented. This work extends applications of graphene into tunable microwave radar cross section (RCS) reduction applications.

  7. Graphene-enabled electrically switchable radar-absorbing surfaces.

    PubMed

    Balci, Osman; Polat, Emre O; Kakenov, Nurbek; Kocabas, Coskun

    2015-03-20

    Radar-absorbing materials are used in stealth technologies for concealment of an object from radar detection. Resistive and/or magnetic composite materials are used to reduce the backscattered microwave signals. Inability to control electrical properties of these materials, however, hinders the realization of active camouflage systems. Here, using large-area graphene electrodes, we demonstrate active surfaces that enable electrical control of reflection, transmission and absorption of microwaves. Instead of tuning bulk material property, our strategy relies on electrostatic tuning of the charge density on an atomically thin electrode, which operates as a tunable metal in microwave frequencies. Notably, we report large-area adaptive radar-absorbing surfaces with tunable reflection suppression ratio up to 50 dB with operation voltages <5 V. Using the developed surfaces, we demonstrate various device architectures including pixelated and curved surfaces. Our results provide a significant step in realization of active camouflage systems in microwave frequencies.

  8. Graphene-enabled electrically switchable radar-absorbing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Osman; Polat, Emre O.; Kakenov, Nurbek; Kocabas, Coskun

    2015-03-01

    Radar-absorbing materials are used in stealth technologies for concealment of an object from radar detection. Resistive and/or magnetic composite materials are used to reduce the backscattered microwave signals. Inability to control electrical properties of these materials, however, hinders the realization of active camouflage systems. Here, using large-area graphene electrodes, we demonstrate active surfaces that enable electrical control of reflection, transmission and absorption of microwaves. Instead of tuning bulk material property, our strategy relies on electrostatic tuning of the charge density on an atomically thin electrode, which operates as a tunable metal in microwave frequencies. Notably, we report large-area adaptive radar-absorbing surfaces with tunable reflection suppression ratio up to 50 dB with operation voltages <5 V. Using the developed surfaces, we demonstrate various device architectures including pixelated and curved surfaces. Our results provide a significant step in realization of active camouflage systems in microwave frequencies.

  9. Graphene-enabled electrically switchable radar absorbing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balci, Osman; Polat, Emre Ozan; Kakenov, Nurbek; Kocabas, Coskun

    2015-03-01

    Radar absorbing materials are used in stealth technologies for concealment of an object from radar detection. Resistive and/or magnetic composite materials are used to reduce the backscattered microwave signals. Inability to control electrical properties of these materials however, hinders the realization of active camouflage systems which require adaptive surfaces operating in microwave frequencies. Here, using large-area graphene electrodes, we demonstrate a new class of active surfaces which enables unprecedented ability to control reflection, transmission and absorption of microwaves by electrical means. Instead of tuning bulk material property, our strategy relies on electrostatic tuning of the charge density on an atomically thin electrode which operates as a tunable metal in microwave frequencies. Notably, we fabricated large area adaptive radar absorbing surfaces with tunable reflection suppression ratio up to 50 dB with operation voltages less than 5 V. These electrically switchable radar absorbing surfaces provide a significant step in realization of active camouflage systems and adaptive cloaking in microwave frequencies, which cannot be realized by conventional materials.

  10. Study on the electromagnetic properties of a coated radar absorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuan-Qin

    2012-06-01

    The sol-gel method is used to fabricate Fe crystalline powders coated with SiO2. By controlling the molar ratio R of diluted water to tetraethoxysilane (TEOS), Fe powders coated with SiO2 with different morphological characteristics are fabricated. The influence of the core diameter on electromagnetic parameters is investigated. The effect of the amount of the coating material SiO2 on electromagnetic parameters is given. Radar wave absorbing properties of Fe coated with SiO2 and TiO2 respectively are compared.

  11. Effect of weight fraction of carbon black and number of plies of E-glass fiber to reflection loss of E-glass/ripoxy composite for radar absorbing structure (RAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widyastuti, Ramadhan, Rizal; Ardhyananta, Hosta; Zainuri, Mochamad

    2013-09-01

    Nowadays, studies on investigating radar absorbing structure (RAS) using fiber reinforced polymeric (FRP) composite materials are becoming popular research field because the electromagnetic properties of FRP composites can be tailored effectively by just adding some electromagnetic powders, such as carbon black, ferrite, carbonyl iron, and etc., to the matrix of composites. The RAS works not only as a load bearing structure to hold the antenna system, but also has the important function of absorbing the in-band electromagnetic wave coming from the electromagnetic energy of tracking systems. In this study, E-glass fiber reinforced ripoxy resin composite was fabricated by blending the conductive carbon black (Ketjenblack EC300J) with the binder matrix of the composite material and maximizing the coefficient of absorption more than 90% (more than -10 dB) within the X-band frequency (8 - 12 GHz). It was measured by electrical conductivity (LCR meter) and vector network analyzer (VNA). Finally, the composite RAS with 0.02 weight fraction of carbon black and 4 plies of E-glass fiber showed thickness of 2.1 mm, electrical conductivity of 8.33 × 10-6 S/m, and maximum reflection loss of -27.123 dB, which can absorb more than 90% of incident EM wave throughout the entire X-band frequency range, has been developed.

  12. Knitted radar absorbing materials (RAM) based on nickel-cobalt magnetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teber, Ahmet; Unver, Ibrahim; Kavas, Huseyin; Aktas, Bekir; Bansal, Rajeev

    2016-05-01

    There has been a long-standing interest in the development of flexible, lightweight, thin, and reconfigurable radar absorbing materials (RAM) for military applications such as camouflaging ground-based hardware against airborne radar observation. The use of polymeric Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fabrics as a host matrix for magnetic metal nano-particles (either at the yarn-stage or after weaving the fabric) for shielding and absorbing applications has been described in the literature. In our experimental investigation, the relative concentrations of Nickel and Cobalt as well as the coating time are varied with a view to optimizing the microwave absorption characteristics of the resulting PAN-based composite material in the radar-frequency bands (X, Ku, and K). It is found that the PAN samples with the shortest coating time have the best return losses (under -20 dB return loss over a moderate bandwidth).

  13. Experimental Demonstration of Printed Graphene Nano-flakes Enabled Flexible and Conformable Wideband Radar Absorbers

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xianjun; Pan, Kewen; Hu, Zhirun

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we have designed, fabricated and experimentally characterized a printed graphene nano-flakes enabled flexible and conformable wideband radar absorber. The absorber covers both X (8–12 GHz) and Ku (12–18 GHz) bands and is printed on flexible substrate using graphene nano-flakes conductive ink through stencil printing method. The measured results show that an effective absorption (above 90%) bandwidth spans from 10.4 GHz to 19.7 GHz, namely a 62% fraction bandwidth, with only 2 mm thickness. The flexibility of the printed graphene nano-flakes enables the absorber conformably bending and attaching to a metal cylinder. The radar cross section (RCS) of the cylinder with and without absorber attachment has been compared and excellent absorption has been obtained. Only 3.6% bandwidth reduction has been observed comparing to that of un-bended absorber. This work has demonstrated unambiguously that printed graphene can provide flexible and conformable wideband radar absorption, which extends the graphene’s application to practical RCS reductions. PMID:27924823

  14. Experimental Demonstration of Printed Graphene Nano-flakes Enabled Flexible and Conformable Wideband Radar Absorbers.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xianjun; Pan, Kewen; Hu, Zhirun

    2016-12-07

    In this work, we have designed, fabricated and experimentally characterized a printed graphene nano-flakes enabled flexible and conformable wideband radar absorber. The absorber covers both X (8-12 GHz) and Ku (12-18 GHz) bands and is printed on flexible substrate using graphene nano-flakes conductive ink through stencil printing method. The measured results show that an effective absorption (above 90%) bandwidth spans from 10.4 GHz to 19.7 GHz, namely a 62% fraction bandwidth, with only 2 mm thickness. The flexibility of the printed graphene nano-flakes enables the absorber conformably bending and attaching to a metal cylinder. The radar cross section (RCS) of the cylinder with and without absorber attachment has been compared and excellent absorption has been obtained. Only 3.6% bandwidth reduction has been observed comparing to that of un-bended absorber. This work has demonstrated unambiguously that printed graphene can provide flexible and conformable wideband radar absorption, which extends the graphene's application to practical RCS reductions.

  15. Experimental Demonstration of Printed Graphene Nano-flakes Enabled Flexible and Conformable Wideband Radar Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xianjun; Pan, Kewen; Hu, Zhirun

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we have designed, fabricated and experimentally characterized a printed graphene nano-flakes enabled flexible and conformable wideband radar absorber. The absorber covers both X (8–12 GHz) and Ku (12–18 GHz) bands and is printed on flexible substrate using graphene nano-flakes conductive ink through stencil printing method. The measured results show that an effective absorption (above 90%) bandwidth spans from 10.4 GHz to 19.7 GHz, namely a 62% fraction bandwidth, with only 2 mm thickness. The flexibility of the printed graphene nano-flakes enables the absorber conformably bending and attaching to a metal cylinder. The radar cross section (RCS) of the cylinder with and without absorber attachment has been compared and excellent absorption has been obtained. Only 3.6% bandwidth reduction has been observed comparing to that of un-bended absorber. This work has demonstrated unambiguously that printed graphene can provide flexible and conformable wideband radar absorption, which extends the graphene’s application to practical RCS reductions.

  16. Structured metal film as a perfect absorber.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xiang; Jiang, Shang-Chi; Hu, Yu-Hui; Peng, Ru-Wen; Wang, Mu

    2013-08-07

    A new type of absorber, a four-tined fish-spear-like resonator (FFR), constructed by the two-photon polymerization process, is reported. An absorbance of more than 90% is experimentally realized and the resonance occurs in the space between the tines. Since a continuous layer of metallic thin film covers the structure, it is perfectly thermo- and electroconductive, which is the mostly desired feature for many applications.

  17. Fabrication of Organic Radar Absorbing Materials: A Report on the TIF Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    frequency dependent. The melt-injected material was macroscopically insulating with Maxwell-Wagner type relaxation. The relaxation frequency is...electrochemical deposits with p-Toluene sulfonic acid as the dopant.[205] Radar absorbing materials can be formed by loading an insulating polymer...1999, 4, 2622. (92) Jones, A. K., Wooding , E.R. IEEE Trans. Antennas and Propagation 1964, AP-12, 508. (93) Dallenbach, W.; Kleinsteuber, W. Hochfreq

  18. Structural geologic interpretations from radar imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeves, Robert G.

    1969-01-01

    Certain structural geologic features may be more readily recognized on sidelooking airborne radar (SLAR) images than on conventional aerial photographs, other remote sensor imagery, or by ground observations. SLAR systems look obliquely to one or both sides and their images resemble aerial photographs taken at low sun angle with the sun directly behind the camera. They differ from air photos in geometry, resolution, and information content. Radar operates at much lower frequencies than the human eye, camera, or infrared sensors, and thus "sees" differently. The lower frequency enables it to penetrate most clouds and some precipitation, haze, dust, and some vegetation. Radar provides its own illumination, which can be closely controlled in intensity and frequency. It is narrow band, or essentially monochromatic. Low relief and subdued features are accentuated when viewed from the proper direction. Runs over the same area in significantly different directions (more than 45° from each other), show that images taken in one direction may emphasize features that are not emphasized on those taken in the other direction; optimum direction is determined by those features which need to be emphasized for study purposes. Lineaments interpreted as faults stand out on radar imagery of central and western Nevada; folded sedimentary rocks cut by faults can be clearly seen on radar imagery of northern Alabama. In these areas, certain structural and stratigraphic features are more pronounced on radar images than on conventional photographs; thus radar imagery materially aids structural interpretation.

  19. Interaction of Electromagnetic Waves with Two-Dimensional Metal Covered with Radar Absorbing Material and Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chaohui; Hu, Xiwei; Jiang, Zhonghe

    2008-12-01

    A two-dimensional metal model is established to investigate the stealth mechanisms of radar absorbing material (RAM) and plasma when they cover the model together. Using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, the interaction of electromagnetic (EM) waves with the model can be studied. In this paper, three covering cases are considered: a. RAM or plasma covering the metal solely; b. RAM and plasma covering the metal, while plasma is placed outside; c. RAM and plasma covering the metal, while RAM is placed outside. The calculated results show that the covering order has a great influence on the absorption of EM waves. Compared to case a, case b has an advantage in the absorption of relatively high-frequency EM waves (HFWs), whereas case c has an advantage in the absorption of relatively low-frequency EM waves (LFWs). Through the optimization of the parameters of both plasma and RAM, it is hopeful to obtain a broad absorption band by RAM and plasma covering. Near-field attenuation rate and far-field radar cross section (RCS) are employed to compare the different cases.

  20. A shock absorber model for structure-borne noise analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaziz, Marouane; Nacivet, Samuel; Thouverez, Fabrice

    2015-08-01

    Shock absorbers are often responsible for undesirable structure-borne noise in cars. The early numerical prediction of this noise in the automobile development process can save time and money and yet remains a challenge for industry. In this paper, a new approach to predicting shock absorber structure-borne noise is proposed; it consists in modelling the shock absorber and including the main nonlinear phenomena responsible for discontinuities in the response. The model set forth herein features: compressible fluid behaviour, nonlinear flow rate-pressure relations, valve mechanical equations and rubber mounts. The piston, base valve and complete shock absorber model are compared with experimental results. Sensitivity of the shock absorber response is evaluated and the most important parameters are classified. The response envelope is also computed. This shock absorber model is able to accurately reproduce local nonlinear phenomena and improves our state of knowledge on potential noise sources within the shock absorber.

  1. Polarization independent broadband metamaterial absorber based on tapered helical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Sajal; Prajapati, Y. K.; Singh, V.; Saini, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    This communication presents a tapered helical structure as absorber, made of unconventional material i.e. metamaterial. Modeling, analytical study and the optimization of the absorber have been done. Quad helical optimized structure gives almost unity absorption at 499 nm wavelength and gives the absorption more than 75% from 300 nm to 1650 nm which is a very wide operating region with, average absorbance of 91.32%. Whereas, triple helical structure gives 85% average absorbance with the operating range from 300 nm to 1350 nm. Also, it is analyzed that the presented structures are polarization independent and broadband. Comparison of the proposed quad helical absorber with the existing metamaterial absorbers is done and found it is most eligible.

  2. Innovative Energy Absorbing Composite Material for Crashworthy Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-12

    Innovative Energy Absorbing Composite Material for Crashworthy Structures Charles E. Bakis, Edward C. Smith, Chandrashekhar Tiwari, Todd C. Henry...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Innovative Energy Absorbing Composite Material for Crashworthy Structures 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER N00014-09-1...vehicles by providing outstanding energy absorption with minimal weight. The structural element is an array of concentric fiber reinforced composite tubes

  3. Thin-film infrared absorber structures for advanced thermal detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, A. D.; Pedder, D. J.

    1988-06-01

    Imaging thermal detector technology is a rapidly advancing field in which the current emphasis is towards the development of very large arrays of very small pyroelectric detector elements. For maximum responsivity, each of the thin pyroelectric elements in an array must be provided with a thermal absorber to convert incoming infrared radiation into heat. This paper describes one such absorber structure, comprising a thin metal film, impedance matched to free space, and a quarter-wave polymer film which offers an acceptably low thermal mass. The structure and properties of this thin-film absorber are compared with those of an electroplated platinum black absorber commonly used in thermal detectors. The theory of the absorber is presented and good agreement is shown between calculated and experimentally derived absorption spectra.

  4. Crash-Energy-Absorbing Composite Subfloor Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, Gary L.

    1988-01-01

    Simple method of predicting energy-absorption capability of composite subfloor beam structure developed. Based upon weighted sum of energy-absorption capabilities of constituent elements of subfloor beam. Procedure general and applicable to wide range of subfloor beam structures.

  5. Simulation of terahertz metamaterial absorbers with microbolometer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Jie; Wang, Jun; Guo, Xiaopei; Jiang, Yadong; Fan, Lin

    2014-09-01

    The metamaterial absorber in terahertz (THz) region, with the metal pattern layer/dielectric spacer/metal reflective layer sandwich structure, is characterized in this paper. The principle of metamaterial absorber absorbing terahertz wave was introduced firstly. The top layer of metamaterial absorber is a periodically patterned with metallic subwavelength structure, which also serves as an electric resonator. The bottom layer is a thick metal plane, which is used to reduce THz wave transmittance. The dielectric layer between two metallic layers results in magnetic resonance and the resonance depends on the thickness and dielectric constant of the dielectric layer. The absorption of metamaterial absorber to terahertz wave was simulated with CST software. The relationship between the size of the metamaterial structure and absorption frequency was analyzed with the simulation results. The results indicate that the absorption frequency is affected by the cell constant and geometric structure of top metal pattern, and absorption rate is related to both the thickness of dielectric layer and the size of resonator. In the end, the possibility of integrating the metamaterial absorber with micro-bridge structure to design room temperature terahertz detector was discussed, and the manufacturing process was introduced about room temperature terahertz detector with high THz wave absorption rate.

  6. Imaging radar investigations of the Sudbury structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, P. D.; Singhroy, V. H.; Slaney, V. R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports preliminary results of airborne imaging radar studies of the Sudbury structure carried out in preparation for a CCRS European Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1) investigation. The data used were synthetic aperture radar (SAR) C-band (5.66 cm) images acquired from about 6 km altitude in 1987. They cover the Sudbury area in both wide and narrow swath modes, with east-west flight paths and north-south illumination directions. Narrow swath resolution is 6 m in range and azimuth; wide swath resolution is 20 m in range and 10 m in azimuth. The STAR imagery has proven highly effective for field use, providing excellent rendition of topography and topographically expressed structure. Reasons for this include the illumination geometry, notably the look azimuth normal to the long axis of the Sudbury structure and Penokean fold axes, the good spatial resolution, and the short wavelength. Forested areas in the Sudbury area tend to be uniformly rough at C-band wavelength, with backscatter dominated by local incidence angle (i.e., topography). Field work using the SAR imagery has to date been concentrated in the North Range and Superior Province as far north as the Benny greenstone belt. This area was chosen for initial investigation of the original size and shape of the Sudbury structure because the effects of the Penokean Orogeny were minimal there. Field work using SAR indicates that there has been little postimpact deformation of the North Range or adjacent Superior Province rock. There appears to be no evidence for an outer ring concentric with the North Range as indicated by early Landsat imagery. The apparent ring shown by Landsat is visible on the SAR imagery as the intersection of two regional fracture patterns not related to the Sudbury structure. There is no outer ring visible southwest of the structure. This can reasonably be explained by Penokean deformation, but there is no outer ring to the northeast cutting the relatively undeformed Huronian

  7. Structurally tunable resonant absorption bands in ultrathin broadband plasmonic absorbers.

    PubMed

    Butun, Serkan; Aydin, Koray

    2014-08-11

    Light absorption is a fundamental optical process playing significantly important role in wide variety of applications ranging from photovoltaics to photothermal therapy. Semiconductors have well-defined absorption bands with low-energy edge dictated by the band gap energy, therefore it is rather challenging to tune the absorption bandwidth of semiconductors. However, resonant absorbers based on plasmonic nanostructures and optical metamaterials emerged as alternative light absorbers due to spectrally selective absorption bands resulting from optical resonances. Recently, a broadband plasmonic absorber design was introduced by Aydin et al. with a reasonably high broadband absorption. Based on that design, here, structurally tunable, broadband absorbers with improved performance are demonstrated. This broadband absorber has a total thickness of 190 nm with 80% average measured absorption (90% simulated absorption) over the entire visible spectrum (400 - 700 nm). Moreover, the effect of the metal and the oxide thicknesses on the absorption spectra are investigated and results indicate that the shorter and the longer band-edge of broadband absorption can be structurally tuned with the metal and the oxide thicknesses, as well as with the resonator size. Detailed numerical simulations shed light on the type of optical resonances that contribute to the broadband absorption response and provide a design guideline for realizing plasmonic absorbers with structurally tunable bandwidths.

  8. Reversibly tunable coupled and decoupled super absorbing structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nan; Dong, Ziye; Ji, Dengxin; Song, Haomin; Zeng, Xie; Liu, Zhejun; Jiang, Suhua; Xu, Yun; Bernussi, Ayrton; Li, Wei; Gan, Qiaoqiang

    2016-02-01

    We differentiate the spacer-dependent peak shift in coupled and decoupled super absorbing structures based on magnetic resonance and interference mechanism, respectively, which is experimentally validated by low-cost and large-area structures fabricated using lithography-free processes. The reversible real-time spectral tunability is then demonstrated by incorporating a thermally tunable polymeric spacer layer.

  9. Radar response from vegetation with nodal structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanchard, B. J.; Oneill, P. E.

    1984-01-01

    Radar images from the SEASAT synthetic aperture radar (SAR) produced unusually high returns from corn and sorghum fields, which seem to indicate a correlation between nodal separation in the stalk and the wavelength of the radar. These images also show no difference in return from standing or harvested corn. Further investigation using images from the Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A) substantiated these observations and showed a degradation of the high return with time after harvest. From portions of corn and sweet sorghum stalks that were sampled to measure stalk water content, it was determined that near and after maturity the water becomes more concentrated in the stalk nodes. The stalk then becomes a linear sequence of alternating dielectrics as opposed to a long slender cylinder with uniform dielectric properties.

  10. Acoustic metamaterial structures based on multi-frequency vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, P. Frank; Peng, Hao

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a new metamaterial beam based on multi-frequency vibration absorbers for broadband vibration absorption. The proposed metamaterial beam consists of a uniform isotropic beam and small two-mass spring-mass- damper subsystems at many locations along the beam to act as multi-frequency vibration absorbers. For an infinite metamaterial beam, governing equations of a unit cell are derived using the extended Hamilton principle. The existence of two stopbands is demonstrated using a model based on averaging material properties over a cell length and a model based on finite element modeling and the Bloch-Floquet theory for periodic structures. For a finite metamaterial beam, because these two idealized models cannot be used for finite beams and/or elastic waves having short wavelengths, a finite-element method is used for detailed modeling and analysis. The concepts of negative effective mass and effective stiffness and how the spring-mass-damper subsystem creates two stopbands are explained in detail. Numerical simulations reveal that the actual working mechanism of the proposed metamaterial beam is based on the concept of conventional mechanical vibration absorbers. For an incoming wave with a frequency in one of the two stopbands, the absorbers are excited to vibrate in their optical modes to create shear forces to straighten the beam and stop the wave propagation. For an incoming wave with a frequency outside of but between the two stopbands, it can be efficiently damped out by the damper with the second mass of each absorber. Hence, the two stopbands are connected into a wide stopband. Numerical examples validate the concept and show that the structure's boundary conditions do not have significant influence on the absorption of high-frequency waves. However, for absorption of low-frequency waves, the structure's boundary conditions and resonance frequencies and the location and spatial distribution of absorbers need to be considered in design, and it

  11. Broadband terahertz metamaterial absorber based on sectional asymmetric structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Cheng; Zhan, Mingzhou; Yang, Jing; Wang, Zhigang; Liu, Haitao; Zhao, Yuejin; Liu, Weiwei

    2016-08-01

    We suggest and demonstrate the concept and design of sectional asymmetric structures which can manipulate the metamaterial absorber’s working bandwidth with maintaining the other inherent advantages. As an example, a broadband terahertz perfect absorber is designed to confirm its effectiveness. The absorber’s each cell integrates four sectional asymmetric rings, and the entire structure composed of Au and Si3N4 is only 1.9 μm thick. The simulation results show the bandwidth with absorptivity being larger than 90% is extended by about 2.8 times comparing with the conventional square ring absorber. The composable small cell, ultra-thin, and broadband absorption with polarization and incident angle insensitivity will make the absorber suitable for the applications of focal plane array terahertz imaging.

  12. Broadband terahertz metamaterial absorber based on sectional asymmetric structures

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Cheng; Zhan, Mingzhou; Yang, Jing; Wang, Zhigang; Liu, Haitao; Zhao, Yuejin; Liu, Weiwei

    2016-01-01

    We suggest and demonstrate the concept and design of sectional asymmetric structures which can manipulate the metamaterial absorber’s working bandwidth with maintaining the other inherent advantages. As an example, a broadband terahertz perfect absorber is designed to confirm its effectiveness. The absorber’s each cell integrates four sectional asymmetric rings, and the entire structure composed of Au and Si3N4 is only 1.9 μm thick. The simulation results show the bandwidth with absorptivity being larger than 90% is extended by about 2.8 times comparing with the conventional square ring absorber. The composable small cell, ultra-thin, and broadband absorption with polarization and incident angle insensitivity will make the absorber suitable for the applications of focal plane array terahertz imaging. PMID:27571941

  13. Preparation of Superparamagnetic Zn0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 Particle by Coprecipitation-Sonochemical Method for Radar Absorbing Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taufiq, A.; Bahtiar, S.; Sunaryono; Hidayat, N.; Hidayat, A.; Mufti, N.; Diantoro, M.; Fuad, A.; Munasir; Rahmawati, R.; Adi, W. A.; Pratapa, S.; Darminto

    2017-05-01

    One of many applications of spinel ferrite nanoparticles is related to their performance as radar absorbing materials. In this work, we report developing synthesis method through combined coprecipitation-sonochemical routes in preparing Zn0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticle from iron sand in Indonesia as a vital raw material. The structure, size, morphology, and elements of the Zn0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticle were investigated via X-Ray diffractometry and Transmission/Scanning Electron Microscopy (TEM/SEM) combining Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The magnetic properties of the Zn0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticle were characterized by using Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). Furthermore, the reflection loss character of the Zn0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticle was determined via Vector Network Analyzer (VNA). From the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the XRD data, it can be identified that the Zn0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 particle formed a spinel cubic structure in a single phase with the lattice parameter of approximately 8.401 Å. It is known from the TEM image that the Zn0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 particle had a size of about 9.7 nm and tended to agglomerate. Furthermore, the data analysis of the M(H) curve presented that the Zn0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticle has a superparamagnetic behavior with the saturation magnetization of approximately 43 emu/g. Finally, the data analysis of the reflection loss as a function of frequency showed that the Zn0.5Mn0.5Fe2O4 nanoparticle performs as a radar absorbing material with the absorption performance of approximately -11.0 dB at the frequency of 10.8 GHz

  14. Tunable multichannel absorber composed of graphene and doped periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiang-kun; Shi, Xiang-zhu; Mo, Jin-jun; Fang, Yun-tuan; Chen, Xin-lei; Liu, Shao-bin

    2017-01-01

    A new design for a tunable multichannel compact absorber, which is achieved by using an asymmetric photonic crystal with graphene monolayers, is theoretically proposed. The graphene monolayers are periodically embedded into the first and last dielectric layers. The absorption, reflection, and transmission spectra of the absorber are studied numerically. A perfect absorption channel is achieved because of impedance matching, and channel number can be modulated by changing periodic number. The characteristic properties of the absorption channel depend on graphene conductivity, which can be controlled via the gate voltage. The proposed structure works as a perfect absorber that is independent from polarization. It has potential applications in the design of multichannel filters, thermal detectors, and electromagnetic wave energy collectors.

  15. Dependence of microwave absorption properties on ferrite volume fraction in MnZn ferrite/rubber radar absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gama, Adriana M.; Rezende, Mirabel C.; Dantas, Christine C.

    2011-11-01

    We report the analysis of measurements of the complex magnetic permeability ( μr) and dielectric permittivity ( ɛr) spectra of a rubber radar absorbing material (RAM) with various MnZn ferrite volume fractions. The transmission/reflection measurements were carried out in a vector network analyzer. Optimum conditions for the maximum microwave absorption were determined by substituting the complex permeability and permittivity in the impedance matching equation. Both the MnZn ferrite content and the RAM thickness effects on the microwave absorption properties, in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz, were evaluated. The results show that the complex permeability and permittivity spectra of the RAM increase directly with the ferrite volume fraction. Reflection loss calculations by the impedance matching degree (reflection coefficient) show the dependence of this parameter on both thickness and composition of RAM.

  16. Impact of structural heterogeneity in solar absorber layers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toney, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Impact of structural heterogeneity in solar absorber layers Michael F Toney SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Structural and morphological heterogeneity is common in thin film and emerging solar cell absorber layers, including organic photovoltaic bulk heterojunctions (OPV BHJs), hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites (HOIP), and Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe), and has a significant impact on the (opto)electronic heterogeneity and hence absorber properties. In this talk I will use X-ray based methods, including scattering and spectroscopies, to characterize and quantify the heterogeneity in OPV BHJs and HOIP absorber layers. The BHJ films are blends of the small molecule X2 and [6,6]-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM) where it has been established that there are three distinct region of the films - pure PC71BM, pure X2 and intimately mixed X2:PC71BM. This talk will show how the absolute concentration of the mixed phase can be used to explain the large PC71BM:X2 composition range where good performance is observed [1]. The talk will also show that spin cast CH3NH3PbI3 films consistent of both crystalline and amorphous regions, which can explain previous heterogeneity in the PL imaging [2]. [1] Huang et al., Adv. Energy Mater. 4, 1301886 (2014). [2] deQuilettes et al., Science 348, 683 (2015).

  17. Microwave metamaterial absorber based on multiple square ring structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weicheng; Wang, Pinghe; Wang, Nan; Jiang, Wei; Dong, Xiaochun; Hu, Song

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we report the design, analysis, and simulation of quintuple-band metamaterial absorber (MMA) in the microwave region. The absorber is constructed of a delicate periodic patterned structures and a metallic background plane, separated by a dielectric substrate. By manipulating the periodic patterned structures, high absorption can be obtained at five specific resonance frequencies. Moreover, the significantly high absorptions of quintuple-peaks are persistent with polarization independence, and the influence of angle of incidence for both TE and TM modes was also elucidated. For explaining the absorption mechanism of proposed structures, the electric and magnetic field distributions and resistance matching principal were given. Importantly, the design idea has the ability to be extended to other frequencies, like terahertz, infrared and optical frequencies.

  18. Characterizing Englacial and Subglacial Temperature Structure Using Airborne Radar Sounding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, D. M.; Seroussi, H. L.

    2015-12-01

    The temperature structure of ice sheet and glaciers is a fundamental control on ice flow, rheology, and stability. However, it is difficult to observationally constrain temperature structures at the catchment to ice-sheet scale. The englacial attenuation of radar sounding data is strongly dependent on the temperature structure of the ice sheets. Therefore, echo strength profiles from airborne radar sounding observation do contain temperature information. However, direct interpretation of englacial attenuation rates from radar sounding profiles is often difficult or impossible due to the ambiguous contribution the geometric and material properties of the bed to echo strength variations. To overcome this challenge, we presents techniques that treat radar sounding echo strength and ice thickness profiles as continuous signals, taking advantage of along-profile ice thickness and echo strength variations to constrain the spatial pattern of englacial attenuation and basal reflectivity. We then apply these techniques to an airborne radar sounding survey in order to characterize the englacial and subglacial temperature structure of the Thwaites Glacier catchment in West Antarctic. We then interpreted this structure in context of local ice sheet velocity, advection, force balance, and bed conditions using the ISSM ice sheet model.

  19. Prediction of microwave absorption properties of tetrapod-needle zinc oxide whisker radar absorbing material without prior knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu-Chen; Wang, Jie; Liu, Jiang-Fan; Song, Zhong-Guo; Xi, Xiao-Li

    2017-07-01

    The radar absorbing material (RAM) containing a tetrapod-needle zinc oxide whisker (T-ZnOw) has been proved to have good efficiency of microwave absorption. However, the available theoretical models, which are intended to predict the microwave absorbing properties of such an interesting composite, still cannot work well without some prior knowledge, like the measured effective electromagnetic parameters of the prepared T-ZnOw composite. Hence, we propose a novel predictive method here to calculate the reflectivity of T-ZnOw RAM without prior knowledge. In this method, the absorbing ability of this kind of material is divided into three main aspects: the unstructured background, the conductive network, and the nanostructured particle. Then, the attenuation properties of these three parts are represented, respectively, by three different approaches: the equivalent spherical particle and the static strong fluctuation theory, the equivalent circuit model obtained from the complex impedance spectra technology, and the combination of four different microscopic electromagnetic responses. The operational calculation scheme can be obtained by integrating these three absorption effects into the existing theoretical attenuation model. The reasonable agreement between the theoretical and experimental data of a T-ZnON/SiO2 composite in the range of 8-14 GHz shows that the proposed scheme can predict the microwave absorption properties of the T-ZnOw RAM. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of these three mechanisms indicates that, on the one hand, the background plays a dominant role in determining the real part of the effective permittivity of the T-ZnOw composite while the network and the particle are the decisive factors of its material loss; on the other hand, an zero-phase impedance, i.e., a pure resistance, with appropriate resonance characteristic might be a rational physical description of the attenuation property of the conductive network, but it is difficult to realize

  20. Shock Absorbers Save Structures and Lives during Earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    With NASA funding, North Tonawanda, New York-based Taylor Devices Inc. developed fluidic shock absorbers to safely remove the fuel and electrical connectors from the space shuttles during launch. The company is now employing the technology as seismic dampers to protect structures from earthquakes. To date, 550 buildings and bridges have the dampers, and not a single one has suffered damage in the wake of an earthquake.

  1. Radar determination of the spatial structure of hydraulic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Oldenborger, Greg A; Schincariol, Robert A; Mansinha, Lalu

    2003-01-01

    Spatial variability of hydraulic conductivity exerts a predominant control on the flow of fluid through porous media. Heterogeneities influence advective pathways, hydrodynamic dispersion, and density-dependent dispersion; they are, therefore, a key concern for studies of ground water resource development, contaminant transport, and reservoir engineering. Ground-penetrating radar contributes to the remote, geophysical characterization of the macroscale variability of natural porous media. On a controlled excavation of a glacial-fluvial sand and gravel deposit in the Fanshawe Delta area (Ontario, Canada), the hydraulic conductivity field of a 45 x 3 m vertical exposure was characterized using constant-head permeameter measurements performed on undisturbed horizontal sediment cores. Ground-penetrating radar data were collected along the excavation face in the form of both reflection and common midpoint surveys. Comparison of geostatistical analyses of the permeameter measurements and the radar data suggests thatthe horizontal correlation structure of radar stack velocity can be used to directly infer the horizontal correlation structure of hydraulic conductivity. The averaging nature of the common midpoint survey is manifest in the vertical correlation structure of stack velocity, making it less useful. Radar reflection data do not exhibit a spatial structure similar to that of hydraulic conductivity possibly because reflections are a result of material property contrasts rather than the material properties themselves.

  2. Crash-Energy Absorbing Composite Structure and Method of Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris (Inventor); Carden, Huey D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A stand-alone, crash-energy absorbing structure and fabrication method are provided. A plurality of adjoining rigid cells are each constructed of resin-cured fiber reinforcement and are arranged in a geometric configuration. The geometric configuration of cells is integrated by means of continuous fibers wrapped thereabout in order to maintain the cells in the geometric configuration. The cured part results in a net shape, stable structure that can function on its own with no additional reinforcement and can withstand combined loading while crushing in a desired direction.

  3. Beyond Radar Backscatter: Estimating Forest Structure and Biomass with Radar Interferometry and Lidar Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavalle, M.; Ahmed, R.

    2014-12-01

    Mapping forest structure and aboveground biomass globally is a major challenge that the remote sensing community has been facing for decades. Radar backscatter is sensitive to biomass only up to a certain amount (about 150 tons/ha at L-band and 300 tons/ha at P-band), whereas lidar remote sensing is strongly limited by poor spatial coverage. In recent years radar interferometry, including its extension to polarimetric radar interferometry (PolInSAR), has emerged as a new technique to overcome the limitations of radar backscatter. The idea of PolInSAR is to use jointly interferometric and polarimetric radar techniques to separate different scattering mechanisms and retrieve the vertical structure of forests. The advantage is to map ecosystem structure continuously over large areas and independently of cloud coverage. Experiments have shown that forest height - an important proxy for biomass - can be estimated using PolInSAR with accuracy between 15% and 20% at plot level. At AGU we will review the state-of-art of repeat-pass PolInSAR for biomass mapping, including its potential and limitations, and discuss how merging lidar data with PolInSAR data can be beneficial not only for product cross-validation but also for achieving better estimation of ecosystem properties over large areas. In particular, lidar data are expected to aid the inversion of PolInSAR models by providing (1) better identification of ground under the canopy, (2) approximate information of canopy structure in limited areas, and (3) maximum tree height useful for mapping PolInSAR temporal decorrelation. We will show our tree height and biomass maps using PolInSAR L-band JPL/UAVSAR data collected in tropical and temperate forests, and P-band ONERA/TROPISAR data acquired in French Guiana. LVIS lidar data will be used, as well as SRTM data, field measurements and inventory data to support our study. The use of two different radar frequencies and repeat-pass JPL UAVSAR data will offer also the

  4. A Novel, Real-Valued Genetic Algorithm for Optimizing Radar Absorbing Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, John Michael

    2004-01-01

    A novel, real-valued Genetic Algorithm (GA) was designed and implemented to minimize the reflectivity and/or transmissivity of an arbitrary number of homogeneous, lossy dielectric or magnetic layers of arbitrary thickness positioned at either the center of an infinitely long rectangular waveguide, or adjacent to the perfectly conducting backplate of a semi-infinite, shorted-out rectangular waveguide. Evolutionary processes extract the optimal physioelectric constants falling within specified constraints which minimize reflection and/or transmission over the frequency band of interest. This GA extracted the unphysical dielectric and magnetic constants of three layers of fictitious material placed adjacent to the conducting backplate of a shorted-out waveguide such that the reflectivity of the configuration was 55 dB or less over the entire X-band. Examples of the optimization of realistic multi-layer absorbers are also presented. Although typical Genetic Algorithms require populations of many thousands in order to function properly and obtain correct results, verified correct results were obtained for all test cases using this GA with a population of only four.

  5. Radar meteor orbital structure of Southern Hemisphere cometary dust streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggaley, W. Jack; Taylor, Andrew D.

    1992-01-01

    The Christchurch, New Zealand meteor orbit radar (AMOR) with its high precision and sensitivity, permits studies of the orbital fine structure of cometary streams. PC generated graphics are presented of data on some Southern Hemisphere Streams. Such data can be related to the formation phase and subsequent dynamical processes of dust streams.

  6. Homogeneous sound-absorbing structures for aircraft engine ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, A. F.; Ushakov, V. G.; Filippova, R. D.

    2009-11-01

    As applied to the ducts of aircraft engines, a new method is studied for extending the frequency range of sound absorption by using special homogeneous materials of a rigid structure. A through- or blind-hole perforation of such a homogeneous material is for the first time suggested with a view to substantially extend its capabilities. A theory is developed for sound-absorbing structures of perforated homogeneous material that allows for computing their wave parameters and impedance on the basis of those of the starting material. Based on this theory, one can calculate the impedance of any, no matter how complex a structure built up of several layers differing in thickness and perforation percentage and diameter. The results of calculations made for the impedance and sound absorption coefficient of single and multiple layer samples show good agreement with experimental data.

  7. The structural, magnetic and microwave properties of spherical and flake shaped carbonyl iron particles as thin multilayer microwave absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khani, Omid; Shoushtari, Morteza Zargar; Ackland, Karl; Stamenov, Plamen

    2017-04-01

    An increase in microwave permeability is a prerequisite for reducing the thickness of radar absorber coatings. The aim of this paper is to increase the magnetic loss of commercial carbonyl iron particles for fabricating wideband microwave absorbers with a multilayer structure. For this purpose, carbonyl iron particles were milled and their static and dynamic magnetic properties were studied before and after milling. A distinct morphological change from spherical to flake-like particles is measured with increased milling time, whereas no distinct changes in magnetic properties are measured with increased milling time. The imaginary part of the permeability (μ״) of the milled carbonyl iron particles increased from 1.23 to 1.88 and showed a very broad peak over the entire frequency range 1-18 GHz. The experimental results were modeled using the Rousselle effective medium theory (EMT) in the Neo formulation. The theoretical predictions showed good agreement with the experimental results. Two layer absorbers were designed according to the measured microwave parameters and the multilayer design. The results revealed that a thin multilayer with a thickness of 1.75 mm can effectively absorb microwaves in both the entire X and Ku frequency bands. The results suggest that microwave absorbers with excellent absorption properties could be mass-produced, using commercial carbonyl iron particles.

  8. Exploring inner structure of Titan's dunes from Cassini Radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, P.; Heggy, E.; Farr, T. G.

    2013-12-01

    Linear dunes discovered in the equatorial regions of Titan by the Cassini-Huygens mission are morphologically very similar to many terrestrial linear dune fields. These features have been compared with terrestrial longitudinal dune fields like the ones in Namib desert in western Africa. This comparison is based on the overall parallel orientation of Titan's dunes to the predominant wind direction on Titan, their superposition on other geomorphological features and the way they wrap around topographic obstacles. Studying the internal layering of dunes has strong implications in understanding the hypothesis for their origin and evolution. In Titan's case, although the morphology of the dunes has been studied from Cassini Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images, it has not been possible to investigate their internal structure in detail as of yet. Since no radar sounding data is available for studying Titan's subsurface yet, we have developed another technique to examine the inner layering of the dunes. In this study, we utilize multiple complementary radar datasets, including radar imaging data for Titan's and Earth's dunes and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR)/radar sounding data for terrestrial dunes. Based on dielectric mixing models, we suggest that the Cassini Ku-band microwaves should be able to penetrate up to ~ 3 m through Titan's dunes, indicating that the returned radar backscatter signal would include contributions from both surface and shallow subsurface echoes. This implies that the shallow subsurface properties can be retrieved from the observed radar backscatter (σ0). In our analysis, the variation of the radar backscatter as a function of dune height is used to provide an insight into the layering in Titan's dunes. We compare the variation of radar backscatter with elevation over individual dunes on Titan and analogous terrestrial dunes in three sites (Great Sand Sea, Siwa dunes and Qattaniya dunes) in the Egyptian Sahara. We observe a strong, positive

  9. Space Shuttle Radar Images of Terrestrial Impact Structures: SIR-C/X-SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHone, J. F.; Blumberg, D. G.; Greeley, R.; Underwood, J. R., Jr.

    1995-09-01

    ; 2.8 km dia) Wind-blown sands which cover much of this relatively small feature make it difficult to distinguish from numerous dark sandstone outcrops using only optical images. Radar, however, penetrates the shallow sand mantle to reveal a nearly complete radar-bright bullseye pattern typical of central-uplift style impact structure. Oasis Structure (24 degrees 35'N; 24 degrees 24'E; >11.5 km dia) Oasis astrobleme was originally described as an elevated ring of sandstone some 5.1 km wide in desert sands. Examination of optical satellite images detected subtle concentric patterns more than 11 km across [2]. SIR-C images reveal strong arcuate reflectors buried beneath the sand at an even larger diameter of greater than 17 km. Aurounga (19 degrees 06'N; 019 degrees 15'E; 12.6 km dia) Although this highly circular depression has been noticed in numerous remote sensing studies, eg.[3], it usually has been associated with a large volcanic field and attributed to endogenic forces. Recent reports of shatter cones [4] and microscopic shock metamorphic effects [5] now demonstrate an impact origin. The radar-dark ring is a sand-filled trough which interupts a regional pattern of yardangs, wind-cut parallel ridges and grooves, developed in surrounding sandstones. Amguid (26 degrees 05'N; 004 degrees 23'E; 450 m dia) Situated in elevated rocky highlands [6], the small Amguid crater is nearly overprinted by surrounding radar backscatter. A dry central bowl is partially filled with smoothly surfaced fine-grained playa deposits which absorb radar energy and/or reflect it away from the spacecraft. The result is a distinct radar-dark disk within a bright regional ground clutter. Spider (16 degrees 44'S; 126 degrees 05'E; 13 km dia) Named for a radially splayed fault system in its center, Spider is the exposed root structure of a central-uplift impact feature [7]. Radar slope effects on processed data clearly delineate its size and internal complexity. Henbury craters (24 degrees 35'S

  10. Realization of compatible stealth material for infrared, laser and radar based on one-dimensional doping-structure photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ji-Kui; Shi, Jia-Ming; Zhao, Da-Peng; Wang, Qi-Chao; Wang, Cheng-Ming

    2017-09-01

    To inhibit the radiant infrared energy between 8 and 14 μm, which is the infrared atmospheric window, and decrease the echo power of detecting laser and radar, to achieve compatible stealth, a doping structural one-dimensional photonic crystal (1-D PC) with Ge, ZnSe and Si was fabricated; and then combine it with radar absorbing material (RAM) to make a compound. After that, the reflection spectra of this compound was tested, and the result shows a high average reflectance (89.5%) in 8-14 μm waveband, and a reflective valley (39.8%) in the wavelength of 10.6 μm, which is the wavelength of CO2 laser; and the reflectance in radar band shows that at high frequency, especially between 7.8 and 18 GHz, the radar power is strongly absorbed by this material and the reflected energy attenuate over 10 dB within the range from 11.1 GHz to 18.3 GHz, even 24.5 dB to the most in the frequency of 14.6 GHz.

  11. Collision induced ultraviolet structure in nitrogen radar REMPI spectra

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, S. Miles, R.

    2014-12-28

    We present 2 + 2 radar REMPI measurements in molecular nitrogen under atmospheric conditions and observe a strong interference in the (1,0) vibrational band of the a{sup 1}Π{sub g} ← X{sup 1}Σ{sub g}{sup +} electronic manifold. The interference is suppressed by using circularly polarized light, permitting rotational analysis of the 2 + 2 radar REMPI spectrum. It is observed in pure nitrogen, though the structure varies with gas composition. The structure also varies with temperature and pressure. These results indicate that it is collision induced. We hypothesize that the source of the interference is a 3 + 1 REMPI process through the a{sup ″1}Σ{sub g}{sup +} electronic state.

  12. Crash-Energy Absorbing Composite Structure and Method of Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellas, Sotiris (Inventor); Carden, Huey D. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A stand-alone, crash-energy absorbing structure and fabrication method are provided. A plurality of adjoining rigid cells are each constructed of resin-cured fiber reinforcement and are arranged in a geometric configuration. The fiber reinforcement can be in the form of a fabric or braided fibers wrapped about a core that is either left in place or removed from the ultimate cured structure. The geometric configuration of cells is held together with more fiber reinforcement (in the form of fabric or braided fibers) in order to integrate the cells in the geometric configuration. The additional fiber reinforcement is resin-cured to the cells. Curing of the cells and ultimate structure can occur in a single step. In applications where post-crash integrity is necessary, ductile fibers can be used to integrate the cells in the geometric configuration. The novelty of the present invention is that simple fabrication techniques are used to create structures that can be formed in a variety of net stable shapes without additional reinforcement and can withstand combined loading while crushing in a desired direction.

  13. Tuned vibration absorbers with nonlinear viscous damping for damped structures under random load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, K. M.

    2015-06-01

    The classical problem for the application of a tuned vibration absorber is to minimize the response of a structural system, such as displacement, velocity, acceleration or to maximize the energy dissipated by tuned vibration absorber. The development of explicit optimal absorber parameters is challenging for a damped structural system since the fixed points no longer exist in the frequency response curve. This paper aims at deriving a set of simple design formula of tuned vibration absorber with nonlinear viscous damping based on the frequency tuning for harmonic load for a damped structural system under white noise excitation. The vibration absorbers being considered include tuned mass damper (TMD) and liquid column vibration absorber (LCVA). Simple approximate expression for the standard deviation velocity response of tuned vibration absorber for damped primary structure is also derived in this study to facilitate the estimation of the damping coefficient of TMD with nonlinear viscous damping and the head loss coefficient of LCVA. The derived results indicate that the higher the structural inherent damping the smaller the supplementary damping provided by a tuned vibration absorber. Furthermore, the optimal damping of tuned vibration absorber is shown to be independent of structural damping when it is tuned using the frequency tuning for harmonic load. Finally, the derived closed-form expressions are demonstrated to be capable of predicting the optimal parameters of tuned vibration absorbers with sufficient accuracy for preliminary design of tuned vibration absorbers with nonlinear viscous damping for a damped primary structure.

  14. Sound-absorbing slabs and structures based on granular materials (bound and unbound). [energy absorbing efficiency of porous material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre-Lazar, S.; Popeea, G.

    1974-01-01

    Sound absorbing slabs and structures made up of bound or unbound granular materials are considered and how to manufacture these elements at the building site. The raw material is a single grain powder (sand, expanded blast furnace slag, etc.) that imparts to the end products an apparent porosity of 25-45% and an energy dissipation within the structure leading to absorption coefficients that can be compared with those of mineral wool and urethane.

  15. Sound-absorbing slabs and structures based on granular materials (bound and unbound). [energy absorbing efficiency of porous material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petre-Lazar, S.; Popeea, G.

    1974-01-01

    Sound absorbing slabs and structures made up of bound or unbound granular materials are considered and how to manufacture these elements at the building site. The raw material is a single grain powder (sand, expanded blast furnace slag, etc.) that imparts to the end products an apparent porosity of 25-45% and an energy dissipation within the structure leading to absorption coefficients that can be compared with those of mineral wool and urethane.

  16. Imaging Absorbing Structures Embedded in Thick Diffusing Media.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilworth, David Saunders

    Linear systems models and confocal imaging techniques are applied to the problem of imaging absorbing structures embedded in thick diffusing media. At the microscopic level, the model is linear in complex field and space variant; at the macroscopic level where spatial averaging processes are considered the model is linear in irradiance and space variant, thereby becoming mathematically more tractable. We describe the planar confocal imager, in which a small spot of light scans the front surface of a diffuser, and the light distribution on the back surface is sampled for each position of the scanning spot. A composite image is then formed by selection of one pixel from each of the 25,600 images, viz., a pixel from a spot opposite or nearly opposite from the scanning spot. The overall process is effectively a confocal imaging process. The planar system can be modified to create 3-D confocal imaging, where many stereo image pairs are created of the absorbing structures within a thick diffuser. Techniques for both planar and exfoliative deconvolution are investigated. Planar deconvolution sharpens images affected by space invariant processes in which the image point spread function is always the same. Exfoliatative deconvolution is a systematic method for sharpening images formed by space variant processes in which the point spread function varies in accordance with the depth of the embedded object. Results from planar and 3-D confocal scanning verify the linear systems model and demonstrate that the broad beam point spread function width (the point spread function formed by conventional, non-confocal imaging) can be reduced by a factor of 2. Results from planar and exfoliative deconvolution demonstrate that the confocal point spread function width can be reduced by a factor of 1.5. Preliminary optical and data processing techniques are discussed for developing a coherent confocal scanner. The image resolution from this type of scanner will be determined by the

  17. Preliminary sizing of vibration absorber for space mast structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, M. F.; Mccomb, H. G., Jr.; Peebles, S. W.

    1982-01-01

    A simple method of sizing a vibration absorber for a large, cantilevered flexible mast is presented. The method is based on Den Hartog's vibration absorber theory for two-degree-of-freedom systems. Generalized design curves are presented as well as specific numerical results for a candidate space experiment in which a long flexible antenna mast is attached to the shuttle orbiter and dynamically excited by orbiter accelerations. Results indicate that for large flexible masts, the mass of the vibration absorber required to meet stringent tip deflection tolerances becomes prohibitively large.

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of BaFe12O19/Poly(aniline, pyrrole, ethylene terephthalate) Composites Coatings as Radar Absorbing Material (RAM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasria, Nia; Ardhyananta, H.; Fajarin, R.; Widyastuti

    2017-07-01

    This research shows the processing and design of radar absorbing material (RAM) based on barium hexaferrite (BaM) and poly(aniline, pyrrole, ethylene terephthalate) (PAni,PPy,PET). BaM was prepared by sol gel method with Ni-Zn doping at mole fraction of 0. 4 to obtain soft magnetic material. BaM/(PAni,PPy) composites were synthesized by in-situ polymerization method at ˜0 °C. (BaM/PET) composite was prepared by melt compounding at 220°C. The composites were coated on A-grade AH36 steel using Dallenbach Layer, Salisbury Screen and Jaumann Layer methods with thickness of 2, 4, and 6 mm. The composites were evaluated using XRD, SEM, FTIR, VSM, LCM-meter and VNA. Results showed that doped BaM showed BaNixZnxFe12-2xO19 structure. BaM/(PAni,PPy,PET) composites possessed globular morphology with M-O and C-H bonds. BaNixZnxFe12-2xO19 exhibited the value of Ms and Hc, 56.6 emu/g and 60 Oe respectively. High electrical conductivity of 1.77744 × 10-5 S/cm was achieved of BaM/PAni composite. The maximum reflection loss (RL) was reached at - 48.720 dB and 8.1 GHz for BaM/PAni composite coating with 6 mm thickness at Jaumann Layer. These results indicated that BaM/PAni composite was a soft magnetic material with a high RL value that is suitable for RAM, which used in stealth technology on naval vessels.

  19. Creating a Multiband Perfect Metamaterial Absorber at K Frequency Band Using Defects in the Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Manh Cuong; Nguyen, Thi Thuy; Ho, Tuan Hung; Do, Hoang Tung

    2017-01-01

    We present a simple method to achieve a multiband perfect metamaterial absorber for use in the K band by applying defects to the absorber structure. Open boundary conditions with an excitation port are used for simulation of the whole considered structure. A defect was then introduced into the structure to obtain multiband absorption. Two perfect absorption peaks were observed at 19.8 GHz and 23.1 GHz for the structure with a defect of 2 × 2 unit cells. The multiple resonance frequencies could be tuned by varying the defect dimensions. In addition, it was found that the absorber structure is insensitive to the polarization angle of the incident electromagnetic wave over a wide range due to the symmetry of the configuration. This represents a simpler method to create a multifrequency absorber compared with previous works. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study considering the influence of structural defects on the absorption frequencies of a metamaterial absorber.

  20. Inflatable Space Structures Technology Development for Large Radar Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeland, R. E.; Helms, Richard G.; Willis, Paul B.; Mikulas, M. M.; Stuckey, Wayne; Steckel, Gary; Watson, Judith

    2004-01-01

    There has been recent interest in inflatable space-structures technology for possible applications on U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) missions because of the technology's potential for high mechanical-packaging efficiency, variable stowed geometry, and deployment reliability. In recent years, the DOD sponsored Large Radar Antenna (LRA) Program applied this new technology to a baseline concept: a rigidizable/inflatable (RI) perimeter-truss structure supporting a mesh/net parabolic reflector antenna. The program addressed: (a) truss concept development, (b) regidizable materials concepts assessment, (c) mesh/net concept selection and integration, and (d) developed potential mechanical-system performance estimates. Critical and enabling technologies were validated, most notably the orbital radiation durable regidized materials and the high modulus, inflatable-deployable truss members. These results in conjunction with conclusions from previous mechanical-packaging studies by the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Special Program Office (SPO) were the impetus for the initiation of the DARPA/SPO Innovative Space-based Antenna Technology (ISAT) Program. The sponsor's baseline concept consisted of an inflatable-deployable truss structure for support of a large number of rigid, active radar panels. The program's goal was to determine the risk associated with the application of these new RI structures to the latest in radar technologies. The approach used to define the technology maturity level of critical structural elements was to: (a) develop truss concept baseline configurations (s), (b) assess specific inflatable-rigidizable materials technologies, and (c) estimate potential mechanical performance. The results of the structures portion of the program indicated there was high risk without the essential materials technology flight experiments, but only moderate risk if the appropriate on-orbit demonstrations were performed. This paper covers both

  1. Single-hole borehole radar detection of layered structures orthogonal to the borehole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, W.; Williams, C.; Lewis, C.; Josh, M.

    2000-04-01

    A vertical borehole may pass through natural layered structures which are orthogonal or near-orthogonal to the borehole. Such structures, particularly if they are layers with a smooth surface, can be very difficult to detect with a borehole radar which has the required long range and low center frequency for remote structure detection. Methods of supplementing the radar data are discussed and include the use of an additional radar with a much higher center frequency, the use of a dielectric probe and the use of a look-ahead radar.

  2. A Proposed Technique for Diagnosis by Radar of Hurricane Structure.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, Ralph J., Jr.

    1991-12-01

    A Doppler radar technique is proposed for remote estimation of hurricane structure by sampling the kinematic properties of the hurricane wind field in a relatively small circular area outside the radius of maximum winds. This technique uses Fourier analysis of the pattern of Doppler velocities measured in a horizontal circle surrounding the radar, following guidelines developed by Browning and Wexler. Two indices, potential-vortex fit (PVF) and radial confluence, are developed as measures of the degree of conformity of the wind field sampled by radar to an idealized Rankine axisymmetric cyclone circulation. The PVF index reveals the extent to which the sampled wind held fits a potential-vortex flow regime, wherein both curvature and speed of the tangential wind component are inversely proportional to distance from a circulation center. The confluence of the radial wind component provides an independent estimate of the curvature of the tangential component.These two indices were measured in Hurricane Gloria (1985) during a period of more than 3 h following its landfall. Values of PVF indicated a weakened circulation during the first half of this period, followed in the latter half by a progressive and rapid decay of the circulation, consistent with other observations. The magnitudes of the radial confluence index, on the other hand, evidently were adversely affected by significant contamination by asymmetries in the hurricane circulation throughout most of the observational period. However, trends in both indices provided an early indication of the deterioration of Hurricane Gloria. Accordingly, it appears worthwhile to seek further evidence of the potential value of this technique as an aid in monitoring hurricane severity.

  3. Model Order Selection Rules for Covariance Structure Classification in Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, Vincenzo; De Maio, Antonio; Orlando, Danilo; Stoica, Petre

    2017-10-01

    The adaptive classification of the interference covariance matrix structure for radar signal processing applications is addressed in this paper. This represents a key issue because many detection architectures are synthesized assuming a specific covariance structure which may not necessarily coincide with the actual one due to the joint action of the system and environment uncertainties. The considered classification problem is cast in terms of a multiple hypotheses test with some nested alternatives and the theory of Model Order Selection (MOS) is exploited to devise suitable decision rules. Several MOS techniques, such as the Akaike, Takeuchi, and Bayesian information criteria are adopted and the corresponding merits and drawbacks are discussed. At the analysis stage, illustrating examples for the probability of correct model selection are presented showing the effectiveness of the proposed rules.

  4. Validation of BALTIMOS precipitation structures using BALTRAD radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theusner, Michael; Hauf, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    The comparison of rain areas observed by the radar network BALTRAD and those produced by the model BALTIMOS shows that the model is able to reproduce the rain areas' basic properties. These are power law distributed frequency distributions as well as lognormal rain area size distributions. The parameters governing these distributions are also matched by power laws evident for the observations and the BALTIMOS data. The distributions also provide evidence that the model produces too many large structures and too little small ones. However, the shape of these structures, represented by their fractal dimension, is well met. The perimeter of the model structures is only slightly smoother than that of the observed ones. The model is also able to reproduce the diurnal cycle of convective activity with emerging and decaying convective cells, though some deficiencies in the timing and the magnitude of the maximum occurrence of rain areas and peaks are evident. Additionally, it was found that the methods developed within this project are a valuable tool to validate BALTIMOS and potentially also other regional climate models.

  5. Exotensioned structural members with energy-absorbing effects

    SciTech Connect

    Brockwell, Michael Ian

    2015-08-11

    Structural members having enhanced load bearing capacity per unit mass include a skeleton structure formed from strips of material. Notches may be placed on the strips and a weave of tensile material placed in the notches and woven around the skeleton structure. At least one pair of structural members can be jointed together to provide very strong joints due to a weave patterns of tensile material, such as Kevlar, that distributes stress throughout the structure, preventing stress from concentrating in one area. Methods of manufacturing such structural members include molding material into skeletons of desired cross section using a matrix of molding segments. Total catastrophic failures in composite materials are substantially avoided and the strength to weight ratio of structures can be increased.

  6. Exotensioned structural members with energy-absorbing effects

    SciTech Connect

    Brockwell, Michael Ian

    2014-01-07

    Structural members having enhanced load bearing capacity per unit mass include a skeleton structure formed from strips of material. Notches may be placed on the strips and a weave of tensile material placed in the notches and woven around the skeleton structure. At least one pair of structural members can be jointed together to provide very strong joints due to a weave patterns of tensile material, such as Kevlar, that distributes stress throughout the structure, preventing stress from concentrating in one area. Methods of manufacturing such structural members include molding material into skeletons of desired cross section using a matrix of molding segments. Total catastrophic failures in composite materials are substantially avoided and the strength to weight ratio of structures can be increased.

  7. Exotensioned structural members with energy-absorbing effects

    DOEpatents

    Brockwell, Michael Ian

    2017-08-22

    Structural members having enhanced load bearing capacity per unit mass include a skeleton structure formed from strips of material. Notches may be placed on the strips and a weave of tensile material placed in the notches and woven around the skeleton structure. At least one pair of structural members can be jointed together to provide very strong joints due to a weave patterns of tensile material, such as Kevlar, that distributes stress throughout the structure, preventing stress from concentrating in one area. Methods of manufacturing such structural members include molding material into skeletons of desired cross section using a matrix of molding segments. Total catastrophic failures in composite materials are substantially avoided and the strength to weight ratio of structures can be increased.

  8. Radar principles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sato, Toru

    1989-01-01

    Discussed here is a kind of radar called atmospheric radar, which has as its target clear air echoes from the earth's atmosphere produced by fluctuations of the atmospheric index of refraction. Topics reviewed include the vertical structure of the atmosphere, the radio refractive index and its fluctuations, the radar equation (a relation between transmitted and received power), radar equations for distributed targets and spectral echoes, near field correction, pulsed waveforms, the Doppler principle, and velocity field measurements.

  9. A multiband absorber with dielectric-dielectric-metal structure in the infrared regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yan-Lin; Zhao, Yan; Lu, He-Ping

    2016-10-01

    We report a multiband absorber with dielectric-dielectric-metal structure in the infrared regime. The simulation results show that that near-perfect absorption is originated from the guide mode resonance and surface plasmonic polaritons (SPPs) excitation. Furthermore, the absorption peaks of this multiband absorber can be tuned by changing the incidence angle or scaling the microstructure dimensions. The results of this study have possible future potential applications in thermal emitter and sensor.

  10. Harnessing snap-through instability for shape-recoverable energy-absorbing structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Sung; Shan, Sicong; Raney, Jordan; Wang, Pai; Candido, Francisco; Lewis, Jennifer; Bertoldi, Katia

    2015-03-01

    Energy absorbing materials and structures are used in numerous areas for maintaining structural integrity, protection and comfort. To absorb/dissipate energy from shock/vibration, one generally relies on processes such as plastic deformation and damping as the case of metal foams and suspensions. Because plastic deformation and damping induce irreversible change in the energy-absorbing systems such as shape changes and degradation of damping elements by heat dissipation, it would be desirable to develop a new energy-absorption mechanism with reversibility. Furthermore, it would be desirable to implement energy-absorption mechanisms whose behavior is not affected by the rate of loading. Here, we report a shape-recoverable system that absorbs energy without degradation by harnessing multistability in elastic structures. Using numerical simulations, we investigate geometrical parameters that determine the onset of the snap-through and multi-stability. We subsequently manufacture structures with different geometrical parameters and sizes using a scalable direct-write 3D printing approach. We experimentally demonstrate reversible energy-absorption in these structures at strain rates over three orders of magnitudes, with reduced peak acceleration under impact by up to one order of magnitude compared with control samples. Our findings can open new opportunities for scalable design and manufacturing of energy-absorbing materials and structures.

  11. Identification of Geometrical Structural Changes in Agriculture by Optical and Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surek, Gyorgy; Nador, Gizella; Akos Gera, David; Hubik, Iren; Kulesar Aniko, Rotterne; Torok, Cecilia

    2013-08-01

    The objective of the project was to monitor the temporal behaviour of geometrical structural change of cropland affected by four different damages: weed infection, Western Corn Rootworm (WCR), storm damage and drought by optical and radar time series data. Based on our preliminary results it is established that ragweed infection in sunflower can be well identified by evaluation of radar (acquired in mid-June) and optical (mid-August) satellite images. Effect of drought in sunflower is well recognizable by spectral indexes from optical, as well as "I"-component of Shannon entropy (SEI) derived from radar satellite images. Detecting damage caused by WCR and storm in maize field is the most efficient by evaluation of radar and optical satellite images acquired in late-July. Components of Shannon entropy have significant role in identification. This project demonstrates the potential of integrated usage of polarimetric radar and optical satellite images for mapping several types of damages in agriculture.

