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Sample records for radial forces derived

  1. Analyses of hydrodynamic radial forces on centrifugal pump impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adkins, D. R.; Brennen, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of the hydrodynamic interactions occurring between a centrifugal pump impeller and a volute is presented. The theoretical analysis provides a quasi-one-dimensional treatment of the flow in the volute, and it is extended to include the hydrodynamic force perturbations caused by the impeller whirling eccentrically in the volute. It is noted that these perturbations are often destabilizing. The theoretical models were found to accurately predict the radial forces caused by the flow through the impeller. The pressure acting on the front shroud of the impeller is shown to have a significant effect on the destabilizing hydrodyamic forces.

  2. Radial forcing and Edgar Allan Poe's lengthening pendulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Matthew; Blasing, David; Whitney, Heather M.

    2013-09-01

    Inspired by Edgar Allan Poe's The Pit and the Pendulum, we investigate a radially driven, lengthening pendulum. We first show that increasing the length of an undriven pendulum at a uniform rate does not amplify the oscillations in a manner consistent with the behavior of the scythe in Poe's story. We discuss parametric amplification and the transfer of energy (through the parameter of the pendulum's length) to the oscillating part of the system. In this manner, radial driving can easily and intuitively be understood, and the fundamental concept applied in many other areas. We propose and show by a numerical model that appropriately timed radial forcing can increase the oscillation amplitude in a manner consistent with Poe's story. Our analysis contributes a computational exploration of the complex harmonic motion that can result from radially driving a pendulum and sheds light on a mechanism by which oscillations can be amplified parametrically. These insights should prove especially valuable in the undergraduate physics classroom, where investigations into pendulums and oscillations are commonplace.

  3. Forced responses on a radial turbine with nozzle guide vanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yixiong; Yang, Ce; Ma, Chaochen; Lao, DaZhong

    2014-04-01

    Radial turbines with nozzle guide vanes are widely used in various size turbochargers. However, due to the interferences with guide vanes, the blades of impellers are exposed to intense unsteady aerodynamic excitations, which cause blade vibrations and lead to high cycle failures (HCF). Moreover, the harmonic resonance in some frequency regions are unavoidable due to the wide operation conditions. Aiming to achieve a detail insight into vibration characteristics of radial flow turbine, a numerical method based on fluid structure interaction (FSI) is presented. Firstly, the unsteady aerodynamic loads are determined by computational fluid dynamics (CFD). And the fluctuating pressures are transformed from time domain to frequency domain by fast Fourier-transform (FFT). Then, the entire rotor model is adopted to analyze frequencies and mode shapes considering mistuning in finite element (FE) method. Meanwhile, harmonic analyses, applying the pressure fluctuation from CFD, are conducted to investigate the impeller vibration behavior and blade forced response in frequency domain. The prediction of the vibration dynamic stress shows acceptable agreement to the blade actual damage in consistent tendency.

  4. The effect of radial pressure force on rotating double tearing mode in compressible plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-Qu; Xiong, Guo-Zhen; Li, Xiao-Qing

    2016-05-01

    The role of radial pressure force in the interlocking dynamics of double tearing modes (DTMs) is investigated by force balance analysis based on the compressible magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) model. It is found that the stability of symmetric DTMs is dominated by the radial pressure force rather than the field line bending force. Owing to the compressibility of rotating plasmas, unbalanced radial forces can just result in the rotating islands drift toward each other in the radial direction but do not trigger the explosive growth of the mode in the interlocking process, which is different from that of antisymmetric DTM without flow.

  5. Second-order lower radial tangent derivatives and applications to set-valued optimization.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bihang; Peng, Zhenhua; Xu, Yihong

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the concepts of second-order radial composed tangent derivative, second-order radial tangent derivative, second-order lower radial composed tangent derivative, and second-order lower radial tangent derivative for set-valued maps by means of a radial tangent cone, second-order radial tangent set, lower radial tangent cone, and second-order lower radial tangent set, respectively. Some properties of second-order tangent derivatives are discussed, using which second-order necessary optimality conditions are established for a point pair to be a Henig efficient element of a set-valued optimization problem, and in the expressions the second-order tangent derivatives of the objective function and the constraint function are separated.

  6. Radial-vertical profiles of tropical cyclone derived from dropsondes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yifang

    The scopes of this thesis research are two folds: the first one is to the construct the intensity-based composite radial-vertical profiles of tropical cyclones (TC) using GPS-based dropsonde observations and the second one is to identify the major deficiencies of Mathur vortices against the dropsonde composites of TCs. The intensity-based dropsonde composites of TCs advances our understanding of the dynamic and thermal structure of TCs of different intensity along the radial direction in and above the boundary layer where lies the devastating high wind that causes property damages and storm surges. The identification of the major deficiencies of Mathur vortices in representing the radial-vertical profiles of TC of different intensity helps to improve numerical predictions of TCs since most operational TC forecast models need to utilize bogus vortices, such as Mathur vortices, to initialize TC forecasts and simulations. We first screen all available GPS dropsonde data within and round 35 named TCs over the tropical Atlantic basin from 1996 to 2010 and pair them with TC parameters derived from the best-track data provided by the National Hurricane Center (NHC) and select 1149 dropsondes that have continuous coverage in the lower troposphere. The composite radial-vertical profiles of tangential wind speed, temperature, mixing ratio and humidity are based for each TC category ranging from "Tropical Storm" (TS) to "Hurricane Category 1" (H1) through "Hurricane Category 5" (H5). The key findings of the dropsonde composites are: (i) all TCs have the maximum tangential wind within 1 km above the ground and a distance of 1-2 times of the radius of maximum wind (RMW) at the surface; (ii) all TCs have a cold ring surrounding the warm core near the boundary layer at a distance of 1-3 times of the RMW and the cold ring structure gradually diminishes at a higher elevation where the warm core structure prevails along the radial direction; (iii) the existence of such shallow cold

  7. Estimation of the radial force using a disturbance force observer for a magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump.

    PubMed

    Pai, C N; Shinshi, T; Shimokohbe, A

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the hydraulic forces in a magnetically levitated (maglev) centrifugal blood pump is important from the point of view of the magnetic bearing design. Direct measurement is difficult due to the absence of a rotor shaft, and computational fluid dynamic analysis demands considerable computational resource and time. To solve this problem, disturbance force observers were developed, using the radial controlled magnetic bearing of a centrifugal blood pump, to estimate the radial forces on the maglev impeller. In order to design the disturbance observer, the radial dynamic characteristics of a maglev impeller were evaluated under different working conditions. It was observed that the working fluid affects the additional mass and damping, while the rotational speed affects the damping and stiffness of the maglev system. Based on these results, disturbance force observers were designed and implemented. The designed disturbance force observers present a bandwidth of 45 Hz. In non-pulsatile conditions, the magnitude of the estimated radial thrust increases in proportion to the flowrate, and the rotational speed has little effect on the force direction. At 5 l/min against 100 mmHg, the estimated radial thrust is 0.95 N. In pulsatile conditions, this method was capable of estimating the pulsatile radial thrust with good response.

  8. Dependence of the beam-channel interaction force on the radial profiles of a relativistic electron beam and an ion channel in the ion-focusing regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, E. K.; Manuilov, A. S.

    2017-02-01

    We have derived the formulas for calculating the force of the interaction of a relativistic electron beam with an ion plasma channel in the case of the beam transportation during ion focusing. The dependence of the difference in radial profiles of the beam and the ion channel on this force for different amplitudes of beam deviations from the channel symmetry axis has been studied.

  9. Ball to separator contact forces in angular contact ball bearings under thrust and radial loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental data are reported on ball to cage contact forces in a 110 mm bore ball bearing operating at speeds to 12,000 rpm under radial and thrust loads. Information is also reported on cage to inner race land contact force, cage to inner race land clearance, and cage to shaft speed ratios.

  10. Axial and radial forces of cross-bridges depend on lattice spacing.

    PubMed

    Williams, C David; Regnier, Michael; Daniel, Thomas L

    2010-12-02

    Nearly all mechanochemical models of the cross-bridge treat myosin as a simple linear spring arranged parallel to the contractile filaments. These single-spring models cannot account for the radial force that muscle generates (orthogonal to the long axis of the myofilaments) or the effects of changes in filament lattice spacing. We describe a more complex myosin cross-bridge model that uses multiple springs to replicate myosin's force-generating power stroke and account for the effects of lattice spacing and radial force. The four springs which comprise this model (the 4sXB) correspond to the mechanically relevant portions of myosin's structure. As occurs in vivo, the 4sXB's state-transition kinetics and force-production dynamics vary with lattice spacing. Additionally, we describe a simpler two-spring cross-bridge (2sXB) model which produces results similar to those of the 4sXB model. Unlike the 4sXB model, the 2sXB model requires no iterative techniques, making it more computationally efficient. The rate at which both multi-spring cross-bridges bind and generate force decreases as lattice spacing grows. The axial force generated by each cross-bridge as it undergoes a power stroke increases as lattice spacing grows. The radial force that a cross-bridge produces as it undergoes a power stroke varies from expansive to compressive as lattice spacing increases. Importantly, these results mirror those for intact, contracting muscle force production.

  11. Magnetic Circuit Model of PM Motor-Generator to Predict Radial Forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLallin, Kerry (Technical Monitor); Kascak, Peter E.; Dever, Timothy P.; Jansen, Ralph H.

    2004-01-01

    A magnetic circuit model is developed for a PM motor for flywheel applications. A sample motor is designed and modeled. Motor configuration and selection of materials is discussed, and the choice of winding configuration is described. A magnetic circuit model is described, which includes the stator back iron, rotor yoke, permanent magnets, air gaps and the stator teeth. Iterative solution of this model yields flux linkages, back EMF, torque, power, and radial force at the rotor caused by eccentricity. Calculated radial forces are then used to determine motor negative stiffness.

  12. Understanding the requirements of self-expandable stents for heart valve replacement: Radial force, hoop force and equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Cabrera, María Sol; Oomens, Cees W J; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2017-04-01

    A proper interpretation of the forces developed during stent crimping and deployment is of paramount importance for a better understanding of the requirements for successful heart valve replacement. The present study combines experimental and computational methods to assess the performance of a nitinol stent for tissue-engineered heart valve implantation. To validate the stent model, the mechanical response to parallel plate compression and radial crimping was evaluated experimentally. Finite element simulations showed good agreement with the experimental findings. The computational models were further used to determine the hoop force on the stent and radial force on a rigid tool during crimping and self-expansion. In addition, stent deployment against ovine and human pulmonary arteries was simulated to determine the hoop force on the stent-artery system and the equilibrium diameter for different degrees of oversizing.

  13. SCM Forcing Data Derived from NWP Analyses

    DOE Data Explorer

    Jakob, Christian

    2008-01-15

    Forcing data, suitable for use with single column models (SCMs) and cloud resolving models (CRMs), have been derived from NWP analyses for the ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites of Manus Island and Nauru.

  14. Fluctuating Pressure Environments and Hydrodynamic Radial Force Mitigation for a Two Blade Unshrouded Inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulder, Andrew; Skelley, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Fluctuating pressure data from water flow testing of an unshrouded two blade inducer revealed a cavitation induced oscillation with the potential to induce a radial load on the turbopump shaft in addition to other more traditionally analyzed radial loads. Subsequent water flow testing of the inducer with a rotating force measurement system confirmed that the cavitation induced oscillation did impart a radial load to the inducer. After quantifying the load in a baseline configuration, two inducer shroud treatments were selected and tested to reduce the cavitation induced load. The first treatment was to increase the tip clearance, and the second was to introduce a circumferential groove near the inducer leading edge. Increasing the clearance resulted in a small decrease in radial load along with some steady performance degradation. The groove greatly reduced the hydrodynamic load with little to no steady performance loss. The groove did however generate some new, relatively high frequency, spatially complex oscillations to the flow environment.

  15. Experimental verification of radial magnetic levitation force on the cylindrical magnets in ferrofluid dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenming; Wang, Pengkai; Hao, Ruican; Ma, Buchuan

    2017-03-01

    Analytical and numerical calculation methods of the radial magnetic levitation force on the cylindrical magnets in cylindrical vessels filled with ferrofluid was reviewed. An experimental apparatus to measure this force was designed and tailored, which could measure the forces in a range of 0-2.0 N with an accuracy of 0.001 N. After calibrated, this apparatus was used to study the radial magnetic levitation force experimentally. The results showed that the numerical method overestimates this force, while the analytical ones underestimate it. The maximum deviation between the numerical results and the experimental ones was 18.5%, while that between the experimental results with the analytical ones attained 68.5%. The latter deviation narrowed with the lengthening of the magnets. With the aids of the experimental verification of the radial magnetic levitation force, the effect of eccentric distance of magnets on the viscous energy dissipation in ferrofluid dampers could be assessed. It was shown that ignorance of the eccentricity of magnets during the estimation could overestimate the viscous dissipation in ferrofluid dampers.

  16. Aerodynamically induced radial forces in a centrifugal gas compressor. Part 1: Experimental measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.J.; Flathers, M.B.

    1998-04-01

    Net radial loading arising from asymmetric pressure fields in the volutes of centrifugal pumps during off-design operation is well known and has been studied extensively. In order to achieve a marked improvement in overall efficiency in centrifugal gas compressors, vaneless volute diffusers are matched to specific impellers to yield improved performance over a wide application envelope. As observed in centrifugal pumps, nonuniform pressure distributions that develop during operation above and below the design flow create static radial loads on the rotor. In order to characterize these radial forces, a novel experimental measurement and post-processing technique is employed that yields both the magnitude and direction of the load by measuring the shaft centerline locus in the tilt-pad bearings. The method is applicable to any turbomachinery operating on fluid film radial bearings equipped with proximity probes. The forces are found to be a maximum near surge and increase with higher pressures and speeds. The results are nondimensionalized, allowing the radial loading for different operating conditions to be predicted.

  17. Effect of Stent Radial Force on Stress Pattern After Deployment: A Finite Element Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, Alessandro; Murphy, Olive; Bahmanyar, Reza; McLeod, Chris

    2014-07-01

    The present article presents a method for assessing the radial stiffness of nitinol stents. An idealized stent model was created, and its radial stiffness was calculated by means of finite element modeling. The calculations were validated against experimental measurements. The variation of radial stiffness with geometrical dimensions was calculated, and the effect of increasing radial stiffness on endovascular deployment was analyzed. Peak tensile and compressive stresses as well as stent penetration were calculated in the case of an idealized pulmonary artery model having realistic dimensions as well as stiffness. The results of stress calculations were compared with a second set of simulations, where an idealized behavior of the stent (uniform expansion to a theoretical contact diameter) was modeled. The results show how in reality nitinol stents behave in a non-ideal way, having a non-uniform expansion and exerting non-uniform pressure on the contact areas with the artery. Such non-ideality decreases though with the increase in radial stiffness. The radial force alone may be insufficient in describing the stent-artery interaction, and numerical modeling proves to be necessary for capturing such complexity.

  18. On the radial force balance in the quiet time magnetotail current sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Angelopoulos, V.; Runov, A.

    2016-05-01

    Using Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions spacecraft observations of the quite magnetotail current sheet within the r∈[9,35]RE region (r is the radial distance from Earth and RE is Earth's radius), we investigate the thermal plasma pressure distribution along the magnetotail. Taking advantage of flapping motions of an ensemble of current sheets at various distances, we estimate the current density magnitude jy (in GSM coordinates). Comparing the tension force jyBz (Bz is the magnetic field component) with the radial gradient of the plasma pressure demonstrates that this gradient is only a small fraction, ˜10-15%, of the Ampere force exerted on the cross-tail current, in the r > 15RE region. We also estimate the contribution of the electron temperature anisotropy to the pressure balance: in the r > 15RE region the corresponding force can balance only 10-15% of the observed tension force jyBz. Thus, we conclude that about 70% of the tension force is not balanced by the combination of isotropic radial pressure gradient or the electron anisotropy. We discuss mechanisms that could be responsible for balancing the magnetotail current sheet.

  19. Current-induced forces: a simple derivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, Tchavdar N.; Dundas, Daniel; Lü, Jing-Tao; Brandbyge, Mads; Hedegård, Per

    2014-11-01

    We revisit the problem of forces on atoms under current in nanoscale conductors. We derive and discuss the five principal kinds of force under steady-state conditions from a simple standpoint that—with the help of background literature—should be accessible to physics undergraduates. The discussion aims at combining methodology with an emphasis on the underlying physics through examples. We discuss and compare two forces present only under current—the non-conservative electron wind force and a Lorentz-like velocity-dependent force. It is shown that in metallic nanowires both display significant features at the wire surface, making it a candidate for the nucleation of current-driven structural transformations and failure. Finally we discuss the problem of force noise and the limitations of Ehrenfest dynamics.

  20. GENERAL: Collision avoidance for a mobile robot based on radial basis function hybrid force control technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Shu-Huan

    2009-10-01

    Collision avoidance is always difficult in the planning path for a mobile robot. In this paper, the virtual force field between a mobile robot and an obstacle is formed and regulated to maintain a desired distance by hybrid force control algorithm. Since uncertainties from robot dynamics and obstacle degrade the performance of a collision avoidance task, intelligent control is used to compensate for the uncertainties. A radial basis function (RBF) neural network is used to regulate the force field of an accurate distance between a robot and an obstacle in this paper and then simulation studies are conducted to confirm that the proposed algorithm is effective.

  1. Fluctuating Pressure Environments and Hydrodynamic Radial Force Mitigation for a Two Blade Unshrouded Inducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulder, Andrew; Skelley, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Fluctuating pressure data from water flow testing of an unshrouded two blade inducer revealed a cavitation induced oscillation with the potential to induce a radial load on the turbopump shaft in addition to other more traditionally analyzed radial loads. Subsequent water flow testing of the inducer with a rotating force measurement system confirmed that the cavitation induced oscillation did impart a radial load to the inducer. After quantifying the load in a baseline configuration, two inducer shroud treatments were selected and tested to reduce the cavitation induced load. The first treatment was to increase the tip clearance, and the second was to introduce a circumferential groove near the inducer leading edge. Increasing the clearance resulted in a small load decrease along with some steady performance degradation. The groove greatly reduced the hydrodynamic load with little to no steady performance loss. The groove did however generate some new, relatively high frequency, spatially complex oscillations to the environment.

  2. Radial force on the vacuum chamber wall during thermal quench in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Pustovitov, V. D.

    2015-12-15

    The radial force balance during a thermal quench in tokamaks is analyzed. As a rule, the duration τ{sub tp} of such events is much shorter than the resistive time τ{sub w} of the vacuum chamber wall. Therefore, the perturbations of the magnetic field B produced by the evolving plasma cannot penetrate the wall, which makes different the magnetic pressures on its inner and outer sides. The goal of this work is the analytical estimation of the resulting integral radial force on the wall. The plasma is considered axially symmetric; for the description of radial forces on the wall, the results of V.D. Shafranov’s classical work [J. Nucl. Energy C 5, 251 (1963)] are used. Developed for tokamaks, the standard equilibrium theory considers three interacting systems: plasma, poloidal field coils, and toroidal field coils. Here, the wall is additionally incorporated with currents driven by ∂B/∂t≠0 accompanying the fast loss of the plasma thermal energy. It is shown that they essentially affect the force redistribution, thereby leading to large loads on the wall. The estimates prove that these loads have to be accounted for in the disruptive scenarios in large tokamaks.

  3. Optimized Reduction of Unsteady Radial Forces in a Singlechannel Pump for Wastewater Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Hyuk; Cho, Bo-Min; Choi, Young-Seok; Lee, Kyoung-Yong; Peck, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Seon-Chang

    2016-11-01

    A single-channel pump for wastewater treatment was optimized to reduce unsteady radial force sources caused by impeller-volute interactions. The steady and unsteady Reynolds- averaged Navier-Stokes equations using the shear-stress transport turbulence model were discretized by finite volume approximations and solved on tetrahedral grids to analyze the flow in the single-channel pump. The sweep area of radial force during one revolution and the distance of the sweep-area center of mass from the origin were selected as the objective functions; the two design variables were related to the internal flow cross-sectional area of the volute. These objective functions were integrated into one objective function by applying the weighting factor for optimization. Latin hypercube sampling was employed to generate twelve design points within the design space. A response-surface approximation model was constructed as a surrogate model for the objectives, based on the objective function values at the generated design points. The optimized results showed considerable reduction in the unsteady radial force sources in the optimum design, relative to those of the reference design.

  4. Evaluation of hydraulic radial forces on the impeller by the volute in a centrifugal rotary blood pump.

    PubMed

    Boehning, Fiete; Timms, Daniel L; Amaral, Felipe; Oliveira, Leonardo; Graefe, Roland; Hsu, Po-Lin; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich

    2011-08-01

    In many state-of-the-art rotary blood pumps for long-term ventricular assistance, the impeller is suspended within the casing by magnetic or hydrodynamic means. For the design of such suspension systems, profound knowledge of the acting forces on the impeller is crucial. Hydrodynamic bearings running at low clearance gaps can yield increased blood damage and magnetic bearings counteracting high forces consume excessive power. Most current rotary blood pump devices with contactless bearings are centrifugal pumps that incorporate a radial diffuser volute where hydraulic forces on the impeller develop. The yielding radial forces are highly dependent on impeller design, operating point and volute design. There are three basic types of volute design--singular, circular, and double volute. In this study, the hydraulic radial forces on the impeller created by the volute in an investigational centrifugal blood pump are evaluated and discussed with regard to the choice of contactless suspension systems. Each volute type was tested experimentally in a centrifugal pump test setup at various rotational speeds and flow rates. For the pump's design point at 5 L/min and 2500 rpm, the single volute had the lowest radial force (∼0 N), the circular volute yielded the highest force (∼2 N), and the double volute possessed a force of approx. 0.5 N. Results of radial force magnitude and direction were obtained and compared with a previously performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study.

  5. Analytical derivation of the radial distribution function in spherical dark matter halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eilersen, Andreas; Hansen, Steen H.; Zhang, Xingyu

    2017-01-01

    The velocity distribution of dark matter near the Earth is important for an accurate analysis of the signals in terrestrial detectors. This distribution is typically extracted from numerical simulations. Here we address the possibility of deriving the velocity distribution function analytically. We derive a differential equation which is a function of radius and the radial component of the velocity. Under various assumptions this can be solved, and we compare the solution with the results from controlled numerical simulations. Our findings complement the previously derived tangential velocity distribution. We hereby demonstrate that the entire distribution function, below ˜0.7vesc, can be derived analytically for spherical and equilibrated dark matter structures.

  6. Optimal design of high damping force engine mount featuring MR valve structure with both annular and radial flow paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Choi, S. B.; Lee, Y. S.; Han, M. S.

    2013-11-01

    This paper focuses on the optimal design of a compact and high damping force engine mount featuring magnetorheological fluid (MRF). In the mount, a MR valve structure with both annular and radial flows is employed to generate a high damping force. First, the configuration and working principle of the proposed MR mount is introduced. The MRF flows in the mount are then analyzed and the governing equations of the MR mount are derived based on the Bingham plastic behavior of the MRF. An optimal design of the MR mount is then performed to find the optimal structure of the MR valve to generate a maximum damping force with certain design constraints. In addition, the gap size of MRF ducts is empirically chosen considering the ‘lockup’ problem of the mount at high frequency. Performance of the optimized MR mount is then evaluated based on finite element analysis and discussions on performance results of the optimized MR mount are given. The effectiveness of the proposed MR engine mount is demonstrated via computer simulation by presenting damping force and power consumption.

  7. Indirect (source-free) integration method. II. Self-force consistent radial fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Patxi; Aoudia, Sofiane; Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.; Cordier, Stéphane

    2016-12-01

    We apply our method of indirect integration, described in Part I, at fourth order, to the radial fall affected by the self-force (SF). The Mode-Sum regularization is performed in the Regge-Wheeler gauge using the equivalence with the harmonic gauge for this orbit. We consider also the motion subjected to a self-consistent and iterative correction determined by the SF through osculating stretches of geodesics. The convergence of the results confirms the validity of the integration method. This work complements and justifies the analysis and the results appeared in [Int. J. Geom. Meth. Mod. Phys. 11 (2014) 1450090].

  8. Three-dimensional analysis of optical forces generated by an active tractor beam using radial polarization.

    PubMed

    Carretero, Luis; Acebal, Pablo; Blaya, Salvador

    2014-02-10

    We theoretically study the three-dimensional behavior of nanoparticles in an active optical conveyor. To do this, we solved the Langevin equation when the forces are generated by a focusing system at the near field. Analytical expressions for the optical forces generated by the optical conveyor were obtained by solving the Richards and Wolf vectorial diffraction integrals in an approximated form when a mask of two annular pupils is illuminated by a radially polarized Hermite-Gauss beam. Trajectories, in both the transverse plane and the longitudinal direction, are analyzed showing that the behavior of the optical conveyor can be optimized by conveniently choosing the configuration of the mask of the two annular pupils (inner and outer radius of the two rings) in order to trap and transport all particles at the focal plane.

  9. Linear stability of a circular Couette flow under a radial thermoelectric body force.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, H N; Meyer, A; Crumeyrolle, O; Mutabazi, I

    2015-03-01

    The stability of the circular Couette flow of a dielectric fluid is analyzed by a linear perturbation theory. The fluid is confined between two concentric cylindrical electrodes of infinite length with only the inner one rotating. A temperature difference and an alternating electric tension are applied to the electrodes to produce a radial dielectrophoretic body force that can induce convection in the fluid. We examine the effects of superposition of this thermoelectric force with the centrifugal force including its thermal variation. The Earth's gravity is neglected to focus on the situations of a vanishing Grashof number such as microgravity conditions. Depending on the electric field strength and of the temperature difference, critical modes are either axisymmetric or nonaxisymmetric, occurring in either stationary or oscillatory states. An energetic analysis is performed to determine the dominant destabilizing mechanism. When the inner cylinder is hotter than the outer one, the circular Couette flow is destabilized by the centrifugal force for weak and moderate electric fields. The critical mode is steady axisymmetric, except for weak fields within a certain range of the Prandtl number and of the radius ratio of the cylinders, where the mode is oscillatory and axisymmetric. The frequency of this oscillatory mode is correlated with a Brunt-Väisälä frequency due to the stratification of both the density and the electric permittivity of the fluid. Under strong electric fields, the destabilization by the dielectrophoretic force is dominant, leading to oscillatory nonaxisymmetric critical modes with a frequency scaled by the frequency of the inner-cylinder rotation. When the outer cylinder is hotter than the inner one, the instability is again driven by the centrifugal force. The critical mode is axisymmetric and either steady under weak electric fields or oscillatory under strong electric fields. The frequency of the oscillatory mode is also correlated with the

  10. Investigation on the forced response of a radial turbine under aerodynamic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chaochen; Huang, Zhi; Qi, Mingxu

    2016-04-01

    Rotor blades in a radial turbine with nozzle guide vanes typically experience harmonic aerodynamic excitations due to the rotor stator interaction. Dynamic stresses induced by the harmonic excitations can result in high cycle fatigue (HCF) of the blades. A reliable prediction method for forced response issue is essential to avoid the HCF problem. In this work, the forced response mechanisms were investigated based on a fluid structure interaction (FSI) method. Aerodynamic excitations were obtained by three-dimensional unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation with phase shifted periodic boundary conditions. The first two harmonic pressures were determined as the primary components of the excitation and applied to finite element (FE) model to conduct the computational structural dynamics (CSD) simulation. The computed results from the harmonic forced response analysis show good agreement with the predictions of Singh's advanced frequency evaluation (SAFE) diagram. Moreover, the mode superposition method used in FE simulation offers an efficient way to provide quantitative assessments of mode response levels and resonant strength.

  11. Adult ependymal cells are postmitotic and are derived from radial glial cells during embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Spassky, Nathalie; Merkle, Florian T; Flames, Nuria; Tramontin, Anthony D; García-Verdugo, José Manuel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2005-01-05

    Ependymal cells on the walls of brain ventricles play essential roles in the transport of CSF and in brain homeostasis. It has been suggested that ependymal cells also function as stem cells. However, the proliferative capacity of mature ependymal cells remains controversial, and the developmental origin of these cells is not known. Using confocal or electron microscopy (EM) of adult mice that received bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) or [3H]thymidine for several weeks, we found no evidence that ependymal cells proliferate. In contrast, ependymal cells were labeled by BrdU administration during embryonic development. The majority of them are born between embryonic day 14 (E14) and E16. Interestingly, we found that the maturation of ependymal cells and the formation of cilia occur significantly later, during the first postnatal week. We analyzed the early postnatal ventricular zone at the EM and found a subpopulation of radial glia in various stages of transformation into ependymal cells. These cells often had deuterosomes. To directly test whether radial glia give rise to ependymal cells, we used a Cre-lox recombination strategy to genetically tag radial glia in the neonatal brain and follow their progeny. We found that some radial glia in the lateral ventricular wall transform to give rise to mature ependymal cells. This work identifies the time of birth and early stages in the maturation of ependymal cells and demonstrates that these cells are derived from radial glia. Our results indicate that ependymal cells are born in the embryonic and early postnatal brain and that they do not divide after differentiation. The postmitotic nature of ependymal cells strongly suggests that these cells do not function as neural stem cells in the adult.

  12. Experimental measurements of hydrodynamic radial forces and stiffness matrices for a centrifugal pump-impeller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamieh, D. S.; Acosta, A. J.; Brennen, C. E.; Caughey, T. K.

    1985-01-01

    Measurements of the steady-state hydrodynamic forces on a centrifugal pump impeller are presented as a function of position within two geometrically different volutes. These correspond to the forces experienced by the impeller at zero whirl frequency. The hydrodynamic force matrices derived from these measurements exhibit both diagonal and off-diagonal terms of substantial magnitude. These terms are of the form which would tend to excite a whirl motion in a rotordynamic analysis of the pump; this may be the cause of 'rough running' reported in many pumps. Static pressure measurements in the impeller discharge flow show that the hydrodynamic force on the impeller contains a substantial component due to the nonisotropy of the net momentum flux leaving the impeller. A similar breakdown of the contributions to the stiffness matrices reveals that the major component of these matrices results from the nonisotropy of the momentum flux.

  13. Method for Cleanly and Precisely Breaking Off a Rock Core Using a Radial Compressive Force

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Megan; Lin, Justin

    2011-01-01

    The Mars Sample Return mission has the goal to drill, break off, and retain rock core samples. After some results gained from rock core mechanics testing, the realization that scoring teeth would cleanly break off the core after only a few millimeters of penetration, and noting that rocks are weak in tension, the idea was developed to use symmetric wedging teeth in compression to weaken and then break the core at the contact plane. This concept was developed as a response to the break-off and retention requirements. The wedges wrap around the estimated average diameter of the core to get as many contact locations as possible, and are then pushed inward, radially, through the core towards one another. This starts a crack and begins to apply opposing forces inside the core to propagate the crack across the plane of contact. The advantage is in the simplicity. Only two teeth are needed to break five varieties of Mars-like rock cores with limited penetration and reasonable forces. Its major advantage is that it does not require any length of rock to be attached to the parent in order to break the core at the desired location. Test data shows that some rocks break off on their own into segments or break off into discs. This idea would grab and retain a disc, push some discs upward and others out, or grab a segment, break it at the contact plane, and retain the portion inside of the device. It also does this with few moving parts in a simple, space-efficient design. This discovery could be implemented into a coring drill bit to precisely break off and retain any size rock core.

  14. Source-free integration method for black hole perturbations and self-force computation: Radial fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoudia, Sofiane; Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.

    2011-03-01

    Perturbations of Schwarzschild-Droste black holes in the Regge-Wheeler gauge benefit from the availability of a wave equation and from the gauge invariance of the wave function, but lack smoothness. Nevertheless, the even perturbations belong to the C0 continuity class, if the wave function and its derivatives satisfy specific conditions on the discontinuities, known as jump conditions, at the particle position. These conditions suggest a new way for dealing with finite element integration in the time domain. The forward time value in the upper node of the (t,r*) grid cell is obtained by the linear combination of the three preceding node values and of analytic expressions based on the jump conditions. The numerical integration does not deal directly with the source term, the associated singularities and the potential. This amounts to an indirect integration of the wave equation. The known wave forms at infinity are recovered and the wave function at the particle position is shown. In this series of papers, the radial trajectory is dealt with first, being this method of integration applicable to generic orbits of EMRI (Extreme Mass Ratio Inspiral).

  15. Research on the effect of wear-ring clearances to the axial and radial force of a centrifugal pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, W. G.; Y He, M.; Qi, C. X.; Li, Y. B.

    2013-12-01

    Varying of the wear-ring clearance not only has a distinct effect on the volumetric loss of the centrifugal pump, but also on the performance of the centrifugal pump including the axial and radial forces. Comparing with the experimental studies, numerical simulation methods have some special advantages, such as the low cost, fast and high efficiency, and convenient to get the detailed structure of the internal flow characteristics, so it has been widely used in the fluid machinery study in recent years. In order to study the effect of wear-ring clearance on the force performance of the centrifugal pump, based on the Reynolds Time-Averaged N-S equations and RNG k-ε turbulence model, a centrifugal pump with three variable styles of the wear-rings was simulated: Only the clearance of the front wear-ring was changed, only the clearance of the back wear-ring was changed and both were changed. Comparing with the experiment, numerical results show a good agreement. In the three changing styles of the clearance, the variable of the clearance of front wear-ring has the most influence on the axial force of the centrifugal pump, while has tiny effect on the radial force for all the conditions.

  16. Stromal-derived factor 1 signalling regulates radial and tangential migration in the developing cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Liapi, Anastasia; Pritchett, James; Jones, Owen; Fujii, Nobutaka; Parnavelas, John G; Nadarajah, Bagirathy

    2008-01-01

    Stromal-derived factor 1 (SDF-1), a known chemoattractant, and its receptor CXCR4 are widely expressed in the developing and adult cerebral cortex. Recent studies have highlighted potential roles for SDF-1 during early cortical development. In view of the current findings, our histological analysis has revealed a distinct pattern of SDF-1 expression in the developing cerebral cortex at a time when cell proliferation and migration are at peak. To determine the role of chemokine signalling during early cortical development, embryonic rat brain slices were exposed to a medium containing secreted SDF-1 to perturb the endogenous levels of chemokine. Alternatively, brain slices were treated with 40 muM of T140 or AMD3100, known antagonists of CXCR4. Using these experimental approaches, we demonstrate that chemokine signalling is imperative for the maintenance of the early cortical plate. In addition, we provide evidence that both neurogenesis and radial migration are concomitantly regulated by this signalling system. Conversely, interneurons, although not dependent on SDF-1 signalling to transgress the telencephalic boundary, require the chemokine to maintain their tangential migration. Collectively, our results demonstrate that SDF-1 with its distinct pattern of expression is essential and uniquely positioned to regulate key developmental events that underlie the formation of the cerebral cortex.

  17. Electromagnetic Radial Forces in a Hybrid Eight-Stator-Pole, Six-Rotor-Pole Bearingless Switched-Reluctance Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Carlos R.; Siebert, Mark W.; Ho, Eric J.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis and experimental measurement of the electromagnet force loads on the hybrid rotor in a novel bearingless switched-reluctance motor (BSRM) have been performed. A BSRM has the combined characteristics of a switched-reluctance motor and a magnetic bearing. The BSRM has an eight-pole stator and a six-pole hybrid rotor, which is composed of circular and scalloped lamination segments. The hybrid rotor is levitated using only one set of stator poles. A second set of stator poles imparts torque to the scalloped portion of the rotor, which is driven in a traditional switched reluctance manner by a processor. Analysis was done for nonrotating rotor poles that were oriented to achieve maximum and minimum radial force loads on the rotor. The objective is to assess whether simple one-dimensional magnetic circuit analysis is sufficient for preliminary evaluation of this machine, which may exhibit strong three-dimensional electromagnetic field behavior. Two magnetic circuit geometries, approximating the complex topology of the magnetic fields in and around the hybrid rotor, were employed in formulating the electromagnetic radial force equations. Reasonable agreement between the experimental results and the theoretical predictions was obtained with typical magnetic bearing derating factors applied to the predictions.

  18. Comparison of Response Surface Construction Methods for Derivative Estimation Using Moving Least Squares, Kriging and Radial Basis Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, Thiagarajan

    2005-01-01

    Response construction methods using Moving Least Squares (MLS), Kriging and Radial Basis Functions (RBF) are compared with the Global Least Squares (GLS) method in three numerical examples for derivative generation capability. Also, a new Interpolating Moving Least Squares (IMLS) method adopted from the meshless method is presented. It is found that the response surface construction methods using the Kriging and RBF interpolation yields more accurate results compared with MLS and GLS methods. Several computational aspects of the response surface construction methods also discussed.

  19. Numerical derivation of forced nutation terms for a rigid earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schastok, J.; Soffel, M.; Ruder, H.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a numerical integration of the Euler equations for a rigid earth model covering a time span of 250 years are compared with Kinoshita's (1977) theory for the forced nutations and with a new nutation series by Kinoshita and Souchay. Numerical corrections to some of the analytically derived nutation terms are presented.

  20. Analysis of radial and longitudinal force of plasma wakefield generated by a chirped pulse laser

    SciTech Connect

    Ghasemi, Leila; Afhami, Saeedeh; Eslami, Esmaeil

    2015-08-15

    In present paper, the chirp effect of an electromagnetic pulse via an analytical model of wakefield generation is studied. Different types of chirps are employed in this study. Our results show that by the use of nonlinear chirped pulse the longitudinal wakefield and focusing force is stronger than that of linear chirped pulse. It is indicated that quadratic nonlinear chirped pulses are globally much efficient than periodic nonlinear chirped pulses. Our calculations also predict that in nonlinear chirped pulse case, the overlap of focusing and accelerating regions is broader than that achieved in linear chirped pulse.

  1. Collision of viscoelastic bodies: Rigorous derivation of dissipative force.

    PubMed

    Goldobin, Denis S; Susloparov, Eugeniy A; Pimenova, Anastasiya V; Brilliantov, Nikolai V

    2015-06-01

    We report a new theory of dissipative forces acting between colliding viscoelastic bodies. The impact velocity is assumed not to be large to neglect plastic deformations in the material and propagation of sound waves. We consider the general case of bodies of an arbitrary convex shape and of different materials. We develop a mathematically rigorous perturbation scheme to solve the continuum mechanics equations that deal with both displacement and displacement rate fields and accounts for the dissipation in the bulk of the material. The perturbative solution of these equations allows to go beyond the previously used quasi-static approximation and obtain the dissipative force. The derived force does not suffer from the inconsistencies of the quasi-static approximation, like the violation of the third Newton's law for the case of different materials, and depends on particle deformation and deformation rate.

  2. Brachial blood pressure-independent relations between radial late systolic shoulder-derived aortic pressures and target organ changes.

    PubMed

    Norton, Gavin R; Majane, Olebogeng H I; Maseko, Muzi J; Libhaber, Carlos; Redelinghuys, Michelle; Kruger, Deirdre; Veller, Martin; Sareli, Pinhas; Woodiwiss, Angela J

    2012-04-01

    Central aortic blood pressure (BP; BPc) predicts outcomes beyond brachial BP. In this regard, the application of a generalized transfer function (GTF) to radial pulse waves for the derivation of BPc is an easy and reproducible measurement technique. However, the use of the GTF may not be appropriate in all circumstances. Although the peak of the second shoulder of the radial waveform (P2) is closely associated with BPc, and, hence, BPc may be assessed without the need for a GTF, whether P2-derived BPc is associated with adverse cardiovascular changes independent of brachial BP is uncertain. Thus, P2- and GTF-derived aortic BPs were assessed using applanation tonometry and SphygmoCor software. Left ventricular mass was indexed for height(1.7) (n=678) and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT; n=462) was determined using echocardiography and vascular ultrasound. With adjustments for nurse-derived brachial pulse pressure (PP), P2-derived central PP was independently associated with left ventricular mass indexed for height(1.7) (partial r=0.18; P<0.0001) and IMT (partial r=0.40; P<0.0001). These relations were similar to nurse-derived brachial PP-independent relations between GTF-derived central PP and target organ changes (left ventricular mass indexed for height(1.7): partial r=0.17, P<0.0001; IMT: partial r=0.37, P<0.0001). In contrast, with adjustments for central PP, nurse-derived brachial PP-target organ relations were eliminated (partial r=-0.21 to 0.05). Twenty-four-hour, day, and night PP-target organ relations did not survive adjustments for nurse-derived brachial BP. In conclusion, central PP derived from P2, which does not require a GTF, is associated with cardiovascular target organ changes independent of brachial BP. Thus, when assessing adverse cardiovascular effects of aortic BP independent of brachial BP, P2-derived measures may complement GTF-derived measures of aortic BP.

  3. Accurate Satellite-Derived Estimates of Tropospheric Ozone Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, Joanna; Schoeberl, Mark R.; Vasilkov, Alexander P.; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Platnick, Steven; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Levelt, Pieternel F.

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of the radiative forcing due to anthropogenically-produced tropospheric O3 are derived primarily from models. Here, we use tropospheric ozone and cloud data from several instruments in the A-train constellation of satellites as well as information from the GEOS-5 Data Assimilation System to accurately estimate the instantaneous radiative forcing from tropospheric O3 for January and July 2005. We improve upon previous estimates of tropospheric ozone mixing ratios from a residual approach using the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) by incorporating cloud pressure information from OMI. Since we cannot distinguish between natural and anthropogenic sources with the satellite data, our estimates reflect the total forcing due to tropospheric O3. We focus specifically on the magnitude and spatial structure of the cloud effect on both the shortand long-wave radiative forcing. The estimates presented here can be used to validate present day O3 radiative forcing produced by models.

  4. Evaluation of the radial deformability of poly(dG)-poly(dC) DNA and G4-DNA using vibrating scanning polarization force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huabin; Lin, Jiwei; Wang, Chunmei; Zhang, Xuehua; An, Hongjie; Zhou, Xingfei; Sun, Jielin; Hu, Jun

    2010-05-18

    Poly(dG)-poly(dC) DNA and G4-DNA are two types of synthetic molecules that are regarded as promising candidates for molecular nanodevices. In this work, vibrating scanning polarization force microscopy (VSPFM) was employed to study the radial deformability of these two molecules coadsorbed on a Ni(2+)-modified mica surface. The values of the radial compressive elastic modulus of these two types of molecules were found to be similar (approximately 5-10 MPa) when the external loading force was between approximately 0.04 and approximately 0.12 nN. However, G4-DNA molecules possessed higher stiffness than poly(dG)-poly(dC) DNA (approximately 20-40 vs approximately 10-20 MPa) when the loading force was larger than approximately 0.12 nN. The results will aid us in understanding these molecule's mechanical performances.

  5. Radial derivatives of the mouse ventral pallium traced with Dbx1-LacZ reporters.

    PubMed

    Puelles, Luis; Medina, Loreta; Borello, Ugo; Legaz, Isabel; Teissier, Anne; Pierani, Alessandra; Rubenstein, John L R

    2016-09-01

    The progeny of Dbx1-expressing progenitors was studied in the developing mouse pallium, using two transgenic mouse lines: (1) Dbx1(nlslacZ) mice, in which the gene of the β-galactosidase reporter (LacZ) is inserted directly under the control of the Dbx1 promoter, allowing short-term lineage tracing of Dbx1-derived cells; and (2) Dbx1(CRE) mice crossed with a Cre-dependent reporter strain (ROSA26(loxP-stop-loxP-LacZ)), in which the Dbx1-derived cells result permanently labeled (Bielle et al., 2005). We thus examined in detail the derivatives of the postulated longitudinal ventral pallium (VPall) sector, which has been defined among other features by its selective ventricular zone expression of Dbx1 (the recent ascription by Puelles, 2014 of the whole olfactory cortex primordium to the VPall was tested). Earlier notions about a gradiental caudorostral reduction of Dbx1 signal were corroborated, so that virtually no signal was found at the olfactory bulb and the anterior olfactory area. The piriform cortex was increasingly labeled caudalwards. The only endopiriform grisea labeled were the ventral endopiriform nucleus and the bed nucleus of the external capsule. Anterior and basolateral parts of the whole pallial amygdala also were densely marked, in contrast to the negative posterior parts of these pallial amygdalar nuclei (leaving apart medial amygdalar parts ascribed to subpallial or extratelencephalic sources of Dbx1-derived GABAergic and non-GABAergic neurons). Alternative tentative interpretations are discussed to explain the partial labeling obtained of both olfactory and amygdaloid structures. This includes the hypothesis of an as yet undefined part of the pallium, potentially responsible for the posterior amygdala, or the hypothesis that the VPall may not be wholly characterized by Dbx1 expression (this gene not being necessary for VPall molecular distinctness and histogenetic potency), which would leave a dorsal Dbx1-negative VPall subdomain of variable size

  6. A new model of Earth's radial conductivity structure derived from over 10 yr of satellite and observatory magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püthe, Christoph; Kuvshinov, Alexey; Khan, Amir; Olsen, Nils

    2015-12-01

    We present a new model of the radial (1-D) conductivity structure of Earth's mantle. This model is derived from more than 10 yr of magnetic measurements from the satellites Ørsted, CHAMP, SAC-C and the Swarm trio as well as the global network of geomagnetic observatories. After removal of core and crustal field as predicted by a recent field model, we fit the magnetic data with spherical harmonic coefficients describing ring current activity and associated induction effects and estimate global C-responses at periods between 1.5 and 150 d. The C-responses are corrected for 3-D effects due to induction in the oceans and inverted for a 1-D model of mantle conductivity using both probabilistic and deterministic methods. Very similar results are obtained, consisting of a highly resistive upper mantle, an increase in conductivity in and beneath the transition zone and a conductive lower mantle. Analysis of the Hessian of the cost function reveals that the data are most sensitive to structures at depths between 800 and 1200 km, in agreement with the results obtained from the probabilistic approach. Preliminary interpretation of the inverted conductivity structure based on laboratory-based conductivity profiles shows that the recovered structure in the lower mantle either requires higher temperatures or the presence of material of high conductivity related to ponding of carbonate melts below the transition zone.

  7. Astrometric light-travel time signature of sources in nonlinear motion. I. Derivation of the effect and radial motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglada-Escudé, G.; Torra, J.

    2006-04-01

    Context: .Very precise planned space astrometric missions and recent improvements in imaging capabilities require a detailed review of the assumptions of classical astrometric modeling.Aims.We show that Light-Travel Time must be taken into account in modeling the kinematics of astronomical objects in nonlinear motion, even at stellar distances.Methods.A closed expression to include Light-Travel Time in the current astrometric models with nonlinear motion is provided. Using a perturbative approach the expression of the Light-Travel Time signature is derived. We propose a practical form of the astrometric modelling to be applied in astrometric data reduction of sources at stellar distances(d>1 pc).Results.We show that the Light-Travel Time signature is relevant at μ as accuracy (or even at mas) depending on the time span of the astrometric measurements. We explain how information on the radial motion of a source can be obtained. Some estimates are provided for known nearby binary systemsConclusions.Given the obtained results, it is clear that this effect must be taken into account in interpreting precise astrometric measurements. The effect is particularly relevant in measurements performed by the planned astrometric space missions (GAIA, SIM, JASMINE, TPF/DARWIN). An objective criterion is provided to quickly evaluate whether the Light-Travel Time modeling is required for a given source or system.

  8. A new model of Earth's radial conductivity structure derived from over 10 years of satellite and observatory magnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püthe, Christoph; Kuvshinov, Alexey; Olsen, Nils; Khan, Amir

    2015-04-01

    We present a new model of the radial (1-D) conductivity structure of Earth's mantle. This model was derived from more than ten years of magnetic measurements taken by the satellites Ørsted, CHAMP, SAC-C and the Swarm trio as well as the global network of geomagnetic observatories. After removal of core and crustal field as predicted by a recent field model we fit the data with spherical harmonic coefficients describing ring current activity and associated induction effects, and estimate global C-responses at periods between 1.5 days and 150 days. An iterative approach is used to correct the estimated C-responses for 3-D effects arising from induction in a heterogeneous surface shell that takes into account the distribution of oceans and continents. We invert the corrected C-responses for a 1-D model of mantle conductivity using both probabilistic and deterministic methods. The different methods yield very similar results, consisting of a highly resistive upper mantle, a conductive lower mantle, and an increase in conductivity in and beneath the transition zone. Analysis of the Hessian of the cost function reveals that the data are most sensitive to structures at depths between 700 km and 1200 km, in agreement with the results obtained from the probabilistic approach. The recovered models feature a marked kink in this well-resolved depth range.

  9. Pluripotent stem cell-derived radial glia-like cells as stable intermediate for efficient generation of human oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Gorris, Raphaela; Fischer, Julia; Erwes, Kim Lina; Kesavan, Jaideep; Peterson, Daniel A; Alexander, Michael; Nöthen, Markus M; Peitz, Michael; Quandel, Tamara; Karus, Michael; Brüstle, Oliver

    2015-12-01

    Neural precursor cells (NPCs) derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) represent an attractive tool for the in vitro generation of various neural cell types. However, the developmentally early NPCs emerging during hPSC differentiation typically show a strong propensity for neuronal differentiation, with more limited potential for generating astrocytes and, in particular, for generating oligodendrocytes. This phenomenon corresponds well to the consecutive and protracted generation of neurons and GLIA during normal human development. To obtain a more gliogenic NPC type, we combined growth factor-mediated expansion with pre-exposure to the differentiation-inducing agent retinoic acid and subsequent immunoisolation of CD133-positive cells. This protocol yields an adherent and self-renewing population of hindbrain/spinal cord radial glia (RG)-like neural precursor cells (RGL-NPCs) expressing typical neural stem cell markers such as nestin, ASCL1, SOX2, and PAX6 as well as RG markers BLBP, GLAST, vimentin, and GFAP. While RGL-NPCs maintain the ability for tripotential differentiation into neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, they exhibit greatly enhanced propensity for oligodendrocyte generation. Under defined differentiation conditions promoting the expression of the major oligodendrocyte fate-determinants OLIG1/2, NKX6.2, NKX2.2, and SOX10, RGL-NPCs efficiently convert into NG2-positive oligodendroglial progenitor cells (OPCs) and are subsequently capable of in vivo myelination. Representing a stable intermediate between PSCs and OPCs, RGL-NPCs expedite the generation of PSC-derived oligodendrocytes with O4-, 4860-, and myelin basic protein (MBP)-positive cells that already appear within 7 weeks following growth factor withdrawal-induced differentiation. Thus, RGL-NPCs may serve as robust tool for time-efficient generation of human oligodendrocytes from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells.

  10. A comparative reliability and performance study of different stent designs in terms of mechanical properties: foreshortening, recoil, radial force, and flexibility.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Bin; Choi, Hyuk; Joo, Sang Min; Kim, Han Ki; Shin, Jae Hee; Hwang, Min Ho; Choi, Jaesoon; Kim, Dong-Gon; Lee, Kwang Ho; Lim, Chun Hak; Yoo, Sun Kook; Lee, Heung-Man; Sun, Kyung

    2013-04-01

    This study seeks to improve the mechanical performance of stents by conducting reliability performance testing and finite element method (FEM)-based simulations for coronary stents. Three commercially available stent designs and our own new design were tested to measure the factors affecting performance, specifically foreshortening, recoil, radial force, and flexibility. The stents used in the present experiments were 3 mm in working diameter and 18 mm of working length. The results of the experiments indicate that the foreshortening of stents A, B, C, and our new design, D, was equivalent to 2.25, 0.67, 0.46, and 0.41%, respectively. The recoil of stents A, B, C, and D was 6.00, 4.35, 3.50, and 4.36%, respectively. Parallel plate radial force measurements were A, 3.72 ± 0.28 N; B, 3.81 ± 0.32 N; C, 4.35 ± 0.18 N; and D, 4.02 ± 0.24 N. Radial forces determined by applying uniform pressure in the circumferential direction were A, 28.749 ± 0.81 N; B, 32.231 ± 1.80 N; C, 34.522 ± 3.06 N; and D, 42.183 ± 2.84 N. The maximum force of crimped stent at 2.2-mm deflection was 1.01 ± 0.08 N, 0.82 ± 0.08 N, 0.92 ± 0.12 N, and 0.68 ± 0.07 N for each of stents A, B, C and D. The results of this study enabled us to identify several factors to enhance the performance of stents. In comparing these stents, we found that our design, stent D, which was designed by a collaborative team from seven universities, performed better than the commercial stents across all parameter of foreshortening, recoil, radial force, and flexibility.

  11. Accurate determination of pyridine-poly(amidoamine) dendrimer absolute binding constants with the OPLS-AA force field and direct integration of radial distribution functions.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yong; Kaminski, George A

    2005-08-11

    OPLS-AA force field and direct integration of intermolecular radial distribution functions (RDF) were employed to calculate absolute binding constants of pyridine molecules to amino group (NH2) and amide group hydrogen atoms in and first generation poly(amidoamine) dendrimers in chloroform. The average errors in the absolute and relative association constants, as predicted with the calculations, are 14.1% and 10.8%, respectively, which translate into ca. 0.08 and 0.06 kcal/mol errors in the absolute and relative binding free energies. We believe that this level of accuracy proves the applicability of the OPLS-AA, force field, in combination with the direct RDF integration, to reproducing and predicting absolute intermolecular association constants of low magnitudes (ca. 0.2-2.0 range).

  12. Accurate Determination of Pyridine -- Poly (Amidoamine) Dendrimer Absolute Binding Constants with the OPLS-AA Force Field and Direct Integration of Radial Distribution Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yong; Kaminski, George

    2006-03-01

    OPLS-AA force field and direct integration of intermolecular radial distribution functions (RDF) were employed to calculate absolute binding constants of pyridine molecules to NH2 and amide group hydrogen atoms in 0th and 1st generation poly (amidoamine) dendrimers in chloroform. The average errors in the absolute and relative association constants, as predicted with the calculations, are 14.1% and 10.8%, respectively, which translate into ca. 0.08 kcal/mol and 0.06 kcal/mol errors in the absolute and relative binding free energies. We believe that this level of accuracy proves the applicability of the OPLS-AA, force field, in combination with the direct RDF integration, to reproducing and predicting absolute intermolecular association constants of low magnitudes (ca. 0.2 -- 2.0 range).

  13. A Simple Adaptive Transfer Function for Deriving the Central Blood Pressure Waveform from a Radial Blood Pressure Waveform.

    PubMed

    Gao, Mingwu; Rose, William C; Fetics, Barry; Kass, David A; Chen, Chen-Huan; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-09-14

    Generalized transfer functions (GTFs) are available to compute the more relevant central blood pressure (BP) waveform from a more easily measured radial BP waveform. However, GTFs are population averages and therefore may not adapt to variations in pulse pressure (PP) amplification (ratio of radial to central PP). A simple adaptive transfer function (ATF) was developed. First, the transfer function is defined in terms of the wave travel time and reflection coefficient parameters of an arterial model. Then, the parameters are estimated from the radial BP waveform by exploiting the observation that central BP waveforms exhibit exponential diastolic decays. The ATF was assessed using the original data that helped popularize the GTF. These data included radial BP waveforms and invasive reference central BP waveforms from cardiac catheterization patients. The data were divided into low, middle, and high PP amplification groups. The ATF estimated central BP with greater accuracy than GTFs in the low PP amplification group (e.g., central systolic BP and PP root-mean-square-errors of 3.3 and 4.2 mm Hg versus 6.2 and 7.1 mm Hg; p ≤ 0.05) while showing similar accuracy in the higher PP amplification groups. The ATF may permit more accurate, non-invasive central BP monitoring in elderly and hypertensive patients.

  14. A Simple Adaptive Transfer Function for Deriving the Central Blood Pressure Waveform from a Radial Blood Pressure Waveform

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Mingwu; Rose, William C.; Fetics, Barry; Kass, David A.; Chen, Chen-Huan; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Generalized transfer functions (GTFs) are available to compute the more relevant central blood pressure (BP) waveform from a more easily measured radial BP waveform. However, GTFs are population averages and therefore may not adapt to variations in pulse pressure (PP) amplification (ratio of radial to central PP). A simple adaptive transfer function (ATF) was developed. First, the transfer function is defined in terms of the wave travel time and reflection coefficient parameters of an arterial model. Then, the parameters are estimated from the radial BP waveform by exploiting the observation that central BP waveforms exhibit exponential diastolic decays. The ATF was assessed using the original data that helped popularize the GTF. These data included radial BP waveforms and invasive reference central BP waveforms from cardiac catheterization patients. The data were divided into low, middle, and high PP amplification groups. The ATF estimated central BP with greater accuracy than GTFs in the low PP amplification group (e.g., central systolic BP and PP root-mean-square-errors of 3.3 and 4.2 mm Hg versus 6.2 and 7.1 mm Hg; p ≤ 0.05) while showing similar accuracy in the higher PP amplification groups. The ATF may permit more accurate, non-invasive central BP monitoring in elderly and hypertensive patients. PMID:27624389

  15. Radial forces of stents used in thoracic endovascular aortic repair and bare self-expanding nitinol stents measured ex vivo - Rapid rescue for obstruction of the innominate artery using bare self-expanding nitinol stents.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Inoue, Kentaro; Tanaka, Shinichi; Aoyagi, Yukihiko; Matsubara, Yutaka; Matsuda, Daisuke; Yoshiya, Keiji; Yoshiga, Ryosuke; Ohkusa, Tomoko; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2017-02-01

    Purpose Our objective was to compare the radial forces of several stents ex vivo to identify stents suitable for rescue of the unexpected coverage of aortic arch branches in thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Methods We measured the radial forces of two types of self-expanding bare nitinol stents (E-luminexx and Epic) used singly or as double-walled pairs, and of three endoprostheses used in thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR, Gore c-TAG, Relay, and Valiant) by compressing the stent using an MTS Instron universal testing machine (model #5582). We also examined the compressive effects of the TEVAR endoprostheses and the bare nitinol stents on each other. Results The radial force was greater in the center than at the edge of each stent. In all stents tested, the radial force decreased incrementally with increasing stent diameter. The radial force at the center was two times greater when using two stents than with a single stent. In the compression test, only E-luminexx used as a pair was not compressed after compressing a Relay endoprosthesis by 12 mm. Conclusion Two E-luminexx stents are appropriate to restore the blood flow if a TEVAR endoprosthesis covers the innominate artery following innominate-carotid-left subclavian arterial bypass.

  16. Carbon nanofibers with radially grown graphene sheets derived from electrospinning for aqueous supercapacitors with high working voltage and energy density.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Qiu, Yejun; Yu, Jie; Deng, Xianyu; Dai, Chenglong; Bai, Xuedong

    2013-06-07

    Improvement of energy density is an urgent task for developing advanced supercapacitors. In this paper, aqueous supercapacitors with high voltage of 1.8 V and energy density of 29.1 W h kg(-1) were fabricated based on carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and Na2SO4 electrolyte. The CNFs with radially grown graphene sheets (GSs) and small average diameter down to 11 nm were prepared by electrospinning and carbonization in NH3. The radially grown GSs contain between 1 and a few atomic layers with their edges exposed on the surface. The CNFs are doped with nitrogen and oxygen with different concentrations depending on the carbonizing temperature. The supercapacitors exhibit excellent cycling performance with the capacity retention over 93.7% after 5000 charging-discharging cycles. The unique structure, possessing radially grown GSs, small diameter, and heteroatom doping of the CNFs, and application of neutral electrolyte account for the high voltage and energy density of the present supercapacitors. The present supercapacitors are of high promise for practical application due to the high energy density and the advantages of neutral electrolyte including low cost, safety, low corrosivity, and convenient assembly in air.

  17. Derivation of Equivalent Continuous Dilution for Cyclic, Unsteady Driving Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Technical University of Denmark, Department of Civil Engineering; Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2010-12-15

    This article uses an analytical approach to determine the dilution of an unsteadily-generated solute in an unsteady solvent stream, under cyclic temporal boundary conditions. The goal is to find a simplified way of showing equivalence of such a process to a reference case where equivalent dilution is defined as a weighted average concentration. This derivation has direct applications to the ventilation of indoor spaces where indoor air quality and energy consumption cannot in general be simultaneously optimized. By solving the equation we can specify how much air we need to use in one ventilation pattern compared to another to obtain same indoor air quality. Because energy consumption is related to the amount of air exchanged by a ventilation system, the equation can be used as a first step to evaluate different ventilation patterns effect on the energy consumption. The use of the derived equation is demonstrated by representative cases of interest in both residential and non-residential buildings.

  18. A radial basis function (RBF) finite difference method for the simulation of reaction-diffusion equations on stationary platelets within the augmented forcing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shankar, Varun; Wright, Grady B.; Fogelson, Aaron L.; Kirby, Robert M.

    2014-05-01

    We present a computational method for solving the coupled problem of chemical transport in a fluid (blood) with binding/unbinding of the chemical to/from cellular (platelet) surfaces in contact with the fluid, and with transport of the chemical on the cellular surfaces. The overall framework is the Augmented Forcing Point Method (AFM) (\\emph{L. Yao and A.L. Fogelson, Simulations of chemical transport and reaction in a suspension of cells I: An augmented forcing point method for the stationary case, IJNMF (2012) 69, 1736-52.}) for solving fluid-phase transport in a region outside of a collection of cells suspended in the fluid. We introduce a novel Radial Basis Function-Finite Difference (RBF-FD) method to solve reaction-diffusion equations on the surface of each of a collection of 2D stationary platelets suspended in blood. Parametric RBFs are used to represent the geometry of the platelets and give accurate geometric information needed for the RBF-FD method. Symmetric Hermite-RBF interpolants are used for enforcing the boundary conditions on the fluid-phase chemical concentration, and their use removes a significant limitation of the original AFM. The efficacy of the new methods are shown through a series of numerical experiments; in particular, second order convergence for the coupled problem is demonstrated.

  19. Radial engine

    SciTech Connect

    Kmicikiewicz, M.A.

    1988-03-01

    A radial engine is described comprising: a housing; equally spaced openings disposed in ring-like arrangement on the periphery of the housing; a piston and cylinder arrangement in each of the opening, a piston rod for each arrangement fixed to and extending radially inwardly from its respective piston and through its respective opening; shoe means pivotally attached at the other end of each of the piston rod; radial guide means extending in the housing in line with each of the piston rods, and the shoe means provided with guide means followers to ensure radial reciprocal movement of the piston rods and shoe means; and a connecting ring journaled on a crankshaft for circular translation motion in the housing, the ring including a circular rim. Each shoe means includes an arcuate follower member being slidably connected to the rim of the connecting ring.

  20. Radial wedge flange clamp

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  1. Gravitational self-force in nonvacuum spacetimes: An effective field theory derivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Peter

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we investigate the motion of small compact objects in nonvacuum spacetimes using methods from effective field theory in curved spacetime. Although a vacuum formulation is sufficient in many astrophysical contexts, there are applications such as the role of the self-force in enforcing cosmic censorship in the context of the overcharging problem, which necessitate an extension into the nonvacuum regime. The defining feature of the self-force problem in nonvacuum spacetimes is the coupling between gravitational and nongravitational field perturbations. The formulation of the self-force problem for nonvacuum spacetimes was recently provided in simultaneous papers by Zimmerman and Poisson [Gravitational self-force in nonvacuum spacetimes, Phys. Rev. D 90, 084030 (2014)] and Linz, Friedmann, and Wiseman [Combined gravitational and electromagnetic self-force on charged particles in electrovac spacetimes, Phys. Rev. D 90, 084031 (2014)]. Here we distinguish ourselves by working with the effective action rather than the field equations. The formalism utilizes the multi-index notation developed by Zimmerman and Poisson [Gravitational self-force in nonvacuum spacetimes, Phys. Rev. D 90, 084030 (2014) to accommodate the coupling between the different fields. Using dimensional regularization, we arrive at a finite expression for the local self-force expressed in terms of multi-index quantities evaluated in the background spacetime. We then apply the formalism to compute the coupled gravitational self-force in two explicit cases. First, we calculate the self-force on a massive particle possessing scalar charge and moving in a scalarvac spacetime. We then derive an expression for the self-force on an electrically charged, massive particle moving in an electrovac spacetime. In both cases, the force is expressed as a sum of local terms involving tensors defined in the background spacetime and evaluated at the current position of the particle, as well as tail integrals

  2. THE EFFECT OF SUBMAXIMAL INHALATION ON MEASURES DERIVED FROM FORCED EXPIRATORY SPIROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE EFFECT OF SUBMAXIMAL INHALATION ON MEASURES DERIVED FROM FORCED EXPIRATORY SPIROMETRY. William F. McDonnell Human Studies Division, NHEERL, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, RTP, NC 27711.
    Short-term exposure to ozone results in a neurally-mediated decrease in the ab...

