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Sample records for radial flow chromatography

  1. Efficient purification of antiproliferative polysaccharides from Hypsizigus marmoreus with radial flow chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yan, Pei-Sheng; Cao, Li-Xin; Zhang, Bing-Zhao

    2014-01-01

    The increasing commercial significance of natural polysaccharides for use in medicinal products is stimulating the development of efficient and easy scale-up techniques for polysaccharide purification. In this research, the crude polysaccharides from submerged cultivation broth of Hypsizigus marmoreus were purified using radial flow chromatography (RFC), and the antiproliferative activity of the purified fractions was evaluated in vitro. DEAE Sepharose CL-6B was selected to be packed in the RFC column based on its good resolution, physical stability, and low cost. Compared with axial flow chromatography (AFC), an efficient chromatographic process with significantly less time and buffer consumption but yielding higher polysaccharide recovery and resolution was established in RFC, which could clearly purify the crude polysaccharides into different fractions. An acceptable linear scale-up effect of RFC from 100 to 500 mL was successfully achieved without loss of resolution and enhancement of time consumption. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assays in cell cultures indicated that the purified polysaccharide fractions possess moderate antiproliferative activities in three different human cancer cell lines, but have significantly lower cytotoxicity in normal human cell lines in vitro. Among the polysaccharide fractions, the main purified acidic fraction W-I could be considered as a novel potential antitumor agent candidate for several tumors, especially for human alveolar epithelial tumors. This research confirmed for the first time that RFC would be a new fast and efficient tool for purification of polysaccharides into different fractions, both at laboratory and commercial scales.

  2. Effect of geometry and scale for axial and radial flow membrane chromatography-Experimental study of bovin serum albumin adsorption.

    PubMed

    Teepakorn, Chalore; Fiaty, Koffi; Charcosset, Catherine

    2015-07-17

    During the last 10 years, membrane chromatography (MC) has been increasingly reported for biomolecule purification at both small and large scales. Although, several axial and radial flow MC devices are commercialized, the effect of the device dimensions on the adsorption performance has not been fully investigated. In this study, axial and radial flow anion ion-exchange MC devices were used for bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption. For both axial and radial flow, three devices at different scales were compared, two having similar diameter and two similar bed height. The pressure drop and the flow distribution using acetone as a non-binding solute were measured, as well as BSA breakthrough curves at different flow rates and BSA loading concentrations. For all devices, it was observed that the flow rate had no effect on the breakthrough curve, which confirms the advantage of MC to be used at high flow rates. In addition, the BSA binding capacity increased with increasing BSA concentration, which suggests that it could be preferable to work with concentrated solutions rather than with very dilute solutions, when using buffer at high phosphate concentration. For both axial and radial flow, the bed height had a negative impact on the binding capacity, as the lowest binding capacities per membrane volume were obtained with the devices having the highest bed height. Radial flow MC has potential at large-scale applications, as a short bed thickness can be combined with a large inlet surface area.

  3. Radial flow heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Valenzuela, Javier

    2001-01-01

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  4. Computational fluid dynamic simulation of axial and radial flow membrane chromatography: mechanisms of non-ideality and validation of the zonal rate model.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pranay; Vahedipour, Kaveh; Lin, Min; Vogel, Jens H; Haynes, Charles; von Lieres, Eric

    2013-08-30

    Membrane chromatography (MC) is increasingly being used as a purification platform for large biomolecules due to higher operational flow rates. The zonal rate model (ZRM) has previously been applied to accurately characterize the hydrodynamic behavior in commercial MC capsules at different configurations and scales. Explorations of capsule size, geometry and operating conditions using the model and experiment were used to identify possible causes of inhomogeneous flow and their contributions to band broadening. In the present study, the hydrodynamics within membrane chromatography capsules are more rigorously investigated by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The CFD models are defined according to precisely measured capsule geometries in order to avoid the estimation of geometry related model parameters. In addition to validating the assumptions and hypotheses regarding non-ideal flow mechanisms encoded in the ZRM, we show that CFD simulations can be used to mechanistically understand and predict non-binding breakthrough curves without need for estimation of any parameters. When applied to a small-scale axial flow MC capsules, CFD simulations identify non-ideal flows in the distribution (hold-up) volumes upstream and downstream of the membrane stack as the major source of band broadening. For the large-scale radial flow capsule, the CFD model quantitatively predicts breakthrough data using binding parameters independently determined using the small-scale axial flow capsule, identifying structural irregularities within the membrane pleats as an important source of band broadening. The modeling and parameter determination scheme described here therefore facilitates a holistic mechanistic-based method for model based scale-up, obviating the need of performing expensive large-scale experiments under binding conditions. As the CFD model described provides a rich mechanistic analysis of membrane chromatography systems and the ability to explore operational space, but

  5. Radial flow pulse jet mixer

    SciTech Connect

    VanOsdol, John G.

    2013-06-25

    The disclosure provides a pulse jet mixing vessel for mixing a plurality of solid particles. The pulse jet mixing vessel is comprised of a sludge basin, a flow surface surrounding the sludge basin, and a downcoming flow annulus between the flow surface and an inner shroud. The pulse jet mixing vessel is additionally comprised of an upper vessel pressurization volume in fluid communication with the downcoming flow annulus, and an inner shroud surge volume separated from the downcoming flow annulus by the inner shroud. When the solid particles are resting on the sludge basin and a fluid such as water is atop the particles and extending into the downcoming flow annulus and the inner shroud surge volume, mixing occurs by pressurization of the upper vessel pressurization volume, generating an inward radial flow over the flow surface and an upwash jet at the center of the sludge basin.

  6. Stirling Engine With Radial Flow Heat Exchangers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vitale, N.; Yarr, George

    1993-01-01

    Conflict between thermodynamical and structural requirements resolved. In Stirling engine of new cylindrical configuration, regenerator and acceptor and rejector heat exchangers channel flow of working gas in radial direction. Isotherms in regenerator ideally concentric cylinders, and gradient of temperature across regenerator radial rather than axial. Acceptor and rejector heat exchangers located radially inward and outward of regenerator, respectively. Enables substantial increase in power of engine without corresponding increase in diameter of pressure vessel.

  7. Radial flow nuclear thermal rocket (RFNTR)

    DOEpatents

    Leyse, Carl F.

    1995-11-07

    A radial flow nuclear thermal rocket fuel assembly includes a substantially conical fuel element having an inlet side and an outlet side. An annular channel is disposed in the element for receiving a nuclear propellant, and a second, conical, channel is disposed in the element for discharging the propellant. The first channel is located radially outward from the second channel, and separated from the second channel by an annular fuel bed volume. This fuel bed volume can include a packed bed of loose fuel beads confined by a cold porous inlet frit and a hot porous exit frit. The loose fuel beads include ZrC coated ZrC-UC beads. In this manner, nuclear propellant enters the fuel assembly axially into the first channel at the inlet side of the element, flows axially across the fuel bed volume, and is discharged from the assembly by flowing radially outward from the second channel at the outlet side of the element.

  8. Radial flow nuclear thermal rocket (RFNTR)

    DOEpatents

    Leyse, Carl F.

    1995-01-01

    A radial flow nuclear thermal rocket fuel assembly includes a substantially conical fuel element having an inlet side and an outlet side. An annular channel is disposed in the element for receiving a nuclear propellant, and a second, conical, channel is disposed in the element for discharging the propellant. The first channel is located radially outward from the second channel, and separated from the second channel by an annular fuel bed volume. This fuel bed volume can include a packed bed of loose fuel beads confined by a cold porous inlet frit and a hot porous exit frit. The loose fuel beads include ZrC coated ZrC-UC beads. In this manner, nuclear propellant enters the fuel assembly axially into the first channel at the inlet side of the element, flows axially across the fuel bed volume, and is discharged from the assembly by flowing radially outward from the second channel at the outlet side of the element.

  9. Fast Radial Flows in Transition Disk Holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Chiang, Eugene; Andrews, Sean M.

    2014-02-01

    Protoplanetary "transition" disks have large, mass-depleted central cavities, yet also deliver gas onto their host stars at rates comparable to disks without holes. The paradox of simultaneous transparency and accretion can be explained if gas flows inward at much higher radial speeds inside the cavity than outside the cavity, since surface density (and by extension optical depth) varies inversely with inflow velocity at fixed accretion rate. Radial speeds within the cavity might even have to approach free-fall values to explain the huge surface density contrasts inferred for transition disks. We identify observational diagnostics of fast radial inflow in channel maps made in optically thick spectral lines. Signatures include (1) twisted isophotes in maps made at low systemic velocities and (2) rotation of structures observed between maps made in high-velocity line wings. As a test case, we apply our new diagnostic tools to archival Atacama Large Millimeter Array data on the transition disk HD 142527 and uncover evidence for free-fall radial velocities inside its cavity. Although the observed kinematics are also consistent with a disk warp, the radial inflow scenario is preferred because it predicts low surface densities that appear consistent with recent observations of optically thin CO isotopologues in this disk. How material in the disk cavity sheds its angular momentum wholesale to fall freely onto the star is an unsolved problem; gravitational torques exerted by giant planets or brown dwarfs are briefly discussed as a candidate mechanism.

  10. Fast radial flows in transition disk holes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Andrews, Sean M.; Chiang, Eugene

    2014-02-20

    Protoplanetary 'transition' disks have large, mass-depleted central cavities, yet also deliver gas onto their host stars at rates comparable to disks without holes. The paradox of simultaneous transparency and accretion can be explained if gas flows inward at much higher radial speeds inside the cavity than outside the cavity, since surface density (and by extension optical depth) varies inversely with inflow velocity at fixed accretion rate. Radial speeds within the cavity might even have to approach free-fall values to explain the huge surface density contrasts inferred for transition disks. We identify observational diagnostics of fast radial inflow in channel maps made in optically thick spectral lines. Signatures include (1) twisted isophotes in maps made at low systemic velocities and (2) rotation of structures observed between maps made in high-velocity line wings. As a test case, we apply our new diagnostic tools to archival Atacama Large Millimeter Array data on the transition disk HD 142527 and uncover evidence for free-fall radial velocities inside its cavity. Although the observed kinematics are also consistent with a disk warp, the radial inflow scenario is preferred because it predicts low surface densities that appear consistent with recent observations of optically thin CO isotopologues in this disk. How material in the disk cavity sheds its angular momentum wholesale to fall freely onto the star is an unsolved problem; gravitational torques exerted by giant planets or brown dwarfs are briefly discussed as a candidate mechanism.

  11. Efficiency gain limits of the parallel segmented inlet and outlet flow concept in analytical liquid chromatography columns suffering from radial transcolumn packing density gradients.

    PubMed

    Broeckhoven, Ken; Desmet, Gert

    2012-10-01

    The maximal gain in efficiency that can be expected from the use of the segmented column end fittings that were recently introduced to alleviate the effect of transcolumn packing density gradients has been quantified and generalized using numerical computations of the band broadening process. It was found that, for an unretained compound in a column with a parabolic packing density gradient, the use of a segmented inlet or a segmented outlet allows to eliminate about 60-100% of the plate height contribution (H(tc)) originating from a parabolic transcolumn velocity gradient in a d(c)=4.6 mm column. In a d(c)=2.1 mm column, these percentages change from 10 to 100%. Using a combined segmented in- and outlet, H(tc) can be reduced by about 90-100% (d(c)=4.6 mm column) or 20-100% (d(c)=2.1 mm column). The strong variation of these gain percentages is due to fact that they depend very strongly on the column length and the flow rate. Dimensionless graphs have been established that allow to directly quantify the effect for each specific case. It was also found that, in agreement with one's physical intuition, trans-column velocity profiles that are more flat in the central region benefit more from the concept than sharp, parabolic-like profiles. The gain margins furthermore tend to become smaller with increasing retention and increasing diffusion coefficient.

  12. On radial flow between parallel disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, A. Y. L.; Gorin, A.

    2015-04-01

    Approximate analytical solutions are presented for converging flow in between two parallel non rotating disks. The static pressure distribution and radial component of the velocity are developed by averaging the inertial term across the gap in between parallel disks. The predicted results from the first approximation are favourable to experimental results as well as results presented by other authors. The second approximation shows that as the fluid approaches the center, the velocity at the mid channel slows down which is due to the struggle between the inertial term and the flowrate.

  13. Description of secondary flows in radial flow machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Braembussche, R.

    Detailed measurements by Moore (1973) have revealed that the jet wake formation in radial flow turbomachines is essentially a three-dimensional phenomenon governed by streamwise vorticity; the boundary layers in question make an important contribution to the behavior of low energy fluid transport to a wake region. Secondary flows also contribute to distorted diffuser inlet conditions, which in turn are responsible for important downstream perturbations. Attention is presently given to blade pressure and suction side boundary layers, secondary flow velocity vectors, meridional velocity variation, secondary flow velocity vectors, and secondary flows in diffusers.

  14. Tube Radial Distribution Chromatography on a Microchip Incorporating Microchannels with a Three-to-One Channel Confluence Point.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Naomichi; Yamashita, Kenichi; Maeda, Hideaki; Hashimoto, Masahiko; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    We developed a capillary chromatography system using a phase-separated solvent mixture as a carrier solution--i.e., a water-hydrophilic/hydrophobic organic solvent mixture--which we call "tube radial distribution chromatography" (TRDC). Here, we attempted to apply the TRDC system to a microchip incorporating microchannels with a double T-junction for injection of analyte solution and a three-to-one, narrow-to-wide channel confluence point for tube radial distribution phenomenon (TRDP) at room temperature. A ternary mixed solvent of water, acetonitrile and ethyl acetate was used as a carrier solution. TRDP in the wide microchannel was examined using various flow rates, temperatures, and component solvent ratios. Successful observation was carried out using a fluorescence microscope-CCD camera. Model analytes perylene (hydrophobic) and Eosin Y (hydrophilic) were separated by flowing through the microchannel, without any treatment such as packed columns or coating, at room temperature (25°C).

  15. Radial Chromatography for the Separation of Nitroaniline Isomers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Robert B.; Case, William S.

    2011-01-01

    Separation techniques are usually presented in the undergraduate organic laboratory to teach students how to purify and isolate compounds. Often the concept of liquid chromatography is introduced by having students create "silica gel columns" to separate components of a reaction mixture. Although useful, column chromatography can be a laborious…

  16. Low cost, radial flow, solid oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrik, M. A.

    The Interscience Radial Flow (IRF) SOFC is designed to minimize problems in high-temperature operation and for low-cost fabrication. The cell has planar, non-sintered construction, uses particulate materials to form porous electrodes, and has internal radial flow. The object of this phase was to demonstrate feasibility of multi-cell stack operation. Performance milestone was 15% DC HHV efficiency with hydrogen at greater than 50 mW/sq cm over 100 h.

  17. Absolute and convective instability of cylindrical Couette flow with axial and radial flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinand, Denis; Serre, Eric; Lueptow, Richard M.

    2009-10-01

    Imposing axial flow in the annulus and/or radial flow through the cylindrical walls in a Taylor-Couette system alters the stability of the flow. Theoretical methods and numerical simulations were used to determine the impact of imposed axial and radial flows, homogeneous in the axial direction, on the first transition of Taylor-Couette flow in the framework of convective and absolute instabilities. At low axial Reynolds numbers the convective instability is axisymmetric, but convective helical modes with an increasing number of helices having a helicity opposite that of the base flow dominate as the axial flow increases. The number of helices and the critical Taylor number are affected only slightly by the radial flow. The flow becomes absolutely unstable at higher Taylor numbers. Absolutely unstable axisymmetric modes occur for inward radial flows, while helical absolute instability modes having a helicity identical to that of the base flow occur at high enough axial Reynolds numbers for outward radial flow.

  18. Toroidal flow and radial particle flux in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callen, J. D.; Cole, A. J.; Hegna, C. C.

    2009-08-01

    Many effects influence toroidal flow evolution in tokamak plasmas. Momentum sources and radial plasma transport due to collisional processes and microturbulence-induced anomalous transport are usually considered. In addition, toroidal flow can be affected by nonaxisymmetric magnetic fields; resonant components cause localized electromagnetic toroidal torques near rational surfaces in flowing plasmas and nonresonant components induce "global" toroidal flow damping torque throughout the plasma. Also, poloidal magnetic field transients on the magnetic field diffusion time scale can influence plasma transport. Many of these processes can also produce momentum pinch and intrinsic flow effects. This paper presents a comprehensive and self-consistent description of all these effects within a fluid moment context. Plasma processes on successive time scales (and constraints they impose) are considered sequentially: compressional Alfvén waves (Grad-Shafranov equilibrium and ion radial force balance), sound waves (pressure constant along a field line and incompressible flows within a flux surface), and ion collisions (damping of poloidal flow). Finally, plasma transport across magnetic flux surfaces is induced by the many second order (in the small gyroradius expansion) toroidal torque effects indicated above. Nonambipolar components of the induced particle transport fluxes produce radial plasma currents. Setting the flux surface average of the net radial current induced by all these effects to zero yields the transport-time-scale equation for evolution of the plasma toroidal flow. It includes a combination of global toroidal flow damping and resonant torques induced by nonaxisymmetric magnetic field components, poloidal magnetic field transients, and momentum source effects, as well as the usual collision- and microturbulence-induced transport. On the transport time scale, the plasma toroidal rotation determines the radial electric field for net ambipolar particle transport

  19. Dynamics of a vortex pair in radial flow

    SciTech Connect

    Bannikova, E. Yu. Kontorovich, V. M. Reznik, G. M.

    2007-10-15

    The problem of vortex pair motion in two-dimensional radial flow is solved. Under certain conditions for flow parameters, the vortex pair can reverse its motion within a bounded region. The vortex-pair translational velocity decreases or increases after passing through the source/sink region, depending on whether the flow is diverging or converging, respectively. The rotational motion of a corotating vortex pair in a quiescent environment transforms into motion along a logarithmic spiral in radial flow. The problem may have applications in astrophysics and geophysics.

  20. Effect of the radial buoyancy on a circular Couette flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Antoine; Yoshikawa, Harunori N.; Mutabazi, Innocent

    2015-11-01

    The effect of a radial temperature gradient on the stability of a circular Couette flow is investigated when the gravitational acceleration is neglected. The induced radial stratification of the fluid density coupled with the centrifugal acceleration generates radial buoyancy which is centrifugal for inward heating and centripetal for outward heating. This radial buoyancy modifies the Rayleigh discriminant and induces the asymmetry between inward heating and outward heating in flow behavior. The critical modes are axisymmetric and stationary for inward heating while for outward heating, they can be oscillatory axisymmetric or nonaxisymmetric depending on fluid diffusion properties, i.e., on the Prandtl number Pr. The dependence of the critical modes on Pr is explored for different values of the radius ratio of the annulus. The power input of the radial buoyancy is compared with other power terms. The critical frequency of the oscillatory axisymmetric modes is linked to the Brunt-Väisälä frequency due to the density stratification in the radial gravity field induced by the rotation. These modes are associated with inertial waves. The dispersion relation of the oscillatory axisymmetric modes is derived in the vicinity of the critical conditions. A weakly nonlinear amplitude equation with a forcing term is proposed to explain the domination of these axisymmetric oscillatory modes over the stationary centrifugal mode.

  1. The vergence eye movements induced by radial optic flow

    PubMed Central

    Kodaka, Y.; Sheliga, B. M.; FitzGibbon, E. J.; Miles, F. A.

    2007-01-01

    Radial optic flow applied to large random dot patterns is known to elicit horizontal vergence eye movements at short latency, expansion causing convergence and contraction causing divergence: the Radial Flow Vergence Response (RFVR). We elicited RFVRs in human subjects by applying radial motion to concentric circular patterns whose radial luminance modulation was that of a square wave lacking the fundamental: the missing fundamental (mf) stimulus. The radial motion consisted of successive ¼-wavelength steps, so that the overall pattern and the 4n+1 harmonics (where n=integer) underwent radial expansion (or contraction), whereas the 4n-1 harmonics—including the strongest Fourier component (the 3rd harmonic)—underwent the opposite radial motion. Radial motion commenced only after the subject had fixated the center of the pattern. The initial RFVRs were always in the direction of the 3rd harmonic, e.g., expansion of the mf pattern causing divergence. Thus, the earliest RFVRs were strongly dependent on the motion of the major Fourier component, consistent with early spatio-temporal filtering prior to motion detection, as in the well-known energy model of motion analysis. If the radial mf stimulus was reduced to just two competing harmonics—the 3rd and 5th—the initial RFVRs showed a nonlinear dependence on their relative contrasts: when the two harmonics differed in contrast by more than about an octave then the one with the higher contrast completely dominated the RFVRs and the one with lower contrast lost its influence: winner-take-all. We suggest that these nonlinear interactions result from mutual inhibition between the mechanisms sensing the motion of the different competing harmonics. If single radial-flow steps were used, a brief inter-stimulus interval resulted in reversed RFVRs, consistent with the idea that the motion detectors mediating these responses receive a visual input whose temporal impulse response function is strongly biphasic. Lastly, all

  2. Sugar Determination in Foods with a Radially Compressed High Performance Liquid Chromatography Column.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ondrus, Martin G.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Advocates use of Waters Associates Radial Compression Separation System for high performance liquid chromatography. Discusses instrumentation and reagents, outlining procedure for analyzing various foods and discussing typical student data. Points out potential problems due to impurities and pump seal life. Suggests use of ribose as internal…

  3. Linear stability of radially-heated circular Couette flow with simulated radial gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagg, Randy; Weidman, Patrick D.

    2007-05-01

    The stability of circular Couette flow between vertical concentric cylinders in the presence of a radial temperature gradient is considered with an effective “radial gravity.” In addition to terrestrial buoyancy - ρg e z we include the term - ρg m f(r)e r where g m f(r) is the effective gravitational acceleration directed radially inward across the gap. Physically, this body force arises in experiments using ferrofluid in the annular gap of a Taylor Couette cell whose inner cylinder surrounds a vertical stack of equally spaced disk magnets. The radial dependence f(r) of this force is proportional to the modified Bessel function K 1(κr), where 2π/κ is the spatial period of the magnetic stack and r is the radial coordinate. Linear stability calculations made to compare with conditions reported by Ali and Weidman (J. Fluid Mech., 220, 1990) show strong destabilization effects, measured by the onset Rayleigh number R, when the inner wall is warmer, and strong stabilization effects when the outer wall is warmer, with increasing values of the dimensionless radial gravity γ = g m /g. Further calculations presented for the geometry and fluid properties of a terrestrial laboratory experiment reveal a hitherto unappreciated structure of the stability problem for differentially-heated cylinders: multiple wavenumber minima exist in the marginal stability curves. Transitions in global minima among these curves give rise to a competition between differing instabilities of the same spiral mode number, but widely separated axial wavenumbers.

  4. FUEL SUBASSEMBLY CONSTRUCTION FOR RADIAL FLOW IN A NUCLEAR REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Treshow, M.

    1962-12-25

    An assembly of fuel elements for a boiling water reactor arranged for radial flow of the coolant is described. The ingress for the coolant is through a central header tube, perforated with parallel circumferertial rows of openings each having a lip to direct the coolant flow downward. Around the central tube there are a number of equally spaced concentric trays, closely fitiing the central header tube. Cylindrical fuel elements are placed in a regular pattern around the central tube, piercing the trays. A larger tube encloses the arrangement, with space provided for upward flow of coolart beyond the edge of the trays. (AEC)

  5. Mannitol permeation and radial flow of water in maize roots.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Michael; Ehwald, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    • The postulated nonselective hydraulic route through the root apoplast has not yet been supported by experimental findings on solvent drag. • Therefore, mannitol transport from the medium to the shoot of young maize plants was studied at different rates of transpiration in hydroculture. The concentration of mannitol was determined by gas chromatography. • Mannitol utilization in shoot metabolism was not detectable. Experiments with exuding roots showed that the radial transport of mannitol was mainly apoplastic. The ratio α between the mannitol concentration in xylem vessels and that of the external medium was calculated from mannitol translocation to the shoot or measurement of the mannitol concentration in the root exudate, where it reached c. 0.07 in the steady state. In transpiring plants, α decreased with increasing water flux from 0.04 to values below 0.01. These findings demonstrate that the root reflection coefficient for mannitol is above 0.99. • It is concluded that the radial movement of water to the vessels is under complete protoplastic control, whereas solutes can diffuse on an apoplastic path. The absence of a significant volume flux through the root apoplast is of physiological importance as it prevents the coupling of the apoplastic permeation of ballast solutes, such as NaCl, to transpiration. PMID:20840609

  6. Onset of radial flow in p+p collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Jiang, Kun; Zhu, Yinying; Liu, Weitao; Chen, Hongfang; Li, Cheng; Ruan, Lijuan; Tang, Zebo; Xu, Zhangbu

    2015-02-23

    It has been debated for decades whether hadrons emerging from p+p collisions exhibit collective expansion. The signal of the collective motion in p+p collisions is not as clear as in heavy-ion collisions because of the low multiplicity and large fluctuation in p+p collisions. Tsallis Blast-Wave (TBW) model is a thermodynamic approach, introduced to handle the overwhelming correlation and fluctuation in the hadronic processes. We have systematically studied the identified particle spectra in p+p collisions from RHIC to LHC using TBW and found no appreciable radial flow in p+p collisions below √s = 900 GeV. At LHC higher energy of 7more » TeV in p+p collisions, the radial flow velocity achieves an average of (β) = 0.320 ± 0.005. This flow velocity is comparable to that in peripheral (40-60%) Au+Au collisions at RHIC. In addition, breaking of the identified particle spectra mT scaling was also observed at LHC from a model independent test.« less

  7. Exact Convex Relaxation of Optimal Power Flow in Radial Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, LW; Li, N; Topcu, U; Low, SH

    2015-01-01

    The optimal power flow (OPF) problem determines a network operating point that minimizes a certain objective such as generation cost or power loss. It is nonconvex. We prove that a global optimum of OPF can be obtained by solving a second-order cone program, under a mild condition after shrinking the OPF feasible set slightly, for radial power networks. The condition can be checked a priori, and holds for the IEEE 13, 34, 37, 123-bus networks and two real-world networks.

  8. RADIAL FLOW PATTERN OF A SLOW CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Li; Gan, Weiqun; Inhester, Bernd

    2015-06-01

    Height–time plots of the leading edge of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have often been used to study CME kinematics. We propose a new method to analyze the CME kinematics in more detail by determining the radial mass transport process throughout the entire CME. Thus, our method is able to estimate not only the speed of the CME front but also the radial flow speed inside the CME. We have applied this method to a slow CME with an average leading edge speed of about 480 km s{sup −1}. In the Lagrangian frame, the speeds of the individual CME mass elements stay almost constant within 2 and 15 R{sub S}, the range over which we analyzed the CME. Hence, we have no evidence of net radial forces acting on parts of the CME in this range or of a pile up of mass ahead of the CME. We find evidence that the leading edge trajectory obtained by tie-pointing may gradually lag behind the Lagrangian front-side trajectories derived from our analysis. Our results also allow a much more precise estimate of the CME energy. Compared with conventional estimates using the CME total mass and leading edge motion, we find that the latter may overestimate the kinetic energy and the gravitational potential energy.

  9. A visual study of radial inward choked flow of liquid nitrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Simoneau, R. J.; Hsu, Y. Y.

    1973-01-01

    A visual study of the radial inward choked flow of liquid nitrogen was conducted. Data and high speed moving pictures were obtained. The study indicated the following: (1) steady radial inward choked flow seems equivalent to steady choked flow through axisymmetric nozzles, (2) transient choked flows through the radial gap are not uniform and the discharge pattern appears as nonuniform impinging jets, and (3) the critical mass flow rate data for the transient case appear different from those of the steady case.

  10. Linear and radial flow targets for characterizing downhole flow in perforations

    SciTech Connect

    Deo, M. ); Tariq, S.M. ); Halleck, P.M. )

    1989-08-01

    Two types of sandstone targets are commonly used to test flow efficiency of shaped-charge jet perforations: linear targets, in which flow enters only the unperforated end of the cylindrical sample, and radial targets, in which flow enters through the end and sides of the sample. To determine which of these targets best represents downhole conditions, the flow distribution along the length of a perforation has been studied by three-dimensional (3D) finite-element analyses. Linear and radial laboratory targets have been compared with downhole perforations under varying conditions. For ideal perforations, the low-shot-density (LSD) case is adequately represented by the radial target, while the high-shot-density (HSD) case falls between the two targets. With realistic crushed and damaged zones, the HSD closely matches the linear target, and the LSD case falls between the two targets.

  11. Boiling radial flow in fractures of varying wall porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Barnitt, Robb Allan

    2000-06-01

    The focus of this report is the coupling of conductive heat transfer and boiling convective heat transfer, with boiling flow in a rock fracture. A series of experiments observed differences in boiling regimes and behavior, and attempted to quantify a boiling convection coefficient. The experimental study involved boiling radial flow in a simulated fracture, bounded by a variety of materials. Nonporous and impermeable aluminum, highly porous and permeable Berea sandstone, and minimally porous and permeable graywacke from The Geysers geothermal field. On nonporous surfaces, the heat flux was not strongly coupled to injection rate into the fracture. However, for porous surfaces, heat flux, and associated values of excess temperature and a boiling convection coefficient exhibited variation with injection rate. Nucleation was shown to occur not upon the visible surface of porous materials, but a distance below the surface, within the matrix. The depth of boiling was a function of injection rate, thermal power supplied to the fracture, and the porosity and permeability of the rock. Although matrix boiling beyond fracture wall may apply only to a finite radius around the point of injection, higher values of heat flux and a boiling convection coefficient may be realized with boiling in a porous, rather than nonporous surface bounded fracture.

  12. An investigation of radial tracer flow in naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Jetzabeth, Ramirez-Sabag; Fernando, Samaniego V.; Jesus, Rivera R.; Fernando Rodriguez

    1991-01-01

    This study presents a general solution for the radial flow of tracers in naturally fractured reservoirs. Continuous and finite step injection of chemical and radioactive tracers are considered. The reservoir is treated as being composed of two regions: a mobile region where longitudinal dispersion and convection take place and a stagnant region where only diffusion and adsorption are allowed. Radioactive decay is considered in both regions. The model of this study is thoroughly compared to those previously presented in literature by Moench and Ogata, Tang et al., Chen et al., and Hsieh et al. The solution is numerically inverted by means of the Crump algorithm. A detailed validation of the model with respect to solutions previously presented and/or simplified physical conditions solutions (i.e., homogeneous case) or limit solutions (i.e., for short times) was carried out. The influence of various dimensionless parameters that enter into the solution was investigated. A discussion of results obtained through the Crump and Stehfest algorithm is presented, concluding that the Crump method provides more reliable tracer concentrations.

  13. A visual study of radial inward choked flow of liquid nitrogen.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Simoneau, R. J.; Hsu, Y. Y.

    1973-01-01

    Data and high speed movies were acquired on pressurized subcooled liquid nitrogen flowing radially inward through a 0.0076 cm gap. The stagnation pressure ranged from 0.7 to 4 MN/sq m. Steady radial inward choked flow appears equivalent to steady choked flow through axisymmetric nozzles. Transient choked flows through the radial gap are not uniform and the discharge pattern appears as nonuniform impinging jets. The critical mass flow rate data for the transient case appear different from those for the steady case. On the mass flow rate vs pressure map, the slope and separation of the isotherms appear to be less for transient than for steady radial choked flow.

  14. Angular momentum, accretion, and radial flows in chemodynamical models of spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzulli, G.; Fraternali, F.

    2016-09-01

    Gas accretion and radial flows are key ingredients of the chemical evolution of spiral galaxies. They are also tightly linked to each other (accretion drives radial flows due to angular momentum conservation) and should therefore be modeled simultaneously. We summarize an algorithm that can be used to consistently compute accretion profiles, radial flows, and abundance gradients under quite general conditions, and we describe illustrative applications to the Milky Way. We find that gas-phase abundance gradients strongly depend on the angular momentum of the accreting material and, in the outer regions, they are significantly affected by the choice of boundary conditions.

  15. Buoyancy-driven flow reversal phenomena in radially rotating serpentine ducts

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J.J.; Wang, W.J.; Chen, C.K.

    2000-02-01

    Convective characteristics are analyzed numerically in a rotating multipass square duct connecting with 180-deg sharp returns. Isoflux is applied to each duct wall and periodic conditions are used between the entrance and exit of a typical two-pass module. Emphasis is placed on the phenomenon of buoyancy-driven reversed flow in the serpentine duct. Predictions reveal that the radial distance from the rotational axis to the location of flow separation in the radial-outward duct decreases with increasing the Richardson number. In addition, the local buoyancy that is required to yield the radial flow reversal increases with increasing the rotation number. This buoyancy-driven reversed flow in the radial-outward duct always results in local hot spots in the cooling channels. The critical buoyancy for the initiation of flow reversal is therefore concluded for the design purpose.

  16. Infant-specific gaze patterns in response to radial optic flow

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Nobu; Imura, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    The focus of a radial optic flow is a valid visual cue used to perceive and control the heading direction of animals. Gaze patterns in response to the focus of radial optic flow were measured in human infants (N = 100, 4–18 months) and in adults (N = 20) using an eye-tracking technique. Overall, although the adults showed an advantage in detecting the focus of an expansion flow (representing forward locomotion) against that of a contraction flow (representing backward locomotion), infants younger than 1 year showed an advantage in detecting the focus of a contraction flow. Infants aged between 13 and 18 months showed no significant advantage in detecting the focus in either the expansion or in the contraction flow. The uniqueness of the gaze patterns in response to the focus of radial optic flow in infants shows that the visual information necessary to perceive heading direction potentially differs between younger and mature individuals. PMID:27708361

  17. One-dimensional analysis of plane and radial thin film flows including solid-body rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, S.; Hankey, W.; Faghri, A.; Swanson, T.

    1989-01-01

    The flow of a thin liquid film with a free surface along a horizontal plate which emanates from a pressurized vessel is examined by integrating the equations of motion across the thin liquid layer and discretizing the integrated equations using finite difference techniques. The effects of 0-g and solid-body rotation will be discussed. The two cases of interest are plane flow and radial flow. In plane flow, the liquid is considered to be flowing along a channel with no change in the width of the channel, whereas in radial flow the liquid spreads out radially over a disk, so that the area changes along the radius. It is desired to determine the height of the liquid film at any location along the plate of disk, so that the heat transfer from the plate or disk can be found. The possibility that the flow could encounter a hydraulic jump is accounted for.

  18. Radial Motions in Disk Stars: Ellipticity or Secular Flows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Corredoira, M.; González-Fernández, C.

    2016-06-01

    Average stellar orbits of the Galactic disk may have some small intrinsic ellipticity which breaks the exact axisymmetry and there may also be some migration of stars inwards or outwards. Both phenomena can be detected through kinematic analyses. We use the red clump stars selected spectroscopically from the APO Galactic Evolution Experiment, with known distances and radial velocities, to measure the radial component of the Galactocentric velocities within 5 kpc < R < 16 kpc, | b| \\lt 5^\\circ , and within 20° from the Sun–Galactic center line. The average Galactocentric radial velocity is VR = (1.48 ± 0.35)[R(kpc) ‑ (8.8 ± 2.7)] km s‑1 outwards in the explored range, with a higher contribution from stars below the Galactic plane. Two possible explanations can be given for this result: (i) the mean orbit of the disk stars is intrinsically elliptical with a Galactocentric radial gradient of eccentricity around 0.01 kpc‑1 or (ii) there is a net secular expansion of the disk, in which stars within R ≈ 9–11 kpc are migrating to the region R ≳ 11 kpc at the rate of ∼2 M⊙ yr‑1, and stars with R ≲ 9 kpc are falling toward the center of the Galaxy. This migration ratio would be unattainable for a long time and should decelerate, otherwise the Galaxy would fade away in around 1 Gyr. At present, both hypotheses are speculative and one would need data on the Galactocentric radial velocities for other azimuths different to the center or anticenter in order to confirm one of the scenarios.

  19. Radial Motions in Disk Stars: Ellipticity or Secular Flows?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Corredoira, M.; González-Fernández, C.

    2016-06-01

    Average stellar orbits of the Galactic disk may have some small intrinsic ellipticity which breaks the exact axisymmetry and there may also be some migration of stars inwards or outwards. Both phenomena can be detected through kinematic analyses. We use the red clump stars selected spectroscopically from the APO Galactic Evolution Experiment, with known distances and radial velocities, to measure the radial component of the Galactocentric velocities within 5 kpc < R < 16 kpc, | b| \\lt 5^\\circ , and within 20° from the Sun-Galactic center line. The average Galactocentric radial velocity is VR = (1.48 ± 0.35)[R(kpc) - (8.8 ± 2.7)] km s-1 outwards in the explored range, with a higher contribution from stars below the Galactic plane. Two possible explanations can be given for this result: (i) the mean orbit of the disk stars is intrinsically elliptical with a Galactocentric radial gradient of eccentricity around 0.01 kpc-1 or (ii) there is a net secular expansion of the disk, in which stars within R ≈ 9-11 kpc are migrating to the region R ≳ 11 kpc at the rate of ˜2 M⊙ yr-1, and stars with R ≲ 9 kpc are falling toward the center of the Galaxy. This migration ratio would be unattainable for a long time and should decelerate, otherwise the Galaxy would fade away in around 1 Gyr. At present, both hypotheses are speculative and one would need data on the Galactocentric radial velocities for other azimuths different to the center or anticenter in order to confirm one of the scenarios.

  20. Computer program for the analysis of the cross flow in a radial inflow turbine scroll

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, A.; Abdallah, S.; Tabakoff, W.

    1977-01-01

    A computer program was used to solve the governing of the potential flow in the cross sectional planes of a radial inflow turbine scroll. A list of the main program, the subroutines, and typical output example are included.

  1. MODFLOW procedure to simulate axisymmetric flow in radially heterogeneous and layered aquifer systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louwyck, Andy; Vandenbohede, Alexander; Bakker, Mark; Lebbe, Luc

    2014-08-01

    A procedure is outlined to simulate axisymmetric groundwater flow in radially heterogeneous and layered aquifer systems using the unmodified version of MODFLOW. The procedure is straightforward, as it only requires correction of some of the input parameters. In contrast to other MODFLOW procedures to simulate axisymmetric flow, no restrictions are imposed on the type of flow, the discretization of radial distance, or the parameter values. Hence, the method can deal with both confined and unconfined flow, wellbore storage, and axisymmetric aquifer inhomogeneities including effects of finite-thickness skin and gravel pack. Several test cases are presented, which compare the calculated results with existing analytical solutions, the analytic element solver TTim, and the axisymmetric, finite-difference model MAxSym. It is concluded that the MODFLOW procedure is capable of simulating accurately axisymmetric flow in radially heterogeneous multi-aquifer systems.

  2. Flow field thermal gradient gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Boeker, Peter; Leppert, Jan

    2015-09-01

    Negative temperature gradients along the gas chromatographic separation column can maximize the separation capabilities for gas chromatography by peak focusing and also lead to lower elution temperatures. Unfortunately, so far a smooth thermal gradient over a several meters long separation column could only be realized by costly and complicated manual setups. Here we describe a simple, yet flexible method for the generation of negative thermal gradients using standard and easily exchangeable separation columns. The measurements made with a first prototype reveal promising new properties of the optimized separation process. The negative thermal gradient and the superposition of temperature programming result in a quasi-parallel separation of components each moving simultaneously near their lowered specific equilibrium temperatures through the column. Therefore, this gradient separation process is better suited for thermally labile molecules such as explosives and natural or aroma components. High-temperature GC methods also benefit from reduced elution temperatures. Even for short columns very high peak capacities can be obtained. In addition, the gradient separation is particularly beneficial for very fast separations below 1 min overall retention time. Very fast measurements of explosives prove the benefits of using negative thermal gradients. The new concept can greatly reduce the cycle time of high-resolution gas chromatography and can be integrated into hyphenated or comprehensive gas chromatography setups.

  3. Numerical and experimental study of unsteady flow field and vibration in radial inflow turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuz-Ihli, T.; Filsinger, D.; Schulz, A.; Wittig, S.

    2000-04-01

    The blades of turbocharger impellers are exposed to unsteady aerodynamic forces, which cause blade vibrations and may lead to failures. An indispensable requirement for a safe design of radial inflow turbines is a detailed knowledge of the exciting forces. Up to now, only a few investigations relating to unsteady aerodynamic forces in radial turbines have been presented. To give a detailed insight into the complex phenomena, a comprehensive research project was initiated at the Institut fuer Thermische Stroemungsmaschinen, at the University of Karlsruhe. A turbocharger test rig was installed in the high-pressure, high-temperature laboratory of the institute. The present paper gives a description of the test rig design and the measuring techniques. The flow field in a vaneless radial inflow turbine was analyzed using laser-Doppler anemometry. First results of unsteady flow field investigations in the turbine scroll and unsteady phase-resolved measurements of the flow field in the turbine rotor will be discussed. Moreover, results from finite element calculations analyzing frequencies and mode shapes are presented. As vibrations in turbines of turbochargers are assumed to be predominantly excited by unsteady aerodynamic forces, a method to predict the actual transient flow in a radial turbine utilizing the commercial Navier-Stokes solver TASCflow3d was developed. Results of the unsteady calculations are presented and comparisons with the measured unsteady flow field are made. As a major result, the excitation effect of the tongue region in a vaneless radial inflow turbine can be demonstrated.

  4. Phase Change Effects on Immiscible Flow Displacements in Radial Injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadlouydarab, Majid; Azaiez, Jalel; Chen, Zhangxin

    2014-11-01

    We report a systematic simulation of immiscible fluid-fluid displacements in radial injection in the presence of phase change. Due to the presence of two fluid-fluid interfaces in the system, a special treatment has been adopted. To track the leading interface position, two highly accurate methods including Level Set and Immersed Interface Method were used, while for locating the trailing interface an energy equation was adopted assuming the existence of a constant thin condensate layer. Dimensional analysis led to three important dimensionless groups including capillary number (Ca), Jacob number (Ja) and viscosity ratios (M) of the three fluids. Simulation results indicate significant influences of these parameters on the development of the instability and the interfacial morphology of fingers. Increasing Ca or M tends to amplify the interfacial instability, fingertip splitting, and results in longer fingers. In contrast, increasing Ja has stabilizing effects due to an increase of the thickness of the condensate layer. On the other hand at lower viscosity ratios as well as lower Ca, because of compensation effects of the phase change, both leading and trailing interfaces are found to be less unstable. Moreover accumulated condensate and oil saturation depletion curves show increasing and decreasing trends, respectively, when the Ca increases. Although viscosity ratio and Ja have similar effects on the accumulated condensate, they do not show any effect on the oil depletion saturation.

  5. Investigations on the Aerodynamic Characteristics and Blade Excitations of the Radial Turbine with Pulsating Inlet Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yixiong; Yang, Ce; Yang, Dengfeng; Zhang, Rui

    2016-04-01

    The aerodynamic performance, detailed unsteady flow and time-based excitations acting on blade surfaces of a radial flow turbine have been investigated with pulsation flow condition. The results show that the turbine instantaneous performance under pulsation flow condition deviates from the quasi-steady value significantly and forms obvious hysteretic loops around the quasi-steady conditions. The detailed analysis of unsteady flow shows that the characteristic of pulsation flow field in radial turbine is highly influenced by the pulsation inlet condition. The blade torque, power and loading fluctuate with the inlet pulsation wave in a pulse period. For the blade excitations, the maximum and the minimum blade excitations conform to the wave crest and wave trough of the inlet pulsation, respectively, in time-based scale. And toward blade chord direction, the maximum loading distributes along the blade leading edge until 20% chord position and decreases from the leading to trailing edge.

  6. Preprocessor and postprocessor computer programs for a radial-flow finite-element model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pucci, A.A.; Pope, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Preprocessing and postprocessing computer programs that enhance the utility of the U.S. Geological Survey radial-flow model have been developed. The preprocessor program: (1) generates a triangular finite element mesh from minimal data input, (2) produces graphical displays and tabulations of data for the mesh , and (3) prepares an input data file to use with the radial-flow model. The postprocessor program is a version of the radial-flow model, which was modified to (1) produce graphical output for simulation and field results, (2) generate a statistic for comparing the simulation results with observed data, and (3) allow hydrologic properties to vary in the simulated region. Examples of the use of the processor programs for a hypothetical aquifer test are presented. Instructions for the data files, format instructions, and a listing of the preprocessor and postprocessor source codes are given in the appendixes. (Author 's abstract)

  7. Nonaxisymmetric modes of the Couette-Taylor instability in ferrofluids with radial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, J.; Bajaj, R.

    2006-03-01

    The stability of a ferrofluid flow against nonaxisymmetric disturbances in an annular region between two co-axially rotating porous cylinders, with a radial flow, in the presence of an axial magnetic field, has been investigated numerically. The critical value of the angular velocity ratio OO of the cylinders at the onset of first nonaxisymmetric mode of instability has been found to depend upon the magnetic field parameter ψ, the radial Reynolds number R and the radius ratio ξ of the cylinders. Tables 2, Figs 2, Refs 21.

  8. Standard Flow Liquid Chromatography for Shotgun Proteomics in Bioenergy Research

    PubMed Central

    González Fernández-Niño, Susana M.; Smith-Moritz, A. Michelle; Chan, Leanne Jade G.; Adams, Paul D.; Heazlewood, Joshua L.; Petzold, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, the bioenergy field has realized significant achievements that have encouraged many follow on efforts centered on biosynthetic production of fuel-like compounds. Key to the success of these efforts has been transformational developments in feedstock characterization and metabolic engineering of biofuel-producing microbes. Lagging far behind these advancements are analytical methods to characterize and quantify systems of interest to the bioenergy field. In particular, the utilization of proteomics, while valuable for identifying novel enzymes and diagnosing problems associated with biofuel-producing microbes, is limited by a lack of robustness and limited throughput. Nano-flow liquid chromatography coupled to high-mass accuracy, high-resolution mass spectrometers has become the dominant approach for the analysis of complex proteomic samples, yet such assays still require dedicated experts for data acquisition, analysis, and instrument upkeep. The recent adoption of standard flow chromatography (ca. 0.5 mL/min) for targeted proteomics has highlighted the robust nature and increased throughput of this approach for sample analysis. Consequently, we assessed the applicability of standard flow liquid chromatography for shotgun proteomics using samples from Escherichia coli and Arabidopsis thaliana, organisms commonly used as model systems for lignocellulosic biofuels research. Employing 120 min gradients with standard flow chromatography, we were able to routinely identify nearly 800 proteins from E. coli samples; while for samples from Arabidopsis, over 1,000 proteins could be reliably identified. An examination of identified peptides indicated that the method was suitable for reproducible applications in shotgun proteomics. Standard flow liquid chromatography for shotgun proteomics provides a robust approach for the analysis of complex samples. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the first attempt to validate the standard

  9. Standard flow liquid chromatography for shotgun proteomics in bioenergy research.

    PubMed

    González Fernández-Niño, Susana M; Smith-Moritz, A Michelle; Chan, Leanne Jade G; Adams, Paul D; Heazlewood, Joshua L; Petzold, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, the bioenergy field has realized significant achievements that have encouraged many follow on efforts centered on biosynthetic production of fuel-like compounds. Key to the success of these efforts has been transformational developments in feedstock characterization and metabolic engineering of biofuel-producing microbes. Lagging far behind these advancements are analytical methods to characterize and quantify systems of interest to the bioenergy field. In particular, the utilization of proteomics, while valuable for identifying novel enzymes and diagnosing problems associated with biofuel-producing microbes, is limited by a lack of robustness and limited throughput. Nano-flow liquid chromatography coupled to high-mass accuracy, high-resolution mass spectrometers has become the dominant approach for the analysis of complex proteomic samples, yet such assays still require dedicated experts for data acquisition, analysis, and instrument upkeep. The recent adoption of standard flow chromatography (ca. 0.5 mL/min) for targeted proteomics has highlighted the robust nature and increased throughput of this approach for sample analysis. Consequently, we assessed the applicability of standard flow liquid chromatography for shotgun proteomics using samples from Escherichia coli and Arabidopsis thaliana, organisms commonly used as model systems for lignocellulosic biofuels research. Employing 120 min gradients with standard flow chromatography, we were able to routinely identify nearly 800 proteins from E. coli samples; while for samples from Arabidopsis, over 1,000 proteins could be reliably identified. An examination of identified peptides indicated that the method was suitable for reproducible applications in shotgun proteomics. Standard flow liquid chromatography for shotgun proteomics provides a robust approach for the analysis of complex samples. To the best of our knowledge, this study represents the first attempt to validate the standard

  10. 3-D model of a radial flow sub-watt methanol fuel processor

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, J. D.; Wang, Y.

    2015-10-01

    A 3-D model is presented for a novel sub-watt packed bed reactor. The reactor uses an annular inlet flow combined with a radial flow packed bed reactor. The baseline reactor is compared to a reactor with multiple outlets and a reactor with 3 internal fins. Increasing the outlets from 1 to 4 did improve the flow distribution, but did not increase the performance in the simulation. However, inserting fins allowed a decrease in temperature with same inlet flow of approximately 35K. Or the inlet flow rate could be increased by a factor of 2.8x while maintaining >99% conversion.

  11. Travel time statistics under radially converging flow in single fractures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotovac, Hrvoje; Srzic, Veljko; Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Kekez, Toni; Malenica, Luka

    2015-04-01

    A stochastic methodology based on Adaptive Fup Monte Carlo Method is used to investigate transport of a conservative solute by steady flow to a single pumping well in two-dimensional randomly heterogeneous single fractures. The spatially variable hydraulic transmissivity is modeled as a stationary random function for three different correlation structures (multi-Gaussian, connected and disconnected fields with correlated mean, high and low lnT values, respectively, according to the Zinn and Harvey, 2003) and heterogeneity levels (lnT variance is 1 and 8). Initially, solute particles are injected at outer circle located at 32 correlation lengths from well according to the in flux and resident injection mode. Therefore, breakthrough curve (BTC) statistics in single well due to different spatial structures, heterogeneity levels, injection modes and dispersion influence is considered. For small heterogeneity, all considered effects have small influences on BTC and related moments. As expected in single fractures, high lnT variance is more usual case which considerably changes flow patterns including channelling effect and fact that only few narrow channels carry out most pumping flow rate. Channelling implies significant differences between different injection modes. Resident mode uniformly injects particles implying that most particles pass through "slower" zones that especially increase late arrivals and contribute to the non-Fickian behaviour of transport. Contrary, "in flux" mode drastically reduces first arrivals and mean values, especially for connected correlation fields. The results from two injection modes lie on different sides of homogeneous mean travel time solution and give complementary information for complete representation of conservative transport. For advection transport, correlation structure and especially lnT variance seems to have major influence on BTC characteristics. On the other side, influence of longitudinal and lateral local scale

  12. Modelling of turbulent flow in a radial reactor with fixed bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhapbasbayev, U. K.; Ramazanova, G. I.; Kenzhaliev, O. B.

    2015-03-01

    The data of the computation of turbulent flow in the CF- π and CP- π configurations of the radial reactor with a fixed bed are presented. The Reynolds motion equations have been solved jointly with the k- ɛ turbulence model. To couple the parameters of flows at the interface free part-fixed bed the classical continuity equations were used. The computational data are obtained for the averaged and turbulent characteristics, and it is shown that the flow in the fixed bed causes the generation of the turbulence kinetic energy and its dissipation rate; the flow in the CF- π configuration is distributed more uniformly as compared to the CP- π configuration of the radial reactor. Computed data are compared with the experimental ones.

  13. Prediction of heat transfer to a thin liquid film in plane and radially spreading flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Faghri, A.; Hankey, W. L.; Swanson, T. D.

    1990-01-01

    The energy equation is incorporated in the solution algorithm of Rahman et al. (1990) to compute the heat transfer to a thin film in the presence or absence of gravity. For a plane flow under zero gravity, it is found that, for both isothermal and uniformly heated walls, the heat transfer coefficient gradually decreases downstream, with Nu-asterisk (the Nusselt number in terms of film height) remaining approximately constant except for regions very close to the entrance. In the case of radial flow under zero gravity, Nu-asterisk is found to decrease monotonically when the plane is uniformly heated. Two different flow regimes are identified in the presence of gravity for both plane and radial flows. The results of the study may be applicable to the design of space-based cooling systems.

  14. Radial Flow Fludized Filter Finds Niche as a Pretreatment System for Surface Water in Small Communities

    EPA Science Inventory

    An emerging technology called radial flow fluidized filter (R3f) has been developed as a low cost simplistic filtration technology for small communities of less than 10,000 people. Fouling is a major impediment to the sustainability of membrane technology particularly for small ...

  15. Laminar flow between a stationary and a rotating disk with radial throughflow

    SciTech Connect

    Nesreddine, H.; Nguyen, C.T.; Vo-Ngoc, D.

    1995-05-01

    The problem of axisymmetric laminar flow of a viscous incompressible fluid that occurs between a stationary and a rotating disk subjected to a uniform radial throughflow has been numerically investigated for a large range of flow parameters. Results show that the basic flow structure is rather complex and depends strongly on both the rotational and the flow structure is rather complex and depends strongly on both the rotational and the throughflow Reynolds numbers. In general, the basic unicellular structure has been observed. With the increase of the throughflow Reynolds number, a multicellular flow structure may be found. The phenomenon of multiple solutions has been clearly observed for cases with sufficiently high rational Re and/or high throughflow Re. Among these solutions, stable as well as unstable solutions have been determined by applying Rayleigh`s stability criterion. The influence of the starting conditions on the stability of the flow has also been investigated for various ranges of flow parameters.

  16. A model of unsteady spatially inhomogeneous flow in a radial-axial blade machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrozhevich, A. V.; Munshtukov, D. A.

    A two-dimensional model of the gasdynamic process in a radial-axial blade machine is proposed which allows for the instantaneous local state of the field of flow parameters, changes in the set angles along the median profile line, profile losses, and centrifugal and Coriolis forces. The model also allows for the injection of cooling air and completion of fuel combustion in the flow. The model is equally applicable to turbines and compressors. The use of the method of singularities provides for a unified and relatively simple description of various factors affecting the flow and, therefore, for computational efficiency.

  17. Separation in the mixed convection boundary-layer radial flow over a constant temperature horizontal plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Feria, R.; del Pino, C.; Fernández-Gutiérrez, A.

    2014-10-01

    The boundary-layer flow of a horizontal current emerging radially from a cylindrical vertical surface of radius r0 with a constant velocity over a heated horizontal wall at constant temperature is analyzed. The boundary-layer equations are made dimensionless with a radial characteristic length in which natural and forced convection become of the same order of magnitude, so that the Prandtl (Pr) number and Gr2/Re5 are the only nondimensional parameters governing the problem, where Gr and Re are the Grashof and Reynolds numbers based on r0, respectively. A similarity solution valid at the leading edge of the boundary-layer flow is obtained. It contains, as the first order correction to Blasius' thermal boundary layer solution, the effect of buoyancy, and as the second order correction the effect of the radial divergence of the flow. This solution is used to start the numerical integration of the equations to provide a criterion for when separation occurs. It is found that separation, based on the boundary layer model, occurs for Gr < B(Pr)Re5/2, where the Prandtl's number function B is characterized numerically and found to be almost constant. This separation location law is compared with experimental results for air flowing over a heated horizontal plate at constant temperature, finding a qualitative good agreement.

  18. Radial heterogeneity of some analytical columns used in high-performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Mriziq, Khaled S; Guiochon, Georges A

    2009-01-01

    An on-column electrochemical microdetector was used to determine accurately the radial distribution of the mobile phase velocity and of the column efficiency at the exit of three common analytical columns, namely a 100 mm x 4.6 mm C18 bonded silica-based monolithic column, a 150 mm x 4.6 mm column packed with 2.7 {micro}m porous shell particles of C18 bonded silica (HALO), and a 150 mm x 4.6 mm column packed with 3 {micro}m fully porous C18 bonded silica particles (LUNA). The results obtained demonstrate that all three columns are not radially homogeneous. In all three cases, the efficiency was found to be lower in the wall region of the column than in its core region (the central core with a radius of 1/3 the column inner radius). The decrease in local efficiency from the core to the wall regions was lower in the case of the monolith (ca. 25%) than in that of the two particle-packed columns (ca. 35-50%). The mobile phase velocity was found to be ca. 1.5% higher in the wall than in the core region of the monolithic column while, in contrast, it was ca. 2.5-4.0% lower in the wall region for the two particle-packed columns.

  19. Stability results for multi-layer radial Hele-Shaw and porous media flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gin, Craig; Daripa, Prabir

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by stability problems arising in the context of chemical enhanced oil recovery, we perform linear stability analysis of Hele-Shaw and porous media flows in radial geometry involving an arbitrary number of immiscible fluids. Key stability results obtained and their relevance to the stabilization of fingering instability are discussed. Some of the key results, among many others, are (i) absolute upper bounds on the growth rate in terms of the problem data; (ii) validation of these upper bound results against exact computation for the case of three-layer flows; (iii) stability enhancing injection policies; (iv) asymptotic limits that reduce these radial flow results to similar results for rectilinear flows; and (v) the stabilizing effect of curvature of the interfaces. Multi-layer radial flows have been found to have the following additional distinguishing features in comparison to rectilinear flows: (i) very long waves, some of which can be physically meaningful, are stable; and (ii) eigenvalues can be complex for some waves depending on the problem data, implying that the dispersion curves for one or more waves can contact each other. Similar to the rectilinear case, these results can be useful in providing insight into the interfacial instability transfer mechanism as the problem data are varied. Moreover, these can be useful in devising smart injection policies as well as controlling the complexity of the long-term dynamics when drops of various immiscible fluids intersperse among each other. As an application of the upper bound results, we provide stabilization criteria and design an almost stable multi-layer system by adding many layers of fluid with small positive jumps in viscosity in the direction of the basic flow.

  20. Modeling of transient flow through a viscoelastic preparative chromatography packing.

    PubMed

    Hekmat, Dariusch; Kuhn, Michael; Meinhardt, Verena; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    The common method for purification of macromolecular bioproducts is preparative packed-bed chromatography using polymer-based, compressible, viscoelastic resins. Because of a downstream processing bottleneck, the chromatography equipment is often operated at its hydrodynamic limit. In this case, the resins may exhibit a complex behavior which results in compression-relaxation hystereses. Up to now, no modeling approach of transient flow through a chromatography packing has been made considering the viscoelasticity of the resins. The aim of the present work was to develop a novel model and compare model calculations with experimental data of two agarose-based resins. Fluid flow and bed permeability were modeled by Darcy's law and the Kozeny-Carman equation, respectively. Fluid flow was coupled to solid matrix stress via an axial force balance and a continuity equation of a deformable packing. Viscoelasticity was considered according to a Kelvin-Voigt material. The coupled equations were solved with a finite difference scheme using a deformable mesh. The model boundary conditions were preset transient pressure drop functions which resemble simulated load/elution/equilibration cycles. Calculations using a homogeneous model (assuming constant variables along the column height) gave a fair agreement with experimental data with regard to predicted flow rate, bed height, and compression-relaxation hysteresis for symmetric as well as asymmetric pressure drop functions. Calculations using an inhomogeneous model gave profiles of the bed porosity as a function of the bed height. In addition, the influence of medium wall support and intraparticle porosity was illustrated. The inhomogeneous model provides insights that so far are not easily experimentally accessible.

  1. Heat transfer in citric Acid production with axial and radial flow impellers.

    PubMed

    Merwe, Jacob D van der; Minarik, Martin; Berovič, Marin; Herakovič, Niko

    2010-03-01

    In order to produce fermentation broth for downstream recovery, a total of 15 fermentations were done in a 15 m3 and two 7.5 m3 vessels. Apart from the evaluation of fermentation yield and productivity, information on the heat and mass transfer coefficients were required for design purposes. The focus of the fermentation study was therefore directed to obtain information on broth rheology, heat transfer aspects and considerations. Broth rheology was found to deviate from Newtonian behavior with increasing biomass concentration. Using axial flow impellers, rather than radial flow producing Rushton turbines, significantly improved heat transfer in this study. PMID:24061667

  2. Radial and vertical flows induced by galactic spiral arms: likely contributors to our `wobbly Galaxy'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faure, Carole; Siebert, Arnaud; Famaey, Benoit

    2014-05-01

    In an equilibrium axisymmetric galactic disc, the mean Galactocentric radial and vertical velocities are expected to be zero everywhere. In recent years, various large spectroscopic surveys have however shown that stars of the Milky Way disc exhibit non-zero mean velocities outside of the Galactic plane in both the Galactocentric radial and vertical velocity components. While radial velocity structures are commonly assumed to be associated with non-axisymmetric components of the potential such as spiral arms or bars, non-zero vertical velocity structures are usually attributed to excitations by external sources such as a passing satellite galaxy or a small dark matter substructure crossing the Galactic disc. Here, we use a three-dimensional test-particle simulation to show that the global stellar response to a spiral perturbation induces both a radial velocity flow and non-zero vertical motions. The resulting structure of the mean velocity field is qualitatively similar to what is observed across the Milky Way disc. We show that such a pattern also naturally emerges from an analytic toy model based on linearized Euler equations. We conclude that an external perturbation of the disc might not be a requirement to explain all of the observed structures in the vertical velocity of stars across the Galactic disc. Non-axisymmetric internal perturbations can also be the source of the observed mean velocity patterns.

  3. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Charles C.; Taylor, Larry T.

    1986-01-01

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (.mu.HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a .mu.HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the .mu.HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF.sub.2), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  4. Liquid chromatography/Fourier transform IR spectrometry interface flow cell

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, C.C.; Taylor, L.T.

    1985-01-04

    A zero dead volume (ZDV) microbore high performance liquid chromatography (..mu.. HPLC)/Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) interface flow cell includes an IR transparent crystal having a small diameter bore therein through which a sample liquid is passed. The interface flow cell further includes a metal holder in combination with a pair of inner, compressible seals for directly coupling the thus configured spectrometric flow cell to the outlet of a ..mu.. HPLC column end fitting to minimize the transfer volume of the effluents exiting the ..mu.. HPLC column which exhibit excellent flow characteristics due to the essentially unencumbered, open-flow design. The IR beam passes transverse to the sample flow through the circular bore within the IR transparent crystal, which is preferably comprised of potassium bromide (KBr) or calcium fluoride (CaF/sub 2/), so as to minimize interference patterns and vignetting encountered in conventional parallel-plate IR cells. The long IR beam pathlength and lensing effect of the circular cross-section of the sample volume in combination with the refractive index differences between the solvent and the transparent crystal serve to focus the IR beam in enhancing sample detection sensitivity by an order of magnitude.

  5. Technique to Measure the Coronal Electron Temperature and Radial Flow Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reginald, N. L.; Davila, J. M.; St Cyr, O. C.

    2011-12-01

    During the March 2006 total solar eclipse we conducted an imaging experiment using the Imaging Spectrograph of Coronal Electrons (ISCORE) to determine the coronal electron temperature and its radial flow speed in the low solar corona. This technique required taking images of the solar eclipse through four broadband filters centered at 385.0, 398.7, 410.0 and 423.3 nm. The K-coronal temperature is determined from intensity ratios from the 385.0 and 410.0 nm filters, and the K-coronal radial flow speed is determined from intensity ratios from the 398.7 and 423.3 nm filters. The theoretical model for this technique assumes a symmetric corona devoid of any features like streamers that might alter the coronal symmetry. The model also requires an isothermal temperature and a uniform outflow speed all along the line of sight. We will call this the Constant Parameter Thomson Scattering Model (CPTSM). The latter assumption may sound unreasonable but in the symmetric corona with rapid fall of the electron density with height in the solar corona, the major contributions to the K-coronal intensity along a given line of sight comes from the plasma properties in the vicinity of the plane of the sky. But the pressing question is how is the derived plasma properties by ISCORE compare with the nature of the true corona. For this we turn to the CORHEL model by Predictive Science Inc. which used magnetogram data to create a realistic model of the solar corona that are made available through the Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) at GSFC. That team has consistently produced the expected coronal image days prior to many total eclipses where the major coronal features from their model matched actual coronal image on the day of the eclipse. Using the CORHEL model data we have calculated the K-coronal intensities at 385.0, 398.7, 410.0 and 423.3 nm using the electron density, plasma temperature (assumed to be electron temperature) and the flow speeds of the plasma along the line

  6. Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brantley, L. Reed, Sr.; Demanche, Edna L.; Klemm, E. Barbara; Kyselka, Will; Phillips, Edwin A.; Pottenger, Francis M.; Yamamoto, Karen N.; Young, Donald B.