  12. Extent and structure of intervening absorbers from absorption lines redshifted on quasar emission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, J.; Boissé, P.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: We wish to study the extent and sub-parsec spatial structure of intervening quasar absorbers, mainly those involving cold neutral and molecular gas. Methods: We have selected quasar absorption systems with high spectral resolution and a good signal-to-noise ratio data, with some of their lines falling on quasar emission features. By investigating the consistency of absorption profiles seen for lines formed either against the quasar continuum source or on the much more extended (Lyα-N v, C iv or Lyβ-O vi) emission line region (ELR), we can probe the extent and structure of the foreground absorber over the extent of the ELR ( 0.3-1 pc). The spatial covering analysis provides constraints on the transverse size of the absorber and thus is complementary to variability or photoionisation modelling studies, which yield information on the absorber size along the line of sight. The methods we used to identify spatial covering or structure effects involve line profile fitting and curve-of-growth analysis. Results: We have detected three absorbers with unambiguous non-uniformity effects in neutral gas. For the extreme case of the Fe I absorber at zabs = 0.45206 towards HE 0001-2340, we derive a coverage factor of the ELR of at most 0.10 and possibly very close to zero; this implies an overall absorber size no larger than 0.06 pc. For the zabs = 2.41837 C I absorber towards QSO J1439+1117, absorption is significantly stronger towards the ELR than towards the continuum source in several C I and C I⋆ velocity components, pointing to spatial variations of their column densities of about a factor of two and to structures at the 100 au-0.1 pc scale. The other systems with firm or possible effects can be described in terms of a partial covering of the ELR, with coverage factors in the range 0.7-1. The overall results for cold neutral absorbers imply a transverse extent of about five times the ELR size or smaller, which is consistent with other known constraints. Although

  13. Robust broadband vibration control of a flexible structure using an electrical dynamic absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Myeong; Wang, Semyung; Brennan, Michael J.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents a simple but practical feedback control method to suppress the vibration of a flexible structure in the frequency range between 10 Hz and 1 kHz. A dynamic vibration absorber is designed for this, which has a natural frequency of 100 Hz and a normalized bandwidth (twice the damping ratio) of 9.9. The absorber is realized electrically by feeding back the structural acceleration at one position on the host structure to a collocated piezoceramic patch actuator via an analog controller consisting of a second-order lowpass filter. This absorber is equivalent to a single degree-of-freedom mechanical oscillator consisting of a serially connected mass-spring-damper system. A first-order lowpass filter is additionally used to improve stability at very high frequencies. Experiments were conducted on a free-free beam embedded with a piezoceramic patch actuator and an accelerometer at its center. It is demonstrated that the single absorber can simultaneously suppress multiple vibration modes within the control bandwidth. It is further shown that the control system is robust to slight changes in the plant. The method described can be applied to many other practical structures, after retuning the absorber parameters for the structure under control.

  14. Optimization of a hybrid vibration absorber for vibration control of structures under random force excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, Y. L.; Wong, W. O.; Cheng, L.

    2013-02-01

    A recently reported design of a hybrid vibration absorber (HVA) which is optimized to suppress resonant vibration of a single degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system is re-optimized for suppressing wide frequency band vibration of the SDOF system under stationary random force excitation. The proposed HVA makes use of the feedback signals from the displacement and velocity of the absorber mass for minimizing the vibration response of the dynamic structure based on the H2 optimization criterion. The objective of the optimal design is to minimize the mean square vibration amplitude of a dynamic structure under a wideband excitation, i.e., the total area under the vibration response spectrum is minimized in this criterion. One of the inherent limitations of the traditional passive vibration absorber is that its vibration suppression is low if the mass ratio between the absorber mass and the mass of the primary structure is low. The active element of the proposed HVA helps further reduce the vibration of the controlled structure and it can provide significant vibration absorption performance even at a low mass ratio. Both the passive and active elements are optimized together for the minimization of the mean square vibration amplitude of the primary system. The proposed HVA are tested on a SDOF system and continuous vibrating structures with comparisons to the traditional passive vibration absorber.

  15. Polarization-independent broadband absorber based on pyramidal metal-dielectric grating structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jun

    2016-12-01

    An infrared broadband polarization-independent metamaterial absorber is designed and investigated. It consists of a pyramidal metal-dielectric multilayered rectangle grating structure. The absorber exhibits near-unit absorption at multiple adjacent wavelengths overlapping with each other, which results in a high absorption over a wide wavelength range. The absorbance at normal incidence is higher than 90% in a wavelength range of 2321 nm-4631 nm, and the broadband absorption performance can be maintained over a large incident angle range. Furthermore, the mechanism of such broadband absorption are investigated by illustrating the electric field distributions for TE polarization and magnetic field distributions for TM polarization at the resonant wavelengths. It is believed that the conclusions can be applied for developing polarization-independent broadband absorber.

  16. Terahertz dual-band metamaterial absorber based on graphene/MgF(2) multilayer structures.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhaoxian; Yin, Jianbo; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2015-01-26

    We design an ultra-thin terahertz metamaterial absorber based on graphene/MgF(2) multilayer stacking unit cells arrayed on an Au film plane and theoretically demonstrate a dual-band total absorption effect. Due to strong anisotropic permittivity, the graphene/MgF(2) multilayer unit cells possess a hyperbolic dispersion. The strong electric and magnetic dipole resonances between unit cells make the impedance of the absorber match to that of the free space, which induces two total absorption peaks in terahertz range. These absorption peaks are insensitive to the polarization and nearly omnidirectional for the incident angle. But the absorption intensity and frequency depend on material and geometric parameters of the multilayer structure. The absorbed electromagnetic waves are finally converted into heat and, as a result, the absorber shows a good nanosecond photothermal effect.

  17. Lagrangian Structures in Very High-Frequency Radar Data and Optimal Pollution Timing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekien, Francois; Coulliette, Chad; Marsden, Jerry

    2003-08-01

    Very High-frequency (VHF) radar technology produces detailed surface velocity maps near the surface of coastal waters. The use of measured velocity data in environmental prediction, however, has remained unexplored. In this paper, we uncover a striking flow structure in coastal radar observations along the coast of Florida. This structure governs the spread of organic contaminants or passive drifters released in the area. We compute the Lyapunov exponents of the VHF radar data to determine optimal release windows in which contaminants are advected efficiently away from the coast and we show that a VHF radar-based pollution release scheme using the hidden flow structure reduces the effect of industrial pollution in the coastal environment.

  18. Crash energy absorbing composite sub-floor structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, G. L.

    1986-01-01

    Static crushing tests were conducted on four different beam concepts; honeycomb sandwich, sine-wave and two integrally stiffened designs. The sine-wave beams, depending upon specimen geometry, has the highest energy absorption potential of the four concepts evaluated. All beam designs produced a progressive crushing mode similar to tube specimens. The energy absorption capability of sine-wave beam specimens were predictable from results of circular cross section tubes. A comparison of energy absorption capability was made between integrally stiffened beams fabricated from graphite/epoxy, Kevlar-49/epoxy and aluminum. The energy absorption capability of the graphite/epoxy integrally stiffened beams exceeded both the Kevlar-49/epoxy and aluminum integrally stiffened beams. The energy absorption potential of composite structures is between five and ten times that of comparable metallic structure.

  19. A possible approach to optimization of parameters of sound-absorbing structures for multimode waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, M. A.

    2011-11-01

    A method of allowing for the spatial sound field structure in designing the sound-absorbing structures for turbojet aircraft engine ducts is proposed. The acoustic impedance of a duct should be chosen so as to prevent the reflection of the primary sound field, which is generated by the sound source in the absence of the duct, from the duct walls.

  20. Structure, function, and wavelength selection in blue-absorbing proteorhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Hillebrecht, Jason R; Galan, Jhenny; Rangarajan, Rekha; Ramos, Lavoisier; McCleary, Kristina; Ward, Donald E; Stuart, Jeffrey A; Birge, Robert R

    2006-02-14

    The absorption maximum of blue proteorhodopsin (BPR) is the most blue-shifted of all retinal proteins found in archaea or bacteria, with the exception of sensory rhodopsin II (SRII). The absorption spectrum also exhibits a pH dependence larger than any other retinal protein. We examine the structural origins of these two properties of BPR by using optical spectroscopy, homology modeling, and molecular orbital theory. Bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and SRII are used as homology parents for comparative purposes. We find that the tertiary structure of BPR based on SRII is more realistic with respect to free energy, dynamic stability, and spectroscopic properties. Molecular orbital calculations including full single- and double-configuration interaction within the chromophore pi-electron system provide perspectives on the wavelength regulation in this protein and indicate that Arg-95, Gln-106, Glu-143, and Asp-229 play important, and in some cases pH-dependent roles. A possible model for the 0.22 eV red shift of BPR at low pH is examined, in which Glu-143 becomes protonated and releases Arg-95 to rotate up into the binding site, altering the electrostatic environment of the chromophore. At high pH, BPR has spectroscopic properties similar to SRII, but at low pH, BPR has spectroscopic properties more similar to BR. Nevertheless, SRII is a significantly better homology model for BPR and opens up the question of whether this protein serves as a proton pump, as commonly believed, or is a light sensor with structure-function properties more comparable to those of SRII. The function of BPR in the native organism is discussed with reference to the results of the homology model.

  1. Broadband light absorber based on porous alumina structure covered with ultrathin iridium film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Bo; Yang, Chenying; Pang, Chenlei; Shen, Weidong; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Yueguang; Yuan, Wenjia; Liu, Xu

    2017-04-01

    In this letter, we propose a broadband absorber with high efficiency by an atomic layer depositing nanometer iridium (Ir) film onto a porous anodic alumina (PAA) template. The average absorption is able to achieve as high as 93.4% from 400 to 1100 nm and the absorption efficiency can reach up to 96.8% for the improved structure of the quadrangular frustum pyramid array. Not only the hexagonal latticed structures of the PAA template but also many similar structures based on gratings or holes with the square latticed or other latticed mode can realize the broadband high absorption efficiency. The light absorbed within the Ir/Glass interface and the sidewalls of PAA by the light funneling effect both contribute to the broadband absorption with high efficiency. This absorber, described in this paper, can be manufactured with a low-cost and large-area manner and has potential applications in fields of light harvesting, imaging, etc.

  2. ESTIMATION OF TROPICAL FOREST STRUCTURE AND BIOMASS FROM FUSION OF RADAR AND LIDAR MEASUREMENTS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saatchi, S. S.; Dubayah, R.; Clark, D. B.; Chazdon, R.

    2009-12-01

    Radar and Lidar instruments are active remote sensing sensors with the potential of measuring forest vertical and horizontal structure and the aboveground biomass (AGB). In this paper, we present the analysis of radar and lidar data acquired over the La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. Radar polarimetry at L-band (25 cm wavelength), P-band (70 cm wavelength) and interferometry at C-band (6 cm wavelength) and VV polarization were acquired by the NASA/JPL airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) system. Lidar images were provided by a large footprint airborne scanning Lidar known as the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS). By including field measurements of structure and biomass over a variety of forest types, we examined: 1) sensitivity of radar and lidar measurements to forest structure and biomass, 2) accuracy of individual sensors for AGB estimation, and 3) synergism of radar imaging measurements with lidar imaging and sampling measurements for improving the estimation of 3-dimensional forest structure and AGB. The results showed that P-band radar combined with any interformteric measurement of forest height can capture approximately 85% of the variation of biomass in La Selva at spatial scales larger than 1 hectare. Similar analysis at L-band frequency captured only 70% of the variation. However, combination of lidar and radar measurements improved estimates of forest three-dimensional structure and biomass to above 90% for all forest types. We present a novel data fusion approach based on a Baysian estimation model with the capability of incorporating lidar samples and radar imagery. The model was used to simulate the potential of data fusion in future satellite mission scenarios as in BIOMASS (planned by ESA) at P-band and DESDynl (planned by NASA) at L-band. The estimation model was also able to quantify errors and uncertainties associated with the scale of measurements, spatial variability of forest structure, and differences in radar and lidar

  3. Additive manufacturing of RF absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, Matthew S.

    The ability of additive manufacturing techniques to fabricate integrated electromagnetic absorbers tuned for specific radio frequency bands within structural composites allows for unique combinations of mechanical and electromagnetic properties. These composites and films can be used for RF shielding of sensitive electromagnetic components through in-plane and out-of-plane RF absorption. Structural composites are a common building block of many commercial platforms. These platforms may be placed in situations in which there is a need for embedded RF absorbing properties along with structural properties. Instead of adding radar absorbing treatments to the external surface of existing structures, which adds increased size, weight and cost; it could prove to be advantageous to integrate the microwave absorbing properties directly into the composite during the fabrication process. In this thesis, a method based on additive manufacturing techniques of composites structures with prescribed electromagnetic loss, within the frequency range 1 to 26GHz, is presented. This method utilizes screen printing and nScrypt micro dispensing to pattern a carbon based ink onto low loss substrates. The materials chosen for this study will be presented, and the fabrication technique that these materials went through to create RF absorbing structures will be described. The calibration methods used, the modeling of the RF structures, and the applications in which this technology can be utilized will also be presented.

  4. An ultrathin dual-band metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Duan, Junping; Zhang, Wendong; Wang, Wanjun; Zhang, Binzhen

    2016-10-01

    The design and preparation of an ultrathin dual-band metamaterial absorber whose resonant frequency located at radar wave (20 GHz-60 GHz) is presented in this paper. The absorber is composed of a 2-D periodic sandwich featured with two concentric annuluses. The influence on the absorber's performance produced by resonant cell's structure size and material parameters was numerically simulated and analyzed based on the standard full wave finite integration technology in CST. Laser ablation process was adopted to prepare the designed absorber on epoxy resin board coated with on double plane of copper with a thickness that is 1/30 and 1/50 of the resonant wavelength at a resonant frequency of 30.51 GHz and 48.15 GHz. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) reached 2.2 GHz and 2.35 GHz and the peak of the absorptance reached 99.977%. The ultrathin absorber is nearly omnidirectional for all polarizations. The test results of prepared sample testify the designed absorber's excellent absorbing performance forcefully. The absorber expands inspirations of radar stealth in military domain due to its flexible design, cost-effective and other outstanding properties.

  5. The time structure of hadronic showers in highly granular calorimeters with tungsten and steel absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adloff, C.; Blaising, J.-J.; Chefdeville, M.; Drancourt, C.; Gaglione, R.; Geffroy, N.; Karyotakis, Y.; Koletsou, I.; Prast, J.; Vouters, G.; Repond, J.; Schlereth, J.; Xia, L.; Baldolemar, E.; Li, J.; Park, S. T.; Sosebee, M.; White, A. P.; Yu, J.; Eigen, G.; Thomson, M. A.; Ward, D. R.; Benchekroun, D.; Hoummada, A.; Khoulaki, Y.; Apostolakis, J.; Arfaoui, S.; Benoit, M.; Dannheim, D.; Elsener, K.; Folger, G.; Grefe, C.; Ivantchenko, V.; Killenberg, M.; Klempt, W.; van der Kraaij, E.; Linssen, L.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Münnich, A.; Poss, S.; Ribon, A.; Roloff, P.; Sailer, A.; Schlatter, D.; Sicking, E.; Strube, J.; Uzhinskiy, V.; Cârloganu, C.; Gay, P.; Manen, S.; Royer, L.; Cornett, U.; David, D.; Ebrahimi, A.; Falley, G.; Feege, N.; Gadow, K.; Göttlicher, P.; Günter, C.; Hartbrich, O.; Hermberg, B.; Karstensen, S.; Krivan, F.; Krüger, K.; Lu, S.; Lutz, B.; Morozov, S.; Morgunov, V.; Neubüser, C.; Reinecke, M.; Sefkow, F.; Smirnov, P.; Terwort, M.; Fagot, A.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Morin, L.; Garutti, E.; Laurien, S.; Marchesini, I.; Matysek, M.; Ramilli, M.; Briggl, K.; Eckert, P.; Harion, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-Ch; Shen, W.; Stamen, R.; Chang, S.; Khan, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kong, D. J.; Oh, Y. D.; Bilki, B.; Norbeck, E.; Northacker, D.; Onel, Y.; Wilson, G. W.; Kawagoe, K.; Miyazaki, Y.; Sudo, Y.; Ueno, H.; Yoshioka, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Cortina Gil, E.; Mannai, S.; Baulieu, G.; Calabria, P.; Caponetto, L.; Combaret, C.; Della Negra, R.; Eté, R.; Grenier, G.; Han, R.; Ianigro, J.-C.; Kieffer, R.; Laktineh, I.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Steen, A.; Tromeur, W.; Vander Donckt, M.; Zoccarato, Y.; Berenguer Antequera, J.; Calvo Alamillo, E.; Fouz, M.-C.; Puerta-Pelayo, J.; Corriveau, F.; Bobchenko, B.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Epifantsev, A.; Markin, O.; Mizuk, R.; Novikov, E.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovsky, E.; Kozlov, V.; Soloviev, Y.; Besson, D.; Buzhan, P.; Ilyin, A.; Kantserov, V.; Kaplin, V.; Popova, E.; Tikhomirov, V.; Gabriel, M.; Kiesling, C.; Seidel, K.; Simon, F.; Soldner, C.; Szalay, M.; Tesar, M.; Weuste, L.; Amjad, M. S.; Bonis, J.; Conforti di Lorenzo, S.; Cornebise, P.; Fleury, J.; Frisson, T.; van der Kolk, N.; Richard, F.; Pöschl, R.; Rouëné, J.; Anduze, M.; Balagura, V.; Becheva, E.; Boudry, V.; Brient, J.-C.; Cornat, R.; Frotin, M.; Gastaldi, F.; Guliyev, E.; Haddad, Y.; Magniette, F.; Ruan, M.; Tran, T. H.; Videau, H.; Callier, S.; Dulucq, F.; Martin-Chassard, G.; de la Taille, Ch; Raux, L.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Zacek, J.; Cvach, J.; Gallus, P.; Havranek, M.; Janata, M.; Kvasnicka, J.; Lednicky, D.; Marcisovsky, M.; Polak, I.; Popule, J.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Ruzicka, P.; Sicho, P.; Smolik, J.; Vrba, V.; Zalesak, J.; Belhorma, B.; Ghazlane, H.; Kotera, K.; Ono, H.; Takeshita, T.; Uozumi, S.; Chai, J. S.; Song, H. S.; Lee, S. H.; Götze, M.; Sauer, J.; Weber, S.; Zeitnitz, C.

    2014-07-01

    The intrinsic time structure of hadronic showers influences the timing capability and the required integration time of hadronic calorimeters in particle physics experiments, and depends on the active medium and on the absorber of the calorimeter. With the CALICE T3B experiment, a setup of 15 small plastic scintillator tiles read out with Silicon Photomultipliers, the time structure of showers is measured on a statistical basis with high spatial and temporal resolution in sampling calorimeters with tungsten and steel absorbers. The results are compared to GEANT4 (version 9.4 patch 03) simulations with different hadronic physics models. These comparisons demonstrate the importance of using high precision treatment of low-energy neutrons for tungsten absorbers, while an overall good agreement between data and simulations for all considered models is observed for steel.

  6. Finite Element Analysis of an Energy Absorbing Sub-floor Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Scott C.

    1995-01-01

    As part of the Advanced General Aviation Transportation Experiments program, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center is conducting tests to design energy absorbing structures to improve occupant survivability in aircraft crashes. An effort is currently underway to design an Energy Absorbing (EA) sub-floor structure which will reduce occupant loads in an aircraft crash. However, a recent drop test of a fuselage specimen with a proposed EA sub-floor structure demonstrated that the effects of sectioning the fuselage on both the fuselage section's stiffness and the performance of the EA structure were not fully understood. Therefore, attempts are underway to model the proposed sub-floor structure on computers using the DYCAST finite element code to provide a better understanding of the structure's behavior in testing, and in an actual crash.

  7. A Noncontact FMCW Radar Sensor for Displacement Measurement in Structural Health Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cunlong; Chen, Weimin; Liu, Gang; Yan, Rong; Xu, Hengyi; Qi, Yi

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the Frequency Modulation Continuous Wave (FMCW) radar sensor for multi-target displacement measurement in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). The principle of three-dimensional (3-D) displacement measurement of civil infrastructures is analyzed. The requirements of high-accuracy displacement and multi-target identification for the measuring sensors are discussed. The fundamental measuring principle of FMCW radar is presented with rigorous mathematical formulas, and further the multiple-target displacement measurement is analyzed and simulated. In addition, a FMCW radar prototype is designed and fabricated based on an off-the-shelf radar frontend and data acquisition (DAQ) card, and the displacement error induced by phase asynchronism is analyzed. The conducted outdoor experiments verify the feasibility of this sensing method applied to multi-target displacement measurement, and experimental results show that three targets located at different distances can be distinguished simultaneously with millimeter level accuracy. PMID:25822139

  8. A noncontact FMCW radar sensor for displacement measurement in structural health monitoring.

    PubMed

    Li, Cunlong; Chen, Weimin; Liu, Gang; Yan, Rong; Xu, Hengyi; Qi, Yi

    2015-03-26

    This paper investigates the Frequency Modulation Continuous Wave (FMCW) radar sensor for multi-target displacement measurement in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). The principle of three-dimensional (3-D) displacement measurement of civil infrastructures is analyzed. The requirements of high-accuracy displacement and multi-target identification for the measuring sensors are discussed. The fundamental measuring principle of FMCW radar is presented with rigorous mathematical formulas, and further the multiple-target displacement measurement is analyzed and simulated. In addition, a FMCW radar prototype is designed and fabricated based on an off-the-shelf radar frontend and data acquisition (DAQ) card, and the displacement error induced by phase asynchronism is analyzed. The conducted outdoor experiments verify the feasibility of this sensing method applied to multi-target displacement measurement, and experimental results show that three targets located at different distances can be distinguished simultaneously with millimeter level accuracy.

  9. Investigating the Surface Structure of Near-Earth Asteroids Using Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virkki, A.; Taylor, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    Planetary radar measurements can give implications on the near-surface geometric and chemical composition of near-Earth asteroids. The dual-polarization radar measurements can be a stronger tool for observing, or even mapping, the near-surface structure of the target than any other ground-based techniques allow. Virkki and Muinonen (2016) show the effect of various surface properties, such as the material, the geometry, and the size of geometrically irregular surface or subsurface scatterers on the observed radar albedo and circular-polarization ratio when a power-law (r-3) size distribution is used. In this work, we continue to study the radar scattering properties of planetary surfaces with the same geometrically irregular scatterers, but now by comparing different normal distributions for the scatterer sizes. The goal is to answer not only how variations of the regolith size distribution may affect the planetary radar echo but also whether using different frequencies, in this case 2380 MHz compared to 8650 MHz, can give information of the surface structure or not. For the modeling, an algorithm of geometric optics with Fresnelian reflections and refractions as well as diffuse scattering is utilized. Reference: Virkki and Muinonen (2016), Radar scattering by planetary surfaces modeled with laboratory-characterized particles, Icarus, 269

  10. A broadband frequency-tunable dynamic absorber for the vibration control of structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsuzaki, T.; Inoue, T.; Terashima, O.

    2016-09-01

    A passive-type dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) is basically a mass-spring system that suppresses the vibration of a structure at a particular frequency. Since the natural frequency of the DVA is usually tuned to a frequency of particular excitation, the DVA is especially effective when the excitation frequency is close to the natural frequency of the structure. Fixing the physical properties of the DVA limits the application to a narrowband, harmonically excited vibration problem. A frequency-tunable DVA that can modulate its stiffness provides adaptability to the vibration control device against non-stationary disturbances. In this paper, we suggest a broadband frequency-tunable DVA whose natural frequency can be extended by 300% to the nominal value using the magnetorheological elastomers (MREs). The frequency adjustability of the proposed absorber is first shown. The real-time vibration control performance of the frequency-tunable absorber for an acoustically excited plate having multiple resonant peaks is then evaluated. Investigations show that the vibration of the structure can be effectively reduced with an improved performance by the DVA in comparison to the conventional passive- type absorber.

  11. Comparing helicopter-borne profiling radar with airborne laser scanner data for forest structure estimation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piermattei, Livia; Hollaus, Markus; Pfeifer, Norbert; Chen, Yuwei; Karjalainen, Mika; Hakala, Teemu; Hyyppä, Juha; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    Forests are complex ecosystems that show substantial variation with respect to climate, management regime, stand history, disturbance, and needs of local communities. The dynamic processes of growth and disturbance are reflected in the structural components of forests that include the canopy vertical structure and geometry (e.g. size, height, and form), tree position and species diversity. Current remote-sensing systems to measure forest structural attributes include passive optical sensors and active sensors. The technological capabilities of active remote sensing like the ability to penetrate the vegetation and provide information about its vertical structure has promoted an extensive use of LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) and radar (RAdio Detection And Ranging) system over the last 20 years. LiDAR measurements from aircraft (airborne laser scanning, ALS) currently represents the primary data source for three-dimensional information on forest vertical structure. Contrary, despite the potential of radar remote sensing, their use is not yet established in forest monitoring. In order to better understand the interaction of pulsed radar with the forest canopy, and to increase the feasibility of this system, the Finnish Geospatial Research Institute has developed a helicopter-borne profiling radar system, called TomoRadar. TomoRadar is capable of recording a canopy-penetrating profile of forests. To georeference the radar measurements the system was equipped with a global navigation satellite system and an inertial measurement unit with a centimeter level accuracy of the flight trajectory. The TomoRadar operates at Ku-band, (wave lengths λ 1.5cm) with two separated parabolic antennas providing co- and cross-polarization modes. The purpose of this work is to investigate the capability of the TomoRadar system, for estimating the forest vertical profile, terrain topography and tree height. We analysed 600 m TomoRadar crosspolarized (i.e. horizontal - vertical

  12. Using Lidar and Radar measurements to constrain predictions of forest ecosystem structure and function.

    PubMed

    Antonarakis, Alexander S; Saatchi, Sassan S; Chazdon, Robin L; Moorcroft, Paul R

    2011-06-01

    Insights into vegetation and aboveground biomass dynamics within terrestrial ecosystems have come almost exclusively from ground-based forest inventories that are limited in their spatial extent. Lidar and synthetic-aperture Radar are promising remote-sensing-based techniques for obtaining comprehensive measurements of forest structure at regional to global scales. In this study we investigate how Lidar-derived forest heights and Radar-derived aboveground biomass can be used to constrain the dynamics of the ED2 terrestrial biosphere model. Four-year simulations initialized with Lidar and Radar structure variables were compared against simulations initialized from forest-inventory data and output from a long-term potential-vegtation simulation. Both height and biomass initializations from Lidar and Radar measurements significantly improved the representation of forest structure within the model, eliminating the bias of too many large trees that arose in the potential-vegtation-initialized simulation. The Lidar and Radar initializations decreased the proportion of larger trees estimated by the potential vegetation by approximately 20-30%, matching the forest inventory. This resulted in improved predictions of ecosystem-scale carbon fluxes and structural dynamics compared to predictions from the potential-vegtation simulation. The Radar initialization produced biomass values that were 75% closer to the forest inventory, with Lidar initializations producing canopy height values closest to the forest inventory. Net primary production values for the Radar and Lidar initializations were around 6-8% closer to the forest inventory. Correcting the Lidar and Radar initializations for forest composition resulted in improved biomass and basal-area dynamics as well as leaf-area index. Correcting the Lidar and Radar initializations for forest composition and fine-scale structure by combining the remote-sensing measurements with ground-based inventory data further improved

  13. Spaceborne cloud-profiling radar: instrument parameter optimization for resolving highly layered cloud structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chung-Chi; Tinel, Claire; Caillault, Karine; Testud, Jacques; Caubet, Eric

    2003-04-01

    EarthCARE, a candidate Earth Explorer Core mission of ESA, aims to improve our knowledge of the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth's radiative budget. The satellite will carry two nadir sounding active instruments: a Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) and a backscatter lidar. In addition, a multispectral cloud-imager, a Fourier transform spectrometer and a broadband radiometer complement the payload. The objective of the present study was to optimize the parameters of the CPR for retrieving accurate radiative profiles for highly layered cloud structures. Realistic cloud scenarios taken from ground-based experiments have been used for simulating the radar response to cloud layers. A radar simulator was developed initially for one-dimensional simulation of the radar echos. The cloud microphysical properties were retrieved using a model as a function of the reflectivity factor and temperature, based on information from in-situ measurements. An extensive parametric analysis was performed for various vertical resolutions and sensitivities which have direct impacts on the radar design and necessary resources on-board the satellite. The analysis demonstrated that the proposed radar characteristics will meet the top-of-the-atmosphere radiative flux density estimation accuracy of 10 W/m2 as recommended by WCRP.

  14. Tropical-Forest Structure and Biomass Dynamics from TanDEM-X Radar Interferometry

    Treesearch

    Robert Treuhaft; Yang Lei; Fabio Gonçalves; Michael Keller; João Santos; Maxim Neumann; André Almeida

    2017-01-01

    Changes in tropical-forest structure and aboveground biomass (AGB) contribute directly to atmospheric changes in CO2, which, in turn, bear on global climate. This paper demonstrates the capability of radar-interferometric phase-height time series at X-band (wavelength = 3 cm) to monitor changes in vertical structure and AGB, with sub-hectare and monthly spatial and...

  15. A broadband polarization-independent perfect absorber with tapered cylinder structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianguo; Zhu, Meiping; Sun, Jian; Yi, Kui; Shao, Jianda

    2016-12-01

    A broadband, polarization-independent, and wide angle metamaterial absorber (MA) with tapered cylinder structures is investigated with finite difference time domain simulations. The titanium nitride (TiN) and indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film are introduced as the tapered cylinder structures. The unit cell structure is mainly composed of two pairs of TiN/ITO layers and one TiN base layer. The absorption is higher than 99% between the wavelength 700 nm and 1000 nm. The broadband, polarization independent average absorption remains above 95% between 400 nm and 1200 nm with a wide range of incident angles from 0° to 40°. The electrical field intensity distributions are studied to disclose the broadband absorption mechanism. This designed broadband absorber appears to be very promising applications in the plasmonic sensing and photovoltaic devices.

  16. Realisation of 3D metamaterial perfect absorber structures by direct laser writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanyaeu, I.; Mizeikis, V.

    2017-02-01

    We report design, fabrication and optical properties of 3D electromagnetic metamaterial structures applicable as perfect absorbers (PA) at mid infra-red frequencies. PA architecture consisting of single-turn metallic helices arranged in a periodic two-dimensional array enables polarization-invariant perfect absorption within a considerable range of incidence angles. The absorber structure is all-metallic, and in principle does not require metallic ground plane, which permits optical transparency at frequencies away from the PA resonance. The samples were fabricated by preparing their dielectric templates using Direct Laser Write technique in photoresist, and metalisation by gold sputtering. Resonant absorption in excess of 90% was found at the resonant wavelength of 7.7 μm in accordance with numerical modelling. Similar PA structures may prove useful for harvesting and conversion of infrared energy as well as narrow-band thermal emission and detection.

  17. Design of three-element dynamic vibration absorber for damped linear structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anh, N. D.; Nguyen, N. X.; Hoa, L. T.

    2013-09-01

    The standard type of dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) called the Voigt DVA is a classical model and has long been investigated. In the paper, we will consider an optimization problem of another model of DVA that is called three-element type DVA for damped primary structures. Unlike the standard absorber configuration, the three-element DVA contains two spring elements in which one is connected to a dashpot in series and the other is placed in parallel. There have been some studies on the design of the three-element DVA for undamped primary structures. Those studies have shown that the three-element DVA produces better performance than the Voigt DVA does. When damping is present at the primary system, to the best knowledge of the authors, there has been no study on the three-element dynamic vibration absorber. This work presents a simple approach to determine the approximate analytical solutions for the H∞ optimization of the three-element DVA attached to the damped primary structure. The main idea of the study is based on the criteria of the equivalent linearization method in order to replace approximately the original damped structure by an equivalent undamped one. Then the approximate analytical solution of the DVA's parameters is given by using known results for the undamped structure obtained. The comparisons have been done to verify the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  18. Incorporating piezoelectric energy harvester in tunable vibration absorber for application in multi-modal vibration reduction of a platform structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chun-Ying; Lin, Jia-Hong

    2017-02-01

    Tunable vibration absorber is an effective device to reduce the vibration of structure subjected to harmonic excitation. The vibration energy is transferred mostly to the absorber when the natural frequency of the absorber is tuned to the excitation frequency. In this study, a piezoelectric (PZT) transducer was incorporated into the absorber in order to harvest the vibration energy and still alleviate the vibration of a platform structure. The tuning in dynamic characteristics of the absorber was facilitated by controlling its tip mass. The design formulation of the absorber was presented with a single degree-of-freedom (SDOF) model having the equivalent parameters. In the meantime, an optimal electric load resistor was determined to maximize the power output from the PZT transducer. The experimental measurement validated the SDOF model with good accuracy both in the vibration response and the output electric voltage. Finally, the absorber was installed on a platform structure to investigate its vibration reduction and energy harvesting capability for the external disturbance frequency covering certain frequency span. With three resonance modes of the platform studied, the absorber was able to reduce more than 80% of its original vibration and harvest several folds of electric power comparing with the untuned absorber. Although the performance in vibration reduction was slightly influenced (<6%), the great increase in the electric energy harvested revealed the absorber design a good potential toward self-powered sensor or actuator applications.

  19. The tectonics of Titan: Global structural mapping from Cassini RADAR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Zac Yung-Chun; Radebaugh, Jani; Harris, Ron A.; Christiansen, Eric H.; Neish, Catherine D.; Kirk, Randolph L.; Lorenz, Ralph D.; ,

    2016-01-01

    The Cassini RADAR mapper has imaged elevated mountain ridge belts on Titan with a linear-to-arcuate morphology indicative of a tectonic origin. Systematic geomorphologic mapping of the ridges in Synthetic Aperture RADAR (SAR) images reveals that the orientation of ridges is globally E–W and the ridges are more common near the equator than the poles. Comparison with a global topographic map reveals the equatorial ridges are found to lie preferentially at higher-than-average elevations. We conclude the most reasonable formation scenario for Titan’s ridges is that contractional tectonism built the ridges and thickened the icy lithosphere near the equator, causing regional uplift. The combination of global and regional tectonic events, likely contractional in nature, followed by erosion, aeolian activity, and enhanced sedimentation at mid-to-high latitudes, would have led to regional infilling and perhaps covering of some mountain features, thus shaping Titan’s tectonic landforms and surface morphology into what we see today.

  20. Planetary benchmarks. [structural design criteria for radar reference devices on planetary surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uphoff, C.; Staehle, R.; Kobrick, M.; Jurgens, R.; Price, H.; Slade, M.; Sonnabend, D.

    1978-01-01

    Design criteria and technology requirements for a system of radar reference devices to be fixed to the surfaces of the inner planets are discussed. Offshoot applications include the use of radar corner reflectors as landing beacons on the planetary surfaces and some deep space applications that may yield a greatly enhanced knowledge of the gravitational and electromagnetic structure of the solar system. Passive retroreflectors with dimensions of about 4 meters and weighing about 10 kg are feasible for use with orbiting radar at Venus and Mars. Earth-based observation of passive reflectors, however, would require very large and complex structures to be delivered to the surfaces. For Earth-based measurements, surface transponders offer a distinct advantage in accuracy over passive reflectors. A conceptual design for a high temperature transponder is presented. The design appears feasible for the Venus surface using existing electronics and power components.

  1. An adaptive piezoelectric vibration absorber enhanced by a negative capacitance applied to a shell structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gripp, J. A. B.; Góes, L. C. S.; Heuss, O.; Scinocca, F.

    2015-12-01

    Piezoelectric shunt damping is a well-known technique to damp mechanical vibrations of a structure, using a piezoelectric transducer to convert mechanical vibration energy into electrical energy, which is dissipated in an electrical resistance. Resonant shunts consisting of a resistance and an inductance connected to a piezoelectric transducer are used to damp structural vibrations in narrow frequency bands, but their performance is very sensitive to variations in structural modal frequencies and transducer capacitance. In order to overcome this drawback, a piezoelectric shunt damping technique with improved performance and robustness is presented in this paper. The design of the adaptive circuit considers the variation of the host structure’s natural frequency as a project parameter. This paper describes an adaptive resonant piezoelectric vibration absorber enhanced by a synthetic negative capacitance applied to a shell structure. The resonant shunt circuit autonomously adapts its inductance value by comparing the phase difference of the vibration velocity and the current flowing through the shunt circuit. Moreover, a synthetic negative capacitance is added to the shunt circuit to enhance the vibration attenuation provided by the piezoelectric absorber. The circuitry is implemented using analog components. Validation of the proposed method is done by bonding the piezoelectric absorber on a free-formed metallic shell.

  2. Metamaterial perfect absorbers with solid and inverse periodic cross structures for optoelectronic applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haochi; Zhao, Ziyi; Qian, Qinbai; Xu, Jie; Gou, Peng; Zou, Yuexin; Cao, Jun; Yang, Le; Qian, Jie; An, Zhenghua

    2017-04-03

    Metamaterial based on a metal/insulator/metal (MIM) tri-layer structure provides an agile platform to realize high absorption efficiency for a variety of applications including semiconductor optoelectronic detectors. In this work, we use the finite time domain difference (FDTD) method and coupled mode theory (CMT) to numerically study metal/semiconductor/metal (MSM) structures and discuss their effective absorption for optoelectronic application. We compare MSM structures with a different top metal layer design and find that cross shaped absorber (CSA) and it's complementary cross shaped absorber (CCSA) exhibit different phase diagrams due to a distinctive dependence of radiation loss on geometrical parameters. Our results show that CSA (CCSA) structures are suitable for thinner (thicker) sandwiched semiconductor with a larger (smaller) imaginary part of its dielectric constant. The necessary condition to realize a maximum figure of merit (FOM) value for effective absorption is discussed in comparison with the perfect absorber condition. Our work may provide guidelines to design the general light-harvesting optoelectronic devices with high efficiencies based on metamaterial-semiconductor hybrid systems.

  3. Imperfectly geometric shapes of nanograting structures as solar absorbers with superior performance for solar cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Huu, Nghia; Cada, Michael; Pištora, Jaromír

    2014-03-10

    The expectation of perfectly geometric shapes of subwavelength grating (SWG) structures such as smoothness of sidewalls and sharp corners and nonexistence of grating defects is not realistic due to micro/nanofabrication processes. This work numerically investigates optical properties of an optimal solar absorber comprising a single-layered silicon (Si) SWG deposited on a finite Si substrate, with a careful consideration given to effects of various types of its imperfect geometry. The absorptance spectra of the solar absorber with different geometric shapes, namely, the grating with attached nanometer-sized features at the top and bottom of sidewalls and periodic defects within four and ten grating periods are investigated comprehensively. It is found that the grating with attached features at the bottom absorbs more energy than both the one at the top and the perfect grating. In addition, it is shown that the grating with defects in each fourth period exhibits the highest average absorptance (91%) compared with that of the grating having defects in each tenth period (89%), the grating with attached features (89%), and the perfect one (86%). Moreover, the results indicate that the absorptance spectrum of the imperfect structures is insensitive to angles of incidence. Furthermore, the absorptance enhancement is clearly demonstrated by computing magnetic field, energy density, and Poynting vector distributions. The results presented in this study prove that imperfect geometries of the nanograting structure display a higher absorptance than the perfect one, and provide such a practical guideline for nanofabrication capabilities necessary to be considered by structure designers.

  4. High-resolution interferometric radar images of equatorial spread F scattering structures using Capon's method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zewdie, G. K.; Rodrigues, F. S.; Paula, E. R.

    2015-12-01

    Coherent backscatter radar imaging techniques use measurements made by multiple antenna baselines (visibility estimates) to infer the spatial distribution of the scatterers (brightness function) responsible for the observed echoes. It has been proposed that the Capon method for spectral estimation can be used for high-resolution estimation of the brightness distribution. We investigate the application of the Capon method to measurements made by a small (7-baseline) 30 MHz ionospheric coherent backscatter radar interferometer in Sao Luis, Brazil. The longest baseline of the interferometer is only 15 times the wavelength of radar signal (10 m), and the ionospheric radar soundings have been made using only 4-8 kW transmitters. Nevertheless, we have been able to obtain high-resolution (kilometric scales in the zonal direction) images of scattering structures during equatorial spread F (ESF) events over a wide field of view (+/- 10 degrees off zenith). We will present numerical simulations demonstrating the performance of the technique for the Sao Luis radar setup as well as results of the Capon technique applied to actual measurements. We will discuss the behavior of the ESF scattering structures as seen in the Capon images. The high-resolution images can assist our interpretation of plasma instabilities in the equatorial ionosphere and serve to test our ability to model the behavior of ionospheric irregularities during space weather events such as those associated with ESF.

  5. Space shuttle observations of terrestrial impact structures using SIR-C and X-SAR radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHone, John F.; Greeley, Ronald; Williams, Kevin K.; Blumberg, Dan G.; Kuzmin, Ruslan O.

    2002-03-01

    Ten terrestrial impact structures were imaged during two flights of the 1994 Space Radar Laboratory (SRL) experiment. These craters include Wolf Creek, Australia; Roter Kamm, Namibia; Zhamanshin, Kazakhstan; B.P. and Oasis, Libya; Aorounga, Chad; Amguid, Algeria; and Spider, Connolly Basin and Henbury, Australia. SRL contained two co-registered instruments; the United States SIR-C polarimetric radar system operating in L-band (?=24 cm) and C-band (?=5.6 cm), and the joint German/Italian X-SAR vertically-polarized radar operating in X-band (?=3 cm). Comparisons show SRL images to be complementary to, or in some cases superior to, corresponding optical images for evaluating size, location, and relative age of impact features. Regardless of wavelength or polarization, craters with significant relief appear prominently on radar as a result of slope and roughness effects. In desert regions, longer wavelengths penetrate dry sand mantles to reveal hidden crater dimensions or associated buried landforms. Radar polarities and wavelengths are particularly sensitive to vegetation, surface roughness, and soil moisture or electrical properties. In the more temperate environments of Kazakhstan and Australia, SRL images show detailed stream patterns that reveal the location and structure of otherwise obscured impact features.

  6. Planetary Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  7. Planetary Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  8. Metamaterial-plasmonic absorber structure for high efficiency amorphous silicon solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Sun, Tianyi; Paudel, Trilochan; Zhang, Yi; Ren, Zhifeng; Kempa, Krzysztof

    2012-01-11

    We show that a planar structure, consisting of an ultrathin semiconducting layer topped with a solid nanoscopically perforated metallic film and then a dielectric interference film, can highly absorb (superabsorb) electromagnetic radiation in the entire visible range, and thus can become a platform for high-efficiency solar cells. The perforated metallic film and the ultrathin absorber in this broadband superabsorber form a metamaterial effective film, which negatively refracts light in this broad frequency range. Our quantitative simulations confirm that the superabsorption bandwidth is maximized at the checkerboard pattern of the perforations. These simulations show also that the energy conversion efficiency of a single-junction amorphous silicon solar cell based on our optimized structure can exceed 12%.

  9. Review of Radar Absorbing Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    DeAngelis, A. R.; Childs, A. D.; Green, D. E., US Patent 5,720,892. 1998. (58) Genies, E. M.; Petrescu, C.; Olmedo , L. Synth. Met. 1991, 41-43, 665...S.H. J. Appl. Poly. Sci. 1999, 74, 2094. (74) Olmedo , L., Hourquebie, P., Jousse, F. Synth. Met. 1995, 69, 205 (75) Pitman, E. H., Kuhn, H.H., US...Condensed Matter 1998, 10, 5595. (168) Mohamed, A. B. H.; Miane, J. L.; Zangar, H. Polymer International 2001, 50, 773. (169) Olmedo , L

  10. Radar Absorbing Colloidal Solutions (RACS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-01

    injection molded microfluidic platforms fabricated from Teflon. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF 18. NUMBER 19a. NAME OF...polymer i"c*e i ontains both polyanilnet1ra b aniivei. More recent work with poly(3,4-ethylenedioxyt6lophene) and copper metal in a polyethylene LiBF4

  11. Metallic rugate structures for near-perfect absorbers in visible and near-infrared regions.

    PubMed

    Shu, Shiwei; Li, Yang Yang

    2012-09-01

    Metallic rugate structures are theoretically investigated for achieving near-perfect absorption in the visible and near-infrared regions. Our model builds on nanoporous metal films whose porosity (volume fraction of voids) follows a sinewave along the film thickness. By setting the initial phase of porosity at the top surface as 0, near-perfect absorption is obtained. The impacts of various structural parameters on the characteristic absorption behaviors are studied. Furthermore, multiple peaks or bands with high absorption can be achieved by integrating several periodicities in one structure. The rugate absorbers show near-perfect absorption for TE and TM polarizations and large incident angles.

  12. Horizontally resolved structures of polar mesospheric echoes obtained with the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latteck, Ralph; Zecha, Marius; Rapp, Markus; Stober, Gunter; Singer, Werner

    2012-07-01

    Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes have been observed in Andenes/Norway (69°N, 16°E) for more than 18 years using the Alomar SOUSY and the ALWIN VHF radars. In 2011 the Leibniz-Institute of Atmospheric Physics in Kühlungsborn completed the installation of the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System ({MAARSY}). The new radar is designed for atmospheric studies from the troposphere up to the lower thermosphere, especially for the investigation of horizontal structures of polar mesospheric echoes. The system is composed of an active phased antenna consisting of 433 array elements and an identical number of transceiver modules individually controllable in frequency, phase, and output power on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This arrangement allows very high flexibility of beam forming and beam steering with a symmetric 3.6° small radar beam and arbitrary beam pointing directions down to 30° off-zenith. The monitoring of polar mesosphere echoes using a vertical pointed radar beam has been continued already during the construction period of MAARSY in order to complete the long term data base available for Andenes. Additionally first multi-beam scanning experiments using up to 97 beams quasi-simultaneously in the mesosphere have been carried out during several campaigns starting in summer 2010. Sophisticated wind analysis methods such as an extended velocity azimuth display have been applied to retrieve additional parameters from the wind field, e.g. horizontal divergence, vertical velocity, stretching and shearing deformation. The results provide a first insight into the strong horizontal variability of scattering structures occurring in the polar mesosphere over Andenes during summer and winter time. The implementation of interferometric radar imaging methods offers further improvement of the horizontal and the vertical resolution.

  13. Active vibration absorber for the CSI evolutionary model - Design and experimental results. [Controls Structures Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, Anne M.; Belvin, W. Keith; Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1991-01-01

    The development of control of large flexible structures technology must include practical demonstrations to aid in the understanding and characterization of controlled structures in space. To support this effort, a testbed facility has been developed to study practical implementation of new control technologies under realistic conditions. The paper discusses the design of a second order, acceleration feedback controller which acts as an active vibration absorber. This controller provides guaranteed stability margins for collocated sensor/actuator pairs in the absence of sensor/actuator dynamics and computational time delay. Experimental results in the presence of these factors are presented and discussed. The robustness of this design under model uncertainty is demonstrated.

  14. Active vibration absorber for the CSI evolutionary model - Design and experimental results. [Controls Structures Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruner, Anne M.; Belvin, W. Keith; Horta, Lucas G.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1991-01-01

    The development of control of large flexible structures technology must include practical demonstrations to aid in the understanding and characterization of controlled structures in space. To support this effort, a testbed facility has been developed to study practical implementation of new control technologies under realistic conditions. The paper discusses the design of a second order, acceleration feedback controller which acts as an active vibration absorber. This controller provides guaranteed stability margins for collocated sensor/actuator pairs in the absence of sensor/actuator dynamics and computational time delay. Experimental results in the presence of these factors are presented and discussed. The robustness of this design under model uncertainty is demonstrated.

  15. An interferometric radar for displacement measurement and its application in civil engineering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, D.; Nagayama, T.; Sun, Z.; Fujino, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Recent progress in radar techniques and systems has led to the development of a microwave interferometer, potentially suitable for non-contact displacement monitoring of civil engineering structures. This paper describes a new interferometric radar system, named IBIS-S, which is possible to measure the static or dynamic displacement at multiple points of structures simultaneously with high accuracy. In this paper, the technical characteristics and specification of the radar system is described. Subsequently, the actual displacement sensitivity of the equipment is illustrated using the laboratory tests with random motion upon a shake table. Finally the applications of the radar system to the measurement on a cable-stayed bridge and a prestressed concrete bridge are presented and discussed. Results show that the new system is an accurate and effective method to measure displacements of multiple targets of structures. It should be noted that the current system can only measure the vibration of the target position along the sensor's line of sight. Hence, proper caution should be taken when designing the sensor posture and prior knowledge of the direction of motion is necessary.

  16. Radar observations of the asteroid's structure from deep interior to regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletti, Valerie; Herique, Alain

    2016-04-01

    Our knowledge of the internal structure of asteroids entirely relies on inferences from remote sensing observations of the surface and theoretical modeling. Is the body a monolithic piece of rock or a rubble-pile, how high is the porosity? What is the typical size of the constituent blocs? Are these blocs homogeneous or heterogeneous? The body is covered by a regolith whose properties remain largely unknown in term of depth, size distribution and spatial variability. Is it resulting from fine particles re-accretion or from thermal fracturing? After several asteroid orbiting missions, theses crucial and yet basic questions remain open. Direct measurements of asteroid deep interior and regolith structure are needed to better understand the asteroid accretion and dynamical evolution and to provide answers that will directly improve our ability to understand the formation and evolution of the Near Earth Asteroids (NEA), that will allow us to model the mechanisms driving NEA deflection and other risk mitigation techniques. Radars operating at distance from a spacecraft are the only instruments capable of achieving this science objective of characterizing the internal structure and heterogeneity from submetric to global scale for the benefit of science as well as for planetary defense or exploration. The AIM mission will have two complementary radars on-board, operating at different frequencies in order to meet the objectives requirements. The deep interior structure tomography requires a low-frequency radar (LFR) in order to propagate throughout the complete body (this LFR will be a direct heritage of the CONSERT radar designed for the Rosetta mission). Ihe characterization of the first ten meters of the subsurface with a metric resolution to identify layering and to reconnect surface measurements to internal structure will be achieved with a higher frequency radar(HFR), the design of which is based on the WISDOM radar developed for the ExoMars mission. Both radars are

  17. Fine-scale radar observations of boundary layer structures in landfalling hurricanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosiba, K.; Wurman, J.; Robinson, P.

    2012-04-01

    The hurricane boundary layer is comprised of coherent structures that are potentially responsible for significant transport of turbulent fluxes throughout the hurricane boundary layer as well as regions of enhanced damage at the surface. These coherent structures are not well understood and consequently their effects are poorly represented in numerical models. Consequently, an understanding of the flow modulating processes in the hurricane boundary layer is necessary to improve hurricane intensity forecasts. Further, enhanced regions of turbulent momentum transport are hypothesized to cause areas of enhanced damage at the surface. In order to characterize these turbulent processed and quantify their effects, the Doppler on Wheels radars (DOWs) have deployed in several hurricanes, obtaining both dual-Doppler and rapid single-Doppler observations in the boundary layer of landfalling hurricanes. Results will be presented from Hurricanes Frances (2004), Gustav (2008), and Ike (2008). During Hurricane Frances, high-resolution, dual-Doppler radar observations of the lowest hundred meters of the boundary layer allowed for the four-dimensional (time and space) analysis of the boundary layer velocity structure and for the quantification of the turbulent fluxes as Frances transitioned from ocean to land. These results will be discussed in the context of current turbulent parameterization schemes used in numerical models. In Hurricanes Gustav and Ike, rapid, single-Doppler observations were obtained of the boundary layers. This allowed for the two-dimensional quantification rapidly evolving of boundary layer structures. Further an array of surface based instruments were deployed in Hurricanes Gustav and Ike in order to correlate observations at radar level with surface observations. Through turbulent considerations, a reduction factor was derived for the radar winds, which allowed for the comparison between radar level winds and winds observed at 1, 2, and 10 m. These results

  18. Preparation and radar-absorbing properties of Al2O3/TiO2/Fe2O3/Yb2O3 composite powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yi-fan; Ji, Zhen; Chen, Ke; Jia, Cheng-chang; Yang, Shan-wu; Wang, Meng-ya

    2017-02-01

    Al2O3/TiO2/Fe2O3/Yb2O3 composite powder was synthesized via the sol-gel method. The structure, morphology, and radar-absorption properties of the composite powder were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis and RF impedance analysis. The results show that two types of particles exist in the composite powder. One is irregular flakes (100-200 nm) and the other is spherical Al2O3 particles (smaller than 80 nm). Electromagnetic wave attenuation is mostly achieved by dielectric loss. The maximum value of the dissipation factor reaches 0.76 (at 15.68 GHz) in the frequency range of 2-18 GHz. The electromagnetic absorption of waves covers 2-18 GHz with the matching thicknesses of 1.5-4.5 mm. The absorption peak shifts to the lower-frequency area with increasing matching thickness. The effective absorption band covers the frequency range of 2.16-9.76 GHz, and the maximum absorption peak reaches -20.18 dB with a matching thickness of 3.5 mm at a frequency of 3.52 GHz.

  19. Ultra-broadband terahertz perfect absorber by exciting multi-order diffractions in a double-layered grating structure.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yan; Zang, XiaoFei; Zhu, YiMing; Shi, Cheng; Chen, Lin; Cai, Bin; Zhuang, SongLin

    2015-02-09

    Terahertz (THz) perfect absorber, as a useful functional device, has attracted considerable attention. Traditional metamaterial perfect absorbers are usually in response to single-frequency or multi-frequency owing to the resonance features of the metal-based sub-wavelength structure. In this paper, a simple double-layered doped-silicon grating structure was designed to realize an ultra-broadband and polarization-independent THz perfect absorber. Both theoretical and experimental results demonstrate that the incident THz waves ranging from 0.59 to 2.58 THz can be efficiently absorbed with an absorptivity of more than 95% and a bandwidth of about 2.0 THz. The excellent characteristic of this broad-bandwidth THz perfect absorber is mainly resulted from the air gap mode resonance together with the first-order and the second-order grating diffractions.

  20. Identification of Structural Changes Caused by Weed Infection in Agriculture by Optical and Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nador, Gizella; Surek, Gyorgy; Fenyes, Diana; Ocsai, Katalin; Linda Toth, Gracia; Akos Gera, David; Hubik, Iren; Simon, Andras; Torok, Cecilia

    2011-03-01

    In most cases the healthy, weed-free cropland has a regular geometric structure determined by sowing technique and plant-to-plant distances. Several plant diseases and weed infections can cause disorders and structural changes in cropland. According to our experience, this type of geometrical changes can be well detected by using polarimetric radar images (RADARSAT2, ALOS PALSAR) with different polarizations (dual, quad) and wavelengths (C, L band).We analyze agricultural damages resulting in structural changes in different croplands. In this paper we propose to complete the methodology of identifying these agricultural damages based on the integrated use of optical and radar satellite images. We focused on the detection of ragweed infection on sunflower lands. According to our results it is possible to develop a methodology based on the quantitative evaluation of polarimetric features which enables us to identify ragweed infected sunflower lands before the beginning of pollen scattering (beginning of August).

  1. Structural investigation of the Grenville Province by radar and other imaging and nonimaging sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, P. D., Jr.; Blodget, H. W.; Webster, W. J., Jr.; Paia, S.; Singhroy, V. H.; Slaney, V. R.

    1984-01-01

    The structural investigation of the Canadian Shield by orbital radar and LANDSAT, is outlined. The area includes parts of the central metasedimentary belt and the Ontario gneiss belt, and major structures as well-expressed topographically. The primary objective is to apply SIR-B data to the mapping of this key part of the Grenville orogen, specifically ductile fold structures and associated features, and igneous, metamorphic, and sedimentary rock (including glacial and recent sediments). Secondary objectives are to support the Canadian RADARSAT project by evaluating the baseline parameters of a Canadian imaging radar satellite planned for late in the decade. The baseline parameters include optimum incidence and azimuth angles. The experiment is to develop techniques for the use of multiple data sets.

  2. Plasmonic Structure Enhanced Exciton Generation at the Interface between the Perovskite Absorber and Copper Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuen-Feng; Chiang, Chien-Hung; Wu, Chun-Guey

    2014-01-01

    The refractive index and extinction coefficient of a triiodide perovskite absorber (TPA) were obtained by fitting the transmittance spectra of TPA/PEDOT:PSS/ITO/glass using the transfer matrix method. Cu nanoplasmonic structures were designed to enhance the exciton generation in the TPA and to simultaneously reduce the film thickness of the TPA. Excitons were effectively generated at the interface between TPA and Cu nanoparticles, as observed through the 3D finite-difference time-domain method. The exciton distribution is advantageous for the exciton dissociation and carrier transport. PMID:25295290

  3. Monolayer graphene saturable absorber with sandwich structure for ultrafast solid-state laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongtong; Zhao, Lina; Liu, Jie; Xu, Shicai; Cai, Wei; Jiang, Shouzhen; Zheng, Lihe; Su, Liangbi; Xu, Jun

    2016-08-01

    The uniform-quality, large-area, monolayer graphene saturable absorber (SA) with sandwich structure was fabricated, tested, and successfully applied for the generation of diode-pumped Yb:Y2SiO5 mode-locked laser. Without extra negative dispersion elements, the shortest pulse with duration of ˜883 fs was obtained at 1042.6 nm with an output power of ˜1 W. These promising experimental results suggested that the low-cost, high-quality graphene SA could potentially be employed in practical, high-power, ultrafast mode-locking laser systems.

  4. Suppression of mechanical vibrations in a building-like structure using a passive/active autoparametric absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abundis-Fong, H. F.; Silva-Navarro, G.

    2014-03-01

    An experimental investigation is carried out on a system consisting of a primary structure coupled with a passive/active autoparametric vibration absorber. The primary structure consists of a building-like mechanical structure, it has three rigid floors connected by flexible columns made from aluminium strips, while the absorber consists of a cantilever beam with a PZT patch actuator actively controlled through an acquisition card. The whole system, which is a coupled non-linear oscillator, is subjected to sinusoidal excitation obtained from an electromechanical shaker in the neighborhood of internal resonances. The natural frequency of the absorber is tuned to be one-half of any of the natural frequencies of the main system. With the addition of a PZT actuator, the autoparametric vibration absorber is made active, thus enabling the possibility to control the effective stiffness associated to the passive absorber and, as a consequence, the implementation of an active vibration control scheme able to preserve, as possible, the autoparametric interaction as well as to compensate varying excitation frequencies. This active vibration absorber employs feedback information from an accelerometer on the primary structure, an accelerometer on the tip of the beam absorber and a strain gage on the base of the beam, feedforward information from the excitation force and on-line computations from the nonlinear approximate frequency response, parameterized in terms of a proportional gain provided by a voltage input to the PZT actuator, thus providing a mechanism to asymptotically track an optimal, robust and stable attenuation solution on the primary system.

  5. High-sensitivity plasmonic sensor based on perfect absorber with metallic nanoring structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Xiaoyuan; Wan, Rengang; Liu, Feng; Zhang, Tongyi

    2016-01-01

    We propose a nanoring array structure backed by a metal mirror to achieve perfect infrared absorber with absorption as high as 99.99%. The frequency of the absorption peak strongly depends on the refractive index surrounding the structured surface, while the maximum of absorption remains constant with varying the surrounding refractive index. These features can be used as plasmonic sensor for refractive index measurement. This plasmonic sensor possesses the figure of merit 700. In addition, we investigate the effect of various materials on the performance of the sensor, including ?, ?, TiN, and ? dielectric spacer and Au, Ag, Al, and Cu back plate and top structure. Due to the high sensitivity and simple sensing scheme, the sensing strategy can find potential applications in chemical and biosensor applications.

  6. Multi-band polarization insensitive metamaterial absorber with dual cross-wires structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Li-fang; Li, Min-hua; Zhai, Xiao-min; Wang, Hui-bo; Dong, Jian-feng

    2015-11-01

    A five-band metamaterial absorber (MMA) based on a simple planar structure is proposed. It utilizes different areas of a single unit cell to match impedance, and produces different absorptive frequencies. Numerical calculation shows that the MMA has five different absorption peaks at 3.78 GHz, 7.66 GHz, 10.9 GHz, 14.5 GHz and 16.7 GHz, and their absorption rates reach 95.5%, 98.6%, 95.7%, 96.6% and 99.8%, respectively. The proposed structure is polarization insensitive for transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) incident waves. Also, the absorptive characteristics over large incident angles are examined. In addition, we analyze the absorption mechanism by the surface current density and power flow density distributions. This simple structure provides a way to design multi-band MMA, and also saves the cost of fabrication.

  7. Final report of LDRD project: Electromagnetic impulse radar for detection of underground structures

    SciTech Connect

    Loubriel, G.; Aurand, J.; Buttram, M.; Zutavern, F.; Brown, D.; Helgeson, W.

    1998-03-01

    This report provides a summary of the LDRD project titled: Electromagnetic impulse radar for the detection of underground structures. The project met all its milestones even with a tight two year schedule and total funding of $400 k. The goal of the LDRD was to develop and demonstrate a ground penetrating radar (GPR) that is based on high peak power, high repetition rate, and low center frequency impulses. The idea of this LDRD is that a high peak power, high average power radar based on the transmission of short impulses can be utilized effect can be utilized for ground penetrating radar. This direct time-domain system the authors are building seeks to increase penetration depth over conventional systems by using: (1) high peak power, high repetition rate operation that gives high average power, (2) low center frequencies that better penetrate the ground, and (3) short duration impulses that allow for the use of downward looking, low flying platforms that increase the power on target relative to a high flying platform. Specifically, chirped pulses that are a microsecond in duration require (because it is difficult to receive during transmit) platforms above 150 m (and typically 1 km) while this system, theoretically could be at 10 m above the ground. The power on target decays with distance squared so the ability to use low flying platforms is crucial to high penetration. Clutter is minimized by time gating the surface clutter return. Short impulses also allow gating (out) the coupling of the transmit and receive antennas.

  8. Ground penetrating imaging radar system for locating and mapping subsurface structures: Phase 1. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hackman, R.H.

    1996-06-01

    This report describes the first phase of a two phase program directed at the development of an advanced Ground Penetrating Imaging Radar (GPIR) system. This system will be capable of locating and mapping buried pipes, utilities lines and other conducting and non-conducting subsurface structures to depths of 4 meters. The system will employ advanced radar hardware technology and advanced signal and image processing capable of generating robust 3-dimensional subsurface maps. The system will be designed for both on- and off-road operation and for real time imaging. The first phase of the program: (1) established a proof of principle for the GPIR concept through a series of subsurface imaging experiments at the Lockheed Martin Ground Penetrating Radar site; (2) developed a system model for prediction of system performance; (3) developed an engineering design for the phase 2 program. In the third element, radar hardware and antenna technologies were evaluated for suitability for the buried utilities problem and selected for further phase 2 development and integration. The program objectives, approach and organization are described further in the Introduction.

  9. Diurnal Variability of Vertical Structure from a TRMM Passive Microwave "Virtual Radar" Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boccippio, Dennis J.; Petersen, Walter A.; Cecil, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Robust description of the diurnal cycle from TRMM observations is complicated by the limitations of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) sampling; from a 'climatological' perspective, sufficient sampling must exist to control for both spatial and seasonal variability, before tackling an additional diurnal component (e.g., with 8 additional 3-hourly or 24 1-hourly bins). For documentation of vertical structure, the narrow sample swath of the TRMM Precipitation Radar limits the resolution of any of these components. A neural-network based 'virtual radar" retrieval has been trained and internally validated, using multifrequency / multipolarization passive microwave(TM1) brightness temperatures and textures parameters and lightning (LIS) observations, as inputs, and PR volumetric reflectivity as targets (outputs). By training the algorithms (essentially highly multivariate, nonlinear regressions) on a very large sample of high-quality co-located data from the center of the TRMM swath, 3D radar reflectivity and derived parameters (VIL, IWC, Echo Tops, etc.) can be retrieved across the entire TMI swath, good to 8-9% over the dynamic range of parameters. As a step in the retrieval (and as an output of the process), each TMI multifrequency pixel (at 85 GHz resolution) is classified into one of the 25 archetypal radar profile vertical structure "types", previously identified using cluster analysis. The dynamic range of retrieved vertical structure appears to have higher fidelity than the current (Version 6) experimental GPROF hydrometeor vertical structure retrievals. This is attributable to correct representation of the prior probabilities of vertical structure variability in the neural network training data, unlike the GPROF cloud-resolving model training dataset used in the V6 algorithms. The LIS lightning inputs are supplementary inputs, and a separate offline neural network has been trained to impute (predict) LIS lightning from passive-microwave-only data. The virtual radar

  10. Design of Tunable, Thin, and Wide-band Microwave Absorbers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-05

    switchable or tunable radar absorbers, which are very useful in electromagnetic compatibility test facilities, radar camouflage and deception roles, and...applications requires switchable or tunable radar absorbers, which are very useful in electromagnetic compatibility test facilities, radar camouflage ...2012. [2] Q. Zhang and Z. Shen, “A dual-polarized switchable microwave absorber,” IEEE AP- S International Symposium , Chicago, July 2012.

  11. Optimized aperiodic multilayer structures for use as narrow-angular absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Granier, Christopher H. Dowling, Jonathan P.; Afzal, Francis O.; Lorenzo, Simón G.; Reyes, Mario; Veronis, Georgios

    2014-12-28

    In this paper, we investigate aperiodic multilayer structures for use as narrow-angular absorbers. The layer thicknesses and materials are optimized using a genetic global optimization algorithm coupled to a transfer matrix code to maximize the angular selectivity in the absorptance at a single or multiple wavelengths. We first consider structures composed of alternating layers of tungsten and silicon or silica, and find that it is not possible to achieve angular selectivity in the absorptance with such structures. We next consider structures composed of alternating layers of silicon and silica, and show that when optimized they exhibit high angular selectivity in absorptance. In addition, as the angular selectivity in absorptance increases, the wavelength range of high angular selectivity also decreases. Optimizing the material composition of the multilayer structures, in addition to optimizing the layer thicknesses, leads to marginal improvement in angular selectivity. Finally, we show that by optimizing the absorptance of the multilayer structures at multiple wavelengths, we can obtain structures exhibiting almost perfect absorptance at normal incidence and narrow angular width in absorptance at these wavelengths. Similar to the structures optimized at a single wavelength, the wavelength range of high angularly selective absorptance is narrow.