  3. Sliding-mode and proportional-derivative-type motion control with radial basis function neural network based estimators for wheeled vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pamosoaji, Anugrah K.; Thuong Cat, Pham; Hong, Keum-Shik

    2014-12-01

    An obstacle avoidance problem of rear-steered wheeled vehicles in consideration of the presence of uncertainties is addressed. Modelling errors and additional uncertainties are taken into consideration. Controller designs for driving and steering motors are designed. A proportional-derivative-type driving motor controller and a sliding-mode steering controller combined with radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) based estimators are proposed. The convergence properties of the RBFNN-based estimators are proven by the Stone-Weierstrass theorem. The stability of the proposed control law is proven using Lyapunov stability analysis. The obstacle avoidance strategy utilising the sliding surface adjustment to an existing navigation method is presented. It is concluded that the driving velocity and steering-angle performances of the proposed control system are satisfactory.

  4. First principles derived, transferable force fields for CO2 adsorption in Na-exchanged cationic zeolites.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hanjun; Kamakoti, Preeti; Ravikovitch, Peter I; Aronson, Matthew; Paur, Charanjit; Sholl, David S

    2013-08-21

    The development of accurate force fields is vital for predicting adsorption in porous materials. Previously, we introduced a first principles-based transferable force field for CO2 adsorption in siliceous zeolites (Fang et al., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2012, 116, 10692). In this study, we extend our approach to CO2 adsorption in cationic zeolites which possess more complex structures. Na-exchanged zeolites are chosen for demonstrating the approach. These methods account for several structural complexities including Al distribution, cation positions and cation mobility, all of which are important for predicting adsorption. The simulation results are validated with high-resolution experimental measurements of isotherms and microcalorimetric heats of adsorption on well-characterized materials. The choice of first-principles method has a significant influence on the ability of force fields to accurately describe CO2-zeolite interactions. The PBE-D2 derived force field, which performed well for CO2 adsorption in siliceous zeolites, does not do so for Na-exchanged zeolites; the PBE-D2 method overestimates CO2 adsorption energies on multi-cation sites that are common in cationic zeolites with low Si/Al ratios. In contrast, a force field derived from the DFT/CC method performed well. Agreement was obtained between simulation and experiment not only for LTA-4A on which the force field fitting is based, but for other two common adsorbents, NaX and NaY.

  5. Satellite-derived aerosol radiative forcing from the 2004 British Columbia wildfires

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, S.; Leighton, H.

    2008-01-01

    The British Columbia wildfires of 2004 was one of the largest wildfire events in the last ten years in Canada. Both the shortwave and longwave smoke aerosol radiative forcing at the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) are investigated using data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instruments. Relationships between the radiative forcing fluxes (??F) and wildfire aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 0.55 ??m (??0.55) are deduced for both noontime instantaneous forcing and diurnally averaged forcing. The noontime averaged instantaneous shortwave and longwave smoke aerosol radiative forcing at the TOA are 45.8??27.5 W m-2 and -12.6??6.9 W m-2, respectively for a selected study area between 62??N and 68??N in latitude and 125??W and 145??W in longitude over three mainly clear-sky days (23-25 June). The derived diurnally averaged smoke aerosol shortwave radiative forcing is 19.9??12.1 W m-2 for a mean ??0.55 of 1.88??0.71 over the same time period. The derived ??F-?? relationship can be implemented in the radiation scheme used in regional climate models to assess the effect of wildfire aerosols.

  6. Lithosphere thickness and mantle viscosity estimated from joint inversion of GPS and GRACE-derived radial deformation and gravity rates in North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, S.

    2013-09-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) and the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) have been used to respectively determine the Earth's surface deformation and gravity changes associated with glacial isostatic adjustment, which is caused by ongoing stress release of the viscoelastic mantle after removal of the Late Pleistocene ice sheets. Here we present a joint inversion analysis of GPS-derived radial (vertical) deformation and GRACE-derived gravity rates in North America to examine whether the ice sheets (ICE-3G and ICE-5G) and earth models can fit the satellite based observations. The results of joint inversion give an effective lithosphere thickness of 150 km (110-180 km under a statistical confidence level of 80 per cent), an upper-mantle viscosity of 3.7 (2.0-5.0; 90 per cent confidence level) × 1020 Pa s, and a lower-mantle viscosity of 1.9 (1.3-2.6; 90 per cent confidence level) × 1021 Pa s. More sophisticated models such as introducing a transition zone of 400-670 km are not fully resolved with current data sets because there is no significant improvement in fitting observations. Tests of modifying ICE-5G show that a reduction of ice thickness by ˜20 per cent in the area west of Hudson Bay and an increase by ˜40 per cent in the southeast (Quebec region) are required to fit both observed vertical deformation and gravity changes. An additional test from inversion analysis of GRACE-derived geoid rates confirms possible signal loss in the GRACE-derived gravity rates, which could be due to noise reduction methods used in data processing stages.

  7. Regional Recovery of the Disturbing Gravitational Potential from Satellite Observations of First-, Second- and Third-order Radial Derivatives of the Disturbing Gravitational Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, P.; Pitonak, M.; Sprlak, M.

    2015-12-01

    Recently realized gravity-dedicated satellite missions allow for measuring values of scalar, vectorial (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment - GRACE) and second-order tensorial (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer - GOCE) parameters of the Earth's gravitational potential. Theoretical aspects related to using moving sensors for measuring elements of a third-order gravitational tensor are currently under investigation, e.g. the gravity-dedicated satellite mission OPTIMA (OPTical Interferometry for global Mass change detection from space) should measure third-order derivatives of the Earth's gravitational potential. This contribution investigates regional recovery of the disturbing gravitational potential on the Earth's surface from satellite observations of first-, second- and third-order radial derivatives of the disturbing gravitational potential. Synthetic measurements along a satellite orbit at the altitude of 250 km are synthetized from the global gravitational model EGM2008 and polluted by the Gaussian noise. The process of downward continuation is stabilized by the Tikhonov regularization. Estimated values of the disturbing gravitational potential are compared with the same quantity synthesized directly from EGM2008. Finally, this contribution also discusses merging a regional solution into a global field as a patchwork.

  8. Possibilities of the regional gravity field recovery from first-, second- and third-order radial derivatives of the disturbing gravitational potential measured on moving platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitonak, Martin; Sprlak, Michal; Novak, Pavel; Tenzer, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Recently realized gravity-dedicated satellite missions allow for measuring values of scalar, vectorial (Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment - GRACE) and second-order tensorial (Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer - GOCE) parameters of the Earth's gravitational potential. Theoretical aspects related to using moving sensors for measuring elements of the third-order gravitational tensor are currently under investigation, e.g., the gravity field-dedicated satellite mission OPTIMA (OPTical Interferometry for global Mass change detection from space) should measure third-order derivatives of the Earth's gravitational potential. This contribution investigates regional recovery of the disturbing gravitational potential on the Earth's surface from satellite and aerial observations of the first-, second- and third-order radial derivatives of the disturbing gravitational potential. Synthetic measurements along a satellite orbit at the altitude of 250 km and along an aircraft track at the altitude of 10 km are synthetized from the global gravitational model EGM2008 and polluted by the Gaussian noise. The process of downward continuation is stabilized by the Tikhonov regularization. Estimated values of the disturbing gravitational potential are compared with the same quantity synthesized directly from EGM2008.

  9. Geometric derivation of the microscopic stress: A covariant central force decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Sánchez, Alejandro; Vanegas, Juan M.; Arroyo, Marino

    2016-08-01

    We revisit the derivation of the microscopic stress, linking the statistical mechanics of particle systems and continuum mechanics. The starting point in our geometric derivation is the Doyle-Ericksen formula, which states that the Cauchy stress tensor is the derivative of the free-energy with respect to the ambient metric tensor and which follows from a covariance argument. Thus, our approach to define the microscopic stress tensor does not rely on the statement of balance of linear momentum as in the classical Irving-Kirkwood-Noll approach. Nevertheless, the resulting stress tensor satisfies balance of linear and angular momentum. Furthermore, our approach removes the ambiguity in the definition of the microscopic stress in the presence of multibody interactions by naturally suggesting a canonical and physically motivated force decomposition into pairwise terms, a key ingredient in this theory. As a result, our approach provides objective expressions to compute a microscopic stress for a system in equilibrium and for force-fields expanded into multibody interactions of arbitrarily high order. We illustrate the proposed methodology with molecular dynamics simulations of a fibrous protein using a force-field involving up to 5-body interactions.

  10. Seasonal variation of surface and atmospheric cloud radiative forcing over the globe derived from satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Shashi K.; Staylor, W. Frank; Darnell, Wayne L.; Wilber, Anne C.; Ritchey, Nancy A.

    1993-01-01

    Global distributions of surface and atmospheric cloud radiative forcing parameters have been derived using parameterized radiation models with satellite meteorological data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project, and directly measured top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment. Specifically, shortwave, longwave, and total cloud forcing at the surface, and column-averaged values of longwave cloud forcing of the atmosphere were derived for the midseasonal months of April, July, and October 1985 and January 1986, covering a complete annual cycle. Seasonal variability is illustrated by comparing the results for July 1985 and January 1986, which represent the seasonal extremes. Surface shortwave cloud forcing is always negative, representing a cooling of the surface, with strongest cooling (-120 to -180 W/sq m) occurring over midlatitude storm tracks of the summer hemisphere. Surface longwave cloud forcing is always positive, representing a warming of the surface, with strongest warming (60 to 75 W/sq m) occurring over storm tracks of the winter hemisphere. Zonal averages show the entire summer hemisphere dominated by shortwave cooling, the middle and high latitudes of the winter hemisphere dominated by longwave warming, and a broad zone of transition in between. The globally averaged total cloud forcing amounts to a cooling throughout the year, ranging from a low of about -12 W/sq m for July 1985 to a high of about -25 W/sq m for January 1986. The longwave cloud forcing of the atmosphere shows a strong warming over deep convective regions in the tropics and a moderate cooling outside the tropics, amounting to a weak cooling (-2 to -5 W/sq m) in the global average. Comparisons of the results with general circulation model simulations show broad qualitative agreement regarding the locations of prominent warming and cooling regions. Quantitative comparisons, on the other hand, show significant differences between the

  11. Repair of 20-mm long rabbit radial bone defects using BMP-derived peptide combined with an alpha-tricalcium phosphate scaffold.

    PubMed

    Saito, Atsuhiro; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Kitamura, Makoto; Ogata, Shin-Ichi; Yoshihara, Yusuke; Masuda, Shingo; Ohtsuki, Chikara; Tanihara, Masao

    2006-06-15

    In previous studies, we have reported that the BMP-2-derived peptide KIPKASSVPTELSAISTLYL, corresponding to BMP-2 residues 73-92, binds to a BMP-2-specific receptor, and elevates both alkaline phosphatase activity and osteocalcin mRNA in the murine mesenchymal cell line, C3H10T1/2. This 73-92 peptide conjugated to a covalently crosslinked alginate gel induced ectopic bone formation in rat calf muscle, and activated osteoblasts to promote the repair of rat tibial bone defects. Here, we report repair of 20-mm long rabbit radial bone defects using the 73-92 peptide combined with a porous alpha-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffold. In vitro, the 73-92 peptide was released from the porous alpha-TCP scaffold over more than one week. In vivo, radiomorphometric analysis showed that the 73-92 peptide combined with the porous alpha-TCP scaffold promoted calcification in the implanted area in a dose-dependent manner, and that 5 mg of the 73-92 peptide induced connection of 20-mm long defects, defects of critical size, 12 weeks after implantation. Histological examination revealed newly formed bone and a marrow cavity in the implanted area. The area of bone denser than 690 mg/cm(3) induced by the 73-92 peptide was nearly equal to that of the contralateral radius.

  12. Force.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  13. COFFDROP: A Coarse-Grained Nonbonded Force Field for Proteins Derived from All-Atom Explicit-Solvent Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We describe the derivation of a set of bonded and nonbonded coarse-grained (CG) potential functions for use in implicit-solvent Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of proteins derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of amino acids. Bonded potential functions were derived from 1 μs MD simulations of each of the 20 canonical amino acids, with histidine modeled in both its protonated and neutral forms; nonbonded potential functions were derived from 1 μs MD simulations of every possible pairing of the amino acids (231 different systems). The angle and dihedral probability distributions and radial distribution functions sampled during MD were used to optimize a set of CG potential functions through use of the iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) method. The optimized set of potential functions—which we term COFFDROP (COarse-grained Force Field for Dynamic Representation Of Proteins)—quantitatively reproduced all of the “target” MD distributions. In a first test of the force field, it was used to predict the clustering behavior of concentrated amino acid solutions; the predictions were directly compared with the results of corresponding all-atom explicit-solvent MD simulations and found to be in excellent agreement. In a second test, BD simulations of the small protein villin headpiece were carried out at concentrations that have recently been studied in all-atom explicit-solvent MD simulations by Petrov and Zagrovic (PLoS Comput. Biol.2014, 5, e1003638). The anomalously strong intermolecular interactions seen in the MD study were reproduced in the COFFDROP simulations; a simple scaling of COFFDROP’s nonbonded parameters, however, produced results in better accordance with experiment. Overall, our results suggest that potential functions derived from simulations of pairwise amino acid interactions might be of quite broad applicability, with COFFDROP likely to be especially useful for modeling unfolded or intrinsically

  14. Minimum Detectable Change in Medial Tibiofemoral Contact Force Parameters: Derivation and Application to a Load-Altering Intervention.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Joaquin; Willson, John

    2017-04-01

    Medial tibiofemoral joint contact forces can be estimated using musculoskeletal models. To assess change in these forces that accompany load-modifying interventions, minimum detectable change (MDC) thresholds must be established. The primary study purpose was to derive MDCs for medial tibiofemoral peak force and force impulse during walking. The secondary purpose was to identify the proportions of individuals exhibiting reductions greater than these MDCs when walking with lateral foot wedging. Eight healthy individuals provided 3-dimensional gait data over 3 test sessions to serve as inputs for an inverse dynamics-driven medial tibiofemoral contact force model, from which MDCs for peak force and impulse were derived. The MDC was 0.246 BW (8.7%) for peak force and 0.0385 BW∙s (3.7%) for impulse. Then, 25 healthy individuals provided gait data by walking with and without 6° laterally wedged foot orthoses, and the proportion of individuals exhibiting changes in medial tibiofemoral contact peak force and impulse values exceeding the MDC threshold was determined. For impulse and peak force, 52% and 4% of participants exhibited a decrease exceeding the MDC, respectively. In summary, medial tibiofemoral contact force MDCs were derived, with impulse showing greater sensitivity than peak force to the effects of a biomechanical intervention.

  15. The force-field derivation and application of explosive/additive interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yao; Chen, Jun

    2016-10-01

    The inter-molecular force-field across RDX/(paraffin, fluoropolymer) interfaces are derived from first-principles calculated energies under the GGA+vdW functional. Based on the force-field, the polycrystal structures of mixture explosives are obtained, and a set of thermodynamic properties are calculated, including the elastic constants, thermal expansion coefficient, heat capacity, isothermal curve and the Hugoniot curve. The results are in good agreement with the available experiments, and provide a reasonable prediction about the properties of plastic bonded explosives. We find that the thermal expansion coefficient of a multi-component explosive is not only determined by the properties of the components, but is also affected by the thermal stress at the explosive/additive interfaces.

  16. Radial-radial single rotor turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Platts, David A.

    2006-05-16

    A rotor for use in turbine applications has a radial compressor/pump having radially disposed spaced apart fins forming passages and a radial turbine having hollow turbine blades interleaved with the fins and through which fluid from the radial compressor/pump flows. The rotor can, in some applications, be used to produce electrical power.

  17. Radial Erosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    The ejecta surrounding the crater (off image to the left) in this image has undergone significant erosion by the wind. The wind has stripped the surface features from the ejecta and has started to winnow away the ejecta blanket. Near the margin of the ejecta the wind is eroding along a radial pattern -- taking advantage of radial emplacement. Note the steep margin of the ejecta blanket. Most, if not all, of the fine ejecta material has been removed and the wind in now working on the more massive continuous ejecta blanket.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 12.5, Longitude 197.4 East (162.6 West). 37 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. Development of a Forced Oscillation System for Measuring Dynamic Derivatives of Fluidic Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trieu, B. C.; Tyler, T. R.; Stewart, B. K.; Chamock, J. K.; Fisher, D. W.; Heim, E. H.; Brandon, J.; Grafton, S. B.

    2006-01-01

    A new Forced Oscillation System (FOS) has been designed and built at NASA Langley Research Center that provides new capabilities for aerodynamic researchers to investigate the dynamic derivatives of vehicle configurations. Test vehicles may include high performance and general aviation aircraft, re-entry spacecraft, submarines and other fluidic vehicles. The measured data from forced oscillation testing is used in damping characteristic studies and in simulation databases for control algorithm development and performance analyses. The newly developed FOS hardware provides new flexibility for conducting dynamic derivative studies. The design is based on a tracking principle where a desired motion profile is achieved via a fast closed-loop positional controller. The motion profile for the tracking system is numerically generated and thus not limited to sinusoidal motion. This approach permits non-traditional profiles such as constant velocity and Schroeder sweeps. Also, the new system permits changes in profile parameters including nominal offset angle, waveform, and associated parameters such as amplitude and frequency. Most importantly, the changes may be made remotely without halting the FOS and the tunnel. System requirements, system analysis, and the resulting design are addressed for a new FOS in the 12-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel (LSWT). The overall system including mechanical, electrical, and control subsystems is described. The design is complete, and the FOS has been built and installed in the 12-Foot LSWT. System integration and testing have verified design intent and safe operation. Currently it is being validated for wind-tunnel operations and aerodynamic testing. The system is a potential major enhancement to forced oscillation studies. The productivity gain from the motion profile automation will shorten the testing cycles needed for control surface and aircraft control algorithm development. The new motion capabilities also will serve as a test bed for

  19. Radial systems of dark globules

    SciTech Connect

    Gyul'budagyn, A.L.

    1986-03-01

    The author gives examples of radial systems consisting of dark globules and ''elephant trunks''. Besides already known systems, which contain hot stars at their center, data are given on three radial systems of a new kind, at the center of which there are stars of spectral types later than B. Data are given on 32 globules of radial systems of the association Cep OB2. On the basis of the observational data, it is concluded that at least some of the isolated Bok globules derive from elephant trunks and dark globules forming radial systems around hot stars. It is also suggested that the two molecular clouds situated near the Rosette nebula and possessing velocities differing by ca 20 km/sec from the velocity of the nebula could have been ejected in opposite directions from the center of the nebula. One of these clouds consists of dark globules forming the radial system of the Rosette nebula.

  20. A novel integrated 4-DOF radial hybrid magnetic bearing for MSCMG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinji, Sun; Ziyan, Ju; Weitao, Han; Gang, Liu

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel integrated radial hybrid magnetic bearing (RHMB) for application with the small-sized magnetically suspended control moment gyroscope (MSCMG), which can control four degrees of freedom (4-DOFs), including two radial translational DOFs and two radial tilting DOFs, and provide the axial passive resilience. The configuration and working principle of the RHMB are introduced. Mathematical models of radial force, axial resilience and moment are established by using equivalent magnetic circuit method (EMCM), from which the radial force-radial displacement, radial force-current relationships are derived, as well as axial resilience-axial displacement, moment-tilting angle and moment-current. Finite element method (FEM) is also applied to analyze the performance and characteristics of the RHMB. The analysis results are in good agreement with that calculated by the EMCM, which is helpful in designing, optimizing and controlling the RHMB. The comparisons between the performances of the integrated 4-DOF RHMB and the traditional 4-DOF RHMB are made. The contrast results indicate that the proposed integrated 4-DOF RHMB possesses better performance compared to the traditional structure, such as copper loss, current stiffness, and tilting current stiffness.

  1. On the use of the proximity force approximation for deriving limits to short-range gravitational-like interactions from sphere-plane Casimir force experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Onofrio, Roberto

    2009-09-15

    We discuss the role of the proximity force approximation in deriving limits to the existence of Yukawian forces--predicted in the submillimeter range by many unification models--from Casimir force experiments using the sphere-plane geometry. Two forms of this approximation are discussed, the first used in most analyses of the residuals from the Casimir force experiments performed so far, and the second recently discussed in this context in R. Decca et al.[Phys. Rev. D 79, 124021 (2009)]. We show that the former form of the proximity force approximation overestimates the expected Yukawa force and that the relative deviation from the exact Yukawa force is of the same order of magnitude, in the realistic experimental settings, as the relative deviation expected between the exact Casimir force and the Casimir force evaluated in the proximity force approximation. This implies both a systematic shift making the actual limits to the Yukawa force weaker than claimed so far, and a degree of uncertainty in the {alpha}-{lambda} plane related to the handling of the various approximations used in the theory for both the Casimir and the Yukawa forces. We further argue that the recently discussed form for the proximity force approximation is equivalent, for a geometry made of a generic object interacting with an infinite planar slab, to the usual exact integration of any additive two-body interaction, without any need to invoke approximation schemes. If the planar slab is of finite size, an additional source of systematic error arises due to the breaking of the planar translational invariance of the system, and we finally discuss to what extent this may affect limits obtained on power-law and Yukawa forces.

  2. On the Problem of Theoretical Pressure of a Radial-Flow Pump Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlechko, V. N.; Protasov, S. K.

    2014-11-01

    An analysis has been made of the velocity of motion of a medium in the wheel of a radial-flow pump unit under the action of a centrifugal force and overcoming the medium's inertial force with its blades. Relations for the pressure produced by the radial-flow pump unit as a function of the angle of inclination of its blades have been derived. The well-known Euler equation describing the dynamic pressure of the radial-flow pump unit has been supplemented to determine its static pressure. An analysis of the obtained results has shown that the pressure of the radial-flow pump unit is maximum at an angle of inclination of its blades of 110o and negative at 140o or larger angles.

  3. Relativistic version of the Feynman-Dyson-Hughes derivation of the Lorentz force law and Maxwell's homogeneous equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essén, Hanno; Nordmark, Arne B.

    2016-09-01

    The canonical Poisson bracket algebra of four-dimensional relativistic mechanics is used to derive the equation of motion for a charged particle, with the Lorentz force, and the homogeneous Maxwell equations.

  4. Enhanced bone formation in large segmental radial defects by combining adipose-derived stem cells expressing bone morphogenetic protein 2 with nHA/RHLC/PLA scaffold.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wei; Dong, Jinlei; Jiang, Ming; Wu, Junwei; Cui, Fuzhai; Zhou, Dongsheng

    2010-12-01

    In this study, rabbit adipose-derived stem cells (rASCs) were isolated, cultured in vitro, and transfected with recombinant adenovirus vector containing human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (Ad-hBMP2). These cells were combined with a nano-hydroxyapatite/recombinant human-like collagen/poly(lactic acid) scaffold (nHA/RHLC/PLA) to fabricate a new biocomposite (hBMP2/rASCs-nHA/RHLC/PLA, group 1) and cultured in osteogenic medium. Non-transfected rASCs mixed with nHA/RHLC/PLA (rASCs-nHA/RHLC/PLA, group 2) and nHA/RHLC/PLA scaffold alone (group 3) served as controls. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) demonstrated integration of rASCs with the nHA/RHLC/PLA scaffold. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analyses of collagen I, osteonectin, and osteopontin cDNA expression indicated that the osteogenic potency of rASCs was enhanced by transfection with Ad-hBMP2. After in vitro culture for seven days, three groups were implanted into 15-mm length critical-sized segmental radial defects in rabbits. After 12 weeks, radiographic and histological analyses were performed. In group 1, the medullary cavity was recanalised, bone was rebuilt and moulding was finished, the bone contour had begun to remodel and scaffold was degraded completely. In contrast, bone defects were not repaired in groups 2 or 3. Furthermore, the scaffold degradation rate in group 1 was significantly higher than in groups 2 or 3. In summary, after transduction with Ad-hBMP2, the osteogenesis of rASCs was enhanced; a new biocomposite created with these cells induced repair of a critical bone defect in vivo in a relatively short time.

  5. Radial Halbach Magnetic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.; Gallo, Christopher A.; Thompson, William K.

    2009-01-01

    Radial Halbach magnetic bearings have been investigated as part of an effort to develop increasingly reliable noncontact bearings for future high-speed rotary machines that may be used in such applications as aircraft, industrial, and land-vehicle power systems and in some medical and scientific instrumentation systems. Radial Halbach magnetic bearings are based on the same principle as that of axial Halbach magnetic bearings, differing in geometry as the names of these two types of bearings suggest. Both radial and axial Halbach magnetic bearings are passive in the sense that unlike most other magnetic bearings that have been developed in recent years, they effect stable magnetic levitation without need for complex active control. Axial Halbach magnetic bearings were described in Axial Halbach Magnetic Bearings (LEW-18066-1), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 7 (July 2008), page 85. In the remainder of this article, the description of the principle of operation from the cited prior article is recapitulated and updated to incorporate the present radial geometry. In simplest terms, the basic principle of levitation in an axial or radial Halbach magnetic bearing is that of the repulsive electromagnetic force between (1) a moving permanent magnet and (2) an electric current induced in a stationary electrical conductor by the motion of the magnetic field. An axial or radial Halbach bearing includes multiple permanent magnets arranged in a Halbach array ("Halbach array" is defined below) in a rotor and multiple conductors in the form of wire coils in a stator, all arranged so the rotary motion produces an axial or radial repulsion that is sufficient to levitate the rotor. A basic Halbach array (see Figure 1) consists of a row of permanent magnets, each oriented so that its magnetic field is at a right angle to that of the adjacent magnet, and the right-angle turns are sequenced so as to maximize the magnitude of the magnetic flux density on one side of the row while

  6. Strategy to use the Terra Aerosol Information to Derive the Global Aerosol Radiative Forcing of Climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Terra will derive the aerosol optical thickness and properties. The aerosol properties can be used to distinguish between natural and human-made aerosol. In the polar orbit Terra will measure aerosol only once a day, around 10:30 am. How will we use this information to study the global radiative impacts of aerosol on climate? We shall present a strategy to address this problem. It includes the following steps: - From the Terra aerosol optical thickness and size distribution model we derive the effect of aerosol on reflection of solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere. In a sensitivity study we show that the effect of aerosol on solar fluxes can be derived 10 times more accurately from the MODIS data than derivation of the optical thickness itself. Applications to data over several regions will be given. - Using 1/2 million AERONET global data of aerosol spectral optical thickness we show that the aerosol optical thickness and properties during the Terra 10:30 pass are equivalent to the daily average. Due to the aerosol lifetime of several days measurements at this time of the day are enough to assess the daily impact of aerosol on radiation. - Aerosol impact on the top of the atmosphere is only part of the climate question. The INDOEX experiment showed that addressing the impact of aerosol on climate, requires also measurements of the aerosol forcing at the surface. This can be done by a combination of measurements of MODIS and AERONET data.

  7. Comparison of immature and mature bone marrow-derived dendritic cells by atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Feiyue; Wang, Jiongkun; Hu, Mingqian; Yu, Yu; Chen, Guoliang; Liu, Jing

    2011-07-01

    A comparative study of immature and mature bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) was first performed through an atomic force microscope (AFM) to clarify differences of their nanostructure and adhesion force. AFM images revealed that the immature BMDCs treated by granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor plus IL-4 mainly appeared round with smooth surface, whereas the mature BMDCs induced by lipopolysaccharide displayed an irregular shape with numerous pseudopodia or lamellapodia and ruffles on the cell membrane besides becoming larger, flatter, and longer. AFM quantitative analysis further showed that the surface roughness of the mature BMDCs greatly increased and that the adhesion force of them was fourfold more than that of the immature BMDCs. The nano-features of the mature BMDCs were supported by a high level of IL-12 produced from the mature BMDCs and high expression of MHC-II on the surface of them. These findings provide a new insight into the nanostructure of the immature and mature BMDCs.

  8. Correlations of the instantaneous carrying force and pressure distribution in the case of the narrow sliding radial bearing under hard shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrescu, I. M.; Coteţiu, R.; Darabă, D.

    2017-02-01

    We present the determining relationship of carriage in non-dimensional form for narrow radial bearings subjected to shocks and vibrations, as well as the determining relationships of the lubricant minimum thickness in relation to the dynamic loading. Due to the very short time of loading radial bearings subjected to shocks and vibrations, of about 0.5-1 ms, we consider only the approaching motion between spindle/axle and bushing on the direction of the centre line, without the rotation of the spindle/axle (the case of the non-rotating bearing), so that the effect of the lubricant expulsion be prevalent in the achieving of the self-carrying film. The paper is focused on determining relationship of carriage in dimensional form for narrow radial bearings exposed to shocks and vibrations, as well as the determining relationships of the pressure distribution from the film to be lubricated in various places of the bearing’s body. It is showed the details during the measuring accomplishments and the experimental results are registered in a record of obtained results. This paper was accepted for publication in Proceedings after double peer reviewing process but was not presented at the Conference ROTRIB’16

  9. Pregnancy-induced remodelling and enhanced endothelium-derived hyperpolarization-type vasodilator activity in rat uterine radial artery: transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4 channels, caveolae and myoendothelial gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Senadheera, Sevvandi; Bertrand, Paul P; Grayson, T Hilton; Leader, Leo; Murphy, Timothy V; Sandow, Shaun L

    2013-01-01

    In pregnancy, the vasculature of the uterus undergoes rapid remodelling to increase blood flow and maintain perfusion to the fetus. The present study determines the distribution and density of caveolae, transient receptor potential vanilloid type 4 channels (TRPV4) and myoendothelial gap junctions, and the relative contribution of related endothelium-dependent vasodilator components in uterine radial arteries of control virgin non-pregnant and 20-day late-pregnant rats. The hypothesis examined is that specific components of endothelium-dependent vasodilator mechanisms are altered in pregnancy-related uterine radial artery remodelling. Conventional and serial section electron microscopy were used to determine the morphological characteristics of uterine radial arteries from control and pregnant rats. TRPV4 distribution and expression was examined using conventional confocal immunohistochemistry, and the contribution of endothelial TRPV4, nitric oxide (NO) and endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH)-type activity determined using pressure myography with pharmacological intervention. Data show outward hypertrophic remodelling occurs in uterine radial arteries in pregnancy. Further, caveolae density in radial artery endothelium and smooth muscle from pregnant rats was significantly increased by ∼94% and ∼31%, respectively, compared with control, whereas caveolae density did not differ in endothelium compared with smooth muscle from control. Caveolae density was significantly higher by ∼59% on the abluminal compared with the luminal surface of the endothelium in uterine radial artery of pregnant rats but did not differ at those surfaces in control. TRPV4 was present in endothelium and smooth muscle, but not associated with internal elastic lamina hole sites in radial arteries. TRPV4 fluorescence intensity was significantly increased in the endothelium and smooth muscle of radial artery of pregnant compared with control rats by ∼2.6- and 5.5-fold

  10. Atomic force microscope observation of branching in single transcript molecules derived from human cardiac muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Jason; Hsueh, Carlin; Mishra, Bud; Gimzewski, James K.

    2008-09-01

    We have used an atomic force microscope to examine a clinically derived sample of single-molecule gene transcripts, in the form of double-stranded cDNA, (c: complementary) obtained from human cardiac muscle without the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. We observed a log-normal distribution of transcript sizes, with most molecules being in the range of 0.4-7.0 kilobase pairs (kb) or 130-2300 nm in contour length, in accordance with the expected distribution of mRNA (m: messenger) sizes in mammalian cells. We observed novel branching structures not previously known to exist in cDNA, and which could have profound negative effects on traditional analysis of cDNA samples through cloning, PCR and DNA sequencing.

  11. Combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blumenstock, Kenneth A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing is disclosed that allows for both radial and thrust axes control of an associated shaft. The combination radial and thrust magnetic bearing comprises a rotor and a stator. The rotor comprises a shaft, and first and second rotor pairs each having respective rotor elements. The stator comprises first and second stator elements and a magnet-sensor disk. In one embodiment, each stator element has a plurality of split-poles and a corresponding plurality of radial force coils and, in another embodiment, each stator element does not require thrust force coils, and radial force coils are replaced by double the plurality of coils serving as an outer member of each split-pole half.

  12. Active-Region Twist Derived from Magnetic Tongues and Linear Force-Free Extrapolations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poisson, Mariano; López Fuentes, Marcelo; Mandrini, Cristina H.; Démoulin, Pascal

    2015-11-01

    The main aim of this study is to compare the amount of twist present in emerging active regions (ARs) from photospheric and coronal data. We use linear force-free field models of the observed coronal structure of ARs to determine the global twist. The coronal twist is derived, on one hand, from the force-free parameter [α] of the model and, on the other, from the computed coronal magnetic helicity normalized by the magnetic flux squared. We compare our results, for the same set of ARs, with those of Poisson et al. ( Solar Phys. 290, 727, 2015), in which the twist was estimated using the so-called magnetic tongues observed in line-of-sight magnetograms during AR emergence. We corroborate the agreement between the photospheric and coronal twist-sign and the presence of magnetic tongues as an early proxy of the AR non-potentiality. We find a globally linear relationship between the coronal twist and the one previously deduced for the emerging AR flux rope at the photospheric level. The coronal-twist value is typically lower by a factor of six than the one deduced for the emerging flux rope. We interpret this result as due to the partial emergence of the flux rope that forms the region.

  13. Electrostatic Forces: Formulas for the First Derivatives of a Polarizable, Anisotropic Electrostatic Potential Energy Function Based on Machine Learning.

    PubMed

    Mills, Matthew J L; Popelier, Paul L A

    2014-09-09

    Explicit formulas are derived analytically for the first derivatives of a (i) polarizable, (ii) high-rank multipolar electrostatic potential energy function for (iii) flexible molecules. The potential energy function uses a machine learning method called Kriging to predict the local-frame multipole moments of atoms defined via the Quantum Chemical Topology (QCT) approach. These atomic multipole moments then interact via an interaction tensor based on spherical harmonics. Atom-centered local coordinate frames are used, constructed from the internal geometry of the molecular system. The forces involve derivatives of both this geometric dependence and of the trained kriging models. In the near future, these analytical forces will enable molecular dynamics and geometry optimization calculations as part of the QCT force field.

  14. Generating and characterizing the mechanical properties of cell-derived matrices using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tello, Marta; Spenlé, Caroline; Hemmerlé, Joseph; Mercier, Luc; Fabre, Roxane; Allio, Guillaume; Simon-Assmann, Patricia; Goetz, Jacky G

    2016-02-01

    Mechanical interaction between cells and their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) controls key processes such as proliferation, differentiation and motility. For many years, two-dimensional (2D) models were used to better understand the interactions between cells and their surrounding ECM. More recently, variation of the mechanical properties of tissues has been reported to play a major role in physiological and pathological scenarios such as cancer progression. The 3D architecture of the ECM finely tunes cellular behavior to perform physiologically relevant tasks. Technical limitations prevented scientists from obtaining accurate assessment of the mechanical properties of physiologically realistic matrices. There is therefore a need for combining the production of high-quality cell-derived 3D matrices (CDMs) and the characterization of their topographical and mechanical properties. Here, we describe methods that allow to accurately measure the young modulus of matrices produced by various cellular types. In the first part, we will describe and review several protocols for generating CDMs matrices from endothelial, epithelial, fibroblastic, muscle and mesenchymal stem cells. We will discuss tools allowing the characterization of the topographical details as well as of the protein content of such CDMs. In a second part, we will report the methodologies that can be used, based on atomic force microscopy, to accurately evaluate the stiffness properties of the CDMs through the quantification of their young modulus. Altogether, such methodologies allow characterizing the stiffness and topography of matrices deposited by the cells, which is key for the understanding of cellular behavior in physiological conditions.

  15. Very empirical treatment of solvation and entropy: a force field derived from Log Po/w

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellogg, Glen Eugene; Burnett, James C.; Abraham, Donald J.

    2001-04-01

    A non-covalent interaction force field model derived from the partition coefficient of 1-octanol/water solubility is described. This model, HINT for Hydropathic INTeractions, is shown to include, in very empirical and approximate terms, all components of biomolecular associations, including hydrogen bonding, Coulombic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, entropy and solvation/desolvation. Particular emphasis is placed on: (1) demonstrating the relationship between the total empirical HINT score and free energy of association, ΔG interaction; (2) showing that the HINT hydrophobic-polar interaction sub-score represents the energy cost of desolvation upon binding for interacting biomolecules; and (3) a new methodology for treating constrained water molecules as discrete independent small ligands. An example calculation is reported for dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) bound with methotrexate (MTX). In that case the observed very tight binding, ΔG interaction≤-13.6 kcal mol-1, is largely due to ten hydrogen bonds between the ligand and enzyme with estimated strength ranging between -0.4 and -2.3 kcal mol-1. Four water molecules bridging between DHFR and MTX contribute an additional -1.7 kcal mol-1 stability to the complex. The HINT estimate of the cost of desolvation is +13.9 kcal mol-1.

  16. Radial stiffness improvement of a flywheel system using multi-surface superconducting levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basaran, Sinan; Sivrioglu, Selim

    2017-03-01

    The goal of this research study is the maximization of the levitation force in a flywheel system by the use of more than one permanent magnet with a single ring-shaped HTS material. An analytical model for the radial stiffness of the ring HTS-PM is derived using the frozen image approach. The experimental works are carried out for different polarizations of the permanent magnets, and radial stiffness values are obtained from the radial force measurements. The rotational test of the flywheel system is also realized for different cases. Finally, natural frequencies of the flywheel superconducting magnetic bearing system are experimentally obtained for different combinations of the permanent magnets using a frequency analyzer.

  17. Improvements in the LLNL objective analysis scheme for deriving forcing fields for single-column models using ARM data

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, M.J.; Yio, J.J.; Cederwall, R.T.

    1997-03-01

    The objective analysis method use for deriving Single-Column Model (SCM) forcing fields with ARM data (Leach, et al., 1996) is undergoing continual improvement. Several improvements were identified at the SCM Workshop held at LLNL in April 1996. These include incorporating large-scale analyses in the objective analysis, and time-filtering input data streams.

  18. The R.E.D. tools: advances in RESP and ESP charge derivation and force field library building.

    PubMed

    Dupradeau, François-Yves; Pigache, Adrien; Zaffran, Thomas; Savineau, Corentin; Lelong, Rodolphe; Grivel, Nicolas; Lelong, Dimitri; Rosanski, Wilfried; Cieplak, Piotr

    2010-07-28

    Deriving atomic charges and building a force field library for a new molecule are key steps when developing a force field required for conducting structural and energy-based analysis using molecular mechanics. Derivation of popular RESP charges for a set of residues is a complex and error prone procedure because it depends on numerous input parameters. To overcome these problems, the R.E.D. Tools (RESP and ESP charge Derive, ) have been developed to perform charge derivation in an automatic and straightforward way. The R.E.D. program handles chemical elements up to bromine in the periodic table. It interfaces different quantum mechanical programs employed for geometry optimization and computing molecular electrostatic potential(s), and performs charge fitting using the RESP program. By defining tight optimization criteria and by controlling the molecular orientation of each optimized geometry, charge values are reproduced at any computer platform with an accuracy of 0.0001 e. The charges can be fitted using multiple conformations, making them suitable for molecular dynamics simulations. R.E.D. allows also for defining charge constraints during multiple molecule charge fitting, which are used to derive charges for molecular fragments. Finally, R.E.D. incorporates charges into a force field library, readily usable in molecular dynamics computer packages. For complex cases, such as a set of homologous molecules belonging to a common family, an entire force field topology database is generated. Currently, the atomic charges and force field libraries have been developed for more than fifty model systems and stored in the RESP ESP charge DDataBase. Selected results related to non-polarizable charge models are presented and discussed.

  19. Neuron-derived FGF9 is essential for scaffold formation of Bergmann radial fibers and migration of granule neurons in the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yongshun; Chen, Lijie; Lin, Chunhong; Luo, Yongde; Tsai, Robert Y L; Wang, Fen

    2009-05-01

    Although fibroblast growth factor 9 (FGF9) is widely expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), the function of FGF9 in neural development remains undefined. To address this question, we deleted the Fgf9 gene specifically in the neural tube and demonstrated that FGF9 plays a key role in the postnatal migration of cerebellar granule neurons. Fgf9-null mice showed severe ataxia associated with disrupted Bergmann fiber scaffold formation, impaired granule neuron migration, and upset Purkinje cell maturation. Ex vivo cultured wildtype or Fgf9-null glia displayed a stellate morphology. Coculture with wildtype neurons, but not Fgf9-deficient neurons, or treating with FGF1 or FGF9 induced the cells to adopt a radial glial morphology. In situ hybridization showed that Fgf9 was expressed in neurons and immunostaining revealed that FGF9 was broadly distributed in both neurons and Bergmann glial radial fibers. Genetic analyses revealed that the FGF9 activities in cerebellar development are primarily transduced by FGF receptors 1 and 2. Furthermore, inhibition of the MAP kinase pathway, but not the PI3K/AKT pathway, abrogated the FGF activity to induce glial morphological changes, suggesting that the activity is mediated by the MAP kinase pathway. This work demonstrates that granule neurons secrete FGF9 to control formation of the Bergmann fiber scaffold, which in turn, guides their own inward migration and maturation of Purkinje cells.

  20. Longitudinal Dispersivity in a Radial Diverging Flow Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, J. C.; Wilson, M.; Bertsch, P. M.; Aburime, S. A.

    2005-12-01

    Hydrodynamic dispersion is an important factor controlling contaminant migration in the subsurface environment. However, few comprehensive data sets exist for evaluating the impact of travel distance and site heterogeneity on solute dispersion under non-uniform flow conditions. In addition, anionic tracers are often used to estimate physical transport parameters based on an erroneous assumption of conservative (i.e., non-reactive) behavior. Therefore, a series of field experiments using tritiated water and several other commonly used hydrologic tracers (Br, Cl, FBAs) were conducted in the water-table aquifer on the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (Aiken, SC) to evaluate solute transport processes in a diverging radial flow field. For each experiment, tracer-free groundwater was injected for approximately 24 hours at a fixed rate of 56.7 L/min (15 gpm) to establish a forced radial gradient prior to the introduction of a tracer pulse. After the tracer pulse, the forced gradient was maintained throughout the experiment using non-labeled groundwater. Tracer migration was monitored using a set of six sampling wells radially spaced at approximate distances of 1.5, 3, and 4.5 meters from a central injection well. Each sampling well was further divided into three discrete sampling depths that were monitored continuously throughout the course of the tracer experiment. At various time intervals, discrete groundwater samples were collected from all 18 sampling ports for tritium analysis. Longitudinal dispersivity for tritium breakthrough at each sampling location was estimated using analytical approximations of the convection dispersion equation (CDE) for radial flow assuming an instantaneous Dirac pulse and a pulse of known duration. The results were also compared to dispersivity values derived from fitting the tracer data to analytical solutions derived from assuming uniform flow conditions. Tremendous variation in dispersivity values and tracer arrival

  1. Aerosol Radiative Forcing Derived From SeaWIFS - Retrieved Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Mong-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Wang, Menghua; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    To understand climatic implications of aerosols over global oceans, the aerosol optical properties retrieved from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) are analyzed, and the effects of the aerosols on the Earth's radiation budgets (aerosol radiative forcing, ARF) are computed using a radiative transfer model. It is found that the distribution of the SeaWiFS-retrieved aerosol optical thickness is distinctively zonal. The maximum in the equatorial region coincides with the Intertropical Convergence Zone, and the maximum in the Southern Hemispheric high latitudes coincides with the region of prevailing westerlies. The minimum aerosol optical thickness is found in the subtropical high pressure regions, especially in the Southern Hemisphere. These zonal patterns clearly demonstrate the influence of atmospheric circulation on the oceanic aerosol distribution. Over global oceans, aerosols reduce the annual mean net downward solar flux by 5.4 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere and by 6.1 W m-2 at the surface. The largest ARF is found in the tropical Atlantic, Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal, the coastal regions of Southeast and East Asia, and the Southern Hemispheric high latitudes. During the period of the Indonesian big fires (September-December 1997), the cooling due to aerosols is greater than 15 W m-2 at the top of the atmosphere and greater than 30 W m(exp -1) at the surface in the vicinity of the maritime continents. The atmosphere receives extra solar radiation by greater than 15 W m(exp -1) over a large area. These large changes in radiative fluxes are expected to have enhanced the atmospheric stability, weakened the atmospheric circulation, and augmented the drought condition during that period. It would be very instructive to simulate the regional climatic. The model-calculated clear sky solar flux at the top of the atmosphere is compared with that derived from the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES). The net downward solar flux of

  2. Method to derive restoring forces of strained molecules from kinetic measurements.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen; Yang, Qing-Zheng; Khvostichenko, Daria; Kucharski, Timothy J; Chen, Joseph; Boulatov, Roman

    2009-02-04

    We report a method to estimate the restoring force of a constrained small molecule and relate changes in its reactivity to this force. Restoring force is a size-invariant measure of molecular strain and offers a conceptual framework to bridge studies of macromolecular reactions by force spectroscopies with those of strained small molecules. We illustrate our method by showing that E stiff stilbene (1,1'-Delta-biindan) with up to 700 pN of force along its C6,C6' axis is accessible by photoisomerization. It reverts thermally to the Z isomer with tau(1/2) approximately 100 ms, probably long enough to be useful for microscale actuation. The quantum yield of photoisomerization and the activation barrier of thermal isomerization of constrained stiff stilbene increase sharply as the restoring force decreases.

  3. Radial Artery Catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the radial artery for cardiac catheterization procedures. Advantages of Radial Artery Catheterization Any catheter placement into ... walk, and eat immediately. This is a particular advantage for patients with back problems because there is ...

  4. Field Sampling and Modeling of Creosote-Derived Contamination in a Tdally Forced Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, C.

    2003-12-01

    We are investigating the fate and transport of a creosote-derived groundwater contaminant plume found in an aquifer adjacent to and beneath a large, tidally forced river. The site, located in Coquitlam, BC, is adjacent to the Fraser River, and has been an active wood preserving facility since the 1920's. In the on-shore source zone, creosote has penetrated into the aquifer and a dissolved-phase plume, composed primarily of naphthalene, flows in the site aquifer from the source zone towards and below the river, eventually discharging from the river bottom. A capture well has been operated since 1996 to contain and capture the contaminant source. Previous research at this site has documented that biodegradation of naphthalene takes place in the plume fringe in the region of the aquifer that is beneath the river, but not onshore. Abundant methane and ferrous iron in the aquifer suggests that iron reduction and methanogenesis are the dominant terminal electron accepting processes. High offshore naphthalene concentrations sampled in 1999 despite three years of source containment and degradation led to the hypothesis that the plume may be at steady state due to buffering of contaminant concentrations by desorption from aquifer sediments. Naphthalene concentrations sampled in this study show that the contaminant plume is not at steady state. Results of groundwater flow modelling and sorption data show that the continued presence of high concentrations of naphthalene offshore are likely due to incomplete source containment or to slow migration of contaminants from upgradient regions of the aqueous plume. Although naphthalene has been the focus of all previous investigations of the offshore plume at this site, recent sampling shows that two other components of creosote, indane and benzothiophene, become the dominant components of the aqueous phase plume as it approaches the discharge point. Significant concentrations of these contaminants are likely discharging to the river

  5. Complex force history of a calving-generated glacial earthquake derived from broadband seismic inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeant, Amandine; Mangeney, Anne; Stutzmann, Eléonore; Montagner, Jean-Paul; Walter, Fabian; Moretti, Laurent; Castelnau, Olivier

    2016-02-01

    The force applied to the Earth by the calving of two icebergs at Jakobshavn Isbrae, Greenland, has been quantified. The source force history was recovered by inversion of regional broadband seismograms without any a priori constraint on the source time function, in contrast with previous studies. For periods 10-100 s, the three-component force can be obtained from distant stations alone and is proportional to the closest station seismograms. This inversion makes it possible to quantify changes of the source force direction and amplitude as a function of time and frequency. A detailed comparison with a video of the event was used to identify four forces associated with collision, then bottom-out and top-out rotation of the first and second icebergs, and ice mélange motion. Only the two iceberg rotations were identified in previous studies. All four processes are found here to contribute to the force amplitude and variability. Such a complete time-frequency force history provides unique dynamical constraints for mechanical calving models.

  6. Integrated Analysis of Contractile Kinetics, Force Generation, and Electrical Activity in Single Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Kijlstra, Jan David; Hu, Dongjian; Mittal, Nikhil; Kausel, Eduardo; van der Meer, Peter; Garakani, Arman; Domian, Ibrahim J

    2015-12-08

    The quantitative analysis of cardiomyocyte function is essential for stem cell-based approaches for the in vitro study of human cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. We present a method to comprehensively assess the function of single human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hPSC-CMs) through simultaneous quantitative analysis of contraction kinetics, force generation, and electrical activity. We demonstrate that statistical analysis of movies of contracting hPSC-CMs can be used to quantify changes in cellular morphology over time and compute contractile kinetics. Using a biomechanical model that incorporates substrate stiffness, we calculate cardiomyocyte force generation at single-cell resolution and validate this approach with conventional traction force microscopy. The addition of fluorescent calcium indicators or membrane potential dyes allows the simultaneous analysis of contractility and calcium handling or action potential morphology. Accordingly, our approach has the potential for broad application in the study of cardiac disease, drug discovery, and cardiotoxicity screening.

  7. Integrated Analysis of Contractile Kinetics, Force Generation, and Electrical Activity in Single Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kijlstra, Jan David; Hu, Dongjian; Mittal, Nikhil; Kausel, Eduardo; van der Meer, Peter; Garakani, Arman; Domian, Ibrahim J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The quantitative analysis of cardiomyocyte function is essential for stem cell-based approaches for the in vitro study of human cardiac physiology and pathophysiology. We present a method to comprehensively assess the function of single human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte (hPSC-CMs) through simultaneous quantitative analysis of contraction kinetics, force generation, and electrical activity. We demonstrate that statistical analysis of movies of contracting hPSC-CMs can be used to quantify changes in cellular morphology over time and compute contractile kinetics. Using a biomechanical model that incorporates substrate stiffness, we calculate cardiomyocyte force generation at single-cell resolution and validate this approach with conventional traction force microscopy. The addition of fluorescent calcium indicators or membrane potential dyes allows the simultaneous analysis of contractility and calcium handling or action potential morphology. Accordingly, our approach has the potential for broad application in the study of cardiac disease, drug discovery, and cardiotoxicity screening. PMID:26626178

  8. Ab initio calculations on peptide-derived oxazoles and thiazoles: Improved molecular mechanics parameters for the AMBER* force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boden, Christopher D. J.; Pattenden, Gerald

    1999-03-01

    Ab initio calculations at the RHF/6-31G* and MP2/6- 31G*//RHF/6-31G* levels of theory are performed for 2-methyl-4-carboxamido-oxazoles and -thiazoles, including rotational profiles for the ring-carboxamide bond, which showed the expected conjugation and hydrogen bonding effects. On the basis of these data, newly optimised stretch, bend and torsional parameters for the AMBER* force field are derived, along with CHELPG-fitted partial atomic charges.

  9. Deriving the Work Done by an Inverse Square Force in Non-Calculus-Based Introductory Physics Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    I describe a method of evaluating the integral of 1/r[superscript 2] with respect to r that uses only algebra and the concept of area underneath a curve, and which does not formally employ any calculus. This is useful for algebra-based introductory physics classes (where the use of calculus is forbidden) to derive the work done by the force of one…

  10. Numerical modeling of the Mount Meager landslide constrained by its force history derived from seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, L.; Allstadt, K.; Mangeney, A.; Capdeville, Y.; Stutzmann, E.; Bouchut, F.

    2015-04-01

    We focus on the 6 August 2010 Mount Meager landslide that occurred in Southwest British Columbia, Canada. This 48.5 Mm3 rockslide that rapidly changed into a debris flow was recorded by over 25 broadband seismic stations. We showed that the waveform inversion of the seismic signal making it possible to calculate the time history of the force applied by the landslide to the ground is very robust and stable, even when using only data from a single station. By comparing this force with the force calculated through numerical modeling of the landslide, we are able to support the interpretation of seismic data made using a simple block model. However, our study gives different values of the friction coefficients involved and more details about the volumes and orientation of the subevents and the flow trajectory and velocity. Our sensitivity analysis shows that the characteristics of the released mass and the friction coefficients all contribute to the amplitude and the phase of the force. Despite this complexity, our study makes it possible to discriminate the best values of all these parameters. Our results suggest that comparing simulated and inverted forces helps to identify appropriate rheological laws for natural flows. We also show that except for the initial collapse, peaks in the low-frequency force related to bends and runup over topography changes are associated with high-frequency generation, possibly due to an increased agitation of the granular material involved.

  11. Biomechanical force induces the growth factor production in human periodontal ligament-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Ichioka, Hiroaki; Yamamoto, Toshiro; Yamamoto, Kenta; Honjo, Ken-Ichi; Adachi, Tetsuya; Oseko, Fumishige; Mazda, Osam; Kanamura, Narisato; Kita, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    Although many reports have been published on the functional roles of periodontal ligament (PDL) cells, the mechanisms involved in the maintenance and homeostasis of PDL have not been determined. We investigated the effects of biomechanical force on growth factor production, phosphorylation of MAPKs, and intracellular transduction pathways for growth factor production in human periodontal ligament (hPDL) cells using MAPK inhibitors. hPDL cells were exposed to mechanical force (6 MPa) using a hydrostatic pressure apparatus. The levels of growth factor mRNA and protein were examined by real-time RT-PCR and ELISA. The phosphorylation of MAPKs was measured using BD™ CBA Flex Set. In addition, MAPKs inhibitors were used to identify specific signal transduction pathways. Application of biomechanical force (equivalent to occlusal force) increased the synthesis of VEGF-A, FGF-2, and NGF. The application of biomechanical force increased the expression levels of phosphorylated ERK and p38, but not of JNK. Furthermore, the levels of VEGF-A and NGF expression were suppressed by ERK or p38 inhibitor. The growth factors induced by biomechanical force may play a role in the mechanisms of homeostasis of PDL.

  12. A fully relativistic radial fall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.; Ritter, Patxi

    2014-10-01

    Radial fall has historically played a momentous role. It is one of the most classical problems, the solutions of which represent the level of understanding of gravitation in a given epoch. A gedankenexperiment in a modern frame is given by a small body, like a compact star or a solar mass black hole, captured by a supermassive black hole. The mass of the small body itself and the emission of gravitational radiation cause the departure from the geodesic path due to the back-action, that is the self-force. For radial fall, as any other non-adiabatic motion, the instantaneous identity of the radiated energy and the loss of orbital energy cannot be imposed and provide the perturbed trajectory. In the first part of this paper, we present the effects due to the self-force computed on the geodesic trajectory in the background field. Compared to the latter trajectory, in the Regge-Wheeler, harmonic and all others smoothly related gauges, a far observer concludes that the self-force pushes inward (not outward) the falling body, with a strength proportional to the mass of the small body for a given large mass; further, the same observer notes a higher value of the maximal coordinate velocity, this value being reached earlier during infall. In the second part of this paper, we implement a self-consistent approach for which the trajectory is iteratively corrected by the self-force, this time computed on osculating geodesics. Finally, we compare the motion driven by the self-force without and with self-consistent orbital evolution. Subtle differences are noticeable, even if self-force effects have hardly the time to accumulate in such a short orbit.

  13. Radial arm strike rail

    DOEpatents

    McKeown, Mark H.; Beason, Steven C.

    1991-01-01

    The radial arm strike rail assembly is a system for measurement of bearings, directions, and stereophotography for geologic mapping, particularly where magnetic compasses are not appropriate. The radial arm, pivoting around a shaft axis, provides a reference direction determination for geologic mapping and bearing or direction determination. The centerable and levelable pedestal provide a base for the radial arm strike rail and the telescoping camera pedestal. The telescoping feature of the radial arm strike rail allows positioning the end of the rail for strike direction or bearing measurement with a goniometer.

  14. SNARE-mediated membrane fusion trajectories derived from force-clamp experiments.

    PubMed

    Oelkers, Marieelen; Witt, Hannes; Halder, Partho; Jahn, Reinhard; Janshoff, Andreas

    2016-11-15

    Fusion of lipid bilayers is usually prevented by large energy barriers arising from removal of the hydration shell, formation of highly curved structures, and, eventually, fusion pore widening. Here, we measured the force-dependent lifetime of fusion intermediates using membrane-coated silica spheres attached to cantilevers of an atomic-force microscope. Analysis of time traces obtained from force-clamp experiments allowed us to unequivocally assign steps in deflection of the cantilever to membrane states during the SNARE-mediated fusion with solid-supported lipid bilayers. Force-dependent lifetime distributions of the various intermediate fusion states allowed us to propose the likelihood of different fusion pathways and to assess the main free energy barrier, which was found to be related to passing of the hydration barrier and splaying of lipids to eventually enter either the fully fused state or a long-lived hemifusion intermediate. The results were compared with SNARE mutants that arrest adjacent bilayers in the docked state and membranes in the absence of SNAREs but presence of PEG or calcium. Only with the WT SNARE construct was appreciable merging of both bilayers observed.

  15. Global Aerosol Radiative Forcing Derived from Sea WiFS-Inferred Aerosol Optical Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah; Chan, Pui-King; Wang, Menghua

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol optical properties inferred from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) radiance measurements are used to compute the aerosol shortwave radiative forcing using a radiative transfer model. The aerosol optical thickness at the wavelength of 865-nm is taken from the SeaWIFS archive. It is found that the nominal optical thickness over oceans ranges from 0.1 to 0.2. Using a maritime aerosol model and the radiances measured at the various SeaWiFS channels, the Angstrom exponent is determined to be 0.2174, the single-scattering albedo to be 0.995, and the asymmetry factor to be 0.786. The radiative transfer model has eight bands in the visible and ultraviolet spectral regions and three bands in the near infrared. It includes the absorption due to aerosols, water vapor, carbon dioxide, and oxygen, and the scattering due to aerosols and gases (Rayleigh scattering). The radiative forcing is computed over global oceans for four months (January, April, July, and October, 1998) to represent four seasons. It is found that the aerosol radiative forcing is large and changes significantly with seasons near the continents with large-scale forest fires and desert dust. Averaged over oceans and the four months, the aerosol radiative forcing is approximately 7 W/sq m at the top of the atmosphere. This large radiative forcing is expected to have a significant cooling effect on the Earth's climate as implied from simulations of a number of general circulation models.

  16. Derivation of revised formulae for eddy viscous forces used in the ocean general circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ru Ling

    1988-01-01

    Presented is a re-derivation of the eddy viscous dissipation tensor commonly used in present oceanographic general circulation models. When isotropy is imposed, the currently-used form of the tensor fails to return to the laplacian operator. In this paper, the source of this error is identified in a consistent derivation of the tensor in both rectangular and earth spherical coordinates, and the correct form of the eddy viscous tensor is presented.

  17. Study on the radial composite piezoelectric ceramic transducer in radial vibration.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuyu

    2007-03-01

    A new type of radial composite piezoelectric transducer in radial vibration is developed and analyzed. The radial composite transducer consists of a piezoelectric ceramic thin ring polarized in the thickness direction and a metal thin circular ring. They are connected together and excited to vibrate in the radial direction. The radial vibrations of a piezoelectric ceramic thin ring and a metal thin circular ring are analyzed, respectively. Their radial electro-mechanical equivalent circuits are obtained. Based on the electro-mechanical equivalent circuits and using the boundary conditions between the piezoelectric ceramic thin ring and the metal thin circular ring in the radial direction, the electro-mechanical equivalent circuit of the radial composite piezoelectric transducer is derived out and the resonance frequency equation is obtained. The relationship between the resonance frequency and the geometrical dimensions of the transducer is analyzed. Some radial composite piezoelectric transducers are designed and manufactured. The resonance frequencies and the anti-resonance frequencies, the electro-mechanical equivalent circuit parameters are measured. The effective electro-mechanical coupling coefficient and the mechanical quality factor are calculated. It is illustrated that the measured radial resonance frequencies are in good agreement with the theoretical results from the resonance frequency equation.

  18. A comparison of catch phase force-time characteristics during clean derivatives from the knee.

    PubMed

    Comfort, Paul; Williams, Robert; Suchomel, Timothy J; Lake, Jason P

    2016-09-27

    The aim of this study was to compare load-absorption force-time characteristics of the clean from the knee (CK), power clean from the knee (PCK) and clean pull from the knee (CPK). Ten collegiate athletes (age 27.5 ± 4.2 years; height 180.4 ± 6.7 cm; mass 84.4 ± 7.8 kg), performed three repetitions each of the CK, PCK and CPK with 90% of their 1RM power clean on a force platform. The CK load-absorption duration (0.95 ± 0.35 s) was significantly longer compared to the CPK (0.44 ± 0.15 s; p < 0.001, d = 2.53), but not compared to the PCK (0.56 ± 0.11 s; p > 0.05, d = 1.08), with no differences between PCK and CPK (p > 0.05, d = 0.91). The CPK demonstrated the greatest mean force (2039 ± 394 N), which was significantly greater than the PCK (1771 ± 325 N; p = 0.012, d = 0.83), but not significantly different to the CK (1830 ± 331 N; p > 0.05, d = 0.60); CK and PCK were not different (p > 0.05, d = 0.18). Significantly more load-absorption work was performed during the CK (655 ± 276 J) compared to the PCK (288 ± 109 J; d = 1.75, p < 0.001); but not compared to the CPK (518 ± 132 J; d = 0.80, p > 0.05). Additionally, more load-absorption work was performed during the CPK compared to the PCK (d = 1.90, p = 0.032). Inclusion of the catch phase during the CK does not provide any additional stimulus in terms of mean force or work during the load-absorption phase compared to the CPK, while the CPK may be beneficial in training rapid force absorption due to high force and a short duration.

  19. Roll Damping Derivatives from Generalized Lifting-Surface Theory and Wind Tunnel Forced-Oscillation Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pototzky, Anthony S; Murphy, Patrick C.

    2014-01-01

    Improving aerodynamic models for adverse loss-of-control conditions in flight is an area being researched under the NASA Aviation Safety Program. Aerodynamic models appropriate for loss of control conditions require a more general mathematical representation to predict nonlinear unsteady behaviors. As more general aerodynamic models are studied that include nonlinear higher order effects, the possibility of measurements that confound aerodynamic and structural responses are probable. In this study an initial step is taken to look at including structural flexibility in analysis of rigid-body forced-oscillation testing that accounts for dynamic rig, sting and balance flexibility. Because of the significant testing required and associated costs in a general study, it makes sense to capitalize on low cost analytical methods where possible, especially where structural flexibility can be accounted for by a low cost method. This paper provides an initial look at using linear lifting surface theory applied to rigid-body aircraft roll forced-oscillation tests.

  20. Management Impact Assessment of Refuse-Derived Fuel Implementation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-19

    Richard K. McIntosh 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT PROJECT. TASK ULTRASYSTEMS, INC. AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS 10340...Democracy Lane Program Element : 64708F Fairfax, Virginia 22030 JON: 20545017 I. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Air Force Engineering...having reviewed the RDF project at WPAFB and interviewed people in all of the involved organizational elements and functional areas within those

  1. Triple acting radial seal

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, Todd A; Carella, John A

    2012-03-13

    A triple acting radial seal used as an interstage seal assembly in a gas turbine engine, where the seal assembly includes an interstage seal support extending from a stationary inner shroud of a vane ring, the interstage seal support includes a larger annular radial inward facing groove in which an outer annular floating seal assembly is secured for radial displacement, and the outer annular floating seal assembly includes a smaller annular radial inward facing groove in which an inner annular floating seal assembly is secured also for radial displacement. A compliant seal is secured to the inner annular floating seal assembly. The outer annular floating seal assembly encapsulates the inner annular floating seal assembly which is made from a very low alpha material in order to reduce thermal stress.

  2. Simulations of cloud-radiation interaction using large-scale forcing derived from the CINDY/DYNAMO northern sounding array

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shuguang; Sobel, Adam H.; Fridlind, Ann; Feng, Zhe; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Minnis, Patrick; Nordeen, Michele L.