    This booklet presents some activities on chromatography. Directions for preparing leaf pigment extracts using alcohol are given, and paper chromatography and thin-layer chromatography are described as modifications of the basic principles of chromatography. (KHR)

  7. Direct numerical simulation of Taylor-Couette flow subjected to a radial temperature gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Hao; Liu, Nansheng; Lu, Xiyun; Khomami, Bamin

    2015-12-01

    Direct numerical simulations have been performed to study the Taylor-Couette (TC) flow between two rotating, coaxial cylinders in the presence of a radial temperature gradient. Specifically, the influence of the buoyant force and the outer cylinder rotation on the turbulent TC flow system with the radius ratio η = 0.912 was examined. For the co-rotating TC flows with Rei (inner cylinder) =1000 and Reo (outer cylinder) =100, a transition pathway to highly turbulent flows is realized by increasing σ, a parameter signifying the ratio of buoyant to inertial force. This nonlinear flow transition involves four intriguing states that emerge in sequence as chaotic wavy vortex flow for σ = 0, wavy interpenetrating spiral flows for σ = 0.02 and 0.05, intermittent turbulent spirals for σ = 0.1 and 0.2, and turbulent spirals for σ = 0.4. Overall, the fluid motion changes from a centrifugally driven flow regime characterized by large-scale wavy Taylor vortices (TVs) to a buoyancy-dominated flow regime characterized by small-scale turbulent vortices. Commensurate changes in turbulence statistics and heat transfer are seen as a result of the weakening of large-scale TV circulations and enhancement of turbulent motions. Additionally, the influence of variation of the outer cylinder rotation, -500 < Reo < 500 in presence of buoyancy (σ = 0.1) with Rei = 1000, has been considered. Specifically, it is demonstrated that this variation strongly influences the azimuthal and axial mean flows with a weaker influence on the fluctuating fluid motions. Of special interest, here are the turbulent dynamics near the outer wall where a marked decrease of turbulence intensity and a sign inversion of the Reynolds stress Rrz are observed for the strongly counter-rotating regimes (Reo = - 300 and -500). To this end, it has been shown that the underlying flow physics for this drastic modification are associated with the modification of the correlation between the radial and axial fluctuating

  8. Direct numerical simulation of Taylor-Couette flow subjected to a radial temperature gradient

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Hao; Liu, Nansheng Lu, Xiyun; Khomami, Bamin

    2015-12-15

    Direct numerical simulations have been performed to study the Taylor-Couette (TC) flow between two rotating, coaxial cylinders in the presence of a radial temperature gradient. Specifically, the influence of the buoyant force and the outer cylinder rotation on the turbulent TC flow system with the radius ratio η = 0.912 was examined. For the co-rotating TC flows with Re{sub i} (inner cylinder) =1000 and Re{sub o} (outer cylinder) =100, a transition pathway to highly turbulent flows is realized by increasing σ, a parameter signifying the ratio of buoyant to inertial force. This nonlinear flow transition involves four intriguing states that emerge in sequence as chaotic wavy vortex flow for σ = 0, wavy interpenetrating spiral flows for σ = 0.02 and 0.05, intermittent turbulent spirals for σ = 0.1 and 0.2, and turbulent spirals for σ = 0.4. Overall, the fluid motion changes from a centrifugally driven flow regime characterized by large-scale wavy Taylor vortices (TVs) to a buoyancy-dominated flow regime characterized by small-scale turbulent vortices. Commensurate changes in turbulence statistics and heat transfer are seen as a result of the weakening of large-scale TV circulations and enhancement of turbulent motions. Additionally, the influence of variation of the outer cylinder rotation, −500 < Re{sub o} < 500 in presence of buoyancy (σ = 0.1) with Re{sub i} = 1000, has been considered. Specifically, it is demonstrated that this variation strongly influences the azimuthal and axial mean flows with a weaker influence on the fluctuating fluid motions. Of special interest, here are the turbulent dynamics near the outer wall where a marked decrease of turbulence intensity and a sign inversion of the Reynolds stress R{sub rz} are observed for the strongly counter-rotating regimes (Re{sub o} = − 300 and −500). To this end, it has been shown that the underlying flow physics for this drastic modification are associated with the modification of the correlation

  9. Intrapericardial denervation - Radial artery blood flow and heart rate responses to LBNP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckeever, Kenneth H.; Skidmore, Michael G.; Keil, Lanny C.; Sandler, Harold

    1990-01-01

    The effects of intrapericardial denervation on the radial artery blood flow velocity (RABFV) and heart rate (HR) responses to LBNP in rhesus monkeys were investigated by measuring the RABFV transcutaneously by a continuous-wave Doppler ultrasonic flowmeter in order to derive an index of forearm blood flow response to low (0 to -20 mm Hg) and high (0 to -60 mm Hg) ramp exposures during supine LBNP. Four of the eight subjects were subjected to efferent and afferent cardiac denervation. It was found that, during low levels of LBNP, monkeys with cardiac denervation exhibited no cardiopulmonary baroreceptor-mediated change in the RABFV or HR, unlike the intact animals, which showed steady decreases in RABFV during both high- and low-pressure protocols. It is suggested that forearm blood flow and HR responses to low-level LBNP, along with pharmacological challenge, are viable physiological tests for verifying the completeness of atrial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptor denervation.

  10. Numerical simulation of the convective flow patterns within a rotating concentric annulus with radial gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabello, Ares; Avila, Ruben

    2010-11-01

    The GEODYNAMO research requires the numerical study of the natural convection of the fluid confined in a rotating spherical shell. We present the flow patterns of a uniform-density Boussinesq fluid within a rotating spherical annulus with radial aspect ratio η=0.35. The convective flow is induced by a gravity field acting radially inwards towards the center of the spheres, and the temperature difference between the internal sphere at Ti and the external sphere at Te (where Ti>Te). We also show (i) the influence of the rotation on the heat transfer rate, and (ii) the influence of the differential rotation (the internal sphere rotates at a different angular velocity than the reference frame and the external sphere) on the heat transfer rate. The fluid equations are solved by using the spectral element method (SEM). In order to avoid the singularity at the poles of the spheres, the numerical mesh is generated by using the Cubed-Sphere algorithm. The flow patterns are obtained for subcritical and supercritical Rayleigh numbers and Taylor numbers in the range 10^3 and 10^5. The results are successfully compared with data previously reported in the literature.

  11. Radial flow fuel nozzle for a combustor of a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Means, Gregory Scott; Boardman, Gregory Allen; Berry, Jonathan Dwight

    2016-07-05

    A combustor for a gas turbine generally includes a radial flow fuel nozzle having a fuel distribution manifold, and a fuel injection manifold axially separated from the fuel distribution manifold. The fuel injection manifold generally includes an inner side portion, an outer side portion, and a plurality of circumferentially spaced fuel ports that extend through the outer side portion. A plurality of tubes provides axial separation between the fuel distribution manifold and the fuel injection manifold. Each tube defines a fluid communication path between the fuel distribution manifold and the fuel injection manifold.

  12. Flow mechanism of Forchheimer's cubic equation in high-velocity radial gas flow through porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Ezeudembah, A.S.; Dranchuk, P.M.

    1982-01-01

    Formal derivation of Forchheimer's cubic equation is made by considering the kinetic energy equation of mean flow and dimensional relations for one-dimensional, linear, incompressible fluid flow. By the addition of the cubic term, this equation is regarded as a modified Forchheimer's quadratic equation which accounts for the flow rates obtained beyond the laminar flow condition. The cubic equation spans a wide range of flow rates and regimes. For suitable use in gas flow studies, this equation has been adapted, modified, and corrected for the gas slippage effect. The physical basis of the cubic term has been established by using boundary layer theory to explain the high-velocity, high-pressure flow behavior through a porous path. Gamma, the main parameter in the cubic term, is related directly to a characteristic, dimensionless shape factor which is significant at higher flow rates. It is inversely related to viscosity, but has no dependence on the gas slippage coefficient in the higher flow regime. 25 references.

  13. Radially-Inflowing Molecular Gas Deposited by a X-ray Cooling Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jeremy; Ao, Y.; Dinh, V.

    2006-12-01

    Galaxy clusters are immersed in hot X-ray-emitting gas that constitutes a large fraction of their baryonic mass. Radiative cooling of this gas, if not adequately balanced by heat input, should result in an inflow of cooler gas to the central dominant giant elliptical (cD) galaxy. Although a straightforward prediction made nearly twenty years ago, the occurrence of such X-ray cooling flows is widely questioned as gas at lower temperatures is often not found at the predicted quantities. The exceptions are cD galaxies harbouring large quantities of cool molecular gas, but the origin of this gas is uncertain as ram-pressure stripping or cannibalism of gas-rich cluster galaxies provide viable alternatives to cooling flows. Here, we present the most direct evidence yet for the deposition of molecular gas in a cD galaxy, Perseus A, from a X-ray cooling flow. The molecular gas detected in this galaxy is concentrated in three radial filaments with projected lengths of at least 2 kpc, one extending inwards close to the active nucleus and the other two extending outwards to at least 8 kpc on the east and west. All three filaments coincide with bright Hα features, and lie along a central X-ray ridge where any cooling flow is strongest. The two outer filaments exhibit increasingly blueshifted velocities at smaller radii that we show trace radial inflow along the gravitational potential of the galaxy. The innermost filament appears to be settling into the potential well, and may fuel the central supermassive black hole whose radio jets heat gas over a large solid angle in the north-south direction. Our results demonstrate that X-ray cooling flows can indeed deposit large quantities of cool gas, but only intermittently along directions where the X-ray gas is not being reheated.

  14. Eigenmodes of Ducted Flows With Radially-Dependent Axial and Swirl Velocity Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kousen, Kenneth A.

    1999-01-01

    This report characterizes the sets of small disturbances possible in cylindrical and annular ducts with mean flow whose axial and tangential components vary arbitrarily with radius. The linearized equations of motion are presented and discussed, and then exponential forms for the axial, circumferential, and time dependencies of any unsteady disturbances are assumed. The resultant equations form a generalized eigenvalue problem, the solution of which yields the axial wavenumbers and radial mode shapes of the unsteady disturbances. Two numerical discretizations are applied to the system of equations: (1) a spectral collocation technique based on Chebyshev polynomial expansions on the Gauss-Lobatto points, and (2) second and fourth order finite differences on uniform grids. The discretized equations are solved using a standard eigensystem package employing the QR algorithm. The eigenvalues fall into two primary categories: a discrete set (analogous to the acoustic modes found in uniform mean flows) and a continuous band (analogous to convected disturbances in uniform mean flows) where the phase velocities of the disturbances correspond to the local mean flow velocities. Sample mode shapes and eigensystem distributions are presented for both sheared axial and swirling flows. The physics of swirling flows is examined with reference to hydrodynamic stability and completeness of the eigensystem expansions. The effect of assuming exponential dependence in the axial direction is discussed.

  15. Modeling full radial electric field and flow shears in gyrokinetic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Weigang; Chen, Yang; Parker, Scott; Groebner, Richard

    2015-11-01

    The radial electric field (Er) is important in the turbulence of tokamak plasmas. It affects the growth rate of instabilities through the E × B shear and changes the real frequency of drift waves by adding a Doppler shift. The modeling of Er in simulations, however, was usually not complete. The full profiles of the main ion toroidal and poloidal flows were not implemented. In the gyrokientic electromagnetic particle code GEM, the poloidal flow was assumed to be zero by introducing a parallel flow. However, recent experiments show that the poloidal flow could be important. In this study we add the full main ion rotation flows to GEM, following the comprehensive procedures of Sugama and Horton. The major contribution to the Er from the ion toroidal flow is used as Er 0, and the result as Er 1. The effects to the growth rate and Doppler shift of all terms in the force balance equation are demonstrated using linear simulations of edge and core tokamak plasmas.

  16. Quantification of the secondary flow in a radial coupled centrifugal blood pump based on particle tracking velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Nobuo; Masuda, Takaya; Iida, Tomoya; Kataoka, Hiroyuki; Fujimoto, Tetsuo; Takatani, Setsuo

    2005-01-01

    Secondary flow in the centrifugal blood pump helps to enhance the washout effect and to minimize thrombus formation. On the other hand, it has an adverse effect on pump efficiency. Excessive secondary flow may induce hemolytic effects. Understanding the secondary flow is thus important to the design of a compact, efficient, biocompatible blood pump. This study examined the secondary flow in a radial coupled centrifugal blood pump based on a simple particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) technique. A radial magnetically coupled centrifugal blood pump has a bell-shaped narrow clearance between the impeller inner radius and the pump casing. In order to vary the flow levels through the clearance area, clearance widths of 0.25 mm and 0.50 mm and impeller washout holes with diameters of 0 mm, 2.5 mm, and 4 mm were prepared. A high-speed video camera (2000 frames per second) was used to capture the particle images from which radial flow components were derived. The flow in the space behind the impeller was assumed to be laminar and Couette type. The larger the inner clearance or diameter of washout hole, the greater was the secondary flow rate. Without washout holes, the flow behind the impeller resulted in convection. The radial flow through the washout holes of the impeller was conserved in the radial as well as in the axial direction behind the impeller. The increase in the secondary flow reduced the net pump efficiency. Simple PTV was successful in quantifying the flow in the space behind the impeller. The results verified the hypothesis that the flow behind the impeller was theoretically Couette along the circumferential direction. The convection flow observed behind the impeller agreed with the reports of other researchers. Simple PTV was effective in understanding the fluid dynamics to help improve the compact, efficient, and biocompatible centrifugal blood pump for safe clinical applications.

  17. Effect of Radial Density Configuration on Wave Field and Energy Flow in Axially Uniform Helicon Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Lei; Li, Qingchong; Zhang, Huijie; Li, Yinghong; Wu, Yun; Zhang, Bailing; Zhuang, Zhong

    2016-08-01

    The effect of the radial density configuration in terms of width, edge gradient and volume gradient on the wave field and energy flow in an axially uniform helicon plasma is studied in detail. A three-parameter function is employed to describe the density, covering uniform, parabolic, linear and Gaussian profiles. It finds that the fraction of power deposition near the plasma edge increases with density width and edge gradient, and decays in exponential and “bump-on-tail” profiles, respectively, away from the surface. The existence of a positive second-order derivative in the volume density configuration promotes the power deposition near the plasma core, which to our best knowledge has not been pointed out before. The transverse structures of wave field and current density remain almost the same during the variation of density width and gradient, confirming the robustness of the m=1 mode observed previously. However, the structure of the electric wave field changes significantly from a uniform density configuration, for which the coupling between the Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) mode and the helicon mode is very strong, to non-uniform ones. The energy flow in the cross section of helicon plasma is presented for the first time, and behaves sensitive to the density width and edge gradient but insensitive to the volume gradient. Interestingly, the radial distribution of power deposition resembles the radial profile of the axial component of current density, suggesting the control of the power deposition profile in the experiment by particularly designing the antenna geometry to excite a required axial current distribution. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 11405271)

  18. Porcine circovirus (PCV) removal by Q sepharose fast flow chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Wang, Hua; Ho, Cintia; Lester, Philip; Chen, Qi; Neske, Florian; Baylis, Sally A; Blümel, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    The recently discovered contamination of oral rotavirus vaccines led to exposure of millions of infants to porcine circovirus (PCV). PCV was not detected by conventional virus screening tests. Regulatory agencies expect exclusion of adventitious viruses from biological products. Therefore, methods for inactivation/removal of viruses have to be implemented as an additional safety barrier whenever feasible. However, inactivation or removal of PCV is difficult. PCV is highly resistant to widely used physicochemical inactivation procedures. Circoviruses such as PCV are the smallest viruses known and are not expected to be effectively removed by currently-used virus filters due to the small size of the circovirus particles. Anion exchange chromatography such as Q Sepharose(®) Fast Flow (QSFF) has been shown to effectively remove a range of viruses including parvoviruses. In this study, we investigated PCV1 removal by virus filtration and by QSFF chromatography. As expected, PCV1 could not be effectively removed by virus filtration. However, PCV1 could be effectively removed by QSFF as used during the purification of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and a log10 reduction value (LRV) of 4.12 was obtained.

  19. Evidence for Radial Flow of Thermal Dileptons in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Scomparin, E.; Banicz, K.; Damjanovic, S.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Fargeix, J.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.; Cicalo, C.; Falco, A. de; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.; Puddu, G.; Serci, S.

    2008-01-18

    The NA60 experiment at the CERN SPS has studied low-mass dimuon production in 158A GeV In-In collisions. An excess of pairs above the known meson decays has been reported before. We now present precision results on the associated transverse momentum spectra. The slope parameter T{sub eff} extracted from the spectra rises with dimuon mass up to the {rho}, followed by a sudden decline above. While the initial rise is consistent with the expectations for radial flow of a hadronic decay source, the decline signals a transition to an emission source with much smaller flow. This may well represent the first direct evidence for thermal radiation of partonic origin in nuclear collisions.

  20. Radially dependent large-scale dynamos in global cylindrical shear flows and the local cartesian limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, F.; Blackman, E. G.

    2016-06-01

    For cylindrical differentially rotating plasmas, we study large-scale magnetic field generation from finite amplitude non-axisymmetric perturbations by comparing numerical simulations with quasi-linear analytic theory. When initiated with a vertical magnetic field of either zero or finite net flux, our global cylindrical simulations exhibit the magnetorotational instability (MRI) and large-scale dynamo growth of radially alternating mean fields, averaged over height and azimuth. This dynamo growth is explained by our analytic calculations of a non-axisymmetric fluctuation-induced electromotive force that is sustained by azimuthal shear of the fluctuating fields. The standard `Ω effect' (shear of the mean field by differential rotation) is unimportant. For the MRI case, we express the large-scale dynamo field as a function of differential rotation. The resulting radially alternating large-scale fields may have implications for angular momentum transport in discs and corona. To connect with previous work on large-scale dynamos with local linear shear and identify the minimum conditions needed for large-scale field growth, we also solve our equations in local Cartesian coordinates. We find that large-scale dynamo growth in a linear shear flow without rotation can be sustained by shear plus non-axisymmetric fluctuations - even if not helical, a seemingly previously unidentified distinction. The linear shear flow dynamo emerges as a more restricted version of our more general new global cylindrical calculations.

  1. Occurrence of turbulent flow conditions in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Ruben; Choikhet, Konstantin; Desmet, Gert; Broeckhoven, Ken

    2014-09-26

    Having similar densities as liquids but with viscosities up to 20 times lower (higher diffusion coefficients), supercritical CO2 is the ideal (co-)solvent for fast and/or highly efficient separations without mass-transfer limitations or excessive column pressure drops. Whereas in liquid chromatography the flow remains laminar in both the packed bed and tubing, except in extreme cases (e.g. in a 75 μm tubing, pure acetonitrile at 5 ml/min), a supercritical fluid can experience a transition from laminar to turbulent flow in more typical operation modes. Due to the significant lower viscosity, this transition for example already occurs at 1.3 ml/min for neat CO2 when using connection tubing with an ID of 127 μm. By calculating the Darcy friction factor, which can be plotted versus the Reynolds number in a so-called Moody chart, typically used in fluid dynamics, higher values are found for stainless steel than PEEK tubing, in agreement with their expected higher surface roughness. As a result turbulent effects are more pronounced when using stainless steel tubing. The higher than expected extra-column pressure drop limits the kinetic performance of supercritical fluid chromatography and complicates the optimization of tubing ID, which is based on a trade-off between extra-column band broadening and pressure drop. One of the most important practical consequences is the non-linear increase in extra-column pressure drop over the tubing downstream of the column which leads to an unexpected increase in average column pressure and mobile phase density, and thus decrease in retention. For close eluting components with a significantly different dependence of retention on density, the selectivity can significantly be affected by this increase in average pressure. In addition, the occurrence of turbulent flow is also observed in the detector cell and connection tubing. This results in a noise-increase by a factor of four when going from laminar to turbulent flow (e.g. going

  2. Retrograde flow detection in the radial artery as a means to assess palmar collateral circulation in newborn infants.

    PubMed

    Hack, W W; Leenhoven, T; vd Lei, J; Okken, A

    1990-01-01

    The aim of this clinical study was to determine whether Doppler ultrasound can be used in newborn infants to assess the adequacy of palmar collateral circulation. Retrograde flow in the radial artery, distal to the site of manual occlusion of the vessel, was studied by Doppler technique. Forty-seven newborn infants, who underwent percutaneous radial artery cannulation were studied. Prior to cannulation palmar collateral circulation was tested in each infant, using the timed Allen test and was considered to be adequate. Pulsatile retrograde flow could be demonstrated in 11 out of 47 infants, but not in 36 of the 47 studied. During the period of cannulation none of the infants showed any sign of vascular insufficiency of the hand. It can be concluded that in newborn infants, the detection of pulsatile retrograde flow in the radial artery, using a Doppler flow meter, does not appear to have advantages over the Allen test as an indicator of adequate palmar collateral circulation.

  3. Rhamnolipid biosurfactant analysis using online turbulent flow chromatography-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Beate; Helmer, Patrick O; Tiso, Till; Blank, Lars M; Hayen, Heiko

    2016-09-23

    Rhamnolipids are biosurfactants produced by a variety of bacterial species that present a promising alternative to surfactants from petrochemical or oleochemical origin. The success of the fermentation is evaluated by subsequent qualitative and quantitative analysis. However, the sample preparation for high numbers of samples is often laborious and inefficient. In this study an online sample preparation is developed for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of rhamnolipids by LC-MS/MS. Online sample preparation is carried out on a TurboFlow Cyclone MAX column using turbulent flow chromatography. Sample preparation prior the analysis is minimized to a dilution and syringe filtration step leading to an instrumental analysis time of 33min. The limit of detection and the limit of quantification were 0.4ng and 0.6ng on column, respectively. Recovery of the main mono- and di-rhamnolipids from a fermentation sample was 102-104%. Additionally, the rhamnolipid biosynthetic precursors 3-hydroxy(alkanoyloxy)alkanoic acids (HAAs) are covered, albeit extraction is not quantitative (85-90%). The analysis of rhamnolipids from four different microbial species was in good agreement with previous reports. The presented method allows rapid and comprehensive analysis of rhamnolipids with minimal sample preparation directly from the fermentation broth. The application of complementary data-dependent MS/MS acquisition enables non-target screening of rhamnolipids.

  4. Rhamnolipid biosurfactant analysis using online turbulent flow chromatography-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Beate; Helmer, Patrick O; Tiso, Till; Blank, Lars M; Hayen, Heiko

    2016-09-23

    Rhamnolipids are biosurfactants produced by a variety of bacterial species that present a promising alternative to surfactants from petrochemical or oleochemical origin. The success of the fermentation is evaluated by subsequent qualitative and quantitative analysis. However, the sample preparation for high numbers of samples is often laborious and inefficient. In this study an online sample preparation is developed for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of rhamnolipids by LC-MS/MS. Online sample preparation is carried out on a TurboFlow Cyclone MAX column using turbulent flow chromatography. Sample preparation prior the analysis is minimized to a dilution and syringe filtration step leading to an instrumental analysis time of 33min. The limit of detection and the limit of quantification were 0.4ng and 0.6ng on column, respectively. Recovery of the main mono- and di-rhamnolipids from a fermentation sample was 102-104%. Additionally, the rhamnolipid biosynthetic precursors 3-hydroxy(alkanoyloxy)alkanoic acids (HAAs) are covered, albeit extraction is not quantitative (85-90%). The analysis of rhamnolipids from four different microbial species was in good agreement with previous reports. The presented method allows rapid and comprehensive analysis of rhamnolipids with minimal sample preparation directly from the fermentation broth. The application of complementary data-dependent MS/MS acquisition enables non-target screening of rhamnolipids. PMID:27567141

  5. Radial patterns of sap flow in woody stems of dominant and understory species: scaling errors associated with positioning of sensors.

    PubMed

    Nadezhdina, Nadezhda; Cermák, Jan; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2002-09-01

    We studied sap flow in dominant coniferous (Pinus sylvestris L.) and broadleaf (Populus canescens L.) species and in understory species (Prunus serotina Ehrh. and Rhododendron ponticum L.) by the heat field deformation (HFD) method. We attempted to identify possible errors arising during flow integration and scaling from single-point measurements to whole trees. Large systematic errors of -90 to 300% were found when it was assumed that sap flow was uniform over the sapwood depth. Therefore, we recommend that the radial sap flow pattern should be determined first using sensors with multiple measuring points along a stem radius followed by single-point measurements with sensors placed at a predetermined depth. Other significant errors occurred in the scaling procedure even when the sap flow radial pattern was known. These included errors associated with uncertainties in the positioning of sensors beneath the cambium (up to 15% per 1 mm error in estimated xylem depth), and differences in environmental conditions when the radial profile applied for integration was determined over the short term (up to 47% error). High temporal variation in the point-to-area correction factor along the xylem radius used for flow integration is also problematic. Compared with midday measurements, measurements of radial variation of sap flow in the morning and evening of sunny days minimized the influence of temporal variations on the point-to-area correction factor, which was especially pronounced in trees with a highly asymmetric sap flow radial pattern because of differences in functioning of the sapwood xylem layers. Positioning a single-point sensor at a depth with maximum sap flow is advantageous because of the high sensitivity of maximum sap flow to water stress conditions and changes in micro-climate, and because of the lower random errors associated with the positioning of a single-point sensor along the xylem radius. PMID:12204847

  6. Systematic radial flows in the chromosphere, transition region, and corona of the quiet sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassler, Donald M.; Rottman, Gary J.; Orrall, Frank Q.

    1991-05-01

    An observational study of the systematic radial flows representative of the quiet sun's chromosphere, transition region, and corona is presented. A sounding rocket experiment (July 27, 1987) obtained high-resolution EUV spectra along a solar diameter with spatial resolution of 20 x 20 arcsec. The center-to-limb behavior of four representative lines (Si II 1533 A, Fe II 1563 A, C IV 1548 A, Ne VIII 770 A formed at different heights in the solar atmosphere is discussed. Assuming that horizontal motions cancel statistically so that the line-of-sight velocity approaches zero at the limb, the net radial downflow is approximately 7.5 + or - 1.0 km/s for C IV, 2.7 + or - 1.5 km/s for Fe II 1563 A, and upper limits of 0 + or - 1.2 km/s and 0 + or - 4 km/s for Si II and Ne VIII, respectively. The absolute wavelengths of each emission line were determined by direct comparison with wavelengths of known platinum lines generated by an inflight calibration lamp. The assumption of line-of-sight velocity approaching zero at the limb is then tested by comparing the wavelengths with recently published laboratory rest wavelengths of the solar emission lines.

  7. Radial-radial single rotor turbine

    DOEpatents

    Platts, David A.

    2006-05-16

    A rotor for use in turbine applications has a radial compressor/pump having radially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and a radial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the radial compressor/pump flows. The rotor can, in some applications, be used to produce electrical power.

  8. Three-dimensional flow in radial turbomachinery and its impact on design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tan, Choon S.; Hawthorne, William

    1993-01-01

    In the two papers on the 'Theory of Blade Design for Large Deflections' published in 1984, a new inverse design technique was presented for designing the shape of turbomachinery blades in three-dimensional flow. The technique involves the determination of the blade profile from the specification of a distribution of the product of the radius and the pitched averaged tangential velocity (i.e., r bar-V(sub theta), the mean swirl schedule) within the bladed region. This is in contrast to the conventional inverse design technique for turbomachinery blading in two dimensional flow in which the blade surface pressure or velocity distribution is specified and the blade profile determined as a result; this is feasible in two-dimensional flow because the streamlines along the blade surfaces are known a priori. However, in three-dimensional flow, the stream surface is free to deform within the blade passage so that the streamlines on the blade surfaces are not known a priori; thus it is difficult and not so useful to prescribe the blade surface pressure or velocity distribution and determine the resulting blade profile. It therefore seems logical to prescribe the swirl schedule within the bladed region for designing a turbomachinery blade profile in three-dimensional flow. Furthermore, specifying r bar-V(sub theta) has the following advantages: (1) it is related to the circulation around the blade (i.e., it is an aerodynamic quantity); (2) the work done or extracted is approximately proportional to the overall change in r bar-V(sub theta) across a given blade row (Euler turbine equation); and (3) the rate of change of r bar-V(sub theta) along the mean streamline at the blade is related to the pressure jump across the blade and therefore the blade loading. Since the publications of those two papers, the technique has been applied to the design of a low speed as well as a high speed radial inflow turbine (for turbocharger applications) both of which showed definite

  9. Accurate evaluation of viscoelasticity of radial artery wall during flow-mediated dilation in ultrasound measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yasumasa; Taki, Hirofumi; Kanai, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    In our previous study, the viscoelasticity of the radial artery wall was estimated to diagnose endothelial dysfunction using a high-frequency (22 MHz) ultrasound device. In the present study, we employed a commercial ultrasound device (7.5 MHz) and estimated the viscoelasticity using arterial pressure and diameter, both of which were measured at the same position. In a phantom experiment, the proposed method successfully estimated the elasticity and viscosity of the phantom with errors of 1.8 and 30.3%, respectively. In an in vivo measurement, the transient change in the viscoelasticity was measured for three healthy subjects during flow-mediated dilation (FMD). The proposed method revealed the softening of the arterial wall originating from the FMD reaction within 100 s after avascularization. These results indicate the high performance of the proposed method in evaluating vascular endothelial function just after avascularization, where the function is difficult to be estimated by a conventional FMD measurement.

  10. Experiments on Thermal Convection in Rotating Spherical Shells With Radial Gravity: The Geophysical Fluid Flow Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, John E.

    1996-01-01

    Experiments designed to study the fluid dynamics of buoyancy driven circulations in rotating spherical shells were conducted on the United States Microgravity Laboratory 2 spacelab mission. These experiments address several aspects of prototypical global convection relevant to large scale motions on the Sun, Earth, and on the giant planets. The key feature is the consistent modeling of radially directed gravity in spherical geometry by using dielectric polarization forces. Imagery of the planforms of thermally driven flows for rapidly-rotating regimes shows an initial separation and eventual merger of equatorial and polar convection as the heating (i.e. the Rayleigh number) is increased. At low rotation rates, multiple-states of motion for the same external parameters were observed.

  11. Acoustic geometry through perturbation of mass accretion rate: radial flow in static spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananda, Deepika B.; Bhattacharya, Sourav; Das, Tapas K.

    2015-09-01

    In this work we present an alternative derivation of the general relativistic acoustic analogue geometry by perturbing the mass accretion rate or flux of an ideal fluid flowing radially in a general static and spherically symmetric spacetime. To the best of our knowledge, this has so far been done in non-relativistic scenario. The resulting causal structure of the two dimensional acoustic geometry is qualitatively similar to that one derives via the perturbation of the velocity potential. Using this, we then briefly discuss the stability issues by studying the wave configurations generated by the perturbation of the mass accretion rate, and formally demonstrate the stability of the accretion process. This is in qualitative agreement with earlier results on stability, established via study of wave configurations generated by the perturbation of velocity potential, by using the acoustic geometry associated with it. We further discuss explicit examples of the Schwarzschild and Rindler spacetimes.

  12. Estimated Performance of Radial-Flow Exit Nozzles for Air in Chemical Equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englert, Gerald W.; Kochendorfer, Fred D.

    1959-01-01

    The thrust, boundary-layer, and heat-transfer characteristics were computed for nozzles having radial flow in the divergent part. The working medium was air in chemical equilibrium, and the boundary layer was assumed to be all turbulent. Stagnation pressure was varied from 1 to 32 atmospheres, stagnation temperature from 1000 to 6000 R, and wall temperature from 1000 to 3000 R. Design pressure ratio was varied from 5 to 320, and operating pressure ratio was varied from 0.25 to 8 times the design pressure ratio. Results were generalized independent of divergence angle and were also generalized independent of stagnation pressure in the temperature range of 1000 to 3000 R. A means of determining the aerodynamically optimum wall angle is provided.

  13. Aerodynamic design of turbomachinery blading in three-dimensional flow - An application to radial inflow turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Y. L.; Tan, C. S.; Hawthorne, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    A computational method, based on a theory for turbomachinery blading design in three-dimensional inviscid flow, is applied to a parametric design study of a radial inflow turbine wheel. As the method requires the specification of swirl distribution, a technique for its smooth generation within the blade region is proposed. Excellent agreements have been obtained between the computed results from this design method and those from direct Euler computations, demonstrating the correspondence and consistency between the two. The computed results indicate the sensitivity of the pressure distribution to a lean in the stacking axis and a minor alteration in the hub/shroud profiles. Analysis based on Navier-Stokes solver shows no breakdown of flow within the designed blade passage and agreement with that from design calculation; thus the flow in the designed turbine rotor closely approximates that of an inviscid one. These calculations illustrate the use of a design method coupled to an analysis tool for establishing guidelines and criteria for designing turbomachinery blading.

  14. Performance back-deduction from a loading to flow coefficient map: Application to radial turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbonneau, Xavier; Binder, Nicolas

    2012-12-01

    Radial turbine stages are often used for applications requiring off-design operation, as turbocharging for instance. The off-design ability of such stages is commonly analyzed through the traditional turbine map, plotting the reduced mass-flow against the pressure-ratio, for reduced-speed lines. However, some alternatives are possible, such as the flow-coefficient ( Ψ) to loading-coefficient ( φ) diagram where the pressure-ratio lines are actually straight lines, very convenient property to perform prediction. A robust method re-creating this map from a predicted Ψ-φ diagram is needed. Recent work has shown that this back-deduction quality, without the use of any loss models, depends on the knowledge of an intermediate pressure-ratio. A modelization of this parameter is then proposed. The comparison with both experimental and CFD results is presented, with quite good agreement for mass flow rate and rotational speed, and for the intermediate pressure ratio. The last part of the paper is dedicated to the application of the intermediate pressure-ratio knowledge to the improvement of the deduction of the pressure ratio lines in the Ψ-φ diagram. Beside this improvement, the back-deduction method of the classical map is structured, applied and evaluated.

  15. PIV investigation of the flow induced by a passive surge control method in a radial compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillou, Erwann; Gancedo, Matthieu; Gutmark, Ephraim; Mohamed, Ashraf

    2012-09-01

    Due to recent emission regulations, the use of turbochargers for force induction of internal combustion engines has increased. Actually, the trend in diesel engines is to downsize the engine by use of turbochargers that operate at higher pressure ratios. Unfortunately, increasing the impeller rotational speed of turbocharger radial compressors tends to reduce their range of operation, which is limited at low mass flow rate by the occurrence of surge. In order to extend the operability of turbochargers, compressor housings can be equipped with a passive surge control device such as a "ported shroud." This specific casing treatment has been demonstrated to enhance the surge margin with minor negative impact on the compressor efficiency. However, the actual working mechanisms of the system remain not well understood. Hence, in order to optimize the design of the ported shroud, it is crucial to identify the dynamic flow changes induced by the implementation of the device to control instabilities. From the full dynamic survey of the compressor performance characteristics obtained with and without ported shroud, specific points of operation were selected to carry out planar flow visualization. At normal working, both standard and stereoscopic particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed to evaluate instantaneous and mean velocity flow fields at the inlet of the compressor. At incipient and full surge, phase-locked PIV measurements were added. As a result, satisfying characterization of the compressor instabilities was provided at different operational speeds. Combining transient pressure data and PIV measurements, the time evolution of the complex flow patterns occurring at surge was reconstructed and a better insight into the bypass mechanism was achieved.

  16. The vergence eye movements induced by radial optic flow: some fundamental properties of the underlying local-motion detectors.

    PubMed

    Kodaka, Y; Sheliga, B M; FitzGibbon, E J; Miles, F A

    2007-09-01

    Radial optic flow applied to large random dot patterns is known to elicit horizontal vergence eye movements at short latency, expansion causing convergence and contraction causing divergence: the Radial Flow Vergence Response (RFVR). We elicited RFVRs in human subjects by applying radial motion to concentric circular patterns whose radial luminance modulation was that of a square wave lacking the fundamental: the missing fundamental (mf) stimulus. The radial motion consisted of successive 1/4-wavelength steps, so that the overall pattern and the 4n+1 harmonics (where n=integer) underwent radial expansion (or contraction), whereas the 4n-1 harmonics--including the strongest Fourier component (the 3rd harmonic)--underwent the opposite radial motion. Radial motion commenced only after the subject had fixated the center of the pattern. The initial RFVRs were always in the direction of the 3rd harmonic, e.g., expansion of the mf pattern causing divergence. Thus, the earliest RFVRs were strongly dependent on the motion of the major Fourier component, consistent with early spatio-temporal filtering prior to motion detection, as in the well-known energy model of motion analysis. If the radial mf stimulus was reduced to just two competing harmonics--the 3rd and 5th--the initial RFVRs showed a nonlinear dependence on their relative contrasts: when the two harmonics differed in contrast by more than about an octave then the one with the higher contrast completely dominated the RFVRs and the one with lower contrast lost its influence: winner-take-all. We suggest that these nonlinear interactions result from mutual inhibition between the mechanisms sensing the motion of the different competing harmonics. If single radial-flow steps were used, a brief inter-stimulus interval resulted in reversed RFVRs, consistent with the idea that the motion detectors mediating these responses receive a visual input whose temporal impulse response function is strongly biphasic. Lastly, all of

  17. The hydraulic jump in radially spreading flow: A new model and new experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackford, B. L.

    1996-02-01

    A new model for the hydraulic jump in radially spreading flow is presented. The equation of motion for a liquid annulus spreading out under the influence of hydrostatic pressure gradient and Frictional drag is developed. The resulting nonlinear differential equation for the liquid depth, h(r), is solved by computer simulation. The jump is assumed to begin when the laminar flow is engulfed by the underlying boundary layer liquid, as suggested recently in the literature. This complicated mixing process is crudely modeled by a drag term which slows the flow and initiates a positive feedback mechanism culminating at a new critical depth, beyond which the depth increases asymptotically to a final value. The model predicts a new relationship between the laminar flow depth just before the jump and the final depth. An experimental apparatus was built to make detailed measurements of the depth h(r), both in the region before the jump and beyond the jump. The theoretical predictions were compared to the experimental data, and gave surprisingly good agreement by suitable adjustment of the two parameters k and C of the model. The parameter k determines the growth rate of the boundary layer thickness, and C determines the drag force. The results suggest that the usual textbook assumption of zero momentum loss across the jump is not appropriate for this type of hydraulic jump. The case of a hydraulic jump in the absence of gravity is considered also and a much different behavior is predicted, which could be tested by experiment in a microgravity environment.

  18. Radial pressure profiles in a cold‐flow gas‐solid vortex reactor

    PubMed Central

    Pantzali, Maria N.; Kovacevic, Jelena Z.; Marin, Guy B.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2015-01-01

    A unique normalized radial pressure profile characterizes the bed of a gas‐solid vortex reactor over a range of particle densities and sizes, solid capacities, and gas flow rates: 950–1240 kg/m3, 1–2 mm, 2 kg to maximum solids capacity, and 0.4–0.8 Nm3/s (corresponding to gas injection velocities of 55–110 m/s), respectively. The combined momentum conservation equations of both gas and solid phases predict this pressure profile when accounting for the corresponding measured particle velocities. The pressure profiles for a given type of particles and a given solids loading but for different gas injection velocities merge into a single curve when normalizing the pressures with the pressure value downstream of the bed. The normalized—with respect to the overall pressure drop—pressure profiles for different gas injection velocities in particle‐free flow merge in a unique profile. © 2015 The Authors AIChE Journal published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 61: 4114–4125, 2015 PMID:27667827

  19. Radial pressure profiles in a cold‐flow gas‐solid vortex reactor

    PubMed Central

    Pantzali, Maria N.; Kovacevic, Jelena Z.; Marin, Guy B.; Shtern, Vladimir N.

    2015-01-01

    A unique normalized radial pressure profile characterizes the bed of a gas‐solid vortex reactor over a range of particle densities and sizes, solid capacities, and gas flow rates: 950–1240 kg/m3, 1–2 mm, 2 kg to maximum solids capacity, and 0.4–0.8 Nm3/s (corresponding to gas injection velocities of 55–110 m/s), respectively. The combined momentum conservation equations of both gas and solid phases predict this pressure profile when accounting for the corresponding measured particle velocities. The pressure profiles for a given type of particles and a given solids loading but for different gas injection velocities merge into a single curve when normalizing the pressures with the pressure value downstream of the bed. The normalized—with respect to the overall pressure drop—pressure profiles for different gas injection velocities in particle‐free flow merge in a unique profile. © 2015 The Authors AIChE Journal published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 61: 4114–4125, 2015

  20. The Potential Effects of a Biofeedback Writing Exercise on Radial Artery Blood Flow and Neck Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Krullaards, Rob L.; Pel, Johan J. M.; Snijders, Chris J.; Kleinrensink, Gert-Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that sustained contraction of the deep neck muscles may reduce axial cervical range of motion (CROM) and radial artery blood flow velocity (vrad.art.mean). No studies have reported both phenomena in relation to acute hand, shoulder or neck trauma. Procedures: The CROM and vrad.art.mean were measured in 20 police officers prior to and immediately after a 2-hours drive on a motorcycle and immediately after a 1-minute writing exercise using biofeedback. The CROM was measured using separate inclinometers and the vrad.art.mean was measured in both arms just proximal to the wrist using echo-Doppler. Findings: During the study, one officer had a motorcycle accident resulting in acute symptoms of neck trauma. His vrad.art.mean was acutely reduced by 73% (right arm) and 45% (left arm). Writing with biofeedback increased his vrad.art.mean by 150% (right arm) and 80% (left arm). In the remaining 19 officers, the CROM to the right was significantly increased after the 2-hours driving task (p<0.05; paired subject t-test). Writing with biofeedback increased their CROM in both directions and vrad.art.mean in both arms (p<001). Conclusions: A 2-hours drive showed modest physical changes in the upper extremities. Biofeedback in writing tasks might relate to the influence of relaxation and diverting attention for neck mobility and arterial blood flow improvement. PMID:23675136

  1. Chromatography

    MedlinePlus

    Chromatography is a way of separating two or more chemical compounds. Chemical compounds are chemicals that are ... of chemical compound. There are different kinds of chromatography. These include gas, high pressure liquid, or ion ...

  2. Study of Radially Varying Magnetic Field on Blood Flow through Catheterized Tapered Elastic Artery with Overlapping Stenosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, S.; Ijaz, S.

    2015-11-01

    A precise model has been developed for studying the influence of metallic nanoparticles on blood flow through catheterized tapered elastic arteries with radially varying magnetic field. The model is solved under the mild stenosis approximation by considering blood as viscous fluid. The influence of different flow parameters associated with this problem such as Hartmann number, nanoparticle volume fraction, Grashof number and heat source or sink parameter is analyzed by plotting the graphs of the wall shear stress, resistance impedance to blood flow and stream lines. The influence of the radially varying magnetic field on resistance impedance to flow is analyzed and it is observed that the significantly strong magnetic force tends to increase in resistance.

  3. Evaluation of Radial Flow Fluidized Filter (R3F) Followed by Microfiltration and Ultrafiltration Systems in Calimesa, California

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. EPA coordinated a field study with South Mesa Water Utility to look for treatment alternatives for California State Project Water in the small community of Calimesa, California. EPA evaluated the performance of a system comprised of Radial Flow Fluidized Filtration (R3f) fo...

  4. 1r2dinv: A finite-difference model for inverse analysis of two dimensional linear or radial groundwater flow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohling, G.C.; Butler, J.J.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a program for inverse analysis of two-dimensional linear or radial groundwater flow problems. The program, 1r2dinv, uses standard finite difference techniques to solve the groundwater flow equation for a horizontal or vertical plane with heterogeneous properties. In radial mode, the program simulates flow to a well in a vertical plane, transforming the radial flow equation into an equivalent problem in Cartesian coordinates. The physical parameters in the model are horizontal or x-direction hydraulic conductivity, anisotropy ratio (vertical to horizontal conductivity in a vertical model, y-direction to x-direction in a horizontal model), and specific storage. The program allows the user to specify arbitrary and independent zonations of these three parameters and also to specify which zonal parameter values are known and which are unknown. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm is used to estimate parameters from observed head values. Particularly powerful features of the program are the ability to perform simultaneous analysis of heads from different tests and the inclusion of the wellbore in the radial mode. These capabilities allow the program to be used for analysis of suites of well tests, such as multilevel slug tests or pumping tests in a tomographic format. The combination of information from tests stressing different vertical levels in an aquifer provides the means for accurately estimating vertical variations in conductivity, a factor profoundly influencing contaminant transport in the subsurface. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Flow Characterization and Dynamic Analysis of a Radial Compressor with Passive Method of Surge Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillou, Erwann

    Due to recent emission regulations, the use of turbochargers for force induction of internal combustion engines has increased. Actually, the trend in diesel engines is to downsize the engine by use of turbochargers that operate at higher pressure ratio. Unfortunately, increasing the rotational speed tends to reduce the turbocharger radial compressor range of operation which is limited at low mass flow rate by the occurrence of surge. In order to extent the operability of turbochargers, compressor housings can be equipped with a passive surge control device also known as ported shroud. This specific casing treatment has been demonstrated to enhance surge margin with minor negative impact on the compressor efficiency. However, the actual working mechanisms of the bypass system remain not well understood. In order to optimize the design of the ported shroud, it is then crucial to identify the dynamic flow changes induced by the implementation of the device to control instabilities. Experimental methods were used to assess the development of instabilities from stable, stall and eventually surge regimes of a ported shroud centrifugal compressor. Systematic comparison was conducted with the same compressor design without ported shroud. Hence, the full pressure dynamic survey of both compressors' performance characteristics converged toward two different and probably interrelated driving mechanisms to the development and/or propagation of unsteadiness within each compressor. One related the pressure disturbances at the compressor inlet, and notably the more apparent development of perturbations in the non-ported compressor impeller, whereas the other was attributed to the pressure distortions induced by the presence of the tongue in the asymmetric design of the compressor volute. Specific points of operation were selected to carry out planar flow measurements. At normal working, both standard and stereoscopic particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) measurements were performed

  6. Experimental evaluation of connectivity influence on dispersivity under confined and unconfined radial convergent flow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzzi, Silvia; Molinari, Antonio; Fallico, Carmine; Pedretti, Daniele

    2014-05-01

    Heterogeneity and connectivity have a significant impact on the fate and transport of contaminants due to the occurrence of formations with largest permeability than the surrounding geological materials, which can originate preferential pathways in groundwater system. These issues are usually addressed by tracer tests and a radial convergent (RC) flow setting is typically selected for convenience but more complicated for model interpretation than uniform flow transport. An experimental investigation was performed using RC tracer tests in a 3D intermediate scale physical model to illustrate the role of connected features on the estimation of dispersivity using the classical Sauty solution and the method of moments, under confined and unconfined aquifer conditions. The physical model consists of 26 piezometers located at difference distances from a constant-discharge central pumping well. The box is filled with gravel channels embedded in a sandy matrix and organized in different layers. Materials have been well characterized before and after the test. For the confined configuration, a silt layer was placed above the previous layers. Tracer tests were performed using potassium iodide solutions with concentration of 3•10-3 M and under a constant pumping flow rate of 0.05 L/s. To mimic a pulse injection in each piezometer we used syringes and pipes, whereas a probe allowed continuous measuring of tracer concentration. Average velocity and longitudinal dispersion coefficient were defined from the first and second central moment of the observed breakthrough curves for each piezometer (integrated over the outflow boundary of the domain) and using the classical curve matching from the Sauty's solution at different Péclet numbers. Results reveal in some cases that estimates of hydrodynamic parameters from the Sauty solution and the method of moments seem to be different. This is related to the different basic assumptions of the two methods applied, and especially because

  7. Hepatic reconstruction from fetal porcine liver cells using a radial flow bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Yuji; Saito, Ryota; Marushima, Hideki; Ito, Ryusuke; Sakamoto, Taro; Yanaga, Katsuhiko

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To examine the efficacy of the radial flow bioreactor (RFB) as an extracorporeal bioartificial liver (BAL) and the reconstruction of liver organoids using embryonic pig liver cells. METHODS: We reconstructed the liver organoids using embryonic porcine liver cells in the RFB. We also determined the gestational time window for the optimum growth of embryonic porcine liver cells. Five weeks of gestation was designated as embryonic day (E) 35 and 8 wk of gestation was designated as E56. These cells were cultured for one week before morphological and functional examinations. Moreover, the efficacy of pulsed administration of a high concentration hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) was examined. RESULTS: Both cell growth and function were excellent after harvesting on E35. The pulsed administration of a high concentration of HGF promoted the differentiation and maturation of these fetal hepatic cells. Microscopic examination of organoids in the RFB revealed palisading and showed that bile duct-like structures were well developed, indicating that the organoids were mini livers. Transmission electron microscopy revealed microvilli on the luminal surfaces of bile duct-like structures and junctional complexes, which form the basis of the cytoskeleton of epithelial tissues. Furthermore, strong expression of connexin (Cx) 32, which is the main protein of hepatocyte gap junctions, was observed. With respect to liver function, ammonia detoxification and urea synthesis were shown to be performed effectively. CONCLUSION: Our system can potentially be applied in the fields of BAL and transplantation medicine. PMID:18461659

  8. A Miniature Radial-Flow Wind Turbine Using Piezoelectric Transducers and Magnetic Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, H.; Yeatman, E. M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a miniature radial-flow piezoelectric wind turbine for harvesting airflow energy. The turbine's transduction is achieved by magnetic “plucking”of a piezoelectric beam by the passing rotor. The magnetic coupling is formed by two magnets on the beam's free end and on the rotor plate. Frequency up-conversion is realized by the magnetic excitation, allowing the rotor to rotate at any low frequency while the beam can vibrate at its resonant frequency after each plucking. The operating range of the device is, therefore, expanded by this mechanism. Two arrangements of magnetic orientation have been investigated, showing that the repulsive arrangement has higher output power. The influence of the vertical gap between magnets was also examined, providing guidance for the final design. A prototype was built and tested in a wind tunnel. A peak power output of 159 μW was obtained with a 270 kΩ load at 2.7 m/s airflow speed. The device started working at 3.5 m/s and kept operating when the airflow speed fell to 1.84 m/s.

  9. Radially symmetric excitation and collection optics for flow cytometric sorting of aspherical cells.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, J C; Schaare, P N; Künnemeyer, R

    1997-12-01

    We report on a new optical configuration for sorting flow cytometers which is optimized for the illumination and collection of light from aspherical cells. This design provides radially symmetric illumination and detection of asymmetric particles while retaining the sort capability of a jet-in-air (or cylindrical cuvette) design. A paraboloidal reflector, symmetrical about the sample stream, both focuses a laser excitation beam and collects cell scatter and fluorescence from the inspection point. The performance of the new optical configuration has been tested and compared to that of a modified commercial flow cytometer, which uses a forward-side fluorescence collection geometry. For fluorescence measurements on calibration microspheres the new system produces histograms with similar coefficients of variation to those obtained with the modified conventional cytometer. Optical artifacts apparent in measurements on flat cells, such as blood cells and mammalian sperm, using conventional optics, are eliminated by the new configuration. Analysis of chinchilla sperm yields a dual-peaked histogram population that has a coefficient of variation and X-Y split which matches that for gated (oriented) fraction of the sample as measured by the conventional system. Bovine sperm, which are larger and flatter than chinchilla sperm, also produce a single population which, when low sample-to-sheath differential pressures are used, has coefficients of variation matching those for an oriented subpopulation as measured by conventional optics. This new optical configuration presents an alternative technique for measuring aspherical cells independent of their orientation, with the potential for higher analysis rates and improved efficiency compared to other optical systems. PMID:9415419

  10. Linear stability of a circular Couette flow under a radial thermoelectric body force.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, H N; Meyer, A; Crumeyrolle, O; Mutabazi, I

    2015-03-01

    The stability of the circular Couette flow of a dielectric fluid is analyzed by a linear perturbation theory. The fluid is confined between two concentric cylindrical electrodes of infinite length with only the inner one rotating. A temperature difference and an alternating electric tension are applied to the electrodes to produce a radial dielectrophoretic body force that can induce convection in the fluid. We examine the effects of superposition of this thermoelectric force with the centrifugal force including its thermal variation. The Earth's gravity is neglected to focus on the situations of a vanishing Grashof number such as microgravity conditions. Depending on the electric field strength and of the temperature difference, critical modes are either axisymmetric or nonaxisymmetric, occurring in either stationary or oscillatory states. An energetic analysis is performed to determine the dominant destabilizing mechanism. When the inner cylinder is hotter than the outer one, the circular Couette flow is destabilized by the centrifugal force for weak and moderate electric fields. The critical mode is steady axisymmetric, except for weak fields within a certain range of the Prandtl number and of the radius ratio of the cylinders, where the mode is oscillatory and axisymmetric. The frequency of this oscillatory mode is correlated with a Brunt-Väisälä frequency due to the stratification of both the density and the electric permittivity of the fluid. Under strong electric fields, the destabilization by the dielectrophoretic force is dominant, leading to oscillatory nonaxisymmetric critical modes with a frequency scaled by the frequency of the inner-cylinder rotation. When the outer cylinder is hotter than the inner one, the instability is again driven by the centrifugal force. The critical mode is axisymmetric and either steady under weak electric fields or oscillatory under strong electric fields. The frequency of the oscillatory mode is also correlated with the

  11. Aerothermal investigations of mixing flow phenomena in case of radially inclined ejection holes at the leading edge

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, D.E.; Kusterer, K.A.

    2000-04-01

    A leading edge cooling configuration is investigated numerically by application of a three-dimensional conjugate fluid flow and heat transfer solver, CHT-flow. The code has been developed at the Institute of Steam and Gas Turbines, Aachen University of Technology. It works on the basis of an implicit finite volume method combined with a multi-block technique. The cooling configuration is an axial turbine blade cascade with leading edge ejection through two rows of cooling holes. The rows are located in the vicinity of the stagnation line, one row on the suction side, the other row is on the pressure side. the cooling holes have a radial ejection angle of 45 degrees. This configuration has been investigated experimentally by other authors and the results have been documented as a test case for numerical calculations of ejection flow phenomena. The numerical investigations focus on the aerothermal mixing process in the cooling jets and the impact on the temperature distribution on the blade surface. The radial ejection angles lead to a fully three-dimensional and asymmetric jet flow field. Within a secondary flow analysis, the cooling fluid jets are investigated in detail. The secondary flow fields include asymmetric kidney vortex systems with one dominating vortex on the back side of the jets. The numerical and experimental data show a respectable agreement concerning the vortex development.

  12. Anatomical features that facilitate radial flow across growth rings and from xylem to cambium in Cryptomeria japonica

    PubMed Central

    Kitin, Peter; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Abe, Hisashi; Takata, Katsuhiko

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Although the lateral movement of water and gas in tree stems is an important issue for understanding tree physiology, as well as for the development of wood preservation technologies, little is known about the vascular pathways for radial flow. The aim of the current study was to understand the occurrence and the structure of anatomical features of sugi (Cryptomeria japonica) wood including the tracheid networks, and area fractions of intertracheary pits, tangential walls of ray cells and radial intercellular spaces that may be related to the radial permeability (conductivity) of the xylem. Methods Wood structure was investigated by light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of traditional wood anatomical preparations and by a new method of exposed tangential faces of growth-ring boundaries. Key Results Radial wall pitting and radial grain in earlywood and tangential wall pitting in latewood provide a direct connection between subsequent tangential layers of tracheids. Bordered pit pairs occur frequently between earlywood and latewood tracheids on both sides of a growth-ring boundary. In the tangential face of the xylem at the interface with the cambium, the area fraction of intertracheary pit membranes is similar to that of rays (2·8 % and 2·9 %, respectively). The intercellular spaces of rays are continuous across growth-ring boundaries. In the samples, the mean cross-sectional area of individual radial intercellular spaces was 1·2 µm2 and their total volume was 0·06 % of that of the xylem and 2·07 % of the volume of rays. Conclusions A tracheid network can provide lateral apoplastic transport of substances in the secondary xylem of sugi. The intertracheid pits in growth-ring boundaries can be considered an important pathway, distinct from that of the rays, for transport of water across growth rings and from xylem to cambium. PMID:19258338

  13. Characterization of azimuthal and radial velocity fields induced by rotors in flows with a low Reynolds number.

    PubMed

    Köhler, J; Friedrich, J; Ostendorf, A; Gurevich, E L

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the flow field that emerges from a rodlike microrotor rotating about its center in a nonaxisymmetric manner. A simple theoretical model is proposed that uses a superposition of two rotlets as a fundamental solution to the Stokes equation. The predictions of this model are compared to measurements of the azimuthal and radial microfluidic velocity field components that are induced by a rotor composed of fused microscopic spheres. The rotor is driven magnetically and the fluid flow is measured with the help of a probe particle fixed by an optical tweezer. We find considerable deviations of the mere azimuthal flow pattern induced by a single rotating sphere as it has been reported by Di Leonardo et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 134502 (2006)]. Notably, the presence of a radial velocity component that manifests itself by an oscillation of the probe particle with twice the rotor frequency is observed. These findings open up a way to discuss possible radial transport in microfluidic devices.

  14. Characterization of azimuthal and radial velocity fields induced by rotors in flows with a low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J.; Friedrich, J.; Ostendorf, A.; Gurevich, E. L.

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically and experimentally investigate the flow field that emerges from a rodlike microrotor rotating about its center in a nonaxisymmetric manner. A simple theoretical model is proposed that uses a superposition of two rotlets as a fundamental solution to the Stokes equation. The predictions of this model are compared to measurements of the azimuthal and radial microfluidic velocity field components that are induced by a rotor composed of fused microscopic spheres. The rotor is driven magnetically and the fluid flow is measured with the help of a probe particle fixed by an optical tweezer. We find considerable deviations of the mere azimuthal flow pattern induced by a single rotating sphere as it has been reported by Di Leonardo et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 134502 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.134502]. Notably, the presence of a radial velocity component that manifests itself by an oscillation of the probe particle with twice the rotor frequency is observed. These findings open up a way to discuss possible radial transport in microfluidic devices.

  15. Evaluation of multi-well test data in a faulted aquifer using linear and radial flow models

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.M.; Michel, F.A.

    1998-11-01

    An extensive drilling and testing program was undertaken at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada, to characterize the aquifer for the design of an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system. The substantial data base provides an excellent record of well yields and hydraulic responses to a series of aquifer tests in a faulted carbonate aquifer. Well yield variability is reflected in the wide range in specific capacity and is dependent upon the proximity of a well to a major fault. Constant discharge data, available for nine pumping wells and several observation wells, reflect both the excellent hydraulic connection along major faults and the limited hydraulic connection between fault blocks. Three different flow models, including vertical fracture and vertical dyke (linear), and Theis (radial), are used to interpret constant discharge test data from nine pumping wells and several observation wells. In all tests, the duration of pumping is sufficient to identify early-time linear flow along faults and late-time pseudo-radial flow between fault blocks. This paper demonstrates the influence of fault-induced heterogeneity on the hydraulic response of a carbonate aquifer and demonstrates the application and limitation of simple radial continuum models to aquifers of this type.

  16. Bisferiens peaks in the radial artery pressure wave during patent ductus arteriosus in newborn infants: relationship with ascending aortic flow.

    PubMed

    Gevers, M; van der Mooren, K; Stergiopulos, N; Van Genderingen, H R; Lafeber, H N; Hack, W W; Westerhof, N

    1996-07-01

    Previously, we found evidence that bisferiens peaks in the radial artery pressure wave in the newborn infant may suggest the presence of a left-to-right shunt through a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). The purpose of the present study was to analyze the origin of this pulsus bisferiens. Starting from the assumption that the radial artery pressure wave form is similar to the aortic pressure wave form, as described previously, we attempted to explain the bisferiens peaks on the basis of echocardiographically obtained ascending aortic flow. We studied 11 preterm mechanically ventilated infants with a left-to-right shunt through a PDA and 7 without. Aortic volume flow was established echocardiographically, and radial artery blood pressure measurement was performed with a high fidelity cathetermanometer system. Ascending aortic peak flow during PDA was significantly higher in the case of PDA, compared with the case without PDA. An augmented peak flow with an abrupt decline after the high peak in PDA, resulting in a sharp pressure peak with a steep decline after the peak, was thought to explain the first sharp peak of pulsus bisferiens. An abrupt decline of flow after peak flow is thought to be due to the fast runoff of blood through the ductus. According to the pulsatile pressure dynamics theories, which state that pressure wave forms consist of forward and backward wave forms, the second peak of the pulsus bisferiens can be explained by the return of the reflected (backward) wave form when the forward wave form has already considerably decreased. We conclude that the bisferiens peaks found in PDA result from a combination of large stroke volume (augmented first peak) and large runoff (quick decline of the forward wave) before the return of the reflected wave.

  17. Measurement of the Md3+/Md2+ reduction potential studied with flow electrolytic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Atsushi; Li, Zijie; Asai, Masato; Sato, Nozomi; Sato, Tetsuya K; Kikuchi, Takahiro; Kaneya, Yusuke; Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Nagame, Yuichiro; Schädel, Matthias; Ooe, Kazuhiro; Kasamatsu, Yoshitaka; Shinohara, Atsushi; Haba, Hiromitsu; Even, Julia

    2013-11-01

    The reduction behavior of mendelevium (Md) was studied using a flow electrolytic chromatography apparatus. By application of the appropriate potentials on the chromatography column, the more stable Md(3+) is reduced to Md(2+). The reduction potential of the Md(3+) + e(-) → Md(2+) couple was determined to be -0.16 ± 0.05 V versus a normal hydrogen electrode. PMID:24116851

  18. Results from Evaluation of Representative ASME AG-1 Section FK Radial Flow Dimple Pleated HEPA Filters Under Elevated Conditions - 12002

    SciTech Connect

    Giffin, Paxton K.; Parsons, Michael S.; Rickert, Jaime G.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2012-07-01

    The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) has recently added Section FK establishing requirements for radial flow HEPA filters to the Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1). Section FK filters are expected to be a major element in the HEPA filtration systems across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Radial flow filters have been used in Europe for some time, however a limited amount of performance evaluation data exists with respect to these new AG-1 Section FK units. In consultation with a technical working group, the Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) at Mississippi State University (MSU)has evaluated a series of representative AG-1 Section FK dimple pleated radial flow HEPA filters. The effects of elevated relative humidity and temperature conditions on these filters are particularly concerning. Results from the evaluation of Section FK filters under ambient conditions have been presented at the 2011 waste management conference. Additions to the previous test stand to enable high temperature and high humidity testing, a review of the equipment used, the steps taken to characterize the new additions, and the filter test results are presented in this study. Test filters were evaluated at a volumetric flow rate of 56.6 m{sup 3}/min (2000 cfm) and were challenged under ambient conditions with Alumina, Al(OH){sub 3}, until reaching a differential pressure of 1 kPa (4 in. w.c.), at which time the filters were tested, unchallenged with aerosol, at 54 deg. C (130 deg. F) for approximately 1 hour. At the end of that hour water was sprayed near the heat source to maximize vaporization exposing the filter to an elevated relative humidity up to 95%. Collected data include differential pressure, temperature, relative humidity, and volumetric flow rate versus time. (authors)

  19. A comparison of the calculated and experimental off-design performance of a radial flow turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tirres, Lizet

    1992-01-01

    Off design aerodynamic performance of the solid version of a cooled radial inflow turbine is analyzed. Rotor surface static pressure data and other performance parameters were obtained experimentally. Overall stage performance and turbine blade surface static to inlet total pressure ratios were calculated by using a quasi-three dimensional inviscid code. The off design prediction capability of this code for radial inflow turbines shows accurate static pressure prediction. Solutions show a difference of 3 to 5 points between the experimentally obtained efficiencies and the calculated values.

  20. A comparison of the calculated and experimental off-design performance of a radial flow turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tirres, Lizet

    1991-01-01

    Off design aerodynamic performance of the solid version of a cooled radial inflow turbine is analyzed. Rotor surface static pressure data and other performance parameters were obtained experimentally. Overall stage performance and turbine blade surface static to inlet total pressure ratios were calculated by using a quasi-three dimensional inviscid code. The off design prediction capability of this code for radial inflow turbines shows accurate static pressure prediction. Solutions show a difference of 3 to 5 points between the experimentally obtained efficiencies and the calculated values.

  1. A Galerkin finite-element flow model to predict the transient response of a radially symmetric aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reilly, Thomas E.

    1984-01-01

    A computer program developed to evaluate radial flow of ground water, such as at a pumping well, recharge basin, or injection well, is capable of simulating anisotropic, inhomogenous, confined, or pseudo-unconfined (constant saturated thickness) conditions. Results compare well with those calculated from published analytical and model solutions. The program is based on the Galerkin finite-element technique. A sample model run is presented to illustrate the use of the program; supplementary material provides the program listing as well as a sample problem data set and output. From the text and other material presented, one can use the program to predict drawdowns from pumping and ground-water buildups from recharge in a radially symmetric ground-water system.