  12. RF-Thermal-Structural Analysis of a Waveguide Higher Order Mode Absorber

    SciTech Connect

    G. Cheng; E. F. Daly; R. A. Rimmer; M. Stirbet; L. Vogel; H. Wang; K. M. Wilson

    2007-07-03

    For an ongoing high current cryomodule project, a total of 5 higher order mode (HOM) absorbers are required per cavity. The load is designed to absorb Radio Frequency (RF) heat induced by HOMs in a 748.5MHz cavity. Each load is targeted at a 4 kW dissipation capability. Water cooling is employed to remove the heat generated in ceramic tiles and by surface losses on the waveguide walls. A sequentially coupled RF-thermal-structural analysis was developed in ANSYS to optimize the HOM load design. Frequency-dependent dielectric material properties measured from samples and RF power spectrum calculated by the beam-cavity interaction codes were considered. The coupled field analysis capability of ANSYS avoided mapping of results between separate RF and thermal/structural simulation codes. For verification purposes, RF results obtained from ANSYS were compared to those from MAFIA, HFSS, and Microwave Studio. Good agreement was reached and this confirms that multiple-field coupled analysis is a desirable choice in analysis of HOM loads. Similar analysis could be performed on other particle accelerator components where distributed RF heating and surface current induced losses are inevitable.

  13. Absorbable energy monitoring scheme: new design protocol to test vehicle structural crashworthiness.

    PubMed

    Ofochebe, Sunday M; Enibe, Samuel O; Ozoegwu, Chigbogu G

    2016-05-01

    In vehicle crashworthiness design optimization detailed system evaluation capable of producing reliable results are basically achieved through high-order numerical computational (HNC) models such as the dynamic finite element model, mesh-free model etc. However the application of these models especially during optimization studies is basically challenged by their inherent high demand on computational resources, conditional stability of the solution process, and lack of knowledge of viable parameter range for detailed optimization studies. The absorbable energy monitoring scheme (AEMS) presented in this paper suggests a new design protocol that attempts to overcome such problems in evaluation of vehicle structure for crashworthiness. The implementation of the AEMS involves studying crash performance of vehicle components at various absorbable energy ratios based on a 2DOF lumped-mass-spring (LMS) vehicle impact model. This allows for prompt prediction of useful parameter values in a given design problem. The application of the classical one-dimensional LMS model in vehicle crash analysis is further improved in the present work by developing a critical load matching criterion which allows for quantitative interpretation of the results of the abstract model in a typical vehicle crash design. The adequacy of the proposed AEMS for preliminary vehicle crashworthiness design is demonstrated in this paper, however its extension to full-scale design-optimization problem involving full vehicle model that shows greater structural detail requires more theoretical development.

  14. Perfect absorbers based on metal-insulator-metal structures in the visible region: a simple approach for practical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenanakis, G.; Mavidis, Ch. P.; Vasilaki, E.; Katsarakis, N.; Kafesaki, M.; Economou, E. N.; Soukoulis, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Perfect absorbers based on metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structures are proposed and demonstrated, both theoretically and experimentally, in the visible region. The proposed structures may possess either sharp or broadband absorption peaks, by simply choosing a single layer of the proposed MIM structure or building several layers of them, while no nanofabrication steps or structure patterning are required, and thus can be easily made to cover a large area. The highly efficient absorption of the MIM structures is maintained for both TE and TM incident polarization, and for angles of incidence up to 75°, indicating that the proposed perfect absorbers can be potentially deployed for solar cells applications and optics.

  15. Experimental application of a vibration absorber in structural vibration reduction using tunable fluid mass driven by micropump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chun-Ying; Chen, Chun-Yuan

    2015-07-01

    A new design of tuned mass damper was proposed in this study to reduce the structural vibration of a machine platform subjected to varying excitation frequency, e.g. disturbance from the unbalance mass of motor in different rotational speeds. The absorber mass was changed by pumping of fluid between the liquid chambers of the vibration absorber. With the stiffness remained unchanged, the absorber's natural frequency could be tuned accordingly. Thus, reduction in machine vibration could be obtained by tuning the natural frequency of the absorber according to the frequency of external harmonic disturbance. Firstly, the variations of natural frequency and damping ratio of the absorber with different tuned masses were measured experimentally. The natural frequency results showed that the adjustable ranges for the first two modes could all reach more than 30%. Then, the absorber was installed on a machine platform and its performance was investigated under external disturbance at the natural frequency of the platform. It was found that, due to the effect of damping increase originated from the fluid sloshing inside liquid chamber, the vibration reduction effect from the absorber was limited. To improve this situation, we added a horizontal separation panel inside the liquid chambers, and the experimental results showed that the liquid sloshing was alleviated, and effectively reduced the damping ratio of absorber. Thus, the system became more stable and the control efficiency was effectively improved.

  16. Stability and Electronic Structures of CuxS Solar Cell Absorbers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, S. H.; Xu, Q.; Huang, B.; Zhao, Y.; Yan, Y.; Noufi, R.

    2012-07-01

    Cu{sub x}S is one of the most promising solar cell absorber materials that has the potential to replace the leading thin-film solar cell material Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} for high efficiency and low cost. In the past, solar cells based on Cu{sub x}S have reached efficiency as high as 10%, but it also suffers serious stability issues. To further improve its efficiency and especially the stability, it is important to understand the stability and electronic structure of Cu{sub x}S. However, due to the complexity of their crystal structures, no systematic theoretical studies have been carried out to understand the stability and electronic structure of the Cu{sub x}S systems. In this work, using first-principles method, we have systematically studied the crystal and electronic band structures of Cu{sub x}S (1.25 < x {le} 2). For Cu{sub 2}S, we find that all the three chalcocite phases, i.e., the low-chalcocite, the high-chalcocite, and the cubic-chalcocite phases, have direct bandgaps around 1.3-1.5 eV, with the low-chalcocite being the most stable one. However, Cu vacancies can form spontaneously in these compounds, causing instability of Cu{sub 2}S. We find that under Cu-rich condition, the anilite Cu{sub 1.75}S is the most stable structure. It has a predicted bandgap of 1.4 eV and could be a promising solar cell absorber.

  17. Mechanical Evaluation of the Skeletal Structure and Tissue of the Woodpecker and Its Shock Absorbing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Juhachi; Sakamoto, Jiro; Sakano, Kenichi

    A woodpecker strikes its beak toward a tree repeatedly. But, the damage of brain or the brain concussion doesn’t occur by this action. Human cannot strike strongly the head without the damage of a brain. Therefore, it is predicted that the brain of a woodpecker is protected from the shock by some methods and that the woodpecker has the original mechanism to absorb a shock. In this study, the endoskeltal structure, especially head part structure of woodpecker is dissected and the impact-proof system is analyzed by FEM and model experiment. From the results, it is obvious that the woodpecker has the original impact-proof system as the unique states of hyoid bone, skull, tissue and brain. Moreover it is considered that woodpecker has the advanced impact-proof system relating with not only the head part but also with the whole body.

  18. fs Laser surface nano-structuring of high refractory ceramics to enhance solar radiation absorbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelli, E.; Orlando, S.; Sciti, D.; Bellucci, A.; Lettino, A.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2014-10-01

    High refractory pressure-less sintered ternary composite ceramics of AlN-SiC-MoSi2 (ASMY), polished by mechanical grinding to a surface roughness R a ~40 nm, have been treated in vacuum by fs Ti:sapphire laser, operating at 800 nm wavelength, 100 fs pulse duration, and increasing fluence, to generate a "black ceramic material", able to minimize solar radiation reflectance, in such a way that they could be used as the absorber material in an innovative conversion module of solar radiation into electrical energy. Disk specimens of approximately 3 cm in diameter and 3 mm thick have been treated by normal incident laser beam, generating a scanning pattern of parallel lines, at a lateral distance of about 80 μm, using a stage in motion, in the x, y, z directions, driven by a computer. The experimental conditions of laser treatment (energy fluence, speed of transition and lateral distance of steps) have been optimized to maximize the absorption properties of the patterned surface. In some samples this value was increased by about 15 %, compared to untreated surface, up to a value of final absorbance of about 95 %, all over the range of solar radiation spectrum (from UV to NIR). The morphological and chemical effects have been evaluated by SEM-EDS analysis. At higher fluence, we obtained the characteristic ablation craters and corresponding local material decomposition, while at lower fluence (over the ablation threshold) an ordered periodic nano-structure has been obtained, exploitable for its high capacity of entrapment of visible light. The laser treated ceramic specimen, characterized by very high absorption properties and reflectivity values lower than 4 %, has been used as active absorber material in a conversion module, installed in a solar test platform.

  19. Observations of frontal zone structures with a VHF Doppler radar and radiosondes, part 1.2A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, M. F.; Rottger, J.

    1984-01-01

    The SOUSY-VHF-Radar is a pulsed coherent radar operating at 53.5 MHz and located near Bad Lauterbert, West Germany. Since 1977, the facility, operated by the Max-Planck-Institut fur Aeronomie, has been used to make a series of frontal passage observations in the spring and fall. Experiments in winter have been difficult because part of the transmitting and receiving array is usually covered by snow during that part of the year. Wavelengths around 6 m are known to be sensitive to the vertical temperature structure of the atmosphere (GREEN and GAGE, 1980; RASTOGI and ROTTGER, 1982). Thus, it has been possible to use radars operating at frequencies near 500 MHz to locate the tropopause. Comparisons between radar data and radiosonde data have shown that there is a large gradient in the radar reflectivity at the height where the radiosonde tropopause occurs. An experiment carried out by ROTTGER (1979) on March 15 to 16, 1977, showed that the radar's sensitivity to the vertical temperature structure could also be used to locate the position of fronts. The SOUSY-VHF-Radar consists of a transmitting array, also used for receiving in some configurations, that can be scanned in the off-vertical direction but not at sufficiently low elevation angles to study the horizontal extent of structures.

  20. Radar attenuation in Europa's ice shell: obstacles and opportunities for constraining shell thickness and thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalousova, Klara; Schroeder, Dustin M.; Soderlund, Krista M.; Sotin, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    With its strikingly young surface and possibly recent endogenic activity, Europa is one of the most exciting bodies within our Solar System and a primary target for spacecraft exploration. Future missions to Europa are expected to carry ice penetrating radar instruments which are powerful tools to investigate the subsurface thermophysical structure of its ice shell.Several authors have addressed the 'penetration depth' of radar sounders at icy moons, however, the concept and calculation of a single value penetration depth is a potentially misleading simplification since it ignores the thermal and attenuation structure complexity of a realistic ice shell. Here we move beyond the concept of a single penetration depth by exploring the variation in two-way radar attenuation for a variety of potential thermal structures of Europa's ice shell as well as for a low loss and high loss temperature-dependent attenuation model. The possibility to detect brines is also investigated.Our results indicate that: (i) for all ice shell thicknesses investigated (5-30 km), a nominal satellite-borne radar sounder will penetrate between 15% and 100% of the total thickness, (ii) the maximum penetration depth strongly varies laterally with the deepest penetration possible through the cold downwellings, (iii) the direct detection of the ice/ocean interface might be possible for shells of up to 15 km if the radar signal travels through the cold downwelling, (iv) even if the ice/ocean interface is not detected, the penetration through most of the shell could constrain the deep shell structure through the loss of signal, and (v) for all plausible ice shells the two-way attenuation to the eutectic point is ≤30 dB which shows a robust potential for longitudinal investigation of the ice shell's shallow structure.Part of this work has been performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. K.K. acknowledges support by the Grant Agency of the

  1. Latitudinal amplitude-phase structure of MHD waves: STARE radar and image magnetometer observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilipenko, Vyacheslav; Kozyreva, Olga; Fedorov, Evgeniy; Uspenskiy, Mihail; Kauristi, Kirsti

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a numerical model that yields a steady-state distribution of field components of MHD wave in an inhomogeneous plasma box simulating the realistic magnetosphere. The problem of adequate boundary condition at the ionosphere-magnetosphere interface for coupled MHD mode is considered. To justify the model's assumptions, we have derived the explicit inequality showing when the ionospheric inductive Hall effect can be neglected upon the consideration of Alfven wave reflection from the ionospheric boundaries. The model predicts a feature of the ULF spatial amplitude/phase distribution that has not been noticed by the field line resonance theory: the existence of a region with opposite phase delays on the source side of the resonance. This theoretical prediction is supported by the amplitude-phase latitudinal structures of Pc5 waves observed by STARE radar and IMAGE magnetometers. A gradual decrease in azimuthal wave number m at smaller L-shells was observed at longitudinally separated radar beams.

  2. The structure of the convective atmospheric boundary layer as revealed by lidar and Doppler radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eilts, M. D.; Sundara-Rajan, A.; Doviak, R. J.

    1985-01-01

    Results on the structure of the convective atmospheric boundary layer based on the analyses of data from the instrumented NSSL-KTVY tower, airborne Doppler lidar, and ground-based Doppler radars are presented. The vertically averaged wind over the boundary layer was found to be insensitive to baroclinicity, supporting the hypothesis of Arya and Wyngaard (1975). The computed momentum flux profiles were affected by baroclinicity. Horizontal wind spectra from lidar, radar, and tower data compared well with each other both in shape and magnitude. A consistent peak found near 4 km in all the computed spectra might have been caused by horizontally symmetric cells with horizontal wavelength 4 times the boundary-layer height as shown in Kuettner (1971) for the case of weak wind shear.

  3. A radar-infrared bi-stealth structure based on metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Shuomin; Jiang, Wei; Xu, Peipeng; Liu, Taijun; Huang, Jifu; Ma, Yungui

    2017-02-01

    In this work, the authors proposed a thin artificial structure that could give rise to the strong reduction of both radar wave reflection and infrared thermal emission. This is realized by the subtle combination of two specifically designed metasurface layers that control the infrared emission and microwave absorption, respectively. Our measurement shows that the fabricated sample could have wideband absorption from 3-8 GHz with attenuation efficiency larger than 90% up to incident angles of 30°. In the infrared atmosphere window, it gives a very low emission value of about 0.2. These results show that our sample is practically very promising for the application of a radar-infrared bi-stealth technology.

  4. Using particle filter to track horizontal variations of atmospheric duct structure from radar sea clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X. F.; Huang, S. X.; Wang, D. X.

    2012-11-01

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating range-varying parameters of the height-dependent refractivity over the sea surface from radar sea clutter. In the forward simulation, the split-step Fourier parabolic equation (PE) is used to compute the radar clutter power in the complex refractive environments. Making use of the inherent Markovian structure of the split-step Fourier PE solution, the refractivity from clutter (RFC) problem is formulated within a nonlinear recursive Bayesian state estimation framework. Particle filter (PF), which is a technique for implementing a recursive Bayesian filter by Monte Carlo simulations, is used to track range-varying characteristics of the refractivity profiles. Basic ideas of employing PF to solve RFC problem are introduced. Both simulation and real data results are presented to confirm the feasibility of PF-RFC performances.

  5. Using particle filter to track horizontal variations of atmospheric duct structure from radar sea clutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, X. F.; Huang, S. X.

    2012-08-01

    This paper addresses the problem of estimating range-varying parameters of the height-dependent refractivity over the sea surface from radar sea clutter. In the forward simulation, the split-step Fourier parabolic equation (PE) is used to compute the radar clutter power in the complex refractive environments. Making use of the inherent Markovian structure of the split-step Fourier PE solution, the refractivity from clutter (RFC) problem is formulated within a nonlinear recursive Bayesian state estimation framework. Particle filter (PF) that is a technique for implementing a recursive Bayesian filter by Monte Carlo simulations is used to track range-varying characteristics of the refractivity profiles. Basic ideas of employing PF to solve RFC problem are introduced. Both simulation and real data results are presented to check up the feasibility of PF-RFC performances.

  6. Dynamic response control of structures using liquid column vibration absorber: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Supradip; Debbarma, Rama

    2017-07-01

    The performance and effectiveness of the liquid column vibration absorber (LCVA) in controlling the vibration of structures have been investigated in this paper. To evaluate the performance of LCVA system in mitigating the structural response under dynamic loading (i.e. harmonic excitation), a set of experiments are conducted on a scaled model of steel structure-LCVA system. LCVA have non-uniform cross-sectional dimensions of the horizontal and vertical columns whereas Tuned Liquid Column Damper (TLCD) carries same cross-sectional dimensions. For conducting a comparative study, same experiments were performed for TLCD also. Several excitation frequency ratios (0.5-2.0) and various mass ratios (5-7.5%) are considered in this study. The parameter, tuning ratio considered for all of the experiments is 1.0. The effectiveness of the LCVA and TLCD is measured based on the response reduction of the structure. From the experimental results, it is observed that LCVA has better performance in controlling the structural response.

  7. Dynamic response control of structures using liquid column vibration absorber: an experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Supradip; Debbarma, Rama

    2017-09-01

    The performance and effectiveness of the liquid column vibration absorber (LCVA) in controlling the vibration of structures have been investigated in this paper. To evaluate the performance of LCVA system in mitigating the structural response under dynamic loading (i.e. harmonic excitation), a set of experiments are conducted on a scaled model of steel structure-LCVA system. LCVA have non-uniform cross-sectional dimensions of the horizontal and vertical columns whereas Tuned Liquid Column Damper (TLCD) carries same cross-sectional dimensions. For conducting a comparative study, same experiments were performed for TLCD also. Several excitation frequency ratios (0.5-2.0) and various mass ratios (5-7.5%) are considered in this study. The parameter, tuning ratio considered for all of the experiments is 1.0. The effectiveness of the LCVA and TLCD is measured based on the response reduction of the structure. From the experimental results, it is observed that LCVA has better performance in controlling the structural response.

  8. Effect of neck geometry of resonance cells on noise reduction efficiency in sound-absorbing structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarev, P. V.; Anoshkin, A. N.; Pan'kov, A. A.

    2016-10-01

    The present work formulates the physical and mathematical models capable to forecast acoustic properties of resonance cells in sound absorbing structures. Distribution of acoustic pressure inside the duct and on sidewall cell was found, loss factor of output acoustic pressure wave was calculated for variety of geometric forms of cell's chamber and neck for monochromatic wave in 100-600Hz frequency range. Analysis of the acoustic pressure fields revealed that cell neck geometry strongly influences on cell resonant frequency and on outlet acoustic pressure loss factor. The effectiveness of the proposed by the authors biconical design of the resonant cell was proved, which increased acoustic radiation at the resonance frequency resulting significant increase of loss ratio of wave acoustic pressure at duct outlet.

  9. Forest Attributes from Radar Interferometric Structure and its Fusion with Optical Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treuhaft, Robert N.; Law, Beverly E.; Asner, Gregory P.

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of global, three-dimensional remote sensing of forest structure with interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) bears on important forest ecological processes, particularly the carbon cycle. InSAR supplements two-dimensional remote sensing with information in the vertical dimension. Its strengths in potential for global coverage complement those of lidar (light detecting and ranging), which has the potential for high-accuracy vertical profiles over small areas. InSAR derives its sensitivity to forest vertical structure from the differences in signals received by two, spatially separate radar receivers. Estimation of parameters describing vertical structure requires multiple-polarization, multiple-frequency, or multiple-baseline InSAR. Combining InSAR with complementary remote sensing techniques, such as hyperspectral optical imaging and lidar, can enhance vertical-structure estimates and consequent biophysical quantities of importance to ecologists, such as biomass. Future InSAR experiments will supplement recent airborne and spaceborne demonstrations, and together with inputs from ecologists regarding structure, they will suggest designs for future spaceborne strategies for measuring global vegetation structure.

  10. Forest Attributes from Radar Interferometric Structure and its Fusion with Optical Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treuhaft, Robert N.; Law, Beverly E.; Asner, Gregory P.

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of global, three-dimensional remote sensing of forest structure with interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) bears on important forest ecological processes, particularly the carbon cycle. InSAR supplements two-dimensional remote sensing with information in the vertical dimension. Its strengths in potential for global coverage complement those of lidar (light detecting and ranging), which has the potential for high-accuracy vertical profiles over small areas. InSAR derives its sensitivity to forest vertical structure from the differences in signals received by two, spatially separate radar receivers. Estimation of parameters describing vertical structure requires multiple-polarization, multiple-frequency, or multiple-baseline InSAR. Combining InSAR with complementary remote sensing techniques, such as hyperspectral optical imaging and lidar, can enhance vertical-structure estimates and consequent biophysical quantities of importance to ecologists, such as biomass. Future InSAR experiments will supplement recent airborne and spaceborne demonstrations, and together with inputs from ecologists regarding structure, they will suggest designs for future spaceborne strategies for measuring global vegetation structure.

  11. Simultaneous fine structure observation of wind and temperature profiles by the Arecibo 430-MHz radar and in situ measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, D.; Bertin, F.; Petitdidier, M.; Teitelbaum, H.; Woodman, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    A simultaneous campaign of balloon and radar measurements took place on March 14 to 16, 1984, above the Arecibo 430-MHz radar. This radar was operating with a vertical resolution of 150 m following two antenna beam directions: 15 deg. from the zenith, respectively, in the N-S and E-W directions. The main results concerning the comparison between the flight and simultaneous radar measurements obtained on March 15, 1984 are analyzed. The radar return power profile (S/N ratio in dB) exhibits maxima which are generally well correlated with step-like structures in the potential temperature profile. These structures are generally considered as the consequence of the mixing processes induced by the turbulence. A good correlation appears in the altitude range 12.5 to 19 km between wind shears induced by a wave structure observed in the meridional wind and the radar echo power maxima. This wave structure is characterized by a vertical wavelength of about 2.5 km, and a period in the range 30 to 40 hours. These characteristics are deduced from the twice daily rawinsonde data launched from the San Juan Airport by the National Weather Service. These results pointed out an example of the interaction between wave and turbulence in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Turbulent layers are observed at locations where wind shears related to an internal inertia-gravity wave are maxima.

  12. The internal structure of the Brunt Ice Shelf, Antarctica from ice-penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Edward; De Rydt, Jan; Gudmundsson, Hilmar

    2016-04-01

    The Brunt Ice Shelf is a small feature on the Coats Land Coast of the Weddell Sea, Antarctica. It is unusual among Antarctic ice shelves because the ice crossing the grounding line from the ice sheet retains no structural integrity, so the ice shelf comprises icebergs of continental ice cemented together by sea ice, with the whole blanketed by in-situ snowfall. The size and distribution of the icebergs is governed by the thickness profile along the grounding line. Where bedrock troughs discharge thick ice to the ice shelf, the icebergs are large and remain close together with little intervening sea ice. Where bedrock ridges mean the ice crossing the grounding line is thin, the icebergs are small and widely-scattered with large areas of sea ice between them. To better understand the internal structure of the Brunt Ice Shelf and how this might affect the flow dynamics we conducted ice-penetrating radar surveys during December 2015 and January 2016. Three different ground-based radar systems were used, operating at centre frequencies of 400, 50 and 10 MHz respectively. The 400 MHz system gave detailed firn structure and accumulation profiles as well as time-lapse profiles of the active propagation of a crevasse. The 50 MHz system provided intermediate-level detail of iceberg distribution and thickness as well as information on the degree of salt water infiltration into the accumulating snow pack. The 10 MHz system used a high-power transmitter in an attempt to measure ice thickness beneath salt-impregnated ice. In this poster we will present example data from each of the three radar systems which will demonstrate the variability of the internal structure of the ice shelf. We will also present preliminary correlations between the internal structure and the surface topography from satellite data.

  13. Investigation of lunar maria structure from cross-analysis of GRAIL gravity and Kaguya radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, M. T.; Ermakov, A.; Smith, D. E.; Mastroguiseppe, M.; Raguso, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Lunar Radar Sounder (LRS) on JAXA's Kaguya spacecraft investigated the subsurface structure of the Moon to a depth of a few km. GRAIL gravity models are potentially sensitive to subsurface structure at such depths. GRAIL gravity and LRS radar data are complementary since both are sensitive to density/compositional heterogeneities. Cross-correlation of GRAIL and LRS data has the potential to produce new constraints on the structure and evolution of the lunar maria. Originally, subsurface reflections within the lunar maria were detected with Lunar Sounder Experiment aboard Apollo 17. Subsurface layering was attributed to multiple episodes of volcanism. Later, Kaguya's LRS produced similar measurements but with global-scale coverage. Laboratory measurements show that density variations among mare basalts can be up to 200 kg m-3 or 7%. The LRS measurements have detected subsurface reflection in the upper 1 km of the crust. Combining these two estimates and using the Bouguer slab approximation, we estimate that anomalies of order 1-10 mGal are expected due to potentially varying density of surface and/or subsurface horizons. This accuracy is achievable with the latest GRAIL gravity models. The LRS surface backscattering power is indicative of surface and near sub-surface dielectric properties, which are sensitive to target density and roughness. We investigate the northwestern part of the Procellarum basin because it is the region with the strongest signal-to-noise ratios in gravity models within maria. To examine shallow subsurface structure, we map the surface received power by tracking the first return of radar echoes and compare it with gravity gradients, which are particularly sensitive to small-scale structures.

  14. Interhemispheric structure and variability of the 5-day planetary wave from meteor radar wind measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iimura, H.; Fritts, D. C.; Janches, D.; Singer, W.; Mitchell, N. J.

    2015-11-01

    A study of the quasi-5-day wave (5DW) was performed using meteor radars at conjugate latitudes in the Northern and Southern hemispheres. These radars are located at Esrange, Sweden (68° N) and Juliusruh, Germany (55° N) in the Northern Hemisphere, and at Tierra del Fuego, Argentina (54° S) and Rothera Station, Antarctica (68° S) in the Southern Hemisphere. The analysis was performed using data collected during simultaneous measurements by the four radars from June 2010 to December 2012 at altitudes from 84 to 96 km. The 5DW was found to exhibit significant short-term, seasonal, and interannual variability at all sites. Typical events had planetary wave periods that ranged between 4 and 7 days, durations of only a few cycles, and infrequent strongly peaked variances and covariances. Winds exhibited rotary structures that varied strongly among sites and between events, and maximum amplitudes up to ~ 20 m s-1. Mean horizontal velocity covariances tended to be largely negative at all sites throughout the interval studied.

  15. Simulation for ground penetrating radar (GPR) study of the subsurface structure of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fa, Wenzhe

    2013-12-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is currently within the scope of China's Chang-E 3 lunar mission, to study the shallow subsurface of the Moon. In this study, key factors that could affect a lunar GPR performance, such as frequency, range resolution, and antenna directivity, are discussed firstly. Geometrical optics and ray tracing techniques are used to model GPR echoes, considering the transmission, attenuation, reflection, geometrical spreading of radar waves, and the antenna directivity. The influence on A-scope GPR echoes and on the simulated radargrams for the Sinus Iridum region by surface and subsurface roughness, dielectric loss of the lunar regolith, radar frequency and bandwidth, and the distance between the transmit and receive antennas are discussed. Finally, potential scientific return about lunar subsurface properties from GPR echoes is also discussed. Simulation results suggest that subsurface structure from several to hundreds of meters can be studied from GPR echoes at P and VHF bands, and information about dielectric permittivity and thickness of subsurface layers can be estimated from GPR echoes in combination with regolith composition data.

  16. A ground-base Radar network to access the 3D structure of MLT winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stober, G.; Chau, J. L.; Wilhelm, S.; Jacobi, C.

    2016-12-01

    The mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) is a highly variable atmospheric region driven by wave dynamics at various scales including planetary waves, tides and gravity waves. Some of these propagate through the MLT into the thermosphere/ionosphere carrying energy and momentum from the middle atmosphere into the upper atmosphere. To improve our understanding of the wave energetics and momentum transfer during their dissipation it is essential to characterize their space time properties. During the last two years we developed a new experimental approach to access the horizontal structure of wind fields at the MLT using a meteor radar network in Germany, which we called MMARIA - Multi-static Multi-frequency Agile Radar for Investigation of the Atmosphere. The network combines classical backscatter meteor radars and passive forward scatter radio links. We present our preliminary results using up to 7 different active and passive radio links to obtain horizontally resolved wind fields applying a statistical inverse method. The wind fields are retrieved with 15-30 minutes temporal resolution on a grid with 30x30 km horizontal spacing. Depending on the number of observed meteors, we are able to apply the wind field inversion at heights between 84-94 km. The horizontally resolved wind fields provide insights of the typical horizontal gravity wave length and the energy cascade from large scales to small scales. We present first power spectra indicating the transition from the synoptic wave scale to the gravity wave scale.

  17. Vibration Control of Shallow Shell Structures Using a Shell-Type Dynamic Vibration Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aida, T.; Aso, T.; Nakamoto, K.; Kawazoe, K.

    1998-11-01

    In this study, a new shell-type dynamic vibration absorber is presented for suppressing several modes of vibration of the shallow shell (main shell) under harmonic load. It consists of a shallow shell (the dynamic absorbing shell), under the same boundary condition and with the same shape as those of the main shell, with connecting springs and dampers in the vertical direction between the main and dynamic absorbing shells. Formulae for an approximate tuning method for the shell-type dynamic absorber are also presented using the optimum tuning method for a dynamic absorber in the two-degree-of-freedom system, obtained by the Den Hartog method. Subsequently, numerical calculations are presented which demonstrate the usefulness of the shell-type dynamic vibration absorbers.

  18. Poly(dimethylsiloxane) oil absorbent with a three-dimensionally interconnected porous structure and swellable skeleton.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aijuan; Chen, Mingjie; Du, Can; Guo, Huizhang; Bai, Hua; Li, Lei

    2013-10-23

    Cleanup of oil spills is a worldwide challenge to prevent serious environmental pollution. A new kind of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oil absorbent with high absorption capacity and excellent reusability was prepared and used for oil/water separation. The preparation process of PDMS oil absorbents involves direct curing of a PDMS prepolymer in a p-xylene solution in the presence of commercial sugar particles, which is simple and economic. PDMS oil absorbents have interconnected pores and a swellable skeleton, combining the advantages of porous materials and gels. Absorption capacities of PDMS oil absorbents are 4-34 g/g for various oils and organic solvents, which are 3 times that reported previously. Owing to their hydrophobicity and oleophilicity, the as-obtained PDMS oil absorbents can selectively collect oils or organic solvents from water. The absorption process can be finished within tens of seconds. Furthermore, the absorbed oils or organic solvents can be recovered by compressing the oil absorbents, and after 20 absorbing/recovering cycles, PDMS oil absorbents show little loss of their absorption capacities and own weights.

  19. Structural analysis of lunar subsurface with Chang'E-3 lunar penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Jialong; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Xiaoping; Tang, Zesheng

    2016-01-01

    Geological structure of the subsurface of the Moon provides valuable information on lunar evolution. Recently, Chang'E-3 has utilized lunar penetrating radar (LPR), which is equipped on the lunar rover named as Yutu, to detect the lunar geological structure in Northern Imbrium (44.1260N, 19.5014W) for the first time. As an in situ detector, Chang'E-3 LPR has relative higher horizontal and vertical resolution and less clutter impact compared to spaceborne radars and earth-based radars. In this work, we analyze the LPR data at 500 MHz transmission frequency to obtain the shallow subsurface structure of the landing area of Chang'E-3 in Mare Imbrium. Filter method and amplitude recovery algorithms are utilized to alleviate the adverse effects of environment and system noises and compensate the amplitude losses during signal propagation. Based on the processed radar image, we observe numerous diffraction hyperbolae, which may be caused by discrete reflectors beneath the lunar surface. Hyperbolae fitting method is utilized to reverse the average dielectric constant to certain depth (ε bar). Overall, the estimated ε bar increases with the depth and ε bar could be classified into three categories. Average ε bar of each category is 2.47, 3.40 and 6.16, respectively. Because of the large gap between the values of ε bar of neighboring categories, we speculate a three-layered structure of the shallow surface of LPR exploration region. One possible geological picture of the speculated three-layered structure is presented as follows. The top layer is weathered layer of ejecta blanket with its average thickness and bound on error is 0.95±0.02 m. The second layer is the ejecta blanket of the nearby impact crater, and the corresponding average thickness is about 2.30±0.07 m, which is in good agreement with the two primary models of ejecta blanket thickness as a function of distance from the crater center. The third layer is regarded as a mixture of stones and soil. The

  20. 3-D Radar Imaging Reveals Deep Structures and Buried Craters Within the Martian Polar Caps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putzig, N. E.; Foss, F. J., II; Campbell, B. A.; Phillips, R. J.; Smith, I. B.

    2015-12-01

    We use Shallow Radar (SHARAD) observations on thousands of orbital passes by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter to produce fully imaged 3-D data volumes encompassing both polar ice caps of Mars. Greatly clarifying the view of subsurface features, a completed volume for Planum Boreum provides new constraints on the nature and timing of emplacement of the northern polar deposits and their relationship to climate. The standard method of mapping subsurface features with single-pass 2-D radargrams has been very fruitful (see Brothers et al. 2015, JGR 120 in press, and references therein), but a full assessment of internal structures has been hindered by interfering off-nadir echoes from spiral troughs and other variable topography prevalent on both caps. By assembling the SHARAD radargrams into a volume and applying a 3-D imaging process (migration) borrowed from seismic processing techniques, we enhance the signal-to-noise ratio while repositioning the echoes to their proper locations, thereby unraveling the interference. As part of the process, we correct ionospheric distortions and delays of the radar echoes (Campbell et al. 2014, IEEE GRSL 11 #3). Interfaces painstakingly mapped in radargrams (e.g., the basal-unit surface, a buried chasma) are clearly visible in the 3-D volume, and new features are revealed. Structures may now be mapped through trough-rich regions, including a widespread sequence that provides corroborative evidence of recent ice ages (Smith et al. 2015, LPSC XLVI #2574). Distinctive radar signatures associated with known, partially buried craters also occur elsewhere in the volume but without surface expression. Presumably, these are fully buried craters that may provide a new means to estimate the age of the deposits. Preliminary work for Planum Australe demonstrates that the 3-D processing currently underway will illuminate deep structures that are broadly obfuscated in 2-D radargrams by a shallow scatterer (Campbell et al. 2015, LPSC XLVI #2366).

  1. Microfabrication of Super Absorbent Polymer Structure Using Nanoimprinting and Swelling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Tomomi; Kano, Tomonori; Miki, Norihisa

    2013-06-01

    Micro-fabrication technologies have been extensively studied to achieve smaller sizes and higher aspect ratios. When the features have sizes of a couple of micrometers or below, nano-imprinting can be an effective method for micro-fabrication at low cost. However, it is difficult to achieve aspect ratio greater than 1. In this research, we propose micro fabrication of super absorbent polymer (SAP) as a new material for micro devices. SAP swells by adding deionized water, which can be used as a post patterning process to enhance the aspect ratio of micro structures. Micropatterning of SAP must be conducted under thoroughly dry conditions and we used nano-imprinting processes. We successfully augmented an aspect ratio of the nano-imprinted micro holes of SAP from 0.65 to 1.2 by the swelling process. The proposed patterning and swelling process of SAP can be applicable to micro-fabricate high-aspect-ratio structures at low cost for high performance lab-on-a-chip.

  2. Digital processing of orbital radar data to enhance geologic structure - Examples from the Canadian Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masuoka, Penny M.; Harris, Jeff; Lowman, Paul D., Jr.; Blodget, Herbert W.

    1988-01-01

    Various digital enhancement techniques for SAR are compared using SIR-B and Seasat images of the Canadian Shield. The three best methods for enhancing geological structure were found to be: (1) a simple linear contrast stretch; (2) a mean or median low-pass filter to reduce speckle prior to edge enhancement or a K nearest-neighbor average to cosmetically reduce speckle; and (3) a modification of the Moore-Waltz (1983) technique. Three look directions were coregistered and several means of data display were investigated as means of compensating for radar azimuth biasing.

  3. Passive radar tracking of a maneuvering target using variable structure multiple-model algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yunxiang; Zhou, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jin

    2013-03-01

    The variable structure multiple-model (VSMM) algorithm to passive radar maneuvering target tracking problem is considered. A new VSMM design, expected mode augmentation based on likely model set (LMS-EMA) algorithm is presented. The LMS-EMA algorithm adaptively determines the fixed grid model set using likely model set (LMS) algorithm, and generates the expected mode based on this set. Then, the union of fixed grid model set and expected model is used to perform multiple-model estimation. The performance of the LMS-EMA algorithm is evaluated via simulation of a highly maneuvering target tracking problem.

  4. Digital processing of orbital radar data to enhance geologic structure - Examples from the Canadian Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masuoka, Penny M.; Harris, Jeff; Lowman, Paul D., Jr.; Blodget, Herbert W.

    1988-01-01

    Various digital enhancement techniques for SAR are compared using SIR-B and Seasat images of the Canadian Shield. The three best methods for enhancing geological structure were found to be: (1) a simple linear contrast stretch; (2) a mean or median low-pass filter to reduce speckle prior to edge enhancement or a K nearest-neighbor average to cosmetically reduce speckle; and (3) a modification of the Moore-Waltz (1983) technique. Three look directions were coregistered and several means of data display were investigated as means of compensating for radar azimuth biasing.

  5. The use of radar and visual observations to characterize the surface structure of the planet Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, P. E.; Kobrick, M.; Jurgens, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis is conducted of available topographic profiles and scattering parameters derived from earth-based S- and X-band radar observations of Mercury, in order to determine the nature and origin of regional surface variations and structures that are typical of the planet. Attention is given to the proposal that intercrater plains on Mercury formed from extensive volcanic flooding during bombardment, so that most craters were formed on a partially molten surface and were thus obliterated, together with previously formed tectonic features.

  6. The use of radar and visual observations to characterize the surface structure of the planet Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, P. E.; Kobrick, M.; Jurgens, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    An analysis is conducted of available topographic profiles and scattering parameters derived from earth-based S- and X-band radar observations of Mercury, in order to determine the nature and origin of regional surface variations and structures that are typical of the planet. Attention is given to the proposal that intercrater plains on Mercury formed from extensive volcanic flooding during bombardment, so that most craters were formed on a partially molten surface and were thus obliterated, together with previously formed tectonic features.

  7. Thin Perfect Absorbers for Electromagnetic Waves: Theory, Design, and Realizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ra'di, Y.; Simovski, C. R.; Tretyakov, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    With recent advances in nanophotonics and nanofabrication, considerable progress has been achieved in realizations of thin composite layers designed for full absorption of incident electromagnetic radiation, from microwaves to the visible. If the layer is structured at a subwavelength scale, thin perfect absorbers are usually called "metamaterial absorbers," because these composite structures are designed to emulate some material responses not reachable with any natural material. On the other hand, many thin absorbing composite layers were designed and used already in the time of the introduction of radar technology, predominantly as a means to reduce radar visibility of targets. In view of a wide variety of classical and new topologies of optically thin metamaterial absorbers and plurality of applications, there is a need for a general, conceptual overview of the fundamental mechanisms of full absorption of light or microwave radiation in thin layers. Here, we present such an overview in the form of a general theory of thin perfectly absorbing layers. Possible topologies of perfect metamaterial absorbers are classified based on their fundamental operational principles. For each of the identified classes, we provide design equations and give examples of particular realizations. The concluding section provides a summary and gives an outlook on future developments in this field.

  8. A variety of radars designed to explore the hidden structures and properties of the Solar System's planets and bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletti, Valérie

    2016-11-01

    Since the very first observations of the Moon from the Earth with radar in 1946, radars are more and more frequently selected to be part of the payload of exploration missions in the Solar System. They are, in fact, able to collect information on the surface structure of bodies or planets hidden by opaque atmospheres, to probe the planet subsurface or even to reveal the internal structure of a small body comet nucleus. A brief review of radars designed for the Solar System planets and bodies' exploration is presented in the paper. This review does not aim at being exhaustive but will focus on the major results obtained. The variety of radars that have been or are currently designed in terms of frequency or operational modes will be highlighted. xml:lang="fr" Une revue non exhaustive des radars scientifiques développés pour l'exploration des planètes et autres corps du système solaire est présentée dans cet article. Quelques résultats majeurs sont présentés. L'accent est mis sur la variété des radars qui ont été et sont actuellement conçus en terme de fréquence ou de mode opératoire en fonction des contraintes de la mission et des objectifs visés.

  9. High-volume use of self-cementing spray dry absorber material for structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Charles E.

    Spray dry absorber (SDA) material, or spray dryer ash, is a byproduct of energy generation by coal combustion and sulfur emissions controls. Like any resource, it ought to be used to its fullest potential offsetting as many of the negative environmental impacts of coal combustion as possible throughout its lifecycle. Its cementitious and pozzolanic properties suggest it be used to augment or replace another energy and emissions intensive product: Portland cement. There is excellent potential for spray dryer ash to be used beneficially in structural applications, which will offset CO2 emissions due to Portland cement production, divert landfill waste by further utilizing a plentiful coal combustion by-product, and create more durable and sustainable structures. The research into beneficial use applications for SDA material is relatively undeveloped and the material is highly underutilized. This dissertation explored a specific self-cementing spray dryer ash for use as a binder in structural materials. Strength and stiffness properties of hydrated spray dryer ash mortars were improved by chemical activation with Portland cement and reinforcement with polymer fibers from automobile tire recycling. Portland cement at additions of five percent of the cementitious material was found to function effectively as an activating agent for spray dryer ash and had a significant impact on the hardened properties. The recycled polymer fibers improved the ductility and toughness of the material in all cases and increased the compressive strength of weak matrix materials like the pure hydrated ash. The resulting hardened materials exhibited useful properties that were sufficient to suggest that they be used in structural applications such as concrete, masonry block, or as a hydraulic cement binder. While the long-term performance characteristics remain to be investigated, from an embodied-energy and carbon emissions standpoint the material investigated here is far superior to

  10. Structural and optical properties of copper-coated substrates for solar thermal absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratesi, Stefano; De Lucia, Maurizio; Meucci, Marco; Sani, Elisa

    2016-10-01

    Spectral selectivity, i.e. merging a high absorbance at sunlight wavelengths to a low emittance at the wavelengths of thermal spectrum, is a key characteristics for materials to be used for solar thermal receivers. It is known that spectrally selective absorbers can raise the receiver efficiency for all solar thermal technologies. Tubular sunlight receivers for parabolic trough collector (PTC) systems can be improved by the use of spectrally selective coatings. Their absorbance is increased by deposing black films, while the thermal emittance is minimized by the use of properly-prepared substrates. In this work we describe the intermediate step in the fabrication of black-chrome coated solar absorbers, namely the fabrication and characterization of copper coatings on previously nickel-plated stainless steel substrates. We investigate the copper surface features and optical properties, correlating them to the coating thickness and to the deposition process, in the perspective to assess optimal conditions for solar absorber applications.

  11. [Analysis of cloud spectral structure characteristics based on cloud profile radar data].

    PubMed

    Han, Yong; Lü, Da-Ren

    2013-04-01

    Cloud plays a very important role in the earth-atmosphere system. However, the current climate models are still lacking data about internal fine structure of cloud. And when the traditional passive satellite radiometer is used for remote sense, a plentiful information of the vertical distribution of cloud layer will be lost. For these reasons, NASA proposed the launch project of CloudSat, Whose purpose is to provide the necessary observation, and then allow us to understand better the internal structure of the cloud. CloudSat was successfully launched on April 28, 2006. It carried the first cloud profile radar (CPR) with W band (94 GHz), which can provide continuous and global time sequence vertical structure and characteristics of cloud. In the present paper, using CloudSat satellite data, we analyzed the 8th "Morakot" and 15th " Koppu" typhoon cloud systems. According to the "typhoon" cloud detection results, the radar reflectivity, cloud types and optical thickness successive variation of cloud layer were gotten, which will provide a reference for studying optical properties of typhoon cloud system.

  12. Minimization of the mean square velocity response of dynamic structures using an active-passive dynamic vibration absorber.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Y L; Wong, W O; Cheng, L

    2012-07-01

    An optimal design of a hybrid vibration absorber (HVA) with a displacement and a velocity feedback for minimizing the velocity response of the structure based on the H(2) optimization criterion is proposed. The objective of the optimal design is to reduce the total vibration energy of the vibrating structure under wideband excitation, i.e., the total area under the velocity response spectrum is minimized in this criterion. One of the inherent limitations of the traditional passive vibration absorber is that its vibration suppression is low if the mass ratio between the absorber mass and the mass of the primary structure is low. The active element of the proposed HVA helps further reduce the vibration of the controlled structure, and it can provide very good vibration absorption performance even at a low mass ratio. Both the passive and active elements are optimized together for the minimization of the mean square velocity of the primary system as well as the active force required in the HVA. The proposed HVA was tested on single degree-of-freedom (SDOF) and continuous vibrating structures and compared to the traditional passive vibration absorber.

  13. Subsurface Structure of Planum Boreum on Mars from Shallow Radar (SHARAD) Soundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putzig, N. E.; Phillips, R. J.; Seu, R.; Biccari, D.; Safaeinili, A.; Holt, J. W.; Plaut, J. J.; Egan, A. F.; SHARAD Team

    2008-12-01

    We have mapped the subsurface structure beneath Planum Boreum using results from the Shallow Radar (SHARAD) instrument, which has acquired sounding observations on more than 1000 orbital passes across the north polar region of Mars since the beginning of its primary science mission in November of 2006. Two- dimensional profiles beneath the instrument's ground track show a series of returns corresponding to dielectric contrasts in the subsurface to depths of 2 to 3 km. Using interactive subsurface-data interpretation software, we have mapped packets of layers within the North Polar Layered Deposits (NPLD) in three dimensions, from the surface down to returns from underlying materials, which are seen as either a diffusely reflective zone (DRZ) or a more coherent basal reflection. The latter presumably represents an extension of the Early Amazonian Vastitas Borealis Interior Unit (Tanaka et al. 2008, Icarus 196, 318) under the NPLD. The DRZ likely corresponds to a Basal Unit identified previously using surface imagery (Byrne and Murray 2002, JGR 107 E6, 5044) and later mapped as the Rupes Tenuis and Planum Boreum cavi units (Tanaka et al. 2008). This radar unit extends under most---but not all---of the main lobe of the NPLD, into Olympia Planum, and also across Chasma Boreale and partly under the Gemina Lingula lobe. These radar results suggest a revised boundary for the Basal Unit that has important implications for its association with the emplacement of Chasma Boreale. Within the NPLD, four radar units, consisting of alternating packets of strongly reflective layers and quiescent zones that may represent nearly pure water ice, extend into both lobes of the deposits. A fifth radar unit is isolated to eastern Gemina Lingula and occurs between the lower two of the regional units, pinching out below the topographic saddle between the two lobes. The layering associated with the radar units is thought to be the result of variations in dust content within water

  14. Two radars for the AIM mission to characterize the regolith and deep interior structure of the asteroid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletti, V.; Herique, A.; Plettemeier, D.

    2015-12-01

    Very little is known till now about the interior of asteroids. The information available has been so far mainly obtained through remote observations of the surface and inferred from theoretical modeling. Observations of asteroids deep interior and regolith structure are needed to better understand the asteroid accretion and dynamical evolution, and to provide answers that will directly improve our ability to understand and model the mechanisms driving Near Earth Asteroids (NEA) deflection and other risk mitigation techniques. Radar operating from a spacecraft is the only technique capable of characterizing the internal structure and heterogeneity from submetric to global scale for the benefit of science as well as for planetary defence or exploration. Access to the deep interior structure requires a low-frequency radar (LFR) that is able to penetrate and propagate throughout the complete body. The LFR will be a bi-static radar similar to the CONSERT radar designed for the Rosetta mission and will perform a tomography of the asteroid. On the other hand, the characterization of the first tens of meters of the subsurface with a submetric resolution will be achieved by a monostatic radar operating at higher frequencies (HFR). It will allow the identification of the layering and the reconnection of the surface features to the internal structure. Its design will be based on the design of the WISDOM radar developped for the ExoMars mission. This presentation reviews, in the context of the AIDA/AIM mission, the benefits of radar measurements performed from a spacecraft. The concept of both HFR and LFR are presented as well as the expected performances of the instruments.

  15. Capturing the Energy Absorbing Mechanisms of Composite Structures under Crash Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Bonnie

    As fiber reinforced composite material systems become increasingly utilized in primary aircraft and automotive structures, the need to understand their contribution to the crashworthiness of the structure is of great interest to meet safety certification requirements. The energy absorbing behavior of a composite structure, however, is not easily predicted due to the great complexity of the failure mechanisms that occur within the material. Challenges arise both in the experimental characterization and in the numerical modeling of the material/structure combination. At present, there is no standardized test method to characterize the energy absorbing capability of composite materials to aide crashworthy structural design. In addition, although many commercial finite element analysis codes exist and offer a means to simulate composite failure initiation and propagation, these models are still under development and refinement. As more metallic structures are replaced by composite structures, the need for both experimental guidelines to characterize the energy absorbing capability of a composite structure, as well as guidelines for using numerical tools to simulate composite materials in crash conditions has become a critical matter. This body of research addresses both the experimental characterization of the energy absorption mechanisms occurring in composite materials during crushing, as well as the numerical simulation of composite materials undergoing crushing. In the experimental investigation, the specific energy absorption (SEA) of a composite material system is measured using a variety of test element geometries, such as corrugated plates and tubes. Results from several crush experiments reveal that SEA is not a constant material property for laminated composites, and varies significantly with the geometry of the test specimen used. The variation of SEA measured for a single material system requires that crush test data must be generated for a range of

  16. Local Structure and Dynamics of Water Absorbed in Poly(ether imide): A Hydrogen Bonding Anatomy.

    PubMed

    de Nicola, Antonio; Correa, Andrea; Milano, Giuseppe; La Manna, Pietro; Musto, Pellegrino; Mensitieri, Giuseppe; Scherillo, Giuseppe

    2017-04-13

    Hydrogen bonding (HB) interactions play a major role in determining the behavior of macromolecular systems absorbing water. In fact, functional and structural properties of polymer-water mixtures are affected by the amount and type of these interactions. This contribution aims at a molecular level understanding of the interactional scenario for the technologically relevant case of the poly(ether imide)-water system. The problem has been tackled by combining different experimental and theoretical approaches which, taken together, provide a comprehensive physical picture. Relevant experimental data were gathered by in situ FTIR spectroscopy, while molecular dynamics (MD) and statistical thermodynamics approaches were used as modeling theoretical tools. It was found that, among the possible configurations, some are strongly prevailing. In particular, water molecules preferentially establish water bridges with two carbonyl groups of the same PEI repeating unit. Water self-interactions were also detected, giving rise to a "second shell" species in the prevalent form of dimers. The population of the different water species was evaluated spectroscopically, and a remarkable agreement with theoretical predictions was found.

  17. D/H in Lyman Limit absorbers with simple velocity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, John

    2001-07-01

    The deuterium abundance in QSO absorbers provides a direct measurement of the baryonic density of the Universe. We will use STIS to obtain new high resolution data of two carefully selected, intermediate redshift absorption systems. Existing FOS data constrain the velocity structure of these systems and show that the high neutral hydrogen column densities are high enough detect deuterium in the new higher resolution observations we propose here. Markarian 132, z{abs} = 1.7306: The FOS G270 spectrum covers the whole Lyman series from Ly-beta down to the limit. Voigt profile fitting to the whole series reveals two strong components but the system is dominated by a cloud with logN{HI} = 18.3 +/- 0.1 which lies at the blue edge of the complex. The velocity spread within this component is b{eff} < 50 km/s. Ton 34, z{abs} = 1.6077: This is a grey Lyman limit system. The Ly-alpha profile looks fairly narrow. Fitting Voigt profiles to the whole series gives logN{HI} = 17.4 +/- 0.1 and b{eff} < 39 km/s so this system may be a single component system.

  18. Design of multiple-layer microwave absorbing structure based on rice husk and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seng, Lee Yeng; Wee, F. H.; Rahim, H. A.; AbdulMalek, MohamedFareq; You, Y. K.; Liyana, Z.; Ezanuddin, A. A. M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a multiple-layered microwave absorber using rice husk and carbon nanotube composite. The dielectric properties of each layer composite were measured and analysed. The different layer of microwave absorber enables to control the microwave absorption performance. The microwave absorption performances are demonstrated through measurements of reflectivity over the frequency range 2-18 GHz. An improvement of microwave absorption <-20 dB is observed with respect to a high lossy composite placed at bottom layer of multiple layers. Reflectivity evaluations indicate that the composites display a great potential application as wideband electromagnetic wave absorbers.

  19. Photothermal evaluation of the influence of nicotine, antitumor drugs, and radiation on cellular absorbing structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharov, Vladimir P.; Galitovsky, Valentin; Chowdhury, Parimal; Chambers, Timothy

    2004-07-01

    This short review presents findings from a recent evaluation of the diagnostic capabilities of a new experimental design of the advanced photothermal (PT) imaging system; specifically, its performance in studying the impact of nicotine, a combination of antitumor drugs, and radiation on the absorbing structures of various cells. We used this imaging system to test our hypothesis that low doses of chemicals or drugs lead to changes in cell metabolism, that these changes are accompanied by the shrinking of cellular absorbing zones (e.g. organelles), and that these reactions cause increased local absorption. Conversely, high (toxic) doses may lead to swelling of organelles or release of chromophores into the intracellular space, causing decreased local absorption. In this study, we compared PT images and PT responses of the pancreatic exocrine tumor cell line AR42J resulting from exposure to various concentrations of nicotine versus those of control cells. We found that responses were almost proportional to the drug concentration in concentrations ranging from 1 nM-100 μM, reached saturation at a maximum of approximately 100 μM-1 mM, and then fell rapidly at concentrations ranging from 1-50 mM. We also examined the influence of antitumor drugs (vinblastine and paclitaxel) on KB3 carcinoma cells, with drug concentrations ranging from 10-10 nM to 10 nM. In this instance, exposure initially led to slight cell activation, which was then followed by decreased cellular PT response. Drug administration led to corresponding changes in the amplitude and spatial intracellular localization of PT responses, including bubble formation, as an indicator of local absorption level. Additionally, it was shown that, depending on cell type, x-ray radiation may produce effects similar to those resulting from exposure to drugs. Independent verification with a combined PT-fluorescence assay and conventional staining kits (trypan blue, Annexin V-propidium iodide [PI]) revealed that this

  20. Detecting forest structure and biomass with C-band multipolarization radar - Physical model and field tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westman, Walter E.; Paris, Jack F.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of C-band radar (4.75 GHz) to discriminate features of forest structure, including biomass, is tested using a truck-mounted scatterometer for field tests on a 1.5-3.0 m pygmy forest of cypress (Cupressus pygmaea) and pine (Pinus contorta ssp, Bolanderi) near Mendocino, CA. In all, 31 structural variables of the forest are quantified at seven sites. Also measured was the backscatter from a life-sized physical model of the pygmy forest, composed of nine wooden trees with 'leafy branches' of sponge-wrapped dowels. This model enabled independent testing of the effects of stem, branch, and leafy branch biomass, branch angle, and moisture content on radar backscatter. Field results suggested that surface area of leaves played a greater role in leaf scattering properties than leaf biomass per se. Tree leaf area index was strongly correlated with vertically polarized power backscatter (r = 0.94; P less than 0.01). Field results suggested that the scattering role of leaf water is enhanced as leaf surface area per unit leaf mass increases; i.e., as the moist scattering surfaces become more dispersed. Fog condensate caused a measurable rise in forest backscatter, both from surface and internal rises in water content. Tree branch mass per unit area was highly correlated with cross-polarized backscatter in the field (r = 0.93; P less than 0.01), a result also seen in the physical model.

  1. Detecting forest structure and biomass with C-band multipolarization radar - Physical model and field tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westman, Walter E.; Paris, Jack F.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of C-band radar (4.75 GHz) to discriminate features of forest structure, including biomass, is tested using a truck-mounted scatterometer for field tests on a 1.5-3.0 m pygmy forest of cypress (Cupressus pygmaea) and pine (Pinus contorta ssp, Bolanderi) near Mendocino, CA. In all, 31 structural variables of the forest are quantified at seven sites. Also measured was the backscatter from a life-sized physical model of the pygmy forest, composed of nine wooden trees with 'leafy branches' of sponge-wrapped dowels. This model enabled independent testing of the effects of stem, branch, and leafy branch biomass, branch angle, and moisture content on radar backscatter. Field results suggested that surface area of leaves played a greater role in leaf scattering properties than leaf biomass per se. Tree leaf area index was strongly correlated with vertically polarized power backscatter (r = 0.94; P less than 0.01). Field results suggested that the scattering role of leaf water is enhanced as leaf surface area per unit leaf mass increases; i.e., as the moist scattering surfaces become more dispersed. Fog condensate caused a measurable rise in forest backscatter, both from surface and internal rises in water content. Tree branch mass per unit area was highly correlated with cross-polarized backscatter in the field (r = 0.93; P less than 0.01), a result also seen in the physical model.

  2. West African Squall-Line Thermodynamic Structure Retrieved from Dual-Doppler Radar Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Frank; Testud, Jacques; Payen, Marc; Pinty, Bernard

    1984-11-01

    Pressure and temperature fields within a West African squall line, retrieved from dual-Doppler radar data collected during the `COPT 81' (Convection Profonde Tropicale) experiment are presented. The method for derivation of thew results is approximately similar to that proposed by Gal-Chen, based on the anelastic equation of motion.Comparisons between pressure and temperature fields deduced from radar data at the lowest levels and surface network measurements show good agreement. The inferred thermodynamic structure displays the influence of a low-level frontward flow which is mainly due to a density current of cold air, generated in the stratiform region of the squall line and resulting from a mesoscale downdraft. This frontward flow contributes to initiate and maintain a frontal updraft through both nonhydrostatic pressure perturbation and temperature difference between entering air and colder frontward flow. At higher altitudes, mixing with the environment reduces buoyancy in the frontal updraft, while weaker convective updrafts develop in the inner region.Comparisons between these results and the kinematic and thermodynamic structures deduced from a previous observation (Le Mone, 1983) display different types of dynamics of organized convective systems.

  3. Two radars for AIM mission: A direct observation of the asteroid's structure from deep interior to regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herique, A.; Ciarletti, V.

    2015-10-01

    Our knowledge of the internal structure of asteroids is, so far, indirect - relying entirely on inferences from remote sensing observations of the surface, and theoretical modeling. What are the bulk properties of the regolith and deep interior? And what are the physical processes that shape their internal structures? Direct measurements are needed to provide answers that will directly improve our ability to understand and model the mechanisms driving Near Earth Asteroids (NEA) for the benefit of science as well as for planetary defense or exploration. Radar tomography is the only technique to characterize internal structure from decimetric scale to global scale. This paper reviews the benefits of direct measurement of the asteroid interior. Then the radar concepts for both deep interior and shallow subsurface are presented and the radar payload proposed for the AIDA/AIM mission is outlined.

  4. Ocean eddy structure by satellite radar altimetry required for iceberg towing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Campbell, W.J.; Cheney, R.E.; Marsh, J.G.; Mognard, N.M.

    1980-01-01

    Models for the towing of large tabular icebergs give towing speeds of 0.5 knots to 1.0 knots relative to the ambient near surface current. Recent oceanographic research indicates that the world oceans are not principally composed of large steady-state current systems, like the Gulf Stream, but that most of the ocean momentum is probably involved in intense rings, formed by meanders of the large streams, and in mid-ocean eddies. These rings and eddies have typical dimensions on the order of 200 km with dynamic height anomalies across them of tens-of-centimeters to a meter. They migrate at speeds on the order of a few cm/sec. Current velocities as great as 3 knots have been observed in rings, and currents of 1 knot are common. Thus, the successful towing of icebergs is dependent on the ability to locate, measure, and track ocean rings and eddies. To accomplish this systematically on synoptic scales appears to be possible only by using satelliteborne radar altimeters. Ocean current and eddy structures as observed by the radar altimeters on the GEOS-3 and Seasat-1 satellites are presented and compared. Several satellite programs presently being planned call for flying radar altimeters in polar or near-polar orbits in the mid-1980 time frame. Thus, by the time tows of large icebergs will probably be attempted, it is possible synoptic observations of ocean rings and eddies which can be used to ascertain their location, size, intensity, and translation velocity will be a reality. ?? 1980.

  5. Advanced Differential Radar Interferometry (A-DInSAR) as integrative tool for a structural geological analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crippa, B.; Calcagni, L.; Rossi, G.; Sternai, P.

    2009-04-01

    Advanced Differential SAR interferometry (A-DInSAR) is a technique monitoring large-coverage surface deformations using a stack of interferograms generated from several complex SLC SAR images, acquired over the same target area at different times. In this work are described the results of a procedure to calculate terrain motion velocity on highly correlated pixels (E. Biescas, M. Crosetto, M. Agudo, O. Monserrat e B. Crippa: Two Radar Interferometric Approaches to Monitor Slow and Fast Land Deformation, 2007) in two area Gemona - Friuli, Northern Italy, Pollino - Calabria, Southern Italy, and, furthermore, are presented some consideration, based on successful examples of the present analysis. The choice of these pixels whose displacement velocity is calculated depends on the dispersion index value (DA) or using coherence values along the stack interferograms. A-DInSAR technique allows to obtain highly reliable velocity values of the vertical displacement. These values concern the movement of minimum surfaces of about 80m2 at the maximum resolution and the minimum velocity that can be recognized is of the order of mm/y. Because of the high versatility of the technology, because of the large dimensions of the area that can be analyzed (of about 10000Km2) and because of the high precision and reliability of the results obtained, we think it is possible to exploit radar interferometry to obtain some important information about the structural context of the studied area, otherwise very difficult to recognize. Therefore we propose radar interferometry as a valid investigation tool whose results must be considered as an important integration of the data collected in fieldworks.

  6. The development and applications of dual channel structure based on maintenance-free moisture absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Wei; Hu, Weimin; Gao, Anliang; Ye, Yu; Huang, Juan; Liu, Xinyu; Yin, Wen

    2017-04-01

    It is necessary to carry out regular maintenance and replacement of the traditional power transformer pressure and humidity absorber in the long running time. When the transformer in use to upgrade or retrofit, usually need to find a simple, practical solution. Conventional moisture absorbers require the use of silica gel particles or similar desiccant to absorb water, the need for regular replacement of desiccant. In order to improve the working efficiency of desiccant and reduce the cost of desiccant replacement, this paper introduces the latest technology of dual-channel maintenance-free moisture absorber, describes the working principle of the device and the advantages of the element, and its application prospects in the power industry Outlook.

  7. Passively Q-switched and mode-locked Nd:YVO4 laser with sandwich structured wallpaper graphene oxide absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Wang, Y. G.; Yu, H. J.; Sun, W.; Han, Z. H.; Zhang, S. B.; Hou, W.; Lin, X. C.; Li, J. M.; Tang, J.

    2011-11-01

    We report on a passively Q-switched and mode-locked Nd:YVO4 laser using a novel low-cost wallpaper graphene oxide absorber. Sandwich structured wallpaper graphene oxide absorber was constructed by a high transmission mirror, a piece of wallpaper graphene oxide absorber and a reflective mirror. The average output power of 310 mW of passively Q-switched and mode-locked laser was successfully achieved. The repetition rate and pulse width of the Q-switched envelope were 213 kHz and 770 ns, respectively. The repetition rate of passively mode-locked pulse within the Q-switched envelope was 81.3 MHz with the pulse energy of 3.8 nJ.

  8. An ultra-narrowband absorber with a dielectric-dielectric-metal structure based on guide-mode resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yan-Lin; Zhao, Yan

    2017-01-01

    We report an ultra-narrowband absorber with a dielectric-dielectric-metal (DDM) tri-layer structure which is composed of a dielectric grating as the top layer, a dielectric spacer and a metal substrate. The simulation results show that, we can get an ultra-narrowband absorber with the absorption bandwidth less than 0.05 nm and the absorption rate more than 0.99 within an ultra-narrow angle for TE polarization (electric field is parallel to grating grooves). The results also show that the ultra-narrowband absorption for TE polarization is originated from guide-mode resonance and low power loss in the metal substrate. This ultra-narrowband absorber is a good candidate for application in coherent emission of light by thermal source.

  9. Highly selective etching of SnO2 absorber in binary mask structure for extreme ultra-violet lithography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Jin; Jung, Chang Yong; Park, Sung Jin; Hwangbo, Chang Kweun; Seo, Hwan Seok; Kim, Sung Soo; Lee, Nae-Eung

    2012-04-01

    Among the core EUVL (extreme ultra-violet lithography) technologies for nanoscale patterning below the 30 nm node for Si chip manufacturing, new materials and fabrication processes for high-performance EUVL masks are of considerable importance due to the use of new reflective optics. In this work, the selective etching of SnO2 (tin oxide) as a new absorber material, with high EUV absorbance due to its large extinction coefficient, for the binary mask structure of SnO2 (absorber layer)/Ru (capping/etch stop layer)/Mo-Si multilayer (reflective layer)/Si (substrate), was investigated. Because infinitely high selectivity of the SnO2 layer to the Ru ESL is required due to the ultrathin nature of the Ru layer, various etch parameters were assessed in the inductively coupled Cl2/Ar plasmas in order to find the process window required for infinitely high etch selectivity of the SnO2 layer. The results showed that the gas flow ratio and V(dc) value play an important role in determining the process window for the infinitely high etch selectivity of SnO2 to Ru ESL. The high EUV-absorbance SnO2 layer, patternable by a dry process, allows a smaller absorber thickness, which can mitigate the geometric shadowing effects observed for high-performance binary EUVL masks.

  10. Intercomparison of vertical structure of storms revealed by ground-based (NMQ) and spaceborne radars (CloudSat-CPR and TRMM-PR).

    PubMed

    Fall, Veronica M; Cao, Qing; Hong, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Spaceborne radars provide great opportunities to investigate the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. Two typical spaceborne radars for such a study are the W-band Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) and Ku-band Precipitation Radar (PR), which are onboard NASA's CloudSat and TRMM satellites, respectively. Compared to S-band ground-based radars, they have distinct scattering characteristics for different hydrometeors in clouds and precipitation. The combination of spaceborne and ground-based radar observations can help in the identification of hydrometeors and improve the radar-based quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE). This study analyzes the vertical structure of the 18 January, 2009 storm using data from the CloudSat CPR, TRMM PR, and a NEXRAD-based National Mosaic and Multisensor QPE (NMQ) system. Microphysics above, within, and below the melting layer are studied through an intercomparison of multifrequency measurements. Hydrometeors' type and their radar scattering characteristics are analyzed. Additionally, the study of the vertical profile of reflectivity (VPR) reveals the brightband properties in the cold-season precipitation and its effect on the radar-based QPE. In all, the joint analysis of spaceborne and ground-based radar data increases the understanding of the vertical structure of storm systems and provides a good insight into the microphysical modeling for weather forecasts.