    2015-09-25

    The recently completed CINDY/DYNAMO field campaign observed two Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) events in the equatorial Indian Ocean from October to December 2011. Prior work has indicated that the moist static energy anomalies in these events grew and were sustained to a significant extent by radiative feedbacks. We present here a study of radiative fluxes and clouds in a set of cloud-resolving simulations of these MJO events. The simulations are driven by the large scale forcing dataset derived from the DYNAMO northern sounding array observations, and carried out in a doubly-periodic domain using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. simulated cloud properties and radiative fluxes are compared to those derived from the S-Polka radar and satellite observations. Furthermore, to accommodate the uncertainty in simulated cloud microphysics, a number of single moment (1M) and double moment (2M) microphysical schemes in the WRF model are tested.

  3. Simulations of cloud-radiation interaction using large-scale forcing derived from the CINDY/DYNAMO northern sounding array

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Shuguang; Sobel, Adam H.; Fridlind, Ann; ...

    2015-09-25

    The recently completed CINDY/DYNAMO field campaign observed two Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) events in the equatorial Indian Ocean from October to December 2011. Prior work has indicated that the moist static energy anomalies in these events grew and were sustained to a significant extent by radiative feedbacks. We present here a study of radiative fluxes and clouds in a set of cloud-resolving simulations of these MJO events. The simulations are driven by the large scale forcing dataset derived from the DYNAMO northern sounding array observations, and carried out in a doubly-periodic domain using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. simulatedmore » cloud properties and radiative fluxes are compared to those derived from the S-Polka radar and satellite observations. Furthermore, to accommodate the uncertainty in simulated cloud microphysics, a number of single moment (1M) and double moment (2M) microphysical schemes in the WRF model are tested.« less

  4. First order derivative spectrophotometric method for the determination of benidipine hydrochloride pharmaceutical preparations and forced degradation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasaka, Ayça

    2015-06-01

    A simple and rapid first order derivative spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of benidipine hydrochloride in pure form and pharmaceutical preparations. For the first derivative spectrophotometric method, the distances between two extremum values l (peak-to-peak amplitudes), 230.2/241.5 nm. The proposed method was validated according to the ICH guidelines with respect to linearity, limit of detection, limit of quantification, accuracy, precision (intra- and inter-day) and recovery were evaluated. The linearity of the method was in the range of 0.2-2.0 μg/mL. Limits of detection and quantification were 0.58 and 1.73 μg/mL, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of pharmaceutical preparations. In addition, forced degradation studies were performed on the benidipine hydrochloride drag substance. The drug substance was exposed to the stress conditions of hydrolysis (acid and base).

  5. RADIAL FLOW PATTERN OF A SLOW CORONAL MASS EJECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Li; Gan, Weiqun; Inhester, Bernd

    2015-06-01

    Height–time plots of the leading edge of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have often been used to study CME kinematics. We propose a new method to analyze the CME kinematics in more detail by determining the radial mass transport process throughout the entire CME. Thus, our method is able to estimate not only the speed of the CME front but also the radial flow speed inside the CME. We have applied this method to a slow CME with an average leading edge speed of about 480 km s{sup −1}. In the Lagrangian frame, the speeds of the individual CME mass elements stay almost constant within 2 and 15 R{sub S}, the range over which we analyzed the CME. Hence, we have no evidence of net radial forces acting on parts of the CME in this range or of a pile up of mass ahead of the CME. We find evidence that the leading edge trajectory obtained by tie-pointing may gradually lag behind the Lagrangian front-side trajectories derived from our analysis. Our results also allow a much more precise estimate of the CME energy. Compared with conventional estimates using the CME total mass and leading edge motion, we find that the latter may overestimate the kinetic energy and the gravitational potential energy.

  6. Surface force measurements and simulations of mussel-derived peptide adhesives on wet organic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Levine, Zachary A; Rapp, Michael V; Wei, Wei; Mullen, Ryan Gotchy; Wu, Chun; Zerze, Gül H; Mittal, Jeetain; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2016-04-19

    Translating sticky biological molecules-such as mussel foot proteins (MFPs)-into synthetic, cost-effective underwater adhesives with adjustable nano- and macroscale characteristics requires an intimate understanding of the glue's molecular interactions. To help facilitate the next generation of aqueous adhesives, we performed a combination of surface forces apparatus (SFA) measurements and replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations on a synthetic, easy to prepare, Dopa-containing peptide (MFP-3s peptide), which adheres to organic surfaces just as effectively as its wild-type protein analog. Experiments and simulations both show significant differences in peptide adsorption on CH3-terminated (hydrophobic) and OH-terminated (hydrophilic) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), where adsorption is strongest on hydrophobic SAMs because of orientationally specific interactions with Dopa. Additional umbrella-sampling simulations yield free-energy profiles that quantitatively agree with SFA measurements and are used to extract the adhesive properties of individual amino acids within the context of MFP-3s peptide adhesion, revealing a delicate balance between van der Waals, hydrophobic, and electrostatic forces.

  7. Surface force measurements and simulations of mussel-derived peptide adhesives on wet organic surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Zachary A.; Rapp, Michael V.; Wei, Wei; Mullen, Ryan Gotchy; Wu, Chun; Zerze, Gül H.; Mittal, Jeetain; Waite, J. Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N.; Shea, Joan-Emma

    2016-01-01

    Translating sticky biological molecules—such as mussel foot proteins (MFPs)—into synthetic, cost-effective underwater adhesives with adjustable nano- and macroscale characteristics requires an intimate understanding of the glue’s molecular interactions. To help facilitate the next generation of aqueous adhesives, we performed a combination of surface forces apparatus (SFA) measurements and replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) simulations on a synthetic, easy to prepare, Dopa-containing peptide (MFP-3s peptide), which adheres to organic surfaces just as effectively as its wild-type protein analog. Experiments and simulations both show significant differences in peptide adsorption on CH3-terminated (hydrophobic) and OH-terminated (hydrophilic) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs), where adsorption is strongest on hydrophobic SAMs because of orientationally specific interactions with Dopa. Additional umbrella-sampling simulations yield free-energy profiles that quantitatively agree with SFA measurements and are used to extract the adhesive properties of individual amino acids within the context of MFP-3s peptide adhesion, revealing a delicate balance between van der Waals, hydrophobic, and electrostatic forces. PMID:27036002

  8. Characteristics of motive force derived from trajectory analysis of Amoeba proteus.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Noritaka; Miyoshi, Hiromi; Tsuchiya, Yoshimi

    2007-01-01

    We used a monochromatic charge-coupled-device camera to observe the migration behavior of Amoeba proteus every 5 s over a time course of 10000 s in order to investigate the characteristics of its centroid movement (cell velocity) over the long term. Fourier transformation of the time series of the cell velocity revealed that its power spectrum exhibits a Lorentz type profile with a relaxation time of a few hundred seconds. Moreover, some sharp peaks were found in the power spectrum, where the ratios of any two frequencies corresponding to the peaks were expressed as simple rational numbers. Analysis of the trajectory using a Langevin equation showed that the power spectrum reflects characteristics of the cell's motive force. These results suggest that some phenomena relating to the cell's motility, such as protoplasmic streaming and the sol-gel transformation of actin filaments, which seem to be independent phenomena and have different relaxation times, interact with each other and cooperatively participate in the generation process of the motive force.

  9. Electrocatalytic Alcohol Oxidation with TEMPO and Bicyclic Nitroxyl Derivatives: Driving Force Trumps Steric Effects.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Mohammad; Miles, Kelsey C; Stahl, Shannon S

    2015-11-25

    Bicyclic nitroxyl derivatives, such as 2-azaadamantane N-oxyl (AZADO) and 9-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonane N-oxyl (ABNO), have emerged as highly effective alternatives to TEMPO-based catalysts for selective oxidation reactions (TEMPO = 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidine N-oxyl). Their efficacy is widely attributed to their smaller steric profile; however, electrocatalysis studies described herein show that the catalytic activity of nitroxyls is more strongly affected by the nitroxyl/oxoammonium redox potential than by steric effects. The inexpensive, high-potential TEMPO derivative, 4-acetamido-TEMPO (ACT), exhibits higher electrocatalytic activity than AZADO and ABNO for the oxidation of primary and secondary alcohols. Mechanistic studies provide insights into the origin of these unexpected reactivity trends. The superior activity of ACT is especially noteworthy at high pH, where bicyclic nitroxyls are inhibited by formation of an oxoammonium hydroxide adduct.

  10. An electromagnetic compressive force by cell exciter stimulates chondrogenic differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Hyug; Sim, Woo Young; Park, Sin Wook; Yang, Sang Sik; Choi, Byung Hyune; Park, So Ra; Park, Kwideok; Min, Byoung-Hyun

    2006-11-01

    In this study, we present a biological micro-electromechanical system and its application to the chondrogenic differentiation of rabbit bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Actuated by an electromagnetic force, the micro cell exciter was designed to deliver a cyclic compressive load (CCL) with various magnitudes. Two major parts in the system are an actuator and a cartridge-type chamber. The former has a permanent magnet and coil, and the latter is equipped with 7 sample dishes and 7 metal caps. Mixed with a 2.4% alginate solution, the alginate/MSC layers were positioned in the sample dishes; the caps contained chondrogenic defined medium without transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). Once powered, the actuator coil-derived electromagnetic force pulled the metal caps down, compressing the samples. The cyclic load was given at 1-Hz frequency for 10 min twice a day. Samples in the dishes without a cap served as a control. The samples were analyzed at 3, 5, and 7 days after stimulation for cell viability, biochemical assays, histologic features, immunohistochemistry, and gene expression of the chondrogenic markers. Applied to the alginate/MSC layer, the CCL system enhanced the synthesis of cartilage-specific matrix proteins and the chondrogenic markers, such as aggrecan, type II collagen, and Sox9. We found that the micromechanically exerted CCL by the cell exciter was very effective in enhancing the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, even without using exogenous TGF-beta.

  11. Test and evaluation of shale derived jet fuel by the United States Air Force

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    In June 1980, the United States Congress passed the Energy Security Act which provided for the formation of the United States Synthetic Fuels Corporation and amended the Defense Production Act of 1950 to provide for synthetic fuels for the Department of Defense (DOD). A subsequent law, P.L., 96-304, appropriated up to $20 billion for financial incentives to foster a national synthetic fuel industry. The initial synthetic fuel project funded under the Energy Security Act is the Unocal Parachute Creek Project in Colorado with an expected shale oil production of 10,000 bbls/day. The Defense Fuel Supply Center (DFSC) contracted with Gary Energy Refining Company, Fruita, Colorado to provide approximately 5,000 bbls/day of shale JP-4 for the United States Air Force (USAF) using crude from the Parachute Creek Project, with initial deliveries to begin in 1985.

  12. Regulation of endothelium-derived vasoactive autacoid production by hemodynamic forces.

    PubMed

    Busse, Rudi; Fleming, Ingrid

    2003-01-01

    Endothelial cells, which are situated at the interface between blood and the vessel wall, have a crucial role in controlling vascular tone and homeostasis, particularly in determining the expression of pro-atherosclerotic and anti-atherosclerotic genes. Many of these effects are mediated by changes in the generation and release of endothelium-derived autacoids [from the Greek autos (self) and akos (remedy)], which are generally short-lived and locally acting. In vivo, endothelial cells are constantly subjected to mechanical stimulation, which in turn determines the acute production of autacoids and the levels of autacoid-producing enzymes.

  13. Radial heat flux transformer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basiulis, A.; Buzzard, R. J.

    1971-01-01

    Unit moves heat radially from small diameter shell to larger diameter shell, or vice versa, with negligible temperature drop, making device useful wherever heating or cooling of concentrically arranged materials, substances, and structures is desired.

  14. Radial head fracture - aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    Elbow fracture - radial head - aftercare ... to 2 weeks. If you have a small fracture and your bones did not move around much, ... to see a bone doctor (orthopedic surgeon). Some fractures require surgery to: Insert pins and plates to ...

  15. Expanded Large-Scale Forcing Properties Derived from the Multiscale Data Assimilation System and Its Application to Single-Column Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, S.; Li, Z.; Liu, Y.; Lin, W.; Toto, T.; Vogelmann, A. M.; Fridlind, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    We present an approach to derive large-scale forcing that is used to drive single-column models (SCMs) and cloud resolving models (CRMs)/large eddy simulation (LES) for evaluating fast physics parameterizations in climate models. The forcing fields are derived by use of a newly developed multi-scale data assimilation (MS-DA) system. This DA system is developed on top of the NCEP Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) System and is implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model at a cloud resolving resolution of 2 km. This approach has been applied to the generation of large scale forcing for a set of Intensive Operation Periods (IOPs) over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The dense ARM in-situ observations and high-resolution satellite data effectively constrain the WRF model. The evaluation shows that the derived forcing displays accuracies comparable to the existing continuous forcing product and, overall, a better dynamic consistency with observed cloud and precipitation. One important application of this approach is to derive large-scale hydrometeor forcing and multiscale forcing, which is not provided in the existing continuous forcing product. It is shown that the hydrometeor forcing poses an appreciable impact on cloud and precipitation fields in the single-column model simulations. The large-scale forcing exhibits a significant dependency on domain-size that represents SCM grid-sizes. Subgrid processes often contribute a significant component to the large-scale forcing, and this contribution is sensitive to the grid-size and cloud-regime.

  16. Single-Molecule Tribology: Force Microscopy Manipulation of a Porphyrin Derivative on a Copper Surface.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Rémy; Ouyang, Wengen; Filippov, Alexander E; Kalikhman-Razvozov, Lena; Kawai, Shigeki; Glatzel, Thilo; Gnecco, Enrico; Baratoff, Alexis; Zheng, Quanshui; Hod, Oded; Urbakh, Michael; Meyer, Ernst

    2016-01-26

    The low-temperature mechanical response of a single porphyrin molecule attached to the apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip during vertical and lateral manipulations is studied. We find that approach-retraction cycles as well as surface scanning with the terminated tip result in atomic-scale friction patterns induced by the internal reorientations of the molecule. With a joint experimental and computational effort, we identify the dicyanophenyl side groups of the molecule interacting with the surface as the dominant factor determining the observed frictional behavior. To this end, we developed a generalized Prandtl-Tomlinson model parametrized using density functional theory calculations that includes the internal degrees of freedom of the side group with respect to the core and its interactions with the underlying surface. We demonstrate that the friction pattern results from the variations of the bond length and bond angles between the dicyanophenyl side group and the porphyrin backbone as well as those of the CN group facing the surface during the lateral and vertical motion of the AFM tip.

  17. Effect of Noise and Flow Field Resolution on the Evaluation of Fluid Dynamic Forces on Bodies Using only the Velocity Field and its Derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breda, Maria Cecilia; Krueger, Paul S.

    2010-11-01

    Determining unsteady fluid dynamic forces on bodies using only measurements of the velocity field and its derivatives is essential in many investigations, including studies of freely swimming or flying animals. In this project, all terms in a control-volume force equation utilizing only the velocity field and its derivatives discussed by Noca et al. (J. Fluids Struct., 13, 551 - 578) will be analyzed with regard to the influence of flow field noise and resolution to determine which terms dominate the error in the computed force and which factor has the greatest effect on the error. Using analytical and computational flow fields for which the lift and drag forces are known, irregularities found in real experimental results including noise and reduced spatial/temporal resolution will be added to assess their effect on the computed forces. Results for several canonical flows will be presented.

  18. Atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy imaging of graphene nanosheets derived from graphite oxide.

    PubMed

    Paredes, J I; Villar-Rodil, S; Solís-Fernández, P; Martínez-Alonso, A; Tascón, J M D

    2009-05-19

    Graphene nanosheets produced in the form of stable aqueous dispersions by chemical reduction of graphene oxide and deposited onto graphite substrates have been investigated by atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopy (AFM/STM). The chemically reduced graphene oxide nanosheets were hardly distinguishable from their unreduced counterparts in the topographic AFM images. However, they could be readily discriminated through phase imaging in the attractive regime of tapping-mode AFM, probably because of differences in hydrophilicity arising from their distinct oxygen contents. The chemically reduced nanosheets displayed a smoothly undulated, globular morphology on the nanometer scale, with typical vertical variations in the subnanometer range and lateral feature sizes of approximately 5-10 nm. Such morphology was attributed to be the result of significant structural disorder in the carbon skeleton, which originates during the strong oxidation that leads to graphene oxide and remains after chemical reduction. Direct evidence of structural disorder was provided by atomic-scale STM imaging, which revealed an absence of long-range periodicity in the graphene nanosheets. Only structured domains a few nanometers large were observed instead. Likewise, the nanosheet edges appeared atomically rough and ill-defined, though smooth on the nanometer scale. The unreduced graphene oxide nanosheets could only be imaged by STM at very low tunneling currents (approximately 1 pA), being visualized in some cases with inverted contrast relative to the graphite substrate, a result that was attributed to their extremely low conductivity. Complementary characterization of the unreduced and chemically reduced nanosheets was carried out by thermogravimetric analysis as well as UV-visible absorption and X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopies. In particular, the somewhat puzzling Raman results were interpreted to be the result of an amorphous character of the graphene oxide material.

  19. Diagnosing Tropical Divergent Circulations From Satellite-Derived Diabatic Forcing and Variational Integral Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Franklin R.; Lu, H.-I.; Goodman, H. Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Large-scale divergent circulations are part of the atmospheric dynamic response to diabatic heating from condensation, radiative processes, and surface energy fluxes. Vertical motion and the associated divergent wind is thus intimately tied to the hydrologic cycle and the global beat balance. Despite its importance, the divergent circulation is too small in comparison to the rotational flow to measure directly with any accuracy. Vertical motions are recovered diagnostically from reanalyses and, as such, are subject to shortcomings in model physics, numerics, and data availability. While reanalysis estimates of tropical divergent circulations are much improved over those from the Global Weather Experiment, there are still substantial differences between products from operational centers. This is because these circulations are still forced largely by model physics and only secondarily by observations. In order to produce a refined estimate of tropical divergence and its interannual variability we have used a number of remotely-sensed data sets along with variational constraints to improve upon reanalysis estimates. Among these are: precipitation from SSM/I and GPCP, TOVS Path-A vertical cloud distributions; ISCCP radiative cooling rates; TOA radiative fluxes from ERBS, surface radiative fluxes from the SRB project, and surface latent and sensible flux estimates from SSM/I. The TOVS Path-A data constrain the divergent outflow in precipitating regions to have the same vertical structure as observed cloudiness. Using integral constraints for moisture, heat, and mass balance, we retrieve consistent divergent wind flows. We examine the ability of this type analysis to capture regional details of ENSO related perturbations to the divergent wind and associated tropical energy balance. Precipitation from satellite is found to be the major constraint in supplying this horizontal structure. We also consider the ability of this analysis to quantify integrated (land vs. ocean

  20. Improved snowmelt simulations with a canopy model forced with photo-derived direct beam canopy transmissivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musselman, Keith N.; Molotch, Noah P.; Margulis, Steven A.; Lehning, Michael; Gustafsson, David

    2012-10-01

    The predictive capacity of a physically based snow model to simulate point-scale, subcanopy snowmelt dynamics is evaluated in a mixed conifer forest, southern Sierra Nevada, California. Three model scenarios each providing varying levels of canopy structure detail were tested. Simulations of three water years initialized at locations of 24 ultrasonic snow depth sensors were evaluated against observations of snow water equivalent (SWE), snow disappearance date, and volumetric soil water content. When canopy model parameters canopy openness and effective leaf area index were obtained from satellite and literature-based sources, respectively, the model was unable to resolve the variable subcanopy snowmelt dynamics. When canopy parameters were obtained from hemispherical photos, the improvements were not statistically significant. However, when the model was modified to accept photo-derived time-varying direct beam canopy transmissivity, the error in the snow disappearance date was reduced by as much as one week and positive and negative biases in melt-season SWE and snow cover duration were significantly reduced. Errors in the timing of soil meltwater fluxes were reduced by 11 days on average. The optimum aggregated temporal model resolution of direct beam canopy transmissivity was determined to be 30 min; hourly averages performed no better than the bulk canopy scenarios and finer time steps did not increase overall model accuracy. The improvements illustrate the important contribution of direct shortwave radiation to subcanopy snowmelt and confirm the known nonlinear melt behavior of snow cover.

  1. R.E.D. Server: a web service for deriving RESP and ESP charges and building force field libraries for new molecules and molecular fragments.

    PubMed

    Vanquelef, Enguerran; Simon, Sabrina; Marquant, Gaelle; Garcia, Elodie; Klimerak, Geoffroy; Delepine, Jean Charles; Cieplak, Piotr; Dupradeau, François-Yves

    2011-07-01

    R.E.D. Server is a unique, open web service, designed to derive non-polarizable RESP and ESP charges and to build force field libraries for new molecules/molecular fragments. It provides to computational biologists the means to derive rigorously molecular electrostatic potential-based charges embedded in force field libraries that are ready to be used in force field development, charge validation and molecular dynamics simulations. R.E.D. Server interfaces quantum mechanics programs, the RESP program and the latest version of the R.E.D. tools. A two step approach has been developed. The first one consists of preparing P2N file(s) to rigorously define key elements such as atom names, topology and chemical equivalencing needed when building a force field library. Then, P2N files are used to derive RESP or ESP charges embedded in force field libraries in the Tripos mol2 format. In complex cases an entire set of force field libraries or force field topology database is generated. Other features developed in R.E.D. Server include help services, a demonstration, tutorials, frequently asked questions, Jmol-based tools useful to construct PDB input files and parse R.E.D. Server outputs as well as a graphical queuing system allowing any user to check the status of R.E.D. Server jobs.

  2. R.E.D. Server: a web service for deriving RESP and ESP charges and building force field libraries for new molecules and molecular fragments

    PubMed Central

    Vanquelef, Enguerran; Simon, Sabrina; Marquant, Gaelle; Garcia, Elodie; Klimerak, Geoffroy; Delepine, Jean Charles; Cieplak, Piotr; Dupradeau, François-Yves

    2011-01-01

    R.E.D. Server is a unique, open web service, designed to derive non-polarizable RESP and ESP charges and to build force field libraries for new molecules/molecular fragments. It provides to computational biologists the means to derive rigorously molecular electrostatic potential-based charges embedded in force field libraries that are ready to be used in force field development, charge validation and molecular dynamics simulations. R.E.D. Server interfaces quantum mechanics programs, the RESP program and the latest version of the R.E.D. tools. A two step approach has been developed. The first one consists of preparing P2N file(s) to rigorously define key elements such as atom names, topology and chemical equivalencing needed when building a force field library. Then, P2N files are used to derive RESP or ESP charges embedded in force field libraries in the Tripos mol2 format. In complex cases an entire set of force field libraries or force field topology database is generated. Other features developed in R.E.D. Server include help services, a demonstration, tutorials, frequently asked questions, Jmol-based tools useful to construct PDB input files and parse R.E.D. Server outputs as well as a graphical queuing system allowing any user to check the status of R.E.D. Server jobs. PMID:21609950

  3. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Radial turbines have been used extensively in many applications including small ground based electrical power generators, automotive engine turbochargers and aircraft auxiliary power units. In all of these applications the turbine inlet temperature is limited to a value commensurate with the material strength limitations and life requirements of uncooled metal rotors. To take advantage of all the benefits that higher temperatures offer, such as increased turbine specific power output or higher cycle thermal efficiency, requires improved high temperature materials and/or blade cooling. Extensive research is on-going to advance the material properties of high temperature superalloys as well as composite materials including ceramics. The use of ceramics with their high temperature potential and low cost is particularly appealing for radial turbines. However until these programs reach fruition the only way to make significant step increases beyond the present material temperature barriers is to cool the radial blading.

  4. Radially uniform electron source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccomas, D.; Bame, S. J.

    1982-01-01

    A thermionic electron source capable of producing uniform count rates in a number of channel electron multipliers simultaneously was required for conditioning multipliers for an extended space mission. It was found that a straight tungsten filament in the center of a cylindrically symmetric geometry surrounded by an array of multipliers emits a radially asymmetric distribution of electrons that changes with time. A source was developed which successfully produces a time-independent radially uniform distribution of electrons by moving the filament out of the direct line of sight and replacing it with a centrally located electron 'cloud.'

  5. The fundamental definition of ``radial velocity''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindegren, Lennart; Dravins, Dainis

    2003-04-01

    Accuracy levels of metres per second require the fundamental concept of ``radial velocity'' for stars and other distant objects to be examined, both as a physical velocity, and as measured by spectroscopic and astrometric techniques. Already in a classical (non-relativistic) framework the line-of-sight velocity component is an ambiguous concept, depending on whether, e.g., the time of light emission (at the object) or that of light detection (by the observer) is used for recording the time coordinate. Relativistic velocity effects and spectroscopic measurements made inside gravitational fields add further complications, causing wavelength shifts to depend, e.g., on the transverse velocity of the object and the gravitational potential at the source. Aiming at definitions that are unambiguous at accuracy levels of 1 m s-1, we analyse different concepts of radial velocity and their interrelations. At this accuracy level, a strict separation must be made between the purely geometric concepts on one hand, and the spectroscopic measurement on the other. Among the geometric concepts we define kinematic radial velocity, which corresponds most closely to the ``textbook definition'' of radial velocity as the line-of-sight component of space velocity; and astrometric radial velocity, which can be derived from astrometric observations. Consistent with these definitions, we propose strict definitions also of the complementary kinematic and astrometric quantities, namely transverse velocity and proper motion. The kinematic and astrometric radial velocities depend on the chosen spacetime metric, and are accurately related by simple coordinate transformations. On the other hand, the observational quantity that should result from accurate spectroscopic measurements is the barycentric radial-velocity measure. This is independent of the metric, and to first order equals the line-of-sight velocity. However, it is not a physical velocity, and cannot be accurately transformed to a

  6. Repeated forced swimming impairs prepulse inhibition and alters brain-derived neurotrophic factor and astroglial parameters in rats.

    PubMed

    Borsoi, Milene; Antonio, Camila Boque; Müller, Liz Girardi; Viana, Alice Fialho; Hertzfeldt, Vivian; Lunardi, Paula Santana; Zanotto, Caroline; Nardin, Patrícia; Ravazzolo, Ana Paula; Rates, Stela Maris Kuze; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Glutamate perturbations and altered neurotrophin levels have been strongly associated with the neurobiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Environmental stress is a risk factor for mood disorders, disrupting glutamatergic activity in astrocytes in addition to cognitive behaviours. Despite the negative impact of stress-induced neuropsychiatric disorders on public health, the molecular mechanisms underlying the response of the brain to stress has yet to be fully elucidated. Exposure to repeated swimming has proven useful for evaluating the loss of cognitive function after pharmacological and behavioural interventions, but its effect on glutamate function has yet to be fully explored. In the present study, rats previously exposed to repeated forced swimming were evaluated using the novel object recognition test, object location test and prepulse inhibition (PPI) test. In addition, quantification of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA expression and protein levels, glutamate uptake, glutathione, S100B, GluN1 subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor and calmodulin were evaluated in the frontal cortex and hippocampus after various swimming time points. We found that swimming stress selectively impaired PPI but did not affect memory recognition. Swimming stress altered the frontal cortical and hippocampal BDNF expression and the activity of hippocampal astrocytes by reducing hippocampal glutamate uptake and enhancing glutathione content in a time-dependent manner. In conclusion, these data support the assumption that astrocytes may regulate the activity of brain structures related to cognition in a manner that alters complex behaviours. Moreover, they provide new insight regarding the dynamics immediately after an aversive experience, such as after behavioural despair induction, and suggest that forced swimming can be employed to study altered glutamatergic activity and PPI disruption in rodents.

  7. Simulations of Cloud-Radiation Interaction Using Large-Scale Forcing Derived from the CINDY/DYNAMO Northern Sounding Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Shuguang; Sobel, Adam H.; Fridlind, Ann; Feng, Zhe; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Minnis, Patrick; Nordeen, Michele L.

    2015-01-01

    The recently completed CINDY/DYNAMO field campaign observed two Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) events in the equatorial Indian Ocean from October to December 2011. Prior work has indicated that the moist static energy anomalies in these events grew and were sustained to a significant extent by radiative feedbacks. We present here a study of radiative fluxes and clouds in a set of cloud-resolving simulations of these MJO events. The simulations are driven by the large-scale forcing data set derived from the DYNAMO northern sounding array observations, and carried out in a doubly periodic domain using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Simulated cloud properties and radiative fluxes are compared to those derived from the S-PolKa radar and satellite observations. To accommodate the uncertainty in simulated cloud microphysics, a number of single-moment (1M) and double-moment (2M) microphysical schemes in the WRF model are tested. The 1M schemes tend to underestimate radiative flux anomalies in the active phases of the MJO events, while the 2M schemes perform better, but can overestimate radiative flux anomalies. All the tested microphysics schemes exhibit biases in the shapes of the histograms of radiative fluxes and radar reflectivity. Histograms of radiative fluxes and brightness temperature indicate that radiative biases are not evenly distributed; the most significant bias occurs in rainy areas with OLR less than 150 W/ cu sq in the 2M schemes. Analysis of simulated radar reflectivities indicates that this radiative flux uncertainty is closely related to the simulated stratiform cloud coverage. Single-moment schemes underestimate stratiform cloudiness by a factor of 2, whereas 2M schemes simulate much more stratiform cloud.

  8. Revisiting the droplet simulation approach to derive force-field parameters for water on molybdenum disulfide from wetting angle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    Owing to its peculiar electronic properties, molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has been the subject of a growing number of studies in the recent years. In applications, this material and other transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) may have to interact with a liquid or polymer phase as well as solutions of biomolecules. It is therefore of primary importance to understand the wetting and adhesion properties of TMDs. Starting from existing models, we derive Lennard-Jones parameters for the interaction between water and the basal plane of MoS2 that are consistent with recent wetting experiments. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that a stack of only two MoS2 monolayers is necessary to capture the wetting behavior of bulk MoS2. It is found that the Coulomb interaction between water and monolayer and bilayer MoS2 plays no role in the related interfacial thermodynamics. Calculations with the optimized parameters show that the depth of the well of the interaction potential between water and bulk MoS2 is of the order of 8.2 kJ/mol. Such a value is comparable with what was found for graphite and consistent with the fact that the wetting angles of water on graphite and MoS2 are almost equal. The derivation of the force-field parameters is performed using a methodology which, contrary to previous studies, makes a consistent use of droplet calculations. The results of our work should find application in further simulation studies on the wetting behavior of TMDs and other dispersive materials.

  9. Inherently-Forced Tensile Strain in Nanodiamond-Derived Onion-like Carbon: Consequences in Defect-Induced Electrochemical Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young-Jin; Cho, Jung-Min; Kim, Inho; Jeong, Doo Seok; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Park, Jong-Keuk; Baik, Young-Joon; Choi, Heon-Jin; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Wook-Seong

    2016-01-01

    We analyzed the nanodiamond-derived onion-like carbon (OLC) as function of synthesis temperature (1000~1400 °C), by high-resolution electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, visible-Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. The temperature dependences of the obtained properties (averaged particle size, tensile strain, defect density, density of states, electron transfer kinetics, and electrochemical oxidation current) unanimously coincided: they initially increased and saturated at 1200 °C. It was attributed to the inherent tensile strains arising from (1) the volume expansion associated with the layer-wise diamond-to-graphite transformation of the core, which caused forced dilation of the outer shells during their thermal synthesis; (2) the extreme curvature of the shells. The former origin was dominant over the latter at the outermost shell, of which the relevant evolution in defect density, DOS and electron transfer kinetics determined the electrochemical performances. In detection of dopamine (DA), uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) using the OLC as electrode, their oxidation peak currents were enhanced by factors of 15~60 with annealing temperature. Their limit of detection and the linear range of detection, in the post-treatment-free condition, were as excellent as those of the nano-carbon electrodes post-treated by Pt-decoration, N-doping, plasma, or polymer. PMID:27032957

  10. Inherently-Forced Tensile Strain in Nanodiamond-Derived Onion-like Carbon: Consequences in Defect-Induced Electrochemical Activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Young-Jin; Cho, Jung-Min; Kim, Inho; Jeong, Doo Seok; Lee, Kyeong-Seok; Park, Jong-Keuk; Baik, Young-Joon; Choi, Heon-Jin; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Lee, Wook-Seong

    2016-04-01

    We analyzed the nanodiamond-derived onion-like carbon (OLC) as function of synthesis temperature (1000~1400 °C), by high-resolution electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, visible-Raman spectroscopy, ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy, impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. The temperature dependences of the obtained properties (averaged particle size, tensile strain, defect density, density of states, electron transfer kinetics, and electrochemical oxidation current) unanimously coincided: they initially increased and saturated at 1200 °C. It was attributed to the inherent tensile strains arising from (1) the volume expansion associated with the layer-wise diamond-to-graphite transformation of the core, which caused forced dilation of the outer shells during their thermal synthesis; (2) the extreme curvature of the shells. The former origin was dominant over the latter at the outermost shell, of which the relevant evolution in defect density, DOS and electron transfer kinetics determined the electrochemical performances. In detection of dopamine (DA), uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) using the OLC as electrode, their oxidation peak currents were enhanced by factors of 15~60 with annealing temperature. Their limit of detection and the linear range of detection, in the post-treatment-free condition, were as excellent as those of the nano-carbon electrodes post-treated by Pt-decoration, N-doping, plasma, or polymer.

  11. Global Comparison of CFD and Wind-Tunnel-Derived Force and Moment Databases for the Space Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Recently a very large (739 runs) collection of high-fidelity RANS CFD solutions was obtained for Space Launch System ascent aerodynamics for the vehicle to be used for the first exploratory (unmanned) mission (EM-1). The extensive computations, at full-scale conditions, were originally developed to obtain detailed line and protuberance loads and surface pressures for venting analyses. The line loads were eventually integrated for comparison of the resulting forces and moments to the database that was derived from wind tunnel tests conducted at sub-scale conditions. The comparisons presented herein cover the ranges 0.5 < or = M(infinity) < or = 5, -6deg < or = alpha < or = 6deg, and -6deg < or = beta < or = 6deg. For detailed comparisons, slender-body-theory-based component build-up aero models from missile aerodynamics are used. The differences in the model fit coefficients are shown to be relatively small except for the low supersonic Mach number range, 1.1 < or = M(infinity) < or = 2.0. The analysis is intended to support process improvement and development of uncertainty models.

  12. The variational explicit polarization potential and analytical first derivative of energy: Towards a next generation force field

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wangshen; Song, Lingchun; Truhlar, Donald G.; Gao, Jiali

    2008-01-01

    A previous article proposed an electronic structure-based polarizable potential, called the explicit polarization (X-POL) potential, to treat many-body polarization and charge delocalization effects in polypeptides. Here, we present a variational version of the X-POL potential, in which the wave function of the entire molecular system is variationally optimized to yield the minimum total electronic energy. This allows the calculation of analytic gradients, a necessity for efficient molecular dynamics simulations. In this paper, the detailed derivations of the Fock matrix and analytic force are presented and discussed. The calculations involve a double self-consistent-field procedure in which the wave function of each fragment is self-consistently optimized in the presence of other fragments, and in addition the polarization of the entire system is self-consistently optimized. The variational X-POL potential has been implemented in the Chemistry at Harvard Molecular Mechanics (CHARMM) package and tested successfully for small model compounds. PMID:18570492

  13. Radial Inflow Turboexpander Redesign

    SciTech Connect

    William G. Price

    2001-09-24

    Steamboat Envirosystems, LLC (SELC) was awarded a grant in accordance with the DOE Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Development. Atlas-Copco Rotoflow (ACR), a radial expansion turbine manufacturer, was responsible for the manufacturing of the turbine and the creation of the new computer program. SB Geo, Inc. (SBG), the facility operator, monitored and assisted ACR's activities as well as provided installation and startup assistance. The primary scope of the project is the redesign of an axial flow turbine to a radial inflow turboexpander to provide increased efficiency and reliability at an existing facility. In addition to the increased efficiency and reliability, the redesign includes an improved reduction gear design, and improved shaft seal design, and upgraded control system and a greater flexibility of application

  14. Variable stator radial turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogo, C.; Hajek, T.; Chen, A. G.

    1984-01-01

    A radial turbine stage with a variable area nozzle was investigated. A high work capacity turbine design with a known high performance base was modified to accept a fixed vane stagger angle moveable sidewall nozzle. The nozzle area was varied by moving the forward and rearward sidewalls. Diffusing and accelerating rotor inlet ramps were evaluated in combinations with hub and shroud rotor exit rings. Performance of contoured sidewalls and the location of the sidewall split line with respect to the rotor inlet was compared to the baseline. Performance and rotor exit survey data are presented for 31 different geometries. Detail survey data at the nozzle exit are given in contour plot format for five configurations. A data base is provided for a variable geometry concept that is a viable alternative to the more common pivoted vane variable geometry radial turbine.

  15. Radial pressure flange seal

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, Thomas H.; Call, Wayne R.

    1989-01-01

    This invention provides an all metal seal for vacuum or pressure vessels or systems. This invention does not use gaskets. The invention uses a flange which fits into a matching groove. Fluid pressure is applied in a chamber in the flange causing at least one of the flange walls to radially press against a side of the groove creating the seal between the flange wall and the groove side.

  16. Radial pressure flange seal

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1989-01-24

    This invention provides an all metal seal for vacuum or pressure vessels or systems. This invention does not use gaskets. The invention uses a flange which fits into a matching groove. Fluid pressure is applied in a chamber in the flange causing at least one of the flange walls to radially press against a side of the groove creating the seal between the flange wall and the groove side. 5 figs.

  17. Radial Field Piezoelectric Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, R. G.; Effinger, R. T., IV; Copeland, B. M., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    A series of active piezoelectric diaphragms were fabricated and patterned with several geometrically defined Inter-Circulating Electrodes "ICE" and Interdigitated Ring Electrodes "ICE". When a voltage potential is applied to the electrodes, the result is a radially distributed electric field that mechanically strains the piezoceramic along the Z-axis (perpendicular to the applied electric field). Unlike other piezoelectric bender actuators, these Radial Field Diaphragms (RFDs) strain concentrically yet afford high displacements (several times that of the equivalent Unimorph) while maintaining a constant circumference. One of the more intriguing aspects is that the radial strain field reverses itself along the radius of the RFD while the tangential strain remains relatively constant. The result is a Z-deflection that has a conical profile. This paper covers the fabrication and characterization of the 5 cm. (2 in.) diaphragms as a function of poling field strength, ceramic thickness, electrode type and line spacing, as well as the surface topography, the resulting strain field and displacement as a function of applied voltage at low frequencies. The unique features of these RFDs include the ability to be clamped about their perimeter with little or no change in displacement, the environmentally insulated packaging, and a highly repeatable fabrication process that uses commodity materials.

  18. Radial velocity studies of cool stars.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hugh R A; Barnes, John; Tuomi, Mikko; Jenkins, James S; Anglada-Escude, Guillem

    2014-04-28

    Our current view of exoplanets is one derived primarily from solar-like stars with a strong focus on understanding our Solar System. Our knowledge about the properties of exoplanets around the dominant stellar population by number, the so-called low-mass stars or M dwarfs, is much more cursory. Based on radial velocity discoveries, we find that the semi-major axis distribution of M dwarf planets appears to be broadly similar to those around more massive stars and thus formation and migration processes might be similar to heavier stars. However, we find that the mass of M dwarf planets is relatively much lower than the expected mass dependency based on stellar mass and thus infer that planet formation efficiency around low-mass stars is relatively impaired. We consider techniques to overcome the practical issue of obtaining good quality radial velocity data for M dwarfs despite their faintness and sustained activity and emphasize (i) the wavelength sensitivity of radial velocity signals, (ii) the combination of radial velocity data from different experiments for robust detection of small amplitude signals, and (iii) the selection of targets and radial velocity interpretation of late-type M dwarfs should consider Hα behaviour.

  19. Antiproton compression and radial measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, G. B.; Bowe, P. D.; Hangst, J. S.; Bertsche, W.; Butler, E.; Charlton, M.; Humphries, A. J.; Jenkins, M. J.; Joergensen, L. V.; Madsen, N.; Werf, D. P. van der; Bray, C. C.; Chapman, S.; Fajans, J.; Povilus, A.; Wurtele, J. S.; Cesar, C. L.; Lambo, R.; Silveira, D. M.; Fujiwara, M. C.

    2008-08-08

    Control of the radial profile of trapped antiproton clouds is critical to trapping antihydrogen. We report detailed measurements of the radial manipulation of antiproton clouds, including areal density compressions by factors as large as ten, achieved by manipulating spatially overlapped electron plasmas. We show detailed measurements of the near-axis antiproton radial profile, and its relation to that of the electron plasma. We also measure the outer radial profile by ejecting antiprotons to the trap wall using an octupole magnet.

  20. Radial Reflection diffraction tomorgraphy

    DOEpatents

    Lehman, Sean K

    2013-11-19

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  1. Radial reflection diffraction tomography

    DOEpatents

    Lehman, Sean K.

    2012-12-18

    A wave-based tomographic imaging method and apparatus based upon one or more rotating radially outward oriented transmitting and receiving elements have been developed for non-destructive evaluation. At successive angular locations at a fixed radius, a predetermined transmitting element can launch a primary field and one or more predetermined receiving elements can collect the backscattered field in a "pitch/catch" operation. A Hilbert space inverse wave (HSIW) algorithm can construct images of the received scattered energy waves using operating modes chosen for a particular application. Applications include, improved intravascular imaging, bore hole tomography, and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of parts having existing access holes.

  2. Heterogeneous Force Chains in Cellularized Biopolymer Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Long; Jones, Christopher Allen Rucksack; Sun, Bo; Jiao, Yang

    Biopolymer Networks play an important role in coordinating and regulating collective cellular dynamics via a number of signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the mechanical response of a model biopolymer network due to the active contraction of embedded cells. Specifically, a graph (bond-node) model derived from confocal microscopy data is used to represent the network microstructure, and cell contraction is modeled by applying correlated displacements at specific nodes, representing the focal adhesion sites. A force-based stochastic relaxation method is employed to obtain force-balanced network under cell contraction. We find that the majority of the forces are carried by a small number of heterogeneous force chains emerged from the contracting cells. The force chains consist of fiber segments that either possess a high degree of alignment before cell contraction or are aligned due to the reorientation induced by cell contraction. Large fluctuations of the forces along different force chains are observed. Importantly, the decay of the forces along the force chains is significantly slower than the decay of radially averaged forces in the system, suggesting that the fibreous nature of biopolymer network structure could support long-range mechanical signaling between cells.

  3. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, Brian R.

    1981-01-01

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume.

  4. Radial cold trap

    DOEpatents

    Grundy, B.R.

    1981-09-29

    The radial cold trap comprises a housing having a plurality of mesh bands disposed therein. The mesh bands comprise concentrically arranged bands of mesh with the mesh specific surface area of each band increasing from the outermost mesh band to the innermost mesh band. An inlet nozzle is attached to the outside section of the housing while an outlet nozzle is attached to the inner portion of the housing so as to be concentrically connected to the innermost mesh band. An inlet baffle having orifices therein may be disposed around the outermost mesh band and within the housing for directing the flow of the fluid from the inlet nozzle to the outermost mesh band in a uniform manner. The flow of fluid passes through each consecutive mesh band and into the outlet nozzle. The circular pattern of the symmetrically arranged mesh packing allows for better utilization of the entire cold trap volume. 2 figs.

  5. TNF-alpha acts via TNFR1 and muscle-derived oxidants to depress myofibrillar force in murine skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Brian J; Campbell, Kenneth S; Smith, Jeffrey D; Arbogast, Sandrine; Smith, Jacqueline; Moylan, Jennifer S; Reid, Michael B

    2008-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) diminishes specific force of skeletal muscle. To address the mechanism of this response, we tested the hypothesis that TNF acts via the type 1 (TNFR1) receptor subtype to increase oxidant activity and thereby depress myofibrillar function. Experiments showed that a single intraperitoneal dose of TNF (100 microg/kg) increased cytosolic oxidant activity (P < 0.05) and depressed maximal force of male ICR mouse diaphragm by approximately 25% within 1 h, a deficit that persisted for 48 h. Pretreating animals with the antioxidant Trolox (10 mg/kg) lessened oxidant activity (P < 0.05) and abolished contractile losses in TNF-treated muscle (P < 0.05). Genetic TNFR1 deficiency prevented the rise in oxidant activity and fall in force stimulated by TNF; type 2 TNF receptor deficiency did not. TNF effects on muscle function were evident at the myofibrillar level. Chemically permeabilized muscle fibers from TNF-treated animals had lower maximal Ca2+-activated force (P < 0.02) with no change in Ca2+ sensitivity or shortening velocity. We conclude that TNF acts via TNFR1 to stimulate oxidant activity and depress specific force. TNF effects on force are caused, at least in part, by decrements in function of calcium-activated myofibrillar proteins.

  6. Nonaxisymmetric incompressible hydrostatic pressure effects in radial face seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1976-01-01

    A flat seal having an angular misalinement is analyzed, taking into account the radial variations in seal clearance. An analytical solution for axial force, tilting moment, and leakage is presented that covers the whole range from zero to full angular misalinement. Nonaxisymmetric hydrostatic pressures due to the radial variations in the film thickness have a considerable effect on seal stability. When the high pressure is on the outer periphery of the seal, both the axial force and the tilting moment are nonrestoring. The case of high-pressure seals where cavitation is eliminated is discussed, and the possibility of dynamic instability is pointed out.

  7. Derivation of force field parameters for SnO2-H2O surface systems from plane-wave density functional theory calculations.

    PubMed

    Bandura, A V; Sofo, J O; Kubicki, J D

    2006-04-27

    Plane-wave density functional theory (DFT-PW) calculations were performed on bulk SnO2 (cassiterite) and the (100), (110), (001), and (101) surfaces with and without H2O present. A classical interatomic force field has been developed to describe bulk SnO2 and SnO2-H2O surface interactions. Periodic density functional theory calculations using the program VASP (Kresse et al., 1996) and molecular cluster calculations using Gaussian 03 (Frisch et al., 2003) were used to derive the parametrization of the force field. The program GULP (Gale, 1997) was used to optimize parameters to reproduce experimental and ab initio results. The experimental crystal structure and elastic constants of SnO2 are reproduced reasonably well with the force field. Furthermore, surface atom relaxations and structures of adsorbed H2O molecules agree well between the ab initio and force field predictions. H2O addition above that required to form a monolayer results in consistent structures between the DFT-PW and classical force field results as well.

  8. Forced collapse of the blastocoel enhances survival of cryotop vitrified bovine hatching/hatched blastocysts derived from in vitro fertilization and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Min, Sung-Hun; Lee, Enok; Son, Hyeong-Hoon; Yeon, Ji-Yeong; Koo, Deog-Bon

    2013-04-01

    Freezing of bovine blastocysts has been widely used to improve the feasibility of cattle production by the embryo transfer technique. However, the low survival of vitrified-warmed embryos and their further development are crucial problems. Particularly, the production of offspring in vitrified-warmed bovine hatching/hatched blastocysts derived from in vitro fertilization (IVF) and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is very low. Thus, we examined the effects of forced blastocoel collapse (FBC) before vitrification of bovine IVF- and SCNT-derived hatching/hatched embryos on the survival rate and apoptosis index after warming. Under optimal conditions, the overall survival rates in vitrified-warmed bovine IVF- and SCNT-derived hatching/hatched blastocysts were higher in FBC groups than in non-FBC groups (p<0.05). The total cell numbers of vitrified-warmed hatching/hatched blastocysts were higher in FBC groups than in non-FBC groups (p<0.05). Otherwise, the number of apoptotic positive cells of vitrified-warmed hatching/hatched blastocysts was lower in FBC groups than in non-FBC groups (p<0.05). Taken together, these findings suggest that forced collapse of the blastocoel using a pulled Pasteur pipette is an effective pretreatment technique for vitrification of bovine IVF- and SCNT-derived hatching/hatched blastocysts.

  9. Single radial immunodiffusion analysis for quantitation of colostral immunoglobulin concentration.

    PubMed

    Fleenor, W A; Stott, G H

    1981-05-01

    Relative accuracy of the single radial immunodiffusion technique to measure immunoglobulin concentrations of colostral preparations (whey, whole, or fat-free) has been assessed. Fresh colostrum samples were analyzed for major constituents. Gammaglobulin as a standard was compared to total immunoglobulin concentration derived from single radial immunodiffusion analysis of colostral preparations with no differences except between standard and whey. Differences were in part from either enhancement or interference of immunoglobulin diffusion by colostral constituents. Removal of casein and fat during whey preparations caused a concentrating effect upon immunoglobulin constituents resulting in exaggerated precipitin rings. Whey has produced unreliable results: therefore, whole colostrum is recommended for single radial immunodiffusion analysis.

  10. Turbine with radial acting seal

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, Darryl S; Ebert, Todd A

    2016-11-22

    A floating brush seal in a rim cavity of a turbine in a gas turbine engine, where the floating brush seal includes a seal holder in which the floating brush seal floats, and a expandable seal that fits within two radial extending seal slots that maintains a seal with radial displacement of the floating brush seal and the seal holder.

  11. Consistency check for radial distribution functions of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lie, George C.

    1986-12-01

    From a relation between the thermal compressibility and radial distribution function, it is shown that the accuracy of the generally accepted Narten and Levy's experimental radial distribution functions (RDFs) for water is very low, compared with newer experimental results. The most recent experimental RDFs obtained by Soper and Phillips not only pass the consistency check derived, but also have the best overall agreement with the simulated results of Lie and Clementi.

  12. Pressure anisotropy and radial stress balance in the Jovian neutral sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paranicas, C. P.; Mauk, B. H.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1991-01-01

    By examining particle and magnetic field data from the Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft, signatures were found indicating that the (greater than about 28 keV) particle pressure parallel to the magnetic field is greater than the pressure perpendicular to the field within the nightside neutral sheet (three nightside neutral sheet crossings, with favorable experimental conditions, were used). By incorporating the pressure anisotropy into the calculation of radial forces within the hightside neutral sheet, it is found that (1) force balance is approximately achieved and (2) the anisotropy force term provides the largest contribution of the other particle forces considered (pressure gradients and the corotation centrifugal force). With regard to the problem of understanding the balance of radial forces within the dayside neutral sheet (McNutt, 1984; Mauk and Krimigis, 1987), the nightside pressure anisotropy force is larger than the dayside pressure gradient forces at equivalent radial distances; however, a full accounting of the dayside regions remains to be achieved.

  13. A Cubic Radial Basis Function in the MLPG Method for Beam Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raju, I. S.; Phillips, D. R.

    2002-01-01

    A non-compactly supported cubic radial basis function implementation of the MLPG method for beam problems is presented. The evaluation of the derivatives of the shape functions obtained from the radial basis function interpolation is much simpler than the evaluation of the moving least squares shape function derivatives. The radial basis MLPG yields results as accurate or better than those obtained by the conventional MLPG method for problems with discontinuous and other complex loading conditions.

  14. An Ensemble Three-Dimensional Constrained Variational Analysis Method to Derive Large-Scale Forcing Data for Single-Column Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Shuaiqi

    Atmospheric vertical velocities and advective tendencies are essential as large-scale forcing data to drive single-column models (SCM), cloud-resolving models (CRM) and large-eddy simulations (LES). They cannot be directly measured or easily calculated with great accuracy from field measurements. In the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, a constrained variational algorithm (1DCVA) has been used to derive large-scale forcing data over a sounding network domain with the aid of flux measurements at the surface and top of the atmosphere (TOA). We extend the 1DCVA algorithm into three dimensions (3DCVA) along with other improvements to calculate gridded large-scale forcing data. We also introduce an ensemble framework using different background data, error covariance matrices and constraint variables to quantify the uncertainties of the large-scale forcing data. The results of sensitivity study show that the derived forcing data and SCM simulated clouds are more sensitive to the background data than to the error covariance matrices and constraint variables, while horizontal moisture advection has relatively large sensitivities to the precipitation, the dominate constraint variable. Using a mid-latitude cyclone case study in March 3rd, 2000 at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, we investigate the spatial distribution of diabatic heating sources (Q1) and moisture sinks (Q2), and show that they are consistent with the satellite clouds and intuitive structure of the mid-latitude cyclone. We also evaluate the Q1 and Q2 in analysis/reanalysis, finding that the regional analysis/reanalysis all tend to underestimate the sub-grid scale upward transport of moist static energy in the lower troposphere. With the uncertainties from large-scale forcing data and observation specified, we compare SCM results and observations and find that models have large biases on cloud properties which could not be fully explained by the uncertainty from the large-scale forcing

  15. Radially sandwiched cylindrical piezoelectric transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shuyu; Fu, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Xiaoli; Wang, Yong; Hu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    A new type of radially sandwiched piezoelectric short cylindrical transducer is developed and its radial vibration is studied. The transducer is composed of a solid metal disk, a radially polarized piezoelectric ceramic short tube and a metal tube. The radial vibrations of the solid metal disk, the radially polarized piezoelectric tube and the metal tube are analyzed and their electromechanical equivalent circuits are introduced. Based on the mechanical boundary conditions among the metal disk, the piezoelectric tube and the metal tube, a three-port electromechanical equivalent circuit for the radially sandwiched transducer is obtained and the frequency equation is given. The theoretical relationship of the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies and the effective electromechanical coupling coefficient with the geometrical dimensions is analyzed. The radial vibration of the sandwiched transducer is simulated by using two different numerical methods. It is shown that the analytical resonance and anti-resonance frequencies are in good agreement with the numerically simulated results. The transducer is expected to be used in piezoelectric resonators, actuators and ultrasonic radiators in ultrasonic and underwater sound applications.

  16. A data-derived forecast model of surface circulation based on statistical forcing-response decomposition techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Yong

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a data-derived surface current forecast model based on statistical decomposition techniques [Kim et al 2010] on the observations of high-frequency radar-derived surface currents, local winds, and sea surface height anomalies (SSHA) off southern San Diego. The regional surface circulation mainly consists of tide-, wind-, and low-frequency pressure gradient-coherent components, which leads us to use tidal harmonic analysis, response functions using wind stress and pressure gradients, autoregressive analysis for residual components in the forecast model. These basis functions have been consecutively added, and the performance of corresponding forecast models is evaluated.

  17. Local nonlinear rf forces in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jiale; Gao, Zhe

    2014-06-15

    The local nonlinear forces induced by radio frequency (rf) waves are derived in inhomogeneous magnetized plasmas, where the inhomogeneity exists in the rf fields, in the static magnetic field as well as in the equilibrium density and temperature. The local parallel force is completely resonant, but a novel component dependent on those inhomogeneities is obtained as the result of the inhomogeneous transport of parallel resonant-absorbed momentum by the nonlinear perpendicular drift flux. In the local poloidal force, the component induced by the inhomogeneity of rf power absorption is also confirmed and it can be recognized as the residual effect from the incomplete cancellation between the rate of the diamagnetic poloidal momentum gain and the Lorentz force due to the radial diffusion-like flux. The compact expression for radial force is also obtained for the first time, whose nonresonant component is expressed as the sum of the ponderomotive force on particles and the gradients of the nonresonant perpendicular pressure and of the nonresonant momentum flux due to the finite temperature effect. Numerical calculations in a 1-D slab model show that the resonant component dependent on the inhomogeneities may be significant when the ion absorption dominates the resonant wave-particle interaction. A quantitative estimation shows that the novel component in the parallel force is important to understand the experiments of the ion-cyclotron-frequency mode-conversion flow drive.

  18. Large atmospheric shortwave radiative forcing by Mediterranean aerosols derived from simultaneous ground-based and spaceborne observations and dependence on the aerosol type and single scattering albedo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Biagio, Claudia; di Sarra, Alcide; Meloni, Daniela

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol optical properties and shortwave irradiance measurements at the island of Lampedusa (central Mediterranean) during 2004-2007 are combined with Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System observations of the outgoing shortwave flux at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The measurements are used to estimate the surface (FES), the top of the atmosphere (FETOA), and the atmospheric (FEATM) shortwave aerosol forcing efficiencies for solar zenith angle (θ) between 15° and 55° for desert dust (DD), urban/industrial-biomass burning aerosols (UI-BB), and mixed aerosols (MA). The forcing efficiency at the different atmospheric levels is derived by applying the direct method, that is, as the derivative of the shortwave net flux versus the aerosol optical depth at fixed θ. The diurnal average forcing efficiency at the surface/TOA at the equinox is (-68.9 ± 4.0)/(-45.5 ± 5.4) W m-2 for DD, (-59.0 ± 4.3)/(-19.2 ± 3.3) W m-2 for UI-BB, and (-94.9 ± 5.1)/(-36.2 ± 1.7) W m-2 for MA. The diurnal average atmospheric radiative forcing at the equinox is (+7.3 ± 2.5) W m-2 for DD, (+8.4 ± 1.9) W m-2 for UI-BB, and (+8.2 ± 1.9) W m-2 for MA, suggesting that the mean atmospheric forcing is almost independent of the aerosol type. The largest values of the atmospheric forcing may reach +35 W m-2 for DD, +23 W m-2 for UI-BB, and +34 W m-2 for MA. FETOA is calculated for MA and 25° ≤ θ ≤ 35° for three classes of single scattering albedo (0.7 ≤ ω < 0.8, 0.8 ≤ ω < 0.9, and 0.9 ≤ ω ≤ 1) at 415.6 and 868.7 nm: FETOA increases, in absolute value, for increasing ω. A 0.1 increment in ω determines an increase in FETOA by 10-20 W m-2.

  19. Analytic expressions for ULF wave radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients.

    PubMed

    Ozeke, Louis G; Mann, Ian R; Murphy, Kyle R; Jonathan Rae, I; Milling, David K

    2014-03-01

    We present analytic expressions for ULF wave-derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, as a function of L and Kp, which can easily be incorporated into global radiation belt transport models. The diffusion coefficients are derived from statistical representations of ULF wave power, electric field power mapped from ground magnetometer data, and compressional magnetic field power from in situ measurements. We show that the overall electric and magnetic diffusion coefficients are to a good approximation both independent of energy. We present example 1-D radial diffusion results from simulations driven by CRRES-observed time-dependent energy spectra at the outer boundary, under the action of radial diffusion driven by the new ULF wave radial diffusion coefficients and with empirical chorus wave loss terms (as a function of energy, Kp and L). There is excellent agreement between the differential flux produced by the 1-D, Kp-driven, radial diffusion model and CRRES observations of differential electron flux at 0.976 MeV-even though the model does not include the effects of local internal acceleration sources. Our results highlight not only the importance of correct specification of radial diffusion coefficients for developing accurate models but also show significant promise for belt specification based on relatively simple models driven by solar wind parameters such as solar wind speed or geomagnetic indices such as Kp.

  20. Coherent anti-phasing between solar forcing and tropical Pacific climate over the past millennium: derivation and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emile-Geay, J.; Cobb, K.; Mann, M. E.; Wittenberg, A. T.

    2011-12-01

    Using a compilation of the most recent, high-resolution proxy data from the tropics, and a state-of-the-art climate reconstruction technique (RegEM iTTLS; Emile-Geay et al, submitted), we reconstruct sea-surface temperature (SST) in the central equatorial Pacific (NINO3.4 region) over the past millennium. Using frozen network experiments and pseudoproxy validation, the reconstruction is found skillful back to 1150 C.E., with inevitable amplitude reduction before 1500 C.E. due to the paucity of proxy predictors. Despite this caveat, wavelet coherency analysis reveals a marked anticorrelation between solar forcing (as estimated from cosmogenic isotope concentrations; Bard et al., 2007; Steinhilber et al., 2009) and the reconstructed NINO3.4 in the ~sim205-year spectral range (DeVries cycle). The phase angle between both signals is 156 ± 33o in this range, indicating that periods of high solar irradiance coincide with cool conditions in the NINO3.4 region, with time lag of 14 ± 19 years. We find this result robust to the reconstruction method, estimate of solar forcing, or analysis method used to estimate the phasing. We then discuss the implication of this result for the response of tropical Pacific climate to radiative forcing. While the anti-phasing seems to favor the ``ocean dynamical thermostat'' hypothesis of Clement et al [1996], this feedback appears subdued in most IPCC-class coupled general circulation models (CGCMs), where it is almost completely compensated by changes in the Pacific trade winds, linked to changes in the vertical structures of atmospheric moisture and temperature (Knutson & Manabe 1995; Held & Soden 2006; Vecchi et al. 2006). If the reconstruction is correct that past NINO3.4 SSTs have varied out of phase with solar irradiance on bicentennial scales, this would pose a new challenge both for CGCM simulations and for our understanding of the equatorial Pacific response to radiative forcing Clement, A. C., Seager, R., Cane, M. A., and Zebiak

  1. Case study of spatial and temporal variability of snow cover, grain size, albedo and radiative forcing in the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountain snowpack derived from imaging spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Felix C.; Rittger, Karl; McKenzie Skiles, S.; Molotch, Noah P.; Painter, Thomas H.

    2016-06-01

    Quantifying the spatial distribution and temporal change in mountain snow cover, microphysical and optical properties is important to improve our understanding of the local energy balance and the related snowmelt and hydrological processes. In this paper, we analyze changes of snow cover, optical-equivalent snow grain size (radius), snow albedo and radiative forcing by light-absorbing impurities in snow and ice (LAISI) with respect to terrain elevation and aspect at multiple dates during the snowmelt period. These snow properties are derived from the NASA/JPL Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data from 2009 in California's Sierra Nevada and from 2011 in Colorado's Rocky Mountains, USA. Our results show a linearly decreasing snow cover during the ablation period in May and June in the Rocky Mountains and a snowfall-driven change in snow cover in the Sierra Nevada between February and May. At the same time, the snow grain size is increasing primarily at higher elevations and north-facing slopes from 200 microns to 800 microns on average. We find that intense snowmelt renders the mean grain size almost invariant with respect to elevation and aspect. Our results confirm the inverse relationship between snow albedo and grain size, as well as between snow albedo and radiative forcing by LAISI. At both study sites, the mean snow albedo value decreases from approximately 0.7 to 0.5 during the ablation period. The mean snow grain size increased from approximately 150 to 650 microns. The mean radiative forcing increases from 20 W m-2 up to 200 W m-2 during the ablation period. The variability of snow albedo and grain size decreases in general with the progression of the ablation period. The spatial variability of the snow albedo and grain size decreases through the melt season while the spatial variability of radiative forcing remains constant.

  2. Magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump with a radial magnetic driver.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Hideo; Katakoa, Kiroyuki; Ohuchi, Katsuhiro; Asama, Jun-ichi; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Shimokohbe, Akira; Takatani, Setsuo

    2005-01-01

    A new magnetic bearing has been designed to achieve a low electronic power requirement and high stiffness. The magnetic bearing consists of 1) radial passive forces between the permanent magnet ring mounted inside the impeller rotor and the electromagnet core materials in the pump casing and 2) radial active forces generated by the electromagnets using the two gap sensor signals. The magnetic bearing was assembled into a centrifugal rotary blood pump (CRBP) driven with a radial, magnetic coupled driver. The impeller vane shape was designed based upon the computational fluid dynamic simulation. The diameter and height of the CRBP were 75 mm and 50 mm, respectively. The magnetic bearing system required the power of 1.0-1.4 W. The radial impeller movement was controlled to within +/- 10 microm. High stiffness in the noncontrolled axes, Z, phi, and theta, was obtained by the passive magnetic forces. The pump flow of 5 L/min against 100 mm Hg head pressure was obtained at 1,800 rpm with the electrical to hydraulic efficiency being greater than 15%. The Normalized Index of Hemolysis (NIH) of the magnetic bearing CRBP was one fifth of the BioPump BP-80 and one half of the NIKKISO HPM-15 after 4 hours. The newly designed magnetic bearing with two degrees of freedom control in combination with optimized impeller vane was successful in achieving an excellent hemolytic performance in comparison with the clinical centrifugal blood pumps.

  3. Radial lean direct injection burner

    DOEpatents

    Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2012-09-04

    A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

  4. Generation and propagation of a vector cosine-Gaussian correlated beam with radial polarization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shijun; Chen, Yahong; Wang, Jing; Wang, Haiyan; Li, Zhenhua; Cai, Yangjian

    2015-12-28

    Scalar cosine-Gaussian-correlated Schell-model (CGCSM) beams of circular or rectangular symmetry were introduced just recently. In this paper, a new kind of partially coherent vector beam named vector CGCSM beam with radial polarization (i.e., radially polarized CGCSM beam) is introduced. The realizability conditions for a radially polarized CGCSM source and the beam condition for radiation generated by such source are derived. The statistical properties, such as the average intensity, the degree of coherence, the degree of polarization and the state of polarization, of a radially polarized CGCSM beam focused by a thin lens are analyzed in detail. It is found that the statistical properties of a radially polarized CGCSM beam are quite different from those of a conventional radial polarized partially coherent beam with Gaussian correlated Schell-model function. Furthermore, we first report experimental generation of a radially polarized CGCSM beam and measure its focusing properties. Our experimental results are consistent with the theoretical predictions.