  2. Short-latency vergence eye movements induced by radial optic flow in humans: dependence on ambient vergence level.

    PubMed

    Yang, D; Fitzgibbon, E J; Miles, F A

    1999-02-01

    Radial patterns of optic flow, such as those experienced by moving observers who look in the direction of heading, evoke vergence eye movements at short latency. We have investigated the dependence of these responses on the ambient vergence level. Human subjects faced a large tangent screen onto which two identical random-dot patterns were back-projected. A system of crossed polarizers ensured that each eye saw only one of the patterns, with mirror galvanometers to control the horizontal positions of the images and hence the vergence angle between the two eyes. After converging the subject's eyes at one of several distances ranging from 16.7 cm to infinity, both patterns were replaced with new ones (using a system of shutters and two additional projectors) so as to simulate the radial flow associated with a sudden 4% change in viewing distance with the focus of expansion/contraction imaged in or very near both foveas. Radial-flow steps induced transient vergence at latencies of 80-100 ms, expansions causing increases in convergence and contractions the converse. Based on the change in vergence 90-140 ms after the onset of the steps, responses were proportional to the preexisting vergence angle (and hence would be expected to be inversely proportional to viewing distance under normal conditions). We suggest that this property assists the observer who wants to fixate ahead while passing through a visually cluttered area (e.g., a forest) and so wants to avoid making vergence responses to the optic flow created by the nearby objects in the periphery.

  3. Pressure-flow relationships for packed beds of compressible chromatography media at laboratory and production scale.

    PubMed

    Stickel, J J; Fotopoulos, A

    2001-01-01

    Pressure drop across chromatography beds employing soft or semirigid media can be a significant problem in the operation of large-scale preparative chromatography columns. The shape or aspect ratio (length/diameter) of a packed bed has a significant effect on column pressure drop due to wall effects, which can result in unexpectedly high pressures in manufacturing. Two types of agarose-based media were packed in chromatography columns at various column aspect ratios, during which pressure drop, bed height, and flow rate were carefully monitored. Compression of the packed beds with increasing flow velocities was observed. An empirical model was developed to correlate pressure drop with the aspect ratio of the packed beds and the superficial velocity. Modeling employed the Blake-Kozeny equation in which empirical relationships were used to predict bed porosity as a function of aspect ratio and flow velocity. Model predictions were in good agreement with observed pressure drops of industrial scale chromatography columns. A protocol was developed to predict compression in industrial chromatography applications by a few laboratory experiments. The protocol is shown to be useful in the development of chromatographic methods and sizing of preparative columns.

  4. Centrifugal instability and turbulence development in Taylor-Couette flow with forced radial throughflow of high intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalin, Ievgen V.; Khalatov, Artem A.

    2015-09-01

    A numerical simulation of the turbulent flow between coaxial permeable cylinders is performed for the case of the rotating inner cylinder and superimposed radial flow through the annular domain. Both forced inflow and outflow are considered in a wide range of the rotation rate and throughflow intensity. Two configurations of the rotating cylinder are examined with an entire permeable porous surface and with lengthwise porous slots. The stable rotational fluid motion is shown to be concentrated within a boundary layer close to the inner cylinder surface at strong enough imposed radial inflow. Under such conditions, the centrifugal stability boundary is independent on the gap width. Flow stabilization due to the forced inflow is possible at any rotation rate considered for both the configurations of the inner rotating cylinder. The stabilization by the forced outflow is feasible only in the case of the entire permeable rotating cylinder. But there are always large-scale vortices in the gap under conditions of the forced outflow through the slotted rotating cylinder except for the relatively low rotation rate. Transition to turbulence in the boundary layer at the inner rotating cylinder may occur before the centrifugal instability onset at large enough inflow intensity. The boundary layer thickness and turbulence intensity are influenced by the inflow rate and differ between the cases of the entire permeable cylinder and the slotted one.

  5. Onset of radial flow in p+p collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Kun; Zhu, Yinying; Liu, Weitao; Chen, Hongfang; Li, Cheng; Ruan, Lijuan; Tang, Zebo; Xu, Zhangbu

    2015-02-23

    It has been debated for decades whether hadrons emerging from p+p collisions exhibit collective expansion. The signal of the collective motion in p+p collisions is not as clear as in heavy-ion collisions because of the low multiplicity and large fluctuation in p+p collisions. Tsallis Blast-Wave (TBW) model is a thermodynamic approach, introduced to handle the overwhelming correlation and fluctuation in the hadronic processes. We have systematically studied the identified particle spectra in p+p collisions from RHIC to LHC using TBW and found no appreciable radial flow in p+p collisions below √s = 900 GeV. At LHC higher energy of 7 TeV in p+p collisions, the radial flow velocity achieves an average of (β) = 0.320 ± 0.005. This flow velocity is comparable to that in peripheral (40-60%) Au+Au collisions at RHIC. In addition, breaking of the identified particle spectra mT scaling was also observed at LHC from a model independent test.

  6. A design methodology for a magnetorheological fluid damper based on a multi-stage radial flow mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, C. R.; Zhao, D. X.; Xie, L.; Liu, Q.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, a magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper based on a multi-stage radial flow mode is put forward, compared with traditional ones with annular damping channel which are of low magnetic field utilization and high energy consumption. The equivalent magnetic circuit model is derived, along with the relation between the magnetic induction at the working gap and the exciting current in the field coils. The finite-element software ANYSY is used to analyze the distribution of the magnetic field in the MR valve. The flow differential equation for a MR fluid in radial flow is theoretically set up, and the numerical solution is validated by means of the Herschel-Bulkley constitutive model. A MR damper was designed and fabricated in Chongqing University in accordance with the technical requirements of a railway vehicle anti-yaw damper, and the force-displacement characteristic of the damper was tested with J95-I type shock absorber test-bed. The results show that the experimental damping forces are in good agreement with the analytical ones, and the methodology is believed to help predict the damping force of a MR damper.

  7. Solution breakdown due to natural convection of the boundary-layer radial flow on a constant temperature horizontal plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Feria, Ramon; Del Pino, Carlos; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto

    2013-11-01

    The boundary-layer flow of a cold horizontal current exiting radially from a cylindrical vertical surface with a constant velocity over a hotter horizontal wall with constant temperature is analyzed. The temperature and velocity fields are coupled by buoyancy through the pressure gradients, so that the boundary-layer equations are made dimensionless with a radial characteristic length in which natural and forced convection become of the same order of magnitude, being the Prandtl number the only nondimensional parameter governing the problem. A similarity solution valid for the leading edge boundary-layer flow is obtained, yielding as a first order correction the effect of natural convection on Blasius' thermal boundary layer. This solution is also used to start the numerical integration of the equations to find out the location where the boundary-layer flow blows up due to the termination of the solution in a singularity. The physical nature of this singularity is analyzed and its position is characterized numerically. The heat flux from the horizontal wall up to this singularity is also characterized and qualitatively compared with previous experimental results from a related experimental setup.

  8. Influence of flow patterns on chromatographic efficiency in centrifugal partition chromatography.

    PubMed

    Marchal, L; Foucaul, A; Patissier, G; Rosant, J M; Legrand, J

    2000-02-11

    Visualization of flow patterns in centrifugal partition chromatography (CPC) was performed with an asynchronous camera and a stroboscope triggered by the CPC rotor, allowing a channel to be selected and observed regardless of rotational speed. Three main types of flow states were noted as a function of rotational speed and flow-rate: jets stuck along channel walls, broken jets and atomization. Our observations emphasize the importance of Coriolis force on flow shape. Chromatographic efficiency was related to the dispersion of the mobile phase in the stationary phase.

  9. Final Technical Report: Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Transport Control via Shaping of Radial Plasma Flow Profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Eugenio

    2014-05-02

    The strong coupling between the different physical variables involved in the plasma transport phenomenon and the high complexity of its dynamics call for a model-based, multivariable approach to profile control where those predictive models could be exploited. The overall objective of this project has been to extend the existing body of work by investigating numerically and experimentally active control of unstable fluctuations, including fully developed turbulence and the associated cross-field particle transport, via manipulation of flow profiles in a magnetized laboratory plasma device. Fluctuations and particle transport can be monitored by an array of electrostatic probes, and Ex B flow profiles can be controlled via a set of biased concentric ring electrodes that terminate the plasma column. The goals of the proposed research have been threefold: i- to develop a predictive code to simulate plasma transport in the linear HELCAT (HELicon-CAThode) plasma device at the University of New Mexico (UNM), where the experimental component of the proposed research has been carried out; ii- to establish the feasibility of using advanced model-based control algorithms to control cross-field turbulence-driven particle transport through appropriate manipulation of radial plasma flow profiles, iii- to investigate the fundamental nonlinear dynamics of turbulence and transport physics. Lehigh University (LU), including Prof. Eugenio Schuster and one full-time graduate student, has been primarily responsible for control-oriented modeling and model-based control design. Undergraduate students have also participated in this project through the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) program. The main goal of the LU Plasma Control Group has been to study the feasibility of controlling turbulence-driven transport by shaping the radial poloidal flow profile (i.e., by controlling flow shear) via biased concentric ring electrodes.

  10. Cylindrically confined pair-ion-electron and pair-ion plasmas having axial sheared flow and radial gradients

    SciTech Connect

    Batool, Nazia; Saleem, H.

    2013-10-15

    The linear and nonlinear dynamics of pair-ion (PI) and pair-ion-electron plasmas (PIE) have been investigated in a cylindrical geometry with a sheared plasma flow along the axial direction having radial dependence. The coupled linear dispersion relation of low frequency electrostatic waves has been presented taking into account the Guassian profile of density and linear gradient of sheared flow. It is pointed out that the quasi-neutral cold inhomogeneous pure pair ion plasma supports only the obliquely propagating convective cell mode. The linear dispersion relation of this mode has been solved using boundary conditions. The nonlinear structures in the form of vortices formed by different waves have been discussed in PI and PIE plasmas.

  11. A radial flow microfluidic device for ultra-high-throughput affinity-based isolation of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Murlidhar, Vasudha; Zeinali, Mina; Grabauskiene, Svetlana; Ghannad-Rezaie, Mostafa; Wicha, Max S; Simeone, Diane M; Ramnath, Nithya; Reddy, Rishindra M; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2014-12-10

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are believed to play an important role in metastasis, a process responsible for the majority of cancer-related deaths. But their rarity in the bloodstream makes microfluidic isolation complex and time-consuming. Additionally the low processing speeds can be a hindrance to obtaining higher yields of CTCs, limiting their potential use as biomarkers for early diagnosis. Here, a high throughput microfluidic technology, the OncoBean Chip, is reported. It employs radial flow that introduces a varying shear profile across the device, enabling efficient cell capture by affinity at high flow rates. The recovery from whole blood is validated with cancer cell lines H1650 and MCF7, achieving a mean efficiency >80% at a throughput of 10 mL h(-1) in contrast to a flow rate of 1 mL h(-1) standardly reported with other microfluidic devices. Cells are recovered with a viability rate of 93% at these high speeds, increasing the ability to use captured CTCs for downstream analysis. Broad clinical application is demonstrated using comparable flow rates from blood specimens obtained from breast, pancreatic, and lung cancer patients. Comparable CTC numbers are recovered in all the samples at the two flow rates, demonstrating the ability of the technology to perform at high throughputs. PMID:25074448

  12. Viscous Fingering Induced Flow Instability in Multidimensional Liquid Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Mayfield, Kirsty; Shalliker, R. Andrew; Catchpoole, Heather J.; Sweeney, Alan P.; Wong, Victor; Guiochon, Georges A

    2005-07-01

    Viscous fingering is a flow instability phenomenon that results in the destabilisation of the interface between two fluids of differing viscosities. The destabilised interface results in a complex mixing of the two fluids in a pattern that resembles fingers. The conditions that enhance this type of flow instability can be found in coupled chromatographic separation systems, even when the solvents used in each of the separation stages have seemingly similar chemical and physical properties (other than viscosity). For example, the viscosities of acetonitrile and methanol are sufficiently different that instability at the interface between these two solvents can be established and viscous fingering results. In coupled chromatographic systems, the volume of solvent transported from one separation dimension to the second often exceeds the injection volume by two or more orders of magnitude. As a consequence, viscous fingering may occur, when otherwise following the injection of normal analytical size injection plugs viscous fingering would not occur. The findings in this study illustrate the onset of viscous fingering in emulated coupled chromatographic systems and show the importance of correct solvent selection for optimum separation performance.

  13. Presentation of the MERC work-flow for the computation of a 2D radial reflector in a PWR

    SciTech Connect

    Clerc, T.; Hebert, A.; Leroyer, H.; Argaud, J. P.; Poncot, A.; Bouriquet, B.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a work-flow for computing an equivalent 2D radial reflector in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core, in adequacy with a reference power distribution, computed with the method of characteristics (MOC) of the lattice code APOLLO2. The Multi-modelling Equivalent Reflector Computation (MERC) work-flow is a coherent association of the lattice code APOLLO2 and the core code COCAGNE, structured around the ADAO (Assimilation de Donnees et Aide a l'Optimisation) module of the SALOME platform, based on the data assimilation theory. This study leads to the computation of equivalent few-groups reflectors, that can be spatially heterogeneous, which have been compared to those obtained with the OPTEX similar methodology developed with the core code DONJON, as a first validation step. Subsequently, the MERC work-flow is used to compute the most accurate reflector in consistency with all the R and D choices made at Electricite de France (EDF) for the core modelling, in terms of number of energy groups and simplified transport solvers. We observe important reductions of the power discrepancies distribution over the core when using equivalent reflectors obtained with the MERC work-flow. (authors)

  14. Simultaneous effects of radial magnetic field and wall properties on peristaltic flow of Carreau-Yasuda fluid in curved flow configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Tanveer, A.; Alsaadi, F.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of present article is to address the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) peristaltic flow of Carreau-Yasuda fluid in a curved geometry. The channel boundaries satisfy wall slip and compliant properties. The fluid is electrically conducting through an applied magnetic field in the radial direction. Heat transfer is also studied. Governing equation comprised the viscous dissipation effects. The non-linear expressions are first obtained and then approximated using long wavelength and low Reynolds number considerations. The resulting systems are solved for the series solutions. The expressions of velocity, temperature, heat transfer coefficient and stream function are obtained and analyzed via graphical illustrations.

  15. Influence of long-scale length radial electric field components on zonal flow-like structures in the TJ-II stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losada, U.; Alonso, A.; van Milligen, B. Ph; Hidalgo, C.; Liu, B.; Pedrosa, M. A.; Silva, C.; the TJ-II team

    2016-08-01

    The influence of long-scale length radial electric fields on zonal flows-like structures has been studied in the TJ-II stellarator. This relation has been investigated in the edge plasma using two electrical rake probes. The results presented here show an empirical correlation between the properties of long-range correlations (LRCs) with zonal flow-like structures and the magnitude of radial (neoclassical, NC) electric fields in TJ-II neutral beam heated plasmas. These experimental findings show that the enhancement of the NC radial electric field \\boldsymbol{E}{\\mathbf{r}} increases the magnitude of LRCs, considered as a proxy of zonal flows, while the radial correlation length of the plasma potential fluctuations was found to decrease by about 40%. A strong relation between the magnitude of electric field structures with long and short radial scales was found. The calculated \\boldsymbol{E}{\\mathbf{r}}× \\boldsymbol{B} shearing rate corresponding to the short scale length structures of the radial electric field may be sufficient to regulate turbulence.

  16. Distributed control of reactive power flow in a radial distribution circuit with high photovoltaic penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Michael; Turitsyn, Konstantin; Backhaus, Scott; Sule, Petr

    2009-01-01

    We show how distributed control of reactive power can serve to regulate voltage and minimize resistive losses in a distribution circuit that includes a significant level of photovoltaic (PV) generation. To demonstrate the technique, we consider a radial distribution circuit with a single branch consisting of sequentially-arranged residential-scale loads that consume both real and reactive power. In parallel, some loads also have PV generation capability. We postulate that the inverters associated with each PV system are also capable of limited reactive power generation or consumption, and we seek to find the optimal dispatch of each inverter's reactive power to both maintain the voltage within an acceptable range and minimize the resistive losses over the entire circuit. We assume the complex impedance of the distribution circuit links and the instantaneous load and PV generation at each load are known. We compare the results of the optimal dispatch with a suboptimal local scheme that does not require any communication. On our model distribution circuit, we illustrate the feasibility of high levels of PV penetration and a significant (20% or higher) reduction in losses.

  17. A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes stage analysis of the flow through a compact radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, James D.

    1991-01-01

    A steady, three dimensional Navier-Stokes average passage computer code is used to analyze the flow through a compact radial turbine stage. The code is based upon the average passage set of equations for turbomachinery, whereby the flow fields for all passages in a given blade row are assumed to be identical while retaining their three-dimensionality. A stage solution is achieved by alternating between stator and rotor calculations, while coupling the two solutions by means of a set of axisymmetric body forces which model the absent blade row. Results from the stage calculation are compared with experimental data and with results from an isolated rotor solution having axisymmetric inlet flow quantities upstream of the vacated stator space. Although the mass-averaged loss through the rotor is comparable for both solutions, the details of the loss distribution differ due to stator effects. The stage calculation predicts smaller spanwise variations in efficiency, in closer agreement with the data. The results of the study indicate that stage analyses hold promise for improved prediction of loss mechanisms in multi-blade row turbomachinery, which could lead to improved designs through the reduction of these losses.

  18. A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes stage analysis of the flow through a compact radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidmann, James D.

    1991-01-01

    A steady, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes average passage computer code is used to analyze the flow through a compact radial turbine stage. The code is based upon the average passage set of equations for turbomachinery, whereby the flow fields for all passages in a given blade row are assumed to be identical while retaining their three-dimensionality. A stage solution is achieved by alternating between stator and rotor calculations, while coupling the two solutions by means of a set of axisymmetric body forces which model the absent blade row. Results from the stage calculation are compared with experimental data and with results from an isolated rotor solution having axisymmetric inlet flow quantities upstream of the vacated stator space. Although the mass-averaged loss through the rotor is comparable for both solutions, the details of the loss distribution differ due to stator effects. The stage calculation predicts smaller spanwise variations in efficiency, in closer agreement with the data. The results of the study indicate that stage analyses hold promise for improved prediction of loss mechanisms in multi-blade row turbomachinery, which could lead to improved designs through the reduction of these losses.

  19. Modelling the effect of radially variable conductivity on dynamo action and zonal flow in the Giant planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimpel, M.; Gomez Perez, N.

    2009-05-01

    The surface winds and magnetic fields of Jupiter and Saturn are observed to be broadly comparable. Both planets have strong and prograde equatorial jet and weaker jets, flowing in alternating directions at higher latitudes. Also, both planets exhibit relatively strong, dipolar magnetic fields. Saturn's magnetic field is weaker and more axisymmetric than that of Jupiter. In addition, Saturn's equatorial jet is broader and stronger than that of Jupiter. We have performed a set of numerical simulations of rotating convection and dynamo action in spherical shells. The model fluid is Boussinesq with radially varying electrical conductivity. The electrical conductivity, which is nearly constant in the deeper parts of the shell, exponentially decreases outward, starting at a chosen radius parameter. We find that the character of the dynamo-generated magnetic field, and the fluid flow structure are strongly affected by the afore-mentioned radius parameter, as well as by the size of the inner boundary radius and the temperature boundary conditions. In some of the simulations a strong, magnetostrophic, mainly dipolar dynamo develops in the deeper region of high electrical conductivity. In most cases, a strong zonal flow with an equatorial jet develops near the low-conductivity, free slip outer surface, and penetrates to a depth associated with the conductivity profile. The zonal flow is attenuated by Lorentz forces at depth and is, in some cases, greatly diminished in the dynamo region. The relationship between the structure of equatorial jets and the magnetic fields generated in our models implies that major differences between the surface zonal flow and magnetic fields of Jupiter and Saturn can arise from the presence of a rocky core, and the depth of transition from their low-conductivity molecular envelopes to their liquid metal interiors.

  20. Hydrodynamic chromatography using flow of a highly concentrated dextran solution through a coiled tube.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Yoichi; Morisada, Shintaro; Ohto, Keisuke; Hidetaka, Kawakita

    2016-08-01

    Separation of colloidal particles in non-Newtonian fluid is important in food engineering. Using hydrodynamic chromatography, colloidal particles and starch granules originating from corn were individually injected into dextran solutions (Mw 2,000,000g/mol) flowing through a coiled tube for efficient size separation. Rheological properties of dextran solutions ranging from 50 to 250g/L were determined, revealing pseudoplastic fluid behavior. Velocity profiles for dextran solution flow in coiled tubes were obtained from rheological power law parameters. Suspensions of colloidal particles of diameters 1.0 and 20μm were individually injected into the dextran flows, demonstrating that dextran solutions at high concentration separated colloidal particles. Starch granules were separated by size using a dextran solution flow (250g/L). Thus, we expect to obtain efficient separation of colloidal particles in foods using highly concentrated dextran solutions. PMID:27112856

  1. [Radial variation and time lag of sap flow of Populus gansuensis in Minqin Oasis, Northwest].

    PubMed

    Dang, Hong-Zhong; Yang, Wen-Bin; Li, Wei; Zhang, You-Yan; Li, Chang-Long

    2014-09-01

    Sap flow of tree trunk is very important to reflect the dynamics of physiological activities, as well as to estimate the water consumption of individual plant. In the present study, we used the thermal dissipation technique to monitor the sap flow velocity (J) at four depth loci (i. e. 2 cm, 3 cm, 5 cm, 8 cm) of three Populus gansuensis trees (30 year-old) in Minqin Oasis for two consecutive growing seasons. The results showed that there were significant differences among J values at four depth loci under tree trunk cambium. J value at the 3 cm depth locus (J3) of the tree trunk was the highest, and then in sequences, were 2 cm, 5 cm and 8 cm depth loci (J2, J5 and J8). J value (J3) on typical sunny days in June with the highest atmospheric potential evapotranspiration (ET0) was up to 28.53 g · cm(-2) · h(-1), which was 1.42, 2.74 and 4.4 times of J2, J5 and J8, respectively. In the process of diurnal variation of sap flow velocity, the peak value time of J at the four depth loci of the tree trunk was different, but the differences among them were within 20 min. Furthermore, the peak value time of sap flow velocity was very different to that of solar radiation (Rs) and air vapour pressure deficit (VPD). The time lag between J and Rs was from 55 to 88 min on typical sunny days during the main growing seasons (from June to August), and, positively related to the depth of the locus under tree trunk cambium, while the time lag between J and VPD reached 60-96 min, and was negatively related to the depth of the locus. The seasonal variation patterns of J were consistent with ET0. With the increase of tree physiological activities, there was a trend that the major water transportation layer extended to the interior sapwood. The most important meteorological factor was the solar radiation, which primarily drove sap flow at different depths of tree trunk. However, the secondary factor changed along with the depth, and VPD became increasingly important with increasing the

  2. Rotor cavity flow and heat transfer with inlet swirl and radial outflow of cooling air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staub, F. W.

    1992-06-01

    To enhance the reliability of turbine disk life prediction, experimental verification is necessary for analytical tools which calculate the heat transfer and flow field coefficients in turbine-stator cavities. A full-scale model of the forward cavity of a typical aircraft gas turbine is utilized employing a high-molecular-weight gas (Refrigerant-12) at ambient temperature and pressure conditions to match the dimensionless parameters at engine conditions. A first-order comparison is given of the velocity distribution and disk heat transfer coefficients calculated by the measured values and a CFD code.

  3. Approximate analysis of three-dimensional groundwater flow toward a radial collector well in a finite-extent unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.-S.; Chen, J.-J.; Yeh, H.-D.

    2016-01-01

    This study develops a three-dimensional (3-D) mathematical model for describing transient hydraulic head distributions due to pumping at a radial collector well (RCW) in a rectangular confined or unconfined aquifer bounded by two parallel streams and no-flow boundaries. The streams with low-permeability streambeds fully penetrate the aquifer. The governing equation with a point-sink term is employed. A first-order free surface equation delineating the water table decline induced by the well is considered. Robin boundary conditions are adopted to describe fluxes across the streambeds. The head solution for the point sink is derived by applying the methods of finite integral transform and Laplace transform. The head solution for a RCW is obtained by integrating the point-sink solution along the laterals of the RCW and then dividing the integration result by the sum of lateral lengths. On the basis of Darcy's law and head distributions along the streams, the solution for the stream depletion rate (SDR) can also be developed. With the aid of the head and SDR solutions, the sensitivity analysis can then be performed to explore the response of the hydraulic head to the change in a specific parameter such as the horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities, streambed permeability, specific storage, specific yield, lateral length, and well depth. Spatial head distributions subject to the anisotropy of aquifer hydraulic conductivities are analyzed. A quantitative criterion is provided to identify whether groundwater flow at a specific region is 3-D or 2-D without the vertical component. In addition, another criterion is also given to allow for the neglect of vertical flow effect on SDR. Conventional 2-D flow models can be used to provide accurate head and SDR predictions if satisfying these two criteria.

  4. Analysis of three-dimensional groundwater flow toward a radial collector well in a finite-extent unconfined aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, C.-S.; Chen, J.-J.; Yeh, H.-D.

    2015-08-01

    This study develops a three-dimensional mathematical model for describing transient hydraulic head distributions due to pumping at a radial collector well (RCW) in a rectangular confined or unconfined aquifer bounded by two parallel streams and no-flow boundaries. The governing equation with a point-sink term is employed. A first-order free surface equation delineating the water table decline induced by the well is considered. The head solution for the point sink is derived by applying the methods of double-integral transform and Laplace transform. The head solution for a RCW is obtained by integrating the point-sink solution along the laterals of the RCW and then dividing the integration result by the sum of lateral lengths. On the basis of Darcy's law and head distributions along the streams, the solution for the stream depletion rate (SDR) can also be developed. With the aid of the head and SDR solutions, the sensitivity analysis can then be performed to explore the response of the hydraulic head to the change in a specific parameter such as the horizontal and vertical hydraulic conductivities, streambed permeability, specific storage, specific yield, lateral length and well depth. Spatial head distributions subject to the anisotropy of aquifer hydraulic conductivities are analyzed. A quantitative criterion is provided to identify whether groundwater flow at a specific region is 3-D or 2-D without the vertical component. In addition, another criterion is also given to allow the neglect of vertical flow effect on SDR. Conventional 2-D flow models can be used to provide accurate head and SDR predictions if satisfying these two criteria.

  5. Optimal design of high damping force engine mount featuring MR valve structure with both annular and radial flow paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Choi, S. B.; Lee, Y. S.; Han, M. S.

    2013-11-01

    This paper focuses on the optimal design of a compact and high damping force engine mount featuring magnetorheological fluid (MRF). In the mount, a MR valve structure with both annular and radial flows is employed to generate a high damping force. First, the configuration and working principle of the proposed MR mount is introduced. The MRF flows in the mount are then analyzed and the governing equations of the MR mount are derived based on the Bingham plastic behavior of the MRF. An optimal design of the MR mount is then performed to find the optimal structure of the MR valve to generate a maximum damping force with certain design constraints. In addition, the gap size of MRF ducts is empirically chosen considering the ‘lockup’ problem of the mount at high frequency. Performance of the optimized MR mount is then evaluated based on finite element analysis and discussions on performance results of the optimized MR mount are given. The effectiveness of the proposed MR engine mount is demonstrated via computer simulation by presenting damping force and power consumption.

  6. Forward-rapidity azimuthal and radial flow of identified particles for s=200 GeV Au+Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brahms Collaboration; Sanders, S. J.; BRAHMS Collaboration

    2009-11-01

    A strong azimuthal flow signature at RHIC suggests rapid system equilibration leading to an almost perfect fluid state. The longitudinal extent of the flow behavior depends on how this state is formed and can be studied by measuring the pseudorapidity and transverse momentum dependence of the second Fourier component (ν(p)) of the azimuthal angular distribution. We report on a measurement of identified-particle ν as a function of p(0.5-2.0 GeV/c), centrality (0-25%, 25-50%), and pseudorapidity (0⩽η<3.2) for s=200 GeV Au+Au collisions. The BRAHMS spectrometers are used for particle identification (π, K, p) and momentum determination and the BRAHMS global detectors are used to determine the corresponding reaction-plane angles. The results are discussed in terms of the pseudorapidity dependence of constituent quark scaling and in terms of models that develop the complete (azimuthal and radial) hydrodynamic aspects of the forward dynamics at RHIC.

  7. Measurement of radionuclides using ion chromatography and flow-cell scintillation counting with pulse shape discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    DeVol, T.A.; Fjeld, R.A.

    1995-10-01

    The use of ion chromatography (IC) for radiochemical separations is a well established technique. IC is commonly used in routine environmental monitoring applications as well as in specialized research applications. Typical usage involves the separation of a single radionuclide from the non-radioactive constituents. During the past decade, a limited amount of research has been conducted using automated IC systems in actinide separation applications (e.g.). More recently, separation procedures for common non-gamma emitting activation and fission products were developed utilizing a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system. In addition, a separation procedure for six common actinides has been developed using a HPLC system. These latter systems used on-line flow-cell detectors for quantification of the radioactive constituents of the effluent stream.

  8. Radial diffusion and penetration of gas molecules and aerosol particles through laminar flow reactors, denuders, and sampling tubes.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Daniel A; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2015-04-01

    Flow reactors, denuders, and sampling tubes are essential tools for many applications in analytical and physical chemistry and engineering. We derive a new method for determining radial diffusion effects and the penetration or transmission of gas molecules and aerosol particles through cylindrical tubes under laminar flow conditions using explicit analytical equations. In contrast to the traditional Brown method [Brown, R. L. J. Res. Natl. Bur. Stand. (U. S.) 1978, 83, 1-8] and CKD method (Cooney, D. O.; Kim, S. S.; Davis, E. J. Chem. Eng. Sci. 1974, 29, 1731-1738), the new approximation developed in this study (known as the KPS method) does not require interpolation or numerical techniques. The KPS method agrees well with the CKD method under all experimental conditions and also with the Brown method at low Sherwood numbers. At high Sherwood numbers corresponding to high uptake on the wall, flow entry effects become relevant and are considered in the KPS and CKD methods but not in the Brown method. The practical applicability of the KPS method is demonstrated by analysis of measurement data from experimental studies of rapid OH, intermediate NO3, and slow O3 uptake on various organic substrates. The KPS method also allows determination of the penetration of aerosol particles through a tube, using a single equation to cover both the limiting cases of high and low deposition described by Gormley and Kennedy (Proc. R. Ir. Acad., Sect. A. 1949, 52A, 163-169). We demonstrate that the treatment of gas and particle diffusion converges in the KPS method, thus facilitating prediction of diffusional loss and penetration of gases and particles, analysis of chemical kinetics data, and design of fluid reactors, denuders, and sampling lines. PMID:25744622

  9. Mid-section of a can-annular gas turbine engine with a radial air flow discharged from the compressor section

    DOEpatents

    Little, David A.; McQuiggan, Gerard; Wasdell, David L.

    2016-10-25

    A midframe portion (213) of a gas turbine engine (210) is presented, and includes a compressor section (212) configured to discharge an air flow (211) directed in a radial direction from an outlet of the compressor section (212). Additionally, the midframe portion (213) includes a manifold (214) to directly couple the air flow (211) from the compressor section (212) outlet to an inlet of a respective combustor head (218) of the midframe portion (213).

  10. Receptor-mediated cell attachment and detachment kinetics. II. Experimental model studies with the radial-flow detachment assay.

    PubMed Central

    Cozens-Roberts, C; Quinn, J A; Lauffenburger, D A

    1990-01-01

    Quantitative information regarding the kinetics of receptor-mediated cell adhesion to a ligand-coated surface are crucial for understanding the role of certain key parameters in many physiological and biotechnology-related processes. Here, we use the probabilistic attachment and detachment models developed in the preceding paper to interpret transient data from well-defined experiments. These data are obtained with a simple model cell system that consists of receptor-coated latex beads (prototype cells) and a Radial-Flow Detachment Assay (RFDA) using a ligand-coated glass disc. The receptors and ligands used in this work are complementary antibodies. The beads enable us to examine transient behavior with particles that possess fairly uniform properties that can be varied systematically, and the RFDA is designed for direct observation of adhesion to the ligand-coated glass surface over a range of shear stresses. Our experiments focus on the effects of surface shear stress, receptor density, and ligand density. These data provide a crucial test of the probabilistic framework. We show that these data can be explained with the probabilistic analyses, whereas they cannot be readily interpreted on the basis of a deterministic analysis. In addition, we examine transient data on cell adhesion reported from other assays, demonstrating the consistency of these data with the predictions of the probabilistic models. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:2174272

  11. In vitro evaluation of a multi-layer radial-flow bioreactor based on galactosylated chitosan nanofiber scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xue-Hui; Shi, Xiao-Lei; Feng, Zhang-Qi; Gu, Jin-Yang; Xu, Hai-Yun; Zhang, Yue; Gu, Zhong-Ze; Ding, Yi-Tao

    2009-09-01

    Clinical use of bioartificial livers (BAL) strongly relies on the development of bioreactors. In this study, we developed a multi-layer radial-flow bioreactor based on galactosylated chitosan nanofiber scaffolds and evaluated its efficacy in vitro. The bioreactor contains 65 layers of stacked flat plates, on which the nanofiber scaffolds were electrospinned for hepatocyte immobilization and aggregation. Culture medium containing pig red blood cells (RBCs) was perfused from the center to periphery, so that exchange materials are sufficient to afford enough oxygen. We determined the parameters for hepatocyte-specific function and general metabolism and also measured the oxygen consumption rate (OCR). Microscope and scanned electron microscopy observation showed a tight adhesion between cells and scaffolds. Compared with the control (bioreactors without nanofiber scaffolds), the number of adhered cells in our bioreactor was 1.59-fold; the protein-synthesis capacity of hepatocytes was 1.73-fold and urea was 2.86-fold. Moreover, the OCR of bioreactors with RBCs was about 1.91-fold that of bioreactors without RBCs. The galactosylated chitosan nanofiber scaffolds introduced into our new bioreactor greatly enhanced cell adhesion and function, and the RBCs added into the culture medium were able to afford enough oxygen for hepatocytes. Importantly, our new bioreactor showed an exciting efficiency, and it may afford the short-term support of patients with hepatic failure. PMID:19500837

  12. Computerized optimization of flows and temperature gradient in flow modulated comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Májek, Pavel; Krupčík, Ján; Gorovenko, Roman; Špánik, Ivan; Sandra, Pat; Armstrong, Daniel W

    2014-07-01

    Informational entropy and syentropy percent were used to optimize the flows in the first (1D) and in the second (2D) dimension ((1)Fm and (2)Fm, respectively) as well as the temperature program rate (r) for the flow modulated GC×GC-FID separation of C6-C12 aromatic hydrocarbons in a low boiling petrochemical sample. The separations were performed on a column series consisting of a 25m×0.25mm i.d.×0.2μm df of the polar ionic liquid SLB-IL 100 (1,9-di(3-vinylimidazolium)nonane bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide) in the first dimension and 5m×0.25mm i.d.×0.25μm df apolar HP-5MS (5% phenyl-95% methylpolysiloxane) in the second dimension. A dependence of a distribution of individual aromatic hydrocarbons in the 2D retention plane on the carrier gas flows ((1)Fm, and (2)Fm,) and temperature gradient (r) was examined in this study. It was found that informational entropy and synentropy percent are advantageous criteria to characterize the distribution of peaks in the 2D retention plane. Maximum informational entropy and synentropy percents correspond to the maximum distribution of C6-C12 aromatic hydrocarbons in the corresponding 2D retention plane gained by the given separation using optimized values of individual carrier gas column volume flows and the temperature rate at the temperature programmed GC×GC separations.

  13. Cored anion-exchange chromatography media for antibody flow-through purification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Soice, Neil P; Ramaswamy, Senthilkumar; Gagnon, Brian A; Umana, Joaquin; Cotoni, Kristen A; Bian, Nanying; Cheng, Kwok-Shun C

    2007-06-29

    Agarose-based anion-exchangers (e.g. quaternary amine, Q) have been widely used in monoclonal antibody flow-through purification to remove trace levels of impurities. Such media are often packed in a large column and the operation is usually robust but with limited throughput due to the compressibility of agarose and consequentially low bed permeability. In order to address this limitation, cored Q beads consisting of a rigid core and a thin agarose gel coating were developed and evaluated for protein flow-through chromatography. Using laboratory-scale columns it was found that, the cored beads indeed provide significantly enhanced rigidity and flow permeability relative to conventional homogeneous agarose resins. Depending on the structure and size of the cored beads, the permeability was 2-4-fold higher than that of a commonly used commercial agarose resin. Good virus and host cell protein clearance was achieved with the cored Q beads even at increased flow velocities. In addition, the impermeable core allows for more efficient use of buffers without loss of useful capacity in polishing applications. Process analyses based upon the experimental data demonstrated that the enhanced permeability achieved with the cored beads can significantly improve process throughput and economics.

  14. Effect of reference conditions on flow rate, modifier fraction and retention in supercritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    De Pauw, Ruben; Shoykhet Choikhet, Konstantin; Desmet, Gert; Broeckhoven, Ken

    2016-08-12

    When using compressible mobile phases such as fluidic CO2, the density, the volumetric flow rates and volumetric fractions are pressure dependent. The pressure and temperature definition of these volumetric parameters (referred to as the reference conditions) may alter between systems, manufacturers and operating conditions. A supercritical fluid chromatography system was modified to operate in two modes with different definition of the eluent delivery parameters, referred to as fixed and variable mode. For the variable mode, the volumetric parameters are defined with reference to the pump operating pressure and actual pump head temperature. These conditions may vary when, e.g. changing the column length, permeability, flow rate, etc. and are thus variable reference conditions. For the fixed mode, the reference conditions were set at 150bar and 30°C, resulting in a mass flow rate and mass fraction of modifier definition which is independent of the operation conditions. For the variable mode, the mass flow rate of carbon dioxide increases with system pump operating pressure, decreasing the fraction of modifier. Comparing the void times and retention factor shows that the deviation between the two modes is almost independent of modifier percentage, but depends on the operating pressure. Recalculating the set volumetric fraction of modifier to the mass fraction results in the same retention behaviour for both modes. This shows that retention in SFC can be best modelled using the mass fraction of modifier. The fixed mode also simplifies method scaling as it only requires matching average column pressure. PMID:27401813

  15. Spatial analysis of aquifer response times for radial flow processes: Nondimensional analysis and laboratory-scale tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jazaei, Farhad; Simpson, Matthew J.; Clement, T. Prabhakar

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental concept in groundwater hydrology is the notion of steady state, or equilibrium conditions. When a system at some initial steady state condition is perturbed by pumping, a transient cone of depression will develop and the system will approach a new steady state condition. Understanding the time scale required for the transient process to occur is of practical interest since it would help practitioners decide whether to use a steady state model or a more complicated transient model. Standard approaches to estimate the response time use simple scaling relationships which neglect spatial variations. Alternatively, others define the response time to be the amount of time taken for the difference between the transient and steady state solutions to fall below some arbitrary tolerance level. Here, we present a novel approach and use the concept of mean action time to predict aquifer response time scales in a two-dimensional radial geometry for pumping, injection and recovery processes. Our approach leads to relatively simple closed form expressions that explicitly show how the time scale depends on the hydraulic parameters and position. Furthermore, our dimensionless framework allows us to predict the response time scales for a range of applications including small scale laboratory problems and large scale field problems. Our analysis shows that the response time scales vary spatially, but are equivalent for pumping, injection and associated recovery processes. Furthermore, the time scale is independent of the pumping or injection flow rate. We test these predictions in a laboratory scale aquifer and find that our physical measurements corroborate the theoretical predictions.

  16. Impact of higher alginate expression on deposition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in radial stagnation point flow and reverse osmosis systems.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, Moshe; Rezene, Tesfalem Zere; Ziemba, Christopher; Gillor, Osnat; Mathee, Kalai

    2009-10-01

    Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) have major impact on biofouling of reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. On one hand, EPS can reduce membrane permeability and on the other, EPS production by the primary colonizers may influence their deposition and attachment rate and subsequently affect the biofouling propensity of the membrane. The role of bacterial exopolysaccharides in bacterial deposition followed by the biofouling potential of an RO membrane was evaluated using an alginate overproducing (mucoid) Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The mucoid P. aeruginosa PAOmucA22 was compared with its isogenic nonmucoid prototypic parent PAO1 microscopically in a radial stagnation point flow (RSPF) system for their bacterial deposition characteristics. Then, biofouling potential of PAO1 and PAOmucA22 was determined in a crossflow rectangular plate-and-frame membrane cell, in which the strains were cultivated on a thin-film composite, polyamide, flat RO membrane coupon (LFC-1) under laminar flow conditions. In the RSPF system, the observed deposition rate of the mucoid strain was between 5- and 10-fold lower than of the wild type using either synthetic wastewater medium (with ionic strength of 14.7 mM and pH 7.4) or 15 mM KCl solution (pH of 6.2). The slower deposition rate of the mucoid strain is explained by 5- to 25-fold increased hydrophilicity of the mucoid strain as compared to the isogenic wild type, PAO1. Corroborating with these results, a significant delay in the onset of biofouling of the RO membrane was observed when the mucoid strain was used as the membrane colonizer, in which the observed time for the induced permeate flux decline was delayed (ca. 2-fold). In conclusion, the lower initial cell attachment of the mucoid strain decelerated biofouling of the RO membrane. Bacterial deposition and attachment is a critical step in biofilm formation and governed by intimate interactions between outer membrane proteins of the bacteria and the surface. Shielding these

  17. Improved hydrophilic interaction chromatography LC/MS of heparinoids using a chip with postcolumn makeup flow.

    PubMed

    Staples, Gregory O; Naimy, Hicham; Yin, Hongfeng; Kileen, Kevin; Kraiczek, Karsten; Costello, Catherine E; Zaia, Joseph

    2010-01-15

    Heparan sulfate (HS) and heparin are linear, heterogeneous carbohydrates of the glycosaminoglycan (GAG) family that are modified by N-acetylation, N-sulfation, O-sulfation, and uronic acid epimerization. HS interacts with growth factors in the extracellular matrix, thereby modulating signaling pathways that govern cell growth, development, differentiation, proliferation, and adhesion. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-chip-based hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry has emerged as a method for analyzing the domain structure of GAGs. However, analysis of highly sulfated GAG structures decasaccharide or larger in size has been limited by spray instability in the negative-ion mode. This report demonstrates that addition of postcolumn makeup flow to the amide-HPLC-chip configuration permits robust and reproducible analysis of extended GAG domains (up to degree of polymerization 18) from HS and heparin. This platform provides quantitative information regarding the oligosaccharide profile, degree of sulfation, and nonreducing chain termini. It is expected that this technology will enable quantitative, comparative glycomics profiling of extended GAG oligosaccharide domains of functional interest.

  18. Semi-targeted analysis of metabolites using capillary-flow ion chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Karl; Creek, Darren; Dewsbury, Paul; Cook, Ken; Barrett, Michael P

    2011-11-30

    This work describes a novel application of capillary-flow ion chromatography mass spectrometry for metabolomic analysis, and comparison of the technique to octadecyl silica and hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC)-based mass spectrometry. While liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) is rapidly becoming the standard technique for metabolomic analysis, metabolomic samples are extremely heterogeneous, leading to a requirement for multiple methods of analysis and separation techniques to perform a 'global' metabolomic analysis. While C18 is suitable for hydrophobic metabolites and has been used extensively in pharmaceutical drug metabolism studies, HILIC is, in general, efficient at separating polar metabolites. Phosphorylated species and organic acids are challenging to analyse and effectively quantitate on both systems. There is therefore a requirement for an MS-compatible analytical technique that can separate negatively charged compounds, such as ion-exchange chromatography. Evaluation of capillary flow ion chromatography with electrolytic suppression was performed on a library of metabolite standards and was shown to effectively separate organic acids and sugar di- and tri-phosphates. Limits of detection for these compounds range from 0.01 to 100 pmol on-column. Application of capillary ion chromatography to a comparative analysis of energy metabolism in procyclic forms of the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei where cells were grown on glucose or proline as a carbon source was demonstrated to be more effective than HILIC for detection of the organic acids that comprise glucose central metabolism and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle.

  19. Reducing NO(x) emissions from a nitric acid plant of domestic petrochemical complex: enhanced conversion in conventional radial-flow reactor of selective catalytic reduction process.

    PubMed

    Abbasfard, Hamed; Hashemi, Seyed Hamid; Rahimpour, Mohammad Reza; Jokar, Seyyed Mohammad; Ghader, Sattar

    2013-01-01

    The nitric acid plant of a domestic petrochemical complex is designed to annually produce 56,400 metric tons (based on 100% nitric acid). In the present work, radial-flow spherical bed reactor (RFSBR) for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides (NO(x)) from the stack of this plant was modelled and compared with the conventional radial-flow reactor (CRFR). Moreover, the proficiency of a radial-flow (water or nitrogen) membrane reactor was also compared with the CRFR which was found to be inefficient at identical process conditions. In the RFSBR, the space between the two concentric spheres is filled by a catalyst. A mathematical model, including conservation of mass has been developed to investigate the performance of the configurations. The model was checked against the CRFR in a nitric acid plant located at the domestic petrochemical complex. A good agreement was observed between the modelling results and the plant data. The effects of some important parameters such as pressure and temperature on NO(x) conversion were analysed. Results show 14% decrease in NO(x) emission annually in RFSBR compared with the CRFR, which is beneficial for the prevention of NO(x) emission, global warming and acid rain.

  20. Reducing NO(x) emissions from a nitric acid plant of domestic petrochemical complex: enhanced conversion in conventional radial-flow reactor of selective catalytic reduction process.

    PubMed

    Abbasfard, Hamed; Hashemi, Seyed Hamid; Rahimpour, Mohammad Reza; Jokar, Seyyed Mohammad; Ghader, Sattar

    2013-01-01

    The nitric acid plant of a domestic petrochemical complex is designed to annually produce 56,400 metric tons (based on 100% nitric acid). In the present work, radial-flow spherical bed reactor (RFSBR) for selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides (NO(x)) from the stack of this plant was modelled and compared with the conventional radial-flow reactor (CRFR). Moreover, the proficiency of a radial-flow (water or nitrogen) membrane reactor was also compared with the CRFR which was found to be inefficient at identical process conditions. In the RFSBR, the space between the two concentric spheres is filled by a catalyst. A mathematical model, including conservation of mass has been developed to investigate the performance of the configurations. The model was checked against the CRFR in a nitric acid plant located at the domestic petrochemical complex. A good agreement was observed between the modelling results and the plant data. The effects of some important parameters such as pressure and temperature on NO(x) conversion were analysed. Results show 14% decrease in NO(x) emission annually in RFSBR compared with the CRFR, which is beneficial for the prevention of NO(x) emission, global warming and acid rain. PMID:24527652

  1. Microfluidic valve geometries and possibilities for flow switching in gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marriott, Philip J.; Eyres, Graham T.; Urban, Sylvia; Rühle, Christian

    2008-12-01

    Classical multi-(two-)dimensional separations in gas chromatography (GC) require switching systems to transfer the gas flow stream from the first to second dimension. This can be accomplished by valve systems, but is more suitably effected by pressure balanced systems, such as the Deans' switch method. Recent developments in microfluidics and related micro-technologies should make gas phase switching much more effective. The capillary flow technology platform of Agilent Technologies is an example of recent developments introduced to GC. Thus various Deans' switch pressure balanced devices, stream splitters, and column couplings bring new capabilities to analytical GC. We are uniquely placed to take advantage of the new devices, owing to our development of advanced operational methods in GC which can make use of microfluidic capillary couplings, and novel cryogenic approaches that deliver performance previously impossible with conventional methods. Multidimensional chromatographic flow switching to isolate pure compounds from complex mixtures suggests many potential applications for enhanced chemical analysis. Multiple dimensions of GC analysis, capabilities for integrating different spectroscopic detection methods for chemical identification of isolated chemical species including mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance and Fourier transform infrared, can be proposed. Applications in the essential oils and petrochemical area will be outlined.

  2. Hydrodynamic chromatography and field flow fractionation in finite aspect ratio channels.

    PubMed

    Shendruk, T N; Slater, G W

    2014-04-25

    Hydrodynamic chromatography (HC) and field-flow fractionation (FFF) separation methods are often performed in 3D rectangular channels, though ideal retention theory assumes 2D systems. Devices are commonly designed with large aspect ratios; however, it can be unavoidable or desirable to design rectangular channels with small or even near-unity aspect ratios. To assess the significance of finite-aspect ratio effects and interpret experimental retention results, an ideal, analytical retention theory is needed. We derive a series solution for the ideal retention ratio of HC and FFF rectangular channels. Rather than limiting devices' ability to resolve samples, our theory predicts that retention curves for normal-mode FFF are well approximated by the infinite plate solution and that the performance of HC is actually improved. These findings suggest that FFF devices need not be designed with large aspect ratios and that rectangular HC channels are optimal when the aspect ratio is unity.

  3. Hydrodynamic chromatography and field flow fractionation in finite aspect ratio channels.

    PubMed

    Shendruk, T N; Slater, G W

    2014-04-25

    Hydrodynamic chromatography (HC) and field-flow fractionation (FFF) separation methods are often performed in 3D rectangular channels, though ideal retention theory assumes 2D systems. Devices are commonly designed with large aspect ratios; however, it can be unavoidable or desirable to design rectangular channels with small or even near-unity aspect ratios. To assess the significance of finite-aspect ratio effects and interpret experimental retention results, an ideal, analytical retention theory is needed. We derive a series solution for the ideal retention ratio of HC and FFF rectangular channels. Rather than limiting devices' ability to resolve samples, our theory predicts that retention curves for normal-mode FFF are well approximated by the infinite plate solution and that the performance of HC is actually improved. These findings suggest that FFF devices need not be designed with large aspect ratios and that rectangular HC channels are optimal when the aspect ratio is unity. PMID:24674643

  4. Enzymatic digestion and liquid chromatography in micropillar reactors: hydrodynamic versus electro-osmotic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarrut, Nicolas; Bouffet, Stephanie; Mittler, Frederique; Constantin, Olivier; Combette, P.; Sudor, Jan; Ricoul, Florence; Vinet, Francoise; Garin, Jerome; Vauchier, Claude

    2005-01-01

    Enzymatic digestion and peptide separation are basic steps for preparation of protein samples prior to their analysis by mass spectrometry. Micro-pillar reactors for digestion and reverse phase liquid chromatography were designed and constructed using semiconductor technologies. The performances of the micro-machined reactors were evaluated: complete Cytochrome C digestion was achieved in 6 min for a concentration up to 25 pmolμl-1 and the separation micro-column was seen to exhibit separation capabilities and capacity close to those obtained with a commercial column. Furthermore, a comparative study between hydrodynamic and electroosmotic driven flows was performed for each peptide of a Cytochrome C digest. It was demonstrated that parasitic electrophoretic phenomena disturbed peptide mobility but not protein identification.

  5. Mixing characteristics of mixers in flow analysis. Application to two-dimensional detection in ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hongzhu; Dasgupta, Purnendu K; Srinivasan, Kannan; Liu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Three mixer designs, a back-flow tee mixer (BT), an end-blocked membrane tee mixer (EMT), and a tubular membrane mixer (TM), were fabricated and compared to three commercially available mixers, Visco-Jet Micro mixer (VJM) and HS binary tee mixer with 2 and 10 μL volume (HS-2 and HS-10) mixing cartridges. Internal volumes ranged from 8.3 to 20.3 μL. Performance characteristics were evaluated by the Villermaux-Dushman reaction, noise in baseline conductance upon mixing an electrolyte solution with water, and dispersion/relative dispersion of an injected solute. No single characteristic would uniquely qualify a particular device. In typical postcolumn use when a small reagent flow is added to a principal flow stream using a low-pulsation high-end chromatographic pump, with the worst of these mixers, imperfect mixing accounted for 99.6% of the observed noise. EMT, BT, and TM with asymmetric inlets provided better mixing performances relative to VJM, HS-2, and HS-10 with symmetric inlet ports, especially when the secondary liquid flow rate was much lower than the principal stream-flow rate. Dispersion per unit residence time was singularly large for HS-2. Based on its mixing efficiency and small dispersion, the BT design was found to be the best for practicing postcolumn reaction. As an illustrative application, this was then used to introduce electrogenerated LiOH in a suppressed ion chromatography system to perform sensitive detection of weak acids in a second dimension. PMID:25426864

  6. The solution-adaptive numerical simulation of the 3D viscous flow in the serpentine coolant passage of a radial inflow turbine blade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawes, W. N.

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes the application of a solution-adaptive, three-dimensional Navier-Stokes solver to the problem of the flow in turbine internal coolant passages. First the variation of Nusselt number in a cylindrical, multi-ribbed duct is predicted and found to be in acceptable agreement with experimental data. Then the flow is computed in the serpentine coolant passage of a radial inflow turbine including modeling the internal baffles and pin fins. The aerodynamics of the passage, particularly that associated with the pin fins, is found to be complex. The predicted heat transfer coefficients allow zones of poor coolant penetration and potential hot spots to be identified.

  7. Post Column Derivatization Using Reaction Flow High Performance Liquid Chromatography Columns.

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew; Pravadali-Cekic, Sercan; Hua, Stanley; Kocic, Danijela; Camenzuli, Michelle; Dennis, Gary; Shalliker, Andrew

    2016-04-26

    A protocol for the use of reaction flow high performance liquid chromatography columns for methods employing post column derivatization (PCD) is presented. A major difficulty in adapting PCD to modern HPLC systems and columns is the need for large volume reaction coils that enable reagent mixing and then the derivatization reaction to take place. This large post column dead volume leads to band broadening, which results in a loss of observed separation efficiency and indeed detection in sensitivity. In reaction flow post column derivatization (RF-PCD) the derivatization reagent(s) are pumped against the flow of mobile phase into either one or two of the outer ports of the reaction flow column where it is mixed with column effluent inside a frit housed within the column end fitting. This technique allows for more efficient mixing of the column effluent and derivatization reagent(s) meaning that the volume of the reaction loops can be minimized or even eliminated altogether. It has been found that RF-PCD methods perform better than conventional PCD methods in terms of observed separation efficiency and signal to noise ratio. A further advantage of RF-PCD techniques is the ability to monitor effluent coming from the central port in its underivatized state. RF-PCD has currently been trialed on a relatively small range of post column reactions, however, there is currently no reason to suggest that RF-PCD could not be adapted to any existing one or two component (as long as both reagents are added at the same time) post column derivatization reaction.

  8. Reduced surface area chromatography for flow-through purification of viruses and virus like particles.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Ganesh; Ramaswamy, Senthilkumar; Asher, Damon; Mehta, Ushma; Leahy, Anne; Chung, Franklin; Cheng, Kwok-Shun

    2011-07-01

    A method for flow-through purification of viruses and virus like nano-particles using a combination of binding and size-exclusion chromatography was developed. This technique relies on minimizing the external surface area per unit volume available for virus binding by increasing the mean diameter of the beads used in the column. At the same time the impurity binding capacity of the column is maximized by utilizing beads with multiple functionalities of the optimum size. Purification of different types of viruses and virus-like-particles could be achieved using this technique. Flow-through purification of influenza virus using this technique yielded virus recoveries greater than 70-80% coupled with impurity removal greater than 80%. Finally an approach to optimize and facilitate process development using this technology is presented. Since the impurity binding occurs via a non-specific mechanism and virus recovery is achieved through reduced surface area, the technique is not limited to specific types of viruses and offers the potential as a universal purification tool.

  9. Flow rate dependent extra-column variance from injection in capillary liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Pankaj; Liu, Kun; Sharma, Sonika; Lawson, John S; Dennis Tolley, H; Lee, Milton L

    2015-02-01

    Efficiency and resolution in capillary liquid chromatography (LC) can be significantly affected by extra-column band broadening, especially for isocratic separations. This is particularly a concern in evaluating column bed structure using non-retained test compounds. The band broadening due to an injector supplied with a commercially available capillary LC system was characterized from experimental measurements. The extra-column variance from the injection valve was found to have an extra-column contribution independent of the injection volume, showing an exponential dependence on flow rate. The overall extra-column variance from the injection valve was found to vary from 34 to 23 nL. A new mathematical model was derived that explains this exponential contribution of extra-column variance on chromatographic performance. The chromatographic efficiency was compromised by ∼130% for a non-retained analyte because of injection valve dead volume. The measured chromatographic efficiency was greatly improved when a new nano-flow pumping system with integrated injection valve was used.

  10. Column properties and flow profiles of a flat, wide column for high-pressure liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Mriziq, Khaled S; Guiochon, Georges A

    2008-01-01

    The design and the construction of a pressurized, flat, wide column for high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are described. This apparatus, which is derived from instruments that implement over-pressured thin layer chromatography, can carry out only uni-dimensional chromatographic separations. However, it is intended to be the first step in the development of more powerful instruments that will be able to carry out two-dimensional chromatographic separations, in which case, the first separation would be a space-based separation, LC{sup x}, taking place along one side of the bed and the second separation would be a time-based separation, LC{sup t}, as in classical HPLC but proceeding along the flat column, not along a tube. The apparatus described consists of a pressurization chamber made of a Plexiglas block and a column chamber made of stainless steel. These two chambers are separated by a thin Mylar membrane. The column chamber is a cavity which is filled with a thick layer (ca. 1 mm) of the stationary phase. Suitable solvent inlet and outlet ports are located on two opposite sides of the sorbent layer. The design allows the preparation of a homogenous sorbent layer suitable to be used as a chromatographic column, the achievement of effective seals of the stationary phase layer against the chamber edges, and the homogenous flow of the mobile phase along the chamber. The entire width of the sorbent layer area can be used to develop separations or elute samples. The reproducible performance of the apparatus is demonstrated by the chromatographic separations of different dyes. This instrument is essentially designed for testing detector arrays to be used in a two-dimensional LC{sup x} x LC{sup t} instrument. The further development of two-dimension separation chromatographs based on the apparatus described is sketched.

  11. Radial engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kmicikiewicz, M.A.

    1988-03-01

    A radial engine is described comprising: a housing; equally spaced openings disposed in ring-like arrangement on the periphery of the housing; a piston and cylinder arrangement in each of the opening, a piston rod for each arrangement fixed to and extending radially inwardly from its respective piston and through its respective opening; shoe means pivotally attached at the other end of each of the piston rod; radial guide means extending in the housing in line with each of the piston rods, and the shoe means provided with guide means followers to ensure radial reciprocal movement of the piston rods and shoe means; and a connecting ring journaled on a crankshaft for circular translation motion in the housing, the ring including a circular rim. Each shoe means includes an arcuate follower member being slidably connected to the rim of the connecting ring.

  12. Characterization of branched ultrahigh molar mass polymers by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation and size exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Otte, T; Pasch, H; Macko, T; Brüll, R; Stadler, F J; Kaschta, J; Becker, F; Buback, M

    2011-07-01

    The molar mass distribution (MMD) of synthetic polymers is frequently analyzed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled to multi angle light scattering (MALS) detection. For ultrahigh molar mass (UHM) or branched polymers this method is not sufficient, because shear degradation and abnormal elution effects falsify the calculated molar mass distribution and information on branching. High temperatures above 130 °C have to be applied for dissolution and separation of semi-crystalline materials like polyolefins which requires special hardware setups. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) offers the possibility to overcome some of the main problems of SEC due to the absence of an obstructing porous stationary phase. The SEC-separation mainly depends on the pore size distribution of the used column set. The analyte molecules can enter the pores of the stationary phase in dependence on their hydrodynamic volume. The archived separation is a result of the retention time of the analyte species inside SEC-column which depends on the accessibility of the pores, the residence time inside the pores and the diffusion ability of the analyte molecules. The elution order in SEC is typically from low to high hydrodynamic volume. On the contrary AF4 separates according to the diffusion coefficient of the analyte molecules as long as the chosen conditions support the normal FFF-separation mechanism. The separation takes place in an empty channel and is caused by a cross-flow field perpendicular to the solvent flow. The analyte molecules will arrange in different channel heights depending on the diffusion coefficients. The parabolic-shaped flow profile inside the channel leads to different elution velocities. The species with low hydrodynamic volume will elute first while the species with high hydrodynamic volume elute later. The AF4 can be performed at ambient or high temperature (AT-/HT-AF4). We have analyzed one low molar mass polyethylene sample and a number of

  13. Large-scale purification of pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA using tangential flow filtration and multi-step chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bo; Yu, XiangHui; Yin, Yuhe; Liu, Xintao; Wu, Yongge; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Xizhen; Jiang, Chunlai; Kong, Wei

    2013-09-01

    The demand for pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA in vaccine applications and gene therapy has been increasing in recent years. In the present study, a process consisting of alkaline lysis, tangential flow filtration, purification by anion exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography and size exclusion chromatography was developed. The final product met the requirements for pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA. The chromosomal DNA content was <1 μg/mg plasmid DNA, and RNA was not detectable by agarose gel electrophoresis. Moreover, the protein content was <2 μg/mg plasmid DNA, and the endotoxin content was <10 EU/mg plasmid DNA. The process was scaled up to yield 800 mg of pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA from approximately 2 kg of bacterial cell paste. The overall yield of the final plasmid DNA reached 48%. Therefore, we have established a rapid and efficient production process for pharmaceutical-grade plasmid DNA.

  14. Liquid chromatography "on-flow" 1H nuclear magnetic resonance on native glycosphingolipid mixtures together with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry on the released oligosaccharides for screening and characterisation of carbohydrate-based antigens from pig lungs.

    PubMed

    Bäcker, A E; Thorbert, S; Rakotonirainy, O; Hallberg, E C; Olling, A; Gustavsson, M; Samuelsson, B E; Soussi, B

    1999-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids were prepared from pig lung and pooled into two fractions with (i) < or = 3 sugar residues, and (ii) > or = 3 sugar residues. Oligosaccharides were prepared and used for gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry. The glycolipid fractions i and ii were further characterised and purified using a novel method based on high performance liquid chromatography "on-flow" proton nuclear magnetic resonance. The LC "on-flow" NMR technique showed good chromatographic separation and gave NMR spectral information which could be used as guidance for pooling of the separated mixture glycolipids. Conventional 1H NMR, thin layer immunostaining, gas chromatography, gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry were used to characterise the glycolipids and to validate LC-NMR spectral data.

  15. Method for (236)U Determination in Seawater Using Flow Injection Extraction Chromatography and Accelerator Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jixin; Hou, Xiaolin; Steier, Peter; Nielsen, Sven; Golser, Robin

    2015-07-21

    An automated analytical method implemented in a flow injection (FI) system was developed for rapid determination of (236)U in 10 L seawater samples. (238)U was used as a chemical yield tracer for the whole procedure, in which extraction chromatography (UTEVA) was exploited to purify uranium, after an effective iron hydroxide coprecipitation. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) was applied for quantifying the (236)U/(238)U ratio, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) was used to determine the absolute concentration of (238)U; thus, the concentration of (236)U can be calculated. The key experimental parameters affecting the analytical effectiveness were investigated and optimized in order to achieve high chemical yields and simple and rapid analysis as well as low procedure background. Besides, the operational conditions for the target preparation prior to the AMS measurement were optimized, on the basis of studying the coprecipitation behavior of uranium with iron hydroxide. The analytical results indicate that the developed method is simple and robust, providing satisfactory chemical yields (80-100%) and high analysis speed (4 h/sample), which could be an appealing alternative to conventional manual methods for (236)U determination in its tracer application. PMID:26105019

  16. Accurate quadrupole MS peak reconstruction in optimized gas-flow comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tranchida, Peter Quinto; Purcaro, Giorgia; Sciarrone, Danilo; Dugo, Paola; Dugo, Giovanni; Mondello, Luigi

    2010-09-01

    In the present research, a split-flow comprehensive 2-D GC-quadrupole MS (qMS) method was developed using: a primary apolar 30 m×0.25 mm id×0.25 μm d(f) capillary linked, via a T-union, to a secondary polar 1.0 m×0.05 mm id×0.05 μm d(f) capillary and to a 0.10 m×0.05 mm id×0.05 μm d(f) uncoated column segment. The GC×GC-qMS instrument was equipped with two GC ovens and a loop-type modulator. The polar column was connected to the MS, whereas the uncoated column directed most of the first-dimension effluent to waste and enabled the generation of optimum gas velocities in both dimensions, namely circa 20 and 80 cm/s in the first and second dimensions, respectively. The rapid-scanning qMS was operated at a scan speed of 10,000 amu/s, a 25-Hz data acquisition frequency (scan time+interscan time: 40 ms), and with a normal GC mass range (m/z 40-360). Chromatography bands at the second-dimension outlet were never less than 360 ms wide (6σ), enabling the acquisition of at least 10 spectra/peak.