  11. Intercomparison of Vertical Structure of Storms Revealed by Ground-Based (NMQ) and Spaceborne Radars (CloudSat-CPR and TRMM-PR)

    PubMed Central

    Fall, Veronica M.; Hong, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Spaceborne radars provide great opportunities to investigate the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. Two typical spaceborne radars for such a study are the W-band Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) and Ku-band Precipitation Radar (PR), which are onboard NASA's CloudSat and TRMM satellites, respectively. Compared to S-band ground-based radars, they have distinct scattering characteristics for different hydrometeors in clouds and precipitation. The combination of spaceborne and ground-based radar observations can help in the identification of hydrometeors and improve the radar-based quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE). This study analyzes the vertical structure of the 18 January, 2009 storm using data from the CloudSat CPR, TRMM PR, and a NEXRAD-based National Mosaic and Multisensor QPE (NMQ) system. Microphysics above, within, and below the melting layer are studied through an intercomparison of multifrequency measurements. Hydrometeors' type and their radar scattering characteristics are analyzed. Additionally, the study of the vertical profile of reflectivity (VPR) reveals the brightband properties in the cold-season precipitation and its effect on the radar-based QPE. In all, the joint analysis of spaceborne and ground-based radar data increases the understanding of the vertical structure of storm systems and provides a good insight into the microphysical modeling for weather forecasts. PMID:24459424

  12. Structure of Florida Thunderstorms Using High-Altitude Aircraft Radiometer and Radar Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymsfield, G. M.; Shepherd, J. M.; Bidwell, S. W.; Boncyk, W. C.; Caylor, I. J.; Ameen, S.; Olson, W. S.

    1996-10-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a unique radar and radiometer dataset from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) ER-2 high-altitude aircraft overlying Florida thunderstorms on 5 October 1993 during the Convection and Moisture Experiment (CAMEX). The observations represent the first ER-2 Doppler radar (EDOP) measurements and perhaps the most comprehensive multispectral precipitation measurements collected from a single aircraft. The objectives of this paper are to 1) examine the relation of the vertical radar reflectivity structure to the radiometric responses over a wide range of remote sensing frequencies, 2) examine the limitations of rain estimation schemes over land and ocean backgrounds based on the observed vertical reflectivity structures and brightness temperatures, and 3) assess the usefulness of scattering-based microwave frequencies (86 GHz and above) to provide information on vertical structure in the ice region. Analysis focused on two types of convection: a small group of thunderstorms over the Florida Straits and sea-breeze-initiated convection along the Florida Atlantic coast.Various radiometric datasets are synthesized including visible, infrared (IR), and microwave (10 220 GHz). The rain cores observed over an ocean background by EDOP, compared quite well with elevated brightness temperatures from the Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) 10.7-GHz channel. However, at higher microwave frequencies, which are ice-scattering based, storm evolution and vertical wind shear were found to be important in interpretation of the radiometric observations. As found in previous studies, the ice-scattering region was displaced significantly downshear of the convective and surface rainfall regions due to upper-level wind advection. The ice region above the rain layer was more opaque in the IR, although the 150- and 220-GHz brightness temperatures Tb approached the IR measurements and both corresponded well with the radar

  13. Original Size of the Sudbury Structure: Evidence from Field Investigations and Imaging Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowmman, Paul D., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    This paper summarizes results of continuing studies of the original size of the Sudbury impact structure, including imaging radar and field investigations of supposed "Sudbury breccia" north of the Sudbury Igneous Comples (SIC). Imaging radar acquired from Canada Centre for Remote Sensing (CCRS) aircraft, European Space Agency Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1), and RADARSAT shows no evidence of outer rings concentric with the North Range. Illumination directions are such that these rings, presumably extension fractures, would be conspicuous by look azimuth highlighting if they existed. Field mapping supports this interpretation, showing that supposed ring fractures occupied by Huronian sediments are essentially synclines older than the 1850 Ma impact and are not related to the impact. Field investigations of "Sudbury breccia" north of the SIC shows that most if not all of it is inside or along contacts with diabase dykes of the Sudbury Swarm (ca. 1238 Ma), and hence is far too young to be related to the impact. A recently-discovered occurrence of "Sudbury breccia" south of the SIC, near Creighton, is similarly associated with a NW-trending diabase dyke cutting the SIC, supporting the post-impact age of the breccia. It is concluded that the original north rim of the Sudbury crater was not more than 5 to 10 km north of the present North Range SIC contact, and that published estimates of the crater size (ca 200 km diameter) are incorrect.

  14. 2-D Joint Structural Inversion of Cross-hole Electrical Resistance and Ground Penetrating Radar Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchedda, Abderrezak; Chouteau, Michel; Giroux, Bernard

    2010-05-01

    We present a joint structural inversion algorithm for cross-hole electrical resistance tomography (ERT) and cross-hole radar travel time tomography (RTT). The algorithm proceeds by combining the exchange of structural information and a regularization method that consists of imposing an L1-norm penalty in the wavelet domain. The minimization of the L1-norm penalty is carried out using an iterative soft-thresholding algorithm. The thresholds are estimated by maximizing a structural similarity criterion, which is a function of the two (ERT and RTT) inverted models. To solve this optimization subproblem, we used the simultaneous perturbation stochastic approach. Besides, the regularization in the wavelet basis allows for the possibility of sharp discontinuities superimposed on a smoothly varying background. Hence the structural information is extracted from each model using a Canny edge detector. The detected edge is used to construct a weighting matrix that is applied to alter the smoothness matrix constraint. To validate our methodology and its implementation, responses from two models were modelled. Experiments demonstrate that the proposed approach improves the spatial resolution and quantitative estimation of physical parameters. In addition, in comparison with joint structural inversion with only the exchange of structural information, our method avoids undesirable bias introduced by the exchange of structural information when the boundaries are near each other. Finally, the proposed algorithm will be applied to real data in the near future to evaluate its performance.

  15. Absorbed dose estimates to structures of the brain and head using a high-resolution voxel-based head phantom.

    PubMed

    Evans, J F; Blue, T E; Gupta, N

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the viability of using a high-resolution 3-D head phantom in Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) structure dosimetry. This work describes a high-resolution voxel-based model of a human head and its use for calculating absorbed doses to the structures of the brain. The Zubal head phantom is a 3-D model of a human head that can be displayed and manipulated on a computer. Several changes were made to the original head phantom which now contains over 29 critical structures of the brain and head. The modified phantom is a 85 x 109 x 120 lattice of voxels, where each voxel is 2.2 x 2.2 x 1.4 mm3. This model was translated into MCNP lattice format. As a proof of principle study, two MCNP absorbed dose calculations were made (left and right lateral irradiations) using a uniformly distributed neutron disk source with an 1/E energy spectrum. Additionally, the results of these two calculations were combined to estimate the absorbed doses from a bilateral irradiation. Radiobiologically equivalent (RBE) doses were calculated for all structures and were normalized to 12.8 Gy-Eq. For a left lateral irradiation, the left motor cortex receives the limiting RBE dose. For a bilateral irradiation, the insula cortices receive the limiting dose. Among the nonencephalic structures, the parotid glands receive RBE doses that were within 15% of the limiting dose.

  16. Radar attenuation in Europa's ice shell: Obstacles and opportunities for constraining the shell thickness and its thermal structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalousová, Klára; Schroeder, Dustin M.; Soderlund, Krista M.

    2017-03-01

    Young surface and possible recent endogenic activity make Europa one of the most exciting solar system bodies and a primary target for spacecraft exploration. Future Europa missions are expected to carry ice-penetrating radar instruments designed to investigate its subsurface thermophysical structure. Several authors have addressed the radar sounders' performance at icy moons, often ignoring the complex structure of a realistic ice shell. Here we explore the variation in two-way radar attenuation for a variety of potential thermal structures of Europa's shell (determined by reference viscosity, activation energy, tidal heating, surface temperature, and shell thickness) as well as for low and high loss temperature-dependent attenuation model. We found that (i) for all investigated ice shell thicknesses (5-30 km), the radar sounder will penetrate between 15% and 100% of the total thickness, (ii) the maximum penetration depth varies laterally, with deepest penetration possible through cold downwellings, (iii) direct ocean detection might be possible for shells of up to 15 km thick if the signal travels through cold downwelling ice or the shell is conductive, (iv) even if the ice/ocean interface is not directly detected, penetration through most of the shell could constrain the deep shell structure through returns from deep non-ocean interfaces or the loss of signal itself, and (v) for all plausible ice shells, the two-way attenuation to the eutectic point is ≲30 dB which shows a robust potential for longitudinal investigation of the ice shell's shallow thermophysical structure.

  17. A polarization insensitive and broadband metamaterial absorber based on three-dimensional structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jingyao; Xiao, Zhongyin; Xu, Kaikai; Liu, Dejun

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a three-dimensional metamaterial absorber based on tailored resistive film patch array. The numerical results show that a broadband abs orption more than 90% can be achieved from 58.6 to 91.4 GHz for either transverse electric or magnetic polarization wave at normal incidence. And the E-field, surface current and power loss density distributions in the absorber are investigated to explain the physical mechanism of high absorption. In addition, the absorption efficiency of oblique incidence is also elucidated. According to the analysis of the E-field and power loss density distributions, we explain the absorption differences between TE and TM mode at oblique incidence. The proposed metamaterial absorber will pave the way for practical applications, such as sensing, imaging and stealth technology. Importantly, the design idea has the ability to be extended to terahertz, infrared and optical region.

  18. Design principles for infrared wide-angle perfect absorber based on plasmonic structure.

    PubMed

    Pu, Mingbo; Hu, Chenggang; Wang, Min; Huang, Cheng; Zhao, Zeyu; Wang, Changtao; Feng, Qin; Luo, Xiangang

    2011-08-29

    An approach for designing a wide-angle perfect absorber at infrared frequencies is proposed. The technique is based on a perfectly impedance-matched sheet (PIMS) formed by plasmonic nanostructure. It is shown that the effective impedance is more physical meaningful and beneficial than effective medium in describing the electromagnetic properties of metamaterial absorber. As a specific implementation of this technique, a wide-angle polarization-independent dual-band absorber is numerically demonstrated at frequencies of 100THz and 280THz with absorption close to 100% simultaneously. Circuit models are utilized to describe the impedance property of localized plasmon modes and the results show good agreement with that retrieved from reflection coefficient at normal incidence.

  19. Enhanced infrared detectors using resonant structures combined with thin type-II superlattice absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldflam, M. D.; Kadlec, E. A.; Olson, B. V.; Klem, J. F.; Hawkins, S. D.; Parameswaran, S.; Coon, W. T.; Keeler, G. A.; Fortune, T. R.; Tauke-Pedretti, A.; Wendt, J. R.; Shaner, E. A.; Davids, P. S.; Kim, J. K.; Peters, D. W.

    2016-12-01

    We examined the spectral responsivity of a 1.77 μm thick type-II superlattice based long-wave infrared detector in combination with metallic nanoantennas. Coupling between the Fabry-Pérot cavity formed by the semiconductor layer and the resonant nanoantennas on its surface enables spectral selectivity, while also increasing peak quantum efficiency to over 50%. Electromagnetic simulations reveal that this high responsivity is a direct result of field-enhancement in the absorber layer, enabling significant absorption in spite of the absorber's subwavelength thickness. Notably, thinning of the absorbing material could ultimately yield lower photodetector noise through a reduction in dark current while improving photocarrier collection efficiency. The temperature- and incident-angle-independent spectral response observed in these devices allows for operation over a wide range of temperatures and optical systems. This detector paradigm demonstrates potential benefits to device performance with applications throughout the infrared.

  20. Local structure of the convective boundary layer measured by a volume-imaging radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollard, Brian David

    For over 30 years, radars have examined the structure of the convective boundary layer (CBL). Those studies have consisted either of the three dimensional structure of km-scale features, or of the vertical structure of local, 1 to 100 m-scale features. A new instrument, the Turbulent Eddy Profiler (TEP), images the local, three dimensional character of the CBL with the 10 m-scale resolution of current vertically profiling systems. This thesis presents TEP CBL measurements, including /tilde Cn2, the local refractive index structure-function parameter, and w, the vertical velocity. Qualitative horizontal and vertical images are shown. The scales of the measured structures are then quantified through calculation of the correlation distance. To examine larger scale features, effective volumes are constructed from TEP time series data through Taylor's hypothesis. Within those volumes, the statistical properties of /tilde Cn2 and w and calculated. These measurements highlight some of the capabilities of the TEP system, and give a unique picture of the morphology and evolution of /tilde Cn2 and w in the CBL. Many of the TEP measurements are compared to appropriately scaled large-eddy simulation (LES) predictions. The LES qualitative CBL structure agrees well with the measurements, while the statistical values of /tilde Cn2 agree well for only some of the measured data. Those /tilde Cn2 comparisons are the first of their kind, however, and suggest that LES may become a useful tool in CBL propagation studies.

  1. Computational prediction of absorbance maxima for a structurally diverse series of engineered green fluorescent protein chromophores.

    PubMed

    Timerghazin, Qadir K; Carlson, Haley J; Liang, Chen; Campbell, Robert E; Brown, Alex

    2008-02-28

    By virtue of its self-sufficiency to form a visible wavelength chromophore within the confines of its tertiary structure, the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (GFP) is single-handedly responsible for the ever-growing popularity of fluorescence imaging of recombinant fusion proteins in biological research. Engineered variants of GFP with altered excitation or emission wavelength maxima have helped to expand the range of applications of GFP. The engineering of the GFP variants is usually done empirically by genetic modifications of the chromophore structure and/or its environment in order to find variants with new photophysical properties. The process of identifying improved variants could be greatly facilitated if augmented or guided by computational studies of the chromophore ground and excited-state properties and dynamics. In pursuit of this goal, we now report a thorough investigation of computational methods for prediction of the absorbance maxima for an experimentally validated series of engineered GFP chromophore analogues. The experimental dataset is composed of absorption maxima for 10 chemically distinct GFP chromophore analogues, including a previously unreported Y66D variant, measured under identical denaturing conditions. For each chromophore analogue, excitation energies and oscillator strengths were calculated using configuration interaction with single excitations (CIS), CIS with perturbative correction for double substitutions [CIS(D)], and time-dependent density functional theory (TD DFT) using several density functionals with solvent effects included using a polarizable continuum model. Comparison of the experimental and computational results show generally poor quantitative agreement with all methods attempted. However, good linear correlations between the calculated and experimental excitation energies (R2>0.9) could be obtained. Oscillator strengths obtained with TD DFT using pure density functionals also correlate well with the

  2. Studies of high latitude mesospheric turbulence by radar and rocket. I - Energy deposition and wave structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Fritts, D. C.; Chou, H.-G.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Barcus, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    The origin of wintertime mesospheric echoes observed with the mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere radar at Poker Flat, Alaska, was studied by probing the mesosphere with in situ rocket measurements during echo occurrences in the early spring, 1985. Within the height range 65-75 km, the structure of the large scale wave field was identified. In this region, a gravity wave with a vertical wavelength of about 2 km was found superimposed on a wave with a larger amplitude and a vertical wavelength of about 6.6 km. Because of the close correlation between the smaller amplitude wave and the modulation observed in the S/N profiles, it is concluded that the smaller wave was dominant in generating turbulence within the middle atmosphere.

  3. Studies of high latitude mesospheric turbulence by radar and rocket. I - Energy deposition and wave structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, R. A.; Fritts, D. C.; Chou, H.-G.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Barcus, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    The origin of wintertime mesospheric echoes observed with the mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere radar at Poker Flat, Alaska, was studied by probing the mesosphere with in situ rocket measurements during echo occurrences in the early spring, 1985. Within the height range 65-75 km, the structure of the large scale wave field was identified. In this region, a gravity wave with a vertical wavelength of about 2 km was found superimposed on a wave with a larger amplitude and a vertical wavelength of about 6.6 km. Because of the close correlation between the smaller amplitude wave and the modulation observed in the S/N profiles, it is concluded that the smaller wave was dominant in generating turbulence within the middle atmosphere.

  4. CO2-Selective Absorbents in Air: Reverse Lipid Bilayer Structure Forming Neutral Carbamic Acid in Water without Hydration.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Matsumoto, Chiaki; Iwata, Takashi; Mukai, Chisato

    2017-04-05

    Emission gas and air contain not only CO2 but also plentiful moisture, making it difficult to achieve selective CO2 absorption without hydration. To generate absorbed CO2 (wet CO2) under heating, the need for external energy to release the absorbed water has been among the most serious problems in the fields of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) and direct air capture (DAC). We found that the introduction of the hydrophobic phenyl group into alkylamines of CO2 absorbents improved the absorption selectivity between CO2 and water. Furthermore, ortho-, meta-, and para-xylylenediamines (OXDA, MXDA, PXDA, respectively) absorbed only CO2 in air without any hydration. Notably, MXDA·CO2 was formed as an anhydrous carbamic acid even in water, presumably because it was covered with hydrophobic phenyl groups, which induces a reverse lipid bilayer structure. Dry CO2 was obtained from heating MXDA·CO2 at 103-120 °C, which was revealed to involve chemically the Grignard reaction to form the resulting carboxylic acids in high yields.

  5. Structural investigation of the Canadian Shield by orbital radar and LANDSAT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, P. D., Jr.; Blodget, H. W.; Webster, W. J., Jr.; Paia, S.; Singhroy, V. H.; Slaney, V. R.

    1984-01-01

    Canadian Shield were studied by orbital radar. The primary objective of the study is scientific: to investigate and clarify the tectonic relationships of the Churchill, Superior, and Grenville Provinces, concentrating on their geologic boundaries, the Nelson and Grenvill Fronts. Theories about its origin range from in-situ regional metamorphism to tectonic sutures resulting from terrain accretion. The SIR-B investigation clarifies this problem. Secondary objectives are technique development, and include: (1) evaluation of the use of orbital radar in high altitude Precambrian terrains; (2) evaluation of look-azimuth biasing in radar and LANDSAT imagery; and (3) investigation of the synergistic use of radar, LANDSAT, and geophysical data in Precambrian studies.

  6. Radar probing of Jovian icy moons: Understanding subsurface water and structure detectability in the JUICE and Europa missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heggy, Essam; Scabbia, Giovanni; Bruzzone, Lorenzo; Pappalardo, Robert T.

    2017-03-01

    Radar probing of Jovian icy satellites is fundamental for understanding the moons' origin and their thermal evolution as potential habitable environments in our Solar System. Using the current state of knowledge of the geological and geophysical properties of Ganymede, Europa and Callisto, we perform a comprehensive radar detectability study to quantify the exploration depth and the lower limit for subsurface identification of water and key tectonic structural elements. To achieve these objectives, we establish parametric dielectric models that reflect different hypotheses on the formation and thermal evolution of each moon. The models are then used for FDTD radar propagation simulations at the 9-MHz sounding frequency proposed for both ESA JUICE and NASA Europa missions. We investigate the detectability above the galactic noise level of four predominant subsurface features: brittle-ductile interfaces, shallow faults, brine aquifers, and the hypothesized global oceans. For Ganymede, our results suggest that the brittle-ductile interface could be within radar detectability range in the bright terrains, but is more challenging for the dark terrains. Moreover, understanding the slope variation of the brittle-ductile interface is possible after clutter reduction and focusing. For Europa, the detection of shallow subsurface structural elements few kilometers deep (such as fractures, faults and brine lenses) is achievable and not compromised by surface clutter. The objective of detecting the potential deep global ocean on Europa is also doable under both the convective and conductive hypotheses. Finally, for Callisto, radar waves can achieve an average penetration depth of ∼15 km, although the current understanding of Callisto's subsurface dielectric properties does not suggest sufficiently strong contrasts to produce unambiguous radar returns.

  7. Temporal and structural evolution of a tropical monsoon cloud system: A case study using X-band radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar Das, Subrata; Deshpande, Sachin M.; Shankar Das, Siddarth; Konwar, Mahen; Chakravarty, Kaustav; Kalapureddy, Madhu Chandra Reddy

    2015-10-01

    A mobile X-band (~9.535 GHz) dual-polarization Doppler weather radar system was operated at a tropical site Pune (18.5386°N, 73.8089°E, 582 m AMSL) by the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology, Pune, India for observing monsoon clouds. The measurement site was on the leeward (eastern) side of the Western Ghats (WG). This study focuses on the horizontal and vertical structure of monsoon precipitating clouds and its temporal evolution as observed by the X-band radar on August 27, 2011. The radar reflectivity factor (Z, dBZ) is used as a proxy for measure of intensity of cloud system. Result shows that the radar reflectivity has a strong temporal variation in the vertical, with a local peak occurring in the afternoon hours. Relatively shallow structure during the late night and early morning hours is noticed. The observed cloud tops were reached up to 8 km heights with reflectivity maxima of about 35 dBZ at ∼5 km. The spatial and vertical evolution of radar reflectivity is consistent with the large-scale monsoon circulation. The variations in the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) from the Kalpana-1 satellite and vertical velocity and cloud-mixing ratio from the Modern Era-Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis data are also analyzed. As direct observations of clouds using radars are sparse over the Indian region, the results presented here would be useful to understand the processes related to cloud and precipitation formation in the tropical environment.

  8. Subsurface structure of Planum Boreum from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Shallow Radar soundings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putzig, Nathaniel E.; Phillips, Roger J.; Campbell, Bruce A.; Holt, John W.; Plaut, Jeffrey J.; Carter, Lynn M.; Egan, Anthony F.; Bernardini, Fabrizio; Safaeinili, Ali; Seu, Roberto

    2009-12-01

    We map the subsurface structure of Planum Boreum using sounding data from the Shallow Radar (SHARAD) instrument onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Radar coverage throughout the 1,000,000-km 2 area reveals widespread reflections from basal and internal interfaces of the north polar layered deposits (NPLD). A dome-shaped zone of diffuse reflectivity up to 12 μs (˜1-km thick) underlies two-thirds of the NPLD, predominantly in the main lobe but also extending into the Gemina Lingula lobe across Chasma Boreale. We equate this zone with a basal unit identified in image data as Amazonian sand-rich layered deposits [Byrne, S., Murray, B.C., 2002. J. Geophys. Res. 107, 5044, 12 pp. doi:10.1029/2001JE001615; Fishbaugh, K.E., Head, J.W., 2005. Icarus 174, 444-474; Tanaka, K.L., Rodriguez, J.A.P., Skinner, J.A., Bourke, M.C., Fortezzo, C.M., Herkenhoff, K.E., Kolb, E.J., Okubo, C.H., 2008. Icarus 196, 318-358]. Elsewhere, the NPLD base is remarkably flat-lying and co-planar with the exposed surface of the surrounding Vastitas Borealis materials. Within the NPLD, we delineate and map four units based on the radar-layer packets of Phillips et al. [Phillips, R.J., and 26 colleagues, 2008. Science 320, 1182-1185] that extend throughout the deposits and a fifth unit confined to eastern Gemina Lingula. We estimate the volume of each internal unit and of the entire NPLD stack (821,000 km 3), exclusive of the basal unit. Correlation of these units to models of insolation cycles and polar deposition [Laskar, J., Levrard, B., Mustard, J.F., 2002. Nature 419, 375-377; Levrard, B., Forget, F., Montmessin, F., Laskar, J., 2007. J. Geophys. Res. 112, E06012, 18 pp. doi:10.1029/2006JE002772] is consistent with the 4.2-Ma age of the oldest preserved NPLD obtained by Levrard et al. [Levrard, B., Forget, F., Montmessin, F., Laskar, J., 2007. J. Geophys. Res. 112, E06012, 18 pp. doi:10.1029/2006JE002772]. We suggest a dominant layering mechanism of dust-content variation during

  9. Mangrove vegetation structure in Southeast Brazil from phased array L-band synthetic aperture radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza Pereira, Francisca Rocha; Kampel, Milton; Cunha-Lignon, Marilia

    2016-07-01

    The potential use of phased array type L-band synthetic aperture radar (PALSAR) data for discriminating distinct physiographic mangrove types with different forest structure developments in a subtropical mangrove forest located in Cananéia on the Southern coast of São Paulo, Brazil, is investigated. The basin and fringe physiographic types and the structural development of mangrove vegetation were identified with the application of the Kruskal-Wallis statistical test to the SAR backscatter values of 10 incoherent attributes. The best results to separate basin to fringe types were obtained using copolarized HH, cross-polarized HV, and the biomass index (BMI). Mangrove structural parameters were also estimated using multiple linear regressions. BMI and canopy structure index were used as explanatory variables for canopy height, mean height, and mean diameter at breast height regression models, with significant R2=0.69, 0.73, and 0.67, respectively. The current study indicates that SAR L-band images can be used as a tool to discriminate physiographic types and to characterize mangrove forests. The results are relevant considering the crescent availability of freely distributed SAR images that can be more utilized for analysis, monitoring, and conservation of the mangrove ecosystem.

  10. Structural Analysis of Lunar Subsurface with Chang'E 3 Lunar Penetrating Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yi; Lai, Jialong; Tang, Zesheng

    2015-04-01

    Geological structure of the subsurface of the Moon provides valuable information for our understanding of lunar evolution. Recently, Chang'E 3 has utilized lunar penetrating radar (LPR), which is equipped on the lunar rover named as Yutu, to detect the lunar geological structure in Northern Imbrium (44.1260N, 19.5014W) for the first time. As an in-situ detector, Chang'E 3 LPR has higher horizontal and vertical resolution and less clutter impact compared to spaceborne radars such as Chandrayaan-1 and Kaguya. In this work, we analyze the LPR data at 500 MHz transmission frequency to obtain the shallow subsurface structure of the landing area of Chang'E 3 in Mare Imbrium. First, filter method and amplitude recover algorithms are introduced for data processing to alleviate the adverse effects of environment and system noises and compensate the amplitude losses during signal propagation. Next, based on the processed LPR data, we present the methods to determine the interfaces between layers. A three-layered structure of the shallow surface of the Moon has been observed. The corresponding real part of relative dielectric constant is inverted with deconvolution method. The average dielectric constants of the surface, second and third layer is 2.8, 3.2 and 3.6, respectively. The phenomenon that the average dielectric constant increases with the depth is consistent with prior art. With the obtained dielectric constants, the thickness of each layer can be calculated. One possible geological picture of the observed three-layered structure is presented as follows. The top layer is lunar regolith with its thickness ranging from 0.59 m to 0.9 m. The second layer is the ejecta blanket of the nearby impact crater, and the corresponding thickness is between 3.6m to 3.9m, which is in good agreement with the model of ejecta blanket thickness (height) as a function of distance from the crater center proposed by Melosh in 1989. The third layer is regarded as early lunar regolith with 4

  11. Structures Within the South Polar Cap of Mars from Three-dimensional Radar Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putzig, N. E.; Foss, F. J., II; Campbell, B. A.; Phillips, R. J.; Smith, I. B.

    2016-12-01

    We used Shallow Radar (SHARAD) observations on 2093 orbital passes by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter over Planum Australe to construct a 3-D data volume encompassing the entirety of the Martian south polar layered deposits (SPLD) and their surroundings. Efforts are underway to apply 3-D migration processing, an imaging process that will correct off-nadir returns (clutter) and properly position internal structures while improving the overall signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Clutter mitigation and the structural corrections that migration provides have been particularly effective for a 3-D SHARAD volume over Planum Boreum, notably supporting the mapping of a shallow unconformity linked to the most recent retreat of mid-latitude glaciation (Smith et al., 2016, Science 352) and revealing what appear to be impact craters fully buried within the ice (Putzig et al., 2015, AGU Fall Meeting, Abs. P53G-05). In the preliminary Planum Australe volume, many crater-like structures are also present, adding to the evidence from surface age dating that the SPLD may be an order of magnitude or more older that the 4-Ma-old north polar layered deposits. Migration processing will sharpen this view, and the expected improvement in SNR is likely to reveal structures that are missing or very faint in single-orbit 2-D profiles, such as the deeper sequences within the layered deposits that are often obfuscated by shallow or internal scattering. The clarified views of the polar-cap interiors emerging from each SHARAD 3-D volume advance our ability to map out the interior structures and infer the history of their emplacement. A full assessment of likely buried craters may provide a means to date the deposits that is independent of climate models and goes beyond estimating a surface age. Achieving these objectives would be a major advancement toward the overarching goal of linking the geologic history of the polar layered deposits to climate processes and their history. Figure provides a cut

  12. a Direct Observation of the Asteroid's Structure from Deep Interior to Regolith: Two Radars on the Aim Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herique, A.; Ciarletti, V.; Plettemeier, D.; Grygorczuk, J.

    2016-12-01

    Our knowledge of the internal structure of asteroids entirely relies on inferences from remote sensing observations of the surface and theoretical modeling. Is the body a monolithic piece of rock or a rubble-pile, how high is the porosity? What is the typical size of the constituent blocs? Are these blocs homogeneous or heterogeneous? The body is covered by a regolith whose properties remain largely unknown in term of depth, size distribution and spatial variability. Is it resulting from fine particles re-accretion or from thermal fracturing? After several asteroid orbiting missions, theses crucial and yet basic questions remain open. Direct measurements of asteroid deep interior and regolith structure are needed to better understand the asteroid accretion and dynamical evolution and to provide answers that will directly improve our ability to understand the formation and evolution of the Near Earth Asteroids (NEA), that will allow us to model the mechanisms driving NEA deflection and other risk mitigation techniques. Radars operating at distance from a spacecraft are the only instruments capable of achieving this science objective of characterizing the internal structure and heterogeneity from submetric to global scale for the benefit of science as well as for planetary defense or exploration. The AIM mission will have two complementary radars on-board, operating at different frequencies in order to meet the objectives requirements. The deep interior structure tomography requires a low-frequency radar (LFR) in order to propagate throughout the complete body and characterize the deep interior: this LFR will be a direct heritage of the CONSERT radar designed for the Rosetta mission. Ihe characterization of the first ten meters of the subsurface with a metric resolution to identify layering and to reconnect surface measurements to internal structure will be achieved with a higher frequency radar (HFR). The design of HFR is based on the WISDOM radar developed for the

  13. Enhanced infrared detectors using resonant structures combined with thin type-II superlattice absorbers

    DOE PAGES

    Goldflam, Michael D.; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Olson, Ben V.; ...

    2016-12-22

    Here we examined the spectral responsivity of a 1.77μm thick type-II superlattice based long-wave infrared detector in combination with metallic nanoantennas. Coupling between the Fabry-Pérot cavity formed by the semiconductor layer and the resonant nanoantennas on its surface enables spectral selectivity, while also increasing peak quantum efficiency to over 50%. Electromagnetic simulations reveal that this high responsivity is a direct result of field-enhancement in the absorber layer, enabling significant absorption in spite of the absorber’s subwavelength thickness. Notably, thinning of the absorbing material could ultimately yield lower photodetector noise through a reduction in dark current while improving photocarrier collection efficiency.more » The temperature- and incident-angle-independent spectral response observed in these devices allows for operation over a wide range of temperatures and optical systems. This detector paradigm demonstrates potential benefits to device performance with applications throughout the infrared.« less

  14. Enhanced infrared detectors using resonant structures combined with thin type-II superlattice absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Goldflam, Michael D.; Kadlec, Emil Andrew; Olson, Ben V.; Klem, John F.; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Parameswaran, S.; Coon, Wesley Thomas; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Fortune, Torben Ray; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Wendt, Joel R.; Shaner, Eric A.; Davids, Paul S.; Kim, Jin K.; Peters, David W.

    2016-12-22

    Here we examined the spectral responsivity of a 1.77μm thick type-II superlattice based long-wave infrared detector in combination with metallic nanoantennas. Coupling between the Fabry-Pérot cavity formed by the semiconductor layer and the resonant nanoantennas on its surface enables spectral selectivity, while also increasing peak quantum efficiency to over 50%. Electromagnetic simulations reveal that this high responsivity is a direct result of field-enhancement in the absorber layer, enabling significant absorption in spite of the absorber’s subwavelength thickness. Notably, thinning of the absorbing material could ultimately yield lower photodetector noise through a reduction in dark current while improving photocarrier collection efficiency. The temperature- and incident-angle-independent spectral response observed in these devices allows for operation over a wide range of temperatures and optical systems. This detector paradigm demonstrates potential benefits to device performance with applications throughout the infrared.

  15. A study on single-crystal alloy surface's structure and performance of laser shock peening without absorbent coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Wang; Zhihui, Tang; Chenguang, Liu; ChunZhi, Li; Zhenye, Zhao

    2016-11-01

    in order to determine how the laser shock peening without absorbent coating (LSPwC) affects Ni-base single-crystal superalloy, DD11, the surface structure and hardness gradient of single-crystal alloy after LSPwC of two pulse energies. The result shows that the width of linear structure is in direct proportion to the laser impact energy by observing the "linear" deformed structure through the scanning electron microscope, and the linear structure's length increases when the pulse energy increases from 3J to 5J; the observation by the transmission electron microscope at ×10 000 show s that the linear structure is actually the "line cluster" formed by more than one parallel "fine lines", and the fine lines are along the the [111] direction; the observation under a high resolution shows that fine lines are the single-crystal structure, the twinning plane is (1-11), and the twinning direction is [1-1-2].

  16. Comparison of vertical structures of hurricanes, typhoons, and cyclones as observed by spaceborne precipitation radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekar, V.; Khajonrat, Direk

    2006-12-01

    Precipitation radar (PR) on Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite offers three-dimensional downwardlooking observations of tropical storms. Such observations are very useful to study the structure of tropical storms. This work presents a systematic study of vertical profile of reflectivity (VPR) of hurricanes over North Atlantic, typhoons over North Western Pacific and cyclones over South Indian Ocean. Due to a large number of VPR observation, it is possible to classify them into characteristic profiles so that it can be useful in comparing different structures. In this study, Self Organizing Map (SOM) is used to classify VPR of hurricanes, typhoons and cyclones observed in the years 2000, 2002 and 2003. We have not included the 2001 data because of the orbit transition during that year. More than 100 storms are studied in this work. VPR of the storms are classified into characteristic profiles. Percentages of contribution of each characteristics profile are determined. In addition the microphysical structure including drop size and its concentration is also derived. Comparative study on yearly basis of hurricanes, typhoons and cyclones reveals similarities and systematic differences among them, and those results are presented.

  17. Lightweight NiFe2O4 with controllable 3D network structure and enhanced microwave absorbing properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fen; Wang, Xing; Zhu, Jianfeng; Yang, Haibo; Kong, Xingang; Liu, Xiao

    2016-11-01

    3D network structure NiFe2O4 was successfully synthesized by a templated salt precipitation method using PMMA colloid crystal as templates. The morphology, phase composition and microwave absorbing properties of as-prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vector network analyzer (VNA), and so on. The results revealed that the 3D network structure was configurated with smooth spherical walls composed of NiFe2O4 nanocrystals and their pore diameters being in the range of 80–250 nm. The microwave absorption properties of the 3D network structure NiFe2O4 were crucially determined by the special structure. The synergy of intrinsic magnetic loss of magnetic NiFe2O4 and the interfacial polarization enhanced by 3D network structure and the interaction of multiple mechanisms endowed the sample with the feature of strong absorption, broad bandwidth and lightweight. There is more than one valley in the reflection loss curves and the maximum reflection loss is 27.5 dB with a bandwidth of 4 GHz. Moreover, the 3D network structure NiFe2O4 show a greater reflection loss with the same thickness comparing to the ordinary NiFe2O4 nanoparticles, which could achieve the feature of lightweight of the microwave absorbing materials.

  18. Lightweight NiFe2O4 with controllable 3D network structure and enhanced microwave absorbing properties

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fen; Wang, Xing; Zhu, Jianfeng; Yang, Haibo; Kong, Xingang; Liu, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    3D network structure NiFe2O4 was successfully synthesized by a templated salt precipitation method using PMMA colloid crystal as templates. The morphology, phase composition and microwave absorbing properties of as-prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vector network analyzer (VNA), and so on. The results revealed that the 3D network structure was configurated with smooth spherical walls composed of NiFe2O4 nanocrystals and their pore diameters being in the range of 80–250 nm. The microwave absorption properties of the 3D network structure NiFe2O4 were crucially determined by the special structure. The synergy of intrinsic magnetic loss of magnetic NiFe2O4 and the interfacial polarization enhanced by 3D network structure and the interaction of multiple mechanisms endowed the sample with the feature of strong absorption, broad bandwidth and lightweight. There is more than one valley in the reflection loss curves and the maximum reflection loss is 27.5 dB with a bandwidth of 4 GHz. Moreover, the 3D network structure NiFe2O4 show a greater reflection loss with the same thickness comparing to the ordinary NiFe2O4 nanoparticles, which could achieve the feature of lightweight of the microwave absorbing materials. PMID:27897209

  19. Lightweight NiFe2O4 with controllable 3D network structure and enhanced microwave absorbing properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fen; Wang, Xing; Zhu, Jianfeng; Yang, Haibo; Kong, Xingang; Liu, Xiao

    2016-11-29

    3D network structure NiFe2O4 was successfully synthesized by a templated salt precipitation method using PMMA colloid crystal as templates. The morphology, phase composition and microwave absorbing properties of as-prepared samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), vector network analyzer (VNA), and so on. The results revealed that the 3D network structure was configurated with smooth spherical walls composed of NiFe2O4 nanocrystals and their pore diameters being in the range of 80-250 nm. The microwave absorption properties of the 3D network structure NiFe2O4 were crucially determined by the special structure. The synergy of intrinsic magnetic loss of magnetic NiFe2O4 and the interfacial polarization enhanced by 3D network structure and the interaction of multiple mechanisms endowed the sample with the feature of strong absorption, broad bandwidth and lightweight. There is more than one valley in the reflection loss curves and the maximum reflection loss is 27.5 dB with a bandwidth of 4 GHz. Moreover, the 3D network structure NiFe2O4 show a greater reflection loss with the same thickness comparing to the ordinary NiFe2O4 nanoparticles, which could achieve the feature of lightweight of the microwave absorbing materials.

  20. Optical theory of partially coherent thin-film energy-absorbing structures for power detectors and imaging arrays.

    PubMed

    Withington, Stafford; Thomas, Christopher N

    2009-06-01

    Free-space power detectors often have energy absorbing structures comprising multilayer systems of patterned thin films. We show that for any system of interacting resistive films, the expectation value of the absorbed power is given by the contraction of two tensor fields: one describes the spatial state of coherence of the incoming radiation, the other the state of coherence to which the detector is sensitive. Equivalently, the natural modes of the optical field scatter power into the natural modes of the detector. We describe a procedure for determining the amplitude, phase, and polarization patterns of a detector's optical modes and their relative responsivities. The procedure gives the state of coherence of the currents flowing in the system and leads to important conceptual insights into the way the pixels of an imaging array interact and extract information from an optical field.

  1. 0.1-20 THz ultra-broadband perfect absorber via a flat multi-layer structure.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gongjie; Zhang, Jun; Zang, Xiaofei; Sugihara, Okihiro; Zhao, Hongwei; Cai, Bin

    2016-10-03

    An ultra-broadband perfect absorber based on graded-index mechanism is designed and fabricated. The perfect absorber is comprised of a heavily-doped silicon absorption substrate and a flat six-layer antireflective structure. The refractive index of each layer was widely tuned by hollow polystyrene microsphere and TiO2 nanoparticle dopants, which can offer a gradually changed refractive index profile from 1.3 to 2.9. The experimental results show that 98% absorption can be achieved within the range of 0.1-20 THz. Moreover, the high absorption efficiency as well as the ultra-broad range can maintain for incident angle from 0 to 75° by the theoretical simulation.

  2. Multiple-layer Radiation Absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Robert M. L.; Baker, Bonnie Sue

    A structure is discussed for absorbing incident radiation, either electromagnetic (EM) or sound. Such a surface structure is needed, for example, in a highly sensitive high-frequency gravitational wave or HFGW detector such as the Li-Baker. The multi-layer absorber, which is discussed, is constructed with metamaterial [MM] layer or layers on top. This MM is configured for a specific EM or sound radiation frequency band, which absorbs incident EM or sound radiation without reflection. Below these top MM layers is a substrate of conventional EM-radiation absorbing or acoustical absorbing reflective material, such as an array of pyramidal foam absorbers. Incident radiation is partially absorbed by the MM layer or layers, and then it is more absorbed by the lower absorbing and reflecting substrate. The remaining reflected radiation is even further absorbed by the MM layers on its "way out_ so that essentially all of the incident radiation is absorbed _ a nearly perfect black-body absorber. In a HFGW detector a substrate, such as foam absorbers, may outgas into a high vacuum and reduce the capability of the vacuum-producing equipment, however, the layers above this lowest substrate will seal the absorbing and reflecting substrate from any external vacuum. The layers also serve to seal the absorbing material against air or water flow past the surfaces of aircraft, watercraft or submarines. Other applications for such a multiple-level radiation absorber include stealth aircraft, missiles and submarines.

  3. A wireless multifunctional radar-based displacement sensor for structural health monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Jennifer A.; Li, Changzhi; Gu, Changzhan; Hernandez, Justin C.

    2011-04-01

    Wireless smart sensor technology offers many opportunities to advance infrastructure monitoring and maintenance by providing pertinent information regarding the condition of a structure at a lower cost and higher density than traditional monitoring approaches. Many civil structures, especially long-span bridges, have low fundamental response frequencies that are challenging to accurately measure with sensors that are suitable for integration with low-cost, low-profile, and power-constrained wireless sensor networks. Existing displacement sensing technology is either not practical for wireless sensor implementations, does not provide the necessary accuracy, or is simply too cost-prohibitive for dense sensor deployments. This paper presents the development and integration of an accurate, low-cost radar-based sensor for the enhancement of low-frequency vibration-based bridge monitoring and the measurement of static bridge deflections. The sensors utilize both a nonlinear vibrometer mode and an arctangent-demodulated interferometry mode to achieve sub-millimeter measurement accuracy for both periodic and non-periodic displacement. Experimental validation results are presented and discussed.

  4. Using ground-penetrating radar for assessing the structural needs of asphalt pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plati, C.; Loizos, A.

    2012-09-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is a nondestructive testing (NDT) approach for pavement investigation that has been developed and improved upon over the past 30 years. This paper aimed to document how the GPR technique could be incorporated successfully into the process of assessing the structural needs of asphalt pavements. Background information is provided regarding the usage of GPR for the evaluation of asphalt road pavements. After outlining the GPR usage, a framework is developed, which is associated primarily with the efficient use of GPR for pavement inspection along a highway and secondarily with the supply of computational tools for GPR data to execute the complex processes to define the structural needs of the pavement. The effectiveness of the suggested framework for pavement preservation is demonstrated through a case study to estimate the required overlay thickness along a highway, which is part of a public private partnership project. The related results produce evidence in support of the statement that through GPR implementation, the intervention works can be optimised to benefit both the road users and the road operators.

  5. Case Study of a Hailstorm in Colorado. Part I: Radar Echo Structure and Evolution.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foote, G. Brant; Wade, Charles G.

    1982-12-01

    A detailed description is given of the morphology and evolution of a moderate hailstorm in terms primarily of quantitative S-band reflectivity factor measurements. During the early phase of the storm's life its movement was strongly influenced by the propagation of new cells on its right flank in a manner typical of `organized' multicell norms. During its later phase, when it was being intensively observed by research aircraft and Doppler radar, the new cells tended to form on the front flank of the storm in a manner similar to that analysed for the multicellular Raymer storm that has been discussed extensively in the literature. In the present case, however, emphasis is given not to the discrete nature of the cellular propagation, but rather to the quasi-steady overall structure that is comparable in certain ways to previous descriptions of supercell storms, with transient weak-echo vaults and a pronounced forward overhang in the echo structure. The present storm was smaller and less intense than the archetypal supercell, and inferred pulsations in updraft intensity indicate a degree of unsteadiness not generally acknowledged for supercell storms. It is suggested that the present regime represents the extension of a steady airflow pattern to environmental conditions with higher instability or weaker shear.

  6. Analysis of beta-carotene absorbance for studying structural properties of human plasma low-density lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Krisko, Anita; Piantanida, Ivo; Kveder, Marina; Pifat, Greta

    2004-08-01

    A novel spectrophotometric assay for monitoring structural rearrangements of native low-density lipoproteins (LDL) is proposed. The approach is based on the analysis of the visible light absorbance maximum of lipoproteins at approximately 461 nm assigned to beta-carotene situated in the hydrophobic parts of LDL. It offers a direct method to study the surface-interior coupling of the lipoprotein particle under physiological conditions. The detected signal is intrinsic to LDL and responsible for the most of the beta-carotene signal from the whole plasma. The negligible interference of beta-carotene absorbance due to the high-density lipoproteins is experimentally verified. Since beta-carotene absorbance belongs to the visible spectral region, no spectral overlapping/artifacts in plasma are expected. The signal sensitivity has been studied through conformational changes of LDL induced by ionic strength, by temperature, and by ligand binding. The results of caffeine binding to LDL indicate that there could be only one dominant type of binding site for caffeine on LDL particles. It can be concluded that visible spectrum characteristics of beta-carotene molecules offer advantages in LDL ligand binding studies which can possibly be extended to monitor the interactions of LDL directly in plasma.

  7. Wind and Temperature Structures in the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere with the MU Radar and Optical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Takuji; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Kawahara, Takuya D.; Ejiri, Mitsumu K.

    The MU radar meteor echo observation with 1 MW transmission power has been used to derive precise horizontal wind velocities in the MLT region (80 - 100 km). A new receiving system with a 29 digital quadrature detection was attached to the MU radar in 2004. We have applied the new MU radar system for meteor echo observation. Coherently integrated 25 channel receiving signals improved the ] SNR of meteor echoes significantly, and meteor echo number became as large as 50,000 per a day, which is about five times of previous meteor observations with the MU radar. The high-rate meteor echoes were utilized to detect horizontal distribution of wind velocity field of about 50 km scale. The limited area for determining wind velocity significantly changed the characteristics of wind velocity variation within the field of view (FOV) of 300 - 400 km, and enabled to detect wind perturbations due to horizontally propagating waves such as gravity waves. The comparison with the airglow imaging has shown that similar wave structures were observed both the radar and the imager, suggesting capability of simultaneous observation of an identical wave. A sodium temperature lidar has also been extensively operated since August 2007 in order to derive atmospheric stability of the background of the wave propagation. External receiving systems for measuring forward scatter of meteor echoes are being built, which also will contribute to clarification of detailed horizontal/vertical structure of MLT region. In this paper, the recent observational results on gravity waves and their interactions, temperature variations and its effects on the MLT dynamics and chemistry will be reported as well as introduction of development of the systems.

  8. Graphene, microscale metallic mesh, and transparent dielectric hybrid structure for excellent transparent electromagnetic interference shielding and absorbing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zhengang; Ma, Limin; Tan, Jiubin; Wang, Heyan; Ding, Xuemei

    2017-06-01

    A high-performance transparent electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding material based on a graphene/metallic mesh/transparent dielectric (GMTD) hybrid structure is designed and characterized. It consists of stacked graphene and metallic mesh layers, with neighboring layers separated by a quartz-glass substrsate. The GMTD hybrid structure combines the microwave-reflecting characteristics of the metallic mesh and the microwave-absorbing characteristics of graphene to achieve simultaneously high visible transmittance, strong microwave shielding effectiveness (SE), and low microwave reflection. Experiments show that a double-graphene and double-metallic mesh GMTD hybrid structure with a mesh periodicity of 160 µm provides microwave SE exceeding 47.79 dB in the K u-band, and an SE exceeding 32.12 dB in the K a-band, with a maximum value of 37.78 dB at 26.5 GHz. SE by absorption exceeds 30.78 dB in the K a-band, with a maximum value of 34.55 dB at 26.5 GHz, while maintaining a normalized visible transmittance of ~85% at 700 nm. This remarkable performance favors the application of the proposed structure as a transparent microwave shield and absorber, and offers a new strategy for transparent EMI shielding.

  9. Ultrathin multi-slit metamaterial as excellent sound absorber: Influence of micro-structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, S. W.; Meng, H.; Xin, F. X.; Lu, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    An ultrathin (subwavelength) hierarchy multi-slit metamaterial with simultaneous negative effective density and negative compressibility is proposed to absorb sound over a wide frequency range. Different from conventional acoustic metamaterials having only negative real parts of acoustic parameters, the imaginary parts of effective density and compressibility are both negative for the proposed metamaterial, which result in superior viscous and thermal dissipation of sound energy. By combining the slit theory of sound absorption with the double porosity theory for porous media, a theoretical model is developed to investigate the sound absorption performance of the metamaterial. To verify the model, a finite element model is established to calculate the effective density, compressibility, and sound absorption of the metamaterial. It is theoretically and numerically confirmed that, upon introducing micro-slits into the meso-slits matrix, the multi-slit metamaterial possesses indeed negative imaginary parts of effective density and compressibility. The influence of micro-slits on the acoustical performance of the metamaterial is analyzed in the context of its specific surface area and static flow resistivity. This work shows great potential of multi-slit metamaterials in noise control applications that require both small volume and small weight of sound-absorbing materials.

  10. 3D Structure of the Heavy Precipitation in South China by Dual-Doppler Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haiguang, Z.

    2010-09-01

    As a result of the effect of the trough at 500hPa, the shear line at 850hPa and the low level cold air, it produced a heavy precipitation in the north region of Guangdong province and Pearl River Delta in China, up to 199.5mm rainfall from 01LST to 04LST and 99.1mm rainfall on 02LST 7 May 2010 at Wushan, 107.4mm rainfall on 02LST 7 May at Dongguan station. The one hour precipitation at Wushan has broken the record. The three dimensional wind fields were retrieved by the volume scan data of the dual-Doppler radar located in Guangzhou and Shenzhen cities. The structure evolution of the 3D wind fields of the heavy rainfall was investigated. It is a convective cloud precipitation as the radar echo analyses shown. The reflectivity is very strong at the heavy precipitation period time that the maximum value is more than 55dBZ. The supercell, bow-echo and the squall line located on the MβCS played an important role on this heavy rainfall. The dual-Doppler retrieval wind show that the heavy rainfall was induced by the meso-β-scale convergence line and the meso-β-scale vortex at the low and medium levels. The meso-β-scale convergence line triggered and maintained the heavy rainfall. The meso-β-scale convergence line moved southeastward. It stayed at Guangzhou and Dongguan city for period of time. There were strong convergence and vorticity at the low and medium levels of the MβCS. The rainband moved southeastward while the convergence line propagated along the same direction. Acknowledgements The work was supported by the Grant Agency of the National Science Foundation of China (grant 40975015, 40605014), the Grant Agency of the National Key Basic Research and Development Project of China (grant 2004CB418305), and the foundation of state key laboratory of severe weather.

  11. Reduction of the radar cross section of arbitrarily shaped cavity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, R.; Ling, H.; Lee, S. W.

    1987-08-01

    The problem of the reduction of the radar cross section (RCS) of open-ended cavities was studied. The issues investigated were reduction through lossy coating materials on the inner cavity wall and reduction through shaping of the cavity. A method was presented to calculate the RCS of any arbitrarily shaped structure in order to study the shaping problem. The limitations of this method were also addressed. The modal attenuation was studied in a multilayered coated waveguide. It was shown that by employing two layers of coating, it was possible to achieve an increase in both the magnitude of attenuation and the frequency band of effectiveness. The numerical method used in finding the roots of the characteristic equation breaks down when the coating thickness is very lossy and large in terms of wavelength. A new method of computing the RCS of an arbitrary cavity was applied to study the effects of longitudinal bending on RCS reduction. The ray and modal descriptions for the fields in a parallel plate waveguide were compared. To extend the range of validity of the Shooting and Bouncing Ray (SBR) method, the simple ray picture must be modified to account for the beam blurring.

  12. Reduction of the radar cross section of arbitrarily shaped cavity structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, R.; Ling, H.; Lee, S. W.

    1987-01-01

    The problem of the reduction of the radar cross section (RCS) of open-ended cavities was studied. The issues investigated were reduction through lossy coating materials on the inner cavity wall and reduction through shaping of the cavity. A method was presented to calculate the RCS of any arbitrarily shaped structure in order to study the shaping problem. The limitations of this method were also addressed. The modal attenuation was studied in a multilayered coated waveguide. It was shown that by employing two layers of coating, it was possible to achieve an increase in both the magnitude of attenuation and the frequency band of effectiveness. The numerical method used in finding the roots of the characteristic equation breaks down when the coating thickness is very lossy and large in terms of wavelength. A new method of computing the RCS of an arbitrary cavity was applied to study the effects of longitudinal bending on RCS reduction. The ray and modal descriptions for the fields in a parallel plate waveguide were compared. To extend the range of validity of the Shooting and Bouncing Ray (SBR) method, the simple ray picture must be modified to account for the beam blurring.

  13. Accelerated life assessment of coating on the radar structure components in coastal environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhe; Ming, ZhiMao

    2016-07-04

    This paper aimed to build an accelerated life test scheme and carry out quantitative analysis between accelerated life test in the laboratory and actual service for the coating composed of epoxy primer and polyurethane paint on structure components of some kind of radar served in the coastal environment of South China Sea. The accelerated life test scheme was built based on the service environment and failure analysis of the coating. The quantitative analysis between accelerated life test and actual service was conducted by comparing the gloss loss, discoloration, chalking, blistering, cracking and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the coating. The main factors leading to the coating failure were ultraviolet radiation, temperature, moisture, salt fog and loads, the accelerated life test included ultraviolet radiation, damp heat, thermal shock, fatigue and salt spray. The quantitative relationship was that one cycle of the accelerated life test was equal to actual service for one year. It was established that one cycle of the accelerated life test was equal to actual service for one year. It provided a precise way to predict actual service life of newly developed coatings for the manufacturer.

  14. Adaptive reconstruction of radar reflectivity maps based on their space-time structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Shinju; Berenguer, Marc

    2013-04-01

    The production of Radar Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) requires processing the observations to ensure their quality and its conversion into the variable of interest (i.e. precipitation rates). This processing is done through a chain of algorithms applied to mitigate the sources of uncertainty affecting radar observations. Some algorithms involve the reconstruction of the meteorological signal in areas where the signal is lost or strongly contaminated, for instance in areas affected by ground, sea clutter, total beam blockage or severe path attenuation by heavy rain. For post-processing of radar uncorrected moment data, the reconstruction has been done with spatial interpolation after the identification of clutter based on the analysis of statistical properties of radar measurements. The aim of this work has been to develop an improved reconstruction method that adapts to the different rainfall situations by using the information of the time and space variability of the rainfall field. The n-dimensional semi-variogram is formulated to reconstruct the radar fields in a n-Dimensional Ordinary Kriging framework: i.e., (i) the horizontal plane, (ii) the closest non-contaminated PPI, and (iii) the closest radar volume scan in time. The last one takes into account the effect of the motion that is very similar to the extrapolation of reflectivity observations to the future in many nowcasting algorithms. Each formulation of the reconstruction methods and their combinations have been studied. The radar fields have been reconstructed over the areas labeled as clutter (with a fuzzy logic algorithm) under different rainfall situations, including scattered convection, organized convection, and widespread precipitation. Also, the comparison between the reconstructed radar rainfall accumulations and collocated raingauge observations have been used for the evaluation.

  15. Transitive, Anti-Symmetric Relational Attributes in Structural Description Matching with Applications to Radar Target Identification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    Based Parametric Estimation .... ............. 18 Ii 2.2.1 The Frequency Domain Parametric Model ...... ... 18 2.2.2 The Range Profile . . . .1.9...3.7 Metric Inter-Node-Set Distances ..... ............... 58 4 APPLICATION TO RADAR OBJECT IDENTIFICATION 62 4.1 Parametric Estimation as a...derived from it. 7 Segmentation of the radar measurement vector is accomplished via a parametric estimation procedure. The chosen procedure is a

  16. Response attenuation in a large-scale structure subjected to blast excitation utilizing a system of essentially nonlinear vibration absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierschem, Nicholas E.; Hubbard, Sean A.; Luo, Jie; Fahnestock, Larry A.; Spencer, Billie F.; McFarland, D. Michael; Quinn, D. Dane; Vakakis, Alexander F.; Bergman, Lawrence A.

    2017-02-01

    Limiting peak stresses and strains in a structure subjected to high-energy, short-duration transient loadings, such as blasts, is a challenging problem, largely due to the well-known insensitivity of the first few cycles of the structural response to damping. Linear isolation, while a potential solution, requires a very low fundamental natural frequency to be effective, resulting in large nearly-rigid body displacement of the structure, while linear vibration absorbers have little or no effect on the early-time response where relative motions, and thus stresses and strains, are at their highest levels. The problem has become increasingly important in recent years with the expectation of blast-resistance as a design requirement in new construction. In this paper, the problem is examined experimentally and computationally in the context of offset-blast loading applied to a custom-built nine story steel frame structure. A fully-passive response mitigation system consisting of six lightweight, essentially nonlinear vibration absorbers (termed nonlinear energy sinks - NESs) is optimized and deployed on the upper two floors of this structure. Two NESs have vibro-impact nonlinearities and the other four possess smooth but essentially nonlinear stiffnesses. Results of the computational and experimental study demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed passive nonlinear mitigation system to rapidly and efficiently attenuate the global structural response, even at early time (i.e., starting at the first response cycle), thus minimizing the peak demand on the structure. This is achieved by nonlinear redistribution of the blast energy within the modal space through low-to-high energy scattering due to the action of the NESs. The experimental results validate the theoretical predictions.

  17. Design and model of wideband absorber made of ultrathin metamaterial structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellier, Alexandre; Teperik, Tatiana V.; Burokur, Shah Nawaz; Sabanowski, Guy; Piau, Gérard-Pascal; de Lustrac, André

    2014-08-01

    A planar microwave ultrathin broadband absorber is proposed. It is composed of metallic patterns arranged on a dielectric material which is backed by a copper plate. The patterns of different dimensions allow to judiciously design absorption peaks at specific frequencies of interest. These peaks are due to the mode resonances of the cavities formed by the metallic patches, the dielectric substrate and the copper plate. In order to widen the absorption bandwidth, patterns of different dimensions are used, together with the different modes of these cavities. Numerical and experimental results are presented to validate the proposed method at microwave frequencies. It is also shown that the use of a composite air dielectric substrate supporting the metallic patterns helps to increase the absorption level.

  18. Producing Science-Ready Radar Datasets for the Retrieval of Forest Structure Parameters from Backscatter: Correcting for Terrain Topography and Changes in Vegetation Reflectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simard, M.; Riel, Bryan; Hensley, S.; Lavalle, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Radar backscatter data contain both geometric and radiometric distortions due to underlying topography and the radar viewing geometry. Our objective is to develop a radiometric correction algorithm specific to the UAVSAR system configuration that would improve retrieval of forest structure parameters. UAVSAR is an airborne Lband radar capable of repeat?pass interferometry producing images with a spatial resolution of 5m. It is characterized by an electronically steerable antenna to compensate for aircraft attitude. Thus, the computation of viewing angles (i.e. look, incidence and projection) must include aircraft attitude angles (i.e. yaw, pitch and roll) in addition to the antenna steering angle. In this presentation, we address two components of radiometric correction: area projection and vegetation reflectivity. The first correction is applied by normalization of the radar backscatter by the local ground area illuminated by the radar beam. The second is a correction due to changes in vegetation reflectivity with viewing geometry.

  19. Producing Science-Ready Radar Datasets for the Retrieval of Forest Structure Parameters from Backscatter: Correcting for Terrain Topography and Changes in Vegetation Reflectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simard, M.; Riel, Bryan; Hensley, S.; Lavalle, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Radar backscatter data contain both geometric and radiometric distortions due to underlying topography and the radar viewing geometry. Our objective is to develop a radiometric correction algorithm specific to the UAVSAR system configuration that would improve retrieval of forest structure parameters. UAVSAR is an airborne Lband radar capable of repeat?pass interferometry producing images with a spatial resolution of 5m. It is characterized by an electronically steerable antenna to compensate for aircraft attitude. Thus, the computation of viewing angles (i.e. look, incidence and projection) must include aircraft attitude angles (i.e. yaw, pitch and roll) in addition to the antenna steering angle. In this presentation, we address two components of radiometric correction: area projection and vegetation reflectivity. The first correction is applied by normalization of the radar backscatter by the local ground area illuminated by the radar beam. The second is a correction due to changes in vegetation reflectivity with viewing geometry.

  20. Six-band terahertz metamaterial absorber based on the combination of multiple-order responses of metallic patches in a dual-layer stacked resonance structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ben-Xin; Wang, Gui-Zhen; Sang, Tian; Wang, Ling-Ling

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on a numerical study of the six-band metamaterial absorber composed of two alternating stack of metallic-dielectric layers on top of a continuous metallic plane. Six obvious resonance peaks with high absorption performance (average larger than 99.37%) are realized. The first, third, fifth, and the second, fourth, sixth resonance absorption bands are attributed to the multiple-order responses (i.e., the 1-, 3- and 5-order responses) of the bottom- and top-layer of the structure, respectively, and thus the absorption mechanism of six-band absorber is due to the combination of two sets of the multiple-order resonances of these two layers. Besides, the size changes of the metallic layers have the ability to tune the frequencies of the six-band absorber. Employing the results, we also present a six-band polarization tunable absorber through varying the sizes of the structure in two orthogonal polarization directions. Moreover, nine-band terahertz absorber can be achieved by using a three-layer stacked structure. Simulation results indicate that the absorber possesses nine distinct resonance bands, and average absorptivities of them are larger than 94.03%. The six-band or nine-band absorbers obtained here have potential applications in many optoelectronic and engineering technology areas.

  1. Six-band terahertz metamaterial absorber based on the combination of multiple-order responses of metallic patches in a dual-layer stacked resonance structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ben-Xin; Wang, Gui-Zhen; Sang, Tian; Wang, Ling-Ling

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports on a numerical study of the six-band metamaterial absorber composed of two alternating stack of metallic-dielectric layers on top of a continuous metallic plane. Six obvious resonance peaks with high absorption performance (average larger than 99.37%) are realized. The first, third, fifth, and the second, fourth, sixth resonance absorption bands are attributed to the multiple-order responses (i.e., the 1-, 3- and 5-order responses) of the bottom- and top-layer of the structure, respectively, and thus the absorption mechanism of six-band absorber is due to the combination of two sets of the multiple-order resonances of these two layers. Besides, the size changes of the metallic layers have the ability to tune the frequencies of the six-band absorber. Employing the results, we also present a six-band polarization tunable absorber through varying the sizes of the structure in two orthogonal polarization directions. Moreover, nine-band terahertz absorber can be achieved by using a three-layer stacked structure. Simulation results indicate that the absorber possesses nine distinct resonance bands, and average absorptivities of them are larger than 94.03%. The six-band or nine-band absorbers obtained here have potential applications in many optoelectronic and engineering technology areas. PMID:28120897

  2. Quality investigation of building structure using ground penetrating radar (GPR) as an early study to prevent severe structural damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumai, M. Fariz; Fernando, Stephen; Nugroho, Gatot; Natania, Kana; Widodo

    2017-07-01

    Many infrastructures in Indonesia suffered damage in a short period of time. It proves that there are still many buildings in Indonesia which have questionable quality so a method is needed for checking the quality of the building. Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is a method used to describe the structure of the building on the inside that cannot be seen from the outside in this case Parahyangan Reksa Raga (PASAGA) Bridge was examined with 19.7 m × 3.3 m × 1.5 m dimension. Thismethod uses propagation of electromagnetic wave, which will give Radargram response inside a building based on the characteristics of the medium such as magnetic permeability, electric permittivity and electrical conductivity. GPR method is one of geophysical method which is effective, efficient, and environmentally friendly. The measurements were carried out using MALA RAMAC X3M device with frequency 800 MHz. The results show thatindication of fractures was found at less than 1 m depth in the structure from the Radargram display of PASAGA Bridge and supported by the observation data on the surface.

  3. Electromagnetic power absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwasaki, R. S. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A structure is presented with a surface portion of dielectric material which passes electromagnetic radiation and with a portion below the surface which includes material that absorbs the radiation, the face of the structure being formed with numerous steep ridges. The steepness of the dielectric material results in a high proportion of the electromagnetic energy passing through the surface for absorption by the absorbing material under the surface. A backing of aluminum or other highly heat-conductive and reflective material lies under the face and has very steep protuberances supporting the absorbing and dielectric materials.

  4. Using Ground Penetrating Radar to Image Paleotopography and Structural Controls at Coral Pink Sand Dunes, Kane County, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozar, E. J.; Bradford, J. H.; Ford, R. L.; Wilkins, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Coral Pink Sand Dunes (CPSD) are one of the largest dune fields in the Great Basin-Colorado Plateau Transition Zone. The dune field rests on Navajo Sandstone, and is bisected by the Sevier Normal Fault, which also forms the bedrock escarpment along the eastern boundary of the lower dune field (LDF). Limited ground penetrating radar (GPR) collected previously, as well as recent ground-based LiDAR data and geomorphic observations, suggest that underlying bedrock is topographically lower in the center of the LDF than on its margins. In order to image the dune-bedrock interface and any structures contained within the bedrock, including buried faults, 50-MHz and 100-MHz GPR antennae with 400-V transmitters were used to conduct over 25 transects, totaling several kilometers, across the LDF. We recorded radar reflections at depths of up to 30 m within the bedrock beneath the modern dunes. Outcrops and/or shallow boreholes along some transects provide ground truth for dune-bedrock contacts. The resulting radar profiles suggest at least two antithetic fault zones within the LDF that, in places, appear to control the location of smaller dunes. Further examination of the relationship between these fault zones and dune forms, as imaged with LiDAR, will help inform whether or not these structural controls affect variation in dune type and patterning across the LDF, and may also explain why the CPSD exist in this location.