  5. Stellar Mass Radial Profiles of Pan-STARRS MDS Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zheng; Thilker, D. A.; Heckman, T. M.

    2013-01-01

    Six-band (ugrizy) surface brightness radial profiles are derived for a sample of 48 late-type face-on non-interacting nearby galaxies using the Pan-STARRS Medium Deep Survey stack imaging (grizy) and the CFHT deep u-band imaging data. The surface brightnesses are measured down to ~ 29-30 ABmag/arcsec^2. The SB radial profiles are then fed into the advanced SED fitting software MAGPHYS (da Cunha et al. 2008) to derive radial profiles of stellar mass surface density as well as other parameters, such as metallicity and star formation history. The output stellar mass surface density profiles can be classified into three types (single exponential, down-bending, and up-bending), which is consistent with the results of Polen & Trujillo (2006). But the up-bending profiles are more common than indicated in PT06.

  6. Clinical usefulness of the second peak of radial systolic blood pressure for estimation of aortic systolic blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Kohara, K; Tabara, Y; Tomita, H; Nagai, T; Igase, M; Miki, T

    2009-08-01

    Central aortic blood pressure (BP), obtained from radial arterial waveform using the transfer function method (TFM), has been shown to have prognostic value independently of brachial BP. In this study, the relationship between peripheral systolic BP (SBP) and aortic SBP was evaluated. We further investigated whether TFM-derived aortic SBP can be estimated by information obtained from the radial waveform. The radial waveform was analysed to obtain the first peak of radial SBP (SBP1), second peak of radial SBP (SBP2), radial augmentation index (AI) (radial (SBP2-DBP)/(SBP1-DBP) x 100 and aortic SBP and AI using TFM in 233 subjects in the supine position. Measurements were repeated after changing position to the prone position. The constructed equation was validated in 149 community residents with different backgrounds. Radial SBP2 was closer to TFM-derived aortic SBP compared with brachial SBP. TFM-derived aortic SBP was approximated by the equation: aortic SBP=18.9-radial SBP2-0.03 x HR-0.214 x radial AI (r2=0.992). The equation was also applicable to predicting aortic SBP in the prone position as well as in different populations (mean difference between predicted aortic SBP and TFM-derived aortic SBP: -0.01+/-1.34 and 1.05+/-1.47 mm Hg, respectively). Radial arterial waveform analysis can be used for estimation of TFM-derived aortic SBP.

  7. Quartic force field-derived vibrational frequencies and spectroscopic constants for the isomeric pair SNO and OSN and isotopologues

    SciTech Connect

    Fortenberry, Ryan C.; Francisco, Joseph S.

    2015-08-28

    The SNO and OSN radical isomers are likely to be of significance in atmospheric and astrochemistry, but very little is known about their gas phase spectroscopic properties. State-of-the-art ab initio composite quartic force fields are employed to analyze the rovibrational features for both systems. Comparison to condensed-phase experimental data for SNO has shown that the 1566.4 cm{sup −1} ν{sub 1} N–O stretch is indeed exceptionally bright and likely located in this vicinity for subsequent gas phase experimental analysis. The OSN ν{sub 1} at 1209.4 cm{sup −1} is better described as the antisymmetric stretch in this molecule and is also quite bright. The full vibrational, rotational, and rovibrational data are provided for SNO and OSN and their single {sup 15}N, {sup 18}O, and {sup 34}S isotopic substitutions in order to give a more complete picture as to the chemical physics of these molecules.

  8. The impact of wave-induced Coriolis-Stokes forcing on satellite-derived ocean surface currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Zhenli; Xu, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Ocean surface currents estimated from the satellite data consist of two terms: Ekman currents from the wind stress and geostrophic currents from the sea surface height (SSH). But the classical Ekman model does not consider the wave effects. By taking the wave-induced Coriolis-Stokes forcing into account, the impact of waves (primarily the Stokes drift) on ocean surface currents is investigated and the wave-modified currents are formed. The products are validated by comparing with OSCAR currents and Lagrangian drifter velocity. The result shows that our products with the Stokes drift are better adapted to the in situ Lagrangian drifter currents. Especially in the Southern Ocean region (40°S-65°S), 90% (91%) of the zonal (meridional) currents have been improved compared with currents that do not include Stokes drift. The correlation (RMSE) in the Southern Ocean has also increased (decreased) from 0.78 (13) to 0.81 (10.99) for the zonal component and 0.76 (10.87) to 0.79 (10.09) for the meridional component. This finding provides the evidence that waves indeed play an important role in the ocean circulation, and need to be represented in numerical simulations of the global ocean circulation. This article was corrected on 10 FEB 2016. See the end of the full text for details.

  9. Forces in General Relativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  10. Losses in radial inflow turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khalil, I. M.; Tabakoff, W.; Hamed, A.

    1976-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine experimentally and theoretically the losses in radial inflow turbine nozzles. Extensive experimental data was obtained to investigate the flow behavior in a full-scale radial turbine stator annulus. A theoretical model to predict the losses in both the vaned and vaneless regions of the nozzle was developed. In this analysis, the interaction effects between the stator and the rotor are not considered. It was found that the losses incurred due to the end wall boundary layers can be significant, especially if they are characterized by a strong crossflow. The losses estimated using the analytical study are compared with the experimentally determined values.

  11. Hydraulic radial piston pump intake porting arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.T.

    1987-06-16

    This patent describes a hydraulic radial piston pump having a slider block mounted on an eccentric of a rotary shaft in a hydraulic fluid supplied cavity. A piston is mounted in a cylinder disposed radially to the shaft. The piston has a flat working face at one end operating in the cylinder and a flat pad at an opposite end slidably engaged by a flat face of the slider block so as to force the piston outward on a compression stroke on shaft rotation. A yoke retains the piston to the slider block so as to retract the piston inward on an intake stroke on shaft rotation characterized by intake porting means for communicating the cavity with the working end of the piston. It comprises an intake passage extending centrally and axially through the piston from the working end to the pad resulting in an annular face at both piston ends. An elongated intake slot in the face of the slider block extends from a point continuously open to the cavity to a point that opens to the intake passage at the pad end on relative movement of the slider block during the intake stroke to just prior to the compression stroke. The annular faces at the working and pad ends of the piston having substantially equal areas to prevent hydraulic film from developing between the slider block and pad and thereby prevent their separation during compression.

  12. Radial plasma transport in Saturn's magnetosphere (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, T. W.

    2010-12-01

    Radial plasma transport in the magnetosphere of Saturn, like that of Jupiter, is driven by the centrifugal force of (partial) corotation acting on internally generated plasma. A significant difference is that the internal plasma source is evidently broadly distributed throughout the inner magnetosphere of Saturn (4 < L <~12), although the neutral water vapor source is evidently tightly localized to Enceladus (L = 4). At Jupiter, by comparison, both the neutral and plasma sources are evidently largely confined to the Io plasma torus (L ~ 6-7). A possible consequence of the broadly distributed source at Saturn is the observed feature that convective outflow channels are relatively broad and slow, while the corresponding inflow channels are relatively narrow and fast. This feature is well documented by Cassini observations (primarily CAPS and MAG), and reproduced in numerical simulations (RCM) that contain a distributed plasma source, although it has not, to my knowledge, been explained by an analytical theory containing an active plasma source. Both planets exhibit strong magnetospheric modulations near the planetary spin period, probably indicating a persistent longitudinal asymmetry of the radial plasma transport process. At Jupiter such an asymmetry is readily understood as a consequence of the dramatic asymmetry of the intrinsic planetary magnetic field. This is not so at Saturn, where any such field asymmetry is known to be very modest at best. In neither case has the precise nature of the asymmetry been identified either observationally or theoretically.

  13. Analytic expressions for ULF wave radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients

    PubMed Central

    Ozeke, Louis G; Mann, Ian R; Murphy, Kyle R; Jonathan Rae, I; Milling, David K

    2014-01-01

    We present analytic expressions for ULF wave-derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, as a function of L and Kp, which can easily be incorporated into global radiation belt transport models. The diffusion coefficients are derived from statistical representations of ULF wave power, electric field power mapped from ground magnetometer data, and compressional magnetic field power from in situ measurements. We show that the overall electric and magnetic diffusion coefficients are to a good approximation both independent of energy. We present example 1-D radial diffusion results from simulations driven by CRRES-observed time-dependent energy spectra at the outer boundary, under the action of radial diffusion driven by the new ULF wave radial diffusion coefficients and with empirical chorus wave loss terms (as a function of energy, Kp and L). There is excellent agreement between the differential flux produced by the 1-D, Kp-driven, radial diffusion model and CRRES observations of differential electron flux at 0.976 MeV—even though the model does not include the effects of local internal acceleration sources. Our results highlight not only the importance of correct specification of radial diffusion coefficients for developing accurate models but also show significant promise for belt specification based on relatively simple models driven by solar wind parameters such as solar wind speed or geomagnetic indices such as Kp. Key Points Analytic expressions for the radial diffusion coefficients are presented The coefficients do not dependent on energy or wave m value The electric field diffusion coefficient dominates over the magnetic PMID:26167440

  14. A design methodology for a magnetorheological fluid damper based on a multi-stage radial flow mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, C. R.; Zhao, D. X.; Xie, L.; Liu, Q.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, a magnetorheological (MR) fluid damper based on a multi-stage radial flow mode is put forward, compared with traditional ones with annular damping channel which are of low magnetic field utilization and high energy consumption. The equivalent magnetic circuit model is derived, along with the relation between the magnetic induction at the working gap and the exciting current in the field coils. The finite-element software ANYSY is used to analyze the distribution of the magnetic field in the MR valve. The flow differential equation for a MR fluid in radial flow is theoretically set up, and the numerical solution is validated by means of the Herschel-Bulkley constitutive model. A MR damper was designed and fabricated in Chongqing University in accordance with the technical requirements of a railway vehicle anti-yaw damper, and the force-displacement characteristic of the damper was tested with J95-I type shock absorber test-bed. The results show that the experimental damping forces are in good agreement with the analytical ones, and the methodology is believed to help predict the damping force of a MR damper.

  15. Fracture behavior of lithium single crystal in the framework of (semi-)empirical force field derived from first-principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groh, Sébastien; Alam, Masud

    2015-06-01

    An approach to derive, from first-principles data, accurate and reliable potentials in the modified embedded-atom method in view of modeling the mechanical behavior of metals is presented in this work and applied to the optimization of a potential representative of lithium (Li). Although the theoretical background of the modified embedded-atom method was considered in this work, the proposed method is general and it can be applied to any other functional form. The main feature of the method is to introduce several path transformations in the material database that are critical for plastic and failure behavior. As part of the potential validation, path transformations different from the ones used for the parameterization procedure are considered. Applied in the case of Li, the material database was enriched with the generalized stacking fault energy curve along the  <1 1 1>  -direction on the {1 1 0}-plane, and with the traction-separation behavior of a {1 0 0}-surface. The path transformations used to enrich the material database were initially derived from first-principles calculations. For validation, the generalized stacking fault energy curves along the  <1 1 1>  -direction on the {1 1 2}- and {1 2 3}-planes were considered for plasticity, while traction-separation behavior of {1 1 0} and {1 1 1}-planes were considered for failure behavior. As part of the validation procedure, the predictions made in the MEAM framework were validated by first-principles data. The final potential accurately reproduced basic equilibrium properties, elastic constants, surface energies in agreement with first-principles predictions, and transition energy between different crystal structures. Furthermore, generalized stacking fault energy curves along the  <1 1 1>  -direction on the {1 1 0}, {1 1 2}, and {1 2 3}-planes, and tensile cohesive stress, characteristic length of fracture, and work of separation of a

  16. Factors influencing the radial-tangential illusion in haptic perception.

    PubMed

    McFarland, James; Soechting, John F

    2007-04-01

    According to the radial-tangential illusion, in the horizontal plane, arm movements executed in directions radial to the trunk are sensed to be longer than movements of the same length in the orthogonal direction. It has been suggested that the illusion arises from the fact that radially directed movements are executed more slowly and require more effort. These suggestions were tested in a series of experiments, using a robotically controlled manipulandum. In all of the experiments subjects grasped the handle of the manipulandum, in some cases exploring the virtual boundary of a rectangle, while in others being guided along a rectangular contour by the robot. In a two-alternative forced choice design, subjects reported whether the rectangle was wide or narrow. In a control experiment, subjects manifested the radial-tangential illusion. Contrary to the hypothesis, the magnitude of this illusion was not altered when a resistive force was added in the tangential direction or when the ratio of movement times in the tangential and radial directions was changed. However, when the contour was explored in the counterclockwise direction, the illusion was much smaller than when it was explored in the clockwise direction. A second series of experiments, in which subjects only explored two sides (i.e., an L-shape), demonstrated that this effect arose from distortions induced by the serial ordering of the exploratory movements. The illusion was much smaller when the radial segment was explored first. We suggest that this distortion arises from the serial nature of haptic exploration, in which the length of the initial segment decreases as it is stored in working memory for subsequent comparison.

  17. Vortex Whistle in Radial Intake

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-10-01

    RTO-MP-AVT-110 22 - 1 Vortex Whistle in Radial Intake Dr. Man-Chun Tse Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. 1000 Marie-Victorin, Longueuil , Quebec...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. 1000 Marie-Victorin, Longueuil , Quebec, Canada, J4G 1A1 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT

  18. Asymptotic screened hydrogenic radial integrals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsgaard, D. A.; Khan, F.; Khandelwal, G. S.

    1988-01-01

    The usefulness of the screened hydrogenic model for the transitions of the helium sequence is studied. The screened hydrogenic radial dipole integral for discrete-discrete transitions from the initial state to the final state is asymptotically expanded to the lowest order such that the final quantum number n approaches infinity. The analytical expression obtained is in terms of confluent hypergeometric functions.

  19. Effects of radial motion on interchange injections at Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paranicas, C.; Thomsen, M. F.; Achilleos, N.; Andriopoulou, M.; Badman, S. V.; Hospodarsky, G.; Jackman, C. M.; Jia, X.; Kennelly, T.; Khurana, K.; Kollmann, P.; Krupp, N.; Louarn, P.; Roussos, E.; Sergis, N.

    2016-01-01

    Charged particle injections are regularly observed in Saturn's inner magnetosphere by Cassini. They are attributed to an ongoing process of flux-tube interchange driven by the strong centrifugal force associated with Saturn's rapid rotation. Numerical simulations suggest that these interchange injections can be associated with inward flow channels, in which plasma confined to a narrow range of longitudes moves radially toward the planet, gaining energy, while ambient plasma in the adjacent regions moves more slowly outward. Most previous analyses of these events have neglected this radial motion and inferred properties of the events under the assumption that they appear instantaneously at the spacecraft's L-shell and thereafter drift azimuthally. This paper describes features of injections that can be related to their radial motion prior to observation. We use a combination of phase space density profiles and an updated version of a test-particle model to quantify properties of the injection. We are able to infer the longitudinal width of the injection, the radial travel time from its point of origin, and the starting L shell of the injection. We can also predict which energies can remain inside the channel during the radial transport. To highlight the effects of radial propagation at a finite speed, we focus on those interchange injections without extensive features of azimuthal dispersion. Injections that have traveled radially for one or more hours prior to observation would have been initiated at a different local time than that of the observation. Finally, we describe an injection where particles have drifted azimuthally into a flow channel prior to observation by Cassini.

  20. Radial elasticity of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Michael W. Smith, Cheol Park, Meng Zheng, Changhong Ke ,In-Tae Bae, Kevin Jordan

    2012-02-01

    We investigated the radial mechanical properties of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes (MW-BNNTs) using atomic force microscopy. The employed MW-BNNTs were synthesized using pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) methods and were dispersed in aqueous solution using ultrasonication methods with the aid of ionic surfactants. Our nanomechanical measurements reveal the elastic deformational behaviors of individual BNNTs with two to four tube walls in their transverse directions. Their effective radial elastic moduli were obtained through interpreting their measured radial deformation profiles using Hertzian contact mechanics models. Our results capture the dependences of the effective radial moduli of MW-BNNTs on both the tube outer diameter and the number of tube layers. The effective radial moduli of double-walled BNNTs are found to be several-fold higher than those of single-walled BNNTs within the same diameter range. Our work contributes directly to a complete understanding of the fundamental structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and the pursuits of their novel structural and electronics applications.

  1. Radial elasticity of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Meng; Ke, Changhong; Bae, In-Tae; Park, Cheol; Smith, Michael W; Jordan, Kevin

    2012-03-09

    We investigated the radial mechanical properties of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes (MW-BNNTs) using atomic force microscopy. The employed MW-BNNTs were synthesized using pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) methods and were dispersed in aqueous solution using ultrasonication methods with the aid of ionic surfactants. Our nanomechanical measurements reveal the elastic deformational behaviors of individual BNNTs with two to four tube walls in their transverse directions. Their effective radial elastic moduli were obtained through interpreting their measured radial deformation profiles using Hertzian contact mechanics models. Our results capture the dependences of the effective radial moduli of MW-BNNTs on both the tube outer diameter and the number of tube layers. The effective radial moduli of double-walled BNNTs are found to be several-fold higher than those of single-walled BNNTs within the same diameter range. Our work contributes directly to a complete understanding of the fundamental structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and the pursuits of their novel structural and electronics applications.

  2. Radial elasticity of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Meng; Ke, Changhong; Bae, In-Tae; Park, Cheol; Smith, Michael W.; Jordan, Kevin

    2012-03-01

    We investigated the radial mechanical properties of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes (MW-BNNTs) using atomic force microscopy. The employed MW-BNNTs were synthesized using pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) methods and were dispersed in aqueous solution using ultrasonication methods with the aid of ionic surfactants. Our nanomechanical measurements reveal the elastic deformational behaviors of individual BNNTs with two to four tube walls in their transverse directions. Their effective radial elastic moduli were obtained through interpreting their measured radial deformation profiles using Hertzian contact mechanics models. Our results capture the dependences of the effective radial moduli of MW-BNNTs on both the tube outer diameter and the number of tube layers. The effective radial moduli of double-walled BNNTs are found to be several-fold higher than those of single-walled BNNTs within the same diameter range. Our work contributes directly to a complete understanding of the fundamental structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and the pursuits of their novel structural and electronics applications.

  3. Waves in Radial Gravity Using Magnetic Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlsen, D. R.; Hart, J. E.; Weidman, P. D.

    1999-01-01

    Terrestrial laboratory experiments studying various fluid dynamical processes are constrained, by being in an Earth laboratory, to have a gravitational body force which is uniform and unidirectional. Therefore fluid free-surfaces are horizontal and flat. Such free surfaces must have a vertical solid boundary to keep the fluid from spreading horizontally along a gravitational potential surface. In atmospheric, oceanic, or stellar fluid flows that have a horizontal scale of about one-tenth the body radius or larger, sphericity is important in the dynamics. Further, fluids in spherical geometry can cover an entire domain without any sidewall effects, i.e. have truly periodic boundary conditions. We describe spherical body-force laboratory experiments using ferrofluid. Ferrofluids are dilute suspensions of magnetic dipoles, for example magnetite particles of order 10 nm diameter, suspended in a carrier fluid. Ferrofluids are subject to an additional body force in the presence of an applied magnetic field gradient. We use this body force to conduct laboratory experiments in spherical geometry. The present study is a laboratory technique improvement. The apparatus is cylindrically axisymmetric. A cylindrical ceramic magnet is embedded in a smooth, solid, spherical PVC ball. The geopotential field and its gradient, the body force, were made nearly spherical by careful choice of magnet height-to-diameter ratio and magnet size relative to the PVC ball size. Terrestrial gravity is eliminated from the dynamics by immersing the "planet" and its ferrofluid "ocean" in an immiscible silicone oil/freon mixture of the same density. Thus the earth gravity is removed from the dynamics of the ferrofluid/oil interface and the only dynamically active force there is the radial magnetic gravity. The entire apparatus can rotate, and waves are forced on the ferrofluid surface by exterior magnets. The biggest improvement in technique is in the wave visualization. Fluorescing dye is added to

  4. Velocidades radiales en Collinder 121

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnal, M.; Morrell, N.

    Se han llevado a cabo observaciones espectroscópicas de unas treinta estrellas que son posibles miembros del cúmulo abierto Collinder 121. Las mismas fueron realizadas con el telescopio de 2.15m del Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito (CASLEO). El análisis de las velocidades radiales derivadas del material obtenido, confirma la realidad de Collinder 121, al menos desde el punto de vista cinemático. La velocidad radial baricentral (LSR) del cúmulo es de +17 ± 3 km.s-1. Esta velocidad coincide, dentro de los errores, con la velocidad radial (LSR) de la nebulosa anillo S308, la cual es de ~20 ± 10 km.s-1. Como S308 se encuentra físicamente asociada a la estrella Wolf-Rayet HD~50896, es muy probable que esta última sea un miembro de Collinder 121. Desde un punto de vista cinemático, la supergigante roja HD~50877 (K3Iab) también pertenecería a Collinder 121. Basándonos en la pertenencia de HD~50896 a Collinder 121, y en la interacción encontrada entre el viento de esta estrella y el medio interestelar circundante a la misma, se estima para este cúmulo una distancia del orden de 1 kpc.

  5. Effects of chronic forced swim stress on hippocampal brain-derived neutrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor (TrkB) immunoreactive cells in juvenile and aged rats.

    PubMed

    Badowska-Szalewska, Ewa; Spodnik, Edyta; Klejbor, Ilona; Morys, Janusz

    2010-01-01

    A type of stress stimulation and age are claimed to affect the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor - tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) in the hippocampal regions differentially. This study aimed to explore the influence of chronic (15 min daily for 21 days) forced swim stress (FS) exposure on the BDNF and TrkB containing neurons in the hippocampal CA1, CA3 pyramidal cell layers and dentate gyrus (DG) granule cell layer in juvenile (P28) and aged (P360) rats. An immunofluorescence (-ir) method was used to detect BDNF-ir and TrkB-ir cells. Under chronic FS exposure, in the group of juvenile rats a significant decrease in the density of BDNF immunoreactive neurons was observed in CA1 and DG (P less than <0.001), unlike CA3, where it remained unaltered just as the density of TrkB-ir cells in CA1 and DG, but in CA3 the number of TrkB-ir cells was found to grow (P less than 0.05) in comparison with control groups. After chronic FS exposure of aged (P360) rats, the density of BDNF-ir and TrkB-ir cells did not decline in any of the subregions of the hippocampus. In all subfields of the hippocampus, the denseness of BDNF-positive neurons was significantly higher in P360 stressed group, compared with P28 stressed group, but the density of TrkB-ir fell more markedly in P360 than in P28. In conclusion, chronic FS stress influenced the number of BDNF and TrkB immunoreactive neurons only in juvenile animals. The age of rats tested in the chronic forced swim test was a decisive factor determining changes in the density of BDNF-ir and TrkB-ir in the hippocampal structures.

  6. On Beam-like Functions with Radial Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Papanicolaou, N. C.; Christov, C. I.

    2008-10-30

    In this work, we introduce a complete orthonormal (CON) set of functions as the eigenfunctions of a fourth-order boundary problem with radial symmetry. We derive the relation for the spectrum of the problem and solve it numerically. For larger indices n of the eigenvalues we derive accurate asymptotic representations valid within o(n{sup -2}).Two model fourth order problems with radial symmetry which admit exact analytic solutions are featured: a simple problem involving only the fourth-order radial operator and a constant and the other also involving the second-order radial operator. We show that for both cases, the rate of convergence is O(N{sup -5}) which is compatible with theoretical predictions. The spectral and analytic solutions are found to be in excellent agreement. With 20 terms the absolute pointwise difference of the spectral and analytical solutions is of order 10{sup -7} which means that the fifth order algebraic rate of convergence is fully adequate.

  7. Radial tears of the menisci: MR findings.

    PubMed

    Tuckman, G A; Miller, W J; Remo, J W; Fritts, H M; Rozansky, M I

    1994-08-01

    Radial meniscal tears have a plane of cleavage oriented across the short axis of the meniscus in the same plane in which radial images are oriented. These tears are important to recognize, because they have clinical implications different from those of other meniscal tears with respect to meniscal function, orthopedic treatment, and clinical course. Depending on their size, location, and orientation, radial tears can have different appearances on standard MR images. Certain types can be fairly subtle to diagnose. The purpose of this essay is to illustrate the varied appearances of radial tears on MR images and the findings commonly associated with radial tears.

  8. Radial vibrations of BPS skyrmions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, C.; Haberichter, M.; Romanczukiewicz, T.; Wereszczynski, A.

    2016-11-01

    We study radial vibrations of spherically symmetric Skyrmions in the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Skyrme model. Concretely, we numerically solve the linearized field equations for small fluctuations in a Skyrmion background, both for linearly stable oscillations and for (unstable) resonances. This is complemented by numerical solutions of the full nonlinear system, which confirm all the results of the linear analysis. In all cases, the resulting fundamental excitation provides a rather accurate value for the Roper resonance, supporting the hypothesis that the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Skyrme model already gives a reasonable approximate description of this resonance. Furthermore, for many potentials additional higher resonances appear, again in agreement with known experimental results.

  9. PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITIES WITH CSHELL

    SciTech Connect

    Crockett, Christopher J.; Prato, L.; Mahmud, Naved I.; Johns-Krull, Christopher M.; Jaffe, Daniel T.; Beichman, Charles A. E-mail: lprato@lowell.edu E-mail: cmj@rice.edu

    2011-07-10

    Radial velocity (RV) identification of extrasolar planets has historically been dominated by optical surveys. Interest in expanding exoplanet searches to M dwarfs and young stars, however, has motivated a push to improve the precision of near-infrared RV techniques. We present our methodology for achieving 58 m s{sup -1} precision in the K band on the M0 dwarf GJ 281 using the CSHELL spectrograph at the 3 m NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. We also demonstrate our ability to recover the known 4 M{sub JUP} exoplanet Gl 86 b and discuss the implications for success in detecting planets around 1-3 Myr old T Tauri stars.

  10. Radial Wettable Gradient of Hot Surface to Control Droplets Movement in Directions

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Shile; Wang, Sijie; Tao, Yuanhao; Shang, Weifeng; Deng, Siyan; Zheng, Yongmei; Hou, Yongping

    2015-01-01

    A radial wettable gradient was fabricated on the surface of graphite plate by a simple one-step anodic oxidation process. It was found that the direction and value of the wettable gradient could be easily controlled by adjusting current and oxidation time gradient. With the increase of surface temperature, droplets on surface not only exhibited the transition of boiling mode, but also showed the controlled radial spreading, evaporation and movement behaviors. These phenomena could be attributed to the cooperation of wettability force, hysteresis force and vapor pressure (Leidenfrost effect). Especially, the controlled radial convergence or divergence of droplets with high velocity were realized on the surfaces with either inside or outside radial gradient, which would have crucial applications in the design of microfluidic devices and the exploration of the biotechnology. PMID:25975722

  11. Nonstandard jump functions for radially symmetric shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, Roy S.; Tucker, Don H.; Stanescu, Dan

    2008-10-01

    Nonstandard analysis is applied to derive generalized jump functions for radially symmetric, one-dimensional, magnetogasdynamic shock waves. It is assumed that the shock wave jumps occur on infinitesimal intervals, and the jump functions for the physical parameters occur smoothly across these intervals. Locally integrable predistributions of the Heaviside function are used to model the flow variables across a shock wave. The equations of motion expressed in nonconservative form are then applied to derive unambiguous relationships between the jump functions for the physical parameters for two families of self-similar flows. It is shown that the microstructures for these families of radially symmetric, magnetogasdynamic shock waves coincide in a nonstandard sense for a specified density jump function

  12. Socket stars: UBVRJIK radial profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Bradley E.

    1995-05-01

    Visual inspectin of stars embedded in H II nebulae has shown a significant fraction to be surrounded by nearly symmetric extended regions within which the nebular brightness is apparently significantly fainter than is typical for the surrounding area. These 'socket stars' might be caused by a bubble in the nebula blown out by a stellar wind or they might be caused by a circumstellar envelope of dust hiding the emission behind the star. As such, the sockets could be the first manifestation of a previously unknown component of pre-main-sequence stars. Unfortunately, no quantitative proof of the existence of sockets has been presented. To fill this need, I have imaged 10 socket stars and six background stars with CCD cameras and infrared array cameras. From these images, I have constructed radial plots which should reveal dips in brightness immediately outside the seeing disk. The radial plots do not show any evidence for the existence of sockets. A detailed examination of the photographs orginally used to identify the sockets show that the causes of these reports are (1) artifacts resulting from the photographic process of dodging and (2) random coincidence of stars with local minima in nebular brightness. Thus, I conclude that 'socket stars' do not exist.

  13. Heterogeneous force network in 3D cellularized collagen networks.

    PubMed

    Liang, Long; Jones, Christopher; Chen, Shaohua; Sun, Bo; Jiao, Yang

    2016-10-25

    Collagen networks play an important role in coordinating and regulating collective cellular dynamics via a number of signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the transmission of forces generated by contractile cells in 3D collagen-I networks. Specifically, the graph (bond-node) representations of collagen networks with collagen concentrations of 1, 2 and 4 mg ml(-1) are derived from confocal microscopy data and used to model the network microstructure. Cell contraction is modeled by applying correlated displacements at specific nodes of the network, representing the focal adhesion sites. A nonlinear elastic model is employed to characterize the mechanical behavior of individual fiber bundles including strain hardening during stretching and buckling under compression. A force-based relaxation method is employed to obtain equilibrium network configurations under cell contraction. We find that for all collagen concentrations, the majority of the forces are carried by a small number of heterogeneous force chains emitted from the contracting cells, which is qualitatively consistent with our experimental observations. The force chains consist of fiber segments that either possess a high degree of alignment before cell contraction or are aligned due to fiber reorientation induced by cell contraction. The decay of the forces along the force chains is significantly slower than the decay of radially averaged forces in the system, suggesting that the fibreous nature of biopolymer network structure can support long-range force transmission. The force chains emerge even at very small cell contractions, and the number of force chains increases with increasing cell contraction. At large cell contractions, the fibers close to the cell surface are in the nonlinear regime, and the nonlinear region is localized in a small neighborhood of the cell. In addition, the number of force chains increases with increasing collagen concentration, due to the larger number of focal adhesion sites

  14. Heterogeneous force network in 3D cellularized collagen networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Long; Jones, Christopher; Chen, Shaohua; Sun, Bo; Jiao, Yang

    2016-12-01

    Collagen networks play an important role in coordinating and regulating collective cellular dynamics via a number of signaling pathways. Here, we investigate the transmission of forces generated by contractile cells in 3D collagen-I networks. Specifically, the graph (bond-node) representations of collagen networks with collagen concentrations of 1, 2 and 4 mg ml-1 are derived from confocal microscopy data and used to model the network microstructure. Cell contraction is modeled by applying correlated displacements at specific nodes of the network, representing the focal adhesion sites. A nonlinear elastic model is employed to characterize the mechanical behavior of individual fiber bundles including strain hardening during stretching and buckling under compression. A force-based relaxation method is employed to obtain equilibrium network configurations under cell contraction. We find that for all collagen concentrations, the majority of the forces are carried by a small number of heterogeneous force chains emitted from the contracting cells, which is qualitatively consistent with our experimental observations. The force chains consist of fiber segments that either possess a high degree of alignment before cell contraction or are aligned due to fiber reorientation induced by cell contraction. The decay of the forces along the force chains is significantly slower than the decay of radially averaged forces in the system, suggesting that the fibreous nature of biopolymer network structure can support long-range force transmission. The force chains emerge even at very small cell contractions, and the number of force chains increases with increasing cell contraction. At large cell contractions, the fibers close to the cell surface are in the nonlinear regime, and the nonlinear region is localized in a small neighborhood of the cell. In addition, the number of force chains increases with increasing collagen concentration, due to the larger number of focal adhesion sites

  15. New constraints on Earth's radial conductivity structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Püthe, Christoph; Kuvshinov, Alexey; Olsen, Nils; Sabaka, Terence

    2014-05-01

    We present a new model of Earth's radial (1-D) conductivity structure at depths between 10 km and the core-mantle boundary. It is based on CM5, the latest version in the Comprehensive Model series that has been derived using 13 years (September 2000 to September 2013) of magnetic data collected by the three satellites Oersted, CHAMP and SAC-C and at the global network of geomagnetic observatories. CM5 describes contributions due to sources in core, lithosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere (and corresponding induced parts) in form of spherical harmonic expansion (SHE) coefficients. Removing predictions of the core, lithospheric and ionospheric field contributions as given by CM5 from the observations, we determine time series of the dominating external and induced SHE coefficients of the magnetic potential due to the magnetospheric ring current. Scalar Q-responses are estimated from these coefficients. An iterative approach is used to correct the estimated responses for 3-D effects arising from lateral heterogeneities in the top 10 km. The corrected Q-responses are converted to C-responses; the latter are subsequently inverted for the layered 1-D mantle conductivity profile with the Newton method. The Hessian matrix of the misfit function, which is derived analytically, is used to estimate confidence limits for the conductivity of each layer. The resulting conductivity-depth profile is compared to 1-D conductivity models of Earth's mantle recovered in previous studies.

  16. Radial deformation of the earth by oceanic tidal loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R. D.; Sanchez, B. V.

    1989-01-01

    A high-degree spherical harmonic series is used to compute the radial deformation of the Earth by oceanic tidal loading. By exploiting fast numerical transforms, this approach is found to be much more efficient, but no less accurate, than the traditional Green's function approach. The method is used to derive an atlas of load tide maps for 10 constitutents of the NSWC ocean tide model.

  17. A new nonenzymatic method and device to obtain a fat tissue derivative highly enriched in pericyte-like elements by mild mechanical forces from human lipoaspirates.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Francesca; Maioli, Margherita; Leonardi, Erika; Olivi, Elena; Pasquinelli, Gianandrea; Valente, Sabrina; Mendez, Armando J; Ricordi, Camillo; Raffaini, Mirco; Tremolada, Carlo; Ventura, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Adipose tissue contains multipotent elements with phenotypic and gene expression profiles similar to human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and pericytes. The chance of clinical translation of the multilineage potential of these cells is delayed by the poor/negligible cell survival within cryopreserved lipoaspirates, the difficulty of ex vivo expansion, and the complexity of current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) requirements for expanded cells. Hence, availability of a minimally manipulated, autologous, hMSC/pericyte-enriched fat product would have remarkable biomedical and clinical relevance. Here, we present an innovative system, named Lipogems, providing a nonexpanded, ready-to-use fat product. The system uses mild mechanical forces in a completely closed system, avoiding enzymes, additives, and other manipulations. Differently from unprocessed lipoaspirate, the nonexpanded Lipogems product encompasses a remarkably preserved vascular stroma with slit-like capillaries wedged between adipocytes and stromal stalks containing vascular channels with evident lumina. Immunohistochemistry revealed that Lipogems stromal vascular tissue included abundant cells with pericyte/hMSC identity. Flow cytometry analysis of nonexpanded, collagenase-treated Lipogems product showed that it was comprised with a significantly higher percentage of mature pericytes and hMSCs, and lower amount of hematopoietic elements, than enzymatically digested lipoaspirates. Differently from the lipoaspirate, the distinctive traits of freshly isolated Lipogems product were not altered by cryopreservation. Noteworthy, the features of fresh product were retained in the Lipogems product obtained from human cadavers, paving the way to an off-the-shelf strategy for reconstructive procedures and regenerative medicine. When placed in tissue culture medium, the Lipogems product yielded a highly homogeneous adipose tissue-derived hMSC population, exhibiting features of hMSCs isolated from other sources

  18. Prediction of hydration free energies for aliphatic and aromatic chloro derivatives using molecular dynamics simulations with the OPLS-AA force field.

    PubMed

    Beckstein, Oliver; Iorga, Bogdan I

    2012-05-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics computer simulations were used to blindly predict the hydration free energies of a range of chloro-organic compounds as part of the SAMPL3 challenge. All compounds were parameterized within the framework of the OPLS-AA force field, using an established protocol to compute the absolute hydration free energy via a windowed free energy perturbation approach and thermodynamic integration. Three different approaches to deriving partial charge parameters were pursued: (1) using existing OPLS-AA atom types and charges with minor adjustments of partial charges on equivalent connecting atoms; (2) calculation of quantum mechanical charges via geometry optimization, followed by electrostatic potential (ESP) fitting, using Jaguar at the LMP2/cc-pVTZ(-F) level; and (3) via geometry optimization and CHelpG charges (Gaussian03 at the HF/6-31G* level), followed by two-stage RESP fitting. Protocol 3 generated the most accurate predictions with a root mean square (RMS) error of 1.2 kcal mol(-1) for the entire data set. It was found that the deficiency of the standard OPLS-AA parameters, protocol 1 (RMS error 2.4 kcal mol(-1) overall), was mostly due to compounds with more than three chlorine substituents on an aromatic ring. For this latter subset, the RMS errors were 1.4 kcal mol(-1) (protocol 3) and 4.3 kcal mol(-1) (protocol 1), respectively. We propose new OPLS-AA atom types for aromatic carbon and chlorine atoms in rings with ≥4 Cl-substituents that perform better than the best QM-based approach, resulting in an RMS error of 1.2 kcal mol(-1) for these difficult compounds.

  19. Prediction of hydration free energies for aliphatic and aromatic chloro derivatives using molecular dynamics simulations with the OPLS-AA force field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckstein, Oliver; Iorga, Bogdan I.

    2012-05-01

    All-atom molecular dynamics computer simulations were used to blindly predict the hydration free energies of a range of chloro-organic compounds as part of the SAMPL3 challenge. All compounds were parameterized within the framework of the OPLS-AA force field, using an established protocol to compute the absolute hydration free energy via a windowed free energy perturbation approach and thermodynamic integration. Three different approaches to deriving partial charge parameters were pursued: (1) using existing OPLS-AA atom types and charges with minor adjustments of partial charges on equivalent connecting atoms; (2) calculation of quantum mechanical charges via geometry optimization, followed by electrostatic potential (ESP) fitting, using Jaguar at the LMP2/cc-pVTZ(-F) level; and (3) via geometry optimization and CHelpG charges (Gaussian03 at the HF/6-31G* level), followed by two-stage RESP fitting. Protocol 3 generated the most accurate predictions with a root mean square (RMS) error of 1.2 kcal mol^{-1} for the entire data set. It was found that the deficiency of the standard OPLS-AA parameters, protocol 1 (RMS error 2.4 kcal mol^{-1} overall), was mostly due to compounds with more than three chlorine substituents on an aromatic ring. For this latter subset, the RMS errors were 1.4 kcal mol^{-1} (protocol 3) and 4.3 kcal mol^{-1} (protocol 1), respectively. We propose new OPLS-AA atom types for aromatic carbon and chlorine atoms in rings with ≥4 Cl-substituents that perform better than the best QM-based approach, resulting in an RMS error of 1.2 kcal mol^{-1} for these difficult compounds.

  20. Radial flow pulse jet mixer

    DOEpatents

    VanOsdol, John G.

    2013-06-25

    The disclosure provides a pulse jet mixing vessel for mixing a plurality of solid particles. The pulse jet mixing vessel is comprised of a sludge basin, a flow surface surrounding the sludge basin, and a downcoming flow annulus between the flow surface and an inner shroud. The pulse jet mixing vessel is additionally comprised of an upper vessel pressurization volume in fluid communication with the downcoming flow annulus, and an inner shroud surge volume separated from the downcoming flow annulus by the inner shroud. When the solid particles are resting on the sludge basin and a fluid such as water is atop the particles and extending into the downcoming flow annulus and the inner shroud surge volume, mixing occurs by pressurization of the upper vessel pressurization volume, generating an inward radial flow over the flow surface and an upwash jet at the center of the sludge basin.

  1. High precision radial velocities: the case for NIR.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleo, I.; Gratton, R.

    In the context of the preparation for the high resolution spectrograph HIRES for E-ELT, we are studying the possibility to derive high-precision radial velocities (RV) on a prototype:GIANO, the near-infrared (NIR) echelle spectrograph now available at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Radial velocities measured from near-infrared spectra are a potential tool to search for extrasolar planets around cool stars. High resolution infrared spectrographs now available are reaching the high precision of visible instruments, with a constant improvement over time. In particular, no other IR instruments have GIANO's capability to cover the entire NIR wavelength range. We have developed an ensemble of IDL procedures to measure high precision radial velocities on GIANO spectra. Taking into account the achieved precisions with GIANO, we constrain the sample of targets for which GIANO is better than HARPS-N, but with the advent of GIARPS (GIANO+HARPS-N), GIANO will improve its performances and include a much larger sample of stars. The NIR range is the future of RV measurements, especially because the jitter due to the star surface activities is reduced in the NIR. As a consequence, HIRES working in NIR range might be very useful, and for a wide range of cases, it will be more efficient than HIRES working in the visible range, for detection and characterization of planets using radial velocity technique.

  2. THE SPIN EFFECT ON PLANETARY RADIAL VELOCIMETRY OF EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Hajime

    2012-11-20

    We consider the effect of planetary spin on the planetary radial velocity (PRV) in dayside spectra of exoplanets. To understand the spin effect qualitatively, we derive an analytic formula of the intensity-weighted radial velocity from the planetary surface on the following assumptions: (1) constant and solid rotation without precession, (2) stable and uniform distribution of molecules/atoms, (3) emission models from the dayside hemisphere, and (4) a circular orbit. On these assumptions, we find that the curve of the PRV is distorted by the planetary spin and this anomaly is characterized by the spin radial velocity at the equator and a projected angle on a celestial plane between the spin axis and the axis of orbital motion {lambda}{sub p} in a manner analogous to the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect. The latter can constrain the planetary obliquity. Creating mock PRV data with 3 km s{sup -1} accuracy, we demonstrate how {lambda}{sub p} and the spin radial velocity at the equator are estimated. We find that the stringent constraint of eccentricity is crucial to detect the spin effect. Though our formula is still qualitative, we conclude that the PRV in the dayside spectra will be a powerful means for constraining the planetary spin.

  3. Surface interpolation with radial basis functions for medical imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, J.C.; Beatson, R.K.; Fright, W.R.

    1997-02-01

    Radial basis functions are presented as a practical solution to the problem of interpolating incomplete surfaces derived from three-dimensional (3-D) medical graphics. The specific application considered is the design of cranial implants for the repair of defects, usually holes, in the skull. Radial basis functions impose few restrictions on the geometry of the interpolation centers and are suited to problems where interpolation centers do not form a regular grid. However, their high computational requirements have previously limited their use to problems where the number of interpolation centers is small (<300). Recently developed fast evaluation techniques have overcome these limitations and made radial basis interpolation a practical approach for larger data sets. In this paper radial basis functions are fitted to depth-maps of the skull`s surface, obtained from X-ray computed tomography (CT) data using ray-tracing techniques. They are used to smoothly interpolate the surface of the skull across defect regions. The resulting mathematical description of the skull`s surface can be evaluated at any desired resolution to be rendered on a graphics workstation or to generate instructions for operating a computer numerically controlled (CNC) mill.

  4. Grinding forces and energy

    SciTech Connect

    Brach, K.; Pai, D.M.; Ratterman, E.; Shaw, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    Grinding forces and energy plan an important role in all abrasive machining operations. While specific grinding energy may be obtained from workpiece dynamometer values or by measuring spindle power, care must be exercised in converting dynamometer reading into power consumed. This is particularly true for operations involving a large ratio of wheel depth of cut to wheel diameter or when the radial force on the wheel is large relative to the tangential component. Interpretation of workpiece dynamometer results are discussed and several specific examples are considered including the diamond sawing of granite and the creep feed grinding of metal.

  5. Grinding forces and energy

    SciTech Connect

    Brach, K.; Pai, D.M.; Ratterman, E.; Shaw, M.C.

    1988-02-01

    Grinding forces and energy play an important role in all abrasive machining operations. While specific grinding energy may be obtained from workpiece dynamometer values or by measuring spindle power, care must be exercised in converting dynamometer reading into power consumed. This is particularly true for operations involving a large ratio of wheel depth of cut to wheel diameter or when the radial force on the wheel is large relative to the tangential component. Interpretation of workpiece dynamometer results are discussed and several specific examples are considered including the diamond sawing of granite and the creep feed grinding of metal.

  6. Tolerancing a radial velocity spectrometer within Zemax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Steven R.

    2016-08-01

    Techniques are described for tolerancing a radial velocity spectrometer system within Zemax, including: how to set up and verify the tolerancing model, performance metrics and tolerance operands used, as well as post- Zemax analysis methods. Use of the tolerancing model for various analyses will be discussed, such as: alignment sensitivity, radial velocity sensitivity, and sensitivity of the optical system to temperature changes. Tolerance results from the Keck Planet Finder project (a precision radial velocity spectrometer of asymmetric white pupil design) will be shown.

  7. Numerical and experimental study of unsteady flow field and vibration in radial inflow turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuz-Ihli, T.; Filsinger, D.; Schulz, A.; Wittig, S.

    2000-04-01

    The blades of turbocharger impellers are exposed to unsteady aerodynamic forces, which cause blade vibrations and may lead to failures. An indispensable requirement for a safe design of radial inflow turbines is a detailed knowledge of the exciting forces. Up to now, only a few investigations relating to unsteady aerodynamic forces in radial turbines have been presented. To give a detailed insight into the complex phenomena, a comprehensive research project was initiated at the Institut fuer Thermische Stroemungsmaschinen, at the University of Karlsruhe. A turbocharger test rig was installed in the high-pressure, high-temperature laboratory of the institute. The present paper gives a description of the test rig design and the measuring techniques. The flow field in a vaneless radial inflow turbine was analyzed using laser-Doppler anemometry. First results of unsteady flow field investigations in the turbine scroll and unsteady phase-resolved measurements of the flow field in the turbine rotor will be discussed. Moreover, results from finite element calculations analyzing frequencies and mode shapes are presented. As vibrations in turbines of turbochargers are assumed to be predominantly excited by unsteady aerodynamic forces, a method to predict the actual transient flow in a radial turbine utilizing the commercial Navier-Stokes solver TASCflow3d was developed. Results of the unsteady calculations are presented and comparisons with the measured unsteady flow field are made. As a major result, the excitation effect of the tongue region in a vaneless radial inflow turbine can be demonstrated.

  8. Propagation of a radial phased-locked Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guoquan

    2011-11-21

    A radial phased-locked (PL) Lorentz beam array provides an appropriate theoretical model to describe a coherent diode laser array, which is an efficient radiation source for high-power beaming use. The propagation of a radial PL Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere is investigated. Based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel integral and some mathematical techniques, analytical formulae for the average intensity and the effective beam size of a radial PL Lorentz beam array are derived in turbulent atmosphere. The average intensity distribution and the spreading properties of a radial PL Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere are numerically calculated. The influences of the beam parameters and the structure constant of the atmospheric turbulence on the propagation of a radial PL Lorentz beam array in turbulent atmosphere are discussed in detail.

  9. The radial plasma structure of 1E 0102.2-7219

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flanagan, K. A.; Canizares, C. R.; Houck, J. C.; Fredericks, A. C.

    Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer observations of 1E 0102 2-7219 have revealed marked radial dependence in its ionization structure Flanagan it et al 2004 In order to explore intrinsic radial variations of temperature or other plasma parameters line ratios may provide useful diagnostics if projection effects are taken into account We have approached this problem using a spatial model of the emission including orientation angular and radial distribution We use MARX to simulate observations of a 3D SNR emissivity distribution and compare these simulations with the actual X-ray line image to fit radial distributions of key diagnostic lines Plasma parameters are derived by forming ratios from the best-fit radial models for each X-ray line We find that ionization age and electron temperature increase smoothly with radius We examine the implications with regard to electron density shock velocity and electron-ion equilibration

  10. Improving the radial nerve neurodynamic test: An observation of tension of the radial, median and ulnar nerves during upper limb positioning.

    PubMed

    Manvell, Joshua J; Manvell, Nicole; Snodgrass, Suzanne J; Reid, Susan A

    2015-12-01

    The radial nerve neurodynamic test (ULNT2b), used to implicate symptoms arising from the radial nerve, is proposed to selectively increase strain of the nerve without increasing strain of adjacent tissue, though this has not been established. This study aimed to determine the upper limb position that results in: (1) the greatest tension of the radial nerve and (2) the greatest difference in tension between the radial nerve and the other two major nerves of the upper limb: median and ulnar. Tension (N) of the radial, median and ulnar nerves was measured simultaneously using three buckle force transducers during seven upper limb positions in the axilla of ten embalmed whole body human cadavers (n = 20 limbs). Repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) with Bonferroni post-hoc tests determined differences in tension between nerves and between limb positions. A Composite position consisting of ULNT2b (scapular depression, shoulder internal rotation, elbow extension, forearm pronation, wrist flexion) with the addition of shoulder abduction 40° and extension 25°, wrist ulnar deviation and thumb flexion demonstrated significantly greater tension of the radial nerve than any other tested position (mean tension 11.32N; 95% CI 10.25, 12.29, p < 0.01), including ULNT2b (2.20N; 1.84, 2.57; p < 0.01). Additionally, the Composite position demonstrated the greatest difference in tension between the radial and median (mean difference 4.88N; 95% CI 3.16, 6.61; p < 0.01) and radial and ulnar nerves (9.26N, 7.54, 10.99; p < 0.01). This position constitutes a biomechanically plausible test to detect neuropathic pain related to the radial nerve.

  11. Are axial and radial flow chromatography different?

    PubMed

    Besselink, Tamara; van der Padt, Albert; Janssen, Anja E M; Boom, Remko M

    2013-01-04

    Radial flow chromatography can be a solution for scaling up a packed bed chromatographic process to larger processing volumes. In this study we compared axial and radial flow affinity chromatography both experimentally and theoretically. We used an axial flow column and a miniaturized radial flow column with a ratio of 1.8 between outer and inner surface area, both with a bed height of 5 cm. The columns were packed with affinity resin to adsorb BSA. The average velocity in the columns was set equal. No difference in performance between the two columns could be observed. To gain more insight into the design of a radial flow column, the velocity profile and resin distribution in the radial flow column were calculated. Using mathematical models we found that the breakthrough performance of radial flow chromatography is very similar to axial flow when the ratio between outer and inner radius of the radial flow column is around 2. When this ratio is increased, differences become more apparent, but remain small. However, the ratio does have a significant influence on the velocity profile inside the resin bed, which directly influences the pressure drop and potentially resin compression, especially at higher values for this ratio. The choice between axial and radial flow will be based on cost price, footprint and packing characteristics. For small-scale processes, axial flow chromatography is probably the best choice, for resin volumes of at least several tens of litres, radial flow chromatography may be preferable.

  12. Force-free thin flux tubes: Basic equations and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhugzhda, Y. D.

    1996-01-01

    The thin flux tube approximation is considered for a straight, symmetrical, force-free, rigidly rotating flux tube. The derived set of equations describes tube, body sausage, and Alfvén wave modes and is valid for any values of β. The linear waves and instabilities of force-free flux tubes are considered. The comparison of approximate and exact solutions for an untwisted, nonrotating flux tube is performed. It is shown that the approximate and exact dispersion equations coincides, except the 20% discrepancy of sausage frequencies. An effective cross section is proposed to introduce the removal of this discrepancy. It makes the derived approximation correct for the force-free thin flux tube dynamics, except the detailed structure of radial eigenfunction. The dispersion of Alfvén torsional waves in a force-free tubes appears. The valve effect of one directional propagation of waves in rotating twisted tube is revealed. The current and rotational sausage instabilities of a force-free, thin flux tube are considered.

  13. Radial vibration and ultrasonic field of a long tubular ultrasonic radiator.

    PubMed

    Shuyu, Lin; Zhiqiang, Fu; Xiaoli, Zhang; Yong, Wang; Jing, Hu

    2013-09-01

    The radial vibration of a metal long circular tube is studied analytically and its electro-mechanical equivalent circuit is obtained. Based on the equivalent circuit, the radial resonance frequency equation is derived. The theoretical relationship between the radial resonance frequency and the geometrical dimensions is studied. Finite element method is used to simulate the radial vibration and the radiated ultrasonic field and the results are compared with those from the analytical method. It is concluded that the radial resonance frequency for a solid metal rod is larger than that for a metal tube with the same outer radius. The radial resonance frequencies from the analytical method are in good agreement with those from the numerical method. Based on the acoustic field analysis, it is concluded that the long metal tube with small wall thickness is superior to that with large wall thickness in producing radial vibration and ultrasonic radiation. Therefore, it is expected to be used as an effective radial ultrasonic radiator in ultrasonic sewage treatment, ultrasonic antiscale and descaling and other ultrasonic liquid handling applications.

  14. Study on the radial vibration and acoustic field of an isotropic circular ring radiator.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuyu; Xu, Long

    2012-01-01

    Based on the exact analytical theory, the radial vibration of an isotropic circular ring is studied and its electro-mechanical equivalent circuit is obtained. By means of the equivalent circuit model, the resonance frequency equation is derived; the relationship between the radial resonance frequency, the radial displacement amplitude magnification and the geometrical dimensions, the material property is analyzed. For comparison, numerical method is used to simulate the radial vibration of isotropic circular rings. The resonance frequency and the radial vibrational displacement distribution are obtained, and the radial radiation acoustic field of the circular ring in radial vibration is simulated. It is illustrated that the radial resonance frequencies from the analytical method and the numerical method are in good agreement when the height is much less than the radius. When the height becomes large relative to the radius, the frequency deviation from the two methods becomes large. The reason is that the exact analytical theory is limited to thin circular ring whose height must be much less than its radius.

  15. Radial structures and nonlinear excitation of Geodesic Acoustic Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liu; Zonca, Fulvio

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we show that GAMs constitute a continuous spectrum due to radial inhomogeneities. The existence of singular layer, thus, suggests linear mode conversion to short-wavelength kinetic GAM (KGAM) via finite ion Larmor radii. This result is demonstrated by derivations of the GAM mode structure and dispersion relation in the singular layer. At the lowest order in krρi, with kr the radial wave vector and ρi the ion Larmor radius, the well known kinetic dispersion relation of GAM is recovered. At the next relevant order, O(kr^2ρi^2), we show that KGAM propagates in the low-temperature and/or high safety-factor domain; i.e., typically, radially outward, and a corresponding damping rate is derived. In this work, we also show that, while KGAM is linearly stable due to ion Landau damping, it can be nonlinearly excited by finite-amplitude DW turbulence via 3-wave parametric interactions. The resultant 3-wave system exhibits the typical prey-predator self-regulatory dynamics.

  16. The magnetic component of geodesic acoustic modes in tokamak plasmas with a radial equilibrium electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Deng

    2016-10-01

    The dispersion relation of geodesic acoustic modes with a magnetic perturbation in the tokamak plasma with an equilibrium radial electric field was derived. The dispersion relation was analyzed for very low field strength. The mode frequency decreases with increasing field strength, which is different from the electrostatic geodesic acoustic mode. There exists an m = 1 magnetic component that is very low when the radial electric field is absent. The ratio between the m = 1 and m = 2 magnetic components increases with strength of the radial electric field for low Mach numbers.

  17. Iatrogenic radial neck fracture on closed reduction of elbow dislocation.

    PubMed

    Ellanti, Prasad; O'Farrell, Dermot

    2013-11-01

    Traumatic dislocation of the elbow is rare in children and can most often be managed in the emergency department using procedural sedation and closed reduction with good functional outcome. Radiographs must be evaluated for associated avulsions and fractures around the elbow. We present the case of a 14-year-old girl who sustained a fracture of the radial neck subsequent to repeated attempts at closed reduction of a pure posterior elbow dislocation that was missed on postreduction radiographs. Careful use of reduction techniques and avoidance of repeated forceful manipulations is emphasized.

  18. Hydrodynamic effects in a misaligned radial face seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1977-01-01

    Hydrodynamic effects in a flat seal having an angular misalignment are analyzed, taking into account the radial variation in seal clearance. An analytical solution for axial force, restoring moment, and transverse moment is presented that covers the whole range from zero to full angular misalignment. Both low pressure seals with cavitating flow and high pressure seals with full fluid film are considered. Strong coupling is demonstrated between angular misalignment and transverse moment which leads the misalignment vector by 90 degrees. This transverse moment, which is entirely due to hydrodynamic effects, is a significant factor in the seal operating mechanism.

  19. Differentiating common causes of radial wrist pain.

    PubMed

    Shuaib, Waqas; Mohiuddin, Zia; Swain, Freddie R; Khosa, Faisal

    2014-09-01

    Radial wrist pain is a common patient complaint with a broad differential. Because treatment and prognosis differ, determining the underlying cause is key. This article reviews a case of intersection syndrome and compares it to other causes of radial wrist pain.

  20. Radial Correlations Between Two Quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, A. M.; Koponen, J.; Pennanen, P.; Michael, C.

    2002-04-01

    In nuclear many-body problems the short-range correlation between two nucleons is well described by the corresponding correlation in the two-body problem. Therefore, as a first step in any attempt at an analogous description of many-quark systems, it is necessary to know the two-quark correlation. With this in mind, we study the light quark distribution in a heavy-light meson with a static heavy quark. The charge and matter radial distributions of these heavy-light mesons are measured on a lattice with a light quark mass about that of the strange quark. Both distributions can be well fitted upto r ≈ 0.7 fm with the exponential form wi2 (r), where Wi(r) = A exp(-r/ri). For the charge(c) and matter(m) distributions rc ≈ 0.32(2)fm and rm ≈ 0.24(2)fm. We also discuss the normalisation of the total charge (defined to be unity in the continuum limit) and matter integrated over all space, finding 1.30(5) and 0.4(1) respectively for a lattice spacing ≈ 0.17 fm.

  1. Computer Simulation of Radial Immunodiffusion

    PubMed Central

    Trautman, Rodes

    1972-01-01

    Theories of diffusion with chemical reaction are reviewed as to their contributions toward developing an algorithm needed for computer simulation of immunodiffusion. The Spiers-Augustin moving sink and the Engelberg stationary sink theories show how the antibody-antigen reaction can be incorporated into boundary conditions of the free diffusion differential equations. For this, a stoichiometric precipitate was assumed and the location of precipitin lines could be predicted. The Hill simultaneous linear adsorption theory provides a mathematical device for including another special type of antibody-antigen reaction in antigen excess regions of the gel. It permits an explanation for the lowered antigen diffusion coefficient, observed in the Oudin arrangement of single linear diffusion, but does not enable prediction of the location of precipitin lines. The most promising mathematical approach for a general solution is implied in the Augustin alternating cycle theory. This assumes the immunodiffusion process can be evaluated by alternating computation cycles: free diffusion without chemical reaction and chemical reaction without diffusion. The algorithm for the free diffusion update cycle, extended to both linear and radial geometries, is given in detail since it was based on gross flow rather than more conventional expressions in terms of net flow. Limitations on the numerical integration process using this algorithm are illustrated for free diffusion from a cylindrical well. PMID:4629869

  2. STARSPOT JITTER IN PHOTOMETRY, ASTROMETRY, AND RADIAL VELOCITY MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Makarov, V. V.; Beichman, C. A.; Lebreton, J.; Malbet, F.; Catanzarite, J. H.; Shao, M.; Fischer, D. A.

    2009-12-10

    Analytical relations are derived for the amplitude of astrometric, photometric, and radial velocity (RV) perturbations caused by a single rotating spot. The relative power of the starspot jitter is estimated and compared with the available data for kappa{sup 1} Ceti and HD 166435, as well as with numerical simulations for kappa{sup 1} Ceti and the Sun. A Sun-like star inclined at i = 90 deg. at 10 pc is predicted to have an rms jitter of 0.087 muas in its astrometric position along the equator, and 0.38 m s{sup -1} in radial velocities. If the presence of spots due to stellar activity is the ultimate limiting factor for planet detection, the sensitivity of SIM Lite to Earth-like planets in habitable zones is about an order of magnitude higher than the sensitivity of prospective ultra-precise RV observations of nearby stars.

  3. New radial pulsation constants for the Beta Cephei variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shobbrook, R. R.

    1985-05-01

    Recent new calibrations of luminosities, temperatures and bolometric corrections for B stars in terms of the β index and the Strömgren parameter c0 have necessitated the recalculation of the radial pulsation constants, Q, for the β Cephei (of β Canis Majoris) variable stars. Corrections for the effect of binaries on the absolute magnitudes, derived both from the luminosity calibration and from the mean distance moduli of those variables in clusters, are calculated in an Appendix. The mean value of Q, although determined from absolute magnitudes which are about 0.4 mag fainter than those from previous calibrations of the β index, still suggests that the majority of the variables are pulsating in the first overtone radial mode, as have most investigations in recent years.

  4. The Radially Symmetric Euler Equations as an Exterior Differential System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baty, Roy; Ramsey, Scott; Schmidt, Joseph

    2016-11-01

    This work develops the Euler equations as an exterior differential system in radially symmetric coordinates. The Euler equations are studied for unsteady, compressible, inviscid fluids in one-dimensional, converging flow fields with a general equation of state. The basic geometrical constructions (for example, the differential forms, tangent planes, jet space, and differential ideal) used to define and analyze differential equations as systems of exterior forms are reviewed and discussed for converging flows. Application of the Frobenius theorem to the question of the existence of solutions to radially symmetric converging flows is also reviewed and discussed. The exterior differential system is further applied to derive and analyze the general family of characteristic vector fields associated with the one-dimensional inviscid flow equations.

  5. [Optimization of gel radial diffusion method for serum immunoglobulin analysis].

    PubMed

    Gerasimov, I G; Zorkova, E V

    2002-07-01

    Serum IgA, IgM, and IgG were measured by radial immunodiffusion in gel; immunoglobulin concentrations correlated with the diameter of their diffusion. A theoretically-based equation was derived; use of this equation will help estimate serum Ig content without plotting a calibration curve by the square diameter of the immunodiffusion ring of undiluted reference serum in a wide range of concentrations (0.3-3 mg/ml for IgA and IgM and 2-18 mg/ml for IgG). This modification of measuring serum immunoglobulins by radial immunodiffusion in gel is as accurate as other methods, but is reagent- and time-saving.

  6. Parametrization of Backbone Flexibility in a Coarse-Grained Force Field for Proteins (COFFDROP) Derived from All-Atom Explicit-Solvent Molecular Dynamics Simulations of All Possible Two-Residue Peptides.

    PubMed

    Frembgen-Kesner, Tamara; Andrews, Casey T; Li, Shuxiang; Ngo, Nguyet Anh; Shubert, Scott A; Jain, Aakash; Olayiwola, Oluwatoni J; Weishaar, Mitch R; Elcock, Adrian H

    2015-05-12

    Recently, we reported the parametrization of a set of coarse-grained (CG) nonbonded potential functions, derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of amino acid pairs and designed for use in (implicit-solvent) Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of proteins; this force field was named COFFDROP (COarse-grained Force Field for Dynamic Representations Of Proteins). Here, we describe the extension of COFFDROP to include bonded backbone terms derived from fitting to results of explicit-solvent MD simulations of all possible two-residue peptides containing the 20 standard amino acids, with histidine modeled in both its protonated and neutral forms. The iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) method was used to optimize new CG potential functions for backbone-related terms by attempting to reproduce angle, dihedral, and distance probability distributions generated by the MD simulations. In a simple test of the transferability of the extended force field, the angle, dihedral, and distance probability distributions obtained from BD simulations of 56 three-residue peptides were compared to results from corresponding explicit-solvent MD simulations. In a more challenging test of the COFFDROP force field, it was used to simulate eight intrinsically disordered proteins and was shown to quite accurately reproduce the experimental hydrodynamic radii (Rhydro), provided that the favorable nonbonded interactions of the force field were uniformly scaled downward in magnitude. Overall, the results indicate that the COFFDROP force field is likely to find use in modeling the conformational behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins and multidomain proteins connected by flexible linkers.