  17. Fully automated screening of veterinary drugs in milk by turbulent flow chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Stolker, Alida A. M.; Peters, Ruud J. B.; Zuiderent, Richard; DiBussolo, Joseph M.

    2010-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in screening methods for quick and sensitive analysis of various classes of veterinary drugs with limited sample pre-treatment. Turbulent flow chromatography in combination with tandem mass spectrometry has been applied for the first time as an efficient screening method in routine analysis of milk samples. Eight veterinary drugs, belonging to seven different classes were selected for this study. After developing and optimising the method, parameters such as linearity, repeatability, matrix effects and carry-over were studied. The screening method was then tested in the routine analysis of 12 raw milk samples. Even without internal standards, the linearity of the method was found to be good in the concentration range of 50 to 500 µg/L. Regarding repeatability, RSDs below 12% were obtained for all analytes, with only a few exceptions. The limits of detection were between 0.1 and 5.2 µg/L, far below the maximum residue levels for milk set by the EU regulations. While matrix effects—ion suppression or enhancement—are obtained for all the analytes the method has proved to be useful for screening purposes because of its sensitivity, linearity and repeatability. Furthermore, when performing the routine analysis of the raw milk samples, no false positive or negative results were obtained. PMID:20379812

  18. Determination of aromatic hydrocarbons in gasolines by flow modulated comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Diehl, John W; Di Sanzo, Frank P

    2005-07-01

    Valve based/flow modulated comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC x GC-FID) was used for quantification of C6 through C12 aromatic hydrocarbons by carbon number in gasolines. A 0.53 mm i.d. non-polar first dimension column was coupled to a 0.53 mm i.d. polar second dimension column through a double loop eight port valve modulator. Depending on the sample type, normalized percent and internal standard (I.S.) quantification was performed. For normalized percent quantification, a one-point calibration performed with one aromatic compound per carbon number/class provided an average % accuracy of 2.1% and a short-term n--1 relative standard deviation of 1.0%. For total aromatic compounds good agreement with the more complex conventional multidimensional GC technique was obtained. However, GC x GC has certain advantages over most other methods, mainly increased selectivity for total and carbon number aromatic content. The identification of the aromatic hydrocarbons was confirmed by GC x GC-MS. PMID:16008054

  19. Selective and Sensitive Chemiluminescence Determination of MCPB: Flow Injection and Liquid Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Meseguer-Lloret, Susana; Torres-Cartas, Sagrario; Catalá-Icardo, Mónica; Gómez-Benito, Carmen

    2016-02-01

    Two new chemiluminescence (CL) methods are described for the determination of the herbicide 4-(4-chloro-o-tolyloxy) butyric acid (MCPB). First, a flow injection chemiluminescence (FI-CL) method is proposed. In this method, MCPB is photodegraded with an ultraviolet (UV) lamp and the photoproducts formed provide a great CL signal when they react with ferricyanide in basic medium. Second, a high-performance liquid chromatography chemiluminescence (HPLC-CL) method is proposed. In this method, before the photodegradation and CL reaction, the MCPB and other phenoxyacid herbicides are separated in a C18 column. The experimental conditions for the FI-CL and HPLC-CL methods are optimized. Both methods present good sensitivity, the detection limits being 0.12 µg L(-1) and 0.1 µg L(-1) (for FI-CL and HPLC-CL, respectively) when solid phase extraction (SPE) is applied. Intra- and interday relative standard deviations are below 9.9%. The methods have been satisfactorily applied to the analysis of natural water samples. FI-CL method can be employed for the determination of MCPB in simple water samples and for the screening of complex water samples in a fast, economic, and simple way. The HPLC-CL method is more selective, and allows samples that have not been resolved with the FI-CL method to be solved.

  20. Influence of heat and mass transfer, initial stress and radially varying magnetic field on the peristaltic flow in an annulus with gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd-Alla, A. M.; Abo-Dahab, S. M.; El-Shahrany, H. D.

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, the effects of both initial stress, radially varying and gravity field on the peristaltic flow of an incompressible MHD Newtonian fluid in a vertical annulus have been studied under the assumption of long wavelength and low-Reynolds number. The analytical solution has been derived for the temperature, concentration and velocity. The results for velocity, concentration and temperature obtained in the analytical form have been evaluated numerically and discussed briefly. The effect of the non-dimensional wave amplitude, the coefficient of viscosity, Sort number, Schmidt number, initial stress, gravitational field and the dimensionless time-mean flow in the wave frame are analyzed theoretically and computed numerically. The expressions for pressure rise, temperature, concentration field, velocity and pressure gradient are sketched for various embedded parameters and interpreted. Numerical results are given and illustrated graphically in each case considered. Comparison was made with the results obtained in the presence and absence of initial stress and gravitational field.

  1. Stopping and radial flow in central {sup 58}Ni+{sup 58}Ni collisions between 1A and 2AGeV

    SciTech Connect

    Buta, A.; Legrand, I.; Petrovici, M.; Simion, V.; Berek, G.; Fodor, Z.; Kecskemeti, J.; Seres, Z.; Alard, J.P.; Amouroux, V.; Bastid, N.; Dupieux, P.; Fraysse, L.; Genoux-Lubain, A.; Pras, P.; Biegansky, J.; Kotte, R.; Moesner, J.; Neubert, W.; Wohlfarth, D.; Herrmann, N.; Eskef, M.; Goebels, G.; Haefele, E.; Korolija, M.; Mohren, S.; Pelte, D.; Trzaska, M.; Belyaev, I.; Lebedev, A.; Somov, A.; Zhilin, A.; Manko, V.; Vasiliev, M.A.; Coffin, J.P.; Crochet, P.; de Schauenburg, B.; Dona, R.; Fintz, P.; Guillaume, G.; Jundt, F.; Kuhn, C.; Maazouzi, C.; Rami, F.; Roy, C.; Tizniti, L.; Wagner, P.

    1998-01-01

    The production of charged pions, protons, and deuterons has been studied in central collisions of {sup 58}Ni on {sup 58}Ni at incident beam energies of 1.06A, 1.45A, and 1.93A GeV. The dependence of transverse-momentum and rapidity spectra on the beam energy and on the centrality of the collison is presented. It is shown that the scaling of the mean rapidity shift of protons established for between 10{ital A} and 200{ital A} GeV at the Brookhaven AGS and the CERN SPS accelerators energies is valid down to 1A GeV. The degree of nuclear stopping is discussed; quantum molecular dynamics calculations reproduce the measured proton rapidity spectra for the most central events reasonably well, but do not show any sensitivity between the soft and the hard equation of state. A radial flow analysis, using the midrapidity transverse-momentum spectra, delivers freeze-out temperatures T and radial flow velocities {beta}{sub r} which increase with beam energy up to 2A GeV; in comparison to the existing data of Au on Au over a large range of energies, only {beta}{sub r} shows a system size dependence. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Determination of Flow Rates in Capillary Liquid Chromatography Coupled to a Nanoelectrospray Source using Droplet Image Analysis Software.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Alejandro M; Soto, Axel J; Fawcett, James P

    2016-08-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS) is widely used in proteomic and metabolomic workflows. Considerable analytical improvements have been observed when the components of LC systems are scaled down. Currently, nano-ESI is typically done at capillary LC flow rates ranging from 200 to 300 nL/min. At these flow rates, trouble shooting and leak detection of LC systems has become increasingly challenging. In this paper we present a novel proof-of-concept approach to measure flow rates at the tip of electrospray emitters when the ionization voltage is turned off. This was achieved by estimating the changes in the droplet volume over time using digital image analysis. The results are comparable with the traditional methods of measuring flow rates, with the potential advantages of being fully automatable and nondisruptive. PMID:27351615

  3. Purification of Hemoglobin from Red Blood Cells using Tangential Flow Filtration and Immobilized Metal Ion Affinity Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Elmer, Jacob; Harris, David; Palmer, Andre F.

    2011-01-01

    Two methods for purifying hemoglobin (Hb) from red blood cells (RBCs) are examined and compared. In the first method, red blood cell lysate is clarified with a 50 nm tangential flow filter and hemoglobin is purified using immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC). In the second method, RBC lysate is processed with 50 nm, 500 kDa, and 50-100 kDa tangential flow filters, then hemoglobin is purified with IMAC. Our results show that the hemoglobins from both processes produce identical Hb products that are ultrapure and retain their biophysical properties (except for chicken hemoglobin, which shows erratic oxygen binding behavior after purification). Therefore, the most efficient method for Hb purification appears to be clarification with a 50 nm tangential flow filter, followed by purification with IMAC, and sample concentration/polishing on a 10-50 kDa tangential flow filter. PMID:21195679

  4. Upscaling Mixed-Limited Reactions for Equilibrium and Fast Complete Kinetic Reactions in Radial and 1-D Flow.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A. A. M.; Ginn, T. R.; Le Borgne, T.; Dentz, M.

    2015-12-01

    The new upscaling approach that implements the lamella concept utilizing the Lagrangian frame of reference gives a promising result when applied to the calcite precipitation equilibrium mixing-limited reaction. Here it is applied to the radial injection case representing aquifer remediation. To approximate aerobic biodegradation, the irreversible bimolecular kinetic reaction case is studied here also using the lamella approach for the one dimensional case. The theoretical rate for the mixing-limited kinetic reaction is derived from Gramling et al. (2002) for the special case where the total concentration of the injected component equals the total concentration of the ambient component, and then this special case is generalized for arbitrary concentrations. The results for both the equilibrium and the kinetic reaction cases are tested numerically versus COMSOL which matched the theoretical cases very well.

  5. Home-made online hyphenation of pressurized liquid extraction, turbulent flow chromatography, and high performance liquid chromatography, Cistanche deserticola as a case study.

    PubMed

    Song, Qingqing; Li, Jun; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Yuan; Guo, Liping; Jiang, Yong; Song, Yuelin; Tu, Pengfei

    2016-03-18

    Incompatibility between the conventional pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) devices and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) extensively hinders direct and green chemical analysis of herbal materials. Herein, a facile PLE module was configured, and then it was online hyphenated with HPLC via a turbulent flow chromatography (TFC) column. Regarding PLE module, a long PEEK tube (0.13 × 1000 mm) was employed to generate desired pressure (approximately 13.0 MPa) when warm acidic water (70 °C) was delivered as extraction solvent at a high flow rate (2.5 mL/min), and a hollow guard column (3.0 × 4.0 mm) was implemented to hold crude materials. Effluent was collected from the outlet of PEEK tube, concentrated, and subjected onto HPLC coupled with hybrid ion trap-time of flight mass spectrometer to assess the extraction efficiency and also to profile the chemical composition of Cistanche deserticola (CD) that is honored as "Ginseng of the desert". Afterwards, a TFC column was introduced to accomplish online transmission of low molecule weight components from PLE module to HPLC coupled with diode array detection, and two electronic 6-port/2-channel valves were in charge of alternating the whole system between extraction (0-3.0 min) and elution (3.0-35.0 min) phases. Quantitative method was developed and validated for simultaneous determination of eight primary phenylethanoid glycosides in CD using online PLE-TFC-HPLC. All findings demonstrated that the home-made platform is advantageous at direct chemical analysis, as well as time-, solvent-, and material-savings, suggesting a robust tool for chemical fingerprinting of herbs.

  6. Quantitative high-throughput analysis of 16 (fluoro)quinolones in honey using automated extraction by turbulent flow chromatography coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mottier, Pascal; Hammel, Yves-Alexis; Gremaud, Eric; Guy, Philippe A

    2008-01-01

    A method making use of turbulent flow chromatography automated online extraction with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was developed for the analysis of 4 quinolones and 12 fluoroquinolones in honey. The manual sample preparation was limited to a simple dilution of the honey test portion in water followed by a filtration. The extract was online purified on a large particle size extraction column where the sample matrix was washed away while the analytes were retained. Subsequently, the analytes were eluted from the extraction column onto an analytical column by means of an organic solvent prior to chromatographic separation and MS detection. Validation was performed at three fortification levels (i.e., 5, 20, and 50 microg/kg) in three different honeys (acacia, multiflower, and forest) using the single-point calibration procedure by means of either a 10 or 25 microg/kg calibrant. Good recovery (85-127%, median 101%) as well as within-day (2-18%, median 6%) and between-day (2-42%, median 9%) precision values was obtained whatever the level of fortification and the analyte surveyed. Due to the complexity of the honey matrix and the large variation of the MS/MS transition reaction signals, which were honey-dependent, the limit of quantification for all compounds was arbitrarily set at the lowest fortification level considered during the validation, e.g., 5 microg/kg. This method has been successfully applied in a minisurvey of 34 honeys, showing ciprofloxacin and norfloxacin as the main (fluoro)quinolone antibiotics administered to treat bacterial diseases of bees. Turbulent flow chromatography coupled to LC-MS/MS showed a strong potential as an alternative method compared to those making use of offline sample preparation, in terms of both increasing the analysis throughput and obtaining higher reproducibility linked to automation to ensure the absence of contaminants in honey samples.

  7. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry determination of perfluoroalkyl acids in environmental solid extracts after phospholipid removal and on-line turbulent flow chromatography purification.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, M; Polesello, S; Rusconi, M; Valsecchi, S

    2016-07-01

    An on-line TFC (Turbulent Flow Chromatography) clean up procedures coupled with UHPLC-MS/MS (Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry) multi-residue method was developed for the simultaneous determination of 8 perfluroalkyl carboxylic acids (PFCA, from 5 to 12 carbon atoms) and 3 perfluoroalkyl sulfonic acids (PFSA, from 4 to 8 carbon atoms) in environmental solid matrices. Fast sample preparation procedure was based on a sonication-assisted extraction with acetonitrile. Phospholipids in biological samples were fully removed by an off-line SPE purification before injection, using HybridSPE(®) Phospholipid Ultra cartridges. The development of the on-line TFC clean-up procedure regarded the choice of the stationary phase, the optimization of the mobile phase composition, flow rate and injected volume. The validation of the optimized method included the evaluation of matrix effects, accuracy and reproducibility. Signal suppression in the analysis of fortified extracts ranged from 1 to 60%, and this problem was overcome by using isotopic dilution. Since no certified reference materials were available for PFAS in these matrices, accuracy was evaluated by recoveries on spiked clam samples which were 98-133% for PFCAs and 40-60% for PFSAs. MLDs and MLQs ranged from 0.03 to 0.3ngg(-1) wet weight and from 0.1 to 0.9ngg(-1) wet weight respectively. Repeatability (intra-day precision) and reproducibility (inter-day precision) showed RSD from 3 to 13% and from 4 to 27% respectively. Validated on-line TFC/UHPLC-MS/MS method has been applied for the determination of perfluoroalkyl acids in different solid matrices (sediment, fish, bivalves and bird yolk). PMID:27237594

  8. Radial lean direct injection burner

    DOEpatents

    Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2012-09-04

    A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

  9. ANALYTICAL APPROXIMATION OF THE BIODEGRADATION RATE FOR IN SITU BIOREMEDIATION OF GROUNDWATER UNDER IDEAL RADIAL FLOW CONDITIONS. (R824785)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We derive the long-term biodegradation rate of an organic contaminant (substrate) for an in situ bioremediation model with axisymmetric flow conditions. The model presumes that a nonsorbing electron acceptor is injected into a saturated homogeneous porous medium which initially c...

  10. The effects of the secondary fluid temperature on the energy transfer in an unsteady ejector with a radial-flow diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababneh, Amer Khalil; Jawarneh, Ali M.; Tlilan, Hitham M.; Ababneh, Mohammad K.

    2009-11-01

    Unsteady ejectors are devices whereby energy is exchanged between directly interacting fluids. Unlike steady ejectors, the mechanism responsible for the energy transfer is reversible in nature and thus higher efficiencies are perceivable. A potential application for PEE is for enhancement in output power per weight as in turbochargers. The unsteady ejector when used as a turbocharger the device is expected to perform under wide range of ambient temperatures. Therefore, it is important to investigate the effects of the temperature of the induced ambient air on the energy transfer. The radial-flow ejector, which usually leads to higher-pressure ratios with fewer stages, was selected for the investigation. The flow field is investigated at two Mach numbers 2.5 and 3.0 utilizing rectangular short-length supersonic nozzles for accelerating the primary fluid. Fundamental to the enhancement of these devices performance relies on the management of the flow field in such a way to minimize entropy production. The numerical analyses were conducted utilizing a package of computational fluid dynamics.

  11. Two-dimensional turbulent flow chromatography coupled on-line to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for solution-based ligand screening against multiple proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian-Liang; An, Jing-Jing; Li, Ping; Li, Hui-Jun; Jiang, Yan; Cheng, Jie-Fei

    2009-03-20

    We present herein a novel bioseparation/chemical analysis strategy for protein-ligand screening and affinity ranking in compound mixtures, designed to increase screening rates and improve sensitivity and ruggedness in performance. The strategy is carried out by combining on-line two-dimensional turbulent flow chromatography (2D-TFC) with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), and accomplished through the following steps: (1) a reversed-phase TFC stage to separate the protein/ligand complex from the unbound free molecules, (2) an on-line dissociation process to release the bound ligands from the complexes, and (3) a second mixed-mode cation-exchange/reversed-phase TFC stage to trap the bound ligands and to remove the proteins and salts, followed by LC-MS analysis for identification and determination of the binding affinities. The technique can implement an ultra-fast isolation of protein/ligand complex with the retention time of a complex peak in about 5s, and on-line prepare the "clean" sample to be directly compatible with the LC-MS analysis. The improvement in performance of this 2D-TFC/LC-MS approach over the conventional approach has been demonstrated by determining affinity-selected ligands of the target proteins acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase from a small library with known binding affinities and a steroidal alkaloid library composed of structurally similar compounds. Our results show that 2D-TFC/LC-MS is a generic and efficient tool for high-throughput screening of ligands with low-to-high binding affinities, and structure-activity relationship evaluation. PMID:19203758

  12. Analysis of endocrine disrupters and related compounds in sediments and sewage sludge using on-line turbulent flow chromatography-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gorga, Marina; Insa, Sara; Petrovic, Mira; Barceló, Damià

    2014-07-25

    A novel fully automated method based on dual column switching using turbulent flow chromatography followed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (TFC-LC-MS/MS) was applied for the determination of endocrine disruptors (EDCs) and related compounds in sediment and sewage sludge samples. This method allows the unequivocal identification and quantification of the most relevant environmental EDCs such as natural and synthetic estrogens and their conjugates, antimicrobials, parabens, bisphenol A (BPA), alkylphenolic compounds, benzotriazoles, and organophosphorus flame retardants, minimizing time of analysis and alleviating matrix effects. Applying this technique, after the extraction of the target compounds by pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), sediment and sewage sludge extracts were directly injected to the chromatographic system and the analytes were concentrated into the clean-up loading column. Using six-port switching system, the analytes were transferred to the analytical column for subsequent detection by MS-MS (QqQ). In order to optimize this multiplexing system, a comparative study employing six types of TurboFlow™ columns, with different chemical modifications, was performed to achieve the maximum retention of analytes and best elimination of matrix components. Using the optimized protocol low limits of quantification (LOQs) were obtained ranging from 0.0083 to 1.6 ng/g for sediment samples and from 0.10 to 125 ng/g for sewage sludge samples (except for alkylphenol monoethoxylate). The method was used to evaluate the presence and fate of target EDCs in the Ebro River which is the most important river in Spain with intensive agricultural and industrial activities in the basin that contribute to deteriorating soil and water quality. PMID:24909438

  13. Oxidation of element 102, nobelium, with flow electrolytic column chromatography on an atom-at-a-time scale.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Atsushi; Kasamatsu, Yoshitaka; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Asai, Masato; Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro; Ishii, Yasuo; Toume, Hayato; Nishinaka, Ichiro; Haba, Hiromitsu; Ooe, Kazuhiro; Sato, Wataru; Shinohara, Atsushi; Akiyama, Kazuhiko; Nagame, Yuichiro

    2009-07-01

    We report here on the successful oxidation of element 102, nobelium (No), on an atom-at-a-time scale in 0.1 M alpha-hydroxyisobutyric acid (alpha-HIB) solution using a newly developed technique, flow electrolytic column chromatography. It is found that the most stable ion, No(2+), is oxidized to No(3+) within 3 min and that the oxidized No complex with alpha-HIB holds the trivalent state in the column above an applied potential of 1.0 V.

  14. Oxidation of element 102, nobelium, with flow electrolytic column chromatography on an atom-at-a-time scale.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Atsushi; Kasamatsu, Yoshitaka; Tsukada, Kazuaki; Asai, Masato; Kitatsuji, Yoshihiro; Ishii, Yasuo; Toume, Hayato; Nishinaka, Ichiro; Haba, Hiromitsu; Ooe, Kazuhiro; Sato, Wataru; Shinohara, Atsushi; Akiyama, Kazuhiko; Nagame, Yuichiro

    2009-07-01

    We report here on the successful oxidation of element 102, nobelium (No), on an atom-at-a-time scale in 0.1 M alpha-hydroxyisobutyric acid (alpha-HIB) solution using a newly developed technique, flow electrolytic column chromatography. It is found that the most stable ion, No(2+), is oxidized to No(3+) within 3 min and that the oxidized No complex with alpha-HIB holds the trivalent state in the column above an applied potential of 1.0 V. PMID:19514720

  15. Packing of large-scale chromatography columns with irregularly shaped glass based resins using a stop-flow method

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Sun Chau; Chia, Celeste; Mok, Yanglin; Pattnaik, Priyabrata

    2014-01-01

    Rigid chromatography resins, such as controlled pore glass based adsorbents, offer the advantage of high permeability and a linear pressure-flow relationship irrespective of column diameter which improves process time and maximizes productivity. However, the rigidity and irregularly shaped nature of these resins often present challenges in achieving consistent and uniform packed beds as formation of bridges between resin particles can hinder bed consolidation. The standard flow-pack method when applied to irregularly shaped particles does not yield well-consolidated packed beds, resulting in formation of a head space and increased band broadening during operation. Vibration packing methods requiring the use of pneumatically driven vibrators are recommended to achieve full packed bed consolidation but limitations in manufacturing facilities and equipment may prevent the implementation of such devices. The stop-flow packing method was developed as an improvement over the flow-pack method to overcome these limitations and to improve bed consolidation without the use of vibrating devices. Transition analysis of large-scale columns packed using the stop-flow method over multiple cycles has shown a two- to three-fold reduction of change in bed integrity values as compared to a flow-packed bed demonstrating an improvement in packed bed stability in terms of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) and peak asymmetry (As). PMID:25080096

  16. Packing of large-scale chromatography columns with irregularly shaped glass based resins using a stop-flow method.

    PubMed

    Siu, Sun Chau; Chia, Celeste; Mok, Yanglin; Pattnaik, Priyabrata

    2014-01-01

    Rigid chromatography resins, such as controlled pore glass based adsorbents, offer the advantage of high permeability and a linear pressure-flow relationship irrespective of column diameter which improves process time and maximizes productivity. However, the rigidity and irregularly shaped nature of these resins often present challenges in achieving consistent and uniform packed beds as formation of bridges between resin particles can hinder bed consolidation. The standard flow-pack method when applied to irregularly shaped particles does not yield well-consolidated packed beds, resulting in formation of a head space and increased band broadening during operation. Vibration packing methods requiring the use of pneumatically driven vibrators are recommended to achieve full packed bed consolidation but limitations in manufacturing facilities and equipment may prevent the implementation of such devices. The stop-flow packing method was developed as an improvement over the flow-pack method to overcome these limitations and to improve bed consolidation without the use of vibrating devices. Transition analysis of large-scale columns packed using the stop-flow method over multiple cycles has shown a two- to three-fold reduction of change in bed integrity values as compared to a flow-packed bed demonstrating an improvement in packed bed stability in terms of the height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) and peak asymmetry (As ). PMID:25080096

  17. Minimizing ultraviolet noise due to mis-matches between detector flow cell and post column mobile phase temperatures in supercritical fluid chromatography: effect of flow cell design.

    PubMed

    Berger, Terry A

    2014-10-17

    A mis-match between the post-column mobile phase temperature and the UV detector flow cell temperature can cause significant UV noise in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). Deviations as little as 5 °C can increase noise as much as 5 times, making the detector unsuited for trace analysis. Two approaches were used to minimize this noise. When a flow cell was in direct thermal contact (metal on metal) with the detector optical bench, the mobile phase temperature was actively controlled to the measured flow cell temperature, by using one of the heat exchangers (HX) in the column compartment. However, with some older, but still widely used flow cell designs, this required repeated, hourly monitoring of the flow cell temperature and repeated manual adjustment of the heat exchanger temperature, due to thermal drift. Flow cell design had a strong influence on susceptibility to this thermally induced noise. Thermally insulating the flow cell from the optical bench made some cells much less susceptible to such thermally induced noise. Five different flow cells, some insulated, some un-insulated, were evaluated. Most had a truncated conical flow path, but one had a cylindrical flow path. Using either approach, the ASTM noise, with a 10mm, 13 μL conical flow cell, could be optimized to ≈0.007 mAU at 2.5 Hz, in SFC, which is very near the 0.006 mAU manufacturer's specification for HPLC. The insulated version of this flow cell required far less optimization, compared to the un-insulated version. At 150 bar, an experimental 3mm, 2 μL flow cell, with only one side insulated, yielded noise slightly too high (≈0.16-0.18 mAU) for trace analysis, at 80 Hz. However, at 200 bar, noise at 80 Hz was <0.06 mAU, which should allow quantification of a 1 mAU tall trace component with a signal to noise ratio (S/N) >10. Even partially un-insulated, this flow cell design was much less susceptible to thermally induced noise. Further insulating this flow cell design failed to improve

  18. Minimizing ultraviolet noise due to mis-matches between detector flow cell and post column mobile phase temperatures in supercritical fluid chromatography: effect of flow cell design.

    PubMed

    Berger, Terry A

    2014-10-17

    A mis-match between the post-column mobile phase temperature and the UV detector flow cell temperature can cause significant UV noise in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). Deviations as little as 5 °C can increase noise as much as 5 times, making the detector unsuited for trace analysis. Two approaches were used to minimize this noise. When a flow cell was in direct thermal contact (metal on metal) with the detector optical bench, the mobile phase temperature was actively controlled to the measured flow cell temperature, by using one of the heat exchangers (HX) in the column compartment. However, with some older, but still widely used flow cell designs, this required repeated, hourly monitoring of the flow cell temperature and repeated manual adjustment of the heat exchanger temperature, due to thermal drift. Flow cell design had a strong influence on susceptibility to this thermally induced noise. Thermally insulating the flow cell from the optical bench made some cells much less susceptible to such thermally induced noise. Five different flow cells, some insulated, some un-insulated, were evaluated. Most had a truncated conical flow path, but one had a cylindrical flow path. Using either approach, the ASTM noise, with a 10mm, 13 μL conical flow cell, could be optimized to ≈0.007 mAU at 2.5 Hz, in SFC, which is very near the 0.006 mAU manufacturer's specification for HPLC. The insulated version of this flow cell required far less optimization, compared to the un-insulated version. At 150 bar, an experimental 3mm, 2 μL flow cell, with only one side insulated, yielded noise slightly too high (≈0.16-0.18 mAU) for trace analysis, at 80 Hz. However, at 200 bar, noise at 80 Hz was <0.06 mAU, which should allow quantification of a 1 mAU tall trace component with a signal to noise ratio (S/N) >10. Even partially un-insulated, this flow cell design was much less susceptible to thermally induced noise. Further insulating this flow cell design failed to improve

  19. Numerical investigation of a coupled moving boundary model of radial flow in low-permeable stress-sensitive reservoir with threshold pressure gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen-Chao, Liu; Yue-Wu, Liu; Cong-Cong, Niu; Guo-Feng, Han; Yi-Zhao, Wan

    2016-02-01

    The threshold pressure gradient and formation stress-sensitive effect as the two prominent physical phenomena in the development of a low-permeable reservoir are both considered here for building a new coupled moving boundary model of radial flow in porous medium. Moreover, the wellbore storage and skin effect are both incorporated into the inner boundary conditions in the model. It is known that the new coupled moving boundary model has strong nonlinearity. A coordinate transformation based fully implicit finite difference method is adopted to obtain its numerical solutions. The involved coordinate transformation can equivalently transform the dynamic flow region for the moving boundary model into a fixed region as a unit circle, which is very convenient for the model computation by the finite difference method on fixed spatial grids. By comparing the numerical solution obtained from other different numerical method in the existing literature, its validity can be verified. Eventually, the effects of permeability modulus, threshold pressure gradient, wellbore storage coefficient, and skin factor on the transient wellbore pressure, the derivative, and the formation pressure distribution are analyzed respectively. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51404232), the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2014M561074), and the National Science and Technology Major Project, China (Grant No. 2011ZX05038003).

  20. Radial Erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The ejecta surrounding the crater (off image to the left) in this image has undergone significant erosion by the wind. The wind has stripped the surface features from the ejecta and has started to winnow away the ejecta blanket. Near the margin of the ejecta the wind is eroding along a radial pattern -- taking advantage of radial emplacement. Note the steep margin of the ejecta blanket. Most, if not all, of the fine ejecta material has been removed and the wind in now working on the more massive continuous ejecta blanket.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 12.5, Longitude 197.4 East (162.6 West). 37 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Effects of climatic conditions on radial growth and sap-flow along an elevation gradient in an inner-alpine dry valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obojes, Nikolaus; Newesely, Christian; Bertoldi, Giacomo; Tassser, Erich; Oberhuber, Walter; Mayr, Stefan; Tappeiner, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    Water availability in mountain forests might change in the future due to rising temperatures and changing precipitation patterns, affecting tree water relations and growth conditions. Changing temperature and precipitation along an elevation gradient in an inner-alpine dry valley in South Tyrol-Italy were used to investigate possible effects of climate change on the transpiration and growth of European Larch (Larix decidua). Stem circumference variation of European Larch was measured for 4 years (2012-2015) with automatic band dendrometers and sap flow for 2 years (2013-2014) with trunk heat balance sensors at 3 sites at elevations of 1115 m, 1715 m, and 1990 m above sea level at a SE-exposed slope. During the first two, rather dry, years, transpiration and stem circumference were reduced during dry periods of one to three weeks at the two lower but not at the highest site. As a consequence, overall yearly radial growth was largest at the highest site in those two years. In 2014, with very high precipitation and colder summer temperatures no correlation of elevation, transpiration, and radial growth was observed. In 2015, with a dry and hot summer, initially high growth rates were strongly reduced after the end of May at the two lower sites. Overall the radial growth of Larix decidua seems to be limited by water scarcity up to an elevation of more than 1700 m a.s.l. in our study area except for unusually wet years. Our 4-year measurements were confirmed by dendro-climatic analysis of stem cores taken at five sites (the three original ones plus two additional sites at 1070 and at the forest line at 2250m) covering the last 50 to 150 years. Year ring widths were lower and highly correlated to precipitation at the lowest sites, and overall highest at the 1990 m site. Our results show that the growth of Larix decidua, which is often considered as more drought resistant than e.g. Picea abies, is limited by water availability at dry conditions in the Alps which might

  2. Numerical investigation into the effects of ordered particle packing and slip flow on the performance of chromatography.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiaohong; Wang, Qiuwang

    2013-05-01

    The pressure drop and the plate height of chromatography columns packed with particles in the face-centered cubic, the body-centered cubic and the simple cubic configurations are calculated by a volume averaging method model. It is found that the Kozeny-Carman equation provides a reasonable prediction of the pressure drop when particles are in the face-centered cubic configuration, but overestimates the pressure drop when particles are in the body-centered cubic and the simple cubic configurations. The face-centered cubic configuration has the advantage to provide a smaller longitudinal dispersion coefficient than the body-centered cubic, the simple cubic, and the random configurations. The pressure drop and the plate height for slip flow through particles in the face-centered cubic configuration are lower than that for no-slip flow. The values of the smallest reduced plate height of columns packed with particles in the face-centered cubic configuration for no-slip flow and slip flow are about 0.084 and 0.059, respectively. The plate height of the ordered particle packing structures is smaller and the effect of slip flow on the plate height is less remarkable than results reported in literature.

  3. Development and validation of a radial inflow turbine model for simulation of the SNL S-CO2 split-flow loop.

    SciTech Connect

    Vilim, R. B.

    2012-07-31

    A one-dimensional model for a radial inflow turbine has been developed for super-critical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle applications. The model accounts for the main phenomena present in the volute, nozzle, and impeller of a single-stage turbine. These phenomena include internal losses due to friction, blade loading, and angle of incidence and parasitic losses due to windage and blade-housing leakage. The model has been added as a component to the G-PASS plant systems code. The model was developed to support the analysis of S-CO{sub 2} cycles in conjunction with small-scale loop experiments. Such loops operate at less than a MWt thermal input. Their size permits components to be reconfigured in new arrangements relatively easily and economically. However, the small thermal input combined with the properties of carbon dioxide lead to turbomachines with impeller diameters of only one to two inches. At these sizes the dominant phenomena differ from those in larger more typical machines. There is almost no treatment in the literature of turbomachines at these sizes. The present work therefore is aimed at developing turbomachine models that support the task of S-CO{sub 2} cycle analysis using small-scale tests. Model predictions were compared against data from an experiment performed for Sandia National Laboratories in the split-flow Brayton cycle loop currently located at Barber-Nichols Inc. The split-flow loop incorporates two turbo-alternator-compressor (TAC) units each incorporating a radial inflow turbine and a radial flow compressor on a common shaft. The predicted thermodynamic conditions at the outlet of the turbine on the main compressor shaft were compared with measured values at different shaft speeds. Two modifications to the original model were needed to better match the experiment data. First, a representation of the heat loss from the volute downstream of the sensed inlet temperature was added. Second, an empirical multiplicative factor was

  4. Radial Inflow Turboexpander Redesign

    SciTech Connect

    William G. Price

    2001-09-24

    Steamboat Envirosystems, LLC (SELC) was awarded a grant in accordance with the DOE Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Development. Atlas-Copco Rotoflow (ACR), a radial expansion turbine manufacturer, was responsible for the manufacturing of the turbine and the creation of the new computer program. SB Geo, Inc. (SBG), the facility operator, monitored and assisted ACR's activities as well as provided installation and startup assistance. The primary scope of the project is the redesign of an axial flow turbine to a radial inflow turboexpander to provide increased efficiency and reliability at an existing facility. In addition to the increased efficiency and reliability, the redesign includes an improved reduction gear design, and improved shaft seal design, and upgraded control system and a greater flexibility of application

  5. Revised FORTRAN program for calculating velocities and streamlines on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of an axial-, radial-, or mixed-flow turbomachine or annular duct. 2: Programmer's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katsanis, T.; Mcnally, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV computer program has been developed that obtains a detailed subsonic or shock free transonic flow solution on the hub-shroud midchannel stream surface of a turbomachine. The blade row may be fixed or rotating, and the blades may be twisted and leaned. Flow may be axial, mixed, or radial. Upstream and downstream flow variables may vary from hub to shroud, and provisions are made to correct for loss of stagnation pressure. The results include velocities, streamlines, and flow angles on the stream surface and approximate blade surface velocities.

  6. Flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry using ≈4 mL min(-1) gas flows.

    PubMed

    Franchina, Flavio A; Maimone, Mariarosa; Tranchida, Peter Q; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    The main objective of the herein described research was focused on performing satisfactory flow modulation (FM), in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS), using an MS-compatible second-dimension gas flow of approx. 4 mL min(-1). The FM model used was based on that initially proposed by Seeley et al. [3]. The use of limited gas flows was enabled through fine tuning of the FM parameters, in particular the duration of the re-injection (or flushing) process. Specifically, the application of a long re-injection period (i.e., 700 ms) enabled efficient accumulation-loop flushing with gas flows of about 4 mL min(-1). It was possible to apply such extended re-injection periods by using different restrictor lengths in the connections linking the modulator to the auxiliary pressure source. FM GC×GC-MS applications were performed on a mixture containing C9-10 alkanes, and on a sample of essential oil. GC×GC-MS sensitivity was compared with that attained by using conventional GC-MS analysis, in essential oil applications. It was observed that signal intensities were, in general, considerably higher in the FM GC×GC-MS experiments.

  7. Simulations of the Neutral-beam-induced Rotation, Radial Electric Field, and Flow Shearing Rate in Next-step Burning Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    R.V. Budny

    2002-08-13

    Toroidal rotation of plasmas in present tokamaks is beneficial for increasing the stability to wall-induced MHD and appears to reduce the anomalous transport associated with micro-turbulence. This paper calculates the toroidal rotation expected from neutral-beam injection in the proposed FIRE and ITER-FEAT tokamak reactors. Self-consistent burning plasmas for these tokamaks have been constructed using the TRANSP plasma analysis code. Neutral-beam injection has been proposed for FIRE and ITER-FEAT. The neutral-beam-induced torques are computed, and assumptions for the anomalous transport of toroidal angular momentum are used to calculate the toroidal rotation profiles. The central Mach numbers are about 3-8%. The ratio of the rotation speed to the Alfvin speed is less than 1%. Assuming neoclassical poloidal rotation and force balance, the radial electric field and flow shearing rate are calculated. Peak shearing rates near the outboard edge are in the 10-100 krad/s range.

  8. Performance of a membrane-dialysis bioreactor with a radial-flow fixed bed for the cultivation of a hybridoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Bohmann, A; Pörtner, R; Märkl, H

    1995-10-01

    A bioreactor system for the continuous cultivation of animal cells with a high potential for scale-up is presented. This reactor system consists of radial-flow fixed-bed units coupled with a dialysis module The dialysis membrane enables the supply of low-molecular-weight nutrients and removal of toxic metabolites, while high-molecular-weight nutrients and products (e.g., monoclonal antibodies) are retained and accumulated. This concept was investigated on the laboratory scale in a bioreactor with an integrated dialysis membrane. The efficiency of the reactor system and the reproducibility of the cell activity (hybridoma cells) under certain process conditions could be demonstrated in fermentations up to 77 days. Based on model calculations, an optimized fermentation strategy was formulated and experimentally confirmed. Compared to chemostat cultures with suspended cells, a ten-times higher mAb concentration (383 mg1(-1)) could be obtained. The highest volumetric specific mAb production rate determined was 6.1 mg mAb (1 fixed bed)-1h-1.

  9. Improved liquid chromatography-MS/MS of heparan sulfate oligosaccharides via chip-based pulsed makeup flow.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Shi, Xiaofeng; Yu, Xiang; Leymarie, Nancy; Staples, Gregory O; Yin, Hongfeng; Killeen, Kevin; Zaia, Joseph

    2011-11-01

    Microfluidic chip-based hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) is a useful separation system for liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) in compositional profiling of heparan sulfate (HS) oligosaccharides; however, ions observed using HILIC LC-MS are low in charge. Tandem MS of HS oligosaccharide ions with low charge results in undesirable losses of SO(3) from precursor ions during collision induced dissociation. One solution is to add metal cations to stabilize sulfate groups. Another is to add a nonvolatile, polar compound such as sulfolane, a molecule known to supercharge proteins, to produce a similar effect for oligosaccharides. We demonstrate use of a novel pulsed makeup flow (MUF) HPLC-chip. The chip enables controlled application of additives during specified chromatographic time windows and thus minimizes the extent to which nonvolatile additives build up in the ion source. The pulsed MUF system was applied to LC-MS/MS of HS oligosaccharides. Metal cations and sulfolane were tested as additives. The most promising results were obtained for sulfolane, for which supercharging of the oligosaccharide ions increased their signal strengths relative to controls. Tandem MS of these supercharged precursor ions showed decreased abundances of product ions from sulfate losses yet more abundant product ions from backbone cleavages.

  10. Online spectrophotometric determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III) by flow injection combined with low pressure ion chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shujuan; Li, Nan; Zhang, Xinshen; Yang, Dongjing; Jiang, Heimei

    2015-03-01

    A simple and new low pressure ion chromatography combined with flow injection spectrophotometric procedure for determining Fe(II) and Fe(III) was established. It is based on the selective adsorption of low pressure ion chromatography column to Fe(II) and Fe(III), the online reduction reaction of Fe(III) and the reaction of Fe(II) in sodium acetate with phenanthroline, resulting in an intense orange complex with a suitable absorption at 515 nm. Various chemical (such as the concentration of colour reagent, eluant and reductive agent) and instrumental parameters (reaction coil length, reductive coil length and wavelength) were studied and were optimized. Under the optimum conditions calibration graph of Fe(II)/Fe(III) was linear in the Fe(II)/Fe(III) range of 0.040-1.0 mg/L. The detection limit of Fe(III) and Fe(II) was respectively 3.09 and 1.55 μg/L, the relative standard deviation (n = 10) of Fe(II) and Fe(III) 1.89% and 1.90% for 0.5 mg/L of Fe(II) and Fe(III) respectively. About 2.5 samples in 1 h can be analyzed. The interfering effects of various chemical species were studied. The method was successfully applied in the determination of water samples.

  11. Online spectrophotometric determination of Fe(II) and Fe(III) by flow injection combined with low pressure ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shujuan; Li, Nan; Zhang, Xinshen; Yang, Dongjing; Jiang, Heimei

    2015-03-01

    A simple and new low pressure ion chromatography combined with flow injection spectrophotometric procedure for determining Fe(II) and Fe(III) was established. It is based on the selective adsorption of low pressure ion chromatography column to Fe(II) and Fe(III), the online reduction reaction of Fe(III) and the reaction of Fe(II) in sodium acetate with phenanthroline, resulting in an intense orange complex with a suitable absorption at 515nm. Various chemical (such as the concentration of colour reagent, eluant and reductive agent) and instrumental parameters (reaction coil length, reductive coil length and wavelength) were studied and were optimized. Under the optimum conditions calibration graph of Fe(II)/Fe(III) was linear in the Fe(II)/Fe(III) range of 0.040-1.0mg/L. The detection limit of Fe(III) and Fe(II) was respectively 3.09 and 1.55μg/L, the relative standard deviation (n=10) of Fe(II) and Fe(III) 1.89% and 1.90% for 0.5mg/L of Fe(II) and Fe(III) respectively. About 2.5 samples in 1h can be analyzed. The interfering effects of various chemical species were studied. The method was successfully applied in the determination of water samples.

  12. Analysis of wastewater for anionic and cationic nutrients by ion chromatography in a single run with sequential flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Karmarkar, S V

    1999-07-30

    To prevent nutrient enrichment and, hence the undesirable ecological impacts, the nutrients monitored in wastewater samples include two anionic species, i.e., nitrate and orthophosphate, and a cationic species, ammonium. Ion chromatography (IC) is one of the popularly used techniques for determinations of nitrate and phosphate in these samples, whereas determination of ammonium in wastewater samples is typically done using manual or automated wet chemistry, e.g., flow injection analysis (FIA). We have developed a sequential IC-FIA method, using Lachat's QC8000 IC system, which allows determinations of nitrate, phosphate and ammonia in a single injection. In this system, a QuickChem Small Suppressor cartridge is regenerated in between the samples. A sample is injected while leaving the suppressor off-line. Ammonium, a cation, elutes in the void volume of an anion-exchange column. The unsuppressed column effluent, exiting the conductivity flow cell, up to this point is used for FIA determination of ammonia. When ammonia exits the conductivity flow cell, a fully regenerated suppressor is brought in-line for conductometric detection of the anions. Analog data are simultaneously acquired from colorimetric and conductometric detectors, for the cationic and anionic nutrients, respectively. The method is accurate with spike recoveries in wastewater samples ranging from 91% for nitrate to 114% for chloride. It is precise with RSD values, for replicate analyses (n = 7) of a mid-range standard, ranging from 0.4% for phosphate to 1% for nitrate.

  13. Removal of endogenous retrovirus-like particles from CHO-cell derived products using Q sepharose fast flow chromatography.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Daniel M; Lute, Scott; Brorson, Kurt; Blank, Gregory S; Chen, Qi; Yang, Bin

    2009-01-01

    Retrovirus-like particles (RVLPs) that are expressed during the production of monoclonal antibodies in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cultures must be removed during product recovery. Anion exchange chromatography (AEX) performed in product flow-through mode, a common component in the purification of monoclonal antibodies, has been shown to provide robust removal of a related retrovirus model, but it's ability to remove the actual RVLP impurities has not been directly investigated. We have determined the ability of a typical Q sepharose process to remove actual CHO RVLP impurities. Using small scale experiments with three model antibodies, we observe that this AEX process is capable of effectively removing both in-process and spiked RVLPs from different feedstocks containing different mAb products. In addition, we show that this AEX process also achieves a similarly high degree of RVLP removal during large scale manufacturing operations.

  14. Radial inflow turbine study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamid, S.; Elder, R. L.

    1992-03-01

    The radial inflow turbine is a primary component used both in small gas turbines and turbochargers. Better understanding of the flow processes occurring within the small passages of the machine could well result in the improved design of units. As most of the detailed aerodynamics is still ill-defined, a joint research project with the objective of improving our understanding has been instigated by Cranfield, the US Army and Turbomach (San Diego). This document gives the seventh report on the project and describes progress and measurements taken.

  15. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  16. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  17. Top-down and bottom-up lipidomic analysis of rabbit lipoproteins under different metabolic conditions using flow field-flow fractionation, nanoflow liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Byeon, Seul Kee; Kim, Jin Yong; Lee, Ju Yong; Chung, Bong Chul; Seo, Hong Seog; Moon, Myeong Hee

    2015-07-31

    This study demonstrated the performances of top-down and bottom-up approaches in lipidomic analysis of lipoproteins from rabbits raised under different metabolic conditions: healthy controls, carrageenan-induced inflammation, dehydration, high cholesterol (HC) diet, and highest cholesterol diet with inflammation (HCI). In the bottom-up approach, the high density lipoproteins (HDL) and the low density lipoproteins (LDL) were size-sorted and collected on a semi-preparative scale using a multiplexed hollow fiber flow field-flow fractionation (MxHF5), followed by nanoflow liquid chromatography-ESI-MS/MS (nLC-ESI-MS/MS) analysis of the lipids extracted from each lipoprotein fraction. In the top-down method, size-fractionated lipoproteins were directly infused to MS for quantitative analysis of targeted lipids using chip-type asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (cAF4-ESI-MS/MS) in selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mode. The comprehensive bottom-up analysis yielded 122 and 104 lipids from HDL and LDL, respectively. Rabbits within the HC and HCI groups had lipid patterns that contrasted most substantially from those of controls, suggesting that HC diet significantly alters the lipid composition of lipoproteins. Among the identified lipids, 20 lipid species that exhibited large differences (>10-fold) were selected as targets for the top-down quantitative analysis in order to compare the results with those from the bottom-up method. Statistical comparison of the results from the two methods revealed that the results were not significantly different for most of the selected species, except for those species with only small differences in concentration between groups. The current study demonstrated that top-down lipid analysis using cAF4-ESI-MS/MS is a powerful high-speed analytical platform for targeted lipidomic analysis that does not require the extraction of lipids from blood samples.

  18. A free-flowing soap film combined with cavity ring-down spectroscopy as a detection system for liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Vogelsang, Markus; Welsch, Thomas; Jones, Harold

    2010-05-01

    We have shown that a free-flowing soap film has sufficiently high-quality optical properties to allow it to be used in the cavity of a ring-down spectrometer (CRDS). The flow rates required to maintain a stable soap film were similar to those used in liquid chromatography and thus allowed interfacing with an HPLC system for use as an optical detector. We have investigated the properties of the system in a relevant analytical application. The soap film/CRDS combination was used at 355 nm as a detector for the separation of a mixture of nitroarenes. These compounds play a role in the residue analysis of areas contaminated with explosives and their decomposition products. In spite of the short absorption path length (9 microm) obtained by the soap film, the high-sensitivity of CRDS allowed a limit of detection of 4 x 10(-6) in absorption units (AU) or less than 17 fmol in the detection volume to be achieved.

  19. Ultra-low Flow Liquid Chromatography Assay with Ultraviolet (UV) Detection for Piperine Quantitation in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Kakarala, Madhuri; Dubey, Shiv Kumar; Tarnowski, Malloree; Cheng, Connie; Liyanage, Samadhi; Strawder, Terrence; Tazi, Karim; Sen, Ananda; Djuric, Zora; Brenner, Dean E.

    2015-01-01

    A robust and sensitive ultra-low flow liquid chromatography (UFLC) method that can reproducibly, at reasonable cost, detect low concentrations of piperine from human plasma is necessary. Piperine in plasma was separated and quantified by a gradient method using ultraviolet detection at a maximal absorbance wavelength of 340 nm. An aliquot was injected onto a reversed-phase column Waters SymmetryShield, 2.1 × 100 mm, 3.5 μm, C18 column, attached to a Waters absorbosphere, 4.6 × 30 mm, C18 guard column and eluted with a mobile phase containing a mixture of acetonitrile/water/ acetic acid (25:74.9:0.1, v/v/v) on line A and acetonitrile/acetic acid (99.9:0.1, v/v) on line B. The flow rate was 0.3 mL/min. The gradient method consisted of an opening condition of 20% pump B, with a linear increase to 37% pump B over 8 min, then a linear increase to 100% pump B at 11 min, 2 min at 100% pump B, and then a return to the opening condition (20% pump B) via a linear gradient over 2 min, followed by 5 min re-equilibration at opening conditions. The total run time was 20 min for each sample. All samples were processed protected from ambient light to avoid isomerization of piperine. The plasma assay was linear with R = 0.9995, with a lower limit of detection [signal-to-noise (S/N) > 5:1] of 100 pg of piperine loaded into the analytical system with acceptable accuracy and precision. Extraction recoveries of piperine from human plasma were 88% for quality control high (QCH), 93% for quality control medium (QCM), and 90% for quality control low (QCL), and the matrix effect was <12%. Piperine was quantifiable from a 50 mg oral dose given to human volunteers. A UFLC method for the rapid assay of human plasma with sensitivity to detect as low as 5 ng/mL piperine was developed. The method sensitivity equals that of liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MSMS) methods with much less cost. PMID:20465211

  20. Quantification of Docetaxel in Serum Using Turbulent Flow Liquid Chromatography Electrospray Tandem Mass Spectrometry (TFC-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Crutchfield, Christopher A; Marzinke, Mark A; Clarke, William A

    2016-01-01

    Docetaxel is a second-generation taxane and is used clinically as an anti-neoplastic agent in cancer chemotherapy via an anti-mitotic mechanism. Its efficacy is limited to a narrow therapeutic window. Inappropriately high concentrations may cause erythema, fluid retention, nausea, diarrhea, and neutropenia. As a result, dosing recommendations have changed from high dosage loading every 3 weeks to lower dosage loading weekly. We describe a method that can be used for therapeutic drug monitoring of docetaxel levels using turbulent flow liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (TFC-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS). The method is rapid, requiring only 6.3 min per analytical run following a simple protein crash. The method requires only 100 μL of serum. Concentrations of docetaxel were quantified by a calibration curve relating the peak-area ratio of docetaxel to a deuterated internal standard (docetaxel-D9). The method was linear from 7.8 to 1000 ng/mL, with imprecision ≤6.2 %.

  1. Automated analysis of perfluorinated compounds in human hair and urine samples by turbulent flow chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Perez, Francisca; Llorca, Marta; Farré, Marinella; Barceló, Damià

    2012-03-01

    Perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are ubiquitous contaminants of humans and animals worldwide. PFCs are bioaccumulated because of their affinity for proteins. It has been shown they could have a variety of toxicological effects and cause damage to human health, emphasizing the need for sensitive and robust analytical methods to assess their bioaccumulation in humans. In this paper we report the development and validation of an analytical method for analysis of PFCs in the non-invasive human matrices hair and urine. The method is based on rapid and simple sample pre-treatment followed by online turbulent flow liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (TFC-LC-MS-MS) for analysis of 21 PFCs. The method was validated for both matrices. Percentage recovery was between 60 and 105 for most compounds in both matrices. Limits of quantification ranged from 0.1 to 9 ng mL(-1) in urine and from 0.04 to 13.4 in hair. The good performance of the method was proved by investigating the presence of selected PFCs in 24 hair and 30 urine samples from different donors living in Barcelona (NE Spain). The results were indicative of bioaccumulation of these compounds in both types of sample. PFOS and PFOA were most frequently detected in hair and PFBA in urine.

  2. Flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow combined with laser ablation for direct analysis of compounds separated by thin-layer chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cegłowski, Michał; Smoluch, Marek; Reszke, Edward; Silberring, Jerzy; Schroeder, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    A thin-layer chromatography-mass spectrometry (TLC-MS) setup for characterization of low molecular weight compounds separated on standard TLC plates has been constructed. This new approach successfully combines TLC separation, laser ablation, and ionization using flowing atmospheric pressure afterglow (FAPA) source. For the laser ablation, a low-priced 445-nm continuous-wave diode laser pointer, with a power of 1 W, was used. The combination of the simple, low-budget laser pointer and the FAPA ion source has made this experimental arrangement broadly available, also for small laboratories. The approach was successfully applied for the characterization of low molecular weight compounds separated on TLC plates, such as a mixture of pyrazole derivatives, alkaloids (nicotine and sparteine), and an extract from a drug tablet consisting of paracetamol, propyphenazone, and caffeine. The laser pointer used was capable of ablating organic compounds without the need of application of any additional substances (matrices, staining, etc.) on the TLC spots. The detection limit of the proposed method was estimated to be 35 ng/cm(2) of a pyrazole derivative.

  3. High-pressure size exclusion chromatography analysis of dissolved organic matter isolated by tangential-flow ultra filtration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Everett, C.R.; Chin, Y.-P.; Aiken, G.R.

    1999-01-01

    A 1,000-Dalton tangential-flow ultrafiltration (TFUF) membrane was used to isolate dissolved organic matter (DOM) from several freshwater environments. The TFUF unit used in this study was able to completely retain a polystyrene sulfonate 1,800-Dalton standard. Unaltered and TFUF-fractionated DOM molecular weights were assayed by high-pressure size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). The weight-averaged molecular weights of the retentates were larger than those of the raw water samples, whereas the filtrates were all significantly smaller and approximately the same size or smaller than the manufacturer-specified pore size of the membrane. Moreover, at 280 nm the molar absorptivity of the DOM retained by the ultrafilter is significantly larger than the material in the filtrate. This observation suggests that most of the chromophoric components are associated with the higher molecular weight fraction of the DOM pool. Multivalent metals in the aqueous matrix also affected the molecular weights of the DOM molecules. Typically, proton-exchanged DOM retentates were smaller than untreated samples. This TFUF system appears to be an effective means of isolating aquatic DOM by size, but the ultimate size of the retentates may be affected by the presence of metals and by configurational properties unique to the DOM phase.

  4. Comparison of segmented flow analysis and ion chromatography for the quantitative characterization of carbohydrates in tobacco products.

    PubMed

    Shifflett, John R; Jones, Lindsey A; Limowski, Edward R; Bezabeh, Dawit Z

    2012-11-28

    Segmented flow analysis (SFA) and ion chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (IC-PAD) are widely used analytical techniques for the analysis of glucose, fructose, and sucrose in tobacco. In the work presented here, 27 cured tobacco leaves and 21 tobacco products were analyzed for sugars using SFA and IC. The results of these analyses demonstrated that both techniques identified the same trends in sugar content across tobacco leaf and tobacco product types. However, comparison of results between techniques was limited by the selectivity of the SFA method, which relies on the specificity of the reaction of p-hydroxybenzoic acid hydrazide (PAHBAH) with glucose and fructose to generate a detectable derivative. Sugar amines and chlorogenic acid, which are found in tobacco, are also known to react with PAHBAH to form a reaction product that interferes with the analysis of fructose and glucose. To mitigate this problem, solid phase extraction (SPE) was used to remove interferences such as sugar amines and chlorogenic acid from sample matrices prior to SFA. A combination of C18 and cation exchange solid phase extraction cartridges was used, and the results from SFA and IC analyses showed significant convergence in the results of both analytical methods. For example, the average difference between the results from the SFA and IC analyses for flue-cured tobacco samples dropped by 73% when the two-step C18/cation exchange resin sample cleanup was used.

  5. NASA contributions to radial turbine aerodynamic analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    A brief description of the radial turbine and its analysis needs is followed by discussions of five analytical areas; design geometry and performance, off design performance, blade row flow, scroll flow, and duct flow. The functions of the programs, areas of applicability, and limitations and uncertainties are emphasized. Both past contributions and current activities are discussed.

  6. Preliminary applications of cross-axis synchronous flow-through coil planet centrifuge for large-scale preparative counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, T Y; Lee, Y W; Fang, Q C; Xiao, R; Ito, Y

    1988-11-11

    The cross-axis synchronous flow-through coil planet centrifuge with a 20-cm revolutional radius and a total capacity of 1600 ml was successfully applied to preparative counter-current chromatography of various biological samples, which include sea buckthorn extract, steroid reaction mixture, indole plant hormones, and dinitrophenylamino acids. The present system offers advantages of stable balance of the centrifuge, a large column capacity, and high resolution. PMID:3069856

  7. Intraoperative hemodynamic evaluation of the radial and ulnar arteries during free radial forearm flap procedure.

    PubMed

    Lorenzetti, Fulvio; Giordano, Salvatore; Suominen, Erkki; Asko-Seljavaara, Sirpa; Suominen, Sinikka

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this prospective study was to assess the blood flow of the radial and ulnar arteries before and after radial forearm flap raising. Twenty-two patients underwent radial forearm microvascular reconstruction for leg soft tissue defects. Blood flow of the radial, ulnar, and recipient arteries was measured intraoperatively by transit-time and ultrasonic flowmeter. In the in situ radial artery, the mean blood flow was 60.5 +/- 47.7 mL/min before, 6.7 +/- 4.1 mL/min after raising the flap, and 5.8 +/- 2.0 mL/min after end-to-end anastomosis to the recipient artery. In the ulnar artery, the mean blood flow was 60.5 +/- 43.3 mL/min before harvesting the radial forearm flap and significantly increased to 85.7 +/- 57.9 mL/min after radial artery sacrifice. A significant difference was also found between this value and the value of blood flow in the ulnar and radial arteries pooled together ( P < 0.05). The vascular resistance in the ulnar artery decreased significantly after the radial artery flap raising (from 2.7 +/- 3.1 to 1.9 +/- 2.2 peripheral resistance units, P = 0.010). The forearm has a conspicuous arterial vascularization not only through the radial and ulnar arteries but also through the interosseous system. The raising of the radial forearm flap increases blood flow and decreases vascular resistance in the ulnar artery. PMID:19902406

  8. Simultaneous determination of aflatoxin B₁, B₂, G₁, and G₂ in corn powder, edible oil, peanut butter, and soy sauce by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry utilizing turbulent flow chromatography.

    PubMed

    Fan, Sufang; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Xiaoguang; Cui, Xiaobin; Zhang, Dongsheng; Zhang, Yan

    2015-05-01

    A novel fully automated method based on dual column switching using turbulent flow chromatography followed by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry was developed for the determination of aflatoxin B1 , B2 , G1 , and G2 in corn powder, edible oil, peanut butter, and soy sauce samples. After ultrasound-assisted extraction, samples were directly injected to the chromatographic system and the analytes were concentrated into the clean-up loading column. Through purge switching, the analytes were transferred to the analytical column for subsequent detection by mass spectrometry. Different types of TurboFlow(TM) columns, transfer flow rate, transfer time were optimized. The limits of detection and quantification of this method ranged between 0.2-2.0 and 0.5-4.0 μg/kg for aflatoxins in different matrixes, respectively. Recoveries of aflatoxins were in range of 83-108.1% for all samples, matrix effects were in range of 34.1-104.7%. The developed method has been successfully applied in the analysis of aflatoxin B1 , B2 , G1 , and G2 in real samples. PMID:25683560

  9. Method using gas chromatography to determine the molar flow balance for proton exchange membrane fuel cells exposed to impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, G.; Angelo, M.; Bethune, K.; Dorn, S.; Thampan, T.; Rocheleau, R.

    An understanding of the potentially serious performance degradation effects that trace level contaminants can cause in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is crucial for the successful deployment of PEMFC for commercial applications. An experimental and analytic methodology is described that employs gas chromatography (GC) to accurately determine the concentration of impurity species in the fuel and oxidant streams of a PEMFC. In this paper we further show that the accurate determination of the contaminant concentrations at the anode and cathode inlets and outlets provides a means to quantify reactions of contaminants within the cell and to identify diffusive mass transport across the membrane. High data accuracy down to sub-ppm contaminant levels is required and was achieved by addressing several challenges pertaining to experimental setup and data analysis which are both discussed in detail. The application of the methodology is demonstrated using carbon monoxide and toluene which were injected into the cell at concentrations between 1 and 10 ppm and 20 and 60 ppm, respectively. Both impurities were observed to react in the fuel cell: carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide, and toluene to methylcyclohexane. For both contaminants closure of the molar flow balances to within 3% was achieved even at the low contaminant concentrations. This allowed the extent of both reactions at the applied operating conditions to be quantified. The presented methodology is shown to be a valuable tool for investigating the effects and reactions of trace contaminants in fuel cells and for providing critical insights into the mechanisms responsible for the associated performance degradation.

  10. Novel Integrated Radial and Axial Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A.; Brown, Gary L.; Powers, Edward I. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Typically, fully active magnetically suspended systems require one axial and two radial magnetic bearings. Combining radial and axial functions into a single device allows for more compact and elegant packaging. Furthermore, in the case of high-speed devices such as energy storage flywheels, it is beneficial to minimize shaft length to keep rotor mode frequencies as high as possible. Attempts have been made to combine radial and axial functionality, but with certain drawbacks. One approach requires magnetic control flux to flow through a bias magnet reducing control effectiveness, thus resulting in increased resistive losses. This approach also requires axial force producing magnetic flux to flow in a direction into the rotor laminate that is undesirable for minimizing eddy-current losses resulting in rotational losses. Another approach applies a conical rotor shape to what otherwise would be a radial heteropolar magnetic bearing configuration. However, positional non-linear effects are introduced with this scheme and the same windings are used for bias, radial, and axial control adding complexity to the controller and electronics. For this approach, the amount of axial capability must be limited. It would be desirable for an integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing to have the following characteristics, separate inputs for radial and axial control for electronics and control simplicity, all magnetic control fluxes should only flow through their respective air gaps and should not flow through any bias magnets for minimal resistive losses, be of a homopolar design to minimize rotational losses, position related non-linear effects should be minimized, and dependent upon the design parameters, be able to achieve any radial/axial force or power ratio as desired. The integrated radial and axial magnetic bearing described in this paper exhibits all these characteristics. Magnetic circuit design, design equations, and analysis results will be presented.

  11. Comparison of the performance of forward fill/flush and reverse fill/flush flow modulation in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Krupčík, Jan; Gorovenko, Roman; Špánik, Ivan; Sandra, Pat; Giardina, Matthew

    2016-09-30

    The performances of forward flow fill and flush (FFF) and of reverse flow fill and flush (RFF) in flow modulated comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) using the same volume of the sampling channel have been studied and compared. Sample models include a reference mixture of hydrocarbons at low concentration, a petroleum reformate product and the essential oil of Rosa damascena Miller. The latter samples contain solutes in different concentrations but some up to 30% allowing to study overloading phenomena in detail. For solutes injected at low quantity, the performance of FFF and RFF is similar. For solutes present in a sample at high quantity, RFF guarantees less broadening and spreading resulting in better quantitation. PMID:27614731

  12. Comparison of the performance of forward fill/flush and reverse fill/flush flow modulation in comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Krupčík, Jan; Gorovenko, Roman; Špánik, Ivan; Sandra, Pat; Giardina, Matthew

    2016-09-30

    The performances of forward flow fill and flush (FFF) and of reverse flow fill and flush (RFF) in flow modulated comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC) using the same volume of the sampling channel have been studied and compared. Sample models include a reference mixture of hydrocarbons at low concentration, a petroleum reformate product and the essential oil of Rosa damascena Miller. The latter samples contain solutes in different concentrations but some up to 30% allowing to study overloading phenomena in detail. For solutes injected at low quantity, the performance of FFF and RFF is similar. For solutes present in a sample at high quantity, RFF guarantees less broadening and spreading resulting in better quantitation.

  13. Radial arm strike rail

    DOEpatents

    McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.

    1991-01-01

    The radial arm strike rail assembly is a system for measurement of bearings, directions, and stereophotography for geologic mapping, particularly where magnetic compasses are not appropriate. The radial arm, pivoting around a shaft axis, provides a reference direction determination for geologic mapping and bearing or direction determination. The centerable and levelable pedestal provide a base for the radial arm strike rail and the telescoping camera pedestal. The telescoping feature of the radial arm strike rail allows positioning the end of the rail for strike direction or bearing measurement with a goniometer.