  5. Characteristics of the structure change based on radar parameters and lightning activity on a big hailstorm case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Xiaoyuan; Zhang, Yijun; Sun, Xiaolei

    2017-04-01

    The observational data from Doppler radar, Safir3000 three-dimensional lightning position system, microwave radiameter,and from high-density meteorology automatic stations were used to analyze a big hail case which connected with a sea breeze-front on the west coast of the Bohai bay. The characteristic of merger and trailer process, quantitative structures change based on radar parameters and lightning activity were studied. At present China,the Doppler radar is the most effective tool of obtaining the data of thunderstorm structure currently and the relationship between the change and hailing and lightening activities basing on radar echoes during the research on hazard weathers are used. Aiming at achieving the quantificational indicators, some new parameters of radar are applied to reflect effectively the special change of thunderstorms, inner dynamic and water-bored materials and so on.For the vertical distribution of these quantities, the higher the parameters are and the stronger the updraft are. Echo at the temperature level determines the nature of water particles, that is, it mainly is water drops or ice crystals. The height of the echo center reflected the height of the water particles in cloud sets. The result was based on the following respects: Firstly, the humid and cold sea breeze convergence line in local instable region on ground was the mechanism for storms' triggering and developing with the time of early warning for hailstorm of 2 h. Secondly, there were two merger types of γ-mesoscale convective cells ,that is,the independence type, and the feeder type. As cells merging, the cloud bridge between two cells emerged at the height of 4-6km or 9-10km . Thirdly, at the time of merging, the development of storm was limited and hailfall and the peak of lightning emerged after merger.Fourthly, the relationship the evolution of quantificational storm 3D-structure ( time-height cross sections of the radar parameters of upFV40?downFV40?ETS11 etc.) with

  6. Multispectral metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Grant, J; McCrindle, I J H; Li, C; Cumming, D R S

    2014-03-01

    We present the simulation, implementation, and measurement of a multispectral metamaterial absorber (MSMMA) and show that we can realize a simple absorber structure that operates in the mid-IR and terahertz (THz) bands. By embedding an IR metamaterial absorber layer into a standard THz metamaterial absorber stack, a narrowband resonance is induced at a wavelength of 4.3 μm. This resonance is in addition to the THz metamaterial absorption resonance at 109 μm (2.75 THz). We demonstrate the inherent scalability and versatility of our MSMMA by describing a second device whereby the MM-induced IR absorption peak frequency is tuned by varying the IR absorber geometry. Such a MSMMA could be coupled with a suitable sensor and formed into a focal plane array, enabling multispectral imaging.

  7. Estimating Forest Vertical Structure from Multialtitude, Fixed-Baseline Radar Interferometric and Polarimetric Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Treuhaft, Robert N.; Law, Beverly E.; Siqueira, Paul R.

    2000-01-01

    Parameters describing the vertical structure of forests, for example tree height, height-to-base-of-live-crown, underlying topography, and leaf area density, bear on land-surface, biogeochemical, and climate modeling efforts. Single, fixed-baseline interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) normalized cross-correlations constitute two observations from which to estimate forest vertical structure parameters: Cross-correlation amplitude and phase. Multialtitude INSAR observations increase the effective number of baselines potentially enabling the estimation of a larger set of vertical-structure parameters. Polarimetry and polarimetric interferometry can further extend the observation set. This paper describes the first acquisition of multialtitude INSAR for the purpose of estimating the parameters describing a vegetated land surface. These data were collected over ponderosa pine in central Oregon near longitude and latitude -121 37 25 and 44 29 56. The JPL interferometric TOPSAR system was flown at the standard 8-km altitude, and also at 4-km and 2-km altitudes, in a race track. A reference line including the above coordinates was maintained at 35 deg for both the north-east heading and the return southwest heading, at all altitudes. In addition to the three altitudes for interferometry, one line was flown with full zero-baseline polarimetry at the 8-km altitude. A preliminary analysis of part of the data collected suggests that they are consistent with one of two physical models describing the vegetation: 1) a single-layer, randomly oriented forest volume with a very strong ground return or 2) a multilayered randomly oriented volume; a homogeneous, single-layer model with no ground return cannot account for the multialtitude correlation amplitudes. Below the inconsistency of the data with a single-layer model is followed by analysis scenarios which include either the ground or a layered structure. The ground returns suggested by this preliminary analysis seem

  8. An Introduction to Radar Absorbent Materials (RAM),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    transition metal ion, a combination of two or more such ions or alterna- tively a combination of mono- and tri- valent ions that maintains overall... valent ions. Not only does the wide variety of compositions lead to a wide variation in the electromagnetic material constants of ferrites, but, even... Giordano , "Measurement of Standing Wave Ratio", ch. 2 in M Sucher, J Fox (Eds) "Handbook of Microwave Measurements, Vol 1", Polytechnic Press of

  9. Determination of vegetation canopy structure and biomass using a fully polarimetric repeat-pass L-band radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, M.; Lavalle, M.; Pinto, N.; Hensley, S.; Dubayah, R.

    2011-12-01

    We use the UAVSAR, an airborne fully polarimetric L-band radar system, to estimate forest canopy structure and biomass through radar backscatter and repeat-pass interferometry. UAVSAR provides backscatter images with a spatial resolution of 5m and is capable of repeat-pass interferometry. Our analysis also includes data from LVIS (Laser vegetation Imaging sensor), which serve as a validation dataset but also provide a priori knowledge for our forest structure model. LVIS is a laser altimeter providing a spatially dense sampling of full waveforms with a footprint of 25m. During the UAVSAR data collection campaigns, we collected weather (wind, precipitation and temperature) as well as forest structure data in a total of 95 plots. The plot measurements included, trunk diameter at breast height, tree height and species as well as terrain slopes. These field data were used to estimate canopy density, height and biomass at the stand level. The main objective of the UAVSAR campaign was to characterize, quantify and mitigate the impact of temporal decorrelation on the estimation of canopy height by radar interferometry. However, we also compare the radar backscatter with the field estimates of stand biomass, to assess its potential. On the other hand, a polarimetric interferometric model is used to estimate vegetation height from radar interferometry (polinSAR). The polinSAR model relies on the measurement of correlation and phase as different polarizations. However, since UAVSAR is a repeat-pass interferometric system, slight changes within the canopy (e.g. due to weather and motion of scatterers) between radar acquisitions tend to decorrelate successive radar images. This effect can be taken into account within the polinSAR model but strongly depends on the assumed temporal decorrelation. We designed the UAVSAR campaign to quantify temporal decorrelation. Within a period of two weeks, we collected several days of data at different time intervals in order to sample

  10. Analysis of Wave Propagation in Stratified Structures Using Circuit Analogues, with Application to Electromagnetic Absorbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sjoberg, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of how circuit models can be used for analysing wave propagation in stratified structures. Relatively complex structures can be analysed using models which are accessible to undergraduate students. Homogeneous slabs are modelled as transmission lines, and thin sheets between the slabs are modelled as lumped…

  11. Analysis of Wave Propagation in Stratified Structures Using Circuit Analogues, with Application to Electromagnetic Absorbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sjoberg, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of how circuit models can be used for analysing wave propagation in stratified structures. Relatively complex structures can be analysed using models which are accessible to undergraduate students. Homogeneous slabs are modelled as transmission lines, and thin sheets between the slabs are modelled as lumped…

  12. Predicting the biological effects of mobile phone radiation absorbed energy linked to the MRI-obtained structure.

    PubMed

    Krstić, Dejan; Zigar, Darko; Petković, Dejan; Sokolović, Dušan; Dinđić, Boris; Cvetković, Nenad; Jovanović, Jovica; Dinđić, Nataša

    2013-01-01

    The nature of an electromagnetic field is not the same outside and inside a biological subject. Numerical bioelectromagnetic simulation methods for penetrating electromagnetic fields facilitate the calculation of field components in biological entities. Calculating energy absorbed from known sources, such as mobile phones when placed near the head, is a prerequisite for studying the biological influence of an electromagnetic field. Such research requires approximate anatomical models which are used to calculate the field components and absorbed energy. In order to explore the biological effects in organs and tissues, it is necessary to establish a relationship between an analogous anatomical model and the real structure. We propose a new approach in exploring biological effects through combining two different techniques: 1) numerical electromagnetic simulation, which is used to calculate the field components in a similar anatomical model and 2) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), which is used to accurately locate sites with increased absorption. By overlapping images obtained by both methods, we can precisely locate the spots with maximum absorption effects. This way, we can detect the site where the most pronounced biological effects are to be expected. This novel approach successfully overcomes the standard limitations of working with analogous anatomical models.

  13. The detectability of archaeological structures beneath the soil using the ground penetrating radar technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrara, C.; Barone, P. M.; Pajewski, L.; Pettinelli, E.; Rossi, G.

    2012-04-01

    The traditional excavation tools applied to Archaeology (i.e. trowels, shovels, bulldozers, etc.) produce, generally, a fast and invasive reconstruction of the ancient past. The geophysical instruments, instead, seem to go in the opposite direction giving, rapidly and non-destructively, geo-archaeological information. Moreover, the economic aspect should not be underestimated: where the former invest a lot of money in order to carry out an excavation or restoration, the latter spend much less to manage a geophysical survey, locating precisely the targets. Survey information gathered using non-invasive methods contributes to the creation of site strategies, conservation, preservation and, if necessary, accurate location of excavation and restoration units, without destructive testing methods, also in well-known archaeological sites [1]-[3]. In particular, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) has, recently, become the most important physical technique in archaeological investigations, allowing the detection of targets with both very high vertical and horizontal resolution, and has been successfully applied both to archaeological and diagnostic purposes in historical and monumental sites [4]. GPR configuration, antenna frequency and survey modality can be different, depending on the scope of the measurements, the nature of the site or the type of targets. Two-dimensional (2D) time/depth slices and radargrams should be generated and integrated with information obtained from other buried or similar artifacts to provide age, structure and context of the surveyed sites. In the present work, we present three case-histories on well-known Roman archaeological sites in Rome, in which GPR technique has been successfully used. To obtain 2D maps of the explored area, a bistatic GPR (250MHz and 500MHz antennas) was applied, acquiring data along several parallel profiles. The GPR results reveal the presence of similar circular anomalies in all the investigated archaeological sites. In

  14. Parameters and structure of lunar regolith in Chang'E-3 landing area from lunar penetrating radar (LPR) data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Zehua; Fang, Guangyou; Ji, Yicai; Gao, Yunze; Wu, Chao; Zhang, Xiaojuan

    2017-01-01

    Chang'E-3 (CE-3) landed in the northwest Mare Imbrium, a region that has not been explored before. Yutu rover that released by CE-3 lander carried the first lunar surface penetrating radar (LPR) for exploring lunar regolith thickness and subsurface shallow geological structures. In this paper, based on the LPR data and the Panoramic Camera (PC) data, we first calculate the lunar surface regolith parameters in CE-3 landing area including its permittivity, density, conductivity and FeO + TiO2 content. LPR data provides a higher spatial resolution and more accuracy for the lunar regolith parameters comparing to other remote sensing techniques, such as orbit radar sounder and microwave sensing or earth-based powerful radar. We also derived the regolith thickness and its weathered rate with much better accuracy in the landing area. The results indicate that the regolith growth rate is much faster than previous estimation, the regolith parameters are not uniform even in such a small study area and the thickness and growth rate of lunar regolith here are different from other areas in Mare Imbrium. We infer that the main reason should be geological deformation that caused by multiple impacts of meteorites in different sizes.

  15. The Relationship Between Total Cloud Lightning Behavior and Radar Derived Thunderstorm Structure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    to the risk lightning presents, many outdoor operational activities, especially aircraft fueling , must be suspended when lightning is expected. In...and Operational Applications, FCM –H11D–2006 (FMH–11), Washington D.C., 1–1–4–128. Williams E.R., S. G. Geotis, A. B. Bhattacharya 1989: A Radar

  16. Mapping Precambrian structures in the Sahara Desert with SIR-C/X-SAR radar: The Neoproterozoic Keraf Suture, NE Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelsalam, Mohamed G.; Stern, Robert J.

    1996-10-01

    A major N-trending Neoproterozoic suture between composite arc terranes of the Arabian-Nubian Shield in the east and older crust of the Nile Craton to the west is inferred to trend N-S close to the Nile in northern Sudan. We used shuttle imaging radar (SIR) C/X synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery to find and map these structures in the poorly known Keraf Suture which are not apparent on visible or near IR imagery due to extensive sand cover. L band (23 cm wavelength) radar images best resolve geologic structure; the other frequencies of the SIR-C/X-SAR system (X and C bands) permit qualitative evaluation of the effects of surface versus subsurface backscattering. Interpretation of L band images supported by field work indicates that the Keraf Suture is ~50 km wide and >550 km long, making it the longest basement structure recognized to date in NE Africa. The northern part of the Suture comprises ophiolitic rocks which were thrust westward over tightly folded sediments of the Nile Craton. The southern Keraf Suture is dominated by N- and NNW-trending, left-lateral strike-slip faults that affect previously deformed passive margin sediments. Associated with these faults are NE-trending transpressional folds and a possible transtensional basin. These structures are interpreted to be due to NW-SE oblique collision between the Arabian-Nubian Shield and the Nile Craton, as east and west Gondwana collided in the last 150 m.y. of Neoproterozoic time.

  17. Vibration control of an inverted pendulum type structure by passive mass spring-pendulum dynamic vibration absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anh, N. D.; Matsuhisa, H.; Viet, L. D.; Yasuda, M.

    2007-10-01

    In this paper, the vibration reduction for a stable inverted pendulum with passive mass-spring-pendulum-type dynamic vibration absorber (DVA) is investigated. Results obtained contain the conventional pendulum systems as a special case. Equivalent mass ratio established shows that the DVA on an inverted pendulum is more effective than the DVA on a normal pendulum system. Parameters of the DVA are determined by maximizing the damping characteristic of the combined system. The location, where the DVA has no effect is specified. Numerical simulation is done in an example of the inverted pendulum structure in the ocean. A mass-spring inverted-pendulum-type DVA is proposed to reduce the required length of the conventional mass-spring-pendulum-type DVA. The cell-to-cell mapping method is used in the numerical simulation to determine the nonlinear stability domain.

  18. Upper-Level Structure of Oklahoma Tornadic Storms on 2 May 1979. I: Radar and Satellite Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Blackmer, Roy H., Jr.; Schotz, Steven

    1983-07-01

    This paper discusses the observational characteristics of the upper level structure of severe tornadic storms in Oklahoma on 2 May 1979 during SESAME. The data analyzed consist of limited-scan GOES-East and West visible, infrared (11 m), and stereo satellite data, dual-Doppler radar observations, and special storm scale soundings. The time-histories of stereo cloud top height, minimum equivalent blackbody temperature (TBB) and radar reflectivity are followed for three severe storms over a several hour period; two of the storms are tornadic. Cloud top IR growth rates and vertical velocities of the storms are computed and found to have maxima which fall into Adler and Fenn's severe storm classification. For one of the storms there is an interesting coupling between cloud top parameters and low-level radar echoes; the other tornadic storm showed no unique relationship. Hail damage began shortly after tropopause penetration by thee storms. Two major IR cold areas associated with the leading downwind storm (i.e., Lahoma storm), are both about 10°C lower than the minimum (tropopause) temperature in an upwind sounding. One is displaced upwind about 15 km from the visible cloud top and the inferred updraft position from radar; the other is located about 15 km to the south of the visible cloud top. A `V' pattern of lower TBB with embedded higher temperature (warm areas) developed after tropopause penetration by the Lahoma storm. Composites of stereo height contours on IR images indicated that TBB is not uniquely related to height.The warm areas are deduced to be of two types: one called the `close-in' warm am is located about 10-20 km downwind of the cloud top of the Lahoma storm, and the other called the `distant' warm area is about 50-75 km downwind. The close-in warm area has a motion similar to that of the storms and appears to be dynamically linked to the leading storm. A model is proposed to explain this warm area based on mixing processes and subsidence near cloud

  19. Structured copolymers and their use as absorbents, gels and carriers of metal ions

    DOEpatents

    Hedstrand, David M.; Helmer, Bradley J.; Tomalia, Donald A.

    1996-01-01

    Dense star polymers or dendrimers having a highly branched interior structure capable of associating or chelating with metal ions are modified by capping with a hydrophobic group capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell. The modified dendrimers are useful for dispersing metal ions in a non-aqueous polymer matrix. Also dense star polymers or dendrimers having a highly branched hydrophilic interior structure are modified by capping with a hydrophobic group capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell, which modified polymers are useful as gels and surfactants.

  20. Structured copolymers and their use as absorbents, gels and carriers of metal ions

    DOEpatents

    Hedstrand, D.M.; Helmer, B.J.; Tomalia, D.A.

    1996-10-01

    Dense star polymers or dendrimers having a highly branched interior structure capable of associating or chelating with metal ions are modified by capping with a hydrophobic group capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell. The modified dendrimers are useful for dispersing metal ions in a non-aqueous polymer matrix. Also dense star polymers or dendrimers having a highly branched hydrophilic interior structure are modified by capping with a hydrophobic group capable of providing a hydrophobic outer shell, which modified polymers are useful as gels and surfactants.

  1. Observation of three-dimensional structures of quasi-periodic echoes associated with mid-latitude sporadic-E layers by MU radar ultra-multi-channel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Hashiguchi, H.; Maegawa, A.

    2006-07-01

    Quasi-periodic (QP) backscatter observed by VHF radars associated with the mid-latitude Sporadic-E (Es) layers is characterized by distinct striations on range-time-intensity (RTI) plots. Two competing models claim to explain the structure of unstable regions that scatter the radar waves: horizontally drifting patches at an almost constant altitude and unstable regions elongated in altitude along the geomagnetic field line. We have conducted interferometric imaging observations of QP radar echoes to investigate spatial structures of QP echoes, precisely. Kyoto University's newly developed ultra-multi-channel receiving system of middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar was used. We used 19 independent channels for the radar imaging, and determined the three-dimensional structure and the motion of the QP echoes. During the observation from 30 May to 02 June 2005, well-defined QP echoes were observed on the nights of 31 May, 01 June, and 02 June 2005. Some of QP echoes were found at altitudes higher than 120 km and appeared to descend in altitude as they approached the radar. This result suggests that backscatter regions are developed along the geomagnetic field line from Es layer altitudes to as high as 130 km and that the fluctuations in plasma density and electric field observed by Pfaff et al. (2005) using in-situ measurements form a part of QP echoes.

  2. Reconstructing the energy band electronic structure of pulsed laser deposited CZTS thin films intended for solar cell absorber applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandiyan, Rajesh; Oulad Elhmaidi, Zakaria; Sekkat, Zouheir; Abd-lefdil, Mohammed; El Khakani, My Ali

    2017-02-01

    We report here on the use of pulsed KrF-laser deposition (PLD) technique for the growth of high-quality Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films onto Si, and glass substrates without resorting to any post sulfurization process. The PLD-CZTS films were deposited at room temperature (RT) and then subjected to post annealing at different temperatures ranging from 200 to 500 °C in Argon atmosphere. The X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy confirmed that the PLD films crystallize in the characteristic kesterite CZTS structure regardless of their annealing temperature (Ta), but their crystallinity is much improved for Ta ≥ 400 °C. The PLD-CZTS films were found to exhibit a relatively dense morphology with a surface roughness (RMS) that increases with Ta (from ∼14 nm at RT to 70 nm at Ta = 500 °C with a value around 40 nm for Ta = 300-400 °C). The optical bandgap of the PLD-CZTS films, was derived from UV-vis transmission spectra analysis, and found to decrease from 1.73 eV for non-annealed films to ∼1.58 eV for those annealed at Ta = 300 °C. These band gap values are very close to the optimum value needed for an ideal solar cell absorber. In order to achieve a complete reconstruction of the one-dimensional energy band structure of these PLD-CZTS absorbers, we have combined both XPS and UPS spectroscopies to determine their chemical bondings, the position of their valence band maximum (relative to Fermi level), and their work function values. This enabled us to sketch out, as accurately as possible, the band alignment of the heterojunction interface formed between CZTS and both CdS and ZnS buffer layer materials.

  3. Super absorbent conjugated microporous polymers: a synergistic structural effect on the exceptional uptake of amines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoming; Xu, Yanhong; Guo, Zhaoqi; Nagai, Atsushi; Jiang, Donglin

    2013-04-21

    Conjugated microporous polymers exhibit a synergistic structural effect on the exceptional uptake of amines, whereas the dense porphyrin units facilitate uptake, the high porosity offers a large interface and the swellability boosts capacity. They are efficient in the uptake of both vapor and liquid amines, are applicable to various types of amines, and are excellent for cycle use.

  4. Acoustic contributions of a sound absorbing blanket placed in a double panel structure: absorption versus transmission.

    PubMed

    Doutres, Olivier; Atalla, Noureddine

    2010-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to propose a simple tool to estimate the absorption vs. transmission loss contributions of a multilayered blanket unbounded in a double panel structure and thus guide its optimization. The normal incidence airborne sound transmission loss of the double panel structure, without structure-borne connections, is written in terms of three main contributions; (i) sound transmission loss of the panels, (ii) sound transmission loss of the blanket and (iii) sound absorption due to multiple reflections inside the cavity. The method is applied to four different blankets frequently used in automotive and aeronautic applications: a non-symmetric multilayer made of a screen in sandwich between two porous layers and three symmetric porous layers having different pore geometries. It is shown that the absorption behavior of the blanket controls the acoustic behavior of the treatment at low and medium frequencies and its transmission loss at high frequencies. Acoustic treatment having poor sound absorption behavior can affect the performance of the double panel structure.

  5. Sound Absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H. V.; Möser, M.

    Sound absorption indicates the transformation of sound energy into heat. It is, for instance, employed to design the acoustics in rooms. The noise emitted by machinery and plants shall be reduced before arriving at a workplace; auditoria such as lecture rooms or concert halls require a certain reverberation time. Such design goals are realised by installing absorbing components at the walls with well-defined absorption characteristics, which are adjusted for corresponding demands. Sound absorbers also play an important role in acoustic capsules, ducts and screens to avoid sound immission from noise intensive environments into the neighbourhood.

  6. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  7. Investigations on the links between rain intensity or reflectivity structures estimated from radar and drop size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachani, Sahar; Boudevillain, Brice; Bargaoui, Zoubeida; Delrieu, Guy

    2015-04-01

    During the first Special Observation Period (SOP) of the Hydrological cycle in the Mediterranean Experiment (HyMeX, www.hymex.org) held in fall 2012 in the Northwestern Mediterranean region, an observation network dedicated to rain studies was implemented in the Cévennes region, France. It was mainly constituted by weather radars, micro rain radars, disdrometers and rain gauges. Observations are performed by a network of 25 OTT Parsivel optical disdrometers distributed with inter-distances ranging from a few meters up to about one hundred kilometers. This presentation focuses on the comparison of one optical disdrometer observations located at Villeneuve-de-berg to observations using weather Météo-France / ARAMIS radar located at Bollène which is in a neighborhood of 60 km from the disdrometer.The period from September to November 2012 is studied. To analyze the structure of the rain observed by radar, a window of investigation centered on the disdrometer was selected and the mean spatial values, standard deviation, gradients, and intermittency of radar reflectivity or rainfall intensity were computed for a time step of 5 minutes.Four different windowsizes were analyzed: 1 km², 25 km², 100 km² and 400 km². On the other hand, the total concentration of drops Nt, the characteristic diameter of drops Dc, and a Gamma distribution shape parameter µ were estimated. Gamma distribution for the DSD related to disdrometer observations was estimated according to the modeling framework proposed by Yu et al. (2014). Correlation coefficient between intensity R obtained by the disdrometer and windowaverage R estimated using radar data is nearly 0.70 whatever the window. The highest value is found for the window 25 km² (0.74). Correlation coefficients between Dc and window average R vary from 0.35 for the window 1 km² to 0.4 for the window 400 km². So, they areweak and not sensitive to the choice of the window. Contrarily, formean radar reflectivityZ, correlation

  8. Surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure of low-Z absorbates using fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Stoehr, J.; Kollin, E.B.; Fischer, D.A.; Hastings, J.B.; Zaera, F.; Sette, F.

    1985-05-01

    Comparison of x-ray fluorescence yield (FY) and electron yield surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra above the S K-edge for c(2 x 2) S on Ni(100) reveals an order of magnitude higher sensitivity of the FY technique. Using FY detection, thiophene (C/sub 4/H/sub 4/S) chemisorption on Ni(100) is studied with S coverages down to 0.08 monolayer. The molecule dissociates at temperatures as low as 100K by interaction with fourfold hollow Ni sites. Blocking of these sites by oxygen leaves the molecule intact.

  9. Novel multi-layer polymer-metal structures for use in ultrasonic transducer impedance matching and backing absorber applications.

    PubMed

    Toda, Minoru; Thompson, Mitchell

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents a novel design principle for designing multilayer polymer-metal structures which are well suited for front surface impedance conversion (matching) and for back surface acoustic absorption. It is shown that a polymer layer with an outer metal layer, when loaded by a low impedance propagation medium, acts as an efficient impedance converter. The resulting impedance seen at the inner polymer surface is increased and the structure provides the same performance as a traditional quarter-wavelength matching layer. Experimental evidence is also shown for a double-matching scheme for a lead zirconate titanate (PZT) transducer using an inner polymer-metal multilayer and an outer polymer quarterwavelength layer, resulting in a 55% bandwidth at 2.6 MHz with air backing. Also, it is theoretically shown that multiple layers of a lossy polymer adhesive-metal structure produce low propagation velocity and high absorption. Experimental proof of this ultrasonic multilayer backing absorber is provided. Design theories based on both a simplified mass and spring model and a rigorous one-dimensional wave model have been developed and show fair agreement.

  10. Structural and magnetic properties of La3+ substituted barium-natural nanoferrites as microwave absorber in X-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widanarto, W.; Amirudin, F.; Ghoshal, S. K.; Effendi, M.; Cahyanto, W. T.

    2017-03-01

    Selection of proper microwave absorbers in the X-band is vital to prevent the interference issues that often damage devices and cause signal degradation. In this spirit, we prepared three La3+ substituted barium-natural nanoferrites (BNFs) samples with chemical composition of BaO:(x)La2O3:(6-x)Fe2O3 (x=0, 0.1, 0.2 in mol) via solid-state reaction route. Synthesized samples were characterized via SEM, XRD, VSM, and VNA measurements to determine the La3+ ions concentration dependent variation in the structural, magnetic and microwave absorption properties. Transmission/reflection line (TRL) method was used to evaluate the samples reflection loss. La3+ free samples sintered at 1100 °C revealed hexagonal BaFe12O19 and rhombohedral Fe2O3 phases. SEM images displayed the growth of new particle with the average size of 0.2 - 0.8 μm as filler in BNFs. Furthermore, an incorporation of La3+ into the BNF system manifested the emergence of new BaLa2Fe2O7 tetragonal crystal phase. The average crystallite size of BNF was found to decrease with increasing La3+ ion concentrations. Conversely, substitution of La3+ in the BNF caused insignificant changes in the magnetic properties, the real part of the relative permittivity and the natural resonance frequency. Meanwhile, a reasonable shift in the microwave frequency absorption and enhancement in the reflection loss was evidenced due to the inclusion of La3+. BNF sample containing 0.2 mol La2O3 exhibited a saturation magnetization and magnetic field anisotropy of 19.02 and 0.36 T, respectively, where the maximum reflection loss is discerned to be -26.61 dB at 10.87 GHz with 1.25 GHz bandwidth. This new class of ferrites may be prospective for microwave absorber in the X-band.

  11. A Structural Basis for Reversible Photoswitching of Absorbance Spectra in Red Fluorescent Protein rsTagRFP

    PubMed Central

    Pletnev, Sergei; Subach, Fedor V.; Dauter, Zbigniew; Wlodawer, Alexander; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2012-01-01

    rsTagRFP the first monomeric red fluorescent protein with reversibly photoswitchable absorbance spectra. The switching is realized by irradiation of rsTagRFP with blue (440 nm) and yellow (567 nm) light, turning the protein fluorescence ON and OFF, respectively. It is perhaps the most useful probe in this color class that has yet been reported. Because of the photoswitchable absorbance, rsTagRFP can be used as an acceptor in photochromic Förster resonance energy transfer (pcFRET). Yellow fluorescent proteins YPet and mVenus have been demonstrated to be excellent pcFRET donors for the rsTagRFP acceptor in its fusion constructs. Analysis of X-ray structures has shown that photoswitching of rsTagRFP is accompanied by cis-trans isomerization and protonation/deprotonation of the chromophore, with the deprotonated cis- and protonated trans- isomers corresponding to its ON and OFF states. Unlike in other photoswitchable fluorescent proteins, both conformers of rsTagRFP chromophore are essentially coplanar. Two other peculiarities of the rsTagRFP chromophore are an essentially hydrophobic environment of its p-hydroxyphenyl site and the absence of direct hydrogen bonding between this moiety and the protein scaffold. The influence of the immediate environment on rsTagRFP chromophore was probed by site-directed mutagenesis. Residues Glu145 and His197 were found to participate in protonation/deprotonation of the chromophore accompanying the photoswitching of rsTagRFP fluorescence, whereas the residues Met160 and Leu174 were shown to spatially restrict chromophore isomerization, favoring its radiative decay. PMID:22310052

  12. A Structural Basis for Reversible Photoswitching of Absorbance Spectra in Red Fluorescent Protein rsTagRFP

    SciTech Connect

    Pletnev, Sergei; Subach, Fedor V.; Dauter, Zbigniew; Wlodawer, Alexander; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2012-09-05

    rsTagRFP is the first monomeric red fluorescent protein (FP) with reversibly photoswitchable absorbance spectra. The switching is realized by irradiation of rsTagRFP with blue (440 nm) and yellow (567 nm) light, turning the protein fluorescence ON and OFF, respectively. It is perhaps the most useful probe in this color class that has yet been reported. Because of the photoswitchable absorbance, rsTagRFP can be used as an acceptor in photochromic Foerster resonance energy transfer. Yellow FPs, YPet and mVenus, are demonstrated to be excellent photochromic Foerster resonance energy transfer donors for the rsTagRFP acceptor in its fusion constructs. Analysis of X-ray structures has shown that photoswitching of rsTagRFP is accompanied by cis-trans isomerization and protonation/deprotonation of the chromophore, with the deprotonated cis- and protonated trans-isomers corresponding to its ON and OFF states, respectively. Unlike in other photoswitchable FPs, both conformers of rsTagRFP chromophore are essentially coplanar. Two other peculiarities of the rsTagRFP chromophore are an essentially hydrophobic environment of its p-hydroxyphenyl site and the absence of direct hydrogen bonding between this moiety and the protein scaffold. The influence of the immediate environment on rsTagRFP chromophore was probed by site-directed mutagenesis. Residues Glu145 and His197 were found to participate in protonation/deprotonation of the chromophore accompanying the photoswitching of rsTagRFP fluorescence, whereas residues Met160 and Leu174 were shown to spatially restrict chromophore isomerization, favoring its radiative decay.

  13. Whither radar?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radford, M. F.

    The evolution of radar technology in the future is examined with respect to both civilian and military applications. Consideration is given to four broad categories of radar technology where improvements in the state of the art are expected. The categories include: antenna design; transmitter design; receiver/signal processor design; and data handling/radar management technology. The influence of CAD/CAM techniques and very high performance ICs on radar system design is evaluated. A formula is presented for calculating the performance requirements of a radar system with respect to sensitivity, resolution, and optimum data rate.

  14. Radar observations of structured plasma in high-latitude F region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vickrey, J. F.

    1981-03-01

    Coordinated measuremens between the Chatanika radar and the TRIAD satellite were investigated and the production mechanisms responsible for localized high latitude scintillation was examined. The radar measured that latitudinal variations of plasma density and electric field while the satellite measured the latitudinal variation of field aligned current. Field aligned ionization enhancements or plasma blobs with steep poleward and equatorward edges were a common feature of the midnight sector auroral F-region. The plasma blobs are unstable to the current convective instability with growth rate of several millihertz. Field aligned currents have a further destabilizing influence. The presence of plasma density irregularities associated with the blobs were verified by observing scintillation on the TRIAD satellite telemetry signal at 150 MHz. The F-region irregularities exist despite the presence of a highly conducting auroral E-region to which the F-region plasma is connected by the geomagnetic field lines.

  15. Investigation of horizontal structures at mesospheric altitudes using coherent radar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sommer, S.; Stober, G.; Schult, C.; Zecha, M.; Latteck, R.

    2013-07-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) in Northern Norway (69.30°N, 16.04°E) was used to perform interferometric observations of Polar Mesosperic Summer Echoes (PMSE) in June 2012. Coherent Radar Imaging (CRI) using Capon's method was applied allowing a high spatial resolution. The algorithm was validated by simulation and trajectories of meteor head echoes. Both data sets show a good correspondence with the algorithm. Using this algorithm, the aspect sensitivity of PMSE was analysed in a case study, making use of the capability of CRI to resolve the pattern within the beam volume. No correction of the beam pattern was made yet. It was found in this case study, that no large variations in the scattering width and the scattering center occured apart from a very short period of time at the upper edge of the PMSE.

  16. Study on the characteristics of magneto-sensitive electromagnetic wave-absorbing properties of magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Miao; Yang, Pingan; Fu, Jie; Liu, Shuzhi; Qi, Song

    2016-08-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) materials are a class of materials whose mechanical and electrical properties can be reversible controlled by the magnetic field. In this study, we pioneered research on the effect of a uniform magnetic field with different strengths and directions on the microwave-absorbing properties of magnetorheological elastomers (MREs), in which the ferromagnetic particles are flower-like carbonyl iron powders (CIPs) prepared by an in situ reduction method. The electromagnetic (EM) absorbing properties of the composites have been analyzed by vector network analysis with the coaxial reflection/transmission technique. Under the magnetic field, the columnar or chainlike structures were formed, which allows EM waves to penetrate. Meanwhile, stronger Debye dipolar relaxation and attenuation constant have been obtained when changing the direction of the applied magnetic field. Compared with untreated MREs, not only have the minimum reflection loss (RL) and the effective absorption bandwidth (below -20 dB) greatly increased, the frequencies of the absorbing peaks shift about 15%. This suggests that MREs are a magnetic-field-sensitive electromagnetic wave-absorbing material and have great potential in applications such as in anti-radar camouflage, due to the fact that radar can continuously conduct detection at many electromagnetic frequencies, while the MR materials can adjust the microwave-absorption peak according to the radar frequency.

  17. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  18. Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous Metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Control

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, J

    2007-01-12

    This report describes the analysis and modeling approaches used in the evaluation for criticality-control applications of the neutron-absorbing structural-amorphous metal (SAM) coatings. The applications of boron-containing high-performance corrosion-resistant material (HPCRM)--amorphous metal as the neutron-absorbing coatings to the metallic support structure can enhance criticality safety controls for spent nuclear fuel in baskets inside storage containers, transportation casks, and disposal containers. The use of these advanced iron-based, corrosion-resistant materials to prevent nuclear criticality in transportation, aging, and disposal containers would be extremely beneficial to the nuclear waste management programs.

  19. Structure property relations and finite element analysis of ram horns: A pathway to energy absorbent bio-inspired designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trim, Michael Wesley

    2011-12-01

    A recently emerging engineering design approach entails studying the brilliant design solutions found in nature with an aim to develop design strategies that mimic the remarkable efficiency found in biological systems. This novel engineering approach is referred to as bio-inspired design. In this context, the present study quantifies the structure-property relations in bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) horn keratin, qualitatively characterizes the effects of a tapered spiral geometry (the same form as in a ram's horn) on pressure wave and impulse mitigation, describes the stress attenuation capabilities and features of a ram's head, and compares the structures and mechanical properties of some energy absorbent natural materials. The results and ideas presented herein can be used in the development of lightweight, energy absorbent, bio-inspired material designs. Among the most notable conclusions garnered from this research include: (1) Horn keratin behaves in an anisotropic manner similar to a long fiber composite. (2) Moisture content dominates the material behavior of horn keratin more than anisotropy, age, and stress-state. This makes moisture content the most influential parameter on the mechanical behavior of horn keratin. (3) Tapered geometries mitigate the impulse generated by a stress wave due to the convergent boundary and a continually decreasing cross sectional area such that greater uniaxial stresses and subsequent axial deformation arises. Furthermore, the tapered geometry introduces small shear stresses that further decrease the impulse. (4) Spiral geometries attenuate the impulse generated by a stress wave by the introduction of shear stresses along the length of the spiral. These shear stresses introduce transverse displacements that function to lessen the impulse. (5) When both a taper and spiral geometry are used in a design, their synergistic effects multiplicatively reduce the impulse (6) Tough natural materials have a high porosity, which makes

  20. Radar Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    This lecture was just a taste of radar remote sensing techniques and applications. Other important areas include Stereo radar grammetry. PolInSAR for volumetric structure mapping. Agricultural monitoring, soil moisture, ice-mapping, etc. The broad range of sensor types, frequencies of observation and availability of sensors have enabled radar sensors to make significant contributions in a wide area of earth and planetary remote sensing sciences. The range of applications, both qualitative and quantitative, continue to expand with each new generation of sensors.

  1. Tuning the Electronic Structure and Properties of Perylene-Porphyrin-Perylene Panchromatic Absorbers.

    PubMed

    Amanpour, Javad; Hu, Gongfang; Alexy, Eric J; Mandal, Amit Kumar; Kang, Hyun Suk; Yuen, Jonathan M; Diers, James R; Bocian, David F; Lindsey, Jonathan S; Holten, Dewey

    2016-09-29

    Light-harvesting architectures that afford strong absorption across the near-ultraviolet to near-infrared region, namely, panchromatic absorptivity, are potentially valuable for capturing the broad spectral distribution of sunlight. One previously reported triad consisting of two perylene monoimides strongly coupled to a free base porphyrin via ethyne linkers (FbT) shows panchromatic absorption together with a porphyrin-like S1 excited state albeit at lower energy than that of a typical monomeric porphyrin. Here, two new porphyrin-bis(perylene) triads have been prepared wherein the porphyrin bears two pentafluorophenyl substituents. The porphyrin is in the free base (FbT-F) or zinc chelate (ZnT-F) forms. The zinc chelate (ZnT) of the original triad bearing nonfluorinated aryl rings also was prepared. The triads were characterized using static and time-resolved optical spectroscopy. The results were analyzed with the aid of molecular-orbital characteristics obtained using density functional theory calculations. Of the four triads, FbT is the most panchromatic in affording the most even distribution of absorption spectral intensity as well as exhibiting the largest wavelength span (380-750 nm). The triads exhibit fluorescence yields (0.35 for FbT-F in toluene) that are substantially greater than for the porphyrin benchmarks (0.049 for FbP-F). The singlet excited-state lifetimes (τS) for the triads in toluene decrease in the order FbT-F (2.7 ns) > FbT (2.0 ns) > ZnT (1.2 ns) ∼ ZnT-F (1.1 ns). The τS values in benzonitrile are FbT (1.3 ns) > FbT-F (1.2 ns) > ZnT-F (0.6 ns) > ZnT (0.2 ns). Thus, the free base triads exhibit relatively long (1.2-2.7 ns) excited-state lifetimes in both polar and nonpolar media. The combined photophysical characteristics indicate that FbT and FbT-F are the best choices for panchromatic light-harvesting systems. Collectively, the findings afford insights into the effects of electronic structure on the panchromatic behavior of ethynyl

  2. Multi-damage detection with embedded ultrasonic structural radar algorithm using piezoelectric wafer active sensors through advanced signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Lingyu; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2005-05-01

    The embedded ultrasonic structural radar (EUSR) algorithm was developed by using piezoelectric wafer active sensor (PWAS) array to detect defects within a large area of a thin-plate specimen. EUSR has been verified to be effective for detecting a single crack either at a broadside or at an offside position. In this research, advanced signal processing techniques were included to enhance inspection image quality and detect multiple damage. The signal processing methods include discrete wavelet transform for signal denoising, short-time Fourier transform and continuous wavelet transform for time-frequency analysis, continuous wavelet transform for frequency filtering, and Hilbert transform for envelope extraction. All these signal processing modules were implemented by developing a graphical user-friendly interface program in LabVIEW. The paper starts with an introduction of embedded ultrasonic structural radar algorithm, followed with the theoretical aspect of the phased array signal processing method. Then, the mathematical algorithms for advanced signal processing are introduced. In the end, laboratory experimental results are presented to show how efficiently the improved EUSR works. The results are analyzed and EUSR is concluded to have been improved by using the advanced signal processing techniques. The improvements include: 1) EUSR is able to provide better image of the specimen under monitoring; 2) it is able to detect multi-damage such as several cracks; 3) it is able to identify different damage types.

  3. Radar and Lidar Radar DEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liskovich, Diana; Simard, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Using radar and lidar data, the aim is to improve 3D rendering of terrain, including digital elevation models (DEM) and estimates of vegetation height and biomass in a variety of forest types and terrains. The 3D mapping of vegetation structure and the analysis are useful to determine the role of forest in climate change (carbon cycle), in providing habitat and as a provider of socio-economic services. This in turn will lead to potential for development of more effective land-use management. The first part of the project was to characterize the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission DEM error with respect to ICESat/GLAS point estimates of elevation. We investigated potential trends with latitude, canopy height, signal to noise ratio (SNR), number of LiDAR waveform peaks, and maximum peak width. Scatter plots were produced for each variable and were fitted with 1st and 2nd degree polynomials. Higher order trends were visually inspected through filtering with a mean and median filter. We also assessed trends in the DEM error variance. Finally, a map showing how DEM error was geographically distributed globally was created.

  4. 3D Scanning Cloud Radar Observations at Azores during the ARM AMF field campaign: Reconstruction and study of 3D cloud structures and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowley, K.; Jo, I.; Tatarevic, A.; Kollias, P.

    2010-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) has been operating at Graciosa Island (Azores) since May 2009. This 21-month field campaign focuses on the study of marine stratus clouds. The ARM/AMF instrumentation and location provides a unique opportunity to observe the cloud properties of marine stratocumulus utilizing a variety of active and passive remote sensors. In addition to the standard profiling instrumentation, the first scanning W-band (94-GHz) ARM Cloud Radar (SWACR) was deployed for a short two-month period (October-November 2009). Several scan strategies were tested during the SWACR deployment. The scan strategies were designed specifically to provide the ability to reconstruct the 3D cloud structure. The raw radar observations are quality controlled with the identification of radar volumes with significant detections, water vapor attenuation and unfolding of the radar Doppler velocity. The observations are also transformed from the original radar coordinate system (spherical) to a Cartesian coordinate system using an adaptive gridding algorithm. The 3D gridding of the radar observables, along with spatial data analysis, allow us to evaluate important issues, specifically spatial variability of cloud and drizzle structures. Column profiles of SWACR observables are used in combination with Liquid Water Path measurements from the collocated Microwave Radiometer (MWR) to develop new relationships to compute Liquid Water Content (LWC). The best possible estimate of the 3D LWC structure is reconstructed by assessing both our relationship and other known relationships between radar reflectivity and LWC. This is required in order to use the 3D cloud observations for radiative transfer modeling. Additional drizzle-identification techniques are also being developed to allow the isolation of 3D cloud-only or liquid-only fields. These types of variables have a key impact on the understanding of the radiative budget

  5. Analyses of the temporal and spatial structures of heavy rainfall from a catalog of high-resolution radar rainfall fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorndahl, Søren; Smith, James A.; Baeck, Mary Lynn; Krajewski, Witold F.

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we develop a storm catalog of heavy rainfall events for a region centered on the Milwaukee, Wisconsin WSR-88D (Weather Surveillance Radar - 1988 Doppler) radar. The study region includes portions of southern Wisconsin, northern Illinois and Lake Michigan. The long-term objective of this study is to develop rainfall frequency analysis methods based on a storm catalog of major rain events. The specific objectives of this study are to develop a long-term catalog of high-resolution radar rainfall fields and characterize key features of the space-time variability of rainfall. The research questions that underlie these objectives are: 1) What are the spatial heterogeneities of rainfall over the study region for major flood-producing storm systems? 2) What are the key elements of storm evolution that control the scale-dependent properties of extreme rainfall? The storm catalog contains a record of the 50 “largest” storm days during the 1996-2011 observation period. We show that mean rainfall for the 50 largest storm days exhibits pronounced spatial heterogeneity with a broad maximum in western Wisconsin and a minimum in the eastern portion of the study region over Lake Michigan. We also show that there is a narrow line of maximum mean rainfall extending from west to east along the Wisconsin-Illinois border. This feature is tied to a maximum in the probability of daily rainfall exceeding 100 mm. There are characteristic elements to the storm life cycle of heavy rainfall days that relate to size, structure and evolution of heavy rainfall. Extreme rainfall is also linked with severe weather (tornados, large hail and damaging wind). The diurnal cycle of rainfall for heavy rain days is characterized by an early peak in the largest rainfall rates, an afternoon-evening peak in rain area exceeding 25 mm h- 1 and development of a large stratiform rain area during the night and early morning.

  6. Structural analysis of three extensional detachment faults with data from the 2000 Space-Shuttle Radar Topography Mission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, J.E.

    2010-01-01

    The Space-Shuttle Radar Topography Mission provided geologists with a detailed digital elevation model of most of Earth's land surface. This new database is used here for structural analysis of grooved surfaces interpreted to be the exhumed footwalls of three active or recently active extensional detachment faults. Exhumed fault footwalls, each with an areal extent of one hundred to several hundred square kilometers, make up much of Dayman dome in eastern Papua New Guinea, the western Gurla Mandhata massif in the central Himalaya, and the northern Tokorondo Mountains in central Sulawesi, Indonesia. Footwall curvature in profile varies from planar to slightly convex upward at Gurla Mandhata to strongly convex upward at northwestern Dayman dome. Fault curvature decreases away from the trace of the bounding detachment fault in western Dayman dome and in the Tokorondo massif, suggesting footwall flattening (reduction in curvature) following exhumation. Grooves of highly variable wavelength and amplitude reveal extension direction, although structural processes of groove genesis may be diverse.

  7. Crash compatibility between cars and light trucks: benefits of lowering front-end energy-absorbing structure in SUVs and pickups.

    PubMed

    Baker, Bryan C; Nolan, Joseph M; O'Neill, Brian; Genetos, Alexander P

    2008-01-01

    Passenger vehicles are designed to absorb crash energy in frontal crashes through deformation or crush of energy-absorbing structures forward of the occupant compartment. In collisions between cars and light trucks (i.e., pickups and SUVs), however, the capacity of energy-absorption structures may not be fully utilized because mismatches often exist between the heights of these structures in the colliding vehicles. In 2003 automakers voluntarily committed to new design standards aimed at reducing the height mismatches between cars and light trucks. By September 2009 all new light trucks will have either the primary front structure (typically the frame rails) or a secondary structure connected to the primary structure low enough to interact with the primary structures in cars, which for most cars is about the height of the front bumper. To estimate the overall benefit of the voluntary commitment, the real-world crash experience of light trucks already meeting the height-matching criteria was compared with that of light trucks not meeting the criteria for 2000-2003 model light trucks in collisions with passenger cars during calendar years 2001-2004. The estimated benefits of lower front energy-absorbing structure were a 19 percent reduction (p<0.05) in fatality risk to belted car drivers in front-to-front crashes with light trucks and a 19 percent reduction (p<0.05) in fatality risk to car drivers in front-to-driver-side crashes with light trucks.

  8. Sensitivity of ERS-1 and JERS-1 radar data to biomass and stand structure in Alaskan boreal forest

    SciTech Connect

    Harrell, P.A.; Christensen, N.L. Jr.; Bourgeau-Chavez, L.L.; Kasischke, E.S.; French, N.H.F.

    1995-12-01

    As the boreal system is such an important component of the global carbon budget, it is important that the system and the potential changes be understood, whether from anthropogenic disturbances or global climate change. Thirty-two boreal forest sites were identified and sampled in the central region of Alaska to evaluate the sensitivity of the C-band ERS-1 and the L-band JERS-1 radar platforms to site biophysical properties. The sites selected represent black spruce (Picea mariana) and white spruce (Picea glauca) stands in a post-fire chronosequence. Black spruce biomass ranged from less than 1 kg/m{sup 2} to 5.6 kg/m{sup 2} and white spruce from 8.8 to 21.5 kg/m{sup 2}. Results indicate both ERS-1 and JERS-1 backscatter is responsive to biomass, density, and height, though other factors, principally surface moisture conditions, are often a stronger influence. Sensitivity to forest biomass and structure appears greatest when surface moisture conditions are minimized as a factor. Biomass correlations with the radar backscatter were strongest in the late winter imagery when all sites had a snow cover, and late summer when the surface is most dry. ERS-1 data may be more sensitive to surface moisture conditions than the JERS-1 data due to the shorter wavelength of the C-band sensor, though this is inconclusive because of limited JERS-1 L-band data for comparison.

  9. Radar Polarimetry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    RADAR CROSS SECTION (RCS) σ.................................................. 15 D. THE RADAR SYSTEM...spherical surface, as [13]: rV V s iV rH H s iH E D E E D E ρ ρ = Γ = Γ (2.27) 15 C. RADAR CROSS SECTION (RCS) σ The radar cross section is...Interpretation ⎥ ⎦ ⎤ ⎢ ⎣ ⎡ 10 01 Odd- bounce Surface, sphere, corner reflectors ⎥ ⎦ ⎤ ⎢ ⎣ ⎡ −10 01 Even-bounce Dihedral ⎥

  10. Synthesis and absorbing mechanism of two-layer microwave absorbers containing polycrystalline iron fibers and carbonyl iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Qingwei; Zhang, Mingang; Zhang, Cunrui; Qian, Tianwei

    2013-04-01

    Polycrystalline iron fibers were fabricated by α-FeOOH fiber precursors. Two-layer microwave absorber had been prepared by as-prepared polycrystalline iron fibers and carbonyl iron. The structure, morphology and properties of the composites were characterized with X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope and Network Analyzer. The complex permittivity and reflection loss (dB) of the composites were measured employing vector network analyzer model PNA 3629D vector in the frequency range between 30 and 6000 MHz. The thickness effect of the carbonyl iron layer on the microwave loss properties of the composites was investigated. A possible microwave-absorbing mechanism of polycrystalline iron fibers/carbonyl iron composite was proposed. The polycrystalline iron fibers/carbonyl iron composite can find applications in suppression of electromagnetic interference, and reduction of radar signature.

  11. Producing Science-Ready radar datasets for the retrieval of forest 3D structure: Correcting for terrain topography and temporal changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, M.; Lavalle, M.; Riel, B. V.; Pinto, N.; Dubayah, R.; Hensley, S.; Calderhead, A. I.

    2010-12-01

    We present the results of the 2009-2010 airborne L-band radar and lidar campaigns in boreal, temperate and tropical forests. The main objective is to improve canopy height and biomass retrieval from radar data both radiometrically and interferometrically. To achieve this, we assessed and designed models to compensate for the impact of terrain topography and temporal decorrelation on the radar data. The UAVSAR is an L-band radar capable of repeat-pass interferometry producing fully polarimetric images with a spatial resolution of 5m. The LVIS system is a laser altimeter providing a spatially dense sampling of full waveforms. The lidar data is used to determine radar scattering model parameters as well as validate model predictions. During the campaigns, we also collected weather as well as forest structure data in a total of 95 plots. First, we present science-ready UAVSAR datasets that are radiometrically corrected for terrain topography and vegetation reflectivity pattern. This is a critical step before accurate estimation of forest parameters. We implemented a generic and homomorphic transform that can also handle UAVSAR’s antenna steering capabilities which otherwise introduce significant distortions of the image radiometry. We show results obtained from the radiometric calibration. The improvements on the biomass retrieval are significant. Another method to estimate forest 3D structure is polarimetric interferometry (polinSAR). However, since UAVSAR is a repeat-pass interferometric system, changes in forest canopy between radar acquisitions tend to decorrelate successive images. To quantify temporal decorrelation, we collected four radar datasets within a period of 11 days. The data enabled quantification of the temporal decorrelation and its relationship to weather patterns. To compensate for temporal decorrelation, we developed a polinSAR inversion model that account for the target changes. The canopy height inversion is demonstrated through a forward model

  12. Combined Holographic Subsurface Radar and Infrared Thermography for Diagnosis of the Conditions of Historical Structures and Artworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capineri, L.; Falorni, P.; Ivashov, S.; Zhuravlev, A.; Vasiliev, I.; Razevig, V.; Bechtel, T.; Stankiewicz, G.

    2009-04-01

    of RASCAN radar and infrared thermography (IRT) as a means of alleviating the non-uniqueness problem. Coincident RASCAN and IRT images have been recorded for laboratory mock-ups of stone, wood and plaster structures and artworks containing subsurface cracks, voids, moisture, insect damage, supports, repairs, and the like. In addition, some initial side-by-side testing has been performed on actual historic structures and artworks. Since both RASCAN and IRT produce real-time, plan-view images, they are easily overlain and compared, and both can be interpreted visually - especially by persons familiar with the particular item under investigation. Because they are sensitive to completely independent physical properties (dielectric constant for RASCAN and thermal conductivity and heat capacity for IRT), this comparison can allow confident identification of target materials and conditions. Our testing confirms that both are exquisitely sensitive to hidden moisture. Finally, instrumentation for both RASCAN and IRT is commercially available, relatively low cost, and easy to use and interpret - making this combination of methods a potentially powerful tool for workers engaged in the preservation and restoration of artworks and architecture.

  13. Solar concentrator/absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Tiesenhausen, G. F.

    1976-01-01

    Collector/energy converter, consisting of dual-slope optical concentrator and counterflow thermal energy absorber, is attached to multiaxis support structure. Efficient over wide range of illumination levels, device may be used to generate high temperature steam, serve as solar powered dryer, or power absorption cycle cooler.

  14. Mesoscale Structure of the Heavy Rainfall in Chuzhou in August 2008 by Dual-radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haiguang, Zhou

    2010-05-01

    Due to the effect of the low-pressure system of Fung-Wong and the cold air, it produced a heavy precipitation in the east region of Anhui province in China, up to 429mm rainfall in Chuzhou and 414mm in Quanjiao from 0800 LST 1 August to 0800 LST 2 August 2008. It is a local, sudden and short time heavy rain. The three dimensional wind fields were retrieved by the volume scan data of the dual-Doppler radar located in Nanjing and Maanshan cities. The evolution of the 3D wind fields and the formation mechanism of the sudden heavy rainfall were investigated. It is a convective cloud precipitation based on the radar echo analyses. The meso-β-scale convective system (MβCS) and the meso-γ-scale system located on the MβCS played an important role on this heavy rainfall. The meso-β-scale convective cloud has high precipitation efficiency. The dual-Doppler retrieved wind reveals that the heavy rainfall was caused by the meso-β-scale shear line and the meso-β-scale convergence lines at the low and the medium levels. The shear line spread from west to east. It stayed on the Chuzhou and Quanjiao area for period of time. The shear line triggered and maintained the heavy rainfall. On the other hand, the plentiful water vapour was transported to the rainfall area continuously. These factors greadtly availed to the heavy rainfall. There were strong convergence and vorticity at the low and medium levels of the MβCS. When the shear line at the low and medium levels moved out of the rainfall area, the precipitation began to weak remarkably too. Acknowlegements The work was supported by the National Science Foundation of China (grant 40605014, 40975015) and the foundation of state key laboratory of severe weather(2008LASWZI01).

  15. Spaceborne radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, R. K.; Eckerman, J.; Meneghini, R.; Atlas, D.; Boerner, W. M.; Cherry, S.; Clark, J. F.; Doviak, R. J.; Goldhirsh, J.; Lhermitte, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    The spaceborne radar panel considered how radar could be used to measure precipitation from satellites. The emphasis was on how radar could be used with radiometry (at microwave, visible (VIS), and infrared (IR) wavelengths) to reduce the uncertainties of measuring precipitation with radiometry alone. In addition, the fundamental electromagnetic interactions involved in the measurements were discussed to determine the key work areas for research and development to produce effective instruments. Various approaches to implementing radar systems on satellites were considered for both shared and dedicated instruments. Finally, a research and development strategy was proposed for establishing the parametric relations and retrieval algorithms required for extracting precipitation information from the radar and associated radiometric data.

  16. The internal structure of sand bars on the Colorado River, Grand Canyon, as determined by ground-penetrating radar

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhardt, Walter A.; Kayen, Robert; Rubin, David; Minasian, Diane L.

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution, subsurface imagery from ground-penetrating radar (GPR) has revealed the internal structure of sand bars at seven sites on the Colorado River, Grand Canyon. Based on reconnaissance-level surveys, we recognized three stratigraphic units and several intervening unconformities. Unit A, which exhibits hyperbolic reflections and always occurs at the base of the section, is interpreted as bedrock and/or talus. Unit B is a commonly observed sand deposit that overlies unit A and is characterized by reflections that gently dip down toward the river axis. Unit C is a sand deposit up to 2 m thick that always occurs at the top of the section and may represent a flood deposit from 1983. This study demonstrates the utility of GPR for non-destructive investigation of sand-bar thickness and the stratigraphic record of flood events in the Grand Canyon.

  17. The structure and organization of clouds under suppressed conditions observed by S-band radar during DYNAMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, A.; Houze, R.

    2013-12-01

    The NCAR S-PolKa dual-polarized Doppler S- and Ka-band radar captured three active periods of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) during the Dynamics of the MJO (DYNAMO) field project. These three multi-week periods were separated by periods of convectively suppressed conditions. While deep convection and widespread stratiform echo during the active periods were responsible for the majority of the precipitation, a goal of DYNAMO was to investigate the entire cloud population as it evolves from shallow, isolated convection to deep mesoscale systems since this evolution needs to be represented in models predicting the MJO. The S-PolKa radar is sensitive enough to detect non-precipitating clouds at both its wavelengths, and its data therefore can be used to describe the organization and structure of boundary layer clouds during the buildup phase of the MJO. The non-precipitating clouds are seen via Bragg scattering in which the boundaries of small cumulus clouds have signatures referred to as mantle echoes. The Bragg scattering also shows layers of strong water vapor gradient. The small non-precipitating clouds are often organized into lines parallel to the boundary layer wind or wind shear before they begin to precipitate. As soon as S-PolKa indicates the onset of precipitation from a small cloud, Bragg and Rayleigh echoes outline quasi-circular cold pools in the boundary layer surrounding the showers. At times, the cold pools intersect with each other and new convection tends to initiate at the intersection points. This study will document the non-precipitating cloud structures as seen by S-PolKa and describe the steps in the evolution of the boundary layer echoes from lines to cold pools, and hence to the development of the deeper MJO convective population.

  18. Improvement Of The Helmholtz Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, Duane L.

    1992-01-01

    Helmholtz-resonator system improved to enable it to absorb sound at more than one frequency without appreciable loss of effectiveness at primary frequency. Addition of annular cavities enables absorption of sound at harmonic frequencies in addition to primary frequency. Improved absorber designed for use on structures of high transmission loss. Applied to such machines as fixed-speed engines and fans.

  19. The MST Radar Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balsley, B. B.

    1985-01-01

    The past ten year have witnessed the development of a new radar technique to examine the structure and dynamics of the atmosphere between roughly 1 to 100 km on a continuous basis. The technique is known as the MST (for Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere) technique and is usable in all weather conditions, being unaffected by precipitation or cloud cover. MST radars make use of scattering from small scale structure in the atmospheric refractive index, with scales of the order of one-half the radar wavelength. Pertinent scale sizes for middle atmospheric studies typically range between a fraction of a meter and a few meters. The structure itself arises primarily from atmospheric turbulence. The technique is briefly described along with the meteorological parameters it measures.

  20. Solvothermal synthesis of monodispersed CoZr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} microspheres and their application as microwave absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Tingting; Sun, Genban; Ma, Shulan; Yang, Xiaojing; Hu, Changwen

    2012-03-15

    Graphical abstract: Monodispersed CoZr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} porous microspheres with shell structure were synthesized via a combined solvothermal method and calcination route. The radar-wave absorbability of the purple sample calcined at 900 Degree-Sign C was strongest at the frequency of about 8.5 GHz. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In this study we synthesized monodispersed CoZr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} porous microspheres as microwave absorber. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relationship between microstructures and the electromagnetic properties was indicated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The radar-wave absorbability of the sample was included. -- Abstract: Monodispersed CoZr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} microspheres with a diameter of 40 {mu}m were achieved via a combining solvothermal and calcination route. The crystallinity of the calcined microspheres with shell structure was improved, while the monodisperse property and morphologies remained. The possible formation mechanism of the porous CoZr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} microspheres with nanoshell was proposed. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR) technologies, thermal analysis (TG and DSC), nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms and network analyzer. The sample calcined at 900 Degree-Sign C shows a strongest absorbability in the radar-wave absorbability test.

  1. The dependence of synthetic aperture radar backscatter on forest structure and biomass: Potential application for global carbon models

    SciTech Connect

    Imhoff, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The NASA airborne P-band (0.438 GHz), L-band (1.25 GHz), and C-band (5.3 GHz) quadpol. SAR system was used to collect data in tropical broadleaf evergreen forests on the Island of Hawaii.l The SAR data were regressed against biomass measurements made in the field and the response curves for the tropical forests were compared to those made for coniferous forests in North America and Europe using the same SAR instrument and imaging angles (40[degrees]-50[degrees]). Results indicated that the response curves for the tropical forests and the coniferous forests were similar and that the radar signals were saturating at relatively low biomass levels. Biomass saturation points were determined at [approx]100 tons/ha for P-band, [approx]40 tons/ha for L-band, and [approx]20 tons/has for C-band (HH, VV, and HV polarization). The possible existence of a universal saturation point for the SAR response to forest biomass distinctly limits the usefulness of P-, L-, and C-band SAR for global biomass mapping. A small percentage of the world's vegetated systems falls below the highest estimated saturation level. Approximately 46% of the world's vegetated surface area containing 82% of the estimated total store of biomass lies above the saturation limit of the current radar systems (>100 tons/ha for P-band). While 54% of the Earth's vegetated surfaces area is below the saturation level for P-band, this class contains only an estimated 18% of total biomass represented by terrestrial vegetation. Theoretical modeling indicated the primary forest canopy structural factor influencing SAR backscatter was the surface area to volume ratio (SA/V) of the branches. This proved true for both broadleaf evergreens and conifers. As a forest stand matures, the form of the phytomass coalesces into fewer larger components and the calculated SA/V declines as biomass increases. As the SA/V declines the backscatter trends to increase since the radar has larger components from which reflections can occur.

  2. The vertical structure of the eastern Pacific ITCZs and associated circulation using the TRMM Precipitation Radar and in situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huaman, L.; Takahashi, K.

    2016-08-01

    The atmospheric circulation associated with the eastern Pacific single and double ITCZs, particularly its vertical structure, is little known due to the sparce observations. Using precipitation profiles from the Tropical Rainfall Measure Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar, with approximations to the liquid water and energy budget equations, we estimated vertical profiles of latent heating and vertical velocity in the far eastern Pacific (95°W-85°W) ITCZs in the 800-730 hPa layer. We combined this with Eastern Pacific Investigation of Climate campaign (EPIC2001) and other in situ data to produce a preliminary characterization of the meridional-vertical circulation. We found evidence of a double-cell structure in boreal fall between the ITCZ and the equator, with both shallow and upper level peaks in vertical velocity. In spring, the flow poleward of the two ITCZs has a single-cell structure, although around the equator it shows some hints of the double cells. Reanalysis and satellite-based data are shown to be unreliable for describing the vertical structure of the circulation.

  3. Evaluating the potential of image fusion of multispectral and radar remote sensing data for the assessment of water body structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunger, Sebastian; Karrasch, Pierre; Wessollek, Christine

    2016-10-01

    The European Water Framework Directive (Directive 2000/60/EC) is a mandatory agreement that guides the member states of the European Union in the field of water policy to fulfill the requirements for reaching the aim of the good ecological status of water bodies. In the last years several workflows and methods were developed to determine and evaluate the characteristics and the status of the water bodies. Due to their area measurements remote sensing methods are a promising approach to constitute a substantial additional value. With increasing availability of optical and radar remote sensing data the development of new methods to extract information from both types of remote sensing data is still in progress. Since most limitations of these data sets do not agree the fusion of both data sets to gain data with higher spectral resolution features the potential to obtain additional information in contrast to the separate processing of the data. Based thereupon this study shall research the potential of multispectral and radar remote sensing data and the potential of their fusion for the assessment of the parameters of water body structure. Due to the medium spatial resolution of the freely available multispectral Sentinel-2 data sets especially the surroundings of the water bodies and their land use are part of this study. SAR data is provided by the Sentinel-1 satellite. Different image fusion methods are tested and the combined products of both data sets are evaluated afterwards. The evaluation of the single data sets and the fused data sets is performed by means of a maximum-likelihood classification and several statistical measurements. The results indicate that the combined use of different remote sensing data sets can have an added value.

  4. A study on urban storm structure in Guangzhou metropolitan by Doppler weather Radar product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuilin, P.