  7. Parameterization of backbone flexibility in a coarse-grained force field for proteins (COFFDROP) derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations of all possible two-residue peptides

    PubMed Central

    Frembgen-Kesner, Tamara; Andrews, Casey T.; Li, Shuxiang; Ngo, Nguyet Anh; Shubert, Scott A.; Jain, Aakash; Olayiwola, Oluwatoni; Weishaar, Mitch R.; Elcock, Adrian H.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we reported the parameterization of a set of coarse-grained (CG) nonbonded potential functions, derived from all-atom explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of amino acid pairs, and designed for use in (implicit-solvent) Brownian dynamics (BD) simulations of proteins; this force field was named COFFDROP (COarse-grained Force Field for Dynamic Representations Of Proteins). Here, we describe the extension of COFFDROP to include bonded backbone terms derived from fitting to results of explicit-solvent MD simulations of all possible two-residue peptides containing the 20 standard amino acids, with histidine modeled in both its protonated and neutral forms. The iterative Boltzmann inversion (IBI) method was used to optimize new CG potential functions for backbone-related terms by attempting to reproduce angle, dihedral and distance probability distributions generated by the MD simulations. In a simple test of the transferability of the extended force field, the angle, dihedral and distance probability distributions obtained from BD simulations of 56 three-residue peptides were compared to results from corresponding explicit-solvent MD simulations. In a more challenging test of the COFFDROP force field, it was used to simulate eight intrinsically disordered proteins and was shown to quite accurately reproduce the experimental hydrodynamic radii (Rhydro), provided that the favorable nonbonded interactions of the force field were uniformly scaled downwards in magnitude. Overall, the results indicate that the COFFDROP force field is likely to find use in modeling the conformational behavior of intrinsically disordered proteins and multi-domain proteins connected by flexible linkers. PMID:26574429

  8. Spectrographs for the Measurement of Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranne, A.

    A radial-velocity measurement derives from a shift in position of spectral features at the focus of a spectrographic instrument. We do not often think about how small these shifts are. It is not generally appreciated that the accuracy to which this shift must be measured is a tiny fraction of a pixel. Or, if we prefer to calculate in microns a surprising minuteness. What precautions should we be taking for the measurement of such small shifts? It is true that, thanks to computers, modern reduction methods allows us to correct for a wide variety of pertubations, provided that these are foreseen and understood; but such reduction procedures will give the best results if such pertubations are kept very small. We must therefore analyse these pertubations and think about how we can control them. The correlation method initiated in its modern form by Roger Griffin, and which we developed further with an optical mask in CORAVEL twenty-five years ago and more recently with a numerical mask in ELODIE, has demonstrated its power. In terms of these methods, the problem of high precision is to improve the correlation peak. Can this be done? Does the correlation method allow us to distinguish the overall radial velocity of the object from possible distortions of the lines? This is certainly a major problem which must be solved. The luminous efficiency of high-precision spectrographs is low. If the use of an optical fibre with scrambling for feeding the spectrograph seems inevitable to us today, it seems to me that the transmission of this system can be considerably improved by a better choice of the F-ratio of the image beam of the telescope which is to be matched with that of the spectrograph. This problem, common to all spectrographs, could be resolved with a specialised focal-plane instrument, giving a much greater than usual F-ratio, resulting in a simplification of the spectrograph optics, and hence an improvement in transmission and a serious decrease in size (which is

  9. SpicyNodes: radial layout authoring for the general public.

    PubMed

    Douma, Michael; Ligierko, Grzegorz; Ancuta, Ovidiu; Gritsai, Pavel; Liu, Sean

    2009-01-01

    Trees and graphs are relevant to many online tasks such as visualizing social networks, product catalogs, educational portals, digital libraries, the semantic web, concept maps and personalized information management. SpicyNodes is an information-visualization technology that builds upon existing research on radial tree layouts and graph structures. Users can browse a tree, clicking from node to node, as well as successively viewing a node, immediately related nodes and the path back to the "home" nodes. SpicyNodes' layout algorithms maintain balanced layouts using a hybrid mixture of a geometric layout (a succession of spanning radial trees) and force-directed layouts to minimize overlapping nodes, plus several other improvements over prior art. It provides XML-based API and GUI authoring tools. The goal of the SpicyNodes project is to implement familiar principles of radial maps and focus+context with an attractive and inviting look and feel in an open system that is accessible to virtually any Internet user.

  10. Thermal convection in a cylindrical annulus under a combined effect of the radial and vertical gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Antoine; Jongmanns, Marcel; Meier, Martin; Egbers, Christoph; Mutabazi, Innocent

    2017-01-01

    The stability of the flow of a dielectric fluid confined in a cylindrical annulus submitted to a radial temperature gradient and a radial electric field is investigated theoretically and experimentally. The radial temperature gradient induces a vertical Archimedean buoyancy and a radial dielectrophoretic buoyancy. These two forces intervene simultaneously in the destabilization of the flow, leading to the occurrence of four types of modes depending on the relative intensity of these two buoyancies and on the fluid's properties: hydrodynamic and thermal modes that are axisymmetric and oscillatory, stationary columnar modes and electric modes which are stationary and non-axisymmetric modes. Experiments performed in a parabolic flight show the existence of non-axisymmetric modes that should be either columnar or helicoidal vortices.

  11. On the radial width of CMEs between 0.1 and 0.4 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savani, N. P.; Forsyth, R. J.; Rouillard, A. P.; Owens, M. J.; Davies, J. A.

    2009-04-01

    The launch of the two STEREO spacecraft in 2006 has heralded a new era of opportunities to make remote observations of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). An example CME on the 16th February 2008 with an approximately circular cross section was tracked through successive images obtained by the Heliospheric Imager (HI) instrument onboard the STEREO-A spacecraft. The cylindrical nature of force-free constant alpha flux ropes is used to determine the radial size of the CME. The radial velocity and longitude of propagation are determined. With these parameters known, the radial size is calculated from the images taking projection effects into account. A power law is obtained for the resulting radial width behaviour with heliocentric distance as the CME travels between 0.1 and 0.4 AU. We compare our results to those obtained in published studies based on in-situ spacecraft observations of ICMEs between 0.3 and 1.0 AU.

  12. A Determination of the Benefits Derived by the Air Force from Providing Air Force Officers in the Logistics Field with Graduate Degrees in the Business Area from Civilian Graduate Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chamberlin, Brian; Smith, Richard A.

    This thesis is concerned with what benefits the Air Force receives from sending logistics officers to civilian graduate institutions (CID). Additionally, the authors wanted to find how CID graduates fare as compared with graduates of the Graduate Logistics Management (GL). Three samples gathered were for CID graduates, the non-degree group…

  13. The Radial Variation of H I Velocity Dispersions in Dwarfs and Spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ianjamasimanana, R.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Walter, Fabian; Heald, George H.; Caldú-Primo, Anahi; Jarrett, Thomas H.

    2015-08-01

    Gas velocity dispersions provide important diagnostics of the forces counteracting gravity to prevent collapse of the gas. We use the 21 cm line of neutral atomic hydrogen (H i) to study H i velocity dispersion ({σ }{{H} {{I}}}) and H i phases as a function of galaxy morphology in 22 galaxies from The H i Nearby Galaxy Survey. We stack individual H i velocity profiles and decompose them into broad and narrow Gaussian components. We study the H i velocity dispersion and the H i surface density, {{{Σ }}}{{H} {{I}}}, as a function of radius. For spirals, the velocity dispersions of the narrow and broad components decline with radius and their radial profiles are well described by an exponential function. For dwarfs, however, the profiles are much flatter. The single Gaussian dispersion profiles are, in general, flatter than those of the narrow and broad components. In most cases, the dispersion profiles in the outer disks do not drop as fast as the star formation profiles derived in the literature. This indicates the importance of other energy sources in driving {σ }{{H} {{I}}} in the outer disks. The radial surface density profiles of spirals and dwarfs are similar. The surface density profiles of the narrow component decline more steeply than those of the broad component, but not as steep as what was found previously for the molecular component. As a consequence, the surface density ratio between the narrow and broad components, an estimate of the mass ratio between cold H i and warm H i, tends to decrease with radius. On average, this ratio is lower in dwarfs than in spirals. This lack of a narrow, cold H i component in dwarfs may explain their low star formation activity.

  14. Power reduction and the radial limit of stall delay in revolving wings of different aspect ratio

    PubMed Central

    Kruyt, Jan W.; van Heijst, GertJan F.; Altshuler, Douglas L.; Lentink, David

    2015-01-01

    Airplanes and helicopters use high aspect ratio wings to reduce the power required to fly, but must operate at low angle of attack to prevent flow separation and stall. Animals capable of slow sustained flight, such as hummingbirds, have low aspect ratio wings and flap their wings at high angle of attack without stalling. Instead, they generate an attached vortex along the leading edge of the wing that elevates lift. Previous studies have demonstrated that this vortex and high lift can be reproduced by revolving the animal wing at the same angle of attack. How do flapping and revolving animal wings delay stall and reduce power? It has been hypothesized that stall delay derives from having a short radial distance between the shoulder joint and wing tip, measured in chord lengths. This non-dimensional measure of wing length represents the relative magnitude of inertial forces versus rotational accelerations operating in the boundary layer of revolving and flapping wings. Here we show for a suite of aspect ratios, which represent both animal and aircraft wings, that the attachment of the leading edge vortex on a revolving wing is determined by wing aspect ratio, defined with respect to the centre of revolution. At high angle of attack, the vortex remains attached when the local radius is shorter than four chord lengths and separates outboard on higher aspect ratio wings. This radial stall limit explains why revolving high aspect ratio wings (of helicopters) require less power compared with low aspect ratio wings (of hummingbirds) at low angle of attack and vice versa at high angle of attack. PMID:25788539

  15. Power reduction and the radial limit of stall delay in revolving wings of different aspect ratio.

    PubMed

    Kruyt, Jan W; van Heijst, GertJan F; Altshuler, Douglas L; Lentink, David

    2015-04-06

    Airplanes and helicopters use high aspect ratio wings to reduce the power required to fly, but must operate at low angle of attack to prevent flow separation and stall. Animals capable of slow sustained flight, such as hummingbirds, have low aspect ratio wings and flap their wings at high angle of attack without stalling. Instead, they generate an attached vortex along the leading edge of the wing that elevates lift. Previous studies have demonstrated that this vortex and high lift can be reproduced by revolving the animal wing at the same angle of attack. How do flapping and revolving animal wings delay stall and reduce power? It has been hypothesized that stall delay derives from having a short radial distance between the shoulder joint and wing tip, measured in chord lengths. This non-dimensional measure of wing length represents the relative magnitude of inertial forces versus rotational accelerations operating in the boundary layer of revolving and flapping wings. Here we show for a suite of aspect ratios, which represent both animal and aircraft wings, that the attachment of the leading edge vortex on a revolving wing is determined by wing aspect ratio, defined with respect to the centre of revolution. At high angle of attack, the vortex remains attached when the local radius is shorter than four chord lengths and separates outboard on higher aspect ratio wings. This radial stall limit explains why revolving high aspect ratio wings (of helicopters) require less power compared with low aspect ratio wings (of hummingbirds) at low angle of attack and vice versa at high angle of attack.

  16. State-dependent radial elasticity of attached cross-bridges in single skinned fibres of rabbit psoas muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, S; Brenner, B; Yu, L C

    1993-01-01

    1. In a single skinned fibre of rabbit psoas muscle, upon attachment of cross bridges to actin in the presence of ADP or pyrophosphate (PPi), the separation between the contractile filaments, as determined by equatorial X-ray diffraction, is found to decrease, suggesting that force is generated in the radial direction. 2. The single muscle fibres were subjected to compression by 0-8% of dextran T500. The changes in lattice spacings by dextran compression were compared with changes induced by cross-bridge attachment to actin. Based on this comparison, the magnitude and the direction of the radial force generated by the attached cross-bridges were estimated. The radial cross-bridge force varied with filament separation, and the magnitude of the radial cross-bridge force reached as high as the maximal axial force produced during isometric contraction. 3. One key parameter of the radial elasticity, i.e. the equilibrium spacing where the radial force is zero, was found to depend on the ligand bound to the myosin head. In the presence of ADP, the equilibrium spacing was 36 nm. In the presence of MgPPi the equilibrium spacing shifted to 35 nm and Ca2+ had little effect on the equilibrium spacing. 4. The equilibrium spacing was independent of the fraction of cross-bridges attached to actin. The fraction of cross-bridges attached in rigor was modulated from 100% to close to 0% by adding up to 10 mM of ATP gamma S in the rigor solution. The lattice spacing remained at 38 nm, the equilibrium spacing for nucleotide-free cross-bridges at mu = 170 mM. 5. Radial force generated by cross-bridges in rigor at large lattice spacings (38 nm < or = d10 < or = 46 nm) appeared to vary linearly with lattice spacing. 6. The titration of ATP gamma S to fibres in rigor provided a correlation between the radial stiffness of the nucleotide-free cross-bridges and the equatorial intensities. The relation between the equatorial intensity ratio I11/I10 and radial stiffness appeared to be

  17. Mimicking photoisomerisation of azo-materials by a force field switch derived from nonadiabatic ab initio simulations: Application to photoswitchable helical foldamers in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böckmann, Marcus; Braun, Sebastian; Doltsinis, Nikos L.; Marx, Dominik

    2013-08-01

    A force field to induce isomerisation of photoswitchable azobenzene groups embedded in molecular materials has been developed in the framework of force field molecular dynamics simulations. A molecular mechanics switching potential has been tuned so as to reproduce both the correct photoisomerisation timescale and mechanism that has been generated by reference nonadiabatic ab initio molecular dynamics. As a first application, we present a force field molecular dynamics study of a prototype photoswitchable foldamer in acetonitrile as solvent. Our analyses reveal that the photoisomerisation of the azobenzene unit embedded in the foldamer occurs via the so-called NN-twist mechanism, and that there exist several distinct unfolding channels for the helix that could be exploited in novel applications of photoresponsive materials.

  18. Electron motion analysis of a radial-radiated electron beam in a radial-line drift tube with finite magnetic field conducted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Fangchao; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhong, Huihuang

    2017-02-01

    Radial-radiated electron beam is widely employed in radial-line structure microwave devices. The quality of the electron beam has a crucial effect on the operating performance of these devices. This paper analyzes theoretically this electron motion in a radial-line drift tube with finite magnetic field conducted. The beam width, spatial period, and fluctuation amplitude are quantitatively analyzed with different beam current parameters. By the particle-in-cell simulation, we examine the theoretical analysis under the condition of a designed realistic coil configuration. It indicates that the derived beam envelope function is capable of predicting the radial-radiated beam trajectory approximately. Meanwhile, it is found that the off-axial z-direction magnetic field, in spite of its greatly slight amplitude, is also one necessary consideration for the propagation characteristic of the radial-radiated electron beam. Furthermore, the presented electron motion analysis may be instructive for the design of the electronic optical system of the radial-line structure microwave devices.

  19. A comparison of far-field properties of radial noncanonical vortex airy beam arrays and radial noncanonical vortex Gaussian beam arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Ke; Jiao, Liyang; Zhong, Xianqiong

    2016-05-01

    Based on the vector angular spectrum representation and stationary phase method, the analytical far-field vectorial expressions of radial noncanonical vortex Airy beam arrays (NVAiBAs) and radial noncanonical vortex Gaussian beam arrays (NVGBAs) are derived, and used to investigate their far-field vectorial properties, e.g. center optical vortices and energy fluxes of these corresponding beams, where the effect of noncanonical strength, topological charge, initial phase index and the number of beamlet on far-field vectorial properties of these corresponding beams is emphasized, respectively. The results show that the topological charge of center optical vortices in the far field is equal to initial phase index for the case of the radial NVAiBAs, whereas for radial NVGBAs the topological charge not only lies on initial phase index, but also is closely related to the odevity and sign of optical vortices embedded in beamlet, where mathematical analysis is made to explain the topological charge of center optical vortices, and the limitation of the number of beamlet to the topological charge of center optical vortices is also discussed. In addition, energy fluxes of radial NVAiBAs and NVGBAs exhibit different space orientations by controlling noncancial strength and present larger dark zones by increasing topological charge of beamlet, respectively. Finally, the relationship between the center optical vortices and energy fluxes of radial NVAiBAs and NVGBAs in even or odd N beamlets is also revealed, respectively.

  20. SCM-Forcing Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Xie, Shaocheng; Tang, Shuaiqi; Zhang, Yunyan; Zhang, Minghua

    2016-07-01

    Single-Column Model (SCM) Forcing Data are derived from the ARM facility observational data using the constrained variational analysis approach (Zhang and Lin 1997 and Zhang et al., 2001). The resulting products include both the large-scale forcing terms and the evaluation fields, which can be used for driving the SCMs and Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) and validating model simulations.

  1. Radial Breathing Modes in Cosmochemistry and Meteoritics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, T.L.; Wilson, K.B.

    2009-01-01

    One area of continuing interest in cosmochemistry and meteoritics (C&M) is the identification of the nature of Q-phase, although some researchers in C&M are not reporting relevant portions of Raman spectral data. Q is the unidentified carrier of noble gases in carbonaceous chondrites (CCs). Being carbonaceous, the focus has been on any number of Q-candidates arising from the sp2 hybridization of carbon (C). These all derive from various forms of graphene, a monolayer of C atoms packed into a two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal honeycomb lattice that is the basic building block for graphitic materials of all other dimensions for sp2 allotropes of C. As a basic lattice, 2D graphene can be curled into fullerenes (0D), wrapped into carbon nanotubes or CNTs (1D), and stacked into graphite (3D). These take such additional forms as scroll-like carbon whiskers, carbon fibers, carbon onions, GPCs (graphite polyhedral crystals) [6], and GICs (graphite intercalation compounds). Although all of these have been observed in meteoritics, the issue is which can explain the Q-abundances. In brief, one or more of the 0D-3D sp2 hybridization forms of C is Q. For some Q-candidates, the radial breathing modes (RBMs) are the most important Raman active vibrational modes that exist, and bear a direct relevance to solving this puzzle. Typically in C&M they are ignored when present. Their importance is addressed here as smoking-gun signatures for certain Q-candidates and are very relevant to the ultimate identification of Q.

  2. Radial transport in the Earth's radiation belts (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kress, B. T.; Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Hudson, M. K.

    2010-12-01

    For over forty years the standard approach to modeling the dynamics of the Earth's radiation belts has been based on a diffusion equation, which can be derived from the Vlasov equation using a quasilinear approximation. The radiation belt diffusion equation describes the evolution of a particle distribution function in a space of one or several of the three adiabatic invariants associated with the motions of a charged particle in a dipole magnetic field. Increasingly, observations and theoretical studies suggest that fully nonlinear transport, not modeled by quasilinear diffusion, plays an important role in radiation belt dynamics, e.g., the shock-drift mechanism modeled by Li et al. [1993]. This presentation will focus on radiation belt particle transport across magnetic L-shells (loosely called radial transport). Radial transport is thought to be one of the primary drivers of radiation belt dynamics. A comprehensive review of the known mechanisms of radial transport and some of their effects will be given, including those that can be modeled with a diffusion equation and those requiring a fully nonlinear treatment. Li, X., I. Roth, M. Temerin, J. R. Wygant, M. K. Hudson, and J. B. Blake, (1993), Simulations of the prompt energization and transport of radiation belt particles during the March 24, 1991 SSC, Geophys. Res. Lett., 20, 2423.

  3. Using radial NMR profiles to characterize pore size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deriche, Rachid; Treilhard, John

    2012-02-01

    Extracting information about axon diameter distributions in the brain is a challenging task which provides useful information for medical purposes; for example, the ability to characterize and monitor axon diameters would be useful in diagnosing and investigating diseases like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)1 or autism.2 Three families of operators are defined by Ozarslan,3 whose action upon an NMR attenuation signal extracts the moments of the pore size distribution of the ensemble under consideration; also a numerical method is proposed to continuously reconstruct a discretely sampled attenuation profile using the eigenfunctions of the simple harmonic oscillator Hamiltonian: the SHORE basis. The work presented here extends Ozarlan's method to other bases that can offer a better description of attenuation signal behaviour; in particular, we propose the use of the radial Spherical Polar Fourier (SPF) basis. Testing is performed to contrast the efficacy of the radial SPF basis and SHORE basis in practical attenuation signal reconstruction. The robustness of the method to additive noise is tested and analysed. We demonstrate that a low-order attenuation signal reconstruction outperforms a higher-order reconstruction in subsequent moment estimation under noisy conditions. We propose the simulated annealing algorithm for basis function scale parameter estimation. Finally, analytic expressions are derived and presented for the action of the operators on the radial SPF basis (obviating the need for numerical integration, thus avoiding a spectrum of possible sources of error).

  4. Radial gate evaluation: Olympus Dam, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The report presents a structural analysis of the radial gates of Olympus Dam in eastern Colorado. Five 20-foot wide by 17-foot high radial gates are used to control flow through the spillway at Olympus Dam. The spillway gates were designed in 1947. The gate arm assemblies consist of two separate wide flange beams, with a single brace between the arms. The arms pivot about a 4.0-inch diameter pin and bronze graphite-insert bushing. The pin is cantilevered from the pier anchor girder. The radial gates are supported by a pin bearing on a pier anchor birder bolted to the end of the concrete pier. The gates are operated by two-part wire rope 15,000-pound capacity hoise. Stoplog slots upstream of the radial gates are provided in the concrete piers. Selected drawings of the gates and hoists are located in appendix A.

  5. Radial construction of an arterial wall.

    PubMed

    Greif, Daniel M; Kumar, Maya; Lighthouse, Janet K; Hum, Justine; An, Andrew; Ding, Ling; Red-Horse, Kristy; Espinoza, F Hernan; Olson, Lorin; Offermanns, Stefan; Krasnow, Mark A

    2012-09-11

    Some of the most serious diseases involve altered size and structure of the arterial wall. Elucidating how arterial walls are built could aid understanding of these diseases, but little is known about how concentric layers of muscle cells and the outer adventitial layer are assembled and patterned around endothelial tubes. Using histochemical, clonal, and genetic analysis in mice, here we show that the pulmonary artery wall is constructed radially, from the inside out, by two separate but coordinated processes. One is sequential induction of successive cell layers from surrounding mesenchyme. The other is controlled invasion of outer layers by inner layer cells through developmentally regulated cell reorientation and radial migration. We propose that a radial signal gradient controls these processes and provide evidence that PDGF-B and at least one other signal contribute. Modulation of such radial signaling pathways may underlie vessel-specific differences and pathological changes in arterial wall size and structure.

  6. Quasilinear description of radiofrequency-induced radial diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambilla, M.

    2007-03-01

    We derive the bounce-averaged quasilinear (QL) operator in axisymmetric toroidal geometry using the standard QL formalism. When specialized to resonant ion cyclotron harmonic interactions, this operator predicts the same radiofrequency-induced radial diffusion as the orbit-averaged operator (Eriksson and Helander 1994 Phys. Plasmas 1 308) obtained using action-angle variables. By assuming the wave field known as a superposition of toroidal and poloidal Fourier modes, the QL diffusion coefficients are written in a form which can be directly evaluated using the output of a spectral full-wave solver of Maxwell equations in toroidal plasmas.

  7. Off-axis radial properties of undulator light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatchyn, Roman; Lindau, Ingolf

    The spatial and polarization properties of light from a transverse sinusoidal undulator are investigated analytically by means of numerical simulations for the single-electron case. The terminology used in the analysis is introduced; formulations for the off-axis intensity patterns, the rest-frame analysis, and radial harmonic maxima are derived; and numerical results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and briefly characterized. It is suggested that the present approach can be extended to treat higher rings and harmonics, coherent interaction among electrons (as in beam bunching and FELs), and random imperfections in undulators.

  8. Mathematical interpretation of radial shearing interferometers.

    PubMed

    Malacara, D

    1974-08-01

    The procedure for computing a radial shearing interferometric pattern is given. The interferometric pattern is analyzed to obtain the wavefront shape. Restricting the discussion to wavefronts having rotational symmetry, we give two different methods of finding the wavefront. One approach is to scan along a diameter of the interferometric pattern and the other is to examine the shape of the fringes. The relative sensitivity of a radial shearing interferometer with respect to that of a Twyman-Green interferometer is also analyzed.

  9. Elbow dislocation with irreparable fracture radial head

    PubMed Central

    Tanna, Dilip

    2013-01-01

    Background: Treatment of elbow dislocation with irreparable radial head fracture needs replacement of radial head to achieve stability of elbow. An alternate method in cases of elbow dislocation with radial head fracture can be resection of radial head with repair of medial collateral ligament. We report a retrospective analysis of cases of elbow dislocation with irreparable radial head treated by excision head of radius and repair of MCL. Materials and Methods: Nine patients of elbow dislocation with associated irreparable fractures of the head of the radius were included in this analysis (6 F:3 M, Age: 35-47 years). Radial head excision was done through the lateral approach and MCL was sutured using no 3 Ethibond using medial approach. Above elbow plaster was given for 6 weeks and gradual mobilization was done thereafter. All patients were assessed at final followup using Mayo elbow performance score (MEPS). Results: Mean followup was 19.55 ± 7.12 months (range 14-36 months). There was no extension deficit when compared to opposite side with mean range of flexion of 138.8° ± 6.97° (range 130 -145°). Mean pronation was 87.7° ± 4.4° (range 80-90°) and mean supination was 87.7 ± 4.62° (range 80-90°). The mean MEPS was 98.8 ± 3.33 (range 90-100). No patient had pain, sensory complaints, subluxation or redislocation. All were able to carry out their daily activities without disability. Conclusion: Radial head excision with MCL repair is an acceptable option for treatment of patients with elbow dislocation and irreparable radial head fracture. PMID:23798760

  10. Radial averages of astigmatic TEM images.

    PubMed

    Fernando, K Vince

    2008-10-01

    The Contrast Transfer Function (CTF) of an image, which modulates images taken from a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM), is usually determined from the radial average of the power spectrum of the image (Frank, J., Three-dimensional Electron Microscopy of Macromolecular Assemblies, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2006). The CTF is primarily defined by the defocus. If the defocus estimate is accurate enough then it is possible to demodulate the image, which is popularly known as the CTF correction. However, it is known that the radial average is somewhat attenuated if the image is astigmatic (see Fernando, K.V., Fuller, S.D., 2007. Determination of astigmatism in TEM images. Journal of Structural Biology 157, 189-200) but this distortion due to astigmatism has not been fully studied or understood up to now. We have discovered the exact mathematical relationship between the radial averages of TEM images with and without astigmatism. This relationship is determined by a zeroth order Bessel function of the first kind and hence we can exactly quantify this distortion in the radial averages of signal and power spectra of astigmatic images. The argument to this Bessel function is similar to an aberration function (without the spherical aberration term) except that the defocus parameter is replaced by the differences of the defoci in the major and minor axes of astigmatism. The ill effects due this Bessel function are twofold. Since the zeroth order Bessel function is a decaying oscillatory function, it introduces additional zeros to the radial average and it also attenuates the CTF signal in the radial averages. Using our analysis, it is possible to simulate the effects of astigmatism in radial averages by imposing Bessel functions on idealized radial averages of images which are not astigmatic. We validate our theory using astigmatic TEM images.

  11. Radial transport with perturbed magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Hazeltine, R. D.

    2015-05-15

    It is pointed out that the viscosity coefficient describing radial transport of toroidal angular momentum is proportional to the second power of the gyro-radius—like the corresponding coefficients for particle and heat transport—regardless of any geometrical symmetry. The observation is widely appreciated, but worth emphasizing because some literature gives the misleading impression that asymmetry can allow radial moment transport in first-order.

  12. Radial vibration of free anisotropic nanoparticles based on nonlocal continuum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Ghavanloo, Esmaeal; Fazelzadeh, S Ahmad

    2013-02-22

    Radial vibration of spherical nanoparticles made of materials with anisotropic elasticity is theoretically investigated using nonlocal continuum mechanics. The anisotropic elastic model is reformulated using the nonlocal differential constitutive relations of Eringen. The nonlocal differential equation of radial motion is derived in terms of radial displacement. Cubic, hexagonal, trigonal and tetragonal symmetries of the elasticity are discussed. The suggested model is justified by a good agreement between the results given by the present model and available experimental data. Furthermore, the model is used to elucidate the effect of small scale on the vibration of several nanoparticles. Our results show that the small scale is essential for the radial vibration of the nanoparticles when the nanoparticle radius is smaller than 1.5 nm.

  13. Response of radiation belt simulations to different radial diffusion coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdov, A.; Shprits, Y.; Subbotin, D.; Kellerman, A. C.

    2013-12-01

    Resonant interactions between Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves and relativistic electrons may violate the third adiabatic invariant of motion, which produces radial diffusion in the electron radiation belts. This process plays an important role in the formation and structure of the outer electron radiation belt and is important for electron acceleration and losses in that region. Two parameterizations of the resonant wave-particle interaction of electrons with ULF waves in the magnetosphere by Brautigam and Albert [2000] and Ozeke et al. [2012] are evaluated using the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) diffusion code to estimate their relative effect on the radiation belt simulation. The period of investigation includes quiet time and storm time geomagnetic activity and is compared to data based on satellite observations. Our calculations take into account wave-particle interactions represented by radial diffusion transport, local acceleration, losses due to pitch-angle diffusion, and mixed diffusion. We show that the results of the 3D diffusion simulations depend on the assumed parametrization of waves. The differences between the simulations and potential missing physical mechanisms are discussed. References Brautigam, D. H., and J. M. Albert (2000), Radial diffusion analysis of outer radiation belt electrons during the October 9, 1990, magnetic storm, J. Geophys. Res., 105(A1), 291-309, doi:10.1029/1999JA900344 Ozeke, L. G., I. R. Mann, K. R. Murphy, I. J. Rae, D. K. Milling, S. R. Elkington, A. A. Chan, and H. J. Singer (2012), ULF wave derived radiation belt radial diffusion coefficients, J. Geophys. Res., 117, A04222, doi:10.1029/2011JA017463.

  14. An extensive radial velocity survey towards NGC 6253

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, M.; Melo, C. H. F.; Santos, N. C.; Queloz, D.; Piotto, G.; Desidera, S.; Bedin, L. R.; Momany, Y.; Saviane, I.

    2016-04-01

    The old and metal-rich open cluster NGC 6253 was observed with the Fibre Large Array Multi Element Spectrograph (FLAMES) multi-object spectrograph during an extensive radial velocity campaign monitoring 317 stars with a median of 15 epochs per object. All the targeted stars are located along the upper main sequence of the cluster between 14.8 < V < 16.5. Fifty nine stars are confirmed cluster members both by radial velocities and proper motions and do not show evidence of variability. We detected 45 variable stars among which 25 belong to NGC 6253. We were able to derive an orbital solution for four cluster members (and for two field stars) yielding minimum masses in between ˜90 MJ and ˜460 MJ and periods between 3 and 220 d. Simulations demonstrated that this survey was sensitive to objects down to 30 MJ at 10 days orbital periods with a detection efficiency equal to 50 per cent. On the basis of these results we concluded that the observed frequency of binaries down to the hydrogen burning limit and up to 20 d orbital period is around (1.5 ± 1.3) per cent in NGC 6253. The overall observed frequency of binaries around the sample of cluster stars is (13 ± 3) per cent. The median radial velocity precision achieved by the GIRAFFE spectrograph in this magnitude range was around ˜240 m s- 1 (˜180 m s- 1 for UVES). Based on a limited follow-up analysis of seven stars in our sample with the High Accuracy Radial velocity Planet Searcher (HARPS) spectrograph we determined that a precision of 35 m s- 1 can be reached in this magnitude range, offering the possibility to further extend the variability analysis into the substellar domain. Prospects are even more favourable once considering the upcoming ESPRESSO spectrograph at VLT.

  15. Rotordynamic Forces Developed by Labyrinth Seals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-01

    force coefficient model was also developed. Predictions obtain from the approximate model are much more sensitive to shaft speed than corresponding...configuration with fluid prerotation in the direction of shaft rotation. The independent variable is running speed and families of curves are...tooth radial clearance a-0.216 mm. and radial distance from cavity base to stator wall d-1,105 mm, The shaft speed flm33.410 rpm. the mean cavity

  16. Radial glia and somal translocation of radial neurons in the developing cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Bagirathy

    2003-07-01

    A series of recent studies have demonstrated that radial glia are neural precursors in the developing cerebral cortex. These studies have further implied that these cells are the sole precursor constituents of the dorsal forebrain ventricular zone that generate the projection neurons of the cortex. In view of these new findings, this review discusses radial neurons, a progeny of cortical neurons that are generated by radial glia and adopt somal translocation as the mode of migration.

  17. [Elbow dislocation with ipsilateral proximal radial shaft fracture and radial head dislocation].

    PubMed

    Köhn, N; Mendel, T; Ullrich, B W

    2015-11-01

    Elbow dislocation with ipsilateral proximal radial shaft fracture and dislocated radial head is a rarely described injury. In this article we present the case of a 23-year-old man with this injury. After the initial diagnostics, the radial shaft fracture was osteosynthetically fixed, whereby the anatomical positions of all parts of the elbow joint were correctly aligned and the medial collateral ligament was reconstructed. After 4.5 months the radial shaft fracture was healed with nearly complete functional recovery of the upper extremity. Thus, a good outcome can be expected when all aspects of bony and ligamentous injuries are accurately addressed.

  18. FDTD simulation of trapping nanowires with linearly polarized and radially polarized optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wu, Xiaoping

    2011-10-10

    In this paper a model of the trapping force on nanowires is built by three dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) and Maxwell stress tensor methods, and the tightly focused laser beam is expressed by spherical vector wave functions (VSWFs). The trapping capacities on nanoscale-diameter nanowires are discussed in terms of a strongly focused linearly polarized beam and radially polarized beam. Simulation results demonstrate that the radially polarized beam has higher trapping efficiency on nanowires with higher refractive indices than linearly polarized beam.

  19. Fast radial flows in transition disk holes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenfeld, Katherine A.; Andrews, Sean M.; Chiang, Eugene

    2014-02-20

    Protoplanetary 'transition' disks have large, mass-depleted central cavities, yet also deliver gas onto their host stars at rates comparable to disks without holes. The paradox of simultaneous transparency and accretion can be explained if gas flows inward at much higher radial speeds inside the cavity than outside the cavity, since surface density (and by extension optical depth) varies inversely with inflow velocity at fixed accretion rate. Radial speeds within the cavity might even have to approach free-fall values to explain the huge surface density contrasts inferred for transition disks. We identify observational diagnostics of fast radial inflow in channel maps made in optically thick spectral lines. Signatures include (1) twisted isophotes in maps made at low systemic velocities and (2) rotation of structures observed between maps made in high-velocity line wings. As a test case, we apply our new diagnostic tools to archival Atacama Large Millimeter Array data on the transition disk HD 142527 and uncover evidence for free-fall radial velocities inside its cavity. Although the observed kinematics are also consistent with a disk warp, the radial inflow scenario is preferred because it predicts low surface densities that appear consistent with recent observations of optically thin CO isotopologues in this disk. How material in the disk cavity sheds its angular momentum wholesale to fall freely onto the star is an unsolved problem; gravitational torques exerted by giant planets or brown dwarfs are briefly discussed as a candidate mechanism.

  20. Radial spoke proteins of Chlamydomonas flagella

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pinfen; Diener, Dennis R.; Yang, Chun; Kohno, Takahiro; Pazour, Gregory J.; Dienes, Jennifer M.; Agrin, Nathan S.; King, Stephen M.; Sale, Winfield S.; Kamiya, Ritsu; Rosenbaum, Joel L.; Witman, George B.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The radial spoke is a ubiquitous component of ‘9+2’ cilia and flagella, and plays an essential role in the control of dynein arm activity by relaying signals from the central pair of microtubules to the arms. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii radial spoke contains at least 23 proteins, only 8 of which have been characterized at the molecular level. Here, we use mass spectrometry to identify 10 additional radial spoke proteins. Many of the newly identified proteins in the spoke stalk are predicted to contain domains associated with signal transduction, including Ca2+-, AKAP- and nucleotide-binding domains. This suggests that the spoke stalk is both a scaffold for signaling molecules and itself a transducer of signals. Moreover, in addition to the recently described HSP40 family member, a second spoke stalk protein is predicted to be a molecular chaperone, implying that there is a sophisticated mechanism for the assembly of this large complex. Among the 18 spoke proteins identified to date, at least 12 have apparent homologs in humans, indicating that the radial spoke has been conserved throughout evolution. The human genes encoding these proteins are candidates for causing primary ciliary dyskinesia, a severe inherited disease involving missing or defective axonemal structures, including the radial spokes. PMID:16507594

  1. Impact of mountain pine beetle outbreaks on forest albedo and radiative forcing, as derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, Rocky Mountains, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanderhoof, M.; Williams, C. A.; Ghimire, B.; Rogan, J.

    2013-12-01

    pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreaks in North America are widespread and have potentially large-scale impacts on albedo and associated radiative forcing. Mountain pine beetle outbreaks in Colorado and southern Wyoming have resulted in persistent and significant increases in both winter albedo (change peaked 10 years post outbreak at 0.06 ± 0.01 and 0.05 ± 0.01, in lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) stands, respectively) and spring albedo (change peaked 10 years post outbreak at 0.06 ± 0.01 and 0.04 ± 0.01, in lodgepole pine and ponderosa pine stands, respectively). Instantaneous top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing peaked for both lodgepole pine and ponderosa pine stands in winter at 10 years post outbreak at -1.7 ± 0.2 W m-2 and -1.4 ± 0.2 W m-2, respectively. The persistent increase in albedo with time since mountain pine beetle disturbance combined with the continued progression of the attack across the landscape from 1994-2011 resulted in an exponential increase in winter and annual radiative cooling (MW) over time. In 2011 the rate of radiative forcing within the study area reached -982.7 ± 139.0 MW, -269.8 ± 38.2 MW, -31.1 ± 4.4 MW, and -147.8 ± 20.9 MW in winter, spring, summer, and fall, respectively. An increase in radiative cooling has the potential to decrease sensible and/or latent heat flux by reducing available energy. Such changes could affect current mountain pine beetle outbreaks which are influenced by climatic conditions.

  2. Implementation of sensorless control of radial magnetic bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Gurumoorthy, R.; Soong, W.L.; Lyons, J.P.; Storace, A.F.

    1995-12-31

    This paper discusses preliminary results of the implementation of sensorless position control of a radial magnetic bearing. The magnetic bearing is controlled using a mutually exclusive excitation scheme; where only one out of the two available actuators in each axis is active at any time. The unused actuator is used for sensorless position estimation. The sensorless position scheme is based on measuring the change of airgap reluctance with the variation of airgap between the actuator and the rotor. The airgap reluctance is measured by driving the unused actuators with short probing pulses and measuring the resultant change of current. The rotor position is controlled using independent Proportional Integral Derivative (PID) control of each axis. This offers a simple and robust controller. The authors present the design of a PID controller. Preliminary experimental results are presented showing levitation at standstill. The sensorless control algorithm has been implemented on a digital controller and levitation of the test-rig rotor with one radial bearing operated without a position sensor has been demonstrated. Due to the inherent double integration from the rotor inertia, the derivative component of the position is required for stabilizing the system. However this also inherently amplifies measurement noise and thus low-noise position estimation is required. Means for reducing the existing noise in the position estimate, in the test-rig system, by increasing the current sensor resolution and using greater filtering are being investigated.

  3. Direct observation of CD4 T cell morphologies and their cross-sectional traction force derivation on quartz nanopillar substrates using focused ion beam technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Gil-Sung; Hyung, Jung-Hwan; Lee, Won-Yong; Hong, Chang-Hee; Lee, Sang-Kwon

    2013-07-01

    Direct observations of the primary mouse CD4 T cell morphologies, e.g., cell adhesion and cell spreading by culturing CD4 T cells in a short period of incubation (e.g., 20 min) on streptavidin-functionalized quartz nanopillar arrays (QNPA) using a high-content scanning electron microscopy method were reported. Furthermore, we first demonstrated cross-sectional cell traction force distribution of surface-bound CD4 T cells on QNPA substrates by culturing the cells on top of the QNPA and further analysis in deflection of underlying QNPA via focused ion beam-assisted technique.

  4. Experimental investigations of radial loads induced by partial cavitation with the LH2 Vulcain inducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goirand, B.; Mertz, A. L.; Joussellin, F.; Rebattet, C.

    Radial forces generated by partial cavitation were investigated both in water and liquid hydrogen (LH2) with the four bladed inducer of the Vulcain liquid hydrogen turbopump. A specific shaft mounted six component balance was developed for inducer water tests, in which force measurements were completed by unsteady pressure measurements and high speed flow visualizations. From water results, a good qualitative agreement with previous experiences was obtained but the influence of blade number was demonstrated. Characteristic frequencies of unsteady cavitation phenomena were identified at different operating points. The force measurements in hydrogen gave promising results about thermodynamics delay, in the scope of establishing transposition rules.

  5. Radial basis function networks and complexity regularization in function learning.

    PubMed

    Krzyzak, A; Linder, T

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we apply the method of complexity regularization to derive estimation bounds for nonlinear function estimation using a single hidden layer radial basis function network. Our approach differs from previous complexity regularization neural-network function learning schemes in that we operate with random covering numbers and l(1) metric entropy, making it possible to consider much broader families of activation functions, namely functions of bounded variation. Some constraints previously imposed on the network parameters are also eliminated this way. The network is trained by means of complexity regularization involving empirical risk minimization. Bounds on the expected risk in terms of the sample size are obtained for a large class of loss functions. Rates of convergence to the optimal loss are also derived.

  6. Unstable force analysis for induction motor eccentricity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Palazzolo, Alan

    2016-05-01

    The increasing popularity of motors in machinery trains has led to an intensified interest in the forces they produce that may influence machinery vibration. Motor design typically assumes a uniform air gap, however in practice all motors operate with the rotor slightly displaced from the motor centerline in what is referred to as an eccentric position. Rotor center eccentricity can cause a radially unbalanced magnetic field when the motor is operating. This will results in both a radial force pulling the motor further away from the center, and a tangential force which can induce a vibration stability problem. In this paper, a magnetic equivalent circuit MEC modeling method is proposed to calculate both the radial and tangential motor eccentric force. The treatment of tangential force determination is rarely addressed, but it is very important for rotordynamic vibration stability evaluation. The proposed model is also coupled with the motor electric circuit model to provide capability for transient vibration simulations. FEM is used to verify the MEC model. A parametric study is performed on the motor radial and tangential eccentric forces. Also a Jeffcott rotor model is used to study the influence of the motor eccentric force on mechanical vibration stability and nonlinear behavior. Furthermore, a stability criteria for the bearing damping is provided. The motor radial and tangential eccentric forces are both curved fitted to include their nonlinearity in time domain transient simulation for both a Jeffcott rotor model and a geared machinery train with coupled torsional-lateral motion. Nonlinear motions are observed, including limit cycles and bifurcation induced vibration amplitude jumps.

  7. Radial head fracture associated with posterior interosseous nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Sassine, Tannus Jorge; Lima, Guilherme de Freitas; Rodrigues, Leandro Marano; Padua, David Victoria Hoffmann; Nadai, Anderson de

    2016-01-01

    Fractures of the radial head and radial neck correspond to 1.7-5.4% of all fractures and approximately 30% may present associated injuries. In the literature, there are few reports of radial head fracture with posterior interosseous nerve injury. This study aimed to report a case of radial head fracture associated with posterior interosseous nerve injury.

  8. Convective overstability in radially stratified accretion disks under thermal relaxation

    SciTech Connect

    Klahr, Hubert; Hubbard, Alexander

    2014-06-10

    This paper expands the stability criterion for radially stratified, vertically unstratified accretion disks incorporating thermal relaxation. We find a linear amplification of epicyclic oscillations in these disks that depends on the effective cooling time, i.e., an overstability. The growth rates of the overstability vanish for both extreme cases, e.g., infinite cooling time and instantaneous cooling, i.e., the adiabatic and fully isothermal cases. However, for thermal relaxation times τ on the order of the orbital frequency, τΩ ∼ 1, modes grow at a rate proportional to the square of the Brunt-Väisälä frequency. The overstability is based on epicyclic motions, with the thermal relaxation causing gas to heat while radially displaced inward and cool while radially displaced outward. This causes the gas to have a lower density when moving outward compared to when it moves inward, so it feels the outward-directed pressure force more strongly on that leg of the journey. We suggest the term 'convective overstability' for the phenomenon which has already been studied numerically in the nonlinear regime in the context of amplifying vortices in disks under the name 'subcritical baroclinic instability'. The aim of the present paper is to make clear that vortex formation in three-dimensional disks is not necessarily subcritical, i.e., does not need a finite perturbation, nor is it baroclinic in the sense of geophysical fluid dynamics, which requires on vertical shear. We find that convective overstability is a linear instability that will operate under a wide range of physical conditions for circumstellar disks.

  9. Radial flow nuclear thermal rocket (RFNTR)

    DOEpatents

    Leyse, Carl F.

    1995-01-01

    A radial flow nuclear thermal rocket fuel assembly includes a substantially conical fuel element having an inlet side and an outlet side. An annular channel is disposed in the element for receiving a nuclear propellant, and a second, conical, channel is disposed in the element for discharging the propellant. The first channel is located radially outward from the second channel, and separated from the second channel by an annular fuel bed volume. This fuel bed volume can include a packed bed of loose fuel beads confined by a cold porous inlet frit and a hot porous exit frit. The loose fuel beads include ZrC coated ZrC-UC beads. In this manner, nuclear propellant enters the fuel assembly axially into the first channel at the inlet side of the element, flows axially across the fuel bed volume, and is discharged from the assembly by flowing radially outward from the second channel at the outlet side of the element.

  10. Radial flow nuclear thermal rocket (RFNTR)

    DOEpatents

    Leyse, Carl F.

    1995-11-07

    A radial flow nuclear thermal rocket fuel assembly includes a substantially conical fuel element having an inlet side and an outlet side. An annular channel is disposed in the element for receiving a nuclear propellant, and a second, conical, channel is disposed in the element for discharging the propellant. The first channel is located radially outward from the second channel, and separated from the second channel by an annular fuel bed volume. This fuel bed volume can include a packed bed of loose fuel beads confined by a cold porous inlet frit and a hot porous exit frit. The loose fuel beads include ZrC coated ZrC-UC beads. In this manner, nuclear propellant enters the fuel assembly axially into the first channel at the inlet side of the element, flows axially across the fuel bed volume, and is discharged from the assembly by flowing radially outward from the second channel at the outlet side of the element.

  11. Precise Near-Infrared Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Gao, P.; Bottom, M.; Davison, C.; Mills, S.; Ciardi, D. R.; Brinkworth, C.; Tanner, A. M.; Beichman, C. A.; Catanzarite, J.; Crawford, S.; Wallace, J.; Mennesson, B.; Johnson, J. A.; White, R. J.; Anglada-Escudé, G.; von Braun, K.; Walp, B.; Vasisht, G.; Kane, S. R.; Prato, L. A.; NIRRVs

    2014-01-01

    We present precise radial velocity time-series from a 2.3 micron pilot survey to detect exoplanets around red, low mass, and young stars. We use the CSHELL spectrograph with an isotopic methane absorption gas cell for common optical path relative wavelength calibration at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility. We present an overview of our Nelder-Mead simplex optimization pipeline for extracting radial velocities. We will also present first light data at 1.6 microns from a near-infrared fiber scrambler used in tandem with our gas cell and CSHELL at IRTF. The fiber scrambler makes use of non-circular core fibers to stabilize the illumination of the slit and echelle grating against changes in seeing, focus, guiding and other sources of systematic radial velocity noise, complementing the wavelength calibration of a gas cell.

  12. Manufacturing of Precision Forgings by Radial Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, S.; Harrer, O.; Buchmayr, B.; Hofer, F.

    2011-01-01

    Radial forging is a multi purpose incremental forging process using four tools on the same plane. It is widely used for the forming of tool steels, super alloys as well as titanium- and refractory metals. The range of application goes from reducing the diameters of shafts, tubes, stepped shafts and axels, as well as for creating internal profiles for tubes in Near-Net-Shape and Net-Shape quality. Based on actual development of a weight optimized transmission input shaft, the specific features of radial forging technology is demonstrated. Also a Finite Element Model for the simulation of the process is shown which leads to reduced pre-processing effort and reduced computing time compared to other published simulation methods for radial forging. The finite element model can be applied to quantify the effects of different forging strategies.

  13. Dispersion-free radial transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Nelson, Scott D.

    2011-04-12

    A dispersion-free radial transmission line ("DFRTL") preferably for linear accelerators, having two plane conductors each with a central hole, and an electromagnetically permeable material ("EPM") between the two conductors and surrounding a channel connecting the two holes. At least one of the material parameters of relative magnetic permeability, relative dielectric permittivity, and axial width of the EPM is varied as a function of radius, so that the characteristic impedance of the DFRTL is held substantially constant, and pulse transmission therethrough is substantially dispersion-free. Preferably, the EPM is divided into concentric radial sections, with the varied material parameters held constant in each respective section but stepwise varied between sections as a step function of the radius. The radial widths of the concentric sections are selected so that pulse traversal time across each section is the same, and the varied material parameters of the concentric sections are selected to minimize traversal error.

  14. Radial anisotropy ambient noise tomography of volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Rivet, Diane; Shapiro, Nikolai; Jaxybulatov, Kairly; Landès, Matthieu; Koulakov, Ivan; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The use of ambient seismic noise allows us to perform surface-wave tomography of targets which could hardly be imaged by other means. The frequencies involved (~ 0.5 - 20 s), somewhere in between active seismic and regular teleseismic frequency band, make possible the high resolution imaging of intermediate-size targets like volcanic edifices. Moreover, the joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves dispersion curves extracted from noise correlations allows us to invert for crustal radial anisotropy. We present here the two first studies of radial anisotropy on volcanoes by showing results from Lake Toba Caldera, a super-volcano in Indonesia, and from Piton de la Fournaise volcano, a hot-spot effusive volcano on the Réunion Island (Indian Ocean). We will see how radial anisotropy can be used to infer the main fabric within a magmatic system and, consequently, its dominant type of intrusion.

  15. Image scanning microscopy with radially polarized light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yun; Zhang, Yunhai; Wei, Tongda; Huang, Wei; Shi, Yaqin

    2017-03-01

    In order to improve the resolution of image scanning microscopy, we present a method based on image scanning microscopy and radially polarized light. According to the theory of image scanning microscopy, we get the effective point spread function of image scanning microscopy with the longitudinal component of radially polarized light and a 1 AU detection area, and obtain imaging results of the analyzed samples using this method. Results show that the resolution can be enhanced by 7% compared with that in image scanning microscopy with circularly polarized light, and is 1.54-fold higher than that in confocal microscopy with a pinhole of 1 AU. Additionally, the peak intensity of ISM is 1.54-fold higher than that of a confocal microscopy with a pinhole of 1 AU. In conclusion, the combination of the image scanning microscopy and the radially polarized light could improve the resolution, and it could realize high-resolution and high SNR imaging at the same time.

  16. Updates on Force Limiting Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolaini, Ali R.; Scharton, Terry

    2013-01-01

    The following conventional force limiting methods currently practiced in deriving force limiting specifications assume one-dimensional translation source and load apparent masses: Simple TDOF model; Semi-empirical force limits; Apparent mass, etc.; Impedance method. Uncorrelated motion of the mounting points for components mounted on panels and correlated, but out-of-phase, motions of the support structures are important and should be considered in deriving force limiting specifications. In this presentation "rock-n-roll" motions of the components supported by panels, which leads to a more realistic force limiting specifications are discussed.

  17. Mapping radial features in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.; Harris, B. E.

    2013-10-01

    We have carried out a comprehensive survey of the best Cassini ISS data of Saturn's main rings for the purpose of cataloguing all observed spiral density waves, spiral bending waves, and other radial and quasi-radial ring structure. Our survey has revealed a number of new features, including the first known resonant waves raised by Enceladus and Hyperion, thus increasing the number of points at which the local surface density and viscosity of the rings can be measured (cf. Tiscareno et al. 2007, Icarus). We also catalogue several wave-like features whose cause is unknown. Although images of the rings taken by the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) are not nominally as high-resolution as the best stellar and radio occultations, they are capable of superior signal-to-noise because of the co-adding inherent in converting a 2-D image into a 1-D "radial scan." In this common technique, as many as a thousand pixels at a given radial distance from Saturn are combined to produce a single characteristic brightness for each radial location. This process suppresses local structure, azimuthal structure, and random noise, all of which commonly decrease the sensitivity of high-resolution occultations, and causes ISS to be the optimal Cassini instrument for detecting a certain class of low-amplitude features. Finally, we employ wavelet techniques (cf. Tiscareno et al. 2007, Icarus) to elucidate subtle periodic and quasi-periodic features in the radial scan data. We will present our results in the context of a ranking of known perturbations in the rings by their resonant torque (updating Lissauer and Cuzzi 1982, AJ). We will identify the strongest expected perturbations that do not appear, and discuss whether the absence is likely to reflect a real limit of ring responsiveness, or (as with previous observations) to reflect sensitivity limits.

  18. Plasma Signatures of Radial Field Power Dropouts

    SciTech Connect

    Lucek, E.A.; Horbury, T.S.; Balogh, A.; McComas, D.J.

    1998-10-04

    A class of small scale structures, with a near-radial magnetic field and a drop in magnetic field fluctuation power, have recently been identified in the polar solar wind. An earlier study of 24 events, each lasting for 6 hours or more, identified no clear plasma signature. In an extension of that work, radial intervals lasting for 4 hours or more (89 in total), have been used to search for a statistically significant plasma signature. It was found that, despite considerable variations between intervals, there was a small but significant drop, on average, in plasma temperature, density and {beta} during these events.

  19. Plasma signatures of radial field power dropouts

    SciTech Connect

    Lucek, E.A.; Balogh, A.; Horbury, T.S.; McComas, D.J.

    1999-06-01

    A class of small scale structures, with a near-radial magnetic field and a drop in magnetic field fluctuation power, have recently been identified in the polar solar wind. An earlier study of 24 events, each lasting for 6 hours or more, identified no clear plasma signature. In an extension of that work, radial intervals lasting for 4 hours or more (89 in total), have been used to search for a statistically significant plasma signature. It was found that, despite considerable variations between intervals, there was a small but significant drop, on average, in plasma temperature, density and {beta} during these events. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Radial Acceleration Relation in Rotationally Supported Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGaugh, Stacy S.; Lelli, Federico; Schombert, James M.

    2016-11-01

    We report a correlation between the radial acceleration traced by rotation curves and that predicted by the observed distribution of baryons. The same relation is followed by 2693 points in 153 galaxies with very different morphologies, masses, sizes, and gas fractions. The correlation persists even when dark matter dominates. Consequently, the dark matter contribution is fully specified by that of the baryons. The observed scatter is small and largely dominated by observational uncertainties. This radial acceleration relation is tantamount to a natural law for rotating galaxies.

  1. Reconstruction for Type IV Radial Polydactyly.

    PubMed

    Wall, Lindley B; Goldfarb, Charles A

    2015-09-01

    Type IV radial polydactyly represents a thumb with an extra proximal and distal phalanx. Assessment of the thumb for surgical reconstruction includes observing thumb function, evaluating thumb size and stability, and assessing the first web space. Reconstruction includes excision of the smaller thumb, typically the radial thumb, and re-creating thumb stability and alignment by addressing tendon insertion and joint orientation. Although surgical results are satisfying and complications are uncommon, additional surgical intervention may be required over time owing to thumb malalignment or instability.

  2. Radial Acceleration Relation in Rotationally Supported Galaxies.

    PubMed

    McGaugh, Stacy S; Lelli, Federico; Schombert, James M

    2016-11-11

    We report a correlation between the radial acceleration traced by rotation curves and that predicted by the observed distribution of baryons. The same relation is followed by 2693 points in 153 galaxies with very different morphologies, masses, sizes, and gas fractions. The correlation persists even when dark matter dominates. Consequently, the dark matter contribution is fully specified by that of the baryons. The observed scatter is small and largely dominated by observational uncertainties. This radial acceleration relation is tantamount to a natural law for rotating galaxies.

  3. Aircraft radial-belted tire evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yager, Thomas J.; Stubbs, Sandy M.; Davis, Pamela A.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of the ongoing joint NASA/FAA/Industry Surface Traction And Radial Tire (START) Program being conducted at NASA Langley's Aircraft Landing Dynamics Facility (ALDF). The START Program involves tests using three different tire sizes to evaluate tire rolling resistance, braking, and cornering performance throughout the aircraft ground operational speed range for both dry and wet runway surfaces. Preliminary results from recent 40 x 14 size bias-ply, radial-belted, and H-type aircraft tire tests are discussed. The paper concludes with a summary of the current program status and planned ALDF test schedule.

  4. Radial excitations of current-carrying vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Betti; Michel, Florent; Peter, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    We report on the existence of a new type of cosmic string solutions in the Witten model with U (1) × U (1) symmetry. These solutions are superconducting with radially excited condensates that exist for both gauged and ungauged currents. Our results suggest that these new configurations can be macroscopically stable, but microscopically unstable to radial perturbations. Nevertheless, they might have important consequences for the network evolution and particle emission. We discuss these effects and their possible signatures. We also comment on analogies with non-relativistic condensed matter systems where these solutions may be observable.

  5. Radial orbit error reduction and sea surface topography determination using satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelis, Theodossios

    1987-01-01

    A method is presented in satellite altimetry that attempts to simultaneously determine the geoid and sea surface topography with minimum wavelengths of about 500 km and to reduce the radial orbit error caused by geopotential errors. The modeling of the radial orbit error is made using the linearized Lagrangian perturbation theory. Secular and second order effects are also included. After a rather extensive validation of the linearized equations, alternative expressions of the radial orbit error are derived. Numerical estimates for the radial orbit error and geoid undulation error are computed using the differences of two geopotential models as potential coefficient errors, for a SEASAT orbit. To provide statistical estimates of the radial distances and the geoid, a covariance propagation is made based on the full geopotential covariance. Accuracy estimates for the SEASAT orbits are given which agree quite well with already published results. Observation equations are develped using sea surface heights and crossover discrepancies as observables. A minimum variance solution with prior information provides estimates of parameters representing the sea surface topography and corrections to the gravity field that is used for the orbit generation. The simulation results show that the method can be used to effectively reduce the radial orbit error and recover the sea surface topography.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SEP stars radial velocities (Fremat+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fremat, Y.; Altmann, M.; Pancino, E.; Soubiran, C.; Jofre, P.; Damerdji, Y.; Heiter, U.; Royer, F.; Seabroke, G.; Sordo, R.; Blanco-Cuaresma, S.; Jasniewicz, G.; Martayan, C.; Thevenin, F.; Vallenari, A.; Blomme, R.; David, M.; Gosset, E.; Katz, D.; Viala, Y.; Boudreault, S.; Cantat-Gaudin, T.; Lobel, A.; Meisenheimer, K.; Nordlander, T.; Raskin, G.; Royer, P.; Zorec, J.

    2016-10-01

    The tables contain a description of the observations we performed with the GIRAFFE and UVES spectrographs of a sample of targets found in the South Ecliptic Pole. Radial velocities and astrophysical parameters were derived, and the variability of the RVs was assessed. (7 data files).

  7. A Neural Network for Estimation of Aortic Pressure from the Radial Artery Pressure Pulse

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    from periphery to artery: a model based study, American Journal of Physiology, 1998,274:43, pp H1386-92 [9] C. Chen, E. Nevo , B Fetics, P Pak, F, Yin, L...36. [10] B Fetics, E Nevo , C. Chen, D Kass, Parametric model derivation of transfer function for noninvasive estimation of aortic pressure by radial

  8. Time efficient aeroelastic simulations based on radial basis functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen; Huang, ChengDe; Yang, Guowei

    2017-02-01

    Aeroelasticity studies the interaction between aerodynamic forces and structural responses, and is one of the fundamental problems to be considered in the design of modern aircraft. The fluid-structure interpolation (FSI) and mesh deformation are two key issues in the CFD-CSD coupling approach (the partitioned approach), which is the mainstream numerical strategy in aeroelastic simulations. In this paper, a time efficient coupling scheme is developed based on the radial basis function interpolations. During the FSI process, the positive definite system of linear equations is constructed with the introduction of pseudo structural forces. The acting forces on the structural nodes can be calculated more efficiently via the solution of the linear system, avoiding the costly computations of the aerodynamic/structural coupling matrix. The multi-layer sequential mesh motion algorithm (MSM) is proposed to improve the efficiency of the volume mesh deformations, which is adequate for large-scale time dependent applications with frequent mesh updates. Two-dimensional mesh motion cases show that the MSM algorithm can reduce the computing cost significantly compared to the standard RBF-based method. The computations of the AGARD 445.6 wing flutter and the static deflections of the three-dimensional high-aspect-ratio aircraft demonstrate that the developed coupling scheme is applicable to both dynamic and static aeroelastic problems.

  9. A three-dimensional chemistry/general circulation model simulation of anthropogenically derived ozone in the troposphere and its radiative climate forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelofs, Geert-Jan; Lelieveld, Jos; van Dorland, Rob

    1997-10-01

    We present results from the tropospheric chemistry/climate European Center Hamburg Model by comparing two simulations that consider a preindustrial and a contemporary emission scenario. Photochemical O3 production from anthropogenically emitted precursors contributes about 30% to the present-day tropospheric O3 content, which is roughly equal to the natural photochemical production. Transports of stratospheric O3 into the troposphere contribute about 40%. As a result of anthropogenic emissions, the O3 maximum over remote northern hemisphere (NH) areas has shifted from winter to spring, when photochemical production of O3 is relatively efficient. Over NH continents the preindustrial seasonal variability is relatively weak whereas a distinct surface O3 summer maximum appears in the contemporary simulation. In the (sub)tropical southern hemisphere (SH), anthropogenic biomass burning emissions cause an increase of O3 mixing ratios in the dry season (September-November). We calculate a relative increase in O3 mixing ratios due to anthropogenic emissions of about 30% in the pristine SH middle and high latitudes to about 100% in the polluted NH boundary layer. The model simulations suggest that the absolute increase of tropospheric O3 maximizes in the middle troposphere. Through convection, upper tropospheric O3 mixing ratios are significantly affected in the tropical regions and, during summer, in the middle and high NH latitudes. Under these conditions the radiative forcing of climate by increasing O3 is relatively large. We calculate a global and annual average radiative forcing by tropospheric O3 perturbations of 0.42 W m-2, i.e., 0.51 W m-2 in the NH and 0.33 W m-2 in the SH.

  10. Radial breathing mode of carbon nanotubes subjected to axial pressure.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xiao-Wen; Ni, Qing-Qing; Shi, Jin-Xing; Natsuki, Toshiaki

    2011-08-11

    In this paper, a theoretical analysis of the radial breathing mode (RBM) of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) subjected to axial pressure is presented based on an elastic continuum model. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are described as an individual elastic shell and double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) are considered to be two shells coupled through the van der Waals force. The effects of axial pressure, wave numbers and nanotube diameter on the RBM frequency are investigated in detail. The validity of these theoretical results is confirmed through the comparison of the experiment, calculation and simulation. Our results show that the RBM frequency is linearly dependent on the axial pressure and is affected by the wave numbers. We concluded that RBM frequency can be used to characterize the axial pressure acting on both ends of a CNT.

  11. Radial stretch reveals distinct populations of mechanosensitive mammalian somatosensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Martha R. C.; Bautista, Diana M.; Wu, Karin; Haeberle, Henry; Lumpkin, Ellen A.; Julius, David

    2008-01-01

    Primary afferent somatosensory neurons mediate our sense of touch in response to changes in ambient pressure. Molecules that detect and transduce thermal stimuli have been recently identified, but mechanisms underlying mechanosensation, particularly in vertebrate organisms, remain enigmatic. Traditionally, mechanically evoked responses in somatosensory neurons have been assessed one cell at a time by recording membrane currents in response to application of focal pressure, suction, or osmotic challenge. Here, we used radial stretch in combination with live-cell calcium imaging to gain a broad overview of mechanosensitive neuronal subpopulations. We found that different stretch intensities activate distinct subsets of sensory neurons as defined by size, molecular markers, or pharmacological attributes. In all subsets, stretch-evoked responses required extracellular calcium, indicating that mechanical force triggers calcium influx. This approach extends the repertoire of stimulus paradigms that can be used to examine mechanotransduction in mammalian sensory neurons, facilitating future physiological and pharmacological studies. PMID:19060212

  12. Particle confinement by a radially polarized laser Bessel beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laredo, Gilad; Kimura, Wayne D.; Schächter, Levi

    2017-03-01

    The stable trajectory of a charged particle in an external guiding field is an essential condition for its acceleration or for forcing it to generate radiation. Examples of possible guiding devices include a solenoidal magnetic field or permanent periodic magnet in klystrons, a wiggler in free-electron lasers, the lattice of any accelerator, and finally the crystal lattice for the case of channeling radiation. We demonstrate that the trajectory of a point-charge in a radially polarized laser Bessel beam may be stable similarly to the case of a positron that bounces back and forth in the potential well generated by two adjacent atomic planes. While in the case of channeling radiation, the transverse motion is controlled by a harmonic oscillator equation, for a Bessel beam the transverse motion is controlled by the Mathieu equation. Some characteristics of the motion are presented.