  14. Finger necrosis after accidental radial artery puncture

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jun Sik; Lee, Tae Rim; Cha, Won Chul; Shin, Tae Gun; Sim, Min Seob; Jo, Ik Joon; Song, Keun Jeong; Rhee, Joong Eui; Jeong, Yeon Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Radial artery puncture, an invasive procedure, is frequently used for critical patients. Although considered safe, severe complications such as finger necrosis can occur. Herein, we review the clinical course of finger necrosis after accidental radial artery puncture. A 63-year-old woman visited the emergency department (ED) with left second and third finger pain after undergoing intravenous (IV) access in her wrist for procedural sedation. During the IV access, she experienced wrist pain, which increased during the 12 hours prior to her ED presentation. Emergency angiography revealed a pseudoaneurysm in her left radial artery and absence of blood flow to the proper palmar digital artery. Subsequent angiointervention and urokinase thrombolysis failed. The second finger was eventually amputated owing to gangrene. Radial artery puncture can occur accidentally during IV wrist access, resulting in severe morbidity. Providers should carefully examine the puncture site and collateral flow, followed by multiple examinations to ensure distal circulation.

  15. Plastic Models Designed to Produce Large Height-to-Length Ratio Steady-State Planar and Axisymmetric (Radial) Viscous Liquid Laminar Flow Gravity Currents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanck, Harvey F.

    2012-01-01

    Naturally occurring gravity currents include events such as air flowing through an open front door, a volcanic eruption's pyroclastic flow down a mountainside, and the spread of the Bhopal disaster's methyl isocyanate gas. Gravity currents typically have a small height-to-distance ratio. Plastic models were designed and constructed with a…

  16. Windmill pitcher's radial neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Sinson, G; Zager, E L; Kline, D G

    1994-06-01

    The authors present two cases of severe radial nerve injury with different sites of pathology but a similar mechanism: the "windmill" pitching motion of competitive softball. Both patients required surgical intervention with neurolysis, and both improved postoperatively. The literature on related radial nerve injuries is briefly reviewed and pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed.

  17. Differentiating organically and conventionally grown oregano using ultraperformance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS), headspace gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (headspace-GC-FID), and flow injection mass spectrum (FIMS) fingerprints combined with multivariate data analysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Boyan; Qin, Fang; Ding, Tingting; Chen, Yineng; Lu, Weiying; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2014-08-13

    Ultraperformance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS), flow injection mass spectrometry (FIMS), and headspace gas chromatography (headspace-GC) combined with multivariate data analysis techniques were examined and compared in differentiating organically grown oregano from that grown conventionally. It is the first time that headspace-GC fingerprinting technology is reported in differentiating organically and conventionally grown spice samples. The results also indicated that UPLC-MS, FIMS, and headspace-GC-FID fingerprints with OPLS-DA were able to effectively distinguish oreganos under different growing conditions, whereas with PCA, only FIMS fingerprint could differentiate the organically and conventionally grown oregano samples. UPLC fingerprinting provided detailed information about the chemical composition of oregano with a longer analysis time, whereas FIMS finished a sample analysis within 1 min. On the other hand, headspace GC-FID fingerprinting required no sample pretreatment, suggesting its potential as a high-throughput method in distinguishing organically and conventionally grown oregano samples. In addition, chemical components in oregano were identified by their molecular weight using QTOF-MS and headspace-GC-MS.

  18. Triple acting radial seal

    DOEpatents

    Ebert, Todd A; Carella, John A

    2012-03-13

    A triple acting radial seal used as an interstage seal assembly in a gas turbine engine, where the seal assembly includes an interstage seal support extending from a stationary inner shroud of a vane ring, the interstage seal support includes a larger annular radial inward facing groove in which an outer annular floating seal assembly is secured for radial displacement, and the outer annular floating seal assembly includes a smaller annular radial inward facing groove in which an inner annular floating seal assembly is secured also for radial displacement. A compliant seal is secured to the inner annular floating seal assembly. The outer annular floating seal assembly encapsulates the inner annular floating seal assembly which is made from a very low alpha material in order to reduce thermal stress.

  19. Off-Design Performance of Radial-Inflow Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, P. L.; Glassman, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    Computer code determines rotor exit flow from hub to tip. RTOD (Radial Turbine Off-Design), computes off-design performance of radial turbine by modeling flow with stator viscous and trailing-edge losses, and with vaneless space loss between stator and rotor, and with rotor incidence, viscous, clearance, trailing-edge, and disk friction losses.

  20. Comparative study of differential flow and cryogenic modulators comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography systems for the detailed analysis of light cycle oil.

    PubMed

    Semard, G; Gouin, C; Bourdet, J; Bord, N; Livadaris, V

    2011-05-27

    The modulator is the key point of comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC×GC). This interface ensures the sampling and transfer of the sample from the first to the second dimension. Many systems based on different principles have been developed. However, to our knowledge, almost only cryogenic modulators are used in the petroleum industry. Nevertheless cryogenic fluids represent some disadvantages in term of safety, cost and time consuming. This paper reports a comparative study between differential flow and cryogenic liquid modulators for the detailed analysis of hydrocarbons in middle distillates type light cycle oil (LCO). Optimization of geometrical dimensions of a set of columns was carried out on the differential flow modulator system in order to reproduce the quality of separation of cryogenic modulation. Then a comparative study was investigated on sensibility and resolution (separation space and peak capacity) between the two systems.

  1. Rapid determination of 88 veterinary drug residues in milk using automated TurborFlow online clean-up mode coupled to liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wei-xia; Yang, Ji-zhou; Wang, Zhao-xing; Wang, Cai-juan; Liu, Ya-feng; Zhang, Li

    2016-02-01

    A novel method based on TurborFlow online solid phase extraction (SPE) combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has been established for simultaneous screening and confirmation of 88 wide-range veterinary drugs belonging to eight families (20 sulfonamides, 7 macrolides, 15 quinolones, 8 penicillins, 13 benzimidazoles, 4 tetracyclines, 2 sedatives, and 19 hormones) in milk. The preparation method consists of sample dilution and ultrasonic extraction, followed by an automated turbulent flow cyclone chromatography sample clean-up system. The detection was achieved in selected reaction monitoring mode (SRM). The total run time was within 39 min, including automated extraction, analytical chromatography and re-equilibration of the turboflow system. The optimization of different experimental parameters including extraction, purification, separation, and detection were evaluated separately in this study. The developed method was validated and good performing characteristics were obtained. The linear regression coefficients (R(2)) of matrix-match calibration standard curves established for quantification were higher than 0.9930. The limits of detection (LOD) were in the range of 0.2-2.0 μg/kg given by signal-noise ratio ≥3 (S/N) and the limits of quantification (LOQ, S/N≥10) ranged between 0.5 μg/kg and 10 μg/kg. Average recoveries of spiked target compounds with different levels were between 63.1% and 117.4%, with percentage relative standard deviations (RSD) in the range of 3.3-17.6%. The results indicated that the developed method has great potential for the routine laboratory analysis of large numbers of samples on measuring different classes of compounds. In comparison to traditional procedures, the automated sample clean-up ensures rapid, effective, sensitive analyses of veterinary drugs in milk.

  2. Development and validation of a turbulent flow chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry method for the quantitation of methotrexate and its metabolites 7-hydroxy methotrexate and DAMPA in serum

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, Ryan C.; Ramanathan, Lakshmi V.; Murata, Kazunori; Grace, Marie; Fleisher, Martin; Pessin, Melissa S.; Carlow, Dean C.

    2016-01-01

    A rapid and simple turbulent flow liquid chromatography (TFC–LC) method implementing positive heated electrospray ionization (HESI) for the accurate and precise determination of methotrexate (MTX), 7-hydroxy methotrexate (7-OH MTX), and 4-amino-4-deoxy-N10-methylpteroic acid (DAMPA) concentrations in serum was developed. MTX was isolated from serum samples (100 μL) after protein precipitation with methanol containing formic acid and internal standard (MTX-D3) followed by centrifugation. The supernatant was injected into the turbulent flow liquid chromatography which is followed by electrospray positive ionization tandem mass spectrometry (TFC–LC–MS/MS) and quantified using a six-point calibration curve. For MTX and DAMPA the assays were linear from 10 to 1000 nmol/L and for 7-OH MTX from 20 to 2000 nmol/L. Dilutions of 10, 100 and 1000-fold were validated giving a clinically reportable range of 10 nmol/L to 5 × 105 nmol/L. Within-day and between-day precisions at concentrations spanning the analytical measurement ranges were less than 10% for all three analytes. MTX, DAMPA and 7-OH MTX were sufficiently stable under all relevant analytical conditions. No significant matrix effect was observed during the method validation. The TFC–LC-MS/MS MTX method was also compared with three other clinically validated MTX assays: a dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibition assay, an immunoassay based on fluorescence polarization and a previously developed LC–MS/MS assay. PMID:26322588

  3. Development and validation of a turbulent flow chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry method for the quantitation of methotrexate and its metabolites 7-hydroxy methotrexate and DAMPA in serum.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Ryan C; Ramanathan, Lakshmi V; Murata, Kazunori; Grace, Marie; Fleisher, Martin; Pessin, Melissa S; Carlow, Dean C

    2015-10-01

    A rapid and simple turbulent flow liquid chromatography (TFC-LC) method implementing positive heated electrospray ionization (HESI) for the accurate and precise determination of methotrexate (MTX), 7-hydroxy methotrexate (7-OH MTX), and 4-amino-4-deoxy-N(10)-methylpteroic acid (DAMPA) concentrations in serum was developed. MTX was isolated from serum samples (100μL) after protein precipitation with methanol containing formic acid and internal standard (MTX-D3) followed by centrifugation. The supernatant was injected into the turbulent flow liquid chromatography which is followed by electrospray positive ionization tandem mass spectrometry (TFC-LC-MS/MS) and quantified using a six-point calibration curve. For MTX and DAMPA the assays were linear from 10 to 1000nmol/L and for 7-OH MTX from 20 to 2000nmol/L. Dilutions of 10, 100 and 1000-fold were validated giving a clinically reportable range of 10nmol/L to 5×10(5)nmol/L. Within-day and between-day precisions at concentrations spanning the analytical measurement ranges were less than 10% for all three analytes. MTX, DAMPA and 7-OH MTX were sufficiently stable under all relevant analytical conditions. No significant matrix effect was observed during the method validation. The TFC-LC-MS/MS MTX method was also compared with three other clinically validated MTX assays: a dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibition assay, an immunoassay based on fluorescence polarization and a previously developed LC-MS/MS assay.

  4. Methods and apparatus for radially compliant component mounting

    DOEpatents

    Bulman, David Edward; Darkins, Jr., Toby George; Stumpf, James Anthony; Schroder, Mark S.; Lipinski, John Joseph

    2012-03-27

    Methods and apparatus for a mounting assembly for a liner of a gas turbine engine combustor are provided. The combustor includes a combustor liner and a radially outer annular flow sleeve. The mounting assembly includes an inner ring surrounding a radially outer surface of the liner and including a plurality of axially extending fingers. The mounting assembly also includes a radially outer ring coupled to the inner ring through a plurality of spacers that extend radially from a radially outer surface of the inner ring to the outer ring.

  5. Radial head arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kleiner, M T; Ilyas, A M; Jupiter, J B

    2010-02-01

    In conclusion, radial head fractures with 3 or more fragments have a high incidence of complications when treated with ORIF including hardware failure, malunion, nonunion, and the need for re-operation. Radial head arthroplasty has demonstrated good success in the treatment of complex, comminuted radial head fractures which are not amenable to non-opeative treatment or ORIF. Success can be optimized by diligent surgical dissection, avoiding inadvertent nerve injury, placement of an appropriately sized implant, repair of associated injuries, and early protected motion. PMID:20214854

  6. Applying Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Jessie W.; Patev, Paul

    1998-01-01

    Presents three experiments to introduce students to different kinds of chromatography: (1) paper chromatography; (2) gel filtration chromatography; and (3) reverse-phase liquid chromatography. Written in the form of a laboratory manual, explanations of each of the techniques, materials needed, procedures, and a glossary are included. (PVD)

  7. Radial head fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Elbow fracture - radial head - aftercare ... to 2 weeks. If you have a small fracture and your bones did not move around much, ... to see a bone doctor (orthopedic surgeon). Some fractures require surgery to: Insert pins and plates to ...

  8. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    The technology of high temperature cooled radial turbines is reviewed. Aerodynamic performance considerations are described. Heat transfer and structural analysis are addressed, and in doing so the following topics are covered: cooling considerations, hot side convection, coolant side convection, and rotor mechanical analysis. Cooled rotor concepts and fabrication are described, and the following are covered in this context: internally cooled rotor, hot isostatic pressure bonded rotor, laminated rotor, split blade rotor, and the NASA radial turbine program.

  9. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    The technology of high temperature cooled radial turbines is reviewed. Aerodynamic performance considerations are described. Heat transfer and structural analysis are addressed, and in doing so the following topics are covered: cooling considerations, hot side convection, coolant side convection, and rotor mechanical analysis. Cooled rotor concepts and fabrication are described, and the following are covered in this context: internally cooled rotor, hot isostatic pressure bonded rotor, laminated rotor, split blade rotor, and the NASA radial turbine program.

  10. Direct analysis of prostaglandin-E2 and -D2 produced in an inflammatory cell reaction and its application for activity screening and potency evaluation using turbulent flow chromatography liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jeong-Sook; Peng, Lei; Kang, Kyungsu; Choi, Yongsoo

    2016-09-01

    Direct analysis of prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) and -D2 (PGD2) produced from a RAW264.7 cell-based reaction was performed by liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS), which was online coupled with turbulent flow chromatography (TFC). The capability of this method to accurately measure PG levels in cell reaction medium containing cytokines or proteins as a reaction byproduct was cross-validated by two conventional methods. Two methods, including an LC-HRMS method after liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) of the sample and a commercial PGE2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), showed PGE2 and/or PGD2 levels almost similar to those obtained by TFC LC-HRMS over the reaction time after LPS stimulation. After the cross-validation, significant analytical throughputs, allowing simultaneous screening and potency evaluation of 80 natural products including 60 phytochemicals and 20 natural product extracts for the inhibition of the PGD2 produced in the cell-based inflammatory reaction, were achieved using the TFC LC-HRMS method developed. Among the 60 phytochemicals screened, licochalcone A and formononetin inhibited PGD2 production the most with IC50 values of 126 and 151nM, respectively. For a reference activity, indomethacin and diclofenac were used, measuring IC50 values of 0.64 and 0.21nM, respectively. This method also found a butanol extract of Akebia quinata Decne (AQ) stem as a promising natural product for PGD2 inhibition. Direct and accurate analysis of PGs in the inflammatory cell reaction using the TFC LC-HRMS method developed enables the high-throughput screening and potency evaluation of as many as 320 samples in less than 48h without changing a TFC column.

  11. Direct analysis of prostaglandin-E2 and -D2 produced in an inflammatory cell reaction and its application for activity screening and potency evaluation using turbulent flow chromatography liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jeong-Sook; Peng, Lei; Kang, Kyungsu; Choi, Yongsoo

    2016-09-01

    Direct analysis of prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) and -D2 (PGD2) produced from a RAW264.7 cell-based reaction was performed by liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS), which was online coupled with turbulent flow chromatography (TFC). The capability of this method to accurately measure PG levels in cell reaction medium containing cytokines or proteins as a reaction byproduct was cross-validated by two conventional methods. Two methods, including an LC-HRMS method after liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) of the sample and a commercial PGE2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), showed PGE2 and/or PGD2 levels almost similar to those obtained by TFC LC-HRMS over the reaction time after LPS stimulation. After the cross-validation, significant analytical throughputs, allowing simultaneous screening and potency evaluation of 80 natural products including 60 phytochemicals and 20 natural product extracts for the inhibition of the PGD2 produced in the cell-based inflammatory reaction, were achieved using the TFC LC-HRMS method developed. Among the 60 phytochemicals screened, licochalcone A and formononetin inhibited PGD2 production the most with IC50 values of 126 and 151nM, respectively. For a reference activity, indomethacin and diclofenac were used, measuring IC50 values of 0.64 and 0.21nM, respectively. This method also found a butanol extract of Akebia quinata Decne (AQ) stem as a promising natural product for PGD2 inhibition. Direct and accurate analysis of PGs in the inflammatory cell reaction using the TFC LC-HRMS method developed enables the high-throughput screening and potency evaluation of as many as 320 samples in less than 48h without changing a TFC column. PMID:27524299

  12. Hall and radial magnetic field effects on radiative peristaltic flow of Carreau-Yasuda fluid in a channel with convective heat and mass transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, T.; Farooq, S.; Alsaedi, A.; Ahmad, B.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of present investigation is to study the Hall and MHD effects on peristaltic flow of Carreau-Yasuda fluid in a convectively curved configuration. Thermal radiation, Soret and Dufour effects are also accounted. The channel walls comprised the no slip and compliant properties. Constitutive equations for mass, momentum, energy and concentration are first modeled in view of considered assumptions and then simplified under long wavelength and low Reynolds number approximation. Solution of the resulting system of equations is carried out via a regular perturbation technique. Physical behaviors of velocity, temperature, concentration and streamlines are discussed with the help of graphical representation.

  13. A new physical model based on cascading column experiments to reproduce the radial flow and transport of micro-iron particles.

    PubMed

    Comba, Silvia; Braun, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    In the field of aquifer restoration and civil engineering, fluids and suspensions are delivered in porous media via well injection. The flow field resulting around the well is three-dimensional. Since two and three-dimensional experiments which can be used to reproduce such flow fields are, although accurate, extremely elaborate and time consuming, the authors suggest to substitute them by a cascade of interdependent, one-dimensional (column) experiments. The new method is used to simulate the injection in aquifers of micro-iron particles dispersed in a shear thinning gel of guar gum and allows the prediction of iron particle distribution around the well and of injection pressure. The method respects the mass balance at the field scale and its predictions are in good agreement with those of a mathematical model proposed in the literature. The method is consistent with the Triad Approach, a way to improve remediation efficiency proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The representativeness of the proposed tests combined with their simplicity and relative inexpensiveness make this new method applicable and useful in the planning and design of real remediation.

  14. A new physical model based on cascading column experiments to reproduce the radial flow and transport of micro-iron particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comba, Silvia; Braun, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    In the field of aquifer restoration and civil engineering, fluids and suspensions are delivered in porous media via well injection. The flow field resulting around the well is three-dimensional. Since two and three-dimensional experiments which can be used to reproduce such flow fields are, although accurate, extremely elaborate and time consuming, the authors suggest to substitute them by a cascade of interdependent, one-dimensional (column) experiments. The new method is used to simulate the injection in aquifers of micro-iron particles dispersed in a shear thinning gel of guar gum and allows the prediction of iron particle distribution around the well and of injection pressure. The method respects the mass balance at the field scale and its predictions are in good agreement with those of a mathematical model proposed in the literature. The method is consistent with the Triad Approach, a way to improve remediation efficiency proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The representativeness of the proposed tests combined with their simplicity and relative inexpensiveness make this new method applicable and useful in the planning and design of real remediation.

  15. [Approaches to radial shaft].

    PubMed

    Bartoníček, J; Naňka, O; Tuček, M

    2015-10-01

    In the clinical practice, radial shaft may be exposed via two approaches, namely the posterolateral Thompson and volar (anterior) Henry approaches. A feared complication of both of them is the injury to the deep branch of the radial nerve. No consensus has been reached, yet, as to which of the two approaches is more beneficial for the proximal half of radius. According to our anatomical studies and clinical experience, Thompson approach is safe only in fractures of the middle and distal thirds of the radial shaft, but highly risky in fractures of its proximal third. Henry approach may be used in any fracture of the radial shaft and provides a safe exposure of the entire lateral and anterior surfaces of the radius.The Henry approach has three phases. In the first phase, incision is made along the line connecting the biceps brachii tendon and the styloid process of radius. Care must be taken not to damage the lateral cutaneous nerve of forearm.In the second phase, fascia is incised and the brachioradialis identified by the typical transition from the muscle belly to tendon and the shape of the tendon. On the lateral side, the brachioradialis lines the space with the radial artery and veins and the superficial branch of the radial nerve running at its bottom. On the medial side, the space is defined by the pronator teres in the proximal part and the flexor carpi radialis in the distal part. The superficial branch of the radial nerve is retracted together with the brachioradialis laterally, and the radial artery medially.In the third phase, the attachment of the pronator teres is identified by its typical tendon in the middle of convexity of the lateral surface of the radial shaft. The proximal half of the radius must be exposed very carefully in order not to damage the deep branch of the radial nerve. Dissection starts at the insertion of the pronator teres and proceeds proximally along its lateral border in interval between this muscle and insertion of the supinator

  16. Method for the quantification of vanadyl porphyrins in fractions of crude oils by High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Flow Injection-Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandekoken, Flávia G.; Duyck, Christiane B.; Fonseca, Teresa C. O.; Saint'Pierre, Tatiana D.

    2016-05-01

    High performance liquid chromatography hyphenated by flow injection to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-FI-ICP-MS) was used to investigate V linked to porphyrins present in fractions of crude oil. First, the crude oil sample was submitted to fractionation by preparative liquid chromatography with UV detection, at the porphyrin Soret band wavelength (400 nm). The obtained porphyrin fractions were then separated in a 250 mm single column, in the HPLC, and eluted with different mobile phases (methanol or methanol:toluene (80:20; v:v)). The quantification of V-porphyrins in the fractions eluted from HPLC was carried out by online measuring the 51V isotope in the ICP-MS, against vanadyl octaethylporphine standard solutions (VO-OEP), prepared in the same solvent as the mobile phase, and injected post-column directly into the plasma. A 20 μg L- 1 Ge in methanol was used as internal standard for minimizing non-spectral interference, such as short-term variations due to injection. The mathematical treatment of the signal based on Fast Fourier Transform smoothing algorithm was employed to improve the precision. The concentrations of V as V-porphyrins were between 2.7 and 11 mg kg- 1 in the fractions, which were close to the total concentration of V in the porphyrin fractions of the studied crude oil.

  17. Understanding the mechanism of virus removal by Q sepharose fast flow chromatography during the purification of CHO-cell derived biotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Strauss, Daniel M; Lute, Scott; Tebaykina, Zinaida; Frey, Douglas D; Ho, Cintia; Blank, Gregory S; Brorson, Kurt; Chen, Qi; Yang, Bin

    2009-10-01

    During production of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in mammalian cell culture, it is important to ensure that viral impurities and potential viral contaminants will be removed during downstream purification. Anion exchange chromatography provides a high degree of virus removal from mAb feedstocks, but the mechanism by which this is achieved has not been characterized. In this work, we have investigated the binding of three viruses to Q sepharose fast flow (QSFF) resin to determine the degree to which electrostatic interactions are responsible for viral clearance by this process. We first used a chromatofocusing technique to determine the isoelectric points of the viruses and established that they are negatively charged under standard QSFF conditions. We then determined that virus removal by this chromatography resin is strongly disrupted by the presence of high salt concentrations or by the absence of the positively charged Q ligand, indicating that binding of the virus to the resin is primarily due to electrostatic forces, and that any non-electrostatic interactions which may be present are not sufficient to provide virus removal. Finally, we determined the binding profile of a virus in a QSFF column after a viral clearance process. These data indicate that virus particles generally behave similarly to proteins, but they also illustrate the high degree of performance necessary to achieve several logs of virus reduction. Overall, this mechanistic understanding of an important viral clearance process provides the foundation for the development of science-based process validation strategies to ensure viral safety of biotechnology products.

  18. Effect of temperature and flow-rate on analysis of basic compounds in high-performance liquid chromatography using a reversed-phase column.

    PubMed

    McCalley, D V

    2000-12-15

    The peak shape and retention of some basic probes together with a neutral reference compound were investigated as a function of temperature and flow-rate using a reversed-phase HPLC column at both pH 3.0 and pH 7.0. The retention of bases often showed an anomalous increase with temperature; retention mechanisms are complex as shown by studies of the effect of buffer cation concentration on retention. Considerable improvements in column efficiency for bases may result from operation at elevated temperature. Improvements did not seem attributable either to incidental changes in the retention factor, or (in this particular study where low sample masses were utilised) to the influence of sample load. The optimum flow-rate for highest efficiency is generally lower for basic compounds than neutrals, and due to the steepness of the Van Deemter curves obtained, high flow-rates appear to be particularly detrimental in the chromatography of basic compounds. PMID:11192164

  19. A fast and simple assay for busulfan in serum or plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using turbulent flow online extraction technology.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Dustin R; Heideloff, Courtney; Ritchie, James C; Wang, Sihe

    2010-12-01

    Busulfan is used in myeloablative preparation regimens for hematopoietic bone marrow transplantation. Due to its narrow therapeutic range therapeutic drug monitoring of busulfan is recommended. In this study a fast and simple method for measuring busulfan in serum or plasma by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has been developed utilizing turbulent flow online extraction technology. Serum or plasma was mixed with acetonitrile containing d(8)-busulfan. After centrifugation the supernatant was injected onto a turbulent flow preparatory column then transferred to a C18 analytical column monitored by a tandem mass spectrometer set at positive electrospray ionization. The analytical cycle time was 4.0min. The method was linear from 0.15 to 41.90μmol/L with an accuracy of 87.9-103.0%. Inter- and intra-assay CVs across four concentration levels were 2.1-7.8%. No significant carryover or ion suppression was observed. No interference was observed from commercial control materials containing more than 100 compounds. Comparison with a well established LC-MS/MS method using patient specimens (n=45) showed a mean bias 1.3% with Deming regression of slope 1.02, intercept -0.02μmol/L, and a linear correlation coefficient 0.9883. The LC-MS/MS method coupled with turbulent flow online sample cleaning technology described here offers reliable busulfan quantitation in serum or plasma with minimum manual sample preparation and was fully validated for clinical use.

  20. Effects of temperature and flow regulated carbon dioxide cooling in longitudinally modulated cryogenic systems for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Haglund, Peter; Harju, Mikael; Danielsson, Conny; Marriott, Philip

    2002-07-12

    Two different modes of temperature regulation in longitudinally modulated cryogenic systems (LMCSs) for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) were compared. Carbon dioxide was used as coolant. In the first mode of operation, the temperature of the trap was regulated to pre-set temperature using a digital temperature controller ("the constant temperature mode"). In the second, the temperature was regulated to a fixed negative offset to the oven temperature by using a constant flow of CO2 ("the constant flow mode"). A number of problems were occasionally observed using the constant temperature mode: (1) severe band broadening of high boiling analytes in the second dimension; (2) non-Gaussian reconstructed first-dimension peak profiles; (3) high background due to modulation of first-dimension column bleed. It was concluded that these problems were associated with inefficient solute remobilization at low LMCS trap temperatures (1 and 2) or large trap temperature fluctuations (3). These problems could be avoided or significantly reduced by using the constant flow mode. Best results were obtained as the trap temperature was kept about 70 degrees C below the oven temperature.

  1. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Radial turbines have been used extensively in many applications including small ground based electrical power generators, automotive engine turbochargers and aircraft auxiliary power units. In all of these applications the turbine inlet temperature is limited to a value commensurate with the material strength limitations and life requirements of uncooled metal rotors. To take advantage of all the benefits that higher temperatures offer, such as increased turbine specific power output or higher cycle thermal efficiency, requires improved high temperature materials and/or blade cooling. Extensive research is on-going to advance the material properties of high temperature superalloys as well as composite materials including ceramics. The use of ceramics with their high temperature potential and low cost is particularly appealing for radial turbines. However until these programs reach fruition the only way to make significant step increases beyond the present material temperature barriers is to cool the radial blading.

  2. Separation and determination of tetrandrine and fangchinoline in herbal medicines by flow injection-micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with internal standard method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lihong; Liu, Xiumei; Chen, Xingguo; Hu, Zhide

    2005-12-01

    A simple, rapid and precision flow injection-micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (FI-MEKC) system with trimethoprim as internal standard (IS) for automated quantitative analysis of tetrandrine (TET) and fangchinoline (FAN) in various herbal medicines was demonstrated. The real sample throughput was 19-40 samples per hour using the background electrolyte (BGE) containing 15mM acetic acid-15mM sodium acetate-3% (v/v) polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate (Tween 20)-5% (v/v) methanol at pH 5.5. The method resulted in excellent linearity, with correlation coefficient of regression equation of 0.9996 and 0.9991 for TET and FAN, respectively. Recoveries were in the range 95-109% and 92-106% for TET and FAN, respectively. PMID:16314176

  3. Determination of perfluorinated chemicals in food and drinking water using high-flow solid-phase extraction and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Chia; Chen, Wen-Ling; Bai, Fang-Yu; Chen, Pau-Chung; Wang, Gen-Shuh; Chen, Chia-Yang

    2012-01-01

    For this study, we developed methods of determining ten perfluorinated chemicals in drinking water, milk, fish, beef, and pig liver using high-flow automated solid-phase extraction (SPE) and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. The analytes were separated on a core-shell Kinetex C18 column. The mobile phase was composed of methanol and 10-mM N-methylmorpholine. Milk was digested with 0.5 N potassium hydroxide in Milli-Q water, and was extracted with an Atlantic HLB disk to perform automated SPE at a flow rate ranged from 70 to 86 mL/min. Drinking water was directly extracted by the SPE. Solid food samples were digested in alkaline methanol and their supernatants were diluted and also processed by SPE. The disks were washed with 40% methanol/60% water and then eluted with 0.1% ammonium hydroxide in methanol. Suppression of signal intensity of most analytes by matrixes was lower than 50%; it was generally lower in fish and drinking water but higher in liver. Most quantitative biases and relative standard deviations were lower than 15%. The limits of detection for most analytes were sub-nanograms per liter for drinking water and sub-nanograms per gram for solid food samples. This method greatly shortened the time and labor needed for digestion, SPE, and liquid chromatography. This method has been applied to analyze 14 types of food samples. Perfluorooctanoic acid was found to be the highest among the analytes (median at 3.2-64 ng/g wet weight), followed by perfluorodecanoic acid (0.7-25 ng/g) and perfluorododecanoic acid (0.6-15 ng/g).

  4. Radial wedge flange clamp

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  5. Radial Nerve Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Andre Eu-Jin; Etcheson, Jennifer; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Radial nerve palsy typically occurs as a result of trauma or iatrogenic injury and leads to the loss of wrist extension, finger extension, thumb extension, and a reduction in grip strength. In the absence of nerve recovery, reconstruction of motor function involves tendon transfer surgery. The most common donor tendons include the pronator teres, wrist flexors, and finger flexors. The type of tendon transfer is classified based on the donor for the extensor digitorum communis. Good outcomes have been reported for most methods of radial nerve tendon transfers as is typical for positional tendon transfers not requiring significant power. PMID:27387076

  6. Approximate theory for radial filtration/consolidation

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, F.M.; Kirby, J.M.; Nguyen, H.L.

    1996-10-01

    Approximate solutions are developed for filtration and subsequent consolidation of compactible cakes on a cylindrical filter element. Darcy`s flow equation is coupled with equations for equilibrium stress under the conditions of plane strain and axial symmetry for radial flow inwards. The solutions are based on power function forms involving the relationships of the solidosity {epsilon}{sub s} (volume fraction of solids) and the permeability K to the solids effective stress p{sub s}. The solutions allow determination of the various parameters in the power functions and the ratio k{sub 0} of the lateral to radial effective stress (earth stress ratio). Measurements were made of liquid and effective pressures, flow rates, and cake thickness versus time. Experimental data are presented for a series of tests in a radial filtration cell with a central filter element. Slurries prepared from two materials (Microwate, which is mainly SrSO{sub 4}, and kaolin) were used in the experiments. Transient deposition of filter cakes was followed by static (i.e., no flow) conditions in the cake. The no-flow condition was accomplished by introducing bentonite which produced a nearly impermeable layer with negligible flow. Measurement of the pressure at the cake surface and the transmitted pressure on the central element permitted calculation of k{sub 0}.

  7. Automated on-line renewable solid-phase extraction-liquid chromatography exploiting multisyringe flow injection-bead injection lab-on-valve analysis.

    PubMed

    Quintana, José Benito; Miró, Manuel; Estela, José Manuel; Cerdà, Víctor

    2006-04-15

    In this paper, the third generation of flow injection analysis, also named the lab-on-valve (LOV) approach, is proposed for the first time as a front end to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for on-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) sample processing by exploiting the bead injection (BI) concept. The proposed microanalytical system based on discontinuous programmable flow features automated packing (and withdrawal after single use) of a small amount of sorbent (<5 mg) into the microconduits of the flow network and quantitative elution of sorbed species into a narrow band (150 microL of 95% MeOH). The hyphenation of multisyringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA) with BI-LOV prior to HPLC analysis is utilized for on-line postextraction treatment to ensure chemical compatibility between the eluate medium and the initial HPLC gradient conditions. This circumvents the band-broadening effect commonly observed in conventional on-line SPE-based sample processors due to the low eluting strength of the mobile phase. The potential of the novel MSFI-BI-LOV hyphenation for on-line handling of complex environmental and biological samples prior to reversed-phase chromatographic separations was assessed for the expeditious determination of five acidic pharmaceutical residues (viz., ketoprofen, naproxen, bezafibrate, diclofenac, and ibuprofen) and one metabolite (viz., salicylic acid) in surface water, urban wastewater, and urine. To this end, the copolymeric divinylbenzene-co-n-vinylpyrrolidone beads (Oasis HLB) were utilized as renewable sorptive entities in the micromachined unit. The automated analytical method features relative recovery percentages of >88%, limits of detection within the range 0.02-0.67 ng mL(-1), and coefficients of variation <11% for the column renewable mode and gives rise to a drastic reduction in operation costs ( approximately 25-fold) as compared to on-line column switching systems. PMID:16615800

  8. Neuere Chromatographie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostettmann, K.

    1983-04-01

    Besides high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) which is now a well-established and currently used technique, several emerging methods for the isolation and separation of natural products are receiving considerable attention. Centrifugal thin-layer chromatography is a very rapid technique, but limited in resolution. Of special interest are the recently developed support-free liquid-liquid chromatography methods such as droplet counter-current chromatography (DCCC) and rotation locular counter-current chromatography (RLCC). This latter method was applied to the separation of the enantiomers of (±)-norephedrine.

  9. Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2009-01-01

    Radial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Radial Halbach magnetic bearings are based on the same principle as that of axial Halbach magnetic bearings, differing in geometry as the names of these two types of bearings suggest. Both radial and axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings were described in Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings (LEW-18066-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2008), page 85. In the remainder of this article, the description of the principle of operation from the cited prior article is recapitulated and updated to incorporate the present radial geometry. In simplest terms, the basic principle of levitation in an axial or radial Halbach magnetic bearing is that of the repulsive electromagnetic force between (1) a moving permanent magnet and (2) an electric current induced in a stationary electrical conductor by the motion of the magnetic field. An axial or radial Halbach bearing includes multiple permanent magnets arranged in a Halbach array ("Halbach array" is defined below) in a rotor and multiple conductors in the form of wire coils in a stator, all arranged so the rotary motion produces an axial or radial repulsion that is sufficient to levitate the rotor. A basic Halbach array (see Figure 1) consists of a row of permanent magnets, each oriented so that its magnetic field is at a right angle to that of the adjacent magnet, and the right-angle turns are sequenced so as to maximize the magnitude of the magnetic flux density on one side of the row while

  10. Determination of histamine in wines with an on-line pre-column flow derivatization system coupled to high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    García-Villar, Natividad; Saurina, Javier; Hernández-Cassou, Santiago

    2005-09-01

    A new rapid and sensitive high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for determining histamine in red wine samples, based on continuous flow derivatization with 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonate (NQS), is proposed. In this system, samples are derivatized on-line in a three-channel flow manifold for reagent, buffer and sample. The reaction takes place in a PTFE coil heated at 80 degrees C and with a residence time of 2.9 min. The reaction mixture is injected directly into the chromatographic system, where the histamine derivative is separated from other aminated compounds present in the wine matrix in less than ten minutes. The HPLC procedure involves a C18 column, a binary gradient of 2% acetic acid-methanol as a mobile phase, and UV detection at 305 nm. Analytical parameters of the method are evaluated using red wine samples. The linear range is up to 66.7 mg L(-1) (r = 0.9999), the precision (RSD) is 3%, the detection limit is 0.22 mg L(-1), and the average histamine recovery is 101.5% +/- 6.7%. Commercial red wines from different Spanish regions are analyzed with the proposed method.

  11. Evaluation of a novel helium ionization detector within the context of (low-)flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Franchina, Flavio A; Maimone, Mariarosa; Sciarrone, Danilo; Purcaro, Giorgia; Tranchida, Peter Q; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-07-10

    The present research is focused on the use and evaluation of a novel helium ionization detector, defined as barrier discharge ionization detector (BID), within the context of (low-)flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (FM GC×GC). The performance of the BID device was compared to that of a flame ionization detector (FID), under similar FM GC×GC conditions. Following development and optimization of the FM GC×GC method, the BID was subjected to fine tuning in relation to acquisition frequency and discharge flow. Moreover, the BID performance was measured and compared to that of the FID, in terms of extra-column band broadening, sensitivity and dynamic range. The comparative study was carried out by using standard compounds belonging to different chemical classes, along with a sample of diesel fuel. Advantages and disadvantages of the BID system, also within the context of FM GC×GC, are critically discussed. In general, the BID system was characterized by a more limited dynamic range and increased sensitivity, compared to the FID. Additionally, BID and FID contribution to band broadening was found to be similar under the operational conditions applied. Particular attention was devoted to the behaviour of the FM GC×GC-BID system toward saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, for a possible future use in the field of mineral-oil food contamination research.

  12. Simultaneous Analysis of Monovalent Anions and Cations with a Sub-Microliter Dead-Volume Flow-Through Potentiometric Detector for Ion Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dumanli, Rukiye; Attar, Azade; Erci, Vildan; Isildak, Ibrahim

    2016-04-01

    A microliter dead-volume flow-through cell as a potentiometric detector is described in this article for sensitive, selective and simultaneous detection of common monovalent anions and cations in single column ion chromatography for the first time. The detection cell consisted of less selective anion- and cation-selective composite membrane electrodes together with a solid-state composite matrix reference electrode. The simultaneous separation and sensitive detection of sodium (Na(+)), potassium (K(+)), ammonium (NH4 (+)), chloride (Cl(-)) and nitrate (NO3 (-)) in a single run was achieved by using 98% 1.5 mM MgSO4 and 2% acetonitrile eluent with a mixed-bed ion-exchange separation column without suppressor column system. The separation and simultaneous detection of the anions and cations were completed in 6 min at the eluent flow-rate of 0.8 mL/min. Detection limits, at S/N = 3, were ranged from 0.2 to 1.0 µM for the anions and 0.3 to 3.0 µM for the cations, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of monovalent anions and cations in several environmental and biological samples.

  13. Four-stage (low-)flow modulation comprehensive gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry for the determination of recently-highlighted cosmetic allergens.

    PubMed

    Tranchida, Peter Q; Maimone, Mariarosa; Franchina, Flavio A; Bjerk, Thiago Rodrigues; Zini, Cláudia Alcaraz; Purcaro, Giorgia; Mondello, Luigi

    2016-03-25

    The present research is based on the development and use of a flow-modulation (FM) comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC×GC-qMS) method for the determination of recently-highlighted (by the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety) fragrance allergens (54) in cosmetics. FM GC×GC-qMS conditions were finely tuned to generate flow conditions (≈7 mL min(-1)) compatible with the qMS system used. Six-point calibration curves, over the range 1, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100 mg L(-1), were constructed for the 54 target allergens, with satisfactory linearity observed in all cases. Absolute quantification was performed by using extracted ions; target analyte identification was performed through measurement of ion ratios (qualifier/quantifier), full-scan MS database matching and the use of linear retention indices. Additional analytical figures of merit subjected to measurement were intra-day repeatability, accuracy at the 25 and 5 mg L(-1) levels, and limits of detection and quantification. The number of data points per peak, along with mass spectral skewing, was also subjected to evaluation. Finally, the FM GC×GC-qMS method was used not only for the quantification of target allergens in five commercial perfumes, but also for general qualitative profiling. PMID:26718184

  14. Evaluation of a direct injection nebulizer interface for flow injection analysis and high performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopic detection

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, K.E.

    1986-01-01

    A direct injection nebulizer (DIN) was designed, developed and evaluated to determine its potential utilization as an effective interface for flow injection analysis (FIA) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopic detection. The analytical figures of merit for the DIN when used as an interface for FIA-ICP-AES were found to be comparable to or better than those obtained with conventional pneumatic nebulization in terms of limits of detection (LODs), reproducibility, linearity, and interelement effects. In the HPLC mode, the LODDs were found to be comparable to those obtained by continuous-flow sample introduction into the ICP, or inferior by up to only a factor of four. Stable plasma operation was maintained for the DIN sample introduction of a variety of pure organic solvents, including acetonitrile, methanol, methyl-isobutylketone, and pyridine. The HPLC-DIN-ICP-AES facility was specifically applied for the speciation of inorganic and organo-metallic species contained in synthetic mixtures, vanilla extracts and a variety of energy-related materials, such as shale oil process water, coal extracts, shale oil, crude oil, and an SRC II. Suggestions for future research are also considered.

  15. Evaluation of a novel helium ionization detector within the context of (low-)flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Franchina, Flavio A; Maimone, Mariarosa; Sciarrone, Danilo; Purcaro, Giorgia; Tranchida, Peter Q; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-07-10

    The present research is focused on the use and evaluation of a novel helium ionization detector, defined as barrier discharge ionization detector (BID), within the context of (low-)flow modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (FM GC×GC). The performance of the BID device was compared to that of a flame ionization detector (FID), under similar FM GC×GC conditions. Following development and optimization of the FM GC×GC method, the BID was subjected to fine tuning in relation to acquisition frequency and discharge flow. Moreover, the BID performance was measured and compared to that of the FID, in terms of extra-column band broadening, sensitivity and dynamic range. The comparative study was carried out by using standard compounds belonging to different chemical classes, along with a sample of diesel fuel. Advantages and disadvantages of the BID system, also within the context of FM GC×GC, are critically discussed. In general, the BID system was characterized by a more limited dynamic range and increased sensitivity, compared to the FID. Additionally, BID and FID contribution to band broadening was found to be similar under the operational conditions applied. Particular attention was devoted to the behaviour of the FM GC×GC-BID system toward saturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, for a possible future use in the field of mineral-oil food contamination research. PMID:26032893

  16. Simultaneous Analysis of Monovalent Anions and Cations with a Sub-Microliter Dead-Volume Flow-Through Potentiometric Detector for Ion Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dumanli, Rukiye; Attar, Azade; Erci, Vildan; Isildak, Ibrahim

    2016-04-01

    A microliter dead-volume flow-through cell as a potentiometric detector is described in this article for sensitive, selective and simultaneous detection of common monovalent anions and cations in single column ion chromatography for the first time. The detection cell consisted of less selective anion- and cation-selective composite membrane electrodes together with a solid-state composite matrix reference electrode. The simultaneous separation and sensitive detection of sodium (Na(+)), potassium (K(+)), ammonium (NH4 (+)), chloride (Cl(-)) and nitrate (NO3 (-)) in a single run was achieved by using 98% 1.5 mM MgSO4 and 2% acetonitrile eluent with a mixed-bed ion-exchange separation column without suppressor column system. The separation and simultaneous detection of the anions and cations were completed in 6 min at the eluent flow-rate of 0.8 mL/min. Detection limits, at S/N = 3, were ranged from 0.2 to 1.0 µM for the anions and 0.3 to 3.0 µM for the cations, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of monovalent anions and cations in several environmental and biological samples. PMID:26786906

  17. Active flow management in preparative chromatographic separations: a preliminary investigation into enhanced separation using a curtain flow inlet fitting and segmented flow outlet fitting.

    PubMed

    Camenzuli, Michelle; Ritchie, Harald J; Ladine, James R; Shalliker, R Andrew

    2012-02-01

    Active flow management in the form of curtain flow sample introduction and segmented outlet flow control has been shown to enable sample to elute through a chromatography column under the principles of the "infinite diameter column". Such an elution process avoids the detrimental effects of the heterogeneity of particle-packed chromatographic columns by injecting the sample directly into the radial core region of the column, thus avoiding wall effects. The process described herein illustrates how the principles of the infinite diameter column can be applied using conventional injection devices suitable for long-term analysis that requires robust protocols. Using this approach, sensitivity in separation was 2.5 times greater than conventional chromatography, yielding a product at twice the concentration. Benefits of curtain flow injection are thus relevant to both preparative-scale and analytical-scale separations.

  18. Radial inflow gas turbine engine with advanced transition duct

    SciTech Connect

    Wiebe, David J

    2015-03-17

    A gas turbine engine (10), including: a turbine having radial inflow impellor blades (38); and an array of advanced transition combustor assemblies arranged circumferentially about the radial inflow impellor blades (38) and having inner surfaces (34) that are adjacent to combustion gases (40). The inner surfaces (34) of the array are configured to accelerate and orient, for delivery directly onto the radial inflow impellor blades (38), a plurality of discrete flows of the combustion gases (40). The array inner surfaces (34) define respective combustion gas flow axes (20). Each combustion gas flow axis (20) is straight from a point of ignition until no longer bound by the array inner surfaces (34), and each combustion gas flow axis (20) intersects a unique location on a circumference defined by a sweep of the radial inflow impellor blades (38).

  19. Quantitative determination of the ligand content in Benzamidine Sepharose 4 Fast Flow media with ion-pair chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gustavsson, Jan; Färenmark, Johan; Johansson, Bo-Lennart

    2005-04-01

    A quantitative hydrochloric acid hydrolysis-HPLC method was developed for the analysis of the ligand content of Benzamidine Sepharose 4 Fast Flow media. The method requires about 100 mg of dried sample and simple reaction vials can be utilised. Release of the ligand (p-aminobenzamidine) from the base matrix (Sepharose 4 Fast Flow) was obtained after hydrolysis for 180min at 70 degrees C in concentrated hydrochloric acid. When Benzamidine Sepharose 4 Fast Flow media were treated this way p-aminobenzoic acid and p-aminobenzamidine were the only products released from the ligand. A chromatographic system based on ion-pair reversed phase separation was used to quantify these ligand products. The mobile phase was made acidic enough to make p-aminobenzoic acid and p-aminobenzamidine positively charged in order to make ion-pair formation with hexanesulfonic acid possible. The relative standard deviation of th e method was below 2% and no systematic errors could be detected when the results were compared to an independent method based on elemental analysis (nitrogen). The new HPLC method was used to analyse ligand densities in the range of 2-20 micromol/ml medium. PMID:15861793

  20. Effect of radial flow on two particle correlations with identified triggers at intermediate pT in p-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Debojit; Choudhury, Subikash; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis

    2016-09-01

    Results from two-particle correlation between identified triggers (pions (π±), protons (p / p bar)) and un-identified charged particles at intermediate transverse momentum (pT) in p-Pb collisions at √{sNN} = 5.02 TeV have been presented. The events generated from a hybrid Monte-Carlo event generator, EPOS 3.107 that implements a flux-tube initial conditions followed by event by event 3+1D viscous hydrodynamical evolution, have been analyzed to calculate two-dimensional correlation functions in Δη- Δϕ. The strength of angular correlations at small relative angles (jet-like correlations), quantified in terms of near-side jet-like per-trigger yield has been calculated as a function of the event multiplicity. The yield associated with pion triggers exhibit negligible multiplicity dependence, while the proton-triggered yield shows a gradual suppression from low to high multiplicity events. In small collision systems like p-Pb where jet modification is expected to be less dominant, the observed suppression may be associated with the hydrodynamical evolution of the bulk system that generates an outward radial flow. Analogous measurements in Au-Au collisions at RHIC energy have shown a hint of dilution in proton-triggered correlation at its highest multiplicity suggesting that the soft physics processes in p-Pb and heavy ion collisions may have qualitative similarity.

  1. Periostin, discovered by nano-flow liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry, is a novel marker of diabetic retinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, Michiya; Ban, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Gou; Ueda, Toshihiko; Saito, Yuta; Nishimura, Eiichi; Fujisawa, Kunimi; Koide, Ryohei; Mizutani, Masakazu; Kozawa, Tadahiko; Shiraishi, Yuji; Bando, Yasuhiko; Tachikawa, Tetsuhiko; Hirano, Tsutomu

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} In proliferative membrane and epiretinal membrane specimens, the numbers of proteins are 225 and 154, respectively, and 123 proteins are common to both. {yields} Periostin and thrombospondin-1 proteins are unique to the proliferative membrane specimens. {yields} The expression of periostin is significantly up-regulated in proliferative membrane specimens. -- Abstract: Diabetes can lead to serious microvascular complications including proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR), the leading cause of blindness in adults. Recent studies using gene array technology have attempted to apply a hypothesis-generating approach to elucidate the pathogenesis of PDR, but these studies rely on mRNA differences, which may or may not be related to significant biological processes. To better understand the basic mechanisms of PDR and to identify potential new biomarkers, we performed shotgun liquid chromatography (LC)/tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analysis on pooled protein extracts from neovascular membranes obtained from PDR specimens and compared the results with those from non-vascular epiretinal membrane (ERM) specimens. We detected 226 distinct proteins in neovascular membranes and 154 in ERM. Among these proteins, 102 were specific to neovascular membranes and 30 were specific to ERM. We identified a candidate marker, periostin, as well as several known PDR markers such as pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF). We then performed RT-PCR using these markers. The expression of periostin was significantly up-regulated in proliferative membrane specimens. Periostin induces cell attachment and spreading and plays a role in cell adhesion. Proteomic analysis by LC/MS/MS, which permits accurate quantitative comparison, was useful in identifying new candidates such as periostin potentially involved in the pathogenesis of PDR.

  2. Variable stator radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, C.; Hajek, T.; Chen, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A radial turbine stage with a variable area nozzle was investigated. A high work capacity turbine design with a known high performance base was modified to accept a fixed vane stagger angle moveable sidewall nozzle. The nozzle area was varied by moving the forward and rearward sidewalls. Diffusing and accelerating rotor inlet ramps were evaluated in combinations with hub and shroud rotor exit rings. Performance of contoured sidewalls and the location of the sidewall split line with respect to the rotor inlet was compared to the baseline. Performance and rotor exit survey data are presented for 31 different geometries. Detail survey data at the nozzle exit are given in contour plot format for five configurations. A data base is provided for a variable geometry concept that is a viable alternative to the more common pivoted vane variable geometry radial turbine.

  3. Axonemal radial spokes

    PubMed Central

    Pigino, Gaia; Ishikawa, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    The radial spoke (RS) is a complex of at least 23 proteins that works as a mechanochemical transducer between the central‐pair apparatus and the peripheral microtubule doublets in eukaryotic flagella and motile cilia. The RS contributes to the regulation of the activity of dynein motors, and thus to flagellar motility. Despite numerous biochemical, physiological and structural studies, the mechanism of the function of the radial spoke remains unclear. Detailed knowledge of the 3D structure of the RS protein complex is needed in order to understand how RS regulates dynein activity. Here we review the most important findings on the structure of the RS, including results of our recent cryo‐electron tomographic analysis of the RS protein complex. PMID:22754630

  4. Radial pressure flange seal

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, Thomas H.; Call, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    This invention provides an all metal seal for vacuum or pressure vessels or systems. This invention does not use gaskets. The invention uses a flange which fits into a matching groove. Fluid pressure is applied in a chamber in the flange causing at least one of the flange walls to radially press against a side of the groove creating the seal between the flange wall and the groove side.

  5. Radially inhomogeneous bounded plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakeri-Khatir, H.; Aghamir, F. M.

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of kinetic theory along with self-consistent field equations, the expressions for dielectric tensor of radially inhomogeneous magnetized plasma columns are obtained. The study of dielectric tensor characteristics allows the accurate analysis of the inhomogeneous properties, beyond limitations that exist in the conventional method. Through the Bessel-Fourier transformation, the localized form of material equations in a radially inhomogeneous medium are obtained. In order to verify the integrity of the model and reveal the effect of inhomogeneity, a special case of a cylindrical plasma waveguide completely filled with inhomogeneous magnetized cold plasma was considered. The dispersion relation curves for four families of electromagnetic (EH and HE) and electrostatic (SC and C) modes are obtained and compared with the findings of the conventional model. The numerical analysis indicates that the inhomogeneity effect leads to coupling of electromagnetic and electrostatic modes each having different radial eigen numbers. The study also reveals that the electrostatic modes are more sensitive to inhomogeneous effects than the electromagnetic modes.

  6. Radially inhomogeneous bounded plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakeri-Khatir, H.; Aghamir, F. M.

    2016-07-01

    On the basis of kinetic theory along with self-consistent field equations, the expressions for dielectric tensor of radially inhomogeneous magnetized plasma columns are obtained. The study of dielectric tensor characteristics allows the accurate analysis of the inhomogeneous properties, beyond limitations that exist in the conventional method. Through the Bessel–Fourier transformation, the localized form of material equations in a radially inhomogeneous medium are obtained. In order to verify the integrity of the model and reveal the effect of inhomogeneity, a special case of a cylindrical plasma waveguide completely filled with inhomogeneous magnetized cold plasma was considered. The dispersion relation curves for four families of electromagnetic (EH and HE) and electrostatic (SC and C) modes are obtained and compared with the findings of the conventional model. The numerical analysis indicates that the inhomogeneity effect leads to coupling of electromagnetic and electrostatic modes each having different radial eigen numbers. The study also reveals that the electrostatic modes are more sensitive to inhomogeneous effects than the electromagnetic modes.

  7. Radial Field Piezoelectric Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, R. G.; Effinger, R. T., IV; Copeland, B. M., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    A series of active piezoelectric diaphragms were fabricated and patterned with several geometrically defined Inter-Circulating Electrodes "ICE" and Interdigitated Ring Electrodes "ICE". When a voltage potential is applied to the electrodes, the result is a radially distributed electric field that mechanically strains the piezoceramic along the Z-axis (perpendicular to the applied electric field). Unlike other piezoelectric bender actuators, these Radial Field Diaphragms (RFDs) strain concentrically yet afford high displacements (several times that of the equivalent Unimorph) while maintaining a constant circumference. One of the more intriguing aspects is that the radial strain field reverses itself along the radius of the RFD while the tangential strain remains relatively constant. The result is a Z-deflection that has a conical profile. This paper covers the fabrication and characterization of the 5 cm. (2 in.) diaphragms as a function of poling field strength, ceramic thickness, electrode type and line spacing, as well as the surface topography, the resulting strain field and displacement as a function of applied voltage at low frequencies. The unique features of these RFDs include the ability to be clamped about their perimeter with little or no change in displacement, the environmentally insulated packaging, and a highly repeatable fabrication process that uses commodity materials.

  8. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.

    2008-08-08

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  9. Reverse Phase-ultra Flow Liquid Chromatography-diode Array Detector Quantification of Anticancerous and Antidiabetic Drug Mangiferin from 11 Species of Swertia from India

    PubMed Central

    Kshirsagar, Parthraj R.; Gaikwad, Nikhil B.; Panda, Subhasis; Hegde, Harsha V.; Pai, Sandeep R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Genus Swertia is valued for its great medicinal potential, mainly Swertia chirayita (Roxb. ex Fleming) H. Karst. is used in traditional medicine for a wide range of diseases. Mangiferin one of xanthoids is referred with enormous pharmacological potentials. Objective: The aim of the study was to quantify and compare the anticancerous and antidiabetic drug mangiferin from 11 Swertia species from India. The study also evaluates hierarchical relationships between the species based on mangiferin content using multivariate analysis. Materials and Methods: The reverse phase-ultra flow liquid chromatography-diode array detector analyses was performed and chromatographic separation was achieved on a Lichrospher 100, C18e (5 μm) column (250–4.6 mm). Mobile phase consisting of 0.2% triethylamine (pH-4 with O-phosphoric acid) and acetonitrile (85:15) was used for separation with injection volume 20 μL and detection wave length at 257 nm. Results: Results indicated that concentration of mangiferin has been found to vary largely between Swertia species collected from different regions. Content of mangiferin was found to be highest in Swertia minor compared to other Swertia species studied herein from the Western Ghats and Himalayan region also. The same was also evident in the multivariate analysis, wherein S. chirayita, S. minor and Swertia paniculata made a separate clade. Conclusion: Conclusively, the work herein provides insights of mangiferin content from 11 Swertia species of India and also presents their hierarchical relationships. To best of the knowledge this is the first report of higher content of mangiferin from any Swertia species. SUMMARY The present study quantifies and compares mangiferin in 11 species of Swertia from India. The study also evaluates hierarchical relationships between the species based on mangiferin content using multivariate analysis. The mangiferin content was highest in S. minor compared to the studied Swertia species. To the

  10. Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Gary R.

    1980-01-01

    Presents selected recent advances in immobilization chemistry which have important connections to affinity chromatography. Discusses ligand immobilization and support modification. Cites 51 references. (CS)

  11. Dielectrokinetic chromatography devices

    SciTech Connect

    Chirica, Gabriela S; Fiechtner, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K

    2014-12-16

    Disclosed herein are methods and devices for dielectrokinetic chromatography. As disclosed, the devices comprise microchannels having at least one perturber which produces a non-uniformity in a field spanning the width of the microchannel. The interaction of the field non-uniformity with a perturber produces a secondary flow which competes with a primary flow. By decreasing the size of the perturber the secondary flow becomes significant for particles/analytes in the nanometer-size range. Depending on the nature of a particle/analyte present in the fluid and its interaction with the primary flow and the secondary flow, the analyte may be retained or redirected. The composition of the primary flow can be varied to affect the magnitude of primary and/or secondary flows on the particles/analytes and thereby separate and concentrate it from other particles/analytes.

  12. Navier-Stokes analysis of radial turbine rotor performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosiliere, L. M.

    1993-01-01

    An analysis of flow through a radial turbine rotor using the three-dimensional, thin-layer Navier-Stokes code RVC3D is described. The rotor is a solid version of an air-cooled metallic radial turbine having thick trailing edges, shroud clearance, and scalloped-backface clearance. Results are presented at the nominal operating condition using both a zero-clearance model and a model simulating the effects of the shroud and scalloped-backface clearance flows. A comparison with the available test data is made and details of the internal flow physics are discussed, allowing a better understanding of the complex flow distribution within the rotor.

  13. Experimental feasibility study of radial injection cooling of three-pad radial air foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Suman K.

    Air foil bearings use ambient air as a lubricant allowing environment-friendly operation. When they are designed, installed, and operated properly, air foil bearings are very cost effective and reliable solution to oil-free turbomachinery. Because air is used as a lubricant, there are no mechanical contacts between the rotor and bearings and when the rotor is lifted off the bearing, near frictionless quiet operation is possible. However, due to the high speed operation, thermal management is one of the very important design factors to consider. Most widely accepted practice of the cooling method is axial cooling, which uses cooling air passing through heat exchange channels formed underneath the bearing pad. Advantage is no hardware modification to implement the axial cooling because elastic foundation structure of foil bearing serves as a heat exchange channels. Disadvantage is axial temperature gradient on the journal shaft and bearing. This work presents the experimental feasibility study of alternative cooling method using radial injection of cooling air directly on the rotor shaft. The injection speeds, number of nozzles, location of nozzles, total air flow rate are important factors determining the effectiveness of the radial injection cooling method. Effectiveness of the radial injection cooling was compared with traditional axial cooling method. A previously constructed test rig was modified to accommodate a new motor with higher torque and radial injection cooling. The radial injection cooling utilizes the direct air injection to the inlet region of air film from three locations at 120° from one another with each location having three axially separated holes. In axial cooling, a certain axial pressure gradient is applied across the bearing to induce axial cooling air through bump foil channels. For the comparison of the two methods, the same amount of cooling air flow rate was used for both axial cooling and radial injection. Cooling air flow rate was

  14. Harvesting the radial artery

    PubMed Central

    Osterday, Robert M.; Brodman, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    The radial artery (RA) has emerged as an important arterial graft for coronary bypass surgery. With improving five-year patency rates and increasing uptake, great attention has been focused on the optimal conduit harvesting technique. We herein present our approach to RA harvesting. Prerequisites of a successful harvest include adherence to important anatomical landmarks, protection of the sensory innervation to the volar forearm, and meticulous handling of the RA branches. Regardless of the harvesting methodology chosen, adherence to a “no-touch” technique will optimize the patency and durability of the RA conduit. PMID:23977633

  15. Radial cutting torch

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, M.C.

    1997-01-08

    The project`s aim is to complete development of the Radial Cutting Torch, a pyrotechnic cutter, for use in all downhole tubular cutting operations in the petroleum industry. Project objectives are to redesign and pressure test nozzle seals to increase product quality, reliability, and manufacturability; improve the mechanical anchor to increase its temperature tolerance and its ability to function in a wider variety of wellbore fluids; and redesign and pressure test the RCT nozzle for operation at pressures from 10 to 20 ksi. The proposal work statement is included in the statement of work for the grant via this reference.

  16. Radial Reflection diffraction tomorgraphy

    DOEpatents

    Lehman, Sean K

    2013-11-19

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  17. Radial reflection diffraction tomography

    DOEpatents

    Lehman, Sean K.

    2012-12-18

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  18. Evaluation of a direct injection nebulizer interface for flow injection analysis and high performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopic detection

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, K.E.

    1986-06-01

    A direct injection nebulizer (DIN) was designed, developed, and evaluated to determine its potential utilization as an effective interface for flow injection analysis (FIA) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopic detection. The analytical figures of merit for the DIN when used as an interface for FIA-ICP-AES were found to be comparable to or better than those obtained with conventional pneumatic nebulization in terms of limits of detection (LODs), reproducibility, linearity, and interelement effects. Stable plasma operation was maintained for the DIN sample introduction of a variety of pure organic solvents, including acetonitrile, methanol, methylisobutylketone, and pyridine. The HPLC-DIN-ICP-AES facility was specifically applied for the speciation of inorganic and organometallic species contained in synthetic mixtures, vanilla extracts, and a variety of energy-related materials, such as shale oil process water, coal extracts, shale oil, crude oil, and an SRC II. Suggestions for future research are also considered. 227 refs., 44 figs., 15 tabs.

  19. Reversed phase liquid chromatography hyphenated to continuous flow-extractive desorption electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry for analysis and charge state manipulation of undigested proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yang, Samuel H; Vidova, Veronika; Rice, Elisa M; Wijeratne, Aruna B; Havlíček, Vladimír; Schug, Kevin A

    2015-01-01

    The application of continuous flow-extractive desorption electrospray ionization (CF-EDESI), an ambient ionization source demonstrated previously for use with intact protein analysis, is expanded here for the coupling of reversed phase protein separations to mass spectrometry. This configuration allows the introduction of charging additives to enhance detection without affecting the chromatographic separation mechanism. Two demonstrations of the advantages of CF-EDESI are presented in this work. First, a proof-of- principle is presented to demonstrate the applicability of hyphenation of liquid chromatography (LC) to CF- EDESI. LC-CF-EDESI-MS has good sensitivity compared to LC-electrospray ionization (ESI)-mass spectrometry. Second, the supercharging mechanism investigated in CF-EDESI provides an insight into a highly debated supercharging process in ESI. The results indicate that the mechanism of protein charging seen in HPLC-CF-EDESI is different from supercharging phenomena in conventional ESI. The surface tension mechanism and binding mechanism may both contribute to protein supercharging in ESI. PMID:26307717

  20. Flow-modulated comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer: a proof-of-principle study.

    PubMed

    Tranchida, Peter Q; Salivo, Simona; Franchina, Flavio A; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-03-01

    The present research is focused on the evaluation of a recently developed high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HR TOF MS), under the challenging conditions of a flow-modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (FM GC × GC) experiment. The HR TOF MS instrument was operated at a spectral generation frequency of 30 Hz and a mass resolution of ≥25,000 (fwhm). The effluent exiting the second-dimension column was in the range 6-8 mL/min, with part directed to waste to avoid exceeding the maximum pumping capacity of the MS system. An FM GC × GC-HR TOF MS method was developed for the untargeted and targeted analysis of a sample of high complexity, namely, heavy gas oil. With regard to the untargeted results, these were satisfactory in relation to MS database searching and mass accuracies. Considering the targeted data, the high selectivity of the MS system was highlighted by the use of accurate mass extracted-ion-chromatograms with narrow mass windows (±5 and ±1 ppm), for specific classes of polyaromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASHs), namely, benzothiophenes and dibenzothiophenes. Finally, the instrumental performance was also evaluated through the injection of standard solutions of four classes of PASHs.