    2016-12-01

    The characteristics of urban storm hyetograph is critical in realizing the metropolitan how to influence on storm and analyzing risk in different regions on urban flooding since the storm Global trends in increasing flooding frequency and urbanization pose observational and modeling challenges to infer the impacts of land use change and green infrastructure on the local hydrology. They also call for the development of methods to secure real-time information during flood propagation through urban areas, but also ground modeling efforts in field measurements.hyetograph determines the peak flooding volume. However, the characteristics of storm hyetograph with spatial-temporal distribution in the small-scale like urban areas have not sufficient consider. This study uses Doppler weather rainfall products with highly spatial and temporal precision to research the characteristics of urban storm hyetograph. Firstly, radar rainfall products during 2014-2015 are validated by observed storm hyetographs, and calculated mean NSE is 0.47, RMSE is 0.94 and RD is 3.63%. Secondly, the hyetograph obtained by radar data and the representative hyetograph in each grid point in Guangzhou metropolitan is selected 50% Huff curve to calculate and the result shows the representative hyetograph in most regions is the 2rd quartile (25-50%) Huff curve in Guangzhou. The location of peak rainfall in urban areas where are Tianhe, Yuexiu and Haizhu districts which the percent of location is between 38-50% mostly is later than sub-urban areas (25-37%). Meanwhile, the percent of peak rainfall location and total precipitation have a positive correlation (0.55). The peak flooding volume simulated with SWMM constructed by lidar data using the four quartiles Huff curve and finding 2rd quartile have the biggest flooding risk for a certain return period. The 2rd quartile Huff curve is further separated with urban and sub-urban areas to calculate the flooding volume and the peak flooding volume of urban

  5. Optical and radar observations of small-scale polar cap auroral structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samara, M.; Michell, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    We present ground-based auroral observations from Resolute Bay, Nunavut, Canada (74.73°N, 94.9°W) during January 2011. Two electron-multiplying CCD (EMCCD) imagers were operated at 31 frames per second. One was equipped with an all-sky field of view (FOV) lens and the other with a narrow (19°) FOV lens, centered on the geographic zenith (0° Az., 90° El.), a few degrees away from magnetic zenith (315° Az., 88° El.). The Resolute Incoherent Scatter Radar (RISR) was operating in a mode that enabled common-volume observations with the imagers. Being well inside the polar cap, the magnetic field at Resolute Bay is considered ‘open’ and connects to the lobes of the magnetotail. However, there is no clear consensus on whether polar cap aurorae occur on open or closed field lines. The electron acceleration is likely driven by direct solar wind processes, distant tail lobe processes or plasma sheet processes. One possible mechanism for accelerating the precipitating electrons is the parallel electric field of inertial Alfvén waves. The dynamic nature of the small-scale auroral features, observed on several nights, and the altitude extent of the ionization observed with RISR provide support for this hypothesis.

  6. Shape of Titan from Cassini radar elevation measurements and implications for interior structure and composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Y. Q.; Zebker, H. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has collected nearly all of its planned radar acquisitions over the surface of Titan. These data now cover the moon about as completely as possible with the Cassini mission, minimizing gaps in coverage that existed earlier in the mission. We have reduced the surface elevation measurements acquired in the altimeter and SARtopo modes, and obtained best-fitting ellipsoid and spherical harmonic solutions for the Titan figure. These solutions represent shape models nearly as refined as Cassini can produce, although a handful of passes remain to be collected and incorporated into the solution. The improved data set still yields a Titan that is slightly out of hydrostatic equilibrium, possibly indicating the presence of unmodeled interior processes affecting the shape. Comparison of the shape with gravity measurements yields constraints on the interior. The outer ice shell appears to be rather thicker than many models predict, implying that the heat flow from the core may be significantly lower than most models assume. If so, then these data may suggest a relative lack of radiogenic material in the core.

  7. Structure, optical properties and thermal stability of Al2O3-WC nanocomposite ceramic spectrally selective solar absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang-Hu; Wang, Cheng-Bing; Guo, Zhi-Ming; Geng, Qing-Fen; Theiss, Wolfgang; Liu, Gang

    2016-08-01

    Traditional metal-dielectric composite coating has found important application in spectrally selective solar absorbers. However, fine metal particles can easily diffuse, congregate, or be oxidized at high temperature, which causes deterioration in the optical properties. In this work, we report a new spectrally selective solar absorber coating, composed of low Al2O3 ceramic volume fraction (Al2O3(L)-WC) layer, high Al2O3 ceramic volume fraction (Al2O3(H)-WC layer) and Al2O3 antireflection layer. The features of our work are: 1) compared with the metal-dielectric composites concept, Al2O3-WC nanocomposite ceramic successfully achieves the all-ceramic concept, which exhibits a high solar absorptance of 0.94 and a low thermal emittance of 0.08, 2) Al2O3 and WC act as filler material and host material, respectively, which are different from traditional concept, 3) Al2O3-WC nanocomposite ceramic solar absorber coating exhibits good thermal stability at 600 °C. In addition, the solar absorber coating is successfully modelled by a commercial optical simulation programme, the result of which agrees with the experimental results.

  8. Dendritic-metasurface-based flexible broadband microwave absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mei; Weng, Bin; Zhao, Jing; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2017-06-01

    Based on the dendritic metasurface model, a type of flexible and lightweight microwave absorber (MA) comprising resistance film array with dendritic slot (RFADS), dielectric material, and metal plate is proposed. A broadband absorptivity of >80% is obtained both from simulation and experiment at frequency ranges of 3.0-9.2 and 3.2-9.00 GHz, respectively. And the thickness of MA is 5 mm, which is only 0.05λ _{low}, or 0.15λ _ {high}, where the λ _{low} and the λ _{high} are the beginning and the end of the working frequency. By combining this metasurface-based MA with the dendritic-resistance-film-based microwave metasurface absorber (MMA), we designed a broadband MMA. The simulations and experiments showed that this kind of MMA can absorb the radiation effectively at a wide frequency range 4.5-17.5 GHz. And the thickness of this combined MMA is 4 mm. All the structures showed their insensitivity to the incident angle (0°-40°) and the polarization of the incident wave because of their structural symmetry. In addition, the small thickness, low apparent density, and flexibility made those structures possess the advantages of being applied in microwave stealth and radar cross-section (RCS) reduction.

  9. Evaluation of 3D Ground Penetrating Radar Efficiency for Abandoned Tailings Pond Internal Structure Analysis and Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortada, Unai; Martínez, Julián; Hidalgo, Mª Carmen; Rey, Javier

    2017-04-01

    Evaluation of 3D Ground Penetrating Radar Efficiency for Abandoned Tailings Pond Internal Structure Analysis and Risk Assessment Abandoned tailings ponds constitute a severe environmental problem in old Pb mining districts due to their high contents in metallic and semi-metallic elements. In most of the cases, there is a lack of information about the construction procedures and the previous environmental situation, which hinders the environmental risk evaluation. In these cases, Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) could be an interesting technique to analyze the internal structure of the tailings ponds and detect vulnerable zones for leaching processes. Consequently, the GPR could help in the abandoned tailings ponds environmental risk assessment. In this study, a GPR 3D campaign was carried out with a 250 MHz frequency antenna in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique in both the analysis of internal structures and the environmental risk assessment. Subsequently, 2D and 3D models were undertaken to represent graphically the obtained results. The studied tailings pond is located in the Guadiel river bank, a water course draining the mining district of Linares, Spain. The dam is 150 m length and 80 m width. The GPR 3D was done in a selected area near the central part of the pond. The analyzed grid was 25x50 m and the spacing of the slides was 1 m. The study revealed that the contact between the tailings and the substratum is located at 2.5 m. No intermediate layer was found, which means that the tailings pond was heightened on the fluvial terrace without any insulation system. Inside the first meter of the pond, a cross stratification was identified. The orientation of those laminations changed with the depth, which means that the stockpiling was performed from the different sides of the tailings pond. Furthermore, the direction of these stratifications is slightly concentric to the middle of the dam which could be associated with a central drainage system

  10. Visible light broadband perfect absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, X. L.; Meng, Q. X.; Yuan, C. X.; Zhou, Z. X.; Wang, X. O.

    2016-03-15

    The visible light broadband perfect absorbers based on the silver (Ag) nano elliptical disks and holes array are studied using finite difference time domain simulations. The semiconducting indium silicon dioxide thin film is introduced as the space layer in this sandwiched structure. Utilizing the asymmetrical geometry of the structures, polarization sensitivity for transverse electric wave (TE)/transverse magnetic wave (TM) and left circular polarization wave (LCP)/right circular polarization wave (RCP) of the broadband absorption are gained. The absorbers with Ag nano disks and holes array show several peaks absorbance of 100% by numerical simulation. These simple and flexible perfect absorbers are particularly desirable for various potential applications including the solar energy absorber.

  11. Radar Interferometry for Monitoring the Vibration Characteristics of Buildings and Civil Structures: Recent Case Studies in Spain.

    PubMed

    Luzi, Guido; Crosetto, Michele; Fernández, Enric

    2017-03-24

    The potential of a coherent microwave sensor to monitor the vibration characteristics of civil structures has been investigated in the past decade, and successful case studies have been published by different research teams. This remote sensing technique is based on the interferometric processing of real aperture radar acquisitions. Its capability to estimate, simultaneously and remotely, the displacement of different parts of the investigated structures, with high accuracy and repeatability, is its main advantage with respect to conventional sensors. A considerable amount of literature on this technique is available, including various case studies aimed at testing the ambient vibration of bridges, buildings, and towers. In the last years, this technique has been used in Spain for civil structures monitoring. In this paper, three examples of such case studies are described: the monitoring of the suspended bridge crossing the Ebro River at Amposta, the communications tower of Collserola in Barcelona, and an urban building located in Vilafranca del Penedès, a small town close to Barcelona. This paper summarizes the main outcomes of these case studies, underlining the advantages and limitations of the sensors currently available, and concluding with the possible improvements expected from the next generation of sensors.

  12. Radar Interferometry for Monitoring the Vibration Characteristics of Buildings and Civil Structures: Recent Case Studies in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Luzi, Guido; Crosetto, Michele; Fernández, Enric

    2017-01-01

    The potential of a coherent microwave sensor to monitor the vibration characteristics of civil structures has been investigated in the past decade, and successful case studies have been published by different research teams. This remote sensing technique is based on the interferometric processing of real aperture radar acquisitions. Its capability to estimate, simultaneously and remotely, the displacement of different parts of the investigated structures, with high accuracy and repeatability, is its main advantage with respect to conventional sensors. A considerable amount of literature on this technique is available, including various case studies aimed at testing the ambient vibration of bridges, buildings, and towers. In the last years, this technique has been used in Spain for civil structures monitoring. In this paper, three examples of such case studies are described: the monitoring of the suspended bridge crossing the Ebro River at Amposta, the communications tower of Collserola in Barcelona, and an urban building located in Vilafranca del Penedès, a small town close to Barcelona. This paper summarizes the main outcomes of these case studies, underlining the advantages and limitations of the sensors currently available, and concluding with the possible improvements expected from the next generation of sensors. PMID:28338604

  13. Signature of recent ice flow acceleration in the radar attenuation and temperature structure of Thwaites Glacier, West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Dustin; Seroussi, Helene; Chu, Winnie; Young, Duncan

    2016-04-01

    Englacial temperature structure exerts significant control on the rheology and flow of glaciers and ice sheets. It is however logistically prohibitive to directly measure at the glacier-catchment scale. As a result, numerical ice sheet models often make broad assumptions about englacial temperatures based on contemporary ice surface velocities. However, this assumption might break down in regions - like the Amundsen Sea Embayment - that have experienced recent acceleration since temperature and rheology do not respond instantaneously to changes in ice flow regime. To address this challenge, we present a new technique for estimating englacial attenuation rates using bed echoes from radar sounding data. We apply this technique to an airborne survey of Thwaites Glacier and compare the results to temperature and attenuation structures modeled using the numerical Ice Sheet System Model (ISSM) for three surface velocity scenarios. These include contemporary surface velocities, surface velocities from the early 1970s, and ice-sheet balance velocities. We find that the observed attenuation structure is much closer to those modeled with pre-acceleration surface velocities. This suggests that ice sheet models initialized with contemporary surface velocities are likely overestimating the temperature and underestimating the rheology of the fast-flowing trunk and grounding zone of Thwaites Glacier.

  14. Simultaneous observations of structure function parameter of refractive index using a high-resolution radar and the DataHawk small airborne measurement system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scipión, Danny E.; Lawrence, Dale A.; Milla, Marco A.; Woodman, Ronald F.; Lume, Diego A.; Balsley, Ben B.

    2016-09-01

    The SOUSY (SOUnding SYstem) radar was relocated to the Jicamarca Radio Observatory (JRO) near Lima, Peru, in 2000, where the radar controller and acquisition system were upgraded with state-of-the-art parts to take full advantage of its potential for high-resolution atmospheric sounding. Due to its broad bandwidth (4 MHz), it is able to characterize clear-air backscattering with high range resolution (37.5 m). A campaign conducted at JRO in July 2014 aimed to characterize the lower troposphere with a high temporal resolution (8.1 Hz) using the DataHawk (DH) small unmanned aircraft system, which provides in situ atmospheric measurements at scales as small as 1 m in the lower troposphere and can be GPS-guided to obtain measurements within the beam of the radar. This was a unique opportunity to make coincident observations by both systems and to directly compare their in situ and remotely sensed parameters. Because SOUSY only points vertically, it is only possible to retrieve vertical radar profiles caused by changes in the refractive index within the resolution volume. Turbulent variations due to scattering are described by the structure function parameter of refractive index Cn2. Profiles of Cn2 from the DH are obtained by combining pressure, temperature, and relative humidity measurements along the helical trajectory and integrated at the same scale as the radar range resolution. Excellent agreement is observed between the Cn2 estimates obtained from the DH and SOUSY in the overlapping measurement regime from 1200 m up to 4200 m above sea level, and this correspondence provides the first accurate calibration of the SOUSY radar for measuring Cn2.

  15. RADAR WARNING SYSTEM,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    RADAR TRACKING, *AIRCRAFT DEFENSE SYSTEMS, RADAR EQUIPMENT, AIR TO AIR, SEARCH RADAR, GUIDED MISSILES, HIGH SPEED BOMBING, EARLY WARNING SYSTEMS, FIRE CONTROL SYSTEM COMPONENTS, AIRCRAFT, TIME, CHINA.

  16. Jet stream related observations by MST radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gage, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    An overview of the jet stream and its observation by MST radar is presented. The climatology and synoptic and mesoscale structure of jet streams is briefly reviewed. MST radar observations of jet stream winds, and associated waves and turbulence are then considered. The possibility of using a network of ST radars to track jet stream winds in near real time is explored.

  17. Layered Subsurface Structure at the Chang'e-3 Landing Site Derived from Imaging Data: Awaiting Ground Truth from Chang'e-3 Radar Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, L.; Xiao, Z.; Xiao, L.; Zhao, J.

    2014-12-01

    Quantifying the subsurface stratigraphic and tectonic features of the Moon, with a depth from a few to thousands of meters, can provide significant information for solving scientific mysteries concerning regional and global evolution history. In December 2013, the Chinese Chang'e-3 (CE-3) spacecraft, carrying the Yutu (Jade Rabbit) rover, successfully landed on the northern Mare Imbrium, the Moon. The surface in-situ radar experiments by CE-3 mission provide an unprecedented opportunity to study the shallow subsurface geology of the Moon. While the processing and interpretation of radar observations usually depend on certain geophysical models and should consider regional geological settings. In this work, we quantified the subsurface structure at the CE-3 landing site using imaging data and illustrated a multi-layer subsurface structure model including three layers of regolith, two layers of basalt deposits and one layer of ejecta. Our result can provide essential references for CE-3 radar data processing and interpretation. The CE-3 radar observations can in turn validate previous technique for quantifying subsurface geology using imaging data, thus further deepening our understanding of lunar geoscience and exploration.

  18. An Evaluation of the Observational Capabilities of A Scanning 95-GHz Radar in Studying the 3D Structures of Marine Stratocumulus Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowley, Kevin

    Marine stratocumulus clouds play a critical role in Earth's radiative balance primarily due to the role of their high albedo reflecting incoming solar radiation, causing a cooling effect, while weakly reflecting outgoing infrared radiation. Characterization of the 3-Dimensional (3D) structure of these cloud systems over scales of 20-40 km is required to accurately account for the role of cloud inhomogeneity and structure on their shortwave forcing and lifetime, which has important applications for Global Climate Models. For first time, such 3D measurements in clouds were made available from a scanning cloud radar during the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) field campaign in the Azores Islands. The scanning radar observations were complemented by a suite of zenith-pointing active and passive remote sensors that were deployed to provide a detailed description of marine stratus over a long-term observation period in the ideal marine environment commonly found at the Azores. The scanning cloud radar observations present a shift from a multi-instrument, vertically pointing 'soda-straw' observation technique to a radar-only, 'radar-centric' observation technique. The scanning radar observations were gridded using a nearest-neighbor type scheme devised to take the natural variability of the observed field into account. The ability of the scheme to capture primary cloud properties (cloud fraction, cloud boundaries, drizzle detection) was assessed using measurements from the vertically pointing sensors. Despite the great sensitivity of the scanning cloud radar (-42.5 dBZ at 1 km range), the drop in sensitivity with range resulted in an artificial thinning of clouds with range from the radar. Drizzle-free cloud structures were undetectable beyond 5 km from the radar. Cloud fields containing drizzle were generally detectable to ranges exceeding 10 km from

  19. Ultra-flexible polarization-insensitive multiband terahertz metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; Fan, Wenhui

    2015-03-20

    A thin-flexible and polarization-insensitive multiband terahertz metamaterial absorber (MMA) has been investigated. Each unit cell of the MMA consists of two metallic structures, which include the top metal resonator ring and the bottom metal ground plane, separated by a thin-flexible dielectric spacer. Finite element simulation indicates that this MMA has three high absorption peaks in the terahertz region, with absorptivities of 89% at 0.72 THz, 98% at 1.4 THz, and 85% at 2.3 THz. However, because of its rotationally symmetric structure, this MMA is polarization-insensitive and can perform very well at a wide range of incident angles, namely, 30° for transverse electric waves and 40° for transverse magnetic waves. The thin-flexible device structure and good performance shows that this MMA is very promising to disguise objects and make them less detectable to radar in the terahertz region.

  20. Algorithmic analysis of quantum radar cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco; Venegas-Andraca, Salvador

    2015-05-01

    Sidelobe structures on classical radar cross section graphs are a consequence of discontinuities in the surface currents. In contrast, quantum radar theory states that sidelobe structures on quantum radar cross section graphs are due to quantum interference. Moreover, it is conjectured that quantum sidelobe structures may be used to detect targets oriented off the specular direction. Because of the high data bandwidth expected from quantum radar, it may be necessary to use sophisticated quantum signal analysis algorithms to determine the presence of stealth targets through the sidelobe structures. In this paper we introduce three potential quantum algorithmic techniques to compute classical and quantum radar cross sections. It is our purpose to develop a computer science-oriented tool for further physical analysis of quantum radar models as well as applications of quantum radar technology in various fields.

  1. Combining 3D seismic tomography and ground-penetrating radar to reveal the structure of a megalithic burial tomb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendes, Manuela; Caldeira, Bento; Borges, José

    2017-04-01

    This work describes a case study concerning a prehistoric buried tomb (around 3000 years B.C.) located near Évora (Portugal). This monument is a tomb completely buried with only five visible irregular small stones distributed in a circle of 3 meter in diameter. A multi-approach combining 3D seismic tomography and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) have been applied to identify hidden elements and arrangement of the stones, required prior to any excavation work. The methodology for the 3D seismic data acquisition involves a total of 24 shots recorded by four lines, with twelve fixed receivers each one. For the GPR survey was used a 400 MHz antenna which moves along parallel lines with 50 cm separation, over a 30x30 m2 area that contains the buried tomb; the GPR unit was configured to a horizontal rate of 50 scans per meter (1024 samples/scan) and a time window of 60 ns. This multi-approach procedure allowed defining: (i) the housing of the tomb in the basement structure; (ii) the presence of a hidden corridor; (iii) the description of the internal structure of the walls of the tomb; (iv) the state of preservation of the monument. Acknowledgements: This work is co-financed by the European Union through the European Regional Development Fund under COMPETE 2020 (Operational Program for Competitiveness and Internationalization) through the ICT project (UID / GEO / 04683/2013) under the reference POCI-01-0145 -FEDER-007690.

  2. A SPECTROPOLARIMETRIC TEST OF THE STRUCTURE OF THE INTRINSIC ABSORBERS IN THE QUASAR HS 1603+3820

    SciTech Connect

    Misawa, Toru; Kawabata, Koji S.; Eracleous, Michael; Charlton, Jane C.; Kashikawa, Nobunari E-mail: mce@astro.psu.ed E-mail: kawabtkj@hiroshima-u.ac.j

    2010-08-20

    We report the results of a spectropolarimetric observation of the C VI 'mini-broad' absorption line (mini-BAL) in the quasar HS 1603+3820 (z {sub em} = 2.542). The observations were carried out with the FOCAS instrument on the Subaru Telescope and yielded an extremely high polarization sensitivity of {delta}p{approx} 0.1%, at a resolving power of R {approx} 1500. HS 1603+3820 has been the target of a high-resolution spectroscopic monitoring campaign for more than four years, aimed at studying its highly variable C VI mini-BAL profile. Using the monitoring observations in an earlier paper, we were able to narrow down the causes of the variability to the following two scenarios: (1) scattering material of variable optical depth redirecting photons around the absorber and (2) a variable, highly ionized screen between the continuum source and the absorber which modulates the UV continuum incident on the absorber. The observations presented here provide a crucial test of the scattering scenario and lead us to disfavor it because (1) the polarization level is very small (p {approx} 0.6%) throughout the spectrum and (2) the polarization level does not increase across the mini-BAL trough. Thus, the variable screen scenario emerges as our favored explanation of the C VI mini-BAL variability. Our conclusion is bolstered by recent X-ray observations of nearby mini-BAL quasars, which show a rapidly variable soft X-ray continuum that appears to be the result of transmission through an ionized absorber of variable ionization parameter and optical depth.

  3. A Spectropolarimetric Test of the Structure of the Intrinsic Absorbers in the Quasar HS 1603+3820

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Toru; Kawabata, Koji S.; Eracleous, Michael; Charlton, Jane C.; Kashikawa, Nobunari

    2010-08-01

    We report the results of a spectropolarimetric observation of the C VI "mini-broad" absorption line (mini-BAL) in the quasar HS 1603+3820 (z em = 2.542). The observations were carried out with the FOCAS instrument on the Subaru Telescope and yielded an extremely high polarization sensitivity of δp~ 0.1%, at a resolving power of R ~ 1500. HS 1603+3820 has been the target of a high-resolution spectroscopic monitoring campaign for more than four years, aimed at studying its highly variable C VI mini-BAL profile. Using the monitoring observations in an earlier paper, we were able to narrow down the causes of the variability to the following two scenarios: (1) scattering material of variable optical depth redirecting photons around the absorber and (2) a variable, highly ionized screen between the continuum source and the absorber which modulates the UV continuum incident on the absorber. The observations presented here provide a crucial test of the scattering scenario and lead us to disfavor it because (1) the polarization level is very small (p ~ 0.6%) throughout the spectrum and (2) the polarization level does not increase across the mini-BAL trough. Thus, the variable screen scenario emerges as our favored explanation of the C VI mini-BAL variability. Our conclusion is bolstered by recent X-ray observations of nearby mini-BAL quasars, which show a rapidly variable soft X-ray continuum that appears to be the result of transmission through an ionized absorber of variable ionization parameter and optical depth. Based on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  4. Effect of ammonia etching on structural and electrical properties of Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hironiwa, Daisuke; Takai, Ryo; Chantana, Jakapan; Sakai, Noriyuki; Kato, Takuya; Sugimoto, Hiroki; Minemoto, Takashi

    2015-10-01

    The efficiency of Cu2ZnSn(Sx,Se1-x)4 (CZTSSe) solar cells is significantly lower than that of other solar cells such as Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells. This is because the open circuit voltage (Voc) of CZTSSe solar cells is significantly low as compared to theoretical value. Thus, we focus on the improvement of the hetero junction quality by a cleaning process using NH4OH etchant. By the NH4OH etching, the decrease in photoluminescence intensity of CZTSSe absorber is observed, implying that the defects are generated by the etching near the surface of CZTSSe absorbers. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that the cations such as Cu, Zn and Sn are dissolved out by the etching. Therefore, the NH4OH etching is not adequate to clean the surface of CZTSSe absorbers. Based on the above result, we optimized the condition of chemical bath deposition (CBD) of CdS buffer layers. Voc and fill factor are increased by decreasing the concentration of NH4OH, thereby improving efficiency. This is considered that the defects in space-charge region of CZTSSe solar cells are decreased by optimizing the solution for CBD-CdS. In conclusion, the Voc of CZTSSe solar cells are improved by reducing use of NH4OH in CBD-CdS solution.

  5. Comet Radar Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asphaug, Erik; CORE Science Team

    2010-10-01

    Comet Radar Explorer (CORE) is a low cost mission that uses sounding radar to image the 3D internal structure of the nucleus of Jupiter-family comet (JFC) Tempel 2. Believed to originate in the Kuiper Belt, JFCs are among the most primitive bodies in the inner solar system. CORE operates a 5 and 15 MHz Radar Reflection Imager from close orbit about the nucleus of Tempel 2, obtaining a dense network of echoes that are used to map its interior dielectric contrasts to high resolution (ង m) and resolve the dielectric constants to  m throughout the 16x8x9 km nucleus. The resulting clear images of internal structure and composition reveal how the nucleus was formed and how it has evolved. Radiometric tracking of the spacecraft orbit results in an interior mass distribution that constrains the radar-based models of interior composition. High-resolution visible and infrared color images provide the surface and exterior boundary conditions for interior models and hypotheses. They present the geology and morphology of the nucleus surface at meter-scales, and also the time-evolving activity, structure and composition of the inner coma. By making deep connections from interior to exterior, the data CORE provides will answer fundamental questions about the earliest stages of planetesimal evolution and planet formation, and lay the foundation for a comet nucleus sample return mission. CORE is led by Prof. Erik Asphaug of the University of California, Santa Cruz and is managed by JPL. It benefits from key scientific and payload contributions by ASI and CNES. The international science team has been assembled on the basis of their key involvement in past and ongoing missions to comets, and in Mars radar missions, and for their expertise in radar data analysis.

  6. Light scattering by dust particles (PROGRA2 experiment): size and structure effects for transparent and absorbing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadamcik, E.; Renard, J.-B.; Lasue, J.; Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.

    2007-08-01

    1- Introduction Cometary and possibly interplanetary dust particles seem to be mainly made of agglomerates of submicron and micron-sized grains. These particles are among the most primitive in our solar system. Regoliths on asteroidal and planetary surfaces seem to be loose materials produced by impinging meteorites on the surface of small bodies. Comparing their physical properties is thus fundamental to understand their evolution. To interpret remote observations of solar light scattered by dust particles and regoliths, it is necessary to use numerical and experimental simulations [1,2,3]. 2- PROGRA2 experiment PROGRA2 instruments are polarimeters; the light sources are two randomly polarized lasers (632.8 nm and 543.5 nm). Levitating particles (in microgravity or lifted by an air-draught) are studied by imaging polarimetry. Details on the instruments can be found in [4,5]. 3- Samples Two kinds of samples are studied: compact particles in the (1-400) micrometer size range and fluffy aggregates in the same size range, made from submicron and micronsized grains. The materials are transparent silica and absorbing carbon. Some deposited particles are huge agglomerates of micron-sized grains produced by random ballistic deposition of single grains [6,7] or produced by evaporation of mixtures in alcohol of fluffy aggregates of submicron-sized grains. Two samples are made of silica spheres coated by a carbonaceous black compound. Cometary analogues are mixtures of silica and amorphous carbon or Mg-Fe silicates mixed with amorphous carbon. 4- Results Phase curves and their main parameters (negative polarization at small phase angles and maximum polarization, Pmax, at 90-100° phase angle) for the different materials will be compared and related to the physical properties. For example, it is well known by numerical simulations and/or by experiments that the maximum polarization decreases when the size (submicrometer range) of the grains increases [2,8,9]. An inverse rule

  7. World's largest radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, J.

    1982-05-01

    The design, construction, and performance characteristics of an ionospheric sounding radar with a 1000-foot diameter (20 acre) antenna built at Arecibo are reviewed. The Arecibo Observatory facility can be used as a radar with transmission and reception at both 430 and 2380 MHz. The CW S-band transmitter consists of a Varian klystron with 2.5 MW peak, 450 kW average power capability. A dual channel receiver uses a maser amplifier. The UHF radar transmitter, employing two klystrons for 2.5 MW peak, 150 average power, is located in the ground station adjacent to the antenna, and the microwave energy is supplied to the feed structure via a waveguide line. The Arecibo antenna beamwidth is about 0.05 deg at 1420 MHz, with a solid angle about 0.002 square degrees; the instrument can easily detect a galaxy like the Milky Way at a distance of 700 million light years.

  8. Mapping Structural Elements in Volcanic Terrain Using Multiple Frequencies and Polarimetric Ground Penetrating Radar: Analogy to the Martian Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heggy, E.; Clifford, S. M.; Herique, A.; Kofman, W.; Hughes, S. S.

    2007-08-01

    Volcanic terrains are among the most prevalent on Mars and several planetary environments, their structural and stratigraphical investigation by GPR providing a powerful tool for understanding the mechanisms and chronological sequence that resulted in their formation. For this reason, a broadband (0.5 - 1.5 GHz) GPR was selected as one of the primary instruments for the European Space Agency's ExoMars rover that will be sent to Mars in 2013-2015. As part of the effort to evaluate the potential of this technique, we carried out a parametric study of several features at Craters of the Moon (COM) National Monument in Idaho (USA). This area, which includes expansive lave fields and volcanic constructs, is a hyper-arid environment with an average annual precipitation of less than _50 mm. It also displays considerable geochemical and geomorphological similarity to a variety of volcanic regions on Mars. Among the examples we investigated were a large cinder cone (Inferno Cone) and surrounding smooth- and rough-surfaced basaltic lava flows. We conducted multiple frequency 270-, 500- and 900-MHz GPR surveys, with both VV and HH polarizations, in both orthogonal and grid form in order to perform a three dimensional mapping of the consolidated core of the cinder cone beneath a thick layer (1-20 m) of tephra that accumulated as a result of different eruptive events. Analysis of the resulting data indicates maximum sounding depths of _13 m deep at 270 MHz, 8 m at 500 MHz and 5 m at 900 MHz in the unconsolidated tephra. Our gridded profiles show that the tephra distribution over the consolidated core is asymmetric, the eastern side being covered by thicker deposits than elsewhere. Our preliminary results also suggest the potential presence of a small spatter cone beneath the eastern flank of the cone. A similar approach was used to investigate the Blue Dragon basaltic lava field located to the south of Inferno Cone. The observed penetration depths were an order of magnitude

  9. Mapping Structural Elements in Volcanic Terrain Using Multiple Frequencies and Polarimetric Ground Penetrating Radar: Analogy to the Martian Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heggy, E.; Clifford, S. M.; Hughes, S. S.

    2007-08-01

    Volcanic terrains are among the most prevalent on Mars and several planetary environments, their structural and stratigraphical investigation by GPR providing a powerful tool for understanding the mechanisms and chronological sequence that resulted in their formation. For this reason, a broadband (0.5 - 1.5 GHz) GPR was selected as one of the primary instruments for the European Space Agency's ExoMars rover that will be sent to Mars in 2013-2015. As part of the effort to evaluate the potential of this technique, we carried out a parametric study of several features at Craters of the Moon (COM) National Monument in Idaho (USA). This area, which includes expansive lave fields and volcanic constructs, is a hyper-arid environment with an average annual precipitation of less than 50 mm. It also displays considerable geochemical and geomorphological similarity to a variety of volcanic regions on Mars. Among the examples we investigated were a large cinder cone (Inferno Cone) and surrounding smooth- and rough-surfaced basaltic lava flows. We conducted multiple frequency 270-, 500- and 900-MHz GPR surveys, with both VV and HH polarizations, in both orthogonal and grid form in order to perform a three dimensional mapping of the consolidated core of the cinder cone beneath a thick layer (1-20 m) of tephra that accumulated as a result of different eruptive events. Analysis of the resulting data indicates maximum sounding depths of 13 m deep at 270 MHz, 8 m at 500 MHz and 5 m at 900 MHz in the unconsolidated tephra. Our gridded profiles show that the tephra distribution over the consolidated core is asymmetric, the eastern side being covered by thicker deposits than elsewhere. Our preliminary results also suggest the potential presence of a small spatter cone beneath the eastern flank of the cone. A similar approach was used to investigate the Blue Dragon basaltic lava field located to the south of Inferno Cone. The observed penetration depths were an order of magnitude

  10. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-02-01

    Here, we demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Moreover, our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.

  11. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul K; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J M; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R; Luk, Ting S; Taylor, Antoinette J; Dalvit, Diego A R; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-02-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.

  12. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    DOE PAGES

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; ...

    2016-02-01

    Here, we demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Moreover, our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributionsmore » to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure.« less

  13. Metasurface Broadband Solar Absorber

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Abul K.; Kort-Kamp, Wilton J. M.; Sykora, Milan; Weisse-Bernstein, Nina R.; Luk, Ting S.; Taylor, Antoinette J.; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a broadband, polarization independent, wide-angle absorber based on a metallic metasurface architecture, which accomplishes greater than 90% absorptance in the visible and near-infrared range of the solar spectrum, and exhibits low absorptivity (emissivity) at mid- and far-infrared wavelengths. The complex unit cell of the metasurface solar absorber consists of eight pairs of gold nano-resonators that are separated from a gold ground plane by a thin silicon dioxide spacer. Our experimental measurements reveal high-performance absorption over a wide range of incidence angles for both s- and p-polarizations. We also investigate numerically the frequency-dependent field and current distributions to elucidate how the absorption occurs within the metasurface structure. PMID:26828999

  14. Multiparameter Radar and Aircraft Based Studies of Microphysical, Kinematic and Electrical Structure of Convective Clouds during CaPE

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-31

    Caylor 1991 ). distributions of p (0) from light rainfall (drizzle) and A conventional differential reflectivity ZDR radar , a "bright band ," the mean...above 8 km regions containing cloud water with low (-25 0 C ) at the time the 2-dB ZDR column concentrations of rain. began to fall back from the 5 km...et al. (1989) have reported single polarization radar observations of Lightning echoes were observed in thunderstorms lightning at UHF, S- band , and C

  15. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Efficient and Robust Design for Absorbing Boundary Conditions in Atomistic Computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Ming; Tang, Shao-Qiang

    2009-11-01

    We propose an efficient and robust way to design absorbing boundary conditions in atomistic computations. An optimal discrete boundary condition is obtained by minimizing a functional of a reflection coefficient integral over a range of wave numbers. The minimization is performed with respect to a set of wave numbers, at which transparent absorption is reached. Compared with the optimization with respect to the boundary condition coefficients suggested by E and Huang [Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 133501], we reduce considerably the number of independent variables and the computing cost. We further demonstrate with numerical examples that both the optimization and the wave absorption are more robust in the proposed design.

  16. Na incorporation into Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin-film solar cell absorbers deposited on polyimide: Impact on the chemical and electronic surface structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, X.; Caballero, R.; Félix, R.; Gerlach, D.; Kaufmann, C. A.; Schock, H.-W.; Wilks, R. G.; Bär, M.

    2012-02-01

    Na has deliberately been incorporated into Cu(In,Ga)Se2 ("CIGSe") chalcopyrite thin-film solar cell absorbers deposited on Mo-coated polyimide flexible substrates by adding differently thick layers of NaF in-between CIGSe absorber and Mo back contact. The impact of Na on the chemical and electronic surface structure of CIGSe absorbers with various Cu-contents deposited at comparatively low temperature (420 °C) has been studied using x-ray photoelectron and x-ray excited Auger electron spectroscopy. We observe a higher Na surface content for the Cu-richer CIGSe samples and can distinguish between two different chemical Na environments, best described as selenide-like and oxidized Na species, respectively. Furthermore, we find a Cu-poor surface composition of the CIGSe samples independent of Na content and — for very high Na contents — indications for the formation of a (Cu,Na)-(In,Ga)-Se like compound. With increasing Na surface content, also a shift of the photoemission lines to lower binding energies could be identified, which we interpret as a reduction of the downward band bending toward the CIGSe surface explained by the Na-induced elimination of InCu defects.

  17. Savannah woody structure modelling and mapping using multi-frequency (X-, C- and L-band) Synthetic Aperture Radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naidoo, Laven; Mathieu, Renaud; Main, Russell; Kleynhans, Waldo; Wessels, Konrad; Asner, Gregory; Leblon, Brigitte

    2015-07-01

    Structural parameters of the woody component in African savannahs provide estimates of carbon stocks that are vital to the understanding of fuelwood reserves, which is the primary source of energy for 90% of households in South Africa (80% in Sub-Saharan Africa) and are at risk of over utilisation. The woody component can be characterised by various quantifiable woody structural parameters, such as tree cover, tree height, above ground biomass (AGB) or canopy volume, each been useful for different purposes. In contrast to the limited spatial coverage of ground-based approaches, remote sensing has the ability to sense the high spatio-temporal variability of e.g. woody canopy height, cover and biomass, as well as species diversity and phenological status - a defining but challenging set of characteristics typical of African savannahs. Active remote sensing systems (e.g. Light Detection and Ranging - LiDAR; Synthetic Aperture Radar - SAR), on the other hand, may be more effective in quantifying the savannah woody component because of their ability to sense within-canopy properties of the vegetation and its insensitivity to atmosphere and clouds and shadows. Additionally, the various components of a particular target's structure can be sensed differently with SAR depending on the frequency or wavelength of the sensor being utilised. This study sought to test and compare the accuracy of modelling, in a Random Forest machine learning environment, woody above ground biomass (AGB), canopy cover (CC) and total canopy volume (TCV) in South African savannahs using a combination of X-band (TerraSAR-X), C-band (RADARSAT-2) and L-band (ALOS PALSAR) radar datasets. Training and validation data were derived from airborne LiDAR data to evaluate the SAR modelling accuracies. It was concluded that the L-band SAR frequency was more effective in the modelling of the CC (coefficient of determination or R2 of 0.77), TCV (R2 of 0.79) and AGB (R2 of 0.78) metrics in Southern African

  18. Combined Radar-Radiometer Rainfall Retrieval for TRMM Using Structure Function-Based Optimization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-28

    Cumulonimbus vertical velocity events in GATE. Part II: Synthesis and model core structure. J. Appi . Meteor., 37, 2458-2469. 187 BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH...rainfall retrieval algorithms,. J. Appi . Meteor., 33, 313-333. Farrar, M.R., and E.A. Smith, 1992: Spatial resolution enhancement of terrestrial features

  19. Remote sensing of auroral E region plasma structures by radio, radar, and UV techniques at solar minimum

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, S.; Valladares, C.E. ); Basu, S.; Eastes, R.; Huffman, R.E. ); Daniell, R.E. ); Chaturvedi, P.K. ); Livingston, R.C. )

    1993-02-01

    The unique capability of the Polar BEAR satellite to simultaneously image auroral luminosities at multiple ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths and to remote sense large-scale (hundreds to tens of kilometers) and small-scale (kilometers to hundreds of meters) plasma density structures with its multifrequency beacon package is utilized to probe the auroral E region in the vicinity of the incoherent scatter radar (ISR) facility near Sondrestrom. In particular, we present coordinated observations on two nights obtained during the sunspot minimum (sunspot number < 10) January-February 1987 period when good spatial and temporal conjunction was obtained between Polar BEAR overflights and Sondrestrom ISR measurements. With careful coordinated observations we were able to confirm that the energetic particle precipitation responsible for the UV emissions causes the electron density increases in the E region. The integrations up to the topside of these ISR electron density profiles were consistent with the total electron content (TEC) measured by the Polar BEAR satellite. An electron transport model was utilized to determine quantitatively the electron density profiles which could be produced by the particle precipitation, which also produced multiple UV emissions measured by the imager; these profiles were found to be in good agreement with the observed ISR profiles in the E region. This outer scale size is also consistent with the measured phase to amplitude scintillation ratio. An estimate of the linear growth rate of the gradient-drift instability in the E region shows that these plasma density irregularities could have been generated by this process. The mutual consistency of these different sets of measurements provides confidence in the ability of the different techniques to remote sense large- and small-scale plasma density structures in the E region at least during sunspot minimum when the convection-dominated high-latitude F region is fairly weak. 56 refs., 16 figs.

  20. Decoloration and mineralization of reactive dyes using electron beam irradiation, Part I: Effect of the dye structure, concentration and absorbed dose (single, binary and ternary systems)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahdat, Ali; Bahrami, S. Hajir; Arami, M.; Bahjat, A.; Tabakh, F.; Khairkhah, M.

    2012-07-01

    In this study, three different reactive dyes (C.I. Reactive Red 4, C.I. Reactive Blue 2 and C.I. Reactive Yellow 4) and their blend solutions were irradiated with 10 MeV electron beam. Effect of absorbed dose, dye structure and primary solution concentrations on the pH value changes, degree of decoloration and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal of solutions were investigated. Results show that this method is effective in decomposition and decoloration of the dyes solutions. This method can be applied in mineralization of wastewater containing different dyes.

  1. Planetary radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    The radar astronomy activities supported by the Deep Space Network during June, July, and August 1980 are reported. The planetary bodies observed were Venus, Mercury, and the asteroid Toro. Data were obtained at both S and X band, and the observations were considered successful.

  2. Structural health monitoring of engineered structures using a space-borne synthetic aperture radar multi-temporal approach: from cultural heritage sites to war zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milillo, Pietro; Tapete, Deodato; Cigna, Francesca; Perissin, Daniele; Salzer, Jacqueline; Lundgren, Paul; Fielding, Eric; Burgmann, Roland; Biondi, Filippo; Milillo, Giovanni; Serio, Carmine

    2016-10-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) of engineered structures consists of an automated or semi-automated survey system that seeks to assess the structural condition of an anthropogenic structure. The aim of an SHM system is to provide insights into possible induced damage or any inherent signals of deformation affecting the structure in terms of detection, localization, assessment, and prediction. During the last decade there has been a growing interest in using several remote sensing techniques, such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR), for SHM. Constellations of SAR satellites with short repeat time acquisitions permit detailed surveys temporal resolution and millimetric sensitivity to deformation that are at the scales relevant to monitoring large structures. The all-weather multi-temporal characteristics of SAR make its products suitable for SHM systems, especially in areas where in situ measurements are not feasible or not cost effective. To illustrate this capability, we present results from COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) and TerraSAR-X SAR observations applied to the remote sensing of engineered structures. We show how by using multiple-geometry SAR-based products which exploit both phase and amplitude of the SAR signal we can address the main objectives of an SHM system including detection and localization. We highlight that, when external data such as rain or temperature records are available or simple elastic models can be assumed, the SAR-based SHM capability can also provide an interpretation in terms of assessment and prediction. We highlight examples of the potential for such imaging capabilities to enable advances in SHM from space, focusing on dams and cultural heritage areas.

  3. Potential of Radar Imaging and Sounding Methods in Mapping Heavily Eroded Impact Craters: Mapping Some Structural Elements of the Hico Crater, TX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heggy, E.; Horz, F.; Reid, A. M.; Hall, S. A.; Chan, C.

    2004-01-01

    Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) data collected over an area north of the town of Hico, central Texas, have been used to map disturbances in the surface topography and subsurface stratigraphy. The Radar topography results confirm the presence of multiple rings suggestive of an impact crater. Correlation between the orbital SRTM and on-the-ground GPR field data are affected by different biases related to variations in terrain and vegetation cover. Nevertheless, the correspondence of the two data sets supports the earlier conclusions that a complex, multiple ring impact structure is reflected in the topography of this area. The SRTM data reveal three previously unrecognized rings; with the outermost ring some 5-6 km in diameter. The crater appears to be significantly larger than the size (2.5 km diameter) previously inferred on the basis of aerial images. In addition, the GPR data suggest the presence of subsurface faulting that spatially coincides with the two inner rings of the crater. This suggests that the topographic rings are structurally controlled by faulting.

  4. Four-beam measurements of ionospheric structure with MU radar during the low-latitude auroral event of 20-23 October 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, W.L. Boston Univ., MA ); Fukao, Shoichiro; Takami, Tomoyuki; Tsuda, Toshitaka; Kato, Susumu )

    1991-11-01

    The MU radar was used to observe the ionospheric F-region electron density simultaneously in four oblique beams during the geomagnetic storm of 20-23 October 1989, when the first significant auroral display over Japan since 1960 was observed. The four beams, separated by about 250 km horizontally in the F region, observed drastically different behavior, with independent and extreme changes occurring on time scales of one minute during the period of peak activity, indicating a strongly structured ionosphere streaming over the radar. The authors observed cases in which, simultaneously, a deep trough was seen in one beam, densities exceeding 4 {times} 10{sup 6} cm{sup {minus}3} were seen in another, and a normal ionosphere was seen in a third. During the most disturbed periods the F-layer peak height appeared to rise to 800 km altitude in one beam while it remained near 500 km in another.

  5. Ultra-Thin Dual-Band Polarization-Insensitive and Wide-Angle Perfect Metamaterial Absorber Based on a Single Circular Sector Resonator Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hao; Cheng, Yong Zhi

    2017-09-01

    We present a simple design for an ultra-thin dual-band polarization-insensitive and wide-angle perfect metamaterial absorber (PMMA) based on a single circular sector resonator structure (CSRS). Both simulation and experimental results reveal that two resonance peaks with average absorption above 99% can be achieved. The dual-band PMMA is ultra-thin with total thickness of 0.5 mm, which is structure reveal the physical picture of the dual-band absorption. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the PMMA could retain high absorption level at large angles of polarization and incidence for both transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) modes. Furthermore, the absorption properties of the PMMA can be adjusted by varying the geometric parameters of the unit-cell structure.

  6. Passive vibration control in a building-like structure using a tuned-mass-damper and an autoparametric cantilever beam absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enriquez-Zarate, J.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.; Silva-Navarro, G.

    2015-04-01

    This article considers a theoretical and experimental comparative analysis in the responses of a three-story building-like structure using two different schemes of passive vibration control. These control schemes are designed to reduce the effects of resonant vibrations generated by an electromechanical shaker located in the base of the building-like structure. The first control scheme consists on the design of a Tuned-Mass-Damper located over the third floor of the structure, and the second control scheme considers the implementation of an autoparametric cantilever beam absorber. The mathematical model of the overall system is obtained using Euler-Lagrange method. In order to validate the frequency response of the main system a finite element model is completed. Some numerical and experimental results are included to show the dynamic behavior and stability performance of the overall mechanical system.

  7. Structural changes caused by radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis: the effect of X-ray absorbed dose in a fungal multicopper oxidase.

    PubMed

    De la Mora, Eugenio; Lovett, Janet E; Blanford, Christopher F; Garman, Elspeth F; Valderrama, Brenda; Rudino-Pinera, Enrique

    2012-05-01

    X-ray radiation induces two main effects at metal centres contained in protein crystals: radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis and a resulting decrease in metal occupancy. In blue multicopper oxidases (BMCOs), the geometry of the active centres and the metal-to-ligand distances change depending on the oxidation states of the Cu atoms, suggesting that these alterations are catalytically relevant to the binding, activation and reduction of O(2). In this work, the X-ray-determined three-dimensional structure of laccase from the basidiomycete Coriolopsis gallica (Cg L), a high catalytic potential BMCO, is described. By combining spectroscopic techniques (UV-Vis, EPR and XAS) and X-ray crystallography, structural changes at and around the active copper centres were related to pH and absorbed X-ray dose (energy deposited per unit mass). Depletion of two of the four active Cu atoms as well as low occupancies of the remaining Cu atoms, together with different conformations of the metal centres, were observed at both acidic pH and high absorbed dose, correlating with more reduced states of the active coppers. These observations provide additional evidence to support the role of flexibility of copper sites during O(2) reduction. This study supports previous observations indicating that interpretations regarding redox state and metal coordination need to take radiation effects explicitly into account.

  8. Structural changes caused by radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis: the effect of X-ray absorbed dose in a fungal multicopper oxidase

    PubMed Central

    De la Mora, Eugenio; Lovett, Janet E.; Blanford, Christopher F.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Valderrama, Brenda; Rudino-Pinera, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    X-ray radiation induces two main effects at metal centres contained in protein crystals: radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis and a resulting decrease in metal occupancy. In blue multicopper oxidases (BMCOs), the geometry of the active centres and the metal-to-ligand distances change depending on the oxidation states of the Cu atoms, suggesting that these alterations are catalytically relevant to the binding, activation and reduction of O2. In this work, the X-ray-determined three-dimensional structure of laccase from the basidiomycete Coriolopsis gallica (Cg L), a high catalytic potential BMCO, is described. By combining spectroscopic techniques (UV–Vis, EPR and XAS) and X-ray crystallography, structural changes at and around the active copper centres were related to pH and absorbed X-­ray dose (energy deposited per unit mass). Depletion of two of the four active Cu atoms as well as low occupancies of the remaining Cu atoms, together with different conformations of the metal centres, were observed at both acidic pH and high absorbed dose, correlating with more reduced states of the active coppers. These observations provide additional evidence to support the role of flexibility of copper sites during O2 reduction. This study supports previous observations indicating that interpretations regarding redox state and metal coordination need to take radiation effects explicitly into account. PMID:22525754

  9. Validation of FD-TD modeling of the radar cross section of three-dimensional structures spanning up to nine wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taflove, A.; Umashankar, K. R.; Jurgens, T. G.

    1985-06-01

    The validation of the finite-difference time-domain (FD-TD) method for modeling the monostatic radar cross section of three-dimensional conducting structures is reported. The structures modeled and tested span up to nine free-space wavelengths and exhibit such scattering physics as edge and corner diffraction, corner reflection, and cavity penetration. The results indicate that FD-TD provides a high modeling accuracy of 1 dB over at least a 40 dB dynamic range relative to reliable anechoic chamber measurements.

  10. Multiparameter Radar and Aircraft Based Studies of the Micro-Physical, Kinematic and Electrical Structure of Convective Clouds.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-14

    study is related to multiparameter radar studies of lightning echoes and a triggered lightning event. q 6 C , 3 O7444/S,•~e ,•,=g vo, 4• - 074 14...SIUIICT TERMS WAMiRN Of PAGES Radar , electrical, storms, lightning jI WA COM. i?. 11cunty cSWICATsON I 13. sECUouTy c •A1SIDCArflO 1%. SECURITY $ASSWI...hence- _ ,, . forth all times are UTC and all heights are msl). For > c e 1 1 B e a few minutes the dual-frequency (S/X- band ) reflectivity ratio, DFR, was

  11. Radars in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delnore, Victor E.

    1990-01-01

    The capabilities of active microwave devices operating from space (typically, radar, scatterometers, interferometers, and altimeters) are discussed. General radar parameters and basic radar principles are explained. Applications of these parameters and principles are also explained. Trends in space radar technology, and where space radars and active microwave sensors in orbit are going are discussed.

  12. TRMM radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okamoto, Kenichi

    1993-01-01

    The results of a conceptual design study and the performance of key components of the Bread Board Model (BBM) of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) radar are presented. The radar, which operates at 13.8 GHz and is designed to meet TRMM mission objectives, has a minimum measurable rain rate of 0.5 mm/h with a range resolution of 250 m, a horizontal resolution of about 4 km, and a swath width of 220 km. A 128-element active phased array system is adopted to achieve contiguous scanning within the swath. The basic characteristics of BBM were confirmed by experiments. The development of EM started with the cooperation of NASDA and CRL.

  13. A polarization-independent broadband terahertz absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Cheng; Zang, XiaoFei E-mail: ymzhu@usst.edu.cn; Wang, YiQiao; Chen, Lin; Cai, Bin; Zhu, YiMing E-mail: ymzhu@usst.edu.cn

    2014-07-21

    A highly efficient broadband terahertz absorber is designed, fabricated, and experimentally as well as theoretically evaluated. The absorber comprises a heavily doped silicon substrate and a well-designed two-dimensional grating. Due to the destructive interference of waves and diffraction, the absorber can achieve over 95% absorption in a broad frequency range from 1 to 2 THz and for angles of incidence from 0° to 60°. Such a terahertz absorber is also polarization-independent due to its symmetrical structure. This omnidirectional and broadband absorber have potential applications in anti-reflection coatings, imaging systems, and so on.

  14. Evolution of microphysical structure of a subtropical squall line observed by a polarimetric radar and a disdrometer during OPACC in Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jing; Zhao, Kun; Huang, Hao; Zhou, Bowen; Yang, Zhonglin; Chen, Gang; Wang, Mingjun; Wen, Long; Dai, Huaning; Xu, Lili; Liu, Su; Zhang, Guifu; Lee, Wen-Chau

    2017-08-01

    The evolution of the microphysical structures of a subtropical squall line observed during the Observation, Prediction and Analysis of Severe Convection of China (OPACC) field campaign in Eastern China is documented in this paper. The data collected from a C-band, polarimetric Doppler radar (reflectivity Z, differential reflectivity ZDR, and specific differential phase KDP) and a disdrometer are used to investigate the variations of microphysical characteristics within the convective region during the formative, intensifying, and mature stages of the squall line. The microphysical characteristics of the squall line are noticeably different among these three stages. When the squall line develops from the formative stage to the mature stage, its radar-derived drop size distribution (DSD) in the convective region evolves from continental-like convection to more maritime-like convection. Contrary to previous studies, the DSD characteristics of a convective line may not be simply locked to a geographical location but varied extensively throughout its life cycle. The polarimetric radar-derived liquid water content below the freezing level in the convective region is 3 times higher than the ice water content above the freezing level. This, in conjunction with a low cloud base ( 0.68 km) and a high freezing level ( 5 km), indicates a deep warm cloud layer and the dominance of the warm rain process within this squall line.

  15. Radar Sounder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    over the shorter time period (resulting in a multilook SAR ) with the result that spatial resolution, the usual r~ason for using SAR techniques, degrades...Field - - - ALT 21. Sea Surface Topography - - - SAR , ALT 22. Ocean Waves (sea, swell, surf) V. Good Some V. Good SAR , ALT * with additional lower freq...OLS - Operational Line-scan System radiometer (4-6 GHz?) ALT - Altimeter •* good at low microwave SAR - Synthetic Aperture frequencies Radar + over

  16. Structural changes caused by radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis: the effect of X-ray absorbed dose in a fungal multicopper oxidase

    SciTech Connect

    De la Mora, Eugenio; Lovett, Janet E.; Blanford, Christopher F.; Garman, Elspeth F.; Valderrama, Brenda; Rudino-Pinera, Enrique

    2012-05-01

    Radiation-induced reduction, radiolysis of copper sites and the effect of pH value together with the concomitant geometrical distortions of the active centres were analysed in several fungal (C. gallica) laccase structures collected at cryotemperature. This study emphasizes the importance of careful interpretation when the crystallographic structure of a metalloprotein is described. X-ray radiation induces two main effects at metal centres contained in protein crystals: radiation-induced reduction and radiolysis and a resulting decrease in metal occupancy. In blue multicopper oxidases (BMCOs), the geometry of the active centres and the metal-to-ligand distances change depending on the oxidation states of the Cu atoms, suggesting that these alterations are catalytically relevant to the binding, activation and reduction of O{sub 2}. In this work, the X-ray-determined three-dimensional structure of laccase from the basidiomycete Coriolopsis gallica (Cg L), a high catalytic potential BMCO, is described. By combining spectroscopic techniques (UV–Vis, EPR and XAS) and X-ray crystallography, structural changes at and around the active copper centres were related to pH and absorbed X-ray dose (energy deposited per unit mass). Depletion of two of the four active Cu atoms as well as low occupancies of the remaining Cu atoms, together with different conformations of the metal centres, were observed at both acidic pH and high absorbed dose, correlating with more reduced states of the active coppers. These observations provide additional evidence to support the role of flexibility of copper sites during O{sub 2} reduction. This study supports previous observations indicating that interpretations regarding redox state and metal coordination need to take radiation effects explicitly into account.

  17. Arecibo radar imagery of Mars: The major volcanic provinces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harmon, John K.; Nolan, Michael C.; Husmann, Diana I.; Campbell, Bruce A.

    2012-08-01

    We present Earth-based radar images of Mars obtained with the upgraded Arecibo S-band (λ = 12.6 cm) radar during the 2005-2012 oppositions. The imaging was done using the same long-code delay-Doppler technique as for the earlier (pre-upgrade) imaging but at a much higher resolution (˜3 km) and, for some regions, a more favorable sub-Earth latitude. This has enabled us to make a more detailed and complete mapping of depolarized radar reflectivity (a proxy for small-scale surface roughness) over the major volcanic provinces of Tharsis, Elysium, and Amazonis. We find that vast portions of these regions are covered by radar-bright lava flows exhibiting circular polarization ratios close to unity, a characteristic that is uncommon for terrestrial lavas and that is a likely indicator of multiple scattering from extremely blocky or otherwise highly disrupted flow surfaces. All of the major volcanoes have radar-bright features on their shields, although the brightness distribution on Olympus Mons is very patchy and the summit plateau of Pavonis Mons is entirely radar-dark. The older minor shields (paterae and tholi) are largely or entirely radar-dark, which is consistent with mantling by dust or pyroclastic material. Other prominent radar-dark features include: the "fan-shaped deposits", possibly glacial, associated with the three major Tharsis Montes shields; various units of the Medusae Fossae Formation; a region south and west of Biblis Patera where "Stealth" deposits appear to obscure Tharsis flows; and a number of "dark-halo craters" with radar-absorbing ejecta blankets deposited atop surrounding bright flows. Several major bright features in Tharsis are associated with off-shield lava flows; these include the Olympus Mons basal plains, volcanic fields east and south of Pavonis Mons, the Daedalia Planum flows south of Arsia Mons, and a broad expanse of flows extending east from the Tharsis Montes to Echus Chasma. The radar-bright lava plains in Elysium are

  18. Design and realization of one-dimensional double hetero-structure photonic crystals for infrared-radar stealth-compatible materials applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhixun; Cheng, Yongzhi Nie, Yan; Wang, Xian; Gong, Rongzhou

    2014-08-07

    In this paper, a new type one-dimensional (1D) double hetero-structure composite photonic crystal (CPC) for infrared-radar stealth-compatible materials applications was proposed and studied numerically and experimentally. First, based on transfer matrix method of thin-film optical theory, the propagation characteristics of the proposed structure comprising a stack of different alternating micrometer-thick layers of germanium and zinc sulfide were investigated numerically. Calculation results exhibit that this 1D single hetero-structure PC could achieve a flat high reflectivity gradually with increasing the number of the alternating media layers in a single broadband range. Then, based on principles of distributed Bragg reflector micro-cavity, a 1D double hetero-structure CPC comprising four PCs with thickness of 0.797 μm, 0.592 μm, 1.480 μm, and 2.114 μm, respectively, was proposed. Calculation results exhibit that this CPC could achieve a high reflectance of greater than 0.99 in the wavelength ranges of 3–5 μm and 8–14 μm and agreed well with experiment. Further experiments exhibit that the infrared emissivity of the proposed CPC is as low as 0.073 and 0.042 in the wavelength ranges of 3–5 μm and 8–12 μm, respectively. In addition, the proposed CPC can be used to construct infrared-radar stealth-compatible materials due to its high transmittance in radar wave band.

  19. Structures in sporadic-E observed with an impedance probe during the SEEK Campaign: Comparisons with neutral-wind and radar-echo observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Masayuki; Ono, Takayuki; Oya, Hiroshi; Tsunoda, Roland T.; Larsen, Miguel F.; Fukao, Shoichiro; Yamamoto, Mamoru

    In order to clarify the origin of the so-called quasi periodic echoes (QPE) that have been often detected by radar observations in the presence of sporadic-E (Es) layers in the nighttime midlatitude ionosphere, two sounding rockets were launched during the SEEK (Sporadic-E Experiment over Kyushu) campaign. Each rocket carried a swept-frequency impedance probe to measure the E-region electron-density (Ne) profile. Using the four Ne profiles obtained during the two rocket flights together with a neutral-wind profile obtained from a trimethyl aluminum (TMA) chemical release experiment on one of the rockets and QPE obtained with a ground-based radar, we consider the role of wind shear in the formation of the observed Es layers, and the question of whether QPE are associated with Es layers that are modulated in altitude. The Ne profiles of Es structures that were obtained in the presence of QPE were characterized by the highly concentrated thin layers. The formation of such a thin layer by a neutral-wind shear process was confirmed in comparison with the TMA measurements. The peak Ne values of the Es layers ranged from 2.2 to 9.3 × 104 el/cm³ near 100-km altitude. These primary Es layers were accompanied by significant secondary structures that were located about 12 to 20 km above the main Es layers and had peak Ne that ranged from 5.2 × 10³ to 1.3×104 el/cm³. The average altitude profiles of QPE approximately covered the range where the Es-layer peaks appeared. Our principal finding is that the observed Es structures tended to resemble horizontally stratified layers rather than structures with deep altitude modulation like previous QPE model, although the rocket measurements were separated from those by radar by 90 to 145 km.

  20. Shuttle imaging radar experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elachi, C.; Brown, W.E.; Cimino, J.B.; Dixon, T.; Evans, D.L.; Ford, J.P.; Saunders, R.S.; Breed, C.; Masursky, H.; McCauley, J.F.; Schaber, G.; Dellwig, L.; England, A.; MacDonald, H.; Martin-Kaye, P.; Sabins, F.

    1982-01-01

    The shuttle imaging radar (SIR-A) acquired images of a variety of the earth's geologic areas covering about 10 million square kilometers. Structural and geomorphic features such as faults, folds, outcrops, and dunes are clearly visible in both tropical and arid regions. The combination of SIR-A and Seasat images provides additional information about the surface physical properties: topography and roughness. Ocean features were also observed, including large internal waves in the Andaman Sea. Copyright ?? 1982 AAAS.

  1. Annealing effect on the structural and optical properties of Cr/α-Cr2O3 monodispersed particles based solar absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamlich, S.; McCrindle, R.; Nuru, Z. Y.; Cingo, N.; Maaza, M.

    2013-01-01

    A cost-effective and environmentally friendly green chemical method, the so-called aqueous chemical growth (ACG) method, was used to deposit chromium/alpha-chromium(III) oxide, Cr/α-Cr2O3, monodispersed particles, for solar absorbers applications. The deposited particles were annealed at various temperatures in a hydrogen atmosphere for 2 h to study the annealing temperature dependence of the structural, chemical and optical properties of the particles grown on tantalum substrates. The deposited Cr/α-Cr2O3 was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), attenuated total reflection (ATR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), and diffuse reflectance UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. The XRD and ATR analysis indicated that by increasing annealing temperature, the particles crystallinity was improved and Ta2O5 was formed around 600 °C, due to the fast oxygen diffusion from the deposited α-Cr2O3 toward the tantalum substrate. The optical measurements show that samples annealed at 400 and 500 °C exhibit the targeted high absorbing optical characteristics of "Black chrome", while those annealed below 400 °C and above 500 °C show a significant low absorptivity and high emissivity.

  2. Radar proves its worth in dam rehabilitation

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    This article outlines the use of radar techniques to survey the masonry structure of White Marble Dam. The survey used a subsurface interface radar, and this equipment displayed a cross-sectional profile of the entire structure, revealing the size and location of any faults. By avoiding the draining and dredging of the upstream pool, it is estimated that this technique saved three months.

  3. Structural dynamics of phenylisothiocyanate in the light-absorbing excited states: resonance Raman and complete active space self-consistent field calculation study.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Bing; Xue, Jia-Dan; Zheng, Xuming; Fang, Wei-Hai

    2014-05-21

    The excited state structural dynamics of phenyl isothiocyanate (PITC) after excitation to the light absorbing S2(A'), S6(A'), and S7(A') excited states were studied by using the resonance Raman spectroscopy and complete active space self-consistent field method calculations. The UV absorption bands of PITC were assigned. The vibrational assignments were done on the basis of the Fourier transform (FT)-Raman and FT-infrared measurements, the density-functional theory computations, and the normal mode analysis. The A-, B-, and C-bands resonance Raman spectra in cyclohexane, acetonitrile, and methanol solvents were, respectively, obtained at 299.1, 282.4, 266.0, 252.7, 228.7, 217.8, and 208.8 nm excitation wavelengths to probe the corresponding structural dynamics of PITC. The results indicated that the structural dynamics in the S2(A'), S6(A'), and S7(A') excited states were very different. The conical intersection point CI(S2/S1) were predicted to play important role in the low-lying excited state decay dynamics. Two major decay channels were predicted for PITC upon excitation to the S2(A') state: the radiative S(2,min) → S0 transition and the nonradiative S2 → S1 internal conversion via CI(S2/S1). The differences in the decay dynamics between methyl isothiocyanate and PITC in the first light absorbing excited state were discussed. The role of the intersystem crossing point ISC(S1/T1) in the excited state decay dynamics of PITC is evaluated.