  13. The Sedov Blast Wave as a Radial Piston Verification Test

    DOE PAGES

    Pederson, Clark; Brown, Bart; Morgan, Nathaniel

    2016-06-22

    The Sedov blast wave is of great utility as a verification problem for hydrodynamic methods. The typical implementation uses an energized cell of finite dimensions to represent the energy point source. We avoid this approximation by directly finding the effects of the energy source as a boundary condition (BC). Furthermore, the proposed method transforms the Sedov problem into an outward moving radial piston problem with a time-varying velocity. A portion of the mesh adjacent to the origin is removed and the boundaries of this hole are forced with the velocities from the Sedov solution. This verification test is implemented onmore » two types of meshes, and convergence is shown. Our results from the typical initial condition (IC) method and the new BC method are compared.« less

  14. Latitudinal Dependence of the Radial IMF Component: Coronal Imprint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Smith, E. J.

    1996-01-01

    Measurements by Ulysses have confirmed that there is no significant gradient with respect to heliomagnetic latitude in the radial component, B(sub r,) of the interplanetary magnetic field. In the corona, the plasma, beta is much less than 1, except directly above streamers, so longitudinal and latitudinal gradients in field strength will relax due to the transverse magnetic pressure gradient force as the solar wind carries magnetic flux away from the Sun. This happens quickly enough so that the field is essentially uniform by 5 - 10 solar radius, apparently remaining so as it is carried to beyond 1 AU. Here, we illustrate the coronal relaxation with a qualitative physical argument and by reference to a detailed Magneto HydroDynamics (MHD) simulation.

  15. The Sedov Blast Wave as a Radial Piston Verification Test

    SciTech Connect

    Pederson, Clark; Brown, Bart; Morgan, Nathaniel

    2016-06-22

    The Sedov blast wave is of great utility as a verification problem for hydrodynamic methods. The typical implementation uses an energized cell of finite dimensions to represent the energy point source. We avoid this approximation by directly finding the effects of the energy source as a boundary condition (BC). Furthermore, the proposed method transforms the Sedov problem into an outward moving radial piston problem with a time-varying velocity. A portion of the mesh adjacent to the origin is removed and the boundaries of this hole are forced with the velocities from the Sedov solution. This verification test is implemented on two types of meshes, and convergence is shown. Our results from the typical initial condition (IC) method and the new BC method are compared.

  16. The phenomenological mechanochemistry of damage and radial cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinfeld, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Traditional damage theory deals with distributed microcracks rather than with individual cracks. In its simplest form, this theory adds just one additional parameter to the set of classical thermodynamic parameters of deformable solids like strain and temperature. Basically, the traditional damage theory reflects only one experimental observation: The elastic moduli become smaller with growing damage. Contrary to the traditional damage theory, the Phenomenological Mechanochemistry of Damage (PMD) uses an energetic approach; it includes, in addition to the bulk elastic energy, the energy associated with braking/recovery of chemical bonds. Therefore, in addition to the elasticity equations, it includes the equation describing evolution/dynamics of chemical bonds. With the minimum amount of physically transparent assumptions, it allows the reproduction of radial cracking patterns that are often observed in experiments and nature. In this paper, we review some earlier results and present the novel ones with emphasis on the electro- or magnetostatics ponderomotive forces.

  17. A Predictive Model for Satellite-Derived Phytoplankton Absorption Over the Louisiana Shelf Hypoxic Zone: Effects of Nutrients and Physical Forcing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-06

    model, the Modular Ocean Data Assimilation System size of summertime hypoxia [Mississippi River/Gulf of (MODAS) [ Carnes et aL, 1996]. Real-time...satellite- derived and model-predicted a,,, in the (a) Mississippi River I plume (Box A) and (b) Atchafalaya River plume (Box B). losi ph (m Both satellite...produc- column mixing. tivity of the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf, J Mar Syst., 11,237- 247.doi: 10.1016/SO924-7963(97)00019-5. Carnes , M. R., D. N

  18. Rotor hub vibration and blade loads reduction, and energy harvesting via embedded radial oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austruy, Julien

    An embedded radial absorber is investigated to control helicopter rotor hub vibration and blade loads. The absorber is modeled as a discrete mass moving in the spanwise direction within the blade. The absorber is retained in place and tuned with a spring and a damper. The radial absorber couples with lead-lag dynamic through Coriolis forces. The embedded radial absorber coupled to the helicopter is analyzed with a comprehensive rotorcraft model. The blade is modeled as an elastic beam undergoing flap bending, lag bending and elastic torsion, and a radial degree of freedom is added for the absorber. The tuning of the embedded radial absorber to a frequency close to 3/rev with no damping is shown to reduce significantly (up to 86%) the 4/rev in-plane hub forces of a 4-bladed hingeless rotor similar to a MBB BO-105 in high speed flight. The simulation shows that the absorber modifies the in-plane blade root shears to synchronize them to cancel each other in the transmission from rotating frame to fixed frame. A design of an embedded radial absorber experiment for hub vibration control is presented and it is concluded that for such high tuning frequencies as 3/rev, it is feasible to use a regular coil spring to compensate for the steady centrifugal force. Large reduction of blade lag shear (85%) and lag bending moment (71%) is achieved by tuning the embedded radial absorber close to 1/rev (also shown for a BO-105 like helicopter in high speed flight). The absorber reduces the amplitude of the lag bending moment at 1/rev, thus reducing the blade lead-lag motion and reducing the blade drag shear and lag bending moment. Finally, the use of the embedded radial absorber is investigated as a source electrical power when combined with an electromagnetic circuit. A model of the electromagnetic system is developed and validated, and an evaluation of the amount of power harvestable for different configurations is presented. The maximum power harvested was calculated to be 133

  19. Contractile force generation by 3D hiPSC-derived cardiac tissues is enhanced by rapid establishment of cellular interconnection in matrix with muscle-mimicking stiffness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soah; Serpooshan, Vahid; Tong, Xinming; Venkatraman, Sneha; Lee, Meelim; Lee, Jaecheol; Chirikian, Orlando; Wu, Joseph C; Wu, Sean M; Yang, Fan

    2017-03-30

    Engineering 3D human cardiac tissues is of great importance for therapeutic and pharmaceutical applications. As cardiac tissue substitutes, extracellular matrix-derived hydrogels have been widely explored. However, they exhibit premature degradation and their stiffness is often orders of magnitude lower than that of native cardiac tissue. There are no reports on establishing interconnected cardiomyocytes in 3D hydrogels at physiologically-relevant cell density and matrix stiffness. Here we bioengineer human cardiac microtissues by encapsulating human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) in chemically-crosslinked gelatin hydrogels (1.25 × 10(8)/mL) with tunable stiffness and degradation. In comparison to the cells in high stiffness (16 kPa)/slow degrading hydrogels, hiPSC-CMs in low stiffness (2 kPa)/fast degrading and intermediate stiffness (9 kPa)/intermediate degrading hydrogels exhibit increased intercellular network formation, α-actinin and connexin-43 expression, and contraction velocity. Only the 9 kPa microtissues exhibit organized sarcomeric structure and significantly increased contractile stress. This demonstrates that muscle-mimicking stiffness together with robust cellular interconnection contributes to enhancement in sarcomeric organization and contractile function of the engineered cardiac tissue. This study highlights the importance of intercellular connectivity, physiologically-relevant cell density, and matrix stiffness to best support 3D cardiac tissue engineering.

  20. GCFR radial blanket and shield experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Muckenthaler, F.J.; Hull, J.L.; Manning, J.J.

    1980-12-01

    This report presents integral neutron flux, energy spectra, and gamma-ray heating measurements made for the Radial Blanket and Shield Experiment at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility as part of a continuing Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor program. The experimental configurations were divided into four basic segments: a spectrum modifier inserted into the Tower Shielding Reactor II beam; blanket slabs consisting of either ThO/sub 2/ or UO/sub 2/ placed directly behind the spectrum modifier; an inner radial shield behind the blankets; and an outer radial shield to complete the mockup. The segments were added in sequence, with selected measurements made within and beyond each segment. The integral experiment was performed to provide verification of calculational methods and nuclear data used in designing a radial shield for the GCFR and determining the effectiveness of the design. The ThO/sub 2/ blanket measurements were needed to bracket the uncertainties in the nuclear cross sections for calculating both the neutron transmission through the blanket and the gamma-ray heating rates within the blanket. Measurements with a UO/sub 2/ blanket were included both as a reference for the ThO/sub 2/ analysis, neutron transmission through UO/sub 2/ having been successfully calculated in previous experiments, and to provide comparison information for other breeder reactor designs.

  1. Extended foil capacitor with radially spoked electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Foster, James C.

    1990-01-01

    An extended foil capacitor has a conductive disk electrically connected in oncrushing contact to the extended foil. A conductive paste is placed through spaces between radial spokes on the disk to electrically and mechanically connect the extended foil to the disk.

  2. Radial-Gap Motor for Ship Propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanamoto, Toshiyuki; Yokoyama, Minoru

    The KHI team has developed radial gap high-temperature superconducting (HTS) motors of three sizes, 1 MW-class, 3 MW, and 20 MW, to be used for electric propulsion systems for ships. The volumetric torque density of the assembled 3 MW HTS motor was recorded at 40 kNm/m3 in the load test; the world's highest in the class.

  3. Radial velocities of Planetary Nebulae revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Roberto; Ayala, Sandra A.; Wendolyn Blanco Cárdenas, Mónica; Contreras, María E.; Gómez-Muñoz, Marco Antonio; Guillén, Pedro F.; Olguín, Lorenzo; Ramos-Larios, Gerardo; Sabin, Laurence; Zavala, Saúl A.

    2015-08-01

    We present a new determination of radial velocities of a sample of Galactic Planetary Nebulae (PNe) using a systematic method and the same instrumental setting: the long-slit high-dispersion Manchester Echelle Spectrograph (MES) on the 2.1-m telescope at the San Pedro Mártir Observatory (OAN-SPM; Mexico). This project was inspired by the work of Schneider et al. (1983, A&AS, 52, 399), which has been an important reference during the last decades. Radial velocities of gaseous nebulae can be obtained using the central wavelength of a Gaussian fit, even when there is an expansion velocity, as expected in PNe, but with not enough resolution to see a spectral line splitting. We have used the software SHAPE, a morpho-kinematic modeling and reconstruction tool for astrophysical objects (Steffen et al. 2011, IEEE Trans. Vis. Comput. Graphics, 17, 454), to prove that non-uniform density or brightness, on an expanding shell, can lead to mistaken conclusions about the radial velocity. To determine radial velocities, we only use the spectral data in which a spectral line-splitting is seen, avoiding thus the problem of the possible biased one-Gaussian fit. Cases when this method is not recommended are discussed.This project has been supported by grant PAPIIT-DGAPA-UNAM IN107914. MWB is in grateful receipt of a DGAPA-UNAM postdoctoral scholarship. MAG acknowledges CONACYT for his graduate scholarship.

  4. Determining Enzyme Activity by Radial Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Bill D.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses advantages of radial diffusion assay in determining presence of enzyme and/or rough approximation of amount of enzyme activities. Procedures are included for the preparation of starch-agar plates, and the application and determination of enzyme. Techniques using plant materials (homogenates, tissues, ungerminated embryos, and seedlings)…

  5. MMICs with Radial Probe Transitions to Waveguides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samoska, Lorene; Chattopadhyay, Goutam; Pukala, David; Soria, Mary; Fung, King Man; Gaier, Todd; Radisic, Vesna; Lai, Richard

    2009-01-01

    A document presents an update on the innovation reported in Integrated Radial Probe Transition From MMIC to Waveguide (NPO-43957), NASA Tech Briefs Vol. 31, No. 5 (May 2007), page 38. To recapitulate: To enable operation or testing of a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC), it is necessary to mount the MMIC in a waveguide package that typically has cross-sectional waveguide dimensions of the order of a few hundred microns. A radial probe transition between an MMIC operating at 340 GHz and a waveguide had been designed (but not yet built and tested) to be fabricated as part of a monolithic unit that would include the MMIC. The radial probe could readily be integrated with an MMIC amplifier because the design provided for fabrication of the transition on a substrate of the same material (InP) and thickness (50 m) typical of substrates of MMICs that can operate above 300 GHz. As illustrated in the updated document by drawings, photographs, and plots of test data, the concept has now been realized by designing, fabricating, and testing several MMIC/radial- probe integrated-circuit chips and designing and fabricating a waveguide package to contain each chip.

  6. Enhanced effects with scanning force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howells, S.; Chen, T.; Gallagher, M.; Yi, L.; Sarid, D.

    1991-05-01

    A general theory that describes the operation of scanning force microscopy in the contact force regime is presented. It is shown that force derivatives along the surface of a sample produce images that can be dramatically enhanced relative to those of surface topography. For scanning tunneling microscopy atomic force microscopy configurations, the spring constant of the cantilever and the force derivatives perpendicular to the surface of the sample determine the enhancement, respectively.

  7. Radial wave crystals: radially periodic structures from anisotropic metamaterials for engineering acoustic or electromagnetic waves.

    PubMed

    Torrent, Daniel; Sánchez-Dehesa, José

    2009-08-07

    We demonstrate that metamaterials with anisotropic properties can be used to develop a new class of periodic structures that has been named radial wave crystals. They can be sonic or photonic, and wave propagation along the radial directions is obtained through Bloch states like in usual sonic or photonic crystals. The band structure of the proposed structures can be tailored in a large amount to get exciting novel wave phenomena. For example, it is shown that acoustical cavities based on radial sonic crystals can be employed as passive devices for beam forming or dynamically orientated antennas for sound localization.

  8. An Ongoing Program of Radial Velocities of Nearby Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperauskas, J.; Boyle, R. P.; Harlow, J.; Jahreiss, H.; Upgren, A. R.

    2003-12-01

    The lists of stars found by Vyssotsky at the McCormick Observatory and the Fourth Edition of the Catalog of Nearby Stars (CNS4) complement each other. Each was limited in a different way, but together they can be used to evaluate sources of systematic error in either of them. The lists of Vyssotsky comprise almost 900 stars, brighter than a limiting visual magnitude of about 11.5. and thus form a magnitude-limited sample. The CNS4 includes all stars believed to be within 25 parsecs of the Sun, and thus forms a distance-limited group. Limits in magnitude are prone to the Malmquist bias by which stars of a given range in magnitude may average spuriously brighter than stars within a given distance range appropriate for the mean distance modulus. The CNS4 stars may be subject to a slight Lutz-Kelker effect. This also requires a correction that depends mainly on the ratios of the standard errors in the distances to the stars, to the distances, themselves. This is a status report on a survey seeking completeness in the six dynamical properties (positions along the three orthogonal axes, and their first time-derivatives). Parallax, proper motion and radial velocity are the stellar properties required for this information and, as is frequently the case among sets of faint stars, the radial velocities are not always available. We seek to obtain radial velocities for a full dynamical picture for more than one thousand nearby stars of which some two-thirds have been observed. It would be most desirable to follow with age-related measures for all stars

  9. Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility. Part 1; Technique, Validation, and Comparison to Satellite-derived Diagnostic Quantities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mace, Gerald G.; Benson, Sally; Sonntag, Karen L.; Kato, Seiji; Min, Qilong; Minnis, Patrick; Twohy, Cynthia H.; Poellot, Michael; Dong, Xiquan; Long, Charles; Zhang, Qiuqing; Doelling, David R.

    2006-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that continuous ground-based remote sensing measurements from active and passive remote sensors combined with regular soundings of the atmospheric thermodynamic structure can be combined to describe the effects of clouds on the clear sky radiation fluxes. We critically test that hypothesis in this paper and a companion paper (Part II). Using data collected at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, we explore an analysis methodology that results in the characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric profile at time resolutions of five minutes and vertical resolutions of 90 m. The description includes thermodynamics and water vapor profile information derived by merging radiosonde soundings with ground-based data, and continues through specification of the cloud layer occurrence and microphysical and radiative properties derived from retrieval algorithms and parameterizations. The description of the atmospheric physical state includes a calculation of the infrared and clear and cloudy sky solar flux profiles. Validation of the methodology is provided by comparing the calculated fluxes with top of atmosphere (TOA) and surface flux measurements and by comparing the total column optical depths to independently derived estimates. We find over a 1-year period of comparison in overcast uniform skies, that the calculations are strongly correlated to measurements with biases in the flux quantities at the surface and TOA of less than 10% and median fractional errors ranging from 20% to as low as 2%. In the optical depth comparison for uniform overcast skies during the year 2000 where the optical depth varies over 3 orders of magnitude we find a mean positive bias of 46% with a median bias of less than 10% and a 0.89 correlation coefficient. The slope of the linear regression line for the optical depth comparison is 0.86 with a normal deviation of 20% about this

  10. Force Limited Vibration Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharton, Terry; Chang, Kurng Y.

    2005-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the concept and applications of Force Limited Vibration Testing. The goal of vibration testing of aerospace hardware is to identify problems that would result in flight failures. The commonly used aerospace vibration tests uses artificially high shaker forces and responses at the resonance frequencies of the test item. It has become common to limit the acceleration responses in the test to those predicted for the flight. This requires an analysis of the acceleration response, and requires placing accelerometers on the test item. With the advent of piezoelectric gages it has become possible to improve vibration testing. The basic equations have are reviewed. Force limits are analogous and complementary to the acceleration specifications used in conventional vibration testing. Just as the acceleration specification is the frequency spectrum envelope of the in-flight acceleration at the interface between the test item and flight mounting structure, the force limit is the envelope of the in-flight force at the interface . In force limited vibration tests, both the acceleration and force specifications are needed, and the force specification is generally based on and proportional to the acceleration specification. Therefore, force limiting does not compensate for errors in the development of the acceleration specification, e.g., too much conservatism or the lack thereof. These errors will carry over into the force specification. Since in-flight vibratory force data are scarce, force limits are often derived from coupled system analyses and impedance information obtained from measurements or finite element models (FEM). Fortunately, data on the interface forces between systems and components are now available from system acoustic and vibration tests of development test models and from a few flight experiments. Semi-empirical methods of predicting force limits are currently being developed on the basis of the limited flight and system test

  11. Activated β-catenin forces N2A cell-derived neurons back to tumor-like neuroblasts and positively correlates with a risk for human neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Feng; Gong, Guangming; Xu, Yan; Zhu, Yan; Hu, Die; Yang, Yilin; Hu, Yiqiao

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonic malignancy arising from neuroblasts. The mechanisms that regulate the origination of neuroblastoma are still not very clear. In this study, we revealed that 6-bromoindirubin 3'-oxime (BIO), a specific GSK-3β inhibitor, promoted N2A cells-derived neurons to become tumor-like neuroblasts. Moreover, constitutively activated β-catenin (S33Y) also promoted this process, whereas, silencing endogenous expression of β-catenin abolished BIO-induced effects. These results implicated the potential relationship between the Wnt/β-catenin signaling and neuroblastoma formation. Indeed, we found that the amount of β-catenin in nucleus, which indicated the activation of Wnt/β-catnin signaling, was accumulated in human neuroblastoma specimens and positively correlated with clinical risk of neuroblastoma. These results give us a new sight into the neuroblastoma initiation and progression, and provide a potential drug target for neuroblastoma treatment.

  12. Comparison of Shortwave Cloud Radiative Forcing Derived from ARM SGP Surface and GOES-8 Satellite Measurements During ARESE I and ARESE II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, A. D.; Doelling, D. R.; Khaiyer, M. M.; Minnis, P.; Smith, W. L., Jr.; Nguyen, L.; Haeffelin, M. P.; Valero, F. P. J.; Asano, S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the objectives of the ARM Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) is to investigate the absorption of solar radiation by clouds over the ARM Southern Great Plains central facility. A variety of techniques employing various combinations Of Surface, aircraft, and satellite data have been used to estimate the absorption empirically. During ARESE-I conducted during fall 1995, conflicting results were produced from different analyses of the combined datasets leading to the need for a more controlled experiment. ARESE-II was conducted during spring 2000. Improved calibrations, different sampling strategies, and broadband satellite data were all available to minimize some of the sources of uncertainty in the data. In this paper, cloud absorption or its parametric surrogates (e.g., Cess et al. 1995) are derived from collocated and coincident surface and satellite radiometer data from both ARESE-I and ARESE-II using the latest satellite and surface instrument calibrations.

  13. Polarization evolution of radially polarized partially coherent vortex fields: role of Gouy phase of Laguerre-Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Herrero, R; Prado, F

    2015-02-23

    In the framework of the paraxial approximation, we derive the analytical expressions for describing the effect of the Gouy phase of Laguerre-Gauss beams on the polarization evolution of partially coherent vortex fields whose electric field vector at some transverse plane exhibits a radially polarized behavior. At each transverse plane, the polarization distribution across the beam profile is characterized by means of the percentage of irradiance associated with the radial or azimuthal components. The propagation laws for these percentages are also presented. As an illustrative example, we analyze a radially polarized partially coherent vortex beam.

  14. Origins of Rolling, Twisting, and Non-radial Propagation of Eruptive Solar Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasenco, Olga; Martin, Sara F.; Velli, Marco; Vourlidas, Angelos

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate that major asymmetries in erupting filaments and CMEs, namely major twists and non-radial motions are typically related to the larger-scale ambient environment around eruptive events. Our analysis of prominence eruptions observed by the STEREO, SDO, and SOHO spacecraft shows that prominence spines retain, during the initial phases, the thin ribbon-like topology they had prior to the eruption. This topology allows bending, rolling, and twisting during the early phase of the eruption, but not before. The combined ascent and initial bending of the filament ribbon is non-radial in the same general direction as for the enveloping CME. However, the non-radial motion of the filament is greater than that of the CME. In considering the global magnetic environment around CMEs, as approximated by the Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) model, we find that the non-radial propagation of both erupting filaments and associated CMEs is correlated with the presence of nearby coronal holes, which deflect the erupting plasma and embedded fields. In addition, CME and filament motions, respectively, are guided towards weaker field regions, namely null points existing at different heights in the overlying configuration. Due to the presence of the coronal hole, the large-scale forces acting on the CME may be asymmetric. We find that the CME propagates usually non-radially in the direction of least resistance, which is always away from the coronal hole. We demonstrate these results using both low- and high-latitude examples.

  15. Operation and Improvement of Liquid Nitrogen Pumps with Radial High- Temperature Superconductor Bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Q. X.; Jiang, D. H.; Deng, Z. G.; Ma, G. T.; Zheng, J.; Wang, W. J.; Shin, D. I.; Gu, X.; Lin, N.; Shao, M. L.

    2015-09-01

    This paper reviews the advantages of replacing the mechanical bearings of low-temperature pumps by radial high- temperature superconductor (HTS) bearings. Radial HTS bearings have the advantage of being non-abrasive, so that the working life is increased significantly. In this article, two types of liquid nitrogen pump with radial HTS bearings are proposed. To reduce heat leakage, one pump uses a permanent magnet (PM) coupling and the other uses a long hollow pipe coupling. Successful stable operation of these two pumps means that radial HTS bearings have the potential to be applied in liquid nitrogen pumps. Test results show that the flow rate is influenced mainly by rotational speed but not by the coupling component. Further designs of the two types of pump for practical applications are described, and their characteristics are analyzed: the pump with a PM coupling has lower heat leakage, whereas the pump with a long hollow pipe coupling can solve the force creep problem of the HTS bearing. The design of the pump with a long hollow pipe coupling is based on the pump that is already in practical use, and therefore has greater feasibility for practical applications. Finally, improvements of the liquid nitrogen pump by improving the structure of the pump and the performance of the radial HTS bearing are discussed.

  16. Geodesic acoustic modes in tokamak plasmas with a radial equilibrium electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Deng

    2015-09-15

    The dispersion relation of geodesic acoustic modes in the tokamak plasma with an equilibrium radial electric field is derived and analyzed. Multiple branches of eigenmodes have been found, similar to the result given by the fluid model with a poloidal mass flow. Frequencies and damping rates of both the geodesic acoustic mode and the sound wave increase with respect to the strength of radial electric field, while the frequency and the damping rate of the lower frequency branch slightly decrease. Possible connection to the experimental observation is discussed.

  17. Radial Star Formation Histories in 15 Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, Daniel A.; Beltz-Mohrmann, Gillian D.; Egan, Arika A.; Hatlestad, Alan J.; Herzog, Laura J.; Leung, Andrew S.; McLane, Jacob N.; Phenicie, Christopher; Roberts, Jareth S.; Barnes, Kate L.; Boquien, Médéric; Calzetti, Daniela; Cook, David O.; Kobulnicky, Henry A.; Staudaher, Shawn M.; van Zee, Liese

    2016-01-01

    New deep optical and near-infrared imaging is combined with archival ultraviolet and infrared data for 15 nearby galaxies mapped in the Spitzer Extended Disk Galaxy Exploration Science survey. These images are particularly deep and thus excellent for studying the low surface brightness outskirts of these disk-dominated galaxies with stellar masses ranging between 108 and {10}11 {M}⊙ . The spectral energy distributions derived from this data set are modeled to investigate the radial variations in the galaxy colors and star formation histories. Taken as a whole, the sample shows bluer and younger stars for larger radii until reversing near the optical radius, whereafter the trend is for redder and older stars for larger galacto-centric distances. These results are consistent with an inside-out disk formation scenario coupled with an old stellar outer disk population formed through radial migration and/or the cumulative history of minor mergers and accretions of satellite dwarf galaxies. However, these trends are quite modest and the variation from galaxy to galaxy is substantial. Additional data for a larger sample of galaxies are needed to confirm or dismiss these modest sample-wide trends.

  18. REEXAMINATION OF THE RADIAL ABUNDANCE GRADIENT BREAK IN NGC 3359

    SciTech Connect

    Zahid, H. J.; Bresolin, F.

    2011-06-15

    In this contribution, we reexamine the radial oxygen abundance gradient in the strongly barred spiral galaxy NGC 3359, for which, using an imaging spectrophotometric technique, Martin and Roy detected a break near the effective radius of the galaxy. We have new emission line flux measurements of H II regions in NGC 3359 from spectra obtained with the Subaru telescope to further investigate this claim. We find that there are small systematic variations in the line ratios determined from narrowband imaging as compared to our spectroscopic measurements. We derive and apply a correction to the line ratios found by Martin and Roy and statistically examine the validity of the gradient break proposed for NGC 3359 using recently developed metallicity diagnostics. We find that, with a high degree of confidence, a model with a break fits the data significantly better than one without it. This suggests that the presence of a strong bar in spiral galaxies can generate measurable changes in the radial distribution of metals.

  19. New Measurements of Radial Mode Eigenfrequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laske, G.; Masters, G.; Dziewonski, A. M.

    2001-12-01

    Radial mode eigenfrequencies are commonly thought to be measured with great ease and precision. The reason for this is that these modes have no geographic pattern so one should be able to measure frequencies from a spectrum observed at any station in the world. Yet, radial modes often seem inconsistent with spherical Earth models that fit all other mode frequencies. It turns out that radial modes are sometimes strongly coupled. The strongest coupling is predicted to be with l=2 modes which is caused by the Earth's hydrostatic ellipticity and aspherical structure of harmonic degree 2. In such cases, mode-coupling due to ellipticity alone can cause a frequency shift for the radial modes by more than 4 microHz. Given that mode frequencies can be measured to within 0.1 microHz, this shift is significant, and some singlets of l=2 modes have indeed been misidentified as the radial mode in the past. Including the spectra of the June 23, 2001 Southern Peru Earthquake we have re-analyzed radial mode eigenfrequencies and present a mode dataset that is internally more consistent than previous ones. We construct spherical Earth models that are consistent with our new data, the Earth's mass and moment of inertia and the current best estimates of ``Reference Normal Mode Data'' (available on the Reference Earth Model web site: //mahi.ucsd.edu/Gabi/rem.html). We seek the smallest perturbation to PREM but update the Q-structure as well as the depths of the upper mantle discontinuities (418~km and 660~km as first order discontinuities; 520~km as change in gradient). The best fitting 1D model is transversely isotropic but we also show isotropic models that fit the data to within their errors. We show that the 220~km discontinuity is not required in the isotropic model but that there exists a trade-off between high shear-velocities in the lid and a low-density zone beneath it. We also investigate ways of truncating transverse isotropy without the 220.

  20. Levitation forces in bearingless permanent magnet motors

    SciTech Connect

    Amrhein, W.; Silber, S.; Nenninger, K.

    1999-09-01

    Bearingless motors combine brushless AC-motors with active magnetic bearings by the integration of two separate winding systems (torque and radial levitation force windings with different pole pairs) in one housing. This paper gives an insight into the influences of the motor design on the levitation force and torque generation. It is shown that especially for machines with small air gaps it can be very important to choose the right design parameters. Increasing the permanent magnet height in order to increase the motor torque can result in a remarkable reduction of radial forces. The interrelationships are discussed on the basis of Maxwell and Lorentz forces acting upon the stator surface. The investigations are presented for a bearingless low cost motor, suited for pump, fan or blower applications. The presented motor needs only four coils for operation.

  1. Determination of the elastic modulus of native collagen fibrils via radial indentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, August J.; Matthews, William G.; Koob, Thomas J.

    2006-10-01

    The authors studied the elastic response of single, native collagen fibrils extracted from tissues of the inner dermis of the sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa, via local nanoscale indentation with an atomic force microscope (AFM). AFM imaging of fibrils under ambient conditions are presented, demonstrating a peak-to-peak periodicity, the d band, of dehydrated, unfixed fibrils to be ˜64.5nm. Radial indentation experiments were performed, and the measured value for the reduced modulus is 1-2GPa.

  2. Assessing the impact of environmental forcing on the condition of anchovy larvae in the Cadiz Gulf using nucleic acid and fatty acid-derived indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodósio, M. A.; Garrido, S.; Peters, J.; Leitão, F.; Ré, P.; Peliz, A.; Santos, A. M. P.

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the environmental processes affecting fish larvae survival is critical for population dynamics, conservation purposes and to ecosystem-based fishery management. Using anchovies (Engraulis encrasicolus) of the Cadiz Gulf as a study case and considering the "Ocean Triad" hypothesis, we investigate the larval ecophysiological status and potential survival in relation to oceanographic variables. Therefore, this study aims to describe the nutritional condition of anchovy larvae during spawning season (peak in summer) through nucleic acid- and fatty acid (FA)-derived indices and to analyze the effects of the major environmental parameters (Depth, Temperature, Salinity, Plankton biomass) on anchovy survival potential at early phases. Fish larvae were collected in August from 30 m to 400 m depth at 35 stations off the southern Iberian coast. A previous upwelling event influenced the oceanographic conditions of the more western stations off Cape São Vicente (CSV). Along the coast, the water became warmer from west to the east through Cape Santa Maria (CSM) ending at Guadiana estuary, where easterly winds originated the development of a counter current. The standardized RNA/DNA (sRD) of anchovy larvae decreased throughout larval ontogeny, reflecting a reduction of growth during the development. Essential FA concentrations also decreased, but docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) in particular was highly conserved even after the reduction of total FA concentration in anchovy larvae related to the onset of swimming abilities (post-flexion phase). The oceanographic conditions (west upwelling, east counter current, and stratification) led to a nearshore aggregation of plankton and anchovy larvae with good ecophysiological conditions in the central area of the southern coast, where an optimal range of temperature and chlorophyll, as an indirect food proxy for anchovy larval development, were registered. The study proves that the oceanographic conditions of the study area are

  3. An Energy-Based Method for Computing Radial Stiffness of Single Archimedes Spiral Plane Supporting Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Enlai; Jia, Fang; Lu, Changhui; Chen, He; Ji, Xin

    With space-based adaptive performance of lower stiffness and greater deformation energy, the plane supporting spring finds its wide application in fields like aeronautics, astronautics, etc. In the current study, the radial stiffness formula of a single Archimedes spiral plane supporting spring is derived by means of energy approach, with three key parameters of the supporting spring as independent variables. A series of the supporting spring FEA models are established via APDL speedy modeling. According to the isolation requirements of electronic equipment for a fighter, an example is presented in the form of finite element analysis. The theoretical calculation and analysis data are studied and fitted by MATLAB using the least-square method to obtain the discipline of the radial stiffness of single spiral plane supporting spring with the changes of its three key parameters. The validity of energy-based radial stiffness formula of the spring is confirmed by the comparison between the theoretical calculation and finite element analysis results.

  4. Comparison of two commercially available single radial immunodiffusion kits for quantitation of llama immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, J M; Salman, M D; Garry, F B; Johnson, L W; Collins, J K; Keefe, T J

    1995-10-01

    Immunoglobin G (IgG) quantitation was performed by a commercially available single radial immunodiffusion kit on 528 plasma samples obtained from llamas. Fifty samples encompassing the range of values obtained were selected for further evaluation. The IgG concentration of these samples was measured by a second commercially available single radial immunodiffusion kit and a sodium sulfite precipitation kit. gamma-Globulins also were measured. IgG values predicted by the single radial immunodiffusion kits were not in agreement. Failure to appreciate this lack of agreement could result in misinterpretation of a llama's IgG level derived from one kit when clinical guidelines established using the other kit are followed.

  5. Transport of radial heat flux and second sound in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Guercan, Oe. D.; Berionni, V.; Hennequin, P.; Morel, P.; Vermare, L.; Diamond, P. H.; Garbet, X.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Kosuga, Y.

    2013-02-15

    Simple flux-gradient relations that involve time delay and radial coupling are discussed. Such a formulation leads to a rather simple description of avalanches and may explain breaking of gyroBohm transport scaling. The generalization of the flux-gradient relation (i.e., constitutive relation), which involve both time delay and spatial coupling, is derived from drift-kinetic equation, leading to kinetic definitions of constitutive elements such as the flux of radial heat flux. This allows numerical simulations to compute these cubic quantities directly. The formulation introduced here can be viewed as an extension of turbulence spreading to include the effect of spreading of cross-phase as well as turbulence intensity, combined in such a way to give the flux. The link between turbulence spreading and entropy production is highlighted. An extension of this formulation to general quasi-linear theory for the distribution function in the phase space of radial position and parallel velocity is also discussed.

  6. A small-signal theory for the radial-line relativistic klystron amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Fangchao; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhong, Huihuang; Zhang, Jun; Ju, Jinchuan

    2017-02-01

    A small-signal theory describing the electron beam modulation in the radial-line relativistic klystron amplifier (RL-RKA) is developed in this paper. We first derive theoretically the space-charge limited current, the dispersion relation of space-charge waves on the radial-radiated electron beam, and the beam coupling coefficient for the radial-line electromagnetic structure. Then, a small-signal theory is established to analyze the beam current bunching during the initial modulation period. With particle-in-cell simulations, the theoretical analysis is verified through observing the fundamental harmonic current of an input cavity in a previous Ku-band RL-RKA. More importantly, the presented small-signal theory can provide a theoretical guidance for the RL-RKA design.

  7. RADIAL DEPENDENCE OF THE FREQUENCY BREAK BETWEEN FLUID AND KINETIC SCALES IN THE SOLAR WIND FLUCTUATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, R.; Trenchi, L.

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the radial dependence of the spectral break separating the inertial from the dissipation range in power density spectra of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations, between 0.42 and 5.3 AU, during radial alignments between MESSENGER and WIND for the inner heliosphere and between WIND and ULYSSES for the outer heliosphere. We found that the spectral break moves to higher and higher frequencies as the heliocentric distance decreases. The radial dependence of the corresponding wavenumber is of the kind κ {sub b} ∼ R {sup –1.08}, in good agreement with that of the wavenumber derived from the linear resonance condition for proton cyclotron damping. These results support conclusions from previous studies which suggest that a cyclotron-resonant dissipation mechanism must participate in the spectral cascade together with other possible kinetic noncyclotron-resonant mechanisms.

  8. Precise Near-Infrared Radial Velocities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavchan, Peter; Gao, Peter; Gagne, Jonathan; Furlan, Elise; Brinkworth, Carolyn; Bottom, Michael; Tanner, Angelle; Anglada-Escude, Guillem; White, Russel; Davison, Cassy; Mills, Sean; Beichman, Chas; Johnson, John Asher; Ciardi, David; Wallace, Kent; Mennesson, Bertrand; Vasisht, Gautam; Prato, Lisa; Kane, Stephen; Crawford, Sam; Crawford, Tim; Sung, Keeyoon; Drouin, Brian; Lin, Sean; Leifer, Stephanie; Catanzarite, Joe; Henry, Todd; von Braun, Kaspar; Walp, Bernie; Geneser, Claire; Ogden, Nick; Stufflebeam, Andrew; Pohl, Garrett; Regan, Joe

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of two 2.3 μm near-infrared (NIR) radial velocity (RV) surveys to detect exoplanets around 36 nearby and young M dwarfs. We use the CSHELL spectrograph (R ~ 46,000) at the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF), combined with an isotopic methane absorption gas cell for common optical path relative wavelength calibration. We have developed a sophisticated RV forward modeling code that accounts for fringing and other instrumental artifacts present in the spectra. With a spectral grasp of only 5 nm, we are able to reach long-term radial velocity dispersions of ~20-30 m s-1 on our survey targets.

  9. Lattice radial quantization: 3D Ising

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brower, R. C.; Fleming, G. T.; Neuberger, H.

    2013-04-01

    Lattice radial quantization is introduced as a nonperturbative method intended to numerically solve Euclidean conformal field theories that can be realized as fixed points of known Lagrangians. As an example, we employ a lattice shaped as a cylinder with a 2D Icosahedral cross-section to discretize dilatations in the 3D Ising model. Using the integer spacing of the anomalous dimensions of the first two descendants (l = 1, 2), we obtain an estimate for η = 0.034 (10). We also observed small deviations from integer spacing for the 3rd descendant, which suggests that a further improvement of our radial lattice action will be required to guarantee conformal symmetry at the Wilson-Fisher fixed point in the continuum limit.

  10. New radial engine technology from Kongsburg

    SciTech Connect

    Mowill, R.J.; Strom, S.

    1983-01-01

    The first engine of a new family of high performance, rugged radial turbines is presented. The new single shaft 1500 kW site rated KG3 is built upon extensive experience from the field proven KG2 of the same nominal power. The KG3 is being developed both as a simple cycle and recuperated engine providing specific fuel consumptions in the range of 0.29 to 0.19 kg/kW-hr (0.47 to 0.32 lbs/hp-hr). The new Kongsberg engine makes use of a high specific speed high pressure ratio centrifugal compressor combined with a very high tip speed uncooled radial turbine to obtain optimized aerodynamic matching. Several novel design features ar described.

  11. Radial spline assembly for antifriction bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Jerry H. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An outer race carrier is constructed for receiving an outer race of an antifriction bearing assembly. The carrier in turn is slidably fitted in an opening of a support wall to accommodate slight axial movements of a shaft. A plurality of longitudinal splines on the carrier are disposed to be fitted into matching slots in the opening. A deadband gap is provided between sides of the splines and slots, with a radial gap at ends of the splines and slots and a gap between the splines and slots sized larger than the deadband gap. With this construction, operational distortions (slope) of the support wall are accommodated by the larger radial gaps while the deadband gaps maintain a relatively high springrate of the housing. Additionally, side loads applied to the shaft are distributed between sides of the splines and slots, distributing such loads over a larger surface area than a race carrier of the prior art.

  12. SpicyNodes Radial Map Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douma, M.; Ligierko, G.; Angelov, I.

    2008-10-01

    The need for information has increased exponentially over the past decades. The current systems for constructing, exploring, classifying, organizing, and searching information face the growing challenge of enabling their users to operate efficiently and intuitively in knowledge-heavy environments. This paper presents SpicyNodes, an advanced user interface for difficult interaction contexts. It is based on an underlying structure known as a radial map, which allows users to manipulate and interact in a natural manner with entities called nodes. This technology overcomes certain limitations of existing solutions and solves the problem of browsing complex sets of linked information. SpicyNodes is also an organic system that projects users into a living space, stimulating exploratory behavior and fostering creative thought. Our interactive radial layout is used for educational purposes and has the potential for numerous other applications.

  13. Simple proposal for radial 3D needlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durastanti, C.; Fantaye, Y.; Hansen, F.; Marinucci, D.; Pesenson, I. Z.

    2014-11-01

    We present here a simple construction of a wavelet system for the three-dimensional ball, which we label radial 3D needlets. The construction envisages a data collection environment in which an observer located at the center of the ball is surrounded by concentric spheres with the same pixelization at different radial distances, for any given resolution. The system is then obtained by weighting the projector operator built on the corresponding set of eigenfunctions and performing a discretization step which turns out to be computationally very convenient. The resulting wavelets can be shown to have very good localization properties in the real and harmonic domain; their implementation is computationally very convenient, and they allow for exact reconstruction as they form a tight frame system. Our theoretical results are supported by an extensive numerical analysis.

  14. Radial localization of odors by human newborns.

    PubMed

    Rieser, J; Yonas, A; Wikner, K

    1976-09-01

    To study sensitivity to radial location of an odor source, 20 human newborns, ranging from 16 to 130 hours of age, were presented with a small amount of ammonium hydroxide. The odor source was placed near the nose slightly to the left or right of midline, with its position randomized over repeated trails. Direction of headturn with respect to the odor location and diffuse motor activity were scored from the videotape recordings of the newborns' behavior. It was found that as a group, the newborns turned away from the odor source more frequently than they turned toward it. The tendency to turn away from the odor was stronger in infants who displayed less motor activity after the response. Newborns also exhibited a right bias in the direction of the head movements. It is concluded that a spatially appropriate avoidance response is present in the neonate and that the newborn is innately sensitive to the radial location of an odor.

  15. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people ages 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or the institutionalized population, such as prison inmates. Determining the size of the labor force is a way of determining how big the economy can get. The size of the labor force depends on two…

  16. Orbit averaged radial buildup code for tandem mirror geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, M.; Futch, A.H.

    1981-01-22

    The radial Fokker-Planck (RFP) model of A. Futch was modified to treat plasma buildup in the tandem mirror plug and center cell with a self-consistent model (TOARBUC). Two major changes have been made to the original version of this code. First, the center cell is treated as having separate electron and ion confining potentials with the ion potential having the opposite sign of that in a conventional mirror. Second, a two-electron-temperature treatment derived by R. Cohen was included in the present model to allow the plug and center cell to have different T/sub e/'s as observed in the experiment. The following sections explain these changes in greater detail.

  17. Extinction, ejecta masses, and radial velocities of novae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert E.

    1994-01-01

    Interstellar reddening is determined for a number of recent novae based upon emission-line ratios which are generally observable using CCDs. Large values of extinction are found for most systems, possibly indicative of an intrinsic component of reddening in postoutburst novae. The unusual characteristics of the (O I) lines in novae, which are strong and optically thick, require a large population of very dense globules which are the likely sites of dust formation. These pyroclasts must be ejected from the white dwarf. The total mass of the neutral gas in the globules in some of the objects is substantially larger than the masses normally derived for the ionized ejecta of novae. The distribution of radial velocities of Galactic novae in the Tololo sample, although uncertain, shows an asymmetry in having predominantly negative values. Either high internal absorption in the expanding ejecta skews the emission lines to bluer wavelengths, or most of the novae are moving out from the center of the Galaxy.

  18. Wavelets, Fractals, and Radial Basis Functions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    of Signal Processing. San Diego, CA: Aca- demic, 1998. [13] G. Strang and T. Q. Nguyen, Wavelets and Filter Banks . Cambridge, MA: Wellesley-Cambridge...localization, multiresolution, radial basis functions, re- finement filter , scaling functions, self-similarity, splines, tempered distributions, two-scale...one linear constraint per basis function, and the corresponding linear system of equations is invertible under relatively mild conditions [11]. The

  19. Radial rib antenna surface deviation analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyner, J. V., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    A digital computer program was developed which analyzes any radial rib antenna with ribs radiating from a central hub. The program has the capability for calculating the antenna surface contour (reversed pillowing effect), the optimum rib shape for minimizing the rms surface error, and the actual rms surface error. Rib deflection due to mesh tension and catenary cable tension can also be compensated for, and the pattern from which the mesh gores are cut can be determined.

  20. Measurement of radial artery spasm using an automatic pullback device.

    PubMed

    Kiemeneij, F; Vajifdar, B U; Eccleshall, S C; Laarman, G; Slagboom, T; van der Wieken, R

    2001-12-01

    Current evaluation of radial artery spasm (RAS), a frequent finding during the transradial approach for coronary angiography and angioplasty (TRA), is subjective. A quantitative measure of RAS will help in evaluation and comparison of management strategies. The objectives of the study were to assess the feasibility and safety of using an automatic pullback device (APD) for removal of transradial introducer sheaths and to establish a parameter to quantify RAS. In 50 consecutive transradial procedures, the APD was used to measure the force required for sheath removal. The mean maximal pullback force (MPF) was 0.53 +/- 0.52 kg (range, 0.1-3.0 kg). In 48 (96%) cases, the MPF was reached within the first 5 sec of pullback. All patients with clinical RAS (n = 4) had an MPF greater than 1.0 kg, while the remaining had an MPF less than 1.0 kg. All patients with severe pain during sheath removal (n = 3) had an MPF greater than 1.0 kg, while no patient with an MPF less than 1.0 kg had severe pain. It is feasible and safe to remove transradial introducer sheaths using the APD. The MPF is achieved within the first 5 sec of pullback and is a reliable parameter to quantify RAS. An MPF more than 1.0 kg correlates with clinical RAS and is associated with severe pain during sheath removal.

  1. Radial growth of zinc oxide nanowire for piezoelectric nanogenerator application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasouli, Safa

    2017-04-01

    Nano- and micro-self-biased sensors employed environmental harvested energy, which are provided by different methods, such as piezoelectric. Piezoelectric materials are capable of producing electrical energy from environmental mechanical force. In this paper, a radial layer of well-arrayed hexagonal zinc oxide nanowires is grown on carbon fiber substrate using a two-step Chemical deposition method of metal salt growth. The resulted morphology is examined using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) micrographs and X-ray Diffraction (XRD) pattern which indicates the quality and the crystallization order of the samples. In addition, composition of the material is studied using a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy method. The results show that zinc oxide nanowires are well managed in vertical direction on the cylindrical carbon fibers. The hexagonal nanowires are grown with a length from 206 to 286 nm (Nanometer) and the diameter from 75 to 103 nm. The results of FTIR spectroscopy and XRD also illustrate the wurtzite structure of zinc oxide. The synthesized nanowires are then applied in a flexible capacitive piezoelectric nanogenerator consisting of a thin Ag layer as the upper contact and a carbon substrate as the back contact which are separated by a PMMA dielectric film. The output current and voltage are measured by applying a random pulse mechanical force on the upper contact. A maximum voltage and current of 14 mV (millivolt) and 20 nA (nanoampere) are generated at the output of nanogenerator, respectively.

  2. Approximate theory for radial filtration/consolidation

    SciTech Connect

    Tiller, F.M.; Kirby, J.M.; Nguyen, H.L.

    1996-10-01

    Approximate solutions are developed for filtration and subsequent consolidation of compactible cakes on a cylindrical filter element. Darcy`s flow equation is coupled with equations for equilibrium stress under the conditions of plane strain and axial symmetry for radial flow inwards. The solutions are based on power function forms involving the relationships of the solidosity {epsilon}{sub s} (volume fraction of solids) and the permeability K to the solids effective stress p{sub s}. The solutions allow determination of the various parameters in the power functions and the ratio k{sub 0} of the lateral to radial effective stress (earth stress ratio). Measurements were made of liquid and effective pressures, flow rates, and cake thickness versus time. Experimental data are presented for a series of tests in a radial filtration cell with a central filter element. Slurries prepared from two materials (Microwate, which is mainly SrSO{sub 4}, and kaolin) were used in the experiments. Transient deposition of filter cakes was followed by static (i.e., no flow) conditions in the cake. The no-flow condition was accomplished by introducing bentonite which produced a nearly impermeable layer with negligible flow. Measurement of the pressure at the cake surface and the transmitted pressure on the central element permitted calculation of k{sub 0}.

  3. Development of a Radial Deconsolidation Method

    SciTech Connect

    Helmreich, Grant W.; Montgomery, Fred C.; Hunn, John D.

    2015-12-01

    A series of experiments have been initiated to determine the retention or mobility of fission products* in AGR fuel compacts [Petti, et al. 2010]. This information is needed to refine fission product transport models. The AGR-3/4 irradiation test involved half-inch-long compacts that each contained twenty designed-to-fail (DTF) particles, with 20-μm thick carbon-coated kernels whose coatings were deliberately fabricated such that they would crack under irradiation, providing a known source of post-irradiation isotopes. The DTF particles in these compacts were axially distributed along the compact centerline so that the diffusion of fission products released from the DTF kernels would be radially symmetric [Hunn, et al. 2012; Hunn et al. 2011; Kercher, et al. 2011; Hunn, et al. 2007]. Compacts containing DTF particles were irradiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) [Collin, 2015]. Analysis of the diffusion of these various post-irradiation isotopes through the compact requires a method to radially deconsolidate the compacts so that nested-annular volumes may be analyzed for post-irradiation isotope inventory in the compact matrix, TRISO outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC), and DTF kernels. An effective radial deconsolidation method and apparatus appropriate to this application has been developed and parametrically characterized.

  4. Atomistic insight into orthoborate-based ionic liquids: force field development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong-Lei; Shah, Faiz Ullah; Glavatskih, Sergei; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2014-07-24

    We have developed an all-atomistic force field for a new class of halogen-free chelated orthoborate-phosphonium ionic liquids. The force field is based on an AMBER framework with determination of force field parameters for phosphorus and boron atoms, as well as refinement of several available parameters. The bond and angle force constants were adjusted to fit vibration frequency data derived from both experimental measurements and ab initio calculations. The force field parameters for several dihedral angles were obtained by fitting torsion energy profiles deduced from ab initio calculations. To validate the proposed force field parameters, atomistic simulations were performed for 12 ionic liquids consisting of tetraalkylphosphonium cations and chelated orthoborate anions. The predicted densities for neat ionic liquids and the [P6,6,6,14][BOB] sample, with a water content of approximately 2.3-2.5 wt %, are in excellent agreement with available experimental data. The potential energy components of 12 ionic liquids were discussed in detail. The radial distribution functions and spatial distribution functions were analyzed and visualized to probe the microscopic ionic structures of these ionic liquids. There are mainly four high-probability regions of chelated orthoborate anions distributed around tetraalkylphosphonium cations in the first solvation shell, and such probability distribution functions are strongly influenced by the size of anions.

  5. Experimental investigation of the stability of a moving radial liquid sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramati, Manjula; Tirumkudulu, Mahesh

    2013-11-01

    Experiments were conducted to understand the stability of moving radial liquid sheets formed by the head-on impingement of two co-linear water jets using laser induced fluorescence technique (LIF). Acoustic sinusoidal fluctuations were introduced at the jet impingement point and we measured the displacement of the center line of the liquid sheet (sinuous mode) and the thickness variation (varicose mode) of the disturbed liquid sheet. Our experiments show that the sinuous disturbances grow as they are convected outward in the radial direction even in the smooth regime (We < 800). In the absence of the acoustic forcing, the measured thickness has the expected 1/r dependence. Interestingly, we were unable to detect any thickness variation about the pre-stimulus values in the presence of acoustic forcing suggesting that the variation in the thickness is lower than the resolution of the technique (+/- 1 μm). The growth rates of the sinuous mode determined from the wave envelope matches with the prediction of a recent theory by Tirumkudulu and Paramati (Communicated to Phys. Of Fluids, 2013) which accounts for the inertia of the liquid phase and the surface tension force in a radial liquid sheet while neglecting the inertial effects due to the surrounding gas phase. The authors acknowledge the financial assistance from Indo-French Center for Pro- motion of Advanced Research and also Indian institute of technology Bombay.

  6. Radial Variations in the Io Plasma Torus during the Cassini Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delamere, P. A.; Bagenal, F.; Steffl, A.

    2005-01-01

    A radial scan through the midnight sector of the Io plasma torus was made by the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph on 14 January 2001, shortly after closest approach to Jupiter. From these data, Steffl et al. (2004a) derived electron temperature, plasma composition (ion mixing ratios), and electron column density as a function of radius from L = 6 to 0 as well as the total luminosity. We have advanced our homogeneous model of torus physical chemistry (Delamere and Bagenal, 2003) to include latitudinal and radial variations in a manner similar to the two-dimensional model by Schreier et al. (1998). The model variables include: (1) neutral source rate, (2) radial transport coefficient, (3) the hot electron fraction, (4) hot electron temperature, and (5) the neutral O/S ratio. The radial variation of parameters 1-4 are described by simple power laws, making a total of nine parameters. We have explored the sensitivity of the model results to variations in these parameters and compared the best fit with previous Voyager era models (schreier et al., 1998), galileo data (Crary et al., 1998), and Cassini observations (steffl et al., 2004a). We find that radial variations during the Cassini era are consistent with a neutral source rate of 700-1200 kg/s, an integrated transport time from L = 6 to 9 of 100-200 days, and that the core electron temperature is largely determined by a spatially and temporally varying superthermal electron population.

  7. Varying deformation patterns in central Tibet revealed by radial anisotropy tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Heng; Zhao, Dapeng; Yu, Chunquan; Zhao, Junmeng

    2016-05-01

    P wave radial anisotropy tomography of the upper mantle beneath the central Tibetan plateau is derived using a large number of traveltime data of teleseismic events. Our results show a prominent high-velocity (high-V) zone which is separated by a low-velocity (low-V) anomaly beneath the Himalayan block, extending to ~33°N, and a low-V zone down to ~300 km depth beneath the northern Qiangtang block. The upper mantle beneath northern Qiangtang exhibits a significant positive radial anisotropy (i.e., horizontal Vp > vertical Vp), implying lateral material flow rather than material upwelling in the upper mantle. In the central part of the study region, a prominent high-V zone exists at depths of 150 to 300 km and exhibits a negative radial anisotropy (i.e., horizontal Vp < vertical Vp), reflecting the subducting Indian lithospheric mantle. Variations of shear wave splitting in this region revealed by previous studies may be attributed to the low-V layer above the Indian lithospheric mantle. A high-V zone with a positive radial anisotropy is located beneath the southern Lhasa block, which is interpreted to be the northward underthrusting Indian lithospheric mantle. Multilayer radial anisotropy is detected beneath southern Tibet, which may reflect a complex deformation pattern there.

  8. Rotordynamic forces on centrifugal pump impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, R.; Arndt, N.; Caughey, T. K.; Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.

    1987-01-01

    The asymmetric flow around an impeller in a volute exerts a force upon the impeller. To study the rotordynamic force on an impeller which is vibrating around its machine axis of rotation, the impeller, mounted on a dynamometer, is made to whirl in a circular orbit within the volute. The measured force is expressed as the sum of a steady radial force and an unsteady force due to the eccentric motion of the impeller. These forces were measured in separate tests on a centrifugal pump with radically increased shroud clearance, a two-dimensional impeller, and an impeller with an inducer, the impeller of the HPOTP (High Pressure Oxygen Turbopump) of the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine). In each case, a destabilizing force was observed over a region of positive whirl.

  9. Effects of Toroidal Forces in Current Loops Embedded in a Background Plasma.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-29

    loop in stable MHD equilibrium described by c’V x B - Vp = 0 where the major radial forces as well as the minor e radial forces arc explicitly...dimensional semi-toroidal equilibria previously identified. ’’It is found that somec equilibrium loops are u~nstable jo such perturbations. resulting in...pressure gradient and drag force due to the ambient gas. For the equilibrium loops studied, the motion is found to be subsonic. Time evolution of the

  10. Radial transport processes as a precursor to particle deposition in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    van Thienen, P; Vreeburg, J H G; Blokker, E J M

    2011-02-01

    Various particle transport mechanisms play a role in the build-up of discoloration potential in drinking water distribution networks. In order to enhance our understanding of and ability to predict this build-up, it is essential to recognize and understand their role. Gravitational settling with drag has primarily been considered in this context. However, since flow in water distribution pipes is nearly always in the turbulent regime, turbulent processes should be considered also. In addition to these, single particle effects and forces may affect radial particle transport. In this work, we present an application of a previously published turbulent particle deposition theory to conditions relevant for drinking water distribution systems. We predict quantitatively under which conditions turbophoresis, including the virtual mass effect, the Saffman lift force, and the Magnus force may contribute significantly to sediment transport in radial direction and compare these results to experimental observations. The contribution of turbophoresis is mostly limited to large particles (>50 μm) in transport mains, and not expected to play a major role in distribution mains. The Saffman lift force may enhance this process to some degree. The Magnus force is not expected to play any significant role in drinking water distribution systems.

  11. Intraoperative in situ radial artery conduit flow assessment.

    PubMed

    Canver, Charles C; Yousafzai, Sajjad M

    2008-01-01

    A technique is described for simple flow assessment of the in situ radial artery conduit during coronary bypass via a small incision. This technique allows morphologic and physiologic direct intraoperative assessment of radial artery quality and expands the use of radial artery during coronary artery surgery.

  12. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  13. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  14. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  15. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  16. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  17. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  18. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  19. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  20. 14 CFR 71.7 - Bearings, radials, and mileages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bearings, radials, and mileages. 71.7 Section 71.7 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... REPORTING POINTS § 71.7 Bearings, radials, and mileages. All bearings and radials in this part are true...

  1. 14 CFR 73.5 - Bearings; radials; miles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bearings; radials; miles. 73.5 Section 73.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE General § 73.5 Bearings; radials; miles. (a) All bearings and radials in this...

  2. Magnetically suspended rotary blood pump with radial type combined motor-bearing.

    PubMed

    Masuzawa, T; Kita, T; Matsuda, K; Okada, Y

    2000-06-01

    A magnetically suspended centrifugal blood pump is being developed with a combined motor-bearing for long-term ventricular assist systems. The combined motor-bearing actively suspends a rotor in a radial direction to deal with radial force unbalance in the pump and rotates the rotor by using the electric magnetic field. Therefore, the pump has no mechanical parts such as bearings of the motor and has a long lifetime. The developed pump consists of a thin rotor with a semi open-type 6 vane impeller and a stator to suspend and rotate the rotor. The rotor has 4-pole permanent magnets on the circumferential surface. The outer diameter and the thickness of the rotor are 60 mm and 8 mm, respectively. Axial movement and tilt of the rotor are restricted by passive stability based on the thin rotor structure. Radial movements of the rotor, such as levitation in radial direction and rotation, are controlled actively by using electric magnets of the stator. The electric magnet coils to produce levitation and rotation forces are constructed on the periphery stator. The p +/- 2-pole algorithm and the synchronous motor mechanism are adopted to levitate and rotate the rotor. The radial gap between the rotor and the stator is 1 mm. A closed-loop circuit filled with water was connected to the developed pump to examine the basic performance of the pump and the magnetic suspension system. Maximum rotational speed, flow rate, and head were 2,800 rpm, 11 L/min, and 270 mm Hg, respectively. The rotor with the impeller could be suspended completely during the entire pumping process. We conclude the pump with the combined motor-bearing has sufficient performance for the blood pump.

  3. Experimental feasibility study of radial injection cooling of three-pad radial air foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Suman K.

    Air foil bearings use ambient air as a lubricant allowing environment-friendly operation. When they are designed, installed, and operated properly, air foil bearings are very cost effective and reliable solution to oil-free turbomachinery. Because air is used as a lubricant, there are no mechanical contacts between the rotor and bearings and when the rotor is lifted off the bearing, near frictionless quiet operation is possible. However, due to the high speed operation, thermal management is one of the very important design factors to consider. Most widely accepted practice of the cooling method is axial cooling, which uses cooling air passing through heat exchange channels formed underneath the bearing pad. Advantage is no hardware modification to implement the axial cooling because elastic foundation structure of foil bearing serves as a heat exchange channels. Disadvantage is axial temperature gradient on the journal shaft and bearing. This work presents the experimental feasibility study of alternative cooling method using radial injection of cooling air directly on the rotor shaft. The injection speeds, number of nozzles, location of nozzles, total air flow rate are important factors determining the effectiveness of the radial injection cooling method. Effectiveness of the radial injection cooling was compared with traditional axial cooling method. A previously constructed test rig was modified to accommodate a new motor with higher torque and radial injection cooling. The radial injection cooling utilizes the direct air injection to the inlet region of air film from three locations at 120° from one another with each location having three axially separated holes. In axial cooling, a certain axial pressure gradient is applied across the bearing to induce axial cooling air through bump foil channels. For the comparison of the two methods, the same amount of cooling air flow rate was used for both axial cooling and radial injection. Cooling air flow rate was

  4. Radial energy transport by magnetospheric ULF waves: Effects of magnetic curvature and plasma pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouznetsov, Igor; Lotko, William

    1995-01-01

    The 'radial' transport of energy by internal ULF waves, stimulated by dayside magnetospheric boundary oscillations, is analyzed in the framework of one-fluid magnetohydrodynamics. (the term radial is used here to denote the direction orthogonal to geomagnetic flux surfaces.) The model for the inhomogeneous magnetospheric plasma and background magnetic field is axisymmetric and includes radial and parallel variations in the magnetic field, magnetic curvature, plasma density, and low but finite plasma pressure. The radial mode structure of the coupled fast and intermediate MHD waves is determined by numerical solution of the inhomogeneous wave equation; the parallel mode structure is characterized by a Wentzel-Kramer-Brillouin (WKB) approximation. Ionospheric dissipation is modeled by allowing the parallel wave number to be complex. For boudnary oscillations with frequencies in the range from 10 to 48 mHz, and using a dipole model for the background magnetic field, the combined effects of magnetic curvature and finite plasma pressure are shown to (1) enhance the amplitude of field line resonances by as much as a factor of 2 relative to values obtained in a cold plasma or box-model approximation for the dayside magnetosphere; (2) increase the energy flux delivered to a given resonance by a factor of 2-4; and (3) broaden the spectral width of the resonance by a factor of 2-3. The effects are attributed to the existence of an 'Alfven buoyancy oscillation,' which approaches the usual shear mode Alfven wave at resonance, but unlike the shear Alfven mode, it is dispersive at short perpendicular wavelengths. The form of dispersion is analogous to that of an internal atmospheric gravity wave, with the magnetic tension of the curved background field providing the restoring force and allowing radial propagation of the mode. For nominal dayside parameters, the propagation band of the Alfven buoyancy wave occurs between the location of its (field line) resonance and that of the

  5. Force cycles and force chains.

    PubMed

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Walker, David M; Lin, Qun

    2010-01-01

    We examine the coevolution of N cycles and force chains as part of a broader study which is designed to quantitatively characterize the role of the laterally supporting contact network to the evolution of force chains. Here, we elucidate the rheological function of these coexisting structures, especially in the lead up to failure. In analogy to force chains, we introduce the concept of force cycles: N cycles whose contacts each bear above average force. We examine their evolution around force chains in a discrete element simulation of a dense granular material under quasistatic biaxial loading. Three-force cycles are shown to be stabilizing structures that inhibit relative particle rotations and provide strong lateral support to force chains. These exhibit distinct behavior from other cycles. Their population decreases rapidly during the initial stages of the strain-hardening regime-a trend that is suddenly interrupted and reversed upon commencement of force chain buckling prior to peak shear stress. Results suggest that the three-force cycles are called upon for reinforcements to ward off failure via shear banding. Ultimately though, the resistance to buckling proves futile; buckling wins under the combined effects of dilatation and increasing compressive load. The sudden increase in three-force cycles may thus be viewed as an indicator of imminent failure via shear bands.

  6. Forced cocurrent smoldering combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Dosanjh, S.S.; Pagni, P.J.; Fernandez-Pello, A.C.