  1. Determination of aromatic sulphur compounds in heavy gas oil by using (low-)flow modulated comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Franchina, Flavio Antonio; Machado, Maria Elisabete; Tranchida, Peter Quinto; Zini, Cláudia Alcaraz; Caramão, Elina Bastos; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-03-27

    The present research is focused on the development of a flow-modulated comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (FM GC × GC-MS/MS) method for the determination of classes of aromatic organic sulphur compounds (benzothiophenes, dibenzothiophenes, and benzonaphthothiophene) in heavy gas oil (HGO). The MS/MS instrument was used to provide both full-scan and multiple-reaction-monitoring (MRM) data. Linear retention index (LRI) ranges were used to define the MRM windows for each chemical class. Calibration solutions (internal standard: 1-fluoronaphthalene) were prepared by using an HGO sample, depleted of S compounds. Calibration information was also derived for the thiophene class (along with MRM and LRI data), even though such constituents were not present in the HGO. Linearity was satisfactory over the analyzed concentration range (1-100 mg/L); intra-day precision for the lowest calibration point was always below 17%. Accuracy was also satisfactory, with a maximum percentage error of 3.5% (absolute value) found among the S classes subjected to (semi-)quantification. The highest limit of quantification was calculated to be 299 μg/L (for the C1-benzothiophene class), while the lowest was 21 μg/L (for the C4-benzothiophene class).

  2. Flow-modulated comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography combined with a high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer: a proof-of-principle study.

    PubMed

    Tranchida, Peter Q; Salivo, Simona; Franchina, Flavio A; Mondello, Luigi

    2015-03-01

    The present research is focused on the evaluation of a recently developed high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer (HR TOF MS), under the challenging conditions of a flow-modulation comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (FM GC × GC) experiment. The HR TOF MS instrument was operated at a spectral generation frequency of 30 Hz and a mass resolution of ≥25,000 (fwhm). The effluent exiting the second-dimension column was in the range 6-8 mL/min, with part directed to waste to avoid exceeding the maximum pumping capacity of the MS system. An FM GC × GC-HR TOF MS method was developed for the untargeted and targeted analysis of a sample of high complexity, namely, heavy gas oil. With regard to the untargeted results, these were satisfactory in relation to MS database searching and mass accuracies. Considering the targeted data, the high selectivity of the MS system was highlighted by the use of accurate mass extracted-ion-chromatograms with narrow mass windows (±5 and ±1 ppm), for specific classes of polyaromatic sulfur heterocycles (PASHs), namely, benzothiophenes and dibenzothiophenes. Finally, the instrumental performance was also evaluated through the injection of standard solutions of four classes of PASHs. PMID:25642594

  3. A novel strategy for the discrimination of gelatinous Chinese medicines based on enzymatic digestion followed by nano-flow liquid chromatography in tandem with orbitrap mass spectrum detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huan; Shen, Yuping; Xu, Ying; Maqueda, Aida Serra; Zheng, Jie; Wu, Qinan; Tam, James P

    2015-01-01

    Gelatinous Chinese medicines made from mammalian skin or horn or reptile shell are a very important type of animal-derived Chinese medicine. They have been extensively used either as both hemopoietic and hemostatic agents to treat vertigo, palpitation, hematuria, and insomnia in traditional Chinese medicine clinics; consumed as a popular tonic for weaker persons such as the elderly or women after giving birth; or further manufactured to health supplements for certain populations. However, they cannot be discriminated from each other by only using the routine approach in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia, as it lacks enough specificity and, consequently, and the requirements can be met even by adding assayed ingredients. In this study, our efforts to differentiate three gelatinous Chinese medicines, Asini Corii Colla, Cervi Cornus Colla, and Testudinis Carapacis ET Plastri Colla, are presented, and a novel strategy based on enzymatic digestion followed by nano-flow liquid chromatography in tandem with orbitrap mass spectrum detector analysis is proposed herein. Fourteen diagnostic fragments identified from the digests of these medicines were exclusively selected for their discrimination. By taking advantage of the favorable features of this strategy, it is feasible and convenient to identify enzymatic-digested peptides originated from signature proteins in each medicine, which thus could be employed as potential biomarkers for their form of raw medicinal material, and the pulverized and the complex especially, that being the direct basis for authentication purpose.

  4. Conversion of propan-2-ol on zeolites LaNaY and HY investigated by gas chromatography and in situ MAS NMR spectroscopy under continuous-flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Hunger, M.; Horvath, T.

    1997-04-01

    The conversion of propan-2-ol on zeolites HY and LaNaY has been investigated by gas chromatography (GC) and in situ {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectroscopy under continuous-flow conditions using a new MAS NMR microreactor with cylindrical catalyst bed. At reaction temperatures of T = 373 K and T = 393 K a propan-2-ol conversion of 50 and 100%, respectively, and the formation of propene, diisopropyl. ether, and small amounts of acetone was determined by GC. Applying in situ {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectroscopy, the initial step of the reaction was found to be the physisorption of propan-2-ol on Bronsted acid sites. A formation of isopropoxy species could be excluded by {sup 13}C MAS NMR spectroscopy. {sup 1}H MAS NMR spectroscopy indicated that the Bronsted acid sites of the zeolites LaNaY and HY were hydrated by water molecules in the first part of the induction period. These water molecules were formed in result of the propan-2-ol dehydration. The strong low-field shift of the {sup 1}H MAS NMR signals of the hydrated Bronsted acid sites is due to a partial protonation of adsorbed water molecules. At T = 393 K, a significant {sup 13}C MAS NMR signal of strongly bonded acetone molecules appeared at 220 ppm in the spectra of zeolites LaNaY and HY. As demonstrated by propan-2-ol conversion on a partially dealuminated zeolite HY, this by-reaction is promoted by extra-framework aluminium species. The formation of coke precursors which caused {sup 13}C MAS NMR signals at 10-50 ppm is explained by an oligomerization of propene. In situ {sup 13}C MAS NMR experiments carried out under a continuous flow of propene showed that the above-mentioned coke precursors are also formed on partially rehydrated zeolite HY. 25 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Simultaneous determination of some food additives in soft drinks and other liquid foods by flow injection on-line dialysis coupled to high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kritsunankul, Orawan; Jakmunee, Jaroon

    2011-06-15

    Flow injection on-line dialysis was developed for sample pretreatment prior to the simultaneous determination of some food additives by high performance liquid chromatography (FID-HPLC). A liquid sample or mixed standard solution (900 μL) was injected into a donor stream (5%, w/v, sucrose) of FID system and was pushed further through a dialysis cell, while an acceptor solution (0.025 mol L(-1) phosphate buffer, pH 3.75) was held in the opposite side of the dialysis membrane. The dialysate was then flowed to an injection loop of the HPLC valve, where it was further injected into the HPLC system and analyzed under isocratic reverse-phase HPLC conditions and UV detection (230 nm). The order of elution of five food additives was acesulfame-K, saccharin, caffeine, benzoic acid and sorbic acid, respectively, with the analysis time of 14 min. On-line dialysis and HPLC analysis could be performed in parallel, providing sample throughput of 4.3h(-1). Dialysis efficiencies of five food additives were in ranges of 5-11%. Linear calibration graphs were in ranges of 10-100 mg L(-1) for acesulfame-K and saccharin, 10-250 mg L(-1) for benzoic acid and 10-500 mg L(-1) for caffeine and sorbic acid. Good precisions (RSD<5%) for all the additives were obtained. The proposed system was applied to soft drink and other liquid food samples. Acceptable percentage recoveries could be obtained by appropriate dilution of the sample before injecting into the system. The developed system has advantages of high degrees of automation for sample pretreatment, i.e., on-line sample separation and dilution and low consumption of chemicals and materials.

  6. [Determination of five imidazole pesticide residues in fruits by Turbo flow online purification-ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Kong, Xianghong; He, Qiang; Zhang, Longzhuang; Li, Jianhu

    2014-06-01

    A Turbo flow-ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (TF-UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed for the determination of five imidazole pesticides (imazapyr, triazoxide, rabenzazole, prochloraz and fenamidone) in fruits. The fruit samples were dissolved in saturated sodium chloride solution and extracted by acetonitrile. After the acetonitrile layer was evaporated and redissolved with acetonitrile-water (1 :1, v/v), the fruit samples were analyzed by TF-UPLC-MS/MS. The main factors influencing the purification efficiency including the TF column, mobile phase, elution solution and elution rate were optimized. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the analytes were purified by Turbo flow C18 column (50 mm x 1.0 mm) and separated on a Hypersil GOLD aQ column (100 mm x 2.1 mm) using the mobile phases of acetonitrile and 5 mmol/L ammonium acetate (containing 0.1% (v/v) formic acid) aqueous solution with gradient elution. The compounds were detected by selective reaction monitoring (SRM) via positive electrospray ionization (ESI(+)). The linear range of the method ranged from 0.007 5 to 0.75 mg/L for all the five imidazole pesticides, with the correlation coefficients (r2) greater than 0.99. The limits of quantification were 0.005 mg/kg for all the five imidazole pesticides. The recoveries were in the range from 71.2% to 122.4% at the spiked levels of 0.005, 0.01, 0.05 and 0.5 mg/kg with the relative standard deviations ranging from 0.5% to 8.9% in actual samples. The results indicate that the developed method is simple, efficient and precise, and can be a reliable technique for the determination of the five imidazole pesticides in fruit samples. PMID:25269251

  7. Simultaneous determination of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in tannery wastewater using low pressure ion chromatography combined with flow injection spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shujuan; Zhang, Xinshen; Yu, Lingyun; Wang, Li; Li, Hui

    2012-03-01

    Trivalent and hexavalent chromium have been successfully separated and determined using low pressure ion chromatography combined with flow injection spectrophotometric analysis (LPIC-FIA). A column packed with crosslinking starch microspheres was used for on-line separation of Cr(III) from Cr(VI) in a flow-injection system because of its absorptive effect on Cr(III). To determine the concentration of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) in samples, we used 3.0 mmol/L nitric acid to elute adsorbed Cr(III) from the column and then used ceric sulfate-sulfuric acid as oxidant to convert all Cr(III) into Cr(VI). Then, Cr(VI) directly came from the samples and Cr(VI) came from Cr(III) successively formed a amaranthine complex with diphenycarbazide and the complex shows a maximum absorption at 530 nm. Analytical parameters including the concentration of eluent and oxidant solution, oxidizing temperature, length of oxidizing reaction coil, reaction coil and injection coil, interfering effects, etc., were optimized. The limit of detection was 1.25 μg/L for Cr(VI) and 3.76 μg/L for Cr(III). The linear relationship between absorption with the concentration of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) was 0.001-1.000 mg/L and 0.030-1.000 mg/L with correlation coefficients of 0.9995 and 0.9994, respectively. The relative standard deviation of Cr(VI) and Cr(III) was 1.21% and 1.66%, respectively (n = 10). Major cations and anions did not show any interference. We validated this method through certified reference materials and through measuring the recovery in tannery wastewater.

  8. On-line pretreatment and determination of parabens in cosmetic products by combination of flow injection analysis, solid-phase extraction and micellar electrokinetic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Han, Fang; He, You-Zhao; Yu, Chang-Zhu

    2008-02-15

    A convenient and automated method for on-line pretreatment and determination of three parabens (i.e. methyl, ethyl and propyl p-hydroxybenzoate) in cosmetic products is proposed by using flow injection analysis (FIA), solid-phase extraction (SPE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC). An improved split-flow interface is used to couple SPE on C(8)-bonded silica with MEKC separation, which can avoid running buffer contamination and reduce buffer consumption, especially, containing expensive reagents. The analytes are loaded onto a C(8) column at 0.6 mL/min for 60s and eluted with a mixed eluent of 40% (v/v) 10 mmol/L sodium tetraborate buffer (pH 9.3) and 60% (v/v) ethanol at 0.75 mL/min. The MEKC separation is accomplished with a running buffer of 20 mmol/L sodium tetraborate (pH 9.3) containing 100 mmol/L sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at 15 kV. For butyl p-hydroxybenzoate did not be detected in the cosmetic products, it was used as an internal standard (IS) added into the real samples. This FIA-SPE-MEKC method using IS allows the sample separation within 12 min and the sample throughput of five samples per hour with the relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) less than 2.3% (n=5). The limits of detection (LOD) are in the range from 0.07 to 0.1 microg/mL (S/N=3 and n=11). The proposed method has been used to determine three parabens in real cosmetic products satisfactorily.

  9. Development of a flow-through enzyme immunoassay and application in screening green coffee samples for ochratoxin A with confirmation by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Sibanda, L; De Saeger, S; Bauters, T G; Nelis, H J; Van Peteghem, C

    2001-10-01

    A flow-through enzyme immunoassay has been developed for the screening of green coffee bean samples for ochratoxin A (OA) and was later used in a survey on OA in green coffee from different countries. The test has a sensitivity of 8 ng/g, and calculated recoveries ranged from 70 to 89% and from 86 to 95% for spiked and naturally contaminated samples, respectively. There were no significant differences in within-day and between-day assay performance (P > 0.05). Green coffee samples (15 Arabica and 7 Robusta) received from an international coffee trader were analyzed for intrinsic fungal contamination, screened for OA, and subsequently confirmed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). All 22 samples were contaminated by fungal species of the genus Aspergillus, while Penicillium species were isolated from a mere 13.6% of the total number of samples. Isolates were tested for their ability to produce OA, and only 3.9% were positive. There was no correlation between occurrence of OA-producing isolates and levels of OA in contaminated samples. Results of the screening procedure showed that 4 of the 22 samples were contaminated with 8 ng/g or higher. The HPLC method confirmed that the OA levels ranged from 27 to 168 ng/g. A fifth sample, which was shown to be negative during screening, had an OA concentration of 4 ng/g. There were no false negatives or positives recorded, and the flow-through enzyme immunoassay results correlated with those obtained by HPLC.

  10. Gas Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karasek, Francis W.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    This review covers fundamental developments in gas chromatography during 1982 and 1983. Literature is considered under these headings: columns; liguid phases; solid supports; sorption processes and solvents; open tubular column gas chromatography; instrumentation; high-resolution columns and applications; other techniques; qualitative and…

  11. Comparison of on-line flow-cell and off-line solvent-elimination interfaces for size-exclusion chromatography and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy in polymer analysis.

    PubMed

    Kok, S J; Wold, C A; Hankemeier, Th; Schoenmakers, P J

    2003-10-31

    Two commercial liquid chromatography-Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy interfaces (LC-FTIR), viz. a flow cell and a solvent-elimination interface have been assessed for use in size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) with respect to their chromatographic integrity (i.e. peak asymmetry, chromatographic resolution), quantitative and qualitative aspects. A polycarbonate/aliphatic polyester (PC/APE) blend and a polycarbonate-co-polydimethylsiloxane (PC-co-PDMS) copolymer were selected for the assessment. Both samples were successfully and selectively analyzed. The relatively large volume of the flow cell and the inherent deposition characteristics of the solvent-elimination interface led to a comparable decrease in the chromatographic resolution. The separation of oligomers was diminished in comparison with SEC-ultra-violet (UV). However, the peak asymmetry was not significantly affected by either interface. For both interfaces, a linear relationship was obtained for the FTIR response versus the injected concentration. The sensitivity was found to be higher for the solvent-elimination interface. For the current model compounds, the flow-cell interface detection limits are worse. However, the repeatability of flow-cell SEC-FTIR, evaluated by means of four SEC-FTIR analyses of polycarbonate, was considerably better than for solvent-elimination SEC-FTIR. This is probably due to the well-defined optical path length of the sample in the flow cell. By spectral subtraction, it was very well possible to obtain qualitative (functional group) information for compound identification also with flow-cell SEC-FTIR.

  12. Gas Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cram, Stuart P.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Selects fundamental developments in theory, methodology, and instrumentation in gas chromatography (GC). A special section reviews GC in the People's Republic of China. Over 1,000 references are cited. (CS)

  13. Impact of Diabetes Mellitus on Radial and Ulnar Arterial Vasoreactivity after Radial Artery Cannulation: A Randomized Controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Jung; Soh, Sarah; Kim, So Yeon; Kil, Hae Keum; Lee, Jae Hoon; Kim, Jeong Min; Kim, Tae Whan; Koo, Bon-Nyeo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes mellitus (DM) may influence arterial vasoreactivity after arterial stimulus, such as cannulation, and cause changes in diameter and blood flow. Despite the frequent use of arterial cannulation during anesthesia and critical care, little information is available regarding vasoreactivity of the radial and ulnar arteries and its influence on underlying DM. Methods: Forty non-DM and 40 DM patients, who required arterial cannulation during general anesthesia, were enrolled. Using duplex Doppler ultrasonography, we measured the patients' arterial diameter, peak systolic velocity, end-diastolic velocity, resistance index, and mean volume flow of both arteries at five different time points. Results: After radial artery cannulation, ulnar arterial diameter and blood flow did not significantly increase in DM group, as they did in non-DM group. Ulnar arterial resistance index significantly increased in both groups, but the degree of decrease in DM group was significantly less than non-DM. Conclusion: Ulnar artery's ability to increase blood flow for compensating the sudden reduction of radial arterial flow in DM patients was significantly less than that in non-DM patients under general anesthesia. Such attenuated vasoreactivity of ulnar artery to compensate the reduced radial arterial flow may have to be considered in radial arterial cannulation for DM patients. PMID:27648000

  14. Development of an Online Cell-Based Bioactivity Screening Method by Coupling Liquid Chromatography to Flow Cytometry with Parallel Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Otvos, Reka A; van Nierop, Pim; Niessen, Wilfried M A; Kini, R Manjunatha; Somsen, Govert W; Smit, August B; Kool, Jeroen

    2016-05-01

    This study describes a new platform for the fast and efficient functional screening for bioactive compounds in complex natural mixtures using a cell-based assay. The platform combines reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC) with online flow cytometry (FC) and mass spectrometry (MS). As a model (an example or proof-of-concept study) we have used a functional calcium-flux assay in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells stably overexpressing the α-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7-nAChR), a potential therapeutic target for central nervous system (CNS) related diseases. We have designed the coupled LC-FC system employing the neuroblastoma cells followed by analytical and pharmacological evaluation of the hyphenated setup in agonist and mixed antagonist-agonist assay modes. Using standard receptor ligands we have validated pharmacological responses and standardized good assay quality parameters. The applicability of the screening system was evaluated by analysis of various types of natural samples, such as a tobacco plant extract (in agonist assay mode) and snake venoms (in mixed antagonist-agonist assay mode). The bioactivity responses were correlated directly to the respective accurate masses of the compounds. Using simultaneous functional agonist and antagonist responses nicotine and known neurotoxins were detected from tobacco extract and snake venoms, respectively. Thus, the developed analytical screening technique represents a new tool for rapid measurement of functional cell-based responses and parallel separation and identification of compounds in complex mixtures targeting the α7-nAChR. It is anticipated that other fast-response cell-based assays (e.g., other ion flux assays) can be incorporated in this analytical setup.

  15. Comparison of cryogenic and differential flow (forward and reverse fill/flush) modulators and applications to the analysis of heavy petroleum cuts by high-temperature comprehensive gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Duhamel, Chloé; Cardinael, Pascal; Peulon-Agasse, Valérie; Firor, Roger; Pascaud, Laurent; Semard-Jousset, Gaëlle; Giusti, Pierre; Livadaris, Vincent

    2015-03-27

    The development of new efficient conversion processes to transform heavy petroleum fractions into valuable products, such as diesel, requires improved chemical knowledge of the latter. High-temperature comprehensive gas chromatography (HT-GC × GC) has proven to be a powerful technique for characterizing such complex samples. This paper reports on an evaluation of the performances of four different differential flow modulators, including two original ones that have not been previously described in the literature, in terms of dispersion, peak intensity, peak capacity and overloading. These modulators, all of which are based on Agilent capillary flow technology (CFT), are forward fill/flush (FFF) differential flow modulators with an integrated collection channel or an adjustable channel (new) and reverse fill/flush (RFF) differential flow modulators with an integrated collection channel (new) or an adjustable channel. First, the optimization of the collection channel dimensions is described. Second, an RFF and an FFF differential flow modulator possessing the same collection channel were compared. The reverse differential flow modulation significantly reduced band broadening compared to forward differential flow modulation, and the peak intensity doubled for every modulated peak when an RFF differential flow modulator was used. Then, an RFF differential flow modulator and CO2 dual-jet modulator were compared. Whereas the percentages of separation space used were similar (61% with the HT-GC × GC method using a cryogenic modulator and 59% with the method using an RFF differential flow modulator), the peak capacities were at least three times more important with differential flow modulation due to the greater length of the column used in the second dimension. The results demonstrate that the RFF differential flow modulator is an excellent tool for studying heavy petroleum cuts. It demonstrates the best performances and it is the most versatile modulator. In its two

  16. High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuhs, Bradley L.; Rounds, Mary Ann

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) developed during the 1960s as a direct offshoot of classic column liquid chromatography through improvements in the technology of columns and instrumental components (pumps, injection valves, and detectors). Originally, HPLC was the acronym for high-pressure liquid chromatography, reflecting the high operating pressures generated by early columns. By the late 1970s, however, high-performance liquid chromatography had become the preferred term, emphasizing the effective separations achieved. In fact, newer columns and packing materials offer high performance at moderate pressure (although still high pressure relative to gravity-flow liquid chromatography). HPLC can be applied to the analysis of any compound with solubility in a liquid that can be used as the mobile phase. Although most frequently employed as an analytical technique, HPLC also may be used in the preparative mode.

  17. DESIGN ANALYSIS OF RADIAL INFLOW TURBINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    This program performs a velocity-diagram analysis required for determining geometry and estimating performance for radial-inflow turbines. Input design requirements are power, mass flow rate, inlet temperature and pressure, and rotative rate. The design variables include stator-exit angle, rotor-exit-tip to rotor-inlet radius ratio, rotor-exit-hub to tip radius ratio, and the magnitude and radial distribution of rotor-exit tangential velocity. The program output includes diameters, total and static efficiences, all absolute and relative temperatures, pressures, and velocities, and flow angles at stator inlet, stator exit, rotor inlet, and rotor exit. Losses accounted for in this program by the internal loss model are three-dimensional (profile plus end wall) viscous losses in the stator and the rotor, the disk-friction loss on the back side of the rotor, the loss due to the clearance between the rotor tip and the outer casing, and the exit velocity loss. The flow analysis is one-dimensional at the stator inlet, stator exit, and rotor inlet, each of these calculation stations being at a constant radius. At the rotor exit where there is a variation in flow-field radius, an axisymmetric two-dimensional analysis is made using constant height sectors. Simple radial equilibrium is used to establish the static pressure gradient at the rotor exit. This program is written in FORTRAN V and has been implemented on a UNIVAC 1100 series computer with a memory requirement of approximately 22K of 36 bit words.

  18. Radial distribution function in polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Przygocki, Wladyslaw

    1997-02-01

    Radial distribution function is a very useful tool for determination of the polymer structure. The connection between the scattered X-ray intensity and radial distribution function is presented. Some examples of RDF for polyethylene and for poly(ethylene terephtalate).

  19. Comparison of perfusion media and monoliths for protein and virus-like particle chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yige; Abraham, Dicky; Carta, Giorgio

    2016-05-20

    Structural and performance characteristics of perfusion chromatography media (POROS HS 20 and 50) and those of a polymethacrylate monolith (CIM SO3-1 tube monolith column) are compared for protein and virus-like particle chromatography using 1mL columns. Axial flow columns are used for POROS while the monolith has a radial flow configuration, which provides comparable operating pressures. The POROS beads contain a bimodal distribution of pore sizes, some as large as 0.5μm, which allow a small fraction of the mobile phase to flow within the particles, while the monolith contains 1-2μm flow channels. For proteins (lysozyme and IgG), the dynamic binding capacity of the POROS columns is more than twice that of the monolith at longer residence times. While the DBC of the POROS HS 50 column decreases at shorter residence times, the DBC of the POROS HS 20 column for IgG remains nearly twice that of the monolith at residence times at least as low as 0.2min as a result of intraparticle convection. Protein recoveries are comparable for all three columns. For VLPs, however, the eluted peaks are broader and recovery is lower for the monolith than for the POROS columns and is dependent on the direction of flow in the monolith, which is attributed to denser layer observed by SEM at the inlet surface of the monolith that appears to trap VLPs when loading in the normal flow direction. PMID:27106397

  20. Radial systems of dark globules

    SciTech Connect

    Gyul'budagyn, A.L.

    1986-03-01

    The author gives examples of radial systems consisting of dark globules and ''elephant trunks''. Besides already known systems, which contain hot stars at their center, data are given on three radial systems of a new kind, at the center of which there are stars of spectral types later than B. Data are given on 32 globules of radial systems of the association Cep OB2. On the basis of the observational data, it is concluded that at least some of the isolated Bok globules derive from elephant trunks and dark globules forming radial systems around hot stars. It is also suggested that the two molecular clouds situated near the Rosette nebula and possessing velocities differing by ca 20 km/sec from the velocity of the nebula could have been ejected in opposite directions from the center of the nebula. One of these clouds consists of dark globules forming the radial system of the Rosette nebula.

  1. Design and performance of a new continuous-flow sample-introduction system for flame infrared-emission spectrometry: Applications in process analysis, flow injection analysis, and ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lam, C K; Zhang, Y; Busch, M A; Busch, K W

    1993-06-01

    A new sample introduction system for the analysis of continuously flowing liquid streams by flame infrared-emission (FIRE) spectrometry has been developed. The system uses a specially designed purge cell to strip dissolved CO(2) from solution into a hydrogen gas stream that serves as the fuel for a hydrogen/air flame. Vibrationally excited CO(2) molecules present in the flame are monitored with a simple infrared filter (4.4 mum) photometer. The new system can be used to introduce analytes as a continuous liquid stream (process analysis mode) or on a discrete basis by sample injection (flow injection analysis mode). The key to the success of the method is the new purge-cell design. The small internal volume of the cell minimizes problems associated with purge-cell clean-out and produces sharp, reproducible signals. Spent analytical solution is continuously drained from the cell, making cell disconnection and cleaning between samples unnecessary. Under the conditions employed in this study, samples could be analyzed at a maximum rate of approximately 60/h. The new sample introduction system was successfully tested in both a process analysis- and a flow injection analysis mode for the determination of total inorganic carbon in Waco tap water. For the first time, flame infrared-emission spectrometry was successfully extended to non-volatile organic compounds by using chemical pretreatment with peroxydisulfate in the presence of silver ion to convert the analytes into dissolved carbon dioxide, prior to purging and detection by the FIRE radiometer. A test of the peroxydisulfate/Ag(+) reaction using six organic acids and five sugars indicated that all 11 compounds were oxidized to nearly the same extent. Finally, the new sample introduction system was used in conjunction with a simple filter FIRE radiometer as a detection system in ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography. Ion-exchange chromatograms are shown for two aqueous mixtures, one containing six organic

  2. Gas chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiochon, Georges; Guillemin, Claude L.

    1990-11-01

    Gas chromatography is a powerful separation technique for gas and vapor mixtures. Combining separation and on-line detection permits accurate quantitative analysis of complex mixtures, including traces of compounds down to parts per trillions in some particular cases. The importance of gas chromatography in quality control and process control in the chemical and drug industry, in environmental pollution investigations and in clinical analysis is critical. The principles of the technique are discussed, the main components of a gas chromatograph are described and some idea of the importance of the applications is given.

  3. Submarine radial vents on Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wanless, V. Dorsey; Garcia, M.O.; Trusdell, F.A.; Rhodes, J.M.; Norman, M.D.; Weis, Dominique; Fornari, D.J.; Kurz, M.D.; Guillou, Herve

    2006-01-01

    A 2002 multibeam sonar survey of Mauna Loa's western flank revealed ten submarine radial vents and three submarine lava flows. Only one submarine radial vent was known previously. The ages of these vents are constrained by eyewitness accounts, geologic relationships, Mn-Fe coatings, and geochemical stratigraphy; they range from 128 years B.P. to possibly 47 ka. Eight of the radial vents produced degassed lavas despite eruption in water depths sufficient to inhibit sulfur degassing. These vents formed truncated cones and short lava flows. Two vents produced undegassed lavas that created “irregular” cones and longer lava flows. Compositionally and isotopically, the submarine radial vent lavas are typical of Mauna Loa lavas, except two cones that erupted alkalic lavas. He-Sr isotopes for the radial vent lavas follow Mauna Loa's evolutionary trend. The compositional and isotopic heterogeneity of these lavas indicates most had distinct parental magmas. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter results, along with photography and sampling during four JASON2 dives, are used to produce a detailed geologic map to evaluate Mauna Loa's submarine geologic history. The new map shows that the 1877 submarine eruption was much larger than previously thought, resulting in a 10% increase for recent volcanism. Furthermore, although alkalic lavas were found at two radial vents, there is no systematic increase in alkalinity among these or other Mauna Loa lavas as expected for a dying volcano. These results refute an interpretation that Mauna Loa's volcanism is waning. The submarine radial vents and flows cover 29 km2 of seafloor and comprise a total volume of ∼2×109 m3 of lava, reinforcing the idea that submarine lava eruptions are important in the growth of oceanic island volcanoes even after they emerged above sea level.

  4. Spiral Countercurrent Chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yoichiro; Knight, Martha; Finn, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    For many years, high-speed countercurrent chromatography conducted in open tubing coils has been widely used for the separation of natural and synthetic compounds. In this method, the retention of the stationary phase is solely provided by the Archimedean screw effect by rotating the coiled column in the centrifugal force field. However, the system fails to retain enough of the stationary phase for polar solvent systems such as the aqueous–aqueous polymer phase systems. To address this problem, the geometry of the coiled channel was modified to a spiral configuration so that the system could utilize the radially acting centrifugal force. This successfully improved the retention of the stationary phase. Two different types of spiral columns were fabricated: the spiral disk assembly, made by stacking multiple plastic disks with single or four interwoven spiral channels connected in series, and the spiral tube assembly, made by inserting the tetrafluoroethylene tubing into a spiral frame (spiral tube support). The capabilities of these column assemblies were successfully demonstrated by separations of peptides and proteins with polar two-phase solvent systems whose stationary phases had not been well retained in the earlier multilayer coil separation column for high-speed countercurrent chromatography. PMID:23833207

  5. Ion Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulik, James D.; Sawicki, Eugene

    1979-01-01

    Accurate for the analysis of ions in solution, this form of analysis enables the analyst to directly assay many compounds that previously were difficult or impossible to analyze. The method is a combination of the methodologies of ion exchange, liquid chromatography, and conductimetric determination with eluant suppression. (Author/RE)

  6. Acoustic aspects of a radial diffuser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Krasinski, J.; Sun, S.; Wawszczak, W.

    This paper describes experimental research on the acoustical aspects of an axially-symmetrical radial diffuser. Tests were made at high subsonic and supersonic speeds at the diffuser entry, using compressed air. The results are analyzed from the point of view of the internal flow and Lighthill's theory of sound generated aerodynamically. The outstanding features of this diffuser are a high efficiency in subsonic and supersonic ranges and extreme shortness and powerful sound attenuating capacity. The noise level of a supersonic nozzle at Mach 4.0 was reduced from about 110 dB to 80 dB.

  7. Entropy generation of radial rotation convective channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alić, Fikret

    2012-03-01

    The exchange of heat between two fluids is established by radial rotating pipe or a channel. The hotter fluid flows through the pipe, while the cold fluid is ambient air. Total length of pipe is made up of multiple sections of different shape and position in relation to the common axis of rotation. In such heat exchanger the hydraulic and thermal irreversibility of the hotter and colder fluid occur. Therefore, the total entropy generated within the radial rotating pipe consists of the total entropy of hotter and colder fluid, taking into account all the hydraulic and thermal irreversibility of both fluids. Finding a mathematical model of the total generated entropy is based on coupled mathematical expressions that combine hydraulic and thermal effects of both fluids with the complex geometry of the radial rotating pipe. Mathematical model follows the each section of the pipe and establishes the function between the sections, so the total generated entropy is different from section to section of the pipe. In one section of the pipe thermal irreversibility may dominate over the hydraulic irreversibility, while in another section of the pipe the situation may be reverse. In this paper, continuous analytic functions that connect sections of pipe in geometric meaning are associated with functions that describe the thermo-hydraulic effects of hotter and colder fluid. In this way, the total generated entropy of the radial rotating pipe is a continuous analytic function of any complex geometry of the rotating pipe. The above method of establishing a relationship between the continuous function of entropy with the complex geometry of the rotating pipe enables indirect monitoring of unnecessary hydraulic and thermal losses of both fluids. Therefore, continuous analytic functions of generated entropy enable analysis of hydraulic and thermal irreversibility of individual sections of pipe, as well as the possibility of improving the thermal-hydraulic performance of the rotating

  8. Radial Electromagnetic Press for Ignitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizzuto, A.; Capriccioli, A.; Gasparotto, M.; Palmieri, A.; Rita, C.; Roccella, M.; Coppi, B.

    1996-11-01

    The active vertical press included so far in the Ignitor design can be substituted advantageously (e.g. in terms of the machine maintenance procedure) by a radial electromagnetic press, without involving modification of the main machine components. Only the bracing ring of the radial mechanical preloading system that is permanently applied requires some changes. The radial press has to compensate for the reduced ring load (from 200 MN to 120 MN) and the original vertical press load of 35 MN. To get an equivalent preloading system, the radial press load has to be 140 MN, which is 25 MN higher, to account for the lower efficiency of the radial load. The current needed to originate the 140 MN force is about 3.2 MA. The press is active for 2 s starting from the plasma current rise. The temperature increase is about 20 ^oC. The stray field at the plasma border is well within the allowable value and can be easily compensated by varying slightly the current of one couple of poloidal coils. The new machine layout is illustrated and the electromagnetic and mechanical analyses carried out for the new configuration are given. Sponsored by ENEA, CNR and ASP, of Italy, and by the US DoE

  9. Development and validation of two LC-MS/MS methods for the detection and quantification of amphetamines, designer amphetamines, benzoylecgonine, benzodiazepines, opiates, and opioids in urine using turbulent flow chromatography.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Nadine; Peters, Benjamin; Schmidt, Peter; Ewald, Andreas H

    2013-01-01

    In the context of driving ability diagnostics in Germany, administrative cutoffs for various drugs and pharmaceuticals in urine have been established. Two liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods for simultaneous detection and quantification of amphetamines, designer amphetamines, benzoylecgonine, benzodiazepines, opiates, and opioids in urine were developed and validated. A 500-μL aliquot of urine was diluted and fortified with an internal standard solution. After enzymatic cleavage, online extraction was performed by an ion-exchange/reversed-phase turbulent flow column. Separation was achieved by using a reversed-phase column and gradient elution. For detection, a Thermo Fisher TSQ Quantum Ultra Accurate Mass tandem mass spectrometer with positive electrospray ionization was used, and the analytes were measured in multiple-reaction monitoring mode detecting two transitions per precursor ion. The total run time for both methods was about 15 min. Validation was performed according to the guidelines of the Society of Toxicological and Forensic Chemistry. The results of matrix effect determination were between 78% and 116%. The limits of detection and quantification for all drugs, except zopiclone, were less than 10 ng/mL and less than 25 ng/mL, respectively. Calibration curves ranged from 25 to 200 ng/mL for amphetamines, designer amphetamines, and benzoylecgonine, from 25 to 250 ng/mL for benzodiazepines, from 12.5 to 100 ng/mL for morphine, codeine, and dihydrocodeine, and from 5 to 50 ng/mL for buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine. Intraday and interday precision values were lower than 15%, and bias values within ± 15% were achieved. Turbulent flow chromatography needs no laborious sample preparation, so the workup is less time-consuming compared with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods. The methods are suitable for quantification of multiple analytes at the cutoff concentrations required for driving ability diagnostics in Germany.

  10. Development and validation of two LC-MS/MS methods for the detection and quantification of amphetamines, designer amphetamines, benzoylecgonine, benzodiazepines, opiates, and opioids in urine using turbulent flow chromatography.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Nadine; Peters, Benjamin; Schmidt, Peter; Ewald, Andreas H

    2013-01-01

    In the context of driving ability diagnostics in Germany, administrative cutoffs for various drugs and pharmaceuticals in urine have been established. Two liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods for simultaneous detection and quantification of amphetamines, designer amphetamines, benzoylecgonine, benzodiazepines, opiates, and opioids in urine were developed and validated. A 500-μL aliquot of urine was diluted and fortified with an internal standard solution. After enzymatic cleavage, online extraction was performed by an ion-exchange/reversed-phase turbulent flow column. Separation was achieved by using a reversed-phase column and gradient elution. For detection, a Thermo Fisher TSQ Quantum Ultra Accurate Mass tandem mass spectrometer with positive electrospray ionization was used, and the analytes were measured in multiple-reaction monitoring mode detecting two transitions per precursor ion. The total run time for both methods was about 15 min. Validation was performed according to the guidelines of the Society of Toxicological and Forensic Chemistry. The results of matrix effect determination were between 78% and 116%. The limits of detection and quantification for all drugs, except zopiclone, were less than 10 ng/mL and less than 25 ng/mL, respectively. Calibration curves ranged from 25 to 200 ng/mL for amphetamines, designer amphetamines, and benzoylecgonine, from 25 to 250 ng/mL for benzodiazepines, from 12.5 to 100 ng/mL for morphine, codeine, and dihydrocodeine, and from 5 to 50 ng/mL for buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine. Intraday and interday precision values were lower than 15%, and bias values within ± 15% were achieved. Turbulent flow chromatography needs no laborious sample preparation, so the workup is less time-consuming compared with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry methods. The methods are suitable for quantification of multiple analytes at the cutoff concentrations required for driving ability diagnostics in Germany. PMID

  11. Temperature distribution study in a cooled radial inflow turbine rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamed, A.; Baskharone, E.; Tabakoff, W.

    1976-01-01

    A numerical study to determine the temperature distribution in the rotor of a radial inflow turbine is presented. The study is based on the use of the finite element method in the three dimensional heat conduction problem. Different cooling techniques with various coolant to primary mass flow ratios are investigated. The resulting temperature distribution in the rotor are presented for comparison.

  12. A new approach to live reaction monitoring using active flow technology in ultra-high-speed HPLC with mass spectral detection.

    PubMed

    Kocic, Danijela; Andrew Shalliker, R

    2015-12-01

    A new type of chromatography column referred to as a parallel segmented flow (PSF) column enables ultra-high-speed high-performance liquid chromatography-MS to be undertaken. This occurs because the separation efficiency obtained on PSF columns has been shown in prior studies to be superior to conventional columns, and the flow stream is split radially inside the outlet end fitting of the column, rather than in an axial post-column flow stream split. As a result, the flow through the column can be five times higher than the flow through the MS. In this work, the degradation of amino acids in dilute nitric acid was used to illustrate the process. Separations were obtained in less than 12 s, although the reinjection process was initiated 6 s after the previous injection. The degradation rate constant of tryptophan, in the presence of tyrosine and phenylalanine, was determined.

  13. Fractures of the Radial Head.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Klaus Josef; Wegmann, Kilian; Müller, Lars P; Gohlke, Frank E

    2015-11-01

    Radial head fractures are the most common fractures around the elbow. Because they are often accompanied by ligamentous injuries, we recommend considering them to be osteoligamentous injuries rather than simple fractures, even in undisplaced or minimally displaced fractures. Surgeons should always suspect and actively exclude concomitant ligament tears. The incidence of these associated injuries increases with greater severity of the radial head fracture. However, the standard Mason classification system does not adequately address this problem, and all attempts to establish a new classification system that provides concise treatment algorithms have failed. This article discusses the current treatment options and the current controversies in nonsurgical therapy, open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) and radial head replacement. PMID:26498543

  14. Gas turbine engine with radial diffuser and shortened mid section

    SciTech Connect

    Charron, Richard C.; Montgomery, Matthew D.

    2015-09-08

    An industrial gas turbine engine (10), including: a can annular combustion assembly (80), having a plurality of discrete flow ducts configured to receive combustion gas from respective combustors (82) and deliver the combustion gas along a straight flow path at a speed and orientation appropriate for delivery directly onto the first row (56) of turbine blades (62); and a compressor diffuser (32) having a redirecting surface (130, 140) configured to receive an axial flow of compressed air and redirect the axial flow of compressed air radially outward.

  15. Effects of radial motion on interchange injections at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranicas, C.; Thomsen, M. F.; Achilleos, N.; Andriopoulou, M.; Badman, S. V.; Hospodarsky, G.; Jackman, C. M.; Jia, X.; Kennelly, T.; Khurana, K.; Kollmann, P.; Krupp, N.; Louarn, P.; Roussos, E.; Sergis, N.

    2016-01-01

    Charged particle injections are regularly observed in Saturn's inner magnetosphere by Cassini. They are attributed to an ongoing process of flux-tube interchange driven by the strong centrifugal force associated with Saturn's rapid rotation. Numerical simulations suggest that these interchange injections can be associated with inward flow channels, in which plasma confined to a narrow range of longitudes moves radially toward the planet, gaining energy, while ambient plasma in the adjacent regions moves more slowly outward. Most previous analyses of these events have neglected this radial motion and inferred properties of the events under the assumption that they appear instantaneously at the spacecraft's L-shell and thereafter drift azimuthally. This paper describes features of injections that can be related to their radial motion prior to observation. We use a combination of phase space density profiles and an updated version of a test-particle model to quantify properties of the injection. We are able to infer the longitudinal width of the injection, the radial travel time from its point of origin, and the starting L shell of the injection. We can also predict which energies can remain inside the channel during the radial transport. To highlight the effects of radial propagation at a finite speed, we focus on those interchange injections without extensive features of azimuthal dispersion. Injections that have traveled radially for one or more hours prior to observation would have been initiated at a different local time than that of the observation. Finally, we describe an injection where particles have drifted azimuthally into a flow channel prior to observation by Cassini.

  16. Gas Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Michael C.

    Gas chromatography (GC) has many applications in the analysis of food products. GC has been used for the determination of fatty acids, triglycerides, cholesterol, gases, water, alcohols, pesticides, flavor compounds, and many more. While GC has been used for other food components such as sugars, oligosaccharides, amino acids, peptides, and vitamins, these substances are more suited to analysis by high performance liquid chromatography. GC is ideally suited to the analysis of volatile substances that are thermally stable. Substances such as pesticides and flavor compounds that meet these criteria can be isolated from a food and directly injected into the GC. For compounds that are thermally unstable, too low in volatility, or yield poor chromatographic separation due to polarity, a derivatization step must be done before GC analysis. The two parts of the experiment described here include the analysis of alcohols that requires no derivatization step, and the analysis of fatty acids which requires derivatization. The experiments specify the use of capillary columns, but the first experiment includes conditions for a packed column.

  17. Atomic Force Microscope Mediated Chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    The atomic force microscope (AFM) is used to inject a sample, provide shear-driven liquid flow over a functionalized substrate, and detect separated components. This is demonstrated using lipophilic dyes and normal phase chromatography. A significant reduction in both size and separation time scales is achieved with a 25-micron-length column scale, and one-second separation times. The approach has general applications to trace chemical and microfluidic analysis. The AFM is now a common tool for ultra-microscopy and nanotechnology. It has also been demonstrated to provide a number of microfluidic functions necessary for miniaturized chromatography. These include injection of sub-femtoliter samples, fluidic switching, and sheardriven pumping. The AFM probe tip can be used to selectively remove surface layers for subsequent microchemical analysis using infrared and tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. With its ability to image individual atoms, the AFM is a remarkably sensitive detector that can be used to detect separated components. These diverse functional components of microfluidic manipulation have been combined in this work to demonstrate AFM mediated chromatography. AFM mediated chromatography uses channel-less, shear-driven pumping. This is demonstrated with a thin, aluminum oxide substrate and a non-polar solvent system to separate a mixture of lipophilic dyes. In conventional chromatographic terms, this is analogous to thin-layer chromatography using normal phase alumina substrate with sheardriven pumping provided by the AFM tip-cantilever mechanism. The AFM detection of separated components is accomplished by exploiting the variation in the localized friction of the separated components. The AFM tip-cantilever provides the mechanism for producing shear-induced flows and rapid pumping. Shear-driven chromatography (SDC) is a relatively new concept that overcomes the speed and miniaturization limitations of conventional liquid chromatography. SDC is based on a

  18. Dielectrokinetic chromatography and devices thereof

    SciTech Connect

    Chirica, Gabriela S; Fiechtner, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K

    2014-04-22

    Disclosed herein are methods and devices for dielectrokinetic chromatography. As disclosed, the devices comprise microchannels having at least one perturber which produces a non-uniformity in a field spanning the width of the microchannel. The interaction of the field non-uniformity with a perturber produces a secondary flow which competes with a primary flow. By decreasing the size of the perturber the secondary flow becomes significant for particles/analytes in the nanometer-size range. Depending on the nature of a particle/analyte present in the fluid and its interaction with the primary flow and the secondary flow, the analyte may be retained or redirected. The composition of the primary flow can be varied to affect the magnitude of primary and/or secondary flows on the particles/analytes and thereby separate and concentrate it from other particles/analytes.

  19. Parachute drag and radial force

    SciTech Connect

    Purvis, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a combination of old and new wind tunnel data in a format which illustrates the effects of inflated diameter, geometric porosity, reefing line length, suspension line length, number of gores, and number of ribbons on parachute drag. A new definition of radial force coefficient is presented, as well as a universal drag curve for flat circular and conical parachutes.

  20. Radial spreading of viscous-gravity currents with solidifying crust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Jonathan H.; Griffiths, Ross W.

    1990-01-01

    In the present investigation of solidifying-crust effects on the dynamics and surface morphology of radial viscous-gravity currents, polyethylene glycol inflows into the base of a tank holding a cold sucrose solution are used as analogs. As the radial current advanced away from the inlet, its surface solidified and deformed through a combination of folding anf fracturing. When cooling was sufficiently rapid, solid crust formed and caused the spreading rate to increase; progressively colder experiments revealed a sequence of surface morphologies resembling features of cooling lava flows and lava lakes, including multiarmed rift structures with shear offsets and bulbous lobate forms resembling pillow lavas on the ocean floor.

  1. Outcomes Following Radial Head Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Fowler, John R; Henry, Sarah E; Xu, Peter; Goitz, Robert J

    2016-05-01

    Most current series of radial head arthroplasty include small numbers of patients with short- to medium-term follow-up and significant heterogeneity in patients, treatments, and outcome measures. The purpose of this systematic review was to review outcomes for radial head arthroplasty based on injury chronicity, injury pattern, and type of implant used. The authors systematically searched electronic databases for studies containing radial head arthroplasty or radial head replacement and identified 19 studies for inclusion in the analysis. For each included study, a composite mean was obtained for Mayo Elbow Performance Score (MEPS) and range of motion. Outcomes were said to differ significantly if their confidence intervals did not overlap. The MEPS for acute treatment (90) was higher than that for delayed treatment (81). There was no difference in the pooled MEPS between the isolated (89) and complex injury pattern (87) groups or implant material. There was no difference in range of motion between the acute and delayed or isolated and complex groups, but the average degree of pronation was higher in patients treated with titanium implants (76°) compared with cobalt chromium implants (66°). This systematic review suggests that outcomes are improved following acute arthroplasty for treatment of radial head fractures compared with delayed treatment, based on MEPS. The lack of other significant differences detected is likely due to the significant heterogeneity and inadequate power in current studies. Further prospective studies isolating the different variables will be needed to determine their true effect on outcomes. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):153-160.]. PMID:27045484

  2. Electroanalytical flow measurements.

    PubMed

    Trojanowicz, Marek

    2005-06-01

    A review based on 94 cited original papers describes recent achievements in application of different electrochemical detection in flow analysis, injection techniques of flow analysis, liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis.

  3. Gas Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Patrick; Whisnant, C. Steven

    2010-02-01

    To prepare frozen-spin HD targets for photonuclear physics at JLab, high purity HD is required. Commercially available gas is only ˜98% HD. To reach the purity required to make nuclear targets, the gas is distilled at low temperature to remove the H2 and D2 impurities. To monitor the distillation process and correlate the gas purity with the spin relaxation times, a low temperature gas chromatograph system has been developed that produces good separation of H2, HD and D2. The system uses a PLOT 5A column in a mixture of LN2 and i-pentane at temperatures between 110K and 135K. With this system, the relative concentrations can be determined with uncertainties of ˜10%. The chromatography process and the resulting chromatograms will be discussed. )

  4. The effect of radial pressure force on rotating double tearing mode in compressible plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-Qu; Xiong, Guo-Zhen; Li, Xiao-Qing

    2016-05-01

    The role of radial pressure force in the interlocking dynamics of double tearing modes (DTMs) is investigated by force balance analysis based on the compressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model. It is found that the stability of symmetric DTMs is dominated by the radial pressure force rather than the field line bending force. Owing to the compressibility of rotating plasmas, unbalanced radial forces can just result in the rotating islands drift toward each other in the radial direction but do not trigger the explosive growth of the mode in the interlocking process, which is different from that of antisymmetric DTM without flow.

  5. Reactive-infiltration instability in radial geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grodzki, Piotr; Szymczak, Piotr

    2015-04-01

    the instability growth rate depends on the Peclet number (Pe) and permeability contrast between the undissolved and dissolved phase (Γ) and find the region in the (Pe,Γ) space when the system is absolutely stable. This behaviour is in contrast to the viscous fingering problem in radial geometry [2], where for a given flow rate the front always becomes eventually unstable, after reaching a certain critical radius R. [1] J. Chadam, D. Ho , E. Merino, P. Ortoleva, A. Sen, Reactive In ltration Instabilities, IMA J. Appl. Math. 36, 207-221 (1986) [2] L. Paterson, Radial fingering in a Hele Shaw cell, J. Fluid Mech. 113, 513-529 (1981)

  6. Errors in radial velocity variance from Doppler wind lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Barthelmie, R. J.; Doubrawa, P.; Pryor, S. C.

    2016-08-01

    A high-fidelity lidar turbulence measurement technique relies on accurate estimates of radial velocity variance that are subject to both systematic and random errors determined by the autocorrelation function of radial velocity, the sampling rate, and the sampling duration. Using both statistically simulated and observed data, this paper quantifies the effect of the volumetric averaging in lidar radial velocity measurements on the autocorrelation function and the dependence of the systematic and random errors on the sampling duration. For current-generation scanning lidars and sampling durations of about 30 min and longer, during which the stationarity assumption is valid for atmospheric flows, the systematic error is negligible but the random error exceeds about 10 %.

  7. Design and experimental evaluation of compact radial-inflow turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredmonski, A. J.; Huber, F. W.; Roelke, R. J.; Simonyi, S.

    1991-01-01

    The application of a multistage 3D Euler solver to the aerodynamic design of two compact radial-inflow turbines is presented, along with experimental results evaluating and validating the designs. The objectives of the program were to design, fabricate, and rig test compact radial-inflow turbines with equal or better efficiency relative to conventional designs, while having 40 percent less rotor length than current traditionally-sized radial turbines. The approach to achieving these objectives was to apply a calibrated 3D multistage Euler code to accurately predict and control the high rotor flow passage velocities and high aerodynamic loadings resulting from the reduction in rotor length. A comparison of the advanced compact designs to current state-of-the-art configurations is presented.

  8. Asymmetric Flow Field Flow Fractionation of Aqueous C60 Nanoparticles with Size Determination by Dynamic Light Scattering and Quantification by Liquid Chromatography Atmospheric Pressure Photo-Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    A size separation method was developed for aqueous C60 fullerene aggregates (aqu/C60) using asymmetric flow field flow fractionation (AF4) coupled to a dynamic light scattering detector in flow through mode. Surfactants, which are commonly used in AF4, were avoided as they may al...

  9. Radial artery vasomotor function following transradial cardiac catheterisation

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, A J; Mills, N L; Newby, D E; Cruden, N L M

    2016-01-01

    Aims To determine the reproducibility of flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and nitrate-mediated dilation (NMD) in the assessment of radial artery vasomotor function, and to examine the effect of transradial catheterisation on radial artery injury and recovery. Methods Radial artery FMD and NMD were examined in 20 volunteers and 20 patients on four occasions (two visits at least 24 hours apart, with two assessments at each visit). In a further 10 patients, radial artery FMD was assessed in the catheterised arm prior to, at 24 hours and 3 months following cardiac catheterisation. Results There were no differences in baseline radial artery diameter (2.7±0.4 mm vs 2.7±0.4 mm), FMD (13.4±6.4 vs 12.89±5.5%) or NMD (13.6±3.8% vs 10.1±4.3%) between healthy volunteers and patients (p>0.05 for all comparisons). Mean differences for within and between day FMD were 2.53% (95% CIs −15.5% to 20.5%) and −4.3% (−18.3% to 9.7%) in patients. Compared to baseline, radial artery FMD was impaired at 24 hours (8.7±4.1% vs 3.9±2.9%, p=0.015) but not 3 months (8.7±4.1% vs 6.2±4.4, p=0.34) following transradial catheterisation. Conclusions Radial FMD is impaired early after transradial catheterisation but appears to recover by 3 months. While test–retest variability was demonstrated, our findings suggest that transradial access for cardiac catheterisation may afford a potential model of vascular injury and repair in vivo in man. PMID:27752330

  10. Application of a high-performance liquid chromatography fluorescence detector as a nephelometric turbidity detector following Field-Flow Fractionation to analyse size distributions of environmental colloids.

    PubMed

    v d Kammer, F; Baborowski, M; Friese, K

    2005-12-23

    A new operation mode for HPLC-type fluorescence detectors is presented and evaluated using synthetic and environmental particles in the colloidal size range. By applying identical wavelengths for excitation and emission a nephelometric turbidity or single angle light scattering detector is created which can be easily coupled to flow or sedimentation Field-Flow Fractionation (Flow FFF or Sed FFF) for the analysis of colloidal dispersions. The results are compared with standard UV-vis detection methods. Signals obtained are given as a function of particle size and selected detection wavelength. Conclusions can be drawn which affect the current practice of FFF but also for other techniques as groundwater sampling and laboratory column experiments when turbidity is measured in nephelometric mode and in small sample volumes or at low flow rates.

  11. The identification and quantification of a high molecular weight light stabilizer in polycarbonate by application of an online coupling of size exclusion chromatography in stopped flow mode with pyrolysis gas chromatography time of flight mass spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brander, Eric; Wold, Christian

    2014-10-01

    The identification and quantification of a high molecular weight light stabilizer (Uvinul 3030™) in an unknown polycarbonate sample was achieved through the application of SEC-Py-TOF-GCMS. A size exclusion column optimized to achieve resolution in the lower mass range was applied to allow the fractionation of an individual additive peak. A commercially available sampling interface was operated in stop flow mode and fractions were pyrolyzed to allow chromatographic separation of the fragments of the otherwise non-volatile stabilizer. After identification on the basis of accurate mass and elemental composition of the additive the quantification was compared using the available SEC-UV and SEC-PY-GC-TOFMS data. The resulting method provided a high degree of certainty in identification and flexibility in quantification expected to be applicable to other additives of similar volatilities or functional class.

  12. Radial coordinates for conformal blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogervorst, Matthijs; Rychkov, Slava

    2013-05-01

    We develop the theory of conformal blocks in CFTd expressing them as power series with Gegenbauer polynomial coefficients. Such series have a clear physical meaning when the conformal block is analyzed in radial quantization: individual terms describe contributions of descendants of a given spin. Convergence of these series can be optimized by a judicious choice of the radial quantization origin. We argue that the best choice is to insert the operators symmetrically. We analyze in detail the resulting “ρ-series” and show that it converges much more rapidly than for the commonly used variable z. We discuss how these conformal block representations can be used in the conformal bootstrap. In particular, we use them to derive analytically some bootstrap bounds whose existence was previously found numerically.

  13. Rapid separation of tritiated thyrotropin-releasing hormone and its catabolic products from mouse and human central nervous system tissues by high-performance liquid chromatography with radioactive flow detection.

    PubMed

    Turner, J G; Schwartz, T M; Brooks, B R

    1989-02-24

    Reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with radioactive flow detection was utilized to investigate the catabolism of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in central nervous system (CNS) tissues. Two different column/gradient solvent systems were tested: (1) octadecylsilane (ODS) with an acetic acid-acetonitrile gradient and (2) poly(styrenedivinylbenzene) (PRP-1) with a trifluoroacetic acid-acetonitrile gradient. Both systems used 1-hexanesulfonic acid as the second ion-pairing reagent and yielded excellent separation of TRH and its catabolic products, TRH acid, cyclo(histidyl-proline), histidyl-proline, proline, and prolinamide, produced in CNS tissue homogenates. The PRP-1 column with a trifluoroacetic acid-acetonitrile solvent system produced a better and more reproducible separation of TRH catabolic products than the ODS column with the acetic acid-acetonitrile solvent system. This PRP-1 technique was utilized to demonstrate different rates and products of TRH catabolism in mouse and human spinal cord compared with cerebral cortex.

  14. RADIAL STABILITY IN STRATIFIED STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, Jonas P.; Rueda, Jorge A. E-mail: jorge.rueda@icra.it

    2015-03-01

    We formulate within a generalized distributional approach the treatment of the stability against radial perturbations for both neutral and charged stratified stars in Newtonian and Einstein's gravity. We obtain from this approach the boundary conditions connecting any two phases within a star and underline its relevance for realistic models of compact stars with phase transitions, owing to the modification of the star's set of eigenmodes with respect to the continuous case.

  15. Use of tube radial distribution of ternary mixed carrier solvents for introduction of absorption reagent for metal ion separation and online detection into capillary.

    PubMed

    Fujinaga, Satoshi; Jinno, Naoya; Hashimoto, Masahiko; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhiko

    2011-10-01

    When ternary mixed solvents consisting of water-hydrophilic/hydrophobic organic solvents are fed into a micro-space under laminar flow conditions, the solvent molecules are radially distributed in the micro-space. The specific fluidic behavior of the solvents is called the "tube radial distribution phenomenon (TRDP)". A novel capillary chromatography method was developed based on the TRDP that creates the inner major and outer minor phases in a tube, where the outer phase acts as a pseudo-stationary phase. This is called "tube radial distribution chromatography (TRDC)". In this study, Chrome Azurol S as an absorption reagent was introduced into the TRDC system for metal ion separation and online detection. The fused-silica capillary tube (75 μm id and 110 cm length) and water-acetonitrile-ethyl acetate mixture (3:8:4 volume ratio) including 20 mM Chrome Azurol S as a carrier solution were used. Metal ions, i.e. Co(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), Al(III), and Fe(III), as models were injected into the present TRDC system. Characteristic individual absorption characteristics and elution times were obtained as the result of complex formation between the metal ions and Chrome Azurol S in the water-acetonitrile-ethyl acetate mixture solution. The elution times of the metal ions were examined based on their absorption behavior; Co(II), Ni(II), Al(III), Fe(III), and Cu(II) were eluted in this order over the elution times of 4.7-6.8 min. The elution orders were determined from the molar ratios of metal ion to Chrome Azurol S and Irving-Williams series for bivalent metal ions.

  16. Velocidades radiales en Collinder 121

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, M.; Morrell, N.

    Se han llevado a cabo observaciones espectroscópicas de unas treinta estrellas que son posibles miembros del cúmulo abierto Collinder 121. Las mismas fueron realizadas con el telescopio de 2.15m del Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO). El análisis de las velocidades radiales derivadas del material obtenido, confirma la realidad de Collinder 121, al menos desde el punto de vista cinemático. La velocidad radial baricentral (LSR) del cúmulo es de +17 ± 3 km.s-1. Esta velocidad coincide, dentro de los errores, con la velocidad radial (LSR) de la nebulosa anillo S308, la cual es de ~20 ± 10 km.s-1. Como S308 se encuentra físicamente asociada a la estrella Wolf-Rayet HD~50896, es muy probable que esta última sea un miembro de Collinder 121. Desde un punto de vista cinemático, la supergigante roja HD~50877 (K3Iab) también pertenecería a Collinder 121. Basándonos en la pertenencia de HD~50896 a Collinder 121, y en la interacción encontrada entre el viento de esta estrella y el medio interestelar circundante a la misma, se estima para este cúmulo una distancia del orden de 1 kpc.

  17. :investigation of a 24-inch Shock-in-rotor Type Supersonic Compressor Designed for Simple Radial Equilibrium Behind Normal Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lown, Harold; Hartmann, Melvin J

    1951-01-01

    A 24-inch-diameter shock-in-rotor supersonic compressor rotor designed to obtain simple radial equilibrium behind the normal shock obtained a maximum total-pressure ratio of 2.02 at an adiabatic efficiency of 0.74 and a weight flow of 61.5 pounds per second at design speed. Although this design method considerably reduced the radial forces, there was no apparent reduction in the radial forces, there was no apparent reduction in the radial redistribution of mass flow over the radial redistribution obtained in the previous investigation. This investigation indicates that the shock boundary-layer interaction pattern and associated effects have a very large effect on the radial redistribution of mass flow through the shock-in-rotor supersonic-compressor rotor.

  18. RTOD- RADIAL TURBINE OFF-DESIGN PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    The RTOD program was developed to accurately predict radial turbine off-design performance. The radial turbine has been used extensively in automotive turbochargers and aircraft auxiliary power units. It is now being given serious consideration for primary powerplant applications. In applications where the turbine will operate over a wide range of power settings, accurate off-design performance prediction is essential for a successful design. RTOD predictions have already illustrated a potential improvement in off-design performance offered by rotor back-sweep for high-work-factor radial turbines. RTOD can be used to analyze other potential performance enhancing design features. RTOD predicts the performance of a radial turbine (with or without rotor blade sweep) as a function of pressure ratio, speed, and stator setting. The program models the flow with the following: 1) stator viscous and trailing edge losses; 2) a vaneless space loss between the stator and the rotor; and 3) rotor incidence, viscous, trailing-edge, clearance, and disk friction losses. The stator and rotor viscous losses each represent the combined effects of profile, endwall, and secondary flow losses. The stator inlet and exit and the rotor inlet flows are modeled by a mean-line analysis, but a sector analysis is used at the rotor exit. The leakage flow through the clearance gap in a pivoting stator is also considered. User input includes gas properties, turbine geometry, and the stator and rotor viscous losses at a reference performance point. RTOD output includes predicted turbine performance over a specified operating range and any user selected flow parameters. The RTOD program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 100K of 8 bit bytes. The RTOD program was developed in 1983.

  19. Radial Stellar Pulsation and Three-dimensional Convection. II. Two-dimensional Convection in Full Amplitude Radial Pulsation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geroux, Chris M.; Deupree, Robert G.

    2013-07-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code to simulate the interaction of convection and radial pulsation in classical variable stars. One key goal is the ability to carry these simulations to full amplitude in order to compare them with observed light curves. Previous multi-dimensional calculations were prevented from reaching full amplitude because of drift in the radial coordinate system, due to the algorithm defining radial movement of the coordinate system during the pulsation cycle. We have removed this difficulty by defining our radial coordinate flow algorithm to require that the mass in a spherical shell remain constant for every time step throughout the pulsation cycle. We have used our new code to perform two-dimensional (2D) simulations of the interaction of radial pulsation and convection. We have made comparisons between light curves from our 2D convective simulations with observed light curves and find that our 2D simulated light curves are better able to match the observed light curve shape near the red edge of the RR Lyrae instability strip than light curves from previous one-dimensional time-dependent convective models.

  20. RADIAL STELLAR PULSATION AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTION. II. TWO-DIMENSIONAL CONVECTION IN FULL AMPLITUDE RADIAL PULSATION

    SciTech Connect

    Geroux, Chris M.; Deupree, Robert G.

    2013-07-10

    We have developed a three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics code to simulate the interaction of convection and radial pulsation in classical variable stars. One key goal is the ability to carry these simulations to full amplitude in order to compare them with observed light curves. Previous multi-dimensional calculations were prevented from reaching full amplitude because of drift in the radial coordinate system, due to the algorithm defining radial movement of the coordinate system during the pulsation cycle. We have removed this difficulty by defining our radial coordinate flow algorithm to require that the mass in a spherical shell remain constant for every time step throughout the pulsation cycle. We have used our new code to perform two-dimensional (2D) simulations of the interaction of radial pulsation and convection. We have made comparisons between light curves from our 2D convective simulations with observed light curves and find that our 2D simulated light curves are better able to match the observed light curve shape near the red edge of the RR Lyrae instability strip than light curves from previous one-dimensional time-dependent convective models.