  4. Structural dynamics of phenylisothiocyanate in the light-absorbing excited states: Resonance Raman and complete active space self-consistent field calculation study

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, Bing Xue, Jia-Dan Zheng, Xuming E-mail: zxm@zstu.edu.cn; Fang, Wei-Hai E-mail: fangwh@dnu.edu.cn

    2014-05-21

    The excited state structural dynamics of phenyl isothiocyanate (PITC) after excitation to the light absorbing S{sub 2}(A′), S{sub 6}(A′), and S{sub 7}(A′) excited states were studied by using the resonance Raman spectroscopy and complete active space self-consistent field method calculations. The UV absorption bands of PITC were assigned. The vibrational assignments were done on the basis of the Fourier transform (FT)-Raman and FT-infrared measurements, the density-functional theory computations, and the normal mode analysis. The A-, B-, and C-bands resonance Raman spectra in cyclohexane, acetonitrile, and methanol solvents were, respectively, obtained at 299.1, 282.4, 266.0, 252.7, 228.7, 217.8, and 208.8 nm excitation wavelengths to probe the corresponding structural dynamics of PITC. The results indicated that the structural dynamics in the S{sub 2}(A′), S{sub 6}(A′), and S{sub 7}(A′) excited states were very different. The conical intersection point CI(S{sub 2}/S{sub 1}) were predicted to play important role in the low-lying excited state decay dynamics. Two major decay channels were predicted for PITC upon excitation to the S{sub 2}(A′) state: the radiative S{sub 2,min} → S{sub 0} transition and the nonradiative S{sub 2} → S{sub 1} internal conversion via CI(S{sub 2}/S{sub 1}). The differences in the decay dynamics between methyl isothiocyanate and PITC in the first light absorbing excited state were discussed. The role of the intersystem crossing point ISC(S{sub 1}/T{sub 1}) in the excited state decay dynamics of PITC is evaluated.

  5. Ferroelectrics based absorbing layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Jianping; Sadaune, Véronique; Burgnies, Ludovic; Lippens, Didier

    2014-07-01

    We show that ferroelectrics-based periodic structure made of BaSrTiO3 (BST) cubes, arrayed onto a metal plate with a thin dielectric spacer film exhibit a dramatic enhancement of absorbance with value close to unity. The enhancement is found around the Mie magnetic resonance of the Ferroelectrics cubes with the backside metal layer stopping any transmitted waves. It also involves quasi-perfect impedance matching resulting in reflection suppression via simultaneous magnetic and electrical activities. In addition, it was shown numerically the existence of a periodicity optimum, which is explained from surface waves analysis along with trade-off between the resonance damping and the intrinsic loss of ferroelectrics cubes. An experimental verification in a hollow waveguide configuration with a good comparison with full-wave numerical modelling is at last reported by measuring the scattering parameters of single and dual BST cubes schemes pointing out coupling effects for densely packed structures.

  6. Potassium doped methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) thin films as a potential absorber for perovskite solar cells; structural, morphological, electronic and optoelectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzammal uz Zaman, Muhammad; Imran, Muhammad; Saleem, Abida; Kamboh, Afzal Hussain; Arshad, Muhammad; Khan, Nawazish Ali; Akhter, Parvez

    2017-10-01

    In this article, we have demonstrated the doping of K in the light absorbing CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite i.e. (M = CH3, A = NH3; x = 0-1). One of the major merits of methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) perovskites is that they act as efficient absorbing material of light in photovoltaic cell imparting long carrier lifetime and optimum band gap. The structural, morphological, electronic and optoelectric properties of potassium (K) doped light absorber methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) perovskites are reported here i.e. Kx(MA)1-xPbI3 (M = CH3, A =NH3; x = 0-1). The thin films of perovskites (x = 0-1) were deposited by spin coating on cleaned FTO substrates and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), current-voltage (IV), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Diffused reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) analysis. The organic constituents i.e. MA = CH3NH3, in perovskites solar cells induce instability even at the room temperature. To overcome such instabilities we have replaced the organic constituents by K because both of them have electropositive nature. Potassium successfully replaces the CH3NH3. Initially, this compound grows in a tetragonal crystal structure, however, beyond 30% doping of potassium orthorhombic distortions are induced in the parent tetragonal unit cell. Such phase transformation is microscopically visible in the electron micrographs of doped samples; cubic grains for MAPbI3 begin to transform into strip like structures in K-doped samples. The resistance of the samples is decreased for partial K-doping, which we suggested to be arising due to the electropositive nature of K. It is observed that the binding energy difference between Pb4f and I3d core levels are very similar in all the investigated systems and show formal oxidation states. Also, the partially doped samples showed increased absorption and bandgaps around 1.5 eV which is an optimum value for solar absorption.

  7. Application of sub-image multiresolution analysis of Ground-penetrating radar data in a study of shallow structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeng, Yih; Lin, Chun-Hung; Li, Yi-Wei; Chen, Chih-Sung; Yu, Hung-Ming

    2011-03-01

    Fourier-based algorithms originally developed for the processing of seismic data are applied routinely in the Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data processing, but these conventional methods of data processing may result in an abundance of spurious harmonics without any geological meaning. We propose a new approach in this study based essentially on multiresolution wavelet analysis (MRA) for GPR noise suppression. The 2D GPR section is similar to an image in all aspects if we consider each data point of the GPR section to be an image pixel in general. This technique is an image analysis with sub-image decomposition. We start from the basic image decomposition procedure using conventional MRA approach and establish the filter bank accordingly. With reasonable knowledge of data and noise and the basic assumption of the target, it is possible to determine the components with high S/N ratio and eliminate noisy components. The MRA procedure is performed further for the components containing both signal and noise. We treated the selected component as an original image and applied the MRA procedure again to that single component with a mother wavelet of higher resolution. This recursive procedure with finer input allows us to extract features or noise events from GPR data more effectively than conventional process. To assess the performance of the MRA filtering method, we first test this method on a simple synthetic model and then on experimental data acquired from a control site using 400 MHz GPR system. A comparison of results from our method and from conventional filtering techniques demonstrates the effectiveness of the sub-image MRA method, particularly in removing ringing noise and scattering events. Field study was carried out in a trenched fault zone where a faulting structure was present at shallow depths ready for understanding the feasibility of improving the data S/N ratio by applying the sub-image multiresolution analysis. In contrast to the conventional

  8. UAVSAR Radar Imagery of Boreal Forests Around Quebec City, Canada

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-09-01

    JPL Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar collected this composite radar image around Québec City, Canada, during an 11-day campaign to study the structure of temperate and boreal forests.

  9. Representing radar QPE and QPF uncertainties using radar ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sempere-Torres, D.; Llort, X.; Roca, J.; Pegram, G.

    2009-09-01

    In the last years, new comprehension of the physics underlying the radar measurements as well as new technological advancements have allowed radar community to propose better algorithms and methodologies and significant advancements have been achieved in improving Quantitative Precipitation Estimates (QPE) and Quantitative Precipitation forecasting (QPF) by radar. Thus the study of the 2D uncertainties field associated to these estimates has become an important subject, specially to enhance the use of radar QPE and QPF in hydrological studies, as well as in providing a reference for satellite precipitations measurements. In this context the use of radar-based rainfall ensembles (i.e. equiprobable rainfall field scenarios generated to be compatible with the observations/forecasts and with the inferred structure of the uncertainties) has been seen as an extremely interesting tool to represent their associated uncertainties. The generation of such radar ensembles requires first the full characterization of the 3D field of associated uncertainties (2D spatial plus temporal), since rainfall estimates show an error structure highly correlated in space and time. A full methodology to deal with this kind of radar-based rainfall ensembles is presented. Given a rainfall event, the 2D uncertainty fields associated to the radar estimates are defined for every time step using a benchmark, or reference field, based on the best available estimate of the rainfall field. This benchmark is built using an advanced non parametric interpolation of a dense raingauge network able to use the spatial structure provided by the radar observations, and is confined to the region in which this combination could be taken as a reference measurement (Velasco-Forero et al. 2008, doi:10.1016/j.advwatres.2008.10.004). Then the spatial and temporal structures of these uncertainty fields are characterized and a methodology to generate consistent multiple realisations of them is used to generate the

  10. Spaceborne radar research in the 1980's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.

    1983-01-01

    The SEASAT SAR and Shuttle Imaging Radar SIR-A experiments demonstrated that spaceborne synthetic aperture radars provide synoptic images of land and ocean features. Radar images clearly show geologic structures, morphologic features, clear cutting, subsurface features (in very arid regions), agricultural and urban land use, ocean surface waves, current boundaries, internal waves, ice floes and numerous other ocean features which affect the surface roughness.

  11. Q-switched dual-wavelength fiber laser using a graphene oxide saturable absorber and singlemode-multimode-singlemode fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, H.; Zulkifli, A. Z.; Yasin, M.; Thambiratnam, K.

    2016-10-01

    A Q-switched dual-wavelength fiber laser using a graphene oxide-based saturable absorber to generate the desired output pulses is proposed and demonstrated. The system utilizes a singlemode-multimode-singlemode fiber structure to control the net losses in the cavity so that only two dominant wavelengths are allowed to oscillate. The proposed system is capable of generating an output with a high repetition rate of 27.1 kHz and a narrow pulse width of 4.03 µs. The output pulses also have average output power and pulse energy of up to 0.5 mW and 18.5 nJ, respectively. The 1st harmonic obtained has a high signal-to-noise ratio of 33.2 dB, indicating a highly stable pulse output with minimum mode hopping.

  12. Self-imaging of transparent objects and structures in focusing of spatially phase-modulated laser radiation into a weakly absorbing medium

    SciTech Connect

    Bubis, E L

    2011-06-30

    Self-imaging of transparent objects and structures in focusing of a spatially phase-modulated laser beam into an extended weakly absorbing medium is described. The laser power level that is necessary for effective imaging corresponds to the illuminating beam power when thermal self-defocusing starts evolving in the medium. The effect can be described in terms of the ideology of Zernike's classical phase-contrast method. Edge enhancement in visualised images of transparent objects is experimentally demonstrated. Self-imaging of a microscopic object in the form of transparent letters and long-lived refractive-index fluctuations in liquid glycerol is shown. Due to the adaptivity of the process under consideration, unlike the classical case, self-imaging occurs also in the situations where a beam is displaced (undergoes random walk) as a whole in the Fourier plane, for example, in the presence of thermal flows. (image processing)

  13. Absorbing a Little Water: The Structural, Thermodynamic, and Kinetic Relationship between Pyrogallol and Its Tetarto-Hydrate

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The anhydrate and the stoichiometric tetarto-hydrate of pyrogallol (0.25 mol water per mol pyrogallol) are both storage stable at ambient conditions, provided that they are phase pure, with the system being at equilibrium at aw (water activity) = 0.15 at 25 °C. Structures have been derived from single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction data for the anhydrate and hydrate, respectively. It is notable that the tetarto-hydrate forms a tetragonal structure with water in channels, a framework that although stabilized by water, is found as a higher energy structure on a computationally generated crystal energy landscape, which has the anhydrate crystal structure as the most stable form. Thus, a combination of slurry experiments, X-ray diffraction, spectroscopy, moisture (de)sorption, and thermo-analytical methods with the computationally generated crystal energy landscape and lattice energy calculations provides a consistent picture of the finely balanced hydration behavior of pyrogallol. In addition, two monotropically related dimethyl sulfoxide monosolvates were found in the accompanying solid form screen. PMID:24027438

  14. Absorbing a Little Water: The Structural, Thermodynamic, and Kinetic Relationship between Pyrogallol and Its Tetarto-Hydrate.

    PubMed

    Braun, Doris E; Bhardwaj, Rajni M; Arlin, Jean-Baptiste; Florence, Alastair J; Kahlenberg, Volker; Griesser, Ulrich J; Tocher, Derek A; Price, Sarah L

    2013-09-04

    The anhydrate and the stoichiometric tetarto-hydrate of pyrogallol (0.25 mol water per mol pyrogallol) are both storage stable at ambient conditions, provided that they are phase pure, with the system being at equilibrium at aw (water activity) = 0.15 at 25 °C. Structures have been derived from single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction data for the anhydrate and hydrate, respectively. It is notable that the tetarto-hydrate forms a tetragonal structure with water in channels, a framework that although stabilized by water, is found as a higher energy structure on a computationally generated crystal energy landscape, which has the anhydrate crystal structure as the most stable form. Thus, a combination of slurry experiments, X-ray diffraction, spectroscopy, moisture (de)sorption, and thermo-analytical methods with the computationally generated crystal energy landscape and lattice energy calculations provides a consistent picture of the finely balanced hydration behavior of pyrogallol. In addition, two monotropically related dimethyl sulfoxide monosolvates were found in the accompanying solid form screen.

  15. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

    1995-05-02

    A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  16. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.; Wicks, George G.; Enz, Glenn L.

    1995-01-01

    A hydrogen absorbing composition. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  17. Rain core structure statistics derived from radar and disdrometer measurements in the mid-Atlantic coast of the US

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldhirsh, Julius; Musiani, Bert H.

    1989-01-01

    During a period spanning more than 5 years, low elevation radar measurements of rain were systematically obtained in the mid-Atlantic coast of the U.S. Drop size distribution measurements with a disdrometer were also acquired on the same rain days. The drop size data were utilized to convert the radar reflectivity factors to estimated rain rates for the respective rain days of operation. Applying high level algorithms to the rain data, core values of rain intensities were identified (peak rain rates), and families of rain rate isopleths analyzed. In particular, equicircle diameters of the family of isopleths enveloping peak rain intensities were statistically characterized. The presented results represents the analysis of two rain days, 12 radar scans, corresponding to 430 culled rain rate isopleths from an available data base of 22,000 contours, approximately 100 scans encompassing 17 rain days. The results presented show trends of the average rain rate vs. contour scale dimensions, and cumulative distributions of rain cell dimensions which belong to core families of precipitation.

  18. Comet radar explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnham, Tony; Asphaug, Erik; Barucci, Antonella; Belton, Mike; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Brownlee, Donald; Capria, Maria Teresa; Carter, Lynn; Chesley, Steve; Farnham, Tony; Gaskell, Robert; Gim, Young; Heggy, Essam; Herique, Alain; Klaasen, Ken; Kofman, Wlodek; Kreslavsky, Misha; Lisse, Casey; Orosei, Roberto; Plaut, Jeff; Scheeres, Dan

    The Comet Radar Explorer (CORE) is designed to perform a comprehensive and detailed exploration of the interior, surface, and inner coma structures of a scientifically impor-tant Jupiter family comet. These structures will be used to investigate the origins of cometary nuclei, their physical and geological evolution, and the mechanisms driving their spectacular activity. CORE is a high heritage spacecraft, injected by solar electric propulsion into orbit around a comet. It is capable of coherent deep radar imaging at decameter wavelengths, high resolution stereo color imaging, and near-IR imaging spectroscopy. Its primary objective is to obtain a high-resolution map of the interior structure of a comet nucleus at a resolution of ¿100 elements across the diameter. This structure shall be related to the surface geology and morphology, and to the structural details of the coma proximal to the nucleus. This is an ideal complement to the science from recent comet missions, providing insight into how comets work. Knowing the structure of the interior of a comet-what's inside-and how cometary activity works, is required before we can understand the requirements for a cryogenic sample return mission. But more than that, CORE is fundamental to understanding the origin of comets and their evolution in time. The mission is made feasible at low cost by the use of now-standard MARSIS-SHARAD reflec-tion radar imaging hardware and data processing, together with proven flight heritage of solar electric propulsion. Radar flight heritage has been demonstrated by the MARSIS radar on Mars Express (Picardi et al., Science 2005; Plaut et al., Science 2007), the SHARAD radar onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (Seu et al., JGR 2007), and the LRS radar onboard Kaguya (Ono et al, EPS 2007). These instruments have discovered detailed subsurface structure to depths of several kilometers in a variety of terrains on Mars and the Moon. A reflection radar deployed in orbit about a comet

  19. Electronic structures and optical properties of α-Fe2O3-xSex alloys for solar absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Congxin; Jia, Yu; Zhang, Qiming

    2015-05-01

    The band structures and optical properties of α-Fe2O3-xSex alloys are studied by means of first-principles methods, considering different Se contents x. Numerical results show that Se content has an obvious influence on band structures and optical properties of α-Fe2O3-xSex alloys. The band gap values of α-Fe2O3-xSex alloys decrease monotonically when Se concentrations increase, resulting in an obvious increase of the optical absorption edge in the visible range. In particular, our results show that α-Fe2O3-xSex alloys have the direct band gap properties with band gap values when Se content x ≈ 0.17, which is beneficial to solar cell applications.

  20. Fluorescence and absorbance analyte sensing in whole blood and plasma based on diffusion separation in silicon-microfabricated flow structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigl, Bernhard H.; Hixson, Greg T.; Kenny, Margaret; Zebert, Diane; Dwinnell, Silver; Buj, Todd; Yager, Paul

    1997-05-01

    Based on the recently introduced T-Sensor method, we demonstrate the fluorescence-determination of various analytes directly in whole blood and in serum. The method relies on microfluidic flow in silicon structures, diffusion-based separation, and analyte determination using fluorescent and absorption indicator dyes. Due to extremely small inertial forces in such structures, practically all flow in microstructures is laminar. This allows the movement of different layers of fluid and particles next to each other in a channel without mixing other than by diffusion. A sample solution (e.g., blood), and a receptor solution containing the indicator dye are introduced in a common channel, and flow laminarly next to each other until they exit the structure. Small ions such as H+, and Na+ diffuse rapidly across the channel, whereas larger molecules diffuse more slowly. Larger particles such as blood cells and polymer beads show no significant diffusion within the time the two flow streams are in contact. The fluorescence emission of indicator dyes is a function of the concentration of the analyte molecules and the dye concentration in the interaction zone between the two streams. This device allows continuous monitoring of the concentration of analytes in whole blood without the use of membranes or prior removal of blood cells. This principle is illustrated by the determination of human albumin, total calcium, and pH in whole blood and serum.

  1. Dual broadband metamaterial absorber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Ju; Yoo, Young Joon; Kim, Ki Won; Rhee, Joo Yull; Kim, Yong Hwan; Lee, YoungPak

    2015-02-23

    We propose polarization-independent and dual-broadband metamaterial absorbers at microwave frequencies. This is a periodic meta-atom array consisting of metal-dielectric-multilayer truncated cones. We demonstrate not only one broadband absorption from the fundamental magnetic resonances but additional broadband absorption in high-frequency range using the third-harmonic resonance, by both simulation and experiment. In simulation, the absorption was over 90% in 3.93-6.05 GHz, and 11.64-14.55 GHz. The corresponding experimental absorption bands over 90% were 3.88-6.08 GHz, 9.95-10.46 GHz and 11.86-13.84 GHz, respectively. The origin of absorption bands was elucidated. Furthermore, it is independent of polarization angle owing to the multilayered circular structures. The design is scalable to smaller size for the infrared and the visible ranges.

  2. THz-metamaterial absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuong Pham, Van; Park, J. W.; Vu, Dinh Lam; Zheng, H. Y.; Rhee, J. Y.; Kim, K. W.; Lee, Y. P.

    2013-03-01

    An ultrabroad-band metamaterial absorber was investigated in mid-IR regime based on a similar model in previous work. The high absorption of metamaterial was obtained in a band of 8-11.7 THz with energy loss distributed in SiO2, which is appropriate potentially for solar-cell applications. A perfect absorption peak was provided by using a sandwich structure with periodical anti-dot pattern in the IR region, getting closed to visible-band metamaterials. The dimensional parameters were examined for the corresponding fabrication. Invited talk at the 6th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology, 30 October-2 November, 2012, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  3. A radar survey of M- and X-class asteroids. III. Insights into their composition, hydration state, & structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, Michael K.; Taylor, Patrick A.; Nolan, Michael C.; Howell, Ellen S.; Springmann, Alessondra; Giorgini, Jon D.; Warner, Brian D.; Harris, Alan W.; Stephens, Robert; Merline, William J.; Rivkin, Andrew; Benner, Lance A. M.; Coley, Dan; Clark, Beth Ellen; Ockert-Bell, Maureen; Magri, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Using the S-band radar at Arecibo Observatory, we observed thirteen X/M-class asteroids; nine were previously undetected and four were re-observed, bringing the total number of Tholen X/M-class asteroids observed with radar to 29. Of these 29M-class asteroids, 13 are also W-class, defined as M-class objects that also display a 3-μm absorption feature which is often interpreted as the signature of hydrated minerals (Jones, T.D., Lebofsky, L.A., Lewis, J.S., Marley, M.S. [1990]. Icarus 88, 172-192; Rivkin, A.S., Howell, E.S., Britt, D.T., Lebofsky, L.A., Nolan, M.C., Branston, D.D. [1995]. Icarus 117, 90-100; Rivkin, A.S., Howell, E.S., Lebofsky, L.A., Clark, B.E., Britt, D.T. [2000]. Icarus 145, 351-368). Consistent with our previous work (Shepard, M.K. et al. [2008]. Icarus 195, 184-205; Shepard, M.K., Harris, A.W., Taylor, P.A., Clark, B.E., Ockert-Bell, M., Nolan, M.C., Howell, E.S., Magri, C., Giorgini, J.D., Benner, L.A.M. [2011]. Icarus 215, 547-551), we find that 38% of our sample (11 of 29) have radar albedos consistent with metal-dominated compositions. With the exception of 83 Beatrix and 572 Rebekka, the remaining objects have radar albedos significantly higher than the mean S- or C-class asteroid (Magri, C., Nolan, M.C., Ostro, S.J., Giorgini, J.D. [2007]. Icarus 186, 126-151). Seven of the eleven high-radar-albedo asteroids, or 64%, also display a 3-μm absorption feature (W-class) which is thought to be inconsistent with the formation of a metal dominated asteroid. We suggest that the hydration absorption could be a secondary feature caused by low-velocity collisions with hydrated asteroids, such as CI or CM analogs, and subsequent implantation of the hydrated minerals into the upper regolith. There is recent evidence for this process on Vesta (Reddy, V. et al. [2012]. Icarus 221, 544-559; McCord, T.B. et al. [2012]. Nature 491, 83-86; Prettyman, T.H. et al. [2012]. Science 338, 242-246; Denevi, B.W. et al. [2012]. Science 338, 246-249). Eleven

  4. An MSK Radar Waveform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quirk, Kevin J.; Srinivasan, Meera

    2012-01-01

    The minimum-shift-keying (MSK) radar waveform is formed by periodically extending a waveform that separately modulates the in-phase and quadrature- phase components of the carrier with offset pulse-shaped pseudo noise (PN) sequences. To generate this waveform, a pair of periodic PN sequences is each passed through a pulse-shaping filter with a half sinusoid impulse response. These shaped PN waveforms are then offset by half a chip time and are separately modulated on the in-phase and quadrature phase components of an RF carrier. This new radar waveform allows an increase in radar resolution without the need for additional spectrum. In addition, it provides self-interference suppression and configurable peak sidelobes. Compared strictly on the basis of the expressions for delay resolution, main-lobe bandwidth, effective Doppler bandwidth, and peak ambiguity sidelobe, it appears that bi-phase coded (BPC) outperforms the new MSK waveform. However, a radar waveform must meet certain constraints imposed by the transmission and reception of the modulation, as well as criteria dictated by the observation. In particular, the phase discontinuity of the BPC waveform presents a significant impediment to the achievement of finer resolutions in radar measurements a limitation that is overcome by using the continuous phase MSK waveform. The phase continuity, and the lower fractional out-of-band power of MSK, increases the allowable bandwidth compared with BPC, resulting in a factor of two increase in the range resolution of the radar. The MSK waveform also has been demonstrated to have an ambiguity sidelobe structure very similar to BPC, where the sidelobe levels can be decreased by increasing the length of the m-sequence used in its generation. This ability to set the peak sidelobe level is advantageous as it allows the system to be configured to a variety of targets, including those with a larger dynamic range. Other conventionally used waveforms that possess an even greater

  5. An investigation on how inner-core structures obtained through radar data assimilation affect track forecasting of typhoon Jangmi (2008) near Taiwan Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingjun; Xue, Ming; Zhao, Kun

    2016-09-01

    The impacts of radar data assimilation (DA) on the westward track deflection of Typhoon Jangmi (2008) near Taiwan Island and the deflection mechanism are investigated. Initial conditions from two data assimilation experiments with significant track forecast differences are analyzed and compared. The environmental, axisymmetric, wave number 1 to 3 asymmetric fields of the typhoon are decomposed by using vortex separation and Fourier decomposition methods. The components are selectively recomposed into new initial conditions that include different vortex-scale components to examine the impact of individual components on the track prediction. The wave number 1 asymmetric structure is found to play a dominant role in the westward deflection of Typhoon Jangmi, and the accurate analysis of this component with radar DA helps to improve the track forecast. The wave number 1 asymmetric circulation is manifested as a pair of cyclonic and anticyclonic gyres with well-defined ventilation flows through the inner-core region, which provides additional steering of the typhoon vortex. The layer-mean environmental steering flow and ventilation flow associated with the wave number 1 gyres are further calculated to quantitatively evaluate the impact of ventilation flow. The ventilation flow is shown to be responsible for most of the westward motion component, suggesting again its role in causing the westward track deflection of Typhoon Jangmi. The results also suggest the importance of analyzing vortex-scale asymmetric structures for accurate tropical cyclone track forecasting, especially when there is a significant track deflection.

  6. Advanced Borehole Radar for Hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.

    2014-12-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar is a useful tool for monitoring the hydrogeological environment. We have developed GPR systems which can be applied to these purposes, and we will demonstrate examples borehole radar measurements. In order to have longer radar detection range, frequency lower than100MHz has been normally adopted in borehole radar. Typical subsurface fractures of our interests have a few mm aperture and radar resolution is much poorer than a few cm in this frequency range. We are proposing and demonstrating to use radar polarimetry to solve this problem. We have demonstrated that a full-polarimetry borehole radar can be used for characterization of subsurface fractures. Together with signal processing for antenna characteristic compensation to equalize the signal by a dipole antenna and slot antennas, we could demonstrate that polarimetric borehole radar can estimate the surface roughness of subsurface fractures, We believe the surface roughness is closely related to water permeability through the fractures. We then developed a directional borehole radar, which uses optical field sensor. A dipole antenna in a borehole has omni-directional radiation pattern, and we cannot get azimuthal information about the scatterers. We use multiple dipole antennas set around the borehole axis, and from the phase differences, we can estimate the 3-diemnational orientation of subsurface structures. We are using optical electric field sensor for receiver of borehole radar. This is a passive sensor and connected only with optical fibers and does not require any electric power supply to operate the receiver. It has two major advantages; the first one is that the receiver can be electrically isolated from other parts, and wave coupling to a logging cable is avoided. Then, secondary, it can operate for a long time, because it does not require battery installed inside the system. It makes it possible to set sensors in fixed positions to monitor the change of environmental

  7. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Shinpei Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-26

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF{sub 2} etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  8. Mushroom plasmonic metamaterial infrared absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shinpei; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Hata, Hisatoshi; Uetsuki, Mitsuharu; Misaki, Koji; Kimata, Masafumi

    2015-01-01

    There has been a considerable amount of interest in the development of various types of electromagnetic wave absorbers for use in different wavelength ranges. In particular, infrared (IR) absorbers with wavelength selectivity can be applied to advanced uncooled IR sensors, which would be capable of identifying objects through their radiation spectrum. In the present study, mushroom plasmonic metamaterial absorbers (MPMAs) for the IR wavelength region were designed and fabricated. The MPMAs consist of a periodic array of thin metal micropatches connected to a thin metal plate with narrow silicon (Si) posts. A Si post height of 200 nm was achieved by isotropic XeF2 etching of a thin Si layer sandwiched between metal plates. This fabrication procedure is relatively simple and is consistent with complementary metal oxide semiconductor technology. The absorption spectra of the fabricated MPMAs were experimentally measured. In addition, theoretical calculations of their absorption properties were conducted using rigorous coupled wave analysis. Both the calculated and measured absorbance results demonstrated that these MPMAs can realize strong selective absorption at wavelengths beyond the period of the array by varying the micropatch width. Absorbance values greater than 90% were achieved. Dual- or single-mode absorption can also be selected by varying the width of the Si posts. Pixel structures using such MPMAs could be used as high responsivity, high resolution and fast uncooled IR sensors.

  9. Loaded metamaterial perfect absorber using substrate integrated cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sijia; Gao, Jun; Cao, Xiangyu; Zhang, Zhao

    2014-06-01

    By embedding the metal cavity into the substrate, a kind of ultrathin substrate integrated cavity metamaterial perfect absorber (SIC-MPA) is proposed in theory and experiment. The SIC-MPA is constructed of a single-square loop metal patch with four splits, a square metal patch in the center and several SICs loaded into the metamaterial perfect absorber. The electric fields of the resonant structures for the SIC-MPA are separated, and the electromagnetic wave leakage is decreased by the SICs. The simulated results show that the SIC-MPA has the advantage of high quality factors (Q-factors) of the absorptivity and the monostatic radar cross section (RCS) reduction. Experiments are carried out to verify the simulation results, and the measurement results show that the Q-factor of the measured absorptivity is increased by 23% and the Q-factors of the measured RCS reduction with 1.5 dB and 3 dB are increased by 21.5% and 18.7% compared with the conventional MPA.

  10. Convective scale structure and evolution of a squall line observed by C-band dual Doppler radar in an arid region of northwestern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liping; Zhuang, Wei; Zhang, Pengfei; Mu, Rong

    2010-09-01

    A long-lived and loosely organized squall line moved rapidly across Ürümqi, the capital city of Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China on 26 June 2005, generating hail and strong winds. The squall line was observed by a dual Doppler radar system in a field experiment conducted in 2004 and 2005 by the Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences and the local meteorological bureau in northwestern China. The 3D wind fields within the squall line were retrieved through dual Doppler analyses and a variational Doppler radar analysis system (VDRAS). The formation and structure of the squall line as well as the genesis and evolution of embedded convective cells were investigated. During its life period, the squall line consisted of six storm cells extending about 100 km in length, and produced hail of about 25 mm in diameter and strong surface winds up to 11 m s-1. Radar observations revealed a broad region of stratiform rain in a meso- β cyclone, with the squall line located to the west of this. Two meso- γ scale vortices were found within the squall line. Compared to typical squall lines in moist regions, such as Guangdong Province and Shanghai, which tend to be around 300-400 km in length, have echo tops of 17-19 km, and produce maximum surface winds of about 25 m s-1 and temperature variations of about 8°C this squall line system had weaker maximum reflectivity (55 dB Z), a lower echo top (13 km) and smaller extension (about 100 km), relatively little stratiform rainfall preceding the convective line, and a similar moving speed and temperature variation at the surface.

  11. Terrestrial Radar Interferometry and Structure-from-Motion Data from Nevado del Ruiz, Colombia for Improved Hazard Assessment and Volcano Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, M.; Dixon, T. H.; Gallant, E.; López, C. M.; Malservisi, R.; Ordoñez, M.; Richardson, J. A.; Voss, N. K.; Xie, S.

    2015-12-01

    Ground-based remote sensing geodesy has huge potential for volcano monitoring and improved modelling of volcanic hazards. Terrestrial Radar Interferometers (TRI) can rapidly and accurately create DEMs and repeat occupation of sites allows measurement of deformation. Structure-from-Motion (SfM) photogrammetry can be used to construct DEMs and SfM surveys can be carried out with relatively accessible equipment. TRI and SfM techniques are highly complimentary: The upper slopes of a volcano may be cloud covered, but can be imaged by TRI, whereas lower canyons may be in radar shadow, but can be imaged with SfM. Both methods are also complimentary to satellite observations (e.g. SRTM, ASTER), offering some advantages in terms of coverage and resolution. We present the acquisition of two new geodetic datasets at Nevado del Ruiz, Colombia (NRV). NRV is a large glacierised volcano that erupted in 1985, generating a glacier-derived lahar that killed over 23,000 people in the city of Armero and 2,000 people in the town of Chinchina. NRV is the most active volcano in Colombia and since 2012 has generated small eruptions (with no casualties) and constant gas and ash emissions. In early 2015, we collected data from several sites close to the crater of NRV and around the Azufrado drainage (the site of previous debris avalanches and lahars). The TRI was operated from three sites, while drone- and ground-based cameras ventured into the canyons to fill in radar shadow gaps. These data have three primary uses: 1) generation of high-precision DEMs for lahar modelling and visualisation of previous events, 2) imaging of summit glacier motion, and 3) establishing a baseline for long-term deformation studies. We discuss ground-based remote sensing geodetic data from high-tech (TRI) to low-tech (SfM) methods and show the importance of combining these complimentary datasets to improve DEMs for hazard modelling and volcano monitoring.

  12. Fast approximate migration of ground penetrating radar using Kalman estimators and determination of the lithospheric structure of Lake Baikal, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dena Ornelas, Oscar S.

    This dissertation is composed of two quite different studies. The first is related to the development of a migration algorithm for vertical incidence Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) using the Kalman approach. The scope of any migration tool is to correct the position and to recover the true geometry of subsurface GPR targets. The advantage of using the Kalman approach is that the GPR records can be migrated at the same time when the data are being collected, avoiding further processing as is required by the available synthetic aperture algorithms for diffraction hyperbola collapse. The second part is a study of the lithosphere of the Lake Baikal, which is one of only a small number of Cenozoic continental rifts, the Baikal Rift Zone (BRZ) is a natural laboratory for understanding processes of rifting. Located in south-central Russia, the rift zone is known for Lake Baikal, a rift valley lake that contains 20% of the world's fresh water. Rifting in the region began about 25 Ma along the boundary between the Archean-Paleoproterozoic Siberian craton and the Early Paleozoic age Sayan-Baikal orogenic belt. Here we present a new velocity model for the structure of the crust along a 160-km transect in the north basin of Lake Baikal. The data, recorded in 1992, come from five 4-component ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) deployed at ca 40 km intervals. The source consisted of 2 air guns with a combined volume of 120 liters, that were fired at 240 m intervals along the transect. The data are of moderately good quality and are characterized by strong first arrivals to offsets of 40 km and a series of wide-angle reflections from interfaces in the crust, including the Moho. Travel times for both P- and S-wave arrivals from the crust were picked from the data. The velocity model, obtained through a combination of forward modeling and inversion, contains two shallow layers associated with basin sediments, a low velocity zone (LVZ) at 6 to 9 km depth, mid-crustal interfaces at ca

  13. Structure-Property Relationship for Two-Photon Absorbing Multiporphyrins: Supramolecular Assembly of Highly-Conjugated Multiporphyrinic Ladders and Prisms

    SciTech Connect

    Easwaramoorthi, Shanmugam; Jang, So Young; Yoon, Zin Seok; Lim, Jong Min; Lee, Cheng-Wei; Mai, Chi-Lun; Liu, Yen-Chun; Yeh, Chen-Yu; Vura-Weis, Josh; Wasielewski, Michael R.; Kim, Dongho

    2008-10-03

    Two-photon absorption (TPA) phenomena of a series of single-strand as well as supramolecular self-assembled ladders and prisms of highly conjugated ethyne bridged multiporphyrin dimer, trimer, and star shaped pentamer have been investigated. The ligand mediated self-assembled supramolecular structures were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy and small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) analysis. The TPA cross section values of multiporphyrins increase nonlinearly from {approx}100 to {approx}18000 GM with an increased number of porphyrin units and elongated ?-conjugation length by virtue of charge transfer and excited-state cumulenic configurations. The observed opposite TPA behavior between their supramolecular ladder and prism configurations necessitates the importance of interstrand interactions between the multiporphyrinic units and the overall shape of the assembly. Furthermore, the diminished TPA cross section of the pentamer, despite the increased ?-conjugation resulting from duplex formation suggests that destabilizing the essential functional configurations at the cost of elongation of ?-delocalization pathway must cause unfavorable effects. We have also shown that one- and two-photon allowed energy-levels of linear multiporphyrins are nearly isoenergetic and the latter transition originates exclusively from the extent of ?-delocalization within the molecule. The identical TPA maximum position of the trimer and pentamer indicates that the TPA of the pentamer arises only from its basic trimer unit in spite of its extended two-dimensional {pi}-conjugation pathway involving five porphyrinic units.

  14. Sensitivity Analysis of Meteor Smoke Size and Derived Daytime Temperature Structure derived from the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, G.; Fentzke, J.; Hsu, V. W.; Brum, C. G.

    2012-12-01

    This work describes the microphysical properties and variability of meteoric smoke particles (MSPs) at high latitude using the Poker Flat ISR (65.1N, 147.5W). In addition, we present a novel technique for determining height resolved daytime D region neutral temperatures, which takes into account the presence of charged dust. We discuss the temporal/spatial variability and the relation to meteoric input observed and MSP microphysical properties in the polar mesopause region. The derived nanometer sized MSPs are consistent with size profiles derived previously using radar/rocket techniques and we note that our results imply a lack of heavy cluster ions below 85 km during the observing period. We examine the sensitivity of the derived sizes and temperatures to background atmospheric models and compare the results with available data sets. We find that he sizes in the range of approximately 0.5 to 1.5nm are in good general agreement with previous radar/rocket studies, but that the variability both temporally and with altitude are greater than at lower latitudes. The observed neutral temperatures are in the nominal range of 130 - 160 K between 70-90 km with several instances of larger departures up to 200 K indicating that wave activity may be present. This work provides a template for potential use at many other radar sites for the determination of microphysical properties of MSPs and day-time neutral temperature in the D region that show good general agreement with NRL-MSISE-00 temperatures during the observing period.

  15. Methods for absorbing neutrons

    DOEpatents

    Guillen, Donna P [Idaho Falls, ID; Longhurst, Glen R [Idaho Falls, ID; Porter, Douglas L [Idaho Falls, ID; Parry, James R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-07-24

    A conduction cooled neutron absorber may include a metal matrix composite that comprises a metal having a thermal neutron cross-section of at least about 50 barns and a metal having a thermal conductivity of at least about 1 W/cmK. Apparatus for providing a neutron flux having a high fast-to-thermal neutron ratio may include a source of neutrons that produces fast neutrons and thermal neutrons. A neutron absorber positioned adjacent the neutron source absorbs at least some of the thermal neutrons so that a region adjacent the neutron absorber has a fast-to-thermal neutron ratio of at least about 15. A coolant in thermal contact with the neutron absorber removes heat from the neutron absorber.

  16. Externally tuned vibration absorber

    DOEpatents

    Vincent, Ronald J.

    1987-09-22

    A vibration absorber unit or units are mounted on the exterior housing of a hydraulic drive system of the type that is powered from a pressure wave generated, e.g., by a Stirling engine. The hydraulic drive system employs a piston which is hydraulically driven to oscillate in a direction perpendicular to the axis of the hydraulic drive system. The vibration absorbers each include a spring or other resilient member having one side affixed to the housing and another side to which an absorber mass is affixed. In a preferred embodiment, a pair of vibration absorbers is employed, each absorber being formed of a pair of leaf spring assemblies, between which the absorber mass is suspended.

  17. CPCs with segmented absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Keita, M.; Robertson, H.S. )

    1991-01-01

    One of the most promising means of improving the performance of solar thermal collectors is to reduce the energy lost by the hot absorber. One way to do this, not currently part of the technology, is to recognize that since the absorber is usually not irradiated uniformly, it is therefore possible to construct an absorber of thermally isolated segments, circulate the fluid in sequence from low to high irradiance segments, and reduce loss by improving effective concentration. This procedure works even for ideal concentrators, without violating Winston's theorem. Two equivalent CPC collectors with single and segmented absorber were constructed and compared under actual operating conditions. The results showed that the daily thermal efficiency of the collector with segmented absorber is higher (about 13%) than that of the collector with nonsegmented absorber.

  18. Shock absorber control system

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Y.; Ohira, M.; Ushida, M.; Miyagawa, T.; Shimodaira, T.

    1987-01-13

    A shock absorber control system is described for controlling a dampening force of a shock absorber of a vehicle comprising: setting means for setting a desired dampening force changeable within a predetermined range; drive means for driving the shock absorber to change the dampening force of the shock absorber linearly; control means for controlling the drive means in accordance with the desired dampening force when the setting of the desired dampening force has been changed; detecting means for detecting an actual dampening force of the shock absorber; and correcting means for correcting the dampening force of the shock absorber by controlling the drive means in accordance with a difference between the desired dampening force and the detected actual dampening force.

  19. Metamaterial absorber with random dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weiren; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2010-05-01

    The metamaterial absorber composed of random dendritic cells has been investigated at microwave frequencies. It is found that the absorptivities come to be weaker and the resonant frequency get red shift as the disordered states increasing, however, the random metamaterial absorber still presents high absorptivity more than 95%. The disordered structures can help understanding of the metamaterial absorber and may be employed for practical design of infrared metamaterial absorber, which may play important roles in collection of radiative heat energy and directional transfer enhancement.

  20. First-principles studies of BN sheets with absorbed transition metal single atoms or dimers: stabilities, electronic structures, and magnetic properties.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dongwei; Lu, Zhansheng; Ju, Weiwei; Tang, Yanan

    2012-04-11

    BN sheets with absorbed transition metal (TM) single atoms, including Fe, Co, and Ni, and their dimers have been investigated by using a first-principles method within the generalized gradient approximation. All of the TM atoms studied are found to be chemically adsorbed on BN sheets. Upon adsorption, the binding energies of the Fe and Co single atoms are modest and almost independent of the adsorption sites, indicating the high mobility of the adatoms and isolated particles to be easily formed on the surface. However, Ni atoms are found to bind tightly to BN sheets and may adopt a layer-by-layer growth mode. The Fe, Co, and Ni dimers tend to lie (nearly) perpendicular to the BN plane. Due to the wide band gap of the pure BN sheet, the electronic structures of the BN sheets with TM adatoms are determined primarily by the distribution of TM electronic states around the Fermi level. Very interesting spin gapless semiconductors or half-metals can be obtained in the studied systems. The magnetism of the TM atoms is preserved well on the BN sheet, very close to that of the corresponding free atoms and often weakly dependent on the adsorption sites. The present results indicate that BN sheets with adsorbed TM atoms have potential applications in fields such as spintronics and magnetic data storage due to the special spin-polarized electronic structures and magnetic properties they possess.

  1. The climatology of zonal wave numbers 1 and 2 planetary wave structure in the MLT using a chain of Northern Hemisphere SuperDARN radars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinknecht, Nora H.; Espy, Patrick J.; Hibbins, Robert E.

    2014-02-01

    The zonal wave components 1 and 2 were extracted from the meridional wind along the latitude band of 51-66°N for the years 2000-2008 using eight Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radars spanning longitudes from 25°E to 150°W. Each extracted zonal component represents the superposition of all temporal periods with that zonal structure and indicates the total planetary wave energy available with that wave number. The Hovmöller diagrams show stationary as well as eastward and westward traveling planetary waves propagating in the background wind. The method used to detect the zonal planetary wave components in the SuperDARN data are detailed and validated using UK Meteorological Office data, which allows the evolution of S1 and S2 planetary wave energy between the stratosphere and mesosphere to be assessed. The climatology of zonal wave number 1 and 2 planetary wave activity in the mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT) is presented and compared to the activity in the stratosphere. The MLT climatology of the mean wind anomalies shows stronger planetary wave activity during winter and weaker activity during summer with enhancement around midsummer and autumn equinox. The climatology of the mean wind displays similar amplitudes apart from very strong S1 planetary wave amplitudes during summer. In addition planetary wave activity during winters with major and minor stratospheric warming events are examined and contrasted.

  2. Estimation of the lateral correlation structure of subsurface water content from surface-based ground-penetrating radar reflection images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irving, James; Knight, Rosemary; Holliger, Klaus

    2009-12-01

    Over the past decade, significant interest has been expressed in relating the spatial statistics of surface-based reflection ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data to those of the imaged subsurface volume. A primary motivation for this work is that changes in the radar wave velocity, which largely control the character of the observed data, are expected to be related to corresponding changes in subsurface water content. Although previous work has indeed indicated that the spatial statistics of GPR images are linked to those of the water content distribution of the probed region, a viable method for quantitatively analyzing the GPR data and solving the corresponding inverse problem has not yet been presented. Here we address this issue by first deriving a relationship between the 2-D autocorrelation of a water content distribution and that of the corresponding GPR reflection image. We then show how a Bayesian inversion strategy based on Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling can be used to estimate the posterior distribution of subsurface correlation model parameters that are consistent with the GPR data. Our results indicate that if the underlying assumptions are valid and we possess adequate prior knowledge regarding the water content distribution, in particular its vertical variability, this methodology allows not only for the reliable recovery of lateral correlation model parameters but also for estimates of parameter uncertainties. In the case where prior knowledge regarding the vertical variability of water content is not available, the results show that the methodology still reliably recovers the aspect ratio of the heterogeneity.

  3. Multiparameter radar and aircraft based studies of microphysical, kinematic, and electrical structure of convective clouds during CaPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bringi, V. N.

    1994-03-01

    Two storms from the 9 August, 1991 CaPE case were analyzed in-depth focusing on multiparameter radar signature evolution over 60 min. in coordination with 24 aircraft penetrations which provided particle image and electric field data together with vertical air motion, cloud water and other state parameters. A total of five discrete 'cells' were identified in the two storms and their life cycle fully documented. Collaboration with South Dakota School of Mines and University of Alabama at Huntsville has resulted in a full integration of aircraft image and field mill data (from SDSM&T T-28 aircraft) with vertical air motion from dual-Doppler wind synthesis (UAH). The cellular evolution starts with a warm rain phase where updrafts and a very low concentration of large drops dominate the cloud. As the supercooled drops rise in the updraft they freeze and acquire a water-coat possibly by collisions with other liquid drops. The multi-parameter radar signatures clearly identify this mixed-phase zone. The cloud thereafter gets electrified which may intensify to produce lightning depending on cloud vertical growth, and generation of updraft/ downdrafts.

  4. About sound mufflers sound-absorbing panels aircraft engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudarev, A. S.; Bulbovich, R. V.; Svirshchev, V. I.

    2016-10-01

    The article provides a formula for calculating the frequency of sound absorbed panel with a perforated wall. And although the sound absorbing structure is a set of resonators Helmholtz, not individual resonators should be considered in acoustic calculations, and all the perforated wall panel. The analysis, showing how the parameters affect the size and sound-absorbing structures in the absorption rate.

  5. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Smolik, Galen R.

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  6. The proposed flatland radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, J. L.; Gage, K. S.; Vanzandt, T. E.; Nastrom, G. D.

    1986-01-01

    A flexible very high frequency (VHF) stratosphere-troposphere (ST) radar configured for meteorological research is to be constructed near Urbana, Illinois. Measurement of small vertical velocities associated with synoptic-scale meteorology can be performed. A large Doppler microwave radar (CHILL) is located a few km from the site of the proposed ST radar. Since the microwave radar can measure the location and velocity of hydrometeors and the VHF ST radar can measure clear (or cloudy) air velocities, simultaneous observations by these two radars of stratiform or convective weather systems would provide valuable meteorological information.

  7. A case study of microphysical structures and hydrometeor phase in convection using radar Doppler spectra at Darwin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riihimaki, L. D.; Comstock, J. M.; Luke, E.; Thorsen, T. J.; Fu, Q.

    2017-07-01

    To understand the microphysical processes that impact diabatic heating and cloud lifetimes in convection, we need to characterize the spatial distribution of supercooled liquid water. To address this observational challenge, ground-based vertically pointing active sensors at the Darwin Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site are used to classify cloud phase within a deep convective cloud. The cloud cannot be fully observed by a lidar due to signal attenuation. Therefore, we developed an objective method for identifying hydrometeor classes, including mixed-phase conditions, using k-means clustering on parameters that describe the shape of the Doppler spectra from vertically pointing Ka-band cloud radar. This approach shows that multiple, overlapping mixed-phase layers exist within the cloud, rather than a single region of supercooled liquid. Diffusional growth calculations show that the conditions for the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process exist within one of these mixed-phase microstructures.

  8. 3D imaging of the internal structure of a rock-cored drumlin using ground-penetrating radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Edward; Spagnolo, Matteo; Rea, Brice; Ely, Jeremy; Lee, Joshua

    2016-04-01

    One key question linking subglacial bedform analyses to ice dynamics relates to the flux of sediment at the bed. It is relatively easy to measure the upper surface of subglacial sediments either in active contemporary systems (using ice-penetrating radar surveys) or in relict subglacial terrain (using high-resolution digital elevation models). However, constraining the lower surface of subglacial sediments, i.e. the contact between the bedform sediment and a lower sediment unit or bedrock, is much more difficult, yet it is crucial to any determination of sediment volume and hence flux. Without observations, we are reliant on assumptions about the nature of the lower sediment surface. For example, we might assume that all the drumlins in a particular drumlin field are deposited on a planar surface, or that all comprise a carapace of till over a rock core. A calculation of sediment volume will give very different results leading to very different interpretations of sediment flux. We have been conducting experiments in the use of ground-penetrating radar to find the lower sedimentary surface beneath drumlins near Kirkby Stephen (Northern England), part of the extensive Eden Valley drumlin field. The drumlins comprise diamict overlying a bedrock surface of Carboniferous limestone which outcrops frequently between the drumlins. Here we present the results of a grid survey over one of the drumlins that clearly demonstrate this drumlin comprises a thin carapace of till overlying a stepped limestone bedrock surface. We provide details on the field data acquisition parameters and discuss the implications for further geophysical studies of drumlin fields.

  9. Polypyrrole Stability and Coatings for Radar Absorbing Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    organiques . Dans cet article, on examine la chimie du polypyrrole électro-conducteur et les facteurs relatifs à la préparation de revêtements faits à partir...l’absorbeur. Les absorbeurs faits de matériaux organiques tels que des polymères conducteurs sont légers et présentent des propriétés qu’il est possible de

  10. Fractal radar scattering from soil.

    PubMed

    Oleschko, Klaudia; Korvin, Gabor; Figueroa, Benjamin; Vuelvas, Marco Antonio; Balankin, Alexander S; Flores, Lourdes; Carreón, Dora

    2003-04-01

    A general technique is developed to retrieve the fractal dimension of self-similar soils through microwave (radar) scattering. The technique is based on a mathematical model relating the fractal dimensions of the georadargram to that of the scattering structure. Clear and different fractal signatures have been observed over four geosystems (soils and sediments) compared in this work.

  11. Radar Detectability of Light Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-04-01

    the aircraft is mounted on a structure that enables the viewing angle (aspect) presented to the radar to be varied. For each aircraft type, the RCS...environment; there are no spurious reflections from the ground or from the supporting structure ; and the effects of propeller rotation, small aircraft...motions due to c-ntrol action or atmospheric turbulence, and structural deflections due to inertial and aerodynamic loading, are properly represented

  12. Wideband-Switchable Metamaterial Absorber Using Injected Liquid Metal

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Ki; Lee, Dongju; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-01-01

    Metamaterial absorbers can provide good solutions for radar-cross-section (RCS) reduction. In spite of their attractive features of thinness, lightness, and low cost, resonant metamaterial absorbers have a drawback of narrow bandwidth. For practical radar applications, wideband absorbers are necessary. In this paper, we propose a wideband-switchable metamaterial absorber using liquid metal. In order to reduce RCS both for X-band and C-band, the switchable Jerusalem cross (JC) resonator is introduced. The JC resonator consists of slotted circular rings, chip resistors, and microfluidic channels. The JC resonator is etched on a flexible printed circuit board (FPCB), and the microfluidic channels are laser-etched on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) material. The proposed absorber can switch the absorption frequency band by injecting a liquid metal alloy into the channels. The performance of the absorber was demonstrated through full-wave simulation and through measurements employing prototypes. The experimental results showed absorption ratios of over 90% from 7.43 GHz to 14.34 GHz, and from 5.62 GHz to 7.3 GHz, with empty channels and liquid metal-filled channels, respectively. Therefore, the absorption band was successfully switched between the C-band (4–8 GHz) and the X-band (8–12 GHz) by injecting liquid metal eutectic gallium indium alloy (EGaIn) into the channels. PMID:27546310

  13. Wideband-Switchable Metamaterial Absorber Using Injected Liquid Metal.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Ki; Lee, Dongju; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-08-22

    Metamaterial absorbers can provide good solutions for radar-cross-section (RCS) reduction. In spite of their attractive features of thinness, lightness, and low cost, resonant metamaterial absorbers have a drawback of narrow bandwidth. For practical radar applications, wideband absorbers are necessary. In this paper, we propose a wideband-switchable metamaterial absorber using liquid metal. In order to reduce RCS both for X-band and C-band, the switchable Jerusalem cross (JC) resonator is introduced. The JC resonator consists of slotted circular rings, chip resistors, and microfluidic channels. The JC resonator is etched on a flexible printed circuit board (FPCB), and the microfluidic channels are laser-etched on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) material. The proposed absorber can switch the absorption frequency band by injecting a liquid metal alloy into the channels. The performance of the absorber was demonstrated through full-wave simulation and through measurements employing prototypes. The experimental results showed absorption ratios of over 90% from 7.43 GHz to 14.34 GHz, and from 5.62 GHz to 7.3 GHz, with empty channels and liquid metal-filled channels, respectively. Therefore, the absorption band was successfully switched between the C-band (4-8 GHz) and the X-band (8-12 GHz) by injecting liquid metal eutectic gallium indium alloy (EGaIn) into the channels.

  14. Wideband-Switchable Metamaterial Absorber Using Injected Liquid Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung Ki; Lee, Dongju; Lim, Sungjoon

    2016-08-01

    Metamaterial absorbers can provide good solutions for radar-cross-section (RCS) reduction. In spite of their attractive features of thinness, lightness, and low cost, resonant metamaterial absorbers have a drawback of narrow bandwidth. For practical radar applications, wideband absorbers are necessary. In this paper, we propose a wideband-switchable metamaterial absorber using liquid metal. In order to reduce RCS both for X-band and C-band, the switchable Jerusalem cross (JC) resonator is introduced. The JC resonator consists of slotted circular rings, chip resistors, and microfluidic channels. The JC resonator is etched on a flexible printed circuit board (FPCB), and the microfluidic channels are laser-etched on a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) material. The proposed absorber can switch the absorption frequency band by injecting a liquid metal alloy into the channels. The performance of the absorber was demonstrated through full-wave simulation and through measurements employing prototypes. The experimental results showed absorption ratios of over 90% from 7.43 GHz to 14.34 GHz, and from 5.62 GHz to 7.3 GHz, with empty channels and liquid metal-filled channels, respectively. Therefore, the absorption band was successfully switched between the C-band (4-8 GHz) and the X-band (8-12 GHz) by injecting liquid metal eutectic gallium indium alloy (EGaIn) into the channels.

  15. Fabrication of nano-Fe3O4 3D structure on carbon fibers as a microwave absorber and EMI shielding composite by modified EPD method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholampoor, Mahdi; Movassagh-Alanagh, Farid; Salimkhani, Hamed

    2017-02-01

    Recently, electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials have absorbed a lot of attention due to a growing need for application in the area of electronic and wireless devices. In this study, a carbon-based EMI shielding composite was fabricated by electrophoretic deposition of Fe3O4 nano-particles on carbon fibers (CFs) as a 3D structure incorporated with an epoxy resin. Co-precipitation method was employed to synthesize Fe3O4 nano-particles. This as-synthesized Fe3O4 nano-powder was then successfully deposited on CFs using a modified multi-step electrophoretic deposition (EPD) method. The results of structural studies showed that the Fe3O4 nano-particles (25 nm) were successfully and uniformly deposited on CFs. The measured magnetic properties of as-synthesized Fe3O4 nano-powder and nano-Fe3O4/CFs composite showed that the saturation magnetization of bare Fe3O4 was decreased from Ms = 72.3 emu/g to Ms = 33.1 emu/g for nano-Fe3O4/CFs composite and also corecivity of Fe3O4 was increased from Hc = 4.9 Oe to Hc = 168 Oe for composite. The results of microwave absorption tests revealed that the reflection loss (RL) of an epoxy-based nano-Fe3O4/CFs composite are significantly influenced by layer thickness. The maximum RL value of -10.21 dB at 10.12 GHz with an effective absorption bandwidth about 2 GHz was obtained for the sample with the thickness of 2 mm. It also exhibited an EMI shielding performance of -23 dB for whole the frequency range of 8.2-12.4 GHz.

  16. Growth of Cu2ZnSnS4 Nanocrystallites on TiO2 Nanorod Arrays as Novel Extremely Thin Absorber Solar Cell Structure via the Successive-Ion-Layer-Adsorption-Reaction Method.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhuoran; Demopoulos, George P

    2015-10-21

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is an environmentally benign semiconductor with excellent optoelectronic properties that attracts a lot of interest in thin film photovoltaics. In departure from that conventional configuration, we fabricate and test a novel absorber-conductor structure featuring in situ successive-ion-layer-adsorption-reaction (SILAR)-deposited CZTS nanocrystallites as a light absorber on one-dimensional TiO2 (rutile) nanorods as an electron conductor. The effectiveness of the nanoscale heterostructure in visible light harvesting and photoelectron generation is demonstrated with an initial short circuit current density of 3.22 mA/cm(2) and an internal quantum efficiency of ∼60% at the blue light region, revealing great potential in developing CZTS extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells.

  17. Internal absorber solar collector

    DOEpatents

    Sletten, Carlyle J.; Herskovitz, Sheldon B.; Holt, F. S.; Sletten, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Thin solar collecting panels are described made from arrays of small rod collectors consisting of a refracting dielectric rod lens with an absorber imbedded within it and a reflecting mirror coated on the back side of the dielectric rod. Non-tracking collector panels on vertical walls or roof tops receive approximately 90% of solar radiation within an acceptance zone 60.degree. in elevation angle by 120.degree. or more in the azimuth sectors with a collector concentration ratio of approximately 3.0. Miniaturized construction of the circular dielectric rods with internal absorbers reduces the weight per area of glass, plastic and metal used in the collector panels. No external parts or insulation are needed as heat losses are low due to partial vacuum or low conductivity gas surrounding heated portions of the collector. The miniature internal absorbers are generally made of solid copper with black selective surface and the collected solar heat is extracted at the collector ends by thermal conductivity along the absorber rods. Heat is removed from end fittings by use of liquid circulants. Several alternate constructions are provided for simplifying collector panel fabrication and for preventing the thermal expansion and contraction of the heated absorber or circulant tubes from damaging vacuum seals. In a modified version of the internal absorber collector, oil with temperature dependent viscosity is pumped through a segmented absorber which is now composed of closely spaced insulated metal tubes. In this way the circulant is automatically diverted through heated portions of the absorber giving higher collector concentration ratios than theoretically possible for an unsegmented absorber.

  18. Lipid-absorbing Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, H. E., Jr.; Wallace, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    The removal of bile acids and cholesterol by polymeric absorption is discussed in terms of micelle-polymer interaction. The results obtained with a polymer composed of 75 parts PEO and 25 parts PB plus curing ingredients show an absorption of 305 to 309%, based on original polymer weight. Particle size effects on absorption rate are analyzed. It is concluded that crosslinked polyethylene oxide polymers will absorb water, crosslinked polybutadiene polymers will absorb lipids; neither polymer will absorb appreciable amounts of lipids from micellar solutions of lipids in water.

  19. MST radar observation in international programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Susumu

    1993-08-01

    MST radars played an important role in the observation of middle atmosphere dynamics in MAP. The radars have made it possible, for the first time, to observe the precise behaviour of atmospheric gravity waves which had so far been suspected, without definite observations, to contribute to produce weak winds around the mesopause. The facilities then built in various places as in the U.S.A., Germany and Japan detected some crucial behaviors to prove the existence of gravity waves breaking in these heights, showing a release of the momentum as required for producing the weak wind region. Since MAP through MAC to STEP which is now going, MST radars have been increasingly active, with increase of the facilities over the globe, in the observation of atmospheric dynamics from near the ground up to the mesosphere. Besides winds, gravity waves and turbulence, the facilities are now found to be able to observe precise structures of various meteorological disturbances as weather-fronts, typhoon, etc. Even the gap without echoes so far between the middle stratosphere and the lower mesosphere would disappear with an appearance of very powerful facilities in future. Like MST radars, ST radars are well developed. They are also pulsed-doppler radars working on VHF radio waves as MST radars, but less sensitive as to be able to observe only the lower stratosphere and the troposphere. ST radars are economical and widely used for unattended observation and in setting-up networks in international programs. ST radars work as meteor radars simply by installing a small device, Medac, to the original systems. Medium frequency (MF) radars suit mesosphere and lower thermosphere observation; they operate with fairly low power, suitable for continuous observation.

  20. Energy-Absorbing, Lightweight Wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waydo, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Improved energy-absorbing wheels are under development for use on special-purpose vehicles that must traverse rough terrain under conditions (e.g., extreme cold) in which rubber pneumatic tires would fail. The designs of these wheels differ from those of prior non-pneumatic energy-absorbing wheels in ways that result in lighter weights and more effective reduction of stresses generated by ground/wheel contact forces. These wheels could be made of metals and/or composite materials to withstand the expected extreme operating conditions. As shown in the figure, a wheel according to this concept would include an isogrid tire connected to a hub via spring rods. The isogrid tire would be a stiff, lightweight structure typically made of aluminum. The isogrid aspect of the structure would both impart stiffness and act as a traction surface. The hub would be a thin-walled body of revolution having a simple or compound conical or other shape chosen for structural efficiency. The spring rods would absorb energy and partially isolate the hub and the supported vehicle from impact loads. The general spring-rod configuration shown in the figure was chosen because it would distribute contact and impact loads nearly evenly around the periphery of the hub, thereby helping to protect the hub against damage that would otherwise be caused by large loads concentrated onto small portions of the hub.

  1. Weather Radar Technology Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-15

    uelocitV WMs ) data processing systems such as NEXRAD to have a reliable technique for removing ambiguities due to velocity aliasing. Performance of many...intended for automated implementation on radar systems such as the NEXt generation weather RADar ( NEXRAD ) system. Several research areas were addressed...with Doppler radar will soon be realized with the deployment of the NEXRAD radar systems. Some of these large scale storms can have devastating wind

  2. Lunar radar backscatter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    The lunar surface material in the Plato area is characterized using Earth based visual, infrared, and radar signatures. Radar scattering in the lunar regolith with an existing optical scattering computer program is modeled. Mapping with 1 to 2 km resolution of the Moon using a 70 cm Arecibo radar is presented.

  3. Radar: Human Safety Net

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a technology that can be used to detect distant objects not visible to the human eye. A predecessor of radar, called the telemobiloscope, was first used to detect ships in the fog in 1904 off the German coast. Many scientists have worked on the development and refinement of radar (Hertz with electromagnetic waves; Popov with determining…

  4. Radar: Human Safety Net

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a technology that can be used to detect distant objects not visible to the human eye. A predecessor of radar, called the telemobiloscope, was first used to detect ships in the fog in 1904 off the German coast. Many scientists have worked on the development and refinement of radar (Hertz with electromagnetic waves; Popov with determining…

  5. Solar Radar Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    communications satellites and electric power grids. RELATED PROJECTS Studies with the HAARP radar facility being constructed in Alaska are conducted with...on wave-plasma interactions and also are assessing the possible use of HAARP as a solar radar. REFERENCES James, J. C., Radar studies of the sun, in

  6. RADAR "SAIL" satellite concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguttes, Jean Paul; Sombrin, Jacques; Conde, Eric

    1996-11-01

    The Radar SAIL concept is based on the use of a rectangular antenna lying in the dawn-dusk orbital plane with the length (along speed vector) smaller than the height. Such geometry makes it possible to place the solar cells on the back of the antenna, to use gravity gradient stabilisation, and to implement multipath-free GPS interferometric measurement of the antenna deformation thus allowing structural relaxation. Less obviously, the geometry favours the RADAR design too, by allowing grating lobes and therefore a lower density of built-in electronic in the active antenna. The antenna can be thin and packed for launch inside a cylinder-shaped bus having pyrotechnic doors for the antenna deployement and bearing the rest of the payload and the service equipment. With respect to a standard design of performant missions, cost savings come from the bus, whose functions (AOCS, power supply) are simplified, from the launch since the mass budget and the stowing configuration become compatible with medium size rockets (LLV2/3, DELTA-LITE, LM-4.), and from the active antenna built-in electronics. The RADAR SAIL concept is all the more cost effective when the mission requires a large, high and short antenna, i.e. high resolution (<5m), low frequency band (L or S or even P), high revisiting, multiple frequencies. Mission implementation and funding can be favored by the new capability to share the satellite between autonomous regional operators. Combined with ground DBF (digital beam forming) technique, the concept allows extremely simple and low cost missions providing a fixed wide swath (10 to 15 m resolution within 500km to 1000 km swath) for systematic surveillance or monitoring.

  7. Design of a non-traditional dynamic vibration absorber.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Y L; Wong, W O

    2009-08-01

    A non-traditional dynamic vibration absorber is proposed for the minimization of maximum vibration velocity response of a vibrating structure. Unlike the traditional damped absorber configuration, the proposed absorber has a linear viscous damper connecting the absorber mass directly to the ground instead of the main mass. Optimum parameters of the proposed absorber are derived based on the fixed-point theory for minimizing the maximum vibration velocity response of a single-degree-of-freedom system under harmonic excitation. The extent of reduction in maximum vibration velocity response of the primary system when using the traditional dynamic absorber is compared with that using the proposed one. Under the optimum tuning condition of the absorbers, it is proved analytically that the proposed absorber provides a greater reduction in maximum vibration velocity response of the primary system than the traditional absorber.

  8. "Smart" Electromechanical Shock Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, Lebarian; Glenn, Dean C.; Carroll, Monty B.

    1989-01-01

    Shock-absorbing apparatus includes electromechanical actuator and digital feedback control circuitry rather than springs and hydraulic damping as in conventional shock absorbers. Device not subject to leakage and requires little or no maintenance. Attenuator parameters adjusted in response to sensory feedback and predictive algorithms to obtain desired damping characteristic. Device programmed to decelerate slowly approaching vehicle or other large object according to prescribed damping characteristic.