    1987-05-01

    An analytic model of the propagation of smoldering combustion through a very porous solid fuel is presented. Here smoldering is initiated at the top of a long, radially insulated, uniform fuel cylinder, so that the smolder wave propagates downward, opposing an upward forced flow of oxidizer. Because the solid fuel and the gaseous oxidizer enter the reaction zone from the same direction, this configuration is referred to as cocurrent (or premixed-flame-like). It is assumed that the propagation of the smolder wave is one-dimensional and steady in a frame of reference moving with the wave. Buoyancy is included and shown to be negligible in the proposed application of a smoldering combustion experiment for use on the Space Shuttle. Radiation heat transfer is incorporated using the diffusion approximation and smoldering combustion is modeled by a finite rate, one-step reaction mechanism.

  7. Inducer Hydrodynamic Forces in a Cavitating Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelley, Stephen E.

    2004-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has developed and demonstrated a measurement device for sensing and resolving the hydrodynamic loads on fluid machinery. The device - a derivative of the six-component wind tunnel balance - senses the forces and moments on the rotating device through a weakened shaft section instrumented with a series of strain gauges. This rotating balance was designed to directly measure the steady and unsteady hydrodynamic loads on an inducer, thereby defining the amplitude and frequency content associated with operating in various cavitation modes. The rotating balance was calibrated statically using a dead-weight load system in order to generate the 6 x 12 calibration matrix later used to convert measured voltages to engineering units. Structural modeling suggested that the rotating assembly first bending mode would be significantly reduced with the balance s inclusion. This reduction in structural stiffness was later confirmed experimentally with a hammer-impact test. This effect, coupled with the relatively large damping associated with the rotating balance waterproofing material, limited the device s bandwidth to approximately 50 Hertz Other pre-test validations included sensing the test article rotating assembly built-in imbalance for two configurations and directly measuring the assembly mass and buoyancy while submerged under water. Both tests matched predictions and confirmed the device s sensitivity while stationary and rotating. The rotating balance was then demonstrated in a water test of a full-scale Space Shuttle Main Engine high-pressure liquid oxygen pump inducer. Experimental data was collected a scaled operating conditions at three flow coefficients across a range of cavitation numbers for the single inducer geometry and radial clearance. Two distinct cavitation modes were observed symmetric tip vortex cavitation and alternate-blade cavitation. Although previous experimental tests on the same inducer demonstrated two additional

  8. Dissipative Forces and Quantum Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eck, John S.; Thompson, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    Shows how to include the dissipative forces of classical mechanics in quantum mechanics by the use of non-Hermetian Hamiltonians. The Ehrenfest theorem for such Hamiltonians is derived, and simple examples which show the classical correspondences are given. (MLH)

  9. New technique for treatment of postcatheterization radial artery pseudoaneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Pancholy, Samir B.; Kartashov, Dmitriy S.

    2016-01-01

    We report a new technique for treatment of radial artery pseudoaneurysm (RAP) caused by transradial access (TRA) for coronary angiography. Traditional extrinsic compression with radial flow cessation leads to a local milieu likely associated with an increase in probability of radial artery occlusion (RAO). Our technique involves obtaining ipsilateral radial artery access distal to the neck of the RAP followed by a prolonged sheath dwell time covering the neck of the RAP which allows the RAP sac to thrombose and maintains radial artery lumen patency. © 2016 The Authors. Catheterization and Cardiovascular Interventions Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27527608

  10. Hydrophilic coating aids radial sheath withdrawal and reduces patient discomfort following transradial coronary intervention: a randomized double-blind comparison of coated and uncoated sheaths.

    PubMed

    Kiemeneij, Ferdinand; Fraser, Douglas; Slagboom, Ton; Laarman, GertJan; van der Wieken, Ron

    2003-06-01

    Radial artery spasm may cause severe discomfort during radial artery sheath removal. A hydrophilic-coated sheath may reduce the force required to remove a radial sheath. This force may be quantified using an automatic pullback device (APD). The objective of this study was to assess if a hydrophilic coating reduces the required force and discomfort associated with removal of a radial sheath following transradial coronary intervention. Ninety patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention via the radial artery were randomly assigned to two groups receiving either coated or uncoated introducer sheaths. Radifocus Introducer II (Terumo) 25 cm, 6 Fr radial sheaths and sheaths that were identical apart from the presence of the coating were used in all patients. The APD was used for sheath removal at the end of the procedure. Three patients (7%) in the coated group experienced discomfort during automatic sheath removal, compared to 12 patients (27%) in the uncoated group (P = 0.02). The maximum pullback force (MPF) was significantly lower in the coated compared to the uncoated group (0.24 +/- 0.31 vs. 0.44 +/- 0.33 kg; P = 0.003). Similarly, the mean pullback force was significantly lower in the coated group (0.14 +/- 0.23 vs. 0.32 +/- 0.24 kg; P < 0.001). Only one patient (2%) in each group had an MPF greater than 1.0 kg together with clinical evidence of radial artery spasm. Removal of the coated Terumo Radifocus sheath requires less force than an identical uncoated sheath. The coated sheath was also associated with less discomfort for the patient.

  11. RADIALLY MAGNETIZED PROTOPLANETARY DISK: VERTICAL PROFILE

    SciTech Connect

    Russo, Matthew; Thompson, Christopher

    2015-11-10

    This paper studies the response of a thin accretion disk to an external radial magnetic field. Our focus is on protoplanetary disks (PPDs), which are exposed during their later evolution to an intense, magnetized wind from the central star. A radial magnetic field is mixed into a thin surface layer, wound up by the disk shear, and pushed downward by a combination of turbulent mixing and ambipolar and ohmic drift. The toroidal field reaches much greater strengths than the seed vertical field that is usually invoked in PPD models, even becoming superthermal. Linear stability analysis indicates that the disk experiences the magnetorotational instability (MRI) at a higher magnetization than a vertically magnetized disk when both the effects of ambipolar and Hall drift are taken into account. Steady vertical profiles of density and magnetic field are obtained at several radii between 0.06 and 1 AU in response to a wind magnetic field B{sub r} ∼ (10{sup −4}–10{sup −2})(r/ AU){sup −2} G. Careful attention is given to the radial and vertical ionization structure resulting from irradiation by stellar X-rays. The disk is more strongly magnetized closer to the star, where it can support a higher rate of mass transfer. As a result, the inner ∼1 AU of a PPD is found to evolve toward lower surface density. Mass transfer rates around 10{sup −8} M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1} are obtained under conservative assumptions about the MRI-generated stress. The evolution of the disk and the implications for planet migration are investigated in the accompanying paper.

  12. Radial velocity measurements in the F corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beavers, W. I.; Eitter, J. J.; Carr, P. H.; Cook, B. C.

    1980-05-01

    A photoelectric radial velocity spectrometer was employed at the February 26, 1979 total solar eclipse in an attempt to detect motion in the F corona. Multiple dip features were recorded in scans made at points 3.2 and 4.3 solar radii west of the sun. By employing simple dynamic models these observations may be interpreted as evidence of the following two separate components of dust in the inner regions of the solar system: dust moving in prograde orbits outside the region beginning at about four solar radii from the sun, and dust falling into the sun with velocities from about 50 to 250 km/s.

  13. Self-stabilizing radial face seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A self-stabilizing radial face seal comprises an axial member and a primary seal ring juxtapositioned to a seal seat. At least one primary seal ring and seal seat unit is affixed to the axial member so as to rotate with it. The primary seal ring has a front face which opposes a face of the seal seat. The seal has both high-pressure and low-pressure regions of fluid, and seal seat is provided with a porous ring-like circumferential structure in the face of the seal seat opposite the front face of the primary seal ring.

  14. Bilateral high radial nerve compressions: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chuangsuwanich, A; Muangsombut, S; Sangruchi, T

    2000-06-01

    A 40-year-old woman with bilateral high radial nerve compressions by non-traumatic cause was reported. It occurred first at the right radial nerve which was explored after a period of investigation and conservative treatment. Two constricted sites 2.0 cm apart of the right radial nerve crossed by branches of the radial collateral artery beneath the lateral head of the triceps were found. The constricted sites including tissue in between was resected and replaced with a sural nerve graft. One year later the patient had the same episode on the left side. The operative finding was the same as the previous one. Sural nerve graft was performed after neurolysis had failed. The patient's normal radial nerve function returned in one year. This is the first reported case in the literature of bilateral high radial nerve compressions by branches of the radial collateral artery.

  15. Radial Anisotropy beneath the Main Ethiopian Rift and Afar Depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardo, N. J.; Gaherty, J. B.; Jin, G.; Shillington, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) and Afar uniquely capture the final stages of transition from continental rifting in the broader East African Rift System to incipient seafloor spreading above a mantle hotspot. Studies of the region increasingly point to magmatism as a controlling factor on continental extension. However, the character and depth extent of these melt products remain contentious. Radial anisotropy derived from surface waves provides a unique diagnostic constraint on the presence of oriented melt pockets versus broader oriented anisotropic fabrics. This study investigates the thermal and radially anisotropic structure beneath the broader MER and Afar to resolve the magmatic character of the region and ultimately to understand the role of magmatism in present day rift development. We utilize 104 stations from 4 collocated arrays in the MER/Afar region to constrain radial anisotropy within the upper mantle via the inversion of Love- and Rayleigh-wave observations between 25 and 100 s period. We employ a multi-channel cross-correlation algorithm to obtain inter-station phase and amplitude information. The multi-channel phase observations are inverted for dynamic phase velocity across the array, which are then corrected for focusing and multipathing using the amplitude observations via Helmholtz tomography. We jointly invert Love- and Rayleigh-wave structural phase velocity measurements employing crustal constraints from co-located active source experiments to obtain estimates of Vsv and Vsh between 50 - 170 km depth. Preliminary results readily reveal the distinct shear velocity structure beneath the MER and Afar. Within the MER, shear velocity structure suggests pronounced low velocities accompanied by strong anisotropy between 80 - 140 km depth beneath the western Ethiopian plateau and rift valley. Within Afar, shear velocity structure is more varied with the slowest velocities found at shallow depths (less than 70 km depth), accompanied by weak

  16. Dropwise Condensation on a Radial Gradient Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macner, Ashley; Daniel, Susan; Steen, Paul

    2013-11-01

    In transient dropwise condensation from steam onto a cool surface, distributions of drops evolve by nucleation, growth, and coalescence. This study examines how surface functionalization affects drop growth and coalescence. Surfaces are treated by silanization to deliver either a spatially uniform contact-angle (hydrophilic, neutral, and hydrophobic) or a radial gradient of contact-angles. The time evolution of number-density and associated drop-size distributions are reported. For a typical condensation experiment on a uniform angle surface, the number-density curves show two regimes: an initial increase in number-density as a result of nucleation and a subsequent decrease in number-density as a result of larger scale coalescence events. Without a removal mechanism, the fractional coverage, regardless of treatment, approaches unity. For the same angle-surface, the associated drop-size distributions progress through four different shapes along the growth curve. In contrast, for a radial gradient surface where removal by sweeping occurs, the number-density increases and then levels off to a value close to the maximum number-density that is well below unity coverage and only two shapes of distributions are observed. Implications for heat transfer will be discussed. This work was supported by a NASA Office of the Chief Technologist's Space Technology Research Fellowship.

  17. Radial reactor for trichloroethylene steam reforming

    SciTech Connect

    Moates, F.C.; McMinn, T.E.; Richardson, J.T.

    1999-11-01

    A ceramic foam radial reactor was used to convert trichloroethylene by steam reforming, using 0.5 wt. % Pt as a catalyst. With a quartz enclosure heated externally by infrared lamps, the inlet temperature to the catalyst bed was low enough to suppress pyrolysis, but high conversions (0.99999 +) were achieved at the exit. Stable operation up to 600 h with a space velocity of 5.6 x 10{sup 4}h{sup {minus}1} was achieved, but reactant break-through then occurred, and the catalyst quickly deactivated. Although the deactivated catalyst was regenerated with carbon burning, activity decline was more rapid due to platinum sintering and washcoat degradation. Measured temperature profiles and model calculations indicated a large gradient in the bed and suggested that stable operation could be extended at lower space velocities. Axial temperature profiles were not uniform, since preferential flow occurred in the middle and lower regions of the radial bed. Potential improvements for future designs are suggested.

  18. A radial transmission line material measurement apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, L.K.; Moyer, R.D.; Koontz, T.E.; Morris, M.E.

    1993-05-01

    A radial transmission line material measurement sample apparatus (sample holder, offset short standards, measurement software, and instrumentation) is described which has been proposed, analyzed, designed, constructed, and tested. The purpose of the apparatus is to obtain accurate surface impedance measurements of lossy, possibly anisotropic, samples at low and intermediate frequencies (vhf and low uhf). The samples typically take the form of sections of the material coatings on conducting objects. Such measurements thus provide the key input data for predictive numerical scattering codes. Prediction of the sample surface impedance from the coaxial input impedance measurement is carried out by two techniques. The first is an analytical model for the coaxial-to-radial transmission line junction. The second is an empirical determination of the bilinear transformation model of the junction by the measurement of three full standards. The standards take the form of three offset shorts (and an additional lossy Salisbury load), which have also been constructed. The accuracy achievable with the device appears to be near one percent.

  19. Combining Transit and Radial Velocity Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Leslie A.

    2016-10-01

    The Kepler Mission, combined with ground based radial velocity (RV) follow-up, has revolutionized the observational constraints on sub-Neptune-size planet compositions. Kepler's unprecedentedly large and homogeneous samples of planets with both mass and radius constraints open the possibility of statistical studies of the underlying planet composition distribution. This presentation describes the application of hierarchical Bayesian models to constrain the underlying planet composition distribution from a sample of noisy mass-radius measurements. This approach represents a promising avenue toward a quantitative measurement of the amount of physical scatter in small planet compositions, the identification of planet sub-populations that may be tied to distinct formation pathways, and empirical constraints on the dominant compositional trends in the planet sample. Both the transit and radial velocity techniques are subject to selection effects, and approaches to mitigate the resulting biases will be addressed. In addition to distilling composition-distribution insights from the current sample of Kepler planets with RV masses, this framework may be used to optimize the target selection for future transiting planet RV follow-up surveys.

  20. Radial Velocity Eclipse Mapping of Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolov, Nikolay; Sainsbury-Martinez, Felix

    2015-07-01

    Planetary rotation rates and obliquities provide information regarding the history of planet formation, but have not yet been measured for evolved extrasolar planets. Here we investigate the theoretical and observational perspective of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect during secondary eclipse (RMse) ingress and egress for transiting exoplanets. Near secondary eclipse, when the planet passes behind the parent star, the star sequentially obscures light from the approaching and receding parts of the rotating planetary surface. The temporal block of light emerging from the approaching (blueshifted) or receding (redshifted) parts of the planet causes a temporal distortion in the planet’s spectral line profiles resulting in an anomaly in the planet’s radial velocity curve. We demonstrate that the shape and the ratio of the ingress-to-egress radial velocity amplitudes depends on the planetary rotational rate, axial tilt, and impact factor (i.e., sky-projected planet spin-orbital alignment). In addition, line asymmetries originating from different layers in the atmosphere of the planet could provide information regarding zonal atmospheric winds and constraints on the hot spot shape for giant irradiated exoplanets. The effect is expected to be most-pronounced at near-infrared wavelengths, where the planet-to-star contrasts are large. We create synthetic near-infrared, high-dispersion spectroscopic data and demonstrate how the sky-projected spin axis orientation and equatorial velocity of the planet can be estimated. We conclude that the RMse effect could be a powerful method to measure exoplanet spins.

  1. Radial Infall onto a Massive Molecular Filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battersby, Cara; Myers, Philip C.; Shirley, Yancy L.; Keto, Eric; Kirk, Helen

    The newly discovered Massive Molecular Filament (MMF) G32.02+0.05 (~ 70 pc long, 105 M⊙) has been shaped and compressed by older generations of massive stars. The similarity of this filament in physical structure (density profile, temperature) to much smaller star-forming filaments, suggests that the mechanism to form such filaments may be a universal process. The densest portion of the filament, apparent as an Infrared Dark Cloud (IRDC) shows a range of massive star formation signatures throughout. We investigate the kinematics in this filament and find widespread inverse P cygni asymmetric line profiles. These line asymmetries are interpreted as a signature of large-scale radial collapse. Using line asymmetries observed with optically thick HCO+ (1-0) and optically thin H13CO+ (1-0) across a range of massive star forming regions in the filament, we estimate the global radial infall rate of the filament to range from a few 100 to a few 1000 M⊙ Myr-1 pc-1. At its current infall rate the densest portions of the cloud will more than double their current mass within a Myr.

  2. Radial stability of anisotropic strange quark stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbañil, José D. V.; Malheiro, M.

    2016-11-01

    The influence of the anisotropy in the equilibrium and stability of strange stars is investigated through the numerical solution of the hydrostatic equilibrium equation and the radial oscillation equation, both modified from their original version to include this effect. The strange matter inside the quark stars is described by the MIT bag model equation of state. For the anisotropy two different kinds of local anisotropic σ = pt-pr are considered, where pt and pr are respectively the tangential and the radial pressure: one that is null at the star's surface defined by pr(R) = 0, and one that is nonnull at the surface, namely, σs = 0 and σs ≠ 0. In the case σs = 0, the maximum mass value and the zero frequency of oscillation are found at the same central energy density, indicating that the maximum mass marks the onset of the instability. For the case σs ≠ 0, we show that the maximum mass point and the zero frequency of oscillation coincide in the same central energy density value only in a sequence of equilibrium configurations with the same value of σs. Thus, the stability star regions are determined always by the condition dM/dρc > 0 only when the tangential pressure is maintained fixed at the star surface's pt(R). These results are also quite important to analyze the stability of other anisotropic compact objects such as neutron stars, boson stars and gravastars.

  3. RADIAL VELOCITY ECLIPSE MAPPING OF EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolov, Nikolay; Sainsbury-Martinez, Felix

    2015-07-20

    Planetary rotation rates and obliquities provide information regarding the history of planet formation, but have not yet been measured for evolved extrasolar planets. Here we investigate the theoretical and observational perspective of the Rossiter–McLaughlin effect during secondary eclipse (RMse) ingress and egress for transiting exoplanets. Near secondary eclipse, when the planet passes behind the parent star, the star sequentially obscures light from the approaching and receding parts of the rotating planetary surface. The temporal block of light emerging from the approaching (blueshifted) or receding (redshifted) parts of the planet causes a temporal distortion in the planet’s spectral line profiles resulting in an anomaly in the planet’s radial velocity curve. We demonstrate that the shape and the ratio of the ingress-to-egress radial velocity amplitudes depends on the planetary rotational rate, axial tilt, and impact factor (i.e., sky-projected planet spin–orbital alignment). In addition, line asymmetries originating from different layers in the atmosphere of the planet could provide information regarding zonal atmospheric winds and constraints on the hot spot shape for giant irradiated exoplanets. The effect is expected to be most-pronounced at near-infrared wavelengths, where the planet-to-star contrasts are large. We create synthetic near-infrared, high-dispersion spectroscopic data and demonstrate how the sky-projected spin axis orientation and equatorial velocity of the planet can be estimated. We conclude that the RMse effect could be a powerful method to measure exoplanet spins.

  4. Labor Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The labor force is the number of people aged 16 or older who are either working or looking for work. It does not include active-duty military personnel or institutionalized people, such as prison inmates. Quantifying this total supply of labor is a way of determining how big the economy can get. Labor force participation rates vary significantly…

  5. New systemic radial velocities of suspected RR Lyrae binary stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guggenberger, E.; Barnes, T. G.; Kolenberg, K.

    2016-05-01

    Among the tens of thousands of known RR Lyrae stars there are only a handful that show indications of possible binarity. The question why this is the case is still unsolved, and has recently sparked several studies dedicated to the search for additional RR Lyraes in binary systems. Such systems are particularly valuable because they might allow to constrain the stellar mass. Most of the recent studies, however, are based on photometry by finding a light time effect in the timings of maximum light. This approach is a very promising and successful one, but it has a major drawback: by itself, it cannot serve as a definite proof of binarity, because other phenomena such as the Blazhko effect or intrinsic period changes could lead to similar results. Spectroscopic radial velocity measurements, on the other hand, can serve as definite proof of binarity. We have therefore started a project to study spectroscopically RR Lyrae stars that are suspected to be binaries. We have obtained radial velocity (RV) curves with the 2.1m telescope at McDonald observatory. From these we derive systemic RVs which we will compare to previous measurements in order to find changes induced by orbital motions. We also construct templates of the RV curves that can facilitate future studies. We also observed the most promising RR Lyrae binary candidate, TU UMa, as no recent spectroscopic measurements were available. We present a densely covered pulsational RV curve, which will be used to test the predictions of the orbit models that are based on the O - C variations.

  6. A Covariant Derivation of the Ponderomotive Force.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-09

    9x As in the previous section, we use Maxwell’s equation to rewrite -- As was the case there, the term cancels, to order Sv/c against the term. What a...contravariant four vector and the inhomogeneous Maxwell’s equation is 3F ij ji . Fn- (40) where J Ji ) ( (41) The homogeneous Maxwell’s equations

  7. Flagellar Radial Spokes Contain a Ca2+-stimulated Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Patel-King, Ramila S.; Gorbatyuk, Oksana; Takebe, Sachiko; King, Stephen M.

    2004-01-01

    The radial spokes are required for Ca2+-initiated intraflagellar signaling, resulting in modulation of inner and outer arm dynein activity. However, the mechanochemical properties of this signaling pathway remain unknown. Here, we describe a novel nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDK) from the Chlamydomonas flagellum. This protein (termed p61 or RSP23) consists of an N-terminal catalytic NDK domain followed by a repetitive region that includes three IQ motifs and a highly acidic C-terminal segment. We find that p61 is missing in axonemes derived from the mutants pf14 (lacks radial spokes) and pf24 (lacks the spoke head and several stalk components) but not in those from pf17 (lacking only the spoke head). The p61 protein can be extracted from oda1 (lacks outer dynein arms) and pf17 axonemes with 0.5 M KI, and copurifies with radial spokes in sucrose density gradients. Furthermore, p61 contains two classes of calmodulin binding site: IQ1 interacts with calmodulin-Sepharose beads in a Ca2+-independent manner, whereas IQ2 and IQ3 show Ca2+-sensitive associations. Wild-type axonemes exhibit two distinct NDKase activities, at least one of which is stimulated by Ca2+. This Ca2+-responsive enzyme, which accounts for ∼45% of total axonemal NDKase, is missing from pf14 axonemes. We found that purified radial spokes also exhibit NDKase activity. Thus, we conclude that p61 is an integral component of the radial spoke stalk that binds calmodulin and exhibits Ca2+-controlled NDKase activity. These observations suggest that nucleotides other than ATP may play an important role in the signal transduction pathway that underlies the regulatory mechanism defined by the radial spokes. PMID:15194815

  8. A novel method for analytically solving a radial advection-dispersion equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Keng-Hsin; Liu, Chen-Wuing; Liang, Ching-Ping; Chen, Jui-Sheng; Sie, Bing-Ruei

    2016-11-01

    An analytical solution for solute transport in a radial flow field has a variety of practical applications in the study of the transport in push-pull/divergent/convergent flow tracer tests, aquifer remediation by pumping and aquifer storage and recovery. However, an analytical solution for radial advective-dispersive transport has been proven very difficult to develop and relatively few in subsurface hydrology have made efforts to do so, because variable coefficients in the governing partial differential equations. Most of the solutions for radial advective-dispersive transport presented in the literature have generally been solved semi-analytically with the final concentration values being obtained with the help of a numerical Laplace inversion. This study presents a novel solution strategy for analytically solving the radial advective-dispersive transport problem. A Laplace transform with respect to the time variable and a generalized integral transform technique with respect to the spatial variable are first performed to convert the transient governing partial differential equations into an algebraic equation. Subsequently, the algebraic equation is solved using simple algebraic manipulations, easily yielding the solution in the transformed domain. The solution in the original domain is ultimately obtained by successive applications of the Laplace and corresponding generalized integral transform inversions. A convergent flow tracer test is used to demonstrate the robustness of the proposed method for deriving an exact analytical solution to the radial advective-dispersive transport problem. The developed analytical solution is verified against a semi-analytical solution taken from the literature. The results show perfect agreement between our exact analytical solution and the semi-analytical solution. The solution method presented in this study can be applied to create more comprehensive analytical models for a great variety of radial advective

  9. Analysis of Forced Spatial Vibrations of a Centrifugal Pump Impeller with Axial Forces Balancing Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhulyov, A.; Martsinkovsky, V.; Kundera, C.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a model of a pump impeller with annular seals and a balancing device, used as a combined support-seal assembly, is considered. The forced coupled radial, angular and axial vibrations of the rotor are determined with consideration of linearized inertial, damping, gyroscopic, positional and circulating forces and moments acting on the impeller from the side of the fluid flow in annular seals. The theoretical analysis is supplemented with a numerical example, the amplitude frequency characteristics are shown.

  10. The Stationary Condensation and Radial Outflow of a Liquid Film on a Horizontal Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolshinskiy, Leonid; Frenkel, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The application of capillary screen liquid acquisition devices to space-based cryogenic propulsion systems is expected to necessitate thermodynamic conditioning in order to stabilize surface tension retention characteristics. The present results have been obtained in the framework of the research of low gravity condensation-flow processes for conditioning cryogenic liquid acquisition devices. The following system is studied: On the top of a subcooled horizontal disk, a liquid film condenses from the ambient saturated vapor. The liquid is forcedly removed at the disk edge, and there is an outward radial flow of the film. Stationary regimes of the flow are uncovered such that (i) the gravity is negligible, being eclipsed by the capillary forces; (ii) the film thickness is everywhere much smaller than the disk radius; and (iii) the slow-flow lubrication approximation is valid. A nonlinear differential equation for the film thickness as a function of the radial coordinate is obtained. The (two-dimensional) fields of velocities, temperature and pressure in the film are explicitly determined by the radial profile of its thickness. The equilibrium is controlled by two parameters: (i) the vapor-disk difference of temperatures and (ii) the liquid exhaust rate. For the flow regimes with a nearly uniform film thickness, the governing equation linearizes, and the film interface is analytically predicted to have a concave-up quartic parabola profile. Thus, perhaps counter-intuitively, the liquid film is thicker at the edge and thinner at the center of the disk.

  11. Origins of hydrodynamic forces on centrifugal pump impellers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adkins, Douglas R.; Brennen, Christopher E.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrodynamic interactions that occur between a centrifugal pump impeller and volute are experimentally and theoretically investigated. The theoretical analysis considers the inability of the blades to perfectly guide the flow through the impeller, and also includes a quasi-one dimensional treatment of the flow in the volute. The disturbance at the impeller discharge and the resulting forces are determined by the theoretical model. The model is then extended to obtain the hydrodynamic force perturbations that are caused by the impeller whirling eccentrically in the volute. Under many operating conditions, these force perturbations were found to be destablizing. Comparisons are made between the theoretical model and the experimental measurements of pressure distributions and radial forces on the impeller. The theoretical model yields fairly accurate predictions of the radial forces caused by the flow through the impeller. However, it was found that the pressure acting on the front shroud of the impeller has a substantial effect on the destablizing hydrodynamic forces.

  12. Body forces and pressures in elastic models of the myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, W H

    1981-01-01

    Tension strands are introduced to represent active myocardial fibers. They create one body force proportional to the divergence of the tension-direction vector, and a second equal to the tension divided by the radius of curvature. Explicit solutions to isotropic linearly elastic tensor equations with these body forces are found for the radially-symmetric, linearly-isotropic, elastic spherical heart with arbitrary radial body force. They confirm experiments showing supraluminal intramural pressures. Such pressures may affect coronary perfusion. A tension strand model which is a reasonable compromise between actual myofibrillar geometry and analytical simplicity is the iso-oblique, terminating, nonintersecting model. The body force from that or any other axially symmetric body force can be the forcing term for equations in which the heart is modeled as a thin, ellipsoidal, elastic membrane. PMID:7213931

  13. Evaluation of performance and magnetic characteristics of a radial-radial flux compound-structure permanent-magnet synchronous machine used for hybrid electric vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Ping; Liu, Ranran; Shen, Lin; Li, Lina; Fan, Weiguang; Wu, Qian; Zhao, Jing

    2008-04-01

    A breed of compound-structure permanent-magnet synchronous machine (CS-PMSM) is used for power-split hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). It can help to fulfill both the speed and torque control of the internal combustion engine and, thus, realize the optimum operation of the HEV. In this paper, a radial-radial flux CS-PMSM, which is integrated by two machines radially [one stator machine (SM) and one double-rotor machine (DRM)], is designed and investigated. The machine performance is evaluated with finite-element method (FEM) and satisfactory results are obtained. The back electromotive force curves of the two machines are somewhat similar to sinusoidal ones; the average torques both meet the requirements; and due to the adoption of skewed slots, the cogging torques and torque ripples are quite small. The inductance parameter is calculated with a phasor diagram based two-dimensional FEM and the magnetic saturation and cross-magnetization effect are discussed. It is concluded that the SM is slightly saturated with no or little cross-magnetization phenomenon, whereas the DRM has deep-degree magnetic saturation and the cross-magnetization effect is notable.

  14. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1993-05-11

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components is described. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  15. Force sensor

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1993-01-01

    A force sensor and related method for determining force components. The force sensor includes a deformable medium having a contact surface against which a force can be applied, a signal generator for generating signals that travel through the deformable medium to the contact surface, a signal receptor for receiving the signal reflected from the contact surface, a generation controller, a reception controller, and a force determination apparatus. The signal generator has one or more signal generation regions for generating the signals. The generation controller selects and activates the signal generation regions. The signal receptor has one or more signal reception regions for receiving signals and for generating detections signals in response thereto. The reception controller selects signal reception regions and detects the detection signals. The force determination apparatus measures signal transit time by timing activation and detection and, optionally, determines force components for selected cross-field intersections. The timer which times by activation and detection can be any means for measuring signal transit time. A cross-field intersection is defined by the overlap of a signal generation region and a signal reception region.

  16. Fabricating Radial Groove Gratings Using Projection Photolithography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iazikov, Dmitri; Mossberg, Thomas W.

    2009-01-01

    Projection photolithography has been used as a fabrication method for radial grove gratings. Use of photolithographic method for diffraction grating fabrication represents the most significant breakthrough in grating technology in the last 60 years, since the introduction of holographic written gratings. Unlike traditional methods utilized for grating fabrication, this method has the advantage of producing complex diffractive groove contours that can be designed at pixel-by-pixel level, with pixel size currently at the level of 45 45 nm. Typical placement accuracy of the grating pixels is 10 nm over 30 nm. It is far superior to holographic, mechanically ruled or direct e-beam written gratings and results in high spatial coherence and low spectral cross-talk. Due to the smooth surface produced by reactive ion etch, such gratings have a low level of randomly scattered light. Also, due to high fidelity and good surface roughness, this method is ideally suited for fabrication of radial groove gratings. The projection mask is created using a laser writer. A single crystal silicon wafer is coated with photoresist, and then the projection mask, with its layer of photoresist, is exposed for patterning in a stepper or scanner. To develop the photoresist, the fabricator either removes the exposed areas (positive resist) of the unexposed areas (negative resist). Next, the patterned and developed photoresist silicon substrate is subjected to reactive ion etching. After this step, the substrate is cleaned. The projection mask is fabricated according to electronic design files that may be generated in GDS file format using any suitable CAD (computer-aided design) or other software program. Radial groove gratings in off-axis grazing angle of incidence mount are of special interest for x-ray spectroscopy, as they allow achieving higher spectral resolution for the same grating area and have lower alignment tolerances than traditional in-plane grating scheme. This is especially

  17. Latitudinal Dependence of the Radial IMF Component - Interplanetary Imprint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, S. T.; Smith, E. J.; Phillips, J.; Goldstein, B. E.; Nerney, S.

    1996-01-01

    Ulysses measurements have confirmed that there is no significant gradient with respect to heliomagnetic latitude in the radial component, B(sub r,), of the interplanetary magnetic field. There are two processes responsible for this observation. In the corona, the plasma beta is much less than 1, except directly above streamers, so both longitudinal and latitudinal (meridional) gradients in field strength will relax, due to the transverse magnetic pressure gradient force, as the solar wind carries magnetic flux away from the Sun. This happens so quickly that the field is essentially uniform by 5 solar radius. Beyond 10 solar radius, beta is greater than 1 and it is possible for a meridional thermal pressure gradient to redistribute magnetic flux - an effect apparently absent in Ulysses and earlier ICE and Interplanetary Magnetic Physics (IMP) data. We discuss this second effect here, showing that its absence is mainly due to the perpendicular part of the anisotropic thermal pressure gradient in the interplanetary medium being too small to drive significant meridional transport between the Sun and approx. 4 AU. This is done using a linear analytic estimate of meridional transport. The first effect was discussed in an earlier paper.

  18. Stress intensity and displacement coefficients for radially cracked ring segments subject to three-point bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, B.; Srawley, J. E.

    1983-01-01

    The boudary collocation method was used to generate Mode 1 stress intensity and crack mouth displacement coefficients for internally and externally radially cracked ring segments (arc bend specimens) subjected to three point radial loading. Numerical results were obtained for ring segment outer to inner radius ratios (R sub o/ R sub i) ranging from 1.10 to 2.50 and crack length to width ratios (a/W) ranging from 0.1 to 0.8. Stress intensity and crack mouth displacement coefficients were found to depend on the ratios R sub o/R sub i and a/W as well as the included angle between the directions of the reaction forces.

  19. Determination of radial electric field from Pfirsch–Schlüter flows in the HSX stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S. T. A.; Talmadge, J. N.; Dobbins, T. J.; Anderson, F. S. B.; Likin, K. M.; Anderson, D. T.

    2017-03-01

    Inboard/outboard asymmetry in the impurity ion parallel flow is observed in the HSX stellarator using charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CHERS). This observation shows the presence of counter-streaming Pfirsch–Schlüter flow predicted by neoclassical theory. The asymmetry of the flow is used to calculate the magnitude and direction of the radial electric field (E r), as well as the mean flow, using computed magnetic geometry factors. This method enables calculation of E r near the core of the HSX plasma where the E r obtained from the radial force balance equation has large uncertainties due to the relatively large width of the diagnostic neutral beam with respect to the plasma minor radius.

  20. Temperature gradients drive radial fluid flow in Petri dishes and multiwell plates.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Stephen M; Yin, John

    2016-06-01

    Liquid in a Petri dish spontaneously circulates in a radial pattern, even when the dish is at rest. These fluid flows have been observed and utilized for biological research, but their origins have not been well-studied. Here we used particle-tracking to measure velocities of radial fluid flows, which are shown to be linked to evaporation. Infrared thermal imaging was used to identify thermal gradients at the air-liquid interface and at the bottom of the dish. Two-color ratiometric fluorescence confocal imaging was used to measure thermal gradients in the vertical direction within the fluid. A finite-element model of the fluid, incorporating the measured temperature profiles, shows that buoyancy forces are sufficient to produce flows consistent with the measured particle velocity results. Such flows may arise in other dish or plate formats, and may impact biological research in positive or negative ways.

  1. Precise radial velocities in the near infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redman, Stephen L.

    Since the first detection of a planet outside our Solar System byWolszczan & Frail (1992), over 500 exoplanets have been found to date2, none of which resemble the Earth. Most of these planets were discovered by measuring the radial velocity (hereafter, RV) of the host star, which wobbles under the gravitational influence of any existing planetary companions. However, this method has yet to achieve the sub-m/s precision necessary to detect an Earth-mass planet in the Habitable Zone (the region around a star that can support liquid water; hereafter, HZ) (Kasting et al. 1993) around a Solar-type star. Even though Kepler (Borucki et al. 2010) has announced several Earth-sized HZ candidates, these targets will be exceptionally difficult to confirm with current astrophysical spectrographs (Borucki et al. 2011). The fastest way to discover and confirm potentiallyhabitable Earth-mass planets is to observe stars with lower masses - in particular, late M dwarfs. While M dwarfs are readily abundant, comprising some 70% of the local stellar population, their low optical luminosity presents a formidable challenge to current optical RV instruments. By observing in the near-infrared (hereafter, NIR), where the flux from M dwarfs peaks, we can potentially reach low RV precisions with significantly less telescope time than would be required by a comparable optical instrument. However, NIR precision RV measurements are a relatively new idea and replete with challenges: IR arrays, unlike CCDs, are sensitive to the thermal background; modal noise is a bigger issue in the NIR than in the optical; and the NIR currently lacks the calibration sources like the very successful thorium-argon (hereafter, ThAr) hollow-cathode lamp and Iodine gas cell of the optical. The PSU Pathfinder (hereafter, Pathfinder) was designed to explore these technical issues with the intention of mitigating these problems for future NIR high-resolution spectrographs, such as the Habitable-Zone Planet Finder (HZPF

  2. Non-radially pulsating Be stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivinius, Th.; Baade, D.; Štefl, S.

    2003-11-01

    Based on more than 3000 high-resolution echelle spectra of 27 early-type Be stars, taken over six years, it is shown that the short-term periodic line profile variability of these objects is due to non-radial pulsation. The appearance of the line profile variability depends mostly on the projected rotational velocity v sin i and thus, since all Be stars rotate rapidly, on the inclination i. The observed variability of the investigated stars is described, and for some of them line profile variability periods are given for the first time. For two of the investigated stars the line profile variability was successfully modeled as non-radial pulsation with l=m=+2 already in previous works. Since Be stars with similarly low v sin i share the same variability properties, these are in general explainable under the same model assumptions. The line profile variability of stars with higher v sin i is different from the one observed in low v sin i stars, but can be reproduced by the same model, if only the model inclination is modified to more equatorial values. Only for a few stars with periodic line profile variability the l=m=2 non-radial pulsation mode is not able to provide a satisfying explanation. These objects might pulsate in different modes (e.g. tesseral ones, l != |m|). Almost all stars in the sample show traces of outburst-like variability, pointing to an ephemeral nature of the mass-loss phenomenon responsible for the formation of the circumstellar disk of early-type Be stars, rather than a steady star-to-disk mass transfer. In addition to the variability due to non-radial pulsation present in most stars, several objects were found to show other periods residing in the immediate circumstellar environment. The presence of these secondary periods is enhanced in the outburst phases. Short-lived aperiodic phenomena were clearly seen in two stars. But, given the unfavourable sampling of our database to follow rapid variability of transient nature, they might be more

  3. Radial propagation of geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Hager, Robert; Hallatschek, Klaus

    2009-07-15

    The GAM group velocity is estimated from the ratio of the radial free energy flux to the total free energy applying gyrokinetic and two-fluid theory. This method is much more robust than approaches that calculate the group velocity directly and can be generalized to include additional physics, e.g., magnetic geometry. The results are verified with the gyrokinetic code GYRO[J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)], the two-fluid code NLET[K. Hallatschek and A. Zeiler, Phys. Plasmas 7, 2554 (2000)], and analytical calculations. GAM propagation must be kept in mind when discussing the windows of GAM activity observed experimentally and the match between linear theory and experimental GAM frequencies.

  4. Radially dependent angular acceleration of twisted light.

    PubMed

    Webster, Jason; Rosales-Guzmán, Carmelo; Forbes, Andrew

    2017-02-15

    While photons travel in a straight line at constant velocity in free space, the intensity profile of structured light may be tailored for acceleration in any degree of freedom. Here we propose a simple approach to control the angular acceleration of light. Using Laguerre-Gaussian modes as our twisted beams carrying orbital angular momentum, we show that superpositions of opposite handedness result in a radially dependent angular acceleration as they pass through a focus (waist plane). Due to conservation of orbital angular momentum, we find that propagation dynamics are complex despite the free-space medium: the outer part of the beam (rings) rotates in an opposite direction to the inner part (petals), and while the outer part accelerates, the inner part decelerates. We outline the concepts theoretically and confirm them experimentally. Such exotic structured light beams are topical due to their many applications, for instance in optical trapping and tweezing, metrology, and fundamental studies in optics.

  5. Porcine radial artery decellularization by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed

    Negishi, Jun; Funamoto, Seiichi; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Nam, Kwangoo; Higami, Tetsuya; Kishida, Akio

    2015-11-01

    Many types of decellularized tissues have been studied and some have been commercially used in clinics. In this study, small-diameter vascular grafts were made using HHP to decellularize porcine radial arteries. One decellularization method, high hydrostatic pressure (HHP), has been used to prepare the decellularized porcine tissues. Low-temperature treatment was effective in preserving collagen and collagen structures in decellularized porcine carotid arteries. The collagen and elastin structures and mechanical properties of HHP-decellularized radial arteries were similar to those of untreated radial arteries. Xenogeneic transplantation (into rats) was performed using HHP-decellularized radial arteries and an untreated porcine radial artery. Two weeks after transplantation into rat carotid arteries, the HHP-decellularized radial arteries were patent and without thrombosis. In addition, the luminal surface of each decellularized artery was covered by recipient endothelial cells and the arterial medium was fully infiltrated with recipient cells.

  6. Radial Shock Wave Devices Generate Cavitation

    PubMed Central

    Császár, Nikolaus B. M.; Angstman, Nicholas B.; Milz, Stefan; Sprecher, Christoph M.; Kobel, Philippe; Farhat, Mohamed; Furia, John P.; Schmitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background Conflicting reports in the literature have raised the question whether radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy (rESWT) devices and vibrating massage devices have similar energy signatures and, hence, cause similar bioeffects in treated tissues. Methods and Findings We used laser fiber optic probe hydrophone (FOPH) measurements, high-speed imaging and x-ray film analysis to compare fundamental elements of the energy signatures of two rESWT devices (Swiss DolorClast; Electro Medical Systems, Nyon, Switzerland; D-Actor 200; Storz Medical, Tägerwillen, Switzerland) and a vibrating massage device (Vibracare; G5/General Physiotherapy, Inc., Earth City, MO, USA). To assert potential bioeffects of these treatment modalities we investigated the influence of rESWT and vibrating massage devices on locomotion ability of Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) worms. Results FOPH measurements demonstrated that both rESWT devices generated acoustic waves with comparable pressure and energy flux density. Furthermore, both rESWT devices generated cavitation as evidenced by high-speed imaging and caused mechanical damage on the surface of x-ray film. The vibrating massage device did not show any of these characteristics. Moreover, locomotion ability of C. elegans was statistically significantly impaired after exposure to radial extracorporeal shock waves but was unaffected after exposure of worms to the vibrating massage device. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that both energy signature and bioeffects of rESWT devices are fundamentally different from those of vibrating massage devices. Clinical Relevance Prior ESWT studies have shown that tissues treated with sufficient quantities of acoustic sound waves undergo cavitation build-up, mechanotransduction, and ultimately, a biological alteration that “kick-starts” the healing response. Due to their different treatment indications and contra-indications rESWT devices cannot be equated to vibrating

  7. Radial-Electric-Field Piezoelectric Diaphragm Pumps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G.; Working, Dennis C.; Mossi, Karla; Castro, Nicholas D.; Mane, Pooma

    2009-01-01

    In a recently invented class of piezoelectric diaphragm pumps, the electrode patterns on the piezoelectric diaphragms are configured so that the electric fields in the diaphragms have symmetrical radial (along-the-surface) components in addition to through-the-thickness components. Previously, it was accepted in the piezoelectric-transducer art that in order to produce the out-of-plane bending displacement of a diaphragm needed for pumping, one must make the electric field asymmetrical through the thickness, typically by means of electrodes placed on only one side of the piezoelectric material. In the present invention, electrodes are placed on both sides and patterned so as to produce substantial radial as well as through-the-thickness components. Moreover, unlike in the prior art, the electric field can be symmetrical through the thickness. Tests have shown in a given diaphragm that an electrode configuration according to this invention produces more displacement than does a conventional one-sided electrode pattern. The invention admits of numerous variations characterized by various degrees of complexity. Figure 1 is a simplified depiction of a basic version. As in other piezoelectric diaphragm pumps of similar basic design, the prime mover is a piezoelectric diaphragm. Application of a suitable voltage to the electrodes on the diaphragm causes it to undergo out-of-plane bending. The bending displacement pushes a fluid out of, or pulls the fluid into, a chamber bounded partly by the diaphragm. Also as in other diaphragm pumps in general, check valves ensure that the fluid flows only in through one port and only out through another port.

  8. Evaluation of a spasmolytic cocktail to prevent radial artery spasm during coronary procedures.

    PubMed

    Kiemeneij, Ferdinand; Vajifdar, Bhavesh U; Eccleshall, Simon C; Laarman, GertJan; Slagboom, Ton; van der Wieken, Ron

    2003-03-01

    Radial artery spasm is a frequent complication of the transradial approach for coronary angiography and angioplasty. Recently, we have been able to quantify spasm using the automatic pullback device. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy of an intra-arterial vasodilating cocktail in reducing the incidence and severity of radial artery spasm. A hundred patients undergoing coronary procedures via the radial artery were divided into two groups of 50 each. Patients in group A received intra-arterial cocktail (5 mg of verapamil plus 200 micro g nitroglycerine in 10 ml of normal saline), while patients in group B did not receive any vasodilating drug. The pullback device was used for sheath removal at the end of the procedure. Seven (14%) patients in group A experienced pain (i.e., pain score of III-V) during automatic sheath removal, as compared to 17 (34%) in group B (P = 0.019). The mean pain score was significantly lower in group A than in group B (1.7 +/- 0.94 vs. 2.08 +/- 1.07; P = 0.03). The maximal pullback force (MPF) was also significantly lower for group A (0.53 +/- 0.52 kg; range, 0.10-3.03 kg) as compared to group B (0.76 +/- 0.45 kg; range, 0.24-1.99 kg; P = 0.013). Only 4 (8%) patients in group A had an MPF value greater than 1.0 kg, suggesting the presence of significant radial artery spasm, as opposed to 11 (22%) in group B (P = 0.029). Administration of an intra-arterial vasodilating cocktail prior to sheath insertion reduces the occurrence and severity of radial artery spasm.

  9. Core Radial Electric Field and Transport in Wendelstein 7-X Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pablant, Novimir

    2016-10-01

    Results from the investigation of core transport and the role of the radial electric field profile (Er) in the first operational phase of the Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) stellarator are presented. In stellarator plasmas, the details of the Er profile are expected to have a strong effect on both the particle and heat fluxes. Neoclassical particle fluxes are not intrinsically ambipolar, which leads to the formation of a radial electric field that enforces ambipolarity. The radial electric field is closely related to the perpendicular plasma flow (u⊥) through the force balance equation. This allows the radial electric field to be inferred from measurements of the perpendicular flow velocity from the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) and correlation reflectometry diagnostics. Large changes in the perpendicular rotation, on the order of Δu⊥ 5km /s (ΔEr 12kV / m), have been observed within a set of experiments where the heating power was stepped down from 2 MW to 0.6 MW . These experiments are examined in detail to explore the relationship between, heating power, response of the temperature and density profiles and the response of the radial electric field. Estimations of the core transport are based on power balance and utilize electron temperature (Te) profiles from the ECE and Thomson scattering, electron density profiles (ne) from interferometry and Thomson scattering, ion temperature (Ti) profiles from XICS, along with measurements of the total stored energy and radiated power. Also described are a set core impurity confinement experiments and results. Impurity confinement has been investigated through the injection of trace amount of argon impurity gas at the plasma edge in conjunction with measurements of the density of various ionization states of argon from the XICS and High Efficiency eXtreme-UV Overview Spectrometer (HEXOS) diagnostics. Finally the inferred Er and heat flux profiles are compared to initial neoclassical calculations using measured

  10. An effective encoding scheme of obtaining radial topology structures in distribution networks.

    PubMed

    Wen, Juan; Tan, Yanghong; Zhang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    The structure of a distribution network has great effects on economy, power supply reliability and investment of a power system. To obtain an optimal topology from possible topologies, we need to solve an optimisation problem which aims to find a radial structure satisfying operating constraints. As a basis of solving this optimisation problem, the encoding scheme, is to represent the candidate configurations by a series of codes. Numerical candidate topologies and unfeasible codes would lead low efficiency or premature convergence. This paper presents an effective scheme which can rapidly produce all radial configurations of a distribution network. In order to reduce the computational requirement of solution space, initial network is simplified as a topological graph which reserves loop branches and T-nodes. And a loop-branch chain incidence matrix is derived from analyzing the relationship between any two loops. Then the principles of selecting switches of each variable are designed to determine the ranges of the variables. All radial candidate solutions are available rapidly through applying the theory of combination. The scheme presented minimizes the number of solutions and avoids tedious radial checking procedure in view of avoiding any infeasible solutions. The validity of the proposed scheme is verified by illustrative examples.

  11. Mapping surface currents from HF radar radial velocity measurements using optimal interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Yong; Terrill, Eric J.; Cornuelle, Bruce D.

    2008-10-01

    An optimal interpolation (OI) method to compute surface vector current fields from radial velocity measurements derived from high-frequency (HF) radars is presented. The method assumes a smooth spatial covariance relationship between neighboring vector currents, in contrast to the more commonly used un-weighted least-squares fitting (UWLS) method, which assumes a constant vector velocity within a defined search radius. This OI method can directly compute any quantities linearly related to the radial velocities, such as vector currents and dynamic quantities (divergence and vorticity) as well as the uncertainties of those respective fields. The OI method is found to be more stable than the UWLS method and reduces spurious vector solutions near the baselines between HF radar installations. The OI method produces a covariance of the uncertainty of the estimated vector current fields. Three nondimensional uncertainty indices are introduced to characterize the uncertainty of the vector current at a point, representing an ellipse with directional characteristics. The vector current estimation using the OI method eliminates the need for multiple mapping steps and optimally fills intermittent coverage gaps. The effects of angular interpolation of radial velocities, a commonly used step in the preprocessing of radial velocity data prior to vector current computation in the UWLS method, are presented.

  12. NEW RADIAL ABUNDANCE GRADIENTS FOR NGC 628 AND NGC 2403

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Danielle A.; Skillman, Evan D.; Croxall, Kevin V.; Marble, Andrew R.; Smith, J. D.; Gordon, Karl; Kennicutt, Robert C. Jr.; Garnett, Donald R. E-mail: skillman@astro.umn.edu E-mail: amarble@nso.edu E-mail: kgordon@stsci.edu

    2013-10-01

    Motivated by recent interstellar medium studies, we present high quality MMT and Gemini spectroscopic observations of H II regions in the nearby spiral galaxies NGC 628 and NGC 2403 in order to measure their chemical abundance gradients. Using long-slit and multi-object mask optical spectroscopy, we obtained measurements of the temperature sensitive auroral lines [O III] λ4363 and/or [N II] λ5755 at a strength of 4σ or greater in 11 H II regions in NGC 628 and 7 regions in NGC 2403. These observations allow us, for the first time, to derive an oxygen abundance gradient in NGC 628 based solely on 'direct' oxygen abundances of H II regions: 12 + log(O/H) = (8.43 ± 0.03) + (–0.017 ± 0.002) × R{sub g} (dex kpc{sup –1}), with a dispersion in log(O/H) of σ = 0.10 dex, from 14 regions with a radial coverage of ∼2-19 kpc. This is a significantly shallower slope than found by previous 'strong-line' abundance studies. In NGC 2403, we derive an oxygen abundance gradient of 12 + log(O/H) = (8.48 ± 0.04) + (–0.032 ± 0.007)× R{sub g} (dex kpc{sup –1}), with a dispersion in log(O/H) of σ = 0.07 dex, from seven H II with a radial coverage of ∼1-10 kpc. Additionally, we measure the N, S, Ne, and Ar abundances. We find the N/O ratio decreases with increasing radius for the inner disk, but reaches a plateau past R{sub 25} in NGC 628. NGC 2403 also has a negative N/O gradient with radius, but we do not sample the outer disk of the galaxy past R{sub 25} and so do not see evidence for a plateau. This bi-modal pattern measured for NGC 628 indicates dominant contributions from secondary nitrogen inside of the R{sub 25} transition and dominantly primary nitrogen farther out. As expected for α-process elements, S/O, Ne/O, and Ar/O are consistent with constant values over a range in oxygen abundance.

  13. Strategic forces briefing

    SciTech Connect

    Bing, G.; Chrzanowski, P.; May, M.; Nordyke, M.

    1989-04-06

    The Strategic Forces Briefing'' is our attempt, accomplished over the past several months, to outline and highlight the more significant strategic force issues that must be addressed in the near future. Some issues are recurrent: the need for an effective modernized Triad and a constant concern for force survivability. Some issues derive from arms control: the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (SALT) are sufficiently advanced to set broad numerical limits on forces, but not so constraining as to preclude choices among weapon systems and deployment modes. Finally, a new administration faced with serious budgetary problems must strive for the most effective strategic forces limited dollars can buy and support. A review of strategic forces logically begins with consideration of the missions the forces are charged with. We begin the briefing with a short review of targeting policy and implementation within the constraints of available unclassified information. We then review each element of the Triad with sections on SLBMs, ICBMs, and Air-Breathing (bomber and cruise missile) systems. A short section at the end deals with the potential impact of strategic defense on offensive force planning. We consider ABM, ASAT, and air defense; but we do not attempt to address the technical issues of strategic defense per se. The final section gives a brief overview of the tritium supply problem. We conclude with a summary of recommendations that emerge from our review. The results of calculation on the effectiveness of various weapon systems as a function of cost that are presented in the briefing are by Paul Chrzanowski.

  14. Bilateral Radial Head Fractures in a Woman With Trivial Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Shariff, Zakir; Patel, Kuntal J.; Elbo, A.; Guisasola, I.

    2005-01-01

    Radial head fractures are common injuries, occurring in about 20% of all acute elbow injuries. Isolated radial head fractures are not common and include about 2% of all fractures around the elbow. Bilateral radial head fractures are rare and usually associated with severe trauma and associated fractures and dislocations. We report a case of bilateral undisplaced radial head fracture in a woman, following a simple fall. Early recognition, proper management, and physical therapy led to complete recovery and full functional movement of the elbow. PMID:16369234

  15. An improved equivalent circuit model of radial mode piezoelectric transformer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yihua; Huang, Wei

    2011-05-01

    In this paper, both the equivalent circuit models of the radial mode and the coupled thickness vibration mode of the radial mode piezoelectric transformer are deduced, and then with the Y-parameter matrix method and the dual-port network theory, an improved equivalent circuit model for the multilayer radial mode piezoelectric transformer is established. A radial mode transformer sample is tested to verify the equivalent circuit model. The experimental results show that the model proposed in this paper is more precise than the typical model.

  16. Interplanetary magnetic field power spectra - Mean field radial or perpendicular to radial

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sari, J. W.; Valley, G. C.

    1976-01-01

    A detailed frequency analysis of Pioneer-6 interplanetary magnetic field data is carried out for 5 to 15 hour periods during which the mean interplanetary field is approximately radial or perpendicular to radial. The reason why these data sets were chosen is that by making the usual assumption that the phase speed of any wave present is much less than the mean solar wind speed, the measured frequency spectra can be interpreted in terms of the wave number parallel or perpendicular to the mean field, without such additional assumptions as isotropy or the dominance of a particular mode and without measurements of velocity and density. The details of the calculation of the magnetic field power spectra, coherencies, and correlation functions are discussed, along with results obtained directly from the data (such as spectra, slopes, anisotropies, and coherencies). The results are interpreted in terms of MHD theory, and are related to work in other areas.

  17. Numerical method for the estimation of column radial heterogeneity and of the actual column efficiency from tailing peak profiles.

    PubMed

    Miyabe, Kanji; Guiochon, Georges

    2011-01-01

    It is probably impossible to prepare high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) columns that have a completely homogeneous packing structure. Many reports in the literature show that the radial distributions of the mobile phase flow velocity and the local column efficiency are not flat, even in columns considered as good. A degree of radial heterogeneity seems to be a common property of all HPLC columns and an important source of peak tailing, which prevents the derivation of accurate information on chromatographic behavior from a straightforward analysis of elution peak profiles. This work reports on a numerical method developed to derive from recorded peak profiles the column efficiency at the column center, the degree of column radial heterogeneity, and the polynomial function that best represents the radial distributions of the flow velocity and the column efficiency. This numerical method was applied to two concrete examples of tailing peak profiles previously described. It was demonstrated that this numerical method is effective to estimate important parameters characterizing the radial heterogeneity of chromatographic columns.

  18. Importance of the ion-pair interactions in the OPEP coarse-grained force field: parametrization and validation.

    PubMed

    Sterpone, Fabio; Nguyen, Phuong H; Kalimeri, Maria; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2013-10-08

    We have derived new effective interactions that improve the description of ion-pairs in the OPEP coarse-grained force field without introducing explicit electrostatic terms. The iterative Boltzmann inversion method was used to extract these potentials from all atom simulations by targeting the radial distribution function of the distance between the center of mass of the side-chains. The new potentials have been tested on several systems that differ in structural properties, thermodynamic stabilities and number of ion-pairs. Our modeling, by refining the packing of the charged amino-acids, impacts the stability of secondary structure motifs and the population of intermediate states during temperature folding/unfolding; it also improves the aggregation propensity of peptides. The new version of the OPEP force field has the potentiality to describe more realistically a large spectrum of situations where salt-bridges are key interactions.

  19. Importance of the ion-pair interactions in the OPEP coarse-grained force field: parametrization and validation

    PubMed Central

    Sterpone, Fabio; Nguyen, Phuong H.; Kalimeri, Maria; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    We have derived new effective interactions that improve the description of ion-pairs in the OPEP coarse-grained force field without introducing explicit electrostatic terms. The iterative Boltzmann inversion method was used to extract these potentials from all atom simulations by targeting the radial distribution function of the distance between the center of mass of the side-chains. The new potentials have been tested on several systems that differ in structural properties, thermodynamic stabilities and number of ion-pairs. Our modeling, by refining the packing of the charged amino-acids, impacts the stability of secondary structure motifs and the population of intermediate states during temperature folding/unfolding; it also improves the aggregation propensity of peptides. The new version of the OPEP force field has the potentiality to describe more realistically a large spectrum of situations where salt-bridges are key interactions. PMID:25419192

  20. Radiation Dose Reduction during Radial Cardiac Catheterization: Evaluation of a Dedicated Radial Angiography Absorption Shielding Drape.

    PubMed

    Ertel, Andrew; Nadelson, Jeffrey; Shroff, Adhir R; Sweis, Ranya; Ferrera, Dean; Vidovich, Mladen I

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Radiation scatter protection shield drapes have been designed with the goal of decreasing radiation dose to the operators during transfemoral catheterization. We sought to investigate the impact on operator radiation exposure of various shielding drapes specifically designed for the radial approach. Background. Radial access for cardiac catheterization has increased due to improved patient comfort and decreased bleeding complications. There are concerns for increased radiation exposure to patients and operators. Methods. Radiation doses to a simulated operator were measured with a RadCal Dosimeter in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. The mock patient was a 97.5 kg fission product phantom. Three lead-free drape designs were studied. The drapes were placed just proximal to the right wrist and extended medially to phantom's trunk. Simulated diagnostic coronary angiography included 6 minutes of fluoroscopy time and 32 seconds of cineangiography time at 4 standard angulated views (8 s each), both 15 frames/s. ANOVA with Bonferroni correction was used for statistical analysis. Results. All drape designs led to substantial reductions in operator radiation exposure compared to control (P < 0.0001). The greatest decrease in radiation exposure (72%) was with the L-shaped design. Conclusions. Dedicated radial shielding drapes decrease radiation exposure to the operator by up to 72% during simulated cardiac catheterization.

  1. Biomechanics of Forearm Rotation: Force and Efficiency of Pronator Teres

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez-Gimeno, Pere; Galtés, Ignasi; Jordana, Xavier; Malgosa, Assumpció; Manyosa, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Biomechanical models are useful to assess the effect of muscular forces on bone structure. Using skeletal remains, we analyze pronator teres rotational efficiency and its force components throughout the entire flexion-extension and pronation-supination ranges by means of a new biomechanical model and 3D imaging techniques, and we explore the relationship between these parameters and skeletal structure. The results show that maximal efficiency is the highest in full elbow flexion and is close to forearm neutral position for each elbow angle. The vertical component of pronator teres force is the highest among all components and is greater in pronation and elbow extension. The radial component becomes negative in pronation and reaches lower values as the elbow flexes. Both components could enhance radial curvature, especially in pronation. The model also enables to calculate efficiency and force components simulating changes in osteometric parameters. An increase of radial curvature improves efficiency and displaces the position where the radial component becomes negative towards the end of pronation. A more proximal location of pronator teres radial enthesis and a larger humeral medial epicondyle increase efficiency and displace the position where this component becomes negative towards forearm neutral position, which enhances radial curvature. Efficiency is also affected by medial epicondylar orientation and carrying angle. Moreover, reaching an object and bringing it close to the face in a close-to-neutral position improve efficiency and entail an equilibrium between the forces affecting the elbow joint stability. When the upper-limb skeleton is used in positions of low efficiency, implying unbalanced force components, it undergoes plastic changes, which improve these parameters. These findings are useful for studies on ergonomics and orthopaedics, and the model could also be applied to fossil primates in order to infer their locomotor form. Moreover, activity

  2. Radial Motion of Two Mutually Attracting Particles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2009-01-01

    A pair of masses or opposite-sign charges released from rest will move directly toward each other under the action of the inverse-distance-squared force of attraction between them. An exact expression for the separation distance as a function of time can only be found by numerically inverting the solution of a differential equation. A simpler,…

  3. Forced Snaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponedel, Benjamin; Knobloch, Edgar

    2016-11-01

    We study spatial localization in the real subcritical Ginzburg-Landau equation ut =m0 u +m1 cos2/π l x u +uxx +d | u | 2 u -| u | 4 u with spatially periodic forcing. When d > 0 and m1 = 0 this equation exhibits bistability between the trivial state u = 0 and a homogeneous nontrivial state u =u0 with stationary localized structures which accumulate at the Maxwell point m0 = - 3d2 / 16 . When spatial forcing is included its wavelength is imprinted on u0 creating conditions favorable to front pinning and hence spatial localization. We use numerical continuation to show that under appropriate conditions such forcing generates a sequence of localized states organized within a snakes-and-ladders structure centered on the Maxwell point, and refer to this phenomenon as forced snaking. We determine the stability properties of these states and show that longer lengthscale forcing leads to stationary trains consisting of a finite number of strongly localized, weakly interacting pulses exhibiting foliated snaking.

  4. Forces driving epithelial wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Jim H.; Gupta, Mukund; Colombelli, Julien; Muñoz, José J.; Brodland, G. Wayne; Ladoux, Benoit; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental feature of multicellular organisms is their ability to self-repair wounds through the movement of epithelial cells into the damaged area. This collective cellular movement is commonly attributed to a combination of cell crawling and “purse-string” contraction of a supracellular actomyosin ring. Here we show by direct experimental measurement that these two mechanisms are insufficient to explain force patterns observed during wound closure. At early stages of the process, leading actin protrusions generate traction forces that point away from the wound, showing that wound closure is initially driven by cell crawling. At later stages, we observed unanticipated patterns of traction forces pointing towards the wound. Such patterns have strong force components that are both radial and tangential to the wound. We show that these force components arise from tensions transmitted by a heterogeneous actomyosin ring to the underlying substrate through focal adhesions. The structural and mechanical organization reported here provides cells with a mechanism to close the wound by cooperatively compressing the underlying substrate. PMID:27340423

  5. Forces driving epithelial wound healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugués, Agustí; Anon, Ester; Conte, Vito; Veldhuis, Jim H.; Gupta, Mukund; Colombelli, Julien; Muñoz, José J.; Brodland, G. Wayne; Ladoux, Benoit; Trepat, Xavier

    2014-09-01

    A fundamental feature of multicellular organisms is their ability to self-repair wounds through the movement of epithelial cells into the damaged area. This collective cellular movement is commonly attributed to a combination of cell crawling and `purse-string’ contraction of a supracellular actomyosin ring. Here we show by direct experimental measurement that these two mechanisms are insufficient to explain force patterns observed during wound closure. At early stages of the process, leading actin protrusions generate traction forces that point away from the wound, showing that wound closure is initially driven by cell crawling. At later stages, we observed unanticipated patterns of traction forces pointing towards the wound. Such patterns have strong force components that are both radial and tangential to the wound. We show that these force components arise from tensions transmitted by a heterogeneous actomyosin ring to the underlying substrate through focal adhesions. The structural and mechanical organization reported here provides cells with a mechanism to close the wound by cooperatively compressing the underlying substrate.