  1. Instrumentation: Ion Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritz, James S.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the importance of ion chromatography in separating and measuring anions. The principles of ion exchange are presented, along with some applications of ion chromatography in industry. Ion chromatography systems are described, as well as ion pair and ion exclusion chromatography, column packings, detectors, and programming. (TW)

  2. Nonstandard jump functions for radially symmetric shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, Roy S.; Tucker, Don H.; Stanescu, Dan

    2008-10-01

    Nonstandard analysis is applied to derive generalized jump functions for radially symmetric, one-dimensional, magnetogasdynamic shock waves. It is assumed that the shock wave jumps occur on infinitesimal intervals, and the jump functions for the physical parameters occur smoothly across these intervals. Locally integrable predistributions of the Heaviside function are used to model the flow variables across a shock wave. The equations of motion expressed in nonconservative form are then applied to derive unambiguous relationships between the jump functions for the physical parameters for two families of self-similar flows. It is shown that the microstructures for these families of radially symmetric, magnetogasdynamic shock waves coincide in a nonstandard sense for a specified density jump function

  3. Fluctuating Pressure Environments and Hydrodynamic Radial Force Mitigation for a Two Blade Unshrouded Inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulder, Andrew; Skelley, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Fluctuating pressure data from water flow testing of an unshrouded two blade inducer revealed a cavitation induced oscillation with the potential to induce a radial load on the turbopump shaft in addition to other more traditionally analyzed radial loads. Subsequent water flow testing of the inducer with a rotating force measurement system confirmed that the cavitation induced oscillation did impart a radial load to the inducer. After quantifying the load in a baseline configuration, two inducer shroud treatments were selected and tested to reduce the cavitation induced load. The first treatment was to increase the tip clearance, and the second was to introduce a circumferential groove near the inducer leading edge. Increasing the clearance resulted in a small decrease in radial load along with some steady performance degradation. The groove greatly reduced the hydrodynamic load with little to no steady performance loss. The groove did however generate some new, relatively high frequency, spatially complex oscillations to the flow environment.

  4. PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITIES WITH CSHELL

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, Christopher J.; Prato, L.; Mahmud, Naved I.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Beichman, Charles A. E-mail: lprato@lowell.edu E-mail: cmj@rice.edu

    2011-07-10

    Radial velocity (RV) identification of extrasolar planets has historically been dominated by optical surveys. Interest in expanding exoplanet searches to M dwarfs and young stars, however, has motivated a push to improve the precision of near-infrared RV techniques. We present our methodology for achieving 58 m s{sup -1} precision in the K band on the M0 dwarf GJ 281 using the CSHELL spectrograph at the 3 m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. We also demonstrate our ability to recover the known 4 M{sub JUP} exoplanet Gl 86 b and discuss the implications for success in detecting planets around 1-3 Myr old T Tauri stars.

  5. Determination of lincomycin in urine and some foodstuffs by flow injection analysis coupled with liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection with a preanodized screen-printed carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Mei-Hsin; Yang, Hsueh-Hui; Liu, Chi-Ho; Zen, Jyh-Myng

    2009-04-01

    An electroanalytical method for the determination of lincomycin in feeds, honey, milk and urine was demonstrated in this study. The procedure employed a solid-phase extraction for the isolation of lincomycin from real samples. The antibiotic residues were subsequently analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with a disposable electrochemical sensor. The use of a disposable sensor together with the application of solid-phase extraction is attractive in practical application and should be useful in fast screening assay. The electroanalysis of lincomycin was first investigated using a preanodized screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE*). Note that the SPCE* holds the advantages of low cost and easy to handle. The analytical parameters, such as, preanodization potential, preanodization time, solution pH, detection potential, cartridge, wash solution, elute solution and mobile phase, were further studied in detail. Under optimized conditions, the linear detection range for lincomycin is up to 1mM (correlation coefficient=0.999) with a detection limit of 0.08microM (S/N=3) and a quantification limit of 0.27microM (S/N=10). The applicability of the method was successfully demonstrated in real sample analysis.

  6. Use of on-line stop-flow heart-cutting two-dimensional high performance liquid chromatography for simultaneous determination of 12 major constituents in tartary buckwheat (Fagopyrum tataricum Gaertn).

    PubMed

    Ren, Qiang; Wu, Caisheng; Zhang, Jinlan

    2013-08-23

    The use of two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC) for quantification studies presents challenges with respect to repeatability, precision, and robustness. The present study used an on-line stop-flow heart-cutting 2D-LC system to determine 12 chemical constituents in tartary buckwheat. A combination of various stationary phases was developed and bridged using two switch valves as the interface. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography was chosen for separation in the first dimension ((1)D), and mixed mode stationary phases (an amide polar-embedded phase and alkyl-phenyl phase) were used in parallel for separation in the second dimension ((2)D). The mobile phase comprised acetonitrile and water containing 0.03% aqueous phosphoric acid. The sample was separated into two fractions on the (1)D column (HILIC-10 column) using 5% acetonitrile. One fraction, mainly comprising flavonoids, was directly eluted onto the head of (2)D column (Polar Advantage II column) and further separated using a linear gradient of 11-23% acetonitrile. The second fraction, containing phenylpropanoid glycosides, was trapped on the (1)D column. This retained fraction was back-flushed onto the (2)D column (Phenyl-1 column) and separated using a linear gradient of 35-43% acetonitrile. An on-line stop-flow heart-cutting 2D-LC system was successfully developed with column switching and back-flush. This 2D-LC system was validated and was able to simultaneously determine 12 major components in tartary buckwheat: seven flavonoids, four phenylpropanoid glycosides, and N-trans-feruloyltyramine. The system showed good performance with respect to linearity (r>0.996), repeatability (RSD, relative standard deviation<3.4%), intra-day and inter-day precision (RSD<4.6%), recovery (91.2-108%), limit of detection (LOD) (0.05-0.21μg/mL), and limit of quantification (LOQ) (0.10-0.41μg/mL). The on-line stop-flow heart-cutting 2D-LC system offers a potential approach to analyze compounds, which have similar

  7. An Automated Method for the Determination of Trimebutine and N-Mono-Desmethyl Trimebutine by On-Line Turbulent Flow Coupled with Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry in Human Plasma: Application to a Fatal Poisoning Case with Toxicokinetic Study.

    PubMed

    Larabi, Islam Amine; Duverneuil-Mayer, Charlotte; Abe, Emuri; Baud, Frédéric; Alvarez, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    A liquid chromatography-MS-MS turbulent flow on-line extraction method was developed for the determination of trimebutine (TMB) and its main active metabolite N-mono-desmethyltrimebutine (nortrimebutine or nor-TMB) in human plasma. After protein precipitation and internal standard (IS, haloperidol-d4) addition, 50 µL of the supernatant were transferred onto a Cyclone-Turbo-Flow extraction column followed by an Hypersil PFP Gold analytical column. Detection was carried out on a triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer using positive electrospray ionization. The transitions used were m/z 388.0→343.0, 374.0→195.0 and 380.1→169.0 for TMB, nor-TMB and IS, respectively. The method was validated over the concentration range of 10-1,000 ng/mL for both compounds. The accuracy evaluated at three concentrations was within 90.0-98.5% and the intra- and interday coefficient of variation's for the two molecules were <8.7%. The method was applied to a toxicokinetic study of a self-poisoning case with TMB in a 19-old girl. The concentration of TMB decreased from 747 to 77 ng/mL, while nor-TMB decreased from 9,745 to 205 ng/mL after 5 days and the fatal issue. This case confirms the literature underlining the potential toxicity of TMB, which has long time been considered as a harmless molecule. PMID:26342056

  8. Radial-Electric-Field Piezoelectric Diaphragm Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G.; Working, Dennis C.; Mossi, Karla; Castro, Nicholas D.; Mane, Pooma

    2009-01-01

    In a recently invented class of piezoelectric diaphragm pumps, the electrode patterns on the piezoelectric diaphragms are configured so that the electric fields in the diaphragms have symmetrical radial (along-the-surface) components in addition to through-the-thickness components. Previously, it was accepted in the piezoelectric-transducer art that in order to produce the out-of-plane bending displacement of a diaphragm needed for pumping, one must make the electric field asymmetrical through the thickness, typically by means of electrodes placed on only one side of the piezoelectric material. In the present invention, electrodes are placed on both sides and patterned so as to produce substantial radial as well as through-the-thickness components. Moreover, unlike in the prior art, the electric field can be symmetrical through the thickness. Tests have shown in a given diaphragm that an electrode configuration according to this invention produces more displacement than does a conventional one-sided electrode pattern. The invention admits of numerous variations characterized by various degrees of complexity. Figure 1 is a simplified depiction of a basic version. As in other piezoelectric diaphragm pumps of similar basic design, the prime mover is a piezoelectric diaphragm. Application of a suitable voltage to the electrodes on the diaphragm causes it to undergo out-of-plane bending. The bending displacement pushes a fluid out of, or pulls the fluid into, a chamber bounded partly by the diaphragm. Also as in other diaphragm pumps in general, check valves ensure that the fluid flows only in through one port and only out through another port.

  9. Alumina supported Co-Mo oxides as a catalyst for hydrodesulphurisation of organic sulfides and disulphides using stopped flow gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, L.H.; Sulaiman, S.T.; AlTamer, M.Y. )

    1989-01-01

    The authors present a model study on the hydrodesulphurization of dimethyl sulphide, di n-prophyl sulphide, di n-butyl sulphide and dimethyl disulphide on Co-Mo-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ surface conducted using stopped-flow chromatographic technique. The plots for the rates of hydrocarbon formation agree well with the first order reaction at the surface of the catalyst.

  10. A radio-high-performance liquid chromatography dual-flow cell gamma-detection system for on-line radiochemical purity and labeling efficiency determination.

    PubMed

    Lindegren, S; Jensen, H; Jacobsson, L

    2014-04-11

    In this study, a method of determining radiochemical yield and radiochemical purity using radio-HPLC detection employing a dual-flow-cell system is evaluated. The dual-flow cell, consisting of a reference cell and an analytical cell, was constructed from two PEEK capillary coils to fit into the well of a NaI(Tl) detector. The radio-HPLC flow was directed from the injector to the reference cell allowing on-line detection of the total injected sample activity prior to entering the HPLC column. The radioactivity eluted from the column was then detected in the analytical cell. In this way, the sample will act as its own standard, a feature enabling on-line quantification of the processed radioactivity passing through the system. All data were acquired on-line via an analog signal from a rate meter using chromatographic software. The radiochemical yield and recovery could be simply and accurately determined by integration of the peak areas in the chromatogram obtained from the reference and analytical cells using an experimentally determined volume factor to correct for the effect of different cell volumes. PMID:24630054

  11. A radio-high-performance liquid chromatography dual-flow cell gamma-detection system for on-line radiochemical purity and labeling efficiency determination.

    PubMed

    Lindegren, S; Jensen, H; Jacobsson, L

    2014-04-11

    In this study, a method of determining radiochemical yield and radiochemical purity using radio-HPLC detection employing a dual-flow-cell system is evaluated. The dual-flow cell, consisting of a reference cell and an analytical cell, was constructed from two PEEK capillary coils to fit into the well of a NaI(Tl) detector. The radio-HPLC flow was directed from the injector to the reference cell allowing on-line detection of the total injected sample activity prior to entering the HPLC column. The radioactivity eluted from the column was then detected in the analytical cell. In this way, the sample will act as its own standard, a feature enabling on-line quantification of the processed radioactivity passing through the system. All data were acquired on-line via an analog signal from a rate meter using chromatographic software. The radiochemical yield and recovery could be simply and accurately determined by integration of the peak areas in the chromatogram obtained from the reference and analytical cells using an experimentally determined volume factor to correct for the effect of different cell volumes.

  12. Radial blanket assembly orificing arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Patterson, J.F.

    1975-07-01

    A nuclear reactor core for a liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor is described in which means are provided for increasing the coolant flow through the reactor fuel assemblies as the reactor ages by varying the coolant flow rate with the changing coolant requirements during the core operating lifetime. (auth)

  13. Simultaneous detection of multi-allergens in an incurred food matrix using ELISA, multiplex flow cytometry and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS).

    PubMed

    Gomaa, Ahmed; Boye, Joyce

    2015-05-15

    Food allergy is a public health concern and an important food safety issue. Food allergies affect up to 6% of infants and children and 4% of adults. The objective of this work was to determine differences in the detection of single and multiple allergens (i.e., casein, soy protein, and gluten) in an incurred food matrix before and after baking. Cookies were used as a model food system. Three methods, namely, multiplex assay (a new optimized method based on flow cytometry for multiple allergen analysis), enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using commercial kits and LC-MS were used to detect allergens in the samples before and after baking. The ELISA kits performed well in detecting allergens in the raw samples with recoveries of 91-108%, 88-127% and 85-108% for casein, soy protein and gluten, respectively. Recoveries were poor for the baked cookies (67-90%, 66-95% and 66-88% for casein, soy protein and gluten, respectively). The multiplex flow cytometry assay permitted multiple allergen detection in the raw samples, with the following recoveries based on soluble protein: casein, 95-107%; soy protein, 92-97%, and gluten, 96-99%. Data for the baked cookies were as follows: casein, 84-90%; soy protein, 80-88%, and gluten, 80-90%. The LC-MS technique detected marker peptides that could be used to identify allergens in the baked food samples up to concentrations of 10 ppm for casein and soy protein, and 100 ppm for gluten. To the best of our knowledge, the current study is the first to compare ELISA, LC-MS and multiplex flow cytometry methods for the detection of multiple allergens simultaneously incurred in a model food system.

  14. Hydrodesulfurization of Qaiyarah 80-205 sup 0 C naphtha fraction of alumina supported Co-Mo-oxides; Part 2: Using stopped flow gas chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, L.H.; Sulaiman, S.T.; AlTamer, M.Y. )

    1990-04-01

    The authors report the effective desulfurization of Qaiyarah 80-205{sup 0}C, naphtha fraction on alumina supported Co-Mo oxides, assembled in a GC column using H{sub 2} as a carrier gas and the stopped-flow technique. Over 90% of sulfur was removed from this partially cracked naphtha and a similar result (Ca 90%) was obtained when hydrodesulfurizing an acid-base treated naphtha. /sup 1/H nmr studies on the chromatographically separated hydrodesulfurized fractions revealed interesting structural parameters which leads to suggestions related to the occurrence of a reforming reaction and the liberation of fresh H{sub 2} gases which further promotes hydrodesulfurization.

  15. Rapid isolation of biomarkers for compound specific radiocarbon dating using high-performance liquid chromatography and flow injection analysis-atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Smittenberg, Rienk H; Hopmans, Ellen C; Schouten, Stefan; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S

    2002-11-29

    Repeated semi-preparative normal-phase HPLC was performed to isolate selected biomarkers from sediment extracts for radiocarbon analysis. Flow injection analysis-mass spectrometry was used for rapid analysis of collected fractions to evaluate the separation procedure, taking only 1 min per fraction. In this way 100-1000 microg of glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers, sterol fractions and chlorophyll-derived phytol were isolated from typically 100 g of marine sediment, i.e., in sufficient quantities for radiocarbon analysis, without significant carbon isotopic fractionation or contamination.

  16. Effect of parallel segmented flow chromatography on the height equivalent to a theoretical plate III--influence of the column length, particle diameter, and the molecular weight of the analyte on the efficiency gain.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Pynt, Jarrod; Soliven, Arianne; Dennis, Gary R; Shalliker, R Andrew; Guiochon, Georges

    2014-03-14

    The effects of column length on performance in segmented flow chromatography were tested. Column efficiencies were measured for 4.6mm I.D. 3, 5, 7.5 and 10 cm long columns packed with 3.0 μm Hypurity-C18 fully porous particles and of 4.6mm I.D. 5, 10, 15 and 25 cm long columns packed with 5 μm Hypersil GOLD C18 particles. For each column length and particle type, two different configurations were tested: (1) both the inlet and outlet column endfittings were standard and (2) the inlet endfitting was standard but the outlet endfitting allowed parallel segmentation of the exiting flow into a central and a peripheral coaxial region. The segmentation flow ratio was set at 45% (for 3 μm) and at 43% or 21% (for 5 μm). Four samples were used, naphthalene, toluene, butylbenzene, and insulin, which has a ten times smaller diffusion coefficient than the small molecules. The column performance for the low molecular weight compound is significantly improved at velocities above the optimum value when the outlet flow rate is segmented because longitudinal diffusion and mass transfer resistance of this compound in the stationary phase are negligible sources of band broadening at reduced linear velocities between 5 and 25. At high flow rate (4 mL/min), the long-range eddy dispersion terms are about 3.9, 3.2, 2.6, and 1.8h unit lower for the 3, 5, 7.5 and 10 cm long columns, respectively. The longer the column, the lower the efficiency improvement because the border effects are smaller. This result was not systematically observed for the columns packed with 5 μm particles because the transverse dispersion is larger. In contrast, the gain in column efficiency is marginal for insulin because the mass transfer mechanism of this compound is mostly controlled by the slow diffusivity of insulin across Hypurity-C18 particles.

  17. Potential of the reversed-inject differential flow modulator for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography in the quantitative profiling and fingerprinting of essential oils of different complexity.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Chiara; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Cobelli, Luigi; Stani, Gianluca; Miliazza, Armando; Giardina, Matthew; Firor, Roger; Bicchi, Carlo

    2015-10-23

    In this study, the first capillary flow technology reverse-inject differential flow modulator was implemented with different column configurations (lengths, diameters and stationary phase coupling) and detector combinations (mass spectrometry--MS and flame ionization detection--FID) to evaluate its potential in the quantitative profiling and fingerprinting of medium-to-highly complex essential oils. In particular, a parallel dual-secondary column dual-detection configuration that has shown to improve the information potential also with thermally modulated GC × GC platforms (MS identification reliability and accurate FID quantitation), was tested. Several system performance parameters (separation measure SGC × GC, modulation ratio MR, separation space used and peak symmetry) were evaluated by analyzing a mixture of volatiles of interest in the flavor and fragrance field. The systems demonstrating the best chromatographic performance were selected for quantitative profiling of lavender and mint essential oils and fingerprinting of vetiver essential oil. Experimental results demonstrate that careful tuning of column dimensions and system configurations yields improved: (a) selectivity; (b) operable carrier gas linear velocities at close-to-optimal values; (c) (2)D separation power by extending the modulation period and (d) handling of overloaded peaks without dramatic losses in resolution and quantitative accuracy. PMID:26387790

  18. Potential of the reversed-inject differential flow modulator for comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography in the quantitative profiling and fingerprinting of essential oils of different complexity.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Chiara; Rubiolo, Patrizia; Cobelli, Luigi; Stani, Gianluca; Miliazza, Armando; Giardina, Matthew; Firor, Roger; Bicchi, Carlo

    2015-10-23

    In this study, the first capillary flow technology reverse-inject differential flow modulator was implemented with different column configurations (lengths, diameters and stationary phase coupling) and detector combinations (mass spectrometry--MS and flame ionization detection--FID) to evaluate its potential in the quantitative profiling and fingerprinting of medium-to-highly complex essential oils. In particular, a parallel dual-secondary column dual-detection configuration that has shown to improve the information potential also with thermally modulated GC × GC platforms (MS identification reliability and accurate FID quantitation), was tested. Several system performance parameters (separation measure SGC × GC, modulation ratio MR, separation space used and peak symmetry) were evaluated by analyzing a mixture of volatiles of interest in the flavor and fragrance field. The systems demonstrating the best chromatographic performance were selected for quantitative profiling of lavender and mint essential oils and fingerprinting of vetiver essential oil. Experimental results demonstrate that careful tuning of column dimensions and system configurations yields improved: (a) selectivity; (b) operable carrier gas linear velocities at close-to-optimal values; (c) (2)D separation power by extending the modulation period and (d) handling of overloaded peaks without dramatic losses in resolution and quantitative accuracy.

  19. Magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with a radial magnetic driver.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Hideo; Katakoa, Kiroyuki; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Asama, Jun-ichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Shimokohbe, Akira; Takatani, Setsuo

    2005-01-01

    A new magnetic bearing has been designed to achieve a low electronic power requirement and high stiffness. The magnetic bearing consists of 1) radial passive forces between the permanent magnet ring mounted inside the impeller rotor and the electromagnet core materials in the pump casing and 2) radial active forces generated by the electromagnets using the two gap sensor signals. The magnetic bearing was assembled into a centrifugal rotary blood pump (CRBP) driven with a radial, magnetic coupled driver. The impeller vane shape was designed based upon the computational fluid dynamic simulation. The diameter and height of the CRBP were 75 mm and 50 mm, respectively. The magnetic bearing system required the power of 1.0-1.4 W. The radial impeller movement was controlled to within +/- 10 microm. High stiffness in the noncontrolled axes, Z, phi, and theta, was obtained by the passive magnetic forces. The pump flow of 5 L/min against 100 mm Hg head pressure was obtained at 1,800 rpm with the electrical to hydraulic efficiency being greater than 15%. The Normalized Index of Hemolysis (NIH) of the magnetic bearing CRBP was one fifth of the BioPump BP-80 and one half of the NIKKISO HPM-15 after 4 hours. The newly designed magnetic bearing with two degrees of freedom control in combination with optimized impeller vane was successful in achieving an excellent hemolytic performance in comparison with the clinical centrifugal blood pumps. PMID:15745136

  20. Radial superlattices and single nanoreactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneke, Ch.; Jin-Phillipp, N.-Y.; Loa, I.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2004-05-01

    We investigate the wall structure and thermal stability of individual freestanding rolled-up nanotubes (RUNTs) using micro-Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and selected area electron diffraction. Our studies reveal that the walls of the InAs/GaAs RUNTs consist of a radial superlattice comprising alternating crystalline and noncrystalline layers. Furthermore, we locally heated individual RUNTs with a laser beam, and Raman spectroscopy was used in situ to monitor any structural changes. At about 300 °C the heated part of a RUNT starts to oxidize and eventually transforms into crystalline β-Ga2O3. This result shows that RUNTs can serve as nanoreactors that locally synthesize material at intentional places on a substrate surface.

  1. Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Rodney R.

    1985-01-01

    Supports, affinity ligands, immobilization, elution methods, and a number of applications are among the topics considered in this discussion of affinity chromatography. An outline of the basic principles of affinity chromatography is included. (JN)

  2. Hollow Cathode With Multiple Radial Orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Improved hollow cathode serving as source of electrons has multiple radial orifices instead of single axial orifice. Distributes ion current more smoothly, over larger area. Prototype of high-current cathodes for ion engines in spacecraft. On Earth, cathodes used in large-diameter ion sources for industrial processing of materials. Radial orientation of orifices in new design causes current to be dispersed radially in vicinity of cathode. Advantageous where desireable to produce plasma more nearly uniform over wider region around cathode.

  3. Electroanalysis of sulfonamides by flow injection system/high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with amperometric detection using boron-doped diamond electrode.

    PubMed

    Preechaworapun, Anchana; Chuanuwatanakul, Suchada; Einaga, Yasuaki; Grudpan, Kate; Motomizu, Shoji; Chailapakul, Orawon

    2006-02-28

    Sulfonamides (SAs) were electrochemically investigated using cyclic voltammetry at a boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrode. Comparison experiments were carried out using a glassy carbon electrode. The BDD electrode provided well-resolved oxidation, irreversible cyclic voltammograms and higher current signals when compared to the glassy carbon electrode. Results obtained from using the BDD electrode in a flow injection system coupled with amperometric detection were illustrated. The optimum potential from a hydrodynamic voltammogram was found to be 1100mV versus Ag/AgCl, which was chosen for the HPLC-amperometric system. Excellent results of linear range and detection limit were obtained. This method was also used for determination of sulfonamides in egg samples. The standard solutions of 5, 10, and 15ppm were spiked in a real sample, and percentage of recoveries was found to be between 90.0 and 107.7.

  4. Determination of low levels of methanol in crude oils by multi-dimensional gas chromatography (MDGC) using novel micro channel flow technology.

    PubMed

    Tipler, Andrew; Marotta, Lee; DiSanzo, Frank; Grecsek, Heidi

    2012-03-01

    The accurate and precise determination of methanol in crude oils at concentrations less than 10 ppm is of economic value to the petroleum industry. This report presents the optimization, results and long term performance of a flow switching device MDGC hardware, the Swafer™, for the rapid and precise analysis of methanol from approximately 0.4 ppm (w/w) to 1000 ppm. The use of low temperature injection and backflush technique decreases maintenance and increases sample throughput. The short term quantitative percent relative standard deviations at 1, 30 and 1000 ppm (w/w) methanol in crude oils are 5, 3 and 0.3, respectively. The MDGC procedure follows closely that described in ASTM D7059 for determination of crude oils; however, D7059 previously has not been evaluated at concentrations of less than 10 ppm. This work further extends the application of D7059 to concentrations of <10 ppm.

  5. Chromatography: concepts and contrasts

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    As the author states in the Preface, this text attempts to provide a unified approach to chromatography (hence the title) by way of contrasting similarities and differences between gas chromatography (GC), column liquid chromatography (LC), and thin-layer chromatography (TLC). This book is also said to be pitched at an elementary level, suitable for most newcomers to the field (e.g., advanced undergraduates and beginning graduate students in the academic world, as well as bench-level chemists in industry).

  6. CRC handbook of chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, M.

    1986-01-01

    This book provides technology for routine analysis or developing new methods of chromatography or organic materials. In this book Section 1 presents the principles, techniques, quantitative determinations and detection methods used in chromatographic analysis. In the major part of the book, Section 2 summarizes data in voluminous tabular/graphic form on paper, thin layer, liquid and gas chromatography. Section 3 lists important books on electrophoreses, gel permeation chromatography, and ion exchange, in addition to the other forms of chromatography.

  7. Continuous time random walks for non-local radial solute transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dentz, Marco; Kang, Peter K.; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2015-08-01

    This study formulates and analyzes continuous time random walk (CTRW) models in radial flow geometries for the quantification of non-local solute transport induced by heterogeneous flow distributions and by mobile-immobile mass transfer processes. To this end we derive a general CTRW framework in radial coordinates starting from the random walk equations for radial particle positions and times. The particle density, or solute concentration is governed by a non-local radial advection-dispersion equation (ADE). Unlike in CTRWs for uniform flow scenarios, particle transition times here depend on the radial particle position, which renders the CTRW non-stationary. As a consequence, the memory kernel characterizing the non-local ADE, is radially dependent. Based on this general formulation, we derive radial CTRW implementations that (i) emulate non-local radial transport due to heterogeneous advection, (ii) model multirate mass transfer (MRMT) between mobile and immobile continua, and (iii) quantify both heterogeneous advection in a mobile region and mass transfer between mobile and immobile regions. The expected solute breakthrough behavior is studied using numerical random walk particle tracking simulations. This behavior is analyzed by explicit analytical expressions for the asymptotic solute breakthrough curves. We observe clear power-law tails of the solute breakthrough for broad (power-law) distributions of particle transit times (heterogeneous advection) and particle trapping times (MRMT model). The combined model displays two distinct time regimes. An intermediate regime, in which the solute breakthrough is dominated by the particle transit times in the mobile zones, and a late time regime that is governed by the distribution of particle trapping times in immobile zones. These radial CTRW formulations allow for the identification of heterogeneous advection and mobile-immobile processes as drivers of anomalous transport, under conditions relevant for field tracer

  8. Relaminarization of fluid flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narasimha, R.; Sreenivasan, K. R.

    1979-01-01

    The mechanisms of the relaminarization of turbulent flows are investigated with a view to establishing any general principles that might govern them. Three basic archetypes of reverting flows are considered: the dissipative type, the absorptive type, and the Richardson type exemplified by a turbulent boundary layer subjected to severe acceleration. A number of other different reverting flows are then considered in the light of the analysis of these archetypes, including radial Poiseuille flow, convex boundary layers, flows reverting by rotation, injection, and suction, as well as heated horizontal and vertical gas flows. Magnetohydrodynamic duct flows are also examined. Applications of flow reversion for turbulence control are discussed.

  9. Fabrication of cooled radial turbine rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, A. N.; Aigret, G. G.; Psichogios, T. P.; Rodgers, C.

    1986-01-01

    A design and fabrication program was conducted to evaluate a unique concept for constructing a cooled, high temperature radial turbine rotor. This concept, called split blade fabrication was developed as an alternative to internal ceramic coring. In this technique, the internal cooling cavity is created without flow dividers or any other detail by a solid (and therefore stronger) ceramic plate which can be more firmly anchored within the casting shell mold than can conventional detailed ceramic cores. Casting is conducted in the conventional manner, except that the finished product, instead of having finished internal cooling passages, is now a split blade. The internal details of the blade are created separately together with a carrier sheet. The inserts are superalloy. Both are produced by essentially the same software such that they are a net fit. The carrier assemblies are loaded into the split blade and the edges sealed by welding. The entire wheel is Hot Isostatic Pressed (HIPed), braze bonding the internal details to the inside of the blades. During this program, two wheels were successfully produced by the split blade fabrication technique.

  10. Through flow analysis within axial flow turbomachinery blade rows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girigoswami, H.

    1986-09-01

    Using Katsanis' Through Flow Code, inviscid flow through an axial flow compressor rotor blade as well as flow through inlet guide vanes are analyzed and the computed parameters such as meridional velocity distribution, axial velocity distribution along radial lines, and velocity distribution over blade surfaces are presented.

  11. Effect of radial inflow on vortex intensification for a tornado-type wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.T.; Ide, H.

    1982-09-01

    A new wind vortex turbine, called tornado-type wind turbine, was studied both theoretically and experimentally for the purpose of better understanding the basic nature of a vortex flow and further improvement of its power efficiencies. Analytical solutions were obtained from the Navier-Stokes equations for the velocity distributions along the radial distance. The result demonstrates the important nature of a vortex structure that, in order to intensify a vortex inside the tower, radial inflow must be provided from the side walls. Based upon this concept, the essential contribution of our experimental work was to furnish the radial inflow by utilizing the dynamic head of incoming wind.

  12. The study of the influence of temperature and initial glucose concentration on the fermentation process in the presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain immobilized on starch gels by reversed-flow gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lainioti, G Ch; Kapolos, J; Koliadima, A; Karaiskakis, G

    2012-01-01

    The technique of reversed-flow gas chromatography (RFGC) was employed for the determination of the alcoholic fermentation phases and of kinetic parameters for free and immobilized cell systems, at different initial glucose concentrations and temperature values. In addition to this, due to its considerable advantages over other techniques, RFGC was used for the characterization of a new biocatalyst, yeast cells immobilized on starch gel, and especially wheat starch gel. Immobilization of wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae AXAZ-1 was accomplished on wheat and corn starch gels in order to prepare new biocatalysts with great interest for the fermentation industry. The RFGC led with great accuracy, resulting from a literature review, to the determination of reaction rate constants and activation energies at each phase of the fermentation processes. A maximum value of rate constants was observed at initial glucose concentration of 205 g/L, where a higher number of yeast cells was observed. The increase of glucose concentrations had a negative influence on the growth of AXAZ-1 cells and rate constants were decreased. The decrease of fermentation temperature caused a substantial reduction in the viability of immobilized cells as well as in rate constant values. Activation energies of corn starch gel presented lower values than those of wheat starch gel. However, the two supports showed higher catalytic efficiency than free cell systems, proving that starch gels may act as a promoter of the catalytic activity of the yeast cells involved in the fermentation process.

  13. Automated pre-column derivatization of thiolic fruit-antibrowning agents by sequential injection coupled to high-performance liquid chromatography using a monolithic stationary phase and an in-loop stopped-flow approach.

    PubMed

    Karakosta, Theano D; Tzanavaras, Paraskevas D; Themelis, Demetrius G

    2011-08-01

    The present study reports the very first application of ethyl propiolate (EP) as an advantageous pre-column derivatization reagent for the determination of thiols by liquid chromatography (LC). Cysteine (CYS), glutathione (GSH) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC) were derivatized online under stopped-flow conditions in a sequential injection (SI) system coupled to HPLC. The formed derivatives were separated isocratically with a monolithic stationary phase (100×4.6 mm id) and UV detected at 285 nm. Critical parameters that affected the online pre-column derivatization reaction (e.g. the reaction time and the amount concentration of EP) and the separation (e.g. pH and the composition of the mobile phase) were investigated. The developed analytical scheme offers a total analysis time of less than 10 min, limits of detection in the range of 0.24-0.35 μmol/L and satisfactory linearity up to 200 μmol/L for all analytes. The proposed method was applied to the analysis of the selected thiols--that are often employed as antibrowning agents--in fresh fruit samples.

  14. Automated and sensitive determination of four anabolic androgenic steroids in urine by online turbulent flow solid-phase extraction coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: a novel approach for clinical monitoring and doping control.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Shao, Jing; Liu, Qian; Shi, Jian-Bo; Jiang, Gui-Bin

    2014-07-01

    A novel method for automated and sensitive analysis of testosterone, androstenedione, methyltestosterone and methenolone in urine samples by online turbulent flow solid-phase extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry was developed. The optimization and validation of the method were discussed in detail. The Turboflow C18-P SPE column showed the best extraction efficiency for all the analytes. Nanogram per liter (ng/L) level of AAS could be determined directly and the limits of quantification (LOQs) were 0.01 ng/mL, which were much lower than normally concerned concentrations for these typical anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) (0.1 ng/mL). The linearity range was from the LOQ to 100 ng/mL for each compound, with the coefficients of determination (r(2)) ranging from 0.9990 to 0.9999. The intraday and interday relative standard deviations (RSDs) ranged from 1.1% to 14.5% (n=5). The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of urine samples collected from 24 male athletes and 15 patients of prostate cancer. The proposed method provides an alternative practical way to rapidly determine AAS in urine samples, especially for clinical monitoring and doping control.

  15. Evaluation of interactions between metal ions and nonionic surfactants in high-concentration HCl using low-pressure high-performance liquid chromatography with low-flow-resistance polystyrene-based monolithic column.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Tomohiko; Kitagawa, Shinya; Ohtani, Hajime; Kinoshita, Takehiko; Ishigaki, Yuzo; Shibata, Nobuyuki; Nii, Susumu

    2013-10-01

    A method for evaluating the interactions between metal ions and nonionic surfactants in aqueous solutions containing high-concentration HCl, using gas pressure-driven low-pressure high-performance liquid chromatography (LP-HPLC) as a highly acid-resistant HPLC system, was developed. To construct the LP-HPLC for this purpose, poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene)-based low-flow-resistance monolithic columns tolerant to highly acidic conditions were prepared using low-conversion thermal polymerization. Thermal polymerization at 65 °C for 1.5 h (monomer conversions, 33% for styrene and 59% for divinylbenzene) allowed preparation of a column with both high separation efficiency (around 60,000 plates m(-1) for alkylbenzenes) and a quite low back pressure of 0.14 MPa at a linear flow rate of 1 mm s(-1) (2.8 × 10(-13) m(2) in permeability). The base column prepared under the above conditions was coated with a nonionic surfactant, polyoxyethylene nonylphenyl ether (PONPE, average oxyethylene unit numbers (n) = 3, 7.5, 15, and 20), and used for evaluation of the interactions between PONPEs and metal ions in 6 M HCl. The interactions between PONPEs and Au(III), Ga(III), Fe(III), Zn(II), and Cu(II) were successfully evaluated using both breakthrough and chromatographic methods. Furthermore, a study of the effect of the polyoxyethylene (POE) chain length revealed that the use of PONPE with the longer POE moiety enhanced the magnitude of the interaction together with the increase in the amount of oxyethylene (OE) units coated on the monolith. Moreover, the interactions of metal ions with a single OE unit were almost constant in the range of n = 7.5-20, whereas the suppression of the interaction between Au(III) with the shortest PONPE chain (n = 3) was also observed. PMID:23884474

  16. Online concentration by field-amplified sample injection in acidic buffer for analysis of fangchinoline and tetrandrine in herbal medicine by flow injection-micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lihong; Chen, Xingguo; Hu, Zhide

    2005-12-01

    A novel, rapid, and continuous online concentration approach based on field-amplified sample injection for the analysis of fangchinoline and tetrandrine was developed in this paper by combination of flow injection-MEKC. The BGE used was a solution composed of 75 mM H3PO4-triethylamine-2.5% v/v polyoxyethylene sorbitan monolaurate-20% v/v methanol buffer (pH* 5.0). The analytes prepared in 50% v/v aqueous ethanol were used as the test analytes. Sample was injected electrokinetically between plugs of water. When the cations reached the boundary between the water plug and BGE, they slowed down and became concentrated. Thereafter, MEKC was initiated for the separation. This results in 6.8-8.9-fold improvement in concentration sensitivity relative to conventional CE methods. The separation could be achieved within 10 min and sample throughput rate can reach up to 50/h. The repeatability (defined as RSD) was 4.8, 4.4% with peak height evaluation and 3.6, 0.94% with peak area evaluation for TET and FAN, respectively. PMID:16259014

  17. Radial head button holing: a cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation.

    PubMed

    Shin, Su-Mi; Chai, Jee Won; You, Ja Yeon; Park, Jina; Bae, Kee Jeong

    2016-10-01

    "Buttonholing" of the radial head through the anterior joint capsule is a known cause of irreducible anterior radial head dislocation associated with Monteggia injuries in pediatric patients. To the best of our knowledge, no report has described an injury consisting of buttonholing of the radial head through the annular ligament and a simultaneous radial head fracture in an adolescent. In the present case, the radiographic findings were a radial head fracture with anterior dislocation and lack of the anterior fat pad sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) clearly demonstrated anterior dislocation of the fractured radial head through the torn annular ligament. The anterior joint capsule and proximal portion of the annular ligament were interposed between the radial head and capitellum, preventing closed reduction of the radial head. Familiarity with this condition and imaging findings will aid clinicians to make a proper diagnosis and fast decision to perform an open reduction. PMID:27502623

  18. Gas dynamics of a supersonic radial jet. Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosarev, V. F.; Klinkov, S. V.; Zaikovskii, V. N.

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents the radial distributions of the pressure measured with a Pitot tube for the case of a radial jet with/without swirling of the input flow in the pre-chamber; the length of the supersonic part of the jet, dependency of the jet thickness as a function of the distance from the nozzle outlet, and approximating analytical formula for the jet thickness that generalizes the experimental data. Experimental data demonstrated that at the deposition distances lower than 4-6 gauges from the nozzle outlet, the solid particle velocity and temperature are almost uniform over the jet cross section. This means that the target surface can be allocated here without loss in coating quality and deposition coefficient. The maximal recommended distance where the deposition is still possible is the length of l s0 ~ 16 gauges.

  19. Experimental evaluation of a translating nozzle sidewall radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.; Rogo, Casimir

    1987-01-01

    An experimental performance evaluation was made of two movable sidewall variable area radial turbines. The turbine designs were representative of the gas generator turbine of a variable flow capacity rotorcraft engine. The first turbine was an uncooled design while the second turbine had a cooled nozzle but an uncooled rotor. The cooled nozzle turbine was evaluated both with and without coolant flow. The test results showed that the movable nozzle wall is a viable and efficient means to effectively control the flow capacity of a radial turbine. Peak efficiencies of the second turbine with and without nozzle coolant were 86.5 and 88 percent respectively. These values are comparable to pivoting vane variable geometry turbines; however, the decrease in efficiency as the flow was varied from the design value was much less for the movable wall turbine. Several design improvements which should increase the turbine efficiency one or two more points are identified. These design improvements include reduced leakage losses and relocation of the vane coolant ejection holes to reduce mainstream disturbance.

  20. Incidence and duration of total occlusion of the radial artery in newborn infants after catheter removal.

    PubMed

    Hack, W W; Vos, A; van der Lei, J; Okken, A

    1990-01-01

    The incidence and duration of total occlusion of the radial artery after catheter removal was determined using repeated Doppler flow measurements. Thirty-two newborn infants with birthweights ranging from 945 g to 3890 g (median 1935 g) and gestational age ranging from 26 to 40 weeks (median 32 weeks) were studied. In 20 out of 32 infants (63%), complete occlusion of the radial artery occurred. The number of occlusions were not related to birthweight, gestational age or duration of cannulation. In all infants, blood flow in the radial artery resumed within 1-29 days after catheter removal. The duration of occlusion was directly related to the duration of cannulation and inversely related to birthweight. This study demonstrates a high frequency of total occlusion of the radial artery in newborn infants after percutaneous radial artery cannulation. In the majority of infants with a radial artery catheter, blood flow to the tissue distal to the cannulation site is dependent solely on the existence of an adequate arterial palmar collateral circulation.

  1. Performance of the same column in supercritical fluid chromatography and in liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Nándor; Felinger, Attila

    2015-08-28

    We have studied the chromatographic behavior of the homologous series of alkylbenzenes (ranging from octylbenzene to octadecylbenzene) on the same C18 reversed-phase column in supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) and reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) at various experimental conditions, such as different eluent compositions, flow-rates, and mobile phase densities. The first and the second moments of the peaks were used to estimate the overall mass-transfer processes in both chromatographic modes using the stochastic model of chromatography. The results confirm that in SFC - as the density of the mobile phase is influenced by the flow-rate - there is a broader variation of mass-transfer properties than in liquid chromatography. As expected, the optimum mobile phase velocity is higher in SFC, but there is no real difference in the minimum value of plate height, i.e. in the optimum efficiency.

  2. Aerodynamic evaluation of two compact radial-inflow turbine rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonyi, P. Susan; Roelke, Richard J.; Stabe, Roy G.; Nowlin, Brentley C.; Dicicco, Danielle

    1995-07-01

    The aerodynamic evaluation of two highly loaded compact radial turbine rotors was conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center Small Engine Component Test Facility (SECTF). The experimental results were used for proof-of-concept, for modeling radial inflow turbine rotors, and for providing data for code verification. Two rotors were designed to have a shorter axial length, up to a 10-percent reduced diameter, a lighter weight, and equal or higher efficiencies with those of conventional radial inflow turbine rotors. Three configurations were tested: rotor 1, having a 40-percent shorter axial length, with the design stator (stator 1); rotor 1 with the design stator vanes closed down (stator 2); and rotor 2, slightly shorter axially and having higher loading, with stator 2. The stator had 36 vanes and the rotors each had 14 solid blades. Although presently uncooled, the rotor blades were designed for thicknesses which would allow cooling passages to be added. The overall stage performance measurements and the rotor and stator exit flow field surveys were obtained. Measurements of steady state temperatures, pressures, mass flow rates, flow angles, and output power were made at various operating conditions. Data were obtained at corrected speeds of 80, 90, 100, 110, and 120 percent of design over a range of equivalent inlet-to-exit pressure ratios of 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0, the maximum pressure ratio achieved. The test showed that the configuration of rotor 1 with stator 1 running at the design pressure ratio produced a flow rate which was 5.6 percent higher than expected. This result indicated the need to close down the stator flow area to reduce the flow. The flow area reduction was accomplished by restaggering the vanes. Rotor 1 was retested with the closed-down stator vanes and achieved the correct mass flow. Rotor 2 was tested only with the restaggered vanes. The test results of the three turbine configurations were nearly identical. Although the measured

  3. Aerodynamic Evaluation of Two Compact Radial-Inflow Turbine Rotors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonyi, P. Susan; Roelke, Richard J.; Stabe, Roy G.; Nowlin, Brentley C.; Dicicco, Danielle

    1995-01-01

    The aerodynamic evaluation of two highly loaded compact radial turbine rotors was conducted at the NASA Lewis Research Center Small Engine Component Test Facility (SECTF). The experimental results were used for proof-of-concept, for modeling radial inflow turbine rotors, and for providing data for code verification. Two rotors were designed to have a shorter axial length, up to a 10-percent reduced diameter, a lighter weight, and equal or higher efficiencies with those of conventional radial inflow turbine rotors. Three configurations were tested: rotor 1, having a 40-percent shorter axial length, with the design stator (stator 1); rotor 1 with the design stator vanes closed down (stator 2); and rotor 2, slightly shorter axially and having higher loading, with stator 2. The stator had 36 vanes and the rotors each had 14 solid blades. Although presently uncooled, the rotor blades were designed for thicknesses which would allow cooling passages to be added. The overall stage performance measurements and the rotor and stator exit flow field surveys were obtained. Measurements of steady state temperatures, pressures, mass flow rates, flow angles, and output power were made at various operating conditions. Data were obtained at corrected speeds of 80, 90, 100, 110, and 120 percent of design over a range of equivalent inlet-to-exit pressure ratios of 3.5, 4.0, 4.5, and 5.0, the maximum pressure ratio achieved. The test showed that the configuration of rotor 1 with stator 1 running at the design pressure ratio produced a flow rate which was 5.6 percent higher than expected. This result indicated the need to close down the stator flow area to reduce the flow. The flow area reduction was accomplished by restaggering the vanes. Rotor 1 was retested with the closed-down stator vanes and achieved the correct mass flow. Rotor 2 was tested only with the restaggered vanes. The test results of the three turbine configurations were nearly identical. Although the measured

  4. The influence of collisional and anomalous radial diffusion on parallel ion transport in edge plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Helander, P.; Hazeltine, R.D.; Catto, P.J.

    1996-12-31

    The orderings in the kinetic equations commonly used to study the plasma core of a tokamak do not allow a balance between parallel ion streaming and radial diffusion, and are, therefore, inappropriate in the plasma edge. Different orderings are required in the edge region where radial transport across the steep gradients associated with the scrape-off layer is large enough to balance the rapid parallel flow caused by conditions close to collecting surfaces (such as the Bohm sheath condition). In the present work, we derive and solve novel kinetic equations, allowing for such a balance, and construct distinctive transport laws for impure, collisional, edge plasmas in which the perpendicular transport is (i) due to Coulomb collisions of ions with heavy impurities, or (ii) governed by anomalous diffusion driven by electrostatic turbulence. In both the collisional and anomalous radial transport cases, we find that one single diffusion coefficient determines the radial transport of particles, momentum and heat. The parallel transport laws and parallel thermal force in the scrape-off layer assume an unconventional form, in which the relative ion-impurity flow is driven by a combination of the conventional parallel gradients, and new (i) collisional or (ii) anomalous terms involving products of radial derivatives of the temperature and density with the radial shear of the parallel velocity. Thus, in the presence of anomalous radial diffusion, the parallel ion transport cannot be entirely classical, as usually assumed in numerical edge computations. The underlying physical reason is the appearance of a novel type of parallel thermal force resulting from the combined action of anomalous diffusion and radial temperature and velocity gradients. In highly sheared flows the new terms can modify impurity penetration into the core plasma.

  5. The design of an air-cooled metallic high temperature radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Philip H.; Roelke, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Recent trends in small advanced gas turbine engines call for higher turbine inlet temperatures. Advances in radial turbine technology have opened the way for a cooled metallic radial turbine capable of withstanding turbine inlet temperatures of 2500 F while meeting the challenge of high efficiency in this small flow size range. In response to this need, a small air-cooled radial turbine has been designed utilizing internal blade coolant passages. The coolant flow passage design is uniquely tailored to simultaneously meet rotor cooling needs and rotor fabrication constraints. The rotor flow-path design seeks to realize improved aerodynamic blade loading characteristics and high efficiency while satisfying rotor life requirements. An up-scaled version of the final engine rotor is currently under fabrication and, after instrumentation, will be tested in the warm turbine test facility at the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  6. Eddy Current Minimizing Flow Plug for Use in Flow Conditioning and Flow Metering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An eddy-current-minimizing flow plug has an outer radial wall with open flow channels formed between the plug's inlet and outlet. The plug has a central region coupled to the inner surface of the outer radial wall. Each open flow channel includes (i) a first portion originating at the inlet and converging to a location in the plug where convergence is contributed to by changes in thickness of the outer radial wall and divergence of the central region, and (ii) a second portion originating in the plug and diverging to the outlet where divergence is contributed to by changes in thickness of the outer radial wall and convergence of the central region. For at least a portion of the open flow channels, a central axis passing through the first and second portions is non-parallel with respect to the given direction of the flow.

  7. AUTO-EXPANSIVE FLOW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physics suggests that the interplay of momentum, continuity, and geometry in outward radial flow must produce density and concomitant pressure reductions. In other words, this flow is intrinsically auto-expansive. It has been proposed that this process is the key to understanding...

  8. [Primary radial head arthroplasty in trauma : Complications].

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Horlohé, K; Buschbeck, S; Wincheringer, D; Weißenberger, M; Hoffmann, R

    2016-10-01

    Radial head fractures are common injuries in elbow trauma. Non-displaced fractures are best treated conservatively. Simple but displaced fractures require anatomic reduction and fixation, typically using screws. The treatment course for complex fractures with multiple fragments is still being debated, as results are less predictable. Radial head resection is not advised if concomitant injuries of the coronoid process or the collateral ligaments with instability are present. Favorable outcomes following open reduction and fixation using plates were reported recently. However, complication rates are very high. Radial head replacement is a valuable tool in treating complex fractures of the radial head with predominantly good and excellent results. Patients who suffer radial head fractures are typically of a younger age, resulting in high functional demands. Certainly, unspecific and specific complications related to radial head arthroplasty were reported in up to 40 % of cases in an acute fracture setting. This article highlights common complications in radial head arthroplasty and aims to present strategies to avoid them. PMID:27600571

  9. Radial head fractures--an update.

    PubMed

    Pike, Jeffrey M; Athwal, George S; Faber, Kenneth J; King, Graham J W

    2009-03-01

    Radial head fractures are the most common fractures occurring around the elbow. Although radial head fractures can occur in isolation, associated fractures and ligament injuries are common. Assembling the clinical presentation, physical examination, and imaging into an effective treatment plan can be challenging. The characteristics of the radial head fracture influence the technique used to optimize the outcome. Fragment number, displacement, impaction, and bone quality are considered when deciding between early motion, fragment excision, and radial head excision, repair, or replacement. Isolated, minimally displaced fractures without evidence of mechanical block can be treated nonsurgically with early active range of motion (ROM). Partial, displaced radial head fractures without evidence of mechanical block can be treated either nonsurgically or with open reduction internal fixation (ORIF), as current evidence does not prove superiority of either strategy. For displaced fractures with greater than 3 fragments, radial head replacement is recommended. Radial head arthroplasty may be preferred over tenuous fracture fixation in the setting of associated ligament injuries when maintenance of joint stability could be compromised by ineffective fracture fixation. PMID:19258159

  10. Chromatography resin support

    DOEpatents

    Dobos, James G.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method of using an improved chromatography resin support is disclosed. The chromatography support platform is provided by a stainless steel hollow cylinder adapted for being inserted into a chromatography column. An exterior wall of the stainless steel cylinder defines a groove for carrying therein an "O"-ring. The upper surface of the stainless steel column is covered by a fine stainless steel mesh welded to the edges of the stainless steel cylinder. When placed upon a receiving ledge defined within a chromatography column, the "O"-ring provides a fluid tight seal with the inner edge wall of the chromatography cylinder. The stainless steel mesh supports the chromatography matrix and provides a back flushable support which is economical and simple to construct.

  11. Heat transfer in cooled guide vanes. [of radial inflow turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabakoff, W.; Kotwal, R.; Hamed, A.

    1977-01-01

    A numerical study to determine the temperature distribution in the guide vanes of a radial inflow turbine is presented. A computer program has been developed to calculate the temperature distribution when the vanes are cooled internally using a combination of impingement and film cooling techniques. The study is based on the use of the finite difference method in a two dimensional heat conduction problem. The results are then compared to determine the best cooling configuration for a certain coolant to primary mass flow ratio.

  12. Cooling characteristics of air cooled radial turbine blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, T.; Takeishi, K.; Matsuura, M.; Miyauchi, J.

    The cooling design and the cooling characteristics of air cooled radial turbine wheels, which are designed for use with the gas generator turbine for the 400 horse power truck gas turbine engine, are presented. A high temperature and high speed test was performed under aerodynamically similar conditions to that of the prototype engine in order to confirm the metal temperature of the newly developed integrated casting wheels constructed of the superalloys INCO 713C. The test results compared with the analytical value, which was established on the basis of the results of the heat transfer test and the water flow test, are discussed.

  13. Numerical modeling of the elution peak profiles of retained solutes in supercritical fluid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Guiochon, Georges A

    2011-01-01

    In supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC), the significant expansion of the mobile phase along the column causes the formation of axial and radial gradients of temperature. Due to these gradients, the mobile phase density, its viscosity, its velocity, its diffusion coefficients, etc. are not constant throughout the column. This results in a nonuniform flow velocity distribution, itself causing a loss of column efficiency in certain cases, even at low flow rates, as they do in HPLC. At high flow rates, an important deformation of the elution profiles of the sample components may occur. The model previously used to account satisfactorily for the retention of an unsorbed solute in SFC is applied to the modeling of the elution peak profiles of retained compounds. The numerical solution of the combined heat and mass balance equations provides the temperature and the pressure profiles inside the column and values of the retention time and the band profiles of retained compounds that are in excellent agreement with independent experimental data for large value of mobile phase reduced density. At low reduced densities, the band profiles can strongly depend on the column axial distribution of porosity.

  14. Building a radial spoke: flagellar radial spoke protein 3 (RSP3) is a dimer.

    PubMed

    Wirschell, Maureen; Zhao, Feifei; Yang, Chun; Yang, Pinfen; Diener, Dennis; Gaillard, Anne; Rosenbaum, Joel L; Sale, Winfield S

    2008-03-01

    Radial spokes are critical multisubunit structures required for normal ciliary and eukaryotic flagellar motility. Experimental evidence indicates the radial spokes are mechanochemical transducers that transmit signals from the central pair apparatus to the outer doublet microtubules for local control of dynein activity. Recently, progress has been made in identifying individual components of the radial spoke, yet little is known about how the radial spoke is assembled or how it performs in signal transduction. Here we focus on radial spoke protein 3 (RSP3), a highly conserved AKAP located at the base of the radial spoke stalk and required for radial spoke assembly on the doublet microtubules. Biochemical approaches were taken to further explore the functional role of RSP3 within the radial spoke structure and for control of motility. Chemical crosslinking, native gel electrophoresis, and epitope-tagged RSP3 proteins established that RSP3 forms a dimer. Analysis of truncated RSP3 proteins indicates the dimerization domain coincides with the previously characterized axoneme binding domain in the N-terminus. We propose a model in which each radial spoke structure is built on an RSP3 dimer, and indicating that each radial spoke can potentially localize multiple PKAs or AKAP-binding proteins in position to control dynein activity and flagellar motility. PMID:18157907

  15. Flow and heat transfer characteristics of orthogonally rotating channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Hiroshi

    1991-12-01

    Numerical analysis was conducted to predict the centripetal buoyant effect on flow and heat transfer characteristics in a channel rotating about a perpendicular axis. The conditions were assumed to be laminar, fully developed, and uniform heat flux. Calculation were conducted both for radially outward flow from the rotating axis and radially inward flow. The calculated results indicated that for radially outward flow buoyancy decreases the suction side friction and heat transfer while increasing pressure side friction and heat transfer. This trends were reversed for radially inward flow.

  16. Radial Velocity Fluctuations of RZ Psc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potravnov, I. S.; Gorynya, N. A.; Grinin, V. P.; Minikulov, N. Kh.

    2014-12-01

    The behavior of the radial velocity of the UX Ori type star RZ Psc is studied. The existence of an inner cavity with a radius of about 0.7 a.u. in the circumstellar disk of this star allows to suggest the presence of a companion. A study of the radial velocity of RZ Psc based on our own measurements and published data yields no periodic component in its variability. The two most accurate measurements of V r , based on high resolution spectra obtained over a period of three months, show that the radial velocity is constant over this time interval to within 0.5 km/s. This imposes a limit of M p ≤10 M Jup on the mass of the hypothetical companion. Possible reasons for the observed strong fluctuations in the radial velocity of this star are discussed.

  17. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kokkalis, Zinon T.; Tolis, Konstantinos E.; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D.; Panagopoulos, Georgios N.; Igoumenou, Vasilios G.; Mavrogenis, Andreas F.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic. PMID:27517078

  18. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Tolis, Konstantinos E; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Panagopoulos, Georgios N; Igoumenou, Vasilios G; Mavrogenis, Andreas F

    2016-06-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic.

  19. Aberrant Radial Artery Causing Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Tolis, Konstantinos E; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Panagopoulos, Georgios N; Igoumenou, Vasilios G; Mavrogenis, Andreas F

    2016-06-01

    Anatomical vascular variations are rare causes of carpal tunnel syndrome. An aberrant medial artery is the most common vascular variation, while an aberrant radial artery causing carpal tunnel syndrome is even more rare, with an incidence ranging less than 3%. This article reports a patient with compression of the median nerve at the carpal tunnel by an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery. An 80- year- old man presented with a 5-year history of right hand carpal tunnel syndrome; Tinel sign, Phalen test and neurophysiological studies were positive. Open carpal tunnel release showed an aberrant superficial branch of the radial artery with its accompanying veins running from radially to medially, almost parallel to the median nerve, ending at the superficial palmar arterial arch. The median nerve was decompressed without ligating the aberrant artery. At the last follow-up, 2 years after diagnosis and treatment the patient is asymptomatic. PMID:27517078

  20. Radial transport with perturbed magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R. D.

    2015-05-15

    It is pointed out that the viscosity coefficient describing radial transport of toroidal angular momentum is proportional to the second power of the gyro-radius—like the corresponding coefficients for particle and heat transport—regardless of any geometrical symmetry. The observation is widely appreciated, but worth emphasizing because some literature gives the misleading impression that asymmetry can allow radial moment transport in first-order.

  1. Mathematical interpretation of radial shearing interferometers.

    PubMed

    Malacara, D

    1974-08-01

    The procedure for computing a radial shearing interferometric pattern is given. The interferometric pattern is analyzed to obtain the wavefront shape. Restricting the discussion to wavefronts having rotational symmetry, we give two different methods of finding the wavefront. One approach is to scan along a diameter of the interferometric pattern and the other is to examine the shape of the fringes. The relative sensitivity of a radial shearing interferometer with respect to that of a Twyman-Green interferometer is also analyzed.

  2. Sequential Assembly of Flagellar Radial Spokes

    PubMed Central

    Diener, Dennis R.; Yang, Pinfen; Geimer, Stefan; Cole, Douglas G.; Sale, Winfield S.; Rosenbaum, Joel L.

    2013-01-01

    The unicellular alga Chlamydomonas can assemble two 10 μm flagella in one hour from proteins synthesized in the cell body. Targeting and transporting these proteins to the flagella are simplified by preassembly of macromolecular complexes in the cell body. Radial spokes are flagellar complexes that are partially assembled in the cell body before entering the flagella. On the axoneme, radial spokes are “T” shaped structures with a head of 5 proteins and a stalk of 18 proteins that sediment together at 20S. In the cell body, radial spokes are partially assembled; about half of the radial spoke proteins (RSPs) form a 12S complex. In mutants lacking a single radial spoke protein, smaller spoke subassemblies were identified. When extracts from two such mutants were mixed in vitro the 12S complex was assembled from several smaller complexes demonstrating that portions of the stepwise assembly of radial spoke assembly can be carried out in vitro to elucidate the order of spoke assembly in the cell body. PMID:21692193

  3. Chitosan-based membrane chromatography for protein adsorption and separation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yezhuo; Feng, Zhicheng; Shao, Zhengzhong; Chen, Xin

    2012-08-01

    A chitosan-based membrane chromatography was set up by using natural chitosan/carboxymethylchitosan (CS/CMCS) blend membrane as the matrix. The dynamic adsorption property for protein (lysozyme as model protein) was detailed discussed with the change in pore size of the membrane, the flow rate and the initial concentration of the feed solution, and the layer of membrane in membrane stack. The best dynamic adsorption capacity of lysozyme on the CS/CMCS membrane chromatography was found to be 15.3mg/mL under the optimal flow conditions. Moreover, the CS/CMCS membrane chromatography exhibited good repeatability and reusability with the desorption efficiency of ~90%. As an application, lysozyme and ovalbumin were successfully separated from their binary mixture through the CS/CMCS membrane chromatography. This implies that such a natural chitosan-based membrane chromatography may have great potential on the bioseparation field in the future.

  4. Advanced proteomic liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Smith, Richard D.; Shen, Yufeng

    2012-10-26

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry is the predominant platform used to analyze proteomics samples consisting of large numbers of proteins and their proteolytic products (e.g., truncated polypeptides) and spanning a wide range of relative concentrations. This review provides an overview of advanced capillary liquid chromatography techniques and methodologies that greatly improve separation resolving power and proteomics analysis coverage, sensitivity, and throughput.

  5. Liquid Chromatography in 1982.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, David H.

    1982-01-01

    Reviews trends in liquid chromatography including apparatus, factors affecting efficient separation of a mixture (peak sharpness and speed), simplified problem-solving, adsorption, bonded phase chromatography, ion selectivity, and size exclusion. The current trend is to control chemical selectivity by the liquid phase. (Author/JN)

  6. Column Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majors, Ronald E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature covering developments of column liquid chromatography during 1982-83. Areas considered include: books and reviews; general theory; columns; instrumentation; detectors; automation and data handling; multidimensional chromatographic and column switching techniques; liquid-solid chromatography; normal bonded-phase, reversed-phase,…

  7. Kool-Aid Chromatography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Christie L.

    1986-01-01

    Offers guidelines and suggests activities that can introduce middle school students to the process and principles of chromatography in an inexpensive and safe manner. Proposes that experiences with Kool-aid and food coloring chromatography can provide insights into how scientists think, work, and communicate. (ML)

  8. Liquid-phase chromatography detector

    DOEpatents

    Voigtman, E.G.; Winefordner, J.D.; Jurgensen, A.R.

    1983-11-08

    A liquid-phase chromatography detector comprises a flow cell having an inlet tubular conduit for receiving a liquid chromatographic effluent and discharging it as a flowing columnar stream onto a vertically adjustable receiving surface spaced apart from and located vertically below and in close proximity to the discharge end of the tubular conduit; a receiver adapted to receive liquid overflowing from the receiving surface; an exit conduit for continuously removing liquid from the receiver; a light source for focusing fluorescence-producing light pulses on the flowing columnar stream as it passes from the outlet of the conduit to the receiving surface and a fluorescence detector to detect the produced fluorescence; a source of light pulse for producing acoustic waves in the columnar stream as it passes from the conduit outlet to the receiving surface; and a piezoelectric transducer adapted to detect those waves; and a source of bias voltage applied to the inlet tubular conduit and adapted to produce ionization of the liquid flowing through the flow cell so as to produce photocurrents therein and an electrical system to detect and record the photocurrents. This system is useful in separating and detecting individual chemical compounds from mixtures thereof. 5 figs.

  9. Liquid-phase chromatography detector

    DOEpatents

    Voigtman, Edward G.; Winefordner, James D.; Jurgensen, Arthur R.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid-phase chromatography detector comprising a flow cell having an inlet tubular conduit for receiving a liquid chromatographic effluent and discharging it as a flowing columnar stream onto a vertically adjustable receiving surface spaced apart from and located vertically below and in close proximity to the discharge end of the tubular conduit; a receiver adapted to receive liquid overflowing from the receiving surface; an exit conduit for continuously removing liquid from the receiver; a light source for focussing fluorescence-producing light pulses on the flowing columnar stream as it passes from the outlet of the conduit to the receiving surface and a fluorescence detector to detect the produced fluorescence; a source of light pulse for producing acoustic waves in the columnar stream as it passes from the conduit outlet to the receiving surface; and a piezoelectric transducer adapted to detect those waves; and a source of bias voltage applied to the inlet tubular conduit and adapted to produce ionization of the liquid flowing through the flow cell so as to produce photocurrents therein and an electrical system to detect and record the photocurrents. This system is useful in separating and detecting individual chemical compounds from mixtures thereof.

  10. Waves in Radial Gravity Using Magnetic Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlsen, D. R.; Hart, J. E.; Weidman, P. D.