  9. "Smart" Electromechanical Shock Absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, Lebarian; Glenn, Dean C.; Carroll, Monty B.

    1989-01-01

    Shock-absorbing apparatus includes electromechanical actuator and digital feedback control circuitry rather than springs and hydraulic damping as in conventional shock absorbers. Device not subject to leakage and requires little or no maintenance. Attenuator parameters adjusted in response to sensory feedback and predictive algorithms to obtain desired damping characteristic. Device programmed to decelerate slowly approaching vehicle or other large object according to prescribed damping characteristic.

  10. Multiple Types of Light Absorbing Carbon Aerosol in East Asian Outflow: Variatons in Morphology and Internal Structure as Characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, J. R.; Alexander, D. T.; Crozier, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    The importance of light absorbing carbon (LAC) aerosols to climate forcing is well established, but such aerosols are typically treated in climate models as uniform in optical properties. When examined by electron microscopy, however, LAC aerosols from regions with significant anthropogenic pollution show a wide variety of morphologies and internal structures. Electron energy loss spectral analysis to date on brown carbon and black carbon, albeit limited, suggests a linkage between internal structure and fundamental optical properties. Some of these LAC varieties can be easily defined as distinct “types” and other varieties show a continuum of variation within which general “types” can be defined. The data discussed here are from a research flight of the NCAR C-130 aircraft flown in April 2001 above the Yellow Sea during the ACE-Asia project. Perhaps the most common LAC type is “soot”, branched and chainlike aggregates of carbonaceous spherules. The spherule size in East Asian soot particles is 20-60 nm in many cases, but soot with large spherules (100 nm or larger) are also present. Spherule size is a “source effect” and not something altered during transport and aging. Some laboratory studies have suggested that as soot ages, the aggregates become more compact, but in these aerosols both compact and open soot particles coexist and compact soot is known to be the initial LAC product under some combustion conditions. In cases where the spherule size of the compact soot is different from that of open-structured soot, clearly the compact soot is not an aged form of the latter. Variability of ordering of the graphene sheets that make up the spherules is also a source effect. The more ordered soot particles consist of graphene sheets that curve concentrically, onion-like, around the spherule center, probably indicative of a high degree of carbonization that accompanies high temperature combustion. There is a range of ordering from highly ordered down to

  11. Structure of the reaction center of photosystem I of plants. An investigation with linear-dichroic absorbance-detected magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Vrieze, J.; Gast, P.; Hoff, A.J.

    1996-06-06

    Photosystem I particles from spinach were studied with linear-dichroic absorbance-detected magnetic resonance in zero-magnetic field. The microwave-induced triplet-minus-singlet (T-S) spectra and the linear-dichroic (LD) T-S spectra were recorded for the {bar D}+ {bar E} and the {bar D} - {bar E} microwave transitions of the triplet state of the primary donor, {sub 3}P{sub 700}. From these data the directions of the optical transition moments contributing to the T-S spectra in the 600-750 nm region, with respect to the triplet x- and y-axes of {sub 3}P{sub 700} were obtained. A comparison is made with data obtained for monomeric chlorophyll (Chl) a in two glasses. The orientation of the Q{sub Y}-transition moment with respect to the in-plane triplet x- and y-axes of {sub 3}P{sub 700} differs from monomeric Chl a in the two glasses. This difference is ascribed to the different environments of P{sub 700} and Chl a, rather than to the dimeric structure of P{sub 700}. In addition to the Q{sub Y}-absorption band of P{sub 700}, the T-S and LD(T-S) spectra contain features that are ascribed to transitions involving accessory Chls. The contribution of the Q{sub Y} transition of the primary acceptor to a band at 687 nm in the T-S spectrum is discussed, and a comparison is made with the signal of the primary acceptor in the T-S spectrum of Heliobacterium chlorum. 51 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Airborne Differential Doppler Weather Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, R.; Bidwell, S.; Liao, L.; Rincon, R.; Heymsfield, G.; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Precipitation Radar aboard the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM) Satellite has shown the potential for spaceborne sensing of snow and rain by means of an incoherent pulsed radar operating at 13.8 GHz. The primary advantage of radar relative to passive instruments arises from the fact that the radar can image the 3-dimensional structure of storms. As a consequence, the radar data can be used to determine the vertical rain structure, rain type (convective/stratiform) effective storm height, and location of the melting layer. The radar, moreover, can be used to detect snow and improve the estimation of rain rate over land. To move toward spaceborne weather radars that can be deployed routinely as part of an instrument set consisting of passive and active sensors will require the development of less expensive, lighter-weight radars that consume less power. At the same time, the addition of a second frequency and an upgrade to Doppler capability are features that are needed to retrieve information on the characteristics of the drop size distribution, vertical air motion and storm dynamics. One approach to the problem is to use a single broad-band transmitter-receiver and antenna where two narrow-band frequencies are spaced apart by 5% to 10% of the center frequency. Use of Ka-band frequencies (26.5 GHz - 40 GHz) affords two advantages: adequate spatial resolution can be attained with a relatively small antenna and the differential reflectivity and mean Doppler signals are directly related to the median mass diameter of the snow and raindrop size distributions. The differential mean Doppler signal has the additional property that this quantity depends only on that part of the radial speed of the hydrometeors that is drop-size dependent. In principle, the mean and differential mean Doppler from a near-nadir viewing radar can be used to retrieve vertical air motion as well as the total mean radial velocity. In the paper, we present theoretical calculations for the

  13. Airborne Differential Doppler Weather Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, R.; Bidwell, S.; Liao, L.; Rincon, R.; Heymsfield, G.; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Precipitation Radar aboard the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM) Satellite has shown the potential for spaceborne sensing of snow and rain by means of an incoherent pulsed radar operating at 13.8 GHz. The primary advantage of radar relative to passive instruments arises from the fact that the radar can image the 3-dimensional structure of storms. As a consequence, the radar data can be used to determine the vertical rain structure, rain type (convective/stratiform) effective storm height, and location of the melting layer. The radar, moreover, can be used to detect snow and improve the estimation of rain rate over land. To move toward spaceborne weather radars that can be deployed routinely as part of an instrument set consisting of passive and active sensors will require the development of less expensive, lighter-weight radars that consume less power. At the same time, the addition of a second frequency and an upgrade to Doppler capability are features that are needed to retrieve information on the characteristics of the drop size distribution, vertical air motion and storm dynamics. One approach to the problem is to use a single broad-band transmitter-receiver and antenna where two narrow-band frequencies are spaced apart by 5% to 10% of the center frequency. Use of Ka-band frequencies (26.5 GHz - 40 GHz) affords two advantages: adequate spatial resolution can be attained with a relatively small antenna and the differential reflectivity and mean Doppler signals are directly related to the median mass diameter of the snow and raindrop size distributions. The differential mean Doppler signal has the additional property that this quantity depends only on that part of the radial speed of the hydrometeors that is drop-size dependent. In principle, the mean and differential mean Doppler from a near-nadir viewing radar can be used to retrieve vertical air motion as well as the total mean radial velocity. In the paper, we present theoretical calculations for the

  14. Energy-Absorbing Beam Member

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littell, Justin D. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    An energy-absorbing (EA) beam member and having a cell core structure is positioned in an aircraft fuselage proximate to the floor of the aircraft. The cell core structure has a length oriented along a width of the fuselage, a width oriented along a length of the fuselage, and a depth extending away from the floor. The cell core structure also includes cell walls that collectively define a repeating conusoidal pattern of alternating respective larger and smaller first and second radii along the length of the cell core structure. The cell walls slope away from a direction of flight of the aircraft at a calibrated lean angle. An EA beam member may include the cell core structure and first and second plates along the length of the cell core structure on opposite edges of the cell material.

  15. Comparison of simulated and actual wind shear radar data products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britt, Charles L.; Crittenden, Lucille H.

    1992-01-01

    Prior to the development of the NASA experimental wind shear radar system, extensive computer simulations were conducted to determine the performance of the radar in combined weather and ground clutter environments. The simulation of the radar used analytical microburst models to determine weather returns and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) maps to determine ground clutter returns. These simulations were used to guide the development of hazard detection algorithms and to predict their performance. The structure of the radar simulation is reviewed. Actual flight data results from the Orlando and Denver tests are compared with simulated results. Areas of agreement and disagreement of actual and simulated results are shown.

  16. Monitoring by holographic radar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catapano, Ilaria; Crocco, Lorenzo; Affinito, Antonio; Gennarelli, Gianluca; Soldovieri, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Nowadays, radar technology represents a significant opportunity to collect useful information for the monitoring and conservation of critical infrastructures. Radar systems exploit the non-invasive interaction between the matter and the electromagnetic waves at microwave frequencies. Such an interaction allows obtaining images of the region under test from which one can infer the presence of potential anomalies such as deformations, cracks, water infiltrations, etc. This information turns out to be of primary importance in practical scenarios where the probed structure is in a poor state of preservation and renovation works must be planned. In this framework, the aim of this contribution is to describe the potentialities of the holographic radar Rascan 4/4000, a holographic radar developed by Remote Sensing Laboratory of Bauman Moscow State Technical University, as a non-destructive diagnostic tool capable to provide, in real-time, high resolution subsurface images of the sounded structure [1]. This radar provides holograms of hidden anomalies from the amplitude of the interference signal arising between the backscattered signal and a reference signal. The performance of the holographic radar is appraised by means of several experiments. Preliminary tests concerning the imaging below the floor and inside wood structures are carried out in controlled conditions at the Electromagnetic Diagnostic Laboratory of IREA-CNR. After, with reference to bridge monitoring for security aim, the results of a measurement campaign performed on the Musmeci bridge are presented [2]. Acknowledgments This research has been performed in the framework of the "Active and Passive Microwaves for Security and Subsurface imaging (AMISS)" EU 7th Framework Marie Curie Actions IRSES project (PIRSES-GA-2010-269157). REFERENCES [1] S. Ivashov, V. Razevig, I. Vasilyev, A. Zhuravlev, T. Bechtel, L. Capineri, The holographic principle in subsurface radar technology, International Symposium to

  17. Examining the Vertical Structure of Clouds Systems in CAM5 Using Simulated Cloudsat Radar Reflectivities with Estimated Uncertainties from Precipitation Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Klein, S. A.; Ma, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Climate models have difficulties in correctly simulating clouds and precipitation. It is critical to know the internal structure of clouds and precipitation since it is the vertical distribution of condensate that determines the characteristics of the cloud radiative forcing and lends insight into the vertical structure of condensation heating, which have large impact on the evolution of cloud systems. Cloudsat and CALIPSO provide the unprecedented data that allow us to look at detailed cloud and precipitation structures. In this study, we examine the vertical distribution of clouds and precipitation in CAM5 using simulated CloudSat radar reflectivities. Our focus is to evaluate how well the model simulated clouds over several different important cloud regimes and estimate the effects of simulator uncertainties from precipitation sub-column distribution. The selected regimes include TWP, Southern Ocean, and Australian stratus region. The impacts of different assumptions used to assign precipitation to sub-columns are examined, and the uncertainties from precipitation distribution are analyzed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Examining the factorial structure, measurement invariance and convergent and discriminant validity of a novel self-report measure of work ability: work ability--personal radar.

    PubMed

    Ilmarinen, Ville; Ilmarinen, Juhani; Huuhtanen, Pekka; Louhevaara, Veikko; Näsman, Ove

    2015-01-01

    For identification of groups and domains for work ability promotion, brief self-report measure, work ability - personal radar (WA-PR), based on the 'the house of work ability' model is presented and psychometrically evaluated in the structural equation framework using data from technological sector (N = 3754). The house model had acceptable fit to the data. In addition, factor loadings in the model were invariant across groups, demonstrating metric invariance of the WA-PR. Scalar invariance of WA-PR was fully demonstrated across men and women, and partially demonstrated across age and employee groups. Comparisons between groups revealed lower levels of health and functional capacity, but higher levels of four other WA-PR dimensions in older employees. In addition, all house structures showed convergence with alternative work ability measures. WA-PR demonstrated potential for effective measurement of multiple work ability dimensions from employees' perspective. It provides means for efficient location of relevant domains and focus groups for work ability promotion. A novel approach to multidimensional work ability measurement was developed to tackle the challenges of work ability promotion. The properties of the instrument were psychometrically evaluated in structural equation modelling framework. Instrument demonstrated potential for locating relevant domains and focus groups for work ability promotions at workplaces and organisations.

  19. Laser diode structures with a saturable absorber for high-energy picosecond optical pulse generation by combined gain-and Q-switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryvkin, B. S.; Avrutin, E. A.; Kostamovaara, J. E. K.; Kostamovaara, J. T.

    2017-02-01

    The performance of gain-switched Fabry-Perot asymmetric-waveguide semiconductor lasers with a large equivalent spot size and an intracavity saturable absorber was investigated experimentally and theoretically. The laser with a short (˜20 μm) absorber emitted high-energy afterpulse-free optical pulses in a broad range of injection current pulse amplitudes; optical pulses with a peak power of about 35 W and a duration of about 80 ps at half maximum were achieved with a current pulse with an amplitude of just 8 A and a duration of 1.5 ns. Good quality pulsations were observed in a broad range of elevated temperatures. The introduction of a substantially longer absorber section leads to strong spectral broadening of the output without a significant improvement to pulse energy and peak power.

  20. Radar stage uncertainty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, J.M.; Davies, W.J.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is investigating the performance of radars used for stage (or water-level) measurement. This paper presents a comparison of estimated uncertainties and data for radar water-level measurements with float, bubbler, and wire weight water-level measurements. The radar sensor was also temperature-tested in a laboratory. The uncertainty estimates indicate that radar measurements are more accurate than uncorrected pressure sensors at higher water stages, but are less accurate than pressure sensors at low stages. Field data at two sites indicate that radar sensors may have a small negative bias. Comparison of field radar measurements with wire weight measurements found that the radar tends to measure slightly lower values as stage increases. Copyright ASCE 2005.

  1. Identification of scintillation signatures on GPS signals originating from plasma structures detected with EISCAT incoherent scatter radar along the same line of sight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forte, Biagio; Coleman, Chris; Skone, Susan; Häggström, Ingemar; Mitchell, Cathryn; Da Dalt, Federico; Panicciari, Tommaso; Kinrade, Joe; Bust, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Ionospheric scintillation originates from the scattering of electromagnetic waves through spatial gradients in the plasma density distribution, drifting across a given propagation direction. Ionospheric scintillation represents a disruptive manifestation of adverse space weather conditions through degradation of the reliability and continuity of satellite telecommunication and navigation systems and services (e.g., European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service, EGNOS). The purpose of the experiment presented here was to determine the contribution of auroral ionization structures to GPS scintillation. European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) measurements were obtained along the same line of sight of a given GPS satellite observed from Tromso and followed by means of the EISCAT UHF radar to causally identify plasma structures that give rise to scintillation on the co-aligned GPS radio link. Large-scale structures associated with the poleward edge of the ionospheric trough, with auroral arcs in the nightside auroral oval and with particle precipitation at the onset of a substorm were indeed identified as responsible for enhanced phase scintillation at L band. For the first time it was observed that the observed large-scale structures did not cascade into smaller-scale structures, leading to enhanced phase scintillation without amplitude scintillation. More measurements and theory are necessary to understand the mechanism responsible for the inhibition of large-scale to small-scale energy cascade and to reproduce the observations. This aspect is fundamental to model the scattering of radio waves propagating through these ionization structures. New insights from this experiment allow a better characterization of the impact that space weather can have on satellite telecommunications and navigation services.

  2. Identification of scintillation signatures on GPS signals originating from plasma structures detected with EISCAT incoherent scatter radar along the same line of sight

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Chris; Skone, Susan; Häggström, Ingemar; Mitchell, Cathryn; Da Dalt, Federico; Panicciari, Tommaso; Kinrade, Joe; Bust, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Ionospheric scintillation originates from the scattering of electromagnetic waves through spatial gradients in the plasma density distribution, drifting across a given propagation direction. Ionospheric scintillation represents a disruptive manifestation of adverse space weather conditions through degradation of the reliability and continuity of satellite telecommunication and navigation systems and services (e.g., European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service, EGNOS). The purpose of the experiment presented here was to determine the contribution of auroral ionization structures to GPS scintillation. European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) measurements were obtained along the same line of sight of a given GPS satellite observed from Tromso and followed by means of the EISCAT UHF radar to causally identify plasma structures that give rise to scintillation on the co‐aligned GPS radio link. Large‐scale structures associated with the poleward edge of the ionospheric trough, with auroral arcs in the nightside auroral oval and with particle precipitation at the onset of a substorm were indeed identified as responsible for enhanced phase scintillation at L band. For the first time it was observed that the observed large‐scale structures did not cascade into smaller‐scale structures, leading to enhanced phase scintillation without amplitude scintillation. More measurements and theory are necessary to understand the mechanism responsible for the inhibition of large‐scale to small‐scale energy cascade and to reproduce the observations. This aspect is fundamental to model the scattering of radio waves propagating through these ionization structures. New insights from this experiment allow a better characterization of the impact that space weather can have on satellite telecommunications and navigation services. PMID:28331778

  3. Identification of scintillation signatures on GPS signals originating from plasma structures detected with EISCAT incoherent scatter radar along the same line of sight.

    PubMed

    Forte, Biagio; Coleman, Chris; Skone, Susan; Häggström, Ingemar; Mitchell, Cathryn; Da Dalt, Federico; Panicciari, Tommaso; Kinrade, Joe; Bust, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Ionospheric scintillation originates from the scattering of electromagnetic waves through spatial gradients in the plasma density distribution, drifting across a given propagation direction. Ionospheric scintillation represents a disruptive manifestation of adverse space weather conditions through degradation of the reliability and continuity of satellite telecommunication and navigation systems and services (e.g., European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service, EGNOS). The purpose of the experiment presented here was to determine the contribution of auroral ionization structures to GPS scintillation. European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT) measurements were obtained along the same line of sight of a given GPS satellite observed from Tromso and followed by means of the EISCAT UHF radar to causally identify plasma structures that give rise to scintillation on the co-aligned GPS radio link. Large-scale structures associated with the poleward edge of the ionospheric trough, with auroral arcs in the nightside auroral oval and with particle precipitation at the onset of a substorm were indeed identified as responsible for enhanced phase scintillation at L band. For the first time it was observed that the observed large-scale structures did not cascade into smaller-scale structures, leading to enhanced phase scintillation without amplitude scintillation. More measurements and theory are necessary to understand the mechanism responsible for the inhibition of large-scale to small-scale energy cascade and to reproduce the observations. This aspect is fundamental to model the scattering of radio waves propagating through these ionization structures. New insights from this experiment allow a better characterization of the impact that space weather can have on satellite telecommunications and navigation services.

  4. Radar sounder performances for ESA JUICE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berquin, Y. P.; Kofman, W. W.; Heggy, E.; Hérique, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Jupiter Icy moons Explorer (JUICE) is the first Large-class mission chosen as part of ESA's Cosmic Vision 2015-2025 program. The mission will study Jovian icy moons Ganymede and Europa as potential habitats for life, addressing two key themes of Cosmic Vision namely the conditions for planet formation and the emergence of life, and the Solar System interactions. The radar sounder instrument on this mission will have great potential to address specific science questions such as the presence of subsurface liquid water and ice shell geophysical structures. One major constraint for radar sounding is the roughness of the planetary surface. The work presented will focus on the characterization of Ganymede's surface topography to better understand its surface properties from a radar point of view. These results should help to put constraints on the design of JUICE's radar sounder. We use topographic data derived from the Voyager and Galileo missions images to try to characterize the surface structure and to quantify its geometry (in terms of slopes and RMS heights mainly). This study will help us evaluating the radar budget in a statistical approach. In addition, deterministic simulations of surface radar echoes conducted on synthetic surfaces -extrapolated from Digital Elevation Models- will be presented to better assess radar sounding performances.

  5. Development of charge structure in a short live convective cell observed by a 3D lightning mapper and a phased array radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, S.; Adachi, T.; Kusunoki, K.; Wu, T.; Ushio, T.; Yoshikawa, E.

    2015-12-01

    Thunderstorm observation has been conducted in Osaka, Japan, with a use of a 3D lightning mapper, called Broadband Observation network for Lightning and Thunderstorm (BOLT), and an X-band phased array radar (PAR). BOLT is a LF sensor network that receives LF emission associated with lightning discharges and locates LF radiation sources in 3D. PAR employs mechanical and electrical scans, respectively, in azimuthal and elevation direction, succeeding in quite high volume scan rate. In this presentation, we focus on lightning activity and charge structure in convective cells that lasted only short time (15 minutes or so). Thunderstorms that consisted of several convective cells developed near the radar site. Precipitation structure of a convective cell in the thunderstorm was clearly observed by PAR. A reflectivity core of the convective cell appeared at an altitude of 6 km at 2245 (JST). After that the core descended and reached the ground at 2256 (JST), resulting in heavy precipitation on surface. The echo top height (30dBZ) increased intermittently between 2245 (JST) and 2253 (JST) and it reached at the altitude of 12 km. The convective cell dissipated at 2300. Many intra-cloud (IC) flashes were initiated within the convective cell. Most IC flashes that were initiated in the convective cell occurred during the time when the echo top height increased, while a few IC flashes were initiated in the convective cell after the cease of the echo top vertical development. These facts indicate that strong updraft at upper levels (about 8 km or higher) plays an important role on thunderstorm electrification for IC flashes. Moreover, initiation altitudes of the IC flashes and the positive charge regions removed by the IC flashes increased, as the echo top height increased. This fact implies that the strong updraft at the upper levels blew up positively-charged ice pellets and negatively-charged graupel, and lifted IC flash initiation altitudes and positive charge regions

  6. 2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, prime search radar tower, height finder radar ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW SOUTHWEST, prime search radar tower, height finder radar towards, height finder radar towers, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  7. SPEAR: Scalable Panels for Efficient, Affordable Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-14

    folding Prime power and cooling becomes excessive 5 Example of Deployable Structure Transportation Mode Unfolded Aperture Air-Supported Radome for Wind...Deployable Structure Risks • Transportable, Lightweight, Deployable Structure • Alignment and Calibration of Deployed Structure • Wind Loading of Large...USASMDC / GTRI Array Implementation SPEAR Technical Director GTRI Industry Partners Radar System Technology (RST) Army, Navy, Air Force Missile Defense

  8. Radar-cross-section reduction of wind turbines. part 1.

    SciTech Connect

    Brock, Billy C.; Loui, Hung; McDonald, Jacob J.; Paquette, Joshua A.; Calkins, David A.; Miller, William K.; Allen, Steven E.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Patitz, Ward E.

    2012-03-05

    In recent years, increasing deployment of large wind-turbine farms has become an issue of growing concern for the radar community. The large radar cross section (RCS) presented by wind turbines interferes with radar operation, and the Doppler shift caused by blade rotation causes problems identifying and tracking moving targets. Each new wind-turbine farm installation must be carefully evaluated for potential disruption of radar operation for air defense, air traffic control, weather sensing, and other applications. Several approaches currently exist to minimize conflict between wind-turbine farms and radar installations, including procedural adjustments, radar upgrades, and proper choice of low-impact wind-farm sites, but each has problems with limited effectiveness or prohibitive cost. An alternative approach, heretofore not technically feasible, is to reduce the RCS of wind turbines to the extent that they can be installed near existing radar installations. This report summarizes efforts to reduce wind-turbine RCS, with a particular emphasis on the blades. The report begins with a survey of the wind-turbine RCS-reduction literature to establish a baseline for comparison. The following topics are then addressed: electromagnetic model development and validation, novel material development, integration into wind-turbine fabrication processes, integrated-absorber design, and wind-turbine RCS modeling. Related topics of interest, including alternative mitigation techniques (procedural, at-the-radar, etc.), an introduction to RCS and electromagnetic scattering, and RCS-reduction modeling techniques, can be found in a previous report.

  9. Application of ground-penetrating radar imagery for three-dimensional visualisation of near-surface structures in ice-rich permafrost, Barrow, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Munroe, Jeffrey S.; Doolittle, James A.; Kanevskiy, Mikhail; Hinkel, Kenneth M.; Nelson, Frederick E.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Shur, Yuri; Kimble, John M.

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional ground-penetrating radar (3D GPR) was used to investigate the subsurface structure of ice-wedge polygons and other features of the frozen active layer and near-surface permafrost near Barrow, Alaska. Surveys were conducted at three sites located on landscapes of different geomorphic age. At each site, sediment cores were collected and characterised to aid interpretation of GPR data. At two sites, 3D GPR was able to delineate subsurface ice-wedge networks with high fidelity. Three-dimensional GPR data also revealed a fundamental difference in ice-wedge morphology between these two sites that is consistent with differences in landscape age. At a third site, the combination of two-dimensional and 3D GPR revealed the location of an active frost boil with ataxitic cryostructure. When supplemented by analysis of soil cores, 3D GPR offers considerable potential for imaging, interpreting and 3D mapping of near-surface soil and ice structures in permafrost environments.

  10. Unidirectional perfect absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, L.; Wang, P.; Song, Z.

    2016-09-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices.

  11. Shock absorber servicing tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koepler, Jack L. (Inventor); Hill, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A tool to assist in the servicing of a shock absorber wherein the shock absorber is constructed of a pair of aligned gas and liquid filled chambers. Each of the chambers is separated by a movable separator member. Maximum efficiency of the shock absorber is achieved in the locating of a precise volume of gas within the gas chamber and a precise volume of liquid within the liquid chamber. The servicing tool of this invention employs a rod which is to connect with the separator and by observation of the position of the rod with respect to the gauge body, the location of the separator is ascertained even though it is not directly observable.

  12. Unidirectional perfect absorber

    PubMed Central

    Jin, L.; Wang, P.; Song, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This study proposes a unidirectional perfect absorber (UPA), which we realized with a two-arm Aharonov-Bohm interferometer, that consists of a dissipative resonator side-coupled to a uniform resonator array. The UPA has reflection-less full absorption on one direction, and reflectionless full transmission on the other, with an appropriate magnetic flux and coupling, detuning, and loss of the side-coupled resonator. The magnetic flux controls the transmission, the left transmission is larger for magnetic flux less than one-half flux quantum; and the right transmission is larger for magnetic flux between one-half and one flux quantum. Besides, a perfect absorber (PA) can be realized based on the UPA, in which light waves from both sides, with arbitrary superposition of the ampli- tude and phase, are perfectly absorbed. The UPA is expected to be useful in the design of novel optical devices. PMID:27615125

  13. Shock Absorbing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-01-01

    A lightweight, inexpensive shock-absorbing system, developed by Langley Research Center 20 years ago, is now in service as safety device for an automated railway at Duke University Medical Center. The transportation system travels at about 25 miles per hour, carrying patients, visitors, staff and cargo. At the end of each guideway of the system are "frangible," (breakable) tube "buffers." If a slowing car fails to make a complete stop at the terminal, it would bump and shatter the tubes, absorbing energy that might otherwise jolt the passengers or damage the vehicle.

  14. Recent developments of smart electromagnetic absorbers based polymer-composites at gigahertz frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idris, Fadzidah Mohd.; Hashim, Mansor; Abbas, Zulkifly; Ismail, Ismayadi; Nazlan, Rodziah; Ibrahim, Idza Riati

    2016-05-01

    The rapid increase in electromagnetic interference has received a serious attention from researchers who responded by producing a variety of radar absorbing materials especially at high gigahertz frequencies. Ongoing investigation is being carried out in order to find the best absorbing materials which can fulfill the requirements for smart absorbing materials which are lightweight, broad bandwidth absorption, stronger absorption etc. Thus, to improve the absorbing capability, several important parameters need to be taken into consideration such as filler type, loading level, type of polymer matrix, physical thickness, grain sizes, layers and bandwidth. Therefore, this article introduces the electromagnetic wave absorption mechanisms and then reveals and reviews those parameters that enhance the absorption performance.

  15. 3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW NORTHWEST, height finder radar towers, and radar tower (unknown function) - Fort Custer Military Reservation, P-67 Radar Station, .25 mile north of Dickman Road, east of Clark Road, Battle Creek, Calhoun County, MI

  16. 30. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #318, showing radar control. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Perimeter acquisition radar building room #318, showing radar control. Console and line printers - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  17. Remote sensing of vegetation 3-D structure for biodiversity and habitat: Review and implications for lidar and radar spaceborne missions

    Treesearch

    K.M. Bergen; S.J. Goetz; R.O. Dubayah; G.M. Henebry; C.T. Hunsaker; M.L. Imhoff; R.F. Nelson; G.G. Parker; V.C. Radeloff

    2009-01-01

    Biodiversity and habitat face increasing pressures due to human and natural influences that alter vegetation structure. Because of the inherent difficulty of measuring forested vegetation three-dimensional (3-D) structure on the ground, this important component of biodiversity and habitat has been, until recently, largely restricted to local measurements, or at larger...

  18. Planetary radar studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. W.; Cutts, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    A catalog of lunar and radar anomalies was generated to provide a base for comparison with Venusian radar signatures. The relationships between lunar radar anomalies and regolith processes were investigated, and a consortium was formed to compare lunar and Venusian radar images of craters. Time was scheduled at the Arecibo Observatory to use the 430 MHz radar to obtain high resolution radar maps of six areas of the lunar suface. Data from 1978 observations of Mare Serenitas and Plato are being analyzed on a PDP 11/70 computer to construct the computer program library necessary for the eventual reduction of the May 1981 and subsequent data acquisitions. Papers accepted for publication are presented.

  19. Laser radar in robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Carmer, D.C.; Peterson, L.M.

    1996-02-01

    In this paper the authors describe the basic operating principles of laser radar sensors and the typical algorithms used to process laser radar imagery for robotic applications. The authors review 12 laser radar sensors to illustrate the variety of systems that have been applied to robotic applications wherein information extracted from the laser radar data is used to automatically control a mechanism or process. Next, they describe selected robotic applications in seven areas: autonomous vehicle navigation, walking machine foot placement, automated service vehicles, manufacturing and inspection, automotive, military, and agriculture. They conclude with a discussion of the status of laser radar technology and suggest trends seen in the application of laser radar sensors to robotics. Many new applications are expected as the maturity level progresses and system costs are reduced.

  20. Shock Absorbing Helmets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents a description of helmets used by football players that offer three times the shock-absorbing capacity of earlier types. An interior padding for the helmets, composed of Temper Foam, first used by NASA's Ames Research Center in the design of aircraft seats is described.

  1. Historical sketch: Radar geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, H.

    1980-01-01

    A chronological assessment is given of the broad spectra of technology associated with radar geology. Particular attention is given to the most recent developments made in the areas of microwave Earth resources applications and geologic remote sensing from aircraft and satellite. The significance of space derived radar in geologic investigations is discussed and the scientific basis for exploiting the sensitivity of radar signals to various aspects of geologic terrain is given.

  2. Bistatic-radar investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, H. T.; Tyler, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    A bistatic-radar study during the Apollo 15 flight is reviewed, with the orbiting command module as one terminal. Bistatic-radar slopes are compared to geological maps of Copernicus and Riphaeus mountain regions and Kepler region. Basic theory is discussed, including the radar echoes composed of the sum of the reflections from the moon area that is mutually visible from the spacecraft and earth. A signal receiving system and data processing system are outlined schematically.

  3. Radar cross-section study of cylindrical cavity-backed apertures with outer or inner material coating: the case of H-polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colak, Dilek; Nosich, Alexander I.; Altintas, Ayhan

    1995-05-01

    A dual-series-based solution is obtained for the scattering of an H-polarized plane wave from a slitted infinite circular cylinder coated with absorbing material from inside or outside. For both cases, numerical results are presented for the radar cross section and comparisons are given for two different realistic absorbing materials. The radar cross-section dependencies are also given for the aspect angle of the scatterer and the thickness of the absorbing layer.

  4. Introduction to Radar Polarimetry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-04-23

    to VI° - SSýSh = fSMI2. But according to the radar formula [143, the power is proportional to the radar cross section , in this case af. Hence we are...knowledge the scattering matrix S can be rewritten as where the phases 4 of the measured voltages and the radar cross sections are made explicit. c...absolute phase the scattering matrix consists ef 8 - 2 - 1 = 5 independent parameters: three radar cross sections and two phase ]ifferences (see Eq.(5.6

  5. Origins of radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, R. D.

    Sessions on the history of thunderstorm and lightning research were held December 11, 1985, at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. At that time, since it was well known that lightning researchers were intimately involved in the development of radar and since the 50th anniversary of radar in the United States was at hand, it was suggested that a session on the history of meteorological radar would be appropriate and interesting. The following contribution was presented in the History of Meteorological Radar session May 22, 1986, at the AGU Spring Meeting in Baltimore, Md.

  6. Polarimetric and three dimensional mapping of shallow subsurface structural elements in mafic pyroclastics using mid- and high-frequency Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heggy, E.; Clifford, S. M.; Hughes, S. S.

    2006-12-01

    Volcanic terrains are among the most prevalent on Mars, their structural and stratigraphical investigation by GPR providing a powerful tool for understanding the mechanisms and chronological sequence that resulted in their formation. For this reason, a broadband (0.5 1.5 GHz) GPR was selected as one of the primary instruments for the European Space Agency's ExoMars rover that will be sent to Mars in 2011. As part of the effort to evaluate the potential of this technique, we carried out a parametric study of several features at Craters of the Moon (COM) National Monument in Idaho (USA). This area, which includes expansive lave fields and volcanic constructs, is a hyper-arid environment with an average annual precipitation of less than ~50 mm. It also displays considerable geochemical and geomorphological similarity to a variety of volcanic regions on Mars. Among the examples we investigated were a large cinder cone (Inferno Cone) and surrounding smooth- and rough-surfaced basaltic lava flows. We conducted multiple frequency 270-, 500- and 900-MHz GPR surveys, with both VV and HH polarizations, in both orthogonal and grid form in order to perform a three dimensional mapping of the consolidated core of the cinder cone beneath a thick layer (1-20 m) of tephra that accumulated as a result of different eruptive events. Analysis of the resulting data indicates maximum sounding depths of ~13 m deep at 270 MHz, 8 m at 500 MHz and 5 m at 900 MHz in the unconsolidated tephra. Our gridded profiles show that the tephra distribution over the consolidated core is asymmetric, the eastern side being covered by thicker deposits than elsewhere. Our preliminary results also suggest the potential presence of a small spatter cone beneath the eastern flank of the cone. A similar approach was used to investigate the Blue Dragon basaltic lava field located to the south of Inferno Cone. The observed penetration depths were an order of magnitude smaller due to the high density of the flow

  7. Direction-of-arrival estimation for co-located multiple-input multiple-output radar using structural sparsity Bayesian learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Fang-Qing; Zhang, Gong; Ben, De

    2015-11-01

    This paper addresses the direction of arrival (DOA) estimation problem for the co-located multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar with random arrays. The spatially distributed sparsity of the targets in the background makes compressive sensing (CS) desirable for DOA estimation. A spatial CS framework is presented, which links the DOA estimation problem to support recovery from a known over-complete dictionary. A modified statistical model is developed to accurately represent the intra-block correlation of the received signal. A structural sparsity Bayesian learning algorithm is proposed for the sparse recovery problem. The proposed algorithm, which exploits intra-signal correlation, is capable being applied to limited data support and low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) scene. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm has less computation load compared to the classical Bayesian algorithm. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm has a more accurate DOA estimation than the traditional multiple signal classification (MUSIC) algorithm and other CS recovery algorithms. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61071163, 61271327, and 61471191), the Funding for Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation in Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, China (Grant No. BCXJ14-08), the Funding of Innovation Program for Graduate Education of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. KYLX 0277), the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. 3082015NP2015504), and the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PADA), China.

  8. Subsurface structure of water-gas escape features revealed by ground-penetrating radar and electrical resistivity tomography, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Lake Powell delta, Utah, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrod, L.; Simpson, E. L.; Higgins, R.; Miller, K.; Morgano, K.; Snyder, E.; Vales, D.

    2016-10-01

    Data gathered by electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) were used to produce a three-dimensional image of subsurface soft-sediment deformation structures developed on the modern Lake Powell delta at Hite, Utah. ERT and GPR lines were run orthogonal across the crater. ERT resolved a low-resistivity layer up to 2 m thick in the area near the vents within the crater. This low-resistivity layer thins toward the margins representing clays ejected from the vents. Below and adjacent to this layer is a high-resistivity layer that reflects delta top and pro-delta sands. The deepest zone recognized in the ERT profiles consists of a low-resistivity layer, clay deposits that accumulated during the maximum lake high stand. This clay zone is connected to the vent within the crater by a conduit that changes diameter vertically. GPR profiles recognized the presence of collapse features restricted to the proximity of the vent. The geometry of the model is consistent with those proposed for marine pockmarks that can be generated seismically or aseismically with the exception of subaerial exposure after the dome stage development.

  9. The Shallow Subsurface Geological Structures at the Chang'E-3 Landing Site Based on Lunar Penetrating Radar Channel-2B Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, N.; Zhu, P.; Yuan, Y.; Yang, K.; Xiao, L.; Xiao, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The Lunar Penetrating Radar (LPR) carried by the Yutu rover of the Chinese Chang'E-3 mission has detected the shallow subsurface structures for the landing site at the northern Mare Imbrium. The antenna B of the LPR Channel-2 has collected more than 2000 traces of usable raw data. We performed calibration on the LPR data including amplitude compensation, filtering, and deconvolution. The processed results reveal that the shallow subsurface of the landing site can be divided into three major layers whose thicknesses are ~1, ~3, and 2-7 m, respectively. Variations occur on the thickness of each layer at different locations. Considering the geological background of the landing site, we interpret that the first layer is the regolith layer accumulated over ~80 Ma since the formation of the 450 m diameter Chang'E A crater. This regolith layer was formed on the basis of the ejecta deposits of Chang'E A. The second layer is the remnant continuous ejecta deposits from the Chang'E A crater, which is thicker closer to the crater rim and thinning outwardly. The Chang'E A crater formed on a paleo-regolith layer over the Eratosthenian basalts, which represents the third layer detected by the Channel 2B of the LPR.

  10. Understanding heavy lake-effect snowfall: The vertical structure of radar reflectivity in a deep snowband over and downwind of Lake Ontario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Daniel James

    The distribution of radar-estimated precipitation from lake-effect snow bands over and downwind of Lake Ontario shows more snowfall in downwind areas than over the lake itself. Here we examine two non-exclusive processes contributing to this: the collapse of convection that lofts hydrometeors over the lake and allows then to settle them downwind, and stratiform ascent over land, due to surface cooling, frictional convergence, and terrain, leading to more uniformly distributed precipitation there. The main data sources for this study are vertical profiles of radar reflectivity and hydrometeor vertical velocity in a well-defined, deep long-lake-axis-parallel band, observed on 11 December, 2013 during the Ontario Winter Lake-effect Systems (OWLeS) project. The profiles are derived from an airborne W-band Doppler radar, as well as an array of four Ka-band radars, a X-band profiling radar, a scanning X-band radar, and a scanning S-band radar. The presence of convection offshore is evident from deep, strong (up to 10 m s-1) updrafts producing bounded weak-echo regions and locally heavily rimed snow particles. The decrease of the standard deviation, skewness, and peak values of Doppler vertical velocity during the downwind shore crossing is consistent with the convection collapse hypothesis. Consistent with the stratiform ascent hypothesis are (a) an increase in mean vertical velocity over land; and (b) an increasing abundance of large snowflakes at low levels and over land, due to depositional growth and aggregation, evident from flight-level and surface particle size distribution data, and from differences in reflectivity profiles from S, X, Ka, and W-band radars at nearly the same time and location.

  11. Syntheses, structures and photoelectrochemical properties of three water-stable, visible light absorbing mental-organic frameworks based on tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)silane and 1,4-bis(pyridyl)benzene mixed ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tiantian; Yang, Xiaowei; Li, Ruyan; Liu, Xiaoyu; Gao, Yanling; Dai, Zhihui; Fang, Min; Liu, Hong-Ke; Wu, Yong

    2017-09-01

    Photovoltaics (PV), which directly convert solar energy into electricity generally using semiconductors, offer a practical and sustainable solution to the current energy shortage and environmental pollution crisis. Photovoltaic applications of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) belong to a relatively new area of research. Given that UV light accounts for only 4% while visible light contributes 43% of solar energy, it is rather imperative to develop semiconductors with narrow band gaps so that they could absorb visible light. In this work, three water-stable, narrow band semiconducting MOFs of [Cu(H2TCS)(H2O)] (1), [Co(H2TCS)(BPB)] (2) and [Ni(H2TCS)(BPB)] (3) were synthesized using tetrakis(4-carboxyphenyl)silane (H4TCS) and 1,4-bis (pyridyl)benzene (BPB) in water, and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffractions. MOF 1 has a 2D structure. MOF 2 and 3 are isostructrual and have 3D frameworks formed by interwoven 2D layers. All three MOFs are stable in acidic water solutions and can be stable in water for 7 days. MOFs 1-3 absorb UV and visible light and have band gaps of 0.50, 1.77 and 1.49 eV, respectively. Rapid and stable photocurrent responses of MOFs 1-3 under UV and visible light illuminations are observed. This work demonstrates that using electron rich Cu2+, Co2+, or Ni2+ as metal nodes can effectively decrease the band gaps of MOFs to make them absorbing visible light. To increase the conjugation in the linker is generally considered to be the method to decrease the band gap of MOFs. The conjugation in H4TCS is not significant and this ligand basically only absorbs UV light. However, by using electron rich Cu2+ ions as metal nodes, the prepared [Cu(H2TCS)(H2O)]·H2O (1) absorbs broadly in the visible light region. Thus, this work suggests that by using electron rich Cu2+, many narrow-band semiconductor MOFs can be prepared even by using ligands which only absorbs UV light.

  12. Radar attenuation and temperature within the Greenland Ice Sheet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacGregor, Joseph A; Li, Jilu; Paden, John D; Catania, Ginny A; Clow, Gary D.; Fahnestock, Mark A; Gogineni, Prasad S.; Grimm, Robert E.; Morlighem, Mathieu; Nandi, Soumyaroop; Seroussi, Helene; Stillman, David E

    2015-01-01

    The flow of ice is temperature-dependent, but direct measurements of englacial temperature are sparse. The dielectric attenuation of radio waves through ice is also temperature-dependent, and radar sounding of ice sheets is sensitive to this attenuation. Here we estimate depth-averaged radar-attenuation rates within the Greenland Ice Sheet from airborne radar-sounding data and its associated radiostratigraphy. Using existing empirical relationships between temperature, chemistry, and radar attenuation, we then infer the depth-averaged englacial temperature. The dated radiostratigraphy permits a correction for the confounding effect of spatially varying ice chemistry. Where radar transects intersect boreholes, radar-inferred temperature is consistently higher than that measured directly. We attribute this discrepancy to the poorly recognized frequency dependence of the radar-attenuation rate and correct for this effect empirically, resulting in a robust relationship between radar-inferred and borehole-measured depth-averaged temperature. Radar-inferred englacial temperature is often lower than modern surface temperature and that of a steady state ice-sheet model, particularly in southern Greenland. This pattern suggests that past changes in surface boundary conditions (temperature and accumulation rate) affect the ice sheet's present temperature structure over a much larger area than previously recognized. This radar-inferred temperature structure provides a new constraint for thermomechanical models of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  13. Combined radar and telemetry system

    DOEpatents

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.; Young, Derek; Chou, Tina; Hsieh, Lung-Hwa; Conover, Kurt; Heintzleman, Richard

    2017-08-01

    A combined radar and telemetry system is described. The combined radar and telemetry system includes a processing unit that executes instructions, where the instructions define a radar waveform and a telemetry waveform. The processor outputs a digital baseband signal based upon the instructions, where the digital baseband signal is based upon the radar waveform and the telemetry waveform. A radar and telemetry circuit transmits, simultaneously, a radar signal and telemetry signal based upon the digital baseband signal.

  14. Orbital SAR and Ground-Penetrating Radar for Mars: Complementary Tools in the Search for Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, B. A.; Grant, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    The physical structure and compositional variability of the upper martian crust is poorly understood. Optical and infrared measurements probe at most the top few cm of the surface layer and indicate the presence of layered volcanics and sediments, but it is likely that permafrost, hydrothermal deposits, and transient liquid water pockets occur at depths of meters to kilometers within the crust. An orbital synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can provide constraints on surface roughness, the depth of fine-grained aeolian or volcanic deposits, and the presence of strongly absorbing near-surface deposits such as carbonates. This information is crucial to the successful landing and operation of any rover designed to search for subsurface water. A rover-based ground-penetrating radar (GPR) can reveal layering in the upper crust, the presence of erosional or other subsurface horizons, depth to a permafrost layer, and direct detection of near-surface transient liquid water. We detail here the radar design parameters likely to provide the best information for Mars, based on experience with SAR and GPR in analogous terrestrial or planetary environments.

  15. Orbital SAR and Ground-Penetrating Radar for Mars: Complementary Tools in the Search for Water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, B. A.; Grant, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    The physical structure and compositional variability of the upper martian crust is poorly understood. Optical and infrared measurements probe at most the top few cm of the surface layer and indicate the presence of layered volcanics and sediments, but it is likely that permafrost, hydrothermal deposits, and transient liquid water pockets occur at depths of meters to kilometers within the crust. An orbital synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can provide constraints on surface roughness, the depth of fine-grained aeolian or volcanic deposits, and the presence of strongly absorbing near-surface deposits such as carbonates. This information is crucial to the successful landing and operation of any rover designed to search for subsurface water. A rover-based ground-penetrating radar (GPR) can reveal layering in the upper crust, the presence of erosional or other subsurface horizons, depth to a permafrost layer, and direct detection of near-surface transient liquid water. We detail here the radar design parameters likely to provide the best information for Mars, based on experience with SAR and GPR in analogous terrestrial or planetary environments.

  16. Next-Generation Spaceborne Cloud Profiling Radars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanelli, Simone; Durden, Stephen L.; Im, Eastwood; Heymsfield, Gerald M.; Racette, Paul; Starr, Dave O.

    2009-01-01

    One of the instruments recommended for deployment on the Aerosol/Cloud/Echosystems (ACE) mission is a new advanced Cloud Profiling Radar (ACE-CPR). The atmospheric sciences community has initiated the effort to define the scientific requirements for this instrument. Initial studies focusing on system configuration, performance and feasibility start from the successful experience of the Cloud Profiling Radar on CloudSat Mission (CS-CPR), the first 94-GHz nadir-looking spaceborne radar which has been acquiring global time series of vertical cloud structure since June 2, 2006. In this paper we address the significance of CloudSat's accomplishments in regards to the design and development of radars for future cloud profiling missions such as EarthCARE and ACE.

  17. Delineation of fault zones using imaging radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toksoz, M. N.; Gulen, L.; Prange, M.; Matarese, J.; Pettengill, G. H.; Ford, P. G.

    1986-01-01

    The assessment of earthquake hazards and mineral and oil potential of a given region requires a detailed knowledge of geological structure, including the configuration of faults. Delineation of faults is traditionally based on three types of data: (1) seismicity data, which shows the location and magnitude of earthquake activity; (2) field mapping, which in remote areas is typically incomplete and of insufficient accuracy; and (3) remote sensing, including LANDSAT images and high altitude photography. Recently, high resolution radar images of tectonically active regions have been obtained by SEASAT and Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A and SIR-B) systems. These radar images are sensitive to terrain slope variations and emphasize the topographic signatures of fault zones. Techniques were developed for using the radar data in conjunction with the traditional types of data to delineate major faults in well-known test sites, and to extend interpretation techniques to remote areas.

  18. Optimal active vibration absorber - Design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina; Juang, Jer-Nan; Sulla, Jeffrey L.

    1993-01-01

    An optimal active vibration absorber can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability and control for large flexible space structures with collocated sensors/actuators. The active vibration absorber is a second-order dynamic system which is designed to suppress any unwanted structural vibration. This can be designed with minimum knowledge of the controlled system. Two methods for optimizing the active vibration absorber parameters are illustrated: minimum resonant amplitude and frequency matched active controllers. The Controls-Structures Interaction Phase-1 Evolutionary Model at NASA LaRC is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the active vibration absorber for vibration suppression. Performance is compared numerically and experimentally using acceleration feedback.

  19. Optimal active vibration absorber: Design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina; Juang, Jer-Nan; Sulla, Jeffrey L.

    1992-01-01

    An optimal active vibration absorber can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability and control for large flexible space structures with collocated sensors/actuators. The active vibration absorber is a second-order dynamic system which is designed to suppress any unwanted structural vibration. This can be designed with minimum knowledge of the controlled system. Two methods for optimizing the active vibration absorber parameters are illustrated: minimum resonant amplitude and frequency matched active controllers. The Controls-Structures Interaction Phase-1 Evolutionary Model at NASA LaRC is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the active vibration absorber for vibration suppression. Performance is compared numerically and experimentally using acceleration feedback.

  20. Application of imaging radar technology to uranium exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Wu; Jie-lin, Zhang; Yanju, Huang; Chuan, Zhang; Donghui, Zhang

    2014-03-01

    The history of imaging radar technology development, technical advantages, current technology research status of lithologic identification with remote sensing have been comprehensively evaluated on this thesis. Radar technology applied in structure recognition, rock identification, and uranium exploration research are discussed in this paper. Examples of microwave-optical fusion technology have been given in part 3, and the results demonstrate that imaging radar technology, as one of the most frontier observation techniques, has extensive application prospect in uranium exploration.

  1. Performance Bounds on Cooperative Radar and Communication Systems Operation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-08

    Performance Bounds on Cooperative Radar and Communication Systems Operation Christ D. Richmond, Prabahan Basu, Rachel E. Learned, James Vian, Andrew...theoretical framework that embraces the compet- ing objectives of cooperative radar- communication operations is proposed that engages the apparent trade-space...received data from both the radar and communication (comm.) system is shown to yield a structured covariance-based water-filling solution. Unlinked

  2. Radar Based Case Study of a Northeast Colorado Winter Storm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    Doppler analysis performed at 2327 UTC 19 Januar;, to describe a particular snow band in greater detail. Appendix C lists the radar characteristics...Doppler radar analyses showed well organized mesoscale snow bands oriented west-southwest to east-northeast, parallel to the 800-400 mb thermal wind...deployed during WISP-91. Radar data and their analyses, important elements in observation of storm structure and snow bands , is the subject of

  3. Apollo couch energy absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wesselski, C. J.; Drexel, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    Load attenuators for the Apollo spacecraft crew couch and its potential applications are described. Energy absorption is achieved through friction and cyclic deformation of material. In one concept, energy absorption is accomplished by rolling a compressed ring of metal between two surfaces. In another concept, energy is absorbed by forcing a plastically deformed washer along a rod. Among the design problems that had to be solved were material selection, fatigue life, ring slippage, lubrication, and friction loading.

  4. Ionized Absorbers in AGN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, S.

    1999-01-01

    As a part of this program, we observed three AGN:PKS2251 + 113, PG0043 = 039 and PLH909. Two objects show signatures of absorbtion in their UV spectra. Based on our earlier modeling of X-ray warm absorbents, we expected to observe X-ray observation in these objects. The third, PLH909, is known to have soft excess in EINSTEIN data. Attachment: "Exploratory ASCA observation of broad absorption line quasi-stellar objects".

  5. Reconstructing the internal structure and long-term evolution of hazardous sinkholes combining trenching, electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) and ground penetrating radar (GPR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabregat, Ivan; Gutiérrez, Francisco; Roqué, Carles; Comas, Xavier; Zarroca, Mario; Carbonel, Domingo; Guerrero, Jesús; Linares, Rogelio

    2017-05-01

    The approaches aimed at characterising specific damaging sinkholes have received limited attention compared with other ground instability phenomena (e.g. landslides). Moreover, the practicality of the trenching technique in combination with numerical dating and retro-deformation analysis for sinkhole site-investigations has been barely explored. This work illustrates the advantages of combining geomorphic mapping, electrical resistivity imaging (ERI), ground penetrating radar (GPR) and trenching for sinkhole characterisation and shows how the trenching technique contributes to fill significant gaps that neither geomorphic nor geophysical methods can address. Two large sinkholes (> 200 m long) related to the interstratal karstification of evaporites and generated by contrasting subsidence mechanisms (sagging, collapse) were investigated in the Fluvia Valley, NE Spain. Although GPR data may provide high resolution information on subsidence-related stratigraphic and structural features at shallow depth, the profiles acquired in the investigated sites with 100 MHz shielded and 40 MHz unshielded antennae provided limited insight into the internal geometry of the sinkholes due to reduced signal penetration related to the presence of conductive clayey material. The ERI sections satisfactorily imaged the general geometry of the sagging and collapse subsidence structures up to depths higher than 100 m and clearly captured the basal contact of the low-resistivity sinkhole fill in the sections with adequate layout and resolution. The trenches, despite their limited depth (ca. 5 m) allowed us to obtain valuable objective information on several key aspects of the subsidence phenomenon: (1) mechanisms (deformation style) and kinematics (progressive versus episodic); (2) limits of ground deformation; (3) temporal evolution (expansion versus contraction); (4) chronology and timing of most recent deformation phase; (5) rates of subsidence and sedimentation; and (6) the role played

  6. The PROUST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bertin, F.; Glass, M.; Ney, R.; Petitdidier, M.

    1986-01-01

    The Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST) radar called PROUST works at 935 MHz using the same klystron and antenna as the coherent-scatter radar. The use of this equipment for ST work has required some important modifications of the transmitting system and the development of receiving, data processing and acquisition (1984,1985) equipment. The modifications are discussed.

  7. Synchronization in multistatic radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jubrink, H. G.

    1993-08-01

    This report gives a summary of multistatic radar principles and synchronization methods. Different methods are described using direct and indirect synchronization. The report also presents a general review of synchronization methods for the future. Two LORAN C receivers have been analyzed for use as local reference oscillators in multistatic radar.

  8. Quantum radar cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2010-06-01

    The radar cross section σC is an objective measure of the "radar visibility" of an object. As such, σC is an important concept for the correct characterization of the operational performance of radar systems. Furthermore, σC is equally essential for the design and development of stealth weapon systems and platforms. Recent years have seen the theoretical development of quantum radars, that is, radars that operate with a small number of photons. In this regime, the radar-target interaction is described through photon-atom scattering processes governed by the laws of quantum electrodynamics. As such, it is theoretically inconsistent to use the same σC to characterize the performance of a quantum radar. In this paper we define a quantum radar cross section σQ based on quantum electrodynamics and interferometric considerations. We discuss the theoretical challenges of defining σQ, as well as computer simulations of σC and σQ for simple targets.

  9. Polarization Radar Processing Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    Oi"C FILE ( J qII RADC-TR-89-144 In-House Report October 1989 AD-A215 242 POLARIZATION RADAR PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY Kenneth C. Stiefvater, Russell D...NO. NO. NO. ACCESSION NO. 62702F 4506 11 58 11. TITLE (Include Security Classification) POLARIZATION RADAR PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S

  10. Radar illusion via metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2011-02-01

    An optical illusion is an image of a real target perceived by the eye that is deceptive or misleading due to a physiological illusion or a specific visual trick. The recently developed metamaterials provide efficient approaches to generate a perfect optical illusion. However, all existing research on metamaterial illusions has been limited to theory and numerical simulations. Here, we propose the concept of a radar illusion, which can make the electromagnetic (EM) image of a target gathered by radar look like a different target, and we realize a radar illusion device experimentally to change the radar image of a metallic target into a dielectric target with predesigned size and material parameters. It is well known that the radar signatures of metallic and dielectric objects are significantly different. However, when a metallic target is enclosed by the proposed illusion device, its EM scattering characteristics will be identical to that of a predesigned dielectric object under the illumination of radar waves. Such an illusion device will confuse the radar, and hence the real EM properties of the metallic target cannot be perceived. We designed and fabricated the radar illusion device using artificial metamaterials in the microwave frequency, and good illusion performances are observed in the experimental results.

  11. Noncooperative rendezvous radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    A fire control radar system was developed, assembled, and modified. The baseline system and modified angle tracking system are described along with the performance characteristics of the baseline and modified systems. Proposed changes to provide additional techniques for radar evaluation are presented along with flight test data.

  12. Java Radar Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaczek, Mariusz P.

    2005-01-01

    Java Radar Analysis Tool (JRAT) is a computer program for analyzing two-dimensional (2D) scatter plots derived from radar returns showing pieces of the disintegrating Space Shuttle Columbia. JRAT can also be applied to similar plots representing radar returns showing aviation accidents, and to scatter plots in general. The 2D scatter plots include overhead map views and side altitude views. The superposition of points in these views makes searching difficult. JRAT enables three-dimensional (3D) viewing: by use of a mouse and keyboard, the user can rotate to any desired viewing angle. The 3D view can include overlaid trajectories and search footprints to enhance situational awareness in searching for pieces. JRAT also enables playback: time-tagged radar-return data can be displayed in time order and an animated 3D model can be moved through the scene to show the locations of the Columbia (or other vehicle) at the times of the corresponding radar events. The combination of overlays and playback enables the user to correlate a radar return with a position of the vehicle to determine whether the return is valid. JRAT can optionally filter single radar returns, enabling the user to selectively hide or highlight a desired radar return.

  13. Determination of radar MTF

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D.

    1994-11-15

    The ultimate goal of the Current Meter Array (CMA) is to be able to compare the current patterns detected with the array with radar images of the water surface. The internal wave current patterns modulate the waves on the water surface giving a detectable modulation of the radar cross-section (RCS). The function relating the RCS modulations to the current patterns is the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). By comparing radar images directly with co-located CMA measurements the MTF can be determined. In this talk radar images and CMA measurements from a recent experiment at Loch Linnhe, Scotland, will be used to make the first direct determination of MTF for an X and S band radar at low grazing angles. The technical problems associated with comparing radar images to CMA data will be explained and the solution method discussed. The results suggest the both current and strain rate contribute equally to the radar modulation for X band. For S band, the strain rate contributes more than the current. The magnitude of the MTF and the RCS modulations are consistent with previous estimates when the wind is blowing perpendicular to the radar look direction.

  14. The Comet Radar Explorer Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asphaug, Erik; Belton, Mike; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; Chesley, Steve; Delbo, Marco; Farnham, Tony; Gim, Yonggyu; Grimm, Robert; Herique, Alain; Kofman, Wlodek; Oberst, Juergen; Orosei, Roberto; Piqueux, Sylvain; Plaut, Jeff; Robinson, Mark; Sava, Paul; Heggy, Essam; Kurth, William; Scheeres, Dan; Denevi, Brett; Turtle, Elizabeth; Weissman, Paul

    2014-11-01

    Missions to cometary nuclei have revealed major geological surprises: (1) Global scale layers - do these persist through to the interior? Are they a record of primary accretion? (2) Smooth regions - are they landslides originating on the surface? Are they cryovolcanic? (3) Pits - are they impact craters or sublimation pits, or rooted in the interior? Unambiguous answers to these and other questions can be obtained by high definition 3D radar reflection imaging (RRI) of internal structure. RRI can answer many of the great unknowns in planetary science: How do primitive bodies accrete? Are cometary nuclei mostly ice? What drives their spectacular activity and evolution? The Comet Radar Explorer (CORE) mission will image the detailed internal structure of the nucleus of 10P/Tempel 2. This ~16 x 8 x 7 km Jupiter Family Comet (JFC), or its parent body, originated in the outer planets region possibly millions of years before planet formation. CORE arrives post-perihelion and observes the comet’s waning activity from safe distance. Once the nucleus is largely dormant, the spacecraft enters a ~20-km dedicated Radar Mapping Orbit (RMO). The exacting design of the RRI experiment and the precise navigation of RMO will achieve a highly focused 3D radar reflection image of internal structure, to tens of meters resolution, and tomographic images of velocity and attenuation to hundreds of meters resolution, tied to the gravity model and shape. Visible imagers will produce maps of the surface morphology, albedo, color, texture, and photometric response, and images for navigation and shape determination. The cameras will also monitor the structure and dynamics of the coma, and its dusty jets, allowing their correlation in 3D with deep interior structures and surface features. Repeated global high-resolution thermal images will probe the near-surface layers heated by the Sun. Derived maps of thermal inertia will be correlated with the radar boundary response, and photometry and

  15. Equatorial MU Radar project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Mamoru; Hashiguchi, H.; Tsuda, Toshitaka; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University (RISH) has been studying the atmosphere by using radars. The first big facility was the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar installed in Shiga, Japan in 1984. This is one of the most powerful and multi-functional radar, and is successful of revealing importance of atmospheric waves for the dynamical vertical coupling processes. The next big radar was the Equatorial Atmosphere Radar (EAR) installed at Kototabang, West Sumatra, Indonesia in 2001. The EAR was operated under close collaboration with LAPAN (Indonesia National Institute for Aeronautics and Space), and conducted the long-term continuous observations of the equatorial atmosphere/ionosphere for more than 10 years. The MU radar and the EAR are both utilized for inter-university and international collaborative research program for long time. National Institute for Polar Research (NIPR) joined EISCAT Scientific Association together with Nagoya University, and developed the PANSY radar at Syowa base in Antarctica as a joint project with University of Tokyo. These are the efforts of radar study of the atmosphere/ionosphere in the polar region. Now we can find that Japan holds a global network of big atmospheric/ionospheric radars. The EAR has the limitation of lower sensitivity compared with the other big radars shown above. RISH now proposes a plan of Equatorial MU Radar (EMU) that is to establish the MU-radar class radar next to the EAR. The EMU will have an active phased array antenna with the 163m diameter and 1055 cross-element Yagis. Total output power of the EMU will be more than 500kW. The EMU can detect turbulent echoes from the mesosphere (60-80km). In the ionosphere incoherent-scatter observations of plasma density, drift, and temperature would be possible. Multi-channel receivers will realize radar-imaging observations. The EMU is one of the key facilities in the project "Study of coupling processes in the solar-terrestrial system

  16. The relation of light-induced slow absorbancy and scattering changes about 520 nm and structure of chloroplast thylakoids--a theoretical investigation.

    PubMed

    Duniec, J T; Thorne, S W

    1977-08-01

    A theoretical analysis is made on the relation between light-induced thylakoid shrinkage, slow light-induced absorbancy changes about 520 nm, and light-induced scattering changes observed at 90 degrees, which occur in isolated chloroplasts. A simple model of the thylakoids stacks (grana) is assumed and by a mathematical formalism a correlation of these effects is shown. The light minus dark difference spectrum is shown to peak around 520 nm, a fact that confirms earlier suggestions that this difference band is due to the combined effects of the selective dispersion and optical-conformational changes in the grana.

  17. Intelligent radar data processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzbaur, Ulrich D.

    The application of artificial intelligence principles to the processing of radar signals is considered theoretically. The main capabilities required are learning and adaptation in a changing environment, processing and modeling information (especially dynamics and uncertainty), and decision-making based on all available information (taking its reliability into account). For the application to combat-aircraft radar systems, the tasks include the combination of data from different types of sensors, reacting to electronic counter-countermeasures, evaluation of how much data should be acquired (energy and radiation management), control of the radar, tracking, and identification. Also discussed are related uses such as monitoring the avionics systems, supporting pilot decisions with respect to the radar system, and general applications in radar-system R&D.

  18. Spaceborne weather radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghini, Robert; Kozu, Toshiaki

    1990-01-01

    The present work on the development status of spaceborne weather radar systems and services discusses radar instrument complementarities, the current forms of equations for the characterization of such aspects of weather radar performance as surface and mirror-image returns, polarimetry, and Doppler considerations, and such essential factors in spaceborne weather radar design as frequency selection, scanning modes, and the application of SAR to rain detection. Attention is then given to radar signal absorption by the various atmospheric gases, rain drop size distribution and wind velocity determinations, and the characteristics of clouds, as well as the range of available estimation methods for backscattering, single- and dual-wavelength attenuation, and polarimetric and climatological characteristics.

  19. Meteorological radar calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodge, D. B.

    1978-01-01

    A meteorological radar calibration technique is developed. It is found that the integrated, range corrected, received power saturates under intense rain conditions in a manner analogous to that encountered for the radiometric path temperature. Furthermore, it is found that this saturation condition establishes a bound which may be used to determine an absolution radar calibration for the case of radars operating at attenuating wavelengths. In the case of less intense rainfall or for radars at nonattenuating wavelengths, the relationship for direct calibration in terms of an independent measurement of radiometric path temperature is developed. This approach offers the advantage that the calibration is in terms of an independent measurement of the rainfall through the same elevated region as that viewed by the radar.

  20. The Highly Variable Absorber of NGC 4507

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braito, Valentina

    2010-03-01

    Variability studies of the X-ray absorbing media in Seyfert galaxies has proved to be a fundamental tool to assess the nature and location of the absorbing matter present in the central region of Active Galactic Nuclei. An exciting recent development is the finding that the X-ray spectra of a few obscured AGN change between characteristically Compton-thin and Compton-thick states on relatively short time scales with the most extreme example being NGC1365. This places severe constraints on the geometry and structure of the X-ray absorbing/reprocessing regions and suggests the presence of apparently multiple absorbers/ reflecting mirrors and that the absorber could be inhomogeneous and could have a range of ionization states. We present the Suzaku observation of the Seyfert 1.9 galaxy NGC4507, one of the X-ray brightest Compton-thin Seyfert 2s and a candidate for a variable absorber. Suzaku caught the source in a reflection dominated state. A comparison with previous X-ray observations shows that NGC4507 changes from transmission to reflection dominated. The pattern of this dramatic spectral variability cannot be simply explained purely by variability of the nuclear activity, but also requires strong variability in the amount of absorption.