  6. Combining axial and radial nanowire heterostructures: radial Esaki diodes and tunnel field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Dey, Anil W; Svensson, Johannes; Ek, Martin; Lind, Erik; Thelander, Claes; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2013-01-01

    The ever-growing demand on high-performance electronics has generated transistors with very impressive figures of merit (Radosavljevic et al., IEEE Int. Devices Meeting 2009, 1-4 and Cho et al., IEEE Int. Devices Meeting 2011, 15.1.1-15.1.4). The continued scaling of the supply voltage of field-effect transistors, such as tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs), requires the implementation of advanced transistor architectures including FinFETs and nanowire devices. Moreover, integration of novel materials with high electron mobilities, such as III-V semiconductors and graphene, are also being considered to further enhance the device properties (del Alamo, Nature 2011, 479, 317-323, and Liao et al., Nature 2010, 467, 305-308). In nanowire devices, boosting the drive current at a fixed supply voltage or maintaining a constant drive current at a reduced supply voltage may be achieved by increasing the cross-sectional area of a device, however at the cost of deteriorated electrostatics. A gate-all-around nanowire device architecture is the most favorable electrostatic configuration to suppress short channel effects; however, the arrangement of arrays of parallel vertical nanowires to address the drive current predicament will require additional chip area. The use of a core-shell nanowire with a radial heterojunction in a transistor architecture provides an attractive means to address the drive current issue without compromising neither chip area nor device electrostatics. In addition to design advantages of a radial transistor architecture, we in this work illustrate the benefit in terms of drive current per unit chip area and compare the experimental data for axial GaSb/InAs Esaki diodes and TFETs to their radial counterparts and normalize the electrical data to the largest cross-sectional area of the nanowire, i.e. the occupied chip area, assuming a vertical device geometry. Our data on lateral devices show that radial Esaki diodes deliver almost 7 times higher peak

  7. PKCδ regulates cortical radial migration by stabilizing the Cdk5 activator p35

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chun-tao; Li, Kun; Li, Jun-tao; Zheng, Wang; Liang, Xu-jun; Geng, An-qi; Li, Ning; Yuan, Xiao-bing

    2009-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) and its activator p35 are critical for radial migration and lamination of cortical neurons. However, how this kinase is regulated by extracellular and intracellular signals during cortical morphogenesis remains unclear. Here, we show that PKCδ, a member of novel PKC expressing in cortical neurons, could stabilize p35 by direct phosphorylation. PKCδ attenuated the degradation of p35 but not its mutant derivative, which could not be phosphorylated by PKCδ. Down-regulation of PKCδ by in utero electroporation of specific small interference RNA (siRNA) severely impaired the radial migration of cortical neurons. This migration defect was similar to that caused by down-regulation of p35 and could be prevented by cotransfection with the wild-type but not the mutant p35. Furthermore, PKCδ could be activated by the promigratory factor brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and was required for the activation of Cdk5 by BDNF. Both PKCδ and p35 were required for the promigratory effect of BDNF on cultured newborn neurons. Thus, PKCδ may promote cortical radial migration through maintaining the proper level of p35 in newborn neurons. PMID:19965374

  8. Use of a polymethacrylate radial head spacer in temporary reconstruction of complex radial head fracture with associated elbow instability.

    PubMed

    Capomassi, Miguel Angel; Clembosky, Gabriel Adrián

    2010-12-01

    Radial head replacement in complex elbow fractures (Mason III) with either bony or ligamentous injuries or interosseous membrane rupture is unquestionable. Actual modular and metallic prosthesis ease the mounting technique and ensure durability. Nevertheless, these types of prostheses are not always available in a short time in our daily practice. We present the use of a transient polymethacrylate spacer as an alternative in nonreconstructable complex radial head fractures with a unstable elbow. We assessed 38 patients between 2006 and 2007, with a median follow-up of 53.8 months. We included 14 Mason IV; 8 Monteggia (posterior); 7 Mason III with either associated medial collateral ligament or interosseous membrane injury; 6 elbow triads; and 3 Essex-Lopresti lesions. With the Mayo elbow performance score and the disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand score questionnaire, we assessed the functionality. Anatomic results were evaluated with x-ray scans of the elbow and wrist using the Broberg and Morrey and the Knirk and Jupiter scales. Functional results were as follows: 14--excellent, 14--good, 8--fair, and 2--poor. Assessment through disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand score questionnaire was 18.7% in average. There was a statistically significant relationship between joint stability and motion. Of the patients, 70% showed mild or moderate chondromalacia of the capitellum and 90% showed osteolysis on the proximal metaphysis of the radius, both events related to follow-up time but not to pain or range of movement. Of the cases, 30% showed heterotopic calcifications and 35% showed moderate arthrosis between the ulna and the humerus. None of the patients presented wrist arthrosis. Complications were 1 deep infection and 1 spacer luxation because of fatigue and ulna plate rupture (Monteggia posterior). In 6 patients, we had to remove the spacer because of pain and/or functional limitation, and 2 of these patients remained with moderate valgus instability

  9. The first radial velocity measurements of a microlensing event: no evidence for the predicted binary⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisse, I.; Santerne, A.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Fakhardji, W.; Santos, N. C.; Figueira, P.; Sousa, S. G.; Ranc, C.

    2015-10-01

    The gravitational microlensing technique allows the discovery of exoplanets around stars distributed in the disk of the galaxy towards the bulge. The alignment of two stars that led to the discovery is unique over the timescale of a human life, however, and cannot be re-observed. Moreover, the target host is often very faint and located in a crowded region. These difficulties hamper and often make impossible the follow up of the target and study of its possible companions. A radial-velocity curve was predicted for the binary system, OGLE-2011-BLG-0417, discovered and characterised from a microlensing event. We used the UVES spectrograph mounted at the VLT, ESO to derive precise radial-velocity measurements of OGLE-2011-BLG-0417. To gather high-precision radial velocities on faint targets of microlensing events, we proposed to use the source star as a reference to measure the lens radial velocities. We obtained ten radial velocities on the putative V = 18 lens with a dispersion of ~100 m s-1, spread over one year. Our measurements do not confirm the microlensing prediction for this binary system. The most likely scenario is that the putative V = 18 mag lens is actually a blend and not the primary lens which is 2 mag fainter. Further observations and analyses are needed to understand the microlensing observation and infer on the nature and characteristics of the lens itself. Based on observations made with ESO Telescope at the Paranal Observatory under program ID 092.C-0763(A) and 093.C-0532(A).Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  10. Intermolecular forces.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, A D

    1975-11-06

    The nature of molecular interactions is examined. Intermolecular forces are divided into long-range and short-range components; the former operate at distances where the effects of electron exchange are negligible and decrease as an inverse power of the separation. The long-range interactions may be subdividied into electrostatic, induction and dispersion contributions, where the electrostatic component is the interaction of the permanent charge distributions and the others originate in the fluctuations in the distributions. Typical magnitudes of the various contributions are given. The forces between macroscopic bodies are briefly considered, as are the effects of a medium. Some of the manifestations of molecular interactions are discussed.

  11. Axial force measurement for esophageal function testing

    PubMed Central

    Gravesen, Flemming H; Funch-Jensen, Peter; Gregersen, Hans; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2009-01-01

    The esophagus serves to transport food and fluid from the pharynx to the stomach. Manometry has been the “golden standard” for the diagnosis of esophageal motility diseases for many decades. Hence, esophageal function is normally evaluated by means of manometry even though it reflects the squeeze force (force in radial direction) whereas the bolus moves along the length of esophagus in a distal direction. Force measurements in the longitudinal (axial) direction provide a more direct measure of esophageal transport function. The technique used to record axial force has developed from external force transducers over in-vivo strain gauges of various sizes to electrical impedance based measurements. The amplitude and duration of the axial force has been shown to be as reliable as manometry. Normal, as well as abnormal, manometric recordings occur with normal bolus transit, which have been documented using imaging modalities such as radiography and scintigraphy. This inconsistency using manometry has also been documented by axial force recordings. This underlines the lack of information when diagnostics are based on manometry alone. Increasing the volume of a bag mounted on a probe with combined axial force and manometry recordings showed that axial force amplitude increased by 130% in contrast to an increase of 30% using manometry. Using axial force in combination with manometry provides a more complete picture of esophageal motility, and the current paper outlines the advantages of using this method. PMID:19132762

  12. Asymmetrical Cortical Processing of Radial Expansioncontraction in Infants and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shirai, Nobu; Birtles, Deirdre; Wattam-Bell, John; Yamaguchi, Masami K.; Kanazawa, So; Atkinson, Janette; Braddick, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    We report asymmetrical cortical responses (steady-state visual evoked potentials) to radial expansion and contraction in human infants and adults. Forty-four infants (22 3-month-olds and 22 4-month-olds) and nine adults viewed dynamic dot patterns which cyclically (2.1 Hz) alternate between radial expansion (or contraction) and random directional…

  13. Development of an endoscopic probe for radial metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, John A.; Smith, James E., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of this work was to design and build a prototype for conducting stress analysis and making spectroscopic measurements inside cavities. The objectives were as follows: (1) to develop a prototype for radial profilometry; (2) to explore the possibility of using the radial profilometer for spectroscopic analysis; and (3) to interface the prototype with various combinations of data acquisition and image processing equipment.

  14. The radial defocusing energy-supercritical NLS in dimension four

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Chao; Zheng, Jiqiang

    2017-04-01

    We consider the radial defocusing nonlinear Schrödinger equations iut + Δu = | u|p u with supercritical exponent p > 4 in four space dimensions, and prove that any radial solution that remains bounded in the critical Sobolev space must be global and scatter.

  15. Effect of Periradial Administration of Papaverine on Radial Artery Diameter

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraja, P. S.; Singh, Naveen G.; Manjunatha, N.; Desai, Rushikesh Chintamanrao

    2017-01-01

    Background: Radial artery cannulation is a skillful procedure. An experienced anesthesiologist might also face difficulty in cannulating a feeble radial pulse. Aim: The purpose of the study was to determine whether periradial subcutaneous administration of papaverine results in effective vasodilation and improvement in the palpability score of radial artery. Settings and Design: Prospective, double-blinded trial. Methodology: Thirty patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery were enrolled in the study. 30 mg of papaverine with 1 ml of 2% lignocaine and 3 ml of normal saline were injected subcutaneously 1–2 cm proximal to styloid process of the radius. Radial artery diameter before and after 20 min of injection papaverine was measured using ultrasonography. The palpability of the radial pulse was also determined before the injection of papaverine and 20 min later. Patients were monitored for hemodynamics and any complications were noted. Statistical Analysis Used: Student's t-test for paired data. Results: Radial artery diameter increased significantly (P < 0.0001), and the pulse palpability score also showed statistically significant improvement (P < 0.0001) after periradial subcutaneous administration of papaverine. There was no statistically significant difference in heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure before and after papaverine injection. No complications were noted in 24 h of follow-up. Conclusion: Periradial subcutaneous administration of papaverine significantly increased the radial artery diameter and pulse palpability score, which had an impact on ease of radial artery cannulation essential for hemodynamic monitoring in cardiac surgical patients. PMID:28298790

  16. Metallic radial head arthroplasty improves valgus stability of the elbow.

    PubMed

    King, G J; Zarzour, Z D; Rath, D A; Dunning, C E; Patterson, S D; Johnson, J A

    1999-11-01

    The stabilizing influence of radial head arthroplasty was studied in eight medial collateral ligament deficient anatomic specimen elbows. An elbow testing apparatus, which used computer controlled pneumatic actuators to apply tendon loading, was used to simulate active elbow flexion. The motion pathways of the elbow were measured using an electromagnetic tracking device, with the forearm in supination and pronation. As a measure of stability, the maximum varus to valgus laxity over the range of elbow flexion was determined from the difference between varus and valgus gravity loaded motion pathways. After transection of the medial collateral ligament, the radial head was excised and replaced with either a silicone or one of three metallic radial head prostheses. Medial collateral ligament transection caused a significant increase in the maximum varus to valgus laxity to 18.0 degrees +/- 3.2 degrees. After radial head excision, this laxity increased to 35.6 degrees +/- 10.3 degrees. The silicone implant conferred no increase in elbow stability, with a maximum varus to valgus laxity of 32.5 degrees +/- 15.5 degrees. All three metallic implants improved the valgus stability of the medial collateral ligament deficient elbow, providing stability similar to the intact radial head. The use of silicone arthroplasty to replace the radial head in the medial collateral ligament deficient elbow must be questioned. Metallic radial head arthroplasty provides improved valgus stability, approaching that of an intact radial head.

  17. A new approach to radial and axial gauges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigert, Heribert; Heinz, Ulrich

    1992-03-01

    We develop a new path integral formulation of QCD in radial and axial gauges. This formalism yields free propagators which are free of gauge poles. We find that radial gauges are ghost free. In axial gauges ghosts cannot generally be excluded from the formalism due to the need to fix the residual gauge freedom.

  18. Zero side force volute development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, P. G.; Franz, R. J.; Farmer, R. C.; Chen, Y. S.

    1995-01-01

    Collector scrolls on high performance centrifugal pumps are currently designed with methods which are based on very approximate flowfield models. Such design practices result in some volute configurations causing excessive side loads even at design flowrates. The purpose of this study was to develop and verify computational design tools which may be used to optimize volute configurations with respect to avoiding excessive loads on the bearings. The new design methodology consisted of a volute grid generation module and a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) module to describe the volute geometry and predict the radial forces for a given flow condition, respectively. Initially, the CFD module was used to predict the impeller and the volute flowfields simultaneously; however, the required computation time was found to be excessive for parametric design studies. A second computational procedure was developed which utilized an analytical impeller flowfield model and an ordinary differential equation to describe the impeller/volute coupling obtained from the literature, Adkins & Brennen (1988). The second procedure resulted in 20 to 30 fold increase in computational speed for an analysis. The volute design analysis was validated by postulating a volute geometry, constructing a volute to this configuration, and measuring the steady radial forces over a range of flow coefficients. Excellent agreement between model predictions and observed pump operation prove the computational impeller/volute pump model to be a valuable design tool. Further applications are recommended to fully establish the benefits of this new methodology.

  19. RADIAL VELOCITY VARIABILITY OF FIELD BROWN DWARFS

    SciTech Connect

    Prato, L.; Mace, G. N.; Rice, E. L.; McLean, I. S.; Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Burgasser, A. J.; Kim, Sungsoo S.

    2015-07-20

    We present paper six of the NIRSPEC Brown Dwarf Spectroscopic Survey, an analysis of multi-epoch, high-resolution (R ∼ 20,000) spectra of 25 field dwarf systems (3 late-type M dwarfs, 16 L dwarfs, and 6 T dwarfs) taken with the NIRSPEC infrared spectrograph at the W. M. Keck Observatory. With a radial velocity (RV) precision of ∼2 km s{sup −1}, we are sensitive to brown dwarf companions in orbits with periods of a few years or less given a mass ratio of 0.5 or greater. We do not detect any spectroscopic binary brown dwarfs in the sample. Given our target properties, and the frequency and cadence of observations, we use a Monte Carlo simulation to determine the detection probability of our sample. Even with a null detection result, our 1σ upper limit for very low mass binary frequency is 18%. Our targets included seven known, wide brown dwarf binary systems. No significant RV variability was measured in our multi-epoch observations of these systems, even for those pairs for which our data spanned a significant fraction of the orbital period. Specialized techniques are required to reach the high precisions sensitive to motion in orbits of very low-mass systems. For eight objects, including six T dwarfs, we present the first published high-resolution spectra, many with high signal to noise, that will provide valuable comparison data for models of brown dwarf atmospheres.

  20. Radial velocities of southern visual multiple stars

    SciTech Connect

    Tokovinin, Andrei; Pribulla, Theodor; Fischer, Debra E-mail: pribulla@ta3.sk

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution spectra of visual multiple stars were taken in 2008–2009 to detect or confirm spectroscopic subsystems and to determine their orbits. Radial velocities of 93 late-type stars belonging to visual multiple systems were measured by numerical cross-correlation. We provide the individual velocities, the width, and the amplitude of the Gaussians that approximate the correlations. The new information on the multiple systems resulting from these data is discussed. We discovered double-lined binaries in HD 41742B, HD 56593C, and HD 122613AB, confirmed several other known subsystems, and constrained the existence of subsystems in some visual binaries where both components turned out to have similar velocities. The orbits of double-lined subsystems with periods of 148 and 13 days are computed for HD 104471 Aa,Ab and HD 210349 Aa,Ab, respectively. We estimate individual magnitudes and masses of the components in these triple systems and update the outer orbit of HD 104471 AB.

  1. Fabrication of cooled radial turbine rotor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, A. N.; Aigret, G. G.; Psichogios, T. P.; Rodgers, C.

    1986-01-01

    A design and fabrication program was conducted to evaluate a unique concept for constructing a cooled, high temperature radial turbine rotor. This concept, called split blade fabrication was developed as an alternative to internal ceramic coring. In this technique, the internal cooling cavity is created without flow dividers or any other detail by a solid (and therefore stronger) ceramic plate which can be more firmly anchored within the casting shell mold than can conventional detailed ceramic cores. Casting is conducted in the conventional manner, except that the finished product, instead of having finished internal cooling passages, is now a split blade. The internal details of the blade are created separately together with a carrier sheet. The inserts are superalloy. Both are produced by essentially the same software such that they are a net fit. The carrier assemblies are loaded into the split blade and the edges sealed by welding. The entire wheel is Hot Isostatic Pressed (HIPed), braze bonding the internal details to the inside of the blades. During this program, two wheels were successfully produced by the split blade fabrication technique.

  2. Camera Calibration with Radial Variance Component Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mélykuti, B.; Kruck, E. J.

    2014-11-01

    Camera calibration plays a more and more important role in recent times. Beside real digital aerial survey cameras the photogrammetric market is dominated by a big number of non-metric digital cameras mounted on UAVs or other low-weight flying platforms. The in-flight calibration of those systems has a significant role to enhance the geometric accuracy of survey photos considerably. It is expected to have a better precision of photo measurements in the center of images then along the edges or in the corners. With statistical methods the accuracy of photo measurements in dependency of the distance of points from image center has been analyzed. This test provides a curve for the measurement precision as function of the photo radius. A high number of camera types have been tested with well penetrated point measurements in image space. The result of the tests led to a general consequence to show a functional connection between accuracy and radial distance and to give a method how to check and enhance the geometrical capability of the cameras in respect to these results.

  3. Analysis of radial basis function interpolation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, You-Long; Hu, Fa-Long; Zhou, Can-Can; Li, Chao-Liu; Dunn, Keh-Jim

    2013-12-01

    The radial basis function (RBF) interpolation approach proposed by Freedman is used to solve inverse problems encountered in well-logging and other petrophysical issues. The approach is to predict petrophysical properties in the laboratory on the basis of physical rock datasets, which include the formation factor, viscosity, permeability, and molecular composition. However, this approach does not consider the effect of spatial distribution of the calibration data on the interpolation result. This study proposes a new RBF interpolation approach based on the Freedman's RBF interpolation approach, by which the unit basis functions are uniformly populated in the space domain. The inverse results of the two approaches are comparatively analyzed by using our datasets. We determine that although the interpolation effects of the two approaches are equivalent, the new approach is more flexible and beneficial for reducing the number of basis functions when the database is large, resulting in simplification of the interpolation function expression. However, the predicted results of the central data are not sufficiently satisfied when the data clusters are far apart.

  4. Experiments of a monolithic radial transmission line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, C.; Wang, X.; Zou, X.; Lehr, J.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the experimental results of a monolithic radial transmission line (MRTL) that may be used in pulsed power generators and microwave devices. The MRTL with a hyperbolic impedance profile is 508 mm in radius, corresponding to a one-way transit time of 15 ns for the electromagnetic wave. In the experiments, up to twenty identical voltage pulses, 10 ns in FWHM and 2 ns in rise-time, were fed into the MRTL through 20 input BNC connectors that are uniformly distributed along the outer circumference of the MRTL. It was found that the amplitude of the voltage from the output BNC connector located in the center of the MRTL is nearly proportional to the total number of the input branches. The effect of the failure modes on the output voltage was investigated. For the MRTL driven by 20 input branches, while the open-circuit or short-circuit even in one input branch considerably decreases the amplitude of the output voltage, the jitter shorter than 2 ns in 3 input branches makes no obvious effect on the output voltage.

  5. The ITER Radial Neutron Camera Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Marocco, D.; Belli, F.; Esposito, B.; Petrizzi, L.; Riva, M.; Bonheure, G.; Kaschuck, Y.

    2008-03-12

    A multichannel neutron detection system (Radial Neutron Camera, RNC) will be installed on the ITER equatorial port plug 1 for total neutron source strength, neutron emissivity/ion temperature profiles and n{sub t}/n{sub d} ratio measurements [1]. The system is composed by two fan shaped collimating structures: an ex-vessel structure, looking at the plasma core, containing tree sets of 12 collimators (each set lying on a different toroidal plane), and an in-vessel structure, containing 9 collimators, for plasma edge coverage. The RNC detecting system will work in a harsh environment (neutron fiux up to 10{sup 8}-10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} s, magnetic field >0.5 T or in-vessel detectors), should provide both counting and spectrometric information and should be flexible enough to cover the high neutron flux dynamic range expected during the different ITER operation phases. ENEA has been involved in several activities related to RNC design and optimization [2,3]. In the present paper the up-to-date design and the neutron emissivity reconstruction capabilities of the RNC will be described. Different options for detectors suitable for spectrometry and counting (e.g. scintillators and diamonds) focusing on the implications in terms of overall RNC performance will be discussed. The increase of the RNC capabilities offered by the use of new digital data acquisition systems will be also addressed.

  6. A Dust-Penetrated Classification Scheme for Bars as Inferred from their Gravitational Force Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buta, R.; Block, D. L.

    2001-05-01

    The division of galaxies into barred (SB) and normal (S) spirals is a fundamental aspect of the Hubble galaxy classification system. This tuning fork view was revised by de Vaucouleurs, whose classification volume recognized apparent bar strength (SA, SAB, SB) as a continuous property of galaxies called the ``family.'' However, the SA, SAB, and SB families are purely visual judgments that can have little bearing on the actual bar strength in a given galaxy. Until recently, published bar judgments were based exclusively on blue light images, where internal extinction or star formation can completely mask a bar. Near-infrared camera arrays, which principally trace the old stellar population in both normal and barred galaxies, now facilitate a quantification of bar strength in terms of gravitational potentials and force fields. In this paper, we show that the maximum value of the ratio of the tangential force to the mean axisymmetric radial force is a quantitative measure of the strength of a bar that can be straightforwardly derived for many galaxies. We show that a wide range of true bar strengths characterizes the category SB, while category SAB corresponds to a narrower range of bar strengths. Based on the force ratio, we define seven classes of bar strength and incorporate these classes into a dust-penetrated classification system for spiral galaxies. This work was supported by NSF grant AST 9617154 and the Anglo-American Chairman's Fund, Mrs. M. Keeton, CEO.

  7. Mapping the fluid flow and shear near the core surface using the radial and horizontal components of the magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Andrew; Bloxham, Jeremy

    1991-01-01

    The problem of calculating the temporal evolution of both the radial and horizontal poloidal components of a field, given an initial field and the flow and shear, is first considered. Attention is then given to the inverse problem of determining the flow and shear, given an initial field and its temporal evolution. The nonuniqueness inherent in such inversions is discussed, and it is shown that part of the nonuniqueness in the shear is closely related to that in the flow derived from just the radial induction equation.

  8. Spectroscopic mode identification of main-sequence non-radially pulsating stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisonneuve, F.; Pollard, K. R.; Cottrell, P. L.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Wright, D. J.; De Cat, P.

    2010-07-01

    We are undertaking an extensive observational campaign of a number of non-radially pulsating stars using the high-resolution HERCULES spectrograph on the 1.0-m telescope at the Mt John University Observatory. This is part of a large world-wide multi-site campaign to improve mode-identification techniques in non-radially pulsating stars, particularly for g-mode pulsators. This paper outlines our campaign and presents preliminary results for one γ Doradus star, HD 40745, and one β Cephei star, HD 61068. We have used a representative cross-correlation line-profile technique presented by Wright in 2008 to extract line profiles and these have then been analyzed using the FAMIAS package due to Zima published in 2006 to derive a spectroscopic mode identification.

  9. An off-center point explosion in a radially stratified medium - Kompaneets approximation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korycansky, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    The Kompaneets (1960) approximation is applied to a blast in a medium that is radially stratified according to a power law. The basic equation is derived that gives the location of the shock front as a function of time. This equation is transformed by means of a conformal coordinate transformation into an equation in which the density variation of the medium does not appear. In the new coordinates, and the problem is reduced to that of a blast in a uniform medium, the solution of which is a set of concentric circles about the initial explosion point; in the transformed coordinates, the paths followed by points on the shock front are radial, making it possible to find the paths in the original coordinates. Using the new solution, the effect of the explosion is considered for a solid core embedded at the origin, and the extent of the core's surface that is affected by the blast is calculated.

  10. Semiclassical trace formula for the two-dimensional radial power-law potentials.

    PubMed

    Magner, A G; Vlasenko, A A; Arita, K

    2013-06-01

    The trace formula for the density of single-particle levels in the two-dimensional radial power-law potentials, which nicely approximate up to a constant shift the radial dependence of the Woods-Saxon potential and its quantum spectra in a bound region, was derived by the improved stationary phase method. The specific analytical results are obtained for the powers α=4 and 6. The enhancement of periodic-orbit contribution to the level density near the bifurcations are found to be significant for the description of the fine shell structure. The semiclassical trace formulas for the shell corrections to the level density and the energy of many-fermion systems reproduce the quantum results with good accuracy through all the bifurcation (symmetry breaking) catastrophe points, where the standard stationary-phase method breaks down. Various limits (including the harmonic oscillator and the spherical billiard) are obtained from the same analytical trace formula.

  11. The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE), a preview to what to expect from the Gaia RVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinmetz, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    The Radial Velocity Experiment (RAVE) is a large wide-field spectroscopic stellar survey of the Milky Way. Over the period 2003-2013, 574,630 spectra for 483,330 stars have been amassed at a resolution of R=7500 in the Ca-triplet region of 8410-8795 Å. Wavelength coverage and resolution are thus comparable to that anticipated from the Gaia RVS. Derived data products of RAVE include radial velocities, stellar parameters, chemicals abundances for Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, and Ni, and absorption measured based on the DIB at 8620 Å. Since more than 290000 RAVE targets are drawn from the Tycho-2 catalogue, RAVE will be interesting prototype for the anticipated full Gaia data releases, in particular when combined with the first Gaia data releases, in particular when combined with the early Gaia data releases, which contain astrometry but not yet stellar parameters and abundances.

  12. Flute instability and the associated radial transport in the tandem mirror with a divertor mirror cell

    SciTech Connect

    Katanuma, I.; Yagi, K.; Haraguchi, Y.; Ichioka, N.; Masaki, S.; Ichimura, M.; Imai, T.

    2010-11-15

    The flute instability and the associated radial transport are investigated in the tandem mirror with a divertor mirror cell (the GAMMA10 A-divertor) with help of computer simulation, where GAMMA10 is introduced [Inutake et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 939 (1985)]. The basic equations used in the simulation were derived on the assumption of an axisymmetric magnetic field. So the high plasma pressure in a nonaxisymmetric minimum-B anchor mirror cell, which is important for the flute mode stability, is taken into account by redefining the specific volume of a magnetic field line. It is found that the flute modes are stabilized by the minimum-B magnetic field even with a divertor mirror although its stabilizing effects are weaker than that without the divertor mirror. The flute instability enhances the radial transport by intermittently repeating the growing up and down of the Fourier amplitude of the flute instability in time.

  13. Marangoni effects on a thin liquid film coating a sphere with axial or radial thermal gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Di; Nadim, Ali; Chugunova, Marina

    2016-11-01

    We study the time evolution of a thin liquid film coating the outer surface of a sphere in the presence of gravity, surface tension and thermal gradients. We derive the fourth-order nonlinear partial differential equation that models the thin film dynamics, including Marangoni terms arising from the dependence of surface tension on temperature. We consider two different heating regimes with axial or radial thermal gradients. We analyze the stability of a uniform coating under small perturbations and carry out numerical simulations in COMSOL for a range of parameter values. In the case of an axial temperature gradient, we find steady states with either uniform film thickness, or with drops forming at the top or bottom of the sphere, depending on the total volume of liquid in the film, dictating whether gravity or Marangoni effects dominate. In the case of a radial temperature gradient, a stability analysis reveals the most unstable non-axisymmetric modes on an initially uniform coating film.

  14. Molecular identity of human outer radial glia during cortical development.

    PubMed

    Pollen, Alex A; Nowakowski, Tomasz J; Chen, Jiadong; Retallack, Hanna; Sandoval-Espinosa, Carmen; Nicholas, Cory R; Shuga, Joe; Liu, Siyuan John; Oldham, Michael C; Diaz, Aaron; Lim, Daniel A; Leyrat, Anne A; West, Jay A; Kriegstein, Arnold R

    2015-09-24

    Radial glia, the neural stem cells of the neocortex, are located in two niches: the ventricular zone and outer subventricular zone. Although outer subventricular zone radial glia may generate the majority of human cortical neurons, their molecular features remain elusive. By analyzing gene expression across single cells, we find that outer radial glia preferentially express genes related to extracellular matrix formation, migration, and stemness, including TNC, PTPRZ1, FAM107A, HOPX, and LIFR. Using dynamic imaging, immunostaining, and clonal analysis, we relate these molecular features to distinctive behaviors of outer radial glia, demonstrate the necessity of STAT3 signaling for their cell cycle progression, and establish their extensive proliferative potential. These results suggest that outer radial glia directly support the subventricular niche through local production of growth factors, potentiation of growth factor signals by extracellular matrix proteins, and activation of self-renewal pathways, thereby enabling the developmental and evolutionary expansion of the human neocortex.

  15. Waves in Radial Gravity Using Magnetic Fluid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohlsen, Daniel R.; Hart, John E.; Weidman, Patrick D.

    1996-01-01

    We are beginning laboratory experiments using magnetically active ferrofluids to study surface waves in novel geometries. Terrestrial gravity is eliminated from the dynamics, and the magnetic body force felt by ferrofluid in the presence of a magnetic field gradient is used to create a geopotential field which is a section of or an entire sphere or cylinder. New optical, electromagnetic and ultrasonic diagnostic techniques are under development to initially study capillary-gravity wave propagation and interaction in such geometries.

  16. Generalized Second-Order Partial Derivatives of 1/r

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hnizdo, V.

    2011-01-01

    The generalized second-order partial derivatives of 1/r, where r is the radial distance in three dimensions (3D), are obtained using a result of the potential theory of classical analysis. Some non-spherical-regularization alternatives to the standard spherical-regularization expression for the derivatives are derived. The utility of a…

  17. A radial velocity study of the intermediate polar EX Hydrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echevarría, J.; Ramírez-Torres, A.; Michel, R.; Hernández Santisteban, J. V.

    2016-09-01

    A study on the intermediate polar EX Hya is presented, based on simultaneous photometry and high-dispersion spectroscopic observations, during four consecutive nights. The strong photometric modulation related to the 67-min spin period of the primary star is clearly present, as well as the narrow eclipses associated with the orbital modulation. Since our eclipse timings have been obtained almost 91 000 cycles since the last reported observations, we present new linear ephemeris, although we cannot rule out a sinusoidal variation suggested by previous authors. The system shows double-peaked H α, H β and He I λ5876 Å emission lines, with almost no other lines present. As H α is the only line with enough S/N ratio in our observations, we have concentrated our efforts in its study, in order to obtain a reliable radial velocity semi-amplitude. From the profile of this line, we find two important components; one with a steep rise and velocities not larger than ˜1000 km s-1 and another broader component extending up to ˜2000 km s-1, which we interpret as coming mainly from the inner disc. A strong and variable hotspot is found and a stream-like structure is seen at times. We show that the best solution correspond to K1 = 58 ± 5 km s-1 from H α, from the two emission components, which are both in phase with the orbital modulation. We remark on a peculiar effect in the radial velocity curve around phase zero, which could be interpreted as a Rositter-MacLaughlin-like effect, which has been taken into account before deriving K1. This value is compatible with the values found in high resolution both in the ultraviolet and X-ray. Using the published inclination angle of i =78° ± 1° and semi-amplitude K2 = 432 ± 5 km s-1, we find: M1 = 0.78 ± 0.03 M⊙, M2 = 0.10 ± 0.02 M⊙ and a = 0.67 ± 0.01 R⊙. Doppler Tomography has been applied, to construct six Doppler tomograms for single orbital cycles spanning the four days of observations to support our conclusions

  18. Adaptive radial basis function mesh deformation using data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillebaart, T.; Blom, D. S.; van Zuijlen, A. H.; Bijl, H.

    2016-09-01

    Radial Basis Function (RBF) mesh deformation is one of the most robust mesh deformation methods available. Using the greedy (data reduction) method in combination with an explicit boundary correction, results in an efficient method as shown in literature. However, to ensure the method remains robust, two issues are addressed: 1) how to ensure that the set of control points remains an accurate representation of the geometry in time and 2) how to use/automate the explicit boundary correction, while ensuring a high mesh quality. In this paper, we propose an adaptive RBF mesh deformation method, which ensures the set of control points always represents the geometry/displacement up to a certain (user-specified) criteria, by keeping track of the boundary error throughout the simulation and re-selecting when needed. Opposed to the unit displacement and prescribed displacement selection methods, the adaptive method is more robust, user-independent and efficient, for the cases considered. Secondly, the analysis of a single high aspect ratio cell is used to formulate an equation for the correction radius needed, depending on the characteristics of the correction function used, maximum aspect ratio, minimum first cell height and boundary error. Based on the analysis two new radial basis correction functions are derived and proposed. This proposed automated procedure is verified while varying the correction function, Reynolds number (and thus first cell height and aspect ratio) and boundary error. Finally, the parallel efficiency is studied for the two adaptive methods, unit displacement and prescribed displacement for both the CPU as well as the memory formulation with a 2D oscillating and translating airfoil with oscillating flap, a 3D flexible locally deforming tube and deforming wind turbine blade. Generally, the memory formulation requires less work (due to the large amount of work required for evaluating RBF's), but the parallel efficiency reduces due to the limited

  19. Radial access for cerebrovascular procedures: Case report and technical note

    PubMed Central

    Vance, Ansar Z; Sivapatham, Thinesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Advantages of radial access over brachial/axillary or femoral access have been well described for several decades and include decreased cost, patient preference, and decreased major access site complications. Despite these advantages, radial access is rarely employed or even considered for neurointerventional procedures. This attitude should be reconsidered given several recent large, randomized, controlled trials from the cardiovascular literature proving that radial access is associated with statistically lower costs, decreased incidence of myocardial infarctions, strokes, and even decreased mortality. Radial access is now considered the standard of care for percutaneous coronary interventions in most US centers. Although radial access has been described for neurovascular procedures in the past, overall experience is limited. The two major challenges are the unique anatomy required to access the cerebral vasculature given very acute angles between the arm and craniocervical vessels and limitations in available technology. Methods We present a simplified approach to radial access for cerebrovascular procedures and provide a concise step-by-step approach for patient selection, ultrasound-guided single-wall access, recommended catheters/wires, and review of patent hemostasis. Additionally, we present a complex cerebrovascular intervention in which standard femoral access was unsuccessful, while radial access was quickly achieved to highlight the importance of familiarity with the radial approach for all neurointerventionalists. Results We have found that the learning curve is not too steep and that the radial access approach can be adopted smoothly for a large percentage of diagnostic and interventional neuroradiologic procedures. Conclusions Radial access should be considered in all patients undergoing a cerebrovascular procedure. PMID:26659807

  20. ForceViewer: A Starting Point Force Tool

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    to assemble the list of capabilities forming the Starting Point Force ( SPF ). This SPF is used by a number of organisations within Defence and in...particular by the Force Structure Review (FSR) team. The SPF is usually assembled using Microsoft Word and Excel to store and derive which capability...better tool that delivers the SPF was identified by Joint Operations Divi- sion, Joint Decisions Support Centre (JDSC) task. This was translated into

  1. Conservative second-order gravitational self-force on circular orbits and the effective one-body formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bini, Donato; Damour, Thibault

    2016-05-01

    We consider Detweiler's redshift variable z for a nonspinning mass m1 in circular motion (with orbital frequency Ω ) around a nonspinning mass m2. We show how the combination of effective-one-body (EOB) theory with the first law of binary dynamics allows one to derive a simple, exact expression for the functional dependence of z on the (gauge-invariant) EOB gravitational potential u =(m1+m2)/R . We then use the recently obtained high-post-Newtonian(PN)-order knowledge of the main EOB radial potential A (u ;ν ) [where ν =m1m2/(m1+m2)2] to decompose the second-self-force-order contribution to the function z (m2Ω ,m1/m2) into a known part (which goes beyond the 4PN level in including the 5PN logarithmic term and the 5.5PN contribution) and an unknown one [depending on the yet unknown, 5PN, 6 PN ,… , contributions to the O (ν2) contribution to the EOB radial potential A (u ;ν )]. We apply our results to the second-self-force-order contribution to the frequency shift of the last stable orbit. We indicate the expected singular behaviors, near the lightring, of the second-self-force-order contributions to both the redshift and the EOB A potential. Our results should help both in extracting information of direct dynamical significance from ongoing second-self-force-order computations and in parametrizing their global strong-field behaviors. We also advocate computing second-self-force-order conservative quantities by iterating the time-symmetric Green-function in the background spacetime.

  2. Inertia driven radial breathing and nonlinear relaxation in cylindrically confined pure electron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2014-02-15

    The dynamics of cylindrically trapped electron plasma has been investigated using a newly developed 2D Electrostatic PIC code that uses unapproximated, mass-included equations of motion for simulation. Exhaustive simulations, covering the entire range of Brillouin ratio, were performed for uniformly filled circular profiles in rigid rotor equilibrium. The same profiles were then loaded away from equilibrium with an initial value of rigid rotation frequency different from that required for radial force balance. Both these sets of simulations were performed for an initial zero-temperature or cold load of the plasma with no spread in either angular velocity or radial velocity. The evolution of the off-equilibrium initial conditions to a steady state involve radial breathing of the profile that scales in amplitude and algebraic growth with Brillouin fraction. For higher Brillouin fractions, the growth of the breathing mode is followed by complex dynamics of spontaneous hollow density structures, excitation of poloidal modes, leading to a monotonically falling density profile.

  3. Inertia driven radial breathing and nonlinear relaxation in cylindrically confined pure electron plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sengupta, M.; Ganesh, R.

    2015-06-29

    The dynamics of cylindrically trapped electron plasma has been investigated using a newly developed 2D Electrostatic PIC code that uses unapproximated, mass-included equations of motion for simulation. Exhaustive simulations, covering the entire range of Brillouin ratio, were performed for uniformly filled circular profiles in rigid rotor equilibrium. The same profiles were then loaded away from equilibrium with an initial value of rigid rotation frequency different from that required for radial force balance. Both these sets of simulations were performed for an initial zero-temperature or cold load of the plasma with no spread in either angular velocity or radial velocity. The evolution of the off-equilibrium initial conditions to a steady state involve radial breathing of the profile that scales in amplitude and algebraic growth with Brillouin fraction. For higher Brillouin fractions, the growth of the breathing mode is followed by complex dynamics of spontaneous hollow density structures, excitation of poloidal modes, leading to a monotonically falling density profile.

  4. Effect of dextran 500 on radial migration of erythrocytes in postcapillary venules at low flow rates.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sangho; Ong, Peng Kai; Johnson, Paul C

    2009-06-01

    Recently, we reported that collision efficiency (fraction of total collisions that result in the formation of aggregates) between red blood cells was an important factor in the formation of aggregates in postcapillary venules. In the present study, we focus on how high molecular weight dextran influences the overall radial migration trend of red blood cells in the postcapillary venule along a longitudinal distance of 50 microm from the bifurcation which would in turn affect collision behavior of these cells. A radial migration index, which defines the extent of radial migration of individual cells relative to the vessel center, was found to have a larger magnitude after infusion of dextran (1.9 +/- 2.73) compared to that before dextran infusion (1.48 +/- 3.89). This implied that dextran-induced aggregation might provide an external force to actively move cells towards the centerline of the vessel, which could contribute to the greater number of red blood cells participating in collision (16% increase) and aggregate formation. Further analysis of the collision behavior of individual red blood cells revealed that collision frequencies of individual cells decreased from a wide range (1 to 14) to a narrow range (1 to 5) after dextran treatment, indicating the alteration of collision behavior of red blood cells by the presence of aggregates along the flow stream.

  5. Radial migration in numerical simulations of Milky-Way sized galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grand, R. J. J.; Kawata, D.

    2016-09-01

    We show that in ßrm N-body simulations of isolated spiral discs, spiral arms appear to transient, recurring features that co-rotate with the stellar disc stars at all radii. As a consequence, stars around the spiral arm continually feel a tangential force from the spiral and gain/lose angular momentum at all radii where spiral structure exists, without gaining significant amounts of random energy. We demonstrate that the ubiquitous radial migration in these simulations can be seen as outward (inward) systematic streaming motions along the trailing (leading) side of the spiral arms. We characterise these spiral induced peculiar motions and compare with those of the Milky Way obtained from APOGEE red clump data. We find that transient, co-rotating spiral arms are consistent with the data, in contrast with density wave-like spirals which are qualitatively inconsistent. In addition, we show that, in our simulations, radial migration does not change the radial metallicity gradient significantly, and broadens the metallicity distribution function at all radii, similar to some previous studies.

  6. The Carina Project. IV. Radial Velocity Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabrizio, M.; Nonino, M.; Bono, G.; Ferraro, I.; François, P.; Iannicola, G.; Monelli, M.; Thévenin, F.; Stetson, P. B.; Walker, A. R.; Buonanno, R.; Caputo, F.; Corsi, C. E.; Dall’Ora, M.; Gilmozzi, R.; James, C. R.; Merle, T.; Pulone, L.; Romaniello, M.

    2011-04-01

    We present new and accurate radial velocity (RV) measurements of luminous stars of all ages (old horizontal branch, intermediate-age red clump, and young blue plume, as well as red giants of a range of ages: 20.6 ≤ V ≤ 22) in the Carina dwarf spheroidal galaxy, based on low-resolution spectra collected with the FORS2 multiobject slit spectrograph at the VLT. This data set was complemented by RV measurements based on medium- and high-resolution archive spectra of brighter (V ≲ 20.6) Carina targets collected with the GIRAFFE multiobject fiber spectrograph at the VLT. The combined sample includes more than 21,340 individual spectra of ≈2000 stars covering the entire body of the galaxy. The mean ( = 220.4 ± 0.1 km s-1) and the dispersion (σ = 11.7 ± 0.1 km s-1) of the RV distribution of candidate Carina stars (∼1210 objects, 180 ≤ RV ≤ 260 km s-1, 4σ) agree quite well with similar measurements available in the literature. To further improve the statistics, the accurate RV measurements recently provided by Walker et al. were also added to the current data set. We ended up with a sample of ∼1370 RV measurements of candidate Carina stars that is ≈75% larger than any previous Carina RV sample. We found that the hypothesis that the Carina RV distribution is Gaussian can be discarded at 99% confidence level. The mean RV across the body of the galaxy varies from ∼220 km s-1 at a distance of 7‧ (∼200 pc) from the center to ∼223 km s-1 at 13‧ (∼400 pc, 6σ level) and flattens out to a constant value of ∼221 km s-1 at larger distances (600 pc, 4σ level). Moreover, and even more importantly, we found that in the Carina regions where the mean RV is smaller, the dispersion is also smaller, and the RV distribution is more centrally peaked (i.e., the kurtosis attains larger values). The difference in mean RV is more than 4 km s-1 (9σ level) when moving from east to west and more than 3 km s-1 (∼7σ level) when moving from north to south

  7. Analysis of steady-state and dynamical radially-symmetric problems of nonlinear viscoelasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, Alexey B.

    This thesis treats radially symmetric steady states and radially symmetric motions of nonlinearly elastic and viscoelastic plates and shells subject to dead-load and hydrostatic pressures on their boundaries and with the plate subject to centrifugal force. The plates and shells are described by specializations of the exact (nonlinear) equations of three-dimensional continuum mechanics. The treatment in every case is very general and encompasses large classes of constitutive functions (characterizing the material response). We first treat the radially symmetric steady states of plates and shells and the radially symmetric steady rotations of plates. We show that the existence, multiplicity, and qualitative behavior of solutions for problems accounting for the live loads due to hydrostatic pressure and centrifugal force depend critically on the material properties of the bodies, physically reasonable refined descriptions of which are given and examined here with great care, and on the nature of boundary conditions. he treatment here, giving new and sharp results, employs several different mathematical tools, ranging from phase-plane analysis to the mathematically more sophisticated direct methods of the Calculus of Variations, fixed-point theorems, and global continuation methods, each of which has different strengths and weaknesses for handling intrinsic difficulties in the mechanics. We then treat the initial-boundary-value problems for the radially symmetric motions of annular plates and spherical shells that consist of a nonlinearly viscoelastic material of strain-rate type. We discuss a range of physically natural constitutive equations. We first show that when the material is strong in a suitable sense relative to externally applied loads, solutions exist for all time, depend continuously on the data, and consequently are unique. We study the role of the constitutive restrictions and that of the regularity of the data in ensuring the preclusion of a total

  8. TRUE MASSES OF RADIAL-VELOCITY EXOPLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Robert A.

    2015-06-01

    We study the task of estimating the true masses of known radial-velocity (RV) exoplanets by means of direct astrometry on coronagraphic images to measure the apparent separation between exoplanet and host star. Initially, we assume perfect knowledge of the RV orbital parameters and that all errors are due to photon statistics. We construct design reference missions for four missions currently under study at NASA: EXO-S and WFIRST-S, with external star shades for starlight suppression, EXO-C and WFIRST-C, with internal coronagraphs. These DRMs reveal extreme scheduling constraints due to the combination of solar and anti-solar pointing restrictions, photometric and obscurational completeness, image blurring due to orbital motion, and the “nodal effect,” which is the independence of apparent separation and inclination when the planet crosses the plane of the sky through the host star. Next, we address the issue of nonzero uncertainties in RV orbital parameters by investigating their impact on the observations of 21 single-planet systems. Except for two—GJ 676 A b and 16 Cyg B b, which are observable only by the star-shade missions—we find that current uncertainties in orbital parameters generally prevent accurate, unbiased estimation of true planetary mass. For the coronagraphs, WFIRST-C and EXO-C, the most likely number of good estimators of true mass is currently zero. For the star shades, EXO-S and WFIRST-S, the most likely numbers of good estimators are three and four, respectively, including GJ 676 A b and 16 Cyg B b. We expect that uncertain orbital elements currently undermine all potential programs of direct imaging and spectroscopy of RV exoplanets.

  9. Scaling thermal effects in radial flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudspeth, R. T.; Guenther, R. B.; Roley, K. L.; McDougal, W. G.

    To adequately evaluate the environmental impact of siting nuclear waste repositories in basalt aquicludes, it is essential to know the effects on parameter identification algorithms of thermal gradients that exist in these basaltic aquicludes. Temperatures of approximately 60°C and pressures of approximately 150 atm can be expected at potential repository sites located at depths of approximately 1000 m. The phenomenon of over-recovery has been observed in some pumping tests conducted at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation located in the Pasco Basin adjacent to the Columbia River in the state of Washington, USA. This over-recovery phenomenon may possibly be due to variations in the fluid density caused by thermal gradients. To assess the potential effects of these thermal gradients on indirect parameter identification algorithms, a systematic scaling of the governing field equations is required in order to obtain dimensionless equations based on the principle of similarity. The constitutive relationships for the specific weight of the fluid and for the porosity of the aquiclude are shown to be exponentially dependent on the pressure gradient. The dynamic pressure is converted to the piezometric head and the flow equation for the piezometric head is then scaled in radial coordinates. Order-of-magnitude estimates are made for all variables in unsteady flow for a typical well test in a basaltic aquiclude. Retaining all nonlinear terms, the parametric dependency of the flow equation on the classical dimensionless thermal and hydraulic parameters is demonstrated. These classical parameters include the Batchelor, Fourier, Froude, Grashof, and Reynolds Numbers associated with thermal flows. The flow equation is linearized from order-of-magnitude estimates based on these classical parameters for application in parameter identification algorithms.

  10. Elongated nanostructures for radial junction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, Yinghuan; Di Vece, Marcel; Rath, Jatindra K.; van Dijk, Lourens; Schropp, Ruud E. I.

    2013-10-01

    In solar cell technology, the current trend is to thin down the active absorber layer. The main advantage of a thinner absorber is primarily the reduced consumption of material and energy during production. For thin film silicon (Si) technology, thinning down the absorber layer is of particular interest since both the device throughput of vacuum deposition systems and the stability of the devices are significantly enhanced. These features lead to lower cost per installed watt peak for solar cells, provided that the (stabilized) efficiency is the same as for thicker devices. However, merely thinning down inevitably leads to a reduced light absorption. Therefore, advanced light trapping schemes are crucial to increase the light path length. The use of elongated nanostructures is a promising method for advanced light trapping. The enhanced optical performance originates from orthogonalization of the light's travel path with respect to the direction of carrier collection due to the radial junction, an improved anti-reflection effect thanks to the three-dimensional geometric configuration and the multiple scattering between individual nanostructures. These advantages potentially allow for high efficiency at a significantly reduced quantity and even at a reduced material quality, of the semiconductor material. In this article, several types of elongated nanostructures with the high potential to improve the device performance are reviewed. First, we briefly introduce the conventional solar cells with emphasis on thin film technology, following the most commonly used fabrication techniques for creating nanostructures with a high aspect ratio. Subsequently, several representative applications of elongated nanostructures, such as Si nanowires in realistic photovoltaic (PV) devices, are reviewed. Finally, the scientific challenges and an outlook for nanostructured PV devices are presented.

  11. High precision radial velocities with GIANO spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carleo, I.; Sanna, N.; Gratton, R.; Benatti, S.; Bonavita, M.; Oliva, E.; Origlia, L.; Desidera, S.; Claudi, R.; Sissa, E.

    2016-06-01

    Radial velocities (RV) measured from near-infrared (NIR) spectra are a potentially excellent tool to search for extrasolar planets around cool or active stars. High resolution infrared (IR) spectrographs now available are reaching the high precision of visible instruments, with a constant improvement over time. GIANO is an infrared echelle spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) and it is a powerful tool to provide high resolution spectra for accurate RV measurements of exoplanets and for chemical and dynamical studies of stellar or extragalactic objects. No other high spectral resolution IR instrument has GIANO's capability to cover the entire NIR wavelength range (0.95-2.45 μm) in a single exposure. In this paper we describe the ensemble of procedures that we have developed to measure high precision RVs on GIANO spectra acquired during the Science Verification (SV) run, using the telluric lines as wavelength reference. We used the Cross Correlation Function (CCF) method to determine the velocity for both the star and the telluric lines. For this purpose, we constructed two suitable digital masks that include about 2000 stellar lines, and a similar number of telluric lines. The method is applied to various targets with different spectral type, from K2V to M8 stars. We reached different precisions mainly depending on the H-magnitudes: for H ˜ 5 we obtain an rms scatter of ˜ 10 m s-1, while for H ˜ 9 the standard deviation increases to ˜ 50 ÷ 80 m s-1. The corresponding theoretical error expectations are ˜ 4 m s-1 and 30 m s-1, respectively. Finally we provide the RVs measured with our procedure for the targets observed during GIANO Science Verification.

  12. Scaling laws for radial foil bearings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honavara Prasad, Srikanth

    The effects of fluid pressurization, structural deformation of the compliant members and heat generation in foil bearings make the design and analysis of foil bearings very complicated. The complex fluid-structural-thermal interactions in foil bearings also make modeling efforts challenging because these phenomena are governed by highly non-linear partial differential equations. Consequently, comparison of various bearing designs require detailed calculation of the flow fields (velocities, pressures), bump deflections (structural compliance) and heat transfer phenomena (viscous dissipation in the fluid, frictional heating, temperature profile etc.,) resulting in extensive computational effort (time/hardware). To obviate rigorous computations and aid in feasibility assessments of foil bearings of various sizes, NASA developed the "rule of thumb" design guidelines for estimation of journal bearing load capacity. The guidelines are based on extensive experimental data. The goal of the current work is the development of scaling laws for radial foil bearings to establish an analytical "rule of thumb" for bearing clearance and bump stiffness. The use of scale invariant Reynolds equation and experimentally observed NASA "rule of thumb" yield scale factors which can be deduced from first principles. Power-law relationships between: a. Bearing clearance and bearing radius, and b. bump stiffness and bearing radius, are obtained. The clearance and bump stiffness values obtained from scaling laws are used as inputs for Orbit simulation to study various cases. As the clearance of the bearing reaches the dimensions of the material surface roughness, asperity contact breaks the fluid film which results in wear. Similarly, as the rotor diameter increases (requiring larger bearing diameters), the load capacity of the fluid film should increase to prevent dry rubbing. This imposes limits on the size of the rotor diameter and consequently bearing diameter. Therefore, this thesis aims

  13. Elongated nanostructures for radial junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Yinghuan; Vece, Marcel Di; Rath, Jatindra K; Dijk, Lourens van; Schropp, Ruud E I

    2013-10-01

    In solar cell technology, the current trend is to thin down the active absorber layer. The main advantage of a thinner absorber is primarily the reduced consumption of material and energy during production. For thin film silicon (Si) technology, thinning down the absorber layer is of particular interest since both the device throughput of vacuum deposition systems and the stability of the devices are significantly enhanced. These features lead to lower cost per installed watt peak for solar cells, provided that the (stabilized) efficiency is the same as for thicker devices. However, merely thinning down inevitably leads to a reduced light absorption. Therefore, advanced light trapping schemes are crucial to increase the light path length. The use of elongated nanostructures is a promising method for advanced light trapping. The enhanced optical performance originates from orthogonalization of the light's travel path with respect to the direction of carrier collection due to the radial junction, an improved anti-reflection effect thanks to the three-dimensional geometric configuration and the multiple scattering between individual nanostructures. These advantages potentially allow for high efficiency at a significantly reduced quantity and even at a reduced material quality, of the semiconductor material. In this article, several types of elongated nanostructures with the high potential to improve the device performance are reviewed. First, we briefly introduce the conventional solar cells with emphasis on thin film technology, following the most commonly used fabrication techniques for creating nanostructures with a high aspect ratio. Subsequently, several representative applications of elongated nanostructures, such as Si nanowires in realistic photovoltaic (PV) devices, are reviewed. Finally, the scientific challenges and an outlook for nanostructured PV devices are presented.

  14. True Masses of Radial-Velocity Exoplanets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert A.

    2015-06-01

    We study the task of estimating the true masses of known radial-velocity (RV) exoplanets by means of direct astrometry on coronagraphic images to measure the apparent separation between exoplanet and host star. Initially, we assume perfect knowledge of the RV orbital parameters and that all errors are due to photon statistics. We construct design reference missions for four missions currently under study at NASA: EXO-S and WFIRST-S, with external star shades for starlight suppression, EXO-C and WFIRST-C, with internal coronagraphs. These DRMs reveal extreme scheduling constraints due to the combination of solar and anti-solar pointing restrictions, photometric and obscurational completeness, image blurring due to orbital motion, and the “nodal effect,” which is the independence of apparent separation and inclination when the planet crosses the plane of the sky through the host star. Next, we address the issue of nonzero uncertainties in RV orbital parameters by investigating their impact on the observations of 21 single-planet systems. Except for two—GJ 676 A b and 16 Cyg B b, which are observable only by the star-shade missions—we find that current uncertainties in orbital parameters generally prevent accurate, unbiased estimation of true planetary mass. For the coronagraphs, WFIRST-C and EXO-C, the most likely number of good estimators of true mass is currently zero. For the star shades, EXO-S and WFIRST-S, the most likely numbers of good estimators are three and four, respectively, including GJ 676 A b and 16 Cyg B b. We expect that uncertain orbital elements currently undermine all potential programs of direct imaging and spectroscopy of RV exoplanets.

  15. Radial Velocity Monitoring of Kepler Heartbeat Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shporer, Avi; Fuller, Jim; Isaacson, Howard; Hambleton, Kelly; Thompson, Susan E.; Prša, Andrej; Kurtz, Donald W.; Howard, Andrew W.; O'Leary, Ryan M.

    2016-09-01

    Heartbeat stars (HB stars) are a class of eccentric binary stars with close periastron passages. The characteristic photometric HB signal evident in their light curves is produced by a combination of tidal distortion, heating, and Doppler boosting near orbital periastron. Many HB stars continue to oscillate after periastron and along the entire orbit, indicative of the tidal excitation of oscillation modes within one or both stars. These systems are among the most eccentric binaries known, and they constitute astrophysical laboratories for the study of tidal effects. We have undertaken a radial velocity (RV) monitoring campaign of Kepler HB stars in order to measure their orbits. We present our first results here, including a sample of 22 Kepler HB systems, where for 19 of them we obtained the Keplerian orbit and for 3 other systems we did not detect a statistically significant RV variability. Results presented here are based on 218 spectra obtained with the Keck/HIRES spectrograph during the 2015 Kepler observing season, and they have allowed us to obtain the largest sample of HB stars with orbits measured using a single instrument, which roughly doubles the number of HB stars with an RV measured orbit. The 19 systems measured here have orbital periods from 7 to 90 days and eccentricities from 0.2 to 0.9. We show that HB stars draw the upper envelope of the eccentricity-period distribution. Therefore, HB stars likely represent a population of stars currently undergoing high eccentricity migration via tidal orbital circularization, and they will allow for new tests of high eccentricity migration theories. The data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  16. Weighing Rocky Exoplanets with Improved Radial Velocimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuesong Wang, Sharon; Wright, Jason; California Planet Survey Consortium

    2016-01-01

    The synergy between Kepler and the ground-based radial velocity (RV) surveys have made numerous discoveries of small and rocky exoplanets, opening the age of Earth analogs. However, most (29/33) of the RV-detected exoplanets that are smaller than 3 Earth radii do not have their masses constrained to better than 20% - limited by the current RV precision (1-2 m/s). Our work improves the RV precision of the Keck telescope, which is responsible for most of the mass measurements for small Kepler exoplanets. We have discovered and verified, for the first time, two of the dominant terms in Keck's RV systematic error budget: modeling errors (mostly in deconvolution) and telluric contamination. These two terms contribute 1 m/s and 0.6 m/s, respectively, to the RV error budget (RMS in quadrature), and they create spurious signals at periods of one sidereal year and its harmonics with amplitudes of 0.2-1 m/s. Left untreated, these errors can mimic the signals of Earth-like or Super-Earth planets in the Habitable Zone. Removing these errors will bring better precision to ten-year worth of Keck data and better constraints on the masses and compositions of small Kepler planets. As more precise RV instruments coming online, we need advanced data analysis tools to overcome issues like these in order to detect the Earth twin (RV amplitude 8 cm/s). We are developing a new, open-source RV data analysis tool in Python, which uses Bayesian MCMC and Gaussian processes, to fully exploit the hardware improvements brought by new instruments like MINERVA and NASA's WIYN/EPDS.

  17. Neurogenic Radial Glia-like Cells in Meninges Migrate and Differentiate into Functionally Integrated Neurons in the Neonatal Cortex.

    PubMed

    Bifari, Francesco; Decimo, Ilaria; Pino, Annachiara; Llorens-Bobadilla, Enric; Zhao, Sheng; Lange, Christian; Panuccio, Gabriella; Boeckx, Bram; Thienpont, Bernard; Vinckier, Stefan; Wyns, Sabine; Bouché, Ann; Lambrechts, Diether; Giugliano, Michele; Dewerchin, Mieke; Martin-Villalba, Ana; Carmeliet, Peter

    2016-11-17

    Whether new neurons are added in the postnatal cerebral cortex is still debated. Here, we report that the meninges of perinatal mice contain a population of neurogenic progenitors formed during embryonic development that migrate to the caudal cortex and differentiate into Satb2(+) neurons in cortical layers II-IV. The resulting neurons are electrically functional and integrated into local microcircuits. Single-cell RNA sequencing identified meningeal cells with distinct transcriptome signatures characteristic of (1) neurogenic radial glia-like cells (resembling neural stem cells in the SVZ), (2) neuronal cells, and (3) a cell type with an intermediate phenotype, possibly representing radial glia-like meningeal cells differentiating to neuronal cells. Thus, we have identified a pool of embryonically derived radial glia-like cells present in the meninges that migrate and differentiate into functional neurons in the neonatal cerebral cortex.

  18. Gfap-Positive Radial Glial Cells Are an Essential Progenitor Population for Later-Born Neurons and Glia in the Zebrafish Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kimberly; Barragan, Jessica; Bashiruddin, Sarah; Smith, Cody J.; Tyrrell, Chelsea; Parsons, Michael J.; Doris, Rosemarie; Kucenas, Sarah; Downes, Gerald B.; Velez, Carla M.; Schneider, Caitlin; Sakai, Catalina; Pathak, Narendra; Anderson, Katrina; Stein, Rachael; Devoto, Stephen H.; Mumm, Jeff S.; Barresi, Michael J. F.

    2016-01-01

    Radial glial cells are presumptive neural stem cells (NSCs) in the developing nervous system. The direct requirement of radial glia for the generation of a diverse array of neuronal and glial subtypes, however, has not been tested. We employed two novel transgenic zebrafish lines and endogenous markers of NSCs and radial glia to show for the first time that radial glia are essential for neurogenesis during development. By using the gfap promoter to drive expression of nuclear localized mCherry we discerned two distinct radial glial-derived cell types: a major nestin+/Sox2+ subtype with strong gfap promoter activity and a minor Sox2+ subtype lacking this activity. Fate mapping studies in this line indicate that gfap+ radial glia generate later-born CoSA interneurons, secondary motorneurons, and oligodendroglia. In another transgenic line using the gfap promoter-driven expression of the nitroreductase enzyme, we induced cell autonomous ablation of gfap+ radial glia and observed a reduction in their specific derived lineages, but not Blbp+ and Sox2+/gfap-negative NSCs, which were retained and expanded at later larval stages. Moreover, we provide evidence supporting classical roles of radial glial in axon patterning, blood–brain barrier formation, and locomotion. Our results suggest that gfap+ radial glia represent the major NSC during late neurogenesis for specific lineages, and possess diverse roles to sustain the structure and function of the spinal cord. These new tools will both corroborate the predicted roles of astroglia and reveal novel roles related to development, physiology, and regeneration in the vertebrate nervous system. PMID:27100776

  19. Elastic actuator for precise force control

    DOEpatents

    Pratt, G.A.; Williamson, M.M.

    1997-07-22

    The invention provides an elastic actuator consisting of a motor and a motor drive transmission connected at an output of the motor. An elastic element is connected in series with the motor drive transmission, and this elastic element is positioned to alone support the full weight of any load connected at an output of the actuator. A single force transducer is positioned at a point between a mount for the motor and an output of the actuator. This force transducer generates a force signal, based on deflection of the elastic element, that indicates force applied by the elastic element to an output of the actuator. An active feedback force control loop is connected between the force transducer and the motor for controlling the motor. This motor control is based on the force signal to deflect the elastic element an amount that produces a desired actuator output force. The produced output force is substantially independent of load motion. The invention also provides a torsional spring consisting of a flexible structure having at least three flat sections each connected integrally with and extending radially from a central section. Each flat section extends axially along the central section from a distal end of the central section to a proximal end of the central section. 30 figs.

  20. Elastic actuator for precise force control

    DOEpatents

    Pratt, Gill A.; Williamson, Matthew M.

    1997-07-22

    The invention provides an elastic actuator consisting of a motor and a motor drive transmission connected at an output of the motor. An elastic element is connected in series with the motor drive transmission, and this elastic element is positioned to alone support the full weight of any load connected at an output of the actuator. A single force transducer is positioned at a point between a mount for the motor and an output of the actuator. This force transducer generates a force signal, based on deflection of the elastic element, that indicates force applied by the elastic element to an output of the actuator. An active feedback force control loop is connected between the force transducer and the motor for controlling the motor. This motor control is based on the force signal to deflect the elastic element an amount that produces a desired actuator output force. The produced output force is substantially independent of load motion. The invention also provides a torsional spring consisting of a flexible structure having at least three flat sections each connected integrally with and extending radially from a central section. Each flat section extends axially along the central section from a distal end of the central section to a proximal end of the central section.