    1999-01-01

    Terrestrial laboratory experiments studying various fluid dynamical processes are constrained, by being in an Earth laboratory, to have a gravitational body force which is uniform and unidirectional. Therefore fluid free-surfaces are horizontal and flat. Such free surfaces must have a vertical solid boundary to keep the fluid from spreading horizontally along a gravitational potential surface. In atmospheric, oceanic, or stellar fluid flows that have a horizontal scale of about one-tenth the body radius or larger, sphericity is important in the dynamics. Further, fluids in spherical geometry can cover an entire domain without any sidewall effects, i.e. have truly periodic boundary conditions. We describe spherical body-force laboratory experiments using ferrofluid. Ferrofluids are dilute suspensions of magnetic dipoles, for example magnetite particles of order 10 nm diameter, suspended in a carrier fluid. Ferrofluids are subject to an additional body force in the presence of an applied magnetic field gradient. We use this body force to conduct laboratory experiments in spherical geometry. The present study is a laboratory technique improvement. The apparatus is cylindrically axisymmetric. A cylindrical ceramic magnet is embedded in a smooth, solid, spherical PVC ball. The geopotential field and its gradient, the body force, were made nearly spherical by careful choice of magnet height-to-diameter ratio and magnet size relative to the PVC ball size. Terrestrial gravity is eliminated from the dynamics by immersing the "planet" and its ferrofluid "ocean" in an immiscible silicone oil/freon mixture of the same density. Thus the earth gravity is removed from the dynamics of the ferrofluid/oil interface and the only dynamically active force there is the radial magnetic gravity. The entire apparatus can rotate, and waves are forced on the ferrofluid surface by exterior magnets. The biggest improvement in technique is in the wave visualization. Fluorescing dye is added to

  11. High performance stationary phases for planar chromatography.

    PubMed

    Poole, Salwa K; Poole, Colin F

    2011-05-13

    The kinetic performance of stabilized particle layers, particle membranes, and thin films for thin-layer chromatography is reviewed with a focus on how layer characteristics and experimental conditions affect the observed plate height. Forced flow and pressurized planar electrochromatography are identified as the best candidates to overcome the limited performance achieved by capillary flow for stabilized particle layers. For conventional and high performance plates band broadening is dominated by molecular diffusion at low mobile phase velocities typical of capillary flow systems and by mass transfer with a significant contribution from flow anisotropy at higher flow rates typical of forced flow systems. There are few possible changes to the structure of stabilized particle layers that would significantly improve their performance for capillary flow systems while for forced flow a number of avenues for further study are identified. New media for ultra thin-layer chromatography shows encouraging possibilities for miniaturized high performance systems but the realization of their true performance requires improvements in instrumentation for sample application and detection.

  12. Effects of secondary flow on heat transfer in rotating passages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Joan G.; Moore, John

    1990-02-01

    Secondary flow in rotating cooling passages of jet engine turbine rotors is considered. A Navier-Stokes calculation procedure for turbulent flow is used to compute flow development in a radially outward flow channel, round a sharp 180 degree bend, and in the radially inward flow channel downstream. Areas of high and low heat transfer are explained by secondary flow development and quantitative results show regions of design interest.

  13. Cooled High-temperature Radial Turbine Program 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Philip H.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this program was the design and fabrication of a air-cooled high-temperature radial turbine (HTRT) intended for experimental evaluation in a warm turbine test facility at the LeRC. The rotor and vane were designed to be tested as a scaled version (rotor diameter of 14.4 inches diameter) of a 8.021 inch diameter rotor designed to be capable of operating with a rotor inlet temperature (RIT) of 2300 F, a nominal mass flow of 4.56 lbm/sec, a work level of equal or greater than 187 Btu/lbm, and efficiency of 86 percent or greater. The rotor was also evaluated to determine it's feasibility to operate at 2500 F RIT. The rotor design conformed to the rotor blade flow path specified by NASA for compatibility with their test equipment. Fabrication was accomplished on three rotors, a bladeless rotor, a solid rotor, and an air-cooled rotor.

  14. Variable area radial turbine fabrication and test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, C.

    1986-01-01

    A variable area radial turbine with a moveable nozzle sidewall was experimentally evaluated. The turbine was designed for an advanced variable capacity gas turbine rotorcraft engine. The turbine has a mass flow rate of 2.27 kg/sec (5.0 lbs/sec), and a rotor inlet temperature of 1477K (2200 F). Testing was conducted at a reduced inlet temperature, but the aerodynamic parameters and Reynolds numbers were duplicated. Overall performance was obtained for a range of nozzle areas from 50% to 100% of the maximum area. The test program determined the effect on performance of: (1) Moving the hub or shroud sidewall; (2) Sidewall-vane clearance leakage; (3) Vaneless space geometry change; and (4) Nozzle cooling flows. Data were obtained for a range of pressure ratios and speeds and are presented in a number of performance maps.

  15. Experimental evaluation of a translating nozzle sidewall radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.; Rogo, Casimir

    1987-01-01

    Studies have shown that reduced specific fuel consumption of rotorcraft engines can be achieved with a variable capacity engine. A key component in such an engine in a high-work, high-temperature variable geometry gas generator turbine. An optimization study indicated that a radial turbine with a translating nozzle sidewall could produce high efficiency over a wide range of engine flows but substantiating data were not available. An experimental program with Teledyne CAE, Toledo, Ohio was undertaken to evaluate the moving sidewall concept. A variety of translating nozzle sidewall turbine configurations were evaluated. The effects of nozzle leakage and coolant flows were also investigated. Testing was done in warm air (121 C). The results of the contractual program were summarized.

  16. Fluctuating Pressure Environments and Hydrodynamic Radial Force Mitigation for a Two Blade Unshrouded Inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulder, Andrew; Skelley, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Fluctuating pressure data from water flow testing of an unshrouded two blade inducer revealed a cavitation induced oscillation with the potential to induce a radial load on the turbopump shaft in addition to other more traditionally analyzed radial loads. Subsequent water flow testing of the inducer with a rotating force measurement system confirmed that the cavitation induced oscillation did impart a radial load to the inducer. After quantifying the load in a baseline configuration, two inducer shroud treatments were selected and tested to reduce the cavitation induced load. The first treatment was to increase the tip clearance, and the second was to introduce a circumferential groove near the inducer leading edge. Increasing the clearance resulted in a small load decrease along with some steady performance degradation. The groove greatly reduced the hydrodynamic load with little to no steady performance loss. The groove did however generate some new, relatively high frequency, spatially complex oscillations to the environment.

  17. Classification of volcanoes of the Kane Patera Quadrangle of Io: Proportions of lava flows and pyroclastic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elston, W. E.

    1984-01-01

    Voyager 1 images show 14 volcanic centers wholly or partly within the Kane Patera quadrangle of Io, which are divided into four major classes: (1) shield with parallel flows; (2) shield with early radial fan shapd flows; (3) shield with radial fan shaped flows, surfaces of flows textured with longitudinal ridges; and (4) depression surrounded by plateau-forming scarp-bounded, untextured deposits. The interpretation attempted here hinges largely on the ability to distinguish lava flows from pyroclastic flows by remote sensing.

  18. Radial Tunnel Syndrome, Diagnostic and Treatment Dilemma.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Ali; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Jupiter, Jess B

    2015-07-01

    Radial tunnel syndrome is a disease which we should consider it in elbow and forearm pains. It is diagnosed with lateral elbow and dorsal forearm pain may radiate to the wrist and dorsum of the fingers. The disease is more prevalent in women with the age of 30 to 50 years old. It occurs by intermittent compression on the radial nerve from the radial head to the inferior border of the supinator muscle, without obvious extensor muscle weakness. Compression could happen in five different sites but the arcade of Frose is the most common area that radial nerve is compressed. To diagnosis radial tunnel syndrome, clinical examination is more important than paraclinic tests such as electrodiagnsic test and imaging studies. The exact site of the pain which can more specified by rule of nine test and weakness of the third finger and wrist extension are valuable physical exams to diagnosis. MRI studies my show muscle edema or atrophy along the distribution of the posterior interosseous nerve. Although non-surgical treatments such as rest, NSAIDs, injections and physiotherapy do not believe to have permanent relief, but it is justify undergoing them before surgery. Surgery could diminish pain and symptoms in 67 to 93 percents of patients completely.

  19. Radial Tunnel Syndrome, Diagnostic and Treatment Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Moradi, Ali; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H; Jupiter, Jess B

    2015-01-01

    Radial tunnel syndrome is a disease which we should consider it in elbow and forearm pains. It is diagnosed with lateral elbow and dorsal forearm pain may radiate to the wrist and dorsum of the fingers. The disease is more prevalent in women with the age of 30 to 50 years old. It occurs by intermittent compression on the radial nerve from the radial head to the inferior border of the supinator muscle, without obvious extensor muscle weakness. Compression could happen in five different sites but the arcade of Frose is the most common area that radial nerve is compressed. To diagnosis radial tunnel syndrome, clinical examination is more important than paraclinic tests such as electrodiagnsic test and imaging studies. The exact site of the pain which can more specified by rule of nine test and weakness of the third finger and wrist extension are valuable physical exams to diagnosis. MRI studies my show muscle edema or atrophy along the distribution of the posterior interosseous nerve. Although non-surgical treatments such as rest, NSAIDs, injections and physiotherapy do not believe to have permanent relief, but it is justify undergoing them before surgery. Surgery could diminish pain and symptoms in 67 to 93 percents of patients completely. PMID:26213698

  20. Helical antimicrobial polypeptides with radial amphiphilicity

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Menghua; Lee, Michelle W.; Mansbach, Rachael A.; Song, Ziyuan; Bao, Yan; Peek, Richard M.; Yao, Catherine; Chen, Lin-Feng; Ferguson, Andrew L.; Wong, Gerard C. L.; Cheng, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    α-Helical antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) generally have facially amphiphilic structures that may lead to undesired peptide interactions with blood proteins and self-aggregation due to exposed hydrophobic surfaces. Here we report the design of a class of cationic, helical homo-polypeptide antimicrobials with a hydrophobic internal helical core and a charged exterior shell, possessing unprecedented radial amphiphilicity. The radially amphiphilic structure enables the polypeptide to bind effectively to the negatively charged bacterial surface and exhibit high antimicrobial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Moreover, the shielding of the hydrophobic core by the charged exterior shell decreases nonspecific interactions with eukaryotic cells, as evidenced by low hemolytic activity, and protects the polypeptide backbone from proteolytic degradation. The radially amphiphilic polypeptides can also be used as effective adjuvants, allowing improved permeation of commercial antibiotics in bacteria and enhanced antimicrobial activity by one to two orders of magnitude. Designing AMPs bearing this unprecedented, unique radially amphiphilic structure represents an alternative direction of AMP development; radially amphiphilic polypeptides may become a general platform for developing AMPs to treat drug-resistant bacteria. PMID:26460016

  1. Radial velocity studies of cool stars.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hugh R A; Barnes, John; Tuomi, Mikko; Jenkins, James S; Anglada-Escude, Guillem

    2014-04-28

    Our current view of exoplanets is one derived primarily from solar-like stars with a strong focus on understanding our Solar System. Our knowledge about the properties of exoplanets around the dominant stellar population by number, the so-called low-mass stars or M dwarfs, is much more cursory. Based on radial velocity discoveries, we find that the semi-major axis distribution of M dwarf planets appears to be broadly similar to those around more massive stars and thus formation and migration processes might be similar to heavier stars. However, we find that the mass of M dwarf planets is relatively much lower than the expected mass dependency based on stellar mass and thus infer that planet formation efficiency around low-mass stars is relatively impaired. We consider techniques to overcome the practical issue of obtaining good quality radial velocity data for M dwarfs despite their faintness and sustained activity and emphasize (i) the wavelength sensitivity of radial velocity signals, (ii) the combination of radial velocity data from different experiments for robust detection of small amplitude signals, and (iii) the selection of targets and radial velocity interpretation of late-type M dwarfs should consider Hα behaviour.

  2. Radial spoke proteins of Chlamydomonas flagella

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pinfen; Diener, Dennis R.; Yang, Chun; Kohno, Takahiro; Pazour, Gregory J.; Dienes, Jennifer M.; Agrin, Nathan S.; King, Stephen M.; Sale, Winfield S.; Kamiya, Ritsu; Rosenbaum, Joel L.; Witman, George B.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The radial spoke is a ubiquitous component of ‘9+2’ cilia and flagella, and plays an essential role in the control of dynein arm activity by relaying signals from the central pair of microtubules to the arms. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii radial spoke contains at least 23 proteins, only 8 of which have been characterized at the molecular level. Here, we use mass spectrometry to identify 10 additional radial spoke proteins. Many of the newly identified proteins in the spoke stalk are predicted to contain domains associated with signal transduction, including Ca2+-, AKAP- and nucleotide-binding domains. This suggests that the spoke stalk is both a scaffold for signaling molecules and itself a transducer of signals. Moreover, in addition to the recently described HSP40 family member, a second spoke stalk protein is predicted to be a molecular chaperone, implying that there is a sophisticated mechanism for the assembly of this large complex. Among the 18 spoke proteins identified to date, at least 12 have apparent homologs in humans, indicating that the radial spoke has been conserved throughout evolution. The human genes encoding these proteins are candidates for causing primary ciliary dyskinesia, a severe inherited disease involving missing or defective axonemal structures, including the radial spokes. PMID:16507594

  3. Radial velocity studies of cool stars.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hugh R A; Barnes, John; Tuomi, Mikko; Jenkins, James S; Anglada-Escude, Guillem

    2014-04-28

    Our current view of exoplanets is one derived primarily from solar-like stars with a strong focus on understanding our Solar System. Our knowledge about the properties of exoplanets around the dominant stellar population by number, the so-called low-mass stars or M dwarfs, is much more cursory. Based on radial velocity discoveries, we find that the semi-major axis distribution of M dwarf planets appears to be broadly similar to those around more massive stars and thus formation and migration processes might be similar to heavier stars. However, we find that the mass of M dwarf planets is relatively much lower than the expected mass dependency based on stellar mass and thus infer that planet formation efficiency around low-mass stars is relatively impaired. We consider techniques to overcome the practical issue of obtaining good quality radial velocity data for M dwarfs despite their faintness and sustained activity and emphasize (i) the wavelength sensitivity of radial velocity signals, (ii) the combination of radial velocity data from different experiments for robust detection of small amplitude signals, and (iii) the selection of targets and radial velocity interpretation of late-type M dwarfs should consider Hα behaviour. PMID:24664922

  4. Manufacturing of Precision Forgings by Radial Forging

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, S.; Harrer, O.; Buchmayr, B.; Hofer, F.

    2011-01-17

    Radial forging is a multi purpose incremental forging process using four tools on the same plane. It is widely used for the forming of tool steels, super alloys as well as titanium- and refractory metals. The range of application goes from reducing the diameters of shafts, tubes, stepped shafts and axels, as well as for creating internal profiles for tubes in Near-Net-Shape and Net-Shape quality. Based on actual development of a weight optimized transmission input shaft, the specific features of radial forging technology is demonstrated. Also a Finite Element Model for the simulation of the process is shown which leads to reduced pre-processing effort and reduced computing time compared to other published simulation methods for radial forging. The finite element model can be applied to quantify the effects of different forging strategies.

  5. Generalized radially self-accelerating helicon beams.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Christian; Eichelkraut, Toni; Ornigotti, Marco; Szameit, Alexander

    2014-10-31

    We report, in theory and experiment, on a new class of optical beams that are radially self-accelerating and nondiffracting. These beams continuously evolve on spiraling trajectories while maintaining their amplitude and phase distribution in their rotating rest frame. We provide a detailed insight into the theoretical origin and characteristics of radial self-acceleration and prove our findings experimentally. As radially self-accelerating beams are nonparaxial and a solution to the full scalar Helmholtz equation, they can be implemented in many linear wave systems beyond optics, from acoustic and elastic waves to surface waves in fluids and soft matter. Our work generalized the study of classical helicon beams to a complete set of solutions for rotating complex fields. PMID:25396370

  6. Radial anisotropy ambient noise tomography of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Rivet, Diane; Shapiro, Nikolai; Jaxybulatov, Kairly; Landès, Matthieu; Koulakov, Ivan; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The use of ambient seismic noise allows us to perform surface-wave tomography of targets which could hardly be imaged by other means. The frequencies involved (~ 0.5 - 20 s), somewhere in between active seismic and regular teleseismic frequency band, make possible the high resolution imaging of intermediate-size targets like volcanic edifices. Moreover, the joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves dispersion curves extracted from noise correlations allows us to invert for crustal radial anisotropy. We present here the two first studies of radial anisotropy on volcanoes by showing results from Lake Toba Caldera, a super-volcano in Indonesia, and from Piton de la Fournaise volcano, a hot-spot effusive volcano on the Réunion Island (Indian Ocean). We will see how radial anisotropy can be used to infer the main fabric within a magmatic system and, consequently, its dominant type of intrusion.

  7. Dispersion-free radial transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Nelson, Scott D.

    2011-04-12

    A dispersion-free radial transmission line ("DFRTL") preferably for linear accelerators, having two plane conductors each with a central hole, and an electromagnetically permeable material ("EPM") between the two conductors and surrounding a channel connecting the two holes. At least one of the material parameters of relative magnetic permeability, relative dielectric permittivity, and axial width of the EPM is varied as a function of radius, so that the characteristic impedance of the DFRTL is held substantially constant, and pulse transmission therethrough is substantially dispersion-free. Preferably, the EPM is divided into concentric radial sections, with the varied material parameters held constant in each respective section but stepwise varied between sections as a step function of the radius. The radial widths of the concentric sections are selected so that pulse traversal time across each section is the same, and the varied material parameters of the concentric sections are selected to minimize traversal error.

  8. Precise Near-Infrared Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Gao, P.; Bottom, M.; Davison, C.; Mills, S.; Ciardi, D. R.; Brinkworth, C.; Tanner, A. M.; Beichman, C. A.; Catanzarite, J.; Crawford, S.; Wallace, J.; Mennesson, B.; Johnson, J. A.; White, R. J.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; von Braun, K.; Walp, B.; Vasisht, G.; Kane, S. R.; Prato, L. A.; NIRRVs

    2014-01-01

    We present precise radial velocity time-series from a 2.3 micron pilot survey to detect exoplanets around red, low mass, and young stars. We use the CSHELL spectrograph with an isotopic methane absorption gas cell for common optical path relative wavelength calibration at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility. We present an overview of our Nelder-Mead simplex optimization pipeline for extracting radial velocities. We will also present first light data at 1.6 microns from a near-infrared fiber scrambler used in tandem with our gas cell and CSHELL at IRTF. The fiber scrambler makes use of non-circular core fibers to stabilize the illumination of the slit and echelle grating against changes in seeing, focus, guiding and other sources of systematic radial velocity noise, complementing the wavelength calibration of a gas cell.

  9. Autumn Leaf Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scharmann, Lawrence C.

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to introduce students to chromatographic techniques. Also describes a teacher demonstration in which leaves obtained during the spring and fall are analyzed using chromatography. Procedures for both the experiment and the demonstration are outlined. (JN)

  10. Special Report: Affinity Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parikh, Indu; Cuatrecasas, Pedro

    1985-01-01

    Describes the nature of affinity chromatography and its use in purifying enzymes, studying cell interactions, exploring hormone receptors, and other areas. The potential the technique may have in treating disease is also considered. (JN)

  11. Reconstruction for Type IV Radial Polydactyly.

    PubMed

    Wall, Lindley B; Goldfarb, Charles A

    2015-09-01

    Type IV radial polydactyly represents a thumb with an extra proximal and distal phalanx. Assessment of the thumb for surgical reconstruction includes observing thumb function, evaluating thumb size and stability, and assessing the first web space. Reconstruction includes excision of the smaller thumb, typically the radial thumb, and re-creating thumb stability and alignment by addressing tendon insertion and joint orientation. Although surgical results are satisfying and complications are uncommon, additional surgical intervention may be required over time owing to thumb malalignment or instability.

  12. Radial elasticity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Palaci, I; Fedrigo, S; Brune, H; Klinke, C; Chen, M; Riedo, E

    2005-05-01

    We report an experimental and a theoretical study of the radial elasticity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a function of external radius. We use atomic force microscopy and apply small indentation amplitudes in order to stay in the linear elasticity regime. The number of layers for a given tube radius is inferred from transmission electron microscopy, revealing constant ratios of external to internal radii. This enables a comparison with molecular dynamics results, which also shed some light onto the applicability of Hertz theory in this context. Using this theory, we find a radial Young modulus strongly decreasing with increasing radius and reaching an asymptotic value of 30+/-10 GPa.

  13. The radial velocity search for extrasolar planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmillan, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    Radial velocity measurements are being made to search for planets orbiting stars other than the Sun. The reflex acceleration induced on stars by planets can be sensed by measuring the small, slow changes in the line-of-site velocities of stars. To detect these planetary perturbations, the data series must be made on a uniform instrumental scale for as long as it takes a planet to orbit its star. A spectrometer of extreme stability and unprecedented sensitivity to changes in stellar radial velocities was operated.

  14. Plasma Signatures of Radial Field Power Dropouts

    SciTech Connect

    Lucek, E.A.; Horbury, T.S.; Balogh, A.; McComas, D.J.

    1998-10-04

    A class of small scale structures, with a near-radial magnetic field and a drop in magnetic field fluctuation power, have recently been identified in the polar solar wind. An earlier study of 24 events, each lasting for 6 hours or more, identified no clear plasma signature. In an extension of that work, radial intervals lasting for 4 hours or more (89 in total), have been used to search for a statistically significant plasma signature. It was found that, despite considerable variations between intervals, there was a small but significant drop, on average, in plasma temperature, density and {beta} during these events.

  15. Gas chromatography in space.

    PubMed

    Akapo, S O; Dimandja, J M; Kojiro, D R; Valentin, J R; Carle, G C

    1999-05-28

    Gas chromatography has proven to be a very useful analytical technique for in situ analysis of extraterrestrial environments as demonstrated by its successful operation on spacecraft missions to Mars and Venus. The technique is also one of the six scientific instruments aboard the Huygens probe to explore Titan's atmosphere and surface. A review of gas chromatography in previous space missions and some recent developments in the current environment of fiscal constraints and payload size limitations are presented.

  16. Gas chromatography in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akapo, S. O.; Dimandja, J. M.; Kojiro, D. R.; Valentin, J. R.; Carle, G. C.

    1999-01-01

    Gas chromatography has proven to be a very useful analytical technique for in situ analysis of extraterrestrial environments as demonstrated by its successful operation on spacecraft missions to Mars and Venus. The technique is also one of the six scientific instruments aboard the Huygens probe to explore Titan's atmosphere and surface. A review of gas chromatography in previous space missions and some recent developments in the current environment of fiscal constraints and payload size limitations are presented.

  17. Advanced proteomic liquid chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fang; Smith, Richard D.; Shen, Yufeng

    2012-01-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry is the predominant platform used to analyze proteomics samples consisting of large numbers of proteins and their proteolytic products (e.g., truncated polypeptides) and spanning a wide range of relative concentrations. This review provides an overview of advanced capillary liquid chromatography techniques and methodologies that greatly improve separation resolving power and proteomics analysis coverage, sensitivity, and throughput. PMID:22840822

  18. OFF-DESIGN PERFORMANCE OF RADIAL INFLOW TURBINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserbauer, C. A.

    1994-01-01

    This program calculates off design performance of radial inflow turbines. The program uses a one dimensional solution of flow conditions through the turbine along the main streamline. The loss model accounts for stator, rotor, incidence, and exit losses. Program features include consideration of stator and rotor trailing edge blockage and computation of performance to limiting load. Stator loss (loss in kinetic energy across the stator) is proportional to the average kinetic energy in the blade row and is represented in the program by an equation which includes a stator loss coefficient determined from design point performance and then assumed to be constant for the off design calculations. Minimum incidence loss does not occur at zero incidence angle with respect to the rotor blade, but at some optimum flow angle. At high pressure ratios the level of rotor inlet velocity seemed to have an excessive influence on the loss. Using the component of velocity in the direction of the optimum flow angle gave better correlations with experimental results. Overall turbine geometry and design point values of efficiency, pressure ratio, and mass flow are needed as input information. The output includes performance and velocity diagram parameters for any number of given speeds over a range of turbine pressure ratio. The program has been implemented on the IBM 7094 and operates in batch mode.

  19. Impact of radial migration on stellar and gas radial metallicity distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand, Robert J. J.; Kawata, Daisuke; Cropper, Mark

    2015-03-01

    Radial migration is defined as the change in guiding centre radius of stars and gas caused by gains or losses of angular momentum that result from gravitational interaction with non-axisymmetric structure. This has been shown to have significant impact on the metallicity distribution in galactic discs, and therefore affects the interpretation of Galactic archaeology. We use a simulation of a Milky Way-sized galaxy to examine the effect of radial migration on the star and gas radial metallicity distribution. We find that both the star and gas component show significant radial migration. The stellar radial metallicity gradient remains almost unchanged but the radial metallicity distribution of the stars is broadened to produce a greater dispersion at all radii. However, the metallicity dispersion of the gas remains narrow. We find that the main drivers of the gas metallicity distribution evolution are metal enrichment and mixing: more efficient metal enrichment in the inner region maintains a negative slope in the radial metallicity distribution, and the metal mixing ensures the tight relationship of the gas metallicity with the radius. The metallicity distribution function reproduces the trend in the age-metallicity relation found from observations for stars younger than 1.0 Gyr in the Milky Way.

  20. Determining Enzyme Activity by Radial Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Bill D.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses advantages of radial diffusion assay in determining presence of enzyme and/or rough approximation of amount of enzyme activities. Procedures are included for the preparation of starch-agar plates, and the application and determination of enzyme. Techniques using plant materials (homogenates, tissues, ungerminated embryos, and seedlings)…

  1. Radial velocities of Planetary Nebulae revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Roberto; Ayala, Sandra A.; Wendolyn Blanco Cárdenas, Mónica; Contreras, María E.; Gómez-Muñoz, Marco Antonio; Guillén, Pedro F.; Olguín, Lorenzo; Ramos-Larios, Gerardo; Sabin, Laurence; Zavala, Saúl A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new determination of radial velocities of a sample of Galactic Planetary Nebulae (PNe) using a systematic method and the same instrumental setting: the long-slit high-dispersion Manchester Echelle Spectrograph (MES) on the 2.1-m telescope at the San Pedro Mártir Observatory (OAN-SPM; Mexico). This project was inspired by the work of Schneider et al. (1983, A&AS, 52, 399), which has been an important reference during the last decades. Radial velocities of gaseous nebulae can be obtained using the central wavelength of a Gaussian fit, even when there is an expansion velocity, as expected in PNe, but with not enough resolution to see a spectral line splitting. We have used the software SHAPE, a morpho-kinematic modeling and reconstruction tool for astrophysical objects (Steffen et al. 2011, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comput. Graphics, 17, 454), to prove that non-uniform density or brightness, on an expanding shell, can lead to mistaken conclusions about the radial velocity. To determine radial velocities, we only use the spectral data in which a spectral line-splitting is seen, avoiding thus the problem of the possible biased one-Gaussian fit. Cases when this method is not recommended are discussed.This project has been supported by grant PAPIIT-DGAPA-UNAM IN107914. MWB is in grateful receipt of a DGAPA-UNAM postdoctoral scholarship. MAG acknowledges CONACYT for his graduate scholarship.

  2. Geodesic acoustic modes in tokamak plasmas with a radial equilibrium electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Deng

    2015-09-15

    The dispersion relation of geodesic acoustic modes in the tokamak plasma with an equilibrium radial electric field is derived and analyzed. Multiple branches of eigenmodes have been found, similar to the result given by the fluid model with a poloidal mass flow. Frequencies and damping rates of both the geodesic acoustic mode and the sound wave increase with respect to the strength of radial electric field, while the frequency and the damping rate of the lower frequency branch slightly decrease. Possible connection to the experimental observation is discussed.

  3. Radial wave crystals: radially periodic structures from anisotropic metamaterials for engineering acoustic or electromagnetic waves.

    PubMed

    Torrent, Daniel; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2009-08-01

    We demonstrate that metamaterials with anisotropic properties can be used to develop a new class of periodic structures that has been named radial wave crystals. They can be sonic or photonic, and wave propagation along the radial directions is obtained through Bloch states like in usual sonic or photonic crystals. The band structure of the proposed structures can be tailored in a large amount to get exciting novel wave phenomena. For example, it is shown that acoustical cavities based on radial sonic crystals can be employed as passive devices for beam forming or dynamically orientated antennas for sound localization.

  4. P wave azimuthal and radial anisotropy of the Hokkaido subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiongwei; Zhao, Dapeng; Li, Jiabiao; Ruan, Aiguo

    2016-04-01

    We present the first three-dimensional P wave radial anisotropy tomography of the Hokkaido subduction zone, as well as P wave azimuthal anisotropy and S wave tomography, which are determined by inverting 298,430 P wave and 233,934 S wave arrival times from 14,245 local earthquakes recorded by 344 seismic stations. Our results reveal significant velocity heterogeneity, seismic anisotropy, and upwelling flows beneath the study region. In the mantle wedge, prominent low-velocity (low-V) anomalies exhibit trench-normal fast-velocity directions (FVDs) and a negative radial anisotropy (i.e., vertical velocity > horizontal velocity), which may reflect upwelling mantle flows. Fan-shaped FVDs are found at depths of 65-90 km, and a detailed 3-D mantle flow pattern is revealed, which may be caused by a combination of oblique subduction of the Pacific plate and collision of the Kuril arc with the Honshu arc beneath southern Hokkaido. The radial anisotropy changes at ~100 km depth, which may reflect variations in temperature and fluid conditions there. The subducting Pacific slab exhibits a positive radial anisotropy (i.e., horizontal velocity > vertical velocity), which may reflect the original fossil anisotropy when the Pacific plate formed at the mid-ocean ridge.

  5. Appearance of target pattern and spiral flames in radial microchannels with CH4-air mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sudarshan; Maruta, Kaoru; Minaev, S.; Fursenko, R.

    2008-02-01

    This paper presents the experimental evidence of the formation of rotating spiral flames with premixed methane-air mixtures introduced at the center of the two parallel circular quartz plates which are separated by a millimeter scale distance (≤5mm). Both plates are externally heated to create a positive wall temperature gradient in the flow direction to resemble heat recirculation through solid walls, which is a requisite to obtain stabilized combustion in microburners. Contrary to the general perception of a stable premixed flame front at a radial location, a variety of nonstationary flame propagation modes are observed. For lower mixture flow rates and a range of mixture equivalence ratios, a radial flame propagation mode is observed with simultaneous presence of two circular flames at different radial locations. For higher flow rates, a rotating spiral flame propagation mode is observed. In addition to radial and spiral flame propagation modes, random and unsymmetrical flame oscillations are also observed. The rotational rates of the spiral flame fronts were observed to vary from 28 to 83Hz. A simple analysis is carried out to describe the formation of spiral flames from a steady circular flame.

  6. Phosphopeptide separation using radially aligned titania nanotubes on titanium wire.

    PubMed

    Wijeratne, Aruna B; Wijesundera, Dharshana N; Paulose, Maggie; Ahiabu, Ivy Belinda; Chu, Wei-Kan; Varghese, Oomman K; Greis, Kenneth D

    2015-06-01

    Phosphoproteomic analysis offers a unique view of cellular function and regulation in biological systems by providing global measures of a key cellular regulator in the form of protein phosphorylation. Understanding the phosphorylation changes between normal and diseased cells or tissues offers a window into the mechanism of disease and thus potential targets for therapeutic intervention. A key step in these studies is the enrichment of phosphorylated peptides that are typically separated and analyzed by using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. The mesoporous titania beads/particles (e.g., Titansphere TiO2 beads from GL Sciences Inc., Japan) that are widely used for phosphopeptide enrichment are expensive and offer very limited opportunities for further performance improvement. Titiania nanotube arrays have shown promising characteristics for phosphopeptide separation. Here we report a proof-of-concept study to evaluate the efficacy of nanotubes on Ti-wire for phosphoproteomics research. We used titania nanotubes radially grown on titanium wires as well as the commercial beads to separate phosphopeptides generated from mouse liver complex tissue extracts. Our studies revealed that the nanotubes on metal wire provide comparable efficacy for enrichment of phophopeptides and offer an ease of use advantage versus mesoporous beads, thus having the potential to become a low cost and more practical material/methodology for phosphopeptide enrichment in biological studies.

  7. Radial forces analysis and rotational speed test of radial permanent magnetic bearing for horizontal axis wind turbine applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriswanto, Jamari

    2016-04-01

    Permanent magnet bearings (PMB) are contact free bearings which utilize the forces generated by the magnets. PMB in this work is a type of radial PMB, which functions as the radial bearings of the Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) rotor shaft. Radial PMB should have a greater radial force than the radial force HAWT rotor shaft (bearing load). This paper presents a modeling and experiments to calculate the radial force of the radial PMB. This paper also presents rotational speed test of the radial PMB compared to conventional bearings for HAWT applications. Modeling using COMSOL Multiphysics 4.3b with the magnetic fields physics models. Experiments were conducted by measuring the displacement of the rotor to the stator for a given load variation. Results of the two methods showed that the large displacement then the radial force would be greater. Radial forces of radial PMB is greater than radial forces of HAWT rotor shaft. The rotational speed test results of HAWT that used radial PMB produced higher rotary than conventional bearings with an average increase of 87.4%. Increasing rotational speed occured because radial PMB had no friction. HAWT that used radial PMB rotated at very low wind speeds are 1.4 m/s with a torque of 0.043 Nm, while the HAWT which uses conventional bearing started rotating at a wind speed of 4.4 m/s and required higher torque of 0.104 N.

  8. Freeze chromatography method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Scott, C.D.

    1987-04-16

    A freeze chromatography method and apparatus are provided which enable separation of the solutes contained in a sample. The apparatus includes an annular column construction comprising cylindrical inner and outer surfaces defining an annular passage therebetween. One of the surfaces is heated and the other cooled while passing an eluent through the annular passageway so that the eluent in contact with the cooled surface freezes and forms a frozen eluent layer thereon. A mixture of solutes dissolved in eluent is passed through the annular passageway in contact with the frozen layer so that the sample solutes in the mixture will tend to migrate either toward or away the frozen layer. The rate at which the mixture flows through the annular passageway is controlled so that the distribution of the sample solutes approaches that at equilibrium and thus a separation between the sample solutes occurs. 3 figs.

  9. Experimental Characterization of Piezoelectric Radial Field Diaphragms for Fluidic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, R. G.; Kavli, S. E.; Thomas, R. A., Jr.; Darji, K. J.; Mossi, K. M.

    2004-01-01

    NASA has recently developed a new piezoelectric actuator, the Radial Field Diaphragm or RFD. This actuator uses a radially-directed electric field to generate concentric out-of-plane (Z-axis) motion that allows this packaged device to be used as a pump or valve diaphragm. In order to efficiently use this new active device, experimental determination of pressure, flow rate, mechanical work, power consumption and overall efficiency needs to be determined by actually building a pump. However, without an optimized pump design, it is difficult to assess the quality of the data, as these results are inherent to the actual pump. Hence, separate experiments must be conducted in order to generate independent results to help guide the design criteria and pump quality. This paper focuses on the experiments used to generate the RFD's operational parameters and then compares these results to the experimentally determined results of several types of ball pumps. Also discussed are how errors are inherently introduced into the experiments, the pump design, experimental hardware and their effects on the overall system efficiency.

  10. Forced responses on a radial turbine with nozzle guide vanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yixiong; Yang, Ce; Ma, Chaochen; Lao, DaZhong

    2014-04-01

    Radial turbines with nozzle guide vanes are widely used in various size turbochargers. However, due to the interferences with guide vanes, the blades of impellers are exposed to intense unsteady aerodynamic excitations, which cause blade vibrations and lead to high cycle failures (HCF). Moreover, the harmonic resonance in some frequency regions are unavoidable due to the wide operation conditions. Aiming to achieve a detail insight into vibration characteristics of radial flow turbine, a numerical method based on fluid structure interaction (FSI) is presented. Firstly, the unsteady aerodynamic loads are determined by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). And the fluctuating pressures are transformed from time domain to frequency domain by fast Fourier-transform (FFT). Then, the entire rotor model is adopted to analyze frequencies and mode shapes considering mistuning in finite element (FE) method. Meanwhile, harmonic analyses, applying the pressure fluctuation from CFD, are conducted to investigate the impeller vibration behavior and blade forced response in frequency domain. The prediction of the vibration dynamic stress shows acceptable agreement to the blade actual damage in consistent tendency.

  11. Development of a thermal and structural analysis procedure for cooled radial turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ganesh N.; Deanna, Russell G.

    1988-06-01

    A procedure for computing the rotor temperature and stress distributions in a cooled radial turbine is considered. Existing codes for modeling the external mainstream flow and the internal cooling flow are used to compute boundary conditions for the heat transfer and stress analyses. An inviscid, quasi three-dimensional code computes the external free stream velocity. The external velocity is then used in a boundary layer analysis to compute the external heat transfer coefficients. Coolant temperatures are computed by a viscous one-dimensional internal flow code for the momentum and energy equation. These boundary conditions are input to a three-dimensional heat conduction code for calculation of rotor temperatures. The rotor stress distribution may be determined for the given thermal, pressure and centrifugal loading. The procedure is applied to a cooled radial turbine which will be tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Representative results from this case are included.

  12. Development of a thermal and structural analysis procedure for cooled radial turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ganesh N.; Deanna, Russell G.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure for computing the rotor temperature and stress distributions in a cooled radial turbine are considered. Existing codes for modeling the external mainstream flow and the internal cooling flow are used to compute boundary conditions for the heat transfer and stress analysis. The inviscid, quasi three dimensional code computes the external free stream velocity. The external velocity is then used in a boundary layer analysis to compute the external heat transfer coefficients. Coolant temperatures are computed by a viscous three dimensional internal flow cade for the momentum and energy equation. These boundary conditions are input to a three dimensional heat conduction code for the calculation of rotor temperatures. The rotor stress distribution may be determined for the given thermal, pressure and centrifugal loading. The procedure is applied to a cooled radial turbine which will be tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Representative results are given.

  13. Development of a thermal and structural analysis procedure for cooled radial turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ganesh N.; Deanna, Russell G.

    1988-01-01

    A procedure for computing the rotor temperature and stress distributions in a cooled radial turbine is considered. Existing codes for modeling the external mainstream flow and the internal cooling flow are used to compute boundary conditions for the heat transfer and stress analyses. An inviscid, quasi three-dimensional code computes the external free stream velocity. The external velocity is then used in a boundary layer analysis to compute the external heat transfer coefficients. Coolant temperatures are computed by a viscous one-dimensional internal flow code for the momentum and energy equation. These boundary conditions are input to a three-dimensional heat conduction code for calculation of rotor temperatures. The rotor stress distribution may be determined for the given thermal, pressure and centrifugal loading. The procedure is applied to a cooled radial turbine which will be tested at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Representative results from this case are included.

  14. The Stationary Condensation and Radial Outflow of a Liquid Film on a Horizontal Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolshinskiy, Leonid; Frenkel, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The application of capillary screen liquid acquisition devices to space-based cryogenic propulsion systems is expected to necessitate thermodynamic conditioning in order to stabilize surface tension retention characteristics. The present results have been obtained in the framework of the research of low gravity condensation-flow processes for conditioning cryogenic liquid acquisition devices. The following system is studied: On the top of a subcooled horizontal disk, a liquid film condenses from the ambient saturated vapor. The liquid is forcedly removed at the disk edge, and there is an outward radial flow of the film. Stationary regimes of the flow are uncovered such that (i) the gravity is negligible, being eclipsed by the capillary forces; (ii) the film thickness is everywhere much smaller than the disk radius; and (iii) the slow-flow lubrication approximation is valid. A nonlinear differential equation for the film thickness as a function of the radial coordinate is obtained. The (two-dimensional) fields of velocities, temperature and pressure in the film are explicitly determined by the radial profile of its thickness. The equilibrium is controlled by two parameters: (i) the vapor-disk difference of temperatures and (ii) the liquid exhaust rate. For the flow regimes with a nearly uniform film thickness, the governing equation linearizes, and the film interface is analytically predicted to have a concave-up quartic parabola profile. Thus, perhaps counter-intuitively, the liquid film is thicker at the edge and thinner at the center of the disk.

  15. Radial gas motions in The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Tobias M.; Bigiel, Frank; Klessen, Ralf S.; de Blok, W. J. G.

    2016-04-01

    The study of 21 cm line observations of atomic hydrogen allows detailed insight into the kinematics of spiral galaxies. We use sensitive high-resolution Very Large Array data from The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey (THINGS) to search for radial gas flows primarily in the outer parts (up to 3 × r25) of 10 nearby spiral galaxies. Inflows are expected to replenish the gas reservoir and fuel star formation under the assumption that galaxies evolve approximately in steady state. We carry out a detailed investigation of existing tilted ring fitting schemes and discover systematics that can hamper their ability to detect signatures of radial flows. We develop a new Fourier decomposition scheme that fits for rotational and radial velocities and simultaneously determines position angle and inclination as a function of radius. Using synthetic velocity fields we show that our novel fitting scheme is less prone to such systematic errors and that it is well suited to detect radial inflows in discs. We apply our fitting scheme to 10 THINGS galaxies and find clear indications of, at least partly previously unidentified, radial gas flows, in particular for NGC 2403 and NGC 3198 and to a lesser degree for NGC 7331, NGC 2903 and NGC 6946. The mass flow rates are of the same order but usually larger than the star formation rates. At least for these galaxies a scenario in which continuous mass accretion feeds star formation seems plausible. The other galaxies show a more complicated picture with either no clear inflow, outward motions or complex kinematic signatures.

  16. Cooled variable-area radial turbine technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Large, G. D.; Meyer, L. J.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of this study was a conceptual evaluation and design analyses of a cooled variable-area radial turbine capable of maintaining nearly constant high efficiency when operated at a constant speed and pressure ratio over a range of flows corresponding to 50- to 100-percent maximum engine power. The results showed that a 1589K (2400 F) turbine was feasible that would satisfy a 4000-hour duty cycle life goal. The final design feasibility is based on 1988 material technology goals. A peak aerodynamic stage total efficiency of 0.88 was predicted at 100 percent power. Two candidate stators were identified: an articulated trailing-edge and a locally movable sidewall. Both concepts must be experimentally evaluated to determine the optimum configuration. A follow-on test program is proposed for this evaluation.

  17. New Research on the Cowling and Cooling of Radial Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molloy, Richard C.; Brewster, James H., III

    1943-01-01

    An extensive series of wind-tunnel tests on a half-scale conventional, nacelle model were made by the United Aircraft Corporation to determine and correlate the effects of many variables on cooling air flow and nacelle drag. The primary investigation was concerned with the reaction of these factors to varying conditions ahead of, across, and behind the engine. In the light of this investigation, common misconceptions and factors which are frequently overlooked in the cooling and cowling of radial engines are considered in some detail. Data are presented to support certain design recommendations and conclusions which should lead toward the improvement of present engine installations. Several charts are included to facilitate the estimation of cooling drag, available cooling pressure, and cowl exit area.

  18. Radial tunnel syndrome. A retrospective review of 30 decompressions of the radial nerve.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, T; Mobbs, P; Fortems, Y; Stanley, J K

    1995-08-01

    Radial tunnel syndrome results from compression of the radial nerve by the free edge of the supinator muscle or closely related structures in the vicinity of the elbow joint. Despite numerous reports on the surgical management of this disorder, it remains largely unrecognized and often neglected. The symptoms of radial tunnel syndrome can resemble those of tennis elbow, chronic wrist pain or tenosynovitis. Reliable objective criteria are not available to differentiate between these pathologies. These difficulties are discussed in relation to 29 patients who underwent 30 primary explorations and proximal decompressions of the radial nerve. Excellent or good results were obtained in 70%, fair results in 13% and poor results in 17% of patients. The results can be satisfactory despite the prolonged duration of symptoms. We believe that a diagnosis of radial tunnel syndrome should always be born in mind when dealing with patients with forearm and wrist pain that has not responded to more conventional treatment. Patients with occupations requiring repetitive manual tasks seem to be particularly at risk of developing radial tunnel syndrome and it is also interesting to note that 66% of patients with on-going medico-legal claims had successful outcomes following surgery. PMID:7594982

  19. Numerical modeling of elution peak profiles in supercritical fluid chromatography. Part I-Elution of an unretained tracer

    SciTech Connect

    Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Guiochon, Georges A

    2010-01-01

    When chromatography is carried out with high-density carbon dioxide as the main component of the mobile phase (a method generally known as 'supercritical fluid chromatography' or SFC), the required pressure gradient along the column is moderate. However, this mobile phase is highly compressible and, under certain experimental conditions, its density may decrease significantly along the column. Such an expansion absorbs heat, cooling the column, which absorbs heat from the outside. The resulting heat transfer causes the formation of axial and radial gradients of temperature that may become large under certain conditions. Due to these gradients, the mobile phase velocity and most physico-chemical parameters of the system (viscosity, diffusion coefficients, etc.) are no longer constant throughout the column, resulting in a loss of column efficiency, even at low flow rates. At high flow rates and in serious cases, systematic variations of the retention factors and the separation factors with increasing flow rates and important deformations of the elution profiles of all sample components may occur. The model previously used to account satisfactorily for the effects of the viscous friction heating of the mobile phase in HPLC is adapted here to account for the expansion cooling of the mobile phase in SFC and is applied to the modeling of the elution peak profiles of an unretained compound in SFC. The numerical solution of the combined heat and mass balance equations provides temperature and pressure profiles inside the column, and values of the retention time and efficiency for elution of this unretained compound that are in excellent agreement with independent experimental data.

  20. High Performance Liquid Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talcott, Stephen

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has many applications in food chemistry. Food components that have been analyzed with HPLC include organic acids, vitamins, amino acids, sugars, nitrosamines, certain pesticides, metabolites, fatty acids, aflatoxins, pigments, and certain food additives. Unlike gas chromatography, it is not necessary for the compound being analyzed to be volatile. It is necessary, however, for the compounds to have some solubility in the mobile phase. It is important that the solubilized samples for injection be free from all particulate matter, so centrifugation and filtration are common procedures. Also, solid-phase extraction is used commonly in sample preparation to remove interfering compounds from the sample matrix prior to HPLC analysis.

  1. Experimental evaluation of a cooled radial-inflow turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tirres, Lizet; Dicicco, L. D.; Nowlin, Brent C.

    1993-01-01

    Two 14.4 inch tip diameter rotors were installed and tested in the Small Engines Component Turbine Facility (SECTF) at NASA Lewis Research Center. The rotors, a solid and a cooled version of a radial-inflow turbine, were tested with a 15 vane stat or over a set of rotational speeds ranging from 80 to 120 percent design speed (17,500 to 21,500 rpm). The total-to-total stage pressure ratios ranged from 2.5 to 5.5. The data obtained at the equivalent conditions using the solid version of the rotor are presented with the cooled rotor data. A Reynolds number of 381,000 was maintained for both rotors, whose stages had a design mass flow of 4.0 lbm/sec, a design work level of 59.61 Btu/lbm, and a design efficiency of 87 percent. The results include mass flow data, turbine torque, turbine exit flow angles, stage efficiency, and rotor inlet and exit surveys.

  2. Experimental Evaluation of a Cooled Radial-inflow Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tirres, Lizet; Dicicco, L. Danielle; Nowlin, Brent C.

    1993-01-01

    Two 14.4 inch tip diameter rotors were installed and tested in the Small Engines Component Turbine Facility (SECTF) at NASA Lewis Research Center. The rotors, a solid and a cooled version of a radial-inflow turbine, were tested with a 15 vane stat or over a set of rotational speeds ranging from 80 to 120 percent design speed (17,500 to 21,500 rpm). The total-to-total stage pressure ratios ranged from 2.5 to 5.5. The data obtained at the equivalent conditions using the solid version of the rotor are presented with the cooled rotor data. A Reynolds number of 381,000 was maintained for both rotors, whose stages had a design mass flow of 4.0 Ibm/sec, a design work level of 59.61 Btu/lbm, and a design efficiency of 87 percent. The results include mass flow data, turbine torque, turbine exit flow angles, stage efficiency, and rotor inlet and exit surveys.

  3. Compact bypass-flow filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, W. G.; Ulanovsky, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Annular filter consisting of stacked rings separates particulates from bypass fluid passing through it in radial direction without slowing down main flow across unimpeded flow of fluid through its center. Applications include fluidized bed reactors, equipment for catalyst operations, and water purification.

  4. Diurnal and seasonal variability in radial distribution of sap flux density: Implications for estimating stand transpiration.

    PubMed

    Fiora, Alessandro; Cescatti, Alessandro

    2006-09-01

    Daily and seasonal patterns in radial distribution of sap flux density were monitored in six trees differing in social position in a mixed coniferous stand dominated by silver fir (Abies alba Miller) and Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst) in the Alps of northeastern Italy. Radial distribution of sap flux was measured with arrays of 1-cm-long Granier probes. The radial profiles were either Gaussian or decreased monotonically toward the tree center, and seemed to be related to social position and crown distribution of the trees. The ratio between sap flux estimated with the most external sensor and the mean flux, weighted with the corresponding annulus areas, was used as a correction factor (CF) to express diurnal and seasonal radial variation in sap flow. During sunny days, the diurnal radial profile of sap flux changed with time and accumulated photosynthetic active radiation (PAR), with an increasing contribution of sap flux in the inner sapwood during the day. Seasonally, the contribution of sap flux in the inner xylem increased with daily cumulative PAR and the variation of CF was proportional to the tree diameter, ranging from 29% for suppressed trees up to 300% for dominant trees. Two models were developed, relating CF with PAR and tree diameter at breast height (DBH), to correct daily and seasonal estimates of whole-tree and stand sap flow obtained by assuming uniform sap flux density over the sapwood. If the variability in the radial profile of sap flux density was not accounted for, total stand transpiration would be overestimated by 32% during sunny days and 40% for the entire season.

  5. Radial spline assembly for antifriction bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jerry H. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An outer race carrier is constructed for receiving an outer race of an antifriction bearing assembly. The carrier in turn is slidably fitted in an opening of a support wall to accommodate slight axial movements of a shaft. A plurality of longitudinal splines on the carrier are disposed to be fitted into matching slots in the opening. A deadband gap is provided between sides of the splines and slots, with a radial gap at ends of the splines and slots and a gap between the splines and slots sized larger than the deadband gap. With this construction, operational distortions (slope) of the support wall are accommodated by the larger radial gaps while the deadband gaps maintain a relatively high springrate of the housing. Additionally, side loads applied to the shaft are distributed between sides of the splines and slots, distributing such loads over a larger surface area than a race carrier of the prior art.

  6. SpicyNodes Radial Map Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douma, M.; Ligierko, G.; Angelov, I.

    2008-10-01

    The need for information has increased exponentially over the past decades. The current systems for constructing, exploring, classifying, organizing, and searching information face the growing challenge of enabling their users to operate efficiently and intuitively in knowledge-heavy environments. This paper presents SpicyNodes, an advanced user interface for difficult interaction contexts. It is based on an underlying structure known as a radial map, which allows users to manipulate and interact in a natural manner with entities called nodes. This technology overcomes certain limitations of existing solutions and solves the problem of browsing complex sets of linked information. SpicyNodes is also an organic system that projects users into a living space, stimulating exploratory behavior and fostering creative thought. Our interactive radial layout is used for educational purposes and has the potential for numerous other applications.

  7. Development of large radial turbine turbochargers

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, K.R.; Hirst, P.; Kay, P.

    1996-12-31

    The use of fully radial turbochargers for medium speed diesel engines have largely been restricted to distillate fuel operation at relatively modest pressure ratios. Pressures on costs per kW have forced the industry to push for increases in rating and range of operation for these machines. The development of a high pressure ratio radial turbocharger with the capability to operate reliably on heavy fuel has become a high priority. This paper discusses the development of a range of such machines to cover engine output of between 500 kW and 1.6 MW. The original design of the first turbocharger in the range, the NAPIER 047, is reviewed together with the development and operational experiences gained to date. These have been incorporated into the latest two turbochargers in the range, the NAPIER 057 and 067. The paper includes descriptions of the means taken to achieve minimum time to market and low cost of manufacture.

  8. Lysozyme fractionation from egg white at pilot scale by means of tangential flow membrane adsorbers: Investigation of the flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Brand, Janina; Voigt, Katharina; Zochowski, Bianca; Kulozik, Ulrich

    2016-03-18

    The application of membrane adsorbers instead of classical packed bed columns for protein fractionation is still a growing field. In the case of egg white protein fractionation, the application of classical chromatography is additionally limited due to its high viscosity that impairs filtration. By using tangential flow membrane adsorbers as stationary phase this limiting factor can be left out, as they can be loaded with particle containing substrates. The flow conditions existing in tangential flow membrane adsorbers are not fully understood yet. Thus, the aim of the present study was to gain a deeper understanding of the transport mechanisms in tangential flow membrane adsorbers. It was found that loading in recirculation mode instead of single pass mode increased the binding capacity (0.39 vs. 0.52 mg cm(-2)). Further, it was shown that either higher flow rates (0.39 mg cm(-2) vs. 0.57 mg cm(-2) at 1 CV min(-1) or 20 CV min(-1), respectively) or higher amounts of the target protein in the feed (0.24 mg cm(-2) vs. 0.85 mg cm(-2) for 2.5 or 39.0 g lysozyme, respectively) led to more protein binding. These results show that, in contrast to radial flow or flat sheet membrane adsorbers, the transport in tangential flow membrane adsorbers is not purely based on convection, but on a mix of convection and diffusion. Additionally, investigations concerning the influence of fouling formation were performed that can lead to transport limitations. It was found that this impact is neglectable. It can be concluded that the usage of tangential flow membrane adsorbers is very recommendable for egg white protein fractionations, although the transport is partly diffusion-limited. PMID:26898148

  9. Radial rib antenna surface deviation analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, J. V., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    A digital computer program was developed which analyzes any radial rib antenna with ribs radiating from a central hub. The program has the capability for calculating the antenna surface contour (reversed pillowing effect), the optimum rib shape for minimizing the rms surface error, and the actual rms surface error. Rib deflection due to mesh tension and catenary cable tension can also be compensated for, and the pattern from which the mesh gores are cut can be determined.

  10. Neurons with radial basis like rate functions.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Zsolt László

    2005-01-01

    Artificial neural networks constructed with "locally tuned processing units" and more generally referred to as "radial basis function networks" have been proposed by a number of workers. In this communication, I submit a conjecture, based on indirect experimental and direct computational evidence of the Hodgkin-Huxley model, that there may be biological neurons in nervous systems for which the rate function is locally tuned. If proved to be valid, this conjecture may simplify neurodynamic models of some functions of nervous systems.

  11. Crustal radial anisotropy in Northeast China and its implications for the regional tectonic extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhen; Yang, Yingjie; Chen, Y. John

    2016-10-01

    We obtain high-resolution Rayleigh and Love wave phase velocity maps from ambient noise tomography using data recorded by NECESSArray in Northeast China. The resulting radial anisotropic model from the joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love wave dispersion curves reveals strong relationship between the crustal radial anisotropy and tectonic provinces, that is, strong positive anisotropy (Vsh > Vsv) beneath the Songliao Basin and weak radial anisotropy beneath the Xinmeng Belt and Changbaishan Region. The Songliao Basin experienced widespread crustal extension during the late Mesozoic. We interpret the lower crustal anisotropy beneath the Songliao Basin as a result of ductile deformation during the rifting stage, which may lead to the alignment of anisotropic minerals and the observed strong radial anisotropy at present. In the northern Songliao Basin, where thick syn-rift and post-rift sediments (≥4 km) are believed to be present, we observe a broader lateral distribution of anisotropy with stronger amplitude compared with the southern basin. We suggest that the broader distribution of crustal radial anisotropy in the northern basin could be the consequence of outward lower crustal flow driven by the sedimentary loading during the post-rift stage, which is also proposed by previous numerical modeling.

  12. Crustal radial anisotropy in Northeast China and its implications for the regional tectonic extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhen; Yang, Yingjie; Chen, Y. John

    2016-07-01

    We obtain high resolution Rayleigh and Love wave phase velocity maps from ambient noise tomography using data recorded by NECESSArray in Northeast China. The resulting radial anisotropic model from the joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love wave dispersion curves reveals strong relationship between the crustal radial anisotropy and tectonic provinces, that is, strong positive anisotropy (Vsh>Vsv) beneath the Songliao Basin and weak radial anisotropy beneath the Xinmeng Belt and Changbaishan region. The Songliao Basin experienced widespread crustal extension during the late Mesozoic. We interpret the lower crustal anisotropy beneath the Songliao Basin as a result of ductile deformation during the rifting stage, which may lead to the alignment of anisotropic minerals and the observed strong radial anisotropy at present. In the northern Songliao Basin, where thick syn-rift and post-rift sediments (≥4 km) are believed to be present, we observe a broader lateral distribution of anisotropy with stronger amplitude compared with the southern basin. We suggest that the broader distribution of crustal radial anisotropy in the northern basin could be the consequence of outward lower crustal flow driven by the sedimentary loading during the post-rift stage, which is also proposed by previous numerical modelling.

  13. Hydraulic analysis of a radial collector well for riverbank filtration near Nakdong River, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eunhee; Hyun, Yunjung; Lee, Kang-Kun; Shin, Jiyoun

    2012-05-01

    A radial collector well is used for the extraction of a large amount of groundwater without causing a deep drawdown at the well's center, and it is appropriate for the supply of municipal water through riverbank filtration (RBF). Flow path changes caused by water extraction through a radial collector well were simulated to estimate the amount of river water induction at a RBF site associated with Nakdong River in South Korea. The structure of the screened horizontal arms of a radial collector well was examined with respect to effective riverbank filtration. The relative ratio of the river water induced to the radial collector well compared to the total groundwater extraction was estimated to be 27-52%. The amount of induced river water varies with the distance of a horizontal arm from the river, indicating that the location and structure of the collector well is significant for RBF. In all simulation cases, the maximum drawdown of the groundwater level near the collector well was 2.1 m, which is not significant considering the substantial pumping rate at the study site. It was concluded that RBF radial collector wells can be used at the study site for a sustainable water supply.

  14. Development of a Radial Deconsolidation Method

    SciTech Connect

    Helmreich, Grant W.; Montgomery, Fred C.; Hunn, John D.

    2015-12-01

    A series of experiments have been initiated to determine the retention or mobility of fission products* in AGR fuel compacts [Petti, et al. 2010]. This information is needed to refine fission product transport models. The AGR-3/4 irradiation test involved half-inch-long compacts that each contained twenty designed-to-fail (DTF) particles, with 20-μm thick carbon-coated kernels whose coatings were deliberately fabricated such that they would crack under irradiation, providing a known source of post-irradiation isotopes. The DTF particles in these compacts were axially distributed along the compact centerline so that the diffusion of fission products released from the DTF kernels would be radially symmetric [Hunn, et al. 2012; Hunn et al. 2011; Kercher, et al. 2011; Hunn, et al. 2007]. Compacts containing DTF particles were irradiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) [Collin, 2015]. Analysis of the diffusion of these various post-irradiation isotopes through the compact requires a method to radially deconsolidate the compacts so that nested-annular volumes may be analyzed for post-irradiation isotope inventory in the compact matrix, TRISO outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC), and DTF kernels. An effective radial deconsolidation method and apparatus appropriate to this application has been developed and parametrically characterized.

  15. Radial inlet guide vanes for a combustor

    DOEpatents

    Zuo, Baifang; Simons, Derrick; York, William; Ziminsky, Willy S

    2013-02-12

    A combustor may include an interior flow path therethrough, a number of fuel nozzles in communication with the interior flow path, and an inlet guide vane system positioned about the interior flow path to create a swirled flow therein. The inlet guide vane system may include a number of windows positioned circumferentially around the fuel nozzles. The inlet guide vane system may also include a number of inlet guide vanes positioned circumferentially around the fuel nozzles and adjacent to the windows to create a swirled flow within the interior flow path.

  16. Studies of Radial Correlations of Edge Turbulence by Laser Imaging in DIII--D: Evidence of Radial Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coda, Stefano

    1997-11-01

    Turbulence associated with electrostatic modes, especially ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) instabilities, is believed to be a primary cause of anomalous transport in tokamaks. Considerable theoretical and numerical work has been devoted to this topic, particularly in an effort to identify the mechanisms for nonlinear saturation of the turbulence. One such mechanism is shear decorrelation by nonlinearly generated, turbulent poloidal sheared flows. In recent years, computer simulations have shown that these ``radial modes'' with low poloidal and toroidal wave numbers can strongly regulate ITG turbulence and the associated transport.(R.E. Waltz, G.D. Kerbel, and J. Milovich, Phys. Plasmas 1,) 2229 (1994). Here, we report on the first experimental observation and characterization of these modes. Measurements of density fluctuations have been carried out at the outer edge of the DIII--D tokamak with a CO_2--laser imaging system employing the Zernike phase-contrast technique. This diagnostic was developed specifically to investigate radially propagating modes with high radial (0.5 cm) and temporal (0.5 μs) resolution, and is restricted to fluctuations with poloidal wave number k_θ~= 0 (with an uncertainty of ~ 0.4 cm-1). The radial-wave-number spectrum of the modes, determined by correlation analysis, is found to peak at nonzero values of k_r, both positive and negative, of the order of 1/(2ρ_s) (where ρs is the ion sound gyroradius), in accordance with simulations; by contrast, finite-k_θ spectra are generally reported to peak at k_r=0. Further agreement is obtained on the spectral width Δ k_r, which is of the same order as the peak value. We have performed an extensive experimental investigation of the properties of radial modes beyond those addressed by computational analysis thus far. Both the peak value k_0r and the width Δ kr increase at the L--H transition. The

  17. Modern Thin-Layer Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Colin F.; Poole, Salwa K.

    1989-01-01

    Some of the important modern developments of thin-layer chromatography are introduced. Discussed are the theory and instrumentation of thin-layer chromatography including multidimensional and multimodal techniques. Lists 53 references. (CW)

  18. Extending Paper Chromatography Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finson, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    One of the "good old" standard activities middle school students seem to enjoy is paper chromatography. The procedures and materials needed are relatively simple and the results can be colorful. All too often, the activity ends just after these colorful results are obtained, cutting short the potential it holds for some further inquiry. With some…

  19. Wave-Vortex Mode Coupling in Astrophysical Accretion Disks under Combined Radial and Vertical Stratification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salhi, A.; Lehner, T.; Godeferd, F.; Cambon, C.

    2013-07-01

    We examine accretion disk flow under combined radial and vertical stratification utilizing a local Cartesian (or "shearing box") approximation. We investigate both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric disturbances with the Boussinesq approximation. Under axisymmetric disturbances, a new dispersion relation is derived. It reduces to the Solberg-Hoïland criterion in the case without vertical stratification. It shows that, asymptotically, stable radial and vertical stratification cannot induce any linear instability; Keplerian flow is accordingly stable. Previous investigations strongly suggest that the so-called bypass concept of turbulence (i.e., that fine-tuned disturbances of any inviscid smooth shear flow can reach arbitrarily large transient growth) can also be applied to Keplerian disks. We present an analysis of this process for three-dimensional plane-wave disturbances comoving with the shear flow of a general rotating shear flow under combined stable radial and vertical rotation. We demonstrate that large transient growth occurs for K 2/k 1 Gt 1 and k 3 = 0 or k 1 ~ k 3, where k 1, K 2, and k 3 are the azimuthal, radial, and vertical components of the initial wave vector, respectively. By using a generalized "wave-vortex" decomposition of the disturbance, we show that the large transient energy growth in a Keplerian disk is mainly generated by the transient dynamics of the vortex mode. The analysis of the power spectrum of total (kinetic+potential) energy in the azimuthal or vertical directions shows that the contribution coming from the vortex mode is dominant at large scales, while the contribution coming from the wave mode is important at small scales. These findings may be confirmed by appropriate numerical simulations in the high Reynolds number regime.

  20. WAVE-VORTEX MODE COUPLING IN ASTROPHYSICAL ACCRETION DISKS UNDER COMBINED RADIAL AND VERTICAL STRATIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Salhi, A.; Lehner, T.; Godeferd, F.; Cambon, C.

    2013-07-10

    We examine accretion disk flow under combined radial and vertical stratification utilizing a local Cartesian (or ''shearing box'') approximation. We investigate both axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric disturbances with the Boussinesq approximation. Under axisymmetric disturbances, a new dispersion relation is derived. It reduces to the Solberg-Hoieland criterion in the case without vertical stratification. It shows that, asymptotically, stable radial and vertical stratification cannot induce any linear instability; Keplerian flow is accordingly stable. Previous investigations strongly suggest that the so-called bypass concept of turbulence (i.e., that fine-tuned disturbances of any inviscid smooth shear flow can reach arbitrarily large transient growth) can also be applied to Keplerian disks. We present an analysis of this process for three-dimensional plane-wave disturbances comoving with the shear flow of a general rotating shear flow under combined stable radial and vertical rotation. We demonstrate that large transient growth occurs for K{sub 2}/k{sub 1} >> 1 and k{sub 3} = 0 or k{sub 1} {approx} k{sub 3}, where k{sub 1}, K{sub 2}, and k{sub 3} are the azimuthal, radial, and vertical components of the initial wave vector, respectively. By using a generalized ''wave-vortex'' decomposition of the disturbance, we show that the large transient energy growth in a Keplerian disk is mainly generated by the transient dynamics of the vortex mode. The analysis of the power spectrum of total (kinetic+potential) energy in the azimuthal or vertical directions shows that the contribution coming from the vortex mode is dominant at large scales, while the contribution coming from the wave mode is important at small scales. These findings may be confirmed by appropriate numerical simulations in the high Reynolds number regime.